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Sample records for 30-min time intervals

  1. Timing matters: negative emotion elicited 5 min but not 30 min or 45 min after learning enhances consolidation of internal-monitoring source memory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Bukuan, Sun

    2015-05-01

    Two experiments examined the time-dependent effects of negative emotion on consolidation of item and internal-monitoring source memory. In Experiment 1, participants (n=121) learned a list of words. They were asked to read aloud half of the words and to think about the remaining half. They were instructed to memorize each word and its associative cognitive operation ("reading" versus "thinking"). Immediately following learning they conducted free recall and then watched a 3-min either neutral or negative video clip when 5 min, 30 min or 45 min had elapsed after learning. Twenty-four hours later they returned to take surprise tests for item and source memory. Experiment 2 was similar to Experiment 1 except that participants, without conducting an immediate test of free recall, took tests of source memory for all encoded words both immediately and 24 h after learning. Experiment 1 showed that negative emotion enhanced consolidation of item memory (as measured by retention ratio of free recall) regardless of delay of emotion elicitation and that negative emotion enhanced consolidation of source memory when it was elicited at a 5 min delay but reduced consolidation of source memory when it was elicited at a 30 min delay; when elicited at a 45 min delay, negative emotion had little effect. Furthermore, Experiment 2 replicated the enhancement effect on source memory in the 5 min delay even when participants were tested on all the encoded words. The current study partially replicated prior studies on item memory and extends the literature by providing evidence for a time-dependent effect of negative emotion on consolidation of source memory based on internal monitoring.

  2. VARIABLE TIME-INTERVAL GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Gross, J.E.

    1959-10-31

    This patent relates to a pulse generator and more particularly to a time interval generator wherein the time interval between pulses is precisely determined. The variable time generator comprises two oscillators with one having a variable frequency output and the other a fixed frequency output. A frequency divider is connected to the variable oscillator for dividing its frequency by a selected factor and a counter is used for counting the periods of the fixed oscillator occurring during a cycle of the divided frequency of the variable oscillator. This defines the period of the variable oscillator in terms of that of the fixed oscillator. A circuit is provided for selecting as a time interval a predetermined number of periods of the variable oscillator. The output of the generator consists of a first pulse produced by a trigger circuit at the start of the time interval and a second pulse marking the end of the time interval produced by the same trigger circuit.

  3. TIME-INTERVAL MEASURING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Gross, J.E.

    1958-04-15

    An electronic device for measuring the time interval between two control pulses is presented. The device incorporates part of a previous approach for time measurement, in that pulses from a constant-frequency oscillator are counted during the interval between the control pulses. To reduce the possible error in counting caused by the operation of the counter gating circuit at various points in the pulse cycle, the described device provides means for successively delaying the pulses for a fraction of the pulse period so that a final delay of one period is obtained and means for counting the pulses before and after each stage of delay during the time interval whereby a plurality of totals is obtained which may be averaged and multplied by the pulse period to obtain an accurate time- Interval measurement.

  4. High resolution time interval meter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  5. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured.

  6. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, K.J.

    1994-07-26

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured. 3 figs.

  7. Effect of 30-min +3 Gz centrifugation on vestibular and autonomic cardiovascular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Wood, Scott J.; Brown, Troy E.; Harm, Deborah L.; Rupert, A. H.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Repeated exposure to increased +Gz enhances human baroreflex responsiveness and improves tolerance to cardiovascular stress. However, it is not known whether such enhancements might also result from a single, more prolonged exposure to increased +Gz. Our study was designed to investigate whether baroreflex function and orthostatic tolerance are acutely improved by a single prolonged exposure to +3 Gz, and moreover, whether changes in autonomic cardiovascular function resulting from exposure to increased +Gz are correlated with changes in otolith function. METHODS: We exposed 15 healthy human subjects to +3 Gz centrifugation for up to 30 min or until symptoms of incipient G-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC) ensued. Tests of autonomic cardiovascular function both before and after centrifugation included: 1) power spectral determinations of beat-to-beat R-R intervals and arterial pressures; 2) carotid-cardiac baroreflex tests; 3) Valsalva tests; and 4) 30-min head-up tilt tests. Otolith function was assessed during centrifugation by the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex and both before and after centrifugation by measurements of ocular counter-rolling and dynamic posturography. RESULTS: Of the 15 subjects who underwent prolonged +3 Gz, 4 were intolerant to 30 min of head-up tilt before centrifugation but became tolerant to such tilt after centrifugation. The Valsalva-related baroreflex as well as a measure of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex were also enhanced after centrifugation. No significant vestibular-autonomic relationships were detected beyond a vestibular-cerebrovascular interaction reported earlier in a subset of seven participants. CONCLUSIONS: A single prolonged exposure to +3 Gz centrifugation acutely improves baroreflex function and orthostatic tolerance.

  8. Scaling of light and dark time intervals.

    PubMed

    Marinova, J

    1978-01-01

    Scaling of light and dark time intervals of 0.1 to 1.1 s is performed by the mehtod of magnitude estimation with respect to a given standard. The standards differ in duration and type (light and dark). The light intervals are subjectively estimated as longer than the dark ones. The relation between the mean interval estimations and their magnitude is linear for both light and dark intervals.

  9. Effects of divided doses of a bronchodilator aerosol and the intervening time interval on the forced expiration.

    PubMed

    Hidinger, K G; Bake, B

    1986-01-01

    Twelve patients with bronchial asthma participated in a blind, randomized, crossover study comparing the effects of 500 micrograms terbutaline in one inhalation, 125 micrograms in four inhalations taken in rapid succession, and 125 micrograms in four inhalations taken with an intervening time interval of 30 min. There were no significant differences between the three modes of inhalation of 500 micrograms terbutaline in any of the spirometric variables, i.e., 1-second forced expiratory volume, forced vital capacity, and maximal airflows when 50 and 75% of the forced vital capacity was exhaled from the total lung capacity. However, there were neither any significant differences between the levels of bronchodilation reached after administration of 500 micrograms and 2 or 3 X 125 micrograms terbutaline with an intervening time interval of 30 min. The time interval between the divided doses was possibly too long to achieve maximum accumulated effect of the four divided doses.

  10. Intact Interval Timing in Circadian CLOCK Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Cordes, Sara; Gallistel, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    While progress has been made in determining the molecular basis for the circadian clock, the mechanism by which mammalian brains time intervals measured in seconds to minutes remains a mystery. An obvious question is whether the interval timing mechanism shares molecular machinery with the circadian timing mechanism. In the current study, we trained circadian CLOCK +/− and −/− mutant male mice in a peak-interval procedure with 10 and 20-s criteria. The mutant mice were more active than their wild-type littermates, but there were no reliable deficits in the accuracy or precision of their timing as compared with wild-type littermates. This suggests that expression of the CLOCK protein is not necessary for normal interval timing. PMID:18602902

  11. Does the time interval after bleaching influence the adhesion of orthodontic brackets?

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Glaucia Cristina Rodrigues; de Miranda, Cyndi Albuquerque; Machado, Sissy Maria Mendes; Brandão, Gustavo Antonio Martins; de Almeida, Haroldo Amorim

    2013-01-01

    Objective To test the null hypothesis that no difference exists between the effects of at-home bleaching and in-office bleaching on shear bond strength (SBS) with bracket bonding at 4 different time intervals after dental bleaching. Methods Ninety extracted human premolars were randomly divided into 9 groups (n = 10) according to the bleaching methods used (at-home bleaching and in-office bleaching) and the storage time in artificial saliva (30 min, 1 day, 2 weeks, and 3 weeks before bonding). The control group was stored in artificial saliva for 7 days. Brackets were bonded with the Transbond XT adhesive system, and SBS testing was performed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was used to assess the amount of resin remaining on the enamel surfaces after debonding. The SBS data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey test. For the ARI, the Kruskal-Wallis test was performed. Significance for all statistical tests was predetermined to be p < 0.05. Results The SBS of the unbleached group was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that of the bleached groups (except for the group bonded 30 min after at-home bleaching). Conclusions The null hypothesis was not totally rejected. All bleaching groups tested had decreased SBS of the brackets to the enamel, except for the group bonded 30 min after at-home bleaching. The SBS returned to values close to those of the unbleached enamel within 3 weeks following bleaching. PMID:24228239

  12. The effects of a 30-min run on the mechanics of the human Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Farris, Dominic James; Trewartha, Grant; McGuigan, Miranda Polly

    2012-02-01

    Tendinous structures often exhibit reduced stiffness following repeated loading via static muscular contractions. The purpose of this study was to determine if human Achilles tendon (AT) stiffness is affected by the repeated loading experienced during running and if this affects normal muscle-tendon interaction. Twelve male participants (mean ± SD: age 27 ± 5 years, height 1.79 ± 0.06 m, mass 78.6 ± 8.4 kg) completed a 30 min run at 12 kmph on a treadmill. AT properties were determined before and after the run during a series of one-legged hops. During hopping and running, AT length data were acquired from a combination of ultrasound imaging (50 Hz) and kinematic data (200 Hz). AT force was estimated from inverse dynamics during hopping and AT stiffness was computed from plots of AT force and length. AT stiffness was not significantly different post run (pre 163 ± 41 N mm(-1), post 147 ± 52 N mm(-1), P > 0.05) and peak AT strain during the stance phase of running (calculated relative to AT length during standing) was similar at different time points during the run (3.5 ± 1.8% at 1 min, 3.2 ± 1.8% at 15 min and 3.8 ± 2% at 30 min). It was concluded that the loading experienced during a single bout of running does not affect the stiffness of the AT and that the properties of the AT are stable during locomotion. This may have implications for muscle fascicle behaviour and Achilles tendon injury mechanisms. PMID:21643918

  13. On selection of the optimal data time interval for real-time hydrological forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Han, D.

    2012-09-01

    With the advancement in modern telemetry and communication technologies, hydrological data can be collected with an increasingly higher sampling rate. An important issue deserving attention from the hydrological community is what suitable time interval of the model input data should be chosen in hydrological forecasting. Such a problem has long been recognised in the control engineering community but is a largely ignored topic in operational applications of hydrological forecasting. In this study, the intrinsic properties of rainfall-runoff data with different time intervals are first investigated from the perspectives of the sampling theorem and the information loss using the discrete wavelet decomposition tool. It is found that rainfall signals with very high sampling rates may not always improve the accuracy of rainfall-runoff modelling due to the catchment low-pass filtering effect. To further investigate the impact of data time interval in real-time forecasting, a real-time forecasting system is constructed by incorporating the Probability Distributed Model (PDM) with a real-time updating scheme, the autoregressive-moving average (ARMA) model. Case studies are then carried out on four UK catchments with different concentration times for real-time flow forecasting using data with different time intervals of 15 min, 30 min, 45 min, 60 min, 90 min and 120 min. A positive relation is found between the forecast lead time and the optimal choice of the data time interval, which is also highly dependent on the catchment concentration time. Finally, based on the conclusions from the case studies, a hypothetical pattern is proposed in three-dimensional coordinates to describe the general impact of the data time interval and to provide implications on the selection of the optimal time interval in real-time hydrological forecasting. Although nowadays most operational hydrological systems still have low data sampling rates (daily or hourly), the trend in the future is that

  14. Systolic Time Intervals and New Measurement Methods.

    PubMed

    Tavakolian, Kouhyar

    2016-06-01

    Systolic time intervals have been used to detect and quantify the directional changes of left ventricular function. New methods of recording these cardiac timings, which are less cumbersome, have been recently developed and this has created a renewed interest and novel applications for these cardiac timings. This manuscript reviews these new methods and addresses the potential for the application of these cardiac timings for the diagnosis and prognosis of different cardiac diseases.

  15. Sunspot Time Series: Passive and Active Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zięba, S.; Nieckarz, Z.

    2014-07-01

    Solar activity slowly and irregularly decreases from the first spotless day (FSD) in the declining phase of the old sunspot cycle and systematically, but also in an irregular way, increases to the new cycle maximum after the last spotless day (LSD). The time interval between the first and the last spotless day can be called the passive interval (PI), while the time interval from the last spotless day to the first one after the new cycle maximum is the related active interval (AI). Minima of solar cycles are inside PIs, while maxima are inside AIs. In this article, we study the properties of passive and active intervals to determine the relation between them. We have found that some properties of PIs, and related AIs, differ significantly between two group of solar cycles; this has allowed us to classify Cycles 8 - 15 as passive cycles, and Cycles 17 - 23 as active ones. We conclude that the solar activity in the PI declining phase (a descending phase of the previous cycle) determines the strength of the approaching maximum in the case of active cycles, while the activity of the PI rising phase (a phase of the ongoing cycle early growth) determines the strength of passive cycles. This can have implications for solar dynamo models. Our approach indicates the important role of solar activity during the declining and the rising phases of the solar-cycle minimum.

  16. Evidence of a major fault zone along the California-Nevada state line 35 deg 30 min to 36 deg 30 min north latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liggett, M. A.; Childs, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Geologic reconnaissance guided by analysis of ERTS-1 and Apollo-9 satellite imagery and intermediate scale photography from X-15 and U-2 aircraft has confirmed the presence of a major fault zone along the California-Nevada state line, between 35 deg 30 min and 36 deg 30 min north latitude. The name Pahrump Fault Zone has been suggested for this feature after the valley in which it is best exposed. Field reconnaissance has indicated the existence of previously unreported faults cutting bedrock along range fronts, and displacing Tertiary and Quaternary basin sediments. Gravity data support the interpretation of regional structural discontinuity along this zone. Individual fault traces within the Pahrump Fault Zone form generally left-stepping en echelon patterns. These fault patterns, the apparent offset of a Laramide age thrust fault, and possible drag folding along a major fault break suggest a component of right lateral displacement. The trend and postulated movement of the Pahrump Fault Zone are similar to the adjacent Las Vegas Shear Zone and Death Valley-Furnace Creek Faults, which are parts of a regional strike slip system in the southern Basin-Range Province.

  17. Precise time and time interval data handling and reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    In the past year, the increase in Precise Time And Time Interval data to be reduced to the U.S. Naval Observatory Master Clock and the requirement for its quick dissemination has necessitated development of more efficient methods of data handling and reduction. An outline of the data involved and of the Time Service computerization of these functions is presented.

  18. Precise time and time interval users, requirements and specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowser, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The functional areas of application of Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) were considered and expanded. A comprehensive overview of the PTTI requirements and applications would provide an opportunity for individuals working in a specific functional area. Mutual problems, requirements, applications or successes shared by those in other functional areas were studied. Based upon the results of a two year study a compendium of PTTI requirements, applications and the means of meeting the requirements among Department of Defense components, other government agencies and major commercial users was compiled and is presented. It was found that the planning process for PTTI support for new acquisitions or new programs was less than a well defined, coordinated process. The processes are described in general terms and a generic model for requirements determination and subsequent coordination which may enhance the planning process and introduce cost benefits to the program is also presented.

  19. Precise time and time interval applications to electric power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    There are many applications of precise time and time interval (frequency) in operating modern electric power systems. Many generators and customer loads are operated in parallel. The reliable transfer of electrical power to the consumer partly depends on measuring power system frequency consistently in many locations. The internal oscillators in the widely dispersed frequency measuring units must be syntonized. Elaborate protection and control systems guard the high voltage equipment from short and open circuits. For the highest reliability of electric service, engineers need to study all control system operations. Precise timekeeping networks aid in the analysis of power system operations by synchronizing the clocks on recording instruments. Utility engineers want to reproduce events that caused loss of service to customers. Precise timekeeping networks can synchronize protective relay test-sets. For dependable electrical service, all generators and large motors must remain close to speed synchronism. The stable response of a power system to perturbations is critical to continuity of electrical service. Research shows that measurement of the power system state vector can aid in the monitoring and control of system stability. If power system operators know that a lightning storm is approaching a critical transmission line or transformer, they can modify operating strategies. Knowledge of the location of a short circuit fault can speed the re-energizing of a transmission line. One fault location technique requires clocks synchronized to one microsecond. Current research seeks to find out if one microsecond timekeeping can aid and improve power system control and operation.

  20. Interval timing in Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens).

    PubMed

    Higa, J J; Simm, L A

    2004-11-30

    The present study evaluated the temporal performance of Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) given short-term exposure to four fixed interval (FI) schedules of reinforcement, FI 30, 60, 120, and 240 s, during which a reinforcer (mirror image) was given for the first response (swimming through a hoop) after the interval requirement had elapsed. Response levels were generally low early in an interval and increased as the interval elapsed; wait times and break points in an interval increased with increases in the FI requirement. The results were similar to that obtained with other species and different types of responses and reinforcers, and demonstrate that the procedure is a feasible method for studying interval timing in fish.

  1. Interval timing in Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens).

    PubMed

    Higa, J J; Simm, L A

    2004-11-30

    The present study evaluated the temporal performance of Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) given short-term exposure to four fixed interval (FI) schedules of reinforcement, FI 30, 60, 120, and 240 s, during which a reinforcer (mirror image) was given for the first response (swimming through a hoop) after the interval requirement had elapsed. Response levels were generally low early in an interval and increased as the interval elapsed; wait times and break points in an interval increased with increases in the FI requirement. The results were similar to that obtained with other species and different types of responses and reinforcers, and demonstrate that the procedure is a feasible method for studying interval timing in fish. PMID:15518999

  2. Effects of gender on stroke rates, critical speed and velocity of a 30-min swim in young swimmers.

    PubMed

    Greco, Camila C; Pelarigo, Jailton G; Figueira, Tiago R; Denadai, Benedito S

    2007-01-01

    Our objective was to analyze the effect of gender on the relationship between stroke rates corresponding to critical speed (SRCS) and maximal speed of 30 min (SRS30) in young swimmers. Twenty two males (GM1) (Age = 15.4 ± 2.1 yr., Body mass = 63.7 ± 12.9 kg, Stature = 1.73 ± 0.09 m) and fourteen female (GF) swimmers (Age = 15.1 ± 1.6 yr., Body mass = 58.3 ± 8.8 kg, Stature = 1.65 ± 0.06 m) were studied. A subset of males (GM2) was matched to the GF by their velocity for a 30 min swim (S30). The critical speed (CS) was determined through the slope of the linear regression line between the distances (200 and 400 m) and participant's respective times. CS was significantly higher than S30 in males (GM1 - 1.25 and 1.16 and GM2 - 1.21 and 1.12 m·s(-1)) and females (GF - 1.15 and 1.11 m·s(-1)). There was no significant difference between SRCS and SRS30 in males (GM1 - 34.16 and 32.32 and GM2 - 34.67 and 32.46 cycle·s(-1), respectively) and females (GF - 34.18 and 33.67 cycle·s(-1), respectively). There was a significant correlation between CS and S30 (GM1 - r = 0.89, GF - r = 0.94 and GM2 - r = 0.90) and between SRCS and SRS30 (GM1 - r = 0.89, GF - r = 0.80 and GM2 - r = 0.88). Thus, the relationship between SRCS and SRS30 is not influenced by gender, in swimmers with similar and different aerobic capacity levels. Key pointsThe main finding of this study was that the relationship between SRCS and SRS30, which is not dependent on gender, in swimmers with similar and different aerobic capacity levels.In swimmers who had different S30 values, CS was higher than S30 in boys and girls, and CS and S30 were higher in boys than girls, but SRCS and SRS30 were similar between genders.In swimmers who had similar S30 values, CS was higher than S30 in boys and girls. However, boys still presented higher values of CS than girls. SRCS was higher than SRS30 in boys, but these variables were similar in girls. SRCS and SRS30 were similar between genders.Girls presented lower

  3. Simultaneous timing of multiple intervals: implications of the scalar property.

    PubMed

    Leak, T M; Gibbon, J

    1995-01-01

    Three experiments with pigeons are reported in which the scalar property in simultaneous timing tasks was studied. According to scalar expectancy theory, the scalar property should be maintained in simultaneous timing, but the behavioral theory of timing predicts that the scalar property should be evident only in independent timing. Experiment 1 showed that the appearance of distinct peaks at reinforcement times required about a 4:1 ratio between intervals. Experiment 2 (2-interval timing task) and Experiment 3 (3-interval timing task) used an individual trial analysis technique to examine high-rate responding segments bracketing the times of reinforcement. The standard deviations of the starting and stopping times of high-rate segments were linearly related to their means and to reinforcement time, supporting the scalar property in simultaneous timing.

  4. Unpacking a time interval lengthens its perceived temporal distance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Li, Shu; Sun, Yan

    2014-01-01

    In quantity estimation, people often perceive that the whole is less than the sum of its parts. The current study investigated such an unpacking effect in temporal distance judgment. Our results showed that participants in the unpacked condition judged a given time interval longer than those in the packed condition, even the time interval was kept constant between the two conditions. Furthermore, this unpacking effect persists regardless of the unpacking ways we employed. Results suggest that unpacking a time interval may be a good strategy for lengthening its perceived temporal distance. PMID:25477854

  5. Unpacking a time interval lengthens its perceived temporal distance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Li, Shu; Sun, Yan

    2014-01-01

    In quantity estimation, people often perceive that the whole is less than the sum of its parts. The current study investigated such an unpacking effect in temporal distance judgment. Our results showed that participants in the unpacked condition judged a given time interval longer than those in the packed condition, even the time interval was kept constant between the two conditions. Furthermore, this unpacking effect persists regardless of the unpacking ways we employed. Results suggest that unpacking a time interval may be a good strategy for lengthening its perceived temporal distance. PMID:25477854

  6. Sustained AS160 and TBC1D1 phosphorylations in human skeletal muscle 30 min after a single bout of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Vendelbo, M. H.; Møller, A. B.; Treebak, J. T.; Gormsen, L. C.; Goodyear, L. J.; Wojtaszewski, J. F. P.; Jørgensen, J. O. L.; Møller, N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: phosphorylation of AS160 and TBC1D1 plays an important role for GLUT4 mobilization to the cell surface. The phosphorylation of AS160 and TBC1D1 in humans in response to acute exercise is not fully characterized. Objective: to study AS160 and TBC1D1 phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle after aerobic exercise followed by a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. Design: eight healthy men were studied on two occasions: 1) in the resting state and 2) in the hours after a 1-h bout of ergometer cycling. A hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp was initiated 240 min after exercise and in a time-matched nonexercised control condition. We obtained muscle biopsies 30 min after exercise and in a time-matched nonexercised control condition (t = 30) and after 30 min of insulin stimulation (t = 270) and investigated site-specific phosphorylation of AS160 and TBC1D1. Results: phosphorylation on AS160 and TBC1D1 was increased 30 min after the exercise bout, whereas phosphorylation of the putative upstream kinases, Akt and AMPK, was unchanged compared with resting control condition. Exercise augmented insulin-stimulated phosphorylation on AS160 at Ser341 and Ser704 270 min after exercise. No additional exercise effects were observed on insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Thr642 and Ser588 on AS160 or Ser237 and Thr596 on TBC1D1. Conclusions: AS160 and TBC1D1 phosphorylations were evident 30 min after exercise without simultaneously increased Akt and AMPK phosphorylation. Unlike TBC1D1, insulin-stimulated site-specific AS160 phosphorylation is modified by prior exercise, but these sites do not include Thr642 and Ser588. Together, these data provide new insights into phosphorylation of key regulators of glucose transport in human skeletal muscle. PMID:24876356

  7. Multiple-interval timing in rats: Performance on two-valued mixed fixed-interval schedules.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, S; Lowe, C F; Wearden, J H

    2003-10-01

    Three experiments studied timing in rats on 2-valued mixed-fixed-interval schedules, with equally probable components, Fixed-Interval S and Fixed-Interval L (FI S and FI L, respectively). When the L:S ratio was greater than 4, 2 distinct response peaks appeared close to FI S and FI L, and data could be well fitted by the sum of 2 Gaussian curves. When the L:S ratio was less than 4, only 1 response peak was usually visible, but nonlinear regression often identified separate sources of behavioral control, by FI S and FI L, although control by FI L dominated. Data were used to test ideas derived from scalar expectancy theory, the behavioral theory of timing, and learning to time.

  8. Use of systolic time intervals in studying hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tarazi, R C; Ibrahim, M M; Dustan, H P; Bravo, E L

    1976-01-01

    Systolic time intervals were measured in 54 hypertensive patients divided into three groups according to severity of hypertension, variability of blood pressure levels and presence or absence of a hyperkinetic heart. The three groups were: borderline hypertension (BLH), fixed essential hypertension (FEH) and hyperkinetic essential hypertension (HEH). Systolic time intervals (STI) provided information indicating an increased cardioadrenergic drive in BLH and HEH. This was supported by finding that propranolol abolished the increased contractility found at rest in BLH and HEH.

  9. The Behavioral Economics of Choice and Interval Timing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jozefowiez, J.; Staddon, J. E. R.; Cerutti, D. T.

    2009-01-01

    The authors propose a simple behavioral economic model (BEM) describing how reinforcement and interval timing interact. The model assumes a Weber-law-compliant logarithmic representation of time. Associated with each represented time value are the payoffs that have been obtained for each possible response. At a given real time, the response with…

  10. Short Blue Light Pulses (30 Min) in the Morning Support a Sleep-Advancing Protocol in a Home Setting.

    PubMed

    Geerdink, Moniek; Walbeek, Thijs J; Beersma, Domien G M; Hommes, Vanja; Gordijn, Marijke C M

    2016-10-01

    Many people in our modern civilized society sleep later on free days compared to work days. This discrepancy in sleep timing will lead to so-called 'social jetlag' on work days with negative consequences for performance and health. Light therapy in the morning is often proposed as the most effective method to advance the circadian rhythm and sleep phase. However, most studies focus on direct effects on the circadian system and not on posttreatment effects on sleep phase and sleep integrity. In this placebo-controlled home study we investigated if blue light, rather than amber light therapy, can phase shift the sleep phase along with the circadian rhythm with preservation of sleep integrity and performance. We selected 42 participants who suffered from 'social jetlag' on workdays. Participants were randomly assigned to either high-intensity blue light exposure or amber light exposure (placebo) with similar photopic illuminance. The protocol consisted of 14 baseline days without sleep restrictions, 9 treatment days with either 30-min blue light pulses or 30-min amber light pulses in the morning along with a sleep advancing scheme and 7 posttreatment days without sleep restrictions. Melatonin samples were taken at days 1, 7, 14 (baseline), day 23 (effect treatment), and day 30 (posttreatment). Light exposure was recorded continuously. Sleep was monitored through actigraphy. Performance was measured with a reaction time task. As expected, the phase advance of the melatonin rhythm from day 14 to day 23 was significantly larger in the blue light exposure group, compared to the amber light group (84 min ± 51 (SD) and 48 min ± 47 (SD) respectively; t36 = 2.23, p < 0.05). Wake-up time during the posttreatment days was slightly earlier compared to baseline in the blue light group compared to slightly later in the amber light group (-21 min ± 33 (SD) and +12 min ± 33 (SD) respectively; F1,35 = 9.20, p < 0.01). The number of sleep bouts was significantly

  11. Short Blue Light Pulses (30 Min) in the Morning Support a Sleep-Advancing Protocol in a Home Setting.

    PubMed

    Geerdink, Moniek; Walbeek, Thijs J; Beersma, Domien G M; Hommes, Vanja; Gordijn, Marijke C M

    2016-10-01

    Many people in our modern civilized society sleep later on free days compared to work days. This discrepancy in sleep timing will lead to so-called 'social jetlag' on work days with negative consequences for performance and health. Light therapy in the morning is often proposed as the most effective method to advance the circadian rhythm and sleep phase. However, most studies focus on direct effects on the circadian system and not on posttreatment effects on sleep phase and sleep integrity. In this placebo-controlled home study we investigated if blue light, rather than amber light therapy, can phase shift the sleep phase along with the circadian rhythm with preservation of sleep integrity and performance. We selected 42 participants who suffered from 'social jetlag' on workdays. Participants were randomly assigned to either high-intensity blue light exposure or amber light exposure (placebo) with similar photopic illuminance. The protocol consisted of 14 baseline days without sleep restrictions, 9 treatment days with either 30-min blue light pulses or 30-min amber light pulses in the morning along with a sleep advancing scheme and 7 posttreatment days without sleep restrictions. Melatonin samples were taken at days 1, 7, 14 (baseline), day 23 (effect treatment), and day 30 (posttreatment). Light exposure was recorded continuously. Sleep was monitored through actigraphy. Performance was measured with a reaction time task. As expected, the phase advance of the melatonin rhythm from day 14 to day 23 was significantly larger in the blue light exposure group, compared to the amber light group (84 min ± 51 (SD) and 48 min ± 47 (SD) respectively; t36 = 2.23, p < 0.05). Wake-up time during the posttreatment days was slightly earlier compared to baseline in the blue light group compared to slightly later in the amber light group (-21 min ± 33 (SD) and +12 min ± 33 (SD) respectively; F1,35 = 9.20, p < 0.01). The number of sleep bouts was significantly

  12. A tuned-trace theory of interval-timing dynamics.

    PubMed

    Staddon, J E R; Chelaru, I M; Higa, J J

    2002-01-01

    Animals on interval schedules of reinforcement can rapidly adjust a temporal dependent variable, such as wait time, to changes in the prevailing interreinforcement interval. We describe data on the effects of impulse, step, sine-cyclic, and variable-interval schedules and show that they can be explained by a tuned-trace timing model with a one-back threshold-setting rule. The model can also explain steady-state timing properties such as proportional and Weber law timing and the effects of reinforcement magnitude. The model assumes that food reinforcers and other time markers have a decaying effect (trace) with properties that can be derived from the rate-sensitive property of habituation (the multiple-time-scale model). In timing experiments, response threshold is determined by the trace value at the time of the most recent reinforcement. The model provides a partial account for the learning of multiple intervals, but does not account for scalloping and other postpause features of responding on interval schedules and has some problems with square-wave schedules.

  13. Atomic temporal interval relations in branching time: calculation and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anger, Frank D.; Ladkin, Peter B.; Rodriguez, Rita V.

    1991-03-01

    A practical method of reasoning about intervals in a branching-time model which is dense, unbounded, future-branching, without rejoining branches is presented. The discussion is based on heuristic constraint- propagation techniques using the relation algebra of binary temporal relations among the intervals over the branching-time model. This technique has been applied with success to models of intervals over linear time by Allen and others, and is of cubic-time complexity. To extend it to branding-time models, it is necessary to calculate compositions of the relations; thus, the table of compositions for the 'atomic' relations is computed, enabling the rapid determination of the composition of arbitrary relations, expressed as disjunctions or unions of the atomic relations.

  14. Unwinding the Molecular Basis of Interval and Circadian Timing

    PubMed Central

    Agostino, Patricia V.; Golombek, Diego A.; Meck, Warren H.

    2011-01-01

    Neural timing mechanisms range from the millisecond to diurnal, and possibly annual, frequencies. Two of the main processes under study are the interval timer (seconds-to-minute range) and the circadian clock. The molecular basis of these two mechanisms is the subject of intense research, as well as their possible relationship. This article summarizes data from studies investigating a possible interaction between interval and circadian timing and reviews the molecular basis of both mechanisms, including the discussion of the contribution from studies of genetically modified animal models. While there is currently no common neurochemical substrate for timing mechanisms in the brain, circadian modulation of interval timing suggests an interaction of different frequencies in cerebral temporal processes. PMID:22022309

  15. Effects of Gender on Stroke Rates, Critical Speed and Velocity of A 30-Min Swim in Young Swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Camila C.; Pelarigo, Jailton G.; Figueira, Tiago R.; Denadai, Benedito S.

    2007-01-01

    Our objective was to analyze the effect of gender on the relationship between stroke rates corresponding to critical speed (SRCS) and maximal speed of 30 min (SRS30) in young swimmers. Twenty two males (GM1) (Age = 15.4 ± 2.1 yr., Body mass = 63.7 ± 12.9 kg, Stature = 1.73 ± 0.09 m) and fourteen female (GF) swimmers (Age = 15.1 ± 1.6 yr., Body mass = 58.3 ± 8.8 kg, Stature = 1.65 ± 0.06 m) were studied. A subset of males (GM2) was matched to the GF by their velocity for a 30 min swim (S30). The critical speed (CS) was determined through the slope of the linear regression line between the distances (200 and 400 m) and participant’s respective times. CS was significantly higher than S30 in males (GM1 - 1.25 and 1.16 and GM2 - 1.21 and 1.12 m·s-1) and females (GF - 1.15 and 1.11 m·s-1). There was no significant difference between SRCS and SRS30 in males (GM1 - 34.16 and 32.32 and GM2 - 34.67 and 32.46 cycle·s-1, respectively) and females (GF - 34.18 and 33.67 cycle·s-1, respectively). There was a significant correlation between CS and S30 (GM1 - r = 0.89, GF - r = 0.94 and GM2 - r = 0.90) and between SRCS and SRS30 (GM1 - r = 0.89, GF - r = 0.80 and GM2 - r = 0.88). Thus, the relationship between SRCS and SRS30 is not influenced by gender, in swimmers with similar and different aerobic capacity levels. Key pointsThe main finding of this study was that the relationship between SRCS and SRS30, which is not dependent on gender, in swimmers with similar and different aerobic capacity levels.In swimmers who had different S30 values, CS was higher than S30 in boys and girls, and CS and S30 were higher in boys than girls, but SRCS and SRS30 were similar between genders.In swimmers who had similar S30 values, CS was higher than S30 in boys and girls. However, boys still presented higher values of CS than girls. SRCS was higher than SRS30 in boys, but these variables were similar in girls. SRCS and SRS30 were similar between genders.Girls presented lower submaximal

  16. A model of interval timing by neural integration.

    PubMed

    Simen, Patrick; Balci, Fuat; de Souza, Laura; Cohen, Jonathan D; Holmes, Philip

    2011-06-22

    We show that simple assumptions about neural processing lead to a model of interval timing as a temporal integration process, in which a noisy firing-rate representation of time rises linearly on average toward a response threshold over the course of an interval. Our assumptions include: that neural spike trains are approximately independent Poisson processes, that correlations among them can be largely cancelled by balancing excitation and inhibition, that neural populations can act as integrators, and that the objective of timed behavior is maximal accuracy and minimal variance. The model accounts for a variety of physiological and behavioral findings in rodents, monkeys, and humans, including ramping firing rates between the onset of reward-predicting cues and the receipt of delayed rewards, and universally scale-invariant response time distributions in interval timing tasks. It furthermore makes specific, well-supported predictions about the skewness of these distributions, a feature of timing data that is usually ignored. The model also incorporates a rapid (potentially one-shot) duration-learning procedure. Human behavioral data support the learning rule's predictions regarding learning speed in sequences of timed responses. These results suggest that simple, integration-based models should play as prominent a role in interval timing theory as they do in theories of perceptual decision making, and that a common neural mechanism may underlie both types of behavior.

  17. A model of interval timing by neural integration

    PubMed Central

    Simen, Patrick; Balci, Fuat; deSouza, Laura; Cohen, Jonathan D.; Holmes, Philip

    2011-01-01

    We show that simple assumptions about neural processing lead to a model of interval timing as a temporal integration process, in which a noisy firing-rate representation of time rises linearly on average toward a response threshold over the course of an interval. Our assumptions include: that neural spike trains are approximately independent Poisson processes; that correlations among them can be largely cancelled by balancing excitation and inhibition; that neural populations can act as integrators; and that the objective of timed behavior is maximal accuracy and minimal variance. The model accounts for a variety of physiological and behavioral findings in rodents, monkeys and humans, including ramping firing rates between the onset of reward-predicting cues and the receipt of delayed rewards, and universally scale-invariant response time distributions in interval timing tasks. It furthermore makes specific, well-supported predictions about the skewness of these distributions, a feature of timing data that is usually ignored. The model also incorporates a rapid (potentially one-shot) duration-learning procedure. Human behavioral data support the learning rule’s predictions regarding learning speed in sequences of timed responses. These results suggest that simple, integration-based models should play as prominent a role in interval timing theory as they do in theories of perceptual decision making, and that a common neural mechanism may underlie both types of behavior. PMID:21697374

  18. Motor and Executive Control in Repetitive Timing of Brief Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holm, Linus; Ullen, Fredrik; Madison, Guy

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the causal role of executive control functions in the production of brief time intervals by means of a concurrent task paradigm. To isolate the influence of executive functions on timing from motor coordination effects, we dissociated executive load from the number of effectors used in the dual task situation. In 3 experiments,…

  19. Systolic time interval data acquisition system. Specialized cardiovascular studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    The development of a data acquisition system for noninvasive measurement of systolic time intervals is described. R-R interval from the ECG determines instantaneous heart rate prior to the beat to be measured. Total electromechanical systole (Q-S2) is measured from the onset of the ECG Q-wave to the onset of the second heart sound (S2). Ejection time (ET or LVET) is measured from the onset of carotid upstroke to the incisure. Pre-ejection period (PEP) is computed by subtracting ET from Q-S2. PEP/ET ratio is computed directly.

  20. Systolic time intervals in normotensive and hypertensive human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Y L; Walters, W A

    1976-09-01

    Systolic time intervals were measured in 10 nonpregnant, 37 normotensive, and 18 hypertensive pregnant women in both supine and lateral positions. With all the subjects in the supine position, left ventricular ejection time (LVET) was shortened; the pre-ejection period (PEP) lengthened, and the PEP/LVET ratio increased in normotensive late pregnancy compared with the nonpregnant state. Similar alterations in systolic time intervals were observed in hypertensive women in both early and late pregnancy in the supine position. In normotensive women in early pregnancy, alterations in systolic time intervals were inconclusive. When normotensive women in late pregnancy were turned from the supine into the left lateral position, a prolongation of LVET and a decrease in the PEP/LVET ratio were observed. When hypertensive women in late pregnancy adopted the left lateral position, no significant alterations in systolic time intervals occurred. Isovolumetric contraction time (ICT) was prolonged only in the hypertensive pregnant women in the supine position. The study suggests that left ventricular performance is diminished in normotensive women in late pregnancy when supine but improves when they adopt the lateral position. In addition, hypertensive pregnant women show evidence of diminished left ventricular performance which is not improved in late pregnancy by assumption of the left lateral position.

  1. Modeling stream fish distributions using interval-censored detection times.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Mário; Filipe, Ana Filipa; Bardos, David C; Magalhães, Maria Filomena; Beja, Pedro

    2016-08-01

    Controlling for imperfect detection is important for developing species distribution models (SDMs). Occupancy-detection models based on the time needed to detect a species can be used to address this problem, but this is hindered when times to detection are not known precisely. Here, we extend the time-to-detection model to deal with detections recorded in time intervals and illustrate the method using a case study on stream fish distribution modeling. We collected electrofishing samples of six fish species across a Mediterranean watershed in Northeast Portugal. Based on a Bayesian hierarchical framework, we modeled the probability of water presence in stream channels, and the probability of species occupancy conditional on water presence, in relation to environmental and spatial variables. We also modeled time-to-first detection conditional on occupancy in relation to local factors, using modified interval-censored exponential survival models. Posterior distributions of occupancy probabilities derived from the models were used to produce species distribution maps. Simulations indicated that the modified time-to-detection model provided unbiased parameter estimates despite interval-censoring. There was a tendency for spatial variation in detection rates to be primarily influenced by depth and, to a lesser extent, stream width. Species occupancies were consistently affected by stream order, elevation, and annual precipitation. Bayesian P-values and AUCs indicated that all models had adequate fit and high discrimination ability, respectively. Mapping of predicted occupancy probabilities showed widespread distribution by most species, but uncertainty was generally higher in tributaries and upper reaches. The interval-censored time-to-detection model provides a practical solution to model occupancy-detection when detections are recorded in time intervals. This modeling framework is useful for developing SDMs while controlling for variation in detection rates, as it

  2. Anesthetic efficacy of a repeated intraosseous injection given 30 min following an inferior alveolar nerve block/intraosseous injection.

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, J.; Reader, A.; Nist, R.; Beck, M.; Meyers, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    To determine whether a repeated intraosseous (IO) injection would increase or prolong pulpal anesthesia, we measured the degree of anesthesia obtained by a repeated IO injection given 30 min following a combination inferior alveolar nerve block/intraosseous injection (IAN/IO) in mandibular second premolars and in first and second molars. Using a repeated-measures design, we randomly assigned 38 subjects to receive two combinations of injections at two separate appointments. The combinations were an IAN/IO injection followed approximately 30 min later by another IO injection of 0.9 ml of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine and a combination IAN/IO injection followed approximately 30 min later by a mock IO injection. The second premolar, first molar, and second molar were blindly tested with an Analytic Technology pulp tester at 2-min cycles for 120 min postinjection. Anesthesia was considered successful when two consecutive readings of 80 were obtained. One hundred percent of the subjects had lip numbness with IAN/IO and with IAN/IO plus repeated IO techniques. Rates of anesthetic success for the IAN/IO and for the IAN/IO plus repeated IO injection, respectively, were 100% and 97% for the second premolar, 95% and 95% for the first molar, and 87% and 87% for the second molar. The repeated IO injection increased pulpal anesthesia for approximately 14 min in the second premolar and for 6 min in the first molar, but no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05) were shown. In conclusion, the repeated IO injection of 0.9 ml of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine given 30 min following a combination IAN/IO injection did not significantly increase pulpal anesthesia in mandibular second premolars or in first and second molars. PMID:10483386

  3. The influence of carbohydrate mouth rinse on self-selected speeds during a 30-min treadmill run.

    PubMed

    Rollo, Ian; Williams, Clyde; Gant, Nicholas; Nute, Maria

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influences of a carbohydrate (CHO) mouth rinse on self-selected running speeds during a 30-min treadmill run. Ten endurance-trained men performed 2 trials, each involving a 10-min warm-up at 60% VO2max followed by a 30-min run. The run was performed on an automated treadmill that allowed the spontaneous selection of speeds without manual input. Participants were asked to run at speeds that equated to a rating of perceived exertion of 15, mouth rinsing with either a 6% CHO or taste-matched placebo (PLA) solution. In addition to recording self-selected speeds and total distance covered the authors assessed the runners' subjective feelings. The total distance covered was greater during the CHO than during the PLA trial (p < .05). Faster speeds selected during the first 5 min of exercise corresponded with enhanced feelings of pleasure when mouth rinsing with the CHO solution. Mouth rinsing with a CHO solution increased total distance covered during a self-selected 30-min run in comparison with mouth rinsing with a color- and taste-matched placebo.

  4. The Effects of Passive Cycling Exercise for 30 min on Cardiorespiratory Dynamics in Healthy Men.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Sayuri; Kime, Ryotaro; Osada, Takuya; Murase, Norio; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    An increase in the incidence rate of cardiovascular disease is attributed to high daily sitting time, while a drop in risk of cardiovascular disease comes from a decrease in daily sitting time, rather than an increase in physical activity levels. Although short-duration passive exercise increases energy expenditure and blood flow, few studies have reported on the responses of cardiorespiratory dynamics to long-duration passive exercise. The purpose of this study was to consider the effect of long-duration passive exercise for 20 min on cardiorespiratory and muscle oxygen dynamics. Eight healthy men continuously performed passive exercise using a cycle ergometer for 20 min at 50 rpm. Changes in oxygen uptake, cardiac output and muscle oxygenation were measured during passive cycling exercise. The oxygen uptake at 1 min after the start of passive exercise was significantly increased, compared to resting level, but subsequently returned to the same as resting level. Cardiac output showed no change during passive cycling exercise. Tissue oxygen saturation increased after the start of passive exercise and subsequently maintained steady state. These results suggest that the effect of increases in energy expenditure was not maintained by passive exercise for 20 min. In addition, it is likely that passive cycling exercise for 20 min has an effect on peripheral circulation, although the exercise seems to have no effect on central circulation.

  5. Department of Defense Precise Time and Time Interval program improvement plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowser, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The United States Naval Observatory is responsible for ensuring uniformity in precise time and time interval operations including measurements, the establishment of overall DOD requirements for time and time interval, and the accomplishment of objectives requiring precise time and time interval with minimum cost. An overview of the objectives, the approach to the problem, the schedule, and a status report, including significant findings relative to organizational relationships, current directives, principal PTTI users, and future requirements as currently identified by the users are presented.

  6. Is high-intensity interval training a time-efficient exercise strategy to improve health and fitness?

    PubMed

    Gillen, Jenna B; Gibala, Martin J

    2014-03-01

    Growing research suggests that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient exercise strategy to improve cardiorespiratory and metabolic health. "All out" HIIT models such as Wingate-type exercise are particularly effective, but this type of training may not be safe, tolerable or practical for many individuals. Recent studies, however, have revealed the potential for other models of HIIT, which may be more feasible but are still time-efficient, to stimulate adaptations similar to more demanding low-volume HIIT models and high-volume endurance-type training. As little as 3 HIIT sessions per week, involving ≤10 min of intense exercise within a time commitment of ≤30 min per session, including warm-up, recovery between intervals and cool down, has been shown to improve aerobic capacity, skeletal muscle oxidative capacity, exercise tolerance and markers of disease risk after only a few weeks in both healthy individuals and people with cardiometabolic disorders. Additional research is warranted, as studies conducted have been relatively short-term, with a limited number of measurements performed on small groups of subjects. However, given that "lack of time" remains one of the most commonly cited barriers to regular exercise participation, low-volume HIIT is a time-efficient exercise strategy that warrants consideration by health practitioners and fitness professionals.

  7. Brain activity during interval timing depends on sensory structure.

    PubMed

    Pfeuty, Micha; Ragot, Richard; Pouthas, Viviane

    2008-04-14

    Precise timing is crucial for accurate perception and action in the range of hundreds of milliseconds. One still unresolved question concerns the influence of sensory information content on timing mechanisms. Numerous studies have converged to suggest that the CNV (Contingent Negative Variation), a slow negative wave that develops between two events, notably reflects temporal processing of the interval between these two events. The present study aimed at investigating CNV activity in duration discrimination tasks using either filled (continuous tones) or empty intervals (silent periods bounded by two brief tones). Participants had to compare a test duration with a 600-ms standard. Time perception was markedly better in the 'empty' than in the 'filled' condition. Electrophysiological analyses performed on the longest test duration (794 ms) of the comparison phase revealed an effect of the sensory structure on both the CNV amplitude and CNV time-course. The CNV amplitude was larger for filled than for empty intervals, suggesting a superimposition of timing-dependent activity and sensory sustained activity. Furthermore, the CNV time-course paralleled the temporal structure of the memorized sensory event: for filled intervals, the CNV amplitude stopped increasing at 600 ms, i.e. the expected end of the continuous tone; for empty intervals, in contrast, the CNV amplitude precisely increased at 600 ms, i.e. the expected onset of the second brief tone. These results suggest that the CNV reflects the mental rehearsal of the memorized sensory event, in line with the idea that temporal processing in the sub-second range is based on sensory information.

  8. Daily meal anticipation: interaction of circadian and interval timing.

    PubMed

    Terman, M; Gibbon, J; Fairhurst, S; Waring, A

    1984-01-01

    Both short-interval and circadian timing systems support anticipatory response accelerations prior to food reinforcement. In the first case, the behavior pattern is determined by a scalar timing process with an arbitrary-reset property. In contrast, under daily cycles of food-availability, behavior reflects a self-sustaining oscillation. With rats as subjects, the concurrent operation of timing of both kinds was studied by addition of premeal auditory cues on the circadian baseline, in the absence of a day-night illumination cycle. Cues within both minute and hour ranges served to lower the level of premeal anticipatory responding, although exponential accelerations were similar to the uncued case. Cues within the minutes range yielded interval-timing functions that reflected approximate superposition. Cues within the hours range suppressed respondings at their outset, in proportion to cue duration. When one of the shorter cues was suddenly lengthened, short-interval accelerations appeared at inappropriate circadian phases. When a premeal cue was extended through mealtime, anticipation rates increased markedly, suggesting that cue termination at the start of mealtime is a potent anchor for premeal anticipation regardless of cue duration. By use of meal-omission probes without external cues, peak rates were located after the onset of expected mealtime, often near its termination. The results suggest interactions between the scalar interval timer and the circadian anticipation timer, as modulated by the circadian free-run timer.

  9. The behavioral economics of choice and interval timing.

    PubMed

    Jozefowiez, J; Staddon, J E R; Cerutti, D T

    2009-07-01

    The authors propose a simple behavioral economic model (BEM) describing how reinforcement and interval timing interact. The model assumes a Weber-law-compliant logarithmic representation of time. Associated with each represented time value are the payoffs that have been obtained for each possible response. At a given real time, the response with the highest payoff is emitted. The model accounts for a wide range of data from procedures such as simple bisection, metacognition in animals, economic effects in free-operant psychophysical procedures, and paradoxical choice in double-bisection procedures. Although it assumes logarithmic time representation, it can also account for data from the time-left procedure usually cited in support of linear time representation. It encounters some difficulties in complex free-operant choice procedures, such as concurrent mixed fixed-interval schedules as well as some of the data on double bisection, which may involve additional processes. Overall, BEM provides a theoretical framework for understanding how reinforcement and interval timing work together to determine choice between temporally differentiated reinforcers.

  10. Individual variability in cardiac biomarker release after 30 min of high-intensity rowing in elite and amateur athletes.

    PubMed

    Legaz-Arrese, Alejandro; López-Laval, Isaac; George, Keith; Puente-Lanzarote, Juan José; Moliner-Urdiales, Diego; Ayala-Tajuelo, Vicente Javier; Mayolas-Pi, Carmen; Reverter-Masià, Joaquín

    2015-09-01

    This study had two objectives: (i) to examine individual variation in the pattern of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) release in response to high-intensity rowing exercise, and (ii) to establish whether individual heterogeneity in biomarker appearance was influenced by athletic status (elite vs. amateur). We examined cTnI and NT-proBNP in 18 elite and 14 amateur rowers before and 5 min, 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h after a 30-min maximal rowing test. Compared with pre-exercise levels, peak postexercise cTnI (pre: 0.014 ± 0.030 μg·L(-1); peak post: 0.058 ± 0.091 μg·L(-1); p = 0.000) and NT-proBNP (pre: 15 ± 11 ng·L(-1); peak post: 31 ± 19 ng·L(-1); p = 0.000) were elevated. Substantial individual heterogeneity in peak and time-course data was noted for cTnI. Peak cTnI exceeded the upper reference limit (URL) in 9 elite and 3 amateur rowers. No rower exceeded the URL for NT-proBNP. Elite rowers had higher baseline (0.019 ± 0.038 vs. 0.008 ± 0.015 μg·L(-1); p = 0.003) and peak postexercise cTnI (0.080 ± 0.115 vs. 0.030 ± 0.029 μg·L(-1); p = 0.022) than amateur rowers, but the change with exercise was similar between groups. There were no significant differences in baseline and peak postexercise NT-proBNP between groups. In summary, marked individuality in the cTnI response to a short but high-intensity rowing bout was observed. Athletic status did not seem to affect the change in cardiac biomarkers in response to high-intensity exercise. PMID:26307519

  11. Interval estimation for uncertain systems with time-varying delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Denis; Perruquetti, Wilfrid; Richard, Jean-Pierre

    2013-10-01

    The estimation problem for uncertain time-delay systems is addressed. A design method of reduced-order interval observers is proposed. The observer estimates the set of admissible values (the interval) for the state at each instant of time. The cases of known fixed delays and uncertain time-varying delays are analysed. The proposed approach can be applied to linear delay systems and nonlinear time-delay systems in the output canonical form. It involves the properties of quasi-monotone/Metzler/cooperative systems. In this framework, it is shown that if under a suitable coordinate transformation the delay-free subsystem is cooperative, then the delayed estimation error dynamics inherits this property. The conditions to find the observer gains are formulated in the form of LMI. The framework efficiency is demonstrated on examples of nonlinear systems.

  12. Versatile all-digital time interval measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyhlidal, David; Cech, Miroslav

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes a design and performance of a versatile all-digital time interval measuring system. The measurement method is based on an interpolation principle. In this principle the time interval is first roughly digitized by a coarse counter driven by a high stability reference clock and the fractions between the clock periods are measured by two Time-to-Digital Converter chips TDC-GPX manufactured by Acam messelectronic. Control circuits allow programmable customization of the system to satisfy many applications such as laser range finding, event counting, or time-of-flight measurements in various physics experiments. The system has two reference clocks inputs and two independent channels for measuring start and stop events. Only one 40 MHz reference is required for the measurement. The second reference can be, for example, 1 PPS (Pulse per Second) signal from a GPS (Global Positioning System) to time tag events. Time intervals are measured using the highest resolution mode of the TDC-GPX chips. The resolution of each chip is software programmable and is PLL (Phase Locked Loop) stabilized against temperature and voltage variations. The system can achieve a timing resolution better than 15 ps rms with up to 90 kHz repetition rate. The time interval measurement range is from 0 ps up to 1 second. The power consumption of the whole system is 18 W including an embedded computer board and an LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) screen. The embedded computer controls the whole system, collects and evaluates measurement data and with the display provides a user interface. The system is implemented using commercially available components.

  13. Effect of clozapine on interval timing and working memory for time in the peak-interval procedure with gaps.

    PubMed

    Buhusi, Catalin V; Meck, Warren H

    2007-02-22

    Previous research indicates that dopamine controls both the speed of an internal clock [Maricq, A.V., Church, R.M., 1983. The differential effects of haloperidol and methamphetamine on time estimation in the rat. Psychopharmacology 79, 10-15] and sharing of resources between the timer and other cognitive processes [Buhusi, C.V., 2003. Dopaminergic mechanisms of interval timing and attention. In: Meck, W.H. (Ed.), Functional and Neural Mechanisms of Interval Timing. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, pp. 317-338]. For example, dopamine agonist methamphetamine increases the speed of an internal clock and resets timing after a gap, while dopamine antagonist haloperidol decreases the speed of an internal clock and stops timing during a gap [Buhusi, C.V., Meck, W.H., 2002. Differential effects of methamphetamine and haloperidol on the control of an internal clock. Behav. Neurosci. 116, 291-297]. Using a 20-s peak-interval procedure with gaps we examined the acute effects of clozapine (2.0mg/kg i.p.), which exerts differential effects on dopamine and serotonin in the cortex and striatum, two brain areas involved in interval timing and working memory. Relative to saline, clozapine injections shifted the response functions leftward both in trials with and without gaps, suggesting that clozapine increased the speed of an internal clock and facilitated the maintenance of the pre-gap interval in working memory. These results suggest that clozapine exerts effects in different brain areas in a manner that allows for the pharmacological separation of clock speed and working memory as a function of peak trials without and with gaps.

  14. Systolic time intervals after a seven-day orbital flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groza, P.; Vrâncianu, R.; Lazǎr, M.; Baevski, R. M.; Funtova, V. L.

    Heart rate, systolic time intervals (pre-ejection period, left ventricular ejection time), ejection fraction, stroke volume and QT interval of two cosmonauts (Leonid Popov - L.P. and Dumitru Prunariu - D.P.) were studied before, during, and after an ergometric bicycle exercise test performed before and after the seven-day Soviet-Romanian orbital flight on the Soyuz 40 - Salyut 6 Complex in May 1981. For this purpose one precordial electrocardiogram (ecg) and the ear photodensitogram (den) were recorded stimulaneously. The method used permitted recording even during exercise, Ecg and den signals were stored on magnetic tape, processed in an analogue device and in a digital computer. The data obtained after landing suggest a slight cardiac deconditioning in L.P., demonstrated especially by augmentation of the pre-ejection period, which was unchanged in D.P. corresponding to a sympathoadrenergic hypertonia. The seven-day orbital flight has not produced important cardiovascular changes.

  15. Systolic time intervals at rest and during exercise in sportsmen.

    PubMed

    Franculescu, V; Sallam, E B; Otoiu, M E

    1982-01-01

    The authors using non-invasive methods, have studied left ventricular performance at rest and during training of sportsmen, taking into consideration the period of activity (during resting, training and competition periods). The studied subjects belonged to three groups (football, basketball and athletics). They all had more than 5 years of performance training. The obtained values are compared with data obtained from a control group of untrained subjects in the same age group. Determination of systolic time intervals has been done using mechanophonocardiographic tracing, registered at rest and during various exercise intensities, measuring PEP, LVET and Weissler ratio. Obtained data have been correlated with oxygen consumption, heart rate and blood pressure. Systolic time intervals measured at rest have been compared with the values obtained by Weissler from untrained subjects. Regression equations are given for values obtained in exercise tests in the case of sportsmen as well as for sedentary persons. In conclusion the authors stress the importance of systolic time intervals determinations for indirect estimation of left ventricular performance at rest and during exercise tests. From the presented data results the importance of PEP and Weissler ratio, which parametres the authors recommend to be systematically determined in the case of performance sportsmen. The most significant modifications are recorded when values are compared for the same subject during all the three periods of activity.

  16. Perception of acoustically presented time series with varied intervals.

    PubMed

    Wackermann, Jiří; Pacer, Jakob; Wittmann, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Data from three experiments on serial perception of temporal intervals in the supra-second domain are reported. Sequences of short acoustic signals ("pips") separated by periods of silence were presented to the observers. Two types of time series, geometric or alternating, were used, where the modulus 1+δ of the inter-pip series and the base duration Tb (range from 1.1 to 6s) were varied as independent parameters. The observers had to judge whether the series were accelerating, decelerating, or uniform (3 paradigm), or to distinguish regular from irregular sequences (2 paradigm). "Intervals of subjective uniformity" (isus) were obtained by fitting Gaussian psychometric functions to individual subjects' responses. Progression towards longer base durations (Tb=4.4 or 6s) shifts the isus towards negative δs, i.e., accelerating series. This finding is compatible with the phenomenon of "subjective shortening" of past temporal intervals, which is naturally accounted for by the lossy integration model of internal time representation. The opposite effect observed for short durations (Tb=1.1 or 1.5s) remains unexplained by the lossy integration model, and presents a challenge for further research.

  17. Interval time-place learning in young children.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Christina M; Hallett, Darcy; Murphy, Melanie; Fitzpatrick, Cheryll L; Bakhtiar, Aishah

    2012-10-01

    While previous research has investigated the ability of animals to learn the spatial and temporal contingencies of biologically significant events (known as time-place learning), this ability has not been studied in humans. Children ranging from 5 to 10 years old were tested on a modified interval time-place learning task using a touchscreen computer. Results demonstrate the children were able to quickly learn both the timing and the sequence of this task. Despite a lack of anticipation on baseline trials, the children continued to follow the spatio-temporal contingencies in probe sessions where these contingencies were removed. Performance on the probe sessions provide strong evidence that the children had learned the spatio-temporal contingencies. Future research is needed to determine what age-related changes in iTPL occur. Furthermore, it is argued that this procedure can be used to extend interval timing in research in children, including, but not limited to, investigation of scalar timing with longer durations than have previously been investigated.

  18. Design of time interval generator based on hybrid counting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuan; Wang, Zhaoqi; Lu, Houbing; Chen, Lian; Jin, Ge

    2016-10-01

    Time Interval Generators (TIGs) are frequently used for the characterizations or timing operations of instruments in particle physics experiments. Though some "off-the-shelf" TIGs can be employed, the necessity of a custom test system or control system makes the TIGs, being implemented in a programmable device desirable. Nowadays, the feasibility of using Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) to implement particle physics instrumentation has been validated in the design of Time-to-Digital Converters (TDCs) for precise time measurement. The FPGA-TDC technique is based on the architectures of Tapped Delay Line (TDL), whose delay cells are down to few tens of picosecond. In this case, FPGA-based TIGs with high delay step are preferable allowing the implementation of customized particle physics instrumentations and other utilities on the same FPGA device. A hybrid counting method for designing TIGs with both high resolution and wide range is presented in this paper. The combination of two different counting methods realizing an integratable TIG is described in detail. A specially designed multiplexer for tap selection is emphatically introduced. The special structure of the multiplexer is devised for minimizing the different additional delays caused by the unpredictable routings from different taps to the output. A Kintex-7 FPGA is used for the hybrid counting-based implementation of a TIG, providing a resolution up to 11 ps and an interval range up to 8 s.

  19. Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Application and Planning Meeting. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardrip, S. C. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Thirty eight papers are presented addressing various aspects of precise time and time interval applications. Areas discussed include: past accomplishments; state of the art systems; new and useful applications, procedures, and techniques; and fruitful directions for research efforts.

  20. Probing interval timing with scalp-recorded electroencephalography (EEG).

    PubMed

    Ng, Kwun Kei; Penney, Trevor B

    2014-01-01

    Humans, and other animals, are able to easily learn the durations of events and the temporal relationships among them in spite of the absence of a dedicated sensory organ for time. This chapter summarizes the investigation of timing and time perception using scalp-recorded electroencephalography (EEG), a non-invasive technique that measures brain electrical potentials on a millisecond time scale. Over the past several decades, much has been learned about interval timing through the examination of the characteristic features of averaged EEG signals (i.e., event-related potentials, ERPs) elicited in timing paradigms. For example, the mismatch negativity (MMN) and omission potential (OP) have been used to study implicit and explicit timing, respectively, the P300 has been used to investigate temporal memory updating, and the contingent negative variation (CNV) has been used as an index of temporal decision making. In sum, EEG measures provide biomarkers of temporal processing that allow researchers to probe the cognitive and neural substrates underlying time perception.

  1. Induction of flowering in tropical trees by a 30-min reduction in photoperiod: evidence from field observations and herbarium specimens.

    PubMed

    Rivera, G; Borchert, R

    2001-03-01

    During the late rainy season in October 1997 we observed. over a range of >100 km, the highly synchronous emergence of flower buds in several deciduous tree species of the semi-deciduous tropical forest in Guanacaste, Costa Rica. Synchronous flowering soon after the rapid decline in day length around the September equinox and in the absence of any notable climatic cues suggested flower induction by declining photoperiod. By combining field observations and the analysis of flowering herbarium collections, we established highly synchronous flowering periods with low interannual and latitudinal variation predicted for photoperiodic flower induction for more than 25 tree species and a few herbs. We describe morphogenetic changes at the shoot apex of three species during flower induction and the suppression and induction of flowering in several herbaceous species by experimental daylight extension. The combined observations provide strong, mainly indirect evidence for photoperiodic induction of flowering in many tropical tree species. At low latitudes with annual variation in day length of 1 hour, flower induction must be caused by a decline in photoperiod of 30 min or less. This is the first report of photoperiodic control of flowering in trees.

  2. Reproducibility and reliability of fetal cardiac time intervals using magnetocardiography.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, P; Lange, S; Klein, A; Geue, D; Zhang, Y; Krause, H J; Grönemeyer, D

    2004-04-01

    We investigated several factors which may affect the accuracy of fetal cardiac time intervals (CTI) determined in magnetocardiographic (MCG) recordings: observer differences, the number of available recording sites and the type of sensor used in acquisition. In 253 fetal MCG recordings, acquired using different biomagnetometer devices between the 15th and 42nd weeks of gestation, P-wave, QRS complex and T-wave onsets and ends were identified in signal averaged data sets independently by different observers. Using a defined procedure for setting signal events, interobserver reliability was high. Increasing the number of registration sites led to more accurate identification of the events. The differences in wave morphology between magnetometer and gradiometer configurations led to deviations in timing whereas the differences between low and high temperature devices seemed to be primarily due to noise. Signal-to-noise ratio played an important overall role in the accurate determination of CTI and changes in signal amplitude associated with fetal maturation may largely explain the effects of gestational age on reproducibility. As fetal CTI may be of value in the identification of pathologies such as intrauterine growth retardation or fetal cardiac hypertrophy, their reliable estimation will be enhanced by strategies which take these factors into account.

  3. Central tendency effects in time interval reproduction in autism

    PubMed Central

    Karaminis, Themelis; Cicchini, Guido Marco; Neil, Louise; Cappagli, Giulia; Aagten-Murphy, David; Burr, David; Pellicano, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Central tendency, the tendency of judgements of quantities (lengths, durations etc.) to gravitate towards their mean, is one of the most robust perceptual effects. A Bayesian account has recently suggested that central tendency reflects the integration of noisy sensory estimates with prior knowledge representations of a mean stimulus, serving to improve performance. The process is flexible, so prior knowledge is weighted more heavily when sensory estimates are imprecise, requiring more integration to reduce noise. In this study we measure central tendency in autism to evaluate a recent theoretical hypothesis suggesting that autistic perception relies less on prior knowledge representations than typical perception. If true, autistic children should show reduced central tendency than theoretically predicted from their temporal resolution. We tested autistic and age- and ability-matched typical children in two child-friendly tasks: (1) a time interval reproduction task, measuring central tendency in the temporal domain; and (2) a time discrimination task, assessing temporal resolution. Central tendency reduced with age in typical development, while temporal resolution improved. Autistic children performed far worse in temporal discrimination than the matched controls. Computational simulations suggested that central tendency was much less in autistic children than predicted by theoretical modelling, given their poor temporal resolution. PMID:27349722

  4. A Model for Residence Time in Concurrent Variable Interval Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navakatikyan, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    A component-functions model of choice behavior is proposed for performance on interdependent concurrent variable-interval (VI) variable-interval schedules based on the product of two component functions, one that enhances behavior and one that reduces behavior. The model is the solution to the symmetrical pair of differential equations describing…

  5. Proceedings of the Fourth Precise Time and Time Interval Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acrivos, H. N. (Compiler); Wardrip, S. C. (Compiler)

    1972-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on Precise Time and Time Interval Planning are presented. The subjects discussed include the following: (1) satellite timing techniques, precision frequency sources, and very long baseline interferometry, (2) frequency stabilities and communications, and (3) very low frequency and ultrahigh frequency propagation and use. Emphasis is placed on the accuracy of time discrimination obtained with time measuring equipment and specific applications of time measurement to military operations and civilian research projects.

  6. On selection of the optimal data time interval for real-time hydrological forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Han, D.

    2013-09-01

    With the advancement in modern telemetry and communication technologies, hydrological data can be collected with an increasingly higher sampling rate. An important issue deserving attention from the hydrological community is which suitable time interval of the model input data should be chosen in hydrological forecasting. Such a problem has long been recognised in the control engineering community but is a largely ignored topic in operational applications of hydrological forecasting. In this study, the intrinsic properties of rainfall-runoff data with different time intervals are first investigated from the perspectives of the sampling theorem and the information loss using the discrete wavelet transform tool. It is found that rainfall signals with very high sampling rates may not always improve the accuracy of rainfall-runoff modelling due to the catchment low-pass-filtering effect. To further investigate the impact of a data time interval in real-time forecasting, a real-time forecasting system is constructed by incorporating the probability distributed model (PDM) with a real-time updating scheme, the autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) model. Case studies are then carried out on four UK catchments with different concentration times for real-time flow forecasting using data with different time intervals of 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min. A positive relation is found between the forecast lead time and the optimal choice of the data time interval, which is also highly dependent on the catchment concentration time. Finally, based on the conclusions from the case studies, a hypothetical pattern is proposed in three-dimensional coordinates to describe the general impact of the data time interval and to provide implications of the selection of the optimal time interval in real-time hydrological forecasting. Although nowadays most operational hydrological systems still have low data sampling rates (daily or hourly), the future is that higher sampling rates will become

  7. Assessment of histological changes in antemortem gingival tissues fixed at various time intervals: A method of estimation of postmortem interval

    PubMed Central

    Mahalakshmi, V.; Gururaj, N.; Sathya, R.; Sabarinath, T. R.; Sivapathasundharam, B.; Kalaiselvan, S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Conventional methods to estimate the time of death are adequate, but a histological method is yet unavailable to assess postmortem interval (PMI). The autolytic changes that occur in an unfixed antemortem gingival tissue which reflects histologically at an early stage are similar to changes that occur in postmortem tissue. These histological changes can be used and applied in a postmortem tissue as a method to assess PMI. Aims: The aim of the study is to assess the histological changes in a gingival tissue left unfixed for various time intervals and to correlate the findings with duration. Materials and Methods: Sixty gingival tissues obtained from patients following therapeutic extractions, impactions, gingivectomy and crown lengthening procedures were used. Each tissue obtained was divided into two pieces and labeled as “A”, the control group and “ B” the study group. Tissues labeled “A” were fixed in 10% formalin immediately and tissues labeled“B” were placed in closed containers and fixed after 15, 30, 45 min, 1, 2, and 4 h time interval. Of the sixty tissues in the study group “ B”, ten tissues were used for each time interval under investigation. All the fixed tissues were processed, stained, assessed, and analyzed statistically using Pearson correlation and regression analysis. Results: Histological changes appear at 15 min in an unfixed antemortem tissue. At 2 h interval, all layers with few cells in basal cell layer are involved. At 4 h interval, loss of stratification and complete homogenization of cells in the superficial layers with prominent changes in basal layer is evident. There was a positive correlation (<1.0) between the time interval and the appearance of the histological changes. Conclusion: Histological changes such as complete homogenization of cells in superficial layers and loss of epithelial architecture at 4 h in unfixed antemortem tissue may be used as a criterion to estimate PMI, after further studies

  8. The 26th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, Richard (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document is a compilation of technical papers presented at the 26th Annual PTTI Applications and Planning Meeting. Papers are in the following categories: (1) Recent developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based frequency standards, and in cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; (2) International and transnational applications of Precise Time and Time Interval technology with emphasis on satellite laser tracking, GLONASS timing, intercomparison of national time scales and international telecommunications; (3) Applications of Precise Time and Time Interval technology to the telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; (4) Applications of PTTI technology to evolving military communications and navigation systems; and (5) Dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MILSTAR, LORAN, and synchronous communications satellites.

