Science.gov

Sample records for 30-m resolution estimates

  1. Developing a 30-m grassland productivity estimation map for central Nebraska using 250-m MODIS and 30-m Landsat-8 observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gu, Yingxin; Wylie, Bruce K.

    2015-01-01

    Accurately estimating aboveground vegetation biomass productivity is essential for local ecosystem assessment and best land management practice. Satellite-derived growing season time-integrated Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (GSN) has been used as a proxy for vegetation biomass productivity. A 250-m grassland biomass productivity map for the Greater Platte River Basin had been developed based on the relationship between Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) GSN and Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) annual grassland productivity. However, the 250-m MODIS grassland biomass productivity map does not capture detailed ecological features (or patterns) and may result in only generalized estimation of the regional total productivity. Developing a high or moderate spatial resolution (e.g., 30-m) productivity map to better understand the regional detailed vegetation condition and ecosystem services is preferred. The 30-m Landsat data provide spatial detail for characterizing human-scale processes and have been successfully used for land cover and land change studies. The main goal of this study is to develop a 30-m grassland biomass productivity estimation map for central Nebraska, leveraging 250-m MODIS GSN and 30-m Landsat data. A rule-based piecewise regression GSN model based on MODIS and Landsat (r = 0.91) was developed, and a 30-m MODIS equivalent GSN map was generated. Finally, a 30-m grassland biomass productivity estimation map, which provides spatially detailed ecological features and conditions for central Nebraska, was produced. The resulting 30-m grassland productivity map was generally supported by the SSURGO biomass production map and will be useful for regional ecosystem study and local land management practices.

  2. Methodology to obtain 30 m resolution of snow cover area from FSCA MODIS and NDSI Landsat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepeda, Javier; Vargas, Ximena

    2016-04-01

    In the last years numerous free images and product satellites have been released, with different spatial and temporal resolution. Out of them, the most commonly used to describe the snow area are MODIS and Landsat. Fractional snow cover area (FSCA) is a daily MODIS product with a 500 m spatial resolution; Landsat images have around 16 days and 30 m respectively. In this work we use both images to obtain a new daily 30 m resolution snow distribution product based in probabilistic and geospatial information. This can be useful because a higher resolution can be used to improve the estimation of the accuracy of a physically-based distributed model to represent the snow cover distribution. We choose three basins in central Chile, with an important snow and glacier presence, to analyze the spatial and temporal distribution of snow using (1) the mean value between MOD10A1 (terra) and MYD10A1 (aqua) and (2) the corrected images by topography and atmosphere from Landsat 5 and Landsat 8 computing the normalized difference snow index (NDSI). When both satellites data are available in the same day, each MODIS pixel is studied considering the Landsat pixels contained in it. A new matrix is created, covering all MODIS pixels, using a 30 m spatial resolution, where each pixel value represents the probability of snow presence in time from Landsat images, and then each pixel is corrected by its neighbour's pixels, elevation, slope and aspect. Then snow is distributed, for each MODIS pixel, considering the corrected probability matrix and sorted between pixels with high probability until the area from FSCA is completed.

  3. Global land cover mapping at 30 m resolution: A POK-based operational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Chen, Jin; Liao, Anping; Cao, Xin; Chen, Lijun; Chen, Xuehong; He, Chaoying; Han, Gang; Peng, Shu; Lu, Miao; Zhang, Weiwei; Tong, Xiaohua; Mills, Jon

    2015-05-01

    Global Land Cover (GLC) information is fundamental for environmental change studies, land resource management, sustainable development, and many other societal benefits. Although GLC data exists at spatial resolutions of 300 m and 1000 m, a 30 m resolution mapping approach is now a feasible option for the next generation of GLC products. Since most significant human impacts on the land system can be captured at this scale, a number of researchers are focusing on such products. This paper reports the operational approach used in such a project, which aims to deliver reliable data products. Over 10,000 Landsat-like satellite images are required to cover the entire Earth at 30 m resolution. To derive a GLC map from such a large volume of data necessitates the development of effective, efficient, economic and operational approaches. Automated approaches usually provide higher efficiency and thus more economic solutions, yet existing automated classification has been deemed ineffective because of the low classification accuracy achievable (typically below 65%) at global scale at 30 m resolution. As a result, an approach based on the integration of pixel- and object-based methods with knowledge (POK-based) has been developed. To handle the classification process of 10 land cover types, a split-and-merge strategy was employed, i.e. firstly each class identified in a prioritized sequence and then results are merged together. For the identification of each class, a robust integration of pixel-and object-based classification was developed. To improve the quality of the classification results, a knowledge-based interactive verification procedure was developed with the support of web service technology. The performance of the POK-based approach was tested using eight selected areas with differing landscapes from five different continents. An overall classification accuracy of over 80% was achieved. This indicates that the developed POK-based approach is effective and feasible

  4. Mapping Impervious Surfaces Globally at 30m Resolution Using Global Land Survey Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeColstoun, Eric Brown; Huang, Chengquan; Tan, Bin; Smith, Sarah Elizabeth; Phillips, Jacqueline; Wang, Panshi; Ling, Pui-Yu; Zhan, James; Li, Sike; Taylor, Michael P.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Tilton, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Impervious surfaces, mainly artificial structures and roads, cover less than 1% of the world's land surface (1.3% over USA). Regardless of the relatively small coverage, impervious surfaces have a significant impact on the environment. They are the main source of the urban heat island effect, and affect not only the energy balance, but also hydrology and carbon cycling, and both land and aquatic ecosystem services. In the last several decades, the pace of converting natural land surface to impervious surfaces has increased. Quantitatively monitoring the growth of impervious surface expansion and associated urbanization has become a priority topic across both the physical and social sciences. The recent availability of consistent, global scale data sets at 30m resolution such as the Global Land Survey from the Landsat satellites provides an unprecedented opportunity to map global impervious cover and urbanization at this resolution for the first time, with unprecedented detail and accuracy. Moreover, the spatial resolution of Landsat is absolutely essential to accurately resolve urban targets such a buildings, roads and parking lots. With long term GLS data now available for the 1975, 1990, 2000, 2005 and 2010 time periods, the land cover/use changes due to urbanization can now be quantified at this spatial scale as well. In the Global Land Survey - Imperviousness Mapping Project (GLS-IMP), we are producing the first global 30 m spatial resolution impervious cover data set. We have processed the GLS 2010 data set to surface reflectance (8500+ TM and ETM+ scenes) and are using a supervised classification method using a regression tree to produce continental scale impervious cover data sets. A very large set of accurate training samples is the key to the supervised classifications and is being derived through the interpretation of high spatial resolution (approx. 2 m or less) commercial satellite data (Quickbird and Worldview2) available to us through the unclassified

  5. Mapping Impervious Surfaces Globally at 30m Resolution Using Landsat Global Land Survey Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown de Colstoun, E.; Huang, C.; Wolfe, R. E.; Tan, B.; Tilton, J.; Smith, S.; Phillips, J.; Wang, P.; Ling, P.; Zhan, J.; Xu, X.; Taylor, M. P.

    2013-12-01

    Impervious surfaces, mainly artificial structures and roads, cover less than 1% of the world's land surface (1.3% over USA). Regardless of the relatively small coverage, impervious surfaces have a significant impact on the environment. They are the main source of the urban heat island effect, and affect not only the energy balance, but also hydrology and carbon cycling, and both land and aquatic ecosystem services. In the last several decades, the pace of converting natural land surface to impervious surfaces has increased. Quantitatively monitoring the growth of impervious surface expansion and associated urbanization has become a priority topic across both the physical and social sciences. The recent availability of consistent, global scale data sets at 30m resolution such as the Global Land Survey from the Landsat satellites provides an unprecedented opportunity to map global impervious cover and urbanization at this resolution for the first time, with unprecedented detail and accuracy. Moreover, the spatial resolution of Landsat is absolutely essential to accurately resolve urban targets such a buildings, roads and parking lots. With long term GLS data now available for the 1975, 1990, 2000, 2005 and 2010 time periods, the land cover/use changes due to urbanization can now be quantified at this spatial scale as well. In the Global Land Survey - Imperviousness Mapping Project (GLS-IMP), we are producing the first global 30 m spatial resolution impervious cover data set. We have processed the GLS 2010 data set to surface reflectance (8500+ TM and ETM+ scenes) and are using a supervised classification method using a regression tree to produce continental scale impervious cover data sets. A very large set of accurate training samples is the key to the supervised classifications and is being derived through the interpretation of high spatial resolution (~2 m or less) commercial satellite data (Quickbird and Worldview2) available to us through the unclassified

  6. Spaceborne SAR data for global urban mapping at 30 m resolution using a robust urban extractor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Yifang; Jacob, Alexander; Gamba, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    With more than half of the world population now living in cities and 1.4 billion more people expected to move into cities by 2030, urban areas pose significant challenges on local, regional and global environment. Timely and accurate information on spatial distributions and temporal changes of urban areas are therefore needed to support sustainable development and environmental change research. The objective of this research is to evaluate spaceborne SAR data for improved global urban mapping using a robust processing chain, the KTH-Pavia Urban Extractor. The proposed processing chain includes urban extraction based on spatial indices and Grey Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) textures, an existing method and several improvements i.e., SAR data preprocessing, enhancement, and post-processing. ENVISAT Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) C-VV data at 30 m resolution were selected over 10 global cities and a rural area from six continents to demonstrate the robustness of the improved method. The results show that the KTH-Pavia Urban Extractor is effective in extracting urban areas and small towns from ENVISAT ASAR data and built-up areas can be mapped at 30 m resolution with very good accuracy using only one or two SAR images. These findings indicate that operational global urban mapping is possible with spaceborne SAR data, especially with the launch of Sentinel-1 that provides SAR data with global coverage, operational reliability and quick data delivery.

  7. Estimating V̄s(30) (or NEHRP site classes) from shallow velocity models (depths < 30 m)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, David M.

    2004-01-01

    The average velocity to 30 m [V??s(30)] is a widely used parameter for classifying sites to predict their potential to amplify seismic shaking. In many cases, however, models of shallow shear-wave velocities, from which V??s(30) can be computed, do not extend to 30 m. If the data for these cases are to be used, some method of extrapolating the velocities must be devised. Four methods for doing this are described here and are illustrated using data from 135 boreholes in California for which the velocity model extends to at least 30 m. Methods using correlations between shallow velocity and V??s(30) result in significantly less bias for shallow models than the simplest method of assuming that the lowermost velocity extends to 30 m. In addition, for all methods the percent of sites misclassified is generally less than 10% and falls to negligible values for velocity models extending to at least 25 m. Although the methods using correlations do a better job on average of estimating V??s(30), the simplest method will generally result in a lower value of V??s(30) and thus yield a more conservative estimate of ground motion [which generally increases as V??s(30) decreases].

  8. A global, 30-m resolution land-surface water body dataset for 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, M.; Sexton, J. O.; Huang, C.; Song, D. X.; Song, X. P.; Channan, S.; Townshend, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Inland surface water is essential to terrestrial ecosystems and human civilization. The distribution of surface water in space and its change over time are related to many agricultural, environmental and ecological issues, and are important factors that must be considered in human socioeconomic development. Accurate mapping of surface water is essential for both scientific research and policy-driven applications. Satellite-based remote sensing provides snapshots of Earth's surface and can be used as the main input for water mapping, especially in large areas. Global water areas have been mapped with coarse resolution remotely sensed data (e.g., the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)). However, most inland rivers and water bodies, as well as their changes, are too small to map at such coarse resolutions. Landsat TM (Thematic Mapper) and ETM+ (Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus) imagery has a 30m spatial resolution and provides decades of records (~40 years). Since 2008, the opening of the Landsat archive, coupled with relatively lower costs associated with computing and data storage, has made comprehensive study of the dynamic changes of surface water over large even global areas more feasible. Although Landsat images have been used for regional and even global water mapping, the method can hardly be automated due to the difficulties on distinguishing inland surface water with variant degrees of impurities and mixing of soil background with only Landsat data. The spectral similarities to other land cover types, e.g., shadow and glacier remnants, also cause misidentification. We have developed a probabilistic based automatic approach for mapping inland surface water bodies. Landsat surface reflectance in multiple bands, derived water indices, and data from other sources are integrated to maximize the ability of identifying water without human interference. The approach has been implemented with open-source libraries to facilitate processing large

  9. Mapping irrigated areas of Ghana using fusion of 30 m and 250 m resolution remote-sensing data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gumma, M.K.; Thenkabail, P.S.; Hideto, F.; Nelson, A.; Dheeravath, V.; Busia, D.; Rala, A.

    2011-01-01

    Maps of irrigated areas are essential for Ghana's agricultural development. The goal of this research was to map irrigated agricultural areas and explain methods and protocols using remote sensing. Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) data and time-series Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data were used to map irrigated agricultural areas as well as other land use/land cover (LULC) classes, for Ghana. Temporal variations in the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) pattern obtained in the LULC class were used to identify irrigated and non-irrigated areas. First, the temporal variations in NDVI pattern were found to be more consistent in long-duration irrigated crops than with short-duration rainfed crops due to more assured water supply for irrigated areas. Second, surface water availability for irrigated areas is dependent on shallow dug-wells (on river banks) and dug-outs (in river bottoms) that affect the timing of crop sowing and growth stages, which was in turn reflected in the seasonal NDVI pattern. A decision tree approach using Landsat 30 m one time data fusion with MODIS 250 m time-series data was adopted to classify, group, and label classes. Finally, classes were tested and verified using ground truth data and national statistics. Fuzzy classification accuracy assessment for the irrigated classes varied between 67 and 93%. An irrigated area derived from remote sensing (32,421 ha) was 20-57% higher than irrigated areas reported by Ghana's Irrigation Development Authority (GIDA). This was because of the uncertainties involved in factors such as: (a) absence of shallow irrigated area statistics in GIDA statistics, (b) non-clarity in the irrigated areas in its use, under-development, and potential for development in GIDA statistics, (c) errors of omissions and commissions in the remote sensing approach, and (d) comparison involving widely varying data types, methods, and approaches used in determining irrigated area statistics

  10. Vertical Accuracy Assessment of 30-M Resolution Alos, Aster, and Srtm Global Dems Over Northeastern Mindanao, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan, J. R.; Makinano-Santillan, M.

    2016-06-01

    The ALOS World 3D - 30 m (AW3D30), ASTER Global DEM Version 2 (GDEM2), and SRTM-30 m are Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) that have been made available to the general public free of charge. An important feature of these DEMs is their unprecedented horizontal resolution of 30-m and almost global coverage. The very recent release of these DEMs, particularly AW3D30 and SRTM- 30 m, calls for opportunities for the conduct of localized assessment of the DEM's quality and accuracy to verify their suitability for a wide range of applications in hydrology, geomorphology, archaelogy, and many others. In this study, we conducted a vertical accuracy assessment of these DEMs by comparing the elevation of 274 control points scattered over various sites in northeastern Mindanao, Philippines. The elevations of these control points (referred to the Mean Sea Level, MSL) were obtained through 3rd order differential levelling using a high precision digital level, and their horizontal positions measured using a global positioning system (GPS) receiver. These control points are representative of five (5) land-cover classes namely brushland (45 points), built-up (32), cultivated areas (97), dense vegetation (74), and grassland (26). Results showed that AW3D30 has the lowest Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 5.68 m, followed by SRTM-30 m (RMSE = 8.28 m), and ASTER GDEM2 (RMSE = 11.98 m). While all the three DEMs overestimated the true ground elevations, the mean and standard deviations of the differences in elevations were found to be lower in AW3D30 compared to SRTM-30 m and ASTER GDEM2. The superiority of AW3D30 over the other two DEMS was also found to be consistent even under different landcover types, with AW3D30's RMSEs ranging from 4.29 m (built-up) to 6.75 m (dense vegetation). For SRTM-30 m, the RMSE ranges from 5.91 m (built-up) to 10.42 m (brushland); for ASTER

  11. Development of Global 30m Resolution Water Body Map with Permanent/Temporal Water Body Separation Using Satellite Acquired Images of Landsat GLS Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeshima, D.; Yamazaki, D.; Yoshikawa, S.; Kanae, S.

    2015-12-01

    The specification of worldwide water body distribution is important for discovering hydrological cycle. Global 3-second Water Body Map (G3WBM) is a global scale map, which indicates the distribution of water body in 90m resolutions (http://hydro.iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp/~yamadai/G3WBM/index.html). This dataset was mainly built to identify the width of river channels, which is one of major uncertainties of continental-scale river hydrodynamics models. To survey the true width of the river channel, this water body map distinguish Permanent Water Body from Temporary Water Body, which means separating river channel and flood plain. However, rivers with narrower width, which is a major case in usual river, could not be observed in this map. To overcome this problem, updating the algorithm of G3WBM and enhancing the resolutions to 30m is the goal of this research. Although this 30m-resolution water body map uses similar algorithm as G3WBM, there are many technical issues attributed to relatively high resolutions. Those are such as lack of same high-resolution digital elevation map, or contamination problem of sub-pixel scale object on satellite acquired image, or invisibility of well-vegetated water body such as swamp. To manage those issues, this research used more than 30,000 satellite images of Landsat Global Land Survey (GLS), and lately distributed topography data of Shuttle Rader Topography Mission (SRTM) 1 arc-second (30m) digital elevation map. Also the effect of aerosol, which would scatter the sun reflectance and disturb the acquired result image, was considered. Due to these revises, the global water body distribution was established in more precise resolution.

  12. The effect of DEM resolution on slope estimation and sediment predictions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Moderate resolution (30 m) digital elevation models (DEMs) are normally used to estimate slope for the parameterization of non-point source process-based water quality models. These models, such as the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), utilize the Modified Universal Soil Loss Equation (MUSLE) ...

  13. Sediment delivery estimates in water quality models altered by resolution and source of topographic data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Moderate resolution (30 m) digital elevation models (DEMs) are normally used to estimate slope for the parameterization of non-point source process-based water quality models. These models, such as the Soil and Water Assessment Tool, utilize the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and Modified USLE...

  14. Global 30m Height Above the Nearest Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donchyts, Gennadii; Winsemius, Hessel; Schellekens, Jaap; Erickson, Tyler; Gao, Hongkai; Savenije, Hubert; van de Giesen, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Variability of the Earth surface is the primary characteristics affecting the flow of surface and subsurface water. Digital elevation models, usually represented as height maps above some well-defined vertical datum, are used a lot to compute hydrologic parameters such as local flow directions, drainage area, drainage network pattern, and many others. Usually, it requires a significant effort to derive these parameters at a global scale. One hydrological characteristic introduced in the last decade is Height Above the Nearest Drainage (HAND): a digital elevation model normalized using nearest drainage. This parameter has been shown to be useful for many hydrological and more general purpose applications, such as landscape hazard mapping, landform classification, remote sensing and rainfall-runoff modeling. One of the essential characteristics of HAND is its ability to capture heterogeneities in local environments, difficult to measure or model otherwise. While many applications of HAND were published in the academic literature, no studies analyze its variability on a global scale, especially, using higher resolution DEMs, such as the new, one arc-second (approximately 30m) resolution version of SRTM. In this work, we will present the first global version of HAND computed using a mosaic of two DEMS: 30m SRTM and Viewfinderpanorama DEM (90m). The lower resolution DEM was used to cover latitudes above 60 degrees north and below 56 degrees south where SRTM is not available. We compute HAND using the unmodified version of the input DEMs to ensure consistency with the original elevation model. We have parallelized processing by generating a homogenized, equal-area version of HydroBASINS catchments. The resulting catchment boundaries were used to perform processing using 30m resolution DEM. To compute HAND, a new version of D8 local drainage directions as well as flow accumulation were calculated. The latter was used to estimate river head by incorporating fixed and

  15. Reducing Uncertainties in Satellite-derived Forest Aboveground Biomass Estimates using a High Resolution Forest Cover Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Ganguly, S.; Nemani, R. R.; Milesi, C.; Basu, S.; Kumar, U.

    2014-12-01

    Several studies to date have provided an extensive knowledge base for estimating forest aboveground biomass (AGB) and recent advances in space-based modeling of the 3-D canopy structure, combined with canopy reflectance measured by passive optical sensors and radar backscatter, are providing improved satellite-derived AGB density mapping for large scale carbon monitoring applications. A key limitation in forest AGB estimation from remote sensing, however, is the large uncertainty in forest cover estimates from the coarse-to-medium resolution satellite-derived land cover maps (present resolution is limited to 30-m of the USGS NLCD Program). The uncertainties in forest cover estimates at the Landsat scale result in high uncertainties for AGB estimation, predominantly in heterogeneous forest and urban landscapes. We have successfully developed an approach using a machine learning algorithm and High-Performance-Computing with NAIP air-borne imagery data for mapping tree cover at 1-m over California and Maryland. In a comparison with high resolution LiDAR data available over selected regions in the two states, we found our results to be promising both in terms of accuracy as well as our ability to scale nationally. The generated 1-m forest cover map will be aggregated to the Landsat spatial grid to demonstrate differences in AGB estimates (pixel-level AGB density, total AGB at aggregated scales like ecoregions and counties) when using a native 30-m forest cover map versus a 30-m map derived from a higher resolution dataset. The process will also be complemented with a LiDAR derived AGB estimate at the 30-m scale to aid in true validation.

  16. Estimating Resolution Lengths of Hybrid Turbulence Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2006-01-01

    A two-stage procedure has been devised for estimating the spatial resolution achievable in the simulation of a given flow on a given computational grid by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code that incorporates a hybrid model of turbulence. The hybrid models to which this procedure is especially relevant are those of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and the partial-averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) approaches. This procedure represents the first step toward adding variable-resolution turbulence-modeling capabilities to CFD codes as part of a continuing effort to increase the accuracy and robustness of CFD simulations of unsteady flows. Some background information is prerequisite to a meaningful summary of the procedure. Among experts in CFD, it is well known that combination of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach and eddy-viscosity turbulence models offers limited capability for simulating unsteady and complex flows. The RANS approach includes an assumption that most of the energy in a given flow is modeled through turbulence-transport equations and is resolved in a computational grid used to simulate the flow. RANS also overpredicts eddy viscosity, thereby yielding excessive damping of unsteady motion. The eddy viscosity attains an unphysically large value because of unresolved scales, and suppresses most temporal and spatial fluctuations in the resolved flow field. One approach used to overcome this deficiency is to provide a mechanism for the RANS equations to resolve motion only on the largest scales and to use a hybrid model to represent effects at smaller scales. The RANS approach involves the use of a standard two-equation turbulence model in which the effect of turbulence is summarized by a viscosity that is a function of (1) the time-averaged kinetic- energy density (k) associated with the local fluctuating (turbulent) component of flow and (2) the time-averaged rate of dissipation of the turbulent-kinetic- energy density ( ). In

  17. Estimating percent surface-water area using intermediate resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, L.; Wylie, B.; Rover, J.

    2008-12-01

    Intermediate spatial resolution satellite data, such as Landsat TM/ETM+, have been used widely for mapping surface-water bodies at regional and national scales. Accurate estimation of surface-water area, however, still remains a challenge because the intermediate resolution images are not capable of detecting very small lakes, ponds, and streams that are usually predominant in wetland regions. To compensate for the limitations of the intermediate resolution images for mapping small water bodies, a fuzzy classification method can be used to estimate the water area proportion at pixel level and produce the map of continuous percent water area. But generally, fuzzy classifications require a large number of field training sites. In the studies of using the Landsat images to map water features for the Yukon River Basin (YRB) and the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR), we developed a regression-based fuzzy classification technique that is capable of collecting training data from the Landsat image itself. In the regression model, the predictor variables are the averaged reflectance of the 5- by 5-pixels (150- by 150-m) window for all Landsat spectral bands; the response variable is the percent water area calculated based on the number of water and non-water pixels within same window. The regression model based on the 150- by 150-m windows is then applied to the 30-m resolution Landsat image to estimate percent water area for every 30-m pixel in the image. As a result, the water feature map produced using the regression method shows the continuous percent water area at the 30-m level. In the examples of YRB and PPR, the regression models showed very high goodness-of-fit: the R- squares are 0.96 and 0.94, respectively, and root mean squared errors are 7.1% and 8.2%, respectively, for the two regions. To validate this technique, we will use the high spatial resolution QuickBird images (2.4 m at nadir for multispectral images) to derive relatively accurate percent water area, which

  18. Towards operational evapotranspiration estimation over the Netherlands at plot scale resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, Joris; van der Velde, Rogier; Hurkmans, Ruud; Wolters, Erwin; de Gooijer, Kees; Versteeg, Rudolph; Verkaijk, Job

    2015-04-01

    In the past years remote sensing data has become more important in water resources management for the Netherlands. Remote sensing techniques provide the possibility of a completely integrated water resources management system for controlling water levels in the rivers and risk analysis of the water sheds and dikes. However only a small part of the available techniques (such as determining the land use and the estimation of precipitation) is currently used, due to limiting factors within the remote sensing products. Within the SAT-Water consortium of several Dutch water boards the focus was to increase the usage of such remote sensing data for operational water monitoring. Within the water cycle evapotranspiration (ET) provides the largest sink of water. It is therefore is vital importance for operational water monitoring systems. However applying these evapotranspiration monitoring over the Netherlands is limited due to a mismatch between sensor footprints and average plotsizes. The average plot size in the Netherlands is around ~30x30m. While remote sensing sensors exist that provide such resolutions, they are in general not used for daily evapotranspiration monitoring; most of these available ET products use satellite sensors (such as MODIS) with a resolution of 250x250m. The goal of the presented research is therefore to 1) develop operational production of daily ET estimations and 2) investigate the disaggregation of this daily evapotranspiration estimation. Specifically the goal was to produce gap-free evapotranspiration estimations on 250x250m resolution. This was accomplished by not only using observations from the orbiting MODIS sensor but also integrating geostationary (15 minute) observations by the SEVERI sensor. These combined products were then used for estimating the land-surface fluxes at high temporal resolution using the SEBS model. In addition to the higher number of cloud-free observation (provided by SEVIRI), the HIRLAM meteorological model was

  19. Developing High-Resolution Inundation Estimates through a Downscaling of Brightness Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, C. K.; Wood, E. F.

    2014-12-01

    There is currently a large demand for high-resolution estimates of inundation extent and flooding for applications in water management, risk assessment and hydrologic modeling. In many regions of the world it is possible to examine the extent of past inundation from visible and infrared imagery provided by sensors such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS); however, this is not possible in regions that are densely vegetated or are under persistent cloud cover. As a result of this, there is a need for alternative methodologies that make use of other remotely sensed data sources to inform high-resolution estimates of inundation. One such data source is the AMSR-E/Aqua 37 GHz vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperature measurements, which have been used in previous studies to estimate the extent of inundated areas and which can make observations in vegetated or cloudy regions. The objective of this work was to develop a decision tree classifier based downscaling methodology by which inundation extent can be obtained at a high resolution, based on microwave brightness temperature measurements and high resolution topographic information. Using a random forest classifier that combined the AMSR-E 37GHz brightness temperatures (~12km mean spatial resolution) and a number of high-resolution topographic indices derived from the National Elevation Dataset for the United States (30m spatial resolution), a high-resolution estimate of inundation was created. A case study of this work is presented for the severe flooding that occurred in Iowa during the summer of 2008. Training and validation data for the random forest classifier were derived from an ensemble of previously existing estimates of inundation from sources such as MODIS imagery, as well as simulated inundation extents generated from a hydrologic routing model. Results of this work suggest that the decision tree based downscaling has skill in producing high-resolution estimates

  20. Sediment delivery estimates in water quality models altered by resolution and source of topographic data.

    PubMed

    Beeson, Peter C; Sadeghi, Ali M; Lang, Megan W; Tomer, Mark D; Daughtry, Craig S T

    2014-01-01

    Moderate-resolution (30-m) digital elevation models (DEMs) are normally used to estimate slope for the parameterization of non-point source, process-based water quality models. These models, such as the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), use the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and Modified USLE to estimate sediment loss. The slope length and steepness factor, a critical parameter in USLE, significantly affects sediment loss estimates. Depending on slope range, a twofold difference in slope estimation potentially results in as little as 50% change or as much as 250% change in the LS factor and subsequent sediment estimation. Recently, the availability of much finer-resolution (∼3 m) DEMs derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data has increased. However, the use of these data may not always be appropriate because slope values derived from fine spatial resolution DEMs are usually significantly higher than slopes derived from coarser DEMs. This increased slope results in considerable variability in modeled sediment output. This paper addresses the implications of parameterizing models using slope values calculated from DEMs with different spatial resolutions (90, 30, 10, and 3 m) and sources. Overall, we observed over a 2.5-fold increase in slope when using a 3-m instead of a 90-m DEM, which increased modeled soil loss using the USLE calculation by 130%. Care should be taken when using LiDAR-derived DEMs to parameterize water quality models because doing so can result in significantly higher slopes, which considerably alter modeled sediment loss. PMID:25602537

  1. Analysis of DOA estimation spatial resolution using MUSIC algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yue; Wang, Hongyuan; Luo, Bin

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents a performance analysis of the spatial resolution of the direction of arrival (DOA) estimates attained by the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm for uncorrelated sources. The confidence interval of estimation angle which is much more intuitionistic will be considered as the new evaluation standard for the spatial resolution. Then, based on the statistic method, the qualitative analysis reveals the factors influencing the performance of the MUSIC algorithm. At last, quantitative simulations prove the theoretical analysis result exactly.

  2. Mechanical concepts for 30 m class telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, Warren B.; Angel, James Roger P.

    2003-01-01

    The 20 20 Telescope is a 30 meter class telescope comprised of two 21.2m collector telescopes on a 100m circular track. Each collector telescope has a focal ratio of F: 0.7 and is comprised of seven 8.4 m segments. There is an instrument bridge that carries the combining instrument. The proposal for 20 20 is to have discrete combiner stations for 30,60,and 100 meter baselines. Additional focal stations are implemented for Nasmyth and bent Cassegrain. The Track has the same segmented construction and tracking motion on hydrostatic bearings as LBT. The collector telescope buildings will co-track and co-rotate on separate tracks. The 30m design has the same basic shape as a single 21 meter Collector but many aspects are different. The 30 meter telescope is a single hexagonal aperture with a primary at F: 0.5. There are 13 that are 8.74m hexagons and 6 half hexagons. The 30m telescope has primarily Nasmyth platforms behind the primary mirror. Both telescopes have a 30 meter equivalent circular aperture. Both telescopes have high structural performance, at 6.5 Hz and 5.3 Hz respectively. Both are balanced, and use similar designed components. Comparison of their characteristics and design differences can show the strengths and weaknesses of each.

  3. Estimating Carbon Storage and Sequestration by Urban Trees at Multiple Spatial Resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Tran, A.; Liao, A.

    2010-12-01

    Urban forests are an important component of urban-suburban environments. Urban trees provide not only a full range of social and psychological benefits to city dwellers, but also valuable ecosystem services to communities, such as removing atmospheric carbon dioxide, improving air quality, and reducing storm water runoff. There is an urgent need for developing strategic conservation plans for environmentally sustainable urban-suburban development based on the scientific understanding of the extent and function of urban forests. However, several challenges remain to accurately quantify various environmental benefits provided by urban trees, among which is to deal with the effect of changing spatial resolution and/or scale. In this study, we intended to examine the uncertainties of carbon storage and sequestration associated with the tree canopy coverage of different spatial resolutions. Multi-source satellite imagery data were acquired for the City of Fullerton, located in Orange County of California. The tree canopy coverage of the study area was classified at three spatial resolutions, ranging from 30 m (Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper), 15 m (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer), to 2.5 m (QuickBird). We calculated the amount of carbon stored in the trees represented on the individual tree coverage maps and the annual carbon taken up by the trees with a model (i.e., CITYgreen) developed by the U.S. Forest Service. The results indicate that urban trees account for significant proportions of land cover in the study area even with the low spatial resolution data. The estimated carbon fixation benefits vary greatly depending on the details of land use and land cover classification. The extrapolation of estimation from the fine-resolution stand-level to the low-resolution landscape-scale will likely not preserve reasonable accuracy.

  4. Effect of spatial resolution on remote sensing estimation of total evaporation in the uMngeni catchment, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoko, Cletah; Clark, David; Mengistu, Michael; Dube, Timothy; Bulcock, Hartley

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of two readily available multispectral sensors: the newly launched 30 m spatial resolution Landsat 8 and the long-serving 1000 m moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) datasets in the spatial representation of total evaporation in the heterogeneous uMngeni catchment, South Africa, using the surface energy balance system model. The results showed that sensor spatial resolution plays a critical role in the accurate estimation of energy fluxes and total evaporation across a heterogeneous catchment. Landsat 8 estimates showed better spatial representation of the biophysical parameters and total evaporation for different land cover types, due to the relatively higher spatial resolution compared to the coarse spatial resolution MODIS sensor. Moreover, MODIS failed to capture the spatial variations of total evaporation estimates across the catchment. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) results showed that MODIS-based total evaporation estimates did not show any significant differences across different land cover types (one-way ANOVA; F1.924=1.412, p=0.186). However, Landsat 8 images yielded significantly different estimates between different land cover types (one-way ANOVA; F1.993=5.185, p<0.001). The validation results showed that Landsat 8 estimates were more comparable to eddy covariance (EC) measurements than the MODIS-based total evaporation estimates. EC measurement on May 23, 2013, was 3.8 mm/day, whereas the Landsat 8 estimate on the same day was 3.6 mm/day, with MODIS showing significantly lower estimates of 2.3 mm/day. The findings of this study underscore the importance of spatial resolution in estimating spatial variations of total evaporation at the catchment scale, thus, they provide critical information on the relevance of the readily available remote sensing products in water resources management in data-scarce environments.

  5. A deployable, annular, 30m telescope, space-based observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Justin J.; Wirth, Allan; Jankevics, Andrew; Landers, Franklin; Rohweller, David; Chen, C. Bill; Bronowicki, Allen

    2014-08-01

    High resolution imaging from space requires very large apertures, such as NASA's current mission the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) which uses a deployable 6.5m segmented primary. Future missions requiring even larger apertures (>>10m) will present a great challenge relative to the size, weight and power constraints of launch vehicles as well as the cost and schedule required to fabricate the full aperture. Alternatively, a highly obscured annular primary can be considered. For example, a 93.3% obscured 30m aperture having the same total mirror area (91m2) as a 10.7m unobscured telescope, can achieve ~3X higher limiting resolution performance. Substantial cost and schedule savings can be realized with this approach compared to fully filled apertures of equivalent resolution. A conceptual design for a ring-shaped 30m telescope is presented and the engineering challenges of its various subsystems analyzed. The optical design consists of a 20X annular Mersenne form beam compactor feeding a classical 1.5m TMA telescope. Ray trace analysis indicates the design can achieve near diffraction limited images over a 200μrad FOV. The primary mirror consists of 70 identical rectangular 1.34x1.0m segments with a prescription well within the demonstrated capabilities of the replicated nanolaminate on SiC substrate technology developed by AOA Xinetics. A concept is presented for the deployable structure that supports the primary mirror segments. A wavefront control architecture consisting of an optical metrology subsystem for coarse alignment and an image based fine alignment and phasing subsystem is presented. The metrology subsystem is image based, using the background starfields for distortion and pointing calibration and fiducials on the segments for measurement. The fine wavefront control employs a hill climbing algorithm operating on images from the science camera. The final key technology required is the image restoration algorithm that will compensate for the highly

  6. Estimating Agricultural Land Use Change in Karamoja, NE. Uganda Using Very High Resolution Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakalembe, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    Land use information is useful for deriving biophysical variables for effective planning and management of natural resources. Land use information is also needed to understand negative environmental impacts of land use while maintaining economic and social benefits. Recent maps of land cover and land use have been generated for Africa at the continental scale from coarse resolution data (e.g. MODIS, Spot Vegetation, MERIS, and Landsat). In these map products, croplands and rangelands are generally poorly represented, particularly in semi-arid regions like Karamoja. Products derived from coarse resolution data also fail at mapping subsistence croplands and are limited in their use for extraction of land-cover specific temporal profiles for agricultural monitoring in the study area (Fritz, See, & Rembold, 2010). Given the subsistence nature of agriculture, most fields in Karamoja are very small that care not discernible from other land uses in coarse resolution data and data products such as FAO Africover2000. product derived from 30m Landsat data is one such product. There is a high level of disagreement and large errors of omission and omission due to the coarse resolution of the data used to derive the product. In addition population growth and policy changes in the region have resulted in a shift to agro-pastoralism and systematic expansion of cropland area since 2000. This research will produce an updated agricultural land use map for Karamoja. The land cover map will be used to estimate agricultural land use change in the region and as a filter to extract agricultural land use specific temporal profiles specific to agriculture to compare to crop statistics.

  7. Burn Severity Estimation Using MERIS Full Resolution Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, Patricia; De Santis, Angela

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents the first results of Fire Effects Modelling and Mapping (FEMM) project carried out in the framemark of the Changing Earth Science Network. The objective of this study is to test the performance of the inversion of Radiative Transfer Models (RTMs) in ENVISA T-MERIS Full Resolution data to estimate burn severity levels in terms of Composite Burn Index (CBI) levels. Nevertheless, as the RTM model was calibrated in Landsat-TM images, evaluation of its performance in MERIS imagery was needed. We tested the performance of the RTM model in several study sites located in two large fires occurred in Spain during 2009 fire season. The results were validated by comparison with burn severity maps computed from Landsat-TM imagery. The results obtained showed values of the coefficient of determination of 0.92 and 0.95 thus, the estimation of burn severity was accurate and consistent, in spite of the different spatial and spectral resolutions.

  8. High Spatio-Temporal Resolution Bathymetry Estimation and Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsma, E. W. J.; Conley, D. C.; Davidson, M. A.; O'Hare, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, bathymetry estimates using video images have become increasingly accurate. With the cBathy code (Holman et al., 2013) fully operational, bathymetry results with 0.5 metres accuracy have been regularly obtained at Duck, USA. cBathy is based on observations of the dominant frequencies and wavelengths of surface wave motions and estimates the depth (and hence allows inference of bathymetry profiles) based on linear wave theory. Despite the good performance at Duck, large discrepancies were found related to tidal elevation and camera height (Bergsma et al., 2014) and on the camera boundaries. A tide dependent floating pixel and camera boundary solution have been proposed to overcome these issues (Bergsma et al., under review). The video-data collection is set estimate depths hourly on a grid with resolution in the order of 10x25 meters. Here, the application of the cBathy at Porthtowan in the South-West of England is presented. Hourly depth estimates are combined and analysed over a period of 1.5 years (2013-2014). In this work the focus is on the sub-tidal region, where the best cBathy results are achieved. The morphology of the sub-tidal bar is tracked with high spatio-temporal resolution on short and longer time scales. Furthermore, the impact of the storm and reset (sudden and large changes in bathymetry) of the sub-tidal area is clearly captured with the depth estimations. This application shows that the high spatio-temporal resolution of cBathy makes it a powerful tool for coastal research and coastal zone management.

  9. Estimating Scots Pine Tree Mortality Using High Resolution Multispectral Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buriak, L.; Sukhinin, A. I.; Conard, S. G.; Ivanova, G. A.; McRae, D. J.; Soja, A. J.; Okhotkina, E.

    2010-12-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) forest stands of central Siberia are characterized by a mixed-severity fire regime that is dominated by low- to high-severity surface fires, with crown fires occurring less frequently. The purpose of this study was to link ground measurements with air-borne and satellite observations of active wildfires and older fire scars to better estimate tree mortality remotely. Data from field sampling on experimental fires and wildfires were linked with intermediate-resolution satellite (Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper) data to estimate fire severity and carbon emissions. Results are being applied to Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery, MERIS, Landsat-ETM, SPOT (i.e., low, middle and high spatial resolution), to understand their remote-sensing capability for mapping fire severity, as indicated by tree mortality. Tree mortality depends on fireline intensity, residence time, and the physiological effects on the cambium layer, foliage and roots. We have correlated tree mortality measured after fires of varying severity with NDVI and other Chlorophyll Indexes to model tree mortality on a landscape scale. The field data obtained on experimental and wildfires are being analyzed and compared with intermediate-resolution satellite data (Landsat7-ETM) to help estimate fire severity, emissions, and carbon balance. In addition, it is being used to monitor immediate ecosystem fire effects (e.g., tree mortality) and long-term postfire vegetation recovery. These data are also being used to validate AVHRR , MODIS, and MERIS estimates of burn area. We studied burned areas in the Angara Region of central Siberia (northeast of Lake Baikal) for which both ground data and satellite data (ENVISAT-MERIS, Spot4, Landsat5, Landsat7-ETM) were available for the 2003 - 2004 and 2006 - 2008 periods. Ground validation was conducted on seventy sample plots established on burned sites differing in

  10. High resolution, large dynamic range field map estimation

    PubMed Central

    Dagher, Joseph; Reese, Timothy; Bilgin, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We present a theory and a corresponding method to compute high resolution field maps over a large dynamic range. Theory and Methods We derive a closed-form expression for the error in the field map value when computed from two echoes. We formulate an optimization problem to choose three echo times which result in a pair of maximally distinct error distributions. We use standard field mapping sequences at the prescribed echo times. We then design a corresponding estimation algorithm which takes advantage of the optimized echo times to disambiguate the field offset value. Results We validate our method using high resolution images of a phantom at 7T. The resulting field maps demonstrate robust mapping over both a large dynamic range, and in low SNR regions. We also present high resolution offset maps in vivo using both, GRE and MEGE sequences. Even though the proposed echo time spacings are larger than the well known phase aliasing cutoff, the resulting field maps exhibit a large dynamic range without the use of phase unwrapping or spatial regularization techniques. Conclusion We demonstrate a novel 3-echo field map estimation method which overcomes the traditional noise-dynamic range trade-off. PMID:23401245

  11. Estimating Biophysical Crop Properties by a Machine Learning Model Inversion using Hyperspectral Imagery of Different Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preidl, S.; Doktor, D.

    2013-12-01

    contrary, pixels lying in the tractor tracks are - compared to their neighboring vegetated pixels - spectrally heterogeneous with higher reflectance in VIS/SWIR but unchanged reflectance in NIR. For these pixels variable estimations - especially LAI for being most sensitive in the NIR region - should be ranked uncertain. The achieved chlorophyll prediction results are very good in line with the SPAD field measurements. The difference in image resolution might be too low to see high scale variance among the variable estimations (therefore working with simulated AISA images of 30m resolution is foreseen). However, the standard deviation of the chlorophyll estimation decreases with lower resolution. Although a pixel-wise inversion was performed the chlorophyll distribution across the field is rather uniform, so that smooth variations between neighboring pixel values can be observed. Predicted LAI values are higher than the ones measured in the field. It is expected that incorporating the outcome of the sensitivity analysis in the forward modeling will improve the prediction accuracy.

  12. High-resolution dynamic speech imaging with deformation estimation.

    PubMed

    Maojing Fu; Barlaz, Marissa S; Shosted, Ryan K; Zhi-Pei Liang; Sutton, Bradley P

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic speech magnetic resonance imaging (DSMRI) is a promising technique for visualizing articulatory motion in real time. However, many existing applications of DSMRI have been limited by slow imaging speed and the lack of quantitative motion analysis. In this paper, we present a novel DS-MRI technique to simultaneously estimate dynamic image sequence of speech and the associated deformation field. Extending on our previous Partial Separability (PS) model-based methods, the proposed technique visualizes both speech motion and deformation with a spatial resolution of 2.2 × 2.2 mm(2) and a nominal frame rate of 100 fps. Also, the technique enables direct analysis of articulatory motion through the deformation fields. Effectiveness of the method is systematically examined via in vivo experiments. Utilizing the obtained high-resolution images and deformation fields, we also performed a phonetics study on Brazilian Portuguese to show the method's practical utility. PMID:26736572

  13. Estimation of vegetation cover at subpixel resolution using LANDSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Michael F.; Eagleson, Peter S.

    1986-01-01

    The present report summarizes the various approaches relevant to estimating canopy cover at subpixel resolution. The approaches are based on physical models of radiative transfer in non-homogeneous canopies and on empirical methods. The effects of vegetation shadows and topography are examined. Simple versions of the model are tested, using the Taos, New Mexico Study Area database. Emphasis has been placed on using relatively simple models requiring only one or two bands. Although most methods require some degree of ground truth, a two-band method is investigated whereby the percent cover can be estimated without ground truth by examining the limits of the data space. Future work is proposed which will incorporate additional surface parameters into the canopy cover algorithm, such as topography, leaf area, or shadows. The method involves deriving a probability density function for the percent canopy cover based on the joint probability density function of the observed radiances.

  14. Crop Area Estimation Using High Spatial Resolution Satellite Imagery and Area Frame Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, M. T.; Husak, G. J.; Pedreros, D.; Alcaraz v., G.

    2006-12-01

    The amount and extent of cropped area are essential parameters for determining food production and ultimately the state of food security in developing countries. Crop area estimation endeavors at the national- level are limited especially in remote areas of the world, due in part to the cost and time of making ground observations. Approximation of crop area using satellite imagery is a viable alternative though few studies have made use of this technique. In previous studies, misclassification of pure pixels and the presence of mixed pixels in relatively coarse Landsat images led to considerable errors in crop area estimates. This is particularly the case in developing countries where small subsistence farms are more prominent than larger mechanized farms. The aim of this study was to develop regression estimators from interpretation of 0.61 and 1 m resolution Quickbird and Ikonos panchromatic imagery respectively, to reduce bias in the crop area assessment from 30 m Landsat ETM+ images taken during the 2005 growing season of Niger. Eighty-five Ikonos and Quickbird scenes randomly stratified along the six primary livelihood zones of Niger and 30 Landsat ETM+ scenes were used to meet three objectives: 1) comprehensive dot-grid (2 km interval) classification of Landsat data for all potential cropped areas, 2) dot-grid (500 m interval) classification of Ikonos and Quickbird data for subsets of Landsat scenes, 3) area frame bias-estimation for each livelihood zone, and 4) validation of model design and process. Percent cropped area from Quickbird and Ikonos images showed high and significant correlations with percent cropped area from Landsat ETM+ for each livelihood zone. A split sample validation of the regression estimators and relative efficiency of the process shows potential to be used in other developing countries. Future studies should attempt to develop regression estimators involving automated textural-based classification techniques (e.g. image segmentation

  15. Improved PPP ambiguity resolution by COES FCB estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yihe; Gao, Yang; Shi, Junbo

    2016-05-01

    Precise point positioning (PPP) integer ambiguity resolution is able to significantly improve the positioning accuracy with the correction of fractional cycle biases (FCBs) by shortening the time to first fix (TTFF) of ambiguities. When satellite orbit products are adopted to estimate the satellite FCB corrections, the narrow-lane (NL) FCB corrections will be contaminated by the orbit's line-of-sight (LOS) errors which subsequently affect ambiguity resolution (AR) performance, as well as positioning accuracy. To effectively separate orbit errors from satellite FCBs, we propose a cascaded orbit error separation (COES) method for the PPP implementation. Instead of using only one direction-independent component in previous studies, the satellite NL improved FCB corrections are modeled by one direction-independent component and three directional-dependent components per satellite in this study. More specifically, the direction-independent component assimilates actual FCBs, whereas the directional-dependent components are used to assimilate the orbit errors. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, GPS measurements from a regional and a global network are processed with the IGSReal-time service (RTS), IGS rapid (IGR) products and predicted orbits with >10 cm 3D root mean square (RMS) error. The improvements by the proposed FCB estimation method are validated in terms of ambiguity fractions after applying FCB corrections and positioning accuracy. The numerical results confirm that the obtained FCBs using the proposed method outperform those by conventional method. The RMS of ambiguity fractions after applying FCB corrections is reduced by 13.2 %. The position RMSs in north, east and up directions are reduced by 30.0, 32.0 and 22.0 % on average.

  16. MODIS-Landsat data fusion for automated continental 30 m burned area mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschetti, L.; Roy, D. P.; Baraldi, A.; Humber, M.

    2013-12-01

    Satellite data have been used to monitor fire for more than three decades using computer algorithms that detect the location of active fires at the time of satellite overpass and the spatial extent of the areas affected by fire. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors have dedicated fire monitoring capabilities and their data are used to systematically generate daily global 1km active fire and monthly 500m burned area products. Neither MODIS product can detect the incidence or extent of fire reliably at the scale of 10's of meters. The free Landsat data policy now provides the opportunity for continental to global scale Landsat 30m resolution processing. We present a multi-temporal methodology to fuse the MODIS active fire and burned area products with Landsat data to map burned areas at 30m on a temporally rolling basis. To demonstrate the methodology, 30m burned area maps of the Western United States are generated using the freely available Web Enabled Landsat (WELD) mosaics (http://landsat.usgs.gov/WELD.php). Validation is conducted by systematic comparison with fire perimeter vectors provided by the USGS Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity project. Prospects for future development and continental application are discussed. The methodology demonstrates the potential use of the Landsat archive to generate a long term 30m fire data record.

  17. Performance and calibration of the NIKA camera at the IRAM 30 m telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, A.; Calvo, M.; Ponthieu, N.; Adam, R.; Adane, A.; Ade, P.; André, P.; Beelen, A.; Belier, B.; Benoît, A.; Bideaud, A.; Billot, N.; Boudou, N.; Bourrion, O.; Coiffard, G.; Comis, B.; D'Addabbo, A.; Désert, F.-X.; Doyle, S.; Goupy, J.; Kramer, C.; Leclercq, S.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Martino, J.; Mauskopf, P.; Mayet, F.; Monfardini, A.; Pajot, F.; Pascale, E.; Perotto, L.; Revéret, V.; Rodriguez, L.; Savini, G.; Schuster, K.; Sievers, A.; Tucker, C.; Zylka, R.

    2014-09-01

    The New IRAM KID Array (NIKA) instrument is a dual-band imaging camera operating with kinetic inductance detectors (KID) cooled at 100 mK. NIKA is designed to observe the sky at wavelengths of 1.25 and 2.14 mm from the IRAM 30 m telescope at Pico Veleta with an estimated resolution of 13 arcsec and 18 arcsec, respectively. This work presents the performance of the NIKA camera prior to its opening to the astrophysical community as an IRAM common-user facility in early 2014. NIKA is a test bench for the final NIKA2 instrument to be installed at the end of 2015. The last NIKA observation campaigns on November 2012 and June 2013 have been used to evaluate this performance and to improve the control of systematic effects. We discuss here the dynamical tuning of the readout electronics to optimize the KID working point with respect to background changes and the new technique of atmospheric absorption correction. These modifications significantly improve the overall linearity, sensitivity, and absolute calibration performance of NIKA. This is proved on observations of point-like sources for which we obtain a best sensitivity (averaged over all valid detectors) of 40 and 14 mJy s1/2 for optimal weather conditions for the 1.25 and 2.14 mm arrays, respectively. NIKA observations of well known extended sources (DR21 complex and the Horsehead nebula) are presented. This performance makes the NIKA camera a competitive astrophysical instrument.

  18. Daily High Spatial Resolution Evapotranspiration Estimation Using Multi-Satellite Data Fusion Approach in Agricultural and Forested Sites in the U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Anderson, M. C.; Semmens, K. A.; Gao, F.; Kustas, W. P.; Hain, C.; Schull, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET), as a major part of the water balance, is a key indicator of vegetation stress and also represents various types of water usage strategies. High spatial and temporal resolution ET mapping can provide detailed information about daily vegetation water use and soil moisture status at finer scales, which is important to water management and vegetation condition monitoring. This research employs a multi-scale ET modeling system which is based on the two source surface energy balance (TSEB) model. We discuss the utility of applying this modeling system over an irrigated agriculture area in California and a forested site in North Carolina. The multi-scale ET modeling system integrates the Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse model and associated disaggregation scheme (ALEXI/DisALEXI) and fuses the ET estimations from both MODIS (1km, daily) and Landsat (30m, bi-weekly). The Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflective Fusion Model (STARFM) is used to retrieve high spatial and temporal resolution ET. A Data Mining Sharpener (DMS) methodology is used in the system to sharpen the native Landsat thermal infrared band (TIR) to 30m resolution. Comparing with Landsat only ET retrievals, this ET modeling system can optimize the usage of multi-satellite data, which are in different temporal and spatial resolution, to maximize the utility of high spatial and temporal ET estimation. Daily high spatial resolution ET retrievals are compared with observations from local flux towers. Determining how model output of daily water use information can be employed in irrigation and forest management applications will be discussed.

  19. Using multi-satellite data fusion to estimate daily high spatial resolution evapotranspiration over a forested site in North Carolina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse model and associated disaggregation scheme (ALEXI/DisALEXI). Satellite-based ET retrievals from both the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectoradiometer (MODIS; 1km, daily) and Landsat (30m, bi-weekly) are fused with The Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflective Fusion ...

  20. An Algorithm for the Retrieval of 30-m Snow-Free Albedo from Landsat Surface Reflectance and MODIS BRDF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuai, Yanmin; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Gao, Feng; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new methodology to generate 30-m resolution land surface albedo using Landsat surface reflectance and anisotropy information from concurrent MODIS 500-m observations. Albedo information at fine spatial resolution is particularly useful for quantifying climate impacts associated with land use change and ecosystem disturbance. The derived white-sky and black-sky spectral albedos maybe used to estimate actual spectral albedos by taking into account the proportion of direct and diffuse solar radiation arriving at the ground. A further spectral-to-broadband conversion based on extensive radiative transfer simulations is applied to produce the broadband albedos at visible, near infrared, and shortwave regimes. The accuracy of this approach has been evaluated using 270 Landsat scenes covering six field stations supported by the SURFace RADiation Budget Network (SURFRAD) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (ARM/SGP) network. Comparison with field measurements shows that Landsat 30-m snow-free shortwave albedos from all seasons generally achieve an absolute accuracy of +/-0.02 - 0.05 for these validation sites during available clear days in 2003-2005,with a root mean square error less than 0.03 and a bias less than 0.02. This level of accuracy has been regarded as sufficient for driving global and regional climate models. The Landsat-based retrievals have also been compared to the operational 16-day MODIS albedo produced every 8-days from MODIS on Terra and Aqua (MCD43A). The Landsat albedo provides more detailed landscape texture, and achieves better agreement (correlation and dynamic range) with in-situ data at the validation stations, particularly when the stations include a heterogeneous mix of surface covers.

  1. A self-trained classification technique for producing 30 m percent-water maps from Landsat data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rover, Jennifer R.; Wylie, Bruce K.; Ji, Lei

    2010-01-01

    Small bodies of water can be mapped with moderate-resolution satellite data using methods where water is mapped as subpixel fractions using field measurements or high-resolution images as training datasets. A new method, developed from a regression-tree technique, uses a 30 m Landsat image for training the regression tree that, in turn, is applied to the same image to map subpixel water. The self-trained method was evaluated by comparing the percent-water map with three other maps generated from established percent-water mapping methods: (1) a regression-tree model trained with a 5 m SPOT 5 image, (2) a regression-tree model based on endmembers and (3) a linear unmixing classification technique. The results suggest that subpixel water fractions can be accurately estimated when high-resolution satellite data or intensively interpreted training datasets are not available, which increases our ability to map small water bodies or small changes in lake size at a regional scale.

  2. Amyloid Cardiomyopathy in Hereditary Transthyretin V30M Amyloidosis - Impact of Sex and Amyloid Fibril Composition

    PubMed Central

    Arvidsson, Sandra; Pilebro, Björn; Westermark, Per; Lindqvist, Per; Suhr, Ole B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Transthyretin V30M (ATTR V30M) amyloidosis is a phenotypically diverse disease with symptoms ranging from predominant neuropathy to exclusive cardiac manifestations. The aims of this study were to determine the dispersion of the two types of fibrils found in Swedish ATTR V30M patients -Type A consisting of a mixture of truncated and full length ATTR fibrils and type B fibrils consisting of full length fibrils, and to estimate the severity of cardiac dysfunction in relation to fibril composition and sex. Material and Methods Echocardiographic data were analysed in 107 Swedish ATTR V30M patients with their fibril composition determined as either type A or type B. Measurements of left ventricular (LV) dimensions and evaluation of systolic and diastolic function including speckle tracking derived strain were performed. Patients were grouped according to fibril type and sex. Multivariate linear regression was utilised to determine factors of significant impact on LV thickness. Results There was no significant difference in proportions of the two types of fibrils between men and women. In patients with type A fibrils, women had significantly lower median septal (p = 0.007) and posterior wall thicknesses (p = 0.010), lower median LV mass indexed to height (p = 0.008), and higher septal strain (p = 0.037), as compared to males. These differences were not apparent in patients with type B fibrils. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that fibril type, sex and age all had significant impact on LV septal thickness. Conclusion This study demonstrates a clear difference between sexes in the severity of amyloid heart disease in ATTR V30M amyloidosis patients. Even though type A fibrils were associated with more advanced amyloid heart disease compared to type B, women with type A fibrils generally developed less cardiac infiltration than men. The differences may explain the better outcome for liver transplanted late-onset female patients compared to males. PMID

  3. A comparison study of tropical Pacific ocean state estimation: Low-resolution assimilation vs. high-resolution simulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Weiwei; Zhu, Jiang; Zhou, Guangqing; Wang, Huijun

    2005-03-01

    A comparison study is performed to contrast the improvements in the tropical Pacific oceanic state of a low-resolution model respectively via data assimilation and by an increase in horizontal resolution. A low resolution model (LR) (1°lat by 2°lon) and a high-resolution model (HR) (0.5°lat by 0.5°lon) are employed for the comparison. The authors perform 20-yr numerical experiments and analyze the annual mean fields of temperature and salinity. The results indicate that the low-resolution model with data assimilation behaves better than the high-resolution model in the estimation of ocean large-scale features. From 1990 to 2000, the average of HR’s RMSE (root-mean-square error) relative to independent Tropical Atmosphere Ocean project (TAO) mooring data at randomly selected points is 0.97°C compared to a RMSE of 0.56°C for LR with temperature assimilation. Moreover, the LR with data assimilation is more frugal in computation. Although there is room to improve the high-resolution model, the low-resolution model with data assimilation may be an advisable choice in achieving a more realistic large-scale state of the ocean at the limited level of information provided by the current observational system.

  4. 5 MV 30 mA industrial electron processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Y.; Mizusawa, K.

    1991-05-01

    Industrial electron beam processing systems have been in use in various application fields such as: improving heat resistivity of wire insulation; controlling quality of automobile rubber tires and melt index characteristics of PE foams; and curing paintings or printing inks. Recently, there has come up a need for electron beam with an energy higher than 3 MV in order to disinfect salmonella in chicken meat, to kill bugs in fruits, and to sterilize medical disposables. To meet this need we developed a 5 MV 30 mA electron processing system with an X-ray conversion target. The machine was tested in NHV's plant in Kyoto at continuous operation of full voltage and full current. It proved to be very steady in operation with a high efficiency (as much as 72%). Also, the X-ray target was tested in a continuous run of 5 MV 30 mA (150 kW). It proved to be viable in industrial utilization. This paper introduces the process and the results of the development.

  5. The Effects of Spatial Resolution on the Maize acreage estimation by Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huanxue, Zhang; Qiangzi, Li; Miao, Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Crop acreage estimation is essential to forecast crop production using remote sensing. The different spatial resolution of remotely sensed data directly affects the accuracy of crop acreage estimation. It is necessary and valuable to study the effect of resolution on crop acreage estimation, from both qualitative and quantitative points of view. Therefore, this paper analysed the resolution effect on the accuracy of acreage estimation by using CBERS-02B imagery. Spatial statistics methods and manifold accuracy evaluation indices were used respectively to analyse the data with different spatial resolutions and crop proportion statistics. The study results indicate that decreased spatial resolution will lead to reduced regional accuracy in addition to increased standard deviation, RMSE and bias due to the augmentation of mixed pixels. A replacement of higher resolution data by lower resolution data will have an important impact on the derived crop proportions. The regional accuracy of crop statistics can remain higher than 88%, when the crop proportion is higher than 40%. In summary, the higher resolution of the imagery can lead to increased average regional accuracy. The results of this paper also provide academic and experimental reference to resolve the problem of data selection in crop acreage estimation by remote sensing.

  6. Developing an Operational System for Daily 800-m Resolution Soil Moisture Estimates across Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochsner, T. E.; Patton, J. C.; Dong, J.; Patrignani, A.; Haffner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Researchers often need meso-scale, high resolution soil moisture estimates for research and decision support in the areas of hydrology, agriculture, and ecology. However, current soil moisture measurement techniques are commonly inadequate in terms of spatial resolution (satellites), spatial support or density (in situ networks), or temporal resolution (rovers). The development of operational systems for high resolution soil moisture estimation will create opportunities for improved drought monitoring, flood forecasting, agricultural management, and wildfire preparedness, as well as for calibration and validation of soil moisture satellites. We are working to develop such an estimation system by merging multiple information sources including: a statewide, mesoscale network (the Oklahoma Mesonet), a cosmic-ray neutron rover, high resolution land cover data, and a proven soil water balance model. This presentation will describe our vision and motivations, our methods, and our progress to date.

  7. MUSIC for Multidimensional Spectral Estimation: Stability and Super-Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wenjing

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a performance analysis of the MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm applied on $D$ dimensional single-snapshot spectral estimation while $s$ true frequencies are located on the continuum of a bounded domain. Inspired by the matrix pencil form, we construct a D-fold Hankel matrix from the measurements and exploit its Vandermonde decomposition in the noiseless case. MUSIC amounts to identifying a noise subspace, evaluating a noise-space correlation function, and localizing frequencies by searching the $s$ smallest local minima of the noise-space correlation function. In the noiseless case, $(2s)^D$ measurements guarantee an exact reconstruction by MUSIC as the noise-space correlation function vanishes exactly at true frequencies. When noise exists, we provide an explicit estimate on the perturbation of the noise-space correlation function in terms of noise level, dimension $D$, the minimum separation among frequencies, the maximum and minimum amplitudes while frequencies are separated by two Rayleigh Length (RL) at each direction. As a by-product the maximum and minimum non-zero singular values of the multidimensional Vandermonde matrix whose nodes are on the unit sphere are estimated under a gap condition of the nodes. Under the 2-RL separation condition, if noise is i.i.d. gaussian, we show that perturbation of the noise-space correlation function decays like $\\sqrt{\\log(\\#(\\mathbf{N}))/\\#(\\mathbf{N})}$ as the sample size $\\#(\\mathbf{N})$ increases. When the separation among frequencies drops below 2 RL, our numerical experiments show that the noise tolerance of MUSIC obeys a power law with the minimum separation of frequencies.

  8. Evaluating high resolution SPOT 5 satellite imagery for crop yield estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High resolution satellite imagery has the potential for mapping within-field variability in crop growth and yield. This study examined SPOT 5 multispectral imagery for estimating grain sorghum yield. A SPOT 5 image with 10-m spatial resolution and four spectral bands (green, red, near-infrared, and ...

  9. Ionization statistics and diffusion: analytical estimate of their contribution to spatial resolution of drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Tarnopolsky, G.J.

    1983-01-01

    The spatial resolution of a drift chamber often is the foremost design parameter. The calculation described here - a design tool - permits us to estimate the contributions of ionization statistics and diffusion to the spatial resolution when actually sampling the drift pulse waveform. Useful formulae are derived for the cylindrical and jet-chamber cell geometries.

  10. Interferometric 30 m bench for calibrations of 1D scales and optical distance measuring instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkuri, J.; Rantanen, A.; Manninen, J.; Esala, V.-P.; Lassila, A.

    2012-09-01

    During construction of a new metrology building for MIKES, a 30 m interferometric bench was designed. The objective was to implement a straight, stable, adjustable and multifunctional 30 m measuring bench for calibrations. Special attention was paid to eliminating the effects of thermal expansion and inevitable concrete shrinkage. The linear guide, situated on top of a monolithic concrete beam, comprises two parallel round shafts with adjustable fixtures every 1 m. A carriage is moved along the rail and its position is followed by a reference interferometer. Depending on the measurement task, one or two retro-reflectors are fixed on the carriage. A microscope with a CCD camera and a monitor can be used to detect line mark positions on different line standards. When calibrating optical distance measuring instruments, various targets can be fixed to the carriage. For the most accurate measurements an online Abbe-error correction based on simultaneous carriage pitch measurement by a separate laser interferometer is applied. The bench is used for calibrations of machinist scales, tapes, circometers, electronic distance meters, total stations and laser trackers. The estimated expanded uncertainty for 30 m displacement for highest accuracy calibrations is 2.6 µm.

  11. Application of the MAP estimation model to hyperspectral resolution image enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Guangjun; Zhou, Haifang; Ji, Song; Shu, Rong

    2009-10-01

    This paper makes a study of maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation method for enhancing the spatial resolution of a hyperspectral image using a higher resolution coincident panchromatic image. Here, the mathematical formulation of the proposed MAP method is described and the detail process step is introduced. Then, enhancement results using PHI hyperspectral image datasets are provided. In general, it is found that the MAP method is able to obtain high-resolution hyperspectral data. Experiment shows that the method is effective while the enhancement for conventional methods, like average estimation, is limited primarily to fuse spectral information.

  12. Estimation of temporal resolution of object identification in human vision.

    PubMed

    Näsänen, Risto; Ojanpää, Helena; Tanskanen, Topi; Päällysaho, Juha

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to estimate the temporal processing capacity of human object identification under different stimulus conditions. Objects, either facial images or characters, were shown in a rapid sequence on a computer display using a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) method. One of the images was a target and the other images were distracters. The task of the observer was to identify the target. A staircase algorithm was used to determine the threshold frequency of image presentation in the RSVP sequence. The threshold frequency was determined as a function of image contrast, size, and mean luminance. The results showed that the threshold frequency, around 10 Hz for faces (100 ms per face) and about 25 Hz for characters (40 ms per character), was independent of contrast and size at medium and high contrast values, medium and large sizes, and high luminances, but decreased at very low contrasts or small sizes and medium or low levels of luminance. Computer simulations with a model, in which temporal integration limited perceptual speed, suggest that the experimentally found difference in processing time for faces and characters is not due to the physical differences of these stimulus types, but it seems that face-specific sites in the brain process facial information slower than object-specific areas process character information. Contrast, size, and luminance affect the signal-to-noise ratio and the temporal characteristics of low-level neural signal representation. Thus, the results suggest that at low contrasts, low luminances and small sizes, the processing speed of object identification is limited by low-level factors, while at high contrasts and luminances, and at large sizes, processing speed is limited by high-order processing stages. Processing speed seems to depend on stimulus type so that for faces processing is slower than for characters. PMID:16491409

  13. Estimating ground cover of field crops using medium-resolution multispectral satellite imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing is useful for estimating plant canopy characteristics, such as leaf area index (LAI) and ground cover (GC). When the source of remote sensing data is medium-resolution satellite imagery, plant canopy characteristics can be estimated for numerous fields within an agricultural region. I...

  14. Estimating ground cover of field crops using medium resolution multispectral satellite imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing is useful for estimating plant canopy characteristics, such as leaf area index (LAI) and ground cover (GC). When the source of remote sensing data is medium-resolution satellite imagery, plant canopy characteristics can be estimated for numerous fields within an agricultural region. I...

  15. TAPAS, a VO archive at the IRAM 30-m telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, Stephane; Espigares, Victor; Ruíz, José Enrique; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Mauersberger, Rainer; Brunswig, Walter; Kramer, Carsten; Santander-Vela, Juan de Dios; Wiesemeyer, Helmut

    2012-07-01

    Astronomical observatories are today generating increasingly large volumes of data. For an efficient use of them, databases have been built following the standards proposed by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA), providing a common protocol to query them and make them interoperable. The IRAM 30-m radio telescope, located in Sierra Nevada (Granada, Spain) is a millimeter wavelength telescope with a constantly renewed, extensive choice of instruments, and capable of covering the frequency range between 80 and 370 GHz. It is continuously producing a large amount of data thanks to the more than 200 scientific projects observed each year. The TAPAS archive at the IRAM 30-m telescope is aimed to provide public access to the headers describing the observations performed with the telescope, according to a defined data policy, making as well the technical data available to the IRAM staff members. A special emphasis has been made to make it Virtual Observatory (VO) compliant, and to offer a VO compliant web interface allowing to make the information available to the scientific community. TAPAS is built using the Django Python framework on top of a relational MySQL database, and is fully integrated with the telescope control system. The TAPAS data model (DM) is based on the Radio Astronomical DAta Model for Single dish radio telescopes (RADAMS), to allow for easy integration into the VO infrastructure. A metadata modeling layer is used by the data-filler to allow an implementation free from assumptions about the control system and the underlying database. TAPAS and its public web interface ( http://tapas.iram.es ) provides a scalable system that can evolve with new instruments and observing modes. A meta description of the DM has been introduced in TAPAS in order to both avoid undesired coupling between the code and the DM and to provide a better

  16. Resolution enhancement of hyperspectral imagery using maximum a posteriori estimation with a stochastic mixing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eismann, Michael Theodore

    A maximum a posteriori estimation method is developed and tested for enhancing the spatial resolution of hyperspectral imagery using higher resolution, coincident, panchromatic or multispectral imagery. The approach incorporates a stochastic mixing model of the underlying spectral scene content to develop a cost function that simultaneously optimizes the estimated hyperspectral scene relative to the observed hyperspectral and auxiliary imagery, as well as the local statistics of the spectral mixing model. The incorporation of the stochastic mixing model is found to be the key ingredient to reconstructing sub-pixel spectral information. It provides the necessary constraints for establishing a well-conditioned linear system of equations that can be solved for the high resolution image estimate. The research presented includes a mathematical formulation of the estimation approach and stochastic mixing model, as well as enhancement results for a variety of both synthetic and actual imagery. Both direct and iterative solution methodologies are developed, the latter being necessary to effectively treat imagery with arbitrarily specified spectral and spatial response functions. The performance of the method is qualitatively and quantitatively compared to that of previously developed resolution enhancement approaches. It is found that this novel approach is generally able to reconstruct sub-pixel information in several principal components of the high resolution hyperspectral image estimate. In contrast, the enhancement for conventional methods such as principal component substitution and least-squares estimation is mostly limited to the first principal component.

  17. Influence of temporal resolution of tracer data on estimates of streamwater transit time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockinger, Michael; Bogena, Heye; Lücke, Andreas; Diekkrüger, Bernd; Cornelissen, Thomas; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    The streamwater transit time distribution (TTD) is often used for a better understanding of a catchment's water storage characteristics and the movement of precipitation water via various flow paths to the stream. Typically, TTDs are estimated by inverse modelling of weekly chemical or stable isotope tracer time series measured in the stream. Few studies used tracer data with a higher temporal resolution. In the present study, we estimated the TTDs for the 42 km² Erkensruhr catchment located in the German low mountain ranges by using weekly and higher temporal resolution of isotope tracer data with the conceptual model TRANSEP. The high resolution data consisted of subdaily precipitation and daily/subdaily streamwater measurements and was aggregated to create the weekly data resolution. Thus, the 1.5 year long time series included base flow as well as event conditions. The high temporal resolution improved the stream isotope simulation compared to the weekly resolution (0.35 vs. 0.24 Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency), and showed more dynamics in the simulation result. The TTD based on high resolution data was considerably different from the weekly one with a shift towards faster transit times. The mean transit time of water particles was reduced by half (9.5 to 5 years) when applying high resolution data. This indicates that weekly isotopic data lacks information about faster water transport mechanisms in the catchment. Thus, we conclude that high resolution data should be preferred over lower resolution data when estimating TTDs. When comparing TTDs of different catchments, the temporal resolution of the used datasets should be considered.

  18. Turbulence strength estimation and super-resolution from an arbitrary set of atmospherically degraded images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamek, Steve; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak

    2006-08-01

    In remote sensing, atmospheric turbulence and aerosols limit the image quality. For many practical cases turbulence is shown to be dominant, especially for horizontal close-to-earth imaging in hot environments. In a horizontal long-range imaging it is usually impractical to measure path-averaged refractive index structure constant C n2 (which characterizes the turbulence strength) with conventional equipment. In this paper we propose a method for estimation of C n2 based just on the available recorded turbulence-degraded image sequence. The method exploits the turbulence-induced image "dancing". C n2 is extracted from the estimated image shifts variance. Experimental comparison with C n2 measurements using a scintillometer shows reliable estimation results. We also estimate image motion with sub-pixel accuracy for the purpose of obtaining a high-resolution image by applying a simple super-resolution procedure. Results of super-resolution for real imagery are presented.

  19. The IRAM 30m Nearby Galaxy Dense Gas Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigiel, Frank

    2015-08-01

    I will present work in progress from EMPIRE, a large program (~440 hr) with the EMIR receiver at the IRAM 30m telescope to map dense gas tracers (HCN, HCO+, HNC, N2H+, C2H etc.) as well as the optically thin 1-0 lines of 13CO and C18O for the first time systematically across the disks of 9 nearby spiral galaxies. Building on a large suite of available ancillary data from the radio to the UV, we will be able to study, among other things, dense gas fractions and star formation efficiencies and how they vary with environment within and among nearby disk galaxies. While the survey has only recently started, we have similar data from a pilot program in M51 as well as from an ancillary study with CARMA in the Antennae Galaxies. I will present results from these two studies, provide an outlook and show first data from EMPIRE, and place our work in context with other work, including existing studies of dense gas tracers in other galaxies as well as our HERACLES CO and THINGS HI surveys.

