Science.gov

Sample records for 30-m resolution estimates

  1. Developing a 30-m grassland productivity estimation map for central Nebraska using 250-m MODIS and 30-m Landsat-8 observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gu, Yingxin; Wylie, Bruce K.

    2015-01-01

    Accurately estimating aboveground vegetation biomass productivity is essential for local ecosystem assessment and best land management practice. Satellite-derived growing season time-integrated Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (GSN) has been used as a proxy for vegetation biomass productivity. A 250-m grassland biomass productivity map for the Greater Platte River Basin had been developed based on the relationship between Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) GSN and Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) annual grassland productivity. However, the 250-m MODIS grassland biomass productivity map does not capture detailed ecological features (or patterns) and may result in only generalized estimation of the regional total productivity. Developing a high or moderate spatial resolution (e.g., 30-m) productivity map to better understand the regional detailed vegetation condition and ecosystem services is preferred. The 30-m Landsat data provide spatial detail for characterizing human-scale processes and have been successfully used for land cover and land change studies. The main goal of this study is to develop a 30-m grassland biomass productivity estimation map for central Nebraska, leveraging 250-m MODIS GSN and 30-m Landsat data. A rule-based piecewise regression GSN model based on MODIS and Landsat (r = 0.91) was developed, and a 30-m MODIS equivalent GSN map was generated. Finally, a 30-m grassland biomass productivity estimation map, which provides spatially detailed ecological features and conditions for central Nebraska, was produced. The resulting 30-m grassland productivity map was generally supported by the SSURGO biomass production map and will be useful for regional ecosystem study and local land management practices.

  2. High-resolution (30 m) lunar radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zisk, Stanley H.

    1988-01-01

    New high-resolution radar images of the lunar surface are being produced using the Haystack Observatory range-Doppler radar system. The goals are to: investigate the decameter-scale properties of the lunar surface, as an aid in the understanding of the geophysical history of the moon; and to improve the understanding of the mechanisms of planetary radar backscattering, to aid in the interpretation of the coarser-resolution images which were and will be obtained from planetary probe missions and other earth-based observations.

  3. Methodology to obtain 30 m resolution of snow cover area from FSCA MODIS and NDSI Landsat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepeda, Javier; Vargas, Ximena

    2016-04-01

    In the last years numerous free images and product satellites have been released, with different spatial and temporal resolution. Out of them, the most commonly used to describe the snow area are MODIS and Landsat. Fractional snow cover area (FSCA) is a daily MODIS product with a 500 m spatial resolution; Landsat images have around 16 days and 30 m respectively. In this work we use both images to obtain a new daily 30 m resolution snow distribution product based in probabilistic and geospatial information. This can be useful because a higher resolution can be used to improve the estimation of the accuracy of a physically-based distributed model to represent the snow cover distribution. We choose three basins in central Chile, with an important snow and glacier presence, to analyze the spatial and temporal distribution of snow using (1) the mean value between MOD10A1 (terra) and MYD10A1 (aqua) and (2) the corrected images by topography and atmosphere from Landsat 5 and Landsat 8 computing the normalized difference snow index (NDSI). When both satellites data are available in the same day, each MODIS pixel is studied considering the Landsat pixels contained in it. A new matrix is created, covering all MODIS pixels, using a 30 m spatial resolution, where each pixel value represents the probability of snow presence in time from Landsat images, and then each pixel is corrected by its neighbour's pixels, elevation, slope and aspect. Then snow is distributed, for each MODIS pixel, considering the corrected probability matrix and sorted between pixels with high probability until the area from FSCA is completed.

  4. Global land cover mapping at 30 m resolution: A POK-based operational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Chen, Jin; Liao, Anping; Cao, Xin; Chen, Lijun; Chen, Xuehong; He, Chaoying; Han, Gang; Peng, Shu; Lu, Miao; Zhang, Weiwei; Tong, Xiaohua; Mills, Jon

    2015-05-01

    Global Land Cover (GLC) information is fundamental for environmental change studies, land resource management, sustainable development, and many other societal benefits. Although GLC data exists at spatial resolutions of 300 m and 1000 m, a 30 m resolution mapping approach is now a feasible option for the next generation of GLC products. Since most significant human impacts on the land system can be captured at this scale, a number of researchers are focusing on such products. This paper reports the operational approach used in such a project, which aims to deliver reliable data products. Over 10,000 Landsat-like satellite images are required to cover the entire Earth at 30 m resolution. To derive a GLC map from such a large volume of data necessitates the development of effective, efficient, economic and operational approaches. Automated approaches usually provide higher efficiency and thus more economic solutions, yet existing automated classification has been deemed ineffective because of the low classification accuracy achievable (typically below 65%) at global scale at 30 m resolution. As a result, an approach based on the integration of pixel- and object-based methods with knowledge (POK-based) has been developed. To handle the classification process of 10 land cover types, a split-and-merge strategy was employed, i.e. firstly each class identified in a prioritized sequence and then results are merged together. For the identification of each class, a robust integration of pixel-and object-based classification was developed. To improve the quality of the classification results, a knowledge-based interactive verification procedure was developed with the support of web service technology. The performance of the POK-based approach was tested using eight selected areas with differing landscapes from five different continents. An overall classification accuracy of over 80% was achieved. This indicates that the developed POK-based approach is effective and feasible

  5. Mapping Impervious Surfaces Globally at 30m Resolution Using Global Land Survey Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeColstoun, Eric Brown; Huang, Chengquan; Tan, Bin; Smith, Sarah Elizabeth; Phillips, Jacqueline; Wang, Panshi; Ling, Pui-Yu; Zhan, James; Li, Sike; Taylor, Michael P.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Tilton, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Impervious surfaces, mainly artificial structures and roads, cover less than 1% of the world's land surface (1.3% over USA). Regardless of the relatively small coverage, impervious surfaces have a significant impact on the environment. They are the main source of the urban heat island effect, and affect not only the energy balance, but also hydrology and carbon cycling, and both land and aquatic ecosystem services. In the last several decades, the pace of converting natural land surface to impervious surfaces has increased. Quantitatively monitoring the growth of impervious surface expansion and associated urbanization has become a priority topic across both the physical and social sciences. The recent availability of consistent, global scale data sets at 30m resolution such as the Global Land Survey from the Landsat satellites provides an unprecedented opportunity to map global impervious cover and urbanization at this resolution for the first time, with unprecedented detail and accuracy. Moreover, the spatial resolution of Landsat is absolutely essential to accurately resolve urban targets such a buildings, roads and parking lots. With long term GLS data now available for the 1975, 1990, 2000, 2005 and 2010 time periods, the land cover/use changes due to urbanization can now be quantified at this spatial scale as well. In the Global Land Survey - Imperviousness Mapping Project (GLS-IMP), we are producing the first global 30 m spatial resolution impervious cover data set. We have processed the GLS 2010 data set to surface reflectance (8500+ TM and ETM+ scenes) and are using a supervised classification method using a regression tree to produce continental scale impervious cover data sets. A very large set of accurate training samples is the key to the supervised classifications and is being derived through the interpretation of high spatial resolution (approx. 2 m or less) commercial satellite data (Quickbird and Worldview2) available to us through the unclassified

  6. Mapping Impervious Surfaces Globally at 30m Resolution Using Landsat Global Land Survey Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown de Colstoun, E.; Huang, C.; Wolfe, R. E.; Tan, B.; Tilton, J.; Smith, S.; Phillips, J.; Wang, P.; Ling, P.; Zhan, J.; Xu, X.; Taylor, M. P.

    2013-12-01

    Impervious surfaces, mainly artificial structures and roads, cover less than 1% of the world's land surface (1.3% over USA). Regardless of the relatively small coverage, impervious surfaces have a significant impact on the environment. They are the main source of the urban heat island effect, and affect not only the energy balance, but also hydrology and carbon cycling, and both land and aquatic ecosystem services. In the last several decades, the pace of converting natural land surface to impervious surfaces has increased. Quantitatively monitoring the growth of impervious surface expansion and associated urbanization has become a priority topic across both the physical and social sciences. The recent availability of consistent, global scale data sets at 30m resolution such as the Global Land Survey from the Landsat satellites provides an unprecedented opportunity to map global impervious cover and urbanization at this resolution for the first time, with unprecedented detail and accuracy. Moreover, the spatial resolution of Landsat is absolutely essential to accurately resolve urban targets such a buildings, roads and parking lots. With long term GLS data now available for the 1975, 1990, 2000, 2005 and 2010 time periods, the land cover/use changes due to urbanization can now be quantified at this spatial scale as well. In the Global Land Survey - Imperviousness Mapping Project (GLS-IMP), we are producing the first global 30 m spatial resolution impervious cover data set. We have processed the GLS 2010 data set to surface reflectance (8500+ TM and ETM+ scenes) and are using a supervised classification method using a regression tree to produce continental scale impervious cover data sets. A very large set of accurate training samples is the key to the supervised classifications and is being derived through the interpretation of high spatial resolution (~2 m or less) commercial satellite data (Quickbird and Worldview2) available to us through the unclassified

  7. Spaceborne SAR data for global urban mapping at 30 m resolution using a robust urban extractor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Yifang; Jacob, Alexander; Gamba, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    With more than half of the world population now living in cities and 1.4 billion more people expected to move into cities by 2030, urban areas pose significant challenges on local, regional and global environment. Timely and accurate information on spatial distributions and temporal changes of urban areas are therefore needed to support sustainable development and environmental change research. The objective of this research is to evaluate spaceborne SAR data for improved global urban mapping using a robust processing chain, the KTH-Pavia Urban Extractor. The proposed processing chain includes urban extraction based on spatial indices and Grey Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) textures, an existing method and several improvements i.e., SAR data preprocessing, enhancement, and post-processing. ENVISAT Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) C-VV data at 30 m resolution were selected over 10 global cities and a rural area from six continents to demonstrate the robustness of the improved method. The results show that the KTH-Pavia Urban Extractor is effective in extracting urban areas and small towns from ENVISAT ASAR data and built-up areas can be mapped at 30 m resolution with very good accuracy using only one or two SAR images. These findings indicate that operational global urban mapping is possible with spaceborne SAR data, especially with the launch of Sentinel-1 that provides SAR data with global coverage, operational reliability and quick data delivery.

  8. Estimating V̄s(30) (or NEHRP site classes) from shallow velocity models (depths < 30 m)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, David M.

    2004-01-01

    The average velocity to 30 m [V??s(30)] is a widely used parameter for classifying sites to predict their potential to amplify seismic shaking. In many cases, however, models of shallow shear-wave velocities, from which V??s(30) can be computed, do not extend to 30 m. If the data for these cases are to be used, some method of extrapolating the velocities must be devised. Four methods for doing this are described here and are illustrated using data from 135 boreholes in California for which the velocity model extends to at least 30 m. Methods using correlations between shallow velocity and V??s(30) result in significantly less bias for shallow models than the simplest method of assuming that the lowermost velocity extends to 30 m. In addition, for all methods the percent of sites misclassified is generally less than 10% and falls to negligible values for velocity models extending to at least 25 m. Although the methods using correlations do a better job on average of estimating V??s(30), the simplest method will generally result in a lower value of V??s(30) and thus yield a more conservative estimate of ground motion [which generally increases as V??s(30) decreases].

  9. A global, 30-m resolution land-surface water body dataset for 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, M.; Sexton, J. O.; Huang, C.; Song, D. X.; Song, X. P.; Channan, S.; Townshend, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Inland surface water is essential to terrestrial ecosystems and human civilization. The distribution of surface water in space and its change over time are related to many agricultural, environmental and ecological issues, and are important factors that must be considered in human socioeconomic development. Accurate mapping of surface water is essential for both scientific research and policy-driven applications. Satellite-based remote sensing provides snapshots of Earth's surface and can be used as the main input for water mapping, especially in large areas. Global water areas have been mapped with coarse resolution remotely sensed data (e.g., the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)). However, most inland rivers and water bodies, as well as their changes, are too small to map at such coarse resolutions. Landsat TM (Thematic Mapper) and ETM+ (Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus) imagery has a 30m spatial resolution and provides decades of records (~40 years). Since 2008, the opening of the Landsat archive, coupled with relatively lower costs associated with computing and data storage, has made comprehensive study of the dynamic changes of surface water over large even global areas more feasible. Although Landsat images have been used for regional and even global water mapping, the method can hardly be automated due to the difficulties on distinguishing inland surface water with variant degrees of impurities and mixing of soil background with only Landsat data. The spectral similarities to other land cover types, e.g., shadow and glacier remnants, also cause misidentification. We have developed a probabilistic based automatic approach for mapping inland surface water bodies. Landsat surface reflectance in multiple bands, derived water indices, and data from other sources are integrated to maximize the ability of identifying water without human interference. The approach has been implemented with open-source libraries to facilitate processing large

  10. Mapping irrigated areas of Ghana using fusion of 30 m and 250 m resolution remote-sensing data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gumma, M.K.; Thenkabail, P.S.; Hideto, F.; Nelson, A.; Dheeravath, V.; Busia, D.; Rala, A.

    2011-01-01

    Maps of irrigated areas are essential for Ghana's agricultural development. The goal of this research was to map irrigated agricultural areas and explain methods and protocols using remote sensing. Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) data and time-series Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data were used to map irrigated agricultural areas as well as other land use/land cover (LULC) classes, for Ghana. Temporal variations in the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) pattern obtained in the LULC class were used to identify irrigated and non-irrigated areas. First, the temporal variations in NDVI pattern were found to be more consistent in long-duration irrigated crops than with short-duration rainfed crops due to more assured water supply for irrigated areas. Second, surface water availability for irrigated areas is dependent on shallow dug-wells (on river banks) and dug-outs (in river bottoms) that affect the timing of crop sowing and growth stages, which was in turn reflected in the seasonal NDVI pattern. A decision tree approach using Landsat 30 m one time data fusion with MODIS 250 m time-series data was adopted to classify, group, and label classes. Finally, classes were tested and verified using ground truth data and national statistics. Fuzzy classification accuracy assessment for the irrigated classes varied between 67 and 93%. An irrigated area derived from remote sensing (32,421 ha) was 20-57% higher than irrigated areas reported by Ghana's Irrigation Development Authority (GIDA). This was because of the uncertainties involved in factors such as: (a) absence of shallow irrigated area statistics in GIDA statistics, (b) non-clarity in the irrigated areas in its use, under-development, and potential for development in GIDA statistics, (c) errors of omissions and commissions in the remote sensing approach, and (d) comparison involving widely varying data types, methods, and approaches used in determining irrigated area statistics

  11. Vertical Accuracy Assessment of 30-M Resolution Alos, Aster, and Srtm Global Dems Over Northeastern Mindanao, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan, J. R.; Makinano-Santillan, M.

    2016-06-01

    The ALOS World 3D - 30 m (AW3D30), ASTER Global DEM Version 2 (GDEM2), and SRTM-30 m are Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) that have been made available to the general public free of charge. An important feature of these DEMs is their unprecedented horizontal resolution of 30-m and almost global coverage. The very recent release of these DEMs, particularly AW3D30 and SRTM- 30 m, calls for opportunities for the conduct of localized assessment of the DEM's quality and accuracy to verify their suitability for a wide range of applications in hydrology, geomorphology, archaelogy, and many others. In this study, we conducted a vertical accuracy assessment of these DEMs by comparing the elevation of 274 control points scattered over various sites in northeastern Mindanao, Philippines. The elevations of these control points (referred to the Mean Sea Level, MSL) were obtained through 3rd order differential levelling using a high precision digital level, and their horizontal positions measured using a global positioning system (GPS) receiver. These control points are representative of five (5) land-cover classes namely brushland (45 points), built-up (32), cultivated areas (97), dense vegetation (74), and grassland (26). Results showed that AW3D30 has the lowest Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 5.68 m, followed by SRTM-30 m (RMSE = 8.28 m), and ASTER GDEM2 (RMSE = 11.98 m). While all the three DEMs overestimated the true ground elevations, the mean and standard deviations of the differences in elevations were found to be lower in AW3D30 compared to SRTM-30 m and ASTER GDEM2. The superiority of AW3D30 over the other two DEMS was also found to be consistent even under different landcover types, with AW3D30's RMSEs ranging from 4.29 m (built-up) to 6.75 m (dense vegetation). For SRTM-30 m, the RMSE ranges from 5.91 m (built-up) to 10.42 m (brushland); for ASTER

  12. Development of Global 30m Resolution Water Body Map with Permanent/Temporal Water Body Separation Using Satellite Acquired Images of Landsat GLS Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeshima, D.; Yamazaki, D.; Yoshikawa, S.; Kanae, S.

    2015-12-01

    The specification of worldwide water body distribution is important for discovering hydrological cycle. Global 3-second Water Body Map (G3WBM) is a global scale map, which indicates the distribution of water body in 90m resolutions (http://hydro.iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp/~yamadai/G3WBM/index.html). This dataset was mainly built to identify the width of river channels, which is one of major uncertainties of continental-scale river hydrodynamics models. To survey the true width of the river channel, this water body map distinguish Permanent Water Body from Temporary Water Body, which means separating river channel and flood plain. However, rivers with narrower width, which is a major case in usual river, could not be observed in this map. To overcome this problem, updating the algorithm of G3WBM and enhancing the resolutions to 30m is the goal of this research. Although this 30m-resolution water body map uses similar algorithm as G3WBM, there are many technical issues attributed to relatively high resolutions. Those are such as lack of same high-resolution digital elevation map, or contamination problem of sub-pixel scale object on satellite acquired image, or invisibility of well-vegetated water body such as swamp. To manage those issues, this research used more than 30,000 satellite images of Landsat Global Land Survey (GLS), and lately distributed topography data of Shuttle Rader Topography Mission (SRTM) 1 arc-second (30m) digital elevation map. Also the effect of aerosol, which would scatter the sun reflectance and disturb the acquired result image, was considered. Due to these revises, the global water body distribution was established in more precise resolution.

  13. Sediment delivery estimates in water quality models altered by resolution and source of topographic data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Moderate resolution (30 m) digital elevation models (DEMs) are normally used to estimate slope for the parameterization of non-point source process-based water quality models. These models, such as the Soil and Water Assessment Tool, utilize the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and Modified USLE...

  14. The effect of DEM resolution on slope estimation and sediment predictions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Moderate resolution (30 m) digital elevation models (DEMs) are normally used to estimate slope for the parameterization of non-point source process-based water quality models. These models, such as the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), utilize the Modified Universal Soil Loss Equation (MUSLE) ...

  15. Estimating Regional Changes in Soil Carbon with High Spatial Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    West, Tristram O.; Brandt, Craig C; Marland, Gregg; De La Torre Ugarte, Daniel G; Larson, James; Hellwinckel, Chad M; Wilson, Bradly; Tyler, Donald G; Nelson, Richard G

    2008-01-01

    To manage lands locally for carbon sequestration and for emissions reductions it is useful to have a system that can monitor and predict changes in soil carbon and greenhouse gas emissions with high spatial resolution. We are developing a carbon accounting framework that can estimate carbon dynamics and net emissions associated with changes in land management. One component of this framework integrates field measurements, inventory data, and remote sensing products to estimate changes in soil carbon and to estimate where these changes are likely to occur at a sub-county (30m x 30m) resolution. We applied this framework component to a mid-western region of the US that consists of 679 counties approximately centered around Iowa. We estimate the 1990 baseline soil carbon to a maximum depth of 3m for this region to be 4,117 Tg C. Cumulative soil carbon accumulation of 70.3 Tg C is estimated for this region between 1991-2000, of which 33.8 Tg C is due to changes in tillage intensity. Without accounting for soil carbon loss following changes to more intensive tillage practices, our estimate increases to 45.0 Tg C. This difference indicates that on-site permanence of soil carbon associated with a change to less intensive tillage practices is approximately 75% if no additional economic incentives are provided for soil carbon sequestration practices. This carbon accounting framework offers a method to integrate inventory and remote sensing data on an annual basis and to transparently account for alternating annual trends in land management and associated carbon stocks and fluxes.

  16. Global 30m Height Above the Nearest Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donchyts, Gennadii; Winsemius, Hessel; Schellekens, Jaap; Erickson, Tyler; Gao, Hongkai; Savenije, Hubert; van de Giesen, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Variability of the Earth surface is the primary characteristics affecting the flow of surface and subsurface water. Digital elevation models, usually represented as height maps above some well-defined vertical datum, are used a lot to compute hydrologic parameters such as local flow directions, drainage area, drainage network pattern, and many others. Usually, it requires a significant effort to derive these parameters at a global scale. One hydrological characteristic introduced in the last decade is Height Above the Nearest Drainage (HAND): a digital elevation model normalized using nearest drainage. This parameter has been shown to be useful for many hydrological and more general purpose applications, such as landscape hazard mapping, landform classification, remote sensing and rainfall-runoff modeling. One of the essential characteristics of HAND is its ability to capture heterogeneities in local environments, difficult to measure or model otherwise. While many applications of HAND were published in the academic literature, no studies analyze its variability on a global scale, especially, using higher resolution DEMs, such as the new, one arc-second (approximately 30m) resolution version of SRTM. In this work, we will present the first global version of HAND computed using a mosaic of two DEMS: 30m SRTM and Viewfinderpanorama DEM (90m). The lower resolution DEM was used to cover latitudes above 60 degrees north and below 56 degrees south where SRTM is not available. We compute HAND using the unmodified version of the input DEMs to ensure consistency with the original elevation model. We have parallelized processing by generating a homogenized, equal-area version of HydroBASINS catchments. The resulting catchment boundaries were used to perform processing using 30m resolution DEM. To compute HAND, a new version of D8 local drainage directions as well as flow accumulation were calculated. The latter was used to estimate river head by incorporating fixed and

  17. Reducing Uncertainties in Satellite-derived Forest Aboveground Biomass Estimates using a High Resolution Forest Cover Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Ganguly, S.; Nemani, R. R.; Milesi, C.; Basu, S.; Kumar, U.

    2014-12-01

    Several studies to date have provided an extensive knowledge base for estimating forest aboveground biomass (AGB) and recent advances in space-based modeling of the 3-D canopy structure, combined with canopy reflectance measured by passive optical sensors and radar backscatter, are providing improved satellite-derived AGB density mapping for large scale carbon monitoring applications. A key limitation in forest AGB estimation from remote sensing, however, is the large uncertainty in forest cover estimates from the coarse-to-medium resolution satellite-derived land cover maps (present resolution is limited to 30-m of the USGS NLCD Program). The uncertainties in forest cover estimates at the Landsat scale result in high uncertainties for AGB estimation, predominantly in heterogeneous forest and urban landscapes. We have successfully developed an approach using a machine learning algorithm and High-Performance-Computing with NAIP air-borne imagery data for mapping tree cover at 1-m over California and Maryland. In a comparison with high resolution LiDAR data available over selected regions in the two states, we found our results to be promising both in terms of accuracy as well as our ability to scale nationally. The generated 1-m forest cover map will be aggregated to the Landsat spatial grid to demonstrate differences in AGB estimates (pixel-level AGB density, total AGB at aggregated scales like ecoregions and counties) when using a native 30-m forest cover map versus a 30-m map derived from a higher resolution dataset. The process will also be complemented with a LiDAR derived AGB estimate at the 30-m scale to aid in true validation.

  18. Influence of resolution in irrigated area mapping and area estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Velpuri, N.M.; Thenkabail, P.S.; Gumma, M.K.; Biradar, C.; Dheeravath, V.; Noojipady, P.; Yuanjie, L.

    2009-01-01

    The overarching goal of this paper was to determine how irrigated areas change with resolution (or scale) of imagery. Specific objectives investigated were to (a) map irrigated areas using four distinct spatial resolutions (or scales), (b) determine how irrigated areas change with resolutions, and (c) establish the causes of differences in resolution-based irrigated areas. The study was conducted in the very large Krishna River basin (India), which has a high degree of formal contiguous, and informal fragmented irrigated areas. The irrigated areas were mapped using satellite sensor data at four distinct resolutions: (a) NOAA AVHRR Pathfinder 10,000 m, (b) Terra MODIS 500 m, (c) Terra MODIS 250 m, and (d) Landsat ETM+ 30 m. The proportion of irrigated areas relative to Landsat 30 m derived irrigated areas (9.36 million hectares for the Krishna basin) were (a) 95 percent using MODIS 250 m, (b) 93 percent using MODIS 500 m, and (c) 86 percent using AVHRR 10,000 m. In this study, it was found that the precise location of the irrigated areas were better established using finer spatial resolution data. A strong relationship (R2 = 0.74 to 0.95) was observed between irrigated areas determined using various resolutions. This study proved the hypotheses that "the finer the spatial resolution of the sensor used, greater was the irrigated area derived," since at finer spatial resolutions, fragmented areas are detected better. Accuracies and errors were established consistently for three classes (surface water irrigated, ground water/conjunctive use irrigated, and nonirrigated) across the four resolutions mentioned above. The results showed that the Landsat data provided significantly higher overall accuracies (84 percent) when compared to MODIS 500 m (77 percent), MODIS 250 m (79 percent), and AVHRR 10,000 m (63 percent). ?? 2009 American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing.

  19. Estimating Resolution Lengths of Hybrid Turbulence Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2006-01-01

    A two-stage procedure has been devised for estimating the spatial resolution achievable in the simulation of a given flow on a given computational grid by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code that incorporates a hybrid model of turbulence. The hybrid models to which this procedure is especially relevant are those of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and the partial-averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) approaches. This procedure represents the first step toward adding variable-resolution turbulence-modeling capabilities to CFD codes as part of a continuing effort to increase the accuracy and robustness of CFD simulations of unsteady flows. Some background information is prerequisite to a meaningful summary of the procedure. Among experts in CFD, it is well known that combination of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach and eddy-viscosity turbulence models offers limited capability for simulating unsteady and complex flows. The RANS approach includes an assumption that most of the energy in a given flow is modeled through turbulence-transport equations and is resolved in a computational grid used to simulate the flow. RANS also overpredicts eddy viscosity, thereby yielding excessive damping of unsteady motion. The eddy viscosity attains an unphysically large value because of unresolved scales, and suppresses most temporal and spatial fluctuations in the resolved flow field. One approach used to overcome this deficiency is to provide a mechanism for the RANS equations to resolve motion only on the largest scales and to use a hybrid model to represent effects at smaller scales. The RANS approach involves the use of a standard two-equation turbulence model in which the effect of turbulence is summarized by a viscosity that is a function of (1) the time-averaged kinetic- energy density (k) associated with the local fluctuating (turbulent) component of flow and (2) the time-averaged rate of dissipation of the turbulent-kinetic- energy density ( ). In

  20. Estimating percent surface-water area using intermediate resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, L.; Wylie, B.; Rover, J.

    2008-12-01

    Intermediate spatial resolution satellite data, such as Landsat TM/ETM+, have been used widely for mapping surface-water bodies at regional and national scales. Accurate estimation of surface-water area, however, still remains a challenge because the intermediate resolution images are not capable of detecting very small lakes, ponds, and streams that are usually predominant in wetland regions. To compensate for the limitations of the intermediate resolution images for mapping small water bodies, a fuzzy classification method can be used to estimate the water area proportion at pixel level and produce the map of continuous percent water area. But generally, fuzzy classifications require a large number of field training sites. In the studies of using the Landsat images to map water features for the Yukon River Basin (YRB) and the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR), we developed a regression-based fuzzy classification technique that is capable of collecting training data from the Landsat image itself. In the regression model, the predictor variables are the averaged reflectance of the 5- by 5-pixels (150- by 150-m) window for all Landsat spectral bands; the response variable is the percent water area calculated based on the number of water and non-water pixels within same window. The regression model based on the 150- by 150-m windows is then applied to the 30-m resolution Landsat image to estimate percent water area for every 30-m pixel in the image. As a result, the water feature map produced using the regression method shows the continuous percent water area at the 30-m level. In the examples of YRB and PPR, the regression models showed very high goodness-of-fit: the R- squares are 0.96 and 0.94, respectively, and root mean squared errors are 7.1% and 8.2%, respectively, for the two regions. To validate this technique, we will use the high spatial resolution QuickBird images (2.4 m at nadir for multispectral images) to derive relatively accurate percent water area, which

  1. Analysis of DOA estimation spatial resolution using MUSIC algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yue; Wang, Hongyuan; Luo, Bin

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents a performance analysis of the spatial resolution of the direction of arrival (DOA) estimates attained by the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm for uncorrelated sources. The confidence interval of estimation angle which is much more intuitionistic will be considered as the new evaluation standard for the spatial resolution. Then, based on the statistic method, the qualitative analysis reveals the factors influencing the performance of the MUSIC algorithm. At last, quantitative simulations prove the theoretical analysis result exactly.

  2. Sediment delivery estimates in water quality models altered by resolution and source of topographic data.

    PubMed

    Beeson, Peter C; Sadeghi, Ali M; Lang, Megan W; Tomer, Mark D; Daughtry, Craig S T

    2014-01-01

    Moderate-resolution (30-m) digital elevation models (DEMs) are normally used to estimate slope for the parameterization of non-point source, process-based water quality models. These models, such as the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), use the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and Modified USLE to estimate sediment loss. The slope length and steepness factor, a critical parameter in USLE, significantly affects sediment loss estimates. Depending on slope range, a twofold difference in slope estimation potentially results in as little as 50% change or as much as 250% change in the LS factor and subsequent sediment estimation. Recently, the availability of much finer-resolution (∼3 m) DEMs derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data has increased. However, the use of these data may not always be appropriate because slope values derived from fine spatial resolution DEMs are usually significantly higher than slopes derived from coarser DEMs. This increased slope results in considerable variability in modeled sediment output. This paper addresses the implications of parameterizing models using slope values calculated from DEMs with different spatial resolutions (90, 30, 10, and 3 m) and sources. Overall, we observed over a 2.5-fold increase in slope when using a 3-m instead of a 90-m DEM, which increased modeled soil loss using the USLE calculation by 130%. Care should be taken when using LiDAR-derived DEMs to parameterize water quality models because doing so can result in significantly higher slopes, which considerably alter modeled sediment loss.

  3. Landscape scale estimation of forest structure and composition using lidar, radar and high resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. B.; Listopad, C.; Noble, J.; Masters, R.

    2005-12-01

    The spatial arrangement of forest canopy components such as leaves and branches directly influences a number of key ecosystem characteristics. Forest canopy structure affects many physical, micrometeorological characteristics (e.g., light, temperature, humidity) as well as numerous ecological processes such as tree growth and recruitment. Forest canopy structural and compositional information are critical for land management activities ranging from estimating fuel loads to mapping species' habitats. A persistent challenge has been to actually quantify the physical distribution of forest canopy structure and the variability of structure in space and time. Field studies are typically limited to small plot sizes (< 0.5 ha) and are both expensive and time-consuming. Remote sensing techniques are therefore necessary for estimating forest structure and composition at broad spatial scales. In this study we explore the use of three complimentary and widely used remote sensing techniques (lidar, radar and high resolution imagery) for estimating the structure and composition of pine and hardwood forests at Tall Timbers Research Station in the Red Hills of northwestern Florida. Small footprint airborne lidar data were used to create very high resolution (1 m) models of bare earth topography and canopy height. Additional canopy structural metrics such as canopy cover were also derived from the airborne lidar data. High resolution satellite imagery was used to estimate forest composition (e.g., pine vs. hardwood). Spectral and textural metrics were also derived from the imagery to estimate forest structural properties. Finally 30 m interferometric synthetic aperture radar data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) were used in conjunction with National Elevation Dataset (NED) to map the height of the scattering phase center (Kellndorfer et al. 2004). We then compared all remotely sensed estimates of forest canopy structure with field measurements of canopy structure

  4. Effect of spatial resolution on remote sensing estimation of total evaporation in the uMngeni catchment, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoko, Cletah; Clark, David; Mengistu, Michael; Dube, Timothy; Bulcock, Hartley

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of two readily available multispectral sensors: the newly launched 30 m spatial resolution Landsat 8 and the long-serving 1000 m moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) datasets in the spatial representation of total evaporation in the heterogeneous uMngeni catchment, South Africa, using the surface energy balance system model. The results showed that sensor spatial resolution plays a critical role in the accurate estimation of energy fluxes and total evaporation across a heterogeneous catchment. Landsat 8 estimates showed better spatial representation of the biophysical parameters and total evaporation for different land cover types, due to the relatively higher spatial resolution compared to the coarse spatial resolution MODIS sensor. Moreover, MODIS failed to capture the spatial variations of total evaporation estimates across the catchment. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) results showed that MODIS-based total evaporation estimates did not show any significant differences across different land cover types (one-way ANOVA; F1.924=1.412, p=0.186). However, Landsat 8 images yielded significantly different estimates between different land cover types (one-way ANOVA; F1.993=5.185, p<0.001). The validation results showed that Landsat 8 estimates were more comparable to eddy covariance (EC) measurements than the MODIS-based total evaporation estimates. EC measurement on May 23, 2013, was 3.8 mm/day, whereas the Landsat 8 estimate on the same day was 3.6 mm/day, with MODIS showing significantly lower estimates of 2.3 mm/day. The findings of this study underscore the importance of spatial resolution in estimating spatial variations of total evaporation at the catchment scale, thus, they provide critical information on the relevance of the readily available remote sensing products in water resources management in data-scarce environments.

  5. A deployable, annular, 30m telescope, space-based observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Justin J.; Wirth, Allan; Jankevics, Andrew; Landers, Franklin; Rohweller, David; Chen, C. Bill; Bronowicki, Allen

    2014-08-01

    High resolution imaging from space requires very large apertures, such as NASA's current mission the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) which uses a deployable 6.5m segmented primary. Future missions requiring even larger apertures (>>10m) will present a great challenge relative to the size, weight and power constraints of launch vehicles as well as the cost and schedule required to fabricate the full aperture. Alternatively, a highly obscured annular primary can be considered. For example, a 93.3% obscured 30m aperture having the same total mirror area (91m2) as a 10.7m unobscured telescope, can achieve ~3X higher limiting resolution performance. Substantial cost and schedule savings can be realized with this approach compared to fully filled apertures of equivalent resolution. A conceptual design for a ring-shaped 30m telescope is presented and the engineering challenges of its various subsystems analyzed. The optical design consists of a 20X annular Mersenne form beam compactor feeding a classical 1.5m TMA telescope. Ray trace analysis indicates the design can achieve near diffraction limited images over a 200μrad FOV. The primary mirror consists of 70 identical rectangular 1.34x1.0m segments with a prescription well within the demonstrated capabilities of the replicated nanolaminate on SiC substrate technology developed by AOA Xinetics. A concept is presented for the deployable structure that supports the primary mirror segments. A wavefront control architecture consisting of an optical metrology subsystem for coarse alignment and an image based fine alignment and phasing subsystem is presented. The metrology subsystem is image based, using the background starfields for distortion and pointing calibration and fiducials on the segments for measurement. The fine wavefront control employs a hill climbing algorithm operating on images from the science camera. The final key technology required is the image restoration algorithm that will compensate for the highly

  6. Spectral estimation optical coherence tomography for axial super-resolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Si; Cui, Dongyao; Yu, Xiaojun; Liu, Linbo

    2015-10-01

    The depth reflectivity profile of Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) is estimated from the inverse Fourier transform of the spectral interference signals (interferograms). As a result, the axial resolution is fundamentally limited by the coherence length of the light source. We demonstrate that using the autoregressive spectral estimation technique instead of the inverse Fourier transform, to analyze the spectral interferograms can improve the axial resolution. We name this method spectral estimation OCT (SE-OCT). SE-OCT breaks the coherence length limitation and improves the axial resolution by a factor of up to 4.7 compared with FD-OCT. Furthermore, SE-OCT provides complete sidelobe suppression in the depth point-spread function, further improving the image quality. We demonstrate that these technical advances enables clear identification of corneal endothelium anatomical details ex vivo that cannot be identified using the corresponding FD-OCT. Given that SE-OCT can be implemented in the FD-OCT devices without any hardware changes, the new capabilities provided by SE-OCT are likely to offer immediate improvements to the diagnosis and management of diseases based on OCT imaging.

  7. High Spatio-Temporal Resolution Bathymetry Estimation and Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsma, E. W. J.; Conley, D. C.; Davidson, M. A.; O'Hare, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, bathymetry estimates using video images have become increasingly accurate. With the cBathy code (Holman et al., 2013) fully operational, bathymetry results with 0.5 metres accuracy have been regularly obtained at Duck, USA. cBathy is based on observations of the dominant frequencies and wavelengths of surface wave motions and estimates the depth (and hence allows inference of bathymetry profiles) based on linear wave theory. Despite the good performance at Duck, large discrepancies were found related to tidal elevation and camera height (Bergsma et al., 2014) and on the camera boundaries. A tide dependent floating pixel and camera boundary solution have been proposed to overcome these issues (Bergsma et al., under review). The video-data collection is set estimate depths hourly on a grid with resolution in the order of 10x25 meters. Here, the application of the cBathy at Porthtowan in the South-West of England is presented. Hourly depth estimates are combined and analysed over a period of 1.5 years (2013-2014). In this work the focus is on the sub-tidal region, where the best cBathy results are achieved. The morphology of the sub-tidal bar is tracked with high spatio-temporal resolution on short and longer time scales. Furthermore, the impact of the storm and reset (sudden and large changes in bathymetry) of the sub-tidal area is clearly captured with the depth estimations. This application shows that the high spatio-temporal resolution of cBathy makes it a powerful tool for coastal research and coastal zone management.

  8. Estimating Scots Pine Tree Mortality Using High Resolution Multispectral Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buriak, L.; Sukhinin, A. I.; Conard, S. G.; Ivanova, G. A.; McRae, D. J.; Soja, A. J.; Okhotkina, E.

    2010-12-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) forest stands of central Siberia are characterized by a mixed-severity fire regime that is dominated by low- to high-severity surface fires, with crown fires occurring less frequently. The purpose of this study was to link ground measurements with air-borne and satellite observations of active wildfires and older fire scars to better estimate tree mortality remotely. Data from field sampling on experimental fires and wildfires were linked with intermediate-resolution satellite (Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper) data to estimate fire severity and carbon emissions. Results are being applied to Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery, MERIS, Landsat-ETM, SPOT (i.e., low, middle and high spatial resolution), to understand their remote-sensing capability for mapping fire severity, as indicated by tree mortality. Tree mortality depends on fireline intensity, residence time, and the physiological effects on the cambium layer, foliage and roots. We have correlated tree mortality measured after fires of varying severity with NDVI and other Chlorophyll Indexes to model tree mortality on a landscape scale. The field data obtained on experimental and wildfires are being analyzed and compared with intermediate-resolution satellite data (Landsat7-ETM) to help estimate fire severity, emissions, and carbon balance. In addition, it is being used to monitor immediate ecosystem fire effects (e.g., tree mortality) and long-term postfire vegetation recovery. These data are also being used to validate AVHRR , MODIS, and MERIS estimates of burn area. We studied burned areas in the Angara Region of central Siberia (northeast of Lake Baikal) for which both ground data and satellite data (ENVISAT-MERIS, Spot4, Landsat5, Landsat7-ETM) were available for the 2003 - 2004 and 2006 - 2008 periods. Ground validation was conducted on seventy sample plots established on burned sites differing in

  9. High-resolution dynamic speech imaging with deformation estimation.

    PubMed

    Maojing Fu; Barlaz, Marissa S; Shosted, Ryan K; Zhi-Pei Liang; Sutton, Bradley P

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic speech magnetic resonance imaging (DSMRI) is a promising technique for visualizing articulatory motion in real time. However, many existing applications of DSMRI have been limited by slow imaging speed and the lack of quantitative motion analysis. In this paper, we present a novel DS-MRI technique to simultaneously estimate dynamic image sequence of speech and the associated deformation field. Extending on our previous Partial Separability (PS) model-based methods, the proposed technique visualizes both speech motion and deformation with a spatial resolution of 2.2 × 2.2 mm(2) and a nominal frame rate of 100 fps. Also, the technique enables direct analysis of articulatory motion through the deformation fields. Effectiveness of the method is systematically examined via in vivo experiments. Utilizing the obtained high-resolution images and deformation fields, we also performed a phonetics study on Brazilian Portuguese to show the method's practical utility. PMID:26736572

  10. Estimating Biophysical Crop Properties by a Machine Learning Model Inversion using Hyperspectral Imagery of Different Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preidl, S.; Doktor, D.

    2013-12-01

    contrary, pixels lying in the tractor tracks are - compared to their neighboring vegetated pixels - spectrally heterogeneous with higher reflectance in VIS/SWIR but unchanged reflectance in NIR. For these pixels variable estimations - especially LAI for being most sensitive in the NIR region - should be ranked uncertain. The achieved chlorophyll prediction results are very good in line with the SPAD field measurements. The difference in image resolution might be too low to see high scale variance among the variable estimations (therefore working with simulated AISA images of 30m resolution is foreseen). However, the standard deviation of the chlorophyll estimation decreases with lower resolution. Although a pixel-wise inversion was performed the chlorophyll distribution across the field is rather uniform, so that smooth variations between neighboring pixel values can be observed. Predicted LAI values are higher than the ones measured in the field. It is expected that incorporating the outcome of the sensitivity analysis in the forward modeling will improve the prediction accuracy.

  11. Estimation of vegetation cover at subpixel resolution using LANDSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Michael F.; Eagleson, Peter S.

    1986-01-01

    The present report summarizes the various approaches relevant to estimating canopy cover at subpixel resolution. The approaches are based on physical models of radiative transfer in non-homogeneous canopies and on empirical methods. The effects of vegetation shadows and topography are examined. Simple versions of the model are tested, using the Taos, New Mexico Study Area database. Emphasis has been placed on using relatively simple models requiring only one or two bands. Although most methods require some degree of ground truth, a two-band method is investigated whereby the percent cover can be estimated without ground truth by examining the limits of the data space. Future work is proposed which will incorporate additional surface parameters into the canopy cover algorithm, such as topography, leaf area, or shadows. The method involves deriving a probability density function for the percent canopy cover based on the joint probability density function of the observed radiances.

  12. Improved PPP ambiguity resolution by COES FCB estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yihe; Gao, Yang; Shi, Junbo

    2016-05-01

    Precise point positioning (PPP) integer ambiguity resolution is able to significantly improve the positioning accuracy with the correction of fractional cycle biases (FCBs) by shortening the time to first fix (TTFF) of ambiguities. When satellite orbit products are adopted to estimate the satellite FCB corrections, the narrow-lane (NL) FCB corrections will be contaminated by the orbit's line-of-sight (LOS) errors which subsequently affect ambiguity resolution (AR) performance, as well as positioning accuracy. To effectively separate orbit errors from satellite FCBs, we propose a cascaded orbit error separation (COES) method for the PPP implementation. Instead of using only one direction-independent component in previous studies, the satellite NL improved FCB corrections are modeled by one direction-independent component and three directional-dependent components per satellite in this study. More specifically, the direction-independent component assimilates actual FCBs, whereas the directional-dependent components are used to assimilate the orbit errors. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, GPS measurements from a regional and a global network are processed with the IGSReal-time service (RTS), IGS rapid (IGR) products and predicted orbits with >10 cm 3D root mean square (RMS) error. The improvements by the proposed FCB estimation method are validated in terms of ambiguity fractions after applying FCB corrections and positioning accuracy. The numerical results confirm that the obtained FCBs using the proposed method outperform those by conventional method. The RMS of ambiguity fractions after applying FCB corrections is reduced by 13.2 %. The position RMSs in north, east and up directions are reduced by 30.0, 32.0 and 22.0 % on average.

  13. Performance and calibration of the NIKA camera at the IRAM 30 m telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, A.; Calvo, M.; Ponthieu, N.; Adam, R.; Adane, A.; Ade, P.; André, P.; Beelen, A.; Belier, B.; Benoît, A.; Bideaud, A.; Billot, N.; Boudou, N.; Bourrion, O.; Coiffard, G.; Comis, B.; D'Addabbo, A.; Désert, F.-X.; Doyle, S.; Goupy, J.; Kramer, C.; Leclercq, S.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Martino, J.; Mauskopf, P.; Mayet, F.; Monfardini, A.; Pajot, F.; Pascale, E.; Perotto, L.; Revéret, V.; Rodriguez, L.; Savini, G.; Schuster, K.; Sievers, A.; Tucker, C.; Zylka, R.

    2014-09-01

    The New IRAM KID Array (NIKA) instrument is a dual-band imaging camera operating with kinetic inductance detectors (KID) cooled at 100 mK. NIKA is designed to observe the sky at wavelengths of 1.25 and 2.14 mm from the IRAM 30 m telescope at Pico Veleta with an estimated resolution of 13 arcsec and 18 arcsec, respectively. This work presents the performance of the NIKA camera prior to its opening to the astrophysical community as an IRAM common-user facility in early 2014. NIKA is a test bench for the final NIKA2 instrument to be installed at the end of 2015. The last NIKA observation campaigns on November 2012 and June 2013 have been used to evaluate this performance and to improve the control of systematic effects. We discuss here the dynamical tuning of the readout electronics to optimize the KID working point with respect to background changes and the new technique of atmospheric absorption correction. These modifications significantly improve the overall linearity, sensitivity, and absolute calibration performance of NIKA. This is proved on observations of point-like sources for which we obtain a best sensitivity (averaged over all valid detectors) of 40 and 14 mJy s1/2 for optimal weather conditions for the 1.25 and 2.14 mm arrays, respectively. NIKA observations of well known extended sources (DR21 complex and the Horsehead nebula) are presented. This performance makes the NIKA camera a competitive astrophysical instrument.

  14. Daily High Spatial Resolution Evapotranspiration Estimation Using Multi-Satellite Data Fusion Approach in Agricultural and Forested Sites in the U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Anderson, M. C.; Semmens, K. A.; Gao, F.; Kustas, W. P.; Hain, C.; Schull, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET), as a major part of the water balance, is a key indicator of vegetation stress and also represents various types of water usage strategies. High spatial and temporal resolution ET mapping can provide detailed information about daily vegetation water use and soil moisture status at finer scales, which is important to water management and vegetation condition monitoring. This research employs a multi-scale ET modeling system which is based on the two source surface energy balance (TSEB) model. We discuss the utility of applying this modeling system over an irrigated agriculture area in California and a forested site in North Carolina. The multi-scale ET modeling system integrates the Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse model and associated disaggregation scheme (ALEXI/DisALEXI) and fuses the ET estimations from both MODIS (1km, daily) and Landsat (30m, bi-weekly). The Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflective Fusion Model (STARFM) is used to retrieve high spatial and temporal resolution ET. A Data Mining Sharpener (DMS) methodology is used in the system to sharpen the native Landsat thermal infrared band (TIR) to 30m resolution. Comparing with Landsat only ET retrievals, this ET modeling system can optimize the usage of multi-satellite data, which are in different temporal and spatial resolution, to maximize the utility of high spatial and temporal ET estimation. Daily high spatial resolution ET retrievals are compared with observations from local flux towers. Determining how model output of daily water use information can be employed in irrigation and forest management applications will be discussed.

  15. Using multi-satellite data fusion to estimate daily high spatial resolution evapotranspiration over a forested site in North Carolina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse model and associated disaggregation scheme (ALEXI/DisALEXI). Satellite-based ET retrievals from both the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectoradiometer (MODIS; 1km, daily) and Landsat (30m, bi-weekly) are fused with The Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflective Fusion ...

  16. A self-trained classification technique for producing 30 m percent-water maps from Landsat data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rover, Jennifer R.; Wylie, Bruce K.; Ji, Lei

    2010-01-01

    Small bodies of water can be mapped with moderate-resolution satellite data using methods where water is mapped as subpixel fractions using field measurements or high-resolution images as training datasets. A new method, developed from a regression-tree technique, uses a 30 m Landsat image for training the regression tree that, in turn, is applied to the same image to map subpixel water. The self-trained method was evaluated by comparing the percent-water map with three other maps generated from established percent-water mapping methods: (1) a regression-tree model trained with a 5 m SPOT 5 image, (2) a regression-tree model based on endmembers and (3) a linear unmixing classification technique. The results suggest that subpixel water fractions can be accurately estimated when high-resolution satellite data or intensively interpreted training datasets are not available, which increases our ability to map small water bodies or small changes in lake size at a regional scale.

  17. An Algorithm for the Retrieval of 30-m Snow-Free Albedo from Landsat Surface Reflectance and MODIS BRDF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuai, Yanmin; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Gao, Feng; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new methodology to generate 30-m resolution land surface albedo using Landsat surface reflectance and anisotropy information from concurrent MODIS 500-m observations. Albedo information at fine spatial resolution is particularly useful for quantifying climate impacts associated with land use change and ecosystem disturbance. The derived white-sky and black-sky spectral albedos maybe used to estimate actual spectral albedos by taking into account the proportion of direct and diffuse solar radiation arriving at the ground. A further spectral-to-broadband conversion based on extensive radiative transfer simulations is applied to produce the broadband albedos at visible, near infrared, and shortwave regimes. The accuracy of this approach has been evaluated using 270 Landsat scenes covering six field stations supported by the SURFace RADiation Budget Network (SURFRAD) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (ARM/SGP) network. Comparison with field measurements shows that Landsat 30-m snow-free shortwave albedos from all seasons generally achieve an absolute accuracy of +/-0.02 - 0.05 for these validation sites during available clear days in 2003-2005,with a root mean square error less than 0.03 and a bias less than 0.02. This level of accuracy has been regarded as sufficient for driving global and regional climate models. The Landsat-based retrievals have also been compared to the operational 16-day MODIS albedo produced every 8-days from MODIS on Terra and Aqua (MCD43A). The Landsat albedo provides more detailed landscape texture, and achieves better agreement (correlation and dynamic range) with in-situ data at the validation stations, particularly when the stations include a heterogeneous mix of surface covers.

  18. Estimating the spatial resolution of in vivo magnetic resonance images using radiofrequency tagging pulses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Tung; Hu, Peng; Meyer, Craig H

    2007-07-01

    The spatial resolution of magnetic resonance (MR) images is usually specified by using nominal spatial resolution, the width of the simulated point-spread function (PSF), or measurement from a resolution phantom. The accuracy of these measures is limited because they do not take into account the effects of in vivo image degradation. In this work, tag lines were used to estimate the spatial resolution of in vivo MR images. The idea of using tag lines to measure resolution was originally proposed by Wayte and Redpath (Magn Reson Imaging 1998;16:37-44), who used sinusoidal tag profiles and calculated an indirect measure of resolution called the modulation percentage. This work uses widely separated thin tag lines to directly measure the shape of the PSF and produce estimates of the PSF width in millimeters. The feasibility of estimating the spatial resolution via tag lines was evaluated using phantom images. The results show that an accurate estimate can be obtained when the tag modulation width is equal to or less than one-half of the best possible resolution. The tag lines are then used to demonstrate the asymmetry and spatial variation of spatial resolution of in vivo images acquired by using a turbo spin-echo (TSE) and a spiral sequence.

  19. 5 MV 30 mA industrial electron processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Y.; Mizusawa, K.

    1991-05-01

    Industrial electron beam processing systems have been in use in various application fields such as: improving heat resistivity of wire insulation; controlling quality of automobile rubber tires and melt index characteristics of PE foams; and curing paintings or printing inks. Recently, there has come up a need for electron beam with an energy higher than 3 MV in order to disinfect salmonella in chicken meat, to kill bugs in fruits, and to sterilize medical disposables. To meet this need we developed a 5 MV 30 mA electron processing system with an X-ray conversion target. The machine was tested in NHV's plant in Kyoto at continuous operation of full voltage and full current. It proved to be very steady in operation with a high efficiency (as much as 72%). Also, the X-ray target was tested in a continuous run of 5 MV 30 mA (150 kW). It proved to be viable in industrial utilization. This paper introduces the process and the results of the development.

  20. Spatial Resolution Estimation of LANDSAT-4 Thematic Mapper Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgillem, C. D.; Anuta, P. E.; Malaret, E.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of estimating the overall point-spread function (PSF) of multispectral scanner systems was studied using real scene data and known geometric structures in the scene. A direct solution to an approximate form of the PSF was made along with a method using the derivative of an estimated edge response. Both results agreed closely. The TM scanner system specifications are given in line-spread function width and these values are listed with the experimental results in terms of meters. The estimated values are very reasonable, considering the number of factors which could be influencing the result. The atmosphere will have a blurring effect on the overall PSF as well as on cubic convolution resampling effects and possible electronic effects not accounted for in the specification. Also, the specific definition of the LSF specification is not known nor is the actual altitude at the instant the data were acquired. Thus the nominal overall PSF half-amplitude width of 39 m is reasonable; however, a greater sample of scene objects should be evaluated to furthur verify this result.

  1. Developing an Operational System for Daily 800-m Resolution Soil Moisture Estimates across Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochsner, T. E.; Patton, J. C.; Dong, J.; Patrignani, A.; Haffner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Researchers often need meso-scale, high resolution soil moisture estimates for research and decision support in the areas of hydrology, agriculture, and ecology. However, current soil moisture measurement techniques are commonly inadequate in terms of spatial resolution (satellites), spatial support or density (in situ networks), or temporal resolution (rovers). The development of operational systems for high resolution soil moisture estimation will create opportunities for improved drought monitoring, flood forecasting, agricultural management, and wildfire preparedness, as well as for calibration and validation of soil moisture satellites. We are working to develop such an estimation system by merging multiple information sources including: a statewide, mesoscale network (the Oklahoma Mesonet), a cosmic-ray neutron rover, high resolution land cover data, and a proven soil water balance model. This presentation will describe our vision and motivations, our methods, and our progress to date.

  2. MUSIC for Multidimensional Spectral Estimation: Stability and Super-Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wenjing

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a performance analysis of the MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm applied on $D$ dimensional single-snapshot spectral estimation while $s$ true frequencies are located on the continuum of a bounded domain. Inspired by the matrix pencil form, we construct a D-fold Hankel matrix from the measurements and exploit its Vandermonde decomposition in the noiseless case. MUSIC amounts to identifying a noise subspace, evaluating a noise-space correlation function, and localizing frequencies by searching the $s$ smallest local minima of the noise-space correlation function. In the noiseless case, $(2s)^D$ measurements guarantee an exact reconstruction by MUSIC as the noise-space correlation function vanishes exactly at true frequencies. When noise exists, we provide an explicit estimate on the perturbation of the noise-space correlation function in terms of noise level, dimension $D$, the minimum separation among frequencies, the maximum and minimum amplitudes while frequencies are separated by two Rayleigh Length (RL) at each direction. As a by-product the maximum and minimum non-zero singular values of the multidimensional Vandermonde matrix whose nodes are on the unit sphere are estimated under a gap condition of the nodes. Under the 2-RL separation condition, if noise is i.i.d. gaussian, we show that perturbation of the noise-space correlation function decays like $\\sqrt{\\log(\\#(\\mathbf{N}))/\\#(\\mathbf{N})}$ as the sample size $\\#(\\mathbf{N})$ increases. When the separation among frequencies drops below 2 RL, our numerical experiments show that the noise tolerance of MUSIC obeys a power law with the minimum separation of frequencies.

  3. A method for estimating spatial resolution of real image in the Fourier domain.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Ryuta; Saiga, Rino; Takekoshi, Susumu; Inomoto, Chie; Nakamura, Naoya; Itokawa, Masanari; Arai, Makoto; Oshima, Kenichi; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Terada, Yasuko; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Spatial resolution is a fundamental parameter in structural sciences. In crystallography, the resolution is determined from the detection limit of high-angle diffraction in reciprocal space. In electron microscopy, correlation in the Fourier domain is used for estimating the resolution. In this paper, we report a method for estimating the spatial resolution of real images from a logarithmic intensity plot in the Fourier domain. The logarithmic intensity plots of test images indicated that the full width at half maximum of a Gaussian point spread function can be estimated from the images. The spatial resolution of imaging X-ray microtomography using Fresnel zone-plate optics was also estimated with this method. A cross section of a test object visualized with the imaging microtomography indicated that square-wave patterns up to 120-nm pitch were resolved. The logarithmic intensity plot was calculated from a tomographic cross section of brain tissue. The full width at half maximum of the point spread function estimated from the plot coincided with the resolution determined from the test object. These results indicated that the logarithmic intensity plot in the Fourier domain provides an alternative measure of the spatial resolution without explicitly defining a noise criterion.

  4. Application of the MAP estimation model to hyperspectral resolution image enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Guangjun; Zhou, Haifang; Ji, Song; Shu, Rong

    2009-10-01

    This paper makes a study of maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation method for enhancing the spatial resolution of a hyperspectral image using a higher resolution coincident panchromatic image. Here, the mathematical formulation of the proposed MAP method is described and the detail process step is introduced. Then, enhancement results using PHI hyperspectral image datasets are provided. In general, it is found that the MAP method is able to obtain high-resolution hyperspectral data. Experiment shows that the method is effective while the enhancement for conventional methods, like average estimation, is limited primarily to fuse spectral information.

  5. Interferometric 30 m bench for calibrations of 1D scales and optical distance measuring instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkuri, J.; Rantanen, A.; Manninen, J.; Esala, V.-P.; Lassila, A.

    2012-09-01

    During construction of a new metrology building for MIKES, a 30 m interferometric bench was designed. The objective was to implement a straight, stable, adjustable and multifunctional 30 m measuring bench for calibrations. Special attention was paid to eliminating the effects of thermal expansion and inevitable concrete shrinkage. The linear guide, situated on top of a monolithic concrete beam, comprises two parallel round shafts with adjustable fixtures every 1 m. A carriage is moved along the rail and its position is followed by a reference interferometer. Depending on the measurement task, one or two retro-reflectors are fixed on the carriage. A microscope with a CCD camera and a monitor can be used to detect line mark positions on different line standards. When calibrating optical distance measuring instruments, various targets can be fixed to the carriage. For the most accurate measurements an online Abbe-error correction based on simultaneous carriage pitch measurement by a separate laser interferometer is applied. The bench is used for calibrations of machinist scales, tapes, circometers, electronic distance meters, total stations and laser trackers. The estimated expanded uncertainty for 30 m displacement for highest accuracy calibrations is 2.6 µm.

  6. Conflict resolution and alert zone estimation in air traffic management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Vincent Hao-Hung

    The current air traffic control (ATC) system provides separations among all aircraft through pre-defined routes and flight procedures, and active controller participation. In particular, en route separations are achieved by choices of different flight routes, different flight levels, and speed control. During the final descent approach over an extended terminal area, aircraft separations are achieved by speed changes, altitude changes, and path stretching. Recently, a concept of free flight has been proposed for future air traffic management. In the proposed free flight environment, aircraft operators can change flight paths in real time, in order to achieve the best efficiency for the aircraft. Air traffic controllers are only supposed to intervene when situation warrants, to resolve potential conflicts among aircraft. In both cases, there is a region around each aircraft called alert zone. As soon as another aircraft touches the alert zone of own aircraft, either the own aircraft or both aircraft must initiate avoidance maneuvers to resolve a potential conflict. This thesis develops a systematic approach based on nonlinear optimal control theories to estimate alert zones in two aircraft conflict scenarios. Specifically, point-mass aircraft models are used to describe aircraft motions. Separate uses of heading, speed, and altitude control are first examined, and then the synergetic use of two control authorities are studied. Both cooperative maneuvers (in which both aircraft act) and non-cooperative maneuvers (in which the own aircraft acts alone) are considered. Optimal control problems are formulated to minimize the initial relative separation between the two aircraft for all possible initial conditions, subject to the requirement that inter-aircraft separation at any time satisfies the separation requirement. These nonlinear optimal control problems are solved numerically using a collation approach and the NPSOL software line for nonlinear programming. In

  7. MAP estimation for hyperspectral image resolution enhancement using an auxiliary sensor.

    PubMed

    Hardie, Russell C; Eismann, Michael T; Wilson, Gregory L

    2004-09-01

    This paper presents a novel maximum a posteriori estimator for enhancing the spatial resolution of an image using co-registered high spatial-resolution imagery from an auxiliary sensor. Here, we focus on the use of high-resolution panchomatic data to enhance hyperspectral imagery. However, the estimation framework developed allows for any number of spectral bands in the primary and auxiliary image. The proposed technique is suitable for applications where some correlation, either localized or global, exists between the auxiliary image and the image being enhanced. To exploit localized correlations, a spatially varying statistical model, based on vector quantization, is used. Another important aspect of the proposed algorithm is that it allows for the use of an accurate observation model relating the "true" scene with the low-resolutions observations. Experimental results with hyperspectral data derived from the airborne visible-infrared imaging spectrometer are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed estimator.

  8. Resolution enhancement of hyperspectral imagery using maximum a posteriori estimation with a stochastic mixing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eismann, Michael Theodore

    A maximum a posteriori estimation method is developed and tested for enhancing the spatial resolution of hyperspectral imagery using higher resolution, coincident, panchromatic or multispectral imagery. The approach incorporates a stochastic mixing model of the underlying spectral scene content to develop a cost function that simultaneously optimizes the estimated hyperspectral scene relative to the observed hyperspectral and auxiliary imagery, as well as the local statistics of the spectral mixing model. The incorporation of the stochastic mixing model is found to be the key ingredient to reconstructing sub-pixel spectral information. It provides the necessary constraints for establishing a well-conditioned linear system of equations that can be solved for the high resolution image estimate. The research presented includes a mathematical formulation of the estimation approach and stochastic mixing model, as well as enhancement results for a variety of both synthetic and actual imagery. Both direct and iterative solution methodologies are developed, the latter being necessary to effectively treat imagery with arbitrarily specified spectral and spatial response functions. The performance of the method is qualitatively and quantitatively compared to that of previously developed resolution enhancement approaches. It is found that this novel approach is generally able to reconstruct sub-pixel information in several principal components of the high resolution hyperspectral image estimate. In contrast, the enhancement for conventional methods such as principal component substitution and least-squares estimation is mostly limited to the first principal component.

  9. TAPAS, a VO archive at the IRAM 30-m telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, Stephane; Espigares, Victor; Ruíz, José Enrique; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Mauersberger, Rainer; Brunswig, Walter; Kramer, Carsten; Santander-Vela, Juan de Dios; Wiesemeyer, Helmut

    2012-07-01

    Astronomical observatories are today generating increasingly large volumes of data. For an efficient use of them, databases have been built following the standards proposed by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA), providing a common protocol to query them and make them interoperable. The IRAM 30-m radio telescope, located in Sierra Nevada (Granada, Spain) is a millimeter wavelength telescope with a constantly renewed, extensive choice of instruments, and capable of covering the frequency range between 80 and 370 GHz. It is continuously producing a large amount of data thanks to the more than 200 scientific projects observed each year. The TAPAS archive at the IRAM 30-m telescope is aimed to provide public access to the headers describing the observations performed with the telescope, according to a defined data policy, making as well the technical data available to the IRAM staff members. A special emphasis has been made to make it Virtual Observatory (VO) compliant, and to offer a VO compliant web interface allowing to make the information available to the scientific community. TAPAS is built using the Django Python framework on top of a relational MySQL database, and is fully integrated with the telescope control system. The TAPAS data model (DM) is based on the Radio Astronomical DAta Model for Single dish radio telescopes (RADAMS), to allow for easy integration into the VO infrastructure. A metadata modeling layer is used by the data-filler to allow an implementation free from assumptions about the control system and the underlying database. TAPAS and its public web interface ( http://tapas.iram.es ) provides a scalable system that can evolve with new instruments and observing modes. A meta description of the DM has been introduced in TAPAS in order to both avoid undesired coupling between the code and the DM and to provide a better

  10. Estimation of high-resolution dust column density maps. Empirical model fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvela, M.; Montillaud, J.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Sub-millimetre dust emission is an important tracer of column density N of dense interstellar clouds. One has to combine surface brightness information at different spatial resolutions, and specific methods are needed to derive N at a resolution higher than the lowest resolution of the observations. Some methods have been discussed in the literature, including a method (in the following, method B) that constructs the N estimate in stages, where the smallest spatial scales being derived only use the shortest wavelength maps. Aims: We propose simple model fitting as a flexible way to estimate high-resolution column density maps. Our goal is to evaluate the accuracy of this procedure and to determine whether it is a viable alternative for making these maps. Methods: The new method consists of model maps of column density (or intensity at a reference wavelength) and colour temperature. The model is fitted using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, comparing model predictions with observations at their native resolution. We analyse simulated surface brightness maps and compare its accuracy with method B and the results that would be obtained using high-resolution observations without noise. Results: The new method is able to produce reliable column density estimates at a resolution significantly higher than the lowest resolution of the input maps. Compared to method B, it is relatively resilient against the effects of noise. The method is computationally more demanding, but is feasible even in the analysis of large Herschel maps. Conclusions: The proposed empirical modelling method E is demonstrated to be a good alternative for calculating high-resolution column density maps, even with considerable super-resolution. Both methods E and B include the potential for further improvements, e.g., in the form of better a priori constraints.

  11. Crop area estimation using high and medium resolution satellite imagery in areas with complex topography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Husak, G.J.; Marshall, M. T.; Michaelsen, J.; Pedreros, Diego; Funk, Christopher C.; Galu, G.

    2008-01-01

    Reliable estimates of cropped area (CA) in developing countries with chronic food shortages are essential for emergency relief and the design of appropriate market-based food security programs. Satellite interpretation of CA is an effective alternative to extensive and costly field surveys, which fail to represent the spatial heterogeneity at the country-level. Bias-corrected, texture based classifications show little deviation from actual crop inventories, when estimates derived from aerial photographs or field measurements are used to remove systematic errors in medium resolution estimates. In this paper, we demonstrate a hybrid high-medium resolution technique for Central Ethiopia that combines spatially limited unbiased estimates from IKONOS images, with spatially extensive Landsat ETM+ interpretations, land-cover, and SRTM-based topography. Logistic regression is used to derive the probability of a location being crop. These individual points are then aggregated to produce regional estimates of CA. District-level analysis of Landsat based estimates showed CA totals which supported the estimates of the Bureau of Agriculture and Rural Development. Continued work will evaluate the technique in other parts of Africa, while segmentation algorithms will be evaluated, in order to automate classification of medium resolution imagery for routine CA estimation in the future.

  12. Crop area estimation using high and medium resolution satellite imagery in areas with complex topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husak, G. J.; Marshall, M. T.; Michaelsen, J.; Pedreros, D.; Funk, C.; Galu, G.

    2008-07-01

    Reliable estimates of cropped area (CA) in developing countries with chronic food shortages are essential for emergency relief and the design of appropriate market-based food security programs. Satellite interpretation of CA is an effective alternative to extensive and costly field surveys, which fail to represent the spatial heterogeneity at the country-level. Bias-corrected, texture based classifications show little deviation from actual crop inventories, when estimates derived from aerial photographs or field measurements are used to remove systematic errors in medium resolution estimates. In this paper, we demonstrate a hybrid high-medium resolution technique for Central Ethiopia that combines spatially limited unbiased estimates from IKONOS images, with spatially extensive Landsat ETM+ interpretations, land-cover, and SRTM-based topography. Logistic regression is used to derive the probability of a location being crop. These individual points are then aggregated to produce regional estimates of CA. District-level analysis of Landsat based estimates showed CA totals which supported the estimates of the Bureau of Agriculture and Rural Development. Continued work will evaluate the technique in other parts of Africa, while segmentation algorithms will be evaluated, in order to automate classification of medium resolution imagery for routine CA estimation in the future.

  13. Application of high-resolution, remotely sensed data for transient storage modeling parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Q. G.; Neilson, B. T.; Neale, C. M. U.; Cardenas, M. B.

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents a method that uses high-resolution multispectral and thermal infrared imagery from airborne remote sensing for estimating two model parameters within the two-zone in-stream temperature and solute (TZTS) model. Previous TZTS modeling efforts have provided accurate in-stream temperature predictions; however, model parameter ranges resulting from the multiobjective calibrations were quite large. In addition to the data types previously required to populate and calibrate the TZTS model, high-resolution, remotely sensed thermal infrared (TIR) and near-infrared, red, and green (multispectral) band imagery were collected to help estimate two previously calibrated parameters: (1) average total channel width (BTOT) and (2) the fraction of the channel comprising surface transient storage zones (β). Multispectral imagery in combination with the TIR imagery provided high-resolution estimates ofBTOT. In-stream temperature distributions provided by the TIR imagery enabled the calculation of temperature thresholds at which main channel temperatures could be delineated from surface transient storage, permitting the estimation ofβ. It was found that an increase in the resolution and frequency at which BTOT and β were physically estimated resulted in similar objective functions in the main channel and transient storage zones, but the uncertainty associated with the estimated parameters decreased.

  14. Super-Resolution Using Hidden Markov Model and Bayesian Detection Estimation Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humblot, Fabrice; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents a new method for super-resolution (SR) reconstruction of a high-resolution (HR) image from several low-resolution (LR) images. The HR image is assumed to be composed of homogeneous regions. Thus, the a priori distribution of the pixels is modeled by a finite mixture model (FMM) and a Potts Markov model (PMM) for the labels. The whole a priori model is then a hierarchical Markov model. The LR images are assumed to be obtained from the HR image by lowpass filtering, arbitrarily translation, decimation, and finally corruption by a random noise. The problem is then put in a Bayesian detection and estimation framework, and appropriate algorithms are developed based on Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) Gibbs sampling. At the end, we have not only an estimate of the HR image but also an estimate of the classification labels which leads to a segmentation result.

  15. Effects of spatial resolution of remotely sensed data on estimating urban impervious surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Weifeng; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Zhou, Weiqi; Chen, Qiuwen

    2011-01-01

    Impervious surfaces are the result of urbanization that can be explicitly quantified, managed and controlled at each stage of land development. It is a very useful environmental indicator that can be used to measure the impacts of urbanization on surface runoff, water quality, air quality, biodiversity and microclimate. Therefore, accurate estimation of impervious surfaces is critical for urban environmental monitoring, land management, decision-making and urban planning. Many approaches have been developed to estimate surface imperviousness, using remotely sensed data with various spatial resolutions. However, few studies, have investigated the effects of spatial resolution on estimating surface imperviousness. We compare medium-resolution Landsat data with high-resolution SPOT images to quantify the imperviousness in Beijing, China. The results indicated that the overall 91% accuracy of estimates of imperviousness based on TM data was considerably higher than the 81% accuracy of the SPOT data. The higher resolution SPOT data did not always predict the imperviousness of the land better than the TM data. At the whole city level, the TM data better predicts the percentage cover of impervious surfaces. At the sub-city level, however, the ring belts from the central core to the urban-rural peripheral, the SPOT data may better predict the imperviousness. These results highlighted the need to combine multiple resolution data to quantify the percentage of imperviousness, as higher resolution data do not necessarily lead to more accurate estimates. The methodology and results in this study can be utilized to identify the most suitable remote sensing data to quickly and efficiently extract the pattern of the impervious land, which could provide the base for further study on many related urban environmental problems.

  16. Estimating the resolution limit of the map equation in community detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Tatsuro; Rosvall, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A community detection algorithm is considered to have a resolution limit if the scale of the smallest modules that can be resolved depends on the size of the analyzed subnetwork. The resolution limit is known to prevent some community detection algorithms from accurately identifying the modular structure of a network. In fact, any global objective function for measuring the quality of a two-level assignment of nodes into modules must have some sort of resolution limit or an external resolution parameter. However, it is yet unknown how the resolution limit affects the so-called map equation, which is known to be an efficient objective function for community detection. We derive an analytical estimate and conclude that the resolution limit of the map equation is set by the total number of links between modules instead of the total number of links in the full network as for modularity. This mechanism makes the resolution limit much less restrictive for the map equation than for modularity; in practice, it is orders of magnitudes smaller. Furthermore, we argue that the effect of the resolution limit often results from shoehorning multilevel modular structures into two-level descriptions. As we show, the hierarchical map equation effectively eliminates the resolution limit for networks with nested multilevel modular structures.

  17. [Super-resolution reconstruction of lung 4D-CT images based on fast sub-pixel motion estimation].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shan; Wang, Tingting; Lü, Qingwen; Zhang, Yu

    2015-07-01

    Super-resolution image reconstruction techniques play an important role for improving image resolution of lung 4D-CT. We presents a super-resolution approach based on fast sub-pixel motion estimation to reconstruct lung 4D-CT images. A fast sub-pixel motion estimation method was used to estimate the deformation fields between "frames", and then iterative back projection (IBP) algorithm was employed to reconstruct high-resolution images. Experimental results showed that compared with traditional interpolation method and super-resolution reconstruction algorithm based on full search motion estimation, the proposed method produced clearer images with significantly enhanced image structure details and reduced time for computation.

  18. BOREAS TE-18, 30-m, Radiometrically Rectified Landsat TM Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-18 team used a radiometric rectification process to produce standardized DN values for a series of Landsat TM images of the BOREAS SSA and NSA in order to compare images that were collected under different atmospheric conditions. The images for each study area were referenced to an image that had very clear atmospheric qualities. The reference image for the SSA was collected on 02-Sep-1994, while the reference image for the NSA was collected on 21-Jun-1995. the 23 rectified images cover the period of 07-Jul-1985 to 18 Sep-1994 in the SSA and from 22-Jun-1984 to 09-Jun-1994 in the NSA. Each of the reference scenes had coincident atmospheric optical thickness measurements made by RSS-11. The radiometric rectification process is described in more detail by Hall et al. (199 1). The original Landsat TM data were received from CCRS for use in the BOREAS project. The data are stored in binary image-format files. Due to the nature of the radiometric rectification process and copyright issues, these full-resolution images may not be publicly distributed. However, a spatially degraded 60-m resolution version of the images is available on the BOREAS CD-ROM series. See Sections 15 and 16 for information about how to possibly acquire the full resolution data. Information about the full-resolution images is provided in an inventory listing on the CD-ROMs. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  19. Estimation of Resolution of Shallow Layers by Frequency Domain Airborne Electromagnetic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. D.; Minsley, B. J.; Kass, M. A.; Abraham, J. D.; Sams, J. I.; Veloski, G. A.; Esfahani, A.; Hodges, G.