  9. Time and memory: towards a pacemaker-free theory of interval timing.

    PubMed

    Staddon, J E; Higa, J J

    1999-03-01

    A popular view of interval timing in animals is that it is driven by a discrete pacemaker-accumulator mechanism that yields a linear scale for encoded time. But these mechanisms are fundamentally at odds with the Weber law property of interval timing, and experiments that support linear encoded time can be interpreted in other ways. We argue that the dominant pacemaker-accumulator theory, scalar expectancy theory (SET), fails to explain some basic properties of operant behavior on interval-timing procedures and can only accommodate a number of discrepancies by modifications and elaborations that raise questions about the entire theory. We propose an alternative that is based on principles of memory dynamics derived from the multiple-time-scale (MTS) model of habituation. The MTS timing model can account for data from a wide variety of time-related experiments: proportional and Weber law temporal discrimination, transient as well as persistent effects of reinforcement omission and reinforcement magnitude, bisection, the discrimination of relative as well as absolute duration, and the choose-short effect and its analogue in number-discrimination experiments. Resemblances between timing and counting are an automatic consequence of the model. We also argue that the transient and persistent effects of drugs on time estimates can be interpreted as well within MTS theory as in SET. Recent real-time physiological data conform in surprising detail to the assumptions of the MTS habituation model. Comparisons between the two views suggest a number of novel experiments.

  10. Effects of wait-time and intertrial interval durations on learning by children with multiple handicaps.

    PubMed Central

    Valcante, G; Roberson, W; Reid, W R; Wolking, W D

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the influence of teacher wait-time and intertrial interval durations on the performance of 4 multiply handicapped students during instruction in 10 skills. Four experimental conditions were evaluated: long wait-time and long intertrial interval, long wait-time and short intertrial interval, short wait-time and long intertrial interval, and short wait-time and short intertrial interval. Instructors attempted to keep short intervals as close as possible to 1 s and long intervals as close as possible to 10 s for both variables. Results showed that student performance was superior under the long wait-time conditions irrespective of the length of the intertrial interval. PMID:2523372

  11. Interresponse Time Structures in Variable-Ratio and Variable-Interval Schedules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Matthew T.; Hill, Jade; Palya, William L.

    2008-01-01

    The interresponse-time structures of pigeon key pecking were examined under variable-ratio, variable-interval, and variable-interval plus linear feedback schedules. Whereas the variable-ratio and variable-interval plus linear feedback schedules generally resulted in a distinct group of short interresponse times and a broad distribution of longer…

  12. Effects of the time interval between fusion and activation on in vitro rabbit nuclear transfer efficiency when nuclear donor cells are derived from older adults.

    PubMed

    Cervera, R P; Garcia-Ximénez, F

    2004-05-01

    Cloning older adult rabbits can serve as a model in animal breeding, biodiversity preservation and in human therapeutic cloning. To establish the required exposure time of fibroblasts from these kind of animals to reprogramming factors, in the present study three different time intervals between fusion and activation were tested (30 min, 30-ADF group; 60 min, 60-ADF group; and 90 min, 90-ADF group). Vitrified epithelial fibroblasts derived from four older adult rabbit females (D1, D2, D3 and D4) and cultured from passages 0 to 4 were used as nuclear donors. Nuclear status of reconstructed embryos was not evaluated. No differences were observed in blastocyst rate (30-ADF 21% vs 60-ADF 19% vs 90-ADF 18%). Differences in hatching rates did not reach significance (30-ADF 11% vs 60-ADF 18% vs 90-ADF 18%). However, in the 60- and 90-ADF groups, embryos reached the blastocyst stage earlier than in the 30-ADF group (day 4: 40% and 50% vs 8%; p > 0.05). Moreover, the quality of blastocysts (good vs poor) was lower in the 30-ADF group (good: 30-ADF 38% vs 60-ADF 90% vs 90-ADF 90%; p > 0.05). Overall, these results suggest an unfavourable effect of the shortest exposure time tested (30 min). Differences between specimen origins were detected (blastocyst and hatching rates: D2 (26%; 25%) and D4 (25%; 27%) vs D1 (10%; 11%) and D3 (12%; 12%)), but significance were not reached. Effect of culture passage was not detected in any parameter studied. PMID:15460108

  13. The 25th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, Richard L. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Papers in the following categories are presented: recent developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based frequency standards, and in cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; international and transnational applications of precise time and time interval (PTTI) technology with emphasis on satellite laser tracking networks, GLONASS timing, intercomparison of national time scales and international telecommunication; applications of PTTI technology to the telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; application of PTTI technology to evolving military communications and navigation systems; and dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MILSTAR, LORAN, and synchronous communications satellites.

  14. The 22nd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, Richard L. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Papers presented at the 22nd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting are compiled. The following subject areas are covered: Rb, Cs, and H-based frequency standards and cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; satellite laser tracking networks, GLONASS timing, intercomparison of national time scales and international telecommunications; telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; military communications and navigation systems; and dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MILSTAR, LORAN, and synchronous communication satellites.

  15. The 22nd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Sydnor, R.L.

    1990-05-01

    Papers presented at the 22nd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting are compiled. The following subject areas are covered: Rb, Cs, and H-based frequency standards and cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; satellite laser tracking networks, GLONASS timing, intercomparison of national time scales and international telecommunications; telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; military communications and navigation systems; and dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MIL<550>STAR, LORAN, and synchronous communication satellites.

  16. Proceedings of the Thirteenth Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardrip, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    Proceedings of an annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting are summarized. A transparent view of the state-of-the-art, an opportunity to express needs, a view of important future trends, and a review of relevant past accomplishments were considered for PTTI managers, systems engineers, and program planner. Specific aims were: to provide PTTI users with new and useful applications, procedures, and techniques; to allow the PTTI researcher to better assess fruitful directions for research efforts.

  17. Proceedings of the 7th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The Proceedings contain the papers presented at the Seventh Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting and the edited record of the discussion period following each paper. This meeting provided a forum to promote more effective, efficient, economical and skillful applications of PTTI technology to the many problem areas to which PTTI offers solutions. Specifically the purpose of the meeting is to: disseminate, coordinate, and exchange practical information associated with precise time and frequency; acquaint systems engineers, technicians and managers with precise time and frequency technology and its applications; and review present and future requirements for PTTI.

  18. Relationship between the Initial Systolic Time Interval and RR-interval during an exercise stimulus measured with Impedance Cardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoekstra, Femke; Habers, Esther; Janssen, Thomas W. J.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Meijer, Jan H.

    2010-04-01

    The Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI), obtained from the electrocardiogram and impedance cardiogram, is considered to be a measure for the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart and reflects an active period of the heart cycle. The relationship between ISTI and the total heart cycle (RR-interval) was studied in three groups of young, healthy volunteers: low, moderately and highly trained subjects. The three groups were exposed to an exercise stimulus on a cycle ergometer with an increasing work load to increase the heart rate. ISTI was decreased with decreasing RR-interval. However, the relative proportion of ISTI, ISTI/RR, was found to increase with decreasing RR-interval. This relationship was found to be inversely proportional. The rate of this increase in ISTI/RR was significantly higher in highly trained subjects. Also, over the whole range of heart rates ISTI was longer in these subjects. It is concluded that ISTI can be used to evaluate cardiac performance during physical exercise non-invasively and in an extramural setting.

  19. MK-801 and memantine act differently on short-term memory tested with different time-intervals in the Morris water maze test.

    PubMed

    Duda, Weronika; Wesierska, Malgorzata; Ostaszewski, Pawel; Vales, Karel; Nekovarova, Tereza; Stuchlik, Ales

    2016-09-15

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) play a crucial role in spatial memory formation. In neuropharmacological studies their functioning strongly depends on testing conditions and the dosage of NMDAR antagonists. The aim of this study was to assess the immediate effects of NMDAR block by (+)MK-801 or memantine on short-term allothetic memory. Memory was tested in a working memory version of the Morris water maze test. In our version of the test, rats underwent one day of training with 8 trials, and then three experimental days when rats were injected intraperitoneally with low- 5 (MeL), high - 20 (MeH) mg/kg memantine, 0.1mg/kg MK-801 or 1ml/kg saline (SAL) 30min before testing, for three consecutive days. On each experimental day there was just one acquisition and one test trial, with an inter-trial interval of 5 or 15min. During training the hidden platform was relocated after each trial and during the experiment after each day. The follow-up effect was assessed on day 9. Intact rats improved their spatial memory across the one training day. With a 5min interval MeH rats had longer latency then all rats during retrieval. With a 15min interval the MeH rats presented worse working memory measured as retrieval minus acquisition trial for path than SAL and MeL and for latency than MeL rats. MK-801 rats had longer latency than SAL during retrieval. Thus, the high dose of memantine, contrary to low dose of MK-801 disrupts short-term memory independent on the time interval between acquisition and retrieval. This shows that short-term memory tested in a working memory version of water maze is sensitive to several parameters: i.e., NMDA receptor antagonist type, dosage and the time interval between learning and testing.

  20. Effects of a reduced time-out interval on compliance with the time-out instruction.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Jeanne M; Vollmer, Timothy R; Yakich, Theresa M; Van Camp, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Time-out is a negative punishment procedure that parents and teachers commonly use to reduce problem behavior; however, specific time-out parameters have not been evaluated adequately. One parameter that has received relatively little attention in the literature is the mode of administration (verbal or physical) of time-out. In this study, we evaluated a procedure designed to reduce problem behavior and increase compliance with the verbal instruction to go to time-out. Specifically, we reduced the time-out interval contingent on compliance with the time-out instruction. Six preschool-aged boys participated in the study. Time-out effectively reduced the problem behavior of all 6 participants, and the procedure to increase compliance with the time-out instruction was effective for 4 of 6 participants. PMID:24114153

  1. Effects of a reduced time-out interval on compliance with the time-out instruction.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Jeanne M; Vollmer, Timothy R; Yakich, Theresa M; Van Camp, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Time-out is a negative punishment procedure that parents and teachers commonly use to reduce problem behavior; however, specific time-out parameters have not been evaluated adequately. One parameter that has received relatively little attention in the literature is the mode of administration (verbal or physical) of time-out. In this study, we evaluated a procedure designed to reduce problem behavior and increase compliance with the verbal instruction to go to time-out. Specifically, we reduced the time-out interval contingent on compliance with the time-out instruction. Six preschool-aged boys participated in the study. Time-out effectively reduced the problem behavior of all 6 participants, and the procedure to increase compliance with the time-out instruction was effective for 4 of 6 participants.

  2. 27th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, Richard L. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This document is a compilation of technical papers presented at the 27th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting, held November 29 - December 1, 1995 at San Diego, CA. Papers are in the following categories: Recent developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based frequency standards; and in cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; International and transnational applications of PTTI technology with emphasis on satellite laser tracking, GLONASS timing, intercomparison of national time scales and international telecommunications; Applications of PTTI technology to the telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; Applications of PTTI technology to evolving military communications and navigation systems; and Dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of Global Positioning System (GPS), Global Satellite Navigation System (GLONASS), MILSTAR, LORAN, and synchronous communications satellites.

  3. Proceedings of the 30th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Systems and Applications Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breakiron, Lee A. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This document is a compilation of technical papers presented at the 30th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Systems and Applications Meeting held 1-3 December 1998 at the Hyatt Regency Hotel at Reston Town Center, Reston, Virginia. Papers are in the following categories: 1) Recent developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based atomic frequency standards, and in trapped-ion and space clock technology; 2) National and international applications of PTTI technology with emphasis on GPS and GLONASS timing, atomic time scales, and telecommunications; 3) Applications of PTTI technology to evolving military navigation and communication systems; geodesy; aviation; and pulsars; and 4) Dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, geosynchronous communication satellites, computer networks, WAAS, and LORAN.

  4. The 24th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    A compilation of technical papers presented at the 24th Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting held in Dec. 1992 is presented. Papers are in the following categories: recent developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based frequency standards, and in cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; international and transnational applications of PTTI technology with emphasis on satellite laser tracking networks, GLONASS timing, intercomparison of national time scales, and international telecommunications; applications of PTTI technology to the telecommunications, power distribution, and platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; applications of PTTI technology to evolving military communications and navigation systems; and dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MILSTAR, Loran, and synchronous communications satellites.

  5. Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, Richard L. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    A compilation of technical papers, from the 23rd annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting, is presented. Papers were given in the following categories: (1) developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based frequency standards, and in cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; (2) international and transnational applications of PTTI technology with emphasis on satellite laser tracking networks, GLONASS timing, comparison of national time scales and international communications; (3) applications of PTTI technology to the telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; (4) applications of PTTI technology to evolving military communications and navigation systems; and (5) dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MILSTAR, Loran, and synchronous communications satellites.

  6. Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Sydnor, R.L.

    1992-07-01

    A compilation of technical papers, from the 23rd annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting, is presented. Papers were given in the following categories: (1) developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based frequency standards, and in cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; (2) international and transnational applications of PTTI technology with emphasis on satellite laser tracking networks, GLONASS timing, comparison of national time scales and international communications; (3) applications of PTTI technology to the telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; (4) applications of PTTI technology to evolving military communications and navigation systems; and (5) dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MILSTAR, Loran, and synchronous communications satellites.

  7. Brain Bases of Working Memory for Time Intervals in Rhythmic Sequences.

    PubMed

    Teki, Sundeep; Griffiths, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    Perception of auditory time intervals is critical for accurate comprehension of natural sounds like speech and music. However, the neural substrates and mechanisms underlying the representation of time intervals in working memory are poorly understood. In this study, we investigate the brain bases of working memory for time intervals in rhythmic sequences using functional magnetic resonance imaging. We used a novel behavioral paradigm to investigate time-interval representation in working memory as a function of the temporal jitter and memory load of the sequences containing those time intervals. Human participants were presented with a sequence of intervals and required to reproduce the duration of a particular probed interval. We found that perceptual timing areas including the cerebellum and the striatum were more or less active as a function of increasing and decreasing jitter of the intervals held in working memory respectively whilst the activity of the inferior parietal cortex is modulated as a function of memory load. Additionally, we also analyzed structural correlations between gray and white matter density and behavior and found significant correlations in the cerebellum and the striatum, mirroring the functional results. Our data demonstrate neural substrates of working memory for time intervals and suggest that the cerebellum and the striatum represent core areas for representing temporal information in working memory.

  8. Brain Bases of Working Memory for Time Intervals in Rhythmic Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Teki, Sundeep; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Perception of auditory time intervals is critical for accurate comprehension of natural sounds like speech and music. However, the neural substrates and mechanisms underlying the representation of time intervals in working memory are poorly understood. In this study, we investigate the brain bases of working memory for time intervals in rhythmic sequences using functional magnetic resonance imaging. We used a novel behavioral paradigm to investigate time-interval representation in working memory as a function of the temporal jitter and memory load of the sequences containing those time intervals. Human participants were presented with a sequence of intervals and required to reproduce the duration of a particular probed interval. We found that perceptual timing areas including the cerebellum and the striatum were more or less active as a function of increasing and decreasing jitter of the intervals held in working memory respectively whilst the activity of the inferior parietal cortex is modulated as a function of memory load. Additionally, we also analyzed structural correlations between gray and white matter density and behavior and found significant correlations in the cerebellum and the striatum, mirroring the functional results. Our data demonstrate neural substrates of working memory for time intervals and suggest that the cerebellum and the striatum represent core areas for representing temporal information in working memory. PMID:27313506

  9. Brain Bases of Working Memory for Time Intervals in Rhythmic Sequences.

    PubMed

    Teki, Sundeep; Griffiths, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    Perception of auditory time intervals is critical for accurate comprehension of natural sounds like speech and music. However, the neural substrates and mechanisms underlying the representation of time intervals in working memory are poorly understood. In this study, we investigate the brain bases of working memory for time intervals in rhythmic sequences using functional magnetic resonance imaging. We used a novel behavioral paradigm to investigate time-interval representation in working memory as a function of the temporal jitter and memory load of the sequences containing those time intervals. Human participants were presented with a sequence of intervals and required to reproduce the duration of a particular probed interval. We found that perceptual timing areas including the cerebellum and the striatum were more or less active as a function of increasing and decreasing jitter of the intervals held in working memory respectively whilst the activity of the inferior parietal cortex is modulated as a function of memory load. Additionally, we also analyzed structural correlations between gray and white matter density and behavior and found significant correlations in the cerebellum and the striatum, mirroring the functional results. Our data demonstrate neural substrates of working memory for time intervals and suggest that the cerebellum and the striatum represent core areas for representing temporal information in working memory. PMID:27313506

  10. Revisiting the Effect of Nicotine on Interval Timing

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Carter W.; Watterson, Elizabeth; Garcia, Raul; Mazur, Gabriel J.; Brackney, Ryan J.; Sanabria, Federico

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the evidence for nicotine-induced acceleration of the internal clock when timing in the seconds-to-minutes timescale, and proposes an alternative explanation to this evidence: that nicotine reduces the threshold for responses that result in more reinforcement. These two hypotheses were tested in male Wistar rats using a novel timing task. In this task, rats were trained to seek food at one location after 8 s since trial onset and at a different location after 16 s. Some rats received the same reward at both times (group SAME); some received a larger reward at 16 s (group DIFF). Steady baseline performance was followed by 3 days of subcutaneous nicotine administration (0.3 mg/kg), baseline recovery, and an antagonist challenge (mecamylamine, 1.0 mg/kg). Nicotine induced a larger, immediate reduction in latencies to switch (LTS) in group DIFF than in group SAME. This effect was sustained throughout nicotine administration. Mecamylamine administration and discontinuation of nicotine rapidly recovered baseline performance. These results support a response-threshold account of nicotinic disruption of timing performance, possibly mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. A detailed analysis of the distribution of LTSs suggests that anomalous effects of nicotine on LTS dispersion may be due to loss of temporal control of behavior. PMID:25637907

  11. Accuracy in Recalling Interest Inventory Information at Three Time Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Jane L.; Gore, Paul A., Jr.; Leuwerke, Wade; D'Achiardi, Catalina; Edwards, Jorie Hitch; Edwards, Jared

    2006-01-01

    Rates of accurate recall of the Strong Interest Inventory (SII; L. W. Harmon, J. C. Hansen, F. H. Borgen, & A. L. Hammer, 1994) profile information varied with the amount of time elapsed since the interpretation, the type of SII scale, and whether immediate recall was elicited, but rates did not vary with the strategy used to provide the…

  12. Physical Determinants of Interval Sprint Times in Youth Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Amonette, William E.; Brown, Denham; Dupler, Terry L.; Xu, Junhai; Tufano, James J.; De Witt, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between sprinting speed, body mass, and vertical jump kinetics were assessed in 243 male soccer athletes ranging from 10–19 years. Participants ran a maximal 36.6 meter sprint; times at 9.1 (10 y) and 36.6 m (40 y) were determined using an electronic timing system. Body mass was measured by means of an electronic scale and body composition using a 3-site skinfold measurement completed by a skilled technician. Countermovement vertical jumps were performed on a force platform - from this test peak force was measured and peak power and vertical jump height were calculated. It was determined that age (r=−0.59; p<0.01), body mass (r=−0.52; p<0.01), lean mass (r=−0.61; p<0.01), vertical jump height (r=−0.67; p<0.01), peak power (r=−0.64; p<0.01), and peak force (r=−0.56; p<0.01) were correlated with time at 9.1 meters. Time-to-complete a 36.6 meter sprint was correlated with age (r=−0.71; p<0.01), body mass (r=−0.67; p<0.01), lean mass (r=−0.76; p<0.01), vertical jump height (r=−0.75; p<0.01), peak power (r=−0.78; p<0.01), and peak force (r=−0.69; p<0.01). These data indicate that soccer coaches desiring to improve speed in their athletes should devote substantive time to fitness programs that increase lean body mass and vertical force as well as power generating capabilities of their athletes. Additionally, vertical jump testing, with or without a force platform, may be a useful tool to screen soccer athletes for speed potential. PMID:25031679

  13. Postprandial hyperglycemia was ameliorated by taking metformin 30 min before a meal than taking metformin with a meal; a randomized, open-label, crossover pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Muhei; Okada, Hiroshi; Mistuhashi, Kazuteru; Kimura, Toshihiro; Kitagawa, Noriyuki; Fukuda, Takuya; Majima, Saori; Fukuda, Yukiko; Tanaka, Yoshimitsu; Yamada, Shunji; Senmaru, Takafumi; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Asano, Mai; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Oda, Yohei; Hasegawa, Goji; Nakamura, Naoto; Fukui, Michiaki

    2016-05-01

    Taking metformin with a meal has been shown to decrease bioavailability of metformin. We hypothesized that taking metformin 30 min before a meal improves glucose metabolism. As an animal model, 18 Zucker-rats were divided into three groups as follows: no medication (Control), metformin (600 mg/kg) with meal (Met), and metformin 10 min before meal (pre-Met). In addition, five diabetic patients were recruited and randomized to take metformin (1000 mg) either 30 min before a meal (pre-Met protocol) or with a meal (Met protocol). In the animal model, the peak glucose level of pre-Met (7.8 ± 1.5 mmol/L) was lower than that of Control (12.6 ± 2.5 mmol/L, P = 0.010) or Met (14.1 ± 2.9 mmol/L, P = 0.020). Although there was no statistical difference among the three groups, total GLP-1 level at t = 0 min of pre-Met (7.4 ± 2.7 pmol/L) tended to be higher than that of Control (3.7 ± 2.0 pmol/L, P = 0.030) or Met (3.9 ± 1.2 pmol/L, P = 0.020). In diabetic patients, the peak glucose level of pre-Met protocol (7.0 ± 0.4 mmol/L) was lower than that of Met protocol (8.5 ± 0.9 mmol/L, P = 0.021). Total GLP-1 level at t = 30 min of pre-Met protocol (11.0 ± 6.1 pmol/L) was higher than that of Met protocol (6.7 ± 3.9 pmol/L, P = 0.033). Taking metformin 30 min before a meal ameliorated postprandial hyperglycemia. This promises to be a novel approach for postprandial hyperglycemia.

  14. Postprandial hyperglycemia was ameliorated by taking metformin 30 min before a meal than taking metformin with a meal; a randomized, open-label, crossover pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Muhei; Okada, Hiroshi; Mistuhashi, Kazuteru; Kimura, Toshihiro; Kitagawa, Noriyuki; Fukuda, Takuya; Majima, Saori; Fukuda, Yukiko; Tanaka, Yoshimitsu; Yamada, Shunji; Senmaru, Takafumi; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Asano, Mai; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Oda, Yohei; Hasegawa, Goji; Nakamura, Naoto; Fukui, Michiaki

    2016-05-01

    Taking metformin with a meal has been shown to decrease bioavailability of metformin. We hypothesized that taking metformin 30 min before a meal improves glucose metabolism. As an animal model, 18 Zucker-rats were divided into three groups as follows: no medication (Control), metformin (600 mg/kg) with meal (Met), and metformin 10 min before meal (pre-Met). In addition, five diabetic patients were recruited and randomized to take metformin (1000 mg) either 30 min before a meal (pre-Met protocol) or with a meal (Met protocol). In the animal model, the peak glucose level of pre-Met (7.8 ± 1.5 mmol/L) was lower than that of Control (12.6 ± 2.5 mmol/L, P = 0.010) or Met (14.1 ± 2.9 mmol/L, P = 0.020). Although there was no statistical difference among the three groups, total GLP-1 level at t = 0 min of pre-Met (7.4 ± 2.7 pmol/L) tended to be higher than that of Control (3.7 ± 2.0 pmol/L, P = 0.030) or Met (3.9 ± 1.2 pmol/L, P = 0.020). In diabetic patients, the peak glucose level of pre-Met protocol (7.0 ± 0.4 mmol/L) was lower than that of Met protocol (8.5 ± 0.9 mmol/L, P = 0.021). Total GLP-1 level at t = 30 min of pre-Met protocol (11.0 ± 6.1 pmol/L) was higher than that of Met protocol (6.7 ± 3.9 pmol/L, P = 0.033). Taking metformin 30 min before a meal ameliorated postprandial hyperglycemia. This promises to be a novel approach for postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:26518190

  15. Proceedings of the 8th Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The Proceedings contain the papers presented at the Eight Annual Precise Time and Tme Interval PTTI Applications and Planning Meeting. The edited record of the discussions following the papers and the panel discussions are also included. This meeting provided a forum for the exchange of information on precise time and frequency technology among members of the scientific community and persons with program applications. The 282 registered attendees came from various U.S. Government agencies, private industry, universities and a number of foreign countries were represented. In this meeting, papers were presented that emphasized: (1) definitions and international regulations of precise time sources and users, (2) the scientific foundations of Hydrogen Maser standards, the current developments in this field and the application experience, and (3) how to measure the stability performance properties of precise standards. As in the previous meetings, update and new papers were presented on system applications with past, present and future requirements identified.

  16. Representation of interval timing by temporally scalable firing patterns in rat prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Min; Zhang, Si-yu; Dan, Yang; Poo, Mu-ming

    2014-01-01

    Perception of time interval on the order of seconds is an essential component of cognition, but the underlying neural mechanism remains largely unknown. In rats trained to estimate time intervals, we found that many neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) exhibited sustained spiking activity with diverse temporal profiles of firing-rate modulation during the time-estimation period. Interestingly, in tasks involving different intervals, each neuron exhibited firing-rate modulation with the same profile that was temporally scaled by a factor linearly proportional to the instructed intervals. The behavioral variability across trials within each task also correlated with the intertrial variability of the temporal scaling factor. Local cooling of the medial PFC, which affects neural circuit dynamics, significantly delayed behavioral responses. Thus, PFC neuronal activity contributes to time perception, and temporally scalable firing-rate modulation may reflect a general mechanism for neural representation of interval timing. PMID:24367075

  17. Time dependent modeling at Mt. Etna volcano: an application to the 2005-2013 time interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannavo', Flavio; McCaffrey, Robert; Palano, Mimmo

    2015-04-01

    Following the 2004-05 eruption, Mt. Etna activity has been characterized by the occurrence of a number of eruptive episodes (2006, 2008 and 2012) and more than 35 paroxysmal events (mainly during the 2011-2012 time interval). In addition, continuous downslope motion of its eastern flank has affected the volcano. This seaward motion has been characterized by some episodic phases combined with the occurrence of multiple slow slip events (SSEs). In order to obtain a comprehensive view of the time evolution of these observed features and thus provide new insight into the ground deformation pattern of Mt. Etna, here we use time-dependent modeling of the three-component daily time series of all GNSS continuous stations installed on the volcanic edifice. All GNSS data spanning the 2005-2013 time interval were processed using the GAMIT/GLOBK software (Herring et al. 2010) following the strategy described in Gonzalez and Palano (2014). Estimated GNSS daily time series were referred to the "Etn@ref" reference frame (a local reference frame computed to isolate the Mt. Etna volcanic deformation from the background tectonic pattern; Palano et al. 2010). Using these daily time series as input we performed a time-dependent, non-linear inversion using the TDEFNODE code (McCaffrey, 2009). We used TDEFNODE to invert the time series to model simultaneously the steady tectonic kinematics plus the transient volcanic and tectonic sources, thus obtaining a realistic model of the complex area. Preliminary results allow us to track, over the considered time interval, the volume changes associated to the activity of a magmatic reservoir located at a depth of about 5 km b.s.l. beneath the upper western flank of the volcano, as well as the location and associated magnitude of four SSEs below the eastern flank. In addition, we attempted a preliminary subdivision of the southern and eastern flanks of Mt. Etna into four tectonic blocks which provide a reasonable representation of the observed

  18. Chronic Treatment with Haloperidol Induces Deficits in Working Memory and Feedback Effects of Interval Timing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lustig, C.; Meck, W.H.

    2005-01-01

    Normal participants (n=5) having no experience with antipsychotic drugs and medicated participants (n=5) with clinical experience with chronic low doses of haloperidol (3-10mg/day for 2-4 months) in the treatment of neuroses were evaluated for the effects of inter-trial interval (ITI) feedback on a discrete-trials peak-interval timing procedure.…

  19. Estimation of postmortem interval based on colony development time for Anoplolepsis longipes (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Goff, M L; Win, B H

    1997-11-01

    The postmortem interval for a set of human remains discovered inside a metal tool box was estimated using the development time required for a stratiomyid fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae), Hermetia illucens, in combination with the time required to establish a colony of the ant Anoplolepsis longipes (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) capable of producing alate (winged) reproductives. This analysis resulted in a postmortem interval estimate of 14 + months, with a period of 14-18 months being the most probable time interval. The victim had been missing for approximately 18 months. PMID:9397565

  20. Estimation of postmortem interval based on colony development time for Anoplolepsis longipes (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Goff, M L; Win, B H

    1997-11-01

    The postmortem interval for a set of human remains discovered inside a metal tool box was estimated using the development time required for a stratiomyid fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae), Hermetia illucens, in combination with the time required to establish a colony of the ant Anoplolepsis longipes (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) capable of producing alate (winged) reproductives. This analysis resulted in a postmortem interval estimate of 14 + months, with a period of 14-18 months being the most probable time interval. The victim had been missing for approximately 18 months.

  1. Time intervals for estimating pronghorn and coyote home ranges and daily movements

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T.D. ); Laundre', J.W. )

    1990-04-01

    The authors compared estimates of home range and daily movement for radio-tagged pronghorns (Antilocapra americana) and coyotes (Canis latrans) based on subsamples of data collected at short time intervals during nonconsecutive 24-hour sampling sessions. Home-range size, calculated by either the minimum area method or the linked-cell grid method, and daily distance traveled were underestimated when sampling intervals were based on statistically independent data. Autocorrelated data provided a better estimate of true home-range sizes than independent data for all sampling intervals. Estimates of daily movement based on sampling intervals > 4 hours for pronghorns and >3 hours for coyotes were not correlated with the actual distance traveled. These relationships suggest that restricting sampling effort to statistically independent time intervals sacrifices biologically significant information.

  2. Monitoring molecular interactions using photon arrival-time interval distribution analysis

    DOEpatents

    Laurence, Ted A.; Weiss, Shimon

    2009-10-06

    A method for analyzing/monitoring the properties of species that are labeled with fluorophores. A detector is used to detect photons emitted from species that are labeled with one or more fluorophores and located in a confocal detection volume. The arrival time of each of the photons is determined. The interval of time between various photon pairs is then determined to provide photon pair intervals. The number of photons that have arrival times within the photon pair intervals is also determined. The photon pair intervals are then used in combination with the corresponding counts of intervening photons to analyze properties and interactions of the molecules including brightness, concentration, coincidence and transit time. The method can be used for analyzing single photon streams and multiple photon streams.

  3. Stability analysis of neural networks with interval time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yi-You; Liao, Teh-Lu; Lien, Chang-Hua; Yan, Jun-Juh

    2007-09-01

    The global exponential stability is investigated for neural networks with interval time-varying delays. Based on the Leibniz-Newton formula and linear matrix inequality technique, delay-dependent stability criteria are proposed to guarantee the exponential stability of neural networks with interval time-varying delays. Some numerical examples and comparisons are provided to show that the proposed results significantly improve the allowable upper and lower bounds of delays over some existing ones in the literature.

  4. Human perception of short and long time intervals: its correlation with body temperature and the duration of wake time.

    PubMed

    Aschoff, J

    1998-10-01

    Time estimation was studied in seven human subjects during prolonged sojourn is isolation from time cues. They wore rectal temperature probes throughout the experiments, and during wakefulness recorded each time they thought one hour had passed. At the end of each of these subjective hours they produced a subjective 5 or 10 sec interval. The produced intervals on the 1-h task were not related to body temperature but were correlated with and proportional to the duration of waketime in all subjects. The produced 5 and 10 sec intervals were in all subjects negatively correlated with rectal temperature, but were not associated with wake time. Brief and long time intervals are subjectively experienced via different mechanisms.

  5. Dissociations between interval timing and intertemporal choice following administration of fluoxetine, cocaine, or methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Heilbronner, Sarah R.; Meck, Warren. H.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of our study was to characterize the relationship between intertemporal choice and interval timing, including determining how drugs that modulate brain serotonin and dopamine levels influence these two processes. In Experiment 1, rats were tested on a standard 40-s peak-interval procedure following administration of fluoxetine (3, 5, or 8 mg/kg) or vehicle to assess basic effects on interval timing. In Experiment 2, rats were tested in a novel behavioral paradigm intended to simultaneously examine interval timing and impulsivity. Rats performed a variant of the bi-peak procedure using 10-s and 40-s target durations with an additional “defection” lever that provided the possibility of a small, immediate reward. Timing functions remained relatively intact, and ‘patience’ across subjects correlated with peak times, indicating a negative relationship between ‘patience’ and clock speed. We next examined the effects of fluoxetine (5 mg/kg), cocaine (15 mg/kg), or methamphetamine (1 mg/kg) on task performance. Fluoxetine reduced impulsivity as measured by defection time without corresponding changes in clock speed. In contrast, cocaine and methamphetamine both increased impulsivity and clock speed. Thus, variations in timing may mediate intertemporal choice via dopaminergic inputs. However, a separate, serotonergic system can affect intertemporal choice without affecting interval timing directly. PMID:24135569

  6. Systolic and diastolic time intervals in pulsus alternans - Significance of alternating isovolumic relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spodick, D. H.; Quarry, V. M.; Khan, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    Systolic and diastolic time intervals in 14 cardiac patients with pulsus alternans revealed significant alternation of preinjection period (PEP), isovolumic contraction time (IVCT), left ventricular ejection time (LVET), ejection time index (ETI), PEP/LVET, and carotid dD/dt with better functional values in the strong beats. Cycle length, duration of electromechanical systole (EMS) and total diastole, i.e., isovolumic relaxation period (IRP) and diastolic filling period (DFP) occurred in 7 out of 8 patients. These diastolic intervals alternated reciprocally such that the IRP of the strong beats encroached upon the DFP of the next (weak) beats.

  7. Effects of two kinds of underwear on metabolic heat production during 60 min recovery after 30 min severe exercise in the cold.

    PubMed

    Ha, M; Tokura, H; Gotoh, J; Holmér, I

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the thermophysiological significance of hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties of underwear materials under the influences of profuse sweating produced during severe exercise in the cold. Two kinds of underwear were used: two layers of cotton underwear with two-piece long-sleeved shirt and full-trousers (C), and two layers of polypropylene underwear with two-piece long-sleeved shirt and full-trousers (P). In addition, the subject put on a two-piece ski suit of 100% polyester including 100% polyester padding. Eight adult females volunteered as subjects in this study. The test was performed in a climatic chamber at an ambient air temperature of 2 degrees C and an air velocity of 0.26 m.s-1. The subject exercised on a cycle ergometer at an intensity of 65% maximal oxygen uptake for 30 min and followed by 60 min recovery. The major findings are summarized as follows: 1) The fall of rectal temperature tended to be greater in P during the recovery. 2) The absolute humidity of innermost layer and middle layer was significantly higher in C than in P during the recovery, but the absolute humidity of middle layer and outermost layer was significantly higher in P than in C during the exercise. 3) Clothing microclimate temperature of innermost at back was significantly higher in C during the exercise and recovery. 4) Metabolic heat production for last 30 min during recovery was significantly higher in P. 5) The degree of skin wettedness sensation and sweating sensation for whole body was significantly higher in P during the exercise. It was concluded that the slower evaporation behavior by absorbing of underwear material in the clothing system has a beneficial influence on thermophysiological responses during severe exercise and its recovery in the cold, although the differences were very small.

  8. An Integrated Theory of Prospective Time Interval Estimation: The Role of Cognition, Attention, and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taatgen, Niels A.; van Rijn, Hedderik; Anderson, John

    2007-01-01

    A theory of prospective time perception is introduced and incorporated as a module in an integrated theory of cognition, thereby extending existing theories and allowing predictions about attention and learning. First, a time perception module is established by fitting existing datasets (interval estimation and bisection and impact of secondary…

  9. Apparent time interval of visual stimuli is compressed during fast hand movement.

    PubMed

    Yokosaka, Takumi; Kuroki, Scinob; Nishida, Shin'ya; Watanabe, Junji

    2015-01-01

    The influence of body movements on visual time perception is receiving increased attention. Past studies showed apparent expansion of visual time before and after the execution of hand movements and apparent compression of visual time during the execution of eye movements. Here we examined whether the estimation of sub-second time intervals between visual events is expanded, compressed, or unaffected during the execution of hand movements. The results show that hand movements, at least the fast ones, reduced the apparent time interval between visual events. A control experiment indicated that the apparent time compression was not produced by the participants' involuntary eye movements during the hand movements. These results, together with earlier findings, suggest hand movement can change apparent visual time either in a compressive way or in an expansive way, depending on the relative timing between the hand movement and visual stimulus. PMID:25853892

  10. Prediction intervals for a noisy nonlinear time series based on a bootstrapping reservoir computing network ensemble.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Chunyang; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Wei; Leung, Henry

    2013-07-01

    Prediction intervals that provide estimated values as well as the corresponding reliability are applied to nonlinear time series forecast. However, constructing reliable prediction intervals for noisy time series is still a challenge. In this paper, a bootstrapping reservoir computing network ensemble (BRCNE) is proposed and a simultaneous training method based on Bayesian linear regression is developed. In addition, the structural parameters of the BRCNE, that is, the number of reservoir computing networks and the reservoir dimension, are determined off-line by the 0.632 bootstrap cross-validation. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, two kinds of time series data, including the multisuperimposed oscillator problem with additive noises and a practical gas flow in steel industry are employed here. The experimental results indicate that the proposed approach has a satisfactory performance on prediction intervals for practical applications.

  11. USSR national time unit keeping over long interval using an ensemble of H-masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshelyaevsky, N. B.; Pushkin, S. B.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S.S.R. State Time and Frequency Service (STFS) is discussed. The STFS is responsible for time and frequency measurement unification both in the field of atomic, TA(SU) and UTC(SU) and universal time UT1(SU) over the whole territory of the U.S.S.R. The U.S.S.R. national time unit keeping over long interval using an ensemble of H-masers is also discussed.

  12. Oxycodone lengthens reproductions of suprasecond time intervals in human research volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Gooch, Cynthia M.; Rakitin, Brian C.; Cooper, Ziva D; Comer, Sandra D.; Balsam, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    Oxycodone, a popularly used opioid for treating pain, is widely abused. Other drugs of abuse have been shown to affect time perception, which in turn may affect sensitivity to future consequences. This may contribute to continued use. The current study evaluated the effect of oxycodone on time perception in normal healthy volunteers. For this within-subject, double-blind design study, participants performed a temporal reproduction task before and after receiving placebo or oxycodone (15 mg, po) over 6 outpatient sessions. Participants were first trained with feedback to reproduce three standard intervals (1.1, 2.2, and 3.3 s) in separate blocks by matching response latency from a start signal to the duration of that block’s standard interval. During testing participants were instructed to reproduce the three intervals from memory without feedback before and after drug administration . Oxycodone significantly lengthened time estimations for the two longer intervals relative to placebo. These results suggest that opioids alter temporal processing for intervals greater than one second, raising questions about the effect of these drugs on valuation of future consequences. PMID:21750426

  13. Density-dependent state-space model for population-abundance data with unequal time intervals.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Brian; Ponciano, José Miguel

    2014-08-01

    The Gompertz state-space (GSS) model is a stochastic model for analyzing time-series observations of population abundances. The GSS model combines density dependence, environmental process noise, and observation error toward estimating quantities of interest in biological monitoring and population viability analysis. However, existing methods for estimating the model parameters apply only to population data with equal time intervals between observations. In the present paper, we extend the GSS model to data with unequal time intervals, by embedding it within a state-space version of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, a continuous-time model of an equilibrating stochastic system. Maximum likelihood and restricted maximum likelihood calculations for the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck state-space model involve only numerical maximization of an explicit multivariate normal likelihood, and so the extension allows for easy bootstrapping, yielding confidence intervals for model parameters, statistical hypothesis testing of density dependence, and selection among sub-models using information criteria. Ecologists and managers previously drawn to models lacking density dependence or observation error because such models accommodated unequal time intervals (for example, due to missing data) now have an alternative analysis framework incorporating density dependence, process noise, and observation error.

  14. Density dependent state space model for population abundance data with unequal time intervals

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Brian; Ponciano, José Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The Gompertz state-space (GSS) model is a stochastic model for analyzing time series observations of population abundances. The GSS model combines density dependence, environmental process noise, and observation error toward estimating quantities of interest in biological monitoring and population viability analysis. However, existing methods for estimating the model parameters apply only to population data with equal time intervals between observations. In the present paper, we extend the GSS model to data with unequal time intervals, by embedding it within a state-space version of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, a continuous-time model of an equilibrating stochastic system. Maximum likelihood and restricted maximum likelihood calculations for the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck state-space model involve only numerical maximization of an explicit multivariate normal likelihood, and so the extension allows for easy bootstrapping, yielding confidence intervals for model parameters, statistical hypothesis testing of density dependence, and selection among sub-models using information criteria. Ecologists and managers previously drawn to models lacking density dependence or observation error because such models accommodated unequal time intervals (for example, due to missing data) now have an alternative analysis framework incorporating density dependence, process noise and observation error. PMID:25230459

  15. Internal Representations of Temporal Statistics and Feedback Calibrate Motor-Sensory Interval Timing

    PubMed Central

    Acerbi, Luigi; Wolpert, Daniel M.; Vijayakumar, Sethu

    2012-01-01

    Humans have been shown to adapt to the temporal statistics of timing tasks so as to optimize the accuracy of their responses, in agreement with the predictions of Bayesian integration. This suggests that they build an internal representation of both the experimentally imposed distribution of time intervals (the prior) and of the error (the loss function). The responses of a Bayesian ideal observer depend crucially on these internal representations, which have only been previously studied for simple distributions. To study the nature of these representations we asked subjects to reproduce time intervals drawn from underlying temporal distributions of varying complexity, from uniform to highly skewed or bimodal while also varying the error mapping that determined the performance feedback. Interval reproduction times were affected by both the distribution and feedback, in good agreement with a performance-optimizing Bayesian observer and actor model. Bayesian model comparison highlighted that subjects were integrating the provided feedback and represented the experimental distribution with a smoothed approximation. A nonparametric reconstruction of the subjective priors from the data shows that they are generally in agreement with the true distributions up to third-order moments, but with systematically heavier tails. In particular, higher-order statistical features (kurtosis, multimodality) seem much harder to acquire. Our findings suggest that humans have only minor constraints on learning lower-order statistical properties of unimodal (including peaked and skewed) distributions of time intervals under the guidance of corrective feedback, and that their behavior is well explained by Bayesian decision theory. PMID:23209386

  16. Time Interval between Trauma and Arthroscopic Meniscal Repair Has No Influence on Clinical Survival.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, Robert J P; Thomassen, Bregje J W; Swen, Jan-Willem A; van Arkel, Ewoud R A

    2016-07-01

    Arthroscopic meniscal repair is the gold standard for longitudinal peripheral meniscal tears. The time interval between trauma and meniscal repair remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate failure rates and clinical outcome of arthroscopic meniscal repair in relation to chronicity of injury. A total of 238 meniscal repairs were performed in 234 patients. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was reconstructed in almost all ACL-deficient knees (130 out of 133). Time interval between injury and repair was divided into acute (< 2 weeks), subacute (> 2 to < 12 weeks), and chronic (> 12 weeks). Patients completed postal questionnaires to evaluate clinical outcome and failure rates. Study instruments included Lysholm, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and Tegner scoring systems. At a median follow-up of 41 months (interquartile range [IQR], 34-53 months) 55 medial and 10 lateral meniscal repairs failed (overall failure rate, 27%). There was a significant higher failure rate for medial meniscal repair (p < 0.05) and ACL-deficient knees without ACL reconstruction. Functional outcome scores showed only significant differences on the KOOS subscale "function in daily living" (95% confidence interval, 1.05-15.27, p < 0.05). No significant difference was found for any interval between trauma and repair. The interval between trauma and arthroscopic meniscal repair has no influence on the failure rate. Differences in survival rate of meniscal repair are more dependent on location of the lesion and ACL status, rather than chronicity of injury.

  17. A method for using a time interval counter to measure frequency stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown how a commercial time interval counter can be used to measure the relative stability of two signals that are offset in frequency and mixed down to a beat note of about 1 Hz. To avoid the dead-time problem, the counter is set up to read the time interval between each beat note upcrossing and the next pulse of a 10 Hz reference pulse train. The actual upcrossing times are recovered by a simple algorithm whose outputs can be used for computing residuals and Allan variance. A noise floor-test yielded a delta f/f Allan deviation of 1.3 times 10 to the minus 9th power/tau relative to the beat frequency.

  18. A Comparison of Momentary Time Sampling and Partial-Interval Recording for Evaluating Functional Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meany-Daboul, Maeve G.; Roscoe, Eileen M.; Bourret, Jason C.; Ahearn, William H.

    2007-01-01

    In the current study, momentary time sampling (MTS) and partial-interval recording (PIR) were compared to continuous-duration recording of stereotypy and to the frequency of self-injury during a treatment analysis to determine whether the recording method affected data interpretation. Five previously conducted treatment analysis data sets were…

  19. Discrimination of two neighboring intra- and intermodal empty time intervals marked by three successive stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Tsuyoshi; Hasuo, Emi; Labonté, Katherine; Laflamme, Vincent; Grondin, Simon

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the discrimination of two neighboring intra- or inter-modal empty time intervals marked by three successive stimuli. Each of the three markers was a flash (visual-V) or a sound (auditory-A). The first and last markers were of the same modality, while the second one was either A or V, resulting in four conditions: VVV, VAV, AVA and AAA. Participants judged whether the second interval, whose duration was systematically varied, was shorter or longer than the 500-ms first interval. Compared with VVV and AAA, discrimination was impaired with VAV, but not so much with AVA (in Experiment 1). Whereas VAV and AVA consisted of the same set of single intermodal intervals (VA and AV), discrimination was impaired in the VAV compared to the AVA condition. This difference between VAV and AVA could not be attributed to the participants' strategy to perform the discrimination task, e.g., ignoring the standard interval or replacing the visual stimuli with sounds in their mind (in Experiment 2). These results are discussed in terms of sequential grouping according to sensory similarity.

  20. Soil moisture mapping over West Africa with a 30-min temporal resolution using AMSR-E observations and a satellite-based rainfall product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellarin, T.; Tran, T.; Cohard, J.-M.; Galle, S.; Laurent, J.-P.; de Rosnay, P.; Vischel, T.

    2009-10-01

    An original and simple method to map surface soil moisture over large areas has been developed to obtain data with a high temporal and spatial resolution for the study of possible feedback mechanisms between soil moisture and convection in West Africa. A rainfall estimation product based on Meteosat geostationary satellite measurements is first used together with a simple Antecedent Precipitation Index (API) model to produce soil moisture maps at a spatial resolution of 10×10 km2 and a temporal resolution of 30-min. However, given the uncertainty of the satellite-based rainfall estimation product, the resulting soil moisture maps are not sufficiently accurate. For this reason, a technique based on assimilating AMSR-E C-band measurements into a microwave emission model was developed in which the estimated rainfall rates between two successive AMSR-E brightness temperature (TB) measurements are adjusted by multiplying them by a factor between 0 and 7 that minimizes the difference between simulated and observed TBs. Ground-based soil moisture measurements obtained at three sites in Niger, Mali and Benin were used to assess the method which was found to improve the soil moisture estimates on all three sites.

  1. One-step kinetics-based immunoassay for the highly sensitive detection of C-reactive protein in less than 30 min.

    PubMed

    Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Czilwik, Gregor; van Oordt, Thomas; von Stetten, Felix; Zengerle, Roland; Marion Schneider, E; Luong, John H T

    2014-07-01

    This article reveals a rapid sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the highly sensitive detection of human C-reactive protein (CRP) in less than 30 min. It employs a one-step kinetics-based highly simplified and cost-effective sandwich ELISA procedure with minimal process steps. The procedure involves the formation of a sandwich immune complex on capture anti-human CRP antibody-bound Dynabeads in 15 min, followed by two magnet-assisted washings and one enzymatic reaction. The developed sandwich ELISA detects CRP in the dynamic range of 0.3 to 81 ng ml(-1) with a limit of detection of 0.4 ng ml(-1) and an analytical sensitivity of 0.7 ng ml(-1). It detects CRP spiked in diluted human whole blood and serum with high analytical precision, as confirmed by conventional sandwich ELISA. Moreover, the results of the developed ELISA for the determination of CRP in the ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid plasma samples of patients are in good agreement with those obtained by the conventional ELISA. The developed immunoassay has immense potential for the development of rapid and cost-effective in vitro diagnostic kits.

  2. True random number generator based on discretized encoding of the time interval between photons.

    PubMed

    Li, Shen; Wang, Long; Wu, Ling-An; Ma, Hai-Qiang; Zhai, Guang-Jie

    2013-01-01

    We propose an approach to generate true random number sequences based on the discretized encoding of the time interval between photons. The method is simple and efficient, and can produce a highly random sequence several times longer than that of other methods based on threshold or parity selection, without the need for hashing. A proof-of-principle experiment has been performed, showing that the system could be easily integrated and applied to quantum cryptography and other fields. PMID:23456008

  3. New delay dependent stability criteria for recurrent neural networks with interval time-varying delay.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiongfen; Ren, Quanhong; Xie, Xuemei

    2014-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the delay dependent stability criteria for a class of static recurrent neural networks with interval time-varying delay. By choosing an appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and employing a delay partitioning method, the less conservative condition is obtained. Furthermore, the LMIs-based condition depend on the lower and upper bounds of time delay. Finally, a numerical example is also designated to verify the reduced conservatism of developed criteria. PMID:24908560

  4. Modeling circadian and sleep-homeostatic effects on short-term interval timing

    PubMed Central

    Späti, Jakub; Aritake, Sayaka; Meyer, Andrea H.; Kitamura, Shingo; Hida, Akiko; Higuchi, Shigekazu; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Mishima, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Short-term interval timing i.e., perception and action relating to durations in the seconds range, has been suggested to display time-of-day as well as wake dependent fluctuations due to circadian and sleep-homeostatic changes to the rate at which an underlying pacemaker emits pulses; pertinent human data being relatively sparse and lacking in consistency however, the phenomenon remains elusive and its mechanism poorly understood. To better characterize the putative circadian and sleep-homeostatic effects on interval timing and to assess the ability of a pacemaker-based mechanism to account for the data, we measured timing performance in eighteen young healthy male subjects across two epochs of sustained wakefulness of 38.67 h each, conducted prior to (under entrained conditions) and following (under free-running conditions) a 28 h sleep-wake schedule, using the methods of duration estimation and duration production on target intervals of 10 and 40 s. Our findings of opposing oscillatory time courses across both epochs of sustained wakefulness that combine with increasing and, respectively, decreasing, saturating exponential change for the tasks of estimation and production are consistent with the hypothesis that a pacemaker emitting pulses at a rate controlled by the circadian oscillator and increasing with time awake determines human short-term interval timing; the duration-specificity of this pattern is interpreted as reflecting challenges to maintaining stable attention to the task that progressively increase with stimulus magnitude and thereby moderate the effects of pacemaker-rate changes on overt behavior. PMID:25741253

  5. Dynamic response analysis of structure under time-variant interval process model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Baizhan; Qin, Yuan; Yu, Dejie; Jiang, Chao

    2016-10-01

    Due to the aggressiveness of the environmental factor, the variation of the dynamic load, the degeneration of the material property and the wear of the machine surface, parameters related with the structure are distinctly time-variant. Typical model for time-variant uncertainties is the random process model which is constructed on the basis of a large number of samples. In this work, we propose a time-variant interval process model which can be effectively used to deal with time-variant uncertainties with limit information. And then two methods are presented for the dynamic response analysis of the structure under the time-variant interval process model. The first one is the direct Monte Carlo method (DMCM) whose computational burden is relative high. The second one is the Monte Carlo method based on the Chebyshev polynomial expansion (MCM-CPE) whose computational efficiency is high. In MCM-CPE, the dynamic response of the structure is approximated by the Chebyshev polynomials which can be efficiently calculated, and then the variational range of the dynamic response is estimated according to the samples yielded by the Monte Carlo method. To solve the dependency phenomenon of the interval operation, the affine arithmetic is integrated into the Chebyshev polynomial expansion. The computational effectiveness and efficiency of MCM-CPE is verified by two numerical examples, including a spring-mass-damper system and a shell structure.

  6. Efficiency of time-lapse intervals and simple baits for camera surveys of wild pigs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.L.; Holtfreter, R.W.; Ditchkoff, S.S.; Grand, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Growing concerns surrounding established and expanding populations of wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have created the need for rapid and accurate surveys of these populations. We conducted surveys of a portion of the wild pig population on Fort Benning, Georgia, to determine if a longer time-lapse interval than had been previously used in surveys of wild pigs would generate similar detection results. We concurrently examined whether use of soured corn at camera sites affected the time necessary for pigs to locate a new camera site or the time pigs remained at a site. Our results suggest that a 9-min time-lapse interval generated dependable detection results for pigs and that soured corn neither attracted pigs to a site any quicker than plain, dry, whole-kernel corn, nor held them at a site longer. Maximization of time-lapse interval should decrease data and processing loads, and use of a simple, available bait should decrease cost and effort associated with more complicated baits; combination of these concepts should increase efficiency of wild pig surveys. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  7. Beat-to-beat systolic time-interval measurement from heart sounds and ECG.

    PubMed

    Paiva, R P; Carvalho, P; Couceiro, R; Henriques, J; Antunes, M; Quintal, I; Muehlsteff, J

    2012-02-01

    Systolic time intervals are highly correlated to fundamental cardiac functions. Several studies have shown that these measurements have significant diagnostic and prognostic value in heart failure condition and are adequate for long-term patient follow-up and disease management. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using heart sound (HS) to accurately measure the opening and closing moments of the aortic heart valve. These moments are crucial to define the main systolic timings of the heart cycle, i.e. pre-ejection period (PEP) and left ventricular ejection time (LVET). We introduce an algorithm for automatic extraction of PEP and LVET using HS and electrocardiogram. PEP is estimated with a Bayesian approach using the signal's instantaneous amplitude and patient-specific time intervals between atrio-ventricular valve closure and aortic valve opening. As for LVET, since the aortic valve closure corresponds to the start of the S2 HS component, we base LVET estimation on the detection of the S2 onset. A comparative assessment of the main systolic time intervals is performed using synchronous signal acquisitions of the current gold standard in cardiac time-interval measurement, i.e. echocardiography, and HS. The algorithms were evaluated on a healthy population, as well as on a group of subjects with different cardiovascular diseases (CVD). In the healthy group, from a set of 942 heartbeats, the proposed algorithm achieved 7.66 ± 5.92 ms absolute PEP estimation error. For LVET, the absolute estimation error was 11.39 ± 8.98 ms. For the CVD population, 404 beats were used, leading to 11.86 ± 8.30 and 17.51 ± 17.21 ms absolute PEP and LVET errors, respectively. The results achieved in this study suggest that HS can be used to accurately estimate LVET and PEP.

  8. An integrated CMOS time interval measurement system with subnanosecond resolution for the WA-98 calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M.L.; Britton, C.L.; Wintenberg, A.L.; Young, G.R.

    1997-02-01

    The time interval measurement system of the WA-98 calorimeter is presented. This system consists of a constant fraction discriminator (CFD), a variable delay circuit, a time-to-amplitude converter (TAC), and a Wilkinson analog-to-digital converter (ADC) all realized in a 1.2-{micro}m N-well CMOS process. These circuits measured the time interval between a reference logic signal and a photomultiplier tube (PMT) signal that had amplitude variations of 100:1 and 10-ns rise and fall times. The system operated over the interval range from 2 ns to 200 ns with a resolution of {approximately}{+-}300 ps including all walk and jitter components. The variable delay circuit allowed the CFD output to be delayed /by up to 1 {micro}s with a jitter component of {approximately}0.04% of the delay setting. These circuits operated with a 5-V power supply. Although this application was in nuclear physics instrumentation, these circuits could also be useful in other scientific measurements, medical imaging, automatic test equipment, ranging systems, and industrial electronics.

  9. H∞ control problem for Hopfield neural networks with interval time-varying delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emharuethai, Chanikan

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we consider H∞ control problem for a class Hopfield neural networks with interval time-varying delay. The time delay is a continuous function belonging to a given interval, but not necessariry differentiable. The stabilizing controllers to be designed must satisfy some exponential stability constraints on the closed-loop poles. Based on the construction of improved Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals combined with Newton-Leibniz formula. H∞ controller is designed via memoryless state feedback control and new sufficient conditions for the existence of the H∞ state-feedback for the system are given in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained result.

  10. Dynamic Parameters Variability: Time Interval Interference on Ground Reaction Force During Running.

    PubMed

    Pennone, Juliana; Mezêncio, Bruno; Amadio, Alberto C; Serrão, Júlio C

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the time between measures on ground reaction force running variability; 15 healthy men (age = 23.8 ± 3.7 years; weight = 72.8 ± 7.7 kg; height 174.3 ± 8.4 cm) performed two trials of running 45 minutes at 9 km/hr at intervals of seven days. The ground reaction forces were recorded every 5 minutes. The coefficients of variation of indicative parameters of the ground reaction forces for each condition were compared. The coefficients of variations of the ground reaction forces curve analyzed between intervals and sessions were 21.9% and 21.48%, respectively. There was no significant difference for the ground reaction forces parameters Fy1, tFy1, TC1, Imp50, Fy2, and tFy2 between intervals and sessions. Although the ground reaction forces variables present a natural variability, this variability in intervals and in sessions remained consistent, ensuring a high reliability in repeated measures designs.

  11. Proceedings of the 14th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardrip, S. C. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Developments and applications in the field of frequency and time are addressed. Specific topics include rubidium frequency standards, future timing requirements, noise and atomic standards, hydrogen maser technology, synchronization, and quartz technology.

  12. Loran-C expansion: Impact on precise time/time interval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roeber, J. F., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    On 16 May 1974, it was announced that Loran-C was chosen as the navigation system to serve the U. S. Coastal Confluence Zone. At the present time, reliable CONUS Loran-C groundwave timing coverage extends westward only about as far as Boulder, CO. The groundwave hyperbolic and timing coverage which will result from the planned CONUS expansion are illustrated. Time frames are provided. A status report on the planned reduction in Loran-C PTTI tolerances is presented.

  13. Tutorials from the 23rd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutes, G.; Logan, R.; Barnes, J.; Fox, C.; Gifford, G. A.

    1992-09-01

    The tutorial papers in this document are: 'Introduction to Quartz Frequency Standards,' J. Vig, Army Research Laboratory; 'Tutorial on High Performance Analog Fiber Optic Systems,' G. Lutes and R. Logan, Jet Propulsion Laboratory; 'Introduction to the Time Domain Characterization of Frequency Standards,' J. Jespersen, NIST; 'Noise Models for Time and Frequency,' J. Barnes, Austron, Inc., 'GPS Time Determination and Dissemination,' Lt. C. Fox, U.S. Air Force; G. A. Gifford, Naval Research Laboratory; and S. R. Stein, Timing Solutions.

  14. Effects of a Reduced Time-Out Interval on Compliance with the Time-Out Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Jeanne M.; Vollmer, Timothy R.; Yakich, Theresa M.; Van Camp, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Time-out is a negative punishment procedure that parents and teachers commonly use to reduce problem behavior; however, specific time-out parameters have not been evaluated adequately. One parameter that has received relatively little attention in the literature is the mode of administration (verbal or physical) of time-out. In this study, we…

  15. Proceedings of the Sixteenth Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The effects of ionospheric and tropospheric propagation on time and frequency transfer, advances in the generation of precise time and frequency, time transfer techniques and filtering and modeling were among the topics emphasized. Rubidium and cesium frequency standard, crystal oscillators, masers, Kalman filters, and atomic clocks were discussed.

  16. Conditional sampling schemes based on the Variable Interval Time Averaging (VITA) algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, J. F.; Tsai, H. M.; Bradshaw, P.

    1986-08-01

    The variable interval time averaging (VITA) algorithm was tested in a variety of boundary layers for its ability to detect motions principally involved in the production of shear stress. A VITA+LEVEL scheme (which uses a variance and level criterion) was devised and is shown to produce length scale statistics that are independent of the conditioning criteria, where those from the VITA scheme are not.

  17. Adaptation to visual or auditory time intervals modulates the perception of visual apparent motion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huihui; Chen, Lihan; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2012-01-01

    It is debated whether sub-second timing is subserved by a centralized mechanism or by the intrinsic properties of task-related neural activity in specific modalities (Ivry and Schlerf, 2008). By using a temporal adaptation task, we investigated whether adapting to different time intervals conveyed through stimuli in different modalities (i.e., frames of a visual Ternus display, visual blinking discs, or auditory beeps) would affect the subsequent implicit perception of visual timing, i.e., inter-stimulus interval (ISI) between two frames in a Ternus display. The Ternus display can induce two percepts of apparent motion (AM), depending on the ISI between the two frames: “element motion” for short ISIs, in which the endmost disc is seen as moving back and forth while the middle disc at the overlapping or central position remains stationary; “group motion” for longer ISIs, in which both discs appear to move in a manner of lateral displacement as a whole. In Experiment 1, participants adapted to either the typical “element motion” (ISI = 50 ms) or the typical “group motion” (ISI = 200 ms). In Experiments 2 and 3, participants adapted to a time interval of 50 or 200 ms through observing a series of two paired blinking discs at the center of the screen (Experiment 2) or hearing a sequence of two paired beeps (with pitch 1000 Hz). In Experiment 4, participants adapted to sequences of paired beeps with either low pitches (500 Hz) or high pitches (5000 Hz). After adaptation in each trial, participants were presented with a Ternus probe in which the ISI between the two frames was equal to the transitional threshold of the two types of motions, as determined by a pretest. Results showed that adapting to the short time interval in all the situations led to more reports of “group motion” in the subsequent Ternus probes; adapting to the long time interval, however, caused no aftereffect for visual adaptation but significantly more reports of group motion for

  18. The Initial Systolic Time Interval in patients with spinal cord injury measured with impedance cardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoekstra, Femke; Martinsen, Ørjan G.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.; Meijer, Jan H.

    2012-12-01

    The Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI), obtained from the electrocardiogram and impedance cardiogram, is considered to be a measure for the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This time delay is influenced by the sympathetic nerve system. Therefore, an observational study was performed in a group of patients (SCI) with spinal cord injuries. The relationship between the ISTI and the total heart cycle (RR-interval) was established by varying the RR-interval using an exercise stimulus to increase the heart rate. The slope of this relationship was observed to be significantly higher in the SCI-group as compared with a control group, although there was no difference in ISTI in the range of common heart rates during the test between the groups. This slope and the ISTI was observed to be significantly different in an acute patient having a recent spinal cord injury at a high level. Because of the variety in injury levels and incompleteness of the injuries further, more specific research is necessary to draw decisive conclusions with respect to the contribution of autonomic nervous control on the ISTI in SCI, although the present observations are notable.

  19. Do rats time filled and empty intervals of equal duration differently?

    PubMed

    Macinnis, Mika L M

    2007-06-01

    The goal was to determine whether rats time filled and empty intervals of equal duration differently. Each of five rats was trained for 50 sessions on an instrumental appetitive head entry procedure in which food was available (primed) every 120 s. On "empty" cycles, 30s prior to the next food prime, a 0.5-s pulse of white noise was presented. On "filled" cycles, 30s prior to the next food prime, white noise came on and stayed on until food was delivered. The two types of cycles were presented with equal probability. The results showed that the rats timed both the food-to-food interval and the stimulus-to-food interval. A comparison of the response gradients on filled and empty cycles following stimulus presentation showed better temporal discrimination on filled cycles. The results were modeled using a Packet theory of timing, with a linear averaging rule to combine the temporal information provided by the stimulus and food. The model fits to the individual response gradients were evaluated with a Turing test.

  20. Time on timing: Dissociating premature responding from interval sensitivity in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Nombela, Cristina; Wolpe, Noham; Barker, Roger A.; Rowe, James B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Parkinson's disease (PD) can cause impulsivity with premature responses, but there are several potential mechanisms. We proposed a distinction between poor decision‐making and the distortion of temporal perception. Both effects may be present and interact, but with different clinical and pharmacological correlates. Objectives This study assessed premature responding during time perception in PD. Methods In this study, 18 PD patients and 19 age‐matched controls completed 2 temporal discrimination tasks (bisection and trisection) and a baseline reaction‐time task. Timing sensitivity and decision‐making processes were quantified by response and response time. An extended version of the modified difference model was used to examine the precision of time representation and the modulation of response time by stimulus ambiguity. Results In the bisection task, patients had a lower bisection point (P < .05) and reduced timing sensitivity when compared with controls (P < .001). In the trisection task, patients showed lower sensitivity in discriminating between short and medium standards (P < .05). The impairment in timing sensitivity correlated positively with patients' levodopa dose equivalent (P < .05). Critically, patients had disproportionately faster response times when compared with controls in more ambiguous conditions, and the degree of acceleration of response time increased with disease severity (P < .05). Computational modeling indicated that patients had poorer precision in time representation and stronger modulation of response time by task ambiguity, leading to smaller scaling of the decision latency (P < .05). Conclusions These findings suggest that timing deficits in PD cannot be solely attributed to perceptual distortions, but are also associated with impulsive decision strategies that bias patients toward premature responses. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on

  1. Do Longer Intervals between Challenges Reduce the Risk of Adverse Reactions in Oral Wheat Challenges?

    PubMed Central

    Yanagida, Noriyuki; Imai, Takanori; Sato, Sakura; Ebisawa, Motohiro

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of oral food challenges (OFCs) in clinics is limited because they are complicated and associated with anaphylactic symptoms. To increase their use, it is necessary to develop novel, effective, and safe methods. However, the effectiveness of different OFCs has not been compared. Objective To investigate the effect of ingestion methods on wheat allergy symptoms and treatment during OFCs. Method Without changing the total challenge dose, we changed the administration method from a 5-installment dose titration every 15 min (15-min interval method) to 3 installments every 30 min (30-min interval method). We retrospectively reviewed and compared the results of 65 positive 15-min interval wheat challenge tests conducted between July 2005 and February 2008 and 87 positive 30-min interval tests conducted between March 2008 and December 2009. Results A history of immediate symptoms was more common for the 30-min interval method; however, no difference between methods was observed in other background parameters. Switching from the 15-min to the 30-min interval method did not increase symptoms or require treatment. The rate of cardiovascular symptoms (p = 0.032), and adrenaline use (p = 0.017) was significantly lower with the 30-min interval method. The results did not change after adjusting for the effects of immediate symptom history in multivariate analysis. Conclusion This study suggests that the 30-min interval method reduces the risk of adverse events, compared to the 15-min interval method. PMID:26624006

  2. Time interval to surgery and outcomes following the surgical treatment of acute traumatic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Khanna, Arjun; Kwon, Churl-Su; Phillips, H Westley; Nahed, Brian V; Coumans, Jean-Valery

    2014-12-01

    Although the pre-surgical management of patients with acute traumatic subdural hematoma prioritizes rapid transport to the operating room, there is conflicting evidence regarding the importance of time interval from injury to surgery with regards to outcomes. We sought to determine the association of surgical timing with outcomes for subdural hematoma. A retrospective review was performed of 522 consecutive patients admitted to a single center from 2006-2012 who underwent emergent craniectomy for acute subdural hematoma. After excluding patients with unknown time of injury, penetrating trauma, concurrent cerebrovascular injury, epidural hematoma, or intraparenchymal hemorrhage greater than 30 mL, there remained 45 patients identified for analysis. Using a multiple regression model, we examined the effect of surgical timing, in addition to other variables on in-hospital mortality (primary outcome), as well as the need for tracheostomy or gastrostomy (secondary outcome). We found that increasing injury severity score (odds ratio [OR] 1.146; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.035-1.270; p=0.009) and age (OR1.066; 95%CI 1.006-1.129; p=0.031) were associated with in-hospital mortality in multivariate analysis. In this model, increasing time to surgery was not associated with mortality, and in fact had a significant effect in decreasing mortality (OR 0.984; 95%CI 0.971-0.997; p=0.018). Premorbid aspirin use was associated with a paradoxical decrease in mortality (OR 0.019; 95%CI 0.001-0.392; p=0.010). In this patient sample, shorter time interval from injury to surgery was not associated with better outcomes. While there are potential confounding factors, these findings support the evaluation of rigorous preoperative resuscitation as a priority in future study. PMID:25065950

  3. Systolic time intervals and impedance cardiogram in pregnant and toxemic women.

    PubMed

    Kagiya, A; Shiratori, H; Shinagawa, S; Seki, K

    1984-07-01

    STI measurements and impedance cardiography were carried out during gestation and post partum in 231 cases. In normal pregnant women, prolongation of the Q-I interval, isometric contraction time (ICT), preejection period (PEP) and shortening both of the Q-II interval and ejection time (ET) were all marked in late stages of pregnancy. Mean values for stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO) and cardiac index (CI) were at the maximum at 16-23 weeks of pregnancy, and then fell in the antepartum period. The total peripheral resistance (TPR) at 16-23 weeks of pregnancy was lower than in other periods. In the postpartum period, the heart rate was lowered, and the Q-II interval and ICT were prolonged. In toxemic pregnancy, SV, CO and CI were lower than those of the normal group and various changes in STI were more apparent than those of non-toxemic pregnants in the supine position. By the postural change from supine to left lateral in toxemia, the improvement in STI was not as good as in the normal pregnant group and, moreover, SV and CO were decreased and TPR was increased. These results suggest that in toxemic pregnancy the left ventricle might be less complaint and less sensitive to the increase in venous return.