  20. Estimation of high-resolution dust column density maps. Empirical model fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvela, M.; Montillaud, J.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Sub-millimetre dust emission is an important tracer of column density N of dense interstellar clouds. One has to combine surface brightness information at different spatial resolutions, and specific methods are needed to derive N at a resolution higher than the lowest resolution of the observations. Some methods have been discussed in the literature, including a method (in the following, method B) that constructs the N estimate in stages, where the smallest spatial scales being derived only use the shortest wavelength maps. Aims: We propose simple model fitting as a flexible way to estimate high-resolution column density maps. Our goal is to evaluate the accuracy of this procedure and to determine whether it is a viable alternative for making these maps. Methods: The new method consists of model maps of column density (or intensity at a reference wavelength) and colour temperature. The model is fitted using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, comparing model predictions with observations at their native resolution. We analyse simulated surface brightness maps and compare its accuracy with method B and the results that would be obtained using high-resolution observations without noise. Results: The new method is able to produce reliable column density estimates at a resolution significantly higher than the lowest resolution of the input maps. Compared to method B, it is relatively resilient against the effects of noise. The method is computationally more demanding, but is feasible even in the analysis of large Herschel maps. Conclusions: The proposed empirical modelling method E is demonstrated to be a good alternative for calculating high-resolution column density maps, even with considerable super-resolution. Both methods E and B include the potential for further improvements, e.g., in the form of better a priori constraints.

  1. Crop area estimation using high and medium resolution satellite imagery in areas with complex topography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Husak, G.J.; Marshall, M. T.; Michaelsen, J.; Pedreros, Diego; Funk, Christopher C.; Galu, G.

    2008-01-01

    Reliable estimates of cropped area (CA) in developing countries with chronic food shortages are essential for emergency relief and the design of appropriate market-based food security programs. Satellite interpretation of CA is an effective alternative to extensive and costly field surveys, which fail to represent the spatial heterogeneity at the country-level. Bias-corrected, texture based classifications show little deviation from actual crop inventories, when estimates derived from aerial photographs or field measurements are used to remove systematic errors in medium resolution estimates. In this paper, we demonstrate a hybrid high-medium resolution technique for Central Ethiopia that combines spatially limited unbiased estimates from IKONOS images, with spatially extensive Landsat ETM+ interpretations, land-cover, and SRTM-based topography. Logistic regression is used to derive the probability of a location being crop. These individual points are then aggregated to produce regional estimates of CA. District-level analysis of Landsat based estimates showed CA totals which supported the estimates of the Bureau of Agriculture and Rural Development. Continued work will evaluate the technique in other parts of Africa, while segmentation algorithms will be evaluated, in order to automate classification of medium resolution imagery for routine CA estimation in the future.

  2. Crop area estimation using high and medium resolution satellite imagery in areas with complex topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husak, G. J.; Marshall, M. T.; Michaelsen, J.; Pedreros, D.; Funk, C.; Galu, G.

    2008-07-01

    Reliable estimates of cropped area (CA) in developing countries with chronic food shortages are essential for emergency relief and the design of appropriate market-based food security programs. Satellite interpretation of CA is an effective alternative to extensive and costly field surveys, which fail to represent the spatial heterogeneity at the country-level. Bias-corrected, texture based classifications show little deviation from actual crop inventories, when estimates derived from aerial photographs or field measurements are used to remove systematic errors in medium resolution estimates. In this paper, we demonstrate a hybrid high-medium resolution technique for Central Ethiopia that combines spatially limited unbiased estimates from IKONOS images, with spatially extensive Landsat ETM+ interpretations, land-cover, and SRTM-based topography. Logistic regression is used to derive the probability of a location being crop. These individual points are then aggregated to produce regional estimates of CA. District-level analysis of Landsat based estimates showed CA totals which supported the estimates of the Bureau of Agriculture and Rural Development. Continued work will evaluate the technique in other parts of Africa, while segmentation algorithms will be evaluated, in order to automate classification of medium resolution imagery for routine CA estimation in the future.

  3. Improving accuracy of Eutrophication State Index estimation in Chaohu Lake by moderate resolution remote sensing data driven method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Bo; Song, Jing-Wei; Wang, Xin-Yuan; Zhen, Jing; Gao, Rui

    2014-11-01

    Trophic Level Index (TLI) calculated from several water quality monitoring indicators is often used to assess the general eutrophication state of inland-lake. In this paper, we proposed a data driven inland-lake eutrophication mapping method by using artificial neural network (ANN) to build relationship from remote sensing data and in-situ TLI sampling. Low spatial resolution remote sensing data (MODIS, 250-m and 500-m) and moderate spatial resolution remote sensing data (OLI, 30-m) together with in-situ observations are acquired to train the net. Result demonstrates that TLI obtained from medium-resolution remote sensing images is more accurate than which from low resolution remote sensing data, and more accurate than TLI calculated from the water quality factors retrieved from remote sensing images. This method provides an efficient way of mapping the TLI spatial distribution in-inland lake.

  4. Super-Resolution Using Hidden Markov Model and Bayesian Detection Estimation Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humblot, Fabrice; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents a new method for super-resolution (SR) reconstruction of a high-resolution (HR) image from several low-resolution (LR) images. The HR image is assumed to be composed of homogeneous regions. Thus, the a priori distribution of the pixels is modeled by a finite mixture model (FMM) and a Potts Markov model (PMM) for the labels. The whole a priori model is then a hierarchical Markov model. The LR images are assumed to be obtained from the HR image by lowpass filtering, arbitrarily translation, decimation, and finally corruption by a random noise. The problem is then put in a Bayesian detection and estimation framework, and appropriate algorithms are developed based on Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) Gibbs sampling. At the end, we have not only an estimate of the HR image but also an estimate of the classification labels which leads to a segmentation result.

  5. Coeval observations of a complete sample of flat-spectrum blazars with Effelsberg, IRAM 30m, and Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachen, Jörg Paul; Fuhrmann, Lars

    2015-08-01

    We present time-resolved broad-band spectra of a complete sample of blazars, selected by showing flat radio spectra up to 143 GHz, taken from observations with Planck, the Effelsberg 100m telescope, and the IRAM 30m telescope. Dedicated Effelsberg observations have been focused on times within two months around Planck single survey scans of each source, with a cadence of 2-4 weeks during the 4th and 5th Planck survey. The data are complemented with flux measurements from the F-GAMMA program (Fuhrmann et. al, 2007, AIPC 921, 249; Fuhrmann et al., 2014, MNRAS 441, 1899), and from other Effelsberg and IRAM monitoring programs, as far as available. Planck data are extracted employing methods used in the blind search for variable sky signals, which allow to estimate snap-shot source fluxes down to pointing period (i.e. hour scale) time resolution (Rachen et al., this conference). The program thus covers 15 frequencies between 2.4 to 857 GHz and is sensitive to variability time scales from hours over weeks up to one year, which is unprecedented in the history of blazar monitoring.

  6. Estimating the resolution limit of the map equation in community detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Tatsuro; Rosvall, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A community detection algorithm is considered to have a resolution limit if the scale of the smallest modules that can be resolved depends on the size of the analyzed subnetwork. The resolution limit is known to prevent some community detection algorithms from accurately identifying the modular structure of a network. In fact, any global objective function for measuring the quality of a two-level assignment of nodes into modules must have some sort of resolution limit or an external resolution parameter. However, it is yet unknown how the resolution limit affects the so-called map equation, which is known to be an efficient objective function for community detection. We derive an analytical estimate and conclude that the resolution limit of the map equation is set by the total number of links between modules instead of the total number of links in the full network as for modularity. This mechanism makes the resolution limit much less restrictive for the map equation than for modularity; in practice, it is orders of magnitudes smaller. Furthermore, we argue that the effect of the resolution limit often results from shoehorning multilevel modular structures into two-level descriptions. As we show, the hierarchical map equation effectively eliminates the resolution limit for networks with nested multilevel modular structures.

  7. Full-reference quality estimation for images with different spatial resolutions.

    PubMed

    Demirtas, Ali Murat; Reibman, Amy R; Jafarkhani, Hamid

    2014-05-01

    Multimedia communication is becoming pervasive because of the progress in wireless communications and multimedia coding. Estimating the quality of the visual content accurately is crucial in providing satisfactory service. State of the art visual quality assessment approaches are effective when the input image and reference image have the same resolution. However, finding the quality of an image that has spatial resolution different than that of the reference image is still a challenging problem. To solve this problem, we develop a quality estimator (QE), which computes the quality of the input image without resampling the reference or the input images. In this paper, we begin by identifying the potential weaknesses of previous approaches used to estimate the quality of experience. Next, we design a QE to estimate the quality of a distorted image with a lower resolution compared with the reference image. We also propose a subjective test environment to explore the success of the proposed algorithm in comparison with other QEs. When the input and test images have different resolutions, the subjective tests demonstrate that in most cases the proposed method works better than other approaches. In addition, the proposed algorithm also performs well when the reference image and the test image have the same resolution. PMID:24686279

  8. Estimation of Resolution of Shallow Layers by Frequency Domain Airborne Electromagnetic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. D.; Minsley, B. J.; Kass, M. A.; Abraham, J. D.; Sams, J. I.; Veloski, G. A.; Esfahani, A.; Hodges, G.

    2012-12-01

    Helicopter frequency domain electromagnetic (HFDEM) that were conducted in two very different geoelectrical settings, permafrost and conductive alluvium, have been used to examine and quantify some aspects of the resolution of shallow layers (less than 5 meters). The surveys have used the Resolve system with six frequencies ranging from 400 Hz to 140 kHz. Though most discussion of the resolution of earth resistivity for airborne EM systems has concentrated on estimating the maximum depth of mapping or the resolution of deep layers, there are important applications for mapping shallow layers and it is useful to understand the capabilities and limitations of the HFDEM system in different environments. In permafrost terrains, mapping of the shallow active layer is important in understanding its distribution relative to surface processes such as thermal history, fires and carbon storage as well as in monitoring applications. Here the shallow active layer is a conductor relative to the very resistive permafrost. Mapping shallow layers in alluvial environments has been the focus of a study of subsurface drip irrigation in the Powder River of Wyoming. Here the focus of the HFDEM study has been in mapping the distribution of conductive clays and naturally occurring saline waters. Mapping of shallow layers in alluvial environments is important in agricultural applications to map recharge, soil salinity, and thickness of alluvium. Parameters for layered models (layer resistivity and thickness) have been estimated by inversion methods and the resolution of parameters has been evaluated using stochastic methods and an evaluation of linear estimates of resolution and uncertainty. Statistical estimates of resolution of parameters are compared with estimates from ground surveys.

  9. Maximum Likelihood Shift Estimation Using High Resolution Polarimetric SAR Clutter Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harant, Olivier; Bombrun, Lionel; Vasile, Gabriel; Ferro-Famil, Laurent; Gay, Michel

    2011-03-01

    This paper deals with a Maximum Likelihood (ML) shift estimation method in the context of High Resolution (HR) Polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) clutter. Texture modeling is exposed and the generalized ML texture tracking method is extended to the merging of various sensors. Some results on displacement estimation on the Argentiere glacier in the Mont Blanc massif using dual-pol TerraSAR-X (TSX) and quad-pol RADARSAT-2 (RS2) sensors are finally discussed.

  10. BOREAS TE-18, 30-m, Radiometrically Rectified Landsat TM Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-18 team used a radiometric rectification process to produce standardized DN values for a series of Landsat TM images of the BOREAS SSA and NSA in order to compare images that were collected under different atmospheric conditions. The images for each study area were referenced to an image that had very clear atmospheric qualities. The reference image for the SSA was collected on 02-Sep-1994, while the reference image for the NSA was collected on 21-Jun-1995. the 23 rectified images cover the period of 07-Jul-1985 to 18 Sep-1994 in the SSA and from 22-Jun-1984 to 09-Jun-1994 in the NSA. Each of the reference scenes had coincident atmospheric optical thickness measurements made by RSS-11. The radiometric rectification process is described in more detail by Hall et al. (199 1). The original Landsat TM data were received from CCRS for use in the BOREAS project. The data are stored in binary image-format files. Due to the nature of the radiometric rectification process and copyright issues, these full-resolution images may not be publicly distributed. However, a spatially degraded 60-m resolution version of the images is available on the BOREAS CD-ROM series. See Sections 15 and 16 for information about how to possibly acquire the full resolution data. Information about the full-resolution images is provided in an inventory listing on the CD-ROMs. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  11. Improving high-resolution quantitative precipitation estimation via fusion of multiple radar-based precipitation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafieeinasab, Arezoo; Norouzi, Amir; Seo, Dong-Jun; Nelson, Brian

    2015-12-01

    For monitoring and prediction of water-related hazards in urban areas such as flash flooding, high-resolution hydrologic and hydraulic modeling is necessary. Because of large sensitivity and scale dependence of rainfall-runoff models to errors in quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE), it is very important that the accuracy of QPE be improved in high-resolution hydrologic modeling to the greatest extent possible. With the availability of multiple radar-based precipitation products in many areas, one may now consider fusing them to produce more accurate high-resolution QPE for a wide spectrum of applications. In this work, we formulate and comparatively evaluate four relatively simple procedures for such fusion based on Fisher estimation and its conditional bias-penalized variant: Direct Estimation (DE), Bias Correction (BC), Reduced-Dimension Bias Correction (RBC) and Simple Estimation (SE). They are applied to fuse the Multisensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE) and radar-only Next Generation QPE (Q2) products at the 15-min 1-km resolution (Experiment 1), and the MPE and Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) QPE products at the 15-min 500-m resolution (Experiment 2). The resulting fused estimates are evaluated using the 15-min rain gauge observations from the City of Grand Prairie in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex (DFW) in north Texas. The main criterion used for evaluation is that the fused QPE improves over the ingredient QPEs at their native spatial resolutions, and that, at the higher resolution, the fused QPE improves not only over the ingredient higher-resolution QPE but also over the ingredient lower-resolution QPE trivially disaggregated using the ingredient high-resolution QPE. All four procedures assume that the ingredient QPEs are unbiased, which is not likely to hold true in reality even if real-time bias correction is in operation. To test robustness under more realistic conditions, the fusion procedures were evaluated with and

  12. Global Food Security-support data at 30 m (GFSAD30)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thenkabail, P. S.

    2013-12-01

    Monitoring global croplands (GCs) is imperative for ensuring sustainable water and food security to the people of the world in the Twenty-first Century. However, the currently available cropland products suffer from major limitations such as: (1) Absence of precise spatial location of the cropped areas; (b) Coarse resolution nature of the map products with significant uncertainties in areas, locations, and detail; (b) Uncertainties in differentiating irrigated areas from rainfed areas; (c) Absence of crop types and cropping intensities; and (e) Absence of a dedicated webdata portal for the dissemination of cropland products. Therefore, our project aims to close these gaps through a Global Food Security-support data at 30 m (GFSAD30) with 4 distinct products: 1. Cropland extentarea, 2. Crop types with focus on 8 crops that occupy 70% of the global cropland areas, 3. Irrigated versus rainfed, and 4. Cropping intensities: single, double, triple, and continuous cropping. The above 4 products will be generated for GFSAD for nominal year 2010 (GFSAD2010) based on Landsat 30m Global Land Survey 2010 (GLS2010) fused with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 250m NDVI monthly maximum value composites (MVC) of 2009-2011 data, and suite of secondary data (e.g., long-term precipitation, temperature, GDEM elevation). GFSAD30 will be produced using three mature cropland mapping algorithms (CMAs): 1. Spectral matching techniques; 2. A cropland classification algorithm (ACCA) that is rule-based; and 3. Hierarchical segmentation (HSeg) algorithm. Funded by NASA MEaSUREs, GFSAD30 will make significant contributions to Earth System Data Records (ESDRs), Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Agriculture and Water Societal Beneficial Areas (GEO Ag. SBAs), GEO Global Agricultural Monitoring Initiative (GEO GLAM), and the recent 'Big Data' initiative by the White House. The project has the support of USGS Working Group on Global Croplands (https://powellcenter.usgs.gov/globalcroplandwater/).

  13. A Global Scale 30m Water Surface Detection Optimized and Validated for Landsat 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekel, J. F.; Cottam, A.; Clerici, M.; Belward, A.; Dubois, G.; Bartholome, E.; Gorelick, N.

    2014-12-01

    Life on Earth as we know it is impossible without water. Its importance to biological diversity, human well-being and the very functioning of the Earth-system cannot be overstressed, but we have remarkably little detailed knowledge concerning the spatial and temporal distribution of this vital resource. Earth observing satellites operating with high temporal revisits yet moderate spatial resolution have provided global datasets documenting spatial and temporal changes to water bodies on the Earth's surface. Landsat 8 has a data acquisition strategy such that global coverage of all land surfaces now occurs more frequently than from any preceding Landsat mission and provides 30 m resolution data. Whilst not the last word in temporal sampling this presents a basis for mapping and monitoring changes to global surface water resources at unprecedented levels of spatial detail. In this paper we provide a first 30 m resolution global synthesis of surface water occurrence, we document permanent water surfaces, seasonal water surfaces and always-dry surfaces. These products have been derived by optimizing a methodology previously developed for use with moderate resolution MODIS imagery for use with Landsat 8. The approach is based on a transformation of RGB color space into HSV combined with a sequence of cloud, topographic and temperature masks. Analysis at the global scale used the Google Earth Engine platform applied to all Landsat 8 acquisitions between June 2013 and June 2014. Systematic validation is done and demonstrated our ability to map surface water. Our method can be applied to other Landsat missions offering the potential to document changes in surface water over three decades; our study shows examples illustrating the capacity to map new water surfaces and ephemeral water surfaces in addition to the three previous classes. Thanks to an optimized data acquisition strategy, a full-free and open data policy and the processing capacity of the GEE global land

  14. A technique for estimating rangeland canopy-gap size distributions from high resolution digital imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The amount and distribution of gaps in vegetation canopy is a useful indicator of multiple ecosystem processes and functions. We describe a semi-automated approach for estimating canopy-gap size distributions in rangelands from high-resolution (HR) digital images using image interpretation by observ...

  15. Use of UAS remote sensing data to estimate crop ET at high spatial resolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estimation of the spatial distribution of evapotranspiration (ET) based on remotely sensed imagery has become useful for managing water in irrigated agricultural at various spatial scales. However, data acquired by conventional satellites (Landsat, ASTER, etc.) lack the spatial resolution to capture...

  16. High-resolution methane emission estimates using the InTEM inversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, S.; Manning, A.; Robinson, A. D.; Riddick, S. N.; Forster, G.; Oram, D.; O'Doherty, S.; Harris, N. R. P.

    2014-12-01

    There is a growing need for comparisons between emission estimates produced using bottom-up and top-down techniques at high spatial resolution. In response to this, an inversion approach, InTEM, was adapted to estimate methane emissions for a region in the South East of the UK (~100 x 150 km). We present results covering a 2-year period (July 2012 - July 2014) in which atmospheric methane concentrations were recorded at 1 - 2 minute time-steps at four locations within the region of interest. Precise measurements were obtained using gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (GC-FID) for all sites except one, which used a PICARRO Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (CRDS). These observations, along with the UK Met Office's Lagrangian particle dispersion model (NAME) were used within InTEM to produce the methane emission fields. Emission estimates were produced at varying spatial resolutions, for annual and seasonal time frames . We present results indicating the optimum number of observation sites required for this region, and how this can affect our uncertainty estimates. These results are compared with the UK National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) which is compiled using bottom-up methods and available at 1x1 km resolution. To our knowledge, no inversion technique has been implemented on such a fine spatial resolution. This is a pilot project which, given proof of concept, could be scaled up as an alternative method for producing national scale emission inventories.

  17. High resolution time of arrival estimation for a cooperative sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morhart, C.; Biebl, E. M.

    2010-09-01

    Distance resolution of cooperative sensors is limited by the signal bandwidth. For the transmission mainly lower frequency bands are used which are more narrowband than classical radar frequencies. To compensate this resolution problem the combination of a pseudo-noise coded pulse compression system with superresolution time of arrival estimation is proposed. Coded pulsecompression allows secure and fast distance measurement in multi-user scenarios which can easily be adapted for data transmission purposes (Morhart and Biebl, 2009). Due to the lack of available signal bandwidth the measurement accuracy degrades especially in multipath scenarios. Superresolution time of arrival algorithms can improve this behaviour by estimating the channel impulse response out of a band-limited channel view. For the given test system the implementation of a MUSIC algorithm permitted a two times better distance resolution as the standard pulse compression.

  18. Discriminating the effects of phylogenetic hypothesis, tree resolution and clade age estimates on phylogenetic signal measurements.

    PubMed

    Seger, G D S; Duarte, L D S; Debastiani, V J; Kindel, A; Jarenkow, J A

    2013-09-01

    Understanding how species traits evolved over time is the central question to comprehend assembly rules that govern the phylogenetic structure of communities. The measurement of phylogenetic signal (PS) in ecologically relevant traits is a first step to understand phylogenetically structured community patterns. The different methods available to estimate PS make it difficult to choose which is most appropriate. Furthermore, alternative phylogenetic tree hypotheses, node resolution and clade age estimates might influence PS measurements. In this study, we evaluated to what extent these parameters affect different methods of PS analysis, and discuss advantages and disadvantages when selecting which method to use. We measured fruit/seed traits and flowering/fruiting phenology of endozoochoric species occurring in Southern Brazilian Araucaria forests and evaluated their PS using Mantel regressions, phylogenetic eigenvector regressions (PVR) and K statistic. Mantel regressions always gave less significant results compared to PVR and K statistic in all combinations of phylogenetic trees constructed. Moreover, a better phylogenetic resolution affected PS, independently of the method used to estimate it. Morphological seed traits tended to show higher PS than diaspores traits, while PS in flowering/fruiting phenology depended mostly on the method used to estimate it. This study demonstrates that different PS estimates are obtained depending on the chosen method and the phylogenetic tree resolution. This finding has implications for inferences on phylogenetic niche conservatism or ecological processes determining phylogenetic community structure. PMID:23368095

  19. Estimating the proportions of objects within a single resolution element of a multispectral scanner.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, H. M.; Nalepka, R. F.; Hyde, P. D.; Morgenstern, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    Description of a procedu*e designed to estimate the proportions of objects and materials contained in the instantaneous field of view (IFOV) of an airborne multispectral device. A mathematical model is derived to relate the signature of a combination of materials in a resolution cell to the signatures of the individual materials considered. Estimation algorithms are generated and digital computer programs are prepared to apply the algorithms in the description of the effects which are observed when several objects are viewed simultaneously. The maximum likelihood estimate of the proportions of various individual materials in an IFOV is discussed. A simulation program is proposed for such estimates. A procedure for analyzing the geometric relations of signatures which affect the accuracy of estimates is set forth.

  20. Alternative techniques for high-resolution spectral estimation of spectrally encoded endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Mahta; Duan, Lian; Javidi, Tara; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally encoded endoscopy (SEE) is a minimally invasive optical imaging modality capable of fast confocal imaging of internal tissue structures. Modern SEE systems use coherent sources to image deep within the tissue and data are processed similar to optical coherence tomography (OCT); however, standard processing of SEE data via the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) leads to degradation of the axial resolution as the bandwidth of the source shrinks, resulting in a well-known trade-off between speed and axial resolution. Recognizing the limitation of FFT as a general spectral estimation algorithm to only take into account samples collected by the detector, in this work we investigate alternative high-resolution spectral estimation algorithms that exploit information such as sparsity and the general region position of the bulk sample to improve the axial resolution of processed SEE data. We validate the performance of these algorithms using bothMATLAB simulations and analysis of experimental results generated from a home-built OCT system to simulate an SEE system with variable scan rates. Our results open a new door towards using non-FFT algorithms to generate higher quality (i.e., higher resolution) SEE images at correspondingly fast scan rates, resulting in systems that are more accurate and more comfortable for patients due to the reduced image time.

  1. Improvement of PPP-inferred tropospheric estimates by integer ambiguity resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, J.; Gao, Y.

    2012-11-01

    Integer ambiguity resolution in Precise Point Positioning (PPP) can improve positioning accuracy and reduce convergence time. The decoupled clock model proposed by Collins (2008) has been used to facilitate integer ambiguity resolution in PPP, and research has been conducted to assess the model's potential to improve positioning accuracy and reduce positioning convergence time. In particular, the biggest benefits have been identified for the positioning solutions within short observation periods such as one hour. However, there is little work reported about the model's potential to improve the estimation of the tropospheric parameter within short observation periods. This paper investigates the effect of PPP ambiguity resolution on the accuracy of the tropospheric estimates within one hour. The tropospheric estimates with float and fixed ambiguities within one hour are compared to two external references. The first reference is the International GNSS Service (IGS) final troposphere product based on the PPP technique. The second reference is the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) radio occultation (RO) event based on the atmospheric profiles along the signal travel path. A comparison among ten co-located ground-based GPS and space-based RO troposphere zenith path delays shows that the mean bias of the troposphere estimates with float ambiguities can be significantly reduced from 30.1 to 17.0 mm when compared to the IGS troposphere product and from 36.3 to 19.7 mm when compared to the COSMIC RO. The root mean square (RMS) accuracy improvement of the tropospheric parameters by the ambiguity resolution is 33.3% when compared to the IGS products and 44.3% when compared to the COSMIC RO. All these improvements are achieved within one hour, which indicates the promising prospect of adopting PPP integer ambiguity resolution for time-critical applications such as typhoon prediction.

  2. The use of high spectral resolution bands for estimating absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (A par)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Chappelle, E. W.; Mcmurtrey, J. E.; Walthall, C. L.

    1994-01-01

    Most remote sensing estimations of vegetation variables such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (APAR), and phytomass are made using broad band sensors with a bandwidth of approximately 100 nm. However, high resolution spectrometers are available and have not been fully exploited for the purpose of improving estimates of vegetation variables. A study directed to investigate the use of high spectral resolution spectroscopy for remote sensing estimates of APAR in vegetation canopies in the presence of nonphotosynthetic background materials such as soil and leaf litter is presented. A high spectral resolution method defined as the Chlorophyll Absorption Ratio Index (CARI) was developed for minimizing the effects of nonphotosynthetic materials in the remote estimates of APAR. CARI utilizes three bands at 550, 670, and 700 nm with bandwidth of 10 nm. Simulated canopy reflectance of a range of LAI were generated with the SAIL model using measurements of 42 different soil types as canopy background. CARI obtained from the simulated canopy reflectance was compared with the broad band vegetation indices (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), and Simple Ratio (SR)). CARI reduced the effect of nonphotosynthetic background materials in the assessment of vegetation canopy APAR more effectively than broad band vegetation indices.

  3. First storm-time plasma velocity estimates from high-resolution ionospheric data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta-Barua, Seebany; Bust, Gary S.; Crowley, Geoff

    2013-11-01

    This paper uses data assimilation to estimate ionospheric state during storm time at subdegree resolution. We use Ionospheric Data Assimilation Four-Dimensional (IDA4D) to resolve the three-dimensional time-varying electron density gradients of the storm-enhanced density poleward plume. By Estimating Model Parameters from Ionospheric Reverse Engineering (EMPIRE), we infer the three-dimensional plasma velocity from the densities. EMPIRE estimates of ExB drift are made by correcting the Weimer 2000 electric potential model. This is the first time electron densities derived from GPS total electron content (TEC) data are being used to estimate field-aligned and field-perpendicular drifts at such high resolution, without reference to direct drift measurements. The time-varying estimated electron densities are used to construct the ionospheric spatial decorrelation in vertical total electron content (TEC) on horizontal scales of less than 100 km. We compare slant TEC (STEC) estimates to actual STEC GPS observations, including independent unassimilated data. The IDA4D density model of the extreme ionospheric storm on 20 November 2003 shows STEC delays of up to 210 TEC units, comparable to the STEC of the GPS ground stations. Horizontal drifts from EMPIRE are predicted to be northwestward within the storm-enhanced density plume and its boundary, turning northeast at high latitudes. These estimates compare favorably to independent Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics-assimilated high-latitude ExB drift estimates. Estimated and measured Defense Meteorological Satellite Program in situ drifts differ by a factor of 2-3 and in some cases have incorrect direction. This indicates that significant density rates of change and more accurate accounting for production and loss may be needed when other processes are not dominant.

  4. Continental scale 30m burned area mapping: demonstration and validation for the conterminous United States and Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschetti, L.; Roy, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    Fire products derived from coarse (500m to 1km) spatial resolution satellite data have become an important source of information for the fire science and applications communities. There is however a demand for moderate spatial resolution burned area maps that are systematically generated at regional to global scale. This paper presents a multi-temporal methodology to fuse the MODIS 1km active fire product with Landsat data to map burned areas at 30m on a temporally rolling basis. A multistage mapping approach is used, with an initial per-pixel change detection on Landsat 30m time series to identify candidate burned areas. The candidate burned area objects are then either retained or discarded by comparison with contemporaneous MODIS active fire detections. Results are illustrated showing 30m burned area maps of the conterminous United States and Alaska for two years (2002 and 2008) generated from weekly Web Enabled Landsat (WELD) Landsat mosaics and daily Terra and Aqua MODIS active fire detections. Validation is conducted by systematic comparison with all the fire perimeter vectors provided by the USGS Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity project. The presented methodology pathfinds the use of the Landsat archive to contribute to a long term burned area data record. Prospects for future developments and global application are discussed.

  5. Impulse Response Estimation for Spatial Resolution Enhancement in Ultrasonic NDE Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G A

    2004-06-25

    This report describes a signal processing algorithm and MATLAB software for improving spatial resolution in ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) imaging of materials. Given a measured reflection signal and an associated reference signal, the algorithm produces an optimal least-squares estimate of the impulse response of the material under test. This estimated impulse response, when used in place of the raw reflection signal, enhances the spatial resolution of the ultrasonic measurements by removing distortion caused by the limited-bandwidth transducers and the materials under test. The theory behind the processing algorithms is briefly presented, while the reader is referred to the bibliography for details. The main focus of the report is to describe how to use the MATLAB software. Two processing examples using actual ultrasonic measurements are provided for tutorial purposes.

  6. A 30 mK, 13.5 T scanning tunneling microscope with two independent tips.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, Anita; Gubrud, M A; Dana, R; Anderson, J R; Lobb, C J; Wellstood, F C; Dreyer, M

    2014-04-01

    We describe the design, construction, and performance of an ultra-low temperature, high-field scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with two independent tips. The STM is mounted on a dilution refrigerator and operates at a base temperature of 30 mK with magnetic fields of up to 13.5 T. We focus on the design of the two-tip STM head, as well as the sample transfer mechanism, which allows in situ transfer from an ultra high vacuum preparation chamber while the STM is at 1.5 K. Other design details such as the vibration isolation and rf-filtered wiring are also described. Their effectiveness is demonstrated via spectral current noise characteristics and the root mean square roughness of atomic resolution images. The high-field capability is shown by the magnetic field dependence of the superconducting gap of CuxBi2Se3. Finally, we present images and spectroscopy taken with superconducting Nb tips with the refrigerator at 35 mK that indicate that the effective temperature of our tips/sample is approximately 184 mK, corresponding to an energy resolution of 16 μeV. PMID:24784617

  7. A 30 mK, 13.5 T scanning tunneling microscope with two independent tips

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, Anita; Gubrud, M. A.; Dana, R.; Dreyer, M.; Anderson, J. R.; Lobb, C. J.; Wellstood, F. C.

    2014-04-15

    We describe the design, construction, and performance of an ultra-low temperature, high-field scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with two independent tips. The STM is mounted on a dilution refrigerator and operates at a base temperature of 30 mK with magnetic fields of up to 13.5 T. We focus on the design of the two-tip STM head, as well as the sample transfer mechanism, which allows in situ transfer from an ultra high vacuum preparation chamber while the STM is at 1.5 K. Other design details such as the vibration isolation and rf-filtered wiring are also described. Their effectiveness is demonstrated via spectral current noise characteristics and the root mean square roughness of atomic resolution images. The high-field capability is shown by the magnetic field dependence of the superconducting gap of Cu{sub x}Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}. Finally, we present images and spectroscopy taken with superconducting Nb tips with the refrigerator at 35 mK that indicate that the effective temperature of our tips/sample is approximately 184 mK, corresponding to an energy resolution of 16 μeV.

  8. Cumulus cloud base height estimation from high spatial resolution Landsat data - A Hough transform approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berendes, Todd; Sengupta, Sailes K.; Welch, Ron M.; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Navar, Murgesh

    1992-01-01

    A semiautomated methodology is developed for estimating cumulus cloud base heights on the basis of high spatial resolution Landsat MSS data, using various image-processing techniques to match cloud edges with their corresponding shadow edges. The cloud base height is then estimated by computing the separation distance between the corresponding generalized Hough transform reference points. The differences between the cloud base heights computed by these means and a manual verification technique are of the order of 100 m or less; accuracies of 50-70 m may soon be possible via EOS instruments.

  9. Estimating hurricane vertical velocity from Doppler radar for high-resolution hurricane model initialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.

    2013-12-01

    A mesoscale vorticity method derives the hurricane inner-core vertical velocity from the vorticity variations in space and in time estimated from a deep layer of wind measurements obtained from Doppler radar. The vorticity method derives the hurricane inner core vertical velocity and thus, the divergent wind based on the mesoscale vorticity equation. The inner-core divergent wind inferred dynamically and rotational wind estimated from radar data form the total horizontal wind which is dynamically balanced with the derived vertical velocity. The derived high-resolution balance wind field is suitable for high resolution hurricane models initialization. The vorticity method is tested using a high-resolution non-hydrostatic hurricane model with radar data from Hurricane Danny which made landfall along the Alabama coast in 1997. Numerical experiments with a high resolution non-hydrostatic hurricane model show positive radar data impacts on track and intensity forecasts, in particular, substantial improvements on the hurricane inner core velocity field, can be obtained with the vertical velocity and thus inner-core divergent wind inferred from the mesoscale vorticity method.

  10. Using High Resolution Numerical Weather Prediction Models to Reduce and Estimate Uncertainty in Flood Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, S. J.; Moore, R. J.; Roberts, N.

    2007-12-01

    Forecast rainfall from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and/or nowcasting systems is a major source of uncertainty for short-term flood forecasting. One approach for reducing and estimating this uncertainty is to use high resolution NWP models that should provide better rainfall predictions. The potential benefit of running the Met Office Unified Model (UM) with a grid spacing of 4 and 1 km compared to the current operational resolution of 12 km is assessed using the January 2005 Carlisle flood in northwest England. These NWP rainfall forecasts, and forecasts from the Nimrod nowcasting system, were fed into the lumped Probability Distributed Model (PDM) and the distributed Grid-to-Grid model to predict river flow at the outlets of two catchments important for flood warning. The results show the benefit of increased resolution in the UM, the benefit of coupling the high- resolution rainfall forecasts to hydrological models and the improvement in timeliness of flood warning that might have been possible. Ongoing work aims to employ these NWP rainfall forecasts in ensemble form as part of a procedure for estimating the uncertainty of flood forecasts.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Horsehead H2CO and CH3OH 30m and PdBI maps (Guzman+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, V.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Pety, J.; Gratier, P.; Gerin, M.; Roueff, E.; Le Petit, F.; Le Bourlot, J.; Faure, A.

    2013-10-01

    Integrated intensity maps of one H2CO line (145.603GHz) an CH3OH lines (145.097 and 145.103GHz) in the Horsehead nebula. The single dish maps observed with the IRAM-30m telescope are included (17.9"x17.9" angular resolution), as well as high-angular resolution (6.1"x5.6") maps observed with the IRAM-PdBI. The single-dish map from the IRAM-30m were used to create the short-spacing visibilities not sampled by the Plateau de Bure interferometer. (2 data files).

  12. Using high time resolution aerosol and number size distribution measurements to estimate atmospheric extinction.

    PubMed

    Malm, William C; McMeeking, Gavin R; Kreidenweis, Sonia M; Levin, Ezra; Carrico, Christian M; Day, Derek E; Collett, Jeffrey L; Lee, Taehyoung; Sullivan, Amy P; Raja, Suresh

    2009-09-01

    Rocky Mountain National Park is experiencing reduced visibility and changes in ecosystem function due to increasing levels of oxidized and reduced nitrogen. The Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur (RoMANS) study was initiated to better understand the origins of sulfur and nitrogen species as well as the complex chemistry occurring during transport from source to receptor. As part of the study, a monitoring program was initiated for two 1-month time periods--one during the spring and the other during late summer/fall. The monitoring program included intensive high time resolution concentration measurements of aerosol number size distribution, inorganic anions, and cations, and 24-hr time resolution of PM2.5 and PM10 mass, sulfate, nitrate, carbon, and soil-related elements concentrations. These data are combined to estimate high time resolution concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 aerosol mass and fine mass species estimates of ammoniated sulfate, nitrate, and organic and elemental carbon. Hour-by-hour extinction budgets are calculated by using these species concentration estimates and measurements of size distribution and assuming internal and external particle mixtures. Summer extinction was on average about 3 times higher than spring extinction. During spring months, sulfates, nitrates, carbon mass, and PM10 - PM2.5 mass contributed approximately equal amounts of extinction, whereas during the summer months, carbonaceous material extinction was 2-3 times higher than other species. PMID:19785272

  13. Comparison and evaluation of high resolution precipitation estimation products in Urmia Basin-Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghajarnia, N.; Liaghat, A.; Daneshkar Arasteh, P.

    2015-05-01

    This study focuses on the comparison and evaluation of six daily 0.25° × 0.25° high resolution precipitation data sets (PERSIANN, CMORPH-RAW, CMORPH-CRT, TMPA-RT, TMPA-V7 and APHRODITE). The comparison is performed during years 2000 till 2011 in Urmia basin of Iran and the local daily rainfall gauge observations are considered as the reference data set. Several statistical, categorical and graphical evaluation techniques are used to compare and evaluate the product performances and quantify their biases from reference data. APHRODITE and TMPA-V7, by benefiting from gauge observations during their adjustment procedures present better estimations while among near real-time products, PERSIANN is able to remarkably outperform other estimations. Both CMORPH products has shown to have great overestimation (more than 200%) over the observations while PERSIANN and TMPA-RT tend to underestimate rainfall on average about 26% and 78% respectively. TMPA-V7 and APHRODITE also overestimate observations about 26 and 3 percentages. Compared to near real-time version of products, TMPA-V7 has succeeded to significantly improve TMPA-RT performance while CMORPH-CRT has completely unsuccessful in its mission. Although all rainfall estimation products are characterized by considerable biases in comparison to the gauge observations, detailed analysis indicate that some of them have the capability of becoming a valuable source of high resolution precipitation estimation data set, especially over purely gauged areas.

  14. RESEARCH PAPER: Automated estimation of stellar fundamental parameters from low resolution spectra: the PLS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Nan; Luo, A.-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2009-06-01

    PLS (Partial Least Squares regression) is introduced into an automatic estimation of fundamental stellar spectral parameters. It extracts the most correlative spectral component to the parameters (Teff, log g and [Fe/H]), and sets up a linear regression function from spectra to the corresponding parameters. Considering the properties of stellar spectra and the PLS algorithm, we present a piecewise PLS regression method for estimation of stellar parameters, which is composed of one PLS model for Teff, and seven PLS models for log g and [Fe/H] estimation. Its performance is investigated by large experiments on flux calibrated spectra and continuum normalized spectra at different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and resolutions. The results show that the piecewise PLS method is robust for spectra at the medium resolution of 0.23 nm. For low resolution 0.5 nm and 1 nm spectra, it achieves competitive results at higher SNR. Experiments using ELODIE spectra of 0.23 nm resolution illustrate that our piecewise PLS models trained with MILES spectra are efficient for O ~ G stars: for flux calibrated spectra, the systematic offsets are 3.8%, 0.14 dex, and -0.09 dex for Teff, log g and [Fe/H], with error scatters of 5.2%, 0.44 dex and 0.38 dex, respectively; for continuum normalized spectra, the systematic offsets are 3.8%, 0.12dex, and -0.13dex for Teff, log g and [Fe/H], with error scatters of 5.2%, 0.49 dex and 0.41 dex, respectively. The PLS method is rapid, easy to use and does not rely as strongly on the tightness of a parameter grid of templates to reach high precision as Artificial Neural Networks or minimum distance methods do.

  15. Spectral estimation optical coherence tomography for axial super-resolution (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinyu; Yu, Xiaojun; Wang, Nanshuo; Bo, En; Luo, Yuemei; Chen, Si; Cui, Dongyao; Liu, Linbo

    2016-03-01

    The sample depth reflectivity profile of Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) is estimated from the inverse Fourier transform of the spectral interference signals (interferograms). As a result, the axial resolution is fundamentally limited by the coherence length of the light source. We demonstrate an axial resolution improvement method by using the autoregressive spectral estimation technique to instead of the inverse Fourier transform to analyze the spectral interferograms, which is named as spectral estimation OCT (SE-OCT). SE-OCT improves the axial resolution by a factor of up to 4.7 compared with the corresponding FD-OCT. Furthermore, SE-OCT provides a complete sidelobe suppression in the point-spread function. Using phantoms such as an air wedge and micro particles, we prove the ability of resolution improvement. To test SE-OCT for real biological tissue, we image the rat cornea and demonstrate that SE-OCT enables clear identification of corneal endothelium anatomical details ex vivo. We also find that the performance of SE-OCT is depended on SNR of the feature object. To evaluate the potential usage and define the application scope of SE-OCT, we further investigate the property of SNR dependence and the artifacts that may be caused. We find SE-OCT may be uniquely suited for viewing high SNR layer structures, such as the epithelium and endothelium in cornea, retina and aorta. Given that SE-OCT can be implemented in the FD-OCT devices easily, the new capabilities provided by SE-OCT are likely to offer immediate improvements to the diagnosis and management of diseases based on OCT imaging.

  16. High-resolution methane emission estimates using surface measurements and the InTEM inversion system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, Sarah; Manning, Alistair; Robinson, Andrew; Riddick, Stuart; Forster, Grant; Oram, Dave; O'Doherty, Simon; Harris, Neil

    2015-04-01

    High quality GHG emission estimates will be required to successfully tackle climate change. There is a growing need for comparisons between emission estimates produced using bottom-up and top-down techniques at high spatial resolution. Here, a top-down inversion approach combining multi-year atmospheric measurements and an inversion model, InTEM, was used to estimate methane emissions for a region in the South East of the UK (~100 x 150 km). We present results covering a 2-year period (July 2012 - July 2014) in which atmospheric methane concentrations were recorded at 1 - 2 minute time-steps at four locations within the region of interest. Precise measurements were obtained using gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (GC-FID) for all sites except one, which used a PICARRO Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (CRDS). These observations, along with the UK Met Office's Lagrangian particle dispersion model, NAME, were used within InTEM to produce the methane emission fields. We present results from both Bayesian and non-prior based inversion analysis at varying spatial resolutions, for annual, seasonal and monthly time frames. These results are compared with the UK National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) which is compiled using bottom-up methods and available at 1x1 km resolution. A thorough assessment of uncertainty is incorporated into this technique which is represented in the results. This project is part of the UK GAUGE campaign which aims to produce robust estimates of the UK GHG budget using new and existing measurement networks (e.g. the UK DECC GHG network) and modelling activities at a range of scales.

  17. On-line 3D motion estimation using low resolution MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glitzner, M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Crijns, S. P. M.

    2015-08-01

    Image processing such as deformable image registration finds its way into radiotherapy as a means to track non-rigid anatomy. With the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided radiotherapy, intrafraction anatomy snapshots become technically feasible. MRI provides the needed tissue signal for high-fidelity image registration. However, acquisitions, especially in 3D, take a considerable amount of time. Pushing towards real-time adaptive radiotherapy, MRI needs to be accelerated without degrading the quality of information. In this paper, we investigate the impact of image resolution on the quality of motion estimations. Potentially, spatially undersampled images yield comparable motion estimations. At the same time, their acquisition times would reduce greatly due to the sparser sampling. In order to substantiate this hypothesis, exemplary 4D datasets of the abdomen were downsampled gradually. Subsequently, spatiotemporal deformations are extracted consistently using the same motion estimation for each downsampled dataset. Errors between the original and the respectively downsampled version of the dataset are then evaluated. Compared to ground-truth, results show high similarity of deformations estimated from downsampled image data. Using a dataset with {{≤ft(2.5 \\text{mm}\\right)}3} voxel size, deformation fields could be recovered well up to a downsampling factor of 2, i.e. {{≤ft(5 \\text{mm}\\right)}3} . In a therapy guidance scenario MRI, imaging speed could accordingly increase approximately fourfold, with acceptable loss of estimated motion quality.

  18. Fast integer least-squares estimation for GNSS high-dimensional ambiguity resolution using lattice theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jazaeri, S.; Amiri-Simkooei, A. R.; Sharifi, M. A.

    2012-02-01

    GNSS ambiguity resolution is the key issue in the high-precision relative geodetic positioning and navigation applications. It is a problem of integer programming plus integer quality evaluation. Different integer search estimation methods have been proposed for the integer solution of ambiguity resolution. Slow rate of convergence is the main obstacle to the existing methods where tens of ambiguities are involved. Herein, integer search estimation for the GNSS ambiguity resolution based on the lattice theory is proposed. It is mathematically shown that the closest lattice point problem is the same as the integer least-squares (ILS) estimation problem and that the lattice reduction speeds up searching process. We have implemented three integer search strategies: Agrell, Eriksson, Vardy, Zeger (AEVZ), modification of Schnorr-Euchner enumeration (M-SE) and modification of Viterbo-Boutros enumeration (M-VB). The methods have been numerically implemented in several simulated examples under different scenarios and over 100 independent runs. The decorrelation process (or unimodular transformations) has been first used to transform the original ILS problem to a new one in all simulations. We have then applied different search algorithms to the transformed ILS problem. The numerical simulations have shown that AEVZ, M-SE, and M-VB are about 320, 120 and 50 times faster than LAMBDA, respectively, for a search space of dimension 40. This number could change to about 350, 160 and 60 for dimension 45. The AEVZ is shown to be faster than MLAMBDA by a factor of 5. Similar conclusions could be made using the application of the proposed algorithms to the real GPS data.

  19. High-Resolution Tsunami Inundation Simulations Based on Accurate Estimations of Coastal Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Y.; Imamura, F.; Sugawara, D.; Furumura, T.

    2015-12-01

    We evaluate the accuracy of high-resolution tsunami inundation simulations in detail using the actual observational data of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake (Mw9.0) and investigate the methodologies to improve the simulation accuracy.Due to the recent development of parallel computing technologies, high-resolution tsunami inundation simulations are conducted more commonly than before. To evaluate how accurately these simulations can reproduce inundation processes, we test several types of simulation configurations on a parallel computer, where we can utilize the observational data (e.g., offshore and coastal waveforms and inundation properties) that are recorded during the Tohoku-Oki earthquake.Before discussing the accuracy of inundation processes on land, the incident waves at coastal sites must be accurately estimated. However, for megathrust earthquakes, it is difficult to find the tsunami source that can provide accurate estimations of tsunami waveforms at every coastal site because of the complex spatiotemporal distribution of the source and the limitation of observation. To overcome this issue, we employ a site-specific source inversion approach that increases the estimation accuracy within a specific coastal site by applying appropriate weighting to the observational data in the inversion process.We applied our source inversion technique to the Tohoku tsunami and conducted inundation simulations using 5-m resolution digital elevation model data (DEM) for the coastal area around Miyako Bay and Sendai Bay. The estimated waveforms at the coastal wave gauges of these bays successfully agree with the observed waveforms. However, the simulations overestimate the inundation extent indicating the necessity to improve the inundation model. We find that the value of Manning's roughness coefficient should be modified from the often-used value of n = 0.025 to n = 0.033 to obtain proper results at both cities.In this presentation, the simulation results with several

  20. Statistical LOR estimation for a high-resolution dMiCE PET detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champley, Kyle M.; Lewellen, Thomas K.; Mac Donald, Lawrence R.; Miyaoka, Robert S.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2009-10-01

    We develop a statistical line of response (LOR) estimator of the three-dimensional interaction positions of a pair of annihilation photons in a PET detector module with depth of interaction capability. The three-dimensional points of interaction of a coincidence pair of photons within the detector module are estimated by calculation of an expectation of the points of interaction conditioned on the signals measured by the photosensors. This conditional expectation is computed from estimates of the probability density function of the light collection process and a model of the kinetics of photon interactions in the detector module. Our algorithm is capable of handling coincidences where each annihilation photon interacts any number of times within the detector module before being completely absorbed or escaping. In the case of multiple interactions, our algorithm estimates the position of the first interaction for each of the coincidence photons. This LOR estimation algorithm is developed for a high-resolution PET detector capable of providing depth-of-interaction information. Depth of interaction is measured by tailoring the light shared between two adjacent detector elements. These light-sharing crystal pairs are referred to as dMiCE and are being developed in our lab. Each detector element in the prototype system has a 2 × 2 mm2 cross section and is directly coupled to a micro-pixel avalanche photodiode (MAPD). In this set-up, the distribution of the ratio of light shared between two adjacent detector elements can be expressed as a function of the depth of interaction. Monte Carlo experiments are performed using our LOR estimation algorithm and compared with Anger logic. We show that our LOR estimation algorithm provides a significant improvement over Anger logic under a variety of parameters.

  1. IRAM 30 m large scale survey of {sup 12}CO(2-1) and {sup 13}CO(2-1) emission in the Orion molecular cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Berné, O.; Cernicharo, J.; Marcelino, N.

    2014-11-01

    Using the IRAM 30 m telescope, we have surveyed a 1 × 0.°8 part of the Orion molecular cloud in the {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO (2-1) lines with a maximal spatial resolution of ∼11'' and spectral resolution of ∼0.4 km s{sup –1}. The cloud appears filamentary, clumpy, and with a complex kinematical structure. We derive an estimated mass of the cloud of 7700 M {sub ☉} (half of which is found in regions with visual extinctions A{sub V} below ∼10) and a dynamical age for the nebula of the order of 0.2 Myr. The energy balance suggests that magnetic fields play an important role in supporting the cloud, at large and small scales. According to our analysis, the turbulent kinetic energy in the molecular gas due to outflows is comparable to turbulent kinetic energy resulting from the interaction of the cloud with the H II region. This latter feedback appears negative, i.e., the triggering of star formation by the H II region is inefficient in Orion. The reduced data as well as additional products such as the column density map are made available online (http://userpages.irap.omp.eu/∼oberne/Olivier{sub B}erne/Data).

  2. IRAM 30 m Large Scale Survey of 12CO(2-1) and 13CO(2-1) Emission in the Orion Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berné, O.; Marcelino, N.; Cernicharo, J.

    2014-11-01

    Using the IRAM 30 m telescope, we have surveyed a 1 × 0.°8 part of the Orion molecular cloud in the 12CO and 13CO (2-1) lines with a maximal spatial resolution of ~11'' and spectral resolution of ~0.4 km s-1. The cloud appears filamentary, clumpy, and with a complex kinematical structure. We derive an estimated mass of the cloud of 7700 M ⊙ (half of which is found in regions with visual extinctions AV below ~10) and a dynamical age for the nebula of the order of 0.2 Myr. The energy balance suggests that magnetic fields play an important role in supporting the cloud, at large and small scales. According to our analysis, the turbulent kinetic energy in the molecular gas due to outflows is comparable to turbulent kinetic energy resulting from the interaction of the cloud with the H II region. This latter feedback appears negative, i.e., the triggering of star formation by the H II region is inefficient in Orion. The reduced data as well as additional products such as the column density map are made available online (http://userpages.irap.omp.eu/~oberne/Olivier_Berne/Data).

  3. Improved global high resolution precipitation estimation using multi-satellite multi-spectral information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrangi, Ali

    In respond to the community demands, combining microwave (MW) and infrared (IR) estimates of precipitation has been an active area of research since past two decades. The anticipated launching of NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission and the increasing number of spectral bands in recently launched geostationary platforms will provide greater opportunities for investigating new approaches to combine multi-source information towards improved global high resolution precipitation retrievals. After years of the communities' efforts the limitations of the existing techniques are: (1) Drawbacks of IR-only techniques to capture warm rainfall and screen out no-rain thin cirrus clouds; (2) Grid-box- only dependency of many algorithms with not much effort to capture the cloud textures whether in local or cloud patch scale; (3) Assumption of indirect relationship between rain rate and cloud-top temperature that force high intensity precipitation to any cold cloud; (4) Neglecting the dynamics and evolution of cloud in time; (5) Inconsistent combination of MW and IR-based precipitation estimations due to the combination strategies and as a result of above described shortcomings. This PhD dissertation attempts to improve the combination of data from Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) and Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites in manners that will allow consistent high resolution integration of the more accurate precipitation estimates, directly observed through LEO's PMW sensors, into the short-term cloud evolution process, which can be inferred from GEO images. A set of novel approaches are introduced to cope with the listed limitations and is consist of the following four consecutive components: (1) starting with the GEO part and by using an artificial-neural network based method it is demonstrated that inclusion of multi-spectral data can ameliorate existing problems associated with IR-only precipitating retrievals; (2) through development of Precipitation Estimation

  4. Estimation of Stand Height and Forest Volume Using High Resolution Stereo Photography and Forest Type Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. M.

    2016-06-01

    Traditional field methods for measuring tree heights are often too costly and time consuming. An alternative remote sensing approach is to measure tree heights from digital stereo photographs which is more practical for forest managers and less expensive than LiDAR or synthetic aperture radar. This work proposes an estimation of stand height and forest volume(m3/ha) using normalized digital surface model (nDSM) from high resolution stereo photography (25cm resolution) and forest type map. The study area was located in Mt. Maehwa model forest in Hong Chun-Gun, South Korea. The forest type map has four attributes such as major species, age class, DBH class and crown density class by stand. Overlapping aerial photos were taken in September 2013 and digital surface model (DSM) was created by photogrammetric methods(aerial triangulation, digital image matching). Then, digital terrain model (DTM) was created by filtering DSM and subtracted DTM from DSM pixel by pixel, resulting in nDSM which represents object heights (buildings, trees, etc.). Two independent variables from nDSM were used to estimate forest stand volume: crown density (%) and stand height (m). First, crown density was calculated using canopy segmentation method considering live crown ratio. Next, stand height was produced by averaging individual tree heights in a stand using Esri's ArcGIS and the USDA Forest Service's FUSION software. Finally, stand volume was estimated and mapped using aerial photo stand volume equations by species which have two independent variables, crown density and stand height. South Korea has a historical imagery archive which can show forest change in 40 years of successful forest rehabilitation. For a future study, forest volume change map (1970s-present) will be produced using this stand volume estimation method and a historical imagery archive.

  5. Merging raster meteorological data with low resolution satellite images for improved estimation of actual evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherif, Ines; Alexandridis, Thomas; Chambel Leitao, Pedro; Jauch, Eduardo; Stavridou, Domna; Iordanidis, Charalampos; Silleos, Nikolaos; Misopolinos, Nikolaos; Neves, Ramiro; Safara Araujo, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    ). A correlation analysis was performed at the common spatial resolution of 1km using selected homogeneous pixels (from the land cover point of view). A statistically significant correlation factor of 0.6 was found, and the RMSE was 0.92 mm/day. Using raster meteorological data the ITA-MyWater algorithms were able to catch the variability of weather patterns over the river basin and thus improved the spatial distribution of evapotranpiration estimations at low resolution. The work presented is part of the FP7-EU project "Merging hydrological models and Earth observation data for reliable information on water - MyWater".

  6. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study of IODP Site U1408 in the Northwest Atlantic - toward the high-resolution relative paleointensity estimate during the middle Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Yamazaki, T.; Oda, H.

    2015-12-01

    We have conducted paleomagnetic and rock magnetic measurements on the sedimentary sections recovered from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site U1408 in the Northwest Atlantic, off Newfoundland. The measurements were done on u-channel samples using a pass-through superconducting rock magnetometer in a manner that remanent magnetizations (natural, anhysteretic and isothermal remanent magnetizations: NRM, ARM and IRM) were subjected to stepwise alternating field (AF) demagnetizations up to 80 mT and are measured with 1 cm spacing at each step.The characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) was resolved after AF demagnetization of 20-30 mT for most of the studied interval. As a result, we could identify several polarity reversals which were able to be correlated with the geomagnetic polarity time scale by Gradstein et al. (2012) (Geologic Time Scale 2012), with referring the shipboard biostratigraphy (Norris et al., 2014). The interval at ~ 33-157 mcd (meter composite depth) was interpreted to cover the Chrons C18n.1n to C20n with missing Chron C19n because of the somewhat ambiguous magnetic signals at the interval at ~ 70-110 mcd. The correlation provided an age model inferring sedimentation rate of about 2-4 cm/kyr during these chrons.There is the interval that shows relatively constant ARM and IRM intensities as well as ratios of ARM to IRM (ARM/IRM): the interval at ~ 37-90 mcd resulted in ARM intensity of 0.2-0.4 A/m, IRM intensity of 1-2 A/m and ARM/IRM of 0.17-0.20. This interval corresponds to the Chron C18 and the estimated sedimentation rate of the interval is ~ 2 cm/kyr. It is expected that high-resolution relative paleointensity estimate during the middle Eocene is potentially possible. We will report a preliminary estimate.

  7. Use of UAS Remote Sensing Data (AggieAir) to Estimate Crop ET at High Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ELarab, M.; Torres, A.; Nieto Solana, H.; Kustas, W. P.; Song, L.; Alfieri, J. G.; Prueger, J. H.; McKee, L.; Anderson, M. C.; Jensen, A.; McKee, M.; Alsina, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Estimation of the spatial distribution of evapotranspiration (ET) based on remotely sensed imagery has become useful for managing water in irrigated agricultural at various spatial scales. Currently, data acquired by conventional satellites (Landsat, ASTER, etc.) lack the needed spatial resolution to capture variability of interest to support evapotranspiration estimates. In this study, an unmanned aerial system (UAS), called AggieAirTM, was used to acquire high-resolution imagery in the visual, near infrared (0.15m resolution) and thermal infrared spectra (0.6m resolution). AggieAir flew over two study sites in Utah and Central Valley of California. The imagery was used as input to a surface energy balance model based on the Mapping Evapotranspiration with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) modeling approach. The discussion will highlight the ET estimation methodologies and the implications of having high resolution ET maps.

  8. A new impulsive seismic shear wave source for near-surface (0-30 m) seismic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, J. M.; Lorenzo, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Estimates of elastic moduli and fluid content in shallow (0-30 m) natural soils below artificial flood containment structures can be particularly useful in levee monitoring as well as seismic hazard studies. Shear wave moduli may be estimated from horizontally polarized, shear wave experiments. However, long profiles (>10 km) with dense receiver and shot spacings (<1m) cannot be collected efficiently using currently available shear wave sources. We develop a new, inexpensive, shear wave source for collecting fast, shot gathers over large acquisition sites. In particular, gas-charged, organic-rich sediments comprising most lower-delta sedimentary facies, greatly attenuate compressional body-waves. On the other hand, SH waves are relatively insensitive to pore-fluid moduli and can improve resolution. We develop a recoil device (Jolly, 1956) into a single-user, light-weight (<20 kg), impulsive, ground-surface-coupled SH wave generator, which is capable of working at rates of several hundred shotpoints per day. Older impulsive methods rely on hammer blows to ground-planted stationary targets. Our source is coupled to the ground with steel spikes and the powder charge can be detonated mechanically or electronically. Electrical fuses show repeatability in start times of < 50 microseconds. The barrel and shell-holder exceed required thicknesses to ensure complete safety during use. The breach confines a black-powder, 12-gauge shotgun shell, loaded with inert, environmentally safe ballast. In urban settings, produced heat and sound are confined by a detached, exterior cover. A moderate 2.5 g black-powder charge generates seismic amplitudes equivalent to three 4-kg sledge-hammer blows. We test this device to elucidate near subsurface sediment properties at former levee breach sites in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Our radio-telemetric seismic acquisition system uses an in-house landstreamer, consisting of 14-Hz horizontal component geophones, coupled to steel plates

  9. Assessment of radar resolution requirements for soil moisture estimation from simulated satellite imagery. [Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T. (Principal Investigator); Dobson, M. C.; Moezzi, S.

    1982-01-01

    Radar simulations were performed at five-day intervals over a twenty-day period and used to estimate soil moisture from a generalized algorithm requiring only received power and the mean elevation of a test site near Lawrence, Kansas. The results demonstrate that the soil moisture of about 90% of the 20-m by 20-m pixel elements can be predicted with an accuracy of + or - 20% of field capacity within relatively flat agricultural portions of the test site. Radar resolutions of 93 m by 100 m with 23 looks or coarser gave the best results, largely because of the effects of signal fading. For the distribution of land cover categories, soils, and elevation in the test site, very coarse radar resolutions of 1 km by 1 km and 2.6 km by 3.1 km gave the best results for wet moisture conditions while a finer resolution of 93 m by 100 m was found to yield superior results for dry to moist soil conditions.

  10. Efficient High-Rate Satellite Clock Estimation for PPP Ambiguity Resolution Using Carrier-Ranges

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Jiang, Weiping; Ge, Maorong; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2014-01-01

    In order to catch up the short-term clock variation of GNSS satellites, clock corrections must be estimated and updated at a high-rate for Precise Point Positioning (PPP). This estimation is already very time-consuming for the GPS constellation only as a great number of ambiguities need to be simultaneously estimated. However, on the one hand better estimates are expected by including more stations, and on the other hand satellites from different GNSS systems must be processed integratively for a reliable multi-GNSS positioning service. To alleviate the heavy computational burden, epoch-differenced observations are always employed where ambiguities are eliminated. As the epoch-differenced method can only derive temporal clock changes which have to be aligned to the absolute clocks but always in a rather complicated way, in this paper, an efficient method for high-rate clock estimation is proposed using the concept of “carrier-range” realized by means of PPP with integer ambiguity resolution. Processing procedures for both post- and real-time processing are developed, respectively. The experimental validation shows that the computation time could be reduced to about one sixth of that of the existing methods for post-processing and less than 1 s for processing a single epoch of a network with about 200 stations in real-time mode after all ambiguities are fixed. This confirms that the proposed processing strategy will enable the high-rate clock estimation for future multi-GNSS networks in post-processing and possibly also in real-time mode. PMID:25429413

  11. Efficient high-rate satellite clock estimation for PPP ambiguity resolution using carrier-ranges.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Jiang, Weiping; Ge, Maorong; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2014-01-01

    In order to catch up the short-term clock variation of GNSS satellites, clock corrections must be estimated and updated at a high-rate for Precise Point Positioning (PPP). This estimation is already very time-consuming for the GPS constellation only as a great number of ambiguities need to be simultaneously estimated. However, on the one hand better estimates are expected by including more stations, and on the other hand satellites from different GNSS systems must be processed integratively for a reliable multi-GNSS positioning service. To alleviate the heavy computational burden, epoch-differenced observations are always employed where ambiguities are eliminated. As the epoch-differenced method can only derive temporal clock changes which have to be aligned to the absolute clocks but always in a rather complicated way, in this paper, an efficient method for high-rate clock estimation is proposed using the concept of "carrier-range" realized by means of PPP with integer ambiguity resolution. Processing procedures for both post- and real-time processing are developed, respectively. The experimental validation shows that the computation time could be reduced to about one sixth of that of the existing methods for post-processing and less than 1 s for processing a single epoch of a network with about 200 stations in real-time mode after all ambiguities are fixed. This confirms that the proposed processing strategy will enable the high-rate clock estimation for future multi-GNSS networks in post-processing and possibly also in real-time mode. PMID:25429413

  12. Experimental Estimation of CLASP Spatial Resolution: Results of the Instrument's Optical Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giono, Gabrial; Katsukawa, Yukio; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Narukage, Noriyuki; Bando, Takamasa; Kano, Ryohei; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Ken; Winebarger, Amy; Auchere, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding-rocket experiment currently being built at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. This instrument aims to probe for the first time the magnetic field strength and orientation in the solar upper-chromosphere and lower-transition region. CLASP will measure the polarization of the Lyman-Alpha line (121.6nm) with an unprecedented accuracy, and derive the magnetic field information through the Hanle effect. Although polarization accuracy and spectral resolution are crucial for the Hanle effect detection, spatial resolution is also important to get reliable context image via the slit-jaw camera. As spatial resolution is directly related with the alignment of optics, it is also a good way of ensuring the alignment of the instrument to meet the scientific requirement. This poster will detail the experiments carried out to align CLASP's optics (telescope and spectrograph), as both part of the instrument were aligned separately. The telescope was aligned in double-pass mode, and a laser interferometer (He-Ne) was used to measure the telescope's wavefront error (WFE). The secondary mirror tilt and position were adjusted to remove comas and defocus aberrations from the WFE. Effect of gravity on the WFE measurement was estimated and the final WFE derived in zero-g condition for CLASP telescope will be presented. In addition, an estimation of the spot shape and size derived from the final WFE will also be shown. The spectrograph was aligned with a custom procedure: because Ly-??light is absorbed by air, the spectrograph's off-axis parabolic mirrors were aligned in Visible Light (VL) using a custom-made VL grating instead of the flight Ly-? grating. Results of the alignment in Visible Light will be shown and the spot shape recorded with CCDs at various position along the slit will be displayed. Results from both alignment experiment will be compared to the design requirement, and will be combined in

  13. Surprises from stream greenhouse gas emissions estimated at high resolution in a catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natchimuthu, Sivakiruthika; Wallin, Marcus; Klemedtsson, Leif; Bastviken, David

    2016-04-01

    Streams represent environments where terrestrial and aquatic habitats meet and has recently been recognized as disproportionally large emitters of CO2 in landscapes. However, previous estimates are often based on measurements with low resolution in time and space, and frequently CO2 concentrations are also estimated indirectly from alkalinity and pH measurements adding to the uncertainty. The capacity of streams to emit CH4 is presently also poorly understood. In this study, we performed regular and spatially distributed measurements of CO2 and CH4 water concentrations and gas exchange rates in a headwater stream network, aiming to resolve spatial and temporal variability in flux patterns. Multiple supplementary methods including tracer injections, CO2 sensor networks, drifting flux chambers, and stream section mass balances were performed. A locally validated spatiotemporal model with high accuracy and resolution was developed. The observed variability was high revealing high fluxes very locally or during short periods in time related to rapid hydrological events, highlighting the need to consider spatiotemporal variability in detail. Stream CH4 emissions were also surprisingly high compared to CO2 emissions.

  14. Enhanced resolution edge and surface estimation from ladar point clouds containing multiple return data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, Kevin D.; Budge, Scott E.

    2013-11-01

    Signal processing enables the detection of more returns in a digital ladar waveform by computing the surface response. Prior work has shown that obtaining the surface response can improve the range resolution by a factor of 2. However, this advantage presents a problem when forming a range image-each ladar shot crossing an edge contains multiple values. To exploit this information, the location of each return inside the spatial beam footprint is estimated by dividing the footprint into sections that correspond to each return and assigning the coordinates of the return to the centroid of the region. Increased resolution results on the edges of targets where multiple returns occur. Experiments focus on angled and slotted surfaces for both simulated and real data. Results show that the angle of incidence on a 75-deg surface is computed only using a single waveform with an error of 1.4 deg and that the width of a 19-cm-wide by 16-cm-deep slot is estimated with an error of 3.4 cm using real data. Point clouds show that the edges of the slotted surface are sharpened. These results can be used to improve features extracted from objects for applications such as automatic target recognition.

  15. A high-resolution approach to estimating ecosystem respiration at continental scales using operational satellite data.

    PubMed

    Jägermeyr, Jonas; Gerten, Dieter; Lucht, Wolfgang; Hostert, Patrick; Migliavacca, Mirco; Nemani, Ramakrishna

    2014-04-01

    A better understanding of the local variability in land-atmosphere carbon fluxes is crucial to improving the accuracy of global carbon budgets. Operational satellite data backed by ground measurements at Fluxnet sites proved valuable in monitoring local variability of gross primary production at highly resolved spatio-temporal resolutions. Yet, we lack similar operational estimates of ecosystem respiration (Re) to calculate net carbon fluxes. If successful, carbon fluxes from such a remote sensing approach would form an independent and sought after measure to complement widely used dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here, we establish an operational semi-empirical Re model, based only on data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) with a resolution of 1 km and 8 days. Fluxnet measurements between 2000 and 2009 from 100 sites across North America and Europe are used for parameterization and validation. Our analysis shows that Re is closely tied to temperature and plant productivity. By separating temporal and intersite variation, we find that MODIS land surface temperature (LST) and enhanced vegetation index (EVI) are sufficient to explain observed Re across most major biomes with a negligible bias [R² = 0.62, RMSE = 1.32 (g C m(-2) d(-1)), MBE = 0.05 (g C m(-2) d(-1))]. A comparison of such satellite-derived Re with those simulated by the DGVM LPJmL reveals similar spatial patterns. However, LPJmL shows higher temperature sensitivities and consistently simulates higher Re values, in high-latitude and subtropical regions. These differences remain difficult to explain and they are likely associated either with LPJmL parameterization or with systematic errors in the Fluxnet sampling technique. While uncertainties remain with Re estimates, the model formulated in this study provides an operational, cross-validated and unbiased approach to scale Fluxnet Re to the continental scale and advances knowledge of spatio-temporal Re variability

  16. Variants in RBP4 and AR genes modulate age at onset in familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP ATTRV30M).

    PubMed

    Santos, Diana; Coelho, Teresa; Alves-Ferreira, Miguel; Sequeiros, Jorge; Mendonça, Denisa; Alonso, Isabel; Lemos, Carolina; Sousa, Alda

    2016-05-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) ATTRV30M is a neurodegenerative disorder due to point mutations in the transthyretin gene, with V30M being the commonest. FAP ATTRV30M shows a wide variation in age at onset (AO) between clusters, families and generations. Portuguese patients also show remarkable AO differences between genders. Genes found to be associated with FAP ATTRV30M pathways may act as AO modifiers. Our aim was to further explore the role of APCS and RBP4 genes and to study for the first time the involvement of sex-linked genetic modifiers - AR and HSD17B1 genes - in AO variation in Portuguese families. We collected DNA from a sample of 318 patients, currently under follow-up. A total of 18 tagging SNPs from APCS, RBP4, AR and HSD17B1 and 5 additional SNPs from APCS and RBP4 previously studied were genotyped. To account for nonindependency of AO between members of the same family, we used generalized estimating equations (GEEs). We found that APCS and RBP4 were associated with late AO. In addition, rs11187545 of the RBP4 was associated with an early AO. For the AR, in the male group three SNPs were associated with an early AO, whereas in the female group four were associated with both an early and later AO. These results strengthened the role of APCS and RBP4 genes and revealed for the first time the contribution of AR genes as an AO modifier in both males and females. These findings may have important implications in genetic counseling and for new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26286643

  17. A sparse reconstruction method for the estimation of multi-resolution emission fields via atmospheric inversion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ray, J.; Lee, J.; Yadav, V.; Lefantzi, S.; Michalak, A. M.; van Bloemen Waanders, B.

    2015-04-29

    Atmospheric inversions are frequently used to estimate fluxes of atmospheric greenhouse gases (e.g., biospheric CO2 flux fields) at Earth's surface. These inversions typically assume that flux departures from a prior model are spatially smoothly varying, which are then modeled using a multi-variate Gaussian. When the field being estimated is spatially rough, multi-variate Gaussian models are difficult to construct and a wavelet-based field model may be more suitable. Unfortunately, such models are very high dimensional and are most conveniently used when the estimation method can simultaneously perform data-driven model simplification (removal of model parameters that cannot be reliably estimated) and fitting.more » Such sparse reconstruction methods are typically not used in atmospheric inversions. In this work, we devise a sparse reconstruction method, and illustrate it in an idealized atmospheric inversion problem for the estimation of fossil fuel CO2 (ffCO2) emissions in the lower 48 states of the USA. Our new method is based on stagewise orthogonal matching pursuit (StOMP), a method used to reconstruct compressively sensed images. Our adaptations bestow three properties to the sparse reconstruction procedure which are useful in atmospheric inversions. We have modified StOMP to incorporate prior information on the emission field being estimated and to enforce non-negativity on the estimated field. Finally, though based on wavelets, our method allows for the estimation of fields in non-rectangular geometries, e.g., emission fields inside geographical and political boundaries. Our idealized inversions use a recently developed multi-resolution (i.e., wavelet-based) random field model developed for ffCO2 emissions and synthetic observations of ffCO2 concentrations from a limited set of measurement sites. We find that our method for limiting the estimated field within an irregularly shaped region is about a factor of 10 faster than conventional approaches. It also

  18. Experimental High Resolution (3 km) SMAP Soil Moisture Data Fields With Uncertainty Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, N. N.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission was launched on January 31st, 2015. The objective of the mission is global mapping of surface soil moisture and landscape freeze/thaw state. SMAP utilizes an L-band radar and radiometer sharing a rotating 6-meter mesh reflector antenna. The SMAP spacecraft is in a 685-km Sun-synchronous near-polar orbit, and viewing the surface at a constant 40-degree incidence angle with a 1000-km swath width. Merging of the high-resolution active (radar) and coarse-resolution but high-sensitivity passive (radiometer) L-band observations enable an unprecedented combination of accuracy, resolution, coverage and revisit-time for soil moisture and freeze/thaw state retrievals. However, on July 7th, 2015, the SMAP radar encountered an anomaly and is currently inoperable. Efforts are being made to revive the SMAP radar. Due to the present status of the SMAP observatory, nearly ~2.5 months (from the end of In-Orbit-Check April 13th, 2015 to July 7th, 2015) of the SMAP Active Passive product will be available to public through the NASA DAAC at National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). The baseline L2_SM_AP product is retrieved soil moisture from the disaggregated/downscaled brightness temperature obtained by merging the coarse-resolution (~36 km) radiometer brightness temperature data and the high-resolution (~3 km) radar backscatter data. The baseline product is intermediate scale 9 km global soil moisture information. Experimentally, a much higher resolution global surface soil moisture data set is also produced at 3 km. This experimental product covering the 2.5 Spring/Summer months is the focus of this presentation. We specifically focus on the analysis of errors and reliability of this data set. The errors in disaggregated brightness temperatures and the retrived soil moisture estimates are discussed. In the presentation the accuracies of the SMAP L2-SM_AP soil moisture retrievals will be shown using summary comparisons with in

  19. Improving global fire carbon emissions estimates by combining moderate resolution burned area and active fire observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; Giglio, L.; Rogers, B. M.; van der Werf, G.