    2012-12-01

    Helicopter frequency domain electromagnetic (HFDEM) that were conducted in two very different geoelectrical settings, permafrost and conductive alluvium, have been used to examine and quantify some aspects of the resolution of shallow layers (less than 5 meters). The surveys have used the Resolve system with six frequencies ranging from 400 Hz to 140 kHz. Though most discussion of the resolution of earth resistivity for airborne EM systems has concentrated on estimating the maximum depth of mapping or the resolution of deep layers, there are important applications for mapping shallow layers and it is useful to understand the capabilities and limitations of the HFDEM system in different environments. In permafrost terrains, mapping of the shallow active layer is important in understanding its distribution relative to surface processes such as thermal history, fires and carbon storage as well as in monitoring applications. Here the shallow active layer is a conductor relative to the very resistive permafrost. Mapping shallow layers in alluvial environments has been the focus of a study of subsurface drip irrigation in the Powder River of Wyoming. Here the focus of the HFDEM study has been in mapping the distribution of conductive clays and naturally occurring saline waters. Mapping of shallow layers in alluvial environments is important in agricultural applications to map recharge, soil salinity, and thickness of alluvium. Parameters for layered models (layer resistivity and thickness) have been estimated by inversion methods and the resolution of parameters has been evaluated using stochastic methods and an evaluation of linear estimates of resolution and uncertainty. Statistical estimates of resolution of parameters are compared with estimates from ground surveys.

  20. Improving high-resolution quantitative precipitation estimation via fusion of multiple radar-based precipitation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafieeinasab, Arezoo; Norouzi, Amir; Seo, Dong-Jun; Nelson, Brian

    2015-12-01

    For monitoring and prediction of water-related hazards in urban areas such as flash flooding, high-resolution hydrologic and hydraulic modeling is necessary. Because of large sensitivity and scale dependence of rainfall-runoff models to errors in quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE), it is very important that the accuracy of QPE be improved in high-resolution hydrologic modeling to the greatest extent possible. With the availability of multiple radar-based precipitation products in many areas, one may now consider fusing them to produce more accurate high-resolution QPE for a wide spectrum of applications. In this work, we formulate and comparatively evaluate four relatively simple procedures for such fusion based on Fisher estimation and its conditional bias-penalized variant: Direct Estimation (DE), Bias Correction (BC), Reduced-Dimension Bias Correction (RBC) and Simple Estimation (SE). They are applied to fuse the Multisensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE) and radar-only Next Generation QPE (Q2) products at the 15-min 1-km resolution (Experiment 1), and the MPE and Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) QPE products at the 15-min 500-m resolution (Experiment 2). The resulting fused estimates are evaluated using the 15-min rain gauge observations from the City of Grand Prairie in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex (DFW) in north Texas. The main criterion used for evaluation is that the fused QPE improves over the ingredient QPEs at their native spatial resolutions, and that, at the higher resolution, the fused QPE improves not only over the ingredient higher-resolution QPE but also over the ingredient lower-resolution QPE trivially disaggregated using the ingredient high-resolution QPE. All four procedures assume that the ingredient QPEs are unbiased, which is not likely to hold true in reality even if real-time bias correction is in operation. To test robustness under more realistic conditions, the fusion procedures were evaluated with and

  1. Use of UAS remote sensing data to estimate crop ET at high spatial resolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estimation of the spatial distribution of evapotranspiration (ET) based on remotely sensed imagery has become useful for managing water in irrigated agricultural at various spatial scales. However, data acquired by conventional satellites (Landsat, ASTER, etc.) lack the spatial resolution to capture...

  2. High-resolution methane emission estimates using the InTEM inversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, S.; Manning, A.; Robinson, A. D.; Riddick, S. N.; Forster, G.; Oram, D.; O'Doherty, S.; Harris, N. R. P.

    2014-12-01

    There is a growing need for comparisons between emission estimates produced using bottom-up and top-down techniques at high spatial resolution. In response to this, an inversion approach, InTEM, was adapted to estimate methane emissions for a region in the South East of the UK (~100 x 150 km). We present results covering a 2-year period (July 2012 - July 2014) in which atmospheric methane concentrations were recorded at 1 - 2 minute time-steps at four locations within the region of interest. Precise measurements were obtained using gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (GC-FID) for all sites except one, which used a PICARRO Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (CRDS). These observations, along with the UK Met Office's Lagrangian particle dispersion model (NAME) were used within InTEM to produce the methane emission fields. Emission estimates were produced at varying spatial resolutions, for annual and seasonal time frames . We present results indicating the optimum number of observation sites required for this region, and how this can affect our uncertainty estimates. These results are compared with the UK National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) which is compiled using bottom-up methods and available at 1x1 km resolution. To our knowledge, no inversion technique has been implemented on such a fine spatial resolution. This is a pilot project which, given proof of concept, could be scaled up as an alternative method for producing national scale emission inventories.

  3. High resolution time of arrival estimation for a cooperative sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morhart, C.; Biebl, E. M.

    2010-09-01

    Distance resolution of cooperative sensors is limited by the signal bandwidth. For the transmission mainly lower frequency bands are used which are more narrowband than classical radar frequencies. To compensate this resolution problem the combination of a pseudo-noise coded pulse compression system with superresolution time of arrival estimation is proposed. Coded pulsecompression allows secure and fast distance measurement in multi-user scenarios which can easily be adapted for data transmission purposes (Morhart and Biebl, 2009). Due to the lack of available signal bandwidth the measurement accuracy degrades especially in multipath scenarios. Superresolution time of arrival algorithms can improve this behaviour by estimating the channel impulse response out of a band-limited channel view. For the given test system the implementation of a MUSIC algorithm permitted a two times better distance resolution as the standard pulse compression.

  4. Global Food Security-support data at 30 m (GFSAD30)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thenkabail, P. S.

    2013-12-01

    Monitoring global croplands (GCs) is imperative for ensuring sustainable water and food security to the people of the world in the Twenty-first Century. However, the currently available cropland products suffer from major limitations such as: (1) Absence of precise spatial location of the cropped areas; (b) Coarse resolution nature of the map products with significant uncertainties in areas, locations, and detail; (b) Uncertainties in differentiating irrigated areas from rainfed areas; (c) Absence of crop types and cropping intensities; and (e) Absence of a dedicated webdata portal for the dissemination of cropland products. Therefore, our project aims to close these gaps through a Global Food Security-support data at 30 m (GFSAD30) with 4 distinct products: 1. Cropland extentarea, 2. Crop types with focus on 8 crops that occupy 70% of the global cropland areas, 3. Irrigated versus rainfed, and 4. Cropping intensities: single, double, triple, and continuous cropping. The above 4 products will be generated for GFSAD for nominal year 2010 (GFSAD2010) based on Landsat 30m Global Land Survey 2010 (GLS2010) fused with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 250m NDVI monthly maximum value composites (MVC) of 2009-2011 data, and suite of secondary data (e.g., long-term precipitation, temperature, GDEM elevation). GFSAD30 will be produced using three mature cropland mapping algorithms (CMAs): 1. Spectral matching techniques; 2. A cropland classification algorithm (ACCA) that is rule-based; and 3. Hierarchical segmentation (HSeg) algorithm. Funded by NASA MEaSUREs, GFSAD30 will make significant contributions to Earth System Data Records (ESDRs), Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Agriculture and Water Societal Beneficial Areas (GEO Ag. SBAs), GEO Global Agricultural Monitoring Initiative (GEO GLAM), and the recent 'Big Data' initiative by the White House. The project has the support of USGS Working Group on Global Croplands (https://powellcenter.usgs.gov/globalcroplandwater/).

  5. High spatial resolution Land Surface Temperature estimation over urban areas with uncertainty indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitraka, Zina; Lazzarini, Michele; Doxani, Georgia; Del Frate, Fabio; Ghedira, Hosni

    2014-05-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a key variable for studying land surface processes and interactions with the atmosphere and it is listed in the Earth System Data Records (ESDRs) identified by international organizations like Global Climate Observing System. It is a valuable source of information for a range of topics in earth sciences and essential for urban climatology studies. Detailed, frequent and accurate LST mapping may support various urban applications, like the monitoring of urban heat island. Currently, no spaceborne instruments provide frequent thermal imagery at high spatial resolution, thus there is a need for synergistic algorithms that combine different kinds of data for LST retrieval. Moreover, knowing the confidence level of any satellite-derived product is highly important to the users, especially when referred to the urban environment, which is extremely heterogenic. The developed method employs spatial-spectral unmixing techniques for improving the spatial resolution of thermal measurements, combines spectral library information for emissivity estimation and applies a split-window algorithm to estimate LST with an uncertainty estimation inserted in the final product. A synergistic algorithm that utilizes the spatial information provided by visible and near-infrared measurements with more frequent low resolution thermal measurements provides excellent means for high spatial resolution LST estimation. Given the low spatial resolution of thermal infrared sensors, the measured radiation is a combination of radiances of different surface types. High spatial resolution information is used to quantify the different surface types in each pixel and then the measured radiance of each pixel is decomposed. The several difficulties in retrieving LST from space measurements, mainly related to the temperature-emissivity coupling and the atmospheric contribution to the thermal measurements, and the measurements themselves, introduce uncertainties in the final

  6. Improved method for estimating tree crown diameter using high-resolution airborne data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovkina, Olga; Latypov, Iscander Sh.; Cienciala, Emil; Fabianek, Tomas

    2016-04-01

    Automatic mapping of tree crown size (radius, diameter, or width) from remote sensing can provide a major benefit for practical and scientific purposes, but requires the development of accurate methods. This study presents an improved method for average tree crown diameter estimation at a forest plot level from high-resolution airborne data. The improved method consists of the combination of a window binarization procedure and a granulometric algorithm, and avoids the complicated crown delineation procedure that is currently used to estimate crown size. The systematic error in average crown diameter estimates is corrected with the improved method. The improved method is tested with coniferous, beech, and mixed-species forest plots based on airborne images of various spatial resolutions. The absolute (quantitative) accuracy of the improved crown diameter estimates is comparable or higher for both monospecies plots and mixed-species plots than the current methods. The ability of the improved method to produce good estimates for average crown diameters for monoculture and mixed species, to use remote sensing data of various spatial resolution and to operate in automatic mode promisingly suggests its applicability to a wide range of forest systems.

  7. Alternative techniques for high-resolution spectral estimation of spectrally encoded endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Mahta; Duan, Lian; Javidi, Tara; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally encoded endoscopy (SEE) is a minimally invasive optical imaging modality capable of fast confocal imaging of internal tissue structures. Modern SEE systems use coherent sources to image deep within the tissue and data are processed similar to optical coherence tomography (OCT); however, standard processing of SEE data via the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) leads to degradation of the axial resolution as the bandwidth of the source shrinks, resulting in a well-known trade-off between speed and axial resolution. Recognizing the limitation of FFT as a general spectral estimation algorithm to only take into account samples collected by the detector, in this work we investigate alternative high-resolution spectral estimation algorithms that exploit information such as sparsity and the general region position of the bulk sample to improve the axial resolution of processed SEE data. We validate the performance of these algorithms using bothMATLAB simulations and analysis of experimental results generated from a home-built OCT system to simulate an SEE system with variable scan rates. Our results open a new door towards using non-FFT algorithms to generate higher quality (i.e., higher resolution) SEE images at correspondingly fast scan rates, resulting in systems that are more accurate and more comfortable for patients due to the reduced image time.

  8. Improvement of PPP-inferred tropospheric estimates by integer ambiguity resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, J.; Gao, Y.

    2012-11-01

    Integer ambiguity resolution in Precise Point Positioning (PPP) can improve positioning accuracy and reduce convergence time. The decoupled clock model proposed by Collins (2008) has been used to facilitate integer ambiguity resolution in PPP, and research has been conducted to assess the model's potential to improve positioning accuracy and reduce positioning convergence time. In particular, the biggest benefits have been identified for the positioning solutions within short observation periods such as one hour. However, there is little work reported about the model's potential to improve the estimation of the tropospheric parameter within short observation periods. This paper investigates the effect of PPP ambiguity resolution on the accuracy of the tropospheric estimates within one hour. The tropospheric estimates with float and fixed ambiguities within one hour are compared to two external references. The first reference is the International GNSS Service (IGS) final troposphere product based on the PPP technique. The second reference is the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) radio occultation (RO) event based on the atmospheric profiles along the signal travel path. A comparison among ten co-located ground-based GPS and space-based RO troposphere zenith path delays shows that the mean bias of the troposphere estimates with float ambiguities can be significantly reduced from 30.1 to 17.0 mm when compared to the IGS troposphere product and from 36.3 to 19.7 mm when compared to the COSMIC RO. The root mean square (RMS) accuracy improvement of the tropospheric parameters by the ambiguity resolution is 33.3% when compared to the IGS products and 44.3% when compared to the COSMIC RO. All these improvements are achieved within one hour, which indicates the promising prospect of adopting PPP integer ambiguity resolution for time-critical applications such as typhoon prediction.

  9. Deriving Theoretical Boundaries to Address Domain and Resolution Dependencies of Triangle Models for Evapotranspiration Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, D.; Singh, V. P.; Scanlon, B. R.

    2011-12-01

    Satellite-based triangle models for evapotranspiration (ET) are unique in interpreting the contextual relationship between Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI)/factional vegetation cover (fc) and surface radiative temperature (Trad) to deduce evaporative fraction (EF) and ET across large heterogeneous areas. The outputs and performance of some satellite-based ET algorithms may be dependent on the domain of a study site being considered and the resolution of satellite imagery being used. These attributes are referred to as domain dependence and resolution dependence. To unravel the domain and resolution dependencies of the triangle models and test the utility of the triangle models using high spatial resolution images, the triangle models were applied to areas with progressively growing domains and to Landsat TM/ETM+ and MODIS sensors, respectively, at the Soil Moisture-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (SMACEX) site in central Iowa, U.S. on Day of Year (DOY) 174 and 182 in year 2002. Results indicate that the triangle models can be domain-dependent and resolution-dependent, showing large uncertainties in the evaporative fraction estimates in terms of a Mean Absolute Percentage Difference (MAPD) up to ~50%. We derived the theoretical boundaries of the fc-Trad space to restrain the domain and resolution dependencies of the triangle models. The theoretical warm edge was derived by solving for temperatures of the driest bare surface and the fully vegetated surface with the largest water stress implicit in both radiation budget and energy balance equations. The areal average temperature can be taken as the theoretical cold edge. The triangle models appear to perform well across large areas but fail to predict the evaporative fraction over small areas. However, performance of the triangle models across small domains can be improved by incorporating the theoretical boundaries. Combining the triangle models with the theoretical boundaries can effectively reduce

  10. Biometric Properties Estimated from High Resolution Imagery in the Amazon and the Cerrado Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, S.; Palace, M. W.; Braswell, B. H.; Bustamante, M.; Ferreira, L.

    2009-12-01

    The Amazon and Cerrado regions are unique ecotypes with complex and varied forest and vegetation structure. Forest structure reveals the dual influences of disturbance and growth. Because these two tropical regions have and are undergoing rapid change due to human encroachment, understanding the forests structure in these ecotypes aids in efforts to quantify carbon dynamics on both regional and global scales. Analysis of data from literature found that canopy cover and biomass are highly correlated in the Cerrado (r2=.86), more so than other structural variables. This indicates that use of radar and lidar to estimate biomass in savannah ecotypes with sparse and clumpy tree cover might be prone to error. Literature also suggests that lidar and radar saturate in high biomass forests. Remote sensing of forest canopy structure estimation has greatly advanced to due the aid of high resolution satellite images. We estimated forest structure using high resolution image data from IKONOS using textural methods such as lacunarity, semivariance, power spectrum, entropy, and a crown characterization algorithm for 11,014 image tiles or sections (1 square km each) extracted from 300 IKONOS images. Our preprocessing of this data calculated top-of-atmosphere reflectance based on metadata from IKONOS image acquisition. A user-trained five category landuse classification was used to determine which areas within an IKONOS tile would be analyzed using textural methods.We compare results with available field measured forest biometric data. We used an Index of Translational Homogeneity (ITH) calculated from our lacunarity results. ITH is an index of average crown width and we estimated an average of 8.1 m +/- 7.7 SD. Our estimate of the range based on semivariance was an average of 11.4 m +/- 7.3 SD. Our crown characterization algorithm estimated average crown width to be 12.5 m +/- 4.0 SD. The average entropy of each tile was 5.7 +/- 0.5 SD. We associated each IKONOS tile with one of

  11. Influence of image resolution and evaluation algorithm on estimates of the lacunarity of porous media.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, D E; Dathe, A; Baveye, P

    2005-10-01

    In recent years, experience has demonstrated that the classical fractal dimensions are not sufficient to describe uniquely the interstitial geometry of porous media. At least one additional index or dimension is necessary. Lacunarity, a measure of the degree to which a data set is translationally invariant, is a possible candidate. Unfortunately, several approaches exist to evaluate it on the basis of binary images of the object under study, and it is unclear to what extent the lacunarity estimates that these methods produce are dependent on the resolution of the images used. In the present work, the gliding-box algorithm of Allain and Cloitre [Phys. Rev. A 44, 3552 (1991)] and two variants of the sandbox algorithm of Chappard et al. [J. Pathol. 195, 515 (2001)], along with three additional algorithms, are used to evaluate the lacunarity of images of a textbook fractal, the Sierpinski carpet, of scanning electron micrographs of a thin section of a European soil, and of light transmission photographs of a Togolese soil. The results suggest that lacunarity estimates, as well as the ranking of the three tested systems according to their lacunarity, are affected strongly by the algorithm used, by the resolution of the images to which these algorithms are applied, and, at least for three of the algorithms (producing scale-dependent lacunarity estimates), by the scale at which the images are observed. Depending on the conditions under which the estimation of the lacunarity is carried out, lacunarity values range from 1.02 to 2.14 for the three systems tested, and all three of the systems used can be viewed alternatively as the most or the least "lacunar." Some of this indeterminacy and dependence on image resolution is alleviated in the averaged lacunarity estimates yielded by Chappard et al.'s algorithm. Further research will be needed to determine if these lacunarity estimates allow an improved, unique characterization of porous media.

  12. Impulse Response Estimation for Spatial Resolution Enhancement in Ultrasonic NDE Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G A

    2004-06-25

    This report describes a signal processing algorithm and MATLAB software for improving spatial resolution in ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) imaging of materials. Given a measured reflection signal and an associated reference signal, the algorithm produces an optimal least-squares estimate of the impulse response of the material under test. This estimated impulse response, when used in place of the raw reflection signal, enhances the spatial resolution of the ultrasonic measurements by removing distortion caused by the limited-bandwidth transducers and the materials under test. The theory behind the processing algorithms is briefly presented, while the reader is referred to the bibliography for details. The main focus of the report is to describe how to use the MATLAB software. Two processing examples using actual ultrasonic measurements are provided for tutorial purposes.

  13. Cumulus cloud base height estimation from high spatial resolution Landsat data - A Hough transform approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berendes, Todd; Sengupta, Sailes K.; Welch, Ron M.; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Navar, Murgesh

    1992-01-01

    A semiautomated methodology is developed for estimating cumulus cloud base heights on the basis of high spatial resolution Landsat MSS data, using various image-processing techniques to match cloud edges with their corresponding shadow edges. The cloud base height is then estimated by computing the separation distance between the corresponding generalized Hough transform reference points. The differences between the cloud base heights computed by these means and a manual verification technique are of the order of 100 m or less; accuracies of 50-70 m may soon be possible via EOS instruments.

  14. Disaster debris estimation using high-resolution polarimetric stereo-SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Christian N.; Gokon, Hideomi; Jimbo, Masaru; Koshimura, Shunichi; Sato, Motoyuki

    2016-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of debris estimation which is one of the most important initial challenges in the wake of a disaster like the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. Reasonable estimates of the debris have to be made available to decision makers as quickly as possible. Current approaches to obtain this information are far from being optimal as they usually rely on manual interpretation of optical imagery. We have developed a novel approach for the estimation of tsunami debris pile heights and volumes for improved emergency response. The method is based on a stereo-synthetic aperture radar (stereo-SAR) approach for very high-resolution polarimetric SAR. An advanced gradient-based optical-flow estimation technique is applied for optimal image coregistration of the low-coherence non-interferometric data resulting from the illumination from opposite directions and in different polarizations. By applying model based decomposition of the coherency matrix, only the odd bounce scattering contributions are used to optimize echo time computation. The method exclusively considers the relative height differences from the top of the piles to their base to achieve a very fine resolution in height estimation. To define the base, a reference point on non-debris-covered ground surface is located adjacent to the debris pile targets by exploiting the polarimetric scattering information. The proposed technique is validated using in situ data of real tsunami debris taken on a temporary debris management site in the tsunami affected area near Sendai city, Japan. The estimated height error is smaller than 0.6 m RMSE. The good quality of derived pile heights allows for a voxel-based estimation of debris volumes with a RMSE of 1099 m3. Advantages of the proposed method are fast computation time, and robust height and volume estimation of debris piles without the need for pre-event data or auxiliary information like DEM, topographic maps or GCPs.

  15. Using High Resolution Numerical Weather Prediction Models to Reduce and Estimate Uncertainty in Flood Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, S. J.; Moore, R. J.; Roberts, N.

    2007-12-01

    Forecast rainfall from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and/or nowcasting systems is a major source of uncertainty for short-term flood forecasting. One approach for reducing and estimating this uncertainty is to use high resolution NWP models that should provide better rainfall predictions. The potential benefit of running the Met Office Unified Model (UM) with a grid spacing of 4 and 1 km compared to the current operational resolution of 12 km is assessed using the January 2005 Carlisle flood in northwest England. These NWP rainfall forecasts, and forecasts from the Nimrod nowcasting system, were fed into the lumped Probability Distributed Model (PDM) and the distributed Grid-to-Grid model to predict river flow at the outlets of two catchments important for flood warning. The results show the benefit of increased resolution in the UM, the benefit of coupling the high- resolution rainfall forecasts to hydrological models and the improvement in timeliness of flood warning that might have been possible. Ongoing work aims to employ these NWP rainfall forecasts in ensemble form as part of a procedure for estimating the uncertainty of flood forecasts.

  16. High-resolution rainfall estimation for Helsinki urban area using Helsinki radar network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Laura; Nordling, Kalle; Cremonini, Roberto; Moisseev, Dmitri; Chandrasekar, Venkatachalam

    2014-05-01

    High resolution precipitation data is a crucial factor for hydrological applications in urban areas. Small fluctuations in precipitation fields are of great importance considering the fast response of urban catchments due to the dominance of impervious surfaces. High resolution precipitation observations are needed in order to characterize these fluctuations. Weather radar provides high spatial resolution precipitation estimations. However, the quality of its observations in an urban environment is significantly degraded, among other things, by ground clutter and beam-blockage. A solution for this problem is to use a radar network, where the data gaps of one radar will be filled by using observations from the others. Very few cities have dedicated weather radar networks. In some cities, like Helsinki, there are several weather radars covering the metropolitan area, but they are operated by different organizations. In this study, we show how such systems can be used to build a network and what is the advantage of using radarnetworks for estimating precipitation in urban catchments. The urban Helsinki area is covered by observations from three individual-purpose C-band weather radars (Helsinki University's Kumpula (KUM), Vaisala Oy's Kerava (KER) and Finnish Meteorological Institute's Vantaa (VAN)). We used the data from these radars to form a network and we design a similar task which runs at the same time in each radar couple of times per day. Nonetheless, it is challenging to make them observe at the same area at exactly the same time, which could lead to fast changing, short precipitation events being missed. Hence, synchronization and temporal resolution are the main concerns when building a network. Consequently, to decrease the impact of these restrictions in the Helsinki radar network we propose the use of the optic flow interpolation algorithm to retrieve information in between two radar observations and use the retrieved dataset from the three radars to

  17. A 30 mK, 13.5 T scanning tunneling microscope with two independent tips

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, Anita; Gubrud, M. A.; Dana, R.; Dreyer, M.; Anderson, J. R.; Lobb, C. J.; Wellstood, F. C.

    2014-04-15

    We describe the design, construction, and performance of an ultra-low temperature, high-field scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with two independent tips. The STM is mounted on a dilution refrigerator and operates at a base temperature of 30 mK with magnetic fields of up to 13.5 T. We focus on the design of the two-tip STM head, as well as the sample transfer mechanism, which allows in situ transfer from an ultra high vacuum preparation chamber while the STM is at 1.5 K. Other design details such as the vibration isolation and rf-filtered wiring are also described. Their effectiveness is demonstrated via spectral current noise characteristics and the root mean square roughness of atomic resolution images. The high-field capability is shown by the magnetic field dependence of the superconducting gap of Cu{sub x}Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}. Finally, we present images and spectroscopy taken with superconducting Nb tips with the refrigerator at 35 mK that indicate that the effective temperature of our tips/sample is approximately 184 mK, corresponding to an energy resolution of 16 μeV.

  18. Improving Spatial Resolution of Agricultural Water Use Estimation Using ALOS AVNIR-2 Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandridis, T. K.; Chemin, Y.; Cherif, I.; Tsakoumis, G.; Galanis, G.; Arampatzis, G.; Zalidis, G. C.; Silleos, N. G.; Stavrinos, E.

    2008-11-01

    Estimating agricultural water use is an issue of primary importance in the Mediterranean. At the same time, several advanced algorithms have been developed, which couple Earth Observation data in thermal, visible and near-infrared wavelengths with a few meteorological measurements to provide a close approximation to the actual water use. However, due to the detailed cropping pattern of the Greek agricultural landscape, higher resolution satellite imagery is necessary, a demand which may not be met by the available thermal infrared imagery (Landsat 5 TM and Terra/ASTER). This study investigates the contribution of ALOS AVNIR-2 images to estimate agricultural water consumption in high spatial resolution. Two methods were tested, the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land and the remote sensing crop coefficient method. The results were compared against similar products derived with Terra/MODIS and Landsat TM images, used as reference. Comparisons were based on a pixel level, with a random dataset for pixel to pixel comparison and on a canal command area level, with statistical comparison of the water use estimations. Merging of the two datasets was based on the modified Brovey technique, which has the advantage of maintaining the original values, but redistributes them in a higher resolution space. Concluding, ALOS AVNIR-2 significantly underestimated agricultural water use with the crop coefficient method, but was successful in providing the element of high spatial detail to the MODIS derived result, proving to be a useful input in modelling water use of irrigated Greek basins.

  19. Spectral estimation optical coherence tomography for axial super-resolution (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinyu; Yu, Xiaojun; Wang, Nanshuo; Bo, En; Luo, Yuemei; Chen, Si; Cui, Dongyao; Liu, Linbo

    2016-03-01

    The sample depth reflectivity profile of Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) is estimated from the inverse Fourier transform of the spectral interference signals (interferograms). As a result, the axial resolution is fundamentally limited by the coherence length of the light source. We demonstrate an axial resolution improvement method by using the autoregressive spectral estimation technique to instead of the inverse Fourier transform to analyze the spectral interferograms, which is named as spectral estimation OCT (SE-OCT). SE-OCT improves the axial resolution by a factor of up to 4.7 compared with the corresponding FD-OCT. Furthermore, SE-OCT provides a complete sidelobe suppression in the point-spread function. Using phantoms such as an air wedge and micro particles, we prove the ability of resolution improvement. To test SE-OCT for real biological tissue, we image the rat cornea and demonstrate that SE-OCT enables clear identification of corneal endothelium anatomical details ex vivo. We also find that the performance of SE-OCT is depended on SNR of the feature object. To evaluate the potential usage and define the application scope of SE-OCT, we further investigate the property of SNR dependence and the artifacts that may be caused. We find SE-OCT may be uniquely suited for viewing high SNR layer structures, such as the epithelium and endothelium in cornea, retina and aorta. Given that SE-OCT can be implemented in the FD-OCT devices easily, the new capabilities provided by SE-OCT are likely to offer immediate improvements to the diagnosis and management of diseases based on OCT imaging.

  20. RESEARCH PAPER: Automated estimation of stellar fundamental parameters from low resolution spectra: the PLS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Nan; Luo, A.-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2009-06-01

    PLS (Partial Least Squares regression) is introduced into an automatic estimation of fundamental stellar spectral parameters. It extracts the most correlative spectral component to the parameters (Teff, log g and [Fe/H]), and sets up a linear regression function from spectra to the corresponding parameters. Considering the properties of stellar spectra and the PLS algorithm, we present a piecewise PLS regression method for estimation of stellar parameters, which is composed of one PLS model for Teff, and seven PLS models for log g and [Fe/H] estimation. Its performance is investigated by large experiments on flux calibrated spectra and continuum normalized spectra at different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and resolutions. The results show that the piecewise PLS method is robust for spectra at the medium resolution of 0.23 nm. For low resolution 0.5 nm and 1 nm spectra, it achieves competitive results at higher SNR. Experiments using ELODIE spectra of 0.23 nm resolution illustrate that our piecewise PLS models trained with MILES spectra are efficient for O ~ G stars: for flux calibrated spectra, the systematic offsets are 3.8%, 0.14 dex, and -0.09 dex for Teff, log g and [Fe/H], with error scatters of 5.2%, 0.44 dex and 0.38 dex, respectively; for continuum normalized spectra, the systematic offsets are 3.8%, 0.12dex, and -0.13dex for Teff, log g and [Fe/H], with error scatters of 5.2%, 0.49 dex and 0.41 dex, respectively. The PLS method is rapid, easy to use and does not rely as strongly on the tightness of a parameter grid of templates to reach high precision as Artificial Neural Networks or minimum distance methods do.

  1. High-resolution methane emission estimates using surface measurements and the InTEM inversion system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, Sarah; Manning, Alistair; Robinson, Andrew; Riddick, Stuart; Forster, Grant; Oram, Dave; O'Doherty, Simon; Harris, Neil

    2015-04-01

    High quality GHG emission estimates will be required to successfully tackle climate change. There is a growing need for comparisons between emission estimates produced using bottom-up and top-down techniques at high spatial resolution. Here, a top-down inversion approach combining multi-year atmospheric measurements and an inversion model, InTEM, was used to estimate methane emissions for a region in the South East of the UK (~100 x 150 km). We present results covering a 2-year period (July 2012 - July 2014) in which atmospheric methane concentrations were recorded at 1 - 2 minute time-steps at four locations within the region of interest. Precise measurements were obtained using gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (GC-FID) for all sites except one, which used a PICARRO Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (CRDS). These observations, along with the UK Met Office's Lagrangian particle dispersion model, NAME, were used within InTEM to produce the methane emission fields. We present results from both Bayesian and non-prior based inversion analysis at varying spatial resolutions, for annual, seasonal and monthly time frames. These results are compared with the UK National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) which is compiled using bottom-up methods and available at 1x1 km resolution. A thorough assessment of uncertainty is incorporated into this technique which is represented in the results. This project is part of the UK GAUGE campaign which aims to produce robust estimates of the UK GHG budget using new and existing measurement networks (e.g. the UK DECC GHG network) and modelling activities at a range of scales.

  2. Estimation of the distribution of Tabebuia guayacan (Bignoniaceae) using high-resolution remote sensing imagery.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Azofeifa, Arturo; Rivard, Benoit; Wright, Joseph; Feng, Ji-Lu; Li, Peijun; Chong, Mei Mei; Bohlman, Stephanie A

    2011-01-01

    Species identification and characterization in tropical environments is an emerging field in tropical remote sensing. Significant efforts are currently aimed at the detection of tree species, of levels of forest successional stages, and the extent of liana occurrence at the top of canopies. In this paper we describe our use of high resolution imagery from the Quickbird Satellite to estimate the flowering population of Tabebuia guayacan trees at Barro Colorado Island (BCI), in Panama. The imagery was acquired on 29 April 2002 and 21 March 2004. Spectral Angle Mapping via a One-Class Support Vector machine was used to detect the presence of 422 and 557 flowering tress in the April 2002 and March 2004 imagery. Of these, 273 flowering trees are common to both dates. This study presents a new perspective on the effectiveness of high resolution remote sensing for monitoring a phenological response and its use as a tool for potential conservation and management of natural resources in tropical environments.

  3. Laser radar cross-section estimation from high-resolution image data.

    PubMed

    Osche, G R; Seeber, K N; Lok, Y F; Young, D S

    1992-05-10

    A methodology for the estimation of ladar cross sections from high-resolution image data of geometrically complex targets is presented. Coherent CO(2) laser radar was used to generate high-resolution amplitude imagery of a UC-8 Buffalo test aircraft at a range of 1.3 km at nine different aspect angles. The average target ladar cross section was synthesized from these data and calculated to be sigma(T) = 15.4 dBsm, which is similar to the expected microwave radar cross sections. The aspect angle dependence of the cross section shows pronounced peaks at nose on and broadside, which are also in agreement with radar results. Strong variations in both the mean amplitude and the statistical distributions of amplitude with the aspect angle have also been observed. The relative mix of diffuse and specular returns causes significant deviations from a simple Lambertian or Swerling II target, especially at broadside where large normal surfaces are present.

  4. Estimating evapotranspiration of riparian vegetation using high resolution multispectral, thermal infrared and lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neale, Christopher M. U.; Geli, Hatim; Taghvaeian, Saleh; Masih, Ashish; Pack, Robert T.; Simms, Ronald D.; Baker, Michael; Milliken, Jeff A.; O'Meara, Scott; Witherall, Amy J.

    2011-11-01

    High resolution airborne multispectral and thermal infrared imagery was acquired over the Mojave River, California with the Utah State University airborne remote sensing system integrated with the LASSI imaging Lidar also built and operated at USU. The data were acquired in pre-established mapping blocks over a 2 day period covering approximately 144 Km of the Mojave River floodplain and riparian zone, approximately 1500 meters in width. The multispectral imagery (green, red and near-infrared bands) was ortho-rectified using the Lidar point cloud data through a direct geo-referencing technique. Thermal Infrared imagery was rectified to the multispectral ortho-mosaics. The lidar point cloud data was classified to separate ground surface returns from vegetation returns as well as structures such as buildings, bridges etc. One-meter DEM's were produced from the surface returns along with vegetation canopy height also at 1-meter grids. Two surface energy balance models that use remote sensing inputs were applied to the high resolution imagery, namely the SEBAL and the Two Source Model. The model parameterizations were slightly modified to accept high resolution imagery (1-meter) as well as the lidar-based vegetation height product, which was used to estimate the aerodynamic roughness length. Both models produced very similar results in terms of latent heat fluxes (LE). Instantaneous LE values were extrapolated to daily evapotranspiration rates (ET) using the reference ET fraction, with data obtained from a local weather station. Seasonal rates were obtained by extrapolating the reference ET fraction according to the seasonal growth habits of the different species. Vegetation species distribution and area were obtained from classification of the multispectral imagery. Results indicate that cottonwood and salt cedar (tamarisk) had the highest evapotranspiration rates followed by mesophytes, arundo, mesquite and desert shrubs. This research showed that high-resolution

  5. On-line 3D motion estimation using low resolution MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glitzner, M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Crijns, S. P. M.

    2015-08-01

    Image processing such as deformable image registration finds its way into radiotherapy as a means to track non-rigid anatomy. With the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided radiotherapy, intrafraction anatomy snapshots become technically feasible. MRI provides the needed tissue signal for high-fidelity image registration. However, acquisitions, especially in 3D, take a considerable amount of time. Pushing towards real-time adaptive radiotherapy, MRI needs to be accelerated without degrading the quality of information. In this paper, we investigate the impact of image resolution on the quality of motion estimations. Potentially, spatially undersampled images yield comparable motion estimations. At the same time, their acquisition times would reduce greatly due to the sparser sampling. In order to substantiate this hypothesis, exemplary 4D datasets of the abdomen were downsampled gradually. Subsequently, spatiotemporal deformations are extracted consistently using the same motion estimation for each downsampled dataset. Errors between the original and the respectively downsampled version of the dataset are then evaluated. Compared to ground-truth, results show high similarity of deformations estimated from downsampled image data. Using a dataset with {{≤ft(2.5 \\text{mm}\\right)}3} voxel size, deformation fields could be recovered well up to a downsampling factor of 2, i.e. {{≤ft(5 \\text{mm}\\right)}3} . In a therapy guidance scenario MRI, imaging speed could accordingly increase approximately fourfold, with acceptable loss of estimated motion quality.

  6. On-line 3D motion estimation using low resolution MRI.

    PubMed

    Glitzner, M; de Senneville, B Denis; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W; Crijns, S P M

    2015-08-21

    Image processing such as deformable image registration finds its way into radiotherapy as a means to track non-rigid anatomy. With the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided radiotherapy, intrafraction anatomy snapshots become technically feasible. MRI provides the needed tissue signal for high-fidelity image registration. However, acquisitions, especially in 3D, take a considerable amount of time. Pushing towards real-time adaptive radiotherapy, MRI needs to be accelerated without degrading the quality of information. In this paper, we investigate the impact of image resolution on the quality of motion estimations. Potentially, spatially undersampled images yield comparable motion estimations. At the same time, their acquisition times would reduce greatly due to the sparser sampling. In order to substantiate this hypothesis, exemplary 4D datasets of the abdomen were downsampled gradually. Subsequently, spatiotemporal deformations are extracted consistently using the same motion estimation for each downsampled dataset. Errors between the original and the respectively downsampled version of the dataset are then evaluated. Compared to ground-truth, results show high similarity of deformations estimated from downsampled image data. Using a dataset with (2.5 mm)3 voxel size, deformation fields could be recovered well up to a downsampling factor of 2, i.e. (5 mm)3. In a therapy guidance scenario MRI, imaging speed could accordingly increase approximately fourfold, with acceptable loss of estimated motion quality.

  7. Estimating and Mapping Urban Impervious Surfaces: Reflection on Spectral, Spatial, and Temporal Resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Q.

    2007-12-01

    Impervious surface is a key indicator of urban environmental quality and urbanization degree. Therefore, estimation and mapping of impervious surfaces in urban areas has attracted more and more attention recently by using remote sensing digital images. In this paper, satellite images with various spectral, spatial, and temporal resolutions are employed to examine the effects of these remote sensing data characteristics on mapping accuracy of urban impervious surfaces. The study area was the city proper of Indianapolis (Marion County), Indiana, United States. Linear spectral mixture analysis was applied to generate high albedo, low albedo, vegetation, and soil fraction images (endmembers) from the satellite images, and impervious surfaces were then estimated by adding high albedo and low albedo fraction images. A comparison of EO-1 ALI (multispectral) and Hyperion (hyperspectral) images indicates that the Hyperion image was more effective in discerning low albedo surface materials, especially the spectral bands in the mid-infrared region. Linear spectral mixing modeling was found more useful for medium spatial resolution images, such as Landsat TM/ETM+ and ASTER images, due to the existence of a large amount of mixed pixels in the urban areas. The model, however, may not be suitable for high spatial resolution images, such as IKONOS images, because of less influence from the mixing pixel. The shadow problem in the high spatial resolution images, caused by tall buildings and large tree crowns, is a challenge in impervious surface extraction. Alternative image processing algorithms such as decision tree classifier may be more appropriate to achieve high mapping accuracy. For mid-latitude cities, seasonal vegetation phenology has a significant effect on the spectral response of terrestrial features, and therefore, image analysis must take into account of this environmental characteristic. Three ASTER images, acquired on April 5, 2004, June 16, 2001, and October 3, 2000

  8. Statistical LOR estimation for a high-resolution dMiCE PET detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champley, Kyle M.; Lewellen, Thomas K.; Mac Donald, Lawrence R.; Miyaoka, Robert S.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2009-10-01

    We develop a statistical line of response (LOR) estimator of the three-dimensional interaction positions of a pair of annihilation photons in a PET detector module with depth of interaction capability. The three-dimensional points of interaction of a coincidence pair of photons within the detector module are estimated by calculation of an expectation of the points of interaction conditioned on the signals measured by the photosensors. This conditional expectation is computed from estimates of the probability density function of the light collection process and a model of the kinetics of photon interactions in the detector module. Our algorithm is capable of handling coincidences where each annihilation photon interacts any number of times within the detector module before being completely absorbed or escaping. In the case of multiple interactions, our algorithm estimates the position of the first interaction for each of the coincidence photons. This LOR estimation algorithm is developed for a high-resolution PET detector capable of providing depth-of-interaction information. Depth of interaction is measured by tailoring the light shared between two adjacent detector elements. These light-sharing crystal pairs are referred to as dMiCE and are being developed in our lab. Each detector element in the prototype system has a 2 × 2 mm2 cross section and is directly coupled to a micro-pixel avalanche photodiode (MAPD). In this set-up, the distribution of the ratio of light shared between two adjacent detector elements can be expressed as a function of the depth of interaction. Monte Carlo experiments are performed using our LOR estimation algorithm and compared with Anger logic. We show that our LOR estimation algorithm provides a significant improvement over Anger logic under a variety of parameters.

  9. Statistical LOR estimation for a high-resolution dMiCE PET detector

    PubMed Central

    Champley, Kyle M.; Lewellen, Thomas K.; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Miyaoka, Robert S.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    We develop a statistical line of response (LOR) estimator of the three-dimensional interaction positions of a pair of annihilation photons in a PET detector module with depth of interaction capability. The three-dimensional points of interaction of a coincidence pair of photons within the detector module are estimated by calculation of an expectation of the points of interaction conditioned on the signals measured by the photosensors. This conditional expectation is computed from estimates of the probability density function of the light collection process and a model of the kinetics of photon interactions in the detector module. Our algorithm is capable of handling coincidences where each annihilation photon interacts any number of times within the detector module before being completely absorbed or escaping. In the case of multiple interactions, our algorithm estimates the position of the first interaction for each of the coincidence photons. This LOR estimation algorithm is developed for a high-resolution PET detector capable of providing depth-of-interaction information. Depth of interaction is measured by tailoring the light shared between two adjacent detector elements. These light-sharing crystal pairs are referred to as dMiCE and are being developed in our lab. Each detector element in the prototype system has a 2 × 2 mm2 cross section and is directly coupled to a micro-pixel avalanche photodiode (MAPD). In this set-up, the distribution of the ratio of light shared between two adjacent detector elements can be expressed as a function of the depth of interaction. Monte Carlo experiments are performed using our LOR estimation algorithm and compared with Anger logic. We show that our LOR estimation algorithm provides a significant improvement over Anger logic under a variety of parameters. PMID:19809102

  10. Estimation of Stand Height and Forest Volume Using High Resolution Stereo Photography and Forest Type Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. M.

    2016-06-01

    Traditional field methods for measuring tree heights are often too costly and time consuming. An alternative remote sensing approach is to measure tree heights from digital stereo photographs which is more practical for forest managers and less expensive than LiDAR or synthetic aperture radar. This work proposes an estimation of stand height and forest volume(m3/ha) using normalized digital surface model (nDSM) from high resolution stereo photography (25cm resolution) and forest type map. The study area was located in Mt. Maehwa model forest in Hong Chun-Gun, South Korea. The forest type map has four attributes such as major species, age class, DBH class and crown density class by stand. Overlapping aerial photos were taken in September 2013 and digital surface model (DSM) was created by photogrammetric methods(aerial triangulation, digital image matching). Then, digital terrain model (DTM) was created by filtering DSM and subtracted DTM from DSM pixel by pixel, resulting in nDSM which represents object heights (buildings, trees, etc.). Two independent variables from nDSM were used to estimate forest stand volume: crown density (%) and stand height (m). First, crown density was calculated using canopy segmentation method considering live crown ratio. Next, stand height was produced by averaging individual tree heights in a stand using Esri's ArcGIS and the USDA Forest Service's FUSION software. Finally, stand volume was estimated and mapped using aerial photo stand volume equations by species which have two independent variables, crown density and stand height. South Korea has a historical imagery archive which can show forest change in 40 years of successful forest rehabilitation. For a future study, forest volume change map (1970s-present) will be produced using this stand volume estimation method and a historical imagery archive.

  11. Merging raster meteorological data with low resolution satellite images for improved estimation of actual evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherif, Ines; Alexandridis, Thomas; Chambel Leitao, Pedro; Jauch, Eduardo; Stavridou, Domna; Iordanidis, Charalampos; Silleos, Nikolaos; Misopolinos, Nikolaos; Neves, Ramiro; Safara Araujo, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    ). A correlation analysis was performed at the common spatial resolution of 1km using selected homogeneous pixels (from the land cover point of view). A statistically significant correlation factor of 0.6 was found, and the RMSE was 0.92 mm/day. Using raster meteorological data the ITA-MyWater algorithms were able to catch the variability of weather patterns over the river basin and thus improved the spatial distribution of evapotranpiration estimations at low resolution. The work presented is part of the FP7-EU project "Merging hydrological models and Earth observation data for reliable information on water - MyWater".

  12. Use of UAS Remote Sensing Data (AggieAir) to Estimate Crop ET at High Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ELarab, M.; Torres, A.; Nieto Solana, H.; Kustas, W. P.; Song, L.; Alfieri, J. G.; Prueger, J. H.; McKee, L.; Anderson, M. C.; Jensen, A.; McKee, M.; Alsina, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Estimation of the spatial distribution of evapotranspiration (ET) based on remotely sensed imagery has become useful for managing water in irrigated agricultural at various spatial scales. Currently, data acquired by conventional satellites (Landsat, ASTER, etc.) lack the needed spatial resolution to capture variability of interest to support evapotranspiration estimates. In this study, an unmanned aerial system (UAS), called AggieAirTM, was used to acquire high-resolution imagery in the visual, near infrared (0.15m resolution) and thermal infrared spectra (0.6m resolution). AggieAir flew over two study sites in Utah and Central Valley of California. The imagery was used as input to a surface energy balance model based on the Mapping Evapotranspiration with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) modeling approach. The discussion will highlight the ET estimation methodologies and the implications of having high resolution ET maps.

  13. IRAM 30 m large scale survey of {sup 12}CO(2-1) and {sup 13}CO(2-1) emission in the Orion molecular cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Berné, O.; Cernicharo, J.; Marcelino, N.

    2014-11-01

    Using the IRAM 30 m telescope, we have surveyed a 1 × 0.°8 part of the Orion molecular cloud in the {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO (2-1) lines with a maximal spatial resolution of ∼11'' and spectral resolution of ∼0.4 km s{sup –1}. The cloud appears filamentary, clumpy, and with a complex kinematical structure. We derive an estimated mass of the cloud of 7700 M {sub ☉} (half of which is found in regions with visual extinctions A{sub V} below ∼10) and a dynamical age for the nebula of the order of 0.2 Myr. The energy balance suggests that magnetic fields play an important role in supporting the cloud, at large and small scales. According to our analysis, the turbulent kinetic energy in the molecular gas due to outflows is comparable to turbulent kinetic energy resulting from the interaction of the cloud with the H II region. This latter feedback appears negative, i.e., the triggering of star formation by the H II region is inefficient in Orion. The reduced data as well as additional products such as the column density map are made available online (http://userpages.irap.omp.eu/∼oberne/Olivier{sub B}erne/Data).

  14. Assessment of radar resolution requirements for soil moisture estimation from simulated satellite imagery. [Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T. (Principal Investigator); Dobson, M. C.; Moezzi, S.

    1982-01-01

    Radar simulations were performed at five-day intervals over a twenty-day period and used to estimate soil moisture from a generalized algorithm requiring only received power and the mean elevation of a test site near Lawrence, Kansas. The results demonstrate that the soil moisture of about 90% of the 20-m by 20-m pixel elements can be predicted with an accuracy of + or - 20% of field capacity within relatively flat agricultural portions of the test site. Radar resolutions of 93 m by 100 m with 23 looks or coarser gave the best results, largely because of the effects of signal fading. For the distribution of land cover categories, soils, and elevation in the test site, very coarse radar resolutions of 1 km by 1 km and 2.6 km by 3.1 km gave the best results for wet moisture conditions while a finer resolution of 93 m by 100 m was found to yield superior results for dry to moist soil conditions.

  15. Experimental Estimation of CLASP Spatial Resolution: Results of the Instrument's Optical Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giono, Gabrial; Katsukawa, Yukio; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Narukage, Noriyuki; Bando, Takamasa; Kano, Ryohei; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Ken; Winebarger, Amy; Auchere, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding-rocket experiment currently being built at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. This instrument aims to probe for the first time the magnetic field strength and orientation in the solar upper-chromosphere and lower-transition region. CLASP will measure the polarization of the Lyman-Alpha line (121.6nm) with an unprecedented accuracy, and derive the magnetic field information through the Hanle effect. Although polarization accuracy and spectral resolution are crucial for the Hanle effect detection, spatial resolution is also important to get reliable context image via the slit-jaw camera. As spatial resolution is directly related with the alignment of optics, it is also a good way of ensuring the alignment of the instrument to meet the scientific requirement. This poster will detail the experiments carried out to align CLASP's optics (telescope and spectrograph), as both part of the instrument were aligned separately. The telescope was aligned in double-pass mode, and a laser interferometer (He-Ne) was used to measure the telescope's wavefront error (WFE). The secondary mirror tilt and position were adjusted to remove comas and defocus aberrations from the WFE. Effect of gravity on the WFE measurement was estimated and the final WFE derived in zero-g condition for CLASP telescope will be presented. In addition, an estimation of the spot shape and size derived from the final WFE will also be shown. The spectrograph was aligned with a custom procedure: because Ly-??light is absorbed by air, the spectrograph's off-axis parabolic mirrors were aligned in Visible Light (VL) using a custom-made VL grating instead of the flight Ly-? grating. Results of the alignment in Visible Light will be shown and the spot shape recorded with CCDs at various position along the slit will be displayed. Results from both alignment experiment will be compared to the design requirement, and will be combined in

  16. Surprises from stream greenhouse gas emissions estimated at high resolution in a catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natchimuthu, Sivakiruthika; Wallin, Marcus; Klemedtsson, Leif; Bastviken, David

    2016-04-01

    Streams represent environments where terrestrial and aquatic habitats meet and has recently been recognized as disproportionally large emitters of CO2 in landscapes. However, previous estimates are often based on measurements with low resolution in time and space, and frequently CO2 concentrations are also estimated indirectly from alkalinity and pH measurements adding to the uncertainty. The capacity of streams to emit CH4 is presently also poorly understood. In this study, we performed regular and spatially distributed measurements of CO2 and CH4 water concentrations and gas exchange rates in a headwater stream network, aiming to resolve spatial and temporal variability in flux patterns. Multiple supplementary methods including tracer injections, CO2 sensor networks, drifting flux chambers, and stream section mass balances were performed. A locally validated spatiotemporal model with high accuracy and resolution was developed. The observed variability was high revealing high fluxes very locally or during short periods in time related to rapid hydrological events, highlighting the need to consider spatiotemporal variability in detail. Stream CH4 emissions were also surprisingly high compared to CO2 emissions.

  17. Efficient high-rate satellite clock estimation for PPP ambiguity resolution using carrier-ranges.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Jiang, Weiping; Ge, Maorong; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2014-11-25

    In order to catch up the short-term clock variation of GNSS satellites, clock corrections must be estimated and updated at a high-rate for Precise Point Positioning (PPP). This estimation is already very time-consuming for the GPS constellation only as a great number of ambiguities need to be simultaneously estimated. However, on the one hand better estimates are expected by including more stations, and on the other hand satellites from different GNSS systems must be processed integratively for a reliable multi-GNSS positioning service. To alleviate the heavy computational burden, epoch-differenced observations are always employed where ambiguities are eliminated. As the epoch-differenced method can only derive temporal clock changes which have to be aligned to the absolute clocks but always in a rather complicated way, in this paper, an efficient method for high-rate clock estimation is proposed using the concept of "carrier-range" realized by means of PPP with integer ambiguity resolution. Processing procedures for both post- and real-time processing are developed, respectively. The experimental validation shows that the computation time could be reduced to about one sixth of that of the existing methods for post-processing and less than 1 s for processing a single epoch of a network with about 200 stations in real-time mode after all ambiguities are fixed. This confirms that the proposed processing strategy will enable the high-rate clock estimation for future multi-GNSS networks in post-processing and possibly also in real-time mode.

  18. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study of IODP Site U1408 in the Northwest Atlantic - toward the high-resolution relative paleointensity estimate during the middle Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Yamazaki, T.; Oda, H.

    2015-12-01

    We have conducted paleomagnetic and rock magnetic measurements on the sedimentary sections recovered from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site U1408 in the Northwest Atlantic, off Newfoundland. The measurements were done on u-channel samples using a pass-through superconducting rock magnetometer in a manner that remanent magnetizations (natural, anhysteretic and isothermal remanent magnetizations: NRM, ARM and IRM) were subjected to stepwise alternating field (AF) demagnetizations up to 80 mT and are measured with 1 cm spacing at each step.The characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) was resolved after AF demagnetization of 20-30 mT for most of the studied interval. As a result, we could identify several polarity reversals which were able to be correlated with the geomagnetic polarity time scale by Gradstein et al. (2012) (Geologic Time Scale 2012), with referring the shipboard biostratigraphy (Norris et al., 2014). The interval at ~ 33-157 mcd (meter composite depth) was interpreted to cover the Chrons C18n.1n to C20n with missing Chron C19n because of the somewhat ambiguous magnetic signals at the interval at ~ 70-110 mcd. The correlation provided an age model inferring sedimentation rate of about 2-4 cm/kyr during these chrons.There is the interval that shows relatively constant ARM and IRM intensities as well as ratios of ARM to IRM (ARM/IRM): the interval at ~ 37-90 mcd resulted in ARM intensity of 0.2-0.4 A/m, IRM intensity of 1-2 A/m and ARM/IRM of 0.17-0.20. This interval corresponds to the Chron C18 and the estimated sedimentation rate of the interval is ~ 2 cm/kyr. It is expected that high-resolution relative paleointensity estimate during the middle Eocene is potentially possible. We will report a preliminary estimate.

  19. A high-resolution approach to estimating ecosystem respiration at continental scales using operational satellite data.

    PubMed

    Jägermeyr, Jonas; Gerten, Dieter; Lucht, Wolfgang; Hostert, Patrick; Migliavacca, Mirco; Nemani, Ramakrishna

    2014-04-01

    A better understanding of the local variability in land-atmosphere carbon fluxes is crucial to improving the accuracy of global carbon budgets. Operational satellite data backed by ground measurements at Fluxnet sites proved valuable in monitoring local variability of gross primary production at highly resolved spatio-temporal resolutions. Yet, we lack similar operational estimates of ecosystem respiration (Re) to calculate net carbon fluxes. If successful, carbon fluxes from such a remote sensing approach would form an independent and sought after measure to complement widely used dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here, we establish an operational semi-empirical Re model, based only on data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) with a resolution of 1 km and 8 days. Fluxnet measurements between 2000 and 2009 from 100 sites across North America and Europe are used for parameterization and validation. Our analysis shows that Re is closely tied to temperature and plant productivity. By separating temporal and intersite variation, we find that MODIS land surface temperature (LST) and enhanced vegetation index (EVI) are sufficient to explain observed Re across most major biomes with a negligible bias [R² = 0.62, RMSE = 1.32 (g C m(-2) d(-1)), MBE = 0.05 (g C m(-2) d(-1))]. A comparison of such satellite-derived Re with those simulated by the DGVM LPJmL reveals similar spatial patterns. However, LPJmL shows higher temperature sensitivities and consistently simulates higher Re values, in high-latitude and subtropical regions. These differences remain difficult to explain and they are likely associated either with LPJmL parameterization or with systematic errors in the Fluxnet sampling technique. While uncertainties remain with Re estimates, the model formulated in this study provides an operational, cross-validated and unbiased approach to scale Fluxnet Re to the continental scale and advances knowledge of spatio-temporal Re variability

  20. A new impulsive seismic shear wave source for near-surface (0-30 m) seismic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, J. M.; Lorenzo, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Estimates of elastic moduli and fluid content in shallow (0-30 m) natural soils below artificial flood containment structures can be particularly useful in levee monitoring as well as seismic hazard studies. Shear wave moduli may be estimated from horizontally polarized, shear wave experiments. However, long profiles (>10 km) with dense receiver and shot spacings (<1m) cannot be collected efficiently using currently available shear wave sources. We develop a new, inexpensive, shear wave source for collecting fast, shot gathers over large acquisition sites. In particular, gas-charged, organic-rich sediments comprising most lower-delta sedimentary facies, greatly attenuate compressional body-waves. On the other hand, SH waves are relatively insensitive to pore-fluid moduli and can improve resolution. We develop a recoil device (Jolly, 1956) into a single-user, light-weight (<20 kg), impulsive, ground-surface-coupled SH wave generator, which is capable of working at rates of several hundred shotpoints per day. Older impulsive methods rely on hammer blows to ground-planted stationary targets. Our source is coupled to the ground with steel spikes and the powder charge can be detonated mechanically or electronically. Electrical fuses show repeatability in start times of < 50 microseconds. The barrel and shell-holder exceed required thicknesses to ensure complete safety during use. The breach confines a black-powder, 12-gauge shotgun shell, loaded with inert, environmentally safe ballast. In urban settings, produced heat and sound are confined by a detached, exterior cover. A moderate 2.5 g black-powder charge generates seismic amplitudes equivalent to three 4-kg sledge-hammer blows. We test this device to elucidate near subsurface sediment properties at former levee breach sites in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Our radio-telemetric seismic acquisition system uses an in-house landstreamer, consisting of 14-Hz horizontal component geophones, coupled to steel plates

  1. Estimating structure quality trends in the Protein Data Bank by equivalent resolution.

    PubMed

    Bagaria, Anurag; Jaravine, Victor; Güntert, Peter

    2013-10-01

    The quality of protein structures obtained by different experimental and ab-initio calculation methods varies considerably. The methods have been evolving over time by improving both experimental designs and computational techniques, and since the primary aim of these developments is the procurement of reliable and high-quality data, better techniques resulted on average in an evolution toward higher quality structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Each method leaves a specific quantitative and qualitative "trace" in the PDB entry. Certain information relevant to one method (e.g. dynamics for NMR) may be lacking for another method. Furthermore, some standard measures of quality for one method cannot be calculated for other experimental methods, e.g. crystal resolution or NMR bundle RMSD. Consequently, structures are classified in the PDB by the method used. Here we introduce a method to estimate a measure of equivalent X-ray resolution (e-resolution), expressed in units of Å, to assess the quality of any type of monomeric, single-chain protein structure, irrespective of the experimental structure determination method. We showed and compared the trends in the quality of structures in the Protein Data Bank over the last two decades for five different experimental techniques, excluding theoretical structure predictions. We observed that as new methods are introduced, they undergo a rapid method development evolution: within several years the e-resolution score becomes similar for structures obtained from the five methods and they improve from initially poor performance to acceptable quality, comparable with previously established methods, the performance of which is essentially stable.

  2. A sparse reconstruction method for the estimation of multi-resolution emission fields via atmospheric inversion

    DOE PAGES

    Ray, J.; Lee, J.; Yadav, V.; Lefantzi, S.; Michalak, A. M.; van Bloemen Waanders, B.

    2015-04-29

    Atmospheric inversions are frequently used to estimate fluxes of atmospheric greenhouse gases (e.g., biospheric CO2 flux fields) at Earth's surface. These inversions typically assume that flux departures from a prior model are spatially smoothly varying, which are then modeled using a multi-variate Gaussian. When the field being estimated is spatially rough, multi-variate Gaussian models are difficult to construct and a wavelet-based field model may be more suitable. Unfortunately, such models are very high dimensional and are most conveniently used when the estimation method can simultaneously perform data-driven model simplification (removal of model parameters that cannot be reliably estimated) and fitting.more » Such sparse reconstruction methods are typically not used in atmospheric inversions. In this work, we devise a sparse reconstruction method, and illustrate it in an idealized atmospheric inversion problem for the estimation of fossil fuel CO2 (ffCO2) emissions in the lower 48 states of the USA. Our new method is based on stagewise orthogonal matching pursuit (StOMP), a method used to reconstruct compressively sensed images. Our adaptations bestow three properties to the sparse reconstruction procedure which are useful in atmospheric inversions. We have modified StOMP to incorporate prior information on the emission field being estimated and to enforce non-negativity on the estimated field. Finally, though based on wavelets, our method allows for the estimation of fields in non-rectangular geometries, e.g., emission fields inside geographical and political boundaries. Our idealized inversions use a recently developed multi-resolution (i.e., wavelet-based) random field model developed for ffCO2 emissions and synthetic observations of ffCO2 concentrations from a limited set of measurement sites. We find that our method for limiting the estimated field within an irregularly shaped region is about a factor of 10 faster than conventional approaches. It also

  3. Experimental High Resolution (3 km) SMAP Soil Moisture Data Fields With Uncertainty Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, N. N.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission was launched on January 31st, 2015. The objective of the mission is global mapping of surface soil moisture and landscape freeze/thaw state. SMAP utilizes an L-band radar and radiometer sharing a rotating 6-meter mesh reflector antenna. The SMAP spacecraft is in a 685-km Sun-synchronous near-polar orbit, and viewing the surface at a constant 40-degree incidence angle with a 1000-km swath width. Merging of the high-resolution active (radar) and coarse-resolution but high-sensitivity passive (radiometer) L-band observations enable an unprecedented combination of accuracy, resolution, coverage and revisit-time for soil moisture and freeze/thaw state retrievals. However, on July 7th, 2015, the SMAP radar encountered an anomaly and is currently inoperable. Efforts are being made to revive the SMAP radar. Due to the present status of the SMAP observatory, nearly ~2.5 months (from the end of In-Orbit-Check April 13th, 2015 to July 7th, 2015) of the SMAP Active Passive product will be available to public through the NASA DAAC at National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). The baseline L2_SM_AP product is retrieved soil moisture from the disaggregated/downscaled brightness temperature obtained by merging the coarse-resolution (~36 km) radiometer brightness temperature data and the high-resolution (~3 km) radar backscatter data. The baseline product is intermediate scale 9 km global soil moisture information. Experimentally, a much higher resolution global surface soil moisture data set is also produced at 3 km. This experimental product covering the 2.5 Spring/Summer months is the focus of this presentation. We specifically focus on the analysis of errors and reliability of this data set. The errors in disaggregated brightness temperatures and the retrived soil moisture estimates are discussed. In the presentation the accuracies of the SMAP L2-SM_AP soil moisture retrievals will be shown using summary comparisons with in

  4. High-resolution property-based flood damage estimation: how should urban topography be represented?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, J.; Yu, D.; Wilby, R. L.; Bosher, L.

    2012-12-01

    High-resolution property-based flood damage estimation: how should urban topography be represented? The cost of damage caused by flooding to property in the UK has increased by 200% decade on decade, from £1.5 billion (1990 - 2000) to £4.5 billion (2000 - 2010) (ABI 2010). This is widely predicted to increase further in the coming decades (Huntington 2006). Flood damage estimation to residential buildings is typically undertaken by coupling vulnerability curves with flow variables obtained from hydraulic modelling. Recent advances in urban flood inundation modelling provide good estimations of flood depth for damage estimation. However, the approaches to the representation of buildings in urban flood inundation modelling require further investigation as this affects the depth prediction which in turn will determine the accuracy of damage estimation. This study evaluates the effects of different approaches to the representation of buildings in urban topography on damage estimation. A case study was undertaken in Cockermouth of the English Lake District, with primary data collected during the November 2009 event to validate both the hydraulic modelling and damage estimation. A 2D inertia-based hydraulic model was used and the prediction was coupled with the standard vulnerability curves for the UK. Three approaches to the representation of buildings in urban topography were investigated: (i) a bare ground Digital Terrain Model with no explicit representation of buildings (DTM); (ii) explicit representation of buildings with impermeable blocks (BLOCKAGE); and (iii) representation of buildings with threshold levels (THRESHOLD). Results were compared with the observed inundation extent and discrete point depths. In terms of inundation extent, the DTM and THRESHOLD approach produced the best estimate. With the BLOCKAGE approach, the extent of water is less well predicted due to the blockage effect of the buildings which effectively act as flow barriers. Depth was best

  5. Improving global fire carbon emissions estimates by combining moderate resolution burned area and active fire observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; Giglio, L.; Rogers, B. M.; van der Werf, G.

    2011-12-01

    In several important biomes, including croplands and tropical forests, many small fires exist that have sizes that are well below the detection limit for the current generation of burned area products derived from moderate resolution spectroradiometers. These fires likely have important effects on greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions and regional air quality. Here we developed an approach for combining 1km thermal anomalies (active fires; MOD14A2) and 500m burned area observations (MCD64A1) to estimate the prevalence of these fires and their likely contribution to burned area and carbon emissions. We first estimated active fires within and outside of 500m burn scars in 0.5 degree grid cells during 2001-2010 for which MCD64A1 burned area observations were available. For these two sets of active fires we then examined mean fire radiative power (FRP) and changes in enhanced vegetation index (EVI) derived from 16-day intervals immediately before and after each active fire observation. To estimate the burned area associated with sub-500m fires, we first applied burned area to active fire ratios derived solely from within burned area perimeters to active fires outside of burn perimeters. In a second step, we further modified our sub-500m burned area estimates using EVI changes from active fires outside and within of burned areas (after subtracting EVI changes derived from control regions). We found that in northern and southern Africa savanna regions and in Central and South America dry forest regions, the number of active fires outside of MCD64A1 burned areas increased considerably towards the end of the fire season. EVI changes for active fires outside of burn perimeters were, on average, considerably smaller than EVI changes associated with active fires inside burn scars, providing evidence for burn scars that were substantially smaller than the 25 ha area of a single 500m pixel. FRP estimates also were lower for active fires outside of burn perimeters. In our

  6. High-resolution image reconstruction for PET using estimated detector response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohme, Michel S.; Qi, Jinyi

    2007-02-01

    The accuracy of the system model in an iterative reconstruction algorithm greatly affects the quality of reconstructed PET images. For efficient computation in reconstruction, the system model in PET can be factored into a product of geometric projection matrix and detector blurring matrix, where the former is often computed based on analytical calculation, and the latter is estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. In this work, we propose a method to estimate the 2D detector blurring matrix from experimental measurements. Point source data were acquired with high-count statistics in the microPET II scanner using a computer-controlled 2-D motion stage. A monotonically convergent iterative algorithm has been derived to estimate the detector blurring matrix from the point source measurements. The algorithm takes advantage of the rotational symmetry of the PET scanner with the modeling of the detector block structure. Since the resulting blurring matrix stems from actual measurements, it can take into account the physical effects in the photon detection process that are difficult or impossible to model in a Monte Carlo simulation. Reconstructed images of a line source phantom show improved resolution with the new detector blurring matrix compared to the original one from the Monte Carlo simulation. This method can be applied to other small-animal and clinical scanners.

  7. Estimation of grassland use intensities based on high spatial resolution LAI time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asam, S.; Klein, D.; Dech, S.

    2015-04-01

    The identification and surveillance of agricultural management and the measurement of biophysical canopy parameters in grasslands is relevant for environmental protection as well as for political and economic reasons, as proper grassland management is partly subsidized. An ideal monitoring tool is remote sensing due to its area wide continuous observations. However, due to small-scaled land use patterns in many parts of central Europe, a high spatial resolution is needed. In this study, the feasibility of RapidEye data to derive leaf area index (LAI) time series and to relate them to grassland management practices is assessed. The study area is the catchment of river Ammer in southern Bavaria, where agricultural areas are mainly grasslands. While extensively managed grasslands are maintained with one to two harvests per year and no or little fertilization, intensive cultivation practices compass three to five harvests per year and turnover pasturing. Based on a RapidEye time series from 2011 with spatial resolution of 6.5 meters, LAI is derived using the inverted radiation transfer model PROSAIL. The LAI in this area ranges from 1.5 to 7.5 over the vegetation period and is estimated with an RMSE between 0.7 and 1.1. The derived LAI maps cover 85 % of the study area's grasslands at least seven times. Using statistical metrics of the LAI time series, different grassland management types can be identified: very intensively managed meadows, intensively managed meadows, intensively managed pastures, and extensively managed meadows and moor. However, a precise identification of the mowing dates highly depends on the coincidence with satellite data acquisitions. Further analysis should focus therefor on the selection of the temporal resolution of the time series as well as on the performance of further vegetation parameters and indices compared to LAI.

  8. Incorporating Hydrologic Insight into Geophysical Inversion: Resolution Limitations and Direct Estimation of Solute Plume Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.; Pidlisecky, A.

    2005-12-01

    Time-lapse geophysical tomography (e.g., electrical resistivity and radar) can provide valuable insights into hydrologic phenomena, including tracer transport, aquifer dynamics, and engineered remediation. Tomograms have been used to infer the spatial and temporal moments of solute plumes for model development and calibration. The reliability of inferred moment values is limited by tomographic resolution, which is a function of survey geometry, measurement physics, measurement error, and inverse problem parameterization and regularization. Here, we (1) assess the resolution-dependent reliability of moment inference based on results from conventional pixel-based inversion with Tikhanov-style regularization; and (2) investigate alternative parameterization/regularization techniques that capitalize on hydrologic insight to produce more reliable moment estimates. Conventional pixel-based parameterization and regularization criteria yield the simplest solution that satisfies the data, where solution simplicity is measured by deviations from a prior mean and/or the norm of the first or second spatial derivative (flatness and smoothness, respectively) between adjacent pixels. While effective for static imaging of large-scale geologic or aquifer structure, these measures of simplicity may be less appropriate for imaging transient hydrologic processes and non-stationary targets such as solute plumes. For underdetermined problems, tomograms may overpredict the extent and underpredict the magnitude of target plumes. We contend that, at best, conventional regularization criteria do not capitalize on valuable hydrologic information, such as the total mass of injected fluid or solute; at worst they are inconsistent with the physics underlying the transport process of interest and may lead to misleading estimates of plume moments. We explore strategies to incorporate hydrologic insight into tomographic inversion for time-lapse hydrologic monitoring: moment-based tomographic

  9. A tool for rapid post-hurricane urban tree debris estimates using high resolution aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szantoi, Zoltan; Malone, Sparkle; Escobedo, Francisco; Misas, Orlando; Smith, Scot; Dewitt, Bon

    2012-08-01

    Coastal communities in the southeast United States have regularly experienced severe hurricane impacts. To better facilitate recovery efforts in these communities following natural disasters, state and federal agencies must respond quickly with information regarding the extent and severity of hurricane damage and the amount of tree debris volume. A tool was developed to detect downed trees and debris volume to better aid disaster response efforts and tree debris removal. The tool estimates downed tree debris volume in hurricane affected urban areas using a Leica Airborne Digital Sensor (ADS40) and very high resolution digital images. The tool employs a Sobel edge detection algorithm combined with spectral information based on color filtering using 15 different statistical combinations of spectral bands. The algorithm identified downed tree edges based on contrasts between tree stems, grass, and asphalt and color filtering was then used to establish threshold values. Colors outside these threshold values were replaced and excluded from the detection processes. Results were overlaid and an "edge line" was placed where lines or edges from longer consecutive segments and color values within the threshold were met. Where two lines were paired within a very short distance in the scene a polygon was drawn automatically and, in doing so, downed tree stems were detected. Tree stem diameter-volume bulking factors were used to estimate post-hurricane tree debris volumes. Images following Hurricane Ivan in 2005 and Hurricane Ike in 2008 were used to assess the error of the tool by comparing downed tree counts and subsequent debris volume estimates with post-hurricane photo-interpreted downed tree counts and actual field measured estimates of downed tree debris volume. The errors associated with the use of the tool and potential applications are also presented.

  10. High-resolution Neogene and Quaternary estimates of Nubia-Eurasia-North America Plate motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Iaffaldano, G.; Merkouriev, S.

    2015-10-01

    Reconstructions of the history of convergence between the Nubia and Eurasia plates constitute an important part of a broader framework for understanding deformation in the Mediterranean region and the closing of the Mediterranean Basin. Herein, we combine high-resolution reconstructions of Eurasia-North America and Nubia-North America Plate motions to determine rotations that describe Nubia-Eurasia Plate motion at ˜1 Myr intervals for the past 20 Myr. We apply trans-dimensional hierarchical Bayesian inference to the Eurasia-North America and Nubia-North America rotation sequences in order to reduce noise in the newly estimated Nubia-Eurasia rotations. The noise-reduced rotation sequences for the Eurasia-North America and Nubia-North America Plate pairs describe remarkably similar kinematic histories since 20 Ma, consisting of relatively steady seafloor spreading from 20 to 8 Ma, ˜20 per cent opening-rate slowdowns at 8-6.5 Ma, and steady plate motion from ˜7 Ma to the present. Our newly estimated Nubia-Eurasia rotations predict that convergence across the central Mediterranean Sea slowed by ˜50 per cent and rotated anticlockwise after ˜25 Ma until 13 Ma. Motion since 13 Ma has remained relatively steady. An absence of evidence for a significant change in motion immediately before or during the Messinian Salinity Crisis at 6.3-5.6 Ma argues against a change in plate motion as its causative factor. The detachment of the Arabian Peninsula from Africa at 30-24 Ma may have triggered the convergence rate slowdown before 13 Ma; however, published reconstructions of Nubia-Eurasia motion for times before 20 Ma are too widely spaced to determine with confidence whether the two are correlated. A significant discrepancy between our new estimates of Nubia-Eurasia motion during the past few Myr and geodetic estimates calls for further investigation.

