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Sample records for 30-min intravenous infusion

  1. Pharmocokinetics of hexobarbital in man after intravenous infusion.

    PubMed

    Breimer, D D; Honhoff, C; Zilly, W; Richter, E; van Rossum, J M

    1975-02-01

    The plasma levels of hexobarbital in humans were determined during and after a 30-min or 60-min zero-order intravenous infusion. Hexobarbital kinetics could be described by conceiving the body to exhibit two compartments. The plasma concentrations were fitted to the postinfusion equation and the parameters intrinsic to the two-compartment open model were estimated. The elimination half-life varied considerably among the 14 individuals (160-441-min), which could mainly be explained by the greatly varying metabolic clearance of the compound (123-360 ml/min). The apparent volume of distribution per kilogram of body weight was relatively constant (1.10 plus or minus 0.12 liters/kg).

  2. Intravenous infusions in chronic pain management.

    PubMed

    Kosharskyy, Boleslav; Almonte, Wilson; Shaparin, Naum; Pappagallo, Marco; Smith, Howard

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, millions of Americans are affected by chronic pain, which adds heavily to national rates of morbidity, mortality, and disability, with an ever-increasing prevalence. According to a 2011 report titled Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education, and Research by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, pain not only exacts its toll on people's lives but also on the economy with an estimated annual economic cost of at least $560 - 635 billion in health care costs and the cost of lost productivity attributed to chronic pain. Intravenous infusions of certain pharmacologic agents have been known to provide substantial pain relief in patients with various chronic painful conditions. Some of these infusions are better, and although not necessarily the first therapeutic choice, have been widely used and extensively studied. The others show promise, however are in need of further investigations. This article will focus on non-opiate intravenous infusions that have been utilized for chronic painful disorders such as fibromyalgia, neuropathic pain, phantom limb pain, post-herpetic neuralgia, complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS), diabetic neuropathy, and central pain related to stroke or spinal cord injuries. The management of patients with chronic pain conditions is challenging and continues to evolve as new treatment modalities are explored and tested. The following intravenous infusions used to treat the aforementioned chronic pain conditions will be reviewed: lidocaine, ketamine, phentolamine, dexmedetomidine, and bisphosphonates. This overview is intended to familiarize the practitioner with the variety of infusions for patients with chronic pain. It will not, however, be able to provide guidelines for their use due to the lack of sufficient evidence.

  3. How to Keep an Infusion Log: Intravenous Immune Globulin (IVIG)

    MedlinePlus

    How to keep an INFUSION LOG Intravenous Immune Globulin (IVIG) How to keep an INFUSION LOG The Value of Keeping Records Excellence in health care ... keeping track of your Intravenous Immune Globulin (IVIG) infusions. Each of the manufacturers prepares IVIG in a ...

  4. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 1b

    PubMed Central

    Cassano-Piché, A; Fan, M; Sabovitch, S; Masino, C; Easty, AC

    2012-01-01

    Background Minimal research has been conducted into the potential patient safety issues related to administering multiple intravenous (IV) infusions to a single patient. Previous research has highlighted that there are a number of related safety risks. In Phase 1a of this study, an analysis of 2 national incident-reporting databases (Institute for Safe Medical Practices Canada and United States Food and Drug Administration MAUDE) found that a high percentage of incidents associated with the administration of multiple IV infusions resulted in patient harm. Objectives The primary objectives of Phase 1b of this study were to identify safety issues with the potential to cause patient harm stemming from the administration of multiple IV infusions; and to identify how nurses are being educated on key principles required to safely administer multiple IV infusions. Data Sources and Review Methods A field study was conducted at 12 hospital clinical units (sites) across Ontario, and telephone interviews were conducted with program coordinators or instructors from both the Ontario baccalaureate nursing degree programs and the Ontario postgraduate Critical Care Nursing Certificate programs. Data were analyzed using Rasmussen’s 1997 Risk Management Framework and a Health Care Failure Modes and Effects Analysis. Results Twenty-two primary patient safety issues were identified with the potential to directly cause patient harm. Seventeen of these (critical issues) were categorized into 6 themes. A cause-consequence tree was established to outline all possible contributing factors for each critical issue. Clinical recommendations were identified for immediate distribution to, and implementation by, Ontario hospitals. Future investigation efforts were planned for Phase 2 of the study. Limitations This exploratory field study identifies the potential for errors, but does not describe the direct observation of such errors, except in a few cases where errors were observed. Not all

  5. [The development of multifunction intravenous infusion quantitative packaging device].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shufang; Li, Ruihua; Shen, Lianhong

    2012-11-01

    Aimed at tackling the compatibility issues arising from the drug reaction in intravenous infusion tube, we developed a simple, suitable and multi-function intravenous infusion tube for the special use for rescuing critical patients, the elderly, children etc. Each drug in a transfusion process can be filtered to realize quantitative packet and packet delivery. Thus, the drugs in the infusion tube are prevented from meeting with each other. No overlap, no particle pollution occurred. Stable performance and accurate dosage are maintained. As a result safety is ensured during drug delivery.

  6. Acute intravenous infusion of disodium dihydrogen (1-hydroxyethylidene)diphosphonate: mechanism of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Francis, M D; Slough, C L

    1984-08-01

    The acute intravenous toxicity of disodium dihydrogen (1-hydroxyethylidene)diphosphonate (etidronate disodium; I) and the mechanism of this toxic response have been investigated in 40 beagle dogs. The intravenous toxicity of I is dependent on the total dose administered and the length of the infusion interval. The toxicity of I is directly related to the ability of the drug to bind or complex with the circulating calcium in the blood. Maximum depressions in ionized calcium coincide in time with peak blood levels of I, and at lethal doses electrocardiographic changes indicative of hypocalcemia are observed. For a 2-min infusion of 2 mg of I/kg, no effect is observed on ionized calcium levels, and the electrocardiogram remains normal. At doses of 16 and 32 mg/kg, coincident with an immediate fall in ionized calcium levels, there is a transient rise in total calcium and a fall in phosphorus levels. The ionized calcium level rises, and total calcium level falls and stabilizes at baseline levels within 30 min after the infusion. However, the phosphorus level rises and exceeds the baseline value, reaching 3-4 times normal by 72 h after the infusion. With proven lethal doses of I (60 mg/kg infused over 2 min) and the simultaneous infusion of an ionized calcium salt such as calcium gluconate (20 mg of Ca2+/kg), electrocardiograms remain normal and death is prevented. Thus, an effective antidote in the event of an overdose or too rapid an infusion of I can be employed to prevent acute toxic effects.

  7. Perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative pain relief in patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Baral, B K; Bhattarai, B K; Rahman, T R; Singh, S N; Regmi, R

    2010-12-01

    Due to unpleasant nature and physiological consequences of postoperative pain, search of safe and effective modalities for its management has remained a subject of interest to clinical researchers. Analgesic action of lidocaine infusion in patients with chronic neuropathic pain is well known but its place in relieving postoperative pain is yet to be established. The study aimed to assess the effectiveness of perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative pain intensity and analgesic requirement. Sixty patients undergoing major upper abdominal surgery were recruited in this randomized double blinded study. Thirty patients received lidocaine 2.0% (intravenous bolus 1.5 mg/kg followed by an infusion of 1.5 mg/kg/h), and 30 patients received normal saline according to randomization. The infusion started 30 min before skin incision and stopped 1 h after the end of surgery. Postoperative pain intensity and analgesic (diclofenac) requirement were assessed at the interval 15 minutes for 1 hour then 4 hourly up to 24 hours. The pain intensity at rest and movement as well as the total postoperative analgesic (diclofenac) requirement were significantly lower (142.50 +/- 37.80 mg vs.185.00 +/- 41.31 mg, P<0.001) in lidocaine group. The extubation time was significantly longer in lidocaine group (14.43 +/- 3.50 minutes vs. 6.73 +/- 1.76 minutes, P<0.001). The time for the first dose of analgesic requirement was longer in lidocaine group (60.97 +/- 18.05 minutes vs.15.73 +/- 7.46 minutes, P<0.001). It can be concluded that perioperative infusion of low dose of lidocaine decreases the intensity of postoperative pain, reduces the postoperative analgesic consumption, without causing significant adverse effects in patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery.

  8. Effect of intravenous nutrient infusions on food intake in rats.

    PubMed

    Walls, E K; Koopmans, H S

    1989-06-01

    To assess the effect of gut signals on food intake two types of nutrients were infused intravenously for 17.5 hours in 17 hour fed rats. In the first experiment a solution of 25% d-glucose and 4.25% amino acids (Travasol) was infused at levels of 26 and 52 kcal/day for two consecutive four-day periods. During infusion periods, food intake was reduced from saline baseline levels by 18.9 +/- 1.7 and 34.8 +/- 1.8 kcal/day, respectively. This represents an oral intake reduction of approximately 70% of the infused calories. In contrast, food intake was reduced 17.4 +/- 1.7 kcal/day below saline baseline levels when 40 kcal of Nutralipid were infused. The reduction in food intake was only 43% of the lipid calories infused. These results indicate that infusions of glucose and amino acids are more effective than infusion of fats in inhibiting daily food intake, that gut signals associated with absorption of fat provide important satiety signals and that removal of fat from the bloodstream has relatively little effect on daily food intake.

  9. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 2a: Ontario Survey

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Mark; Koczmara, Christine; Masino, Caterina; Cassano-Piché, Andrea; Trbovich, Patricia; Easty, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Background Research conducted in earlier phases of this study prospectively identified a number of concerns related to the safe administration of multiple intravenous (IV) infusions in Ontario hospitals. Objective To investigate the potential prevalence of practices or policies that may contribute to the patient safety risks identified in Phase 1b of this study. Data Sources and Review Methods Sixty-four survey responses were analyzed from clinical units where multiple IV infusions may occur (e.g., adult intensive care units). Survey questions were organized according to the topics identified in Phase 1b as potential contributors to patient harm (e.g., labelling practices, patient transfer practices, secondary infusion policies). Results Survey results indicated suboptimal practices and policies in some clinical units, and variability in a number of infusion practices. Key areas of concern included the following: use of primary IV tubing without back check valves when administering secondary infusions administration of secondary infusions with/as high-alert continuous IV medications potential confusion about how IV tubing should be labelled to reflect replacement date and time interruptions to IV therapy due to IV pump and/or tubing changes when patients are transferred between clinical units coadministration of continuous or intermittent infusions on central venous pressure monitoring ports variability in respondents’ awareness of the infusion pump's bolus capabilities Limitations Due to the limited sample size, survey responses may not be representative of infusion practices across Ontario. Answers to some questions indicated that the intent of the questions might have been misunderstood. Due to a design error, 1 question about bolus administration methods was not shown to as many respondents as appropriate. Conclusions The Ontario survey revealed variability in IV infusion practice across the province and potential opportunities to improve safety. PMID

  10. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 2b: Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinkney, Sonia; Fan, Mark; Chan, Katherine; Koczmara, Christine; Colvin, Christopher; Sasangohar, Farzan; Masino, Caterina; Easty, Anthony; Trbovich, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background Administering multiple intravenous (IV) infusions to a single patient via infusion pump occurs routinely in health care, but there has been little empirical research examining the risks associated with this practice or ways to mitigate those risks. Objectives To identify the risks associated with multiple IV infusions and assess the impact of interventions on nurses’ ability to safely administer them. Data Sources and Review Methods Forty nurses completed infusion-related tasks in a simulated adult intensive care unit, with and without interventions (i.e., repeated-measures design). Results Errors were observed in completing common tasks associated with the administration of multiple IV infusions, including the following (all values from baseline, which was current practice): setting up and programming multiple primary continuous IV infusions (e.g., 11.7% programming errors) identifying IV infusions (e.g., 7.7% line-tracing errors) managing dead volume (e.g., 96.0% flush rate errors following IV syringe dose administration) setting up a secondary intermittent IV infusion (e.g., 11.3% secondary clamp errors) administering an IV pump bolus (e.g., 11.5% programming errors) Of 10 interventions tested, 6 (1 practice, 3 technology, and 2 educational) significantly decreased or even eliminated errors compared to baseline. Limitations The simulation of an adult intensive care unit at 1 hospital limited the ability to generalize results. The study results were representative of nurses who received training in the interventions but had little experience using them. The longitudinal effects of the interventions were not studied. Conclusions Administering and managing multiple IV infusions is a complex and risk-prone activity. However, when a patient requires multiple IV infusions, targeted interventions can reduce identified risks. A combination of standardized practice, technology improvements, and targeted education is required. PMID:26316919

  11. Management and prevention of complications of subcutaneous intravenous infusion port.

    PubMed

    Jan, Hsiang-Chun; Chou, Shao-Jiun; Chen, Tzu-Hung; Lee, Chuin-I; Chen, Tze-Kai; Lou, Mary Ann

    2012-03-01

    Subcutaneous intravenous infusion port (SIIP) has become an increasingly and widely adopted technique in the management of oncology patients. This route has been used not only for chemotherapy but also for parenteral nutrition provision, blood transfusion, medication administration, blood sample collection, hemodialysis, and so on. This system provides a safe vascular access with low complication rate which helps preventing patients from vascular infection and catheter associated thrombosis. In this study, we reviewed 1247 cases of breast cancer patients that had subcutaneous intravenous infusion port implanted for chemotherapy in our general surgery department from 1990 to 2008. The result indicates that complication decreases as our technique and experience mature. We hereby share our accrued experience and improved technique, hoping to be of help to young surgeons.

  12. Continuous intravenous infusions of bromodeoxyuridine as a clinical radiosensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J.; Mitchell, J.B.; Russo, A.; Aiken, M.; Morstyn, G.; Hsu, S.M.; Rowland, J.; Glatstein, E.

    1984-10-01

    Twelve patients were treated with continuous intravenous (24-hour) infusions of bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) at 650 or 1000 mg/m2/d for up to two weeks. Myelosuppression, especially thrombocytopenia, was the major systemic toxicity and limited the infusion period to nine to 14 days. However, bone marrow recovery occurred within seven to ten days, allowing for a second infusion in most patients. Local toxicity (within the radiation field) was minimal, with the exception of one of four patients, who underwent abdominal irradiation. Pharmacology studies revealed a steady-state arterial plasma level of 6 x 10(-7) mol/L and 1 x 10(-6) mol/L during infusion of 650 and 1000 mg/m2/d, respectively. In vivo BUdR uptake into normal bone marrow was evaluated in two patients by comparison of preinfusion and postinfusion in vitro radiation survival curves of marrow CFUc with enhancement ratios (D0-pre/D0-post) of 1.8 (with 650 mg/m2/d) and 2.5 (with 1000 mg/m2/d). In vivo BUdR incorporation into normal skin and tumor cells using an anti-BUdR monoclonal antibody and immunohistochemistry was demonstrated in biopsies from three patients revealing substantially less cellular incorporation into normal skin (less than 10%) compared with tumor (up to 50% to 70%). The authors conclude that local and systemic toxicity of continuous infusion of BUdR at 1000 mg/m2/d for approximately two weeks is tolerable. The observed normal tissue toxicity is comparable with previous clinical experience with intermittent (12 hours every day for two weeks) infusions of BUdR. Theoretically, a constant infusion should allow for greater incorporation of BUdR into cycling tumor cells and thus, for further enhancement of radiosensitization.

  13. Comparison study of intraosseous, central intravenous, and peripheral intravenous infusions of emergency drugs.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, J P; Porembka, D T; Gallagher, J M; Lockrem, J D; VanLente, F

    1990-01-01

    Intraosseous infusion of emergency drugs is a lifesaving alternative to intravenous administration when intravenous access cannot be rapidly established. We studied the comparative pharmacokinetics of the following six emergency drugs and solutions: epinephrine hydrochloride, 0.01 mg/kg; sodium bicarbonate, 1 mEq/kg; calcium chloride, 10 mg/kg; hydroxyethyl starch, 10 mL/kg; 50% dextrose in water, 250 mg/kg; and lidocaine hydrochloride, 1 mg/kg. Studies were conducted in normotensive, anesthetized dogs, with three animals studied with each of the drugs or solutions and each animal being treated with all three routes of administration (central intravenous, peripheral intravenous, and intraosseous) in randomized sequence. The effects of epinephrine were also assessed in a shock model. The intraosseous route of administration was comparable with the central and peripheral intravenous routes for all of the emergency drugs and solutions studied, with equivalent magnitudes of peak effect or drug level and equal or longer durations of action. Time to placement of the intraosseous needle varied from 15 seconds to 5 minutes, with a mean of 60 seconds. Time to placement of the needle varies with the skill and experience of the individual. With experience, all individuals could place the intraosseous needle in 60 seconds or less. The intraosseous route is comparable in effect to the central and peripheral intravenous routes of drug administration for epinephrine, sodium bicarbonate, hydroxyethyl starch, calcium chloride, 50% dextrose in water, and lidocaine and is a clinically feasible alternative when intravenous access will be critically delayed.

  14. The Utilization of Long Nylon Catheters for Prolonged Intravenous Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ronald B.; Wilkinson, R. H.; Bayliss, C. E.

    1967-01-01

    A study of 300 patients receiving intravenous therapy showed that 90 had associated phlebitis. Because of this high rate of complications, the use of long plastic catheters, with the tip located in a large central vessel, was investigated. One hundred and one catheters were inserted into the basilic vein through a cut-down. The patients were divided into four groups: infusions lasting one to seven days, eight to 14 days, 15 to 28 days and 29 days or longer. The most common complication was obstruction of the catheter with clotted blood. In four patients the catheters had to be removed because of phlebitis; two were pulled out by the patients themselves. Infection was not observed. Two factors probably contributed to the successful infusions: the composition of the plastic catheters (nylon) and the location of the tip in a large central vessel. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:6017172

  15. Venipuncture and intravenous infusion access during zero-gravity flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupa, Debra T.; Gosbee, John; Billica, Roger; Bechtle, Perry; Creager, Gerald J.; Boyce, Joey B.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to establish the difficulty associated with securing an intravenous (IV) catheter in place in microgravity flight and the techniques applicable in training the Crew Medical Officer (CMO) for Space Station Freedom, as well as aiding in the selection of appropriate hardware and supplies for the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF). The objectives are the following: (1) to determine the difficulties associated with venipuncture in a microgravity environment; (2) to evaluate the various methods of securing an IV catheter and attached tubing for infusion with regard to the unique environment; (3) to evaluate the various materials available for securing an intravenous catheter in place; and (4) to evaluate the fluid therapy administration system when functioning in a complete system. The inflight test procedures and other aspects of the KC-135 parabolic flight test to simulate microgravity are presented.

  16. Cefoxitin sodium compatibility with intravenous infusions and additives.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, M J; Portnoff, J B; Cohen, E M

    1979-01-01

    The compatibility and stability of cefoxitin sodium in solution with a series of frequently used intravenous infusion fluids and injectable additives were studied. Cefoxitin sodium's stability in various solutions was measured by ultraviolet spectrophotometry, iodometry, thin-layer chromatography, high-pressure liquid chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography and microbiological assay. Cefoxitin sodium was shown to maintain 90% of its initial concentration in aqueous solution for 40 hours at room temperature (25 C) and about 30 days at 5 C. The stability of cefoxitin sodium in common i.v. infusion fluids was independent of the concentrations (1 mg/ml to 400 mg/ml) and containers used, and was retained after 30 weeks storage at -20 C. Similar stability patterns were demonstrated for cefoxitin sodium in protein hydrolysate solutions and multivitamin formulations. Cefoxitin sodium was chemically and visually compatible with amikacin sulfate, gentamicin sulfate, kanamycin sulfate and tobramycin sulfate when admixed with normal saline or 5% dextrose in water injections. Cefoxitin sodium (397 mg/ml) in 0.5% lidocaine hydrochloride was stable after 26 weeks of storage at -20 C. Sodium cefoxitin is compatible with a wide variety of commonly used infusion solutions. Its stability is independent of concentration or pH within the ranges studied, and of types of common containers.

  17. Intravenous cannulation of hens for long-term infusion.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, R M

    1978-12-01

    Intravenous cannulation was performed on the brachial vein of the hen. The cannulation system consisted of a jacket that fitted around the body of the hen. An external sheath passed through the top of the cage, over a small pulley and was counter-weighted with lead. A subcutaneous polyethylene sheath was extended from the wing near the site of cannulation to the mid-point of the back between the wings and into the external sheath. Once the polyethylene cannula was inserted into and attached to the brachial vein, the free end was passed through the subcutaneous sheath, into and through the external sheath, and attached to a syringe or pump. No special post-cannulation care was necessary. The hens were housed in wire cages and received feed and water ad libitum. Twenty-four hens were continuously or intermittently infused for up to 73 days after cannulation.

  18. Efficacy of Intravenous Infusion of Acetaminophen for Intrapartum Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Zutshi, Vijay; Rani, Kumari Usha; Patel, Madhumita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The intensity of pain experienced by women in labour, has been found to affect the progress of labour, foetal well-being and maternal psychology. Adverse effects associated with commonly used opioids for providing intrapartum analgesia have created a need for an alternative non-opioid drug. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of an intravenous infusion of 1000 mg of acetaminophen as an intrapartum analgesic. Materials and Methods The present prospective single-centre, single blind, placebo-controlled randomized interventional study was conducted in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Vardhaman Mahavir Medical College & Safdarjung Hospital over a period of six months from September 2014 to March 2015. After receiving the ethical clearance and written informed consent. The first 200 consecutive parturients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were recruited into the study. Women were then randomised to receive either intravenous 1000 mg (100ml) of acetaminophen (Group A, n=100) or 100 ml normal saline (Group B, n=100). Primary outcome assessed was effectiveness of acetaminophen to provide an adequate amount of analgesia, as measured by a change in Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain intensity score at various times after drug administration. Secondary outcomes measured were duration of labour, need for additional rescue analgesia and presence of adverse maternal or foetal effect. Results There was pain reduction at 1 and 2 hours in both groups (p<0.001). However, it was more significant in the acetaminophen group, especially at 1 hour. Duration of labour was shortened in both the groups, without any maternal and foetal adverse effects. Conclusion Intravenous acetaminophen is an efficacious non-opioid drug for relieving labour pain without any significant maternal and foetal adverse effects. PMID:27656511

  19. [Effect of intravenous infusion with lidocaine on rapid recovery of laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Chen, X Z; Lou, Q B; Sun, C C; Zhu, W S; Li, J

    2017-03-28

    Objective: To investigate the effect of intravenous infusion with lidocaine on rapid recovery of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods: This study was a prospective randomized controlled trial. From February to August 2016 in Affiliated Yiwu Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, 60 patients scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia were involved and randomly divided into control group (n=30) and lidocaine group (n=30). Patients in lidocaine group received lidocaine 1.5 mg/kg intravenously before induction and followed by 2.0 mg·kg(-1)·h(-1) to the end of surgery. Patients in control group received equal volumes of saline intravenously. Anesthesia induction in both groups were given intravenous midazolam 0.03 mg/kg, sufentanil 0.2 μg/kg, propofol 2.0 mg/kg and cisatracuium 0.2 mg/kg. Anesthesia was maintained with propofol 0.05-0.20 mg·kg(-1)·min(-1) and remifentanil 0.1-0.5 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1) for laryngeal mask airway which bispectral index (BIS) value maintained at 40-60. BIS, heart rate(HR) and mean arterial pressure(MAP) were recorded before anesthesia induction, before and immediately after laryngeal mask implantation, intraoperative 30 min and anesthesia awake. Pain scores were assessed using visual analogue scales (VAS) at postoperation immediately, 30 min during postanesthesia care unit (PACU), 2, 6, 12, and 24 h after surgery. The time of PACU retention, postoperative ambulation, first intestine venting and discharge were recorded. The dosage of propofol and remifentanil, the frequency of sufentanil used, the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting were also recorded. Patient satisfaction was evaluated by using Simple Restoration Quality Score (QoR-9). Results: BIS values before and after laryngeal mask implantation in lidocaine group were 50.50±3.47 and 54.63±1.25 respectively, which was lower than those in control group(54.30±4.78, 55.80±2.33; t=3.542, 2.423, all P<0.05). The VAS score at postoperation

  20. The direct cost of intravenous insulin infusions to the NHS in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Rajesh; Scott, Anne; Rayman, Gerry

    2015-08-01

    The cost of intravenous insulin infusion to the NHS is unknown. The aim of this study was to estimate the direct cost of insulin infusions to the NHS in England and Wales in the first 24-hour period of infusion. Data from the National Inpatient Diabetes Audit 2013 in the UK were used to estimate the number of insulin infusions in use across England and Wales. Costs were calculated for six models for setting up and maintenance of insulin infusions, depending on the extent of involvement of different healthcare professionals in the UK. In this study, the direct costs of intravenous insulin infusions to the NHS in England and Wales have been estimated to vary from £6.4-8.5 million in the first 24-hour period on infusion. More appropriate use of these infusions could result in substantial cost savings.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of intravenous ibuprofen: implications of time of infusion in the treatment of pain and fever.

    PubMed

    Smith, Howard S; Voss, Bryan

    2012-02-12

    Intravenous NSAIDs are playing an increasingly large role in analgesia, anti-inflammation and antipyresis in the hospitalized setting. For many years, ketorolac was the only intravenous NSAID available in the US, but in 2009 intravenous ibuprofen was approved by the US FDA for the treatment of pain and fever in adults. In developing intravenous ibuprofen, a range of times of infusion and dosing levels have been utilized and compared with the oral route of administration. The earliest studies utilized a 60-minute infusion, and later a 30-minute infusion was used for the pivotal/registration studies demonstrating efficacy and safety. Another recent trial in healthy volunteers demonstrated a safe and tolerable rapid infusion (5-7 minute) of intravenous ibuprofen. The pharmacokinetic data from all of the clinical trials on 400 and 800 mg doses of intravenous ibuprofen were compiled, and pharmacokinetic modelling was utilized to simulate any data not acquired in the clinical studies. The pharmacokinetic profile of the following doses was modelled: 30-minute infusion of 800 mg intravenous ibuprofen, 5- to 7-minute infusion of 400 mg intravenous ibuprofen and 400 mg ibuprofen oral tablet. These pharmacokinetic analyses revealed that, in general, maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) decreases considerably as the length of the infusion increases and that an oral dose is not able to achieve the C(max) level of any intravenous dose. For the rapid infusion, C(max) was twice that of the oral dose and, as expected, time to C(max) (t(max)) was much more rapid than with the oral dose. However, the oral dose still maintained virtually 100% oral bioavailability. The efficacy of intravenous ibuprofen in terms of pain and fever has also been studied and this review found the drug to be efficacious for both indications. Future areas of study should include assessment of the analgesic and antipyretic efficacy of a rapid (5- to 10-minute) infusion and further assessment of pre

  2. Cerebral regulation of renal sodium excretion in sheep infused intravenously with hypertonic NaCl.

    PubMed Central

    Chodobski, A; McKinley, M J

    1989-01-01

    1. The natriuretic response to intravenous infusion of 2 M-NaCl was investigated in six conscious sheep. This hypertonic NaCl load resulted in relatively small, physiological (2-3 mmol l-1) increases in plasma Na+ concentration and was followed by a natriuresis with a maximum mean urinary sodium excretion 5 times higher than pre-infusion values. 2. Intravenous infusion of isotonic NaCl, delivering the same Na+ load as hypertonic NaCl infusion, did not induce natriuresis. This suggested, therefore, that with the hypertonic sodium load administered in the present study, the rise in plasma Na+ and/or tonicity rather than increase in blood volume is important in evoking the natriuretic response. 3. Intracerebroventricular infusion of low-Na+ artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) reduced CSF Na+ concentration, decreased plasma vasopressin (AVP) levels and caused a copious water diuresis. This was associated with excessive loss of water and large increases in plasma Na+ concentration and osmolality. 4. The natriuresis induced by intravenous hypertonic NaCl load could be blocked by lowering CSF Na+ concentration in situations where water diuresis was either prevented or reduced by intravenous infusion of AVP or by delayed intracerebroventricular infusion of low-Na+ CSF, respectively. 5. The results of the present study provide further evidence that renal sodium excretion can be controlled by the central nervous system. PMID:2621619

  3. Adverse events of intravenous immunoglobulin infusions: a ten-year retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Shirley L.; Padua, Florecita R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is a biological product with adverse effects that appears to vary considerably among different IVIG preparations. Objectives To describe the adverse events of patients given intravenous immunoglobulin infusions. Method Data was collected on all patients receiving IVIG infusion at a tertiary hospital from January 2001 to December 2010. Descriptive statistics was used. Results 77 patients (45 males, 32 females) received IVIG infusions. Thirty two percent (n = 25) experienced adverse reactions. The most common indication was Kawasaki disease (85.7%) followed by immunodeficiency disorders (7.8%). Majority of the patients were children, with the highest frequency of infusions among those aged 2 to 8 years old (52%). 36 infusions were associated with occurrence of adverse effects. Fever was the most common adverse event (n = 11, 30.6%), followed by rash (n = 8, 22.2%) and chills (n = 7, 19.4%). Other adverse events were cyanosis (n = 3, 8.3%), hypotension (n = 2, 5.6%), hypothermia (n = 2, 5.6%), irritability (n = 1, 2.8%), vomiting (n = 1, 2.8%), and chest pain (n = 1, 2.8%). Adverse events were observed to occur most frequently within 1 to 6 h from onset of IVIG infusion. Among the various IVIG preparations available locally (Gammagard, Kiovig, Gamimune, Veno-S & IV Globulin S), Gammagard was the brand frequently used (50.7%). It also has the most number of adverse events, with 17 out of 41 (41.5%) infusions resulting in adverse reactions. Most of the reactions occurred with fast infusion rates, and clinical manifestations subsided when the rate of infusion was reduced. Conclusion In this study, thirty two percent of patients given IVIG infusions experienced adverse events. Fever was the most common manifestation. Symptoms occurred within 1 to 6 h from onset of infusion, were affected by fast infusion rates, and managed by reducing the rate of infusion. PMID:24260730

  4. Attenuation of Hemodynamic Response to Skull Pin Head Holder Insertion: Intravenous Clonidine versus Intravenous Lignocaine Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Nanjundaswamy, Nethra H.; Marulasiddappa, Vinay

    2017-01-01

    Background: Insertion of skull pin induces a significant increase in heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP) and intracranial pressure. Alpha 2 agonist clonidine and intravenous (i.v.) lignocaine are effective in attenuating stress response. Local infiltration of pin site and scalp block with lignocaine are commonly used techniques for prevention of hemodynamic response to skull pin insertion. We compared the effectiveness of i.v. clonidine infusion and i.v. lignocaine infusion in suppressing the hemodynamic response to skull pin head holder insertion. Designs: Randomized double blind study conducted with sample size - sixty patients, divided into two groups: Group C (n = 30) - clonidine i.v. dose 2 μg/kg; Group L (n = 30) - lignocaine i.v. dose 1.5 mg/kg. Materials and Methods: All patients posted for elective craniotomy belonging to American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) 1 and 2, age group 18–70 were included in the study. ASA 3, 4; difficult airway; hypertensives; allergy to study drugs; ischemic heart disease; and arteriovenous malformations were excluded. Study drugs were administered 10 min prior to induction in 10 ml syringes with infusion pump over 10 min. Standard anesthesia protocol followed. HR, noninvasive BP, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and IBP were recorded at baseline (BL), after study drug (AD), 1 min after intubation (AI), 1 min prior to pin insertion -pre pin (PP), and 5 min after pin insertion (AP). Analysis: Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis – Student's t- and Chi-square/Fisher exact test were used (SAS 9.2, SPSS 15.0) P value described as *moderately significant (P value: 0.01 < P ≤ 0.05) **strongly significant (P value: P ≤ 0.01). Results: Groups were matched with respect to age (P = 0.7), gender distribution (P = 0.6), and weight (P = 0.67) There was no difference in BL HR in two groups. Significant difference in HR was noted after intubation P < 0.031 and pin insertion P < 0.001 stages with lower HR in Group C (76

  5. Effects of Intrarenal and Intravenous Infusion of the Phosphodiesterase 3 Inhibitor Milrinone on Renin Secretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, Kazuhiro; Reid, Ian A.

    1994-01-01

    We have reported that administration of the phosphodiesterase III inhibitor milrinone increases renin secretion in conscious rabbits. The aim of the present study was to determine if the increase in renin secretion results from a direct renal action of milrinone, or from an indirect extrarenal effect of the drug. This was accomplished by comparing the effects of intrarenal and intravenous infusion of graded doses of milrinone on plasma renin activity in unilaterally nephrectomized conscious rabbits. Milrinone was infused into the renal artery in doses of 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 micro-g/kg/min, and intravenously in the same rabbits in doses of 0.01, 0.1, 1.0 and 10 micro-g/kg/min. Each dose was infused for 15 min. No intrarenal dose of milrinone altered plasma renin activity or arterial pressure, although at the highest dose, there was a small increase in heart rate. Intravenous infusion of milrinone at 1.0 micro-g/kg/min increased plasma renin activity to 176 +/- 55% of the control value (P less than 0.05). Heart rate increased but arterial pressure did not change. Intravenous infusion of milrinone at 1O micro-g/kg/min increased plasma renin activity to 386 +/- 193% of control in association with a decrease in arterial pressure and an increase in heart rate. These results confirm that milrinone increases renin secretion, and indicate that the stimulation is due to an extrarenal effect of the drug.

  6. Intravenous Lidocaine Infusion to Treat Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Papapetrou, Peter; Kumar, Aashish J; Muppuri, Rudram; Chakrabortty, Shushovan

    2015-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a debilitating side effect of chemotherapy, which manifests as paresthesias, dysesthesias, and numbness in the hands and feet. Numerous chemoprotective agents and treatments have been used with limited success to treat chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. We report a case in which a patient presenting with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy received an IV lidocaine infusion over the course of 60 minutes with complete symptomatic pain relief for a prolonged period of 2 weeks.

  7. Promotion of gallbladder emptying by intravenous aminoacids.

    PubMed

    Zoli, G; Ballinger, A; Healy, J; O'Donnell, L J; Clark, M; Farthing, M J

    1993-05-15

    Patients receiving total intravenous nutrition have inert gallbladders; gallbladder sludge and gallstones often develop, but are preventable if gallbladder emptying can be improved. We measured the effect of giving rapid intravenous infusions of aminoacid solutions in eight normal subjects. Four regimens were tested (250 mL over 30 min, 250 mL over 10 min, 125 mL over 5 min, and 50 mL over 5 min). Gallbladder emptying, as measured by ultrasound and cholecystokinin release, depended on both the amount and the rate of aminoacid infusion. Rapid infusion of 125 mL of an aminoacid mixture (Synthamin 14 without electrolytes) over 5 min (2.1 g per min) produced a 64% reduction in gallbladder volume within 30 min, whereas a 50 mL infusion over 5 min produced only a 22% reduction. Intermittent rapid infusion of small amounts of aminoacids may prevent gallstones in patients receiving intravenous nutrition.

  8. Reversible lactic acidosis associated with repeated intravenous infusions of sorbitol and ethanol.

    PubMed Central

    Batstone, G. F.; Alberti, K. G.; Dewar, A. K.

    1977-01-01

    Infusions of fructose or sorbitol are used commonly in parenteral nutrition and may cause lactic acidosis. A case is reported in whom blood lactate concentration was monitored frequently over a 5-day period during intravenous feeding with a sorbitol-ethanol-amino acid mixture. During the first five infusions blood lactate rose only moderately, but with the final infusion lactate rose to 11-1 mmol/l and the patient had a severe metabolic acidosis. In retrospect the patient had shown deterioration in renal and hepatic function tests during the preceding 24 hr. On terminating the infusions the blood lactate concentration fell rapidly. It is suggested that great care should be exercised when using such infusions in ill patients and acid base status and renal and hepatic function should be monitored frequently. PMID:22069

  9. Intravenous medication safety and smart infusion systems: lessons learned and future opportunities.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Carol A; Hayes, Judy; Saniuk, Catherine; Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Bates, David W

    2005-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine report To Err Is Human: Building a Safe Health System greatly increased national awareness of the need to improve patient safety in general and medication safety in particular. Infusion-related errors are associated with the greatest risk of harm, and "smart" (computerized) infusion systems are currently available that can avert high-risk errors and provide previously unavailable data for continuous quality improvement (CQI) efforts. As healthcare organizations consider how to invest scarce dollars, infusion nurses have a key role to play in assessing need, evaluating technology, and selecting and implementing specific products. This article reviews the need to improve intravenous medication safety. It describes smart infusion systems and the results they have achieved. Finally, it details the lessons learned and the opportunities identified through the use of smart infusion technology at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts.

  10. Durability of Benefit From Repeated Intravenous Lidocaine Infusions in Fibromyalgia Patients: A Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Marks, David M.; Newhouse, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a painful disorder with no curative treatments, and available medications typically provide partial relief of pain. Reported here is the effective use of serial intravenous lidocaine infusions for the chronic management of 3 patients with fibromyalgia. The details of the infusion procedure are described, and relevant literature is reviewed. Lidocaine infusions should be considered in fibromyalgia patients who are refractory to other treatments, and a positive response to 1 infusion may justify repeated infusions for chronic management. PMID:26835161

  11. Quality of intravenous infusion fluids manufactured in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Aluoch-Orwa, J A; Ondari, C O; Kibwage, I O; Hoogmartens, J

    1995-12-01

    The incidence and nature of microbial contamination of intravenous fluids prepared by four manufacturing establishments in Kenya was evaluated using the European Pharmacopoeia membrane filtration method for sterility testing. The percentage failures were 28.6% for source D, 18.8% for source A, 12.5% for source B and 10.5% for source C. The major contaminant was aspergillus which was isolated from samples from three sources. Candida and Staphylococcus accounted for the contamination of samples from two sources. Failure rates due to the chemical composition of the products was 66.7% for Source A, 60.0% for D, 41.7% for C and 13.3% for B. The experience of the manufacturing sites appeared to correlate with the quality of the products, with the older manufacturing establishments showing lower percentage failures.

  12. Effects of intravenous infusion of glycerol on blood parameters and urinary glycerol concentrations.

    PubMed

    Okano, Masato; Nishitani, Yasunori; Dohi, Michiko; Kageyama, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    In sports, the oral intake and intravenous administration of glycerol as a potential masking agent have been prohibited. The effect of glycerol on blood parameters was investigated by comparing the intravenous administration of glycerol (20g/200mL) with that of an electrolyte (8g glucose/200mL) as a comparator (n=7, fixed-dose-rate i.v. infusion, 200mL in 1h). This study was also designed to evaluate whether the urinary concentrations reached the positivity threshold after the intravenous infusion of glycerol. Significant decreases of the haemoglobin (HGB, g/dL), haematocrit (HCT, %) and OFF-h Score (OFF-score) values were observed after the infusion of glycerol (P<0.05 at 1-6h). The differences in the HGB, HCT and OFF-score between pre- and post-administration were -0.49±0.23g/dL (2h), -1.54±0.73% (2h) and -3.89±3.66 (2h), respectively. Glycerol infusion significantly increased the plasma volume by 12.1% (1h), 6.3% (2h) and 5.7% (3h) compared with the initial values. The infusion of the comparator also increased the plasma volume by 9.6% (1h), 5.8% (2h) and 4.9% (3h) compared with the values before infusion. There were no significant differences in the change of the plasma volume between the intravenous infusions of glycerol and the glucose-based electrolyte (as the comparator) (P≥0.05). This finding might indicate that glycerol itself only exhibited limited effects on the expansion of plasma. After administration of glycerol, the urinary glycerol concentrations increased from 0.0013±0.0004mg/mL to 6.86±2.86mg/mL at 1h and 6.45±3.08mg/mL at 2h. The intravenous infusion of glycerol can most likely be detected using the current urine analysis; however, the dependence of the concentration of urinary glycerol on the urine volume should be considered.

  13. Serum concentrations of amoxicillin in neonates during continuous intravenous infusion.

    PubMed

    van Boekholt, A; Fleuren, H; Mouton, J; Kramers, C; Sprong, T; Gerrits, P; Semmekrot, B

    2016-06-01

    Amoxicillin is commonly used for the treatment of neonatal bacterial infection with intermittent dosing (ID) regimens. However, increasing bacterial resistance, in addition to a lack of new antimicrobial agents, urges the optimization of current therapeutic options. Clinical studies in adults suggest continuous infusion (CI) regimens of beta-lactam antibiotics to be superior to ID. There are as yet no guidelines concerning the CI dosing of amoxicillin. The present study was developed to describe the CI pharmacokinetics and -dynamics of amoxicillin during the first 3 days of life in search of the optimal dosing regimen. Neonates with a gestational age above 34 weeks, at risk of neonatal infection and requiring amoxicillin therapy, were included. Serum concentrations of amoxicillin were measured during CI on days 1 and 3 in the steady state. Twenty-two serum samples of 11 patients were collected. All patients reached and retained serum concentrations of amoxicillin within the therapeutic range without exceeding the toxic concentration (serum concentrations on day 1 mean 55.4 mg/l, range 30.9-69.5, SD 10.5, and on day 3 48.8 mg/l, range 25.5-92.4, SD 18.4). There was no significant decrease in concentration from day 1 to day 3 (p = 0.38). This study showed therapeutic, nontoxic concentrations of amoxicillin in neonates on CI of amoxicillin in the first 3 days of life. Randomized controlled trials should reveal whether the clinical benefits of the CI of amoxicillin exceed those of ID regimens.

  14. Multiorgan crystal deposition following intravenous oxalate infusion in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenfrucht, M.J.; Cheeks, C.; Wedeen, R.P.

    1986-06-01

    Deposition of calcium oxalate is responsible for the pathologic manifestations of oxalosis and may contribute to multiorgan dysfunction in uremia and to the progression of renal damage after renal failure is established. We have developed a rat model of oxalosis using a single intravenous injection of sodium oxalate, 0.3 mmol./kg. body weight, in rats. Polarized light microscopy and section freeze-dry autoradiography were used to identify /sup 14/C-oxalate within the renal parenchyma and in extrarenal organs. /sup 14/C-oxalate crystals under three mu in length were identified within one min. of injection in proximal tubule lumens. Section freeze-dry autoradiography showed occasional minute crystals within glomeruli, heart, lung and liver at one hr. In contrast to concentrative cellular uptake demonstrated in rat renal cortical slices in vitro, intracellular accumulation of /sup 14/C-oxalate could not be detected in vivo. Within the first 24 hr., renal oxalate retention reached a maximum of 25 +/- 4 per cent of the injected dose/gm. kidney compared to a maximum of only 7 +/- 3 per cent/gm. kidney after intraperitoneal administration. Although less than one per cent dose/gm. kidney remained after one week, crystal fragments were scattered throughout the cortex and medulla, often surrounded by foci of interstitial nephritis. The retention of crystals in kidney and other body organs following i.v. oxalate provides a model of oxalosis which stimulates pathophysiologic events in a variety of clinical situations characterized by transiently or persistently elevated serum oxalate.

  15. Intravenous infusion of hyperosmotic NaCl solution induces acute cor pulmonale in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Abe, Chikara; Tsuru, Yoshiharu; Iwata, Chihiro; Ogihara, Ryosuke; Morita, Hironobu

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous hyperosmotic NaCl infusion is an effective treatment for circulatory shock. However, a fast infusion rate (2 mL/kg at the rate of 1 mL/s) induces transient hypotension. This response has been reported to be due to decreased total peripheral resistance and/or decreased cardiac performance. Although the hypotension is transient and recovers within 2 min without detrimental consequences, it is important to understand the associated hemodynamics and mechanisms. We found that the hypotensive effect was larger with intravenous NaCl infusion than with intra-aortic infusion, indicating that change in cardiac performance played a more significant role than change in peripheral resistance. NaCl infusion induced an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and central venous pressure and a decrease in right ventricular dP/dt max, suggesting acute cor pulmonale. Diastolic ventricular crosstalk-induced left ventricular failure was also observed. Hyperosmotic NaCl-induced hypotension was therefore mainly due to a combination of acute cor pulmonale and left ventricular failure.

  16. Histamine and Nt-methylhistamine in the circulation during intravenous infusion of histamine in normal volunteers.

    PubMed

    Sheinman, B D; Devalia, J L; Wylie, G; Davies, R J

    1988-12-01

    Plasma levels of histamine and Nt-methylhistamine were measured simultaneously by high performance liquid chromatography during the intravenous infusion of histamine acid phosphate in six normal volunteers. Progressive, dose-related increases in plasma histamine were noted, reaching a maximum value of 3.1 +/- 0.14 ng ml-1 corresponding to a maximum infusion rate of 180 ng kg-1 min-1 (means +/- SEM). Increases in plasma histamine were accompanied by a significant dose-related fall in mean diastolic blood pressure (baseline 74.0 +/- 4.4 mm Hg falling to 60.0 +/- 3.3 mm Hg at maximum infusion rate, p less than 0.001) and an increase in pulse rate (baseline 76.3 +/- 2.8 beats min-1 rising to 89.24 beats min-1 at maximum infusion rate, p less than 0.05). All subjects exhibited facial flushing, the threshold plasma histamine level for this effect being 1.3 +/- 0.15 ng ml-1 corresponding to an infusion rate of 60 ng kg-1 min-1. Elevation of plasma Nt-methylhistamine was seen in only one subject, who exhibited a level of 0.5 ng ml-1 at the highest infusion rate. These results suggest that measurements of plasma Nt-methylhistamine are unlikely to provide a useful index of histamine release into the circulation.

  17. Analysis of 72-Hour Sterility of Common Pediatric Continuous Intravenous Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Piro, Christina C.; Davis, Jennifer; Frelix, Arlesia; Grisso, Alison G.; Sinclair-Pingel, Julie; Willingham, Harold; Wright, Lorianne; Potts, Amy L.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Patient morbidity and mortality associated with contaminated and improperly prepared sterile products has captured national attention. In response, both the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) and Centers for Disease Control (CDC) have published recommendations in an effort to minimize the risk of infection. While the CDC recommends that administration sets are not changed more frequently than every 72 hours, the USP recommends a maximum beyond use date of 48 hours. Neither organization provides specific guidance on expiration dating once the intravenous drug is dispensed. Likewise, neither addresses the length of time that a bag containing medication for continuous infusion may hang once administration to the patient has begun. We evaluated the sterility of medications that are commonly administered by continuous infusion to pediatric patients. Because frequent manipulation of infusion and administration sets may predispose the patient to adverse events, we evaluated sterility for extended beyond use dating up to 72 hours. METHODS Thirty-five common intravenous (IV) continuous infusions using 94 standard concentrations and diluents were identified. IV solutions were mixed using sterile technique in the laminar flow hood in accordance with USP guidelines. Medications were excluded for short stability, short durations of use or high cost. A sample from each solution was tested for contamination or bacterial growth at 72 hours. Any visible discoloration suggesting physical instability was also evaluated. RESULTS None of the syringes or chambers resulted in contamination, bacterial growth or discoloration after 72 hours. CONCLUSIONS This study provides sufficient data that these compounded sterile products may be stored using a beyond use date up to 72 hours for a number of commonly used continuous IV infusions in pediatric patients. In our institution, this allows for a more convenient and consistent change of both administration sets and continuous infusions

  18. Improved Arterial Blood Oxygenation Following Intravenous Infusion of Cold Supersaturated Dissolved Oxygen Solution

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Daniel J; Gentile, Michael A; Riggs, John H; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND One of the primary goals of critical care medicine is to support adequate gas exchange without iatrogenic sequelae. An emerging method of delivering supplemental oxygen is intravenously rather than via the traditional inhalation route. The objective of this study was to evaluate the gas-exchange effects of infusing cold intravenous (IV) fluids containing very high partial pressures of dissolved oxygen (>760 mm Hg) in a porcine model. METHODS Juvenile swines were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Each animal received an infusion of cold (13 °C) Ringer’s lactate solution (30 mL/kg/hour), which had been supersaturated with dissolved oxygen gas (39.7 mg/L dissolved oxygen, 992 mm Hg, 30.5 mL/L). Arterial blood gases and physiologic measurements were repeated at 15-minute intervals during a 60-minute IV infusion of the supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution. Each animal served as its own control. RESULTS Five swines (12.9 ± 0.9 kg) were studied. Following the 60-minute infusion, there were significant increases in PaO2 and SaO2 (P < 0.05) and a significant decrease in PaCO2 (P < 0.05), with a corresponding normalization in arterial blood pH. Additionally, there was a significant decrease in core body temperature (P < 0.05) when compared to the baseline preinfusion state. CONCLUSIONS A cold, supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution may be intravenously administered to improve arterial blood oxygenation and ventilation parameters and induce a mild therapeutic hypothermia in a porcine model. PMID:25249764

  19. The disposition of lidocaine during a 12-hour intravenous infusion to postoperative horses.

    PubMed

    Milligan, M; Kukanich, B; Beard, W; Waxman, S

    2006-12-01

    Lidocaine is administered as an intravenous infusion to horses for a variety of reasons, but no study has assessed plasma lidocaine concentrations during a 12-h infusion to horses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetics of lidocaine during a 12-h infusion to postoperative horses. A second purpose of the study was to evaluate the in vitro plasma protein binding of lidocaine in equine plasma. Lidocaine hydrochloride was administered as a loading dose, 1.3 mg/kg over 15 min, then by a constant rate IV infusion, 50 microg/kg/min to six postoperative horses. Lidocaine plasma concentrations were measured by a validated high-pressure liquid chromatography method. One horse experienced tremors and collapsed 5.5 h into the study. The range of plasma concentrations during the infusion was 1.21-3.13 microg/mL. Lidocaine plasma concentrations were significantly increased at 0.5, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 h compared with 1, 2 and 3 h. The in vitro protein binding of lidocaine in equine plasma at 2 microg/mL was 53.06+/-10.28% and decreased to 27.33+/-9.72% and 29.52+/-6.44% when in combination with ceftiofur or the combination of ceftiofur and flunixin, respectively. In conclusion, a lower lidocaine infusion rate may need to be administered to horses on long-term lidocaine infusions. The in vitro protein binding of lidocaine is moderate in equine plasma, but highly protein bound drugs may displace lidocaine increasing unbound concentrations and the risk of lidocaine toxicity.

  20. Utilities associated with subcutaneous injections and intravenous infusions for treatment of patients with bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Matza, Louis S; Cong, Ze; Chung, Karen; Stopeck, Alison; Tonkin, Katia; Brown, Janet; Braun, Ada; Van Brunt, Kate; McDaniel, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Although cost-utility models are often used to estimate the value of treatments for metastatic cancer, limited information is available on the utility of common treatment modalities. Bisphosphonate treatment for bone metastases is frequently administered via intravenous infusion, while a newer treatment is administered as a subcutaneous injection. This study estimated the impact of these treatment modalities on health state preference. Methods Participants from the UK general population completed time trade-off interviews to assess the utility of health state vignettes. Respondents first rated a health state representing cancer with bone metastases. Subsequent health states added descriptions of treatment modalities (ie, injection or infusion) to this basic health state. The two treatment modalities were presented with and without chemotherapy, and infusion characteristics were varied by duration (30 minutes or 2 hours) and renal monitoring. Results A total of 121 participants completed the interviews (52.1% female, 76.9% white). Cancer with bone metastases had a mean utility of 0.40 on a standard utility scale (1 = full health; 0 = dead). The injection, 30-minute infusion, and 2-hour infusion had mean disutilities of −0.004, −0.02, and −0.04, respectively. The mean disutility of the 30-minute infusion was greater with renal monitoring than without. Chemotherapy was associated with substantial disutility (−0.17). When added to health states with chemotherapy, the mean disutilities of injection, 30-minute infusion, and 2-hour infusion were −0.02, −0.03, and −0.04, respectively. The disutility associated with injection was significantly lower than the disutility of the 30-minute and 2-hour infusions (P < 0.05), regardless of chemotherapy status. Conclusion Respondents perceived an inconvenience with each type of treatment modality, but injections were preferred over infusions. The resulting utilities may be used in cost-utility models

  1. Opiate refractory pain from an intestinal obstruction responsive to an intravenous lidocaine infusion.

    PubMed

    Bafuma, Patrick J; Nandi, Arun; Weisberg, Michael

    2015-10-01

    A 24-year-old female patient presented to our community emergency department (ED) for abdominal pain that had progressively worsened over the last 28 hours. Of note, 1 month prior to her presentation, the patient had a colostomy due to a rectal abscess and required stoma revision 5 days prior to her visit to our ED. The patient's pain was refractory to opiate analgesia in our ED, but experienced significant relief after an intravenous lidocaine infusion. Computer tomography of the abdomen and pelvis ultimately revealed a large bowel obstruction just proximal to the colostomy site. Historically, options for ED management of severe pain have been limited beyond narcotic analgesia. For patients whom are refractory to opiates in the ED, or for whom opiates are contraindicated, lidocaine infusions have shown promise for a variety of both acute and chronic painful conditions.

  2. Effects of Intravenous Ketamine Infusions in a Neuropathic Pain Patient with Lichen Sclerosus et Atrophicus

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Ashraf F.; Armstrong, Josh S.; Smith, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    A patient reported to the Florida Spine Institute (Clearwater, Fla., USA) with severe lichen sclerosus of the anogenital region and legs. The patient's pain presentation was neuropathic with hypersensitivity, allodynia, swelling, and weakness. The patient had failed multiple pain management modalities including opioid therapy, anticonvulsants, and antidepressants. The patient completed a standard intravenous ketamine infusion regimen developed at the Florida Spine Institute and reported complete abolishment of her pain syndrome. For the first time, we report that ketamine infusions also dramatically improved a patient's lichen sclerosus. That ketamine is known to have immunomodulatory properties, and given the clinical observations described in this case report, suggests that ketamine should be explored as a possible new therapeutic option for managing lichen sclerosus, especially in cases that are refractory to conventional therapies. PMID:27462225

  3. Hemoglobinuria and acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis following intravenous immunoglobulin infusion.

    PubMed

    Welles, Christine C; Tambra, Shouieb; Lafayette, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), a product initially developed for patients with immunodeficiencies, now has multiple other indications and increasing off-label use. IVIG generally is well tolerated, with few adverse effects. Antibody-mediated (Coombs-positive) hemolysis is known to occur after IVIG infusion, but often is subclinical and previously has not been reported to lead to acute kidney injury (AKI). The predominantly known mechanism of AKI after IVIG infusion has been osmotic nephrosis, primarily associated with sucrose-containing formulations. We present a case of a bone marrow transplant recipient who was treated with a sucrose-free IVIG product and subsequently developed Coombs-positive hemolysis leading to AKI requiring hemodialysis, who ultimately died secondary to infectious complications. The severity of this case emphasizes the importance of identifying populations who may be at increased risk of pigment-mediated kidney injury before consideration of IVIG therapy.

  4. Effects of Intravenous Ketamine Infusions in a Neuropathic Pain Patient with Lichen Sclerosus et Atrophicus.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Ashraf F; Armstrong, Josh S; Smith, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    A patient reported to the Florida Spine Institute (Clearwater, Fla., USA) with severe lichen sclerosus of the anogenital region and legs. The patient's pain presentation was neuropathic with hypersensitivity, allodynia, swelling, and weakness. The patient had failed multiple pain management modalities including opioid therapy, anticonvulsants, and antidepressants. The patient completed a standard intravenous ketamine infusion regimen developed at the Florida Spine Institute and reported complete abolishment of her pain syndrome. For the first time, we report that ketamine infusions also dramatically improved a patient's lichen sclerosus. That ketamine is known to have immunomodulatory properties, and given the clinical observations described in this case report, suggests that ketamine should be explored as a possible new therapeutic option for managing lichen sclerosus, especially in cases that are refractory to conventional therapies.

  5. Increased dietary sodium alters Fos expression in the lamina terminalis during intravenous angiotensin II infusion.

    PubMed

    Bealer, Steven L; Metcalf, Cameron S; Heyborne, Ryan

    2007-03-01

    These studies examined the effects of increased dietary sodium on expression of Fos, the protein product of c-fos, in forebrain structures in the rat following intravenous infusion with angiotensin II (AngII). Animals were provided with either tap water (Tap) or isotonic saline solution (Iso) as their sole drinking fluid for 3-5 weeks prior to testing. Rats were then implanted with catheters in a femoral artery and vein. The following day, the conscious, unrestrained animals received iv infusion of either isotonic saline (Veh), AngII, or phenylephrine (Phen) for 2 h. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored continuously throughout the procedure. Brains were subsequently processed for evaluation of Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-Li IR) in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT), the subfornical organ (SFO), and the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO). Fos-Li IR was significantly increased in the SFO and OVLT of animals consuming both Tap and Iso following AngII, but not Phen, compared to Veh infusions. Furthermore, Fos-Li IR in the MnPO was increased following AngII infusion in rats consuming a high sodium diet, but not in animals drinking Tap. These data suggest that increased dietary sodium sensitizes the MnPO neurons to excitatory input from brain areas responding to circulating AngII.

  6. Intravenous infusion of electrolyte solution changes pharmacokinetics of drugs: pharmacokinetics of ampicillin.

    PubMed

    Britzi, M; Mazon, Y; Lavy, E; Soback, S

    2014-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ampicillin in dogs was determined after intravenous (i.v.) bolus and constant rate infusion. Ampicillin was administered to six beagle dogs as an i.v. bolus at 20 mg/kg and as a constant rate i.v. infusion (CRI) at 20 mg/kg during 8 h (0.042 mL/min/kg) in Ringer's lactate (Hartmann's) solution. The concentrations were determined by an LC/MS/MS method. After i.v. bolus, ampicillin total body clearance, apparent volume of distribution at steady-state, mean residence time (MRT), and half-life were 4.53 ± 0.70 mL/min/kg, 0.275 ± 0.044 L/kg, 61 ± 13 min, and 111 (85-169) min, respectively. The corresponding parameters calculated after CRI were 13.5 ± 1.06 mL/min/kg, 0.993 ± 0.415 L/kg, 73 ± 27 min, and 49 (31-69) min. Ampicillin concentration decreased by 30% in the Ringer's lactate infusion solution mostly during the first hour after preparation of the solution. Constant rate infusion of Ringer's lactate solution during 8 h caused significant changes in ampicillin pharmacokinetics. The results suggested that special attention should be given to drug pharmacokinetics when co-administered intravenously with electrolyte solutions.

  7. Induction of hyperlipidemia by intravenous infusion of tallow emulsion causes insulin resistance in Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Pires, J A A; Souza, A H; Grummer, R R

    2007-06-01

    The objective was to test whether the induction of elevated blood nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) by i.v. infusion of a tallow emulsion altered glucose tolerance and responsiveness to insulin in Holstein cows. Six non-lactating, nongestating Holstein cows were assigned to a crossover design. One cow was excluded before initiation of the experiment because of complications from mastitis. Treatments consisted of 11-h i.v. infusions of saline (control) or a 20% (wt/vol) triacylglycerol (TG) emulsion derived from tallow (tallow) to elevate plasma NEFA. Each period consisted of two 11-h infusions (INF1 and INF2), separated by 1 d in which cows were not infused. Intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTT) and insulin challenges (IC) were performed 8 h after initiation of INF1 and INF2, respectively. The infusion of treatments continued during the 3 h of sampling for IVGTT and IC. Cows were fed every 4 h at a rate to meet energy requirements for 5 d prior to each period, and every 2 h during the first 8 h of infusions. Infusion of tallow induced hyperlipidemia by increasing plasma NEFA (295 +/- 9 vs. 79 +/- 7 microEq/L), serum TG (41.0 +/- 6 vs. 11.4 +/- 4.4 mg/dL), and glycerol (0.81 +/- 0.09 vs. 0.23 +/- 0.1 mg/dL) concentrations during INF1. During INF2, tallow treatment increased plasma NEFA (347 vs. 139 +/- 18 microEq/L), serum TG (20.8 +/- 4.6 vs. 13.1 +/- 2.3 mg/dL), and glycerol (0.88 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.31 +/- 0.02 mg/dL) concentrations. Induction of hyperlipidemia impaired glucose clearance during IVGTT, despite the greater endogenous insulin response to the glucose infusion, leading to a lower insulin sensitivity index [0.29 vs. 1.88 +/- 0.31 x 10(-4) min(-1)/(microIU/mL)]. Accordingly, hyperlipidemia impaired glucose clearance during IC (1.58 vs. 2.72 %/min), reflecting lower responsiveness to insulin. These data show that induction of hyperlipidemia causes insulin resistance in Holstein cows by impairing both sensitivity and maximum responsiveness to insulin. The

  8. Post-reconstitution Stability of Telavancin with Commonly Used Diluents and Intravenous Infusion Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhengtian; Parra, Carlos; Wong, Anissa; Nguyen, Alice; Cheung, Ronnie; Catalano, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objective The post-reconstitution chemical stability and microbial challenge hold time of nonpreserved telavancin for injection was determined using common reconstitution diluents and intravenous (IV) infusion solutions stored at room temperature with light (ambient) or at 2°C to 8°C without light (refrigeration). Methods Telavancin was reconstituted with 5% dextrose, 0.9% normal saline, or sterile water (15 mg/mL). Infusion solutions at 0.6 and 8.0 mg/mL were prepared in ViaFlex (polyvinyl chloride) IV bags (Baxter International Inc, Deerfield, Illinois) using 5% dextrose, 0.9% normal saline, or lactated Ringer’s solution. Chemical stability was evaluated for up to 14 days under refrigeration and for up to 3 days under ambient conditions. Telavancin concentration and degradant levels were determined using a stability-indicating HPLC method. Solutions were subjected to microbial-challenge testing for up to 48 hours (ambient) or for up to 6 days (refrigeration). Results All reconstituted or infused telavancin solutions met the prespecified stability acceptance criteria after 2 days under ambient and minimum 7 days under refrigeration. Following inoculation with gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms, telavancin infusion solutions stored under ambient conditions reduced or inhibited populations of all organisms up to 48 hours, except for Serratia marcescens, which exhibited growth of >0.5 log10 after 12 hours. All refrigerated samples inhibited or reduced bacterial populations up to 6 days. Conclusions These results are supportive of a total hold time for reconstituted telavancin in vials plus the time in IV infusion solutions in polyvinyl chloride bags to not exceed 12 hours under ambient conditions and 7 days under refrigeration. PMID:26843895

  9. [Clinical study of astromicin administered by intravenous drip infusion against chronic complicated urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Takanashi, K; Nagakubo, I; Kiyosaki, H; Naide, Y

    1987-07-01

    Astromicin (ASTM) was administered by intravenous drip infusion (i.v.d.) to 22 patients with chronic complicated urinary tract infections and the clinical efficacy and safety of this drug were evaluated. The overall clinical efficacy rate obtained was 71.4% (excellent 6; moderate 9) of 21 evaluable cases by the UTI committee's criteria. Concerning the response on clinical isolates, the drug was highly effective especially against strains of Escherichia coli, indole positive Proteus and Serratia marcescens. It was not effective, however, against 2 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. As for adverse reactions, there was one case which complained of headache on the 3rd day after starting treatment. In this case the drug administration was discontinued at the 5th day. The symptom disappeared within 24 hours without any treatment. No any other adverse reactions were noted. With regard to clinical test values for peripheral blood, liver and renal functions, no abnormality was observed in any of the cases treated with the drug. In conclusion, ASTM was found to be a highly effective and safe drug when administered by intravenous drip infusion in the treatment of chronic complicated urinary tract infections.

  10. Magnesium (Mg) Retention and Mood Effects After Intravenous Mg Infusion in Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Khine, Khursheed; Rosenstein, Donald L.; Elin, Ronald J.; Niemela, Julie E.; Schmidt, Peter J.; Rubinow, David R.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Conflicting data exist regarding the presence of magnesium (Mg) deficiency and the therapeutic efficacy of Mg in premenstrual syndrome or premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Methods: The % Mg retention was determined using 24-hour urinary Mg excretion and the total dose of Mg given intravenously. In women with (n = 17) and without (n = 14) prospectively diagnosed PMDD, several blood measures of Mg and mood were obtained before, immediately after, and the day following an intravenous Mg (.1 mmol/kg) loading dose. A positive mood response was seen under open conditions; as open Mg infusion improved mood, subsequent PMDD patients (n = 10) were randomized in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover fashion. Results: Patients (31.5%) and control subjects (27.5%) retained comparable mean percentages of Mg. Neither group differed in measures of mean Mg before, immediately after, or the day following Mg infusion. Although there was a time effect for all mood measures in the patient group (p <.01 for all), there was neither a treatment nor time-by-treatment effect. Conclusions: Contrary to prior reports, we found no evidence of Mg deficiency in women with PMDD compared with control subjects. Furthermore, Mg was not superior to placebo in the mitigation of mood symptoms in women with PMDD. PMID:16197921

  11. Platelet transfusion in chemotherapy patients: comparison of the effect of intravenous infusion pumps versus gravity transfusion.

    PubMed

    Meess, A

    2015-01-01

    Platelet concentrates are given to patients suffering with severe thrombocytopenia usually by a gravity transfusion procedure. Increasing patient numbers that are in need of this treatment increase the pressure on hospital staff and space. In order to combat time issues, the use of medical devices such as intravenous infusion pumps are thought to be beneficial for time and simultaneously for safety in transfusion practices. By using infusion pumps, platelet concentrates can be transfused in less time and provide accurate volume measurements. Manufacturers of infusion pumps claim that these devices are safe to be used for blood products including platelet concentrates. However, published studies were performed on older models and newer devices are on the market now. The purpose of this study is to evaluate infusion pumps, which are claimed to be suitable for blood products and to investigate the impact the pumps had on platelets. Furthermore, the study revealed if the intravenous infusion pumps are safe to be used for platelet transfusion as claimed by manufacturers. A simulated transfusion was performed using the Carefusion Alaris GP Plus volumetric pump and Fresenius Kabi Volumat Agilia infusion pump. Samples were taken from expired platelet concentrates before and after passage through the pump. All samples were investigated for full blood count that included platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW) and a plateletcrit (PCT). The samples were then centrifuged to achieve platelet-poor plasma and then tested for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). A power calculation performed on the statistical power analysis program G*power indicated a requirement of 82 samples for a power of 80%. Statistical analysis was performed with the IBM SPSS statistic software. A paired sample t-test was used to calculate mean, standard deviation and P values for the infusion pumps used. The Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test was used to evaluate results that had a non

  12. Decrease in serum FGF23 levels after intravenous infusion of pamidronate in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Kitaoka, Taichi; Namba, Noriyuki; Miura, Kohji; Kubota, Takuo; Ohata, Yasuhisa; Fujiwara, Makoto; Hirai, Haruhiko; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Ozono, Keiichi

    2011-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) plays a central role in phosphate (P) homeostasis. However, the precise mechanism of how FGF23 secretion is regulated remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we examined the effect of intravenous pamidronate administration on serum levels of FGF23. Thirteen patients with osteogenesis imperfecta were treated with two cycles of 3-day pamidronate infusion. Blood samples at pre- and post-drip pamidronate infusion were evaluated for serum calcium, P, intact PTH (iPTH), 1,25(OH)(2)D, intact FGF23 (FGF23), type I collagen cross-linked N-telopeptides (NTx), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), and TmP/GFR. During the two cycles, FGF23 levels decreased significantly preceding the decline in P levels. Although the change in P levels became less apparent during the second cycle, the reduction in FGF23 levels was similar during both cycles. Moreover, absence of correlation between FGF23 and P indicates that FGF23 attenuation is independent of the decrease in P levels during pamidronate infusion. Significant correlation between NTx suppression and the decrease in FGF23 levels during the 1st cycle (r = 0.665, P = 0.013) suggests that inhibition of osteoclast function may have some role in suppressing FGF23 levels. Because pamidronate dose was most associated with the decrease in FGF23 levels during the second cycle, pamidronate may directly attenuate osteocyte/osteoblast-mediated FGF23 production. This is the first evidence of a rapid fall in FGF23 levels following pamidronate infusion, raising the possibility that inhibition of bone resorption and/or direct effects of pamidronate may suppress secretion of FGF23.

  13. Intravenous phentolamine infusion alleviates the pain of abdominal visceral cancer, including pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Masako; Yasukawa, Ken'ichi; Kamiizumi, You; Yokoyama, Ryouji

    2007-01-01

    This case report series describes eight patients (four patients with pancreatic carcinoma, one patient with hepatocellular carcinoma, one patient with gastric and rectal carcinoma, one with sigmoid colon cancer, and one with rectal cancer), whose abdominal cancer pain was treated with intravenous phentolamine infusion at 80 mg x day(-1) for 2 days. All but one of the patients had already been treated with opioids. All eight patients complained of severe abdominal pain; in five patients the pain radiated to the back, and there was associated anal pain in two patients. Analgesia was achieved in three patients; pain alleviation was obtained in four patients, but was not sustained in two of these four patients; and the treatment in one patient could not be judged for efficacy because epidural morphine was used together with the phentolamine. Adverse effects of phentolamine were tachycardia and/or hypotension.

  14. Impact of intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative analgesia and recovery from surgery: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Grace C; Megalla, Sohair A; Habib, Ashraf S

    2010-06-18

    Postoperative pain continues to be inadequately managed. While opioids remain the mainstay for postoperative analgesia, their use can be associated with adverse effects, including ileus, which can prolong hospital stay. A number of studies have investigated the use of perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion for improving postoperative analgesia and enhancing recovery of bowel function. This systematic review was performed to determine the overall efficacy of intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative analgesia and recovery from surgery in patients undergoing various surgical procedures. We searched the databases of MEDLINE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library from 1966 to December 2009. We searched for randomized controlled comparisons of lidocaine infusion with placebo in the surgical setting and reporting on postoperative analgesia and other aspects of patient recovery from surgery. The quality of all included studies was assessed using the Modified Oxford Scale. Information on postoperative pain intensity and analgesic requirements was extracted from the trials and compared qualitatively. Other relevant data such as return of bowel function, length of hospital stay, intraoperative anaesthetic requirement and adverse effects were also compared. Sixteen trials were included. A total of 395 patients received intravenous lidocaine with 369 controls. In open and laparoscopic abdominal surgery, as well as in ambulatory surgery patients, intravenous perioperative infusion of lidocaine resulted in significant reductions in postoperative pain intensity and opioid consumption. Pain scores were reduced at rest and with cough or movement for up to 48 hours postoperatively. Opioid consumption was reduced by up to 85% in lidocaine-treated patients when compared with controls. Infusion of lidocaine also resulted in earlier return of bowel function, allowing for earlier rehabilitation and shorter duration of hospital stay. First flatus occurred up to 23 hours earlier

  15. [Postoperative analgesia with tramal in newborn children using the method of continuous intravenous infusion].

    PubMed

    Mikhel'son, V A; Zhirkova, Iu V; Beliaeva, I D; Stepanenko, S M; Manerova, A F; Butyleva, O Iu

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficiency of postoperative analgesia with tramal in the newborns. Analgesia with tramal (5% solution for injections, "Gruonental GmbH", Germany) was administered postoperatively in 20 newborn children. Thirteen children were operated for congenital malformations in the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts, three children were operated for purulent-septic diseases and four children were operated for neoplasms. Hemodynamics indices, i.e. heart rate (HR) and arterial pressure, as well as SaO2, respiratory rate (RR), acid-base condition and behavioral reactions were assessed. Analgesia was implemented by the method of continuous intravenous infusion of tramal, 0.1-0.2 mg/kg.h combined with boluses, 1-2 mg/kg. The newborns were asleep for a major part of time during analgesia with tamal; the stable indices of hemodynamics, acid-base balance, glycemia and of the cortisol level were registered. Arterial hypertension, caused by several factors including the effect produced by tamal, was noted in 70% of children. Dose-dependent hypercapnia was registered in 80% of tests in children at unassisted respiration during the infusion of tamal, which is indicative of that tamal affects the respiratory center during the neonatal period and that it is necessary to monitor thoroughly the respiratory functions, i.e. RR, SatO2, pO2, pCO2, and to choose accurately a preparation dose. The continuous infusion of tamal ensures a sufficient analgesia after different operations and especially after medium-traumatic operations.

  16. Increasing plasma [K+] by intravenous potassium infusion reduces NCC phosphorylation and drives kaliuresis and natriuresis.

    PubMed

    Rengarajan, Srinivas; Lee, Donna H; Oh, Young Taek; Delpire, Eric; Youn, Jang H; McDonough, Alicia A

    2014-05-01

    Dietary potassium loading results in rapid kaliuresis, natriuresis, and diuresis associated with reduced phosphorylation (p) of the distal tubule Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC). Decreased NCC-p inhibits NCC-mediated Na(+) reabsorption and shifts Na(+) downstream for reabsorption by epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC), which can drive K(+) secretion. Whether the signal is initiated by ingesting potassium or a rise in plasma K(+) concentration ([K(+)]) is not understood. We tested the hypothesis, in male rats, that an increase in plasma [K(+)] is sufficient to reduce NCC-p and drive kaliuresis. After an overnight fast, a single 3-h 2% potassium (2%K) containing meal increased plasma [K(+)] from 4.0 ± 0.1 to 5.2 ± 0.2 mM; increased urinary K(+), Na(+), and volume excretion; decreased NCC-p by 60%; and marginally reduced cortical Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC) phosphorylation 25% (P = 0.055). When plasma [K(+)] was increased by tail vein infusion of KCl to 5.5 ± 0.1 mM over 3 h, significant kaliuresis and natriuresis ensued, NCC-p decreased by 60%, and STE20/SPS1-related proline alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) phosphorylation was marginally reduced 35% (P = 0.052). The following were unchanged at 3 h by either the potassium-rich meal or KCl infusion: Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3), NHE3-p, NKCC, ENaC subunits, and renal outer medullary K(+) channel. In summary, raising plasma [K(+)] by intravenous infusion to a level equivalent to that observed after a single potassium-rich meal triggers renal kaliuretic and natriuretic responses, independent of K(+) ingestion, likely driven by decreased NCC-p and activity sufficient to shift sodium reabsorption downstream to where Na(+) reabsorption and flow drive K(+) secretion.