  4. Model for the respiratory modulation of the heart beat-to-beat time interval series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, Alberto; Diambra, Luis; Malta, C. P.

    2005-09-01

    In this study we present a model for the respiratory modulation of the heart beat-to-beat interval series. The model consists of a set of differential equations used to simulate the membrane potential of a single rabbit sinoatrial node cell, excited with a periodic input signal with added correlated noise. This signal, which simulates the input from the autonomous nervous system to the sinoatrial node, was included in the pacemaker equations as a modulation of the iNaK current pump and the potassium current iK. We focus at modeling the heart beat-to-beat time interval series from normal subjects during meditation of the Kundalini Yoga and Chi techniques. The analysis of the experimental data indicates that while the embedding of pre-meditation and control cases have a roughly circular shape, it acquires a polygonal shape during meditation, triangular for the Kundalini Yoga data and quadrangular in the case of Chi data. The model was used to assess the waveshape of the respiratory signals needed to reproduce the trajectory of the experimental data in the phase space. The embedding of the Chi data could be reproduced using a periodic signal obtained by smoothing a square wave. In the case of Kundalini Yoga data, the embedding was reproduced with a periodic signal obtained by smoothing a triangular wave having a rising branch of longer duration than the decreasing branch. Our study provides an estimation of the respiratory signal using only the heart beat-to-beat time interval series.

  5. Timing in a variable interval procedure: evidence for a memory singularity.

    PubMed

    Matell, Matthew S; Kim, Jung S; Hartshorne, Loryn

    2014-01-01

    Rats were trained in either a 30 s peak-interval procedure, or a 15-45 s variable interval peak procedure with a uniform distribution (Exp 1) or a ramping probability distribution (Exp 2). Rats in all groups showed peak shaped response functions centered around 30 s, with the uniform group having an earlier and broader peak response function and rats in the ramping group having a later peak function as compared to the single duration group. The changes in these mean functions, as well as the statistics from single trial analyses, can be better captured by a model of timing in which memory is represented by a single, average, delay to reinforcement compared to one in which all durations are stored as a distribution, such as the complete memory model of Scalar Expectancy Theory or a simple associative model. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Associative and Temporal Learning.

  6. Timing in a variable interval procedure: evidence for a memory singularity.

    PubMed

    Matell, Matthew S; Kim, Jung S; Hartshorne, Loryn

    2014-01-01

    Rats were trained in either a 30 s peak-interval procedure, or a 15-45 s variable interval peak procedure with a uniform distribution (Exp 1) or a ramping probability distribution (Exp 2). Rats in all groups showed peak shaped response functions centered around 30 s, with the uniform group having an earlier and broader peak response function and rats in the ramping group having a later peak function as compared to the single duration group. The changes in these mean functions, as well as the statistics from single trial analyses, can be better captured by a model of timing in which memory is represented by a single, average, delay to reinforcement compared to one in which all durations are stored as a distribution, such as the complete memory model of Scalar Expectancy Theory or a simple associative model. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Associative and Temporal Learning. PMID:24012783

  7. Automatic identification of fetal breathing movements in fetal RR interval time series.

    PubMed

    Van Leeuwen, Peter; Voss, Anna; Cysarz, Dirk; Edelhäuser, Friedrich; Grönemeyer, Dietrich

    2012-03-01

    Fetal breathing movements are associated with respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). We present an algorithm which processes RR interval time series in the time and frequency domain, identifying spectral peaks with characteristics consistent with fetal RSA. Tested on 50 data sets from the second and third trimester, the algorithm had a sensitivity of 96.1%, false positive rate 35.7%, false negative rate 3.9%. The characteristics of automatically and visually identified episodes were very similar and corresponded the expected changes over gestation. The method is suited for easy and reliable identification of fetal breathing movements.

  8. The time lag and interval of discharge with a spring actuated fuel injection pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Robertson; Gardiner, A W

    1923-01-01

    Discussed here is research on a spring activated fuel pump for solid or airless injection with small, high speed internal combustion engines. The pump characteristics under investigation were the interval of fuel injection in terms of degrees of crank travel and in absolute time, the lag between the time the injection pump plunger begins its stroke and the appearance of the jet at the orifice, and the manner in which the fuel spray builds up to a maximum when the fuel valve is opened, and then diminishes.

  9. Linear time-dependent reference intervals where there is measurement error in the time variable-a parametric approach.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    This article re-examines parametric methods for the calculation of time specific reference intervals where there is measurement error present in the time covariate. Previous published work has commonly been based on the standard ordinary least squares approach, weighted where appropriate. In fact, this is an incorrect method when there are measurement errors present, and in this article, we show that the use of this approach may, in certain cases, lead to referral patterns that may vary with different values of the covariate. Thus, it would not be the case that all patients are treated equally; some subjects would be more likely to be referred than others, hence violating the principle of equal treatment required by the International Federation for Clinical Chemistry. We show, by using measurement error models, that reference intervals are produced that satisfy the requirement for equal treatment for all subjects.

  10. Time interval moderates the relationship between psyching-up and actual sprint performance.

    PubMed

    Hammoudi-Nassib, Sarra; Chtara, Moktar; Nassib, Sabri; Briki, Walid; Hammoudi-Riahi, Sabra; Tod, David; Chamari, Karim

    2014-11-01

    This study attempted to test whether the strongest effect of psyching-up (PU) strategy on actual sprint performance can be observed when the strategy is used immediately (or almost) before performance compared with when there is a delay between PU and performance. To do so, 16 male sprinters (age, 20.6 ± 1.3 years; body mass, 77.5 ± 7.1 kg; height, 180.8 ± 5.6 cm) were enrolled in a counterbalanced experimental design in which participants were randomly assigned to 10 sessions (2 [Experimental Condition: imagery vs. distraction] × 5 [Time Intervals: no interval, 1 minute, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, and 5 minutes]). Before performing the experimental tasks, participants rated: (a) the Hooper index, (b) their degree of self-confidence, and (c) after the completion of the experimental test; they rated their perceived effort. Findings showed that the imagery significantly improved sprint performance. Specifically, the imagery enhanced performance on the phase of acceleration (0-10 m) and on the overall sprint (0-30 m) when used immediately before performance and at 1- and 2-minute intervals but not for 3- and 5-minute intervals. These findings support the hypothesis that the potential effect of the PU strategy on performance vanishes over time. The pre-experimental task Hooper and self-efficacy indexes did not change across the 10 experimental sessions, reinforcing the view that the observed performance changes were directly caused by the experimental manipulation and not through any altered status of the athletes (self-efficacy, fatigue/recovery, and stress). The potential mechanisms underlying such a process and practical applications are discussed.

  11. A BiCMOS time interval digitizer based on fully-differential, current-steering circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Loinaz, M.J.; Wooley, B.A. . Center for Integrated Systems)

    1994-06-01

    A time interval digitizer cell with a 0--16 ns input range and a nominal LSB width of 1.0 ns has been integrated in a 2-[mu]m BiCMOS technology. The circuit exhibits both integral and differential nonlinearity below 0.15 LSB and a timing error of 0.32 ns RMS. Logic gate propagation delays are used as time measurement units, and the nominal value of the delays is set by an on-chip phase-locked loop (PLL). Fully-differential, current-steering circuits with low voltage swings are used to implement the time interval digitizer so as to generate minimal switching noise. The cell is to be used in the monolithic, multi-channel realization of a high-sensitivity, mixed-signal data acquisition front-end. By virtue of the time digitization architecture used, the average power dissipation of the cell is only 19.8 mW, despite the use of circuits that dissipate static power, and the layout area is a compact 448 [mu]m x 634 [mu]m.

  12. Non-Linear Dynamic Analysis of Inter-Word Time Intervals in Psychotic Speech

    PubMed Central

    Avissar, Sofia; Schreiber, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    “Language is a form and not a substance” — Ferdinand de Saussure Objective: Analyses of speech processes in schizophrenia are invariably focused on words as vocal signals. The results of such analyses are, however, strongly related to content, and may be language- and culture-dependent. Little attention has been paid to a pure measure of the form of speech, unrelated to its content: inter-words time intervals. Method: 15 patients with schizophrenia and 15 healthy volunteers are recorded spontaneously speaking for 10–15 min. Recordings are analyzed for inter-words time intervals using the following non-linear dynamical methods: unstable periodic orbits, correlation dimension, bi-spectral analysis, and symbolic dynamics. Results: The series of inter-word time intervals in normal speech have the characteristics of a low-dimensional chaotic attractor with a correlation dimension of \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$3.2\\pm 1.1$\\end{document}. Deconstruction of the attractor appears in psychosis with re-establishment after anti-psychotic treatment. Shannon entropy, a measure of the complexity in the time series, calculated from symbolic dynamics, is higher for psychotic speech, which is also characterized by higher levels of phase coupling: higher bicoherence, obtained using bi-spectral analysis. Conclusion: Non-linear dynamical methods applied to ITIs thus enable a content-independent, pure measure of the form of normal thought, its distortion in psychosis, and its restoration under treatment. PMID:27170852

  13. Effect of Variations in IRU Integration Time Interval On Accuracy of Aqua Attitude Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natanson, G. A.; Tracewell, Dave

    2003-01-01

    During Aqua launch support, attitude analysts noticed several anomalies in Onboard Computer (OBC) rates and in rates computed by the ground Attitude Determination System (ADS). These included: 1) periodic jumps in the OBC pitch rate every 2 minutes; 2) spikes in ADS pitch rate every 4 minutes; 3) close agreement between pitch rates computed by ADS and those derived from telemetered OBC quaternions (in contrast to the step-wise pattern observed for telemetered OBC rates); 4) spikes of +/- 10 milliseconds in telemetered IRU integration time every 4 minutes (despite the fact that telemetered time tags of any two sequential IRU measurements were always 1 second apart from each other). An analysis presented in the paper explains this anomalous behavior by a small average offset of about 0.5 +/- 0.05 microsec in the time interval between two sequential accumulated angle measurements. It is shown that errors in the estimated pitch angle due to neglecting the aforementioned variations in the integration time interval by the OBC is within +/- 2 arcseconds. Ground attitude solutions are found to be accurate enough to see the effect of the variations on the accuracy of the estimated pitch angle.

  14. Accelerometer body sensor network improves systolic time interval assessment with wearable ballistocardiography.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Andrew D; Inan, Omer T

    2015-01-01

    Systolic time intervals (STI) are non-invasive measures of cardiac function. Due to the fact that STI can be measured noninvasively outside the clinic, STI are a promising method for long-term monitoring of patients with cardiovascular disease. In particular, the pre-ejection period (PEP) has been measured successfully from body vibrations of the beating heart, a technique called ballistocardiography (BCG), using a weighing scale. Similar measurements can be made with on-body accelerometers, however these wearable BCG signals are typically more challenging to interpret than whole-body BCG. In this paper, we conducted a small pilot study with four subjects to investigate whether a body sensor network of four accelerometers positioned on the wrist, arm, sternum, and head could improve beat-by-beat PEP prediction beyond that of each sensor alone. Linear models were fitted from the R-J and R-I intervals of the four BCG signals to PEP measured with impedance cardiography from 5-minute recordings after isometric lower-body exercise. Specifically, we found that (i) the RMS error of PEP estimation from the wearable BCG sensors can be reduced by using double integration, (ii) the standard deviation of PEP estimates from R-I intervals was smaller than from R-J intervals, and (iii) linear models combining both R-J and R-I measurements from all sensors resulted in the best average correlation (r(2) = 0.96 ± 0.01) and lowest average root mean square error (2.5 ± 0.8 ms) from 5×2-fold cross validation.

  15. Dynamic response of the Initial Systolic Time Interval to a breathing stimulus measured with impedance cardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijer, Jan H.; Hoekstra, Femke; Habers, Esther; Verdaasdonk, Ruud M.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2010-04-01

    The Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI) is a measure for the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. The present study reports about the dynamic response of ISTI to a Valsalva manoeuvre. This response was investigated in 22 young healthy volunteers, having different levels of training in sports. The time course of the ISTI during the Valsalva manoeuvre was found to follow a distinct pattern and to be analogous to the course of the Pre-Ejection Period (PEP), also obtained from ECG and ICG signals, reported earlier. The recordings show a definite influence of the Frank-Starling mechanism and are to some extent consistent with reports on the time course of sympathetic activation. The highly trained subjects showed an ISTI that was systematically longer at all moments of the manoeuvre.

  16. Oscillations in the evaluation of fractal dimension of RR intervals time series.

    PubMed

    Muñoz Diosdado, A; Gálvez Coyt, G; Pérez Uribe, B M

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we have reported the presence of oscillations in the graphs we have used to evaluate the Higuchi's fractal dimension in RR intervals time series of congestive heart failure (CHF) patients in the sleep phase but these oscillations hardly appear in all the six hours of the awake phase. In this paper we report the same analysis for heart rate time series for different groups of healthy subjects; we are looking for the presence of this kind of oscillations in other situations. We analyzed all the time series in the Exaggerated Heart Rate Oscillations database of Physionet during two meditation techniques: volunteers with spontaneous breathing, subjects in meditation, volunteers in a metronomic breathing group and elite athletes. We have found oscillations in the graphs of the Higuchi's fractal dimension in the heart rate time series of subjects in meditation and metronomic breathing and this fact coincides with previous reported results.

  17. Effects of varied doses of psilocybin on time interval reproduction in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Wackermann, Jirí; Wittmann, Marc; Hasler, Felix; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2008-04-11

    Action of a hallucinogenic substance, psilocybin, on internal time representation was investigated in two double-blind, placebo-controlled studies: Experiment 1 with 12 subjects and graded doses, and Experiment 2 with 9 subjects and a very low dose. The task consisted in repeated reproductions of time intervals in the range from 1.5 to 5s. The effects were assessed by parameter kappa of the 'dual klepsydra' model of internal time representation, fitted to individual response data and intra-individually normalized with respect to initial values. The estimates kappa were in the same order of magnitude as in earlier studies. In both experiments, kappa was significantly increased by psilocybin at 90 min from the drug intake, indicating a higher loss rate of the internal duration representation. These findings are tentatively linked to qualitative alterations of subjective time in altered states of consciousness.

  18. Fast time-series prediction using high-dimensional data: Evaluating confidence interval credibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Yoshito

    2014-05-01

    I propose an index for evaluating the credibility of confidence intervals for future observables predicted from high-dimensional time-series data. The index evaluates the distance from the current state to the data manifold. I demonstrate the index with artificial datasets generated from the Lorenz'96 II model [Lorenz, in Proceedings of the Seminar on Predictability, Vol. 1 (ECMWF, Reading, UK, 1996), p. 1], the Lorenz'96 I model [Hansen and Smith, J. Atmos. Sci. 57, 2859 (2000), 10.1175/1520-0469(2000)057<2859:TROOCI>2.0.CO;2], and the coupled map lattice, and a real dataset for the solar irradiation around Japan.

  19. Comparative evaluation of nickel discharge from brackets in artificial saliva at different time intervals

    PubMed Central

    Jithesh, C.; Venkataramana, V.; Penumatsa, Narendravarma; Reddy, S. N.; Poornima, K. Y.; Rajasigamani, K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine and compare the potential difference of nickel release from three different orthodontic brackets, in different artificial pH, in different time intervals. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven samples of three different orthodontic brackets were selected and grouped as 1, 2, and 3. Each group was divided into three subgroups depending on the type of orthodontic brackets, salivary pH and the time interval. The Nickel release from each subgroup were analyzed by using inductively coupled plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrophotometer (Perkin Elmer, Optima 2100 DV, USA) model. Quantitative analysis of nickel was performed three times, and the mean value was used as result. ANOVA (F-test) was used to test the significant difference among the groups at 0.05 level of significance (P < 0.05). The descriptive method of statistics was used to calculate the mean, standard deviation, minimum and maximum. SPSS 18 software ((SPSS.Ltd, Quarry bay, Hong Kong, PASW-statistics 18) was used to analyze the study. Result: The analysis shows a significant difference between three groups. The study shows that the nickel releases from the recycled stainless steel brackets have the highest at all 4.2 pH except in 120 h. Conclusion: The study result shows that the nickel release from the recycled stainless steel brackets is highest. Metal slot ceramic bracket release significantly less nickel. So, recycled stainless steel brackets should not be used for nickel allergic patients. Metal slot ceramic brackets are advisable. PMID:26538924

  20. Interval timing under variations in the relative validity of temporal cues.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Neil; Roberts, William A

    2013-10-01

    Two groups of pigeons were trained to respond on a white center key to a fixed-interval, 60-s schedule of reinforcement signaled by the onset of a side-key cue (S+ training). In additional training sessions, S+ trials alternated between S- trials in which a different side-key cue signaled nonreinforcement after 60 s (S+/S- training). For one group, S+/S- training sessions followed S+ training, and for the other group, S+/S- training preceded S+ training. Peak-time curves obtained from extended nonrewarded probe trials inserted among training trials showed loss of control by time during S+/S- training relative to S+ training. A follow-up experiment showed that this result was not caused by a difference in probability of reinforcement. We suggest that attention to time was weakened by the introduction of visual cues that were more valid predictors of trial outcomes. PMID:23627800

  1. Time interval measurement device based on surface acoustic wave filter excitation, providing 1 ps precision and stability

    SciTech Connect

    Panek, Petr; Prochazka, Ivan

    2007-09-15

    This article deals with the time interval measurement device, which is based on a surface acoustic wave (SAW) filter as a time interpolator. The operating principle is based on the fact that a transversal SAW filter excited by a short pulse can generate a finite signal with highly suppressed spectra outside a narrow frequency band. If the responses to two excitations are sampled at clock ticks, they can be precisely reconstructed from a finite number of samples and then compared so as to determine the time interval between the two excitations. We have designed and constructed a two-channel time interval measurement device which allows independent timing of two events and evaluation of the time interval between them. The device has been constructed using commercially available components. The experimental results proved the concept. We have assessed the single-shot time interval measurement precision of 1.3 ps rms that corresponds to the time of arrival precision of 0.9 ps rms in each channel. The temperature drift of the measured time interval on temperature is lower than 0.5 ps/K, and the long term stability is better than {+-}0.2 ps/h. These are to our knowledge the best values reported for the time interval measurement device. The results are in good agreement with the error budget based on the theoretical analysis.

  2. Time interval measurement device based on surface acoustic wave filter excitation, providing 1 ps precision and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panek, Petr; Prochazka, Ivan

    2007-09-01

    This article deals with the time interval measurement device, which is based on a surface acoustic wave (SAW) filter as a time interpolator. The operating principle is based on the fact that a transversal SAW filter excited by a short pulse can generate a finite signal with highly suppressed spectra outside a narrow frequency band. If the responses to two excitations are sampled at clock ticks, they can be precisely reconstructed from a finite number of samples and then compared so as to determine the time interval between the two excitations. We have designed and constructed a two-channel time interval measurement device which allows independent timing of two events and evaluation of the time interval between them. The device has been constructed using commercially available components. The experimental results proved the concept. We have assessed the single-shot time interval measurement precision of 1.3ps rms that corresponds to the time of arrival precision of 0.9ps rms in each channel. The temperature drift of the measured time interval on temperature is lower than 0.5ps/K, and the long term stability is better than ±0.2ps/h. These are to our knowledge the best values reported for the time interval measurement device. The results are in good agreement with the error budget based on the theoretical analysis.

  3. Detection of abnormal item based on time intervals for recommender systems.

    PubMed

    Gao, Min; Yuan, Quan; Ling, Bin; Xiong, Qingyu

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of e-business, personalized recommendation has become core competence for enterprises to gain profits and improve customer satisfaction. Although collaborative filtering is the most successful approach for building a recommender system, it suffers from "shilling" attacks. In recent years, the research on shilling attacks has been greatly improved. However, the approaches suffer from serious problem in attack model dependency and high computational cost. To solve the problem, an approach for the detection of abnormal item is proposed in this paper. In the paper, two common features of all attack models are analyzed at first. A revised bottom-up discretized approach is then proposed based on time intervals and the features for the detection. The distributions of ratings in different time intervals are compared to detect anomaly based on the calculation of chi square distribution (χ(2)). We evaluated our approach on four types of items which are defined according to the life cycles of these items. The experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves a high detection rate with low computational cost when the number of attack profiles is more than 15. It improves the efficiency in shilling attacks detection by narrowing down the suspicious users.

  4. Digital redesign of uncertain interval systems based on time-response resemblance via particle swarm optimization.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chen-Chien; Lin, Geng-Yu

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, a particle swarm optimization (PSO) based approach is proposed to derive an optimal digital controller for redesigned digital systems having an interval plant based on time-response resemblance of the closed-loop systems. Because of difficulties in obtaining time-response envelopes for interval systems, the design problem is formulated as an optimization problem of a cost function in terms of aggregated deviation between the step responses corresponding to extremal energies of the redesigned digital system and those of their continuous counterpart. A proposed evolutionary framework incorporating three PSOs is subsequently presented to minimize the cost function to derive an optimal set of parameters for the digital controller, so that step response sequences corresponding to the extremal sequence energy of the redesigned digital system suitably approximate those of their continuous counterpart under the perturbation of the uncertain plant parameters. Computer simulations have shown that redesigned digital systems incorporating the PSO-derived digital controllers have better system performance than those using conventional open-loop discretization methods.

  5. Detection of Abnormal Item Based on Time Intervals for Recommender Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Quan; Ling, Bin; Xiong, Qingyu

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of e-business, personalized recommendation has become core competence for enterprises to gain profits and improve customer satisfaction. Although collaborative filtering is the most successful approach for building a recommender system, it suffers from “shilling” attacks. In recent years, the research on shilling attacks has been greatly improved. However, the approaches suffer from serious problem in attack model dependency and high computational cost. To solve the problem, an approach for the detection of abnormal item is proposed in this paper. In the paper, two common features of all attack models are analyzed at first. A revised bottom-up discretized approach is then proposed based on time intervals and the features for the detection. The distributions of ratings in different time intervals are compared to detect anomaly based on the calculation of chi square distribution (χ2). We evaluated our approach on four types of items which are defined according to the life cycles of these items. The experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves a high detection rate with low computational cost when the number of attack profiles is more than 15. It improves the efficiency in shilling attacks detection by narrowing down the suspicious users. PMID:24693248

  6. Detection of abnormal item based on time intervals for recommender systems.

    PubMed

    Gao, Min; Yuan, Quan; Ling, Bin; Xiong, Qingyu

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of e-business, personalized recommendation has become core competence for enterprises to gain profits and improve customer satisfaction. Although collaborative filtering is the most successful approach for building a recommender system, it suffers from "shilling" attacks. In recent years, the research on shilling attacks has been greatly improved. However, the approaches suffer from serious problem in attack model dependency and high computational cost. To solve the problem, an approach for the detection of abnormal item is proposed in this paper. In the paper, two common features of all attack models are analyzed at first. A revised bottom-up discretized approach is then proposed based on time intervals and the features for the detection. The distributions of ratings in different time intervals are compared to detect anomaly based on the calculation of chi square distribution (χ(2)). We evaluated our approach on four types of items which are defined according to the life cycles of these items. The experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves a high detection rate with low computational cost when the number of attack profiles is more than 15. It improves the efficiency in shilling attacks detection by narrowing down the suspicious users. PMID:24693248

  7. Mechanisms of impulsive choice: I. Individual differences in interval timing and reward processing.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Andrew T; Smith, Aaron P; Kirkpatrick, Kimberly

    2014-07-01

    Impulsive choice behavior incorporates the psychological mechanisms involved in the processing of the anticipated magnitude and delay until reward. The goal of the present experiment was to determine whether individual differences in such processes related to individual differences in impulsive choice behavior. Two groups of rats (Delay Group and Magnitude Group) were initially exposed to an impulsive choice task with choices between smaller-sooner (SS) and larger-later (LL) rewards. The Delay Group was subsequently exposed to a temporal discrimination task followed by a progressive interval task, whereas the Magnitude Group was exposed to a reward magnitude sensitivity task followed by a progressive ratio task. Intertask correlations revealed that the rats in the Delay Group that made more self-controlled (LL) choices also displayed lower standard deviations in the temporal bisection task and greater delay tolerance in the progressive interval task. Impulsive choice behavior in the Magnitude Group did not display any substantial correlations with the reward magnitude sensitivity and progressive ratio tasks. The results indicate the importance of core timing processes in impulsive choice behavior, and encourage further research examining the effects of changes in core timing processes on impulsive choice.

  8. Pre- and postflight systolic time intervals during LBNP: the second manned Skylab mission.

    PubMed

    Bergman, S A; Hoffler, G W; Johnson, R L; Wolthuis, R A

    1976-04-01

    After space flight of 59 d, Skylab 3 astronauts were stressed with lower body negative pressure (LBNP). During this stress procedure vectorcardiograms, pneumograms, phonocardiograms, and carotid pulse tracings were monitored and recorded onto analog tape. Accepted techniques were used to measure the intervals of systole. The postflight results were compared to multiple preflight tests and each of the three crewmen served as his own control. Immediately postflight, there were elevations in heart rate and blood pressure in response to a fixed level (-50 mm Hg) of LBNP. Total electromechanical systole, (Q-S2) I, was unchanged. Ejection time index (ETI) was depressed at rest and during stress, while pre-ejection period was elevated compared with preflight values. Systolic time intervals (STI) were within preflight limits after 1 month on earth in all crewmen. Resting STI returned sooner than did stressed STI. The magnitude and direction of STI in the postflight period were similar to those obtained from patients with moderate heart disease, although signs and symptoms were absent in the astronauts. However, the abnormality of the stressed STI persisted after both blood volume repletion and lowered afterload. These findings suggest a compromise in cardiac function, peripheral circulatory integrity, or both after exposure to long-duration space flight, and are consistent with findings reported after 3 weeks of absolute bedrest. PMID:1275822

  9. One-Year Real-Time Operational Prediction Intervals for Direct Normal Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Y.; Carreira Pedro, H. T.; Coimbra, C. F.

    2015-12-01

    This work describes an algorithm to generate intra-hour prediction intervals (PIs) for the highly-variable direct normal irradiance, which is the energy source for the concentrated solar power technologies. The prediction intervals are generated using a Multi-layer Stochastic-Learning Model (MSLM), which is developed based on methods such as: sky imaging techniques, support vector machine and artificial neural network. The MSLM is trained using one year of co-located, high-quality irradiance and sky image recording in Folsom, California. In addition to being validated with historical data, the algorithm has been generating operational PI forecasts in real-time for that observatory since July 1st 2014. In the real-time scenario, without re-training or significant maintenance, the hybrid model consistently provides valid PI (PICP > 92%) and outperforms the reference persistence model (PICP ~ 85%) regardless of weather condition. This work has great impact in the field of solar energy to potentially facilitate the level of solar penetration in the grid with significantly reduced integration costs.

  10. An application of the active time model to multiple concurrent variable-interval schedules.

    PubMed

    Brown, Emily Kathryn; Cleaveland, J Mark

    2009-06-01

    The current experiment investigates whether an active time model can account for anomalous results that have emerged from multiple schedule, concurrent variable-interval (VI) VI experiments. The model assumes that (1) during concurrent VI VI training pigeons learn a function that relates time since the most immediate response, i.e., active time, to changeover probabilities and (2) that molar preference is the result of an interaction between inter-response time frequencies and the learned active time changeover functions. Pigeons were trained under a concurrent VI 30-s VI 30-s schedule and a concurrent VI 60-s VI 60-s schedule. Probes were conducted in which VI 30-s and VI 60-s stimuli were paired. During these probes, birds allocated choices equally to the stimuli. The active time model accurately fit individual subject data. In contrast data were not fit by a variant of scalar expectancy theory proposed by Gibbon [Gibbon, J., 1995. Dynamics of time matching: arousal makes better seem worse. Psychon. Bull. Rev. 2, 208-215].

  11. Amphetamine affects the start of responding in the peak interval timing task.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kathleen M; Horvitz, Jon C; Balsam, Peter D

    2007-02-22

    In this paper we investigate how amphetamine affects performance in a PI task by comparing two analyses of responding during peak trials. After training on 24 s fixed interval (FI-24) with 96 s peak trials, rats were given amphetamine for 4 consecutive days at doses of .5 and 1.0 mg/kg. Responses during peak trials were fitted with a Gaussian distribution to estimate the expected time of reinforcement from the peak time. A single trials analysis was also performed to determine the start time and stop time of the transition into and out of a high rate of responding on each peak trial. Amphetamine significantly decreased peak times as measured with the Gaussian curve fitting. However, in the single trials analysis, animals initiated responding significantly earlier, but did not stop responding earlier. Thus, fitting a Gaussian to the average performance across trials sometimes provides a different characterization of the timing process than does analyzing the start and stop of responding on individual trials. In the current experiment, the latter approach provided a more precise characterization of the effects of amphetamine on response timing.

  12. Income maximizing on concurrent ratio-interval schedules of reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Shurtleff, David; Silberberg, Alan

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments examined the effect of food availability on pigeons' choice behavior under concurrent schedules of reinforcement. In Experiment 1, 3 pigeons earned their daily food ration by choosing, in 30-min sessions, between concurrent variable-ratio 30 variable-interval 40-s schedules. Food presentations during both schedules lasted 2 or 12 s, depending upon the condition. Relative variable-ratio response rate was inversely related to hopper duration. In Experiment 2, 4 pigeons received their daily feeding by responding on the same schedule pair as in Experiment 1 (with 4-s food presentations) in sessions that varied in length from 10 to 30 min, depending on the condition. The length of a vertical slit projected on a response key increased with time so that “passage of time” might be more easily discriminable. As session duration decreased, relative variable-ratio response rate increased. In Experiment 3, 4 pigeons chose between two variable-interval 40-s schedules. One schedule operated without regard to the schedule selected, whereas the other operated only when the subject responded in its presence (dependent). Although these schedules had the same feedback function, preference for the dependent variable interval increased as session duration decreased from 30 to 10 min. The preference changes in these studies reveal the operation of an income-maximizing process in choice. PMID:16812610

  13. Derivation of systolic time intervals from Doppler measurement of temporal arterial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Rothendler, J A; Schick, E C; Ryan, T J

    1981-01-01

    The carotid pulse method of recording systolic time intervals is limited by significant motion-induced artifact, making it unsuitable for studying patients during exercise. As an approach to overcoming this limitation, a new method utilizing the blood velocity profile of the superficial temporal artery measured by Doppler ultrasound has been developed. When compared with the values obtained from the conventional carotid pulse method, Doppler-derived left ventricular ejection time and preejection period showed excellent correlation (r = 0.99 for both) and the Doppler-derived measurements showed little intra- or interobserver variability. Studies performed during treadmill exercise showed that in 8 of 10 subjects, suitable tracing could be recorded through stage 3 of the Bruce protocol, confirming the enhanced stability of the technique compared with the carotid pulse method.

  14. Pigeons' wait-time responses to transitions in interfood-interval duration: Another look at cyclic schedule performance

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Jennifer J.; Thaw, Jean M.; Staddon, John E. R.

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments reveal that animals can rapidly learn about intervals of time. We studied the nature of this fast-acting process in two experiments. In Experiment 1 pigeons were exposed to a modified fixed-time schedule, in which the time between food rewards (interfood interval) changed at an unpredictable point in each session, either decreasing from 15 to 5 s (step-down) or increasing from 15 to 45 s (step-up). The birds were able to track under both conditions by producing postreinforcement wait times proportional to the preceding interfood-interval duration. However, the time course of responding differed: Tracking was apparently more gradual in the step-up condition. Experiment 2 studied the effect of having both kinds of transitions within the same session by exposing pigeons to a repeating (cyclic) sequence of the interfood-interval values used in Experiment 1. Pigeons detected changes in the input sequence of interfood intervals, but only for a few sessions—discrimination worsened with further training. The dynamic effects we observed do not support a linear waiting process of time discrimination, but instead point to a timing mechanism based on the frequency and recency of prior interfood intervals and not the preceding interfood interval alone. PMID:16812693

  15. Continuous-time interval model identification of blood glucose dynamics for type 1 diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchsteiger, Harald; Johansson, Rolf; Renard, Eric; del Re, Luigi

    2014-07-01

    While good physiological models of the glucose metabolism in type 1 diabetic patients are well known, their parameterisation is difficult. The high intra-patient variability observed is a further major obstacle. This holds for data-based models too, so that no good patient-specific models are available. Against this background, this paper proposes the use of interval models to cover the different metabolic conditions. The control-oriented models contain a carbohydrate and insulin sensitivity factor to be used for insulin bolus calculators directly. Available clinical measurements were sampled on an irregular schedule which prompts the use of continuous-time identification, also for the direct estimation of the clinically interpretable factors mentioned above. An identification method is derived and applied to real data from 28 diabetic patients. Model estimation was done on a clinical data-set, whereas validation results shown were done on an out-of-clinic, everyday life data-set. The results show that the interval model approach allows a much more regular estimation of the parameters and avoids physiologically incompatible parameter estimates.

  16. On the gap and time interval between the first two maxima of long continuous time random walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounaix, Philippe; Schehr, Grégory; Majumdar, Satya N.

    2016-01-01

    We consider a one-dimensional continuous time random walk (CTRW) on a fixed time interval T where at each time step the walker waits a random time τ, before performing a jump drawn from a symmetric continuous probability distribution function (PDF) f(η ) , of Lévy index 0<μ ≤slant 2 . Our study includes the case where the waiting time PDF \\Psi(τ ) has a power law tail, \\Psi(τ )\\propto {τ-1-γ} , with 0<γ <1 , such that the average time between two consecutive jumps is infinite. The random motion is sub-diffusive if γ <μ /2 (and super-diffusive if γ >μ /2 ). We investigate the joint PDF of the gap g between the first two highest positions of the CTRW and the time t separating these two maxima. We show that this PDF reaches a stationary limiting joint distribution p(g, t) in the limit of long CTRW, T\\to ∞ . Our exact analytical results show a very rich behavior of this joint PDF in the (γ,μ ) plane, which we study in great detail. Our main results are verified by numerical simulations. This work provides a non trivial extension to CTRWs of the recent study in the discrete time setting by Majumdar et al (2014 J. Stat. Mech. P09013).

  17. Cumulative Instructional Time and Relative Effectiveness Conclusions: Extending Research on Response Intervals, Learning, and Measurement Scale.

    PubMed

    Black, Michelle P; Skinner, Christopher H; Forbes, Bethany E; McCurdy, Merilee; Coleman, Mari Beth; Davis, Kristie; Gettelfinger, Maripat

    2016-03-01

    Adapted alternating treatments designs were used to evaluate three computer-based flashcard reading interventions (1-s, 3-s, or 5-s response intervals) across two students with disabilities. When learning was plotted with cumulative instructional sessions on the horizontal axis, the session-series graphs suggest that the interventions were similarly effective. When the same data were plotted as a function of cumulative instructional seconds, time-series graphs suggest that the 1-s intervention caused the most rapid learning for one student. Discussion focuses on applied implications of comparative effectiveness studies and why measures of cumulative instructional time are needed to identify the most effective intervention(s).Comparative effectiveness studies may not identify the intervention which causes the most rapid learning.Session-series repeated measures are not the same as time-series repeated measures.Measuring the time students spend in each intervention (i.e., cumulative instructional seconds) allows practitioners to identify interventions that enhance learning most rapidly.Student time spent working under interventions is critical for drawing applied conclusions. PMID:27606240

  18. A comparison of momentary time sampling and partial-interval recording for evaluating functional relations.

    PubMed

    Meany-Daboul, Maeve G; Roscoe, Eileen M; Bourret, Jason C; Ahearn, William H

    2007-01-01

    In the current study, momentary time sampling (MTS) and partial-interval recording (PIR) were compared to continuous-duration recording of stereotypy and to the frequency of self-injury during a treatment analysis to determine whether the recording method affected data interpretation. Five previously conducted treatment analysis data sets were analyzed by creating separate graphic displays for each measurement method (duration or frequency, MTS, and PIR). An expert panel interview and structured criterion visual inspection were used to evaluate treatment effects across measurement methods. Results showed that treatment analysis interpretations based on both discontinuous recording methods often matched those based on frequency or duration recording; however, interpretations based on MTS were slightly more likely to match those based on duration and those based on PIR were slightly more likely to match those based on frequency.

  19. A sediment budget for southern Lake Michigan: source and sink models for different time intervals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.; Foster, D.S.

    1994-01-01

    Two terms dominate the modern sediment-budget equation: (1) bluff erosion, which is an order of magnitude larger than either rivers or aerosols as a source, and (2) deposition in the deep basin, which is more than two orders of magnitude greater as a sink than suspended sediment transport out of the basin. The attempt to reconstruct sediment budgets for time intervals of 100, 5000, and 10 000 years leads to important insights about erosion and sedimentation processes. Bluff erosion is the dominant source of both sand and mud in the basin. The deep lake floor is the primary sink for mud, whereas both the deep lake and nearshore areas are important sinks for sand. -from Authors

  20. Optimal time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy in preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jong Hoon . E-mail: jhkim2@amc.seoul.kr; Choi, Won Sik; Kim, Hee Cheol; Chang, Heung Moon; Ryu, Min Hee; Jang, Se Jin; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-wook; Shin, Seong Soo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: Capecitabine and its metabolites reach peak plasma concentrations 1 to 2 hours after a single oral administration, and concentrations rapidly decrease thereafter. We performed a retrospective analysis to find the optimal time interval between capecitabine administration and radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy was measured in patients who were treated with preoperative radiotherapy and concurrent capecitabine for rectal cancer. Patients were classified into the following groups. Group A1 included patients who took capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy, and Group B1 included all other patients. Group B1 was then subdivided into Group A2 (patients who took capecitabine 2 hours before radiotherapy) and Group B2. Group B2 was further divided into Group A3 and Group B3 with the same method. Total mesorectal excision was performed 6 weeks after completion of chemoradiation and the pathologic response was evaluated. Results: A total of 200 patients were enrolled in this study. Pathologic examination showed that Group A1 had higher rates of complete regression of primary tumors in the rectum (23.5% vs. 9.6%, p = 0.01), good response (44.7% vs. 25.2%, p = 0.006), and lower T stages (p = 0.021) compared with Group B1; however, Groups A2 and A3 did not show any improvement compared with Groups B2 and B3. Multivariate analysis showed that increases in primary tumors in the rectum and good response were only significant when capecitabine was administered 1 hour before radiotherapy. Conclusion: In preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, the pathologic response could be improved by administering capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy.

  1. Protein supplementation during a short-interval prostaglandin-based protocol for timed AI in sheep.

    PubMed

    Fierro, S; Gil, J; Viñoles, C; Soca, F; Banchero, G; Olivera-Muzante, J

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this experiment was to improve the reproductive performance of a short-interval prostaglandin (PG)-based protocol for timed artificial insemination in sheep, using a short-term nutritional treatment. During the breeding season (March-April), 132 multiparous and 61 nulliparous Corriedale ewes grazing natural pastures (600 kg DM/ha, 8.5% CP), were allocated to two groups: 1, Control group (n=100) two injections of D-Cloprostenol (75 μg per dose, 7d apart: Synchrovine(®) protocol); and 2, Supplemented group (n=93) ewes in which stage of the oestrous cycle was synchronised with Synchrovine(®) protocol plus focus feeding of a protein supplement (33.8% CP) between PG doses (Day -7 to -2). Cervical AI was performed at fixed time (Day 0), 46 ± 1.0 h after the second PG injection using 150 million sperm per ewe. Ovulation rate (Day 10), pregnancy rate, prolificacy and fecundity at Day 69 were evaluated by ultrasonography. Ovulation rate at Day 10 (1.20 ± 0.05 vs. 1.22 ± 0.05), pregnancy (46 ± 0.05 vs. 56 ± 0.05), prolificacy (1.09 ± 0.04 vs. 1.06 ± 0.05), and fecundity (0.49 ± 0.06 vs. 0.59 ± 0.06) at Day 69, were similar between groups (P>0.05; Control and Supplemented group respectively). It is concluded that focus feeding for 6d with protein supplementation during a short-interval PG-based protocol (Synchrovine(®)) did not improve the reproductive outcome associated with this protocol.

  2. Protein supplementation during a short-interval prostaglandin-based protocol for timed AI in sheep.

    PubMed

    Fierro, S; Gil, J; Viñoles, C; Soca, F; Banchero, G; Olivera-Muzante, J

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this experiment was to improve the reproductive performance of a short-interval prostaglandin (PG)-based protocol for timed artificial insemination in sheep, using a short-term nutritional treatment. During the breeding season (March-April), 132 multiparous and 61 nulliparous Corriedale ewes grazing natural pastures (600 kg DM/ha, 8.5% CP), were allocated to two groups: 1, Control group (n=100) two injections of D-Cloprostenol (75 μg per dose, 7d apart: Synchrovine(®) protocol); and 2, Supplemented group (n=93) ewes in which stage of the oestrous cycle was synchronised with Synchrovine(®) protocol plus focus feeding of a protein supplement (33.8% CP) between PG doses (Day -7 to -2). Cervical AI was performed at fixed time (Day 0), 46 ± 1.0 h after the second PG injection using 150 million sperm per ewe. Ovulation rate (Day 10), pregnancy rate, prolificacy and fecundity at Day 69 were evaluated by ultrasonography. Ovulation rate at Day 10 (1.20 ± 0.05 vs. 1.22 ± 0.05), pregnancy (46 ± 0.05 vs. 56 ± 0.05), prolificacy (1.09 ± 0.04 vs. 1.06 ± 0.05), and fecundity (0.49 ± 0.06 vs. 0.59 ± 0.06) at Day 69, were similar between groups (P>0.05; Control and Supplemented group respectively). It is concluded that focus feeding for 6d with protein supplementation during a short-interval PG-based protocol (Synchrovine(®)) did not improve the reproductive outcome associated with this protocol. PMID:25129637

  3. Reasoning about real-time systems with temporal interval logic constraints on multi-state automata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabrielian, Armen

    1991-01-01

    Models of real-time systems using a single paradigm often turn out to be inadequate, whether the paradigm is based on states, rules, event sequences, or logic. A model-based approach to reasoning about real-time systems is presented in which a temporal interval logic called TIL is employed to define constraints on a new type of high level automata. The combination, called hierarchical multi-state (HMS) machines, can be used to model formally a real-time system, a dynamic set of requirements, the environment, heuristic knowledge about planning-related problem solving, and the computational states of the reasoning mechanism. In this framework, mathematical techniques were developed for: (1) proving the correctness of a representation; (2) planning of concurrent tasks to achieve goals; and (3) scheduling of plans to satisfy complex temporal constraints. HMS machines allow reasoning about a real-time system from a model of how truth arises instead of merely depending of what is true in a system.

  4. Mice plan decision strategies based on previously learned time intervals, locations, and probabilities.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Tuğçe; Gür, Ezgi; Balcı, Fuat

    2016-01-19

    Animals can shape their timed behaviors based on experienced probabilistic relations in a nearly optimal fashion. On the other hand, it is not clear if they adopt these timed decisions by making computations based on previously learnt task parameters (time intervals, locations, and probabilities) or if they gradually develop their decisions based on trial and error. To address this question, we tested mice in the timed-switching task, which required them to anticipate when (after a short or long delay) and at which of the two delay locations a reward would be presented. The probability of short trials differed between test groups in two experiments. Critically, we first trained mice on relevant task parameters by signaling the active trial with a discriminative stimulus and delivered the corresponding reward after the associated delay without any response requirement (without inducing switching behavior). During the test phase, both options were presented simultaneously to characterize the emergence and temporal characteristics of the switching behavior. Mice exhibited timed-switching behavior starting from the first few test trials, and their performance remained stable throughout testing in the majority of the conditions. Furthermore, as the probability of the short trial increased, mice waited longer before switching from the short to long location (experiment 1). These behavioral adjustments were in directions predicted by reward maximization. These results suggest that rather than gradually adjusting their time-dependent choice behavior, mice abruptly adopted temporal decision strategies by directly integrating their previous knowledge of task parameters into their timed behavior, supporting the model-based representational account of temporal risk assessment. PMID:26733674

  5. An Efficient Format for Nearly Constant-Time Access to Arbitrary Time Intervals in Large Trace Files

    DOE PAGES

    Chan, Anthony; Gropp, William; Lusk, Ewing

    2008-01-01

    A powerful method to aid in understanding the performance of parallel applications uses log or trace files containing time-stamped events and states (pairs of events). These trace files can be very large, often hundreds or even thousands of megabytes. Because of the cost of accessing and displaying such files, other methods are often used that reduce the size of the tracefiles at the cost of sacrificing detail or other information. This paper describes a hierarchical trace file format that provides for display of an arbitrary time window in a time independent of the total size of the file andmore » roughly proportional to the number of events within the time window. This format eliminates the need to sacrifice data to achieve a smaller trace file size (since storage is inexpensive, it is necessary only to make efficient use of bandwidth to that storage). The format can be used to organize a trace file or to create a separate file of annotations that may be used with conventional trace files. We present an analysis of the time to access all of the events relevant to an interval of time and we describe experiments demonstrating the performance of this file format.« less

  6. Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI) as a Predictor of Intradialytic Hypotension (IDH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biesheuvel, J. D.; Vervloet, M. G.; Verdaasdonk, R. M.; Meijer, J. H.

    2013-04-01

    In haemodialysis treatment the clearance and volume control by the kidneys of a patient are partially replaced by intermittent haemodialysis. Because this artificial process is performed on a limited time scale, unphysiological imbalances in the fluid compartments of the body occur, that can lead to intradialytic hypotensions (IDH). An IDH endangers the efficacy of the haemodialysis session and is associated with dismal clinical endpoints, including mortality. A diagnostic method that predicts the occurrence of these drops in blood pressure could facilitate timely measures for the prevention of IDH. The present study investigates whether the Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI) can provide such a diagnostic method. The ISTI is defined as the time difference between the R-peak in the electrocardiogram (ECG) and the C-wave in the impedance cardiogram (ICG) and is considered to be a non-invasive assessment of the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This time delay has previously been found to depend on autonomic nervous function as well as preload of the heart. Therefore, it can be expected that ISTI may predict an imminent IDH caused by a low circulating blood volume. This ongoing observational clinical study investigates the relationship between changes in ISTI and subsequent drops in blood pressure during haemodialysis. A registration of a complicated dialysis showed a significant correlation between a drop in blood pressure, a decrease in relative blood volume and a substantial increase in ISTI. An uncomplicated dialysis, in which also a considerable amount of fluid was removed, showed no correlations. Both, blood pressure and ISTI remained stable. In conclusion, the preliminary results of the present study show a substantial response of ISTI to haemodynamic instability, indicating an application in optimization and individualisation of the dialysis process.

  7. A new algorithm for segmentation of cardiac quiescent phases and cardiac time intervals using seismocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari Tadi, Mojtaba; Koivisto, Tero; Pänkäälä, Mikko; Paasio, Ari; Knuutila, Timo; Teräs, Mika; Hänninen, Pekka

    2015-03-01

    Systolic time intervals (STI) have significant diagnostic values for a clinical assessment of the left ventricle in adults. This study was conducted to explore the feasibility of using seismocardiography (SCG) to measure the systolic timings of the cardiac cycle accurately. An algorithm was developed for the automatic localization of the cardiac events (e.g. the opening and closing moments of the aortic and mitral valves). Synchronously acquired SCG and electrocardiography (ECG) enabled an accurate beat to beat estimation of the electromechanical systole (QS2), pre-ejection period (PEP) index and left ventricular ejection time (LVET) index. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated on a healthy test group with no evidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD). STI values were corrected based on Weissler's regression method in order to assess the correlation between the heart rate and STIs. One can see from the results that STIs correlate poorly with the heart rate (HR) on this test group. An algorithm was developed to visualize the quiescent phases of the cardiac cycle. A color map displaying the magnitude of SCG accelerations for multiple heartbeats visualizes the average cardiac motions and thereby helps to identify quiescent phases. High correlation between the heart rate and the duration of the cardiac quiescent phases was observed.

  8. Brain response during the M170 time interval is sensitive to socially relevant information.

    PubMed

    Arviv, Oshrit; Goldstein, Abraham; Weeting, Janine C; Becker, Eni S; Lange, Wolf-Gero; Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Deciphering the social meaning of facial displays is a highly complex neurological process. The M170, an event related field component of MEG recording, like its EEG counterpart N170, was repeatedly shown to be associated with structural encoding of faces. However, the scope of information encoded during the M170 time window is still being debated. We investigated the neuronal origin of facial processing of integrated social rank cues (SRCs) and emotional facial expressions (EFEs) during the M170 time interval. Participants viewed integrated facial displays of emotion (happy, angry, neutral) and SRCs (indicated by upward, downward, or straight head tilts). We found that the activity during the M170 time window is sensitive to both EFEs and SRCs. Specifically, highly prominent activation was observed in response to SRC connoting dominance as compared to submissive or egalitarian head cues. Interestingly, the processing of EFEs and SRCs appeared to rely on different circuitry. Our findings suggest that vertical head tilts are processed not only for their sheer structural variance, but as social information. Exploring the temporal unfolding and brain localization of non-verbal cues processing may assist in understanding the functioning of the social rank biobehavioral system.

  9. Individual Case Analysis of Postmortem Interval Time on Brain Tissue Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Chunyu; Hernandez, Damarys; Siedlak, Sandra L.; Rodgers, Mark S.; Achar, Rojan K.; Fahmy, Lara M.; Torres, Sandy L.; Petersen, Robert B.; Zhu, Xiongwei; Casadesus, Gemma; Lee, Hyoung-gon

    2016-01-01

    At autopsy, the time that has elapsed since the time of death is routinely documented and noted as the postmortem interval (PMI). The PMI of human tissue samples is a parameter often reported in research studies and comparable PMI is preferred when comparing different populations, i.e., disease versus control patients. In theory, a short PMI may alleviate non-experimental protein denaturation, enzyme activity, and other chemical changes such as the pH, which could affect protein and nucleic acid integrity. Previous studies have compared PMI en masse by looking at many different individual cases each with one unique PMI, which may be affected by individual variance. To overcome this obstacle, in this study human hippocampal segments from the same individuals were sampled at different time points after autopsy creating a series of PMIs for each case. Frozen and fixed tissue was then examined by Western blot, RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry to evaluate the effect of extended PMI on proteins, nucleic acids, and tissue morphology. In our results, immunostaining profiles for most proteins remained unchanged even after PMI of over 50 h, yet by Western blot distinctive degradation patterns were observed in different protein species. Finally, RNA integrity was lower after extended PMI; however, RNA preservation was variable among cases suggesting antemortem factors may play a larger role than PMI in protein and nucleic acid integrity. PMID:26982086

  10. Brain response during the M170 time interval is sensitive to socially relevant information.

    PubMed

    Arviv, Oshrit; Goldstein, Abraham; Weeting, Janine C; Becker, Eni S; Lange, Wolf-Gero; Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Deciphering the social meaning of facial displays is a highly complex neurological process. The M170, an event related field component of MEG recording, like its EEG counterpart N170, was repeatedly shown to be associated with structural encoding of faces. However, the scope of information encoded during the M170 time window is still being debated. We investigated the neuronal origin of facial processing of integrated social rank cues (SRCs) and emotional facial expressions (EFEs) during the M170 time interval. Participants viewed integrated facial displays of emotion (happy, angry, neutral) and SRCs (indicated by upward, downward, or straight head tilts). We found that the activity during the M170 time window is sensitive to both EFEs and SRCs. Specifically, highly prominent activation was observed in response to SRC connoting dominance as compared to submissive or egalitarian head cues. Interestingly, the processing of EFEs and SRCs appeared to rely on different circuitry. Our findings suggest that vertical head tilts are processed not only for their sheer structural variance, but as social information. Exploring the temporal unfolding and brain localization of non-verbal cues processing may assist in understanding the functioning of the social rank biobehavioral system. PMID:26423664

  11. Determination of short-term error caused by the reference clock in precision time-interval measurement and generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisz, Jozef

    1988-06-01

    A simple analysis based on the randomized clock cycle T(o) yields a useful formula on its variance in terms of the Allan variance. The short-term uncertainty of the measured or generated time interval t is expressed by the standard deviation in an approximate form as a function of the Allen variance. The estimates obtained are useful for determining the measurement uncertainty of time intervals within the approximate range of 10 ms-100 s.

  12. Effects of variable sequences of food availability on interval time-place learning by pigeons.

    PubMed

    García-Gallardo, Daniel; Carpio, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    The effects of within session variability of the sequences of food availability in a 16 period Time Place Learning (TPL) task on the performance of pigeons were assessed. Two groups of birds were exposed to two conditions. For group 1 (N=3), the first condition consisted of a TPL task in which food could be obtained according to a Random Interval (RI) 25s schedule of reinforcement in one of four feeders, the correct feeder changed every 3min. The same sequence was repeated four times within every training session (Fixed Sequence). The second condition was exactly the same as the first one with the exception that the sequence in which the correct feeder changed was randomized, yielding a total of four randomized sequences of food availability each session (Variable Sequence). An Open Hopper Test (OHT) was conducted at the end of each condition. Birds in group 2 (N=3) experienced the same conditions but in the reverse order. Results showed high percent correct responses for both group of birds under both conditions. However, birds were able to time the availability period's duration only under the Fixed Sequence condition, as shown by anticipation, anticipation of depletion and persistence of visiting patterns on the OHT. The implications of these results to Gallistels (1990) tripartite time-place-event memory code model are discussed, pointing out that these results are in line with previous findings about the important role that spatial parameters of a TPL task can play, for accurate timing was precluded when a variable sequence was employed. PMID:27425658

  13. [The cortical interactions in short time intervals during the search for verbal associations].

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, A R; Ivanitskiĭ, G A; Ivanitskiĭ, A M

    2000-01-01

    Cortical connectivity was studied in tasks of generating the use of words in comparison with reading aloud the same words. These tasks were used earlier in PET and high-density ERP recording studies, which described both the functional anatomy and time course of involvement of cortical areas in word processing. We developed a new method for studying the synchrony of EEG spectral components within the short time intervals compatible with the duration of particular cognitive operations. The wavelet transform of the ERP records and calculation of correlations between the wavelet curves were used to reveal connections between cortical areas. Three stages of intracortical communications developing over the course of task performance were discovered: between the right and left frontal areas (0-200 ms after the stimulus presentation), between the left frontal and left posterior temporo-parietal areas (250-500 ms), and, finally, between the left temporal and right fronto-centro-temporal areas. These findings are in good agreement with the results of the previous PET and ERP studies and supplement them with the circuitry of cortical information transfer. Also, they suggest some differences in information processing during automated reading and performance of more complicated use-generation task.

  14. Computing short-interval transition matrices of a discrete-time Markov chain from partially observed data.

    PubMed

    Charitos, Theodore; de Waal, Peter R; van der Gaag, Linda C

    2008-03-15

    Markov chains constitute a common way of modelling the progression of a chronic disease through various severity states. For these models, a transition matrix with the probabilities of moving from one state to another for a specific time interval is usually estimated from cohort data. Quite often, however, the cohort is observed at specific times with intervals that may be greater than the interval of interest. The transition matrix computed then needs to be decomposed in order to estimate the desired interval transition matrix suited to the model. Although simple to implement, this method of matrix decomposition can yet result in an invalid short-interval transition matrix with negative or complex entries. In this paper, we present a method for computing short-interval transition matrices that is based on regularization techniques. Our method operates separately on each row of the invalid short-interval transition matrix aiming to minimize an appropriate distance measure. We test our method on various matrix structures and sizes, and evaluate its performance on a real-life transition model for HIV-infected individuals. PMID:17579926

  15. Salt marsh mapping based on a short-time interval NDVI time-series from HJ-1 CCD imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SUN, C.

    2015-12-01

    Salt marshes are regard as one of the most dynamic and valuable ecosystems in coastal zone. It is crucial to obtain accurate information on the species composition and spatial distribution of salt marshes in time since they are experiencing tremendous replacement and disappearance. However, discriminating various types of salt marshes is a rather difficult task because of the strong spectral similarities. In previous studies, salt marsh mappings were mainly focused on high-spatial and hyperspectral resolution imageries combined with auxiliary information but this method can hardly extend to a large region. With high temporal and moderate spatial resolutions, Chinese HJ-1 CCD imagery would not only allow monitoring phenological changes of salt marsh vegetation in short-time intervals, but also cover large areas of salt marshes. Taking the middle coast of Jiangsu (east China) as an example, our study first constructed a monthly NDVI time-series to classify various types of salt marshes. Then, we tested the idea of compressed time-series continuously to broaden the applicability and portability of this particular approach. The results showed that (1) the overall accuracy of salt marsh mapping based on the monthly NDVI time-series reached 90.3%, which increased approximately 16.0% in contrast with a single-phase classification strategy; (2) a compressed time-series, including NDVI from six key months (April, June to September, and November) demonstrated very little decline (2.3%) in overall accuracy but led to obvious improvements in unstable regions; (3) Spartina alterniflora identification could be achieved with only a scene NDVI image from November, which could provide an effective way to regularly monitor its distribution. Besides, by comparing the calibrated performance between HJ-1 CCD and other sensors (i.e., Landsat TM/ETM+, OLI), we certified the reliability of HJ-1 CCD imagery, which is expected to pave the way for laws expansibility from this imagery.

  16. Induction of mycobacterial proteins during phagocytosis and heat shock: a time interval analysis.

    PubMed

    Alavi, M R; Affronti, L F

    1994-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis survives macrophage bactericidal activities by mechanisms that may include induction of stress proteins. We sought to determine whether the synthesis of any mycobacterial proteins is increased during phagocytosis and whether any of these proteins are also up-regulated during heat shock. Protein synthesis by M. tuberculosis H37Ra during phagocytosis by the mouse macrophage cell line IC-21, and during heat shock at 45 and 48 degrees C, was monitored at various time intervals using 35S-labeled methionine/cysteine and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Our data suggest the existence of certain common elements in the stress response of mycobacteria to the three stress stimuli. This apparent similarity was best characterized by the up-regulation of a 25-kDa protein after exposure to each of the stress conditions. Furthermore, this 25-kDa protein and a 37-kDa protein that was also synthesized during phagocytosis appeared to be extracellular because they were preferentially solubilized when infected macrophages were lysed with 0.5% NP-40. PMID:8182341

  17. Average time spent by Lévy flights and walks on an interval with absorbing boundaries.

    PubMed

    Buldyrev, S V; Havlin, S; Kazakov, A Y; da Luz, M G; Raposo, E P; Stanley, H E; Viswanathan, G M

    2001-10-01

    We consider a Lévy flyer of order alpha that starts from a point x(0) on an interval [O,L] with absorbing boundaries. We find a closed-form expression for the average number of flights the flyer takes and the total length of the flights it travels before it is absorbed. These two quantities are equivalent to the mean first passage times for Lévy flights and Lévy walks, respectively. Using fractional differential equations with a Riesz kernel, we find exact analytical expressions for both quantities in the continuous limit. We show that numerical solutions for the discrete Lévy processes converge to the continuous approximations in all cases except the case of alpha-->2, and the cases of x(0)-->0 and x(0)-->L. For alpha>2, when the second moment of the flight length distribution exists, our result is replaced by known results of classical diffusion. We show that if x(0) is placed in the vicinity of absorbing boundaries, the average total length has a minimum at alpha=1, corresponding to the Cauchy distribution. We discuss the relevance of this result to the problem of foraging, which has received recent attention in the statistical physics literature.

  18. Scaling behaviour of heartbeat intervals obtained by wavelet-based time-series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Rosenblum, Michael G.; Peng, C.-K.; Mietus, Joseph; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene; Goldberger, Ary L.

    1996-09-01

    BIOLOGICAL time-series analysis is used to identify hidden dynamical patterns which could yield important insights into underlying physiological mechanisms. Such analysis is complicated by the fact that biological signals are typically both highly irregular and non-stationary, that is, their statistical character changes slowly or intermittently as a result of variations in background influences1-3. Previous statistical analyses of heartbeat dynamics4-6 have identified long-range correlations and power-law scaling in the normal heartbeat, but not the phase interactions between the different frequency components of the signal. Here we introduce a new approach, based on the wavelet transform and an analytic signal approach, which can characterize non-stationary behaviour and elucidate such phase interactions. We find that, when suitably rescaled, the distributions of the variations in the beat-to-beat intervals for all healthy subjects are described by a single function stable over a wide range of timescales. However, a similar scaling function does not exist for a group with cardiopulmonary instability caused by sleep apnoea. We attribute the functional form of the scaling observed in the healthy subjects to underlying nonlinear dynamics, which seem to be essential to normal heart function. The approach introduced here should be useful in the analysis of other nonstationary biological signals.

  19. Corticostriatal Field Potentials Are Modulated at Delta and Theta Frequencies during Interval-Timing Task in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Emmons, Eric B.; Ruggiero, Rafael N.; Kelley, Ryan M.; Parker, Krystal L.; Narayanan, Nandakumar S.

    2016-01-01

    Organizing movements in time is a critical and highly conserved feature of mammalian behavior. Temporal control of action requires corticostriatal networks. We investigate these networks in rodents using a two-interval timing task while recording LFPs in medial frontal cortex (MFC) or dorsomedial striatum. Consistent with prior work, we found cue-triggered delta (1–4 Hz) and theta activity (4–8 Hz) primarily in rodent MFC. We observed delta activity across temporal intervals in MFC and dorsomedial striatum. Rewarded responses were associated with increased delta activity in MFC. Activity in theta bands in MFC and delta bands in the striatum was linked with the timing of responses. These data suggest both delta and theta activity in frontostriatal networks are modulated during interval timing and that activity in these bands may be involved in the temporal control of action. PMID:27092091

  20. [Processing acoustically presented time intervals of seconds duration: an expression of the phonological loop of the working memory?].

    PubMed

    Grube, D

    1996-01-01

    Working memory has been proposed to contribute to the processing of time, rhythm and music; the question which component of working memory is involved is under discussion. The present study tests the hypothesis that the phonological loop component (Baddeley, 1986) is involved in the processing of auditorily presented time intervals of a few seconds' duration. Typical effects well known with short-term retention of verbal material could be replicated with short-term retention of temporal intervals: The immediate reproduction of time intervals was impaired under conditions of background music and articulatory suppression. Neither the accuracy nor the speed of responses in a (non-phonological) mental rotation task were diminished under these conditions. Processing of auditorily presented time intervals seems to be constrained by the capacity of the phonological loop: The immediate serial recall of sequences of time intervals was shown to be related to the immediate serial recall of words (memory span). The results confirm the notion that working memory resources, and especially the phonological loop component, underlie the processing of auditorily presented temporal information with a duration of a few seconds.

  1. Attenuation of Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy by Sirolimus: Relationship to Time Interval Following Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yoshiki; Cassar, Andrew; Yoshino, Satoshi; Flammer, Andreas J.; Li, Jing; Gulati, Rajiv; Topilsky, Yan; Raichlin, Eugenia; Lennon, Ryan J.; Lerman, Lilach O.; Rihal, Charanjit S.; Kushwaha, Sudhir S.; Lerman, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to assess temporal changes in plaque size and components following heart transplantation (HTx), and to evaluate the differences in treatment effects on plaque progression between sirolimus and calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). Methods The study comprised 146 HTx recipients who were converted from CNIs to sirolimus as primary immunosuppressant (sirolimus group, n=61), and those who were maintained on CNIs (CNI group, n=85). A retrospective compositional analysis of serial virtual histology-intravascular ultrasound was performed. Results During a median follow-up of 2.8 years, there was a significant difference in plaque volume in favor of sirolimus between groups (P=0.004). When subjects were subclassified according to the time interval between HTx and study inclusion, those in the early group (≤2 years after HTx) had a greater increase in plaque volume (P=0.006) characterized by a higher progression rate of fibrous plaque volume (P=0.01). The treatment difference between groups in plaque volume was identified in the early group in favor of sirolimus with attenuating effects on the progression of fibrous plaque component (both P=0.03 for interaction). By contrast, there were significant differences of necrotic core and dense calcium volume (both P<0.05 for interaction) in favor of CNIs in the late group (≥6 years after HTx). Conclusions Compared with a continued CNI therapy, sirolimus attenuated plaque progression in recipients with early conversion, but contributed to increases in necrotic core and dense calcium volume in those with late conversion. The current study supports the early initiation of sirolimus offers greater benefits on the development of CAV. PMID:23856215

  2. Chronic irradiation enteritis: its correlation with the elapsed time interval and morphological changes.

    PubMed

    Oya, M; Yao, T; Tsuneyoshi, M

    1996-08-01

    Twenty-one lesions from 19 patients with chronic irradiation enteritis (CIE) were examined to elucidate correlations with the histological findings and either the elapsed time interval or the macroscopic features. The lesions were divided into the early CIE group (E group; the lesions resected within 2 years after irradiation) of 10 lesions and the late CIE group (L group; the lesions resected more than 8 years after irradiation) of 11 lesions. Based on the macroscopic features, the lesions of CIE were divided into three types: ulcerative stricture type (U type; 11 lesions), serosal adhesion type (A type; 6 lesions) and wall sclerosing type (S type; 4 lesions). Only A type lesions were observed in the E group, and U type lesions were significantly more frequently encountered in the L group (9 of 11; 82%) than in the E group (2 of 10; 20%). Moderately to markedly degenerated changes of the vessel wall (8 of 11; 73%), enteritis cystica profunda (8 of 11; 73%), atypical epithelia (7 of 11; 64%), and the occurrence of fistula (2 of 11; 18%) were all significantly more frequently present in the L group than in the E group. No radiation-induced colorectal carcinomas were observed. The authors thus conclude that CIE is a slowly progressive disease. The late CIE showed macroscopically ulcerative stricture type properties with tissue degradation, such as fistulas, perforation, and dysplastic epithelia compared with early CIE; thus, long-standing CIE should be followed for the early identification of further complications. The classification of CIE based on macroscopic features is, therefore, considered to be useful to understand the clinical course of this disease better.

  3. Lethal pedestrian--passenger car collisions in Berlin. Changed injury patterns in two different time intervals.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Edwin; Tischer, Anja; Maxeiner, H

    2009-04-01

    To expand the passive safety of automobiles protecting traffic participants technological innovations were done in the last decades. Objective of our retrospective analysis was to examine if these technical modifications led to a clearly changed pattern of injuries of pedestrians whose death was caused by the accidents. Another reduction concerns the exclusion of injured car passengers--only pedestrians walking or standing at the moment of collision were included. We selected time intervals 1975-1985 and 1991-2004 (=years of construction of the involved passenger cars). The cars were classified depending on their frontal construction in types as presented by Schindler et al. [Schindler V, Kühn M, Weber S, Siegler H, Heinrich T. Verletzungsmechanismen und Wirkabschätzungen der Fahrzegfrontgestaltung bei Pkw-Fussgänger-Kollisionen. Abschlussbericht im Auftrag der Deutschen Versicherungswirtschaft e.V. TU-Berlin Fachgebiet Kraftfahrzeuge (GDV) 2004:36-40]. In both periods more than 90% of all cars were from the usual types small/medium/large class. Hundred and thirty-four autopsy records of such cases from Department of Forensic Medicine (Charité Berlin) data were analysed. The data included technical information of the accidents and vehicles and the external and internal injuries of the victims. The comparison of the two periods showed a decrease of serious head injuries and femoral fractures but an increase of chest-, abdominal and pelvic injuries. This situation could be explained by an increased occurrence of soft-face-constructions and changed front design of modern passenger cars, resulting in a favourable effects concerning head impact to the car during accident. Otherwise the same kinetic energy was transferred to the (complete) victim - but because of a displacement of main focus of impact the pattern of injuries modified (went distally).