  11. ELM: an Algorithm to Estimate the Alpha Abundance from Low-resolution Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Yude; Zhao, Gang; Pan, Jingchang; Bharat Kumar, Yerra

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated a novel methodology using the extreme learning machine (ELM) algorithm to determine the α abundance of stars. Applying two methods based on the ELM algorithm—ELM+spectra and ELM+Lick indices—to the stellar spectra from the ELODIE database, we measured the α abundance with a precision better than 0.065 dex. By applying these two methods to the spectra with different signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) and different resolutions, we found that ELM+spectra is more robust against degraded resolution and ELM+Lick indices is more robust against variation in S/N. To further validate the performance of ELM, we applied ELM+spectra and ELM+Lick indices to SDSS spectra and estimated α abundances with a precision around 0.10 dex, which is comparable to the results given by the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline. We further applied ELM to the spectra of stars in Galactic globular clusters (M15, M13, M71) and open clusters (NGC 2420, M67, NGC 6791), and results show good agreement with previous studies (within 1σ). A comparison of the ELM with other widely used methods including support vector machine, Gaussian process regression, artificial neural networks, and linear least-squares regression shows that ELM is efficient with computational resources and more accurate than other methods.

  12. River discharge estimation from multi-mission altimetry with optimized spatial coverage and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourian, Mohammad J.; Sneeuw, Nico

    2016-04-01

    One of the main challenges of hydrological modeling is the poor spatio-temporal coverage of in situ discharge databases. The global network of in situ gauges is declining steadily over the past few decades. It has been demonstrated that altimetry-derived water height over rivers can sensibly be used to deal with the growing lack of in situ discharge data. However, the altimetric discharge is often estimated from a single virtual station with a coarse temporal resolution, dictated by the satellite repeat period (10 or 35 days). In this study, we implement an assimilation scheme that connects all virtual stations of several satellite altimeters along the main stream and tributaries distributed over a catchment. This helps to generate densified water level time series with temporal resolution of less than ~3 days at any given location in the catchment. We then propose a scheme that extends the current one-on-one relationship between a discharge gauge and a nearby (densified) virtual station towards a methodology which links multiple virtual stations to all available gauges. We assess our method over the Amazon river/basin/catchment, where we have access to in situ discharge data from GRDC, and where multiple altimetric water level time series from different missions are available.

  13. Estimation of boron isotope ratios using high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltsche, Helmar; Prattes, Karl; Zischka, Michael; Knapp, Günter

    2009-04-01

    In the production of 10B enriched steels, the production-recycling process needs to be closely monitored for inadvertent mix-up of materials with different B isotope levels. A quick and simple method for the estimation of boron isotope ratios in high alloyed steels using high resolution continuum source flame AAS (HR-CS-FAAS) was developed. On the 208.9 nm B line the wavelength of the peak absorption of 10B and 11B differs by 2.5 pm. The wavelength of the peak absorption of boron was determined by fitting a Gauss function through spectra simultaneously recorded by HR-CS-FAAS. It was shown that a linear correlation between the wavelength of the peak absorption and the isotope ratio exists and that this correlation is independent of the total boron concentration. Internal spectroscopic standards were used to compensate for monochromator drift and monochromator resolution changes. Accuracy and precision of the analyzed samples were thereby increased by a factor of up to 1.3. Three steel reference materials and one boric acid CRM, each certified for the boron isotope ratio were used to validate the procedure.

  14. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Lundgren, E.; Andrews, A. E.; Biraud, S. C.; Boesch, H.; Bowman, K. W.; Deutscher, N. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Hase, F.; Kuze, A.; Notholt, J.; Ohyama, H.; Parker, R.; Payne, V. H.; Sussmann, R.; Sweeney, C.; Velazco, V. A.; Warneke, T.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wunch, D.

    2015-06-01

    We use 2009-2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to estimate global and North American methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. GEOS-Chem and GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface and tower networks (NOAA/ESRL, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/ESRL, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a total methane source of 539 Tg a-1 with some important regional corrections to the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2-42.7 Tg a-1, as compared to 24.9-27.0 Tg a-1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0-44.5 Tg a-1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the southern-central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands; large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. Using prior information on source locations, we attribute 29-44 % of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22-31 % to oil/gas, 20 % to landfills/wastewater, and 11-15 % to coal. Wetlands contribute an additional 9.0-10.1 Tg a-1.

  15. Large scale IRAM 30 m CO-observations in the giant molecular cloud complex W43

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlhoff, P.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Schilke, P.; Motte, F.; Schneider, N.; Beuther, H.; Bontemps, S.; Heitsch, F.; Hill, T.; Kramer, C.; Ossenkopf, V.; Schuller, F.; Simon, R.; Wyrowski, F.

    2013-12-01

    We aim to fully describe the distribution and location of dense molecular clouds in the giant molecular cloud complex W43. It was previously identified as one of the most massive star-forming regions in our Galaxy. To trace the moderately dense molecular clouds in the W43 region, we initiated W43-HERO, a large program using the IRAM 30 m telescope, which covers a wide dynamic range of scales from 0.3 to 140 pc. We obtained on-the-fly-maps in 13CO (2-1) and C18O (2-1) with a high spectral resolution of 0.1 km s-1 and a spatial resolution of 12''. These maps cover an area of ~1.5 square degrees and include the two main clouds of W43 and the lower density gas surrounding them. A comparison to Galactic models and previous distance calculations confirms the location of W43 near the tangential point of the Scutum arm at approximately 6 kpc from the Sun. The resulting intensity cubes of the observed region are separated into subcubes, which are centered on single clouds and then analyzed in detail. The optical depth, excitation temperature, and H2 column density maps are derived out of the 13CO and C18O data. These results are then compared to those derived from Herschel dust maps. The mass of a typical cloud is several 104 M⊙ while the total mass in the dense molecular gas (>102 cm-3) in W43 is found to be ~1.9 × 106 M⊙. Probability distribution functions obtained from column density maps derived from molecular line data and Herschel imaging show a log-normal distribution for low column densities and a power-law tail for high densities. A flatter slope for the molecular line data probability distribution function may imply that those selectively show the gravitationally collapsing gas. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe final datacubes (13CO and C18O) for the entire survey are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/560/A24

  16. Improving Accuracy and Temporal Resolution of Learning Curve Estimation for within- and across-Session Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tabelow, Karsten; König, Reinhard; Polzehl, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of learning curves is ubiquitously based on proportions of correct responses within moving trial windows. Thereby, it is tacitly assumed that learning performance is constant within the moving windows, which, however, is often not the case. In the present study we demonstrate that violations of this assumption lead to systematic errors in the analysis of learning curves, and we explored the dependency of these errors on window size, different statistical models, and learning phase. To reduce these errors in the analysis of single-subject data as well as on the population level, we propose adequate statistical methods for the estimation of learning curves and the construction of confidence intervals, trial by trial. Applied to data from an avoidance learning experiment with rodents, these methods revealed performance changes occurring at multiple time scales within and across training sessions which were otherwise obscured in the conventional analysis. Our work shows that the proper assessment of the behavioral dynamics of learning at high temporal resolution can shed new light on specific learning processes, and, thus, allows to refine existing learning concepts. It further disambiguates the interpretation of neurophysiological signal changes recorded during training in relation to learning. PMID:27303809

  17. High-Resolution Forest Canopy Height Estimation in an African Blue Carbon Ecosystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagomasino, David; Fatoyinbo, Temilola; Lee, Seung-Kuk; Simard, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Mangrove forests are one of the most productive and carbon dense ecosystems that are only found at tidally inundated coastal areas. Forest canopy height is an important measure for modeling carbon and biomass dynamics, as well as land cover change. By taking advantage of the flat terrain and dense canopy cover, the present study derived digital surface models (DSMs) using stereophotogrammetric techniques on high-resolution spaceborne imagery (HRSI) for southern Mozambique. A mean-weighted ground surface elevation factor was subtracted from the HRSI DSM to accurately estimate the canopy height in mangrove forests in southern Mozambique. The mean and H100 tree height measured in both the field and with the digital canopy model provided the most accurate results with a vertical error of 1.18-1.84 m, respectively. Distinct patterns were identified in the HRSI canopy height map that could not be discerned from coarse shuttle radar topography mission canopy maps even though the mode and distribution of canopy heights were similar over the same area. Through further investigation, HRSI DSMs have the potential of providing a new type of three-dimensional dataset that could serve as calibration/validation data for other DSMs generated from spaceborne datasets with much larger global coverage. HSRI DSMs could be used in lieu of Lidar acquisitions for canopy height and forest biomass estimation, and be combined with passive optical data to improve land cover classifications.

  18. Effective gene prediction by high resolution frequency estimator based on least-norm solution technique

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Linear algebraic concept of subspace plays a significant role in the recent techniques of spectrum estimation. In this article, the authors have utilized the noise subspace concept for finding hidden periodicities in DNA sequence. With the vast growth of genomic sequences, the demand to identify accurately the protein-coding regions in DNA is increasingly rising. Several techniques of DNA feature extraction which involves various cross fields have come up in the recent past, among which application of digital signal processing tools is of prime importance. It is known that coding segments have a 3-base periodicity, while non-coding regions do not have this unique feature. One of the most important spectrum analysis techniques based on the concept of subspace is the least-norm method. The least-norm estimator developed in this paper shows sharp period-3 peaks in coding regions completely eliminating background noise. Comparison of proposed method with existing sliding discrete Fourier transform (SDFT) method popularly known as modified periodogram method has been drawn on several genes from various organisms and the results show that the proposed method has better as well as an effective approach towards gene prediction. Resolution, quality factor, sensitivity, specificity, miss rate, and wrong rate are used to establish superiority of least-norm gene prediction method over existing method. PMID:24386895

  19. Estimation of Venus wind velocities from high-resolution infrared spectra. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. A. H.

    1978-01-01

    Zonal velocity profiles in the Venus atmosphere above the clouds were estimated from measured asymmetries of HCl and HF infrared absorption lines in high-resolution Fourier interferometer spectra of the planet. These asymmetries are caused by both pressure-induced shifts in the positions of the hydrogen-halide lines perturbed by CO2 and Doppler shifts due to atmospheric motions. Particularly in the case of the HCl 2-0 band, the effects of the two types of line shifts can be easily isolated, making it possible to estimate a profile of average Venus equatorial zonal velocity as a function of pressure in the region roughly 60 to 70 km above the surface of the planet. The mean profiles obtained show strong vertical shear in the Venus zonal winds near the cloud-top level, and both the magnitude and direction of winds at all levels in this region appear to vary greatly with longitude relative to the sub-solar point.

  20. Estimating aboveground biomass in Avicennia marina plantation in Indian Sundarbans using high-resolution satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, Sudip; Nandy, Subrata; Chanda, Abhra; Akhand, Anirban; Hazra, Sugata; Dadhwal, Vinay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Mangroves are active carbon sequesters playing a crucial role in coastal ecosystems. In the present study, aboveground biomass (AGB) was estimated in a 5-year-old Avicennia marina plantation (approximate area ≈190 ha) of Indian Sundarbans using high-resolution satellite data in order to assess its carbon sequestration potential. The reflectance values of each band of LISS IV satellite data and the vegetation indices, viz., normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), optimized soil adjusted vegetation index (OSAVI), and transformed difference vegetation index (TDVI), derived from the satellite data, were correlated with the AGB. OSAVI showed the strongest positive linear relationship with the AGB and hence carbon content of the stand. OSAVI was found to predict the AGB to a great extent (r=0.72) as it is known to nullify the background soil reflectance effect added to vegetation reflectance. The total AGB of the entire plantation was estimated to be 236 metric tons having a carbon stock of 54.9 metric tons, sequestered within a time span of 5 years. Integration of this technique for monitoring and management of young mangrove plantations will give time and cost effective results.

  1. Estimation of crops biomass and evapotranspiration from high spatial and temporal resolutions remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claverie, Martin; Demarez, Valérie; Duchemin, Benoît.; Ceschia, Eric; Hagolle, Olivier; Ducrot, Danielle; Keravec, Pascal; Beziat, Pierre; Dedieu, Pierre

    2010-05-01

    Carbon and water cycles are closely related to agricultural activities. Agriculture has been indeed identified by IPCC 2007 report as one of the options to sequester carbon in soil. Concerning the water resources, their consumptions by irrigated crops are called into question in view of demographic pressure. In the prospect of an assessment of carbon production and water consumption, the use of crop models at a regional scale is a challenging issue. The recent availability of high spatial resolution (10 m) optical sensors associated to high temporal resolution (1 day) such as FORMOSAT-2 and, in the future, Venµs and SENTINEL-2 will offer new perspectives for agricultural monitoring. In this context, the objective of this work is to show how multi-temporal satellite observations acquired at high spatial resolution are useful for a regional monitoring of following crops biophysical variables: leaf area index (LAI), aboveground biomass (AGB) and evapotranspiration (ET). This study focuses on three summer crops dominant in South-West of France: maize, sunflower and soybean. A unique images data set (82 FORMOSAT-2 images over four consecutive years, 2006-2009) was acquired for this project. The experimental data set includes LAI and AGB measurements over eight agricultural fields. Two fields were intensively monitored where ET flux were measured with a 30 minutes time step using eddy correlation methods. The modelisation approach is based on FAO-56 method coupled with a vegetation functioning model based on Monteith theory: the SAFY model [5]. The model operates at a daily time step model to provide estimates of plant characteristics (LAI, AGB), soil conditions (soil water content) and water use (ET). As a key linking variable, LAI is deduced from FORMOSAT-2 reflectances images, and then introduced into the SAFY model to provide spatial and temporal estimates of these biophysical variables. Most of the SAFY parameters are crop related and have been fixed according to

  2. Effects of measurement resolution on the analysis of temperature time series for stream-aquifer flux estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-López, Carlos D.; Meixner, Thomas; Ferré, Ty P. A.

    2011-12-01

    From its inception in the mid-1960s, the use of temperature time series (thermographs) to estimate vertical fluxes has found increasing use in the hydrologic community. Beginning in 2000, researchers have examined the impacts of measurement and parameter uncertainty on the estimates of vertical fluxes. To date, the effects of temperature measurement discretization (resolution), a characteristic of all digital temperature loggers, on the determination of vertical fluxes has not been considered. In this technical note we expand the analysis of recently published work to include the effects of temperature measurement resolution on estimates of vertical fluxes using temperature amplitude and phase shift information. We show that errors in thermal front velocity estimation introduced by discretizing thermographs differ when amplitude or phase shift data are used to estimate vertical fluxes. We also show that under similar circumstances sensor resolution limits the range over which vertical velocities are accurately reproduced more than uncertainty in temperature measurements, uncertainty in sensor separation distance, and uncertainty in the thermal diffusivity combined. These effects represent the baseline error present and thus the best-case scenario when discrete temperature measurements are used to infer vertical fluxes. The errors associated with measurement resolution can be minimized by using the highest-resolution sensors available. But thoughtful experimental design could allow users to select the most cost-effective temperature sensors to fit their measurement needs.

  3. High-Resolution Spatial Distribution and Estimation of Access to Improved Sanitation in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Peng; Anderson, John D.; Leitner, Michael; Rheingans, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Access to sanitation facilities is imperative in reducing the risk of multiple adverse health outcomes. A distinct disparity in sanitation exists among different wealth levels in many low-income countries, which may hinder the progress across each of the Millennium Development Goals. Methods The surveyed households in 397 clusters from 2008–2009 Kenya Demographic and Health Surveys were divided into five wealth quintiles based on their national asset scores. A series of spatial analysis methods including excess risk, local spatial autocorrelation, and spatial interpolation were applied to observe disparities in coverage of improved sanitation among different wealth categories. The total number of the population with improved sanitation was estimated by interpolating, time-adjusting, and multiplying the surveyed coverage rates by high-resolution population grids. A comparison was then made with the annual estimates from United Nations Population Division and World Health Organization /United Nations Children's Fund Joint Monitoring Program for Water Supply and Sanitation. Results The Empirical Bayesian Kriging interpolation produced minimal root mean squared error for all clusters and five quintiles while predicting the raw and spatial coverage rates of improved sanitation. The coverage in southern regions was generally higher than in the north and east, and the coverage in the south decreased from Nairobi in all directions, while Nyanza and North Eastern Province had relatively poor coverage. The general clustering trend of high and low sanitation improvement among surveyed clusters was confirmed after spatial smoothing. Conclusions There exists an apparent disparity in sanitation among different wealth categories across Kenya and spatially smoothed coverage rates resulted in a closer estimation of the available statistics than raw coverage rates. Future intervention activities need to be tailored for both different wealth categories and nationally

  4. Functional connectivity estimation over large networks at cellular resolution based on electrophysiological recordings and structural prior

    PubMed Central

    Ullo, Simona; Nieus, Thierry R.; Sona, Diego; Maccione, Alessandro; Berdondini, Luca; Murino, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Despite many structural and functional aspects of the brain organization have been extensively studied in neuroscience, we are still far from a clear understanding of the intricate structure-function interactions occurring in the multi-layered brain architecture, where billions of different neurons are involved. Although structure and function can individually convey a large amount of information, only a combined study of these two aspects can probably shade light on how brain circuits develop and operate at the cellular scale. Here, we propose a novel approach for refining functional connectivity estimates within neuronal networks using the structural connectivity as prior. This is done at the mesoscale, dealing with thousands of neurons while reaching, at the microscale, an unprecedented cellular resolution. The High-Density Micro Electrode Array (HD-MEA) technology, combined with fluorescence microscopy, offers the unique opportunity to acquire structural and functional data from large neuronal cultures approaching the granularity of the single cell. In this work, an advanced method based on probabilistic directional features and heat propagation is introduced to estimate the structural connectivity from the fluorescence image while functional connectivity graphs are obtained from the cross-correlation analysis of the spiking activity. Structural and functional information are then integrated by reweighting the functional connectivity graph based on the structural prior. Results show that the resulting functional connectivity estimates are more coherent with the network topology, as compared to standard measures purely based on cross-correlations and spatio-temporal filters. We finally use the obtained results to gain some insights on which features of the functional activity are more relevant to characterize actual neuronal interactions. PMID:25477790

  5. Functional connectivity estimation over large networks at cellular resolution based on electrophysiological recordings and structural prior.

    PubMed

    Ullo, Simona; Nieus, Thierry R; Sona, Diego; Maccione, Alessandro; Berdondini, Luca; Murino, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Despite many structural and functional aspects of the brain organization have been extensively studied in neuroscience, we are still far from a clear understanding of the intricate structure-function interactions occurring in the multi-layered brain architecture, where billions of different neurons are involved. Although structure and function can individually convey a large amount of information, only a combined study of these two aspects can probably shade light on how brain circuits develop and operate at the cellular scale. Here, we propose a novel approach for refining functional connectivity estimates within neuronal networks using the structural connectivity as prior. This is done at the mesoscale, dealing with thousands of neurons while reaching, at the microscale, an unprecedented cellular resolution. The High-Density Micro Electrode Array (HD-MEA) technology, combined with fluorescence microscopy, offers the unique opportunity to acquire structural and functional data from large neuronal cultures approaching the granularity of the single cell. In this work, an advanced method based on probabilistic directional features and heat propagation is introduced to estimate the structural connectivity from the fluorescence image while functional connectivity graphs are obtained from the cross-correlation analysis of the spiking activity. Structural and functional information are then integrated by reweighting the functional connectivity graph based on the structural prior. Results show that the resulting functional connectivity estimates are more coherent with the network topology, as compared to standard measures purely based on cross-correlations and spatio-temporal filters. We finally use the obtained results to gain some insights on which features of the functional activity are more relevant to characterize actual neuronal interactions. PMID:25477790

  6. The Fundamental Structure of UV-Irradiated Cloud Edges: Combined ALMA and IRAM-30m Observations of the Orion Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicoechea, J.; Cuadrado, S.; Pety, J.; Ag'undez, M.; Cernicharo, J.; Chapillon, E.; Dumas, G.; Fuente, A.; Gerin, M.; Joblin, C.; Marcelino, N.; Müller, H. S. P.; Pilleri, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Orion Bar is the prototypical photodissociation region (PDR) exposed to a far-UV radiation field (FUV) of a few 104 times the mean interstellar field. Because of its proximity and nearly edge-on orientation, it provides a unique laboratory to study the physical and chemical gradients of a strongly FUV-illuminated molecular cloud. Using ALMA at ˜350 GHz, we have observed a field-of-view of ˜40”×40” toward the Orion Bar PDR consisting of a mosaic of 27 Nyquist-sampled pointings. These observations provide an unprecedented high angular resolution view (˜1” or ˜414 AU at the distance to Orion) of the most exposed molecular cloud edge. In addition, ACA and IRAM-30m maps were used to produce the short-spacing visibilities filtered out by the ALMA array. These interferometric observations complement a complete line survey we have carried out using the IRAM-30m telescope between ˜80 GHz and ˜360 GHz. Despite being a harsh environment, over 60 species with up to 6 atoms have been identified, including main isotopologues (D, 13C, 18O, 17O, 34S, 33S, and 15N). The first molecular line images of the Orion Bar obtained with ALMA at ˜1” resolution reveal the fundamental structure in density and temperature of the molecular gas as well as its complex kinematics at an unprecedented spatial resolution. This early data set also allowed us to compute corrected line frequencies for SH+, an interesting hydride tracing reactions of S+ with vibrationally excited H2 in the PDR edge.

  7. Carbon budget estimation of a subarctic catchment using a dynamic ecosystem model at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J.; Miller, P. A.; Persson, A.; Olefeldt, D.; Pilesjo, P.; Heliasz, M.; Jackowicz-Korczynski, M.; Yang, Z.; Smith, B.; Callaghan, T. V.; Christensen, T. R.

    2015-05-01

    A large amount of organic carbon is stored in high-latitude soils. A substantial proportion of this carbon stock is vulnerable and may decompose rapidly due to temperature increases that are already greater than the global average. It is therefore crucial to quantify and understand carbon exchange between the atmosphere and subarctic/arctic ecosystems. In this paper, we combine an Arctic-enabled version of the process-based dynamic ecosystem model, LPJ-GUESS (version LPJG-WHyMe-TFM) with comprehensive observations of terrestrial and aquatic carbon fluxes to simulate long-term carbon exchange in a subarctic catchment at 50 m resolution. Integrating the observed carbon fluxes from aquatic systems with the modeled terrestrial carbon fluxes across the whole catchment, we estimate that the area is a carbon sink at present and will become an even stronger carbon sink by 2080, which is mainly a result of a projected densification of birch forest and its encroachment into tundra heath. However, the magnitudes of the modeled sinks are very dependent on future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Furthermore, comparisons of global warming potentials between two simulations with and without CO2 increase since 1960 reveal that the increased methane emission from the peatland could double the warming effects of the whole catchment by 2080 in the absence of CO2 fertilization of the vegetation. This is the first process-based model study of the temporal evolution of a catchment-level carbon budget at high spatial resolution, including both terrestrial and aquatic carbon. Though this study also highlights some limitations in modeling subarctic ecosystem responses to climate change, such as aquatic system flux dynamics, nutrient limitation, herbivory and other disturbances, and peatland expansion, our study provides one process-based approach to resolve the complexity of carbon cycling in subarctic ecosystems while simultaneously pointing out the key model developments for capturing

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: IRAM 30m CO-observations in W43 (Carlhoff+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlhoff, P.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Schilke, P.; Motte, F.; Schneider, N.; Beuther, H.; Bontemps, S.; Heitsch, F.; Hill, T.; Kramer, C.; Ossenkopf, V.; Schuller, F.; Simon, R.; Wyrowski, F.

    2013-10-01

    We observed molecular clouds in the giant star forming region W43. For this project we used the IRAM 30m telescope to observe the molecular emission lines 13CO (2-1) and C18O (2-1), that trace the mid-density (n~103cm-3) molecular gas. The lines were observed with the HERA receiver and the VESPA backend. At the observed frequencies the IRAM 30m has a beam size of 11.7". We include two FITS files containing the data-cubes (pos-pos-vel) of the 13CO and C18O emission lines of the W43 complex. We used equatorial coordinates for the spatial dimensions and vlsr for the spectral dimension. The pixel size is 5.9" in spatial dimension and the spectral resolution is 0.16km/s. All values are in K. The data-cubes span an area of about 1x1.5° (RAxDec) around the center of the maps at 18:46:54.4 -02:14:11 (EQ=J2000) and the velocity range from 30 to 130km/s and include the complete W43 complex and several fore- and background clouds. (2 data files).

  9. GLONASS fractional-cycle bias estimation across inhomogeneous receivers for PPP ambiguity resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jianghui; Bock, Yehuda

    2016-04-01

    The key issue to enable precise point positioning with ambiguity resolution (PPP-AR) is to estimate fractional-cycle biases (FCBs), which mainly relate to receiver and satellite hardware biases, over a network of reference stations. While this has been well achieved for GPS, FCB estimation for GLONASS is difficult because (1) satellites do not share the same frequencies as a result of Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA) signals; (2) and even worse, pseudorange hardware biases of receivers vary in an irregular manner with manufacturers, antennas, domes, firmware, etc., which especially complicates GLONASS PPP-AR over inhomogeneous receivers. We propose a general approach where external ionosphere products are introduced into GLONASS PPP to estimate precise FCBs that are less impaired by pseudorange hardware biases of diverse receivers to enable PPP-AR. One month of GLONASS data at about 550 European stations were processed. From an exemplary network of 51 inhomogeneous receivers, including four receiver types with various antennas and spanning about 800 km in both longitudinal and latitudinal directions, we found that 92.4 % of all fractional parts of GLONASS wide-lane ambiguities agree well within ± 0.15 cycles with a standard deviation of 0.09 cycles if global ionosphere maps (GIMs) are introduced, compared to only 51.7 % within ± 0.15 cycles and a larger standard deviation of 0.22 cycles otherwise. Hourly static GLONASS PPP-AR at 40 test stations can reach position estimates of about 1 and 2 cm in RMS from ground truth for the horizontal and vertical components, respectively, which is comparable to hourly GPS PPP-AR. Integrated GLONASS and GPS PPP-AR can further achieve an RMS of about 0.5 cm in horizontal and 1-2 cm in vertical components. We stress that the performance of GLONASS PPP-AR across inhomogeneous receivers depends on the accuracy of ionosphere products. GIMs have a modest accuracy of only 2-8 TECU (Total Electron Content Unit) in vertical

  10. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    DOE PAGES

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Lundgren, E.; Andrews, A. E.; Biraud, S. C.; Boesch, H.; Bowman, K. W.; Deutscher, N. M.; et al

    2015-06-30

    We use 2009–2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to estimate global and North American methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. GEOS-Chem and GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface and tower networks (NOAA/ESRL, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/ESRL, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a totalmore » methane source of 539 Tg a−1 with some important regional corrections to the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2–42.7 Tg a−1, as compared to 24.9–27.0 Tg a−1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0–44.5 Tg a−1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the southern–central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands; large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. Using prior information on source locations, we attribute 29–44 % of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22–31 % to oil/gas, 20 % to landfills/wastewater, and 11–15 % to coal. Wetlands contribute an additional 9.0–10.1 Tg a−1.« less

  11. High Resolution/High Fidelity Seismic Imaging and Parameter Estimation for Geological Structure and Material Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Ru-Shan Wu; Xiao-Bi Xie

    2008-06-08

    Our proposed work on high resolution/high fidelity seismic imaging focused on three general areas: (1) development of new, more efficient, wave-equation-based propagators and imaging conditions, (2) developments towards amplitude-preserving imaging in the local angle domain, in particular, imaging methods that allow us to estimate the reflection as a function of angle at a layer boundary, and (3) studies of wave inversion for local parameter estimation. In this report we summarize the results and progress we made during the project period. The report is divided into three parts, totaling 10 chapters. The first part is on resolution analysis and its relation to directional illumination analysis. The second part, which is composed of 6 chapters, is on the main theme of our work, the true-reflection imaging. True-reflection imaging is an advanced imaging technology which aims at keeping the image amplitude proportional to the reflection strength of the local reflectors or to obtain the reflection coefficient as function of reflection-angle. There are many factors which may influence the image amplitude, such as geometrical spreading, transmission loss, path absorption, acquisition aperture effect, etc. However, we can group these into two categories: one is the propagator effect (geometric spreading, path losses); the other is the acquisition-aperture effect. We have made significant progress in both categories. We studied the effects of different terms in the true-amplitude one-way propagators, especially the terms including lateral velocity variation of the medium. We also demonstrate the improvements by optimizing the expansion coefficients in different terms. Our research also includes directional illumination analysis for both the one-way propagators and full-wave propagators. We developed the fast acquisition-aperture correction method in the local angle-domain, which is an important element in the true-reflection imaging. Other developments include the super

  12. High-resolution estimates of Southwest Indian Ridge plate motions, 20 Ma to present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Merkouriev, S.; Sauter, D.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first estimates of Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) plate motions at high temporal resolution during the Quaternary and Neogene based on nearly 5000 crossings of 21 magnetic reversals out to C6no (19.72 Ma) and the digitized traces of 17 fracture zones and transform faults. Our reconstructions of this slow-spreading mid-ocean ridge reveal several unexpected results with notable implications for regional and global plate reconstructions since 20 Ma. Extrapolations of seafloor opening distances to zero-age seafloor based on reconstructions of reversals C1n (0.78 Ma) through C3n.4 (5.2 Ma) reveal evidence for surprisingly large outward displacement of 5 ± 1 km west of 32°E, where motion between the Nubia and Antarctic plates occurs, but 2 ± 1 km east of 32°E, more typical of most mid-ocean ridges. Newly estimated SWIR seafloor spreading rates are up to 15 per cent slower everywhere along the ridge than previous estimates. Reconstructions of the numerous observations for times back to 11 Ma confirm the existence of the hypothesized Lwandle plate at high confidence level and indicate that the Lwandle plate's western and eastern boundaries respectively intersect the ridge near the Andrew Bain transform fault complex at 32°E and between ˜45°E and 52°E, in accord with previous results. The Nubia-Antarctic, Lwandle-Antarctic and Somalia-Antarctic rotation sequences that best fit many magnetic reversal, fracture zone and transform fault crossings define previously unknown changes in the Neogene motions of all three plate pairs, consisting of ˜20 per cent slowdowns in their spreading rates at 7.2^{+0.9 }_{ -1.4} Ma if we enforce a simultaneous change in motion everywhere along the SWIR and gradual 3°-7° anticlockwise rotations of the relative slip directions. We apply trans-dimensional Bayesian analysis to our noisy, best-fitting rotation sequences in order to estimate less-noisy rotation sequences suitable for use in future global plate reconstructions

  13. High resolution diameter estimation of microthin wires by a novel 3D diffraction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Khushi; Lolla, Kameswara Rao

    2011-08-01

    Micro-thin wires are of significant importance to academia, research laboratories as well as industries engaged in micro-fabrication of products related to diverse fields like micromechanics, bio-instrumentation, optoelectronics etc. Critical dimension metrology of such wires often demands diameter estimation with tight tolerances. Amongst other measurement techniques, Optical Diffractometry under Fraunhofer approximation has emerged over years as a nondestructive, robust and precise technique for on-line diameter estimation of thin wires. However, it is observed that existing Fraunhofer models invariably result in experimental overestimation of wire diameter, leading to unacceptable error performances particularly for diameters below 50 μm. In this paper, a novel diffraction model based on Geometric theory is proposed and demonstrated to theoretically quantify this diameter overestimation. The proposed model utilizes hitherto unused paths-ways for the two lateral rays that contribute to the first diffraction minimum. Based the 3-D geometry of the suggested model, a new 'diffraction formulation' is proposed. The theoretical analysis reveals the following. For diffraction experiment, the Actual diameter of the diffracting wire is a function of four parameters: source wavelength 'λ', axial distance 'z', diffraction angle corresponding to first diffraction minimum 'θd' and a newly defined characteristic parameter 'm'. The analysis reveals further that the proposed characteristic parameter 'm' varies non-linearly with diameter and presents a dependence only on the experimentally measured diffraction angle 'θd'. Based on the proposed model, the communication reports for the first time, a novel diameter-inversion procedure which, not only corrects for the overestimated but also facilitates wire diameter-inversion with high resolution. Micro-thin metallic wires having diameters spanning the range 1-50 μm are examined. Experimental results are obtained that

  14. Estimating root-zone moisture and evapotranspiration with AVHRR data[Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.; Wesely, M. L.

    1999-10-08

    The parameterized subgrid-scale surface fluxes (PASS) model uses satellite data and limited surface observations to infer root-zone available moisture content and evapotranspiration rate with moderate spatial resolution over extended terrestrial areas. The ultimate goal of this work is to produce estimates of water loss by evapotranspiration, for application in hydrological models. The major advantage to the method is that it can be applied to areas having diverse surface characteristics where direct surface flux measurements either do not exist or are not feasible and where meteorological data are available from only a limited number of ground stations. The emphasis of this work with the PASS model is on improving (1) methods of using satellite remote sensing data to derive the essential parameters for individual types of surfaces over large areas, (2) algorithms for describing the interactions of near-surface atmospheric conditions with surface processes, and (3) algorithms for computing surface energy and water vapor flux at a scale close to the size of a satellite-derived image pixel. The PASS approach is being developed and tested further with observations from the 1997 Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97) at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) site in the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), an area of about 5,000 km{sup 2} in southern Kansas. Here the authors describe some of the progress made since the previous report.

  15. Global sensitivity of high-resolution estimates of crop water footprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuninetti, Marta; Tamea, Stefania; D'Odorico, Paolo; Laio, Francesco; Ridolfi, Luca

    2015-10-01

    Most of the human appropriation of freshwater resources is for agriculture. Water availability is a major constraint to mankind's ability to produce food. The notion of virtual water content (VWC), also known as crop water footprint, provides an effective tool to investigate the linkage between food and water resources as a function of climate, soil, and agricultural practices. The spatial variability in the virtual water content of crops is here explored, disentangling its dependency on climate and crop yields and assessing the sensitivity of VWC estimates to parameter variability and uncertainty. Here we calculate the virtual water content of four staple crops (i.e., wheat, rice, maize, and soybean) for the entire world developing a high-resolution (5 × 5 arc min) model, and we evaluate the VWC sensitivity to input parameters. We find that food production almost entirely depends on green water (>90%), but, when applied, irrigation makes crop production more water efficient, thus requiring less water. The spatial variability of the VWC is mostly controlled by the spatial patterns of crop yields with an average correlation coefficient of 0.83. The results of the sensitivity analysis show that wheat is most sensitive to the length of the growing period, rice to reference evapotranspiration, maize and soybean to the crop planting date. The VWC sensitivity varies not only among crops, but also across the harvested areas of the world, even at the subnational scale.

  16. Estimation of integral curves from high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Owen; Sakhanenko, Lyudmila

    2015-01-01

    We develop statistical methodology for a popular brain imaging technique HARDI based on the high order tensor model by Özarslan and Mareci [10]. We investigate how uncertainty in the imaging procedure propagates through all levels of the model: signals, tensor fields, vector fields, and fibers. We construct asymptotically normal estimators of the integral curves or fibers which allow us to trace the fibers together with confidence ellipsoids. The procedure is computationally intense as it blends linear algebra concepts from high order tensors with asymptotical statistical analysis. The theoretical results are illustrated on simulated and real datasets. This work generalizes the statistical methodology proposed for low angular resolution diffusion tensor imaging by Carmichael and Sakhanenko [3], to several fibers per voxel. It is also a pioneering statistical work on tractography from HARDI data. It avoids all the typical limitations of the deterministic tractography methods and it delivers the same information as probabilistic tractography methods. Our method is computationally cheap and it provides well-founded mathematical and statistical framework where diverse functionals on fibers, directions and tensors can be studied in a systematic and rigorous way. PMID:25937674

  17. The Fire INventory from NCAR (FINN) - a high resolution global model to estimate the emissions from open burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedinmyer, C.; Akagi, S. K.; Yokelson, R. J.; Emmons, L. K.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Orlando, J. J.; Soja, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Fire INventory from NCAR version 1.0 (FINNv1) provides daily, 1 km resolution, global estimates of the trace gas and particle emissions from open burning of biomass, which includes wildfire, agricultural fires, and prescribed burning and does not include biofuel use and trash burning. Emission factors used in the calculations have been updated with recent data, particularly for the non-methane organic compounds (NMOC). The resulting global annual NMOC emission estimates are as much as a factor of 5 greater than some prior estimates. Chemical speciation profiles, necessary to allocate the total NMOC emission estimates to lumped species for use by chemical transport models, are provided for three widely used chemical mechanisms: SAPRC99, GEOS-CHEM, and MOZART-4. Using these profiles, FINNv1 also provides global estimates of key organic compounds, including formaldehyde and methanol. The uncertainty in the FINNv1 emission estimates are about a factor of two; but, the estimates agree closely with other global inventories of biomass burning emissions for CO, CO2, and other species with less variable emission factors. FINNv1 emission estimates have been developed specifically for modeling atmospheric chemistry and air quality in a consistent framework at scales from local to global. The product is unique because of the high temporal and spatial resolution, global coverage, and the number of species estimated. FINNv1 can be used for both hindcast and forecast or near-real time model applications and the results are being critically evaluated with models and observations whenever possible.

  18. GISMO: A Giant (30m) cold (10K) far-Ir and Submm space Observatory using Fresnel optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawarden, T. G.; Stevens, J. A.; Cliffe, M. R.; Henry, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    We have examined the possibility of applying difractive Fresnel optical concepts developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for a possible O/NIR space telescope to the much more relaxed tolerance regimes of the far-IR and sub-millimetre. We conclude that the approach is indeed applicable and that a powerful FIR-submm observatory (GISMO) could be built around a 30m primary lens of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) 2.3mm thick.This would be the main component of a "Lens" Spacecraft (LSC) which would be located 3 km from a second "Instrument" spacecraft (ISC) carrying field optics, a Fresnel corrector lens, re-imaging optics and focal plane instruments. In its Sun-Earth L2 halo orbit, the Lens would cool by radiation to 10K; the ISC optics would be actively cooled to a few K and would resemble a simplified version of current plans for SAFIR, the Single-Aperture Far-IR mission under study by NASA. GISMO could be a good deal cheaper to build than the current 10m, 4K SAFIR concept. Relative positioning of the two spaceraft needs to be accurate to a few millimetres laterally and a tens of centimetres in separation (focus). We highlight some technical uncertainties. For most observations at wavelengths between 20 and 600 microns GISMO should be between 3 and 10 times more sensitive than the 10m, 4K SAFIR concept. The possible exception is spectroscopy betwen 250 and 450 microns, where its sensitivity should be about the same. GISMO's 30m aperture would of course offer a three-fold improvement in spatial resolution at all wavelengths. As a result GISMO is expected to achieve almost complete resolution of the FIR background, reaching sources below 100 micro-Jansky in seconds, and would be an immensely powerful facility throughout its wavelength range of operation.

  19. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    DOE PAGES

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Biraud, S. C.; Boesch, H.; Bowman, K. W.; Deutscher, N. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Griffith, D. W. T.; et al

    2015-02-18

    We use 2009–2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to constrain global and North American inversions of methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. The GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface networks (NOAA, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/DOE, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. The surface and aircraft data are subsequently usedmore » for independent evaluation of the methane source inversions. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a total methane source of 539 Tg a−1 and points to a large East Asian overestimate in the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide full error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2–42.7 Tg a−1, as compared to 24.9–27.0 Tg a−1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0–44.5 Tg a−1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the South-Central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands, large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. We attribute 29–44% of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22–31% to oil/gas, 20% to landfills/waste water, and 11–15% to coal with an additional 9.0–10.1 Tg a−1 source from wetlands.« less

  20. Carbon budget estimation of a subarctic catchment using a dynamic ecosystem model at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J.; Miller, P. A.; Persson, A.; Olefeldt, D.; Pilesjö, P.; Heliasz, M.; Jackowicz-Korczynski, M.; Yang, Z.; Smith, B.; Callaghan, T. V.; Christensen, T. R.

    2015-01-01

    Large amount of organic carbon is stored in high latitude soils. A substantial proportion of this carbon stock is vulnerable and may decompose rapidly due to temperature increases that are already greater than the global average. It is therefore crucial to quantify and understand carbon exchange between the atmosphere and subarctic/arctic ecosystems. In this paper, we combine an arctic-enabled version of the process-based dynamic ecosystem model, LPJ-GUESS (version LPJG-WHyMe-TFM) with comprehensive observations of terrestrial and aquatic carbon fluxes to simulate long-term carbon exchange in a subarctic catchment comprising both mineral and peatland soils. The model is applied at 50 m resolution and is shown to be able to capture the seasonality and magnitudes of observed fluxes at this fine scale. The modelled magnitudes of CO2 uptake generally follow the descending sequence: birch forest, non-permafrost Eriophorum, Sphagnum and then tundra heath during the observation periods. The catchment-level carbon fluxes from aquatic systems are dominated by CO2 emissions from streams. Integrated across the whole catchment, we estimate that the area is a carbon sink at present, and will become an even stronger carbon sink by 2080, which is mainly a result of a projected densification of birch forest and its encroachment into tundra heath. However, the magnitudes of the modelled sinks are very dependent on future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Furthermore, comparisons of global warming potentials between two simulations with and without CO2 increase since 1960 reveal that the increased methane emission from the peatland could double the warming effects of the whole catchment by 2080 in the absence of CO2 fertilization of the vegetation. This is the first process-based model study of the temporal evolution of a catchment-level carbon budget at high spatial resolution, integrating comprehensive and diverse fluxes including both terrestrial and aquatic carbon. Though this

  1. Au-Ge film thermometers for temperature range 30 mK-300 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthoux, O.; Brusetti, R.; Lasjaunias, J. C.; Sahling, S.

    After optmization of the Au concentration and the annealing temperature, highly sensitive Au-Ge film thermometers for the temperature range 30 mK-300 K were obtained. The thermometers show good reproducibility, a very short relaxation time constant at low temperatures and are quite insensitive to magnetic field.

  2. The Fire INventory from NCAR (FINN): a high resolution global model to estimate the emissions from open burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedinmyer, C.; Akagi, S. K.; Yokelson, R. J.; Emmons, L. K.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Orlando, J. J.; Soja, A. J.

    2011-07-01

    The Fire INventory from NCAR version 1.0 (FINNv1) provides daily, 1 km resolution, global estimates of the trace gas and particle emissions from open burning of biomass, which includes wildfire, agricultural fires, and prescribed burning and does not include biofuel use and trash burning. Emission factors used in the calculations have been updated with recent data, particularly for the non-methane organic compounds (NMOC). The resulting global annual NMOC emission estimates are as much as a factor of 5 greater than some prior estimates. Chemical speciation profiles, necessary to allocate the total NMOC emission estimates to lumped species for use by chemical transport models, are provided for three widely used chemical mechanisms: SAPRC99, GEOS-CHEM, and MOZART-4. Using these profiles, FINNv1 also provides global estimates of key organic compounds, including formaldehyde and methanol. Uncertainties in the emissions estimates arise from several of the method steps. The use of fire hot spots, assumed area burned, land cover maps, biomass consumption estimates, and emission factors all introduce error into the model estimates. The uncertainty in the FINNv1 emission estimates are about a factor of two; but, the global estimates agree reasonably well with other global inventories of biomass burning emissions for CO, CO2, and other species with less variable emission factors. FINNv1 emission estimates have been developed specifically for modeling atmospheric chemistry and air quality in a consistent framework at scales from local to global. The product is unique because of the high temporal and spatial resolution, global coverage, and the number of species estimated. FINNv1 can be used for both hindcast and forecast or near-real time model applications and the results are being critically evaluated with models and observations whenever possible.

  3. GISMO, an ELT in space: a giant (30-m) far-infrared and submillimeter space observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawarden, Timothy G.; Johnstone, Callum; Johnstone, Graeme

    2004-07-01

    We describe GISMO, a concept for a 30-m class achromatic diffractive Fesnel space telescope operating in the far-IR and submillimeter from ~20 μm to ~700 μm. The concept is based on the precepts of Hyde (1999). It involves two units, the Lens and Instrument spacecraft, 3 km apart in a halo orbit around the Earth-Sun L2 point. The primary lens, L1, is a 30.1-m, 32-zone f/100 Fresnel lens, fabricated from ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE). It is 1.0 to 3.4 mm thick (the features are 2.4 mm high for a "design wavelength" of 1.2 mm) and made in 5 strips linked by fabric hinges. It is stowed for launch by folding and rolling. It is deployed warm, unrolled by pneumatic or mechanical means, unfolded by carbon-fiber struts with Shape Memory Alloy hinges and stiffened until cold by a peripheral inflatable ring. Re-oriented edgeways-on to the Sun behind a 5-layer sunshade, L1 will then cool by radiation to space, approaching ~10K after 200 - 300 days. The low equilibrium temperature occurs because the lens is very thin and has a huge view factor to space but a small one to the sunshade. The Instrument spacecraft resembles a smaller, colder (~4K) version of the James Webb Space Telescope and shares features of a concept for the SAFIR mission. A near-field Ritchey-Chretien telescope with a 3-segment off-axis 6m x 3m primary acts as field lens, re-imaging L1 on a 30-cm f/1 Fresnel Corrector lens of equal and opposite dispersion, producing an achromatic beam which is directed to a focal plane equipped with imaging and spectroscopic instruments. The "design wavelength" of the telescope is 1.2 mm and it is employed at its second and higher harmonics. The shortest wavelength, ~20μm, is set by the transmission properties of the lens material (illustrated here) and determines the design tolerances of the optical system. The overall mass is estimated at ~5 tonnes and the stowed length around 14 m. Technical challenges and areas of uncertainty for the design concept

  4. On the calibration of Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter surface roughness estimates using high-resolution DTMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, W.; Muller, J.-P.; Gupta, S.

    2012-04-01

    Planetary surface roughness is critical in the selection of suitable landing sites for robotic lander or roving missions. It has also been used in the identification of terrain, for better calibration of radar returns and improved understanding of aerodynamic roughness [1]. One of the secondary science goals of the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) was the study of surface roughness at 100 m, using the backscatter pulse width of the laser pulse, which has a footprint of 168 m in diameter [2]. The pulse width values in the final release (version L) of the MOLA Precision Experiment Data Record (PEDR) have been corrected for across track slopes and the removal of 'bad points', and footprint diameter was revised to 75 m, with a 35 m response length in [3]. We look here at comparing surface roughness values derived from the MOLA pulse-width data with surface roughness estimates derived at various scales from high-resolution digital terrain models (DTMs) to determine if these theoretically derived surface roughness lengths are physically meaningful. The final four potential landing sites for Mars Science Laboratory were used in this study, as they have extensive HiRISE (1m) and HRSC (50m) DTM coverage [4]. Pulse width data from both the MOLA PEDR (version L) and the data used in [3] was collected and compared for each of the sites against surface roughness estimates at various scales from HiRISE, and HRSC, DTMs using the RMS height. This assumed a circular footprint for each MOLA footprint and that the horizontal geolocation of the PEDR MOLA footprints was sufficiently accurate to only extract those DTM points which lay inside the footprints. Results from the MOLA PEDR data were extremely poor, and show no correlation with surface roughness measurements from DTMs. Results using the corrected data in [3] were mixed. Eberswalde and Holden Craters both show significantly improved correlations for a variety of surface roughness scales. The best correlations were found to

  5. Estimation of Land Surface Energy Balance Using Satellite Data of Spatial Reduced Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vintila, Ruxandra; Radnea, Cristina; Savin, Elena; Poenaru, Violeta

    2010-12-01

    The paper presents preliminary results concerning the monitoring at national level of several geo-biophysical variables retrieved by remote sensing, in particular those related to drought or aridisation. The study, which is in progress, represents also an exercise for to the implementation of a Land Monitoring Core Service for Romania, according to the Kopernikus Program and in compliance with the INSPIRE Directive. The SEBS model has been used to retrieve land surface energy balance variables, such as turbulent heat fluxes, evaporative fraction and daily evaporation, based on three information types: (1) surface albedo, emissivity, temperature, fraction of vegetation cover (fCover), leaf area index (LAI) and vegetation height; (2) air pressure, temperature, humidity and wind speed at the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height; (3) downward solar radiation and downward longwave radiation. AATSR and MERIS archived reprocessed images have provided several types of information. Thus, surface albedo, emissivity, and land surface temperature have been retrieved from AATSR, while LAI and fCover have been estimated from MERIS. The vegetation height has been derived from CORINE Land Cover and PELCOM Land Use databases, while the meteorological information at the height of PBL have been estimated from the measurements provided by the national weather station network. Other sources of data used during this study have been the GETASSE30 digital elevation model with 30" spatial resolution, used for satellite image orthorectification, and the SIGSTAR-200 geographical information system of soil resources of Romania, used for water deficit characterisation. The study will continue by processing other AATSR and MERIS archived images, complemented by the validation of SEBS results with ground data collected on the most important biomes for Romania at various phenological stages, and the transformation of evaporation / evapotranspiration into a drought index using the soil texture

  6. The effect of flow data resolution on sediment yield estimation and channel design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosburg, Tyler T.; Nelson, Peter A.; Sholtes, Joel S.; Bledsoe, Brian P.

    2016-07-01

    The decision to use either daily-averaged or sub-daily streamflow records has the potential to impact the calculation of sediment transport metrics and stream channel design. Using bedload and suspended load sediment transport measurements collected at 138 sites across the United States, we calculated the effective discharge, sediment yield, and half-load discharge using sediment rating curves over long time periods (median record length = 24 years) with both daily-averaged and sub-daily streamflow records. A comparison of sediment transport metrics calculated with both daily-average and sub-daily stream flow data at each site showed that daily-averaged flow data do not adequately represent the magnitude of high stream flows at hydrologically flashy sites. Daily-average stream flow data cause an underestimation of sediment transport and sediment yield (including the half-load discharge) at flashy sites. The degree of underestimation was correlated with the level of flashiness and the exponent of the sediment rating curve. No consistent relationship between the use of either daily-average or sub-daily streamflow data and the resultant effective discharge was found. When used in channel design, computed sediment transport metrics may have errors due to flow data resolution, which can propagate into design slope calculations which, if implemented, could lead to unwanted aggradation or degradation in the design channel. This analysis illustrates the importance of using sub-daily flow data in the calculation of sediment yield in urbanizing or otherwise flashy watersheds. Furthermore, this analysis provides practical charts for estimating and correcting these types of underestimation errors commonly incurred in sediment yield calculations.

  7. High resolution land surface geophysical parameters estimation from ALOS PALSAR data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High resolution land surface geophysical products, such as soil moisture, surface roughness and vegetation water content, are essential for a variety of applications ranging from water management to regional climate predictions. In India high resolution geophysical products, in particular soil moist...

  8. Three-dimensional estimates of tree canopies: Scaling from high-resolution UAV data to satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankey, T.; Donald, J.; McVay, J.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution remote sensing images and datasets are typically acquired at a large cost, which poses big a challenge for many scientists. Northern Arizona University recently acquired a custom-engineered, cutting-edge UAV and we can now generate our own images with the instrument. The UAV has a unique capability to carry a large payload including a hyperspectral sensor, which images the Earth surface in over 350 spectral bands at 5 cm resolution, and a lidar scanner, which images the land surface and vegetation in 3-dimensions. Both sensors represent the newest available technology with very high resolution, precision, and accuracy. Using the UAV sensors, we are monitoring the effects of regional forest restoration treatment efforts. Individual tree canopy width and height are measured in the field and via the UAV sensors. The high-resolution UAV images are then used to segment individual tree canopies and to derive 3-dimensional estimates. The UAV image-derived variables are then correlated to the field-based measurements and scaled to satellite-derived tree canopy measurements. The relationships between the field-based and UAV-derived estimates are then extrapolated to a larger area to scale the tree canopy dimensions and to estimate tree density within restored and control forest sites.

  9. Thermomechanical Properties of 30M HTS Power Cable in DAPAS Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. H.; Kim, C. D.; Kim, I. S.; Park, I. S.; Jang, H. M.; Lee, C. Y.; Kim, D. W.

    2006-04-01

    The 22.9 kV 3 phase 30 m HTS (High Temperature Superconducting) power cable system that contributes to the research for commercial applications was developed as a part of "DAPAS (Dream for Advanced Power system by Applied Superconductivity technologies) Project" in Korea. LS Cable Ltd. has been playing a significant role in design, manufacture, installation, and test of the 30m power cable system. The manufacture and the installation of the cable system were completed in 2004. We performed the initial cool down and the basic operation test of the cable system. We have performed a long period of operation test of the cable system since February 2005. This paper reports the thermo-mechanical properties of the cable system measured during test.

  10. The fidelity of stochastic single-molecule super-resolution reconstructions critically depends upon robust background estimation.

    PubMed

    Hoogendoorn, Eelco; Crosby, Kevin C; Leyton-Puig, Daniela; Breedijk, Ronald M P; Jalink, Kees; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Postma, Marten

    2014-01-24

    The quality of super resolution images obtained by stochastic single-molecule microscopy critically depends on image analysis algorithms. We find that the choice of background estimator is often the most important determinant of reconstruction quality. A variety of techniques have found use, but many have a very narrow range of applicability depending upon the characteristics of the raw data. Importantly, we observe that when using otherwise accurate algorithms, unaccounted background components can give rise to biases on scales defeating the purpose of super-resolution microscopy. We find that a temporal median filter in particular provides a simple yet effective solution to the problem of background estimation, which we demonstrate over a range of imaging modalities and different reconstruction methods.

  11. Estimates of greenhouse gas and black carbon emissions from a major Australian wildfire with high spatiotemporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surawski, N. C.; Sullivan, A. L.; Roxburgh, S. H.; Polglase, P. J.

    2016-08-01

    Estimates of greenhouse gases and particulate emissions are made with a high spatiotemporal resolution from the Kilmore East fire in Victoria, Australia, which burnt approximately 100,000 ha over a 12 h period. Altogether, 10,175 Gigagrams (Gg) of CO2 equivalent (CO2-e) emissions occurred, with CO2 (˜68%) being the dominant chemical species emitted followed by CH4 (˜17%) and black carbon (BC) (˜15%). About 63% of total CO2-e emissions were estimated to be from coarse woody debris, 22% were from surface fuels, 7% from bark, 6% from elevated fuels, and less than 2% from tree crown consumption. To assess the quality of our emissions estimates, we compared our results with previous estimates which used the Global Fire Emissions Database version 3.1 (GFEDv3.1) and the Fire INventory from the National Center for Atmospheric Research version 1.0 (FINNv1), as well as Australia's National Inventory System (and its revision). The uncertainty in emission estimates was addressed using truncated Monte Carlo analysis, which derived a probability density function for total emissions from the uncertainties in each input. The distribution of emission estimates from Monte Carlo analysis was lognormal with a mean of 10,355 Gigagrams (Gg) and a ±1 standard deviation (σ) uncertainty range of 7260-13,450 Gg. Results were in good agreement with the global data sets (when using the same burnt area), although they predicted lower total emissions by 15-37% due to underestimating fuel consumed. Emissions estimates can be improved by obtaining better estimates of fuel consumed and BC emission factors. Overall, this study presents a methodological template for high-resolution emissions accounting and its uncertainty, enabling a step toward process-based emissions accounting to be achieved.

  12. Estimating Temperature Retrieval Accuracy Associated With Thermal Band Spatial Resolution Requirements for Center Pivot Irrigation Monitoring and Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert E.; Irons, James; Spruce, Joseph P.; Underwood, Lauren W.; Pagnutti, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This study explores the use of synthetic thermal center pivot irrigation scenes to estimate temperature retrieval accuracy for thermal remote sensed data, such as data acquired from current and proposed Landsat-like thermal systems. Center pivot irrigation is a common practice in the western United States and in other parts of the world where water resources are scarce. Wide-area ET (evapotranspiration) estimates and reliable water management decisions depend on accurate temperature information retrieval from remotely sensed data. Spatial resolution, sensor noise, and the temperature step between a field and its surrounding area impose limits on the ability to retrieve temperature information. Spatial resolution is an interrelationship between GSD (ground sample distance) and a measure of image sharpness, such as edge response or edge slope. Edge response and edge slope are intuitive, and direct measures of spatial resolution are easier to visualize and estimate than the more common Modulation Transfer Function or Point Spread Function. For these reasons, recent data specifications, such as those for the LDCM (Landsat Data Continuity Mission), have used GSD and edge response to specify spatial resolution. For this study, we have defined a 400-800 m diameter center pivot irrigation area with a large 25 K temperature step associated with a 300 K well-watered field surrounded by an infinite 325 K dry area. In this context, we defined the benchmark problem as an easily modeled, highly common stressing case. By parametrically varying GSD (30-240 m) and edge slope, we determined the number of pixels and field area fraction that meet a given temperature accuracy estimate for 400-m, 600-m, and 800-m diameter field sizes. Results of this project will help assess the utility of proposed specifications for the LDCM and other future thermal remote sensing missions and for water resource management.

  13. Merging Radar Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPEs) from the High-resolution NEXRAD Reanalysis over CONUS with Rain-gauge Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, O. P.; Nelson, B. R.; Stevens, S. E.; Nickl, E.; Seo, D. J.; Kim, B.; Zhang, J.; Qi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The processing of radar-only precipitation via the reanalysis from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor Quantitative (NMQ/Q2) based on the WSR-88D Next-generation Radar (Nexrad) network over the Continental United States (CONUS) is completed for the period covering from 2002 to 2011. While this constitutes a unique opportunity to study precipitation processes at higher resolution than conventionally possible (1-km, 5-min), the long-term radar-only product needs to be merged with in-situ information in order to be suitable for hydrological, meteorological and climatological applications. The radar-gauge merging is performed by using rain gauge information at daily (Global Historical Climatology Network-Daily: GHCN-D), hourly (Hydrometeorological Automated Data System: HADS), and 5-min (Automated Surface Observing Systems: ASOS; Climate Reference Network: CRN) resolution. The challenges related to incorporating differing resolution and quality networks to generate long-term large-scale gridded estimates of precipitation are enormous. In that perspective, we are implementing techniques for merging the rain gauge datasets and the radar-only estimates such as Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW), Simple Kriging (SK), Ordinary Kriging (OK), and Conditional Bias-Penalized Kriging (CBPK). An evaluation of the different radar-gauge merging techniques is presented and we provide an estimate of uncertainty for the gridded estimates. In addition, comparisons with a suite of lower resolution QPEs derived from ground based radar measurements (Stage IV) are provided in order to give a detailed picture of the improvements and remaining challenges.

  14. Fusion of multiple radar-based quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE) for high-resolution flash flood forecasting in large urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafieei Nasab, A.; Norouzi, A.; Kim, B.; Seo, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    With increasingly widespread use of weather radars, multiple radar-based QPEs are now routinely available in many places. In the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex (DFW), for example, the Multisensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE), Q2 (Next Generation QPE) and CASA (Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of Atmosphere) QPEs are available. Because these products are based on different radar systems, different sources of additional information, and/or processing algorithms, they have different error characteristics and spatiotemporal resolutions. In this work, we explore improving the accuracy of the highest-resolution radar QPE by fusing it with lower-resolution QPE(s). Two approaches are examined. The first is to pose fusion as a Fisher estimation problem in which the state vector is the true unknown precipitation at the highest resolution and the observation vector is made of all radar QPEs at their native resolutions. The second is to upscale the higher resolution QPE(s) to the lowest resolution, merge them via optimal estimation, and disaggregate the merged estimates based on the spatiotemporal patterns of precipitation in the high resolution QPE. In both approaches, we compare Fisher estimation with conditional bias-penalized Fisher-like estimation which improves estimation of heavy-to-extreme precipitation. For evaluation, we compare the precipitation estimates from the two approaches with rain gauge observations in the DFW area.

  15. Estimation of Orbital Neutron Detector Spatial Resolution by Systematic Shifting of Differential Topographic Masks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, T. P.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Livengood, T.; Starr, R. D.; Evans, L. G.; Mazarico, E.; Smith, D. E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a method and preliminary results related to determining the spatial resolution of orbital neutron detectors using epithermal maps and differential topographic masks. Our technique is similar to coded aperture imaging methods for optimizing photonic signals in telescopes [I]. In that approach photon masks with known spatial patterns in a telescope aperature are used to systematically restrict incoming photons which minimizes interference and enhances photon signal to noise. Three orbital neutron detector systems with different stated spatial resolutions are evaluated. The differing spatial resolutions arise due different orbital altitudes and the use of neutron collimation techniques. 1) The uncollimated Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer (LPNS) system has spatial resolution of 45km FWHM from approx. 30km altitude mission phase [2]. The Lunar Rennaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) with two detectors at 50km altitude evaluated here: 2) the collimated 10km FWHM spatial resolution detector CSETN and 3) LEND's collimated Sensor for Epithermal Neutrons (SETN). Thus providing two orbital altitudes to study factors of: uncollimated vs collimated and two average altitudes for their effect on fields-of-view.

  16. A spatial resolution threshold of land cover in estimating terrestrial carbon sequestration in four counties in Georgia and Alabama, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, S.Q.; Liu, S.; Li, Z.; Sohl, T.L.

    2010-01-01

    Changes in carbon density (i.e., carbon stock per unit area) and land cover greatly affect carbon sequestration. Previous studies have shown that land cover change detection strongly depends on spatial scale. However, the influence of the spatial resolution of land cover change information on the estimated terrestrial carbon sequestration is not known. Here, we quantified and evaluated the impact of land cover change databases at various spatial resolutions (250 m, 500 m, 1 km, 2 km, and 4 km) on the magnitude and spatial patterns of regional carbon sequestration in four counties in Georgia and Alabama using the General Ensemble biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS). Results indicated a threshold of 1 km in the land cover change databases and in the estimated regional terrestrial carbon sequestration. Beyond this threshold, significant biases occurred in the estimation of terrestrial carbon sequestration, its interannual variability, and spatial patterns. In addition, the overriding impact of interannual climate variability on the temporal change of regional carbon sequestration was unrealistically overshadowed by the impact of land cover change beyond the threshold. The implications of these findings directly challenge current continental- to global-scale carbon modeling efforts relying on information at coarse spatial resolution without incorporating fine-scale land cover dynamics.

  17. Use of High-Resolution Multispectral Imagery to Estimate Chlorophyll and Plant Nitrogen in Oats (Avena sativa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ELarab, M.; Ticlavilca, A. M.; Torres-Rua, A. F.; Maslova, I.; McKee, M.

    2013-12-01

    Precision agriculture requires high spatial resolution in the application of the inputs to agricultural production. This requires that actionable information about crop and field status be acquired at the same high spatial resolution and at a temporal frequency appropriate for timely responses. In this study, high-resolution imagery was obtained through the use of a small, unmanned aerial vehicle, called AggieAirTM, that provides spatial resolution as fine as 6 cm. Simultaneously with AggieAir flights, intensive ground sampling was conducted at precisely determined locations for plant chlorophyll, plant nitrogen, and other parameters. This study investigated the spectral signature of a crop of oats (Avena sativa) and formulated machine learning regression models of reflectance response between the multi-spectral bands available from AggieAir (red, green, blue, near infrared, and thermal), plant chlorophyll and plant nitrogen. We tested two, separate relevance vector machines (RVM) and a single multivariate relevance vector machine (MVRVM) to develop the linkages between the remotely sensed data and plant chlorophyll and nitrogen at approximately 15-cm resolution. The results of this study are presented, including a statistical evaluation of the performance of the different models and a comparison of the RVM modeling methods against more traditional approaches that have been used for estimation of plant chlorophyll and nitrogen.

  18. The influence of spatial resolution on human health risk co-benefit estimates for global climate policy assessments.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hsiu-Ching; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Ma, Hwong-wen

    2015-03-15

    Assessment of the ability of climate policies to produce desired improvements in public health through co-benefits of air pollution reduction can consume resources in both time and research funds. These resources increase significantly as the spatial resolution of models increases. In addition, the level of spatial detail available in macroeconomic models at the heart of climate policy assessments is much lower than that available in traditional human health risk modeling. It is therefore important to determine whether increasing spatial resolution considerably affects risk-based decisions; which kinds of decisions might be affected; and under what conditions they will be affected. Human health risk co-benefits from carbon emissions reductions that bring about concurrent reductions in Particulate Matter (PM10) emissions is therefore examined here at four levels of spatial resolution (Uniform Nation, Uniform Region, Uniform County/city, Health Risk Assessment) in a case study of Taiwan as one of the geographic regions of a global macroeceonomic model, with results that are representative of small, industrialized nations within that global model. A metric of human health risk mortality (YOLL, years of life lost in life expectancy) is compared under assessments ranging from a "uniform simulation" in which there is no spatial resolution of changes in ambient air concentration under a policy to a "highly spatially resolved simulation" (called here Health Risk Assessment). PM10 is chosen in this study as the indicator of air pollution for which risks are assessed due to its significance as a co-benefit of carbon emissions reductions within climate mitigation policy. For the policy examined, the four estimates of mortality in the entirety of Taiwan are 747 YOLL, 834 YOLL, 984 YOLL and 916 YOLL, under Uniform Taiwan, Uniform Region, Uniform County and Health Risk Assessment respectively; or differences of 18%, 9%, 7% if the HRA methodology is taken as the baseline. While

  19. The influence of spatial resolution on human health risk co-benefit estimates for global climate policy assessments.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hsiu-Ching; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Ma, Hwong-wen

    2015-03-15

    Assessment of the ability of climate policies to produce desired improvements in public health through co-benefits of air pollution reduction can consume resources in both time and research funds. These resources increase significantly as the spatial resolution of models increases. In addition, the level of spatial detail available in macroeconomic models at the heart of climate policy assessments is much lower than that available in traditional human health risk modeling. It is therefore important to determine whether increasing spatial resolution considerably affects risk-based decisions; which kinds of decisions might be affected; and under what conditions they will be affected. Human health risk co-benefits from carbon emissions reductions that bring about concurrent reductions in Particulate Matter (PM10) emissions is therefore examined here at four levels of spatial resolution (Uniform Nation, Uniform Region, Uniform County/city, Health Risk Assessment) in a case study of Taiwan as one of the geographic regions of a global macroeceonomic model, with results that are representative of small, industrialized nations within that global model. A metric of human health risk mortality (YOLL, years of life lost in life expectancy) is compared under assessments ranging from a "uniform simulation" in which there is no spatial resolution of changes in ambient air concentration under a policy to a "highly spatially resolved simulation" (called here Health Risk Assessment). PM10 is chosen in this study as the indicator of air pollution for which risks are assessed due to its significance as a co-benefit of carbon emissions reductions within climate mitigation policy. For the policy examined, the four estimates of mortality in the entirety of Taiwan are 747 YOLL, 834 YOLL, 984 YOLL and 916 YOLL, under Uniform Taiwan, Uniform Region, Uniform County and Health Risk Assessment respectively; or differences of 18%, 9%, 7% if the HRA methodology is taken as the baseline. While

  20. Development of corotational formulated FEM for application to 30m class large deployable reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Satoru; Fujiwara, Yuuichi; Tsujihata, Akio

    2010-06-01

    JAXA, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, is now developing a corotational formulated finite element analysis method and its software "Origami/ETS" for the development of 30m class large deployable reflectors. For the reason that the deployable reflector is composed of beams, cables and mesh, this analysis method is generalized for finite elements with multiple nodes, which are commonly used in linear finite element analyses. The large displacement and rotation are taken into account by the corotational formulation. The tangent stiffness matrix for finite elements with multiple nodes is obtained as follows; the geometric stiffness matrix of two node elements is derived by taking variation of the element's corotational matrix from the virtual work of finite elements with large displacement; similarly the geometric stiffness matrix for three node elements is derived; as the extension of two and three node element theories, the geometric stiffness matrix for multiple node elements is derived; with the geometric stiffness matrix for multiple node elements, the tangent stiffness matrix is obtained. The analysis method is applied for the deployment analysis and static structural analysis of the 30m class large deployable reflector. In the deployment analysis, it is confirmed that this method stably analyzes the deployment motion from the deployment configuration to the stowed configuration of the reflector. In the static analysis, it is confirmed that the mesh structure is analyzed successfully. The 30m class large deployable reflector is now still being developed and is about to undergo several tests with its prototypes. This analysis method will be used in the tests and verifications of the reflector.

  1. Regional Climate Modelling: impact of horizontal grid resolution on precipitation estimates over Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Ray; Nolan, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Regional Climate Models (RCMs) are widely used to dynamically downscale the outputs from global climate model simulations. There is some evidence that high resolution RCMs with explicit convection can provide more accurate information on extreme precipitation events compared to coarse resolution simulations with parameterized convection. In flooding applications, where the interest may be focused on precipitation over a relatively large river catchment area, compared to the model grid spacing, the value of enhanced resolution needs to be quantified. This is addressed in a study using two RCMs: the COnsortium for Small-scale Modeling-Climate Limited-area Modelling (COSMO-CLM) model (version CCLM_5.00) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model (version 3.7.1). Using ERA-Interim global re-analysis data as boundaries, climate simulations were performed for the period 1981-2015, for an area focused on Ireland, using model horizontal grid spacings of 18, 6 and 2 km (WRF) and 18, 6 and 1.5 km (COSMO-CLM). Model hourly precipitation outputs were compared with gridded and point observational datasets for time intervals extending from hours to seasons to assess the performance of the RCMs at the different resolutions.

  2. Air quality estimates in Mediterranean cities using high resolution satellite technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudnovsky, Alexandra; Lyapustin, Alexei; Wang, Yujie

    2016-04-01

    Satellite imaging is an essential tool for monitoring air pollution because, unlike ground observations, it supplies continuous data with global coverage of terrestrial and atmospheric components. Satellite-based Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) retrievals reflect particle abundance in the atmospheric column. This data provide some indication on the extent of particle concentrations. However, it is difficult to retrieve AOD at high spatial resolution above areas with high surface reflectance and heterogeneous land cover, such as urban areas. Therefore, many crowded regions worldwide including Israel, AOD climatology are still uncertain because of the high ground reflectance and coarse spatial resolution. Recently, a new Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm was developed for MODIS which provides AOD at 1 km resolution. This study aims to investigate the spatial variability of AOD within Israeli and several other Mediterranean cities. In addition, we aim to characterize the impact of climatic condition on pollution patterns in-and-between cities and to identify days when cities exhibit the highest variability in AOD. Furthermore, we assessed the differences in pollution levels between adjacent locations. We will report on spatial variability in AOD levels derived from high 1km resolution MAIAC AOD algorithm on a temporal basis, in relation to season and synoptic-meteorological conditions.

  3. Use of ultra-high resolution imagery in the estimation of wildfire fuel load across chaparral vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Ian Thomas

    Development of improved methods to more accurately estimate spatial distributions of fuel loads in shrublands will allow for improved understanding of ecological processes such as wildfire behavior and postburn recovery. The goal of this study is to develop and test remote sensing methods to scale-up from field plot estimates of shrubland fuel over landscapes or to pixels of coarser spatial resolution data sets using ultra high spatial resolution imagery captured by a light-sport aircraft. The study is conducted on chaparral shrublands located in eastern San Diego County, California. We measured fuel load in the field using an allometric approach and estimated ground coverage of individual shrub species by using ultra-high spatial resolution imagery and image processing routines. Study results show a strong relationship between shrub coverage and fuel loads in all three stands (7, 28, and 68 years since last wildfire). Ordinary least squares analysis using ground coverage as the independent variable regressed against biomass was conducted. The analysis yielded R2 values ranging from 0.78 to 0.96 in the older stands for the live shrub species, while R2 values for species in the younger stands ranged from 0.03 to 0.8. Pooling species-based data into larger sample sizes consisting of functional and all-shrub classes while obtaining suitable linear regression models supports the potential for these methods to be used for scaling-up fuel estimates to broader areal extents, without having to classify and map shrubland vegetation at the species level.