    2011-12-01

    In several important biomes, including croplands and tropical forests, many small fires exist that have sizes that are well below the detection limit for the current generation of burned area products derived from moderate resolution spectroradiometers. These fires likely have important effects on greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions and regional air quality. Here we developed an approach for combining 1km thermal anomalies (active fires; MOD14A2) and 500m burned area observations (MCD64A1) to estimate the prevalence of these fires and their likely contribution to burned area and carbon emissions. We first estimated active fires within and outside of 500m burn scars in 0.5 degree grid cells during 2001-2010 for which MCD64A1 burned area observations were available. For these two sets of active fires we then examined mean fire radiative power (FRP) and changes in enhanced vegetation index (EVI) derived from 16-day intervals immediately before and after each active fire observation. To estimate the burned area associated with sub-500m fires, we first applied burned area to active fire ratios derived solely from within burned area perimeters to active fires outside of burn perimeters. In a second step, we further modified our sub-500m burned area estimates using EVI changes from active fires outside and within of burned areas (after subtracting EVI changes derived from control regions). We found that in northern and southern Africa savanna regions and in Central and South America dry forest regions, the number of active fires outside of MCD64A1 burned areas increased considerably towards the end of the fire season. EVI changes for active fires outside of burn perimeters were, on average, considerably smaller than EVI changes associated with active fires inside burn scars, providing evidence for burn scars that were substantially smaller than the 25 ha area of a single 500m pixel. FRP estimates also were lower for active fires outside of burn perimeters. In our

  20. High-resolution image reconstruction for PET using estimated detector response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohme, Michel S.; Qi, Jinyi

    2007-02-01

    The accuracy of the system model in an iterative reconstruction algorithm greatly affects the quality of reconstructed PET images. For efficient computation in reconstruction, the system model in PET can be factored into a product of geometric projection matrix and detector blurring matrix, where the former is often computed based on analytical calculation, and the latter is estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. In this work, we propose a method to estimate the 2D detector blurring matrix from experimental measurements. Point source data were acquired with high-count statistics in the microPET II scanner using a computer-controlled 2-D motion stage. A monotonically convergent iterative algorithm has been derived to estimate the detector blurring matrix from the point source measurements. The algorithm takes advantage of the rotational symmetry of the PET scanner with the modeling of the detector block structure. Since the resulting blurring matrix stems from actual measurements, it can take into account the physical effects in the photon detection process that are difficult or impossible to model in a Monte Carlo simulation. Reconstructed images of a line source phantom show improved resolution with the new detector blurring matrix compared to the original one from the Monte Carlo simulation. This method can be applied to other small-animal and clinical scanners.

  1. Super-resolution spectral estimation in short-time non-contact vital sign measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Li, Yusheng; Hong, Hong; Xi, Feng; Cai, Weidong; Zhu, Xiaohua

    2015-04-01

    Non-contact techniques for measuring vital signs attract great interest due to the benefits shown in medical monitoring, military application, etc. However, the presence of respiration harmonics caused by nonlinear phase modulation will result in performance degradation. Suffering from smearing and leakage problems, conventional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) based methods cannot distinguish the heartbeat component from closely located respiration harmonics in frequency domain, especially in short-time processing. In this paper, the theory of sparse reconstruction is merged with an extended harmonic model of vital signals, aiming at achieving a super-resolution spectral estimation of vital signals by additionally exploiting the inherent sparse prior information. Both simulated and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has superior performance to DFT-based methods and the recently applied multiple signal classification algorithm, and the required processing window length has been shortened to 5.12 s.

  2. Super-resolution spectral estimation in short-time non-contact vital sign measurement.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Li, Yusheng; Hong, Hong; Xi, Feng; Cai, Weidong; Zhu, Xiaohua

    2015-04-01

    Non-contact techniques for measuring vital signs attract great interest due to the benefits shown in medical monitoring, military application, etc. However, the presence of respiration harmonics caused by nonlinear phase modulation will result in performance degradation. Suffering from smearing and leakage problems, conventional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) based methods cannot distinguish the heartbeat component from closely located respiration harmonics in frequency domain, especially in short-time processing. In this paper, the theory of sparse reconstruction is merged with an extended harmonic model of vital signals, aiming at achieving a super-resolution spectral estimation of vital signals by additionally exploiting the inherent sparse prior information. Both simulated and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has superior performance to DFT-based methods and the recently applied multiple signal classification algorithm, and the required processing window length has been shortened to 5.12 s. PMID:25933881

  3. Incorporating Hydrologic Insight into Geophysical Inversion: Resolution Limitations and Direct Estimation of Solute Plume Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.; Pidlisecky, A.

    2005-12-01

    Time-lapse geophysical tomography (e.g., electrical resistivity and radar) can provide valuable insights into hydrologic phenomena, including tracer transport, aquifer dynamics, and engineered remediation. Tomograms have been used to infer the spatial and temporal moments of solute plumes for model development and calibration. The reliability of inferred moment values is limited by tomographic resolution, which is a function of survey geometry, measurement physics, measurement error, and inverse problem parameterization and regularization. Here, we (1) assess the resolution-dependent reliability of moment inference based on results from conventional pixel-based inversion with Tikhanov-style regularization; and (2) investigate alternative parameterization/regularization techniques that capitalize on hydrologic insight to produce more reliable moment estimates. Conventional pixel-based parameterization and regularization criteria yield the simplest solution that satisfies the data, where solution simplicity is measured by deviations from a prior mean and/or the norm of the first or second spatial derivative (flatness and smoothness, respectively) between adjacent pixels. While effective for static imaging of large-scale geologic or aquifer structure, these measures of simplicity may be less appropriate for imaging transient hydrologic processes and non-stationary targets such as solute plumes. For underdetermined problems, tomograms may overpredict the extent and underpredict the magnitude of target plumes. We contend that, at best, conventional regularization criteria do not capitalize on valuable hydrologic information, such as the total mass of injected fluid or solute; at worst they are inconsistent with the physics underlying the transport process of interest and may lead to misleading estimates of plume moments. We explore strategies to incorporate hydrologic insight into tomographic inversion for time-lapse hydrologic monitoring: moment-based tomographic

  4. High-resolution Neogene and Quaternary estimates of Nubia-Eurasia-North America Plate motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Iaffaldano, G.; Merkouriev, S.

    2015-10-01

    Reconstructions of the history of convergence between the Nubia and Eurasia plates constitute an important part of a broader framework for understanding deformation in the Mediterranean region and the closing of the Mediterranean Basin. Herein, we combine high-resolution reconstructions of Eurasia-North America and Nubia-North America Plate motions to determine rotations that describe Nubia-Eurasia Plate motion at ˜1 Myr intervals for the past 20 Myr. We apply trans-dimensional hierarchical Bayesian inference to the Eurasia-North America and Nubia-North America rotation sequences in order to reduce noise in the newly estimated Nubia-Eurasia rotations. The noise-reduced rotation sequences for the Eurasia-North America and Nubia-North America Plate pairs describe remarkably similar kinematic histories since 20 Ma, consisting of relatively steady seafloor spreading from 20 to 8 Ma, ˜20 per cent opening-rate slowdowns at 8-6.5 Ma, and steady plate motion from ˜7 Ma to the present. Our newly estimated Nubia-Eurasia rotations predict that convergence across the central Mediterranean Sea slowed by ˜50 per cent and rotated anticlockwise after ˜25 Ma until 13 Ma. Motion since 13 Ma has remained relatively steady. An absence of evidence for a significant change in motion immediately before or during the Messinian Salinity Crisis at 6.3-5.6 Ma argues against a change in plate motion as its causative factor. The detachment of the Arabian Peninsula from Africa at 30-24 Ma may have triggered the convergence rate slowdown before 13 Ma; however, published reconstructions of Nubia-Eurasia motion for times before 20 Ma are too widely spaced to determine with confidence whether the two are correlated. A significant discrepancy between our new estimates of Nubia-Eurasia motion during the past few Myr and geodetic estimates calls for further investigation.

  5. Estimation of grassland use intensities based on high spatial resolution LAI time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asam, S.; Klein, D.; Dech, S.

    2015-04-01

    The identification and surveillance of agricultural management and the measurement of biophysical canopy parameters in grasslands is relevant for environmental protection as well as for political and economic reasons, as proper grassland management is partly subsidized. An ideal monitoring tool is remote sensing due to its area wide continuous observations. However, due to small-scaled land use patterns in many parts of central Europe, a high spatial resolution is needed. In this study, the feasibility of RapidEye data to derive leaf area index (LAI) time series and to relate them to grassland management practices is assessed. The study area is the catchment of river Ammer in southern Bavaria, where agricultural areas are mainly grasslands. While extensively managed grasslands are maintained with one to two harvests per year and no or little fertilization, intensive cultivation practices compass three to five harvests per year and turnover pasturing. Based on a RapidEye time series from 2011 with spatial resolution of 6.5 meters, LAI is derived using the inverted radiation transfer model PROSAIL. The LAI in this area ranges from 1.5 to 7.5 over the vegetation period and is estimated with an RMSE between 0.7 and 1.1. The derived LAI maps cover 85 % of the study area's grasslands at least seven times. Using statistical metrics of the LAI time series, different grassland management types can be identified: very intensively managed meadows, intensively managed meadows, intensively managed pastures, and extensively managed meadows and moor. However, a precise identification of the mowing dates highly depends on the coincidence with satellite data acquisitions. Further analysis should focus therefor on the selection of the temporal resolution of the time series as well as on the performance of further vegetation parameters and indices compared to LAI.

  6. ELM: an Algorithm to Estimate the Alpha Abundance from Low-resolution Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Yude; Zhao, Gang; Pan, Jingchang; Bharat Kumar, Yerra

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated a novel methodology using the extreme learning machine (ELM) algorithm to determine the α abundance of stars. Applying two methods based on the ELM algorithm—ELM+spectra and ELM+Lick indices—to the stellar spectra from the ELODIE database, we measured the α abundance with a precision better than 0.065 dex. By applying these two methods to the spectra with different signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) and different resolutions, we found that ELM+spectra is more robust against degraded resolution and ELM+Lick indices is more robust against variation in S/N. To further validate the performance of ELM, we applied ELM+spectra and ELM+Lick indices to SDSS spectra and estimated α abundances with a precision around 0.10 dex, which is comparable to the results given by the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline. We further applied ELM to the spectra of stars in Galactic globular clusters (M15, M13, M71) and open clusters (NGC 2420, M67, NGC 6791), and results show good agreement with previous studies (within 1σ). A comparison of the ELM with other widely used methods including support vector machine, Gaussian process regression, artificial neural networks, and linear least-squares regression shows that ELM is efficient with computational resources and more accurate than other methods.

  7. Estimation of boron isotope ratios using high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltsche, Helmar; Prattes, Karl; Zischka, Michael; Knapp, Günter

    2009-04-01

    In the production of 10B enriched steels, the production-recycling process needs to be closely monitored for inadvertent mix-up of materials with different B isotope levels. A quick and simple method for the estimation of boron isotope ratios in high alloyed steels using high resolution continuum source flame AAS (HR-CS-FAAS) was developed. On the 208.9 nm B line the wavelength of the peak absorption of 10B and 11B differs by 2.5 pm. The wavelength of the peak absorption of boron was determined by fitting a Gauss function through spectra simultaneously recorded by HR-CS-FAAS. It was shown that a linear correlation between the wavelength of the peak absorption and the isotope ratio exists and that this correlation is independent of the total boron concentration. Internal spectroscopic standards were used to compensate for monochromator drift and monochromator resolution changes. Accuracy and precision of the analyzed samples were thereby increased by a factor of up to 1.3. Three steel reference materials and one boric acid CRM, each certified for the boron isotope ratio were used to validate the procedure.

  8. Estimation of the distribution of Tabebuia guayacan (Bignoniaceae) using high-resolution remote sensing imagery.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Azofeifa, Arturo; Rivard, Benoit; Wright, Joseph; Feng, Ji-Lu; Li, Peijun; Chong, Mei Mei; Bohlman, Stephanie A

    2011-01-01

    Species identification and characterization in tropical environments is an emerging field in tropical remote sensing. Significant efforts are currently aimed at the detection of tree species, of levels of forest successional stages, and the extent of liana occurrence at the top of canopies. In this paper we describe our use of high resolution imagery from the Quickbird Satellite to estimate the flowering population of Tabebuia guayacan trees at Barro Colorado Island (BCI), in Panama. The imagery was acquired on 29 April 2002 and 21 March 2004. Spectral Angle Mapping via a One-Class Support Vector machine was used to detect the presence of 422 and 557 flowering tress in the April 2002 and March 2004 imagery. Of these, 273 flowering trees are common to both dates. This study presents a new perspective on the effectiveness of high resolution remote sensing for monitoring a phenological response and its use as a tool for potential conservation and management of natural resources in tropical environments. PMID:22163825

  9. Biomass estimation with high resolution satellite images: A case study of Quercus rotundifolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Adélia M. O.; Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Mesquita, Paulo; Marques da Silva, José R.

    2015-03-01

    Forest biomass has had a growing importance in the world economy as a global strategic reserve, due to applications in bioenergy, bioproduct development and issues related to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Current techniques used for forest inventory are usually time consuming and expensive. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop reliable, low cost methods that can be used for forest biomass estimation and monitoring. This study uses new techniques to process high spatial resolution satellite images (0.70 m) in order to assess and monitor forest biomass. Multi-resolution segmentation method and object oriented classification are used to obtain the area of tree canopy horizontal projection for Quercus rotundifolia. Forest inventory allows for calculation of tree and canopy horizontal projection and biomass, the latter with allometric functions. The two data sets are used to develop linear functions to assess above ground biomass, with crown horizontal projection as an independent variable. The functions for the cumulative values, both for inventory and satellite data, for a prediction error equal or smaller than the Portuguese national forest inventory (7%), correspond to stand areas of 0.5 ha, which include most of the Q.rotundifolia stands.

  10. Estimation of the Distribution of Tabebuia guayacan (Bignoniaceae) Using High-Resolution Remote Sensing Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Azofeifa, Arturo; Rivard, Benoit; Wright, Joseph; Feng, Ji-Lu; Li, Peijun; Chong, Mei Mei; Bohlman, Stephanie A.

    2011-01-01

    Species identification and characterization in tropical environments is an emerging field in tropical remote sensing. Significant efforts are currently aimed at the detection of tree species, of levels of forest successional stages, and the extent of liana occurrence at the top of canopies. In this paper we describe our use of high resolution imagery from the Quickbird Satellite to estimate the flowering population of Tabebuia guayacan trees at Barro Colorado Island (BCI), in Panama. The imagery was acquired on 29 April 2002 and 21 March 2004. Spectral Angle Mapping via a One-Class Support Vector machine was used to detect the presence of 422 and 557 flowering tress in the April 2002 and March 2004 imagery. Of these, 273 flowering trees are common to both dates. This study presents a new perspective on the effectiveness of high resolution remote sensing for monitoring a phenological response and its use as a tool for potential conservation and management of natural resources in tropical environments. PMID:22163825

  11. Combining high-resolution satellite images and altimetry to estimate the volume of small lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baup, F.; Frappart, F.; Maubant, J.

    2013-12-01

    This study presents an approach to determine the volume of water in small lakes (<100 ha) by combining satellite altimetry data and high-resolution (HR) images. The lake being studied is located in the south-west of France and is only used for agricultural irrigation purposes. The altimetry satellite data are provided by RA-2 sensor on board Envisat, and the high-resolution images (<10 m) are obtained from optical (Formosat-2) and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensors (Terrasar-X and Radarsat-2) satellites. The altimetry data (data are obtained every 35 days) and the HR images (45) have been available since 2003 and 2010, respectively. In situ data (for the water levels and volumes) going back to 2003 have been provided by the manager of the lake. Three independent approaches are developed to estimate the lake volume and its temporal variability. The first two approaches are empirical and use synchronous ground measurements of the water volume and the satellite data. The results demonstrate that altimetry and imagery can be effectively and accurately used to monitor the temporal variations of the lake (R2altimetry = 0.97, RMSEaltimetry = 5.2%, R2imagery = 0.90, and RMSEimagery = 7.4%). The third method combines altimetry (to measure the lake level) and satellite images (of the lake surface) to estimate the volume changes of the lake and produces the best results (R2 = 0.99) of the three methods, demonstrating the potential of future Sentinel and SWOT missions to monitor small lakes and reservoirs for agricultural and irrigation applications.

  12. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Lundgren, E.; Andrews, A. E.; Biraud, S. C.; Boesch, H.; Bowman, K. W.; Deutscher, N. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Hase, F.; Kuze, A.; Notholt, J.; Ohyama, H.; Parker, R.; Payne, V. H.; Sussmann, R.; Sweeney, C.; Velazco, V. A.; Warneke, T.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wunch, D.

    2015-06-01

    We use 2009-2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to estimate global and North American methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. GEOS-Chem and GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface and tower networks (NOAA/ESRL, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/ESRL, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a total methane source of 539 Tg a-1 with some important regional corrections to the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2-42.7 Tg a-1, as compared to 24.9-27.0 Tg a-1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0-44.5 Tg a-1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the southern-central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands; large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. Using prior information on source locations, we attribute 29-44 % of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22-31 % to oil/gas, 20 % to landfills/wastewater, and 11-15 % to coal. Wetlands contribute an additional 9.0-10.1 Tg a-1.

  13. Large scale IRAM 30 m CO-observations in the giant molecular cloud complex W43

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlhoff, P.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Schilke, P.; Motte, F.; Schneider, N.; Beuther, H.; Bontemps, S.; Heitsch, F.; Hill, T.; Kramer, C.; Ossenkopf, V.; Schuller, F.; Simon, R.; Wyrowski, F.

    2013-12-01

    We aim to fully describe the distribution and location of dense molecular clouds in the giant molecular cloud complex W43. It was previously identified as one of the most massive star-forming regions in our Galaxy. To trace the moderately dense molecular clouds in the W43 region, we initiated W43-HERO, a large program using the IRAM 30 m telescope, which covers a wide dynamic range of scales from 0.3 to 140 pc. We obtained on-the-fly-maps in 13CO (2-1) and C18O (2-1) with a high spectral resolution of 0.1 km s-1 and a spatial resolution of 12''. These maps cover an area of ~1.5 square degrees and include the two main clouds of W43 and the lower density gas surrounding them. A comparison to Galactic models and previous distance calculations confirms the location of W43 near the tangential point of the Scutum arm at approximately 6 kpc from the Sun. The resulting intensity cubes of the observed region are separated into subcubes, which are centered on single clouds and then analyzed in detail. The optical depth, excitation temperature, and H2 column density maps are derived out of the 13CO and C18O data. These results are then compared to those derived from Herschel dust maps. The mass of a typical cloud is several 104 M⊙ while the total mass in the dense molecular gas (>102 cm-3) in W43 is found to be ~1.9 × 106 M⊙. Probability distribution functions obtained from column density maps derived from molecular line data and Herschel imaging show a log-normal distribution for low column densities and a power-law tail for high densities. A flatter slope for the molecular line data probability distribution function may imply that those selectively show the gravitationally collapsing gas. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe final datacubes (13CO and C18O) for the entire survey are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/560/A24

  14. Effective gene prediction by high resolution frequency estimator based on least-norm solution technique

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Linear algebraic concept of subspace plays a significant role in the recent techniques of spectrum estimation. In this article, the authors have utilized the noise subspace concept for finding hidden periodicities in DNA sequence. With the vast growth of genomic sequences, the demand to identify accurately the protein-coding regions in DNA is increasingly rising. Several techniques of DNA feature extraction which involves various cross fields have come up in the recent past, among which application of digital signal processing tools is of prime importance. It is known that coding segments have a 3-base periodicity, while non-coding regions do not have this unique feature. One of the most important spectrum analysis techniques based on the concept of subspace is the least-norm method. The least-norm estimator developed in this paper shows sharp period-3 peaks in coding regions completely eliminating background noise. Comparison of proposed method with existing sliding discrete Fourier transform (SDFT) method popularly known as modified periodogram method has been drawn on several genes from various organisms and the results show that the proposed method has better as well as an effective approach towards gene prediction. Resolution, quality factor, sensitivity, specificity, miss rate, and wrong rate are used to establish superiority of least-norm gene prediction method over existing method. PMID:24386895

  15. Improving Accuracy and Temporal Resolution of Learning Curve Estimation for within- and across-Session Analysis.

    PubMed

    Deliano, Matthias; Tabelow, Karsten; König, Reinhard; Polzehl, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of learning curves is ubiquitously based on proportions of correct responses within moving trial windows. Thereby, it is tacitly assumed that learning performance is constant within the moving windows, which, however, is often not the case. In the present study we demonstrate that violations of this assumption lead to systematic errors in the analysis of learning curves, and we explored the dependency of these errors on window size, different statistical models, and learning phase. To reduce these errors in the analysis of single-subject data as well as on the population level, we propose adequate statistical methods for the estimation of learning curves and the construction of confidence intervals, trial by trial. Applied to data from an avoidance learning experiment with rodents, these methods revealed performance changes occurring at multiple time scales within and across training sessions which were otherwise obscured in the conventional analysis. Our work shows that the proper assessment of the behavioral dynamics of learning at high temporal resolution can shed new light on specific learning processes, and, thus, allows to refine existing learning concepts. It further disambiguates the interpretation of neurophysiological signal changes recorded during training in relation to learning. PMID:27303809

  16. Improving Accuracy and Temporal Resolution of Learning Curve Estimation for within- and across-Session Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tabelow, Karsten; König, Reinhard; Polzehl, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of learning curves is ubiquitously based on proportions of correct responses within moving trial windows. Thereby, it is tacitly assumed that learning performance is constant within the moving windows, which, however, is often not the case. In the present study we demonstrate that violations of this assumption lead to systematic errors in the analysis of learning curves, and we explored the dependency of these errors on window size, different statistical models, and learning phase. To reduce these errors in the analysis of single-subject data as well as on the population level, we propose adequate statistical methods for the estimation of learning curves and the construction of confidence intervals, trial by trial. Applied to data from an avoidance learning experiment with rodents, these methods revealed performance changes occurring at multiple time scales within and across training sessions which were otherwise obscured in the conventional analysis. Our work shows that the proper assessment of the behavioral dynamics of learning at high temporal resolution can shed new light on specific learning processes, and, thus, allows to refine existing learning concepts. It further disambiguates the interpretation of neurophysiological signal changes recorded during training in relation to learning. PMID:27303809

  17. High-Resolution Forest Canopy Height Estimation in an African Blue Carbon Ecosystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagomasino, David; Fatoyinbo, Temilola; Lee, Seung-Kuk; Simard, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Mangrove forests are one of the most productive and carbon dense ecosystems that are only found at tidally inundated coastal areas. Forest canopy height is an important measure for modeling carbon and biomass dynamics, as well as land cover change. By taking advantage of the flat terrain and dense canopy cover, the present study derived digital surface models (DSMs) using stereophotogrammetric techniques on high-resolution spaceborne imagery (HRSI) for southern Mozambique. A mean-weighted ground surface elevation factor was subtracted from the HRSI DSM to accurately estimate the canopy height in mangrove forests in southern Mozambique. The mean and H100 tree height measured in both the field and with the digital canopy model provided the most accurate results with a vertical error of 1.18-1.84 m, respectively. Distinct patterns were identified in the HRSI canopy height map that could not be discerned from coarse shuttle radar topography mission canopy maps even though the mode and distribution of canopy heights were similar over the same area. Through further investigation, HRSI DSMs have the potential of providing a new type of three-dimensional dataset that could serve as calibration/validation data for other DSMs generated from spaceborne datasets with much larger global coverage. HSRI DSMs could be used in lieu of Lidar acquisitions for canopy height and forest biomass estimation, and be combined with passive optical data to improve land cover classifications.

  18. Estimation of Venus wind velocities from high-resolution infrared spectra. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. A. H.

    1978-01-01

    Zonal velocity profiles in the Venus atmosphere above the clouds were estimated from measured asymmetries of HCl and HF infrared absorption lines in high-resolution Fourier interferometer spectra of the planet. These asymmetries are caused by both pressure-induced shifts in the positions of the hydrogen-halide lines perturbed by CO2 and Doppler shifts due to atmospheric motions. Particularly in the case of the HCl 2-0 band, the effects of the two types of line shifts can be easily isolated, making it possible to estimate a profile of average Venus equatorial zonal velocity as a function of pressure in the region roughly 60 to 70 km above the surface of the planet. The mean profiles obtained show strong vertical shear in the Venus zonal winds near the cloud-top level, and both the magnitude and direction of winds at all levels in this region appear to vary greatly with longitude relative to the sub-solar point.

  19. Effective gene prediction by high resolution frequency estimator based on least-norm solution technique.

    PubMed

    Roy, Manidipa; Barman, Soma

    2014-01-01

    Linear algebraic concept of subspace plays a significant role in the recent techniques of spectrum estimation. In this article, the authors have utilized the noise subspace concept for finding hidden periodicities in DNA sequence. With the vast growth of genomic sequences, the demand to identify accurately the protein-coding regions in DNA is increasingly rising. Several techniques of DNA feature extraction which involves various cross fields have come up in the recent past, among which application of digital signal processing tools is of prime importance. It is known that coding segments have a 3-base periodicity, while non-coding regions do not have this unique feature. One of the most important spectrum analysis techniques based on the concept of subspace is the least-norm method. The least-norm estimator developed in this paper shows sharp period-3 peaks in coding regions completely eliminating background noise. Comparison of proposed method with existing sliding discrete Fourier transform (SDFT) method popularly known as modified periodogram method has been drawn on several genes from various organisms and the results show that the proposed method has better as well as an effective approach towards gene prediction. Resolution, quality factor, sensitivity, specificity, miss rate, and wrong rate are used to establish superiority of least-norm gene prediction method over existing method. PMID:24386895

  20. Impact of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud mask interpretation on cloud amount estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotarba, Andrzej Z.

    2015-09-01

    Cloud masks serve as a basis for estimates of cloud amount, which is an essential parameter for studying the Earth's radiation budget. The most commonly used cloud mask is a simple thematic classification, which includes qualitative information on the presence of clouds in the satellite's instantaneous field of view (IFOV). Cloud mask classes have to be "translated" into a quantitative measure, in order to be used for cloud amount calculations. The assignment of cloud fractions to cloud mask classes is a subjective process and increases uncertainty in cloud amount estimates. We evaluated this degree of uncertainty using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud mask product. Together with the operational MODIS cloud mask interpretation, we investigated two extreme alternatives: "rigorous" (only "confident cloudy" IFOVs were 100% cloudy) and "tolerant" (only "confident clear" IFOVs were 0% cloudy). Results showed that the range of uncertainty was 14.3% in Europe and controlled by the frequency of small convective clouds. Comparison with surface-based observations suggests that the rigorous interpretation of the cloud mask is more accurate than that used operationally for MODIS level 3 product generation. The rigorous approach resulted in the smallest bias (-0.7%), the smallest root-mean-square error (4.6%), the small standard deviation (6%), and the strongest correlation (0.935). These results suggest that for climatological applications the rigorous scenario should be considered as a more accurate "best guess" over land.

  1. Air-sea exchange over Black Sea estimated from high resolution regional climate simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velea, Liliana; Bojariu, Roxana; Cica, Roxana

    2013-04-01

    Black Sea is an important influencing factor for the climate of bordering countries, showing cyclogenetic activity (Trigo et al, 1999) and influencing Mediterranean cyclones passing over. As for other seas, standard observations of the atmosphere are limited in time and space and available observation-based estimations of air-sea exchange terms present quite large ranges of uncertainty. The reanalysis datasets (e.g. ERA produced by ECMWF) provide promising validation estimates of climatic characteristics against the ones in available climatic data (Schrum et al, 2001), while cannot reproduce some local features due to relatively coarse horizontal resolution. Detailed and realistic information on smaller-scale processes are foreseen to be provided by regional climate models, due to continuous improvements of physical parameterizations and numerical solutions and thus affording simulations at high spatial resolution. The aim of the study is to assess the potential of three regional climate models in reproducing known climatological characteristics of air-sea exchange over Black Sea, as well as to explore the added value of the model compared to the input (reanalysis) data. We employ results of long-term (1961-2000) simulations performed within ENSEMBLE project (http://ensemblesrt3.dmi.dk/) using models ETHZ-CLM, CNRM-ALADIN, METO-HadCM, for which the integration domain covers the whole area of interest. The analysis is performed for the entire basin for several variables entering the heat and water budget terms and available as direct output from the models, at seasonal and annual scale. A comparison with independent data (ERA-INTERIM) and findings from other studies (e.g. Schrum et al, 2001) is also presented. References: Schrum, C., Staneva, J., Stanev, E. and Ozsoy, E., 2001: Air-sea exchange in the Black Sea estimated from atmospheric analysis for the period 1979-1993, J. Marine Systems, 31, 3-19 Trigo, I. F., T. D. Davies, and G. R. Bigg (1999): Objective

  2. Combining high-resolution satellite images and altimetry to estimate the volume of small lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baup, F.; Frappart, F.; Maubant, J.

    2014-05-01

    This study presents an approach to determining the volume of water in small lakes (<100 ha) by combining satellite altimetry data and high-resolution (HR) images. In spite of the strong interest in monitoring surface water resources on a small scale using radar altimetry and satellite imagery, no information is available about the limits of the remote-sensing technologies for small lakes mainly used for irrigation purposes. The lake being studied is located in the south-west of France and is only used for agricultural irrigation purposes. The altimetry satellite data are provided by an RA-2 sensor onboard Envisat, and the high-resolution images (<10 m) are obtained from optical (Formosat-2) and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) antenna (Terrasar-X and Radarsat-2) satellites. The altimetry data (data are obtained every 35 days) and the HR images (77) have been available since 2003 and 2010, respectively. In situ data (for the water levels and volumes) going back to 2003 have been provided by the manager of the lake. Three independent approaches are developed to estimate the lake volume and its temporal variability. The first two approaches (HRBV and ABV) are empirical and use synchronous ground measurements of the water volume and the satellite data. The results demonstrate that altimetry and imagery can be effectively and accurately used to monitor the temporal variations of the lake (R2ABV = 0.98, RMSEABV = 5%, R2HRBV = 0.90, and RMSEABV = 7.4%), assuming a time-varying triangular shape for the shore slope of the lake (this form is well adapted since it implies a difference inferior to 2% between the theoretical volume of the lake and the one estimated from bathymetry). The third method (AHRBVC) combines altimetry (to measure the lake level) and satellite images (of the lake surface) to estimate the volume changes of the lake and produces the best results (R2AHRBVC = 0.98) of the three methods, demonstrating the potential of future Sentinel and SWOT missions to

  3. Estimation of crops biomass and evapotranspiration from high spatial and temporal resolutions remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claverie, Martin; Demarez, Valérie; Duchemin, Benoît.; Ceschia, Eric; Hagolle, Olivier; Ducrot, Danielle; Keravec, Pascal; Beziat, Pierre; Dedieu, Pierre

    2010-05-01

    Carbon and water cycles are closely related to agricultural activities. Agriculture has been indeed identified by IPCC 2007 report as one of the options to sequester carbon in soil. Concerning the water resources, their consumptions by irrigated crops are called into question in view of demographic pressure. In the prospect of an assessment of carbon production and water consumption, the use of crop models at a regional scale is a challenging issue. The recent availability of high spatial resolution (10 m) optical sensors associated to high temporal resolution (1 day) such as FORMOSAT-2 and, in the future, Venµs and SENTINEL-2 will offer new perspectives for agricultural monitoring. In this context, the objective of this work is to show how multi-temporal satellite observations acquired at high spatial resolution are useful for a regional monitoring of following crops biophysical variables: leaf area index (LAI), aboveground biomass (AGB) and evapotranspiration (ET). This study focuses on three summer crops dominant in South-West of France: maize, sunflower and soybean. A unique images data set (82 FORMOSAT-2 images over four consecutive years, 2006-2009) was acquired for this project. The experimental data set includes LAI and AGB measurements over eight agricultural fields. Two fields were intensively monitored where ET flux were measured with a 30 minutes time step using eddy correlation methods. The modelisation approach is based on FAO-56 method coupled with a vegetation functioning model based on Monteith theory: the SAFY model [5]. The model operates at a daily time step model to provide estimates of plant characteristics (LAI, AGB), soil conditions (soil water content) and water use (ET). As a key linking variable, LAI is deduced from FORMOSAT-2 reflectances images, and then introduced into the SAFY model to provide spatial and temporal estimates of these biophysical variables. Most of the SAFY parameters are crop related and have been fixed according to

  4. Obtaining high resolution polarimetric radar based precipitation estimates in Skjern catchment, Denmark for hydrological modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, X.; Vejen, F.; Sonnenborg, T. O.; Jensen, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation is the main driving force for the terrestrial water cycle and therefore plays a critical role in determining the water budget at catchment scale. Traditionally, rain gauges are used to measure precipitation on the ground surface for hydrological modeling. However, the number of rain gauges in Denmark has significantly decreased in recent years, and it is no longer possible to represent the spatial heterogeneity of rainfall only by interpolating the rain gauge data given the current gauge density in Skjern catchment, Denmark. The quality of simulated hydrological patterns using such rain gauge based products is visibly decreased. Weather radar scans the atmosphere with large areal coverage and high spatial and temporal resolution, which makes it an ideal tool to overcome this problem. The Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) operates C-band radars over the country. It has been previously attempted to use the single-polarization radar located at Rømø to estimate precipitation in Skjern catchment; however, the hydrological improvement by adding the single-polarization radar data was marginal due to many restrictions. A new radar located at Virring with upgraded dual-polarization technology opens new possibilities to further improve the precipitation estimation at Skjern catchment. New parameters retrieved from the Virring radar will be used to develop more advanced quantitative precipitation estimation algorithms which is an important supplement to the existing algorithm called ARNE. The development of the new algorithm will be based on the Open Source Library for Weather Radar Data Processing (WRadLib). The results of hydrological models using such product are expected to better close the water budget and improve the simulated hydrological pattern such as the land surface temperature.

  5. High-Resolution Spatial Distribution and Estimation of Access to Improved Sanitation in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Peng; Anderson, John D.; Leitner, Michael; Rheingans, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Access to sanitation facilities is imperative in reducing the risk of multiple adverse health outcomes. A distinct disparity in sanitation exists among different wealth levels in many low-income countries, which may hinder the progress across each of the Millennium Development Goals. Methods The surveyed households in 397 clusters from 2008–2009 Kenya Demographic and Health Surveys were divided into five wealth quintiles based on their national asset scores. A series of spatial analysis methods including excess risk, local spatial autocorrelation, and spatial interpolation were applied to observe disparities in coverage of improved sanitation among different wealth categories. The total number of the population with improved sanitation was estimated by interpolating, time-adjusting, and multiplying the surveyed coverage rates by high-resolution population grids. A comparison was then made with the annual estimates from United Nations Population Division and World Health Organization /United Nations Children's Fund Joint Monitoring Program for Water Supply and Sanitation. Results The Empirical Bayesian Kriging interpolation produced minimal root mean squared error for all clusters and five quintiles while predicting the raw and spatial coverage rates of improved sanitation. The coverage in southern regions was generally higher than in the north and east, and the coverage in the south decreased from Nairobi in all directions, while Nyanza and North Eastern Province had relatively poor coverage. The general clustering trend of high and low sanitation improvement among surveyed clusters was confirmed after spatial smoothing. Conclusions There exists an apparent disparity in sanitation among different wealth categories across Kenya and spatially smoothed coverage rates resulted in a closer estimation of the available statistics than raw coverage rates. Future intervention activities need to be tailored for both different wealth categories and nationally

  6. Effects of measurement resolution on the analysis of temperature time series for stream-aquifer flux estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-López, Carlos D.; Meixner, Thomas; Ferré, Ty P. A.

    2011-12-01

    From its inception in the mid-1960s, the use of temperature time series (thermographs) to estimate vertical fluxes has found increasing use in the hydrologic community. Beginning in 2000, researchers have examined the impacts of measurement and parameter uncertainty on the estimates of vertical fluxes. To date, the effects of temperature measurement discretization (resolution), a characteristic of all digital temperature loggers, on the determination of vertical fluxes has not been considered. In this technical note we expand the analysis of recently published work to include the effects of temperature measurement resolution on estimates of vertical fluxes using temperature amplitude and phase shift information. We show that errors in thermal front velocity estimation introduced by discretizing thermographs differ when amplitude or phase shift data are used to estimate vertical fluxes. We also show that under similar circumstances sensor resolution limits the range over which vertical velocities are accurately reproduced more than uncertainty in temperature measurements, uncertainty in sensor separation distance, and uncertainty in the thermal diffusivity combined. These effects represent the baseline error present and thus the best-case scenario when discrete temperature measurements are used to infer vertical fluxes. The errors associated with measurement resolution can be minimized by using the highest-resolution sensors available. But thoughtful experimental design could allow users to select the most cost-effective temperature sensors to fit their measurement needs.

  7. The Fundamental Structure of UV-Irradiated Cloud Edges: Combined ALMA and IRAM-30m Observations of the Orion Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicoechea, J.; Cuadrado, S.; Pety, J.; Ag'undez, M.; Cernicharo, J.; Chapillon, E.; Dumas, G.; Fuente, A.; Gerin, M.; Joblin, C.; Marcelino, N.; Müller, H. S. P.; Pilleri, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Orion Bar is the prototypical photodissociation region (PDR) exposed to a far-UV radiation field (FUV) of a few 104 times the mean interstellar field. Because of its proximity and nearly edge-on orientation, it provides a unique laboratory to study the physical and chemical gradients of a strongly FUV-illuminated molecular cloud. Using ALMA at ˜350 GHz, we have observed a field-of-view of ˜40”×40” toward the Orion Bar PDR consisting of a mosaic of 27 Nyquist-sampled pointings. These observations provide an unprecedented high angular resolution view (˜1” or ˜414 AU at the distance to Orion) of the most exposed molecular cloud edge. In addition, ACA and IRAM-30m maps were used to produce the short-spacing visibilities filtered out by the ALMA array. These interferometric observations complement a complete line survey we have carried out using the IRAM-30m telescope between ˜80 GHz and ˜360 GHz. Despite being a harsh environment, over 60 species with up to 6 atoms have been identified, including main isotopologues (D, 13C, 18O, 17O, 34S, 33S, and 15N). The first molecular line images of the Orion Bar obtained with ALMA at ˜1” resolution reveal the fundamental structure in density and temperature of the molecular gas as well as its complex kinematics at an unprecedented spatial resolution. This early data set also allowed us to compute corrected line frequencies for SH+, an interesting hydride tracing reactions of S+ with vibrationally excited H2 in the PDR edge.

  8. a Class of Regression-Cum Estimators in Two-Phase Sampling for Utilizing Information from High Resolution Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handique, B. K.

    2012-07-01

    Two-phase sampling design offers a variety of possibilities for effective use of auxiliary information such as those from high resolution remote sensing data. Continuous satellite data with large area coverage provide scope for deriving population values of the auxiliary variables, which can effectively be used for estimating the population parameters of the variable of interest. This study has been made to examine the possibilities of different forms of auxiliary information derived from remote sensing data in two-phase sampling design and suggest an appropriate estimator that will be of broad interest and applications. A new class of regression-cum-ratio estimators has been proposed for two-phase sampling using information on two auxiliary variables derived from high resolution satellite data. The bias and the mean square error (MSE) of the proposed estimators have been obtained up to first order approximation. Efficiency comparison of the proposed estimators has been made with some traditional estimators. The proposed estimator is found to be more efficient than the usual regression and ratio estimators. Numerical illustration has been carried out to examine the efficiency of the estimator in case of forest timber volume estimation utilizing tree crown diameter and tree height as auxiliary variables. It is shown that these estimators can be employed in a variety of conditions where there is strong correlation of satellite derived information with sample based ground measurements and when the cost of ground measurements is relatively high.

  9. Physics-based Multi-resolution Radar-Radiometer Soil Moisture Estimation within the SMAP Mission Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, R.; Moghaddam, M.

    2014-12-01

    To further develop our understanding of global carbon and water cycles and to support the NASA Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) mission efforts have been made to develop joint and combined radar and radiometer soil moisture estimation algorithms. Taking advantage of the complimentary sensitivities of radar backscatter and brightness temperature to soil moisture and vegetation has the potential to greatly improve global soil moisture estimates. With the advent of SMAP, not only combing radar and radiometer information is of interest, combing multi-resolution data becomes critical. The work presented here will discuss methods to estimate soil moisture within the SMAP framework via a global optimization technique. Fine resolution radar backscatter measurements (3 km for SMAP) are combined with coarse resolution radiometer data (36 km for SMAP) in a joint cost function. Brightness temperature disaggregation and soil moisture estimation are then performed at the radar resolution. Furthermore, to capture the underlying physics of emission and scattering within the cost function, physics-based forward models which link emission and scattering from first principles are employed. The resulting effect is the ability to define a parameter kernel shared between emission and scattering models. Preliminary investigation yields improved soil moisture estimation when radar and radiometer information are used jointly. Furthermore, over a wide range of soil moisture (0.04 - 0.4 cm3/cm3) and vegetation (0- 5 kg/m2) physics based joint estimation yields the least retrieval errors.

  10. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Biraud, S. C.; Boesch, H.; Bowman, K. W.; Deutscher, N. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Hase, F.; Kuze, A.; Notholt, J.; Ohyama, H.; Parker, R.; Payne, V. H.; Sussmann, R.; Velazco, V. A.; Warneke, T.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wunch, D.

    2015-02-01

    We use 2009-2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to constrain global and North American inversions of methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. The GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface networks (NOAA, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/DOE, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. The surface and aircraft data are subsequently used for independent evaluation of the methane source inversions. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a total methane source of 539 Tg a-1 and points to a large East Asian overestimate in the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide full error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2-42.7 Tg a-1, as compared to 24.9-27.0 Tg a-1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0-44.5 Tg a-1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the South-Central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands, large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. We attribute 29-44% of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22-31% to oil/gas, 20% to landfills/waste water, and 11-15% to coal with an additional 9.0-10.1 Tg a-1 source from wetlands.

  11. Carbon budget estimation of a subarctic catchment using a dynamic ecosystem model at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J.; Miller, P. A.; Persson, A.; Olefeldt, D.; Pilesjo, P.; Heliasz, M.; Jackowicz-Korczynski, M.; Yang, Z.; Smith, B.; Callaghan, T. V.; Christensen, T. R.

    2015-05-01

    A large amount of organic carbon is stored in high-latitude soils. A substantial proportion of this carbon stock is vulnerable and may decompose rapidly due to temperature increases that are already greater than the global average. It is therefore crucial to quantify and understand carbon exchange between the atmosphere and subarctic/arctic ecosystems. In this paper, we combine an Arctic-enabled version of the process-based dynamic ecosystem model, LPJ-GUESS (version LPJG-WHyMe-TFM) with comprehensive observations of terrestrial and aquatic carbon fluxes to simulate long-term carbon exchange in a subarctic catchment at 50 m resolution. Integrating the observed carbon fluxes from aquatic systems with the modeled terrestrial carbon fluxes across the whole catchment, we estimate that the area is a carbon sink at present and will become an even stronger carbon sink by 2080, which is mainly a result of a projected densification of birch forest and its encroachment into tundra heath. However, the magnitudes of the modeled sinks are very dependent on future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Furthermore, comparisons of global warming potentials between two simulations with and without CO2 increase since 1960 reveal that the increased methane emission from the peatland could double the warming effects of the whole catchment by 2080 in the absence of CO2 fertilization of the vegetation. This is the first process-based model study of the temporal evolution of a catchment-level carbon budget at high spatial resolution, including both terrestrial and aquatic carbon. Though this study also highlights some limitations in modeling subarctic ecosystem responses to climate change, such as aquatic system flux dynamics, nutrient limitation, herbivory and other disturbances, and peatland expansion, our study provides one process-based approach to resolve the complexity of carbon cycling in subarctic ecosystems while simultaneously pointing out the key model developments for capturing

  12. GLONASS fractional-cycle bias estimation across inhomogeneous receivers for PPP ambiguity resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jianghui; Bock, Yehuda

    2016-04-01

    The key issue to enable precise point positioning with ambiguity resolution (PPP-AR) is to estimate fractional-cycle biases (FCBs), which mainly relate to receiver and satellite hardware biases, over a network of reference stations. While this has been well achieved for GPS, FCB estimation for GLONASS is difficult because (1) satellites do not share the same frequencies as a result of Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA) signals; (2) and even worse, pseudorange hardware biases of receivers vary in an irregular manner with manufacturers, antennas, domes, firmware, etc., which especially complicates GLONASS PPP-AR over inhomogeneous receivers. We propose a general approach where external ionosphere products are introduced into GLONASS PPP to estimate precise FCBs that are less impaired by pseudorange hardware biases of diverse receivers to enable PPP-AR. One month of GLONASS data at about 550 European stations were processed. From an exemplary network of 51 inhomogeneous receivers, including four receiver types with various antennas and spanning about 800 km in both longitudinal and latitudinal directions, we found that 92.4 % of all fractional parts of GLONASS wide-lane ambiguities agree well within ± 0.15 cycles with a standard deviation of 0.09 cycles if global ionosphere maps (GIMs) are introduced, compared to only 51.7 % within ± 0.15 cycles and a larger standard deviation of 0.22 cycles otherwise. Hourly static GLONASS PPP-AR at 40 test stations can reach position estimates of about 1 and 2 cm in RMS from ground truth for the horizontal and vertical components, respectively, which is comparable to hourly GPS PPP-AR. Integrated GLONASS and GPS PPP-AR can further achieve an RMS of about 0.5 cm in horizontal and 1-2 cm in vertical components. We stress that the performance of GLONASS PPP-AR across inhomogeneous receivers depends on the accuracy of ionosphere products. GIMs have a modest accuracy of only 2-8 TECU (Total Electron Content Unit) in vertical

  13. High-resolution estimates of Nubia-North America plate motion: 20 Ma to present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkouriev, S.; DeMets, C.

    2014-03-01

    We present new, detailed estimates of Nubia-North America plate motion since 20 Ma based on 21 rotations that reconstruct seafloor spreading magnetic lineations and fracture zone flow lines between the two plates and an instantaneous angular velocity that best fits the velocities of 1343 GPS stations on the two plates. Total opening distances and opening gradients along the plate boundary are constrained by nearly 11 000 crossings of magnetic reversals 1n (0.78 Ma) to 6n (19.7 Ma) from shipboard and aeromagnetic data surveys of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between the Azores triple junction and Fifteen-Twenty fracture zone. Plate slip directions are estimated from flow lines digitized from multibeam, single-beam and satellite-based bathymetry for the Oceanographer, Hayes and Atlantis fracture zones. Linear extrapolations of seafloor spreading distances for young magnetic reversals to zero seafloor age shows that magnetic reversal boundaries everywhere along the plate boundary are shifted outwards by 1 ± 0.5 km from the spreading axis with respect to their idealized locations; small corrections to the finite opening rotations to compensate for this outward displacement are thus made to reveal the underlying plate motion. A single inversion of the nearly 13 000 kinematic data is used to estimate the 21 rotations that simultaneously optimize the fits to the reconstructed magnetic lineations and the three fracture zone flow lines and their transform fault traces. Uncertainties in the rotations are estimated via bootstrapping. The new rotations indicate that seafloor spreading rates remained steady from 20 to 8.2 Ma, slowed by 25 per cent between 8.2 Ma and 6.2 Ma, and remained steady since 6.2 Ma within the ≈1 mm yr-1 resolution of our new rotations. Our kinematic results corroborate a significant change in motion at ≈7 Ma previously identified by Sloan and Patriat from a dense magnetic survey of young seafloor from 28°N to 29°N. The timing and magnitude of the change

  14. High-resolution estimates of Southwest Indian Ridge plate motions, 20 Ma to present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Merkouriev, S.; Sauter, D.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first estimates of Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) plate motions at high temporal resolution during the Quaternary and Neogene based on nearly 5000 crossings of 21 magnetic reversals out to C6no (19.72 Ma) and the digitized traces of 17 fracture zones and transform faults. Our reconstructions of this slow-spreading mid-ocean ridge reveal several unexpected results with notable implications for regional and global plate reconstructions since 20 Ma. Extrapolations of seafloor opening distances to zero-age seafloor based on reconstructions of reversals C1n (0.78 Ma) through C3n.4 (5.2 Ma) reveal evidence for surprisingly large outward displacement of 5 ± 1 km west of 32°E, where motion between the Nubia and Antarctic plates occurs, but 2 ± 1 km east of 32°E, more typical of most mid-ocean ridges. Newly estimated SWIR seafloor spreading rates are up to 15 per cent slower everywhere along the ridge than previous estimates. Reconstructions of the numerous observations for times back to 11 Ma confirm the existence of the hypothesized Lwandle plate at high confidence level and indicate that the Lwandle plate's western and eastern boundaries respectively intersect the ridge near the Andrew Bain transform fault complex at 32°E and between ˜45°E and 52°E, in accord with previous results. The Nubia-Antarctic, Lwandle-Antarctic and Somalia-Antarctic rotation sequences that best fit many magnetic reversal, fracture zone and transform fault crossings define previously unknown changes in the Neogene motions of all three plate pairs, consisting of ˜20 per cent slowdowns in their spreading rates at 7.2^{+0.9 }_{ -1.4} Ma if we enforce a simultaneous change in motion everywhere along the SWIR and gradual 3°-7° anticlockwise rotations of the relative slip directions. We apply trans-dimensional Bayesian analysis to our noisy, best-fitting rotation sequences in order to estimate less-noisy rotation sequences suitable for use in future global plate reconstructions

  15. High Resolution/High Fidelity Seismic Imaging and Parameter Estimation for Geological Structure and Material Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Ru-Shan Wu; Xiao-Bi Xie

    2008-06-08

    Our proposed work on high resolution/high fidelity seismic imaging focused on three general areas: (1) development of new, more efficient, wave-equation-based propagators and imaging conditions, (2) developments towards amplitude-preserving imaging in the local angle domain, in particular, imaging methods that allow us to estimate the reflection as a function of angle at a layer boundary, and (3) studies of wave inversion for local parameter estimation. In this report we summarize the results and progress we made during the project period. The report is divided into three parts, totaling 10 chapters. The first part is on resolution analysis and its relation to directional illumination analysis. The second part, which is composed of 6 chapters, is on the main theme of our work, the true-reflection imaging. True-reflection imaging is an advanced imaging technology which aims at keeping the image amplitude proportional to the reflection strength of the local reflectors or to obtain the reflection coefficient as function of reflection-angle. There are many factors which may influence the image amplitude, such as geometrical spreading, transmission loss, path absorption, acquisition aperture effect, etc. However, we can group these into two categories: one is the propagator effect (geometric spreading, path losses); the other is the acquisition-aperture effect. We have made significant progress in both categories. We studied the effects of different terms in the true-amplitude one-way propagators, especially the terms including lateral velocity variation of the medium. We also demonstrate the improvements by optimizing the expansion coefficients in different terms. Our research also includes directional illumination analysis for both the one-way propagators and full-wave propagators. We developed the fast acquisition-aperture correction method in the local angle-domain, which is an important element in the true-reflection imaging. Other developments include the super

  16. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Lundgren, E.; Andrews, A. E.; Biraud, S. C.; Boesch, H.; Bowman, K. W.; Deutscher, N. M.; et al

    2015-06-30

    We use 2009–2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to estimate global and North American methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. GEOS-Chem and GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface and tower networks (NOAA/ESRL, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/ESRL, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a totalmore » methane source of 539 Tg a−1 with some important regional corrections to the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2–42.7 Tg a−1, as compared to 24.9–27.0 Tg a−1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0–44.5 Tg a−1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the southern–central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands; large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. Using prior information on source locations, we attribute 29–44 % of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22–31 % to oil/gas, 20 % to landfills/wastewater, and 11–15 % to coal. Wetlands contribute an additional 9.0–10.1 Tg a−1.« less

  17. Design, Manufacture and Test of the L-Band Feed for the FAST 30m Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian-Jian; Cao, Yang; Gan, Heng-Qian; Jin, Chen-Jin

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, the design, manufacture and test of the L-band feed for the FAST (Five hundred meter Aperture Spherical Radio Teslescope) 30m demonstrator are presented. The HFSS is used for the simulation during the design. The feed was made by hand using cardboard, plastic board and adhesive aluminum foil tap. The test manufacture shows that this manually made feed meets the required specification of the FAST 30m demonstrator. The design using the HFSS and manufacture by hand might be a fast, economical and effective method for producing simple feed and may be helpful to other similar work.

  18. Global sensitivity of high-resolution estimates of crop water footprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuninetti, Marta; Tamea, Stefania; D'Odorico, Paolo; Laio, Francesco; Ridolfi, Luca

    2015-10-01

    Most of the human appropriation of freshwater resources is for agriculture. Water availability is a major constraint to mankind's ability to produce food. The notion of virtual water content (VWC), also known as crop water footprint, provides an effective tool to investigate the linkage between food and water resources as a function of climate, soil, and agricultural practices. The spatial variability in the virtual water content of crops is here explored, disentangling its dependency on climate and crop yields and assessing the sensitivity of VWC estimates to parameter variability and uncertainty. Here we calculate the virtual water content of four staple crops (i.e., wheat, rice, maize, and soybean) for the entire world developing a high-resolution (5 × 5 arc min) model, and we evaluate the VWC sensitivity to input parameters. We find that food production almost entirely depends on green water (>90%), but, when applied, irrigation makes crop production more water efficient, thus requiring less water. The spatial variability of the VWC is mostly controlled by the spatial patterns of crop yields with an average correlation coefficient of 0.83. The results of the sensitivity analysis show that wheat is most sensitive to the length of the growing period, rice to reference evapotranspiration, maize and soybean to the crop planting date. The VWC sensitivity varies not only among crops, but also across the harvested areas of the world, even at the subnational scale.

  19. Estimation of integral curves from high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Owen; Sakhanenko, Lyudmila

    2015-01-01

    We develop statistical methodology for a popular brain imaging technique HARDI based on the high order tensor model by Özarslan and Mareci [10]. We investigate how uncertainty in the imaging procedure propagates through all levels of the model: signals, tensor fields, vector fields, and fibers. We construct asymptotically normal estimators of the integral curves or fibers which allow us to trace the fibers together with confidence ellipsoids. The procedure is computationally intense as it blends linear algebra concepts from high order tensors with asymptotical statistical analysis. The theoretical results are illustrated on simulated and real datasets. This work generalizes the statistical methodology proposed for low angular resolution diffusion tensor imaging by Carmichael and Sakhanenko [3], to several fibers per voxel. It is also a pioneering statistical work on tractography from HARDI data. It avoids all the typical limitations of the deterministic tractography methods and it delivers the same information as probabilistic tractography methods. Our method is computationally cheap and it provides well-founded mathematical and statistical framework where diverse functionals on fibers, directions and tensors can be studied in a systematic and rigorous way. PMID:25937674

  20. Estimating root-zone moisture and evapotranspiration with AVHRR data[Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.; Wesely, M. L.

    1999-10-08

    The parameterized subgrid-scale surface fluxes (PASS) model uses satellite data and limited surface observations to infer root-zone available moisture content and evapotranspiration rate with moderate spatial resolution over extended terrestrial areas. The ultimate goal of this work is to produce estimates of water loss by evapotranspiration, for application in hydrological models. The major advantage to the method is that it can be applied to areas having diverse surface characteristics where direct surface flux measurements either do not exist or are not feasible and where meteorological data are available from only a limited number of ground stations. The emphasis of this work with the PASS model is on improving (1) methods of using satellite remote sensing data to derive the essential parameters for individual types of surfaces over large areas, (2) algorithms for describing the interactions of near-surface atmospheric conditions with surface processes, and (3) algorithms for computing surface energy and water vapor flux at a scale close to the size of a satellite-derived image pixel. The PASS approach is being developed and tested further with observations from the 1997 Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97) at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) site in the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), an area of about 5,000 km{sup 2} in southern Kansas. Here the authors describe some of the progress made since the previous report.

  1. The Fire INventory from NCAR (FINN) - a high resolution global model to estimate the emissions from open burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedinmyer, C.; Akagi, S. K.; Yokelson, R. J.; Emmons, L. K.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Orlando, J. J.; Soja, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Fire INventory from NCAR version 1.0 (FINNv1) provides daily, 1 km resolution, global estimates of the trace gas and particle emissions from open burning of biomass, which includes wildfire, agricultural fires, and prescribed burning and does not include biofuel use and trash burning. Emission factors used in the calculations have been updated with recent data, particularly for the non-methane organic compounds (NMOC). The resulting global annual NMOC emission estimates are as much as a factor of 5 greater than some prior estimates. Chemical speciation profiles, necessary to allocate the total NMOC emission estimates to lumped species for use by chemical transport models, are provided for three widely used chemical mechanisms: SAPRC99, GEOS-CHEM, and MOZART-4. Using these profiles, FINNv1 also provides global estimates of key organic compounds, including formaldehyde and methanol. The uncertainty in the FINNv1 emission estimates are about a factor of two; but, the estimates agree closely with other global inventories of biomass burning emissions for CO, CO2, and other species with less variable emission factors. FINNv1 emission estimates have been developed specifically for modeling atmospheric chemistry and air quality in a consistent framework at scales from local to global. The product is unique because of the high temporal and spatial resolution, global coverage, and the number of species estimated. FINNv1 can be used for both hindcast and forecast or near-real time model applications and the results are being critically evaluated with models and observations whenever possible.

  2. Fractional Snowcover Estimates from Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomonson, Vincent V.

    2002-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua missions has shown considerable capability for mapping snowcover. The typical approach that has used, along with other criteria, the Normalized Snow Difference Index (NDSI) that takes the difference between 500 meter observations at 1.64 micrometers (MODIS band 6) and 0.555 micrometers (MODIS band 4) over the sum of these observations to determine whether MODIS pixels are snowcovered or not in mapping the extent of snowcover. For many hydrological and climate studies using remote sensing of snowcover, it is desirable to assess if the MODIS snowcover observations could not be enhanced by providing the fraction of snowcover in each MODIS observation (pixel). Pursuant to this objective studies have been conducted to assess whether there is sufficient "signal%o in the NDSI parameter to provide useful estimates of fractional snowcover in each MODIS 500 meter pixel. To accomplish this objective high spatial resolution (30 meter) Landsat snowcover observations were used and co-registered with MODIS 500 meter pixels. The NDSI approach was used to assess whether a Landsat pixel was or was not snowcovered. Then the number of snowcovered Landsat pixels within a MODIS pixel was used to determine the fraction of snowcover within each MODIS pixel. The e results were then used to develop statistical relationships between the NDSI value for each 500 meter MODIS pixel and the fraction of snowcover in the MODIS pixel. Such studies were conducted for three widely different areas covered by Landsat scenes in Alaska, Russia, and the Quebec Province in Canada. The statistical relationships indicate that a 10 percent accuracy can be attained. The variability in the statistical relationship for the three areas was found to be remarkably similar (-0.02 for mean error and less than 0.01 for mean absolute error and standard deviation). Independent tests of the relationships were

  3. Au-Ge film thermometers for temperature range 30 mK-300 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthoux, O.; Brusetti, R.; Lasjaunias, J. C.; Sahling, S.

    After optmization of the Au concentration and the annealing temperature, highly sensitive Au-Ge film thermometers for the temperature range 30 mK-300 K were obtained. The thermometers show good reproducibility, a very short relaxation time constant at low temperatures and are quite insensitive to magnetic field.

  4. Evaluating the influence of spatial resolutions of DEM on watershed runoff and sediment yield using SWAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, A. Sivasena; Reddy, M. Janga

    2015-10-01

    Digital elevation model (DEM) of a watershed forms key basis for hydrologic modelling and its resolution plays a key role in accurate prediction of various hydrological processes. This study appraises the effect of different DEMs with varied spatial resolutions (namely TOPO 20 m, CARTO 30 m, ASTER 30 m, SRTM 90 m, GEO-AUS 500 m and USGS 1000 m) on hydrological response of watershed using Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and applied for a case study of Kaddam watershed in India for estimating runoff and sediment yield. From the results of case study, it was observed that reach lengths, reach slopes, minimum and maximum elevations, sub-watershed areas, land use mapping areas within the sub-watershed and number of HRUs varied substantially due to DEM resolutions, and consequently resulted in a considerable variability in estimated daily runoff and sediment yields. It was also observed that, daily runoff values have increased (decreased) on low (high) rainy days respectively with coarser resolution of DEM. The daily sediment yield values from each sub-watershed decreased with coarser resolution of the DEM. The study found that the performance of SWAT model prediction was not influenced much for finer resolution DEMs up to 90 m for estimation of runoff, but it certainly influenced the estimation of sediment yields. The DEMs of TOPO 20 m and CARTO 30 m provided better estimates of sub-watershed areas, runoff and sediment yield values over other DEMs.

  5. Combining Remote Sensing imagery of both fine and coarse spatial resolution to Estimate Crop Evapotranspiration and quantifying its Influence on Crop Growth Monitoring.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepulcre-Cantó, Guadalupe; Gellens-Meulenberghs, Françoise; Arboleda, Alirio; Duveiller, Gregory; Piccard, Isabelle; de Wit, Allard; Tychon, Bernard; Bakary, Djaby; Defourny, Pierre

    2010-05-01

    This study has been carried out in the framework of the GLOBAM -Global Agricultural Monitoring system by integration of earth observation and modeling techniques- project whose objective is to fill the methodological gap between the state of the art of local crop monitoring and the operational requirements of the global monitoring system programs. To achieve this goal, the research aims to develop an integrated approach using remote sensing and crop growth modeling. Evapotranspiration (ET) is a valuable parameter in the crop monitoring context since it provides information on the plant water stress status, which strongly influences crop development and, by extension, crop yield. To assess crop evapotranspiration over the GLOBAM study areas (300x300 km sites in Northern Europe and Central Ethiopia), a Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer (SVAT) model forced with remote sensing and numerical weather prediction data has been used. This model runs at pre-operational level in the framework of the EUMETSAT LSA-SAF (Land Surface Analysis Satellite Application Facility) using SEVIRI and ECMWF data, as well as the ECOCLIMAP database to characterize the vegetation. The model generates ET images at the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) spatial resolution (3 km at subsatellite point),with a temporal resolution of 30 min and monitors the entire MSG disk which covers Europe, Africa and part of Sud America . The SVAT model was run for 2007 using two approaches. The first approach is at the standard pre-operational mode. The second incorporates remote sensing information at various spatial resolutions going from LANDSAT (30m) to SEVIRI (3-5 km) passing by AWIFS (56m) and MODIS (250m). Fine spatial resolution data consists of crop type classification which enable to identify areas where pure crop specific MODIS time series can be compiled and used to derive Leaf Area Index estimations for the most important crops (wheat and maize). The use of this information allowed to characterize

  6. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Biraud, S. C.; Boesch, H.; Bowman, K. W.; Deutscher, N. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Griffith, D. W. T.; et al

    2015-02-18

    We use 2009–2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to constrain global and North American inversions of methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. The GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface networks (NOAA, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/DOE, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. The surface and aircraft data are subsequently usedmore » for independent evaluation of the methane source inversions. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a total methane source of 539 Tg a−1 and points to a large East Asian overestimate in the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide full error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2–42.7 Tg a−1, as compared to 24.9–27.0 Tg a−1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0–44.5 Tg a−1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the South-Central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands, large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. We attribute 29–44% of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22–31% to oil/gas, 20% to landfills/waste water, and 11–15% to coal with an additional 9.0–10.1 Tg a−1 source from wetlands.« less

  7. Carbon budget estimation of a subarctic catchment using a dynamic ecosystem model at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J.; Miller, P. A.; Persson, A.; Olefeldt, D.; Pilesjö, P.; Heliasz, M.; Jackowicz-Korczynski, M.; Yang, Z.; Smith, B.; Callaghan, T. V.; Christensen, T. R.

    2015-01-01

    Large amount of organic carbon is stored in high latitude soils. A substantial proportion of this carbon stock is vulnerable and may decompose rapidly due to temperature increases that are already greater than the global average. It is therefore crucial to quantify and understand carbon exchange between the atmosphere and subarctic/arctic ecosystems. In this paper, we combine an arctic-enabled version of the process-based dynamic ecosystem model, LPJ-GUESS (version LPJG-WHyMe-TFM) with comprehensive observations of terrestrial and aquatic carbon fluxes to simulate long-term carbon exchange in a subarctic catchment comprising both mineral and peatland soils. The model is applied at 50 m resolution and is shown to be able to capture the seasonality and magnitudes of observed fluxes at this fine scale. The modelled magnitudes of CO2 uptake generally follow the descending sequence: birch forest, non-permafrost Eriophorum, Sphagnum and then tundra heath during the observation periods. The catchment-level carbon fluxes from aquatic systems are dominated by CO2 emissions from streams. Integrated across the whole catchment, we estimate that the area is a carbon sink at present, and will become an even stronger carbon sink by 2080, which is mainly a result of a projected densification of birch forest and its encroachment into tundra heath. However, the magnitudes of the modelled sinks are very dependent on future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Furthermore, comparisons of global warming potentials between two simulations with and without CO2 increase since 1960 reveal that the increased methane emission from the peatland could double the warming effects of the whole catchment by 2080 in the absence of CO2 fertilization of the vegetation. This is the first process-based model study of the temporal evolution of a catchment-level carbon budget at high spatial resolution, integrating comprehensive and diverse fluxes including both terrestrial and aquatic carbon. Though this

  8. GISMO, an ELT in space: a giant (30-m) far-infrared and submillimeter space observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawarden, Timothy G.; Johnstone, Callum; Johnstone, Graeme

    2004-07-01

    We describe GISMO, a concept for a 30-m class achromatic diffractive Fesnel space telescope operating in the far-IR and submillimeter from ~20 μm to ~700 μm. The concept is based on the precepts of Hyde (1999). It involves two units, the Lens and Instrument spacecraft, 3 km apart in a halo orbit around the Earth-Sun L2 point. The primary lens, L1, is a 30.1-m, 32-zone f/100 Fresnel lens, fabricated from ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE). It is 1.0 to 3.4 mm thick (the features are 2.4 mm high for a "design wavelength" of 1.2 mm) and made in 5 strips linked by fabric hinges. It is stowed for launch by folding and rolling. It is deployed warm, unrolled by pneumatic or mechanical means, unfolded by carbon-fiber struts with Shape Memory Alloy hinges and stiffened until cold by a peripheral inflatable ring. Re-oriented edgeways-on to the Sun behind a 5-layer sunshade, L1 will then cool by radiation to space, approaching ~10K after 200 - 300 days. The low equilibrium temperature occurs because the lens is very thin and has a huge view factor to space but a small one to the sunshade. The Instrument spacecraft resembles a smaller, colder (~4K) version of the James Webb Space Telescope and shares features of a concept for the SAFIR mission. A near-field Ritchey-Chretien telescope with a 3-segment off-axis 6m x 3m primary acts as field lens, re-imaging L1 on a 30-cm f/1 Fresnel Corrector lens of equal and opposite dispersion, producing an achromatic beam which is directed to a focal plane equipped with imaging and spectroscopic instruments. The "design wavelength" of the telescope is 1.2 mm and it is employed at its second and higher harmonics. The shortest wavelength, ~20μm, is set by the transmission properties of the lens material (illustrated here) and determines the design tolerances of the optical system. The overall mass is estimated at ~5 tonnes and the stowed length around 14 m. Technical challenges and areas of uncertainty for the design concept

  9. The Fire INventory from NCAR (FINN): a high resolution global model to estimate the emissions from open burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedinmyer, C.; Akagi, S. K.; Yokelson, R. J.; Emmons, L. K.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Orlando, J. J.; Soja, A. J.

    2011-07-01

    The Fire INventory from NCAR version 1.0 (FINNv1) provides daily, 1 km resolution, global estimates of the trace gas and particle emissions from open burning of biomass, which includes wildfire, agricultural fires, and prescribed burning and does not include biofuel use and trash burning. Emission factors used in the calculations have been updated with recent data, particularly for the non-methane organic compounds (NMOC). The resulting global annual NMOC emission estimates are as much as a factor of 5 greater than some prior estimates. Chemical speciation profiles, necessary to allocate the total NMOC emission estimates to lumped species for use by chemical transport models, are provided for three widely used chemical mechanisms: SAPRC99, GEOS-CHEM, and MOZART-4. Using these profiles, FINNv1 also provides global estimates of key organic compounds, including formaldehyde and methanol. Uncertainties in the emissions estimates arise from several of the method steps. The use of fire hot spots, assumed area burned, land cover maps, biomass consumption estimates, and emission factors all introduce error into the model estimates. The uncertainty in the FINNv1 emission estimates are about a factor of two; but, the global estimates agree reasonably well with other global inventories of biomass burning emissions for CO, CO2, and other species with less variable emission factors. FINNv1 emission estimates have been developed specifically for modeling atmospheric chemistry and air quality in a consistent framework at scales from local to global. The product is unique because of the high temporal and spatial resolution, global coverage, and the number of species estimated. FINNv1 can be used for both hindcast and forecast or near-real time model applications and the results are being critically evaluated with models and observations whenever possible.

  10. A simulation study exploring the effects of sensor spatial resolution on estimates of cloud cover from satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shenk, W. E.; Salomonson, V. V.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of the effects of sensor spatial resolution on estimating the amount of clouds covering the earth by simulating various cloud distributions and sizes, and measuring the known cloud amount with resolution of different sizes using a cloud-no cloud threshold technique often applied in automatic data processing. Cloud amount statistics have been tabulated for a three-orders-of-magnitude range in the ratio (R) of areal cloud size to areal resolution size for seven cloud amounts between 6 and 90%. Three different cloud patterns were used. These were 1) a regularly spaced pattern of homogeneous dots arranged in rows and columns (to simulate cloud streets), 2) a randomly spaced pattern of the same dots (to simulate randomly oriented cumulus clouds), and 3) a heterogeneous cloud size distribution irregularly spaced (to simulate a view of different cloud types and sizes). Two cloud amount estimation techniques were tested. Cloud amounts of 100% (method 1) and 50% (method 2) were assigned to partially filled resolution elements. Using criteria applicable to some studies carried out in the past, it is shown that cloud amount estimations can be in error by as much as 86 and 38%, respectively, for the two methods. Nomograms have been developed which subtantially improve the estimate of the true cloud cover for R less than 100, provided that R can be determined.

  11. On the calibration of Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter surface roughness estimates using high-resolution DTMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, W.; Muller, J.-P.; Gupta, S.