  4. Impulsive observers with variable update intervals for Lipschitz nonlinear time-delay systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wu-Hua; Li, Dan-Xia; Lu, Xiaomei

    2013-10-01

    This article is concerned with the design of impulsive observers with variable update intervals for Lipschitz nonlinear systems with delays in state. Discontinuous Lyapunov function/funtional approaches are developed to analyse the stability of error dynamics. Delay-independent sufficient conditions for uniform exponential stability of the error dynamics over variable update intervals are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). When these LMIs are feasible, the observer gain matrix can be solved numerically with an LMI-based optimisation algorithm. Numerical examples are provided to show the efficiency of the proposed approach.

  5. An assessment of fixed interval timing in free-flying honey bees (Apis mellifera ligustica): an analysis of individual performance.

    PubMed

    Craig, David Philip Arthur; Varnon, Christopher A; Sokolowski, Michel B C; Wells, Harrington; Abramson, Charles I

    2014-01-01

    Interval timing is a key element of foraging theory, models of predator avoidance, and competitive interactions. Although interval timing is well documented in vertebrate species, it is virtually unstudied in invertebrates. In the present experiment, we used free-flying honey bees (Apis mellifera ligustica) as a model for timing behaviors. Subjects were trained to enter a hole in an automated artificial flower to receive a nectar reinforcer (i.e. reward). Responses were continuously reinforced prior to exposure to either a fixed interval (FI) 15-sec, FI 30-sec, FI 60-sec, or FI 120-sec reinforcement schedule. We measured response rate and post-reinforcement pause within each fixed interval trial between reinforcers. Honey bees responded at higher frequencies earlier in the fixed interval suggesting subject responding did not come under traditional forms of temporal control. Response rates were lower during FI conditions compared to performance on continuous reinforcement schedules, and responding was more resistant to extinction when previously reinforced on FI schedules. However, no "scalloped" or "break-and-run" patterns of group or individual responses reinforced on FI schedules were observed; no traditional evidence of temporal control was found. Finally, longer FI schedules eventually caused all subjects to cease returning to the operant chamber indicating subjects did not tolerate the longer FI schedules.

  6. An Assessment of Fixed Interval Timing in Free-Flying Honey Bees (Apis mellifera ligustica): An Analysis of Individual Performance

    PubMed Central

    Craig, David Philip Arthur; Varnon, Christopher A.; Sokolowski, Michel B. C.; Wells, Harrington; Abramson, Charles I.

    2014-01-01

    Interval timing is a key element of foraging theory, models of predator avoidance, and competitive interactions. Although interval timing is well documented in vertebrate species, it is virtually unstudied in invertebrates. In the present experiment, we used free-flying honey bees (Apis mellifera ligustica) as a model for timing behaviors. Subjects were trained to enter a hole in an automated artificial flower to receive a nectar reinforcer (i.e. reward). Responses were continuously reinforced prior to exposure to either a fixed interval (FI) 15-sec, FI 30-sec, FI 60-sec, or FI 120-sec reinforcement schedule. We measured response rate and post-reinforcement pause within each fixed interval trial between reinforcers. Honey bees responded at higher frequencies earlier in the fixed interval suggesting subject responding did not come under traditional forms of temporal control. Response rates were lower during FI conditions compared to performance on continuous reinforcement schedules, and responding was more resistant to extinction when previously reinforced on FI schedules. However, no “scalloped” or “break-and-run” patterns of group or individual responses reinforced on FI schedules were observed; no traditional evidence of temporal control was found. Finally, longer FI schedules eventually caused all subjects to cease returning to the operant chamber indicating subjects did not tolerate the longer FI schedules. PMID:24983960

  7. An assessment of fixed interval timing in free-flying honey bees (Apis mellifera ligustica): an analysis of individual performance.

    PubMed

    Craig, David Philip Arthur; Varnon, Christopher A; Sokolowski, Michel B C; Wells, Harrington; Abramson, Charles I

    2014-01-01

    Interval timing is a key element of foraging theory, models of predator avoidance, and competitive interactions. Although interval timing is well documented in vertebrate species, it is virtually unstudied in invertebrates. In the present experiment, we used free-flying honey bees (Apis mellifera ligustica) as a model for timing behaviors. Subjects were trained to enter a hole in an automated artificial flower to receive a nectar reinforcer (i.e. reward). Responses were continuously reinforced prior to exposure to either a fixed interval (FI) 15-sec, FI 30-sec, FI 60-sec, or FI 120-sec reinforcement schedule. We measured response rate and post-reinforcement pause within each fixed interval trial between reinforcers. Honey bees responded at higher frequencies earlier in the fixed interval suggesting subject responding did not come under traditional forms of temporal control. Response rates were lower during FI conditions compared to performance on continuous reinforcement schedules, and responding was more resistant to extinction when previously reinforced on FI schedules. However, no "scalloped" or "break-and-run" patterns of group or individual responses reinforced on FI schedules were observed; no traditional evidence of temporal control was found. Finally, longer FI schedules eventually caused all subjects to cease returning to the operant chamber indicating subjects did not tolerate the longer FI schedules. PMID:24983960

  8. Systolic time intervals combined with Valsalva maneuver for the diagnosis of left ventricular dysfunction in COPD exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Boubaker, Hamdi; Grissa, Mohamed Habib; Beltaief, Kaouther; Dridi, Zohra; Najjar, Mohamed Fadhel; Bouida, Wahid; Boukef, Riadh; Marghli, Soudani; Nouira, Semir

    2016-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to determine the value of systolic time intervals and their change during Valsalva maneuver (VM) in the diagnosis of left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). Methods We included 166 patients admitted to the emergency department for AECOPD. Measurement of systolic time intervals included electromechanical activation time (EMAT), left ventricular ejection time (LVET), and EMAT/LVET ratio. These were performed at baseline and during the first strain phase of the VM using a computerized phonoelectrocardiographic method. The diagnosis of LVD was determined on the basis of clinical examination, echocardiography, and brain natriuretic peptide. The values of systolic time intervals were compared between patients with and without LVD; their diagnostic performance was assessed using the area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results Patients with LVD (n=95) had a significantly higher EMAT and lower LVET and EMAT/LVET ratio compared to patients without LVD (n=71); the area under ROC curve was 0.79, 0.88, and 0.90, respectively, for EMAT, LVET, and EMAT/LVET ratio. All baseline systolic time intervals changed significantly during VM in patients without LVD but they did not change in patients with LVD. The area under ROC curve increased to 0.84 and 0.93, respectively, for EMAT and EMAT/LVET ratio but did not change for LVET. Conclusion Simple and noninvasive measurements of systolic time intervals combined with VM could be helpful to detect or rule out LVD in patients admitted to the emergency room for COPD excacerbation. The EMAT/LVET ratio seems to have the best diagnostic value.

  9. Systolic time intervals combined with Valsalva maneuver for the diagnosis of left ventricular dysfunction in COPD exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Boubaker, Hamdi; Grissa, Mohamed Habib; Beltaief, Kaouther; Dridi, Zohra; Najjar, Mohamed Fadhel; Bouida, Wahid; Boukef, Riadh; Marghli, Soudani; Nouira, Semir

    2016-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to determine the value of systolic time intervals and their change during Valsalva maneuver (VM) in the diagnosis of left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). Methods We included 166 patients admitted to the emergency department for AECOPD. Measurement of systolic time intervals included electromechanical activation time (EMAT), left ventricular ejection time (LVET), and EMAT/LVET ratio. These were performed at baseline and during the first strain phase of the VM using a computerized phonoelectrocardiographic method. The diagnosis of LVD was determined on the basis of clinical examination, echocardiography, and brain natriuretic peptide. The values of systolic time intervals were compared between patients with and without LVD; their diagnostic performance was assessed using the area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results Patients with LVD (n=95) had a significantly higher EMAT and lower LVET and EMAT/LVET ratio compared to patients without LVD (n=71); the area under ROC curve was 0.79, 0.88, and 0.90, respectively, for EMAT, LVET, and EMAT/LVET ratio. All baseline systolic time intervals changed significantly during VM in patients without LVD but they did not change in patients with LVD. The area under ROC curve increased to 0.84 and 0.93, respectively, for EMAT and EMAT/LVET ratio but did not change for LVET. Conclusion Simple and noninvasive measurements of systolic time intervals combined with VM could be helpful to detect or rule out LVD in patients admitted to the emergency room for COPD excacerbation. The EMAT/LVET ratio seems to have the best diagnostic value. PMID:27695311

  10. Effect of collection-maturation interval time and pregnancy status of donor mares on oocyte developmental competence in horse cloning.

    PubMed

    Gambini, A; Andrés, G; Jarazo, J; Javier, J; Karlanian, F; Florencia, K; De Stéfano, A; Salamone, D F

    2014-02-01

    The current limitations for obtaining ovaries from slaughterhouses and the low efficiency of in vivo follicular aspiration necessitate a complete understanding of the variables that affect oocyte developmental competence in the equine. For this reason, we assessed the effect on equine oocyte meiotic competence and the subsequent in vitro cloned embryo development of 1) the time interval between ovary collection and the onset of oocyte in vitro maturation (collection-maturation interval time) and 2) the pregnancy status of the donor mares. To define the collection-maturation interval time, collected oocytes were classified according to the slaughtering time and the pregnancy status of the mare. Maturation rate was recorded and some matured oocytes of each group were used to reconstruct zona free cloned embryos. Nuclear maturation rates were lower when the collection-maturation interval time exceeded 10 h as compared to 4 h (32/83 vs. 76/136, respectively; P = 0.0128) and when the donor mare was pregnant as compared to nonpregnant (53/146 vs. 177/329, respectively; P = 0.0004). Low rates of cleaved embryos were observed when the collection-maturation interval time exceeded 10 h as compared to 6 to 10 h (11/27 vs. 33/44, respectively; P = 0.0056), but the pregnancy status of donor mares did not affect cloned equine blastocyst development (3/49 vs. 1/27 for blastocyst rates of nonpregnant and pregnant groups, respectively; P = 1.00). These results indicate that, to apply assisted reproductive technologies in horses, oocytes should be harvested within approximately 10 h after ovary collection. Also, even though ovaries from pregnant mares are a potential source of oocytes, they should be processed at the end of the collection routine due to the lower collection and maturation rate in this group.

  11. The application of the analog signal to discrete time interval converter to the signal conditioner power supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenfeld, A. D.; Yu, Y.

    1973-01-01

    The Analog Signal to Discrete Time Interval Converter microminiaturized module was utilized to control the signal conditioner power supplies. The multi-loop control provides outstanding static and dynamic performance characteristics, exceeding those generally associated with single-loop regulators. Eight converter boards, each containing three independent dc to dc converter, were built, tested, and delivered.

  12. 33 CFR 150.503 - What are the time interval requirements for maintenance on survival craft falls?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the time interval requirements for maintenance on survival craft falls? 150.503 Section 150.503 Navigation and Navigable Waters... maintenance on survival craft falls? (a) Each fall used in a launching device for survival craft or...

  13. A Comparison of Momentary Time Sampling and Partial-Interval Recording for Assessment of Effects of Social Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radley, Keith C.; O'Handley, Roderick D.; Labrot, Zachary C.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment in social skills training often utilizes procedures such as partial-interval recording (PIR) and momentary time sampling (MTS) to estimate changes in duration in social engagements due to intervention. Although previous research suggests PIR to be more inaccurate than MTS in estimating levels of behavior, treatment analysis decisions…

  14. Passivity and robust synchronisation of switched interval coupled neural networks with time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Cao, Jinde

    2016-09-01

    This paper is concerned with passivity and robust synchronisation of switched coupled neural networks with uncertain parameters. First, the mathematical model of switched coupled neural networks with interval uncertain parameters is established, which consists of L modes and switches from one mode to another according to the switching rule. Second, by employing passivity theory and linear matrix inequality techniques, delay-independent and delay-dependent conditions are derived to guarantee the passivity of switched interval coupled neural networks. Moreover, based on the proposed passivity results, global synchronisation criteria can be obtained for switched coupled neural networks with or without uncertain parameters. Finally, an illustrative example is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  15. A multiple imputation approach to the analysis of interval-censored failure time data with the additive hazards model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ling; Sun, Jianguo

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses regression analysis of interval-censored failure time data, which occur in many fields including demographical, epidemiological, financial, medical, and sociological studies. For the problem, we focus on the situation where the survival time of interest can be described by the additive hazards model and a multiple imputation approach is presented for inference. A major advantage of the approach is its simplicity and it can be easily implemented by using the existing software packages for right-censored failure time data. Extensive simulation studies are conducted which indicate that the approach performs well for practical situations and is comparable to the existing methods. The methodology is applied to a set of interval-censored failure time data arising from an AIDS clinical trial. PMID:25419022

  16. Penalized regression for interval-censored times of disease progression: Selection of HLA markers in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Cook, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Times of disease progression are interval-censored when progression status is only known at a series of assessment times. This situation arises routinely in clinical trials and cohort studies when events of interest are only detectable upon imaging, based on blood tests, or upon careful clinical examination. We consider the problem of selecting important prognostic biomarkers from a large set of candidates when disease progression status is only known at irregularly spaced and individual-specific assessment times. Penalized regression techniques (e.g., LASSO, adaptive LASSO, and SCAD) are adapted to handle interval-censored time of disease progression. An expectation-maximization algorithm is described which is empirically shown to perform well. Application to the motivating study of the development of arthritis mutilans in patients with psoriatic arthritis is given and several important human leukocyte antigen (HLA) variables are identified for further investigation.

  17. An experimental evaluation of electrical skin conductivity changes in postmortem interval and its assessment for time of death estimation.

    PubMed

    Cantürk, İsmail; Karabiber, Fethullah; Çelik, Safa; Şahin, M Feyzi; Yağmur, Fatih; Kara, Sadık

    2016-02-01

    In forensic medicine, estimation of the time of death (ToD) is one of the most important and challenging medico-legal problems. Despite the partial accomplishments in ToD estimations to date, the error margin of ToD estimation is still too large. In this study, electrical conductivity changes were experimentally investigated in the postmortem interval in human cases. Electrical conductivity measurements give some promising clues about the postmortem interval. A living human has a natural electrical conductivity; in the postmortem interval, intracellular fluids gradually leak out of cells. These leaked fluids combine with extra-cellular fluids in tissues and since both fluids are electrolytic, intracellular fluids help increase conductivity. Thus, the level of electrical conductivity is expected to increase with increased time after death. In this study, electrical conductivity tests were applied for six hours. The electrical conductivity of the cases exponentially increased during the tested time period, indicating a positive relationship between electrical conductivity and the postmortem interval.

  18. An experimental evaluation of electrical skin conductivity changes in postmortem interval and its assessment for time of death estimation.

    PubMed

    Cantürk, İsmail; Karabiber, Fethullah; Çelik, Safa; Şahin, M Feyzi; Yağmur, Fatih; Kara, Sadık

    2016-02-01

    In forensic medicine, estimation of the time of death (ToD) is one of the most important and challenging medico-legal problems. Despite the partial accomplishments in ToD estimations to date, the error margin of ToD estimation is still too large. In this study, electrical conductivity changes were experimentally investigated in the postmortem interval in human cases. Electrical conductivity measurements give some promising clues about the postmortem interval. A living human has a natural electrical conductivity; in the postmortem interval, intracellular fluids gradually leak out of cells. These leaked fluids combine with extra-cellular fluids in tissues and since both fluids are electrolytic, intracellular fluids help increase conductivity. Thus, the level of electrical conductivity is expected to increase with increased time after death. In this study, electrical conductivity tests were applied for six hours. The electrical conductivity of the cases exponentially increased during the tested time period, indicating a positive relationship between electrical conductivity and the postmortem interval. PMID:26751404

  19. Time interval between successive trading in foreign currency market: from microscopic to macroscopic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Aki-Hiro

    2004-12-01

    Recently, it has been shown that inter-transaction interval (ITI) distribution of foreign currency rates has a fat tail. In order to understand the statistical property of the ITI dealer model with N interactive agents is proposed. From numerical simulations it is confirmed that the ITI distribution of the dealer model has a power law tail. The random multiplicative process (RMP) can be approximately derived from the ITI of the dealer model. Consequently, we conclude that the power law tail of the ITI distribution of the dealer model is a result of the RMP.

  20. Polyandry Depends on Postmating Time Interval in the Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Degner, Ethan C.; Harrington, Laura C.

    2016-01-01

    Aedes aegypti is the primary vector of the dengue and chikungunya viruses. After mating, male seminal fluid molecules cause females to become unreceptive to a subsequent mating. This response is often assumed to be immediate and complete, but a growing body of evidence suggests that some females do mate more than once. It is unknown how quickly a female becomes unreceptive to a second mating. Furthermore, the degree to which she remains monandrous after laying several batches of eggs has not been rigorously tested. Therefore, we assessed the rates of polyandry in two sets of experiments using wild-type males and those with fluorescent sperm. The first experiment tested the likelihood of polyandry after postmating intervals of various durations. Most females became refractory to a second mating within 2 hours after mating, and rates of polyandry ranged from 24% immediately after mating to 3% at 20 hours after mating. The second experiment tested whether females were polyandrous after cycles of blood meals and oviposition. No re-insemination was found after one, three, or five such cycles. This study is the first to demonstrate that polyandrous behavior depends on the postmating interval. Our results will inform future applications that depend on an accurate knowledge of Ae. aegypti mating behavior, including models of gene flow, investigations of molecules that drive female mating behavior, and control strategies that deploy genetically modified mosquitoes into the field. PMID:26880776

  1. D1-dependent 4 Hz oscillations and ramping activity in rodent medial frontal cortex during interval timing.

    PubMed

    Parker, Krystal L; Chen, Kuan-Hua; Kingyon, Johnathan R; Cavanagh, James F; Narayanan, Nandakumar S

    2014-12-10

    Organizing behavior in time is a fundamental process that is highly conserved across species. Here we study the neural basis of timing processes. First, we found that rodents had a burst of stimulus-triggered 4 Hz oscillations in the medial frontal cortex (MFC) during interval timing tasks. Second, rodents with focally disrupted MFC D1 dopamine receptor (D1DR) signaling had impaired interval timing performance and weaker stimulus-triggered oscillations. Prior work has demonstrated that MFC neurons ramp during interval timing, suggesting that they underlie temporal integration. We found that MFC D1DR blockade strongly attenuated ramping activity of MFC neurons that correlated with behavior. These macro- and micro-level phenomena were linked, as we observed that MFC neurons with strong ramping activity tended to be coherent with stimulus-triggered 4 Hz oscillations, and this relationship was diminished with MFC D1DR blockade. These data provide evidence demonstrating how D1DR signaling controls the temporal organization of mammalian behavior. PMID:25505330

  2. Towards a bipolar layer-counted ice-core chronology for the 41-75 ka time interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Anders; Bigler, Matthias; Blunier, Thomas; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Fischer, Hubertus; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Rasmussen, Sune; Schwander, Jakob; Seierstad, Inger; Steffensen, Jørgen Peder; Vallelonga, Paul; Vinther, Bo; Wegner, Anna; Wilhelms, Frank; Winstrup, Mai

    2015-04-01

    Precise chronologies have been developed for Greenland and Antarctic ice cores based on counting of annual layers in high-resolution water isotope and impurity profiles. Antarctic ice cores are layer-counted back to 31 ka (WAIS Divide ice core) whereas Greenland ice cores are dated back to 60 ka (NGRIP ice core, GICC05 time scale). Beyond 60 ka, in Marine Isotope Stage 4 (MIS4), annual layers in Greenland are thin (less than 1 cm in NGRIP in the coldest periods) and annual layer counting is more uncertain. In the Antarctic EDML ice core annual layers are somewhat thicker over most of MIS4 although they are still marginal for counting. Greenland and Antarctic ice cores are tightly linked at the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion (41 ka) and at the Toba YTT eruption (74 ka) providing end constrains for the investigated time interval. In this work, annual layer counting has been performed in parallel in the NGRIP and EDML ice cores for the time interval 41-75 ka using high-resolution records of visual stratigraphy, dust concentrations, and continuous chemistry. For NGRIP the GICC05 time scale is adapted for the period 41-60 ka. The NGRIP and EDML ice cores are then synchronized by identifying series of bipolar volcanic eruptions in acidity records of electrolytic conductivity, sulfur concentrations, and electric measurements of the solid ice (ECM and DEP). The synchronization is constrained by the layer counting that provides interval durations between volcanic markers. In some periods, a pattern of several bipolar volcanic events provides robust synchronization, but there are longer intervals for which there are no synchronization due to the lack of unambiguous bipolar markers. Over periods of robust synchronization the North-South phasing of climate (water isotopes) and dust concentrations can be investigated at decadal precision. During MIS4 the resulting time scale shows a North-South phasing somewhat different from that of the modelled AICC2012 time scale.

  3. Time dose relationships in endometrial adenocarcinoma: importance of the interval from external pelvic irradiation to surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.F.; Cox, J.D.; Chahbazian, C.M.; del Regato, J.A.

    1980-05-01

    One hundred twenty-one patients with adenocarcinoma of the endometrium received external pelvic irradiation (EPI) as a preoperative surgical adjuvant to total abdominal hysterectomy between March, 1951 and February, 1977. Either 400 KVP x-rays, Cobalt teletherapy or 25 MeV photons were used. In more than one third of the hysterectomy specimens, there was no histopathological evidence of residual cancer. Statistical analysis shows a significant reduction in the proportion of positive specimens as the interval to hysterectomy increased. The data support the concept that adenocarcinomas are not radioresistant but may be slow to regress following irradiation. Caution is advised against making decisions about therapy based on histopathological findings in patients who receive surgery immediately following short course or intracavitary preoperative irradiation.

  4. Modulation of photodynamic activity with Photofrin: effect of dose, time interval, fluence, and delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbo, Greta M.; Ballard, Jonathan R.; Harrison, Linda T.; Kik, Peter K.; Wieman, T. J.; Fingar, Victor H.

    2005-04-01

    A goal of our laboratory is to accurately define the parameters of light dose and drug dose that contribute to tissue destruction after Photodynamic therapy (PDT). Using Photofrin as sensitizer, we examined a range of drug doses, various intervals between injection and light treatment, and various fluence rates. The effect of Photofrin photosensitizer encapsulated in liposomal delivery vehicle was also studied. Three liposome delivery vehicles were chosen to deliver the photosensitizer in vivo: DPPC/cholesterol, DMPC/HPC and stealth liposomes. Tumor response and microvessel behaviour were examined in tumor and surrounding skin in a mouse model. Under these conditions, better selectivity of tissue damage was seen using some of the treatment. These data might be used to design better clinical protocols for patient care. In memory of Dr. Victor Fingar (Supported by R01 CA51771).

  5. Rating depression over brief time intervals with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale: standard vs. abbreviated scales.

    PubMed

    Luckenbaugh, David A; Ameli, Rezvan; Brutsche, Nancy E; Zarate, Carlos A

    2015-02-01

    Although antidepressant trials typically use weekly ratings to examine changes in symptoms over six to 12 weeks, antidepressant treatments may improve symptoms more quickly. Thus, rating scales must be adapted to capture changes over shorter intervals. We examined the use of the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) to evaluate more rapid changes. Data were examined from 58 patients with major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder enrolled in double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover studies who received a single infusion of ketamine (0.5 mg/kg) or placebo over 40 min then crossed over to the other condition. HDRS subscales, a single HDRS Depressed mood item, and a visual analogue scale were used at baseline, after a brief interval (230 min), and one week post-infusion. Effect sizes for the ketamine-placebo difference were moderate (d > 0.50), but one and two-item HDRS subscales had the smallest effects. Response rates on active drug were lowest for the complete HDRS (43%); the remaining scales had higher response rates to active drug, but the shortest subscales had higher response rates to placebo. Correlations between the changes from baseline to 230 min post-ketamine across scores were similar for most subscales (r = 0.82-0.97), but correlations using the single items were lower (r < 0.74). Overall, effect sizes for drug-placebo differences and correlations between changes were lower for one- and two-item measures. Response rates were lower with the full HDRS scale. The data suggest that, to best identify rapid antidepressant effects, a scale should have more than two items, but fewer items than a full scale.

  6. Confirmation of Romer's Gap as a low oxygen interval constraining the timing of initial arthropod and vertebrate terrestrialization.

    PubMed

    Ward, Peter; Labandeira, Conrad; Laurin, Michel; Berner, Robert A

    2006-11-01

    The first terrestrialization of species that evolved from previously aquatic taxa was a seminal event in evolutionary history. For vertebrates, one of the most important terrestrialized groups, this event was interrupted by a time interval known as Romer's Gap, for which, until recently, few fossils were known. Here, we argue that geochronologic range data of terrestrial arthropods show a pattern similar to that of vertebrates. Thus, Romer's Gap is real, occupied an interval from 360 million years before present (MYBP) to 345 MYBP, and occurred when environmental conditions were unfavorable for air-breathing, terrestrial animals. These model results suggest that atmospheric oxygen levels were the major driver of successful terrestrialization, and a low-oxygen interval accounts for Romer's Gap. Results also show that terrestrialization among members of arthropod and vertebrate clades occurred in two distinct phases. The first phase was a 65-million-year (My) interval from 425 to 360 MYBP, representing an earlier, prolonged event of complete arthropod terrestrialization of smaller-sized forms (425-385 MYBP) and a subsequent, modest, and briefer event of incipient terrestrialization of larger-sized, aquatic vertebrates (385-360 MYBP). The second phase began at 345 MYBP, characterized by numerous new terrestrial species emerging in both major clades. The first and second terrestrialization phases bracket Romer's Gap, which represents a depauperate spectrum of major arthropod and vertebrate taxa before a major Late Paleozoic colonization of terrestrial habitats.

  7. Conditional-sampling schemes for turbulent flow, based on the variable-interval time averaging (VITA) algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, J. F.; Tsai, H. M.; Bradshaw, P.

    1988-12-01

    The variable-interval time-averaging (“VITA”) algorithm has been tested in a variety of turbulent boundary layers for its ability to detect shear-stress-producing motions from hot-wire signals. A “VITA + LEVEL” scheme (which uses criteria for both short-time variance and short-time average, i.e.“level”) has been devised, and used in several different boundary layers. This scheme yields length-scale statistics that are acceptably independent of the conditioning criteria, which the VITA scheme does not.

  8. Conditional-sampling schemes for turbulent flow, based on the variable-interval time averaging (VITA) algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, J. F.; Tsai, H. M.; Bradshaw, P.

    The variable-interval time-averaging ('VITA') algorithm has been tested in a variety of turbulent boundary layers for its ability to detect shear-stress-producing motions from hot-wire signals. A 'VITA+LEVEL' scheme (which uses criteria for both short-time variance and short-time average, i.e., 'level') has been devised, and used in several different boundary layers. This scheme yields length-scale statistics that are acceptably independent of the conditioning criteria, which the VITA scheme does not.

  9. High-intensity interval exercise induces 24-h energy expenditure similar to traditional endurance exercise despite reduced time commitment.

    PubMed

    Skelly, Lauren E; Andrews, Patricia C; Gillen, Jenna B; Martin, Brian J; Percival, Michael E; Gibala, Martin J

    2014-07-01

    Subjects performed high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and continuous moderate-intensity training (END) to evaluate 24-h oxygen consumption. Oxygen consumption during HIIT was lower versus END; however, total oxygen consumption over 24 h was similar. These data demonstrate that HIIT and END induce similar 24-h energy expenditure, which may explain the comparable changes in body composition reported despite lower total training volume and time commitment.

  10. Reliability of the interval death rate analysis for estimating the time course of the motoneurone afterhyperpolarization in humans.

    PubMed

    MacDonell, Christopher William; Ivanova, Tanya Dimitrova; Garland, S Jayne

    2007-05-15

    The reliability of the afterhyperpolarization (AHP) time course, as estimated by the interval death rate (IDR) analysis was evaluated both within and between investigators. The IDR analysis uses the firing history of a single motor unit train at low tonic firing rates to calculate an estimate of the AHP time course [Matthews PB. Relationship of firing intervals of human motor units to the trajectory of post-spike after-hyperpolarization and synaptic noise. J Physiol 1996;492:597-628]. Single motor unit trains were collected from the tibialis anterior (TA) to determine intra-rater reliability (within investigator). Data from the first dorsal interosseus (FDI), collected in a previous investigation [Gossen ER, Ivanova TD, Garland SJ. The time course of the motoneurone afterhyperpolarization is related to motor unit twitch speed in human skeletal muscle. J Physiol 2003;552:657-64], were used to examine the inter-rater reliability (between investigators). The lead author was blinded to the original time constants and file identities for the re-analysis. The intra-rater reliability of the AHP time constant in the TA data was high (r(2)=0.88; p<0.001; ICC=0.91). The inter-rater reliability for the FDI data was also strong (r(2)=0.92; p<0.001; ICC=0.95). The standard error of measurement was 0.61 ms for the TA and 0.55 ms for FDI. It is concluded that the interval death rate analysis is a reliable tool for estimating the AHP time course with experienced investigators.

  11. Modeling Pharmacological Clock and Memory Patterns of Interval Timing in a Striatal Beat-Frequency Model with Realistic, Noisy Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oprisan, Sorinel A.; Buhusi, Catalin V.

    2011-01-01

    In most species, the capability of perceiving and using the passage of time in the seconds-to-minutes range (interval timing) is not only accurate but also scalar: errors in time estimation are linearly related to the estimated duration. The ubiquity of scalar timing extends over behavioral, lesion, and pharmacological manipulations. For example, in mammals, dopaminergic drugs induce an immediate, scalar change in the perceived time (clock pattern), whereas cholinergic drugs induce a gradual, scalar change in perceived time (memory pattern). How do these properties emerge from unreliable, noisy neurons firing in the milliseconds range? Neurobiological information relative to the brain circuits involved in interval timing provide support for an striatal beat frequency (SBF) model, in which time is coded by the coincidental activation of striatal spiny neurons by cortical neural oscillators. While biologically plausible, the impracticality of perfect oscillators, or their lack thereof, questions this mechanism in a brain with noisy neurons. We explored the computational mechanisms required for the clock and memory patterns in an SBF model with biophysically realistic and noisy Morris–Lecar neurons (SBF–ML). Under the assumption that dopaminergic drugs modulate the firing frequency of cortical oscillators, and that cholinergic drugs modulate the memory representation of the criterion time, we show that our SBF–ML model can reproduce the pharmacological clock and memory patterns observed in the literature. Numerical results also indicate that parameter variability (noise) – which is ubiquitous in the form of small fluctuations in the intrinsic frequencies of neural oscillators within and between trials, and in the errors in recording/retrieving stored information related to criterion time – seems to be critical for the time-scale invariance of the clock and memory patterns. PMID:21977014

  12. Self-Produced Time Intervals Are Perceived as More Variable and/or Shorter Depending on Temporal Context in Subsecond and Suprasecond Ranges

    PubMed Central

    Mitani, Keita; Kashino, Makio

    2016-01-01

    The processing of time intervals is fundamental for sensorimotor and cognitive functions. Perceptual and motor timing are often performed concurrently (e.g., playing a musical instrument). Although previous studies have shown the influence of body movements on time perception, how we perceive self-produced time intervals has remained unclear. Furthermore, it has been suggested that the timing mechanisms are distinct for the sub- and suprasecond ranges. Here, we compared perceptual performances for self-produced and passively presented time intervals in random contexts (i.e., multiple target intervals presented in a session) across the sub- and suprasecond ranges (Experiment 1) and within the sub- (Experiment 2) and suprasecond (Experiment 3) ranges, and in a constant context (i.e., a single target interval presented in a session) in the sub- and suprasecond ranges (Experiment 4). We show that self-produced time intervals were perceived as shorter and more variable across the sub- and suprasecond ranges and within the suprasecond range but not within the subsecond range in a random context. In a constant context, the self-produced time intervals were perceived as more variable in the suprasecond range but not in the subsecond range. The impairing effects indicate that motor timing interferes with perceptual timing. The dependence of impairment on temporal contexts suggests multiple timing mechanisms for the subsecond and suprasecond ranges. In addition, violation of the scalar property (i.e., a constant variability to target interval ratio) was observed between the sub- and suprasecond ranges. The violation was clearer for motor timing than for perceptual timing. This suggests that the multiple timing mechanisms for the sub- and suprasecond ranges overlap more for perception than for motor. Moreover, the central tendency effect (i.e., where shorter base intervals are overestimated and longer base intervals are underestimated) disappeared with motor timing within the

  13. Self-Produced Time Intervals Are Perceived as More Variable and/or Shorter Depending on Temporal Context in Subsecond and Suprasecond Ranges.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Keita; Kashino, Makio

    2016-01-01

    The processing of time intervals is fundamental for sensorimotor and cognitive functions. Perceptual and motor timing are often performed concurrently (e.g., playing a musical instrument). Although previous studies have shown the influence of body movements on time perception, how we perceive self-produced time intervals has remained unclear. Furthermore, it has been suggested that the timing mechanisms are distinct for the sub- and suprasecond ranges. Here, we compared perceptual performances for self-produced and passively presented time intervals in random contexts (i.e., multiple target intervals presented in a session) across the sub- and suprasecond ranges (Experiment 1) and within the sub- (Experiment 2) and suprasecond (Experiment 3) ranges, and in a constant context (i.e., a single target interval presented in a session) in the sub- and suprasecond ranges (Experiment 4). We show that self-produced time intervals were perceived as shorter and more variable across the sub- and suprasecond ranges and within the suprasecond range but not within the subsecond range in a random context. In a constant context, the self-produced time intervals were perceived as more variable in the suprasecond range but not in the subsecond range. The impairing effects indicate that motor timing interferes with perceptual timing. The dependence of impairment on temporal contexts suggests multiple timing mechanisms for the subsecond and suprasecond ranges. In addition, violation of the scalar property (i.e., a constant variability to target interval ratio) was observed between the sub- and suprasecond ranges. The violation was clearer for motor timing than for perceptual timing. This suggests that the multiple timing mechanisms for the sub- and suprasecond ranges overlap more for perception than for motor. Moreover, the central tendency effect (i.e., where shorter base intervals are overestimated and longer base intervals are underestimated) disappeared with motor timing within the

  14. Effects of posture on exercise performance - Measurement by systolic time intervals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spodick, D. H.; Quarry-Pigott, V. M.

    1973-01-01

    Because posture significantly influences cardiac performance, the effects of moderate supine and upright ergometer exercise were compared on the basis of proportional (+37%) rate increments over resting control. Supine exercise produced significant decreases in left ventricular ejection time (LVET), pre-ejection period (PEP), and isovolumic contraction time (IVCT). Ejection time index (ETI) and corrected ejection time (LVETc) did not change significantly. Upright exercise produced greater decreases in PEP and LVET, but despite the rate increase there was no change in LVET, which resulted in sharp increases in ETI and LVETc. The discordant directional effects on LVET and its rate-correcting indices between the two postures were consistent with hemodynamic studies demonstrating lack of stroke volume change during supine exercise and increased stroke volume over control during light to moderate upright exercise.

  15. VALIDATION OF SPRING OPERATED PRESSURE RELIEF VALVE TIME TO FAILURE AND THE IMPORTANCE OF STATISTICALLY SUPPORTED MAINTENANCE INTERVALS

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, R; Stephen Harris, S

    2009-02-18

    The Savannah River Site operates a Relief Valve Repair Shop certified by the National Board of Pressure Vessel Inspectors to NB-23, The National Board Inspection Code. Local maintenance forces perform inspection, testing, and repair of approximately 1200 spring-operated relief valves (SORV) each year as the valves are cycled in from the field. The Site now has over 7000 certified test records in the Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS); a summary of that data is presented in this paper. In previous papers, several statistical techniques were used to investigate failure on demand and failure rates including a quantal response method for predicting the failure probability as a function of time in service. The non-conservative failure mode for SORV is commonly termed 'stuck shut'; industry defined as the valve opening at greater than or equal to 1.5 times the cold set pressure. Actual time to failure is typically not known, only that failure occurred some time since the last proof test (censored data). This paper attempts to validate the assumptions underlying the statistical lifetime prediction results using Monte Carlo simulation. It employs an aging model for lift pressure as a function of set pressure, valve manufacturer, and a time-related aging effect. This paper attempts to answer two questions: (1) what is the predicted failure rate over the chosen maintenance/ inspection interval; and do we understand aging sufficient enough to estimate risk when basing proof test intervals on proof test results?

  16. The Influence of Pretreatment Characteristics and Radiotherapy Parameters on Time Interval to Development of Radiation-Associated Meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Paulino, Arnold C.; Ahmed, Irfan M.; Mai, Wei Y.; Teh, Bin S.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To identify pretreatment characteristics and radiotherapy parameters which may influence time interval to development of radiation-associated meningioma (RAM). Methods and Materials: A Medline/PUBMED search of articles dealing with RAM yielded 66 studies between 1981 and 2006. Factors analyzed included patient age and gender, type of initial tumor treated, radiotherapy (RT) dose and volume, and time interval from RT to development of RAM. Results: A total of 143 patients with a median age at RT of 12 years form the basis of this report. The most common initial tumors or conditions treated with RT were medulloblastoma (n = 27), pituitary adenoma (n = 20), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 20), low-grade astrocytoma (n = 19), and tinea capitis (n = 14). In the 116 patients whose RT fields were known, 55 (47.4%) had a portion of the brain treated, whereas 32 (27.6%) and 29 (25.0%) had craniospinal and whole-brain fields. The median time from RT to develop a RAM or latent time (LT) was 19 years (range, 1-63 years). Male gender (p = 0.001), initial diagnosis of leukemia (p = 0.001), and use of whole brain or craniospinal field (p <= 0.0001) were associated with a shorter LT, whereas patients who received lower doses of RT had a longer LT (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The latent time to develop a RAM was related to gender, initial tumor type, radiotherapy volume, and radiotherapy dose.

  17. Effect of different post-feeding intervals on the total time of development of the blowfly Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Mai, Madeleine; Amendt, Jens

    2012-09-10

    By estimating the age of the immature stages of flies developing on a corpse, forensic entomologists are able to establish the minimum post-mortem interval. Blowflies, which are the first and most important colonizers, usually leave the cadaver at the end of the last larval stage searching for a pupation site. This period of development is referred as the post-feeding or wandering stage. The characteristics of the ground where the corpse was placed might be of notable importance for the post-feeding dispersal time: For pupariation the larvae prefer an environment protected from light and predators and may have a longer dispersal time in order to reach an appropriate pupation site. Hence, the dispersal time can vary and may influence the total time of development which may lead to an erroneous calculation of the post-mortem interval. This study investigates the effect of various post-feeding time intervals on the development of the blowfly Lucilia sericata at a temperature of 25°C. As larvae reached the post-feeding stage a pupariation substrate was offered at 0 and after 12, 24 and 48h. Only the larvae with a dispersal time of 24h (total time of development 325.2h; median) and 48h (total time of development 347.7h; median) showed a significantly longer total development time compared to the control group (total time of development 318.4h; median). The mortality rate did not differ between groups; however the flies that emerged from the group with a dispersal of 48h were significantly smaller indicating increased energy consumption during dispersal. The results of this study indicate that a prolonged post-feeding stage could increase the total developmental time of L. sericata which should be taken into consideration when interpreting entomological findings. The need for a serious examination of current rearing practices in forensic entomology laboratories is indicated because reference data sets for the time of development are usually produced by offering the post

  18. Effect of different post-feeding intervals on the total time of development of the blowfly Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Mai, Madeleine; Amendt, Jens

    2012-09-10

    By estimating the age of the immature stages of flies developing on a corpse, forensic entomologists are able to establish the minimum post-mortem interval. Blowflies, which are the first and most important colonizers, usually leave the cadaver at the end of the last larval stage searching for a pupation site. This period of development is referred as the post-feeding or wandering stage. The characteristics of the ground where the corpse was placed might be of notable importance for the post-feeding dispersal time: For pupariation the larvae prefer an environment protected from light and predators and may have a longer dispersal time in order to reach an appropriate pupation site. Hence, the dispersal time can vary and may influence the total time of development which may lead to an erroneous calculation of the post-mortem interval. This study investigates the effect of various post-feeding time intervals on the development of the blowfly Lucilia sericata at a temperature of 25°C. As larvae reached the post-feeding stage a pupariation substrate was offered at 0 and after 12, 24 and 48h. Only the larvae with a dispersal time of 24h (total time of development 325.2h; median) and 48h (total time of development 347.7h; median) showed a significantly longer total development time compared to the control group (total time of development 318.4h; median). The mortality rate did not differ between groups; however the flies that emerged from the group with a dispersal of 48h were significantly smaller indicating increased energy consumption during dispersal. The results of this study indicate that a prolonged post-feeding stage could increase the total developmental time of L. sericata which should be taken into consideration when interpreting entomological findings. The need for a serious examination of current rearing practices in forensic entomology laboratories is indicated because reference data sets for the time of development are usually produced by offering the post

  19. Dependency of magnetocardiographically determined fetal cardiac time intervals on gestational age, gender and postnatal biometrics in healthy pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Peter; Lange, Silke; Klein, Anita; Geue, Daniel; Grönemeyer, Dietrich HW

    2004-01-01

    Background Magnetocardiography enables the precise determination of fetal cardiac time intervals (CTI) as early as the second trimester of pregnancy. It has been shown that fetal CTI change in course of gestation. The aim of this work was to investigate the dependency of fetal CTI on gestational age, gender and postnatal biometric data in a substantial sample of subjects during normal pregnancy. Methods A total of 230 fetal magnetocardiograms were obtained in 47 healthy fetuses between the 15th and 42nd week of gestation. In each recording, after subtraction of the maternal cardiac artifact and the identification of fetal beats, fetal PQRST courses were signal averaged. On the basis of therein detected wave onsets and ends, the following CTI were determined: P wave, PR interval, PQ interval, QRS complex, ST segment, T wave, QT and QTc interval. Using regression analysis, the dependency of the CTI were examined with respect to gestational age, gender and postnatal biometric data. Results Atrioventricular conduction and ventricular depolarization times could be determined dependably whereas the T wave was often difficult to detect. Linear and nonlinear regression analysis established strong dependency on age for the P wave and QRS complex (r2 = 0.67, p < 0.001 and r2 = 0.66, p < 0.001) as well as an identifiable trend for the PR and PQ intervals (r2 = 0.21, p < 0.001 and r2 = 0.13, p < 0.001). Gender differences were found only for the QRS complex from the 31st week onward (p < 0.05). The influence on the P wave or QRS complex of biometric data, collected in a subgroup in whom recordings were available within 1 week of birth, did not display statistical significance. Conclusion We conclude that 1) from approximately the 18th week to term, fetal CTI which quantify depolarization times can be reliably determined using magnetocardiography, 2) the P wave and QRS complex duration show a high dependency on age which to a large part reflects fetal growth and 3) fetal gender

  20. Natural Course of Chlamydia trachomatis Bacterial Load in the Time Interval between Screening and Treatment in Anogenital Samples

    PubMed Central

    Dirks, J. A. M. C.; van Liere, G. A. F. S.; Bogers, S.; Dukers-Muijrers, N. H. T. M.; Wolffs, P. F. G.; Hoebe, C. J. P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infection worldwide, little is known about the natural course of the bacterial load during infection. We investigated the natural course of the bacterial load in the interval between screening and returning for treatment in genital and anorectal CT-infections. Materials & Methods CT-positive patients, visiting our STI-clinic in the Netherlands from June 2011–January 2014, provided a second urogenital and/or anorectal sample when returning for treatment (diagnostic sample = T1; treatment sample = T2). Patient-record provided data about the days between samples and the date of last unsafe sex. Included patients were ≥18 years old, HIV-negative and did not report antibiotic use in the study-interval. CT load was quantified using qPCR. CT load was log-transformed, and a CT load difference (Δ-CT load) of >1 log was deemed clinically relevant. Chi-square test compared load category distributions over time (decrease/equal/increase), between sample types. Results 274 patients provided 296 paired samples. Majority of samples had a stable CT load in the interval T1-T2 (66.3%, 73.1% and 48.6% for vaginal swabs, urine and anorectal swabs resp. p = 0.07). Load decreased in 17–41% of patients, while ±10% of patients showed an increase in CT load. No association between Δ-CT load and the interval T1-T2 was observed. Large variations can be seen in CT load at T1 and over time. Discussion The majority (±90%) of patients have a stable or decreasing CT load in the time interval between screening and returning for treatment. The number of days between sampling was not associated with change in CT load. In the first month after the last unsafe sex, only stable CT loads were seen. Our data seems to indicate that when most patients visit an STI-clinic, recommended 2 weeks after infection, the infection has already been established or is in its downward phase. PMID:26713628

  1. Persistent time intervals between features in solar flare hard X-ray emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Upendra D.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Talon, R.; Vedrenne, G.

    1986-01-01

    Several solar hard X-ray events (greater than 100 keV) were observed simultaneously with identical instruments on the Venera 11, 12, 13, 14, and Prognoz spacecraft. High time resolution (= 2 ms) data were stored in memory when a trigger occurred. The observations of modulation are presented with a period of 1.6 s for the event on December 3, 1978. Evidence is also presented for fast time fluctuations from an event on November 6, 1979, observed from Venera 12 and another on September 6, 1981, observed from the Solar Maximum Mission. Power spectrum analysis, epoch folding, and Monte Carlo simulation were used to evaluate the statistical significance of persistent time delays between features. The results are discussed in light of the MHD model proposed by Zaitsev and Stepanov.

  2. A Further Assessment of Momentary Time-Sampling across Extended Interval Lengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvero, Alicia M.; Rappaport, Eva; Taylor, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    The current study compared the estimation of momentary time-sampling (MTS) to actual safety performance of three ergonomic responses: back, shoulder, and feet. Actual safety performance was established for the five participants by measuring the target responses with a continuous procedure. MTS 90, 105, 120, 135, 150, 165, 180, 195, 210, 240, and…

  3. Effects of Improvements in Interval Timing on the Mathematics Achievement of Elementary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Gordon E.; McGrew, Kevin S.; Keith, Timothy Z.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the effect of improvements in timing/rhythmicity on mathematics achievement. A total of 86 participants attending 1st through 4th grades completed pre- and posttest measures of mathematics achievement from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement. Students in the experimental group participated in a 4-week intervention…

  4. Interstimulus Interval and Delivery Cues Influence Timed Conditioned Responding in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Douglas A.; Chubala, Chrissy M.; Mather, Amber A.; Johns, Kenneth W.

    2009-01-01

    Appetitive contextual excitation supported by intertrial unconditioned stimuli was more easily overcome by timed conditioned responding in rats using quiet (Experiment 1) rather than noisy (Experiment 2) food pellet deliveries. Head-entry responding in acquisition peaked above the contextual baseline when pellet delivery occurred 10, 30, 60, or 90…

  5. The Estimation of Short Time Intervals as a Function of Age and Metronome Pacing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Donald W.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The time judgments of the older participants were significantly and systematically determined by a metronome rate. Results are consistent with the notion of increased field-dependence among older persons and suggest that their greater social conformity and their inability to ignore irrelevant stimuli might also be explicable. (Author)

  6. Estimating the time interval between exposure to the World Trade Center disaster and incident diagnoses of obstructive airway disease.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Michelle S; Webber, Mayris P; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Weakley, Jessica; Liu, Xiaoxue; Ye, Fen; Cohen, Hillel W; Aldrich, Thomas K; Kelly, Kerry J; Nolan, Anna; Weiden, Michael D; Prezant, David J; Hall, Charles B

    2014-08-01

    Respiratory disorders are associated with occupational and environmental exposures. The latency period between exposure and disease onset remains uncertain. The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster presents a unique opportunity to describe the latency period for obstructive airway disease (OAD) diagnoses. This prospective cohort study of New York City firefighters compared the timing and incidence of physician-diagnosed OAD relative to WTC exposure. Exposure was categorized by WTC arrival time as high (on the morning of September 11, 2001), moderate (after noon on September 11, 2001, or on September 12, 2001), or low (during September 13-24, 2001). We modeled relative rates and 95% confidence intervals of OAD incidence by exposure over the first 5 years after September 11, 2001, estimating the times of change in the relative rate with change point models. We observed a change point at 15 months after September 11, 2001. Before 15 months, the relative rate for the high- versus low-exposure group was 3.96 (95% confidence interval: 2.51, 6.26) and thereafter, it was 1.76 (95% confidence interval: 1.26, 2.46). Incident OAD was associated with WTC exposure for at least 5 years after September 11, 2001. There were higher rates of new-onset OAD among the high-exposure group during the first 15 months and, to a lesser extent, throughout follow-up. This difference in relative rate by exposure occurred despite full and free access to health care for all WTC-exposed firefighters, demonstrating the persistence of WTC-associated OAD risk. PMID:24980522

  7. Rank-based inference for the accelerated failure time model in the presence of interval censored data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Mostafa; Ibrahim, Noor Akma; Bakar, Mohd. Rizam Abu; Arasan, Jayanthi

    2016-06-01

    Semiparametric analysis and rank-based inference for the accelerated failure time model are complicated in the presence of interval censored data. The main difficulty with the existing rank-based methods is that they involve estimating functions with the possibility of multiple roots. In this paper a class of asymptotically normal rank estimators is developed which can be aquired via linear programming for estimating the parameters of the model, and a two-step iterative algorithm is introduce for solving the estimating equations. The proposed inference procedures are assessed through a real example.

  8. Global robust dissipativity of interval recurrent neural networks with time-varying delay and discontinuous activations.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lian; Huang, Lihong; Guo, Zhenyuan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the problems of robust dissipativity and robust exponential dissipativity are discussed for a class of recurrent neural networks with time-varying delay and discontinuous activations. We extend an invariance principle for the study of the dissipativity problem of delay systems to the discontinuous case. Based on the developed theory, some novel criteria for checking the global robust dissipativity and global robust exponential dissipativity of the addressed neural network model are established by constructing appropriate Lyapunov functionals and employing the theory of Filippov systems and matrix inequality techniques. The effectiveness of the theoretical results is shown by two examples with numerical simulations. PMID:27475061

  9. Global robust dissipativity of interval recurrent neural networks with time-varying delay and discontinuous activations.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lian; Huang, Lihong; Guo, Zhenyuan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the problems of robust dissipativity and robust exponential dissipativity are discussed for a class of recurrent neural networks with time-varying delay and discontinuous activations. We extend an invariance principle for the study of the dissipativity problem of delay systems to the discontinuous case. Based on the developed theory, some novel criteria for checking the global robust dissipativity and global robust exponential dissipativity of the addressed neural network model are established by constructing appropriate Lyapunov functionals and employing the theory of Filippov systems and matrix inequality techniques. The effectiveness of the theoretical results is shown by two examples with numerical simulations.

  10. Global robust dissipativity of interval recurrent neural networks with time-varying delay and discontinuous activations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lian; Huang, Lihong; Guo, Zhenyuan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the problems of robust dissipativity and robust exponential dissipativity are discussed for a class of recurrent neural networks with time-varying delay and discontinuous activations. We extend an invariance principle for the study of the dissipativity problem of delay systems to the discontinuous case. Based on the developed theory, some novel criteria for checking the global robust dissipativity and global robust exponential dissipativity of the addressed neural network model are established by constructing appropriate Lyapunov functionals and employing the theory of Filippov systems and matrix inequality techniques. The effectiveness of the theoretical results is shown by two examples with numerical simulations.

  11. Online Doppler Effect Elimination Based on Unequal Time Interval Sampling for Wayside Acoustic Bearing Fault Detecting System.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Kesai; Lu, Siliang; Zhang, Shangbin; Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-08-27

    The railway occupies a fairly important position in transportation due to its high speed and strong transportation capability. As a consequence, it is a key issue to guarantee continuous running and transportation safety of trains. Meanwhile, time consumption of the diagnosis procedure is of extreme importance for the detecting system. However, most of the current adopted techniques in the wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system (ADBD) are offline strategies, which means that the signal is analyzed after the sampling process. This would result in unavoidable time latency. Besides, the acquired acoustic signal would be corrupted by the Doppler effect because of high relative speed between the train and the data acquisition system (DAS). Thus, it is difficult to effectively diagnose the bearing defects immediately. In this paper, a new strategy called online Doppler effect elimination (ODEE) is proposed to remove the Doppler distortion online by the introduced unequal interval sampling scheme. The steps of proposed strategy are as follows: The essential parameters are acquired in advance. Then, the introduced unequal time interval sampling strategy is used to restore the Doppler distortion signal, and the amplitude of the signal is demodulated as well. Thus, the restored Doppler-free signal is obtained online. The proposed ODEE method has been employed in simulation analysis. Ultimately, the ODEE method is implemented in the embedded system for fault diagnosis of the train bearing. The results are in good accordance with the bearing defects, which verifies the good performance of the proposed strategy.

  12. Online Doppler Effect Elimination Based on Unequal Time Interval Sampling for Wayside Acoustic Bearing Fault Detecting System

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Kesai; Lu, Siliang; Zhang, Shangbin; Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-01-01

    The railway occupies a fairly important position in transportation due to its high speed and strong transportation capability. As a consequence, it is a key issue to guarantee continuous running and transportation safety of trains. Meanwhile, time consumption of the diagnosis procedure is of extreme importance for the detecting system. However, most of the current adopted techniques in the wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system (ADBD) are offline strategies, which means that the signal is analyzed after the sampling process. This would result in unavoidable time latency. Besides, the acquired acoustic signal would be corrupted by the Doppler effect because of high relative speed between the train and the data acquisition system (DAS). Thus, it is difficult to effectively diagnose the bearing defects immediately. In this paper, a new strategy called online Doppler effect elimination (ODEE) is proposed to remove the Doppler distortion online by the introduced unequal interval sampling scheme. The steps of proposed strategy are as follows: The essential parameters are acquired in advance. Then, the introduced unequal time interval sampling strategy is used to restore the Doppler distortion signal, and the amplitude of the signal is demodulated as well. Thus, the restored Doppler-free signal is obtained online. The proposed ODEE method has been employed in simulation analysis. Ultimately, the ODEE method is implemented in the embedded system for fault diagnosis of the train bearing. The results are in good accordance with the bearing defects, which verifies the good performance of the proposed strategy. PMID:26343657

  13. Online Doppler Effect Elimination Based on Unequal Time Interval Sampling for Wayside Acoustic Bearing Fault Detecting System.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Kesai; Lu, Siliang; Zhang, Shangbin; Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-01-01

    The railway occupies a fairly important position in transportation due to its high speed and strong transportation capability. As a consequence, it is a key issue to guarantee continuous running and transportation safety of trains. Meanwhile, time consumption of the diagnosis procedure is of extreme importance for the detecting system. However, most of the current adopted techniques in the wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system (ADBD) are offline strategies, which means that the signal is analyzed after the sampling process. This would result in unavoidable time latency. Besides, the acquired acoustic signal would be corrupted by the Doppler effect because of high relative speed between the train and the data acquisition system (DAS). Thus, it is difficult to effectively diagnose the bearing defects immediately. In this paper, a new strategy called online Doppler effect elimination (ODEE) is proposed to remove the Doppler distortion online by the introduced unequal interval sampling scheme. The steps of proposed strategy are as follows: The essential parameters are acquired in advance. Then, the introduced unequal time interval sampling strategy is used to restore the Doppler distortion signal, and the amplitude of the signal is demodulated as well. Thus, the restored Doppler-free signal is obtained online. The proposed ODEE method has been employed in simulation analysis. Ultimately, the ODEE method is implemented in the embedded system for fault diagnosis of the train bearing. The results are in good accordance with the bearing defects, which verifies the good performance of the proposed strategy. PMID:26343657

  14. Influence of the dosing interval on prolactin release after remoxipride.

    PubMed Central

    Movin-Osswald, G; Hammarlund-Udenaes, M; Von Bahr, C; Eneroth, P; Walton-Bowen, K

    1995-01-01

    1. The prolactin response following administration of the D2-dopamine receptor antagonist remoxipride was studied in eight healthy male volunteers. The purpose of the study was to investigate the duration of a refractory period of prolactin release following two doses of remoxipride. A further aim was to compare the prolactin response following remoxipride and thyrotropin release hormone (TRH) during the refractory period. The subjects received two 30 min intravenous (i.v.) infusions of remoxipride 50 mg with different time intervals between the two doses, in a randomized six period crossover design. The time intervals between the two remoxipride doses were 2, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h. On one occasion the remoxipride dose was followed by an i.v. injection of TRH after 2 h. 2. The plasma peak prolactin concentrations obtained after the first remoxipride dose correspond to a maximal release of prolactin according to earlier studies. A small second peak of prolactin was observed after 2 h. The release was gradually increased with longer time intervals between the consecutive doses. The refractory period for a second prolactin release similar to the first one after remoxipride was found to be 24 h for most of the subjects. 3. TRH resulted in a faster and higher increase in prolactin response of a shorter duration than after remoxipride administered 2 h after the first dose. PMID:7669486

  15. Short time interval for condensation of high-temperature silicates in the solar accretion disk

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Tu-Han; Young, Edward D.; Gounelle, Matthieu; Chaussidon, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Chondritic meteorites are made of primitive components that record the first steps of formation of solids in our Solar System. Chondrules are the major component of chondrites, yet little is known about their formation mechanisms and history within the solar protoplanetary disk (SPD). We use the reconstructed concentrations of short-lived 26Al in chondrules to constrain the timing of formation of their precursors in the SPD. High-precision bulk magnesium isotopic measurements of 14 chondrules from the Allende chondrite define a 26Al isochron with 26Al/27Al = 1.2(±0.2) × 10−5 for this subset of Allende chondrules. This can be considered to be the minimum bulk chondrule 26Al isochron because all chondrules analyzed so far with high precision (∼50 chondrules from CV and ordinary chondrites) have an inferred minimum bulk initial (26Al/27Al) ≥ 1.2 × 10−5. In addition, mineral 26Al isochrons determined on the same chondrules show that their formation (i.e., fusion of their precursors by energetic events) took place from 0 Myr to ∼2 Myr after the formation of their precursors, thus showing in some cases a clear decoupling in time between the two events. The finding of a minimum bulk chondrule 26Al isochron is used to constrain the astrophysical settings for chondrule formation. Either the temperature of the condensation zone dropped below the condensation temperature of chondrule precursors at ∼1.5 My after the start of the Solar System or the transport of precursors from the condensation zone to potential storage sites stopped after 1.5 My, possibly due to a drop in the disk accretion rate. PMID:25605942

  16. Short time interval for condensation of high-temperature silicates in the solar accretion disk.

    PubMed

    Luu, Tu-Han; Young, Edward D; Gounelle, Matthieu; Chaussidon, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Chondritic meteorites are made of primitive components that record the first steps of formation of solids in our Solar System. Chondrules are the major component of chondrites, yet little is known about their formation mechanisms and history within the solar protoplanetary disk (SPD). We use the reconstructed concentrations of short-lived (26)Al in chondrules to constrain the timing of formation of their precursors in the SPD. High-precision bulk magnesium isotopic measurements of 14 chondrules from the Allende chondrite define a (26)Al isochron with (26)Al/(27)Al = 1.2(±0.2) × 10(-5) for this subset of Allende chondrules. This can be considered to be the minimum bulk chondrule (26)Al isochron because all chondrules analyzed so far with high precision (∼50 chondrules from CV and ordinary chondrites) have an inferred minimum bulk initial ((26)Al/(27)Al) ≥ 1.2 × 10(-5). In addition, mineral (26)Al isochrons determined on the same chondrules show that their formation (i.e., fusion of their precursors by energetic events) took place from 0 Myr to ∼2 Myr after the formation of their precursors, thus showing in some cases a clear decoupling in time between the two events. The finding of a minimum bulk chondrule (26)Al isochron is used to constrain the astrophysical settings for chondrule formation. Either the temperature of the condensation zone dropped below the condensation temperature of chondrule precursors at ∼1.5 My after the start of the Solar System or the transport of precursors from the condensation zone to potential storage sites stopped after 1.5 My, possibly due to a drop in the disk accretion rate.

  17. Effect on tumour control of time interval between surgery and postoperative radiotherapy: an empirical approach using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Dweri, Feras M. O.; Guirado, Damián; Lallena, Antonio M.; Pedraza, Vicente

    2004-07-01

    In this work, a procedure, based on Monte Carlo techniques, to analyse the effect on the tumour control probability of the time interval between surgery and postoperative radiotherapy is presented. The approach includes the tumour growth as well as the survival of tumour cells undergoing fractionated radiotherapy. Both processes are described in terms of the binomial distribution. We have considered two different growth models, exponential and Gompertz, the parameters of which have been fixed to reproduce the clinical outcome corresponding to a retrospective study for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. In the cases analysed, we have not found significant differences between the results obtained for both growth models. The mean doubling times found for residual clonogens after surgery are less than 40 days. The rate of decrease in local control is around 0.09% per day of delay between surgery and radiotherapy and the corresponding time factor is about 0.11 Gy per day.

  18. Effects of low and high cadence interval training on power output in flat and uphill cycling time-trials.

    PubMed

    Nimmerichter, Alfred; Eston, Roger; Bachl, Norbert; Williams, Craig

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the effects of low-cadence (60 rev min(-1)) uphill (Int(60)) or high-cadence (100 rev min(-1)) level-ground (Int(100)) interval training on power output (PO) during 20-min uphill (TT(up)) and flat (TT(flat)) time-trials. Eighteen male cyclists ([Formula: see text]: 58.6 ± 5.4 mL min(-1) kg(-1)) were randomly assigned to Int(60), Int(100) or a control group (Con). The interval training comprised two training sessions per week over 4 weeks, which consisted of six bouts of 5 min at the PO corresponding to the respiratory compensation point (RCP). For the control group, no interval training was conducted. A two-factor ANOVA revealed significant increases on performance measures obtained from a laboratory-graded exercise test (GXT) (P (max): 2.8 ± 3.0%; p < 0.01; PO and [Formula: see text] at RCP: 3.6 ± 6.3% and 4.7 ± 8.2%, respectively; p < 0.05; and [Formula: see text] at ventilatory threshold: 4.9 ± 5.6%; p < 0.01), with no significant group effects. Significant interactions between group and uphill and flat time-trial, pre- versus post-training on PO were observed (p < 0.05). Int(60) increased PO during both TT(up) (4.4 ± 5.3%) and TT(flat) (1.5 ± 4.5%). The changes were -1.3 ± 3.6, 2.6 ± 6.0% for Int(100) and 4.0 ± 4.6%, -3.5 ± 5.4% for Con during TT(up) and TT(flat), respectively. PO was significantly higher during TT(up) than TT(flat) (4.4 ± 6.0; 6.3 ± 5.6%; pre and post-training, respectively; p < 0.001). These findings suggest that higher forces during the low-cadence intervals are potentially beneficial to improve performance. In contrast to the GXT, the time-trials are ecologically valid to detect specific performance adaptations.

  19. Symptomatic versus inapparent outcome in repeat dengue virus infections is influenced by the time interval between infections and study year.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Magelda; Gresh, Lionel; Mercado, Juan Carlos; Williams, Katherine L; Vargas, Maria José; Gutierrez, Gamaliel; Kuan, Guillermina; Gordon, Aubree; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Four dengue virus serotypes (DENV1-4) circulate globally, causing more human illness than any other arthropod-borne virus. Dengue can present as a range of clinical manifestations from undifferentiated fever to Dengue Fever to severe, life-threatening syndromes. However, most DENV infections are inapparent. Yet, little is known about determinants of inapparent versus symptomatic DENV infection outcome. Here, we analyzed over 2,000 DENV infections from 2004 to 2011 in a prospective pediatric cohort study in Managua, Nicaragua. Symptomatic cases were captured at the study health center, and paired healthy annual samples were examined on a yearly basis using serological methods to identify inapparent DENV infections. Overall, inapparent and symptomatic DENV infections were equally distributed by sex. The mean age of infection was 1.2 years higher for symptomatic DENV infections as compared to inapparent infections. Although inapparent versus symptomatic outcome did not differ by infection number (first, second or third/post-second DENV infections), substantial variation in the proportion of symptomatic DENV infections among all DENV infections was observed across study years. In participants with repeat DENV infections, the time interval between a first inapparent DENV infection and a second inapparent infection was significantly shorter than the interval between a first inapparent and a second symptomatic infection. This difference was not observed in subsequent infections. This result was confirmed using two different serological techniques that measure total anti-DENV antibodies and serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies, respectively. Taken together, these findings show that, in this study, age, study year and time interval between consecutive DENV infections influence inapparent versus symptomatic infection outcome, while sex and infection number had no significant effect. Moreover, these results suggest that the window of cross-protection induced by a first

  20. Time-interval for integration of stabilizing haptic and visual information in subjects balancing under static and dynamic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Honeine, Jean-Louis; Schieppati, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining equilibrium is basically a sensorimotor integration task. The central nervous system (CNS) continually and selectively weights and rapidly integrates sensory inputs from multiple sources, and coordinates multiple outputs. The weighting process is based on the availability and accuracy of afferent signals at a given instant, on the time-period required to process each input, and possibly on the plasticity of the relevant pathways. The likelihood that sensory inflow changes while balancing under static or dynamic conditions is high, because subjects can pass from a dark to a well-lit environment or from a tactile-guided stabilization to loss of haptic inflow. This review article presents recent data on the temporal events accompanying sensory transition, on which basic information is fragmentary. The processing time from sensory shift to reaching a new steady state includes the time to (a) subtract or integrate sensory inputs; (b) move from allocentric to egocentric reference or vice versa; and (c) adjust the calibration of motor activity in time and amplitude to the new sensory set. We present examples of processes of integration of posture-stabilizing information, and of the respective sensorimotor time-intervals while allowing or occluding vision or adding or subtracting tactile information. These intervals are short, in the order of 1–2 s for different postural conditions, modalities and deliberate or passive shift. They are just longer for haptic than visual shift, just shorter on withdrawal than on addition of stabilizing input, and on deliberate than unexpected mode. The delays are the shortest (for haptic shift) in blind subjects. Since automatic balance stabilization may be vulnerable to sensory-integration delays and to interference from concurrent cognitive tasks in patients with sensorimotor problems, insight into the processing time for balance control represents a critical step in the design of new balance- and locomotion training devices

  1. A further application of the active time model to multiple concurrent variable-interval schedules.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Andrew T; Cleaveland, J Mark

    2010-05-01

    In this experiment we show that the active time model (ATM) accurately predicts probe data from multiple concurrent VI VI schedules. Subjects were trained under a concurrent VI 30-s VI 60-s and a concurrent VI 60-s VI 120-s schedule. Two types of unreinforced probes were then conducted. The first paired the two VI 60-s stimuli. These stimuli, while equivalent in their associated absolute rates of reinforcement, differed in their relative rates of reinforcement. The second probe paired the VI 30-s stimulus with the relatively rich VI 60-s stimulus. In contrast with the first probe, these stimuli differed in their absolute rates of reinforcement, while being similar in their relative rates. During the first set of probes, birds preferred the VI 60-s stimulus trained with the VI 120-s schedule. During the second set of probes, birds were indifferent to the two stimuli. These results are less extreme than others reported in the literature. Nonetheless, we found that ATM accurately fit individual subject data in both sets of probes. In contrast a variant of scalar expectancy theory did not fit the data at either the individual or group level.

  2. Blind synchronization of the OFDM signals in multipath channels on the basis of the time and frequency protection intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkov, G. N.; Gorokhov, K. V.; Kolobkov, A. V.

    2013-08-01

    New methods of symbol-timing and carrier-frequency blind synchronization of an OFDM-signal receiver are developed and studied. They generalize the well-known methods which use either the protection interval in time in the cyclic prefix form or the protection interval with respect to frequency in the form of virtual subcarriers, and are based on their joint application. To reduce the computational complexity, approximate algorithms which are based on the approximation of the optimal rules, but, according to the study results, have almost the same characteristics of parameter-estimation accuracy and the reception bit-error-rate performance are proposed. It is shown that in terms of the parameter-estimation accuracy and the reception bit-error-rate performance, the proposed methods are superior to the well-known methods of synchronization by the cyclic prefix and the virtual subcarriers in the two-path Rayleigh-fading channel. For incoherent systems with the differential phase shift keying variants, using such methods makes it possible to rule out the necessity of accurate synchronization and, due to insignificant redundancy of the system band and the cyclic prefix length, closely approach the reception bit-error-rate performance for perfect synchronization.