  17. A case of necrolytic migratory erythema managed for 24 months with intravenous amino acid and lipid infusions

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Jonathan F.; Glasser, Seth A.

    2013-01-01

    A 9-year-old castrated male Shetland sheepdog was diagnosed with necrolytic migratory erythema and hepatocutaneous syndrome. Necrolytic migratory erythema was treated with intermittent intravenous amino acids as needed to control cutaneous lesions. The addition of lipid infusions extended the treatment interval. The patient had a favorable response for 24 months. PMID:24155493

  18. [Clinical experience with ampicillin-cloxacillin (Viccillin S 'Meiji') by intravenous drip infusion in gynecological infections (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Takabatake, H; Nishino, R; Shiina, M; Sato, Y; Ohno, T

    1979-09-01

    Ampicillin-cloxacillin (Viccillin S 'Meiji') by intravenous drip infusion was used in gynecological infections, with the following satisfactory results. 1) The drug was markedly effective in 2 out of 6 cases, effective in 4, being the efficacy rate 100%. 2) No abnormal laboratory findings and side effects were observed in our study.

  19. The analgesic efficacy of intravenous lidocaine infusion after laparoscopic fundoplication: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dale, Gregory J; Phillips, Stephanie; Falk, Gregory L

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if intravenous lidocaine infusion reduces postoperative pain intensity following laparoscopic fundoplication surgery and to also validate the safety of intravenous lidocaine at the dose tested. This was an equally randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, single center trial. Adult patients undergoing laparoscopic fundoplication were recruited. The intervention group received 1 mg/kg intravenous lidocaine bolus prior to induction of anesthesia, then an intravenous infusion at 2 mg/kg/h for 24 hours. The primary outcome was pain, measured using a numeric rating scale for 30 hours postoperatively. Secondary outcomes were nausea and vomiting, opioid requirements, adverse events, serum lidocaine concentration, and length of hospital stay. The study was terminated after an interim analysis of 24 patients showed evidence of futility. There was no difference in postoperative pain scores (lidocaine versus control, mean ± standard deviation) at rest (2.0 ± 2.7 vs 2.1 ± 2.4, P=0.286) or with movement (2.0 ± 2.6 vs 2.6 ± 2.7, P=0.487). Three adverse events occurred in the lidocaine group (25% of patients). Intravenous lidocaine did not provide clinically significant analgesia to patients undergoing laparoscopic fundoplication. The serum lidocaine concentration of patients who experienced adverse events were within the therapeutic range. This trial cannot confirm the safety of intravenous lidocaine at the dose tested.

  20. The analgesic efficacy of intravenous lidocaine infusion after laparoscopic fundoplication: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Gregory J; Phillips, Stephanie; Falk, Gregory L

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if intravenous lidocaine infusion reduces postoperative pain intensity following laparoscopic fundoplication surgery and to also validate the safety of intravenous lidocaine at the dose tested. This was an equally randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, single center trial. Adult patients undergoing laparoscopic fundoplication were recruited. The intervention group received 1 mg/kg intravenous lidocaine bolus prior to induction of anesthesia, then an intravenous infusion at 2 mg/kg/h for 24 hours. The primary outcome was pain, measured using a numeric rating scale for 30 hours postoperatively. Secondary outcomes were nausea and vomiting, opioid requirements, adverse events, serum lidocaine concentration, and length of hospital stay. The study was terminated after an interim analysis of 24 patients showed evidence of futility. There was no difference in postoperative pain scores (lidocaine versus control, mean ± standard deviation) at rest (2.0 ± 2.7 vs 2.1 ± 2.4, P=0.286) or with movement (2.0 ± 2.6 vs 2.6 ± 2.7, P=0.487). Three adverse events occurred in the lidocaine group (25% of patients). Intravenous lidocaine did not provide clinically significant analgesia to patients undergoing laparoscopic fundoplication. The serum lidocaine concentration of patients who experienced adverse events were within the therapeutic range. This trial cannot confirm the safety of intravenous lidocaine at the dose tested. PMID:27980437

  1. Development of a web-based observational tool for detecting intravenous medication errors with smart infusion pumps.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Dykes, Patricia; McIntosh, Kathleen; Buckley, Elizabeth; Wien, Matt; Kreitzman, Kevin; Dumais, Michael; Bates, David W

    2013-01-01

    Computerized smart infusion pumps have been widely implemented to decrease the rate of intravenous (IV) medication errors in hospitals. However, these devices have not always achieved their potential, and important IV errors still persist. Findings from a previous study [1] that assessed the frequency of IV medication errors and the impact of smart infusion pumps identified major issues related to use of smart infusion pumps in a single facility, but generalizability of these results is uncertain. Additionally, lack of standardized methodology for measuring these errors remains an issue. In this study, we developed an observational tool to capture IV medication errors through iterative participatory design with interdisciplinary experts and then tested the tool by using incident cases regarding smart pump errors. We found that the tool could capture all smart infusion pump errors and is ready for testing for use as standard data collection tool in different hospital settings.

  2. The pharmacokinetics of cytarabine in dogs when administered via subcutaneous and continuous intravenous infusion routes.

    PubMed

    Crook, K I; Early, P J; Messenger, K M; Muñana, K R; Gallagher, R; Papich, M G

    2013-08-01

    This crossover study compared the pharmacokinetics of cytarabine in six healthy dogs following intravenous constant rate infusion (CRI) and subcutaneous (SC) administrations, as these are two routes of administration commonly employed in the treatment of meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology. Each dog received a SC cytarabine injection of 50 mg/m(2) or an 8 h CRI of 25 mg/m(2) per hour, with a 7-day washout before receiving the alternative treatment. Blood samples were collected for 16 h after CRI initiation and for 8 h after SC injection. Plasma concentrations were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using the best-fit compartmental analysis for both CRI and SC routes. Terminal half-life (T(1/2) ) of cytarabine was 1.35 ± 0.3 and 1.15 ± 0.13 h after SC administration and CRI, respectively. Mean peak concentration (Cmax ) was 2.88 and 2.80 μg/mL for SC and CRI administration, respectively. Volume of distribution was 0.66 ± 0.07 l/kg. The 8-h CRI produced steady-state plasma concentrations as determined by consecutive measurement that did not decline until the end of the infusion. The SC administration did not achieve steady-state concentrations because cytarabine administered by this route was rapidly absorbed and eliminated quickly. The steady state achieved with the cytarabine CRI may produce a more prolonged exposure of cytarabine at cytotoxic levels in plasma compared to the concentrations after SC administration.

  3. Potential therapeutic application of intravenous autologous bone marrow infusion in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takafumi; Okumoto, Kazuo; Haga, Hiroaki; Nishise, Yuko; Ishii, Rika; Sato, Chikako; Watanabe, Hisayoshi; Okada, Akio; Ikeda, Motoki; Togashi, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Terai, Shuji; Sakaida, Isao; Kawata, Sumio

    2011-09-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the application and efficacy of autologous bone marrow infusion (ABMi) for improvement of liver function in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC). Five subjects and 5 control patients with ALC who had abstained from alcohol intake for 24 weeks before the study were enrolled. Autologous bone marrow cells were washed and injected intravenously, and the changes in serum liver function parameters, and the level of the type IV collagen 7S domain as a marker of fibrosis, were monitored for 24 weeks. The distribution of activated bone marrow was assessed by indium-111-chloride bone marrow scintigraphy. The number of cells infused was 8.0±7.3×10(9) (mean±standard error). The serum levels of albumin and total protein and the prothrombin time were significantly higher during the follow-up period after ABMi than during the observation period in treated patients, whereas no such changes were observed in the controls. In the patients who received ABMi, the Child-Pugh score decreased in all 3 who were classified as class B; the serum levels of type IV collagen 7S domain improved in 4 of the 5 patients; and bone marrow scintigraphy demonstrated an increase of indium-111-chloride uptake in 3 of the 4 patients tested. ABMi for patients with ALC helps improve liver function parameters in comparison with observation during abstinence and ameliorates the degree of fibrosis in terms of serum markers and bone marrow activation in most cases.

  4. Responses to low dose intravenous perindoprilat infusion in salt deplete/salt replete normotensive volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    MacFadyen, R J; Lees, K R; Reid, J L

    1994-01-01

    1. Intravenous ACE inhibitor therapy appears to have a role in the treatment of acute heart failure and early after myocardial infarction. Practical experience with intravenous administration with activation of renin is limited. We report responses to perindoprilat (Pt, 0.67 mg) or placebo (P) infused over 4 h in normotensive male volunteers (n = 12, 19-28 years, 53-77 kg) with double-blind, placebo controlled salt depletion (SD) or salt repletion (SR) as a model of the activated renin system. 2. Salt depletion caused no significant fall in serum sodium (P, 139.4 +/- 2.4; Pt, 138.3 +/- 1.9) compared with salt replete preparation (P, 139.9 +/- 1.2; Pt, 139.7 +/- 0.9) but elevation of plasma renin activity 2-3-fold. Pretreatment baseline systolic blood pressure following salt depletion (P, 121 +/- 9.3/71 +/- 7.9; Pt, 121.5 +/- 9.6/69 +/- 8.1) was higher than following salt replete preparation (P, 114 +/- 9.5/61 +/- 7.2; Pt, 116.9 +/- 6.9/67 +/- 7.2). 3. Baseline corrected supine SBP fell significantly and to a similar extent following active treatment regardless of activation of the renin system (SD, -14.6 +/- 9.5/-9.4 +/- 6.4; SR, -12 +/- 14/-10.1 +/- 6.6) compared with placebo (SD, -6.1 +/- 6/-3.7 +/- 5.6; SR, -4.7 +/- 10/-1.3 +/- 6.5). Heart rate was unchanged.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7833222

  5. [Value of the technique of intravenous infusion of contrast media for the diagnosis of fluid processes (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ramos, L; Marcos, L; Arenas de Pablo, A; Mora, M H; Illanas, M; Paya, F P; Picouto, P P

    1977-01-01

    The study covered 50 patients suffering from hepatic effusions; a solution used in contrast intravenous psychography was administered to them by the intravenous route, at similar doses to those used in intravenous psychography with infusions. This process which we have called Intravenous Viscerogramme, because of the similarity of the images obtained with those of the viscerographic phase of arteriography, has enabled the diagnosis of 35 hydatidiform cysts, one case of cholangiolar hamartoma and an abscess. Owing to the ease with which it can be carried out, we think that it can be used in the diagnosis of tumoral lesions of the liver. When the result is positive, radiological signs are obtained which enable identification of the lesion, thus avoiding resorting to more complex investigations such as angiography.

  6. Delivery of a novel nitrosourea, MCNU, to the brain tissue in glioma-bearing rats. Intracarotid versus intravenous infusion.

    PubMed

    Hodozuka, A; Sako, K; Nakai, H; Tomabechi, M; Suzuki, N; Yonemasu, Y

    1993-01-01

    We observed the tissue delivery of a novel water-soluble nitrosourea, 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-(methyl-alpha-D-glucopyranos-6-yl)-1-nitros our ea (MCNU) in rats bearing experimental brain tumors by conducting autoradiography on all. Prior to this study, the development of a streaming phenomenon was ascertained (and thus finding the optimum velocity for intra-arterial infusion) by 14C-iodoantipyrine (IAP) autoradiography. Furthermore, a single pass extraction value of MCNU was measured. At an arterial infusion rate of 0.2 ml/min., the streaming phenomenon was recognized but the tracer was fairly evenly distributed at a rate of 1.0 ml/min. On the other hand, the single pass extraction value for MCNU was 0.18 +/- 0.036 (mean +/- S.D., n = 3, under pentobarbital anesthesia). It was suggested that MCNU is very unlikely to be transported into the normal rat brain. We conducted 14C-MCNU autoradiography to observe tissue distribution of MCNU following its intra-arterial and intravenous infusions in a brain tumor model using rats. The normal side (the side where no infusions were given) and the cerebral cortex at the side affected by the tumor (the side where the infusion was given) showed hardly any uptake of 14C-MCNU in both the intra-arterial and intravenous infusion groups. The tumorous section was divided into the periphery and the center to measure tissue concentration of the tracer in each section. Compared against the cortical section, the periphery and the center showed significant increases in the concentration (approximately 11 to 15 times and 3 to 7 times, respectively, the figure for the cortical region) for both the intra-arterial and intravenous groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Intravenous infusion tests have limited utility for selecting long-term drug therapy in patients with chronic pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Steven P; Kapoor, Shruti G; Rathmell, James P

    2009-08-01

    Since the first description in the early 1990s, the scope of intravenous infusions tests has expanded to encompass multiple drug classes and indications. Purported advantages of these tests include elucidating mechanisms of pain, providing temporary relief of symptoms, and usefulness as prognostic tools in guiding drug therapy. In an attempt to discern the value of these tests, the authors conducted a systematic review to explore the rationale and evidence behind the following intravenous infusion tests: lidocaine, ketamine, opioid, and phentolamine. The studies evaluating all intravenous infusion tests were characterized by lack of standardization, wide variations in outcome measures, and methodological flaws. The strongest evidence found was for the intravenous lidocaine test, with the phentolamine test characterized by the least convincing data. Whereas intravenous opioid infusions are the most conceptually appealing test, their greatest utility may be in predicting poor responders to sustained-release formulations.

  8. Effects of dihydroergotamine on the feline cardiovascular response to intravenous infusion of live Escherichia coli bacteria.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, S; Lindblad, B; Esquivel, C; Fält, K; Lindström, C; Bergqvist, D; Haglund, U

    1984-01-01

    A septic shock state was induced in cats by intravenous infusion of live Escherichia coli bacteria. Cats pretreated with an unspecific 5-HT blocker, dihydroergotamine (DHE), or with a specific 5-HT blocker, ketanserin, were compared with a series receiving bacteria without pretreatment. DHE pretreatment prevented the reduction in systemic arterial blood pressure found in the other series during the 2-hour period of septic shock. Pretreatment could not influence the increased vascular resistance in the pulmonary vascular bed or the early increase in pulmonary arterial blood pressure. Peripheral blood flow distribution was studied using radioactive labelled microspheres. Compared to bacteremia without pretreatment, the 5-HT blockers increased CNS blood flow and ketanserin also prevented the reduction in pancreatic blood flow. Gastric blood flow and gastric mucosal blood flow remained unchanged in all series as did the small intestinal total blood flow. Small intestinal mucosal blood flow, however, was reduced after 2 h of bacteremia. Microscopy revealed no gastric epithelial damage while the jejunal mucosa was characteristically damaged. There was no correlation between the changes in the small intestinal blood flow and the degree of mucosal damage, however, supporting the countercurrent theory for the pathogenesis of these lesions.

  9. Organ distribution of histones after intravenous infusion of FITC histones or after sepsis.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, Fatemeh; Grailer, Jamison J; Jajou, Lawrence; Zetoune, Firas S; Andjelkovic, Anuska V; Ward, Peter A

    2015-03-01

    Histones appear in plasma during infectious or non-infectious sepsis and are associated with multiorgan injury. In the current studies, intravenous infusion of histones resulted in their localization in major organs. In vitro exposure of mouse macrophages to histones caused a buildup of histones on cell membranes followed by localization into cytosol and into the nucleus. After polymicrobial sepsis (cecal ligation and puncture), histones appeared in plasma as well as in a multiorgan pattern, peaking at 8 h followed by decline. In lungs, histones and neutrophils appeared together, with evidence for formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which represent an innate immune response to trap and kill bacteria and other infectious agents. In liver, there was intense NET formation, featuring linear patterns containing histones and strands of DNA. When neutrophils were activated in vitro with C5a or phorbol myristate acetate, NET formation ensued. While formation of NETs represents entrapment and killing of infectious agents, the simultaneous release from neutrophils of histones often results in tissue/organ damage.

  10. Lidocaine infusion adjunct to total intravenous anesthesia reduces the total dose of propofol during intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Tod B; Mongan, Paul; Lyda, Clark; Koht, Antoun

    2014-04-01

    Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) with propofol and opioids is frequently utilized for spinal surgery where somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) and motor evoked potentials (tcMEP) are monitored. Lidocaine infusions can contribute to antinociception and unconsciousness, thus allowing for a reduction in the total dose of propofol. We examined our recent experience with lidocaine infusions to quantify this effect. After institutional review board approval, we conducted a retrospective review of propofol usage in propofol-opioid TIVA (with and without lidocaine) for spine cases monitored with SSEP and tcMEP over a 7 months period. The propofol infusion rate, cortical amplitudes of the SSEP (median nerve, posterior tibial nerve), amplitudes and stimulation voltage of the tcMEP (adductor pollicis brevis, tibialis anterior) were evaluated. The savings of propofol and sufentanil were estimated based on utilization in 50 milliliter (ml) bottles and 5 ml ampules, respectively. 129 cases were evaluated. Propofol infusion rates were reduced with lidocaine infusion from an average of 115-99 μg/kg/min (p = 0.00038) and sufentanil infusions from an average of 0.36-0.29 μg/kg/h (p = 0.0059). This reduction in propofol infusion was also seen when the cases were divided into anterior cervical, posterior cervical, or posterior thoraco-lumbar procedures. No significant differences in the cortical SSEP or tcMEP amplitudes or the tcMEP stimulation voltages used were observed. No complications were associated with the use of the lidocaine infusion. The total estimated drug savings included 104 50 ml bottles of propofol and 5 5 ml ampules of sufentanil. These cases indicate that a lidocaine infusion can be effectively utilized in spine surgery with SSEP and tcMEP monitoring as a means to reduce propofol and sufentanil usage without a negative effect on the monitoring.

  11. Clinical outcomes of intracoronary eptifibatide bolus only versus intracoronary bolus and intravenous infusion of eptifibatide in primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Soon, Dinna; Ho, Hee Hwa; Loh, Kwok Kong; Ooi, Yau Wei; Foo, David; Jafary, Fahim H; Ong, Paul Jau

    2012-03-01

    Intracoronary bolus of eptifibatide during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been shown to result in higher local platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor occupancy with improved microvascular perfusion. It is unclear whether intracoronary administration of eptifibatide in a larger patient population results in favourable clinical outcomes. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of two regimens of intracoronary eptifibatide (bolus only versus bolus followed by intravenous infusion) in patients undergoing primary PCI for ST-elevation MI. They were divided into two groups: Group A (n=67) who received fixed-dose intracoronary eptifibatide bolus only and Group B (n=88) who received intracoronary bolus and continuous intravenous infusion of eptifibatide for 18 h. The preliminary findings from our registry showed that both regimens were associated with good angiographic outcomes, few bleeding events and low in-hospital major adverse cardiac events. A large prospective randomized, multi-centre trial is needed to confirm our observation.

  12. Effect of heparin dose and infusion rate on lipid clearance and bilirubin binding in premature infants receiving intravenous fat emulsions.

    PubMed

    Spear, M L; Stahl, G E; Hamosh, M; McNelis, W G; Richardson, L L; Spence, V; Polin, R A; Pereira, G R; Hamosh, P

    1988-01-01

    The effect of heparin dose and infusion rate on plasma lipids, lipases, and unbound bilirubin was investigated in 22 premature infants with physiologic jaundice. Infants were randomly assigned to receive low or high intravenous doses (24 vs 137.3 U/day) of heparin. Each patient then received 2 g/kg/day of 10% Intralipid on 2 successive days: one day during a 15-hour period and the other day over 24 hours, with the order assigned randomly. The results demonstrate a significantly greater change in serum-free fatty acids in infants receiving the high heparin dose during the 15-hour lipid infusion period. Lipoprotein lipase activity rose more with the high heparin dose and equally at either infusion rate. We conclude that lipid infusions of 2 g/kg/day with low heparin dosage infused over 24 hours resulted in less elevation in serum-free fatty acids. There were no adverse effects on unbound bilirubin at either infusion rate or heparin dosage.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of cefpimizole in normal humans after single- and multiple-dose intravenous infusions.

    PubMed Central

    Lakings, D B; Friis, J M; Brown, R J; Allen, H R

    1984-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cefpimizole (free acid equivalents of cefpimizole sodium), a broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic, were determined after single- and multiple-dose 20-min intravenous infusions of 1, 2, and 4 g. The kinetics of single-dose administration of cefpimizole correspond to a two-compartment model with an average apparent volume of distribution of 20.0 +/- 3.5 liters, a distribution rate constant of 2.24 +/- 1.00 h-1, and a terminal rate constant of 0.358 +/- 0.036 h-1 (half-life, 1.9 h). The total body clearance was 118.6 +/- 20.2 ml/min. The primary route of elimination for cefpimizole was the renal route, with approximately 80% of the administered dose excreted as the parent compound. The elimination rate constant, as calculated from urinary excretion data, was 0.339 +/- 0.043 h-1, which is in close agreement with the terminal rate constant for plasma. Renal clearance of cefpimizole was 96.2 +/- 17.3 ml/min. Dose proportionality over the three dose levels was obtained from area under the plasma curve and cumulative urinary excretion data. The results of the multiple-dose study indicated that no apparent change in the distribution or elimination kinetics of cefpimizole occurred after the administration of 1-, 2-, and 4-g doses for 7 days, three times a day. The kinetics from the multiple-dose study were in close agreement with those from the single-dose study. No accumulation of cefpimizole occurred, and nondetectable levels was observed 24 h after administration of the last dose. Peaks that could be attributed to metabolites of cefpimizole were not observed during high-pressure liquid chromatographic analysis of either plasma or urine specimens. PMID:6524897

  14. Effect of intravenous zoledronic acid infusion on electrocardiographic parameters in patients with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Aktas, I; Nazikoglu, C; Kepez, A; Ozkan, F U; Kaysin, M Y; Akpinar, P; Dogan, Z; Ileri, C; Saymaz, S; Erdogan, O

    2016-12-01

    We evaluated the effects of zoledronic acid (ZA) therapy on electrocardiographic (ECG) parameters for the first time in the literature. Measurements were performed on ECGs obtained before and after ZA infusion on the same day as well as 1 month after the infusion. ZA infusion did not have any short- or long-term effect on any parameter that might be associated with the tendency for atrial fibrillation or ventricular arrhythmias.

  15. Effect of intravenous near isosmotic nutrient infusions on nitrogen balance in critically ill injured patients.

    PubMed

    McDougal, W S; Wilmore, D W; Pruitt, B A

    1977-09-01

    Hypocaloric near isosmotic infusions of crystalline amino acids have the same effect on nitrogen balance as do equal caloric infusions of glucose in burned patients with and without bacteremia. The effects of the two substrates on balance appeared equal and additive. Infusion of a 10 per cent soybean oil emulsion was indistinguishable from low dosage glucose when administered with amino acids. Near isosmotic hypocaloric diets containing glucose and amino acids significantly diminish nitrogen loss in severely burned patients. A combination of both substrates in the infusate is to be preferred.

  16. Arterial medial necrosis and hemorrhage induced in rats by intravenous infusion of fenoldopam mesylate, a dopaminergic vasodilator.

    PubMed Central

    Yuhas, E. M.; Morgan, D. G.; Arena, E.; Kupp, R. P.; Saunders, L. Z.; Lewis, H. B.

    1985-01-01

    Fenoldopam mesylate, a selective, postsynaptic, dopaminergic vasodilator, was administered to rats for assessment of its clinical, toxicologic, and pathologic effects. Groups of 8 male and 8 female rats received 5, 25, 50, or 100 micrograms/kg/min by intravenous infusion for 24 hours. Groups of 12 male and 12 female rats received 2, 8, 16, or 20 mg/kg/day by intravenous injection once daily for 12 days. Tissues were examined by light microscopy. Rats infused for 24-hours with 5-100 micrograms/kg/min of fenoldopam had lesions of renal and splanchnic arteries characterized by medial necrosis and hemorrhage. None were seen in control rats or those administered the compound by intravenous injection. Arteries with four to five layers of medial smooth-muscle cells were most severely and frequently affected. Lesions were particularly severe in interlobular pancreatic arteries and subserosal gastric arteries. They occurred first at 4 hours, were present at low incidence at 8 hours, were induced in unrestrained rats, and were not caused by the experimental procedures employed. The nature and disposition of this novel arterial lesion in the rat suggests that its pathogenesis may be related to the pharmacologic activity of fenoldopam mesylate at the dopamine receptor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2858975

  17. Design of a safer approach to intravenous drug infusions: failure mode effects analysis

    PubMed Central

    Apkon, M; Leonard, J; Probst, L; DeLizio, L; Vitale, R

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: A set of standard processes was developed for delivering continuous drug infusions in order to improve (1) patient safety; (2) efficiency in staff workflow; (3) hemodynamic stability during infusion changes, and (4) efficient use of resources. Failure modes effects analysis (FMEA) was used to examine the impact of process changes on the reliability of delivering drug infusions. Setting: An 11 bed multidisciplinary pediatric ICU in the children's hospital of an academic medical center staffed by board certified pediatric intensivists. The hospital uses computerized physician order entry for all medication orders. Methods: A multidisciplinary team characterized key elements of the drug infusion process. The process was enhanced to increase overall reliability and the original and revised processes were compared using FMEA. Resource consumption was estimated by reviewing purchasing and pharmacy records for the calendar year after full implementation of the revised process. Staff satisfaction was evaluated using an anonymous questionnaire administered to staff nurses in the ICU and pediatric residents who had rotated through the ICU. Results: The original process was characterized by six elements: selecting the drug; selecting a dose; selecting an infusion rate; calculating and ordering the infusion; preparing the infusion; programming the infusion pump and delivering the infusion. The following practice changes were introduced: standardizing formulations for all infusions; developing database driven calculators; extending infusion hang times from 24 to 72 hours; changing from bedside preparation by nurses to pharmacy prepared or premanufactured solutions. FMEA showed that the last three elements of the original process had high risk priority numbers (RPNs) of >225 whereas the revised process had no elements with RPNs >100. The combined effect of prolonging infusion hang times, preparation in the pharmacy, and purchasing premanufactured solutions resulted

  18. Impact of intravenous infusion time on AAV8 vector pharmacokinetics, safety, and liver transduction in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Greig, Jenny A; Nordin, Jayme Ml; Bote, Erin; Makaron, Leah; Garnett, Mason E; Kattenhorn, Lisa M; Bell, Peter; Goode, Tamara; Wilson, James M

    2016-01-01

    Systemically delivered adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are now in early-phase clinical trials for a variety of diseases. While there is a general consensus on inclusion and exclusion criteria for each of these trials, the conditions under which vectors are infused vary significantly. In this study, we evaluated the impact of intravenous infusion rate of AAV8 vector in cynomolgus macaques on transgene expression, vector clearance from the circulation, and potential activation of the innate immune system. The dose of AAV8 vector in terms of genome copies per kilogram body weight and its concentration were fixed, while the rate of infusion varied to deliver the entire dose over different time periods, including 1, 10, or 90 minutes. Analyses during the in-life phase of the experiment included sequential evaluation of whole blood for vector genomes and appearance of proinflammatory cytokines. Liver tissues were analyzed at the time of necropsy for enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) expression and vector genomes. The data were remarkable with a relative absence of any statistically significant effect of infusion time on vector transduction, safety, and clearance. However, some interesting and unexpected trends did emerge.

  19. Impact of intravenous infusion time on AAV8 vector pharmacokinetics, safety, and liver transduction in cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Jenny A; Nordin, Jayme ML; Bote, Erin; Makaron, Leah; Garnett, Mason E; Kattenhorn, Lisa M; Bell, Peter; Goode, Tamara; Wilson, James M

    2016-01-01

    Systemically delivered adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are now in early-phase clinical trials for a variety of diseases. While there is a general consensus on inclusion and exclusion criteria for each of these trials, the conditions under which vectors are infused vary significantly. In this study, we evaluated the impact of intravenous infusion rate of AAV8 vector in cynomolgus macaques on transgene expression, vector clearance from the circulation, and potential activation of the innate immune system. The dose of AAV8 vector in terms of genome copies per kilogram body weight and its concentration were fixed, while the rate of infusion varied to deliver the entire dose over different time periods, including 1, 10, or 90 minutes. Analyses during the in-life phase of the experiment included sequential evaluation of whole blood for vector genomes and appearance of proinflammatory cytokines. Liver tissues were analyzed at the time of necropsy for enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) expression and vector genomes. The data were remarkable with a relative absence of any statistically significant effect of infusion time on vector transduction, safety, and clearance. However, some interesting and unexpected trends did emerge. PMID:27933307

  20. Glycemic increase induced by intravenous glucose infusion fails to affect hunger, appetite, or satiety following breakfast in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Schultes, Bernd; Panknin, Ann-Kristin; Hallschmid, Manfred; Jauch-Chara, Kamila; Wilms, Britta; de Courbière, Felix; Lehnert, Hendrik; Schmid, Sebastian M

    2016-10-01

    Meal-dependent fluctuations of blood glucose and corresponding endocrine signals such as insulin are thought to provide important regulatory input for central nervous processing of hunger and satiety. Since food intake also triggers the release of numerous gastrointestinal signals, the specific contribution of changes in blood glucose to appetite regulation in humans has remained unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that inducing glycemic fluctuations by intravenous glucose infusion is associated with concurrent changes in hunger, appetite, and satiety. In a single blind, counter-balanced crossover study 15 healthy young men participated in two experimental conditions on two separate days. 500 ml of a solution containing 50 g glucose or 0.9% saline, respectively, was intravenously infused over a 1-h period followed by a 1-h observation period. One hour before start of the respective infusion subjects had a light breakfast (284 kcal). Blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations as well as self-rated feelings of hunger, appetite, satiety, and fullness were assessed during the entire experiment. Glucose as compared to saline infusion markedly increased glucose and insulin concentrations (peak glucose level: 9.7 ± 0.8 vs. 5.3 ± 0.3 mmol/l; t(14) = -5.159, p < 0.001; peak insulin level: 370.4 ± 66.5 vs. 109.6 ± 21.5 pmol/l; t(14) = 4.563, p < 0.001) followed by a sharp decline in glycaemia to a nadir of 3.0 ± 0.2 mmol/l (vs. 3.9 ± 0.1 mmol/l at the corresponding time in the control condition; t(14) = -3.972, p = 0.001) after stopping the infusion. Despite this wide glycemic fluctuation in the glucose infusion condition subjective feelings of hunger, appetite satiety, and fullness did not differ from the control condition throughout the experiment. These findings clearly speak against the notion that fluctuations in glycemia and also insulinemia represent major signals in the short-term regulation of hunger and satiety.

  1. Effects of large volume, ice-cold intravenous fluid infusion on respiratory function in cardiac arrest survivors.

    PubMed

    Jacobshagen, Claudius; Pax, Anja; Unsöld, Bernhard W; Seidler, Tim; Schmidt-Schweda, Stephan; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Maier, Lars S

    2009-11-01

    International guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation recommend mild hypothermia (32-34 degrees C) for 12-24h in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. To induce therapeutic hypothermia a variety of external and intravascular cooling devices are available. A cheap and effective method for inducing hypothermia is the infusion of large volume, ice-cold intravenous fluid. There are concerns regarding the effects of rapid infusion of large volumes of fluid on respiratory function in cardiac arrest survivors. We have retrospectively studied the effects of high volume cold fluid infusion on respiratory function in 52 resuscitated cardiac arrest patients. The target temperature of 32-34 degrees C was achieved after 4.1+/-0.5h (cooling rate 0.48 degrees C/h). During this period 3427+/-210 mL ice-cold fluid was infused. Despite significantly reduced LV-function (EF 35.8+/-2.2%) the respiratory status of these patients did not deteriorate significantly. On intensive care unit admission the mean PaO(2) was 231.4+/-20.6 mmHg at a F(i)O(2) of 0.82+/-0.03 (PaO(2)/F(i)O(2)=290.0+/-24.1) and a PEEP level of 7.14+/-0.31 mbar. Until reaching the target temperature of infusion to achieve a body temperature of 33 degrees C, the F(i)O(2) could be further reduced with unchanged PEEP. The infusion of large volume, ice-cold fluid is an effective and inexpensive method for inducing therapeutic hypothermia. Resuscitation from cardiac arrest is associated with a deterioration in respiratory function. The infusion of large volumes of cold fluid does not cause a statistically significant further deterioration in respiratory function. A larger, randomized and prospective study is required to assess the efficacy and safety of ice-cold fluid infusion for

  2. Vascular effects of intravenous intralipid and dextrose infusions in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Gosmanov, Aidar R; Smiley, Dawn D; Peng, Limin; Siquiera, Joselita; Robalino, Gonzalo; Newton, Christopher; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2012-10-01

    Hyperglycemia and elevated free fatty acids (FFA) are implicated in the development of endothelial dysfunction. Infusion of soy-bean oil-based lipid emulsion (Intralipid®) increases FFA levels and results in elevation of blood pressure (BP) and endothelial dysfunction in obese healthy subjects. The effects of combined hyperglycemia and high FFA on BP, endothelial function and carbohydrate metabolism are not known. Twelve obese healthy subjects received four random, 8-h IV infusions of saline, Intralipid 40 mL/h, Dextrose 10% 40 mL/h, or combined Intralipid and dextrose. Plasma levels of FFA increased by 1.03±0.34 mmol/L (p=0.009) after Intralipid, but FFAs remained unchanged during saline, dextrose, and combined Intralipid and dextrose infusion. Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations significantly increased after dextrose and combined Intralipid and dextrose (all, p<0.05) and were not different from baseline during saline and lipid infusion. Intralipid increased systolic BP by 12±9 mmHg (p<0.001) and diastolic BP by 5±6 mmHg (p=0.022),and decreased flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) from baseline by 3.2%±1.4% (p<0.001). Saline and dextrose infusion had neutral effects on BP and FMD. The co-administration of lipid and dextrose decreased FMD by 2.4%±2.1% (p=0.002) from baseline, but did not significantly increase systolic or diastolic BP. Short-term Intralipid infusion significantly increased FFA and BP; in contrast, FFA and BP were unchanged during combined infusion of Intralipid and dextrose. Combined Intralipid and dextrose infusion resulted in endothelial dysfunction similar to Intralipid alone.

  3. An overlapping propagating spreading center at 87 deg 30 min W on the Galapagos Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perram, Laura Jean; MacDonald, Ken C.

    1994-01-01

    In September of 1987 nwe completed a SeaMARC II (SMII) survey of the propagating spreading center located at 87 deg 30 min W on the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC). The spreading rate in the area is intermediate with a full rate of approximately 70 mm/yr and the spreading axis is marked by an axial high. Analysis of bathymetry, sidescan sonar and surface magnetic data indicates 90 - 100 mm/yr eastward propagation of the 26 km offset. The morphology of the feature is that of an overlapping spreading center pair (OSC). It fits a kinematic model of overlapping ridges with cyclic failure of the dying rift. There are marked differences in the morphology and kinematics of the propagator compared to the propagator at 95 deg 30 min W where the spreading rate and offset are comparable. The 87 deg 30 min W propagator is marked by an axial high and greater than 40 km of overlap in contrast to the axial rift valley and small amount of overlap associated with the 95 deg 30 min W propagator. Near-field stresses associated with variable axial topography contribute to decrease crack propagation forces at the 95 deg 30 min W propagator and increase those at the 87 deg 30 min W propagator. Differences in crack propagation forces and morphology may be due to a fundamental difference in the amount of available magma. This difference is evident in dominance of volcanism near 87 deg 30 min W as opposed to the dominance of tectonism near 95 deg 30 min W.

  4. Safety, Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Plasma Lipoprotein Distribution of Eritoran (E5564) during Continuous Intravenous Infusion into Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Daniel P.; Wasan, Kishor M.; Choo, Eugene; Yau, Edwin; Wong, Nancy; Rose, Jeffrey; Moran, Jeffrey; Lynn, Melvyn

    2004-01-01

    Eritoran, a structural analogue of the lipid A portion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is an antagonist of LPS in animal and human endotoxemia models. Previous studies have shown that low doses (350 to 3,500 μg) of eritoran have demonstrated a long pharmacokinetic half-life but a short pharmacodynamic half-life. The present study describes the safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, and lipid distribution profile of eritoran during and after a 72-h intravenous infusion of 500, 2,000, or 3,500 μg/h into healthy volunteers. Except for the occurrence of phlebitis, eritoran administration over 72 h was safe and well tolerated. Eritoran demonstrated a slow plasma clearance (0.679 to 0.930 ml/h/kg of body weight), a small volume of distribution (45.6 to 49.8 ml/kg), and a relatively long half-life (50.4 to 62.7 h). In plasma, the majority (∼55%) of eritoran was bound to high-density lipoproteins. During infusion and for up to 72 h thereafter, ex vivo response of blood to 1- or 10-ng/ml LPS was inhibited by ≥85%, even when the lowest dose of eritoran (500 μg/h) was infused. Inhibition of response was dependent on eritoran dose and the concentration of LPS used as an agonist. Finally, in vitro analysis with purified lipoprotein and protein fractions from plasma obtained from healthy volunteers indicated that eritoran is inactivated by high-density but not low-density lipoproteins, very-low-density lipoproteins, or albumin. From these results, we conclude that up to 252 mg of eritoran can be safely infused into normal volunteers over 72 h and even though it associates extensively with high-density lipoproteins, antagonistic activity is maintained, even after infusion ceases. PMID:15328078

  5. A Model for the Application of Target-Controlled Intravenous Infusion for a Prolonged Immersive DMT Psychedelic Experience.

    PubMed

    Gallimore, Andrew R; Strassman, Rick J

    2016-01-01

    The state of consciousness induced by N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is one of the most extraordinary of any naturally-occurring psychedelic substance. Users consistently report the complete replacement of normal subjective experience with a novel "alternate universe," often densely populated with a variety of strange objects and other highly complex visual content, including what appear to be sentient "beings." The phenomenology of the DMT state is of great interest to psychology and calls for rigorous academic enquiry. The extremely short duration of DMT effects-less than 20 min-militates against single dose administration as the ideal model for such enquiry. Using pharmacokinetic modeling and DMT blood sampling data, we demonstrate that the unique pharmacological characteristics of DMT, which also include a rapid onset and lack of acute tolerance to its subjective effects, make it amenable to administration by target-controlled intravenous infusion. This is a technology developed to maintain a stable brain concentration of anesthetic drugs during surgery. Simulations of our model demonstrate that this approach will allow research subjects to be induced into a stable and prolonged DMT experience, making it possible to carefully observe its psychological contents, and provide more extensive accounts for subsequent analyses. This model would also be valuable in performing functional neuroimaging, where subjects are required to remain under the influence of the drug for extended periods. Finally, target-controlled intravenous infusion of DMT may aid the development of unique psychotherapeutic applications of this psychedelic agent.

  6. Evidence-based guideline for neuropathic pain interventional treatments: Spinal cord stimulation, intravenous infusions, epidural injections and nerve blocks

    PubMed Central

    Mailis, Angela; Taenzer, Paul

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Special Interest Group of the Canadian Pain Society has produced consensus-based guidelines for the pharmacological management of neuropathic pain. The society aimed to generate an additional guideline for other forms of neuropathic pain treatments. OBJECTIVE: To develop evidence-based recommendations for neuropathic pain interventional treatments. METHODS: A task force was created and engaged the Institute of Health Economics in Edmonton, Alberta, to survey the literature pertaining to multiple treatments. Sufficient literature existed on four interventions only: spinal cord stimulation; epidural injections; intravenous infusions; and nerve blocks. A comprehensive search was conducted for systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials and evidence-based clinical practice guidelines; a critical review was generated on each topic. A modified United States Preventive Services Task Force tool was used for quality rating and grading of recommendations. RESULTS: Investigators reviewed four studies of spinal cord stimulation, 19 studies of intravenous infusions, 14 studies of epidural injections and 16 studies of nerve blocks that met the inclusion criteria. The task force chairs rated the quality of evidence and graded the recommendations. Feedback was solicited from the members of the task force. CONCLUSION: There is sufficient evidence to support recommendations for some of these interventions for selected neuropathic pain conditions. This evidence is, at best, moderate and is often limited or conflicting. Pain practitioners are encouraged to explore evidence-based treatment options before considering unproven treatments. Full disclosure of risks and benefits of the available options is necessary for shared decision making and informed consent. PMID:22606679

  7. A Model for the Application of Target-Controlled Intravenous Infusion for a Prolonged Immersive DMT Psychedelic Experience

    PubMed Central

    Gallimore, Andrew R.; Strassman, Rick J.

    2016-01-01

    The state of consciousness induced by N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is one of the most extraordinary of any naturally-occurring psychedelic substance. Users consistently report the complete replacement of normal subjective experience with a novel “alternate universe,” often densely populated with a variety of strange objects and other highly complex visual content, including what appear to be sentient “beings.” The phenomenology of the DMT state is of great interest to psychology and calls for rigorous academic enquiry. The extremely short duration of DMT effects—less than 20 min—militates against single dose administration as the ideal model for such enquiry. Using pharmacokinetic modeling and DMT blood sampling data, we demonstrate that the unique pharmacological characteristics of DMT, which also include a rapid onset and lack of acute tolerance to its subjective effects, make it amenable to administration by target-controlled intravenous infusion. This is a technology developed to maintain a stable brain concentration of anesthetic drugs during surgery. Simulations of our model demonstrate that this approach will allow research subjects to be induced into a stable and prolonged DMT experience, making it possible to carefully observe its psychological contents, and provide more extensive accounts for subsequent analyses. This model would also be valuable in performing functional neuroimaging, where subjects are required to remain under the influence of the drug for extended periods. Finally, target-controlled intravenous infusion of DMT may aid the development of unique psychotherapeutic applications of this psychedelic agent. PMID:27471468

  8. Effects of Acute Intravenous Infusion of Apelin on Left Ventricular Function in Dogs with Advanced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mengjun; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Rastogi, Sharad; Kohli, Smita; Sabbah, Michael S.; Zhang, Kefei; Mohyi, Paula; Hogie, Manuela; Fischer, Yvan; Sabbah, Hani N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Apelin-13 (APLN) through apelin receptor (APJ) exerts peripheral vasodilatory and potent positive inotropic effects. We examined the effects of exogenous intravenous infusion of APLN on left ventricular (LV) systolic function in dogs with heart failure (HF, LV ejection fraction, EF~30%). Methods and Results Studies were performed in 7 dogs with microembolization-induced HF. Each dog received an intravenous infusion of low dose and high dose APLN followed by washout period. LV end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and LV EF were measured at specified time points. APLN protein level was determined in plasma at all time points. mRNA and protein levels of APLN and APJ in LV tissue were also measured in 7 normal (NL) and 7 heart failure (HF) dogs. APLN reduced EDV only at the high dose, significantly reduced ESV and increased EF with both doses. In plasma of HF dogs, APLN levels were reduced significantly compared to NL dogs. APLN treatment in HF dogs significantly increased the plasma APLN levels at both low and high doses. Expression of APLN, but not of APJ, was reduced in LV tissue of HF dogs compared to NL. Conclusion Exogenous administration of APLN improved LV systolic function in dogs with advanced HF. PMID:23834927

  9. Isolation and characterisation of poliovirus mutants resistant to heating at 50 degrees Celsius for 30 min.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Hiroshi; Urasawa, Tomoko; Urasawa, Shozo; Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Abe, Shibobu; Taniguchi, Koki

    2004-11-01

    Poliovirus is heat-labile; on heating at 50 degrees Celsius for 30 min its infectivity decreases drastically and its antigenicity reverts from N to H. However, mutants resistant to heating at 50 degrees Celsius for 30 min from the Sabin 1 and 2 viruses were isolated by repeating the process of incubation of the virus stock at 50 degrees Celsius for 30 min and multiplication of the remaining virus in a cell culture. The isolated mutants were stable genetically, and maintained the rct and d markers of the parent virus. On electron microscopical examination, the mutants were observed to retain the intact morphology after being heated at 50 degrees Celsius for 30 min, while the parent virus was converted to empty particles devoid of RNA under the same conditions. On determination of the nucleotide sequence of the P1 region, a single nucleotide sequence substitution was detected at nucleotide no. 2741, resulting in an amino acid change from valine to alanine at the 87th position of VP1. This amino acid might be associated with the heat-resistance of the mutants. Furthermore, it was found that the thermostable mutants obtained in this study, which are resistant to "high" temperature (50 degrees Celsius) for a short time (30 min), were not stable against heating at the ambient temperature (37 degrees Celsius) for a long time (5 or 7 days). This suggests that the inactivation at high temperature for a short time and that at ambient temperature for a long time involve different mechanisms.

  10. Evidence of a major fault zone along the California-Nevada state line 35 deg 30 min to 36 deg 30 min north latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liggett, M. A.; Childs, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Geologic reconnaissance guided by analysis of ERTS-1 and Apollo-9 satellite imagery and intermediate scale photography from X-15 and U-2 aircraft has confirmed the presence of a major fault zone along the California-Nevada state line, between 35 deg 30 min and 36 deg 30 min north latitude. The name Pahrump Fault Zone has been suggested for this feature after the valley in which it is best exposed. Field reconnaissance has indicated the existence of previously unreported faults cutting bedrock along range fronts, and displacing Tertiary and Quaternary basin sediments. Gravity data support the interpretation of regional structural discontinuity along this zone. Individual fault traces within the Pahrump Fault Zone form generally left-stepping en echelon patterns. These fault patterns, the apparent offset of a Laramide age thrust fault, and possible drag folding along a major fault break suggest a component of right lateral displacement. The trend and postulated movement of the Pahrump Fault Zone are similar to the adjacent Las Vegas Shear Zone and Death Valley-Furnace Creek Faults, which are parts of a regional strike slip system in the southern Basin-Range Province.

  11. Infusion Rate Dependent Pharmacokinetics of Bendamustine with Altered Formation of γ-hydroxybendamustine (M3) Metabolite Following 30- and 60-min Infusion of Bendamustine in Rats.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, N R; Richter, W; Devaraj, V C; Suresh, P S; Bhamdipati, R K; Mullangi, R

    2016-07-01

    Bendamustine is an alkylating agent administered as 1 h intravenous infusion in the clinic for the treatment of malignant haematological cancers. The aim of the study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of bendamustine and its key cytochrome P 450 (CYP) 1A2 mediated γ-hydroxybendamustine (M3) metabolite after 30- and 60-min intravenous infusion of bendamustine in rats. 2 groups were assigned to receive bendamustine either as 30- or 60-min infusion and doses were normalized to 15 mg/kg for the sake of statistical evaluation. Serial pharmacokinetic samples were collected and were analysed for the circulatory levels of bendamustine and its M3 metabolite. Standard pharmacokinetic parameters were generated for bendamustine and its M3 metabolite. Regardless of the intravenous regimens, Cmax coincided with end of infusion for both bendamustine and its M3 metabolite. Immediately after stoppage of infusion, a rapid decline in the plasma levels occurred for both bendamustine and M3 metabolite. The Cmax and AUC0-∞ parameters for bendamustine after 60-min infusion were 1.90 and 1.34-fold higher; while CL was lower by 1.32-fold as compared to the 30-min infusion. In contrast, the Cmax and AUC0-∞ after 30-min infusion for the M3 metabolite was 2.15- and 2.78-fold greater; while CL was 2.32-fold lower when compared to the 60-min infusion. However, T1/2 and Vz values were similar between the 2 intravenous treatments for bendamustine or the M3 metabolite. The data unequivocally confirmed the existence of differential pharmacokinetics of bendamustine and its M3 metabolite as the function of the duration of intravenous infusion.

  12. The effects of short term intravenous infusion of a soybean based lipid emulsion on some blood constituents in sheep: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Hamid; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of intravenous infusion of a soybean based lipid emulsion (Lipovenoes 10%) on some blood constituents in sheep, a replicated 2 × 2 Latin square design experiment was conducted in four clinically healthy ewes. Lipid emulsion (LE group) or normal saline (NS group) was infused intravenously at a rate of 0.025 mL kg-1 per min for 6 hr and the concentrations of blood triglyceride, glucose, insulin, calcium, magnesium, phosphorous, sodium and potassium were measured before (baseline) and then at timepoints 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hr after infusion. Compared to the baseline values and/or NS infusion, LE infusion resulted in a significant increase in the concentrations of triglyceride (p < 0.001), glucose (p < 0.01), calcium (p < 0.05), phosphorous (p < 0.01) and a significant decrease in insulin (p < 0.001) and magnesium (p < 0.05) concentrations. Compared to the baseline value, the homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index increased (p < 0.001) at timepoints 2 and 4 hr and abruptly decreased at timepoint six hr (p < 0.01) following LE infusion. In LE group, HOMA-IR values were significantly (p < 0.001) higher than those for NS group at timepoints 2 and 4 hr after infusion. Neither treatment nor time influenced serum sodium and potassium concentrations (p > 0.05). In conclusion, intravenous infusion of Lipovenoes temporarily influenced some blood constituents. Increased triglyceride concentrations were associated with an increase in HOMA-IR values indicating a state of insulin resistance. No remarkable adverse effect was observed following LE infusion and lipid based emulsions can be safely used in ruminants not suffering from extensive lipid mobilization. PMID:25568690

  13. Optimal intravenous infusion to decrease the haematocrit level in patient of DHF infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handayani, D.; Nuraini, N.; Saragih, R.; Wijaya, K. P.; Naiborhu, J.

    2014-02-01

    The optimal control of infusion model for Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) infection is formulated here. The infusion model will be presented in form of haematocrit level. The input control aim to normalize the haematocrit level and is expressed as infusion volume on mL/day. The stability near the equilibrium points will be analyzed. Numerical simulation shows the dynamic of each infection compartments which gives a description of within-host dynamic of dengue virus. These results show particularly that infected compartments tend to be vanished in ±15days after the onset of the virus. In fact, without any control added, the haematocrit level will decrease but not up to the normal level. Therefore the effective haematocrit normalization should be done with the treatment control. Control treatment for a fixed time using a control input can bring haematocrit level to normal range 42-47%. The optimal control in this paper is divided into three cases, i.e. fixed end point, constrained input, and tracking haematocrit state. Each case shows different infection condition in human body. However, all cases require that the haematocrit level to be in normal range in fixed final time.

  14. In situ degradation of antibiotic residues in medical intravenous infusion bottles using high energy electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Zhang, Lele; Zhang, Guilong; Pang, Tao; Zhang, Xin; Cai, Dongqing; Wu, Zhengyan

    2017-01-01

    This study reported an immediate approach for the degradation of three antibiotic (amoxicillin, ofloxacin, and cefradine) residues in medical intravenous infusion bottles (MIIBs) using high energy electron beam (HEEB) irradiation. The effects of irradiation doses, initial concentrations, initial pH, and scavengers of active radicals on the degradation of three antibiotic residues (ARs) were investigated, and the results displayed that 97.02%, 97.61% and 96.87% of amoxicillin, ofloxacin, and cefradine residues could be degraded in situ through HEEB irradiation respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) analysis demonstrated that ARs were mainly decomposed into inorganic ions and alkanes. Typically, the detailed degradation mechanism of ARs was also investigated, and the dominant active particle inducing the degradation of antibiotics during the HEEB irradiation process was demonstrated to be hydroxyl radical.

  15. In situ degradation of antibiotic residues in medical intravenous infusion bottles using high energy electron beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Zhang, Lele; Zhang, Guilong; Pang, Tao; Zhang, Xin; Cai, Dongqing; Wu, Zhengyan

    2017-01-01

    This study reported an immediate approach for the degradation of three antibiotic (amoxicillin, ofloxacin, and cefradine) residues in medical intravenous infusion bottles (MIIBs) using high energy electron beam (HEEB) irradiation. The effects of irradiation doses, initial concentrations, initial pH, and scavengers of active radicals on the degradation of three antibiotic residues (ARs) were investigated, and the results displayed that 97.02%, 97.61% and 96.87% of amoxicillin, ofloxacin, and cefradine residues could be degraded in situ through HEEB irradiation respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) analysis demonstrated that ARs were mainly decomposed into inorganic ions and alkanes. Typically, the detailed degradation mechanism of ARs was also investigated, and the dominant active particle inducing the degradation of antibiotics during the HEEB irradiation process was demonstrated to be hydroxyl radical. PMID:28045097

  16. Intravenous salbutamol bolus compared with an aminophylline infusion in children with severe asthma: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, G; Newsom, D; Gomez, K; Raffles, A; Saglani, S; Begent, J; Lachman, P; Sloper, K; Buchdahl, R; Habel, A

    2003-01-01

    Background: The relative efficacies of aminophylline and salbutamol in severe acute childhood asthma are currently unclear. A single bolus of salbutamol was compared with a continuous aminophylline infusion in children with severe asthma in a randomised double blind study. Methods: Children aged 1–16 years with acute severe asthma were enrolled if they showed little improvement with three nebulisers (combined salbutamol and ipratropium) administered over an hour and systemic steroids. Subjects were randomised to receive either a short intravenous bolus of salbutamol (15 µg/kg over 20 minutes) followed by a saline infusion or an aminophylline infusion (5 mg/kg over 20 minutes) followed by 0.9 mg/kg/h. Results: Forty four subjects were enrolled, with 18 randomly allocated to receive salbutamol and 26 to receive aminophylline. The groups were well matched at baseline. An intention to treat analysis showed that there was no statistically significant difference in the asthma severity score (ASS) at 2 hours between the two groups (median (IQR) 6 (6, 8) and 6.5 (5, 8) for salbutamol and aminophylline respectively, p=0.93). A similar improvement in ASS to 2 hours was seen in the two groups (mean difference –0.08, 95% CI –0.97 to 0.80), there was a trend (p=0.07) towards a longer duration of oxygen therapy in the salbutamol group (17.8 hours (95% CI 8.5 to 37.5) v 7.0 hours (95% CI 3.4 to 14.2)), and a significantly (p=0.02) longer length of hospital stay in the salbutamol group (85.4 (95% CI 66.1 to 110.2) hours v 57.3 hours (95% CI 45.6 to 72.0)). There was no significant difference in adverse events between the two groups. Conclusions: This study suggests that, in severe childhood asthma, there is no significant difference in the effectiveness of a bolus of salbutamol and an aminophylline infusion in the first 2 hours of treatment. Overall, the aminophylline infusion was superior as it significantly reduced the length of stay in hospital. PMID:12668792

  17. TSH response to 30 min stay in sauna in the morning and during evening hours.

    PubMed

    Tatár, P; Strbák, V; Strec, V; Aksamitová, K; Vigas, M

    1984-05-01

    The response of plasma TSH to 30 min stay in sauna was compared in the morning and in the evening. Both in the morning and in the evening plasma TSH was significantly elevated after sauna, with more prolonged response in the evening. This difference resembles the different reactivity of TSH to exogenous TRH administration in various times of day.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of intravenous continuous rate infusions of sodium benzylpenicillin and ceftiofur sodium in adult horses.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Scott H; Khalfan, Shahid A; Jacobson, Glenn A; Pirie, Adam D; Raidal, Sharanne L

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine plasma drug concentrations after IV administration of a bolus followed by continuous rate infusion (CRI) of sodium benzylpenicillin and ceftiofur sodium to healthy adult horses. ANIMALS 6 Thoroughbred mares (3 to 9 years old; mean ± SD body weight, 544 ± 55 kg) with no history of recent antimicrobial treatment. PROCEDURES Horses were used in 2 experiments conducted 14 days apart. For each experiment, horses were housed individually in stables, and catheters were placed bilaterally in both jugular veins for drug administration by CRI (left catheter) and for intermittent collection of blood samples (right catheter). Synovial fluid samples were obtained from carpal joints following ceftiofur administration to evaluate drug diffusion into articular spaces. RESULTS Plasma concentrations above accepted minimum inhibitory concentrations for common pathogens of horses were achieved within 1 minute after bolus administration and remained above the minimum inhibitory concentration for 48 (ceftiofur) or 12 (benzylpenicillin) hours (ie, the duration of the CRI). Mean synovial fluid ceftiofur free acid equivalent concentrations were approximately 46% (range, 25.4% to 59.8%) of plasma concentrations at the end of infusion. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Compared with intermittent bolus administration, the loading dose and CRI used less drug but maintained high plasma concentrations for the duration of infusion. By use of pharmacological parameters derived in this study, a loading dose of 2.5 mg/kg and CRI of 200 μg/kg/h should achieve plasma ceftiofur concentrations of 4 μg/mL; a loading dose and CRI of 1.3 mg/kg and 2.5 μg/kg/h, respectively, should achieve plasma benzylpenicillin concentrations of 2 μg/mL.

  19. Regression of atherosclerosis by the intravenous infusion of specific biochemical nutrient substrates in animals and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Dudrick, S J

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary studies in 400 New Zealand albino rabbits produced a reliable animal model of nutrient-induced atherosclerosis that simulated that observed in humans. Atherosclerosis was then induced in an additional 1600 rabbits in sets of 40 animals each, maintaining plasma cholesterol concentrations between 1000 and 2000 mg/dL for 6-20 weeks. In each set, 10 control rabbits were killed to document baseline atherosclerosis, and the other 30 rabbits were assigned randomly to one of three groups of 10 rabbits. Groups of 10 rabbits were either continued on the atherogenic diet (group I), given standard laboratory rabbit pellets (group II), or infused continuously with specially formulated anticholesterol solutions via central venous catheters (group III) for 6 weeks. At autopsy, atherosclerotic lesions consistently involved 85-95% of the aorta in group I. In group II, atherosclerosis was comparable with the baseline control group with no regression. In group III, regression of atherosclerosis by 90-95% was consistently documented. Correlations between plasma amino acids and plasma cholesterol concentrations were established in four humans with severe atherosclerosis to maximize the cholesterol reduction capacity of the amino acid formulation. Infusion of the modified total parenteral nutrition solution induced prompt reduction in plasma cholesterol levels by 40-60% regardless of the initial level and was accompanied by evidence of regression of atherosclerosis after a 90-day infusion therapy period. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 13. Fig. 14. Fig. 15. Fig. 16. Fig. 18. Fig. 19. Fig. 20. PMID:3115205

  20. Minimal contribution of the gastrointestinal tract to splanchnic uptake of intravenously infused ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Mingta )

    1992-02-26

    The uptake of iv infused ethanol in the liver and the GI tract were determined by the portal-hepatic and arterial-portal gradients of ethanol in this report. Male Wistar rats were cannulated either in the portal vein (P), the hepatic vein (H) and the inferior vena cava (V) or in the common carotid artery (A), the portal vein (P) and the inferior vena cava (V). The experiments were performed in the fed state only on those animals whose daily food consumption has returned to pre-cannulation level. Ethanol was infused into V at a rate of 15.2 umol/min/rat for 90 min. Five sets of P and H blood or A and P blood were simultaneously taken from PHV and APV cannulated rats between 60 and 90 min of infusion when plasma ethanol concentrations in A,P and H were found to reach plateau. Ethanol concentration P was 3.10 {plus minus} 1.17 mM (SD), H was 2.64 {plus minus} 1.19 mM(SD). The difference between the two was highly significant. P-H gradient was 0.46 {plus minus} 0.06 mM(SD). A-P gradients of ethanol in APV cannulated were 0.03 {approximately} 0.04 mM, 12 {approximately} 15 times lower than hepatic gradient. It was concluded that the role of alcohol dehydrogenase activity recently found in the GI tract in metabolizing blood ethanol is insignificant in comparison to that of the liver.

  1. Effects of intravenous infusion of amino acids and glucose on the yield and concentration of milk protein in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Kim, C H; Kim, T G; Choung, J J; Chamberlain, D G

    2001-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that the availability of glucose or its precursors can influence the response of milk protein concentration to the intravenous infusion of amino acids, five cows were used in a 5 x 5 Latin square design with period lengths of 7 d. The five treatments were the basal diet of grass silage ad lib. plus 5 kg/d of a cereal-based supplement containing feather meal (Basal); Basal plus 4 g/d histidine, 8 g/d methionine and 26 g/d lysine (4H); Basal plus 8 g/d histidine, 8 g/d methionine and 26 g/d lysine (SH); and these two amino acid mixtures together with 600 g/d of gluctose (4HG and 8HG respectively). Earlier experiments with this basal diet had shown that histidine was first-limiting for secretion of milk protein, followed by methionine and lysine. The yield of milk protein was increased progressively with the amount of histidine infused. The efficiency of transfer of histidine into milk protein was 0.42 for the 4H and 4HG and 0.35 for the 8H and 8HG treatments, and the concentration of milk protein was increased over Basal by all infusion treatments. However, milk protein concentrations were higher, and lactose concentrations in the milk were lower, in the absence of added glucose. Concentrations of insulin in blood plasma were not affected by treatment. It is concluded that, with the treatments without added glucose, a shortage of glucose prevented an increase in lactose secretion, and hence limited the increase in milk yield, leading to an increased concentration of protein in the milk.

  2. Effectiveness of Intravenous Infusion Algorithms for Glucose Control in Diabetic Patients Using Different Simulation Models

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Terry G.; Edgar, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of closed-loop insulin infusion algorithms is assessed for three different mathematical models describing insulin and glucose dynamics within a Type I diabetes patient. Simulations are performed to assess the effectiveness of proportional plus integral plus derivative (PID) control, feedforward control, and a physiologically-based control system with respect to maintaining normal glucose levels during a meal and during exercise. Control effectiveness is assessed by comparing the simulated response to a simulation of a healthy patient during both a meal and exercise and establishing maximum and minimum glucose levels and insulin infusion levels, as well as maximum duration of hyperglycemia. Controller effectiveness is assessed within the minimal model, the Sorensen model, and the Hovorka model. Results showed that no type of control was able to maintain normal conditions when simulations were performed using the minimal model. For both the Sorensen model and the Hovorka model, proportional control was sufficient to maintain normal glucose levels. Given published clinical data showing the ineffectiveness of PID control in patients, the work demonstrates that controller success based on simulation results can be misleading, and that future work should focus on addressing the model discrepancies. PMID:20161147

  3. Evaluation of a volumetric intravenous fluid infusion pump for transfusion of blood components containing red cells.

    PubMed

    Thompson, H W; Lasky, L C; Polesky, H F

    1986-01-01

    A method was devised to evaluate the suitability of an infusion pump for transfusing components containing red cells. With simulated transfusions of units of whole blood tested before or after the expiration date there was no increase in the plasma hemoglobin level in pumped blood compared with blood that was put through a standard blood transfusion set. With outdated units of red cells there was an increased level of plasma hemoglobin after pumping. The increases were greatest at maximum pump rates, but were not statistically or clinically significant. The authors' evaluation indicates that this pump causes minimal damage to the red cells, although care should be exercised when rapidly transfusing red cells with high hematocrit values.

  4. Effect of intravenous infusion of recombinant ovine leptin on feed intake and serum concentrations of GH, LH, insulin, IGF-1, cortisol, and thyroxine in growing prepubertal ewe lambs.

    PubMed

    Morrison, C D; Wood, R; McFadin, E L; Whitley, N C; Keisler, D H

    2002-04-01

    In sheep, serum concentrations of leptin change congruently with increases or decreases in nutritional status, while intracerebroventricular infusions of leptin dramatically suppress feed intake in well-fed lambs, and may also increase growth hormone (GH), and/or luteinizing hormone (LH) in undernourished lambs. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of peripherally delivered ovine leptin, via intravenous infusions, on feed intake and serum concentrations of GH, LH, insulin, IGF-1, cortisol, and thyroxine. Twelve ewe lambs weighing 29.4 +/- 0.7 kg were infused intravenously with a linearly increasing dose of leptin or saline (n = 6 per group) for 10 days, reaching a maximum dose delivered of 0.5mg/h on day 10. Feed intake was assessed twice daily, and blood samples were collected every 10 min for 6 h on days 0, 2, 5, 8, and 10. Serum concentrations of leptin increased in leptin-treated lambs by day 2 (P = 0.05), and continued to increase to concentrations 9-fold greater than saline-infused lambs by day 10 (P < 0.001). Despite the substantial increase in serum leptin, feed intake did not differ between leptin and saline-infused lambs except on day 3.5 (P = 0.01). Furthermore, intravenous infusions of leptin did not significantly influence serum concentrations of insulin, cortisol, IGF-1, thyroxine, LH, or GH. Collectively, these observations contrast with the potent hypophagic effects of leptin when delivered intracerebroventricularly into well-fed lambs. The reasons for the disparate response of lambs treated intravenously with leptin, versus that reported for lambs treated intracerebroventricularly with leptin are not known, but may provide insight into the mechanism(s) of leptin resistance.

  5. Regional myocardial lidocaine concentration following continuous intravenous infusion early and later after myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Zito, R.A.; Caride, V.J.; Holford, T.; Zaret, B.L.

    1982-09-01

    The regional concentration of lidocaine using a double constant infusion technique (250 micrograms/kg/min x 15 minutes followed by 35 micrograms/kg/mg/min x 120 minutes) was studied immediately (2 hours) in seven dogs and 24 hours (six dogs) after myocardial infarction. Tissue levels were determined by gas chromatography and related to regional myocardial blood flow as determined by the radioactive microsphere technique in multiple samples. At 2 hours after infarction a significantly higher lidocaine concentration (4.1 +/- 0.42 micrograms/g) was found in zones with greatly reduced blood flow (regional myocardial blood flow less than 0.2 ml/min per g) when compared with that (2.6 +/- 0.19 micrograms/g) in zones with normal blood flow (regional myocardial blood flow greater than 0.8 ml/min per g) (p less than 0.01). In contrast, in the 24 hour model the opposite situation was observed. Although the concentration of lidocaine in the infarct zone was substantial, a significant decline in lidocaine tissue concentration was found in the zones of lowest blood flow (regional myocardial blood flow less than 0.2 ml/min per g) when compared with that in normal zones (1.76 +/- 0.21 versus 3.38 +/- 0.21 micrograms/g, p less than 0.001). In addition, no significant differences in lidocaine concentrations were found between endocardium and epicardium in any of the groups other than those related to regional myocardial blood flow. Thus, with the double constant infusion technique, lidocaine reached normal and ischemic myocardium in concentrations equivalent to therapeutic plasma concentrations, even in lower infarct blood flow zones, with no significant differences between endocardium and epicardium. Of perhaps greater significance, the age of the ischemic insult is an important determinant of lidocaine tissue distribution in infarcted myocardium.

  6. Fifteen-month-old infants' cortisol levels decrease after a 30-min-warm-up procedure.

    PubMed

    Zmyj, Norbert; Schneider, Silvia; Seehagen, Sabine

    2017-02-01

    Stress-induction procedures designed to increase cortisol levels in infants have been ineffective in many studies. One reason might be that infants did not have sufficient time to settle into the laboratory environment prior to the start of the stress induction, and thus already had high baseline levels of cortisol. In this study we investigate whether an extended warm-up period reduces infants' (N=22) cortisol levels. Fifteen-month-old infants' saliva cortisol was measured upon arrival at the laboratory. Then, they were allowed to play with their parent. After 30min, cortisol was measured again. There was a decrease in cortisol after 30min of free play. Our study suggests that infants' cortisol levels decrease when infants have the opportunity to acclimatize to the test environment. An extended warm-up phase prior to stress induction procedures might be necessary to reliably increase cortisol levels in infants.

  7. Acute hypoglycemic, hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects of continuous intravenous infusion of a lyophilised aqueous extract of Ajuga iva L. Schreber whole plant in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    El-Hilaly, Jaouad; Tahraoui, Adil; Israili, Zafar H; Lyoussi, Badiâa

    2007-10-01

    The hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effect of continuous intravenous infusion of a lyophilised aqueous extract of the whole plant Ajuga iva (L.) Schreber (Labiatae) (AI-extract) was investigated in anesthetized normal and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. The AI-extract was administered to a group of rats by continuous intravenous infusion for 4 h at a dose of 4.2 microg/min/100 g body weight; another group was infused with taurine, the reference compound, at the same dose. In normal rats, AI-extract infusion had no effect on plasma glucose or triglycerides, but plasma cholesterol levels were significantly decreased (22%; P<0.05). However, taurine infusion produced significant hypoglycemic, hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects (all changes, P<0.05). In STZ-diabetic rats, AI-extract infusion reduced plasma levels of glucose by 24 % (P<0.05), cholesterol by 35% (P<0.01) and triglycerides by 13% (P<0.05). Infusion with taurine produced a greater fall in plasma glucose (72%, P<0.01), cholesterol (54%; P<0.001) and triglyceride (24%; P<0.001) levels. Our results indicate that intravenously administered AI-extract exerts hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects in diabetic rats by mechanism(s) which appear to be similar to that of taurine, which involve insulin sensitization or an insulin-like effect. The identity and the exact mechanism(s) of action of the active component(s) of the AI-extract are not known. Ajuga iva appears to be a useful plant in the therapy of diabetes, a condition in which hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia coexist quite often.

  8. [New intravenous anesthetics. Remifentanil, S(+)-ketamine, eltanolone and target controlled infusion].

    PubMed

    Albrecht, S; Hering, W; Schüttler, J; Schwilden, H

    1996-12-01

    a substance is presented which is known as the metabolite pregnanolon of the reductive metabolic pathway of progesterone since the 50s and which is known to possess strong hypnotic potency. However, because of its low water solubility it could not be studied as an i.v. agent until in 1990 one succeeded in making a water soluble emulsion in fat. The clearance of eltanolon is ca. 25 ml/kg/min and it has a terminal half-life of about 3 hr. It has, however, a pronounced hysteresis of 8 min between blood and effect site. This unfavourable pharmacokinetic property in conjunction with observed unvoluntary spontaneous movements and increased muscle tone during application has led to the cessation of its further clinical development. With the introduction of shorter acting compounds it is also necessary to improve the traditional techniques of i.v. drug delivery like manual bolus injections or drip infusions. After more than 16 years of research and development in the field of Target-Controlled Infusions (TCI), there has been recently introduced the so called Diprifusor-TCI, as a commercially available software module to control the delivery of propofol. TCI uses established pharmacokinetic data to determine infusion rates to achieve desired drug concentrations serving as the target, which can be chosen interactively. This way of dosing i.v. anesthetics is obviously not restricted to one specific compound but can be applied to any i.v.-drug if appropriate pharmacokinetic data are used.

  9. Studies of embryotoxicity and the incidence of external malformations after continuous intravenous infusion of alpha-chaconine in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Hellenäs, K E; Cekan, E; Slanina, P; Bergman, K

    1992-05-01

    Embryotoxicity and effects on the incidence of external malformations of the major potato glycoalkaloid alpha-chaconine (alpha-cha) were studied in rats. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 17) were given a continuous intravenous infusion of alpha-cha via implanted osmotic minipumps (1.7 mg/kg/day), to maintain a stable blood concentration on days 6-13 of gestation. Control animals received physiological saline solution or were left untreated, respectively. Blood serum levels of alpha-cha were monitored at selected time intervals during the treatment using a specific HPLC method. The foetal body weights and the number of resorbed or dead foetuses per litter in the alpha-cha treated group were not significantly different from the control groups. No case of malformation was detected among 143 foetuses inspected in the treated group. The average maternal blood serum concentration of alpha-cha measured during the experiment was 340 ng/ml. This is more than 20 times the average peak serum level previously reported for human volunteers after intake of potatoes with a total glycoalkaloid content at the upper safe limit for acute adverse effects. The results support the view that potato glycoalkaloids, at levels normally found in potatoes, do not present a risk for teratogenicity in humans.

  10. Simulation of oral glucose tolerance tests and the corresponding isoglycemic intravenous glucose infusion studies for calculation of the incretin effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeungseon; Oh, Tae Jung; Lee, Jung Chan; Choi, Karam; Kim, Min Young; Kim, Hee Chan; Cho, Young Min; Kim, Sungwan

    2014-03-01

    The incretin effect, which is a unique stimulus of insulin secretion in response to oral ingestion of nutrients, is calculated by the difference in insulin secretory responses from an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and a corresponding isoglycemic intravenous glucose infusion (IIGI) study. The OGTT model of this study, which is individualized by fitting the glucose profiles during an OGTT, was developed to predict the glucose profile during an IIGI study in the same subject. Also, the model predicts the insulin and incretin profiles during both studies. The incretin effect, estimated by simulation, was compared with that measured by physiologic studies from eight human subjects with normal glucose tolerance, and the result exhibited a good correlation (r > 0.8); the incretin effect from the simulation was 56.5% ± 10.6% while the one from the measured data was 52.5% ± 19.6%. In conclusion, the parameters of the OGTT model have been successfully estimated to predict the profiles of both OGTTs and IIGI studies. Therefore, with glucose data from the OGTT alone, this model could control and predict the physiologic responses, including insulin secretion during OGTTs and IIGI studies, which could eventually eliminate the need for complex and cumbersome IIGI studies in incretin research.

  11. Effect of 30-min +3 Gz centrifugation on vestibular and autonomic cardiovascular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Wood, Scott J.; Brown, Troy E.; Harm, Deborah L.; Rupert, A. H.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Repeated exposure to increased +Gz enhances human baroreflex responsiveness and improves tolerance to cardiovascular stress. However, it is not known whether such enhancements might also result from a single, more prolonged exposure to increased +Gz. Our study was designed to investigate whether baroreflex function and orthostatic tolerance are acutely improved by a single prolonged exposure to +3 Gz, and moreover, whether changes in autonomic cardiovascular function resulting from exposure to increased +Gz are correlated with changes in otolith function. METHODS: We exposed 15 healthy human subjects to +3 Gz centrifugation for up to 30 min or until symptoms of incipient G-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC) ensued. Tests of autonomic cardiovascular function both before and after centrifugation included: 1) power spectral determinations of beat-to-beat R-R intervals and arterial pressures; 2) carotid-cardiac baroreflex tests; 3) Valsalva tests; and 4) 30-min head-up tilt tests. Otolith function was assessed during centrifugation by the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex and both before and after centrifugation by measurements of ocular counter-rolling and dynamic posturography. RESULTS: Of the 15 subjects who underwent prolonged +3 Gz, 4 were intolerant to 30 min of head-up tilt before centrifugation but became tolerant to such tilt after centrifugation. The Valsalva-related baroreflex as well as a measure of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex were also enhanced after centrifugation. No significant vestibular-autonomic relationships were detected beyond a vestibular-cerebrovascular interaction reported earlier in a subset of seven participants. CONCLUSIONS: A single prolonged exposure to +3 Gz centrifugation acutely improves baroreflex function and orthostatic tolerance.