    2012-04-01

    Planetary surface roughness is critical in the selection of suitable landing sites for robotic lander or roving missions. It has also been used in the identification of terrain, for better calibration of radar returns and improved understanding of aerodynamic roughness [1]. One of the secondary science goals of the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) was the study of surface roughness at 100 m, using the backscatter pulse width of the laser pulse, which has a footprint of 168 m in diameter [2]. The pulse width values in the final release (version L) of the MOLA Precision Experiment Data Record (PEDR) have been corrected for across track slopes and the removal of 'bad points', and footprint diameter was revised to 75 m, with a 35 m response length in [3]. We look here at comparing surface roughness values derived from the MOLA pulse-width data with surface roughness estimates derived at various scales from high-resolution digital terrain models (DTMs) to determine if these theoretically derived surface roughness lengths are physically meaningful. The final four potential landing sites for Mars Science Laboratory were used in this study, as they have extensive HiRISE (1m) and HRSC (50m) DTM coverage [4]. Pulse width data from both the MOLA PEDR (version L) and the data used in [3] was collected and compared for each of the sites against surface roughness estimates at various scales from HiRISE, and HRSC, DTMs using the RMS height. This assumed a circular footprint for each MOLA footprint and that the horizontal geolocation of the PEDR MOLA footprints was sufficiently accurate to only extract those DTM points which lay inside the footprints. Results from the MOLA PEDR data were extremely poor, and show no correlation with surface roughness measurements from DTMs. Results using the corrected data in [3] were mixed. Eberswalde and Holden Craters both show significantly improved correlations for a variety of surface roughness scales. The best correlations were found to

  12. Estimation of Land Surface Energy Balance Using Satellite Data of Spatial Reduced Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vintila, Ruxandra; Radnea, Cristina; Savin, Elena; Poenaru, Violeta

    2010-12-01

    The paper presents preliminary results concerning the monitoring at national level of several geo-biophysical variables retrieved by remote sensing, in particular those related to drought or aridisation. The study, which is in progress, represents also an exercise for to the implementation of a Land Monitoring Core Service for Romania, according to the Kopernikus Program and in compliance with the INSPIRE Directive. The SEBS model has been used to retrieve land surface energy balance variables, such as turbulent heat fluxes, evaporative fraction and daily evaporation, based on three information types: (1) surface albedo, emissivity, temperature, fraction of vegetation cover (fCover), leaf area index (LAI) and vegetation height; (2) air pressure, temperature, humidity and wind speed at the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height; (3) downward solar radiation and downward longwave radiation. AATSR and MERIS archived reprocessed images have provided several types of information. Thus, surface albedo, emissivity, and land surface temperature have been retrieved from AATSR, while LAI and fCover have been estimated from MERIS. The vegetation height has been derived from CORINE Land Cover and PELCOM Land Use databases, while the meteorological information at the height of PBL have been estimated from the measurements provided by the national weather station network. Other sources of data used during this study have been the GETASSE30 digital elevation model with 30" spatial resolution, used for satellite image orthorectification, and the SIGSTAR-200 geographical information system of soil resources of Romania, used for water deficit characterisation. The study will continue by processing other AATSR and MERIS archived images, complemented by the validation of SEBS results with ground data collected on the most important biomes for Romania at various phenological stages, and the transformation of evaporation / evapotranspiration into a drought index using the soil texture

  13. The effect of flow data resolution on sediment yield estimation and channel design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosburg, Tyler T.; Nelson, Peter A.; Sholtes, Joel S.; Bledsoe, Brian P.

    2016-07-01

    The decision to use either daily-averaged or sub-daily streamflow records has the potential to impact the calculation of sediment transport metrics and stream channel design. Using bedload and suspended load sediment transport measurements collected at 138 sites across the United States, we calculated the effective discharge, sediment yield, and half-load discharge using sediment rating curves over long time periods (median record length = 24 years) with both daily-averaged and sub-daily streamflow records. A comparison of sediment transport metrics calculated with both daily-average and sub-daily stream flow data at each site showed that daily-averaged flow data do not adequately represent the magnitude of high stream flows at hydrologically flashy sites. Daily-average stream flow data cause an underestimation of sediment transport and sediment yield (including the half-load discharge) at flashy sites. The degree of underestimation was correlated with the level of flashiness and the exponent of the sediment rating curve. No consistent relationship between the use of either daily-average or sub-daily streamflow data and the resultant effective discharge was found. When used in channel design, computed sediment transport metrics may have errors due to flow data resolution, which can propagate into design slope calculations which, if implemented, could lead to unwanted aggradation or degradation in the design channel. This analysis illustrates the importance of using sub-daily flow data in the calculation of sediment yield in urbanizing or otherwise flashy watersheds. Furthermore, this analysis provides practical charts for estimating and correcting these types of underestimation errors commonly incurred in sediment yield calculations.

  14. Error Estimation in an Optimal Interpolation Scheme for High Spatial and Temporal Resolution SST Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigney, Matt; Jedlovec, Gary; LaFontaine, Frank; Shafer, Jaclyn

    2010-01-01

    Heat and moisture exchange between ocean surface and atmosphere plays an integral role in short-term, regional NWP. Current SST products lack both spatial and temporal resolution to accurately capture small-scale features that affect heat and moisture flux. NASA satellite is used to produce high spatial and temporal resolution SST analysis using an OI technique.

  15. Design and Analysis of 20m track mounted and 30m telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, Warren B.; Woolf, Neville J.; Angel, James Roger P.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents designs of compact 21 and 30 m aperture telescopes with primary focal of f/0.7 and f/0.56. The 20 20 telescope moves on three axes; the elevation axis (which is below the primary vertex), the azimuth axis, and a tracking axis at the center of 100 m diameter tracks. The 30 m telescope has an elevation and azimuth axis. All of the axes move on hydrostatic bearings. A primary requirement for such large telescopes is stiffness against deformation by wind gusts. The mass and stiffness needed for the structure is substantially independent of the primary mirror mass, which can therefore be set by thermal and diffraction issues. For the 21 m design, whose primary has seven 8.4 m glass segments weighing 128 tons, the total moving mass is 905 tons, and the lowest resonant frequency 6.5 Hz. For the 30 m design, whose primary has, 13 whole and 6 half, glass segments 8.7 m, across the points, weighing 256 tons, the total moving mass is 3,460 tons, and the lowest resonant frequency 5.3 Hz. These practical designs offer two versatile telescopes with high performance.

  16. Comparison of Potential of Two High Spatial Resolution Optical Remote Sensing Data in Estimation of Carbon Sequestration of Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Arun; Singh Rana, Sumit; Lakshmanan, Gnanappazham

    2012-07-01

    The estimation of biomass is one of the hot topics in the present scenario to unveil the quest that how much Carbon dioxide could be sequestrated by vegetation. Climate change modelling requires the rate of terrestrial carbon sequestration. The conventional methods of quantifying carbon sink in forest ecosystem are difficult and time consuming due to its topography and inaccessibility. Advances in Remote sensing and Image Processing have improvised the indirect estimation methods to estimate the amount of carbon stored in soil. The present study aims at the estimation of carbon sequestrated by the rubber plantation of Valiamala area, Thiruvananthapuram. Indirect method of estimating Leaf Area Index (LAI) from two high resolution satellite data, IKONOS and Geoeye-1 image is followed by correlating Normalized Differential Vegetation Index (NDVI) and field based LAI values measured by Plant Canopy Analyzer instrument from the study area. An allometric equation is derived to estimate LAI for the whole study area. The estimated LAI is highly correlated with NDVI map generated. Moreover, soil samples have been collected from equally distributed 15 sample points in the study area for the direct estimation of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) using elemental analysis. Carbon sequestration data for the 12 of the sample location data are used to derive the function of LAI for carbon estimation using multiple linear regression analysis. Remaining 3 sample location data are used to validate the equation derived. The results of the analysis of satellite data are compared for the carbon sequestration. Keywords: Carbon Sequestration, Leaf Area Index, Total Organic Carbon

  17. The fidelity of stochastic single-molecule super-resolution reconstructions critically depends upon robust background estimation.

    PubMed

    Hoogendoorn, Eelco; Crosby, Kevin C; Leyton-Puig, Daniela; Breedijk, Ronald M P; Jalink, Kees; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Postma, Marten

    2014-01-01

    The quality of super resolution images obtained by stochastic single-molecule microscopy critically depends on image analysis algorithms. We find that the choice of background estimator is often the most important determinant of reconstruction quality. A variety of techniques have found use, but many have a very narrow range of applicability depending upon the characteristics of the raw data. Importantly, we observe that when using otherwise accurate algorithms, unaccounted background components can give rise to biases on scales defeating the purpose of super-resolution microscopy. We find that a temporal median filter in particular provides a simple yet effective solution to the problem of background estimation, which we demonstrate over a range of imaging modalities and different reconstruction methods. PMID:24458236

  18. Advanced high resolution seismic imaging, material properties estimation and full wavefield inversion for the shallow subsurface. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Levander, A.; Zelt, C.A.; Symes, W.W.

    1998-06-01

    'The authors are developing advanced seismic data processing, imaging, and inversion methods for high resolution seismic reflection/refraction imaging and material property estimation of the shallow subsurface. The imaging methods are being developed to map the structural and material properties of aquifers and aquitards. This report summarizes work completed in the first seven months of a three year project which began in November 1997. The research is proceeding along three lines: data acquisition, data processing, and algorithm development.'

  19. Estimating Temperature Retrieval Accuracy Associated With Thermal Band Spatial Resolution Requirements for Center Pivot Irrigation Monitoring and Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert E.; Irons, James; Spruce, Joseph P.; Underwood, Lauren W.; Pagnutti, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This study explores the use of synthetic thermal center pivot irrigation scenes to estimate temperature retrieval accuracy for thermal remote sensed data, such as data acquired from current and proposed Landsat-like thermal systems. Center pivot irrigation is a common practice in the western United States and in other parts of the world where water resources are scarce. Wide-area ET (evapotranspiration) estimates and reliable water management decisions depend on accurate temperature information retrieval from remotely sensed data. Spatial resolution, sensor noise, and the temperature step between a field and its surrounding area impose limits on the ability to retrieve temperature information. Spatial resolution is an interrelationship between GSD (ground sample distance) and a measure of image sharpness, such as edge response or edge slope. Edge response and edge slope are intuitive, and direct measures of spatial resolution are easier to visualize and estimate than the more common Modulation Transfer Function or Point Spread Function. For these reasons, recent data specifications, such as those for the LDCM (Landsat Data Continuity Mission), have used GSD and edge response to specify spatial resolution. For this study, we have defined a 400-800 m diameter center pivot irrigation area with a large 25 K temperature step associated with a 300 K well-watered field surrounded by an infinite 325 K dry area. In this context, we defined the benchmark problem as an easily modeled, highly common stressing case. By parametrically varying GSD (30-240 m) and edge slope, we determined the number of pixels and field area fraction that meet a given temperature accuracy estimate for 400-m, 600-m, and 800-m diameter field sizes. Results of this project will help assess the utility of proposed specifications for the LDCM and other future thermal remote sensing missions and for water resource management.

  20. Particle filter-based estimation of inter-frequency phase bias for real-time GLONASS integer ambiguity resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yumiao; Ge, Maorong; Neitzel, Frank

    2015-11-01

    GLONASS could hardly reach the positioning performance of GPS, especially for fast and real-time precise positioning. One of the reasons is the phase inter-frequency bias (IFB) at the receiver end prevents its integer ambiguity resolution. A number of studies were carried out to achieve the integer ambiguity resolution for GLONASS. Based on some of the revealed IFB characteristics, for instance IFB is a linear function of the received carrier frequency and L1 and L2 have the same IFB in unit of length, most of recent methods recommend estimating the IFB rate together with ambiguities. However, since the two sets of parameters are highly correlated, as demonstrated in previous studies, observations over several hours up to 1 day are needed even with simultaneous GPS observations to obtain a reasonable solution. Obviously, these approaches cannot be applied for real-time positioning. Actually, it can be demonstrated that GLONASS ambiguity resolution should also be available even for a single epoch if the IFB rate is precisely known. In addition, the closer the IFB rate value is to its true value, the larger the fixing RATIO will be. Based on this fact, in this paper, a new approach is developed to estimate the IFB rate by means of particle filtering with the likelihood function derived from RATIO. This approach is evaluated with several sets of experimental data. For both static and kinematic cases, the results show that IFB rates could be estimated precisely just with GLONASS data of a few epochs depending on the baseline length. The time cost with a normal PC can be controlled around 1 s and can be further reduced. With the estimated IFB rate, integer ambiguity resolution is available immediately and as a consequence, the positioning accuracy is improved significantly to the level of GPS fixed solution. Thus the new approach enables real-time precise applications of GLONASS.

  1. Estimation of Orbital Neutron Detector Spatial Resolution by Systematic Shifting of Differential Topographic Masks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, T. P.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Livengood, T.; Starr, R. D.; Evans, L. G.; Mazarico, E.; Smith, D. E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a method and preliminary results related to determining the spatial resolution of orbital neutron detectors using epithermal maps and differential topographic masks. Our technique is similar to coded aperture imaging methods for optimizing photonic signals in telescopes [I]. In that approach photon masks with known spatial patterns in a telescope aperature are used to systematically restrict incoming photons which minimizes interference and enhances photon signal to noise. Three orbital neutron detector systems with different stated spatial resolutions are evaluated. The differing spatial resolutions arise due different orbital altitudes and the use of neutron collimation techniques. 1) The uncollimated Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer (LPNS) system has spatial resolution of 45km FWHM from approx. 30km altitude mission phase [2]. The Lunar Rennaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) with two detectors at 50km altitude evaluated here: 2) the collimated 10km FWHM spatial resolution detector CSETN and 3) LEND's collimated Sensor for Epithermal Neutrons (SETN). Thus providing two orbital altitudes to study factors of: uncollimated vs collimated and two average altitudes for their effect on fields-of-view.

  2. A spatial resolution threshold of land cover in estimating terrestrial carbon sequestration in four counties in Georgia and Alabama, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, S.Q.; Liu, S.; Li, Z.; Sohl, T.L.

    2010-01-01

    Changes in carbon density (i.e., carbon stock per unit area) and land cover greatly affect carbon sequestration. Previous studies have shown that land cover change detection strongly depends on spatial scale. However, the influence of the spatial resolution of land cover change information on the estimated terrestrial carbon sequestration is not known. Here, we quantified and evaluated the impact of land cover change databases at various spatial resolutions (250 m, 500 m, 1 km, 2 km, and 4 km) on the magnitude and spatial patterns of regional carbon sequestration in four counties in Georgia and Alabama using the General Ensemble biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS). Results indicated a threshold of 1 km in the land cover change databases and in the estimated regional terrestrial carbon sequestration. Beyond this threshold, significant biases occurred in the estimation of terrestrial carbon sequestration, its interannual variability, and spatial patterns. In addition, the overriding impact of interannual climate variability on the temporal change of regional carbon sequestration was unrealistically overshadowed by the impact of land cover change beyond the threshold. The implications of these findings directly challenge current continental- to global-scale carbon modeling efforts relying on information at coarse spatial resolution without incorporating fine-scale land cover dynamics.

  3. Use of High-Resolution Multispectral Imagery to Estimate Chlorophyll and Plant Nitrogen in Oats (Avena sativa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ELarab, M.; Ticlavilca, A. M.; Torres-Rua, A. F.; Maslova, I.; McKee, M.

    2013-12-01

    Precision agriculture requires high spatial resolution in the application of the inputs to agricultural production. This requires that actionable information about crop and field status be acquired at the same high spatial resolution and at a temporal frequency appropriate for timely responses. In this study, high-resolution imagery was obtained through the use of a small, unmanned aerial vehicle, called AggieAirTM, that provides spatial resolution as fine as 6 cm. Simultaneously with AggieAir flights, intensive ground sampling was conducted at precisely determined locations for plant chlorophyll, plant nitrogen, and other parameters. This study investigated the spectral signature of a crop of oats (Avena sativa) and formulated machine learning regression models of reflectance response between the multi-spectral bands available from AggieAir (red, green, blue, near infrared, and thermal), plant chlorophyll and plant nitrogen. We tested two, separate relevance vector machines (RVM) and a single multivariate relevance vector machine (MVRVM) to develop the linkages between the remotely sensed data and plant chlorophyll and nitrogen at approximately 15-cm resolution. The results of this study are presented, including a statistical evaluation of the performance of the different models and a comparison of the RVM modeling methods against more traditional approaches that have been used for estimation of plant chlorophyll and nitrogen.

  4. Estimation of sampling errors in a high-resolution TV microscope image-processing system.

    PubMed

    Harms, H; Aus, H M

    1984-05-01

    The basic postulate of this paper is that the commonly accepted sampling density of 2-4 pixels/micron in a high-resolution TV microscope system is too low to digitize exactly and analyze the complex cellular detail found in stained cell images. Depending on the specific microscope system, the required sampling density is much higher, lying between 15 and 30 pixels/micron. This sampling density is derived from the aliasing error, the resolution loss, and computational limitations. The mathematical and optical methods and equipment used to obtain these results are described in detail. PMID:6375997

  5. The effect of grid resolution on estimates of the burden of ozone and fine particulate matter on premature mortality in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Punger, Elizabeth M.; West, J. Jason

    2013-01-01

    Assessments of human health impacts associated with outdoor air pollution often use air quality models to represent exposure, but involve uncertainties due to coarse model resolution. Here we quantify how estimates of mortality in the United States attributable to ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) at coarse resolution differ from those at finer resolution. Using the finest modeled concentrations (12 km), we estimate that 66,000 (95% CI, 39,300 – 84,500) all-cause and 21,400 (5,600 – 34,200) respiratory deaths per year are attributable to PM2.5 and O3 concentrations above low-concentration thresholds, respectively. Using model results at 36 km resolution gives mortality burdens that are 11% higher for PM2.5 and 12% higher for O3 than the 12 km estimates, suggesting a modest positive bias. We also scale modeled concentrations at 12 km to coarser resolutions by simple averaging, and repeat the mortality assessment at multiple resolutions from 24 to 408 km, including the resolutions of global models; in doing so, we account for the effect of resolution on population exposure. Coarse grid resolutions produce mortality estimates that are substantially biased low for PM2.5 (30–40% lower than the 12 km estimate at >250 km resolution), but less than 6% higher for O3 at any resolution. Mortality estimates for primary PM2.5 species show greater bias at coarse resolution than secondary species. These results suggest that coarse resolution global models (>100 km) are likely biased low for PM2.5 health effects. For ozone, biases due to coarse resolution may be much smaller, and the effect on modeled chemistry likely dominates. PMID:24348882

  6. Development of corotational formulated FEM for application to 30m class large deployable reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Satoru; Fujiwara, Yuuichi; Tsujihata, Akio

    2010-06-01

    JAXA, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, is now developing a corotational formulated finite element analysis method and its software "Origami/ETS" for the development of 30m class large deployable reflectors. For the reason that the deployable reflector is composed of beams, cables and mesh, this analysis method is generalized for finite elements with multiple nodes, which are commonly used in linear finite element analyses. The large displacement and rotation are taken into account by the corotational formulation. The tangent stiffness matrix for finite elements with multiple nodes is obtained as follows; the geometric stiffness matrix of two node elements is derived by taking variation of the element's corotational matrix from the virtual work of finite elements with large displacement; similarly the geometric stiffness matrix for three node elements is derived; as the extension of two and three node element theories, the geometric stiffness matrix for multiple node elements is derived; with the geometric stiffness matrix for multiple node elements, the tangent stiffness matrix is obtained. The analysis method is applied for the deployment analysis and static structural analysis of the 30m class large deployable reflector. In the deployment analysis, it is confirmed that this method stably analyzes the deployment motion from the deployment configuration to the stowed configuration of the reflector. In the static analysis, it is confirmed that the mesh structure is analyzed successfully. The 30m class large deployable reflector is now still being developed and is about to undergo several tests with its prototypes. This analysis method will be used in the tests and verifications of the reflector.

  7. Test results of a 30-m HTS cable pre-demonstration system in Yokohama project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumura, H.; Ashibe, Y.; Ohya, M.; Itoh, H.; Watanabe, M.; Yatsuka, K.; Masuda, T.; Honjo, S.; Mimura, T.; Kitoh, Y.; Noguchi, Y.

    2010-11-01

    High temperature superconducting cable demonstration project supported by Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry and New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization has started since FY 2007 in Japan. Target of this project is to operate a 66 kV, 200 MVA HTS cable in a live grid in order to demonstrate its reliability and stable operation. A demonstration site has been decided to Asahi substation which is located in Yokohama. The cable length will be decided to between 200 and 300 m depending on a site configuration. Various preliminary tests such as critical current, ac losses, fault current loading, mechanical tests, have been conducted by using short core samples in order to confirm a HTS cable design and a cable-to-cable joint structure. From these test results, a HTS cable, a joint and a termination have been designed to meet the required specifications. To verify their performances before the installation of the HTS cable system in Yokohama, a 30-m HTS cable was manufactured and various sample tests were conducted as shipping test. The critical current of the HTS conductor and shield were 6.1 kA and 7.1 kA, respectively. The AC loss was 0.83 W/m/ph at 2 kA rms, 60 Hz. As withstand voltage tests, AC 90 kV for 3 h and lightning impulse at ±385 kV were applied to cable core, successfully. These test results has confirmed that the 30-m cable had good properties as designed and satisfied the required specifications. After the success of the shipping tests, the 30-m HTS cable pre-demonstration system has been installed at SEI factory. The cable system will be operated and checked the various performances in this summer.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: IRAM 30m reduced spectra of 59 sources (Gerner+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerner, T.; Beuther, H.; Semenov, D.; Linz, H.; Vasyunina, T.; Bihr, S.; Shirley, Y. L.; Henning, T.

    2014-01-01

    IRAM30m reduced spectra in TMB for 86.6GHz-94.2GHz, 217.3GHz-22 and 241.3GHz-245.2GHz for the 59 sources in fits-format. The file names are sourcenames1.fits, sourcenames2.fits, sourcenames3.fits and sourcenames4.fits with s1 = 86.6GHz-90.5GHz s2 = 90.2GHz-94.2GHz s3 = 217.3GHz-221.2GHz s4 = 241.3GHz-245.2GHz (3 data files).

  9. Picosecond Nd:Cr:GSGG-laser system with 30 mJ energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, H. J.; Liu, B.

    1992-01-01

    An actively and passively mode locked solid-state laser system has been constructed, which delivers single 25 ps pulses with energy up to 30 mJ at λ=1.061 μm. The system is characterized by its good time and energy stability, high pump efficiency and low pulse background. This was accomplished by using Nd:Cr:GSGG as active material and by developing a low voltage, solid state external pulse selector. The construction details of the system and its performance are described.

  10. Regional Climate Modelling: impact of horizontal grid resolution on precipitation estimates over Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Ray; Nolan, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Regional Climate Models (RCMs) are widely used to dynamically downscale the outputs from global climate model simulations. There is some evidence that high resolution RCMs with explicit convection can provide more accurate information on extreme precipitation events compared to coarse resolution simulations with parameterized convection. In flooding applications, where the interest may be focused on precipitation over a relatively large river catchment area, compared to the model grid spacing, the value of enhanced resolution needs to be quantified. This is addressed in a study using two RCMs: the COnsortium for Small-scale Modeling-Climate Limited-area Modelling (COSMO-CLM) model (version CCLM_5.00) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model (version 3.7.1). Using ERA-Interim global re-analysis data as boundaries, climate simulations were performed for the period 1981-2015, for an area focused on Ireland, using model horizontal grid spacings of 18, 6 and 2 km (WRF) and 18, 6 and 1.5 km (COSMO-CLM). Model hourly precipitation outputs were compared with gridded and point observational datasets for time intervals extending from hours to seasons to assess the performance of the RCMs at the different resolutions.

  11. Air quality estimates in Mediterranean cities using high resolution satellite technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudnovsky, Alexandra; Lyapustin, Alexei; Wang, Yujie

    2016-04-01

    Satellite imaging is an essential tool for monitoring air pollution because, unlike ground observations, it supplies continuous data with global coverage of terrestrial and atmospheric components. Satellite-based Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) retrievals reflect particle abundance in the atmospheric column. This data provide some indication on the extent of particle concentrations. However, it is difficult to retrieve AOD at high spatial resolution above areas with high surface reflectance and heterogeneous land cover, such as urban areas. Therefore, many crowded regions worldwide including Israel, AOD climatology are still uncertain because of the high ground reflectance and coarse spatial resolution. Recently, a new Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm was developed for MODIS which provides AOD at 1 km resolution. This study aims to investigate the spatial variability of AOD within Israeli and several other Mediterranean cities. In addition, we aim to characterize the impact of climatic condition on pollution patterns in-and-between cities and to identify days when cities exhibit the highest variability in AOD. Furthermore, we assessed the differences in pollution levels between adjacent locations. We will report on spatial variability in AOD levels derived from high 1km resolution MAIAC AOD algorithm on a temporal basis, in relation to season and synoptic-meteorological conditions.

  12. Cropland carbon fluxes in the United States: increasing Geospatial Resolution of Inventory-Based Carbon Accounting

    SciTech Connect

    West, Tristram O.; Brandt, Craig C; Baskaran, Latha Malar; Hellwinckel, Chad M; Marland, Gregg; Nelson, Richard G; De La Torre Ugarte, Daniel G; Post, Wilfred M

    2010-01-01

    Net annual soil carbon change, fossil fuel emissions from cropland production, and cropland net primary productivity were estimated and spatially distributed using land cover defined by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and by the Cropland Data Layer (CDL). Spatially resolved estimates of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) were developed. NEE represents net on-site vertical fluxes of carbon. NECB represents all on-site and off-site carbon fluxes associated with crop production. Estimates of cropland NEE using moderate resolution (~1km2) land cover data were generated for the conterminous US and compared with higher resolution (30m) estimates of NEE and with direct measurements of CO2 flux from croplands in Illinois and Nebraska. Estimates of NEE using the CDL (30m resolution) had a higher correlation with eddy covariance flux tower estimates compared with estimates of NEE using MODIS. Estimates of NECB are primarily driven by net soil carbon change, fossil-fuel emissions associated with crop production, and CO2 emissions from the application of agricultural lime. NEE and NECB for US croplands were -274 and 7 Tg C yr-1 for 2004, respectively. Use of moderate to high resolution satellite-based land cover data enables improved estimates of cropland carbon dynamics.

  13. Improving High-resolution Spatial Estimates of Precipitation in the Equatorial Americas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdin, A.; Rajagopalan, B.; Funk, C. C.

    2013-12-01

    Drought and flood management practices require accurate estimates of precipitation in space and time. However, data is sparse in regions with complicated terrain (such as the Equatorial Americas), often in valleys (where people farm), and of poor quality. Consequently, extreme precipitation events are poorly represented. Satellite-derived rainfall data is an attractive alternative in such regions and is being widely used, though it too suffers from problems such as underestimation of extreme events (due to its dependency on retrieval algorithms) and the indirect relationship between satellite radiation observations and precipitation intensities. Thus, it seems appropriate to blend satellite-derived rainfall data of extensive spatial coverage with rain gauge data in order to provide a more robust estimate of precipitation. To this end, in this research we offer three techniques to blend rain gauge data and the Climate Hazards group InfraRed Precipitation (CHIRP) satellite-derived precipitation estimate for Central America and Colombia. In the first two methods, the gauge data is assigned to the closest CHIRP grid point, where the error is defined as r = Yobs - Ysat. The spatial structure of r is then modeled using physiographic information (Easting, Northing, and Elevation) by two methods (i) a traditional Cokriging approach whose variogram is calculated in Euclidean space and (ii) a nonparametric method based on local polynomial functional estimation. The models are used to estimate r at all grid points, which is then added to the CHIRP, thus creating an improved satellite estimate. We demonstrate these methods by applying them to pentadal and monthly total precipitation fields during 2009. The models' predictive abilities and their ability to capture extremes are investigated. These blending methods significantly improve upon the satellite-derived estimates and are also competitive in their ability to capture extreme precipitation. The above methods assume

  14. Panel positioning error and support mechanism for a 30-m THz radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, De-Hua; Okoh, Daniel; Zhou, Guo-Hua; Li, Ai-Hua; Li, Guo-Ping; Cheng, Jing-Quan

    2011-06-01

    A 30-m TeraHertz (THz) radio telescope is proposed to operate at 200 μm with an active primary surface. This paper presents sensitivity analysis of active surface panel positioning errors with optical performance in terms of the Strehl ratio. Based on Ruze's surface error theory and using a Monte Carlo simulation, the effects of six rigid panel positioning errors, such as piston, tip, tilt, radial, azimuthal and twist displacements, were directly derived. The optical performance of the telescope was then evaluated using the standard Strehl ratio. We graphically illustrated the various panel error effects by presenting simulations of complete ensembles of full reflector surface errors for the six different rigid panel positioning errors. Study of the panel error sensitivity analysis revealed that the piston error and tilt/tip errors are dominant while the other rigid errors are much less important. Furthermore, as indicated by the results, we conceived of an alternative Master-Slave Concept-based (MSC-based) active surface by implementating a special Series-Parallel Concept-based (SPC-based) hexapod as the active panel support mechanism. A new 30-m active reflector based on the two concepts was demonstrated to achieve correction for all the six rigid panel positioning errors in an economically feasible way.

  15. High Resolution Direction of Arrival (DOA) Estimation Based on Improved Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) Algorithm by Iterative Local Searching

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenyi; Wu, Renbiao

    2013-01-01

    DOA (Direction of Arrival) estimation is a major problem in array signal processing applications. Recently, compressive sensing algorithms, including convex relaxation algorithms and greedy algorithms, have been recognized as a kind of novel DOA estimation algorithm. However, the success of these algorithms is limited by the RIP (Restricted Isometry Property) condition or the mutual coherence of measurement matrix. In the DOA estimation problem, the columns of measurement matrix are steering vectors corresponding to different DOAs. Thus, it violates the mutual coherence condition. The situation gets worse when there are two sources from two adjacent DOAs. In this paper, an algorithm based on OMP (Orthogonal Matching Pursuit), called ILS-OMP (Iterative Local Searching-Orthogonal Matching Pursuit), is proposed to improve DOA resolution by Iterative Local Searching. Firstly, the conventional OMP algorithm is used to obtain initial estimated DOAs. Then, in each iteration, a local searching process for every estimated DOA is utilized to find a new DOA in a given DOA set to further decrease the residual. Additionally, the estimated DOAs are updated by substituting the initial DOA with the new one. The simulation results demonstrate the advantages of the proposed algorithm. PMID:23974150

  16. High resolution direction of arrival (DOA) estimation based on improved orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) algorithm by iterative local searching.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenyi; Wu, Renbiao

    2013-01-01

    DOA (Direction of Arrival) estimation is a major problem in array signal processing applications. Recently, compressive sensing algorithms, including convex relaxation algorithms and greedy algorithms, have been recognized as a kind of novel DOA estimation algorithm. However, the success of these algorithms is limited by the RIP (Restricted Isometry Property) condition or the mutual coherence of measurement matrix. In the DOA estimation problem, the columns of measurement matrix are steering vectors corresponding to different DOAs. Thus, it violates the mutual coherence condition. The situation gets worse when there are two sources from two adjacent DOAs. In this paper, an algorithm based on OMP (Orthogonal Matching Pursuit), called ILS-OMP (Iterative Local Searching-Orthogonal Matching Pursuit), is proposed to improve DOA resolution by Iterative Local Searching. Firstly, the conventional OMP algorithm is used to obtain initial estimated DOAs. Then, in each iteration, a local searching process for every estimated DOA is utilized to find a new DOA in a given DOA set to further decrease the residual. Additionally, the estimated DOAs are updated by substituting the initial DOA with the new one. The simulation results demonstrate the advantages of the proposed algorithm. PMID:23974150

  17. Vineyard Yield Estimation Based on the Analysis of High Resolution Images Obtained with Artificial Illumination at Night

    PubMed Central

    Font, Davinia; Tresanchez, Marcel; Martínez, Dani; Moreno, Javier; Clotet, Eduard; Palacín, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method for vineyard yield estimation based on the analysis of high-resolution images obtained with artificial illumination at night. First, this paper assesses different pixel-based segmentation methods in order to detect reddish grapes: threshold based, Mahalanobis distance, Bayesian classifier, linear color model segmentation and histogram segmentation, in order to obtain the best estimation of the area of the clusters of grapes in this illumination conditions. The color spaces tested were the original RGB and the Hue-Saturation-Value (HSV). The best segmentation method in the case of a non-occluded reddish table-grape variety was the threshold segmentation applied to the H layer, with an estimation error in the area of 13.55%, improved up to 10.01% by morphological filtering. Secondly, after segmentation, two procedures for yield estimation based on a previous calibration procedure have been proposed: (1) the number of pixels corresponding to a cluster of grapes is computed and converted directly into a yield estimate; and (2) the area of a cluster of grapes is converted into a volume by means of a solid of revolution, and this volume is converted into a yield estimate; the yield errors obtained were 16% and −17%, respectively. PMID:25860071

  18. Vineyard yield estimation based on the analysis of high resolution images obtained with artificial illumination at night.

    PubMed

    Font, Davinia; Tresanchez, Marcel; Martínez, Dani; Moreno, Javier; Clotet, Eduard; Palacín, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method for vineyard yield estimation based on the analysis of high-resolution images obtained with artificial illumination at night. First, this paper assesses different pixel-based segmentation methods in order to detect reddish grapes: threshold based, Mahalanobis distance, Bayesian classifier, linear color model segmentation and histogram segmentation, in order to obtain the best estimation of the area of the clusters of grapes in this illumination conditions. The color spaces tested were the original RGB and the Hue-Saturation-Value (HSV). The best segmentation method in the case of a non-occluded reddish table-grape variety was the threshold segmentation applied to the H layer, with an estimation error in the area of 13.55%, improved up to 10.01% by morphological filtering. Secondly, after segmentation, two procedures for yield estimation based on a previous calibration procedure have been proposed: (1) the number of pixels corresponding to a cluster of grapes is computed and converted directly into a yield estimate; and (2) the area of a cluster of grapes is converted into a volume by means of a solid of revolution, and this volume is converted into a yield estimate; the yield errors obtained were 16% and -17%, respectively. PMID:25860071

  19. Daily Estimation of Ground-Level PM2.5 Concentrations over Beijing Using 3 km Resolution MODIS AOD.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuanyu; Wang, Yuxuan; Zhang, Kai; Dong, Wenhao; Lv, Baolei; Bai, Yuqi

    2015-10-20

    Estimating exposures to PM2.5 within urban areas requires surface PM2.5 concentrations at high temporal and spatial resolutions. We developed a mixed effects model to derive daily estimations of surface PM2.5 levels in Beijing, using the 3 km resolution satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) calibrated daily by the newly available high-density surface measurements. The mixed effects model accounts for daily variations of AOD-PM2.5 relationships and shows good performance in model predictions (R(2) of 0.81-0.83) and cross-validations (R(2) of 0.75-0.79). Satellite derived population-weighted mean PM2.5 for Beijing was 51.2 μg/m(3) over the study period (Mar 2013 to Apr 2014), 46% higher than China's annual-mean PM2.5 standard of 35 μg/m(3). We estimated that more than 19.2 million people (98% of Beijing's population) are exposed to harmful level of long-term PM2.5 pollution. During 25% of the days with model data, the population-weighted mean PM2.5 exceeded China's daily PM2.5 standard of 75 μg/m(3). Predicted high-resolution daily PM2.5 maps are useful to identify pollution "hot spots" and estimate short- and long-term exposure. We further demonstrated that a good calibration of the satellite data requires a relatively large number of ground-level PM2.5 monitoring sites and more are still needed in Beijing. PMID:26310776

  20. Experimental Estimation of CLASP Spatial and Spectral Resolutions: Results of the Instrument's Optical Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giono, G.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ishikawa, R.; Narukage, N.; Bando, T.; Kano, R.; Suematsu, Y.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Auchere, F.

    2015-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter is a sounding rocket experiment design to measure for the first time the polarization signal of the Lyman-Alpha line (121.6nm), emitted in the solar upper-chromosphere and transition region. This instrument aims to detect the Hanle effect's signature hidden in the Ly-alpha polarization, as a tool to probe the chromospheric magnetic field. Hence, an unprecedented polarization accuracy is needed ((is) less than 10 (exp -3). Nevertheless, spatial and spectral resolutions are also crucial to observe chhromospheric feature such as spicules, and to have precise measurement of the Ly-alpha line core and wings. Hence, this poster will present how the telescope and the spectrograph were separately aligned, and their combined spatial and spectral resolutions.

  1. An adaptive spectral estimation technique to detect cavitation in HIFU with high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Probert Smith, Penny; Mayia, Fares; Ye, Guoliang

    2011-07-01

    In ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy, the changes observed on tissue are subtle during treatment; some ultrasound-guided HIFU protocols rely on the observation of significant brightness changes as the indicator of tissue lesions. The occurrence of a distinct hyperechogenic region ("bright-up") around the focus is often associated with acoustic cavitation resulting in microbubble formation, but it may indicate different physical events such as larger bubbles from boiling (known to alter acoustic impedance) or sometimes lesion formation. A reliable method to distinguish and spatially localize these causes within the tissue would assist the control of HIFU delivery, which is the subject of this paper. Spectral analysis of the radio frequency (RF) signal underlying the B-mode image provides more information on the physical cause, but the usual techniques that are methods on the Fourier transform require a long series for good spectral resolution and so they give poor spatial resolution. This paper introduces an active spectral cavitation detection method to attain high spatial resolution (0.15 × 0.15 mm per pixel) through a parametric statistical method (ARMA modeling) used on finite-length data sets, which enables local changes to be identified more easily. This technique uses the characteristics of the signal itself to optimize the model parameters and structure. Its performance is assessed using synthesized cavitation RF data, and it is then demonstrated in ex vivo bovine liver during and after HIFU exposure. The results suggest that good spatial and spectral resolution can be obtained by the design of suitable algorithms. In ultrasound-guided HIFU, the technique provides a useful supplement to B-mode analysis, with no additional time penalty in data acquisition. PMID:21684454

  2. High resolution fire danger modeling : integration of quantitative precipitation amount estimates derived from weather radars as an input of FWI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloppet, E.; Regimbeau, M.

    2009-09-01

    Fire meteo indices provide efficient guidance tools for the prevention, early warning and surveillance of forest fires. The indices are based on meteorological input data. The underlying approach is to exploit meteorological information as fully as possible to model the soil water content, biomass condition and fire danger. Fire meteorological danger is estimated by Météo-France at national level through the use of Fire Weather Index. The fire index services developed within the PREVIEW project (2005-2008) offer for the first time very high resolution mapping of forest fire risk. The high resolution FWI has been implemented in France complementary to the existing EFFIS operated by the Joint Research Center. A new method (ANTILOPE method) of combining precipitation data originating from different sources like rain gauges and weather radar measurements has been applied in the new service. Some of the advantages of this new service are: · Improved detection of local features of fire risk · More accurate analysis of meteorological input data used in forest fire index models providing added value for forest fire risk forecasts · Use of radar precipitation data "as is” utilizing the higher resolution, i.e. avoiding averaging operations The improved accuracy and spatial resolution of the indices provide a powerful early warning tool for national and regional civil protection and fire fighting authorities to alert and initiate forest fire fighting actions and measures.

  3. A new remote sensing procedure for the estimation of crop water requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiliotopoulos, M.; Loukas, A.; Mylopoulos, N.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this work is the development of a new approach for the estimation of water requirements for the most important crops located at Karla Watershed, central Greece. Satellite-based energy balance for mapping evapotranspiration with internalized calibration (METRIC) was used as a basis for the derivation of actual evapotranspiration (ET) and crop coefficient (ETrF) values from Landsat ETM+ imagery. MODIS imagery has been also used, and a spatial downscaling procedure is followed between the two sensors for the derivation of a new NDVI product with a spatial resolution of 30 m x 30 m. GER 1500 spectro-radiometric measurements are additionally conducted during 2012 growing season. Cotton, alfalfa, corn and sugar beets fields are utilized, based on land use maps derived from previous Landsat 7 ETM+ images. A filtering process is then applied to derive NDVI values after acquiring Landsat ETM+ based reflectance values from the GER 1500 device. ETrF vs NDVI relationships are produced and then applied to the previous satellite based downscaled product in order to finally derive a 30 m x 30 m daily ETrF map for the study area. CropWat model (FAO) is then applied, taking as an input the new crop coefficient values with a spatial resolution of 30 m x 30 m available for every crop. CropWat finally returns daily crop water requirements (mm) for every crop and the results are analyzed and discussed.

  4. Kalman-filtered compressive sensing for high resolution estimation of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions from sparse measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Jaideep; Lee, Jina; Lefantzi, Sophia; Yadav, Vineet; Michalak, Anna M.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2013-09-01

    The estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2) from limited ground-based and satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations will form a key component of the monitoring of treaties aimed at the abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. The limited nature of the measured data leads to a severely-underdetermined estimation problem. If the estimation is performed at fine spatial resolutions, it can also be computationally expensive. In order to enable such estimations, advances are needed in the spatial representation of ffCO2 emissions, scalable inversion algorithms and the identification of observables to measure. To that end, we investigate parsimonious spatial parameterizations of ffCO2 emissions which can be used in atmospheric inversions. We devise and test three random field models, based on wavelets, Gaussian kernels and covariance structures derived from easily-observed proxies of human activity. In doing so, we constructed a novel inversion algorithm, based on compressive sensing and sparse reconstruction, to perform the estimation. We also address scalable ensemble Kalman filters as an inversion mechanism and quantify the impact of Gaussian assumptions inherent in them. We find that the assumption does not impact the estimates of mean ffCO2 source strengths appreciably, but a comparison with Markov chain Monte Carlo estimates show significant differences in the variance of the source strengths. Finally, we study if the very different spatial natures of biogenic and ffCO2 emissions can be used to estimate them, in a disaggregated fashion, solely from CO2 concentration measurements, without extra information from products of incomplete combustion e.g., CO. We find that this is possible during the winter months, though the errors can be as large as 50%.

  5. Tethered Spectroscopic Probes Estimate Dynamic Distances with Subnanometer Resolution in Voltage-Dependent Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Jarecki, Brian W.; Zheng, Suqing; Zhang, Leili; Li, Xiaoxun; Zhou, Xin; Cui, Qiang; Tang, Weiping; Chanda, Baron

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of inter- and intramolecular distances are important for monitoring structural changes and understanding protein interaction networks. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer and functionalized chemical spacers are the two predominantly used strategies to map short-range distances in living cells. Here, we describe the development of a hybrid approach that combines the key advantages of spectroscopic and chemical methods to estimate dynamic distance information from labeled proteins. Bifunctional spectroscopic probes were designed to make use of adaptable-anchor and length-varied spacers to estimate molecular distances by exploiting short-range collisional electron transfer. The spacers were calibrated using labeled polyproline peptides of defined lengths and validated by molecular simulations. This approach was extended to estimate distance restraints that enable us to evaluate the resting-state model of the Shaker potassium channel. PMID:24359744

  6. Observation of lens aberrations for high resolution electron microscopy II: simple expressions for optimal estimates.

    PubMed

    Saxton, W Owen

    2015-04-01

    This paper lists simple closed-form expressions estimating aberration coefficients (defocus, astigmatism, three-fold astigmatism, coma / misalignment, spherical aberration) on the basis of image shift or diffractogram shape measurements as a function of injected beam tilt. Simple estimators are given for a large number of injected tilt configurations, optimal in the sense of least-squares fitting of all the measurements, and so better than most reported previously. Standard errors are given for most, allowing different approaches to be compared. Special attention is given to the measurement of the spherical aberration, for which several simple procedures are given, and the effect of foreknowledge of this on other aberration estimates is noted. Details and optimal expressions are also given for a new and simple method of analysis, requiring measurements of the diffractogram mirror axis direction only, which are simpler to make than the focus and astigmatism measurements otherwise required. PMID:25728295

  7. Detecting tents to estimate the displaced populations for post-disaster relief using high resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shifeng; So, Emily; Smith, Pete

    2015-04-01

    Estimating the number of refugees and internally displaced persons is important for planning and managing an efficient relief operation following disasters and conflicts. Accurate estimates of refugee numbers can be inferred from the number of tents. Extracting tents from high-resolution satellite imagery has recently been suggested. However, it is still a significant challenge to extract tents automatically and reliably from remote sensing imagery. This paper describes a novel automated method, which is based on mathematical morphology, to generate a camp map to estimate the refugee numbers by counting tents on the camp map. The method is especially useful in detecting objects with a clear shape, size, and significant spectral contrast with their surroundings. Results for two study sites with different satellite sensors and different spatial resolutions demonstrate that the method achieves good performance in detecting tents. The overall accuracy can be up to 81% in this study. Further improvements should be possible if over-identified isolated single pixel objects can be filtered. The performance of the method is impacted by spectral characteristics of satellite sensors and image scenes, such as the extent of area of interest and the spatial arrangement of tents. It is expected that the image scene would have a much higher influence on the performance of the method than the sensor characteristics.

  8. High-resolution satellite image recovery by modulation transfer function (MTF) compensation method using phase congruency estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xiaopeng; Yang, Hong; Zhang, Shaohui; Jin, Zhenhua; Du, Juan

    2013-09-01

    Satellite imagery always has low-resolution causing poor application in practice because the serious degradation in imaging is resulted in many factors such as atmospheric turbulence, cloud, and aberration of optical system. To reconstruct the degraded remote sensing images with a high quality, we designed an algorithm to estimate the system modulation transfer function (MTF) accurately. Phase congruency is employed to detect the edges and corners of the image first, then the significant edges, which are utilized to estimate the edge spread function (ESF) using inclined edge method, are picked up from above features through a certain line detection measurement. An image restoration algorithm based on total variation (TV) is introduced to deconvolute the degraded image with the estimated MTF which is derived from the ESF. The experiments show that this method is adaptive and efficient to recover the remote sensing images taken from a Chinese Satellite. The restored images with a higher resolution and higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) will improve the applications greatly.

  9. Estimating daily air temperature across the Southeastern United States using high-resolution satellite data: A statistical modeling study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liuhua; Liu, Pengfei; Kloog, Itai; Lee, Mihye; Kosheleva, Anna; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-04-01

    Accurate estimates of spatio-temporal resolved near-surface air temperature (Ta) are crucial for environmental epidemiological studies. However, values of Ta are conventionally obtained from weather stations, which have limited spatial coverage. Satellite surface temperature (Ts) measurements offer the possibility of local exposure estimates across large domains. The Southeastern United States has different climatic conditions, more small water bodies and wetlands, and greater humidity in contrast to other regions, which add to the challenge of modeling air temperature. In this study, we incorporated satellite Ts to estimate high resolution (1km×1km) daily Ta across the southeastern USA for 2000-2014. We calibrated Ts-Ta measurements using mixed linear models, land use, and separate slopes for each day. A high out-of-sample cross-validated R(2) of 0.952 indicated excellent model performance. When satellite Ts were unavailable, linear regression on nearby monitors and spatio-temporal smoothing was used to estimate Ta. The daily Ta estimations were compared to the NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) model. A good agreement with an R(2) of 0.969 and a mean squared prediction error (RMSPE) of 1.376°C was achieved. Our results demonstrate that Ta can be reliably predicted using this Ts-based prediction model, even in a large geographical area with topography and weather patterns varying considerably. PMID:26717080

  10. Improved estimates of boreal Fire Radiative Energy using high temporal resolution data and a modified active fire detection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Kirsten

    2016-04-01

    Reliable estimates of biomass combusted during wildfires can be obtained from satellite observations of fire radiative power (FRP). Total fire radiative energy (FRE) is typically estimated by integrating instantaneous measurements of fire radiative power (FRP) at the time of orbital satellite overpass or geostationary observation. Remotely-sensed FRP products from orbital satellites are usually global in extent, requiring several thresholding and filtering operations to reduce the number of false fire detections. Some filters required for a global product may not be appropriate to fire detection in the boreal forest resulting in errors of omission and increased data processing times. We evaluate the effect of a boreal-specific active fire detection algorithm and estimates of FRP/FRE. Boreal fires are more likely to escape detection due to lower intensity smouldering combustion and sub canopy fires, therefore improvements in boreal fire detection could substantially reduce the uncertainty of emissions from biomass combustion in the region. High temporal resolution data from geostationary satellites have led to improvements in FRE estimation in tropical and temperate forests, but such a perspective is not possible for high latitude ecosystems given the equatorial orbit of geostationary observation. The increased density of overpasses in high latitudes from polar-orbiting satellites, however, may provide adequate temporal sampling for estimating FRE.

  11. A Real-Time Smart Sensor for High-Resolution Frequency Estimation in Power Systems

    PubMed Central

    Granados-Lieberman, David; Romero-Troncoso, Rene J.; Cabal-Yepez, Eduardo; Osornio-Rios, Roque A.; Franco-Gasca, Luis A.

    2009-01-01

    Power quality monitoring is a theme in vogue and accurate frequency measurement of the power line is a major issue. This problem is particularly relevant for power generating systems since the generated signal must comply with restrictive standards. The novelty of this work is the development of a smart sensor for real-time high-resolution frequency measurement in accordance with international standards for power quality monitoring. The proposed smart sensor utilizes commercially available current clamp, hall-effect sensor or resistor as primary sensor. The signal processing is carried out through the chirp z-transform. Simulations and experimental results show the efficiency of the proposed smart sensor. PMID:22400002

  12. IMPROVED METHOD FOR ESTIMATING MOLECULAR WEIGHTS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM LOW RESOLUTION MASS SPECTRA

    EPA Science Inventory

    An improved method of estimating molecular weights of volatile organic compound from their mass spectra has been developed and implemented with an expert system. he method is based on the strong correlation of MAXMASS, the highest mass with an intensity of 5% of the base peak in ...

  13. Comparing LAI estimates of corn and soybean from vegetation indices of multi-resolution satellite images

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf area index (LAI) is important in explaining the ability of the crop to intercept solar energy for biomass production and in understanding the impact of crop management practices. This paper describes a procedure for estimating LAI as a function of image-derived vegetation indices from temporal ...

  14. Multi-scale geospatial agroecosystem modeling: a case study on the influence of soil data resolution on carbon budget estimates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H; Zhao, Kaiguang; Leduc, Stephen D; Xu, Min; Xiong, Wei; Zhang, Aiping; Izaurralde, Roberto C; Thomson, Allison M; West, Tristram O; Post, Wilfred M

    2014-05-01

    The development of effective measures to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentration and mitigate negative impacts of climate change requires accurate quantification of the spatial variation and magnitude of the terrestrial carbon (C) flux. However, the spatial pattern and strength of terrestrial C sinks and sources remain uncertain. In this study, we designed a spatially-explicit agroecosystem modeling system by integrating the Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model with multiple sources of geospatial and surveyed datasets (including crop type map, elevation, climate forcing, fertilizer application, tillage type and distribution, and crop planting and harvesting date), and applied it to examine the sensitivity of cropland C flux simulations to two widely used soil databases (i.e. State Soil Geographic-STATSGO of a scale of 1:250,000 and Soil Survey Geographic-SSURGO of a scale of 1:24,000) in Iowa, USA. To efficiently execute numerous EPIC runs resulting from the use of high resolution spatial data (56m), we developed a parallelized version of EPIC. Both STATSGO and SSURGO led to similar simulations of crop yields and Net Ecosystem Production (NEP) estimates at the State level. However, substantial differences were observed at the county and sub-county (grid) levels. In general, the fine resolution SSURGO data outperformed the coarse resolution STATSGO data for county-scale crop-yield simulation, and within STATSGO, the area-weighted approach provided more accurate results. Further analysis showed that spatial distribution and magnitude of simulated NEP were more sensitive to the resolution difference between SSURGO and STATSGO at the county or grid scale. For over 60% of the cropland areas in Iowa, the deviations between STATSGO- and SSURGO-derived NEP were larger than 1MgCha(-1)yr(-1), or about half of the average cropland NEP, highlighting the significant uncertainty in spatial distribution and magnitude of simulated C fluxes resulting from

  15. Multi-scale geospatial agroecosystem modeling: a case study on the influence of soil data resolution on carbon budget estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, D.; Zhao, Kaiguang; LeDuc, Stephen D.; Xu, Min; Xiong, Wei; Zhang, Aiping; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; West, Tristram O.; Post, W. M.

    2014-05-01

    The development of effective measures to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentration and mitigate negative impacts of climate change requires accurate quantification of the spatial variation and magnitude of the terrestrial carbon (C) flux. However, the spatial pattern and strength of terrestrial C sinks and sources remain uncertain. In this study, we designed a spatially-explicit agroecosystem modeling system by integrating the Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model with multiple sources of geospatial and surveyed datasets (including crop type map, elevation, climate forcing, fertilizer application, tillage type and distribution, and crop planting and harvesting date), and applied it to examine the sensitivity of cropland C flux simulations to two widely used soil databases (i.e. State Soil Geographic-STATSGO of a scale of 1:250,000 and Soil Survey Geographic-SSURGO of a scale of 1:24,000) in Iowa, USA. To efficiently execute numerous EPIC runs resulting from the use of high resolution spatial data (56m), we developed a parallelized version of EPIC. Both STATSGO and SSURGO led to similar simulations of crop yields and Net Ecosystem Production (NEP) estimates at the State level. However, substantial differences were observed at the county and sub-county (grid) levels. In general, the fine resolution SSURGO data outperformed the coarse resolution STATSGO data for county-scale crop-yield simulation, and within STATSGO, the area-weighted approach provided more accurate results. Further analysis showed that spatial distribution and magnitude of simulated NEP were more sensitive to the resolution difference between SSURGO and STATSGO at the county or grid scale. For over 60% of the cropland areas in Iowa, the deviations between STATSGO- and SSURGO-derived NEP were larger than 1MgCha(-1)yr(-1), or about half of the average cropland NEP, highlighting the significant uncertainty in spatial distribution and magnitude of simulated C fluxes resulting from

  16. Revised spectroscopic parameters of SH+ from ALMA and IRAM 30 m observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Holger S. P.; Goicoechea, Javier R.; Cernicharo, José; Agúndez, Marcelino; Pety, Jérôme; Cuadrado, Sara; Gerin, Maryvonne; Dumas, Gaëlle; Chapillon, Edwige

    2014-09-01

    Hydrides represent the first steps of interstellar chemistry. Sulfanylium (SH+), in particular, is a key tracer of energetic processes. We used ALMA and the IRAM 30 m telescope to search for the lowest frequency rotational lines of SH+ toward the Orion Bar, the prototypical photo-dissociation region illuminated by a strong UV radiation field. On the basis of previous Herschel/HIFI observations of SH+, we expected to detect emission of the two SH+ hyperfine structure (HFS) components of the NJ = 10-01 fine structure (FS) component near 346 GHz. While we did not observe any lines at the frequencies predicted from laboratory data, we detected two emission lines, each ~15 MHz above the SH+ predictions and with relative intensities and HFS splitting expected for SH+. The rest frequencies of the two newly detected lines are more compatible with the remainder of the SH+ laboratory data than the single line measured in the laboratory near 346 GHz and previously attributed to SH+. Therefore, we assign these new features to the two SH+ HFS components of the NJ = 10-01 FS component and re-determine its spectroscopic parameters, which will be useful for future observations of SH+, in particular if its lowest frequency FS components are studied. Our observations demonstrate the suitability of these lines for SH+ searches at frequencies easily accessible from the ground. This paper makes use of the following ALMA data: ADS/JAO.ALMA#2012.1.00352.S. ALMA is a partnership of ESO (representing its member states), NSF (USA) and NINS (Japan), together with NRC (Canada) and NSC and ASIAA (Taiwan), in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. The Joint ALMA Observatory is operated by ESO, AUI/NRAO and NAOJ.This paper makes use of observations obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Resolution of deep angiosperm phylogeny using conserved nuclear genes and estimates of early divergence times.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Liping; Zhang, Qiang; Sun, Renran; Kong, Hongzhi; Zhang, Ning; Ma, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Angiosperms are the most successful plants and support human livelihood and ecosystems. Angiosperm phylogeny is the foundation of studies of gene function and phenotypic evolution, divergence time estimation and biogeography. The relationship of the five divergent groups of the Mesangiospermae (~99.95% of extant angiosperms) remains uncertain, with multiple hypotheses reported in the literature. Here transcriptome data sets are obtained from 26 species lacking sequenced genomes, representing each of the five groups: eudicots, monocots, magnoliids, Chloranthaceae and Ceratophyllaceae. Phylogenetic analyses using 59 carefully selected low-copy nuclear genes resulted in highly supported relationships: sisterhood of eudicots and a clade containing Chloranthaceae and Ceratophyllaceae, with magnoliids being the next sister group, followed by monocots. Our topology allows a re-examination of the evolutionary patterns of 110 morphological characters. The molecular clock estimates of Mesangiospermae diversification during the late to middle Jurassic correspond well to the origins of some insects, which may have been a factor facilitating early angiosperm radiation. PMID:25249442

  18. Resolution of deep angiosperm phylogeny using conserved nuclear genes and estimates of early divergence times

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Liping; Zhang, Qiang; Sun, Renran; Kong, Hongzhi; Zhang, Ning; Ma, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Angiosperms are the most successful plants and support human livelihood and ecosystems. Angiosperm phylogeny is the foundation of studies of gene function and phenotypic evolution, divergence time estimation and biogeography. The relationship of the five divergent groups of the Mesangiospermae (~99.95% of extant angiosperms) remains uncertain, with multiple hypotheses reported in the literature. Here transcriptome data sets are obtained from 26 species lacking sequenced genomes, representing each of the five groups: eudicots, monocots, magnoliids, Chloranthaceae and Ceratophyllaceae. Phylogenetic analyses using 59 carefully selected low-copy nuclear genes resulted in highly supported relationships: sisterhood of eudicots and a clade containing Chloranthaceae and Ceratophyllaceae, with magnoliids being the next sister group, followed by monocots. Our topology allows a re-examination of the evolutionary patterns of 110 morphological characters. The molecular clock estimates of Mesangiospermae diversification during the late to middle Jurassic correspond well to the origins of some insects, which may have been a factor facilitating early angiosperm radiation. PMID:25249442

  19. Estimating loop length from CryoEM images at medium resolutions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background De novo protein modeling approaches utilize 3-dimensional (3D) images derived from electron cryomicroscopy (CryoEM) experiments. The skeleton connecting two secondary structures such as α-helices represent the loop in the 3D image. The accuracy of the skeleton and of the detected secondary structures are critical in De novo modeling. It is important to measure the length along the skeleton accurately since the length can be used as a constraint in modeling the protein. Results We have developed a novel computational geometric approach to derive a simplified curve in order to estimate the loop length along the skeleton. The method was tested using fifty simulated density images of helix-loop-helix segments of atomic structures and eighteen experimentally derived density data from Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB). The test using simulated density maps shows that it is possible to estimate within 0.5Å of the expected length for 48 of the 50 cases. The experiments, involving eighteen experimentally derived CryoEM images, show that twelve cases have error within 2Å. Conclusions The tests using both simulated and experimentally derived images show that it is possible for our proposed method to estimate the loop length along the skeleton if the secondary structure elements, such as α-helices, can be detected accurately, and there is a continuous skeleton linking the α-helices. PMID:24565041

  20. Estimation of Evapotraspiration of Tamarisk using Energy Balance Models with High Resolution Airborne Imagery and LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geli, H. M.; Taghvaeian, S.; Neale, C. M.; Pack, R.; Watts, D. R.; Osterberg, J.

    2010-12-01

    The wide uncontrolled spread of the invasive species of Tamarisk (Salt Cedar) in the riparian areas of the southwest of the United States has become a source of concern to the water resource management community. This tree which was imported for ornamental purposes and to control bank erosion during the 1800’s later became problematic and unwanted due to its biophysical properties: Its vigorous growth out-competes native species for moisture, lowering water tables, increasing the soil salinity and hence becomes the dominant riparian vegetation especially over arid to semi-arid floodplain environments. Most importantly they consume large amounts of water leading to reduction of river flows and lowering the groundwater table. We implemented this study in an effort to provide reliable estimates of the amount of water consumed or “lost” by such species through evapotranspiration (ET) as well as to a better understand of the related land surface and near atmosphere interactions. The recent advances in remote sensing techniques and the related data quality made it possible to provide spatio-temporal estimates of ET at a considerably higher resolution and reliable accuracy over a wide range of surface heterogeneity. We tested two different soil-vegetation atmosphere transfer models (SVAT) that are based on thermal remote sensing namely: the two source model (TSM) of Norman et al. (1995) with its recent modifications and the Surface Energy balance algorithm (SEBAL) of Bastiaanssen et al. (1998) to estimate the different surface energy balance components and the evapotranspiration (ET) spatially. We used high resolution (1.0 meter pixel size) shortwave reflectance and longwave thermal airborne imagery acquired by the research aircraft at the Remote Sensing Services Lab at Utah State University (USU) and land use map classified from these images as well as a detailed vegetation height image acquired by the LASSI Lidar also developed at USU. We also compared estimates

  1. Temporal resolution limit estimation of x-ray streak cameras using a CsI photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiang; Gu, Li; Zong, Fangke; Zhang, Jingjin; Yang, Qinlao

    2015-08-28

    A Monte Carlo model is developed and implemented to calculate the characteristics of x-ray induced secondary electron (SE) emission from a CsI photocathode used in an x-ray streak camera. Time distributions of emitted SEs are investigated with an incident x-ray energy range from 1 to 30 keV and a CsI thickness range from 100 to 1000 nm. Simulation results indicate that SE time distribution curves have little dependence on the incident x-ray energy and CsI thickness. The calculated time dispersion within the CsI photocathode is about 70 fs, which should be the temporal resolution limit of x-ray streak cameras that use CsI as the photocathode material.

  2. Estimating rheological properties of lava flows using high-resolution time lapse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Applegarth, L. J.; Pinkerton, H.; Fryer, T.

    2011-12-01

    During effusive eruptions, property and infrastructure can be threatened by lava flow inundation. In order to maximise the effectiveness of the response to such an event, it is necessary to be able to reliably forecast the area that will be affected. One of the major controls on the advance of a lava flow is its rheology, which is spatially and temporally variable, and depends on many underlying factors. Estimating the rheological properties of a lava flow, and the change in these over space and time is therefore of the utmost importance. Here we report estimates of rheological properties made from geometric and velocity measurements on integrated topographic and image data using the method of Ellis et al. (2004) (Ellis B, Wilson L & Pinkerton H (2004) Estimating the rheology of basaltic lava flows. Lunar & Planetary Science XXXV Abst. 1550). These are then compared to the viscosity predicted from composition and temperature by the GRD model (Giordano D, Russell JK, & Dingwell DB (2008) Viscosity of Magmatic Liquids: A Model. Earth & Planetary Science Letters, 271, 123-134). During the 13 May 2008 - 6 July 2009 eruption of Mt Etna, Sicily, lava flows were emplaced into the Valle del Bove, reaching a maximum length of >6 km. Towards the end of the eruption, multiple channelized aa flows were active simultaneously, reaching tens to hundreds of metres in length. Flow lifetimes were of the order hours to days. In the last month of the eruption, we installed a Canon EOS 450D camera at Pizzi Deneri, on the north side of the Valle del Bove, to collect visible images at 15-minute intervals. On one day, topographic data (using a Riegl LPM-321 terrestrial laser scanner) and thermal images (using a FLIR Thermacam S40) were also collected from this location. The fronts of some of the larger flows were tracked through the time lapse image sequence. Using knowledge of the camera imaging geometry, the pixel tracks were reprojected onto the topographic surface to determine flow

  3. Application of high-resolution passive seismic tomographic inversion and estimating reservoir properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayatollahy Tafti, T.; Aminzadeh, F.

    2011-12-01

    We use the travel time information from micro-seismic events of the micro earthquake data to perform tomographic inversion to accurately estimate P wave and S wave velocities. These velocities lead us to structural and lithological information about the subsurface. We test the method using the MEQ data from the NW Geysers geothermal field for both velocity inversion and estimating the reservoir properties. Complementary geophysical data are helpful for imaging the sub-surface structure. We integrate the available geologic information with the MEQ data. Porosity, fracture density and permeability are some of the properties that we extract from our integrated method. In addition, we quantify the changes of the velocities with time in parts of the field; we then ascribe such changes to various phenomena of transient geological processes such as, dyke intrusions or fluid pressure increase in the fracture network or even fracture network propagation into the medium. We demonstrate that integrating the passive seismic tomography with geologic information allows us to detect the space-time dependency of elastic properties in response to local variations of fluid pressure. We use the seismicity data set as a geothermal reservoir monitoring tool for mapping the fluid movements and other changes in reservoir properties. Our results are consistent with both injection and production well data. We focus on two sub-regions for our investigation. One region corresponds to a traditional hydrothermal reservoir. The second region relates to a high temperature zone, a candidate for creation of Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) project. These results show the importance of integration of passive seismic tomography with geologic information for estimating the geothermal reservoir properties where sufficient microseismicity is present.

  4. Model-free uncertainty estimation in stochastical optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) leads to a doubled temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberg, Wim; Duwé, Sam; Leutenegger, Marcel; Moeyaert, Benjamien; Krajnik, Bartosz; Lasser, Theo; Dedecker, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) is a super-resolution fluorescence imaging technique that makes use of stochastic fluctuations in the emission of the fluorophores. During a SOFI measurement multiple fluorescence images are acquired from the sample, followed by the calculation of the spatiotemporal cumulants of the intensities observed at each position. Compared to other techniques, SOFI works well under conditions of low signal-to-noise, high background, or high emitter densities. However, it can be difficult to unambiguously determine the reliability of images produced by any superresolution imaging technique. In this work we present a strategy that enables the estimation of the variance or uncertainty associated with each pixel in the SOFI image. In addition to estimating the image quality or reliability, we show that this can be used to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of SOFI images by including multiple pixel combinations in the cumulant calculation. We present an algorithm to perform this optimization, which automatically takes all relevant instrumental, sample, and probe parameters into account. Depending on the optical magnification of the system, this strategy can be used to improve the SNR of a SOFI image by 40% to 90%. This gain in information is entirely free, in the sense that it does not require additional efforts or complications. Alternatively our approach can be applied to reduce the number of fluorescence images to meet a particular quality level by about 30% to 50%, strongly improving the temporal resolution of SOFI imaging. PMID:26977356

  5. Fourier domain optical coherence tomography artifact and speckle reduction by autoregressive spectral estimation without a loss of resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousi, Evgenia; Pitris, Costas

    2015-03-01

    Fourier Domain (FD) Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) interferograms require a Fourier transformation in order to be converted to A-Scans representing the backscattering intensity from the different depths of the tissue microstructure. Most often, this transformation is performed using a discrete Fourier transform, i.e. the well-known Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). However, there are many alternatives for performing the necessary spectral conversion. Autoregressive (AR) spectral estimation techniques are one such example. The parametric nature of AR techniques offers several advantages, compared to the commonly-used FFT, including better convergence and less susceptibility to noise. They can also be adjusted to represent more or less of the signal detail depending on the order of the autoregression. These features make them uniquely suited for processing the FD OCT data. The advantages of the proposed methodology are illustrated on in vivo skin imaging data and the resolution is verified on single back-reflections from a glass surface. AR spectral estimation can be used to convert the interferograms to A-Scans while at the same time reducing the artifacts caused by high intensity back-reflections (by -20 dB) and diminishing the speckle (by -12 dB) all without the degradation in the resolution associated with other techniques.

  6. Estimation of porphyrin concentration in the kerogen fraction of shales using high-resolution reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Peter N.; Gaffey, Michael J.; Sundararaman, P.

    1991-01-01

    An interpretive model for estimating porphyrin concentration in bitumen and kerogen from spectral reaflectance data in the visible and near-ultraviolet region of the spectrum is derived and calibrated. Preliminary results obtained using the model are consistent with concentrations determined from the bitumen extract and suggest that 40 to 60 percent of the total porphyrin concentration remains in the kerogen after extraction of bitumen from thermally immature samples. The reflectance technique will contribute to porphyrin and kerogen studies and can be applied at its present level of development to several areas of geologic and paleo-oceanographic research.

  7. Estimation of Trees Outside Forests using IRS High Resolution data by Object Based Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujar, G. S.; Reddy, P. M.; Reddy, C. S.; Jha, C. S.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2014-11-01

    Assessment of Trees outside forests (TOF) is widely being recognized as a pivotal theme, in sustainable natural resource management, due to their role in offering variety of goods, such as timber, fruits and fodder as well as services like water, carbon, biodiversity. Forest Conservation efforts involving reduction of deforestation and degradation may have to increasingly rely on alternatives provided by TOF in catering to economic demands in forest edges. Spatial information systems involving imaging, analysis and monitoring to achieve objectives under protocols like REDD+, require incorporation of information content from areas under forest as well as trees outside forests, to aid holistic decisions. In this perspective, automation in retrieving information on area under trees, growing outside forests, using high resolution imaging is essential so that measuring and verification of extant carbon pools, are strengthened. Retrieval of this tree cover is demonstrated herewith, using object based image analysis in a forest edge of dry deciduous forests of Eastern Ghats, in Khammam district of Telangana state of India. IRS high resolution panchromatic 2.5 m data (Cartosat-1 Orthorectified) used in tandem with 5.8 m multispectral LISS IV data, discerns tree crowns and clusters at a detailed scale and hence semi-automated approach is attempted to classify TOF from a pair of image from relatively crop and cloud free season. Object based image analysis(OBIA) approach as implemented in commercial suite of e-Cognition (Ver 8.9) consists of segmentation at user defined scale followed by application of wide range of spectral, textural and object geometry based parameters for classification. Software offers innovative blend of raster and vector features that can be juxtaposed flexibly, across scales horizontally or vertically. Segmentation was carried out at multiple scales to discern first the major land covers, such as forest, water, agriculture followed by that at a finer

  8. A ground calibration of the engineering model of the SXT onboard ASTRO-H using the ISAS 30m pencil beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihara, K.; Hayashi, T.; Ishida, M.; Maeda, Y.; Mori, H.; Sato, T.; Tomikawa, K.; Ishibashi, K.; Iizuka, R.; Okajima, T.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Soong, Y.

    2012-09-01

    The Japanese ASTRO-H mission, planned to be launched in 2014, will carry several instruments for covering a wide energy range from a few keV to 600 keV. Among them there are four thin-foil-nested Wolter-I X-ray telescopes. Two of them are Soft X-ray Telescopes (SXTs) covering up to ~12 keV. Each of them focuses an image on the focal plane detectors of the CCD camera (SXI) and the calorimeter (SXS-XCS), respectively. In 2011, we performed a ground calibration of a quadrant engineering model (EM) of SXT that was fabricated at MASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The ground calibration was made with a combination of the measurements at the GSFC and Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) facilities. In this paper we report the results of the calibration at the ISAS 30m beamline facility. We used a raster san method with a pencil beam at the baseline length of 30m. An effective area and angular resolution of the EM quadrant were measured. The effective area is 147 cm2 at 1.49 keV and 116 cm2 at 4.51 keV, respectively, while the angular longer by ~20mm from nominal length. We also measured imaging performance in separate parts of nested mirrors. The angular resolution of parts at outer radius is larger than those at inner radius, and the quadrant have different focal lengths in radius.

  9. Estimation of Surface Air Temperature from MODIS 1km Resolution Land Surface Temperature Over Northern China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.; Gerasimov, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Surface air temperature is a critical variable to describe the energy and water cycle of the Earth-atmosphere system and is a key input element for hydrology and land surface models. It is a very important variable in agricultural applications and climate change studies. This is a preliminary study to examine statistical relationships between ground meteorological station measured surface daily maximum/minimum air temperature and satellite remotely sensed land surface temperature from MODIS over the dry and semiarid regions of northern China. Studies were conducted for both MODIS-Terra and MODIS-Aqua by using year 2009 data. Results indicate that the relationships between surface air temperature and remotely sensed land surface temperature are statistically significant. The relationships between the maximum air temperature and daytime land surface temperature depends significantly on land surface types and vegetation index, but the minimum air temperature and nighttime land surface temperature has little dependence on the surface conditions. Based on linear regression relationship between surface air temperature and MODIS land surface temperature, surface maximum and minimum air temperatures are estimated from 1km MODIS land surface temperature under clear sky conditions. The statistical errors (sigma) of the estimated daily maximum (minimum) air temperature is about 3.8 C(3.7 C).

  10. Geological structure of the offshore Sumatra forearc region estimated from high-resolution MCS reflection survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Ayanori; Hirata, Kenji; Seeber, Leonard; Arai, Kohsaku; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Rahardiawan, Riza; Udrekh; Fujiwara, Toshiya; Kinoshita, Masataka; Baba, Hisatoshi; Kameo, Katsura; Adachi, Keita; Sarukawa, Hiroshi; Tokuyama, Hidekazu; Permana, Haryadi; Djajadihardja, Yusuf S.; Ashi, Juichiro

    2014-01-01

    To investigate detailed fault distributions and shallow geological structure offshore northwestern Sumatra, we obtained high-resolution Multi-Channel Seismic (MCS) reflection data around the Sunda Trench, trench slope, and forearc high regions offshore northwestern Sumatra. In general, trench-parallel anticlinal ridges are distributed from trench slope region to forearc high region. Two kinds of different vergence systems are characterized in the Sumatra forearc region; landward vergence is dominant in the lower trench slope region, and seaward vergence is dominant in the forearc high region. Moreover, piggyback or slope basins are recognized between anticlinal ridges. Deformation in the uppermost part of these basins, that is referred to ‘recent’ deformation in this paper, can be identified not only along major thrusts but also between major thrusts and the lower trench slope, suggesting these are related to recently active faulting. Several but the largest number of such deformation are distributed along a major thrust located in the middle of the forearc high region, whereas few are done along other major thrusts.

  11. High Resolution, Consistent Online Estimation of Potential Flood Damage in The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoes, O.; Hut, R.; van Leeuwen, E.