  4. Daily Estimation of Ground-Level PM2.5 Concentrations over Beijing Using 3 km Resolution MODIS AOD.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuanyu; Wang, Yuxuan; Zhang, Kai; Dong, Wenhao; Lv, Baolei; Bai, Yuqi

    2015-10-20

    Estimating exposures to PM2.5 within urban areas requires surface PM2.5 concentrations at high temporal and spatial resolutions. We developed a mixed effects model to derive daily estimations of surface PM2.5 levels in Beijing, using the 3 km resolution satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) calibrated daily by the newly available high-density surface measurements. The mixed effects model accounts for daily variations of AOD-PM2.5 relationships and shows good performance in model predictions (R(2) of 0.81-0.83) and cross-validations (R(2) of 0.75-0.79). Satellite derived population-weighted mean PM2.5 for Beijing was 51.2 μg/m(3) over the study period (Mar 2013 to Apr 2014), 46% higher than China's annual-mean PM2.5 standard of 35 μg/m(3). We estimated that more than 19.2 million people (98% of Beijing's population) are exposed to harmful level of long-term PM2.5 pollution. During 25% of the days with model data, the population-weighted mean PM2.5 exceeded China's daily PM2.5 standard of 75 μg/m(3). Predicted high-resolution daily PM2.5 maps are useful to identify pollution "hot spots" and estimate short- and long-term exposure. We further demonstrated that a good calibration of the satellite data requires a relatively large number of ground-level PM2.5 monitoring sites and more are still needed in Beijing. PMID:26310776

  5. High Resolution Direction of Arrival (DOA) Estimation Based on Improved Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) Algorithm by Iterative Local Searching

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenyi; Wu, Renbiao

    2013-01-01

    DOA (Direction of Arrival) estimation is a major problem in array signal processing applications. Recently, compressive sensing algorithms, including convex relaxation algorithms and greedy algorithms, have been recognized as a kind of novel DOA estimation algorithm. However, the success of these algorithms is limited by the RIP (Restricted Isometry Property) condition or the mutual coherence of measurement matrix. In the DOA estimation problem, the columns of measurement matrix are steering vectors corresponding to different DOAs. Thus, it violates the mutual coherence condition. The situation gets worse when there are two sources from two adjacent DOAs. In this paper, an algorithm based on OMP (Orthogonal Matching Pursuit), called ILS-OMP (Iterative Local Searching-Orthogonal Matching Pursuit), is proposed to improve DOA resolution by Iterative Local Searching. Firstly, the conventional OMP algorithm is used to obtain initial estimated DOAs. Then, in each iteration, a local searching process for every estimated DOA is utilized to find a new DOA in a given DOA set to further decrease the residual. Additionally, the estimated DOAs are updated by substituting the initial DOA with the new one. The simulation results demonstrate the advantages of the proposed algorithm. PMID:23974150

  6. High resolution direction of arrival (DOA) estimation based on improved orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) algorithm by iterative local searching.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenyi; Wu, Renbiao

    2013-01-01

    DOA (Direction of Arrival) estimation is a major problem in array signal processing applications. Recently, compressive sensing algorithms, including convex relaxation algorithms and greedy algorithms, have been recognized as a kind of novel DOA estimation algorithm. However, the success of these algorithms is limited by the RIP (Restricted Isometry Property) condition or the mutual coherence of measurement matrix. In the DOA estimation problem, the columns of measurement matrix are steering vectors corresponding to different DOAs. Thus, it violates the mutual coherence condition. The situation gets worse when there are two sources from two adjacent DOAs. In this paper, an algorithm based on OMP (Orthogonal Matching Pursuit), called ILS-OMP (Iterative Local Searching-Orthogonal Matching Pursuit), is proposed to improve DOA resolution by Iterative Local Searching. Firstly, the conventional OMP algorithm is used to obtain initial estimated DOAs. Then, in each iteration, a local searching process for every estimated DOA is utilized to find a new DOA in a given DOA set to further decrease the residual. Additionally, the estimated DOAs are updated by substituting the initial DOA with the new one. The simulation results demonstrate the advantages of the proposed algorithm. PMID:23974150

  7. Vineyard Yield Estimation Based on the Analysis of High Resolution Images Obtained with Artificial Illumination at Night

    PubMed Central

    Font, Davinia; Tresanchez, Marcel; Martínez, Dani; Moreno, Javier; Clotet, Eduard; Palacín, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method for vineyard yield estimation based on the analysis of high-resolution images obtained with artificial illumination at night. First, this paper assesses different pixel-based segmentation methods in order to detect reddish grapes: threshold based, Mahalanobis distance, Bayesian classifier, linear color model segmentation and histogram segmentation, in order to obtain the best estimation of the area of the clusters of grapes in this illumination conditions. The color spaces tested were the original RGB and the Hue-Saturation-Value (HSV). The best segmentation method in the case of a non-occluded reddish table-grape variety was the threshold segmentation applied to the H layer, with an estimation error in the area of 13.55%, improved up to 10.01% by morphological filtering. Secondly, after segmentation, two procedures for yield estimation based on a previous calibration procedure have been proposed: (1) the number of pixels corresponding to a cluster of grapes is computed and converted directly into a yield estimate; and (2) the area of a cluster of grapes is converted into a volume by means of a solid of revolution, and this volume is converted into a yield estimate; the yield errors obtained were 16% and −17%, respectively. PMID:25860071

  8. Experimental Estimation of CLASP Spatial and Spectral Resolutions: Results of the Instrument's Optical Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giono, G.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ishikawa, R.; Narukage, N.; Bando, T.; Kano, R.; Suematsu, Y.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Auchere, F.

    2015-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter is a sounding rocket experiment design to measure for the first time the polarization signal of the Lyman-Alpha line (121.6nm), emitted in the solar upper-chromosphere and transition region. This instrument aims to detect the Hanle effect's signature hidden in the Ly-alpha polarization, as a tool to probe the chromospheric magnetic field. Hence, an unprecedented polarization accuracy is needed ((is) less than 10 (exp -3). Nevertheless, spatial and spectral resolutions are also crucial to observe chhromospheric feature such as spicules, and to have precise measurement of the Ly-alpha line core and wings. Hence, this poster will present how the telescope and the spectrograph were separately aligned, and their combined spatial and spectral resolutions.

  9. Estimating expected change of wind speed and solar radiation in the Carpathian basin using fine resolution regional climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholy, J.; Pongracz, R.; Dobor, L.; Miklos, E.; Gelybo, G. Y.

    2009-04-01

    Spatial resolution of global climate models (GCMs) are inappropriate to describe regional climate processes; therefore, GCM outputs may be misleading to compose regional climate change scenarios for the 21st century. In order to provide better estimations for regional climate parameters, fine resolution regional climate models (RCM) can be used. RCMs are limited area models nested in GCMs, i.e., the initial and the boundary conditions of RCMs are provided by the GCM outputs. In order to estimate the regional climate change expected in the Carpathian basin, outputs from several RCMs are summarized and analyzed for the periods of 2071-2100 (in case of A2 and B2 emission scenarios) and 1961-1990 (representing the current baseline climatic conditions). The RCM output variables with 50 km resolution horizontal are available from the completed European project PRUDENCE (Prediction of Regional scenarios and Uncertainties for Defining EuropeaN Climate change risks and Effects). Wind speed and solar radiation are both important meteorological parameters in terms of renewable energy potentials. The results suggest that in the Carpathian basin wind speed is likely to increase in all months by the end of the 21st century in case of both scenarios, which increases the wind energy potential in the region. Solar radiation is projected to increase in the summer half-year, and slightly decrease in winter. Thus, solar energy use during summer may become a more efficient renewable source in the future.

  10. High resolution fire danger modeling : integration of quantitative precipitation amount estimates derived from weather radars as an input of FWI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloppet, E.; Regimbeau, M.

    2009-09-01

    Fire meteo indices provide efficient guidance tools for the prevention, early warning and surveillance of forest fires. The indices are based on meteorological input data. The underlying approach is to exploit meteorological information as fully as possible to model the soil water content, biomass condition and fire danger. Fire meteorological danger is estimated by Météo-France at national level through the use of Fire Weather Index. The fire index services developed within the PREVIEW project (2005-2008) offer for the first time very high resolution mapping of forest fire risk. The high resolution FWI has been implemented in France complementary to the existing EFFIS operated by the Joint Research Center. A new method (ANTILOPE method) of combining precipitation data originating from different sources like rain gauges and weather radar measurements has been applied in the new service. Some of the advantages of this new service are: · Improved detection of local features of fire risk · More accurate analysis of meteorological input data used in forest fire index models providing added value for forest fire risk forecasts · Use of radar precipitation data "as is” utilizing the higher resolution, i.e. avoiding averaging operations The improved accuracy and spatial resolution of the indices provide a powerful early warning tool for national and regional civil protection and fire fighting authorities to alert and initiate forest fire fighting actions and measures.

  11. The Plateau de Bure + 30 m Arcsecond Whirlpool Survey Reveals a Thick Disk of Diffuse Molecular Gas in the M51 Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pety, Jérôme; Schinnerer, Eva; Leroy, Adam K.; Hughes, Annie; Meidt, Sharon E.; Colombo, Dario; Dumas, Gaelle; García-Burillo, Santiago; Schuster, Karl F.; Kramer, Carsten; Dobbs, Clare L.; Thompson, Todd A.

    2013-12-01

    We present the data of the Plateau de Bure Arcsecond Whirlpool Survey, a high spatial and spectral resolution 12CO (1-0) line survey of the inner ~10 × 6 kpc of the M51 system, and the first wide-field imaging of molecular gas in a star-forming spiral galaxy with resolution matched to the typical size of giant molecular clouds (40 pc). We describe the observation, reduction, and combination of the Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) and IRAM-30 m "short spacing" data. The final data cube attains 1.''1 resolution over the ~270'' × 170'' field of view, with sensitivity to all spatial scales from the combination of PdBI and IRAM-30 m data, and a brightness sensitivity of 0.4 K (1σ) in each 5 km s-1-wide channel map. We find a CO luminosity of 9 × 108 K km s-1 pc2, corresponding to a molecular gas mass of 4 × 109 M ⊙ for a standard CO-to-H2 conversion factor. Unexpectedly, we find that a large fraction of this emission, (50 ± 10)%, arises mostly from spatial scales larger than 36'' ~= 1.3 kpc. Through a series of tests, we demonstrate that this extended emission does not result from a processing artifact. We discuss its origin in light of the stellar component, the 12CO/13CO ratio, and the difference between the kinematics and structure of the PdBI-only and hybrid synthesis (PdBI + IRAM-30 m) images. The extended emission is consistent with a thick, diffuse disk of molecular gas with a typical scale height of ~200 pc, substructured in unresolved filaments that fill ~0.1% of the volume.

  12. Detecting tents to estimate the displaced populations for post-disaster relief using high resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shifeng; So, Emily; Smith, Pete

    2015-04-01

    Estimating the number of refugees and internally displaced persons is important for planning and managing an efficient relief operation following disasters and conflicts. Accurate estimates of refugee numbers can be inferred from the number of tents. Extracting tents from high-resolution satellite imagery has recently been suggested. However, it is still a significant challenge to extract tents automatically and reliably from remote sensing imagery. This paper describes a novel automated method, which is based on mathematical morphology, to generate a camp map to estimate the refugee numbers by counting tents on the camp map. The method is especially useful in detecting objects with a clear shape, size, and significant spectral contrast with their surroundings. Results for two study sites with different satellite sensors and different spatial resolutions demonstrate that the method achieves good performance in detecting tents. The overall accuracy can be up to 81% in this study. Further improvements should be possible if over-identified isolated single pixel objects can be filtered. The performance of the method is impacted by spectral characteristics of satellite sensors and image scenes, such as the extent of area of interest and the spatial arrangement of tents. It is expected that the image scene would have a much higher influence on the performance of the method than the sensor characteristics.

  13. Kalman-filtered compressive sensing for high resolution estimation of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions from sparse measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Jaideep; Lee, Jina; Lefantzi, Sophia; Yadav, Vineet; Michalak, Anna M.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2013-09-01

    The estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2) from limited ground-based and satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations will form a key component of the monitoring of treaties aimed at the abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. The limited nature of the measured data leads to a severely-underdetermined estimation problem. If the estimation is performed at fine spatial resolutions, it can also be computationally expensive. In order to enable such estimations, advances are needed in the spatial representation of ffCO2 emissions, scalable inversion algorithms and the identification of observables to measure. To that end, we investigate parsimonious spatial parameterizations of ffCO2 emissions which can be used in atmospheric inversions. We devise and test three random field models, based on wavelets, Gaussian kernels and covariance structures derived from easily-observed proxies of human activity. In doing so, we constructed a novel inversion algorithm, based on compressive sensing and sparse reconstruction, to perform the estimation. We also address scalable ensemble Kalman filters as an inversion mechanism and quantify the impact of Gaussian assumptions inherent in them. We find that the assumption does not impact the estimates of mean ffCO2 source strengths appreciably, but a comparison with Markov chain Monte Carlo estimates show significant differences in the variance of the source strengths. Finally, we study if the very different spatial natures of biogenic and ffCO2 emissions can be used to estimate them, in a disaggregated fashion, solely from CO2 concentration measurements, without extra information from products of incomplete combustion e.g., CO. We find that this is possible during the winter months, though the errors can be as large as 50%.

  14. Anechoic Sphere Phantoms for Estimating 3-D Resolution of Very High Frequency Ultrasound Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Ernest L.; Frank, Gary R.; McCormick, Matthew M.; Deaner, Meagan E.; Stiles, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Two phantoms have been constructed for assessing the performance of high frequency ultrasound imagers. They also allow for periodic quality assurance tests. The phantoms contain eight blocks of tissue-mimicking material where each block contains a spatially random distribution of suitably small anechoic spheres having a small distribution of diameters. The eight mean sphere diameters are distributed from 0.10 to 1.09 mm. The two phantoms differ primarily in terms of the backscatter coefficient of the background material in which the spheres are suspended. The mean scatterer diameter for one phantom is larger than that for the other phantom resulting in a lesser increase in backscatter coefficient for the second phantom; however, the backscatter curves cross at about 35 MHz. Since spheres have no preferred orientation, all three (spatial) dimensions of resolution contribute to sphere detection on an equal basis; thus, the resolution is termed 3-D. Two high frequency scanners are compared. One employs single-element (fixed focus) transducers, and the other employs variable focus linear arrays. The nominal frequency for the single element transducers were 25 and 55 MHz and for the linear array transducers were 20, 30 and 40 MHz. The depth range for detection of spheres of each size is determined corresponding to determination of 3-D resolution as a function of depth. As expected, the single-element transducers are severely limited in useful imaging depth ranges compared with the linear arrays. Note that these phantoms could also be useful for training technicians in using higher frequency scanners. PMID:20889416

  15. A real-time smart sensor for high-resolution frequency estimation in power systems.

    PubMed

    Granados-Lieberman, David; Romero-Troncoso, Rene J; Cabal-Yepez, Eduardo; Osornio-Rios, Roque A; Franco-Gasca, Luis A

    2009-01-01

    Power quality monitoring is a theme in vogue and accurate frequency measurement of the power line is a major issue. This problem is particularly relevant for power generating systems since the generated signal must comply with restrictive standards. The novelty of this work is the development of a smart sensor for real-time high-resolution frequency measurement in accordance with international standards for power quality monitoring. The proposed smart sensor utilizes commercially available current clamp, hall-effect sensor or resistor as primary sensor. The signal processing is carried out through the chirp z-transform. Simulations and experimental results show the efficiency of the proposed smart sensor.

  16. Estimating daily air temperature across the Southeastern United States using high-resolution satellite data: A statistical modeling study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liuhua; Liu, Pengfei; Kloog, Itai; Lee, Mihye; Kosheleva, Anna; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-04-01

    Accurate estimates of spatio-temporal resolved near-surface air temperature (Ta) are crucial for environmental epidemiological studies. However, values of Ta are conventionally obtained from weather stations, which have limited spatial coverage. Satellite surface temperature (Ts) measurements offer the possibility of local exposure estimates across large domains. The Southeastern United States has different climatic conditions, more small water bodies and wetlands, and greater humidity in contrast to other regions, which add to the challenge of modeling air temperature. In this study, we incorporated satellite Ts to estimate high resolution (1km×1km) daily Ta across the southeastern USA for 2000-2014. We calibrated Ts-Ta measurements using mixed linear models, land use, and separate slopes for each day. A high out-of-sample cross-validated R(2) of 0.952 indicated excellent model performance. When satellite Ts were unavailable, linear regression on nearby monitors and spatio-temporal smoothing was used to estimate Ta. The daily Ta estimations were compared to the NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) model. A good agreement with an R(2) of 0.969 and a mean squared prediction error (RMSPE) of 1.376°C was achieved. Our results demonstrate that Ta can be reliably predicted using this Ts-based prediction model, even in a large geographical area with topography and weather patterns varying considerably.

  17. Improved estimates of boreal Fire Radiative Energy using high temporal resolution data and a modified active fire detection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Kirsten

    2016-04-01

    Reliable estimates of biomass combusted during wildfires can be obtained from satellite observations of fire radiative power (FRP). Total fire radiative energy (FRE) is typically estimated by integrating instantaneous measurements of fire radiative power (FRP) at the time of orbital satellite overpass or geostationary observation. Remotely-sensed FRP products from orbital satellites are usually global in extent, requiring several thresholding and filtering operations to reduce the number of false fire detections. Some filters required for a global product may not be appropriate to fire detection in the boreal forest resulting in errors of omission and increased data processing times. We evaluate the effect of a boreal-specific active fire detection algorithm and estimates of FRP/FRE. Boreal fires are more likely to escape detection due to lower intensity smouldering combustion and sub canopy fires, therefore improvements in boreal fire detection could substantially reduce the uncertainty of emissions from biomass combustion in the region. High temporal resolution data from geostationary satellites have led to improvements in FRE estimation in tropical and temperate forests, but such a perspective is not possible for high latitude ecosystems given the equatorial orbit of geostationary observation. The increased density of overpasses in high latitudes from polar-orbiting satellites, however, may provide adequate temporal sampling for estimating FRE.

  18. Estimating daily air temperature across the Southeastern United States using high-resolution satellite data: A statistical modeling study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liuhua; Liu, Pengfei; Kloog, Itai; Lee, Mihye; Kosheleva, Anna; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-04-01

    Accurate estimates of spatio-temporal resolved near-surface air temperature (Ta) are crucial for environmental epidemiological studies. However, values of Ta are conventionally obtained from weather stations, which have limited spatial coverage. Satellite surface temperature (Ts) measurements offer the possibility of local exposure estimates across large domains. The Southeastern United States has different climatic conditions, more small water bodies and wetlands, and greater humidity in contrast to other regions, which add to the challenge of modeling air temperature. In this study, we incorporated satellite Ts to estimate high resolution (1km×1km) daily Ta across the southeastern USA for 2000-2014. We calibrated Ts-Ta measurements using mixed linear models, land use, and separate slopes for each day. A high out-of-sample cross-validated R(2) of 0.952 indicated excellent model performance. When satellite Ts were unavailable, linear regression on nearby monitors and spatio-temporal smoothing was used to estimate Ta. The daily Ta estimations were compared to the NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) model. A good agreement with an R(2) of 0.969 and a mean squared prediction error (RMSPE) of 1.376°C was achieved. Our results demonstrate that Ta can be reliably predicted using this Ts-based prediction model, even in a large geographical area with topography and weather patterns varying considerably. PMID:26717080

  19. Analysis of solar radiation on the surface estimated from GWNU solar radiation model with temporal resolution of satellite cloud fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zo, Il-Sung; Jee, Joon-Bum; Lee, Kyu-Tae; Kim, Bu-Yo

    2016-08-01

    Preliminary analysis with a solar radiation model is generally performed for photovoltaic power generation projects. Therefore, model accuracy is extremely important. The temporal and spatial resolutions used in previous studies of the Korean Peninsula were 1 km × 1 km and 1-h, respectively. However, calculating surface solar radiation at 1-h intervals does not ensure the accuracy of the geographical effects, and this parameter changes owing to atmospheric elements (clouds, aerosol, ozone, etc.). Thus, a change in temporal resolution is required. In this study, one-year (2013) analysis was conducted using Chollian geostationary meteorological satellite data from observations recorded at 15-min intervals. Observation data from the intensive solar site at Gangneung-Wonju National University (GWNU) showed that the coefficient of determination (R²), which was estimated for each month and season, increased, whereas the standard error (SE) decreased when estimated in 15-min intervals over those obtained in 1-h intervals in 2013. When compared with observational data from 22 solar sites of the Korean Meteorological Administration (KMA), R2 was 0.9 or higher on average, and over- or under-simulated sites did not exceed 3 sites. The model and 22 solar sites showed similar values of annual accumulated solar irradiation, and their annual mean was similar at 4,998 MJ m-2 (3.87 kWh m-2). These results show a difference of approximately ± 70 MJ m-2 (± 0.05 kWh m-2) from the distribution of the Korean Peninsula estimated in 1-h intervals and a higher correlation at higher temporal resolution.

  20. Comparing LAI estimates of corn and soybean from vegetation indices of multi-resolution satellite images

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf area index (LAI) is important in explaining the ability of the crop to intercept solar energy for biomass production and in understanding the impact of crop management practices. This paper describes a procedure for estimating LAI as a function of image-derived vegetation indices from temporal ...

  1. Women's Self-Estimates of Competence and the Resolution of the Career/Home Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stake, Jayne E.

    1979-01-01

    Relationships among women's role factors, self-estimates of competence, and career commitment were investigated. Female business students and alumnae completed the Attitudes toward Women Scale, the Performance-Self-Esteem Scale (PSES), and questions regarding home and career choices. As predicted, PSES scores were related to extent of career…

  2. Multi-scale geospatial agroecosystem modeling: a case study on the influence of soil data resolution on carbon budget estimates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H; Zhao, Kaiguang; Leduc, Stephen D; Xu, Min; Xiong, Wei; Zhang, Aiping; Izaurralde, Roberto C; Thomson, Allison M; West, Tristram O; Post, Wilfred M

    2014-05-01

    The development of effective measures to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentration and mitigate negative impacts of climate change requires accurate quantification of the spatial variation and magnitude of the terrestrial carbon (C) flux. However, the spatial pattern and strength of terrestrial C sinks and sources remain uncertain. In this study, we designed a spatially-explicit agroecosystem modeling system by integrating the Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model with multiple sources of geospatial and surveyed datasets (including crop type map, elevation, climate forcing, fertilizer application, tillage type and distribution, and crop planting and harvesting date), and applied it to examine the sensitivity of cropland C flux simulations to two widely used soil databases (i.e. State Soil Geographic-STATSGO of a scale of 1:250,000 and Soil Survey Geographic-SSURGO of a scale of 1:24,000) in Iowa, USA. To efficiently execute numerous EPIC runs resulting from the use of high resolution spatial data (56m), we developed a parallelized version of EPIC. Both STATSGO and SSURGO led to similar simulations of crop yields and Net Ecosystem Production (NEP) estimates at the State level. However, substantial differences were observed at the county and sub-county (grid) levels. In general, the fine resolution SSURGO data outperformed the coarse resolution STATSGO data for county-scale crop-yield simulation, and within STATSGO, the area-weighted approach provided more accurate results. Further analysis showed that spatial distribution and magnitude of simulated NEP were more sensitive to the resolution difference between SSURGO and STATSGO at the county or grid scale. For over 60% of the cropland areas in Iowa, the deviations between STATSGO- and SSURGO-derived NEP were larger than 1MgCha(-1)yr(-1), or about half of the average cropland NEP, highlighting the significant uncertainty in spatial distribution and magnitude of simulated C fluxes resulting from

  3. Multi-scale geospatial agroecosystem modeling: a case study on the influence of soil data resolution on carbon budget estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, D.; Zhao, Kaiguang; LeDuc, Stephen D.; Xu, Min; Xiong, Wei; Zhang, Aiping; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; West, Tristram O.; Post, W. M.

    2014-05-01

    The development of effective measures to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentration and mitigate negative impacts of climate change requires accurate quantification of the spatial variation and magnitude of the terrestrial carbon (C) flux. However, the spatial pattern and strength of terrestrial C sinks and sources remain uncertain. In this study, we designed a spatially-explicit agroecosystem modeling system by integrating the Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model with multiple sources of geospatial and surveyed datasets (including crop type map, elevation, climate forcing, fertilizer application, tillage type and distribution, and crop planting and harvesting date), and applied it to examine the sensitivity of cropland C flux simulations to two widely used soil databases (i.e. State Soil Geographic-STATSGO of a scale of 1:250,000 and Soil Survey Geographic-SSURGO of a scale of 1:24,000) in Iowa, USA. To efficiently execute numerous EPIC runs resulting from the use of high resolution spatial data (56m), we developed a parallelized version of EPIC. Both STATSGO and SSURGO led to similar simulations of crop yields and Net Ecosystem Production (NEP) estimates at the State level. However, substantial differences were observed at the county and sub-county (grid) levels. In general, the fine resolution SSURGO data outperformed the coarse resolution STATSGO data for county-scale crop-yield simulation, and within STATSGO, the area-weighted approach provided more accurate results. Further analysis showed that spatial distribution and magnitude of simulated NEP were more sensitive to the resolution difference between SSURGO and STATSGO at the county or grid scale. For over 60% of the cropland areas in Iowa, the deviations between STATSGO- and SSURGO-derived NEP were larger than 1MgCha(-1)yr(-1), or about half of the average cropland NEP, highlighting the significant uncertainty in spatial distribution and magnitude of simulated C fluxes resulting from

  4. Resolution of deep angiosperm phylogeny using conserved nuclear genes and estimates of early divergence times

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Liping; Zhang, Qiang; Sun, Renran; Kong, Hongzhi; Zhang, Ning; Ma, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Angiosperms are the most successful plants and support human livelihood and ecosystems. Angiosperm phylogeny is the foundation of studies of gene function and phenotypic evolution, divergence time estimation and biogeography. The relationship of the five divergent groups of the Mesangiospermae (~99.95% of extant angiosperms) remains uncertain, with multiple hypotheses reported in the literature. Here transcriptome data sets are obtained from 26 species lacking sequenced genomes, representing each of the five groups: eudicots, monocots, magnoliids, Chloranthaceae and Ceratophyllaceae. Phylogenetic analyses using 59 carefully selected low-copy nuclear genes resulted in highly supported relationships: sisterhood of eudicots and a clade containing Chloranthaceae and Ceratophyllaceae, with magnoliids being the next sister group, followed by monocots. Our topology allows a re-examination of the evolutionary patterns of 110 morphological characters. The molecular clock estimates of Mesangiospermae diversification during the late to middle Jurassic correspond well to the origins of some insects, which may have been a factor facilitating early angiosperm radiation. PMID:25249442

  5. Estimation of Evapotraspiration of Tamarisk using Energy Balance Models with High Resolution Airborne Imagery and LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geli, H. M.; Taghvaeian, S.; Neale, C. M.; Pack, R.; Watts, D. R.; Osterberg, J.

    2010-12-01

    The wide uncontrolled spread of the invasive species of Tamarisk (Salt Cedar) in the riparian areas of the southwest of the United States has become a source of concern to the water resource management community. This tree which was imported for ornamental purposes and to control bank erosion during the 1800’s later became problematic and unwanted due to its biophysical properties: Its vigorous growth out-competes native species for moisture, lowering water tables, increasing the soil salinity and hence becomes the dominant riparian vegetation especially over arid to semi-arid floodplain environments. Most importantly they consume large amounts of water leading to reduction of river flows and lowering the groundwater table. We implemented this study in an effort to provide reliable estimates of the amount of water consumed or “lost” by such species through evapotranspiration (ET) as well as to a better understand of the related land surface and near atmosphere interactions. The recent advances in remote sensing techniques and the related data quality made it possible to provide spatio-temporal estimates of ET at a considerably higher resolution and reliable accuracy over a wide range of surface heterogeneity. We tested two different soil-vegetation atmosphere transfer models (SVAT) that are based on thermal remote sensing namely: the two source model (TSM) of Norman et al. (1995) with its recent modifications and the Surface Energy balance algorithm (SEBAL) of Bastiaanssen et al. (1998) to estimate the different surface energy balance components and the evapotranspiration (ET) spatially. We used high resolution (1.0 meter pixel size) shortwave reflectance and longwave thermal airborne imagery acquired by the research aircraft at the Remote Sensing Services Lab at Utah State University (USU) and land use map classified from these images as well as a detailed vegetation height image acquired by the LASSI Lidar also developed at USU. We also compared estimates

  6. Estimating loop length from CryoEM images at medium resolutions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background De novo protein modeling approaches utilize 3-dimensional (3D) images derived from electron cryomicroscopy (CryoEM) experiments. The skeleton connecting two secondary structures such as α-helices represent the loop in the 3D image. The accuracy of the skeleton and of the detected secondary structures are critical in De novo modeling. It is important to measure the length along the skeleton accurately since the length can be used as a constraint in modeling the protein. Results We have developed a novel computational geometric approach to derive a simplified curve in order to estimate the loop length along the skeleton. The method was tested using fifty simulated density images of helix-loop-helix segments of atomic structures and eighteen experimentally derived density data from Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB). The test using simulated density maps shows that it is possible to estimate within 0.5Å of the expected length for 48 of the 50 cases. The experiments, involving eighteen experimentally derived CryoEM images, show that twelve cases have error within 2Å. Conclusions The tests using both simulated and experimentally derived images show that it is possible for our proposed method to estimate the loop length along the skeleton if the secondary structure elements, such as α-helices, can be detected accurately, and there is a continuous skeleton linking the α-helices. PMID:24565041

  7. Assessing the horizontal refraction of ocean acoustic tomography signals using high-resolution ocean state estimates.

    PubMed

    Dushaw, Brian D

    2014-07-01

    The analysis of signals for acoustic tomography sent between a source and a receiver most often uses the unrefracted geodesic path, an approximation that is justified from theoretical considerations, relying on estimates of horizontal gradients of sound speed, or on simple theoretical models. To quantify the effects of horizontal refraction caused by a realistic ocean environment, horizontal refractions of long-range signals were computed using global ocean state estimates for 2004 from the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO2) project. Basin-scale paths in the eastern North Pacific Ocean and regional-scale paths in the Philippine Sea were used as examples. At O(5 Mm) basin scales, refracted geodesic and geodesic paths differed by only about 5 km. Gyre-scale features had the greatest refractive influence, but the precise refractive effects depended on the path geometry with respect to oceanographic features. Refraction decreased travel times by 5-10 ms and changed azimuthal angles by about 0.2°. At O(500 km) regional scales, paths deviated from the geodesic by only 250 m, and travel times deviated by less than 0.5 ms. Such effects are of little consequence in the analysis of tomographic data. Refraction details depend only slightly on mode number and frequency. PMID:24993200

  8. Temporal resolution limit estimation of x-ray streak cameras using a CsI photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiang; Gu, Li; Zong, Fangke; Zhang, Jingjin; Yang, Qinlao

    2015-08-28

    A Monte Carlo model is developed and implemented to calculate the characteristics of x-ray induced secondary electron (SE) emission from a CsI photocathode used in an x-ray streak camera. Time distributions of emitted SEs are investigated with an incident x-ray energy range from 1 to 30 keV and a CsI thickness range from 100 to 1000 nm. Simulation results indicate that SE time distribution curves have little dependence on the incident x-ray energy and CsI thickness. The calculated time dispersion within the CsI photocathode is about 70 fs, which should be the temporal resolution limit of x-ray streak cameras that use CsI as the photocathode material.

  9. Estimating rheological properties of lava flows using high-resolution time lapse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Applegarth, L. J.; Pinkerton, H.; Fryer, T.

    2011-12-01

    During effusive eruptions, property and infrastructure can be threatened by lava flow inundation. In order to maximise the effectiveness of the response to such an event, it is necessary to be able to reliably forecast the area that will be affected. One of the major controls on the advance of a lava flow is its rheology, which is spatially and temporally variable, and depends on many underlying factors. Estimating the rheological properties of a lava flow, and the change in these over space and time is therefore of the utmost importance. Here we report estimates of rheological properties made from geometric and velocity measurements on integrated topographic and image data using the method of Ellis et al. (2004) (Ellis B, Wilson L & Pinkerton H (2004) Estimating the rheology of basaltic lava flows. Lunar & Planetary Science XXXV Abst. 1550). These are then compared to the viscosity predicted from composition and temperature by the GRD model (Giordano D, Russell JK, & Dingwell DB (2008) Viscosity of Magmatic Liquids: A Model. Earth & Planetary Science Letters, 271, 123-134). During the 13 May 2008 - 6 July 2009 eruption of Mt Etna, Sicily, lava flows were emplaced into the Valle del Bove, reaching a maximum length of >6 km. Towards the end of the eruption, multiple channelized aa flows were active simultaneously, reaching tens to hundreds of metres in length. Flow lifetimes were of the order hours to days. In the last month of the eruption, we installed a Canon EOS 450D camera at Pizzi Deneri, on the north side of the Valle del Bove, to collect visible images at 15-minute intervals. On one day, topographic data (using a Riegl LPM-321 terrestrial laser scanner) and thermal images (using a FLIR Thermacam S40) were also collected from this location. The fronts of some of the larger flows were tracked through the time lapse image sequence. Using knowledge of the camera imaging geometry, the pixel tracks were reprojected onto the topographic surface to determine flow

  10. A new remote sensing procedure for the estimation of crop water requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiliotopoulos, M.; Loukas, A.; Mylopoulos, N.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this work is the development of a new approach for the estimation of water requirements for the most important crops located at Karla Watershed, central Greece. Satellite-based energy balance for mapping evapotranspiration with internalized calibration (METRIC) was used as a basis for the derivation of actual evapotranspiration (ET) and crop coefficient (ETrF) values from Landsat ETM+ imagery. MODIS imagery has been also used, and a spatial downscaling procedure is followed between the two sensors for the derivation of a new NDVI product with a spatial resolution of 30 m x 30 m. GER 1500 spectro-radiometric measurements are additionally conducted during 2012 growing season. Cotton, alfalfa, corn and sugar beets fields are utilized, based on land use maps derived from previous Landsat 7 ETM+ images. A filtering process is then applied to derive NDVI values after acquiring Landsat ETM+ based reflectance values from the GER 1500 device. ETrF vs NDVI relationships are produced and then applied to the previous satellite based downscaled product in order to finally derive a 30 m x 30 m daily ETrF map for the study area. CropWat model (FAO) is then applied, taking as an input the new crop coefficient values with a spatial resolution of 30 m x 30 m available for every crop. CropWat finally returns daily crop water requirements (mm) for every crop and the results are analyzed and discussed.

  11. Model-free uncertainty estimation in stochastical optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) leads to a doubled temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Vandenberg, Wim; Duwé, Sam; Leutenegger, Marcel; Moeyaert, Benjamien; Krajnik, Bartosz; Lasser, Theo; Dedecker, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Stochastic optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) is a super-resolution fluorescence imaging technique that makes use of stochastic fluctuations in the emission of the fluorophores. During a SOFI measurement multiple fluorescence images are acquired from the sample, followed by the calculation of the spatiotemporal cumulants of the intensities observed at each position. Compared to other techniques, SOFI works well under conditions of low signal-to-noise, high background, or high emitter densities. However, it can be difficult to unambiguously determine the reliability of images produced by any superresolution imaging technique. In this work we present a strategy that enables the estimation of the variance or uncertainty associated with each pixel in the SOFI image. In addition to estimating the image quality or reliability, we show that this can be used to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of SOFI images by including multiple pixel combinations in the cumulant calculation. We present an algorithm to perform this optimization, which automatically takes all relevant instrumental, sample, and probe parameters into account. Depending on the optical magnification of the system, this strategy can be used to improve the SNR of a SOFI image by 40% to 90%. This gain in information is entirely free, in the sense that it does not require additional efforts or complications. Alternatively our approach can be applied to reduce the number of fluorescence images to meet a particular quality level by about 30% to 50%, strongly improving the temporal resolution of SOFI imaging.

  12. Model-free uncertainty estimation in stochastical optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) leads to a doubled temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberg, Wim; Duwé, Sam; Leutenegger, Marcel; Moeyaert, Benjamien; Krajnik, Bartosz; Lasser, Theo; Dedecker, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) is a super-resolution fluorescence imaging technique that makes use of stochastic fluctuations in the emission of the fluorophores. During a SOFI measurement multiple fluorescence images are acquired from the sample, followed by the calculation of the spatiotemporal cumulants of the intensities observed at each position. Compared to other techniques, SOFI works well under conditions of low signal-to-noise, high background, or high emitter densities. However, it can be difficult to unambiguously determine the reliability of images produced by any superresolution imaging technique. In this work we present a strategy that enables the estimation of the variance or uncertainty associated with each pixel in the SOFI image. In addition to estimating the image quality or reliability, we show that this can be used to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of SOFI images by including multiple pixel combinations in the cumulant calculation. We present an algorithm to perform this optimization, which automatically takes all relevant instrumental, sample, and probe parameters into account. Depending on the optical magnification of the system, this strategy can be used to improve the SNR of a SOFI image by 40% to 90%. This gain in information is entirely free, in the sense that it does not require additional efforts or complications. Alternatively our approach can be applied to reduce the number of fluorescence images to meet a particular quality level by about 30% to 50%, strongly improving the temporal resolution of SOFI imaging. PMID:26977356

  13. Fourier domain optical coherence tomography artifact and speckle reduction by autoregressive spectral estimation without a loss of resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousi, Evgenia; Pitris, Costas

    2015-03-01

    Fourier Domain (FD) Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) interferograms require a Fourier transformation in order to be converted to A-Scans representing the backscattering intensity from the different depths of the tissue microstructure. Most often, this transformation is performed using a discrete Fourier transform, i.e. the well-known Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). However, there are many alternatives for performing the necessary spectral conversion. Autoregressive (AR) spectral estimation techniques are one such example. The parametric nature of AR techniques offers several advantages, compared to the commonly-used FFT, including better convergence and less susceptibility to noise. They can also be adjusted to represent more or less of the signal detail depending on the order of the autoregression. These features make them uniquely suited for processing the FD OCT data. The advantages of the proposed methodology are illustrated on in vivo skin imaging data and the resolution is verified on single back-reflections from a glass surface. AR spectral estimation can be used to convert the interferograms to A-Scans while at the same time reducing the artifacts caused by high intensity back-reflections (by -20 dB) and diminishing the speckle (by -12 dB) all without the degradation in the resolution associated with other techniques.

  14. Estimation of porphyrin concentration in the kerogen fraction of shales using high-resolution reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Peter N.; Gaffey, Michael J.; Sundararaman, P.

    1991-01-01

    An interpretive model for estimating porphyrin concentration in bitumen and kerogen from spectral reaflectance data in the visible and near-ultraviolet region of the spectrum is derived and calibrated. Preliminary results obtained using the model are consistent with concentrations determined from the bitumen extract and suggest that 40 to 60 percent of the total porphyrin concentration remains in the kerogen after extraction of bitumen from thermally immature samples. The reflectance technique will contribute to porphyrin and kerogen studies and can be applied at its present level of development to several areas of geologic and paleo-oceanographic research.

  15. Estimation of Trees Outside Forests using IRS High Resolution data by Object Based Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujar, G. S.; Reddy, P. M.; Reddy, C. S.; Jha, C. S.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2014-11-01

    Assessment of Trees outside forests (TOF) is widely being recognized as a pivotal theme, in sustainable natural resource management, due to their role in offering variety of goods, such as timber, fruits and fodder as well as services like water, carbon, biodiversity. Forest Conservation efforts involving reduction of deforestation and degradation may have to increasingly rely on alternatives provided by TOF in catering to economic demands in forest edges. Spatial information systems involving imaging, analysis and monitoring to achieve objectives under protocols like REDD+, require incorporation of information content from areas under forest as well as trees outside forests, to aid holistic decisions. In this perspective, automation in retrieving information on area under trees, growing outside forests, using high resolution imaging is essential so that measuring and verification of extant carbon pools, are strengthened. Retrieval of this tree cover is demonstrated herewith, using object based image analysis in a forest edge of dry deciduous forests of Eastern Ghats, in Khammam district of Telangana state of India. IRS high resolution panchromatic 2.5 m data (Cartosat-1 Orthorectified) used in tandem with 5.8 m multispectral LISS IV data, discerns tree crowns and clusters at a detailed scale and hence semi-automated approach is attempted to classify TOF from a pair of image from relatively crop and cloud free season. Object based image analysis(OBIA) approach as implemented in commercial suite of e-Cognition (Ver 8.9) consists of segmentation at user defined scale followed by application of wide range of spectral, textural and object geometry based parameters for classification. Software offers innovative blend of raster and vector features that can be juxtaposed flexibly, across scales horizontally or vertically. Segmentation was carried out at multiple scales to discern first the major land covers, such as forest, water, agriculture followed by that at a finer

  16. Estimation of Surface Air Temperature from MODIS 1km Resolution Land Surface Temperature Over Northern China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.; Gerasimov, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Surface air temperature is a critical variable to describe the energy and water cycle of the Earth-atmosphere system and is a key input element for hydrology and land surface models. It is a very important variable in agricultural applications and climate change studies. This is a preliminary study to examine statistical relationships between ground meteorological station measured surface daily maximum/minimum air temperature and satellite remotely sensed land surface temperature from MODIS over the dry and semiarid regions of northern China. Studies were conducted for both MODIS-Terra and MODIS-Aqua by using year 2009 data. Results indicate that the relationships between surface air temperature and remotely sensed land surface temperature are statistically significant. The relationships between the maximum air temperature and daytime land surface temperature depends significantly on land surface types and vegetation index, but the minimum air temperature and nighttime land surface temperature has little dependence on the surface conditions. Based on linear regression relationship between surface air temperature and MODIS land surface temperature, surface maximum and minimum air temperatures are estimated from 1km MODIS land surface temperature under clear sky conditions. The statistical errors (sigma) of the estimated daily maximum (minimum) air temperature is about 3.8 C(3.7 C).

  17. Quantifying the influences of spectral resolution on uncertainty in leaf trait estimates through a Bayesian approach to RTM inversion

    DOE PAGES

    Shiklomanov, Alexey N.; Dietze, Michael C.; Viskari, Toni; Townsend, Philip A.; Serbin, Shawn P.

    2016-06-09

    examine the influence of spectral resolution on parameter uncertainty, we simulated leaf reflectance as observed by ten common remote sensing platforms with varying spectral configurations and performed a Bayesian inversion on the resulting spectra. We found that full-range hyperspectral platforms were able to retrieve all parameters accurately and precisely, while the parameter estimates of multispectral platforms were much less precise and prone to bias at high and low values. We also observed that variations in the width and location of spectral bands influenced the shape of the covariance structure of parameter estimates. Lastly, our Bayesian spectral inversion provides a powerful and versatile framework for future RTM development and single- and multi-instrumental remote sensing of vegetation.« less

  18. High resolution X-Band radar rainfall estimates for a Mediterranean to hyper-arid transition area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Francesco; Lokshin, Anton; Notarpietro, Riccardo; Gabella, Marco; Branca, Marco; Bonfil, David; Morin, Efrat

    2015-04-01

    Weather radars provide rainfall estimates with high spatial and temporal resolutions over wide areas. X-Band weather radars are of relatively low-cost and easy to be handled and maintained, moreover they offer extremely high spatial and temporal resolutions and are therefore object of particular interest. Main drawback of these instruments lies on the quantitative accuracy, that can be significantly affected by atmospheric attenuation. Distributed rainfall information is a key issue when hydrological applications are needed for small space-time scale phenomena such as flash floods and debris flows. Moreover, such detailed measurements represent a great benefit for agricultural management of areas characterized by substantial rainfall variability. Two single polarization, single elevation, non-Doppler X-Band weather radars are operational since Oct-2012 in the northern Negev (Israel). Mean annual precipitation over the area drops dramatically from 500 mm/yr at the Mediterranean coast to less than 50 mm/yr at the hyper-arid region near the Dead Sea in less than a 100 km distance. The dryer region close to the Dead Sea is prone to flash floods that often cause casualties and severe damage while the western Mediterranean region is extensively used for agricultural purposes. Measures from a C-Band weather radar located 40-120 km away and from a sparse raingauge network (density ~1gauge/450km2) are also available. C-Band rainfall estimates are corrected using combined physically-based and empirical adjustment of data. The aim of this study is to assess the quantitative accuracy of X-Band rainfall estimates with respect to the combined use of in situ measurements and C-Band observations. Results from a set of storms occurred during the first years of measurements are discussed paying particular attention to: (i) wet radome attenuation, (ii) range dependent degradation including attenuation along the path and (iii) systematic effects related to the Mediterranean to hyper

  19. Cerebral Blood Flow Estimation Using Classification Techniques On A Sequence Of Low Resolution Tomographic Evolutive Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Marie; Aguilar-Martin, Joseph; Boulanouar, Kader; Celsis, Pierre; Marc-Vergnes, Jean P.

    1989-05-01

    In order to improve the performance of the instrumental variable method (IVM) in calculating regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPELT), and inert diffusible tracer such as 133Xe, we use Learning Algorithms for Multivariate Data Analysis (LAMDA) to classify the voxels of the images of local concentrations in the brain. The LAMDA method correctly distinguished between extra and intra-cerebral voxels. However the topography of the intra-cerebral classes did not match the Regions Of Interest (ROI) defined on an anatomical basis. Provided that all the intra-cerebral classes contaminated by bone and air passage artefact were rejected, the results given by the NM are in good agreement with those derived by the bolus distribution principle. We thus conclude that LAMDA methods can improve the reliability of images of CBF estimates.

  20. Evaluation of high-resolution satellite precipitation estimates over southern South America using a dense rain gauge network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salio, Paola; Hobouchian, María Paula; García Skabar, Yanina; Vila, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Six different satellite rainfall estimates are evaluated for a 24-hour accumulation period at 12 UTC with a 0.25 degree resolution. The rain gauge data are obtained from a dense inter-institutional station network for December 1, 2008 to November 30, 2010 over South America. The evaluated satellite rainfall products are the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission 3B42 V6, V7 and RT, the NOAA/Climate Prediction Center Morphing technique (CMORPH), Hydroestimator (HYDRO) and the Combined Scheme algorithm (CoSch). The validation and intercomparison of these products are focused on southern South America. The performance improves in the "blended" estimates by including microwave observations and surface observations in the adjustments, i.e., 3B42 V6, V7 and CoSch; however, large overestimations are detectable in CMORPH, principally for extreme values over plains areas. The estimates based on parameters associated with infrared images only (HYDRO) underestimate precipitation south of 20° S and tend to overestimate the warm precipitation to the north. The inclusion of observed precipitation data is convenient from monthly (3B42 V7 and V6) to daily scales (CoSch) and improves the estimates. The estimates that include microwave observations show a strong tendency to overestimate extreme values of precipitation over 70 mm. This effect is strongly evident in northern and central Argentina and southern Brazil. A deeper assessment is necessary, particularly over the Central Andes, where effects of topography principally associated with solid precipitation correspond to the persistence of majorly overestimated precipitation.

  1. Using high-resolution satellite aerosol optical depth to estimate daily PM2.5 geographical distribution in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Just, Allan C.; Wright, Robert O.; Schwartz, Joel; Coull, Brent A.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Tellez-Rojo, Martha María; Moody, Emily; Wang, Yujie; Lyapustin, Alexei; Kloog, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in estimating fine particle (PM2.5) ambient concentrations use daily satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) for spatially and temporally resolved exposure estimates. Mexico City is a dense megacity that differs from other previously modeled regions in several ways: it has bright land surfaces, a distinctive climatological cycle, and an elevated semi-enclosed air basin with a unique planetary boundary layer dynamic. We extend our previous satellite methodology to the Mexico City area, a region with higher PM2.5 than most US and European urban areas. Using a novel 1 km resolution AOD product from the MODIS instrument, we constructed daily predictions across the greater Mexico City area for 2004–2014. We calibrated the association of AOD to PM2.5 daily using municipal ground monitors, land use, and meteorological features. Predictions used spatial and temporal smoothing to estimate AOD when satellite data were missing. Our model performed well, resulting in an out-of-sample cross validation R2 of 0.724. Cross-validated root mean squared prediction error (RMSPE) of the model was 5.55 μg/m3. This novel model reconstructs long- and short-term spatially resolved exposure to PM2.5 for epidemiological studies in Mexico City. PMID:26061488

  2. Effects of exposure model resolution on seismic risk estimates - Examples from the cities of Kerak and Madaba in Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Michael; Al-Qaryouti, Mahmoud; Ashour, Anas; Daoud, Nazar; Pittore, Massimiliano; Sarayrah, Abdullah; Sawarieh, Ali; Wieland, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Seismic risk is composed of the three components seismic hazard, exposed structures and the structures' vulnerability with respect to ground motion. Seismic risk estimates are subject to often large uncertainties, whose precise quantification remain a challenge. In general the largest uncertainties are considered to stem from the seismic hazard component, followed by the uncertainties in the vulnerability models. The importance of uncertainties in the exposure component are often regarded as of minor importance. This is obvious in the case the seismic risk assessment is carried out for a set of specific structures, but in case of risk estimates at city- or regional-scale the importance of uncertainties in the exposure model strongly increases. In this presentation exposure models derived from census data, remote sensing data and panoramic images obtained by a mobile mapping system for the two cities of Kerak and Madaba in Jordan and their uncertainties are discussed. Furthermore, the presentation aims to provide an insight on the effects of using these exposure models, derived from different data with varying resolution and different model assumptions on the uncertainties of seismic risk estimates for the two considered locations.

  3. The ESA-ANISAP Study: Estimate Of Troospheric Scintillation Along A LEO-LEO Link Through High Resolution Radiosonde Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Enrica; Freni, Angelo; Facheris, Luca; Cuccoli, Fabrizio

    2013-12-01

    This work describes the procedure developed in the framework of the ESA-ANISAP study to obtain, for a given atmospheric profile, an estimate of scintillation effects in a LEO-LEO link. In this procedure, the refractive-index structure constant profiles describing the intensity of turbulence, are derived by applying the vertical gradient approach to high resolution radiosonde data. The fact that turbulence in the free atmosphere is confined to vertically thin layers is accounted for by identifying the turbulent layers through the analysis of the Richardson number profiles. Then, the derived structure constant profiles are inserted into a parametric scintillation model to create a scintillation disturbance estimate consistent with the considered atmospheric profile. In the parametric model, the troposphere is described as a spherically symmetric turbulent medium. Rytov's first iteration solution for weak fluctuations is used to derive an expression for two quantities of interest to evaluate the performances of the Normalized Differential Spectral Attenuation for the estimate of the total content of water vapour along the propagation path between two LEO satellite, namely: the variance of amplitude fluctuations of the wave and the correlation between the fluctuations at different frequencies. The influence on these quantities of some turbulence characteristics which are not known with confidence, like the outer scale length and the behaviour of the spectrum in the input range, is also investigated.

  4. Using High-Resolution Satellite Aerosol Optical Depth To Estimate Daily PM2.5 Geographical Distribution in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Just, Allan C; Wright, Robert O; Schwartz, Joel; Coull, Brent A; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Tellez-Rojo, Martha María; Moody, Emily; Wang, Yujie; Lyapustin, Alexei; Kloog, Itai

    2015-07-21

    Recent advances in estimating fine particle (PM2.5) ambient concentrations use daily satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) for spatially and temporally resolved exposure estimates. Mexico City is a dense megacity that differs from other previously modeled regions in several ways: it has bright land surfaces, a distinctive climatological cycle, and an elevated semi-enclosed air basin with a unique planetary boundary layer dynamic. We extend our previous satellite methodology to the Mexico City area, a region with higher PM2.5 than most U.S. and European urban areas. Using a novel 1 km resolution AOD product from the MODIS instrument, we constructed daily predictions across the greater Mexico City area for 2004-2014. We calibrated the association of AOD to PM2.5 daily using municipal ground monitors, land use, and meteorological features. Predictions used spatial and temporal smoothing to estimate AOD when satellite data were missing. Our model performed well, resulting in an out-of-sample cross-validation R(2) of 0.724. Cross-validated root-mean-squared prediction error (RMSPE) of the model was 5.55 μg/m(3). This novel model reconstructs long- and short-term spatially resolved exposure to PM2.5 for epidemiological studies in Mexico City. PMID:26061488

  5. Using High-Resolution Satellite Aerosol Optical Depth To Estimate Daily PM2.5 Geographical Distribution in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Just, Allan C; Wright, Robert O; Schwartz, Joel; Coull, Brent A; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Tellez-Rojo, Martha María; Moody, Emily; Wang, Yujie; Lyapustin, Alexei; Kloog, Itai

    2015-07-21

    Recent advances in estimating fine particle (PM2.5) ambient concentrations use daily satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) for spatially and temporally resolved exposure estimates. Mexico City is a dense megacity that differs from other previously modeled regions in several ways: it has bright land surfaces, a distinctive climatological cycle, and an elevated semi-enclosed air basin with a unique planetary boundary layer dynamic. We extend our previous satellite methodology to the Mexico City area, a region with higher PM2.5 than most U.S. and European urban areas. Using a novel 1 km resolution AOD product from the MODIS instrument, we constructed daily predictions across the greater Mexico City area for 2004-2014. We calibrated the association of AOD to PM2.5 daily using municipal ground monitors, land use, and meteorological features. Predictions used spatial and temporal smoothing to estimate AOD when satellite data were missing. Our model performed well, resulting in an out-of-sample cross-validation R(2) of 0.724. Cross-validated root-mean-squared prediction error (RMSPE) of the model was 5.55 μg/m(3). This novel model reconstructs long- and short-term spatially resolved exposure to PM2.5 for epidemiological studies in Mexico City.

  6. Estimating photosynthesis with high resolution field spectroscopy in a Mediterranean grassland under different nutrient availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Priego, O.; Guan, J.; Fava, F.; Rossini, M.; Wutzler, T.; Moreno, G.; Carrara, A.; Kolle, O.; Schrumpf, M.; Reichstein, M.; Migliavacca, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have shown how human induced N:P imbalances are affecting essential processes (e.g. photosynthesis, plant growth rate) that lead to important changes in ecosystem structure and function. In this regard, the accuracy of the approaches based on remotely-sensed data for monitoring and modeling gross primary production (GPP) relies on the ability of vegetation indices (VIs) to track the dynamics of vegetation physiological and biophysical properties/variables. Promising results have been recently obtained when Chlorophyll-sensitive VIs and Chlorophyll fluorescence are combined with structural indices in the framework of the Monteith's light use efficiency (LUE) model. However, further ground-based experiments are required to validate LUE model performances, and their capability to be generalized under different nutrient availability conditions. In this study, the overall objective was to investigate the sensitivity of VIs to track short- and long-term GPP variations in a Mediterranean grassland under different N and P fertilization treatments. Spectral VIs were acquired manually using high resolution spectrometers (HR4000, OceanOptics, USA) along a phenological cycle. The VIs examined included photochemical reflectance index (PRI), MERIS terrestrial-chlorophyll index (MTCI) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence calculated at the oxygen absorption band O2-A (F760) using spectral fitting methods was also used. Simultaneously, measurements of GPP and environmental variables were conducted using a transient-state canopy chamber. Overall, GPP, F760 and VIs showed a clear seasonal time-trend in all treatments, which was driven by the phenological development of the grassland. Results showed significant differences (p<0.05) in midday GPP values between N and without N addition plots, in particular at the peak of the growing season during the flowering stage and at the end of the season during senescence. While

  7. Impairment of autophagy by TTR V30M aggregates: in vivo reversal by TUDCA and curcumin.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Cristina A; Almeida, Maria do Rosário; Saraiva, Maria João

    2016-09-01

    Transthyretin (TTR)-related amyloidoses are diseases characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils and aggregates in tissues composed of insoluble misfolded TTR that becomes toxic. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of small compounds in preventing and reversing TTR V30M deposition in transgenic mice gastrointestinal (GI) tract as well as lowering biomarkers associated with cellular stress and apoptotic mechanisms. In the present study we aimed to study TTR V30M aggregates effect in autophagy, a cellular mechanism crucial for cell survival that has been implicated in the development of several neurodegenerative diseases. We were able to demonstrate in cell culture that TTR V30M aggregates cause a partial impairment of the autophagic machinery as shown by p62 accumulation, whereas early steps of the autophagic flux remain unaffected as shown by autophagosome number evaluation and LC3 turnover assay. Our studies performed in TTR V30M transgenic animals demonstrated that tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) and curcumin effectively reverse p62 accumulation in the GI tract pointing to the ability of both compounds to modulate autophagy additionally to mitigate apoptosis. Overall, our in vitro and in vivo studies establish an association between TTR V30M aggregates and autophagy impairment and suggest the use of autophagy modulators as an additional and alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of TTR V30M-related amyloidosis. PMID:27382986

  8. Revised spectroscopic parameters of SH(+) from ALMA and IRAM 30m observations.

    PubMed

    Müller, Holger S P; Goicoechea, Javier R; Cernicharo, José; Agúndez, Marcelino; Pety, Jérôme; Cuadrado, Sara; Gerin, Maryvonne; Dumas, Gaëlle; Chapillon, Edwige

    2014-09-19

    Hydrides represent the first steps of interstellar chemistry. Sulfanylium (SH(+)), in particular, is a key tracer of energetic processes. We used ALMA and the IRAM 30 m telescope to search for the lowest frequency rotational lines of SH(+) toward the Orion Bar, the prototypical photo-dissociation region illuminated by a strong UV radiation field. On the basis of previous Herschel/HIFI observations of SH(+), we expected to detect emission of the two SH(+) hyperfine structure (HFS) components of the NJ = 10-01 fine structure (FS) component near 346 GHz. While we did not observe any lines at the frequencies predicted from laboratory data, we detected two emission lines, each ~15 MHz above the SH(+) predictions and with relative intensities and HFS splitting expected for SH(+). The rest frequencies of the two newly detected lines are more compatible with the remainder of the SH(+) laboratory data than the single line measured in the laboratory near 346 GHz and previously attributed to SH(+). Therefore, we assign these new features to the two SH(+) HFS components of the NJ = 10-01 FS component and re-determine its spectroscopic parameters, which will be useful for future observations of SH(+), in particular if its lowest frequency FS components are studied. Our observations demonstrate the suitability of these lines for SH(+) searches at frequencies easily accessible from the ground.

  9. Cryogenic and Electrical Test Results of 30 M Hts Power Cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sytnikov, V. E.; Vysotsky, V. S.; Fetisov, S. S.; Nosov, A. A.; Shakaryan, Yu. G.; Kochkin, V. I.; Kiselev, A. N.; Terentyev, Yu. A.; Patrikeev, V. M.; Zubko, V. V.

    2010-04-01

    In the framework of the Russian R&D Program for HTS power devices, 3×30 m cable with operating current of ˜1.5-2 kA and operating voltage of 20 kV was delivered by Russian Scientific R&D Cable Institute as the first stage of the HTS power cables project. Different basic HTS materials, cryostats and current leads were used for the cable design in this essentially research part of the project. The cable is being tested at special test facility for superconducting power devices developed at the R&D Center for Power Engineering. The cryogenic system for the test facility was provided by Stirling. The basic cryogenic system was equipped with a specially developed flow distribution unit. This unit permits variation and control of liquid nitrogen flows, pressures and temperatures in all three cable phases. Dependencies on temperature of critical currents of each phase were measured during cable tests. The results of the project]s first stage were used to develop and produce a 3×200 m cable system for Moscow distribution grid. In the paper results of cryogenic system tests and cable electrical tests are presented.

  10. The effects of 30 mT electromagnetic fields on hippocampus cells of rats

    PubMed Central

    Teimori, Farzaneh; Khaki, Amir A.; Rajabzadeh, Asghar; Roshangar, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the use of electromagnetic waves in the treatment of some acute and chronic diseases, application of these waves in everyday life has created several problems for humans, especially the nerve system. In this study, the effects of 30mT electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on the hippocampus is investigated. Methods: Twenty-four 5-month Wistar rats weighing 150–200 g were divided into two groups. The experimental group rats were under the influence of an EMF at an intensity of 3 mT for approximately 4 hours a day (from 8 AM to 12 PM) during 10 weeks. After the hippocampus was removed, thin slides were prepared for transmission electron microscope (TEM) to study the ultrastructural tissue. Cell death detection POD kits were used to determine the apoptosis rate. Results: The results of the TEM showed that, in the hippocampus of the experimental group, in comparison to the control group, there was a substantial shift; even intracellular organelles such as the mitochondria were morphologically abnormal and uncertain. The number of apoptotic cells in the exposed group compared to the control group showed significant changes. Conclusions: Similar to numerous studies that have reported the effects of EMFs on nerves system, it was also confirmed in this lecture. Hence, the hippocampus which is important in regulating emotions, behavior, motivation, and memory functions, may be impaired by the negative impacts of EMFs. PMID:27453795

  11. Revised spectroscopic parameters of SH(+) from ALMA and IRAM 30m observations.

    PubMed

    Müller, Holger S P; Goicoechea, Javier R; Cernicharo, José; Agúndez, Marcelino; Pety, Jérôme; Cuadrado, Sara; Gerin, Maryvonne; Dumas, Gaëlle; Chapillon, Edwige

    2014-09-19

    Hydrides represent the first steps of interstellar chemistry. Sulfanylium (SH(+)), in particular, is a key tracer of energetic processes. We used ALMA and the IRAM 30 m telescope to search for the lowest frequency rotational lines of SH(+) toward the Orion Bar, the prototypical photo-dissociation region illuminated by a strong UV radiation field. On the basis of previous Herschel/HIFI observations of SH(+), we expected to detect emission of the two SH(+) hyperfine structure (HFS) components of the NJ = 10-01 fine structure (FS) component near 346 GHz. While we did not observe any lines at the frequencies predicted from laboratory data, we detected two emission lines, each ~15 MHz above the SH(+) predictions and with relative intensities and HFS splitting expected for SH(+). The rest frequencies of the two newly detected lines are more compatible with the remainder of the SH(+) laboratory data than the single line measured in the laboratory near 346 GHz and previously attributed to SH(+). Therefore, we assign these new features to the two SH(+) HFS components of the NJ = 10-01 FS component and re-determine its spectroscopic parameters, which will be useful for future observations of SH(+), in particular if its lowest frequency FS components are studied. Our observations demonstrate the suitability of these lines for SH(+) searches at frequencies easily accessible from the ground. PMID:26525172

  12. The Role of Orograph and Parallax Corrections on High Resolution Geostationary Satellite Rainfall Estimates for Flash Flood Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicente, Gilberto A.; Davenport, Clay; Scofield, Rod

    1999-01-01

    The current generation of geosynchronous satellites exhibits considerably improved capabilities in the area of resolution, gridding accuracy, and sampling frequency as compared to their predecessors. These improvements have made it possible to accurately observe the life cycle of small scale, short-live phenomenon like rapidly developing thunderstorms, at a very high spatial and temporal resolutions. While the gain in the improved resolution is not significant for synoptic scale cloud systems, it plays a major role on the computation of precipitation values for mesoscale and stonn scale systems. Two of the important factor on the accurate precision of precipitation from satellite imagery are the position of the cloud tops as viewed by the satellite and the influence of orographic effects on the distribution of precipitation. The first problem has to do with the fact that the accurate estimation of precipitation from data collected by a satellite in geosynchronous orbit requires the knowledge of the exact position of the cloud tops with respect to the ground below. This is not a problem when a cloud is located directly below the satellite; at large viewing angles the geographic coordinates on satellite images are dependent on cloud heights and distance from the sub-satellite point. The latitude and longitude coordinates for high convective cloud tops are displaced away from the sub-satellite point and may be shifted by as much as 20 Km from the sea level coordinates. The second problem has to do with the variations in rainfall distribution with elevation. Ground observations have shown that precipitation amounts tend to increase with height and that the slope of the hill or mountain that is facing the prevailing wind normally receives greater rainfall then do the lee slopes. The purpose of the study is to show the recent developments at the Office of Research and Applications (ORA) at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA/NESDIS) in Camp Springs

  13. Ecosystem services - from assessements of estimations to quantitative, validated, high-resolution, continental-scale mapping via airborne LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlinszky, András; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    service potential" which is the ability of the local ecosystem to deliver various functions (water retention, carbon storage etc.), but can't quantify how much of these are actually used by humans or what the estimated monetary value is. Due to its ability to measure both terrain relief and vegetation structure in high resolution, airborne LIDAR supports direct quantification of the properties of an ecosystem that lead to it delivering a given service (such as biomass, water retention, micro-climate regulation or habitat diversity). In addition, its high resolution allows direct calibration with field measurements: routine harvesting-based ecological measurements, local biodiversity indicator surveys or microclimate recordings all take place at the human scale and can be directly linked to the local value of LIDAR-based indicators at meter resolution. Therefore, if some field measurements with standard ecological methods are performed on site, the accuracy of LIDAR-based ecosystem service indicators can be rigorously validated. With this conceptual and technical approach high resolution ecosystem service assessments can be made with well established credibility. These would consolidate the concept of ecosystem services and support both scientific research and evidence-based environmental policy at local and - as data coverage is continually increasing - continental scale.

  14. Estimating the spatial resolution of fNIRS sensors for BCI purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almajidy, Rand Kasim; Kirch, Robert D.; Christ, Olaf; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2014-03-01

    Differential near infrared sensors recently sparked a growing interest as a promising measuring modality for brain computer interfacing. In our study we present the design and characterization of novel, differential functional NIRS sensors, intended to record hemodynamic changes of the human motor cortex in the hand-area during motor imagery tasks. We report on the spatial characterization of a portable, multi-channel NIRS system with one module consisting of two central light emitting diodes (LED) (770 nm and 850 nm) and four symmetric pairs of radially aligned photodiodes (PD) resembling a plus symbol. The other sensor module features four similar, differential light paths crossing in the center of a star. Characterization was performed on a concentric, double beaker phantom, featuring a PBS/intralipid/blood mixture (97/1/2%). In extension of previous work, the inner, oxygenated beaker was covered by neoprene sleeves with holes of various sizes, thus giving an estimate on the spatial limits of the NIRS sensor's measurement volume. The star shaped sensor module formed a diffuse focus of approximately 3 cm in diameter at 1.4 cm depth, whereas the plus shaped arrangement suggested a concentric ring of four separate regions of interest, overall larger than 6 cm. The systems measurement sensitivity could be improved by removing ambient light from the sensing photodiodes by optical filtering. Altogether, we conclude that both our novel fNIRS design as well as its electronics perform well in the double-layered oxygenation phantom and are thus suitable for in-vivo testing.

  15. SACRA - a method for the estimation of global high-resolution crop calendars from a satellite-sensed NDVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsuki, S.; Tanaka, K.

    2015-11-01

    To date, many studies have performed numerical estimations of biomass production and agricultural water demand to understand the present and future supply-demand relationship. A crop calendar (CC), which defines the date or month when farmers sow and harvest crops, is an essential input for the numerical estimations. This study aims to present a new global data set, the SAtellite-derived CRop calendar for Agricultural simulations (SACRA), and to discuss advantages and disadvantages compared to existing census-based and model-derived products. We estimate global CC at a spatial resolution of 5 arcmin using satellite-sensed normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data, which corresponds to vegetation vitality and senescence on the land surface. Using the time series of the NDVI averaged from three consecutive years (2004-2006), sowing/harvesting dates are estimated for six crops (temperate-wheat, snow-wheat, maize, rice, soybean and cotton). We assume time series of the NDVI represent the phenology of one dominant crop and estimate CCs of the dominant crop in each grid. The dominant crops are determined using harvested areas based on census-based data. The cultivation period of SACRA is identified from the time series of the NDVI; therefore, SACRA considers current effects of human decisions and natural disasters. The difference between the estimated sowing dates and other existing products is less than 2 months (< 62 days) in most of the areas. A major disadvantage of our method is that the mixture of several crops in a grid is not considered in SACRA. The assumption of one dominant crop in each grid is a major source of discrepancy in crop calendars between SACRA and other products. The disadvantages of our approach may be reduced with future improvements based on finer satellite sensors and crop-type classification studies to consider several dominant crops in each grid. The comparison of the CC also demonstrates that identification of wheat type (sowing in

  16. High Resolution/High Fidelity Seismic Imaging and Parameter Estimation for Geological Structure and Material Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Ru-Shan Wu, Xiao-Bi Xie, Thorne Lay

    2005-06-06

    In this project, we develop new theories and methods for multi-domain one-way wave-equation based propagators, and apply these techniques to seismic modeling, seismic imaging, seismic illumination and model parameter estimation in 3D complex environments. The major progress of this project includes: (1) The development of the dual-domain wave propagators. We continue to improve the one-way wave-equation based propagators. Our target is making propagators capable of handling more realistic velocity models. A wide-angle propagator for transversely isotropic media with vertically symmetric axis (VTI) has been developed for P-wave modeling and imaging. The resulting propagator is accurate for large velocity perturbations and wide propagation angles. The thin-slab propagator for one-way elastic-wave propagation is further improved. With the introduction of complex velocities, the quality factors Qp and Qs have been incorporated into the thin-slab propagator. The resulting viscoelastic thin-slab propagator can handle elastic-wave propagation in models with intrinsic attenuations. We apply this method to complex models for AVO modeling, random media characterization and frequency-dependent reflectivity simulation. (2) Exploring the Information in the Local Angle Domain. Traditionally, the local angle information can only be extracted using the ray-based method. We develop a wave-equation based technique to process the local angle domain information. The approach can avoid the singularity problem usually linked to the high-frequency asymptotic method. We successfully apply this technique to seismic illumination and the resulting method provides a practical tool for three-dimensional full-volume illumination analysis in complex structures. The directional illumination also provides information for angle-domain imaging corrections. (3) Elastic-Wave Imaging. We develop a multicomponent elastic migration method. The application of the multicomponent one-way elastic propagator

  17. Using a hybrid Monte Carlo/Genetic Algorithm Slip Estimator to produce high resolution models of paleoearthquakes from geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, A.; McCloskey, J.; Nalbant, S. S.; Simao, N.; Murphy, S.; NicBhloscaidh, M.; Steacy, S.

    2013-12-01

    Identifying fault sections where slip deficits have accumulated may provide a means for understanding sequences of large megathrust earthquakes. Stress accumulated during the interseismic period on locked sections of an active fault is stored as potential slip. Where this potential slip remains unreleased during earthquakes, a slip deficit can be said to have accrued. Analysis of the spatial distribution of slip during antecedent events along the fault will show where the locked plate has spent its stored slip and indicate where the potential for large events remains. The location of recent earthquakes and their distribution of slip can be estimated instrumentally. To develop the idea of long-term slip-deficit modelling it is necessary to constrain the size and distribution of slip for pre-instrumental events dating back hundreds of years covering more than one ';seismic cycle'. This requires the exploitation of proxy sources of data. Coral microatolls, growing in the intertidal zone of the outer island arc of the Sunda trench, present the possibility of producing high resolution reconstructions of slip for a number of pre-instrumental earthquakes. Their growth is influenced by tectonic flexing of the continental plate beneath them allows them to act as long term geodetic recorders. However, the sparse distribution of data available using coral geodesy results in a under determined problem with non-unique solutions. Instead of producing one definite model satisfying the observed corals displacements, a Monte Carlo Slip Estimator based on a Genetic Algorithm (MCSE-GA) accelerating the rate of convergence is used to identify a suite of models consistent with the data. Successive iterations of the MCSE-GA sample different displacements at each coral location, from within the spread of associated uncertainties, producing a catalog of models from the full range of possibilities. The suite of best slip distributions are weighted according to their fitness and stacked to

  18. The effects of vertical sampling resolution on estimates of plankton biomass and rate calculations in stratified water columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutor, Malinda M.; Dagg, Michael J.

    2008-06-01

    The effects of vertical sampling resolution on estimates of plankton biomass and grazing calculations were examined using data collected in two different areas with vertically stratified water columns. Data were collected from one site in the upwelling region off Oregon and from four sites in the Northern Gulf of Mexico, three within the Mississippi River plume and one in adjacent oceanic waters. Plankton were found to be concentrated in discrete layers with sharp vertical gradients at all the stations. Phytoplankton distributions were correlated with gradients in temperature and salinity, but microzooplankton and mesozooplankton distributions were not. Layers of zooplankton were sometimes collocated with layers of phytoplankton, but this was not always the case. Simulated calculations demonstrate that when averages are taken over the water column, or coarser scale vertical sampling resolution is used, biomass and mesozooplankton grazing and filtration rates can be greatly underestimated. This has important implications for understanding the ecological significance of discrete layers of plankton and for assessing rates of grazing and production in stratified water columns.

  19. ESTIMATING SMALL ANGULAR SCALE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ANISOTROPY WITH HIGH-RESOLUTION N-BODY SIMULATIONS: WEAK LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Fullana, M. J.; Arnau, J. V.; Thacker, R. J.; Couchman, H. M. P.; Saez, D.

    2010-03-20

    We estimate the impact of weak lensing by strongly nonlinear cosmological structures on the cosmic microwave background. Accurate calculation of large l multipoles requires N-body simulations and ray-tracing schemes with both high spatial and temporal resolution. To this end, we have developed a new code that combines a gravitational Adaptive Particle-Particle, Particle-Mesh solver with a weak-lensing evaluation routine. The lensing deviations are evaluated while structure evolves during the simulation so that all evolution steps-rather than just a few outputs-are used in the lensing computations. The new code also includes a ray-tracing procedure that avoids periodicity effects in a universe that is modeled as a three-dimensional torus in the standard way. Results from our new simulations are compared with previous ones based on Particle-Mesh simulations. We also systematically investigate the impact of box volume, resolution, and ray-tracing directions on the variance of the computed power spectra. We find that a box size of 512 h {sup -1} Mpc is sufficient to provide a robust estimate of the weak-lensing angular power spectrum in the l-interval (2000-7000). For a reaslistic cosmological model, the power [l(l + 1)C{sub l}/2pi]{sup 1/2} takes on values of a few muK in this interval, which suggests that a future detection is feasible and may explain the excess power at high l in the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association and Cosmic Background Imager observations.

  20. A DUAL-BAND MILLIMETER-WAVE KINETIC INDUCTANCE CAMERA FOR THE IRAM 30 m TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Monfardini, A.; Benoit, A.; Bideaud, A.; Swenson, L.; Cruciani, A.; Camus, P.; Hoffmann, C.; Desert, F. X.; Doyle, S.; Ade, P.; Mauskopf, P.; Tucker, C.; Roesch, M.; Leclercq, S.; Schuster, K. F.; Endo, A.; Baryshev, A.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Ferrari, L.; Yates, S. J. C

    2011-06-01

    The Neel IRAM KIDs Array (NIKA) is a fully integrated measurement system based on kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) currently being developed for millimeter wave astronomy. The instrument includes dual-band optics allowing simultaneous imaging at 150 GHz and 220 GHz. The imaging sensors consist of two spatially separated arrays of KIDs. The first array, mounted on the 150 GHz branch, is composed of 144 lumped-element KIDs. The second array (220 GHz) consists of 256 antenna-coupled KIDs. Each of the arrays is sensitive to a single polarization; the band splitting is achieved by using a grid polarizer. The optics and sensors are mounted in a custom dilution cryostat, with an operating temperature of {approx}70 mK. Electronic readout is realized using frequency multiplexing and a transmission line geometry consisting of a coaxial cable connected in series with the sensor array and a low-noise 4 K amplifier. The dual-band NIKA was successfully tested in 2010 October at the Institute for Millimetric Radio Astronomy (IRAM) 30 m telescope at Pico Veleta, Spain, performing in-line with laboratory predictions. An optical NEP was then calculated to be around 2 x 10{sup -16} W Hz{sup -1/2} (at 1 Hz) while under a background loading of approximately 4 pW pixel{sup -1}. This improvement in comparison with a preliminary run (2009) verifies that NIKA is approaching the target sensitivity for photon-noise limited ground-based detectors. Taking advantage of the larger arrays and increased sensitivity, a number of scientifically relevant faint and extended objects were then imaged including the Galactic Center SgrB2 (FIR1), the radio galaxy Cygnus A, and the NGC1068 Seyfert galaxy. These targets were all observed simultaneously in the 150 GHz and 220 GHz atmospheric windows.