  12. Efficacy of small-volume simethicone given at least 30 min before gastroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Mingjun; Kwek, Andrew Boon Eu; Law, Ngai Moh; Ong, Jeannie Peng Lan; Tan, Jessica Yi-Lyn; Harichander Thurairajah, Prem; Ang, Daphne Shih Wen; Ang, Tiing Leong

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy of 5 mL simethicone solution in decreasing gastric foam if given at least 30 min before gastroscopy. METHODS This was a randomized, placebo controlled, endoscopist blinded study performed at Changi General Hospital. Patients were at least 21 years old, had no prior surgical resection of the upper gastrointestinal tract, and scheduled for elective diagnostic gastroscopies. The primary outcome was the total mucosal visibility score (TMVS) which was evaluated using McNally score. The sample size was calculated to be 24 per group (SD 2.4, 80% power, P < 0.05, 2-sample t test). RESULTS Fifty-four patients were randomised to receive either simethicone [1 mL liquid simethicone (100 mg) in 5 mL of water] or placebo (5 mL of water) at least 30 min before their gastroscopy. Six accredited consultants conducted the gastroscopy, and the interobserver agreement of scoring TMVS was good with a Kappa statistic of 0.73. The simethicone group had significantly better mean TMVS compared to placebo (5.78 ± SD 1.65 vs 8.89 ± SD 1.97, P < 0.001). The improvement was statistically significant for the duodenum and the gastric antrum, angularis, body, and fundus. Percent 51.9 of patients in the simethicone group had a TMVS of 4 (no bubbles at all) to 5 (only 1 area with minimal bubbles), while in the placebo group 3.7% of patients had TMVS of 4 or 5. The number needed to treat was 2.1 to avoid a TMVS of 6 and more. The simethicone group also had a significantly shorter procedure time with less volume of additional flushes required during gastroscopy to clear away obscuring gastric foam. CONCLUSION With a premedication time of at least 30 min, 5 mL simethicone can significantly decrease gastric foam, decrease the volume of additional flushes, and shorten gastroscopy time. PMID:27867691

  13. Responses of milk production to the intravenous infusion of amino acids in dairy cows given diets of grass silage and cereal-based supplements.

    PubMed

    Kim, C H; Choung, J J; Chamberlain, D G

    2001-10-01

    Three experiments were carried out to examine responses of milk production to the intravenous infusion of amino acids in dairy cows given diets of grass silage and supplements based on barley, with or without added soyabean meal and ranging in crude protein content from 16 to 19% in dry matter. Particular attention was given to histidine, administered alone or in combination with methionine, lysine and tryptophan. Responses of milk protein secretion to infusion of histidine were seen only when the diet contained a supplement of barley alone. When soyabean meal was included, there were no responses of milk production to infusion of any of the infused amino acids. Calculations suggested that, although histidine remained first-limiting when soya was included in the diet, any response to infusion of histidine was blocked by the rapidly emerging deficiency of another amino acid, probably leucine. The results confirm that, for diets based on grass silage and supplements of cereal only, histidine is first-limiting such that increases of milk protein secretion can be obtained in response to infusion of histidine alone. In assessing the practical significance of this finding, it should be remembered that greater responses in the yield of milk protein can probably be obtained by substituting 1 kg of soyabean meal for 1 kg of cereal, which is likely to be an easier and cheaper option.

  14. Time Savings with Rituximab Subcutaneous Injection versus Rituximab Intravenous Infusion: A Time and Motion Study in Eight Countries

    PubMed Central

    De Cock, Erwin; Kritikou, Persefoni; Sandoval, Mariana; Tao, Sunning; Wiesner, Christof; Carella, Angelo Michele; Ngoh, Charles; Waterboer, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background Rituximab is a standard treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The SABRINA trial (NCT01200758) showed that a subcutaneous (SC) rituximab formulation did not compromise efficacy or safety compared with intravenous (IV) infusion. We aimed to quantify active healthcare professional (HCP) time and patient chair time for rituximab SC and IV, including potential time savings. Methods This non-interventional time and motion study was run in eight countries and 30 day oncology units. Rituximab SC data were collected alongside the MabCute trial (NCT01461928); IV data were collected per routine real-world practice. Trained observers recorded active HCP time for pre-specified tasks (stopwatch) and chair time (time of day). A random intercept model was used to analyze active HCP time (by task and for all tasks combined) in the treatment room and drug preparation area, drug administration duration, chair time and patient treatment room time by country and/or across countries. Active HCP and chair time were extrapolated to a patient’s first year of treatment (11 rituximab sessions). Results Mean active HCP time was 35.0 and 23.7 minutes for IV and SC process, respectively (-32%, p <0.0001). By country, relative reduction in time was 27–58%. Absolute reduction in extrapolated active HCP time (first year of treatment) was 1.1–5.2 hours. Mean chair time was 262.1 minutes for IV, including 180.9 minutes infusion duration, vs. 67.3 minutes for SC, including 8.3 minutes SC injection administration (-74%, p <0.0001). By country, relative reduction was 53–91%. Absolute reduction in extrapolated chair time for the first year of treatment was 3.1–5.5 eight-hour days. Conclusions Compared with rituximab IV, rituximab SC was associated with reduced chair time and active HCP time. The latter could be invested in other activities, whereas the former may lead to more available appointments, reducing waiting lists and increasing the efficiency of day oncology units. Trial

  15. Effect on truck drivers' alertness of a 30-min. exposure to bright light: a field study.

    PubMed

    Landström, Ulf; Akerstedt, Torbörn; Byström, Marianne; Nordström, Bertil; Wibom, Roger

    2004-06-01

    Reduced alertness is common during night driving. Light treatment may constitute one countermeasure to reduce sleepiness. To test this idea six professional drivers participated in this study in which they self-administered a 30-min. light treatment during a break in the middle of a night drive of about 9 hours. Two experimental conditions were used, including light exposures with a light box and a light visor. There was a control condition. Alertness was measured on a 100-mm visual analogue scale. No significant effect of light was found, but ratings of sleepiness increased significantly through the night drive. The experimental light treatment was not correlated with any increased wakefulness compared to the drivings where no extra light exposures were carried out.

  16. Disposition, Metabolism, and Excretion of [14C]Doripenem after a Single 500-Milligram Intravenous Infusion in Healthy Men▿

    PubMed Central

    Cirillo, Iolanda; Mannens, Geert; Janssen, Cor; Vermeir, Marc; Cuyckens, Filip; Desai-Krieger, Daksha; Vaccaro, Nicole; Kao, L. Mark; Devineni, Damayanthi; Redman, Rebecca; Turner, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    In this open-label, single-center study, eight healthy men each received a single 500-mg dose of [14C]doripenem, containing 50 μCi of [14C]doripenem, administered as a 1-h intravenous infusion. The concentrations of unchanged doripenem and its primary metabolite (doripenem-M-1) resulting from β-lactam ring opening were measured in plasma and urine by a validated liquid chromatography method coupled to a tandem mass spectrometry assay. Total radioactivity was measured in blood, plasma, urine, and feces by liquid scintillation counting. Further metabolite profiling was conducted on urine samples using liquid chromatography coupled to radiochemical detection and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Unchanged doripenem and doripenem-M-1 accounted for means of 80.7% and 12.7% of the area under the plasma total-radioactivity-versus-time curve (area under the concentration-time curve extrapolated to infinity) and exhibited elimination half-lives of 1.1 and 2.5 h, respectively. Total clearance of doripenem was 16 liters/h, and renal clearance was 12.5 liters/h. At 7 days after the single dose, 95.3% of total doripenem-related radioactivity was recovered in urine and 0.72% in feces. A total mean of 97.2% of the administered dose was excreted in the urine as unchanged doripenem (78.7% ± 5.7%) and doripenem-M-1 (18.5% ± 2.6%). Most of the urinary recovery occurred within 4 h of dosing. Three additional minor metabolites were identified in urine: the glycine and taurine conjugates of doripenem-M-1 and oxidized doripenem-M-1. These results show that doripenem is predominantly eliminated in urine as unchanged drug, with only a fraction metabolized to doripenem-M-1 and other minor metabolites. PMID:18644951

  17. [A case of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome with dramatic improvement in consciousness immediately after intravenous infusion of thiamine].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, A; Chida, K; Misu, T; Okita, N; Nomura, H; Konno, H; Takase, S; Takeda, A; Itoyama, Y

    2000-01-01

    A 68-year-old man was hospitalized on March 4, 1998 for disturbances in consciousness. In 1995, he had received proximal subtotal gastrectomy and reconstructive surgery of the jejunal interposition for gastric cancer. Thereafter he had been taking enough food without the habit of taking liquor. In October 1997, his short term memory was becoming gradually worse. On February 12, 1998, he suffered from numbness in the feet, and then dysphagia, unsteady gait, and diplopia developed gradually. On February 26, brain MRI showed no abnormalities. On March 3, he had a fever of 38.5 degrees C and his consciousness became unclear. Neurological examination revealed semi-coma, total ophthalmoplegia, and absence of doll's eye movement. Deep tendon reflexes were absent. The serum thiamine level was 9 ng/ml (normal range: 20-50). Brain MRI demonstrated symmetrical high intensity lesions in the periaqueductal area of the midbrain, dorsomedial nuclei of bilateral thalami, and vestibular nuclei. About 30 seconds after intravenous infusion of thiamine, his consciousness improved dramatically, but returned to semi-coma after about two minutes. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome usually occurs acutely. In the present case, however, the disease showed slow onset, chronic progression, and then rapid worsening after fever. Reconstructive surgery of the jejunal interposition might have caused the slow onset of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, and fever might have facilitated the rapid progression of the disease. An immediate high concentration of thiamine modifies the kinetics of acetylcholine receptor ion channels, thereby maintaining wakefulness, and the level of consciousness may change dramatically.

  18. Continuous intravenous infusion of ATP in humans yields large expansions of erythrocyte ATP pools but extracellular ATP pools are elevated only at the start followed by rapid declines.

    PubMed

    Rapaport, Eliezer; Salikhova, Anna; Abraham, Edward H

    2015-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) was investigated in a clinical trial that included 15 patients with advanced malignancies (solid tumors). ATP was administered by continuous intravenous infusions of 8 h once weekly for 8 weeks. Three values of blood ATP levels were determined. These were total blood (erythrocyte) and blood plasma (extracellular) ATP pools along with the initial rate of release of ATP into the blood plasma. We found that values related to erythrocyte ATP pools showed great variability (diversity) among individuals (standard deviation of about 30-40% of mean at baseline). It was discovered that erythrocyte baseline ATP pool sizes are unique to each individual and that they fall within a narrow range in each individual. At the end of an 8 h continuous intravenous infusion of ATP, intracellular erythrocyte ATP pools were increased in the range of 40-60% and extracellular ATP declined from elevated levels achieved at the beginning and middle of the infusion, to baseline levels. The ability of erythrocytes to sequester exogenously administered ATP to this degree, after its initial conversion to adenosine in the blood plasma is unexpected, considering that some of the adenosine is likely to have been degraded by in vivo catabolic activities or taken up by organs. The data suggest that administration of ATP by short-term intravenous infusions, of up to 4 h, may be a favorable way for elevating extracellular ATP pools. A large fraction of the total exogenously administered ATP is sequestered into the intracellular compartments of the erythrocytes after an 8 h intravenous infusion. Erythrocytes loaded with ATP are known to release their ATP pools by the application of previously established agents or conditions applied locally or globally to circulating erythrocytes. Rapid degradation of intravenously administered ATP to adenosine and subsequent accumulation of ATP inside erythrocytes indicate the existence of very effective mechanisms

  19. Home infusion of intravenous velaglucerase alfa: Experience from pooled clinical studies in 104 patients with type 1 Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Elstein, Deborah; Burrow, T Andrew; Charrow, Joel; Giraldo, Pilar; Mehta, Atul; Pastores, Gregory M; Lee, Hak-Myung; Mellgard, Björn; Zimran, Ari

    The introduction of a home therapy option during clinical trials of velaglucerase alfa in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease marked the first time that home infusions have been permitted during a clinical trial for an investigational drug for Gaucher disease. Home infusions were an available option in 4 open-label velaglucerase alfa clinical studies to eligible patients who received their initial infusions at a clinic. Patients who participated in the home therapy option and received at least 10% of their infusions at home (n=100) received a range of 11.6%-100% of their scheduled infusions at home (median 87.5%), excluding infusions received at the clinic during protocol-mandated visits. The length of time over which individual patients received home therapy ranged from 13days to 4.56years (median 0.57years). During the time that home therapy was available, 2904 of 3572 (81.3%) infusions were administered at home. Ten patients experienced 62 infusion-related adverse events (IRAEs) during 38 home infusions, with malaise, pain, hypertension, fatigue, and headache being reported most frequently. No notable differences were found between the type and severity of IRAEs experienced at home and those experienced at the clinic. Home infusions administered by trained and qualified medical personnel were successfully introduced into the velaglucerase alfa clinical development program, and fewer than 10% of patients experienced IRAEs in the home setting. Local labeling and practice guidelines should be consulted for administration of velaglucerase alfa infusions at home.

  20. A rapid infusion pump driven by micro electromagnetic linear actuation for pre-hospital intravenous fluid administration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Chong, Yinbao; Zhao, An; Lang, Lang; Wang, Qing; Liu, Jiuling

    2015-02-01

    A rapid infusion pump with a maximum flow rate of 6 L/h was designed experimentally using a micro electromagnetic linear actuator, and its effectiveness was evaluated by comparing with that of a commercial Power Infuser under preset flow rates of 0.2, 2, and 6 L/h. The flow rate, air detection sensitivity, occlusion response time, quantitative determination of hemolysis, and power consumption of the infusion devices were extensively investigated using statistical analysis methods (p < 0.05). The experimental results revealed that the flow rate of the designed infusion pump was more stable and accurate, and the hemolysis was significantly less than that of the Power Infuser. The air detection sensitivity and the power consumption could be comparable to that of the Power Infuser except the occlusion response time. The favorable performance made the designed infusion pump a potential candidate for applications in pre-hospital fluid administration.

  1. Does pretreatment of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with 5-azacytidine or double intravenous infusion improve their therapeutic potential for dilated cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sirui; Piao, Jinhua; Jin, Lianhua; Zhou, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was designed to investigate whether pretreatment of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) with 5-azacytidine (5-aza) or double intravenous infusion could enhance their therapeutic potential for dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Material/Methods BMSCs were cultured for 2 weeks in the presence or absence of 5-aza and DCM serum. The cultured BMSCs (Groups 1 and 2), 5-aza-induced BMSCs (Groups 3 and 4), and medium alone (model control) were transplanted into 80 female Wistar rats by intravenous tail vein injection. Double infusion of BMSCs with 1-day time-interval was carried out in Groups 2 and 4. Postmortem histological analysis and evaluation of heart function were performed at 4 weeks post-transplantation. Results Some transplanted BMSCs engrafted into myocardial tissue and were positive for cardiac marker troponin T. The hearts containing transplanted BMSCs secreted a larger amount of vascular endothelial growth factor. Cardiac function parameters and serum level of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) did not differ among Groups 1, 3, and the model control. As compared with model control, BMSC transplantation in Groups 2 and 4 significantly decreased the serum level of BNP and improved cardiac contractile function, as evidenced by reduced left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic diameter, elevated ejection fraction, and fractional shortening. Conclusions BMSC transplantation is a promising strategy for the treatment of DCM. Pretreatment of BMSCs with 5-aza and DCM serum does not enhance their therapeutic efficacy, and the double intravenous BMSC infusion method is superior to single infusion for preserving cardiac contractile function in a rat model of DCM. PMID:23314418

  2. The post-occipital spinal venous sinus of the Nile crocodile Crocodylus niloticus: its anatomy and use for blood sample collection and intravenous infusions.

    PubMed

    Myburgh, Jan G; Kirberger, Robert M; Steyl, Johan C A; Soley, John T; Booyse, Dirk G; Huchzermeyer, Fritz W; Lowers, Russel H; Guillette, Louis J

    2014-05-05

    The post-occipital sinus of the spinal vein is often used for the collection of blood samples from crocodilians. Although this sampling method has been reported for several crocodilian species, the technique and associated anatomy has not been described in detail in any crocodilian, including the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus). The anatomy of the cranial neck region was investigated macroscopically, microscopically, radiographically and by means of computed tomography. Latex was injected into the spinal vein and spinal venous sinus of crocodiles to visualise the regional vasculature. The spinal vein ran within the vertebral canal, dorsal to and closely associated with the spinal cord and changed into a venous sinus cranially in the post-occipital region. For blood collection, the spinal venous sinus was accessed through the interarcuate space between the atlas and axis (C1 and C2) by inserting a needle angled just off the perpendicular in the midline through the craniodorsal cervical skin, just cranial to the cranial borders of the first cervical osteoderms. The most convenient method of blood collection was with a syringe and hypodermic needle. In addition, the suitability of the spinal venous sinus for intravenous injections and infusions in live crocodiles was evaluated. The internal diameter of the commercial human epidural catheters used during these investigations was relatively small, resulting in very slow infusion rates. Care should be taken not to puncture the spinal cord or to lacerate the blood vessel wall using this route for blood collection or intravenous infusions.

  3. Intravenous lipid emulsion given to volunteers does not affect symptoms of lidocaine brain toxicity.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Juho A; Litonius, Erik; Salmi, Tapani; Haasio, Juhani; Tarkkila, Pekka; Backman, Janne T; Rosenberg, Per H

    2015-04-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsion has been suggested as treatment for local anaesthetic toxicity, but the exact mechanism of action is still uncertain. Controlled studies on the effect of lipid emulsion on toxic doses of local anaesthetics have not been performed in man. In randomized, subject-blinded and two-phase cross-over fashion, eight healthy volunteers were given a 1.5 ml/kg bolus of 20% Intralipid(®) (200 mg/ml) or Ringer's acetate solution intravenously, followed by a rapid injection of lidocaine 1.0 mg/kg. Then, the same solution as in the bolus was infused at a rate of 0.25 ml/kg/min. for 30 min. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded, and 5 min. after lidocaine injection, the volunteers were asked to report subjective symptoms. Total and un-entrapped lidocaine plasma concentrations were measured from venous blood samples. EEG band power changes (delta, alpha and beta) after the lidocaine bolus were similar during lipid and during Ringer infusion. There were no differences between infusions in the subjective symptoms of central nervous system toxicity. Lidocaine was only minimally entrapped in the plasma by lipid emulsion, but the mean un-entrapped lidocaine area under concentration-time curve from 0 to 30 min. was clearly smaller during lipid than Ringer infusion (16.4 versus 21.3 mg × min/l, p = 0.044). Intravenous lipid emulsion did not influence subjective toxicity symptoms nor affect the EEG changes caused by lidocaine.

  4. Safety and efficacy of intravenous infusion of allogeneic cryopreserved mesenchymal stem cells for treatment of chronic kidney disease in cats: results of three sequential pilot studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to improve renal function in rodent models of chronic kidney disease (CKD), in part by reducing intrarenal inflammation and suppressing fibrosis. CKD in cats is characterized by tubulointerstitial inflammation and fibrosis, and thus treatment with MSCs might improve renal function and urinary markers of inflammation in this disease. Therefore, a series of pilot studies was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of intravenous administration of allogeneic adipose-derived MSCs (aMSCs) in cats with naturally occurring CKD. Methods Cats enrolled in these studies received an intravenous infusion of allogeneic aMSCs every 2 weeks collected from healthy, young, specific pathogen-free cats. Cats in pilot study 1 (six cats) received 2 × 106 cryopreserved aMSCs per infusion, cats in pilot study 2 (five cats) received 4 × 106 cryopreserved aMSCs per infusion, and cats in pilot study 3 (five cats) received 4 × 106 aMSCs cultured from cryopreserved adipose. Serum biochemistry, complete blood count, urinalysis, urine protein, glomerular filtration rate, and urinary cytokine concentrations were monitored during the treatment period. Changes in clinical parameters were compared statistically by means of repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Bonferroni’s correction. Results Cats in pilot study 1 had few adverse effects from the aMSC infusions and there was a statistically significant decrease in serum creatinine concentrations during the study period, however the degree of decrease seems unlikely to be clinically relevant. Adverse effects of the aMSC infusion in cats in pilot study 2 included vomiting (2/5 cats) during infusion and increased respiratory rate and effort (4/5 cats). Cats in pilot study 3 did not experience any adverse side effects. Serum creatinine concentrations and glomerular filtration rates did not change significantly in cats in pilot studies 2 and 3

  5. Pharmacokinetics of perfluorobutane following intravenous bolus injection and continuous infusion of sonazoid in healthy volunteers and in patients with reduced pulmonary diffusing capacity.

    PubMed

    Landmark, Kristin Eitrem; Johansen, Per Wiik; Johnson, Judith A; Johansen, Bjørn; Uran, Steinar; Skotland, Tore

    2008-03-01

    The ultrasound contrast agent Sonazoidtrade mark was administered as an i.v. bolus injection of 0.6 microL microbubbles/kg body weight or as a continuous infusion over 30 min at a rate of 1.2 microL microbubbles/kg body weight to healthy volunteers and patients with reduced pulmonary diffusing capacity. Expired air and blood samples were collected from 32 subjects and perfluorobutane (PFB) gas was analyzed using validated gas chromatography mass spectrometry methods. Blood concentrations of PFB declined biphasicly with a distribution half-life (t(0.5 to 15)) of 2 to 3 min and an elimination half-life (t(15 to 120)) of 30 to 45 min. Area under the curve (AUC) values in patients with impaired gas diffusion were significantly larger than those in healthy volunteers. The exhalation kinetics were somewhat variable with a PFB elimination half-life (t(15 to 120)) of 28 to 111 min. Clearance of PFB was independent of study population and mode of administration. There were no deaths and no serious adverse events that resulted in the withdrawal of a subject from the study. With the exception that arthralgia predominated in healthy volunteers, healthy volunteers and diseased subjects did not show a different adverse event profile whether Sonazoid was administered as a bolus injection or as an infusion. Assessment of laboratory parameters (serum biochemistry, haematology and urinalysis), vital signs, oxygen saturation and electrocardiograms (ECGs) showed no changes which caused safety concern. (E-mail: Kristin.Landmark@ge.com).

  6. Analysis of the variable factors influencing tacrolimus blood concentration during the switch from continuous intravenous infusion to oral administration after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Kimitaka; Ikesue, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Shiratsuchi, Motoaki; Yamamoto-Taguchi, Nanae; Tsuchiya, Yuichi; Matsukawa, Kumi; Uchida, Mayako; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Akashi, Koichi; Masuda, Satohiro

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to identify variable factors affecting tacrolimus blood concentration during the switch from continuous intravenous infusion to twice-daily oral administration in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients (n = 73). The blood concentration/dose ratio of tacrolimus immediately before the change from continuous infusion (C/Div) was compared with that between 3 and 5 days after the change to oral administration (C/Dpo). Median (C/Dpo)/(C/Div) was 0.21 (range 0.04-0.58). Multiple regression analysis showed that concomitant use of oral itraconazole or voriconazole significantly increased the (C/Dpo)/(C/Div) of tacrolimus (p = 0.002), probably owing to the inhibition of enterohepatic cytochrome P450 3A4. In addition, 5 of 18 (28%) patients who had the lowest quartile (C/Dpo)/(C/Div) values developed acute graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD), which was significantly higher than in others [5 of 55 (9%) patients, p = 0.045]. Although the switch from intravenous to oral administration at a ratio of 1:5 appeared to be appropriate, a lower conversion ratio was suitable in patients taking oral itraconazole or voriconazole. In patients whose blood concentration decreases after the switch, the development of GVHD should be monitored and tacrolimus dosage should be readjusted to maintain an appropriate blood concentration.

  7. Role of prostaglandins in the renal response to calcium infusion.

    PubMed

    Lahera, V; Fiksen-Olsen, M J; Romero, J C

    1990-04-01

    The effects of intrarenal infusions of calcium gluconate (10 and 100 micrograms Ca.kg-1.min-1) on renal hemodynamics and on renal excretory function were studied in anesthetized mongrel dogs. In one group, the two doses of calcium were infused for 30 min each (1 ml/min). In a second group, the same doses were administered 30 min after the start of an infusion of prostaglandin (PG) inhibitors (intrarenal indomethacin, 10 micrograms.kg-1.min-1, or intravenous bolus injection of meclofenamate, 5 mg/kg). No change with physiological significance was observed during the infusion of 10 micrograms Ca.kg-1.min-1. However, the infusion of 100 micrograms Ca.kg-1.min-1 induced increases (P less than 0.05) in glomerular filtration rate (50%), sodium excretion rate (180%), and fractional excretion of sodium (160%), with respect to control precalcium values. All these changes were prevented by the concurrent administration of PG synthesis inhibitors. Urinary PGE2 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha increased 220 and 85%, respectively, during the infusion of 100 micrograms Ca.kg-1.min-1, but both decreased (P less than 0.05) below basal levels during the concurrent administration of PG synthesis inhibitors. The infusion of 100 micrograms Ca.kg-1.min-1 decreased (P less than 0.05) renal blood flow by 16% during the administration of PG synthesis inhibitors. These results suggest that PGs are mediating the increase in hemodynamic and excretory factors induced by the intrarenal infusion of 100 micrograms Ca.kg-1.min-1.

  8. Effect of Intravenous Infusion of G-CSF-Mobilized Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells on Upper Extremity Function in Cerebral Palsy Children

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of intravenous infusion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (mPBMC) mobilized by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on upper extremity function in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Methods Fifty-seven children with CP were enrolled. Ten patients were excluded due to follow-up loss. In total, 47 patients (30 males and 17 females) were analyzed. All patients' parents provided signed consent before the start of the study. After administration of G-CSF for 5 days, mPBMC was collected and cryopreserved. Patients were randomized into two groups 1 month later. Twenty-two patients were administered mPBMC and 25 patients received normal saline as placebo. Six months later, the two groups were switched, and administered mPBMC and placebo, respectively. Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test (QUEST) and the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) were used to evaluate upper motor function. Results All subdomain and total scores of QUEST were significantly improved after mPBMC and placebo infusion, without significant differences between mPBMC and placebo groups. A month after G-CSF, all subdomain and total scores of QUEST were improved. The level of MACS remained unchanged in both mPBMC and placebo groups. Conclusion In this study, intravenously infused mPBMC showed no significant effect on upper extremity function in children with CP, as compared to placebo. The effect of mPBMC was likely masked by the effect of G-CSF, which was used in both groups and/or G-CSF itself might have other neurotrophic potentials in children with CP. PMID:28289643

  9. Evaluation of Meropenem Regimens Suppressing Emergence of Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii with Human Simulated Exposure in an In Vitro Intravenous-Infusion Hollow-Fiber Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Xian-Jia; Yang, Yang; Gong, Wei-Tao; Xu, Bin; Zhu, Ying-Qun

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to carbapenems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be suppressed by optimizing the administration of meropenem. However, whether the same is true for Acinetobacter baumannii is not fully understood. We assessed the bactericidal activity of meropenem and its potency to suppress the emergence of resistance in A. baumannii with human simulated exposure in an in vitro intravenous-infusion hollow-fiber infection model (HFIM). Two clinical strains of carbapenem-susceptible multidrug-resistant A. baumannii (CS-MDRAB), CSRA24 and CSRA91, were used, and their MICs and mutant prevention concentrations (MPCs) were determined. Six meropenem dosage regimens (0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 g given every 8 h [q8h] with a 0.5-h or 3-h infusion for seven consecutive days) were simulated and then evaluated in the HFIM. Both the total population and resistant subpopulations of the two strains were quantified. Drug concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. All dosage regimens, except for the lowest dosage (0.5 g for both the 0.5-h and 3-h infusions), showed 3-log CFU/ml bacterial killing. Dosage regimens of 2.0 g with 0.5-h and 3-h infusions exhibited an obvious bactericidal effect and suppressed resistance. Selective amplification of subpopulations with reduced susceptibility to meropenem was suppressed with a percentage of the dosage interval in which meropenem concentrations exceeded the MPC (T>MPC) of ≥20% or with a ratio of T>MPC to the percentage of the dosage interval in which drug concentrations are within the mutant selection window of ≥0.25. Our in vitro data support the use of a high dosage of meropenem (2.0 g q8h) for the treatment of severe infection caused by CS-MDRAB. PMID:25182633

  10. Intravenous Infusion of Monocytes Isolated from 2-Week-Old Mice Enhances Clearance of Beta-Amyloid Plaques in an Alzheimer Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Hohsfield, Lindsay A.; Humpel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by the deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ) senile plaques and tau-associated neurofibrillary tangles. Other disease features include neuroinflammation and cholinergic neurodegeneration, indicating their possible importance in disease propagation. Recent studies have shown that monocytic cells can migrate into the AD brain toward Aβ plaques and reduce plaque burden. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the administration of intravenous infusions of ‘young’ CD11b-positive (+) monocytes into an AD mouse model can enhance Aβ plaque clearance and attenuate cognitive deficits. Peripheral monocytes were isolated from two-week-old wildtype mice using the Pluriselect CD11b+ isolation method and characterized by FACS analysis for surface marker expression and effective phagocytosis of 1 μm fluorescent microspheres, FITC-Dextran or FITC-Aβ1–42. The isolated monocytes were infused via the tail vein into a transgenic AD mouse model, which expresses the Swedish, Dutch/Iowa APP mutations (APPSwDI). The infusions began when animals reached 5 months of age, when little plaque deposition is apparent and were repeated again at 6 and 7 months of age. At 8 months of age, brains were analyzed for Aβ+ plaques, inflammatory processes and microglial (Iba1) activation. Our data show that infusions of two-week-old CD11b+ monocytes into adult APPSwDI mice results in a transient improvement of memory function, a reduction (30%) in Aβ plaque load and significantly in small (<20 μm) and large (>40 μm) plaques. In addition, we observe a reduction in Iba1+ cells, as well as no marked elevations in cytokine levels or other indicators of inflammation. Taken together, our findings indicate that young CD11b+ monocytes may serve as therapeutic candidates for improved Aβ clearance in AD. PMID:25830951

  11. The effect of intravenous insulin infusion on renal blood flow in conscious sheep is partially mediated by nitric oxide but not by prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Tebot, I; Bonnet, J-M; Paquet, C; Ayoub, J-Y; Da Silva, S M; Louzier, V; Cirio, A

    2012-04-01

    To test the effect of insulin on renal perfusion and the participation of NO and PG as mediators of this response, renal blood flow (RBF) was measured in sheep (n = 8) implanted with ultrasonic flow probes around renal arteries and with a systemic arterial pressure (SAP, n = 4) telemetry device. Three protocols were performed: 1) RBF and SAP were recorded (0800 to 1800 h) in fed and fasted sheep, with the latter receiving intravenous (i.v.) infusions (0.5 mL/min) of insulin at 2 or 6 mU/(kg·min); 2) fasted sheep received i.v. infusions of either an inhibitor of NO synthesis (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, L-NAME) alone [0.22 mg/(kg·min), 1000 to 1200 h] or L-NAME (1000 to 1200 h) + insulin during the second hour (6 mU/(kg·min), 1100 to 1200 h); and 3) the same protocol was followed as in protocol 2, substituting L-NAME with ketoprofen [0.2 mg/(kg·min)], a cyclooxygenase inhibitor. In all protocols, plasma insulin and glucose were determined. During insulin administration, euglycemia was maintained and hypokalemia was prevented by infusing glucose and KCl solutions. After the onset of meals, a long-lasting 18% increase in RBF and a 48% insulin increase were observed (P < 0.05), without changes in SAP. Low- and high-dose insulin infusions increased RBF by 19 and 40%, respectively (P < 0.05). As after meals, the increases in RBF lasted longer than the insulin increase (P < 0.05). The L-NAME infusion decreased RBF by 15% (P < 0.05); when insulin was added, RBF increased to preinfusion values. Ketoprofen decreased RBF by 9% (P < 0.05); when insulin was added, RBF increased to 13% above preinfusion values (P < 0.05). In no case was a modification in SAP or glucose noted during the RBF changes. In conclusion, insulin infusion mimics the meal-dependent increase in RBF, independent of SAP, and lasts longer than the blood insulin plateau. The RBF increase induced by insulin was only partially prevented by L-NAME. Ketoprofen failed to prevent the insulin

  12. No antidotal effect of intravenous lipid emulsion in experimental amitriptyline intoxication despite significant entrapment of amitriptyline.

    PubMed

    Litonius, Erik; Niiya, Tomohisa; Neuvonen, Pertti J; Rosenberg, Per H

    2012-04-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsion has been used in the resuscitative treatment of intoxications caused by local anaesthetics and tricyclic antidepressants with seemingly beneficial results. We studied the effect of intravenous lipid emulsion on the plasma concentration of amitriptyline and haemodynamic recovery in a pig model of amitriptyline intoxication. Twenty pigs were anaesthetized (1% isoflurane in 21% O(2)) and given amitriptyline 15 mg/kg intravenously for 15 min. In random fashion immediately thereafter, either 20% lipid emulsion (ClinOleic(®), Lipid group) or Ringer's acetate (Control group) was infused for 30 min.; first 1.5 ml/kg for 1 min., followed by 0.25 ml/kg/min. for 29 min. The amitriptyline concentration in total and lipid-poor plasma and haemodynamic parameters were measured until 30 min. after the infusions. Lipid infusion prevented the decrease in plasma total amitriptyline concentration, resulting in a 90% higher (p < 0.001) total concentration and significantly (p = 0.014) lower free fraction of plasma amitriptyline in the Lipid group (1.1%) compared with the Control group (3.0%) at 30 min. Haemodynamic recovery from the intoxication as measured by heart rate, arterial pressure or cardiac output was similar in both groups. However, five pigs in the Lipid group and two pigs in the Control group died. In conclusion, a marked entrapment of amitriptyline by intravenous lipid emulsion was observed but this did not improve the pigs' haemodynamic recovery from severe amitriptyline intoxication. Care should be exercised in the antidotal use of lipid emulsion until controlled human studies indicate its efficacy and safety.

  13. Intravenous infusion of H2-saline suppresses oxidative stress and elevates antioxidant potential in Thoroughbred horses after racing exercise.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masahiko; Kusano, Kanichi; Ishibashi, Toru; Kiuchi, Masataka; Koyama, Katsuhiro

    2015-10-23

    Upon intensive, exhaustive exercise, exercise-induced reactive oxygen species may exceed the antioxidant defence threshold, consequently resulting in muscular damage or late-onset chronic inflammation. Recently, the therapeutic antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of molecular hydrogen (H2) for human rheumatoid arthritis have been demonstrated. However, it is also important to clarify the effects of administrating H2 in large animals other than humans, as H2 is thought to reach the target organ by passive diffusion upon delivery from the blood flow, indicating that the distance from the administration point to the target is critical. However, data on the effects of H2 on oxidative stress in real-life exhaustive exercise in large animals are currently lacking. We here investigated 13 Thoroughbred horses administered intravenous 2-L saline with or without 0.6-ppm H2 (placebo, N = 6; H2, N = 7) before participating in a high-intensity simulation race. Intravenous H2-saline significantly suppressed oxidative stress immediately, 3 h, and 24 h after the race, although the antioxidant capability was not affected throughout the study. The serum creatine kinase, lactate, and uric acid levels were increased in both groups. Taken together, these results indicate that intravenous H2-saline can significantly and specifically suppress oxidative stress induced after exhaustive racing in Thoroughbred horses.

  14. Intravenous infusion of H2-saline suppresses oxidative stress and elevates antioxidant potential in Thoroughbred horses after racing exercise

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Masahiko; Kusano, Kanichi; Ishibashi, Toru; Kiuchi, Masataka; Koyama, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Upon intensive, exhaustive exercise, exercise-induced reactive oxygen species may exceed the antioxidant defence threshold, consequently resulting in muscular damage or late-onset chronic inflammation. Recently, the therapeutic antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of molecular hydrogen (H2) for human rheumatoid arthritis have been demonstrated. However, it is also important to clarify the effects of administrating H2 in large animals other than humans, as H2 is thought to reach the target organ by passive diffusion upon delivery from the blood flow, indicating that the distance from the administration point to the target is critical. However, data on the effects of H2 on oxidative stress in real-life exhaustive exercise in large animals are currently lacking. We here investigated 13 Thoroughbred horses administered intravenous 2-L saline with or without 0.6-ppm H2 (placebo, N = 6; H2, N = 7) before participating in a high-intensity simulation race. Intravenous H2-saline significantly suppressed oxidative stress immediately, 3 h, and 24 h after the race, although the antioxidant capability was not affected throughout the study. The serum creatine kinase, lactate, and uric acid levels were increased in both groups. Taken together, these results indicate that intravenous H2-saline can significantly and specifically suppress oxidative stress induced after exhaustive racing in Thoroughbred horses. PMID:26493164

  15. A comparison of serum antivenom concentrations after intravenous and intramuscular administration of redback (widow) spider antivenom

    PubMed Central

    Isbister, Geoffrey K; O'Leary, Margaret; Miller, Mark; Brown, Simon G A; Ramasamy, Sharmaine; James, Rosemary; Schneider, Jennifer S

    2008-01-01

    AIMS There are no studies measuring antivenom concentrations following intramuscular administration. This study aimed to compare antivenom concentrations following intravenous and intramuscular administration of redback spider antivenom (RBSAV). METHODS Twenty patients recruited to a controlled trial comparing intramuscular and intravenous administration of antivenom had serial blood samples collected at 30 min intervals for 2 h after the administration of one or two doses of antivenom. Antivenom concentration was measured using an enzyme immunoassay. RESULTS Ten patients received intramuscular antivenom but antivenom could not be detected in serum after either one or two vials, at any time point. The median time of the final sample after commencement of antivenom treatment in these patients was 3.2 h (1.8–5 h). Ten patients received intravenous antivenom (three one vial and seven two or more vials) and antivenom was detected in all patients. CONCLUSIONS RBS AV given by the intramuscular route is unlikely to be effective in the treatment of redback (widow) spider bite. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT Widow spider antivenoms, including redback spider antivenom, are often given by the intramuscular route. No studies have measured widow spider antivenom following intramuscular or intravenous antivenom. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS Intramuscular redback spider antivenom is not detectable in serum for at least 3–5 h after treatment. Intravenous antivenom is detectable 30 min after intravenous infusion. Intramuscular antivenom may not be an effective administration route. PMID:18171334

  16. The effect of intravenous magnesium sulfate infusion on reduction of pain after abdominal hysterectomy under general anesthesia: a double-blind, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Jarahzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Harati, Sina Taghizadeh; Babaeizadeh, Hamideh; Yasaei, Elahe; Bashar, Farshid Rahimi

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-surgical pain is a physiological response to tissue trauma that produces unpleasant physiological effects with manifestations on various organic systems. Objective According to the effect of magnesium sulfate on the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, this study examined the effect of magnesium sulfate on the reduction of pain and the mean amount of narcotics consumed by patients after abdominal hysterectomies. Methods This double-blind clinical trial study was performed on 60 patients who had undergone abdominal hysterectomies in Shahid Sadoughi Hospital in Yazd, Iran, from 2013 to 2015. The patients were divided randomly into two groups of 30 members each. All of the patients received 2 mg of Midazolam and 2 mcg/kg of Fentanyl as the induction of anesthesia with propofol (2–2.5 mg/kg) and Atracurium 0.5 mg/kg was conducted. All of the patients received 5 mg of intravenous morphine 30 min after induction of anesthesia. Afterwards, the study group received 50 mg/kg of magnesium sulfate in 500 cm3 of Ringer’s serum during the 20 minutes, and 500 cm3 of Ringer’s serum was administered to the members of the placebo group. Visual analogue scale VAS scores were evaluated to reach the minimum difference of 0.8 in mean pain score Results The results of this study indicated that the mean pain scores immediately after surgery and at 1, 2, 6, and 12 hr after surgery were lower in the study group than in the placebo group. The mean value of narcotic consumption at all measured time points was higher in the placebo group. No significant differences were found between two groups concerning drug complications. Conclusion The results of this study indicated that the intravenous injection of magnesium sulfate can reduce pain, reduce morphine consumption, and reduce the side effects of morphine in patients after surgery. Funding This study was funded by Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran Clinical trial registration The trial was

  17. A Comparison of Oxycodone and Alfentanil in Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia with a Time-Scheduled Decremental Infusion after Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Suk; Jang, Ji Su; Lee, Na Rea; Kim, Seong Su; Kim, Young Ki; Hwang, Byeong Mun; Kang, Seong Sik; Son, Hee Jeong; Lim, So Young

    2016-01-01

    Background. Oxycodone, a semisynthetic opioid, has been widely used for acute and chronic pain. Objectives. The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic and adverse effects of oxycodone and alfentanil on postoperative pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods. This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind study. A total of 82 patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly assigned to receive either oxycodone or alfentanil using intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). PCA was administered as a time-scheduled decremental continuous infusion based on lean body mass for 48 hours postoperatively. Patients were assessed for pain with a visual analogue scale (VAS), the cumulative PCA dose, adverse effects, sedation level at 1, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, and satisfaction during the postoperative 48 hours. Results. There were no significant differences (p < 0.05) between the two groups in VAS score, cumulative PCA dose, adverse effects, sedation level at 1, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, and satisfaction during the postoperative 48 hours. Conclusions. Our data showed that the analgesic and adverse effects of oxycodone and alfentanil were similar. Therefore, oxycodone may be a good alternative to alfentanil for pain management using intravenous PCA after laparoscopic cholecystectomy when used at a conversion ratio of 10 : 1. This trial is registered with KCT0001962.

  18. A Comparison of Oxycodone and Alfentanil in Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia with a Time-Scheduled Decremental Infusion after Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ji Su; Kim, Seong Su; Kim, Young Ki; Hwang, Byeong Mun; Kang, Seong Sik; Son, Hee Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Background. Oxycodone, a semisynthetic opioid, has been widely used for acute and chronic pain. Objectives. The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic and adverse effects of oxycodone and alfentanil on postoperative pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods. This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind study. A total of 82 patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly assigned to receive either oxycodone or alfentanil using intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). PCA was administered as a time-scheduled decremental continuous infusion based on lean body mass for 48 hours postoperatively. Patients were assessed for pain with a visual analogue scale (VAS), the cumulative PCA dose, adverse effects, sedation level at 1, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, and satisfaction during the postoperative 48 hours. Results. There were no significant differences (p < 0.05) between the two groups in VAS score, cumulative PCA dose, adverse effects, sedation level at 1, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, and satisfaction during the postoperative 48 hours. Conclusions. Our data showed that the analgesic and adverse effects of oxycodone and alfentanil were similar. Therefore, oxycodone may be a good alternative to alfentanil for pain management using intravenous PCA after laparoscopic cholecystectomy when used at a conversion ratio of 10 : 1. This trial is registered with KCT0001962. PMID:27725791

  19. Oligodeoxynucleotide CpG 7909 delivered as intravenous infusion demonstrates immunologic modulation in patients with previously treated non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Link, Brian K; Ballas, Zuhair K; Weisdorf, Daniel; Wooldridge, James E; Bossler, Aaron D; Shannon, Mary; Rasmussen, Wendy L; Krieg, Arthur M; Weiner, George J

    2006-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides containing CpG motifs (CpG ODN) can alter various immune cell subsets important in antibody therapy of malignancy. We undertook a phase I trial of CPG 7909 (also known as PF-3512676) in patients with previously treated lymphoma with the primary objective of evaluating safety across a range of doses, and secondary objectives of evaluating immunomodulatory effects and clinical effects. Twenty-three patients with previously treated non-Hodgkin lymphoma received up to 3 weekly 2-hour intravenous (IV) infusions of CPG ODN 7909 at dose levels 0.01 to 0.64 mg/kg. Evaluation of immunologic parameters and clinical endpoints occurred for 6 weeks. Infusion-related toxicity included grade 1 nausea, hypotension, and IV catheter discomfort. Serious adverse hematologic events observed more than once included anemia (2=Gr3, 2=Gr4), thrombocytopenia (4=Gr3), and neutropenia (2=Gr3), and were largely judged owing to progressive disease. Immunologic observations included: (1) The mean ratio of NK-cell concentrations compared with pretreatment at day 2 was 1.44 (95% CI=0.94-1.94) and at day 42 was 1.53 (95% CI=1.14-1.91); (2) NK activity generally increased in subjects; and (3) Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity activity increased in select cohorts. No clinical responses were documented radiographically at day 42. Two subjects demonstrated late response. We conclude CpG 7909 can be safely given as a 2-hour IV infusion to patients with previously treated non-Hodgkin lymphoma at doses that have immunomodulatory effects.

  20. Anesthetic efficacy of a repeated intraosseous injection given 30 min following an inferior alveolar nerve block/intraosseous injection.

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, J.; Reader, A.; Nist, R.; Beck, M.; Meyers, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    To determine whether a repeated intraosseous (IO) injection would increase or prolong pulpal anesthesia, we measured the degree of anesthesia obtained by a repeated IO injection given 30 min following a combination inferior alveolar nerve block/intraosseous injection (IAN/IO) in mandibular second premolars and in first and second molars. Using a repeated-measures design, we randomly assigned 38 subjects to receive two combinations of injections at two separate appointments. The combinations were an IAN/IO injection followed approximately 30 min later by another IO injection of 0.9 ml of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine and a combination IAN/IO injection followed approximately 30 min later by a mock IO injection. The second premolar, first molar, and second molar were blindly tested with an Analytic Technology pulp tester at 2-min cycles for 120 min postinjection. Anesthesia was considered successful when two consecutive readings of 80 were obtained. One hundred percent of the subjects had lip numbness with IAN/IO and with IAN/IO plus repeated IO techniques. Rates of anesthetic success for the IAN/IO and for the IAN/IO plus repeated IO injection, respectively, were 100% and 97% for the second premolar, 95% and 95% for the first molar, and 87% and 87% for the second molar. The repeated IO injection increased pulpal anesthesia for approximately 14 min in the second premolar and for 6 min in the first molar, but no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05) were shown. In conclusion, the repeated IO injection of 0.9 ml of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine given 30 min following a combination IAN/IO injection did not significantly increase pulpal anesthesia in mandibular second premolars or in first and second molars. PMID:10483386

  1. Changing the 30-min Rule in Canada: The Effect of Room Temperature on Bacterial Growth in Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Arcos, Sandra; Kou, Yuntong; Ducas, Éric; Thibault, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Background To maintain product quality and safety, the ‘30-min rule’ requires the discard of red blood cells (RBCs) that are exposed to uncontrolled temperatures for more than 30 min. Recent studies suggest this rule may safely be extended to a 60-min rule. Methods A pool-and-split design study (N = 4) was run in parallel at Canadian Blood Services (SAGM RBCs) and Héma-Québec (AS-3 RBCs). RBCs were spiked with ∼1 colony-forming unit/ml of mesophilic and psychrophilic bacteria. Control units remained in storage at 1-6 °C for 42 days. Test 30 (T30) and T60 units were exposed to room temperature (RT) six times during storage, each time for 30 and 60 min, respectively. Bacterial proliferation was monitored. Results Mesophilic bacteria do not proliferate in RBCs. The growth of psychrophilic bacteria is not significantly different in RBCs exposed for 30 or 60 min to RT (p < 0.05). Conclusion The study findings were the final evidence to support extension from a 30-min rule to a 60-min rule in Canada. PMID:27994525

  2. Effects of continuous rate intravenous infusion of butorphanol on physiologic and outcome variables in horses after celiotomy.

    PubMed

    Sellon, Debra C; Roberts, Malcolm C; Blikslager, Anthony T; Ulibarri, Catherine; Papich, Mark G

    2004-01-01

    A randomized, controlled, blinded clinical trial was performed to determine whether butorphanol administered by continuous rate infusion (CRI) for 24 hours after abdominal surgery would decrease pain and surgical stress responses and improve recovery in horses. Thirty-one horses undergoing exploratory celiotomy for abdominal pain were randomly assigned to receive butorphanol CRI (13 microg/kg/h for 24 hours after surgery; treatment) or isotonic saline (control). All horses received flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg IV q12h). There were no significant differences between treatment and control horses in preoperative or operative variables. Treatment horses had significantly lower plasma cortisol concentration compared with control horses at 2, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after surgery. Mean weight loss while hospitalized was significantly less for treatment horses than control horses, whether expressed as total decrease in body weight (13.9+/-3.4 and 27.9+/-4.5 kg, respectively) or as a percentage decrease in body weight (2.6+/-0.7 and 6.3+/-1.1%, respectively). Treatment horses were significantly delayed in time to first passage of feces (median times of 15 and 4 hours, respectively). Treatment horses had significantly improved behavior scores during the first 24 hours after surgery, consistent with the conclusion that they experienced less pain during that time. Butorphanol CRI during the immediate postoperative period significantly decreased plasma cortisol concentrations and improved recovery characteristics in horses undergoing abdominal surgery.

  3. Intravenous infusion of magnesium sulphate during subarachnoid anaesthesia in hip surgery and its effect on postoperative analgesia: our experience.

    PubMed

    Pastore, A; Lanna, M; Lombardo, N; Policastro, C; Iacovazzo, C

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of degenerative hip joint disease involves modern operative techniques and the use of prosthetic devices individualized on each patient. Being a surgery of considerable importance, great attention is always given by the anaesthesiologist to postoperative analgesia. In general, our goal is to limit the doses of NSAIDs, known to be associated with haemostasis interference and alteration of gastrointestinal apparatus; component of our baseline analgesic protocols after arthroplasty is morphine given parenterally. In order to steadily improve analgesic techniques, which directly impact on patient outcome, we experimented the use of a continuous infusion of magnesium sulphate during subarachnoid anaesthesia. Magnesium sulphate is the drug of choice in case of eclampsia, and pre-eclampsia (for the risk of evolution in eclampsia). According to the most recent findings, this drug has also analgesic properties: its use as an adjunct to analgesia is based on a non-competitive antagonism towards the NMDA receptor and on the blocking of calcium channels: these properties prevent the mechanisms of central sensitization due to nociceptive stimulation of peripheral nerves.

  4. Intravenous paracetamol infusion: Superior pain management and earlier discharge from hospital in patients undergoing palliative head-neck cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Saikat; Das, Anjan; Kundu, Ratul; Mukherjee, Dipankar; Hazra, Bimal; Mitra, Tapobrata

    2014-01-01

    Background: Paracetamol; a cyclooxygenase inhibitor; acts through the central nervous system as well as serotoninergic system as a nonopioid analgesic. A prospective, double-blinded, and randomized-controlled study was carried out to compare the efficacy of preoperative 1g intravenous (iv) paracetamol with placebo in providing postoperative analgesia in head-neck cancer surgery. Materials and Methods: From 2008 February to 2009 December, 80 patients for palliative head-neck cancer surgery were randomly divided into (F) and (P) Group receiving ivplacebo and iv paracetamol, respectively, 5 min before induction. Everybody received fentanyl before induction and IM diclofenac for pain relief at8 hourly for 24 h after surgery. Visual analogue scale (VAS) and amount of fentanyl were measured for postoperative pain assessment (24 h). Results and Statistical analysis: The mean VAS score in 1st, 2nd postoperative hour, and fentanyl requirement was less and the need for rescue analgesic was delayed in ivparacetamol group which were all statistically significant. Paracetamol group had a shorter surgical intensive care unit (SICU) and hospital stay which was also statistically significant. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the effectiveness of ivparacetamol as preemptive analgesic in the postoperative pain control after head-neck cancer surgery and earlier discharge from hospital. PMID:25276627

  5. Biochemical and clinical evaluation of the efficiency of intracervical extraamniotic prostaglandin F2 alpha and intravenous oxytocin infusion to induce labour at term.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, K; Rechberger, T; Oleszczuk, J; Jakowicki, J; Oleszczuk, J

    1994-08-01

    A prospective randomized study of 296 patients was undertaken to evaluate the efficiency of 15 mg prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) suspended in tylose gel and applied intracervically for labour induction. The control group was treated with standard oxytocin intravenous infusion. Results indicated that local PGF2 alpha was superior to oxytocin therapy in shortening the duration of labour (6.3 +/- 2.3 versus 8.1 +/- 2.6 hours, p < 0.05). Only 19% of the patients treated with PGF2 alpha required oxytocin augmentation during labour. Our data suggest that PGF2 alpha treatment is associated with few maternal side-effects, few failed inductions, a low operative delivery rate and favourable neonatal outcome. To investigate the influence of PGF2 alpha for labour promotion we have measured interstitial collagenase and elastase activity in the lower uterine segment after both methods of labour induction. The total collagenase activity was 22 times higher in tissue samples obtained from patients in active spontaneous and oxytocin-induced labour, compared with women not in labour (at term) (p < 0.001). The total interstitial elastase activity was 2-fold higher in women in active labour than in patients at term (p < 0.03). A significantly higher collagenase and elastase activity was observed in uterine specimens obtained from patients treated with PGF2 alpha compared to oxytocin, and this indicates that cervical collagen may be digested more quickly in the presence of exogenous prostaglandin F2 alpha.

  6. Comparison of high-dose and low-dose insulin by continuous intravenous infusion in the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis in children.

    PubMed

    Burghen, G A; Etteldorf, J N; Fisher, J N; Kitabchi, A Q

    1980-01-01

    We studied the efficacy of low-dose (0.1 U/kg/h) and high-dose (1..0 U/kg/h) insulin, given randomly to children with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) by continuous intravenous infusion without a loading dose. Plasma glucose reached 250 mg/dl in 3.4 +/- 0.4 h with the high-dose insulin group compared with 5.4 +/- 0.5 h with the low-dose insulin group (P < 0.01). During the first 12 h of therapy, plasma glucose fell below 100 mg/dl in 2 of 16 in the low-dose compared with 12 of 16 in the high-dose patients. The decrement of ketone bodies, cortisol, and glucagon was similar in both groups. The number of hours required for HCO3(-) greater than or equal to meq/l and arterial blood pH greater than or equal to 7.30 were not significantly different in the two groups. Hypokalemia (K < 3.4 meq/L) occurred in 3 of 16 low-dose and 10 of 16 high-dose patients. The data show that low-dose insulin, with a slower rate of glucose decrease, is as effective as a high dose for the treatment of DKA in children with less incidence of hypokalemia and decreased potential for hypoglycemia.

  7. Effects of intravenous infusions of commercial fat emulsions (Intralipid 10 or 20%) on rat plasma lipoproteins: phospholipids in excess are the main precursors of lipoprotein-X-like particles.

    PubMed

    Hajri, T; Férézou, J; Lutton, C

    1990-11-12

    Like most commercial parenteral emulsions, Intralipid contains the same amount of phospholipids (12 mg/ml) to stabilize 100 or 200 mg of soybean oil (10 or 20% formula, respectively). By centrifugation, 10 or 20% Intralipid was separated into a supernatant, fat particles containing the bulk of triacylglycerols stabilized by a fraction of phospholipids and an infranatant--called mesophase--consisting mainly of phospholipids used in excess as emulsifier. We observed that the initial triacylglycerol/phospholipid ratio of the emulsion (100/12 and 200/12, respectively) determines the size of the triacylglycerol-rich particles (260 and 350 nm) as well as the phospholipid content of the mesophase (6.02 and 4.67 mg/ml). To understand the mechanism of the lipoprotein-X (LPX) accumulation generally reported after intravenous fat infusions, plasma lipid levels and lipoprotein profiles were first compared in the rats after infusion (at a constant rate of 0.5 or 1 ml/h for 43 h) of Intralipid 10 or 20%. For the same intravenous triacylglycerol load (100 mg/h), rats infused with Intralipid 10% at 1 ml/h displayed higher triacylglycerol levels than rats infused with the 20% emulsion at 0.5 ml/h, suggesting that the size of exogenous fat particles modulated the catabolic rate of their triacylglycerols. The plasma levels of LPX varied according to the infusion rate of phospholipids not associated with triacylglycerol-rich particles of the emulsion. Moreover, an apo E and apo B enrichment of plasma and an elevation of the apo B48/apo B100 ratio was always observed after Intralipid infusions. In order to confirm that phospholipids of the mesophase are the main LPX precursors, lipoprotein profiles were then compared in the rats after intravenous infusion, at a constant rate of 1 ml/h, of either the mesophase or a suspension of triacylglycerol-rich particles isolated from Intralipid 20%. As expected, significant LPX amounts were only detected in rats infused with the pure mesophase of

  8. Intravenous iron in a primary-care clinic.

    PubMed

    Maslovsky, I

    2005-04-01

    The preferable route of iron delivery for most iron-deficient patients is oral. Parenteral iron therapy is used in patients who cannot tolerate oral iron or in cases in which oral iron is not sufficiently effective. The most frequent indications for parenteral iron therapy are unbearable gastrointestinal side effects induced by oral iron itself, worsening of inflammatory bowel disease symptoms, insufficient intestinal absorption, renal failure-caused anemia that is treated with erythropoietin, and unresolved ongoing bleeding, which would cause the acceptable oral doses of iron therapy to be exceeded. The serious adverse effects of iron dextran that was used in the past could explain the reluctance of medical personnel to prescribe this effective treatment. Patients with iron deficiency anemia were treated with intravenous iron in a primary care clinic. The iron gluconate was given in a dosage of 62.5 mg diluted in 150 mL of normal saline and was infused intravenously over 30 min, while iron sucrose was given in a dosage of 100 mg diluted in the same volume of normal saline and given at the same rate. In total, 724 infusions were administered to 57 patients. Iron sucrose was used in 628 infusions, and iron gluconate was used in the remaining 96. The frequency of the infusion treatments depended on the underlying disease and ranged from three times a week to once a month. Adverse effects were seldom observed and were minor in patients receiving iron gluconate, and were not registered at all in patients treated with iron sucrose. Two cases of flushing with paresthesias occurred. Slowing the infusion rate successfully eliminated these side effects. One case of hypotension was treated successfully with 500 cc of normal saline infusion. One case of dropout occurred, due to the patient's refusal to cooperate. No anaphylactic reactions were observed. Iron gluconate and iron sucrose are effective and safe for use in primary care clinics. The risk of adverse effects is low.

  9. Efficacy of subpleural continuous infusion of local anesthetics after thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer compared to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Joonho; Haam, Seokjin

    2016-01-01

    Background This study compared the efficacy and side effects of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) with those of a subpleural continuous infusion of local anesthetic (ON-Q system) in patients undergoing thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 66 patients who underwent thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer from January 2014 to August 2015 (36 in the IV-PCA group and 30 in the ON-Q group). The numeric pain intensity scale (NPIS), additional IV injections for pain control, side effects, and early discontinuation of the pain control device were compared. Results There were no differences in the general characteristics of the two groups. The NPIS scores gradually decreased with time (P<0.001), but the two groups had differences in pattern of NPIS scores (P=0.111). There were no differences in the highest NPIS score during admission (4.75±2.35 vs. 5.27±1.87, P=0.334) or the number of additional IV injections for pain control in the same period (0.72±0.94 for IV-PCA vs. 0.83±0.65 for ON-Q; P=0.575). Side effects such as nausea, dizziness, and drowsiness were significantly more frequent with IV-PCA (36.1% vs. 10.0%, P=0.014), and early discontinuation of the pain control device was more frequent in the IV-PCA group (33.3% vs. 6.7%, P=0.008). Conclusions The ON-Q system was equivalent to the IV-PCA for postoperative pain control after thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer, and it also had fewer effects and early discontinuations. PMID:27499973

  10. Role of capsaicin-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons in anorexic responses to intravenous infusions of cholecystokinin, peptide YY-(3-36), and glucagon-like peptide-1 in rats.

    PubMed

    Reidelberger, Roger; Haver, Alvin; Anders, Krista; Apenteng, Bettye

    2014-10-15

    Cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced suppression of feeding is mediated by vagal sensory neurons that are destroyed by the neurotoxin capsaicin (CAP). Here we determined whether CAP-sensitive neurons mediate anorexic responses to intravenous infusions of gut hormones peptide YY-(3-36) [PYY-(3-36)] and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Rats received three intraperitoneal injections of CAP or vehicle (VEH) in 24 h. After recovery, non-food-deprived rats received at dark onset a 3-h intravenous infusion of CCK-8 (5, 17 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹), PYY-(3-36) (5, 17, 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹), or GLP-1 (17, 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹). CCK-8 was much less effective in reducing food intake in CAP vs. VEH rats. CCK-8 at 5 and 17 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ reduced food intake during the 3-h infusion period by 39 and 71% in VEH rats and 7 and 18% in CAP rats. In contrast, PYY-(3-36) and GLP-1 were similarly effective in reducing food intake in VEH and CAP rats. PYY-(3-36) at 5, 17, and 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ reduced food intake during the 3-h infusion period by 15, 33, and 70% in VEH rats and 13, 30, and 33% in CAP rats. GLP-1 at 17 and 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ reduced food intake during the 3-h infusion period by 48 and 60% in VEH rats and 30 and 52% in CAP rats. These results suggest that anorexic responses to PYY-(3-36) and GLP-1 are not primarily mediated by the CAP-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons (presumably vagal) that mediate CCK-8-induced anorexia.

  11. Effects of Gender on Stroke Rates, Critical Speed and Velocity of A 30-Min Swim in Young Swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Camila C.; Pelarigo, Jailton G.; Figueira, Tiago R.; Denadai, Benedito S.

    2007-01-01

    Our objective was to analyze the effect of gender on the relationship between stroke rates corresponding to critical speed (SRCS) and maximal speed of 30 min (SRS30) in young swimmers. Twenty two males (GM1) (Age = 15.4 ± 2.1 yr., Body mass = 63.7 ± 12.9 kg, Stature = 1.73 ± 0.09 m) and fourteen female (GF) swimmers (Age = 15.1 ± 1.6 yr., Body mass = 58.3 ± 8.8 kg, Stature = 1.65 ± 0.06 m) were studied. A subset of males (GM2) was matched to the GF by their velocity for a 30 min swim (S30). The critical speed (CS) was determined through the slope of the linear regression line between the distances (200 and 400 m) and participant’s respective times. CS was significantly higher than S30 in males (GM1 - 1.25 and 1.16 and GM2 - 1.21 and 1.12 m·s-1) and females (GF - 1.15 and 1.11 m·s-1). There was no significant difference between SRCS and SRS30 in males (GM1 - 34.16 and 32.32 and GM2 - 34.67 and 32.46 cycle·s-1, respectively) and females (GF - 34.18 and 33.67 cycle·s-1, respectively). There was a significant correlation between CS and S30 (GM1 - r = 0.89, GF - r = 0.94 and GM2 - r = 0.90) and between SRCS and SRS30 (GM1 - r = 0.89, GF - r = 0.80 and GM2 - r = 0.88). Thus, the relationship between SRCS and SRS30 is not influenced by gender, in swimmers with similar and different aerobic capacity levels. Key pointsThe main finding of this study was that the relationship between SRCS and SRS30, which is not dependent on gender, in swimmers with similar and different aerobic capacity levels.In swimmers who had different S30 values, CS was higher than S30 in boys and girls, and CS and S30 were higher in boys than girls, but SRCS and SRS30 were similar between genders.In swimmers who had similar S30 values, CS was higher than S30 in boys and girls. However, boys still presented higher values of CS than girls. SRCS was higher than SRS30 in boys, but these variables were similar in girls. SRCS and SRS30 were similar between genders.Girls presented lower submaximal

  12. Cardiorespiratory and antinociceptive effects of two different doses of lidocaine administered to horses during a constant intravenous infusion of xylazine and ketamine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated the antinociceptive effects of a constant rate infusion (CRI) of lidocaine during xylazine and ketamine anesthesia in horses and aimed to correlate these effects with cardiorespiratory variables, bispectral index (BIS) and plasma lidocaine concentrations. Six adult crossbred mares weighing 320–400 kg were anesthetized on three different occasions. Sedation was performed with xylazine (0.75 mg/kg IV) and anesthetic induction with guaifenesin (75 mg/kg IV) and ketamine (2 mg/kg IV). Anesthesia was maintained with 37.5 μg/kg/min of xylazine and 87.5 μg/kg/min of ketamine both administered intravenously for 75 min. The three treatments consisted of: lidocaine (loading dose: 5 mg/kg, CRI: 100 μg/kg/min; THL); lidocaine (loading dose: 2.5 mg/kg; CRI: 50 μg/kg/min: TLL); and saline (TS); all given 15 min after induction and maintained for 1 h. Antinociception was measured by response to electrical stimulation and bispectral index (BIS) was recorded during anesthesia. Parametric and non-parametric data were compared using ANOVA followed by Student-Newman-Keuls and Friedman tests, respectively. Results Plasma lidocaine concentrations peaked at the end of lidocaine loading dose and was greater in THL (9.61 ± 2.75 μg/mL) vs TLL (4.50 ± 3.34 μg/mL). Electrical noxious stimulation caused purposeful movement in all horses from TS, but no response in THL. The BIS was decreased in THL only and was less when compared to the other treatments throughout anesthesia. Blood pressure, PaO2 and PaCO2 increased and heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), pH, total plasma protein and temperature decreased during anesthesia in all treatments. PaCO2 and HR were greater and RR and pH less in THL compared to TLL and TS at 30 min during anesthesia. All recoveries were considered excellent. Time to standing was longer after THL (60 ± 20 min) than following TLL and TS (32 ± 17 and 30 ± 15 min, respectively

  13. Effects of intravenous triacylglycerol emulsions on hepatic metabolism and blood metabolites in fasted dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Mashek, D G; Bertics, S J; Grummer, R R

    2005-01-01

    The objective was to determine the effects of intravenous infusion of triacylglycerol (TAG) emulsions derived from different lipid sources on energy metabolism during a 4-d fast. Six nonpregnant, nonlactating multiparous Holstein cows were randomly assigned to treatments in a replicated 3 x 3 Latin Square design. Treatments included intravenous infusion of tallow, linseed oil, or fish oil emulsions at a rate of 0.54 g of TAG/kg of body weight per day; infusions were concurrent with a 4-d fast. The emulsions were administered for 20 to 30 min every 4 h throughout the 4-d fast. Cows were fed ad libitum for 24 d between the fast/infusion periods. Infusion of tallow, linseed oil, or fish oil emulsions increased plasma concentrations of palmitic acid, linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, respectively. Infusion of linseed oil emulsion decreased plasma TAG concentrations compared with tallow and fish oil treatments, which were similar. Infusion of the tallow emulsion resulted in the highest concentrations of plasma nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA), insulin, and glucose, whereas the infusion derived from linseed oil had the lowest NEFA and beta-hydroxybutyric acid concentrations. The different TAG emulsions had no effect on total or peroxisomal oxidation of [1-(14C)]oleic acid in liver homogenates. Liver TAG content increased 12.0, 7.8, and 14.1 microg/microg of DNA during the fast for tallow, linseed oil, and fish oil treatments, respectively; linseed oil was different from fish oil and tended to be different from tallow.

  14. Synthesis and intravenous infusion into the rat of glyceryl bisacetoacetate, 1-acetoacetamido-2, 3-propane diol, and partially reduced glucosyl pentaacetoacetate.

    PubMed

    Birkhahn, R H; Clemens, R J; Hubbs, J C

    1997-07-01

    The efficacy of parenteral nutrition could be improved by finding a more effective energy source. Esters of short-chain fatty acids have exhibited some promise as alternatives to glucose. The present study reports on two new esters and one amide, each containing acetoacetate as the organic acid. The three compounds: glyceryl bisacetoacetate, N-2',3'-dihydroxypropyl-3-oxo-butanamide (1-acetoacetamido-2,3-propane diol), and partially reduced glucosyl pentaacetoacetate, were synthesized and then continuously infused into rats for 7 d. The infusion rate provided 50% of the rats' estimated metabolic energy requirements, and rats were fed with a reduced-energy oral diet that provided the remaining 50% of energy plus adequate protein. Rat groups for each compound were: (1) experimental-compound-infused and ad libitum-fed, (2) isoenergetic glucose-infused and pairfed, and (3) saline infused and pair-fed. Body-weight changes, N losses and N retention were measured daily. All rats died from partially reduced glucosyl pentaacetoacetate infusion at 100% and 50% of the intended rate. Rats infused with 1-acetoacetamido-2,3-propane diol failed to gain weight and to increase the plasma ketone-body concentration. Glyceryl bisacetoacetate produced hyperketonaemia, and weight gain and N variables that were similar to those for glucose-infused rats. It was concluded that only glyceryl bisacetoacetate would make a satisfactory parenteral nutrient.

  15. Tomographic imaging of the shallow crustal structure of the East Pacific Rise at 9 deg 30 min N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomey, Douglas R.; Solomon, Sean C.; Purdy, G. M.

    1994-12-01

    Compressional wave travel times from a seismic tomography experiment at 9 deg 30 min N on the East Pacific Rise are analyzed by a new tomographic method to determine the three-dimensional seismic velocity structure of the upper 2.5 km of oceanic crust within a 20 x 18 km area centered on the rise axis. The data comprise the travel times and associated uncertainties of 1459 compressional waves that have propagated above the axial magma chamber. A careful analysis of source and receiver parameters, in conjunction with an automated method of picking P wave onsets and assigning uncertainties, constrains the prior uncertainty in the data to 5 to 20 ms. The new tomographic method employs graph theory to estimate ray paths and travel times through strongly heterogeneous and densely parameterized seismic velocity models. The nonlinear inverse method uses a jumping strategy to minimize a functional that includes the penalty function, horizontal and vertical smoothing constraints, and prior model assumptions; all constraints applied to model perturbations are normalized to remove bias. We use the tomographic method to reject the null hypothesis that the axial seismic structure is two-dimensional. Three-dimensional models reveal a seismic structure that correlates well with cross- and along-axis variations in seafloor morphology, the location of the axial summit caldera, and the distribution of seafloor hydrothermal activity. The along-axis segmentation of the seismic structure above the axial magma chamber is consistent with the hypothesis that mantle-derived melt is preferentially injected midway along a locally linear segment of the rise and that the architecture of the crustal section is characterized by an en echelon series of elongate axial volcanoes approximately 10 km in length. The seismic data are compatible with a 300- to 500-m-thick thermal anomaly above a midcrustal melt lens; such an interpretation suggests that hydrothermal fluids may not have penetrated this

  16. Individual variability in cardiac biomarker release after 30 min of high-intensity rowing in elite and amateur athletes.

    PubMed

    Legaz-Arrese, Alejandro; López-Laval, Isaac; George, Keith; Puente-Lanzarote, Juan José; Moliner-Urdiales, Diego; Ayala-Tajuelo, Vicente Javier; Mayolas-Pi, Carmen; Reverter-Masià, Joaquín

    2015-09-01

    This study had two objectives: (i) to examine individual variation in the pattern of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) release in response to high-intensity rowing exercise, and (ii) to establish whether individual heterogeneity in biomarker appearance was influenced by athletic status (elite vs. amateur). We examined cTnI and NT-proBNP in 18 elite and 14 amateur rowers before and 5 min, 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h after a 30-min maximal rowing test. Compared with pre-exercise levels, peak postexercise cTnI (pre: 0.014 ± 0.030 μg·L(-1); peak post: 0.058 ± 0.091 μg·L(-1); p = 0.000) and NT-proBNP (pre: 15 ± 11 ng·L(-1); peak post: 31 ± 19 ng·L(-1); p = 0.000) were elevated. Substantial individual heterogeneity in peak and time-course data was noted for cTnI. Peak cTnI exceeded the upper reference limit (URL) in 9 elite and 3 amateur rowers. No rower exceeded the URL for NT-proBNP. Elite rowers had higher baseline (0.019 ± 0.038 vs. 0.008 ± 0.015 μg·L(-1); p = 0.003) and peak postexercise cTnI (0.080 ± 0.115 vs. 0.030 ± 0.029 μg·L(-1); p = 0.022) than amateur rowers, but the change with exercise was similar between groups. There were no significant differences in baseline and peak postexercise NT-proBNP between groups. In summary, marked individuality in the cTnI response to a short but high-intensity rowing bout was observed. Athletic status did not seem to affect the change in cardiac biomarkers in response to high-intensity exercise.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and safety study of posaconazole intravenous solution administered peripherally to healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kersemaekers, Wendy M; van Iersel, Thijs; Nassander, Ulla; O'Mara, Edward; Waskin, Hetty; Caceres, Maria; van Iersel, Marlou L P S

    2015-02-01

    This study evaluated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of a posaconazole i.v. (intravenous) solution. This was a single-center, 2-part, randomized, rising single- and multiple-dose study in healthy adults. In part 1, subjects received 0 (vehicle), 50, 100, 200, 250, or 300 mg posaconazole in a single dose i.v. by 30-min peripheral infusion (6 cohorts of 12 subjects each [9 active and 3 placebo], making a total of 72 subjects). Blood samples were collected until 168 h postdose. In part 2, subjects were to receive 2 peripheral infusions at a 12-h interval on day 1 followed by once-daily infusion for 9 days. However, part 2 was terminated early because of high rates of infusion site reactions with multiple dosing at the same infusion site. The pharmacokinetics results for part 1 (n=45 subjects) showed that the mean posaconazole exposure (area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity [AUC0-∞]) ranged from 4,890 to 46,400 ng · h/ml (range of coefficient of variation values, 26 to 50). The dose-proportionality slope estimate (90% confidence interval) for AUC0-∞ was 1.30 (1.19 to 1.41), indicating a greater-than-dose-proportional increase. The data for safety in part 1 show that 29/72 subjects had ≥1 adverse event. Infusion site reactions were reported in 2/9 vehicle subjects, 0/18 placebo subjects, and 7/45 i.v. posaconazole subjects. The data for safety in part 2 show that infusion site reactions were reported in 1/4 (25%) placebo subjects, 3/9 (33%) vehicle control subjects, and 4/5 (80%) i.v. posaconazole (100 mg) subjects (3 posaconazole recipients subsequently developed thrombophlebitis and were discontinued from treatment). In conclusion, the posaconazole i.v. solution showed a greater-than-dose-proportional increase in exposure, primarily at doses below 200 mg. When administered peripherally at the same infusion site, multiple dosing of i.v. posaconazole led to unacceptably high rates of infusion site reactions. Intravenous

  18. Clinical outcomes with extended or continuous versus short-term intravenous infusion of carbapenems and piperacillin/tazobactam: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Falagas, Matthew E; Tansarli, Giannoula S; Ikawa, Kazuro; Vardakas, Konstantinos Z

    2013-01-01

    We sought to study whether the better pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) properties of carbapenems and piperacillin/tazobactam, when the duration of infusion is longer, were associated with lower mortality. PubMed and Scopus were searched for studies reporting on patients treated with extended (≥3 hours) or continuous (24 hours) versus short-term duration (20-60 minutes) infusions of carbapenems or piperacillin/tazobactam. Fourteen studies were included (1229 patients). Mortality was lower among patients receiving extended or continuous infusion of carbapenems or piperacillin/tazobactam compared to those receiving short-term (risk ratio [RR], 0.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], .41-.83). Patients with pneumonia who received extended or continuous infusion had lower mortality than those receiving short-term infusion (RR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.26-0.96). Data for other specific infections were not available. The available evidence from mainly nonrandomized studies suggests that extended or continuous infusion of carbapenems or piperacillin/tazobactam was associated with lower mortality. Well-designed randomized controlled trials are warranted to confirm these findings before such approaches become widely used.