    2014-12-01

    In the current age where water authorities no longer blindly design and maintain all infrastructure just to meet a certain standardized return period, accurate estimation of potential flood damage is important in decision making with regards to flood prevention measures. We identify three issues with current methods of estimating flood damages. Firstly, common practice is to assume that for a given land use type, damage is mainly dependent on inundation depth, and sometimes flow velocity. We recognize that depending on the type of land use inundation depth, velocity, flood duration, season, detour time and recovery time influences the amount of damage significantly. Secondly, setting stage-damage curves is usually left to an end user and can thus vary between different water authorities within a single country. What was needed at a national level is a common way of calculating flood damages, so different prevention measures can be fairly compared. Finally, most flood models use relatively large grid cells, usually in the order of 25 m2 or coarser. Especially in urban areas this leads to obvious errors: different land uses (shops, housing, park, are all classified as "urban" and treated equally. To tackle these issues we developed a web-based model which can be accessed via www.waterschadeschatter.nl (water schade schatter is Dutch for water damage estimator). It includes all necessary data sources to calculate the damage of any potential flood in the Netherlands. It uses different damage functions for different land use types, which the user can, but need not change. It runs on 0.25m2 grid cells. Both the datasets required and the amount of calculation needed is more than a desktop computer can handle. In order to start a calculation a user needs to upload the relevant flood information to the website. The calculation is divided over several multicore servers, after which the user will receive an email with a link to the results of his calculations. Our

  12. Cerebral Blood Flow Estimation Using Classification Techniques On A Sequence Of Low Resolution Tomographic Evolutive Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Marie; Aguilar-Martin, Joseph; Boulanouar, Kader; Celsis, Pierre; Marc-Vergnes, Jean P.

    1989-05-01

    In order to improve the performance of the instrumental variable method (IVM) in calculating regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPELT), and inert diffusible tracer such as 133Xe, we use Learning Algorithms for Multivariate Data Analysis (LAMDA) to classify the voxels of the images of local concentrations in the brain. The LAMDA method correctly distinguished between extra and intra-cerebral voxels. However the topography of the intra-cerebral classes did not match the Regions Of Interest (ROI) defined on an anatomical basis. Provided that all the intra-cerebral classes contaminated by bone and air passage artefact were rejected, the results given by the NM are in good agreement with those derived by the bolus distribution principle. We thus conclude that LAMDA methods can improve the reliability of images of CBF estimates.

  13. Optimal Estimation Retrievals of Aerosol Microphysical Properties from High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and Polarimeter Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Burton, S. P.; Stamnes, S.; Mueller, D.; Chemyakin, E.; Sawamura, P.; Cairns, B.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the vertical profile, composition, concentration, and size distribution of aerosols is required to quantify the impacts of aerosols on human health, global and regional climate, clouds and precipitation, and ocean ecosystems. We will describe an Optimal Estimation (OE) retrieval method that will use three wavelengths of aerosol backscattering (3β) and two wavelengths of aerosol extinction (2α). We will also describe how to use the OE framework to retrieve vertical profiles simultaneously using altitude resolved HSRL data. Finally, we will describe how to include additional measurements (e.g. polarimeter or Sun photometer) for improved aerosol microphysical property retrievals. In a traditional aerosol retrieval algorithm, one solves for aerosol size distributions under various parameter space (rmin, rmax, real and imaginary refractive index) using Tikhonov (or other) regularization and then selects physically and mathematically meaningful solutions from hundreds of thousand retrievals. In an attempt to speed up the retrieval and to provide retrieval error estimates, the OE method solves for all related aerosol microphysical parameters (e.g. number concentrations, particle size distribution, real and imaginary part of refractive indices) simultaneously in a maximum-likelihood sense by fitting the observed data. Other quantities such as effective particle radius, surface area concentration, volume concentration, and single scattering albedo are also derived from the retrieved size distribution and the number concentrations. We will show preliminary results using both simulated data and airborne measurements from HSRL-2. Coincident airborne in-situ and surface remote sensing datasets will be used to evaluate the performance of the new OE algorithm.

  14. High resolution X-Band radar rainfall estimates for a Mediterranean to hyper-arid transition area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Francesco; Lokshin, Anton; Notarpietro, Riccardo; Gabella, Marco; Branca, Marco; Bonfil, David; Morin, Efrat

    2015-04-01

    Weather radars provide rainfall estimates with high spatial and temporal resolutions over wide areas. X-Band weather radars are of relatively low-cost and easy to be handled and maintained, moreover they offer extremely high spatial and temporal resolutions and are therefore object of particular interest. Main drawback of these instruments lies on the quantitative accuracy, that can be significantly affected by atmospheric attenuation. Distributed rainfall information is a key issue when hydrological applications are needed for small space-time scale phenomena such as flash floods and debris flows. Moreover, such detailed measurements represent a great benefit for agricultural management of areas characterized by substantial rainfall variability. Two single polarization, single elevation, non-Doppler X-Band weather radars are operational since Oct-2012 in the northern Negev (Israel). Mean annual precipitation over the area drops dramatically from 500 mm/yr at the Mediterranean coast to less than 50 mm/yr at the hyper-arid region near the Dead Sea in less than a 100 km distance. The dryer region close to the Dead Sea is prone to flash floods that often cause casualties and severe damage while the western Mediterranean region is extensively used for agricultural purposes. Measures from a C-Band weather radar located 40-120 km away and from a sparse raingauge network (density ~1gauge/450km2) are also available. C-Band rainfall estimates are corrected using combined physically-based and empirical adjustment of data. The aim of this study is to assess the quantitative accuracy of X-Band rainfall estimates with respect to the combined use of in situ measurements and C-Band observations. Results from a set of storms occurred during the first years of measurements are discussed paying particular attention to: (i) wet radome attenuation, (ii) range dependent degradation including attenuation along the path and (iii) systematic effects related to the Mediterranean to hyper

  15. Estimating gross primary productivity (GPP) of forests across southern England at high spatial and temporal resolution using the FLIGHT model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankaew, Prasan; Milton, Edward; Dawson, Terry; Dash, Jadu

    2013-04-01

    Forests and woodlands play an important role in CO2 flux and in the storage of carbon, therefore it is important to be able to estimate gross primary productivity (GPP) and its change over time. The MODIS GPP product (MOD17) provides near-global GPP, but at relatively coarse spatial resolution (1km pixel size) and only every eight days. In order to study the dynamics of GPP over shorter time periods and over smaller areas it is necessary to make ground measurements or use a plant canopy model. The most reliable ground-based GPP data are those from the FLUXNET network, which comprises over 500 sites worldwide, each of which measures GPP using the eddy covariance method. Each FLUXNET measurement corresponds to GPP from an area around the sampling tower, the size and shape of which varies with weather conditions, notably wind speed and direction. The FLIGHT forest light simulation model (North, 1996) is a Monte Carlo based model to estimate the GPP from forest canopies, which does not take into account the spatial complexity of the site or the wind conditions at the time. Forests in southern England are small and embedded in a matrix of other land cover types (agriculture, urban etc.), so GPP estimated from FLIGHT needs to be adjusted to match that measured from a FLUXNET tower. The aim of this paper is to develop and test a method to adjust FLIGHT GPP so that it matches FLUXNET GPP. The advantage of this is that GPP can then be estimated over many other forests which do not possess FLUXNET sites. The study was based on data from two mixed broadleaf forests in southern England (Wytham Woods and Alice Holt forest), both of which have FLUXNET sites located within them. The FLUXNET meteorological data were prepared for use in the FLIGHT model by converting broadband irradiance to photosynthetically active radiance (PAR) and estimating diffuse PAR, using methods developed in previous work by the authors. The standard FLIGHT model tended to overestimate GPP in the winter

  16. Impairment of autophagy by TTR V30M aggregates: in vivo reversal by TUDCA and curcumin.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Cristina A; Almeida, Maria do Rosário; Saraiva, Maria João

    2016-09-01

    Transthyretin (TTR)-related amyloidoses are diseases characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils and aggregates in tissues composed of insoluble misfolded TTR that becomes toxic. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of small compounds in preventing and reversing TTR V30M deposition in transgenic mice gastrointestinal (GI) tract as well as lowering biomarkers associated with cellular stress and apoptotic mechanisms. In the present study we aimed to study TTR V30M aggregates effect in autophagy, a cellular mechanism crucial for cell survival that has been implicated in the development of several neurodegenerative diseases. We were able to demonstrate in cell culture that TTR V30M aggregates cause a partial impairment of the autophagic machinery as shown by p62 accumulation, whereas early steps of the autophagic flux remain unaffected as shown by autophagosome number evaluation and LC3 turnover assay. Our studies performed in TTR V30M transgenic animals demonstrated that tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) and curcumin effectively reverse p62 accumulation in the GI tract pointing to the ability of both compounds to modulate autophagy additionally to mitigate apoptosis. Overall, our in vitro and in vivo studies establish an association between TTR V30M aggregates and autophagy impairment and suggest the use of autophagy modulators as an additional and alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of TTR V30M-related amyloidosis. PMID:27382986

  17. Evaluation of high-resolution satellite precipitation estimates over southern South America using a dense rain gauge network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salio, Paola; Hobouchian, María Paula; García Skabar, Yanina; Vila, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Six different satellite rainfall estimates are evaluated for a 24-hour accumulation period at 12 UTC with a 0.25 degree resolution. The rain gauge data are obtained from a dense inter-institutional station network for December 1, 2008 to November 30, 2010 over South America. The evaluated satellite rainfall products are the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission 3B42 V6, V7 and RT, the NOAA/Climate Prediction Center Morphing technique (CMORPH), Hydroestimator (HYDRO) and the Combined Scheme algorithm (CoSch). The validation and intercomparison of these products are focused on southern South America. The performance improves in the "blended" estimates by including microwave observations and surface observations in the adjustments, i.e., 3B42 V6, V7 and CoSch; however, large overestimations are detectable in CMORPH, principally for extreme values over plains areas. The estimates based on parameters associated with infrared images only (HYDRO) underestimate precipitation south of 20° S and tend to overestimate the warm precipitation to the north. The inclusion of observed precipitation data is convenient from monthly (3B42 V7 and V6) to daily scales (CoSch) and improves the estimates. The estimates that include microwave observations show a strong tendency to overestimate extreme values of precipitation over 70 mm. This effect is strongly evident in northern and central Argentina and southern Brazil. A deeper assessment is necessary, particularly over the Central Andes, where effects of topography principally associated with solid precipitation correspond to the persistence of majorly overestimated precipitation.

  18. The effects of 30 mT electromagnetic fields on hippocampus cells of rats

    PubMed Central

    Teimori, Farzaneh; Khaki, Amir A.; Rajabzadeh, Asghar; Roshangar, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the use of electromagnetic waves in the treatment of some acute and chronic diseases, application of these waves in everyday life has created several problems for humans, especially the nerve system. In this study, the effects of 30mT electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on the hippocampus is investigated. Methods: Twenty-four 5-month Wistar rats weighing 150–200 g were divided into two groups. The experimental group rats were under the influence of an EMF at an intensity of 3 mT for approximately 4 hours a day (from 8 AM to 12 PM) during 10 weeks. After the hippocampus was removed, thin slides were prepared for transmission electron microscope (TEM) to study the ultrastructural tissue. Cell death detection POD kits were used to determine the apoptosis rate. Results: The results of the TEM showed that, in the hippocampus of the experimental group, in comparison to the control group, there was a substantial shift; even intracellular organelles such as the mitochondria were morphologically abnormal and uncertain. The number of apoptotic cells in the exposed group compared to the control group showed significant changes. Conclusions: Similar to numerous studies that have reported the effects of EMFs on nerves system, it was also confirmed in this lecture. Hence, the hippocampus which is important in regulating emotions, behavior, motivation, and memory functions, may be impaired by the negative impacts of EMFs. PMID:27453795

  19. Revised spectroscopic parameters of SH(+) from ALMA and IRAM 30m observations.

    PubMed

    Müller, Holger S P; Goicoechea, Javier R; Cernicharo, José; Agúndez, Marcelino; Pety, Jérôme; Cuadrado, Sara; Gerin, Maryvonne; Dumas, Gaëlle; Chapillon, Edwige

    2014-09-19

    Hydrides represent the first steps of interstellar chemistry. Sulfanylium (SH(+)), in particular, is a key tracer of energetic processes. We used ALMA and the IRAM 30 m telescope to search for the lowest frequency rotational lines of SH(+) toward the Orion Bar, the prototypical photo-dissociation region illuminated by a strong UV radiation field. On the basis of previous Herschel/HIFI observations of SH(+), we expected to detect emission of the two SH(+) hyperfine structure (HFS) components of the NJ = 10-01 fine structure (FS) component near 346 GHz. While we did not observe any lines at the frequencies predicted from laboratory data, we detected two emission lines, each ~15 MHz above the SH(+) predictions and with relative intensities and HFS splitting expected for SH(+). The rest frequencies of the two newly detected lines are more compatible with the remainder of the SH(+) laboratory data than the single line measured in the laboratory near 346 GHz and previously attributed to SH(+). Therefore, we assign these new features to the two SH(+) HFS components of the NJ = 10-01 FS component and re-determine its spectroscopic parameters, which will be useful for future observations of SH(+), in particular if its lowest frequency FS components are studied. Our observations demonstrate the suitability of these lines for SH(+) searches at frequencies easily accessible from the ground. PMID:26525172

  20. Dense and accurate motion and strain estimation in high resolution speckle images using an image-adaptive approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cofaru, Corneliu; Philips, Wilfried; Van Paepegem, Wim

    2011-09-01

    Digital image processing methods represent a viable and well acknowledged alternative to strain gauges and interferometric techniques for determining full-field displacements and strains in materials under stress. This paper presents an image adaptive technique for dense motion and strain estimation using high-resolution speckle images that show the analyzed material in its original and deformed states. The algorithm starts by dividing the speckle image showing the original state into irregular cells taking into consideration both spatial and gradient image information present. Subsequently the Newton-Raphson digital image correlation technique is applied to calculate the corresponding motion for each cell. Adaptive spatial regularization in the form of the Geman- McClure robust spatial estimator is employed to increase the spatial consistency of the motion components of a cell with respect to the components of neighbouring cells. To obtain the final strain information, local least-squares fitting using a linear displacement model is performed on the horizontal and vertical displacement fields. To evaluate the presented image partitioning and strain estimation techniques two numerical and two real experiments are employed. The numerical experiments simulate the deformation of a specimen with constant strain across the surface as well as small rigid-body rotations present while real experiments consist specimens that undergo uniaxial stress. The results indicate very good accuracy of the recovered strains as well as better rotation insensitivity compared to classical techniques.

  1. Using high-resolution satellite aerosol optical depth to estimate daily PM2.5 geographical distribution in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Just, Allan C.; Wright, Robert O.; Schwartz, Joel; Coull, Brent A.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Tellez-Rojo, Martha María; Moody, Emily; Wang, Yujie; Lyapustin, Alexei; Kloog, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in estimating fine particle (PM2.5) ambient concentrations use daily satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) for spatially and temporally resolved exposure estimates. Mexico City is a dense megacity that differs from other previously modeled regions in several ways: it has bright land surfaces, a distinctive climatological cycle, and an elevated semi-enclosed air basin with a unique planetary boundary layer dynamic. We extend our previous satellite methodology to the Mexico City area, a region with higher PM2.5 than most US and European urban areas. Using a novel 1 km resolution AOD product from the MODIS instrument, we constructed daily predictions across the greater Mexico City area for 2004–2014. We calibrated the association of AOD to PM2.5 daily using municipal ground monitors, land use, and meteorological features. Predictions used spatial and temporal smoothing to estimate AOD when satellite data were missing. Our model performed well, resulting in an out-of-sample cross validation R2 of 0.724. Cross-validated root mean squared prediction error (RMSPE) of the model was 5.55 μg/m3. This novel model reconstructs long- and short-term spatially resolved exposure to PM2.5 for epidemiological studies in Mexico City. PMID:26061488

  2. Effects of exposure model resolution on seismic risk estimates - Examples from the cities of Kerak and Madaba in Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Michael; Al-Qaryouti, Mahmoud; Ashour, Anas; Daoud, Nazar; Pittore, Massimiliano; Sarayrah, Abdullah; Sawarieh, Ali; Wieland, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Seismic risk is composed of the three components seismic hazard, exposed structures and the structures' vulnerability with respect to ground motion. Seismic risk estimates are subject to often large uncertainties, whose precise quantification remain a challenge. In general the largest uncertainties are considered to stem from the seismic hazard component, followed by the uncertainties in the vulnerability models. The importance of uncertainties in the exposure component are often regarded as of minor importance. This is obvious in the case the seismic risk assessment is carried out for a set of specific structures, but in case of risk estimates at city- or regional-scale the importance of uncertainties in the exposure model strongly increases. In this presentation exposure models derived from census data, remote sensing data and panoramic images obtained by a mobile mapping system for the two cities of Kerak and Madaba in Jordan and their uncertainties are discussed. Furthermore, the presentation aims to provide an insight on the effects of using these exposure models, derived from different data with varying resolution and different model assumptions on the uncertainties of seismic risk estimates for the two considered locations.

  3. Using High-Resolution Satellite Aerosol Optical Depth To Estimate Daily PM2.5 Geographical Distribution in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Just, Allan C; Wright, Robert O; Schwartz, Joel; Coull, Brent A; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Tellez-Rojo, Martha María; Moody, Emily; Wang, Yujie; Lyapustin, Alexei; Kloog, Itai

    2015-07-21

    Recent advances in estimating fine particle (PM2.5) ambient concentrations use daily satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) for spatially and temporally resolved exposure estimates. Mexico City is a dense megacity that differs from other previously modeled regions in several ways: it has bright land surfaces, a distinctive climatological cycle, and an elevated semi-enclosed air basin with a unique planetary boundary layer dynamic. We extend our previous satellite methodology to the Mexico City area, a region with higher PM2.5 than most U.S. and European urban areas. Using a novel 1 km resolution AOD product from the MODIS instrument, we constructed daily predictions across the greater Mexico City area for 2004-2014. We calibrated the association of AOD to PM2.5 daily using municipal ground monitors, land use, and meteorological features. Predictions used spatial and temporal smoothing to estimate AOD when satellite data were missing. Our model performed well, resulting in an out-of-sample cross-validation R(2) of 0.724. Cross-validated root-mean-squared prediction error (RMSPE) of the model was 5.55 μg/m(3). This novel model reconstructs long- and short-term spatially resolved exposure to PM2.5 for epidemiological studies in Mexico City. PMID:26061488

  4. Estimating photosynthesis with high resolution field spectroscopy in a Mediterranean grassland under different nutrient availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Priego, O.; Guan, J.; Fava, F.; Rossini, M.; Wutzler, T.; Moreno, G.; Carrara, A.; Kolle, O.; Schrumpf, M.; Reichstein, M.; Migliavacca, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have shown how human induced N:P imbalances are affecting essential processes (e.g. photosynthesis, plant growth rate) that lead to important changes in ecosystem structure and function. In this regard, the accuracy of the approaches based on remotely-sensed data for monitoring and modeling gross primary production (GPP) relies on the ability of vegetation indices (VIs) to track the dynamics of vegetation physiological and biophysical properties/variables. Promising results have been recently obtained when Chlorophyll-sensitive VIs and Chlorophyll fluorescence are combined with structural indices in the framework of the Monteith's light use efficiency (LUE) model. However, further ground-based experiments are required to validate LUE model performances, and their capability to be generalized under different nutrient availability conditions. In this study, the overall objective was to investigate the sensitivity of VIs to track short- and long-term GPP variations in a Mediterranean grassland under different N and P fertilization treatments. Spectral VIs were acquired manually using high resolution spectrometers (HR4000, OceanOptics, USA) along a phenological cycle. The VIs examined included photochemical reflectance index (PRI), MERIS terrestrial-chlorophyll index (MTCI) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence calculated at the oxygen absorption band O2-A (F760) using spectral fitting methods was also used. Simultaneously, measurements of GPP and environmental variables were conducted using a transient-state canopy chamber. Overall, GPP, F760 and VIs showed a clear seasonal time-trend in all treatments, which was driven by the phenological development of the grassland. Results showed significant differences (p<0.05) in midday GPP values between N and without N addition plots, in particular at the peak of the growing season during the flowering stage and at the end of the season during senescence. While

  5. Estimating the resolution of a commercial optical coherence tomography system with limited spatial sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolliams, Peter D.; Tomlins, Peter H.

    2011-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is becoming increasingly widespread as an experimental tool for clinical investigation, facilitated by the development of commercial instruments. In situ performance evaluation of such 'black box' systems presents a challenge, where the instrument hardware and software can limit access to important configuration parameters and raw data. Two key performance metrics for imaging systems are the point-spread function (PSF) and the associated modulation transfer function (MTF). However, previously described experimental measurement techniques assume user-variable spatial sampling and may not be appropriate for the characterization of deployed commercial instruments. Characterization methods developed for other modalities do not address this issue and rely upon experimental accuracy. Therefore, in this paper we propose a method to characterize the PSF of a commercial OCT microscope that uses OCT images of three-dimensional PSF phantoms to produce an oversampled estimate of the system PSF by combining spatially coincident measurements. This method does not rely upon any strong a priori assumption of the PSF morphology, requires no modification to the system sampling configuration or additional experimental procedure. We use our results to determine the PSF and MTF across the B-scan image plane of a commercial OCT system.

  6. The Role of Orograph and Parallax Corrections on High Resolution Geostationary Satellite Rainfall Estimates for Flash Flood Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicente, Gilberto A.; Davenport, Clay; Scofield, Rod

    1999-01-01

    The current generation of geosynchronous satellites exhibits considerably improved capabilities in the area of resolution, gridding accuracy, and sampling frequency as compared to their predecessors. These improvements have made it possible to accurately observe the life cycle of small scale, short-live phenomenon like rapidly developing thunderstorms, at a very high spatial and temporal resolutions. While the gain in the improved resolution is not significant for synoptic scale cloud systems, it plays a major role on the computation of precipitation values for mesoscale and stonn scale systems. Two of the important factor on the accurate precision of precipitation from satellite imagery are the position of the cloud tops as viewed by the satellite and the influence of orographic effects on the distribution of precipitation. The first problem has to do with the fact that the accurate estimation of precipitation from data collected by a satellite in geosynchronous orbit requires the knowledge of the exact position of the cloud tops with respect to the ground below. This is not a problem when a cloud is located directly below the satellite; at large viewing angles the geographic coordinates on satellite images are dependent on cloud heights and distance from the sub-satellite point. The latitude and longitude coordinates for high convective cloud tops are displaced away from the sub-satellite point and may be shifted by as much as 20 Km from the sea level coordinates. The second problem has to do with the variations in rainfall distribution with elevation. Ground observations have shown that precipitation amounts tend to increase with height and that the slope of the hill or mountain that is facing the prevailing wind normally receives greater rainfall then do the lee slopes. The purpose of the study is to show the recent developments at the Office of Research and Applications (ORA) at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA/NESDIS) in Camp Springs

  7. Ecosystem services - from assessements of estimations to quantitative, validated, high-resolution, continental-scale mapping via airborne LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlinszky, András; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    service potential" which is the ability of the local ecosystem to deliver various functions (water retention, carbon storage etc.), but can't quantify how much of these are actually used by humans or what the estimated monetary value is. Due to its ability to measure both terrain relief and vegetation structure in high resolution, airborne LIDAR supports direct quantification of the properties of an ecosystem that lead to it delivering a given service (such as biomass, water retention, micro-climate regulation or habitat diversity). In addition, its high resolution allows direct calibration with field measurements: routine harvesting-based ecological measurements, local biodiversity indicator surveys or microclimate recordings all take place at the human scale and can be directly linked to the local value of LIDAR-based indicators at meter resolution. Therefore, if some field measurements with standard ecological methods are performed on site, the accuracy of LIDAR-based ecosystem service indicators can be rigorously validated. With this conceptual and technical approach high resolution ecosystem service assessments can be made with well established credibility. These would consolidate the concept of ecosystem services and support both scientific research and evidence-based environmental policy at local and - as data coverage is continually increasing - continental scale.

  8. Estimating the spatial resolution of fNIRS sensors for BCI purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almajidy, Rand Kasim; Kirch, Robert D.; Christ, Olaf; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2014-03-01

    Differential near infrared sensors recently sparked a growing interest as a promising measuring modality for brain computer interfacing. In our study we present the design and characterization of novel, differential functional NIRS sensors, intended to record hemodynamic changes of the human motor cortex in the hand-area during motor imagery tasks. We report on the spatial characterization of a portable, multi-channel NIRS system with one module consisting of two central light emitting diodes (LED) (770 nm and 850 nm) and four symmetric pairs of radially aligned photodiodes (PD) resembling a plus symbol. The other sensor module features four similar, differential light paths crossing in the center of a star. Characterization was performed on a concentric, double beaker phantom, featuring a PBS/intralipid/blood mixture (97/1/2%). In extension of previous work, the inner, oxygenated beaker was covered by neoprene sleeves with holes of various sizes, thus giving an estimate on the spatial limits of the NIRS sensor's measurement volume. The star shaped sensor module formed a diffuse focus of approximately 3 cm in diameter at 1.4 cm depth, whereas the plus shaped arrangement suggested a concentric ring of four separate regions of interest, overall larger than 6 cm. The systems measurement sensitivity could be improved by removing ambient light from the sensing photodiodes by optical filtering. Altogether, we conclude that both our novel fNIRS design as well as its electronics perform well in the double-layered oxygenation phantom and are thus suitable for in-vivo testing.

  9. SACRA - a method for the estimation of global high-resolution crop calendars from a satellite-sensed NDVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsuki, S.; Tanaka, K.

    2015-11-01

    To date, many studies have performed numerical estimations of biomass production and agricultural water demand to understand the present and future supply-demand relationship. A crop calendar (CC), which defines the date or month when farmers sow and harvest crops, is an essential input for the numerical estimations. This study aims to present a new global data set, the SAtellite-derived CRop calendar for Agricultural simulations (SACRA), and to discuss advantages and disadvantages compared to existing census-based and model-derived products. We estimate global CC at a spatial resolution of 5 arcmin using satellite-sensed normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data, which corresponds to vegetation vitality and senescence on the land surface. Using the time series of the NDVI averaged from three consecutive years (2004-2006), sowing/harvesting dates are estimated for six crops (temperate-wheat, snow-wheat, maize, rice, soybean and cotton). We assume time series of the NDVI represent the phenology of one dominant crop and estimate CCs of the dominant crop in each grid. The dominant crops are determined using harvested areas based on census-based data. The cultivation period of SACRA is identified from the time series of the NDVI; therefore, SACRA considers current effects of human decisions and natural disasters. The difference between the estimated sowing dates and other existing products is less than 2 months (< 62 days) in most of the areas. A major disadvantage of our method is that the mixture of several crops in a grid is not considered in SACRA. The assumption of one dominant crop in each grid is a major source of discrepancy in crop calendars between SACRA and other products. The disadvantages of our approach may be reduced with future improvements based on finer satellite sensors and crop-type classification studies to consider several dominant crops in each grid. The comparison of the CC also demonstrates that identification of wheat type (sowing in

  10. High Resolution/High Fidelity Seismic Imaging and Parameter Estimation for Geological Structure and Material Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Ru-Shan Wu, Xiao-Bi Xie, Thorne Lay

    2005-06-06

    In this project, we develop new theories and methods for multi-domain one-way wave-equation based propagators, and apply these techniques to seismic modeling, seismic imaging, seismic illumination and model parameter estimation in 3D complex environments. The major progress of this project includes: (1) The development of the dual-domain wave propagators. We continue to improve the one-way wave-equation based propagators. Our target is making propagators capable of handling more realistic velocity models. A wide-angle propagator for transversely isotropic media with vertically symmetric axis (VTI) has been developed for P-wave modeling and imaging. The resulting propagator is accurate for large velocity perturbations and wide propagation angles. The thin-slab propagator for one-way elastic-wave propagation is further improved. With the introduction of complex velocities, the quality factors Qp and Qs have been incorporated into the thin-slab propagator. The resulting viscoelastic thin-slab propagator can handle elastic-wave propagation in models with intrinsic attenuations. We apply this method to complex models for AVO modeling, random media characterization and frequency-dependent reflectivity simulation. (2) Exploring the Information in the Local Angle Domain. Traditionally, the local angle information can only be extracted using the ray-based method. We develop a wave-equation based technique to process the local angle domain information. The approach can avoid the singularity problem usually linked to the high-frequency asymptotic method. We successfully apply this technique to seismic illumination and the resulting method provides a practical tool for three-dimensional full-volume illumination analysis in complex structures. The directional illumination also provides information for angle-domain imaging corrections. (3) Elastic-Wave Imaging. We develop a multicomponent elastic migration method. The application of the multicomponent one-way elastic propagator

  11. Using a hybrid Monte Carlo/Genetic Algorithm Slip Estimator to produce high resolution models of paleoearthquakes from geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, A.; McCloskey, J.; Nalbant, S. S.; Simao, N.; Murphy, S.; NicBhloscaidh, M.; Steacy, S.

    2013-12-01

    Identifying fault sections where slip deficits have accumulated may provide a means for understanding sequences of large megathrust earthquakes. Stress accumulated during the interseismic period on locked sections of an active fault is stored as potential slip. Where this potential slip remains unreleased during earthquakes, a slip deficit can be said to have accrued. Analysis of the spatial distribution of slip during antecedent events along the fault will show where the locked plate has spent its stored slip and indicate where the potential for large events remains. The location of recent earthquakes and their distribution of slip can be estimated instrumentally. To develop the idea of long-term slip-deficit modelling it is necessary to constrain the size and distribution of slip for pre-instrumental events dating back hundreds of years covering more than one ';seismic cycle'. This requires the exploitation of proxy sources of data. Coral microatolls, growing in the intertidal zone of the outer island arc of the Sunda trench, present the possibility of producing high resolution reconstructions of slip for a number of pre-instrumental earthquakes. Their growth is influenced by tectonic flexing of the continental plate beneath them allows them to act as long term geodetic recorders. However, the sparse distribution of data available using coral geodesy results in a under determined problem with non-unique solutions. Instead of producing one definite model satisfying the observed corals displacements, a Monte Carlo Slip Estimator based on a Genetic Algorithm (MCSE-GA) accelerating the rate of convergence is used to identify a suite of models consistent with the data. Successive iterations of the MCSE-GA sample different displacements at each coral location, from within the spread of associated uncertainties, producing a catalog of models from the full range of possibilities. The suite of best slip distributions are weighted according to their fitness and stacked to

  12. An Improved Method for the Estimation and Visualization of Velocity Fields from Gastric High-Resolution Electrical Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; O'Grady, Gregory; Du, Peng; Pullan, Andrew J; Cheng, Leo K

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution (HR) electrical mapping is an important clinical research tool for understanding normal and abnormal gastric electrophysiology. Analyzing velocities of gastric electrical activity in a reliable and accurate manner can provide additional valuable information for quantitatively and qualitatively comparing features across and within subjects, particularly during gastric dysrhythmias. In this study we compared three methods of estimating velocities from HR recordings to determine which method was the most reliable for use with gastric HR electrical mapping. The three methods were i) Simple finite difference ii) Smoothed finite difference and a iii) Polynomial based method. With synthetic data, the accuracy of the simple finite difference method resulted in velocity errors almost twice that of the smoothed finite difference and the polynomial based method, in the presence of activation time error up to 0.5s. With three synthetic cases under various noise types and levels, the smoothed finite difference resulted in average speed error of 3.2% and an average angle error of 2.0° and the polynomial based method had an average speed error of 3.3% and an average angle error of 1.7°. With experimental gastric slow wave recordings performed in pigs, the three methods estimated similar velocities (6.3-7.3 mm/s), but the smoothed finite difference method had a lower standard deviation in its velocity estimate than the simple finite difference and the polynomial based method, leading it to be the method of choice for velocity estimation in gastric slow wave propagation. An improved method for visualizing velocity fields is also presented. PMID:22207635

  13. Development and Analysis of Global, High-Resolution Diagnostic Metrics for Vegetation Monitoring, Yield Estimation and Famine Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, B. T.; Zhang, P.; Myneni, R.

    2008-12-01

    Drought, through its impact on food scarcity and crop prices, can have significant economic, social, and environmental impacts - presently, up to 36 countries and 73 million people are facing food crises around the globe. Because of these adverse affects, there has been a drive to develop drought and vegetation- monitoring metrics that can quantify and predict human vulnerability/susceptibility to drought at high- resolution spatial scales over the entire globe. Here we introduce a new vegetation-monitoring index utilizing data derived from satellite-based instruments (the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer - MODIS) designed to identify the vulnerability of vegetation in a particular region to climate variability during the growing season. In addition, the index can quantify the percentage of annual grid-point vegetation production either gained or lost due to climatic variability in a given month. When integrated over the growing season, this index is shown to be better correlated with end-of-season crop yields than traditional remotely-sensed or meteorological indices. In addition, in-season estimates of the index, which are available in near real-time, provide yield forecasts comparable to concurrent in situ objective yield surveys, which are only available in limited regions of the world. Overall, the cost effectiveness and repetitive, near-global view of earth's surface provided by this satellite-based vegetation monitoring index can potentially improve our ability to mitigate human vulnerability/susceptibility to drought and its impacts upon vegetation and agriculture.

  14. A DUAL-BAND MILLIMETER-WAVE KINETIC INDUCTANCE CAMERA FOR THE IRAM 30 m TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Monfardini, A.; Benoit, A.; Bideaud, A.; Swenson, L.; Cruciani, A.; Camus, P.; Hoffmann, C.; Desert, F. X.; Doyle, S.; Ade, P.; Mauskopf, P.; Tucker, C.; Roesch, M.; Leclercq, S.; Schuster, K. F.; Endo, A.; Baryshev, A.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Ferrari, L.; Yates, S. J. C

    2011-06-01

    The Neel IRAM KIDs Array (NIKA) is a fully integrated measurement system based on kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) currently being developed for millimeter wave astronomy. The instrument includes dual-band optics allowing simultaneous imaging at 150 GHz and 220 GHz. The imaging sensors consist of two spatially separated arrays of KIDs. The first array, mounted on the 150 GHz branch, is composed of 144 lumped-element KIDs. The second array (220 GHz) consists of 256 antenna-coupled KIDs. Each of the arrays is sensitive to a single polarization; the band splitting is achieved by using a grid polarizer. The optics and sensors are mounted in a custom dilution cryostat, with an operating temperature of {approx}70 mK. Electronic readout is realized using frequency multiplexing and a transmission line geometry consisting of a coaxial cable connected in series with the sensor array and a low-noise 4 K amplifier. The dual-band NIKA was successfully tested in 2010 October at the Institute for Millimetric Radio Astronomy (IRAM) 30 m telescope at Pico Veleta, Spain, performing in-line with laboratory predictions. An optical NEP was then calculated to be around 2 x 10{sup -16} W Hz{sup -1/2} (at 1 Hz) while under a background loading of approximately 4 pW pixel{sup -1}. This improvement in comparison with a preliminary run (2009) verifies that NIKA is approaching the target sensitivity for photon-noise limited ground-based detectors. Taking advantage of the larger arrays and increased sensitivity, a number of scientifically relevant faint and extended objects were then imaged including the Galactic Center SgrB2 (FIR1), the radio galaxy Cygnus A, and the NGC1068 Seyfert galaxy. These targets were all observed simultaneously in the 150 GHz and 220 GHz atmospheric windows.

  15. A Dual-band Millimeter-wave Kinetic Inductance Camera for the IRAM 30 m Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfardini, A.; Benoit, A.; Bideaud, A.; Swenson, L.; Cruciani, A.; Camus, P.; Hoffmann, C.; Désert, F. X.; Doyle, S.; Ade, P.; Mauskopf, P.; Tucker, C.; Roesch, M.; Leclercq, S.; Schuster, K. F.; Endo, A.; Baryshev, A.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Ferrari, L.; Yates, S. J. C.; Bourrion, O.; Macias-Perez, J.; Vescovi, C.; Calvo, M.; Giordano, C.

    2011-06-01

    The Néel IRAM KIDs Array (NIKA) is a fully integrated measurement system based on kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) currently being developed for millimeter wave astronomy. The instrument includes dual-band optics allowing simultaneous imaging at 150 GHz and 220 GHz. The imaging sensors consist of two spatially separated arrays of KIDs. The first array, mounted on the 150 GHz branch, is composed of 144 lumped-element KIDs. The second array (220 GHz) consists of 256 antenna-coupled KIDs. Each of the arrays is sensitive to a single polarization; the band splitting is achieved by using a grid polarizer. The optics and sensors are mounted in a custom dilution cryostat, with an operating temperature of ~70 mK. Electronic readout is realized using frequency multiplexing and a transmission line geometry consisting of a coaxial cable connected in series with the sensor array and a low-noise 4 K amplifier. The dual-band NIKA was successfully tested in 2010 October at the Institute for Millimetric Radio Astronomy (IRAM) 30 m telescope at Pico Veleta, Spain, performing in-line with laboratory predictions. An optical NEP was then calculated to be around 2 × 10-16 W Hz-1/2 (at 1 Hz) while under a background loading of approximately 4 pW pixel-1. This improvement in comparison with a preliminary run (2009) verifies that NIKA is approaching the target sensitivity for photon-noise limited ground-based detectors. Taking advantage of the larger arrays and increased sensitivity, a number of scientifically relevant faint and extended objects were then imaged including the Galactic Center SgrB2 (FIR1), the radio galaxy Cygnus A, and the NGC1068 Seyfert galaxy. These targets were all observed simultaneously in the 150 GHz and 220 GHz atmospheric windows.

  16. High resolution reconstructions of Southwest Indian Ridge plate motions during the Neogene: Comparison to GPS estimates and implications for global plate motion estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Merkouriev, S.; Sauter, D.; Calais, E.

    2013-12-01

    Plate kinematic data from the slow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) are the primary source of information about relative movements between Antarctica and Africa over geologic time and are critical for linking the movements of plates in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean basins. We describe the first high-resolution model of SWIR plate kinematics from the present to 20 Ma, consisting of rotations based on 21 magnetic reversals with ~1 million-year spacing. The new rotations, which are derived from 4822 identifications of magnetic reversals C1n to C6no and 6000 crossings of 21 fracture zones and transform faults, describe in detail the ultra-slow motions of the Nubia, Lwandle, and Somalia plates north of the SWIR relative to the Antarctic plate. A search for the Nubia-Lwandle-Antarctic triple junction with all data since C5n.2 (11.0 Ma) gives a best location at the Andrew Bain transform fault (~32E), in accord with previous work. Plate kinematic data from the SWIR east of the Andrew Bain fracture zone support the existence of the previously proposed Lwandle plate at high confidence level. The likely diffuse Lwandle-Somalia plate boundary north of the SWIR is however only loosely constrained to 45E-52E. After calibrating the new rotations for the biasing effects of finite-width magnetic polarity transition zones (i.e. outward displacement), the new rotations reveal that SWIR plate motion has remained steady from the present back to 7.5 Ma, but was modestly faster (~25%) from 19.6 Ma to 7.5 Ma. GPS estimates of present SWIR plate motions based on more than 100 continuous GPS sites on the Antarctic, Nubia, and Somalia plates are remarkably consistent with SWIR velocities determined with the new geological reconstructions. The superb agreement between the two independent plate motion estimates validates both sets of estimates and our calibration for outward displacement. Implications of the new estimates, including evidence for anomalously wide outward displacement

  17. Using remote sensing products to classify landscape. A multi-spatial resolution approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Llamas, Paula; Calvo, Leonor; Álvarez-Martínez, José Manuel; Suárez-Seoane, Susana

    2016-08-01

    The European Landscape Convention encourages the inventory and characterization of landscapes for environmental management and planning actions. Among the range of data sources available for landscape classification, remote sensing has substantial applicability, although difficulties might arise when available data are not at the spatial resolution of operational interest. We evaluated the applicability of two remote sensing products informing on land cover (the categorical CORINE map at 30 m resolution and the continuous NDVI spectral index at 1 km resolution) in landscape classification across a range of spatial resolutions (30 m, 90 m, 180 m, 1 km), using the Cantabrian Mountains (NW Spain) as study case. Separate landscape classifications (using topography, urban influence and land cover as inputs) were accomplished, one per each land cover dataset and spatial resolution. Classification accuracy was estimated through confusion matrixes and uncertainty in terms of both membership probability and confusion indices. Regarding landscape classifications based on CORINE, both typology and number of landscape classes varied across spatial resolutions. Classification accuracy increased from 30 m (the original resolution of CORINE) to 90m, decreasing towards coarser resolutions. Uncertainty followed the opposite pattern. In the case of landscape classifications based on NDVI, the identified landscape patterns were geographically structured and showed little sensitivity to changes across spatial resolutions. Only the change from 1 km (the original resolution of NDVI) to 180 m improved classification accuracy. The value of confusion indices increased with resolution. We highlight the need for greater effort in selecting data sources at the suitable spatial resolution, matching regional peculiarities and minimizing error and uncertainty.

  18. Improved estimation of flood parameters by combining space based SAR data with very high resolution digital elevation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwenzner, H.; Voigt, S.

    2009-05-01

    Severe flood events turned out to be the most devastating catastrophes for Europe's population, economy and environment during the past decades. The total loss caused by the August 2002 flood is estimated to be 10 billion Euros for Germany alone. Due to their capability to present a synoptic view of the spatial extent of floods, remote sensing technology, and especially synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems, have been successfully applied for flood mapping and monitoring applications. However, the quality and accuracy of the flood masks and derived flood parameters always depends on the scale and the geometric precision of the original data as well as on the classification accuracy of the derived data products. The incorporation of auxiliary information such as elevation data can help to improve the plausibility and reliability of the derived flood masks as well as higher level products. This paper presents methods to improve the matching of flood masks with very high resolution digital elevation models as derived from LiDAR measurements for example. In the following, a cross section approach is presented that allows the dynamic fitting of the position of flood mask profiles according to the underlying terrain information from the DEM. This approach is tested in two study areas, using different input data sets. The first test area is part of the Elbe River (Germany) where flood masks derived from Radarsat-1 and IKONOS during the 2002 flood are used in combination with a LiDAR DEM of 1 m spatial resolution. The other test data set is located on the River Severn (UK) and flood masks derived from the TerraSAR-X satellite and aerial photos acquired during the 2007 flood are used in combination with a LiDAR DEM of 2 m pixel spacing. By means of these two examples the performance of the matching technique and the scaling effects are analysed and discussed. Furthermore, the systematic flood mapping capability of the different imaging systems are examined. It could be

  19. Improved estimation of flood parameters by combining space based SAR data with very high resolution digital elevation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwenzner, H.; Voigt, S.

    2008-10-01

    Severe flood events turned out to be the most devastating catastrophes for Europe's population, economy and environment during the past decades. The total loss caused by the August 2002 flood is estimated to be 10 billion Euros for Germany alone. Due to their capability to present a synoptic view of the spatial extent of floods, remote sensing technology, and especially synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems, have been successfully applied for flood mapping and monitoring applications. However, the quality and accuracy of the flood masks and derived flood parameters always depends on the scale and the geometric precision of the original data as well as on the classification accuracy of the derived data products. The incorporation of auxiliary information such as elevation data can help to improve the plausibility and reliability of the derived flood masks as well as higher level products. This paper presents methods to improve the matching of flood masks with very high resolution digital elevation models as derived from LiDAR measurements for example. In the following, a cross section approach is presented that allows the dynamic fitting of the position of flood mask profiles according to the underlying terrain information from the DEM. This approach is tested in two study areas, using different input data sets. The first test area is part of the Elbe River (Germany) where flood masks derived from Radarsat-1 and IKONOS during the 2002 flood are used in combination with a LiDAR DEM of 1 m spatial resolution. The other test data set is located on the River Severn (UK) and flood masks derived from the TerraSAR-X satellite and aerial photos acquired during the 2007 flood are used in combination with a LiDAR DEM of 2 m pixel spacing. By means of these two examples the performance of the matching technique and the scaling effects are analysed and discussed. Furthermore, the systematic flood mapping capability of the different imaging systems are examined. It could be

  20. Seasonal monitoring and estimation of regional aerosol distribution over Po valley, northern Italy, using a high-resolution MAIAC product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvani, Barbara; Pierce, R. Bradley; Lyapustin, Alexei I.; Wang, Yujie; Ghermandi, Grazia; Teggi, Sergio

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the new 1 km-resolved Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm is employed to characterize seasonal PM10 - AOD correlations over northern Italy. The accuracy of the new dataset is assessed compared to the widely used Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 5.1 Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) data, retrieved at 0.55 μm with spatial resolution of 10 km (MYD04_L2). We focused on evaluating the ability of these two products to characterize both temporal and spatial distributions of aerosols within urban and suburban areas. Ground PM10 measurements were obtained from 73 of the Italian Regional Agency for Environmental Protection (ARPA) monitoring stations, spread across northern Italy, during a three-year period from 2010 to 2012. The Po Valley area (northern Italy) was chosen as the study domain because of its severe urban air pollution, resulting from it having the highest population and industrial manufacturing density in the country, being located in a valley where two surrounding mountain chains favor the stagnation of pollutants. We found that the global correlations between the bin-averaged PM10 and AOD are R2 = 0.83 and R2 = 0.44 for MYD04_L2 and for MAIAC, respectively, suggesting a greater sensitivity of the high-resolution product to small-scale deviations. However, the introduction of Relative Humidity (RH) and Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) depth corrections allowed for a significant improvement to the bin-averaged PM - AOD correlation, which led to a similar performance: R2 = 0.96 for MODIS and R2 = 0.95 for MAIAC. Furthermore, the introduction of the PBL information in the corrected AOD values was found to be crucial in order to capture the clear seasonal cycle shown by measured PM10 values. The study allowed us to define four seasonal linear correlations that estimate PM10 concentrations satisfactorily from the remotely sensed MAIAC AOD retrieval. Overall, the results show that

  1. Resolution Analysis and the Backus-Gilbert Local Estimator for the Inverse Problem in the Scanning Magnetometory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, Y.; Uehara, M.

    2009-12-01

    The scanning magnetometory reveals fine-scale magnetic field images over geological samples, offering unique paleomagnetic information. Recent scanning magnetometory reaches high moment sensitivity and high spatial resolution (less than 1 mm), owing to the high field-sensitivity sensors (e.g., SQUID, Magneto-Impedance (MI), Giant-Magneto-Resistance) and small sample-to-sensor distance. Using an MI sensor driven by low-noise circuit, we successfully obtained magnetic field images of thin-sectioned geological samples carrying natural remanent magnetization. The main challenge in the scanning magnetometory is to invert the obtained field data into a magnetization pattern (Weiss et al., 2007). Since the magnetization pattern is a continuous function of position, the magnetic inverse problem is essentially underdetermined. Consequently, there should always be limitations in the resolving power of the estimated magnetization. Assessing the resolving power is essential to properly interpret the solution of inverse problems. Nevertheless, this has not been done for the scanning magnetometory. In this study, we used the model-resolution to assess the problem. We developed software to calculate and visualize the model-resolution for a single target point using the Backus-Gilbert method and iterative least-square calculation. Examples using results obtained by our MI scanning magnetometer will be presented. Any solution to a linear inverse problem can be expressed as a linear combination of data. The corresponding combination of data kernel constructs an averaging kernel. Thus, any solution is a weighted average of the true magnetization pattern of the sample. In other words, the resolving power of the solution, or the model-resolution, can be assessed by drawing the averaging kernel. Since the scanning magnetometory measures 2-dimensional samples, the averaging kernel for single target point becomes 2-dimensioanl image. Preliminary calculation was performed on a field image

  2. A High-Resolution Dataset of Water Fluxes and States for Germany accounting for Uncertainties in the Parameter Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zink, Matthias; Kumar, Rohini; Cuntz, Matthias; Samaniego, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Long term, high-resolution data of hydrologic fluxes and states are needed for many hydrological applications such as i) impact assessment studies (e.g. drought, flood or climate change analyses), ii) studies that need the state or variability of hydrometeorological or hydrologic variables (e.g. downscaling of climate model outputs), iii) modeling studies that need hydrologic variables as input or boundary conditions (e.g. recharge for groundwater modeling). Since long-term, large-scale observations of such fluxes and states are not feasible, hydrological or land surface models are applied to derive them. Usually such datasets are provided as single model realization without accounting for input, model structural or uncertainty caused by equifinal model parameter sets. This study aims to analyze and provide a high resolution dataset of hydrological fluxes and states accounting for uncertainties caused by the estimation of model parameters. Furthermore, the spatiotemporal distribution of uncertainties in various hydrological variables as well as the superposition of uncertainties through different model compartments is investigated. The hydrological variables of interest are evapotranspiration, soil moisture, recharge, and generated discharge. They are estimated for entire Germany in the period 1950 - 2010 employing the mesoscale hydrological model mHM (www.ufz.de/mhm). The spatial resolution is 4 km and the temporal resolution is 1 day. The ensemble of 100 model realization is based on 700 parameter sets which are derived from 100 calibration runs in the seven, major German river basins. These 700 parameter sets are filtered for those exceeding a Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) of 0.65 in each of the seven catchments, which leads to the final 100 parameter sets. The model is evaluated against observed runoff in 222 additional catchments. In this catchments the mean and the standard deviation are for daily discharge 0.68 and 0.09 and for monthly discharge 0.81 and 0

  3. Estimation of the atmosphere-ocean fluxes of greenhouse gases and aerosols at the finer resolution of the coastal ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Vasco; Sahlée, Erik; Jurus, Pavel; Clementi, Emanuela; Pettersson, Heidi; Mateus, Marcos

    2016-04-01

    The balances and fluxes of greenhouse gases and aerosols between atmosphere and ocean are fundamental for Earth's heat budget. Hence, the scientific community needs to know and simulate them with accuracy in order to monitor climate change from Earth-Observation satellites and to produce reliable estimates of climate change using Earth-System Models (ESM). So far, ESM have represented earth's surface with coarser resolutions so that each cell of the marine domain is dominated by the open ocean. In such case it is enough to use simple algorithms considering the wind speed 10m above sea-surface (u10) as sole driver of the gas transfer velocity. The formulation by Wanninkhof (1992) is broadly accepted as the best. However, the ESM community is becoming increasingly aware of the need to model with finer resolutions. Then, it is no longer enough to only consider u10 when modelling gas transfer velocities across the coastal oceans' surfaces. More comprehensive formulations are required that adjust better to local conditions by also accounting for the effects of sea-surface agitation, wave breaking, atmospheric stability of the Surface Boundary Layer, current drag with the bottom, surfactants and rain. Accurate algorithms are also fundamental to monitor atmosphere and ocean greenhouse gas concentrations using satellite data and reverse modelling. Past satellite missions ERS, Envisat, Jason-2, Aqua, Terra and Metop, have already been remotely sensing the ocean's surface at much finer resolutions than ESM using instruments like MERIS, MODIS, AMR, AATSR, MIPAS, Poseidon-3, SCIAMACHY, SeaWiFS, and IASI. The planned new satellite missions Sentinel-3, OCO-2 and GOSAT will further increase the resolutions. We developed a framework to congregate competing formulations for the estimation of the solubility and transfer velocity of virtually any gas on the biosphere taking into consideration the atmosphere and ocean fundamental variables and their derived geophysical processes

  4. Evaluation of a moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer triangle-based algorithm for evapotranspiration estimates in subalpine regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipper, Kyle R.; Kinoshita, Alicia M.; Hogue, Terri S.

    2016-01-01

    The current study evaluates the application of a moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) triangle-based method to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) in subalpine environments. Topographic corrections and improved soil moisture representation are applied to a previously developed net radiation (Rn) model and triangle algorithm to develop an 8-day average ET product based solely on satellite products. We evaluate modeled Rn and MODIS ET (MOD-ET) against ground-based values at four sites in the Sierra Nevada of northern California and also present a comparison between two monthly distributed ET datasets [operational simplified surface energy balance (SSEBop) and MODIS MOD16]. Modeled daily Rn results indicate a systematic underestimation (between -83 and -110 W/m2 bias). Consequently, Rn is bias-corrected before calculating MOD-ET. MOD-ET validation shows correlations between 0.15 and 0.45 with errors between 73 and 126 W/m2. MOD-ET and SSEBop ET report correlations of 0.36 and 0.20, respectively, on average, compared to ground-based monthly ET. MOD16 underestimates monthly totals, with bias values on the range of -14 to -144 W/m2. Semiarid conditions and scale differences between the MODIS pixel and station contribute to errors with respect to observation. Overall, MOD-ET provides reasonable ET estimates and may better capture temporal dynamics in environments undergoing chronic disturbance.

  5. Effect of spatial resolution on estimating surface albedo: A case study in Speulderbos forest in The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weligepolage, K.; Gieske, A. S. M.; Su, Z.

    2013-08-01

    Land surface albedo is one of the most important parameters accountable for the planetary radiative energy budget. It is known that albedo varies in both space and time as a result of various natural processes and human interventions. Especially in forest ecosystems these variations are much more intense due to inherent canopy structural differences and anticipated seasonal changes. In such environments, estimation of spatially distributed surface albedo poses challenges in terms of capturing the spatial variability using a remotely sensed sensor with a finite field of view. This study investigated the stand level surface albedo variability of a patchwork forest in the central part of The Netherlands. The data used for the study included airborne and satellite imageries and tower-based solar radiation measurements acquired through a dedicated field campaign. The imageries were preprocessed and atmospherically corrected to obtain top of the canopy (TOC) reflectance. The TOC reflectance bands in the visible and near-infrared domain were integrated to estimate spatially distributed surface albedo while the tower-based radiation measurements in the solar-reflective region were used to obtain the temporal variation of surface albedo over a needleleaf forest canopy. The diurnal variation of surface albedo is consistent with the previous findings for needleleaf forest canopies. The spatial mean surface albedo values estimated from remote sensing data for needleleaf (pure Douglas fir), broadleaf (pure Beech) and mixed forest classes are 0.09, 0.13 and 0.11, respectively. Both visual characteristics and descriptive statistics indicate that with increased pixel size, the spatial variability of albedo progressively decreases. The semivariogram analysis was more insightful to perceive the nature and causes of albedo spatial variability in different forest classes in relation to sensor spatial resolution.

  6. An Approach for the Long-Term 30-m Land Surface Snow-Free Albedo Retrieval from Historic Landsat Surface Reflectance and MODIS-based A Priori Anisotropy Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuai, Yanmin; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Gao, Feng; Schaaf, Crystal B.; He, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Land surface albedo has been recognized by the Global Terrestrial Observing System (GTOS) as an essential climate variable crucial for accurate modeling and monitoring of the Earth's radiative budget. While global climate studies can leverage albedo datasets from MODIS, VIIRS, and other coarse-resolution sensors, many applications in heterogeneous environments can benefit from higher-resolution albedo products derived from Landsat. We previously developed a "MODIS-concurrent" approach for the 30-meter albedo estimation which relied on combining post-2000 Landsat data with MODIS Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) information. Here we present a "pre-MODIS era" approach to extend 30-m surface albedo generation in time back to the 1980s, through an a priori anisotropy Look-Up Table (LUT) built up from the high quality MCD43A BRDF estimates over representative homogenous regions. Each entry in the LUT reflects a unique combination of land cover, seasonality, terrain information, disturbance age and type, and Landsat optical spectral bands. An initial conceptual LUT was created for the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of the United States and provides BRDF shapes estimated from MODIS observations for undisturbed and disturbed surface types (including recovery trajectories of burned areas and non-fire disturbances). By accepting the assumption of a generally invariant BRDF shape for similar land surface structures as a priori information, spectral white-sky and black-sky albedos are derived through albedo-to-nadir reflectance ratios as a bridge between the Landsat and MODIS scale. A further narrow-to-broadband conversion based on radiative transfer simulations is adopted to produce broadband albedos at visible, near infrared, and shortwave regimes.We evaluate the accuracy of resultant Landsat albedo using available field measurements at forested AmeriFlux stations in the PNW region, and examine the consistency of the surface albedo generated by this approach

  7. Using a hybrid Monte Carlo/ Slip Estimator-Genetic Algorithm (MCSE-GA) to produce high resolution estimates of paleoearthquakes from geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Anthony; McCloskey, John; Simão, Nuno; Murphy, Shane; Bhloscaidh, Mairead Nic

    2014-05-01

    Algorithm element of the MCSE-GA allows it to recombine the information stored in a population of randomly generated models to rapidly converge on a possible solution. These solutions are evaluated and those satisfying a threshold number of observations join an ensemble of models contributing to a final Weighted Average Model (WAM). The WAM represents a high resolution estimate of the slip distribution responsible for any given set of displacements. Analysis of the slip values of the ensemble models allows areas of high confidence to be identified where the standard deviation is low. Similarly, areas of low confidence will be found where standard deviations are high. This presentation will demonstrate the ability of the MCSE-GA to produce both accurate models of slip for a number of recent instrumentally recorded earthquakes along the Sunda Trench and estimates of slip during 1797 and 1833 paleoearthquakes that are consistent with those produced from other techniques.

  8. A comprehensive filtering scheme for high-resolution estimation of the water balance components from high-precision lysimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannes, M.; Wollschlager, U.; Schrader, F.; Durner, W.; Gebler, S.; Putz, T.; Fank, J.; von Unold, G.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2015-08-01

    Large weighing lysimeters are currently the most precise method to directly measure all components of the terrestrial water balance in parallel via the built-in weighing system. As lysimeters are exposed to several external forces such as management practices or wind influencing the weighing data, the calculated fluxes of precipitation and evapotranspiration can be altered considerably without having applied appropriate corrections to the raw data. Therefore, adequate filtering schemes for obtaining most accurate estimates of the water balance components are required. In this study, we use data from the TERENO (TERrestrial ENvironmental Observatories) SoilCan research site in Bad Lauchstadt to develop a comprehensive filtering procedure for high-precision lysimeter data, which is designed to deal with various kinds of possible errors starting from the elimination of large disturbances in the raw data resulting e.g., from management practices all the way to the reduction of noise caused e.g., by moderate wind. Furthermore, we analyze the influence of averaging times and thresholds required by some of the filtering steps on the calculated water balance and investigate the ability of two adaptive filtering methods (the adaptive window and adaptive threshold filter (AWAT filter; Peters et al., 2014), and a new synchro filter applicable to the data from a set of several lysimeters) to further reduce the filtering error. Finally, we take advantage of the data sets of all 18 lysimeters running in parallel at the Bad Lauchstadt site to evaluate the performance and accuracy of the proposed filtering scheme. For the tested time interval of 2 months, we show that the estimation of the water balance with high temporal resolution and good accuracy is possible. The filtering code can be downloaded from the journal website as Supplement to this publication.

  9. Estimating hydrodynamic roughness in a wave-dominated environment with a high-resolution acoustic Doppler profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lacy, J.R.; Sherwood, C.R.; Wilson, D.J.; Chisholm, T.A.; Gelfenbaum, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrodynamic roughness is a critical parameter for characterizing bottom drag in boundary layers, and it varies both spatially and temporally due to variation in grain size, bedforms, and saltating sediment. In this paper we investigate temporal variability in hydrodynamic roughness using velocity profiles in the bottom boundary layer measured with a high-resolution acoustic Doppler profiler (PCADP). The data were collected on the ebb-tidal delta off Grays Harbor, Washington, in a mean water depth of 9 m. Significant wave height ranged from 0.5 to 3 m. Bottom roughness has rarely been determined from hydrodynamic measurements under conditions such as these, where energetic waves and medium-to-fine sand produce small bedforms. Friction velocity due to current u*c and apparent bottom roughness z0a were determined from the PCADP burst mean velocity profiles using the law of the wall. Bottom roughness kB was estimated by applying the Grant-Madsen model for wave-current interaction iteratively until the model u*c converged with values determined from the data. The resulting kB values ranged over 3 orders of magnitude (10-1 to 10-4 m) and varied inversely with wave orbital diameter. This range of kB influences predicted bottom shear stress considerably, suggesting that the use of time-varying bottom roughness could significantly improve the accuracy of sediment transport models. Bedform height was estimated from kB and is consistent with both ripple heights predicted by empirical models and bedforms in sonar images collected during the experiment. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Identification of recharge zones in the Lower Mississippi River alluvial aquifer using high-resolution precipitation estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Jamie; Mercer, Andrew; Rigby, James R.; Grimes, Alexandria

    2015-12-01

    Water resources in the lower Mississippi River alluvial valley play a critical role in agricultural productivity due to the widespread use of irrigation during the growing season. However, the unknown specifics of surface-atmosphere feedbacks in the region, along with diminishing groundwater availability and the non-sustainable trend in irrigation draws from the alluvial aquifer, makes it difficult for water resource managers to make sound decisions for future water sustainability. As a result, it is crucial to identify spatial and temporal associations between local rainfall patterns and groundwater levels to determine the influence of precipitation on regional aquifer recharge. Specifically, it is critical to define the recharge zones of the aquifer so that rainfall distribution can be used to assess potential groundwater recovery. This project addresses the issue of defining areas of recharge in the lower Mississippi River alluvial aquifer (LMRAA) through an assessment of historical precipitation variability using high-resolution radar-derived precipitation estimates. A rotated principal component analysis (RPCA) of both groundwater and precipitation data from October through April is used to define locations where aquifer levels show the greatest variability, with a stepwise regression approach used to define areas where rainfall and groundwater levels show the strongest association. Results show that the greatest recharge through direct rainfall is along the Tallahatchie River basin in the northeastern Mississippi Delta, with recharge along the periphery of the LMRAA likely a result of direct water flux from surface hydrologic features.

  11. Generation of the 30 M-Mesh Global Digital Surface Model by Alos Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadono, T.; Nagai, H.; Ishida, H.; Oda, F.; Naito, S.; Minakawa, K.; Iwamoto, H.

    2016-06-01

    Topographical information is fundamental to many geo-spatial related information and applications on Earth. Remote sensing satellites have the advantage in such fields because they are capable of global observation and repeatedly. Several satellite-based digital elevation datasets were provided to examine global terrains with medium resolutions e.g. the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), the global digital elevation model by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER GDEM). A new global digital surface model (DSM) dataset using the archived data of the Panchromatic Remote-sensing Instrument for Stereo Mapping (PRISM) onboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS, nicknamed "Daichi") has been completed on March 2016 by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) collaborating with NTT DATA Corp. and Remote Sensing Technology Center, Japan. This project is called "ALOS World 3D" (AW3D), and its dataset consists of the global DSM dataset with 0.15 arcsec. pixel spacing (approx. 5 m mesh) and ortho-rectified PRISM image with 2.5 m resolution. JAXA is also processing the global DSM with 1 arcsec. spacing (approx. 30 m mesh) based on the AW3D DSM dataset, and partially releasing it free of charge, which calls "ALOS World 3D 30 m mesh" (AW3D30). The global AW3D30 dataset will be released on May 2016. This paper describes the processing status, a preliminary validation result of the AW3D30 DSM dataset, and its public release status. As a summary of the preliminary validation of AW3D30 DSM, 4.40 m (RMSE) of the height accuracy of the dataset was confirmed using 5,121 independent check points distributed in the world.

  12. Estimation of high resolution shallow water bathymetry via two-media-photogrammetry - a case study at the Pielach River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, Michael; Mandlburger, Gottfried; Ressl, Camillo; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    In our contribution, a photogrammetric approach for water depth estimation of a shallow water body is developed and applied to a gravel-bed river in order to evaluate the possibilities of passive optical remote sensing for high resolution bathymetry. While 2-media (air and water) photogrammetry has been described before, it was concentrated on reconstruction of individual points. Here, we take a different approach and aim at a dense surface description of the river bed as seen from the aerial image through the water column. In a first step, the influence of light refraction at the boundary between two media for photogrammetric point retrieval is assessed. The effect is theoretically investigated under varying conditions, i.e. the 3D point displacement caused by refraction is related to parameters such as water depth, image geometry et cetera. Especially the assumption of a plain, horizontal water surface does not hold in practice. Therefore, also the limitations of the theoretical model are determined by investigating, how water surface waves and the corresponding deviation of the surface normal vectors from vertical direction distort the results. In the second, practical part of the work, a refraction correction procedure is derived from the prior investigations and is embedded into the photogrammetric workflow. A full photogrammetric processing chain is applied to a set of aerial images of the pre-Alpine Pielach River in Lower Austria. The RGB images were taken simultaneously to an Airborne Laser Bathymetry (ALB) campaign providing high resolution reference data. Based on these images, a Digital Terrain Model is derived for the open as well as the submerged areas. Running through the procedure gives important insights about the possibilities of influencing the processing pipeline of commercial photogrammetric software packages in order to apply the developed refraction correction. Especially, the deviation from the epipolar constraint caused by refraction and the

  13. New high proper motion stars with declinations between -5(deg) and -30(deg) , and right ascensions between 13h 30m and 24h

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wroblewski, H.; Costa, E.

    1999-10-01

    Proper motions, positions, finding charts and magnitudes are given for 293 newly discovered stars with proper motions larger than 0.15 arcsec/year. They are located between -5(deg) and -30(deg) in declination, and 13h 30m and 24h in right ascension. Their blue photographic magnitudes range from approximately 13.0 to 18.5. Six stars of the above sample have proper motions larger than 0.4 (0.401 to 0.534) arcsec/year. An estimated precision level between 7 and 13 mas/year was achieved for the proper motions. Table~2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp 130.79.128.5 or http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html and figures~2 are available in the on-line edition of the journal at http://www.edpsciences.com

  14. A High-Resolution Two-Stage Satellite Model to Estimate PM2.5 Concentrations in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Ma, Z.; Hu, X.; Yang, K.

    2014-12-01

    With the rapid economic development and urbanization, severe and widespread PM2.5 pollution in China has attracted nationwide attention. Study of the health impact of PM2.5 exposure has been hindered, however, by the limited coverage of ground measurements from recently established regulatory monitoring networks. Estimating ground-level PM2.5 from satellite remote sensing is a promising new method to evaluate the spatial and temporal patterns of PM2.5 exposure. We developed a two-stage spatial statistical model to estimate daily mean PM2.5 concentrations at 10 km resolution in 2013 in China using MODIS Collection 6 AOD, assimilated meteorology, population density, and land use parameters. A custom inverse variance weighting approach was developed to combine MODIS Dark Target (DT) and Deep Blue (DB) AOD to optimize coverage. Compared with the AERONET AOD measurements, our combined AOD (R2=0.80, mean bias = 0.07) performs similarly to MODIS' combined AOD (R2=0.81, mean bias =0.07), but has 90% greater coverage. We used the first-stage linear mixed effect model to represent the temporal variability of PM2.5 and the second-stage generalized additive model to represent its spatial contrast. The overall model cross-validation R2 and relative prediction error are 0.80 and 30%, respectively. PM2.5 levels exhibit strong seasonal patterns, with the highest national mean concentrations in winter (75 µg/m3) and the lowest in summer (30 µg/m3). Elevated annual mean PM2.5 levels are predicted in North China Plain and Sichuan Basin, with the maximum annual PM2.5 concentrations higher than 130 µg/m3 and 110 µg/m3, respectively. Our results also indicates that over 94% of the Chinese population lives in areas that exceed the WHO Air Quality Interim Target-1 standard (35 μg/m3). The exceptions include Taiwan, Hainan, Yunnan, Tibet, and North Inner Mongolia.

  15. Cropland carbon fluxes in the United States: increasing geospatial resolution of inventory-based carbon accounting.

    PubMed

    West, Tristram O; Brandt, Craig C; Baskaran, Latha M; Hellwinckel, Chad M; Mueller, Richard; Bernacchi, Carl J; Bandaru, Varaprasad; Yang, Bai; Wilson, Bradly S; Marland, Gregg; Nelson, Richard G; De la Torre Ugarte, Daniel G; Post, Wilfred M

    2010-06-01

    Net annual soil carbon change, fossil fuel emissions from cropland production, and cropland net primary production were estimated and spatially distributed using land cover defined by NASA's moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) and by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) cropland data layer (CDL). Spatially resolved estimates of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) were developed. The purpose of generating spatial estimates of carbon fluxes, and the primary objective of this research, was to develop a method of carbon accounting that is consistent from field to national scales. NEE represents net on-site vertical fluxes of carbon. NECB represents all on-site and off-site carbon fluxes associated with crop production. Estimates of cropland NEE using moderate resolution (approximately 1 km2) land cover data were generated for the conterminous United States and compared with higher resolution (30-m) estimates of NEE and with direct measurements of CO2 flux from croplands in Illinois and Nebraska, USA. Estimates of NEE using the CDL (30-m resolution) had a higher correlation with eddy covariance flux tower estimates compared with estimates of NEE using MODIS. Estimates of NECB are primarily driven by net soil carbon change, fossil fuel emissions associated with crop production, and CO2 emissions from the application of agricultural lime. NEE and NECB for U.S. croplands were -274 and 7 Tg C/yr for 2004, respectively. Use of moderate- to high-resolution satellite-based land cover data enables improved estimates of cropland carbon dynamics. PMID:20597291

  16. An Evaluation of New High-Resolution Image Collection and Processing Techniques for Estimating Shrub Cover and Detecting Landscape Changes

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, D.J.; Ostler, W.K.

    2001-05-01

    Research funded by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as part of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) evaluated novel techniques for collecting and processing high-resolution images in the Mojave Desert. Several camera types, lens, films, and digital processing techniques were evaluated on the basis of their ability to correctly estimate canopy cover of shrubs. A high degree of accuracy was obtained with photo scales of 1:1000 to 1:4000 and flatbed scanning rates from films or prints of 300 lines per inch or larger. Smaller scale images were of value in detecting retrospective changes in cover of large shrubs, but failed to detect smaller shrubs. New image-processing software, typically used in light microscopy, forensics, and industrial engineering, make it possible to accurately measure areas for total cover of up to four dominant shrub species in minutes compared to hours or days of field work. Canopy cover and individual shrub parameters such as width, length, circumference, and shape factors can be readily measured yielding size distribution histograms and other statistical data on plant community structure. These novel techniques are being evaluated in a four-year study of military training impacts at Fort Irwin, California. Results will be compared among the new and conventional imagery and processing, including 1-meter (m) pixel IKONOS images. The new processes create georectified color-coded contour maps of shrub cover for use with Geographic Information System (GIS) software. The technique is a valuable new emerging tool to accurately assess vegetation structure and landscape changes due to military or other land-use disturbances.

  17. The Influence of Data Resolution on Predicted Distribution and Estimates of Extent of Current Protection of Three ‘Listed’ Deep-Sea Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Lauren K.; Ross, Rebecca E.; Stewart, Heather A.; Howell, Kerry L.

    2015-01-01

    Modelling approaches have the potential to significantly contribute to the spatial management of the deep-sea ecosystem in a cost effective manner. However, we currently have little understanding of the accuracy of such models, developed using limited data, of varying resolution. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of predictive models constructed using non-simulated (real world) data of different resolution. Predicted distribution maps for three deep-sea habitats were constructed using MaxEnt modelling methods using high resolution multibeam bathymetric data and associated terrain derived variables as predictors. Model performance was evaluated using repeated 75/25 training/test data partitions using AUC and threshold-dependent assessment methods. The overall extent and distribution of each habitat, and the percentage contained within an existing MPA network were quantified and compared to results from low resolution GEBCO models. Predicted spatial extent for scleractinian coral reef and Syringammina fragilissima aggregations decreased with an increase in model resolution, whereas Pheronema carpenteri total suitable area increased. Distinct differences in predicted habitat distribution were observed for all three habitats. Estimates of habitat extent contained within the MPA network all increased when modelled at fine scale. High resolution models performed better than low resolution models according to threshold-dependent evaluation. We recommend the use of high resolution multibeam bathymetry data over low resolution bathymetry data for use in modelling approaches. We do not recommend the use of predictive models to produce absolute values of habitat extent, but likely areas of suitable habitat. Assessments of MPA network effectiveness based on calculations of percentage area protection (policy driven conservation targets) from low resolution models are likely to be fit for purpose. PMID:26496639

  18. The Influence of Data Resolution on Predicted Distribution and Estimates of Extent of Current Protection of Three 'Listed' Deep-Sea Habitats.