  3. Effect of sintering temperature and time intervals on morphological and hardness behaviour of Al-20 vol% Sn matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badarulzaman, N. A.; Karim, S. R.; Lajis, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    Aluminium (Al) alloys are widely used in various industries, such as automotive and aerospace. The production processes in these sectors create large amount of Al residues. In this paper, a new method of recycling Al chip is presented. Metal matrix composite (MMCs) of Al-20 vol% Sn was prepared by using solid state direct conversion method of recycled Al 6061 alloy. Constant pressure (10 ton) was used to implement the cold forging process. The differences of sintering temperature (200 °C, 250 °C, 300 °C and 350 °C) and time intervals (1h, 2h, 3h, 4h and 5h) were studied to obtain the optimum hardness, strength and surface integrity of Al-20 vol% Sn. The results showed that, hardness and strength of Al-20 vol% Sn was decreased by additional temperature and increase with time interval of sintering. Sintering temperature at 350 °C produces better morphology structure of Al-Sn composites.

  4. Intercalibration of radioisotopic and astrochronologic time scales for the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary interval, western interior Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyers, S.R.; Siewert, S.E.; Singer, B.S.; Sageman, B.B.; Condon, D.J.; Obradovich, J.D.; Jicha, B.R.; Sawyer, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    We develop an intercalibrated astrochronologic and radioisotopic time scale for the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary (CTB) interval near the Global Stratotype Section and Point in Colorado, USA, where orbitally influenced rhythmic strata host bentonites that contain sanidine and zircon suitable for 40Ar/ 39Ar and U-Pb dating. Paired 40Ar/ 39Ar and U-Pb ages are determined from four bentonites that span the Vascoceras diartianum to Pseudaspidoceras flexuosum ammonite biozones, utilizing both newly collected material and legacy sanidine samples of J. Obradovich. Comparison of the 40Ar/ 39Ar and U-Pb results underscores the strengths and limitations of each system, and supports an astronomically calibrated Fish Canyon sanidine standard age of 28.201 Ma. The radioisotopic data and published astrochronology are employed to develop a new CTB time scale, using two statistical approaches: (1) a simple integration that yields a CTB age of 93.89 ?? 0.14 Ma (2??; total radioisotopic uncertainty), and (2) a Bayesian intercalibration that explicitly accounts for orbital time scale uncertainty, and yields a CTB age of 93.90 ?? 0.15 Ma (95% credible interval; total radioisotopic and orbital time scale uncertainty). Both approaches firmly anchor the floating orbital time scale, and the Bayesian technique yields astronomically recalibrated radioisotopic ages for individual bentonites, with analytical uncertainties at the permil level of resolution, and total uncertainties below 2???. Using our new results, the duration between the Cenomanian-Turonian and the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundaries is 27.94 ?? 0.16 Ma, with an uncertainty of less than one-half of a long eccentricity cycle. ?? 2012 Geological Society of America.

  5. High-intensity interval training (HIT) for effective and time-efficient pre-surgical exercise interventions.

    PubMed

    Weston, Matthew; Weston, Kathryn L; Prentis, James M; Snowden, Chris P

    2016-01-01

    The advancement of perioperative medicine is leading to greater diversity in development of pre-surgical interventions, implemented to reduce patient surgical risk and enhance post-surgical recovery. Of these interventions, the prescription of pre-operative exercise training is gathering momentum as a realistic means for enhancing patient surgical outcome. Indeed, the general benefits of exercise training have the potential to pre-operatively optimise several pre-surgical risks factors, including cardiorespiratory function, frailty and cognitive function. Any exercise programme incorporated into the pre-operative pathway of care needs to be effective and time efficient in that any fitness gains are achievable in the limited period between the decision for surgery and operation (e.g. 4 weeks). Fortunately, there is a large volume of research describing effective and time-efficient exercise training programmes within the discipline of sports science. Accordingly, the objective of our commentary is to synthesise contemporary exercise training research, both from non-clinical and clinical populations, with the overarching aim of informing the development of effective and time-efficient pre-surgical exercise training programmes. The development of such exercise training programmes requires the careful consideration of several key principles, namely frequency, intensity, time, type and progression of exercise. Therefore, in light of more recent evidence demonstrating the effectiveness and time efficiency of high-intensity interval training-which involves brief bouts of intense exercise interspersed with longer recovery periods-the principles of exercise training programme design will be discussed mainly in the context of such high-intensity interval training programmes. Other issues pertinent to the development, implementation and evaluation of pre-operative exercise training programmes, such as individual exercise prescription, training session monitoring and potential

  6. High-intensity interval training (HIT) for effective and time-efficient pre-surgical exercise interventions.

    PubMed

    Weston, Matthew; Weston, Kathryn L; Prentis, James M; Snowden, Chris P

    2016-01-01

    The advancement of perioperative medicine is leading to greater diversity in development of pre-surgical interventions, implemented to reduce patient surgical risk and enhance post-surgical recovery. Of these interventions, the prescription of pre-operative exercise training is gathering momentum as a realistic means for enhancing patient surgical outcome. Indeed, the general benefits of exercise training have the potential to pre-operatively optimise several pre-surgical risks factors, including cardiorespiratory function, frailty and cognitive function. Any exercise programme incorporated into the pre-operative pathway of care needs to be effective and time efficient in that any fitness gains are achievable in the limited period between the decision for surgery and operation (e.g. 4 weeks). Fortunately, there is a large volume of research describing effective and time-efficient exercise training programmes within the discipline of sports science. Accordingly, the objective of our commentary is to synthesise contemporary exercise training research, both from non-clinical and clinical populations, with the overarching aim of informing the development of effective and time-efficient pre-surgical exercise training programmes. The development of such exercise training programmes requires the careful consideration of several key principles, namely frequency, intensity, time, type and progression of exercise. Therefore, in light of more recent evidence demonstrating the effectiveness and time efficiency of high-intensity interval training-which involves brief bouts of intense exercise interspersed with longer recovery periods-the principles of exercise training programme design will be discussed mainly in the context of such high-intensity interval training programmes. Other issues pertinent to the development, implementation and evaluation of pre-operative exercise training programmes, such as individual exercise prescription, training session monitoring and potential

  7. Estimating incremental cost-effectiveness ratios and their confidence intervals with different terminating events for survival time and costs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Zhao, Hongwei

    2013-07-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) is an important component of the economic evaluation of new treatment options. In many clinical and observational studies of costs, censored data pose challenges to the CEA. We consider a special situation where the terminating events for the survival time and costs are different. Traditional methods for statistical inference offer no means for dealing with censored data in these circumstances. To address this gap, we propose a new method for deriving the confidence interval for the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. The simulation studies and real data example show that our method performs very well for some practical settings, revealing a great potential for application to actual settings in which terminating events for the survival time and costs differ.

  8. Time interval since last test in a breast cancer screening programme: a case-control study in Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Palli, D; Rosselli del Turco, M; Buiatti, E; Ciatto, S; Crocetti, E; Paci, E

    1989-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a population based screening programme for breast cancer. DESIGN: This was a case-control study of women dying of breast cancer between 1977 and 1987 who had been invited to take part in a screening programme. SETTING: Community based study of women aged between 40 and 70 years (total population about 35,000 at 1981 census), living in 23 small towns near Florence, Italy. PARTICIPANTS: 103 cases were identified from death certification, and 515 living controls (five per case) selected for year of birth and town of residence. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Screening history was obtained from computer archive. Sociodemographic information was obtained from town registry offices and directly from relatives of the deceased and from the controls by postal questionnaire, and if necessary telephone or personal interview. Analysis was carried out on two age groups--40-49 years and 50+ years at diagnosis--and considered the number of screening tests and the time interval since the last test, separately and together. In the older age group, women with at least one screening test in the previous 2 1/2 years showed a 50% reduction in risk (odds ratio 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.25-0.95). If they had also had another previous negative screen the risk was reduced to one third (odds ratio 0.35, 95% CI 0.14-0.85). There was a significant trend of decreasing risk with increasing number of screens in older women. No clear evidence of a similar protective effect was shown for women in the 40-49 year age group. CONCLUSIONS: A significant protective effect of the screening programme is evident in older women but not in younger ones. The data do not allow an assessment of optimal screening interval because of the small number of previously screened cases. PMID:2607303

  9. High-Intensity Interval Exercise and Postprandial Triacylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Burns, Stephen F; Miyashita, Masashi; Stensel, David J

    2015-07-01

    This review examined if high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) reduces postprandial triacylglycerol (TAG) levels. Fifteen studies were identified, in which the effect of interval exercise conducted at an intensity of >65% of maximal oxygen uptake was evaluated on postprandial TAG levels. Analysis was divided between studies that included supramaximal exercise and those that included submaximal interval exercise. Ten studies examined the effect of a single session of low-volume HIIE including supramaximal sprints on postprandial TAG. Seven of these studies noted reductions in the postprandial total TAG area under the curve the morning after exercise of between ~10 and 21% compared with rest, but three investigations found no significant difference in TAG levels. Variations in the HIIE protocol used, inter-individual variation or insufficient time post-exercise for an increase in lipoprotein lipase activity are proposed reasons for the divergent results among studies. Five studies examined the effect of high-volume submaximal interval exercise on postprandial TAG. Four of these studies were characterised by high exercise energy expenditure and effectively attenuated total postprandial TAG levels by ~15-30%, but one study with a lower energy expenditure found no effect on TAG. The evidence suggests that supramaximal HIIE can induce large reductions in postprandial TAG levels but findings are inconsistent. Submaximal interval exercise offers no TAG metabolic or time advantage over continuous aerobic exercise but could be appealing in nature to some individuals. Future research should examine if submaximal interval exercise can reduce TAG levels in line with more realistic and achievable exercise durations of 30 min per day.

  10. Priority effects of time of arrival of plant functional groups override sowing interval or density effects: a grassland experiment.

    PubMed

    von Gillhaussen, Philipp; Rascher, Uwe; Jablonowski, Nicolai D; Plückers, Christine; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Temperton, Vicky M

    2014-01-01

    Priority effects occur when species that arrive first in a habitat significantly affect the establishment, growth, or reproduction of species arriving later and thus affect functioning of communities. However, we know little about how the timing of arrival of functionally different species may alter structure and function during assembly. Even less is known about how plant density might interact with initial assembly. In a greenhouse experiment legumes, grasses or forbs were sown a number of weeks before the other two plant functional types were sown (PFT) in combination with a sowing density treatment. Legumes, grasses or non-legume forbs were sown first at three different density levels followed by sowing of the remaining PFTs after three or six-weeks. We found that the order of arrival of different plant functional types had a much stronger influence on aboveground productivity than sowing density or interval between the sowing events. The sowing of legumes before the other PFTs produced the highest aboveground biomass. The larger sowing interval led to higher asymmetric competition, with highest dominance of the PFT sown first. It seems that legumes were better able to get a head-start and be productive before the later groups arrived, but that their traits allowed for better subsequent establishment of non-legume PFTs. Our study indicates that the manipulation of the order of arrival can create priority effects which favour functional groups of plants differently and thus induce different assembly routes and affect community composition and functioning.

  11. Priority effects of time of arrival of plant functional groups override sowing interval or density effects: a grassland experiment.

    PubMed

    von Gillhaussen, Philipp; Rascher, Uwe; Jablonowski, Nicolai D; Plückers, Christine; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Temperton, Vicky M

    2014-01-01

    Priority effects occur when species that arrive first in a habitat significantly affect the establishment, growth, or reproduction of species arriving later and thus affect functioning of communities. However, we know little about how the timing of arrival of functionally different species may alter structure and function during assembly. Even less is known about how plant density might interact with initial assembly. In a greenhouse experiment legumes, grasses or forbs were sown a number of weeks before the other two plant functional types were sown (PFT) in combination with a sowing density treatment. Legumes, grasses or non-legume forbs were sown first at three different density levels followed by sowing of the remaining PFTs after three or six-weeks. We found that the order of arrival of different plant functional types had a much stronger influence on aboveground productivity than sowing density or interval between the sowing events. The sowing of legumes before the other PFTs produced the highest aboveground biomass. The larger sowing interval led to higher asymmetric competition, with highest dominance of the PFT sown first. It seems that legumes were better able to get a head-start and be productive before the later groups arrived, but that their traits allowed for better subsequent establishment of non-legume PFTs. Our study indicates that the manipulation of the order of arrival can create priority effects which favour functional groups of plants differently and thus induce different assembly routes and affect community composition and functioning. PMID:24497995

  12. Eliminating livelock by assigning the same priority state to each message that is inputted into a flushable routing system during N time intervals

    DOEpatents

    Faber, Vance

    1994-01-01

    Livelock-free message routing is provided in a network of interconnected nodes that is flushable in time T. An input message processor generates sequences of at least N time intervals, each of duration T. An input register provides for receiving and holding each input message, where the message is assigned a priority state p during an nth one of the N time intervals. At each of the network nodes a message processor reads the assigned priority state and awards priority to messages with priority state (p-1) during an nth time interval and to messages with priority state p during an (n+1) th time interval. The messages that are awarded priority are output on an output path toward the addressed output message processor. Thus, no message remains in the network for a time longer than T.

  13. Eliminating livelock by assigning the same priority state to each message that is input into a flushable routing system during N time intervals

    DOEpatents

    Faber, V.

    1994-11-29

    Livelock-free message routing is provided in a network of interconnected nodes that is flushable in time T. An input message processor generates sequences of at least N time intervals, each of duration T. An input register provides for receiving and holding each input message, where the message is assigned a priority state p during an nth one of the N time intervals. At each of the network nodes a message processor reads the assigned priority state and awards priority to messages with priority state (p-1) during an nth time interval and to messages with priority state p during an (n+1) th time interval. The messages that are awarded priority are output on an output path toward the addressed output message processor. Thus, no message remains in the network for a time longer than T. 4 figures.

  14. Effect of the time interval between fusion and activation on epigenetic reprogramming and development of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Wang, Yongsheng; Su, Jianmin; Wang, Lijun; Li, Ruizhe; Li, Qian; Wu, Yongyan; Hua, Song; Quan, Fusheng; Guo, Zekun; Zhang, Yong

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that the time interval between fusion and activation (FA interval) play an important role in nuclear remodeling and in vitro development of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. However, the effects of FA interval on the epigenetic reprogramming and in vivo developmental competence of SCNT embryos remain unknown. In the present study, the effects of different FA intervals (0 h, 2 h, and 4 h) on the epigenetic reprogramming and developmental competence of bovine SCNT embryos were assessed. The results demonstrated that H3 lysine 9 (H3K9ac) levels decreased rapidly after fusion in all three groups. H3K9ac was practically undetectable 2 h after fusion in the 2-h and 4-h FA interval groups. However, H3K9ac was still evidently detectable in the 0-h FA interval group. The H3K9ac levels increased 10 h after fusion in all three groups, but were higher in the 2-h and 4-h FA interval groups than that in the 0-h FA interval group. The methylation levels of the satellite I region in day-7 blastocysts derived from the 2-h or 4-h FA interval groups was similar to that of in vitro fertilization blastocysts and is significantly lower than that of the 0-h FA interval group. SCNT embryos derived from 2-h FA interval group showed higher developmental competence than those from the 0-h and 4-h FA interval groups in terms of cleavage rate, blastocyst formation rate, apoptosis index, and pregnancy and calving rates. Hence, the FA interval is an important factor influencing the epigenetic reprogramming and developmental competence of bovine SCNT embryos.

  15. STICK: Spike Time Interval Computational Kernel, a Framework for General Purpose Computation Using Neurons, Precise Timing, Delays, and Synchrony.

    PubMed

    Lagorce, Xavier; Benosman, Ryad

    2015-11-01

    There has been significant research over the past two decades in developing new platforms for spiking neural computation. Current neural computers are primarily developed to mimic biology. They use neural networks, which can be trained to perform specific tasks to mainly solve pattern recognition problems. These machines can do more than simulate biology; they allow us to rethink our current paradigm of computation. The ultimate goal is to develop brain-inspired general purpose computation architectures that can breach the current bottleneck introduced by the von Neumann architecture. This work proposes a new framework for such a machine. We show that the use of neuron-like units with precise timing representation, synaptic diversity, and temporal delays allows us to set a complete, scalable compact computation framework. The framework provides both linear and nonlinear operations, allowing us to represent and solve any function. We show usability in solving real use cases from simple differential equations to sets of nonlinear differential equations leading to chaotic attractors. PMID:26378879

  16. Four-dimensional noise reduction using the time series of medical computed tomography datasets with short interval times: a static-phantom study.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Tatsuya; Kono, Atsushi K; Tani, Wakiko; Suehiro, Erina; Negi, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Satoru; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds. This study examines the hypothesis that four-dimensional noise reduction (4DNR) with short interval times reduces noise in cardiac computed tomography (CCT) using "padding" phases. Furthermore, the capability of reducing the reduction dose in CCT using this post-processing technique was assessed. Methods. Using base and quarter radiation doses for CCT (456 and 114 mAs/rot with 120 kVp), a static phantom was scanned ten times with retrospective electrocardiogram gating, and 4DNR with short interval times (50 ms) was performed using a post-processing technique. Differences in the computed tomography (CT) attenuation, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution with modulation transfer function in each dose image obtained with and without 4DNR were assessed by conducting a Tukey-Kramer's test and non-inferiority test. Results. For the base dose, by using 4DNR, the CNR was improved from 1.18 ± 0.15 to 2.08 ± 0.20 (P = 0.001), while the CT attenuation and spatial resolution of the image of 4DNR did not were significantly inferior to those of reference image (P < 0.001). CNRs of the quarter-dose image in 4DNR also improved to 1.28 ± 0.11, and were not inferior to those of the non-4DNR images of the base dose (P < 0.001). Conclusions. 4DNR with short interval times significantly reduced noise. Furthermore, applying this method to CCT would have the potential of reducing the radiation dose by 75%, while maintaining a similar image noise level. PMID:26893966

  17. Design, development, and fabrication of a electronic analog microminiaturized electronic analog signal to discrete time interval converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenfeld, A. D.; Schuegraf, K. K.

    1973-01-01

    The microminiaturization of an electronic analog signal to discrete time interval converter is presented. Discrete components and integrated circuits comprising the converter were assembled on a thin-film ceramic substrate containing nichrome resistors with gold interconnections. The finished assembly is enclosed in a flat package measuring 3.30 by 4.57 centimeters. The module can be used whenever conversion of analog to digital signals is required, in particular for the purpose of regulation by means of pulse modulation. In conjunction with a precision voltage reference, the module was applied to control the duty cycle of a switching regulator within a temperature range of -55 C to +125 C, and an input voltage range of 10V to 35V. The output-voltage variation was less than + or - 300 parts per million, i.e., less than + or - 3mV for a 10V output.

  18. Deficits in Interval Timing Measured by the Dual-Task Paradigm among Children and Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Shoou-Lian; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Hsu, Wen-Yau; Wu, Yu-Yu

    2010-01-01

    Background: The underlying mechanism of time perception deficit in long time intervals in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is still unclear. This study used the time reproduction dual task to explore the role of the attentional resource in time perception deficits among children and adolescents with ADHD. Methods: Participants…

  19. Simultaneous estimation of T₁ and the flip angle in hyperpolarized NMR experiments using acquisition at non-regular time intervals.

    PubMed

    Puckeridge, Max; Pagès, Guilhem; Kuchel, Philip W

    2012-09-01

    In NMR spectroscopy of the liquid state T(1) is typically measured using an inversion recovery pulse sequence; but with hyperpolarized spins use is made of a sequence of multiple small radiofrequency (RF) induced nutations, α. Depending on the values of α and τ, the time interval between the pulses, the estimate of T(1) can be artifactually smaller than the real value; so without knowing the value of α the estimate of T(1) can be incorrect. Thus, we propose a method that involves a series of pulses with timing governed by a geometric sequence (or in general, any mathematically specified non-uniformly spaced sequence). This approach enables the simultaneous estimation of both the intrinsic T(1) value and α. The method was successfully applied to obtain T(1)=(44.9 ± 0.3)s and α=(4.0 ± 0.2)° (n=3) for a sample of hyperpolarized (13)C-urea in solution, matching with the inversion recovery pulse sequence estimate of T(1)=44 ± 2s using non-hyperpolarized (13)C-urea in solution.

  20. Estimation of the Time Interval between the Administration of Heroin and the Sampling of Blood in Chronic Inhalers.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Nathalie; Hallet, Claude; Seidel, Laurence; Demaret, Isabelle; Luppens, David; Ansseau, Marc; Rozet, Eric; Albert, Adelin; Hubert, Philippe; Charlier, Corinne

    2015-05-01

    To develop a model for estimating the time delay between last heroin consumption and blood sampling in chronic drug users. Eleven patients, all heroin inhalers undergoing detoxification, were included in the study. Several plasma samples were collected during the detoxification procedure and analyzed for the heroin metabolites 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), morphine (MOR), morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) and morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G), according to a UHPLC/MSMS method. The general linear mixed model was applied to time-related concentrations and a pragmatic four-step delay estimation approach was proposed based on the simultaneous presence of metabolites in plasma. Validation of the model was carried out using the jackknife technique on the 11 patients, and on a group of 7 test patients. Quadratic equations were derived for all metabolites except 6AM. The interval delay estimation was 2-4 days when only M3G present in plasma, 1-2 days when M6G and M3G were both present, 0-1 day when MOR, M6G and M3G were present and <2 h for all metabolites present. The 'jackknife' correlation between declared and actual estimated delays was 0.90. The overall precision of the delay estimates was 8-9 h. The delay between last heroin consumption and blood sampling in chronic drug users can be satisfactorily predicted from plasma heroin metabolites.

  1. Robust iterative learning protocols for finite-time consensus of multi-agent systems with interval uncertain topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Deyuan; Jia, Yingmin; Du, Junping

    2015-04-01

    This paper is devoted to the robust finite-time output consensus problems of multi-agent systems under directed graphs, where all agents and their communication topologies are subject to interval uncertainties. Distributed protocols are constructed by using iterative learning control (ILC) algorithms, where information is exchanged only at the end of one iteration and learning is used to update the control inputs after each iteration. It is proved that under ILC-based protocols, the finite-time consensus can be achieved with an increasing number of iterations if the communication network of agents is guaranteed to have a spanning tree. Moreover, if the information of any desired terminal output is available to a portion (not necessarily all) of the agents, then the consensus output that all agents finally reach can be enabled to be the desired terminal output. It is also proved that for all ILC-based protocols, gain selections can be provided in terms of bound values, and consensus conditions can be developed associated with bound matrices. Simulation results are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results.

  2. A Prolonged Time Interval Between Trauma and Prophylactic Radiation Therapy Significantly Increases the Risk of Heterotopic Ossification

    SciTech Connect

    Mourad, Waleed F.; Packianathan, Satyaseelan; Shourbaji, Rania A.; Zhang Zhen; Graves, Mathew; Khan, Majid A.; Baird, Michael C.; Russell, George; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To ascertain whether the time from injury to prophylactic radiation therapy (RT) influences the rate of heterotopic ossification (HO) after operative treatment of displaced acetabular fractures. Methods and Materials: This is a single-institution, retrospective analysis of patients referred for RT for the prevention of HO. Between January 2000 and January 2009, 585 patients with displaced acetabular fractures were treated surgically followed by RT for HO prevention. We analyzed the effect of time from injury on prevention of HO by RT. In all patients, 700 cGy was prescribed in a single fraction and delivered within 72 hours postsurgery. The patients were stratified into five groups according to time interval (in days) from the date of their accident to the date of RT: Groups A {<=}3, B {<=}7, C {<=}14, D {<=}21, and E >21days. Results: Of the 585 patients with displaced acetabular fractures treated with RT, (18%) 106 patients developed HO within the irradiated field. The risk of HO after RT increased from 10% for RT delivered {<=}3 days to 92% for treatment delivered >21 days after the initial injury. Wilcoxon test showed a significant correlation between the risk of HO and the length of time from injury to RT (p < 0.0001). Chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis showed no significant association between all other factors and the risk of HO (race, gender, cause and type of fracture, surgical approach, or the use of indomethacin). Conclusions: Our data suggest that there is higher incidence and risk of HO if prophylactic RT is significantly delayed after a displaced acetabular fracture. Thus, RT should be administered as early as clinically possible after the trauma. Patients undergoing RT >3 weeks from their displaced acetabular fracture should be informed of the higher risk (>90%) of developing HO despite prophylaxis.

  3. Effect of denture cleansers on surface hardness of resilient denture liners at various time intervals- an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pahuja, Rasleen Kaur; Bansal, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was aimed to determine the effect of two chemically distinct denture cleansers and water on the surface hardness of acrylic and silicone based soft denture liners at various time intervals. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two commonly used commercial resilient liner material were selected based on their chemical composition (silicone- and acrylic-based soft liners) for this investigation. 120 cylindrical specimens were made of 15 mm × 10 mm dimensions (according to ASTM: D-2240-64T) in a custom made metal mold. All specimens were stored in artificial saliva throughout the study. Forty specimens were cleansed daily in 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution; forty were cleansed in sodium perborate and remaining forty specimens were daily rinsed in water. Testing was done at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months for surface hardness using a Shore A Durometer. A mean of 3 reading for each sample was subjected to one-way ANOVA, Post Hoc test and pair-t test for statistical analysis. P values of less than 0.05 were taken as statistically significant. RESULTS Surface hardness of all the samples was significantly higher after a period of 6 months irrespective of the cleansing treatment. Minor changes were observed between control, sodium hypochlorite and sodium perborate groups with time. Greater change was observed in surface hardness of acrylic-based soft denture liners as compared to silicone-based soft liners for all groups, as time progressed. CONCLUSION Silicone-based soft denture liners performed significantly better in all cleansing treatments than acrylic-based soft denture liners. PMID:24049568

  4. Entropy, pattern entropy, and related methods for the analysis of data on the time intervals between heartbeats from 24-h electrocardiograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żebrowski, J. J.; Popławska, W.; Baranowski, R.

    1994-11-01

    Sequences of the time intervals between heartbeats-medically termed RR intervals-extracted from 24-h electrocardiogram recordings are examined as three-dimensional return map images. The recordings were made in humans by means of the medically widely used portable electrocardiograph (Holter system). A time window measured in the number of heartbeats is used and different types of behavior are classified. Bifurcations between the types of dynamics of the heart are noted and a form of intermittency is found. An alternative quantitative measure-a form pattern entropy of the return map image-is defined that characterizes the dynamics of the RR interval sequence. It is shown that this is a measure of the degree of ordering of the RR interval sequence and as such it is a good novel medical diagnostic tool for analyzing heart rate variability which distinguishes between illness and health where other diagnostics fail.

  5. Global fuel consumption optimization of an open-time terminal rendezvous and docking with large-eccentricity elliptic-orbit by the method of interval analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongliang; Xu, Shijie

    2016-11-01

    By defining two open-time impulse points, the optimization of a two-impulse, open-time terminal rendezvous and docking with target spacecraft on large-eccentricity elliptical orbit is proposed in this paper. The purpose of optimization is to minimize the velocity increment for a terminal elliptic-reference-orbit rendezvous and docking. Current methods for solving this type of optimization problem include for example genetic algorithms and gradient based optimization. Unlike these methods, interval methods can guarantee that the globally best solution is found for a given parameterization of the input. The non-linear Tschauner- Hempel(TH) equations of the state transitions for a terminal elliptic target orbit are transformed form time domain to target orbital true anomaly domain. Their homogenous solutions and approximate state transition matrix for the control with a short true anomaly interval can be used to avoid interval integration. The interval branch and bound optimization algorithm is introduced for solving the presented rendezvous and docking optimization problem and optimizing two open-time impulse points and thruster pulse amplitudes, which systematically eliminates parts of the control and open-time input spaces that do not satisfy the path and final time state constraints. Several numerical examples are undertaken to validate the interval optimization algorithm. The results indicate that the sufficiently narrow spaces containing the global optimization solution for the open-time two-impulse terminal rendezvous and docking with target spacecraft on large-eccentricity elliptical orbit can be obtained by the interval algorithm (IA). Combining the gradient-based method, the global optimization solution for the discontinuous nonconvex optimization problem in the specifically remained search space can be found. Interval analysis is shown to be a useful tool and preponderant in the discontinuous nonconvex optimization problem of the terminal rendezvous and

  6. Exercise-induced hypoalgesia - interval versus continuous mode.

    PubMed

    Kodesh, Einat; Weissman-Fogel, Irit

    2014-07-01

    Aerobic exercise at approximately 70% of maximal aerobic capacity moderately reduces pain sensitivity and attenuates pain, even after a single session. If the analgesic effects depend on exercise intensity, then high-intensity interval exercise at 85% of maximal aerobic capacity should further reduce pain. The aim of this study was to explore the exercise-induced analgesic effects of high-intensity interval aerobic exercise and to compare them with the analgesic effects of moderate continuous aerobic exercise. Twenty-nine young untrained healthy males were randomly assigned to aerobic-continuous (70% heart rate reserve (HRR)) and interval (4 × 4 min at 85% HRR and 2 min at 60% HRR between cycles) exercise modes, each lasting 30 min. Psychophysical pain tests, pressure and heat pain thresholds (HPT), and tonic heat pain (THP) were conducted before and after exercise sessions. Repeated measures ANOVA was used for data analysis. HPT increased (p = 0.056) and THP decreased (p = 0.013) following exercise unrelated to exercise type. However, the main time effect (pre-/postexercise) was a trend of increased HPT (45.6 ± 1.9 °C to 46.2 ± 1.8 °C; p = 0.082) and a significant reduction in THP (from 50.7 ± 25 to 45.9 ± 25.4 numeric pain scale; p = 0.043) following interval exercise. No significant change was found for the pressure pain threshold following either exercise type. In conclusion, interval exercise (85% HRR) has analgesic effects on experimental pain perception. This, in addition to its cardiovascular, muscular, and metabolic advantages may promote its inclusion in pain management programs. PMID:24773287

  7. Interval Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, Washington, DC.

    Regardless of the type of physical activity used, interval training is simply repeated periods of physical stress interspersed with recovery periods during which activity of a reduced intensity is performed. During the recovery periods, the individual usually keeps moving and does not completely recover before the next exercise interval (e.g.,…

  8. Time series and recurrence interval models to predict the vulnerability of streams to episodic acidification in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deviney, F.A.; Rice, K.C.; Hornberger, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Acid rain affects headwater streams by temporarily reducing the acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) of the water, a process termed episodic acidification. The increase in acidic components in stream water can have deleterious effects on the aquatic biota. Although acidic deposition is uniform across Shenandoah National Park (SNP) in north central Virginia, the stream water quality response during rain events varies substantially. This response is a function of the catchment's underlying geology and topography. Geologic and topographic data for SNP's 231 catchments are readily available; however, long-term measurements (tens of years) of ANC and accompanying discharge are not and would be prohibitively expensive to collect. Transfer function time series models were developed to predict hourly ANC from discharge for five SNP catchments with long-term water-quality and discharge records. Hourly ANC predictions over short time periods (??? 1 week) were averaged, and distributions of the recurrence intervals of annual water-year minimum ANC values were model-simulated for periods of 6, 24, 72, and 168 hours. The distributions were extrapolated to the rest of the SNP catchments on the basis of catchment geology and topography. On the basis of the models, large numbers of SNP streams have 6- to 168-hour periods of low-ANC values, which may stress resident fish populations. Smaller catchments are more vulnerable to episodic acidification than larger catchments underlain by the same bedrock. Catchments with similar topography and size are more vulnerable if underlain by less basaltic/carbonate bedrock. Many catchments are predicted to have successive years of low-ANC values potentially sufficient to extirpate some species. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Time Series and Recurrence Interval Models to Predict the Vulnerability of Streams to Episodic Acidification in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deviney, F. A.; Rice, K. C.; Hornberger, G. M.

    2006-05-01

    Acid rain affects headwater streams by temporarily reducing the acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) of the water, a process termed episodic acidification. The increase in acidic components in streamwater can have deleterious effects on the aquatic biota. Although acidic deposition is uniform across Shenandoah National Park (SNP) in north-central Virginia, the streamwater quality response during rain events varies substantially. This response is a function of the catchment's underlying geology and topography. Geologic and topographic data for SNP's 231 catchments are readily available, however, long-term measurements (tens of years) of ANC and accompanying discharge are not and would be prohibitively expensive to collect. Transfer function time series models were developed to predict hourly ANC from discharge for five SNP catchments with long-term water-quality and discharge records. Hourly ANC predictions over short time periods were averaged and distributions of the recurrence intervals of annual water-year minimum ANC values were model-simulated for periods of 6, 24, 72, and 168 hours. The distributions were extrapolated to the rest of the SNP catchments on the basis of catchment geology and topography. On the basis of the models, large numbers of SNP streams have 6- to 168-hour periods of low-ANC values, which may stress resident fish populations. Smaller catchments are more vulnerable to episodic acidification than larger catchments underlain by the same bedrock. Catchments with similar topography and size are more vulnerable if underlain by less basaltic/carbonate bedrock. Many catchments are predicted to have successive years of low-ANC values potentially sufficient to extirpate some species.

  10. Time series and recurrence interval models to predict the vulnerability of streams to episodic acidification in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deviney, Frank A.; Rice, Karen C.; Hornberger, George M.

    2006-09-01

    Acid rain affects headwater streams by temporarily reducing the acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) of the water, a process termed episodic acidification. The increase in acidic components in stream water can have deleterious effects on the aquatic biota. Although acidic deposition is uniform across Shenandoah National Park (SNP) in north central Virginia, the stream water quality response during rain events varies substantially. This response is a function of the catchment's underlying geology and topography. Geologic and topographic data for SNP's 231 catchments are readily available; however, long-term measurements (tens of years) of ANC and accompanying discharge are not and would be prohibitively expensive to collect. Transfer function time series models were developed to predict hourly ANC from discharge for five SNP catchments with long-term water-quality and discharge records. Hourly ANC predictions over short time periods (≤1 week) were averaged, and distributions of the recurrence intervals of annual water-year minimum ANC values were model-simulated for periods of 6, 24, 72, and 168 hours. The distributions were extrapolated to the rest of the SNP catchments on the basis of catchment geology and topography. On the basis of the models, large numbers of SNP streams have 6- to 168-hour periods of low-ANC values, which may stress resident fish populations. Smaller catchments are more vulnerable to episodic acidification than larger catchments underlain by the same bedrock. Catchments with similar topography and size are more vulnerable if underlain by less basaltic/carbonate bedrock. Many catchments are predicted to have successive years of low-ANC values potentially sufficient to extirpate some species.

  11. Optimizing 4D cone beam computed tomography acquisition by varying the gantry velocity and projection time interval.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Ricky T; Cooper, Benjamin J; Keall, Paul J

    2013-03-21

    Four dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) is an emerging clinical image guidance strategy for tumour sites affected by respiratory motion. In current generation 4DCBCT techniques, both the gantry rotation speed and imaging frequency are constant and independent of the patient's breathing which can lead to projection clustering. We present a mixed integer quadratic programming (MIQP) model for respiratory motion guided-4DCBCT (RMG-4DCBCT) which regulates the gantry velocity and projection time interval, in response to the patient's respiratory signal, so that a full set of evenly spaced projections can be taken in a number of phase, or displacement, bins during the respiratory cycle. In each respiratory bin, an image can be reconstructed from the projections to give a 4D view of the patient's anatomy so that the motion of the lungs, and tumour, can be observed during the breathing cycle. A solution to the full MIQP model in a practical amount of time, 10 s, is not possible with the leading commercial MIQP solvers, so a heuristic method is presented. Using parameter settings typically used on current generation 4DCBCT systems (4 min image acquisition, 1200 projections, 10 respiratory bins) and a sinusoidal breathing trace with a 4 s period, we show that the root mean square (RMS) of the angular separation between projections with displacement binning is 2.7° using existing constant gantry speed systems and 0.6° using RMG-4DCBCT. For phase based binning the RMS is 2.7° using constant gantry speed systems and 2.5° using RMG-4DCBCT. The optimization algorithm presented is a critical step on the path to developing a system for RMG-4DCBCT.

  12. The different effects of high intensity interval training and moderate intensity interval training for weightlessness countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin-Jie; Cheng, Tan; Zhi-Li, Li; Hui-juan, Wang; Wen-juan, Chen; Jianfeng, Zhang; Desheng, Wang; Dongbin, Niu; Qi, Zhao; Chengjia, Yang; Yanqing, Wang

    High intensity interval training (HIIT) has been demonstrated to improve performance in a relatively short training period. But the difference between high intensity interval training and moderate intensity interval training (MIIT) in simulated weightlessness still has not been well studied. This study sought to characterize the difference between 6 weeks high intensity interval training and moderate intensity interval training under reduced weight (RW) gait training device and zero-gravity locomotion system (ZLS). Twenty-three subjects (14M/4F, 32.5±4.5 years) volunteered to participate. They were divided into three groups, that were MITT (alternating 2 min at 40% VO _{2} peak and 2 min at 60% VO _{2} peak for 30min, five days per week) RW group (n=8), HITT (alternating 2 min at 40% VO _{2} peak and 2 min at 90% VO _{2} peak for 30min, three days per week) RW group (n=8) and HITT ZLS group (n=7). The Z-axis load used in RW group was 80% body weight (BW) and in ZLS was 100% BW. Cardiopulmonary function was measured before, after 4-week training and after 6-week training. Isokinetic knee extension-flexion test at 60(°) deg/s and 180(°) deg/s were performed before and after the 6-week training, and isometric knee extension-flexion test at 180(°) deg/s was also examined at the same time. It was found that the VO _{2} peaks, metabolic equivalent (MET), Speedmax and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) were significantly increased after 4 and 6-week training in all three groups and no significant group difference were detected. The peak torque at 60(°) deg/s for right knee flexion were significantly increased after 6 week-training in all three groups, and only in HITT RW group the total power at 60(°) deg/s for right knee flexion enhanced. The total power and average power at 60(°) deg/s for right knee extension decreased significantly after 6-week training in all three groups. The peak torque at 60(°) deg/s for right knee extension in MIIT RW group was

  13. RISMA: A Rule-based Interval State Machine Algorithm for Alerts Generation, Performance Analysis and Monitoring Real-Time Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laban, Shaban; El-Desouky, Aly

    2013-04-01

    The monitoring of real-time systems is a challenging and complicated process. So, there is a continuous need to improve the monitoring process through the use of new intelligent techniques and algorithms for detecting exceptions, anomalous behaviours and generating the necessary alerts during the workflow monitoring of such systems. The interval-based or period-based theorems have been discussed, analysed, and used by many researches in Artificial Intelligence (AI), philosophy, and linguistics. As explained by Allen, there are 13 relations between any two intervals. Also, there have also been many studies of interval-based temporal reasoning and logics over the past decades. Interval-based theorems can be used for monitoring real-time interval-based data processing. However, increasing the number of processed intervals makes the implementation of such theorems a complex and time consuming process as the relationships between such intervals are increasing exponentially. To overcome the previous problem, this paper presents a Rule-based Interval State Machine Algorithm (RISMA) for processing, monitoring, and analysing the behaviour of interval-based data, received from real-time sensors. The proposed intelligent algorithm uses the Interval State Machine (ISM) approach to model any number of interval-based data into well-defined states as well as inferring them. An interval-based state transition model and methodology are presented to identify the relationships between the different states of the proposed algorithm. By using such model, the unlimited number of relationships between similar large numbers of intervals can be reduced to only 18 direct relationships using the proposed well-defined states. For testing the proposed algorithm, necessary inference rules and code have been designed and applied to the continuous data received in near real-time from the stations of International Monitoring System (IMS) by the International Data Centre (IDC) of the Preparatory

  14. Classification mapping and species identification of salt marshes based on a short-time interval NDVI time-series from HJ-1 optical imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chao; Liu, Yongxue; Zhao, Saishuai; Zhou, Minxi; Yang, Yuhao; Li, Feixue

    2016-03-01

    Salt marshes are seen as the most dynamic and valuable ecosystems in coastal zones, and in these areas, it is crucial to obtain accurate remote sensing information on the spatial distributions of species over time. However, discriminating various types of salt marsh is rather difficult because of their strong spectral similarities. Previous salt marsh mapping studies have focused mainly on high spatial and spectral (i.e., hyperspectral) resolution images combined with auxiliary information; however, the results are often limited to small regions. With a high temporal and moderate spatial resolution, the Chinese HuanJing-1 (HJ-1) satellite optical imagery can be used not only to monitor phenological changes of salt marsh vegetation over short-time intervals, but also to obtain coverage of large areas. Here, we apply HJ-1 satellite imagery to the middle coast of Jiangsu in east China to monitor changes in saltmarsh vegetation cover. First, we constructed a monthly NDVI time-series to classify various types of salt marsh and then we tested the possibility of using compressed time-series continuously, to broaden the applicability of this particular approach. Our principal findings are as follows: (1) the overall accuracy of salt marsh mapping based on the monthly NDVI time-series was 90.3%, which was ∼16.0% higher than the single-phase classification strategy; (2) a compressed time-series, including NDVI from six key months (April, June-September, and November), demonstrated very little reduction (2.3%) in overall accuracy but led to obvious improvements in unstable regions; and (3) a simple rule for Spartina alterniflora identification was established using a scene solely from November, which may provide an effective way for regularly monitoring its distribution.

  15. Note: Simple calibration of the counting-rate dependence of the timing shift of single photon avalanche diodes by photon interval analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Otosu, Takuhiro; Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei

    2013-03-15

    The counting-rate dependence of the temporal response of single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) is a critical issue for the accurate determination of the fluorescence lifetime. In this study, the response of SPADs was examined with analyzing the time interval of the detected photons. The results clearly show that the shift of the detection timing causes the counting-rate dependence of the temporal response, and this timing shift is solely determined by the time interval from the preceding photon. We demonstrate that this timing instability is readily calibrated by utilizing the macrotime data taken with the time-tag mode that is implemented in the time-correlated single photon counting modules.

  16. To study the flow property of seven commercially available zinc oxide eugenol impression material at various time intervals after mixing.

    PubMed

    Katna, Vishal; Suresh, S; Vivek, Sharma; Meenakshi, Khandelwal; Ankita, Gaur

    2014-12-01

    Aims and objective of the study was to evaluate the flow property of seven commercially available zinc oxide eugenol impression materials at various time intervals, after mixing 49 samples (seven groups) were fabricated for flow property of the material. The sample were fabricated as equal length of base and accelerator paste of the test materials was taken on the glass slab and mixed with a rigid stainless steel spatula as per manufacturers recommendation till the homogenous mix was obtained. The mix material was loaded in glass syringe and 0.5 ml material was injected on a cellophane sheet placed on marked glass plate. A cellophane sheet and glass plate 70 and 500 g weight was carefully placed on freshly dispensed zinc oxide eugenol impression paste sequentially. The diameter of the mix was noted after 30 s and 1 min of load application and also after the final set of material. The diameter gives the flow of material. The samples were stored at the room temperature. The data of the flow property was analyzed with analysis of variance, Post hoc test and t test. The flow of the zinc oxide eugenol impression paste after 30 s, 1 min and final set of load application for Group A to Group G was noted. Maximum flow was seen for Group G zinc oxide eugenol impression material followed by Group F, D, E, B, C and A in descending order respectively after 30 s, where as the flow property changed after 1 min in the sequence of maximum for Group G followed by Group E, D, B, A, C, and F. Lastly after final set of the impression material the flow maximum for Group G followed by Group E, D, C, F, A and B in descending order. Based on statistical analysis of the results and within in the limitations of this in-vitro study, the following conclusions were drawn that; the flow of zinc oxide eugenol impression material after 30 s, 1 min and that after the final set was maximum for P.S.P. (Group G) and the flow for PYREX (Group A) was minimum.

  17. Administration of the Phosphodiesterase Type 4 Inhibitor Rolipram into the Amygdala at a Specific Time Interval after Learning Increases Recognition Memory Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werenicz, Aline; Christoff, Raissa R.; Blank, Martina; Jobim, Paulo F. C.; Pedroso, Thiago R.; Reolon, Gustavo K.; Schroder, Nadja; Roesler, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Here we show that administration of the phosphodiesterase type 4 (PDE4) inhibitor rolipram into the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) at a specific time interval after training enhances memory consolidation and induces memory persistence for novel object recognition (NOR) in rats. Intra-BLA infusion of rolipram immediately, 1.5 h, or 6 h…

  18. Measurement of Trained Speech Patterns in Stuttering: Interjudge and Intrajudge Agreement of Experts by Means of Modified Time-Interval Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpermann, Anke; Huber, Walter; Natke, Ulrich; Willmes, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Improved fluency after stuttering therapy is usually measured by the percentage of stuttered syllables. However, outcome studies rarely evaluate the use of trained speech patterns that speakers use to manage stuttering. This study investigated whether the modified time interval analysis can distinguish between trained speech patterns, fluent…

  19. Nitrate Intake Promotes Shift in Muscle Fiber Type Composition during Sprint Interval Training in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, Stefan; Van Thienen, Ruud; Deldicque, Louise; James, Ruth; Sale, Craig; Bishop, David J.; Hespel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the effect of sprint interval training (SIT) in normoxia, vs. SIT in hypoxia alone or in conjunction with oral nitrate intake, on buffering capacity of homogenized muscle (βhm) and fiber type distribution, as well as on sprint and endurance performance. Methods: Twenty-seven moderately-trained participants were allocated to one of three experimental groups: SIT in normoxia (20.9% FiO2) + placebo (N), SIT in hypoxia (15% FiO2) + placebo (H), or SIT in hypoxia + nitrate supplementation (HN). All participated in 5 weeks of SIT on a cycle ergometer (30-s sprints interspersed by 4.5 min recovery-intervals, 3 weekly sessions, 4–6 sprints per session). Nitrate (6.45 mmol NaNO3) or placebo capsules were administered 3 h before each session. Before and after SIT participants performed an incremental VO2max-test, a 30-min simulated cycling time-trial, as well as a 30-s cycling sprint test. Muscle biopsies were taken from m. vastus lateralis. Results: SIT decreased the proportion of type IIx muscle fibers in all groups (P < 0.05). The relative number of type IIa fibers increased (P < 0.05) in HN (P < 0.05 vs. H), but not in the other groups. SIT had no significant effect on βhm. Compared with H, SIT tended to enhance 30-s sprint performance more in HN than in H (P = 0.085). VO2max and 30-min time-trial performance increased in all groups to a similar extent. Conclusion: SIT in hypoxia combined with nitrate supplementation increases the proportion of type IIa fibers in muscle, which may be associated with enhanced performance in short maximal exercise. Compared with normoxic training, hypoxic SIT does not alter βhm or endurance and sprinting exercise performance. PMID:27378942

  20. Confidence intervals for time averages in the presence of long-range correlations, a case study on Earth surface temperature anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massah, M.; Kantz, H.

    2016-09-01

    Time averages, a standard tool in the analysis of environmental data, suffer severely from long-range correlations. The sample size needed to obtain a desired small confidence interval can be dramatically larger than for uncorrelated data. We present quantitative results for short- and long-range correlated Gaussian stochastic processes. Using these, we calculate confidence intervals for time averages of surface temperature measurements. Temperature time series are well known to be long-range correlated with Hurst exponents larger than 1/2. Multidecadal time averages are routinely used in the study of climate change. Our analysis shows that uncertainties of such averages are as large as for a single year of uncorrelated data.

  1. Defibrillation time intervals and outcomes of cardiac arrest in hospital: retrospective cohort study from Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation registry

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenhui; Chan, Paul S; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K; Grunwald, Gary K; Self, Alyssa; Sasson, Comilla; Varosy, Paul D; Anderson, Monique L; Schneider, Preston M; Ho, P Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe temporal trends in the time interval between first and second attempts at defibrillation and the association between this time interval and outcomes in patients with persistent ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF) arrest in hospital. Design Retrospective cohort study Setting 172 hospitals in the United States participating in the Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation registry, 2004-12. Participants Adults who received a second defibrillation attempt for persistent VT/VF arrest within three minutes of a first attempt. Interventions Second defibrillation attempts categorized as early (time interval of up to and including one minute between first and second defibrillation attempts) or deferred (time interval of more than one minute between first and second defibrillation attempts). Main outcome measure Survival to hospital discharge. Results Among 2733 patients with persistent VT/VF after the first defibrillation attempt, 1121 (41%) received a deferred second attempt. Deferred second defibrillation for persistent VT/VF increased from 26% in 2004 to 57% in 2012 (P<0.001 for trend). Compared with early second defibrillation, unadjusted patient outcomes were significantly worse with deferred second defibrillation (57.4% v 62.5% for return of spontaneous circulation, 38.4% v 43.6% for survival to 24 hours, and 24.7% v 30.8% for survival to hospital discharge; P<0.01 for all comparisons). After risk adjustment, deferred second defibrillation was not associated with survival to hospital discharge (propensity weighting adjusted risk ratio 0.89, 95% confidence interval 0.78 to 1.01; P=0.08; hierarchical regression adjusted 0.92, 0.83 to 1.02; P=0.1). Conclusions Since 2004, the use of deferred second defibrillation for persistent VT/VF in hospital has doubled. Deferred second defibrillation was not associated with improved survival. PMID:27052620

  2. Evaluation of the Effects of Light Intensity and Time Interval After the Start of Scotophase on the Female Flight Propensity of Asian Gypsy Moth (Lepidoptera: Erebidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Shi, Juan; Keena, Melody

    2016-04-01

    Asian gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar L. (Lepidoptera: Erebidae), females are capable of flight, but little is known about what causes the variation in flight propensity that has been observed. The female flight propensity and capability of Asian gypsy moth from seven geographic populations (three from China, two from Russia, one from Japan, and one from Korea) were compared under all combinations of three light intensities (0.05, 0.10, and 0.40 lux) and during three time intervals after the start of scotophase. A total of 567 females were flight tested. Female flight propensity, time to initiate walking, fanning, and flying, and duration of fanning differed significantly among geographic populations. Females were less likely to voluntarily fly during the 0-1-h time interval after the start of scotophase than during the later time intervals (1-2 and 2-3 h), suggesting that the light intensity cue has to occur at the correct time after the expected start of scotophase for flight initiation. Light intensity did not significantly affect the proportion of females that voluntarily flew, but did impact the timing of the walking and fanning preflight behaviors. The interaction between light intensity and time interval after the start of scotophase had a significant effect on the proportion of females that fanned. The proportion of females with sustained flight capability varied among the populations evaluated. These results may aid in determining the risk of Asian gypsy moth dispersal, but further work is needed to assess other factors that play a role in flight propensity. PMID:26748672

  3. Evaluation of the Effects of Light Intensity and Time Interval After the Start of Scotophase on the Female Flight Propensity of Asian Gypsy Moth (Lepidoptera: Erebidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Shi, Juan; Keena, Melody

    2016-04-01

    Asian gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar L. (Lepidoptera: Erebidae), females are capable of flight, but little is known about what causes the variation in flight propensity that has been observed. The female flight propensity and capability of Asian gypsy moth from seven geographic populations (three from China, two from Russia, one from Japan, and one from Korea) were compared under all combinations of three light intensities (0.05, 0.10, and 0.40 lux) and during three time intervals after the start of scotophase. A total of 567 females were flight tested. Female flight propensity, time to initiate walking, fanning, and flying, and duration of fanning differed significantly among geographic populations. Females were less likely to voluntarily fly during the 0-1-h time interval after the start of scotophase than during the later time intervals (1-2 and 2-3 h), suggesting that the light intensity cue has to occur at the correct time after the expected start of scotophase for flight initiation. Light intensity did not significantly affect the proportion of females that voluntarily flew, but did impact the timing of the walking and fanning preflight behaviors. The interaction between light intensity and time interval after the start of scotophase had a significant effect on the proportion of females that fanned. The proportion of females with sustained flight capability varied among the populations evaluated. These results may aid in determining the risk of Asian gypsy moth dispersal, but further work is needed to assess other factors that play a role in flight propensity.

  4. Stability criteria for T-S fuzzy systems with interval time-varying delays and nonlinear perturbations based on geometric progression delay partitioning method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Zhong, Shouming; Li, Min; Liu, Xingwen; Adu-Gyamfi, Fehrs

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a novel delay partitioning method is proposed by introducing the theory of geometric progression for the stability analysis of T-S fuzzy systems with interval time-varying delays and nonlinear perturbations. Based on the common ratio α, the delay interval is unequally separated into multiple subintervals. A newly modified Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF) is established which includes triple-integral terms and augmented factors with respect to the length of every related proportional subintervals. In addition, a recently developed free-matrix-based integral inequality is employed to avoid the overabundance of the enlargement when dealing with the derivative of the LKF. This innovative development can dramatically enhance the efficiency of obtaining the maximum upper bound of the time delay. Finally, much less conservative stability criteria are presented. Numerical examples are conducted to demonstrate the significant improvements of this proposed approach. PMID:27138648

  5. The geomagnetic field recorded in sediments of the Tuzla section (the Krasnodar Territory, Russia) over the time interval 120-70 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, O. V.; Abrahamsen, N.; Trubikhin, V. M.

    2007-08-01

    Petro-and paleomagnetic methods are applied to the study of the lower part of the Early Pleistocene Tuzla section on the Black Sea coast of the Taman Peninsula, This part of the section is composed of marine and lagoonal sediments deposited over the time interval 120-70 ka. The measured curves of the variation in the geomagnetic field inclination reveal an anomalous direction dated at ˜110 ka that coincides with a similar anomalous direction in the Eltigen section (Ukraine) correlating with the Blake paleomagnetic event. The significant correlation between the time series NRM0.015/SIRM0.015 (Tuzla section) and the world composite Sint-800 curve indicates that the curve NRM0.015/SIRM0.015 in the interval 110-70 ka actually reflects the variation in the relative paleointensity of the geomagnetic field.

  6. Improved results on nonlinear perturbed T-S fuzzy systems with interval time-varying delays using a geometric sequence division method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents improved stability results by introducing a new delay partitioning method based on the theory of geometric progression to deal with T-S fuzzy systems in the appearance of interval time-varying delays and nonlinear perturbations. A common ratio [Formula: see text] is applied to split the delay interval into multiple unequal subintervals. A modified Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF) is constructed with triple-integral terms and augmented factors including the length of every subintervals. In addition, the recently developed free-matrix-based integral inequality is employed to combine with the extended reciprocal convex combination and free weight matrices techniques for avoiding the overabundance of the enlargement when deducing the derivative of the LKF. Eventually, this developed research work can efficiently obtain the maximum upper bound of the time-varying delay with much less conservatism. Numerical results are conducted to illustrate the remarkable improvements of this proposed method. PMID:27429885

  7. The Acute Effects of Interval-Type Exercise on Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Subjects: Importance of Interval Length. A Controlled, Counterbalanced, Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Ida; Solomon, Thomas P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Interval-type exercise is effective for improving glycemic control, but the optimal approach is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of the interval length on changes in postprandial glycemic control following a single exercise bout. Twelve subjects with type 2 diabetes completed a cross-over study with three 1-hour interventions performed in a non-randomized but counter-balanced order: 1) Interval walking consisting of repeated cycles of 3 min slow (aiming for 54% of Peak oxygen consumption rate [VO2peak]) and 3 min fast (aiming for 89% of VO2peak) walking (IW3); 2) Interval walking consisting of repeated cycles of 1 min slow and 1 min fast walking (IW1) and 3) No walking (CON). The exercise interventions were matched with regards to walking speed, and VO2 and heart rate was assessed throughout all interventions. A 4-hour liquid mixed meal tolerance test commenced 30 min after each intervention, with blood samples taken regularly. IW3 and IW1 resulted in comparable mean VO2 and heart rates. Overall mean postprandial blood glucose levels were lower after IW3 compared to CON (10.3±3.0 vs. 11.1±3.3 mmol/L; P < 0.05), with no significant differences between IW1 (10.5±2.8 mmol/L) and CON or IW3 and IW1 (P > 0.05 for both). Conversely blood glucose levels at specific time points during the MMTT differed significantly following both IW3 and IW1 as compared to CON. Our findings support the previously found blood glucose lowering effect of IW3 and suggest that reducing the interval length, while keeping the walking speed and time spend on fast and slow walking constant, does not result in additional improvements. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02257190 PMID:27695119

  8. Recovery from exercise at varying work loads - Time course of responses of heart rate and systolic intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nandi, P. S.; Spodick, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    The time course of the recovery period was characterized by noninvasive measurements after 4 minute bicycle exercise at 3 separate work loads in volunteers with normal peak responses. Most responses started immediately to return toward resting control values. Left ventricular ejection time and stroke volume change are discussed. Changes in pre-ejection period were determined by changes in isovolume contraction time, and factors affecting the degree and rate of return are considered. The rates of change in the ejection time index and in the ratio pre-ejection period/left ventricular ejection time were virtually independent of load throughout most of recovery.

  9. The relationship between adjunctive drinking, blood ethanol concentration and plasma corticosterone across fixed-time intervals of food delivery in two inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Ford, Matthew M; Steele, Andrea M; McCracken, Aubrey D; Finn, Deborah A; Grant, Kathleen A

    2013-11-01

    Schedules of intermittent food delivery induce excessive fluid intake, termed schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP), and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation is important for the expression and maintenance of this adjunctive behavior. Previous work has focused on examining the relationship between water intake and plasma corticosterone (CORT) in rats at a single or a limited range of fixed time (FT) intervals. However, little remains known regarding SIP and the corresponding stress response (1) across the bitonic function that epitomizes adjunctive behavior, (2) when ethanol is the available fluid, and (3) when a species other than rat or multiple strains are studied. Here we report the findings from ethanol-preferring C57BL/6J (B6) and non-preferring DBA/2J (D2) mice serially exposed to progressively larger FT intervals (0 → 60 min) and given access to either water or a 5% (v/v) ethanol solution. Following 2 weeks of experience with each schedule, blood samples were collected at the conclusion of the last 60-min session to evaluate CORT and the blood ethanol concentration (BEC) achieved. While both strains exhibited a bitonic function of ethanol intake and BEC that peaked at or near a 5-min interval, only D2 mice showed a similar response with water. In contrast, CORT levels rose monotonically with incremental increases in the FT interval regardless of the strain examined or fluid type offered, indicating that glucocorticoid release likely reflects the aversive aspects of increasing intervals between reinforcement rather than engagement in adjunctive behavior. These findings also caution against the use of a single intensity stressor to evaluate the relationship between stress and ethanol intake, as the magnitude of stress appears to affect ethanol consumption in a non-linear fashion.

  10. The relationship between adjunctive drinking, blood ethanol concentration and plasma corticosterone across fixed-time intervals of food delivery in two inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Ford, Matthew M; Steele, Andrea M; McCracken, Aubrey D; Finn, Deborah A; Grant, Kathleen A

    2013-11-01

    Schedules of intermittent food delivery induce excessive fluid intake, termed schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP), and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation is important for the expression and maintenance of this adjunctive behavior. Previous work has focused on examining the relationship between water intake and plasma corticosterone (CORT) in rats at a single or a limited range of fixed time (FT) intervals. However, little remains known regarding SIP and the corresponding stress response (1) across the bitonic function that epitomizes adjunctive behavior, (2) when ethanol is the available fluid, and (3) when a species other than rat or multiple strains are studied. Here we report the findings from ethanol-preferring C57BL/6J (B6) and non-preferring DBA/2J (D2) mice serially exposed to progressively larger FT intervals (0 → 60 min) and given access to either water or a 5% (v/v) ethanol solution. Following 2 weeks of experience with each schedule, blood samples were collected at the conclusion of the last 60-min session to evaluate CORT and the blood ethanol concentration (BEC) achieved. While both strains exhibited a bitonic function of ethanol intake and BEC that peaked at or near a 5-min interval, only D2 mice showed a similar response with water. In contrast, CORT levels rose monotonically with incremental increases in the FT interval regardless of the strain examined or fluid type offered, indicating that glucocorticoid release likely reflects the aversive aspects of increasing intervals between reinforcement rather than engagement in adjunctive behavior. These findings also caution against the use of a single intensity stressor to evaluate the relationship between stress and ethanol intake, as the magnitude of stress appears to affect ethanol consumption in a non-linear fashion. PMID:23827168

  11. Effects of microbial lipases on hydrolyzed milk fat at different time intervals in flavour development and oxidative stability.

    PubMed

    Omar, Khamis Ali; Gounga, Mahamadou Elhadji; Liu, Ruijie; Mlyuka, Erasto; Wang, Xingguo

    2016-02-01

    The interest in application of biocatalysis during natural milk fat flavours development has increased rapidly and lipases have become the most studied group in the development of bovine milk fat flavours. Lipozyme-435, Novozyme-435 and Thermomyces lanuginosus Immobilized (TL-IM) lipases were used to hydrolyze anhydrous milk fat (AMF) and anhydrous buffalo milk fat (ABF) and their volatile flavouring compounds were identified by solid-phase micro-extraction gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SPME-GC/MS) and then compared at three hydrolysis intervals. Both AMF and ABF after lipolysis produced high amount of butanoic and hexanoic acids and other flavouring compounds; however, highest amount were produced by Lipozyme-435 and Novozyme-435 followed by TL-IM. The hydrolyzed products were assessed by Rancimat-743 for oxidative stability and found both that, for AMF and ABF treated butter oil, Lipozyme-435 and TL-IM were generally more stable compared to Novozyme-435. For both AMF and ABF treated butter oil, Lipozyme-435 was observed to cause no further oxidation consequences which indicates Lipozyme-435 was stable during hydrolysis at 55 °C for 24 h. PMID:27162383

  12. Effects of microbial lipases on hydrolyzed milk fat at different time intervals in flavour development and oxidative stability.

    PubMed

    Omar, Khamis Ali; Gounga, Mahamadou Elhadji; Liu, Ruijie; Mlyuka, Erasto; Wang, Xingguo

    2016-02-01

    The interest in application of biocatalysis during natural milk fat flavours development has increased rapidly and lipases have become the most studied group in the development of bovine milk fat flavours. Lipozyme-435, Novozyme-435 and Thermomyces lanuginosus Immobilized (TL-IM) lipases were used to hydrolyze anhydrous milk fat (AMF) and anhydrous buffalo milk fat (ABF) and their volatile flavouring compounds were identified by solid-phase micro-extraction gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SPME-GC/MS) and then compared at three hydrolysis intervals. Both AMF and ABF after lipolysis produced high amount of butanoic and hexanoic acids and other flavouring compounds; however, highest amount were produced by Lipozyme-435 and Novozyme-435 followed by TL-IM. The hydrolyzed products were assessed by Rancimat-743 for oxidative stability and found both that, for AMF and ABF treated butter oil, Lipozyme-435 and TL-IM were generally more stable compared to Novozyme-435. For both AMF and ABF treated butter oil, Lipozyme-435 was observed to cause no further oxidation consequences which indicates Lipozyme-435 was stable during hydrolysis at 55 °C for 24 h.

  13. Wait Times Experienced by Lung Cancer Patients in the BC Southern Interior to Obtain Oncologic Care: Exploration of the Intervals from First Abnormal Imaging to Oncologic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Rezwan; Boyce, Andrew; Halperin, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is associated with rapid disease progression, which can significantly progress over a duration of four to eight weeks. This study examines the time interval lung cancer patients from the interior of British Columbia (BC) experience while undergoing diagnostic evaluation, biopsy, staging, and preparation for treatment. Methods: A chart review of lung cancer patients (n=231) referred to the BC Cancer Agency Centre for the Southern Interior between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011 was performed. Time zero was defined as the date of the first abnormal chest imaging. Time intervals, expressed as median averages, to specialist consult, biopsy, oncologic referral, initial oncology consultation, and commencement of oncologic treatment were obtained. Results: The median time interval from first abnormal chest imaging to a specialist consultation was 18 days (interquartile range, IQR, 7-36). An additional nine days elapsed prior to biopsy in the form of bronchoscopy, CT-guided biopsy, or sputum cytology (median; IQR, 3-21); if lobectomy was required, 18 days elapsed (median; IQR, 9-28). Eight days were required for pathologic diagnosis and subsequent referral to the cancer centre (median; IQR, 3-16.5). Once referral was received, 10 days elapsed prior to consultation with either a medical or radiation oncologist (median, IQR 5-18). Finally, eight days was required for initiation of radiation and/or chemotherapy (median; IQR, 1-15). The median wait time from detection of lung cancer on imaging to oncologic treatment in the form of radiation and/or chemotherapy was 65.5 days (IQR, 41.5-104.3).  Interpretation: Patients in the BC Southern Interior experience considerable delays in accessing lung cancer care. During this time, the disease has the potential to significantly progress and it is possible that a subset of patients may lose their opportunity for curative intent treatment. PMID:26543688

  14. Cardiac Time Intervals by Tissue Doppler Imaging M-Mode: Normal Values and Association with Established Echocardiographic and Invasive Measures of Systolic and Diastolic Function

    PubMed Central

    Mogelvang, Rasmus; de Knegt, Martina Chantal; Olsen, Flemming Javier; Galatius, Søren; Jensen, Jan Skov

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To define normal values of the cardiac time intervals obtained by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) M-mode through the mitral valve (MV). Furthermore, to evaluate the association of the myocardial performance index (MPI) obtained by TDI M-mode (MPITDI) and the conventional method of obtaining MPI (MPIConv), with established echocardiographic and invasive measures of systolic and diastolic function. Methods In a large community based population study (n = 974), where all are free of any cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular risk factors, cardiac time intervals, including isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT), isovolumic contraction time (IVCT), and ejection time (ET) were obtained by TDI M-mode through the MV. IVCT/ET, IVRT/ET and the MPI ((IVRT+IVCT)/ET) were calculated. We also included a validation population (n = 44) of patients who underwent left heart catheterization and had the MPITDI and MPIConv measured. Results IVRT, IVRT/ET and MPI all increased significantly with increasing age in both genders (p<0.001 for all). IVCT, ET, IVRT/ET, and MPI differed significantly between males and females, displaying that women, in general exhibit better cardiac function. MPITDI was significantly associated with invasive (dP/dt max) and echocardiographic measures of systolic (LVEF, global longitudinal strain and global strainrate s) and diastolic function (e’, global strainrate e)(p<0.05 for all), whereas MPIConv was significantly associated with LVEF, e’ and global strainrate e (p<0.05 for all). Conclusion Normal values of cardiac time intervals differed between genders and deteriorated with increasing age. The MPITDI (but not MPIConv) is associated with most invasive and established echocardiographic measures of systolic and diastolic function. PMID:27093636

  15. Distortion of time interval reproduction in an epileptic patient with a focal lesion in the right anterior insular/inferior frontal cortices.

    PubMed

    Monfort, Vincent; Pfeuty, Micha; Klein, Madelyne; Collé, Steffie; Brissart, Hélène; Jonas, Jacques; Maillard, Louis

    2014-11-01

    This case report on an epileptic patient suffering from a focal lesion at the junction of the right anterior insular cortex (AIC) and the adjacent inferior frontal cortex (IFC) provides the first evidence that damage to this brain region impairs temporal performance in a visual time reproduction task in which participants had to reproduce the presentation duration (3, 5 and 7s) of emotionally-neutral and -negative pictures. Strikingly, as compared to a group of healthy subjects, the AIC/IFC case considerably overestimated reproduction times despite normal variability. The effect was obtained in all duration and emotion conditions. Such a distortion in time reproduction was not observed in four other epileptic patients without insular or inferior frontal damage. Importantly, the absolute extent of temporal over-reproduction increased in proportion to the magnitude of the target durations, which concurs with the scalar property of interval timing, and points to an impairment of time-specific rather than of non temporal (such as motor) mechanisms. Our data suggest that the disability in temporal reproduction of the AIC/IFC case would result from a distorted memory representation of the encoded duration, occurring during the process of storage and/or of recovery from memory and leading to a deviation of the temporal judgment during the reproduction task. These findings support the recent proposal that the anterior insular/inferior frontal cortices would be involved in time interval representation. PMID:25223467

  16. Time Interval From Breast-Conserving Surgery to Breast Irradiation in Early Stage Node-Negative Breast Cancer: 17-Year Follow-Up Results and Patterns of Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Vujovic, Olga; Yu, Edward; Cherian, Anil; Dar, A. Rashid; Stitt, Larry; Perera, Francisco

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: A retrospectivechart review was conducted to determine whether the time interval from breast-conserving surgery to breast irradiation (surgery-radiation therapy interval) in early stage node-negative breast cancer had any detrimental effects on recurrence rates. Methods and Materials: There were 566 patients with T1 to T3, N0 breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and breast irradiation and without adjuvant systemic treatment between 1985 and 1992. The surgery-to-radiation therapy intervals used for analysis were 0 to 8 weeks (201 patients), >8 to 12 weeks (233 patients), >12 to 16 weeks (91 patients), and >16 weeks (41 patients). Kaplan-Meier estimates of time to local recurrence, disease-free survival, distant disease-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were calculated. Results: Median follow-up was 17.4 years. Patients in all 4 time intervals were similar in terms of characteristics and pathologic features. There were no statistically significant differences among the 4 time groups in local recurrence (P=.67) or disease-free survival (P=.82). The local recurrence rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 4.9%, 11.5%, and 15.0%, respectively. The distant disease relapse rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 10.6%, 15.4%, and 18.5%, respectively. The disease-free failure rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 20%, 32.3%, and 39.8%, respectively. Cause-specific survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 92%, 84.6%, and 79.8%, respectively. The overall survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 89.3%, 79.2%, and 66.9%, respectively. Conclusions: Surgery-radiation therapy intervals up to 16 weeks from breast-conserving surgery are not associated with any increased risk of recurrence in early stage node-negative breast cancer. There is a steady local recurrence rate of 1% per year with adjuvant radiation alone.