  19. Water intoxication associated with oxytocin infusion

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Audrey J.; Clark, Elizabeth H.; Jacobs, Howard S.

    1975-01-01

    During a mid-trimester abortion with high dose oxytocin infusion and intravenous fluids, a patient developed an acute dilutational hyponatraemia and coma. The relationship of water intoxication and synthetic oxytocin infusion is discussed and the literature reviewed. PMID:1197156

  20. Effects of an overnight intravenous lipid infusion on intramyocellular lipid content and insulin sensitivity in African-American versus Caucasian adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, SoJung; Boesch, Chris; Kuk, Jennifer L.; Arslanian, Silva

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explain the predisposition for insulin resistance among African American (AA) adolescents, this study aimed to: 1) examine changes in intramyocellular lipid content (IMCL), and insulin sensitivity with intralipid (IL) infusion; and 2) determine whether the increase in IMCL is comparable between AA and Caucasian adolescents. Materials and Methods Thirteen AA and 15 Caucasian normal-weight adolescents (BMI <85th) underwent a 3-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, on two occasions in random order, after an overnight 12-hr infusion of: 1) 20% IL and 2) normal saline (NS). IMCL was quantified by 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in tibialis anterior muscle before and after IL infusion. Results During IL infusion, plasma TG, glycerol, FFA and fat oxidation increased significantly, with no race differences. Hepatic insulin sensitivity decreased with IL infusion with no difference between the groups. IL infusion was associated with a significant increase in IMCL, which was comparable between AA (Δ 105%; NS: 1.9 ± 0.8 vs. IL: 3.9 ± 1.6 mmol/kg wet weight) and Caucasian (Δ 86%; NS: 2.8 ± 2.1 vs. IL: 5.2 ± 2.4 mmol/kg wet weight), with similar reductions (P<0.01) in insulin sensitivity between the groups (Δ −44%: NS: 9.1 ± 3.3 vs. IL: 5.1 ± 1.8 mg/kg/min per µU/ml in AA) and (Δ−39%: NS: 12.9 ± 6.0 vs. IL: 7.9 ± 3.8 mg/kg/min per µU/ml in Caucasian) adolescents. Conclusions In healthy adolescents, an acute elevation in plasma FFA with IL infusion is accompanied by significant increases in IMCL and reductions in insulin sensitivity with no race differential. Our findings suggest that AA normal-weight adolescents are not more susceptible than Caucasians to FFA-induced IMCL accumulation and insulin resistance. PMID:23122836

  1. The use of a volumetric infusion pump for the intra-arterial infusion of drugs.

    PubMed

    Cooper, A M; Lilliman, M

    1985-01-01

    Volumetric infusion pumps are widely used for intravenous infusions. We have extended their use to the intra-arterial infusion of drugs. An in vitro evaluation of the performance of such devices, under experimental conditions comparable to an intra-arterial infusion, was carried out. The results obtained confirmed the accuracy of volumetric infusion pumps for intra-arterial infusions. The system was found to be safe, reliable and simple in clinical practice.

  2. A neurotensin analog, NT69L, attenuates intravenous nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Boules, Mona; Oliveros, Alfredo; Liang, Yanqi; Williams, Katrina; Shaw, Amanda; Robinson, Jessica; Fredrickson, Paul; Richelson, Elliott

    2011-02-01

    NT69L is a neurotensin analog that blocks nicotine-induced locomotor activity and has sustained efficacy in a rat model of nicotine-induced sensitization when administered peripherally. Additionally, NT69L attenuates food-reinforcement in rats. The present study tested the effect of acute administration of NT69L on nicotine self-infusion in Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were trained to self-infuse nicotine intravenously (0.03mg/kg per infusion) following operant training. Once the rats acquired stable responding to nicotine self-infusion they were pretreated with NT69L (1mg/kg, i.p.) or saline 30min before being assessed for nicotine self-infusion. Pretreatment with NT69L significantly attenuated nicotine self-infusion under FR1 (fixed ratio of 1) and FR5 schedule of reinforcement as compared to saline pretreatment. Control rats that were response-independent "yoked" as well as rats that self-infused saline or NT69L showed minimal responses, indicating that nicotine served as a reinforcer. Additionally, NT69L modulated serum corticosterone; brain norepinephrine serotonin; and dopamine receptors mRNA levels altered in the nicotine self-infused rats after a 24h withdrawal period. Pretreatment with NT69L significantly decreased the nicotine-induced increase in serum corticosterone levels and striatal norepinephrine and increased the nicotine-induced reduction in serotonin in both the striatum and the prefrontal cortex (PFC). NT69L might modulate dopamine neurotransmission implicated in the reinforcing effects of nicotine by modulating tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine receptor mRNA levels in the PFC and striatum. These data support further study of the effects of NT analogs on attenuating the reinforcing effects of psychostimulants.

  3. Teicoplanin pharmacokinetics in intravenous drug abusers being treated for bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Rybak, M J; Lerner, S A; Levine, D P; Albrecht, L M; McNeil, P L; Thompson, G A; Kenny, M T; Yuh, L

    1991-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of teicoplanin were determined after multiple 30-min intravenous infusions of 10 to 15 mg/kg every 12 to 24 h in 11 intravenous drug abuse (IVDA) patients being treated for bacterial endocarditis. Multiple serum samples were obtained over 7 to 14 days. Twenty-four-hour urine collections were obtained on days 1 and 5. Serum concentration-time data were analyzed by using multiple-dose pharmacokinetic analysis (NONLIN84). Results were compared with pharmacokinetic parameters derived from previous studies in normal healthy volunteers following multiple intravenous infusions of teicoplanin (3 to 6 mg/kg/day). Total and renal clearances of teicoplanin in IVDA patients were found to be significantly greater and more highly variable than those observed previously in normal healthy volunteers. As a result, predicted steady-state trough concentrations in serum may vary up to fivefold. The mechanism responsible for this variation appears to be related to the glomerular filtration rate. In IVDA patients, individualized teicoplanin dosage may be required in the treatment of bacterial endocarditis. PMID:1829880

  4. Breadboard development of a fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A functional breadboard of a zero gravity Intravenous Infusion System (IVI) is presented. Major components described are: (1) infusate pack pressurizers; (2) pump module; (3) infusion set; and (4) electronic control package. The IVI breadboard was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of using the parallel solenoid pump and spring powered infusate source pressurizers for the emergency infusion of various liquids in a zero gravity environment. The IVI was tested for flow rate and sensitivity to back pressure at the needle. Results are presented.

  5. Sustained AS160 and TBC1D1 phosphorylations in human skeletal muscle 30 min after a single bout of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Vendelbo, M. H.; Møller, A. B.; Treebak, J. T.; Gormsen, L. C.; Goodyear, L. J.; Wojtaszewski, J. F. P.; Jørgensen, J. O. L.; Møller, N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: phosphorylation of AS160 and TBC1D1 plays an important role for GLUT4 mobilization to the cell surface. The phosphorylation of AS160 and TBC1D1 in humans in response to acute exercise is not fully characterized. Objective: to study AS160 and TBC1D1 phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle after aerobic exercise followed by a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. Design: eight healthy men were studied on two occasions: 1) in the resting state and 2) in the hours after a 1-h bout of ergometer cycling. A hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp was initiated 240 min after exercise and in a time-matched nonexercised control condition. We obtained muscle biopsies 30 min after exercise and in a time-matched nonexercised control condition (t = 30) and after 30 min of insulin stimulation (t = 270) and investigated site-specific phosphorylation of AS160 and TBC1D1. Results: phosphorylation on AS160 and TBC1D1 was increased 30 min after the exercise bout, whereas phosphorylation of the putative upstream kinases, Akt and AMPK, was unchanged compared with resting control condition. Exercise augmented insulin-stimulated phosphorylation on AS160 at Ser341 and Ser704 270 min after exercise. No additional exercise effects were observed on insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Thr642 and Ser588 on AS160 or Ser237 and Thr596 on TBC1D1. Conclusions: AS160 and TBC1D1 phosphorylations were evident 30 min after exercise without simultaneously increased Akt and AMPK phosphorylation. Unlike TBC1D1, insulin-stimulated site-specific AS160 phosphorylation is modified by prior exercise, but these sites do not include Thr642 and Ser588. Together, these data provide new insights into phosphorylation of key regulators of glucose transport in human skeletal muscle. PMID:24876356

  6. Postprandial hyperglycemia was ameliorated by taking metformin 30 min before a meal than taking metformin with a meal; a randomized, open-label, crossover pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Muhei; Okada, Hiroshi; Mistuhashi, Kazuteru; Kimura, Toshihiro; Kitagawa, Noriyuki; Fukuda, Takuya; Majima, Saori; Fukuda, Yukiko; Tanaka, Yoshimitsu; Yamada, Shunji; Senmaru, Takafumi; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Asano, Mai; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Oda, Yohei; Hasegawa, Goji; Nakamura, Naoto; Fukui, Michiaki

    2016-05-01

    Taking metformin with a meal has been shown to decrease bioavailability of metformin. We hypothesized that taking metformin 30 min before a meal improves glucose metabolism. As an animal model, 18 Zucker-rats were divided into three groups as follows: no medication (Control), metformin (600 mg/kg) with meal (Met), and metformin 10 min before meal (pre-Met). In addition, five diabetic patients were recruited and randomized to take metformin (1000 mg) either 30 min before a meal (pre-Met protocol) or with a meal (Met protocol). In the animal model, the peak glucose level of pre-Met (7.8 ± 1.5 mmol/L) was lower than that of Control (12.6 ± 2.5 mmol/L, P = 0.010) or Met (14.1 ± 2.9 mmol/L, P = 0.020). Although there was no statistical difference among the three groups, total GLP-1 level at t = 0 min of pre-Met (7.4 ± 2.7 pmol/L) tended to be higher than that of Control (3.7 ± 2.0 pmol/L, P = 0.030) or Met (3.9 ± 1.2 pmol/L, P = 0.020). In diabetic patients, the peak glucose level of pre-Met protocol (7.0 ± 0.4 mmol/L) was lower than that of Met protocol (8.5 ± 0.9 mmol/L, P = 0.021). Total GLP-1 level at t = 30 min of pre-Met protocol (11.0 ± 6.1 pmol/L) was higher than that of Met protocol (6.7 ± 3.9 pmol/L, P = 0.033). Taking metformin 30 min before a meal ameliorated postprandial hyperglycemia. This promises to be a novel approach for postprandial hyperglycemia.

  7. Optimization of health-care organization and perceived improvement of patient comfort by switching from intra-venous BU four-times-daily infusions to a once-daily administration scheme in adult hematopoietic stem cell recipients.

    PubMed

    Xhaard, A; Rzepecki, P; Valcarcel, D; Santarone, S; Fürst, S; Serrano, D; De Angelis, G; Krüger, W; Scheid, C

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have shown an equivalent pharmacokinetic profile between four-times-daily (4QD) and once-daily (QD) administration of intra-venous (IV) BU, without increased toxicity. We assess the impact of a switch in IV BU from a 4QD to a QD schedule, in terms of health-care organization, staff working conditions, quality of care dispensed and perceived patient comfort. Clinicians, nurses and pharmacists from nine allogeneic transplantation units in five European countries were interviewed face to face. Overall perception of QD versus 4QD BU was very positive. Both administration schemes were evaluated to be equally efficaciousZ. QD BU was perceived to be safer and more convenient. Clinicians and nurses perceived that patient comfort was improved, due to fewer complications associated with repeated infusions, and avoiding night infusions associated with stress, anxiety and decreased quality of sleep. Switching from 4QD to QD BU had a significant impact on health-care organization, with a better integration in the overall management and usual timelines in the pharmacies and transplantation units. Time spent to prepare and administer BU was significantly reduced, leading to potential financial savings that merit further assessment and would be of particular interest in the current economic climate.

  8. The effects of intestinal Escherichia coli 263, intravenous infusion of Escherichia coli 263 culture filtrate and iron dextran supplementation on iron metabolism in the young pig.

    PubMed

    Knight, C D; Klasing, K C; Forsyth, D M

    1984-12-01

    An experiment using 32 pigs in a 2(3) factorial arrangement of treatments was used to determine the effects on the (1) level of iron dextran supplementation, (2) iv infusion of an Escherichia coli 263 culture filtrate and (3) presence of E. coli 263 in a ligated intestinal segment, on the ability of the young pig to limit systemic Fe availability. Iron dextran was administered im 3 d postpartum. Culture filtrate was infused iv, E. coli were injected into ligated intestines and blood sampling was started at 14 d postpartum. Blood was taken every 2 h for 22 h, after which pigs were euthanized and livers, spleens and kidneys were removed. Pigs receiving 400 mg of iron dextran (HiFe) exhibited greater serum Fe (SFe) and lower total Fe-binding capacity (TIBC) than pigs injected with 100 mg Fe (LoFe). The effects of the E. coli culture filtrate infusion appeared to be associated with endotoxin-induced circulatory shock. The presence of E. coli in the intestine increased TIBC in LoFe pigs, but not in HiFe pigs. The increase in TIBC coincided with the time of maximal fluid secretion into the intestine. Intestinal E. coli also caused an increase in liver Fe content, particularly in HiFe pigs. These data suggest that intestinal E. coli can cause a shift of Fe from the plasma to the reticuloendothelial system, and pigs receiving high supplemental dosages of Fe are less able to limit the availability of Fe to microorganisms.

  9. A phase I trial of c-Raf kinase antisense oligonucleotide ISIS 5132 administered as a continuous intravenous infusion in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, C C; Holmlund, J T; Schiller, J H; Geary, R S; Kwoh, T J; Dorr, A; Nemunaitis, J

    2000-05-01

    Raf proteins play a central role in the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and hence are involved in oncogenic transformation and tumor cell proliferation. ISIS 5132 is a 20-base antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxyribonucleotide that specifically down-regulates c-raf expression. We report here an initial study of the safety and tolerability of an i.v. infusion of ISIS 5132 in patients with advanced cancer. A continuous i.v. infusion of ISIS 5132 was administered for 21 days every 4 weeks to 34 patients with a variety of solid tumors refractory to standard therapy. The dose of ISIS 5132 was increased in sequential cohorts of patients, as toxicity allowed, until a final dose of 5.0 mg/kg body weight was reached. Toxicity was scored by common toxicity criteria, and tumor response was monitored. Pharmacokinetic studies were performed for 30 patients treated at doses of < or =4.0 mg/kg/day. The initial dose of ISIS 5132 was 0.5 mg/kg body weight and was successfully increased incrementally to 5.0 mg/kg body weight. Toxicities through the 4.0 mg/kg dose level were not dose limiting. Side effects were minimal and could not be specifically related to ISIS 5132. Two patients had prolonged stabilization of their disease, and one patient with ovarian carcinoma had a significant response with a 97% reduction in CA-125 levels. ISIS 5132, an antisense oligonucleotide against c-raf, was well tolerated at doses up to and including 4.0 mg/kg/day by 21-day continuous i.v. infusion and demonstrated antitumor activity at the doses tested.

  10. Biodistribution of boron after intravenous 4-dihydroxyborylphenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F) infusion in meningioma and schwannoma patients: A feasibility study for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Kulvik, Martti; Kallio, Merja; Laakso, Juha; Vähätalo, Jyrki; Hermans, Raine; Järviluoma, Eija; Paetau, Anders; Rasilainen, Merja; Ruokonen, Inkeri; Seppälä, Matti; Jääskeläinen, Juha

    2015-12-01

    We studied the uptake of boron after 100 mg/kg BPA infusion in three meningioma and five schwannoma patients as a pre-BNCT feasibility study. With average tumour-to-whole blood boron concentrations of 2.5, we discuss why BNCT could, and probably should, be developed to treat severe forms of the studied tumours. However, analysing 72 tumour and 250 blood samples yielded another finding: the plasma-to-whole blood boron concentrations varied with time, suggesting that the assumed constant boron ratio of 1:1 between normal brain tissue and whole blood deserves re-assessment.

  11. Effects of local alpha2-adrenergic receptor blockade on adipose tissue lipolysis during prolonged systemic adrenaline infusion in normal man.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Lene; Enevoldsen, Lotte H; Stallknecht, Bente; Bülow, Jens

    2008-03-01

    During prolonged adrenaline infusion, lipolysis peaks within 30 min and thereafter tends to decline, and we hypothesized that the stimulation of local adipose tissue alpha2-adrenergic receptors accounts for this decline. The lipolytic effect of a prolonged intravenous adrenaline infusion combined with local infusion of the alpha2-blocker phentolamine in superficial and deep abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and in preperitoneal adipose tissue was studied in seven healthy subjects. The interstitial glycerol concentration in the three adipose tissue depots was measured by the microdialysis method. Regional adipose tissue blood flow was measured by the (133)Xe clearance technique. Regional glycerol output (lipolytic rate) was calculated from these measurements and simultaneous measurements of arterial glycerol concentrations. Adrenaline infusion increased lipolysis in all three depots (data previously published). Phentolamine infusion did not augment lipolysis in the subcutaneous depots while it increased the lipolytic rate in the preperitoneal depot. It is concluded that alpha2-adrenergic receptors do not have a significant effect on subcutaneous adipose tissue lipolysis during high circulating adrenaline concentrations, and the decrease in lipolysis in subcutaneous adipose tissue under prolonged adrenaline stimulation is thus not attributed to alpha2-adrenergic receptor inhibition of lipolysis. However, in the preperitoneal adipose tissue depot, alpha2-adrenergic receptor tone plays a role for the lipolytic rate obtained during prolonged adrenaline stimulation.

  12. Haemodynamic and cerebrovascular responses to glycerol infusion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Chen, J L; Wang, Y C; Wang, J Y

    1989-11-01

    1. The response of cerebral blood vessels to hyperosmolar agents in vivo remains controversial, and little is known about the effect of glycerol on cerebral vessels. In this study we investigated the cerebrovascular response to intravenous administration of glycerol (1 g/kg, infused over 25 min) in dogs under pentobarbital anaesthesia. 2. intracranial pressure, systemic arterial pressure, mean arterial blood pressure, serum osmolarity and packed cell volume were continuously monitored, and blood gases were checked frequently. Through a parietal cranial window, pial vessel diameter was measured by means of a surgical microscope and a video image-analyser. 3. Pial vessel diameter increased gradually with a maximum at 30 min after the beginning of glycerol infusion. The maximum increase in diameter in small (less than or equal to 100 microns) vessels was 14.3%, whereas that in large (greater than 100 microns) vessels was 10.3%. There was only a slight increase (less than 4%) in pial vessel diameter in vehicle-infused animals. The intracranial pressure decreased drastically after glycerol infusion, whereas the mean arterial blood pressure remained constant. There were correlations between the rise in serum osmolarity, fall in packed cell volume and vasodilatation, indicating that glycerol caused vasodilatation accompanied by plasma volume expansion. 4. Our data suggest that glycerol produces cerebral vasodilatation, which might be beneficial in cerebral ischaemia and vasospasm, in addition to its intracranial pressure-reducing effect on normal or oedematous brain. The degree of vasodilatation was not sufficient to affect the predominant intracranial pressure drop resulting from cerebral dehydration.

  13. Effect of intravenous infusion of a beta-adrenergic blocking agent on the haemodynamic changes in human masseter muscle induced by cold-pressor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, K; Kuboki, T; Miyawaki, T; Shimada, M; Yamashita, A; Clark, G T

    1999-06-01

    Eight healthy non-smoking males (mean age: 24.1 +/- 1.1 years) without any history of chronic muscle pain and migraine participated in this study. Haemoglobin (Hb) and oxygen (O2) saturation in the right masseter muscle were continuously recorded with a non-invasive near-infrared spectroscopic device. Heart rate and blood pressure were also recorded. The experiment had three phases: a placebo drug (physiological saline) with cold-pressor trial, a 30-sec maximal voluntary clenching (MVC) trial, and a propranolol with cold-pressor trial. The saline and drug trials each involved continuous recording for 1 min before, 2 min during and 5 min after the cold-pressor stimulation (4 degrees C). Physiological saline (20 ml) or propranolol hydrochloride (20 ml) were infused at the rate of 2 ml/min. This infusion was begun 20 min before the baseline recording and participants did not know which solution (saline or propranolol) was being infused. For the MVC trial, each participant was asked to perform a 30-sec clench of their jaw-closing muscles. There was a rest period of 15 min between each trial. The individual Hb and O2 data were normalized so that the baseline at the beginning of the experiment was equal to zero, and the Hb and O2 data were normalized as a percentage of the individual's own highest absolute Hb and O2 after and during the MVC, respectively. The results showed that the mean baseline Hb 1 min before cold-pressor stimulation was significantly lower in the beta-blocker trial than in the placebo trial (p = 0.035). The mean change in Hb from baseline during cold-pressor stimulation in the beta-blocker trial was also significantly less than in the placebo trial (p = 0.035). The mean Hb rebound change after the cold-pressor stimulation in the beta-blocker trial was significantly higher than in the placebo trial, and no significant heart-rate differences were observed in the period after cold-pressor stimulation. Overall, the mean heart rate before and during that

  14. Prolonged continuous intravenous infusion of the dipeptide L-alanine- L-glutamine significantly increases plasma glutamine and alanine without elevating brain glutamate in patients with severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low plasma glutamine levels are associated with worse clinical outcome. Intravenous glutamine infusion dose- dependently increases plasma glutamine levels, thereby correcting hypoglutaminemia. Glutamine may be transformed to glutamate which might limit its application at a higher dose in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). To date, the optimal glutamine dose required to normalize plasma glutamine levels without increasing plasma and cerebral glutamate has not yet been defined. Methods Changes in plasma and cerebral glutamine, alanine, and glutamate as well as indirect signs of metabolic impairment reflected by increased intracranial pressure (ICP), lactate, lactate-to-pyruvate ratio, electroencephalogram (EEG) activity were determined before, during, and after continuous intravenous infusion of 0.75 g L-alanine-L-glutamine which was given either for 24 hours (group 1, n = 6) or 5 days (group 2, n = 6) in addition to regular enteral nutrition. Lab values including nitrogen balance, urea and ammonia were determined daily. Results Continuous L-alanine-L-glutamine infusion significantly increased plasma and cerebral glutamine as well as alanine levels, being mostly sustained during the 5 day infusion phase (plasma glutamine: from 295 ± 62 to 500 ± 145 μmol/ l; brain glutamine: from 183 ± 188 to 549 ± 120 μmol/ l; plasma alanine: from 327 ± 91 to 622 ± 182 μmol/ l; brain alanine: from 48 ± 55 to 89 ± 129 μmol/ l; p < 0.05, ANOVA, post hoc Dunn’s test). Plasma glutamate remained unchanged and cerebral glutamate was decreased without any signs of cerebral impairment. Urea and ammonia were significantly increased within normal limits without signs of organ dysfunction (urea: from 2.7 ± 1.6 to 5.5 ± 1.5 mmol/ l; ammonia: from 12 ± 6.3 to 26 ± 8.3 μmol/ l; p < 0.05, ANOVA, post hoc Dunn’s test). Conclusions High dose L-alanine-L-glutamine infusion (0

  15. Impact of repeated intravenous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells infusion on myocardial collagen network remodeling in a rat model of doxorubicin-induced dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Li, Qianxiao; Na, Rongmei; Li, Xiaofei; Liu, Baiting; Meng, Lili; Liutong, Hanyu; Fang, Weiyi; Zhu, Ning; Zheng, Xiaoqun

    2014-02-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation improved cardiac function and reduced myocardial fibrosis in both ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. We evaluated the effects of repeated peripheral vein injection of MSCs on collagen network remodeling and myocardial TGF-β1, AT1, CYP11B2 (aldosterone synthase) gene expressions in a rat model of doxorubicin (DOX)-induced dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Thirty-eight out of 53 SD rats survived at 10 weeks post-DOX injection (2.5 mg/kg/week for 6 weeks, i.p.) were divided into DCM blank (without treatment, n = 12), DCM placebo (intravenous tail injection of 0.5 mL serum-free culture medium every other day for ten times, n = 13), and DCM plus MSCs group (intravenous tail injection of 5 × 10(6) MSCs dissolved in 0.5 mL serum-free culture medium every other day for 10 times, n = 13). Ten untreated rats served as normal controls. At 20 weeks after DOX injection, echocardiography, myocardial collagen content, myocardial expressions of types I and III collagen, TGF-β1, AT1, and CYP11B2 were compared among groups. At 20 weeks post-DOX injection, 8 rats (67%) survived in DCM blank group, 9 rats (69%) survived in DCM placebo group while 13 rats (100 %) survived in DCM plus MSCs group. Left ventricular end-diastolic diameter was significantly higher and ejection fraction was significantly lower in DCM blank and DCM placebo groups compared to normal control rats, which were significantly improved in DCM plus MSCs group (all p < 0.05 vs. DCM blank and DCM placebo groups). Moreover, myocardial collagen volume fraction, types I and III collagen, myocardial mRNA expressions of TGF-β1, AT1, CYP11B2, and collagen I/III ratio were all significantly lower in DCM plus MSCs group compared to DCM blank and DCM placebo groups (all p < 0.05). Repeated intravenous MSCs transplantation could improve cardiac function by attenuating myocardial collagen network remodeling possibly through downregulating renin

  16. Effect of Subchronic Intravenous Morphine Infusion and Naloxone-Precipitated Morphine Withdrawal on P-gp and Bcrp at the Rat Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Catarina; Gómez-Zepeda, David; Auvity, Sylvain; Menet, Marie-Claude; Crété, Dominique; Labat, Laurence; Remião, Fernando; Cisternino, Salvatore; Declèves, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Chronic morphine regimen increases P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer-resistance protein (Bcrp) expressions at the rat blood–brain barrier (BBB) but what drives this effect is poorly understood. The objective of this study is to assess subchronic continuous morphine infusion and naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal effects on P-gp/Bcrp contents and activities at the rat BBB. Rats were treated either with (i) a continuous i.v. morphine for 120 h, (ii) escalating morphine dosing (10-40 mg/kg, i.p., 5 days), (iii) a chronic morphine regimen (10 mg/kg s.c., 5 days) followed by a withdrawal period (2 days) and treatment for 3 additional days. Animal behavior was assessed after naloxone-precipitated withdrawal (1 mg/kg, s.c.). P-gp/Bcrp expressions and activities were determined in brain microvessels by qRT-PCR, Western blot, UHPLC–MS/MS, and in situ brain perfusion of P-gp or Bcrp substrates. Results show continuous i.v. morphine did not change P-gp/Bcrp protein levels in rat brain microvessels, whereas naloxone-precipitated withdrawal after escalating or chronic morphine dose regimen increased Mdr1a and Bcrp mRNA levels by 1.4-fold and 2.4-fold, respectively. Conversely, P-gp/Bcrp protein expressions remained unchanged after naloxone administration, and brain uptake of [3H]-verapamil (P-gp) and [3H]-mitoxantrone (Bcrp) was not altered. The study concludes subchronic morphine infusion and naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal have poor effect on P-gp/Bcrp levels at the rat BBB.

  17. IT infusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Infusing IT technology is a perennial challenge. The Technology Infusion and Maturity Assessment approach of Cornford & Hicks is shown applied to an example of IT infusion: moedl-based V&V of spacecraft software.

  18. Minimum Capacity of NaS Battery according to Capacity of PV System in a Microgrid under 30 min Power Balancing Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimakage, Toyonari; Sone, Akihito; Sumita, Jiro; Kato, Takeyoshi; Suzuoki, Yasuo

    On constructing a microgrid, it is essential to design capacity of photovoltaic power generation (PV) systems and storage batteries in accordance with a control target. In this study, we constructed a simulation model of energy control system in the microgrid used in the demonstration project. By using this model, we investigated the minimum capacity of NaS battery for different PV system capacities for keeping the target power imbalance within ±3% over 30 min. The main results are as follows. The microgrid involving 330-kW PV systems (corresponding to the actual system) needs a NaS battery capacity of at least approximately ±20kW, and PV systems with a capacity up to about 890kW can be integrated in the microgrid with a NaS battery capacity of ±500kW (corresponding to the actual system). We estimated the minimum capacity of NaS battery for different PV system capacities and clarified that the output behavior of the NaS battery and PAFC when supply and demand power imbalance over 30 min. exceeds the ±3% limit. We suggested the improved control model and showed that it is effective in decreasing the minimum capacity of NaS battery, although it has negative effects on the reduction of short-period power flow fluctuation at the grid-connection point.

  19. Intravenous infusion of gastrin-releasing peptide-27 and bombesin in rats reveals differential effects on meal size and intermeal interval length.

    PubMed

    Washington, Martha C; Salyer, Sarah; Aglan, Amnah H; Sayegh, Ayman I

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that the intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of gastrin-releasing peptide-27 (GRP-27) or bombesin (BN) (at 0.21, 0.41 and 1.03nmol/kg) reduces meal size (MS) and prolongs the intermeal interval (IMI). Here, we hypothesized that the intravenous (i.v.) administration of the same doses of GRP-27 and BN will be as effective as the i.p. administration in evoking these feeding responses. To test this hypothesis, we administered GRP-27 and BN i.v. and measured first MS (10% sucrose), IMI, satiety ratio (SR, IMI/MS) and second MS in overnight food-deprived but not water-deprived male Sprague Dawley rats. We found that (1) only GRP-27 reduced the first MS, (2) BN prolonged the IMI, (3) GRP-27 and BN increased the SR and (4) only BN reduced the size of the second meal. Contrary to our hypothesis, the i.v. administration of GRP-27 and BN affected the MS and IMI differently than did the i.p. administration. In conclusion, this pharmacological study suggests that the MS and IMI are regulated at different sites.

  20. Intravenous infusion of gastrin-releasing peptide-27 and bombesin in rats reveals differential effects on meal size and intermeal interval length

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Martha C.; Salyer, Sarah; Aglan, Amnah H.; Sayegh, Ayman I.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that the intraperitoneal (i.p) administration of gastrin-releasing peptide-27 (GRP-27) or bombesin (BN) (at 0.21, 0.41 and 1.03 nmol/kg) reduces meal size (MS) and prolongs the intermeal interval (IMI). Here, we hypothesized that the intravenous (i.v) administration of the same doses of GRP-27 and BN will be as effective as the i.p administration in evoking these feeding responses. To test this hypothesis, we administered GRP-27 and BN i.v and measured first MS (10% sucrose), IMI, satiety ratio (SR, IMI/MS) and second MS in overnight food-deprived but not water-deprived male Sprague Dawley rats. We found that (1) only GRP-27 reduced the first MS, (2) BN prolonged the IMI, (3) GRP-27 and BN increased the SR and (4) only BN reduced the size of the second meal. Contrary to our hypothesis, the i.v administration of GRP-27 and BN affected the MS and IMI differently than did the i.p administration. In conclusion, this pharmacological study suggests that the MS and IMI are regulated at different sites. PMID:24291388

  1. Safety and pharmacokinetics of 120 mg/kg versus 60 mg/kg weekly intravenous infusions of alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, crossover study (SPARK).

    PubMed

    Campos, Michael A; Kueppers, Friedrich; Stocks, James M; Strange, Charlie; Chen, Junliang; Griffin, Rhonda; Wang-Smith, Laurene; Brantly, Mark L

    2013-12-01

    Augmentation therapy with the approved dose of 60 mg/kg weekly intravenous (IV) alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (alpha1-PI), achieves a trough serum level of 11 μM in individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), yet this is still below the level observed in healthy individuals. This study assessed the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of weekly infusions of a 120 mg/kg dose of alpha1-PI in 30 adults with AATD. Subjects with symptomatic, genetically determined (genotypes PI*ZZ, PI*Z(null), PI*(null)(null) or PI*(Z)Mmalton) AATD were randomly assigned to weekly infusions of 60 or 120 mg/kg alpha1-PI (Prolastin-C®) for 8 weeks before crossing over to the alternate dose for 8 weeks. Adverse events (AEs) (including exacerbations), vital signs, pulmonary function tests, and laboratory assessments were recorded. Pharmacokinetic measurements included AUC0-7days, Cmax, trough, tmax, and t1/2, based on serum alpha1-PI concentrations. In total for both treatments, 112 AEs were reported, with exacerbation of COPD being the most frequent, consistent with the subjects' diagnoses. Mean steady-state serum alpha1-PI concentrations following 120 mg/kg weekly IV alpha1-PI were higher than with the 60 mg/kg dose and mean trough concentrations were 27.7 versus 17.3 μM, respectively. Dose proportionality was demonstrated for AUC0-7days and Cmax, with low inter-subject variability. The 120 mg/kg alpha1-PI weekly dose was considered to be safe and well tolerated, and provided more favorable physiologic alpha1-PI serum levels than the currently recommended 60 mg/kg dose. The effect of this dosing regimen on slowing and/or preventing emphysema progression in subjects with AATD warrants further investigation.

  2. Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol intravenous infusion formulation optimization, stability and compatibility testing: A case study to overcome polysorbate 80 interference in chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Inas A; Hammell, Dana C; Hassan, Hazem E; Stinchcomb, Audra L

    2016-06-05

    Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol is a progestin/estrogen combination hormonal contraceptive indicated for the prevention of pregnancy in women. The very poor solubility and wettability of these drugs, along with their high potency (adsorption issues), give rise to difficulties in designing intravenous (IV) formulations to assess absolute bioavailability of products containing both drugs. The purpose of this study was to develop an IV formulation, evaluate its stability under different conditions and evaluate its compatibility with IV sets for potential use in absolute bioavailability studies in humans. Also, a selective high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for quantification of ethinyl estradiol and norelgestromin in polysorbate 80 matrix was developed and validated. Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol IV solution was prepared using sterile water for injection with 2.5% ethanol and 2.5% polysorbate 80 as a cosolvent/surfactant system to obtain a final drug solution of 25μg ethinyl estradiol and 252μg norelgestromin from a concentrated stock drug solution. The stabilities of the concentrated stock and IV solutions were assessed after storing them in the refrigerator (3.7±0.6°C) and at room temperature (19.5±0.5°C), respectively. Additional studies were conducted to examine the stability of the IV solution using an Alarias(®) low sorbing IV administration set with and without an inline filter. The solution was allowed to drip at 1mL/min over a 60min period. Samples were obtained at the beginning, middle and end of the 60min duration. The chemical stability was evaluated for up to 10 days. Norelgestromin and ethinyl estradiol concentration, purity, and degradant levels were determined using the HPLC method. The norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol IV formulation met the chemical stability criteria when tested on day 1 through day 9 (216h). Norelgestromin concentrations assayed in stock and IV solutions were in the range of 90.0-98.5% and 90

  3. Successful use of daily intravenous infusion of C1 esterase inhibitor concentrate in the treatment of a hereditary angioedema patient with ascites, hypovolemic shock, sepsis, renal and respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hoang; Santucci, Stephanie; Yang, William H

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare autosomal dominant disease most commonly associated with defects in C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). HAE manifests as recurrent episodes of edema in various body locations. Atypical symptoms, such as ascites, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and hypovolemic shock, have also been reported. Management of HAE conventionally involves the treatment of acute attacks, as well as short- and long-term prophylaxis. Since attacks can be triggered by several factors, including stress and physical trauma, prophylactic therapy is recommended for patients undergoing surgery. Human plasma-derived C1-INH (pdC1-INH) concentrate is indicated for the treatment of both acute HAE attacks and pre-procedure prevention of HAE episodes in patients undergoing medical, dental, or surgical procedures. We report the first case of a patient with HAE who experienced an abdominal attack precipitated by a retroperitoneal bleed while being converted from warfarin to heparin in preparation for surgery. Subsequently, the patient had a protracted course in hospital with other complications, which included hypovolemic shock, ascites, severe sepsis from nosocomial pneumonia, renal and respiratory failure. Despite intensive interventions, the patient remained in a critical state for months; however, after a trial of daily intravenous infusion of pdC1-INH concentrate (Berinert®, CSL Behring GmbH, Marburg, Germany), clinical status improved, particularly renal function. Therefore, pdC1-INH concentrate may be an effective treatment option to consider for critically-ill patients with HAE.

  4. Timing matters: negative emotion elicited 5 min but not 30 min or 45 min after learning enhances consolidation of internal-monitoring source memory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Bukuan, Sun

    2015-05-01

    Two experiments examined the time-dependent effects of negative emotion on consolidation of item and internal-monitoring source memory. In Experiment 1, participants (n=121) learned a list of words. They were asked to read aloud half of the words and to think about the remaining half. They were instructed to memorize each word and its associative cognitive operation ("reading" versus "thinking"). Immediately following learning they conducted free recall and then watched a 3-min either neutral or negative video clip when 5 min, 30 min or 45 min had elapsed after learning. Twenty-four hours later they returned to take surprise tests for item and source memory. Experiment 2 was similar to Experiment 1 except that participants, without conducting an immediate test of free recall, took tests of source memory for all encoded words both immediately and 24 h after learning. Experiment 1 showed that negative emotion enhanced consolidation of item memory (as measured by retention ratio of free recall) regardless of delay of emotion elicitation and that negative emotion enhanced consolidation of source memory when it was elicited at a 5 min delay but reduced consolidation of source memory when it was elicited at a 30 min delay; when elicited at a 45 min delay, negative emotion had little effect. Furthermore, Experiment 2 replicated the enhancement effect on source memory in the 5 min delay even when participants were tested on all the encoded words. The current study partially replicated prior studies on item memory and extends the literature by providing evidence for a time-dependent effect of negative emotion on consolidation of source memory based on internal monitoring.

  5. Comparative serum bactericidal activities of three doses of ciprofloxacin administered intravenously.

    PubMed Central

    Dan, M; Poch, F; Quassem, C; Kitzes, R

    1994-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and serum bactericidal activities of three intravenous doses of ciprofloxacin were studied comparatively in 30 patients. Single 200-, 300-, and 400-mg intravenous doses of ciprofloxacin were given over 30 min to 10 patients each, and serum samples were obtained at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, and 12 h after the start of the infusion. Serum drug concentrations were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by using noncompartmental analysis methods. Serum bactericidal activity against clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and Staphylococcus aureus was determined for samples obtained at 0.5, 4, 8, and 12 h. Excellent activity was demonstrated up to 12 h by all doses against E. coli and E. cloacae. Much poorer titers were observed for the remaining organisms, although the 400-mg dose prompted improved results against P. aeruginosa with a mean bactericidal titer of 1:2.9 at 8 h. In conclusion, while the 200-mg dose appears to be largely adequate for infections caused by members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, it seems that when P. aeruginosa is involved, 400 mg twice a day or even three times a day is more appropriate. Intravenous ciprofloxacin performs poorly against A. calcoaceticus and S. aureus, even at a higher dose. PMID:8031055

  6. Fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    Development of a fluid infusion system was undertaken in response to a need for an intravenous infusion device operable under conditions of zero-g. The initial design approach, pursued in the construction of the first breadboard instrument, was to regulate the pressure of the motive gas to produce a similar regulated pressure in the infusion liquid. This scheme was not workable because of the varying bag contact area, and a major design iteration was made. A floating sensor plate in the center of the bag pressure plate was made to operate a pressure regulator built into the bellows assembly, effectively making liquid pressure the directly controlled variable. Other design changes were made as experience was gained with the breadboard. Extensive performance tests were conducted on both the breadboard and the prototype device; accurately regulated flows from 6 m1/min to 100 m1/min were achieved. All system functions were shown to operate satisfactorily.

  7. Infusion Extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction, where a piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, and where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber.

  8. One-step kinetics-based immunoassay for the highly sensitive detection of C-reactive protein in less than 30 min.

    PubMed

    Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Czilwik, Gregor; van Oordt, Thomas; von Stetten, Felix; Zengerle, Roland; Marion Schneider, E; Luong, John H T

    2014-07-01

    This article reveals a rapid sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the highly sensitive detection of human C-reactive protein (CRP) in less than 30 min. It employs a one-step kinetics-based highly simplified and cost-effective sandwich ELISA procedure with minimal process steps. The procedure involves the formation of a sandwich immune complex on capture anti-human CRP antibody-bound Dynabeads in 15 min, followed by two magnet-assisted washings and one enzymatic reaction. The developed sandwich ELISA detects CRP in the dynamic range of 0.3 to 81 ng ml(-1) with a limit of detection of 0.4 ng ml(-1) and an analytical sensitivity of 0.7 ng ml(-1). It detects CRP spiked in diluted human whole blood and serum with high analytical precision, as confirmed by conventional sandwich ELISA. Moreover, the results of the developed ELISA for the determination of CRP in the ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid plasma samples of patients are in good agreement with those obtained by the conventional ELISA. The developed immunoassay has immense potential for the development of rapid and cost-effective in vitro diagnostic kits.

  9. Influence of vancomycin infusion methods on endothelial cell toxicity.

    PubMed

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Décaudin, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral intravenous therapy is frequently used in routine hospital practice and, due to various factors, its most common side effect is phlebitis. The infusion of vancomycin is particularly associated with phlebitis despite its widespread use. French guidelines recommend central intravenous infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous therapy is often preferred in intensive care units. Methods of vancomycin infusion are either intermittent infusion or continuous infusion. A comparison of these methods under in vitro conditions simulating clinical use could result in better infusion efficacy. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were therefore challenged with clinical doses of vancomycin over a 24- to 72-h period using these infusion methods. Cell death was measured with the alamarBlue test. Concentration-dependent and time-dependent vancomycin toxicity on HUVECs was noted with a 50% lethal dose at 5 mg/ml after 24 h, reaching 2.5 mg/ml after 72 h of infusion, simulating long-term infusion. This toxicity does not seem to be induced by acidic pH. In comparing infusion methods, we observed that continuous infusion induced greater cell toxicity than intermittent infusion at doses higher than 1 g/day. The increasing use of vancomycin means that new guidelines are required to avoid phlebitis. If peripheral intravenous therapy is used to reduce infusion time, along with intermittent infusion, vein irritation and localized phlebitis may be reduced. Further studies have to be carried out to explore the causes of vancomycin endothelial toxicity.

  10. Influence of Vancomycin Infusion Methods on Endothelial Cell Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral intravenous therapy is frequently used in routine hospital practice and, due to various factors, its most common side effect is phlebitis. The infusion of vancomycin is particularly associated with phlebitis despite its widespread use. French guidelines recommend central intravenous infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous therapy is often preferred in intensive care units. Methods of vancomycin infusion are either intermittent infusion or continuous infusion. A comparison of these methods under in vitro conditions simulating clinical use could result in better infusion efficacy. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were therefore challenged with clinical doses of vancomycin over a 24- to 72-h period using these infusion methods. Cell death was measured with the alamarBlue test. Concentration-dependent and time-dependent vancomycin toxicity on HUVECs was noted with a 50% lethal dose at 5 mg/ml after 24 h, reaching 2.5 mg/ml after 72 h of infusion, simulating long-term infusion. This toxicity does not seem to be induced by acidic pH. In comparing infusion methods, we observed that continuous infusion induced greater cell toxicity than intermittent infusion at doses higher than 1 g/day. The increasing use of vancomycin means that new guidelines are required to avoid phlebitis. If peripheral intravenous therapy is used to reduce infusion time, along with intermittent infusion, vein irritation and localized phlebitis may be reduced. Further studies have to be carried out to explore the causes of vancomycin endothelial toxicity. PMID:25421476

  11. Metabolic response of normal man and insulin-infused diabetics to postprandial exercise.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J D; Poussier, P; Marliss, E B; Albisser, A M; Zinman, B

    1982-05-01

    Physical exercise is often performed during absorption of meals. We have characterized the metabolic response to 45 min of moderate exercise (approximately 55% of estimated maximal oxygen uptake) beginning 30 min after breakfast in seven healthy controls. Nine insulin-dependent diabetes were studied in an identical manner, with glycemia controlled by a closed-loop "artificial endocrine pancreas" controlled by a closed-loop "artificial endocrine pancreas" (AEP). Responses were compared to those during breakfast without exercise. In the controls, onset of exercise rapidly reversed the rise in both glycemia and insulin (IRI) that occurred with breakfast alone, both returning to fasting levels (glycemia, 80 +/- 3 mg/dl; IRI, 0.38 +/- 0.10 ng/ml). After exercise, small and transient increments occurred (glycemia, 33 +/- 6 mg/dl; IRI, 0.81 +/- 0.15 ng/ml). In the diabetics, prior overnight intravenous insulin normalized fasting glycemia (98 +/- 4 mg/dl), and its postbreakfast excursion was identical to that of controls, as were those of most measured substrates. Similarly, with exercise, glycemia returned rapidly to fasting levels, accompanied by an appropriate decrease in insulin infusion rates. "Free" IRI levels mirrored changes in infusion rates by the AEP, with a decrease in insulin requirement of 30% during exercise as compared to breakfast alone (P less than 0.05). Thus, in both diabetics treated with the AEP and in normals, the responses to postprandial exercise required rapid modulation of insulin delivery. To demonstrate the effect of postprandial exercise on preprogrammed open-loop insulin replacement, four diabetic subjects were studied during breakfast with and without exercise while receiving a fixed open-loop insulin infusion pattern (6.1 +/- 0.7 U over 140 +/- 8 min). The glycemic response to breakfast alone was entirely normalized. However, symptomatic hypoglycemia occurred in all subjects when exercise was initiated 30 min after breakfast. The diabetic

  12. Accelerated trace eyeblink conditioning after cortisol IV-infusion.

    PubMed

    Kuehl, Linn K; Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Richter, Steffen; Blumenthal, Terry D; Oitzl, Melly; Schachinger, Hartmut

    2010-11-01

    Impairing effects of cortisol on learning performance have been shown in human trace eyeblink conditioning. As the effect is observed from 30 min to hours after administration, a genomic action of cortisol is assumed. Here we report rapid cortisol effects that were observed during the first 10 min after cortisol administration in humans. Young healthy males (n=24) received the cortisol synthesis inhibitor metyrapone (1.5 g per os) to avoid interference of the endogenous pulsatile secretion of cortisol. Next, 2mg cortisol or placebo was infused intravenously, immediately before the trace conditioning task. The probability of the conditioned eyeblink responses was assessed electromyographically during the trace eyeblink conditioning task (unconditioned stimulus: corneal air puff, 10 psi, 50 ms; conditioned stimulus: binaural pure tone, 7 dB, 1000 Hz, 400 ms; empty interval between CS and US: 550 ms). Cortisol resulted in a faster increase of conditioning (p=.02), reaching a comparable level to placebo later on. This result extends the well-known effects of stress on the quality and amount of learning by showing that cortisol also affects the speed of learning. We propose that cortisol accelerates trace eyeblink conditioning via a fast, non-genomic mechanism. This fast action of cortisol is part of the adaptive strategy during the early stress response.

  13. Blood Sample Reliability Using Infusing Intravenous Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-01

    effect the value of Hgb and Hct in healthy non-bleeding subjects (Greenfield, Bessen, & Henneman , 1989). Greenfield and associates studied 28...Difference in Specimen Value Pairs 1.0.8.6.4.20.0-.2 M ea n Va lu e Fo r W BC R es ul ts 14.0 13.0 12.0 11.0 10.0 9.0 8.0 7.0 6.0 5.0 4.0 3.0 2.0...research: Conduct, critique, and utilization (3rd Ed.). Philidelphia: W . B. Saunders. Burtis C., & Ashwood E. (1994).Tietz textbook of clinical

  14. Standard concentration infusions in paediatric intensive care: the clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Joanne; Aguado-Lorenzo, Virginia; Arenas-Lopez, Sara

    2016-08-14

    The use of standard concentrations of intravenous infusions has been advocated by international organisations to increase intravenous medication safety in paediatric and neonatal critical care. However, there is no guidance on how to identify and implement these infusions leading to great interunit variability.

  15. Infusion extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction. A piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber. The method is applicable to operation in low or micro-gravity environments.

  16. Comparison Between Intraperitoneal and Intravenous Lidocaine for Postoperative Analgesia After Elective Abdominal Hysterectomy, a Double-Blind Placebo Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Samimi, Saghar; Taheri, Arman; Davari Tanha, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of intravenous and intraperitoneal injection of lidocaine and normal saline in relieving postoperative pain after elective abdominal hysterectomy. Materials and methods: For this double-blind randomized controlled study 109 patients undergoing elective abdominal hysterectomy were randomly allocated to three groups :1) IV group (intravenous injection group) received intravenous lidocaine %2 bolus 1.5mg/kg 30 min before incision and then a continuous lidocaine infusion of 2mg/kg and before the wound closure an intraperitoneal injection of N/S , 2) IP group (intraperitoneal group) received intravenous N/S and intraperitoneal lidocaine 3mg/kg , 3) P group (placebo, N/S) received both intravenous and intraperitoneal N/S. The pain scores (VAS) at rest, total morphine consumption , the time to first need for rescue analgesic ,incidence of lidocaine related adverse effects and nausea and vomiting were recorded at 0,2,4,8,12 and 24 hrs postoperatively. Results: The VAS scores were significantly lower in IP and IV groups compared with placebo (p = 0.001). Total consumption of morphine (p = 0.001) and time to firs request of recue analgesic (p = 0.001) were lower too in IP and IV groups.Incidence of vomiting was comparable between groups (p < 0.05) but nausea was higher in control group (p > 0.05).There were not notable lidocaine-related adverse effects. IP and IV groups were not statistically different for all investigated variables. Conclusion: This study showed lidocaine administration both intravenously and intraperitoneally are effective in reducing the postoperative pain and also have opioid sparing effect and can be safely used in elective abdominal hysterectomy without any major adverse effects. PMID:27047566

  17. Partial intravenous anesthesia in cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Duke, Tanya

    2013-03-01

    The partial intravenous anesthesia technique (PIVA) is used to lower the inspired concentration of an inhalational anesthetic by concurrent use of injectable drugs. This technique reduces the incidence of undesirable side-effects and provides superior quality of anesthesia and analgesia. Drugs commonly used for PIVA include opioids, alpha-2 adrenergic agonists, injectable anesthetic agents, and lidocaine. Most are administered by intravenous infusion.

  18. A randomized, open, multicenter clinical study on the short course of intravenous infusion of 750 mg of levofloxacin and the sequential standard course of intravenous infusion/oral administration of 500 mg of levofloxacin for treatment of community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tiemei; Chen, Liang-An; Wang, Ping; Tian, Guizhen; Ye, Feng; Zhu, Huili; He, Bei; Zhang, Baiying; Shao, Changzhou; Jie, Zhijun; Gao, Xiwen; Wang, Dongxia; Song, Weidong; Pan, Zhijie; Chen, Jin; Zhang, Xingyi; Gao, Zhancheng; Chen, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background To compare 5-day regimen of levofloxacin 750 mg IV daily with 7–14-day conventional regimen of levofloxacin 500 mg intravenous to oral (IV/PO) daily for treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Chinese population. Methods This was a non-inferiority study to assess the difference of clinical efficacy at the end of treatment (EOT) between two regimens. Adult CAP patients with CURB-65 score 0–2 were enrolled from 17 hospitals in China from November 2012 to July 2014. The subjects were randomized into levofloxacin 750 or 500 mg group and the clinical data were collected. Sputum and blood specimens were sent for bacterial culture. The urinary antigen of Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) was detected as well. At EOT, the clinical efficacy (primary endpoint), microbiological efficacy and safety were evaluated. Results A total of 457 patients were enrolled. Intent-to-treat (ITT) for primary endpoint analysis and per-protocol set (PPS) populations were 448 and 427 patients respectively. The therapeutic durations were 4.86 and 10.35 days and the mean drug exposure was 3,641.4 and 5,169.6 mg in 750 and 500 mg groups respectively. The clinical efficacy rate was 91.40% (202/221) in 750 mg group and 94.27% (214/227) in 500 mg group (ITT, P=0.2449). The difference in clinical efficacy rate was −2.87 (95% CI: −7.64, 1.90) between the two groups. The non-inferiority hypothesis of two groups was tenable (Δ=10%). The bacterial eradication rate was 100.00% in both groups. The most common drug-related clinical adverse events were injection site and gastrointestinal reactions. The most common drug-related laboratory abnormalities were WBC decrease and ALT/AST elevation. No statistical difference was found between two groups (P>0.05). Conclusions The 5-day regimen of levofloxacin 750 mg daily is non-inferior to 7–14-day conventional regimen of 500 mg daily in clinical efficacy for treatment of mild to moderate Chinese CAP population. The short

  19. Glucose Infusion into Exercising Dogs after Confinement: Rectal and Active Muscle Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Kruk, B.; Nazar, K.; Falecka-Wieczorek, I.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.

    1995-01-01

    Intravenous glucose infusion into ambulatory dogs results in attenuation of exercise-induced increase of both rectal and thigh muscle temperatures. That glucose (Glu) infusion attenuates excessive increase in body temperature from restricted activity during confinement deconditioning. Intravenous glucose infusion attenuates the rise in exercise core temperature in deconditioned dogs by a yet undefined mechanism.

  20. Encephalopathy is the dose-limiting toxicity of intravenous hepsulfam: results of a phase I trial in patients with advanced hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Larson, R A; Geller, R B; Janisch, L; Milton, J; Grochow, L B; Ratain, M J

    1995-01-01

    Hepsulfam is a bisulfamic ester which is similar in structure to busulfan and is believed to act as a bifunctional alkylator inducing both DNA-DNA and DNA-protein crosslinks. Prior studies in patients with refractory solid tumors have identified the dose-limiting toxicity of hepsulfam to be cumulative myelosuppression resulting in prolonged leukopenia and thrombocytopenia. This phase I trial was designed to determine the maximally tolerated dose of hepsulfam administered intravenously in patients with refractory leukemias and other advanced hematologic malignancies. Hepsulfam was administered as a 30-min or 2-h intravenous infusion to 21 patients with advanced leukemia or multiple myeloma. All patients had been extensively treated and had progressive disease. Cycles were repeated every 5 weeks. Cohorts of patients were treated at 360, 480, 640, and 800 mg/m2. The dose-limiting toxicity of intravenous hepsulfam was severe encephalopathy. The single patient treated at 800 mg/m2 became comatose within 48 h and required 3 weeks for his mental status to return to baseline. There were, however, no irreversible neurological sequelae. Several patients treated at 640 mg/m2 had clinical evidence of toxic deliriums and slowing of alpha rhythm waves on electroencephalograms indicative of a gray-matter encephalopathy. When hepsulfam was infused over 30 min, patients complained of uncomfortable parasthesias, but when the drug was administered over 2 h, these acute symptoms were less common. Myelosuppression was observed in most patients. Among those patients who had some suppression of their leukemia, peripheral blood counts recovered to pretreatment levels after 3-5 weeks. Apart from CNS toxicity, non-hematologic toxicity was minimal. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated rapid clearance of hepsulfam so that the drug was not reliably detected in the plasma after 24 h. The recommended phase II dose of hepsulfam as a single 2-h intravenous infusion is 480 mg/m2, but this dose

  1. Intravenous Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galliart, Barbara

    Intended for teaching licensed practical nurses, this curriculum guide provides information related to the equipment and skills required for nursing care of patients needing intravenous (IV) therapy. It also explains the roles and responsibilities of the licensed practical nurse with regard to intravenous therapy. Each of the 15 instructional…

  2. Mercury excretion and intravenous ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Dirks, M J; Davis, D R; Cheraskin, E; Jackson, J A

    1994-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that intravenous ascorbic acid increases urinary excretion of mercury in subjects with low mercury levels from dental amalgam, food, and other sources. From 89 adult volunteers we selected 28 subjects with the highest mercury excretions (2 to 14 micrograms/24 h). We administered intravenous infusions of 500 ml lactated Ringer's solution with and without addition of 750 mg of ascorbic acid/kg body weight, up to 60 g ascorbic acid. Average mercury excretion during the 24 h after infusion of ascorbic acid was 4.0 +/- 0.5 micrograms (mean +/- SEM), which was not significantly more than after infusion of Ringer's solution alone (3.7 +/- 0.5 micrograms). Lead excretion was similarly unaffected. If ascorbic acid administered intravenously benefits some persons with suspected adverse reactions to mercury, the benefit in subjects similar to ours appears unrelated to short-term enhanced excretion of mercury or lead.

  3. Slow infusion rate of doxorubicin induces higher pro-inflammatory cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Tien, Chin-Chieh; Peng, Yi-Chi; Yang, Fwu-Lin; Subeq, Yi-Maun; Lee, Ru-Ping

    2016-11-01

    Different infusion rates of doxorubicin (DOX) have been used for treating human malignancies. Organ toxicity after DOX infusion is a major issue in treatment disruption. However, whether different DOX infusion rates induce different toxicity is still unknown. In this study, we examined the toxicity effects of different DOX infusion rates in the early phase of organ toxicity. Thirty-six rats were randomly divided into 5-, 15-, and 30-min infusion rate groups. A single dose of DOX (8.3 mg/kg, I.V.) was administered at different infusion rates. Blood samples were collected from the femoral artery at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, 24, 36, and 48 h after DOX administration. The blood cell count and blood biochemistry were analyzed. The liver, kidney, and heart were removed for pathological examinations after the rats were sacrificed. Our findings show that the 30-min group had higher injury markers in the liver (glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase and glutamic pyruvic transaminase), kidneys (blood urea nitrogen and creatinine), and heart (creatine phosphokinase-MB and lactate dehydrogenase), and had higher tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin 6 levels than did the other groups. The 30-min group also had more severe damage according to the pathological examinations. In conclusion, slower infusion of DOX induced a higher inflammatory response and greater organ damage.

  4. Use and abuse of intravenous solutions.

    PubMed

    Vidt, D G

    1975-05-05

    Recent microbial infusion disasters underline the fact that infusions carry a substantial risk of morbidity and mortality. Those who make a habit of setting up an intravenous infusion as a convenient route for the administration of drugs, or just in case it may be needed later, would do well to review their methodsmthe increased probability of contamination and subsequent patient infection by the practice of adding drugs to intravenous fluids is not generally recognized. To reduce the possibility of microbial contamination, the open system with tube containers should be opened only in an aseptic environment, eg, a laminar flow hood, to allow the vacuum to be replace by aseptic air; the open-system containers should be opened only in an aseptic environment, and a bacterial filter should be inserted in the air entry port of the closure. Routine monitoring of intravenous solutions for microbial contamination should be standard procedure for any institution providing intravenous fluid therapy to patientsmthe following recommendations are suggested for consideration by hospital pharmacy and therapeutics committees: 1, The addition of drugs to intravenous fluids should be discouraged except in recognized cases of emergency. 2 when the addition of drugs to intravenous fluids is indicated, only one drug should be added to an intravenous fluid, and the only intravenous fluids used for this purpose should be isotonic saline or 5% dextrose solution in water. More complicated electrolyte solutions and protein hydrolysate solutions should never be used for additive purposes. Guidelines should be established in hospitals for the addition of drugs to intravenous fluids. These guidelines should be followed by trained personnel who have access to all available compatibility data. Additions should be made under aseptic conditions by trained personnel, preferably in the hospital pharmacy. 4. All additions of drugs should be included in the patient's permanent drug file, and the

  5. Infusion pump development and implications for nurses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul

    Infusion pumps are commonplace in today's healthcare settings and their design and development has kept pace with technology over the decades. In the 1970s and 1980s infusion pumps began to emerge in the UK market and were basic, mechanical devices with limited functions. Today, infusion pumps have a plethora of functions and features and a range of alarms to help alert the user and the patient that infusions are nearing completion, have ended or their range of sensors has detected that the infusion pump, or patient, requires attention. The role of the nurse in safely managing this ever-changing technology should not be underestimated. This paper reviews the progress made over the past 40 years in the UK healthcare setting and how the nurses have had to keep up to speed with the technology as it develops. It highlights the importance of fully integrating infusion pumps into intravenous (IV) therapy training and assessment. The important role the nurse plays is highlighted as well as exploring how he or she can help organisations better understand infusion pumps in the day-to-day management of patients undergoing intravenous therapy.

  6. Rationale and design of the allogeneiC human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in patients with aging fRAilTy via intravenoUS delivery (CRATUS) study: A phase I/II, randomized, blinded and placebo controlled trial to evaluate the safety and potential efficacy of allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cell infusion in patients with aging frailty

    PubMed Central

    Golpanian, Samuel; DiFede, Darcy L.; Pujol, Marietsy V.; Lowery, Maureen H.; Levis-Dusseau, Silvina; Goldstein, Bradley J.; Schulman, Ivonne H.; Longsomboon, Bangon; Wolf, Ariel; Khan, Aisha; Heldman, Alan W.; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Frailty is a syndrome associated with reduced physiological reserves that increases an individual's vulnerability for developing increased morbidity and/or mortality. While most clinical trials have focused on exercise, nutrition, pharmacologic agents, or a multifactorial approach for the prevention and attenuation of frailty, none have studied the use of cell-based therapies. We hypothesize that the application of allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (allo-hMSCs) as a therapeutic agent for individuals with frailty is safe and efficacious. The CRATUS trial comprises an initial non-blinded phase I study, followed by a blinded, randomized phase I/II study (with an optional follow-up phase) that will address the safety and pre-specified beneficial effects in patients with the aging frailty syndrome. In the initial phase I protocol, allo-hMSCs will be administered in escalating doses via peripheral intravenous infusion (n=15) to patients allocated to three treatment groups: Group 1 (n=5, 20 million allo-hMSCs), Group 2 (n=5, 100 million allo-hMSCs), and Group 3 (n=5, 200 million allo-hMSCs). Subsequently, in the randomized phase, allo-hMSCs or matched placebo will be administered to patients (n=30) randomly allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to one of two doses of MSCs versus placebo: Group A (n=10, 100 million allo-hMSCs), Group B (n=10, 200 million allo-hMSCs), and Group C (n=10, placebo). Primary and secondary objectives are, respectively, to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of allo-hMSCs administered in frail older individuals. This study will determine the safety of intravenous infusion of stem cells and compare phenotypic outcomes in patients with aging frailty. PMID:26933813

  7. Cerebral Microvascular and Systemic Effects Following Intravenous Administration of the Perfluorocarbon Emulsion Perftoran

    PubMed Central

    Abutarboush, Rania; Saha, Biswajit K.; Mullah, Saad H.; Arnaud, Francoise G.; Haque, Ashraful; Aligbe, Chioma; Pappas, Georgina; Auker, Charles R.; McCarron, Richard M.; Moon-Massat, Paula F.; Scultetus, Anke H.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen-carrying perfluorocarbon (PFC) fluids have the potential to increase tissue oxygenation during hypoxic states and to reduce ischemic cell death. Regulatory approval of oxygen therapeutics was halted due to concerns over vasoconstrictive side effects. The goal of this study was to assess the potential vasoactive properties of Perftoran by measuring brain pial arteriolar diameters in a healthy rat model. Perftoran, crystalloid (saline) or colloid (Hextend) solutions were administered as four sequential 30 min intravenous (IV) infusions, thus allowing an evaluation of cumulative dose-dependent effects. There were no overall changes in diameters of small-sized (<50 μm) pial arterioles within the Perftoran group, while both saline and Hextend groups exhibited vasoconstriction. Medium-sized arterioles (50–100 μm) showed minor (~8–9%) vasoconstriction within saline and Hextend groups and only ~5% vasoconstriction within the Perftoran group. For small- and medium-sized pial arterioles, the mean percent change in vessel diameters was not different among the groups. Although there was a tendency for arterial blood pressures to increase with Perftoran, pressures were not different from the other two groups. These data show that Perftoran, when administered to healthy anesthetized rats, does not cause additional vasoconstriction in cerebral pial arterioles or increase systemic blood pressure compared with saline or Hextend. PMID:27869709

  8. Kinetics of plasma procalcitonin, soluble CD14, CCL2 and IL-10 after a sublethal infusion of lipopolysaccharide in horses.

    PubMed

    Bonelli, Francesca; Meucci, Valentina; Divers, Thomas J; Wagner, Bettina; Intorre, Luigi; Sgorbini, Micaela

    2017-02-01

    Endotoxemia represents a significant clinical and economic problem for the equine industry. This study assesses the kinetics of soluble CD14 (sCD14), chemokine (CC motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), interleukin 10 (IL-10) and plasma procalcitonin (PCT) in healthy horses after the intravenous infusion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The aim was to contribute to the basic understanding of the equine species-specific kinetics of these molecules in response to LPS exposure, which could support further findings in clinical studies and identify valuable inflammatory biomarkers for equine practice. Eleven healthy horses were involved in this experimental in vivo study. Horses were classified as healthy before the LPS infusion. After the pre-infusion blood collection (T0), all horses received an infusion of E. coli endotoxin (30ng/kg over 30min). Data and samples were collected 1h (T1), 2 (T2), 3 (T3) and 24h (T24) after infusion. Plasma sCD14, CCL2 and IL-10 were evaluated with a fluorescent bead-based assay, while PCT was evaluated with an equine PCT ELISA assay. A one-way ANOVA test was performed between each blood-sampling time for PCT, sCD14 and IL-10, and a Friedman test was performed for CCL2. Plasma PCT, IL-10 and CCL2 concentrations increased statistically significantly at T1, T2 and T3 compared to T0. No statistically significant differences were found between plasma IL-10 and CCL2 concentrations between T0 vs T24, although plasma PCT values remained high 24h after LPS infusion. Plasma sCD14 concentration showed no statistically significant differences for any of sampling times. Our results demonstrate that LPS injection into healthy horses results in PCT, CCL2 and IL-10 increases in plasma without an increase in sCD14. The increases in PCT, CCL2 and IL-10 are related to the inflammatory response induced by circulating lipopolysaccharide.

  9. Calcium gluconate infusion is as effective as the vascular endothelial growth factor antagonist cabergoline for the prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Naredi, Nikita; Karunakaran, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) is an iatrogenic and potentially life-threatening disease process, which may occur in healthy young women undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for assisted reproduction. As the treatment is largely empirical, prevention forms the mainstay of management. OBJECTIVE: The present study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of intravenous (IV) calcium gluconate infusion in comparison to the dopamine agonist cabergoline (Cb2) in preventing OHSS in high risk patients undergoing assisted reproductive technique cycles. MATERIALS AND METHODS: It was a comparative study wherein the 202 high risk patients undergoing in vitro-fertilization over a period of 18 months after meeting the strict inclusion and the exclusion criteria, were randomly divided into two groups (98 subjects in Group I and 104 in Group II). Women in Group I were administered IV calcium gluconate while the remaining 104 received the dopamine agonist Cb2. The 104 patients belonging to Group II were started Cb2 0.5 mg/day from the day of ovulation trigger and continued until the next 8 days while the 98 high risk patients from Group I were infused with 10 ml of 10% calcium gluconate solution in 200 ml physiologic saline within 30 min of ovum pick up and continued thereafter on day 1, day 2 and day 3. RESULTS: The occurrence of OHSS was seen in only nine patients (in the calcium infusion group, when compared with 16 patients (9.2% vs. 15.4%) who were administered Cb2, but it was not statistically significant. However, only one had severe OHSS in Group I, whereas two women were diagnosed as severe OHSS belonging to the Cb2 arm. CONCLUSION: Our results document that calcium infusion can effectively prevent severe OHSS and decreases OHSS occurrence rates when used for high-risk patients, but does not suggest its superiority over Cb2. With comparable success rates, either of them can be employed as a preventive strategy for OHSS. PMID:24672164

  10. Perioperative Effects of Different Narcotic Analgesics Used to Improve Effectiveness of Total Intravenous Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Saraçoğlu, Ayten; Eti, Zeynep; Konya, Deniz; Kabahasanoğlu, Kadir; Göğüş, Fevzi Yılmaz

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the depth of anaesthesia, perioperative haemodynamics, postoperative pain scores, analgesic consumption in patients receiving remifentanil- or alfentanil-based total intravenous anaesthesia for single-level lumbar discectomy. Methods Seventy patients undergoing discectomy were enrolled in the study. Patients were intravenously administered an initial bolus dose of 2 mg kg−1 propofol and 10 mcg kg−1 alfentanil or 1 mcg kg−1 remifentanil, followed by 6 mg kg−1 h−1 propofol and either 1 mcg kg−1 min−1 alfentanil or 0.25 mcg kg−1 min−1 remifentanil infusion. Bispectral index (BIS) values, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, end-tidal carbon dioxide and oxygen saturation were recorded. Postoperative pain scores at 0, 30 and 60 min were measured and recorded with additional opioid requirements. Results Postoperative pain scores at 0 and 30 min, total analgesic consumption and requirement for additional analgesics were significantly high in the remifentanil group. After the first hour, the pain scores were not significantly different. Mean arterial blood pressure was significantly low at 45 and 60 min preoperatively in the remifentanil group. In the remifentanil group, heart rate at 15, 30, 45, 60 min were significantly lower than those in the alfentanil group. BIS values of the two groups were not significantly different at any measurement time point. BIS values of remifentanil group at 30, 45, 60, 90 and 180 min significantly increased compared with those at 15 min. Conclusion Alfentanil provided more stable BIS and haemodynamic values preoperatively and less opioid consumption, along with lower pain scores, during the early postoperative period compared with remifentanil in patients undergoing single-level discectomy. PMID:27366550

  11. 78 FR 79469 - Strategies To Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ... Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public... Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to... complication of Immune Globulin Intravenous (IGIV) (Human) infusion. Complications of hemolysis include...

  12. Acute hepatitis after amiodarone infusion.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Paulo; Dias, Adelaide; Gonçalves, Helena; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Gama, Vasco

    2015-10-16

    Acute hepatitis is a very rare, but potentially fatal, adverse effect of intravenous amiodarone. We present a case of an 88-year-old man with history of ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and severely depressed left ventricular function that was admitted to our coronary care unit with diagnosis of decompensated heart failure and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. A few hours after the beginning of intravenous amiodarone he developed an acute hepatitis. There was a completely recovery within the next days after amiodarone withdrawn and other causes of acute hepatitis have been ruled out. This case highlights the need for close monitoring of hepatic function during amiodarone infusion in order to identify any potential hepatotoxicity and prevent a fatal outcome. Oral amiodarone is, apparently, a safe option in these patients.

  13. Intravenous drug delivery in neonates: lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, Catherine M T; Medlicott, Natalie J; Reith, David M; Broadbent, Roland S

    2014-06-01

    Intravenous drug administration presents a series of challenges that relate to the pathophysiology of the neonate and intravenous infusion systems in neonates. These challenges arise from slow intravenous flow rates, small drug volume, dead space volume and limitations on the flush volume in neonates. While there is a reasonable understanding of newborn pharmacokinetics, an appreciation of the substantial delay and variability in the rate of drug delivery from the intravenous line is often lacking. This can lead to difficulties in accurately determining the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationship of drugs in the smallest patients. The physical variables that affect the passage of drugs through neonatal lines need to be further explored in order to improve our understanding of their impact on the delivery of drugs by this route in neonates. Through careful investigation, the underlying causes of delayed drug delivery may be identified and administration protocols can then be modified to ensure predictable, appropriate drug input kinetics.