  1. A Dual-band Millimeter-wave Kinetic Inductance Camera for the IRAM 30 m Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfardini, A.; Benoit, A.; Bideaud, A.; Swenson, L.; Cruciani, A.; Camus, P.; Hoffmann, C.; Désert, F. X.; Doyle, S.; Ade, P.; Mauskopf, P.; Tucker, C.; Roesch, M.; Leclercq, S.; Schuster, K. F.; Endo, A.; Baryshev, A.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Ferrari, L.; Yates, S. J. C.; Bourrion, O.; Macias-Perez, J.; Vescovi, C.; Calvo, M.; Giordano, C.

    2011-06-01

    The Néel IRAM KIDs Array (NIKA) is a fully integrated measurement system based on kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) currently being developed for millimeter wave astronomy. The instrument includes dual-band optics allowing simultaneous imaging at 150 GHz and 220 GHz. The imaging sensors consist of two spatially separated arrays of KIDs. The first array, mounted on the 150 GHz branch, is composed of 144 lumped-element KIDs. The second array (220 GHz) consists of 256 antenna-coupled KIDs. Each of the arrays is sensitive to a single polarization; the band splitting is achieved by using a grid polarizer. The optics and sensors are mounted in a custom dilution cryostat, with an operating temperature of ~70 mK. Electronic readout is realized using frequency multiplexing and a transmission line geometry consisting of a coaxial cable connected in series with the sensor array and a low-noise 4 K amplifier. The dual-band NIKA was successfully tested in 2010 October at the Institute for Millimetric Radio Astronomy (IRAM) 30 m telescope at Pico Veleta, Spain, performing in-line with laboratory predictions. An optical NEP was then calculated to be around 2 × 10-16 W Hz-1/2 (at 1 Hz) while under a background loading of approximately 4 pW pixel-1. This improvement in comparison with a preliminary run (2009) verifies that NIKA is approaching the target sensitivity for photon-noise limited ground-based detectors. Taking advantage of the larger arrays and increased sensitivity, a number of scientifically relevant faint and extended objects were then imaged including the Galactic Center SgrB2 (FIR1), the radio galaxy Cygnus A, and the NGC1068 Seyfert galaxy. These targets were all observed simultaneously in the 150 GHz and 220 GHz atmospheric windows.

  2. High resolution reconstructions of Southwest Indian Ridge plate motions during the Neogene: Comparison to GPS estimates and implications for global plate motion estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Merkouriev, S.; Sauter, D.; Calais, E.

    2013-12-01

    Plate kinematic data from the slow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) are the primary source of information about relative movements between Antarctica and Africa over geologic time and are critical for linking the movements of plates in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean basins. We describe the first high-resolution model of SWIR plate kinematics from the present to 20 Ma, consisting of rotations based on 21 magnetic reversals with ~1 million-year spacing. The new rotations, which are derived from 4822 identifications of magnetic reversals C1n to C6no and 6000 crossings of 21 fracture zones and transform faults, describe in detail the ultra-slow motions of the Nubia, Lwandle, and Somalia plates north of the SWIR relative to the Antarctic plate. A search for the Nubia-Lwandle-Antarctic triple junction with all data since C5n.2 (11.0 Ma) gives a best location at the Andrew Bain transform fault (~32E), in accord with previous work. Plate kinematic data from the SWIR east of the Andrew Bain fracture zone support the existence of the previously proposed Lwandle plate at high confidence level. The likely diffuse Lwandle-Somalia plate boundary north of the SWIR is however only loosely constrained to 45E-52E. After calibrating the new rotations for the biasing effects of finite-width magnetic polarity transition zones (i.e. outward displacement), the new rotations reveal that SWIR plate motion has remained steady from the present back to 7.5 Ma, but was modestly faster (~25%) from 19.6 Ma to 7.5 Ma. GPS estimates of present SWIR plate motions based on more than 100 continuous GPS sites on the Antarctic, Nubia, and Somalia plates are remarkably consistent with SWIR velocities determined with the new geological reconstructions. The superb agreement between the two independent plate motion estimates validates both sets of estimates and our calibration for outward displacement. Implications of the new estimates, including evidence for anomalously wide outward displacement

  3. Seasonal monitoring and estimation of regional aerosol distribution over Po valley, northern Italy, using a high-resolution MAIAC product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvani, Barbara; Pierce, R. Bradley; Lyapustin, Alexei I.; Wang, Yujie; Ghermandi, Grazia; Teggi, Sergio

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the new 1 km-resolved Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm is employed to characterize seasonal PM10 - AOD correlations over northern Italy. The accuracy of the new dataset is assessed compared to the widely used Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 5.1 Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) data, retrieved at 0.55 μm with spatial resolution of 10 km (MYD04_L2). We focused on evaluating the ability of these two products to characterize both temporal and spatial distributions of aerosols within urban and suburban areas. Ground PM10 measurements were obtained from 73 of the Italian Regional Agency for Environmental Protection (ARPA) monitoring stations, spread across northern Italy, during a three-year period from 2010 to 2012. The Po Valley area (northern Italy) was chosen as the study domain because of its severe urban air pollution, resulting from it having the highest population and industrial manufacturing density in the country, being located in a valley where two surrounding mountain chains favor the stagnation of pollutants. We found that the global correlations between the bin-averaged PM10 and AOD are R2 = 0.83 and R2 = 0.44 for MYD04_L2 and for MAIAC, respectively, suggesting a greater sensitivity of the high-resolution product to small-scale deviations. However, the introduction of Relative Humidity (RH) and Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) depth corrections allowed for a significant improvement to the bin-averaged PM - AOD correlation, which led to a similar performance: R2 = 0.96 for MODIS and R2 = 0.95 for MAIAC. Furthermore, the introduction of the PBL information in the corrected AOD values was found to be crucial in order to capture the clear seasonal cycle shown by measured PM10 values. The study allowed us to define four seasonal linear correlations that estimate PM10 concentrations satisfactorily from the remotely sensed MAIAC AOD retrieval. Overall, the results show that

  4. Seasonal monitoring and estimation of regional aerosol distribution over Po valley, northern Italy, using a high-resolution MAIAC product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvani, Barbara; Pierce, R. Bradley; Lyapustin, Alexei I.; Wang, Yujie; Ghermandi, Grazia; Teggi, Sergio

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the new 1 km-resolved Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm is employed to characterize seasonal PM10 - AOD correlations over northern Italy. The accuracy of the new dataset is assessed compared to the widely used Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 5.1 Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) data, retrieved at 0.55 μm with spatial resolution of 10 km (MYD04_L2). We focused on evaluating the ability of these two products to characterize both temporal and spatial distributions of aerosols within urban and suburban areas. Ground PM10 measurements were obtained from 73 of the Italian Regional Agency for Environmental Protection (ARPA) monitoring stations, spread across northern Italy, during a three-year period from 2010 to 2012. The Po Valley area (northern Italy) was chosen as the study domain because of its severe urban air pollution, resulting from it having the highest population and industrial manufacturing density in the country, being located in a valley where two surrounding mountain chains favor the stagnation of pollutants. We found that the global correlations between the bin-averaged PM10 and AOD are R2 = 0.83 and R2 = 0.44 for MYD04_L2 and for MAIAC, respectively, suggesting a greater sensitivity of the high-resolution product to small-scale deviations. However, the introduction of Relative Humidity (RH) and Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) depth corrections allowed for a significant improvement to the bin-averaged PM - AOD correlation, which led to a similar performance: R2 = 0.96 for MODIS and R2 = 0.95 for MAIAC. Furthermore, the introduction of the PBL information in the corrected AOD values was found to be crucial in order to capture the clear seasonal cycle shown by measured PM10 values. The study allowed us to define four seasonal linear correlations that estimate PM10 concentrations satisfactorily from the remotely sensed MAIAC AOD retrieval. Overall, the results show that the high

  5. Resolution Analysis and the Backus-Gilbert Local Estimator for the Inverse Problem in the Scanning Magnetometory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, Y.; Uehara, M.

    2009-12-01

    The scanning magnetometory reveals fine-scale magnetic field images over geological samples, offering unique paleomagnetic information. Recent scanning magnetometory reaches high moment sensitivity and high spatial resolution (less than 1 mm), owing to the high field-sensitivity sensors (e.g., SQUID, Magneto-Impedance (MI), Giant-Magneto-Resistance) and small sample-to-sensor distance. Using an MI sensor driven by low-noise circuit, we successfully obtained magnetic field images of thin-sectioned geological samples carrying natural remanent magnetization. The main challenge in the scanning magnetometory is to invert the obtained field data into a magnetization pattern (Weiss et al., 2007). Since the magnetization pattern is a continuous function of position, the magnetic inverse problem is essentially underdetermined. Consequently, there should always be limitations in the resolving power of the estimated magnetization. Assessing the resolving power is essential to properly interpret the solution of inverse problems. Nevertheless, this has not been done for the scanning magnetometory. In this study, we used the model-resolution to assess the problem. We developed software to calculate and visualize the model-resolution for a single target point using the Backus-Gilbert method and iterative least-square calculation. Examples using results obtained by our MI scanning magnetometer will be presented. Any solution to a linear inverse problem can be expressed as a linear combination of data. The corresponding combination of data kernel constructs an averaging kernel. Thus, any solution is a weighted average of the true magnetization pattern of the sample. In other words, the resolving power of the solution, or the model-resolution, can be assessed by drawing the averaging kernel. Since the scanning magnetometory measures 2-dimensional samples, the averaging kernel for single target point becomes 2-dimensioanl image. Preliminary calculation was performed on a field image

  6. Estimation of the atmosphere-ocean fluxes of greenhouse gases and aerosols at the finer resolution of the coastal ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Vasco; Sahlée, Erik; Jurus, Pavel; Clementi, Emanuela; Pettersson, Heidi; Mateus, Marcos

    2016-04-01

    The balances and fluxes of greenhouse gases and aerosols between atmosphere and ocean are fundamental for Earth's heat budget. Hence, the scientific community needs to know and simulate them with accuracy in order to monitor climate change from Earth-Observation satellites and to produce reliable estimates of climate change using Earth-System Models (ESM). So far, ESM have represented earth's surface with coarser resolutions so that each cell of the marine domain is dominated by the open ocean. In such case it is enough to use simple algorithms considering the wind speed 10m above sea-surface (u10) as sole driver of the gas transfer velocity. The formulation by Wanninkhof (1992) is broadly accepted as the best. However, the ESM community is becoming increasingly aware of the need to model with finer resolutions. Then, it is no longer enough to only consider u10 when modelling gas transfer velocities across the coastal oceans' surfaces. More comprehensive formulations are required that adjust better to local conditions by also accounting for the effects of sea-surface agitation, wave breaking, atmospheric stability of the Surface Boundary Layer, current drag with the bottom, surfactants and rain. Accurate algorithms are also fundamental to monitor atmosphere and ocean greenhouse gas concentrations using satellite data and reverse modelling. Past satellite missions ERS, Envisat, Jason-2, Aqua, Terra and Metop, have already been remotely sensing the ocean's surface at much finer resolutions than ESM using instruments like MERIS, MODIS, AMR, AATSR, MIPAS, Poseidon-3, SCIAMACHY, SeaWiFS, and IASI. The planned new satellite missions Sentinel-3, OCO-2 and GOSAT will further increase the resolutions. We developed a framework to congregate competing formulations for the estimation of the solubility and transfer velocity of virtually any gas on the biosphere taking into consideration the atmosphere and ocean fundamental variables and their derived geophysical processes

  7. A High-Resolution Dataset of Water Fluxes and States for Germany accounting for Uncertainties in the Parameter Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zink, Matthias; Kumar, Rohini; Cuntz, Matthias; Samaniego, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Long term, high-resolution data of hydrologic fluxes and states are needed for many hydrological applications such as i) impact assessment studies (e.g. drought, flood or climate change analyses), ii) studies that need the state or variability of hydrometeorological or hydrologic variables (e.g. downscaling of climate model outputs), iii) modeling studies that need hydrologic variables as input or boundary conditions (e.g. recharge for groundwater modeling). Since long-term, large-scale observations of such fluxes and states are not feasible, hydrological or land surface models are applied to derive them. Usually such datasets are provided as single model realization without accounting for input, model structural or uncertainty caused by equifinal model parameter sets. This study aims to analyze and provide a high resolution dataset of hydrological fluxes and states accounting for uncertainties caused by the estimation of model parameters. Furthermore, the spatiotemporal distribution of uncertainties in various hydrological variables as well as the superposition of uncertainties through different model compartments is investigated. The hydrological variables of interest are evapotranspiration, soil moisture, recharge, and generated discharge. They are estimated for entire Germany in the period 1950 - 2010 employing the mesoscale hydrological model mHM (www.ufz.de/mhm). The spatial resolution is 4 km and the temporal resolution is 1 day. The ensemble of 100 model realization is based on 700 parameter sets which are derived from 100 calibration runs in the seven, major German river basins. These 700 parameter sets are filtered for those exceeding a Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) of 0.65 in each of the seven catchments, which leads to the final 100 parameter sets. The model is evaluated against observed runoff in 222 additional catchments. In this catchments the mean and the standard deviation are for daily discharge 0.68 and 0.09 and for monthly discharge 0.81 and 0

  8. Using remote sensing products to classify landscape. A multi-spatial resolution approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Llamas, Paula; Calvo, Leonor; Álvarez-Martínez, José Manuel; Suárez-Seoane, Susana

    2016-08-01

    The European Landscape Convention encourages the inventory and characterization of landscapes for environmental management and planning actions. Among the range of data sources available for landscape classification, remote sensing has substantial applicability, although difficulties might arise when available data are not at the spatial resolution of operational interest. We evaluated the applicability of two remote sensing products informing on land cover (the categorical CORINE map at 30 m resolution and the continuous NDVI spectral index at 1 km resolution) in landscape classification across a range of spatial resolutions (30 m, 90 m, 180 m, 1 km), using the Cantabrian Mountains (NW Spain) as study case. Separate landscape classifications (using topography, urban influence and land cover as inputs) were accomplished, one per each land cover dataset and spatial resolution. Classification accuracy was estimated through confusion matrixes and uncertainty in terms of both membership probability and confusion indices. Regarding landscape classifications based on CORINE, both typology and number of landscape classes varied across spatial resolutions. Classification accuracy increased from 30 m (the original resolution of CORINE) to 90m, decreasing towards coarser resolutions. Uncertainty followed the opposite pattern. In the case of landscape classifications based on NDVI, the identified landscape patterns were geographically structured and showed little sensitivity to changes across spatial resolutions. Only the change from 1 km (the original resolution of NDVI) to 180 m improved classification accuracy. The value of confusion indices increased with resolution. We highlight the need for greater effort in selecting data sources at the suitable spatial resolution, matching regional peculiarities and minimizing error and uncertainty.

  9. Estimating the gas transfer velocity: a prerequisite for more accurate and higher resolution GHG fluxes (lower Aare River, Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollberger, S.; Perez, K.; Schubert, C. J.; Eugster, W.; Wehrli, B.; Del Sontro, T.

    2013-12-01

    Currently, carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions from lakes, reservoirs and rivers are readily investigated due to the global warming potential of those gases and the role these inland waters play in the carbon cycle. However, there is a lack of high spatiotemporally-resolved emission estimates, and how to accurately assess the gas transfer velocity (K) remains controversial. In anthropogenically-impacted systems where run-of-river reservoirs disrupt the flow of sediments by increasing the erosion and load accumulation patterns, the resulting production of carbonic greenhouse gases (GH-C) is likely to be enhanced. The GH-C flux is thus counteracting the terrestrial carbon sink in these environments that act as net carbon emitters. The aim of this project was to determine the GH-C emissions from a medium-sized river heavily impacted by several impoundments and channelization through a densely-populated region of Switzerland. Estimating gas emission from rivers is not trivial and recently several models have been put forth to do so; therefore a second goal of this project was to compare the river emission models available with direct measurements. Finally, we further validated the modeled fluxes by using a combined approach with water sampling, chamber measurements, and highly temporal GH-C monitoring using an equilibrator. We conducted monthly surveys along the 120 km of the lower Aare River where we sampled for dissolved CH4 (';manual' sampling) at a 5-km sampling resolution, and measured gas emissions directly with chambers over a 35 km section. We calculated fluxes (F) via the boundary layer equation (F=K×(Cw-Ceq)) that uses the water-air GH-C concentration (C) gradient (Cw-Ceq) and K, which is the most sensitive parameter. K was estimated using 11 different models found in the literature with varying dependencies on: river hydrology (n=7), wind (2), heat exchange (1), and river width (1). We found that chamber fluxes were always higher than boundary

  10. Using a hybrid Monte Carlo/ Slip Estimator-Genetic Algorithm (MCSE-GA) to produce high resolution estimates of paleoearthquakes from geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Anthony; McCloskey, John; Simão, Nuno; Murphy, Shane; Bhloscaidh, Mairead Nic

    2014-05-01

    Algorithm element of the MCSE-GA allows it to recombine the information stored in a population of randomly generated models to rapidly converge on a possible solution. These solutions are evaluated and those satisfying a threshold number of observations join an ensemble of models contributing to a final Weighted Average Model (WAM). The WAM represents a high resolution estimate of the slip distribution responsible for any given set of displacements. Analysis of the slip values of the ensemble models allows areas of high confidence to be identified where the standard deviation is low. Similarly, areas of low confidence will be found where standard deviations are high. This presentation will demonstrate the ability of the MCSE-GA to produce both accurate models of slip for a number of recent instrumentally recorded earthquakes along the Sunda Trench and estimates of slip during 1797 and 1833 paleoearthquakes that are consistent with those produced from other techniques.

  11. Estimating hydrodynamic roughness in a wave-dominated environment with a high-resolution acoustic Doppler profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lacy, J.R.; Sherwood, C.R.; Wilson, D.J.; Chisholm, T.A.; Gelfenbaum, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrodynamic roughness is a critical parameter for characterizing bottom drag in boundary layers, and it varies both spatially and temporally due to variation in grain size, bedforms, and saltating sediment. In this paper we investigate temporal variability in hydrodynamic roughness using velocity profiles in the bottom boundary layer measured with a high-resolution acoustic Doppler profiler (PCADP). The data were collected on the ebb-tidal delta off Grays Harbor, Washington, in a mean water depth of 9 m. Significant wave height ranged from 0.5 to 3 m. Bottom roughness has rarely been determined from hydrodynamic measurements under conditions such as these, where energetic waves and medium-to-fine sand produce small bedforms. Friction velocity due to current u*c and apparent bottom roughness z0a were determined from the PCADP burst mean velocity profiles using the law of the wall. Bottom roughness kB was estimated by applying the Grant-Madsen model for wave-current interaction iteratively until the model u*c converged with values determined from the data. The resulting kB values ranged over 3 orders of magnitude (10-1 to 10-4 m) and varied inversely with wave orbital diameter. This range of kB influences predicted bottom shear stress considerably, suggesting that the use of time-varying bottom roughness could significantly improve the accuracy of sediment transport models. Bedform height was estimated from kB and is consistent with both ripple heights predicted by empirical models and bedforms in sonar images collected during the experiment. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. A comprehensive filtering scheme for high-resolution estimation of the water balance components from high-precision lysimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannes, M.; Wollschlager, U.; Schrader, F.; Durner, W.; Gebler, S.; Putz, T.; Fank, J.; von Unold, G.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2015-08-01

    Large weighing lysimeters are currently the most precise method to directly measure all components of the terrestrial water balance in parallel via the built-in weighing system. As lysimeters are exposed to several external forces such as management practices or wind influencing the weighing data, the calculated fluxes of precipitation and evapotranspiration can be altered considerably without having applied appropriate corrections to the raw data. Therefore, adequate filtering schemes for obtaining most accurate estimates of the water balance components are required. In this study, we use data from the TERENO (TERrestrial ENvironmental Observatories) SoilCan research site in Bad Lauchstadt to develop a comprehensive filtering procedure for high-precision lysimeter data, which is designed to deal with various kinds of possible errors starting from the elimination of large disturbances in the raw data resulting e.g., from management practices all the way to the reduction of noise caused e.g., by moderate wind. Furthermore, we analyze the influence of averaging times and thresholds required by some of the filtering steps on the calculated water balance and investigate the ability of two adaptive filtering methods (the adaptive window and adaptive threshold filter (AWAT filter; Peters et al., 2014), and a new synchro filter applicable to the data from a set of several lysimeters) to further reduce the filtering error. Finally, we take advantage of the data sets of all 18 lysimeters running in parallel at the Bad Lauchstadt site to evaluate the performance and accuracy of the proposed filtering scheme. For the tested time interval of 2 months, we show that the estimation of the water balance with high temporal resolution and good accuracy is possible. The filtering code can be downloaded from the journal website as Supplement to this publication.

  13. An Approach for the Long-Term 30-m Land Surface Snow-Free Albedo Retrieval from Historic Landsat Surface Reflectance and MODIS-based A Priori Anisotropy Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuai, Yanmin; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Gao, Feng; Schaaf, Crystal B.; He, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Land surface albedo has been recognized by the Global Terrestrial Observing System (GTOS) as an essential climate variable crucial for accurate modeling and monitoring of the Earth's radiative budget. While global climate studies can leverage albedo datasets from MODIS, VIIRS, and other coarse-resolution sensors, many applications in heterogeneous environments can benefit from higher-resolution albedo products derived from Landsat. We previously developed a "MODIS-concurrent" approach for the 30-meter albedo estimation which relied on combining post-2000 Landsat data with MODIS Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) information. Here we present a "pre-MODIS era" approach to extend 30-m surface albedo generation in time back to the 1980s, through an a priori anisotropy Look-Up Table (LUT) built up from the high quality MCD43A BRDF estimates over representative homogenous regions. Each entry in the LUT reflects a unique combination of land cover, seasonality, terrain information, disturbance age and type, and Landsat optical spectral bands. An initial conceptual LUT was created for the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of the United States and provides BRDF shapes estimated from MODIS observations for undisturbed and disturbed surface types (including recovery trajectories of burned areas and non-fire disturbances). By accepting the assumption of a generally invariant BRDF shape for similar land surface structures as a priori information, spectral white-sky and black-sky albedos are derived through albedo-to-nadir reflectance ratios as a bridge between the Landsat and MODIS scale. A further narrow-to-broadband conversion based on radiative transfer simulations is adopted to produce broadband albedos at visible, near infrared, and shortwave regimes.We evaluate the accuracy of resultant Landsat albedo using available field measurements at forested AmeriFlux stations in the PNW region, and examine the consistency of the surface albedo generated by this approach

  14. Identification of recharge zones in the Lower Mississippi River alluvial aquifer using high-resolution precipitation estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Jamie; Mercer, Andrew; Rigby, James R.; Grimes, Alexandria

    2015-12-01

    Water resources in the lower Mississippi River alluvial valley play a critical role in agricultural productivity due to the widespread use of irrigation during the growing season. However, the unknown specifics of surface-atmosphere feedbacks in the region, along with diminishing groundwater availability and the non-sustainable trend in irrigation draws from the alluvial aquifer, makes it difficult for water resource managers to make sound decisions for future water sustainability. As a result, it is crucial to identify spatial and temporal associations between local rainfall patterns and groundwater levels to determine the influence of precipitation on regional aquifer recharge. Specifically, it is critical to define the recharge zones of the aquifer so that rainfall distribution can be used to assess potential groundwater recovery. This project addresses the issue of defining areas of recharge in the lower Mississippi River alluvial aquifer (LMRAA) through an assessment of historical precipitation variability using high-resolution radar-derived precipitation estimates. A rotated principal component analysis (RPCA) of both groundwater and precipitation data from October through April is used to define locations where aquifer levels show the greatest variability, with a stepwise regression approach used to define areas where rainfall and groundwater levels show the strongest association. Results show that the greatest recharge through direct rainfall is along the Tallahatchie River basin in the northeastern Mississippi Delta, with recharge along the periphery of the LMRAA likely a result of direct water flux from surface hydrologic features.

  15. Generation of the 30 M-Mesh Global Digital Surface Model by Alos Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadono, T.; Nagai, H.; Ishida, H.; Oda, F.; Naito, S.; Minakawa, K.; Iwamoto, H.

    2016-06-01

    Topographical information is fundamental to many geo-spatial related information and applications on Earth. Remote sensing satellites have the advantage in such fields because they are capable of global observation and repeatedly. Several satellite-based digital elevation datasets were provided to examine global terrains with medium resolutions e.g. the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), the global digital elevation model by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER GDEM). A new global digital surface model (DSM) dataset using the archived data of the Panchromatic Remote-sensing Instrument for Stereo Mapping (PRISM) onboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS, nicknamed "Daichi") has been completed on March 2016 by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) collaborating with NTT DATA Corp. and Remote Sensing Technology Center, Japan. This project is called "ALOS World 3D" (AW3D), and its dataset consists of the global DSM dataset with 0.15 arcsec. pixel spacing (approx. 5 m mesh) and ortho-rectified PRISM image with 2.5 m resolution. JAXA is also processing the global DSM with 1 arcsec. spacing (approx. 30 m mesh) based on the AW3D DSM dataset, and partially releasing it free of charge, which calls "ALOS World 3D 30 m mesh" (AW3D30). The global AW3D30 dataset will be released on May 2016. This paper describes the processing status, a preliminary validation result of the AW3D30 DSM dataset, and its public release status. As a summary of the preliminary validation of AW3D30 DSM, 4.40 m (RMSE) of the height accuracy of the dataset was confirmed using 5,121 independent check points distributed in the world.

  16. Estimation of high resolution shallow water bathymetry via two-media-photogrammetry - a case study at the Pielach River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, Michael; Mandlburger, Gottfried; Ressl, Camillo; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    In our contribution, a photogrammetric approach for water depth estimation of a shallow water body is developed and applied to a gravel-bed river in order to evaluate the possibilities of passive optical remote sensing for high resolution bathymetry. While 2-media (air and water) photogrammetry has been described before, it was concentrated on reconstruction of individual points. Here, we take a different approach and aim at a dense surface description of the river bed as seen from the aerial image through the water column. In a first step, the influence of light refraction at the boundary between two media for photogrammetric point retrieval is assessed. The effect is theoretically investigated under varying conditions, i.e. the 3D point displacement caused by refraction is related to parameters such as water depth, image geometry et cetera. Especially the assumption of a plain, horizontal water surface does not hold in practice. Therefore, also the limitations of the theoretical model are determined by investigating, how water surface waves and the corresponding deviation of the surface normal vectors from vertical direction distort the results. In the second, practical part of the work, a refraction correction procedure is derived from the prior investigations and is embedded into the photogrammetric workflow. A full photogrammetric processing chain is applied to a set of aerial images of the pre-Alpine Pielach River in Lower Austria. The RGB images were taken simultaneously to an Airborne Laser Bathymetry (ALB) campaign providing high resolution reference data. Based on these images, a Digital Terrain Model is derived for the open as well as the submerged areas. Running through the procedure gives important insights about the possibilities of influencing the processing pipeline of commercial photogrammetric software packages in order to apply the developed refraction correction. Especially, the deviation from the epipolar constraint caused by refraction and the

  17. The Influence of Data Resolution on Predicted Distribution and Estimates of Extent of Current Protection of Three 'Listed' Deep-Sea Habitats.

    PubMed

    Ross, Lauren K; Ross, Rebecca E; Stewart, Heather A; Howell, Kerry L

    2015-01-01

    Modelling approaches have the potential to significantly contribute to the spatial management of the deep-sea ecosystem in a cost effective manner. However, we currently have little understanding of the accuracy of such models, developed using limited data, of varying resolution. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of predictive models constructed using non-simulated (real world) data of different resolution. Predicted distribution maps for three deep-sea habitats were constructed using MaxEnt modelling methods using high resolution multibeam bathymetric data and associated terrain derived variables as predictors. Model performance was evaluated using repeated 75/25 training/test data partitions using AUC and threshold-dependent assessment methods. The overall extent and distribution of each habitat, and the percentage contained within an existing MPA network were quantified and compared to results from low resolution GEBCO models. Predicted spatial extent for scleractinian coral reef and Syringammina fragilissima aggregations decreased with an increase in model resolution, whereas Pheronema carpenteri total suitable area increased. Distinct differences in predicted habitat distribution were observed for all three habitats. Estimates of habitat extent contained within the MPA network all increased when modelled at fine scale. High resolution models performed better than low resolution models according to threshold-dependent evaluation. We recommend the use of high resolution multibeam bathymetry data over low resolution bathymetry data for use in modelling approaches. We do not recommend the use of predictive models to produce absolute values of habitat extent, but likely areas of suitable habitat. Assessments of MPA network effectiveness based on calculations of percentage area protection (policy driven conservation targets) from low resolution models are likely to be fit for purpose.

  18. The Influence of Data Resolution on Predicted Distribution and Estimates of Extent of Current Protection of Three ‘Listed’ Deep-Sea Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Lauren K.; Ross, Rebecca E.; Stewart, Heather A.; Howell, Kerry L.

    2015-01-01

    Modelling approaches have the potential to significantly contribute to the spatial management of the deep-sea ecosystem in a cost effective manner. However, we currently have little understanding of the accuracy of such models, developed using limited data, of varying resolution. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of predictive models constructed using non-simulated (real world) data of different resolution. Predicted distribution maps for three deep-sea habitats were constructed using MaxEnt modelling methods using high resolution multibeam bathymetric data and associated terrain derived variables as predictors. Model performance was evaluated using repeated 75/25 training/test data partitions using AUC and threshold-dependent assessment methods. The overall extent and distribution of each habitat, and the percentage contained within an existing MPA network were quantified and compared to results from low resolution GEBCO models. Predicted spatial extent for scleractinian coral reef and Syringammina fragilissima aggregations decreased with an increase in model resolution, whereas Pheronema carpenteri total suitable area increased. Distinct differences in predicted habitat distribution were observed for all three habitats. Estimates of habitat extent contained within the MPA network all increased when modelled at fine scale. High resolution models performed better than low resolution models according to threshold-dependent evaluation. We recommend the use of high resolution multibeam bathymetry data over low resolution bathymetry data for use in modelling approaches. We do not recommend the use of predictive models to produce absolute values of habitat extent, but likely areas of suitable habitat. Assessments of MPA network effectiveness based on calculations of percentage area protection (policy driven conservation targets) from low resolution models are likely to be fit for purpose. PMID:26496639

  19. A High-Resolution Two-Stage Satellite Model to Estimate PM2.5 Concentrations in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Ma, Z.; Hu, X.; Yang, K.

    2014-12-01

    With the rapid economic development and urbanization, severe and widespread PM2.5 pollution in China has attracted nationwide attention. Study of the health impact of PM2.5 exposure has been hindered, however, by the limited coverage of ground measurements from recently established regulatory monitoring networks. Estimating ground-level PM2.5 from satellite remote sensing is a promising new method to evaluate the spatial and temporal patterns of PM2.5 exposure. We developed a two-stage spatial statistical model to estimate daily mean PM2.5 concentrations at 10 km resolution in 2013 in China using MODIS Collection 6 AOD, assimilated meteorology, population density, and land use parameters. A custom inverse variance weighting approach was developed to combine MODIS Dark Target (DT) and Deep Blue (DB) AOD to optimize coverage. Compared with the AERONET AOD measurements, our combined AOD (R2=0.80, mean bias = 0.07) performs similarly to MODIS' combined AOD (R2=0.81, mean bias =0.07), but has 90% greater coverage. We used the first-stage linear mixed effect model to represent the temporal variability of PM2.5 and the second-stage generalized additive model to represent its spatial contrast. The overall model cross-validation R2 and relative prediction error are 0.80 and 30%, respectively. PM2.5 levels exhibit strong seasonal patterns, with the highest national mean concentrations in winter (75 µg/m3) and the lowest in summer (30 µg/m3). Elevated annual mean PM2.5 levels are predicted in North China Plain and Sichuan Basin, with the maximum annual PM2.5 concentrations higher than 130 µg/m3 and 110 µg/m3, respectively. Our results also indicates that over 94% of the Chinese population lives in areas that exceed the WHO Air Quality Interim Target-1 standard (35 μg/m3). The exceptions include Taiwan, Hainan, Yunnan, Tibet, and North Inner Mongolia.

  20. An Evaluation of New High-Resolution Image Collection and Processing Techniques for Estimating Shrub Cover and Detecting Landscape Changes

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, D.J.; Ostler, W.K.

    2001-05-01

    Research funded by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as part of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) evaluated novel techniques for collecting and processing high-resolution images in the Mojave Desert. Several camera types, lens, films, and digital processing techniques were evaluated on the basis of their ability to correctly estimate canopy cover of shrubs. A high degree of accuracy was obtained with photo scales of 1:1000 to 1:4000 and flatbed scanning rates from films or prints of 300 lines per inch or larger. Smaller scale images were of value in detecting retrospective changes in cover of large shrubs, but failed to detect smaller shrubs. New image-processing software, typically used in light microscopy, forensics, and industrial engineering, make it possible to accurately measure areas for total cover of up to four dominant shrub species in minutes compared to hours or days of field work. Canopy cover and individual shrub parameters such as width, length, circumference, and shape factors can be readily measured yielding size distribution histograms and other statistical data on plant community structure. These novel techniques are being evaluated in a four-year study of military training impacts at Fort Irwin, California. Results will be compared among the new and conventional imagery and processing, including 1-meter (m) pixel IKONOS images. The new processes create georectified color-coded contour maps of shrub cover for use with Geographic Information System (GIS) software. The technique is a valuable new emerging tool to accurately assess vegetation structure and landscape changes due to military or other land-use disturbances.

  1. Design and Expected Performance of GISMO-2, a Two Color Millimeter Camera for the IRAM 30 m Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staguhn, Johannes G.; Benford, Dominic J.; Dwek, Eli; Hilton, Gene; Fixsen, Dale J.; Irwin, Kent; Jhabvala, Christine; Kovacs, Attila; Leclercq, Samuel; Maher, Stephen F.; Miller, Tim; Moseley, S. Harvey; Sharp, Elmer H.; Wollack, Edward

    2014-01-01

    We present the main design features for the GISMO-2 bolometer camera, which we build for background-limited operation at the IRAM 30 m telescope on Pico Veleta, Spain. GISMO-2 will operate simultaneously in the 1 and 2 mm atmospherical windows. The 1 mm channel uses a 32 × 40 TES-based backshort under grid (BUG) bolometer array, the 2 mm channel operates with a 16 × 16 BUG array. The camera utilizes almost the entire full field of view provided by the telescope. The optical design of GISMO-2 was strongly influenced by our experience with the GISMO 2mm bolometer camera, which is successfully operating at the 30 m telescope. GISMO is accessible to the astronomical community through the regularIRAMcall for proposals.

  2. Estimating chlorophyll with thermal and broadband multispectral high resolution imagery from an unmanned aerial system using relevance vector machines for precision agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elarab, Manal; Ticlavilca, Andres M.; Torres-Rua, Alfonso F.; Maslova, Inga; McKee, Mac

    2015-12-01

    Precision agriculture requires high-resolution information to enable greater precision in the management of inputs to production. Actionable information about crop and field status must be acquired at high spatial resolution and at a temporal frequency appropriate for timely responses. In this study, high spatial resolution imagery was obtained through the use of a small, unmanned aerial system called AggieAirTM. Simultaneously with the AggieAir flights, intensive ground sampling for plant chlorophyll was conducted at precisely determined locations. This study reports the application of a relevance vector machine coupled with cross validation and backward elimination to a dataset composed of reflectance from high-resolution multi-spectral imagery (VIS-NIR), thermal infrared imagery, and vegetative indices, in conjunction with in situ SPAD measurements from which chlorophyll concentrations were derived, to estimate chlorophyll concentration from remotely sensed data at 15-cm resolution. The results indicate that a relevance vector machine with a thin plate spline kernel type and kernel width of 5.4, having LAI, NDVI, thermal and red bands as the selected set of inputs, can be used to spatially estimate chlorophyll concentration with a root-mean-squared-error of 5.31 μg cm-2, efficiency of 0.76, and 9 relevance vectors.

  3. A New Folding Kinetic Mechanism for Human Transthyretin and the Influence of the Amyloidogenic V30M Mutation.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Catarina S H; Almeida, Zaida L; Vaz, Daniela C; Faria, Tiago Q; Brito, Rui M M

    2016-08-31

    Protein aggregation into insoluble amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, chief among them Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Although caused by different proteins, these pathologies share some basic molecular mechanisms with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP), a rare hereditary neuropathy caused by amyloid formation and deposition by transthyretin (TTR) in the peripheral and autonomic nervous systems. Among the amyloidogenic TTR mutations known, V30M-TTR is the most common in FAP. TTR amyloidogenesis (ATTR) is triggered by tetramer dissociation, followed by partial unfolding and aggregation of the low conformational stability monomers formed. Thus, tetramer dissociation kinetics, monomer conformational stability and competition between refolding and aggregation pathways do play a critical role in ATTR. Here, we propose a new model to analyze the refolding kinetics of WT-TTR and V30M-TTR, showing that at pH and protein concentrations close to physiological, a two-step mechanism with a unimolecular first step followed by a second-order second step adjusts well to the experimental data. Interestingly, although sharing the same kinetic mechanism, V30M-TTR refolds at a much slower rate than WT-TTR, a feature that may favor the formation of transient species leading to kinetic partition into amyloidogenic pathways and, thus, significantly increasing the probability of amyloid formation in vivo.

  4. Cryogenic Tests of 30 m Flexible Hybrid Energy Transfer Line with Liquid Hydrogen and Superconducting MgB2 Cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vysotsky, V. S.; Antyukhov, I. V.; Firsov, V. P.; Blagov, E. V.; Kostyuk, V. V.; Nosov, A. A.; Fetisov, S. S.; Zanegin, S. Yu.; Rachuk, V. S.; Katorgin, B. I.

    Recently we reported about first in the world test of 10 m hybrid energy transfer line with liquid hydrogen and MgB2 superconducting cable. In this paper we present the new development of our second hybrid energy transfer line with 30 m length. The flexible 30 m hydrogen cryostat has three sections with different types of thermal insulation in each section: simple vacuum superinsulation, vacuum superinsulation with liquid nitrogen shield and active evaporating cryostatting (AEC) system. We performed thermo-hydraulic tests of the cryostat to compare three thermo-insulating methods. The tests were performed at temperatures from 20 to 26 K, hydrogen flow from 100 to 450 g/s and pressure from 0.25 to 0.5 MPa. It was found that AEC thermal insulation practically eliminated completely heat transfer from room temperature to liquid hydrogen in the 10 m section. AEC thermal insulation method can be used for long superconducting power cables. High voltage current leads were developed as well. The current leads and superconducting MgB2 cable have been passed high voltage DC test up to 50 kV DC. Critical current of the cable at ∼21 K was ∼3500 A. The 30 m hybrid energy system developed is able to deliver up to 135 MW of chemical and electrical power in total.

  5. A New Folding Kinetic Mechanism for Human Transthyretin and the Influence of the Amyloidogenic V30M Mutation.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Catarina S H; Almeida, Zaida L; Vaz, Daniela C; Faria, Tiago Q; Brito, Rui M M

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation into insoluble amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, chief among them Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Although caused by different proteins, these pathologies share some basic molecular mechanisms with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP), a rare hereditary neuropathy caused by amyloid formation and deposition by transthyretin (TTR) in the peripheral and autonomic nervous systems. Among the amyloidogenic TTR mutations known, V30M-TTR is the most common in FAP. TTR amyloidogenesis (ATTR) is triggered by tetramer dissociation, followed by partial unfolding and aggregation of the low conformational stability monomers formed. Thus, tetramer dissociation kinetics, monomer conformational stability and competition between refolding and aggregation pathways do play a critical role in ATTR. Here, we propose a new model to analyze the refolding kinetics of WT-TTR and V30M-TTR, showing that at pH and protein concentrations close to physiological, a two-step mechanism with a unimolecular first step followed by a second-order second step adjusts well to the experimental data. Interestingly, although sharing the same kinetic mechanism, V30M-TTR refolds at a much slower rate than WT-TTR, a feature that may favor the formation of transient species leading to kinetic partition into amyloidogenic pathways and, thus, significantly increasing the probability of amyloid formation in vivo. PMID:27589730

  6. A New Folding Kinetic Mechanism for Human Transthyretin and the Influence of the Amyloidogenic V30M Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Jesus, Catarina S. H.; Almeida, Zaida L.; Vaz, Daniela C.; Faria, Tiago Q.; Brito, Rui M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation into insoluble amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, chief among them Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Although caused by different proteins, these pathologies share some basic molecular mechanisms with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP), a rare hereditary neuropathy caused by amyloid formation and deposition by transthyretin (TTR) in the peripheral and autonomic nervous systems. Among the amyloidogenic TTR mutations known, V30M-TTR is the most common in FAP. TTR amyloidogenesis (ATTR) is triggered by tetramer dissociation, followed by partial unfolding and aggregation of the low conformational stability monomers formed. Thus, tetramer dissociation kinetics, monomer conformational stability and competition between refolding and aggregation pathways do play a critical role in ATTR. Here, we propose a new model to analyze the refolding kinetics of WT-TTR and V30M-TTR, showing that at pH and protein concentrations close to physiological, a two-step mechanism with a unimolecular first step followed by a second-order second step adjusts well to the experimental data. Interestingly, although sharing the same kinetic mechanism, V30M-TTR refolds at a much slower rate than WT-TTR, a feature that may favor the formation of transient species leading to kinetic partition into amyloidogenic pathways and, thus, significantly increasing the probability of amyloid formation in vivo. PMID:27589730

  7. The link between a negative high resolution resist contrast/developer performance and the Flory-Huggins parameter estimated from the Hansen solubility sphere

    SciTech Connect

    StCaire, Lorri; Olynick, Deirdre L.; Chao, Weilun L.; Lewis, Mark D.; Lu, Haoren; Dhuey, Scott D.; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2008-07-01

    We have implemented a technique to identify candidate polymer solvents for spinning, developing, and rinsing for a high resolution, negative electron beam resist hexa-methyl acetoxy calix(6)arene to elicit the optimum pattern development performance. Using the three dimensional Hansen solubility parameters for over 40 solvents, we have constructed a Hansen solubility sphere. From this sphere, we have estimated the Flory Huggins interaction parameter for solvents with hexa-methyl acetoxy calix(6)arene and found a correlation between resist development contrast and the Flory-Huggins parameter. This provides new insights into the development behavior of resist materials which are necessary for obtaining the ultimate lithographic resolution.

  8. Estimating KIR Haplotype Frequencies on a Cohort of 10,000 Individuals: A Comprehensive Study on Population Variations, Typing Resolutions, and Reference Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, Jyothi; Trowsdale, John; Traherne, James; Kuang, Rui; Spellman, Stephen; Maiers, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) mediate human natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity via activating or inhibiting signals. Although informative and functional haplotype patterns have been reported, most genotyping has been performed at resolutions that are structurally ambiguous. In order to leverage structural information given low-resolution genotypes, we performed experiments to quantify the effects of population variations, reference haplotypes, and genotyping resolutions on population-level haplotype frequency estimations as well as predictions of individual haplotypes. We genotyped 10,157 unrelated individuals in 5 populations (518 African American[AFA], 258 Asian or Pacific Islander[API], 8,245 European[EUR], 1,073 Hispanic[HIS], and 63 Native American[NAM]) for KIR gene presence/absence (PA), and additionally half of the AFA samples for KIR gene copy number variation (CNV). A custom EM algorithm was used to estimate haplotype frequencies for each population by interpretation in the context of three sets of reference haplotypes. The algorithm also assigns each individual the haplotype pairs of maximum likelihood. Generally, our haplotype frequency estimates agree with similar previous publications to within <5% difference for all haplotypes. The exception is that estimates for NAM from the U.S. showed higher frequency association of cB02 with tA01 (+14%) instead of tB01 (-8.5%) compared to a previous study of NAM from south of the U.S. The higher-resolution CNV genotyping on the AFA samples allowed unambiguous haplotype-pair assignments for the majority of individuals, resulting in a 22% higher median typing resolution score (TRS), which measures likelihood of self-match in the context of population-specific haplo- and geno-types. The use of TRS to quantify reduced ambiguity with CNV data clearly revealed the few individuals with ambiguous genotypes as outliers. It is observed that typing resolution and reference haplotype set influence

  9. AN EVALUATION OF TWO GROUND-BASED CROWN CLOSURE ESTIMATION TECHNIQUES COMPARED TO CROWN CLOSURE ESTIMATES DERIVED FROM HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two ground-based canopy closure estimation techniques, the Spherical Densitometer (SD) and the Vertical Tube (VT), were compared for the effect of deciduous understory on dominant/co-dominant crown closure estimates in even-aged loblolly (Pinus taeda) pine stands located in the N...

  10. AN EVALUATION OF TWO GROUND-BASED CROWN CLOSURE ESTIMATION TECHNIQUES COMPARED TO CROWN CLOSURE ESTIMATES DERIVED FROM HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two ground-based canopy closure estimation techniques, the Spherical Densitometer (SD) and the Vertical Tube (VT), were compared for the effect of deciduous understory on dominantlco-dominant crown closure estimates in even-aged loblolly (Pinus taeda) pine stands located in the N...

  11. A global inverse model for estimating surface CO2 fluxes at a 0.1x0.1 degree resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksyutov, Shamil; Oda, Tomohiro; Janardanan, Rajesh; Yaremchuk, Alexey; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Ito, Akihiko; Belikov, Dmitry; Zhuravlev, Ruslan; Ganshin, Alexander; Valsala, Vinu

    2015-04-01

    We propose an iterative inversion method for estimating surface CO2 fluxes at a high spatial resolution (0.1 degree) using atmospheric CO2 data collected by the global in-situ network and GOSAT. The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART was coupled to the Eulerian atmospheric tracer transport model (NIES-TM) and an adjoint of the coupled model was derived. The inverse model calculates weekly corrections to given prior fluxes at a spatial resolution of the surface flux footprints simulated by FLEXPART model (0.1 degrees). Prior fluxes are given at different spatial resolutions in low and high resolution mode implementations. The hourly terrestrial biosphere fluxes are simulated with VISIT model using CFSR reanalysis. Ocean fluxes are calculated using a 4D-Var assimilation system of the surface pCO2 observations. Fossil fuel (ODIAC) and biomass burning (GFASv1.1) emissions are given at original model resolutions (0.1 degree), while terrestrial biosphere and ocean fluxes are interpolated from a coarser resolution. Flux response functions (footprints) for observations are first simulated with FLEXPART. The precalculated flux response functions are then used in forward and adjoint runs of the coupled transport model. We apply Lanczos process to obtain the truncated singular value decomposition (SVD) of the scaled tracer transport operator A = R-1/2HB1/2, where H - tracer transport operator, R and B - error covariance matrices for observations and fluxes, respectively. The square root of covariance matrix B is constructed by directional splitting in latitude, longitude and time, with exponential decay scales of 500 km on land, 1000 km over oceans and 2 weeks in time. Once singular vectors of AAT are obtained, the prior and posterior flux uncertainties are evaluated. Numerical experiments of inverting surface CO2 fluxes showed that the high-resolution (Lagrangian) part of the flux responses dominates the solution so that spatial patterns from the coarser

  12. Use of High-Resolution Multispectral Imagery to Estimate Soil and Plant Nitrogen in Oats (Avena sativa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ELarab, M.; Ticlavilca, A. M.; Torres-Rua, A. F.; McKee, M.

    2014-12-01

    Precision agriculture requires high spatial resolution in the application of the inputs to agricultural production. This requires that actionable information about crop and field status be acquired at the same high spatial resolution and at a temporal frequency appropriate for timely responses. In this study, high-resolution imagery was obtained through the use of a small, unmanned aerial vehicle, called AggieAirTM, which provides spatial resolution as fine as 15 cm. Simultaneously with AggieAir flights, intensive ground sampling was conducted at precisely determined locations for plant and soil nitrogen among other parameters. This study investigated the spectral signature of oats and formulated a machine learning regression model of reflectance response between the multi-spectral bands available from AggieAir (red, green, blue, near infrared, and thermal), plant nitrogen and soil nitrogen. A multivariate relevance vector machine (MVRVM) was used to develop the linkages between the remotely sensed data and plant and soil nitrogen at approximately 15-cm resolution. The results of this study are presented, including a statistical evaluation of the performance of the model.

  13. Using Very High Resolution Remotely Sensed Imagery to Estimate Agricultural Production: A comparison of food insecure and secure growing areas in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grace, K.; Husak, G. J.; Bogle, S.

    2013-12-01

    Determining the amount of food produced in a food insecure, isolated, subsistence farming community can be used to help identify households or communities who may be in need of additional food resources. Measuring annual food production in developing countries, much less at a sub-national level, is complicated by lack of data. It can be difficult and costly to access all of the farming households engaged in subsistence farming. However, recent research has focused on the use of remotely sensed data to aid in the estimation of area under cultivation and because food production is the measure of yield (production per hectare) multiplied by area (number of hectares), we can use the area measure to reduce uncertainty in food production estimates. One strategy for estimating cultivated area relies on a fairly time intensive manual interpretation of very high resolution data. Due to the availability of very high resolution data it is possible to construct estimates of cultivated area, even in communities where fields are small. While this strategy has been used to effectively estimate cultivated area in a timely manner, questions remain about the spatial and temporal generalizability of this approach. The purpose of this paper is to produce and compare estimates of cultivated area in two very different agricultural areas of Kenya, a highly food insecure country in East Africa, during two different agricultural seasons. The areas selected represent two different livelihood zones: a marginal growing area where poor farmers rely on inconsistent rainfall and a lush growing area near the mountainous region of the middle-West area of the country where rainfall is consistent and therefore more suited to cultivation. The overarching goal is to determine the effectiveness of very high resolution remotely sensed imagery in calculating estimates of cultivated area in areas where food production strategies are different. Additionally the results of this research will explore the

  14. RESOLUTION AND ERROR IN MEASURING LAND-COVER CHANGE: EFFECTS ON ESTIMATING NET CARBON RELEASE FROM MEXICAN TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reliable estimates of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere due to land-use change have become increasingly important. One source of land-use changes estimates comes from comparing multi-date remote sensing imagery, though the effect of land-cover clas...

  15. Cotton yield estimation using very high-resolution digital images acquired on a low-cost miniature unmanned aerial vehicle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yield estimation is a critical task in crop management. A number of traditional methods are available for crop yield estimation but they are costly, time-consuming and difficult to expand to a relatively large field. Remote sensing provides techniques to develop quick coverage over a field at any sc...

  16. Image interpreter tool: An ArcGIS tool for estimating vegetation cover from high-resolution imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land managers need increased temporal and spatial resolution of rangeland assessment and monitoring data. However, with flat or declining land management and monitoring agency budgets, such increases in sampling intensity are unlikely unless new methods can be developed that capture data of key rang...

  17. First Results from Astronomical Observations with the GISMO 2 Millimeter Bolometer Camera at the IRAM 30m Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staguhn, Johannes; Allen, C.; Benford, D.; Sharp, E.; Ames, T.; Arendt, R.; Chuss, D.; Dwek, E.; Maher, S.; Miller, T.; Moseley, S. H.; Navarro, S.; Sansigre, A. M.; Schinnerer, E.; Sievers, A.; Walter, F.; Wollack, E.

    2007-12-01

    Title: First Results from Astronomical Observations with the GISMO 2 Millimeter Bolometer Camera at the IRAM 30m Telescope The 2mm bolometer camera GISMO (Goddard-IRAM Superconducting 2-Millimeter Observer) was installed for the first time in November 2007 at the IRAM 30m telescope on Pico Veleta in Spain. With its 128 pixel superconducting transition edge sensor bolometer array, this instrument provides unprecedented observational capabilities in terms of its field of view and sensitivity in the 2mm atmospheric window. In particular, observations of dust-enshrouded massive starburst galaxies and quasars can be performed very efficiently with the instrument even at redshifts of z>7. Furthermore GISMO provides important complementary data to observations obtained with other (sub-)millimeter instruments, such as SHARC-2 (350 μm), SCUBA, (450 and 850 μm), AzTEC (1.1 mm), and MAMBO (1.2 mm). Here we present preliminary astronomical results obtained with GISMO during its commissioning observing period.

  18. Estimation of surface energy balance from radiant surface temperature and NOAA AVHRR sensor reflectances over agricultural and native vegetation. [AVHRR (advanced very high resolution radiometer)

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xinmei; Lyons, T.J. ); Smith, R.C.G. ); Hacker, J.M.; Schwerdtfeger, P. )

    1993-08-01

    A model is developed to evaluate surface heat flux densities using the radiant surface temperature and red and near-infrared reflectances from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer sensor. Net radiation is calculated from an empirical formulation and albedo estimated from satellite observations. Infrared surface temperature is corrected to aerodynamic surface temperature in estimating the sensible heat flux and the latent flux is evaluated as the residual of the surface energy balance. When applied to relatively homogeneous agricultural and native vegetation, the model yields realistic estimates of sensible and latent heat flux density in the surface layer for cases where either the sensible or latent flux dominates. 29 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. IRAM-30m Molecular Submm Surveys of Two Very Different Comets: C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS) and C/2012 F6 (Lemmon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biver, Nicolas; Debout, V.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.; Colom, P.; Moreno, R.; Boissier, J.; Paubert, G.; Lis, D. C.; Hartogh, P.; Dello-Russo, N.; Vervack, R.; Weaver, H. A.

    2013-10-01

    The two bright comets of the spring of 2013, C/2011 L4 (Pan-STARRS) and C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) were observed on 14-18 March and 5-8 April with the IRAM-30m radiotelescope in Spain. Despite adverse observing conditions we conducted wide frequency surveys (85-93, 166-170, 210-272 GHz) of the two comets using the EMIR receivers and high resolution FTS spectrometer. The wide instantaneous frequency coverage (12-16 GHz dual polarization) enables the coverage of many lines of the same molecular species, making the detection faster. We detected HCN, HNC, CS, HCO+, CH3OH, HC3N, HNCO in comet PanSTARRS and HCN, HNC, HC3N, CH3CN, HNCO, CH3OH, H2CO, H2S, CS, C34S, SO, OCS, H2CS, HCO+ and HDO in comet Lemmon. We present derived production rates and their time evolution. Relative molecular abundances will be discussed in the context of our taxonomic study of Oort-cloud comets [1,2,3]. Comet Lemmon appears intrinsically much more gaseous than comet PanSTARRS and relatively rich in volatiles. [1] Biver et al. (2002), Earth, Moon and Planets 90, 32 [2] Crovisier et al. (2009), Earth, Moon Planet 105, 267 [3] Biver et al. (2011), A&A 528, A142

  20. Modeling atmospheric transport of CO2 at High Resolution to estimate the potentialities of spaceborne observation to monitor anthropogenic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciais, P.; Chimot, J.; Klonecki, A.; Prunet, P.; Vinuessa, J.; Nussli, C.; Breon, F.

    2010-12-01

    There is a crucial and urgent need to quantify and monitor anthropogenic fossil fuel emissions of CO2. Spaceborne measurements, such as those from GOSAT or the forthcoming OCO-2, or other space missions in preparation, could provide the necessary information, in particular over regions with few in-situ measurements of atmospheric concentration are too scarce. Contrarily to biogenic flux, anthropogenic emissions are highly heterogeneous in space with typical values that vary by several orders of magnitudes. A proper analysis of the impact of anthropogenic emissions on the atmospheric concentration of CO2 therefore requires a high spatial resolution, typically of a few km. Simulations of the transport of fossil CO2 plumes were performed with a resolution of 1 km over the main industrialized regions of France, and using other models of lower resolution to account for the influence of distant sources advected into the area of interest. The results clearly show the plumes from intense yet localized sources, such as urban areas or power plants, and how their structures vary with the meteorology (wind speed and direction). They also show that the plume from distant sources, such as the large emission from Northern Europe, may sometime mask the local plume, even from large cities like Paris or Lyon. These atmospheric transport simulations are then sampled according to cloud cover, spaceborne instrument sampling and typical errors, to analyze the information content of the remote sensing data and how they can improve the current knowledge on anthropogenic emissions.

  1. CEH-GEAR: 1 km resolution daily and monthly areal rainfall estimates for the UK for hydrological use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, V. D. J.; Tanguy, M.; Prosdocimi, I.; Terry, J. A.; Hitt, O.; Cole, S. J.; Fry, M.; Morris, D. G.; Dixon, H.

    2015-01-01

    The Centre for Ecology & Hydrology - Gridded Estimates of Areal Rainfall (CEH-GEAR) dataset was developed to provide reliable 1 km gridded estimates of daily and monthly rainfall for Great Britain (GB) and Northern Ireland (NI) (together with approximately 3500 km2 of catchment in the Republic of Ireland) from 1890 onwards. The dataset was primarily required to support hydrological modelling. The rainfall estimates are derived from the Met Office collated historical weather observations for the UK which include a national database of raingauge observations. The natural neighbour interpolation methodology, including a normalisation step based on average annual rainfall, was used to generate the daily and monthly rainfall grids. To derive the monthly estimates, rainfall totals from monthly and daily (when complete month available) read raingauges were used in order to obtain maximum information from the raingauge network. The daily grids were adjusted so that the monthly grids are fully consistent with the daily grids. The CEH-GEAR dataset was developed according to the guidance provided by the British Standards Institution. The CEH-GEAR dataset contains 1 km grids of daily and monthly rainfall estimates for GB and NI for the period 1890-2012. For each day and month, CEH-GEAR includes a secondary grid of distance to the nearest operational raingauge. This may be used as an indicator of the quality of the estimates. When this distance is greater than 100 km, the estimates are not calculated due to high uncertainty. CEH-GEAR is available free of charge for commercial and non-commercial use subject to licensing terms and conditions. doi:10.5285/5dc179dc-f692-49ba-9326-a6893a503f6e

  2. CEH-GEAR: 1 km resolution daily and monthly areal rainfall estimates for the UK for hydrological and other applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, V. D. J.; Tanguy, M.; Prosdocimi, I.; Terry, J. A.; Hitt, O.; Cole, S. J.; Fry, M.; Morris, D. G.; Dixon, H.

    2015-06-01

    The Centre for Ecology & Hydrology - Gridded Estimates of Areal Rainfall (CEH-GEAR) data set was developed to provide reliable 1 km gridded estimates of daily and monthly rainfall for Great Britain (GB) and Northern Ireland (NI) (together with approximately 3500 km2 of catchment in the Republic of Ireland) from 1890 onwards. The data set was primarily required to support hydrological modelling. The rainfall estimates are derived from the Met Office collated historical weather observations for the UK which include a national database of rain gauge observations. The natural neighbour interpolation methodology, including a normalisation step based on average annual rainfall (AAR), was used to generate the daily and monthly rainfall grids. To derive the monthly estimates, rainfall totals from monthly and daily (when complete month available) rain gauges were used in order to obtain maximum information from the rain gauge network. The daily grids were adjusted so that the monthly grids are fully consistent with the daily grids. The CEH-GEAR data set was developed according to the guidance provided by the British Standards Institution. The CEH-GEAR data set contains 1 km grids of daily and monthly rainfall estimates for GB and NI for the period 1890-2012. For each day and month, CEH-GEAR includes a secondary grid of distance to the nearest operational rain gauge. This may be used as an indicator of the quality of the estimates. When this distance is greater than 100 km, the estimates are not calculated due to high uncertainty. CEH-GEAR is available from doi:10.5285/5dc179dc-f692-49ba-9326-a6893a503f6e and is free of charge for commercial and non-commercial use subject to licensing terms and conditions.

  3. High-Resolution Satellite-Derived PM2.5 from Optimal Estimation and Geographically Weighted Regression over North America.

    PubMed

    van Donkelaar, Aaron; Martin, Randall V; Spurr, Robert J D; Burnett, Richard T

    2015-09-01

    We used a geographically weighted regression (GWR) statistical model to represent bias of fine particulate matter concentrations (PM2.5) derived from a 1 km optimal estimate (OE) aerosol optical depth (AOD) satellite retrieval that used AOD-to-PM2.5 relationships from a chemical transport model (CTM) for 2004-2008 over North America. This hybrid approach combined the geophysical understanding and global applicability intrinsic to the CTM relationships with the knowledge provided by observational constraints. Adjusting the OE PM2.5 estimates according to the GWR-predicted bias yielded significant improvement compared with unadjusted long-term mean values (R(2) = 0.82 versus R(2) = 0.62), even when a large fraction (70%) of sites were withheld for cross-validation (R(2) = 0.78) and developed seasonal skill (R(2) = 0.62-0.89). The effect of individual GWR predictors on OE PM2.5 estimates additionally provided insight into the sources of uncertainty for global satellite-derived PM2.5 estimates. These predictor-driven effects imply that local variability in surface elevation and urban emissions are important sources of uncertainty in geophysical calculations of the AOD-to-PM2.5 relationship used in satellite-derived PM2.5 estimates over North America, and potentially worldwide. PMID:26261937

  4. Estimating brain age using high-resolution pattern recognition: Younger brains in long-term meditation practitioners.

    PubMed

    Luders, Eileen; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Gaser, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Normal aging is known to be accompanied by loss of brain substance. The present study was designed to examine whether the practice of meditation is associated with a reduced brain age. Specific focus was directed at age fifty and beyond, as mid-life is a time when aging processes are known to become more prominent. We applied a recently developed machine learning algorithm trained to identify anatomical correlates of age in the brain translating those into one single score: the BrainAGE index (in years). Using this validated approach based on high-dimensional pattern recognition, we re-analyzed a large sample of 50 long-term meditators and 50 control subjects estimating and comparing their brain ages. We observed that, at age fifty, brains of meditators were estimated to be 7.5years younger than those of controls. In addition, we examined if the brain age estimates change with increasing age. While brain age estimates varied only little in controls, significant changes were detected in meditators: for every additional year over fifty, meditators' brains were estimated to be an additional 1month and 22days younger than their chronological age. Altogether, these findings seem to suggest that meditation is beneficial for brain preservation, effectively protecting against age-related atrophy with a consistently slower rate of brain aging throughout life. PMID:27079530

  5. High-Resolution Satellite-Derived PM2.5 from Optimal Estimation and Geographically Weighted Regression over North America.

    PubMed

    van Donkelaar, Aaron; Martin, Randall V; Spurr, Robert J D; Burnett, Richard T

    2015-09-01

    We used a geographically weighted regression (GWR) statistical model to represent bias of fine particulate matter concentrations (PM2.5) derived from a 1 km optimal estimate (OE) aerosol optical depth (AOD) satellite retrieval that used AOD-to-PM2.5 relationships from a chemical transport model (CTM) for 2004-2008 over North America. This hybrid approach combined the geophysical understanding and global applicability intrinsic to the CTM relationships with the knowledge provided by observational constraints. Adjusting the OE PM2.5 estimates according to the GWR-predicted bias yielded significant improvement compared with unadjusted long-term mean values (R(2) = 0.82 versus R(2) = 0.62), even when a large fraction (70%) of sites were withheld for cross-validation (R(2) = 0.78) and developed seasonal skill (R(2) = 0.62-0.89). The effect of individual GWR predictors on OE PM2.5 estimates additionally provided insight into the sources of uncertainty for global satellite-derived PM2.5 estimates. These predictor-driven effects imply that local variability in surface elevation and urban emissions are important sources of uncertainty in geophysical calculations of the AOD-to-PM2.5 relationship used in satellite-derived PM2.5 estimates over North America, and potentially worldwide.

  6. SACRA - global data sets of satellite-derived crop calendars for agricultural simulations: an estimation of a high-resolution crop calendar using satellite-sensed NDVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsuki, S.; Tanaka, K.

    2015-01-01

    To date, many studies have performed numerical estimations of food production and agricultural water demand to understand the present and future supply-demand relationship. A crop calendar (CC) is an essential input datum to estimate food production and agricultural water demand accurately with the numerical estimations. CC defines the date or month when farmers plant and harvest in cropland. This study aims to develop a new global data set of a satellite-derived crop calendar for agricultural simulations (SACRA) and reveal advantages and disadvantages of the satellite-derived CC compared to other global products. We estimate global CC at a spatial resolution of 5 min (≈10 km) using the satellite-sensed NDVI data, which corresponds well to vegetation growth and death on the land surface. We first demonstrate that SACRA shows similar spatial pattern in planting date compared to a census-based product. Moreover, SACRA reflects a variety of CC in the same administrative unit, since it uses high-resolution satellite data. However, a disadvantage is that the mixture of several crops in a grid is not considered in SACRA. We also address that the cultivation period of SACRA clearly corresponds to the time series of NDVI. Therefore, accuracy of SACRA depends on the accuracy of NDVI used for the CC estimation. Although SACRA shows different CC from a census-based product in some regions, multiple usages of the two products are useful to take into consideration the uncertainty of the CC. An advantage of SACRA compared to the census-based products is that SACRA provides not only planting/harvesting dates but also a peak date from the time series of NDVI data.

  7. High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Joseph M.; Herring, Mark; Norris, David D.

    1988-01-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS), related data system, orbit, and mission operations are described. The pushbroom instrument simultaneously images the terrestrial surface in 192 spectral bands from 0.4 to 2.5 microns. The swath width is 30 km and spatial resolution is 30 m. It is planned to be launched with the Earth Observing System aboard the Space Station Polar Platform in 1995. Array detectors allow concurrent integration of the signals at 192,000 detector elements.

  8. MeSiC: A Model-Based Method for Estimating 5 mC Levels at Single-CpG Resolution from MeDIP-seq

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yun; Yu, Fulong; Pang, Lin; Zhao, Hongying; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Guanxiong; Liu, Tingting; Zhang, Hongyi; Fan, Huihui; Zhang, Yan; Pang, Bo; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    As the fifth base in mammalian genome, 5-methylcytosine (5 mC) is essential for many biological processes including normal development and disease. Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (MeDIP-seq), which uses anti-5 mC antibodies to enrich for methylated fraction of the genome, is widely used to investigate methylome at a resolution of 100–500 bp. Considering the CpG density-dependent bias and limited resolution of MeDIP-seq, we developed a Random Forest Regression (RFR) model method, MeSiC, to estimate DNA methylation levels at single-base resolution. MeSiC integrated MeDIP-seq signals of CpG sites and their surrounding neighbors as well as genomic features to construct genomic element-dependent RFR models. In the H1 cell line, a high correlation was observed between MeSiC predictions and actual 5 mC levels. Meanwhile, MeSiC enabled to calibrate CpG density-dependent bias of MeDIP-seq signals. Importantly, we found that MeSiC models constructed in the H1 cell line could be used to accurately predict DNA methylation levels for other cell types. Comparisons with methylCRF and MEDIPS showed that MeSiC achieved comparable and even better performance. These demonstrate that MeSiC can provide accurate estimations of 5 mC levels at single-CpG resolution using MeDIP-seq data alone. PMID:26424089

  9. Fast and Accurate Phylogenetic Reconstruction from High-Resolution Whole-Genome Data and a Novel Robustness Estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu; Rajan, Vaibhav; Moret, Bernard M. E.

    The rapid accumulation of whole-genome data has renewed interest in the study of genomic rearrangements. Comparative genomics, evolutionary biology, and cancer research all require models and algorithms to elucidate the mechanisms, history, and consequences of these rearrangements. However, even simple models lead to NP-hard problems, particularly in the area of phylogenetic analysis. Current approaches are limited to small collections of genomes and low-resolution data (typically a few hundred syntenic blocks). Moreover, whereas phylogenetic analyses from sequence data are deemed incomplete unless bootstrapping scores (a measure of confidence) are given for each tree edge, no equivalent to bootstrapping exists for rearrangement-based phylogenetic analysis.

  10. High-resolution estimates of Nubia-Somalia plate motion since 20 Ma from reconstructions of the Southwest Indian Ridge, Red Sea, and Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Merkuryev, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We estimate Nubia-Somalia rotations at ~1-Myr intervals for the past 20 Myr from newly available, high-resolution reconstructions of the Southwest Indian Ridge and reconstructions of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. The former rotations are based on many more data, extend farther back in time, and have more temporal resolution than has previously been the case. Nubia-Somalia plate motion has remained remarkably steady since 5.2 Ma. For example, at the northern end of the East Africa rift, our Nubia-Somalia plate motion estimates at six different times between 0.78 Ma and 5.2 Ma agree to within 3% with the rift-normal component of motion that is extrapolated from the recently estimated Saria et al. (2014) GPS angular velocity. Over the past 10.6 Myr, the Nubia-Somalia rotations predict 42±4 km of rift-normal extension across the northern segment of the Main Ethiopian Rift. This agrees with approximate minimum and maximum estimates of 40 km and 53 km for post-10.6-Myr extension from seismological surveys of this narrow part of the plate boundary and is also close to 55-km and 48±3 km estimates from published and our own reconstructions of the Nubia-Arabia and Somalia-Arabia seafloorspreading histories for the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. Our new rotations exclude at high confidence level two previously published estimates of Nubia-Somalia motion based on inversions of Chron 5n.2 along the Southwest Indian Ridge, which predict rift-normal extensions of 13±14 km and 129±16 km across the Main Ethiopian Rift since 11 Ma. Constraints on Nubia-Somalia motion before ~15 Ma are weaker due to sparse coverage of pre-15-Myr magnetic reversals along the Nubia-Antarctic plate boundary, but appear to require motion before 15 Ma. Nubia-Somalia rotations that we estimate from a probabilistic analysis of geometric and age constraints from the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden are consistent with those determined from Southwest Indian Ridge data, particularly for the past 11 Myr. Nubia

  11. Millimetre observations of comets P/Brorsen-Metcalf (1989o) and Austin (1989c1) with the IRAM 30-m radio telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colom, P.; Despois, D.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.; Paubert, G.

    1990-01-01

    Millimeter observations with the IRAM 30 m telescope were conducted in comet P/Brorsen-Metcalf (1989o) on September 1989 and Austin (1989c1) on April and May 1990. The HCN J(1-0) and J(3-2) lines were detected in both comets. The HCN production rate relative to water in P/Brorsen-Metcalf is comparable to that previously measured in comet P/Halley, while that inferred in comet Austin might be smaller by a factor of two. The H2CO(3 sub 12 - 2 sub 11) transition, marginally observed in comet P/Brorsen-Metcalf, was firmly detected in May 1990 in comet Austin. Observations performed at offset positions suggest that the source of H2CO might be distributed. The H2CO abundance is on the order of 0.5 percent that of water for both comets, assuming a scalelength of 10(exp 4) km at 1 AU from the Sun for the distributed source. During the May observing period of comet Austin, two new species were detected for the first time in a comet: hydrogen sulfide (H2S) through its 1(sub 10) - 1(sub 01) ortho line at 169 GHz, and methanol (CH3OH) through J(3-2) delta K = 0 transitions at 145 GHz. Preliminary estimates of their abundances are 1.5 x 10(exp -3) for H2S and 8 x 10(exp -3) for CH3OH.

  12. Relationship Among High Rainfall Rates, Atmospheric Moisture, and Temperature Based on High-Resolution Radar-Based Precipitation Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, S. E.; Nelson, B. R.; Kunkel, K.; Prat, O. P.; Karl, T. R.

    2014-12-01

    Global warming is expected to increase maximum rainfall rates in many areas. A primary factor for this expectation is the large increase in atmospheric water vapor content expected with global warming, a simple application of the Clausius-Clapeyron (C-C) relationship. However, the spatial variations of changes will also be modulated by changes in frequency, intensity and location of the storms that produce heavy rainfall. In this study, we explore one dimension of this complex issue, specifically the observational evidence for robust relationships among atmospheric temperature, total precipitable water, and the most extreme magnitudes of surface rainfall rates. We investigate the extent to which a C-C relationship is followed and whether this is dependent on rainstorm duration. This information is crucial to understanding how to incorporate climate change considerations into extreme rainfall design values. Using high-frequency rainfall measurements from both in-situ networks such as the US Climate Reference Network (USCRN) and radar estimates such as the newly-developed National Mosaic and Multisensor Quantitative Precipitation Estimate (NMQ/Q2), rainfall rates and accumulations are compared to precipitable water estimates obtained from both radiosonde data and hourly gridded model analysis. A variety of durations are explored to determine if rising temperature, and thus rising precipitable water availability, corresponds to an increase in the most extreme values of short-term rainfall intensity, longer-term rainfall accumulation, both, or neither.

  13. Estimating biomass, yield, evaprotranspiration and carbon fluxes for winter wheat by using high resolution remote sensing data combined with a crop model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veloso, A.; Ceschia, E.; Demarez, V.