    PubMed

    Ross, Lauren K; Ross, Rebecca E; Stewart, Heather A; Howell, Kerry L

    2015-01-01

    Modelling approaches have the potential to significantly contribute to the spatial management of the deep-sea ecosystem in a cost effective manner. However, we currently have little understanding of the accuracy of such models, developed using limited data, of varying resolution. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of predictive models constructed using non-simulated (real world) data of different resolution. Predicted distribution maps for three deep-sea habitats were constructed using MaxEnt modelling methods using high resolution multibeam bathymetric data and associated terrain derived variables as predictors. Model performance was evaluated using repeated 75/25 training/test data partitions using AUC and threshold-dependent assessment methods. The overall extent and distribution of each habitat, and the percentage contained within an existing MPA network were quantified and compared to results from low resolution GEBCO models. Predicted spatial extent for scleractinian coral reef and Syringammina fragilissima aggregations decreased with an increase in model resolution, whereas Pheronema carpenteri total suitable area increased. Distinct differences in predicted habitat distribution were observed for all three habitats. Estimates of habitat extent contained within the MPA network all increased when modelled at fine scale. High resolution models performed better than low resolution models according to threshold-dependent evaluation. We recommend the use of high resolution multibeam bathymetry data over low resolution bathymetry data for use in modelling approaches. We do not recommend the use of predictive models to produce absolute values of habitat extent, but likely areas of suitable habitat. Assessments of MPA network effectiveness based on calculations of percentage area protection (policy driven conservation targets) from low resolution models are likely to be fit for purpose. PMID:26496639

  19. Design and Expected Performance of GISMO-2, a Two Color Millimeter Camera for the IRAM 30 m Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staguhn, Johannes G.; Benford, Dominic J.; Dwek, Eli; Hilton, Gene; Fixsen, Dale J.; Irwin, Kent; Jhabvala, Christine; Kovacs, Attila; Leclercq, Samuel; Maher, Stephen F.; Miller, Tim; Moseley, S. Harvey; Sharp, Elmer H.; Wollack, Edward

    2014-01-01

    We present the main design features for the GISMO-2 bolometer camera, which we build for background-limited operation at the IRAM 30 m telescope on Pico Veleta, Spain. GISMO-2 will operate simultaneously in the 1 and 2 mm atmospherical windows. The 1 mm channel uses a 32 × 40 TES-based backshort under grid (BUG) bolometer array, the 2 mm channel operates with a 16 × 16 BUG array. The camera utilizes almost the entire full field of view provided by the telescope. The optical design of GISMO-2 was strongly influenced by our experience with the GISMO 2mm bolometer camera, which is successfully operating at the 30 m telescope. GISMO is accessible to the astronomical community through the regularIRAMcall for proposals.

  20. A New Folding Kinetic Mechanism for Human Transthyretin and the Influence of the Amyloidogenic V30M Mutation.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Catarina S H; Almeida, Zaida L; Vaz, Daniela C; Faria, Tiago Q; Brito, Rui M M

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation into insoluble amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, chief among them Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Although caused by different proteins, these pathologies share some basic molecular mechanisms with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP), a rare hereditary neuropathy caused by amyloid formation and deposition by transthyretin (TTR) in the peripheral and autonomic nervous systems. Among the amyloidogenic TTR mutations known, V30M-TTR is the most common in FAP. TTR amyloidogenesis (ATTR) is triggered by tetramer dissociation, followed by partial unfolding and aggregation of the low conformational stability monomers formed. Thus, tetramer dissociation kinetics, monomer conformational stability and competition between refolding and aggregation pathways do play a critical role in ATTR. Here, we propose a new model to analyze the refolding kinetics of WT-TTR and V30M-TTR, showing that at pH and protein concentrations close to physiological, a two-step mechanism with a unimolecular first step followed by a second-order second step adjusts well to the experimental data. Interestingly, although sharing the same kinetic mechanism, V30M-TTR refolds at a much slower rate than WT-TTR, a feature that may favor the formation of transient species leading to kinetic partition into amyloidogenic pathways and, thus, significantly increasing the probability of amyloid formation in vivo. PMID:27589730

  1. Estimating chlorophyll with thermal and broadband multispectral high resolution imagery from an unmanned aerial system using relevance vector machines for precision agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elarab, Manal; Ticlavilca, Andres M.; Torres-Rua, Alfonso F.; Maslova, Inga; McKee, Mac

    2015-12-01

    Precision agriculture requires high-resolution information to enable greater precision in the management of inputs to production. Actionable information about crop and field status must be acquired at high spatial resolution and at a temporal frequency appropriate for timely responses. In this study, high spatial resolution imagery was obtained through the use of a small, unmanned aerial system called AggieAirTM. Simultaneously with the AggieAir flights, intensive ground sampling for plant chlorophyll was conducted at precisely determined locations. This study reports the application of a relevance vector machine coupled with cross validation and backward elimination to a dataset composed of reflectance from high-resolution multi-spectral imagery (VIS-NIR), thermal infrared imagery, and vegetative indices, in conjunction with in situ SPAD measurements from which chlorophyll concentrations were derived, to estimate chlorophyll concentration from remotely sensed data at 15-cm resolution. The results indicate that a relevance vector machine with a thin plate spline kernel type and kernel width of 5.4, having LAI, NDVI, thermal and red bands as the selected set of inputs, can be used to spatially estimate chlorophyll concentration with a root-mean-squared-error of 5.31 μg cm-2, efficiency of 0.76, and 9 relevance vectors.

  2. The link between a negative high resolution resist contrast/developer performance and the Flory-Huggins parameter estimated from the Hansen solubility sphere

    SciTech Connect

    StCaire, Lorri; Olynick, Deirdre L.; Chao, Weilun L.; Lewis, Mark D.; Lu, Haoren; Dhuey, Scott D.; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2008-07-01

    We have implemented a technique to identify candidate polymer solvents for spinning, developing, and rinsing for a high resolution, negative electron beam resist hexa-methyl acetoxy calix(6)arene to elicit the optimum pattern development performance. Using the three dimensional Hansen solubility parameters for over 40 solvents, we have constructed a Hansen solubility sphere. From this sphere, we have estimated the Flory Huggins interaction parameter for solvents with hexa-methyl acetoxy calix(6)arene and found a correlation between resist development contrast and the Flory-Huggins parameter. This provides new insights into the development behavior of resist materials which are necessary for obtaining the ultimate lithographic resolution.

  3. AN EVALUATION OF TWO GROUND-BASED CROWN CLOSURE ESTIMATION TECHNIQUES COMPARED TO CROWN CLOSURE ESTIMATES DERIVED FROM HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two ground-based canopy closure estimation techniques, the Spherical Densitometer (SD) and the Vertical Tube (VT), were compared for the effect of deciduous understory on dominant/co-dominant crown closure estimates in even-aged loblolly (Pinus taeda) pine stands located in the N...

  4. AN EVALUATION OF TWO GROUND-BASED CROWN CLOSURE ESTIMATION TECHNIQUES COMPARED TO CROWN CLOSURE ESTIMATES DERIVED FROM HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two ground-based canopy closure estimation techniques, the Spherical Densitometer (SD) and the Vertical Tube (VT), were compared for the effect of deciduous understory on dominantlco-dominant crown closure estimates in even-aged loblolly (Pinus taeda) pine stands located in the N...

  5. A global inverse model for estimating surface CO2 fluxes at a 0.1x0.1 degree resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksyutov, Shamil; Oda, Tomohiro; Janardanan, Rajesh; Yaremchuk, Alexey; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Ito, Akihiko; Belikov, Dmitry; Zhuravlev, Ruslan; Ganshin, Alexander; Valsala, Vinu

    2015-04-01

    We propose an iterative inversion method for estimating surface CO2 fluxes at a high spatial resolution (0.1 degree) using atmospheric CO2 data collected by the global in-situ network and GOSAT. The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART was coupled to the Eulerian atmospheric tracer transport model (NIES-TM) and an adjoint of the coupled model was derived. The inverse model calculates weekly corrections to given prior fluxes at a spatial resolution of the surface flux footprints simulated by FLEXPART model (0.1 degrees). Prior fluxes are given at different spatial resolutions in low and high resolution mode implementations. The hourly terrestrial biosphere fluxes are simulated with VISIT model using CFSR reanalysis. Ocean fluxes are calculated using a 4D-Var assimilation system of the surface pCO2 observations. Fossil fuel (ODIAC) and biomass burning (GFASv1.1) emissions are given at original model resolutions (0.1 degree), while terrestrial biosphere and ocean fluxes are interpolated from a coarser resolution. Flux response functions (footprints) for observations are first simulated with FLEXPART. The precalculated flux response functions are then used in forward and adjoint runs of the coupled transport model. We apply Lanczos process to obtain the truncated singular value decomposition (SVD) of the scaled tracer transport operator A = R-1/2HB1/2, where H - tracer transport operator, R and B - error covariance matrices for observations and fluxes, respectively. The square root of covariance matrix B is constructed by directional splitting in latitude, longitude and time, with exponential decay scales of 500 km on land, 1000 km over oceans and 2 weeks in time. Once singular vectors of AAT are obtained, the prior and posterior flux uncertainties are evaluated. Numerical experiments of inverting surface CO2 fluxes showed that the high-resolution (Lagrangian) part of the flux responses dominates the solution so that spatial patterns from the coarser

  6. Use of High-Resolution Multispectral Imagery to Estimate Soil and Plant Nitrogen in Oats (Avena sativa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ELarab, M.; Ticlavilca, A. M.; Torres-Rua, A. F.; McKee, M.

    2014-12-01

    Precision agriculture requires high spatial resolution in the application of the inputs to agricultural production. This requires that actionable information about crop and field status be acquired at the same high spatial resolution and at a temporal frequency appropriate for timely responses. In this study, high-resolution imagery was obtained through the use of a small, unmanned aerial vehicle, called AggieAirTM, which provides spatial resolution as fine as 15 cm. Simultaneously with AggieAir flights, intensive ground sampling was conducted at precisely determined locations for plant and soil nitrogen among other parameters. This study investigated the spectral signature of oats and formulated a machine learning regression model of reflectance response between the multi-spectral bands available from AggieAir (red, green, blue, near infrared, and thermal), plant nitrogen and soil nitrogen. A multivariate relevance vector machine (MVRVM) was used to develop the linkages between the remotely sensed data and plant and soil nitrogen at approximately 15-cm resolution. The results of this study are presented, including a statistical evaluation of the performance of the model.

  7. A real-time and fine resolution analyser used to estimate the instantaneous energy distribution of Doppler signals.

    PubMed

    Fan, L; Evans, D H

    1994-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound signal analysers in current use require that the signal be stationary within the time interval of processing, and yield average results for that interval. A real-time instantaneous frequency analyser based on the Wigner distribution function (WDF) has been developed, which provides a means of analysing time-varying signals or signals with short stationary time periods, and also produces results with very high instantaneous temporal resolution without causing significant deterioration of frequency resolution. In addition to the real-time processing, the most recent 2.4 s of Doppler signal is stored in the analyser so that the operator can perform further fine analysis and obtain results with very high resolutions in both the time and frequency domains. The pseudo-instantaneous mean frequency (PIMF) and the Pseudo-Instantaneous Power Distribution (PIPD) are calculated and displayed every 4.0 ms in the real-time processing mode, and with a resolution of between 80 microseconds and 2 ms in the fine resolution analysis mode. The analyser utilises an algorithm developed so that the WDF can be calculated efficiently using the conventional Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method, and the PIPDs are calculated from data that contribute equally. PMID:7941102

  8. RESOLUTION AND ERROR IN MEASURING LAND-COVER CHANGE: EFFECTS ON ESTIMATING NET CARBON RELEASE FROM MEXICAN TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reliable estimates of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere due to land-use change have become increasingly important. One source of land-use changes estimates comes from comparing multi-date remote sensing imagery, though the effect of land-cover clas...

  9. Development of the inverse model for estimation of the surface CO2 fluxes at grid scale and high resolution with GOSAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksyutov, S. S.; Ito, A.; Oda, T.; Kaiser, J. W.; Belikov, D. A.; Janardanan Achari, R.; Yaremchuk, A.; Zhuravlev, R.; Ganshin, A.; Valsala, V.

    2014-12-01

    We develop an iterative inversion method to estimate surface CO2 fluxes at resolutions up to 0.1 degree using atmospheric CO2 data collected by the global in-situ network and GOSAT. The atmospheric transport model and its adjoint are made by coupling the Eulerian grid model (NIES-TM) to Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART. The inverse model calculates corrections to the prior fluxes at a weekly time step and spatial resolution of the FLEXPART model (1 or 0.1 degrees). The terrestrial biosphere fluxes are simulated with VISIT model at hourly time step using CFSR reanalysis. Ocean fluxes are calculated using a 4D-Var assimilation system of the surface pCO2 observations. In the high resolution mode, prior fluxes of fossil emissions (ODIAC) and biomass burning (GFASv1.1) are given at a model resolution, while ocean and terrestrial ecosystem fluxes are interpolated from a coarser resolution. The surface flux footprints for in-situ and GOSAT observations are simulated with Flexpart. Precalculated flux response functions are then used in forward and adjoint runs of the coupled transport model. We apply the truncated singular value decomposition (SVD) of the scaled tracer transport operator A=R-1/2HB1/2, where H - tracer transport operator, R and B - uncertainty matrices for observations and fluxes, respectively. The square root of covariance matrix B is constructed by directional splitting in latitude, longitude and time, with exponential decay scales of 500 km on land, 1000 km over oceans and 2 weeks in time. Once right and left singular vectors of ATA are obtained, the prior and posterior flux uncertainties are evaluated. Numerical experiments of inverting the surface CO2 fluxes showed that the high resolution (Lagrangian) part of the flux responses dominates the solution so that patterns from the coarser resolution NIES TM (10x10 degree) are not visible in flux singular vectors and the optimized flux. The reconstruction of the fluxes at highest resolution of

  10. Image interpreter tool: An ArcGIS tool for estimating vegetation cover from high-resolution imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land managers need increased temporal and spatial resolution of rangeland assessment and monitoring data. However, with flat or declining land management and monitoring agency budgets, such increases in sampling intensity are unlikely unless new methods can be developed that capture data of key rang...

  11. Estimation of surface energy balance from radiant surface temperature and NOAA AVHRR sensor reflectances over agricultural and native vegetation. [AVHRR (advanced very high resolution radiometer)

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xinmei; Lyons, T.J. ); Smith, R.C.G. ); Hacker, J.M.; Schwerdtfeger, P. )

    1993-08-01

    A model is developed to evaluate surface heat flux densities using the radiant surface temperature and red and near-infrared reflectances from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer sensor. Net radiation is calculated from an empirical formulation and albedo estimated from satellite observations. Infrared surface temperature is corrected to aerodynamic surface temperature in estimating the sensible heat flux and the latent flux is evaluated as the residual of the surface energy balance. When applied to relatively homogeneous agricultural and native vegetation, the model yields realistic estimates of sensible and latent heat flux density in the surface layer for cases where either the sensible or latent flux dominates. 29 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Estimating absolute methylation levels at single-CpG resolution from methylation enrichment and restriction enzyme sequencing methods

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Michael; Cheng, Jeffrey B.; Li, Daofeng; Xie, Mingchao; Hong, Chibo; Maire, Cécile L.; Ligon, Keith L.; Hirst, Martin; Marra, Marco A.; Costello, Joseph F.; Wang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in sequencing-based DNA methylation profiling methods provide an unprecedented opportunity to map complete DNA methylomes. These include whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS, MethylC-seq, or BS-seq), reduced-representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS), and enrichment-based methods such as MeDIP-seq, MBD-seq, and MRE-seq. These methods yield largely comparable results but differ significantly in extent of genomic CpG coverage, resolution, quantitative accuracy, and cost, at least while using current algorithms to interrogate the data. None of these existing methods provides single-CpG resolution, comprehensive genome-wide coverage, and cost feasibility for a typical laboratory. We introduce methylCRF, a novel conditional random fields–based algorithm that integrates methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP-seq) and methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme (MRE-seq) sequencing data to predict DNA methylation levels at single-CpG resolution. Our method is a combined computational and experimental strategy to produce DNA methylomes of all 28 million CpGs in the human genome for a fraction (<10%) of the cost of whole-genome bisulfite sequencing methods. methylCRF was benchmarked for accuracy against Infinium arrays, RRBS, WGBS sequencing, and locus-specific bisulfite sequencing performed on the same human embryonic stem cell line. methylCRF transformation of MeDIP-seq/MRE-seq was equivalent to a biological replicate of WGBS in quantification, coverage, and resolution. We used conventional bisulfite conversion, PCR, cloning, and sequencing to validate loci where our predictions do not agree with whole-genome bisulfite data, and in 11 out of 12 cases, methylCRF predictions of methylation level agree better with validated results than does whole-genome bisulfite sequencing. Therefore, methylCRF transformation of MeDIP-seq/MRE-seq data provides an accurate, inexpensive, and widely accessible strategy to create full DNA methylomes. PMID:23804401

  13. Estimating absolute methylation levels at single-CpG resolution from methylation enrichment and restriction enzyme sequencing methods.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Michael; Cheng, Jeffrey B; Li, Daofeng; Xie, Mingchao; Hong, Chibo; Maire, Cécile L; Ligon, Keith L; Hirst, Martin; Marra, Marco A; Costello, Joseph F; Wang, Ting

    2013-09-01

    Recent advancements in sequencing-based DNA methylation profiling methods provide an unprecedented opportunity to map complete DNA methylomes. These include whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS, MethylC-seq, or BS-seq), reduced-representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS), and enrichment-based methods such as MeDIP-seq, MBD-seq, and MRE-seq. These methods yield largely comparable results but differ significantly in extent of genomic CpG coverage, resolution, quantitative accuracy, and cost, at least while using current algorithms to interrogate the data. None of these existing methods provides single-CpG resolution, comprehensive genome-wide coverage, and cost feasibility for a typical laboratory. We introduce methylCRF, a novel conditional random fields-based algorithm that integrates methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP-seq) and methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme (MRE-seq) sequencing data to predict DNA methylation levels at single-CpG resolution. Our method is a combined computational and experimental strategy to produce DNA methylomes of all 28 million CpGs in the human genome for a fraction (<10%) of the cost of whole-genome bisulfite sequencing methods. methylCRF was benchmarked for accuracy against Infinium arrays, RRBS, WGBS sequencing, and locus-specific bisulfite sequencing performed on the same human embryonic stem cell line. methylCRF transformation of MeDIP-seq/MRE-seq was equivalent to a biological replicate of WGBS in quantification, coverage, and resolution. We used conventional bisulfite conversion, PCR, cloning, and sequencing to validate loci where our predictions do not agree with whole-genome bisulfite data, and in 11 out of 12 cases, methylCRF predictions of methylation level agree better with validated results than does whole-genome bisulfite sequencing. Therefore, methylCRF transformation of MeDIP-seq/MRE-seq data provides an accurate, inexpensive, and widely accessible strategy to create full DNA methylomes. PMID:23804401

  14. CEH-GEAR: 1 km resolution daily and monthly areal rainfall estimates for the UK for hydrological and other applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, V. D. J.; Tanguy, M.; Prosdocimi, I.; Terry, J. A.; Hitt, O.; Cole, S. J.; Fry, M.; Morris, D. G.; Dixon, H.

    2015-06-01

    The Centre for Ecology & Hydrology - Gridded Estimates of Areal Rainfall (CEH-GEAR) data set was developed to provide reliable 1 km gridded estimates of daily and monthly rainfall for Great Britain (GB) and Northern Ireland (NI) (together with approximately 3500 km2 of catchment in the Republic of Ireland) from 1890 onwards. The data set was primarily required to support hydrological modelling. The rainfall estimates are derived from the Met Office collated historical weather observations for the UK which include a national database of rain gauge observations. The natural neighbour interpolation methodology, including a normalisation step based on average annual rainfall (AAR), was used to generate the daily and monthly rainfall grids. To derive the monthly estimates, rainfall totals from monthly and daily (when complete month available) rain gauges were used in order to obtain maximum information from the rain gauge network. The daily grids were adjusted so that the monthly grids are fully consistent with the daily grids. The CEH-GEAR data set was developed according to the guidance provided by the British Standards Institution. The CEH-GEAR data set contains 1 km grids of daily and monthly rainfall estimates for GB and NI for the period 1890-2012. For each day and month, CEH-GEAR includes a secondary grid of distance to the nearest operational rain gauge. This may be used as an indicator of the quality of the estimates. When this distance is greater than 100 km, the estimates are not calculated due to high uncertainty. CEH-GEAR is available from doi:10.5285/5dc179dc-f692-49ba-9326-a6893a503f6e and is free of charge for commercial and non-commercial use subject to licensing terms and conditions.

  15. High-Resolution Satellite-Derived PM2.5 from Optimal Estimation and Geographically Weighted Regression over North America.

    PubMed

    van Donkelaar, Aaron; Martin, Randall V; Spurr, Robert J D; Burnett, Richard T

    2015-09-01

    We used a geographically weighted regression (GWR) statistical model to represent bias of fine particulate matter concentrations (PM2.5) derived from a 1 km optimal estimate (OE) aerosol optical depth (AOD) satellite retrieval that used AOD-to-PM2.5 relationships from a chemical transport model (CTM) for 2004-2008 over North America. This hybrid approach combined the geophysical understanding and global applicability intrinsic to the CTM relationships with the knowledge provided by observational constraints. Adjusting the OE PM2.5 estimates according to the GWR-predicted bias yielded significant improvement compared with unadjusted long-term mean values (R(2) = 0.82 versus R(2) = 0.62), even when a large fraction (70%) of sites were withheld for cross-validation (R(2) = 0.78) and developed seasonal skill (R(2) = 0.62-0.89). The effect of individual GWR predictors on OE PM2.5 estimates additionally provided insight into the sources of uncertainty for global satellite-derived PM2.5 estimates. These predictor-driven effects imply that local variability in surface elevation and urban emissions are important sources of uncertainty in geophysical calculations of the AOD-to-PM2.5 relationship used in satellite-derived PM2.5 estimates over North America, and potentially worldwide. PMID:26261937

  16. Estimating brain age using high-resolution pattern recognition: Younger brains in long-term meditation practitioners.

    PubMed

    Luders, Eileen; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Gaser, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Normal aging is known to be accompanied by loss of brain substance. The present study was designed to examine whether the practice of meditation is associated with a reduced brain age. Specific focus was directed at age fifty and beyond, as mid-life is a time when aging processes are known to become more prominent. We applied a recently developed machine learning algorithm trained to identify anatomical correlates of age in the brain translating those into one single score: the BrainAGE index (in years). Using this validated approach based on high-dimensional pattern recognition, we re-analyzed a large sample of 50 long-term meditators and 50 control subjects estimating and comparing their brain ages. We observed that, at age fifty, brains of meditators were estimated to be 7.5years younger than those of controls. In addition, we examined if the brain age estimates change with increasing age. While brain age estimates varied only little in controls, significant changes were detected in meditators: for every additional year over fifty, meditators' brains were estimated to be an additional 1month and 22days younger than their chronological age. Altogether, these findings seem to suggest that meditation is beneficial for brain preservation, effectively protecting against age-related atrophy with a consistently slower rate of brain aging throughout life. PMID:27079530

  17. Application of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)-based Vegetation Health Indices for Estimation of Malaria Cases

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Atiqur; Krakauer, Nir; Roytman, Leonid; Goldberg, Mitch; Kogan, Felix

    2010-01-01

    Satellite data may be used to map climatic conditions conducive to malaria outbreaks, assisting in the targeting of public health interventions to mitigate the worldwide increase in incidence of the mosquito-transmitted disease. This work analyzes correlation between malaria cases and vegetation health (VH) indices derived from satellite remote sensing for each week over a period of 14 years for Bandarban, Bangladesh. Correlation analysis showed that years with a high summer temperature condition index (TCI) tended to be those with high malaria incidence. Principal components regression was performed on patterns of weekly TCI during each of the two annual malaria seasons to construct a model as a function of the TCI. These models reduced the malaria estimation error variance by 57% if first-peak (June–July) TCI was used as the estimator and 74% if second-peak (August–September) was used, compared with an estimation of average number of malaria cases for each year. PMID:20519592

  18. MeSiC: A Model-Based Method for Estimating 5 mC Levels at Single-CpG Resolution from MeDIP-seq

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yun; Yu, Fulong; Pang, Lin; Zhao, Hongying; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Guanxiong; Liu, Tingting; Zhang, Hongyi; Fan, Huihui; Zhang, Yan; Pang, Bo; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    As the fifth base in mammalian genome, 5-methylcytosine (5 mC) is essential for many biological processes including normal development and disease. Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (MeDIP-seq), which uses anti-5 mC antibodies to enrich for methylated fraction of the genome, is widely used to investigate methylome at a resolution of 100–500 bp. Considering the CpG density-dependent bias and limited resolution of MeDIP-seq, we developed a Random Forest Regression (RFR) model method, MeSiC, to estimate DNA methylation levels at single-base resolution. MeSiC integrated MeDIP-seq signals of CpG sites and their surrounding neighbors as well as genomic features to construct genomic element-dependent RFR models. In the H1 cell line, a high correlation was observed between MeSiC predictions and actual 5 mC levels. Meanwhile, MeSiC enabled to calibrate CpG density-dependent bias of MeDIP-seq signals. Importantly, we found that MeSiC models constructed in the H1 cell line could be used to accurately predict DNA methylation levels for other cell types. Comparisons with methylCRF and MEDIPS showed that MeSiC achieved comparable and even better performance. These demonstrate that MeSiC can provide accurate estimations of 5 mC levels at single-CpG resolution using MeDIP-seq data alone. PMID:26424089

  19. MeSiC: A Model-Based Method for Estimating 5 mC Levels at Single-CpG Resolution from MeDIP-seq.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun; Yu, Fulong; Pang, Lin; Zhao, Hongying; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Guanxiong; Liu, Tingting; Zhang, Hongyi; Fan, Huihui; Zhang, Yan; Pang, Bo; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    As the fifth base in mammalian genome, 5-methylcytosine (5 mC) is essential for many biological processes including normal development and disease. Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (MeDIP-seq), which uses anti-5 mC antibodies to enrich for methylated fraction of the genome, is widely used to investigate methylome at a resolution of 100-500 bp. Considering the CpG density-dependent bias and limited resolution of MeDIP-seq, we developed a Random Forest Regression (RFR) model method, MeSiC, to estimate DNA methylation levels at single-base resolution. MeSiC integrated MeDIP-seq signals of CpG sites and their surrounding neighbors as well as genomic features to construct genomic element-dependent RFR models. In the H1 cell line, a high correlation was observed between MeSiC predictions and actual 5 mC levels. Meanwhile, MeSiC enabled to calibrate CpG density-dependent bias of MeDIP-seq signals. Importantly, we found that MeSiC models constructed in the H1 cell line could be used to accurately predict DNA methylation levels for other cell types. Comparisons with methylCRF and MEDIPS showed that MeSiC achieved comparable and even better performance. These demonstrate that MeSiC can provide accurate estimations of 5 mC levels at single-CpG resolution using MeDIP-seq data alone. PMID:26424089

  20. Estimated UV clutter levels at 10-100 meter sensor pixel resolution extrapolated from recent polar bear measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlers, M.; Huguenin, R.; Weinberg, M.; Huffman, R. E.; Eastes, R. W.; Delgreco, F. P.

    1989-08-01

    There is continuing need for information about the earth background clutter at ultraviolet wavelengths. The methodology and the results obtained at 1304 are described. A wavelength from an analysis of th AFGL Polar Bear Experiment. The basic measurement equipment provided data of a spatial resolution of 20 km over a large portion of the earth. The instrumentation also provided sampled outputs as the footprint scanned along the measurement track. The combination of the fine scanning and large area coverage provided opportunity for a spatial power spectral analysis that in turn provided a means for extrapolation to finer-spatial scale; a companion paper discusses the physical basis for this extrapolation.

  1. Estimated UV clutter levels at 10-100 meter sensor pixel resolution extrapolated from recent Polar Bear measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlers, M.; Huguenin, R.; Weinberg, M.; Huffman, R.; Eastes, R.

    1989-12-01

    This paper describes the methodology and the results obtained at 1304 A wavelength from an analysis of the AFGL Polar Bear experiment. The basic measurement equipment provided data of a spatial resolution of 20 km over a large portion of the earth. The instrumentation also provided sampled outputs as the footprint scanned along the measurement track. The combination of the fine scanning and large area coverage provided opportunity for a spatial power spectral analysis that in turn provided a means for extrapolation to finer spatial scale.

  2. Independent Component Analysis (ICA) performance to bathymetric estimation using high resolution satellite data in an estuarine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodoro, A. C.; Almeida, Rute; Gonçalves, M.

    2014-10-01

    The use of satellite remote sensing data is a valid alternative to the classical survey bathymetric methods for bathymetric estimation in shallow waters. Multispectral satellite data has been used to produce bathymetric maps by considering the pixel reflectance as a depth indicator. Teodoro et al., (2010) already proposes a model for the estimation of depth based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of an IKONOS-2 image, for the Douro River estuary (Porto, Portugal). In this work, alternative univariate and bivariate models are proposed for the same IKONOS-2 image based on PCA and Independent Component Analysis (ICA). The PCA is the standard method for separating mixed signals. Such analysis provides signals that are linearly uncorrelated. Although the separated signals are uncorrelated they could still be depended, i.e., nonlinear correlation remains. The ICA was developed to investigate such data. Fast ICA algorithm was used in Matlab®. The results obtained were compared with the bathymetric estimation trough PCA. Best univariate ICA based model allowed to estimate depth with a mean error of 0.00m [with 1.15 of standard deviation], outperforming the best PCA based univariate model results of 0.39[1.34], even with the first PCA component explains 80% of data variance. With bivariate models is possible to reduce the standard deviation of the error to 1.01m.

  3. A New Calibration of [Fe/H] and [C/Fe] Estimates for Medium-Resolution Spectra of Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Catherine R.; Beers, T. C.; Marsteller, B.; Sivarani, T.; Rossi, S.; Plez, B.; Masseron, T.; Lucatello, S.

    2006-12-01

    In recent years it has become clear that a significant fraction (on the order of at least 20%) of Galactic halo stars with [Fe/H] < -2.0 exhibit strong enhancements of carbon, with [C/Fe] > +1.0. The availability of many thousands of medium-resolution spectra from previous (and ongoing) surveys such as the HK survey of Beers and colleagues, and the Hamburg/ESO Survey of Christlieb and collaborators, provide the opportunity to identify and quantify the distribution of [C/Fe] over a wide range of [Fe/H] and stellar evolutionary states. In order to quickly obtain this information, previous attempts have been made to develop a calibration of line index estimates of [Fe/H] and [C/Fe] based on the observed strengths of the CaII K line and the CH G-band feature. The methodology developed by Rossi et al. (2005) relied on a sample of some 120 stars with available high-resolution spectroscopic estimates of [Fe/H] and [C/Fe], as well as 2MASS J-K colors, to carry out such a calibration. Unfortunately, the sample of calibration objects did not include numerous stars with effective temperatures (and carbon abundances) over the full range that is required for some applications. Recently the numbers of potential calibration objects has increased dramatically, to over 500 stars, due to the completion of several large high-resolution spectroscopic studies (e.g., Barklem et al. 2005, Cohen et al. 2005, Spite et al. 2005, and Aoki et al. 2006). In addition, new carbon-enhanced model atmospheres from which synthetic spectra and colors can be estimated have become available. We explore the use of these new data and tools and develop a revised calibration that is expected to be superior in many respects to previous attempts.

  4. A Revised Calibration Of [Fe/H] And [C/Fe] Estimates For Medium Resolution Spectra Of Carbon Enhanced Metal Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Catherine R.; Beers, T. C.; Marsteller, B.; Sivarani, T.; Rossi, S.; Plez, B.; Masseron, T.; Lucatello, S.

    2007-05-01

    In recent years it has become clear that a significant fraction (on the order of at least 20%) of Galactic halo stars with [Fe/H] < -2.0 exhibit strong enhancements of carbon, with [C/Fe] > +1.0. The availability of many thousands of medium-resolution spectra from previous (and ongoing) surveys such as the HK survey of Beers and colleagues, and the Hamburg/ESO Survey of Christlieb and collaborators, provide the opportunity to identify and quantify the distribution of [C/Fe] over a wide range of [Fe/H] and stellar evolutionary states. In order to quickly obtain this information, previous attempts have been made to develop a calibration of line index estimates of [Fe/H] and [C/Fe] based on the observed strengths of the CaII K line and the CH G-band feature. The methodology developed by Rossi et al. (2005) relied on a sample of some 120 stars with available high-resolution spectroscopic estimates of [Fe/H] and [C/Fe], as well as 2MASS J-K colors, to carry out such a calibration. Unfortunately, the sample of calibration objects did not include numerous stars with effective temperatures (and carbon abundances) over the full range that is required for some applications. Recently the numbers of potential calibration objects has increased dramatically, to over 500 stars, due to the completion of several large high-resolution spectroscopic studies (e.g., Barklem et al. 2005, Cohen et al. 2005, Spite et al. 2005, and Aoki et al. 2006). In addition, new carbon-enhanced model atmospheres from which synthetic spectra and colors can be estimated have become available. We explore the use of these new data and tools and develop a revised calibration that is expected to be superior in many respects to previous attempts.

  5. High-resolution estimates of Nubia-Somalia plate motion since 20 Ma from reconstructions of the Southwest Indian Ridge, Red Sea, and Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Merkuryev, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We estimate Nubia-Somalia rotations at ~1-Myr intervals for the past 20 Myr from newly available, high-resolution reconstructions of the Southwest Indian Ridge and reconstructions of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. The former rotations are based on many more data, extend farther back in time, and have more temporal resolution than has previously been the case. Nubia-Somalia plate motion has remained remarkably steady since 5.2 Ma. For example, at the northern end of the East Africa rift, our Nubia-Somalia plate motion estimates at six different times between 0.78 Ma and 5.2 Ma agree to within 3% with the rift-normal component of motion that is extrapolated from the recently estimated Saria et al. (2014) GPS angular velocity. Over the past 10.6 Myr, the Nubia-Somalia rotations predict 42±4 km of rift-normal extension across the northern segment of the Main Ethiopian Rift. This agrees with approximate minimum and maximum estimates of 40 km and 53 km for post-10.6-Myr extension from seismological surveys of this narrow part of the plate boundary and is also close to 55-km and 48±3 km estimates from published and our own reconstructions of the Nubia-Arabia and Somalia-Arabia seafloorspreading histories for the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. Our new rotations exclude at high confidence level two previously published estimates of Nubia-Somalia motion based on inversions of Chron 5n.2 along the Southwest Indian Ridge, which predict rift-normal extensions of 13±14 km and 129±16 km across the Main Ethiopian Rift since 11 Ma. Constraints on Nubia-Somalia motion before ~15 Ma are weaker due to sparse coverage of pre-15-Myr magnetic reversals along the Nubia-Antarctic plate boundary, but appear to require motion before 15 Ma. Nubia-Somalia rotations that we estimate from a probabilistic analysis of geometric and age constraints from the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden are consistent with those determined from Southwest Indian Ridge data, particularly for the past 11 Myr. Nubia

  6. Millimetre observations of comets P/Brorsen-Metcalf (1989o) and Austin (1989c1) with the IRAM 30-m radio telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colom, P.; Despois, D.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.; Paubert, G.

    1990-01-01

    Millimeter observations with the IRAM 30 m telescope were conducted in comet P/Brorsen-Metcalf (1989o) on September 1989 and Austin (1989c1) on April and May 1990. The HCN J(1-0) and J(3-2) lines were detected in both comets. The HCN production rate relative to water in P/Brorsen-Metcalf is comparable to that previously measured in comet P/Halley, while that inferred in comet Austin might be smaller by a factor of two. The H2CO(3 sub 12 - 2 sub 11) transition, marginally observed in comet P/Brorsen-Metcalf, was firmly detected in May 1990 in comet Austin. Observations performed at offset positions suggest that the source of H2CO might be distributed. The H2CO abundance is on the order of 0.5 percent that of water for both comets, assuming a scalelength of 10(exp 4) km at 1 AU from the Sun for the distributed source. During the May observing period of comet Austin, two new species were detected for the first time in a comet: hydrogen sulfide (H2S) through its 1(sub 10) - 1(sub 01) ortho line at 169 GHz, and methanol (CH3OH) through J(3-2) delta K = 0 transitions at 145 GHz. Preliminary estimates of their abundances are 1.5 x 10(exp -3) for H2S and 8 x 10(exp -3) for CH3OH.

  7. A Generalized Subspace Least Mean Square Method for High-resolution Accurate Estimation of Power System Oscillation Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Ning; Abdollahi, Ali

    2013-09-10

    A Generalized Subspace-Least Mean Square (GSLMS) method is presented for accurate and robust estimation of oscillation modes from exponentially damped power system signals. The method is based on orthogonality of signal and noise eigenvectors of the signal autocorrelation matrix. Performance of the proposed method is evaluated using Monte Carlo simulation and compared with Prony method. Test results show that the GSLMS is highly resilient to noise and significantly dominates Prony method in tracking power system modes under noisy environments.

  8. Urban flash flood applications of high-resolution rainfall estimation by X-band dual-polarization radar network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, V.; Chen, Haonan; Maki, Masayuki

    2012-11-01

    Flooding in general, especially the urban flash flooding is one of the most destructive nature hazards. Rainfall estimates from radar network are often used as input to various hydrological models for further flood warning and mitigations. The X-band dual-polarization radar network developed by the United States National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center (NSF-ERC) for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) has shown great improvement to radar based Quantitative Precipitation Estimation (QPE), through many years of experimental validation studies. QPE and rainfall nowcasting are important goals of CASA X-band dual-polarization radar networks. This paper presents an overview of CASA QPE and nowcasting methodology. In addition, 20 rainfall events collected from the Oklahoma test best during the past 3 years are used to evaluate the networked radar rainfall products. Cross validation with a gauge network using these 20 events' data shows that the estimates of instantaneous rain rate, 5-minute,10- minute, and hourly rainfall have normalized standard error of about 47.57%, 40.03%, 34.61% and 24.78% , respectively, whereas a low bias of about -3.83%, -2.83%,-2.77% and -3.45% respectively. These evaluation results demonstrate great improvement compared to the current state-of-the-art. The paper also deals with the potential role of these highresolution rainfall products for flash floods warning and mitigation.

  9. 20 and 30 m telescope designs with potential for subsequent incorporation into a track-mounted pair (20/20 or 30/30).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, James Roger P.; Burge, James H.; Codona, Johanan L.; Davison, Warren B.; Martin, Buddy

    2003-01-01

    Any future giant ground-based telescope must, at a minimum, provide foci for seeing-limited imaging over a wide field and for diffraction-limited imaging over ~1 arcminute fields corrected by adaptive optics (AO). While this is possible with a number of design concepts, our choices are constrained if we anticipate wanting to later add a second telescope for imaging with still higher resolution, and very high contrast imaging for exoplanet studies. This paper explores designs that allow for such future development. Higher resolution imaging by interferometric combination of the AO-corrected fields of two telescopes is possible without loss of point-source sensitivity or field of view, as long as the baseline can be held perpendicular to the source and can be varied in length. This requirement is made practical even for very large telescopes, provided both can move continuously on a circular track. The 20/20 telescope illustrates this concept. Telescopes so mounted can additionally be operated as Bracewell nulling interferometers with low thermal background, making possible the thermal detection of planets that would have been unresolvable by a sin-gle 20 m aperture. In practice, limits set by funding and engineering experience will likely require a single 20 or 30 m telescope be built first. This would be on a conventional alt-az mount, but it should be at a site with enough room for later addition of a companion and track. In anticipation of future motion it should be compact and stiff, with a fast primary focal ratio. We envisage the use of large, highly aspheric, off-axis segments, manufactured using the figuring methods for strong aspherics already proven for 8 m class primaries. A compact giant telescope built under these guidelines should be able to perform well on its own for a broad range of astronomical observations, with good resistance to wind buffeting and simple alignment and control of its few, large segments. We compare here configurations with

  10. Estimating biomass, yield, evaprotranspiration and carbon fluxes for winter wheat by using high resolution remote sensing data combined with a crop model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veloso, A.; Ceschia, E.; Demarez, V.

    2013-12-01

    The use of crop models allows simulating plant development, growth, yield, CO2 and water fluxes under different environmental and management conditions. When combined with high spatial and temporal resolution remote sensing data, these models provide new perspectives for crop monitoring at regional scale. Besides, monitoring spatial and temporal variation in water budget and amount of carbon fixed by these crops is an ultimate goal of earth climate change studies. We propose here an approach to estimate time courses of dry aboveground biomass (DAM), yield and evapotranspiration (ETR) for winter wheat by assimilating Green Area Index (GAI) data, obtained from satellite observations, into a simple crop model. This model is then coupled with a ';carbon flux module' for estimating the components of the carbon budget (gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration (Reco), ...). Among the several land surface biophysical variables accessible from satellite observations, the GAI is the one that has a key role in soil-plant-atmosphere interactions and in biomass accumulation process. Many methods have been developed to relate GAI to optical remote sensing signal. Here, seasonal dynamics of remotely sensed GAI were estimated by applying a method based on the inversion of a radiative transfer model using artificial neural networks. For this work, we employed a unique set of Formosat-2 and SPOT images acquired from 2006 to 2011 in southwest France. The modelling approach is based on the Simple Algorithm for Yield and Evapotranspiration estimate (SAFYE) model, which couples the FAO-56 model with an agro-meteorological model, based on Monteith's light-use efficiency theory. The SAFYE model is a daily time step crop model that simulates time series of GAI, biomass (NPP), grain yield and ETR. The carbon flux module simulates GPP, the autotrophic respiration (Ra) that is defined as the sum of plant growth and maintenance respiration and the heterotrophic respiration (Rh

  11. Sulphur-bearing molecules in diffuse molecular clouds: new results from SOFIA/GREAT and the IRAM 30 m telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, D. A.; Godard, B.; Gerin, M.; Pineau des Forêts, G.; Bernier, C.; Falgarone, E.; Graf, U. U.; Güsten, R.; Herbst, E.; Lesaffre, P.; Schilke, P.; Sonnentrucker, P.; Wiesemeyer, H.

    2015-05-01

    We have observed five sulphur-bearing molecules in foreground diffuse molecular clouds lying along the sight-lines to five bright continuum sources. We have used the GREAT instrument on SOFIA to observe the SH 1383 GHz 2Π3/2 J = 5/2 ← 3/2 lambda doublet toward the star-forming regions W31C, G29.96-0.02, G34.3+0.1, W49N and W51, detecting foreground absorption towards all five sources; and the EMIR receivers on the IRAM 30 m telescope at Pico Veleta to detect the H2S 110-101 (169 GHz), CS J = 2-1 (98 GHz) and SO 32-21 (99 GHz) transitions. Upper limits on the H3S+10-00 (293 GHz) transition were also obtained at the IRAM 30 m. In nine foreground absorption components detected towards these sources, the inferred column densities of the four detected molecules showed relatively constant ratios, with N(SH) /N(H2S) in the range 1.1-3.0, N(CS) /N(H2S) in the range 0.32-0.61, and N(SO) /N(H2S) in the range 0.08-0.30. The column densities of the sulphur-bearing molecules are very well correlated amongst themselves, moderately well correlated with CH (a surrogate tracer for H2), and poorly correlated with atomic hydrogen. The observed SH/H2 ratios - in the range 5 to 26 × 10-9 - indicate that SH (and other sulphur-bearing molecules) account for ≪ 1% of the gas-phase sulphur nuclei. The observed abundances of sulphur-bearing molecules, however, greatly exceed those predicted by standard models of cold diffuse molecular clouds, providing further evidence for the enhancement of endothermic reaction rates by elevated temperatures or ion-neutral drift. We have considered the observed abundance ratios in the context of shock and turbulent dissipation region (TDR) models. Using the TDR model, we find that the turbulent energy available at large scale in the diffuse ISM is sufficient to explain the observed column densities of SH and CS. Standard shock and TDR models, however, fail to reproduce the column densities of H2S and SO by a factor of about 10; more elaborate shock

  12. The IRAM-30 m line survey of the Horsehead PDR. IV. Comparative chemistry of H2CO and CH3OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, V. V.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Pety, J.; Gratier, P.; Gerin, M.; Roueff, E.; Le Petit, F.; Le Bourlot, J.; Faure, A.

    2013-12-01

    Context. Theoretical models and laboratory experiments show that CH3OH is efficiently formed on cold grain surfaces through the successive hydrogenation of CO, forming HCO and H2CO as intermediate species. In cold cores and low UV-field illumination photo-dissociation regions (PDRs) the ices can be released into the gas-phase through nonthermal processes such as photodesorption, which considerably increases their gas-phase abundances. Aims: We investigate the dominant formation mechanism of H2CO and CH3OH in the Horsehead PDR and its associated dense core. Methods: We performed deep integrations of several H2CO and CH3OH lines at two positions in the Horsehead, namely the PDR and dense core, with the IRAM-30 m telescope. In addition, we observed one H2CO higher-frequency line with the CSO telescope at both positions. We determined the H2CO and CH3OH column densities and abundances from the single-dish observations complemented with IRAM-PdBI high-angular resolution maps (6'') of both species. We compared the observed abundances with PDR models including either pure gas-phase chemistry or both gas-phase and grain surface chemistry. Results: We derived CH3OH abundances relative to total number of hydrogen atoms of ~1.2 × 10-10 and ~2.3 × 10-10 in the PDR and dense-core positions, respectively. These abundances are similar to the inferred H2CO abundance in both positions (~2 × 10-10). We find an abundance ratio H2CO/CH3OH of ~2 in the PDR and ~1 in the dense core. Pure gas-phase models cannot reproduce the observed abundances of either H2CO or CH3OH at the PDR position. The two species are therefore formed on the surface of dust grains and are subsequently photodesorbed into the gas-phase at this position. At the dense core, on the other hand, photodesorption of ices is needed to explain the observed abundance of CH3OH, while a pure gas-phase model can reproduce the observed H2CO abundance. The high-resolution observations show that CH3OH is depleted onto grains at

  13. Shear wave velocity for the upper 30 m: Combining a 3D voxel model and seismic CPTS for the Groningen gas field, the Netherlands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dambrink, Roula; Gunnink, Jan; Stafleu, Jan; de Lange, Ger; Kruiver, Pauline

    2016-04-01

    The Groningen gas field in the Netherlands is one of the largest gas fields of Europe and has been in production since the 1960's. Due to the progressive depletion of the reservoir, induced seismic activity has increased in recent years. In 2012, an earthquake of magnitude 3.6 initiated further research in prediction and management of risks related to man-induced earthquakes. Last year the government decided to reduce the gas extraction for this reason. One of the topics of concern is the large difference in earthquake-related damage to buildings which, in addition to the distance to the epicenter, appears to be also related to the composition of the shallow subsurface. To improve the spatial distribution of Shear Wave Velocities (Vs) in the shallow subsurface, used for hazard prediction, the Geological Survey of the Netherlands and Deltares constructed a Vs30 map of the upper 30 m of the gas field. In this map a high-resolution geological model (GeoTOP) is combined with seismic cone penetration tests (SCPT) from the area. The GeoTOP model is a 3D voxel model of the upper 50 m, in which each voxel (100x100x0.5 m) is attributed with lithostratigraphy and the most likely lithological class (peat, clay, fine sand, etc.). To obtain statistical distributions (with mean and standard deviation) of Vs for each combination of lithostratigraphical unit and lithoclass, 60 SCPTs were analyzed. In this way, it was possible to assign a specific Vs to each voxel in the model. For each voxel in the stack of voxels that covers the upper 30 m (i.e. 60 voxels), a Vs value was randomly drawn from the statistical distribution of the lithostratigraphical - lithoclass combination it belongs to. The Vs30 for each voxelstack is then calculated using the harmonic mean of the Vs of the 60 voxels. By repeating this procedure 100 times, an (average) Vs30 map and the uncertainty in Vs30 has been constructed. Using the procedure described above we were able to delineate zones with distinct Vs30

  14. Performance evaluation of high-resolution rainfall estimation by X-band dual-polarization radar for flash flood applications in mountainous basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostou, Marios N.; Kalogiros, John; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Tarolli, Michele; Papadopoulos, Anastasios; Borga, Marco

    2010-11-01

    SummaryDifferent relations between surface rainfall rate, R, and high-resolution polarimetric X-band radar observations were evaluated using a dense network of rain gauge measurements over complex terrain in Central Italian Alps. The specific differential phase shift, KDP, rainfall algorithm (RKDP) although associated with low systematic error it exhibits low sensitivity to the spatial variability of rainfall as compared to the standard algorithm (RSTD) that is based on the reflectivity-to-rainfall (Z-R) relationship. On the other hand, the dependence of the reflectivity measurement on the absolute radar calibration and the rain-path radar signal attenuation introduces significant systematic error on the RSTD rainfall estimates. The study shows that adjusting the Z-R relationship for mean-field bias determined using the RKDP estimates as reference is the best technique for acquiring unbiased radar-rainfall estimates at fine space-time scales. Overall, the bias of the RKDP-adjusted Z-R estimator is shown to be lower than 10% for both storm cases, while the relative root-mean-square error is shown to range from 0.6 (convective storm) to 0.9 (stratiform storm). A vertical rainfall profile correction (VPR) technique is tested in this study for the stratiform storm case. The method is based on a newly developed VPR algorithm that uses the X-band polarimetric information to identify the properties of the melting layer and devices a precipitation profile that varies for each radar volume scan to correct the radar-rainfall estimates. Overall, when accounting for the VPR effect there is up to 70% reduction in the systematic error of the 3° elevation estimates, while the reduction in terms of relative root-mean-square error is limited to within 10%.

  15. A New Hybrid Spatio-temporal Model for Estimating Daily Multi-year PM2.5 Concentrations Across Northeastern USA Using High Resolution Aerosol Optical Depth Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloog, Itai; Chudnovsky, Alexandra A.; Just, Allan C.; Nordio, Francesco; Koutrakis, Petros; Coull, Brent A.; Lyapustin, Alexei; Wang, Yujie; Schwartz, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The use of satellite-based aerosol optical depth (AOD) to estimate fine particulate matter PM(sub 2.5) for epidemiology studies has increased substantially over the past few years. These recent studies often report moderate predictive power, which can generate downward bias in effect estimates. In addition, AOD measurements have only moderate spatial resolution, and have substantial missing data. We make use of recent advances in MODIS satellite data processing algorithms (Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC), which allow us to use 1 km (versus currently available 10 km) resolution AOD data.We developed and cross validated models to predict daily PM(sub 2.5) at a 1X 1 km resolution across the northeastern USA (New England, New York and New Jersey) for the years 2003-2011, allowing us to better differentiate daily and long term exposure between urban, suburban, and rural areas. Additionally, we developed an approach that allows us to generate daily high-resolution 200 m localized predictions representing deviations from the area 1 X 1 km grid predictions. We used mixed models regressing PM(sub 2.5) measurements against day-specific random intercepts, and fixed and random AOD and temperature slopes. We then use generalized additive mixed models with spatial smoothing to generate grid cell predictions when AOD was missing. Finally, to get 200 m localized predictions, we regressed the residuals from the final model for each monitor against the local spatial and temporal variables at each monitoring site. Our model performance was excellent (mean out-of-sample R(sup 2) = 0.88). The spatial and temporal components of the out-of-sample results also presented very good fits to the withheld data (R(sup 2) = 0.87, R(sup)2 = 0.87). In addition, our results revealed very little bias in the predicted concentrations (Slope of predictions versus withheld observations = 0.99). Our daily model results show high predictive accuracy at high spatial resolutions

  16. The Impact of the Processing Batch Length in GNSS Data Analysis on the Estimates of Earth Rotation Parameters with Daily and Subdaily Time Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meindl, M.; Dach, R.; Thaller, D.; Schaer, S.; Beutler, G.; Jaeggi, A.

    2012-04-01

    Microwave observations from GNSS are traditionally analyzed in the post-processing mode using (solar) daily data batches. The 24-hour session length differs by only about four minutes from two revolution periods of a GPS satellite (corresponding to one sidereal day). The deep 2:1 resonance of the GPS revolution period with the length of the sidereal day may cause systematic effects in parameter estimates and spurious periodic signals in the resulting parameter time series. The selection of other (than daily) session lengths may help to identify systematic effects and to study their impact on GNSS-derived products. Such investigations are of great interest in a combined multi-GNSS analysis because of substantial differences in the satellites' revolution periods. Three years (2008-2010) of data from a global network of about 90 combined GPS/GLONASS receivers have been analyzed. Four different session lengths were used, namely the traditional 24 hours (UTC), two revolutions of a GLONASS satellite (16/17 sidereal days), two revolutions of a GPS satellite (one sidereal day), and a session length of 18/17 sidereal days, which does not correspond to either two GPS or two GLONASS revolution periods. GPS-only, GLONASS-only, and GPS/GLONASS-combined solution are established for each of the session lengths. Special care was taken to keep the GPS and GLONASS solutions fully consistent and comparable in particular where the station selection is concerned. We generate ERPs with a subdaily time resolution of about 1.4 hours (1/17 sidereal day). Using the session-specific normal equation systems (NEQs) containing the Earth rotation parameters with the 1.4 hours time resolution we derive in addition ERPs with a (sidereal) daily resolution. Note that this step requires the combination of the daily NEQs and a subsequent re-binning of 17 consecutive ERPs with 1/17 day time resolution into one (sidereal) daily parameter. These tests will reveal the impact of the session length on ERP

  17. 10 Yr Spatial and Temporal Trends of PM2.5 Concentrations in the Southeastern US Estimated Using High-resolution Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, X.; Waller, L. A.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term PM2.5 exposure has been reported to be associated with various adverse health outcomes. However, most ground monitors are located in urban areas, leading to a potentially biased representation of the true regional PM2.5 levels. To facilitate epidemiological studies, accurate estimates of spatiotemporally continuous distribution of PM2.5 concentrations are essential. Satellite-retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been widely used for PM2.5 concentration estimation due to its comprehensive spatial coverage. Nevertheless, an inherent disadvantage of current AOD products is their coarse spatial resolutions. For instance, the spatial resolutions of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) are 10 km and 17.6 km, respectively. In this paper, a new AOD product with 1 km spatial resolution retrieved by the multi-angle implementation of atmospheric correction (MAIAC) algorithm was used. A two-stage model was developed to account for both spatial and temporal variability in the PM2.5-AOD relationship by incorporating the MAIAC AOD, meteorological fields, and land use variables as predictors. Our study area is in the southeastern US, centered at the Atlanta Metro area, and data from 2001 to 2010 were collected from various sources. The model was fitted for each year individually, and we obtained model fitting R2 ranging from 0.71 to 0.85, MPE from 1.73 to 2.50 g m3, and RMSPE from 2.75 to 4.10 g m3. In addition, we found cross validation R2 ranging from 0.62 to 0.78, MPE from 2.00 to 3.01 g m3, and RMSPE from 3.12 to 5.00 g m3, indicating a good agreement between the estimated and observed values. Spatial trends show that high PM2.5 levels occurred in urban areas and along major highways, while low concentrations appeared in rural or mountainous areas. A time series analysis was conducted to examine temporal trends of PM2.5 concentrations in the study area from 2001 to 2010. The results showed

  18. Assessment of Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves for the Eastern Mediterranean region derived from high-resolution satellite and radar rainfall estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Francesco; Morin, Efrat; Peleg, Nadav; Mei, Yiwen; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.

    2016-04-01

    Intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves are used in flood risk management and hydrological design studies to relate the characteristics of a rainfall event to the probability of its occurrence. The usual approach relies on long records of raingauge data providing accurate estimates of the IDF curves for a specific location, but whose representativeness decreases with distance. Radar rainfall estimates have recently been tested over the Eastern Mediterranean area, characterized by steep climatological gradients, showing that radar IDF curves generally lay within the raingauge confidence interval and that radar is able to identify the climatology of extremes. Recent availability of relatively long records (>15 years) of high resolution satellite rainfall information allows to explore the spatial distribution of extreme rainfall with increased detail over wide areas, thus providing new perspectives for the study of precipitation regimes and promising both practical and theoretical implications. This study aims to (i) identify IDF curves obtained from radar rainfall estimates and (ii) identify and assess IDF curves obtained from two high resolution satellite retrieval algorithms (CMORPH and PERSIANN) over the Eastern Mediterranean region. To do so, we derive IDF curves fitting a GEV distribution to the annual maxima series from 23 years (1990-2013) of carefully corrected data from a C-Band radar located in Israel (covering Mediterranean to arid climates) as well as from 15 years (1998-2014) of gauge-adjusted high-resolution CMORPH and 10 years (2003-2013) of gauge-adjusted high-resolution PERSIANN data. We present the obtained IDF curves and we compare the curves obtained from the satellite algorithms to the ones obtained from the radar during overlapping periods; this analysis will draw conclusions on the reliability of the two satellite datasets for deriving rainfall frequency analysis over the region and provide IDF corrections. We compare then the curves obtained

  19. 10-year spatial and temporal trends of PM2.5 concentrations in the southeastern US estimated using high-resolution satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Waller, L. A.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Y.

    2014-06-01

    Long-term PM2.5 exposure has been associated with various adverse health outcomes. However, most ground monitors are located in urban areas, leading to a potentially biased representation of true regional PM2.5 levels. To facilitate epidemiological studies, accurate estimates of the spatiotemporally continuous distribution of PM2.5 concentrations are important. Satellite-retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been increasingly used for PM2.5 concentration estimation due to its comprehensive spatial coverage. Nevertheless, previous studies indicated that an inherent disadvantage of many AOD products is their coarse spatial resolution. For instance, the available spatial resolutions of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) AOD products are 10 and 17.6 km, respectively. In this paper, a new AOD product with 1 km spatial resolution retrieved by the multi-angle implementation of atmospheric correction (MAIAC) algorithm based on MODIS measurements was used. A two-stage model was developed to account for both spatial and temporal variability in the PM2.5-AOD relationship by incorporating the MAIAC AOD, meteorological fields, and land use variables as predictors. Our study area is in the southeastern US centered at the Atlanta metro area, and data from 2001 to 2010 were collected from various sources. The model was fitted annually, and we obtained model fitting R2 ranging from 0.71 to 0.85, mean prediction error (MPE) from 1.73 to 2.50 μg m-3, and root mean squared prediction error (RMSPE) from 2.75 to 4.10 μg m-3. In addition, we found cross-validation R2 ranging from 0.62 to 0.78, MPE from 2.00 to 3.01 μg m-3, and RMSPE from 3.12 to 5.00 μg m-3, indicating a good agreement between the estimated and observed values. Spatial trends showed that high PM2.5 levels occurred in urban areas and along major highways, while low concentrations appeared in rural or mountainous areas. Our time

  20. 10 yr spatial and temporal trends of PM2.5 concentrations in the southeastern US estimated using high-resolution satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Waller, L. A.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Y.

    2013-10-01

    Long-term PM2.5 exposure has been reported to be associated with various adverse health outcomes. However, most ground monitors are located in urban areas, leading to a potentially biased representation of the true regional PM2.5 levels. To facilitate epidemiological studies, accurate estimates of spatiotemporally continuous distribution of PM2.5 concentrations are essential. Satellite-retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been widely used for PM2.5 concentration estimation due to its comprehensive spatial coverage. Nevertheless, an inherent disadvantage of current AOD products is their coarse spatial resolutions. For instance, the spatial resolutions of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) are 10 km and 17.6 km, respectively. In this paper, a new AOD product with 1 km spatial resolution retrieved by the multi-angle implementation of atmospheric correction (MAIAC) algorithm was used. A two-stage model was developed to account for both spatial and temporal variability in the PM2.5-AOD relationship by incorporating the MAIAC AOD, meteorological fields, and land use variables as predictors. Our study area is in the southeastern US, centered at the Atlanta Metro area, and data from 2001 to 2010 were collected from various sources. The model was fitted for each year individually, and we obtained model fitting R2 ranging from 0.71 to 0.85, MPE from 1.73 to 2.50 μg m-3, and RMSPE from 2.75 to 4.10 μg m-3. In addition, we found cross validation R2 ranging from 0.62 to 0.78, MPE from 2.00 to 3.01 μg m-3, and RMSPE from 3.12 to 5.00 μg m-3, indicating a good agreement between the estimated and observed values. Spatial trends show that high PM2.5 levels occurred in urban areas and along major highways, while low concentrations appeared in rural or mountainous areas. A time series analysis was conducted to examine temporal trends of PM2.5 concentrations in the study area from 2001 to 2010. The

  1. Estimation of PSD shifts for high-resolution metrology of thickness micro-changes with possible applications in vessel walls and biological membrane characterization.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Antonio; Bazán, Ivonne; Negreira, Carlos; Brum, Javier; Gómez, Tomás; Calás, Héctor; Ruiz, Abelardo; de la Rosa, José Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Achieving accurate measurements of inflammation levels in tissues or thickness changes in biological membranes (e.g., amniotic sac, parietal pleura) and thin biological walls (e.g., blood vessels) from outside the human body, is a promising research line in the medical area. It would provide a technical basis to study the options for early diagnosis of some serious diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis or tuberculosis. Nevertheless, achieving the aim of non-invasive measurement of those scarcely-accessible parameters on patient internal tissues, currently presents many difficulties. The use of high-frequency ultrasonic transducer systems appears to offer a possible solution. Previous studies using conventional ultrasonic imaging have shown this, but the spatial resolution was not sufficient so as to permit a thickness evaluation with clinical significance, which requires an accuracy of a few microns. In this paper a broadband ultrasonic technique, that was recently developed by the authors to address other non-invasive medical detection problems (by integrating a piezoelectric transducer into a spectral measuring system), is extended to our new objective; the aim is its application to the thickness measurement of sub-millimeter membranes or layers made of materials similar to some biological tissues (phantoms). The modeling and design rules of such a transducer system are described, and various methods of estimating overtones location in the power spectral density (PSD) are quantitatively assessed with transducer signals acquired using piezoelectric systems and also generated from a multi-echo model. Their effects on the potential resolution of the proposed thickness measuring tool, and their capability to provide accuracies around the micron are studied in detail. Comparisons are made with typical tools for extracting spatial parameters in laminar samples from echo-waveforms acquired with ultrasonic transducers. Results of this advanced measurement

  2. Estimation of PSD Shifts for High-Resolution Metrology of Thickness Micro-Changes with Possible Applications in Vessel Walls and Biological Membrane Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Antonio; Bazán, Ivonne; Negreira, Carlos; Brum, Javier; Gómez, Tomás; Calás, Héctor; Ruiz, Abelardo; de la Rosa, José Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Achieving accurate measurements of inflammation levels in tissues or thickness changes in biological membranes (e.g., amniotic sac, parietal pleura) and thin biological walls (e.g., blood vessels) from outside the human body, is a promising research line in the medical area. It would provide a technical basis to study the options for early diagnosis of some serious diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis or tuberculosis. Nevertheless, achieving the aim of non-invasive measurement of those scarcely-accessible parameters on patient internal tissues, currently presents many difficulties. The use of high-frequency ultrasonic transducer systems appears to offer a possible solution. Previous studies using conventional ultrasonic imaging have shown this, but the spatial resolution was not sufficient so as to permit a thickness evaluation with clinical significance, which requires an accuracy of a few microns. In this paper a broadband ultrasonic technique, that was recently developed by the authors to address other non-invasive medical detection problems (by integrating a piezoelectric transducer into a spectral measuring system), is extended to our new objective; the aim is its application to the thickness measurement of sub-millimeter membranes or layers made of materials similar to some biological tissues (phantoms). The modeling and design rules of such a transducer system are described, and various methods of estimating overtones location in the power spectral density (PSD) are quantitatively assessed with transducer signals acquired using piezoelectric systems and also generated from a multi-echo model. Their effects on the potential resolution of the proposed thickness measuring tool, and their capability to provide accuracies around the micron are studied in detail. Comparisons are made with typical tools for extracting spatial parameters in laminar samples from echo-waveforms acquired with ultrasonic transducers. Results of this advanced measurement

  3. High-resolution estimates of Nubia-Somalia plate motion since 20 Ma from reconstructions of the Southwest Indian Ridge, Red Sea, and Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Merkouriev, S.

    2016-07-01

    Large gaps and inconsistencies remain in published estimates of Nubia-Somalia plate motion based on reconstructions of seafloor spreading data around Africa. Herein, we use newly available reconstructions of the Southwest Indian Ridge at ˜1-Myr intervals since 20 Ma to estimate Nubia-Somalia plate motion farther back in time than previously achieved and with an unprecedented degree of temporal resolution. At the northern end of the East African rift, our new estimates of Nubia-Somalia motion for six times from 0.78 Ma to 5.2 Ma differ by only 2% from the rift-normal component of motion that is extrapolated from a recently estimated GPS angular velocity. The rate of rift-normal extension thus appears to have remained steady since at least 5.2 Ma. Our new rotations indicate that the two plates have moved relative to each other since at least 16 Ma and possibly longer. Motion has either been steady since at least 16 Ma or accelerated modestly between 6 and 5.2 Ma. Our Nubia-Somalia rotations predict 42.5±3.8 km of rift-normal extension since 10.6 Ma across the well-studied, northern segment of the Main Ethiopian Rift, consistent with 40-50 km estimates for extension since 10.6 Myr based on seismological surveys of this narrow part of the plate boundary. Nubia-Somalia rotations are also derived by combining newly estimated Somalia-Arabia rotations that reconstruct the post-20-Ma opening of the Gulf of Aden with Nubia-Arabia rotations estimated via a probabilistic analysis of plausible opening scenarios for the Red Sea. These rotations predict Nubia-Somalia motion since 5.2 Myr that is consistent with that determined from Southwest Indian Ridge data and also predict 40±3 km of rift-normal extension since 10.6 Ma across the Main Ethiopian Rift, consistent with our 42.5±3.8 km Southwest Indian Ridge estimate. Our new rotations exclude at high confidence level previous estimates of 12±13 km and 123±14 km for rift-normal extensions across the Main Ethiopian Rift since

  4. Low-temperature dynamic nuclear polarization at 9.4 T with a 30 mW microwave source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2010-06-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can provide large signal enhancements in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by transfer of polarization from electron spins to nuclear spins. We discuss several aspects of DNP experiments at 9.4 T (400 MHz resonant frequency for 1H, 264 GHz for electron spins in organic radicals) in the 7-80 K temperature range, using a 30 mW, frequency-tunable microwave source and a quasi-optical microwave bridge for polarization control and low-loss microwave transmission. In experiments on frozen glycerol/water doped with nitroxide radicals, DNP signal enhancements up to a factor of 80 are observed (relative to 1H NMR signals with thermal equilibrium spin polarization). The largest sensitivity enhancements are observed with a new triradical dopant, DOTOPA-TEMPO. Field modulation with a 10 G root-mean-squared amplitude during DNP increases the nuclear spin polarizations by up to 135%. Dependencies of 1H NMR signal amplitudes, nuclear spin relaxation times, and DNP build-up times on the dopant and its concentration, temperature, microwave power, and modulation frequency are reported and discussed. The benefits of low-temperature DNP can be dramatic: the 1H spin polarization is increased approximately 1000-fold at 7 K with DNP, relative to thermal polarization at 80 K.

  5. Nano silver and nano zinc-oxide in surface waters - exposure estimation for Europe at high spatial and temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Egon; Johnson, Andrew C; Keller, Virginie D J; Williams, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Nano silver and nano zinc-oxide monthly concentrations in surface waters across Europe were modeled at ~6 x 9 km spatial resolution. Nano-particle loadings from households to rivers were simulated considering household connectivity to sewerage, sewage treatment efficiency, the spatial distribution of sewage treatment plants, and their associated populations. These loadings were used to model temporally varying nano-particle concentrations in rivers, lakes and wetlands by considering dilution, downstream transport, water evaporation, water abstraction, and nano-particle sedimentation. Temporal variability in concentrations caused by weather variation was simulated using monthly weather data for a representative 31-year period. Modeled concentrations represent current levels of nano-particle production.Two scenarios were modeled. In the most likely scenario, half the river stretches had long-term average concentrations exceeding 0.002 ng L(-1) nano silver and 1.5 ng L(-1) nano zinc oxide. In 10% of the river stretches, these concentrations exceeded 0.18 ng L(-1) and 150 ng L(-1), respectively. Predicted concentrations were usually highest in July. PMID:25463731

  6. Evaluation of High-Resolution Precipitation Estimates from Satellites during July 2012 Beijing Flood Event Using Dense Rain Gauge Observations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng; Liu, Huijuan; You, Yalei; Mullens, Esther; Hu, Junjun; Yuan, Ye; Huang, Mengyu; He, Li; Luo, Yongming; Zeng, Xingji; Tang, Guoqiang; Hong, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Satellite-based precipitation estimates products, CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS, were evaluated with a dense rain gauge network over Beijing and adjacent regions for an extremely heavy precipitation event on July 21 2012. CMORPH and PEERSIANN-CSS misplaced the region of greatest rainfall accumulation, and failed to capture the spatial pattern of precipitation, evidenced by a low spatial correlation coefficient (CC). CMORPH overestimated the daily accumulated rainfall by 22.84% while PERSIANN-CCS underestimated by 72.75%. In the rainfall center, both CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS failed to capture the temporal variation of the rainfall, and underestimated rainfall amounts by 43.43% and 87.26%, respectively. Based on our results, caution should be exercised when using CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS as input for monitoring and forecasting floods in Beijing urban areas, and the potential for landslides in the mountainous zones west and north of Beijing. PMID:24691358

  7. Evaluation of high-resolution precipitation estimates from satellites during July 2012 Beijing flood event using dense rain gauge observations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Liu, Huijuan; You, Yalei; Mullens, Esther; Hu, Junjun; Yuan, Ye; Huang, Mengyu; He, Li; Luo, Yongming; Zeng, Xingji; Tang, Guoqiang; Hong, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Satellite-based precipitation estimates products, CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS, were evaluated with a dense rain gauge network over Beijing and adjacent regions for an extremely heavy precipitation event on July 21 2012. CMORPH and PEERSIANN-CSS misplaced the region of greatest rainfall accumulation, and failed to capture the spatial pattern of precipitation, evidenced by a low spatial correlation coefficient (CC). CMORPH overestimated the daily accumulated rainfall by 22.84% while PERSIANN-CCS underestimated by 72.75%. In the rainfall center, both CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS failed to capture the temporal variation of the rainfall, and underestimated rainfall amounts by 43.43% and 87.26%, respectively. Based on our results, caution should be exercised when using CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS as input for monitoring and forecasting floods in Beijing urban areas, and the potential for landslides in the mountainous zones west and north of Beijing. PMID:24691358

  8. An objective technique to estimate percentage of an ERTS-1 water boundary resolution element covered by water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erb, R. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An objective technique was developed to measure the surface area of water bodies. Nineteen water bodies in the Houston and Galveston, Texas area were selected as a basis for the technique development. The actual surface area of each body was determined from rectified and enlarged NASA aircraft photography. A clustering algorithm was used to produce classification maps of the region from ERTS-1 data. Certain classes were identified as being 100% water. Other classes were identified as being mixtures of water with land or vegetation. The number of picture elements falling on each water body and its boundary were counted. A linear regression analysis was performed to relate the total number of picture elements and boundary elements counted to the actual surface area. The standard error of the estimate was 6.7 acres. The absolute error was not a function of the actual surface area of the water body.

  9. ESOLIP - estimate of solid and liquid precipitation at sub-daily time resolution by combining snow height and rain gauge measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, E.; Bertoldi, G.; Leitinger, G.; Della Chiesa, S.; Niedrist, G.; Tappeiner, U.

    2013-07-01

    Measuring precipitation in mountain areas is a demanding task, but essential for hydrological and environmental themes. Especially in small Alpine catchments with short hydrological response, precipitation data with high temporal resolution are required for a better understanding of the hydrological cycle. Since most climate/meteorological stations are situated at the easily accessible bottom of valleys, and the few heated rain gauges installed at higher elevation sites are problematic in winter conditions, an accurate quantification of winter (snow) precipitation at high elevations remains difficult. However, there are an increasing number of micro-meteorological stations and snow height sensors at high elevation locations in Alpine catchments. To benefit from data of such stations, an improved approach to estimate solid and liquid precipitation (ESOLIP) is proposed. ESOLIP allows gathering hourly precipitation data throughout the year by using unheated rain gauge data, careful filtering of snow height sensors as well as standard meteorological data (air temperature, relative humidity, global shortwave radiation, wind speed). ESOLIP was validated at a well-equipped test site in Stubai Valley (Tyrol, Austria), comparing results to winter precipitation measured with a snow pillow and a heated rain gauge. The snow height filtering routine and indicators for possible precipitation were tested at a field site in Matsch Valley (South Tyrol, Italy). Results show a good match with measured data because variable snow density is taken into account, which is important when working with freshly fallen snow. Furthermore, the results show the need for accurate filtering of the noise of the snow height signal and they confirm the unreliability of heated rain gauges for estimating winter precipitation. The described improved precipitation estimate ESOLIP at sub-daily time resolution is helpful for precipitation analysis and for several hydrological applications like monitoring

  10. Estimating Agricultural Water Use using the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance Evapotranspiration Estimation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Due to the predominantly arid climate in Arizona, access to adequate water supply is vital to the economic development and livelihood of the State. Water supply has become increasingly important during periods of prolonged drought, which has strained reservoir water levels in the Desert Southwest over past years. Arizona's water use is dominated by agriculture, consuming about seventy-five percent of the total annual water demand. Tracking current agricultural water use is important for managers and policy makers so that current water demand can be assessed and current information can be used to forecast future demands. However, many croplands in Arizona are irrigated outside of areas where water use reporting is mandatory. To estimate irrigation withdrawals on these lands, we use a combination of field verification, evapotranspiration (ET) estimation, and irrigation system qualification. ET is typically estimated in Arizona using the Modified Blaney-Criddle method which uses meteorological data to estimate annual crop water requirements. The Modified Blaney-Criddle method assumes crops are irrigated to their full potential over the entire growing season, which may or may not be realistic. We now use the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) ET data in a remote-sensing and energy-balance framework to estimate cropland ET. SSEBop data are of sufficient resolution (30m by 30m) for estimation of field-scale cropland water use. We evaluate our SSEBop-based estimates using ground-truth information and irrigation system qualification obtained in the field. Our approach gives the end user an estimate of crop consumptive use as well as inefficiencies in irrigation system performance—both of which are needed by water managers for tracking irrigated water use in Arizona.