  14. Endothelial Cell Toxicity of Vancomycin Infusion Combined with Other Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Décaudin, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    French guidelines recommend central intravenous (i.v.) infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous (p.i.v.) infusion is often preferred in intensive care units. Vancomycin infusion has been implicated in cases of phlebitis, with endothelial toxicity depending on the drug concentration and the duration of the infusion. Vancomycin is frequently infused in combination with other i.v. antibiotics through the same administrative Y site, but the local toxicity of such combinations has been poorly evaluated. Such an assessment could improve vancomycin infusion procedures in hospitals. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were challenged with clinical doses of vancomycin over 24 h with or without other i.v. antibiotics. Cell death was measured with the alamarBlue test. We observed an excess cellular death rate without any synergistic effect but dependent on the numbers of combined infusions when vancomycin and erythromycin or gentamicin were infused through the same Y site. Incompatibility between vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam was not observed in our study, and rinsing the cells between the two antibiotic infusions did not reduce endothelial toxicity. No endothelial toxicity of imipenem-cilastatin was observed when combined with vancomycin. p.i.v. vancomycin infusion in combination with other medications requires new recommendations to prevent phlebitis, including limiting coinfusion on the same line, reducing the infusion rate, and choosing an intermittent infusion method. Further studies need to be carried out to explore other drug combinations in long-term vancomycin p.i.v. therapy so as to gain insight into the mechanisms of drug incompatibility under multidrug infusion conditions.

  15. Intravenous access: a comparison of two methods.

    PubMed

    Duffy, B L; Lee, J S

    1983-05-01

    The reliability in providing a continued venous route to the circulation is compared between a winged needle (Abbott "Butterfly--23 INT") and a plastic catheter (Jelco Teflon "Catheter Placement Unit", 22 gauge). The catheter remained within the vein in all cases and had a much lower incidence of total obstruction during the study period. Where an intravenous infusion is not in place, a plastic catheter provides a more reliable access route to the circulation than does a winged needle.

  16. Method of infusion extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction, where a piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, and where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber.

  17. Conditioning Effects of Chronic Infusions of Dobutamine

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chang-Seng; Tuttle, Ronald R.; Hood, William B.; Gavras, Haralambos

    1979-01-01

    We studied the conditioning effects of chronic infusion of dobutamine and exercise training in three groups of chronically instrumented dogs. One group was infused with normal saline, a second group was infused with dobutamine (40 μg/kg per min), and the third group was exercised on a treadmill at 4 mph, up a 10° incline. Each group was either infused or exercised for 2 h a day, 5 d a week for 5 consecutive wk. Resting heart rate and arterial blood lactate concentration, measured at weekly intervals, decreased progressively in the dobutamine and exercise groups, but not in the group that received normal saline infusion. Cardiovascular responses to submaximal treadmill exercise were not changed by 5 wk of normal saline infusion. However, the increases in heart rate, cardiac output, mean aortic blood pressure, arterial blood lactate, plasma renin activity, and norepinephrine concentration during exercise were significantly smaller after 5 wk of conditioning with either dobutamine or exercise training. After conditioning, the increases in arteriovenous oxygen difference during exercise were larger in the latter two groups, but the increases in total body oxygen consumption did not differ before and after conditioning. To assess ventricular function, we intravenously infused methoxamine both before and after conditioning. The slope of the line that related systolic aortic blood pressure and mean left atrial pressure increased in the animals conditioned with either dobutamine or exercise, indicating enhanced myocardial contractility. Left ventricular blood flow was lower in these two groups of animals than it was in the normal saline group. Left ventricular weight did not differ among the three groups. Our results show that chronic infusion of dobutamine produced cardiovascular and metabolic conditioning effects like those produced by exercise training, and further suggest that sympathetic stimulation during exercise plays a role in physical conditioning. PMID:457872

  18. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for antibody deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, M T; Pirofsky, B; Gerritz, G A; Golding, B

    1979-01-01

    Twenty patients with antibody deficiency were treated at random with either intramuscular immune serum globulin (ISG) or intravenous modified immune serum globulin (M-ISG). Fourteen patients received of 259 M-ISG infusions during 242 months of treatment. Catastrophic vasomotor reactions were not observed. A single dose of 150 mg/kilo M-ISG increased serum IgG values a mean 248 mg%. Intravenous M-ISG therapy was effective in reducing the incidence of acute infections. Subjects receiving M-ISG developed 0.103 acute infections per month of treatment. Patients injected with ISG had 0.295 acute infections per month of treatment. Seven subjects had separate courses of both intravenous M-ISG and intramuscular ISG. Acute infections per month of treatment for M-ISG and ISG were 0.104 and 0.406, respectively. PMID:477026

  19. [Bacterial contamination as a complication of intravenous therapy in intensive care (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kilian, J; Hösch, A; Ahnefeld, F W; Schmitz, J E; Vanek, E

    1980-10-01

    Intravenous infusion therapy has become an indispensible part of intensive care. Problems of bacterial contamination during this therapy are well known. To check on the possible routes of contamination we examined the infusion system in its several parts (infusion solution, infusion system, connection between infusion system and catheter and content of syringes). The highest rate of contamination was found at the connection between the infusion system and the catheter after use for 24 h (26.7%, 39 out of 146 probes); just at the beginning of the infusion we found bacterial growth in 7.1% (10 out of 141 probes). After injection of drugs into the system the infusion solution was contaminated in 1.9% (6 of 320 probes). The system for measuring the central venous pressure was contaminated in 2.7% (4 of 148 probes). At the end of infusion the infusion solutions were contaminated in 3.1% (9 of 287 probes). Different drugs in syringes in no case were contaminated. In most cases (59 probes) we found gram-positive bacteria (87.3%), in only seven cases (9.7%) gram-negative bacterias and in two cases Candida tropicalis. Our results show that the extrinsic or in use contamination plays the most important part in bacterial contamination of the infusion system. Infection control of intravenous therapy necessitates care in the hygienic standard adopted during the infusion and injection procedures.

  20. Impact of smart infusion technology on administration of anticoagulants (unfractionated Heparin, Argatroban, Lepirudin, and Bivalirudin).

    PubMed

    Fanikos, John; Fiumara, Karen; Baroletti, Steve; Luppi, Carol; Saniuk, Catherine; Mehta, Amar; Silverman, Jon; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2007-04-01

    This study reviewed 863 alerts generated from the infusion of anticoagulants in 355 patients from October 2003 to January 2005. Alerts were generated by smart infusion technology pumps and recorded in the devices' memory. The most common alerts were underdose alerts (59.8%), followed by overdose alerts (31.3%) and duplicate drug therapy alerts (8.9%). In response to the alerts, users' most frequent action was to cancel (46.5%) or reprogram (43.1%) the infusions. The highest percentage of alerts occurred from 2 to 4 p.m. During the study, there were 4 infusion rate errors, compared with 15 in the immediately preceding 16-month period. In conclusion, smart infusion technology intercepted keypad entry errors, thereby reducing the likelihood of intravenous anticoagulant overdose or underdose. Dose or infusion rate programming during intravenous anticoagulation is an important targets for medication safety interventions.

  1. Water Intoxication Following Low-Dose Intravenous Cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Tai Yeon; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Park, Joon Sung; Lee, Chang Hwa; Park, Moon Hyang; Kang, Chong Myung

    2007-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide is frequently used for the treatment of severe lupus nephritis, but is very rarely associated with dilutional hyponatremia. Recently we experienced a case of water intoxication following low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide. Five hours after one dose of intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide 750 mg, the patient developed nausea, vomiting, and general weakness. Serum sodium concentration revealed 114 mEq/L and her hyponatremia was initially treated with hypertonic saline infusion. Then her serum sodium concentration rapidly recovered to normal with water restriction alone. During the course of intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide therapy, one must be aware of the possibility of significant water retention. PMID:24459501

  2. Water intoxication following low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Koo, Tai Yeon; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Park, Joon Sung; Lee, Chang Hwa; Park, Moon Hyang; Kang, Chong Myung; Kim, Gheun-Ho

    2007-06-01

    Cyclophosphamide is frequently used for the treatment of severe lupus nephritis, but is very rarely associated with dilutional hyponatremia. Recently we experienced a case of water intoxication following low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide. Five hours after one dose of intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide 750 mg, the patient developed nausea, vomiting, and general weakness. Serum sodium concentration revealed 114 mEq/L and her hyponatremia was initially treated with hypertonic saline infusion. Then her serum sodium concentration rapidly recovered to normal with water restriction alone. During the course of intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide therapy, one must be aware of the possibility of significant water retention.

  3. [Infusion therapy use in treatment of patients with sialoadenitis and sialadenosis].

    PubMed

    Afanas'ev, V V; Avdienko, O V

    2006-01-01

    The authors treated 42 patients with sialoadenitis and sialadenosis by intravenous drop infusion of hemodes and rheopolyglucin solutions for detoxication and tissue microcirculation improvement. The best results were received with rheopolyglucin (84% of positive response). Infusions of hemodes solution were more effective when used as a component of combined pharmacotherapy of chronic diseases of the salivary glands.

  4. Optical detection of intravenous infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, Leonard W.; Chou, Nee-Yin

    2006-02-01

    Infiltration of medications during infusion therapy results in complications ranging from erythema and pain to tissue necrosis requiring amputation. Infiltration occurs from improper insertion of the cannula, separation of the cannula from the vein, penetration of the vein by the cannula during movement, and response of the vein to the medication. At present, visual inspection by the clinical staff is the primary means for detecting intravenous (IV) infiltration. An optical sensor was developed to monitor the needle insertion site for signs of IV infiltration. Initial studies on simulated and induced infiltrations on a swine model validated the feasibility of the methodology. The presence of IV infiltration was confirmed by visual inspection of the infusion site and/or absence of blood return in the IV line. Potential sources of error due to illumination changes, motion artifacts, and edema were also investigated. A comparison of the performance of the optical device and blinded expert observers showed that the optical sensor has higher sensitivity and specificity, and shorter detection time than the expert observers. An improved model of the infiltration monitoring device was developed and evaluated in a clinical study on induced infiltrations of healthy adult volunteers. The performance of the device was compared with the observation of a blinded expert observer. The results show that the rates of detection of infiltrations are 98% and 82% for the optical sensor and the observer, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the optical sensor are 0.97 and 0.98, respectively.

  5. [Research and application of microcontroller system for target controlled infusion].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuke; Dou, Jianhong; Zhang, Xingan; Wang, Ruosong

    2005-08-01

    This paper presents a microcontroller system for target controlled infusion according to pharmacodynamic parameters of intravenous anesthetics. It can control the depth of anesthesia by adjusting the level of plasma concentrations. The system has the advantages of high precision, extending power and easy manipulation. It has been used in the clinical anesthesia.

  6. Laparoscopic appendectomy under spinal anesthesia with dexmedetomidine infusion

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Go-Woon; Kim, Min-Su; Yang, Hun-Ju; Park, Dong-Ho; Cho, Choon-Kyu; Kwon, Hee-Uk; Kang, Po-Soon; Moon, Ju-Ik

    2014-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) is rarely performed under regional anesthesia because of pneumoperitoneum-related problems. We expected that dexmedetomidine would compensate for the problems arising from spinal anesthesia alone. Thus, we performed a feasibility study of spinal anesthesia with intravenous dexmedetomidine infusion. Methods Twenty-six patients undergoing LA received spinal anesthesia with intravenous dexmedetomidine infusion. During surgery, the patient's pain or discomfort was controlled by supplemental fentanyl or ketamine injection, and all adverse effects were evaluated. Results No patient required conversion to general anesthesia, and all operations were completed laparoscopically without conversion to open surgery. Seventeen (65.4%) patients required supplemental injection of fentanyl or ketamine. Bradycardia occurred in seven (26.9%) patients. Conclusions Spinal anesthesia with dexmedetomidine infusion may be feasible for LA. However, additional analgesia, sedation, and careful attention to the potential development of bradycardia are needed for a successful anesthetic outcome. PMID:25368782

  7. [The effect of air within the infusion syringe on drug delivery of syringe pump infusion systems] .

    PubMed

    Schulz, G; Fischer, J; Neff, T; Bänziger, O; Weiss, M

    2000-12-01

    Application of highly concentrated short-acting vasoactive drugs in the critically ill patient requires precisely working syringe pump systems for continuous intravenous drug delivery. We performed a bench study to investigate the consequences of small amounts of air entrapped within a 50-ml infusion syringe. In particular we studied the effect of entrapped air on drug delivery after moderate vertical displacement of the pump by 50 cm (e.g. in preparation for transport) and the effect on the time required to trigger the pressure alarm after occlusion of the infusion line. At a flow rate of 1 ml/h, lowering the syringe pump prolonged the zero-drug delivery time from (mean +/- SD) 4.1 +/- 0.8 min (without air) to 6.2 +/- 0.9 (with 1 ml air) and to 13.1 +/- 0.9 min (with 2 ml of air, p < 0.001 for all comparisons). Entrapping of 2 ml of air within the syringe resulted in a 2.6-fold prolongation of the occlusion alarm time after accidental occlusion of the infusion line and a 3-fold increase of the resulting infusion bolus after occlusion. Enclosed air within infusion syringes considerably affects the syringe compliance. It increases the susceptibility of constant drug delivery to vertical displacement of syringe pumps and impairs the occlusion alarm function. Therefore, any air in syringe of infusion pump systems should be carefully removed. To avoid infusion boluses of short-acting vasoactive drugs after accidental occlusions, the occluded infusion line should be released to ambient pressure first.

  8. Programmable physiological infusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. H.; Young, D. R.; Adachi, R. R. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A programmable physiological infusion device and method are provided wherein a program source, such as a paper tape, is used to actuate an infusion pump in accordance with a desired program. The system is particularly applicable for dispensing calcium in a variety of waveforms.

  9. Extended-infusion cefepime reduces mortality in patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Karri A; West, Jessica E; O'Brien, James M; Goff, Debra A

    2013-07-01

    In an era of escalating resistance and a lack of new antimicrobial discovery, stewardship programs must utilize knowledge of pharmacodynamics to achieve maximal exposure in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. We evaluated the clinical and economic outcomes associated with extended-infusion cefepime in the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. This single-center study compared inpatients who received cefepime for bacteremia and/or pneumonia admitted from 1 January 2008 through 30 June 2010 (a 30-min infusion of 2 g every 8 h) to those admitted from 1 July 2010 through 31 May 2011 (a 4-h infusion of 2 g every 8 h). The overall mortality was significantly lower in the group that received extended-infusion treatment (20% versus 3%; P = 0.03). The mean length of stay was 3.5 days less for patients who received extended infusion (P = 0.36), and for patients admitted to the intensive care unit the mean length of stay was significantly less in the extended-infusion group (18.5 days versus 8 days; P = 0.04). Hospital costs were $23,183 less per patient, favoring the extended-infusion treatment group (P = 0.13). We conclude that extended-infusion treatment with cefepime provides increased clinical and economic benefits in the treatment of invasive P. aeruginosa infections.

  10. Dilation and degradation of the brain extracellular matrix enhances penetration of infused polymer nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Neeves, Keith B.; Sawyer, Andrew J.; Foley, Conor P.; Saltzman, W. Mark; Olbricht, William L.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates methods of manipulating the brain extracellular matrix (ECM) to enhance the penetration of nanoparticle drug carriers in convection-enhanced delivery (CED). A probe was fabricated with two independent microfluidic channels to infuse, either simultaneously or sequentially, nanoparticles and ECM-modifying agents. Infusions were performed in the striatum of the normal rat brain. Monodisperse polystyrene particles with a diameter of 54 nm were used as a model nanoparticle system. Because the size of these particles is comparable to the effective pore size of the ECM, their transport may be significantly hindered compared with the transport of low molecular weight molecules. To enhance the transport of the infused nanoparticles, we attempted to increase the effective pore size of the ECM by two methods: dilating the extracellular space and degrading selected constituents of the ECM. Two methods of dilating the extracellular space were investigated: co-infusion of nanoparticles and a hyperosmolar solution of mannitol, and pre-infusion of an isotonic buffer solution followed by infusion of nanoparticles. These treatments resulted in an increase in the nanoparticle distribution volume of 50% and 123%, respectively. To degrade hyaluronan, a primary structural component of the brain ECM, a pre-infusion of hyaluronidase (20,000 U/mL) was followed after 30 min by infusion of nanoparticles. This treatment resulted in an increase in the nanoparticle distribution of 64%. Our results suggest that both dilation and enzymatic digestion can be incorporated into CED protocols to enhance nanoparticle penetration. PMID:17920047

  11. Intravenous application of an anticalin dramatically lowers plasma digoxin levels and reduces its toxic effects in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Eyer, Florian; Steimer, Werner; Nitzsche, Thomas; Jung, Nicole; Neuberger, Heidi; Müller, Christine; Schlapschy, Martin; Zilker, Thomas; Skerra, Arne

    2012-09-15

    Lipocalins tailored with high affinity for prescribed ligands, so-called anticalins, constitute promising candidates as antidotes. Here, we present an animal study to investigate both pharmacokinetic and clinical effects of an anticalin specific for the digitalis compound digoxin. Intravenous digoxin (2.5–50 μg/kg/min) was administered to rats until first changes in the ECG occurred (dose finding study) or a priori for 30 min (kinetic study). The anticalin DigA16(H86N), dubbed DigiCal, was administered intravenously at absolute doses of 1, 5, 10 and 20 mg, while the control group received isotonic saline. Hemodynamic changes, several ECG parameters and digoxin concentration in plasma were monitored at given time intervals. After DigiCal administration free digoxin concentration in plasma ultrafiltrate declined dramatically within 1 min to the presumably non-toxic range. There was also a significant and DigiCal dose-dependent effect on longer survival, less ECG alterations, arrhythmia, and improved hemodynamics. Infusion of a lower digoxin dose (2.5 μg/kg/min) resulted in a more sustained reduction of free digoxin in plasma after DigiCal administration compared to a higher digoxin dose (25 μg/kg/min), whereas ECG and hemodynamic parameters did not markedly differ, reflecting the known relative insensitivity of rats towards digoxin toxicity. Notably, we observed a re-increase of free digoxin in plasma some time after bolus administration of DigiCal, which was presumably due to toxin redistribution from tissue in combination with the relatively fast renal clearance of the rather small protein antidote. We conclude that anticalins with appropriately engineered drug-binding activities and, possibly, prolonged plasma half-life offer prospects for next-generation antidotal therapy. -- Highlights: ► We provide an advanced model of digoxin toxicity in rats. ► We report on binding of digoxin to a novel designed anticalin. ► We report on pharmacokinetics of digoxin

  12. Short versus long infusion of meropenem in very-low-birth-weight neonates.

    PubMed

    Padari, Helgi; Metsvaht, Tuuli; Kõrgvee, Lenne-Triin; Germovsek, Eva; Ilmoja, Mari-Liis; Kipper, Karin; Herodes, Koit; Standing, Joseph F; Oselin, Kersti; Lutsar, Irja

    2012-09-01

    Prolonged infusion of meropenem has been suggested in studies with population pharmacokinetic modeling but has not been tested in neonates. We compared the steady-state pharmacokinetics (PK) of meropenem given as a short (30-min) or prolonged (4-h) infusion to very-low-birth-weight (gestational age, <32 weeks; birth weight, <1,200 g) neonates to define the appropriate dosing regimen for a phase 3 efficacy study. Short (n = 9) or prolonged (n = 10) infusions of meropenem were given at a dose of 20 mg/kg every 12 h. Immediately before and 0.5, 1.5, 4, 8, and 12 h after the 4th to 7th doses of meropenem, blood samples were collected. Meropenem concentrations were measured by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography. PK analysis was performed with WinNonlin software, and modeling was performed with NONMEM software. A short infusion resulted in a higher mean drug concentration in serum (C(max)) than a prolonged infusion (89 versus 54 mg/liter). In all but two patients in the prolonged-infusion group, the free serum drug concentration was above the MIC (2 mg/liter) 100% of the time. Meropenem clearance (CL) was not influenced by postnatal or postmenstrual age. In population PK analysis, a one-compartment model provided the best fit and the steady-state distribution volume (V(ss)) was scaled with body weight and CL with a published renal maturation function. The covariates serum creatinine and postnatal and gestational ages did not improve the model fit. The final parameter estimates were a V(ss) of 0.301 liter/kg and a CL of 0.061 liter/h/kg. Meropenem infusions of 30 min are acceptable as they balance a reasonably high C(max) with convenience of dosing. In very-low-birth-weight neonates, no dosing adjustment is needed over the first month of life.

  13. Continuous ampicillin infusion as an alternative to intermittent infusion for adult inpatients: a case series.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Taku; Kasahara, Kei; Ikawa, Kazuro; Shigeta, Junichi; Komatsu, Yuko; Kuruno, Noriko; Uno, Kenji; Maeda, Koichi; Mikasa, Keiichi

    2014-10-01

    Intravenous ampicillin has been extensively used for various kinds of infections for more than fifty years. This drug is administered intermittently, which can result in missed or delayed drug administration and sleep interruption that can have a negative impact on the quality of life during hospitalization. Continuous infusion may solve these concerns. We reviewed the cases of five patients who were treated with continuous ampicillin infusions in our hospital. The ampicillin serum concentrations were from 11.3 to 32.8 μg/mL, which was above the ampicillin MICs of the causative organisms, ≤0.06 to 4 μg/mL. Although the dosages given of ampicillin varied in each case, the serum concentrations showed a strong correlation with creatinine clearance (r(2) = 0.91). All the patients improved at the time of discharge, or transfer to another hospital, with no significant complications during the continuous infusion. Continuous ampicillin infusion could be a better alternative for frequent intermittent infusion for adult inpatients with infections due to ampicillin-susceptible organisms.

  14. Intravenous paracetamol (acetaminophen).

    PubMed

    Duggan, Sean T; Scott, Lesley J

    2009-01-01

    Intravenous paracetamol (rINN)/intravenous acetaminophen (USAN) is an analgesic and antipyretic agent, recommended worldwide as a first-line agent for the treatment of pain and fever in adults and children. In double-blind clinical trials, single or multiple doses of intravenous paracetamol 1 g generally provided significantly better analgesic efficacy than placebo treatment (as determined by primary efficacy endpoints) in adult patients who had undergone dental, orthopaedic or gynaecological surgery. Furthermore, where evaluated, intravenous paracetamol 1 g generally showed similar analgesic efficacy to a bioequivalent dose of propacetamol, and a reduced need for opioid rescue medication. In paediatric surgical patients, recommended doses of intravenous paracetamol 15 mg/kg were not significantly different from propacetamol 30 mg/kg for the treatment of pain, and showed equivocal analgesic efficacy compared with intramuscular pethidine 1 mg/kg in several randomized, active comparator-controlled studies. In a randomized, noninferiority study in paediatric patients with an infection-induced fever, intravenous paracetamol 15 mg/kg treatment was shown to be no less effective than propacetamol 30 mg/kg in terms of antipyretic efficacy. Intravenous paracetamol was well tolerated in clinical trials, having a tolerability profile similar to placebo. Additionally, adverse reactions emerging from the use of the intravenous formulation of paracetamol are extremely rare (<1/10 000). [table: see text].

  15. Pharmacokinetics of a combination of amikacin sulfate and penicillin G sodium for intravenous regional limb perfusion in adult horses.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Jorge E; Trela, Jan; Stanley, Scott D; Yamout, Sawsan; Snyder, Jack R

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of amikacin and penicillin G sodium when administered in combination as an intravenous regional limb perfusion (IVRLP) to horses. Seven healthy adult horses underwent an IVRLP in the cephalic vein with 2 g of amikacin sulfate and 10 mill IU of penicillin G sodium diluted to 60 mL in 0.9% saline. A pneumatic tourniquet set at 450 mmHg was left in place for 30 min. Synovial fluid was collected from the metacarpophalangeal joint 35 min and 2, 6, 12, and 24 h after infusion of the antimicrobials. Concentrations of amikacin and penicillin in synovial fluid were quantitated by liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry analysis. Therapeutic concentrations of amikacin and penicillin for equine-susceptible pathogens were achieved in the synovial fluid. Maximum synovial concentrations (Cmax) (mean ± SE) for amikacin and penicillin were 132 ± 33 μg/mL and 8474 ± 5710 ng/mL, respectively. Only 3 horses had detectable levels of penicillin at 6 h and 1 at the 12 h sample. The combination of amikacin with penicillin G sodium via IVDLP resulted in reported therapeutic concentrations of both antibiotics in the synovial fluid. The Cmax:MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) ratio for amikacin was 8:1 and Time > MIC for penicillin was 6 h. At 24 h, the mean concentration of amikacin was still above 4 μg/mL. Terminal elimination rate constants (T1/2 lambdaz) were 13.6 h and 2.8 h for amikacin and penicillin, respectively. The use of IVDLP with penicillin may therefore not be practical as rapid clearance of penicillin from the synovial fluid requires frequent perfusions to maintain acceptable therapeutic concentrations.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of a combination of amikacin sulfate and penicillin G sodium for intravenous regional limb perfusion in adult horses

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Jorge E.; Trela, Jan; Stanley, Scott D.; Yamout, Sawsan; Snyder, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of amikacin and penicillin G sodium when administered in combination as an intravenous regional limb perfusion (IVRLP) to horses. Seven healthy adult horses underwent an IVRLP in the cephalic vein with 2 g of amikacin sulfate and 10 mill IU of penicillin G sodium diluted to 60 mL in 0.9% saline. A pneumatic tourniquet set at 450 mmHg was left in place for 30 min. Synovial fluid was collected from the metacarpophalangeal joint 35 min and 2, 6, 12, and 24 h after infusion of the antimicrobials. Concentrations of amikacin and penicillin in synovial fluid were quantitated by liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry analysis. Therapeutic concentrations of amikacin and penicillin for equine-susceptible pathogens were achieved in the synovial fluid. Maximum synovial concentrations (Cmax) (mean ± SE) for amikacin and penicillin were 132 ± 33 μg/mL and 8474 ± 5710 ng/mL, respectively. Only 3 horses had detectable levels of penicillin at 6 h and 1 at the 12 h sample. The combination of amikacin with penicillin G sodium via IVDLP resulted in reported therapeutic concentrations of both antibiotics in the synovial fluid. The Cmax:MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) ratio for amikacin was 8:1 and Time > MIC for penicillin was 6 h. At 24 h, the mean concentration of amikacin was still above 4 μg/mL. Terminal elimination rate constants (T1/2 lambdaz) were 13.6 h and 2.8 h for amikacin and penicillin, respectively. The use of IVDLP with penicillin may therefore not be practical as rapid clearance of penicillin from the synovial fluid requires frequent perfusions to maintain acceptable therapeutic concentrations. PMID:27408337

  17. Review of Intravenous Lipid Emulsion Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous fat emulsion (IVFE) is an important source of calories and essential fatty acids for patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN). Administered as an individual infusion or combined with PN, the fats provided by IVFE are vital for cellular structural function and metabolism. The affinity of some medications to lipids has led to the use of IVFE as a treatment for any lipophilic drug overdose. This article will explain the available formulations of IVFE, administration, and maintenance issues, as well as the risks and benefits for various applications. PMID:27828934

  18. Severe hypophosphataemia after intravenous iron administration

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Gurpreet; Schmid, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Iron deficiency is common and can be effectively treated with parenteral iron infusion. We report a case of an iron-deficient and vitamin D-deficient woman who developed severe symptomatic hypophosphataemia following intravenous ferric carboxymaltose administration. We stress the need of increased awareness of this potential complication among physicians. Patients should be informed of this complication and instructed to report for follow-up if they experience new musculoskeletal symptoms or worsening of tiredness. As severe hypophosphataemia is usually symptomatic, we recommend screening symptomatic patients for this complication. Recognising and treating the possible exacerbating factors, especially vitamin D deficiency, might be a simple measure to mitigate this complication. PMID:28289000

  19. Wireless application in intravenous infiltration detection system.

    PubMed

    Alley, Matthew S; Naramore, William J; Chou, Nee-Yin; Winchester, Leonard W

    2008-01-01

    The IrDA wireless protocol has been applied to a fiber optics based point-of-care system for the detection of intravenous infiltration. The system is used for monitoring patients under infusion therapy. It is optimized for portability by incorporating a battery source and wireless communication. The IrDA protocol provides secure data communication between the electronic module of the system and the PDAs carried by the nurses. The PDA is used for initiating the actions of the electronic module and for data transfer. Security is provided by specially designed software and hardware.

  20. Rapid infusion of magnesium sulfate obviates need for intubation in status asthmaticus.

    PubMed

    Schiermeyer, R P; Finkelstein, J A

    1994-03-01

    Rapid infusion of intravenous magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) was given to two young adults with impending respiratory failure caused by status asthmaticus. The infusion of 2 g of MgSO4 during a 2-minute period was associated with an immediate, dramatic reversal of their severe bronchospasm. This treatment obviated the need for intubation. Continuous beta 2-agonist therapy was performed simultaneously, taking advantage of the MgSO4-induced bronchodilation to deliver the beta 2-agonist to the target tissues. Rapid infusion of intravenous MgSO4 has been documented as safe in standard obstetric literature. Previous reports of MgSO4 therapy for acute asthma have used slow infusion. This is the first report of rapid infusion of MgSO4 for the emergency department management of asthma. In both cases, this therapy obviated the need for endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation.

  1. General-purpose infusion pumps.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    General-purpose infusion pumps deliver liquid medications to patients through intravenous or epidural routes at specified flows. They are most often used in hospitals and alternative care settings (e.g., physician' offices, patients' homes) when liquid medications need to be administered with greater accuracy or at higher flows than can be provided through a manually adjusted gravity administration set. In this Update of our February 1997 Evaluation of infusion pumps (Health Devices 26[2]), we tested 3 additional pumps from 3 suppliers. We also rated and ranked them in comparison with the 16 units from the February 1997 study that are still being produced. With a few exceptions, we tested the new pumps against the same criteria and using the same test methods as those in the previous Evaluation. However, for this Update, the focus of our findings has broadened: although we continue to place strong emphasis on the pumps' protection against gravity free-flow, we also give significant weight to their overall safety, performance, and human factors design. As a result, our ratings and rankings scheme has changed, affecting the rankings of some of the previously evaluated units. Of the 19 currently available units that have been evaluated to date, we rated 13 units Acceptable, with 5 of those units ranked above the other 8. A further 5 units were rated Conditionally Acceptable; we consider them Acceptable if they are used with the available free-flow protection. And 1 unit had performance problems that caused us to rate it Unacceptable (this unit has been recalled by its supplier; see the inset on page 162). As always, we caution readers not to base selection and purchasing decisions on our conclusions alone, but on a thorough understanding of the issues behind those conclusions, which can be gained by reading this Evaluation in its entirety and carefully reviewing the February 1997 issue.

  2. Intravenous methamphetamine self-administration in rats: effects of intravenous or intraperitoneal MDMA co-administration.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Kelly J; Cornish, Jennifer L; Hunt, Glenn E; McGregor, Iain S

    2006-10-01

    The combined use of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy') with methamphetamine (METH) by recreational drug users is of particular concern due to their similar pharmacological and toxic profiles. In the current study we sought to elucidate why combining these particular drugs is such a popular choice among party-drug users. This was investigated through characterisation of the possible interactive effects of MDMA on METH intravenous self-administration. The first experiment involved characterisation of the METH dose-response curve for intravenous self-administration. Male Hooded-Wistar rats were trained to self-administer intravenous METH (0.01-0.3 mg/kg/infusion) and an inverted-U dose-response curve was obtained. In Experiment 2, a second squad of rats self-administered 0.01, 0.03 or 0.1 mg/kg/infusion METH and had small amounts of MDMA (0.001-0.03 mg/kg) then introduced into the infusion solution. Addition of MDMA to the METH infusion solution resulted in a dose independent reduction in responding. In Experiment 3, a third squad of rats was treated 20 min pre-session with an intraperitoneal injection of saline, 1.25 or 2.5 mg/kg of MDMA or METH to evaluate whether the reduction in responding evident in Experiment 2 was due to an MDMA-induced decrease in locomotor activity. Pre-treatment with intraperitoneal MDMA or METH had no effect on METH self-administration nor activity. We hypothesise that the reduction in METH self-administration caused by MDMA may reflect inhibitory effects of MDMA-induced 5-HT release on dopaminergic mechanisms.

  3. Fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Performance testing carried out in the development of the prototype zero-g fluid infusion system is described and summarized. Engineering tests were performed in the course of development, both on the original breadboard device and on the prototype system. This testing was aimed at establishing baseline system performance parameters and facilitating improvements. Acceptance testing was then performed on the prototype system to verify functional performance. Acceptance testing included a demonstration of the fluid infusion system on a laboratory animal.

  4. Accelerated Infliximab Infusion: Safety, Factors Predicting Adverse Events, Patients’ Satisfaction and Cost Analysis. A Cohort Study in IBD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuoli, S.; Tricarico, D.; Demma, F.; Furneri, G.; Guglielmi, F. W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Standard Infliximab infusion consists of a 2-hour intravenous administration. Recently, Infliximab shortened infusion has been included in the Infliximab label as possible maintenance regimen for patients tolerating Infliximab induction therapy. Aim To verify if accelerated 1-hour Infliximab infusions are as safe as standard administrations, in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Methods Seventy-four patients treated between September 2008 and November 2014 were evaluated. Patients were eligible for 1-hour infusion if they had no history of infusion reactions during the previous 2-hour infusions. Results Twenty-three patients received 2-hour infusions, 16 patients received 1-hour infusions, 35 patients received 2-hour infusions followed by 1-hour infusions. A total of 1,123 Infliximab infusions were administered. The proportion of patients experiencing infusion reaction was: 4% over the 1-hour infusions and 9% over the 2-hour (P = 0.318). Adverse reaction/infusion rate was 0.55% over the 1-hour infusions and 0.66% over the 2-hour (P = 0.835). In the logistic model, accelerated infusion was the only statistically significant predictor of infusion reaction risk reduction (-90%; P = 0.024). Mean satisfaction was 8/10 (±0.84) with 1-hour regimen and 6/10 (±0.56) with 2-hour infusions (P = 0.000). The mean total cost was reduced by 47% with the 1-hour regimen (133.54€ and 250.86€ for 1-hour and 2-hour infusions, respectively). Conclusions Accelerated Infliximab infusion does not increase the acute infusion reaction incidence. In patients with inflammatory bowel disease, the 1-hour regimen should be preferred to 2-hour protocol also due to positive effects on indirect costs and patient’s satisfaction. PMID:27851772

  5. Tachyphylaxis and sensitization to nicotine-induced tachycardiac and pressor effects after nicotine infusions.

    PubMed

    Cruz, S L; Vidrio, H

    1997-01-01

    This work examined the effects of nicotine on mean arterial pressure and heart rate in non-anesthetized spinal rats. Nicotine (200 mg/kg) was administered as a single bolus, as infusions lasting 7.5, 15 or 30 min, and as a post-infusion bolus. A nicotine bolus increased pressure and rate. These effects were less marked as the rate of infusion decreased. The infusions affected differentially the effects of a subsequent bolus. Thus, while tachycardia was decreased, the blood pressure rise was increased. An initial transient bradycardia was observed after bolus administration, but not during infusions; this effect was unchanged after post-infusion boluses. Pharmacological analysis indicated that tachycardia and bradycardia were predominantly due to ganglionic stimulation, while adrenal and sympathetic nerve catecholamine release played a major role in the pressor response. These results indicate that slow nicotine infusions do not induce tachyphylaxis for all of the cardiovascular effects of a subsequent bolus, and that development of acute tolerance appears to depend on the mechanism of action of the response.

  6. Cisplatin Concentrations in Long and Short Duration Infusion: Implications for the Optimal Time of Radiation Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Binu Susan; Das, Saikat; Isaiah, Rajesh; John, Subashini; Prabha, Ratna; Fleming, Denise Helen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cisplatin has radiosensitizing properties and the best sensitization to radiotherapy occurs with a higher plasma concentration of cisplatin. To our knowledge the optimal time sequence between chemotherapy and administration of radiation therapy, to obtain maximum effect from concurrent chemoradiation is unclear. Aim The aim of this study was to measure the two cisplatin infusion regimens in order to determine the total and free cisplatin post infusion concentration changes over time. These changes may have clinical implications on the optimum time of administration of post infusion radiation therapy. Materials and Methods Two cohorts of patients were recruited and both, total and free plasma concentration of cisplatin following long and short durations of intravenous infusion was determined. Blood samples were collected at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 and 5 hours from the start of the infusion in the 1hour infusion group and at 2, 3, 3.5, 4, 6 and 24 hours from the start of the infusion, in the 3 hour infusion group. Total and free cisplatin concentrations were measured using a validated HPLC-UV method. Results The highest concentration of total and free cisplatin was achieved at the end of the infusion in both regimens. Total cisplatin concentration declined 30 minutes after the end of infusion in both the groups. After 1hour of discontinuing cisplatin, the free cisplatin concentration also declined significantly. Conclusion We conclude that radiation should be administered within 30 minutes of completion of the infusion irrespective of the duration of infusion. PMID:27630935

  7. Continuous infusion of enzyme replacement therapy is inferior to weekly infusions in MPS I dogs

    PubMed Central

    Passage, M.B.; Krieger, A.W.; Peinovich, M.C.; Lester, T.; Le, S.Q.; Dickson, P.I.; Kakkis, E.D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Intravenous enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human α-l-iduronidase (rhIDU) is used weekly to treat mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) I. We tested continuous administration of rhIDU at two dosing levels (0.58 mg/kg/week and 2 mg/kg/week) in MPS I dogs, and compared the efficacy of continuous to the clinically-used 0.58 mg/kg weekly three-hour infusion. Peak plasma concentrations of rhIDU were much higher in weekly-treated dogs (mean 256 units/ml) than steady-state concentrations in dogs treated with continuous infusion (mean 1.97 units/ml at 0.58 mg/kg/week; 10.1 units/ml at 2 mg/kg/week). Dogs receiving continuous IV rhIDU, even at a higher (2 mg/kg/week) dose, had consistently lower iduronidase levels in tissues than dogs receiving a weekly (0.58 mg/kg/week) dose. GAG storage was also less improved by continuous intravenous infusion. Adverse events were similar in all dosing groups. We found that continuous administration of 2 mg/kg/week rhIDU to MPS I dogs was insufficient to achieve GAG storage reduction comparable to 0.58 mg/kg weekly dosing. PMID:19562502

  8. Clinical use of intravenous iron: administration, efficacy, and safety.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Michael; Ballard, Harold

    2010-01-01

    This section reviews the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and toxicity of intravenous iron. Intravenous iron offers advantages over oral iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia across a wide range of disease states associated with absolute and functional iron deficiency. However, there remain concerns about the acute safety profiles of the available preparations and the potential for long-term toxicity with their repeated administration. Seven intravenous iron formulations are available. Confusion concerning the relative toxicities of the different formulations abounds. The similarities and differences are discussed. Iron repletion has been associated with adverse outcomes in infections. The relationship, if any, between intravenous iron administration and infections is reviewed. The potential advantages of total dose infusion (TDI), complete repletion in a single setting, are highlighted. A new paradigm for iron replacement therapy in iron deficiency anemia is presented.

  9. [Reflections on betalactam antibiotics administered by continuous infusion].

    PubMed

    López, Ester; Soy, Dolors; Miana, M Teresa; Codina, Carles; Ribas, Josep

    2006-01-01

    Numerous studies on continuous intravenous infusion of betalactam antibiotics have indicated that this could be a useful strategy for treating nosocomial infections as well as exacerbations of pulmonary infections in patients with cystic fibrosis and episodes of febrile neutropenia. From the pharmacodynamic viewpoint, betalactam antibiotics have a time-dependent behavior. Thus, the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic index that best correlates with therapeutic efficacy appears to be the time during which free antibiotic concentrations remain above the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the infecting microorganism. Continuous infusion of betalactams successfully optimizes this pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic index. Furthermore, some studies have shown that this therapeutic strategy may be favorable economically.

  10. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a bolus and infusion of cangrelor: a direct, parenteral P2Y12 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Akers, Wendell S; Oh, Jennifer J; Oestreich, Julie H; Ferraris, Suellen; Wethington, Mary; Steinhubl, Steven R

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of cangrelor administered as an intravenous bolus plus a continuous infusion in healthy volunteers. Twenty-two healthy volunteers are randomized to receive 1 of 2 intravenous cangrelor dosing regimens: a 15-microg/kg bolus followed by a 2-microg/kg/min infusion or a 30-microg/kg bolus followed by a 4-microg/kg/min infusion. The infusion is continued for 60 minutes, and serial blood samples are obtained for evaluation of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters. Administration of an intravenous bolus followed by a continuous infusion rapidly achieves maximum concentrations of cangrelor that are associated with extensive platelet inhibition within 2 minutes. Moreover, extensive platelet inhibition is maintained throughout the infusion period with near-full recovery of platelet function within 60 to 90 minutes of terminating the infusion. The effect of high-dose cangrelor is more consistent and demonstrates a greater level of inhibition on adenosine diphosphate-induced P-selectin expression; how ever, no significant differences are observed between the 2 dosing regimens with regard to platelet aggregation or time to recovery of platelet function. Cangrelor administered as an intravenous bolus followed by a continuous infusion in healthy volunteers offers rapid and reversible inhibition of platelet function.

  11. Fatal myocardial infarction associated with intravenous N-acetylcysteine error

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background N-acetylcysteine is used to treat acetaminophen toxicity and is available in both intravenous and oral formulations. Our report describes a patient treated with intravenous N-acetylcysteine for acetaminophen toxicity who died after an anaphylactoid reaction following initiation of the infusion. Objective Clinicians should be aware of potential complications when deciding on which formulation of N-acetylcysteine to administer. Case Report A 53-year-old male presented with altered mental status after an overdose of acetaminophen/hydrocodone and carisoprodol. He had an acetaminophen level of 49 mcg/ml with an unknown time of ingestion. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) on a naloxone drip and was started on intravenous N-acetylcysteine (NAC) at the presumed dose of 150 mg/kg. Shortly after initiating the NAC infusion, the patient developed periorbital edema, skin rash, and hypotension. The infusion of N-acetylcysteine was immediately stopped and the patient required emergent intubation. Resuscitation was begun with intravenous fluids followed by the initiation of phenylephrine. He developed ST elevation in the inferior leads on his ECG. This evolved into an inferior myocardial infarction by ECG and cardiac enzymes. Echocardiogram showed global, severe hypokinesis with an ejection fraction of less than 20% in a patient with no pre-existing cardiac history. Despite aggressive support, he died approximately 17 hours after the initiation of intravenous NAC. Further investigation found a 10-fold formulation error in his NAC loading dose. Conclusion The intravenous formulation of NAC has a higher probability of significant adverse effects and complications not described with the oral formulation. Clinicians should be aware of these potential complications when deciding on which formulation to administer. PMID:21878099

  12. Pharmacokinetics as applied to total intravenous anaesthesia. Practical implications.

    PubMed

    Schüttler, J; Schwilden, H; Stoekel, H

    1983-07-01

    In six patients undergoing gynaecological surgery computer assisted total intravenous anaesthesia (CATIA) was performed using etomidate and alfentanil. Constant plasma levels of etomidate (0.3 microgram/ml) from the very beginning onwards were achieved using the so called B.E.T. infusion scheme. Alfentanil plasma concentrations of 0.45 microgram/ml were maintained by the same infusion scheme beginning with skin incision until 20 minutes prior to the end of surgery. The proposed concept of CATIA provided an adequate analgesic and hypnotic effect during anaesthesia for abdominal surgery with a recovery period of short duration.

  13. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15mg/kg; maximum of 1000mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia.

  14. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15 mg/kg; maximum of 1000 mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  15. Disposition of intravenous radioactive acyclovir

    SciTech Connect

    de Miranda, P.; Good, S.S.; Laskin, O.L.; Krasny, H.C.; Connor, J.D.; Lietman, P.S.

    1981-11-01

    The kinetic and metabolic disposition of (8-14C)acyclovir (ACV) was investigated in five subjects with advanced malignancy. The drug was administered by 1-hr intravenous infusion at doses of 0.5 and 2.5 mg/kg. Plasma and blood radioactivity-time, and plasma concentration-time data were defined by a two-compartment open kinetic model. There was nearly equivalent distribution of radioactivity in blood and plasma. The overall mean plasma half-life and total body clearance +/- SD of ACV were 2.1 +/- 0.5 hr and 297 +/- 53 ml/min/1.73 m2. Binding of ACV to plasma proteins was 15.4 +/- 4.4%. Most of the radioactive dose excreted was recovered in the urine (71% to 99%) with less than 2% excretion in the feces and only trace amounts in the expired Co2. Analyses by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography indicated that 9-(carboxymethoxymethyl)guanine was the only significant urinary metabolite of ACV, accounting for 8.5% to 14.1% of the dose. A minor metabolite (less than 0.2% of dose) had the retention time of 8-hydroxy-9-((2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl)guanine. Unchanged urinary ACV ranged from 62% to 91% of the dose. There was no indication of ACV cleavage to guanine. Renal clearance of ACV was approximately three times the corresponding creatinine clearances.

  16. Cardiovascular effects of dobutamine and phenylephrine infusion in sevoflurane-anesthetized Thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Minoru; Kurimoto, Shinjiro; Ishikawa, Yuhiro; Tokushige, Hirotaka; Mae, Naomi; Nagata, Shun-ichi; Mamada, Masayuki

    2013-11-01

    To determine dose-dependent cardiovascular effects of dobutamine and phenylephrine during anesthesia in horses, increasing doses of dobutamine and phenylephrine were infused to 6 healthy Thoroughbred horses. Anesthesia was induced with xylazine, guaifenesin and thiopental and maintained with sevoflurane at 2.8% of end-tidal concentration in all horses. The horses were positioned in right lateral recumbency and infused 3 increasing doses of dobutamine (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 µg/kg/min) for 15 min each dose. Following to 30 min of reversal period, 3 increasing doses of phenylephrine (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 µg/kg/min) were infused. Cardiovascular parameters were measured before and at the end of each 15-min infusion period for each drug. Blood samples were collected every 5 min during phenylephrine infusion period. There were no significant changes in heart rate throughout the infusion period. Both dobutamine and phenylephrine reversed sevoflurane-induced hypotension. Dobutamine increased both mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and cardiac output (CO) as the result of the increase in stroke volume, whereas phenylephrine increased MAP but decreased CO as the result of the increase in systemic vascular resistance. Plasma phenylephrine concentration increased dose-dependently, and these values at 15, 30 and 45 min were 6.2 ± 1.2, 17.0 ± 4.8 and 37.9 ± 7.3 ng/ml, respectively.

  17. Comparison of intravenous acetylsalicylic acid and dipyrone in postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Blendinger, I.; Eberlein, H. J.

    1980-01-01

    1 In 17 gynaecological patients with postoperative pain the analgesic efficacy of intravenous lysine salicylate 1.8 g (corresponding to acetylsalicyclic acid (ASA) 1.0 g) and dipyrone 1.0 g were compared in a double-blind randomized study. 2 In the ASA group, mean pain relief and pain intensity difference scores reached a maximum 30 min after drug administration and remained at this level for the next 90 minutes. 3 In the dipyrone group, these scores reached their peak 60 min after drug administration and seemed to fall off during the next hour. 4 The mean pain relief and intensity difference scores were greater following aspirin than dipyrone. However, firm conclusions cannot be drawn from the results of this small study. PMID:7437274

  18. Clinical perspectives of intravenous ketamine anaesthesia in peafowl (Pavo cristatus).

    PubMed

    Athar, M; Shakoor, A; Muhammad, G; Sarwar, M N; Chaudhry, N I

    1996-01-01

    A total of 29 peafowl (Pavo cristatus), rectified surgically for infraorbital abscesses (n = 22), lacerated wounds (n = 4), and fractures of tibia (n = 2) and radius (n = 1), were anaesthetized by the intravenous administration of ketamine hydrochloride (Inj. Calypsol, Gedeon Richter, Hungary) in a dose of 15 20 mg/kg body weight. Divided doses (10 mg + 5 mg + 5 mg) were used with an interval of 1-2 min. No premedication was undertaken in any of the birds. Anaesthesia lasted for about 15 min and the birds gained their feet completely after 30 min to 3 hours. The respiration rate was markedly depressed (8-10/min) and the respiratory pattern was deep abdominal. Only a slight increase was observed in the heart rate. Analgesia was incomplete and muscle relaxation was not satisfactory. Mild salivation was also noticed in some of the birds (n = 3). Recovery, although not smooth, was uneventful.

  19. Algorithms for intravenous insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, Susan S; Clement, Stephen

    2008-08-01

    This review aims to classify algorithms for intravenous insulin infusion according to design. Essential input data include the current blood glucose (BG(current)), the previous blood glucose (BG(previous)), the test time of BG(current) (test time(current)), the test time of BG(previous) (test time(previous)), and the previous insulin infusion rate (IR(previous)). Output data consist of the next insulin infusion rate (IR(next)) and next test time. The classification differentiates between "IR" and "MR" algorithm types, both defined as a rule for assigning an insulin infusion rate (IR), having a glycemic target. Both types are capable of assigning the IR for the next iteration of the algorithm (IR(next)) as an increasing function of BG(current), IR(previous), and rate-of-change of BG with respect to time, each treated as an independent variable. Algorithms of the IR type directly seek to define IR(next) as an incremental adjustment to IR(previous). At test time(current), under an IR algorithm the differences in values of IR(next) that might be assigned depending upon the value of BG(current) are not necessarily continuously dependent upon, proportionate to, or commensurate with either the IR(previous) or the rate-of-change of BG. Algorithms of the MR type create a family of IR functions of BG differing according to maintenance rate (MR), each being an iso-MR curve. The change of IR(next) with respect to BG(current) is a strictly increasing function of MR. At test time(current), algorithms of the MR type use IR(previous) and the rate-of-change of BG to define the MR, multiplier, or column assignment, which will be used for patient assignment to the right iso-MR curve and as precedent for IR(next). Bolus insulin therapy is especially effective when used in proportion to carbohydrate load to cover anticipated incremental transitory enteral or parenteral carbohydrate exposure. Specific distinguishing algorithm design features and choice of parameters may be important to

  20. Single-dose pharmacokinetics of intravenous ampicillin plus sulbactam in healthy elderly and young adult subjects.

    PubMed

    Rho, J P; Jones, A; Woo, M; Castle, S; Smith, K; Bawdon, R E; Norman, D C

    1989-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics of intravenous ampicillin and sulbactam, a beta-lactamase inhibitor, were evaluated in two different age groups. Twelve healthy elderly subjects (age 65-93 years) and 12 healthy young adult subjects (age 20-35 years) received both a dose of ampicillin 1 g plus sulbactam 0.5 g and a higher dose of ampicillin 2 g plus sulbactam 1 g after a one-week period between doses. A reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography method was used for the quantitation of ampicillin and sulbactam in serum and urine. The pharmacokinetic parameters for both ampicillin and sulbactam were calculated by computer-based two-compartment nonlinear model. After a 30-min infusion, serum concentrations of both drugs declined in a biexponential manner for both doses. Elderly subjects demonstrated significantly lower total clearances (Clt) than young adult subjects of ampicillin 1 g (220.0 +/- 104.2 vs 360.0 +/- 95.8 ml/min/1.73 m2), ampicillin 2 g (72.6 +/- 36.6 vs 306.8 +/- 109.77 ml/min/1.73 m2), sulbactam 0.5 g (122.3 +/- 47.8 vs 263.9 +/- 93.7 ml/min/1.73 m2), and sulbactam 1 g (171.2 +/- 85.8 vs 391.7 +/- 70.8 ml/min/1.73 m2), respectively. Significance was defined as P less than 0.05. Renal clearance was also significantly reduced in the elderly subjects. Area under the curve was found to be significantly increased in the elderly subjects compared to the young subjects for both ampicillin and sulbactam as were the beta elimination half-lives. No significant difference in the apparent volume of distribution, when adjusted for body weight, was found for either sulbactam (P greater than 0.95) or ampicillin (P greater than 0.95) between the two groups. Linear regression analysis revealed that age was significantly correlated with the Clt of ampicillin 1 g (r = 0.85, P less than 0.001), ampicillin 2 g (r = 0.90, P less than 0.001), sulbactam 0.5 g (r = 0.80, P less than 0.001), and sulbactam 1 g (r = 0.93, P less than 0.001). A multivariate analysis showed a slight

  1. Assessment of implantable infusion pumps for continuous infusion of human insulin in rats: potential for group housing.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Vivi Flou Hjorth; Mølck, Anne-Marie; Mårtensson, Martin; Strid, Mette Aagaard; Chapman, Melissa; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Bøgh, Ingrid Brück

    2016-07-27

    Group housing is considered to be important for rats, which are highly sociable animals. Single housing may impact behaviour and levels of circulating stress hormones. Rats are typically used in the toxicological evaluation of insulin analogues. Human insulin (HI) is frequently used as a reference compound in these studies, and a comparator model of persistent exposure by HI infusion from external pumps has recently been developed to support toxicological evaluation of long-acting insulin analogues. However, this model requires single housing of the animals. Developing an insulin-infusion model which allows group housing would therefore greatly improve animal welfare. The aim of the present study was to investigate the suitability of implantable infusion pumps for HI infusion in group-housed rats. Group housing of rats implanted with a battery-driven pump proved to be possible. Intravenous infusion of HI lowered blood glucose levels persistently for two weeks, providing a comparator model for use in two-week repeated-dose toxicity studies with new long-acting insulin analogues, which allows group housing, and thereby increasing animal welfare compared with an external infusion model.

  2. Simplified intravenous nutrition using Intralipid-based mixtures in patients with serious gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, W. R.; Knott, C. E.; Cook, J. A.; Langman, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    An Intralipid-based intravenous feeding mixture has been given to 20 patients with serious gastrointestinal disease who required parenteral nutritional support (mean duration 13.75 days). In half of the patients, only peripheral veins were used for infusion (mean duration 12 days), the infusion site being changed every 24-48 hr. Positive nitrogen balance was maintained in all but one individual and other parameters of nutrition improved. No serious complications due to intravenous feeding were encountered, although some patients did develop abnormal liver function tests and mild phlebitis at the peripheral vein infusion site. No abnormalities of pulmonary gas exchange attributable to the infusion were noted. We conclude that this mixture is safe, relatively simple to use and effective. Consequently, it may be especially appropriate for patients in general medical and surgical wards as well as those in specialist units. PMID:6415636

  3. The use of intravenous cannulae and the occurrence of thrombophlebitis.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, P J; de Herder-Swinkels, J M; Moffie, B G; van den Berg, W H; Hermans, J

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence of thrombophlebitis in a coronary care unit was studied in relation to the use of short plastic intravenous cannulae. The incidence of thrombophlebitis was 51% in cases where cannulae were used for continuous infusion of glucose 5% and 13% for cannulae which were locked after the injection of heparin. Only one case of infectious thrombophlebitis was seen. The other cases of thrombophlebitis had a chemical or mechanical aetiology. Replacement of glucose 5% by a NaCl 0.9% solution for continuous infusion reduced the incidence of thrombophlebitis to 33%. Heparin-locked cannulae, to provide rapid access to the patient's circulation, proved to be a safe alternative to continuous infusion.

  4. Optimization of induction of mild therapeutic hypothermia with cold saline infusion: A laboratory experiment.

    PubMed

    Fluher, Jure; Markota, Andrej; Stožer, Andraž; Sinkovič, Andreja

    2015-11-12

    Cold fluid infusions can be used to induce mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Fluid temperature higher than 4°C can increase the volume of fluid needed, prolong the induction phase of hypothermia and thus contribute to complications. We performed a laboratory experiment with two objectives. The first objective was to analyze the effect of wrapping fluid bags in ice packs on the increase of fluid temperature with time in bags exposed to ambient conditions. The second objective was to quantify the effect of insulating venous tubing and adjusting flow rate on fluid temperature increase from bag to the level of an intravenous cannula during a simulated infusion. The temperature of fluid in bags wrapped in ice packs was significantly lower compared to controls at all time points during the 120 minutes observation. The temperature increase from the bag to the level of intravenous cannula was significantly lower for insulated tubing at all infusion rates (median temperature differences between bag and intravenous cannula were: 8.9, 4.8, 4.0, and 3.1°C, for non-insulated and 5.9, 3.05, 1.1, and 0.3°C, for insulated tubing, at infusion rates 10, 30, 60, and 100 mL/minute, respectively). The results from this study could potentially be used to decrease the volume of fluid infused when inducing mild hypothermia with an infusion of cold fluids.

  5. Update on intravenous dipyridamole cardiac imaging in the assessment of ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Younis, L.T.; Chaitman, B.R. )

    1990-01-01

    Intravenous dipyridamole is a relative selective coronary vasodilator which, when combined with thallium-201, provides a useful technique to assess myocardial perfusion. The intravenous dipyridamole is administered as an infusion at a rate of 0.14 mg/kg/min for 4 minutes. In the presence of significant coronary artery disease the increase of coronary blood flow is disproportionate between vessels with and without significant coronary lesions, providing the basis for detecting regional differences in flow using thallium-201. The test can be used alone or combined with low level exercise to increase test sensitivity. The test is safe when performed under medical supervision and when patient selection is done appropriately. Most of the side effects induced by dipyridamole infusion are well tolerated by patients and readily reversed with intravenous aminophylline and sublingual nitroglycerin. The average sensitivity and specificity of the dipyridamole thallium scintigraphy test from the major studies are 76% and 70%, respectively. The test is very useful in providing prognostic information in patients who are unable to exercise. A reversible thallium defect after dipyridamole infusion has been shown to be associated with significant mortality and morbidity in patients with documented or suspected coronary artery disease. The use of intravenous dipyridamole has been extended into other modalities of imaging, including 2-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography, to study functional changes in the left ventricular induced by the infusion of intravenous dipyridamole. 52 references.

  6. Hepatic Artery Infusion Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schüller, J.; Kroiss, A.; Dinstl, K.

    1990-01-01

    Hepatic artery chemotherapy was given to 36 patients, using totally implantable devices consisting of a port and external pump. Twenty-seven patients had inoperable liver metastases of colorectal origin. The infusion system was inserted by laparotomy into the hepatic artery via the gastroduodenal artery. There was no operative mortality. Thirteen infusion systems could not be used for chemotherapy due to dislodgement, early death and lack of follow-up. FUdR was infused every two weeks. There were minor local complications like thrombosis of the system and dislodgement of the port. Toxic effects could be managed by reducing the dose. Response to chemotherapy was evaluated by survival, clinical condition, CEA, ultrasound and CT six months after onset of arterial chemotherapy. Ten/twenty-three patients (43%) responded to therapy, eight of them died on the average 19 months after initial chemotherapy. Six patients were non-responders, seven had stable disease. Five/ten patients developed extrahepatic metastases. Mean survival time was 13.1 months, mean interval until relapse 10.6 months. PMID:2149279

  7. Pilot experience with continuous infusion alemtuzumab in patients with fludarabine-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Wierda, William G; LaPushin, Ruth; O'Brien, Susan M; Faderl, Stefan; Browning, Mary L; Keating, Michael J

    2008-04-01

    We evaluated the activity and tolerability of alemtuzumab given as a continuous infusion for 7 d followed by subcutaneous administration for 11 wk as salvage therapy for 10 patients with fludarabine-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The continuous infusion of alemtuzumab was well tolerated. The typical infusion reaction seen with intravenous alemtuzumab was abolished. Two patients achieved a partial response with an overall response rate of 20%. Alemtuzumab levels were measured in four patients and detectable levels were obtained in three. Clinical activity needs to be confirmed in a larger patient population.

  8. Angina induced by 5-fluorouracil infusion in a patient with normal coronaries.

    PubMed

    Tajik, Reza; Saadat, Habib; Taherkhani, Maryam; Movahed, Mohammad Reza

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the occurrence of angina in patients treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) without significant coronary artery disease. We present a case followed by a review of the literature. A 43-year-old man with a history of colon cancer developed typical angina during intravenous infusion of 5-FU. His electrocardiogram (ECG) showed tall T waves during his angina episode. His angina and ECG changes reoccurred during a second 5-FU infusion. His coronary angiography was normal. This case is consistent with a rare occurrence of 5-FU-induced angina despite normal coronaries. Physician should be aware of this important side effect of 5-FU infusion.

  9. Effect of different extracting methods on quality of Chrysanthemum Morifolium Ramat. Infusion.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qian; Liang, Yuerong; Lu, Jianliang

    2007-01-01

    The flower of Chrysanthemum Morifolium Ramat. (CM) is a useful food and folk medicine in China. Effects of Chrysanthemum Morifolium extracting (CME) conditions, including extraction temperature, extraction time and the ratio of flower to water on infusion quality were investigated. The extractability, liquor color differences and the major flavonoids of luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucoside and luteolin of various CME methods were evaluated. The results indicated that CME temperature was the most important factors affecting quality of CM infusion. Based on the extractability and chemical compositions, the best CME conditions were the 90 to approximately 100 degrees C, 20-30 min and the ratio of flower to water of 1:40 (w/v). High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of Chrysanthemum Morifolium chemical compositions including luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucoside and luteolin was also discussed in the present paper.

  10. Intravenous dihydroergotamine therapy for pediatric abdominal migraines.

    PubMed

    Raina, Madiha; Chelimsky, Gisela; Chelimsky, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Abdominal migraines present with debilitating symptoms in adolescence. At our institution, the gastroenterology, neurology, and autonomic departments collaborated in treating patients with such presentations. This case series describes 6 patients who were given intravenous dihydroergotamine (DHE) for presumed abdominal migraines. DHE was only used when other agents like amitriptyline, verapamil, topiramate, or depakote had proved ineffective. DHE was started at 0.5 mg dose and on average 7 to 9 mg were given on each hospitalization. Patient ages ranged from 13 to 19 years with the majority being female. One patient did not respond to treatment. One patient was admitted 4 times for symptoms of abdominal migraines resolving with DHE. The average time between symptom relapse was about 5 to 12 months. Five of our 6 patients responded to the infusion without significant side effects. Based on these case series, DHE may be a treatment option in children with intractable abdominal migraine.

  11. Platelet functional and transcriptional changes induced by intralipid infusion.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Lea M; Vitseva, Olga; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Kucukural, Alper; Mick, Eric; Hamburg, Naomi; Vita, Joseph; Freedman, Jane E

    2016-06-02

    Multiple studies have shown the effects of long-term exposure to high-fat or western diets on the vascular system. There is limited knowledge on the acute effects of high circulating fat levels, specifically on platelets, which have a role in many processes, including thrombosis and inflammation. This study investigated the effects of acute, high-fat exposure on platelet function and transcript profile. Twenty healthy participants were given an intravenous infusion of 20% Intralipid emulsion and heparin over 6 hours. Blood samples were taken prior to and the day after infusion to measure platelet function and transcript expression levels. Platelet aggregation was not significantly affected by Intralipid infusion, but, when mitochondria function was inhibited by carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) or oligomycin, platelet aggregation was higher in the post-infusion state compared to baseline. Through RNA sequencing, and verified by RT-qPCR, 902 miRNAs and 617 mRNAs were affected by Intralipid infusion. MicroRNAs increased include miR-4259 and miR-346, while miR-517b and miR-517c are both decreased. Pathway analysis identified two clusters significantly enriched, including cell motility. In conclusion, acute exposure to high fat affects mitochondrial-dependent platelet function, as well as the transcript profile.

  12. Analgesic efficacy of ropivacaine wound infusion after laparoscopic colorectal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Bo Young; Park, Yoon Ah; Koo, Hye Young; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Woo Yong; Cho, Juhee; Sim, Woo Seog

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Local anesthetic wound infusion has been previously investigated in postoperative pain management. However, a limited number of studies have evaluated its use in laparoscopic colorectal surgery. This study aims to evaluate whether ropivacaine wound infusion is effective for postoperative pain management after laparoscopic surgery in patients with colorectal cancer. Methods This prospective study included 184 patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer between July 2012 and June 2013. The patients were grouped as the combined group (intravenous patient-controlled analgesia [IV-PCA] plus continuous wound infusion with ropivacaine, n = 92) and the PCA group (IV-PCA only, n = 92). Efficacy and safety were assessed in terms of numeric rating scale (NRS) pain score, opioid consumption, postoperative recovery, and complications. Results The total quantity of PCA fentanyl was significantly less in the combined group than in the PCA group (P < 0.001). The NRS score of the combined group was not higher than in the PCA group, despite less opioid consumption. There were no differences between groups for postoperative recovery and most complications, including wound complications. However, the rate of nausea and vomiting was significantly lower in the combined group (P = 0.022). Conclusion Ropivacaine wound infusion significantly reduced postoperative opioid requirements and the rate of nausea/vomiting. This study showed clinical efficacy of ropivacaine wound infusion for postoperative pain control in colorectal cancer patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery. PMID:27757398

  13. Plasma Calcium, Inorganic Phosphate and Magnesium During Hypocalcaemia Induced by a Standardized EDTA Infusion in Cows

    PubMed Central

    Mellau, LSB; Jørgensen, RJ; Enemark, JMD

    2001-01-01

    The intravenous Na2EDTA infusion technique allows effective specific chelation of circulating Ca2+ leading to a progressive hypocalcaemia. Methods previously used were not described in detail and results obtained by monitoring total and free ionic calcium were not comparable due to differences in sampling and analysis. This paper describes a standardized EDTA infusion technique that allowed comparison of the response of calcium, phosphorus and magnesium between 2 groups of experimental cows. The concentration of the Na2EDTA solution was 0.134 mol/l and the flow rate was standardized at 1.2 ml/kg per hour. Involuntary recumbency occurred when ionised calcium dropped to 0.39 – 0.52 mmol/l due to chelation. An initial fast drop of ionized calcium was observed during the first 20 min of infusion followed by a fluctuation leading to a further drop until recumbency. Pre-infusion [Ca2+] between tests does not correlate with the amount of EDTA required to induce involuntary recumbence. Total calcium concentration measured by atomic absorption remained almost constant during the first 100 min of infusion but declined gradually when the infusion was prolonged. The concentration of inorganic phosphate declined gradually in a fluctuating manner until recumbency. Magnesium concentration remained constant during infusion. Such electrolyte responses during infusion were comparable to those in spontaneous milk fever. The standardized infusion technique might be useful in future experimental studies. PMID:11503370

  14. Central but not systemic lipid infusion augments the counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, Samuel C.; Bree, Adam J.; Puente, Erwin C.; Daphna-Iken, Dorit; Fisher, Simon J.

    2009-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that lipids could act as an alternative fuel source in the brain during insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to hyperinsulinemic (5 mU·kg−1·min−1) hypoglycemic (∼50 mg/dl) clamps. In protocol 1, intralipid (IL), a fat emulsion, was infused intravenously to prevent the fall in free fatty acid levels that occurs in response to hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Intravenous lipid infusion did not alter the counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia. To test whether IL could have central effects in mediating the counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia, in protocol 2 the brains of precannulated rats were intracerebroventricularly (icv) infused with IL or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) as control. Unexpectedly, the epinephrine and glucagon response to hypoglycemia was significantly augmented with icv IL infusion. To determine whether central IL infusion could restore defective counterregulation, in protocol 3 rats were made recurrently hypoglycemic (RH) for 3 days and on the 4th day underwent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamps with icv IL or aCSF infusion. RH rats had the expected impaired epinephrine response to hypoglycemia, and icv IL infusion again significantly augmented the epinephrine response in RH rats to normal. With regard to our experimental model of hypoglycemic counterregulation, we conclude that 1) systemic lipid infusion did not alter the counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia, 2) the icv infusion of lipids markedly increased CSF FFA levels and paradoxically augmented the epinephrine and glucagon responses, and 3) the blunted sympathoadrenal response in recurrently hypoglycemic rats was completely normalized with the icv lipid infusion. It is concluded that, in the setting of insulin-induced hypoglycemia, increased brain lipids can enhance the sympathoadrenal response. PMID:19417126

  15. Factors Influencing the Accurate Administration of Peristaltic Finger Infusion Pumps Attached to Polyvinylchloride Infusion Sets Containing Tris(2-ethylhexyl) trimellitate.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Masayuki; Arai, Daichi; Maegawa, Kanae; Shigeno, Katsuro; Wakiya, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    An accurate continuous intravenous injection via a peristaltic finger infusion pump has been utilized at outpatient clinics recently. An infusion element designed for this pump is necessary for the accurate handling of the pump, and for proper use of this equipment, we need accurate information. Our experiments have shown that medication administration has occasionally been incomplete at the calculated input time when a peristaltic finger infusion pump has been used. In this paper, we have investigated the cause of the delay in the administration time and the effect of the attachment procedure using a combination of features from three kinds of such infusion pumps and five kinds of exclusive polyvinyl chloride (PVC) infusion sets, under various conditions. Our results suggest that the time required for complete administration was correlated to the input time when five kinds of PVC tubing without stretching were attached to three kinds of peristaltic finger infusion pumps (R(2)=0.9998-1.0000). However, when the PVC tubing was stretched 1-3 cm and was attached to the pump, the time required for complete administration of the solution was prolonged compared to the recommended listed input time (p<0.01-0.05, ANOVA, Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison). Therefore, we suggest that the procedure technique used by the medical staff and involving the infusion pump adversely prolonged the time required for completion of the administration of medication. In our opinion, pharmacists must provide information concerning not only the drugs, but also the medical devices used to the physicians and nurses.

  16. [The research on a pocket microcontroller system for target controlled infusion].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Ke; Zhang, Xin-An; Zhang, Yan-Wu; Wu, Qun-Ling; Dou, Jian-Hong; Wang, Rou-Shong

    2005-05-01

    This paper present a microcontroller system for target controlled infusion according to pharmacodynamic parameters of intravenous anesthetics. It can control the depth of anesthesia by adjusting the level of plasma concentrations. The system has the advantages of high precision, extended function and easy operation. It has been now used in the clinical anesthesia.

  17. Efficacy of intravenous nicorandil for fractional flow reserve assessment: study protocol for a crossover randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Takeshi; Kitahara, Hideki; Fujimoto, Yoshihide; Nakayama, Takashi; Sugimoto, Kazumasa; Hanaoka, Hideki; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nicorandil has vasodilatory effects on both the epicardial coronary arteries and the coronary microvasculature, thereby increasing coronary blood flow. Intravenous administration of nicorandil can be applicable for fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurement as a hyperaemic agent and a possible alternative to adenosine. However, the effectiveness of intravenous nicorandil infusion for FFR measurement is largely unclear. Methods and analysis This crossover randomised study is being performed to investigate the efficacy of intravenous administration of nicorandil for FFR measurement. Patients with an intermediate coronary artery stenosis who satisfy the eligibility criteria undergo FFR measurement with a consecutive randomised order of patient-blind infusions of continuous intravenous administration of adenosine and a single bolus intravenous administration of nicorandil. The primary end point of the study is the agreement between the FFR values obtained by the intravenous nicorandil and those obtained by the intravenous adenosine. Recruitment of this trial started in November 2015 and will end in March 2017, or until a total of 50 participants have been recruited. Ethics and dissemination The protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board at Chiba University Hospital. Study findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number UMIN000019309; Pre-results. PMID:27872119

  18. The effect of temperature on di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate leaching from PVC infusion sets exposed to lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Rose, R J; Priston, M J; Rigby-Jones, A E; Sneyd, J R

    2012-05-01

    Poly vinyl chloride (PVC) infusion equipment contains substantial amounts of the plasticiser di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). We determined the amount of DEHP leached from Mediplus Dual TIVA(®) Infusion sets, into lipid and non-lipid infusates. Two propofol admixtures (Diprivan(®) 1%, Propoven(®) 1%), Intralipid(®) 10% and 0.9% saline were evaluated as infusates. Solutions were infused through TIVA sets at 12 ml.h(-1) for 6 h at 24, 32 and 37 °C. In addition, TIVA sets were filled with 2 ml infusates, sealed and incubated at 24 and 37 °C for 6 h. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate was detected in all lipid infusates after dynamic infusion and static contact, and in 0.9% saline after dynamic infusion at 37 °C. At 32 and 37 °C, the quantity of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate leaching into the lipid infusates may exceed the recommended maximum exposure amount set by the European Union for DEHP of 20-48 μg.kg(-1) day(-1) if lipid based infusates are used for sedation or intravenous feeding of infants or neonates.

  19. Community intravenous therapy provision.

    PubMed

    O'Hanlon, Sue; McGrail, Pam; Hodgkins, Paul

    2017-03-08

    Many healthcare services that were once only available in acute settings are now common in the community. Intravenous (IV) therapy is increasingly available as a community service. Given the option, most patients would choose to receive their treatment in a community setting, rather than in hospital. This article describes several outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy services, including their advantages and disadvantages. It explores the ways one community NHS trust has developed its community IV therapy service over the past ten years and examines issues pertinent to effective service delivery.

  20. 21 CFR 880.6990 - Infusion stand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Infusion stand. 880.6990 Section 880.6990 Food and....6990 Infusion stand. (a) Identification. The infusion stand is a stationary or movable stand intended to hold infusion liquids, infusion accessories, and other medical devices. (b) Classification....

  1. 21 CFR 880.6990 - Infusion stand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Infusion stand. 880.6990 Section 880.6990 Food and....6990 Infusion stand. (a) Identification. The infusion stand is a stationary or movable stand intended to hold infusion liquids, infusion accessories, and other medical devices. (b) Classification....

  2. 21 CFR 880.6990 - Infusion stand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Infusion stand. 880.6990 Section 880.6990 Food and....6990 Infusion stand. (a) Identification. The infusion stand is a stationary or movable stand intended to hold infusion liquids, infusion accessories, and other medical devices. (b) Classification....