    2013-12-01

    The use of crop models allows simulating plant development, growth, yield, CO2 and water fluxes under different environmental and management conditions. When combined with high spatial and temporal resolution remote sensing data, these models provide new perspectives for crop monitoring at regional scale. Besides, monitoring spatial and temporal variation in water budget and amount of carbon fixed by these crops is an ultimate goal of earth climate change studies. We propose here an approach to estimate time courses of dry aboveground biomass (DAM), yield and evapotranspiration (ETR) for winter wheat by assimilating Green Area Index (GAI) data, obtained from satellite observations, into a simple crop model. This model is then coupled with a ';carbon flux module' for estimating the components of the carbon budget (gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration (Reco), ...). Among the several land surface biophysical variables accessible from satellite observations, the GAI is the one that has a key role in soil-plant-atmosphere interactions and in biomass accumulation process. Many methods have been developed to relate GAI to optical remote sensing signal. Here, seasonal dynamics of remotely sensed GAI were estimated by applying a method based on the inversion of a radiative transfer model using artificial neural networks. For this work, we employed a unique set of Formosat-2 and SPOT images acquired from 2006 to 2011 in southwest France. The modelling approach is based on the Simple Algorithm for Yield and Evapotranspiration estimate (SAFYE) model, which couples the FAO-56 model with an agro-meteorological model, based on Monteith's light-use efficiency theory. The SAFYE model is a daily time step crop model that simulates time series of GAI, biomass (NPP), grain yield and ETR. The carbon flux module simulates GPP, the autotrophic respiration (Ra) that is defined as the sum of plant growth and maintenance respiration and the heterotrophic respiration (Rh

  14. 20 and 30 m telescope designs with potential for subsequent incorporation into a track-mounted pair (20/20 or 30/30).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, James Roger P.; Burge, James H.; Codona, Johanan L.; Davison, Warren B.; Martin, Buddy

    2003-01-01

    Any future giant ground-based telescope must, at a minimum, provide foci for seeing-limited imaging over a wide field and for diffraction-limited imaging over ~1 arcminute fields corrected by adaptive optics (AO). While this is possible with a number of design concepts, our choices are constrained if we anticipate wanting to later add a second telescope for imaging with still higher resolution, and very high contrast imaging for exoplanet studies. This paper explores designs that allow for such future development. Higher resolution imaging by interferometric combination of the AO-corrected fields of two telescopes is possible without loss of point-source sensitivity or field of view, as long as the baseline can be held perpendicular to the source and can be varied in length. This requirement is made practical even for very large telescopes, provided both can move continuously on a circular track. The 20/20 telescope illustrates this concept. Telescopes so mounted can additionally be operated as Bracewell nulling interferometers with low thermal background, making possible the thermal detection of planets that would have been unresolvable by a sin-gle 20 m aperture. In practice, limits set by funding and engineering experience will likely require a single 20 or 30 m telescope be built first. This would be on a conventional alt-az mount, but it should be at a site with enough room for later addition of a companion and track. In anticipation of future motion it should be compact and stiff, with a fast primary focal ratio. We envisage the use of large, highly aspheric, off-axis segments, manufactured using the figuring methods for strong aspherics already proven for 8 m class primaries. A compact giant telescope built under these guidelines should be able to perform well on its own for a broad range of astronomical observations, with good resistance to wind buffeting and simple alignment and control of its few, large segments. We compare here configurations with

  15. Examination of high resolution rainfall products and satellite greenness indices for estimating patch and landscape forage biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angerer, Jay Peter

    Assessment of vegetation productivity on rangelands is needed to assist in timely decision making with regard to management of the livestock enterprise as well as to protect the natural resource. Characterization of the vegetation resource over large landscapes can be time consuming, expensive and almost impossible to do on a near real-time basis. The overarching goal of this study was to examine available technologies for implementing near real-time systems to monitor forage biomass available to livestock on a given landscape. The primary objectives were to examine the ability of the Climate Prediction Center Morphing Product (CMORPH) and Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) rainfall products to detect and estimate rainfall at semi-arid sites in West Texas, to verify the ability of a simulation model (PHYGROW) to predict herbaceous biomass at selected sites (patches) in a semi-arid landscape using NEXRAD rainfall, and to examine the feasibility of using cokriging for integrating simulation model output and satellite greenness imagery (NDVI) for producing landscape maps of forage biomass in Mongolia's Gobi region. The comparison of the NEXRAD and CMORPH rainfall products to gage collected rainfall revealed that NEXRAD outperformed the CMORPH rainfall with lower estimation bias, lower variability, and higher estimation efficiency. When NEXRAD was used as a driving variable in PHYGROW simulations that were calibrated using gage measured rainfall, model performance for estimating forage biomass was generally poor when compared to biomass measurements at the sites. However, when model simulations were calibrated using NEXRAD rainfall, performance in estimating biomass was substantially better. A suggested reason for the improved performance was that calibration with NEXRAD adjusted the model for the general over or underestimation of rainfall by the NEXRAD product. In the Gobi region of Mongolia, the PHYGROW model performed well in predicting forage biomass except

  16. The Impact of the Processing Batch Length in GNSS Data Analysis on the Estimates of Earth Rotation Parameters with Daily and Subdaily Time Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meindl, M.; Dach, R.; Thaller, D.; Schaer, S.; Beutler, G.; Jaeggi, A.

    2012-04-01

    Microwave observations from GNSS are traditionally analyzed in the post-processing mode using (solar) daily data batches. The 24-hour session length differs by only about four minutes from two revolution periods of a GPS satellite (corresponding to one sidereal day). The deep 2:1 resonance of the GPS revolution period with the length of the sidereal day may cause systematic effects in parameter estimates and spurious periodic signals in the resulting parameter time series. The selection of other (than daily) session lengths may help to identify systematic effects and to study their impact on GNSS-derived products. Such investigations are of great interest in a combined multi-GNSS analysis because of substantial differences in the satellites' revolution periods. Three years (2008-2010) of data from a global network of about 90 combined GPS/GLONASS receivers have been analyzed. Four different session lengths were used, namely the traditional 24 hours (UTC), two revolutions of a GLONASS satellite (16/17 sidereal days), two revolutions of a GPS satellite (one sidereal day), and a session length of 18/17 sidereal days, which does not correspond to either two GPS or two GLONASS revolution periods. GPS-only, GLONASS-only, and GPS/GLONASS-combined solution are established for each of the session lengths. Special care was taken to keep the GPS and GLONASS solutions fully consistent and comparable in particular where the station selection is concerned. We generate ERPs with a subdaily time resolution of about 1.4 hours (1/17 sidereal day). Using the session-specific normal equation systems (NEQs) containing the Earth rotation parameters with the 1.4 hours time resolution we derive in addition ERPs with a (sidereal) daily resolution. Note that this step requires the combination of the daily NEQs and a subsequent re-binning of 17 consecutive ERPs with 1/17 day time resolution into one (sidereal) daily parameter. These tests will reveal the impact of the session length on ERP

  17. A New Hybrid Spatio-temporal Model for Estimating Daily Multi-year PM2.5 Concentrations Across Northeastern USA Using High Resolution Aerosol Optical Depth Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloog, Itai; Chudnovsky, Alexandra A.; Just, Allan C.; Nordio, Francesco; Koutrakis, Petros; Coull, Brent A.; Lyapustin, Alexei; Wang, Yujie; Schwartz, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The use of satellite-based aerosol optical depth (AOD) to estimate fine particulate matter PM(sub 2.5) for epidemiology studies has increased substantially over the past few years. These recent studies often report moderate predictive power, which can generate downward bias in effect estimates. In addition, AOD measurements have only moderate spatial resolution, and have substantial missing data. We make use of recent advances in MODIS satellite data processing algorithms (Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC), which allow us to use 1 km (versus currently available 10 km) resolution AOD data.We developed and cross validated models to predict daily PM(sub 2.5) at a 1X 1 km resolution across the northeastern USA (New England, New York and New Jersey) for the years 2003-2011, allowing us to better differentiate daily and long term exposure between urban, suburban, and rural areas. Additionally, we developed an approach that allows us to generate daily high-resolution 200 m localized predictions representing deviations from the area 1 X 1 km grid predictions. We used mixed models regressing PM(sub 2.5) measurements against day-specific random intercepts, and fixed and random AOD and temperature slopes. We then use generalized additive mixed models with spatial smoothing to generate grid cell predictions when AOD was missing. Finally, to get 200 m localized predictions, we regressed the residuals from the final model for each monitor against the local spatial and temporal variables at each monitoring site. Our model performance was excellent (mean out-of-sample R(sup 2) = 0.88). The spatial and temporal components of the out-of-sample results also presented very good fits to the withheld data (R(sup 2) = 0.87, R(sup)2 = 0.87). In addition, our results revealed very little bias in the predicted concentrations (Slope of predictions versus withheld observations = 0.99). Our daily model results show high predictive accuracy at high spatial resolutions

  18. 10-year spatial and temporal trends of PM2.5 concentrations in the southeastern US estimated using high-resolution satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Waller, L. A.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Y.

    2014-06-01

    Long-term PM2.5 exposure has been associated with various adverse health outcomes. However, most ground monitors are located in urban areas, leading to a potentially biased representation of true regional PM2.5 levels. To facilitate epidemiological studies, accurate estimates of the spatiotemporally continuous distribution of PM2.5 concentrations are important. Satellite-retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been increasingly used for PM2.5 concentration estimation due to its comprehensive spatial coverage. Nevertheless, previous studies indicated that an inherent disadvantage of many AOD products is their coarse spatial resolution. For instance, the available spatial resolutions of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) AOD products are 10 and 17.6 km, respectively. In this paper, a new AOD product with 1 km spatial resolution retrieved by the multi-angle implementation of atmospheric correction (MAIAC) algorithm based on MODIS measurements was used. A two-stage model was developed to account for both spatial and temporal variability in the PM2.5-AOD relationship by incorporating the MAIAC AOD, meteorological fields, and land use variables as predictors. Our study area is in the southeastern US centered at the Atlanta metro area, and data from 2001 to 2010 were collected from various sources. The model was fitted annually, and we obtained model fitting R2 ranging from 0.71 to 0.85, mean prediction error (MPE) from 1.73 to 2.50 μg m-3, and root mean squared prediction error (RMSPE) from 2.75 to 4.10 μg m-3. In addition, we found cross-validation R2 ranging from 0.62 to 0.78, MPE from 2.00 to 3.01 μg m-3, and RMSPE from 3.12 to 5.00 μg m-3, indicating a good agreement between the estimated and observed values. Spatial trends showed that high PM2.5 levels occurred in urban areas and along major highways, while low concentrations appeared in rural or mountainous areas. Our time

  19. 10 Yr Spatial and Temporal Trends of PM2.5 Concentrations in the Southeastern US Estimated Using High-resolution Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, X.; Waller, L. A.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term PM2.5 exposure has been reported to be associated with various adverse health outcomes. However, most ground monitors are located in urban areas, leading to a potentially biased representation of the true regional PM2.5 levels. To facilitate epidemiological studies, accurate estimates of spatiotemporally continuous distribution of PM2.5 concentrations are essential. Satellite-retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been widely used for PM2.5 concentration estimation due to its comprehensive spatial coverage. Nevertheless, an inherent disadvantage of current AOD products is their coarse spatial resolutions. For instance, the spatial resolutions of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) are 10 km and 17.6 km, respectively. In this paper, a new AOD product with 1 km spatial resolution retrieved by the multi-angle implementation of atmospheric correction (MAIAC) algorithm was used. A two-stage model was developed to account for both spatial and temporal variability in the PM2.5-AOD relationship by incorporating the MAIAC AOD, meteorological fields, and land use variables as predictors. Our study area is in the southeastern US, centered at the Atlanta Metro area, and data from 2001 to 2010 were collected from various sources. The model was fitted for each year individually, and we obtained model fitting R2 ranging from 0.71 to 0.85, MPE from 1.73 to 2.50 g m3, and RMSPE from 2.75 to 4.10 g m3. In addition, we found cross validation R2 ranging from 0.62 to 0.78, MPE from 2.00 to 3.01 g m3, and RMSPE from 3.12 to 5.00 g m3, indicating a good agreement between the estimated and observed values. Spatial trends show that high PM2.5 levels occurred in urban areas and along major highways, while low concentrations appeared in rural or mountainous areas. A time series analysis was conducted to examine temporal trends of PM2.5 concentrations in the study area from 2001 to 2010. The results showed

  20. Implications of uncertainty on regional CO2 mitigation policies for the U.S. onroad sector based on a high-resolution emissions estimate

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, D.; Gurney, Kevin R.; Geethakumar, Sarath; Chandrasekaran, Vandhana; Zhou, Yuyu; Razlivanov, I.

    2013-04-01

    In this study we present onroad fossil fuel CO2 emissions estimated by the Vulcan Project, an effort quantifying fossil fuel CO2 emissions for the U.S. in high spatial and temporal resolution. This high-resolution data, aggregated at the state-level and classified in broad road and vehicle type categories, is compared to a commonly used national-average approach. We find that the use of national averages incurs state-level biases for road groupings that are almost twice as large as for vehicle groupings. The uncertainty for all groups exceeds the bias, and both quantities are positively correlated with total state emissions. States with the largest emissions totals are typically similar to one another in terms of emissions fraction distribution across road and vehicle groups, while smaller-emitting states have a wider range of variation in all groups. Errors in reduction estimates as large as ±60% corresponding to ±0.2 MtC are found for a national-average emissions mitigation strategy focused on a 10% emissions reduction from a single vehicle class, such as passenger gas vehicles or heavy diesel trucks. Recommendations are made for reducing CO2 emissions uncertainty by addressing its main drivers: VMT and fuel efficiency uncertainty.

  1. Sulphur-bearing molecules in diffuse molecular clouds: new results from SOFIA/GREAT and the IRAM 30 m telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, D. A.; Godard, B.; Gerin, M.; Pineau des Forêts, G.; Bernier, C.; Falgarone, E.; Graf, U. U.; Güsten, R.; Herbst, E.; Lesaffre, P.; Schilke, P.; Sonnentrucker, P.; Wiesemeyer, H.

    2015-05-01

    We have observed five sulphur-bearing molecules in foreground diffuse molecular clouds lying along the sight-lines to five bright continuum sources. We have used the GREAT instrument on SOFIA to observe the SH 1383 GHz 2Π3/2 J = 5/2 ← 3/2 lambda doublet toward the star-forming regions W31C, G29.96-0.02, G34.3+0.1, W49N and W51, detecting foreground absorption towards all five sources; and the EMIR receivers on the IRAM 30 m telescope at Pico Veleta to detect the H2S 110-101 (169 GHz), CS J = 2-1 (98 GHz) and SO 32-21 (99 GHz) transitions. Upper limits on the H3S+10-00 (293 GHz) transition were also obtained at the IRAM 30 m. In nine foreground absorption components detected towards these sources, the inferred column densities of the four detected molecules showed relatively constant ratios, with N(SH) /N(H2S) in the range 1.1-3.0, N(CS) /N(H2S) in the range 0.32-0.61, and N(SO) /N(H2S) in the range 0.08-0.30. The column densities of the sulphur-bearing molecules are very well correlated amongst themselves, moderately well correlated with CH (a surrogate tracer for H2), and poorly correlated with atomic hydrogen. The observed SH/H2 ratios - in the range 5 to 26 × 10-9 - indicate that SH (and other sulphur-bearing molecules) account for ≪ 1% of the gas-phase sulphur nuclei. The observed abundances of sulphur-bearing molecules, however, greatly exceed those predicted by standard models of cold diffuse molecular clouds, providing further evidence for the enhancement of endothermic reaction rates by elevated temperatures or ion-neutral drift. We have considered the observed abundance ratios in the context of shock and turbulent dissipation region (TDR) models. Using the TDR model, we find that the turbulent energy available at large scale in the diffuse ISM is sufficient to explain the observed column densities of SH and CS. Standard shock and TDR models, however, fail to reproduce the column densities of H2S and SO by a factor of about 10; more elaborate shock

  2. Performance evaluation of high-resolution rainfall estimation by X-band dual-polarization radar for flash flood applications in mountainous basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostou, Marios N.; Kalogiros, John; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Tarolli, Michele; Papadopoulos, Anastasios; Borga, Marco

    2010-11-01

    SummaryDifferent relations between surface rainfall rate, R, and high-resolution polarimetric X-band radar observations were evaluated using a dense network of rain gauge measurements over complex terrain in Central Italian Alps. The specific differential phase shift, KDP, rainfall algorithm (RKDP) although associated with low systematic error it exhibits low sensitivity to the spatial variability of rainfall as compared to the standard algorithm (RSTD) that is based on the reflectivity-to-rainfall (Z-R) relationship. On the other hand, the dependence of the reflectivity measurement on the absolute radar calibration and the rain-path radar signal attenuation introduces significant systematic error on the RSTD rainfall estimates. The study shows that adjusting the Z-R relationship for mean-field bias determined using the RKDP estimates as reference is the best technique for acquiring unbiased radar-rainfall estimates at fine space-time scales. Overall, the bias of the RKDP-adjusted Z-R estimator is shown to be lower than 10% for both storm cases, while the relative root-mean-square error is shown to range from 0.6 (convective storm) to 0.9 (stratiform storm). A vertical rainfall profile correction (VPR) technique is tested in this study for the stratiform storm case. The method is based on a newly developed VPR algorithm that uses the X-band polarimetric information to identify the properties of the melting layer and devices a precipitation profile that varies for each radar volume scan to correct the radar-rainfall estimates. Overall, when accounting for the VPR effect there is up to 70% reduction in the systematic error of the 3° elevation estimates, while the reduction in terms of relative root-mean-square error is limited to within 10%.

  3. Estimation of PSD Shifts for High-Resolution Metrology of Thickness Micro-Changes with Possible Applications in Vessel Walls and Biological Membrane Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Antonio; Bazán, Ivonne; Negreira, Carlos; Brum, Javier; Gómez, Tomás; Calás, Héctor; Ruiz, Abelardo; de la Rosa, José Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Achieving accurate measurements of inflammation levels in tissues or thickness changes in biological membranes (e.g., amniotic sac, parietal pleura) and thin biological walls (e.g., blood vessels) from outside the human body, is a promising research line in the medical area. It would provide a technical basis to study the options for early diagnosis of some serious diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis or tuberculosis. Nevertheless, achieving the aim of non-invasive measurement of those scarcely-accessible parameters on patient internal tissues, currently presents many difficulties. The use of high-frequency ultrasonic transducer systems appears to offer a possible solution. Previous studies using conventional ultrasonic imaging have shown this, but the spatial resolution was not sufficient so as to permit a thickness evaluation with clinical significance, which requires an accuracy of a few microns. In this paper a broadband ultrasonic technique, that was recently developed by the authors to address other non-invasive medical detection problems (by integrating a piezoelectric transducer into a spectral measuring system), is extended to our new objective; the aim is its application to the thickness measurement of sub-millimeter membranes or layers made of materials similar to some biological tissues (phantoms). The modeling and design rules of such a transducer system are described, and various methods of estimating overtones location in the power spectral density (PSD) are quantitatively assessed with transducer signals acquired using piezoelectric systems and also generated from a multi-echo model. Their effects on the potential resolution of the proposed thickness measuring tool, and their capability to provide accuracies around the micron are studied in detail. Comparisons are made with typical tools for extracting spatial parameters in laminar samples from echo-waveforms acquired with ultrasonic transducers. Results of this advanced measurement

  4. Shear wave velocity for the upper 30 m: Combining a 3D voxel model and seismic CPTS for the Groningen gas field, the Netherlands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dambrink, Roula; Gunnink, Jan; Stafleu, Jan; de Lange, Ger; Kruiver, Pauline

    2016-04-01

    The Groningen gas field in the Netherlands is one of the largest gas fields of Europe and has been in production since the 1960's. Due to the progressive depletion of the reservoir, induced seismic activity has increased in recent years. In 2012, an earthquake of magnitude 3.6 initiated further research in prediction and management of risks related to man-induced earthquakes. Last year the government decided to reduce the gas extraction for this reason. One of the topics of concern is the large difference in earthquake-related damage to buildings which, in addition to the distance to the epicenter, appears to be also related to the composition of the shallow subsurface. To improve the spatial distribution of Shear Wave Velocities (Vs) in the shallow subsurface, used for hazard prediction, the Geological Survey of the Netherlands and Deltares constructed a Vs30 map of the upper 30 m of the gas field. In this map a high-resolution geological model (GeoTOP) is combined with seismic cone penetration tests (SCPT) from the area. The GeoTOP model is a 3D voxel model of the upper 50 m, in which each voxel (100x100x0.5 m) is attributed with lithostratigraphy and the most likely lithological class (peat, clay, fine sand, etc.). To obtain statistical distributions (with mean and standard deviation) of Vs for each combination of lithostratigraphical unit and lithoclass, 60 SCPTs were analyzed. In this way, it was possible to assign a specific Vs to each voxel in the model. For each voxel in the stack of voxels that covers the upper 30 m (i.e. 60 voxels), a Vs value was randomly drawn from the statistical distribution of the lithostratigraphical - lithoclass combination it belongs to. The Vs30 for each voxelstack is then calculated using the harmonic mean of the Vs of the 60 voxels. By repeating this procedure 100 times, an (average) Vs30 map and the uncertainty in Vs30 has been constructed. Using the procedure described above we were able to delineate zones with distinct Vs30

  5. High-resolution estimates of Nubia-Somalia plate motion since 20 Ma from reconstructions of the Southwest Indian Ridge, Red Sea, and Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Merkouriev, S.

    2016-07-01

    Large gaps and inconsistencies remain in published estimates of Nubia-Somalia plate motion based on reconstructions of seafloor spreading data around Africa. Herein, we use newly available reconstructions of the Southwest Indian Ridge at ˜1-Myr intervals since 20 Ma to estimate Nubia-Somalia plate motion farther back in time than previously achieved and with an unprecedented degree of temporal resolution. At the northern end of the East African rift, our new estimates of Nubia-Somalia motion for six times from 0.78 Ma to 5.2 Ma differ by only 2% from the rift-normal component of motion that is extrapolated from a recently estimated GPS angular velocity. The rate of rift-normal extension thus appears to have remained steady since at least 5.2 Ma. Our new rotations indicate that the two plates have moved relative to each other since at least 16 Ma and possibly longer. Motion has either been steady since at least 16 Ma or accelerated modestly between 6 and 5.2 Ma. Our Nubia-Somalia rotations predict 42.5±3.8 km of rift-normal extension since 10.6 Ma across the well-studied, northern segment of the Main Ethiopian Rift, consistent with 40-50 km estimates for extension since 10.6 Myr based on seismological surveys of this narrow part of the plate boundary. Nubia-Somalia rotations are also derived by combining newly estimated Somalia-Arabia rotations that reconstruct the post-20-Ma opening of the Gulf of Aden with Nubia-Arabia rotations estimated via a probabilistic analysis of plausible opening scenarios for the Red Sea. These rotations predict Nubia-Somalia motion since 5.2 Myr that is consistent with that determined from Southwest Indian Ridge data and also predict 40±3 km of rift-normal extension since 10.6 Ma across the Main Ethiopian Rift, consistent with our 42.5±3.8 km Southwest Indian Ridge estimate. Our new rotations exclude at high confidence level previous estimates of 12±13 km and 123±14 km for rift-normal extensions across the Main Ethiopian Rift since

  6. High-resolution estimates of Nubia-Somalia plate motion since 20 Ma from reconstructions of the Southwest Indian Ridge, Red Sea and Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Merkouriev, S.

    2016-10-01

    Large gaps and inconsistencies remain in published estimates of Nubia-Somalia plate motion based on reconstructions of seafloor spreading data around Africa. Herein, we use newly available reconstructions of the Southwest Indian Ridge at ˜1-Myr intervals since 20 Ma to estimate Nubia-Somalia plate motion farther back in time than previously achieved and with an unprecedented degree of temporal resolution. At the northern end of the East African rift, our new estimates of Nubia-Somalia motion for six times from 0.78 Ma to 5.2 Ma differ by only 2 per cent from the rift-normal component of motion that is extrapolated from a recently estimated GPS angular velocity. The rate of rift-normal extension thus appears to have remained steady since at least 5.2 Ma. Our new rotations indicate that the two plates have moved relative to each other since at least 16 Ma and possibly longer. Motion has either been steady since at least 16 Ma or accelerated modestly between 6 and 5.2 Ma. Our Nubia-Somalia rotations predict 42.5 ± 3.8 km of rift-normal extension since 10.6 Ma across the well-studied, northern segment of the Main Ethiopian Rift, consistent with 40-50 km estimates for extension since 10.6 Myr based on seismological surveys of this narrow part of the plate boundary. Nubia-Somalia rotations are also derived by combining newly estimated Somalia-Arabia rotations that reconstruct the post-20-Ma opening of the Gulf of Aden with Nubia-Arabia rotations estimated via a probabilistic analysis of plausible opening scenarios for the Red Sea. These rotations predict Nubia-Somalia motion since 5.2 Myr that is consistent with that determined from Southwest Indian Ridge data and also predict 40 ± 3 km of rift-normal extension since 10.6 Ma across the Main Ethiopian Rift, consistent with our 42.5 ± 3.8 km Southwest Indian Ridge estimate. Our new rotations exclude at high confidence level previous estimates of 12 ± 13 and 123 ± 14 km for rift-normal extensions across the Main

  7. Nano silver and nano zinc-oxide in surface waters - exposure estimation for Europe at high spatial and temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Egon; Johnson, Andrew C; Keller, Virginie D J; Williams, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Nano silver and nano zinc-oxide monthly concentrations in surface waters across Europe were modeled at ~6 x 9 km spatial resolution. Nano-particle loadings from households to rivers were simulated considering household connectivity to sewerage, sewage treatment efficiency, the spatial distribution of sewage treatment plants, and their associated populations. These loadings were used to model temporally varying nano-particle concentrations in rivers, lakes and wetlands by considering dilution, downstream transport, water evaporation, water abstraction, and nano-particle sedimentation. Temporal variability in concentrations caused by weather variation was simulated using monthly weather data for a representative 31-year period. Modeled concentrations represent current levels of nano-particle production.Two scenarios were modeled. In the most likely scenario, half the river stretches had long-term average concentrations exceeding 0.002 ng L(-1) nano silver and 1.5 ng L(-1) nano zinc oxide. In 10% of the river stretches, these concentrations exceeded 0.18 ng L(-1) and 150 ng L(-1), respectively. Predicted concentrations were usually highest in July. PMID:25463731

  8. Nano silver and nano zinc-oxide in surface waters - exposure estimation for Europe at high spatial and temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Egon; Johnson, Andrew C; Keller, Virginie D J; Williams, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Nano silver and nano zinc-oxide monthly concentrations in surface waters across Europe were modeled at ~6 x 9 km spatial resolution. Nano-particle loadings from households to rivers were simulated considering household connectivity to sewerage, sewage treatment efficiency, the spatial distribution of sewage treatment plants, and their associated populations. These loadings were used to model temporally varying nano-particle concentrations in rivers, lakes and wetlands by considering dilution, downstream transport, water evaporation, water abstraction, and nano-particle sedimentation. Temporal variability in concentrations caused by weather variation was simulated using monthly weather data for a representative 31-year period. Modeled concentrations represent current levels of nano-particle production.Two scenarios were modeled. In the most likely scenario, half the river stretches had long-term average concentrations exceeding 0.002 ng L(-1) nano silver and 1.5 ng L(-1) nano zinc oxide. In 10% of the river stretches, these concentrations exceeded 0.18 ng L(-1) and 150 ng L(-1), respectively. Predicted concentrations were usually highest in July.

  9. Evaluation of High-Resolution Precipitation Estimates from Satellites during July 2012 Beijing Flood Event Using Dense Rain Gauge Observations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng; Liu, Huijuan; You, Yalei; Mullens, Esther; Hu, Junjun; Yuan, Ye; Huang, Mengyu; He, Li; Luo, Yongming; Zeng, Xingji; Tang, Guoqiang; Hong, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Satellite-based precipitation estimates products, CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS, were evaluated with a dense rain gauge network over Beijing and adjacent regions for an extremely heavy precipitation event on July 21 2012. CMORPH and PEERSIANN-CSS misplaced the region of greatest rainfall accumulation, and failed to capture the spatial pattern of precipitation, evidenced by a low spatial correlation coefficient (CC). CMORPH overestimated the daily accumulated rainfall by 22.84% while PERSIANN-CCS underestimated by 72.75%. In the rainfall center, both CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS failed to capture the temporal variation of the rainfall, and underestimated rainfall amounts by 43.43% and 87.26%, respectively. Based on our results, caution should be exercised when using CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS as input for monitoring and forecasting floods in Beijing urban areas, and the potential for landslides in the mountainous zones west and north of Beijing. PMID:24691358

  10. An objective technique to estimate percentage of an ERTS-1 water boundary resolution element covered by water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erb, R. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An objective technique was developed to measure the surface area of water bodies. Nineteen water bodies in the Houston and Galveston, Texas area were selected as a basis for the technique development. The actual surface area of each body was determined from rectified and enlarged NASA aircraft photography. A clustering algorithm was used to produce classification maps of the region from ERTS-1 data. Certain classes were identified as being 100% water. Other classes were identified as being mixtures of water with land or vegetation. The number of picture elements falling on each water body and its boundary were counted. A linear regression analysis was performed to relate the total number of picture elements and boundary elements counted to the actual surface area. The standard error of the estimate was 6.7 acres. The absolute error was not a function of the actual surface area of the water body.

  11. Evaluation of high-resolution precipitation estimates from satellites during July 2012 Beijing flood event using dense rain gauge observations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Liu, Huijuan; You, Yalei; Mullens, Esther; Hu, Junjun; Yuan, Ye; Huang, Mengyu; He, Li; Luo, Yongming; Zeng, Xingji; Tang, Guoqiang; Hong, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Satellite-based precipitation estimates products, CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS, were evaluated with a dense rain gauge network over Beijing and adjacent regions for an extremely heavy precipitation event on July 21 2012. CMORPH and PEERSIANN-CSS misplaced the region of greatest rainfall accumulation, and failed to capture the spatial pattern of precipitation, evidenced by a low spatial correlation coefficient (CC). CMORPH overestimated the daily accumulated rainfall by 22.84% while PERSIANN-CCS underestimated by 72.75%. In the rainfall center, both CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS failed to capture the temporal variation of the rainfall, and underestimated rainfall amounts by 43.43% and 87.26%, respectively. Based on our results, caution should be exercised when using CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS as input for monitoring and forecasting floods in Beijing urban areas, and the potential for landslides in the mountainous zones west and north of Beijing.

  12. Evaluation of high-resolution precipitation estimates from satellites during July 2012 Beijing flood event using dense rain gauge observations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Liu, Huijuan; You, Yalei; Mullens, Esther; Hu, Junjun; Yuan, Ye; Huang, Mengyu; He, Li; Luo, Yongming; Zeng, Xingji; Tang, Guoqiang; Hong, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Satellite-based precipitation estimates products, CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS, were evaluated with a dense rain gauge network over Beijing and adjacent regions for an extremely heavy precipitation event on July 21 2012. CMORPH and PEERSIANN-CSS misplaced the region of greatest rainfall accumulation, and failed to capture the spatial pattern of precipitation, evidenced by a low spatial correlation coefficient (CC). CMORPH overestimated the daily accumulated rainfall by 22.84% while PERSIANN-CCS underestimated by 72.75%. In the rainfall center, both CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS failed to capture the temporal variation of the rainfall, and underestimated rainfall amounts by 43.43% and 87.26%, respectively. Based on our results, caution should be exercised when using CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS as input for monitoring and forecasting floods in Beijing urban areas, and the potential for landslides in the mountainous zones west and north of Beijing. PMID:24691358

  13. Constraints on Flow Dynamics within the Oceanic Asthenosphere from a High-Resolution Estimate of Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaherty, J. B.; Lin, P. Y.; Jin, G.; Collins, J. A.; Lizarralde, D.; Evans, R. L.; Hirth, G.; Mark, H. F.

    2015-12-01

    Convective flow in the mantle and the motions of tectonic plates produce deformation of the Earth's interior, and the rock fabric produced by this deformation can be discerned using anisotropy of seismic wavespeed. This deformation is particularly prevalent within the oceanic asthenosphere, including near seafloor-spreading centers as new plates are formed via corner flow, and within a weak asthenosphere that lubricates large-scale plate-driven flow and/or accommodates smaller-scale convection. Seismic models of oceanic upper mantle are conflicting regarding the relative importance of these deformation processes. Seafloor-spreading fabric is very strong just beneath the Moho at relatively local scales. At ocean-basin scales, the strongest fabric in the asthenosphere, and the relative importance of density-driven flow and plate-induced shear is ambiguous. Using Rayleigh waves recorded across the NoMelt ocean-bottom seismograph (OBS) array in the central Pacific, we provide a unique high-resolution constraint on seismic anisotropy within the oceanic lithosphere-asthenosphere system in the middle of a plate. Shear-velocity and conductivity profiles delineate a dry, high-velocity lid overlying a damp, weak asthenosphere. Azimuthal anisotropy is strongest within the lid, with fast direction coincident with seafloor spreading, consistent with Pn observations. Minimum azimuthal anisotropy occurs within the lowest-velocity (weakest) portion of the asthenosphere, and below which it increases to a secondary maximum. In no depth range does the fast direction correspond to apparent plate motion. The results suggest that the dominant deformation in the oceanic mantle occurs during corner flow at the ridge axis, and via pressure- and/or buoyancy-driven flow within the asthenosphere, possibly within a non-Newtonian low-viscosity channel. Shear associated with motion of the plate over the underlying asthenosphere, if present, is weak compared to these processes.

  14. Estimation of excess mortality due to long-term exposure to PM2.5 in Japan using a high-resolution model for present and future scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Daisuke; Ueda, Kayo; Ng, Chris Fook Sheng; Takami, Akinori; Ariga, Toshinori; Matsuhashi, Keisuke; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2016-09-01

    Particulate matter with a diameter of less than 2.5 μm, known as PM2.5, can affect human health, especially in elderly people. Because of the imminent aging of society in the near future in most developed countries, the human health impacts of PM2.5 must be evaluated. In this study, we used a global-to-regional atmospheric transport model to simulate PM2.5 in Japan with a high-resolution stretched grid system (∼10 km for the high-resolution model, HRM) for the present (the 2000) and the future (the 2030, as proposed by the Representative Concentrations Pathway 4.5, RCP4.5). We also used the same model with a low-resolution uniform grid system (∼100 km for the low-resolution model, LRM). These calculations were conducted by nudging meteorological fields obtained from an atmosphere-ocean coupled model and providing emission inventories used in the coupled model. After correcting for bias, we calculated the excess mortality due to long-term exposure to PM2.5 among the elderly (over 65 years old) based on different minimum PM2.5 concentration (MINPM) levels to account for uncertainty using the simulated PM2.5 distributions to express the health effect as a concentration-response function. As a result, we estimated the excess mortality for all of Japan to be 31,300 (95% confidence intervals: 20,700 to 42,600) people in 2000 and 28,600 (95% confidence intervals: 19,000 to 38,700) people in 2030 using the HRM with a MINPM of 5.8 μg/m3. In contrast, the LRM resulted in underestimates of approximately 30% (for PM2.5 concentrations in the 2000 and 2030), approximately 60% (excess mortality in the 2000) and approximately 90% (excess mortality in 2030) compared to the HRM results. We also found that the uncertainty in the MINPM value, especially for low PM2.5 concentrations in the future (2030) can cause large variability in the estimates, ranging from 0 (MINPM of 15 μg/m3 in both HRM and LRM) to 95,000 (MINPM of 0 μg/m3 in HRM) people.

  15. A high resolution estimate of the inorganic nitrogen flux from the Scheldt estuary to the coastal North Sea during a nitrogen-limited algal bloom, spring 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Regnier, P. |; Steefel, C.I.

    1999-05-01

    Massive short-term (4--8 wk) blooms of Phaeocystis have been observed in coastal North Sea waters in the spring for a number of years now. Researchers have shown that these algal blooms, which lead to eutrophication of the local water mass, are limited by the supply of inorganic nitrogen from the various bordering estuaries. The authors demonstrate using the case of a typical heavily polluted macrotidal estuary, the Scheldt in Belgium and the Netherlands, that the short duration of the algal blooms requires estuarine flux estimation methods with a high temporal resolution. They use the fully transient, multicomponent reactive transport model CONTRASTE to compute inorganic nitrogen fluxes through the mouth of the Scheldt estuary into the North Sea. The model simulations use a detailed dataset of upstream river discharges and solute concentrations along with tidal forcings for a 210 day period between December 1, 1994 and June 30, 1995. The temporally resolved estimate shows that widely used estuarine flux estimation methods which rely on a steady-state approximation underestimate the inorganic nitrogen loading available to sustain primary production in the North Sea during the period of the algal bloom by 100%.

  16. Instrument Performance of GISMO, a 2 Millimeter TES Bolometer Camera used at the IRAM 30 m Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staguhn, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    In November of 2007 we demonstrated a monolithic Backshort-Under-Grid (BUG) 8x16 array in the field using our 2 mm wavelength imager GISMO (Goddard IRAM Superconducting 2 Millimeter Observer) at the IRAM 30 m telescope in Spain for astronomical observations. The 2 mm spectral range provides a unique terrestrial window enabling ground-based observations of the earliest active dusty galaxies in the universe and thereby allowing a better constraint on the star formation rate in these objects. The optical design incorporates a 100 mm diameter silicon lens cooled to 4 K, which provides the required fast beam yielding 0.9 lambda/D pixels. With this spatial sampling, GISMO will be very efficient at detecting sources serendipitously in large sky surveys, while the capability for diffraction limited imaging is preserved. The camera provides significantly greater detection sensitivity and mapping speed at this wavelength than has previously been possible. The instrument will fill in the spectral energy distribution of high redshift galaxies at the Rayleigh-Jeans part of the dust emission spectrum, even at the highest redshifts. Here1 will we present early results from our observing run with the first fielded BUG bolometer array. We have developed key technologies to enable highly versatile, kilopixel, infrared through millimeter wavelength bolometer arrays. The Backshort-Under-Grid (BUG) array consists of three components: 1) a transition-edge-sensor (TES) based bolometer array with background-limited sensitivity and high filling factor, 2) a quarter-wave reflective backshort grid providing high optical efficiency, and 3) a superconducting bump-bonded large format Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) multiplexer readout. The array is described in more detail elsewhere (Allen et al., this conference). In November of 2007 we demonstrated a monolithic 8x 16 array with 2 mm-pitch detectors in the field using our 2 mm wavelength imager GISMO (Goddard IRAM

  17. Complex organic molecules in the interstellar medium: IRAM 30 m line survey of Sagittarius B2(N) and (M)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloche, A.; Müller, H. S. P.; Menten, K. M.; Schilke, P.; Comito, C.

    2013-11-01

    Context. The discovery of amino acids in meteorites fallen to Earth and the detection of glycine, the simplest of them, in samples returned from a comet to Earth strongly suggest that the chemistry of the interstellar medium is capable of producing such complex organic molecules and that they may be widespread in our Galaxy. Aims: Our goal is to investigate the degree of chemical complexity that can be reached in the interstellar medium, in particular in dense star-forming regions. Methods: We performed an unbiased, spectral line survey toward Sgr B2(N) and (M), two regions where high-mass stars are formed, with the IRAM 30 m telescope in the 3 mm atmospheric transmission window. Partial surveys at 2 and 1.3 mm were performed in parallel. The spectra were analyzed with a simple radiative transfer model that assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium but takes optical depth effects into account. Results: About 3675 and 945 spectral lines with a peak signal-to-noise ratio higher than 4 are detected at 3 mm toward Sgr B2(N) and (M), i.e. about 102 and 26 lines per GHz, respectively. This represents an increase by about a factor of two over previous surveys of Sgr B2. About 70% and 47% of the lines detected toward Sgr B2(N) and (M) are identified and assigned to 56 and 46 distinct molecules as well as to 66 and 54 less abundant isotopologues of these molecules, respectively. In addition, we report the detection of transitions from 59 and 24 catalog entries corresponding to vibrationally or torsionally excited states of some of these molecules, respectively, up to a vibration energy of 1400 cm-1 (2000 K). Excitation temperatures and column densities were derived for each species but should be used with caution. The rotation temperatures of the detected complex molecules typically range from ~50 to 200 K. Among the detected molecules, aminoacetonitrile, n-propyl cyanide, and ethyl formate were reported for the first time in space based on this survey, as were five rare

  18. Using High Resolution Tracer Data to Constrain Storage and Flux Estimates in a Spatially Distributed Rainfall-runoff Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Huijgevoort, M.; Tetzlaff, D.; Sutanudjaja, E.; Soulsby, C.

    2015-12-01

    Models simulating both stream flow and conservative tracers can provide a more realistic representation of flow paths, storage distributions and mixing processes that is advantageous for many predictions. Conceptual models with such integration have provided useful insights, but tend to be lumped and thus crude representations of catchment processes. Using tracers to aid spatially-distributed models has considerable potential to improve the conceptualisation of the dynamics of internal hydrological stores and fluxes. Here, we examine the strengths and weaknesses of a data-driven, spatially-distributed tracer-aided rainfall-runoff model. The model structure allows the assessment of the effect of landscape properties on the routing and mixing of water and tracers. The model was applied to an experimental site (3.2 km2) in the Scottish Highlands with a unique tracer data set; 4 years of daily isotope ratios in stream water and precipitation were available, as well as 2 years of weekly soil and ground water isotopes. The model evolved from an empirically-based, lumped tracer-aided model previously developed for the catchment. The best model runs were selected from Monte Carlo simulations based on a dual calibration criterion that included objective functions for both stream water isotopes and discharge at the outlet. Model results were also tested against observed spatially-distributed soil water isotope data. Model performance for both criteria was good and the model could reproduce the variable isotope signals in steeper hillslopes where storage was low and damped isotope responses in valley bottom cells with high storage. The model also allows us to estimate the age distributions of internal water fluxes and stream flow and has substantially improved spatial and temporal dynamics of process representation. This gives a more robust framework for projecting the effects of environmental change.

  19. Estimation of Basal Depth of Magnetic Sources from High Resolution Aeromagnetic Data of Middle Niger Basin, Nigeria using Adapted Centroid Technique for Fractal Distribution of Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwankwo, L.

    2015-12-01

    An estimate of depths to the bottom of magnetic sources in the Middle Niger Basin, north-central Nigeria has been made from a recently acquired high-resolution aeromagnetic data using adapted centroid technique for fractal distribution of sources. The result shows that the depth varies between 11.71 and 26.53 km. Deeper values are found in northern and central regions while values as low as 12 km were observed in the southern part. The shallower depths to the bottom of magnetic sources may be representing the thermal/petrological boundaries in the basin. This study is therefore crucial for quantitative understanding of the geo-processes and geothermal parameters in the study area.

  20. High resolution inventory of re-estimating ammonia emissions from agricultural fertilizer in China from 1978 to 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, P.; Lin, Y. H.; Liao, Y. J.; Zhao, C. X.; Wang, G. S.; Luan, S. J.

    2015-09-01

    The quantification of ammonia (NH3) emissions is essential to the more accurate quantification of atmospheric nitrogen deposition, improved air quality and the assessment of ammonia-related agricultural policy and climate mitigation strategies. The quantity, geographic distribution and historical trends of these emissions remain largely uncertain. In this paper, a new Chinese agricultural fertilizer NH3 (CAF_NH3) emissions inventory has been compiled that exhibits the following improvements: (1) a 1 km × 1 km gridded map on the county level was developed for 2008, (2) a combined bottom-up and top-down method was used for the local correction of emission factors (EFs) and parameters, (3) the spatial and temporal patterns of historical time trends for 1978-2008 were estimated and the uncertainties were quantified for the inventories, and (4) a sensitivity test was performed in which a province-level disaggregated map was compared with CAF_NH3 emissions for 2008. The total CAF_NH3 emissions for 2008 were 8.4 Tg NH3 yr-1 (a 6.6-9.8 Tg interquartile range). From 1978 to 2008, annual NH3 emissions fluctuated with three peaks (1987, 1996 and 2005), and total emissions increased from 3.2 to 8.4 Tg at an annual rate of 3.0 %. During the study period, the contribution of livestock manure spreading increased from 37.0 to 45.5 % because of changing fertilization practices and the rapid increase in egg, milk and meat consumption. The average contribution of synthetic fertilizer, which has a positive effect on crop yields, was approximately 38.3 % (minimum: 33.4 %; maximum: 42.7 %). With rapid urbanization causing a decline in the rural population, the contribution of the rural excrement sector varied widely between 20.3 and 8.5 %. The average contributions of cake fertilizer and straw returning were approximately 3.8 and 4.5 %, respectively, thus small and stable. Collectively, the CAF_NH3 emissions reflect the nation's agricultural policy to a certain extent. An effective

  1. Scatter estimation and removal of anti-scatter grid-line artifacts from anthropomorphic head phantom images taken with a high resolution image detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, R.; Jain, A.; Shankar, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2016-03-01

    In radiography, one of the best methods to eliminate image-degrading scatter radiation is the use of anti-scatter grids. However, with high-resolution dynamic imaging detectors, stationary anti-scatter grids can leave grid-line shadows and moiré patterns on the image, depending upon the line density of the grid and the sampling frequency of the x-ray detector. Such artifacts degrade the image quality and may mask small but important details such as small vessels and interventional device features. Appearance of these artifacts becomes increasingly severe as the detector spatial resolution is improved. We have previously demonstrated that, to remove these artifacts by dividing out a reference grid image, one must first subtract the residual scatter that penetrates the grid; however, for objects with anatomic structure, scatter varies throughout the FOV and a spatially differing amount of scatter must be subtracted. In this study, a standard stationary Smit-Rontgen X-ray grid (line density - 70 lines/cm, grid ratio - 13:1) was used with a high-resolution CMOS detector, the Dexela 1207 (pixel size - 75 micron) to image anthropomorphic head phantoms. For a 15 x 15cm FOV, scatter profiles of the anthropomorphic head phantoms were estimated then iteratively modified to minimize the structured noise due to the varying grid-line artifacts across the FOV. Images of the anthropomorphic head phantoms taken with the grid, before and after the corrections, were compared demonstrating almost total elimination of the artifact over the full FOV. Hence, with proper computational tools, antiscatter grid artifacts can be corrected, even during dynamic sequences.

  2. Fine Resolution Tree Height Estimation from Lidar Data and Its Application in SRTM DEM Correction across Forests of Sierra Nevada, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Guo, Q.; Ma, Q.; Li, W.

    2015-12-01

    Sierra Nevada (SN) is a mountain range located in the northeastern California, USA, covering an area of 63,100 km2. As one of the most diverse temperate conifer forests on the Earth, forests of SN serve a series of ecosystem functions and are valuable natural heritages for the region and even the country. The still existed gap of accurate fine-resolution tree height estimation has lagged ecological, hydrological and forestry studies within the region. Moreover, the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM), as one of the most frequently used land surface elevation product in the region, has been proved systematically higher than actual land surface in vegetated mountain areas due to the absorption and reflection effects of canopy on the SRTM radar signal. An accurate fine resolution tree height product across the region is urgently needed for developing models to correct SRTM DEM. In this study, we firstly developed a method to estimate SN tree height distribution (defined by Lorey's height) through the combination of airborne lidar data, spaceborne lidar data, optical imagery, climate surfaces, and field measurements. Over 5 470 km2airborne lidar data and 1 000 plot measurements were collected across the SN to address this mission. Our method involved three main steps: 1) estimate tree heights within airborne lidar footprints using step-wise regression; 2) link the airborne lidar derived tree height to spaceborne lidar data and compute tree heights at spaceborne lidar footprints; 3) extrapolate tree height estimation from spaceborne lidar footprints to the whole region using Random Forest. The obtained SN tree height product showed good correspondence with independent field plot measurements. The coefficient of determination is higher than 0.65, and the root-mean-square error is around 5 m. With the obtained tree height product, we further explored the possibility of correcting SRTM DEM. The results showed that the obtained tree height

  3. Estimation and modeling of forest attributes across large spatial scales using BiomeBGC, high-resolution imagery, LiDAR data, and inventory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golinkoff, Jordan Seth

    The accurate estimation of forest attributes at many different spatial scales is a critical problem. Forest landowners may be interested in estimating timber volume, forest biomass, and forest structure to determine their forest's condition and value. Counties and states may be interested to learn about their forests to develop sustainable management plans and policies related to forests, wildlife, and climate change. Countries and consortiums of countries need information about their forests to set global and national targets to deal with issues of climate change and deforestation as well as to set national targets and understand the state of their forest at a given point in time. This dissertation approaches these questions from two perspectives. The first perspective uses the process model Biome-BGC paired with inventory and remote sensing data to make inferences about a current forest state given known climate and site variables. Using a model of this type, future climate data can be used to make predictions about future forest states as well. An example of this work applied to a forest in northern California is presented. The second perspective of estimating forest attributes uses high resolution aerial imagery paired with light detection and ranging (LiDAR) remote sensing data to develop statistical estimates of forest structure. Two approaches within this perspective are presented: a pixel based approach and an object based approach. Both approaches can serve as the platform on which models (either empirical growth and yield models or process models) can be run to generate inferences about future forest state and current forest biogeochemical cycling.

  4. Changes in cell death of peripheral blood lymphocytes isolated from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia upon stimulation with 7 Hz, 30 mT pulsed electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Kaszuba-Zwoińska, Jolanta; Ćwiklińska, Magdalena; Balwierz, Walentyna; Chorobik, Paulina; Nowak, Bernadeta; Wójcik-Piotrowicz, Karolina; Ziomber, Agata; Malina-Novak, Kinga; Zaraska, Wiesław; Thor, Piotr J

    2015-03-01

    Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) influenced the viability of proliferating in vitro peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from Crohn's disease patients as well as acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) patients by induction of cell death, but did not cause any vital changes in cells from healthy donors. Experiments with lymphoid U937 and monocytic MonoMac6 cell lines have shown a protective effect of PEMF on the death process in cells treated with death inducers. The aim of the current study was to investigate the influence of PEMF on native proliferating leukocytes originating from newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. The effects of exposure to PEMF were studied in PBMCs from 20 children with ALL. PBMCs were stimulated with three doses of PEMF (7 Hz, 30 mT) for 4 h each with 24 h intervals. After the last stimulation, the cells were double stained with annexin V and propidium iodide dye to estimate viability by flow cytometric analysis. The results indicated an increase of annexin V positive as well as double stained annexin V and propidium iodide positive cells after exposure to threefold PEMF stimulation. A low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field induces cell death in native proliferating cells isolated from ALL patients. The increased vulnerability of proliferating PBMCs to PEMF-induced interactions may be potentially applied in the therapy of ALL. The analysis of expression of apoptosis-related genes revealed changes in mRNA of some genes engaged in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway belonging to the Bcl-2 family and the pathway with apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) abundance upon PEMF stimulation of PBMCs.

  5. Estimation of net ecosystem production in Asia using the diagnostic-type ecosystem model with a 10 km grid-scale resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasai, Takahiro; Obikawa, Hiroki; Murakami, Kazutaka; Kato, Soushi; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Nemani, Ramakrishna R.

    2016-06-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle in Asia is highly uncertain, and it affects our understanding of global warming. One of the important issues is the need for an enhancement of spatial resolution, since local regions in Asia are heterogeneous with regard to meteorology, land form, and land cover type, which greatly impacts the detailed spatial patterns in its ecosystem. Thus, an important goal of this study is to reasonably reproduce the heterogeneous biogeochemical patterns in Asia by enhancing the spatial resolution of the ecosystem model biosphere model integrating eco-physiological and mechanistic approaches using satellite data (BEAMS). We estimated net ecosystem production (NEP) over eastern Asia and examined the spatial differences in the factors controlling NEP by using a 10 km grid-scale approach over two different decades (2001-2010 and 2091-2100). The present and future meteorological inputs were derived from satellite observations and the downscaled Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) data set, respectively. The results showed that the present NEP in whole eastern Asia was carbon source (-214.9 TgC yr-1) and in future scenarios, the greatest positive (76.4 TgC yr-1) and least negative (-95.9 TgC yr-1) NEPs were estimated from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) 6.0 and RCP8.5 scenarios, respectively. Calculated annual NEP in RCP8.5 was mostly positive in the southern part of East Asia and Southeast Asia and negative in northern and central parts of East Asia. Under the RCP scenario with higher greenhouse gases emission (RCP8.5), deciduous needleleaf and mixed forests distributed in the middle and high latitudes served as carbon source. In contrast, evergreen broadleaf forests distributed in low latitudes served as carbon sink. The sensitivity study demonstrated that the spatial tendency of NEP was largely influenced by atmospheric CO2 and temperature.

  6. Estimating Agricultural Water Use using the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance Evapotranspiration Estimation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Due to the predominantly arid climate in Arizona, access to adequate water supply is vital to the economic development and livelihood of the State. Water supply has become increasingly important during periods of prolonged drought, which has strained reservoir water levels in the Desert Southwest over past years. Arizona's water use is dominated by agriculture, consuming about seventy-five percent of the total annual water demand. Tracking current agricultural water use is important for managers and policy makers so that current water demand can be assessed and current information can be used to forecast future demands. However, many croplands in Arizona are irrigated outside of areas where water use reporting is mandatory. To estimate irrigation withdrawals on these lands, we use a combination of field verification, evapotranspiration (ET) estimation, and irrigation system qualification. ET is typically estimated in Arizona using the Modified Blaney-Criddle method which uses meteorological data to estimate annual crop water requirements. The Modified Blaney-Criddle method assumes crops are irrigated to their full potential over the entire growing season, which may or may not be realistic. We now use the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) ET data in a remote-sensing and energy-balance framework to estimate cropland ET. SSEBop data are of sufficient resolution (30m by 30m) for estimation of field-scale cropland water use. We evaluate our SSEBop-based estimates using ground-truth information and irrigation system qualification obtained in the field. Our approach gives the end user an estimate of crop consumptive use as well as inefficiencies in irrigation system performance—both of which are needed by water managers for tracking irrigated water use in Arizona.

  7. Influence of aerosols on surface reaching spectral irradiance and introduction to a new technique of estimating aerosol radiative forcing from high resolution spectral flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Roshan

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol radiative forcing estimates with high certainty are required in climate change studies. The approach in estimating the aerosol radiative forcing by using the chemical composition of aerosols is not effective as the chemical composition data with radiative properties are not widely available. We look into the approach where ground based spectral radiation flux measurement is made and along with an Radtiative transfer (RT) model, radiative forcing is estimated. Measurements of spectral flux were made using an ASD spectroradiometer with 350 - 1050 nm wavelength range and a 3nm resolution during around 54 clear-sky days during which AOD range was around 0.01 to 0.7. Simultaneous measurements of black carbon were also made using Aethalometer (Magee Scientific) which ranged from around 1.5 ug/m3 to 8 ug/m3. The primary study involved in understanding the sensitivity of spectral flux due to change in individual aerosol species (Optical properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) classified aerosol species) using the SBDART RT model. This made us clearly distinguish the influence of different aerosol species on the spectral flux. Following this, a new technique has been introduced to estimate an optically equivalent mixture of aerosol species for the given location. The new method involves matching different combinations of aerosol species in OPAC model and RT model as long as the combination which gives the minimum root mean squared deviation from measured spectral flux is obtained. Using the optically equivalent aerosol mixture and RT model, aerosol radiative forcing is estimated. Also an alternate method to estimate the spectral SSA is discussed. Here, the RT model, the observed spectral flux and spectral AOD is used. Spectral AOD is input to RT model and SSA is varied till the minimum root mean squared difference between observed and simulated spectral flux from RT model is obtained. The methods discussed are limited to clear sky scenes and its accuracy to derive

  8. Improving Quantitative Precipitation Estimation via Data Fusion of High-Resolution Ground-based Radar Network and CMORPH Satellite-based Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifelli, R.; Chen, H.; Chandrasekar, V.; Xie, P.

    2015-12-01

    A large number of precipitation products at multi-scales have been developed based upon satellite, radar, and/or rain gauge observations. However, how to produce optimal rainfall estimation for a given region is still challenging due to the spatial and temporal sampling difference of different sensors. In this study, we develop a data fusion mechanism to improve regional quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) by utilizing satellite-based CMORPH product, ground radar measurements, as well as numerical model simulations. The CMORPH global precipitation product is essentially derived based on retrievals from passive microwave measurements and infrared observations onboard satellites (Joyce et al. 2004). The fine spatial-temporal resolution of 0.05o Lat/Lon and 30-min is appropriate for regional hydrologic and climate studies. However, it is inadequate for localized hydrometeorological applications such as urban flash flood forecasting. Via fusion of the Regional CMORPH product and local precipitation sensors, the high-resolution QPE performance can be improved. The area of interest is the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Metroplex, which is the largest land-locked metropolitan area in the U.S. In addition to an NWS dual-polarization S-band WSR-88DP radar (i.e., KFWS radar), DFW hosts the high-resolution dual-polarization X-band radar network developed by the center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA). This talk will present a general framework of precipitation data fusion based on satellite and ground observations. The detailed prototype architecture of using regional rainfall instruments to improve regional CMORPH precipitation product via multi-scale fusion techniques will also be discussed. Particularly, the temporal and spatial fusion algorithms developed for the DFW Metroplex will be described, which utilizes CMORPH product, S-band WSR-88DP, and X-band CASA radar measurements. In order to investigate the uncertainties associated with each

  9. Estimation of Effective Soil Hydraulic Properties Using Data From High Resolution Gamma Densiometry and Tensiometers of Multi-Step-Outflow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werisch, Stefan; Lennartz, Franz; Bieberle, Andre

    2013-04-01

    Dynamic Multi Step Outflow (MSO) experiments serve for the estimation of the parameters from soil hydraulic functions like e.g. the Mualem van Genuchten model. The soil hydraulic parameters are derived from outflow records and corresponding matric potential measurements from commonly a single tensiometer using inverse modeling techniques. We modified the experimental set up allowing for simultaneous measurements of the matric potential with three tensiometers and the water content using a high-resolution gamma-ray densiometry measurement system (Bieberle et al., 2007, Hampel et al., 2007). Different combinations of the measured time series were used for the estimation of effective soil hydraulic properties, representing different degrees of information of the "hydraulic reality" of the sample. The inverse modeling task was solved with the multimethod search algorithm AMALGAM (Vrugt et al., 2007) in combination with the Hydrus1D model (Šimúnek et al., 2008). Subsequently, the resulting effective soil hydraulic parameters allow the simulation of the MSO experiment and the comparison of model results with observations. The results show that the information of a single tensiometer together with the outflow record result in a set of effective soil hydraulic parameters producing an overall good agreement between the simulation and the observation for the location of the tensiometer. Significantly deviating results are obtained for the other tensiometer positions using this parameter set. Inclusion of more information, such as additional matric potential measurements with the according water contents within the optimization procedure lead to different, more representative hydraulic parameters which improved the overall agreement significantly. These findings indicate that more information about the soil hydraulic state variables in space and time are necessary to obtain effective soil hydraulic properties of soil core samples. Bieberle, A., Kronenberg, J., Schleicher, E

  10. Mangrove Blue Carbon stocks and change estimation from PolInSAR, Lidar and High Resolution Stereo Imagery combined with Forest Cover change mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalles, V.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Simard, M.; Lagomasino, D.; Lee, S. K.; Trettin, C.; Feliciano, E. A.; Hansen, M.; John, P.

    2015-12-01

    Mangroves and tidal wetlands have the highest carbon density among terrestrial ecosystems. Although they only represent 3 % of the total forest area (or 0.01 % of land area), C emissions from mangrove destruction alone at current rates could be equivalent to 10 % of carbon emissions from deforestation. One of the main challenges to implementing carbon mitigation projects is measuring carbon, efficiently, effectively, and safely. In mangroves especially, the extreme difficulty of the terrain has hindered the establishment of sufficient field plots needed to accurately measure carbon on the scale necessary to relate remotely sensed measurements with field measurements at accuracies required for REDD and other C trading mechanisms. In this presentation we will showcase the methodologies for, and the remote sensing products necessary to implement MRV (monitoring, reporting and verification) systems in Coastal Blue Carbon ecosystems. Specifically, we will present new methods to estimate aboveground biomass stocks and change in mangrove ecosystems using remotely sensed data from Interferometric SAR from the TanDEM-X mission, commercial airborne Lidar, High Resolution Stereo-imagery, and timeseries analysis of Landsat imagery in combination with intensive field measurements of above and belowground carbon stocks. Our research is based on the hypothesis that by combining field measurements, commercial airborne Lidar, optical and Pol-InSAR data, we are able to estimate Mangrove blue carbon storage with an error under 20% at the project level and permit the evaluation of UNFCCC mechanisms for the mitigation of carbon emissions from coastal ecosystems.

  11. High time resolution electron density estimation in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetotail using PEACE, WHISPER and EFW experiments on Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, A.; Décréau, P.; Fazakerley, A.; André, M.; Trotignon, J.; Laakso, H.; Escoubet, P.; Rochel, A.; Taylor, M.; Opgenoorth, H.

    2006-12-01

    The four spacecraft of the ESA/NASA Cluster mission were launched in summer 2000 and put into a polar orbit with a perigee at 4 Earth radii (Re) and a line of apsides around the ecliptic plane. To date there have been 6 magnetotail seasons of around 4 months duration in which the spacecraft apogee has precessed across the magnetotail at a geocentric distance of about 20 Re. The plasma density in the vicinity of the tail is a difficult parameter to derive as plasma are tenuous. The Cluster satellites carry five instruments (CIS, EFW, PEACE, WBD, WHISPER) that provide information about the local electron and ion density. This study focuses on the derivation of high time resolution (0.2s) electron density timeseries using active soundings of the WHISPER relaxation sounder, the spacecraft potential measured by the EFW electric field instrument and the electron density estimation derived from the PEACE electron experiment. Analysis of a few tens of cases collected during the 2002 and 2003 tail seasons, of a few hours duration each, will be presented. A new procedure to calibrate the spacecraft potential based on active soundings and numerical simulations will be detailed. Benefits of this study to the calibration of the electron density estimation by PEACE will also be exposed.

  12. Grazer Effects on Stream Primary Production and Nitrate Utilization: Estimating Feedbacks Under Reduced Nitrate Levels at High-Temporal Resolutions from the Patch to Reach-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijo, C. J.; Cohen, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    While nutrient enrichment is often identified as the leading cause for changes in stream gross primary production (GPP) and shifts in vegetative communities, other factors such as grazers influence overall stream structure and function. Evidence shows that grazers are a top-down control on algae in streams; however, the specific feedbacks between overall stream metabolism, grazer effects, and nutrient cycling have been variable and little is known about these interactions at nutrient levels below ambient. To further our understanding of these linkages, a nutrient depletion chamber was created and paired with high-resolution in situ sensors to estimate stream metabolism and characterize nitrate uptake (UNO3) pathways (i.e. plant uptake and denitrification). The Plexiglas chamber blocks flow and nutrient supply, inserts into upper sediments, allows light in and sediment-water-air interactions to occur. At Gum Slough Springs, FL, nitrate was reduced from ambient levels (1.40 mg N/L) to below regulatory thresholds (ca. 0.20 mg N/L) within one week. Paired chambers with and without the presence of snails (Elimia floridensis) were deployed across submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV; Vallisneria americana) and algae (Lyngbya) substrates. Results show that GPP and UNO3 were higher under SAV (70 g O2/m2/d and 300 mg NO3/m2/d, respectively) and a general lack of nutrient limitation even at low [NO3]. Grazer effects differed by vegetation type as it alleviated the reduction of NO3 levels and GPP under SAV but enhanced the decrease of algal GPP and NO3 levels over time. Continued work includes estimating grazer effects on denitrification, quantifying snail nutrient excretion contributions, and scaling up all estimates from the patch to reach level. Overall, this study will further our understanding of grazer-production-nutrient interactions within stream systems, making it possible to predict changes in feedbacks when one part of the biotic or abiotic ecosystem is altered.

  13. Application of high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry measurements to estimate volatility distributions of α-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products

    DOE PAGES

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-01-05

    Recent developments in high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made it possible to directly detect atmospheric organic compounds in real time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low-volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, using ions identified by high-resolution spectra from an HR-ToF-CIMS with acetate reagent ion chemistry, we develop an algorithm to estimate the vapor pressures of measured organic acids. The algorithm uses identified ion formulas and calculated double bond equivalencies, information unavailable in quadrupole CIMS technology, as constraints for the number of possible oxygen-containing functionalmore » groups. The algorithm is tested with acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry (acetate-CIMS) spectra of O3 and OH oxidation products of α-pinene and naphthalene formed in a flow reactor with integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec s cm−3, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. The predicted condensed-phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA) average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous chamber and flow reactor measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.« less

  14. Topographic and Acoustic Estimates of Grain-Scale Roughness from High-Resolution Multibeam Echo-Sounder: Examples from the Colorado River in Marble and Grand Canyons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscombe, D.; Grams, P. E.

    2014-12-01

    High-frequency (several hundred kilohertz) multibeam echo-sounder (MBES) systems have the potential to provide complete coverage of large areas (km2) of the bed, rapidly (mins to hrs), at high resolution (cm2), and with high positional accuracy (cm). Here, we explore the use of MBES data to estimate grain-scale roughness of submerged riverbed sediment. There are two broad approaches: 1) using digital elevation models constructed from depth soundings, and 2) using acoustic backscatter. We discuss the relative merits of both approaches using examples from data collected on the Colorado River in Marble and Grand Canyons, Arizona, USA. The primary advantage of acoustic backscatter over topography from soundings, for the purposes of sediment classification, is the potential to distinguish between sediment at a higher resolution. This is because soundings are point measurements, whereas a recorded backscatter magnitude is the integral of backscattered sound from all scatterers in the insonified area. In addition, this acoustic return contains information about both the roughness and the hardness/impedance of the sediment. The statistics of backscatter magnitudes alone are found to be a poor discriminator between sediment types perhaps because, using our 400 kHz system, the scattering regime changes from Rayleigh (sound scattering by particles smaller than the sound wavelength) for fine sand, to geometric (scattering by larger-than-sound-wavelength particles) for substrates coarser than sand. However, simple measures derived from backscatter power spectra (namely, the variance, integral lengthscale, and the intercept and slope from a power-law form - see Figure) are found to distinguish between patches of sand, gravel, cobbles and boulders. Using this dependence, we present a new data-driven approach to classify grain-scale roughness, developed by comparing the spectral properties of backscatter with bed-sediment observations using geo-referenced underwater video.

  15. Estimation de parametres structuraux des arbres dans une savane a partir de mesures LiDAR terrestre et d'imagerie a tres haute resolution spatiale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beland, Martin

    to produce the leaf area, estimates. The second part of the thesis explores the combination of the tree representations generated in the first part with a ray tracing model to simulate the interactions of light with tree crowns. This approach is highly innovative and our study showed its potential to improve our understanding of the factors influencing the radiative environment in a savanna. The methods presented offer a solution to map leaf area at the individual tree scale over large areas from very high spatial resolution imagery. Mots-cles: Scanneur LiDAR terrestre, voxel, distribution 3D de surface foliaire, savanes, densite de surface foliaire (LAD), indice de surface foliaire (LAI), effets d'occlusion, parametrage, cartographie de la surface foliaire, lancer de rayons, modelisation du transfert radiatif.

  16. High Resolution MEMS Accelerometers to Estimate VO2 and Compare Running Mechanics between Highly Trained Inter-Collegiate and Untrained Runners

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Stephen J.; Busa, Michael A.; Yaggie, James A.; Bollt, Erik M.

    2009-01-01

    Background The purposes of this study were to determine the validity and reliability of high resolution accelerometers (HRA) relative to VO2 and speed, and compare putative differences in HRA signal between trained (T) and untrained (UT) runners during treadmill locomotion. Methodology Runners performed 2 incremental VO2max trials while wearing HRA. RMS of high frequency signal from three axes (VT, ML, AP) and the Euclidean resultant (RES) were compared to VO2 to determine validity and reliability. Additionally, axial rms relative to speed, and ratio of axial accelerations to RES were compared between T and UT to determine if differences in running mechanics could be identified between the two groups. Principal Findings Regression of RES was strongly related to VO2, but T was different than UT (r = 0.96 vs 0.92; p<.001) for walking and running. During walking, only the ratio of ML and AP to RES were different between groups. For running, nearly all acceleration parameters were lower for T than UT, the exception being ratio of VT to RES, which was higher in T than UT. All of these differences during running were despite higher VO2, O2 cost, and lower RER in T vs UT, which resulted in no significant difference in energy expenditure between groups. Conclusions/Signficance These results indicate that HRA can accurately and reliably estimate VO2 during treadmill locomotion, but differences exist between T and UT that should be considered when estimating energy expenditure. Differences in running mechanics between T and UT were identified, yet the importance of these differences remains to be determined. PMID:19806216

  17. Very High Resolution Mapping of Tree Cover Using Scalable Deep Learning Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ganguly, sangram; basu, saikat; nemani, ramakrishna; mukhopadhyay, supratik; michaelis, andrew; votava, petr; saatchi, sassan

    2016-04-01

    Several studies to date have provided an extensive knowledge base for estimating forest aboveground biomass (AGB) and recent advances in space-based modeling of the 3-D canopy structure, combined with canopy reflectance measured by passive optical sensors and radar backscatter, are providing improved satellite-derived AGB density mapping for large scale carbon monitoring applications. A key limitation in forest AGB estimation from remote sensing, however, is the large uncertainty in forest cover estimates from the coarse-to-medium resolution satellite-derived land cover maps (present resolution is limited to 30-m of the USGS NLCD Program). As part of our NASA Carbon Monitoring System Phase II activities, we have demonstrated that uncertainties in forest cover estimates at the Landsat scale result in high uncertainties in AGB estimation, predominantly in heterogeneous forest and urban landscapes. We have successfully tested an approach using scalable deep learning architectures (Feature-enhanced Deep Belief Networks and Semantic Segmentation using Convolutional Neural Networks) and High-Performance Computing with NAIP air-borne imagery data for mapping tree cover at 1-m over California and Maryland. Our first high resolution satellite training label dataset from the NAIP data can be found here at http://csc.lsu.edu/~saikat/deepsat/ . In a comparison with high resolution LiDAR data available over selected regions in the two states, we found our results to be promising both in terms of accuracy as well as our ability to scale nationally. In this project, we propose to estimate very high resolution forest cover for the continental US at spatial resolution of 1-m in support of reducing uncertainties in the AGB estimation. The proposed work will substantially contribute to filling the gaps in ongoing carbon monitoring research and help quantifying the errors and uncertainties in related carbon products.

  18. Sexual recruitment of the corals Favia fragum and Agaricia humilis in a 30-m(3) exhibit aquarium: species-specific limitations and implications on reproductive ecology.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Dirk; Laterveer, Michaël; Visser, Gerard

    2007-03-01

    We studied the recruitment of the Caribbean reef building corals Favia fragum (F. fragum) and Agaricia humilis(A. humilis) in captivity. Thirty colonies of each species collected in Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles, reproduced sexually during a temporary stay in a 30-m(3) closed system from November 2001-January 2002. Twelve months later, the F1 generation of F. fragum started reproducing and formed an F2 generation. No reproduction of the F1 recruits of A. humilis was observed. Two years after the introduction of the field colonies, sexual recruits of both species were assessed using two different methods: recruits were estimated using quadrats (quadrat sampling method) and the total number of recruits was counted by creating a map of the artificial rock work divided in distinct areas (area census method). Recruitment rates of F. fragum were highest for the F2 generation on horizontal surfaces (area census method: 137.9+/-191.7 recruits m(-2); quadrat sampling method: 272.0+/-254.8 recruits m(-2); mean+/-SD) and were overall lowest for the F1 generation on overhanging areas of the tank (area census method: 3.8+/-4.0 recruits m(-2); quadrat sampling method: 4.0+/-6.1 recruits m(-2); mean+/-SD recruits m(-2)). The populations of both species showed similar patterns independent of the applied assessment method with highest densities on horizontal surfaces followed by vertical surfaces and lowest densities on overhanging surfaces; however, both methods showed conflicting results when the influence of the surface orientation on the population densities was statistically analyzed. The maximum density of A. humilis (1.4+/-2.7 recruits m(-2) on horizontal surfaces) was much lower than the maximum density of the F1 generation of F. fragum (24.7+/-18.3 recruits m(-2)). Colony sizes of recruits within each population (F. fragum F1: 3.12+/-0.98 cm, F2: 0.83+/-0.41 cm; A. humilis F1: 3.79+/-1.35 cm; maximum diameter+/-SD) did not differ between different orientations (horizontal

  19. Variability of Marine Aerosol Fine-Mode Fraction and Estimates of Anthropogenic Aerosol Component Over Cloud-Free Oceans from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kleidman, Richard G.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bian, Huisheng; Diehl, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examine seasonal and geographical variability of marine aerosol fine-mode fraction (f(sub m)) and its impacts on deriving the anthropogenic component of aerosol optical depth (tau(sub a)) and direct radiative forcing from multispectral satellite measurements. A proxy of f(sub m), empirically derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 5 data, shows large seasonal and geographical variations that are consistent with the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation Transport (GOCART) and Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) model simulations. The so-derived seasonally and spatially varying f(sub m) is then implemented into a method of estimating tau(sub a) and direct radiative forcing from the MODIS measurements. It is found that the use of a constant value for fm as in previous studies would have overestimated Ta by about 20% over global ocean, with the overestimation up to 45% in some regions and seasons. The 7-year (2001-2007) global ocean average tau(sub a) is 0.035, with yearly average ranging from 0.031 to 0.039. Future improvement in measurements is needed to better separate anthropogenic aerosol from natural ones and to narrow down the wide range of aerosol direct radiative forcing.

  20. Comparison of 3D-OP-OSEM and 3D-FBP reconstruction algorithms for High-Resolution Research Tomograph studies: effects of randoms estimation methods.

    PubMed

    van Velden, Floris H P; Kloet, Reina W; van Berckel, Bart N M; Wolfensberger, Saskia P A; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Boellaard, Ronald

    2008-06-21

    The High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) is a dedicated human brain positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. Recently, a 3D filtered backprojection (3D-FBP) reconstruction method has been implemented to reduce bias in short duration frames, currently observed in 3D ordinary Poisson OSEM (3D-OP-OSEM) reconstructions. Further improvements might be expected using a new method of variance reduction on randoms (VRR) based on coincidence histograms instead of using the delayed window technique (DW) to estimate randoms. The goal of this study was to evaluate VRR in combination with 3D-OP-OSEM and 3D-FBP reconstruction techniques. To this end, several phantom studies and a human brain study were performed. For most phantom studies, 3D-OP-OSEM showed higher accuracy of observed activity concentrations with VRR than with DW. However, both positive and negative deviations in reconstructed activity concentrations and large biases of grey to white matter contrast ratio (up to 88%) were still observed as a function of scan statistics. Moreover 3D-OP-OSEM+VRR also showed bias up to 64% in clinical data, i.e. in some pharmacokinetic parameters as compared with those obtained with 3D-FBP+VRR. In the case of 3D-FBP, VRR showed similar results as DW for both phantom and clinical data, except that VRR showed a better standard deviation of 6-10%. Therefore, VRR should be used to correct for randoms in HRRT PET studies.