  17. Two locations, two times, and the element set. [applicable to orbit determination of artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taff, L. G.; Randall, P. M. S.

    1985-01-01

    A robust analytical formulation is developed to apply classical initial orbital determination to artificial satellites whose locations are uncertain to about 1 cu km and separated in time by no more than 30 min. An analytical simplification reduces Gauss's method, iteration on the semilatus rectum, iteration on the true anomaly, and the Lambert-Euler technique, to the solution of a single equation in one unknown, instead of the usual coupled triplet of three equations in three unknowns. The method is demonstrated for all common artificial satellite orbits over a variety of time intervals between the two location vectors, and for a varied set of position and distance errors.

  18. Impact of Time Interval between Trauma Onset and Burr Hole Surgery on Recurrence of Late Subacute or Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-in; Kim, Jae-hoon; Kang, Hee-in; Moon, Byung-gwan; Kim, Joo-seung

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although subdural hematoma (SDH) is commonly treatable by burr hole surgery in the late subacute or chronic stage, there is no clear consensus regarding appropriate management and exact predictive factors for postoperative recurrence also remain unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate risk factors associated with recurrence of SDH that requires burr hole surgery in the late subacute or chronic stage. We also identified the appropriate timing of surgery for reducing the recurrence. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 274 patients with SDH in the late subacute or chronic stage treated with burr hole surgery in our hospital between January 2007 and December 2014. Excluding patients with acute intracranial complications or unknown time of trauma onset left 216 patients included in the study. Results Of 216 patients with SDH in the late subacute or chronic stage, recurrence was observed in 36 patients (16.7%). The timing of the operation in patients with late subacute stage (15–28 days) resulted in a significant decrease in recurrence (RR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.17–0.65; p=0.001) compared to chronic stage (>28 days). Otherwise, no significant risk factors were associated with recurrences including comorbidities and surgical details. Conclusion The results indicated that time from trauma onset to burr hole surgery may be important for decreasing the risk of recurrence. Therefore, unless patients can be treated conservatively without surgery, prompt surgical management is recommended in patients diagnosed as having late subacute or chronic subdural hematoma treatable by burr hole surgery, even when neurological deficits are unclear.

  19. Impact of Time Interval between Trauma Onset and Burr Hole Surgery on Recurrence of Late Subacute or Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-in; Kim, Jae-hoon; Kang, Hee-in; Moon, Byung-gwan; Kim, Joo-seung

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although subdural hematoma (SDH) is commonly treatable by burr hole surgery in the late subacute or chronic stage, there is no clear consensus regarding appropriate management and exact predictive factors for postoperative recurrence also remain unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate risk factors associated with recurrence of SDH that requires burr hole surgery in the late subacute or chronic stage. We also identified the appropriate timing of surgery for reducing the recurrence. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 274 patients with SDH in the late subacute or chronic stage treated with burr hole surgery in our hospital between January 2007 and December 2014. Excluding patients with acute intracranial complications or unknown time of trauma onset left 216 patients included in the study. Results Of 216 patients with SDH in the late subacute or chronic stage, recurrence was observed in 36 patients (16.7%). The timing of the operation in patients with late subacute stage (15–28 days) resulted in a significant decrease in recurrence (RR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.17–0.65; p=0.001) compared to chronic stage (>28 days). Otherwise, no significant risk factors were associated with recurrences including comorbidities and surgical details. Conclusion The results indicated that time from trauma onset to burr hole surgery may be important for decreasing the risk of recurrence. Therefore, unless patients can be treated conservatively without surgery, prompt surgical management is recommended in patients diagnosed as having late subacute or chronic subdural hematoma treatable by burr hole surgery, even when neurological deficits are unclear. PMID:27651869

  20. Cut off values of laser fluorescence for different storage methods at different time intervals in comparison to frozen condition: A 1 year in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Rudra; Kaul, Vibhuti; Farooq, Riyaz; Wazir, Nikhil Dev; Khateeb, Shafayat Ullah; Malik, Altaf H; Masoodi, Ajaz Amin

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the following study is to evaluate the change in laser fluorescence (LF) values for extracted teeth stored in different solutions over 1 year period, to give cut-off values for different storage media at different time intervals to get them at par with the in vivo conditions and to see which medium gives best results with the least change in LF values and while enhancing the validity of DIAGNOdent in research. Materials and Methods: Ninety extracted teeth selected, from a pool of frozen teeth, were divided into nine groups of 10 each. Specimens in Groups 1-8 were stored in 1% chloramine, 10% formalin, 10% buffered formalin, 0.02% thymol, 0.12% chlorhexidine, 3% sodium hypochlorite, a commercially available saliva substitute-Wet Mouth (ICPA Pharmaceuticals) and normal saline respectively at 4°C. The last group was stored under frozen condition at −20°C without contact with any storage solution. DIAGNOdent was used to measure the change the LF values at day 30, 45, 60, 160 and 365. Statistical Analysis Used: The mean change in LF values in different storage mediums at different time intervals were compared using two-way ANOVA. Results: At the end of 1 year, significant decrease in fluorescence (P < 0.05) was observed in Groups 1-8. Maximum drop in LF values occurred between day 1 and 30. Group 9 (frozen specimens) did not significantly change their fluorescence response. Conclusions: An inevitable change in LF takes place due to various storage media commonly used in dental research at different time intervals. The values obtained from our study can remove the bias caused by the storage media and the values of LF thus obtained can hence be conveniently extrapolated to the in vivo condition. PMID:24778506

  1. Paleomagnetic record in the Late Pleistocene loess-soil deposits of the Pekla section in the time interval 425-50 Ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, O. V.; Trubikhin, V. M.

    2011-08-01

    The composition, granulometry data, and concentration of grains that carry the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) are studied in the bottom 6.5 meters of the loess-soil deposits of the Pekla section (Azov coast, Krasnodar region). It was shown that these strata, which correspond to the 9th-11th marine oxygen isotope stages (MIS) and cover the time interval ˜425-300 ka, are suitable for further paleomagnetic investigation. The deposits in the upper portion of the Inzhavino paleosoils (Likhvin Interstadial) contain the records of anomalous deviations of the direction of magnetization from the dipole field at the sampling site. The studied interval was sampled by taking two hand blocks from four sampling levels, which minimizes the errors due to the specimen cutting. This anomaly dated ˜300 ka possibly corresponds to the Biva-II geomagnetic excursion. However, the studies of implications of anisotropy in magnetic susceptibility (AMS) for the direction of natural remanent magnetization (NMR) have shown that parts of the samples from the Inzhavino paleosoils and the underlying loess horizon are magnetically anisotropic, which is characteristic for biogenic magnetite grains, while other parts of the samples exhibit plane anisotropy typical for natural sedimentary structures. A weak correlation between the time series of averaged curves of relative paleointensity, NRM20/ARM20 (and NRM20/ K) for the loess horizons of the Pekla section and the global composite reference curve of relative paleointensity, Sint-800, in the time intervals 200-130 ka and 370-320 ka indicates that the paleomagnetic records have been imprinted not only on the detritic magnetic grains but also on the grains produced by chemical reactions and the life processes of bacteria.

  2. New results on delay-range-dependent stability analysis for interval time-varying delay systems with non-linear perturbations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pin-Lin

    2015-07-01

    This paper studies the problem of the stability analysis of interval time-varying delay systems with nonlinear perturbations. Based on the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF), a sufficient delay-range-dependent criterion for asymptotic stability is derived in terms of linear matrix inequality (LMI) and integral inequality approach (IIA) and delayed decomposition approach (DDA). Further, the delay range is divided into two equal segments for stability analysis. Both theoretical and numerical comparisons have been provided to show the effectiveness and efficiency of the present method. Two well-known examples are given to show less conservatism of our obtained results and the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Seismic recurrence intervals and timing of aseismic subduction inferred from emerged corals and reefs of the Central Vanuatu (New Hebrides) Frontal Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Frederick W.; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Wasserburg, G. J.; Frohlich, Cliff

    1990-01-01

    The recognition and dating of corals that have been killed by tectonic uplift allow us to date paleoseismic uplifts in the Vanuatu island arc. We recognize corals that record paleouplifts by their similarity to those known to have died during contemporary sudden uplifts and date them (1) by counting annual coral growth bands (only if part of the coral is alive at the time of collection) or (2) by newly developed techniques for obtaining 230Th ages by mass spectrometry. The mass spectrometric method produces isotopic ages with precisions of ±3 to ±9 years (2σ) in the 0-1000 years B.P. time range. The 230Th ages in this time range appear to be accurate. Samples whose ages are known by counting coral growth bands give 230Th ages that are indistinguishable from their growth band ages. By dividing the average increment of uplift for the latest Holocene uplifts by the mean Holocene uplift rate, we can estimate average seismic uplift recurrence intervals for the past 6000 years. The results for each of four central Vanuatu arc segments are (1) North Santo emerged 1.2 m in 1866 A.D. and 0.6 m 107 years later in 1973 A.D. The average coseismic uplift of 0.9 m and mean Holocene uplift rate of 4.3 mm yr-1 suggest a longer recurrence interval of 212 years. (2) South Santo emerged 0.29 m in 1946 and 0.26 m 19 years later in 1965, including the related 1971 event. Here the mean Holocene uplift rate is 5.5 mm yr-1. The uplift data suggest a longer average recurrence interval of about 51 years. (3) North Malekula emerged 1.23 m near 1729 A. D. and 1.05 m 236 years later in 1965. The mean Holocene uplift rate of 2.7 mm yr-1 and mean coseismic uplift of 1.14 m for dated events suggest a longer recurrence interval of 422 years. (4) Part of southernmost Malekula has uplifted continuously or episodically by about 0.35 m from about 1957 until at least mid-1983 A.D. The maximum uplift of 2.7 mm yr-1 occurs near a nest of small earthquakes. Both the earthquakes and rapid uplift suggest

  4. Systolic time intervals derived from electrocardiographic gated intra-renal artery Doppler waveform associated with left ventricular systolic function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Hsien; Hsu, Po-Chao; Chu, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Hung-Hao; Lee, Meng-Kuang; Lee, Chee-Siong; Yen, Hsueh-Wei; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Voon, Wen-Chol; Lai, Wen-Ter; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung; Su, Ho-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the correlation between renal and cardiac STIs, including pre-ejection period (PEP), ejection time (ET), and PEP/ET, and to assess the diagnostic values of renal STIs in predicting left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <50%. The cross sectional observation study enrolled 230 participants. The renal STIs, including renal PEP (rPEP), renal ET (rET), and rPEP/rET, were measured from electrocardiographic gated renal Doppler ultrasound and cardiac PEP, ET, and PEP/ET were measured from echocardiography. Renal STIs were correlated with cardiac STIs (all P < 0.001). Multivariate analyses showed that rPEP/rET was independently associated with LVEF (unstandardized coefficient β = −0.116, P = 0.046) and LVEF <50% (odds ratio = 2.145, per 0.11 increase; P = 0.017). The areas under the curve for rPEP, 1/rET, and rPEP/rET in predicting LVEF <50% were 0.773, 0.764, and 0.821, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of rPEP/rET > 0.46 in prediction of LVEF <50% were 76.7% and 78.1%, respectively. Our study demonstrated that the novel parameters of renal STIs were significantly associated with cardiac STIs. However, the clinical application of renal STIs needs to be investigated in future studies. PMID:27553182

  5. Systolic time intervals derived from electrocardiographic gated intra-renal artery Doppler waveform associated with left ventricular systolic function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Hsien; Hsu, Po-Chao; Chu, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Hung-Hao; Lee, Meng-Kuang; Lee, Chee-Siong; Yen, Hsueh-Wei; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Voon, Wen-Chol; Lai, Wen-Ter; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung; Su, Ho-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the correlation between renal and cardiac STIs, including pre-ejection period (PEP), ejection time (ET), and PEP/ET, and to assess the diagnostic values of renal STIs in predicting left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <50%. The cross sectional observation study enrolled 230 participants. The renal STIs, including renal PEP (rPEP), renal ET (rET), and rPEP/rET, were measured from electrocardiographic gated renal Doppler ultrasound and cardiac PEP, ET, and PEP/ET were measured from echocardiography. Renal STIs were correlated with cardiac STIs (all P < 0.001). Multivariate analyses showed that rPEP/rET was independently associated with LVEF (unstandardized coefficient β = -0.116, P = 0.046) and LVEF <50% (odds ratio = 2.145, per 0.11 increase; P = 0.017). The areas under the curve for rPEP, 1/rET, and rPEP/rET in predicting LVEF <50% were 0.773, 0.764, and 0.821, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of rPEP/rET > 0.46 in prediction of LVEF <50% were 76.7% and 78.1%, respectively. Our study demonstrated that the novel parameters of renal STIs were significantly associated with cardiac STIs. However, the clinical application of renal STIs needs to be investigated in future studies. PMID:27553182

  6. Protective effects of quercetin on cadmium fluoride induced oxidative stress at different intervals of time in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Zargar, Seema; Siddiqi, Nikhat Jamal; Al Daihan, Sooad Khalaf; Wani, Tanveer A

    2015-01-01

    Quercetin, a member of the flavonoid family is a major antioxidant acquired in humans by food consumption, while Cadmium fluoride (CdF2) is one of the naturally occurring chemicals having adverse effects. The protective effect of quercetin on time dependent oxidative damage induced in mice liver by CdF2 was studied in the following groups of mice consisting of six mice each: (i) control group; (ii) mice treated with single i.p injection of 2 mg/kg bw CdF2 for 24 h; (iii) mice treated with single i.p injection of 2 mg/kg bw CdF2 for 48 h; (iv) mice treated with single i.p injection of quercetin (100 mg/kg bw); (v) mice treated with i.p injection of 100 mg/kg bw of quercetin followed by i.p injection of CdF2 (2 mg/kg bw) for 24 h; and (vi) mice treated with i.p injection of 100mg/kg bw of quercetin followed by CdF2 (2 mg/kg bw) for 48 h. Administration of quercetin two hours before CdF2 significantly reduced the biochemical alterations in reduced glutathione, ascorbic acid, lipid peroxidation, super oxide dismutase, catalase and total protein (p<0.05). Histopathology also showed the protective effect of quercetin. The livers treated with CdF2 were atrophic, markedly nodular, inflamed and necrotic. However, this effect was reduced to a minimum in the mice pre-treated for two hours with quercetin. PMID:25856559

  7. Effect of addition of lycopene to calcium hydroxide and chlorhexidine as intracanal medicament on fracture resistance of radicular dentin at two different time intervals: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Madhusudhana, Koppolu; Archanagupta, Kasamsetty; Suneelkumar, Chinni; Lavanya, Anumula; Deepthi, Mandava

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term use of intracanal medicaments such as calcium hydroxide (CH) reduces the fracture resistance of dentin. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the fracture resistance of radicular dentin on long-term use of CH, chlorhexidine (CHX) with lycopene (LP). Aim: To compare the fracture resistance of radicular dentin when intracanal medicaments such as CH, CHX with LP were used for 1-week and 1-month time interval. Settings and Design: Sixty single-rooted extracted human permanent premolars were collected, and complete instrumentation was done. Samples were divided into three groups based on intracanal medicament used. Materials and Methods: Group 1 - no medicament was placed (CON), group 2 - mixture of 1.5 g of CH and 1 ml of 2% CHX (CHCHX), group 3 - mixture of 1.5 g of CH, 1 ml of CHX and 1 ml of 5% LP solution (CHCHXLP). After storage period of each group for 1-week and 1-month, middle 8 mm root cylinder was sectioned and tested for fracture resistance. Statistical Analysis: Results were analyzed using paired t-test. Results: At 1-month time interval, there was a statistically significant difference in fracture resistance between CHCHX and CHCHXLP groups. Conclusion: Addition of LP has not decreased the fracture resistance of radicular dentin after 1-month. PMID:26069405

  8. High Resolution ECG for Evaluation of QT Interval Variability during Exposure to Acute Hypoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zupet, P.; Finderle, Z.; Schlegel, Todd T.; Starc, V.

    2010-01-01

    Ventricular repolarization instability as quantified by the index of QT interval variability (QTVI) is one of the best predictors for risk of malignant ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Because it is difficult to appropriately monitor early signs of organ dysfunction at high altitude, we investigated whether high resolution advanced ECG (HR-ECG) analysis might be helpful as a non-invasive and easy-to-use tool for evaluating the risk of cardiac arrhythmias during exposure to acute hypoxia. 19 non-acclimatized healthy trained alpinists (age 37, 8 plus or minus 4,7 years) participated in the study. Five-minute high-resolution 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) were recorded (Cardiosoft) in each subject at rest in the supine position breathing room air and then after breathing 12.5% oxygen for 30 min. For beat-to-beat RR and QT variability, the program of Starc was utilized to derive standard time domain measures such as root mean square of the successive interval difference (rMSSD) of RRV and QTV, the corrected QT interval (QTc) and the QTVI in lead II. Changes were evaluated with paired-samples t-test with p-values less than 0.05 considered statistically significant. As expected, the RR interval and its variability both decreased with increasing altitude, with p = 0.000 and p = 0.005, respectively. Significant increases were found in both the rMSSDQT and the QTVI in lead II, with p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively. There was no change in QTc interval length (p = non significant). QT variability parameters may be useful for evaluating changes in ventricular repolarization caused by hypoxia. These changes might be driven by increases in sympathetic nervous system activity at ventricular level.

  9. Low cadence interval training at moderate intensity does not improve cycling performance in highly trained veteran cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Kristoffersen, Morten; Gundersen, Hilde; Leirdal, Stig; Iversen, Vegard V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate effects of low cadence training at moderate intensity on aerobic capacity, cycling performance, gross efficiency, freely chosen cadence, and leg strength in veteran cyclists. Method: Twenty-two well trained veteran cyclists [age: 47 ± 6 years, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max): 57.9 ± 3.7 ml · kg−1 · min−1] were randomized into two groups, a low cadence training group and a freely chose cadence training group. Respiratory variables, power output, cadence and leg strength were tested before and after a 12 weeks training intervention period. The low cadence training group performed 12 weeks of moderate [73–82% of maximal heart rate (HRmax)] interval training (5 × 6 min) with a cadence of 40 revolutions per min (rpm) two times a week, in addition to their usual training. The freely chosen cadence group added 90 min of training at freely chosen cadence at moderate intensity. Results: No significant effects of the low cadence training on aerobic capacity, cycling performance, power output, cadence, gross efficiency, or leg strength was found. The freely chosen cadence group significantly improved both VO2max (58.9 ± 2.4 vs. 62.2 ± 3.2 ml · kg−1 · min−1), VO2 consumption at lactate threshold (49.4 ± 3.8 vs. 51.8 ± 3.5 ml · kg−1 · min−1) and during the 30 min performance test (52.8 ± 3.0 vs. 54.7 ± 3.5 ml · kg−1 · min−1), and power output at lactate threshold (284 ± 47 vs. 294 ± 48 W) and during the 30 min performance test (284 ± 42 vs. 297 ± 50 W). Moreover, a significant difference was seen when comparing the change in freely chosen cadence from pre- to post between the groups during the 30 min performance test (2.4 ± 5.0 vs. −2.7 ± 6.2). Conclusion: Twelve weeks of low cadence (40 rpm) interval training at moderate intensity (73–82% of HRmax) twice a week does not improve aerobic capacity, cycling performance or leg strength in highly trained veteran cyclists

  10. The Efficacy and Safety of Insulin Degludec Given in Variable Once-Daily Dosing Intervals Compared With Insulin Glargine and Insulin Degludec Dosed at the Same Time Daily

    PubMed Central

    Meneghini, Luigi; Atkin, Stephen L.; Gough, Stephen C.L.; Raz, Itamar; Blonde, Lawrence; Shestakova, Marina; Bain, Stephen; Johansen, Thue; Begtrup, Kamilla; Birkeland, Kåre I.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The requirement to inject current basal insulin analogs at a fixed time each day may complicate adherence and compromise glycemic control. This trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of varying the daily injection time of insulin degludec (IDeg), an ultra-long-acting basal insulin. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This 26-week, open-label, treat-to-target trial enrolled adults (≥18 years) with type 2 diabetes who were either insulin naïve and receiving oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) (HbA1c = 7–11%) or previously on basal insulin ± OAD(s) (HbA1c = 7–10%). Participants were randomized to 1) once-daily (OD) IDeg in a prespecified dosing schedule, creating 8–40-h intervals between injections (IDeg OD Flex; n = 229); 2) once-daily IDeg at the main evening meal (IDeg OD; n = 228); or 3) once-daily insulin glargine at the same time each day (IGlar OD; n = 230). The primary outcome was noninferiority of IDeg OD Flex to IGlar OD in HbA1c reduction after 26 weeks. RESULTS After 26 weeks, IDeg OD Flex, IDeg OD, and IGlar OD improved HbA1c by 1.28, 1.07, and 1.26% points, respectively (estimated treatment difference [IDeg OD Flex − IGlar OD]: 0.04% points [–0.12 to 0.20], confirming noninferiority). No statistically significant differences in overall or nocturnal hypoglycemia were found between IDeg OD Flex and IGlar OD. Comparable glycemic control and rates of hypoglycemia were seen with IDeg OD Flex and IDeg OD. Adverse event profiles were similar across groups. CONCLUSIONS The use of extreme dosing intervals of 8–40 h demonstrates that the daily injection time of IDeg can be varied without compromising glycemic control or safety. PMID:23340894

  11. Histopathologic evaluation of postmortem autolytic changes in bluegill (Lepomis macrohirus) and crappie (Pomoxis anularis) at varied time intervals and storage temperatures.

    PubMed

    George, Jami; Van Wettere, Arnaud J; Michaels, Blayk B; Crain, Debbi; Lewbart, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    Information is lacking on preserving fish carcasses to minimize postmortem autolysis artifacts when a necropsy cannot be performed immediately. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively identify and score histologic postmortem changes in two species of freshwater fish (bluegill-Lepomis macrochirus; crappie-Pomoxis annularis), at varied time intervals and storage temperatures, to assess the histologic quality of collected samples. A pooled sample of 36 mix sex individuals of healthy bluegill and crappie were euthanized, stored either at room temperature, refrigerated at 4 °C, or frozen at -20 °C, and then necropsied at 0, 4, 24, and 48 h intervals. Histologic specimens were evaluated by light microscopy. Data showed that immediate harvesting of fresh samples provides the best quality and refrigeration would be the preferred method of storage if sample collection had to be delayed for up to 24 h. When sample collection must be delayed more than 24 h, the preferred method of storage to minimize autolysis artifacts is freezing if evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract is most important, or refrigeration if gill histology is most important. The gill arch, intestinal tract, followed by the liver and kidney were the most sensitive organs to autolysis. PMID:27114885

  12. Histopathologic evaluation of postmortem autolytic changes in bluegill (Lepomis macrohirus) and crappie (Pomoxis anularis) at varied time intervals and storage temperatures

    PubMed Central

    George, Jami; Van Wettere, Arnaud J.; Michaels, Blayk B.; Crain, Debbi

    2016-01-01

    Information is lacking on preserving fish carcasses to minimize postmortem autolysis artifacts when a necropsy cannot be performed immediately. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively identify and score histologic postmortem changes in two species of freshwater fish (bluegill—Lepomis macrochirus; crappie—Pomoxis annularis), at varied time intervals and storage temperatures, to assess the histologic quality of collected samples. A pooled sample of 36 mix sex individuals of healthy bluegill and crappie were euthanized, stored either at room temperature, refrigerated at 4 °C, or frozen at −20 °C, and then necropsied at 0, 4, 24, and 48 h intervals. Histologic specimens were evaluated by light microscopy. Data showed that immediate harvesting of fresh samples provides the best quality and refrigeration would be the preferred method of storage if sample collection had to be delayed for up to 24 h. When sample collection must be delayed more than 24 h, the preferred method of storage to minimize autolysis artifacts is freezing if evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract is most important, or refrigeration if gill histology is most important. The gill arch, intestinal tract, followed by the liver and kidney were the most sensitive organs to autolysis. PMID:27114885

  13. Multiple-dose lorazepam kinetics: shuttling of lorazepam glucuronide between the circulation and the gut during day- and night-time dosing intervals in response to feeding.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, A; Lane, R A; Woo, D; Herman, R J

    1993-12-01

    Lorazepam kinetics were examined in seven healthy males age 18 to 30 years after single- and multiple-dose lorazepam administration and in the presence and absence of neomycin and cholestyramine to block the enterohepatic circulation of the drug. Methods used a simultaneous i.v./p.o. dosing regimen with provision to measure lorazepam clearance during day- and night-time dosing intervals. The day-time steady-state clearance of free lorazepam measured 7.55 +/- 1.95 ml/min/kg (mean +/- S.D.) and was identical to that observed after single-dose administration (7.68 +/- 3.19 ml/min/kg). Neomycin and cholestyramine increased lorazepam clearances 5 to 45% (P < or = .05) as would be expected for interruption of an enterohepatic circulation and in keeping with previous observations under nonsteady-state conditions. Lorazepam clearances were the same during the day as during the night, except in the presence of neomycin and cholestyramine, where night-time clearances were significantly greater (10.16 +/- 3.52 vs. 8.77 +/- 2.43 ml/min/kg, P < or = .05). Urinary recoveries of lorazepam glucuronide, on the other hand, were greater during the day than during the night (114 +/- 11 vs. 77 +/- 15%, P < or = .05) and in all cases were greater than 100% of the administered dose for that interval. Thus, there is a diurnal variation in lorazepam elimination consistent with a fasting-induced increase in hepatic glucuronidation during the night. This, combined with the relative inactivity of the gut during this period, serves to trap the glucuronide and delay its transfer back to the systemic circulation and urine.

  14. Endurance and sprint benefits of high-intensity and supramaximal interval training.

    PubMed

    Cicioni-Kolsky, Daniel; Lorenzen, Christian; Williams, Morgan David; Kemp, Justin Guy

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of two different interval training programs-high-intensity interval training (HIT) and supramaximal interval training (SMIT)-on measures of sprint and endurance performance. Physically active individuals (Females: n=32; age 19.3, s=2.2 years; mass 67.6, s=9.1 kg; stature 172.7, s=6.6 cm. Males: n=23; age 20.0, s=2.7 years; mass 71.3, s=8.3 kg; stature 176.6, s=5.8 cm) completed pre-testing that comprised (1) 3000 m time-trial, (2) 40 m sprint, and (3) repeated sprint ability (RSA-6×40 m sprints, 24 s active recovery) performance. Participants were then matched for average 3000 m running velocity (AV) and randomly assigned to one of three groups: (i) HIT, n=19, 4 min at 100% AV, 4 min passive recovery, 4-6 bouts per session; (ii) SMIT, n=20, 30 s at 130% AV, 150 s passive recovery, 7-12 bouts per session; and (iii) control group, n=16, 30 min continuous running at 75% AV. Groups trained three times per week for six weeks. When time to complete each test were compared among groups: (i) improvements in 3000 m time trial performance were greater following SMIT than continuous running, and (ii) improvements in 40 m sprint and RSA performance were greater following SMIT than HIT and continuous running. In addition, a gender effect was observed for the 3000 m time trial only, where females changed more following the training intervention than males. In summary, for concurrent improvements in endurance, sprint and repeated sprint performance, SMIT provides the greatest benefits for physically active individuals.

  15. Effect of extending the interval from Presynch to initiation of Ovsynch in a Presynch-Ovsynch protocol on fertility of timed artificial insemination services in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Giordano, J O; Thomas, M J; Catucuamba, G; Curler, M D; Wijma, R; Stangaferro, M L; Masello, M

    2016-01-01

    The specific objective of this study was to determine if increasing the interval between the Presynch and Ovsynch portion of the Presynch-Ovsynch protocol (Presynch: PGF2α-14 d-PGF2α and Ovsynch: GnRH-7 d-PGF2α-56 h-GnRH-16-20 h-timed artificial insemination) from 12 to 14 d would reduce the fertility of lactating dairy cows not detected in estrus after Presynch that receive timed artificial insemination (TAI). Cows from 4 commercial dairy farms (n=3,165) were blocked by parity (primiparous vs. multiparous) and randomly assigned to a 12 (PSOv14-12; n=1,566) or 14 d (PSOv14-14; n=1,599) interval between the second PGF2α (PGF) injection of Presynch (P2) and the beginning of Ovsynch. Cows detected in estrus any time between P2 and the day of the TAI were inseminated (AIED group). From a subgroup of cows (177 and 150 in PSOv14-12 and PSOv14-14, respectively), ovarian parameters and ovulation were evaluated through determination of concentrations of progesterone (P4) in blood and transrectal ultrasonography at the time of the first GnRH (GnRH1) and the PGF injection of Ovsynch. Overall, 52.8% (n=1,671) of the cows were AIED, whereas 47.2% (n=1,494) received TAI. For cows that received TAI, pregnancies per artificial insemination 39 d after artificial insemination were similar for PSOv14-12 (36.3%) and PSOv14-14 (36.0%) but were greater for primiparous (41.5%) than multiparous cows (33.6%). Pregnancy loss from 39 to 105 d after artificial insemination was similar for PSOv14-12 (4.8%) and PSOv14-14 (8.6%), for primiparous (6.4%) and multiparous cows (7.0%), but a tendency for a treatment by parity interaction was observed. Both treatments had a similar proportion of cows with a follicle ≥ 10 mm and similar follicle size at GnRH1; however, the ovulatory response to GnRH was greater for PSOv14-12 (62.2%) than PSOv14-14 (46.4%). A greater proportion of cows with a functional corpus luteum (75.3 vs. 65.6%) and greater concentrations of P4 (3.9 vs. 3.3 ng/mL) at GnRH1 in

  16. The importance of independent chronology in integrating records of past climate change for the 60-8 ka INTIMATE time interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, Achim; Hajdas, Irka; Blockley, Simon P. E.; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Christl, Marcus; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Moseley, Gina E.; Nowaczyk, Norbert N.; Rasmussen, Sune O.; Roberts, Helen M.; Spötl, Christoph; Staff, Richard A.; Svensson, Anders

    2014-12-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the most common dating techniques applied in palaeoclimate and palaeoenvironmental studies including four radiometric and isotopic dating methods (radiocarbon, 230Th disequilibrium, luminescence, cosmogenic nuclides) and two incremental methods based on layer counting (ice layer, varves). For each method, concise background information about the fundamental principles and methodological approaches is provided. We concentrate on the time interval of focus for the INTIMATE (Integrating Ice core, MArine and TErrestrial records) community (60-8 ka). This dating guide addresses palaeoclimatologists who aim at interpretation of their often regional and local proxy time series in a wider spatial context and, therefore, have to rely on correlation with proxy records obtained from different archives from various regions. For this reason, we especially emphasise scientific approaches for harmonising chronologies for sophisticated and robust proxy data integration. In this respect, up-to-date age modelling techniques are presented as well as tools for linking records by age equivalence including tephrochronology, cosmogenic 10Be and palaeomagnetic variations. Finally, to avoid inadequate documentation of chronologies and assure reliable correlation of proxy time series, this paper provides recommendations for minimum standards of uncertainty and age datum reporting.

  17. High-intensity interval training improves VO(2peak), maximal lactate accumulation, time trial and competition performance in 9-11-year-old swimmers.

    PubMed

    Sperlich, Billy; Zinner, Christoph; Heilemann, Ilka; Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Mester, Joachim

    2010-11-01

    Training volume in swimming is usually very high when compared to the relatively short competition time. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has been demonstrated to improve performance in a relatively short training period. The main purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of a 5-week HIIT versus high-volume training (HVT) in 9-11-year-old swimmers on competition performance, 100 and 2,000 m time (T(100 m) and T(2,000 m)), VO(2peak) and rate of maximal lactate accumulation (Lac(max)). In a 5-week crossover study, 26 competitive swimmers with a mean (SD) age of 11.5 ± 1.4 years performed a training period of HIIT and HVT. Competition (P < 0.01; effect size = 0.48) and T(2,000 m) (P = 0.04; effect size = 0.21) performance increased following HIIT. No changes were found in T(100 m) (P = 0.20). Lac(max) increased following HIIT (P < 0.01; effect size = 0.43) and decreased after HVT (P < 0.01; effect size = 0.51). VO(2peak) increased following both interventions (P < 0.05; effect sizes = 0.46-0.57). The increases in competition performance, T(2,000 m), Lac(max) and VO(2peak) following HIIT were achieved in significantly less training time (~2 h/week). PMID:20683609

  18. Comparing Fat Oxidation in an Exercise Test with Moderate-Intensity Interval Training

    PubMed Central

    Alkahtani, Shaea

    2014-01-01

    This study compared fat oxidation rate from a graded exercise test (GXT) with a moderate-intensity interval training session (MIIT) in obese men. Twelve sedentary obese males (age 29 ± 4.1 years; BMI 29.1 ± 2.4 kg·m-2; fat mass 31.7 ± 4.4 %body mass) completed two exercise sessions: GXT to determine maximal fat oxidation (MFO) and maximal aerobic power (VO2max), and an interval cycling session during which respiratory gases were measured. The 30-min MIIT involved 5-min repetitions of workloads 20% below and 20% above the MFO intensity. VO2max was 31.8 ± 5.5 ml·kg-1·min-1 and all participants achieved ≥ 3 of the designated VO2max test criteria. The MFO identified during the GXT was not significantly different compared with the average fat oxidation rate in the MIIT session. During the MIIT session, fat oxidation rate increased with time; the highest rate (0.18 ± 0.11 g·min- 1) in minute 25 was significantly higher than the rate at minute 5 and 15 (p ≤ 0.01 and 0.05 respectively). In this cohort with low aerobic fitness, fat oxidation during the MIIT session was comparable with the MFO determined during a GXT. Future research may consider if the varying workload in moderate-intensity interval training helps adherence to exercise without compromising fat oxidation. Key Points Fat oxidation during interval exercise is not com-promised by the undulating exercise intensity Physiological measures corresponding with the MFO measured during the GXT correlated well to the MIIT The validity of exercise intensity markers derived from a GXT to reflect the physiological responses during MIIT. PMID:24570605

  19. Comparing fat oxidation in an exercise test with moderate-intensity interval training.

    PubMed

    Alkahtani, Shaea

    2014-01-01

    This study compared fat oxidation rate from a graded exercise test (GXT) with a moderate-intensity interval training session (MIIT) in obese men. Twelve sedentary obese males (age 29 ± 4.1 years; BMI 29.1 ± 2.4 kg·m(-2); fat mass 31.7 ± 4.4 %body mass) completed two exercise sessions: GXT to determine maximal fat oxidation (MFO) and maximal aerobic power (VO2max), and an interval cycling session during which respiratory gases were measured. The 30-min MIIT involved 5-min repetitions of workloads 20% below and 20% above the MFO intensity. VO2max was 31.8 ± 5.5 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) and all participants achieved ≥ 3 of the designated VO2max test criteria. The MFO identified during the GXT was not significantly different compared with the average fat oxidation rate in the MIIT session. During the MIIT session, fat oxidation rate increased with time; the highest rate (0.18 ± 0.11 g·min(- 1)) in minute 25 was significantly higher than the rate at minute 5 and 15 (p ≤ 0.01 and 0.05 respectively). In this cohort with low aerobic fitness, fat oxidation during the MIIT session was comparable with the MFO determined during a GXT. Future research may consider if the varying workload in moderate-intensity interval training helps adherence to exercise without compromising fat oxidation. Key PointsFat oxidation during interval exercise is not com-promised by the undulating exercise intensityPhysiological measures corresponding with the MFO measured during the GXT correlated well to the MIITThe validity of exercise intensity markers derived from a GXT to reflect the physiological responses during MIIT.

  20. A Clinical Trial of Optimal Time Interval Between Ablation and Diagnostic Activity When a Pretherapy RAI Scanning Is Performed on Patients With Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yafu; Mao, Qiufen; Chen, Song; Li, Na; Li, Xuena; Li, Yaming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article investigates the association of the time interval between the diagnostic dose and ablation with the stunning effect, when a 74 MBq 131I pretherapy scanning was performed on patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC); the patients who were diagnosed as DTC and would be performed radioiodine (RAI) ablation of thyroid remnants or metastases were recruited during January 2011 and May 2012 in our hospital. Thirty-seven patients with DTC who had the RAI ablation of thyroid remnants or metastases for the first time were recruited. All the patients received a dose of 1850 to 7400 MBq of 131I for ablation and a diagnostic scan was performed 24 hours after the administration of 74 MBq 131I before ablation. A posttherapy scan was performed 2 to 7 days after the ablation. The patients were broken down into 3 groups (G1, G2, and G3) according to the interval time between the diagnostic dose and therapy (1–3, 4–7, and >7 days). The fractional concentrations of 131I in remnants or functional metastases were quantified and expressed as therapeutic/diagnostic (Rx/Dx). The level of significance was set at 0.05. Sixty-seven foci were found both on pretherapy and posttherapy scans, the mean ratio of Rx/Dx was 0.43 ± 0.29, and the ratio of 49 foci (73.13%) was <0.6. The ratios in G1, G2, and G3 were 0.46 ± 0.29, 0.29 ± 0.18, and 0.55 ± 0.33, respectively. The differences between G1 and G2, and G2 and G3 were statistically significant (t = 2.40, P = 0.021 and t = 3.28, P = 0.002), whereas the difference between G1 and G3 was not significant (t = 1.01, P = 0.319). By a diagnostic scan of 74 MBq 131I, stunning prominently occurs with a time of 4 to 7 days between the diagnostic dose and ablation. We recommend that for less stunning effect, RAI ablation should be performed within 3 days or postponed until 1 week after the diagnostic dose administrated. PMID:26252311

  1. Twelve Weeks of Sprint Interval Training Improves Indices of Cardiometabolic Health Similar to Traditional Endurance Training despite a Five-Fold Lower Exercise Volume and Time Commitment

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Brian J.; MacInnis, Martin J.; Skelly, Lauren E.; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.; Gibala, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims We investigated whether sprint interval training (SIT) was a time-efficient exercise strategy to improve insulin sensitivity and other indices of cardiometabolic health to the same extent as traditional moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT). SIT involved 1 minute of intense exercise within a 10-minute time commitment, whereas MICT involved 50 minutes of continuous exercise per session. Methods Sedentary men (27±8y; BMI = 26±6kg/m2) performed three weekly sessions of SIT (n = 9) or MICT (n = 10) for 12 weeks or served as non-training controls (n = 6). SIT involved 3x20-second ‘all-out’ cycle sprints (~500W) interspersed with 2 minutes of cycling at 50W, whereas MICT involved 45 minutes of continuous cycling at ~70% maximal heart rate (~110W). Both protocols involved a 2-minute warm-up and 3-minute cool-down at 50W. Results Peak oxygen uptake increased after training by 19% in both groups (SIT: 32±7 to 38±8; MICT: 34±6 to 40±8ml/kg/min; p<0.001 for both). Insulin sensitivity index (CSI), determined by intravenous glucose tolerance tests performed before and 72 hours after training, increased similarly after SIT (4.9±2.5 to 7.5±4.7, p = 0.002) and MICT (5.0±3.3 to 6.7±5.0 x 10−4 min-1 [μU/mL]-1, p = 0.013) (p<0.05). Skeletal muscle mitochondrial content also increased similarly after SIT and MICT, as primarily reflected by the maximal activity of citrate synthase (CS; P<0.001). The corresponding changes in the control group were small for VO2peak (p = 0.99), CSI (p = 0.63) and CS (p = 0.97). Conclusions Twelve weeks of brief intense interval exercise improved indices of cardiometabolic health to the same extent as traditional endurance training in sedentary men, despite a five-fold lower exercise volume and time commitment. PMID:27115137

  2. [Sound affects the discrimination of weak intensities of light in the visual cortex of the rabbit depending on time intervals between sound and light].

    PubMed

    Polianskiĭ, V B; Alymkulov, D É; Evtikhin, D V; Chernyshev, B V

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we researched an influence of sound (2000 Hz, 70 dB, 40 ms) to the discrimination of low-light intensities (0.3 and 1 cd/m2) in the visual cortex of the rabbit. We used a recording of evoked potentials from the visual cortex of awaked rabbits in chronic experiments. The sound was switched on with different time slots before and after the replacement of the light intensities at each other (range from -750 to +150 ms). Sound itself caused no response. In 42 experiments on 3 rabbits we revealed that' he sound has a significant modulating effect on the discrimination of low-light intensities in the range of time shifts from -300 to +50 ms. Maximum sound effect was manifested in the transition of light from a high-intensity (1 cd/m2) to lower (0.3 cd/m2). Analyses of the phases of visual evoked potentials revealed that significant influence of sound to the light occurs in the intervals -300, -100, -60, -40, -20, 0, -20 and + 50 ms. We found that phase P2 (120-150 ms from the moment of replacement of the light stimuli) is most affected by sound in response to the replacement of low-light intensities both in the number of significant (p < 0.05) time slots (7) and the impact of sound on the light response. In phase P2 the impact of sound was almost exclusively facilitating (by 19-36%) compared with the responses to the light, whereas in phases N1 80-110 ms) and N2 (180-250 ms) were only 2-3 intervals with the significant influence of the sound. And the degree of response facilitation to light was ranged by 8-12%. We assumed that the effect of sound on the light response in visual cortex is delayed that caused by the passage of auditory signal through the auditory,parietal cortex, superior colliculus.

  3. Distribution of transition times in a stochastic model of excitable cell: Insights into the cell-intrinsic mechanisms of randomness in neuronal interspike intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requena-Carrión, Jesús; Requena-Carrión, Víctor J.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we develop an analytical approach to studying random patterns of activity in excitable cells. Our analytical approach uses a two-state stochastic model of excitable system based on the electrophysiological properties of refractoriness and restitution, which characterize cell recovery after excitation. By applying the notion of probability density flux, we derive the distributions of transition times between states and the distribution of interspike interval (ISI) durations for a constant applied stimulus. The derived ISI distribution is unimodal and, provided that the time spent in the excited state is constant, can be approximated by a Rayleigh peak followed by an exponential tail. We then explore the role of the model parameters in determining the shape of the derived distributions and the ISI coefficient of variation. Finally, we use our analytical results to study simulation results from the stochastic Morris-Lecar neuron and from a three-state extension of the proposed stochastic model, which is capable of reproducing multimodal ISI histograms.

  4. Improved VO2max and time trial performance with more high aerobic intensity interval training and reduced training volume: a case study on an elite national cyclist.

    PubMed

    Støren, Øyvind; Bratland-Sanda, Solfrid; Haave, Marius; Helgerud, Jan

    2012-10-01

    The present study investigated to what extent more high aerobic intensity interval training (HAIT) and reduced training volume would influence maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and time trial (TT) performance in an elite national cyclist in the preseason period. The cyclist was tested for VO2max, cycling economy (C(c)), and TT performance on an ergometer cycle during 1 year. Training was continuously logged using heart rate monitor during the entire period. Total monthly training volume was reduced in the 2011 preseason compared with the 2010 preseason, and 2 HAIT blocks (14 sessions in 9 days and 15 sessions in 10 days) were performed as running. Between the HAIT blocks, 3 HAIT sessions per week were performed as cycling. From November 2010 to February 2011, the cyclist reduced total average monthly training volume by 18% and cycling training volume by 60%. The amount of training at 90-95% HRpeak increased by 41%. VO2max increased by 10.3% on ergometer cycle. TT performance improved by 14.9%. C(c) did not change. In conclusion, preseason reduced total training volume but increased amount of HAIT improved VO2max and TT performance without any changes in C(c). These improvements on cycling appeared despite that the HAIT blocks were performed as running. Reduced training time, and training transfer from running into improved cycling form, may be beneficial for cyclists living in cold climate areas.

  5. Time-Induced Super-Latent Inhibition Is Dependent on the Distinctiveness of the Retention-Interval Context from the Other Experimental Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubow, R.E.; De la Casa, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    A conditioned taste aversion experiment examined the role of the retention-interval context (between conditioning and test stages) on the modulation of long-delay latent inhibition (LI). A super-LI effect was obtained only when the animals spent the retention interval in a context that was different from that of preexposure, conditioning, and…

  6. Time Interval from Symptom Onset to Hospital Care in Patients with Acute Heart Failure: A Report from the Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Emergency Medical Service Database

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Kohsaka, Shun; Harada, Kazumasa; Sakai, Tetsuro; Takagi, Atsutoshi; Miyamoto, Takamichi; Iida, Kiyoshi; Tanimoto, Shuzou; Fukuda, Keiichi; Nagao, Ken; Sato, Naoki; Takayama, Morimasa

    2015-01-01

    Aims There seems to be two distinct patterns in the presentation of acute heart failure (AHF) patients; early- vs. gradual-onset. However, whether time-dependent relationship exists in outcomes of patients with AHF remains unclear. Methods The Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Database prospectively collects information of emergency admissions via EMS service to acute cardiac care facilities from 67 participating hospitals in the Tokyo metropolitan area. Between 2009 and 2011, a total of 3811 AHF patients were registered. The documentation of symptom onset time was mandated by the on-site ambulance team. We divided the patients into two groups according to the median onset-to-hospitalization (OH) time for those patients (2h); early- (presenting ≤2h after symptom onset) vs. gradual-onset (late) group (>2h). The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Results The early OH group had more urgent presentation, as demonstrated by a higher systolic blood pressure (SBP), respiratory rate, and higher incidence of pulmonary congestion (48.6% vs. 41.6%; P<0.001); whereas medical comorbidities such as stroke (10.8% vs. 7.9%; P<0.001) and atrial fibrillation (30.0% vs. 26.0%; P<0.001) were more frequently seen in the late OH group. Overall, 242 (6.5%) patients died during hospitalization. Notably, a shorter OH time was associated with a better in-hospital mortality rate (odds ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.51−0.99; P = 0.043). Conclusions Early-onset patients had rather typical AHF presentations (e.g., higher SBP or pulmonary congestion) but had a better in-hospital outcome compared to gradual-onset patients. PMID:26562780

  7. Comparative evaluation of demineralization of radicular dentin with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 10% citric acid, and MTAD at different time intervals: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Yogender; Lohar, Jitendra; Bhat, Sureka; Bhati, Manisha; Gandhi, Aanesh; Mehta, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Background: The smear layer has the capability to protect the bacteria within the dentinal tubules from intracanal medicament. After removal of the smear layer from infected root canals, it allows disinfection of the entire root canal. The smear layer compromising the seal between the root canal sealer and root canal wall also decreases the penetration of irrigants into dentinal tubules. Aims: This study compares the amount of phosphorous liberated and demineralization of the radicular dentin with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 10% citric acid and mixture of doxycycline, citric acid, and a detergent at different time intervals. Materials and Methods: Extracted maxillary single-rooted teeth were prepared by using a combination of passive step-back and rotary 0.04 taper nickel-titanium files. Sodium hypochlorite 5.25% and sterile distilled water were used as an intracanal irrigant. The canals were then treated with 5 mL of one of the following solutions such as final rinse sterile distilled water, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or mixture of doxycycline, citric acid, and a detergent. The presence or absence of smear layer and the amount of erosion on the surface of the root canal walls at the coronal, middle, and apical portions of each canal were examined under a scanning electron microscope. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) to determine whether there were significant differences between the groups. Results: The results show that mixture of doxycycline, citric acid, and a detergent is an effective solution for the removal of the smear layer and does not significantly change the structure of the dentinal tubules. Conclusions: In this study, 10% citric acid shows the maximum amount of dimeneralization of radicular dentine followed by mixture of doxycycline, citric acid, and a detergent, and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. When all the subgroups were compared, it was seen

  8. Precision errors, least significant change, and monitoring time interval in pediatric measurements of bone mineral density, body composition, and mechanostat parameters by GE lunar prodigy.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Maciej; Pludowski, Pawel

    2013-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) method is widely used in pediatrics in the study of bone density and body composition. However, there is a limit to how precise DXA can estimate bone and body composition measures in children. The study was aimed to (1) evaluate precision errors for bone mineral density, bone mass and bone area, body composition, and mechanostat parameters, (2) assess the relationships between precision errors and anthropometric parameters, and (3) calculate a "least significant change" and "monitoring time interval" values for DXA measures in children of wide age range (5-18yr) using GE Lunar Prodigy densitometer. It is observed that absolute precision error values were different for thin and standard technical modes of DXA measures and depended on age, body weight, and height. In contrast, relative precision error values expressed in percentages were similar for thin and standard modes (except total body bone mineral density [TBBMD]) and were not related to anthropometric variables (except TBBMD). Concluding, due to stability of percentage coefficient of variation values in wide range of age, the use of precision error expressed in percentages, instead of absolute error, appeared as convenient in pediatric population.

  9. Reducing Error Bars through the Intercalibration of Radioisotopic and Astrochronologic Time Scales for the Cenomanian/Turonian Boundary Interval, Western Interior Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, S. R.; Siewert, S. E.; Singer, B. S.; Sageman, B. B.; Condon, D. J.; Obradovich, J. D.; Jicha, B.; Sawyer, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    We develop a new intercalibrated astrochronologic and radioisotopic time scale for the Cenomanian/Turonian (C/T) boundary interval near the GSSP in Colorado, where orbitally-influenced rhythmic strata host bentonites that contain sanidine and zircon suitable for 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb dating. This provides a rare opportunity to directly intercalibrate two independent radioisotopic chronometers against an astrochronologic age model. We present paired 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb ages from four bentonites spanning the Vascoceras diartianum to Pseudaspidoceras flexuosum biozones, utilizing both newly collected material and legacy sanidine samples of Obradovich (1993). Full 2σ uncertainties (decay constant, standard age, analytical sources) for the 40Ar/39Ar ages, using a weighted mean of 33-103 concordant age determinations and an age of 28.201 Ma for Fish Canyon sanidine (FCs), range from ±0.15 to 0.19 Ma, with ages from 93.67 to 94.43 Ma. The traditional FCs age of 28.02 Ma yields ages from 93.04 to 93.78 Ma with full uncertainties of ±1.58 Ma. Using the ET535 tracer, single zircon CA-TIMS 206Pb/238U ages determined from each bentonite record a range of ages (up to 2.1 Ma), however, in three of the four bentonites the youngest single crystal ages are statistically indistinguishable from the 40Ar/39Ar ages calculated relative to 28.201 Ma FCs, supporting this calibration. Using the new radioisotopic data and published astrochronology (Sageman et al., 2006) we develop an integrated C/T boundary time scale using a Bayesian statistical approach that builds upon the strength of each geochronologic method. Whereas the radioisotopic data provide an age with a well-defined uncertainty for each bentonite, the orbital time scale yields a more highly resolved estimate of the duration between stratigraphic horizons, including the radioisotopically dated beds. The Bayesian algorithm yields a C/T time scale that is statistically compatible with the astrochronologic and radioisotopic data

  10. Effect of night time-intervals, height of traps and lunar phases on sand fly collection in a highly endemic area for canine leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Gaglio, Gabriella; Brianti, Emanuele; Napoli, Ettore; Falsone, Luigi; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Tarallo, Viviana D; Otranto, Domenico; Giannetto, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    The activity of phlebotomine sand flies was monitored in a sub-urban area of Sicily in order to acquire data on seasonality and to elucidate the effect of the night time-intervals, height of traps from ground and lunar phases on the abundance of the capture. The study was conducted in the farm of the University of Messina (Italy). Light traps were placed as in the following: biweekly, from dusk to dawn, and from May to November; for three consecutive nights from 18:00 to 6:00, with the net bag being changed every 2h; for 30 days, at different heights from 18:00 to 6:00. A total of five species (i.e., Phlebotomus perniciosus, Phlebotomus neglectus, Phlebotomus sergenti, Phlebotomus perfiliewi, and Sergentomyia minuta), three of which are proven vectors of Leishmania infantum, were captured. The most abundant species was P. perniciosus (73.3%) followed by S. minuta (23.3%). The highest number of phlebotomine sand flies was collected in August and September with a peak of collection recorded in the evening (i.e., from 20:01 to 22.00). The number of phlebotomine sand flies collected at 50cm above the ground was significantly higher (P=0.041) than that captured at 150cm. Results of this study shed light on the ecology of main phlebotomine species in the Mediterranean area, and on the influence of some factors, such as time and height of traps, on the light trap capture efficiency.

  11. Effect of night time-intervals, height of traps and lunar phases on sand fly collection in a highly endemic area for canine leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Gaglio, Gabriella; Brianti, Emanuele; Napoli, Ettore; Falsone, Luigi; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Tarallo, Viviana D; Otranto, Domenico; Giannetto, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    The activity of phlebotomine sand flies was monitored in a sub-urban area of Sicily in order to acquire data on seasonality and to elucidate the effect of the night time-intervals, height of traps from ground and lunar phases on the abundance of the capture. The study was conducted in the farm of the University of Messina (Italy). Light traps were placed as in the following: biweekly, from dusk to dawn, and from May to November; for three consecutive nights from 18:00 to 6:00, with the net bag being changed every 2h; for 30 days, at different heights from 18:00 to 6:00. A total of five species (i.e., Phlebotomus perniciosus, Phlebotomus neglectus, Phlebotomus sergenti, Phlebotomus perfiliewi, and Sergentomyia minuta), three of which are proven vectors of Leishmania infantum, were captured. The most abundant species was P. perniciosus (73.3%) followed by S. minuta (23.3%). The highest number of phlebotomine sand flies was collected in August and September with a peak of collection recorded in the evening (i.e., from 20:01 to 22.00). The number of phlebotomine sand flies collected at 50cm above the ground was significantly higher (P=0.041) than that captured at 150cm. Results of this study shed light on the ecology of main phlebotomine species in the Mediterranean area, and on the influence of some factors, such as time and height of traps, on the light trap capture efficiency. PMID:24561074

  12. Mood and selective attention in the cold: the effect of interval versus continuous exercise.

    PubMed

    Muller, Matthew D; Muller, Sarah M; Kim, Chul-Ho; Ryan, Edward J; Gunstad, John; Glickman, Ellen L

    2011-07-01

    Both mood and cognitive function are altered in cold environments. Body warming through exercise may improve Stroop interference score and lessen total negative mood. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of equal caloric bouts of interval (INT) and continuous (CONT) exercise on mood and selective attention in the cold. Eleven young men underwent two experimental trials in 5°C air. Both trials consisted of 90 min acute cold exposure (ACE), 30 min exercise (INT vs. CONT), and 60 min recovery (REC). The Profile of Mood States (POMS) and Stroop Color Word Test (SCWT) were administered at four time points. Mean body temperature decreased during ACE, increased during exercise, and decreased during REC. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a main effect for time for several of the POMS sub scores. In particular, negative mood was significantly decreased after exercise relative to ACE and then significantly increased during REC. Further, CONT appears to be more effective than INT at decreasing negative mood. Components of the SCWT supported both the arousal and distraction theories for simple perception, but no significant effects were shown for the interference score. In the cold, exercise decreases negative mood but does not appear to affect selective attention. Further mechanistic studies could determine the best mode and intensity of exercise for improving cognitive function in the cold. PMID:21152931

  13. Multichannel interval timer (MINT)

    SciTech Connect

    Kimball, K.B.

    1982-06-01

    A prototype Multichannel INterval Timer (MINT) has been built for measuring signal Time of Arrival (TOA) from sensors placed in blast environments. The MINT is intended to reduce the space, equipment costs, and data reduction efforts associated with traditional analog TOA recording methods, making it more practical to field the large arrays of TOA sensors required to characterize blast environments. This document describes the MINT design features, provides the information required for installing and operating the system, and presents proposed improvements for the next generation system.

  14. Effect of background region of interest and time-interval selection on glomerular filtration ratio estimation by percentage dose uptake of (99m)Tc-DTPA in comparison with (51)Cr-EDTA clearance in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Debruyn, Katrien; Vandermeulen, Eva; Saunders, Jimmy H; Dobbeleir, André A; Ham, Hamphrey R; Peremans, Kathelijne

    2013-08-01

    Evaluation of glomerular function is a useful part of the diagnostic approach in animals suspected of having renal disease. Time-interval and background region of interest (bg ROI) selection are determining factors when calculating the glomerular filtration ratio (GFR) based on percentage uptake of (99m)technetium-labelled diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid ((99m)Tc-DTPA). Therefore, three different time intervals (60-120 s, 120-180 s, 60-180 s) and three different bg ROIs (C-shape, caudolateral, cranial + caudal) were investigated. In addition, global GFRs based on percentage dose uptake of (99m)Tc-DTPA for the different time-intervals and bg ROIs were compared with the global GFR based on (51)chromium-ethylene diaminic tetra-acetic acid ((51)Cr-EDTA) plasma clearance in nine healthy European domestic shorthair cats. Paired Student's t-tests and linear regression analysis were used to analyse the data. Different time intervals seemed to cause significant variation (P <0.01) in absolute GFR values, regardless of the choice of bg ROI. Significant differences (P <0.01) between bg ROIs were only observed in the 120-180s time interval between the C-shape and cranial + caudal bg ROI, and between the caudolateral and cranial + caudal bg ROI. The caudolateral bg ROI in the 60-180 s time interval showed the highest correlation coefficient (r = 0.882) between (99m)Tc-DTPA and (51)Cr-EDTA, although a significant difference (P <0.05) was present between both techniques. PMID:23349527

  15. The effect of acidosis on the interval-force relation and mechanical restitution in ferret papillary muscle.

    PubMed

    McCall, E; Orchard, C H

    1991-01-01

    1. The effect of a respiratory acidosis on the interval-force relation and on mechanical restitution was investigated in ferret papillary muscles. 2. Acidosis (pH 6.85) decreased developed force over a range of stimulation frequencies (1.0.06 Hz); the percentage decrease was greatest at the lowest stimulation frequencies. Qualitatively similar effects of acidosis on developed force were observed in the presence of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) inhibitor ryanodine. 3. Mechanical restitution curves were constructed by interpolating extra-systoles at different test intervals following a train of steady-state beats. Mechanical restitution in ferret papillary muscle was triphasic: an initial, rapid, exponential increase in force with test intervals to 2 s, a further increase with test intervals between 60 and 90 s and then a slow decline, with a plateau at about 30 min (0.33 Hz, 30 degrees C). 4. Acidosis slowed the initial phase of mechanical restitution. The degree of slowing depended on the steady-state stimulation frequency, being greatest at low frequencies. 5. Inhibition of the SR abolished the initial phase of mechanical restitution, suggesting that this phase depends on Ca2+ release from the SR. 6. The strength of the first contraction after the extra-systole varied inversely with the size of the extra-systole under all conditions studied. 7. It is concluded that acidosis may inhibit the SR by altering the time required for Ca2+ recycling between contractions. This effect may alter Ca2+ release from the SR during acidosis, and may underlie the mechanical alternans (the alternation of small and large contractions) that can occur during acidosis.

  16. The theoretical aspects of the time dependent Z equation as a means of postmortem interval estimation using body temperature data only.

    PubMed

    Green, M A; Wright, J C

    1985-05-01

    It has been clearly demonstrated that the rectal cooling curve does not obey Newton's Law, which is exponential. The first success in modelling rectal cooling mathematically was achieved by Marshall and Hoare [1]. An amendment was made to the simple exponential curve which led to a good mathematical model, exhibiting the three main sections of rectal cooling, i.e. lag, linear and quasi-exponential. The resultant method of postmortem interval estimation required a knowledge of the body mass and height. The present study has led to a totally different amendment to Newton's Law, which provides a means of postmortem interval estimation from body temperature data only. The derivation of the method, with a background on Newton's Law follows.

  17. Sleep Deprivation and Time-on-Task Performance Decrement in the Rat Psychomotor Vigilance Task

    PubMed Central

    Oonk, Marcella; Davis, Christopher J.; Krueger, James M.; Wisor, Jonathan P.; Van Dongen, Hans P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: The rat psychomotor vigilance task (rPVT) was developed as a rodent analog of the human psychomotor vigilance task (hPVT). We examined whether rPVT performance displays time-on-task effects similar to those observed on the hPVT. Design: The rPVT requires rats to respond to a randomly presented light stimulus to obtain a water reward. Rats were water deprived for 22 h prior to each 30-min rPVT session to motivate performance. We analyzed rPVT performance over time on task and as a function of the response-stimulus interval, at baseline and after sleep deprivation. Setting: The study was conducted in an academic research vivarium. Participants: Male Long-Evans rats were trained to respond to a 0.5 sec stimulus light within 3 sec of stimulus onset. Complete data were available for n = 20 rats. Interventions: Rats performed the rPVT for 30 min at baseline and after 24 h total sleep deprivation by gentle handling. Measurements and Results: Compared to baseline, sleep deprived rats displayed increased performance lapses and premature responses, similar to hPVT lapses of attention and false starts. However, in contrast to hPVT performance, the time-on-task performance decrement was not significantly enhanced by sleep deprivation. Moreover, following sleep deprivation, rPVT response times were not consistently increased after short response-stimulus intervals. Conclusions: The rat psychomotor vigilance task manifests similarities to the human psychomotor vigilance task in global performance outcomes, but not in post-sleep deprivation effects of time on task and response-stimulus interval. Citation: Oonk M, Davis CJ, Krueger JM, Wisor JP, Van Dongen HPA. Sleep deprivation and time-on-task performance decrement in the rat psychomotor vigilance task. SLEEP 2015;38(3):445–451. PMID:25515099

  18. Effects of time of suckling during the solar day on duration of the postpartum anovulatory interval in Brahman x Hereford (F1) cows.

    PubMed

    Gazal, O S; Guzman-Vega, G A; Williams, G L

    1999-05-01

    Previously published reports have indicated that postpartum anovulatory intervals can be markedly reduced and rebreeding performance enhanced in Bos taurus cows by eliminating nighttime suckling. We sought to confirm this hypothesis by examining the effects of day, nighttime, and ad libitum suckling on suckling behavior of calves, duration of the postpartum anovulatory interval, and pregnancy rates in 45 fall-calving Brahman x Hereford (F1) cows. Beginning on d 9 to 12 postpartum, calves were removed from lactating cows from 0700 to 1900 (Night-Suckled, n = 15) or from 1900 to 0700 (Day-Suckled, n = 15), or remained with their dams continuously (Ad Libitum-Suckled, n = 15). Cows in each group were maintained with fertile Angus bulls from d 10 postpartum until the first normal luteal phase or 100 d postpartum, whichever occurred first. Cows were observed for estrous behavior twice daily, and jugular blood samples were collected twice weekly for the determination of serum progesterone concentration. Mean number of suckling episodes per 24 h was greater (P < .0001) for the Ad Libitum-Suckled group than either Night- or Day-Suckled groups (5.9+/-.42 vs 3.8+/-.14, and 3.9+/-.32, respectively). Hourly analysis of suckling episodes in the Ad Libitum group indicated that they were not skewed toward a particular period, with suckling occurring at a periodicity of 4 to 6 h. Intervals to the first rise in progesterone > or = 1 ng/mL (32+/-2.5, 32+/-4.5, and 31+/-1.7 d, respectively), first normal luteal phase (38+/-3.1, 38+/-3.8, and 37+/-2.5 d, respectively), and first estrus (43+/-3.5, 40+/-3.9, and 36+/-1.1 d, respectively) did not differ (P > .05) among the three groups. Similarly, cumulative pregnancy rates within 100 d after calving did not differ (P > .05). These results in Bos indicus x Bos taurus (F1) cattle do not support the previous conclusions in Bos taurus that eliminating nighttime suckling reduces the postpartum anovulatory interval. PMID:10340568

  19. Evaluation of timings and outcomes in category-one caesarean sections: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Clare Newton; Zhang, Qianpian; Sia, Josh Tjunrong; Assam, Pryseley Nkouibert; Tagore, Shephali; Sng, Ban Leong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: A decision-to-delivery interval (DDI) of 30 min for category-one caesarean section (CS) deliveries is the standard of practice recommended by clinical guidelines. Our institution established a protocol for category-one (‘crash’) CS to expedite deliveries. The aim of this study is to evaluate DDI, factors that affect DDI and the mode of anaesthesia for category-one CS. Methods: This retrospective cohort study evaluated 390 women who underwent category-one CS in a tertiary obstetric centre. We analysed the factors associated with DDI, mode of anaesthesia and perinatal outcomes. Summary statistics were performed for the outcomes. The association factors were considered significant at P < 0.05. Results: The mean (standard deviation) DDI was 9.4 (3.2) min with all deliveries achieved within 30 min. The longest factor in the DDI was time taken to transfer patients. A shorter DDI was not significantly associated with improved perinatal outcomes. The majority (88.9%) of women had general anaesthesia (GA) for category-one CS. Of those who had an epidural catheter already in situ (34.4%), 25.6% had successful epidural extension. GA was associated with shorter DDI, but worse perinatal outcomes than regional anaesthesia (RA). Conclusions: Our ‘crash’ CS protocol achieved 100% of deliveries within 30 min. The majority (88.9%) of the patients had GA for category-one CS. GA was found to be associated with shorter anaesthesia and operation times, but poorer perinatal outcomes compared to RA. PMID:27601736

  20. Evaluation of timings and outcomes in category-one caesarean sections: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Clare Newton; Zhang, Qianpian; Sia, Josh Tjunrong; Assam, Pryseley Nkouibert; Tagore, Shephali; Sng, Ban Leong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: A decision-to-delivery interval (DDI) of 30 min for category-one caesarean section (CS) deliveries is the standard of practice recommended by clinical guidelines. Our institution established a protocol for category-one (‘crash’) CS to expedite deliveries. The aim of this study is to evaluate DDI, factors that affect DDI and the mode of anaesthesia for category-one CS. Methods: This retrospective cohort study evaluated 390 women who underwent category-one CS in a tertiary obstetric centre. We analysed the factors associated with DDI, mode of anaesthesia and perinatal outcomes. Summary statistics were performed for the outcomes. The association factors were considered significant at P < 0.05. Results: The mean (standard deviation) DDI was 9.4 (3.2) min with all deliveries achieved within 30 min. The longest factor in the DDI was time taken to transfer patients. A shorter DDI was not significantly associated with improved perinatal outcomes. The majority (88.9%) of women had general anaesthesia (GA) for category-one CS. Of those who had an epidural catheter already in situ (34.4%), 25.6% had successful epidural extension. GA was associated with shorter DDI, but worse perinatal outcomes than regional anaesthesia (RA). Conclusions: Our ‘crash’ CS protocol achieved 100% of deliveries within 30 min. The majority (88.9%) of the patients had GA for category-one CS. GA was found to be associated with shorter anaesthesia and operation times, but poorer perinatal outcomes compared to RA.

  1. EVALUATION OF SPRING OPERATED RELIEF VALVE MAINTENANCE INTERVALS AND EXTENSION OF MAINTENANCE TIMES USING A WEIBULL ANALYSIS WITH MODIFIED BAYESIAN UPDATING

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.; Gross, R.; Mitchell, E.

    2011-01-18

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) spring operated pressure relief valve (SORV) maintenance intervals were evaluated using an approach provided by the American Petroleum Institute (API RP 581) for risk-based inspection technology (RBI). In addition, the impact of extending the inspection schedule was evaluated using Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS). The API RP 581 approach is characterized as a Weibull analysis with modified Bayesian updating provided by SRS SORV proof testing experience. Initial Weibull parameter estimates were updated as per SRS's historical proof test records contained in the Center for Chemical Process Safety (CCPS) Process Equipment Reliability Database (PERD). The API RP 581 methodology was used to estimate the SORV's probability of failing on demand (PFD), and the annual expected risk. The API RP 581 methodology indicates that the current SRS maintenance plan is conservative. Cost savings may be attained in certain mild service applications that present low PFD and overall risk. Current practices are reviewed and recommendations are made for extending inspection intervals. The paper gives an illustration of the inspection costs versus the associated risks by using API RP 581 Risk Based Inspection (RBI) Technology. A cost effective maintenance frequency balancing both financial risk and inspection cost is demonstrated.