  3. Correction of hypovolemia with crystalloid fluids: Individualizing infusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Liamis, George; Filippatos, Theodosios D; Elisaf, Moses S

    2015-05-01

    Many situations in clinical practice involving patients with hypovolemia or acutely ill patients usually require the administration of intravenous fluids. Current evidence shows that the use of crystalloids should be considered, since most colloids and human albumin are usually associated with increased adverse effects and high cost, respectively. Among crystalloids, the use of normal saline is implicated with the development of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis and renal vasoconstriction. These observations have led many authors to propose balanced solutions, mainly Lactated Ringer's, as the infusate of choice. However, although the restoration of volume status is the primary target in hypovolemic state, the correction of any associated acid-base or electrolyte disorders that frequently coexist is also of vital importance. This review presents specific situations that are common in daily clinical practice and require targeted infusate therapy in patients with reduced volume status. Furthermore, the review presents an algorithm aiming to help clinicians to make the best choice between normal or hypotonic saline and lactated Ringer's infusates. Lactated Ringer's infusate should not be given in patients with severe metabolic alkalosis, lactic acidosis with decreased lactate clearance, or severe hyperkalemia, and in patients with traumatic brain injury or at risk of increased intracranial pressure. The optimal choice of infusate should be guided by the cause of hypovolemia, the cardiovascular state of the patient, the renal function, as well as the serum osmolality and the coexisting acid-base and electrolyte disorders. Clinicians should be aware of any coexisting disorders in patients with hypovolemia and guide their choice of infusate treatment based on the overall picture of their patients.

  4. A comparative study of peripheral to central circulation delivery times between intraosseous and intravenous injection using a radionuclide technique in normovolemic and hypovolemic canines

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, J.L.; Fontanarosa, P.B.; Passalaqua, A.M.

    1989-03-01

    Intraosseous infusion is considered a useful technique for administration of medications and fluids in emergency situations when peripheral intravascular access is unobtainable. This study examined the effectiveness of intraosseous infusion for delivery of substances to the central circulation. Central deliveries of a radionuclide tracer administered by the intraosseous and intravenous routes were evaluated during normovolemic and hypovolemic states. Intraosseous infusion achieved peripheral to central circulation transit times comparable to those achieved by the intravenous route. Analysis of variance revealed no statistically significant differences between the peripheral to central delivery times comparing intraosseous and intravenous administration. The results demonstrate that intraosseous infusion is a rapid and effective method of delivery to the central circulation and is an alternative method for intravascular access. This study also suggests that a radionuclide tracer is useful for the evaluation of transit times following intraosseous injection.

  5. Phase I study of intravenous iododeoxyuridine as a clinical radiosensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J.; Russo, A.; Mitchell, J.B.; Collins, J.M.; Rowland, J.; Wright, D.; Glatstein, E.

    1985-11-01

    Twenty-four patients with locally advanced (19 patients) or metastatic (5 patients) tumors were treated in a Phase I study combining constant intravenous infusions of iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) and hyperfractionated radiation therapy. IUdR was given as a constant infusion for 12 hours/day for two separate 14-day infusion periods in most patients. The dose of IUdR was escalated from 250 to 1200 mg/m2/12-hour infusion in this study. The initial tumor volume was treated to 45 Gy/1.5 Gy BID/3 weeks followed by a cone-down boost to 20-25 Gy/1.25 Gy BID/2 weeks after a planned 2-week break. THe IUdR infusion preceded the initial and cone-down irradiation by 1 week. Local acute toxicity (within the radiation volume) was uncommon and few patients required an alteration of the planned treatment schedule. Two patients developed late local toxicity with one patient showing clinical signs of radiation hepatitis and another patient developing a large bowel obstruction that required surgical bypass. Dose-limiting systemic toxicity was confined to the bone marrow with moderate to severe thrombocytopenia developing on Day 10-14 of infusions at 1200 mg/m2/12 hours. Mild stomatitis and partial alopecia occurred in some patients at this dose level. No systemic skin toxicity was seen. Pharmacology studies revealed steady-state arterial plasma levels of IUdR of 1 to 8 X 10(-6) M over the dose range used. In vivo IUdR incorporation into tumors was studied in three patients with high-grade sarcomas using an anti-IUdR monoclonal antibody and immunohistochemistry and demonstrated incorporation in up to 50-70% of tumor cells. The preliminary treatment results, particularly in patients with unresectable sarcomas, are encouraging.

  6. Intravenous Fluid Generation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John; McKay, Terri; Brown, Daniel; Zoldak, John

    2013-01-01

    The ability to stabilize and treat patients on exploration missions will depend on access to needed consumables. Intravenous (IV) fluids have been identified as required consumables. A review of the Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List (SMEMCL) lists over 400 medical conditions that could present and require treatment during ISS missions. The Intravenous Fluid Generation System (IVGEN) technology provides the scalable capability to generate IV fluids from indigenous water supplies. It meets USP (U.S. Pharmacopeia) standards. This capability was performed using potable water from the ISS; water from more extreme environments would need preconditioning. The key advantage is the ability to filter mass and volume, providing the equivalent amount of IV fluid: this is critical for remote operations or resource- poor environments. The IVGEN technology purifies drinking water, mixes it with salt, and transfers it to a suitable bag to deliver a sterile normal saline solution. Operational constraints such as mass limitations and lack of refrigeration may limit the type and volume of such fluids that can be carried onboard the spacecraft. In addition, most medical fluids have a shelf life that is shorter than some mission durations. Consequently, the objective of the IVGEN experiment was to develop, design, and validate the necessary methodology to purify spacecraft potable water into a normal saline solution, thus reducing the amount of IV fluids that are included in the launch manifest. As currently conceived, an IVGEN system for a space exploration mission would consist of an accumulator, a purifier, a mixing assembly, a salt bag, and a sterile bag. The accumulator is used to transfer a measured amount of drinking water from the spacecraft to the purifier. The purifier uses filters to separate any air bubbles that may have gotten trapped during the drinking water transfer from flowing through a high-quality deionizing cartridge that removes the impurities in

  7. Safety of Intravenous Application of Mistletoe (Viscum album L.) Preparations in Oncology: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Steele, Megan L; Axtner, Jan; Happe, Antje; Kröz, Matthias; Matthes, Harald; Schad, Friedemann

    2014-01-01

    Background. Traditional mistletoe therapy in cancer patients involves subcutaneous applications of Viscum album L. preparations, with doses slowly increasing based on patient responses. Intravenous infusion of high doses may improve therapeutic outcomes and is becoming more common. Little is known about the safety of this "off-label" application of mistletoe. Methods. An observational study was performed within the Network Oncology. Treatment with intravenous mistletoe applications is described. The frequency of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to intravenous mistletoe applications was calculated and compared to ADR data from a study on subcutaneous applications. Results. Of 475 cancer patients who received intravenous infusions of Helixor, Abnoba viscum, or Iscador mistletoe preparations, 22 patients (4.6%) reported 32 ADRs of mild (59.4%) or moderate severity (40.6%). No serious ADRs occurred. ADRs were more frequently reported to i.v. mistletoe administered alone (4.3%), versus prior to chemotherapy (1.6%). ADR frequency differed with respect to preparation type, with Iscador preparations showing a higher relative frequency, compared to Abnoba viscum and Helixor. Overall, patients were almost two times less likely to experience an ADR to intravenous compared to subcutaneous application of mistletoe. Conclusion. Intravenous mistletoe therapy was found to be safe and prospective studies for efficacy are recommended.

  8. Comparison of the cost-effectiveness of administering heparin subcutaneously or intravenously for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed Central

    Barber, N. D.; Hoffmeyer, U. K.

    1993-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of subcutaneous heparin (20,000 iu, twice daily, prefilled syringes), a continuous intravenous infusion of 24,000 iu heparin in 24 h, and the intravenous infusion of 48,000 iu heparin as two consecutive 12-h infusions of 24,000 iu, were compared. The costs were calculated by timing and observing staff in three hospitals, and by noting the costs of what they used. Cannulation of a vein by a doctor took a mean of 4 min 16 s and cost 2.61 pounds. To prepare and administer the 24,000 iu of heparin in a 24-h infusion took a mean of 22 min 42 s/day and cost 9.52 pounds. If a 48,000 iu in 24-h infusion was used it took a mean of 36 min 3 s/day and cost 16.81 pounds. The use of heparin syringes, 20,000 iu subcutaneously twice daily, took 2 min 53 s/day and cost 4.80 pounds. A generic cost formula was calculated to allow for variation in staff or drug costs. The subcutaneous and intravenous routes were assumed to be equally effective on the basis of the medical literature. This study shows that subcutaneous heparin therapy is significantly more cost-effective than intravenous heparin therapy. The reduction in cost and liberation of nursing time mean that the subcutaneous route should be preferred. PMID:8285546

  9. Evidence of Different Propofol Pharmacokinetics under Short and Prolonged Infusion Times in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Campos, Sónia; Monteiro, Joaquim; Valenzuela, Belén; Gonçalinho, Helena; de Pinho, Paula Guedes; Fresco, Paula; Félix, Luis; Antunes, Luís

    2016-06-01

    Propofol is an anaesthetic widely used in both human beings and animals. However, the characterization of propofol pharmacokinetics (PK) is not well understood when long-term infusions are used. The main objective of this study was to explore the PK behaviour of propofol in a rabbit model during short and prolonged propofol infusions and to develop an internally validated PK model, for propofol dose individualization in the rabbit for future use. Population 1 (P1) was constituted by seven New Zealand rabbits and was used to characterize the PK profile of propofol at short infusions. Animals were anaesthetized with a bolus of 20 mg/kg, followed by an infusion rate of 50 mg/kg/hr of propofol at 1%, which was then maintained for 30 min. A second rabbit population (P2, n = 7) was sedated according to reflexes responses and Index of Consciousness values, for 20 consecutive hours using propofol 2% aiming at characterizing propofol behaviour at long-term infusions. Clinical data and blood samples were collected at specific time-points in both populations. Propofol plasma concentrations were determined by gas chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry. The NONMEM VII software was used to evaluate the relationships between dose and plasma concentrations. A linear two-compartment model with different central compartment volume and plasma clearance (separately modelled in the two populations) was the one that best described propofol concentrations. The time course of propofol plasma concentrations was well characterized by the PK model developed, which simultaneously accounts for propofol short- and long-term infusions and can be used to optimize future PK studies in rabbits.

  10. Successful treatment of refractory Trichomonas vaginalis infection using intravenous metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Isobel; Carne, Christopher; Sonnex, Christopher; Carmichael, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a sexually transmitted protozoan infection resulting in a vulvo-vaginitis and altered vaginal discharge in symptomatic women. Since its introduction in the 1960 s, metronidazole has been the first-line drug for trichomonal infection. Other nitroimidazoles, such as tinidazole, are used as alternative regimens with similar activity but at a greater expense. Treatment failure usually represents patient non-compliance or reinfection, although metronidazole resistance has previously been documented. Sensitivity testing is currently not available in the UK. Patients with disease unresponsive to first-line treatments pose a major challenge, as therapeutic options are limited. This case looks at a patient with refractory disease over an 18-month period, where intravenous infusion of metronidazole resulted in cure after multiple previous therapy failures. There is limited evidence to endorse the use of intravenous metronidazole, and this case report provides further support for its efficacy.

  11. Evaluation of an intravenous catheter for use in the horse.

    PubMed

    Gulick, B A; Meagher, D M

    1981-02-01

    A commercially available polyvinyl chloride intravenous catheter was studied in 9 horses for 3 to 10 days to evaluate the catheter's suitability for use in the horse, to develop a new insertion technique, and to establish a protocol for catheter care. Seven of the animals were clinically normal horses receiving parenteral nutrition; one was a horse with hypocalcemia receiving frequent intravenous injections of calcium gluconate, and one was a clinically normal horse receiving no infusions. The catheter dressings were changed every 48 hours, and an aspirate from the catheter and the catheter tip was cultured at the time of catheter removal. One catheter became infected following a break in the protocol. It was concluded that the polyvinyl catheter is suitable for use in the horse and that the proposed protocol for catheter insertion and maintenance may reduce the likelihood of complications such as catheter sepsis, thrombophlebitis, and embolism.

  12. IPMC-assisted miniature disposable infusion pumps with embedded computer control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vohnout, Sonia; Kim, Sang-Mun; Park, Il-Seok; Banister, Mark; Tiwari, Rashi; Kim, Kwang J.

    2007-04-01

    For military applications, the availability of safe, disposable, and robust infusion pumps for intravenous fluid and drug delivery would provide a significant improvement in combat healthcare. To meet these needs, we have developed a miniature infusion prototype pump for safe and accurate fluid and drug delivery that is programmable, lightweight, and disposable. In this paper we present techniques regarding inter-digitated IPMCs and a scaleable IPMC that exhibits significantly improved force performance over the conventional IPMCs. The results of this project will be a low cost accurate infusion device that can be scaled from a disposable small volume liquid drug delivery patch to disposable large volume fluid resuscitation infusion pumps for trauma victims in both the government and private sectors of the health industry.

  13. [Exfoliative dermatitis as a side effect of intravenous immunoglobulin treatment].

    PubMed

    Markvardsen, Lars Høj; Jakobsen, Johannes

    2011-10-24

    Three patients with immune-mediated polyneuropathies developed rash, eczema, whole body scaling, vesicles in hands and loss of hair a few days after infusion of large doses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). The condition was diagnosed as exfoliative dermatitis. Two out of three patients were afterwards treated with low doses of IVIG slowly increased over a year given under the protection of oral steroids. Our findings indicate that exfoliative dermatitis can be provoked by IVIG treatment, and that the treatment can be reinstalled by slowly increasing the IVIG dose under steroid cover.

  14. Intravenous heparin dosing strategy in hospitalized patients with atrial dysrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Roswell, Robert O; Greet, Brian; Shah, Sunny; Bernard, Samuel; Milin, Alexandra; Lobach, Iryna; Guo, Yu; Radford, Martha J; Berger, Jeffrey S

    2016-08-01

    Patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) have an elevated stroke risk that is 2-7 times greater than in those without AF. Intravenous unfractionated heparin (UFH) is commonly used for hospitalized patients with atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter (AFL) to prevent stroke. Dosing strategies exist for intravenous anticoagulation in patients with acute coronary syndromes and venous thromboembolic diseases, but there are no data to guide providers on a dosing strategy for intravenous anticoagulation in patients with AF/AFL. 996 hospitalized patients with AF/AFL on UFH were evaluated. Bolus dosing and initial infusion rates of UFH were recorded along with rates of stroke, thromboemobolic events, and bleeding events as defined by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis criteria. Among 226 patients included in the analysis, 76 bleeding events occurred. Using linear regression analysis, initial rates of heparin infusion ranging from 9.7 to 11.8 units/kilogram/hour (U/kg/h) resulted in activated partial thromboplastin times that were within therapeutic range. The median initial infusion rate in patients with bleeding was 13.3 U/kg/h, while in those without bleeding it was 11.4 U/kg/h; p = 0.012. An initial infusion rate >11.0 U/kg/h yielded an OR 1.95 (1.06-3.59); p = 0.03 for any bleeding event. Using IV heparin boluses neither increased the probability of attaining a therapeutic aPTT (56.1 vs 56.3 %; p = 0.99) nor did it significantly increase bleeding events in the study (35.7 vs 31.3 %; p = 0.48). The results suggest that higher initial rates of heparin are associated with increased bleeding risk. From this dataset, initial heparin infusion rates of 9.7-11.0 U/kg/h without a bolus can result in therapeutic levels of anticoagulation in hospitalized patients with AF/AFL without increasing the risk of bleeding.

  15. Safety and feasibility of countering neurological impairment by intravenous administration of autologous cord blood in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Backgrounds We conducted a pilot study of the infusion of intravenous autologous cord blood (CB) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) to assess the safety and feasibility of the procedure as well as its potential efficacy in countering neurological impairment. Methods Patients diagnosed with CP were enrolled in this study if their parents had elected to bank their CB at birth. Cryopreserved CB units were thawed and infused intravenously over 10~20 minutes. We assessed potential efficacy over 6 months by brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and various evaluation tools for motor and cognitive functions. Results Twenty patients received autologous CB infusion and were evaluated. The types of CP were as follows: 11 quadriplegics, 6 hemiplegics, and 3 diplegics. Infusion was generally well-tolerated, although 5 patients experienced temporary nausea, hemoglobinuria, or urticaria during intravenous infusion. Diverse neurological domains improved in 5 patients (25%) as assessed with developmental evaluation tools as well as by fractional anisotropy values in brain MRI-DTI. The neurologic improvement occurred significantly in patients with diplegia or hemiplegia rather than quadriplegia. Conclusions Autologous CB infusion is safe and feasible, and has yielded potential benefits in children with CP. PMID:22443810

  16. Oxalic acid excretion after intravenous ascorbic acid administration.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Line; Mamer, Orval A; Miller, Wilson H; Levine, Mark; Assouline, Sarit; Melnychuk, David; Rousseau, Caroline; Hoffer, L John

    2009-02-01

    Ascorbic acid is frequently administered intravenously by alternative health practitioners and, occasionally, by mainstream physicians. Intravenous administration can greatly increase the amount of ascorbic acid that reaches the circulation, potentially increasing the risk of oxalate crystallization in the urinary space. To investigate this possibility, we developed gas chromatography mass spectrometry methodology and sampling and storage procedures for oxalic acid analysis without interference from ascorbic acid and measured urinary oxalic acid excretion in people administered intravenous ascorbic acid in doses ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 g/kg body weight. In vitro oxidation of ascorbic acid to oxalic acid did not occur when urine samples were brought immediately to pH less than 2 and stored at -30 degrees C within 6 hours. Even very high ascorbic acid concentrations did not interfere with the analysis when oxalic acid extraction was carried out at pH 1. As measured during and over the 6 hours after ascorbic acid infusions, urinary oxalic acid excretion increased with increasing doses, reaching approximately 80 mg at a dose of approximately 100 g. We conclude that, when studied using correct procedures for sample handling, storage, and analysis, less than 0.5% of a very large intravenous dose of ascorbic acid is recovered as urinary oxalic acid in people with normal renal function.

  17. A comparison of continuous infusion of vecuronium and atracurium in midline and paramedian laparotomies.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, L S; Shetty, A N; Buddhi, M; Krishnan, G

    1999-01-01

    This was a study to compare continuous intravenous infusion of atracurium with continuous intravenous infusion of vecuronium for intraoperative muscle relaxation in 62 ASA I / II patients. Scheduled for laparotomies and pelvic surgeries under general anaesthesia. They were randomly allocated in two groups to receive either vecuronium infusion of 50 microg/kg/hour following a bolus dose of 0.1 microg/kg, or atracurium infusion of 400 microg/kg/hour following a bolus dose of 0.5 microg/kg. The mean infusion dose of atracurium was 478 +/- 44.11 microg/kg/hour and that of vecuronium was 63.2 +/- 74 microg/kg/hour for adequate muscle relaxation. The depth of neuromuscular blockade was monitored by using peripheral nerve stimulator so that only one twitch of train of four was present, resistance to ventilation, surgical relaxation and haemodynamic changes. Vecuronium infusions produced more haemodynamic stability than atracurium infusions. Vecuronium produced lesser change in systolic blood pressure (mean change of 3. 46 +/- 3.33%) from baseline values as compared to atracurium (mean change of 5.81 +/- 3.73%) from baseline values ( p < 0.01) which was statistically significant. The difference in mean pulse rate change from baseline value in the atracurium group (4.78 +/- 2.745%) was less than that in the vecuronium group (5.99 +/- 2.67%), which was not statistically significant. Spontaneous recovery was faster with vecuronium (540.94 +/- 76.46 seconds) as compared to atracurium (596. 33 +/- 72.48 seconds). 84.4% of patients who received vecuronium fell within good to very good category of muscle relaxation as compared to 63.3% in atracurium group. There were no cost benefits when either agents were used in infusion form.

  18. Body temperature, behavior, and plasma cortisol changes induced by chronic infusion of Staphylococcus aureus in goats.

    PubMed

    Mphahlele, Noko R; Fuller, Andrea; Roth, Joachim; Kamerman, Peter R

    2004-10-01

    Most experimentally induced fevers are acute, usually lasting approximately 6-12 h, and thus do not mimic chronic natural fevers, which can extend over several days or more. To produce a model of chronic natural fever, we infused eight goats (Capra hircus) intravenously with 2 ml of 2 x 10(11) cell walls of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) for 6 days using osmotic infusion pumps (10 microl/h) while measuring changes in body temperature, behavior, and plasma cortisol concentration. Seven control animals were infused with sterile saline. Abdominal temperature-sensitive data loggers and osmotic infusion pumps were implanted under halothane anesthesia. To compare our new model with existing models of experimental fever, we also administered 2-ml bolus intravenous injections of 2 x 10(11) S. aureus cell walls, 0.1 microg/kg lipopolysaccharide (Escherichia coli, serotype 0111:B4), and sterile saline in random order to six other goats. Bolus injection of lipopolysaccharide and S. aureus induced typical acute phase responses, characterized by fevers lasting approximately 6 h, sickness behavior, and increased plasma cortisol concentration. Infusion of S. aureus evoked prolonged fevers, which lasted for approximately 3 days, starting on day 4 of infusion (ANOVA, P < 0.05), and did not disrupt the normal circadian rhythm of body temperature. However, pyrogen infusion did not cause plasma cortisol concentration to rise (ANOVA, P > 0.05) or the expression of sickness behavior. In conclusion, infusion of S. aureus produced a fever response resembling that of sustained natural fevers but did not elicit the cortisol and behavioral responses that often are described clinically and during short-term experimental fevers.

  19. [Transitory hyperbilirubinemia and oxytocin infusion].

    PubMed

    Quoss, I

    1978-01-01

    Serum bilirubin levels at 5th day of life was compared between 100 mature newborns with oxytocin infusion to the mother during labour and 100 mature newborns without oxytocin. Newborns, whose mothers received more than 5 IU oxytocin had significant higher bilirubin values than the controll group without oxytocin and the cases with oxytocin administration under 5 U. Hyperbilirubinaemie was also present in babies after vacuum extraction and oxytocin infusion.

  20. Continuous Regional Arterial Infusion Therapy for Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Motoo Ogino, Hiroyuki; Shimohira, Masashi; Hara, Masaki; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2009-05-15

    A case of acute necrotizing pancreatitis due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was treated in an 8-year-old girl. She experienced acute pancreatitis during treatment for M. pneumoniae. Contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan revealed necrotizing pancreatitis. The computed tomographic severity index was 8 points (grade E). A protease inhibitor, ulinastatin, was provided via intravenous infusion but was ineffective. Continuous regional arterial infusion therapy was provided with gabexate mesilate (FOY-007, a protease inhibitor) and meropenem trihydrate, and the pancreatitis improved. This case suggests that infusion therapy is safe and useful in treating necrotizing pancreatitis in children.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of oxycodone after intravenous and subcutaneous administration in Japanese patients with cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Kokubun, Hideya; Yoshimoto, Tetsusuke; Hojo, Minoru; Fukumura, Kazuya; Matoba, Motohiro

    2014-12-01

    ABSTRACT In Japan, Oxycodone hydrochloride injection formulation has been approved in 2012. However, its pharmacokinetics has been poorly studied. The aim of this study is to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of oxycodone after intravenous and subcutaneous administration of oxycodone hydrochloride injection in Japanese patients with cancer pain. Noncompartmental analysis and population pharmacokinetic analysis were performed. We conducted a multicenter open-label study of oxycodone hydrochloride administered as constant infusion with the dose titrated individually according to the pain intensity in patients with cancer pain. Pharmacokinetic parameters for plasma oxycodone and its metabolites were estimated using pharmacokinetics of oxycodone was evaluated using a total of 344 plasma concentrations obtained from 89 patients. The estimated geometric mean clearance (CL) of oxycodone was 24.3 L per hour after constant intravenous infusion and 29.5 L per hour after constant subcutaneous infusion, respectively. Population pharmacokinetic analysis indicated that body surface area was the influencing factor on CL and there were no pharmacokinetic differences for CL between intravenous and subcutaneous infusion. These results provide important information for the clinical use of oxycodone injection.

  2. Severe and prolonged hypophosphatemia after intravenous iron administration in a malnourished patient.

    PubMed

    Fierz, Y C; Kenmeni, R; Gonthier, A; Lier, F; Pralong, F; Coti Bertrand, P

    2014-04-01

    Malnutrition may result in a phosphate-deficient state owing to a chronically insufficient phosphate intake. Concomitant iron deficiency is common and often supplemented by the intravenous route. It is not widely recognized that some parenteral iron formulations can induce hypophosphatemia. Herein we report a case of a severe and symptomatic hypophosphatemia (0.18 mM, normal range 0.8-1.4 mM) associated with an inappropriately reduced tubular reabsorption of phosphate (33%, norm >95%) in a malnourished patient with anorexia/bulimia who received 2 × 500 mg iron carboxymaltose (FCM) intravenously. Despite intravenous and oral phosphate supplements, it required 2 months to achieve a normal serum phosphate level. Our case demonstrates that in a chronically malnourished and phosphate-deficient state intravenous FCM could potentially be dangerous. If this form of iron application cannot be avoided, phosphate supplementation before and after iron infusion as well as close monitoring of phosphate levels are needed.

  3. Home infusion program for Fabry disease: experience with agalsidase alfa in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Kisinovsky, Isaac; Cáceres, Guillermo; Coronel, Cristina; Reisin, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by inherited deficiency of the enzyme a-galactosidase A. Enzyme replacement treatment using agalsidase alfa significantly reduces pain, improves cardiac function and quality of life, and slows renal deterioration. Nevertheless, it is a life-long treatment which requires regular intravenous infusions and entails a great burden for patients. Our objective was to evaluate retrospectively the safety and tolerability of the home infusion of agalsidase alfa in patients with Fabry disease in Argentina. We evaluated all the patients with Fabry disease who received home infusion with agalsidase alfa 0.2 mg/kg between January 2005 and June 2011. The program included 87 patients; 51 males (mean age: 30 years) and 36 females (mean age: 34 years). A total of 5229 infusions (mean: 59 per patient; range: 1-150) were administered. A total of 5 adverse reactions were seen in 5 patients (5.7% of patients and 0.9% of the total number of infusions). All were mild in severity and resolved by reducing the rate of infusion and by using antihistaminics. All these 5 patients were positive for IgG antibodies, but none of them presented IgE antibodies and none suffered an anaphylactic shock. In our group 18 patients were switched from agalsidase beta to agalsidase alfa without complications. Home infusion with agalsidase alfa is safe, well tolerated and is associated to high compliance.

  4. Phase I study of intermittent intravenous bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) with conventional fractionated irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J.; Russo, A.; Mitchell, J.B.; Rowland, J.; Jenkins, J.; Schwade, J.; Myers, C.E.; Collins, J.M.; Speyer, J.; Kornblith, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    A Phase I trial of intravenous bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) and conventional fractionated radiation therapy was performed in 14 patients with glioblastoma multiforme and 7 patients with other poorly radioresponsive tumors. The BUdR was given as a constant intravenous infusion for 12 hr/day for up to 14 days. Local toxicity (within the radiation field) was minor, with 7 of the 21 patients requiring a brief treatment break for moist skin desquamation. There was no significant CNS toxicity noted clinically nor by autopsy examination. Additionally, no significant enhancement of radiation injury was noted to bowel or liver. Dose-dependent systemic toxicity occurred in bone marrow and skin. Moderate myelosuppression, especially thrombocytopenia, was found following a 14 day cycle of BUdR at and above 650 mg/m/sup 2//12 hr infusion. Approximately one-third of patients developed a maculo-papular erythematous rash to the scalp, neck and upper chest. Pharmacology studies revealed steady-state arterial plasma levels of 2 x 10/sup -6/M/1 during the 12 hr infusion of 650 to 700 mg/m/sup 2/. Radiosensitization was measured by a change in the D/sub 0/ of radiation survival curves of human bone marrow CFUc prior to and following the 14 day infusion in 4 patients. A trend of increasing radiosensitization was noted in most patients as the infusion rate of BUdR was increased from 500 to 870 mg/m/sup 2//12 hr. It is concluded that the maximum tolerable dose of BUdR is 650 to 700 mg/m/sup 2//12 hrs when given as a 2 week intermittent intravenous infusion. Local toxicity is acceptable. The major systemic toxicities are myelosuppression and a maculopapular skin rash.

  5. Feedback to the field: an assessment of sternal intraosseous (IO) infusion.

    PubMed

    Harcke, H Theodore; Crawley, Geoffrey; Mazuchowski, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Intraosseous vascular infusion (IO) is a recognized alternative to peripheral intravenous infusion when access is inadequate. The sternum and proximal tibia are the preferred sites. A review of 98 cases at autopsy revealed successful sternal IO placement in 78 cases (80%). Assuming a worst case scenario for placement (pin mark and no tip in bone [17 cases] and tip present and not in the sternum [3 cases]), attempts were unsuccessful in 20 cases (20%). We draw no specific conclusions regarding sternal IO use, but hope that personnel placing these devices and those providing medical training can use the information.

  6. Hypersensitivity reactions to intravenous iron: guidance for risk minimization and management

    PubMed Central

    Rampton, David; Folkersen, Joergen; Fishbane, Steven; Hedenus, Michael; Howaldt, Stefanie; Locatelli, Francesco; Patni, Shalini; Szebeni, Janos; Weiss, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous iron is widely used for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia when oral iron is inappropriate, ineffective or poorly tolerated. Acute hypersensitivity reactions during iron infusions are very rare but can be life-threatening. This paper reviews their frequency, pathogenesis and risk factors, and provides recommendations about their management and prevention. Complement activation-related pseudo-allergy triggered by iron nanoparticles is probably a more frequent pathogenetic mechanism in acute reactions to current formulations of intravenous iron than is an immunological IgE-mediated response. Major risk factors for hypersensitivity reactions include a previous reaction to an iron infusion, a fast iron infusion rate, multiple drug allergies, severe atopy, and possibly systemic inflammatory diseases. Early pregnancy is a contraindication to iron infusions, while old age and serious co-morbidity may worsen the impact of acute reactions if they occur. Management of iron infusions requires meticulous observation, and, in the event of an adverse reaction, prompt recognition and severity-related interventions by well-trained medical and nursing staff. PMID:25420283

  7. Taurine infused intrastriatally elevates, but intranigrally decreases striatal extracellular dopamine concentration in anaesthetised rats.

    PubMed

    Ruotsalainen, M; Heikkilä, M; Lillsunde, P; Seppälä, T; Ahtee, L

    1996-01-01

    In the present study we infused taurine (50, 150 or 450 mM, 2 microliters/min for 4h) into the dorsal striatum or into the substantia nigra via microdialysis probe and estimated the extracellular concentrations of dopamine and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), in the dorsal striatum of anaesthetised rats. Intrastriatal infusion of taurine elevated striatal dopamine at all concentrations studied. At the 450 mM concentration taurine elevated the extracellular dopamine 10-fold, but only in the first 30 min sample after starting the taurine infusion. At 50 and 150 mM taurine elevated dopamine throughout the 4h infusion maximally up to 3-4-fold the control level. Extracellular DOPAC was increased by 150 and 450 mM taurine (up to about 150-160% of the control level), whereas at all three concentrations taurine decreased HVA to about 85% of the control; however, the decrease caused by 450 mM taurine was short-lasting. At all three concentrations taurine infused into the substantia nigra decreased the extracellular dopamine in the ipsilateral striatum to about 40-50% of the control, and increased extracellular DOPAC and HVA maximally to about 150% and 170% of the control, respectively. These results show that the effects of taurine on the concentrations of extracellular dopamine and its metabolites depend on its administration site on nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. It elevates the extracellular dopamine when given into the striatum, but when given into the cell body region of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway it decreases the extracellular dopamine in the ipsilateral striatum.

  8. Blood Samples of Peripheral Venous Catheter or The Usual Way: Do Infusion Fluid Alters the Biochemical Test Results?

    PubMed Central

    Taghizadeganzadeh, Mahboobeh; Yazdankhahfard, Mohammadreza; Farzaneh, Mohammadreza; Mirzaei, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most blood tests require venous blood samples. Puncturing the vein also causes pain, infection, or damage to the blood, and lymph flow, or long-term healing. This study aimed to determine and compare the biochemical laboratory value of the blood samples that were provided through: peripheral vein infusion (PVI) receiving continuous intravenous fluid; and the usual method of blood sampling. Methods: This is an interventional, quasi-experimental, and controlled study. The selected study sample included 60 patients, who were hospitalized during 2014, in the Internal Medicine, part of Martyrs of Persian Gulf, teaching hospital at Bushehr. Three blood samples were taken from each patient that were provided through PVI line (5 ml blood collected at beginning of IVC and then another 5 cc), and another case was prepared by common blood sampling (control). All the samples were analyzed in terms of sodium, potassium, urea and creatinine using SPSS Ver.19 software, by paired t-test and Pearson’s correlation coefficients. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between the amount of sodium and potassium in the first blood samples taken from the intravenous infusion line and vein puncture. However, no significant differences were found among the biochemical amount in the second blood samples taken from the intravenous infusion line and vein puncture. Conclusions: We can use blood samples taken from peripheral intravenous infusion lines after 5cc discarding from the first part of the sample for measuring the value of sodium, potassium, urea and creatinine. PMID:26925892

  9. Effect of magnesium infusion on thoracic epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sampa Dutta; Mitra, Koel; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Roy, Suddhadeb; Sarkar, Aniruddha; Kundu, Sudeshna; Goswami, Anupam; Sarkar, Uday Narayan; Sanki, Prakash; Mitra, Ritabrata

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Patients of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) having an ASA status III or more are likely to be further downgraded by surgery to critical levels of pulmonary function. Aim: To compare the efficacy of thoracic epidural block with (0.125%) bupivacaine, fentanyl combination and (0.125%) bupivacaine, fentanyl combination with adjunctive intravenous magnesium infusion for the relief of postoperative pain in patients undergoing LVRS. Methods: Patients were operated under general anesthesia. Thirty minutes before the anticipated completion of skin closure in both groups, (Group A and Group B) 7 ml of (0.125%) bupivacaine calculated as 1.5 ml/thoracic segment space for achieving analgesia in dermatomes of T4, T5, T6, T7, and T8 segments, along with fentanyl 50 μg (0.5 ml), was administered through the catheter, activating the epidural block, and the time was noted. Thereafter, in patients of Group A, magnesium sulfate injection 30 mg/kg i.v. bolus was followed by infusion of magnesium sulfate at 10 mg/kg/hr and continued up to 24 hours. Group B was treated as control. Results and Analysis: A significant increase in the mean and maximum duration of analgesia in Group A in comparison with Group B (P<0.05) was observed. Total epidural dose of fentanyl and bupivacaine required in Group A was significantly lower in comparison with Group B in 24 hours. Discussion: Requirement of total doses of local anesthetics along with opioids could be minimized by magnesium infusion; therefore, the further downgradation of patients of LVRS may be prevented. Conclusion: Intravenous magnesium can prolong opioid-induced analgesia while minimizing nausea, pruritus, and somnolence. PMID:21655018

  10. Catheter indwell time and phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration

    PubMed Central

    Pasalioglu, Kadriye Burcu; Kaya, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Intravenous catheters have been indispensable tools of modern medicine. Although intravenous applications can be used for a multitude of purposes, these applications may cause complications, some of which have serious effects. Of these complications, the most commonly observed is phlebitis. This study was conducted to determine the effect of catheter indwell time on phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration. Methods: This study determined the effect of catheter indwell time on phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration. The study included a total of 103 individuals who were administered 439 catheters and satisfied the study enrollment criteria at one infectious diseases clinic in Istanbul/Turkey. Data were compiled from Patient Information Forms, Peripheral Intravenous Catheter and Therapy Information Forms, reported grades based on the Visual Infusion Phlebitis Assessment Scale, and Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Nurse Observation Forms. The data were analyzed using SPSS. Results : The mean patient age was 53.75±15.54 (standard deviation) years, and 59.2% of the study participants were men. Phlebitis was detected in 41.2% of peripheral intravenous catheters, and the rate decreased with increased catheter indwell time. Analyses showed that catheter indwell time, antibiotic usage, sex, and catheterization sites were significantly associated with development of phlebitis. Conclusion: The results of this study show that catheters can be used for longer periods of time when administered under optimal conditions and with appropriate surveillance. PMID:25097505

  11. Cost-Minimization Analysis Favours Intravenous Ferric Carboxymaltose over Ferric Sucrose for the Ambulatory Treatment of Severe Iron Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Calvet, Xavier; Ruíz, Miquel Àngel; Dosal, Angelina; Moreno, Laura; López, Maria; Figuerola, Ariadna; Suarez, David; Miquel, Mireia; Villoria, Albert; Gené, Emili

    2012-01-01

    Objective Intravenous iron is widely used to treat iron deficiency in day-care units. Ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) allows administration of larger iron doses than iron sucrose (IS) in each infusion (1000 mg vs. 200 mg). As FCM reduces the number of infusions required but is more expensive, we performed a cost-minimization analysis to compare the cost impact of the two drugs. Materials and Methods The number of infusions and the iron dose of 111 consecutive patients who received intravenous iron at a gastrointestinal diseases day-care unit from 8/2007 to 7/2008 were retrospectively obtained. Costs of intravenous iron drugs were obtained from the Spanish regulatory agencies. The accounting department of the Hospital determined hospital direct and indirect costs for outpatient iron infusion. Non-hospital direct costs were calculated on the basis of patient interviews. In the pharmacoeconomic model, base case mean costs per patient were calculated for administering 1000 mg of iron per infusion using FCM or 200 mg using IS. Sensitivity analysis and Monte Carlo simulation were performed. Results Under baseline assumptions, the estimated cost of iron infusion per patient and year was €304 for IS and €274 for FCM, a difference of €30 in favour of FCM. Adding non-hospital direct costs to the model increased the difference to €67 (€354 for IS vs. €287 for FCM). A Monte Carlo simulation taking into account non-hospital direct costs favoured the use of FCM in 97% of simulations. Conclusion In this pharmacoeconomic analysis, FCM infusion reduced the costs of iron infusion at a gastrointestinal day-care unit. PMID:23029129

  12. [Modifications of contingent negative variation (CNV) induced by oxytocin infusion].

    PubMed

    Timsit-Berthier, M; Mantanus, H; Geenen, V; Adam, F; Legros, J J

    1988-12-01

    The central effects of an intravenous infusion of oxytocin (OT), 3,680 mIU in 45 min, were investigated in 20 male volunteers in a double-blind study combining an electrophysiological and a psychometrical approach. The electrophysiological approach consisted in the simultaneous recording of the CNV (Fz-A1 and Cz-A1) and the spontaneous EEG (bipolar P3-P4) recording on which was carried out an FFT analysis. On the other hand, various psychometric tests allowed to assess memory (Rey's tests), attention (K-T test) processes and mood changes (visual analogue scales). Within the hour following the infusion, OT induced a significant decrease of CNV amplitude and an increase of the post-imperative positive component at Cz-A1. A similar effect was still observed one week later, but was more marked at Fz-A1. Neither mood nor attention tests evidenced any significant effect of OT. Only one item of the memory test PRM (item 4) revealed a significant impairment after OT infusion. There were no subjective effects reported. These observations provide new electrophysiological arguments supporting a central action of peripheral OT administration in man. This action, which may be characterized as an acceleration of CNV "habituation" is the opposite of the one described with vasopressin.

  13. Parenteral arginine infusion in humans: nutrient substrate or pharmacologic agent?

    PubMed

    Sigal, R K; Shou, J; Daly, J M

    1992-01-01

    When given as a dietary supplement, arginine enhances lymphocyte mitogenesis and improves nitrogen balance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate arginine's ability to mediate these same effects when given as the sole nitrogen source with minimum additional calories. Thirty patients were randomized to receive 20 g/day arginine hydrochloride or a mixed amino acid solution (Travasol) by intravenous infusion for 7 days after abdominal operations. Mean patient age, body weight, gender ratios, and preoperative degree of weight loss were similar between groups. Mean plasma arginine and ornithine levels rose to 228 +/- 50 mumol/L and 191 +/- 76 mumol/L in the arginine group during infusion. Mean nitrogen balance was -8.8 g/day and -9.2 g/day in the arginine and Travasol groups, respectively. Mean lymphocyte stimulation indices to concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin fell on postoperative day 1 in both groups. No significant differences in patterns of lymphocyte mitogenesis changes were noted between groups. The mean total number of circulating T cells increased in the arginine group at postoperative day 7. Thus, parenteral arginine infusion in postoperative patients provided comparable nitrogen balance to a balanced amino acid solution but did not increase peripheral blood lymphocyte mitogenesis. When arginine is given parenterally as the sole nitrogen source with minimal additional calories to postoperative patients, no enhancement of mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation could be demonstrated.

  14. Effect of intravenous or oral sodium chlorate administration on the fecal shedding of Escherichia coli in sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of gavage or intravenous (i.v.) administration of sodium chlorate salts on the fecal shedding of generic Escherichia coli in wether lambs was studied. To this end, 9 lambs (27 +/- 2.5 kg) were administered 150 mg NaClO3 per kg BW by gavage or i.v. infusion in a cross-over design with sal...

  15. Primary treatment of incomplete Kawasaki disease with infliximab and methylprednisolone in a patient with a contraindication to intravenous immune globulin.

    PubMed

    Shirley, Debbie-Ann; Stephens, Ina

    2010-10-01

    Incomplete Kawasaki disease was diagnosed in a 3-year-old boy. Because intravenous immune globulin infusion was not tolerated, he was treated with infliximab and methylprednisolone. Coronary aneurysms were not visualized on initial or follow-up echocardiograms. To our knowledge, this is the first report to document the use of infliximab and methylprednisolone as first line therapy for Kawasaki disease.

  16. [The intraosseous infusion in adult].

    PubMed

    Plancade, D; Rüttimann, M; Wagnon, G; Landy, C; Schaeffer, E; Gagnon, N; Nadaud, J; Favier, J-C

    2013-05-01

    Intraosseous infusion is an old knowledge, abandoned in the 1950s in favor of the peripheral vein, and it was essentially described in pediatrics and military medicine. Since 2005, this way is experiencing a resurgence of interest in emergency medicine particularly in adults after the failure's installation of a peripheral vein in order not to waste the time of care and administration of treatment. New devices that allow intraosseous infusion are currently used in humans. We propose to review the different kind of catheters used, to know the main technical characteristics, indications, contraindications and potential complications. We propose a comparison with the peripheral vein and a comparison between the different catheters.

  17. [Inadvertent epidural infusion of paracetamol].

    PubMed

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sánchez, V E; del Pino Moreno, A L

    2014-10-01

    A 45-year-old woman was accidentally administered an epidural infusion of paracetamol instead of levobupivacaine for postoperative pain therapy during the postoperative period of abdominal hysterectomy under general anesthesia combined with epidural analgesia. The patient had no neurological symptoms at any time, although a slight tendency to arterial hypotension that did not require treatment was observed. No rescue analgesia was necessary until 8h after the start of epidural infusion. The incidence of these types of errors is probably underestimated, although there are several cases reported with various drugs.

  18. Effects of caffeine on fractional flow reserve values measured using intravenous adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Masafumi; Chikamori, Taishiro; Uchiyama, Takashi; Kimura, Yo; Hijikata, Nobuhiro; Ito, Ryosuke; Yuhara, Mikio; Sato, Hideaki; Kobori, Yuichi; Yamashina, Akira

    2017-01-21

    We investigated the effects of caffeine intake on fractional flow reserve (FFR) values measured using intravenous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) before cardiac catheterization. Caffeine is a competitive antagonist for adenosine receptors; however, it is unclear whether this antagonism affects FFR values. Patients were evenly randomized into 2 groups preceding the FFR study. In the caffeine group (n = 15), participants were given coffee containing 222 mg of caffeine 2 h before the catheterization. In the non-caffeine group (n = 15), participants were instructed not to take any caffeine-containing drinks or foods for at least 12 h before the catheterization. FFR was performed in patients with more than intermediate coronary stenosis using the intravenous infusion of ATP at 140 μg/kg/min (normal dose) and 170 μg/kg/min (high dose), and the intracoronary infusion of papaverine. FFR was followed for 30 s after maximal hyperemia. In the non-caffeine group, the FFR values measured with ATP infusion were not significantly different from those measured with papaverine infusion. However, in the caffeine group, the FFR values were significantly higher after ATP infusion than after papaverine infusion (P = 0.002 and P = 0.007, at normal and high dose ATP vs. papaverine, respectively). FFR values with ATP infusion were significantly increased 30 s after maximal hyperemia (P = 0.001 and P < 0.001 for normal and high dose ATP, respectively). The stability of the FFR values using papaverine showed no significant difference between the 2 groups. Caffeine intake before the FFR study affected FFR values and their stability. These effects could not be reversed by an increased ATP dose.

  19. Low-dose intravenous nitrite improves hemodynamics in a canine model of acute pulmonary thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Dias-Junior, Carlos A C; Gladwin, Mark T; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2006-12-15

    Acute pulmonary thomboembolism (APT)-induced pulmonary hypertension can be counteracted by activating the nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway. Recent studies have demonstrated that the naturally occurring anion nitrite (NO(2)(-)) is a bioactive storage reservoir for NO, and is reduced to NO under conditions of hypoxia and acidosis. We hypothesized that nitrite infused intravenously could attenuate the hemodynamic changes associated with APT. APT was induced with autologous blood clots injected into the right atrium in mongrel dogs. After APT (or saline), the dogs received an intravenous nitrite (or saline) infusion (6.75 micromol/kg over 15 min and then 0.28 micromol/kg/min) and hemodynamic evaluations were carried out for 2 h. Plasma nitrite concentrations were measured using ozone-based reductive chemiluminescence methodologies. APT decreased cardiac index (CI) and increased pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI); these effects were improved during infusions of sodium nitrite. Accordingly, nitrite infusion increased cardiac index by 28%, reduced the PVRI by 48%, and the systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) by 21% in embolized dogs, suggesting a greater effect on the ischemic embolized vascular system than the systemic circulation following embolization. Interestingly, in nonembolized control dogs the same nitrite infusion decreased MAP and CI (all P<0.05). The nitrite infusion increased plasma nitrite concentrations by approximately 2 microM, and produced dose-dependent effects on PVRI, MAP, and SVRI. Remarkably, blood levels of nitrite as low as 500 nM decreased PVRI and SVRI in this model, suggesting a potential role of nitrite in physiological blood flow regulation. These results suggest that a low-dose nitrite infusion produces beneficial hemodynamic effects in a dog model of APT. These findings suggest a new therapeutic application for nitrite and support emerging evidence for a surprisingly potent and potentially physiological vasoactivity of nitrite.

  20. The Effect of an Amino Acid Infusion on Central Thermoregulatory Control in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yasufumi; Takamata, Akira; Matsukawa, Takashi; Sessler, Daniel I.; Kitamura, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yoshifumi; Mizobe, Toshiki

    2005-01-01

    Background Administration of protein or amino acids enhances thermogenesis, presumably by stimulating oxidative metabolism. However, hyperthermia results even when thermoregulatory responses are intact, suggesting that amino acids also alter central thermoregulatory control. We thus tested the hypothesis that amino acid infusion increases the thermoregulatory setpoint. Methods Nine male volunteers each participated on four study days in randomized order: 1) intravenous amino acids infused at 4 kJ·kg−1·hr−1 for 2.5 h combined with skin-surface warming; 2) amino acid infusion combined with cutaneous cooling; 3) a saline infusion combined with skin-surface warming; and, 4) saline infusion combined with cutaneous cooling. Results Amino acid infusion increased resting core temperature by 0.3 ± 0.1°C (mean ± SD) and oxygen consumption by 18 ± 12%. Furthermore, amino acid infusion increased the calculated core temperature threshold (triggering core temperature at a designated mean-skin temperature of 34°C) for active cutaneous vasodilation by 0.3 ± 0.3°C, for sweating by 0.2 ± 0.2°C, for thermoregulatory vasoconstriction by 0.3 ± 0.3°C, and for thermogenesis by 0.4 ± 0.5°C. Amino acid infusion did not alter the incremental response intensity (i.e., gain) of thermoregulatory defenses. Conclusions Amino acid infusion increased the metabolic rate and resting core temperature. However, amino acids also produced a synchronous increase in all major autonomic thermoregulatory defense thresholds; the increase in core temperature was identical to the setpoint increase — even in a cold environment with amble potential to dissipate heat. In subjects with intact thermoregulatory defenses, amino acid-induced hyperthermia appears to result from an elevated setpoint increase rather than increased metabolic rate per se. PMID:15108979

  1. Utilizing Electronic Health Record Information to Optimize Medication Infusion Devices: A Manual Data Integration Approach.

    PubMed

    Chuk, Amanda; Maloney, Robert; Gawron, Joyce; Skinner, Colin

    Health information technology is increasingly utilized within healthcare delivery systems today. Two examples of this type of technology include the capture of patient-specific information within an electronic health record and intravenous medication infusion devices equipped with dose error reduction software known as drug libraries. Automatic integration of these systems, termed intravenous (IV) interoperability, should serve as the goal toward which all healthcare systems work to maximize patient safety. For institutions lacking IV interoperability, we describe a manual approach of querying the electronic health record to incorporate medication administration information with data from infusion device software to optimize drug library settings. This approach serves to maximize utilization of available information to optimize medication safety provided by drug library software.

  2. Utilizing Electronic Health Record Information to Optimize Medication Infusion Devices: A Manual Data Integration Approach.

    PubMed

    Chuk, Amanda; Maloney, Robert; Gawron, Joyce; Skinner, Colin

    2015-05-23

    Health information technology is increasingly utilized within healthcare delivery systems today. Two examples of this type of technology include the capture of patient-specific information within an electronic health record and intravenous medication infusion devices equipped with dose error reduction software known as drug libraries. Automatic integration of these systems, termed intravenous (IV) interoperability, should serve as the goal toward which all healthcare systems work to maximize patient safety. For institutions lacking IV interoperability, we describe a manual approach of querying the electronic health record to incorporate medication administration information with data from infusion device software to optimize drug library settings. This approach serves to maximize utilization of available information to optimize medication safety provided by drug library software.

  3. Acute injury with intravenous iron and concerns regarding long-term safety.

    PubMed

    Bishu, Kalkidan; Agarwal, Rajiv

    2006-09-01

    Intravenous iron is widely used to maintain adequate iron stores and prevent iron deficiency anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease, yet concerns remain about its long-term safety with respect to oxidative stress, kidney injury, and accelerated atherosclerosis, which are the subjects of this review. Three parenteral iron formulations are available for use in the United States: Iron dextran, iron gluconate, and iron sucrose. Iron dextran, especially the high molecular form, has been linked with anaphylactoid and anaphylactic reactions, and its use has been declining. A portion of intravenous iron preparations is redox-active, labile iron available for direct donation to transferrin. In vitro tests show that commonly available intravenous iron formulations have differing capacities to saturate transferrin directly: Iron gluconate > iron sucrose > iron dextran. Intravenous iron treatment produces oxidative stress, as demonstrated by increases in plasma levels of lipid peroxidation products (malondialdehyde), at a point that is much earlier than the time to peak concentration of catalytically active iron, suggesting a direct effect of iron sucrose on oxidative stress. Furthermore, iron sucrose infusion produces endothelial dysfunction that seems to peak earlier than the serum level of free iron. Intravenous iron sucrose infusion also has been shown to produce acute renal injury and inflammation as demonstrated by increased urinary albumin, enzyme (N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase), and cytokine (chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) excretions. Although the long-term dangers of intravenous iron are unproved, these data call for examination of effects of intravenous iron on the potential for long-term harm in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  4. Single-dose pharmacokinetics of intravenous sulbactam in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Schaad, U B; Guenin, K; Straehl, P

    1986-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of intravenously administered sulbactam were studied in 17 pediatric patients two to 14 years of age. Single doses of 12.5 or 25 mg/kg were infused over 3 min, and in previously healthy children, mean peak plasma concentrations 5 min after dosing were 71 and 163 micrograms/ml, respectively. Noncompartmental and compartmental calculations resulted in similar pharmacokinetic parameters. Linear pharmacokinetics were found in the concentration range studied. The mean terminal-phase half-life was 1.75 hr, the mean total plasma clearance was 180 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and the mean apparent volume of distribution was 340 ml/kg. Approximately 70%-80% of an intravenous dose was excreted unchanged in the urine. In children with cystic fibrosis, both total plasma clearance and apparent volume of distribution were significantly increased. The data support the intravenous administration of 12.5-25 mg of sulbactam/kg every 6 to 8 hr for assessing the adequacy of this drug as an adjunct to beta-lactam therapy for various bacterial infections in children.

  5. Persistent staphylococcal bacteremia in an intravenous drug abuser.

    PubMed

    Barg, N L; Supena, R B; Fekety, R

    1986-02-01

    A patient with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia received vancomycin (MIC = 0.8 microgram/ml, MBC = 15 micrograms/ml) and heparin simultaneously through the same intravenous line to treat a septic deep venous thrombosis. Bacteremia persisted for 7 days. Bacteremia terminated when the simultaneous infusion of heparin and vancomycin through the same line was stopped. This suggested that an interaction between vancomycin and heparin may have occurred, which resulted in a reduction in vancomycin activity. To test for such an interaction, mixtures of heparin and vancomycin in various concentrations were made and tested for antimicrobial activity against the organisms in the patient. A precipitate formed at the concentrations achieved in the intravenous lines, and when the vancomycin concentrations were measured by bioassay, a 50 to 60% reduction in activity was noted. In contrast, when these solutions were prepared and mixed at microgram concentrations, a precipitate was no longer observed, and antimicrobial activity was not reduced. Heparin appeared to interact unfavorably with vancomycin at the concentrations in the intravenous lines when these drugs were administered simultaneously to patients. This may be the cause of poor therapeutic responses to vancomycin in some patients, especially those infected with tolerant organisms.

  6. Infusing Technology throughout Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maliski, Susanne; Bartell, Carol; Gathercoal, Paul

    This paper reports on overall accomplishments in meeting goals for technology infusion at California Lutheran University's School of Education, using evaluation data collected over 3 years. Data came from surveys completed by administrators, faculty, and students about their experiences using technology at baseline (1997) and over the next 3…

  7. Cerebral oxygenation following epinephrine infusion.

    PubMed

    Steinback, Craig D; Zubin, Petra; Breskovic, Toni; Bakovic, Darija; Pivac, Nediljko; Dujic, Zeljko

    2012-10-15

    Evidence suggests that the autonomic nervous system may actively regulate the cerebral vasculature. In this study, central hemodynamics and brain oxy-hemoglobin, deoxy-hemoglobin and total hemoglobin changes (bO₂Hb, bdHb and bTHb) were monitored during infusion of epinephrine (0.06 μg/kg/min over 6 min, and 0.12 μg/kg/min for 3 min) in 12 men. Epinephrine decreased mean arterial pressure (MAP) and total peripheral resistance (TPR), while heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) increased, but did not affect bO₂Hb, bdHb or bTHb. However, upon the cessation of epinephrine infusion an increase in both Oxy- and Total Hb occurred which peaked at 3 min post infusion (+6.0±4.6 and +4.9±4.8 μmol/L respectively, P<0.05) and persisted for 20 min post infusion (+1.5±2.2 and +1.8±2.7 μmol/L respectively, P<0.05). No evidence was found for reduction in cerebral oxygenation during a cold-pressor test. The results of the present study demonstrated that clinical doses of epinephrine result in a delayed increase in cortical blood volume due to an increase in Oxy-Hb, consistent with vasodilation.

  8. Infusing Culture in Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Nancy; Collins, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the culture-infused career counselling (CICC) model. Six principles are foundational to a tripartite model emphasizing cultural self-awareness, awareness of client cultural identities, and development of a culturally sensitive working alliance. The core competencies ensure the cultural validity and relevance of career…

  9. Microcomputer Infusion Project: A Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossberg, Stephen A.; Bitter, Gary G.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the Microcomputer Infusion Project (MIP), which was developed at Arizona State University to provide faculty with the necessary hardware, software, and training to become models of computer use in both lesson development and presentation for preservice teacher education students. Topics discussed include word processing; database…

  10. Rapid infusions of human normal immunoglobulin 50g/l are safe and well tolerated in immunodeficiencies and immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, Giuseppe; Vultaggio, Alessandra; Alberto Bosi, A; Reichert, Dietmar; Janssen, Jan; Lamacchia, Donatella; Nappi, Liliana; Pecoraro, Antonio; Milito, Cinzia; Ferraro, Andrea; Matucci, Andrea; Bacchiarri, Francesca; Carrai, Valentina; Hibbeler, Azra; Speckman, Elisabet; Guarnieri, Chiara; Bongiovanni, Serena; Quinti, Isabella

    2017-03-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is accepted as an effective and well-tolerated treatment for primary and secondary immunodeficiencies (ID) and immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Adverse reactions of IVIg are usually mild, comprising transient flu-like symptoms, change in blood pressure and tachycardia. However IVIg therapy can be burdensome for both patients and healthcare facilities, since the infusion may take up to 4h to administer. The objective of our multicentre, prospective, open-label phase III trial was to evaluate the tolerability and safety of human normal immunoglobulin 50g/l (Ig VENA) at high intravenous infusion rates in adult patients with ID and ITP who had previously tolerated IVIg treatment, by progressively increasing infusion rate up to 8ml/kg/hr. 39 ID patients received three infusions, 5 ITP patients received up to a maximum of 5 infusions for a maximum of 5days. Overall 55 adverse events were reported in 18 patients, and all were mild and self-limiting. Two serious adverse events occurred in ID patients and 1 in an ITP patient; none was fatal or treatment-related. No clinically significant changes or abnormalities were observed in vital signs, laboratory results and HRQoL. In summary, in this study, more rapid IVIg infusions were well tolerated by ID and ITP patients, while maintaining their quality of life, helping to minimise the time spent in outpatient hospital visiting to potentially optimise adherence to treatment.

  11. Intraduodenal infusion of a water-based levodopa dispersion for optimisation of the therapeutic effect in severe Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bredberg, E; Nilsson, D; Johansson, K; Aquilonius, S M; Johnels, B; Nyström, C; Paalzow, L

    1993-01-01

    Motor performance of five patients with advanced Parkinson's disease was investigated during their optimum oral therapy (conventional tablets and/or depot capsules) and during a continuous duodenal infusion of levodopa. Due to the low water solubility of the drug, conventional tablets of levodopa+carbidopa (Sinemet) were milled and dispersed in a 1.8% aqueous methylcellulose solution. The dispersion was delivered nasoduodenally by a portable pump. The effect of levodopa in the two dosing regimens was estimated optico-electronically every 15 min and was also evaluated from videorecordings every 30 min and plasma levels of levodopa was regularly measured. Each dosage regimen the was studied twice, at a 2-4 day interval. Duodenal infusion improved motor function in all five patients and the fluctuations were reduced when compared to the oral therapy. Variation in plasma levodopa concentrations was 3-10 fold during oral therapy, while during the infusion a stable concentration was obtained. The therapeutic concentration varied from 0.3-3 ml-1 between patients. The relative bioavailability of levodopa in the solid preparation compared to the dispersion was in all patients 100%. Our results encourage further development of a duodenal infusion system with a levodopa dispersion for clinical use in parkinsonian patients who show severe fluctuation.

  12. Continuous subcutaneous infusion of lidocaine for persistent hiccup in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaneishi, Keisuke; Kawabata, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Persistent hiccup can cause anorexia, weight loss, disabling sleep deprivation, anxiety, and depression. Therefore, relief of persistent hiccup is important for advanced cancer patients and their family. Most reports on this condition are case series reports advocating the use of baclofen, haloperidol, gabapentin, and midazolam. However, these medications are occasionally ineffective or accompanied by intolerable side effects. The sodium channel blocker lidocaine has been shown to be effective in treating a variety of disorders thought to involve neuropathic mechanisms. Intravenous administration of lidocaine is common but efficacy has also been reported for subcutaneous infusion. In advanced cancer patients, subcutaneous infusion is easy, advantageous, and accompanied by less discomfort. We report a case of severe and sustained hiccup caused by gastric cancer that was successfully treated with a continuous subcutaneous infusion of lidocaine (480 mg (24 ml)/day) without severe side effects.

  13. The relief of bone pain in primary biliary cirrhosis with calcium infusions

    PubMed Central

    Ajdukiewicz, A. B.; Agnew, J. E.; Byers, P. D.; Wills, M. R.; Sherlock, Sheila

    1974-01-01

    Intravenous calcium infusions produced subjective relief of bone pain in 14 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. The bone pain had developed despite long-term parenteral vitamin D therapy. The pain returned after two to three months, but a subsequent course of infusions again brought relief. Before treatment satisfactory iliac crest bone biopsies were obtained in 11 of the patients and were normal in seven; two patients had biopsies indicating osteomalacia and two osteoporosis. After treatment a repeat biopsy in one of the patients with osteomalacia showed marked reduction in osteoid. The infusion treatment produced no change in plasma calcium concentration, serum phosphate, or serum alkaline phosphatase. Absorption of oral calcium was also unchanged. PMID:4279816

  14. Propofol infusion for sedation in the intensive care unit: preliminary report.

    PubMed Central

    Grounds, R M; Lalor, J M; Lumley, J; Royston, D; Morgan, M

    1987-01-01

    Propofol (2,6,di-isopropylphenol) was given by continuous intravenous infusion to provide sedation after cardiac surgery in 30 patients and its effects compared with those of midazolam given to a further 30 patients. Propofol infusion allowed rapid and accurate control of the level of sedation, which was satisfactory for longer than with midazolam. Patients given propofol recovered significantly more rapidly from their sedation once they had fulfilled the criteria for weaning from artificial ventilation and as a result spent a significantly shorter time attached to a ventilator. There were no serious complications in either group. Both medical and nursing staff considered the propofol infusion to be superior to midazolam in these patients. These findings suggest that propofol is a suitable replacement for etomidate and alphaxalone-alphadolone for sedating patients receiving intensive care. PMID:3101895

  15. [Infusion-associated kidney and liver failure in undiagnosed hereditary fructose intolerance].

    PubMed

    Müller-Wiefel, D E; Steinmann, B; Holm-Hadulla, M; Wille, L; Schärer, K; Gitzelmann, R

    1983-06-24

    Appendectomy was performed in a 14 1/2-year-old boy with undiagnosed hereditary fructose intolerance because of chronic recurrent abdominal pain. During and after operation fructose containing solutions were infused. The patient received a total of 250 g fructose intravenously over 30 hours. Hours after onset of infusion he became soporous, hypoglycaemic and acidotic and was anuric after one day. Although the diagnosis was suspected by the end of the first postoperative day and fructose had been cancelled and haemodialysis been started, the boy died after a further 3 days with signs of acute kidney and liver failure. The diagnosis of hereditary fructose intolerance was biochemically established in post mortem liver tissue. This case recalls the fact that fructose, sorbitol or invert sugars should not be added to infusion solutions as they may be toxic for healthy persons and imply a lethal risk for patients with undiagnosed hereditary fructose intolerance, even well beyond the baby and infant period.

  16. Pamidronate infusion in patients with systemic sclerosis results in changes in blood mononuclear cell cytokine profiles

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, L D; Warrington, K J; Barrow, K D; Pugazhenthi, M; Watsky, M A; Somes, G; Ingels, J; Postlethwaite, A E

    2006-01-01

    A single infusion of pamidronate was given to patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma, SSc) to assess effects on cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and lymphocyte subsets. Eighteen patients with SSc received a single intravenous dose of 60 mg of pamidronate and were followed for 6 months. Assessment of cytokine production [interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-4] by PBMC and lymphocyte subsets by flow cytometry was carried out before and after the pamidronate infusion. Unstimulated PBMC produced increased amounts of IFN-γ and TNF-α and reduced levels of TGF-β1 for up to 24 weeks after the infusion. γδ T cells from patients with SSc were activated in vitro and produced increased IFN-γ. The effects of pamidronate on modulation of cytokine profiles in patients with SSc may merit future study. PMID:17100755

  17. Intravenous glucagon in a deliberate insulin overdose in an adolescent with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    White, Mary; Zacharin, Margaret R; Werther, George A; Cameron, Fergus J

    2016-02-01

    Massive insulin overdose may be associated with unpredictable and prolonged hypoglycemia. Concerns surrounding the potential provocation of insulin release from beta cells have previously prevented the use of intravenous glucagon as an adjunct to infusion of dextrose in this situation. We describe the case of a 15-yr-old boy with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) who presented with profound hypoglycemia following an overdose of an unknown quantity of premixed insulin. Owing to an increasing dextrose requirement and a dependence on hourly intramuscular glucagon injections, a continuous intravenous infusion of glucagon was commenced which successfully avoided the requirement for central venous access or concentrated dextrose infusion. Nausea was managed with anti-emetics. Intramuscular and subcutaneous glucagon is effective in the management of refractory and severe hypoglycemia in youth with both T1DM and hyperinsulinism. Concerns regarding the precipitation of rebound hypoglycemia with the use of intravenous glucagon do not relate to those with T1DM. This treatment option may be a useful adjunct in the management of insulin overdose in youth with T1DM and may avoid the requirement for invasive central venous access placement.

  18. Central venous catheter-related blood stream infections in patients receiving intravenous iloprost for pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sammut, D; Elliot, C A; Kiely, D G; Armstrong, I J; Martin, L; Wilkinson, J; Sephton, P; Jones, J; Hamilton, N; Hurdman, J; McLellan, E; Sabroe, I; Condliffe, R

    2013-07-01

    Catheter-related blood stream infection (CR-BSI) in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) receiving intravenous iloprost via an indwelling central line has previously not been fully described. Recent studies have suggested a link between the pH of prostanoid infusions and the rate and nature of CR-BSI. We have investigated CR-BSI in patients receiving intravenous iloprost at our unit. Databases and hospital records were interrogated for all patients receiving intravenous iloprost between September 2007 and June 2012. Fifty-nine patients received intravenous iloprost via an indwelling central catheter with a total of 23,072 treatment days. There were 15 episodes of CR-BSI, identified using a systematic screening protocol, involving 11 patients giving an overall CR-BSI rate of 0.65/1,000 treatment days. CR-BSI rate for Gram-positive organisms was 0.26/1,000 treatment-days and for Gram-negative organisms was 0.39/1,000 treatment-days. The pH of iloprost in typical dosing regimens was comparable to the pH used in standard-diluent treprostinil and dissimilar to alkaline epoprostenol infusions. The proportion of Gram-negative CR-BSI was similar to that reported for standard-diluent treprostinil. CRP was normal on admission in 33 % of cases of confirmed CR-BSI and remained normal in 13 % of cases. CR-BSI rates with intravenous iloprost are comparable to those observed for other prostanoids. The high proportion of Gram-negative organisms observed and the neutral pH of iloprost infusions support the previously hypothesised link between pH and antimicrobial activity. Although usually elevated during a CR-BSI, CRP may be normal in early infection and a normal result cannot completely exclude infection.

  19. Intravenous vitamin C as adjunctive therapy for enterovirus/rhinovirus induced acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fowler Iii, Alpha A; Kim, Christin; Lepler, Lawrence; Malhotra, Rajiv; Debesa, Orlando; Natarajan, Ramesh; Fisher, Bernard J; Syed, Aamer; DeWilde, Christine; Priday, Anna; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar

    2017-02-04

    We report a case of virus-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) treated with parenteral vitamin C in a patient testing positive for enterovirus/rhinovirus on viral screening. This report outlines the first use of high dose intravenous vitamin C as an interventional therapy for ARDS, resulting from enterovirus/rhinovirus respiratory infection. From very significant preclinical research performed at Virginia Commonwealth University with vitamin C and with the very positive results of a previously performed phase I safety trial infusing high dose vitamin C intravenously into patients with severe sepsis, we reasoned that infusing identical dosing to a patient with ARDS from viral infection would be therapeutic. We report here the case of a 20-year-old, previously healthy, female who contracted respiratory enterovirus/rhinovirus infection that led to acute lung injury and rapidly to ARDS. She contracted the infection in central Italy while on an 8-d spring break from college. During a return flight to the United States, she developed increasing dyspnea and hypoxemia that rapidly developed into acute lung injury that led to ARDS. When support with mechanical ventilation failed, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was initiated. Twelve hours following ECMO initiation, high dose intravenous vitamin C was begun. The patient's recovery was rapid. ECMO and mechanical ventilation were discontinued by day-7 and the patient recovered with no long-term ARDS sequelae. Infusing high dose intravenous vitamin C into this patient with virus-induced ARDS was associated with rapid resolution of lung injury with no evidence of post-ARDS fibroproliferative sequelae. Intravenous vitamin C as a treatment for ARDS may open a new era of therapy for ARDS from many causes.

  20. Intravenous vitamin C as adjunctive therapy for enterovirus/rhinovirus induced acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fowler III, Alpha A; Kim, Christin; Lepler, Lawrence; Malhotra, Rajiv; Debesa, Orlando; Natarajan, Ramesh; Fisher, Bernard J; Syed, Aamer; DeWilde, Christine; Priday, Anna; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of virus-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) treated with parenteral vitamin C in a patient testing positive for enterovirus/rhinovirus on viral screening. This report outlines the first use of high dose intravenous vitamin C as an interventional therapy for ARDS, resulting from enterovirus/rhinovirus respiratory infection. From very significant preclinical research performed at Virginia Commonwealth University with vitamin C and with the very positive results of a previously performed phase I safety trial infusing high dose vitamin C intravenously into patients with severe sepsis, we reasoned that infusing identical dosing to a patient with ARDS from viral infection would be therapeutic. We report here the case of a 20-year-old, previously healthy, female who contracted respiratory enterovirus/rhinovirus infection that led to acute lung injury and rapidly to ARDS. She contracted the infection in central Italy while on an 8-d spring break from college. During a return flight to the United States, she developed increasing dyspnea and hypoxemia that rapidly developed into acute lung injury that led to ARDS. When support with mechanical ventilation failed, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was initiated. Twelve hours following ECMO initiation, high dose intravenous vitamin C was begun. The patient’s recovery was rapid. ECMO and mechanical ventilation were discontinued by day-7 and the patient recovered with no long-term ARDS sequelae. Infusing high dose intravenous vitamin C into this patient with virus-induced ARDS was associated with rapid resolution of lung injury with no evidence of post-ARDS fibroproliferative sequelae. Intravenous vitamin C as a treatment for ARDS may open a new era of therapy for ARDS from many causes. PMID:28224112

  1. The effect of intracarotid vasopressin infusion on ACTH release in neurohypophysectomized, conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Raff, H; Papanek, P E; Liard, J F; Cowley, A W

    1994-09-01

    Neurohypophysectomy (NHX) attenuates the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) response to arterial hypotension but not corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) or insulin-induced hypoglycemia in conscious dogs. The purpose of the present study was to determine if increasing vasopressin (AVP) in the cephalic circulation by carotid infusion normalizes the ACTH response to hypotension attenuated by NHX. Five male, conditioned dogs underwent controlled, acute decreases in arterial pressure (by approximately 25 mmHg) by infusion of sodium nitroprusside (NP) before and > 4 wk after selective NHX. ACTH increased from 40 +/- 3 to 242 +/- 79 pg/ml during NP in the intact state. This response was greatly attenuated after NHX (peak ACTH 81 +/- 15 pg/ml). Simultaneous intravenous infusion of AVP (12.5 ng/min) had a small, augmenting effect on the ACTH response to NP (peak ACTH 120 +/- 27 pg/ml). Intracarotid AVP (12.5 ng/min) greatly augmented the ACTH response to NP (peak ACTH 202 +/- 26 pg/ml) such that it was no longer different from the intact response. Neither intravenous nor intracarotid AVP infusion per se had a great effect on ACTH. A normal ACTH response to hypotension requires an intact neurohypophysis and is mediated by a cephalic action of magnocellular AVP.

  2. 21 CFR 880.5725 - Infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Infusion pump. (a) Identification. An infusion pump is a device used in a health care facility to pump fluids into a patient in a controlled manner. The device may use a piston pump, a roller pump, or a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Infusion pump. 880.5725 Section 880.5725 Food...

  3. 21 CFR 880.5725 - Infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Infusion pump. (a) Identification. An infusion pump is a device used in a health care facility to pump fluids into a patient in a controlled manner. The device may use a piston pump, a roller pump, or a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Infusion pump. 880.5725 Section 880.5725 Food...

  4. 21 CFR 880.5725 - Infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Infusion pump. (a) Identification. An infusion pump is a device used in a health care facility to pump fluids into a patient in a controlled manner. The device may use a piston pump, a roller pump, or a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Infusion pump. 880.5725 Section 880.5725 Food...

  5. 21 CFR 880.5725 - Infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Infusion pump. (a) Identification. An infusion pump is a device used in a health care facility to pump fluids into a patient in a controlled manner. The device may use a piston pump, a roller pump, or a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Infusion pump. 880.5725 Section 880.5725 Food...

  6. 21 CFR 880.5725 - Infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Infusion pump. (a) Identification. An infusion pump is a device used in a health care facility to pump fluids into a patient in a controlled manner. The device may use a piston pump, a roller pump, or a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Infusion pump. 880.5725 Section 880.5725 Food...