  1. Comparison of 3D-OP-OSEM and 3D-FBP reconstruction algorithms for High-Resolution Research Tomograph studies: effects of randoms estimation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Velden, Floris H. P.; Kloet, Reina W.; van Berckel, Bart N. M.; Wolfensberger, Saskia P. A.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Boellaard, Ronald

    2008-06-01

    The High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) is a dedicated human brain positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. Recently, a 3D filtered backprojection (3D-FBP) reconstruction method has been implemented to reduce bias in short duration frames, currently observed in 3D ordinary Poisson OSEM (3D-OP-OSEM) reconstructions. Further improvements might be expected using a new method of variance reduction on randoms (VRR) based on coincidence histograms instead of using the delayed window technique (DW) to estimate randoms. The goal of this study was to evaluate VRR in combination with 3D-OP-OSEM and 3D-FBP reconstruction techniques. To this end, several phantom studies and a human brain study were performed. For most phantom studies, 3D-OP-OSEM showed higher accuracy of observed activity concentrations with VRR than with DW. However, both positive and negative deviations in reconstructed activity concentrations and large biases of grey to white matter contrast ratio (up to 88%) were still observed as a function of scan statistics. Moreover 3D-OP-OSEM+VRR also showed bias up to 64% in clinical data, i.e. in some pharmacokinetic parameters as compared with those obtained with 3D-FBP+VRR. In the case of 3D-FBP, VRR showed similar results as DW for both phantom and clinical data, except that VRR showed a better standard deviation of 6-10%. Therefore, VRR should be used to correct for randoms in HRRT PET studies.

  2. Use of high-resolution imagery acquired from an unmanned aircraft system for fluvial mapping and estimating water-surface velocity in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzel, P. J.; Bauer, M.; Feller, M.; Holmquist-Johnson, C.; Preston, T.

    2013-12-01

    The use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) for environmental monitoring in the United States is anticipated to increase in the coming years as the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) further develops guidelines to permit their integration into the National Airspace System. The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Unmanned Aircraft Systems Project Office routinely obtains Certificates of Authorization from the FAA for utilizing UAS technology for a variety of natural resource applications for the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI). We evaluated the use of a small UAS along two reaches of the Platte River near Overton Nebraska, USA, to determine the accuracy of the system for mapping the extent and elevation of emergent sandbars and to test the ability of a hovering UAS to identify and track tracers to estimate water-surface velocity. The UAS used in our study is the Honeywell Tarantula Hawk RQ16 (T-Hawk), developed for the U.S. Army as a reconnaissance and surveillance platform. The T-Hawk has been recently modified by USGS, and certified for airworthiness by the DOI - Office of Aviation Services, to accommodate a higher-resolution imaging payload than was originally deployed with the system. The T-Hawk is currently outfitted with a Canon PowerShot SX230 HS with a 12.1 megapixel resolution and intervalometer to record images at a user defined time step. To increase the accuracy of photogrammetric products, orthoimagery and DEMs using structure-from-motion (SFM) software, we utilized ground control points in the study reaches and acquired imagery using flight lines at various altitudes (200-400 feet above ground level) and oriented both parallel and perpendicular to the river. Our results show that the mean error in the elevations derived from SFM in the upstream reach was 17 centimeters and horizontal accuracy was 6 centimeters when compared to 4 randomly distributed targets surveyed on emergent sandbars. In addition to the targets, multiple transects were

  3. 3D Transient Hydraulic Tomography (3DTHT): An Efficient Field and Modeling Method for High-Resolution Estimation of Aquifer Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrash, W.; Cardiff, M. A.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2012-12-01

    The distribution of hydraulic conductivity (K) is a major control on groundwater flow and contaminant transport. Our limited ability to determine 3D heterogeneous distributions of K is a major reason for increased costs and uncertainties associated with virtually all aspects of groundwater contamination management (e.g., site investigations, risk assessments, remediation method selection/design/operation, monitoring system design/operation). Hydraulic tomography (HT) is an emerging method for directly estimating the spatially variable distribution of K - in a similar fashion to medical or geophysical imaging. Here we present results from 3D transient field-scale experiments (3DTHT) which capture the heterogeneous K distribution in a permeable, moderately heterogeneous, coarse fluvial unconfined aquifer at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS). The results are verified against high-resolution K profiles from multi-level slug tests at BHRS wells. The 3DTHT field system for well instrumentation and data acquisition/feedback is fully modular and portable, and the in-well packer-and-port system is easily assembled and disassembled without expensive support equipment or need for gas pressurization. Tests are run for 15-20 min and the aquifer is allowed to recover while the pumping equipment is repositioned between tests. The tomographic modeling software developed uses as input observations of temporal drawdown behavior from each of numerous zones isolated in numerous observation wells during a series of pumping tests conducted from numerous isolated intervals in one or more pumping wells. The software solves for distributed K (as well as storage parameters Ss and Sy, if desired) and estimates parameter uncertainties using: a transient 3D unconfined forward model in MODFLOW, the adjoint state method for calculating sensitivities (Clemo 2007), and the quasi-linear geostatistical inverse method (Kitanidis 1995) for the inversion. We solve for K at >100,000 sub-m3

  4. Estimation of the Components of the Carbon and Water Budgets for Winter Wheat by Combining High Resolution Remote Sensing Data with a Crop Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veloso, A.; Ceschia, E.

    2014-12-01

    Croplands occupy more than one third of Earth's terrestrial surface contributing to climate change and also being impacted by those changes, since their production is conditioned by climatic conditions and water resources. It is thus essential to quantify and analyze the production and the main components of the carbon and water cycles for crop ecosystems. We propose here a regional modeling approach that combines: high spatial and temporal resolutions (HSTR) optical remote sensing data, a simple crop model and an extensive set of in-situ measurements for model's calibration and validation. The model, named SAFYE-CO2 (Simple Algorithm for Fluxes and Yield Estimates), is a daily time step model based on Monteith's light-use efficiency theory and coupled with a water budget module (FAO-56 method). SAFYE-CO2 estimates components of the carbon budget (gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration (Reco), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), …) and of the crop water cycle (evaporation, transpiration, evapotranspiration (ETR) and soil water content) and also time courses of dry aboveground biomass and yield by assimilating Green Area Index (GAI) data obtained from HSTR satellite observations. For this work, we used a unique set of Formosat-2 and SPOT images acquired from 2006 to 2011 in southwest France. Crop and soil model parameters were set using both in-situ measurements and values found in the literature. Phenological parameters were calibrated by the GAI assimilation. The results indicate that the model correctly reproduces winter wheat biomass and yield production (relative error about 25%) for years with contrasted climatic conditions. The estimated net carbon flux components were overall in agreement with the flux measurements, presenting good correlations (R² about 0.9 for GPP, 0.77 for Reco and 0.84 for NEE). Regarding the ETR, a good correlation (R2 about 0.73) and satisfactory errors (RMSE about 0.47 mm.d-1) were found. Carbon and water budgets as well

  5. Estimation of Carbon Budgets for Croplands by Combining High Resolution Remote Sensing Data with a Crop Model and Validation Ground Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangiarotti, S.; Veloso, A.; Ceschia, E.; Tallec, T.; Dejoux, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Croplands occupy large areas of Earth's land surface playing a key role in the terrestrial carbon cycle. Hence, it is essential to quantify and analyze the carbon fluxes from those agro-ecosystems, since they contribute to climate change and are impacted by the environmental conditions. In this study we propose a regional modeling approach that combines high spatial and temporal resolutions (HSTR) optical remote sensing data with a crop model and a large set of in-situ measurements for model calibration and validation. The study area is located in southwest France and the model that we evaluate, called SAFY-CO2, is a semi-empirical one based on the Monteith's light-use efficiency theory and adapted for simulating the components of the net ecosystem CO2 fluxes (NEE) and of the annual net ecosystem carbon budgets (NECB) at a daily time step. The approach is based on the assimilation of satellite-derived green area index (GAI) maps for calibrating a number of the SAFY-CO2 parameters linked to crop phenology. HSTR data from the Formosat-2 and SPOT satellites were used to produce the GAI maps. The experimental data set includes eddy covariance measurements of net CO2 fluxes from two experimental sites and partitioned into gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco). It also includes measurements of GAI, biomass and yield between 2005 and 2011, focusing on the winter wheat crop. The results showed that the SAFY-CO2 model correctly reproduced the biomass production, its dynamic and the yield (relative errors about 24%) in contrasted climatic, environmental and management conditions. The net CO2 flux components estimated with the model were overall in agreement with the ground data, presenting good correlations (R² about 0.93 for GPP, 0.77 for Reco and 0.86 for NEE). The evaluation of the modelled NECB for the different site-years highlighted the importance of having accurate estimates of each component of the NECB. Future works aim at considering

  6. High-Resolution Rainfall From Radar Reflectivity and Terrestrial Rain Gages for use in Estimating Debris-Flow Susceptibility in the Day Fire, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanshaw, M. N.; Schmidt, K. M.; Jorgensen, D. P.; Stock, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    SMART-R also recorded higher seasonal cumulative rainfall than the terrestrial gages, perhaps indicating that not all precipitation reached the ground. For one storm in particular, time-lapse photographs of the ground document snow. This could explain, in part, the discrepancy between storm-specific totals when the rain gages recorded significantly lower totals than the SMART-R. For example, during the storm where snow was observed, the SMART-R recorded a maximum of 66% higher rainfall than the maximum recorded by the gages. Unexpectedly, the highest elevation gage, located in a pre-fire coniferous vegetation community, consistently recorded the lowest precipitation, whereas gages in the lower elevation pre- fire chaparral community recorded the highest totals. The spatial locations of the maximum rainfall inferred by the SMART-R and the terrestrial gages are also offset by 1.6 km, with terrestrial values shifted easterly. The observation that the SMART-R images high rainfall intensities recorded by rain gages suggests that this technology has the ability to quantitatively estimate the spatial distribution over larger areas at a high resolution. Discrepancies on the storm scale, however, need to be investigated further, but we are optimistic that such high resolution data from the SMART-R and the terrestrial gages may lead to the effective application of a prototype debris-flow warning system where such processes put lives at risk.

  7. How does grid-resolution modulate the topographic expression of geomorphic processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieve, Stuart W. D.; Mudd, Simon M.; Milodowski, David T.; Clubb, Fiona J.; Furbish, David J.

    2016-08-01

    In many locations, our ability to study the processes which shape the Earth are greatly enhanced through the use of high-resolution digital topographic data. However, although the availability of such datasets has markedly increased in recent years, many locations of significant geomorphic interest still do not have high-resolution topographic data available. Here, we aim to constrain how well we can understand surface processes through topographic analysis performed on lower-resolution data. We generate digital elevation models from point clouds at a range of grid resolutions from 1 to 30 m, which covers the range of widely used data resolutions available globally, at three locations in the United States. Using these data, the relationship between curvature and grid resolution is explored, alongside the estimation of the hillslope sediment transport coefficient (D, in m2 yr-1) for each landscape. Curvature, and consequently D, values are shown to be generally insensitive to grid resolution, particularly in landscapes with broad hilltops and valleys. Curvature distributions, however, become increasingly condensed around the mean, and theoretical considerations suggest caution should be used when extracting curvature from landscapes with sharp ridges. The sensitivity of curvature and topographic gradient to grid resolution are also explored through analysis of one-dimensional approximations of curvature and gradient, providing a theoretical basis for the results generated using two-dimensional topographic data. Two methods of extracting channels from topographic data are tested. A geometric method of channel extraction that finds channels by detecting threshold values of planform curvature is shown to perform well at resolutions up to 30 m in all three landscapes. The landscape parameters of hillslope length and relief are both successfully extracted at the same range of resolutions. These parameters can be used to detect landscape transience and our results suggest

  8. Variability in Surface BRDF at Different Spatial Scales (30 m-500 m) Over a Mixed Agricultural Landscape as Retrieved from Airborne and Satellite Spectral Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Miguel O.; Gatebe, Charles K.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Poudyal, Rajesh; Wang, Zhousen; King, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, the role of multiangle remote sensing has been central to the development of algorithms for the retrieval of global land surface properties including models of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), albedo, land cover/dynamics, burned area extent, as well as other key surface biophysical quantities represented by the anisotropic reflectance characteristics of vegetation. In this study, a new retrieval strategy for fine-to-moderate resolution multiangle observations was developed, based on the operational sequence used to retrieve the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 5 reflectance and BRDF/albedo products. The algorithm makes use of a semiempirical kernel-driven bidirectional reflectance model to provide estimates of intrinsic albedo (i.e., directional-hemispherical reflectance and bihemispherical reflectance), model parameters describing the BRDF, and extensive quality assurance information. The new retrieval strategy was applied to NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) data acquired during the 2007 Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over the well-instrumented Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in Oklahoma, USA. For the case analyzed, we obtained approx.1.6 million individual surface bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) retrievals, from nadir to 75 off-nadir, and at spatial resolutions ranging from 3 m - 500 m. This unique dataset was used to examine the interaction of the spatial and angular characteristics of a mixed agricultural landscape; and provided the basis for detailed assessments of: (1) the use of a priori knowledge in kernel-driven BRDF model inversions; (2) the interaction between surface reflectance anisotropy and instrument spatial resolution; and (3) the uncertain ties that arise when sub-pixel differences in the BRDF are aggregated to a moderate resolution satellite pixel

  9. Variability in Surface BRDF at Different Spatial Scales (30m-500m) Over a Mixed Agricultural Landscape as Retrieved from Airborne and Satellite Spectral Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Miguel O.; Gatebe, Charles K.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Poudyal, Rajesh; Wang, Zhuosen; King, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, the role of multiangle 1 remote sensing has been central to the development of algorithms for the retrieval of global land surface properties including models of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), albedo, land cover/dynamics, burned area extent, as well as other key surface biophysical quantities represented by the anisotropic reflectance characteristics of vegetation. In this study, a new retrieval strategy for fine-to-moderate resolution multiangle observations was developed, based on the operational sequence used to retrieve the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 5 reflectance and BRDF/albedo products. The algorithm makes use of a semiempirical kernel-driven bidirectional reflectance model to provide estimates of intrinsic albedo (i.e., directional-hemispherical reflectance and bihemispherical reflectance), model parameters describing the BRDF, and extensive quality assurance information. The new retrieval strategy was applied to NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) data acquired during the 2007 Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over the well-instrumented Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in Oklahoma, USA. For the case analyzed, we obtained approx.1.6 million individual surface bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) retrievals, from nadir to 75deg off-nadir, and at spatial resolutions ranging from 3 m - 500 m. This unique dataset was used to examine the interaction of the spatial and angular 18 characteristics of a mixed agricultural landscape; and provided the basis for detailed assessments of: (1) the use of a priori knowledge in kernel-driven BRDF model inversions; (2) the interaction between surface reflectance anisotropy and instrument spatial resolution; and (3) the uncertainties that arise when sub-pixel differences in the BRDF are aggregated to a moderate resolution satellite

  10. Estimating Earthquake Magnitude from the Kentucky Bend Scarp in the New Madrid Seismic Zone Using Field Geomorphic Mapping and High-Resolution LiDAR Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelson, K. I.; Kirkendall, W. G.

    2014-12-01

    Recent suggestions that the 1811-1812 earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) ranged from M6.8-7.0 versus M8.0 have implications for seismic hazard estimation in the central US. We more accurately identify the location of the NW-striking, NE-facing Kentucky Bend scarp along the northern Reelfoot fault, which is spatially associated with the Lake County uplift, contemporary seismicity, and changes in the Mississippi River from the February 1812 earthquake. We use 1m-resolution LiDAR hillshades and slope surfaces, aerial photography, soil surveys, and field geomorphic mapping to estimate the location, pattern, and amount of late Holocene coseismic surface deformation. We define eight late Holocene to historic fluvial deposits, and delineate younger alluvia that are progressively inset into older deposits on the upthrown, western side of the fault. Some younger, clayey deposits indicate past ponding against the scarp, perhaps following surface deformational events. The Reelfoot fault is represented by sinuous breaks-in-slope cutting across these fluvial deposits, locally coinciding with shallow faults identified via seismic reflection data (Woolery et al., 1999). The deformation pattern is consistent with NE-directed reverse faulting along single or multiple SW-dipping fault planes, and the complex pattern of fluvial deposition appears partially controlled by intermittent uplift. Six localities contain scarps across correlative deposits and allow evaluation of cumulative surface deformation from LiDAR-derived topographic profiles. Displacements range from 3.4±0.2 m, to 2.2±0.2 m, 1.4±0.3 m, and 0.6±0.1 m across four progressively younger surfaces. The spatial distribution of the profiles argues against the differences being a result of along-strike uplift variability. We attribute the lesser displacements of progressively younger deposits to recurrent surface deformation, but do not yet interpret these initial data with respect to possible earthquake

  11. Watershed erosion estimated from a high-resolution sediment core reveals a non-stationary frequency-magnitude relationship and importance of seasonal climate drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavin, D. G.; Colombaroli, D.; Morey, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    The inclusion of paleo-flood events greatly affects estimates of peak magnitudes (e.g., Q100) in flood-frequency analysis. Likewise, peak events also are associated with certain synoptic climatic patterns that vary on all time scales. Geologic records preserved in lake sediments have the potential to capture the non-stationarity in frequency-magnitude relationships, but few such records preserve a continuous history of event magnitudes. We present a 10-meter 2000-yr record from Upper Squaw Lake, Oregon, that contains finely laminated silt layers that reflect landscape erosion events from the 40 km2 watershed. CT-scans of the core (<1 mm resolution) and a 14C-dated chronology yielded a pseudo-annual time series of erosion magnitudes. The most recent 80 years of the record correlates strongly with annual peak stream discharge and road construction. We examined the frequency-magnitude relationship for the entire pre-road period and show that the seven largest events fall above a strongly linear relationship, suggesting a distinct process (e.g., severe fires or earthquakes) operating at low-frequency to generate large-magnitude events. Expressing the record as cumulative sediment accumulation anomalies showed the importance of the large events in "returning the system" to the long-term mean rate. Applying frequency-magnitude analysis in a moving window showed that the Q100 and Q10 of watershed erosion varied by 1.7 and 1.0 orders of magnitude, respectively. The variations in watershed erosion are weakly correlated with temperature and precipitation reconstructions at the decadal to centennial scale. This suggests that dynamics both internal (i.e., sediment production) and external (i.e., earthquakes) to the system, as well as more stochastic events (i.e., single severe wildfires) can at least partially over-ride external climate forcing of watershed erosion at decadal to centennial time scales.

  12. Turbulence characteristics over tropical station Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E) estimated using high-resolution GPS radiosonde data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Debashis; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Patra, A. K.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.; Bhaskar Rao, S. Vijaya

    2010-04-01

    Seasonal variation of the turbulence parameters, refractivity structure constant Cn2, eddy dissipation rate ɛ, and eddy diffusivity K, is presented using 3 years (April 2006 to March 2009) of high vertical resolution GPS radiosonde measurements over the tropical station Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E). First, a correlation analysis was done in order to study the relative contributions of temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) to the refractive index gradient (M). A strong positive (negative) correlation between M and RH (T) gradients is noticed up to 10 km. Above 10 km, a strong positive correlation between M and T gradients is seen, except at altitudes near the tropopause. In the present study we flag the turbulent layers using the Thorpe sorting method and estimate the structure constant Cn2 for the turbulent layers. The probability of occurrence of Cn2 is derived from the cumulative distribution at each height and is found to decrease from 10-7 to 10-17 m-2/3 with height. The probability of the occurrence of Cn2 conditioned to the occurrence of turbulence as a function of height is derived, and it is found that only the mean and the 90th percentile profile reach an altitude of ˜27 km. The demarcation between the boundary layer and the free atmosphere as well as between the troposphere and the stratosphere are quite clear from the turbulence profile, which allows us to identify the boundary layer and tropopause heights from turbulence profiles. Thus, the present analysis introduces an alternative approach to identify the height of the boundary layer as well as the tropopause and also to characterize the probability of turbulence and thickness of turbulent eddies in the atmosphere with a finer scale size (down to 5 m) for the first time from a tropical latitude.

  13. Cryogenic design and test results of 30-m flexible hybrid energy transfer line with liquid hydrogen and superconducting MgB2 cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyuk, V. V.; Blagov, E. V.; Antyukhov, I. V.; Firsov, V. P.; Vysotsky, V. S.; Nosov, A. A.; Fetisov, S. S.; Zanegin, S. Yu.; Svalov, G. G.; Rachuk, V. S.; Katorgin, B. I.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present the development of a new hybrid energy transfer line with 30 m length. The line is essentially a flexible 30 m hydrogen cryostat that has three sections with different types of thermal insulation in each section: simple vacuum superinsulation, vacuum superinsulation with liquid nitrogen precooling and active evaporating cryostatting (AEC) system. We performed thermo-hydraulic tests of the cryostat to compare three thermo-insulating methods. The tests were made at temperatures from 20 to 26 K, hydrogen flow from 70 to 450 g/s and pressure from 0.25 to 0.5 MPa. It was found that AEC thermal insulation was the most effective in reducing heat transfer from room temperature to liquid hydrogen in ∼10 m section of the cryostat, indicating that it can be used for long superconducting power cables. High voltage current leads were developed as well. The current leads and superconducting MgB2 cable passed high voltage DC test up to 50 kV DC. Critical current of the cable at ∼21 K was 3500 A. It means that the 30 m hybrid energy system developed is able to deliver ∼50-60 MW of chemical power and ∼50-75 MW of electrical power, i.e. up to ∼135 MW in total.

  14. Integrating High-Resolution Taskable Imagery into a Sensorweb for Automatic Space-Based Monitoring of Flooding in Thailand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Mclaren, David; Doubleday, Joshua; Tran, Daniel; Tanpipat, Veerachai; Chitradon, Royol; Boonya-aroonnet, Surajate; Thanapakpawin, Porranee; Mandl, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Several space-based assets (Terra, Aqua, Earth Observing One) have been integrated into a sensorweb to monitor flooding in Thailand. In this approach, the Moderate Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) data from Terra and Aqua is used to perform broad-scale monitoring to track flooding at the regional level (250m/pixel) and EO-1 is autonomously tasked in response to alerts to acquire higher resolution (30m/pixel) Advanced Land Imager (ALI) data. This data is then automatically processed to derive products such as surface water extent and volumetric water estimates. These products are then automatically pushed to organizations in Thailand for use in damage estimation, relief efforts, and damage mitigation. More recently, this sensorweb structure has been used to request imagery, access imagery, and process high-resolution (several m to 30m), targetable asset imagery from commercial assets including Worldview-2, Ikonos, Radarsat-2, Landsat-7, and Geo-Eye-1. We describe the overall sensorweb framework as well as new workflows and products made possible via these extensions.

  15. Estimation of reactogenicity of preparations produced on the basis of photoinactivated live vaccines against brucellosis and tularaemia on the organismic level.2. Using the method of speckle-microscopy with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulianova, O. V.; Uianov, S. S.; Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Qingming

    2011-04-01

    The method of speckle microscopy was adapted to estimate the reactogenicity of the prototypes of vaccine preparations against extremely dangerous infections. The theory is proposed to describe the mechanism of formation of the output signal from the super-high spatial resolution speckle microscope. The experimental studies show that bacterial suspensions, irradiated in different regimes of inactivation, do not exert negative influence on the blood microcirculations in laboratory animals.

  16. Estimation of reactogenicity of preparations produced on the basis of photoinactivated live vaccines against brucellosis and tularaemia on the organismic level. 2. Using the method of speckle-microscopy with high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ulianova, O V; Uianov, S S; Li Pengcheng; Luo Qingming

    2011-04-30

    The method of speckle microscopy was adapted to estimate the reactogenicity of the prototypes of vaccine preparations against extremely dangerous infections. The theory is proposed to describe the mechanism of formation of the output signal from the super-high spatial resolution speckle microscope. The experimental studies show that bacterial suspensions, irradiated in different regimes of inactivation, do not exert negative influence on the blood microcirculations in laboratory animals. (optical technologies in biophysics and medicine)

  17. Impact of I30T and I30M substitution in MPZ gene associated with Dejerine-Sottas syndrome type B (DSSB): A molecular modeling and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Agrahari, Ashish; George Priya Doss, C

    2015-10-01

    Myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene encodes MPZ protein is a vital component of the myelin sheath. Mutationsassociated with MPZ gene leads to severe de-hypomyelination Dejerine-Sottas syndrome type B (DSSB) also termed as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) type 3. In this work, we employed a set of various in silico prediction methods to screen 97 nsSNPs associated with MPZ gene. Based on this, we identified the nsSNPs to be most deleterious and pathogenic associated with DSSB. To get more insight into the mutational effect at three-dimensional structural level, we modeled the homology structure of native type as well as I30T and I30M mutant of MPZ protein using Modeler 9.13 software. Molecular dynamics simulation was initiated to explain the impact of the mutation on its structure and function. The obtained results depict that the protein with I30T mutation had variable structural conformation and dynamic behavior than native and mutant I30M of MPZ protein. We hope our computational insight might be helpful in rationalizing the deleterious mutations in DSSB and the advancement of novel pharmacological strategy. PMID:26135405

  18. Impact of I30T and I30M substitution in MPZ gene associated with Dejerine-Sottas syndrome type B (DSSB): A molecular modeling and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Agrahari, Ashish; George Priya Doss, C

    2015-10-01

    Myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene encodes MPZ protein is a vital component of the myelin sheath. Mutationsassociated with MPZ gene leads to severe de-hypomyelination Dejerine-Sottas syndrome type B (DSSB) also termed as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) type 3. In this work, we employed a set of various in silico prediction methods to screen 97 nsSNPs associated with MPZ gene. Based on this, we identified the nsSNPs to be most deleterious and pathogenic associated with DSSB. To get more insight into the mutational effect at three-dimensional structural level, we modeled the homology structure of native type as well as I30T and I30M mutant of MPZ protein using Modeler 9.13 software. Molecular dynamics simulation was initiated to explain the impact of the mutation on its structure and function. The obtained results depict that the protein with I30T mutation had variable structural conformation and dynamic behavior than native and mutant I30M of MPZ protein. We hope our computational insight might be helpful in rationalizing the deleterious mutations in DSSB and the advancement of novel pharmacological strategy.

  19. Oil slick morphology derived from AVIRIS measurements of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill: Implications for spatial resolution requirements of remote sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Shaojie; Hu, Chuanmin; Feng, Lian; Swayze, Gregg A.; Holmes, Jamie; Graettinger, George; Ian R. MacDonald,; Garcia, Oscar; Leifer, Ira

    2015-01-01

    Using fine spatial resolution (~ 7.6 m) hyperspectral AVIRIS data collected over the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, we statistically estimated slick lengths, widths and length/width ratios to characterize oil slick morphology for different thickness classes. For all AVIRIS-detected oil slicks (N = 52,100 continuous features) binned into four thickness classes (≤ 50 μm but thicker than sheen, 50–200 μm, 200–1000 μm, and > 1000 μm), the median lengths, widths, and length/width ratios of these classes ranged between 22 and 38 m, 7–11 m, and 2.5–3.3, respectively. The AVIRIS data were further aggregated to 30-m (Landsat resolution) and 300-m (MERIS resolution) spatial bins to determine the fractional oil coverage in each bin. Overall, if 50% fractional pixel coverage were to be required to detect oil with thickness greater than sheen for most oil containing pixels, a 30-m resolution sensor would be needed.

  20. Oil slick morphology derived from AVIRIS measurements of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill: Implications for spatial resolution requirements of remote sensors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shaojie; Hu, Chuanmin; Feng, Lian; Swayze, Gregg A; Holmes, Jamie; Graettinger, George; MacDonald, Ian; Garcia, Oscar; Leifer, Ira

    2016-02-15

    Using fine spatial resolution (~7.6m) hyperspectral AVIRIS data collected over the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, we statistically estimated slick lengths, widths and length/width ratios to characterize oil slick morphology for different thickness classes. For all AVIRIS-detected oil slicks (N=52,100 continuous features) binned into four thickness classes (≤50 μm but thicker than sheen, 50-200 μm, 200-1000 μm, and >1000 μm), the median lengths, widths, and length/width ratios of these classes ranged between 22 and 38 m, 7-11 m, and 2.5-3.3, respectively. The AVIRIS data were further aggregated to 30-m (Landsat resolution) and 300-m (MERIS resolution) spatial bins to determine the fractional oil coverage in each bin. Overall, if 50% fractional pixel coverage were to be required to detect oil with thickness greater than sheen for most oil containing pixels, a 30-m resolution sensor would be needed.

  1. Oil slick morphology derived from AVIRIS measurements of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill: Implications for spatial resolution requirements of remote sensors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shaojie; Hu, Chuanmin; Feng, Lian; Swayze, Gregg A; Holmes, Jamie; Graettinger, George; MacDonald, Ian; Garcia, Oscar; Leifer, Ira

    2016-02-15

    Using fine spatial resolution (~7.6m) hyperspectral AVIRIS data collected over the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, we statistically estimated slick lengths, widths and length/width ratios to characterize oil slick morphology for different thickness classes. For all AVIRIS-detected oil slicks (N=52,100 continuous features) binned into four thickness classes (≤50 μm but thicker than sheen, 50-200 μm, 200-1000 μm, and >1000 μm), the median lengths, widths, and length/width ratios of these classes ranged between 22 and 38 m, 7-11 m, and 2.5-3.3, respectively. The AVIRIS data were further aggregated to 30-m (Landsat resolution) and 300-m (MERIS resolution) spatial bins to determine the fractional oil coverage in each bin. Overall, if 50% fractional pixel coverage were to be required to detect oil with thickness greater than sheen for most oil containing pixels, a 30-m resolution sensor would be needed. PMID:26725867

  2. Long-Term Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution over CONUS: Bias-Adjustment of the Radar-Only National Mosaic and Multi-sensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) Precipitation Reanalysis (2001-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, Olivier; Nelson, Brian; Stevens, Scott; Seo, Dong-Jun; Kim, Beomgeun

    2015-04-01

    The processing of radar-only precipitation via the reanalysis from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor Quantitative (NMQ/Q2) based on the WSR-88D Next-generation Radar (NEXRAD) network over Continental United States (CONUS) is completed for the period covering from 2001 to 2012. This important milestone constitutes a unique opportunity to study precipitation processes at a 1-km spatial resolution for a 5-min temporal resolution. However, in order to be suitable for hydrological, meteorological and climatological applications, the radar-only product needs to be bias-adjusted and merged with in-situ rain gauge information. Several in-situ datasets are available to assess the biases of the radar-only product and to adjust for those biases to provide a multi-sensor QPE. The rain gauge networks that are used such as the Global Historical Climatology Network-Daily (GHCN-D), the Hydrometeorological Automated Data System (HADS), the Automated Surface Observing Systems (ASOS), and the Climate Reference Network (CRN), have different spatial density and temporal resolution. The challenges related to incorporating non-homogeneous networks over a vast area and for a long-term record are enormous. Among the challenges we are facing are the difficulties incorporating differing resolution and quality surface measurements to adjust gridded estimates of precipitation. Another challenge is the type of adjustment technique. The objective of this work is threefold. First, we investigate how the different in-situ networks can impact the precipitation estimates as a function of the spatial density, sensor type, and temporal resolution. Second, we assess conditional and un-conditional biases of the radar-only QPE for various time scales (daily, hourly, 5-min) using in-situ precipitation observations. Finally, after assessing the bias and applying reduction or elimination techniques, we are using a unique in-situ dataset merging the different RG networks (CRN, ASOS, HADS, GHCN-D) to

  3. A stochastic analysis of distance estimation approaches in single molecule microscopy - quantifying the resolution limits of photon-limited imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Sripad; Ward, E. Sally; Ober, Raimund J.

    2012-01-01

    Optical microscopy is an invaluable tool to visualize biological processes at the cellular scale. In the recent past, there has been significant interest in studying these processes at the single molecule level. An important question that arises in single molecule experiments concerns the estimation of the distance of separation between two closely spaced molecules. Presently, there exists different experimental approaches to estimate the distance between two single molecules. However, it is not clear as to which of these approaches provides the best accuracy for estimating the distance. Here, we address this problem rigorously by using tools of statistical estimation theory. We derive formulations of the Fisher information matrix for the underlying estimation problem of determining the distance of separation from the acquired data for the different approaches. Through the Cramer-Rao inequality, we derive a lower bound to the accuracy with which the distance of separation can be estimated. We show through Monte-Carlo simulations that the bound can be attained by the maximum likelihood estimator. Our analysis shows that the distance estimation problem is in fact related to the localization accuracy problem, the latter being a distinct problem that deals with how accurately the location of an object can be determined. We have carried out a detailed investigation of the relationship between the Fisher information matrices of the two problems for the different experimental approaches considered here. The paper also addresses the issue of a singular Fisher information matrix, which presents a significant complication when calculating the Cramer-Rao lower bound. Here, we show how experimental design can overcome the singularity. Throughout the paper, we illustrate our results by considering a specific image profile that describe the image of a single molecule. PMID:24932067

  4. High-resolution digital elevation model from tri-stereo Pleiades-1 satellite imagery for lava flow volume estimates at Fogo Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnardi, Marco; González, Pablo J.; Hooper, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Resolving changes in topography through time using accurate high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) is key to understanding active volcanic processes. For the first time in a volcanic environment, we utilize very high-resolution tri-stereo optical imagery acquired by the Pleiades-1 satellite constellation and generate a 1 m resolution DEM of Fogo Volcano, Cape Verde -- the most active volcano in the Eastern Atlantic region. Point cloud density is increased by a factor of 6.5 compared to conventional stereo imagery, and the number of 1 m2 pixels with no height measurements is reduced by 43%. We use the DEM to quantify topographic changes associated with the 2014-2015 eruption at Fogo. Height differences between the posteruptive Pleiades-1 DEM and the preeruptive topography from TanDEM-X give a lava flow volume of 45.83 ± 0.02 × 106 m3, emplaced over an area of 4.8 km2 at a mean rate of 6.8 m3 s-1.

  5. RAVEN - High-resolution Mapping of Venus within a Discovery Mission Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpton, V. L.; Herrick, R. R.; Rogers, F.; Waterman, S.

    2009-12-01

    It has been more than 15 years since the Magellan mission mapped Venus with S-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images at ~100-m resolution. Advances in radar technology are such that current Earth-orbiting SAR instruments are capable of providing images at meter-scale resolution. RAVEN (RAdar at VENus) is a mission concept that utilizes the instrument developed for the RADARSAT Constellation Mission (RCM) to map Venus in an economical, highly capable, and reliable way. RCM relies on a C-band SAR that can be tuned to generate images at a wide variety of resolutions and swath widths, ranging from ScanSAR mode (broad swaths at 30-m resolution) to strip-map mode (resolutions as fine as 3 m), as well as a spotlight mode that can image patches at 1-m resolution. In particular, the high-resolution modes allow the landing sites of previous missions to be pinpointed and characterized. Repeat-pass interferometric SAR (InSAR) and stereo radargrammetry provide options for constraining topography to better than 100-m horizontal and 10-m vertical resolution. InSAR also provides the potential for detecting surface deformation at centimeter precision. Performing InSAR requires precise knowledge and control of the orbital geometry, and for this reason a 600-km circular polar orbit is favored. This configuration causes the equatorial nadir point to move ~9 km per orbit. Considering both ascending and descending passes, the spacecraft will pass over every point on the planet in half a Venus day (~4 Earth months). The ability to transmit data back to Earth via the Deep Space Network is the primary limiting factor on the volume of data that can be collected. Our current estimates indicate that within an imaging cycle of one Venus day we can image 20-30 percent of the planet at 20-30-m resolution and several percent at 3-5 m resolution. These figures compare favorably to the coverage provided by recent imaging systems orbiting Mars. Our strategy calls for the first cycle of coverage

  6. Using Dynamical Adjustment to Estimate the Anthropogenically-forced Response of Surface Temperature and Precipitation within a High-resolution Regional Climate Model: A Case Study of the Pacific Northwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siler, N.; Roe, G.

    2014-12-01

    One of the greatest challenges in regional climate prediction is distinguishing the anthropogenically-forced response from low-frequency internal variability. In a large ensemble, the forced response is well approximated by the mean trend of the ensemble members. However, in mountainous regions like the Pacific Northwest, very high model resolution is required to accurately represent the terrain, making large ensembles prohibitively expensive. Here we take a different approach, employing a statistical technique called "dynamical adjustment" to estimate the forced response of wintertime (DJF) surface temperature and precipitation within two high-resolution simulations of the 21st-century climate in the Pacific Northwest. The simulations were performed at 12-km resolution using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model, downscaled from global CCSM3 and ECHAM5 simulations under an A1B emissions scenario. While the raw simulations exhibit large differences in the magnitude and spatial structure of precipitation and surface temperature trends, dynamical adjustment results in much better agreement between the simulations, especially with regard to projected surface warming. These results suggest that dynamical adjustment of a small number of high-resolution simulations can provide much of the benefit of a large ensemble, but at far less computational expense.

  7. Long-Term Large-Scale Bias-Adjusted Precipitation Estimates at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Derived from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) Precipitation Reanalysis over CONUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, O. P.; Nelson, B. R.; Stevens, S. E.; Seo, D. J.; Kim, B.

    2014-12-01

    The processing of radar-only precipitation via the reanalysis from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor Quantitative (NMQ/Q2) based on the WSR-88D Next-generation Radar (Nexrad) network over Continental United States (CONUS) is nearly completed for the period covering from 2000 to 2012. This important milestone constitutes a unique opportunity to study precipitation processes at a 1-km spatial resolution for a 5-min temporal resolution. However, in order to be suitable for hydrological, meteorological and climatological applications, the radar-only product needs to be bias-adjusted and merged with in-situ rain gauge information. Rain gauge networks such as the Hydrometeorological Automated Data System (HADS), the Automated Surface Observing Systems (ASOS), the Climate Reference Network (CRN), and the Global Historical Climatology Network - Daily (GHCN-D) are used to adjust for those biases and to merge with the radar only product to provide a multi-sensor estimate. The challenges related to incorporating non-homogeneous networks over a vast area and for a long-term record are enormous. Among the challenges we are facing are the difficulties incorporating differing resolution and quality surface measurements to adjust gridded estimates of precipitation. Another challenge is the type of adjustment technique. After assessing the bias and applying reduction or elimination techniques, we are investigating the kriging method and its variants such as simple kriging (SK), ordinary kriging (OK), and conditional bias-penalized Kriging (CBPK) among others. In addition we hope to generate estimates of uncertainty for the gridded estimate. In this work the methodology is presented as well as a comparison between the radar-only product and the final multi-sensor QPE product. The comparison is performed at various time scales from the sub-hourly, to annual. In addition, comparisons over the same period with a suite of lower resolution QPEs derived from ground based radar

  8. A multi-resolution assessment of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model v4.7 wet deposition estimates for 2002-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, K. W.; Foley, K. M.; Bash, J. O.; Pinder, R. W.; Dennis, R. L.; Allen, D. J.; Pickering, K.

    2011-05-01

    This paper examines the operational performance of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model simulations for 2002-2006 using both 36-km and 12-km horizontal grid spacing, with a primary focus on the performance of the CMAQ model in predicting wet deposition of sulfate (SO4=), ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-). Performance of the wet deposition estimates from the model is determined by comparing CMAQ predicted concentrations to concentrations measured by the National Acid Deposition Program (NADP), specifically the National Trends Network (NTN). For SO4= wet deposition, the CMAQ model estimates were generally comparable between the 36-km and 12-km simulations for the eastern US, with the 12-km simulation giving slightly higher estimates of SO4= wet deposition than the 36-km simulation on average. The result is a slightly larger normalized mean bias (NMB) for the 12-km simulation; however both simulations had annual biases that were less than ±15 % for each of the five years. The model estimated SO4= wet deposition values improved when they were adjusted to account for biases in the model estimated precipitation. The CMAQ model underestimates NH4+ wet deposition over the eastern US, with a slightly larger underestimation in the 36-km simulation. The largest underestimations occur in the winter and spring periods, while the summer and fall have slightly smaller underestimations of NH4+ wet deposition. The underestimation in NH4+ wet deposition is likely due in part to the poor temporal and spatial representation of ammonia (NH3) emissions, particularly those emissions associated with fertilizer applications and NH3 bi-directional exchange. The model performance for estimates of NO3- wet deposition are mixed throughout the year, with the model largely underestimating NO3- wet deposition in the spring and summer in the eastern US, while the model has a relatively small bias in the fall and winter. Model estimates of NO3- wet deposition tend to be slightly

  9. [Estimation of canopy chlorophyll content using hyperspectral data].

    PubMed

    Dong, Jing-Jing; Wang, Li; Niu, Zheng

    2009-11-01

    Many researches have developed models to estimate chlorophyl content at leaf and canopy level, but they were species-specific. The objective of the present paper was to develop a new model. First, canopy reflectance was simulated for different species and different canopy architecture using radiative transfer models. Based on the simulated canopy reflectance, the relationship between canopy reflectance and canopy chlorophyll content was studied, and then a chlorophyll estimation model was built using the method of spectral index. The coefficient of determination (R2) between spectral index based model and canopy chlorophyll content reached 0.75 for simulated data. To investigate the applicability of this chlorophyll model, the authors chose a field sample area in Gansu Province to carry out the measurement of leaf chlorophyll content, canopy reflectance and other parameters. Besides, the authors also ordered the synchronous Hyperion data, a hyperspectral image with a spatial resolution of 30 m. Canopy reflectance from field measurment and reflectance from Hyperion image were respectively used as the input parameter for the chlorophyll estimation model. Both of them got good results, which indicated that the model could be used for accurate canopy chlorophyll estimation using canopy reflectance. However, while using spaceborne hyperspectral data to estimate canopy chlorophyll content, good atmospheric correction is required. PMID:20101973

  10. A multi-resolution assessment of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Model v4.7 wet deposition estimates for 2002-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, K. W.; Foley, K. M.; Bash, J. O.; Pinder, R. W.; Dennis, R. L.; Allen, D. J.; Pickering, K.

    2010-12-01

    This paper examines the operational performance of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model simulations for 2002-2006 using both 36-km and 12-km horizontal grid spacing with a primary focus on the performance of the CMAQ model in predicting wet deposition of sulfate (SO4=), ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-). Performance of the wet deposition species is determined by comparing CMAQ predicted concentrations to concentrations measured by the National Acid Deposition Program (NADP), specifically the National Trends Network (NTN). For SO4= wet deposition, the CMAQ model estimates were generally comparable between the 36-km and 12-km simulations for the eastern US, with the 12-km simulation giving slightly higher estimates of SO4= wet deposition than the 36-km simulation on average. The normalized mean bias (NMB) was slightly higher for the 12-km simulation, however, both simulations had annual biases that were less than ±15% for each of the five years. The model estimated SO4= wet deposition values improved when they were adjusted to account for biases in the model estimated precipitation. The CMAQ model underestimates NH4+ wet deposition over the eastern US using both the 36-km and 12-km horizontal grid spacing, with a slightly larger underestimation in the 36-km simulation. The largest underestimations occur during the winter and spring periods, while the summer and fall have slightly smaller underestimations of NH4+ wet deposition. Annually, the NMB generally ranges between -10% and -16% for the 12-km simulation and -12% to -18% for the 36-km simulation over the five-year period for the eastern US. The underestimation in NH4+ wet deposition is likely due, in part, to the poor temporal and spatial representation of ammonia (NH3) emissions, particularly those emissions associated with fertilizer applications and NH3 bi-directional exchange. The model performance for estimates of NO3- wet deposition are mixed throughout the year, with the model largely

  11. Synergistic using medium-resolution and high-resolution remote sensing imagery to extract impervious surface for Dianci Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Liang; Yang, Kun; Deng, Ming; Liu, Cun

    2014-03-01

    The knowledge of impervious surfaces, especially the magnitude, location, geometry, spatial pattern of impervious surfaces, is significant to urban ecosystem studies, including urban hydrology, urban climate, land use planning and resource management.Impervious surface area (ISA) is considered a key indicator of environmental quality and can be used to address complex urban environmental issues, particularly those related to the health of urban watersheds. ISA is also an indicator of non-point source pollution or polluted runoff. Remote sensing offers a consistent framework for representing spatial patterns and rates of urbanization over time through accurate observations of impervious surface area. Most of the existing methods of extracting impervious surface based on remote sensing concentrate on an urban scale, but the rapid and accurate methods of extracting impervious surfaces in a basin scale are nearly nonexistent in China and abroad. In recent years,with the rapid urbanization especially surrounding the Dianchi water body, the impervious surface coverage rate also grows rapidly and results in severe degradation of basin water environment within Dianchi watershed. In this study, we developed an approach to extract impervious surface for Dianci Basin by synergistic using medium-resolution and high-resolution remote sensing imagery. Subpixel percent impervious surfaces at Thematic Mapper (TM) images were mapped using the classification and regression tree(CART) algorithm. Sub-pixel impervious surfaces at 30m resolution were mapped in this study area through regression tree models. The estimated ISA results were evaluated through independent ISA reference data derived from high resolution QuickBird. The results prove the suitability of the approach for a widely automated and mapping of impervious surfaces in a basin scale.

  12. Fusing enhanced radar precipitation, in-situ hydrometeorological measurements and airborne LIDAR snowpack estimates in a hyper-resolution hydrologic model to improve seasonal water supply forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gochis, D. J.; Busto, J.; Howard, K.; Mickey, J.; Deems, J. S.; Painter, T. H.; Richardson, M.; Dugger, A. L.; Karsten, L. R.; Tang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Scarcity of spatially- and temporally-continuous observations of precipitation and snowpack conditions in remote mountain watersheds results in fundamental limitations in water supply forecasting. These limitationsin observational capabilities can result in strong biases in total snowmelt-driven runoff amount, the elevational distribution of runoff, river basin tributary contributions to total basin runoff and, equally important for water management, the timing of runoff. The Upper Rio Grande River basin in Colorado and New Mexico is one basin where observational deficiencies are hypothesized to have significant adverse impacts on estimates of snowpack melt-out rates and on water supply forecasts. We present findings from a coordinated observational-modeling study within Upper Rio Grande River basin whose aim was to quanitfy the impact enhanced precipitation, meteorological and snowpack measurements on the simulation and prediction of snowmelt driven streamflow. The Rio Grande SNOwpack and streamFLOW (RIO-SNO-FLOW) Prediction Project conducted enhanced observing activities during the 2014-2015 water year. Measurements from a gap-filling, polarimetric radar (NOXP) and in-situ meteorological and snowpack measurement stations were assimilated into the WRF-Hydro modeling framework to provide continuous analyses of snowpack and streamflow conditions. Airborne lidar estimates of snowpack conditions from the NASA Airborne Snow Observatory during mid-April and mid-May were used as additional independent validations against the various model simulations and forecasts of snowpack conditions during the melt-out season. Uncalibrated WRF-Hydro model performance from simulations and forecasts driven by enhanced observational analyses were compared against results driven by currently operational data inputs. Precipitation estimates from the NOXP research radar validate significantly better against independent in situ observations of precipitation and snow-pack increases

  13. Estimation of magnetospheric plasma ion composition for 1956-1975 by using high time resolution geomagnetic field data created from analog magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Nosé, M.; Mashiko, N.; Morinaga, K.; Nagamachi, S.

    2016-06-01

    This study addresses the ion composition in the magnetosphere before the satellite era. We estimate the plasma ion mass for 1956-1975 from the period of low-latitude Pi2 pulsations found in digital geomagnetic field data that are created from analog magnetograms at Kakioka. The period of investigation covers most of solar cycle 19 and the whole solar cycle 20. To consider long-term variation, the moving average of the estimated plasma ion mass is calculated with a 1 year time window. We find that 1 year moving average of the plasma ion mass changed by a factor of ˜2 during one solar cycle (i.e., between ˜1.1 amu and ˜2.4 amu for solar cycle 19 and between ˜1.1 amu and ˜2.0 amu for solar cycle 20). The correlation coefficient between the 1 year moving average of the plasma ion mass and that of the F10.7 index is 0.86. This result supports the idea that in long-term variation, solar radiation increases the density and the temperature of O+ ions in the ionosphere, leads to the outflow of O+ ions, and contributes to the enhancement of the plasma ion mass in the nightside magnetosphere. The digital data created from analog magnetograms provide an important clue to know the space environment in old days and are advantageous for studies of the space weather and space climate.

  14. Improved estimate of the policy-relevant background ozone in the United States using the GEOS-Chem global model with 1/2° × 2/3° horizontal resolution over North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Jacob, Daniel J.; Downey, Nicole V.; Wood, Dana A.; Blewitt, Doug; Carouge, Claire C.; van Donkelaar, Aaron; Jones, Dylan B. A.; Murray, Lee T.; Wang, Yuxuan

    2011-12-01

    The policy-relevant background (PRB) ozone is defined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as the surface ozone concentration that would be present over the US in the absence of North American anthropogenic emissions. It is intended to provide a baseline for risk and exposure assessments used in setting the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). We present here three-year statistics (2006-2008) of PRB ozone over the US calculated using the GEOS-Chem global 3-D model of atmospheric composition with 1/2° × 2/3° horizontal resolution over North America and adjacent oceans (2° × 2.5° for the rest of the world). We also provide estimates of the US background (no anthropogenic US emissions) and natural background (no anthropogenic emissions worldwide and pre-industrial methane). Our work improves on previous GEOS-Chem PRB estimates through the use of higher model resolution, 3-year statistics, better representation of stratospheric influence, and updated emissions. PRB is particularly high in the intermountain West due to high elevation, arid terrain, and large-scale subsidence. We present for this region a detailed model evaluation showing that the model is successful in reproducing ozone exceedances up to 70 ppbv. However, the model cannot reproduce PRB-relevant exceptional events associated with wildfires or stratospheric intrusions. The mean PRB estimates for spring-summer are 27 ± 8 ppbv at low-altitude sites and 40 ± 7 ppbv at high-altitude sites. Differences between the PRB simulation and the natural simulation indicate a mean enhancement from intercontinental pollution and anthropogenic methane of 9 ppbv at low-altitude sites and 13 ppbv at high-altitude sites. The PRB is higher than average when ozone exceeds 60 ppbv, particularly in the intermountain West. Our PRB estimates are on average 4 ppbv higher than previous GEOS-Chem studies and we attribute this to higher lighting, increasing Asian emissions, and improved model resolution

  15. Nano silver and nano zinc-oxide in surface waters – Exposure estimation for Europe at high spatial and temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Egon; Johnson, Andrew C.; Keller, Virginie D.J.; Williams, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Nano silver and nano zinc-oxide monthly concentrations in surface waters across Europe were modeled at ∼6 × 9 km spatial resolution. Nano-particle loadings from households to rivers were simulated considering household connectivity to sewerage, sewage treatment efficiency, the spatial distribution of sewage treatment plants, and their associated populations. These loadings were used to model temporally varying nano-particle concentrations in rivers, lakes and wetlands by considering dilution, downstream transport, water evaporation, water abstraction, and nano-particle sedimentation. Temporal variability in concentrations caused by weather variation was simulated using monthly weather data for a representative 31-year period. Modeled concentrations represent current levels of nano-particle production. Two scenarios were modeled. In the most likely scenario, half the river stretches had long-term average concentrations exceeding 0.002 ng L−1 nano silver and 1.5 ng L−1 nano zinc oxide. In 10% of the river stretches, these concentrations exceeded 0.18 ng L−1 and 150 ng L−1, respectively. Predicted concentrations were usually highest in July. PMID:25463731

  16. The limits of ultrahigh-resolution x-ray mapping: estimating uncertainties in thin-film and interface structures determined by phase retrieval methods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou H.; Pindak R.; Clarke, R.; Steinberg, D.NM.; Yacoby, Y.

    2012-04-25

    Capturing subtle details at the sub-Angstrom level is key to understanding the structural basis of many intriguing interfacial phenomena in epitaxial thin films and nanostructures. X-ray phase retrieval methods are ideally suited to this task but the usual approaches for determination of uncertainties, based on refining a parametrized model, are not applicable in this case. Here we describe a method to estimate the uncertainties of the system electron density, obtained by phase retrieval, and of parameters of interest obtained from it. The method is based on the bootstrap approach and it can be generally applied to surface x-ray scattering data. Several examples are given which illustrate the method's utility in determining uncertainties arising from random and systematic errors. The approach also provides a quantitative measure of the validity of structural solutions obtained by phase retrieval methods.

  17. Automated drumlin shape and volume estimation using high resolution LiDAR imagery (Curvature Based Relief Separation): A test from the Wadena Drumlin Field, Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peter; Eyles, Nick; Sookhan, Shane

    2015-10-01

    Resolving the origin(s) of drumlins and related megaridges in areas of megascale glacial lineations (MSGL) left by paleo-ice sheets is critical to understanding how ancient ice sheets interacted with their sediment beds. MSGL is now linked with fast-flowing ice streams but there is a broad range of erosional and depositional models. Further progress is reliant on constraining fluxes of subglacial sediment at the ice sheet base which in turn is dependent on morphological data such as landform shape and elongation and most importantly landform volume. Past practice in determining shape has employed a broad range of geomorphological methods from strictly visualisation techniques to more complex semi-automated and automated drumlin extraction methods. This paper reviews and builds on currently available visualisation, semi-automated and automated extraction methods and presents a new, Curvature Based Relief Separation (CBRS) technique; for drumlin mapping. This uses curvature analysis to generate a base level from which topography can be normalized and drumlin volume can be derived. This methodology is tested using a high resolution (3 m) LiDAR elevation dataset from the Wadena Drumlin Field, Minnesota, USA, which was constructed by the Wadena Lobe of the Laurentide Ice Sheet ca. 20,000 years ago and which as a whole contains ~ 2000 drumlins across an area of ~ 7500 km2. This analysis demonstrates that CBRS provides an objective and robust procedure for automated drumlin extraction. There is strong agreement with manually selected landforms but the method is also capable of resolving features that were not detectable manually thereby considerably expanding the known population of streamlined landforms. CBRS provides an effective automatic method for visualisation of large areas of the streamlined beds of former ice sheets and for modelling sediment fluxes below ice sheets.

  18. Expanding Molecular Bubble Surrounding Tycho’s Supernova Remnant (SN 1572) Observed with the IRAM 30 m Telescope: Evidence for a Single-degenerate Progenitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping; Chen, Yang; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Li, Xiang-Dong; Safi-Harb, Samar; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-07-01

    Whether the progenitors of SNe Ia are single-degenerate or double-degenerate white dwarf (WD) systems is a highly debated topic. To address the origin of Tycho’s Type Ia supernova remnant (SNR), SN 1572, we have carried out a 12CO J = 2–1 mapping and a 3 mm line survey toward the remnant using the IRAM 30 m telescope. We show that Tycho is surrounded by a clumpy molecular bubble at a local standard of rest velocity of ˜ 61 {km} {{{s}}}-1, which expands at a speed of ˜ 4.5 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and has a mass of ˜ 220 {M}ȯ (at the distance of 2.5 kpc). Enhanced 12CO J = 2–1 line emission relative to 12CO J = 1–0 emission and possible line broadenings (in velocity range ‑64 to ‑60 km s‑1) are found at the northeastern boundary of the SNR, where the shell is deformed and decelerated. These features, combined with the morphological correspondence between the expanding molecular bubble and Tycho, suggest that the SNR is associated with the bubble at the velocity range ‑66 to ‑57 km s‑1. The most plausible origin for the expanding bubble is the fast outflow (with velocity of hundreds km s‑1) driven from the vicinity of a WD as it accreted matter from a nondegenerate companion star. The SNR has been expanding in the low-density wind-blown bubble, and the shock wave has just reached the molecular cavity wall. This is the first unambiguous detection of an expanding bubble driven by the progenitor of a Type Ia SNR, which constitutes evidence for a single-degenerate progenitor for this SN Ia.

  19. Investigation of rat bone fracture healing using pulsed 1.5 MHz, 30 mW/cm(2) burst ultrasound--axial distance dependency.

    PubMed

    Fung, Chak-Hei; Cheung, Wing-Hoi; Pounder, Neill M; de Ana, F Javier; Harrison, Andrew; Leung, Kwok-Sui

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of LIPUS on fracture healing when fractures were exposed to ultrasound at three axial distances: z=0 mm, 60 mm, and 130 mm. We applied LIPUS to rat fracture at these three axial distances mimicking the exposure condition of human fractures at different depths under the soft tissue. Measurement of LIPUS shows pressure variations in near field (nearby transducer); uniform profile was found beyond it (far field). We asked whether different positions of the fracture within the ultrasound field cause inconsistent biological effect during the healing process. Closed femoral fractured Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into control, near-field (0mm), mid-near field (60 mm) or far-field (130 mm) groups. Daily LIPUS treatment (plane, but apodized source, see details in the text; 2.2 cm in diameter; 1.5 MHz sine waves repeating at 1 kHz PRF; spatial average temporal average intensity, ISATA=30 mW/cm(2)) was given to fracture site at the three axial distances. Weekly radiographs and endpoint microCT, histomorphometry, and mechanical tests were performed. The results showed that the 130 mm group had the highest tissue mineral density; and significantly higher mechanical properties than control at week 4. The 60 mm and 0 mm groups had significantly higher (i.e. p<0.05) woven bone percentage than control group in radiological, microCT and histomorphometry measurements. In general, LIPUS at far field augmented callus mineralization and mechanical properties; while near field and mid-near field enhanced woven bone formation. Our results indicated the therapeutic effect of LIPUS is dependent on the axial distance of the ultrasound beam. Therefore, the depth of fracture under the soft tissue affects the biological effect of LIPUS. Clinicians have to be aware of the fracture depth when LIPUS is applied transcutaneously.

  20. Expanding Molecular Bubble Surrounding Tycho’s Supernova Remnant (SN 1572) Observed with the IRAM 30 m Telescope: Evidence for a Single-degenerate Progenitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping; Chen, Yang; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Li, Xiang-Dong; Safi-Harb, Samar; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-07-01

    Whether the progenitors of SNe Ia are single-degenerate or double-degenerate white dwarf (WD) systems is a highly debated topic. To address the origin of Tycho’s Type Ia supernova remnant (SNR), SN 1572, we have carried out a 12CO J = 2-1 mapping and a 3 mm line survey toward the remnant using the IRAM 30 m telescope. We show that Tycho is surrounded by a clumpy molecular bubble at a local standard of rest velocity of ˜ 61 {km} {{{s}}}-1, which expands at a speed of ˜ 4.5 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and has a mass of ˜ 220 {M}⊙ (at the distance of 2.5 kpc). Enhanced 12CO J = 2-1 line emission relative to 12CO J = 1-0 emission and possible line broadenings (in velocity range -64 to -60 km s-1) are found at the northeastern boundary of the SNR, where the shell is deformed and decelerated. These features, combined with the morphological correspondence between the expanding molecular bubble and Tycho, suggest that the SNR is associated with the bubble at the velocity range -66 to -57 km s-1. The most plausible origin for the expanding bubble is the fast outflow (with velocity of hundreds km s-1) driven from the vicinity of a WD as it accreted matter from a nondegenerate companion star. The SNR has been expanding in the low-density wind-blown bubble, and the shock wave has just reached the molecular cavity wall. This is the first unambiguous detection of an expanding bubble driven by the progenitor of a Type Ia SNR, which constitutes evidence for a single-degenerate progenitor for this SN Ia.

  1. Investigation of rat bone fracture healing using pulsed 1.5 MHz, 30 mW/cm(2) burst ultrasound--axial distance dependency.

    PubMed

    Fung, Chak-Hei; Cheung, Wing-Hoi; Pounder, Neill M; de Ana, F Javier; Harrison, Andrew; Leung, Kwok-Sui

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of LIPUS on fracture healing when fractures were exposed to ultrasound at three axial distances: z=0 mm, 60 mm, and 130 mm. We applied LIPUS to rat fracture at these three axial distances mimicking the exposure condition of human fractures at different depths under the soft tissue. Measurement of LIPUS shows pressure variations in near field (nearby transducer); uniform profile was found beyond it (far field). We asked whether different positions of the fracture within the ultrasound field cause inconsistent biological effect during the healing process. Closed femoral fractured Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into control, near-field (0mm), mid-near field (60 mm) or far-field (130 mm) groups. Daily LIPUS treatment (plane, but apodized source, see details in the text; 2.2 cm in diameter; 1.5 MHz sine waves repeating at 1 kHz PRF; spatial average temporal average intensity, ISATA=30 mW/cm(2)) was given to fracture site at the three axial distances. Weekly radiographs and endpoint microCT, histomorphometry, and mechanical tests were performed. The results showed that the 130 mm group had the highest tissue mineral density; and significantly higher mechanical properties than control at week 4. The 60 mm and 0 mm groups had significantly higher (i.e. p<0.05) woven bone percentage than control group in radiological, microCT and histomorphometry measurements. In general, LIPUS at far field augmented callus mineralization and mechanical properties; while near field and mid-near field enhanced woven bone formation. Our results indicated the therapeutic effect of LIPUS is dependent on the axial distance of the ultrasound beam. Therefore, the depth of fracture under the soft tissue affects the biological effect of LIPUS. Clinicians have to be aware of the fracture depth when LIPUS is applied transcutaneously. PMID:24239510

  2. Evaluating The National Land Cover Database Tree Canopy and Impervious Cover Estimates Across the Conterminous United States: A Comparison with Photo-Interpreted Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    The 2001 National Land Cover Database (NLCD) provides 30-m resolution estimates of percentage tree canopy and percentage impervious cover for the conterminous United States. Previous estimates that compared NLCD tree canopy and impervious cover estimates with photo-interpreted cover estimates within selected counties and places revealed that NLCD underestimates tree and impervious cover. Based on these previous results, a wall-to-wall comprehensive national analysis was conducted to determine if and how NLCD derived estimates of tree and impervious cover varies from photo-interpreted values across the conterminous United States. Results of this analysis reveal that NLCD significantly underestimates tree cover in 64 of the 65 zones used to create the NCLD cover maps, with a national average underestimation of 9.7% (standard error (SE) = 1.0%) and a maximum underestimation of 28.4% in mapping zone 3. Impervious cover was also underestimated in 44 zones with an average underestimation of 1.4% (SE = 0.4%) and a maximum underestimation of 5.7% in mapping zone 56. Understanding the degree of underestimation by mapping zone can lead to better estimates of tree and impervious cover and a better understanding of the potential limitations associated with NLCD cover estimates. PMID:20676888

  3. Evaluating The National Land Cover Database Tree Canopy and Impervious Cover Estimates Across the Conterminous United States: A Comparison with Photo-Interpreted Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, David J.; Greenfield, Eric J.

    2010-09-01

    The 2001 National Land Cover Database (NLCD) provides 30-m resolution estimates of percentage tree canopy and percentage impervious cover for the conterminous United States. Previous estimates that compared NLCD tree canopy and impervious cover estimates with photo-interpreted cover estimates within selected counties and places revealed that NLCD underestimates tree and impervious cover. Based on these previous results, a wall-to-wall comprehensive national analysis was conducted to determine if and how NLCD derived estimates of tree and impervious cover varies from photo-interpreted values across the conterminous United States. Results of this analysis reveal that NLCD significantly underestimates tree cover in 64 of the 65 zones used to create the NCLD cover maps, with a national average underestimation of 9.7% (standard error (SE) = 1.0%) and a maximum underestimation of 28.4% in mapping zone 3. Impervious cover was also underestimated in 44 zones with an average underestimation of 1.4% (SE = 0.4%) and a maximum underestimation of 5.7% in mapping zone 56. Understanding the degree of underestimation by mapping zone can lead to better estimates of tree and impervious cover and a better understanding of the potential limitations associated with NLCD cover estimates.

  4. [Dispute Resolutions].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Claudia L.; Cooks, Leda M.

    1994-01-01

    Focusing on the teaching of alternative dispute resolutions at universities, Claudia L. Hale and Leda M. Cooks argue that mediation should be taught primarily as a communication process that involves the joint efforts of mediator and disputants. Teachers of mediation should begin by distinguishing mediation from other forms of dispute resolution,…

  5. Resolution Enhancement of Multilook Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Galbraith, Amy E.

    2004-07-01

    This dissertation studies the feasibility of enhancing the spatial resolution of multi-look remotely-sensed imagery using an iterative resolution enhancement algorithm known as Projection Onto Convex Sets (POCS). A multi-angle satellite image modeling tool is implemented, and simulated multi-look imagery is formed to test the resolution enhancement algorithm. Experiments are done to determine the optimal con guration and number of multi-angle low-resolution images needed for a quantitative improvement in the spatial resolution of the high-resolution estimate. The important topic of aliasing is examined in the context of the POCS resolution enhancement algorithm performance. In addition, the extension of the method to multispectral sensor images is discussed and an example is shown using multispectral confocal fluorescence imaging microscope data. Finally, the remote sensing issues of atmospheric path radiance and directional reflectance variations are explored to determine their effect on the resolution enhancement performance.

  6. Comparison of separations of fatty acids from fish products using a 30-m Supelcowax-10 and a 100-m SP-2560 column.

    PubMed

    Santercole, Viviana; Delmonte, Pierluigi; Kramer, John K G

    2012-03-01

    Commercial fish oils and foods containing fish may contain trans and/or isomerized fatty acids (FA) produced during processing or as part of prepared foods. The current American Oil Chemists' Society (AOCS) official method for marine oils (method Ce 1i-07) is based on separation by use of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) columns, for example Supelcowax-10 or equivalent, which do not resolve most unsaturated FA geometric isomers. Highly polar 100-m cyanopropyl siloxane (CPS) columns, for example SP-2560 and CP Sil 88 are recommended for separation of geometric FA isomers. Complementary separations were achieved by use of two different elution temperature programs with the same CPS column. This study is the first direct comparison of the separations achieved by use of 30-m Supelcowax-10 and 100-m SP-2560 columns for fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) prepared from the same fish oil and fish muscle sample. To simplify the identification of the FA in these fish samples, FA were fractionated on the basis of the number and type of double bonds by silver-ion solid-phase extraction (Ag⁺-SPE) before GC analysis. The results showed that a combination of the three GC separations was necessary to resolve and identify most of the unsaturated FA, FA isomers, and other components of fish products, for example phytanic and phytenic acids. Equivalent chain length (ECL) values of most FAME in fish were calculated from the separations achieved by use of both GC columns; the values obtained were shown to be consistent with previously reported values for the Supelcowax-10 column. ECL values were also calculated for the FA separated on the SP-2560 column. The calculated ECL values were equally valid under isothermal and temperature-programmed elution GC conditions, and were valuable for confirmation of the identity of several unsaturated FAME in the fish samples. When analyzing commercially prepared fish foods, deodorized marine oils, or foods fortified with marine oils it is strongly

  7. Geostatistics and remote sensing using NOAA-AVHRR satellite imagery as predictive tools in tick distribution and habitat suitability estimations for Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) in South America. National Oceanographic and Atmosphere Administration-Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Peña, A

    1999-02-01

    Remote sensing based on NOAA (National Oceanographic and Atmosphere Administration) satellite imagery was used, together with geostatistics (cokriging) to model the correlation between the temperature and vegetation variables and the distribution of the cattle tick, Boophilus microplus (Canestrini), in the Neotropical region. The results were used to map the B. microplus habitat suitability on a continental scale. A database of B. microplus capture localities was used, which was tabulated with the AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) images from the NOAA satellite series. They were obtained at 10 days intervals between 1983 and 1994, with an 8 km resolution. A cokriging system was generated to extrapolate the results. The data for habitat suitability obtained through two vegetation and four temperature variables were strongly correlated with the known distribution of B. microplus (sensitivity 0.91; specificity 0.88) and provide a good estimation of the tick habitat suitability. This model could be used as a guide to the correct interpretation of the distribution limits of B. microplus. It can be also used to prepare eradication campaigns or to make predictions about the effects of global change on the distribution of the parasite.

  8. Position Resolution in DROIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samedov, Victor V.

    2008-04-01

    Since the very beginning, Distributed Read-Out Imaging Devices (DROIDs) were proposed to achieve both good position and energy resolutions. In DROIDs, the absorption of primary particle energy occurs in a long superconductive strip. Quasiparticles produced in the absorber diffuse along the strip and counted by the superconductive tunnel junctions positioned at the two ends of the strip. In this paper the formula for estimation DROID’s position resolution from experimental data was derived. This formula takes into account correlation between fluctuations of signals of DROID’s detectors.

  9. On 10 to 30 m-scale fracture networks in Gale Crater: Contraction of fine-grained sediments due to drying or of frozen sediments due to cooling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sletten, Ronald; Hallet, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    The area in Gale Crater north of the Curiosity landing site has been identified as an alluvial fan [1] and features diverse geological units [2], some with abundant contraction cracks that delineate polygons on the order of 10-30 meters across. These polygons are much larger than the < 1m flagstones seen in Yellowknife by Curiosity [3] and are more suggestive of polygonal patterned ground seen at higher latitudes on Mars [4] and Earth; however, current conditions indicate that ground ice is not stable in Gale Crater [4]. Nevertheless, past conditions, e.g. obliquity changes, may have allowed permafrost to develop and ground ice to form. The domains between the larger polygons are several meters wide, which is consistent with cyclic ratcheting of ice-cemented permafrost (thermal contraction with fractures opening, debris infilling the fractures, and the fractures not closing fully when the ground warms and expands). On the other hand, the large-scale crack networks often seem to be associated with certain lithologic units, including the thinly-bedded, lightly-colored mudstones exposed at Yellowknife. This suggests that the contraction cracks defining these 10 to 30-m polygons, as well as those defining the < 1m flagstones, formed in moist fine-grained sediments that contracted upon desiccation. If the fractures were due to contraction of ice-cemented permafrost, they would be insensitive to the type of sediments they formed in because the mechanical properties would be dominated by ice. The interpretation of the larger-scale crack network is limited to satellite images since Curiosity did not visit this area, and to evidence about surface materials elsewhere in the vicinity of the rover. This evidence points to the former presence of flowing water in Gale Crater and existence of shallow lakes of relatively low salinity and near-neutral pH at Yellowknife [5]. The large amount of contraction in Yellowknife deposits is consistent with a desiccation origin in these

  10. HIRIS - The High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, Jeff

    1988-01-01

    The High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS) is a JPL facility instrument designed for NASA's Earth Observing System (Eos).It will have 10-nm wide spectral bands from 0.4-2.5 microns at 30 m spatial resolution over a 30 km swath. The spectral resolution allows identification of many minerals in rocks and soils, important algal pigments in oceans and inland waters, spectral changes associated with plant canopy biochemistry, composition of atmospheric aerosols, and grain size of snow and its contamination by absorbing impurities. The bands wil have 12-bit quantization over a dynamic range suitable for bright targets, such as snow. For targets of low brightness, such as water bodies, image-motion compensation will allow gains up to a factor of eight to increase signal-to-noise ratios. In the 824-km orbit altitude proposed for Eos, the crosstrack pointing capability will allow 4-5 views during a 16-day revisit cycle.

  11. Conflict resolution.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger

    2006-03-01

    The sooner conflict is identified and confronted, the more quickly it can be resolved (and the sooner, the better). When this is accomplished calmly and objectively, many areas of conflict will be eliminated. Addressing conflict as it arises also sends a clear message to the team that the practice seeks resolution, not punishment or negative consequences. In addition, the dentist and the office manager need to lead by example by avoiding gossip and encouraging open communication. The goal is to go from a parent-child relationship with the dental team to an adult-adult relationship using this series of managerial conflict resolution steps.

  12. Assessing Changes in Impervious Area Using Land Use Maps of Different Resolution in the Croton NY City Water Supply Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerlot, C.; Duncan, J.; Endreny, T.

    2001-05-01

    With the advance of remote sensing, options arise for the hydrologic modeler to access both public domain and privately contracted watershed land cover maps. Land use classification processes using aerial photographs are highly variable depending on tools and training, but distinction between impervious and pervious land cover is relatively simple. Hydrologic models will estimate different runoff timing, volume, and water quality depending on the percent imperviousness of the watershed. This research will examine how percent imperviousness varies with changes in both radiometric and spatial land cover map resolution. WinHSPF was run with four distinct land cover maps derived from remote imagery: MRLC (30 m), LULC (1 km), contracted aerial photos (1 m), and processed digital (1 M) ortho quarter quads. Comparisons were made between map percent impervious cover and runoff timing and volume. A modified export coefficient model that tracks pollutant discharge through down gradient filters examined how estimated nutrient loading changed with differences in these land cover map products. Methods are suggested for updating estimates of percent impervious cover in coarser resolution maps using field data or other means.

  13. Satellite Estimates of Crop Area and Maize Yield in Zambia's Agricultural Districts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzari, G.; Lobell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Predicting crop yield and area from satellite is a valuable tool to monitor different aspects of productivity dynamics and food security. In Sub-Saharan Africa, where the agricultural landscape is complex and dominated by smallholder systems, such dynamics need to be investigated at the field scale. We leveraged the large data pool and computational power of Google Earth Engine to 1) generate 30 m resolution cover maps of selected provinces of Zambia, 2) estimate crop area, and 3) produce yearly maize yield maps using the recently developed SCYM (Scalable satellite-based Crop Yield Mapper) algorithm. We will present our results and their validation against a ground survey dataset collected yearly by the Zambia Ministry of Agriculture from about 12,500 households.

  14. NCAI Resolutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal of the Institute for the Development of Indian Law, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Five Major Policy Resolutions were adopted, without objection, at the 33rd Annual Convention of the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) held in Salt Lake City, Utah, in October 1976. The issues involved were: Treaties and Trust Responsibilities, Tribal Government, Jurisdiction, Federal Administration and Structure of Indian Affairs, and…

  15. Fuzzy logic structure analysis of trabecular bone of the calcaneus to estimate proximal femur fracture load and discriminate subjects with and without vertebral fractures using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 T and 3 T.