  11. Estimation of excess mortality due to long-term exposure to PM2.5 in Japan using a high-resolution model for present and future scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Daisuke; Ueda, Kayo; Ng, Chris Fook Sheng; Takami, Akinori; Ariga, Toshinori; Matsuhashi, Keisuke; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2016-09-01

    Particulate matter with a diameter of less than 2.5 μm, known as PM2.5, can affect human health, especially in elderly people. Because of the imminent aging of society in the near future in most developed countries, the human health impacts of PM2.5 must be evaluated. In this study, we used a global-to-regional atmospheric transport model to simulate PM2.5 in Japan with a high-resolution stretched grid system (∼10 km for the high-resolution model, HRM) for the present (the 2000) and the future (the 2030, as proposed by the Representative Concentrations Pathway 4.5, RCP4.5). We also used the same model with a low-resolution uniform grid system (∼100 km for the low-resolution model, LRM). These calculations were conducted by nudging meteorological fields obtained from an atmosphere-ocean coupled model and providing emission inventories used in the coupled model. After correcting for bias, we calculated the excess mortality due to long-term exposure to PM2.5 among the elderly (over 65 years old) based on different minimum PM2.5 concentration (MINPM) levels to account for uncertainty using the simulated PM2.5 distributions to express the health effect as a concentration-response function. As a result, we estimated the excess mortality for all of Japan to be 31,300 (95% confidence intervals: 20,700 to 42,600) people in 2000 and 28,600 (95% confidence intervals: 19,000 to 38,700) people in 2030 using the HRM with a MINPM of 5.8 μg/m3. In contrast, the LRM resulted in underestimates of approximately 30% (for PM2.5 concentrations in the 2000 and 2030), approximately 60% (excess mortality in the 2000) and approximately 90% (excess mortality in 2030) compared to the HRM results. We also found that the uncertainty in the MINPM value, especially for low PM2.5 concentrations in the future (2030) can cause large variability in the estimates, ranging from 0 (MINPM of 15 μg/m3 in both HRM and LRM) to 95,000 (MINPM of 0 μg/m3 in HRM) people.

  12. A high resolution estimate of the inorganic nitrogen flux from the Scheldt estuary to the coastal North Sea during a nitrogen-limited algal bloom, spring 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Regnier, P. |; Steefel, C.I.

    1999-05-01

    Massive short-term (4--8 wk) blooms of Phaeocystis have been observed in coastal North Sea waters in the spring for a number of years now. Researchers have shown that these algal blooms, which lead to eutrophication of the local water mass, are limited by the supply of inorganic nitrogen from the various bordering estuaries. The authors demonstrate using the case of a typical heavily polluted macrotidal estuary, the Scheldt in Belgium and the Netherlands, that the short duration of the algal blooms requires estuarine flux estimation methods with a high temporal resolution. They use the fully transient, multicomponent reactive transport model CONTRASTE to compute inorganic nitrogen fluxes through the mouth of the Scheldt estuary into the North Sea. The model simulations use a detailed dataset of upstream river discharges and solute concentrations along with tidal forcings for a 210 day period between December 1, 1994 and June 30, 1995. The temporally resolved estimate shows that widely used estuarine flux estimation methods which rely on a steady-state approximation underestimate the inorganic nitrogen loading available to sustain primary production in the North Sea during the period of the algal bloom by 100%.

  13. Instrument Performance of GISMO, a 2 Millimeter TES Bolometer Camera used at the IRAM 30 m Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staguhn, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    In November of 2007 we demonstrated a monolithic Backshort-Under-Grid (BUG) 8x16 array in the field using our 2 mm wavelength imager GISMO (Goddard IRAM Superconducting 2 Millimeter Observer) at the IRAM 30 m telescope in Spain for astronomical observations. The 2 mm spectral range provides a unique terrestrial window enabling ground-based observations of the earliest active dusty galaxies in the universe and thereby allowing a better constraint on the star formation rate in these objects. The optical design incorporates a 100 mm diameter silicon lens cooled to 4 K, which provides the required fast beam yielding 0.9 lambda/D pixels. With this spatial sampling, GISMO will be very efficient at detecting sources serendipitously in large sky surveys, while the capability for diffraction limited imaging is preserved. The camera provides significantly greater detection sensitivity and mapping speed at this wavelength than has previously been possible. The instrument will fill in the spectral energy distribution of high redshift galaxies at the Rayleigh-Jeans part of the dust emission spectrum, even at the highest redshifts. Here1 will we present early results from our observing run with the first fielded BUG bolometer array. We have developed key technologies to enable highly versatile, kilopixel, infrared through millimeter wavelength bolometer arrays. The Backshort-Under-Grid (BUG) array consists of three components: 1) a transition-edge-sensor (TES) based bolometer array with background-limited sensitivity and high filling factor, 2) a quarter-wave reflective backshort grid providing high optical efficiency, and 3) a superconducting bump-bonded large format Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) multiplexer readout. The array is described in more detail elsewhere (Allen et al., this conference). In November of 2007 we demonstrated a monolithic 8x 16 array with 2 mm-pitch detectors in the field using our 2 mm wavelength imager GISMO (Goddard IRAM

  14. Complex organic molecules in the interstellar medium: IRAM 30 m line survey of Sagittarius B2(N) and (M)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloche, A.; Müller, H. S. P.; Menten, K. M.; Schilke, P.; Comito, C.

    2013-11-01

    Context. The discovery of amino acids in meteorites fallen to Earth and the detection of glycine, the simplest of them, in samples returned from a comet to Earth strongly suggest that the chemistry of the interstellar medium is capable of producing such complex organic molecules and that they may be widespread in our Galaxy. Aims: Our goal is to investigate the degree of chemical complexity that can be reached in the interstellar medium, in particular in dense star-forming regions. Methods: We performed an unbiased, spectral line survey toward Sgr B2(N) and (M), two regions where high-mass stars are formed, with the IRAM 30 m telescope in the 3 mm atmospheric transmission window. Partial surveys at 2 and 1.3 mm were performed in parallel. The spectra were analyzed with a simple radiative transfer model that assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium but takes optical depth effects into account. Results: About 3675 and 945 spectral lines with a peak signal-to-noise ratio higher than 4 are detected at 3 mm toward Sgr B2(N) and (M), i.e. about 102 and 26 lines per GHz, respectively. This represents an increase by about a factor of two over previous surveys of Sgr B2. About 70% and 47% of the lines detected toward Sgr B2(N) and (M) are identified and assigned to 56 and 46 distinct molecules as well as to 66 and 54 less abundant isotopologues of these molecules, respectively. In addition, we report the detection of transitions from 59 and 24 catalog entries corresponding to vibrationally or torsionally excited states of some of these molecules, respectively, up to a vibration energy of 1400 cm-1 (2000 K). Excitation temperatures and column densities were derived for each species but should be used with caution. The rotation temperatures of the detected complex molecules typically range from ~50 to 200 K. Among the detected molecules, aminoacetonitrile, n-propyl cyanide, and ethyl formate were reported for the first time in space based on this survey, as were five rare

  15. Upgrade of the 30-m x-ray pencil beam line at the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Takayuki; Sato, Toshiki; Kikuchi, Naomichi; Kurashima, Sho; Nakaniwa, Nozomi; Sato, Takuro; Iizuka, Ryo; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Ishida, Manabu

    2015-10-01

    The 30-m x-ray pencil beam line at the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science has been upgraded. The vacuum chamber has been replaced by a new cylindrical chamber of diameter 1.8μm and length 11.3μm. Stages on which a telescope and detectors had been mounted were also replaced. At the same time, a new charge-coupled device consisting of 1240×1152 pixels of size 22.5×22.5 μm2 was introduced. The detector stage can be moved along the x-ray beam in the vacuum chamber, which enables us to vary the distance between the sample and the detectors from 0.7 to 9μm. The two stages can be moved in a square region 500×500 mm2 in the plane normal to the x-ray beam. The pitching of moving axes of Y direction (horizontal and normal to the beam) of the sample and the detector stages is somewhat large, but does not exceed 60 arc sec. The pitching of the other axes and the yawing of all the axes are less than 30 arc sec. As for rolling, we could obtain only the upper limits because of the difficulty in measuring them. The upper limit of the Z direction (vertical and normal to the beam) of the detector stage moving axis is somewhat large and is about 60 arc sec, and those of the other axes are less than 30 arc sec. A summary of the beam line performance is presented. Soon after the upgrade, the ASTRO-H Soft X-ray telescopes were calibrated in this beam line.

  16. Using High Resolution Tracer Data to Constrain Storage and Flux Estimates in a Spatially Distributed Rainfall-runoff Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Huijgevoort, M.; Tetzlaff, D.; Sutanudjaja, E.; Soulsby, C.

    2015-12-01

    Models simulating both stream flow and conservative tracers can provide a more realistic representation of flow paths, storage distributions and mixing processes that is advantageous for many predictions. Conceptual models with such integration have provided useful insights, but tend to be lumped and thus crude representations of catchment processes. Using tracers to aid spatially-distributed models has considerable potential to improve the conceptualisation of the dynamics of internal hydrological stores and fluxes. Here, we examine the strengths and weaknesses of a data-driven, spatially-distributed tracer-aided rainfall-runoff model. The model structure allows the assessment of the effect of landscape properties on the routing and mixing of water and tracers. The model was applied to an experimental site (3.2 km2) in the Scottish Highlands with a unique tracer data set; 4 years of daily isotope ratios in stream water and precipitation were available, as well as 2 years of weekly soil and ground water isotopes. The model evolved from an empirically-based, lumped tracer-aided model previously developed for the catchment. The best model runs were selected from Monte Carlo simulations based on a dual calibration criterion that included objective functions for both stream water isotopes and discharge at the outlet. Model results were also tested against observed spatially-distributed soil water isotope data. Model performance for both criteria was good and the model could reproduce the variable isotope signals in steeper hillslopes where storage was low and damped isotope responses in valley bottom cells with high storage. The model also allows us to estimate the age distributions of internal water fluxes and stream flow and has substantially improved spatial and temporal dynamics of process representation. This gives a more robust framework for projecting the effects of environmental change.

  17. Changes in cell death of peripheral blood lymphocytes isolated from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia upon stimulation with 7 Hz, 30 mT pulsed electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Kaszuba-Zwoińska, Jolanta; Ćwiklińska, Magdalena; Balwierz, Walentyna; Chorobik, Paulina; Nowak, Bernadeta; Wójcik-Piotrowicz, Karolina; Ziomber, Agata; Malina-Novak, Kinga; Zaraska, Wiesław; Thor, Piotr J

    2015-03-01

    Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) influenced the viability of proliferating in vitro peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from Crohn's disease patients as well as acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) patients by induction of cell death, but did not cause any vital changes in cells from healthy donors. Experiments with lymphoid U937 and monocytic MonoMac6 cell lines have shown a protective effect of PEMF on the death process in cells treated with death inducers. The aim of the current study was to investigate the influence of PEMF on native proliferating leukocytes originating from newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. The effects of exposure to PEMF were studied in PBMCs from 20 children with ALL. PBMCs were stimulated with three doses of PEMF (7 Hz, 30 mT) for 4 h each with 24 h intervals. After the last stimulation, the cells were double stained with annexin V and propidium iodide dye to estimate viability by flow cytometric analysis. The results indicated an increase of annexin V positive as well as double stained annexin V and propidium iodide positive cells after exposure to threefold PEMF stimulation. A low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field induces cell death in native proliferating cells isolated from ALL patients. The increased vulnerability of proliferating PBMCs to PEMF-induced interactions may be potentially applied in the therapy of ALL. The analysis of expression of apoptosis-related genes revealed changes in mRNA of some genes engaged in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway belonging to the Bcl-2 family and the pathway with apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) abundance upon PEMF stimulation of PBMCs. PMID:26204398

  18. High resolution inventory of re-estimating ammonia emissions from agricultural fertilizer in China from 1978 to 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, P.; Lin, Y. H.; Liao, Y. J.; Zhao, C. X.; Wang, G. S.; Luan, S. J.

    2015-09-01

    The quantification of ammonia (NH3) emissions is essential to the more accurate quantification of atmospheric nitrogen deposition, improved air quality and the assessment of ammonia-related agricultural policy and climate mitigation strategies. The quantity, geographic distribution and historical trends of these emissions remain largely uncertain. In this paper, a new Chinese agricultural fertilizer NH3 (CAF_NH3) emissions inventory has been compiled that exhibits the following improvements: (1) a 1 km × 1 km gridded map on the county level was developed for 2008, (2) a combined bottom-up and top-down method was used for the local correction of emission factors (EFs) and parameters, (3) the spatial and temporal patterns of historical time trends for 1978-2008 were estimated and the uncertainties were quantified for the inventories, and (4) a sensitivity test was performed in which a province-level disaggregated map was compared with CAF_NH3 emissions for 2008. The total CAF_NH3 emissions for 2008 were 8.4 Tg NH3 yr-1 (a 6.6-9.8 Tg interquartile range). From 1978 to 2008, annual NH3 emissions fluctuated with three peaks (1987, 1996 and 2005), and total emissions increased from 3.2 to 8.4 Tg at an annual rate of 3.0 %. During the study period, the contribution of livestock manure spreading increased from 37.0 to 45.5 % because of changing fertilization practices and the rapid increase in egg, milk and meat consumption. The average contribution of synthetic fertilizer, which has a positive effect on crop yields, was approximately 38.3 % (minimum: 33.4 %; maximum: 42.7 %). With rapid urbanization causing a decline in the rural population, the contribution of the rural excrement sector varied widely between 20.3 and 8.5 %. The average contributions of cake fertilizer and straw returning were approximately 3.8 and 4.5 %, respectively, thus small and stable. Collectively, the CAF_NH3 emissions reflect the nation's agricultural policy to a certain extent. An effective

  19. Estimation of Basal Depth of Magnetic Sources from High Resolution Aeromagnetic Data of Middle Niger Basin, Nigeria using Adapted Centroid Technique for Fractal Distribution of Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwankwo, L.

    2015-12-01

    An estimate of depths to the bottom of magnetic sources in the Middle Niger Basin, north-central Nigeria has been made from a recently acquired high-resolution aeromagnetic data using adapted centroid technique for fractal distribution of sources. The result shows that the depth varies between 11.71 and 26.53 km. Deeper values are found in northern and central regions while values as low as 12 km were observed in the southern part. The shallower depths to the bottom of magnetic sources may be representing the thermal/petrological boundaries in the basin. This study is therefore crucial for quantitative understanding of the geo-processes and geothermal parameters in the study area.

  20. Fine Resolution Tree Height Estimation from Lidar Data and Its Application in SRTM DEM Correction across Forests of Sierra Nevada, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Guo, Q.; Ma, Q.; Li, W.

    2015-12-01

    Sierra Nevada (SN) is a mountain range located in the northeastern California, USA, covering an area of 63,100 km2. As one of the most diverse temperate conifer forests on the Earth, forests of SN serve a series of ecosystem functions and are valuable natural heritages for the region and even the country. The still existed gap of accurate fine-resolution tree height estimation has lagged ecological, hydrological and forestry studies within the region. Moreover, the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM), as one of the most frequently used land surface elevation product in the region, has been proved systematically higher than actual land surface in vegetated mountain areas due to the absorption and reflection effects of canopy on the SRTM radar signal. An accurate fine resolution tree height product across the region is urgently needed for developing models to correct SRTM DEM. In this study, we firstly developed a method to estimate SN tree height distribution (defined by Lorey's height) through the combination of airborne lidar data, spaceborne lidar data, optical imagery, climate surfaces, and field measurements. Over 5 470 km2airborne lidar data and 1 000 plot measurements were collected across the SN to address this mission. Our method involved three main steps: 1) estimate tree heights within airborne lidar footprints using step-wise regression; 2) link the airborne lidar derived tree height to spaceborne lidar data and compute tree heights at spaceborne lidar footprints; 3) extrapolate tree height estimation from spaceborne lidar footprints to the whole region using Random Forest. The obtained SN tree height product showed good correspondence with independent field plot measurements. The coefficient of determination is higher than 0.65, and the root-mean-square error is around 5 m. With the obtained tree height product, we further explored the possibility of correcting SRTM DEM. The results showed that the obtained tree height

  1. Estimation and modeling of forest attributes across large spatial scales using BiomeBGC, high-resolution imagery, LiDAR data, and inventory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golinkoff, Jordan Seth

    The accurate estimation of forest attributes at many different spatial scales is a critical problem. Forest landowners may be interested in estimating timber volume, forest biomass, and forest structure to determine their forest's condition and value. Counties and states may be interested to learn about their forests to develop sustainable management plans and policies related to forests, wildlife, and climate change. Countries and consortiums of countries need information about their forests to set global and national targets to deal with issues of climate change and deforestation as well as to set national targets and understand the state of their forest at a given point in time. This dissertation approaches these questions from two perspectives. The first perspective uses the process model Biome-BGC paired with inventory and remote sensing data to make inferences about a current forest state given known climate and site variables. Using a model of this type, future climate data can be used to make predictions about future forest states as well. An example of this work applied to a forest in northern California is presented. The second perspective of estimating forest attributes uses high resolution aerial imagery paired with light detection and ranging (LiDAR) remote sensing data to develop statistical estimates of forest structure. Two approaches within this perspective are presented: a pixel based approach and an object based approach. Both approaches can serve as the platform on which models (either empirical growth and yield models or process models) can be run to generate inferences about future forest state and current forest biogeochemical cycling.

  2. THE SEGUE STELLAR PARAMETER PIPELINE. V. ESTIMATION OF ALPHA-ELEMENT ABUNDANCE RATIOS FROM LOW-RESOLUTION SDSS/SEGUE STELLAR SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Sun; Beers, Timothy C.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Lai, David K.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; An, Deokkeun; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Yanny, Brian E-mail: beers@pa.msu.edu E-mail: david@ucolick.org E-mail: heather@vegemite.case.edu E-mail: deokkeun@ewha.ac.kr E-mail: yanny@fnal.gov

    2011-03-15

    We present a method for the determination of [{alpha}/Fe] ratios from low-resolution (R = 2000) SDSS/SEGUE stellar spectra. By means of a star-by-star comparison with degraded spectra from the ELODIE spectral library and with a set of moderately high-resolution (R = 15, 000) and medium-resolution (R = 6000) spectra of SDSS/SEGUE stars, we demonstrate that we are able to measure [{alpha}/Fe] from SDSS/SEGUE spectra (with S/N>20/1) to a precision of better than 0.1 dex, for stars with atmospheric parameters in the range T{sub eff} = [4500, 7000] K, log g = [1.5, 5.0], and [Fe/H] = [-1.4, +0.3], over the range [{alpha}/Fe] = [-0.1, +0.6]. For stars with [Fe/H] <-1.4, our method requires spectra with slightly higher signal-to-noise to achieve this precision (S/N>25/1). Over the full temperature range considered, the lowest metallicity star for which a confident estimate of [{alpha}/Fe] can be obtained from our approach is [Fe/H] {approx}-2.5; preliminary tests indicate that a metallicity limit as low as [Fe/H] {approx}-3.0 may apply to cooler stars. As a further validation of this approach, weighted averages of [{alpha}/Fe] obtained for SEGUE spectra of likely member stars of Galactic globular clusters (M15, M13, and M71) and open clusters (NGC 2420, M67, and NGC 6791) exhibit good agreement with the values of [{alpha}/Fe] from previous studies. The results of the comparison with NGC 6791 imply that the metallicity range for the method may extend to {approx}+0.5.

  3. Scatter estimation and removal of anti-scatter grid-line artifacts from anthropomorphic head phantom images taken with a high resolution image detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, R.; Jain, A.; Shankar, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2016-03-01

    In radiography, one of the best methods to eliminate image-degrading scatter radiation is the use of anti-scatter grids. However, with high-resolution dynamic imaging detectors, stationary anti-scatter grids can leave grid-line shadows and moiré patterns on the image, depending upon the line density of the grid and the sampling frequency of the x-ray detector. Such artifacts degrade the image quality and may mask small but important details such as small vessels and interventional device features. Appearance of these artifacts becomes increasingly severe as the detector spatial resolution is improved. We have previously demonstrated that, to remove these artifacts by dividing out a reference grid image, one must first subtract the residual scatter that penetrates the grid; however, for objects with anatomic structure, scatter varies throughout the FOV and a spatially differing amount of scatter must be subtracted. In this study, a standard stationary Smit-Rontgen X-ray grid (line density - 70 lines/cm, grid ratio - 13:1) was used with a high-resolution CMOS detector, the Dexela 1207 (pixel size - 75 micron) to image anthropomorphic head phantoms. For a 15 x 15cm FOV, scatter profiles of the anthropomorphic head phantoms were estimated then iteratively modified to minimize the structured noise due to the varying grid-line artifacts across the FOV. Images of the anthropomorphic head phantoms taken with the grid, before and after the corrections, were compared demonstrating almost total elimination of the artifact over the full FOV. Hence, with proper computational tools, antiscatter grid artifacts can be corrected, even during dynamic sequences.

  4. On-the-fly Ambiguity Resolution Using an Estimator of the Modified Ambiguity Covariance Matrix for the GNSS Positioning Model Based on Phase Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cellmer, S.

    2012-01-01

    On-the-fly ambiguity resolution (OTF AR) is based on a small data set, obtained from a very short observation session or even from a single epoch observation. In these cases, a classical approach to ambiguity resolution (e.g. the Lambda method) can meet some numerical problems. The basis of the Lambda method is an integer decorrelation of the positive definite ambiguity covariance matrix (ACM). The necessary condition for the proper performing of this procedure is a positive definiteness of ACM. However, this condition is not satisfied in cases of very short observation sessions or single epoch positioning if phase-only observations are used. The subject of this contribution is such a case where phase-only observations are used in the final part of the computational process. The modification of ACM is proposed in order to ensure its positive definiteness. An estimator of modified ACM is a good ACM approximation for the purpose of performing the LAMBDA method. Another problem of short sessions (or a single epoch) positioning is the poor quality of the float solution. In this paper, a cascade adjustment with wide-lane combinations of signals L1 and L2 as a method of solving this problem is presented.

  5. Estimation of net ecosystem production in Asia using the diagnostic-type ecosystem model with a 10 km grid-scale resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasai, Takahiro; Obikawa, Hiroki; Murakami, Kazutaka; Kato, Soushi; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Nemani, Ramakrishna R.

    2016-06-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle in Asia is highly uncertain, and it affects our understanding of global warming. One of the important issues is the need for an enhancement of spatial resolution, since local regions in Asia are heterogeneous with regard to meteorology, land form, and land cover type, which greatly impacts the detailed spatial patterns in its ecosystem. Thus, an important goal of this study is to reasonably reproduce the heterogeneous biogeochemical patterns in Asia by enhancing the spatial resolution of the ecosystem model biosphere model integrating eco-physiological and mechanistic approaches using satellite data (BEAMS). We estimated net ecosystem production (NEP) over eastern Asia and examined the spatial differences in the factors controlling NEP by using a 10 km grid-scale approach over two different decades (2001-2010 and 2091-2100). The present and future meteorological inputs were derived from satellite observations and the downscaled Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) data set, respectively. The results showed that the present NEP in whole eastern Asia was carbon source (-214.9 TgC yr-1) and in future scenarios, the greatest positive (76.4 TgC yr-1) and least negative (-95.9 TgC yr-1) NEPs were estimated from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) 6.0 and RCP8.5 scenarios, respectively. Calculated annual NEP in RCP8.5 was mostly positive in the southern part of East Asia and Southeast Asia and negative in northern and central parts of East Asia. Under the RCP scenario with higher greenhouse gases emission (RCP8.5), deciduous needleleaf and mixed forests distributed in the middle and high latitudes served as carbon source. In contrast, evergreen broadleaf forests distributed in low latitudes served as carbon sink. The sensitivity study demonstrated that the spatial tendency of NEP was largely influenced by atmospheric CO2 and temperature.

  6. Influence of aerosols on surface reaching spectral irradiance and introduction to a new technique of estimating aerosol radiative forcing from high resolution spectral flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Roshan

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol radiative forcing estimates with high certainty are required in climate change studies. The approach in estimating the aerosol radiative forcing by using the chemical composition of aerosols is not effective as the chemical composition data with radiative properties are not widely available. We look into the approach where ground based spectral radiation flux measurement is made and along with an Radtiative transfer (RT) model, radiative forcing is estimated. Measurements of spectral flux were made using an ASD spectroradiometer with 350 - 1050 nm wavelength range and a 3nm resolution during around 54 clear-sky days during which AOD range was around 0.01 to 0.7. Simultaneous measurements of black carbon were also made using Aethalometer (Magee Scientific) which ranged from around 1.5 ug/m3 to 8 ug/m3. The primary study involved in understanding the sensitivity of spectral flux due to change in individual aerosol species (Optical properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) classified aerosol species) using the SBDART RT model. This made us clearly distinguish the influence of different aerosol species on the spectral flux. Following this, a new technique has been introduced to estimate an optically equivalent mixture of aerosol species for the given location. The new method involves matching different combinations of aerosol species in OPAC model and RT model as long as the combination which gives the minimum root mean squared deviation from measured spectral flux is obtained. Using the optically equivalent aerosol mixture and RT model, aerosol radiative forcing is estimated. Also an alternate method to estimate the spectral SSA is discussed. Here, the RT model, the observed spectral flux and spectral AOD is used. Spectral AOD is input to RT model and SSA is varied till the minimum root mean squared difference between observed and simulated spectral flux from RT model is obtained. The methods discussed are limited to clear sky scenes and its accuracy to derive

  7. Estimation of Effective Soil Hydraulic Properties Using Data From High Resolution Gamma Densiometry and Tensiometers of Multi-Step-Outflow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werisch, Stefan; Lennartz, Franz; Bieberle, Andre

    2013-04-01

    Dynamic Multi Step Outflow (MSO) experiments serve for the estimation of the parameters from soil hydraulic functions like e.g. the Mualem van Genuchten model. The soil hydraulic parameters are derived from outflow records and corresponding matric potential measurements from commonly a single tensiometer using inverse modeling techniques. We modified the experimental set up allowing for simultaneous measurements of the matric potential with three tensiometers and the water content using a high-resolution gamma-ray densiometry measurement system (Bieberle et al., 2007, Hampel et al., 2007). Different combinations of the measured time series were used for the estimation of effective soil hydraulic properties, representing different degrees of information of the "hydraulic reality" of the sample. The inverse modeling task was solved with the multimethod search algorithm AMALGAM (Vrugt et al., 2007) in combination with the Hydrus1D model (Šimúnek et al., 2008). Subsequently, the resulting effective soil hydraulic parameters allow the simulation of the MSO experiment and the comparison of model results with observations. The results show that the information of a single tensiometer together with the outflow record result in a set of effective soil hydraulic parameters producing an overall good agreement between the simulation and the observation for the location of the tensiometer. Significantly deviating results are obtained for the other tensiometer positions using this parameter set. Inclusion of more information, such as additional matric potential measurements with the according water contents within the optimization procedure lead to different, more representative hydraulic parameters which improved the overall agreement significantly. These findings indicate that more information about the soil hydraulic state variables in space and time are necessary to obtain effective soil hydraulic properties of soil core samples. Bieberle, A., Kronenberg, J., Schleicher, E

  8. Improving Quantitative Precipitation Estimation via Data Fusion of High-Resolution Ground-based Radar Network and CMORPH Satellite-based Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifelli, R.; Chen, H.; Chandrasekar, V.; Xie, P.

    2015-12-01

    A large number of precipitation products at multi-scales have been developed based upon satellite, radar, and/or rain gauge observations. However, how to produce optimal rainfall estimation for a given region is still challenging due to the spatial and temporal sampling difference of different sensors. In this study, we develop a data fusion mechanism to improve regional quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) by utilizing satellite-based CMORPH product, ground radar measurements, as well as numerical model simulations. The CMORPH global precipitation product is essentially derived based on retrievals from passive microwave measurements and infrared observations onboard satellites (Joyce et al. 2004). The fine spatial-temporal resolution of 0.05o Lat/Lon and 30-min is appropriate for regional hydrologic and climate studies. However, it is inadequate for localized hydrometeorological applications such as urban flash flood forecasting. Via fusion of the Regional CMORPH product and local precipitation sensors, the high-resolution QPE performance can be improved. The area of interest is the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Metroplex, which is the largest land-locked metropolitan area in the U.S. In addition to an NWS dual-polarization S-band WSR-88DP radar (i.e., KFWS radar), DFW hosts the high-resolution dual-polarization X-band radar network developed by the center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA). This talk will present a general framework of precipitation data fusion based on satellite and ground observations. The detailed prototype architecture of using regional rainfall instruments to improve regional CMORPH precipitation product via multi-scale fusion techniques will also be discussed. Particularly, the temporal and spatial fusion algorithms developed for the DFW Metroplex will be described, which utilizes CMORPH product, S-band WSR-88DP, and X-band CASA radar measurements. In order to investigate the uncertainties associated with each

  9. Mangrove Blue Carbon stocks and change estimation from PolInSAR, Lidar and High Resolution Stereo Imagery combined with Forest Cover change mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalles, V.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Simard, M.; Lagomasino, D.; Lee, S. K.; Trettin, C.; Feliciano, E. A.; Hansen, M.; John, P.

    2015-12-01

    Mangroves and tidal wetlands have the highest carbon density among terrestrial ecosystems. Although they only represent 3 % of the total forest area (or 0.01 % of land area), C emissions from mangrove destruction alone at current rates could be equivalent to 10 % of carbon emissions from deforestation. One of the main challenges to implementing carbon mitigation projects is measuring carbon, efficiently, effectively, and safely. In mangroves especially, the extreme difficulty of the terrain has hindered the establishment of sufficient field plots needed to accurately measure carbon on the scale necessary to relate remotely sensed measurements with field measurements at accuracies required for REDD and other C trading mechanisms. In this presentation we will showcase the methodologies for, and the remote sensing products necessary to implement MRV (monitoring, reporting and verification) systems in Coastal Blue Carbon ecosystems. Specifically, we will present new methods to estimate aboveground biomass stocks and change in mangrove ecosystems using remotely sensed data from Interferometric SAR from the TanDEM-X mission, commercial airborne Lidar, High Resolution Stereo-imagery, and timeseries analysis of Landsat imagery in combination with intensive field measurements of above and belowground carbon stocks. Our research is based on the hypothesis that by combining field measurements, commercial airborne Lidar, optical and Pol-InSAR data, we are able to estimate Mangrove blue carbon storage with an error under 20% at the project level and permit the evaluation of UNFCCC mechanisms for the mitigation of carbon emissions from coastal ecosystems.

  10. Grazer Effects on Stream Primary Production and Nitrate Utilization: Estimating Feedbacks Under Reduced Nitrate Levels at High-Temporal Resolutions from the Patch to Reach-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijo, C. J.; Cohen, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    While nutrient enrichment is often identified as the leading cause for changes in stream gross primary production (GPP) and shifts in vegetative communities, other factors such as grazers influence overall stream structure and function. Evidence shows that grazers are a top-down control on algae in streams; however, the specific feedbacks between overall stream metabolism, grazer effects, and nutrient cycling have been variable and little is known about these interactions at nutrient levels below ambient. To further our understanding of these linkages, a nutrient depletion chamber was created and paired with high-resolution in situ sensors to estimate stream metabolism and characterize nitrate uptake (UNO3) pathways (i.e. plant uptake and denitrification). The Plexiglas chamber blocks flow and nutrient supply, inserts into upper sediments, allows light in and sediment-water-air interactions to occur. At Gum Slough Springs, FL, nitrate was reduced from ambient levels (1.40 mg N/L) to below regulatory thresholds (ca. 0.20 mg N/L) within one week. Paired chambers with and without the presence of snails (Elimia floridensis) were deployed across submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV; Vallisneria americana) and algae (Lyngbya) substrates. Results show that GPP and UNO3 were higher under SAV (70 g O2/m2/d and 300 mg NO3/m2/d, respectively) and a general lack of nutrient limitation even at low [NO3]. Grazer effects differed by vegetation type as it alleviated the reduction of NO3 levels and GPP under SAV but enhanced the decrease of algal GPP and NO3 levels over time. Continued work includes estimating grazer effects on denitrification, quantifying snail nutrient excretion contributions, and scaling up all estimates from the patch to reach level. Overall, this study will further our understanding of grazer-production-nutrient interactions within stream systems, making it possible to predict changes in feedbacks when one part of the biotic or abiotic ecosystem is altered.

  11. Estimation of vertical plant area density profiles in a rice canopy at different growth stages by high-resolution portable scanning lidar with a lightweight mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoi, Fumiki; Omasa, Kenji

    2012-11-01

    We used a high-resolution portable scanning lidar together with a lightweight mirror and a voxel-based canopy profiling method to estimate the vertical plant area density (PAD) profile of a rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Koshihikari) canopy at different growth stages. To improve the laser's penetration of the dense canopy, we used a mirror to change the direction of the laser beam from horizontal to vertical (0°) and off-vertical (30°). The estimates of PAD and plant area index (PAI) were more accurate at 30° than at 0°. The root-mean-square errors of PAD at each growth stage ranged from 1.04 to 3.33 m2 m-3 at 0° and from 0.42 to 2.36 m2 m-3 at 30°, and those across all growth stages averaged 1.79 m2 m-3 at 0° and 1.52 m2 m-3 at 30°. The absolute percent errors of PAI at each growth stage ranged from 1.8% to 66.1% at 0° and from 4.3% to 23.2% at 30°, and those across all growth stages averaged 30.4% at 0° and 14.8% at 30°. The degree of laser beam coverage of the canopy (expressed as index Ω) explained these errors. From the estimates of PAD at 30°, regressions between the areas of stems, leaves, and ears per unit ground area and actual dry weights gave standard errors of 7.9 g m-2 for ears and 12.2 g m-2 for stems and leaves.

  12. a Simple and Effective Retrieval of Land Surface Temperature Using a New Reflectance Based Emissivity Estimation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nithiyanandam, Y.; Nichol, J. E.

    2016-06-01

    Emissivity is a significant factor in determining land surface temperature (LST) retrieved from the thermal infrared (TIR) satellite images. A new simplified method (reflectance method) for emissivity correction was developed in this study while estimating emissivity values at a spatial resolution of 30 m from the radiance values of the SWIR image. This in turn enables mapping surface temperatures at a much finer spatial resolution (30 m). Temperatures so estimated are validated against surface temperatures measured in the ground by thermocouple data loggers recorded during satellite overpass time. In this study, surface emissivity values are derived directly from the AST_ L1B images. The reflectance method estimates temperature at higher spatial resolution of 30 m when compared to the 90 m spatial resolution of TES and reference channel methods. Temperature determined for the daytime image of 30th November 2007 using different emissivity techniques was compared with the temperatures measured on the field using thermocouple data loggers. It is observed that the estimates from the reflectance method are much closer to the field measurements than the TES and reference channel methods. The temperature difference values range from 0.2 to 2.3 °C, 0.15 to 5.6 °C, and 2.6 to 8.6 °C for the reflectance method, normalization method and reference channel method, respectively. The new reflectance emissivity techniques i.e. reflectance method exhibits the least deviation from the field measured temperature values. While considering the accuracy of data logger (1 °C) the reflectance method enables one to map surface temperature precisely than other two methods.

  13. Evaluation of spatial resolution and estimation error of seafloor displacement observation from vessel-based bathymetric survey by use of AUV-based bathymetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Toshiya; Masaki, Yuka; Yamamoto, Fujio

    2015-03-01

    A repeated bathymetric survey reveals seafloor displacement between before and after geodynamic events. We evaluated the less-known spatial resolution and estimation error of the seafloor displacement observation from a vessel-based multi-narrow beam bathymetric survey. In this evaluation, bathymetric data from vessel-based and near-seafloor high-resolution autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV)-based surveys in the same area were used. Simulated vessel-based bathymetric "before and after" data of the seafloor displacement were made using AUV-based bathymetric data. The displacement was verified by comparing these simulated data using the analysis conditions that no locational errors of beam sounding points exist, a footprint effect is uniform, depth accuracy is constant in the analysis area, and there are no depth offset between two data. As a result, we found that the smallest vertical seafloor displacement that can be detected occurs when the horizontal extent of the deformation is larger than several times the size of the footprint (area of the narrow sounding beam projected onto the seafloor) of the used vessel's multi-narrow beam echo sounder, and in the situation that the amplitude of the depth difference is greater than the accuracy of the vessel-based depth measurement (standard deviation of measuring error). When local slopes of the bathymetry are gentler than those of the artificial variation appeared in the depth differences between two data, the horizontal seafloor displacement seems to be difficult to resolve accurately. The local slope of the artificial depth variation is derived from the wavelength and the amplitude which are equivalent to ~1-3 times of the footprint size and the accuracy of the depth measurement, respectively.

  14. Application of high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry measurements to estimate volatility distributions of α-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-01-05

    Recent developments in high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made it possible to directly detect atmospheric organic compounds in real time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low-volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, using ions identified by high-resolution spectra from an HR-ToF-CIMS with acetate reagent ion chemistry, we develop an algorithm to estimate the vapor pressures of measured organic acids. The algorithm uses identified ion formulas and calculated double bond equivalencies, information unavailable in quadrupole CIMS technology, as constraints for the number of possible oxygen-containing functionalmore » groups. The algorithm is tested with acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry (acetate-CIMS) spectra of O3 and OH oxidation products of α-pinene and naphthalene formed in a flow reactor with integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec s cm−3, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. The predicted condensed-phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA) average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous chamber and flow reactor measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.« less

  15. Topographic and Acoustic Estimates of Grain-Scale Roughness from High-Resolution Multibeam Echo-Sounder: Examples from the Colorado River in Marble and Grand Canyons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscombe, D.; Grams, P. E.

    2014-12-01

    High-frequency (several hundred kilohertz) multibeam echo-sounder (MBES) systems have the potential to provide complete coverage of large areas (km2) of the bed, rapidly (mins to hrs), at high resolution (cm2), and with high positional accuracy (cm). Here, we explore the use of MBES data to estimate grain-scale roughness of submerged riverbed sediment. There are two broad approaches: 1) using digital elevation models constructed from depth soundings, and 2) using acoustic backscatter. We discuss the relative merits of both approaches using examples from data collected on the Colorado River in Marble and Grand Canyons, Arizona, USA. The primary advantage of acoustic backscatter over topography from soundings, for the purposes of sediment classification, is the potential to distinguish between sediment at a higher resolution. This is because soundings are point measurements, whereas a recorded backscatter magnitude is the integral of backscattered sound from all scatterers in the insonified area. In addition, this acoustic return contains information about both the roughness and the hardness/impedance of the sediment. The statistics of backscatter magnitudes alone are found to be a poor discriminator between sediment types perhaps because, using our 400 kHz system, the scattering regime changes from Rayleigh (sound scattering by particles smaller than the sound wavelength) for fine sand, to geometric (scattering by larger-than-sound-wavelength particles) for substrates coarser than sand. However, simple measures derived from backscatter power spectra (namely, the variance, integral lengthscale, and the intercept and slope from a power-law form - see Figure) are found to distinguish between patches of sand, gravel, cobbles and boulders. Using this dependence, we present a new data-driven approach to classify grain-scale roughness, developed by comparing the spectral properties of backscatter with bed-sediment observations using geo-referenced underwater video.

  16. Estimation de parametres structuraux des arbres dans une savane a partir de mesures LiDAR terrestre et d'imagerie a tres haute resolution spatiale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beland, Martin

    to produce the leaf area, estimates. The second part of the thesis explores the combination of the tree representations generated in the first part with a ray tracing model to simulate the interactions of light with tree crowns. This approach is highly innovative and our study showed its potential to improve our understanding of the factors influencing the radiative environment in a savanna. The methods presented offer a solution to map leaf area at the individual tree scale over large areas from very high spatial resolution imagery. Mots-cles: Scanneur LiDAR terrestre, voxel, distribution 3D de surface foliaire, savanes, densite de surface foliaire (LAD), indice de surface foliaire (LAI), effets d'occlusion, parametrage, cartographie de la surface foliaire, lancer de rayons, modelisation du transfert radiatif.

  17. Very High Resolution Mapping of Tree Cover Using Scalable Deep Learning Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ganguly, sangram; basu, saikat; nemani, ramakrishna; mukhopadhyay, supratik; michaelis, andrew; votava, petr; saatchi, sassan

    2016-04-01

    Several studies to date have provided an extensive knowledge base for estimating forest aboveground biomass (AGB) and recent advances in space-based modeling of the 3-D canopy structure, combined with canopy reflectance measured by passive optical sensors and radar backscatter, are providing improved satellite-derived AGB density mapping for large scale carbon monitoring applications. A key limitation in forest AGB estimation from remote sensing, however, is the large uncertainty in forest cover estimates from the coarse-to-medium resolution satellite-derived land cover maps (present resolution is limited to 30-m of the USGS NLCD Program). As part of our NASA Carbon Monitoring System Phase II activities, we have demonstrated that uncertainties in forest cover estimates at the Landsat scale result in high uncertainties in AGB estimation, predominantly in heterogeneous forest and urban landscapes. We have successfully tested an approach using scalable deep learning architectures (Feature-enhanced Deep Belief Networks and Semantic Segmentation using Convolutional Neural Networks) and High-Performance Computing with NAIP air-borne imagery data for mapping tree cover at 1-m over California and Maryland. Our first high resolution satellite training label dataset from the NAIP data can be found here at http://csc.lsu.edu/~saikat/deepsat/ . In a comparison with high resolution LiDAR data available over selected regions in the two states, we found our results to be promising both in terms of accuracy as well as our ability to scale nationally. In this project, we propose to estimate very high resolution forest cover for the continental US at spatial resolution of 1-m in support of reducing uncertainties in the AGB estimation. The proposed work will substantially contribute to filling the gaps in ongoing carbon monitoring research and help quantifying the errors and uncertainties in related carbon products.

  18. On the use of fire radiative power, area, and temperature estimates to characterize biomass burning via moderate to coarse spatial resolution remote sensing data in the Brazilian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Wilfrid; Csiszar, Ivan; Giglio, Louis; Schmidt, Christopher C.

    2010-11-01

    Spaceborne instruments provide a unique view of global vegetation fire activity many times a day. In this study, we assessed the fire characterization information provided by two major products: the Terra and Aqua MODIS Thermal Anomalies product (MOD14 and MYD14, respectively) and the Wildfire Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm (WF_ABBA) product derived from GOES East Imager. Using higher spatial resolution imagery data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) instruments, we analyzed the characterization of subpixel fires detected by MOD14, MYD14, and WF_ABBA over parts of Brazilian Amazonia. Our results suggest that MODIS and GOES fire radiative power (FRP) estimates derived for individual fire-pixel clusters are subject to errors due to the effects of the point spread function of those instruments (underestimation of up to 75%), improper fire background characterization (overestimation of up to 80% assuming a 10 K cold bias in background temperature), and omission of small fire lines. Detection limits were approximately 11 and 9 MW for MOD14 and MYD14, respectively, and were equivalent to 27 and 19 MW for WF_ABBA data acquired coincidently with MOD14 and MYD14, respectively. We found a positive correlation between FRP and percentage tree cover indicating that FRP is sensitive to biomass density. Fire area and temperature estimates derived from the application of Dozier's (1981) approach to GOES data did not agree with our reference data (i.e., ASTER and ETM+ active fire masks and in situ fire temperature data), suggesting that large and variable errors could affect the retrieval of those parameters.

  19. High Resolution MEMS Accelerometers to Estimate VO2 and Compare Running Mechanics between Highly Trained Inter-Collegiate and Untrained Runners

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Stephen J.; Busa, Michael A.; Yaggie, James A.; Bollt, Erik M.

    2009-01-01

    Background The purposes of this study were to determine the validity and reliability of high resolution accelerometers (HRA) relative to VO2 and speed, and compare putative differences in HRA signal between trained (T) and untrained (UT) runners during treadmill locomotion. Methodology Runners performed 2 incremental VO2max trials while wearing HRA. RMS of high frequency signal from three axes (VT, ML, AP) and the Euclidean resultant (RES) were compared to VO2 to determine validity and reliability. Additionally, axial rms relative to speed, and ratio of axial accelerations to RES were compared between T and UT to determine if differences in running mechanics could be identified between the two groups. Principal Findings Regression of RES was strongly related to VO2, but T was different than UT (r = 0.96 vs 0.92; p<.001) for walking and running. During walking, only the ratio of ML and AP to RES were different between groups. For running, nearly all acceleration parameters were lower for T than UT, the exception being ratio of VT to RES, which was higher in T than UT. All of these differences during running were despite higher VO2, O2 cost, and lower RER in T vs UT, which resulted in no significant difference in energy expenditure between groups. Conclusions/Signficance These results indicate that HRA can accurately and reliably estimate VO2 during treadmill locomotion, but differences exist between T and UT that should be considered when estimating energy expenditure. Differences in running mechanics between T and UT were identified, yet the importance of these differences remains to be determined. PMID:19806216

  20. Quantitative and rapid estimations of human sub-surface skin mass using ultra-high-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Wen-Chuan; Kuo, Yue-Ming; Wen, Su-Ying

    2016-04-01

    Non-invasive and quantitative estimations for the delineation of sub-surface tumor margins could greatly aid in the early detection and monitoring of the morphological appearances of tumor growth, ensure complete tumor excision without the unnecessary sacrifice of healthy tissue, and facilitate post-operative follow-up for recurrence. In this study, a high-speed, non-invasive, and ultra-high-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography (UHR-SDOCT) imaging platform was developed for the quantitative measurement of human sub-surface skin mass. With a proposed robust, semi-automatic analysis, the system can rapidly quantify lesion area and shape regularity by an en-face-oriented algorithm. Various sizes of nylon sutures embedded in pork skin were used first as a phantom to verify the accuracy of our algorithm, and then in vivo, feasibility was proven using benign human angiomas and pigmented nevi. Clinically, this is the first step towards an automated skin lesion measurement system. In vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) image of angioma (A). Thin red arrows point to a blood vessel (BV). PMID:25755214

  1. Variability of Marine Aerosol Fine-Mode Fraction and Estimates of Anthropogenic Aerosol Component Over Cloud-Free Oceans from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kleidman, Richard G.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bian, Huisheng; Diehl, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examine seasonal and geographical variability of marine aerosol fine-mode fraction (f(sub m)) and its impacts on deriving the anthropogenic component of aerosol optical depth (tau(sub a)) and direct radiative forcing from multispectral satellite measurements. A proxy of f(sub m), empirically derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 5 data, shows large seasonal and geographical variations that are consistent with the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation Transport (GOCART) and Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) model simulations. The so-derived seasonally and spatially varying f(sub m) is then implemented into a method of estimating tau(sub a) and direct radiative forcing from the MODIS measurements. It is found that the use of a constant value for fm as in previous studies would have overestimated Ta by about 20% over global ocean, with the overestimation up to 45% in some regions and seasons. The 7-year (2001-2007) global ocean average tau(sub a) is 0.035, with yearly average ranging from 0.031 to 0.039. Future improvement in measurements is needed to better separate anthropogenic aerosol from natural ones and to narrow down the wide range of aerosol direct radiative forcing.

  2. Assessing the quality of low-spatial resolution remote sensing data and products by independent large-scale estimations at the Valencia and the Alacant Anchor Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Baeza, E.; Cano, A.; Domenech, C.; Fenollar, J.; Ferreira, G.; Ruiz, C.; Saleh, K.; Velazquez, A.; Vidal, S.

    The fundamental objective of the Valencia and the Alacant Anchor Stations is to develop scientific activities addressed towards the validation of low-spatial resolution remote sensing data and products in the framework of Earth Observation Missions such as GERB Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget SMOS Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity EarthCARE Earth Clouds Aerosols and Radiation Explorer Both Anchor Stations are similar and are located in natural regions where the land uses are also similar vineyards matorral and shrubs and some olive pine and almond trees However both stations belong to two different climate areas On the one hand the Valencia Anchor Station representative area of about 50 x 50 km2 has a continental type of climate with Mediterranean influences and the mean annual precipitation is about 450 mm On the other hand the Alacant Anchor Station representative area of about 10 x 10 km2 has a Mediterranean semi-arid type of climate where the annual mean precipitation is about 250 mm Moreover the Alacant Anchor Station was chosen on the most degraded crop area of the Valencia Region in the Eastern part of Spain Monitoring and comparing meteorological parameters from both Anchor Stations is of great interest to study the interactions between desertification and climate The satellite missions above mentioned are addressed to the estimation of net radiation at the top of the atmosphere GERB already operational and of soil moisture content SMOS to be launched in September 2007 Our interest is the derivation of

  3. Use of high-resolution imagery acquired from an unmanned aircraft system for fluvial mapping and estimating water-surface velocity in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzel, P. J.; Bauer, M.; Feller, M.; Holmquist-Johnson, C.; Preston, T.

    2013-12-01

    The use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) for environmental monitoring in the United States is anticipated to increase in the coming years as the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) further develops guidelines to permit their integration into the National Airspace System. The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Unmanned Aircraft Systems Project Office routinely obtains Certificates of Authorization from the FAA for utilizing UAS technology for a variety of natural resource applications for the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI). We evaluated the use of a small UAS along two reaches of the Platte River near Overton Nebraska, USA, to determine the accuracy of the system for mapping the extent and elevation of emergent sandbars and to test the ability of a hovering UAS to identify and track tracers to estimate water-surface velocity. The UAS used in our study is the Honeywell Tarantula Hawk RQ16 (T-Hawk), developed for the U.S. Army as a reconnaissance and surveillance platform. The T-Hawk has been recently modified by USGS, and certified for airworthiness by the DOI - Office of Aviation Services, to accommodate a higher-resolution imaging payload than was originally deployed with the system. The T-Hawk is currently outfitted with a Canon PowerShot SX230 HS with a 12.1 megapixel resolution and intervalometer to record images at a user defined time step. To increase the accuracy of photogrammetric products, orthoimagery and DEMs using structure-from-motion (SFM) software, we utilized ground control points in the study reaches and acquired imagery using flight lines at various altitudes (200-400 feet above ground level) and oriented both parallel and perpendicular to the river. Our results show that the mean error in the elevations derived from SFM in the upstream reach was 17 centimeters and horizontal accuracy was 6 centimeters when compared to 4 randomly distributed targets surveyed on emergent sandbars. In addition to the targets, multiple transects were

  4. 3D Transient Hydraulic Tomography (3DTHT): An Efficient Field and Modeling Method for High-Resolution Estimation of Aquifer Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrash, W.; Cardiff, M. A.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2012-12-01

    The distribution of hydraulic conductivity (K) is a major control on groundwater flow and contaminant transport. Our limited ability to determine 3D heterogeneous distributions of K is a major reason for increased costs and uncertainties associated with virtually all aspects of groundwater contamination management (e.g., site investigations, risk assessments, remediation method selection/design/operation, monitoring system design/operation). Hydraulic tomography (HT) is an emerging method for directly estimating the spatially variable distribution of K - in a similar fashion to medical or geophysical imaging. Here we present results from 3D transient field-scale experiments (3DTHT) which capture the heterogeneous K distribution in a permeable, moderately heterogeneous, coarse fluvial unconfined aquifer at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS). The results are verified against high-resolution K profiles from multi-level slug tests at BHRS wells. The 3DTHT field system for well instrumentation and data acquisition/feedback is fully modular and portable, and the in-well packer-and-port system is easily assembled and disassembled without expensive support equipment or need for gas pressurization. Tests are run for 15-20 min and the aquifer is allowed to recover while the pumping equipment is repositioned between tests. The tomographic modeling software developed uses as input observations of temporal drawdown behavior from each of numerous zones isolated in numerous observation wells during a series of pumping tests conducted from numerous isolated intervals in one or more pumping wells. The software solves for distributed K (as well as storage parameters Ss and Sy, if desired) and estimates parameter uncertainties using: a transient 3D unconfined forward model in MODFLOW, the adjoint state method for calculating sensitivities (Clemo 2007), and the quasi-linear geostatistical inverse method (Kitanidis 1995) for the inversion. We solve for K at >100,000 sub-m3

  5. How does grid-resolution modulate the topographic expression of geomorphic processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieve, Stuart W. D.; Mudd, Simon M.; Milodowski, David T.; Clubb, Fiona J.; Furbish, David J.

    2016-08-01

    In many locations, our ability to study the processes which shape the Earth are greatly enhanced through the use of high-resolution digital topographic data. However, although the availability of such datasets has markedly increased in recent years, many locations of significant geomorphic interest still do not have high-resolution topographic data available. Here, we aim to constrain how well we can understand surface processes through topographic analysis performed on lower-resolution data. We generate digital elevation models from point clouds at a range of grid resolutions from 1 to 30 m, which covers the range of widely used data resolutions available globally, at three locations in the United States. Using these data, the relationship between curvature and grid resolution is explored, alongside the estimation of the hillslope sediment transport coefficient (D, in m2 yr-1) for each landscape. Curvature, and consequently D, values are shown to be generally insensitive to grid resolution, particularly in landscapes with broad hilltops and valleys. Curvature distributions, however, become increasingly condensed around the mean, and theoretical considerations suggest caution should be used when extracting curvature from landscapes with sharp ridges. The sensitivity of curvature and topographic gradient to grid resolution are also explored through analysis of one-dimensional approximations of curvature and gradient, providing a theoretical basis for the results generated using two-dimensional topographic data. Two methods of extracting channels from topographic data are tested. A geometric method of channel extraction that finds channels by detecting threshold values of planform curvature is shown to perform well at resolutions up to 30 m in all three landscapes. The landscape parameters of hillslope length and relief are both successfully extracted at the same range of resolutions. These parameters can be used to detect landscape transience and our results suggest

  6. Variability in Surface BRDF at Different Spatial Scales (30m-500m) Over a Mixed Agricultural Landscape as Retrieved from Airborne and Satellite Spectral Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Miguel O.; Gatebe, Charles K.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Poudyal, Rajesh; Wang, Zhuosen; King, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, the role of multiangle 1 remote sensing has been central to the development of algorithms for the retrieval of global land surface properties including models of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), albedo, land cover/dynamics, burned area extent, as well as other key surface biophysical quantities represented by the anisotropic reflectance characteristics of vegetation. In this study, a new retrieval strategy for fine-to-moderate resolution multiangle observations was developed, based on the operational sequence used to retrieve the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 5 reflectance and BRDF/albedo products. The algorithm makes use of a semiempirical kernel-driven bidirectional reflectance model to provide estimates of intrinsic albedo (i.e., directional-hemispherical reflectance and bihemispherical reflectance), model parameters describing the BRDF, and extensive quality assurance information. The new retrieval strategy was applied to NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) data acquired during the 2007 Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over the well-instrumented Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in Oklahoma, USA. For the case analyzed, we obtained approx.1.6 million individual surface bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) retrievals, from nadir to 75deg off-nadir, and at spatial resolutions ranging from 3 m - 500 m. This unique dataset was used to examine the interaction of the spatial and angular 18 characteristics of a mixed agricultural landscape; and provided the basis for detailed assessments of: (1) the use of a priori knowledge in kernel-driven BRDF model inversions; (2) the interaction between surface reflectance anisotropy and instrument spatial resolution; and (3) the uncertainties that arise when sub-pixel differences in the BRDF are aggregated to a moderate resolution satellite

  7. Variability in Surface BRDF at Different Spatial Scales (30 m-500 m) Over a Mixed Agricultural Landscape as Retrieved from Airborne and Satellite Spectral Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Miguel O.; Gatebe, Charles K.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Poudyal, Rajesh; Wang, Zhousen; King, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, the role of multiangle remote sensing has been central to the development of algorithms for the retrieval of global land surface properties including models of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), albedo, land cover/dynamics, burned area extent, as well as other key surface biophysical quantities represented by the anisotropic reflectance characteristics of vegetation. In this study, a new retrieval strategy for fine-to-moderate resolution multiangle observations was developed, based on the operational sequence used to retrieve the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 5 reflectance and BRDF/albedo products. The algorithm makes use of a semiempirical kernel-driven bidirectional reflectance model to provide estimates of intrinsic albedo (i.e., directional-hemispherical reflectance and bihemispherical reflectance), model parameters describing the BRDF, and extensive quality assurance information. The new retrieval strategy was applied to NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) data acquired during the 2007 Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over the well-instrumented Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in Oklahoma, USA. For the case analyzed, we obtained approx.1.6 million individual surface bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) retrievals, from nadir to 75 off-nadir, and at spatial resolutions ranging from 3 m - 500 m. This unique dataset was used to examine the interaction of the spatial and angular characteristics of a mixed agricultural landscape; and provided the basis for detailed assessments of: (1) the use of a priori knowledge in kernel-driven BRDF model inversions; (2) the interaction between surface reflectance anisotropy and instrument spatial resolution; and (3) the uncertain ties that arise when sub-pixel differences in the BRDF are aggregated to a moderate resolution satellite pixel

  8. Estimating Earthquake Magnitude from the Kentucky Bend Scarp in the New Madrid Seismic Zone Using Field Geomorphic Mapping and High-Resolution LiDAR Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelson, K. I.; Kirkendall, W. G.

    2014-12-01

    Recent suggestions that the 1811-1812 earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) ranged from M6.8-7.0 versus M8.0 have implications for seismic hazard estimation in the central US. We more accurately identify the location of the NW-striking, NE-facing Kentucky Bend scarp along the northern Reelfoot fault, which is spatially associated with the Lake County uplift, contemporary seismicity, and changes in the Mississippi River from the February 1812 earthquake. We use 1m-resolution LiDAR hillshades and slope surfaces, aerial photography, soil surveys, and field geomorphic mapping to estimate the location, pattern, and amount of late Holocene coseismic surface deformation. We define eight late Holocene to historic fluvial deposits, and delineate younger alluvia that are progressively inset into older deposits on the upthrown, western side of the fault. Some younger, clayey deposits indicate past ponding against the scarp, perhaps following surface deformational events. The Reelfoot fault is represented by sinuous breaks-in-slope cutting across these fluvial deposits, locally coinciding with shallow faults identified via seismic reflection data (Woolery et al., 1999). The deformation pattern is consistent with NE-directed reverse faulting along single or multiple SW-dipping fault planes, and the complex pattern of fluvial deposition appears partially controlled by intermittent uplift. Six localities contain scarps across correlative deposits and allow evaluation of cumulative surface deformation from LiDAR-derived topographic profiles. Displacements range from 3.4±0.2 m, to 2.2±0.2 m, 1.4±0.3 m, and 0.6±0.1 m across four progressively younger surfaces. The spatial distribution of the profiles argues against the differences being a result of along-strike uplift variability. We attribute the lesser displacements of progressively younger deposits to recurrent surface deformation, but do not yet interpret these initial data with respect to possible earthquake

  9. Watershed erosion estimated from a high-resolution sediment core reveals a non-stationary frequency-magnitude relationship and importance of seasonal climate drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavin, D. G.; Colombaroli, D.; Morey, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    The inclusion of paleo-flood events greatly affects estimates of peak magnitudes (e.g., Q100) in flood-frequency analysis. Likewise, peak events also are associated with certain synoptic climatic patterns that vary on all time scales. Geologic records preserved in lake sediments have the potential to capture the non-stationarity in frequency-magnitude relationships, but few such records preserve a continuous history of event magnitudes. We present a 10-meter 2000-yr record from Upper Squaw Lake, Oregon, that contains finely laminated silt layers that reflect landscape erosion events from the 40 km2 watershed. CT-scans of the core (<1 mm resolution) and a 14C-dated chronology yielded a pseudo-annual time series of erosion magnitudes. The most recent 80 years of the record correlates strongly with annual peak stream discharge and road construction. We examined the frequency-magnitude relationship for the entire pre-road period and show that the seven largest events fall above a strongly linear relationship, suggesting a distinct process (e.g., severe fires or earthquakes) operating at low-frequency to generate large-magnitude events. Expressing the record as cumulative sediment accumulation anomalies showed the importance of the large events in "returning the system" to the long-term mean rate. Applying frequency-magnitude analysis in a moving window showed that the Q100 and Q10 of watershed erosion varied by 1.7 and 1.0 orders of magnitude, respectively. The variations in watershed erosion are weakly correlated with temperature and precipitation reconstructions at the decadal to centennial scale. This suggests that dynamics both internal (i.e., sediment production) and external (i.e., earthquakes) to the system, as well as more stochastic events (i.e., single severe wildfires) can at least partially over-ride external climate forcing of watershed erosion at decadal to centennial time scales.

  10. Estimation of surface long wave radiation and broadband emissivity using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land surface temperature/emissivity products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kaicun; Wan, Zhengming; Wang, Pucai; Sparrow, Michael; Liu, Jingmiao; Zhou, Xiuji; Haginoya, Shigenori

    2005-06-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) global land surface temperature (LST)/emissivity products supply daily, 8-day, and monthly global temperature and narrowband emissivity data. This article uses these products to calculate the surface long wave radiation of natural objects such as sand, soil, vegetation, etc., based on the Planck function and the Stefan-Boltzmann law. The results show that using the narrowband emissivity of a single band instead of the broadband emissivity results in large errors of up to 100 W m-2 of the calculated long wave radiation. A method to calculate broadband emissivity in the entire TIR spectral region from the narrowband emissivities of the MODIS bands (29, 31, and 32) in the thermal infrared region is proposed. Using the broadband emissivity, the surface long wave radiation could be calculated to an accuracy better than 6 W m-2 in the temperature region of 240-330 K, with a standard deviation of 1.22 W m-2, and a maximum error of 6.05 W m-2 (not considering the uncertainty associated with the MODIS LST/emissivity products themselves). The satellite estimated broadband emissivity was compared with 3-year (January 2001 to December 2003) ground-based measurements of emissivity at Gaize (32.30°N, 84.06°E, 4420 m) on the western Tibetan Plateau. The results show that the broadband emissivity calculated from MODIS narrowband emissivities by this method matches well the ground measurements, with a standard deviation of 0.0085 and a bias of 0.0015.

  11. Prognostic value of M30/M65 for outcome of hepatitis B virus-related acute-on-chronic liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Su-Jun; Liu, Shuang; Liu, Mei; McCrae, Malcolm A; Li, Jun-Feng; Han, Yuan-Ping; Xu, Chun-Hui; Ren, Feng; Chen, Yu; Duan, Zhong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prognostic value of circulating indicators of cell death in acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection as the single etiology. METHODS: Full length and caspase cleaved cytokeratin 18 (detected as M65 and M30 antigens) represent circulating indicators of necrosis and apoptosis. M65 and M30 were identified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 169 subjects including healthy controls (n = 33), patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB, n = 55) and patients with ACLF (n = 81). According to the 3-mo survival period, ACLF patients were defined as having spontaneous recovery (n = 33) and non-spontaneous recovery which included deceased patients and those who required liver transplantation (n = 48). RESULTS: Both biomarker levels significantly increased gradually as liver disease progressed (for M65: P < 0.001 for all; for M30: control vs CHB, P = 0.072; others: P < 0.001 for all). In contrast, the M30/M65 ratio was significantly higher in controls compared with CHB patients (P = 0.010) or ACLF patients (P < 0.001). In addition, the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) analysis demonstrated that both biomarkers had diagnostic value (AUC ≥ 0.80) in identifying ACLF from CHB patients. Interestingly, it is worth noting that the M30/M65 ratio was significantly different between spontaneous and non-spontaneous recovery in ACLF patients (P = 0.032). The prognostic value of the M30/M65 ratio was compared with the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) and Child-Pugh scores at the 3-mo survival period, the AUC of the M30/M65 ratio was 0.66 with a sensitivity of 52.9% and the highest specificity of 92.6% (MELD:AUC = 0.71; sensitivity, 79.4%; specificity, 63.0%; Child-Pugh: AUC = 0.77; sensitivity, 61.8%; specificity, 88.9%). CONCLUSION: M65 and M30 are strongly associated with liver disease severity. The M30/M65 ratio may be a potential prognostic marker for spontaneous recovery in

  12. An evaluation of new high resolution image collection and processing techniques for estimating shrub cover and detecting landscape changes associated with military training in arid lands

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, D.J.; Ostler, W.K.

    2000-02-01

    Research funded by the US Department of Defense, US Department of Energy, and the US Environmental Protection Agency as part of Project CS-1131 of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program evaluated novel techniques for collecting high-resolution images in the Mojave Desert using helicopters, helium-filled blimps, kites, and hand-held telescoping poles at heights from 1 to 150 meters. Several camera types, lens, films, and digital techniques were evaluated on the basis of their ability to correctly estimate canopy cover of shrubs. A high degree of accuracy was obtained with photo scales of 1:4,000 or larger and flatbed scanning rates from films or prints of 300 lines per inch or larger. Smaller scale images were of value in detecting retrospective changes in cover of large shrubs, but failed to detect smaller shrubs. Excellent results were obtained using inexpensive 35-millimeter cameras and new super-fine grain film such as Kodak's Royal Gold{trademark} (ASA 100) film or megapixel digital cameras. New image-processing software, such as SigmaScan Pro{trademark}, makes it possible to accurately measure areas up to 1 hectare in size for total cover and density in 10 minutes compared to several hours or days of field work. In photographs with scales of 1:1,000 and 1:2,000, it was possible to detect cover and density of up to four dominant shrub species. Canopy cover and other parameters such as width, length, feet diameter, and shape factors can be nearly instantaneously measured for each individual shrub yielding size distribution histograms and other statistical data on plant community structure. Use of the technique is being evaluated in a four-year study of military training impacts at Fort Irwin, California, and results compared with image processing using conventional aerial photography and satellite imagery, including the new 1-meter pixel IKONOS images. The technique is a valuable new emerging tool to accurately assess vegetation structure

  13. Integrating High-Resolution Taskable Imagery into a Sensorweb for Automatic Space-Based Monitoring of Flooding in Thailand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Mclaren, David; Doubleday, Joshua; Tran, Daniel; Tanpipat, Veerachai; Chitradon, Royol; Boonya-aroonnet, Surajate; Thanapakpawin, Porranee; Mandl, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Several space-based assets (Terra, Aqua, Earth Observing One) have been integrated into a sensorweb to monitor flooding in Thailand. In this approach, the Moderate Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) data from Terra and Aqua is used to perform broad-scale monitoring to track flooding at the regional level (250m/pixel) and EO-1 is autonomously tasked in response to alerts to acquire higher resolution (30m/pixel) Advanced Land Imager (ALI) data. This data is then automatically processed to derive products such as surface water extent and volumetric water estimates. These products are then automatically pushed to organizations in Thailand for use in damage estimation, relief efforts, and damage mitigation. More recently, this sensorweb structure has been used to request imagery, access imagery, and process high-resolution (several m to 30m), targetable asset imagery from commercial assets including Worldview-2, Ikonos, Radarsat-2, Landsat-7, and Geo-Eye-1. We describe the overall sensorweb framework as well as new workflows and products made possible via these extensions.

  14. Oil slick morphology derived from AVIRIS measurements of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill: Implications for spatial resolution requirements of remote sensors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shaojie; Hu, Chuanmin; Feng, Lian; Swayze, Gregg A; Holmes, Jamie; Graettinger, George; MacDonald, Ian; Garcia, Oscar; Leifer, Ira

    2016-02-15

    Using fine spatial resolution (~7.6m) hyperspectral AVIRIS data collected over the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, we statistically estimated slick lengths, widths and length/width ratios to characterize oil slick morphology for different thickness classes. For all AVIRIS-detected oil slicks (N=52,100 continuous features) binned into four thickness classes (≤50 μm but thicker than sheen, 50-200 μm, 200-1000 μm, and >1000 μm), the median lengths, widths, and length/width ratios of these classes ranged between 22 and 38 m, 7-11 m, and 2.5-3.3, respectively. The AVIRIS data were further aggregated to 30-m (Landsat resolution) and 300-m (MERIS resolution) spatial bins to determine the fractional oil coverage in each bin. Overall, if 50% fractional pixel coverage were to be required to detect oil with thickness greater than sheen for most oil containing pixels, a 30-m resolution sensor would be needed. PMID:26725867

  15. Oil slick morphology derived from AVIRIS measurements of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill: Implications for spatial resolution requirements of remote sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Shaojie; Hu, Chuanmin; Feng, Lian; Swayze, Gregg A.; Holmes, Jamie; Graettinger, George, (compiler); Ian R. MacDonald; Garcia, Oscar; Leifer, Ira

    2015-01-01

    Using fine spatial resolution (~ 7.6 m) hyperspectral AVIRIS data collected over the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, we statistically estimated slick lengths, widths and length/width ratios to characterize oil slick morphology for different thickness classes. For all AVIRIS-detected oil slicks (N = 52,100 continuous features) binned into four thickness classes (≤ 50 μm but thicker than sheen, 50–200 μm, 200–1000 μm, and > 1000 μm), the median lengths, widths, and length/width ratios of these classes ranged between 22 and 38 m, 7–11 m, and 2.5–3.3, respectively. The AVIRIS data were further aggregated to 30-m (Landsat resolution) and 300-m (MERIS resolution) spatial bins to determine the fractional oil coverage in each bin. Overall, if 50% fractional pixel coverage were to be required to detect oil with thickness greater than sheen for most oil containing pixels, a 30-m resolution sensor would be needed.

  16. Predicting gross primary production with high spatio-temporal resolution remote sensing datasets at regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, D.; Chen, B.

    2012-04-01

    Remote sensing has great potential for estimating gross primary production (GPP) without resorting to interpolation of many surface observations. Meanwhile, it can be applied to analyzing the variation of GPP at different ecosystems across a wide range of spatial, temporal, and spectral resolutions. However, the availability of input data for remote-sensing-based GPP models is the bottleneck. The input data of remote-sensing-based greenness and radiation (GR) model is more independent on climate or ground-based observations, and the result is promising. Previous work using this modeling approach only used coarse spatial resolution data (e.g. MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS), the estimated spatio-temporal distributions of GPP with higher resolution remains unclear. To overcome this limitation, a modified image fusion method was developed based on Enhanced Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (mESTARFM), producing images with high spatial and temporal resolutions based on Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) / Enhanced TM Plus (ETM+) (high spatial resolution, low temporal resolution) and MODIS (low spatial resolution, high temporal resolution). Meanwhile, the Simple Analytical Footprint model on Eulerian coordinates (SAFE) model to estimate the flux tower's footprint, which will be helpful for GR model's calibration, and improve the accuracy of GPP estimate. In the study, twelve flux sites belonging to Fluxnet-Canada Research Network (FCRN)/Canadian Carbon Program (CCP) were selected, covering grassland, forest, and wetland biomes. The remote sensing dataset acquired in this study for each site include MODIS reflectance product (MOD09A1, 500 m), Landsat TM /ETM+ (30 m), MODIS BRDF/ Albedo model parameter product (MCD43A1, 500 m), MODIS BRDF/ Albedo quality product (MCD43A2, 500 m). The steps are as follows:: (i) Landsat TM /ETM+ and MODIS data were used as mESTARFM inputs to produce reflectance datasets with high spatio

  17. Estimation of reactogenicity of preparations produced on the basis of photoinactivated live vaccines against brucellosis and tularaemia on the organismic level. 2. Using the method of speckle-microscopy with high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ulianova, O V; Uianov, S S; Li Pengcheng; Luo Qingming

    2011-04-30

    The method of speckle microscopy was adapted to estimate the reactogenicity of the prototypes of vaccine preparations against extremely dangerous infections. The theory is proposed to describe the mechanism of formation of the output signal from the super-high spatial resolution speckle microscope. The experimental studies show that bacterial suspensions, irradiated in different regimes of inactivation, do not exert negative influence on the blood microcirculations in laboratory animals. (optical technologies in biophysics and medicine)

  18. Estimation of reactogenicity of preparations produced on the basis of photoinactivated live vaccines against brucellosis and tularaemia on the organismic level.2. Using the method of speckle-microscopy with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulianova, O. V.; Uianov, S. S.; Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Qingming

    2011-04-01

    The method of speckle microscopy was adapted to estimate the reactogenicity of the prototypes of vaccine preparations against extremely dangerous infections. The theory is proposed to describe the mechanism of formation of the output signal from the super-high spatial resolution speckle microscope. The experimental studies show that bacterial suspensions, irradiated in different regimes of inactivation, do not exert negative influence on the blood microcirculations in laboratory animals.

  19. Daily high spatial resolution evapotranspiration estimation using multi-satellite data fusion over a managed pine plantation in North Carolina, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a major part of the water balance and connects hydrologic and biologic processes. High spatial and temporal resolution ET mapping using satellite remote sensing can provide detailed information about daily vegetation water use and soil moisture status at scales of land-use...

  20. A stochastic analysis of distance estimation approaches in single molecule microscopy - quantifying the resolution limits of photon-limited imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Sripad; Ward, E. Sally; Ober, Raimund J.