  7. Intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulin G replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Francisco A

    2016-11-01

    Human polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) for therapeutic use has been available for decades. This drug was developed for treatment of antibody deficiency (replacement therapy), although its use has expanded into many anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory applications in recent years. This review focuses on IgG prescribing for replacement therapy. IgG for replacement is most often administered via the intravenous IgG (IVIG) or subcutaneous IgG (SCIG) routes. IVIG is usually administered every 34 weeks, and SCIG is usually administered weekly, although variations may be considered in all cases. Recently, a new product became available that uses hyaluronidase to facilitate absorption of large doses of SCIG less frequently (every 34 weeks, as with IVIG). There are important differences between the pharmacokinetics of these three routes of administration. IVIG therapy leads to high peaks and low troughs between infusions. IgG concentration fluctuates much less over time with SCIG. Hyaluronidase-facilitated SCIG is intermediate. SCIG may have lower bioavailability in comparison with IVIG and may require higher doses over time; this is not true for hyaluronidase SCIG. However, there are large variations in IgG half-life among individuals and with different products. Therefore, individualization of therapy is essential. Mild systemic flu-like adverse effects may affect up to 2025% of patients who receive IVIG, smaller fractions may experience more-severe symptoms, whereas anaphylaxis is exceedingly rare. General flu-like systemic adverse effects are minimal with SCIG (intermediate with hyaluronidase SCIG), but transient (24 hours), mild, local inflammatory symptoms at infusion sites are relatively common with both forms. Additional rare but important complications of IgG therapy include thrombotic events and hemolysis that can be seen at high doses with any route of administration. Renal adverse effects may occur with IVIG as well. The variety of IgG products and routes of

  8. Neuroprotective Effects of Intravenous Anesthetics: A New Critical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bilotta, Federico; Stazi, Elisabetta; Zlotnik, Alexander; Gruenbaum, Shaun E.; Rosa, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative cerebral damage can result in various clinical sequela ranging from minor neurocognitive deficits to catastrophic neurological morbidity with permanent impairment and death. The goal of neuroprotective treatments is to reduce the clinical effects of cerebral damage through two major mechanisms: increased tolerance of neurological tissue to ischemia and changes in intra-cellular responses to energy supply deprivation. In this review, we present the clinical evidence of intravenous anesthetics on perioperative neuroprotection, and we also provide a critical perspective for future studies. The neuroprotective efficacy of the intravenous anesthetics thiopental, propofol and etomidate is unproven. Lidocaine may be neuroprotective in non-diabetic patients who have undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CBP) or with a 48-hour infusion, but conclusive data are lacking. There are several limitations of clinical studies that evaluate postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), including difficulties in identifying patients at high-risk and a lack of consensus for defining the “gold-standard” neuropsychological testing. Although a battery of neurocognitive tests remains the primary method for diagnosing POCD, recent evidence suggests a role for novel biomarkers and neuroimaging to preemptively identify patients more susceptible to cognitive decline in the perioperative period. Current evidence, while inconclusive, suggest that intravenous anesthetics may be both neuroprotective and neurotoxic in the perioperative period. A critical analysis on data recorded from randomized control trials (RCTs) is essential in identifying patients who may benefit or be harmed by a particular anesthetic. RCTs will also contribute to defining methodologies for future studies on the neuroprotective effects of intravenous anesthetics. PMID:24669972

  9. [Complications caused by intravenous therapy].

    PubMed

    Quirós Luque, José María; Gago Fornells, Manuel

    2005-11-01

    Nursing professionals must know everything related to complications caused by intravenous therapy including the ways to prevent and solve these complications. We need not forget that nurses are the ones mainly responsible for the insertion, manipulation, removal and care of catheters.

  10. [Lethal intravenous injection of benzine].

    PubMed

    Zirwes, Christian; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie; Hinsch, Nora; Kardel, Bernd; Hartung, Benno

    2015-01-01

    A man who suffered from chronic pain syndrome died two days after intravenous injection of 2 ml benzine. Previous suicide attempts by drug intoxication and strangulation had failed. Death occurred due to multi-organ failure. We present the results of the clinical, morphological and toxicological examinations performed.

  11. Nanostructured lipid carriers of artemether-lumefantrine combination for intravenous therapy of cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Priyanka; Suryavanshi, Shital; Pathak, Sulabha; Patra, Aditya; Sharma, Shobhona; Patravale, Vandana

    2016-11-20

    Patients with cerebral malaria (CM) are unable to take oral medication due to impaired consciousness and vomiting thus necessitating parenteral therapy. Quinine, artemether, and artesunate which are currently used for parenteral malaria therapy have their own drawbacks. The World Health Organization (WHO) has now banned monotherapy and recommends artemisinin-based combination therapy for malaria treatment. However, presently there is no intravenous formulation available for combination therapy of malaria. Artemether-Lumefantrine (ARM-LFN) is a WHO approved combination for oral malaria therapy. However, the low aqueous solubility of ARM and LFN hinders their intravenous delivery. The objective of this study was to formulate ARM-LFN nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) for intravenous therapy of CM. ARM-LFN NLC were prepared by microemulsion template technique and characterized for size, drug content, entrapment efficiency, drug release, crystallinity, morphology, amenability to autoclaving, compatibility with infusion fluids, stability, antimalarial efficacy in mice, and toxicity in rats. The ARM-LFN NLC showed sustained drug release, amenability to autoclaving, compatibility with infusion fluids, good stability, complete parasite clearance and reversal of CM symptoms with 100% survival in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice, and safety in rats. The biocompatible ARM-LFN NLC fabricated by an industrially feasible technique offer a promising solution for intravenous therapy of CM.

  12. Comparison of effectiveness of high-dose intracoronary adenosine versus intravenous administration on the assessment of fractional flow reserve in patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    López-Palop, Ramón; Carrillo, Pilar; Frutos, Araceli; Cordero, Alberto; Agudo, Pilar; Mashlab, Samer; Bertomeu-Martínez, Vicente

    2013-05-01

    Intravenous adenosine is considered the drug of choice to obtain maximum hyperemia in the measurement of the fractional flow reserve (FFR). However, comparative studies performed between intravenous and intracoronary administration have not used high doses of intracoronary adenosine. The present study compared the efficacy and safety of high doses of intracoronary adenosine to intravenous administration when calculating the FFR. Intracoronary bolus doses of 60, 180, 300, and 600 μg adenosine were compared to an intravenous administration of 140 μg/kg/min, 200 μg/kg/min, and 140 μg/kg/min plus an intracoronary bolus of 120 μg. All the cases were performed using the radial approach. FFR was assessed in 102 patients with 108 intermediate lesions by an intracoronary pressure wire. The intracoronary dose of 60 μg was associated with a significantly greater FFR compared to the intravenous infusion (0.02 ± 0.03, p = 0.001). The intracoronary doses of 300 (-0.01 ± 0.00; p = 0.006) and 600 μg (-0.02 ± 0.00; p <0.0005) were significantly associated with a smaller FFR compared to the intravenous infusion. An intracoronary dose of 600 μg revealed a significantly greater percentage of lesions with an FFR <0.80 compared to intravenous infusion at 140 μg/kg/min (37.6 vs 31.5%; p <0.05) and 200 μg/kg/min (37.6 vs 32.4%; p <0.05) and compared to intracoronary doses of 60 (26.9%) and 180 μg (31.5%). In conclusion, an intracoronary bolus dose >300 μg can be equal to or more effective than an intravenous infusion of adenosine in achieving maximum hyperemia when calculating the FFR. Its use could simplify these procedures without having an effect on safety.

  13. Treatment of a mild chronic case of ciguatera fish poisoning with intravenous mannitol, a case study.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gary

    2005-03-01

    This article describes a recent case of ciguatera poisoning treated with intravenous mannitol. Mannitol has been used with good effect in non-controlled studies in acutely severely poisoned patients, but is not described in the treatment of chronic or milder poisoning. Our patient was a 35-year-old Niuean man who had eaten a ciguatoxic fish two weeks previously. His symptoms were not severe but were very unpleasant and restricted his ability to work. He was given a single dose of mannitol (0.66g/kg) as an intravenous infusion over two hours. His symptoms dramatically improved within 24 hours, and within a few days he felt virtually back to his former self. He experienced no side effects to the mannitol. It is suggested that intravenous mannitol may prove to be a useful treatment for mild to moderate ciguatera poisoning, and for patients who present late for treatment.

  14. Antibacterial activity of epidural infusions.

    PubMed

    Coghlan, M W; Davies, M J; Hoyt, C; Joyce, L; Kilner, R; Waters, M J

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of epidural abscess following epidural catheterisation appears to be increasing, being recently reported as one in 1000 among surgical patients. This study was designed to investigate the antibacterial activity of various local anaesthetics and additives, used in epidural infusions, against a range of micro-organisms associated with epidural abscess. The aim was to determine which, if any, epidural infusion solution has the greatest antibacterial activity. Bupivacaine, ropivacaine and levobupivacaine crystals were dissolved and added to Mueller-Hinton Agar in concentrations of 0.06%, 0.125%, 0.2%, 0.25%, 0.5% and 1%. Fentanyl, adrenaline and clonidine were also mixed with agar in isolation and in combination with the local anaesthetics. Using a reference agar dilution method, the minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for a range of bacteria. Bupivacaine showed antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli with minimum inhibitory concentrations between 0.125% and 0.25%. It did not inhibit the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at any of the concentrations tested. Levobupivacaine and ropivacaine showed no activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, even at the highest concentrations tested, and minimal activity against Escherichia coli (minimum inhibitory concentrations 0.5% and 1% respectively). The presence of fentanyl, adrenaline and clonidine had no additional effect on the antibacterial activity of any of the local anaesthetic agents. The low concentrations of local anaesthetic usually used in epidural infusions have minimal antibacterial activity. While the clinical implications of this in vitro study are not known, consideration should be given to increasing the concentration of bupivacaine in an epidural infusion or to administering a daily bolus of 0.25% bupivacaine to reduce the risk of epidural bacterial growth.

  15. The complexity of prescribing intravenous lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Waitzberg, Dan Linetzky; Torrinhas, Raquel Susana

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsions (LEs) are relevant for patients receiving parenteral nutrition because they prevent the depletion of essential fatty acids (FAs) and, as a highly dense energy source, enable the reduction of glucose provision, thereby decreasing the risks of hyperglycemia and hepatic impairment. The prescription of LEs is complex, due mainly to their distinct FA components, which may alter the immune response in different ways and distinctly influence inflammation, oxidative stress and blood coagulation according to their biochemical properties. In addition, an excess of other LE components, such as phospholipids and phytosterols, may be associated with hepatic steatosis and dysfunction. These associations do not represent direct risks or obstacles to LE use in metabolically stable patients but can render the choice of the best LE for hypermetabolic patients difficult. The infusion of LEs according to the available guidelines provides more benefit than harm and should be part of exclusive parenteral nutrition regimens or complement enteral nutrition when appropriate. The patient's metabolic profile should guide the type of FA and amount of lipids that are provided. For critically ill hypermetabolic patients, growing evidence indicates that standard LEs based solely on soybean oil should be avoided in favor of new LEs containing medium-chain triglycerides, olive oil, or fish oil to decrease the provision of potentially oxidative, inflammatory/immunosuppressive, and prothrombotic n-6 FAs. In addition, as sources of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, LEs containing fish oil may be important for critically ill patients because they allow better modulation of the immune response and likely reduce the length of intensive care unity stay. However, current evidence precludes the recommendation of a specific LE for clinical use in this patient population.

  16. The new generation of liquid intravenous immunoglobulin formulations in patient care: a comparison of intravenous immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Stein, Mark R

    2010-09-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IGIV) replacement therapy is the standard of care for primary immunodeficiencies with impaired humoral immunity. It is also the immunomodulatory therapy of choice for some types of neuroimmunologic and autoimmune hematologic disorders and for immunomodulation in bone marrow and some solid organ transplants. Currently available IGIV products include older lyophilized formulations, 5% liquid products, and newer, liquid, ready-to-use, 10% formulations. Differences in the formulations, manufacturing processes, excipients, pH, and other physicochemical properties of IGIV products may affect their clinical efficacy and tolerability. Among at-risk patients, the possibility of serious complications such as renal insufficiency, heart failure, thrombotic events, and immunological reactions may be increased if an IGIV formulation has sugar as a stabilizer, has high sodium or immunoglobulin A (IgA) content, or is hyperosmolar. The 10% liquid formulations may offer advantages because of their lower IgA concentrations, optimal pH, glycine or proline stabilizers, low sodium content, and lower osmolality. Liquid formulations are more convenient for patients and health care providers due to shorter infusion times and easier preparation and administration.

  17. Systematic evaluation of errors occurring during the preparation of intravenous medication

    PubMed Central

    Parshuram, Christopher S.; To, Teresa; Seto, Winnie; Trope, Angela; Koren, Gideon; Laupacis, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Errors in the concentration of intravenous medications are not uncommon. We evaluated steps in the infusion-preparation process to identify factors associated with preventable medication errors. Methods We included 118 health care professionals who would be involved in the preparation of intravenous medication infusions as part of their regular clinical activities. Participants performed 5 infusion-preparation tasks (drug-volume calculation, rounding, volume measurement, dose-volume calculation, mixing) and prepared 4 morphine infusions to specified concentrations. The primary outcome was the occurrence of error (deviation of > 5% for volume measurement and > 10% for other measures). The secondary outcome was the magnitude of error. Results Participants performed 1180 drug-volume calculations, 1180 rounding calculations and made 1767 syringe-volume measurements, and they prepared 464 morphine infusions. We detected errors in 58 (4.9%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.7% to 6.2%) drug-volume calculations, 30 (2.5%, 95% CI 1.6% to 3.4%) rounding calculations and 29 (1.6%, 95% CI 1.1% to 2.2%) volume measurements. We found 7 errors (1.6%, 95% CI 0.4% to 2.7%) in drug mixing. Of the 464 infusion preparations, 161 (34.7%, 95% CI 30.4% to 39%) contained concentration errors. Calculator use was associated with fewer errors in dose-volume calculations (4% v. 10%, p = 0.001). Four factors were positively associated with the occurence of a concentration error: fewer infusions prepared in the previous week (p = 0.007), increased number of years of professional experience (p = 0.01), the use of the more concentrated stock solution (p < 0.001) and the preparation of smaller dose volumes (p < 0.001). Larger magnitude errors were associated with fewer hours of sleep in the previous 24 hours (p = 0.02), the use of more concentrated solutions (p < 0.001) and preparation of smaller infusion doses (p < 0.001). Interpretation Our data suggest that the reduction of provider

  18. Part II: Biochemical changes after pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-38 infusion in migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Guo, Song; Vollesen, Anne Luise Haulund; Hansen, Young Bae Lee; Frandsen, Erik; Andersen, Malene Rohr; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-02-01

    Background Intravenous infusion of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-38 (PACAP38) provokes migraine attacks in 65-70% of migraine without aura (MO) patients. We investigated whether PACAP38 infusion causes changes in the endogenous production of PACAP38, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), S100 calcium binding protein B (S100B), neuron-specific enolase and pituitary hormones in migraine patients. Methods We allocated 32 previously genotyped MO patients to receive intravenous infusion PACAP38 (10 pmol/kg/minute) for 20 minutes and recorded migraine-like attacks. Sixteen of the patients were carriers of the risk allele rs2274316 ( MEF2D), which confers increased risk of MO and may regulate PACAP38 expression, and 16 were non-carriers. We collected blood samples at baseline and 20, 30, 40, 60 and 90 minutes after the start of the infusion. A control group of six healthy volunteers received intravenous saline. Results PACAP38 infusion caused significant changes in plasma concentrations of VIP ( p = 0.026), prolactin ( p = 0.011), S100B ( p < 0.001) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH; p = 0.015), but not CGRP ( p = 0.642) and TNFα ( p = 0.535). We found no difference in measured biochemical variables after PACAP38 infusion in patients who later developed migraine-like attacks compared to those who did not ( p > 0.05). There was no difference in the changes of biochemical variables between patients with and without the MEF2D-associated gene variant ( p > 0.05). Conclusion PACAP38 infusion elevated the plasma levels of VIP, prolactin, S100B and TSH, but not CGRP and TNFα. Development of delayed migraine-like attacks or the presence of the MEF2D gene variant was not associated with pre-ictal changes in plasma levels of neuropeptides, TNFα and pituitary hormones.

  19. Efficacy and safety of intravenous iron sucrose in treating adults with iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini; de Figueiredo, Pedro Otavio Novis; Olivato, Maria Cristina Albe; Chiattone, Carlos Sérgio

    2011-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency is the most common disorder in the world, affecting approximately 25% of the world`s population and the most common cause of anemia. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravenous iron sucrose (IS) in the treatment of adults with iron deficiency anemia Methods Eighty-six adult patients with iron deficiency anemia, who had intolerance or showed no effect with oral iron therapy, received a weekly dose of 200 mg of intravenous iron sucrose until the hemoglobin level was corrected or until receiving the total dose of intravenous iron calculated for each patient Results The mean hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels were 8.54 g/dL and 7.63 ng/mL (pre-treatment) and 12.1 g/dL and 99.0 ng/mL (post-treatment) (p-value < 0.0001), respectively. The average increases in hemoglobin levels were 3.29 g/dL for women and 4.58 g/dL for men; 94% of male and 84% of female patients responded (hemoglobin increased by at least 2 g/dL) to intravenous iron therapy. Correction of anemia was obtained in 47 of 69 (68.1%) female patients and in 12 of 17 male (70.6%) patients. A total of 515 intravenous infusions of iron sucrose were administered and iron sucrose was generally well tolerated with no moderate or serious adverse drug reactions recorded by the investigators. Conclusions Our data confirm that the use of intravenous iron sucrose is a safe and effective option in the treatment of adult patients with iron deficiency anemia who lack satisfactory response to oral iron therapy. Intravenous iron sucrose is well tolerated and with a clinically manageable safety profile when using appropriate dosing and monitoring. The availability of intravenous iron sucrose would potentially improve compliance and thereby reduce morbidities from iron deficiency. PMID:23049360

  20. Fat emulsion for intravenous administration: clinical experience with intralipid 10%.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, L M; Hardie, B S; Hidalgo, J

    1976-01-01

    A 10% soybean oil emulsion (Intralipid 10%), used extensively in Europe for intravenous alimentation, has now been clinically evaluated in the United States. Controlled studies have shown that the soybean oil emulsion can be substituted for glucose to supply one-third to two-thirds of the total calories, and can be administered peripherally without significant vein irritation. Essential fatty acid deficiencies, frequently encountered in patients dependent on parenteral alimentation with fat-free solutions, are prevented and corrected by use of this preparation. Data on long-term tolerance to Intralipid 10% infusions are presented for 292 patients treated for more than 6,000 patient days. The soybean oil emulsion was usually well tolerated. Side effects were reported in two of 133 adults and 12 of 159 pediatric patients. PMID:820291

  1. [Hypokalemic effect of salbutamol administered intravenously in the preoperative period].

    PubMed

    Fábregas, N; Taurá, P; Castillo, J; Tomás, A; Planella, V L; Naldá, M A

    1989-01-01

    In 8 healthy patients (ASA I-II) there was analyzed the effect of salbutamol over serum levels of potassium, glucose, insulin, AMPc and GMPc. Also were determined the arterial blood pressure and heart rate. The drug was administered intravenously, as bronchodilator, during the preoperative period. There was a significant decrease in kaliemia (p less than 0.001 immediately after receiving the salbutamol infusion and p less than 0.05 at 60 min). Their plasma potassium levels dropped from 4.03 +/- 25 to 3.45 +/- 0.16 mEq.l-1. The plasma levels of glucose and insulin increased with a significance of p less than 0.001 post salbutamol perfusion. There were no changes in the plasmatic AMPc and GMPc. Heart rate increased from 67 +/- 10.8 to 80.5 +/- 13.7 (p less than 0.01) post perfusion, returning afterwards to their basal values. Arterial blood pressure was unmodified.

  2. Renal electrolyte excretion and renin release during calcium and parathormone infusions in conscious rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Peart, W S; Roddis, S A; Unwin, R J

    1986-01-01

    Following a random block experimental design in each case, three repeated measurement studies were carried out in three different groups of conscious rabbits, to investigate the renal effects of increasing doses of intravenous calcium chloride (CaCl2) and bovine parathyroid hormone (PTH). In the first study, each rabbit received either CaCl2 (0.15, 0.3, 0.5 or 1.0 mg kg-1 min-1) or vehicle alone (control) for 160 min. In the second study, rabbits were given either PTH (0.15 microgram kg-1 min-1), CaCl2 (1.0 mg kg-1 min-1), PTH plus CaCl2 (0.15 microgram kg-1 min-1 and 1.0 mg kg-1 min-1, respectively) or vehicle alone; PTH was infused for just over 60 min. In the third study, a much smaller dose (0.05 mg kg-1 min-1) of CaCl2 was infused for 100 min. CaCl2 infusion produced a striking fall in fractional excretion of sodium of at least 50% (P less than 0.01), but this was not dose related, being almost maximal at the smaller doses infused. Although this effect was evident in the absence of any changes in total plasma calcium concentration at the lower doses of CaCl2, renal calcium excretion was increased between 2- and 20-fold (P less than 0.01) at all doses infused. Fractional excretion of chloride doubled at the two higher doses of CaCl2 (P less than 0.01), but potassium excretion was unchanged. There were no consistent alterations in mean arterial blood pressure, effective renal plasma flow, glomerular filtration rate or plasma renin activity (PRA); total plasma calcium concentration was consistently elevated only during infusion of the high dose by just under 1 mmol l-1. PTH infusion had no measured effect on fractional excretion of sodium or renal calcium excretion, but doubled fractional potassium excretion (P less than 0.05). Heart rate and PRA increased (P less than 0.01 and less than 0.05, respectively), the latter by 50%, but systemic pressure and renal haemodynamics were not significantly affected. By contrast, PTH infused with CaCl2 produced a 4-fold rise

  3. Effect of short-term intralipid infusion on the immune response during low-dose endotoxemia in humans.

    PubMed

    Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Plomgaard, Peter; Akerstrom, Thorbjorn; Møller, Kirsten; Schmitz, Ole; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2008-02-01

    Novel anti-inflammatory effects of insulin have recently been described, and insulin therapy to maintain euglycemia suppresses the plasma levels of free fatty acids (FFA) and increases the survival of critically ill patients. We aimed to explore the effect of short-term high levels of plasma FFA on the inflammatory response to a low dose of endotoxin. Fourteen healthy male volunteers underwent the following two trials in a randomized crossover design: 1) continuous infusion of 20% Intralipid [0.7 ml.kg(-1).h(-1) (1.54 g/kg)] for 11 h, and 2) infusion of isotonic saline for 11 h (control). In each trial, heparin was given to activate lipoprotein lipase, and an intravenous bolus of endotoxin (0.1 ng/kg) was given after 6 h of Intralipid/saline infusion. Blood samples and muscle and fat biopsies were obtained before the Intralipid/saline infusion and before as well as after infusion of an endotoxin bolus. Plasma levels of FFA, triglycerides, and glycerol were markedly increased during the Intralipid infusion. Endotoxin exposure induced an increase in plasma levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6, and neutrophils and further stimulated gene expression of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in both skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. The systemic inflammatory response to endotoxin was significantly pronounced during Intralipid infusion. Short-term hyperlipidemia enhances the inflammatory response to endotoxin, and skeletal muscle and adipose tissue are capable of producing essential inflammatory mediators after endotoxin stimulation.

  4. High-dose diazepam facilitates core cooling during cold saline infusion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hostler, David; Northington, William E; Callaway, Clifton W

    2009-08-01

    Studies have suggested that inducing mild hypothermia improves neurologic outcomes after traumatic brain injury, major stroke, cardiac arrest, or exertional heat illness. While infusion of cold normal saline is a simple and inexpensive method for reducing core temperature, human cold-defense mechanisms potentially make this route stressful or ineffective. We hypothesized that intravenous administration of diazepam during a rapid infusion of 30 mL.kg-1 of cold (4 degrees C) 0.9% saline to healthy subjects would be more comfortable and reduce core body temperature more than the administration of cold saline alone. Fifteen subjects received rapidly infused cold (4 degrees C) 0.9% saline. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive, intravenously, 20 mg diazepam (HIGH), 10 mg diazepam (LOW), or placebo (CON). Main outcomes were core temperature, skin temperature, and oxygen consumption. Data for the main outcomes were analyzed with generalized estimating equations to identify differences in group, time, or a group x time interaction. Core temperature decreased in all groups (CON, 1.0 +/- 0.2 degrees C; LOW, 1.4 +/- 0.2 degrees C; HIGH, 1.5 +/- 0.2 degrees C), while skin temperature was unchanged. Mean (95% CI) oxygen consumption was 315.3 (253.8, 376.9) mL.kg-1.min-1 in the CON group, 317.9 (275.5, 360.3) in the LOW group, and 226.1 (216.4, 235.9) in the HIGH group. Significant time and group x time interaction was observed for core temperature and oxygen consumption (p < 0.001). Administration of high-dose diazepam resulted in decreased oxygen consumption during cold saline infusion, suggesting that 20 mg of intravenous diazepam may reduce the shivering threshold without compromising respiratory or cardiovascular function.

  5. Drug Infusion Systems: Technologies, Performance, and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Kim, Uoo R; Peterfreund, Robert A; Lovich, Mark A

    2017-02-16

    This review aims to broadly describe drug infusion technologies and raise subtle but important issues arising from infusion therapy that can potentially lead to patient instability and morbidity. Advantages and disadvantages of gravity-dependent drug infusion are described and compared with electromechanical approaches for precise control of medication infusion, including large-volume peristaltic and syringe pumps. This review discusses how drugs and inert carriers interact within infusion systems and outlines several complexities and potential sources of drug error. Major topics are (1) the importance of the infusion system dead volume; (2) the quantities of coadministered fluid and the concept of microinfusion; and (3) future directions for drug infusion.The infusion system dead volume resides between the point where drug and inert carrier streams meet and the patient's blood. The dead volume is an often forgotten reservoir of drugs, especially when infusion flows slow or stop. Even with medications and carriers flowing, some mass of drug always resides within the dead volume. This reservoir of drug can be accidentally delivered into patients. When dose rate is changed, there can be a significant lag between intended and actual drug delivery. When a drug infusion is discontinued, drug delivery continues until the dead volume is fully cleared of residual drug by the carrier. When multiple drug infusions flow together, a change in any drug flow rate transiently affects the rate of delivery of all the others. For all of these reasons, the use of drug infusion systems with smaller dead volumes may be advantageous.For critically ill patients requiring multiple infusions, the obligate amount of administered fluid can contribute to volume overload. Recognition of the risk of overload has given rise to microinfusion strategies wherein drug solutions are highly concentrated and infused at low rates. However, potential risks associated with the dead volume may be magnified

  6. Low flow measurement for infusion pumps: implementation and uncertainty determination of the normalized method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebeiro, J.; Musacchio, A.; Fernández Sardá, E.

    2011-12-01

    Intravenous drug delivery is a standard practice in hospitalized patients. As the blood concentration reached depends directly on infusion rate, it is important to use safe devices that guarantee output accuracy. In pediatric intensive care units, low infusion rates (i.e. lower than 10.0 ml/h) are frequently used. Thus, it would be necessary to use control programs to search for deviations at this flow range. We describe the implementation of a gravimetric method to test infusion pumps in low flow delivery. The procedure recommended by the ISO/IEC 60601-2-24 standard was used being a reasonable option among the methods frequently used in hospitals, such as infusion pumps analyzers and volumetric cylinders. The main uncertainty sources affecting this method are revised and a numeric and graphic uncertainty analysis is presented in order to show its dependence on flow. Additionally, the obtained uncertainties are compared to those presented by an automatic flow analyzer. Finally, the results of a series of tests performed on a syringe infusion pump operating at low rates are shown.

  7. Effect of intraoperative infusion of low-dose ketamine on management of postoperative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sarvjeet; Saroa, Richa; Aggarwal, Shobha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Use of opioids for perioperative analgesia is associated with sedation, respiratory depression and postoperative nausea and vomiting. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist such as ketamine has both analgesic and antihyperalgesic properties. We studied the effect of intraoperative infusion of low-dose ketamine on postoperative analgesia and its management with opioids. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 patients scheduled for open cholecystectomy under general anesthesia were randomly allocated into two equal groups in a randomized double-blinded way. The general anesthetic technique was standardized in both groups. Group K patients (n = 40) received bolus of ketamine 0.2 mg/kg intravenously followed by an infusion of 0.1 mg/kg/h before skin incision, which was continued up to the end of surgery. Similar volume of saline was infused in Group C (n = 40). The pain score at different intervals and cumulative morphine consumption over 24 h was observed. Secondary outcomes such as hemodynamic parameters, patient satisfaction score and incidences of side effects were also recorded. Results: Intraoperative infusion of low-dose ketamine resulted in effective analgesia in first 6 h of the postoperative period, which was evident from reduced pain scores and reduced opioid requirements (P = 0.001). The incidence of side effects and patient satisfaction were similar in both groups. Conclusion: Intraoperative low-dose ketamine infusion provides good postoperative analgesia while reducing need of opioid analgesics, which must be considered for better management of postoperative analgesia. PMID:26283834

  8. Intravenous Solutions for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Fletcher J.; Niederhaus, Charles; Barlow, Karen; Griffin, DeVon

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the intravenous (IV) fluids requirements being developed for medical care during NASA s future exploration class missions. Previous research on IV solution generation and mixing in space is summarized. The current exploration baseline mission profiles are introduced, potential medical conditions described and evaluated for fluidic needs, and operational issues assessed. We briefly introduce potential methods for generating IV fluids in microgravity. Conclusions on the recommended fluid volume requirements are presented.

  9. Synthetic Platelets: Intravenous Infusible Nanoparticles to Promote Hemostasis and Survival Following Liver Injury in Swine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-12

    patt ic les arc not directly affecting the platelet plug, but arc aOccting something else. Many of the swine were observed to flush immediately...chosen because their cardiovascular sys tem is similar to that of the human cardiovascular sys tem. When changing animal models we optimized our...8217 hypotens ion. skin flushing and rash. bronchospasm, decreased cardiac output, increased adenosine, and more’. The zeta potential of a nanoparticle

  10. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Sustained Low-Dose Intravenous Infusions of Pyridostigmine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-17

    over 20 years. This drug is used routinely in several daily doses for years in treating patients with a disease called myasthenia gravis . This drug...smaller than the dose usually used in treating patients with myasthenia gravis . Patients take over 20 times more of the drug each day than you will in

  11. Provider Needs for Distributed Simulation Education System in Total Intravenous Anesthesia and Target Controlled Infusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    extremely useful for a quick just-in-time introduction to the concepts of thinking in terms of achieving constant blood concentrations, in contrast to...linear learning, i.e. start at the beginning, and sequentially work through the material in a logical sequence . - more advanced learners were interested...logical sequence . - more advanced learners were interested in “just-in-time” information. This is also known as asynchronous learning. They wanted

  12. Provider Needs for Distributed Simulation Education System in Total Intravenous Anesthesia and Target Controlled Infusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    i.e. start at the beginning, and sequentially work through the material in a logical sequence . more advanced learners were interested in ’’just-in...interested in linear learning, i.e. start at the beginning, and sequentially work through the material in a logical sequence . more advanced learners were...residents. (However, feedback indicated that even beginner residents, e.g. first night on call, found the web site extremely useful for a quick

  13. [Formation of oxalate in oxaliplatin injection diluted with infusion solutions].

    PubMed

    Eto, Seiji; Yamamoto, Kie; Shimazu, Kounosuke; Sugiura, Toshimune; Baba, Kaori; Sato, Ayaka; Goromaru, Takeshi; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Hara, Keiko; Shinohara, Yoshitake; Takahashi, Kojiro

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin use can cause acute peripheral neuropathy characterized by sensory paresthesias, which are markedly exacerbated by exposure to cold temperatures, and is a dose-limiting factor in the treatment of colorectal cancer.Oxalate is eliminated in a series of nonenzymatic conversions of oxaliplatin in infusion solutions or biological fluids.Elimination of oxalate from oxaliplatin has been suggested as one of the reasons for the development of acute neuropathy.In this study, we developed a high-performance liquid chromatography(HPLC)-based method to detect oxalate formation, and investigated the time dependent formation of oxalate in oxaliplatin diluted with infusion solutions.The results obtained showed that the amount of oxalate in the solution corresponded to 1.6% of oxaliplatin 8 h after oxaliplatin dilution with a 5% glucose solution. On the other hand, oxalate formation from oxaliplatin diluted with a saline solution was ten-fold higher than that from oxaliplatin diluted with the 5% glucose solution.Most patients who were intravenously injected with oxaliplatin experienced venous pain.As a preventive measure against venous pain, dexamethasone was added to the oxaliplatin injection.We measured the amount of oxalate formed in the dexamethasone-containing oxaliplatin injection diluted with a 5% glucose solution.The amount of oxalate formed when dexamethasone was added did not differ significantly from that formed when dexamethasone was not added.Thus, there are no clinical problems associated with the stability of oxaliplatin solutions.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of Ferric Pyrophosphate Citrate, a Novel Iron Salt, Administered Intravenously to Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Swinkels, Dorine W.; Ikizler, T. Alp; Gupta, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ferric pyrophosphate citrate (Triferic) is a water‐soluble iron salt that is administered via dialysate to maintain iron balance and hemoglobin in hemodialysis patients. This double‐blind, randomized, placebo‐controlled, single‐, ascending‐dose study was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and safety of intravenous ferric pyrophosphate citrate in 48 healthy iron‐replete subjects (drug, n = 36; placebo, n = 12). Single doses of 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, or 10 mg of ferric pyrophosphate citrate or placebo were administered over 4 hours, and single doses of 15 or 20 mg of ferric pyrophosphate citrate or placebo were administered over 12 hours via intravenous infusion. Serum total iron (sFetot), transferrin‐bound iron (TBI), hepcidin‐25, and biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation were determined using validated assays. Marked diurnal variation in sFetot was observed in placebo‐treated subjects. Concentrations of sFetot and TBI increased rapidly after drug administration, with maximum serum concentrations (Cmax) reached at the end of infusion. Increases in baseline‐corrected Cmax and area under the concentration‐time curve from 0 to the time of the last quantifiable concentration (AUC0‐t) were dose proportional up to 100% transferrin saturation. Iron was rapidly cleared (apparent terminal phase half‐life 1.2‐2 hours). No significant changes from baseline in serum hepcidin‐25 concentration were observed at end of infusion for any dose. Biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation were unaffected. Intravenous doses of ferric pyrophosphate citrate were well tolerated. These results demonstrate that intravenous ferric pyrophosphate citrate is rapidly bound to transferrin and cleared from the circulation without increasing serum hepcidin levels or biomarkers of oxidative stress or inflammation. PMID:27557937

  15. Stability of Reconstituted Telavancin Drug Product in Frozen Intravenous Bags

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Anissa; Raquinio, Elvira; Nguyen, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Intravenous (IV) infusions of telavancin for injection are generally administered in-hospital, but in some circumstances they may be administered in an outpatient environment. In that setting, antibiotics may be premixed and frozen. This study determined the chemical stability of nonpreserved telavancin in various commonly used reconstitution diluents stored in IV bags (polyvinyl chloride [PVC] and PVC-free) at -20°C (-4°F) without light. Methods: Telavancin (750 mg/vial) was reconstituted with 5% dextrose injection USP (D5W) or 0.9% sodium chloride injection USP (NS) to obtain drug solutions at approximately 15 mg/mL. Infusion solutions of telavancin at diluted concentrations of 0.6 mg/mL and 8.0 mg/mL covering the range utilized in clinical practice were prepared in both PVC and PVC-free IV bags using D5W or NS solutions. The infusion solutions were stored under frozen conditions (-20°C ± 5°C [-4°F ± 41°F]) and the chemical stability was evaluated for up to 32 days. Telavancin concentration, purity, and degradant levels were determined using a stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Results: Telavancin IV infusion solutions in D5W or NS at 0.6 mg/mL and 8 mg/mL and stored at -20°C (-4°F) met the chemical stability criteria when tested on days 0, 7, 14, and 32. The assayed telavancin concentration at each time point was within 97% to 103% of the initial mean assay value. The total degradants quantified by the HPLC stability-indicating method did not show any significant change over the 32-day study period. Conclusion: Telavancin IV infusion solutions (in D5W or NS) in both PVC and PVC-free IV bags were stable for at least 32 days when stored at -20°C (-4°F) without light. These results provide prolonged frozen stability data further to that previously established for 7 days under refrigerated conditions (2°C-8°C [36°F -46°F]), and for 12 hours at room temperature when diluted into IV bags

  16. Safety of intravenous iron use in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Philip A.; Bhandari, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is common and associated with fatigue, reduced quality of life and poorer clinical outcomes. Treatment with oral iron is often inadequate and international guidelines recommend intravenous (i.v.) iron as the preferred option for the treatment of IDA in certain clinical situations. In this review, we assess the safety of using i.v. iron with a particular focus on patients with chronic kidney disease. Recent findings Recent publications have raised safety concerns regarding the incidence of serious reactions accompanying i.v. infusion, as well as the subsequent risk of infections and cardiovascular events. Methodological flaws influence the interpretation of these data that lack evidence from the use of modern irons. The latter have been investigated in several randomized control trials. Summary There is a need for better understanding and definition of the nature of i.v. iron reactions, as many are nonserious infusion reactions rather than true anaphylaxis. Retrospective identification of anaphylaxis is difficult and we suggest the importance of reanalysing data using fatalities or standardized terms as outcome measures. With the exception of high molecular weight iron dextran, serious or life-threatening reactions are rare with the use of i.v. irons, and they can be used safely for the treatment of IDA. PMID:27557350

  17. Occult Spinal Dysraphism in Obstetrics: A Case Report of Caesarean Section with Subarachnoid Anaesthesia after Remifentanil Intravenous Analgesia for Labour

    PubMed Central

    Valente, A.; Frassanito, L.; Natale, L.; Draisci, G.

    2012-01-01

    Neuraxial techniques of anaesthesia and analgesia are the current choice in obstetrics for efficacy and general low risk of major complications. Concern exists about neuraxial anaesthesia in patients with occult neural tube defects, regarding both labour analgesia and anaesthesia for Caesarean section. Recently, remifentanil infusion has been proposed as an analgesic technique alternative to lumbar epidural, especially when epidural analgesia appears to be contraindicated. Here, we discuss the case of a pregnant woman attending at our institution with occult, symptomatic spinal dysraphism who requested labour analgesia. She was selected for remifentanil intravenous infusion for labour pain and then underwent urgent operative delivery with spinal anaesthesia with no complications. PMID:22844625

  18. Comparison of intraduodenal and intravenous administration of amino acids on gastric secretion in healthy subjects and patients with duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, S J; Kwiecień, N; Obtułowicz, W; Mikoś, E; Sito, E; Oleksy, J

    1978-01-01

    The ability of an amino acid mixture given intraduodenally or intravenously to stimulate gastric secretion is compared in healthy subjects and in duodenal ulcer patients. Graded amounts of amino acids by both routes produced a similar increase in acid output in healthy subjects, reaching about 30% of the maximal response to pentagastrin. Serum gastrin concentrations remained virtually unchanged but serum alpha amino acid nitrogen levels were about twice as high with intravenous as with intraduodenal administration. Intravenously administered amino acids produced a significantly higher acid output in patients with duodenal ulcer than in healthy subjects, but did not produce a significant increase in gastric acid or pepsin secretion when combined with a pentagastrin infusion as compared with pentagastrin alone. Cimetidine (2 mg/kg/h) added to intravenous amino acid infusions caused almost complete suppression of acid secretion. This study indicates that amino acids are capable of stimulating gastric secretion after intraduodenal and after intravenous administration. The response to the latter is significantly higher in patients with duodenal ulcer than in healthy subjects, does not appear to involve gastrin release, is not affected by pentagastrin, and is strongly suppressed by histamine H2-blocker. PMID:361509

  19. Intravenous alcohol self-administration in the P rat.

    PubMed

    Windisch, Kyle A; Kosobud, Ann E K; Czachowski, Cristine L

    2014-08-01

    Alcohol consumption produces a complex array of effects that can be divided into two types: the explicit pharmacological effects of ethanol (which can be temporally separate from time of intake) and the more temporally "relevant" effects (primarily olfactory and taste) that bridge the time from intake to onset of the pharmacological effects. Intravenous (IV) self-administration of ethanol limits the confounding "non-pharmacological" effects associated with oral consumption, allows for controlled and precise dosing, and bypasses first order absorption kinetics, allowing for more direct and better-controlled assessment of alcohol's effect on the brain. IV ethanol self-administration has been reliably demonstrated in mouse and human experimental models; however, models of IV self-administration have been historically problematic in the rat. An operant multiple-schedule study design was used to elucidate the role of each component of a compound IV-ethanol plus oral-sucrose reinforcer. Male alcohol-preferring P rats had free access to both food and water during all IV self-administration sessions. Animals were trained to press a lever for orally delivered 1% sucrose (1S) on a fixed ratio 4 schedule, and then surgically implanted with an indwelling jugular catheter. Animals were then trained to respond on a multiple FR4-FR4 schedule composed of alternating 2.5-min components across 30-min sessions. For the multiple schedule, two components were used: an oral 1S only and an oral 1S plus IV 20% ethanol (25 mg/kg/injection). Average total ethanol intake was 0.47 ± 0.04 g/kg. We found significantly higher earning of sucrose-only reinforcers and greater sucrose-lever error responding relative to the compound oral-sucrose plus IV-ethanol reinforcer. These response patterns suggest that sucrose, not ethanol, was responsible for driving overall responding. The work with a compound IV ethanol-oral sucrose reinforcer presented here suggests that the existing intravenous ethanol

  20. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors for peptic ulcer bleeding: Clinical benefits and limits.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2011-03-16

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a common disease and recurrent bleeding is an independent risk factor of mortality. Infusion with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) prevents recurrent bleeding after successful endoscopic therapy. A gastric acidic environment of less than pH 5.4 alters coagulation function and activates pepsin to disaggregate platelet plugs. Gastric acid is secreted by H(+), K(+)-ATPase, naming the proton pump. This update review focuses on the mechanism and the role of PPIs in the clinical management of patients with peptic ulcer bleeding. An intravenous omeprazole bolus followed by high-dose continuous infusion for 72 h after successful endoscopic therapy can prevent the recurrent bleeding. In the Asian, however, the infusion dosage can possibly be diminished whilst preserving favorable control of the intragastric pH and thereby still decreasing rates of recurrent bleeding. Irrespective of the infusion dosage of PPIs, rates of recurrent bleeding remain high in patients with co-morbidities. Because recurrent peptic ulcer bleeding may be prolonged in those with co-morbidities, a low-dose infusion of IV PPIs for up to 7-day may result in better control of recurrent bleeding of peptic ulcers. Due to the inter-patient variability in CYP2C19 genotypes, the infusion form of new generation PPIs, such as esomeprazole, should be promising for the prevention of recurrent bleeding. This article offers a comprehensive review of clinical practice, highlighting the indication, the optimal dosage, the duration, and the potential limitation of PPIs infusion for peptic ulcer bleeding.

  1. Intravenous pamidronate in the treatment of severe idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia.

    PubMed

    Skalova, Sylva; Cerna, Lucie; Bayer, Milan; Kutilek, Stepan; Konrad, Martin; Schlingmann, Karl-Peter

    2013-03-01

    Idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia (IIH) is a rare disorder caused by CYP24A1 loss-of-function mutation, resulting in impaired degradation of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Pamidronate, an intravenously administered bisphosphonate, which is a potent inhibitor of bone resorption, has been reported only once for treatment IIH. We present a case of a previously healthy 5-month-old boy with IIH, where calcemia peaked to 5 mmol/L. Treatment with methylprednisone and furosemide had only minor effects; therefore, 2 intravenous infusions of pamidronate (0.6 mg/kg per dose) corrected the serum calcium level to 2.95 mmol/L. Furthermore, CYP24A1 homozygous mutation p.R396W (c.1186c>t) was identified in this patient, confirming the clinical diagnosis of IIH. In conclusion, IIH has a favorable outcome once properly detected and appropriately treated. Pamidronate has a beneficial effect in those patients with IIH where glucocorticoids and furosemide fail to meet the expectations.  

  2. Thermic effect and substrate oxidation in response to intravenous nutrition in cancer patients who lose weight.

    PubMed Central

    Lindmark, L; Bennegård, K; Edén, E; Svaninger, G; Ternell, M; Lundholm, K

    1986-01-01

    This study examined oxidative metabolism and thermogenesis in the acute response to controlled intravenous nutrition in seven cancer patients who lost weight. Six weight-losing and malnourished patients without cancer served as controls. Indirect calorimetry was used and measurements of arterial concentrations of various substrates, metabolic end products, and insulin were performed. Resting energy expenditure (REE) was measured after an overnight fast. The resting energy need was calculated for each patient according to REE. The nutrition program consisted of glucose and lipids (Intralipid KabiVitrum AB, Stockholm, Sweden) each as 50% of nonprotein calories and amino acids (6.9 mg N/kcal). These substrates were infused simultaneously at rates equivalent to one, two, and three times REE, over periods of 6.5 hours on 3 consecutive days after a 12-hour fast. Arterial substrate levels and energy expenditure were measured between 6 and 6.5 hours after the start of the infusion. The cancer patients had well-recognized metabolic changes in the fasted state, such as elevated plasma levels of glycerol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, and lactate, and higher energy expenditure than predicted. The cancer patients responded to strictly defined substrate challenge in a similar way as the malnourished patients without cancer. Whole body oxidative capacity and the proportion of infused glucose and lipids that were oxidized at different levels of infusion rates were not decreased in cancer patients compared with control patients. Similar arterial substrate concentrations among the groups during infusions argues for a maintained plasma clearance of the substrate in the cancer patients. This study supports the suggestion that cachectic cancer patients can generate and conserve energy normally in response to intravenous nutrition. This refers to cancer patients with a history of weight loss up to 15% of their normal body weight. Therefore, weight loss due to altered tumor

  3. Two years of experience in the treatment of status epilepticus with intravenous levetiracetam.

    PubMed

    Eue, S; Grumbt, M; Müller, M; Schulze, A

    2009-08-01

    Since its introduction in 2006, 43 patients with various forms of status epilepticus (SE) have been treated with the intravenous formulation of levetiracetam (LEV) in our clinic. After ineffective treatment with benzodiazepines, intravenous LEV was administered as a short infusion (nonconvulsive and subtle SE) at a dose of 1000 or 2000 mg. In cases of convulsive SE, a fractionated injection of 1000 or 2000 mg was used. When the results for both are combined, SE could be terminated in 19 of 43 patients. Intravenous LEV was more effective in simple focal SE (3/5), complex focal SE (11/18) and myoclonic status (2/2) than in nonconvulsive (2/8) and subtle (1/2) SE. In no case was (secondarily) generalized convulsive status epilepticus (0/8) terminated. Intravenous LEV was also well-tolerated when injected in fractionated form. No severe adverse reactions were observed. As a result of this investigation, intravenous LEV in moderate doses may represent an efficacious and well-tolerated alternative for the treatment of focal (simple and complex focal) and myoclonic SE. Further investigations are needed to confirm this assumption as the patient numbers are quite low.

  4. Design of low cost smart infusion device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saputra, Yohanes David; Purnamaningsih, Retno Wigajatri

    2015-01-01

    We propose design of a smart infusion device suitable for public hospitals in Indonesia. The device comprised of LED, photodiode and DC motor to measure and control the infusion rate, using the principle of LED beam absorption. The infusion rate was identified by using microcontroller and displayed through computer unit. Experiment results for different flow rate level and concentration of Dextrose showed that the device is able to detect, measure, and control the infusion droplets flow rate by the average error rate of 1.0081%.

  5. A novel subcutaneous infusion delivery system based on osmotic pump: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wei; Ma, Rui; Mei, Danyu; Jing, Pei; Dong, Xiao; Li, Bingsheng; Yang, Yanfang; Du, Lina; Mei, Xing-Guo; Hu, Fu-Qiang

    2014-02-01

    An economical, convenient portable drug delivery system combining osmotic pump with subcutaneous infusion was developed, which was composed of three primary components: water chamber, osmotic pump chamber and support base. Ceftriaxone sodium (CRO) was selected as the model drug and osmotic pump tablets were prepared. The influence of osmotic agents on drug release profiles was evaluated. As the adjustment made by the osmotic agents was limited, the compositions of semipermeable membrane were investigated to determine significant associations of factors based on orthogonal design. The in vitro release profiles of the optimum formulation achieved to the predetermined value (15 ± 3 min for the initial release time T(i) and 5.75 ± 0.25 h for the extent release time T(e)). The pharmacokinetic profiles of this drug delivery system were evaluated in Beagle dogs. In vivo results demonstrated that the osmotic pump subcutaneous infusion administration was equivalent to intravenous injection administration in terms of bioavailability. Moreover, constant drug plasma levels with minimized fluctuations could be achieved with this osmotic pump subcutaneous infusion system, compared with intravenous injection.

  6. Cholesterol diet counteracts repeated anesthesia/infusion-induced cognitive deficits in male Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Hohsfield, Lindsay A; Ehrlich, Daniela; Humpel, Christian

    2013-11-01

    A variety of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are associated with alterations in cholesterol levels and metabolism. Moreover, convincing evidence shows that high cholesterol diet can lead to learning and memory impairments. On the other hand, a significant body of research has also demonstrated that learning is improved by elevated dietary cholesterol. Despite these conflicting findings, it is clear that cholesterol plays an important role in these cognitive properties. However, it remains unclear how this blood-brain barrier (BBB)-impenetrable molecule affects the brain and under what circumstances it provides either detrimental or beneficial effects to learning and memory. The aim of this study was to characterize the effects of 5% cholesterol diet on six-month-old inbred Brown Norway rats. More important, we sought to examine the role that cholesterol can play when repeated anesthesia and intravenous infusion disrupts cognitive function. This present study supports previous work showing that enriched cholesterol diet leads to significant alterations in neuroinflammation and BBB disruption. Following repeated anesthesia and intravenous infusion of saline we observe that animals under normal diet conditions exhibit significant deficiencies in spatial learning and cholinergic neuron populations compared to animals under enriched cholesterol diet, which do not show such deficiencies. These findings indicate that cholesterol diet can protect against or counteract anesthesia/infusion-induced cognitive deficits. Ultimately, these results suggest that cholesterol homeostasis serves an important functional role in the brain and that altering this homeostasis can either exert positive or negative effects on cognitive properties.

  7. Safety and effectiveness of home intravenous antibiotic therapy for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Mujal, A; Sola, J; Hernandez, M; Villarino, M-A; Machado, M-L; Baylina, M; Tajan, J; Oristrell, J

    2015-06-01

    Home intravenous antibiotic therapy is an alternative to hospital admission for moderately severe infections. However, few studies have analyzed its safety and effectiveness in the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. The purpose of this study is to analyze the safety and effectiveness of home intravenous antibiotic therapy in multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. We analyzed prospectively all patients admitted to our service who underwent home intravenous antibiotic therapy during the period 2008-2012. All the treatments were administered by caretakers or self-administered by patients, through elastomeric infusion devices. Effectiveness was evaluated by analyzing the readmission rate for poor infection control. Safety was evaluated by analyzing adverse events, catheter-related complications, and readmissions not related to poor infection control. There were 433 admissions (in 355 patients) for home intravenous antibiotic therapy during the study period. There were 226 (52.2 %) admissions due to multidrug-resistant bacterial infections and 207 (47.8 %) due to non-multidrug-resistant infections. Hospital readmissions in patients with multidrug-resistant infections were uncommon. Multidrug-resistant enterococcal infections, healthcare-associated infections, and carbapenem therapy were independent variables associated with increased readmissions due to poor infection control. Readmissions not related to poor infection control, adverse events, and catheter-related complications were similar in multidrug-resistant compared to non-multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Home intravenous therapy, administered by patients or their caretakers using elastomeric infusion pumps, was safe and effective for the treatment of most multidrug-resistant bacterial infections.

  8. Intravenous anaesthesia in goats: a review.

    PubMed

    Dzikiti, T Brighton

    2013-02-13

    Intravenous anaesthesia is gradually becoming popular in veterinary practice. Traditionally, general anaesthesia is induced with intravenous drugs and then maintained with inhalation agents. Inhalation anaesthetic agents cause more significant dose-dependent cardiorespiratory depression than intravenous anaesthetic drugs, creating a need to use less of the inhalation anaesthetic agents for maintenance of general anaesthesia by supplementing with intravenous anaesthesia drugs. Better still, if anaesthesia is maintained completely with intravenous anaesthetic drugs, autonomic functions remain more stable intra-operatively. Patient recovery from anaesthesia is smoother and there is less pollution of the working environment than happens with inhalation anaesthetic agents. Recently, a number of drugs with profiles (pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic) suitable for prolonged intravenous anaesthesia have been studied, mostly in humans and, to a certain extent, in dogs and horses. There is currently very little scientific information on total intravenous anaesthesia in goats, although, in the past few years, some scholarly scientific articles on drugs suitable for partial intravenous anaesthesia in goats have been published. This review article explored the information available on drugs that have been assessed for partial intravenous anaesthesia in goats, with the aim of promoting incorporation of these drugs into total intravenous anaesthesia protocols in clinical practice. That way, balanced anaesthesia, a technique in which drugs are included in anaesthetic protocols for specific desired effects (hypnosis, analgesia, muscle relaxation, autonomic stabilisation) may be utilised in improving the welfare of goats undergoing general anaesthesia.

  9. A part-randomized study of intravenous oseltamivir in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Várkonyi, I; Chappey, C; Giraudon, M; Burleigh, L

    2015-06-01

    Seriously ill patients with influenza may be unable to take oral medication. The safety of intravenous oseltamivir was evaluated in adults and adolescents. This prospective, part-randomized study enrolled hospitalized patients aged ≥13 years with clinical or laboratory-confirmed influenza, who started study medication within 144 h of illness onset. Patients with normal renal function received oseltamivir 100 or 200 mg every 12 h for 5 days by slow intravenous infusion. Patients with renal impairment received lower doses, appropriate to the degree of impairment. Blood samples were taken for pharmacokinetics, and nasal swabs were taken to monitor viral shedding and resistance [reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and culture]. Adverse events (AEs) were monitored for 30 days from treatment initiation. Of the 118 patients enrolled, 103 had normal renal function. On day 1, 64 patients had laboratory-confirmed influenza. Ninety-four (80 %) patients completed 5 days of oseltamivir treatment (32 intravenous only). Sixty-eight and 13 patients reported on-treatment AEs and serious AEs (SAEs), respectively (62 and nine during intravenous dosing, respectively). For 33 and six patients, these AEs and SAEs were considered treatment-related (31 and five during intravenous dosing, respectively); 11 patients had AEs causing treatment withdrawal. Five patients died. Adequate systemic exposure to oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) was achieved at the intravenous doses tested. Oseltamivir-resistant viruses (H275Y) were detected in two patients. In seriously ill, hospitalized patients with/without renal impairment, intravenous oseltamivir was not associated with adverse safety findings at the dosages tested and achieved systemic OC exposures at least as high as the approved oral dose.

  10. Safety of Infusing Ipilimumab Over 30 Minutes

    PubMed Central

    Momtaz, Parisa; Park, Vivian; Panageas, Katherine S.; Postow, Michael A.; Callahan, Margaret; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Chapman, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The approved dose of ipilimumab is 3 mg/kg infused over 90 minutes; however, in clinical trials, 10 mg/kg has also been infused over 90 minutes. At this higher dose, patients receive 3 mg/kg within the first 27 minutes of treatment. We sought to determine whether the standard dose of 3 mg/kg could be safely infused over 30 minutes. Methods We reviewed retrospectively the incidence of infusion-related reactions (IRRs) to ipilimumab at our institution in patients receiving doses of either 3 or 10 mg/kg infused over 90 minutes. Our findings led to a change in institutional guidelines for ipilimumab infusion time from 90 minutes to 30 minutes. We reviewed the first 14 months of our prospective experience using a 30-minute infusion of ipilimumab. Results Between April 1, 2008, and June 30, 2013, 595 patients received 2,507 doses of ipilimumab infused at either 3 mg/kg (n = 457) or 10 mg/kg (n = 138) over 90 minutes. Although the 10 mg/kg group had a higher incidence of IRRs (4.3%) than the 3 mg/kg group (2.2%), this difference was not statistically significant (P = .22). In 120 patients treated prospectively with ipilimumab 3 mg/kg infused over 30 minutes, seven patients (5.8%) had an IRR (P = .06 compared with 90-minute infusions). All IRRs occurred at dose 2; six were grade 2, and one was grade 3. All seven patients received subsequent doses of ipilimumab safely, the majority with premedication. Conclusion Ipilimumab at 3 mg/kg can be infused safely over 30 minutes with an acceptably low incidence of IRRs. After an IRR, patients can safely receive additional doses of ipilimumab with premedication. PMID:26124475

  11. Effects of Intravenous Nicotine on Prepulse Inhibition in Smokers and Nonsmokers: Relationship with Familial Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Drobes, David J.; MacQueen, David A.; Blank, Melissa D.; Saladin, Michael E.; Malcolm, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale The reinforcing properties of nicotine may be, in part, derived from its ability to enhance certain forms of cognitive processing. Several animal and human studies have shown that nicotine increases prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex. However, it remains unclear whether these effects are related to smoking susceptibility. Objectives The current study examined the effects of intravenously delivered nicotine on PPI in smokers and nonsmokers, as well as its association with a quantitative index of familial smoking. Methods The sample consisted of 30 non-smokers and 16 smokers, who completed an initial assessment, followed on a separate day by a laboratory assessment of PPI prior to and following each of two intravenous nicotine infusions. Separate doses were used in smoker and non-smoker samples. Results Analyses indicated that both nicotine infusions acutely enhanced PPI among non-smokers, and this enhancement was positively related to the degree of smoking among first and second-degree relatives. Smokers also displayed PPI enhancement after receiving the first infusion, but this effect was unrelated to familial smoking. Conclusions These data suggest that the PPI paradigm may have utility as an endophenotype for cognitive processes which contribute to smoking risk. PMID:23624809

  12. Lung tissue distribution after intravenous administration of grepafloxacin: comparative study with levofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Hirota, Masao; Kaneki, Toshimichi; Ogasawara, Hitoshi; Yamazaki, Yoshitaka; Fujimoto, Keisaku; Kubo, Keishi

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to study the pharmacokinetics in plasma, lung lymph and bronchial washing fluid after intravenous infusion of grepafloxacin (GPFX), in comparison with those of levofloxacin (LVFX). Four conscious sheep with chronically instrumented lung lymph fistulas and tracheotomy were prepared. GPFX and LVFX concentrations in plasma and lung lymph after intravenous infusion of the drugs (10 mg/kg) for over 10 min were measured. In addition serial bronchial washing with 50 mL normal saline was performed to obtain epithelial lining fluid (ELF) at 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24 h after the intravenous administration. The time courses of lung lymph concentration were almost identical to those of the concomitant levels of both GPFX and LVFX in plasma, suggesting that both GPFX and LVFX could be easily moved from plasma to pulmonary interstitium and/or lung lymph circulation. However, GPFX concentrations of ELF were significantly higher than LVFX concentrations over time after the administration. In addition, intracellular concentrations in ELF of GPFX were also extremely high compared with those of LVFX. These results demonstrated that penetration of GPFX in bronchial wall, bronchial epithelium and/or phagocytic cells was superior to that of LVFX. These observations suggest that the pharmacokinetic characteristics of GPFX in the lung may provide a new insight into the strategy for clinical treatment of various pulmonary infections, especially cytotropic bacterial infections.

  13. Continuous versus short-term infusion of cefuroxime: assessment of concept based on plasma, subcutaneous tissue, and bone pharmacokinetics in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Tøttrup, Mikkel; Bibby, Bo M; Hardlei, Tore F; Bue, Mats; Kerrn-Jespersen, Sigrid; Fuursted, Kurt; Søballe, Kjeld; Birke-Sørensen, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    The relatively short half-lives of most β-lactams suggest that continuous infusion of these time-dependent antimicrobials may be favorable compared to short-term infusion. Nevertheless, only limited solid-tissue pharmacokinetic data are available to support this theory. In this study, we randomly assigned 12 pigs to receive cefuroxime as either a short-term or continuous infusion. Measurements of cefuroxime were obtained every 30 min in plasma, subcutaneous tissue, and bone. For the measurements in solid tissues, microdialysis was applied. A two-compartment population model was fitted separately to the drug concentration data for the different tissues using a nonlinear mixed-effects regression model. Estimates of the pharmacokinetic parameters and time with concentrations above the MIC were derived using Monte Carlo simulations. Except for subcutaneous tissue in the short-term infusion group, the tissue penetration was incomplete for all tissues. For short-term infusion, the tissue penetration ratios were 0.97 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67 to 1.39), 0.61 (95% CI, 0.51 to 0.73), and 0.45 (95% CI, 0.36 to 0.56) for subcutaneous tissue, cancellous bone, and cortical bone, respectively. For continuous infusion, they were 0.53 (95% CI, 0.33 to 0.84), 0.38 (95% CI, 0.23 to 0.57), and 0.27 (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.48) for the same tissues, respectively. The absolute areas under the concentration-time curve were also lower in the continuous infusion group. Nevertheless, a significantly longer time with concentrations above the MIC was found for continuous infusion up until MICs of 4, 2, 2, and 0.5 μg/ml for plasma and the same three tissues mentioned above, respectively. For drugs with a short half-life, like cefuroxime, continuous infusion seems to be favorable compared to short-term infusion; however, incomplete tissue penetration and high MIC strains may jeopardize the continuous infusion approach.

  14. The U.S. home infusion market.

    PubMed

    Monk-Tutor, M R

    1998-10-01

    Medicare legislation stimulated the development of home care services but also resulted in fragmentation of service components. In the 1980s, prospective pricing and diagnosis-related groups, and resulting pressures to reduce inpatient length of stay, prompted additional growth of the industry. Even so, in 1995 home care represented only 3% of total national expenditures on health care. The annual growth rate of the home infusion industry dropped from 64% in 1982-86 to 24% in 1986-93. While revenue per patient for home infusion is expected to decrease under managed care, an increasing number of patients will support continued market growth. The home infusion market is highly competitive, with only a few large national providers and many small local providers. In 1996, 29% of acute care hospitals provided or were developing a home care program. Community pharmacists' options in the home infusion area include independent services, partnerships, joint ventures, contracts with hospitals, and franchises. The home infusion market is being integrated into alternative sites, such as ambulatory infusion centers (AICs), as providers attempt to diversify to maintain managed care contracts. AICs provide infusion therapy and nursing to noninstitutionalized, nonhome-bound patients. Untapped sources for future growth of the infusion market include long-term-care facilities. More consistent studies of the home care market are needed. Despite slowed growth in recent years, home care has a strong market in the United States.

  15. Infusing Systems Thinking into Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Charles W.; Tomlin, James H.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the role of career counselors in infusing systems thinking into occupational advising. The authors conducted a qualitative review and analysis of selected literature on systems thinking and analyzed trends for adaptation to career counseling practice. This analysis suggests that career counselors need to infuse systems…

  16. 21 CFR 526.1130 - Hetacillin infusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hetacillin infusion. 526.1130 Section 526.1130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... infusion. (a) Specifications. Each 10 milliliter syringe contains hetacillin potassium equivalent of...

  17. The Infusion Approach to Teacher Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Ellen M.

    1995-01-01

    The underlying premise of infusion is that information about individuals with disabilities must be more systematically integrated throughout an entire curriculum. This article describes the infusion approach to teacher development, explaining three central premises, providing sample program applications for each premise, and discussing brain…

  18. Problems identified with home infusion pumps.

    PubMed

    Koeppen, M A; Caspers, S M

    1994-01-01

    A variety of infusion pumps and devices are available on the market today. In this article, the authors examine these products based on questionnaires sent out to typical consumers, including hospitals and caregivers. Using the results of this questionnaire, the authors identify whether or not users of home infusion pumps and devices find them difficult to operate.

  19. Effect of felodipine on renal haemodynamics and tubular sodium handling after single-dose cyclosporin infusion in renal transplant recipients treated with azathioprine and prednisolone.

    PubMed

    Madsen, J K; Kornerup, H J; Pedersen, E B

    1995-11-01

    A total of 25 renal transplant recipients, treated solely with prednisolone and azathioprine, were investigated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. The effect of a single oral dose of felodipine 5 mg or placebo on: glomerular filtration rate (GFR); renal plasma flow (RPF); renal vascular resistance (RVR); renal tubular sodium and water handling, measured by the lithium clearance technique; plasma levels of angiotensin II (AngII), aldosterone (Aldo), atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and arginine vasopressin (AVP); blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR) was studied before, during, and after an intravenous infusion of cyclosporin (CyA). Three consecutive clearance periods were performed, each lasting 1 h. During the second period, CyA (0.75 mg kg-1 body weight) was infused. Before infusion of CyA, felodipine caused a significant rise (6.7%) in RPF and lowered RVR, but did not change GFR significantly. The rise in RPF was abolished by infusion of CyA. After infusion, both GFR (7.8%) and RPF (9.4%) were significantly higher and RVR lower after felodipine than after placebo. Proximal tubular output and total sodium excretion were higher on the felodipine day before and after, but not during CyA infusion. In all three periods felodipine reduced both systolic and diastolic BP. In conclusion, a single dose of felodipine increases RPF and decreases blood pressure in renal transplant recipients not treated with CyA. Although some of these changes are abolished by an acute intravenous infusion of CyA, the effects of felodipine are present again also during the 1st hour after the infusion and thereby indicate at least in part some renal protective effect of felodipine. It is suggested that a higher dose of felodipine might also have been preventive against CyA renal side-effects during the acute infusion.

  20. Intravenous nutrition during a twin pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Karamatsu, J T; Boyd, A T; Cooke, J; Vinall, P S; McMahon, M J

    1987-01-01

    A case is reported of a woman in the third trimester of a twin pregnancy who required intravenous nutrition because of inadequate absorption of nutrients due to a jejunoileal bypass. Weight gain was poor, and there was evidence of intrauterine growth retardation before commencement of intravenous feeding. She received overnight intravenous nutrition for 6 weeks and gained weight with ultrasound evidence of fetal growth. During the 33rd week of gestation, she was delivered of healthy twin males who were at appropriate birth weights and development for their age of gestation. The considerations in intravenous nutrition for a twin pregnancy after jejunoileal bypass are discussed.

  1. Identification of nitric oxide metabolites in various honeys: effects of intravenous honey on plasma and urinary nitric oxide metabolites concentrations.

    PubMed

    Al-Waili, Noori S

    2003-01-01

    Honey has antibacterial activity, promotes healing, and enhances immunity. Its acidity, osmotic effects of its high content of sugar, and hydrogen peroxide are assumed to be responsible for its effects. In this study, various honeys were investigated for the presence of nitrite/nitrate, the stable nitric oxide (NO) metabolites, and the effects of intravenous infusion of honey on urinary and plasma NO end products were studied in healthy sheep. Seven kinds of honey, different in their origin (three from Yemen, two from the United Arab Emirates, one from Germany, and one from India), color, and duration of storage, were investigated for the presence of NO metabolites. The assessment of NO metabolites was performed before and after exposure of the honey samples to heating (80 degrees C for 1 hour) or ultraviolet light (for 24 hours). Seven healthy male sheep were used for the study. Fresh unprocessed yellow honey (2 g/kg of body weight) was infused over a period of 45 minutes to each fasting sheep. Plasma and urinary NO metabolites were measured before and after the infusion. All the honey samples examined had various concentrations of NO metabolites; the highest concentration was in the fresh dark honey collected from Yemen, and the lowest in 1-year-stored dark honey collected from India. Darker or fresh honeys contained more NO metabolites than light or stored honey. After heating, NO metabolites decreased in all the kinds of honey. After ultraviolet exposure, NO metabolites were decreased in four kinds of honey, increased in one kind, and unchanged in two kinds. The darker stored honey had more resistance to heating and ultraviolet exposure. Intravenous infusion of honey elevated urinary NO metabolites from 8.4 +/- 7.4 micromol/L to 14.9 +/- 10 micromol/L during the first 60-90 min after infusion and to 35.2 +/- 34 micromol/L during the next 150-180 min. Plasma NO metabolites were increased during 1, 2, and 3 hours after infusion by 3%, 3.6%, and 17%, respectively

  2. Regulation of branchial V-H(+)-ATPase, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and NHE2 in response to acid and base infusions in the Pacific spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias).

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin; Katoh, Fumi; Fenton, Heather; Jasinska, Edyta; Goss, Greg G

    2005-01-01

    To study the mechanisms of branchial acid-base regulation, Pacific spiny dogfish were infused intravenously for 24 h with either HCl (495+/- 79 micromol kg(-1) h(-1)) or NaHCO(3) (981+/-235 micromol kg(-1) h(-1)). Infusion of HCl produced a transient reduction in blood pH. Despite continued infusion of acid, pH returned to normal by 12 h. Infusion of NaHCO(3) resulted in a new steady-state acid-base status at approximately 0.3 pH units higher than the controls. Immunostained serial sections of gill revealed the presence of separate vacuolar proton ATPase (V-H(+)-ATPase)-rich or sodium-potassium ATPase (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase)-rich cells in all fish examined. A minority of the cells also labeled positive for both transporters. Gill cell membranes prepared from NaHCO(3)-infused fish showed significant increases in both V-H(+)-ATPase abundance (300+/-81%) and activity. In addition, we found that V-H(+)-ATPase subcellular localization was mainly cytoplasmic in control and HCl-infused fish, while NaHCO(3)-infused fish demonstrated a distinctly basolateral staining pattern. Western analysis in gill membranes from HCl-infused fish also revealed increased abundance of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 2 (213+/-5%) and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (315+/-88%) compared to the control.

  3. Initial Observations of the Effects of Calcium Chloride Infusions in Pediatric Patients with Low Cardiac Output.

    PubMed

    Averin, Konstantin; Villa, Chet; Krawczeski, Catherine D; Pratt, Jesse; King, Eileen; Jefferies, John L; Nelson, David P; Cooper, David S; Ryan, Thomas D; Sawyer, Jaclyn; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Lorts, Angela

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial contractility and relaxation are highly dependent on calcium homeostasis. Immature myocardium, as in pediatric patients, is thought to be more dependent on extracellular calcium for optimal function. For this reason, intravenous calcium chloride infusions may improve myocardial function in the pediatric patient. The objectives of this study were to report the hemodynamic changes seen after administration of continuous calcium chloride to critically ill children. We retrospectively identified pediatric patients (newborn to 17 years old) with hemodynamic instability admitted to the cardiac ICU between May 2011 and May 2012 who received a continuous infusion of calcium chloride. The primary outcome was improvement in cardiac output, assessed by arterial-mixed venous oxygen saturation (A-V) difference. Sixty-eight patients, mean age 0.87 ± 2.67 years, received a total of 116 calcium infusions. Calcium chloride infusions resulted in significant improvements in primary and secondary measures of cardiac output at 2 and 6 h. Six hours after calcium initiation, A-V oxygen saturation difference decreased by 7.4 % (32.6 ± 2.1 to 25.2 ± 2.0 %, p < 0.001), rSO2 increased by 5.5 % (63.1 vs 68.6 %, p < 0.001), and serum lactate decreased by 0.9 mmol/l (3.3 vs 2.4 mmol/l, p < 0.001) with no change in HR (149.1 vs 145.6 bpm p = 0.07). Urine output increased 0.66 ml/kg/h in the 8-h period after calcium initiation when compared to pre-initiation (p = 0.003). Neonates had the strongest evidence of effectiveness with other age groups trending toward significance. Calcium chloride infusions improve markers of cardiac output in a heterogenous group of pediatric patients in a cardiac ICU. Neonates appear to derive the most benefit from utilization of these infusions.

  4. Evaluation of MRI Fat Fraction in the Liver and Spine Pre and Post SPIO Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Liau, Joy; Shiehmorteza, Masoud; Girard, Olivier M.; Sirlin, Claude B.; Bydder, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the robustness of a magnetic resonance (MR) fat quantification method to changes in R2* caused by an intravenous infusion of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) contrast agent. The R2* and proton density fat fraction (PDFF) were measured in liver and spine in 14 subjects using an investigational sequence (IDEAL IQ) provided by the MR scanner vendor. Measurements were made before and after SPIO infusion. Results showed SPIO significantly increased R2* in both liver (p = 8.8 × 10−8) and spine (p = 1.3 × 10−2) but PDFFs were not significantly different in either the liver (p = 5.5 × 10−1) or the spine (p = 5.6 × 10−1). These results confirm that the IDEAL IQ method of fat quantification is robust to changes in R2*. PMID:23602721

  5. Synthesis of guinea-pig cardiac myosin as measured by constant infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Wyborny, L E; Kritcher, E M; Luchi, R J

    1978-01-01

    An equation was derived from which the turnover time of individual muscle proteins could be calculated from measurements made at a single time interval in individual animals after initiation of constant intravenous infusion of labelled amino acid. The calculation requires only the specific radioactivities of the amino acid in plasma, in the intracellular fluid and in the protein under study. Pool sizes were not required. When the equation was applied to adult guinea-pig cardiac myosin, the average turnover time was 16 +/- 1 days. PMID:629779

  6. Ralstonia pickettii and Burkholderia cepacia complex bloodstream infections related to infusion of contaminated water for injection.

    PubMed

    Moreira, B M; Leobons, M B G P; Pellegrino, F L P C; Santos, M; Teixeira, L M; de Andrade Marques, E; Sampaio, J L M; Pessoa-Silva, C L

    2005-05-01

    Ralstonia pickettii and Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates are causes of healthcare-associated infection related to contamination of intravenously administered products. Based on microbiological and epidemiological data and molecular typing by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we report the occurrence of two outbreaks of R. pickettii and B. cepacia complex bloodstream infections. The first outbreak occurred from August 1995 to September 1996, and the second outbreak occurred from 28 March to 8 April 1998, affecting adults and neonates, respectively. Infusion of contaminated water for injection was the source of infection.

  7. Insulin delivery route for the artificial pancreas: subcutaneous, intraperitoneal, or intravenous? Pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Renard, Eric

    2008-07-01

    Insulin delivery is a crucial component of a closed-loop system aiming at the development of an artificial pancreas. The intravenous route, which has been used in the bedside artificial pancreas model for 30 years, has clear advantages in terms of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, but cannot be used in any ambulatory system so far. Subcutaneous (SC) insulin infusion benefits from the broad expansion of insulin pump therapy that promoted the availability of constantly improving technology and fast-acting insulin analog use. However, persistent delays of insulin absorption and action, variability and shortterm stability of insulin infusion from SC-inserted catheters generate effectiveness and safety issues in view of an ambulatory, automated, glucose-controlled, artificial beta cell. Intraperitoneal insulin delivery, although still marginally used in diabetes care, may offer an interesting alternative because of its more-physiological plasma insulin profiles and sustained stability and reliability of insulin delivery.