    PubMed

    Patel, Priyesh V; Eckstein, Felix; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Phan, Catherine; Matsuura, Maiko; Lochmüller, Eva-Maria; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M

    2007-10-01

    Newly developed fuzzy logic-derived structural parameters were used to characterize trabecular bone architecture in high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) of human cadaver calcaneus specimens. These parameters were compared to standard histomorphological structural measures and analyzed concerning performance in discriminating vertebral fracture status and estimating proximal femur fracture load. Sets of 60 sagittal 1.5 T and 3.0 T HR-MRI images of the calcaneus were obtained in 39 cadavers using a fast gradient recalled echo sequence. Structural parameters equivalent to bone histomorphometry and fuzzy logic-derived parameters were calculated using two chosen regions of interest. Calcaneal, spine, and hip bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were also obtained. Fracture status of the thoracic and lumbar spine was assessed on lateral radiographs. Finally, mechanical strength testing of the proximal femur was performed. Diagnostic performance in discriminating vertebral fracture status and estimating femoral fracture load was calculated using regression analyses, two-tailed t-tests of significance, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses. Significant correlations were obtained at both field strengths between all structural and fuzzy logic parameters (r up to 0.92). Correlations between histomorphological or fuzzy logic parameters and calcaneal BMD were mostly significant (r up to 0.78). ROC analyses demonstrated that standard structural parameters were able to differentiate persons with and without vertebral fractures (area under the curve [A(Z)] up to 0.73). However, none of the parameters obtained in the 1.5-T images and none of the fuzzy logic parameters discriminated persons with and without vertebral fractures. Significant correlations were found between fuzzy or structural parameters and femoral fracture load. Using multiple regression analysis, none of the structural or fuzzy parameters were found to add discriminative value to BMD

  16. Estimation of yield and water requirements of maize crops combining high spatial and temporal resolution images with a simple crop model, in the perspective of the Sentinel-2 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battude, Marjorie; Bitar, Ahmad Al; Brut, Aurore; Cros, Jérôme; Dejoux, Jean-François; Huc, Mireille; Marais Sicre, Claire; Tallec, Tiphaine; Demarez, Valérie

    2016-04-01

    Water resources are under increasing pressure as a result of global change and of a raising competition among the different users (agriculture, industry, urban). It is therefore important to develop tools able to estimate accurately crop water requirements in order to optimize irrigation while maintaining acceptable production. In this context, remote sensing is a valuable tool to monitor vegetation development and water demand. This work aims at developing a robust and generic methodology mainly based on high resolution remote sensing data to provide accurate estimates of maize yield and water needs at the watershed scale. Evapotranspiration (ETR) and dry aboveground biomass (DAM) of maize crops were modeled using time series of GAI images used to drive a simple agro-meteorological crop model (SAFYE, Duchemin et al., 2005). This model is based on a leaf partitioning function (Maas, 1993) for the simulation of crop biomass and on the FAO-56 methodology for the ETR simulation. The model also contains a module to simulate irrigation. This study takes advantage of the SPOT4 and SPOT5 Take5 experiments initiated by CNES (http://www.cesbio.ups-tlse.fr/multitemp/). They provide optical images over the watershed from February to May 2013 and from April to August 2015 respectively, with a temporal and spatial resolution similar to future images from the Sentinel-2 and VENμS missions. This dataset was completed with LandSat8 and Deimos1 images in order to cover the whole growing season while reducing the gaps in remote sensing time series. Radiometric, geometric and atmospheric corrections were achieved by the THEIA land data center, and the KALIDEOS processing chain. The temporal dynamics of the green area index (GAI) plays a key role in soil-plant-atmosphere interactions and in biomass accumulation process. Consistent seasonal dynamics of the remotely sensed GAI was estimated by applying a radiative transfer model based on artificial neural networks (BVNET, Baret

  17. Intra- and Inter-Seasonal Supra-glacial Water Variability over the West Greenland Ice Sheet as Estimated from Combining High Resolution Satellite Optical Data and a Digital Elevation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. G.; Tedesco, M.; Smith, L. C.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Yang, K.

    2015-12-01

    The supra-glacial hydrology of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) plays a crucial role on the surface energy and mass balance budgets of the ice sheet as a whole. The surface hydrology network variability of small streams in the ablation zone of Greenland is poorly understood both spatially and temporally. Using satellites that can spatially resolve the presence and associated properties of small streams, the scientific community is now able to be provided with accurate spatial and temporal analysis of surface hydrology on the ice sheet (that could not have been resolved with other sensors such as those on board MODIS or LANDSAT). In this study we report mapped supra-glacial water networks over a region of the West GrIS (approximately 164 km2) derived from high resolution multispectral satellite imagery from the Quickbird and WorldView - 2 satellites in tandem with a 2 meter stereographic SETSM DEM (digital elevation model). The branching complexity of the identified surface streams is computed from the available DEM as well as the intra- and inter seasonal changes observed in the hydrological system. The stream networks created during the melt season (at several different stages of melting) are compared and discussed as well as the networks mapped between consecutive years for proximate dates. Also, depth and volume estimations for the surface water features identified were extracted via band math algorithms, threshold classifications, and morphological operations. Our results indicate that the higher stream orders have the largest amount of stored surface water per km but the lower stream orders, specifically 1st order with widths of ~ 2 meters, hold more stored surface water overall. We also employ and compare runoff data from the numerical model MAR (Modèle Atmosphérique Régional) to the estimations found using imagery and the DEM.

  18. A reliable compound-specific nitrogen isotope analysis of amino acids by GC-C-IRMS following derivatisation into N-pivaloyl-iso-propyl (NPIP)esters for high-resolution food webs estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongyi; Tian, Jing; Xiao, Hongwei; Zheng, Nengjian; Gao, Xiaofei; Zhu, Renguo; Xiao, Huayun

    2016-10-15

    The signatures of natural stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ(15)N) of individual amino acid (AA) have been confirmed to be a potentially effective tool for elucidating nitrogen cycling and trophic position of various organisms in food webs. In the present study, a two-stage derivatisation approach of esterification followed by acylation was evaluated. The biological samples underwent acid hydrolysis and the released individual AA was derivatived into corresponding N-pivaloyl-isopropyl (NPIP) esters for nitrogen isotopic analysis in gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). Usually, 13 individual AA derivatives were separated with fine baseline resolution based on a nonpolar gas chromatography column (DB-5ms). The minimum sample amount required under the presented conditions is larger than 20ngN on column in order to accurately determine the δ(15)N values. The δ(15)N values determined by GC-C-IRMS with a precision of better than 1‰, were within 1‰ after empirical correction compared to the corresponding measured by element analysis (EA)-IRMS. Bland-Altman plot showed highly consistency of the δ(15)N values determined by the two measurement techniques. Cation-exchange chromatography was applied to remove interfering fraction from the extracts of plant and animal samples and without nitrogen isotope fractionation during the treatment procedure. Moreover, this approach was carried out to estimate the trophic level of various natural organisms in a natural lake environment. Results highly proved that the trophic level estimated via the presented AA method well reflected the actual food web structure in natural environments.

  19. A reliable compound-specific nitrogen isotope analysis of amino acids by GC-C-IRMS following derivatisation into N-pivaloyl-iso-propyl (NPIP)esters for high-resolution food webs estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongyi; Tian, Jing; Xiao, Hongwei; Zheng, Nengjian; Gao, Xiaofei; Zhu, Renguo; Xiao, Huayun

    2016-10-15

    The signatures of natural stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ(15)N) of individual amino acid (AA) have been confirmed to be a potentially effective tool for elucidating nitrogen cycling and trophic position of various organisms in food webs. In the present study, a two-stage derivatisation approach of esterification followed by acylation was evaluated. The biological samples underwent acid hydrolysis and the released individual AA was derivatived into corresponding N-pivaloyl-isopropyl (NPIP) esters for nitrogen isotopic analysis in gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). Usually, 13 individual AA derivatives were separated with fine baseline resolution based on a nonpolar gas chromatography column (DB-5ms). The minimum sample amount required under the presented conditions is larger than 20ngN on column in order to accurately determine the δ(15)N values. The δ(15)N values determined by GC-C-IRMS with a precision of better than 1‰, were within 1‰ after empirical correction compared to the corresponding measured by element analysis (EA)-IRMS. Bland-Altman plot showed highly consistency of the δ(15)N values determined by the two measurement techniques. Cation-exchange chromatography was applied to remove interfering fraction from the extracts of plant and animal samples and without nitrogen isotope fractionation during the treatment procedure. Moreover, this approach was carried out to estimate the trophic level of various natural organisms in a natural lake environment. Results highly proved that the trophic level estimated via the presented AA method well reflected the actual food web structure in natural environments. PMID:27636011

  20. Using a data fusion method to estimate daily stand-scale evapotranspiration over a managed pine plantation in North Carolina, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Anderson, M. C.; Gao, F.; Hain, C.; Kustas, W. P.; Noormets, A.; Wynne, R. H.; Thomas, V. A.; Sun, G.

    2015-12-01

    Within the context of a globally changing climate, efficient management of freshwater resource management is becoming an increasingly critical issue. As an indicator of vegetation health and soil moisture status, remotely sensed estimates of evapotranspiration (ET) estimation can provide valuable information about water usage in managed landscapes. The two source energy balance (TSEB) model has been widely applied to quantify field scale ET over agricultural systems using thermal infrared remote sensing data. However, limitations on the spatial and temporal resolution of the satellite data combined with the effects of cloud contamination constrain the amount of detail that a single satellite can provide. Fusing multi-satellite data with varying spatial and temporal resolutions can give a more continuous estimation of daily ET at field scale. In this study, we used the regional TSEB modeling system (Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse; ALEXI) to map ET at 4-km resolution over the continental U.S. using imagery from geostationary satellites. These 4-km regional estimates were disaggregated to 1-km (daily timesteps) using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) input data and down to 30-m with Landsat data 8 scenes during the growing season) using the disaggregation scheme DisALEXI, applied over a managed pine plantation in North Carolina, USA. The MODIS and Landsat ET retrievals were then combined using the Spatial-Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM) to estimate daily ET estimates at 30-m resolution. The modeled daily ET was in good agreement compared with observations at two Ameriflux eddy covariance flux tower sites (US-NC2, mid-rotation site and US-NC3, recently clear cut site). Seasonal water use patterns varied significantly with stand age, with higher rates of ET from mid-rotation stands in comparison with younger stands. Water use also varies with land cover types, with higher rates of ET from forested areas than from agricultural

  1. National-scale estimation of gross forest aboveground carbon loss: a case study of the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyukavina, A.; Stehman, S. V.; Potapov, P. V.; Turubanova, S. A.; Baccini, A.; Goetz, S. J.; Laporte, N. T.; Houghton, R. A.; Hansen, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing enable the mapping and monitoring of carbon stocks without relying on extensive in situ measurements. The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is among the countries where national forest inventories (NFI) are either non-existent or out of date. Here we demonstrate a method for estimating national-scale gross forest aboveground carbon (AGC) loss and associated uncertainties using remotely sensed-derived forest cover loss and biomass carbon density data. Lidar data were used as a surrogate for NFI plot measurements to estimate carbon stocks and AGC loss based on forest type and activity data derived using time-series multispectral imagery. Specifically, DRC forest type and loss from the FACET (Forêts d’Afrique Centrale Evaluées par Télédétection) product, created using Landsat data, were related to carbon data derived from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). Validation data for FACET forest area loss were created at a 30-m spatial resolution and compared to the 60-m spatial resolution FACET map. We produced two gross AGC loss estimates for the DRC for the last decade (2000-2010): a map-scale estimate (53.3 ± 9.8 Tg C yr-1) accounting for whole-pixel classification errors in the 60-m resolution FACET forest cover change product, and a sub-grid estimate (72.1 ± 12.7 Tg C yr-1) that took into account 60-m cells that experienced partial forest loss. Our sub-grid forest cover and AGC loss estimates, which included smaller-scale forest disturbances, exceed published assessments. Results raise the issue of scale in forest cover change mapping and validation, and subsequent impacts on remotely sensed carbon stock change estimation, particularly for smallholder dominated systems such as the DRC.

  2. Resolution Enhancement of MODIS-Derived Water Indices for Studying Persistent Flooding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, L. W.; Kalcic, Maria; Fletcher, Rose

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring coastal marshes for persistent flooding and salinity stress is a high priority issue in Louisiana. Remote sensing can identify environmental variables that can be indicators of marsh habitat conditions, and offer timely and relatively accurate information for aiding wetland vegetation management. Monitoring activity accuracy is often limited by mixed pixels which occur when areas represented by the pixel encompasses more than one cover type. Mixtures of marsh grasses and open water in 250m Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data can impede flood area estimation. Flood mapping of such mixtures requires finer spatial resolution data to better represent the cover type composition within 250m MODIS pixel. Fusion of MODIS and Landsat can improve both spectral and temporal resolution of time series products to resolve rapid changes from forcing mechanisms like hurricane winds and storm surge. For this study, using a method for estimating sub-pixel values from a MODIS time series of a Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), using temporal weighting, was implemented to map persistent flooding in Louisiana coastal marshes. Ordinarily NDWI computed from daily 250m MODIS pixels represents a mixture of fragmented marshes and water. Here, sub-pixel NDWI values were derived for MODIS data using Landsat 30-m data. Each MODIS pixel was disaggregated into a mixture of the eight cover types according to the classified image pixels falling inside the MODIS pixel. The Landsat pixel means for each cover type inside a MODIS pixel were computed for the Landsat data preceding the MODIS image in time and for the Landsat data succeeding the MODIS image. The Landsat data were then weighted exponentially according to closeness in date to the MODIS data. The reconstructed MODIS data were produced by summing the product of fractional cover type with estimated NDWI values within each cover type. A new daily time series was produced using both the reconstructed 250

  3. Resolution Enhancement of MODIS-derived Water Indices for Studying Persistent Flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, L. W.; Kalcic, M. T.; Fletcher, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Monitoring coastal marshes for persistent flooding and salinity stress is a high priority issue in Louisiana. Remote sensing can identify environmental variables that can be indicators of marsh habitat conditions, and offer timely and relatively accurate information for aiding wetland vegetation management. Monitoring activity accuracy is often limited by mixed pixels which occur when areas represented by the pixel encompasses more than one cover type. Mixtures of marsh grasses and open water in 250m Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data can impede flood area estimation. Flood mapping of such mixtures requires finer spatial resolution data to better represent the cover type composition within 250m MODIS pixel. Fusion of MODIS and Landsat can improve both spectral and temporal resolution of time series products to resolve rapid changes from forcing mechanisms like hurricane winds and storm surge. For this study, using a method for estimating sub-pixel values from a MODIS time series of a Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), using temporal weighting, was implemented to map persistent flooding in Louisiana coastal marshes. Ordinarily NDWI computed from daily 250m MODIS pixels represents a mixture of fragmented marshes and water. Here, sub-pixel NDWI values were derived for MODIS data using Landsat 30-m data. Each MODIS pixel was disaggregated into a mixture of the eight cover types according to the classified image pixels falling inside the MODIS pixel. The Landsat pixel means for each cover type inside a MODIS pixel were computed for the Landsat data preceding the MODIS image in time and for the Landsat data succeeding the MODIS image. The Landsat data were then weighted exponentially according to closeness in date to the MODIS data. The reconstructed MODIS data were produced by summing the product of fractional cover type with estimated NDWI values within each cover type. A new daily time series was produced using both the reconstructed 250

  4. Impact of scale/resolution on evapotranspiration from Landsat and MODIS images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vivek; Kilic, Ayse; Irmak, Suat

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the role of landscape heterogeneity and its influence on the scaling behavior of surface fluxes as observed by satellite sensors with different spatial resolutions is a critical need to investigate. In this study, the effects of pixel scales on ETc estimation and other parameters that are used to calculate ETc were investigated over different vegetation surfaces in south central Nebraska, USA. Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) was used to estimate spatially distributed ETc by combining ground-based meteorological data for Landsat and MODIS imagery. The estimated surface energy fluxes were compared and validated to the measured Bowen Ratio Energy Balance System (BREBS) ETc fluxes. Validation results showed that Landsat has more preferable spatial resolution (30 m) to map and analyze ETc; regression models explained 91% of the variability in the observed data (RMSD = 0.064 mm/h; MBE = 0.04 mm/h). However, for MODIS-based ETc, the regression model explained only 59% of the variability in observed ETc with a larger error (RMSD = 0.17 mm/h; MBE = 0.15 mm/h). MODIS-based ETc was about 31% higher than the measured ETc. Imperfect assessment in MODIS-based retrievals is due to the underlying assumption of spatial heterogeneity and coarser sensor pixel scale (500 m), which was summarized by up-scaling the Landsat images to MODIS images using output flux aggregation and input up-scaling procedure using simple average and nearest neighbor aggregation techniques and comparisons were made on both image and pixel scales. Aggregation results illustrate that simple average with output flux aggregation provides close interpretation in aggregating fluxes to coarser resolution than other aggregation approaches. Pixel-by-pixel comparison using output aggregation with simple average resulted in close agreement (error range 5%-35%) between measured and up-scaled fluxes, compared to input up-scaling using simple average (error range 25%-60%). Larger error in input up

  5. Resolution in Photovoltaic Potential Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, N.; Coors, V.; Zlatanova, S.; Oosterom, P. J. M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, an analysis of the effect of the various types of resolution involved in photovoltaic potential computation is presented. To calculate solar energy incident on a surface, shadow from surrounding buildings has been considered. The incident energy on a surface has been calculated taking the orientation, tilt and position into consideration. Different sky visibility map has been created for direct and diffuse radiation and only the effect of resolution of the factors has been explored here. The following four resolutions are considered: 1. temporal resolution (1, 10, 60 minutes time interval for calculating visibility of sun), 2. object surface resolution (0.01, 0.1, 0.375, 0.75, 1.25, 2.5 and 5 m2 as maximum triangle size of a surface to be considered), 3. blocking obstacle resolution (number of triangles from LoD1, LoD2, or LoD3 CityGML building models), and 4. sky resolution (ranging from 150 to 600 sky-patches used to divide the sky-dome). Higher resolutions result in general in more precise estimation of the photovoltaic potential, but also the computation time is increasing, especially as realizes that this computation has to be done for every building with its object surface (both roofs and façades). This paper is the first in depth analysis ever of the effect of resolution and will help to configure the proper settings for effective photovoltaic potential computations.

  6. HIRIS: NASA's high-resolution imaging spectrometer for the Earth Observing System (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, J.; Herring, M.

    1988-01-01

    The HIRIS design includes 10 nm spectral bands from 0.4 to 2.5 micron at 30 m spatial resolution over a 24 or 30 km swath. This resolution allows identification of many minerals in rocks and soils, important algal pigments in oceans and inland water and spectral changes in land canopy. In the 824 km orbit altitude proposed, the cross track pointing capability allows 4 to 5 views during a 16 day revisit cycle.

  7. Recent wetland land loss due to hurricanes: improved estimates based upon multiple source images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kranenburg, Christine J.; Palaseanu-Lovejoy, Monica; Barras, John A.; Brock, John C.; Wang, Ping; Rosati, Julie D.; Roberts, Tiffany M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a moderate resolution 30-m fractional water map of the Chenier Plain for 2003, 2006 and 2009 by using information contained in high-resolution satellite imagery of a subset of the study area. Indices and transforms pertaining to vegetation and water were created using the high-resolution imagery, and a threshold was applied to obtain a categorical land/water map. The high-resolution data was used to train a decision-tree classifier to estimate percent water in a lower resolution (Landsat) image. Two new water indices based on the tasseled cap transformation were proposed for IKONOS imagery in wetland environments and more than 700 input parameter combinations were considered for each Landsat image classified. Final selection and thresholding of the resulting percent water maps involved over 5,000 unambiguous classified random points using corresponding 1-m resolution aerial photographs, and a statistical optimization procedure to determine the threshold at which the maximum Kappa coefficient occurs. Each selected dataset has a Kappa coefficient, percent correctly classified (PCC) water, land and total greater than 90%. An accuracy assessment using 1,000 independent random points was performed. Using the validation points, the PCC values decreased to around 90%. The time series change analysis indicated that due to Hurricane Rita, the study area lost 6.5% of marsh area, and transient changes were less than 3% for either land or water. Hurricane Ike resulted in an additional 8% land loss, although not enough time has passed to discriminate between persistent and transient changes.

  8. Satellite-based monitoring of particulate matter pollution at very high resolution: the HOTBAR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robin; Milton, Edward; Nield, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    Particulate matter air pollution is a major health risk, and is responsible for millions of premature deaths each year. Concentrations tend to be highest in urban areas - particularly in the mega-cities of rapidly industrialising countries, where there are limited ground monitoring networks. Satellite-based monitoring has been used for many years to assess regional-scale trends in air quality, but currently available satellite products produce data at 1-10km resolution: too coarse to discern the small-scale patterns of sources and sinks seen in urban areas. Higher-resolution satellite products are required to provide accurate assessments of particulate matter concentrations in these areas, and to allow analysis of localised air quality effects on health. The Haze Optimized Transform-based Aerosol Retrieval (HOTBAR) method is a novel method which provides estimates of PM2.5 concentrations from high-resolution (approximately 30m) satellite imagery. This method is designed to work over a wide range of land covers and performs well over the complex land-cover mosaic found in urban areas. It requires only standard visible and near-infrared data, making it applicable to a range of data from sensors such as Landsat, SPOT and Sentinel-2. The method is based upon an extension of the Haze Optimized Transform (HOT), which was originally designed for assessing areas of thick haze in satellite imagery. This was done by calculating a 'haziness' value for each pixel in an image as the distance from a 'Clear Line' in feature space, defined by the high correlation between visible bands. Here, we adapt the HOT method and use it to estimate Aerosol Optical Thickness (a measure of the column-integrated haziness of the atmosphere) instead, from which PM2.5 concentrations can then be estimated. Significant extensions to the original HOT method include Monte Carlo estimation of the 'Clear Line', object-based correction for land cover, and estimation of AOT from the haziness values

  9. Estimation of Droplet Size and Liquid Water Content Using Radar and Lidar: Marine Cumulus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, J. Vivek; Jensen, Jorgen; Ellis, Scott; Morley, Bruce; Tsai, Peisang; Spuler, Scott; Ghate, Virendra; Schwartz, Christian

    2016-04-01

    During the Cloud Systems Evolution in the Trades (CSET) field campaign airborne measurements from the High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) Cloud Radar (HCR) and the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) were made in the North Pacific. In addition, in situ observations of cloud and aerosols size distributions and radiation were also collected. The HCR operated at a frequency of 94 GHz (3 mm wavelength) and collected observations at high temporal (0.5 sec) and range (30 m) resolution. The capability of HCR is enhanced by the coordination with the HSRL that made high temporal and range resolution observations of calibrated backscatter and extinction. The lidar, designed and built by the University of Wisconsin. The radar and lidar are designed to fly on the NCAR Gulfstream V HIAPER aircraft. The remote and in situ measurements collected during CSET offer opportunities for evaluating the engineering performance of the instruments and developing cloud microphysical scientific products. The coincident HCR and HSRL measurements are analyzed for assess their utility to characterize cloud boundaries, estimate liquid water content (LWC) and mean particle size. Retrievals of LWC and mean particle sizes from remote radar and lidar measurements will be compared with those from the in situ instruments.

  10. Preliminary verification of instantaneous air temperature estimation for clear sky conditions based on SEBAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shanyou; Zhou, Chuxuan; Zhang, Guixin; Zhang, Hailong; Hua, Junwei

    2016-03-01

    Spatially distributed near surface air temperature at the height of 2 m is an important input parameter for the land surface models. It is of great significance in both theoretical research and practical applications to retrieve instantaneous air temperature data from remote sensing observations. An approach based on Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) to retrieve air temperature under clear sky conditions is presented. Taking the meteorological measurement data at one station as the reference and remotely sensed data as the model input, the research estimates the air temperature by using an iterative computation. The method was applied to the area of Jiangsu province for nine scenes by using MODIS data products, as well as part of Fujian province, China based on four scenes of Landsat 8 imagery. Comparing the air temperature estimated from the proposed method with that of the meteorological station measurement, results show that the root mean square error is 1.7 and 2.6 °C at 1000 and 30 m spatial resolution respectively. Sensitivity analysis of influencing factors reveals that land surface temperature is the most sensitive to the estimation precision. Research results indicate that the method has great potentiality to be used to estimate instantaneous air temperature distribution under clear sky conditions.

  11. A Novel Method to Retrieve Aerosol Optical Thickness from High-Resolution Optical Satellite Images for Air Quality Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nield, J. M.; Wilson, R. T.; Milton, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) data has many important applications including atmospheric correction of satellite imagery and monitoring of particulate matter air pollution. Current data products are generally available at a kilometre-scale resolution, but many applications require far higher resolutions. For example, particulate matter concentrations vary on a metre-scale, and thus data products at a similar scale are required to provide accurate assessments of particle densities and allow effective monitoring of air quality and analysis of local air quality effects on health. A novel method has been developed which retrieves per-pixel AOT values from high-resolution (~30m) satellite data. This method is designed to work over a wide range of land covers - including both bright and dark surfaces - and requires only standard visible and near-infrared data, making it applicable to a range of data from sensors such as Landsat, SPOT and Sentinel-2. The method is based upon an extension of the Haze Optimized Transform (HOT). The HOT was originally designed for assessing areas of thick haze in satellite imagery by calculating a 'haziness' value for each pixel in an image as the distance from a 'Clear Line' in feature space, defined by the high correlation between visible bands. Here, we adapt the HOT method and use it to provide AOT data instead. Significant extensions include Monte Carlo estimation of the 'Clear Line', object-based correction for land cover, and estimation of AOT from the haziness values through radiative transfer modelling. This novel method will enable many new applications of AOT data that were impossible with previously available low-resolution data, and has the potential to contribute significantly to our understanding of the air quality on health, the accuracy of satellite image atmospheric correction and the role of aerosols in the climate system.

  12. Assessing resolution in super-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Demmerle, Justin; Wegel, Eva; Schermelleh, Lothar; Dobbie, Ian M

    2015-10-15

    Resolution is a central concept in all imaging fields, and particularly in optical microscopy, but it can be easily misinterpreted. The mathematical definition of optical resolution was codified by Abbe, and practically defined by the Rayleigh Criterion in the late 19th century. The limit of conventional resolution was also achieved in this period, and it was thought that fundamental constraints of physics prevented further increases in resolution. With the recent development of a range of super-resolution techniques, it is necessary to revisit the concept of optical resolution. Fundamental differences in super-resolution modalities mean that resolution is not a directly transferrable metric between techniques. This article considers the issues in resolution raised by these new technologies, and presents approaches for comparing resolution between different super-resolution methods.

  13. The Effects of a 6-Week Strength Training on Critical Velocity, Anaerobic Running Distance, 30-M Sprint and Yo-Yo Intermittent Running Test Performances in Male Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Karsten, Bettina; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Kandemir, Gokhan; Hazir, Tahir; Klose, Andreas; Naclerio, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of a moderate intensity strength training on changes in critical velocity (CV), anaerobic running distance (D'), sprint performance and Yo-Yo intermittent running test (Yo-Yo IR1) performances. Methods: two recreational soccer teams were divided in a soccer training only group (SO; n = 13) and a strength and soccer training group (ST; n = 13). Both groups were tested for values of CV, D', Yo-Yo IR1 distance and 30-m sprint time on two separate occasions (pre and post intervention). The ST group performed a concurrent 6-week upper and lower body strength and soccer training, whilst the SO group performed a soccer only training. Results: after the re-test of all variables, the ST demonstrated significant improvements for both, YoYo IR1 distance (p = 0.002) and CV values (p<0.001) with no significant changes in the SO group. 30-m sprint performance were slightly improved in the ST group with significantly decreased performance times identified in the SO group (p<0.001). Values for D' were slightly reduced in both groups (ST -44.5 m, 95% CI = -90.6 to 1.6; SO -42.6 m, 95% CI = -88.7 to 3.5). Conclusions: combining a 6-week moderate strength training with soccer training significantly improves CV, Yo-Yo IR1 whilst moderately improving 30-m sprint performances in non-previously resistance trained male soccer players. Critical Velocity can be recommended to coaches as an additional valid testing tool in soccer. PMID:27015418

  14. Optical resolution from Fisher information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motka, L.; Stoklasa, B.; D'Angelo, M.; Facchi, P.; Garuccio, A.; Hradil, Z.; Pascazio, S.; Pepe, F. V.; Teo, Y. S.; Řeháček, J.; Sánchez-Soto, L. L.

    2016-05-01

    The information gained by performing a measurement on a physical system is most appropriately assessed by the Fisher information, which in fact establishes lower bounds on estimation errors for an arbitrary unbiased estimator. We revisit the basic properties of the Fisher information and demonstrate its potential to quantify the resolution of optical systems. We illustrate this with some conceptually important examples, such as single-slit diffraction, spectroscopy and superresolution techniques.

  15. High resolution measurements supported by electronic structure calculations of two naphthalene derivatives: [1,5]- and [1,6]-naphthyridine--estimation of the zero point inertial defect for planar polycyclic aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Gruet, S; Goubet, M; Pirali, O

    2014-06-21

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) molecules are suspected to be present in the interstellar medium and to participate to the broad and unresolved emissions features, the so-called unidentified infrared bands. In the laboratory, very few studies report the rotationally resolved structure of such important class of molecules. In the present work, both experimental and theoretical approaches provide the first accurate determination of the rotational energy levels of two diazanaphthalene: [1,5]- and [1,6]-naphthyridine. [1,6]-naphthyridine has been studied at high resolution, in the microwave (MW) region using a Fourier transform microwave spectrometer and in the far-infrared (FIR) region using synchrotron-based Fourier transform spectroscopy. The very accurate set of ground state (GS) constants deduced from the analysis of the MW spectrum allowed the analysis of the most intense modes in the FIR (ν38-GS centered at about 483 cm(-1) and ν34-GS centered at about 842 cm(-1)). In contrast with [1,6]-naphthyridine, pure rotation spectroscopy of [1,5]-naphthyridine cannot be performed for symmetry reasons so the combined study of the two intense FIR modes (ν22-GS centered at about 166 cm(-1) and ν18-GS centered at about 818 cm(-1)) provided the GS and the excited states constants. Although the analysis of the very dense rotational patterns for such large molecules remains very challenging, relatively accurate anharmonic density functional theory calculations appeared as a highly relevant supporting tool to the analysis for both molecules. In addition, the good agreement between the experimental and calculated infrared spectrum shows that the present theoretical approach should provide useful data for the astrophysical models. Moreover, inertial defects calculated in the GS (ΔGS) of both molecules exhibit slightly negative values as previously observed for planar species of this molecular family. We adjusted the semi-empirical relations to estimate the zero

  16. Estimating the spatial distribution of evapotranspiration using the water balance model WAVE and fine spatial resolution airborne remote sensing images from the DAIS-sensor: Experimental set-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Veroustraete, F.; Feyen, J.

    2003-04-01

    Actual evapotranspiration (ET) of agricultural land and forestland surfaces play an important role in the redistribution of water on the Earth's surface. Any change in evapotranspiration, either through change in vegetation or climate change, directly effects the available water resources. For quantifying these effects physical models need to be constructed. Most hydrological models have to deal with a lack of good spatial resolution, despite their good temporal information. Remote sensing techniques on the contrary determine the spatial pattern of landscape features and hence are very useful on large scales. The main objective of this research is the combination of the spatial pattern of remote sensing (using visible and thermal infrared spectrum) with the temporal pattern of the water balance model WAVE (Vanclooster et al., 1994 and 1996). To realise this, the following objectives are formulated: (i) relate soil and vegetation surface temperatures to actual evapotranspiration of forest and crops simulated with the water balance model WAVE using remote sensing derived parameters. Three methods will be used and mutually compared. Both airborne and satellite imagery will be implemented; (1) compare the spatial pattern of evapotranspiration, as a result of the three methods, with the energy balance model SEBAL (Bastiaanssen et al., 1998) and finally; (2) subject the up-scaled WAVE and SEBAL models to an uncertainty analysis using the GLUE-approach (Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimate) (Beven en Binley, 1992). To study the behaviour of the model beyond the field-scale (micro-scale), a meso-scale study was conducted at the test-site of DURAS (50°50'38"N, 5°08'50"W, Sint-Truiden). Airborne imagery from the DAIS/ROSIS sensor are available. For the determination of the spatial pattern of actual evapotranspiration the next two methods are considered: (1) relations between surface temperature, surface albedo and vegetation indices are linked with field

  17. High resolution measurements supported by electronic structure calculations of two naphthalene derivatives: [1,5]- and [1,6]-naphthyridine—Estimation of the zero point inertial defect for planar polycyclic aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gruet, S. E-mail: manuel.goubet@univ-lille1.fr; Pirali, O.; Goubet, M. E-mail: manuel.goubet@univ-lille1.fr

    2014-06-21

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) molecules are suspected to be present in the interstellar medium and to participate to the broad and unresolved emissions features, the so-called unidentified infrared bands. In the laboratory, very few studies report the rotationally resolved structure of such important class of molecules. In the present work, both experimental and theoretical approaches provide the first accurate determination of the rotational energy levels of two diazanaphthalene: [1,5]- and [1,6]-naphthyridine. [1,6]-naphthyridine has been studied at high resolution, in the microwave (MW) region using a Fourier transform microwave spectrometer and in the far-infrared (FIR) region using synchrotron-based Fourier transform spectroscopy. The very accurate set of ground state (GS) constants deduced from the analysis of the MW spectrum allowed the analysis of the most intense modes in the FIR (ν{sub 38}-GS centered at about 483 cm{sup −1} and ν{sub 34}-GS centered at about 842 cm{sup −1}). In contrast with [1,6]-naphthyridine, pure rotation spectroscopy of [1,5]-naphthyridine cannot be performed for symmetry reasons so the combined study of the two intense FIR modes (ν{sub 22}-GS centered at about 166 cm{sup −1} and ν{sub 18}-GS centered at about 818 cm{sup −1}) provided the GS and the excited states constants. Although the analysis of the very dense rotational patterns for such large molecules remains very challenging, relatively accurate anharmonic density functional theory calculations appeared as a highly relevant supporting tool to the analysis for both molecules. In addition, the good agreement between the experimental and calculated infrared spectrum shows that the present theoretical approach should provide useful data for the astrophysical models. Moreover, inertial defects calculated in the GS (Δ{sub GS}) of both molecules exhibit slightly negative values as previously observed for planar species of this molecular family. We adjusted

  18. Integration of Multisensor Remote Sensing Data for the Retrieval of Consistent Times Series of High-Resolution NDVI Images for Crop Monitoring in Landscapes Dominated By Small-Scale Farming Agricultural

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedano, F.; Kempeneers, P.

    2014-12-01

    There is a need for timely and accurate information of food supply and early warnings of production shortfalls. Crop growth models commonly rely on information on vegetation dynamics from low and moderate spatial resolution remote sensing imagery. While the short revisit period of these sensors captures the temporal dynamics of crops, they are not able to monitor small-scale farming areas where environmental factors, crop type and management practices often vary at subpixel level. Although better suited to retrieve fine spatial structure, time series of higher resolution imagery (circa 30 m) are often incomplete due to larger revisit periods and persistent cloud coverage. However, as the Landsat archive expands and more fine resolution Earth observation sensors become available, the possibilities of multisensor integration to monitor crop dynamics with higher level of spatial detail are expanding. We have integrated remote sensing imagery from two moderate resolution sensors (MODIS and PROBA-V) and three medium resolution platforms (Landsat 7- 8; and DMC) to improve the characterization of vegetation dynamics in agricultural landscapes dominated by small-scale farms. We applied a data assimilation method to produce complete temporal sequences of synthetic medium-resolution NDVI images. The method implements a Kalman filter recursive algorithm that incorporates models, observations and their respective uncertainties to generate medium-resolution images at time steps for which only moderate-resolution imagery is available. The results for the study sites show that the time series of synthetic NDVI images captured seasonal vegetation dynamics and maintained the spatial structure of the landscape at higher spatial resolution. A more detailed characterization of spatiotemporal dynamics of vegetation in agricultural systems has the potential to improve the estimates of crop growth models and allow a more precise monitoring and forecasting of crop productivity.

  19. A Spatio-Temporal Enhancement Method for medium resolution LAI (STEM-LAI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houborg, Rasmus; McCabe, Matthew F.; Gao, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Satellite remote sensing has been used successfully to map leaf area index (LAI) across landscapes, but advances are still needed to exploit multi-scale data streams for producing LAI at both high spatial and temporal resolution. A multi-scale Spatio-Temporal Enhancement Method for medium resolution LAI (STEM-LAI) has been developed to generate 4-day time-series of Landsat-scale LAI from existing medium resolution LAI products. STEM-LAI has been designed to meet the demands of applications requiring frequent and spatially explicit information, such as effectively resolving rapidly evolving vegetation dynamics at sub-field (30 m) scales. In this study, STEM-LAI is applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) based LAI data and utilizes a reference-based regression tree approach for producing MODIS-consistent, but Landsat-based, LAI. The Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM) is used to interpolate the downscaled LAI between Landsat acquisition dates, providing a high spatial and temporal resolution improvement over existing LAI products. STARFM predicts high resolution LAI by blending MODIS and Landsat based information from a common acquisition date, with MODIS data from a prediction date. To demonstrate its capacity to reproduce fine-scale spatial features observed in actual Landsat LAI, the STEM-LAI approach is tested over an agricultural region in Nebraska. The implementation of a 250 m resolution LAI product, derived from MODIS 1 km data and using a scale consistent approach based on the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), is found to significantly improve accuracies of spatial pattern prediction, with the coefficient of efficiency (E) ranging from 0.77-0.94 compared to 0.01-0.85 when using 1 km LAI inputs alone. Comparisons against an 11-year record of in-situ measured LAI over maize and soybean highlight the utility of STEM-LAI in reproducing observed LAI dynamics (both characterized by r2 = 0.86) over a

  20. EVALUATING SOIL EROSION PARAMETER ESTIMATES FROM DIFFERENT DATA SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Topographic factors and soil loss estimates that were derived from thee data sources (STATSGO, 30-m DEM, and 3-arc second DEM) were compared. Slope magnitudes derived from the three data sources were consistently different. Slopes from the DEMs tended to provide a flattened sur...

  1. Effects of a 30-mL Epidural Normal Saline Bolus on Time to Full Motor Recovery in Parturients Who Received Patient-Controlled Epidural Analgesia With 0.125% Bupivacaine With 2 µg/mL of Fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Couture, Darren; Osborne, Lisa; Peterson, Jeffery A; Clements, Sharon M; Sanders, Andrew; Spring, Julie A; Spence, Dennis L

    2016-06-01

    Previous research suggests that an epidural bolus of 30 mL of normal saline after vaginal delivery may decrease the time for recovery from motor block. A double-blind, randomized controlled study was conducted in 46 parturients to determine if a 30-mL normal saline bolus or sham administered via epidural approach after delivery reduces the time to full motor recovery and the time to 2-dermatome regression. No significant difference was found in time to full motor recovery (saline group 83.18 ± 54 minutes vs control group 100.23 ± 48 minutes, P = .27) or time to 2-dermatome sensory regression (saline group 29.32 ± 16.35 minutes vs control group 36.14 ± 14.39 minutes, P = .15). Results suggest no advantage to the administration of a saline bolus after delivery to hasten the motor recovery in parturients. A post hoc power analysis suggested a sample size of 204 subjects would have been needed to show a difference for this dilute local anesthetic regimen. There were no complications to the technique, which suggests that it is safe to perform, but the difference in recovery (approximately 17 minutes) from a dilute local anesthetic dose may not be clinically significant. PMID:27501650

  2. Image Resolution in Optical Nanoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwenhuizen, Robert P.J.; Lidke, Keith A.; Bates, Mark; Puig, Daniela Leyton; Grünwald, David; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Rieger, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Resolution in optical nanoscopy depends on the localization uncertainty of single fluorescent labels, the density of labels covering the sample, and the sample’s spatial structure. Currently there is no integral, practical resolution measure that takes all factors into account. Here we introduce such a measure that can be computed directly from the image. We demonstrate its validity and benefits on 2D and 3D localization microscopy images of tubulin and actin filaments. Our approach makes it possible to compare achieved resolutions in images taken with different nanoscopy methods, optimize and rank different emitter localization and labeling strategies, define a stopping criterion for data acquisition, describe image anisotropy and heterogeneity, and, surprisingly, estimate the average number of localizations per emitter. Our findings challenge the current focus on obtaining the best localization precision, but instead show how the best image resolution can be achieved as fast as possible. PMID:23624665

  3. Estimating stream discharge from a Himalayan Glacier using coupled satellite sensor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Child, S. F.; Stearns, L. A.; van der Veen, C. J.; Haritashya, U. K.; Tarpanelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    The 4th IPCC report highlighted our limited understanding of Himalayan glacier behavior and contribution to the region's hydrology. Seasonal snow and glacier melt in the Himalayas are important sources of water, but estimates greatly differ about the actual contribution of melted glacier ice to stream discharge. A more comprehensive understanding of the contribution of glaciers to stream discharge is needed because streams being fed by glaciers affect the livelihoods of a large part of the world's population. Most of the streams in the Himalayas are unmonitored because in situ measurements are logistically difficult and costly. This necessitates the use of remote sensing platforms to obtain estimates of river discharge for validating hydrological models. In this study, we estimate stream discharge using cost-effective methods via repeat satellite imagery from Landsat-8 and SENTINEL-1A sensors. The methodology is based on previous studies, which show that ratio values from optical satellite bands correlate well with measured stream discharge. While similar, our methodology relies on significantly higher resolution imagery (30 m) and utilizes bands that are in the blue and near-infrared spectrum as opposed to previous studies using 250 m resolution imagery and spectral bands only in the near-infrared. Higher resolution imagery is necessary for streams where the source is a glacier's terminus because the width of the stream is often only 10s of meters. We validate our methodology using two rivers in the state of Kansas, where stream gauges are plentiful. We then apply our method to the Bhagirathi River, in the North-Central Himalayas, which is fed by the Gangotri Glacier and has a well monitored stream gauge. The analysis will later be used to couple river discharge and glacier flow and mass balance through an integrated hydrologic model in the Bhagirathi Basin.

  4. Resolution enhancement in tilted coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri Naghadeh, Diako; Keith Morley, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    Deconvolution is applied to remove source wavelet effects from seismograms. The results are resolution enhancement that enables detection of thin layers. Following enhancement of resolution, low frequency and high angle reflectors, particularly at great depth, appear as low amplitude and semi-invisible reflectors that are difficult to track and pick. A new approach to enhance resolution is introduced that estimates a derivative using continuous wavelet transform in tilted coordinates. The results are compared with sparse spike deconvolution, curvelet deconvolution and inverse quality filtering in wavelet domain. The positive consequence of the new method is to increase sampling of high dip features by changing the coordinate system from Cartesian to tilted. To compare those methods a complex data set was chosen that includes high angle faults and chaotic mass transport complex. Image enhancement using curvelet deconvolution shows a chaotic system as a non-chaotic one. The results show that sparse spike deconvolution and inverse quality filtering in wavelet domain are able to enhance resolution more than curvelet deconvolution especially at great depth but it is impossible to follow steep dip reflectors after resolution enhancement using these methods, especially when their apparent dips are more than 45°. By estimating derivatives in a continuous wavelet transform from tilted data sets similar resolution enhancement as the other deconvolution methods is achieved but additionally steep dipping reflectors are imaged much better than others. Subtracted results of the enhanced resolution data set using new method and the other introduced methods show that steeply dipping reflectors are highlighted as a particular ability of the new method. The results show that high frequency recovery in Cartesian co-ordinate is accompanied by inability to image steeply dipping reflectors especially at great depths. Conversely recovery of high frequency data and imaging of the data

  5. High-Resolution Modeling Disturbance-Induced Forest Carbon Dynamics with Lidar and Landsat Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, M.; Huang, C.; Hurtt, G. C.; Dubayah, R.; Fisk, J.; Sahajpal, R.; Flanagan, S.; Swatantran, A.; Huang, W.; Tang, H.; ONeil-Dunne, J.; Johnson, K. D.

    2015-12-01

    Forest stands are dynamic in a status from severely, partially disturbed, or undisturbed to different stages of recovery towards maturity and equilibrium. Forest ecosystem models generally use potential biomass (an assumption of equilibrium status) as initial biomass, which is unrealistic and could result in unreliable estimates of disturbance-induced carbon changes. To accurately estimate spatiotemporal changes of forest carbon stock and fluxes, it requires accurate information on initial biomass, the extent and severity of disturbance, and following land use. We demonstrate a prototype system to achieve this goal by integrating 1-m small footprint Lidar acquired in year 2004, 30-m Landsat disturbances from 1984 to 2011, and an individual-based structure height Ecosystem Demography (ED) model. Lidar provides critical information on forest canopy height, improving the accuracy of initial forest biomass estimates; impervious surfaces data and yearly disturbance data from Landsat provide information on wall-to-wall yearly natural and anthropogenic disturbances and their severity (on average 0.32% for the natural and 0.19% for the anthropogenic for below test area); ED model plays a central role by linking both Lidar canopy height and Landsat disturbances with ecosystem processes. We tested the system at 90-m spatial resolution in Charles County, Maryland, by running ED model for six experiments, the combinations of three initial biomass (potential, moderate and low initial biomass constrained by Lidar canopy height) with two disturbance scenarios (with and without anthropogenic disturbances). Our experiments show that estimated changes of carbon stock and flux are sensitive to initial biomass status and human-induced land cover change. Our prototype system can assess regional carbon dynamics at local scale under changing climate and disturbance regimes, and provide useful information for forest management and land use policies.

  6. Deriving Continuous Fields of Tree Cover at 1-m over the Continental United States From the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) Imagery to Reduce Uncertainties in Forest Carbon Stock Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, S.; Basu, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Michaelis, A.; Milesi, C.; Votava, P.; Nemani, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    An unresolved issue with coarse-to-medium resolution satellite-based forest carbon mapping over regional to continental scales is the high level of uncertainty in above ground biomass (AGB) estimates caused by the absence of forest cover information at a high enough spatial resolution (current spatial resolution is limited to 30-m). To put confidence in existing satellite-derived AGB density estimates, it is imperative to create continuous fields of tree cover at a sufficiently high resolution (e.g. 1-m) such that large uncertainties in forested area are reduced. The proposed work will provide means to reduce uncertainty in present satellite-derived AGB maps and Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) based regional estimates. Our primary objective will be to create Very High Resolution (VHR) estimates of tree cover at a spatial resolution of 1-m for the Continental United States using all available National Agriculture Imaging Program (NAIP) color-infrared imagery from 2010 till 2012. We will leverage the existing capabilities of the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) high performance computing and storage facilities. The proposed 1-m tree cover map can be further aggregated to provide percent tree cover at any medium-to-coarse resolution spatial grid, which will aid in reducing uncertainties in AGB density estimation at the respective grid and overcome current limitations imposed by medium-to-coarse resolution land cover maps. We have implemented a scalable and computationally-efficient parallelized framework for tree-cover delineation - the core components of the algorithm [that] include a feature extraction process, a Statistical Region Merging image segmentation algorithm and a classification algorithm based on Deep Belief Network and a Feedforward Backpropagation Neural Network algorithm. An initial pilot exercise has been performed over the state of California (~11,000 scenes) to create a wall-to-wall 1-m tree cover map and the classification accuracy has been assessed

  7. On the use of high-resolution topographic data as a proxy for seismic site conditions (VS30)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, T.I.; Wald, D.J.

    2009-01-01

    An alternative method has recently been proposed for evaluating global seismic site conditions, or the average shear velocity to 30 m depth (VS30), from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 30 arcsec digital elevation models (DEMs). The basic premise of the method is that the topographic slope can be used as a reliable proxy for VS30 in the absence of geologically and geotechnically based site-condition maps through correlations between VS30 measurements and topographic gradient. Here we evaluate the use of higher-resolution (3 and 9 arcsec) DEMs to examine whether we are able to resolve VS30 in more detail than can be achieved using the lower-resolution SRTM data. High-quality DEMs at resolutions greater than 30 arcsec are not uniformly available at the global scale. However, in many regions where such data exist, they may be employed to resolve finer-scale variations in topographic gradient, and consequently, VS30. We use the U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Data Center's National Elevation Dataset (NED) to investigate the use of high-resolution DEMs for estimating VS30 in several regions across the United States, including the San Francisco Bay area in California, Los Angeles, California, and St. Louis, Missouri. We compare these results with an example from Taipei, Taiwan, that uses 9 arcsec SRTM data, which are globally available. The use of higher-resolution NED data recovers finer-scale variations in topographic gradient, which better correlate to geological and geomorphic features, in particular, at the transition between hills and basins, warranting their use over 30 arcsec SRTM data where available. However, statistical analyses indicate little to no improvement over lower-resolution topography when compared to VS30 measurements, suggesting that some topographic smoothing may provide more stable VS30 estimates. Furthermore, we find that elevation variability in canopy-based SRTM measurements at resolutions

  8. Multi-frame image super resolution based on sparse coding.

    PubMed

    Kato, Toshiyuki; Hino, Hideitsu; Murata, Noboru

    2015-06-01

    An image super-resolution method from multiple observation of low-resolution images is proposed. The method is based on sub-pixel accuracy block matching for estimating relative displacements of observed images, and sparse signal representation for estimating the corresponding high-resolution image, where correspondence between high- and low-resolution images are modeled by a certain degradation process. Relative displacements of small patches of observed low-resolution images are accurately estimated by a computationally efficient block matching method. The matching scores of the block matching are used to select a subset of low-resolution patches for reconstructing a high-resolution patch, that is, an adaptive selection of informative low-resolution images is realized. The proposed method is shown to perform comparable or superior to conventional super-resolution methods through experiments using various images.

  9. High resolution imaging of vadose zone transport using crosswell radar and seismic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, Ernest L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Peterson, John E.; Daley, Thomas E.

    2001-10-10

    The summary and conclusions are that overall the radar and seismic results were excellent. At the time of design of the experiments we did not know how well these two methods could penetrate or resolve the moisture content and structure. It appears that the radar could easily go up to 5, even 10 meters between boreholes at 200 Mhz and even father (up to 20 to 40 m) at 50 Mhz. The seismic results indicate that at several hundred hertz propagation of 20 to 30 meters giving high resolution is possible. One of the most important results, however is that together the seismic and radar are complementary in their properties estimation. The radar being primarily sensitive to changes in moisture content, and the seismic being primarily sensitive to porosity. Taken in a time lapse sense the radar can show the moisture content changes to a high resolution, with the seismic showing high resolution lithology. The significant results for each method are: Radar: (1) Delineated geological layers 0.25 to 3.5 meters thick with 0.25 m resolution; (2) Delineated moisture movement and content with 0.25 m resolution; (3) Compared favorably with neutron probe measurements; and (4) Penetration up to 30 m. Radar results indicate that the transport of the riverwater is different from that of the heavier and more viscous sodium thiosulfate. It appears that the heavier fluids are not mixing readily with the in-situ fluids and the transport may be influenced by them. Seismic: (1) Delineated lithology at .25 m resolution; (2) Penetration over 20 meters, with a possibility of up to 30 or more meters; and (3) Maps porosity and density differences of the sediments. Overall the seismic is mapping the porosity and density distribution. The results are consistent with the flow field mapped by the radar, there is a change in flow properties at the 10 to 11 meter depth in the flow cell. There also appears to be break through by looking at the radar data with the denser sodium thiosulfate finally

  10. Effect of spatial resolution on watershed characteristics and the ANSWERS model hydrological simulations for a small watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ramadhar; Tiwari, Kamlesh Narayan; Mal, Bimal Chandra

    2006-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of cell size variation on watershed characteristics and hydrological simulations of the physically based distributed parameter Areal Non point Source Watershed Environment Response Simulation (ANSWERS) model. The study is carried out in Banha watershed located in Upper Damodar catchment, Jharkhand, India having 16.13 km2 area (with average slope of 1.91%.) using Digital Elevation Model (DEM), GIS and remote sensing techniques for automatic extraction of the model input parameters. The spatial resolution (cell size) variation from 30m to 150m with incremental step of 30m influences the accuracy of watershed characteristics extracted from DEM. The flow path length and average watershed slope decreased by 53.71% and 20.94% respectively due to variation in cell size. Important watershed parameters such as drainage area, stream network, slope etc. were extracted most accurately automatically with variations less than 10% using DEM of 30m resolution through EASI/PACE and IDRISI GIS. Land use and land cover information generated from Indian Remote Sensing Satellite (IRS-1B, LISS-II) data at 30 m resolution resulted in overall classification accuracy greater than 88%. The watershed hydrological data from fifteen storms of 1995 and 1996 were used for the ANSWERS model cell size sensitivity study. The runoff, peak flow and sediment yield simulations by the model decrease as cell size increases from 30 m to 150 m. The model simulated peak flow at acceptable accuracy for 30 m cell size. The runoff and sediment yield simulations are not observed to be significantly different from the observed values up to 120 m cell size.

  11. The high resolution imaging spectrometer (HIRIS) for EOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Alexander F. H.; Herring, Mark

    1989-01-01

    The high resolution imaging spectrometer (HIRIS) designed for the Earth Observing System (EOS) is designed to acquire images in 192 spectral bands simultaneously in the 0.4-2.5-micron wavelength region. HIRIS is a targeting rather than a continuous acquisition instrument and obtains high-spatial- and spectral-resolution images in a 30-km swath with a 30-m ground instantaneous field of view (GIFOV) in vertical viewing. Pointing will allow image acquisition at -30 to +60 deg along-track and +/-24 deg cross-track. The raw data rate of the instrument is 512 Mbs. The high spectral resolution will make it possible to identify many surficial materials such as rocks, soils, and suspended matter in water directly. HIRIS also offers the possibility of studying biochemical process in vegetation canopies.

  12. Examining the utility of satellite-based wind sheltering estimates for lake hydrodynamic modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2014-01-01

    Satellite-based measurements of vegetation canopy structure have been in common use for the last decade but have never been used to estimate canopy's impact on wind sheltering of individual lakes. Wind sheltering is caused by slower winds in the wake of topography and shoreline obstacles (e.g. forest canopy) and influences heat loss and the flux of wind-driven mixing energy into lakes, which control lake temperatures and indirectly structure lake ecosystem processes, including carbon cycling and thermal habitat partitioning. Lakeshore wind sheltering has often been parameterized by lake surface area but such empirical relationships are only based on forested lakeshores and overlook the contributions of local land cover and terrain to wind sheltering. This study is the first to examine the utility of satellite imagery-derived broad-scale estimates of wind sheltering across a diversity of land covers. Using 30 m spatial resolution ASTER GDEM2 elevation data, the mean sheltering height, hs, being the combination of local topographic rise and canopy height above the lake surface, is calculated within 100 m-wide buffers surrounding 76,000 lakes in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. Uncertainty of GDEM2-derived hs was compared to SRTM-, high-resolution G-LiHT lidar-, and ICESat-derived estimates of hs, respective influences of land cover type and buffer width on hs are examined; and the effect of including satellite-based hs on the accuracy of a statewide lake hydrodynamic model was discussed. Though GDEM2 hs uncertainty was comparable to or better than other satellite-based measures of hs, its higher spatial resolution and broader spatial coverage allowed more lakes to be included in modeling efforts. GDEM2 was shown to offer superior utility for estimating hs compared to other satellite-derived data, but was limited by its consistent underestimation of hs, inability to detect within-buffer hs variability, and differing accuracy across land cover types. Nonetheless

  13. Numerical Estimation in Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berteletti, Ilaria; Lucangeli, Daniela; Piazza, Manuela; Dehaene, Stanislas; Zorzi, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Children's sense of numbers before formal education is thought to rely on an approximate number system based on logarithmically compressed analog magnitudes that increases in resolution throughout childhood. School-age children performing a numerical estimation task have been shown to increasingly rely on a formally appropriate, linear…

  14. Estimation of velocity structure around a natural gas reservoir at Yufutsu, Japan, by microtremor survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, H.; Asanuma, H.; Tezuka, K.

    2010-12-01

    Seismic reflection survey has been commonly used for exploration and time-lapse monitoring of oil/gas resources. Seismic reflection images typically have reasonable reliability and resolution for commercial production. However, cost consideration sometimes avoids deployment of widely distributed array or repeating survey in cases of time lapse monitoring or exploration of small-scale reservoir. Hence, technologies to estimate structures and physical properties around the reservoir with limited cost would be effectively used. Microtremor survey method (MSM) has an ability to realize long-term monitoring of reservoir with low cost, because this technique has a passive nature and minimum numbers of the monitoring station is four. MSM has been mainly used for earthquake disaster prevention, because velocity structure of S-wave is directly estimated from velocity dispersion of the Rayleigh wave. The authors experimentally investigated feasibility of the MSM survey for exploration of oil/gas reservoir. The field measurement was carried out around natural gas reservoir at Yufutsu, Hokkaido, Japan. Four types of arrays with array radii of 30m, 100m, 300m and 600m are deployed in each area. Dispersion curves of the velocity of Rayleigh wave were estimated from observed microtremors, and S-wave velocity structures were estimated by an inverse analysis of the dispersion curves with genetic algorism (GA). The estimated velocity structures showed good consistency with one dimensional velocity structure by previous reflection surveys up to 4-5 km. We also found from the field experiment that a data of 40min is effective to estimate the velocity structure even the seismometers are deployed along roads with heavy traffic.

  15. Multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares and kinetic modeling applied to near-infrared data from curing reactions of epoxy resins: mechanistic approach and estimation of kinetic rate constants.

    PubMed

    Garrido, M; Larrechi, M S; Rius, F X

    2006-02-01

    This study describes the combination of multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares with a kinetic modeling strategy for obtaining the kinetic rate constants of a curing reaction of epoxy resins. The reaction between phenyl glycidyl ether and aniline is monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy under isothermal conditions for several initial molar ratios of the reagents. The data for all experiments, arranged in a column-wise augmented data matrix, are analyzed using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares. The concentration profiles recovered are fitted to a chemical model proposed for the reaction. The selection of the kinetic model is assisted by the information contained in the recovered concentration profiles. The nonlinear fitting provides the kinetic rate constants. The optimized rate constants are in agreement with values reported in the literature.

  16. Benthic remineralisation rates in southern North Sea - from point measurements to areal estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Andreas; Friedrich, Jana; van Beusekom, Justus; Naderipour, Céline

    2015-04-01

    The southern North Sea is enclosed by densely populated hinterland with intensive use by agriculture and industry and thus substantially affected by anthropogenic influences. As a coastal subsystem, this applies especially to the German Wadden Sea, a system of back-barrier tidal flats along the whole German Bight. Ongoing efforts to implement environmental protection policies during the last decades changed the significance of various pollutants such as reactive nitrogen or phosphate, which raises the desire for constant monitoring of the coastal ecosystem to assess the efficiency of the employed environmental protection measures. Environmental monitoring is limited to point measurements which thus have to be interpolated with appropriate models. However, existing models to estimate various sediment characteristics for the interpolation of point measurements appear insufficient when compared with actual field measurements in the southern North Sea. We therefore seek to improve these models by identifying and quantifying key variables of benthic solute fluxes by comprehensive measurements which cover the complete spatial and seasonal variability. We employ in-situ measurements with the eddy-correlation technique and flux chambers in combination with ex-situ incubations of sediment cores to establish benthic fluxes of oxygen and nutrients. Additional ex-situ measurements determine basic sediment characteristics such as permeability, volumetric reaction rates, and substrate concentration. With our first results we mapped the distribution of measured sediment permeability, which suggest that areas with water depth greater than 30 m are impervious whereas sediment in shallower water at the Dogger Bank and along the coast is substantially permeable with permeability between 10-12 m2 and 10-10 m2. This implies that benthic fluxes can be estimated with simple diffusion-type models for water depths >30 m, whereas estimates especially for coastal sediments require

  17. A novel method to retrieve Aerosol Optical Thickness from high-resolution optical satellite images using an extended version of the Haze Optimized Transform (HOTBAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robin; Milton, Edward; Nield, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) data has many important applications including atmospheric correction of satellite imagery and monitoring of particulate matter air pollution. Current data products are generally available at a kilometre-scale resolution, but many applications require far higher resolutions. For example, particulate matter concentrations vary on a metre-scale, and thus data products at a similar scale are required to provide accurate assessments of particle densities and allow effective monitoring of air quality and analysis of local air quality effects on health. A novel method has been developed which retrieves per-pixel AOT values from high-resolution (~30m) satellite data. This method is designed to work over a wide range of land covers - including both bright and dark surfaces - and requires only standard visible and near-infrared data, making it applicable to a range of data from sensors such as Landsat, SPOT and Sentinel-2. The method is based upon an extension of the Haze Optimized Transform (HOT). The HOT was originally designed for assessing areas of thick haze in satellite imagery by calculating a 'haziness' value for each pixel in an image as the distance from a 'Clear Line' in feature space, defined by the high correlation between visible bands. Here, we adapt the HOT method and use it to provide AOT data instead. Significant extensions include Monte Carlo estimation of the 'Clear Line', object-based correction for land cover, and estimation of AOT from the haziness values through radiative transfer modelling. This novel method will enable many new applications of AOT data that were impossible with previously available low-resolution data, and has the potential to contribute significantly to our understanding of the air quality on health, the accuracy of satellite image atmospheric correction and the role of aerosols in the climate system.

  18. Estimation of daily Snow Cover Area combining MODIS and LANDSAT information by using cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo-Iguzquiza, Eulogio; Juan Collados Lara, Antonio; Pulido-Velazquez, David

    2016-04-01

    The snow availability in Alpine catchments is essential for the economy of these areas. It plays an important role in tourist development but also in the management of the Water Resources Snow is an important water resource in many river basins with mountains in the catchment area. The determination of the snow water equivalent requires the estimation of the evolution of the snow pack (cover area, thickness and snow density) along the time. Although there are complex physical models of the dynamics of the snow pack, sometimes the data available are scarce and a stochastic model like the cellular automata (CA) can be of great practical interest. CA can be used to model the dynamics of growth and wane of the snow pack. The CA is calibrated with historical data. This requires the determination of transition rules that are capable of modeling the evolution of the spatial pattern of snow cover area. Furthermore, CA requires the definition of states and neighborhoods. We have included topographical variables and climatological variables in order to define the state of each pixel. The evolution of snow cover in a pixel depends on its state, the state of the neighboring pixels and the transition rules. The calibration of the CA is done using daily MODIS data, available for the period 24/02/2002 to present with a spatial resolution of 500 m, and the LANDSAT information available with a sixteen-day periodicity from 1984 to the present and with spatial resolution of 30 m. The methodology has been applied to estimation of the snow cover area of Sierra Nevada mountain range in the Southern of Spain to obtain snow cover area daily information with 500 m spatial resolution for the period 1980-2014. Acknowledgments: This research has been partially supported by the GESINHIMPADAPT project (CGL2013-48424-C2-2-R) with Spanish MINECO funds. We would also like to thank NASA DAAC and LANDSAT project for the data provided for this study.

  19. Resolution in forensic microbial genotyping

    SciTech Connect

    Velsko, S P

    2005-08-30

    Resolution is a key parameter for differentiating among the large number of strain typing methods that could be applied to pathogens involved in bioterror events or biocrimes. In this report we develop a first-principles analysis of strain typing resolution using a simple mathematical model to provide a basis for the rational design of microbial typing systems for forensic applications. We derive two figures of merit that describe the resolving power and phylogenetic depth of a strain typing system. Rough estimates of these figures-of-merit for MLVA, MLST, IS element, AFLP, hybridization microarrays, and other bacterial typing methods are derived from mutation rate data reported in the literature. We also discuss the general problem of how to construct a ''universal'' practical typing system that has the highest possible resolution short of whole-genome sequencing, and that is applicable with minimal modification to a wide range of pathogens.

  20. Estimating aboveground forest biomass carbon and fire consumption in the U.S. Utah High Plateaus using data from the Forest Inventory and Analysis program, Landsat, and LANDFIRE

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, X.; Liu, S.; Zhu, Z.; Vogelmann, J.; Li, Z.; Ohlen, D.

    2011-01-01

    The concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have been increasing and greatly affecting global climate and socio-economic systems. Actively growing forests are generally considered to be a major carbon sink, but forest wildfires lead to large releases of biomass carbon into the atmosphere. Aboveground forest biomass carbon (AFBC), an important ecological indicator, and fireinduced carbon emissions at regional scales are highly relevant to forest sustainable management and climate change. It is challenging to accurately estimate the spatial distribution of AFBC across large areas because of the spatial heterogeneity of forest cover types and canopy structure. In this study, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data, Landsat, and Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools Project (LANDFIRE) data were integrated in a regression tree model for estimating AFBC at a 30-m resolution in the Utah High Plateaus. AFBC were calculated from 225 FIA field plots and used as the dependent variable in the model. Of these plots, 10% were held out for model evaluation with stratified random sampling, and the other 90% were used as training data to develop the regression tree model. Independent variable layers included Landsat imagery and the derived spectral indicators, digital elevation model (DEM) data and derivatives, biophysical gradient data, existing vegetation cover type and vegetation structure. The cross-validation correlation coefficient (r value) was 0.81 for the training model. Independent validation using withheld plot data was similar with r value of 0.82. This validated regression tree model was applied to map AFBC in the Utah High Plateaus and then combined with burn severity information to estimate loss of AFBC in the Longston fire of Zion National Park in 2001. The final dataset represented 24 forest cover types for a 4 million ha forested area. We estimated a total of 353 Tg AFBC with an average of 87 MgC/ha in the Utah High

  1. High resolution airborne geophysics at hazardous waste disposal sites

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, L.P.; Nyquist, J.E.; Doll, W.E.; Chong Foo, M.; Gamey, T.J.

    1995-06-01

    In 1994, a high resolution helicopter geophysical survey was conducted over portions of the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee. The 1800 line kilometer survey included multi-frequency electromagnetic and magnetic sensors. The areas covered by the high resolution portion of the survey were selected on the basis of their importance to the environmental restoration effort and on data obtained from the reconnaissance phase of the airborne survey in which electromagnetic, magnetic, and radiometric data were collected over the entire Oak Ridge Reservation in 1992--1993. The high resolution phase had lower sensor heights, more and higher EM frequencies, and tighter line spacings than did the reconnaissance survey. When flying over exceptionally clear areas, the high resolution bird came within a few meters of the ground surface. Unfortunately, even sparse trees and power or phone lines could prevent the bird from being towed safely at low altitude, and over such areas it was more usual for it to be flown at about the same altitude as the bird in the reconnaissance survey, about 30m. Even so, the magnetometers used in the high resolution phase were 20m closer to the ground than in the reconnaissance phase because they were mounted on the tail of the bird rather than on the tow cable above the bird. The EM frequencies used in the high resolution survey ranged from 7400Hz to 67000Hz. Only the horizontal coplanar loop configuration was used in the high resolution flyovers.

  2. Spatial resolution in visual memory.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shalom, Asaf; Ganel, Tzvi

    2015-04-01

    Representations in visual short-term memory are considered to contain relatively elaborated information on object structure. Conversely, representations in earlier stages of the visual hierarchy are thought to be dominated by a sensory-based, feed-forward buildup of information. In four experiments, we compared the spatial resolution of different object properties between two points in time along the processing hierarchy in visual short-term memory. Subjects were asked either to estimate the distance between objects or to estimate the size of one of the objects' features under two experimental conditions, of either a short or a long delay period between the presentation of the target stimulus and the probe. When different objects were referred to, similar spatial resolution was found for the two delay periods, suggesting that initial processing stages are sensitive to object-based properties. Conversely, superior resolution was found for the short, as compared with the long, delay when features were referred to. These findings suggest that initial representations in visual memory are hybrid in that they allow fine-grained resolution for object features alongside normal visual sensitivity to the segregation between objects. The findings are also discussed in reference to the distinction made in earlier studies between visual short-term memory and iconic memory.

  3. Estimating aboveground biomass in interior Alaska with Landsat data and field measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, Lei; Wylie, Bruce K.; Nossov, Dana R.; Peterson, Birgit E.; Waldrop, Mark P.; McFarland, Jack W.; Rover, Jennifer R.; Hollingsworth, Teresa N.

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial plant biomass is a key biophysical parameter required for understanding ecological systems in Alaska. An accurate estimation of biomass at a regional scale provides an important data input for ecological modeling in this region. In this study, we created an aboveground biomass (AGB) map at 30-m resolution for the Yukon Flats ecoregion of interior Alaska using Landsat data and field measurements. Tree, shrub, and herbaceous AGB data in both live and dead forms were collected in summers and autumns of 2009 and 2010. Using the Landsat-derived spectral variables and the field AGB data, we generated a regression model and applied this model to map AGB for the ecoregion. A 3-fold cross-validation indicated that the AGB estimates had a mean absolute error of 21.8 Mg/ha and a mean bias error of 5.2 Mg/ha. Additionally, we validated the mapping results using an airborne lidar dataset acquired for a portion of the ecoregion. We found a significant relationship between the lidar-derived canopy height and the Landsat-derived AGB (R2 = 0.40). The AGB map showed that 90% of the ecoregion had AGB values ranging from 10 Mg/ha to 134 Mg/ha. Vegetation types and fires were the primary factors controlling the spatial AGB patterns in this ecoregion.

  4. Using lidar and effective LAI data to evaluate IKONOS and Landsat 7 ETM+ vegetation cover estimates in a ponderosa pine forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, X.; Vierling, Lee; Rowell, E.; DeFelice, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Structural and functional analyses of ecosystems benefit when high accuracy vegetation coverages can be derived over large areas. In this study, we utilize IKONOS, Landsat 7 ETM+, and airborne scanning light detection and ranging (lidar) to quantify coniferous forest and understory grass coverages in a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) dominated ecosystem in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Linear spectral mixture analyses of IKONOS and ETM+ data were used to isolate spectral endmembers (bare soil, understory grass, and tree/shade) and calculate their subpixel fractional coverages. We then compared these endmember cover estimates to similar cover estimates derived from lidar data and field measures. The IKONOS-derived tree/shade fraction was significantly correlated with the field-measured canopy effective leaf area index (LAIe) (r2=0.55, p<0.001) and with the lidar-derived estimate of tree occurrence (r2=0.79, p<0.001). The enhanced vegetation index (EVI) calculated from IKONOS imagery showed a negative correlation with the field measured tree canopy effective LAI and lidar tree cover response (r 2=0.30, r=-0.55 and r2=0.41, r=-0.64, respectively; p<0.001) and further analyses indicate a strong linear relationship between EVI and the IKONOS-derived grass fraction (r2=0.99, p<0.001). We also found that using EVI resulted in better agreement with the subpixel vegetation fractions in this ecosystem than using normalized difference of vegetation index (NDVI). Coarsening the IKONOS data to 30 m resolution imagery revealed a stronger relationship with lidar tree measures (r2=0.77, p<0.001) than at 4 m resolution (r2=0.58, p<0.001). Unmixed tree/shade fractions derived from 30 m resolution ETM+ imagery also showed a significant correlation with the lidar data (r2=0.66, p<0.001). These results demonstrate the power of using high resolution lidar data to validate spectral unmixing results of satellite imagery, and indicate that IKONOS data and Landsat 7 ETM+ data both can

  5. Spatial upscaling using thematic maps: An analysis of uncertainties in permafrost soil carbon estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugelius, Gustaf

    2012-06-01

    Studies of periglacial regions confirm their importance in the global carbon (C) cycle, but estimates of ecosystem C storage or green-house gas fluxes from these remote areas are generally poorly constrained and quantitative estimates of upscaling uncertainties are lacking. In this study, a regional database describing soil organic carbon (SOC) storage in periglacial terrain (European Russian Arctic) was used to evaluate spatial upscaling from point measurements using thematic maps. The selection of classes for upscaling and the need for replication in soil sampling were statistically evaluated. Upscaling using a land cover classification and a soil map estimated SOC storage to 48.5 and 47.0 kg C m-2, respectively with 95% confidence intervals (CI) within ±8%. When corrected for spatial errors in the LCC upscaling proxy, SOC was estimated to 46.5 kg C m-2 with a 95% CI reflecting propagated variance from both natural variability and spatial errors of ±11%. Artificially decreasing the size of the database used for upscaling showed that relatively stable results could be achieved with lower replication in some upscaling classes. Decreased spatial resolution for upscaling from 30 m to 1 km had little impact on SOC estimates in this region, but classification accuracy was dramatically reduced and land cover classes show different, sometimes nonlinear, responses to scale. The methods and recommendations presented here can provide guidelines for any future study where point observations of a variable are upscaled using remotely sensed thematic maps or classifications and potential applications for circum-arctic studies are discussed. For future upscaling studies at large geographic scales, a priori determination of sample sizes and tests to insure unimodal and statistically independent samples are recommended. If these prerequisites are not fulfilled, classes may be merged or subdivided prior to upscaling.

  6. Estimating the spatial distribution of PM2.5 concentration by integrating geographic data and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, L.; Sang, H.; Zhang, J.; An, F.

    2015-06-01

    Air quality directly affects the health and living of human beings, and it receives wide concern of public and attaches great important of governments at all levels. The estimation of the concentration distribution of PM2.5 and the analysis of its impacting factors is significant for understanding the spatial distribution regularity and further for decision supporting of governments. In this study, multiple sources of remote sensing and GIS data are utilized to estimate the spatial distribution of PM2.5 concentration in Shijiazhuang, China, by utilizing multivariate linear regression modelling, and integrating year average values of PM2.5 collected from local environment observing stations. Two major sources of PM2.5 are collected, including