  2. Pavlovian conditioning of morphine hyperthermia: assessment of interstimulus interval and CS-US overlap.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, J; Cunningham, C L

    1996-07-01

    The present study examined the effect of interstimulus interval on acquisition of conditioned thermal responses produced by trials in which a light/noise stimulus (CS) was repeatedly paired with infusion of morphine sulphate (US). Rats were implanted with a chronic intravenous catheter for drug delivery and a biotelemetry device for remote monitoring of core body temperature. In experiment 1, different groups received morphine either 0.5 (group P0.5) or 15 min (group P15) after onset of the 15-min CS. A third group was exposed to an identical number of CS and US presentations but in an explicitly unpaired manner (group UP). After repeated exposure to morphine, all groups showed a more rapid rise in body temperature in response to drug infusion. Test presentations of CS alone revealed conditioned hyperthermic responses to CS in groups P0.5 and P15. However, the response of the P15 group was smaller than that of the P0.5 group, suggesting weaker conditioning at the longer interstimulus interval. The contribution of CS-US overlap to the diminished associative strength observed in the P15 group was assessed in experiment 2. Groups P0.5/15 and P0.5/30 received infusions of morphine 0.5 min after onset of a 15- or 30-min CS, respectively. Group P15/30 received morphine 15 min after onset of a 30 min CS, whereas group UP/30 received explicitly unpaired presentations of the US and a 30-min CS. Enhancement of the hyperthermic effect of morphine was observed in all groups after ten conditioning trials. Test presentations of the CS without drug revealed that all paired groups had acquired conditioned hyperthermic responses. These results support the conclusion that drug-induced conditioning can occur at relatively long interstimulus intervals when there is sufficient temporal overlap between the CS and unconditioned response evoked by the drug US.

  3. Delivery times for caesarean section at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi: is a 30-minute 'informed to start of operative delivery time' achievable?

    PubMed

    O'Regan, M

    2003-08-01

    A timesheet questionnaire was used to assess the time it took from informing the anaesthetist about a case to the start of operative delivery in 78 consecutive patients undergoing caesarean section. Median (IQR [range]) times for grade-1 cases (immediate threat to the life of the mother or fetus) and grade-2 cases (fetal or maternal compromise without immediate threat to life) were 20 (17-35 [6-75]) min and 41 (27-60 [17-136]) min, respectively. Delays occurred in all the component time intervals examined. The primary avoidable delay was the patient's late arrival in theatre. Many significant delays were apparently not perceived by the anaesthetist. In nine (69%) grade-1 cases, the 30-min target decreed by the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain & Ireland and the Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association was achieved.

  4. Updating representations of temporal intervals.

    PubMed

    Danckert, James; Anderson, Britt

    2015-12-01

    Effectively engaging with the world depends on accurate representations of the regularities that make up that world-what we call mental models. The success of any mental model depends on the ability to adapt to changes-to 'update' the model. In prior work, we have shown that damage to the right hemisphere of the brain impairs the ability to update mental models across a range of tasks. Given the disparate nature of the tasks we have employed in this prior work (i.e. statistical learning, language acquisition, position priming, perceptual ambiguity, strategic game play), we propose that a cognitive module important for updating mental representations should be generic, in the sense that it is invoked across multiple cognitive and perceptual domains. To date, the majority of our tasks have been visual in nature. Given the ubiquity and import of temporal information in sensory experience, we examined the ability to build and update mental models of time. We had healthy individuals complete a temporal prediction task in which intervals were initially drawn from one temporal range before an unannounced switch to a different range of intervals. Separate groups had the second range of intervals switch to one that contained either longer or shorter intervals than the first range. Both groups showed significant positive correlations between perceptual and prediction accuracy. While each group updated mental models of temporal intervals, those exposed to shorter intervals did so more efficiently. Our results support the notion of generic capacity to update regularities in the environment-in this instance based on temporal information. The task developed here is well suited to investigations in neurological patients and in neuroimaging settings.

  5. Updating representations of temporal intervals.

    PubMed

    Danckert, James; Anderson, Britt

    2015-12-01

    Effectively engaging with the world depends on accurate representations of the regularities that make up that world-what we call mental models. The success of any mental model depends on the ability to adapt to changes-to 'update' the model. In prior work, we have shown that damage to the right hemisphere of the brain impairs the ability to update mental models across a range of tasks. Given the disparate nature of the tasks we have employed in this prior work (i.e. statistical learning, language acquisition, position priming, perceptual ambiguity, strategic game play), we propose that a cognitive module important for updating mental representations should be generic, in the sense that it is invoked across multiple cognitive and perceptual domains. To date, the majority of our tasks have been visual in nature. Given the ubiquity and import of temporal information in sensory experience, we examined the ability to build and update mental models of time. We had healthy individuals complete a temporal prediction task in which intervals were initially drawn from one temporal range before an unannounced switch to a different range of intervals. Separate groups had the second range of intervals switch to one that contained either longer or shorter intervals than the first range. Both groups showed significant positive correlations between perceptual and prediction accuracy. While each group updated mental models of temporal intervals, those exposed to shorter intervals did so more efficiently. Our results support the notion of generic capacity to update regularities in the environment-in this instance based on temporal information. The task developed here is well suited to investigations in neurological patients and in neuroimaging settings. PMID:26303026

  6. Remarks on solving the one-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation on the interval ?: the case of a quantum bouncer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembinski, S. T.; Wolniewicz, L.

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that the 1D Hamiltonian, which is a sum of operators which generate a finite nilpotent Lie algebra and depends explicitly on time existing closed form solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, cannot fulfil in general boundary and normalization conditions on a positive semi-axis. An explanation of the controversy surrounding the solutions of the quantum bouncer model, which appeared recently in the literature, is given.

  7. Interval neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, R.B.

    1995-05-01

    Traditional neural networks like multi-layered perceptrons (MLP) use example patterns, i.e., pairs of real-valued observation vectors, ({rvec x},{rvec y}), to approximate function {cflx f}({rvec x}) = {rvec y}. To determine the parameters of the approximation, a special version of the gradient descent method called back-propagation is widely used. In many situations, observations of the input and output variables are not precise; instead, we usually have intervals of possible values. The imprecision could be due to the limited accuracy of the measuring instrument or could reflect genuine uncertainty in the observed variables. In such situation input and output data consist of mixed data types; intervals and precise numbers. Function approximation in interval domains is considered in this paper. We discuss a modification of the classical backpropagation learning algorithm to interval domains. Results are presented with simple examples demonstrating few properties of nonlinear interval mapping as noise resistance and finding set of solutions to the function approximation problem.

  8. Comparative evaluation of the calcium release from mineral trioxide aggregate and its mixture with glass ionomer cement in different proportions and time intervals – An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Surbhi; Vivekananda Pai, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Addition of glass ionomer cement (GIC) has been suggested to improve the setting time and handling characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). This study evaluated the effect of adding GIC to MTA in terms of calcium release, an issue that has not been previously studied. Materials and methods The study comprised four groups with five samples each: a control group of MTA alone and experimental groups I (1MTA:1GIC), II (2MTA:1GIC), and III (1MTA:2GIC) based on the mixture of MTA and GIC powders in the respective proportions by volume. Calcium release from the samples was measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry at 15 min, 6 h, 24 h, and 1 week after setting. The level of statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results Groups I (1MTA:1GIC) and III (1MTA:2GIC) released significantly less calcium than the control group at all time periods, except at 15 min for group I. Group II (2MTA:1GIC) showed no significant difference in calcium release compared to the control at any time period. Group II exhibited greater calcium release than group I or III at all time periods, with significant differences between groups I and II at 1 week and between groups I and III at 24 h and 1 week. There were no statistical differences in calcium release between groups I and III. Conclusions Adding GIC to improve the setting time and handling properties of the MTA powder can be detrimental to the calcium-releasing ability of the resultant mixture, depending on the proportion of GIC added. Adding MTA and GIC at a proportion of 2:1 by volume did not impact calcium release from the mixture. These findings should be verified through further clinical studies. PMID:26644757

  9. Duration of First Off-Treatment Interval Is Prognostic for Time to Castration Resistance and Death in Men With Biochemical Relapse of Prostate Cancer Treated on a Prospective Trial of Intermittent Androgen Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Evan Y.; Gulati, Roman; Telesca, Donatello; Jiang, Peter; Tam, Stephen; Russell, Kenneth J.; Nelson, Peter S.; Etzioni, Ruth D.; Higano, Celestia S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This was an exploratory analysis of a trial of intermittent androgen deprivation (IAD) in men with biochemical relapse (BR) to establish first cycle characteristics prognostic for progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and death. Patients and Methods Men with BR of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy (RP) or radiation (RT) were treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) comprised of leuprolide and flutamide. After 9 months on treatment, ADT was stopped, and monthly prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were observed during the off-treatment interval. When the PSA reached a threshold value (1 ng/mL for RP, 4 ng/mL for RT), ADT was resumed in a new cycle. Patients were treated intermittently in this manner until CRPC, which was defined as ≥ two consecutive increasing PSA values while on ADT with castrate testosterone levels. Results Seventy-two of 100 patients enrolled onto the study met criteria for this analysis. The duration of the first off-treatment interval (≤ v > 40 weeks) was associated with shorter time to CRPC (hazard ratio = 2.9; 95% CI, 1.1 to 7.7; P = .03) and death (hazard ratio = 3.8; 95% CI, 1.1 to 13.6; P = .04) after adjusting for age, stage, grade, and PSA at diagnosis. Conclusion In patients who completed the first cycle of IAD, a duration of the first off-treatment interval of ≤ 40 weeks defines a subset of patients at higher risk of CRPC and death. Conversely, patients with an off-treatment interval of more than 40 weeks have a significantly better long-term prognosis. PMID:20421544

  10. Intervals in evolutionary algorithms for global optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, R.B.

    1995-05-01

    Optimization is of central concern to a number of disciplines. Interval Arithmetic methods for global optimization provide us with (guaranteed) verified results. These methods are mainly restricted to the classes of objective functions that are twice differentiable and use a simple strategy of eliminating a splitting larger regions of search space in the global optimization process. An efficient approach that combines the efficient strategy from Interval Global Optimization Methods and robustness of the Evolutionary Algorithms is proposed. In the proposed approach, search begins with randomly created interval vectors with interval widths equal to the whole domain. Before the beginning of the evolutionary process, fitness of these interval parameter vectors is defined by evaluating the objective function at the center of the initial interval vectors. In the subsequent evolutionary process the local optimization process returns an estimate of the bounds of the objective function over the interval vectors. Though these bounds may not be correct at the beginning due to large interval widths and complicated function properties, the process of reducing interval widths over time and a selection approach similar to simulated annealing helps in estimating reasonably correct bounds as the population evolves. The interval parameter vectors at these estimated bounds (local optima) are then subjected to crossover and mutation operators. This evolutionary process continues for predetermined number of generations in the search of the global optimum.

  11. Timing of HPV vaccine intervals among United States teens with consideration to the current ACIP schedule and the WHO 2-dose schedule.

    PubMed

    Cloessner, Emily A; Stokley, Shannon; Yankey, David; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2016-06-01

    The current recommendation for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in the United States is for 3 doses to be administered over a 6 month period. In April 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended adoption of a 2-dose schedule, with doses spaced a minimum of 6 months apart, for teens who begin the series before age 15. We analyzed data from the 2013 National Immunization Survey-Teen to examine the timing of second and third dose receipt among US adolescents. All analyses were restricted to adolescents age 13-17 y who had adequate provider data. The Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test measured differences in time to receive vaccine doses among demographic and socioeconomic groups. Logistic regression identified socioeconomic characteristics associated with receiving the second dose of HPV vaccine at least 6 months after the first dose. The median time for teens to receive the second dose of HPV vaccine was 2.6 months after the first dose, and the median time to receive the third dose was 4.9 months after the second dose. Minority teens and teens living below the poverty level took significantly longer to receive doses. Among teens that initiated the HPV vaccine series before age 15 y, 28.6% received the second dose at least 6 months after the first dose. If these teens, who met the WHO criteria for up-to-date HPV vaccination, were classified as having completed the vaccination series, overall coverage in the US would increase 3.9 percentage points, with African American and Hispanic teens having the greatest increases in coverage.

  12. Timing of HPV vaccine intervals among United States teens with consideration to the current ACIP schedule and the WHO 2-dose schedule.

    PubMed

    Cloessner, Emily A; Stokley, Shannon; Yankey, David; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2016-06-01

    The current recommendation for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in the United States is for 3 doses to be administered over a 6 month period. In April 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended adoption of a 2-dose schedule, with doses spaced a minimum of 6 months apart, for teens who begin the series before age 15. We analyzed data from the 2013 National Immunization Survey-Teen to examine the timing of second and third dose receipt among US adolescents. All analyses were restricted to adolescents age 13-17 y who had adequate provider data. The Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test measured differences in time to receive vaccine doses among demographic and socioeconomic groups. Logistic regression identified socioeconomic characteristics associated with receiving the second dose of HPV vaccine at least 6 months after the first dose. The median time for teens to receive the second dose of HPV vaccine was 2.6 months after the first dose, and the median time to receive the third dose was 4.9 months after the second dose. Minority teens and teens living below the poverty level took significantly longer to receive doses. Among teens that initiated the HPV vaccine series before age 15 y, 28.6% received the second dose at least 6 months after the first dose. If these teens, who met the WHO criteria for up-to-date HPV vaccination, were classified as having completed the vaccination series, overall coverage in the US would increase 3.9 percentage points, with African American and Hispanic teens having the greatest increases in coverage. PMID:26587886

  13. Effect of Androctonus bicolor scorpion venom on serum electrolytes in rats: A 24-h time-course study.

    PubMed

    Al-Asmari, A; Khan, H A; Manthiri, R A

    2016-03-01

    Black fat-tailed scorpion (Androctonus bicolor) belongs to the family Buthidae and is one of the most venomous scorpions in the world. The effects of A. bicolor venom on serum electrolytes were not known and therefore investigated in this study. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into seven groups with five animals in each group. One of the groups served as control and received vehicle only. The animals in the remaining groups received a single subcutaneous injection of crude A. bicolor venom (200 μg/kg bodyweight) and were killed at different time intervals including 30 min, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h, and 24 h after venom injection. The results showed that scorpion venom caused significant increase in serum sodium levels within 30 min after injection which slightly subsided after 1 h and then persisted over 24 h. Serum potassium levels continued to significantly increase until 4 h and then slightly subsided. There were significant decreases in serum magnesium (Mg(+)) levels following scorpion venom injection, at all the time points during the course of study. Serum calcium levels were significantly increased during the entire course of study, whereas serum chloride was significantly decreased. In conclusion, A. bicolor envenomation in rats caused severe and persistent hypomagnesemia with accompanied hypernatremia, hyperkalemia, and hypercalcemia. It is important to measure serum Mg(+) levels in victims of scorpion envenomation, and patients with severe Mg(+) deficiency should be treated accordingly.

  14. Effect of Androctonus bicolor scorpion venom on serum electrolytes in rats: A 24-h time-course study.

    PubMed

    Al-Asmari, A; Khan, H A; Manthiri, R A

    2016-03-01

    Black fat-tailed scorpion (Androctonus bicolor) belongs to the family Buthidae and is one of the most venomous scorpions in the world. The effects of A. bicolor venom on serum electrolytes were not known and therefore investigated in this study. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into seven groups with five animals in each group. One of the groups served as control and received vehicle only. The animals in the remaining groups received a single subcutaneous injection of crude A. bicolor venom (200 μg/kg bodyweight) and were killed at different time intervals including 30 min, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h, and 24 h after venom injection. The results showed that scorpion venom caused significant increase in serum sodium levels within 30 min after injection which slightly subsided after 1 h and then persisted over 24 h. Serum potassium levels continued to significantly increase until 4 h and then slightly subsided. There were significant decreases in serum magnesium (Mg(+)) levels following scorpion venom injection, at all the time points during the course of study. Serum calcium levels were significantly increased during the entire course of study, whereas serum chloride was significantly decreased. In conclusion, A. bicolor envenomation in rats caused severe and persistent hypomagnesemia with accompanied hypernatremia, hyperkalemia, and hypercalcemia. It is important to measure serum Mg(+) levels in victims of scorpion envenomation, and patients with severe Mg(+) deficiency should be treated accordingly. PMID:25964378

  15. Geochemistry and Cyclostratigraphy of Magnetic Susceptibility data from the Frasnian-Famennian event interval in western Canada: Insights in the pattern and timing of a biotic crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, M. T.; De Vleeschouwer, D.; Sliwinski, M. G.; Claeys, P. F.; Day, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Cyclostratigraphic calibration of magnetic susceptibility data along with stable isotopic and geochemical proxy data for redox, productivity, and detrital input from western Canada provide insight into the pace and timing of the Late Devonian, Frasnian-Famennian (F-F) biotic crisis. Two organic-rich shales that, in much of the world, display geochemical anomalies indicating low oxygen conditions and carbon burial characterize the F-F event. These events, referred to as the Lower and Upper Kellwasser events (LKE & UKE), have been linked to the evolutionary expansion of deeply rooted terrestrial forests and the concomitant changes in soil development and chemical weathering and changes in Late Devonian climate. Our geochemical data record relatively high levels of redox sensitive trace metals (Mo, U, V), proxies for biological productivity (Ba, Cu, Ni, Zn), and detrital input (Al, Si, Ti, Zr) during both events. C stable isotopic data generated from organic matter records a 3-4‰ positive excursion during both events. Each event is recorded in lowstand and/or early transgressive facies. These data corroborate hypotheses about enhanced biological productivity, driven by heightened terrestrial detrital input, leading to low oxygen conditions and decreases in biotic diversity during during relatively low stands of Late Devonian sea level. Age dating of such events in deep time is problematic due to insufficient biochronologic control. Each event is within one conodont biostratigraphic zone, with durations on the order of 0.5-1.0 Ma. Time series analysis of high-resolution magnetic susceptibility data identified 16 long eccentricity cycles (405 ky) during the Frasnian stage and one in the earliest Famennian stage. The geochemical anomalies associated with the LKE and UKE are recorded over 7 and 14 m of stratigraphic section respectively. These strata represent only a portion of a 405 ky long eccentricity cycle and astronomical tuning implies that the LKE likely occurred

  16. Effects of food form and timing of ingestion on appetite and energy intake in lean and obese young adults

    PubMed Central

    RD, Mattes; WW, Campbell

    2009-01-01

    Objective Overweight and obesity have been attributed to increased eating frequency and the size of eating events. This study explored the influence of the timing of eating events and food form on appetite and daily energy intake. Design Cross-over, clinical intervention where participants consumed 300 kcal loads of a solid (apple), semi-solid (apple sauce) and beverage (apple juice) at a meal or 2 hours later (snack). Subjects Twenty normal weight (body mass index - BMI=22.6±1.8kg/m2) and 20 obese (BMI=32.3±1.5kg/m2) adults. There were 10 males and 10 females within each BMI group. Measurements On 6 occasions, participants reported to the laboratory at their customary midday meal time. Appetite questionnaires and motor skills tests were completed upon arrival and at 30min intervals for the 2 hours participants were in the laboratory and at 30min intervals for 4 hours after leaving the laboratory. Diet recalls were collected the next day. Data were collected between January of 2006 and June of 2007. Results Whether consumed with a meal or alone as a snack, the beverage elicited the weakest appetitive response, the solid food form elicited the strongest appetitive response and the semi-solid response was intermediate. The appetite shift was greatest for the solid food when consumed as a snack. The interval between test food consumption and the first spontaneous eating event >100 kcal was shortest for the beverage. No significant treatment effects were observed for test day energy intake or between lean and obese individuals. Conclusion Based on the appetitive findings, consumption of an energy-yielding beverage either with a meal or as a snack poses a greater risk for promoting positive energy than macronutrient-matched semi-solid or solid foods consumed at these times. PMID:19248858

  17. The interval order polytope of a digraph

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, R.; Schulz, A.

    1994-12-31

    Interval orders and their cocomparability graphs, the interval graphs, are of significant importance as structures of solutions for several combinatorial optimization problems. This is due to the fact that each element is associated with an interval, which may be interpreted as a time interval, for example in a schedule, or as a substring in a string of items, for example, a substring of a DNA string in molecular biology. In the talk we show that the interval order polytope of a digraph may serve as a basis for a polyhedral combinatorial approach to this class of problems. We present results on odd cycle and clique based valid inequalities and discuss the complexity of their separation problem. We show that well-known valid inequalities of the linear ordering polytope, as, e.g., Mobius ladder inequalities and fence inequalities obtain a natural interpretation in terms of these inequalities of the interval order polytope.

  18. Long-Term Habituation to Repeated Loud Noise Is Impaired by Relatively Short Interstressor Intervals in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Masini, Cher V.; Day, Heidi E. W.; Campeau, Serge

    2008-01-01

    The phenomenon of spaced (longer intertrial interval) compared with massed (shorter intertrial interval) training leading to better long-term habituation and associative learning is well documented. However, the effects of intertrial intervals on response habituation to repeated stress exposures have not been previously examined. The present experiments found that massed (six 30-min exposures of 95 dB white noise in 6 hr) and spaced (one 30-min exposure daily for 6 days) noise exposures led to similar habituation of plasma corticosterone and ACTH responses, heart rate, and core body temperature after the 6th exposure in male Sprague–Dawley rats. However, these habituated responses were not retained in the massed group on a similar noise re-exposure 48 hr later, compared with the spaced group. The habituated responses found in the massed group after the 6 noise exposures were not due to differential hearing threshold shifts, as examined with modifications of the acoustic startle reflex. These data indicate that relatively short interstressor intervals impair long-term stress adaptation. This series of studies supports the idea of distinct short- and long-term habituation processes to stress responsiveness. PMID:18298264

  19. Assessing uncertainty in reference intervals via tolerance intervals: application to a mixed model describing HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Katki, Hormuzd A; Engels, Eric A; Rosenberg, Philip S

    2005-10-30

    We define the reference interval as the range between the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles of a random variable. We use reference intervals to compare characteristics of a marker of disease progression between affected populations. We use a tolerance interval to assess uncertainty in the reference interval. Unlike the tolerance interval, the estimated reference interval does not contains the true reference interval with specified confidence (or credibility). The tolerance interval is easy to understand, communicate and visualize. We derive estimates of the reference interval and its tolerance interval for markers defined by features of a linear mixed model. Examples considered are reference intervals for time trends in HIV viral load, and CD4 per cent, in HIV-infected haemophiliac children and homosexual men. We estimate the intervals with likelihood methods and also develop a Bayesian model in which the parameters are estimated via Markov-chain Monte Carlo. The Bayesian formulation naturally overcomes some important limitations of the likelihood model. PMID:16189804

  20. Sleeping Pill Administration Time and Patient Subjective Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Seockhoon; Youn, Soyoung; Yi, Kikyoung; Park, Boram; Lee, Suyeon

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Taking hypnotic agents 30 min before bedtime is the usual suggested administration time, but some patients report dissatisfaction with their sleeping pills. We investigated whether the timing of sleeping pill administration influences patient subjective satisfaction with these drugs. Methods: One hundred twelve patients with primary insomnia currently taking benzodiazepine or nonbenzodiazepine gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonists as sleeping pills were selected. The time of administration for their sleeping pills, bedtime, sleep onset time, and wake up time were obtained from their medical records. Subjects were also categorized into satisfied or dissatisfied groups. Results: Hypnotic agents administration time (p < 0.001) and bedtime (p < 0.001), but not sleep onset or wake up time, occurred later in the night in the satisfied group. The durations from administration of pills to sleep onset (33.6 ± 20.7 min) and to wake up time (7.2 ± 1.2 h) were significantly shorter in the satisfied group when compared to the dissatisfied group (135.9 ± 73.4 min and 9.3 ± 1.5 h for time to sleep onset and wake up, respectively). Logistic regression analysis revealed that patient subjective satisfaction with hypnotic agents could be predicted by a short duration from administration of pills to sleep onset (odds ratio = 0.01; 95% confidence interval [0.001–0.09]) and a short duration from administration of pills to wake up time (0.53; [0.31–0.89], F = 49.9, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Taking sleeping pills at a later time and a shorter interval between pill administration and wake up time may increase patient subjective satisfaction with hypnotic agents. We propose that physicians advise patients to take sleeping pills approximately 7 h before their usual getting-out-of-bed time instead of the current standard of 30 min before bedtime. Citation: Chung S, Youn S, Yi K, Park B, Lee S. Sleeping pill administration time and patient subjective satisfaction. J

  1. Easy identification of generalized common and conserved nested intervals.

    PubMed

    de Montgolfier, Fabien; Raffinot, Mathieu; Rusu, Irena

    2014-07-01

    In this article we explain how to easily compute gene clusters, formalized by classical or generalized nested common or conserved intervals, between a set of K genomes represented as K permutations. A b-nested common (resp. conserved) interval I of size |I| is either an interval of size 1 or a common (resp. conserved) interval that contains another b-nested common (resp. conserved) interval of size at least |I|-b. When b=1, this corresponds to the classical notion of nested interval. We exhibit two simple algorithms to output all b-nested common or conserved intervals between K permutations in O(Kn+nocc) time, where nocc is the total number of such intervals. We also explain how to count all b-nested intervals in O(Kn) time. New properties of the family of conserved intervals are proposed to do so.

  2. Easy identification of generalized common and conserved nested intervals.

    PubMed

    de Montgolfier, Fabien; Raffinot, Mathieu; Rusu, Irena

    2014-07-01

    In this article we explain how to easily compute gene clusters, formalized by classical or generalized nested common or conserved intervals, between a set of K genomes represented as K permutations. A b-nested common (resp. conserved) interval I of size |I| is either an interval of size 1 or a common (resp. conserved) interval that contains another b-nested common (resp. conserved) interval of size at least |I|-b. When b=1, this corresponds to the classical notion of nested interval. We exhibit two simple algorithms to output all b-nested common or conserved intervals between K permutations in O(Kn+nocc) time, where nocc is the total number of such intervals. We also explain how to count all b-nested intervals in O(Kn) time. New properties of the family of conserved intervals are proposed to do so. PMID:24650221

  3. Real-time fluorescence microscopy monitoring of porphyrin biodistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimel, Sol; Gottfried, Varda; Kunzi-Rapp, Karin; Akguen, Nermin; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    1996-01-01

    In vivo uptake of the natural porphyrins, uroporphyrin III (UP), coproporphyrin III (CP) and protoporphyrin IX (PP), was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Experiments were performed using the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model, which allowed video documentation of fluorescence both in real time and after integration over a chosen time interval (usually 2 s). Sensitizers at a concentration of 50 (mu) M (100 (mu) L) were injected into a medium-sized vein (diameter approximately 40 micrometer) using an ultra-fine 10 micrometer diameter needle. Fluorescence images were quantitated by subtracting the fluorescence intensity of surrounding CAM tissue (Fmatrix) from the intravascular fluorescence intensity (Fintravascular), after transformation of the video frames into digital form. The differential fluorescence intensity, Fintravascular - Fmatrix, is a measure of the biodistribution. Real time measurements clearly showed that CP and UP fluorescence is associated with moving erythrocytes and not with endothelial cells of the vessel wall. Fluorescence intensity was monitored, up to 60 minutes after injection, by averaging the fluorescence over time intervals of 2 s and recording the integrated images. The fluorescence intensity reached its maximum in about 20 - 30 min after injection, presumably after monomerization inside erythrocyte membranes. The results are interpreted in terms of physical-chemical characteristics (e.g. hydrophilicity) and correlated with the photodynamically induced hemostasis in CAM blood vessels.

  4. Interval arithmetic operations for uncertainty analysis with correlated interval variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao; Fu, Chun-Ming; Ni, Bing-Yu; Han, Xu

    2016-08-01

    A new interval arithmetic method is proposed to solve interval functions with correlated intervals through which the overestimation problem existing in interval analysis could be significantly alleviated. The correlation between interval parameters is defined by the multidimensional parallelepiped model which is convenient to describe the correlative and independent interval variables in a unified framework. The original interval variables with correlation are transformed into the standard space without correlation, and then the relationship between the original variables and the standard interval variables is obtained. The expressions of four basic interval arithmetic operations, namely addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division, are given in the standard space. Finally, several numerical examples and a two-step bar are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. Interval-valued random functions and the kriging of intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, P.

    1988-04-01

    Estimation procedures using data that include some values known to lie within certain intervals are usually regarded as problems of constrained optimization. A different approach is used here. Intervals are treated as elements of a positive cone, obeying the arithmetic of interval analysis, and positive interval-valued random functions are discussed. A kriging formalism for interval-valued data is developed. It provides estimates that are themselves intervals. In this context, the condition that kriging weights be positive is seen to arise in a natural way. A numerical example is given, and the extension to universal kriging is sketched.

  6. Comparison of Polar® RS800G3™ heart rate monitor with Polar® S810i™ and electrocardiogram to obtain the series of RR intervals and analysis of heart rate variability at rest.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Marianne Penachini da Costa de Rezende; da Silva, Natália Turri; de Azevedo, Fábio Mícolis; Pastre, Carlos Marcelo; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2016-03-01

    The Polar® RS800G3™ rate monitor was released in the market to replace the Polar® S810i™, and few studies have assessed that the RR series obtained by this equipment is reliable for analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). We compared HRV indexes among the devices Polar® RS800G3™, Polar® S810i™ and eletrocardiogram (ECG) to know whether the series of Polar® RS800G3™ are as reliable as those devices already validated. We analysed data from 30 healthy young adults, male, with an average age of 20·66 ± 1·40 years, which had captured the heart rate beat to beat in the three devices simultaneously with spontaneously breathing, first in the supine position and subsequently sit both for 30 min. The obtained series of RR intervals was used to calculate the indexes of HRV in the time domain (SDNN and RMSSD) and in the frequency domain (LF, HF and LF/HF). There were no significant differences in HRV indexes calculated from series obtained by the three devices, regardless of the position analysed, and a high correlation coefficient was observed. The results suggest that the Polar® RS800G3™ is able to capture series of RR intervals for analysis of HRV indexes as reliable as those obtained by ECG and Polar® S810i™.

  7. Differences between capillary and venous blood-alcohol concentrations as a function of time after drinking, with emphasis on sampling variations in left vs right arm.

    PubMed

    Jones, A W; Jönsson, K A; Jorfeldt, L

    1989-03-01

    Twelve healthy men drank 0.8 g of ethanol per kilogram of body weight during 30 min after an overnight (10 h) fast. At nine exactly timed intervals (30-390 min after the start of drinking), blood was sampled through indwelling catheters in cubital veins on the left and right arms. Immediately thereafter, capillary blood was sampled from fingertips on the left and right hands. The blood ethanol concentration (BAC) was determined by headspace gas chromatography. The SD for alcohol determinations in venous blood, including the left vs right arm sampling variation, was 30 mg/L (range 8.3-83 mg/L), whereas for capillary blood the SD was 35 mg/L (range 11-60 mg/L). This difference much exceeded the purely analytical errors: SD = 2.67 mg/L for venous blood and 14.2 mg/L for fingertip blood. During the first 60 min after the subjects started to drink, capillary BAC exceeded venous BAC, the mean difference at 30 min being 136 mg/L (range 36-216 mg/L). In the postabsorptive state later than 60 min after drinking, venous BAC exceeded capillary BAC [mean difference 58 mg/L (range 0.0-170 mg/L]), the values for venous and capillary BAC crossing 37 min (range 6-77 min) after the end of drinking. Apparently, the source of blood analyzed, venous or capillary, must be considered in clinical pharmacokinetic studies of ethanol.

  8. Quantitative, Time-Resolved Proteomic Analysis by Combining Bioorthogonal Noncanonical Amino Acid Tagging and Pulsed Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture*

    PubMed Central

    Bagert, John D.; Xie, Yushu J.; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Qi, Yutao; Hess, Sonja; Schuman, Erin M.; Tirrell, David A.

    2014-01-01

    An approach to proteomic analysis that combines bioorthogonal noncanonical amino acid tagging (BONCAT) and pulsed stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (pSILAC) provides accurate quantitative information about rates of cellular protein synthesis on time scales of minutes. The method is capable of quantifying 1400 proteins produced by HeLa cells during a 30 min interval, a time scale that is inaccessible to isotope labeling techniques alone. Potential artifacts in protein quantification can be reduced to insignificant levels by limiting the extent of noncanonical amino acid tagging. We find no evidence for artifacts in protein identification in experiments that combine the BONCAT and pSILAC methods. PMID:24563536

  9. The microanalysis of fixed-interval responding

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, G. David; Weiss, Bernard; Laties, Victor G.

    1983-01-01

    The fixed-interval schedule of reinforcement is one of the more widely studied schedules in the experimental analysis of behavior and is also a common baseline for behavior pharmacology. Despite many intensive studies, the controlling variables and the pattern of behavior engendered are not well understood. The present study examined the microstructure and superstructure of the behavior engendered by a fixed-interval 5- and a fixed-interval 15-minute schedule of food reinforcement in the pigeon. Analysis of performance typical of fixed-interval responding indicated that the scalloped pattern does not result from smooth acceleration in responding, but, rather, from renewed pausing early in the interval. Individual interresponse-time (IRT) analyses provided no evidence of acceleration. There was a strong indication of alternation in shorter-longer IRTs, but these shorter-longer IRTs did not occur at random, reflecting instead a sequential dependency in successive IRTs. Furthermore, early in the interval there was a high relative frequency of short IRTs. Such a pattern of early pauses and short IRTs does not suggest behavior typical of reinforced responding as exemplified by the pattern found near the end of the interval. Thus, behavior from clearly scalloped performance can be classified into three states: postreinforcement pause, interim behavior, and terminal behavior. PMID:16812324

  10. Microanalysis of fixed-interval responding

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, G.D.; Weiss, B.; Laties, V.G.

    1983-03-01

    The fixed-interval schedule of reinforcement is one of the more widely studied schedules in the experimental analysis of behavior and is also a common baseline for behavior pharmacology. Despite many intensive studies, the controlling variables and the pattern of behavior engendered are not well understood. The present study examined the microstructure and superstructure of the behavior engendered by a fixed-interval 5- and a fixed-interval 15-minute schedule of food reinforcement in the pigeon. Analysis of performance typical of fixed-interval responding indicated that the scalloped pattern does not result from smooth acceleration in responding, but, rather, from renewed pausing early in the interval. Individual interresponse-time (IRT) analyses provided no evidence of acceleration. There was a strong indication of alternation is shorter-longer IRTs, but these shorter-longer IRTs did not occur at random, reflecting instead a sequential dependency in successive IRTs. Furthermore, early in the interval there was a high relative frequency of short IRTs. Such a pattern of early pauses and short IRTs does not suggest behavior typical of reinforced responding as exemplified by the pattern found near the end of the interval. Thus, behavior from clearly scalloped performance can be classified into three states: postreinforcement pause, interim behavior, and terminal behavior. 31 references, 11 figures, 4 tables.

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF SOURCES AND ESTIMATION OF EMISSION PROFILES FROM HIGHLY TIME-RESOLVED POLLUTANT MEASUREMENTS IN TAMPA, FL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerosol slurry samples were collected at 30-min intervals for sequential 1-month periods at each of two sites (Sydney and "Dairy") in the Tampa Bay area during the 2002 Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment using the University of Maryland Semicontinuous Elements in Aeros...

  12. New delay-interval stability condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Fernando O.; Palhares, Reinaldo M.

    2014-03-01

    The delay-dependent stability problem for systems with time-delay varying in an interval is addressed in this article. The new idea in this article is to connect two very efficient approaches: the discretised Lyapunov functional for systems with pointwise delay and the convex analysis for systems with time-varying delay. The proposed method is able to check the stability interval when the time-varying delay d(t) belongs to an interval [r, τ]. The case of unstable delayed systems for r = 0 is also treatable. The resulting criterion, expressed in terms of a convex optimisation problem, outperforms the existing ones in the literature, as illustrated by the numerical examples.

  13. An interval model updating strategy using interval response surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Sheng-En; Zhang, Qiu-Hu; Ren, Wei-Xin

    2015-08-01

    Stochastic model updating provides an effective way of handling uncertainties existing in real-world structures. In general, probabilistic theories, fuzzy mathematics or interval analyses are involved in the solution of inverse problems. However in practice, probability distributions or membership functions of structural parameters are often unavailable due to insufficient information of a structure. At this moment an interval model updating procedure shows its superiority in the aspect of problem simplification since only the upper and lower bounds of parameters and responses are sought. To this end, this study develops a new concept of interval response surface models for the purpose of efficiently implementing the interval model updating procedure. The frequent interval overestimation due to the use of interval arithmetic can be maximally avoided leading to accurate estimation of parameter intervals. Meanwhile, the establishment of an interval inverse problem is highly simplified, accompanied by a saving of computational costs. By this means a relatively simple and cost-efficient interval updating process can be achieved. Lastly, the feasibility and reliability of the developed method have been verified against a numerical mass-spring system and also against a set of experimentally tested steel plates.

  14. Memory of a choice direction in a T maze as measured by spontaneous alternation in mice: Effects of intertrial interval and reward.

    PubMed

    Jaffard, R; Dubois, M; Galey, D

    1981-03-01

    Spontaneous alternation in a T maze was studied as a one trial learning paradigm in mice of the BALB/c strain. In the first experiment the combined effects of time interval between the first and second trial (intertrial interval: ITI), food deprivation and feeding given during the first trial, were shown to affect performance. Thus, on the one hand, the percentage of spontaneous alternation decreased as ITI increased; on the other hand, food reward dramatically improved spontaneous alternation for the 24-h ITI, but had no significant effect for 30-sec and 1-h ITI. Since the effect of feeding might be due either to an increase of arousal, thus favoring input of informations associated with the first choice, or to an improvement in memory consolidation, a second experiment was aimed at testing the effect of food given after the first trial. It was shown that, as in the first experiment, post-trial feeding improved spontaneous alternation on the second trial given 24 hours later with a temporal gradient of effect less than 30 min. These results clearly showed that the reinforcement of run to one side (first trial) increased the tendency to go to the other side 24 hours later. It is concluded that reinforcement might have two distinct effects: (i) according to SR theory, reinforcement increases conditioned responses and (ii), as shown here, acts on memory processes by preventing memory traces from fading. The fact that this last effect was only observed for long ITI suggests that short-term or transient memory and long-term memory are two relatively independent processes.

  15. Short-interval intracortical inhibition is modulated by high-frequency peripheral mixed nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takenobu; Sakuma, Kenji; Nomura, Takashi; Nakashima, Kenji

    2007-06-01

    Cortical excitability can be modulated by manipulation of afferent input. We investigated the influence of peripheral mixed nerve stimulation on the excitability of the motor cortex. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs), short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) in the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB), extensor carpi radialis (ECR) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles were evaluated using paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) before and after high-frequency peripheral mixed nerve stimulation (150 Hz, 30 min) over the right median nerve at the wrist. The MEP amplitude and SICI of the APB muscle decreased transiently 0-10 min after the intervention, whereas the ICF did not change. High-frequency peripheral mixed nerve stimulation reduced the excitability of the motor cortex. The decrement in the SICI, which reflects the function of GABA(A)ergic inhibitory interneurons, might compensate for the reduced motor cortical excitability after high-frequency peripheral mixed nerve stimulation.

  16. Minimax confidence intervals in geomagnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, Philip B.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper uses theory of Donoho (1989) to find lower bounds on the lengths of optimally short fixed-length confidence intervals (minimax confidence intervals) for Gauss coefficients of the field of degree 1-12 using the heat flow constraint. The bounds on optimal minimax intervals are about 40 percent shorter than Backus' intervals: no procedure for producing fixed-length confidence intervals, linear or nonlinear, can give intervals shorter than about 60 percent the length of Backus' in this problem. While both methods rigorously account for the fact that core field models are infinite-dimensional, the application of the techniques to the geomagnetic problem involves approximations and counterfactual assumptions about the data errors, and so these results are likely to be extremely optimistic estimates of the actual uncertainty in Gauss coefficients.

  17. Effect Sizes, Confidence Intervals, and Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The present article provides a primer on (a) effect sizes, (b) confidence intervals, and (c) confidence intervals for effect sizes. Additionally, various admonitions for reformed statistical practice are presented. For example, a very important implication of the realization that there are dozens of effect size statistics is that "authors must…

  18. Improved outcomes for emergency department patients whose ambulance off-stretcher time is not delayed

    PubMed Central

    Crilly, Julia; Keijzers, Gerben; Tippett, Vivienne; O’Dwyer, John; Lind, James; Bost, Nerolie; O’Dwyer, Marilla; Shiels, Sue; Wallis, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe and compare characteristics and outcomes of patients who arrive by ambulance to the ED. We aimed to (i) compare patients with a delayed ambulance offload time (AOT) >30 min with those who were not delayed; and (ii) identify predictors of an ED length of stay (LOS) of >4 h for ambulance-arriving patients. Methods A retrospective, multi-site cohort study was undertaken in Australia using 12 months of linked health data (September 2007–2008). Outcomes of AOT delayed and non-delayed presentations were compared. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken to identify predictors of an ED LOS of >4 h. Results Of the 40 783 linked, analysable ambulance presentations, AOT delay of >30 min was experienced by 15%, and 63% had an ED LOS of >4 h. Patients with an AOT <30 min had better outcomes for: time to triage; ambulance time at hospital; time to see healthcare professional; proportion seen within recommended triage time frame; and ED LOS for both admitted and non-admitted patients. In-hospital mortality did not differ. Strong predictors of an ED LOS >4 h included: hospital admission, older age, triage category, and offload delay >30 min. Conclusion Patients arriving to the ED via ambulance and offloaded within 30 min experience better outcomes than those delayed. Given that offload delay is a modifiable predictor of an ED LOS of >4 h, targeted improvements in the ED arrival process for ambulance patients might be useful. PMID:25940975

  19. Precise Interval Timer for Software Defined Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozhidaev, Aleksey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A precise digital fractional interval timer for software defined radios which vary their waveform on a packet-by-packet basis. The timer allows for variable length in the preamble of the RF packet and allows to adjust boundaries of the TDMA (Time Division Multiple Access) Slots of the receiver of an SDR based on the reception of the RF packet of interest.

  20. Explorations in Statistics: Confidence Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran-Everett, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Learning about statistics is a lot like learning about science: the learning is more meaningful if you can actively explore. This third installment of "Explorations in Statistics" investigates confidence intervals. A confidence interval is a range that we expect, with some level of confidence, to include the true value of a population parameter…

  1. Teaching Confidence Intervals Using Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagtvedt, Reidar; Jones, Gregory Todd; Jones, Kari

    2008-01-01

    Confidence intervals are difficult to teach, in part because most students appear to believe they understand how to interpret them intuitively. They rarely do. To help them abandon their misconception and achieve understanding, we have developed a simulation tool that encourages experimentation with multiple confidence intervals derived from the…

  2. Automatic Error Analysis Using Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothwell, E. J.; Cloud, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    A technique for automatic error analysis using interval mathematics is introduced. A comparison to standard error propagation methods shows that in cases involving complicated formulas, the interval approach gives comparable error estimates with much less effort. Several examples are considered, and numerical errors are computed using the INTLAB…

  3. Feedback precision and postfeedback interval duration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, C. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Precision of feedback gain was manipulated in a simple positioning task. An optimum was found; an increase in precision past that optimum produced deleterious effects upon rate of acquisition. In a second study, increasing postfeedback interval removed that optimum. The feedback precision effects were then replicated in a timing task. The combined results of the 3 studies were interpreted as supportive of an information-processing approach to the study of postfeedback interval events for simple motor skills. The findings additionally supported specific predictions by Bilodeau and deductions from Adams' 1971 theory of motor learning.

  4. Extended Time on Academic Assignments: Does Increased Time Lead to Improved Performance for Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pariseau, Meaghan E.; Fabiano, Gregory A.; Massetti, Greta M.; Hart, Katie C.; Pelham, William E., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Researchers examined the impact of an extended time accommodation on appropriate classroom behavior and rate of work completion for 33 children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Participants received standard (30 min) or extended (45 min) time to complete seatwork in a within-subject, crossover design study. Appropriate…

  5. A prospective evaluation of non-interval- and interval-based exercise training progressions in rodents.

    PubMed

    Jendzjowsky, Nicholas G; DeLorey, Darren S

    2011-10-01

    Non-interval and interval training progressions were used to determine (i) the mean rate at which treadmill speed could be incremented daily using a non-interval training progression to train rats to run continuously at different intensities and (ii) the number of training days required for rats to run continuously at different exercise intensities with non-interval- and interval-based training progressions to establish methods of progressive overload for rodent exercise training studies. Rats were randomly assigned to mild-intensity (n = 5, 20 m·min(-1), 5% grade), moderate-intensity (n = 5, 30 m·min(-1), 5% grade), and heavy-intensity non-interval groups (n = 5, 40 m·min(-1), 5% grade) or a heavy-intensity interval (n = 5, 40 m·min(-1), 5% grade) group and ran 5 days·week(-1) for 6 weeks. Non-interval training involved a daily increase of treadmill speed, whereas interval training involved a daily increase of interval time, until the animal could run continuously at a prescribed intensity. In mild-, moderate-, and heavy-intensity non-interval-trained rats, treadmill speed was increased by 0.6 ± 0.7 m·min(-1)·day(-1), 0.6 ± 0.2 m·min(-1)·day(-1), and 0.8 ± 0.1 m·min(-1)·day(-1), respectively. Target training intensity and duration were obtained following 0.4 ± 0.5 days, 17 ± 3 days, and 23 ± 3 training days (p < 0.05) in mild-, moderate-, and heavy-intensity groups, respectively. In contrast, interval-trained rodents required 11 ± 1 training days. These data demonstrate that rodents will tolerate an increase in treadmill speed of ∼0.7 ± 0.1 m·min(-1)·day(-1) and that this progression enables rats to run continuously at moderate and heavy intensities with 3-4 weeks of progressive overload. Interval training significantly reduces the number of training days required to attain a target intensity.

  6. Subjective probability intervals: how to reduce overconfidence by interval evaluation.

    PubMed

    Winman, Anders; Hansson, Patrik; Juslin, Peter

    2004-11-01

    Format dependence implies that assessment of the same subjective probability distribution produces different conclusions about over- or underconfidence depending on the assessment format. In 2 experiments, the authors demonstrate that the overconfidence bias that occurs when participants produce intervals for an uncertain quantity is almost abolished when they evaluate the probability that the same intervals include the quantity. The authors successfully apply a method for adaptive adjustment of probability intervals as a debiasing tool and discuss a tentative explanation in terms of a naive sampling model. According to this view, people report their experiences accurately, but they are naive in that they treat both sample proportion and sample dispersion as unbiased estimators, yielding small bias in probability evaluation but strong bias in interval production. PMID:15521796

  7. Psychophysical basis for consonant musical intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnick, L.

    1981-06-01

    A suggestion is made to explain the acceptance of certain musical intervals as consonant and others as dissonant. The proposed explanation involves the relation between the time required to perceive a definite pitch and the period of a complex tone. If the former time is greater than the latter, the tone is consonant; otherwise it is dissonant. A quantitative examination leads to agreement with empirical data.

  8. Influence of high ovarian hormones on QT interval duration in young African women.

    PubMed

    Balayssac-Siransy, Edwige; Ouattara, Soualiho; Adoubi, Anicet; Kouamé, Chantal; Hauhouot-Attoungbré, Marie-Laure; Dah, Cyrille; Bogui, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The longer QT interval duration observed in women compared to men is usually attributed to sexual hormones. The aim of our study was to investigate, among black African women, the influence of hormonal variations during the menstrual cycle on the duration of the QT interval. Fourteen young black African women, healthy, sedentary, aged 24 ± 1.7 years, with a regular menstrual cycle (28 ± 1 days) were selected from 59 volunteers. At each phase of their menstrual cycle, menstrual 2.9 ± 0.6 days, follicular 13 ± 1.5 days, and luteal 23.1 ± 1.4 days, an electrocardiogram was performed in supine position after a resting period of 30 min, to measure QT interval duration. QT interval was corrected by Bazett's (QTcb) and Fridericia's (QTcf) formulae. Then, blood samples were obtained to measure estradiol, progesterone, and serum electrolytes (K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+)). There was no significant difference in uncorrected QT intervals between the three phases of the menstrual cycle. It was the same for QTcb and QTcf. Moreover, during the menstrual cycle, we did not observe any correlation between each QT, QTcb, QTcf, and estradiol levels which raised during the follicular phase (356.61 ± 160.77 pg/mL) and progesterone levels which raised during the luteal phase (16.38 ± 5.88 ng/mL). Finally, the method of Bland and Altman demonstrated that the corrections of QT by Bazett and Fridericia formulae were not interchangeable. The results of this study showed that high levels of estradiol and progesterone in young black African women did not influence the QT, QTcb and QTcf intervals duration during the menstrual cycle.

  9. Simple Interval Timers for Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, M.; Burgess, G.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses simple interval timers for microcomputers, including (1) the Jiffy clock; (2) CPU count timers; (3) screen count timers; (4) light pen timers; and (5) chip timers. Also examines some of the general characteristics of all types of timers. (JN)

  10. Duration perception in crossmodally-defined intervals.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Katja M; Di Luca, Massimiliano; Ernst, Marc O

    2014-03-01

    How humans perform duration judgments with multisensory stimuli is an ongoing debate. Here, we investigated how sub-second duration judgments are achieved by asking participants to compare the duration of a continuous sound to the duration of an empty interval in which onset and offset were marked by signals of different modalities using all combinations of visual, auditory and tactile stimuli. The pattern of perceived durations across five stimulus durations (ranging from 100 ms to 900 ms) follows the Vierordt Law. Furthermore, intervals with a sound as onset (audio-visual, audio-tactile) are perceived longer than intervals with a sound as offset. No modality ordering effect is found for visualtactile intervals. To infer whether a single modality-independent or multiple modality-dependent time-keeping mechanisms exist we tested whether perceived duration follows a summative or a multiplicative distortion pattern by fitting a model to all modality combinations and durations. The results confirm that perceived duration depends on sensory latency (summative distortion). Instead, we did not find evidence for multiplicative distortions. The results of the model and the behavioural data support the concept of a single time-keeping mechanism that allows for judgments of durations marked by multisensory stimuli. PMID:23953664

  11. Intra-hole fluid convection: High-resolution temperature time monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cermak, Vladimir; Safanda, Jan; Kresl, Milan

    2008-01-01

    SummaryIntra-hole convection was monitored in detail by a string of five high resolution temperature probes arranged in an 8-m long unit lowered step-by-step into a slim experimental borehole. The experiment was performed in the test hole Sporilov (Prague). A 50-m long depth interval (between 80 and 130 m) was covered in five successive steps. The hole itself is 150 m deep and 112 mm in diameter. The experiment occurred in the internal plastic tube 5 cm in diameter which is sealed from the influx of ground water in the surrounding strata. In the studied interval the temperature gradient varies in the range of 0.020-0.0215 K/m. The borehole was drilled in 1993 and has been in equilibrium since then. Temperature as a function of time was sampled in 15 s intervals and the individual measuring steps took from 1.5 to 2.5 days, each temperature time series thus contained 9000 up to 16,000 data points. The obtained results revealed: (1) temperature-time series present a complex apparently random oscillation pattern with the amplitude of up to 0.045 K; (2) the statistical analysis confirmed a quasi-periodic skeleton of a two-frequency oscillation structure. Shorter periods of 10 up to 30 min are superposed on longer variations with period of several hours. (3) The quasi-periodicity may be hidden under a considerable amount of noise. (4) Within the studied interval the quasi-periodic convection may alternate with a relatively "quiet" regime when temperature oscillations decreased to only 0.004-0.01 K range. (5) Regardless of certain deterministic rules present in the dynamics, the bulk of temperature variations are chaotic.

  12. Subjective Probability Intervals: How to Reduce Overconfidence by Interval Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winman, Anders; Hansson, Patrik; Juslin, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Format dependence implies that assessment of the same subjective probability distribution produces different conclusions about over- or underconfidence depending on the assessment format. In 2 experiments, the authors demonstrate that the overconfidence bias that occurs when participants produce intervals for an uncertain quantity is almost…

  13. Generalized Confidence Intervals and Fiducial Intervals for Some Epidemiological Measures

    PubMed Central

    Bebu, Ionut; Luta, George; Mathew, Thomas; Agan, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    For binary outcome data from epidemiological studies, this article investigates the interval estimation of several measures of interest in the absence or presence of categorical covariates. When covariates are present, the logistic regression model as well as the log-binomial model are investigated. The measures considered include the common odds ratio (OR) from several studies, the number needed to treat (NNT), and the prevalence ratio. For each parameter, confidence intervals are constructed using the concepts of generalized pivotal quantities and fiducial quantities. Numerical results show that the confidence intervals so obtained exhibit satisfactory performance in terms of maintaining the coverage probabilities even when the sample sizes are not large. An appealing feature of the proposed solutions is that they are not based on maximization of the likelihood, and hence are free from convergence issues associated with the numerical calculation of the maximum likelihood estimators, especially in the context of the log-binomial model. The results are illustrated with a number of examples. The overall conclusion is that the proposed methodologies based on generalized pivotal quantities and fiducial quantities provide an accurate and unified approach for the interval estimation of the various epidemiological measures in the context of binary outcome data with or without covariates. PMID:27322305

  14. Overconfidence in Interval Estimates: What Does Expertise Buy You?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Craig R. M.; Liersch, Michael J.; Yaniv, Ilan

    2008-01-01

    People's 90% subjective confidence intervals typically contain the true value about 50% of the time, indicating extreme overconfidence. Previous results have been mixed regarding whether experts are as overconfident as novices. Experiment 1 examined interval estimates from information technology (IT) professionals and UC San Diego (UCSD) students…

  15. Technical note: A device for obtaining time-integrated samples of ruminal fluid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corley, R. N.; Murphy, M.R.; Lucena, J.; Panno, S.V.

    1999-01-01

    A device was adapted to allow for time-integrated sampling of fluid from the rumen via a cannula. The sampler consisted of a cup-shaped ceramic filter positioned in the ventral rumen of a cannulated cow and attached to a tube through which fluid entering the filter was removed continuously using a peristaltic pump. Rate of ruminal fluid removal using the device was monitored over two 36-h periods (at 6-h intervals) and was not affected (P > .05) by time, indicating that the system was not susceptible to clogging during this period. Two cows having ad libitum access to a totally mixed ration were used in a split-block design to evaluate the utility of the system for obtaining time-integrated samples of ruminal fluid. Ruminal fluid VFA concentration and pattern in samples collected in two replicated 8-h periods by the time-integrated sampler (at 1-h intervals) were compared with composite samples collected using a conventional suction-strainer device (at 30-min intervals). Each 8-h collection period started 2 h before or 6 h after feeding. Results indicated that total VFA concentration was not affected (P > .05) by the sampling method. Volatile fatty acid patterns were likewise unaffected (P > .05) except that acetate was 2.5% higher (P < .05) in samples collected 2 h before feeding and valerate was 5% higher (P < .05) in samples collected 6 h after feeding by the suction-strainer device. Although significant, these differences were not considered physiologically important. We concluded that use of the ceramic filter improved the sampling of ruminal fluid by simplifying the technique and allowing time-integrated samples to be obtained.

  16. Children's food intake following drinks sweetened with sucrose or aspartame: time course effects.

    PubMed

    Birch, L L; McPhee, L; Sullivan, S

    1989-02-01

    In two experiments, 2-5-year-old children's responsiveness to caloric density cues was examined. In a preloading protocol, consumption of fixed volumes of drinks (205 ml in Experiment 1; 150 ml in Experiment 2), sweetened with sucrose, aspartame, aspartame plus low glucose maltodextrin, or a water control, was followed by ad lib consumption from among a variety of foods. Caloric drinks had about 90 kcal in Experiment 1, 65 kcal in Experiment 2. The delay interval between the preload and the ad lib consumption was 0, 30 or 60 minutes. In Experiment 1, 24 4- and 5-year-old children participated in only one delay interval, while in Experiment 2, all 20 2- and 3-year-old children were seen in all conditions. Results revealed evidence of caloric compensation, but no evidence of preload x time delay interaction. In both experiments, aspartame also produced a significant suppression of intake relative to water, primarily due to the pattern at 30 min following the preload. Across conditions, the suppression following aspartame was usually significantly less than that produced by the caloric sweet drinks, providing evidence for postingestive effects. In Experiment 1, suppression of intake was related to the children's preferences for the foods, not to macronutrient content; consumption of nonpreferred foods was most suppressed. Consumption of sweetened drinks as long as 1 hour prior to eating suppressed food intake, and this common feeding practice may also reduce dietary variety.

  17. Greater impact of acute high-intensity interval exercise on post-exercise executive function compared to moderate-intensity continuous exercise.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Hayato; Suga, Tadashi; Takenaka, Saki; Tanaka, Daichi; Takeuchi, Tatsuya; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Isaka, Tadao; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    Aerobic moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MCE) can improve executive function (EF) acutely, potentially through the activation of both physiological and psychological factors. Recently, high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) has been reported to be more beneficial for physical adaptation than MCE. Factors for EF improvement can potentially be more enhanced by HIIE than by MCE; but the effects of HIIE on EF remain unknown. Therefore, we aimed to examine to what extent HIIE impacts post-exercise EF immediately after exercise and during post-exercise recovery, compared with traditional MCE. Twelve healthy male subjects performed cycle ergometer exercise based on either HIIE or MCE protocols in a randomized and counterbalanced order. The HIIE protocol consisted of four 4-min bouts at 90% of peak VO2 with 3-min active recovery at 60% of peak VO2. A volume-matched MCE protocol was applied at 60% of peak VO2. To evaluate EF, a color-words Stroop task was performed pre- and post-exercise. Improvement in EF immediately after exercise was the same for the HIIE and MCE protocols. However, the improvement of EF by HIIE was sustained during 30 min of post-exercise recovery, during which MCE returned to the pre-exercise level. The EF response in the post-exercise recovery was associated with changes in physiological and psychological responses. The present findings showed that HIIE and MCE were capable of improving EF. Moreover, HIIE could prolong improvement in EF during post-exercise recovery. For the first time, we suggest that HIIE may be more effective strategy than MCE for improving EF.

  18. Pigeons' Memory for Number of Events: Effects of Intertrial Interval and Delay Interval Illumination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hope, Chris; Santi, Angelo

    2004-01-01

    In Experiment 1, pigeons were trained at a 0-s baseline delay to discriminate sequences of light flashes (illumination of the feeder) that varied in number but not time (2f/4s and 8f/4s). During training, the intertrial interval was illuminated by the houselight for Group Light, but it was dark for Group Dark. Testing conducted with dark delay…

  19. Fluctuations of healthy and unhealthy heartbeat intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Boon Leong; Toda, Mikito

    2013-04-01

    We show that the RR-interval fluctuations, defined as the difference between successive natural-logarithm of the RR interval, for healthy, congestive-heart-failure (CHF) and atrial-fibrillation (AF) subjects are well modeled by non-Gaussian stable distributions. Our results suggest that healthy or unhealthy RR-interval fluctuation can generally be modeled as a sum of a large number of independent physiological effects which are identically distributed with infinite variance. Furthermore, we show for the first time that one indicator —the scale parameter of the stable distribution— is sufficient to robustly distinguish the three groups of subjects. The scale parameters for healthy subjects are smaller than those for AF subjects but larger than those for CHF subjects —this ordering suggests that the scale parameter could be used to objectively quantify the severity of CHF and AF over time and also serve as an early warning signal for a healthy person when it approaches either boundary of the healthy range.

  20. Simulation of Interval Censored Data in Medical and Biological Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Kaveh; Arasan, Jayanthi

    This research looks at the simulation of interval censored data when the survivor function of the survival time is known and attendance probability of the subjects for follow-ups can take any number between 0 to 1. Interval censored data often arise in the medical and biological follow-up studies where the event of interest occurs somewhere between two known times. Regardless of the methods used to analyze these types of data, simulation of interval censored data is an important and challenging step toward model building and prediction of survival time. The simulation itself is rather tedious and very computer intensive due to the interval monitoring of subjects at prescheduled times and subject's incomplete attendance to follow-ups. In this paper the simulated data by the proposed method were assessed using the bias, standard error and root mean square error (RMSE) of the parameter estimates where the survival time T is assumed to follow the Gompertz distribution function.

  1. Determination of the gastric emptying of solid dosage forms using gamma-scintigraphy: a problem of image timing and mathematical analysis.

    PubMed

    Podczeck, F; Course, N J; Newton, J M

    1999-04-01

    This work was designed to identify the maximum time interval of image acquisition by gamma-scintigraphy for monitoring the emptying of a dosage form such as a tablet. Appropriate statistical parameters to describe this process were sought, including a statistical procedure for group comparisons of such data. Gamma-scintigraphy was employed in seven healthy male volunteers, who swallowed a light and a dense tablet, each 12 mm in diameter, formulated to contain different isotopes to allow identification. Images were taken sequentially at 30-s intervals to provide images of each tablet in 1-min spacing until emptying of both tablets was reported. In selecting images, it was also possible to simulate image acquisition intervals of 2, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 min. The values derived are discrete random variables. The maximum time interval between image acquisitions that permitted reliable results to be obtained was found to be 3 min for light and 2 min for dense tablets. Consideration of the emptying of a tablet as a Bernoulli random event provided a suitable statistical approach to the analysis of such data, giving a median and an interquartile range. While the commonly applied method, which is based on parametric procedures deriving arithmetic means and standard deviations, failed to detect a difference in the emptying times of the two types of tablets, the use of non-parametric statistics (Wilcoxon test) provided a clear distinction between them in this respect. The assessment of gastric emptying by gamma-scintigraphy studies can be improved by using short image intervals and application of appropriate statistical analysis.

  2. Constraint-based Attribute and Interval Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, Ari; Frank, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe Constraint-based Attribute and Interval Planning (CAIP), a paradigm for representing and reasoning about plans. The paradigm enables the description of planning domains with time, resources, concurrent activities, mutual exclusions among sets of activities, disjunctive preconditions and conditional effects. We provide a theoretical foundation for the paradigm, based on temporal intervals and attributes. We then show how the plans are naturally expressed by networks of constraints, and show that the process of planning maps directly to dynamic constraint reasoning. In addition, we de ne compatibilities, a compact mechanism for describing planning domains. We describe how this framework can incorporate the use of constraint reasoning technology to improve planning. Finally, we describe EUROPA, an implementation of the CAIP framework.

  3. Temporal control in fixed-interval schedules.

    PubMed

    Zeiler, M D; Powell, D G

    1994-01-01

    The peak procedure was used to study temporal control in pigeons exposed to seven fixed-interval schedules ranging from 7.5 to 480 s. The focus was on behavior in individual intervals. Quantitative properties of temporal control depended on whether the aspect of behavior considered was initial pause duration, the point of maximum acceleration in responding, the point of maximum deceleration, the point at which responding stopped, or several different statistical derivations of a point of maximum responding. Each aspect produced different conclusions about the nature of temporal control, and none conformed to what was known previously about the way ongoing responding was controlled by time under conditions of differential reinforcement. Existing theory does not explain why Weber's law so rarely fit the results or why each type of behavior seemed unique. These data fit with others suggesting that principles of temporal control may depend on the role played by the particular aspect of behavior in particular situations.

  4. Interval sampling methods and measurement error: a computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Oliver; Slaven, James; Taylor, Matthew A

    2014-01-01

    A simulation study was conducted to provide a more thorough account of measurement error associated with interval sampling methods. A computer program simulated the application of momentary time sampling, partial-interval recording, and whole-interval recording methods on target events randomly distributed across an observation period. The simulation yielded measures of error for multiple combinations of observation period, interval duration, event duration, and cumulative event duration. The simulations were conducted up to 100 times to yield measures of error variability. Although the present simulation confirmed some previously reported characteristics of interval sampling methods, it also revealed many new findings that pertain to each method's inherent strengths and weaknesses. The analysis and resulting error tables can help guide the selection of the most appropriate sampling method for observation-based behavioral assessments.

  5. An Event Restriction Interval Theory of Tense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beamer, Brandon Robert

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation presents a novel theory of tense and tense-like constructions. It is named after a key theoretical component of the theory, the event restriction interval. In Event Restriction Interval (ERI) Theory, sentences are semantically evaluated relative to an index which contains two key intervals, the evaluation interval and the event…

  6. High Intensity Interval Training Improves Glycaemic Control and Pancreatic β Cell Function of Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Søren Møller; Thorup, Anne Cathrine; Overgaard, Kristian; Jeppesen, Per Bendix

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity improves the regulation of glucose homeostasis in both type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients and healthy individuals, but the effect on pancreatic β cell function is unknown. We investigated glycaemic control, pancreatic function and total fat mass before and after 8 weeks of low volume high intensity interval training (HIIT) on cycle ergometer in T2D patients and matched healthy control individuals. Study design/method: Elderly (56 yrs±2), non-active T2D patients (n = 10) and matched (52 yrs±2) healthy controls (CON) (n = 13) exercised 3 times (10×60 sec. HIIT) a week over an 8 week period on a cycle ergometer. Participants underwent a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). On a separate day, resting blood pressure measurement was conducted followed by an incremental maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max) cycle ergometer test. Finally, a whole body dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was performed. After 8 weeks of training, the same measurements were performed. Results: in the T2D-group, glycaemic control as determined by average fasting venous glucose concentration (p = 0.01), end point 2-hour OGTT (p = 0.04) and glycosylated haemoglobin (p = 0.04) were significantly reduced. Pancreatic homeostasis as determined by homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and HOMA β cell function (HOMA-%β) were both significantly ameliorated (p = 0.03 and p = 0.03, respectively). Whole body insulin sensitivity as determined by the disposition index (DI) was significantly increased (p = 0.03). During OGTT, the glucose continuum was significantly reduced at -15 (p = 0.03), 30 (p = 0.03) and 120 min (p = 0.03) and at -10 (p = 0.003) and 0 min (p = 0.003) with an additional improvement (p = 0.03) of its 1st phase (30 min) area under curve (AUC). Significant abdominal fat mass losses were seen in both groups (T2D: p = 0.004 and CON: p = 0.02) corresponding to a percentage change of -17.84%±5.02 and -9.66%±3.07, respectively. Conclusion: these results

  7. Chaotic dynamics from interspike intervals.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, A N; Sosnovtseva, O V; Mosekilde, E; Anishchenko, V S

    2001-03-01

    Considering two different mathematical models describing chaotic spiking phenomena, namely, an integrate-and-fire and a threshold-crossing model, we discuss the problem of extracting dynamics from interspike intervals (ISIs) and show that the possibilities of computing the largest Lyapunov exponent (LE) from point processes differ between the two models. We also consider the problem of estimating the second LE and the possibility to diagnose hyperchaotic behavior by processing spike trains. Since the second exponent is quite sensitive to the structure of the ISI series, we investigate the problem of its computation. PMID:11308739

  8. Chaotic dynamics from interspike intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Alexey N.; Sosnovtseva, Olga V.; Mosekilde, Erik; Anishchenko, Vadim S.

    2001-03-01

    Considering two different mathematical models describing chaotic spiking phenomena, namely, an integrate-and-fire and a threshold-crossing model, we discuss the problem of extracting dynamics from interspike intervals (ISIs) and show that the possibilities of computing the largest Lyapunov exponent (LE) from point processes differ between the two models. We also consider the problem of estimating the second LE and the possibility to diagnose hyperchaotic behavior by processing spike trains. Since the second exponent is quite sensitive to the structure of the ISI series, we investigate the problem of its computation.

  9. Postexercise Hypotension After Continuous, Aerobic Interval, and Sprint Interval Exercise.

    PubMed

    Angadi, Siddhartha S; Bhammar, Dharini M; Gaesser, Glenn A

    2015-10-01

    We examined the effects of 3 exercise bouts, differing markedly in intensity, on postexercise hypotension (PEH). Eleven young adults (age: 24.6 ± 3.7 years) completed 4 randomly assigned experimental conditions: (a) control, (b) 30-minute steady-state exercise (SSE) at 75-80% maximum heart rate (HRmax), (4) aerobic interval exercise (AIE): four 4-minute bouts at 90-95% HRmax, separated by 3 minutes of active recovery, and (d) sprint interval exercise (SIE): six 30-second Wingate sprints, separated by 4 minutes of active recovery. Exercise was performed on a cycle ergometer. Blood pressure (BP) was measured before exercise and every 15-minute postexercise for 3 hours. Linear mixed models were used to compare BP between trials. During the 3-hour postexercise, systolic BP (SBP) was lower (p < 0.001) after AIE (118 ± 10 mm Hg), SSE (121 ± 10 mm Hg), and SIE (121 ± 11 mm Hg) compared with control (124 ± 8 mm Hg). Diastolic BP (DBP) was also lower (p < 0.001) after AIE (66 ± 7 mm Hg), SSE (69 ± 6 mm Hg), and SIE (68 ± 8 mm Hg) compared with control (71 ± 7 mm Hg). Only AIE resulted in sustained (>2 hours) PEH, with SBP (120 ± 9 mm Hg) and DBP (68 ± 7 mm Hg) during the third-hour postexercise being lower (p ≤ 0.05) than control (124 ± 8 and 70 ± 7 mm Hg). Although all exercise bouts produced similar reductions in BP at 1-hour postexercise, the duration of PEH was greatest after AIE.