  8. Measurement of interleukins in vitreous infusion fluid.

    PubMed

    Kase, Satoru; Yokoi, Masahiko; Ishida, Susumu; Kase, Manabu

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of interleukin (IL)-6 and -10 concentrations in the vitreous can be used to differentiate intraocular lymphoma (IOL) from uveitis. This is the first study reporting the IL-6 and -10 concentrations in the undiluted vitreous fluid and vitreous infusion fluid, which were simultaneously examined in the patients. A total of 2 females presented with intraocular inflammation, and underwent pars plana vitrectomy. Undiluted anterior vitreous and vitreous infusion fluid were collected simultaneously. IL concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay systems. Vitreous infusion fluid of 20 ml was eventually collected following completion of core vitrectomy in the two patients. IL-6 concentrations of the first patient were 513 and 106 pg/ml in the undiluted vitreous and the infusion fluid, respectively, while those of the second patient were 263 and 29 pg/ml. By contrast, IL-10 was under the detectable levels in all the fluids. The IL-10/-6 ratio was <1 in both fluids in the patients. Cytological examination revealed the presence of reactive inflammatory cells in the vitreous fluid. The two patients were eventually diagnosed with uveitis. Measurements of IL concentrations in the vitreous infusion fluid provided significant evidence on the differential diagnosis between IOL and uveitis, when considering how vitreous infusion fluid was diluted. The present study highlighted a novel application of cytokine analyses using the vitreous infusion fluid, which may contribute to the development of future translational researches on uveitis/IOL patients.

  9. Infliximab-Related Infusion Reactions: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ron, Yulia; Kivity, Shmuel; Ben-Horin, Shomron; Israeli, Eran; Fraser, Gerald M.; Dotan, Iris; Chowers, Yehuda; Confino-Cohen, Ronit; Weiss, Batia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Administration of infliximab is associated with a well-recognised risk of infusion reactions. Lack of a mechanism-based rationale for their prevention, and absence of adequate and well-controlled studies, has led to the use of diverse empirical administration protocols. The aim of this study is to perform a systematic review of the evidence behind the strategies for preventing infusion reactions to infliximab, and for controlling the reactions once they occur. Methods: We conducted extensive search of electronic databases of MEDLINE [PubMed] for reports that communicate various aspects of infusion reactions to infliximab in IBD patients. Results: We examined full texts of 105 potentially eligible articles. No randomised controlled trials that pre-defined infusion reaction as a primary outcome were found. Three RCTs evaluated infusion reactions as a secondary outcome; another four RCTs included infusion reactions in the safety evaluation analysis; and 62 additional studies focused on various aspects of mechanism/s, risk, primary and secondary preventive measures, and management algorithms. Seven studies were added by a manual search of reference lists of the relevant articles. A total of 76 original studies were included in quantitative analysis of the existing strategies. Conclusions: There is still paucity of systematic and controlled data on the risk, prevention, and management of infusion reactions to infliximab. We present working algorithms based on systematic and extensive review of the available data. More randomised controlled trials are needed in order to investigate the efficacy of the proposed preventive and management algorithms. PMID:26092578

  10. High incidence of hypoglycaemia in African patients treated with intravenous quinine for severe malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Okitolonda, W; Delacollette, C; Malengreau, M; Henquin, J C

    1987-01-01

    Changes in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were monitored over 24 hours in 28 African patients receiving quinine intravenously in an average dose of 8.5 mg base/kg over one hour eight hourly for severe malaria. The patients (nine children and 19 adults) were moderately undernourished; none was pregnant or had renal insufficiency. Plasma insulin concentrations rose during the infusion and then declined. Plasma glucose concentrations were decreased at two, three, and four hours after the start of the infusion. Insulin: glucose ratios were raised between half an hour and two hours after the start of the infusion. The three infusions of quinine increased plasma insulin concentrations in a similar way. In nine patients, including four children, plasma glucose concentrations fell below 2.8 mmol/l on one or two occasions. At the time of the hypoglycaemia plasma insulin concentrations were inappropriately high as shown by a consistent and often considerable increase in the insulin:glucose ratio. Hypoglycaemia that may pass unnoticed in comatose patients is thus a common complication of treating severe malaria with quinine, in particular in children. Its high incidence calls for attentive monitoring and preventive measures. PMID:3117315

  11. Emptying the gallbladder prior to intravenous cholangiography: effect on gallbladder visualization.

    PubMed

    Martinez, C R; Fara, J W; Donner, M W

    1979-01-01

    Experiments were done to test the hypothesis that emptying the gallbladder prior to intravenous cholangiography (IVC) would result in earler and better opacification of the gallbladder. Five dogs were studied on two separate days in a crossover experiment. Each dog had a standard IVC (15-minute infusion of meglumine iodipamide) 2.5 cc/kg of following a 14-16-hour fasting period. On one of the days, 0.3 mcg/kg of Ceruletide was intramuscularly administered to each dog 30 to 45 minutes prior to the iodipamide infusion. Films obtained at the end of infusion and at 20, 40, 60, and 90 minutes were evaluated independently by three radiologists. The results indicate that pretreatment with Ceruletide produces a significant (p less than 0.05) improvement in the quality of gallbladder opacification during the first 90 minutes following iodipamide infusion. We conclude that earlier and better opacification of the gallbladder during IVC can be obtained by prior emptying of the gallbladder with a cholecystokinetic agent.

  12. Prolonged minor allograft survival in intravenously primed mice--a test of the veto hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.L.

    1987-07-01

    Experiments were performed to test the hypothesis that veto cells are responsible for the prolonged survival of minor allografts of skin that is observed in recipients primed intravenously with spleen cells from mice syngeneic with the skin donors. This prolonged survival was observed for each of several minor histocompatibility (H) antigens and is antigen-specific. Gamma radiation (3300 rads) abolished the ability of male spleen cells infused i.v. to delay the rejection of male skin grafts (H-Y antigen) on female recipients. However, depletion of Thy-1+ cells from the i.v. infusion failed to abolish the ability to prolong male skin graft survival. Furthermore, the prolonged survival accorded to B6 (H-2b) male skin grafts on CB6F1 (H-2b/H-2d) female recipients given i.v. infusions of B6 male spleen cells extended to BALB/c (H-2d) male skin grafts as well, indicating a lack of MHC restriction. Thus, prolongation of minor allograft survival by i.v. infusion of minor H antigen-bearing spleen cells appears not to depend on veto T cells that others have found to be responsible for the suppression of CTL generation.

  13. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging after pharmacologic coronary vasodilation: Preliminary results of a comparison between oral and intravenous administration of dipyridamole

    SciTech Connect

    Taillefer, R.; Lette, J.; Phaneuf, D.C.; Lemire, F.; Leveille, J.

    1985-05-01

    Although the diagnostic utility of Tl-201 myocardial imaging after dipyridamole (DIP) infusion is well established, the intravenous form of the drug is not commercially available. The author prospectively studied 34 consecutive patients referred for coronary angiography. With in a 2 week period, each patient underwent cardiac catheterization and Tl-201 myocardial imaging following both oral and i.v. DIP. With the patient supine, DIP was infused at a rate of 0.56 mg/kg over 4 minutes. Tl-201 was injected 3 min. after the end of the infusion with the patient standing. Myocardial imaging was performed in 3 views at 3 min. and 4 hrs after Tl-201 injection. All patients were then randomized to either 200 mg or 400 mg of oral DIP. Imaging protocol was similar to the i.v. technique, except for a delay of 45-60 min. before Tl-201 injection. Myocardial regional perfusion was evaluated by 2 independent observers using original analog and background substracted digital images with segmental profile analysis. For the 17 patients who recieved DIP 400 mg, the sensitivity was 75%(9/12) with the infusion and 83% (10/12) with the oral dose. Side effects were minor and less frequent with the oral DIP. Despite the small number of patients studied, Tl-201 imaging following 400 mg oral DIP administration proved to be reliable alternative to the intravenously induced coronary vasodilation.

  14. Space Tethers Programmatic Infusion Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, J. A.; Frame, K. L.

    2005-01-01

    Programmatic opportunities abound for space Cables, Stringers and Tethers, justified by the tremendous performance advantages that these technologies offer and the rather wide gaps that must be filled by the NASA Exploration program, if the "sustainability goal" is to be met. A definition and characterization of the three categories are presented along with examples. A logical review of exploration requirements shows how each class can be infused throughout the program, from small experimental efforts to large system deployments. The economics of tethers in transportation is considered along with the impact of stringers for structural members. There is an array of synergistic methodologies that interlace their fabrication, implementation and operations. Cables, stringers and tethers can enhance a wide range of other space systems and technologies, including power storage, formation flying, instrumentation, docking mechanisms and long-life space components. The existing tether (i.e., MXER) program's accomplishments are considered consistent with NASA's new vision and can readily conform to requirements-driven technology development.

  15. A prototype space flight intravenous injection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.

    1985-01-01

    Medical emergencies, especially those resulting from accidents, frequently require the administration of intravenous fluids to replace lost body liquids. The development of a prototype space flight intravenous injection system is presented. The definition of requirements, injectable concentrates development, water polisher, reconstitution hardware development, administration hardware development, and prototype fabrication and testing are discussed.

  16. [Perioperative Management of a Patient with Severe Parkinson's Disease with Intravenous Levodopa Administration].

    PubMed

    Terashima, Satoko; Yanagido, Yurina; Watabe, Akira; Yamane, Masahiro; Morimoto, Yuji

    2015-08-01

    A 70-year-old man with severe Parkinson's disease was scheduled for thoracic aortic aneurysm resection and aortic valve replacement. We administered levodopa intravenously during the perioperative period to avoid the malignant syndrome which is reported to arise with abrupt cessation of anti-Parkinson's drugs. The dose of intravenous administration was tapered with the resumption of oral intake. No manifestation of malignant syndrome was observed. We measured blood concentrations of levodopa several times during the perioperative period. The concentration of levodopa during the surgery was relatively high; however no adverse events of overdose (e.g. dyskinesis) occurred. In the postoperative period, administration of levodopa was changed to the oral route and serum levels of levodopa showed a notable decrease, the cause of which may be poor absorption through the digestive system during the perioperative period. Therefore, in the peri- and post-operative periods, it is necessary to take great care when reducing the infusion dose.

  17. Comparison of Intravenous Anesthetic Agents for the Treatment of Refractory Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Reznik, Michael E.; Berger, Karen; Claassen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Status epilepticus that cannot be controlled with first- and second-line agents is called refractory status epilepticus (RSE), a condition that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Most experts agree that treatment of RSE necessitates the use of continuous infusion intravenous anesthetic drugs such as midazolam, propofol, pentobarbital, thiopental, and ketamine, each of which has its own unique characteristics. This review compares the various anesthetic agents while providing an approach to their use in adult patients, along with possible associated complications. PMID:27213459

  18. A protocol for administering intravenous iron dextran in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Huff, J

    1998-08-01

    Intravenous (i.v.) iron has been underutilized in the peritoneal dialysis (PD) population due to poor peripheral access and logistical barriers. In PD patients who are intolerant or nonadherent to oral iron, a convenient method of i.v. iron administration is total dose infusion (TDI). This method of administration involves administering the total therapeutic dose of i.v. iron over one to two administrations. This article will review the literature on the use of parenteral iron in PD patients, and will outline West Coast Dialysis Center's successful protocol for TDI of iron dextran in its PD population.

  19. [Medication errors with concentrated potassium intravenous solutions: Data of the literature, context and prevention].

    PubMed

    Charpiat, B; Magdinier, C; Leboucher, G; Aubrun, F

    2016-01-01

    Accidental direct intravenous injection of a concentrated solution of potassium often leads to patient death. In France, recommendations of healthcare agencies to prevent such accidents cover only preparation and intravenous infusion conditions. Accidents continue to occur in French hospitals. These facts demonstrate that these recommendations are insufficient and ineffective to prevent such deaths, especially those occurring during a catheter flushing. This article reviews the measures able to reduce the number of accidents. Countries which removed concentrated ampoules from ward stocks observed a decrease of the number of accidental deaths. This withdrawal, recommended by the World Health Organization, is now part of standards in studies aimed at determining the safety of care in hospitals. However, removal alone is insufficient to eliminate the risk. The combination with other measures should be considered. These measures are the provision of a combination of diluted intravenous ready to use solutions, the promotion of the oral route with tablets and oral solutions for potassium replenishment and to make available products with safeguards to prevent single shot intravenous injection. Studies aimed at determining the consequences on preventing concentrated potassium accidents of a widespread distribution of isotonic sodium chloride pre-filled ready-to-use syringes for catheter flushing should be performed.

  20. Increased lung vascular permeability after pancreatitis and trypsin infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Tahamont, M. V.; Barie, P. S.; Blumenstock, F. A.; Hussain, M. H.; Malik, A. B.

    1982-01-01

    We examined the role of proteases in mediating lung vascular injury after acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis. Studies were made in sheep in which pulmonary lymph was collected for assessment of the changes in transvascular fluid and protein exchange. The induction of pancreatitis by injection of trypsin and sodium taurocholate into the pancreas resulted in increases in pulmonary lymph flow and transvascular protein clearance (lymph flow x lymph-to-plasma protein concentration ratio). The pulmonary vascular pressures did not change significantly after pancreatitis, indicating that the increases in pulmonary lymph flow and protein clearance were due to increased pulmonary endothelial permeability. The response to pancreatitis was also characterized by decreases in concentrations of fibrinogen, platelets, and granulocytes. Pulmonary leukostasis was a common morphologic feature in this group. In another group, an intravenous infusion of trypsin, which produced decreases in antiprotease activity comparable to those observed after pancreatitis, also resulted in increases in pulmonary lymph flow and transvascular protein clearance. These increases in lymph fluxes were comparable to those observed after pancreatitis and were also associated with decreases in concentrations of fibrinogen, platelets, and granulocytes. Pulmonary leukostasis was evident in this group upon histologic examination. In a third group, pretreatment with Trasylol prevented the increases in pulmonary lymph flow and transvascular protein clearance after pancreatitis, suggesting that the pancreatitis-induced pulmonary vascular injury is the result of the release of proteases. The results indicate a common pulmonary vascular response to acute pancreatitis and trypsin infusion. The release of proteases into the circulation after acute pancreatitis may be the initiating event mediating the pulmonary vascular injury. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figures 11 and 12 PMID:6181692

  1. A phase 2 safety study of accelerated elotuzumab infusion, over less than 1 hour, in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone, in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Berenson, James; Manges, Robert; Badarinath, Suprith; Cartmell, Alan; McIntyre, Kristi; Lyons, Roger; Harb, Wael; Mohamed, Hesham; Nourbakhsh, Ali; Rifkin, Robert

    2017-02-18

    Elotuzumab, an immunostimulatory SLAMF7-targeting monoclonal antibody, induces myeloma cell death with minimal effects on normal tissue. In a previous phase 3 study in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM), elotuzumab (10 mg/kg, ∼3-hour infusion), combined with lenalidomide and dexamethasone, demonstrated durable efficacy and acceptable safety; 10% (33/321) of patients had infusion reactions (IRs; Grade 1/2: 29; Grade 3: 4). This phase 2 study (NCT02159365) investigated an accelerated infusion schedule in 70 patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma or RRMM. The primary endpoint was cumulative incidence of Grade 3/4 IRs by completion of treatment Cycle 2. Dosing comprised elotuzumab 10 mg/kg intravenously (weekly, Cycles 1-2; biweekly, Cycles 3+), lenalidomide 25 mg (daily, Days 1-21) and dexamethasone (28 mg orally and 8 mg intravenously, weekly, Cycles 1-2; 40 mg orally, weekly, Cycles 3+), in 28-day cycles. Premedication with diphenhydramine, acetaminophen, and ranitidine (or their equivalents) was given as in previous studies. If no IRs occurred, infusion rate was increased in Cycle 1 from 0.5 to 2 mL/min during dose 1 (∼2 hours 50 min duration) to 5 mL/min for the entire infusion by dose 3 and also during all subsequent infusions (∼1-hour duration). Median number of treatment cycles was six. No Grade 3/4 IRs occurred; only one Grade 1 and one Grade 2 IR occurred, both during the first infusion. These data support the safety of a faster infusion of elotuzumab administered over ∼1 hour by the third dose, providing a more convenient alternative dosing option for patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. [A new volumetric infusion pump (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Radke, J; Wencker, K H

    1977-06-01

    Our experience with a new volumetric infusion pump "Tekmar T 92" is reported. Over a period of months the reported advantages of the instrument were investigated on three separate units. Some few disadvantages for routine use were observed.

  3. Nanosuspension formulations of poorly water-soluble compounds for intravenous administration in exploratory toxicity studies: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Hisako; Komasaka, Takao; Tomari, Taizo; Kitano, Yasunori; Takekawa, Kouji

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the use of a nanosuspension for intravenous injection into dogs to increase exposure without toxic additives for preclinical studies in the discovery stage. Nanosuspensions were prepared with a mixer mill and zirconia beads with a vehicle of 2% (w/v) poloxamer 338, which was confirmed to lead to no histamine release in dogs. Sterilized nanosuspensions of poorly water-soluble compounds, cilostazol (Cil), spironolactone (Spi) and probucol (Pro), at 10 mg ml(-1) were obtained by milling for 30 min, followed by autoclaving for 20 min at 121 °C and milling for 30 min (mill-autoclave-mill method). The particle sizes (d50) of Cil, Spi and Pro were 0.554, 0.484 and 0.377 µm, respectively, and the percentages of the nominal concentration were 79.1%, 99.6% and 75.4%, respectively. In chromatographic data, no extra peaks were observed. The particle size of Cil was 0.564 µm after storage for 16 days at 2-8 °C. Cil in nanosuspension, but not in microsuspension, rapidly dissolved in dog plasma. Cil nanosuspension at 0.4 mg kg(-1) and Cil saline solution at 0.03 mg kg(-1) , around the saturation solubility, were intravenously administered to dogs. Nanosuspension increased exposure. The versatility of the mill-autoclave-mill method was checked for 15 compounds, and the particle size of 12 compounds was in the nano range. The nanosuspension optimized in this study may be useful for intravenous toxicological and pharmacological studies in the early stage of drug development. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Improving Infusion Pump Safety Through Usability Testing.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kristen E; Arnold, Ryan; Capan, Muge; Campbell, Michele; Zern, Susan Coffey; Dressler, Robert; Duru, Ozioma O; Ebbert, Gwen; Jackson, Eric; Learish, John; Strauss, Danielle; Wu, Pan; Bennett, Dean A

    With the recognition that the introduction of new technology causes changes in workflow and may introduce new errors to the system, usability testing was performed to provide data on nursing practice and interaction with infusion pump technology. Usability testing provides the opportunity to detect and analyze potentially dangerous problems with the design of infusion pumps that could cause or allow avoidable errors. This work will reduce preventable harm through the optimization of health care delivery.

  5. Myrtus communis L. infusions: the effect of infusion time on phytochemical composition, antioxidant, and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Messaoud, Chokri; Laabidi, Abdelmonoem; Boussaid, Mohamed

    2012-09-01

    In traditional medicine, myrtle (Myrtus communis L.) is frequently consumed as an infusion and decoction. In this study, we investigate the phenolic and volatile compositions and antioxidant and antibacterial activities of leaf infusions prepared during 3 different times. The total phenolics contents (146.74 to 179.55 mg GAE/g DM) varied significantly between infusions. Eleven phenolic compounds were identified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Phenolic acids (7.64 to 14.28 μmol/g DM) and flavonol glycosides (7.05 to 12.11 μmol/g DM) were the major phenolic fractions of infusions. Significant quantitative variation in 6 phenolic components was observed between infusions. Sixteen volatile components were identified by gas chromatography (GC) and GC mass spectrometry analyses. The main constituents were 1,8-cineole (42.58% to 51.39%), α-terpineol (9.45% to 9.72%), methyl eugenol (6.69% to 7.11%), and linalool (5.91% to 6.06%). Quantitative variations of the volatile components of the analyzed oils in relation to the infusion time were observed. The antioxidant properties of infusions, assayed through DPPH (2,2- diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) method, β-carotene bleaching test, chelating effect on ferrous ions, and ferric reducing power method, were considerable and varied according to the infusion time. Myrtle infusions exhibited a substantial antimicrobial activity against 6 tested bacteria.

  6. Cangrelor: a novel intravenous antiplatelet agent with a questionable future.

    PubMed

    Waite, Laura H; Phan, Yvonne L; Spinler, Sarah A

    2014-10-01

    Current percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) guidelines recommend the use of a P2Y12 inhibitor with aspirin and an injectable anticoagulant. However, available oral P2Y12 inhibitor therapy is limited by significant drug interactions, unclear oral absorption in selected clinical conditions, and delayed onset and offset of activity that may be cumbersome for patients requiring coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Cangrelor, a novel intravenous P2Y12 inhibitor, offers potential advantages compared with currently available oral agents, particularly in regard to rapid onset and offset of platelet inhibition. The Cangrelor versus Standard Therapy to Achieve Optimal Management of Platelet Inhibition (CHAMPION) trials compared cangrelor versus an oral loading dose of clopidogrel, given before or after PCI, in patients with both stable and acute coronary syndromes. The results were conflicting, but some evidence demonstrated a lower rate of stent thrombosis compared with clopidogrel and lower rates of a composite cardiovascular end point, with comparable bleeding rates. The BRIDGE study assessed cangrelor as a replacement for oral P2Y12 inhibitors in patients awaiting CABG surgery and demonstrated that cangrelor maintained platelet inhibition during the preoperative period and enabled a rapid return to baseline platelet function upon cessation of the infusion. A new drug application was submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use during PCI to prevent thrombotic events and as bridging therapy for patients awaiting surgery who require therapy with P2Y12 inhibitors. In February 2014, the FDA's Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs Advisory Committee recommended against approval due to concerns over an appropriate risk-benefit ratio for use during PCI and a lack of evidence supporting the bridging indication. On April 30, 2014, the FDA issued a Complete Response letter for the PCI and bridging indications, denying approval and requesting further data. The

  7. Intravenous pamidronate treatment of infants with severe osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Åström, Eva; Jorulf, Håkan; Söderhäll, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Objective Children with the severe forms of osteogenesis imperfecta have in several studies been treated with intravenous pamidronate, but there are only few reports of the effect of early treatment. Aim To evaluate the effect of treatment started in infancy. Methods In a prospective observational study, with a historic control group, intravenous disodium pamidronate (APD) was given as monthly infusions to 11 children with osteogenesis imperfecta aged 3–13 (median 3.6) months, who had severe osteogenesis imperfecta with congenital bowing of the femora and vertebral compression fractures. Results During treatment of children aged between 3 and 6 (median 4.5) years, dual‐energy x ray absorptiometry measurements of the lumbar spine showed a gradual increase in bone density. Bone metabolism parameters in serum (alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, procollagen 1 carboxy‐terminal peptide, collagen 1 teleopeptide) and in urine (deoxypyridinoline) indicated a decrease in bone turnover. An improvement of mobility was seen and at the latest recording, at the age of 3.3–6.5 (median 4.8) years, the children could all walk. Vertebral remodelling was seen, with increased vertebral height, and no child developed scoliosis, kyphosis or basilar impression. All children required femoral intramedullar rods for fractures, and five needed tibial rodding for extreme curvatures that prevented functional standing and walking. No adverse effects were seen on growth, fracture healing or blood chemistry. Conclusions APD is an efficient symptomatic treatment for infants with severe osteogenesis imperfecta, but additional orthopaedic surgery is often needed. Early treatment may prevent scoliosis and basilar impression. Long‐term follow‐up is important. PMID:17114205

  8. Intravenous magnesium in experimental stent thrombosis in swine.

    PubMed

    Rukshin, V; Azarbal, B; Shah, P K; Tsang, V T; Shechter, M; Finkelstein, A; Cercek, B; Kaul, S

    2001-09-01

    We investigated the effects of magnesium on acute platelet-dependent stent thrombosis in an ex vivo porcine arteriovenous shunt model of high-shear blood flow. Control nitinol stents were expanded to 2 mm in diameter in a tubular perfusion chamber interposed in the shunt and exposed to flowing arterial blood at a shear rate of 2100 s(-1) for 20 minutes (n=156 perfusion runs in 10 swine). Animals were treated with intravenous heparin or MgSO(4) alone (2 g bolus over 20 minutes, followed by 2 g/h infusion) and combined heparin plus MgSO(4) in random fashion. Effects on thrombus weight (TW), platelet aggregation, bleeding time, activated clotting time, mean arterial blood pressure, and heart rate were quantified. Data points in the magnesium-treated animals were examined within 20 minutes after bolus (Mg-early) and >40 minutes after bolus (Mg-late). Stent TW (20+/-3 mg, pretreatment) was reduced by 42+/-21%, 47+/-19%, 48+/-16%, 67+/-12%, and 86+/-8% in the groups treated with Mg-early alone, Mg-late alone, heparin alone, heparin+Mg-early, and heparin+Mg-late, respectively (all P<0.001 versus pretreatment, P<0.001 for heparin+Mg-early and Mg-late versus heparin or magnesium alone, and P<0.05 for heparin+Mg-late versus heparin+Mg-early, ANOVA). Magnesium had no significant effect on platelet aggregation, activated clotting time, or bleeding time. There were no significant effects on heart rate or mean arterial blood pressure. The serum magnesium level was inversely correlated with TW (r=-0.70, P=0.002). In conclusion, treatment with intravenous MgSO(4) produced a time-dependent inhibition of acute stent thrombosis under high-shear flow conditions without any hemostatic or significant hemodynamic complications. Thus, magnesium may be an effective agent for preventing stent thrombosis.

  9. Effect of Intravenous Ketorolac on Postoperative Pain in Mandibular Fracture Surgery; A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Eftekharian, Hamid Reza; Ilkhani pak, Homa

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of intravenous ketorolac on early postoperative pain in patients with mandibular fractures, who underwent surgical repair. Methods: This prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in Shahid Rajaei Hospital, affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences during a 1-year period from 2015 to 2016. We included a total number of 50 patients with traumatic mandibular fractures who underwent surgical repair. Patients with obvious contraindications to ketorolac such as asthma, renal dysfunction, peptic ulceration, bleeding disorders, cardiovascular disease, mental retardation, or allergy to ketorolac or NSAIDS, were excluded. The patients were randomly assigned to receive intravenous ketorolac (30 mg) at the end of operation in post anesthesia care unit immediately upon the onset of pain (n=25), or intravenous distilled water as placebo (n=25). Postoperative monitoring included non-invasive arterial blood pressure, ECG, and peripheral oxygen saturation. The postoperative pain was evaluated by a nurse using visual analog scale (VAS) (0–100 mm) pain score 4 hours after surgery and was compared between the two study groups. Results: Overall we included 50 patients (25 per group) in the current study. The baseline characteristics including age, gender, weight, operation duration, anesthesia duration and type of surgical procedure were comparable between two study groups. Those who received placebo had significantly higher requirements for analgesic use compared to ketorolac group (72% vs. 28%; p=0.002). Ketorolac significantly reduced the pain intensity 30-min after the operation (p<0.001). There were no significant side effects associated with ketorolac. Conclusion: Intravenous single-dose ketorolac is a safe and effective analgesic agent for the short-term management of mild to moderate acute postoperative pain in mandibular fracture surgery and can be used as an alternative to opioids. PMID:28246618

  10. Efficacy of Continuous S(+)-Ketamine Infusion for Postoperative Pain Control: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Miziara, Luiz Eduardo de Paula Gomes; Simoni, Ricardo Francisco; Esteves, Luís Otávio; Cangiani, Luis Henrique; Grillo-Filho, Gil Fernando Ribeiro; Paula, Anderson Garcia Lima E

    2016-01-01

    Aim. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy of continuous intraoperative infusion of S(+)-ketamine under intravenous anesthesia with target-controlled infusion of remifentanil and propofol for postoperative pain control. Methods. Forty-eight patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were assigned to receive continuous S(+)-ketamine infusion at a rate of 0.3 mg·kg(-1)·h(-1) (n = 24, intervention group) or an equivalent volume of saline at the same rate (n = 24, placebo group). The same target-controlled intravenous anesthesia was induced in both groups. Pain was assessed using a 0 to 10 verbal numeric rating scale during the first 12 postoperative hours. Pain scores and morphine consumption were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and at 4 and 12 hours after surgery. Results. Pain scores were lower in the intervention group at all time points. Morphine consumption did not differ significantly between groups during PACU stay, but it was significantly lower in the intervention group at each time point after PACU discharge (P = 0.0061). At 12 hours after surgery, cumulative morphine consumption was also lower in the intervention group (5.200 ± 2.707) than in the placebo group (7.525 ± 1.872). Conclusions. Continuous S(+)-ketamine infusion during laparoscopic cholecystectomy under target-controlled intravenous anesthesia provided better postoperative pain control than placebo, reducing morphine requirement. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02421913.

  11. Phenylephrine infusion for spinal-induced hypotension in elective cesarean delivery: Does preload make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Bottiger, Brandi A; Bezinover, Dmitri S; Mets, Berend; Dalal, Priti G; Prozesky, Jansie; Ural, Serdar; Vaida, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Patients undergoing elective cesarean delivery (CD) have a high-risk of spinal-induced hypotension (SIH). We hypothesized that a colloid preload would further reduce SIH when compared with a crystalloid preload. Material and Methods: Eighty-two healthy parturients undergoing elective CD were included in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups (41 patients in each group) to receive either Lactated Ringer's solution (1500 ml) or hydroxyethyl starch (6% in normal saline, 500 ml) 30 min prior to placement of spinal anesthesia. All patients were treated with a phenylephrine infusion (100 mcg/min), titrated during the study. Results: There was no statistical difference between groups with regards to the incidence of hypotension (10.8% in the colloid group vs. 27.0% in the crystalloid group, P = 0.12). There was also no difference between groups with respect to bradycardia, APGAR scores, and nausea and vomiting. Significantly less phenylephrine (1077.5 ± 514 mcg) was used in the colloid group than the crystalloid group (1477 ± 591 mcg, P = 0.003). Conclusion: The preload with 6% of hydroxyethyl starch before CD might be beneficial for the prevention of SIH. PMID:27625478

  12. Intracerebral adenosine infusion improves neurological outcome after transient focal ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Hisashi; Mori, Atsushi; Shimada, Jun; Mitsumoto, Yasuhide; Kikuchi, Tetsuro

    2002-04-01

    Second Institute of New Drug Research, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Tokushima, Japan In order to elucidate the role of adenosine in brain ischemia, the possible protective effects of adenosine on ischemic brain injury were investigated in a rat model of brain ischemia both in vitro and in vivo. Exogenous adenosine dose-dependently rescued cortical neuronal cells from injury after glucose deprivation in vitro. Adenosine (1 mM) also significantly reduced hypoglycemia/hypoxia-induced glutamate release from the hippocampal slice. In a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), extracellular adenosine concentration was increased immediately after occlusion, and then returned to the baseline by 30 min after reperfusion. Adenosine infusion through a microdialysis probe into the ipsilateral striatum (1 mM adenosine, 2 microl min(-1), total 4.5 h from the occlusion to 3 h after reperfusion) showed a significant improvement in the neurological outcome, and about 25% reduction of infarct volume, although the effect did not reach statistical significance, compared with the vehicle-treated group at 20 h after 90 min of MCAO. These results demonstrated the neuroprotective effect of adenosine against ischemic brain injury both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting the possible therapeutic application of adenosine regulating agents, which inhibit adenosine uptake or metabolism to enhance or maintain extracellular endogenous adenosine levels, for stroke treatment.

  13. No improvement of pancreas transplant endocrine function by exogenous insulin infusion (islet rest) in the postoperative period.

    PubMed

    Dafoe, D C; Campbell, D A; Rosenberg, L; Merion, R M; Ucros, I; Vinik, A I; Klandorf, H; Turcotte, J G

    1989-07-01

    The concept of islet exhaustion maintains that exposure of pancreatic islets to hyperglycemia and other stresses leads to islet dysfunction and irreparable damage. The process of pancreatic transplantation places many stresses on islets (e.g., counter-regulatory hormones, steroids, cyclosporine toxicity). As practiced by some centers, it may be important to administer exogenous insulin in the postoperative period to provide islet rest. Using a porcine pancreas transplant model that simulates clinical transplantation, we studied 2 groups: 1 group (n = 8) received constant insulin infusion for 7 days after transplantation; the control group (n = 5) received vehicle only. The islets in the insulin infusion group were rested as evidenced by a significantly decreased mean C-peptide level (0.27 +/- 0.04 ng/ml) as compared to the control group (0.66 +/- 0.08 ng/ml) (P less than 0.05). After insulin infusion was discontinued, intravenous glucose tolerance testing found insulin, C-peptide and glucagon responses were not different between groups. Glucose clearance was also comparable; K values were -1.79 and -1.60 in the insulin infusion and control groups, respectively. In conclusion, islet rest by insulin infusion for 7 postoperative days did not improve subsequent pancreas transplant endocrine function.

  14. [Superselective intra-arterial infusion therapy with docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil for head and neck cancer--for tongue cancer patients in comparison patients with other therapies].

    PubMed

    Furusaka, Tohru

    2006-09-01

    In order to cure head and neck cancer without resection, chemotherapy (superselective intra-arterial infusion therapy with DCF) was conducted by anterograde, superselective intra-arterial infusion of 50-60 mg/m(2) of DOC and 50-60 mg/m(2) of CDDP via the femoral artery on day 1 followed by continuous intravenous instillation of 600-750 mg/m(2)/day of 5-FU for 5 days from day 2. A total of 70 patients with advanced and recurrent cancer of the head and neck have been treated since April 2000. With the median follow-up duration of 1,017 days, the survival rate was 92.7% and the organ preservation rate was 90.1%. Almost no complications associated with this therapy were observed. Due to space limitations, here we report only cases of tongue cancer. Histological CR was obtained from all 19 patients with squamous cell cancer of the tongue. With the median follow-up duration of 1,371 days (45.7 months: 471-2, 133 days), the survival rate was 94.74% and the organ preservation rate was 88.42% by the Kaplan-Meier method. For both the survival rate and organ preservation rate, extremely good results were obtained by the superselective intra-arterial infusion therapy with DCF compared to the intravenous infusion therapy using a combination of CDDP and 5-FU (five-year survival rate: 20%) as well as the superselective intra-arterial infusion of CDDP alone followed by continuous intravenous infusion of 5-FU (five year survival rate: 28.5%) that had been conducted before. Major adverse effects observed were leukopenia and alopecia. Although patients who underwent concurrent radiation therapy developed mucositis and dermatitis, both were reversible changes.

  15. A remote drip infusion monitoring system employing Bluetooth.

    PubMed

    Amano, Hikaru; Ogawa, Hidekuni; Maki, Hiromichi; Tsukamoto, Sosuke; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Caldwell, W Morton

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a remote drip infusion monitoring system for use in hospitals. The system consists of several infusion monitoring devices and a central monitor. The infusion monitoring device employing a Bluetooth module can detect the drip infusion rate and an empty infusion solution bag, and then these data are sent to the central monitor placed at the nurses' station via the Bluetooth. The central monitor receives the data from several infusion monitoring devices and then displays graphically them. Therefore, the developed system can monitor intensively the drip infusion situation of the several patients at the nurses' station.

  16. Intravenous vs intraperitoneal mesenchymal stem cells administration: What is the best route for treating experimental colitis?

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Fabiany da Costa; Schneider, Natália; Pinto, Fernanda Otesbelgue; Meyer, Fabíola Schons; Visioli, Fernanda; Pfaffenseller, Bianca; Lopez, Patrícia Luciana da Costa; Passos, Eduardo Pandolfi; Cirne-Lima, Elizabeth Obino; Meurer, Luíse; Paz, Ana Helena

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the therapeutic effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplanted intraperitoneally and intravenously in a murine model of colitis. METHODS: MSCs were isolated from C57BL/6 mouse adipose tissue. MSC cultures were analyzed according to morphology, cellular differentiation potential, and surface molecular markers. Experimental acute colitis was induced in C57BL/6 mice by oral administration of 2% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water ad libitum from days 0 to 7. Colitis mice were treated with 1 × 106 MSCs via intraperitoneal or intravenous injection on days 2 and 5. The disease activity index was determined daily based on the following parameters: weight loss, stool consistency and presence of blood in the feces and anus. To compare morphological and functional differences in tissue regeneration between different MSC injection modalities, mice were euthanized on day 8, and their colons were examined for length, weight, and histopathological changes. Inflammatory responses were determined by measuring the levels of different serum cytokines using a CBA Th1/Th2/Th17 kit. Apoptotic rates were evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUDP-biotin nick end labeling assay. RESULTS: Intravenous infusion of MSCs was more effective than intraperitoneal treatment (P < 0.001) in reducing the clinical and histopathologic severity of colitis, which includes weight loss, diarrhea and inflammation. An histological evaluation demonstrated decreased colonic inflammation based on reduced crypt loss and reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells. This therapeutic effect was most likely mediated by the down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)]; and by the up-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10 and IL-4). Intravenous transplantation also induced high levels of IFN that lead to activation of the immunosuppressive activity of the MSCs, which did not occur with

  17. A short course of infusion of a hydrogen sulfide-donor attenuates endotoxemia induced organ injury via stimulation of anti-inflammatory pathways, with no additional protection from prolonged infusion.

    PubMed

    Aslami, Hamid; Beurskens, Charlotte J P; de Beer, Friso M; Kuipers, Maria T; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Hegeman, Maria A; Van der Sluijs, Koen F; Schultz, Marcus J; Juffermans, Nicole P

    2013-02-01

    Organ failure is associated with increased mortality and morbidity in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Previously, we showed that a short course of infusion of a hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) donor reduced metabolism with concurrent reduction of lung injury. Here, we hypothesize that prolonged H(2)S infusion is more protective than a short course in endotoxemia with organ failure. Also, as H(2)S has both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects, we explored the effect of H(2)S on interleukin production. Endotoxemia was induced by an intravenous bolus injection of LPS (7.5mg/kg) in mechanically ventilated rats. H(2)S donor NaHS (2mg/kg) or vehicle (saline) was infused and organ injury was determined after either 4 or 8h. A short course of H(2)S infusion was associated with reduction of lung and kidney injury. Prolonged infusion did not enhance protection. Systemically, infusion of H(2)S increased both the pro-inflammatory response during endotoxemia, as demonstrated by increased TNF-α levels, as well as the anti-inflammatory response, as demonstrated by increased IL-10 levels. In LPS-stimulated whole blood of healthy volunteers, co-incubation with H(2)S had solely anti-inflammatory effects, resulting in decreased TNF-α levels and increased IL-10 levels. Co-incubation with a neutralizing IL-10 antibody partly abrogated the decrease in TNF-α levels. In conclusion, a short course of H(2)S infusion reduced organ injury during endotoxemia, at least in part via upregulation of IL-10.

  18. [The action of sodium oxybutyrate and emoxypin on the functional state of the adrenaline-damaged myocardium in an experiment].

    PubMed

    Sysoliatina, N A; Artamonova, V V

    1998-01-01

    The effect of agents possessing antihypoxic and antioxidant activity, namely sodium oxybutyrate and emoxypin, on the functional state of the heart muscle was studied in experiments on dogs with epinephrine necroses of the myocardium. A marked cardioprotective effect was produced by sodium oxybutyrate infused intravenously (200 mg/kg) either 10 min or 2 hrs after myocardial damage had been modelled and by emoxypin (4 mg/kg; 0.4 mg/kg) infused intravenously 30 min after the damage.

  19. Effects of nicotinic and NMDA receptor channel blockers on intravenous cocaine and nicotine self-administration in mice.

    PubMed

    Blokhina, Elena A; Kashkin, Vladimir A; Zvartau, Edwin E; Danysz, Wojciech; Bespalov, Anton Y

    2005-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated that blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors prevents acquisition of instrumental behaviors reinforced by food and drugs such as morphine and cocaine. The present study aimed to extend this evidence by testing whether NMDA receptor channel blocker, memantine, would exert similar effects on acquisition of cocaine and nicotine self-administration in mice. Inasmuch as memantine also acts as nicotinic receptor channel blocker, this study assessed the effects of mecamylamine and MRZ 2/621 that are more selective nicotinic blockers. Adult male Swiss mice were allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.8-2.4 microg/infusion) or nicotine (0.08-0.32 microg/infusion) during the 30-min test. Pretreatment with memantine (0.1-10 mg/kg) prevented acquisition of nicotine but not cocaine self-administration. Pretreatment with mecamylamine (0.3-3 mg/kg) and MRZ 2/621 (0.3-10 mg/kg) produced dose-dependent suppression of both cocaine and nicotine self-administration. Taken together with the previous reports, these results indicate that nicotinic receptor blockers antagonize acute reinforcing effects of cocaine while NMDA receptor blockade may have limited effectiveness.

  20. The response of arginine vasopressin to intravenous ethanol and hypertonic saline in man: the impact of aging.

    PubMed

    Helderman, J H; Vestal, R E; Rowe, J W; Tobin, J D; Andres, R; Robertson, G L

    1978-01-01

    The effect of age on the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-renal axis in normal man was determined by assaying plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) responses to inhibitory and to secretory stimuli. Nine young (21-49 years) and 13 old (54-92 years) subjects received IV ethanol (375 mg/m2 per min). AVP levels fell progressively during the infusion in the young group, but fell for only 30 min in the old group and then rose paradoxically despite the continuing increase in blood ethanol. Eight young (22-48 years) and 8 old (52-66 years) men were provided identical osmolal loads by a 2-hour IV infusion of 3% NaCl at 0.1 ml/kg per min. Serum AVP rose 2.5 times the baseline in the young and 4.5 times the baseline in the old men despite identical free water clearances. Osmoreceptor sensitivity (the slope of AVP on osmolality) was greater in the old subjects. The heightened sensitivity to hyperosomolality helps examine the paradoxical response to ethanol, since osmolality increased during that time. This increased AVP response may severe to compensate for the reduced renal ability to conserve salt and water in aging man.

  1. A study on total intravenous anesthesia in orthognathic surgical procedures

    PubMed Central

    Vasundhar, P. L.; Sadhasivam, Gokkulakrishnan; Bhushan, Satya; Kalyan, Siva; Chiang, Kho Chai

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objective: To assess the use of propofol for induction and maintenance of anaesthesia among patients undergoing various combinations of orthognathic surgical procedures. Materials and Methods: Following Preoperative evaluation, patients were given Fentanyl (2 micrograms/kg) intravenously. Induction (2 mg/kg) and maintenance (10 mg/kg/hr) of anaesthesia was achieved by Propofol infusion. Blood Pressure and heart rate were maintained at >70 or 80 mm Hg and >50 respectively and were monitored continuously. Infusion was stopped approximately 30 to 40 minutes before the end of surgery. Immediate recovery recorded and was assessed. Results: The average duration of anaesthesia and surgery were found to be 4 hrs 28 min (SD= 1 hr. 35 min) and 4 hrs 3 min (SD=1 hr 38 min). None of the patients experienced pain on injection of induction agent. No significant change was observed in the mean heart rate and mean BP at different time intervals from baseline value to 30 minutes after the recovery. The average time taken to obey simple commands after stopping Propofol infusion was 42.60 ± 9.09 min. Time taken for spontaneous eye opening, full orientation and to count backwards was 43.45 ± 9.11, 47.85 ± 8.18 and 50.9 ± 9.14 respectively. Face-Hand test performed at 15 min after extubation was positive in all the patients. The mean Aldrete score at 15 min after extubation was 11.65 ± 0.75. The mean value of unaided sitting time for at least 2 min was after 119.00 ± 20.56 min. The average score of picture card test, time taken in “picking up matches” test, Ball bearing test, time taken to walk and to void urine were 5.80 ± 1.47, 67.95 ± 5.72, 9.80 ± 2.57, 172.75 ± 39.25 and 163.75 ± 55.96 respectively. Ninety percent of the patients were amenable for a repeat of this anaesthetic using the same regime but 10% of them did not answer anything. Seven patients (35%) had chills post-operatively. Conclusion: Propofol is an excellent anaesthetic for day care procedures

  2. Analgesic effects of ketamine infusion therapy in korean patients with neuropathic pain: A 2-week, open-label, uncontrolled study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jin Gu; Lee, Chul Joong; Kim, Tae Hyeong; Sim, Woo Seok; Shin, Byung Seop; Lee, Sang Hyun; Nahm, Francis Sahngun; Lee, Pyung Bok; Kim, Yong Chul; Lee, Sang Chul

    2010-01-01

    Background: The overexcitation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor complex appears to play a critical role in the development of neuropathic pain, and ketamine acts as an antagonist to that receptor. Some publications have reported on the prominent relief of neuropathic pain with intravenous or subcutaneous ketamine infusions or a single-dose intravenous ketamine injection despite adverse effects. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to determine the analgesic effect of intravenous ketamine infusion therapy for neuropathic pain refractory to conventional treatments. Secondary objectives included identifying the variables related to the analgesic effect and the pain descriptors susceptible to ketamine infusion. Methods: This 2-week, open-label, uncontrolled study was conducted in Korean patients with neuropathic pain recruited from the Samsung Seoul Hospital (Seoul, Republic of Korea) outpatient pain management unit. Patients were required to have a pain severity score >5 (visual analog scale [VAS], where 0 = no pain and 10 = worst pain imaginable) over a period of ≥1 month while on standard treatment. The patients were required to have shown no benefit from standard treatment and no pain relief lasting over 1 month. The ketamine infusion therapy was composed of 3 sessions performed consecutively every other day. Midazolam was administered concomitantly to reduce the occurrence of central nervous system-related adverse events (AEs) secondary to ketamine. Each session was as follows: ketamine 0.2 mg/kg and midazolam 0.1 mg/kg were administered intravenously for 5 minutes as a loading dose, followed by a continuous infusion of ketamine 0.5 mg/kg/h and midazolam 0.025 mg/kg/h for 2 hours. AEs were assessed in the following ways: close monitoring of ECG, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and evaluating the need for treatment of AEs during infu- sion and until discharge by an attending anesthesiologist; an open question about discomfort at the end of

  3. Levodopa "drug holiday" with amantadine infusions as a treatment of complications in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Koziorowski, Dariusz; Friedman, Andrzej

    2007-05-15

    The loss of beneficial effect of levodopa due to progression of the disease and alteration of receptor sensitivity makes the treatment of the advanced stadium of Parkinson's disease (PD) very difficult. In the past "drug holidays" was used in attempt to resensitize dopamine receptors in the striatum to make the treatment easier. However possible serious complications like neuroleptical malignant-like syndrome discouraged the use of this procedure. Intravenous administration of amantadine, another antiparkinsonian medication during "drug holidays," procedure could be a solution for this problem. We studied 12 patients with PD suffering from complication of the therapy. Daily dose of Levodopa used as monotherapy before amantadine infusions ranged between 700 and 2,000 mg. Levodopa was discontinued for 3 days and during that time amantadine sulfate intravenous was administrated. After "drug holidays" levodopa in the same dose as before treatment was resumed. An assessment of the parkinsonian condition was performed with Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale before "drug holidays" 2 days after and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 months later. The follow-up study demonstrated a significant improvement both in the motor condition and complication of therapy. The improvement after therapy was maintained up to 4 month. The levodopa "drug holidays" with amantadine infusion is a valuable option in the therapy of advanced stages of PD.

  4. The effect of posture on the sympathoadrenal response to theophylline infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, J B; Turner, C; Dalton, N; Thomson, A; Cochrane, G M; Clark, T J

    1983-01-01

    We studied the effect of posture on the sympathoadrenal response to intravenous theophylline in six normal subjects. On three separate occasions they received an intravenous infusion of either theophylline (6 mg/kg) while supine, theophylline (6 mg/kg) while standing or saline as placebo while standing. With the subjects standing theophylline caused tremor, a peak heart rate of 99 +/- 6 beats/min, and an elevation of plasma cyclic AMP from 9.3 +/- 0.7 to 15.1 +/- 1.7 nmol/1 (mean +/- s.e. mean). There was a small, but significant, elevation of plasma adrenaline, noradrenaline and glucose. The elevation in plasma catecholamines was insufficient to explain either the sympathomimetic effects of theophylline or the rise in plasma cyclic AMP. Theophylline had little or no effect with the subjects supine. The mean peak theophylline concentration following infusion was significantly higher with the subjects upright than when supine (18.3 c.f. 12.4 mg/l, P less than 0.025). However, adequate plasma levels of theophylline were obtained in all subjects when lying or supine. Analysis of individual data suggests that differences in plasma levels of theophylline are unlikely to account for the increased effects seen on standing. The mechanism of action of theophylline cannot be explained by increased secretion of catecholamines alone. Theophylline appears to amplify the increased sympathetic activity associated with standing and this is probably by phosphodiesterase inhibition. PMID:6313028

  5. Intraoperative magnesium infusion during carotid endarterectomy: a double-blind placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mack, William J.; Kellner, Christopher P.; Sahlein, Daniel H.; Ducruet, Andrew F.; Kim, Grace H.; Mocco, J; Zurica, Joseph; Komotar, Ricardo J.; Haque, Raqeeb; Sciacca, Robert; Quest, Donald O.; Solomon, Robert A.; Connolly, E. Sander; Heyer, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Object Recent data from both experimental and clinical studies have supported the use of intravenous magnesium as a potential therapy in the setting of cerebral ischemia. This study assessed whether intraoperative magnesium therapy improves neuropsychometric testing (NPT) following carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Methods One hundred eight patients undergoing CEA were randomly assigned to receive placebo infusion or 1 of 3 magnesium-dosing protocols. Neuropsychometric testing was performed 1 day after surgery and compared with baseline performance. Assessment was also performed on a set of 35 patients concurrently undergoing lumbar laminectomy to serve as a control group for NPT. A forward stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of magnesium therapy on NPT. A subgroup analysis was then performed, analyzing the impact of each intraoperative dose on NPT. Results Patients treated with intravenous magnesium infusion demonstrated less postoperative neurocognitive impairment than those treated with placebo (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.10–0.74, p = 0.01). When stratified according to dosing bolus and intraoperative magnesium level, those who were treated with low-dose magnesium had less cognitive decline than those treated with placebo (OR 0.09, 95% CI 0.02-0.50, p < 0.01). Those in the high-dose magnesium group demonstrated no difference from the placebo-treated group. Conclusions Low-dose intraoperative magnesium therapy protects against neurocognitive decline following CEA. PMID:19199498

  6. LH release and ovulatory response after intramuscular, intravenous, and intrauterine administration of β-nerve growth factor of seminal plasma origin in female llamas.

    PubMed

    Silva, M; Fernández, A; Ulloa-Leal, C; Adams, G P; Berland, M A; Ratto, M H

    2015-10-15

    The objective of the study was to compare the pituitary and ovarian responses after intramuscular, intravenous, or intrauterine administration of β-nerve growth factor (β-NGF) of seminal plasma origin (SP-NGF) in llamas. In experiment 1, mature female llamas with a growing follicle of 7 mm or greater were assigned randomly to four groups (n = 7/group) and given 2 mg of purified SP-NGF in a volume of 2 mL by (1) intramuscular administration, (2) intravenous administration, and (3) intrauterine infusion, or (4) intrauterine infusion of 2 mL of PBS (negative control). Because ovulations were not detected after intrauterine infusion in experiment 1, a second experiment was done to determine if a higher dose of SP-NGF given by intrauterine infusion, similar to a natural dose during copulation, will elicit an ovulatory response. In experiment 2, llamas with a growing follicle of 7 mm or greater were assigned randomly to three groups (n = 6/per group) given an intrauterine infusion of (1) 4 mL of raw seminal plasma, (2) 4 mL of PBS containing 20 mg of purified llama SP-NGF, or 3) 4 mL of PBS (negative control). In both experiments, the ovaries were examined daily by transrectal ultrasonography using a B-mode scanner and power Doppler mode to detect ovulation and to monitor CL growth, regression, and vascularization. Blood samples were collected to determine plasma LH and progesterone concentrations. In experiment 1, only llamas treated by intramuscular or intravenous administration of SP-NGF ovulated (7 of 7 and 6 of 7, respectively). Plasma LH concentration did not differ between the intramuscular and intravenous SP-NGF-treated groups, nor did CL diameter, CL vascularization, or plasma progesterone concentration profiles. In experiment 2, the ovulation rate was 100% for llamas treated by intrauterine infusion of raw seminal plasma or llama SP-NFG, whereas no ovulations were detected in females treated with PBS. Plasma LH concentrations did not differ between groups

  7. Changes in regional plasma extravasation in rats following endotoxin infusion

    SciTech Connect

    van Lambalgen, A.A.; van den Bos, G.C.; Thijs, L.G.

    1987-07-01

    Regional differences in plasma extravasation during endotoxin shock in rats and a possible relationship with changes in regional blood flow were studied with radioactive isotopes (/sup 125/I-HSA, 51Cr-labeled red blood cells, microspheres) in anesthetized rats (pentobarbital). Shock was induced by intravenous infusion of endotoxin (Eschericia coli; 10 mg X kg-1) for 60 min (starting at t = 0); at t = 120 min, the experiments were terminated. These rats (n = 8) were compared with time-matched control rats (n = 8). A third group (rats killed 7.5 min after injection of /sup 125/I-HSA, i.e., no extravasation; n = 8) served as baseline. The amount of plasma extravasated in 2 hr of endotoxin shock was significantly increased over control values in skin (by 67%), colon (88%), skeletal muscle (105%), stomach (230%), pancreas (300%), and diaphragm (1300%). Losses of /sup 125/I-HSA into intestinal lumen and peritoneal cavity had also increased over control values by 146 and 380%, respectively. Blood flow was compromised in most organs except heart and diaphragm. Extravasation when normalized for total plasma supply was correlated with total blood supply; the more the blood supply decreased, the higher the normalized extravasation. In the diaphragm, however, blood supply and plasma leakage increased together. Decreased blood supply and plasma extravasation may be related but they could also be simultaneously occurring independent phenomena with a common origin.

  8. Intravenous bicarbonate and sodium chloride both prolong endurance during intense cycle ergometer exercise.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, T H; Abraham, G; Wing, S; Magder, S A; Cosio, M G; Deschamps, A; Marliss, E B

    1990-08-01

    To determine the effects of neutralizing exercise systemic acidosis via the intravenous route upon endurance and metabolic responses, eight lean, normal, postabsorptive men exercised to exhaustion at about 80% of their VO2 max (69 +/- 3%, mean +/- SEM, of maximum power output) on a cycle ergometer. Exercise studies were performed either with no infusion (control) or with a total infusion volume of about 1.5 L, mainly as 1.3% sodium bicarbonate or as 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl), infused (double-blind) throughout exercise. The sodium bicarbonate was to prevent acid-base change, the sodium chloride was as a control for the volume infused. Arterialized venous blood and breath-by-breath analysis of expired gases were obtained. [H+] (nmol.L-1) and [HCO3-] (mmol.L-1) at exhaustion were similar in control and NaCl (46.5 +/- 1.8, 19.9 +/- 0.9), but remained unchanged from rest values with bicarbonate (38.4 +/- 0.9, 24.8 +/- 1.5, p less than 0.005 vs control and NaCl). At exhaustion, VO2, VCO2, RER, heart rate, and systolic BP as well as FFA, glycerol, alanine, insulin, norepinephrine, and epinephrine did not differ among protocols. Endurance was markedly prolonged (p less than 0.01) with bicarbonate (31.9 +/- 5.8 min) and NaCl (31.8 +/- 4.1 min) compared with the control (19.0 +/- 2.9 min) condition. Plasma glucose at exhaustion was higher (p less than 0.025) in the control compared to bicarbonate and NaCl experiments, while lactate was higher (p less than 0.025) in the bicarbonate than in the control and NaCl experiments. Thus, the prolonged endurance with sodium bicarbonate infusion could not be explained either by its effect of maintaining blood acid-base equilibrium or concomitant metabolic changes.

  9. Intravenous lidocaine for effective pain relief after a laparoscopic colectomy: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ahn, EunJin; Kang, Hyun; Choi, Geun Joo; Park, Yong Hee; Yang, So Young; Kim, Beom Gyu; Choi, Seung Won

    2015-03-01

    A perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion has been reported to decrease postoperative pain. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of intravenous lidocaine in reducing postoperative pain for laparoscopic colectomy patients. Fifty-five patients scheduled for an elective laparoscopic colectomy were randomly assigned to 2 groups. Group L received an intravenous bolus injection of lidocaine 1.5 mg/kg before intubation, followed by 2 mg/kg/h continuous infusion during the operation. Group C received the same dosage of saline at the same time. Postoperative pain was assessed at 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 hours after surgery by using the visual analog scale (VAS). Fentanyl consumption by patient-controlled plus investigator-controlled rescue administration and the total number of button pushes were measured at 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 hours after surgery. In addition, C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were checked on the operation day and postoperative days 1, 2, 3, and 5. VAS scores were significantly lower in group L than group C until 24 hours after surgery. Fentanyl consumption was lower in group L than group C until 12 hours after surgery. Moreover, additional fentanyl injections and the total number of button pushes appeared to be lower in group L than group C (P < 0.05). The CRP level tended to be lower in group L than group C, especially on postoperative day 1 and 2 and appeared to be statistically significant. The satisfaction score was higher in group L than group C (P = 0.024). Intravenous lidocaine infusion during an operation reduces pain after a laparoscopic colectomy.

  10. Rational use of intravenous fat emulsions.

    PubMed

    Pelham, L D

    1981-02-01

    The composition, effect on blood components, relative value compared with intravenous dextrose, clinical applications as a caloric and fatty acid source, adverse reactions, limitations, and administration of intravenous fat emulsions are reviewed. Fat emulsions provide essential fatty acids and calories and are primarily used to supplement of parenteral nutrition regimens. Their use as a major source of calories remains limited because of cost. However, the trend toward aligning intravenous nutrition to that of the normal diet and the increased demand for peripherally administered parenteral nutrition have increased demand for use. The advantages and disadvantages presented may be used by clinicians to assist in establishing the role of intravenous fat therapy in nutritional support services.

  11. Reorganization for intravenous procedures in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, N B

    1975-08-01

    The importance of reorganization for intravenous dental procedures, involving not only premises and equipment but also the dentist and his staff, is emphasised. These matters are discussed in detail with special emphasis on certain essential factors and psychologic aspects.

  12. Continuous Infusion of Ketamine for Out-of-hospital Isolated Orthopedic Injuries Secondary to Trauma: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Wiel, Eric; Zitouni, Djamel; Assez, Nathalie; Sebilleau, Quentin; Lys, Sébastien; Duval, Audrey; Mauriaucourt, Patrick; Hubert, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Although ketamine has recently been demonstrated to provide a morphine-sparing effect, no previous study reports the effect of continuous infusion of ketamine for analgesia in out-of-hospital environments. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a continuous infusion of ketamine (IK group) vs. a continuous infusion of saline (IS group) on morphine requirements in out-of-hospital trauma patients suffering from severe acute pain. Methods. In this prospective, multicenter, randomized, single-blind clinical study, patients suffering from isolated orthopedic injuries secondary to trauma with severe acute pain received a low-dose intravenous (IV) bolus of ketamine (0.2 mg·kg(-1)) combined with an IV bolus of morphine (0.1 mg·kg(-1)) and were randomized either in the IK group (IV continuous infusion of ketamine 0.2 mg·kg(-1)·h(-1)), or in the IS group (IV continuous infusion of saline at the same volume). The primary endpoint was morphine requirements in terms of total dose of morphine (excluding the baseline bolus) injected at the end of prehospital emergency care at hospital admission (final time, Tf). The secondary endpoint was evaluation of pain with visual analogic scale (VAS). Results. Sixty-six patients were enrolled. Total morphine dose was not significantly reduced with continuous infusion of ketamine (0.048 [0.000; 0.150] vs. 0.107 [0.052; 0.150] in IK and IS groups), with similar mean duration of care (median 35.0 min). Analgesia was as efficient without any significant difference in VAS at Tf between groups (3.1 ± 2.3 (IK group) vs. 3.7 ± 2.7 (IS group), p = 0.5). Conclusions. Continuous ketamine infusion did not reduce morphine requirements in severe acute pain trauma patients in the out-of-hospital emergency settings.

  13. Intravenous iron-containing products: EMA procrastination.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    A European reassessment has led to identical changes in the summaries of product characteristics (SPCs) for all intravenous iron-containing products: the risk of serious adverse effects is now highlighted, underlining the fact that intravenous iron-containing products should only be used when the benefits clearly outweigh the harms. Unfortunately, iron dextran still remains on the market despite a higher risk of hypersensitivity reactions than with iron sucrose.

  14. Cocaine self-administration punished by intravenous histamine in adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Nathan A; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2015-06-01

    Adolescence is a transitional phase marked by a heightened vulnerability to substances of abuse. It has been hypothesized that both increased sensitivity to reward and decreased sensitivity to aversive events may drive drug-use liability during this phase. To investigate possible age-related differences in sensitivity to the aversive consequences of drug use, adolescent and adult rats were compared on self-administration of cocaine before, during, and after a 10-day period in which an aversive agent, histamine, was added to the cocaine solution. Adult and adolescent female rats were trained to self-administer intravenous cocaine (0.4 mg/kg/infusion) over 10 sessions (2 h/session; 2 sessions/day). Histamine (4 mg/kg/infusion) was then added directly into the cocaine solution for the next 10 sessions. Finally, the cocaine/histamine solution was replaced with a cocaine-only solution, and rats continued to self-administer cocaine (0.4 mg/kg) for 20 sessions. Compared with adolescent rats, adult rats showed a greater decrease in cocaine self-administration when it was punished with intravenous histamine compared with their baseline cocaine self-administration rates. These results suggest that differences in the sensitivity to negative consequences of drug use may partially explain developmental differences in drug use vulnerability.

  15. Cocaine self-administration punished by intravenous histamine in adolescent and adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Holtz, Nathan A.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence is a transitional phase marked by a heightened vulnerability to substances of abuse. It has been hypothesized that both increased sensitivity to reward and decreased sensitivity to aversive events may drive drug-use liability during this phase. To investigate possible age-related differences in sensitivity to the aversive consequences of drug use, adolescent and adult rats were compared on self-administration of cocaine before, during, and after a 10-day period in which an aversive agent, histamine, was added to the cocaine solution. Adult and adolescent female rats were trained to self-administer intravenous cocaine (0.4 mg/kg/infusion) over 10 sessions (2 h/session; 2 sessions/day). Histamine (4 mg/kg/infusion) was then added directly into the cocaine solution for the next 10 sessions. Finally, the cocaine/histamine solution was replaced with a cocaine-only solution, and rats continued to self-administer cocaine (0.4 mg/kg) for 20 sessions. Compared with adolescent rats, adult rats showed a greater decrease in cocaine self-administration when it was punished with intravenous histamine compared with their baseline cocaine self-administration rates. These results suggest that differences in the sensitivity to negative consequences of drug use may partially explain developmental differences in drug use vulnerability. PMID:25769092

  16. Hypoglycemia following intravenous insulin plus glucose for hyperkalemia in patients with impaired renal function

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Ana Lucia; Bustamante, Jesus; Mendiluce, Alicia; Floege, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Background Hypoglycemia is a serious complication following the administration of insulin for hyperkalemia. We determined the incidence of hypoglycemia and severe hypoglycemia (blood glucose <70 or ≤40 mg/dl, respectively) in a cohort of AKI and non-dialysis dependent CKD patients who received an intravenous infusion of insulin plus glucose to treat hyperkalemia. Methods We retrospectively reviewed charts of all AKI and non-dialysis dependent CKD patients who received 10 U of insulin plus 50 g glucose to treat hyperkalemia from December 1, 2013 to May 31, 2015 at our Department. Results One hundred sixty four episodes of hyperkalemia were treated with insulin plus glucose and were eligible for analysis. Serum potassium levels dropped by 1.18 ± 1.01 mmol/l. Eleven treatments (6.1%) resulted in hypoglycemia and two (1.2%) in severe hypoglycemia. A lower pretreatment blood glucose tended to associate with a higher subsequent risk of hypoglycemia. Age, sex, renal function, an established diagnosis of diabetes or previous treatment were not associated with the development of this complication. We did not register any significant adverse events. Conclusion Our intravenous regimen combining an infusion of insulin plus glucose effectively reduced serum potassium levels compared to previous studies and associated a low risk of symptomatic hypoglycemia and other complications. PMID:28245289

  17. Evaluation of intravenous lipid emulsion on haloperidol-induced hypotension in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Moshiri, Mohammad; Vahabzadeh, Maryam; Mohammadpour, Amir Hooshang; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2016-05-01

    There are many reports on the effects of intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) as an antidote in drug toxicity. Haloperidol (HAL) is a butyrophenone antipsychotic agent which is highly lipophilic. Hypotension is an important adverse effect of HAL administration and overdose. The aim of this study was to investigate the beneficial hemodynamic effects of ILE on acute HAL poisoning. We used six groups of five male rabbits. Two groups received aseptic distilled water intravenously followed by infusion of 18.6 ml/kg normal saline, as negative control group, or ILE 20% after 0.5 h. The third group received 18.6 ml/kg normal saline after HAL infusion (2.6 mg/kg). The other three groups received ILE 20% solution (6, 12, and 18.6 ml/kg) following HAL (2.6 mg/kg) administration. We measured blood pressure at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, and 24 h after starting HAL administration, from left forelimb using a noninvasive method that was carried out automatically with a neonatal intensive care unit bedside monitor. ILE 20% at the dose of 18 ml/kg could return the reduced mean arterial pressure and diastolic blood pressure sooner than the other doses and normal saline. In conclusion, ILE could reverse HAL-induced hypotension same as the other lipophilic drugs. However, the clinical use of ILE for this purpose needs more evaluation to determine its exact indication and safety.

  18. ORAL AND INTRAVENOUSLY ADMINISTERED AMINO ACIDS PRODUCE SIMILAR EFFECTS ON MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS IN THE ELDERLY

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, B.B.; Wolfe, R.R.; Volpi, E.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Muscle protein synthesis is stimulated in the elderly when amino acid availability is increased. OBJECTIVE To determine which mode of delivery of amino acids (intravenous vs. oral ingestion) is more effective in stimulating the rate of muscle protein synthesis in elderly subjects. DESIGN Fourteen elderly subjects were assigned to one of two groups. Following insertion of femoral arterial and venous catheters, subjects were infused with a primed, continuous infusion of L-[ring-2H5] phenylalanine. Blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained to measure muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR) with the precursor-product model, phenylalanine kinetics across the leg with the three-pool model, and whole body phenylalanine kinetics. Protein metabolism parameters were measured in the basal period, and during the administration of oral amino acids (n=8) or a similar amount of intravenous amino acids (n=6). RESULTS Enteral and parenteral amino acid administration increased amino acid arterial concentrations and delivery to the leg to a similar extent in both groups. Muscle protein synthesis as measured by both FSR, and the three-pool model, increased during amino acid administration (P < 0.05 vs. basal) in both groups with no differences between groups. Whole body proteolysis did not change with the oral amino acids whereas it increased slightly during parenteral amino acid administration. CONCLUSIONS Increased amino acid availability stimulates the rate of muscle protein synthesis independent of the route of administration (enteral vs. parenteral). PMID:12459885

  19. Leg edema from intrathecal opiate infusions.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J A; Couto da Silva JM

    2000-01-01

    Despite the increasing popularity of intrathecal infusions to treat patients with long-term non-cancer-related pain, this therapy is not without serious side-effects. Five out of 23 patients who had intrathecal infusions of opiates for longer than 24 months developed leg and feet edema. As predisposing factors, cardiovascular disease, deep venous thrombosis, peripheral vascular disease, and venous stasis of the lower extremities were considered. Every patient who developed pedal and leg edema after the implantation of an infusion pump was also found to have leg edema and venous stasis prior to the time when the pump was inserted. This complication was severe enough to limit their physical activity, and to produce lymphedema, ulcerations and hyperpigmentation of the skin. Reduction of the edema occurred when the dose of the opiate was decreased, and in two cases in which the infusion was discontinued, there was almost complete resolution of the syndrome. It appears that the pre-existence of pedal edema and of venous stasis is a relative contraindication to the long-term intrathecal infusion of opiates in patients with chronic non-cancer pain.

  20. Evidence for opponent-process actions of intravenous cocaine and cocaethylene.

    PubMed

    Knackstedt, Lori A; Samimi, Max M; Ettenberg, Aaron

    2002-07-01

    The affective response to cocaine (COC) has been suggested to follow a time-course and pattern that adheres to the prediction of opponent-process models of drug actions. While the initial impact of the drug is positive, within a few minutes that effect wanes and is replaced by an aversive state characterized by anxiety and drug craving. We have demonstrated this phenomenon in animals by showing that rats prefer distinctive environments associated with the immediate effects of intravenous COC (1.0 mg/kg) but avoid environments associated with the state present 15-min postinjection. Human addicts have reported taking ethanol with their COC as a means of attenuating the negative aftereffects of COC administration. The combination of ethanol and COC results in the production of cocaethylene (CE), a metabolite of COC having psychostimulant properties. The current study was devised to assess whether the immediate and delayed affective responses to CE might account for the self-medication strategy of COC addicts pretreating themselves with ethanol. Rats developed conditioned place preferences for environments paired with the immediate effects of a 1.44-mg/kg intravenous dose of CE (equimolar to a 1.0-mg/kg dose of COC). While no aversive effects were observed at 0, 5, or 15 min postinjection, reliable place avoidance was detected for an environment paired with the internal state present 30-min post-CE. These data are consistent with the view that the development of CE may account for efficacy of ethanol to delay and weaken the aversive aftereffects of COC.

  1. The effect of intravenous magnesium hypophosphite in calcium borogluconate solution on the serum concentration of inorganic phosphorus in healthy cows.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Jehle, W

    2007-03-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effect of intravenous (IV) administration of phosphite on the serum concentration of inorganic phosphorus in cows. Twelve clinically healthy cows were divided into four groups of three. All cows received 600 mL of a 40% calcium borogluconate solution; three cows each received this as a rapid (20 min) IV infusion with and without 6% magnesium hypophosphite, and three other cows each received this as a slow IV infusion (8 h) with and without 6% magnesium hypophosphite. Samples of blood were collected for the determination of serum concentrations of calcium, inorganic phosphorus and magnesium before and 10, 20, 40, 60 and 90 min and 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 24, 48 and 72 h after the start of treatment. The concentration of calcium increased after treatment in all cows but the increase was most rapid in cows that received the rapid infusion. In cows that received the rapid IV infusion containing magnesium hypophosphite, the mean concentration of inorganic phosphorus decreased significantly 3-4 h after treatment compared with initial serum levels. The serum concentration of inorganic phosphorus did not change significantly in cows that received the rapid IV solution without magnesium hypophosphite or the slow IV infusion with or without magnesium hypophosphite. The serum concentration of magnesium increased after treatment in all cows receiving magnesium hypophosphite but remained unchanged in the others. The rapid infusion of calcium borogluconate without magnesium hypophosphite made all three cows anorexic and hypercalcaemic and the slow infusion made 1/3 anorexic. It is concluded that the IV administration of a calcium solution containing magnesium hypophosphite does not increase the serum concentration of inorganic phosphorus.

  2. Failure of intravenous pentagastrin challenge to induce panic-like effects in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Rupniak, N M; Schaffer, L; Siegl, P; Iversen, S D

    1993-08-01

    We examined the ability of intravenous (i.v.) challenge with pentagastrin to induce behavioural and cardiovascular effects consistent with panic attack in conscious rhesus monkeys. For behavioural evaluation, 4 naive male rhesus monkeys familiar with minimal manual restraint necessary for drug administration received a rapid i.v. bolus of pentagastrin (4, 8 or 16 micrograms/kg) or water on four separate occasions according to a randomised cross-over design. Behaviour was rated by a blind observer continuously during, and for the first 5 min immediately following i.v. injections while the monkey sat on the handler's lap, and then for a further 25 min in an individual observation cage. In separate experiments, the ability of pentagastrin to alter cardiovascular parameters which may accompany panic or anxiety (elevated heart rate and blood pressure) was explored. For cardiovascular studies, 8 male or female rhesus monkeys with femoral artery catheters were chair restrained and received a bolus injection of pentagastrin (4, 8 or 16 micrograms/kg) or saline into the saphenous vein at 30 min intervals. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored continuously using a Statham Gould pressure transducer. Pentagastrin induced no consistent behavioural or cardiovascular changes. Similar pilot studies using CCK4 also failed to reveal such effects. We conclude that CCK-induced panic-like effects may not be demonstrable following challenge with pentagastrin under laboratory conditions in rhesus monkeys.

  3. Case report: acute renal failure after administering intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Graumann, Aaron; Zawada, Edward T

    2010-03-01

    We report the case of an 87-year-old white woman with myasthenia gravis who presented with nausea, shortness of breath, azotemia, and hyperkalemia shortly after completing a course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). She had been receiving monthly transfusions of IVIG, but this time had received daily infusions for 5 days rather than 1 day. She had received this same dose in the past without incident. Her history was significant for coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, chronic steroid use, and recurrent urinary tract infection. On examination, she was slightly confused, mildly dehydrated, had a grade II systolic ejection murmur along the upper left sternal border, had bilateral and symmetric mild weakness of the upper and low