    2012-01-01

    Optical microscopy is an invaluable tool to visualize biological processes at the cellular scale. In the recent past, there has been significant interest in studying these processes at the single molecule level. An important question that arises in single molecule experiments concerns the estimation of the distance of separation between two closely spaced molecules. Presently, there exists different experimental approaches to estimate the distance between two single molecules. However, it is not clear as to which of these approaches provides the best accuracy for estimating the distance. Here, we address this problem rigorously by using tools of statistical estimation theory. We derive formulations of the Fisher information matrix for the underlying estimation problem of determining the distance of separation from the acquired data for the different approaches. Through the Cramer-Rao inequality, we derive a lower bound to the accuracy with which the distance of separation can be estimated. We show through Monte-Carlo simulations that the bound can be attained by the maximum likelihood estimator. Our analysis shows that the distance estimation problem is in fact related to the localization accuracy problem, the latter being a distinct problem that deals with how accurately the location of an object can be determined. We have carried out a detailed investigation of the relationship between the Fisher information matrices of the two problems for the different experimental approaches considered here. The paper also addresses the issue of a singular Fisher information matrix, which presents a significant complication when calculating the Cramer-Rao lower bound. Here, we show how experimental design can overcome the singularity. Throughout the paper, we illustrate our results by considering a specific image profile that describe the image of a single molecule. PMID:24932067

  1. Herschel and IRAM-30m Observations of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) at 4.5 AU from the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, Laurence; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Biver, Nicolas; Altieri, Bruno; Teyssier, David; Jorda, Laurent; Debout, Vincent; Snodgrass, Colin; Küppers, Michael; A'Hearn, Michael; Müller, Thomas; Farnham, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    The sungrazer comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) (perihelion at rh = 0.0125 AU from the Sun) was bright and active when discovered in September 2012 at 6.3 AU from the Sun. Our goal was to characterize the distant gaseous and dust activity of this comet, inbound, from observations of H2O, CO and the dust coma in the far-infrared and submillimeter domains. We report observations undertaken with the Herschel Space Observatory (Pilbratt et al, 2010) on 8 & 13 March 2013 (rh = 4.54--4.47AU) and with the 30m telescope of Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique (IRAM) in March and April 2013 (rh = 4.45--4.18 AU). The HIFI instrument aboard Herschel was used to observe the H2O 110-101 line at 557 GHz, whereas images of the dust coma at 70~μm and 160~μm were acquired with the PACS instrument. Spectra acquired at the IRAM 30m telescope cover the CO J(2--1) line at 230.5 GHz. The spectral observations were analysed with excitation and radiative transfer models (Biver et al., 2007). A model of dust thermal emission taking into account a range of dust sizes is used to analyse the PACS maps, equivalent to that used in Bockelée-Morvan et al., 2010. While H2O was not detected in our 8 March 2013 observation, we derive a sensitive 3σ upper limit of Q_H_2O

  2. RAVEN - High-resolution Mapping of Venus within a Discovery Mission Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpton, V. L.; Herrick, R. R.; Rogers, F.; Waterman, S.

    2009-12-01

    It has been more than 15 years since the Magellan mission mapped Venus with S-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images at ~100-m resolution. Advances in radar technology are such that current Earth-orbiting SAR instruments are capable of providing images at meter-scale resolution. RAVEN (RAdar at VENus) is a mission concept that utilizes the instrument developed for the RADARSAT Constellation Mission (RCM) to map Venus in an economical, highly capable, and reliable way. RCM relies on a C-band SAR that can be tuned to generate images at a wide variety of resolutions and swath widths, ranging from ScanSAR mode (broad swaths at 30-m resolution) to strip-map mode (resolutions as fine as 3 m), as well as a spotlight mode that can image patches at 1-m resolution. In particular, the high-resolution modes allow the landing sites of previous missions to be pinpointed and characterized. Repeat-pass interferometric SAR (InSAR) and stereo radargrammetry provide options for constraining topography to better than 100-m horizontal and 10-m vertical resolution. InSAR also provides the potential for detecting surface deformation at centimeter precision. Performing InSAR requires precise knowledge and control of the orbital geometry, and for this reason a 600-km circular polar orbit is favored. This configuration causes the equatorial nadir point to move ~9 km per orbit. Considering both ascending and descending passes, the spacecraft will pass over every point on the planet in half a Venus day (~4 Earth months). The ability to transmit data back to Earth via the Deep Space Network is the primary limiting factor on the volume of data that can be collected. Our current estimates indicate that within an imaging cycle of one Venus day we can image 20-30 percent of the planet at 20-30-m resolution and several percent at 3-5 m resolution. These figures compare favorably to the coverage provided by recent imaging systems orbiting Mars. Our strategy calls for the first cycle of coverage

  3. Long-Term Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution over CONUS: Bias-Adjustment of the Radar-Only National Mosaic and Multi-sensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) Precipitation Reanalysis (2001-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, Olivier; Nelson, Brian; Stevens, Scott; Seo, Dong-Jun; Kim, Beomgeun

    2015-04-01

    The processing of radar-only precipitation via the reanalysis from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor Quantitative (NMQ/Q2) based on the WSR-88D Next-generation Radar (NEXRAD) network over Continental United States (CONUS) is completed for the period covering from 2001 to 2012. This important milestone constitutes a unique opportunity to study precipitation processes at a 1-km spatial resolution for a 5-min temporal resolution. However, in order to be suitable for hydrological, meteorological and climatological applications, the radar-only product needs to be bias-adjusted and merged with in-situ rain gauge information. Several in-situ datasets are available to assess the biases of the radar-only product and to adjust for those biases to provide a multi-sensor QPE. The rain gauge networks that are used such as the Global Historical Climatology Network-Daily (GHCN-D), the Hydrometeorological Automated Data System (HADS), the Automated Surface Observing Systems (ASOS), and the Climate Reference Network (CRN), have different spatial density and temporal resolution. The challenges related to incorporating non-homogeneous networks over a vast area and for a long-term record are enormous. Among the challenges we are facing are the difficulties incorporating differing resolution and quality surface measurements to adjust gridded estimates of precipitation. Another challenge is the type of adjustment technique. The objective of this work is threefold. First, we investigate how the different in-situ networks can impact the precipitation estimates as a function of the spatial density, sensor type, and temporal resolution. Second, we assess conditional and un-conditional biases of the radar-only QPE for various time scales (daily, hourly, 5-min) using in-situ precipitation observations. Finally, after assessing the bias and applying reduction or elimination techniques, we are using a unique in-situ dataset merging the different RG networks (CRN, ASOS, HADS, GHCN-D) to

  4. High-resolution digital elevation model from tri-stereo Pleiades-1 satellite imagery for lava flow volume estimates at Fogo Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnardi, Marco; González, Pablo J.; Hooper, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Resolving changes in topography through time using accurate high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) is key to understanding active volcanic processes. For the first time in a volcanic environment, we utilize very high-resolution tri-stereo optical imagery acquired by the Pleiades-1 satellite constellation and generate a 1 m resolution DEM of Fogo Volcano, Cape Verde -- the most active volcano in the Eastern Atlantic region. Point cloud density is increased by a factor of 6.5 compared to conventional stereo imagery, and the number of 1 m2 pixels with no height measurements is reduced by 43%. We use the DEM to quantify topographic changes associated with the 2014-2015 eruption at Fogo. Height differences between the posteruptive Pleiades-1 DEM and the preeruptive topography from TanDEM-X give a lava flow volume of 45.83 ± 0.02 × 106 m3, emplaced over an area of 4.8 km2 at a mean rate of 6.8 m3 s-1.

  5. [Estimation of canopy chlorophyll content using hyperspectral data].

    PubMed

    Dong, Jing-Jing; Wang, Li; Niu, Zheng

    2009-11-01

    Many researches have developed models to estimate chlorophyl content at leaf and canopy level, but they were species-specific. The objective of the present paper was to develop a new model. First, canopy reflectance was simulated for different species and different canopy architecture using radiative transfer models. Based on the simulated canopy reflectance, the relationship between canopy reflectance and canopy chlorophyll content was studied, and then a chlorophyll estimation model was built using the method of spectral index. The coefficient of determination (R2) between spectral index based model and canopy chlorophyll content reached 0.75 for simulated data. To investigate the applicability of this chlorophyll model, the authors chose a field sample area in Gansu Province to carry out the measurement of leaf chlorophyll content, canopy reflectance and other parameters. Besides, the authors also ordered the synchronous Hyperion data, a hyperspectral image with a spatial resolution of 30 m. Canopy reflectance from field measurment and reflectance from Hyperion image were respectively used as the input parameter for the chlorophyll estimation model. Both of them got good results, which indicated that the model could be used for accurate canopy chlorophyll estimation using canopy reflectance. However, while using spaceborne hyperspectral data to estimate canopy chlorophyll content, good atmospheric correction is required. PMID:20101973

  6. Herschel and IRAM-30 m observations of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) at 4.5 AU from the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, L.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Biver, N.; Altieri, B.; Teyssier, D.; Jorda, L.; Debout, V.; Snodgrass, C.; Küppers, M.; A'Hearn, M.; Müller, T. G.; Farnham, T.

    2013-12-01

    Context. The sungrazer comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) (perihelion at rh = 0.0125 AU from the Sun) was bright and active when discovered in September 2012 at 6.3 AU from the Sun. Aims: Our goal was to characterize the distant gaseous and dust activity of this comet, inbound, from observations of H2O, CO and the dust coma in the far-infrared and submillimeter domains. Methods: We report observations undertaken with the Herschel space observatory on 8 and 13 March 2013 (rh = 4.54-4.47AU) and with the 30 m telescope of Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique (IRAM) in March and April 2013 (rh = 4.45-4.18 AU). The HIFI instrument aboard Herschel was used to observe the H2O 110 - 101 line at 557 GHz, whereas images of the dust coma at 70 μm and 160 μm were acquired with the PACS instrument. Spectra acquired at the IRAM 30 m telescope cover the CO J(2-1) line at 230.5 GHz. The spectral observations were analysed with excitation and radiative transfer models. A model of dust thermal emission taking into account a range of dust sizes is used to analyse the PACS maps. Results: While H2O was not detected in our 8 March 2013 observation, we derive a sensitive 3σ upper limit of QH2O < 3.5 × 1026 molecules s-1 for this date. A marginal 3.2σ detection of CO is found, corresponding to a CO production rate of QCO = 3.5 × 1027 molecules s-1. The Herschel PACS measurements show a clear detection of the coma and tail in both the 70 μm and 160 μm maps. Under the assumption of a 2-km radius nucleus, we infer dust production rates in the range 10-13 kg s-1 or 40-70 kg s-1, depending on whether a low or high gaseous activity from the nucleus surface is assumed. We constrain the size distribution of the emitted dust by comparing PACS 70 and 160 μm data, and considering optical data. Size indices between -4 and -3.6 are suggested. The morphology of the tail observed on 70 μm images can be explained by the presence of grains with ages older than 60 days. Herschel is an ESA space

  7. Long-Term Large-Scale Bias-Adjusted Precipitation Estimates at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Derived from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) Precipitation Reanalysis over CONUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, O. P.; Nelson, B. R.; Stevens, S. E.; Seo, D. J.; Kim, B.

    2014-12-01

    The processing of radar-only precipitation via the reanalysis from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor Quantitative (NMQ/Q2) based on the WSR-88D Next-generation Radar (Nexrad) network over Continental United States (CONUS) is nearly completed for the period covering from 2000 to 2012. This important milestone constitutes a unique opportunity to study precipitation processes at a 1-km spatial resolution for a 5-min temporal resolution. However, in order to be suitable for hydrological, meteorological and climatological applications, the radar-only product needs to be bias-adjusted and merged with in-situ rain gauge information. Rain gauge networks such as the Hydrometeorological Automated Data System (HADS), the Automated Surface Observing Systems (ASOS), the Climate Reference Network (CRN), and the Global Historical Climatology Network - Daily (GHCN-D) are used to adjust for those biases and to merge with the radar only product to provide a multi-sensor estimate. The challenges related to incorporating non-homogeneous networks over a vast area and for a long-term record are enormous. Among the challenges we are facing are the difficulties incorporating differing resolution and quality surface measurements to adjust gridded estimates of precipitation. Another challenge is the type of adjustment technique. After assessing the bias and applying reduction or elimination techniques, we are investigating the kriging method and its variants such as simple kriging (SK), ordinary kriging (OK), and conditional bias-penalized Kriging (CBPK) among others. In addition we hope to generate estimates of uncertainty for the gridded estimate. In this work the methodology is presented as well as a comparison between the radar-only product and the final multi-sensor QPE product. The comparison is performed at various time scales from the sub-hourly, to annual. In addition, comparisons over the same period with a suite of lower resolution QPEs derived from ground based radar

  8. Synergistic using medium-resolution and high-resolution remote sensing imagery to extract impervious surface for Dianci Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Liang; Yang, Kun; Deng, Ming; Liu, Cun

    2014-03-01

    The knowledge of impervious surfaces, especially the magnitude, location, geometry, spatial pattern of impervious surfaces, is significant to urban ecosystem studies, including urban hydrology, urban climate, land use planning and resource management.Impervious surface area (ISA) is considered a key indicator of environmental quality and can be used to address complex urban environmental issues, particularly those related to the health of urban watersheds. ISA is also an indicator of non-point source pollution or polluted runoff. Remote sensing offers a consistent framework for representing spatial patterns and rates of urbanization over time through accurate observations of impervious surface area. Most of the existing methods of extracting impervious surface based on remote sensing concentrate on an urban scale, but the rapid and accurate methods of extracting impervious surfaces in a basin scale are nearly nonexistent in China and abroad. In recent years,with the rapid urbanization especially surrounding the Dianchi water body, the impervious surface coverage rate also grows rapidly and results in severe degradation of basin water environment within Dianchi watershed. In this study, we developed an approach to extract impervious surface for Dianci Basin by synergistic using medium-resolution and high-resolution remote sensing imagery. Subpixel percent impervious surfaces at Thematic Mapper (TM) images were mapped using the classification and regression tree(CART) algorithm. Sub-pixel impervious surfaces at 30m resolution were mapped in this study area through regression tree models. The estimated ISA results were evaluated through independent ISA reference data derived from high resolution QuickBird. The results prove the suitability of the approach for a widely automated and mapping of impervious surfaces in a basin scale.

  9. Performance of the vertical optical filter for the NG-3 30 m SANS instrument at the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Center for Neutron Research

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Jeremy C.; Glinka, Charles J.; Schroeder, Ivan G.

    2005-02-01

    The straight neutron guide and crystal filter formerly used to supply a cold neutron beam to the NG-3 30 m small angle scattering instrument at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research has been replaced by a vertically-kinked 'optical filter' neutron guide that eliminates direct lines-of-sight between the instrument and the neutron source. Due to pre-existing lateral spatial constraints, the optical filter bend is in a vertical plane requiring a vertical displacement of the sample-detector axis by about 14 cm. The optical filter is successful in excluding unwanted fast neutrons and gamma rays from the beam at the sample position without the use of crystal filters. We show that the optical filter provides neutron current density gains at the sample by a factor of about 1.8 at 15 A neutron wavelength with negligible increase in the beam divergence, whilst allowing some measurement capability at wavelengths shorter than 4 A (previously excluded by the beryllium-bismuth crystal filter)

  10. Use of Salt Baths in the Temperature Range from 175 °C to 540 °C with Uncertainties of Less than 30 m°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alper, F. Melda Patan; Ince, Ahmet T.; Aiordachioaiei, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Calibration of thermometers in the temperature range from -80 °C to 550 °C requires liquid baths; alcohol, water, silicon oil, salt baths and dry block furnaces. In this study, the use of salt baths outside of their usual range of 250 °C to 540 °C for calibrating thermometers in the range between 175 °C and 250 °C is proposed. The calibration range from 150 °C to 250 °C is usually covered by an oil bath, but utilizing a salt bath saves calibration time and resources, improves stability and homogeneity, allows longer term usage of the liquid, and reduces hazardous chemical vapors evaporated at temperatures above 175 °C. This proposal is based on a study of the uncertainty contributions at varying salt bath temperatures in the range from 175 °C to 540 °C which was carried out in this study. Results achieved and analyzed in this study indicate that the implementation of salt baths in this lower temperature range provides opportunities to calibrate reference and/or working thermometers with an uncertainty below 30 m°C, almost the same as the oil-bath uncertainty in the range of 175 °C to 250 °C. The main components of uncertainty contributed by a salt bath over this temperature range are discussed in this study.

  11. Fusing enhanced radar precipitation, in-situ hydrometeorological measurements and airborne LIDAR snowpack estimates in a hyper-resolution hydrologic model to improve seasonal water supply forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gochis, D. J.; Busto, J.; Howard, K.; Mickey, J.; Deems, J. S.; Painter, T. H.; Richardson, M.; Dugger, A. L.; Karsten, L. R.; Tang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Scarcity of spatially- and temporally-continuous observations of precipitation and snowpack conditions in remote mountain watersheds results in fundamental limitations in water supply forecasting. These limitationsin observational capabilities can result in strong biases in total snowmelt-driven runoff amount, the elevational distribution of runoff, river basin tributary contributions to total basin runoff and, equally important for water management, the timing of runoff. The Upper Rio Grande River basin in Colorado and New Mexico is one basin where observational deficiencies are hypothesized to have significant adverse impacts on estimates of snowpack melt-out rates and on water supply forecasts. We present findings from a coordinated observational-modeling study within Upper Rio Grande River basin whose aim was to quanitfy the impact enhanced precipitation, meteorological and snowpack measurements on the simulation and prediction of snowmelt driven streamflow. The Rio Grande SNOwpack and streamFLOW (RIO-SNO-FLOW) Prediction Project conducted enhanced observing activities during the 2014-2015 water year. Measurements from a gap-filling, polarimetric radar (NOXP) and in-situ meteorological and snowpack measurement stations were assimilated into the WRF-Hydro modeling framework to provide continuous analyses of snowpack and streamflow conditions. Airborne lidar estimates of snowpack conditions from the NASA Airborne Snow Observatory during mid-April and mid-May were used as additional independent validations against the various model simulations and forecasts of snowpack conditions during the melt-out season. Uncalibrated WRF-Hydro model performance from simulations and forecasts driven by enhanced observational analyses were compared against results driven by currently operational data inputs. Precipitation estimates from the NOXP research radar validate significantly better against independent in situ observations of precipitation and snow-pack increases

  12. Evaluating The National Land Cover Database Tree Canopy and Impervious Cover Estimates Across the Conterminous United States: A Comparison with Photo-Interpreted Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    The 2001 National Land Cover Database (NLCD) provides 30-m resolution estimates of percentage tree canopy and percentage impervious cover for the conterminous United States. Previous estimates that compared NLCD tree canopy and impervious cover estimates with photo-interpreted cover estimates within selected counties and places revealed that NLCD underestimates tree and impervious cover. Based on these previous results, a wall-to-wall comprehensive national analysis was conducted to determine if and how NLCD derived estimates of tree and impervious cover varies from photo-interpreted values across the conterminous United States. Results of this analysis reveal that NLCD significantly underestimates tree cover in 64 of the 65 zones used to create the NCLD cover maps, with a national average underestimation of 9.7% (standard error (SE) = 1.0%) and a maximum underestimation of 28.4% in mapping zone 3. Impervious cover was also underestimated in 44 zones with an average underestimation of 1.4% (SE = 0.4%) and a maximum underestimation of 5.7% in mapping zone 56. Understanding the degree of underestimation by mapping zone can lead to better estimates of tree and impervious cover and a better understanding of the potential limitations associated with NLCD cover estimates. PMID:20676888

  13. Estimation of magnetospheric plasma ion composition for 1956-1975 by using high time resolution geomagnetic field data created from analog magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Nosé, M.; Mashiko, N.; Morinaga, K.; Nagamachi, S.

    2016-06-01

    This study addresses the ion composition in the magnetosphere before the satellite era. We estimate the plasma ion mass for 1956-1975 from the period of low-latitude Pi2 pulsations found in digital geomagnetic field data that are created from analog magnetograms at Kakioka. The period of investigation covers most of solar cycle 19 and the whole solar cycle 20. To consider long-term variation, the moving average of the estimated plasma ion mass is calculated with a 1 year time window. We find that 1 year moving average of the plasma ion mass changed by a factor of ˜2 during one solar cycle (i.e., between ˜1.1 amu and ˜2.4 amu for solar cycle 19 and between ˜1.1 amu and ˜2.0 amu for solar cycle 20). The correlation coefficient between the 1 year moving average of the plasma ion mass and that of the F10.7 index is 0.86. This result supports the idea that in long-term variation, solar radiation increases the density and the temperature of O+ ions in the ionosphere, leads to the outflow of O+ ions, and contributes to the enhancement of the plasma ion mass in the nightside magnetosphere. The digital data created from analog magnetograms provide an important clue to know the space environment in old days and are advantageous for studies of the space weather and space climate.

  14. Improved estimate of the policy-relevant background ozone in the United States using the GEOS-Chem global model with 1/2° × 2/3° horizontal resolution over North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Jacob, Daniel J.; Downey, Nicole V.; Wood, Dana A.; Blewitt, Doug; Carouge, Claire C.; van Donkelaar, Aaron; Jones, Dylan B. A.; Murray, Lee T.; Wang, Yuxuan

    2011-12-01

    The policy-relevant background (PRB) ozone is defined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as the surface ozone concentration that would be present over the US in the absence of North American anthropogenic emissions. It is intended to provide a baseline for risk and exposure assessments used in setting the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). We present here three-year statistics (2006-2008) of PRB ozone over the US calculated using the GEOS-Chem global 3-D model of atmospheric composition with 1/2° × 2/3° horizontal resolution over North America and adjacent oceans (2° × 2.5° for the rest of the world). We also provide estimates of the US background (no anthropogenic US emissions) and natural background (no anthropogenic emissions worldwide and pre-industrial methane). Our work improves on previous GEOS-Chem PRB estimates through the use of higher model resolution, 3-year statistics, better representation of stratospheric influence, and updated emissions. PRB is particularly high in the intermountain West due to high elevation, arid terrain, and large-scale subsidence. We present for this region a detailed model evaluation showing that the model is successful in reproducing ozone exceedances up to 70 ppbv. However, the model cannot reproduce PRB-relevant exceptional events associated with wildfires or stratospheric intrusions. The mean PRB estimates for spring-summer are 27 ± 8 ppbv at low-altitude sites and 40 ± 7 ppbv at high-altitude sites. Differences between the PRB simulation and the natural simulation indicate a mean enhancement from intercontinental pollution and anthropogenic methane of 9 ppbv at low-altitude sites and 13 ppbv at high-altitude sites. The PRB is higher than average when ozone exceeds 60 ppbv, particularly in the intermountain West. Our PRB estimates are on average 4 ppbv higher than previous GEOS-Chem studies and we attribute this to higher lighting, increasing Asian emissions, and improved model resolution

  15. Nano silver and nano zinc-oxide in surface waters – Exposure estimation for Europe at high spatial and temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Egon; Johnson, Andrew C.; Keller, Virginie D.J.; Williams, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Nano silver and nano zinc-oxide monthly concentrations in surface waters across Europe were modeled at ∼6 × 9 km spatial resolution. Nano-particle loadings from households to rivers were simulated considering household connectivity to sewerage, sewage treatment efficiency, the spatial distribution of sewage treatment plants, and their associated populations. These loadings were used to model temporally varying nano-particle concentrations in rivers, lakes and wetlands by considering dilution, downstream transport, water evaporation, water abstraction, and nano-particle sedimentation. Temporal variability in concentrations caused by weather variation was simulated using monthly weather data for a representative 31-year period. Modeled concentrations represent current levels of nano-particle production. Two scenarios were modeled. In the most likely scenario, half the river stretches had long-term average concentrations exceeding 0.002 ng L−1 nano silver and 1.5 ng L−1 nano zinc oxide. In 10% of the river stretches, these concentrations exceeded 0.18 ng L−1 and 150 ng L−1, respectively. Predicted concentrations were usually highest in July. PMID:25463731

  16. By Air and Land: Estimating Post-Fire Debris-Flow Susceptibility through High-Resolution Radar Reflectivity and Tipping-Bucket Gage Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanshaw, M. N.; Schmidt, K. M.; Jorgensen, D. P.; Stock, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Wildfires often increase the occurrence of post-fire hazardous flash floods and debris flows from steeplands during intense rainfall. Rainfall intensity-duration thresholds have been used to forecast when this hazard increases rapidly; one threshold for Southern California is 15 mm/hr. However, such thresholds are usually developed with point measurements that only capture a small portion of the landscape. In an attempt to limit potential loss of life, the USGS is collaborating with NOAA on a demonstration early-warning system. To address the lack of spatial rainfall coverage, NOAA deployed a small mobile radar truck (SMART-R) to the Day fire in the western Transverse Range during the 2006-07 winter, and to the Canyon and Corral fires in the Santa Monica Mountains near Malibu during the 2007-08 winter. The SMART-R's C-band Doppler radar can be used to estimate rainfall rates over entire burned areas. On topography susceptible to debris flows within these 3 fires, the USGS installed a dense array of ground-based instruments, including 8 tipping- bucket rain gages in the Day fire, and 3 each in the Canyon and Corral fires. After converting hourly time- step grids of SMART-R reflectivity (150 m node spacing) into precipitation estimates, we compared the gage data to its spatially coincident SMART-R cell.Results from the Day fire indicate that SMART-R derived seasonal and event-based rainfall totals were typically greater than gage totals during the 2006-07 winter of record-low rainfall. Both data sets, however, reflected similar spatial patterns of rainfall intensity. In contrast, for the Malibu fires there is no systematic agreement in spatial pattern or rainfall mismatch; the difference between the two data sets. Of the 9 storms recorded during this 2007-08 winter, SMART-R estimates of rainfall totals exceeded the gage totals for only 3, underestimating totals for the remaining 6. The mismatch magnitudes also exceed that of the previous winter recorded at the Day

  17. Pike and salmon as sister taxa: detailed intraclade resolution and divergence time estimation of Esociformes + Salmoniformes based on whole mitochondrial genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Matthew A; López, J Andrés; Sado, Tetsuya; Miya, Masaki

    2013-11-01

    The increasing number of taxa and loci in molecular phylogenetic studies of basal euteleosts has brought stability in a controversial area. A key emerging aspect to these studies is a sister Esociformes (pike) and Salmoniformes (salmon) relationship. We evaluate mitochondrial genome support for a sister Esociformes and Salmoniformes hypothesis by surveying many potential outgroups for these taxa, employing multiple phylogenetic approaches, and utilizing a thorough sampling scheme. Secondly, we conduct a simultaneous divergence time estimation and phylogenetic inference in a Bayesian framework with fossil calibrations focusing on relationships within Esociformes+Salmoniformes. Our dataset supports a sister relationship between Esociformes and Salmoniformes; however the nearest relatives of Esociformes+Salmoniformes are inconsistent among analyses. Within the order Esociformes, we advocate for a single family, Esocidae. Subfamily relationships within Salmonidae are poorly supported as Salmoninae sister to Thymallinae+Coregoninae. PMID:23954876

  18. Expanding Molecular Bubble Surrounding Tycho’s Supernova Remnant (SN 1572) Observed with the IRAM 30 m Telescope: Evidence for a Single-degenerate Progenitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping; Chen, Yang; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Li, Xiang-Dong; Safi-Harb, Samar; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-07-01

    Whether the progenitors of SNe Ia are single-degenerate or double-degenerate white dwarf (WD) systems is a highly debated topic. To address the origin of Tycho’s Type Ia supernova remnant (SNR), SN 1572, we have carried out a 12CO J = 2–1 mapping and a 3 mm line survey toward the remnant using the IRAM 30 m telescope. We show that Tycho is surrounded by a clumpy molecular bubble at a local standard of rest velocity of ˜ 61 {km} {{{s}}}-1, which expands at a speed of ˜ 4.5 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and has a mass of ˜ 220 {M}ȯ (at the distance of 2.5 kpc). Enhanced 12CO J = 2–1 line emission relative to 12CO J = 1–0 emission and possible line broadenings (in velocity range ‑64 to ‑60 km s‑1) are found at the northeastern boundary of the SNR, where the shell is deformed and decelerated. These features, combined with the morphological correspondence between the expanding molecular bubble and Tycho, suggest that the SNR is associated with the bubble at the velocity range ‑66 to ‑57 km s‑1. The most plausible origin for the expanding bubble is the fast outflow (with velocity of hundreds km s‑1) driven from the vicinity of a WD as it accreted matter from a nondegenerate companion star. The SNR has been expanding in the low-density wind-blown bubble, and the shock wave has just reached the molecular cavity wall. This is the first unambiguous detection of an expanding bubble driven by the progenitor of a Type Ia SNR, which constitutes evidence for a single-degenerate progenitor for this SN Ia.

  19. Investigation of rat bone fracture healing using pulsed 1.5 MHz, 30 mW/cm(2) burst ultrasound--axial distance dependency.

    PubMed

    Fung, Chak-Hei; Cheung, Wing-Hoi; Pounder, Neill M; de Ana, F Javier; Harrison, Andrew; Leung, Kwok-Sui

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of LIPUS on fracture healing when fractures were exposed to ultrasound at three axial distances: z=0 mm, 60 mm, and 130 mm. We applied LIPUS to rat fracture at these three axial distances mimicking the exposure condition of human fractures at different depths under the soft tissue. Measurement of LIPUS shows pressure variations in near field (nearby transducer); uniform profile was found beyond it (far field). We asked whether different positions of the fracture within the ultrasound field cause inconsistent biological effect during the healing process. Closed femoral fractured Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into control, near-field (0mm), mid-near field (60 mm) or far-field (130 mm) groups. Daily LIPUS treatment (plane, but apodized source, see details in the text; 2.2 cm in diameter; 1.5 MHz sine waves repeating at 1 kHz PRF; spatial average temporal average intensity, ISATA=30 mW/cm(2)) was given to fracture site at the three axial distances. Weekly radiographs and endpoint microCT, histomorphometry, and mechanical tests were performed. The results showed that the 130 mm group had the highest tissue mineral density; and significantly higher mechanical properties than control at week 4. The 60 mm and 0 mm groups had significantly higher (i.e. p<0.05) woven bone percentage than control group in radiological, microCT and histomorphometry measurements. In general, LIPUS at far field augmented callus mineralization and mechanical properties; while near field and mid-near field enhanced woven bone formation. Our results indicated the therapeutic effect of LIPUS is dependent on the axial distance of the ultrasound beam. Therefore, the depth of fracture under the soft tissue affects the biological effect of LIPUS. Clinicians have to be aware of the fracture depth when LIPUS is applied transcutaneously. PMID:24239510

  20. Expanding Molecular Bubble Surrounding Tycho’s Supernova Remnant (SN 1572) Observed with the IRAM 30 m Telescope: Evidence for a Single-degenerate Progenitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping; Chen, Yang; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Li, Xiang-Dong; Safi-Harb, Samar; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-07-01

    Whether the progenitors of SNe Ia are single-degenerate or double-degenerate white dwarf (WD) systems is a highly debated topic. To address the origin of Tycho’s Type Ia supernova remnant (SNR), SN 1572, we have carried out a 12CO J = 2–1 mapping and a 3 mm line survey toward the remnant using the IRAM 30 m telescope. We show that Tycho is surrounded by a clumpy molecular bubble at a local standard of rest velocity of ∼ 61 {km} {{{s}}}-1, which expands at a speed of ∼ 4.5 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and has a mass of ∼ 220 {M}ȯ (at the distance of 2.5 kpc). Enhanced 12CO J = 2–1 line emission relative to 12CO J = 1–0 emission and possible line broadenings (in velocity range ‑64 to ‑60 km s‑1) are found at the northeastern boundary of the SNR, where the shell is deformed and decelerated. These features, combined with the morphological correspondence between the expanding molecular bubble and Tycho, suggest that the SNR is associated with the bubble at the velocity range ‑66 to ‑57 km s‑1. The most plausible origin for the expanding bubble is the fast outflow (with velocity of hundreds km s‑1) driven from the vicinity of a WD as it accreted matter from a nondegenerate companion star. The SNR has been expanding in the low-density wind-blown bubble, and the shock wave has just reached the molecular cavity wall. This is the first unambiguous detection of an expanding bubble driven by the progenitor of a Type Ia SNR, which constitutes evidence for a single-degenerate progenitor for this SN Ia.

  1. Automated drumlin shape and volume estimation using high resolution LiDAR imagery (Curvature Based Relief Separation): A test from the Wadena Drumlin Field, Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peter; Eyles, Nick; Sookhan, Shane

    2015-10-01

    Resolving the origin(s) of drumlins and related megaridges in areas of megascale glacial lineations (MSGL) left by paleo-ice sheets is critical to understanding how ancient ice sheets interacted with their sediment beds. MSGL is now linked with fast-flowing ice streams but there is a broad range of erosional and depositional models. Further progress is reliant on constraining fluxes of subglacial sediment at the ice sheet base which in turn is dependent on morphological data such as landform shape and elongation and most importantly landform volume. Past practice in determining shape has employed a broad range of geomorphological methods from strictly visualisation techniques to more complex semi-automated and automated drumlin extraction methods. This paper reviews and builds on currently available visualisation, semi-automated and automated extraction methods and presents a new, Curvature Based Relief Separation (CBRS) technique; for drumlin mapping. This uses curvature analysis to generate a base level from which topography can be normalized and drumlin volume can be derived. This methodology is tested using a high resolution (3 m) LiDAR elevation dataset from the Wadena Drumlin Field, Minnesota, USA, which was constructed by the Wadena Lobe of the Laurentide Ice Sheet ca. 20,000 years ago and which as a whole contains ~ 2000 drumlins across an area of ~ 7500 km2. This analysis demonstrates that CBRS provides an objective and robust procedure for automated drumlin extraction. There is strong agreement with manually selected landforms but the method is also capable of resolving features that were not detectable manually thereby considerably expanding the known population of streamlined landforms. CBRS provides an effective automatic method for visualisation of large areas of the streamlined beds of former ice sheets and for modelling sediment fluxes below ice sheets.

  2. Validation of Binary, Fractional and Interpolated Snow Maps at Multiple Resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittger, K.; McKenzie, C.; Painter, T.; Dozier, J.

    2008-12-01

    Mapping snow cover from multispectral sensors began with a simple normalized index using visible and near infrared wavelengths to classify pixels as either snow covered or snow free, a "binary" classification. Using a canopy reflectance model and incorporating a vegetation index improved the binary algorithm. Although the binary snow mapping methods are computationally simple, they are in practice flawed because sensors with fine spatial resolution usually have a coarse temporal resolution, and vice versa. For sensors with fine enough temporal resolution to track the dynamic seasonal snow environment, few pixels are either completely snow covered or completely snow free. Methods to estimate snow cover enable us to determine the fraction of the pixel covered with snow. Fractional methods include: decision tree classifiers, relationships of snow cover to snow index developed using regressions with finer-resolution data, and spectral un-mixing. Finally, daily data can be interpolated to produce a best estimate of snow cover. Here, we compare snow cover retrievals from binary and fractional snow cover algorithms using various satellites at fine and moderate resolution: AVHRR (1km), MODIS (500m), Landsat (30m) and ASTER (15m), AVIRIS (2m), and 1m data from degraded classified imagery. For binary snow cover we use both NDSI and NDSI with vegetation correction. For fractional snow cover we use a currently implemented operation algorithm MOD10A1 and our own estimates from MODSCAG spectral un-mixing. For smoothed estimates of snow cover we use another operational algorithm, MOD10A2 and our own reanalysis of MODSCAG fractional snow cover. The main study area is the Sierra Nevada of California, along with scenes in the Upper Rio Grande, Colorado Rocky Mountains and the Annapurna and Khumbal Himal. We find that fractional methods are superior to binary methods. Moreover, we find that linear spectral un-mixing gives the best estimates of snow cover at moderate resolution over

  3. [Dispute Resolutions].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Claudia L.; Cooks, Leda M.

    1994-01-01

    Focusing on the teaching of alternative dispute resolutions at universities, Claudia L. Hale and Leda M. Cooks argue that mediation should be taught primarily as a communication process that involves the joint efforts of mediator and disputants. Teachers of mediation should begin by distinguishing mediation from other forms of dispute resolution,…

  4. The IRAM-30 m line survey of the Horsehead PDR. III. High abundance of complex (iso-)nitrile molecules in UV-illuminated gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratier, P.; Pety, J.; Guzmán, V.; Gerin, M.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Roueff, E.; Faure, A.

    2013-09-01

    obtained with the IRAM-30 m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Comparison of separations of fatty acids from fish products using a 30-m Supelcowax-10 and a 100-m SP-2560 column.

    PubMed

    Santercole, Viviana; Delmonte, Pierluigi; Kramer, John K G

    2012-03-01

    Commercial fish oils and foods containing fish may contain trans and/or isomerized fatty acids (FA) produced during processing or as part of prepared foods. The current American Oil Chemists' Society (AOCS) official method for marine oils (method Ce 1i-07) is based on separation by use of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) columns, for example Supelcowax-10 or equivalent, which do not resolve most unsaturated FA geometric isomers. Highly polar 100-m cyanopropyl siloxane (CPS) columns, for example SP-2560 and CP Sil 88 are recommended for separation of geometric FA isomers. Complementary separations were achieved by use of two different elution temperature programs with the same CPS column. This study is the first direct comparison of the separations achieved by use of 30-m Supelcowax-10 and 100-m SP-2560 columns for fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) prepared from the same fish oil and fish muscle sample. To simplify the identification of the FA in these fish samples, FA were fractionated on the basis of the number and type of double bonds by silver-ion solid-phase extraction (Ag⁺-SPE) before GC analysis. The results showed that a combination of the three GC separations was necessary to resolve and identify most of the unsaturated FA, FA isomers, and other components of fish products, for example phytanic and phytenic acids. Equivalent chain length (ECL) values of most FAME in fish were calculated from the separations achieved by use of both GC columns; the values obtained were shown to be consistent with previously reported values for the Supelcowax-10 column. ECL values were also calculated for the FA separated on the SP-2560 column. The calculated ECL values were equally valid under isothermal and temperature-programmed elution GC conditions, and were valuable for confirmation of the identity of several unsaturated FAME in the fish samples. When analyzing commercially prepared fish foods, deodorized marine oils, or foods fortified with marine oils it is strongly

  6. Characterizing uncertainties of the national-scale forest gross aboveground biomass (AGB) loss estimate: a case study of the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyukavina, A.; Stehman, S.; Potapov, P.; Turubanova, S.; Baccini, A.; Goetz, S. J.; Laporte, N. T.; Houghton, R. A.; Hansen, M.

    2013-12-01

    Modern remote sensing techniques enable the mapping and monitoring of aboveground biomass (AGB) carbon stocks without relying on extensive in situ measurements. The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is among the countries where a national forest inventory (NFI) has yet to be established due to a lack of infrastructure and political instability. We demonstrate a method for producing national-scale gross AGB loss estimates and quantifying uncertainty of the estimates using remotely sensed-derived forest cover loss and biomass carbon density data. Forest cover type and loss were characterized using published Landsat-based data sets and related to LIDAR-derived biomass data from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). We produced two gross AGB loss estimates for the DRC for the last decade (2000-2010): a conservative estimate accounting for classification errors in the 60-m resolution FACET forest cover change product, and a maximal estimate that also took into consideration omitted change at the 30m spatial resolution. Omitted disturbances were largely related to smallholder agriculture, the detection of which is scale-dependent. The use of LIDAR data as a substitute for NFI data to estimate AGB loss based on Landsat-derived activity data was demonstrated. Comparisons of our forest cover loss and AGB estimates with published studies raise the issue of scale in forest cover change mapping and its impact on carbon stock change estimation using remotely sensed data.

  7. On 10 to 30 m-scale fracture networks in Gale Crater: Contraction of fine-grained sediments due to drying or of frozen sediments due to cooling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sletten, Ronald; Hallet, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    The area in Gale Crater north of the Curiosity landing site has been identified as an alluvial fan [1] and features diverse geological units [2], some with abundant contraction cracks that delineate polygons on the order of 10-30 meters across. These polygons are much larger than the < 1m flagstones seen in Yellowknife by Curiosity [3] and are more suggestive of polygonal patterned ground seen at higher latitudes on Mars [4] and Earth; however, current conditions indicate that ground ice is not stable in Gale Crater [4]. Nevertheless, past conditions, e.g. obliquity changes, may have allowed permafrost to develop and ground ice to form. The domains between the larger polygons are several meters wide, which is consistent with cyclic ratcheting of ice-cemented permafrost (thermal contraction with fractures opening, debris infilling the fractures, and the fractures not closing fully when the ground warms and expands). On the other hand, the large-scale crack networks often seem to be associated with certain lithologic units, including the thinly-bedded, lightly-colored mudstones exposed at Yellowknife. This suggests that the contraction cracks defining these 10 to 30-m polygons, as well as those defining the < 1m flagstones, formed in moist fine-grained sediments that contracted upon desiccation. If the fractures were due to contraction of ice-cemented permafrost, they would be insensitive to the type of sediments they formed in because the mechanical properties would be dominated by ice. The interpretation of the larger-scale crack network is limited to satellite images since Curiosity did not visit this area, and to evidence about surface materials elsewhere in the vicinity of the rover. This evidence points to the former presence of flowing water in Gale Crater and existence of shallow lakes of relatively low salinity and near-neutral pH at Yellowknife [5]. The large amount of contraction in Yellowknife deposits is consistent with a desiccation origin in these

  8. Satellite Estimates of Crop Area and Maize Yield in Zambia's Agricultural Districts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzari, G.; Lobell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Predicting crop yield and area from satellite is a valuable tool to monitor different aspects of productivity dynamics and food security. In Sub-Saharan Africa, where the agricultural landscape is complex and dominated by smallholder systems, such dynamics need to be investigated at the field scale. We leveraged the large data pool and computational power of Google Earth Engine to 1) generate 30 m resolution cover maps of selected provinces of Zambia, 2) estimate crop area, and 3) produce yearly maize yield maps using the recently developed SCYM (Scalable satellite-based Crop Yield Mapper) algorithm. We will present our results and their validation against a ground survey dataset collected yearly by the Zambia Ministry of Agriculture from about 12,500 households.

  9. Using a data fusion method to estimate daily stand-scale evapotranspiration over a managed pine plantation in North Carolina, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Anderson, M. C.; Gao, F.; Hain, C.; Kustas, W. P.; Noormets, A.; Wynne, R. H.; Thomas, V. A.; Sun, G.

    2015-12-01

    Within the context of a globally changing climate, efficient management of freshwater resource management is becoming an increasingly critical issue. As an indicator of vegetation health and soil moisture status, remotely sensed estimates of evapotranspiration (ET) estimation can provide valuable information about water usage in managed landscapes. The two source energy balance (TSEB) model has been widely applied to quantify field scale ET over agricultural systems using thermal infrared remote sensing data. However, limitations on the spatial and temporal resolution of the satellite data combined with the effects of cloud contamination constrain the amount of detail that a single satellite can provide. Fusing multi-satellite data with varying spatial and temporal resolutions can give a more continuous estimation of daily ET at field scale. In this study, we used the regional TSEB modeling system (Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse; ALEXI) to map ET at 4-km resolution over the continental U.S. using imagery from geostationary satellites. These 4-km regional estimates were disaggregated to 1-km (daily timesteps) using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) input data and down to 30-m with Landsat data 8 scenes during the growing season) using the disaggregation scheme DisALEXI, applied over a managed pine plantation in North Carolina, USA. The MODIS and Landsat ET retrievals were then combined using the Spatial-Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM) to estimate daily ET estimates at 30-m resolution. The modeled daily ET was in good agreement compared with observations at two Ameriflux eddy covariance flux tower sites (US-NC2, mid-rotation site and US-NC3, recently clear cut site). Seasonal water use patterns varied significantly with stand age, with higher rates of ET from mid-rotation stands in comparison with younger stands. Water use also varies with land cover types, with higher rates of ET from forested areas than from agricultural

  10. Estimating seasonal changes of land cover, surface wetness and latent heat flux of wet polygonal tundra (Samoylov Island, Lena-Delta, Siberia) with high-resolution aerial and hyperspectral CHRIS Proba satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muster, S.; Langer, M.; Boike, J.

    2009-12-01

    Vegetation cover, land cover and surface wetness are few of the many factors exerting control on the partitioning of energy to latent, sensible and ground heat flux. Spatial estimates of these factors can be inferred from remote sensing data. The fractionated polygonal tundra landscape of Samoylov Island of wet and dry surfaces induces strong spatial variations of resistance to evapotranspiration. The development of low-centered ice-wedge polygons results in a prominent microrelief that is the most important factor for small-scale differences in vegetation type and near surface soil moisture. Depressed polygon centers alternate with elevated polygon rims with elevation differences of up to 0.5 m over a few meters distance. In the depressed polygon centers, drainage is strongly impeded due to the underlying permafrost resulting in water-saturated soils or small ponds. A process-based understanding of the surface energy balance, however, needs to consider both the temporal and the spatial variations of the surface. In the course of the summer season, the surface wetness changes significantly since the water table falls about 5 cm below the surface. This change in surface wetness is likely to be associated with changing evapotranspiration rates. We consider the effect of seasonal changes in land cover, vegetation cover and surface wetness on latent heat flux by investigating a time-series of high-resolution aerial and hyperspectral satellite imagery and comparing them to ground-based measurements of near-surface soil moisture and latent heat flux. Two sets of aerial images from August 15 and September 11, 2008 in the VNIR provide detailed information of the polygonal landscape with a resolution of 0.3m. CHRIS Proba imagery provides hyperspectral data with 18 spectral bands in the VNIR range (400 - 1050 nm) and a resolution of 17 m. Acquisition dates are June 21, July 23 and September 10, 2008. Daily point-based measurements of near-surface soil moisture and latent

  11. Long-term, high-spatial resolution carbon balance monitoring of the Amazonian frontier: Predisturbance and postdisturbance carbon emissions and uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomey, Michael; Roberts, Dar A.; Caviglia-Harris, Jill; Cochrane, Mark A.; Dewes, Candida F.; Harris, Daniel; Numata, Izaya; Sales, Marcio H.; Sills, Erin; Souza, Carlos M.

    2013-06-01

    We performed high-spatial and high-temporal resolution modeling of carbon stocks and fluxes in the state of Rondônia, Brazil for the period 1985-2009, using annual Landsat-derived land cover classifications and a modified bookkeeping modeling approach. According to these results, Rondônia contributed 3.5-4% of pantropical humid forest deforestation emissions over this period. Similar to well-known figures reported by the Brazilian Space Agency, we found a decline in deforestation rates since 2006. However, we estimate a lesser decrease, with deforestation rates continuing at levels similar to the early 2000s. Forest carbon stocks declined at an annual rate of 1.51%; emissions from postdisturbance land use nearly equaled those of the initial deforestation events. Carbon uptake by secondary forest was negligible due to limited spatial extent and high turnover rates. Net carbon emissions represented 93% of initial forest carbon stocks, due in part to repeated slash and pasture burnings and secondary forest clearing. We analyzed potential error incurred when spatially aggregating land cover by comparing results based on coarser-resolution (250 m) and full-resolution land cover products. At the coarser resolution, more than 90% of deforestation and secondary forest would be unresolvable, assuming that a 50% change threshold is necessary for detection. Therefore, we strongly suggest the use of Landsat-scale (~30m) resolution carbon monitoring in tropical regions dominated by nonmechanized, smallholder land use change.

  12. Estimation of yield and water requirements of maize crops combining high spatial and temporal resolution images with a simple crop model, in the perspective of the Sentinel-2 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battude, Marjorie; Bitar, Ahmad Al; Brut, Aurore; Cros, Jérôme; Dejoux, Jean-François; Huc, Mireille; Marais Sicre, Claire; Tallec, Tiphaine; Demarez, Valérie

    2016-04-01

    Water resources are under increasing pressure as a result of global change and of a raising competition among the different users (agriculture, industry, urban). It is therefore important to develop tools able to estimate accurately crop water requirements in order to optimize irrigation while maintaining acceptable production. In this context, remote sensing is a valuable tool to monitor vegetation development and water demand. This work aims at developing a robust and generic methodology mainly based on high resolution remote sensing data to provide accurate estimates of maize yield and water needs at the watershed scale. Evapotranspiration (ETR) and dry aboveground biomass (DAM) of maize crops were modeled using time series of GAI images used to drive a simple agro-meteorological crop model (SAFYE, Duchemin et al., 2005). This model is based on a leaf partitioning function (Maas, 1993) for the simulation of crop biomass and on the FAO-56 methodology for the ETR simulation. The model also contains a module to simulate irrigation. This study takes advantage of the SPOT4 and SPOT5 Take5 experiments initiated by CNES (http://www.cesbio.ups-tlse.fr/multitemp/). They provide optical images over the watershed from February to May 2013 and from April to August 2015 respectively, with a temporal and spatial resolution similar to future images from the Sentinel-2 and VENμS missions. This dataset was completed with LandSat8 and Deimos1 images in order to cover the whole growing season while reducing the gaps in remote sensing time series. Radiometric, geometric and atmospheric corrections were achieved by the THEIA land data center, and the KALIDEOS processing chain. The temporal dynamics of the green area index (GAI) plays a key role in soil-plant-atmosphere interactions and in biomass accumulation process. Consistent seasonal dynamics of the remotely sensed GAI was estimated by applying a radiative transfer model based on artificial neural networks (BVNET, Baret

  13. Application of a crop model forced with remote sensing data at high spatio-temporal resolution to estimate evaporation and yields of irrigated grasslands in the South Eastern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couralt, D.; Hadria, R.; Ruget, F.; Duchemin, B.; Hagolle, O.

    2009-09-01

    This study focused on the feasibility of using remote sensing data acquired at high spatial and temporal resolution (FORMOSAT-2 images(http://www.spotimage.fr/web/en/977--formosat-2-images.php) for crop monitoring at regional scale. The monitoring of agricultural practices such as grassland mowing and irrigation is essential to simulate accurately all processes related to crop system. This information is needed for example in crop simulation models to estimate production, water and fertilizer consumption and can thus serve to better understand the interactions between agriculture and climate. The analysis of these interactions is especially important in Mediterranean region where the effects of climate changes and crop management modifications are increasingly marked. In this context, an experiment was conducted in 2006 in Crau region in the South-Eastern France. In this area, permanent grassland represents 67 % of the usable agricultural area, and it is often used with irrigation (47 % of the permanent grassland). A time series of 36 FORMOSAT-2 images was acquired with a three days frequency from March to October 2006. Information concerning grassland mowing and irrigation was collected through a survey over 120 fields. The high FORMOSAT-2 revisit frequency allowed replicating the dynamics of Leaf Area index (LAI), and detecting to some extents cultural practices like vegetation cut. Simple automatic algorithms were developed to obtain daily values of LAI for each grasslands field linked with the main agricultural practices performed (cut and irrigation dates). This information was then used in a crop model called STICS (http://147.100.66.194/stics/) to estimate the spatial variability of evapotranspiration and drainage associated with the aerial biomass productions. Comparisons between simulated and observed yields gave satisfactory results. The great spatial variations of evapotranspiration were strongly related to the crop and water management. Such

  14. National-scale estimation of gross forest aboveground carbon loss: a case study of the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyukavina, A.; Stehman, S. V.; Potapov, P. V.; Turubanova, S. A.; Baccini, A.; Goetz, S. J.; Laporte, N. T.; Houghton, R. A.; Hansen, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing enable the mapping and monitoring of carbon stocks without relying on extensive in situ measurements. The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is among the countries where national forest inventories (NFI) are either non-existent or out of date. Here we demonstrate a method for estimating national-scale gross forest aboveground carbon (AGC) loss and associated uncertainties using remotely sensed-derived forest cover loss and biomass carbon density data. Lidar data were used as a surrogate for NFI plot measurements to estimate carbon stocks and AGC loss based on forest type and activity data derived using time-series multispectral imagery. Specifically, DRC forest type and loss from the FACET (Forêts d’Afrique Centrale Evaluées par Télédétection) product, created using Landsat data, were related to carbon data derived from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). Validation data for FACET forest area loss were created at a 30-m spatial resolution and compared to the 60-m spatial resolution FACET map. We produced two gross AGC loss estimates for the DRC for the last decade (2000-2010): a map-scale estimate (53.3 ± 9.8 Tg C yr-1) accounting for whole-pixel classification errors in the 60-m resolution FACET forest cover change product, and a sub-grid estimate (72.1 ± 12.7 Tg C yr-1) that took into account 60-m cells that experienced partial forest loss. Our sub-grid forest cover and AGC loss estimates, which included smaller-scale forest disturbances, exceed published assessments. Results raise the issue of scale in forest cover change mapping and validation, and subsequent impacts on remotely sensed carbon stock change estimation, particularly for smallholder dominated systems such as the DRC.

  15. Resolution Enhancement of MODIS-derived Water Indices for Studying Persistent Flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, L. W.; Kalcic, M. T.; Fletcher, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Monitoring coastal marshes for persistent flooding and salinity stress is a high priority issue in Louisiana. Remote sensing can identify environmental variables that can be indicators of marsh habitat conditions, and offer timely and relatively accurate information for aiding wetland vegetation management. Monitoring activity accuracy is often limited by mixed pixels which occur when areas represented by the pixel encompasses more than one cover type. Mixtures of marsh grasses and open water in 250m Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data can impede flood area estimation. Flood mapping of such mixtures requires finer spatial resolution data to better represent the cover type composition within 250m MODIS pixel. Fusion of MODIS and Landsat can improve both spectral and temporal resolution of time series products to resolve rapid changes from forcing mechanisms like hurricane winds and storm surge. For this study, using a method for estimating sub-pixel values from a MODIS time series of a Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), using temporal weighting, was implemented to map persistent flooding in Louisiana coastal marshes. Ordinarily NDWI computed from daily 250m MODIS pixels represents a mixture of fragmented marshes and water. Here, sub-pixel NDWI values were derived for MODIS data using Landsat 30-m data. Each MODIS pixel was disaggregated into a mixture of the eight cover types according to the classified image pixels falling inside the MODIS pixel. The Landsat pixel means for each cover type inside a MODIS pixel were computed for the Landsat data preceding the MODIS image in time and for the Landsat data succeeding the MODIS image. The Landsat data were then weighted exponentially according to closeness in date to the MODIS data. The reconstructed MODIS data were produced by summing the product of fractional cover type with estimated NDWI values within each cover type. A new daily time series was produced using both the reconstructed 250

  16. Resolution Enhancement of MODIS-Derived Water Indices for Studying Persistent Flooding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, L. W.; Kalcic, Maria; Fletcher, Rose

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring coastal marshes for persistent flooding and salinity stress is a high priority issue in Louisiana. Remote sensing can identify environmental variables that can be indicators of marsh habitat conditions, and offer timely and relatively accurate information for aiding wetland vegetation management. Monitoring activity accuracy is often limited by mixed pixels which occur when areas represented by the pixel encompasses more than one cover type. Mixtures of marsh grasses and open water in 250m Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data can impede flood area estimation. Flood mapping of such mixtures requires finer spatial resolution data to better represent the cover type composition within 250m MODIS pixel. Fusion of MODIS and Landsat can improve both spectral and temporal resolution of time series products to resolve rapid changes from forcing mechanisms like hurricane winds and storm surge. For this study, using a method for estimating sub-pixel values from a MODIS time series of a Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), using temporal weighting, was implemented to map persistent flooding in Louisiana coastal marshes. Ordinarily NDWI computed from daily 250m MODIS pixels represents a mixture of fragmented marshes and water. Here, sub-pixel NDWI values were derived for MODIS data using Landsat 30-m data. Each MODIS pixel was disaggregated into a mixture of the eight cover types according to the classified image pixels falling inside the MODIS pixel. The Landsat pixel means for each cover type inside a MODIS pixel were computed for the Landsat data preceding the MODIS image in time and for the Landsat data succeeding the MODIS image. The Landsat data were then weighted exponentially according to closeness in date to the MODIS data. The reconstructed MODIS data were produced by summing the product of fractional cover type with estimated NDWI values within each cover type. A new daily time series was produced using both the reconstructed 250

  17. High spectral resolution reflectance spectroscopy of minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; King, T.V.V.; Klejwa, M.; Swayze, G.A.; Vergo, N.

    1990-01-01

    The reflectance spectra of minerals are studied as a function of spectral resolution in the range from 0.2 to 3.0 ??m. Selected absorption bands were studied at resolving powers (??/????) as high as 2240. At resolving powers of approximately 1000, many OH-bearing minerals show diagnostic sharp absorptions at the resolution limit. At low resolution, some minerals may not be distinguishable, but as the resolution is increased, most can be easily identified. As the resolution is increased, many minerals show fine structure, particularly in the OH-stretching overtone region near 1.4 ??m. The fine structure can enhance the ability to discriminate between minerals, and in some cases the fine structure can be used to determine elemental composition. The study shows that high-resolution reflectance spectroscopy of minerals may prove to be a very important tool in the laboratory, in the field using field-portable spectrometers, from aircraft, and from satellites looking at Earth or other planetary surfaces. -from Authors

  18. Impact of scale/resolution on evapotranspiration from Landsat and MODIS images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vivek; Kilic, Ayse; Irmak, Suat

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the role of landscape heterogeneity and its influence on the scaling behavior of surface fluxes as observed by satellite sensors with different spatial resolutions is a critical need to investigate. In this study, the effects of pixel scales on ETc estimation and other parameters that are used to calculate ETc were investigated over different vegetation surfaces in south central Nebraska, USA. Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) was used to estimate spatially distributed ETc by combining ground-based meteorological data for Landsat and MODIS imagery. The estimated surface energy fluxes were compared and validated to the measured Bowen Ratio Energy Balance System (BREBS) ETc fluxes. Validation results showed that Landsat has more preferable spatial resolution (30 m) to map and analyze ETc; regression models explained 91% of the variability in the observed data (RMSD = 0.064 mm/h; MBE = 0.04 mm/h). However, for MODIS-based ETc, the regression model explained only 59% of the variability in observed ETc with a larger error (RMSD = 0.17 mm/h; MBE = 0.15 mm/h). MODIS-based ETc was about 31% higher than the measured ETc. Imperfect assessment in MODIS-based retrievals is due to the underlying assumption of spatial heterogeneity and coarser sensor pixel scale (500 m), which was summarized by up-scaling the Landsat images to MODIS images using output flux aggregation and input up-scaling procedure using simple average and nearest neighbor aggregation techniques and comparisons were made on both image and pixel scales. Aggregation results illustrate that simple average with output flux aggregation provides close interpretation in aggregating fluxes to coarser resolution than other aggregation approaches. Pixel-by-pixel comparison using output aggregation with simple average resulted in close agreement (error range 5%-35%) between measured and up-scaled fluxes, compared to input up-scaling using simple average (error range 25%-60%). Larger error in input up

  19. Preliminary verification of instantaneous air temperature estimation for clear sky conditions based on SEBAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shanyou; Zhou, Chuxuan; Zhang, Guixin; Zhang, Hailong; Hua, Junwei

    2016-03-01

    Spatially distributed near surface air temperature at the height of 2 m is an important input parameter for the land surface models. It is of great significance in both theoretical research and practical applications to retrieve instantaneous air temperature data from remote sensing observations. An approach based on Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) to retrieve air temperature under clear sky conditions is presented. Taking the meteorological measurement data at one station as the reference and remotely sensed data as the model input, the research estimates the air temperature by using an iterative computation. The method was applied to the area of Jiangsu province for nine scenes by using MODIS data products, as well as part of Fujian province, China based on four scenes of Landsat 8 imagery. Comparing the air temperature estimated from the proposed method with that of the meteorological station measurement, results show that the root mean square error is 1.7 and 2.6 °C at 1000 and 30 m spatial resolution respectively. Sensitivity analysis of influencing factors reveals that land surface temperature is the most sensitive to the estimation precision. Research results indicate that the method has great potentiality to be used to estimate instantaneous air temperature distribution under clear sky conditions.

  20. Recent wetland land loss due to hurricanes: improved estimates based upon multiple source images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kranenburg, Christine J.; Palaseanu-Lovejoy, Monica; Barras, John A.; Brock, John C.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a moderate resolution 30-m fractional water map of the Chenier Plain for 2003, 2006 and 2009 by using information contained in high-resolution satellite imagery of a subset of the study area. Indices and transforms pertaining to vegetation and water were created using the high-resolution imagery, and a threshold was applied to obtain a categorical land/water map. The high-resolution data was used to train a decision-tree classifier to estimate percent water in a lower resolution (Landsat) image. Two new water indices based on the tasseled cap transformation were proposed for IKONOS imagery in wetland environments and more than 700 input parameter combinations were considered for each Landsat image classified. Final selection and thresholding of the resulting percent water maps involved over 5,000 unambiguous classified random points using corresponding 1-m resolution aerial photographs, and a statistical optimization procedure to determine the threshold at which the maximum Kappa coefficient occurs. Each selected dataset has a Kappa coefficient, percent correctly classified (PCC) water, land and total greater than 90%. An accuracy assessment using 1,000 independent random points was performed. Using the validation points, the PCC values decreased to around 90%. The time series change analysis indicated that due to Hurricane Rita, the study area lost 6.5% of marsh area, and transient changes were less than 3% for either land or water. Hurricane Ike resulted in an additional 8% land loss, although not enough time has passed to discriminate between persistent and transient changes.

  1. A comparison of modeling schemes for mapping daily evapotranspiration at high resolution using remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ring, T.; Cuenca, R. H.; Anderson, M. C.; Hain, C.; Semmens, K. A.; Kustas, W. P.; Alfieri, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is an important component of the hydrologic cycle that transfers large quantities of water vapor away from Earth's surface into the atmosphere. In addition to having water management applications in agriculture, including monitoring water rights compliance and irrigation scheduling, it is also important to be able to accurately measure water used by other landscapes for soil-vegetation-atmosphere-transfer (SVAT) models. This can only be done with large scale estimations which are most efficiently achieved with remote sensing. This research compares daily ET retrieved from two remote sensing modeling schemes: a) Reconstructed METRIC: Mapping EvapoTranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration; and b) ALEXI/DisALEXI: Atmosphere-Land EXchange Inverse /Disaggregated ALEXI, over two predominately forested landscapes. ET flux estimates are retrieved from ALEXI/DisALEXI using GOES (daily, 4km), MODIS (daily, 1km) and Landsat 8 (16 days, 30m) and from Reconstructed METRIC using Landsat 8. We develop daily Landsat scale ET maps for the summer months of 2013. The flux-tower footprint is calculated at each site to match the remotely sensed retrieval with that of the flux tower such that modeled output can be evaluated against ground based observations, taken from the AmeriFlux network. In addition, surface and evaporative fluxes retrieved from the two models are inter-compared over the different land cover types in the scenes. Differences in input and data processing requirements for each of the two methods will be also described

  2. Estimation of Droplet Size and Liquid Water Content Using Radar and Lidar: Marine Cumulus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, J. Vivek; Jensen, Jorgen; Ellis, Scott; Morley, Bruce; Tsai, Peisang; Spuler, Scott; Ghate, Virendra; Schwartz, Christian

    2016-04-01

    During the Cloud Systems Evolution in the Trades (CSET) field campaign airborne measurements from the High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) Cloud Radar (HCR) and the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) were made in the North Pacific. In addition, in situ observations of cloud and aerosols size distributions and radiation were also collected. The HCR operated at a frequency of 94 GHz (3 mm wavelength) and collected observations at high temporal (0.5 sec) and range (30 m) resolution. The capability of HCR is enhanced by the coordination with the HSRL that made high temporal and range resolution observations of calibrated backscatter and extinction. The lidar, designed and built by the University of Wisconsin. The radar and lidar are designed to fly on the NCAR Gulfstream V HIAPER aircraft. The remote and in situ measurements collected during CSET offer opportunities for evaluating the engineering performance of the instruments and developing cloud microphysical scientific products. The coincident HCR and HSRL measurements are analyzed for assess their utility to characterize cloud boundaries, estimate liquid water content (LWC) and mean particle size. Retrievals of LWC and mean particle sizes from remote radar and lidar measurements will be compared with those from the in situ instruments.

  3. Satellite-based monitoring of particulate matter pollution at very high resolution: the HOTBAR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robin; Milton, Edward; Nield, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    Particulate matter air pollution is a major health risk, and is responsible for millions of premature deaths each year. Concentrations tend to be highest in urban areas - particularly in the mega-cities of rapidly industrialising countries, where there are limited ground monitoring networks. Satellite-based monitoring has been used for many years to assess regional-scale trends in air quality, but currently available satellite products produce data at 1-10km resolution: too coarse to discern the small-scale patterns of sources and sinks seen in urban areas. Higher-resolution satellite products are required to provide accurate assessments of particulate matter concentrations in these areas, and to allow analysis of localised air quality effects on health. The Haze Optimized Transform-based Aerosol Retrieval (HOTBAR) method is a novel method which provides estimates of PM2.5 concentrations from high-resolution (approximately 30m) satellite imagery. This method is designed to work over a wide range of land covers and performs well over the complex land-cover mosaic found in urban areas. It requires only standard visible and near-infrared data, making it applicable to a range of data from sensors such as Landsat, SPOT and Sentinel-2. The method is based upon an extension of the Haze Optimized Transform (HOT), which was originally designed for assessing areas of thick haze in satellite imagery. This was done by calculating a 'haziness' value for each pixel in an image as the distance from a 'Clear Line' in feature space, defined by the high correlation between visible bands. Here, we adapt the HOT method and use it to estimate Aerosol Optical Thickness (a measure of the column-integrated haziness of the atmosphere) instead, from which PM2.5 concentrations can then be estimated. Significant extensions to the original HOT method include Monte Carlo estimation of the 'Clear Line', object-based correction for land cover, and estimation of AOT from the haziness values

  4. EVALUATING SOIL EROSION PARAMETER ESTIMATES FROM DIFFERENT DATA SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Topographic factors and soil loss estimates that were derived from thee data sources (STATSGO, 30-m DEM, and 3-arc second DEM) were compared. Slope magnitudes derived from the three data sources were consistently different. Slopes from the DEMs tended to provide a flattened sur...

  5. The Effects of a 6-Week Strength Training on Critical Velocity, Anaerobic Running Distance, 30-M Sprint and Yo-Yo Intermittent Running Test Performances in Male Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Karsten, Bettina; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Kandemir, Gokhan; Hazir, Tahir; Klose, Andreas; Naclerio, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of a moderate intensity strength training on changes in critical velocity (CV), anaerobic running distance (D'), sprint performance and Yo-Yo intermittent running test (Yo-Yo IR1) performances. Methods: two recreational soccer teams were divided in a soccer training only group (SO; n = 13) and a strength and soccer training group (ST; n = 13). Both groups were tested for values of CV, D', Yo-Yo IR1 distance and 30-m sprint time on two separate occasions (pre and post intervention). The ST group performed a concurrent 6-week upper and lower body strength and soccer training, whilst the SO group performed a soccer only training. Results: after the re-test of all variables, the ST demonstrated significant improvements for both, YoYo IR1 distance (p = 0.002) and CV values (p<0.001) with no significant changes in the SO group. 30-m sprint performance were slightly improved in the ST group with significantly decreased performance times identified in the SO group (p<0.001). Values for D' were slightly reduced in both groups (ST -44.5 m, 95% CI = -90.6 to 1.6; SO -42.6 m, 95% CI = -88.7 to 3.5). Conclusions: combining a 6-week moderate strength training with soccer training significantly improves CV, Yo-Yo IR1 whilst moderately improving 30-m sprint performances in non-previously resistance trained male soccer players. Critical Velocity can be recommended to coaches as an additional valid testing tool in soccer. PMID:27015418

  6. High resolution measurements supported by electronic structure calculations of two naphthalene derivatives: [1,5]- and [1,6]-naphthyridine—Estimation of the zero point inertial defect for planar polycyclic aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gruet, S. E-mail: manuel.goubet@univ-lille1.fr; Pirali, O.; Goubet, M. E-mail: manuel.goubet@univ-lille1.fr

    2014-06-21

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) molecules are suspected to be present in the interstellar medium and to participate to the broad and unresolved emissions features, the so-called unidentified infrared bands. In the laboratory, very few studies report the rotationally resolved structure of such important class of molecules. In the present work, both experimental and theoretical approaches provide the first accurate determination of the rotational energy levels of two diazanaphthalene: [1,5]- and [1,6]-naphthyridine. [1,6]-naphthyridine has been studied at high resolution, in the microwave (MW) region using a Fourier transform microwave spectrometer and in the far-infrared (FIR) region using synchrotron-based Fourier transform spectroscopy. The very accurate set of ground state (GS) constants deduced from the analysis of the MW spectrum allowed the analysis of the most intense modes in the FIR (ν{sub 38}-GS centered at about 483 cm{sup −1} and ν{sub 34}-GS centered at about 842 cm{sup −1}). In contrast with [1,6]-naphthyridine, pure rotation spectroscopy of [1,5]-naphthyridine cannot be performed for symmetry reasons so the combined study of the two intense FIR modes (ν{sub 22}-GS centered at about 166 cm{sup −1} and ν{sub 18}-GS centered at about 818 cm{sup −1}) provided the GS and the excited states constants. Although the analysis of the very dense rotational patterns for such large molecules remains very challenging, relatively accurate anharmonic density functional theory calculations appeared as a highly relevant supporting tool to the analysis for both molecules. In addition, the good agreement between the experimental and calculated infrared spectrum shows that the present theoretical approach should provide useful data for the astrophysical models. Moreover, inertial defects calculated in the GS (Δ{sub GS}) of both molecules exhibit slightly negative values as previously observed for planar species of this molecular family. We adjusted

  7. Integration of Multisensor Remote Sensing Data for the Retrieval of Consistent Times Series of High-Resolution NDVI Images for Crop Monitoring in Landscapes Dominated By Small-Scale Farming Agricultural

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedano, F.; Kempeneers, P.

    2014-12-01

    There is a need for timely and accurate information of food supply and early warnings of production shortfalls. Crop growth models commonly rely on information on vegetation dynamics from low and moderate spatial resolution remote sensing imagery. While the short revisit period of these sensors captures the temporal dynamics of crops, they are not able to monitor small-scale farming areas where environmental factors, crop type and management practices often vary at subpixel level. Although better suited to retrieve fine spatial structure, time series of higher resolution imagery (circa 30 m) are often incomplete due to larger revisit periods and persistent cloud coverage. However, as the Landsat archive expands and more fine resolution Earth observation sensors become available, the possibilities of multisensor integration to monitor crop dynamics with higher level of spatial detail are expanding. We have integrated remote sensing imagery from two moderate resolution sensors (MODIS and PROBA-V) and three medium resolution platforms (Landsat 7- 8; and DMC) to improve the characterization of vegetation dynamics in agricultural landscapes dominated by small-scale farms. We applied a data assimilation method to produce complete temporal sequences of synthetic medium-resolution NDVI images. The method implements a Kalman filter recursive algorithm that incorporates models, observations and their respective uncertainties to generate medium-resolution images at time steps for which only moderate-resolution imagery is available. The results for the study sites show that the time series of synthetic NDVI images captured seasonal vegetation dynamics and maintained the spatial structure of the landscape at higher spatial resolution. A more detailed characterization of spatiotemporal dynamics of vegetation in agricultural systems has the potential to improve the estimates of crop growth models and allow a more precise monitoring and forecasting of crop productivity.

  8. Optical resolution from Fisher information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motka, L.; Stoklasa, B.; D'Angelo, M.; Facchi, P.; Garuccio, A.; Hradil, Z.; Pascazio, S.; Pepe, F. V.; Teo, Y. S.; Řeháček, J.; Sánchez-Soto, L. L.

    2016-05-01

    The information gained by performing a measurement on a physical system is most appropriately assessed by the Fisher information, which in fact establishes lower bounds on estimation errors for an arbitrary unbiased estimator. We revisit the basic properties of the Fisher information and demonstrate its potential to quantify the resolution of optical systems. We illustrate this with some conceptually important examples, such as single-slit diffraction, spectroscopy and superresolution techniques.

  9. A Spatio-Temporal Enhancement Method for medium resolution LAI (STEM-LAI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houborg, Rasmus; McCabe, Matthew F.; Gao, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Satellite remote sensing has been used successfully to map leaf area index (LAI) across landscapes, but advances are still needed to exploit multi-scale data streams for producing LAI at both high spatial and temporal resolution. A multi-scale Spatio-Temporal Enhancement Method for medium resolution LAI (STEM-LAI) has been developed to generate 4-day time-series of Landsat-scale LAI from existing medium resolution LAI products. STEM-LAI has been designed to meet the demands of applications requiring frequent and spatially explicit information, such as effectively resolving rapidly evolving vegetation dynamics at sub-field (30 m) scales. In this study, STEM-LAI is applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) based LAI data and utilizes a reference-based regression tree approach for producing MODIS-consistent, but Landsat-based, LAI. The Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM) is used to interpolate the downscaled LAI between Landsat acquisition dates, providing a high spatial and temporal resolution improvement over existing LAI products. STARFM p