  10. Time required to achieve homogeneity in swine feed mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, G J; Miller, E; King, M T; Perfetti, G A; Warner, C R; Adamo, N C; Sporn, E M

    1982-03-01

    FD&C Red No. 3 was mixed with 20 kg pig feed to give a concentration of 0.1%. A mixing time of 30 min was sufficient to achieve homogeneity for this mixture. For larger amounts or more flocculent types of additives, a longer time may be required. Ammoniated glycyrrhizin was mixed with 8 separate batches of pig feed at a concentration of 1%; 1 h was sufficient mixing time.

  11. Orders on Intervals Over Partially Ordered Sets: Extending Allen's Algebra and Interval Graph Results

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, Francisco; Kreinovich, Vladik; Joslyn, Cliff A.; Hogan, Emilie A.

    2013-08-01

    To make a decision, we need to compare the values of quantities. In many practical situations, we know the values with interval uncertainty. In such situations, we need to compare intervals. Allen’s algebra describes all possible relations between intervals on the real line, and ordering relations between such intervals are well studied. In this paper, we extend this description to intervals in an arbitrary partially ordered set (poset). In particular, we explicitly describe ordering relations between intervals that generalize relation between points. As auxiliary results, we provide a logical interpretation of the relation between intervals, and extend the results about interval graphs to intervals over posets.

  12. Timing During Interruptions in Timing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortin, Claudette; Bedard, Marie-Claude; Champagne, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Duration and location of breaks in time interval production were manipulated in various conditions of stimulus presentation (Experiments 1-4). Produced intervals shortened and then stabilized as break duration lengthened, suggesting that participants used the break as a preparatory period to restart timing as quickly as possible at the end of the…

  13. Pigeons' Choices between Fixed-Interval and Random-Interval Schedules: Utility of Variability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrzejewski, Matthew E.; Cardinal, Claudia D.; Field, Douglas P.; Flannery, Barbara A.; Johnson, Michael; Bailey, Kathleen; Hineline, Philip N.

    2005-01-01

    Pigeons' choosing between fixed-interval and random-interval schedules of reinforcement was investigated in three experiments using a discrete-trial procedure. In all three experiments, the random-interval schedule was generated by sampling a probability distribution at an interval (and in multiples of the interval) equal to that of the…

  14. Receptor modeling for multiple time resolved species: The Baltimore supersite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogulei, David; Hopke, Philip K.; Zhou, Liming; Paatero, Pentti; Park, Seung Shik; Ondov, John M.

    A number of advances have been made toward solving receptor modeling problems using advanced factor analysis methods. Most recently, a factor analysis method has been developed for source apportionment utilizing aerosol compositional data with varying temporal resolution. The data used in that study had time resolutions ranged from 10 min to 1 h. In this work, this expanded model is tested using a data set from the Ponca Street site of the Baltimore supersite with time resolutions ranging from 30 min to 24 h. The nature of this data set implies that traditional eigenvalue-based methods cannot adequately resolve source factors for the atmospheric situation under consideration. Also, valuable temporal information is lost if one averaged or interpolated data in an attempt to produce a data set of the identical time resolution. Each data point has been used in its original time schedule and the source contributions were averaged to correspond to the specific sampling time interval. A weighting coefficient, w24, was incorporated in the modeling equations in order to improve data fitting for the 24-h data in the model. A total of nine sources were resolved: oil-fired power plant (2%), diesel emissions (1%), secondary sulfate (23%), coal-fired power plant (3%), incinerator (9%), steel plant (12%), aged sea salt (1%), secondary nitrate (23%), and spark-ignition emissions (26%). The results showed the very strong influence of the adjacent interstate highways I-95 and I-895 as well as the tunnel toll booths located to the south of the sampling site. Most of the sulfate observed was found to be associated with distant coal-fired power plants situated in the heavily industrialized midwestern parts of the United States. The contribution of the steel plant (<10 miles, 141°SE) to the observed PM concentrations (12%) was also significant.

  15. Time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    2013-09-01

    The concept of time in the `clockwork' Newtonian world was irrelevant; and has generally been ignored until recently by several generations of physicists since the implementation of quantum mechanics. We will set aside the utility of time as a property relating to physical calculations of events relating to a metrics line element or as an aspect of the transformation of a particles motion/interaction in a coordinate system or in relation to thermodynamics etc., i.e. we will discard all the usual uses of time as a concept used to circularly define physical parameters in terms of other physical parameters; concentrating instead on time as an aspect of the fundamental cosmic topology of our virtual reality especially as it inseparably relates to the nature and role of the observer in natural science.

  16. Permutations and topological entropy for interval maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiurewicz, Michal

    2003-05-01

    Recently Bandt, Keller and Pompe (2002 Entropy of interval maps via permutations Nonlinearity 15 1595-602) introduced a method of computing the entropy of piecewise monotone interval maps by counting permutations exhibited by initial pieces of orbits. We show that for topological entropy this method does not work for arbitrary continuous interval maps. We also show that for piecewise monotone interval maps topological entropy can be computed by counting permutations exhibited by periodic orbits.

  17. Interval process model and non-random vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Ni, B. Y.; Liu, N. Y.; Han, X.; Liu, J.

    2016-07-01

    This paper develops an interval process model for time-varying or dynamic uncertainty analysis when information of the uncertain parameter is inadequate. By using the interval process model to describe a time-varying uncertain parameter, only its upper and lower bounds are required at each time point rather than its precise probability distribution, which is quite different from the traditional stochastic process model. A correlation function is defined for quantification of correlation between the uncertain-but-bounded variables at different times, and a matrix-decomposition-based method is presented to transform the original dependent interval process into an independent one for convenience of subsequent uncertainty analysis. More importantly, based on the interval process model, a non-random vibration analysis method is proposed for response computation of structures subjected to time-varying uncertain external excitations or loads. The structural dynamic responses thus can be derived in the form of upper and lower bounds, providing an important guidance for practical safety analysis and reliability design of structures. Finally, two numerical examples and one engineering application are investigated to demonstrate the feasibility of the interval process model and corresponding non-random vibration analysis method.

  18. Postingestive inhibition of food intake by aspartame: importance of interval between aspartame administration and subsequent eating.

    PubMed

    Rogers, P J; Burley, V J; Alikhanizadeh, L A; Blundell, J E

    1995-03-01

    Aspartame administered in capsules (i.e., without tasting) 1 h before a meal significantly reduces the amount eaten in that meal. In the present study 36 young men and women were divided into 3 groups of 12 to receive aspartame (400 mg) or placebo (400 mg starch) on separate occasions either 5 min (Group A), 30 min (Group B) or 60 min (Group C) before beginning an ad lib test meal. Compared with placebo, aspartame reduced food intake in Group C (by 18.5%, p < 0.01), but did not reliably affect intake in Groups A or B. There were, in contrast, no significant effects of aspartame on premeal ratings of hunger, desire to eat or fullness for any of the groups. These results confirm a postingestive inhibitory action of aspartame on appetite, which may involve the amplification of the satiating effects of food. The lack of effect of aspartame administered at the shorter intervals before eating suggests a postgastric or even postabsorptive mechanism of action. This observation is also important in its implications for the possible therapeutic exploitation of the anorexic effect of capsulated aspartame.

  19. The Effects of Interval Duration on Temporal Tracking and Alternation Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludvig, Elliot A.; Staddon, John E. R.

    2005-01-01

    On cyclic-interval reinforcement schedules, animals typically show a postreinforcement pause that is a function of the immediately preceding time interval ("temporal tracking"). Animals, however, do not track single-alternation schedules--when two different intervals are presented in strict alternation on successive trials. In this experiment,…

  20. Interval approach to braneworld gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph; Park, Minjoon

    2005-10-01

    Gravity in five-dimensional braneworld backgrounds may exhibit extra scalar degrees of freedom with problematic features, including kinetic ghosts and strong coupling behavior. Analysis of such effects is hampered by the standard heuristic approaches to braneworld gravity, which use the equations of motion as the starting point, supplemented by orbifold projections and junction conditions. Here we develop the interval approach to braneworld gravity, which begins with an action principle. This shows how to implement general covariance, despite allowing metric fluctuations that do not vanish on the boundaries. We reproduce simple Z2 orbifolds of gravity, even though in this approach we never perform a Z2 projection. We introduce a family of “straight gauges”, which are bulk coordinate systems in which both branes appear as straight slices in a single coordinate patch. Straight gauges are extremely useful for analyzing metric fluctuations in braneworld models. By explicit gauge-fixing, we show that a general AdS5/AdS4 setup with two branes has at most a radion, but no physical “brane-bending” modes.

  1. Response Priming Patterns Differ with Interstimulus Interval Duration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Kristie A.; Wiley, Erin

    2008-01-01

    Priming paradigms make it possible to study the nature of response preparation before the onset of movement. One way to examine this process is through manipulation of the interstimulus interval (ISI). The timing of the prime and target presentation has been shown to have distinct effects on reaction time patterns, in both healthy and…

  2. High-intensity interval training: Modulating interval duration in overweight/obese men

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Ryan, Abbie E.; Melvin, Malia N.; Wingfield, Hailee L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient strategy shown to induce various cardiovascular and metabolic adaptations. Little is known about the optimal tolerable combination of intensity and volume necessary for adaptations, especially in clinical populations. Objectives In a randomized controlled pilot design, we evaluated the effects of two types of interval training protocols, varying in intensity and interval duration, on clinical outcomes in overweight/obese men. Methods Twenty-five men [body mass index (BMI) > 25 kg·m2] completed baseline body composition measures: fat mass (FM), lean mass (LM) and percent body fat (%BF) and fasting blood glucose, lipids and insulin (IN). A graded exercise cycling test was completed for peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) and power output (PO). Participants were randomly assigned to high-intensity short interval (1MIN-HIIT), high-intensity interval (2MIN-HIIT) or control groups. 1MIN-HIIT and 2MIN-HIIT completed 3 weeks of cycling interval training, 3 days/week, consisting of either 10 × 1 min bouts at 90% PO with 1 min rests (1MIN-HIIT) or 5 × 2 min bouts with 1 min rests at undulating intensities (80%–100%) (2MIN-HIIT). Results There were no significant training effects on FM (Δ1.06 ± 1.25 kg) or %BF (Δ1.13% ± 1.88%), compared to CON. Increases in LM were not significant but increased by 1.7 kg and 2.1 kg for 1MIN and 2MIN-HIIT groups, respectively. Increases in VO2peak were also not significant for 1MIN (3.4 ml·kg−1·min−1) or 2MIN groups (2.7 ml·kg−1·min−1). IN sensitivity (HOMA-IR) improved for both training groups (Δ −2.78 ± 3.48 units; p < 0.05) compared to CON. Conclusion HIIT may be an effective short-term strategy to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and IN sensitivity in overweight males. PMID:25913937

  3. Stress-induced hyperthermia depends on both time of day and light condition.

    PubMed

    Peloso, Elizabeth; Wachulec, Maciej; Satinoff, Evelyn

    2002-04-01

    Rats placed in an environment other than their home cage increase their body temperature (Tb) by more than 1 degree C. This stress-induced hyperthermia is considered to be a fever, in the sense that the Tb rise seems to reflect an upward shift in the level of regulated Tb (set point). The circadian rhythm of Tb also reflects changes in set point. One might therefore expect to see differences in response to such stress during various phases of the light-dark (LD) cycle as Tb fluctuates between L and D. To test this, 3- to 6-month-old male Long-Evans rats were taken from their home cages (12:12 LD) and placed individually in a Plexiglas container for 30 min. Tb and activity were measured via telemetry. In the first experiment, rats were placed in the container during day (from 1 to 3 h after lights on) and night (from 1 to 3 h after lights off), with light on or off during the test. There was a significant Tb rise in response to placement in the container at all times except when the rats were tested during the night with light on in the container; in that condition there was no Tb rise. In the second experiment, the authors determined that 30 min of light in the home cage before the test did not affect Tb: If the light was on in the test situation, hyperthermia was inhibited, and if it was off, hyperthermia was as high as control levels. In the third experiment, to determine whether this effect was time dependent, the test was performed at 4-h intervals, with light on or off during the test. The strongest inhibiting effect of light was in early night. In the fourth experiment, the authors turned the lights on during early night while the rats were in their home cages. This reduced their Tb significantly by less than 0.3 degrees C. The authors conclude that both clock time and light condition during testing are factors affecting the Tb rise in response to stress. PMID:12002163

  4. Light-intensity and high-intensity interval training improve cardiometabolic health in rats.

    PubMed

    Batacan, Romeo B; Duncan, Mitch J; Dalbo, Vincent J; Connolly, Kylie J; Fenning, Andrew S

    2016-09-01

    Physical activity has the potential to reduce cardiometabolic risk factors but evaluation of different intensities of physical activity and the mechanisms behind their health effects still need to be fully established. This study examined the effects of sedentary behaviour, light-intensity training, and high-intensity interval training on biometric indices, glucose and lipid metabolism, inflammatory and oxidative stress markers, and vascular and cardiac function in adult rats. Rats (12 weeks old) were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: control (CTL; no exercise), sedentary (SED; no exercise and housed in small cages to reduce activity), light-intensity trained (LIT; four 30-min exercise bouts/day at 8 m/min separated by 2-h rest period, 5 days/week), and high-intensity interval trained (HIIT, four 2.5-min work bouts/day at 50 m/min separated by 3-min rest periods, 5 days/week). After 12 weeks of intervention, SED had greater visceral fat accumulation (p < 0.01) and slower cardiac conduction (p = 0.04) compared with the CTL group. LIT and HIIT demonstrated beneficial changes in body weight, visceral and epididymal fat weight, glucose regulation, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and mesenteric vessel contractile response compared with the CTL group (p < 0.05). LIT had significant improvements in insulin sensitivity and cardiac conduction compared with the CTL and SED groups whilst HIIT had significant improvements in systolic blood pressure and endothelium-independent vasodilation to aorta and mesenteric artery compared with the CTL group (p < 0.05). LIT and HIIT induce health benefits by improving traditional cardiometabolic risk factors. LIT improves cardiac health while HIIT promotes improvements in vascular health. PMID:27523646

  5. Low volume-high intensity interval exercise elicits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in humans.

    PubMed

    Wadley, Alex J; Chen, Yu-Wen; Lip, Gregory Y H; Fisher, James P; Aldred, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare acute changes in oxidative stress and inflammation in response to steady state and low volume, high intensity interval exercise (LV-HIIE). Untrained healthy males (n = 10, mean ± s: age 22 ± 3 years; VO2MAX 42.7 ± 5.0 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)) undertook three exercise bouts: a bout of LV-HIIE (10 × 1 min 90% VO2MAX intervals) and two energy-matched steady-state cycling bouts at a moderate (60% VO2MAX; 27 min, MOD) and high (80% VO2MAX; 20 min, HIGH) intensity on separate days. Markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and physiological stress were assessed before, at the end of exercise and 30 min post-exercise (post+30). At the end of all exercise bouts, significant changes in lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) and protein carbonyls (PCs) (LOOH (nM): MOD +0.36; HIGH +3.09; LV-HIIE +5.51 and PC (nmol · mg(-1) protein): MOD -0.24; HIGH -0.11; LV-HIIE -0.37) were observed. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) increased post+30, relative to the end of all exercise bouts (TAC (µM): MOD +189; HIGH +135; LV-HIIE +102). Interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 increased post+30 in HIGH and LV-HIIE only (P < 0.05). HIGH caused the greatest lymphocytosis, adrenaline and cardiovascular response (P < 0.05). At a reduced energy cost and physiological stress, LV-HIIE elicited similar cytokine and oxidative stress responses to HIGH.

  6. Light-intensity and high-intensity interval training improve cardiometabolic health in rats.

    PubMed

    Batacan, Romeo B; Duncan, Mitch J; Dalbo, Vincent J; Connolly, Kylie J; Fenning, Andrew S

    2016-09-01

    Physical activity has the potential to reduce cardiometabolic risk factors but evaluation of different intensities of physical activity and the mechanisms behind their health effects still need to be fully established. This study examined the effects of sedentary behaviour, light-intensity training, and high-intensity interval training on biometric indices, glucose and lipid metabolism, inflammatory and oxidative stress markers, and vascular and cardiac function in adult rats. Rats (12 weeks old) were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: control (CTL; no exercise), sedentary (SED; no exercise and housed in small cages to reduce activity), light-intensity trained (LIT; four 30-min exercise bouts/day at 8 m/min separated by 2-h rest period, 5 days/week), and high-intensity interval trained (HIIT, four 2.5-min work bouts/day at 50 m/min separated by 3-min rest periods, 5 days/week). After 12 weeks of intervention, SED had greater visceral fat accumulation (p < 0.01) and slower cardiac conduction (p = 0.04) compared with the CTL group. LIT and HIIT demonstrated beneficial changes in body weight, visceral and epididymal fat weight, glucose regulation, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and mesenteric vessel contractile response compared with the CTL group (p < 0.05). LIT had significant improvements in insulin sensitivity and cardiac conduction compared with the CTL and SED groups whilst HIIT had significant improvements in systolic blood pressure and endothelium-independent vasodilation to aorta and mesenteric artery compared with the CTL group (p < 0.05). LIT and HIIT induce health benefits by improving traditional cardiometabolic risk factors. LIT improves cardiac health while HIIT promotes improvements in vascular health.

  7. Procrastination by pigeons with fixed-interval response requirements.

    PubMed

    Mazur, J E

    1998-03-01

    Two experiments studied the phenomenon of procrastination, in which pigeons chose a larger, more delayed response requirement over a smaller, more immediate response requirement. The response requirements were fixed-interval schedules that did not lead to an immediate food reinforcer, but that interrupted a 55-s period in which food was delivered at random times. The experiments used an adjusting-delay procedure in which the delay to the start of one fixed-interval requirement was varied over trials to estimate an indifference point--a delay at which the two alternatives were chosen about equally often. Experiment 1 found that as the delay to a shorter fixed-interval requirement was increased, the adjusting delay to a longer fixed-interval requirement also increased, and the rate of increase depended on the duration of the longer fixed-interval requirement. Experiment 2 found a strong preference for a fixed delay of 10 s to the start of a fixed-interval requirement compared to a mixed delay of either 0 or 20 s. The results help to distinguish among different equations that might describe the decreasing effectiveness of a response requirement with increasing delay, and they suggest that delayed reinforcers and delayed response requirements have symmetrical but opposite effects on choice.

  8. Antipsychotic Polypharmacy and Corrected QT Interval: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Suzuki, Takefumi; Remington, Gary; Uchida, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Objective: It remains unclear whether antipsychotic polypharmacy, a common clinical practice, is related to an increased risk of corrected time between start of Q wave and end of T wave (QTc) interval prolongation. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to address this important issue. Method: A systematic literature search was conducted in October 2014, using MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO. Studies and case reports were included if they reported QTc intervals or QTc interval changes before and after antipsychotic polypharmacy or QTc intervals in both antipsychotic polypharmacy and monotherapy groups. Results: A total of 21 articles (10 clinical trials, 4 observational studies, and 7 case reports) met inclusion criteria. The clinical trials have shown that a combination treatment with risperidone or pimozide is not obviously related to an increase in QTc interval, whereas ziprasidone or sertindole combined with clozapine may prolong QTc interval. Among the 4 observational studies, antipsychotic polypharmacy was not clearly associated with QTc prolongation in 3 studies, each cross-sectional. In contrast, one prospective study showed a significant increase in QTc interval following antipsychotic coadministration. The case reports indicated an increased risk of QTc prolongation in at least some patients receiving antipsychotic polypharmacy. Conclusions: Currently available evidence fails to confirm that antipsychotic polypharmacy worsens QTc prolongation in general, although the evidence is scarce and inconsistent. Clinicians are advised to remain conservative in resorting to antipsychotic polypharmacy, as a combination of some QTc-prolongation liable antipsychotics may further prolong QTc interval, and efficacy supporting the clinical benefits of antipsychotic polypharmacy is equivocal, at best. PMID:26174525

  9. Source Identification of PM2.5 in Steubenville, Ohio Using a Hybrid Method for Highly Time-resolved Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new source-type identification method, Reduction and Species Clustering Using Episodes (ReSCUE), was developed to exploit the temporal synchronicity between species to form clusters of species that vary together. High time-resolution (30 min) PM2.5 sampling was condu...

  10. Effects of high-intensity interval training and moderate-intensity continuous training on endothelial function and cardiometabolic risk markers in obese adults.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Brandon J; Tucker, Wesley J; Bhammar, Dharini M; Ryder, Justin R; Sweazea, Karen L; Gaesser, Glenn A

    2016-07-01

    We hypothesized that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) would be more effective than moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) at improving endothelial function and maximum oxygen uptake (V̇o2 max) in obese adults. Eighteen participants [35.1 ± 8.1 (SD) yr; body mass index = 36.0 ± 5.0 kg/m(2)] were randomized to 8 wk (3 sessions/wk) of either HIIT [10 × 1 min, 90-95% maximum heart rate (HRmax), 1-min active recovery] or MICT (30 min, 70-75% HRmax). Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) increased after HIIT (5.13 ± 2.80% vs. 8.98 ± 2.86%, P = 0.02) but not after MICT (5.23 ± 2.82% vs. 3.05 ± 2.76%, P = 0.16). Resting artery diameter increased after MICT (3.68 ± 0.58 mm vs. 3.86 ± 0.58 mm, P = 0.02) but not after HIIT (4.04 ± 0.70 mm vs. 4.09 ± 0.70 mm; P = 0.63). There was a significant (P = 0.02) group × time interaction in low flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC) between MICT (0.63 ± 2.00% vs. -2.79 ± 3.20%; P = 0.03) and HIIT (-1.04 ± 4.09% vs. 1.74 ± 3.46%; P = 0.29). V̇o2 max increased (P < 0.01) similarly after HIIT (2.19 ± 0.65 l/min vs. 2.64 ± 0.88 l/min) and MICT (2.24 ± 0.48 l/min vs. 2.55 ± 0.61 l/min). Biomarkers of cardiovascular risk and endothelial function were unchanged. HIIT and MICT produced different vascular adaptations in obese adults, with HIIT improving FMD and MICT increasing resting artery diameter and enhancing L-FMC. HIIT required 27.5% less total exercise time and ∼25% less energy expenditure than MICT. PMID:27255523

  11. The effect of filled and empty intervals on clock and memory processes in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Price, Elizabeth; Santi, Angelo

    2014-06-01

    According to the mixed memory model (Penney, Gibbon, & Meck, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 26, 1770-1787, 2000), different clock rates for stimuli with different nontemporal properties must be stored within a single reference memory distribution in order to detect a difference between the clock rates of the different signals. In Experiment 1, pigeons were trained in a between-subjects design to discriminate empty intervals (bound by two 1-s visual markers) and filled intervals (a continuous visual signal). The intervals were signaled by different visual stimuli, and they required responses to different sets of comparison stimuli. Empty intervals were judged as being longer than filled intervals. The difference between the point of subjective equality (PSE) for the empty intervals and the PSE for the filled intervals increased proportionally as the magnitudes of the anchor duration pairs were increased from 2 and 8 s to 4 and 16 s. In Experiment 2, the pigeons were trained to discriminate intervals signaled by the absence of houselight illumination (Group Empty) or the presence of houselight illumination (Group Filled). The psychophysical timing functions for these intervals were identical to each other. The results of Experiment 1 indicate that memory mixing is not necessary for detecting a timing difference between empty and filled intervals in pigeons. The results of Experiment 2 suggest that the nature of the stimuli that signal the empty and filled intervals impacts how pigeons judge the durations of empty and filled intervals.

  12. Momentary maximizing in concurrent schedules with a minimum interchangeover interval.

    PubMed

    Todorov, J C; Souza, D G; Bori, C M

    1993-09-01

    Eight pigeons were trained on concurrent variable-interval variable-interval schedules with a minimum interchangeover time programmed as a consequence of changeovers. In Experiment 1 the reinforcement schedules remained constant while the minimum interchangeover time varied from 0 to 200 s. Relative response rates and relative time deviated from relative reinforcement rates toward indifference with long minimum interchangeover times. In Experiment 2 different reinforcement ratios were scheduled in successive experimental conditions with the minimum interchangeover time constant at 0, 2, 10, or 120 s. The exponent of the generalized matching equation was close to 1.0 when the minimum interchangeover time was 0 s (the typical procedure for concurrent schedules without a changeover delay) and decreased as that duration was increased. The data support the momentary maximizing theory and contradict molar maximizing theories and the melioration theory.

  13. Stimulus properties of fixed-interval responses.

    PubMed

    Buchman, I B; Zeiler, M D

    1975-11-01

    Responses in the first component of a chained schedule produced a change to the terminal component according to a fixed-interval schedule. The number of responses emitted in the fixed interval determined whether a variable-interval schedule of food presentation or extinction prevailed in the terminal component. In one condition, the variable-interval schedule was in effect only if the number of responses during the fixed interval was less than that specified; in another condition, the number of responses had to exceed that specified. The number of responses emitted in the fixed interval did not shift markedly in the direction required for food presentation. Instead, responding often tended to change in the opposite direction. Such an effect indicated that differential food presentation did not modify the reference behavior in accord with the requirement, but it was consistent with other data on fixed-interval schedule performance. Behavior in the terminal component, however, did reveal sensitivity to the relation between total responses emitted in the fixed interval and the availability of food. Response rate in the terminal component was a function of the proximity of the response number emitted in the fixed interval to that required for food presentation. Thus, response number served as a discriminative stimulus controlling subsequent performance.

  14. A note on the path interval distance.

    PubMed

    Coons, Jane Ivy; Rusinko, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    The path interval distance accounts for global congruence between locally incongruent trees. We show that the path interval distance provides a lower bound for the nearest neighbor interchange distance. In contrast to the Robinson-Foulds distance, random pairs of trees are unlikely to be maximally distant from one another under the path interval distance. These features indicate that the path interval distance should play a role in phylogenomics where the comparison of trees on a fixed set of taxa is becoming increasingly important. PMID:27040521

  15. A note on the path interval distance.

    PubMed

    Coons, Jane Ivy; Rusinko, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    The path interval distance accounts for global congruence between locally incongruent trees. We show that the path interval distance provides a lower bound for the nearest neighbor interchange distance. In contrast to the Robinson-Foulds distance, random pairs of trees are unlikely to be maximally distant from one another under the path interval distance. These features indicate that the path interval distance should play a role in phylogenomics where the comparison of trees on a fixed set of taxa is becoming increasingly important.

  16. Interval timer control of puberty in photoinhibited Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Ho; Kauffman, Alexander S; Paul, Matthew J; Butler, Matthew P; Beery, Annaliese K; Costantini, Ruth M; Zucker, Irving

    2006-10-01

    Puberty, which is markedly delayed in male Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) born into short day lengths, is controlled by an interval timer regulated by the duration of nocturnal melatonin secretion. Properties of the interval timer were assessed by perturbing normal patterns of melatonin secretion in males gestated and maintained thereafter in 1 of 2 short day lengths, 10 h light/day (10 L) or 12L. Melatonin secretion of short-day hamsters was suppressed by constant light treatment or modified by daily injection of propranolol to mimic nocturnal melatonin durations typical of long-day hamsters. Constant light treatment during weeks 3 to 5 induced early incomplete gonadal growth in 12L but not 10 L hamsters but did not affect late onset of gonadal development indicative of puberty in either photoperiod. Propranolol treatment during postnatal weeks 3 to 5 induced transient growth of the testes and ultimately delayed the timing of puberty by 3 weeks. Similar treatments between weeks 5 and 7 or on alternate weeks for 24 weeks did not affect the interval timer. The first 2 weeks after weaning may constitute a critical period during which the interval timer is highly responsive to photoperiod. Alternatively, the hamsters' photoperiodic history rather than age or developmental stage may be the critical variable. The interpolation of long-day melatonin signals at the time of weaning does not appear to reset the interval timer to its zero position but may reduce timer responsiveness to long-day melatonin signals several weeks later.

  17. Oxygen uptake in maximal effort constant rate and interval running.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Daniel; O'Brien, Brendan J; Clark, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated differences in average VO2 of maximal effort interval running to maximal effort constant rate running at lactate threshold matched for time. The average VO2 and distance covered of 10 recreational male runners (VO2max: 4158 ± 390 mL · min(-1)) were compared between a maximal effort constant-rate run at lactate threshold (CRLT), a maximal effort interval run (INT) consisting of 2 min at VO2max speed with 2 minutes at 50% of VO2 repeated 5 times, and a run at the average speed sustained during the interval run (CR submax). Data are presented as mean and 95% confidence intervals. The average VO2 for INT, 3451 (3269-3633) mL · min(-1), 83% VO2max, was not significantly different to CRLT, 3464 (3285-3643) mL · min(-1), 84% VO2max, but both were significantly higher than CR sub-max, 3464 (3285-3643) mL · min(-1), 76% VO2max. The distance covered was significantly greater in CLRT, 4431 (4202-3731) metres, compared to INT and CR sub-max, 4070 (3831-4309) metres. The novel finding was that a 20-minute maximal effort constant rate run uses similar amounts of oxygen as a 20-minute maximal effort interval run despite the greater distance covered in the maximal effort constant-rate run. PMID:24288501

  18. Walking Changes the Dynamics of Cognitive Estimates of Time Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiefer, Adam W.; Riley, Michael A.; Shockley, Kevin; Villard, Sebastien; Van Orden, Guy C.

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive performance exhibits patterns of trial-to-trial variation that can be described as 1/f or pink noise, as do repeated measures of locomotor performance. Although cognitive and locomotor performances are known to interact when performed concurrently, it is not known whether concurrent performance affects the tasks' pink noise dynamical…

  19. Temporal search as a function of the variability of interfood intervals.

    PubMed

    Church, R M; Lacourse, D M; Crystal, J D

    1998-07-01

    We attempted to determine whether timing theories developed primarily to explain performance in fixed-interval reinforcement schedules are also applicable to variable intervals. Groups of rats were trained in lever boxes on peak procedures with a 30-, 45-, or 60-s interval, or a 30- to 60-s uniform distribution (Experiment 1); a 60-s fixed and 1- to 121-s uniform distribution between and within animals (Experiment 2); and a procedure in which the interval between food and next available food gradually changed from a fixed 60 s to a uniform distribution between 0 and 120 s (Experiment 3). In uniform interval schedules rats made lever responses at particular times since food, as measured by the distribution of food-food intervals, the distribution of postreinforcement pauses, and the mean response rate as a function of time since food. Qualitative features of this performance are described by a multiple-oscillator connectionist theory of timing.

  20. Statistical Properties of Extreme Solar Activity Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lioznova, A. V.; Blinov, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    A study of long-term solar variability reflected in indirect indices of past solar activity leads to stimulating results. We compare the statistics of intervals of very low and very high solar activity derived from two cosmogenic radionuclide records and look for consistency in their timing and physical interpretation. According to the applied criteria, the numbers of minima and of maxima are 61 and 68, respectively, from the 10Be record, and 42 and 46 from the 14C record. The difference between the enhanced and depressed states of solar activity becomes apparent in the difference in their statistical distributions. We find no correlation between the level or type (minimum or maximum) of an extremum and the level or type of the predecessor. The hypothesis of solar activity as a periodic process on the millennial time scale is not supported by the existing proxies. A new homogeneous series of 10Be measurements in polar ice covering the Holocene would be of great value for eliminating the existing discrepancy in the available solar activity reconstructions.

  1. High-Intensity Interval Training for Improving Postprandial Hyperglycemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Jonathan P.; Francois, Monique E.

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has garnered attention in recent years as a time-efficient exercise option for improving cardiovascular and metabolic health. New research demonstrates that HIIT may be particularly effective for improving postprandial hyperglycemia in individuals with, or at risk for, type 2 diabetes (T2D). These findings…

  2. Earning and Obtaining Reinforcers under Concurrent Interval Scheduling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonall, James S.

    2005-01-01

    Contingencies of reinforcement specify how reinforcers are earned and how they are obtained. Ratio contingencies specify the number of responses that earn a reinforcer, and the response satisfying the ratio requirement obtains the earned reinforcer. Simple interval schedules specify that a certain time earns a reinforcer, which is obtained by the…

  3. Interval and Contour Processing in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaton, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    High functioning children with autism and age and intelligence matched controls participated in experiments testing perception of pitch intervals and musical contours. The finding from the interval study showed superior detection of pitch direction over small pitch distances in the autism group. On the test of contour discrimination no group…

  4. SINGLE-INTERVAL GAS PERMEABILITY ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single-interval, steady-steady-state gas permeability testing requires estimation of pressure at a screened interval which in turn requires measurement of friction factors as a function of mass flow rate. Friction factors can be obtained by injecting air through a length of pipe...

  5. Interval colorectal carcinoma: An unsolved debate

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Mark; Neto, Antonio Galvao; Zhang, Xuchen

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC), as the third most common new cancer diagnosis, poses a significant health risk to the population. Interval CRCs are those that appear after a negative screening test or examination. The development of interval CRCs has been shown to be multifactorial: location of exam-academic institution versus community hospital, experience of the endoscopist, quality of the procedure, age of the patient, flat versus polypoid neoplasia, genetics, hereditary gastrointestinal neoplasia, and most significantly missed or incompletely excised lesions. The rate of interval CRCs has decreased in the last decade, which has been ascribed to an increased understanding of interval disease and technological advances in the screening of high risk individuals. In this article, we aim to review the literature with regard to the multifactorial nature of interval CRCs and provide the most recent developments regarding this important gastrointestinal entity. PMID:26668498

  6. Constructing Confidence Intervals for Qtl Location

    PubMed Central

    Mangin, B.; Goffinet, B.; Rebai, A.

    1994-01-01

    We describe a method for constructing the confidence interval of the QTL location parameter. This method is developed in the local asymptotic framework, leading to a linear model at each position of the putative QTL. The idea is to construct a likelihood ratio test, using statistics whose asymptotic distribution does not depend on the nuisance parameters and in particular on the effect of the QTL. We show theoretical properties of the confidence interval built with this test, and compare it with the classical confidence interval using simulations. We show in particular, that our confidence interval has the correct probability of containing the true map location of the QTL, for almost all QTLs, whereas the classical confidence interval can be very biased for QTLs having small effect. PMID:7896108

  7. Interval Management Display Design Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxley, Brian T.; Beyer, Timothy M.; Cooke, Stuart D.; Grant, Karlus A.

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) estimated that U.S. commercial air carriers moved 736.7 million passengers over 822.3 billion revenue-passenger miles. The FAA also forecasts, in that same report, an average annual increase in passenger traffic of 2.2 percent per year for the next 20 years, which approximates to one-and-a-half times the number of today's aircraft operations and passengers by the year 2033. If airspace capacity and throughput remain unchanged, then flight delays will increase, particularly at those airports already operating near or at capacity. Therefore it is critical to create new and improved technologies, communications, and procedures to be used by air traffic controllers and pilots. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the FAA, and the aviation industry are working together to improve the efficiency of the National Airspace System and the cost to operate in it in several ways, one of which is through the creation of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). NextGen is intended to provide airspace users with more precise information about traffic, routing, and weather, as well as improve the control mechanisms within the air traffic system. NASA's Air Traffic Management Technology Demonstration-1 (ATD-1) Project is designed to contribute to the goals of NextGen, and accomplishes this by integrating three NASA technologies to enable fuel-efficient arrival operations into high-density airports. The three NASA technologies and procedures combined in the ATD-1 concept are advanced arrival scheduling, controller decision support tools, and aircraft avionics to enable multiple time deconflicted and fuel efficient arrival streams in high-density terminal airspace.

  8. Fibrinolytic Therapy in CCU Instead of Emergency Ward: How It Affects Door to Needle Time?

    PubMed Central

    Zeraati, Fatemeh; Homayounfar, Shahram; Esna-Ashari, Farzaneh; Khalili, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The door-to-needle-time (DNT) is considered a standard time for scheduling thrombolysis for acute ST-segment elevation of myocardial infarction and this time can be reduced by minimizing the delay in starting thrombolytic treatment once the patient has reached to the hospital. This study was carried out on a sample of Iranian patients with acute myocardial infarction to determine the DNT in those after changing schedule of thrombolysis during 8 years from emergency to coronary care unit (CCU). Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out on all consecutive patients with a confirmed diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction admitted to the emergency ward of Ekbatan Hospital in Hamadan, Iran, within 2011 and had an indication of fibrinolytic therapy, which 47 patients were finally indicated to receive streptokinase in the part of CCU. Results: The mean time interval between arrival at the hospital and electrocardiogram (ECG) assessment was 6.30 min, taking ECG and patient's admission was 21.6 min and transferring the patient from admission to CCU ward was 31.9. The time between transferring the patients to CCU ward and fibrinolytic administration order and the time between its ordering and infusion was 31.2 min and 14.0 min respectively. In sum, the DNT was estimated 84.48 ± 53.00 min ranged 30-325 min that was significantly more than standard DNT (P <0.01). Furthermore, DNT mean in this study is significantly more than a study conducted 8 years ago in the same hospital (P <0.01). Conclusions: The DNT is higher than the standard level and higher than the estimated level in the past. This shows that DNT was longer after transferring to CCU. PMID:24829715

  9. Oscillatory dynamics of vasoconstriction and vasodilation identified by time-localized phase coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, L. W.; Vuksanović, V.; McClintock, P. V. E.; Stefanovska, A.

    2011-06-01

    We apply wavelet-based time-localized phase coherence to investigate the relationship between blood flow and skin temperature, and between blood flow and instantaneous heart rate (IHR), during vasoconstriction and vasodilation provoked by local cooling or heating of the skin. A temperature-controlled metal plate (≈10 cm2) placed on the volar side of the left arm was used to provide the heating and cooling. Beneath the plate, the blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry and the adjacent skin temperature by a thermistor. Two 1 h datasets were collected from each of the ten subjects. In each case a 30 min basal recording was followed by a step change in plate temperature, to either 24 °C or 42 °C. The IHR was derived from simultaneously recorded ECG. We confirm the changes in the energy and frequency of blood flow oscillations during cooling and heating reported earlier. That is, during cooling, there was a significant decrease in the average frequency of myogenic blood flow oscillations (p < 0.05) and the myogenic spectral peak became more prominent. During heating, there was a significant (p < 0.05) general increase in spectral energy, associated with vasodilation, except in the myogenic interval. Weak phase coherence between temperature and blood flow was observed for unperturbed skin, but it increased in all frequency intervals as a result of heating. It was not significantly affected by cooling. We also show that significant (p < 0.05) phase coherence exists between blood flow and IHR in the respiratory and myogenic frequency intervals. Cooling did not affect this phase coherence in any of the frequency intervals, whereas heating enhanced the phase coherence in the respiratory and myogenic intervals. This can be explained by the reduction in vascular resistance produced by heating, a process where myogenic mechanisms play a key role. We conclude that the mechanisms of vasodilation and vasoconstriction, in response to temperature change, are

  10. Sampling Theory and Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes: Using ESCI To Illustrate "Bouncing"; Confidence Intervals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du, Yunfei

    This paper discusses the impact of sampling error on the construction of confidence intervals around effect sizes. Sampling error affects the location and precision of confidence intervals. Meta-analytic resampling demonstrates that confidence intervals can haphazardly bounce around the true population parameter. Special software with graphical…

  11. Acceleration-induced electrocardiographic interval changes.

    PubMed

    Whinnery, C C; Whinnery, J E

    1988-02-01

    The electrocardiographic intervals (PR, QRS, QT, and RR) before, during, and post +Gz stress were measured in 24 healthy male subjects undergoing +Gz centrifuge exposure. The PR and QRS intervals responded in a predictable manner, shortening during stress and returning to baseline resting values post-stress. The QT interval, however, was not observed to be dependent solely on heart rate. Bazett's formula, which was developed to correct for heart rate variability, did not adequately result in a homogeneous correction of the QT interval for each stress-related period. During +Gz stress, the QT was shortened, and the QTc prolonged. The QT interval remained shortened even though the heart rate returned to baseline (with the QTc undercorrected) in the post-stress period. The QT (QTc) interval variations probably reflect the effects of both heart rate and autonomic balance during and after +Gz stress, and may provide a measure of the prevailing autonomic (sympathetic or parasympathetic) tone existing at a given point associated with +Gz stress. These electrocardiographic interval changes define the normal response for healthy individuals. Individuals with exaggerated autonomic responses could be identified by comparing their responses to these normal responses resulting from +Gz stress. PMID:3345170

  12. Interval modeling of dynamics for multibody systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Ekaterina

    2007-02-01

    Modeling of multibody systems is an important though demanding field of application for interval arithmetic. Interval modeling of dynamics is particularly challenging, not least because of the differential equations which have to be solved in the process. Most modeling tools transform these equations into a (non-autonomous) initial value problem, interval algorithms for solving of which are known. The challenge then consists in finding interfaces between these algorithms and the modeling tools. This includes choosing between "symbolic" and "numerical" modeling environments, transforming the usually non-autonomous resulting system into an autonomous one, ensuring conformity of the new interval version to the old numerical, etc. In this paper, we focus on modeling multibody systems' dynamics with the interval extension of the "numerical" environment MOBILE, discuss the techniques which make the uniform treatment of interval and non-interval modeling easier, comment on the wrapping effect, and give reasons for our choice of MOBILE by comparing the results achieved with its help with those obtained by analogous symbolic tools.

  13. Post-KR Delay Intervals and Mental Practice: A Test of Adams' Closed Loop Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bole, Ronald

    1976-01-01

    The present study suggests that post-KR delay interval time or activity in the interval has little to do with learning on a self-paced positioning task, not ruling out that on ballistic tasks or more complex nonballistic tasks that a learner could make use of additional time or strategy. (MB)

  14. Advanced Interval Management: A Benefit Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timer, Sebastian; Peters, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This document is the final report for the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC)- sponsored task order 'Possible Benefits for Advanced Interval Management Operations.' Under this research project, Architecture Technology Corporation performed an analysis to determine the maximum potential benefit to be gained if specific Advanced Interval Management (AIM) operations were implemented in the National Airspace System (NAS). The motivation for this research is to guide NASA decision-making on which Interval Management (IM) applications offer the most potential benefit and warrant further research.

  15. Importance of QT interval in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Ambhore, Anand; Teo, Swee-Guan; Bin Omar, Abdul Razakjr; Poh, Kian-Keong

    2014-12-01

    Long QT interval is an important finding that is often missed by electrocardiogram interpreters. Long QT syndrome (inherited and acquired) is a potentially lethal cardiac channelopathy that is frequently mistaken for epilepsy. We present a case of long QT syndrome with multiple cardiac arrests presenting as syncope and seizures. The long QTc interval was aggravated by hypomagnesaemia and drugs, including clarithromycin and levofloxacin. Multiple drugs can cause prolongation of the QT interval, and all physicians should bear this in mind when prescribing these drugs.

  16. Time-dependent effects of sodium arsenite on DNA breakage and apoptosis observed in the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Brink, Andreas; Schulz, Berta; Kobras, Kristin; Lutz, Werner K; Stopper, Helga

    2006-02-28

    To assess genotoxic effects of sodium arsenite (NaAsO2) the single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) had been conducted in various studies indicating genotoxicity. However, DNA fragmentation due to NaAsO2-induced apoptosis may constitute a bias in the interpretation of the results. Apoptotic cells can show typically large and diffuse comets, which are usually excluded during genotoxicity analysis. It is controversial whether there is a time-window in which the apoptotic process generates comets that would falsely be interpreted to be the result of genotoxic DNA damage. Therefore, we evaluated frequency histograms for single-cell measures of tail DNA (% DNA in comet tail) in 30-min intervals after incubation of mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells with sodium arsenite (NaAsO2). In parallel, we evaluated apoptosis by measuring annexin V-positive cells with flow cytometry, and visualized apoptotic cells on slides by Hoechst bisbenzimide 33258 staining. The first observed effect at 30 min after treatment was an increase in annexin V-positive cells. At about 60 min the number of cells with moderate DNA migration increased in the comet-assay analysis. After 90 min, an increase in the number of cells with high levels of DNA migration was observed, which resulted in a bimodal distribution of cells with moderate and high levels of DNA migration. Hoechst-stained apoptotic cells could only be observed at later times (> or = 120 min). This means that the treatment would have been considered to be genotoxic if analysed at 120 min even if the cells with high levels of DNA migration would have been excluded. The occurrence of annexin V-positive cells preceded the appearance of cells with moderate levels of DNA migration. We hypothesize that these cells were early apoptotic cells and not indicative of genotoxic damage. We conclude that DNA-damaging effects of NaAsO2 cannot adequately be interpreted if the comet assay is not accompanied by separate analysis of early endpoints for

  17. Globally convergent autocalibration using interval analysis.

    PubMed

    Fusiello, Andrea; Benedetti, Arrigo; Farenzena, Michela; Busti, Alessandro

    2004-12-01

    We address the problem of autocalibration of a moving camera with unknown constant intrinsic parameters. Existing autocalibration techniques use numerical optimization algorithms whose convergence to the correct result cannot be guaranteed, in general. To address this problem, we have developed a method where an interval branch-and-bound method is employed for numerical minimization. Thanks to the properties of Interval Analysis this method converges to the global solution with mathematical certainty and arbitrary accuracy and the only input information it requires from the user are a set of point correspondences and a search interval. The cost function is based on the Huang-Faugeras constraint of the essential matrix. A recently proposed interval extension based on Bernstein polynomial forms has been investigated to speed up the search for the solution. Finally, experimental results are presented. PMID:15573823

  18. Efficient Computation Of Confidence Intervals Of Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C.

    1992-01-01

    Study focuses on obtaining efficient algorithm for estimation of confidence intervals of ML estimates. Four algorithms selected to solve associated constrained optimization problem. Hybrid algorithms, following search and gradient approaches, prove best.

  19. Predictive intervals for age-specific fertility.

    PubMed

    Keilman, N; Pham, D Q

    2000-03-01

    A multivariate ARIMA model is combined with a Gamma curve to predict confidence intervals for age-specific birth rates by 1-year age groups. The method is applied to observed age-specific births in Norway between 1900 and 1995, and predictive intervals are computed for each year up to 2050. The predicted two-thirds confidence intervals for Total Fertility (TF) around 2010 agree well with TF errors in old population forecasts made by Statistics Norway. The method gives useful predictions for age-specific fertility up to the years 2020-30. For later years, the intervals become too wide. Methods that do not take into account estimation errors in the ARIMA model coefficients underestimate the uncertainty for future TF values. The findings suggest that the margin between high and low fertility variants in official population forecasts for many Western countries are too narrow. PMID:12158991

  20. Almost primes in almost all short intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TERÄVÄINEN, JONI

    2016-09-01

    Let $E_k$ be the set of positive integers having exactly $k$ prime factors. We show that almost all intervals $[x,x+\\log^{1+\\varepsilon} x]$ contain $E_3$ numbers, and almost all intervals $[x,x+\\log^{3.51} x]$ contain $E_2$ numbers. By this we mean that there are only $o(X)$ integers $1\\leq x\\leq X$ for which the mentioned intervals do not contain such numbers. The result for $E_3$ numbers is optimal up to the $\\varepsilon$ in the exponent. The theorem on $E_2$ numbers improves a result of Harman, which had the exponent $7+\\varepsilon$ in place of $3.51$. We will also consider general $E_k$ numbers, and find them on intervals whose lengths approach $\\log x$ as $k\\to \\infty$.

  1. Calibration intervals at Bendix Kansas City

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.T.

    1980-01-01

    The calibration interval evaluation methods and control in each calibrating department of the Bendix Corp., Kansas City Division is described, and a more detailed description of those employed in metrology is provided.

  2. Patterns of interval correlations in neural oscillators with adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Schwalger, Tilo; Lindner, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Neural firing is often subject to negative feedback by adaptation currents. These currents can induce strong correlations among the time intervals between spikes. Here we study analytically the interval correlations of a broad class of noisy neural oscillators with spike-triggered adaptation of arbitrary strength and time scale. Our weak-noise theory provides a general relation between the correlations and the phase-response curve (PRC) of the oscillator, proves anti-correlations between neighboring intervals for adapting neurons with type I PRC and identifies a single order parameter that determines the qualitative pattern of correlations. Monotonically decaying or oscillating correlation structures can be related to qualitatively different voltage traces after spiking, which can be explained by the phase plane geometry. At high firing rates, the long-term variability of the spike train associated with the cumulative interval correlations becomes small, independent of model details. Our results are verified by comparison with stochastic simulations of the exponential, leaky, and generalized integrate-and-fire models with adaptation. PMID:24348372

  3. Reinforcer concentration effects on a fixed-interval schedule.

    PubMed

    Blomeley, Frances J; Lowe, C F; Wearden, J H

    2004-07-30

    Four rats received training on a mixed FI 30-s FI 150-s schedule, where the different FI values were associated with different levers. During baseline, the reinforcer was a 30% concentration of condensed milk. During subsequent testing sessions, the reinforcer concentration was varied within sessions over values of 10, 30, 50, and 70%. Measures of behaviour were taken from the FI 30-s lever during trials where the reinforcer was delivered for responses on the other lever. Increasing the reinforcer concentration which began the interval (a) increased the time to start responding in the interval, and (b) increased the location of the response peak on the FI 30-s lever (often to values well above 30s). Response rate at the peak, and spread of the response rate versus time function, changed much less with reinforcer concentration. The data are discussed relative to predictions derived from Scalar Expectancy Theory, the Behavioural Theory of Timing, and the Tuned-trace model.

  4. SOPIE: Sequential Off-Pulse Interval Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutte, Willem D.

    2016-07-01

    SOPIE (Sequential Off-Pulse Interval Estimation) provides functions to non-parametrically estimate the off-pulse interval of a source function originating from a pulsar. The technique is based on a sequential application of P-values obtained from goodness-of-fit tests for the uniform distribution, such as the Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Cramér-von Mises, Anderson-Darling and Rayleigh goodness-of-fit tests.

  5. Reference intervals for serum creatine kinase in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Mougios, Vassilis

    2007-01-01

    Background The serum concentration of creatine kinase (CK) is used widely as an index of skeletal muscle fibre damage in sport and exercise. Since athletes have higher CK values than non‐athletes, comparing the values of athletes to the normal values established in non‐athletes is pointless. The purpose of this study was to introduce reference intervals for CK in athletes. Method CK was assayed in serum samples from 483 male athletes and 245 female athletes, aged 7–44. Samples had been obtained throughout the training and competition period. For comparison, CK was also assayed in a smaller number of non‐athletes. Reference intervals (2.5th to 97.5th percentile) were calculated by the non‐parametric method. Results The reference intervals were 82–1083 U/L (37°C) in male and 47–513 U/L in female athletes. The upper reference limits were twice the limits reported for moderately active non‐athletes in the literature or calculated in the non‐athletes in this study. The upper limits were up to six times higher than the limits reported for inactive individuals in the literature. When reference intervals were calculated specifically in male football (soccer) players and swimmers, a threefold difference in the upper reference limit was found (1492 vs 523 U/L, respectively), probably resulting from the different training and competition demands of the two sports. Conclusion Sport training and competition have profound effects on the reference intervals for serum CK. Introducing sport‐specific reference intervals may help to avoid misinterpretation of high values and to optimise training. PMID:17526622

  6. Probability Distribution for Flowing Interval Spacing

    SciTech Connect

    S. Kuzio

    2004-09-22

    Fracture spacing is a key hydrologic parameter in analyses of matrix diffusion. Although the individual fractures that transmit flow in the saturated zone (SZ) cannot be identified directly, it is possible to determine the fractured zones that transmit flow from flow meter survey observations. The fractured zones that transmit flow as identified through borehole flow meter surveys have been defined in this report as flowing intervals. The flowing interval spacing is measured between the midpoints of each flowing interval. The determination of flowing interval spacing is important because the flowing interval spacing parameter is a key hydrologic parameter in SZ transport modeling, which impacts the extent of matrix diffusion in the SZ volcanic matrix. The output of this report is input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). Specifically, the analysis of data and development of a data distribution reported herein is used to develop the uncertainty distribution for the flowing interval spacing parameter for the SZ transport abstraction model. Figure 1-1 shows the relationship of this report to other model reports that also pertain to flow and transport in the SZ. Figure 1-1 also shows the flow of key information among the SZ reports. It should be noted that Figure 1-1 does not contain a complete representation of the data and parameter inputs and outputs of all SZ reports, nor does it show inputs external to this suite of SZ reports. Use of the developed flowing interval spacing probability distribution is subject to the limitations of the assumptions discussed in Sections 5 and 6 of this analysis report. The number of fractures in a flowing interval is not known. Therefore, the flowing intervals are assumed to be composed of one flowing zone in the transport simulations. This analysis may overestimate the flowing interval spacing because the number of fractures that contribute to a flowing interval cannot be

  7. Optimising sprint interval exercise to maximise energy expenditure and enjoyment in overweight boys.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Nicole A; Fournier, Paul A; Licari, Melissa K; Braham, Rebecca; Guelfi, Kym J

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the sprint frequency that when supplemented to continuous exercise at the intensity that maximises fat oxidation (Fat(max)), optimises energy expenditure, acute postexercise energy intake and enjoyment. Eleven overweight boys completed 30 min of either continuous cycling at Fat(max) (MOD), or sprint interval exercise that consisted of continuous cycling at Fat(max) interspersed with 4-s maximal sprints every 2 min (SI(120)), every 1 min (SI(60)), or every 30 s (SI(30)). Energy expenditure was assessed during exercise, after which participants completed a modified Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PACES) followed by a buffet-type breakfast to measure acute postexercise energy intake. Energy expenditure increased with increasing sprint frequency (p < 0.001), but the difference between SI(60) and SI(30) did not reach significance (p = 0.076), likely as a result of decreased sprint quality as indicated by a significant decline in peak power output from SI(60) to SI(30) (p = 0.034). Postexercise energy intake was similar for MOD, SI(120), and SI(30) (p > 0.05), but was significantly less for SI(60) compared with MOD (p = 0.025). PACES was similar for MOD, SI(120), and SI(60) (p > 0.05), but was less for SI(30) compared with MOD (p = 0.038), SI(120) (p = 0.009), and SI(60) (p = 0.052). In conclusion, SI(60) appears optimal for overweight boys given that it maximises energy expenditure (i.e., there was no additional increase in expenditure with a further increase in sprint frequency) without prompting increased energy intake. This, coupled with the fact that enjoyment was not compromised, may have important implications for increased adherence and long-term energy balance.

  8. The lucid interval associated with epidural bleeding: evolving understanding.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to elucidate the evolution of our understanding of the term "lucid interval." A number of texts were reviewed to assess their suitability for analysis. The primary requirement was that the text contain detailed descriptions of a series of patients. Details of the clinical course, the findings and timing of surgery, and, when relevant, the time of death and postmortem findings were required. Books written by Henri-François Le Dran, Percival Pott, and James Hill fulfilled these criteria. Surgical findings included the presence and type of fractures, changes in the bone, separation of periosteum, malodorous or purulent material, tense brain, and hematoma. Postmortem findings supplemented and/or complemented the surgical findings. The courses of the patients were then tabulated, and the correlation between different clinical and operative findings was thereby determined. Our understanding of a lucid interval began in the early 18th century with the work of Henri-François Le Dran and Percival Pott in London. They did not, however, demonstrate an interval without symptoms between trauma and deterioration in patients with epidural hematomas (EDHs). The interval they described was longer than usually expected with EDHs and occurred exclusively in patients who had a posttraumatic infection. In 1751, James Hill, from Dumfries, Scotland, described the first hematoma-related lucid interval in a patient with a subdural hematoma. The first case of a lucid interval associated with an EDH was described by John Abernethy. In the 19th century, Jonathan Hutchinson and Walter Jacobson described the interval as it is known today, in cases of EDH. The most recent work on the topic came from studies in Cincinnati and Oslo, where it was demonstrated that bleeding can separate dura mater and that hemorrhage into the epidural space can be shunted out via the veins. This shunting could delay the accumulation of a hematoma and thus the rise in intracranial pressure

  9. The lucid interval associated with epidural bleeding: evolving understanding.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to elucidate the evolution of our understanding of the term "lucid interval." A number of texts were reviewed to assess their suitability for analysis. The primary requirement was that the text contain detailed descriptions of a series of patients. Details of the clinical course, the findings and timing of surgery, and, when relevant, the time of death and postmortem findings were required. Books written by Henri-François Le Dran, Percival Pott, and James Hill fulfilled these criteria. Surgical findings included the presence and type of fractures, changes in the bone, separation of periosteum, malodorous or purulent material, tense brain, and hematoma. Postmortem findings supplemented and/or complemented the surgical findings. The courses of the patients were then tabulated, and the correlation between different clinical and operative findings was thereby determined. Our understanding of a lucid interval began in the early 18th century with the work of Henri-François Le Dran and Percival Pott in London. They did not, however, demonstrate an interval without symptoms between trauma and deterioration in patients with epidural hematomas (EDHs). The interval they described was longer than usually expected with EDHs and occurred exclusively in patients who had a posttraumatic infection. In 1751, James Hill, from Dumfries, Scotland, described the first hematoma-related lucid interval in a patient with a subdural hematoma. The first case of a lucid interval associated with an EDH was described by John Abernethy. In the 19th century, Jonathan Hutchinson and Walter Jacobson described the interval as it is known today, in cases of EDH. The most recent work on the topic came from studies in Cincinnati and Oslo, where it was demonstrated that bleeding can separate dura mater and that hemorrhage into the epidural space can be shunted out via the veins. This shunting could delay the accumulation of a hematoma and thus the rise in intracranial pressure

  10. Variations in rupture process with recurrence interval in a repeated small earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vidale, J.E.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Cole, A.; Marone, C.

    1994-01-01

    In theory and in laboratory experiments, friction on sliding surfaces such as rock, glass and metal increases with time since the previous episode of slip. This time dependence is a central pillar of the friction laws widely used to model earthquake phenomena. On natural faults, other properties, such as rupture velocity, porosity and fluid pressure, may also vary with the recurrence interval. Eighteen repetitions of the same small earthquake, separated by intervals ranging from a few days to several years, allow us to test these laboratory predictions in situ. The events with the longest time since the previous earthquake tend to have about 15% larger seismic moment than those with the shortest intervals, although this trend is weak. In addition, the rupture durations of the events with the longest recurrence intervals are more than a factor of two shorter than for the events with the shortest intervals. Both decreased duration and increased friction are consistent with progressive fault healing during the time of stationary contact.In theory and in laboratory experiments, friction on sliding surfaces such as rock, glass and metal increases with time since the previous episode of slip. This time dependence is a central pillar of the friction laws widely used to model earthquake phenomena. On natural faults, other properties, such as rupture velocity, porosity and fluid pressure, may also vary with the recurrence interval. Eighteen repetitions of the same small earthquake, separated by intervals ranging from a few days to several years, allow us to test these laboratory predictions in situ. The events with the longest time since the previous earthquake tend to have about 15% larger seismic moment than those with the shortest intervals, although this trend is weak. In addition, the rupture durations of the events with the longest recurrence intervals are more than a factor of two shorter than for the events with the shortest intervals. Both decreased duration and

  11. Regularization and control of irregular vehicular motion through a series of signals at disordered intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    We study the control and regularization of irregular motion of a vehicle moving through the series of traffic signals positioned at disordered intervals. All signals are controlled by both cycle time and phase shift. The nonlinear dynamic model of the vehicular motion controlled by signals is described in terms of the stochastic nonlinear map. The vehicle exhibits a very complex behavior with varying both cycle time and strength of disordered intervals. The delay or advance of tour time is compensated by synchronizing the phase shift with disordered intervals. The irregular motion induced by the disordered configuration of signals is regularized for various values of cycle time.

  12. Musical intervals and relative pitch: Frequency resolution, not interval resolution, is special

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Josh H.; Keebler, Michael V.; Micheyl, Christophe; Oxenham, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Pitch intervals are central to most musical systems, which utilize pitch at the expense of other acoustic dimensions. It seemed plausible that pitch might uniquely permit precise perception of the interval separating two sounds, as this could help explain its importance in music. To explore this notion, a simple discrimination task was used to measure the precision of interval perception for the auditory dimensions of pitch, brightness, and loudness. Interval thresholds were then expressed in units of just-noticeable differences for each dimension, to enable comparison across dimensions. Contrary to expectation, when expressed in these common units, interval acuity was actually worse for pitch than for loudness or brightness. This likely indicates that the perceptual dimension of pitch is unusual not for interval perception per se, but rather for the basic frequency resolution it supports. The ubiquity of pitch in music may be due in part to this fine-grained basic resolution. PMID:20968366

  13. Dietary reference intervals for vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Kevin D

    2012-01-01

    Dietary reference intervals relate to the distribution of dietary requirement for a particular nutrient as defined by the distribution of physiological requirement for that nutrient. These have more commonly been called Dietary Reference Values (DRV) or Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI), amongst other names. The North American DRI for vitamin D are the most current dietary reference intervals and arguably arising from the most comprehensive evaluation and report on vitamin D nutrition to date. These are a family of nutrient reference values, including the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR), the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA), the Adequate Intake, and Tolerable Upper Intake Level. In particular, the EAR is used for planning and assessing diets of populations; it also serves as the basis for calculating the RDA, a value intended to meet the needs of nearly all people. The DRVs for vitamin D in the UK and the European Community have been in existence for almost two decades, and both are currently under review. The present paper briefly overviews these three sets of dietary reference intervals as case studies to highlight both the similarities as well as possible differences that may exist between reference intervals for vitamin D in different countries/regions. In addition, it highlights the scientific basis upon which these are based, which may explain some of the differences. Finally, it also overviews how the dietary reference intervals for vitamin D may be applied, and especially in terms of assessing the adequacy of vitamin D intake in populations. PMID:22536775

  14. Realtime Multichannel System for Beat to Beat QT Interval Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starc, Vito; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The measurement of beat-to-beat QT interval variability (QTV) shows clinical promise for identifying several types of cardiac pathology. However, until now, there has been no device capable of displaying, in real time on a beattobeat basis, changes in QTV in all 12 conventional leads in a continuously monitored patient. While several software programs have been designed to analyze QTV, heretofore, such programs have all involved only a few channels (at most) and/or have required laborious user interaction or offline calculations and postprocessing, limiting their clinical utility. This paper describes a PC-based ECG software program that in real time, acquires, analyzes and displays QTV and also PQ interval variability (PQV) in each of the eight independent channels that constitute the 12lead conventional ECG. The system also processes certain related signals that are derived from singular value decomposition and that help to reduce the overall effects of noise on the realtime QTV and PQV results.

  15. Stability Problem of Canard-Cycles on a Finite Interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumakov, Gennadii A.; Chumakova, Nataliya A.; Lashina, Elena A.

    2010-09-01

    A detailed study of two-variable mathematical model of a heterogeneous catalytic reaction is presented with special attention to the stability problem of canard-cycles on a finite interval. Our analysis of the global error behavior in a long-time numerical integration shows that a high sensitive dependence on the initial conditions appears due to the existence of a shower-type bundle of trajectories which is formed by stable and unstable canard solutions.

  16. Pigeons' choices between fixed-interval and random-interval schedules: utility of variability?

    PubMed

    Andrzejewski, Matthew E; Cardinal, Claudia D; Field, Douglas P; Flannery, Barbara A; Johnson, Michael; Bailey, Kathleen; Hineline, Philip N

    2005-03-01

    Pigeons' choosing between fixed-interval and random-interval schedules of reinforcement was investigated in three experiments using a discrete-trial procedure. In all three experiments, the random-interval schedule was generated by sampling a probability distribution at an interval (and in multiples of the interval) equal to that of the fixed-interval schedule. Thus the programmed delays to reinforcement on the random alternative were never shorter and were often longer than the fixed interval. Despite this feature, the fixed schedule was not strongly preferred. Increases in the probability used to generate the random interval resulted in decreased preferences for the fixed schedule. In addition, the number of consecutive choices on the preferred alternative varied directly with preference, whereas the consecutive number of choices on the nonpreferred alternative was fairly constant. The probability of choosing the random alternative was unaffected by the immediately prior interval encountered on that schedule, even when it was very long relative to the average value. The results loosely support conceptions of a "preference for variability" from foraging theory and the "utility of behavioral variability" from human decision-making literatures.

  17. Statistics of return intervals between long heartbeat intervals and their usability for online prediction of disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Kireenkov, Igor S.; Nifontov, Eugene M.; Bunde, Armin

    2009-06-01

    We study the statistics of return intervals between large heartbeat intervals (above a certain threshold Q) in 24 h records obtained from healthy subjects. We find that both the linear and the nonlinear long-term memory inherent in the heartbeat intervals lead to power-laws in the probability density function PQ(r) of the return intervals. As a consequence, the probability WQ(t; Δt) that at least one large heartbeat interval will occur within the next Δt heartbeat intervals, with an increasing elapsed number of intervals t after the last large heartbeat interval, follows a power-law. Based on these results, we suggest a method of obtaining a priori information about the occurrence of the next large heartbeat interval, and thus to predict it. We show explicitly that the proposed method, which exploits long-term memory, is superior to the conventional precursory pattern recognition technique, which focuses solely on short-term memory. We believe that our results can be straightforwardly extended to obtain more reliable predictions in other physiological signals like blood pressure, as well as in other complex records exhibiting multifractal behaviour, e.g. turbulent flow, precipitation, river flows and network traffic.

  18. Radial basis function networks with linear interval regression weights for symbolic interval data.

    PubMed

    Su, Shun-Feng; Chuang, Chen-Chia; Tao, C W; Jeng, Jin-Tsong; Hsiao, Chih-Ching

    2012-02-01

    This paper introduces a new structure of radial basis function networks (RBFNs) that can successfully model symbolic interval-valued data. In the proposed structure, to handle symbolic interval data, the Gaussian functions required in the RBFNs are modified to consider interval distance measure, and the synaptic weights of the RBFNs are replaced by linear interval regression weights. In the linear interval regression weights, the lower and upper bounds of the interval-valued data as well as the center and range of the interval-valued data are considered. In addition, in the proposed approach, two stages of learning mechanisms are proposed. In stage 1, an initial structure (i.e., the number of hidden nodes and the adjustable parameters of radial basis functions) of the proposed structure is obtained by the interval competitive agglomeration clustering algorithm. In stage 2, a gradient-descent kind of learning algorithm is applied to fine-tune the parameters of the radial basis function and the coefficients of the linear interval regression weights. Various experiments are conducted, and the average behavior of the root mean square error and the square of the correlation coefficient in the framework of a Monte Carlo experiment are considered as the performance index. The results clearly show the effectiveness of the proposed structure.

  19. Perceptual interference decays over short unfilled intervals.

    PubMed

    Schulkind, M D

    2000-09-01

    The perceptual interference effect refers to the fact that object identification is directly related to the amount of information available at initial exposure. The present article investigated whether perceptual interference would dissipate when a short, unfilled interval was introduced between exposures to a degraded object. Across three experiments using both musical and pictorial stimuli, identification performance increased directly with the length of the unfilled interval. Consequently, significant perceptual interference was obtained only when the interval between exposures was relatively short (< 500 msec for melodies; < 300 msec for pictures). These results are consistent with explanations that attribute perceptual interference to increased perceptual noise created by exposures to highly degraded objects. The data also suggest that perceptual interference is mediated by systems that are not consciously controlled by the subject and that perceptual interference in the visual domain decays more rapidly than perceptual interference in the auditory domain. PMID:11105520

  20. Atomic momentum patterns with narrower intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Baoguo; Jin, Shengjie; Dong, Xiangyu; Liu, Zhe; Yin, Lan; Zhou, Xiaoji

    2016-10-01

    We studied the atomic momentum distribution of a superposition of Bloch states in the lowest band of an optical lattice after the action of the standing-wave pulse. By designing the imposing pulse on this superposed state, an atomic momentum pattern appears with a narrow interval between the adjacent peaks that can be far less than double recoil momentum. The patterns with narrower interval come from the effect of the designed pulse on the superposition of many Bloch states with quasimomenta throughout the first Brillouin zone. Our experimental result of narrow interval peaks is consistent with the theoretical simulation. The patterns of multiple modes with different quasimomenta may be helpful for precise measurement and atomic manipulation.