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Sample records for 30-mj superconducting magnetic

  1. 30-MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage for electric-transmission stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.D.; Rogers, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration operates the electric power transmission system that connects the Pacific Northwest and southern California. The HVAC interties develop 0.35 Hz oscillations when the lines are heavily loaded. A 30 MJ (8.4 kWh) Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) unit with a 10 MW converter can provide system damping for the oscillation. The unit is scheduled for installation in 1982 and operation in 1982-83. Status of the project is described. The conductor has been fully tested electrically and mechanically and the 5 kA superconducting cable has been produced. The 30 MJ superconducting coil is essentially complete. All major components of the electrical and cryogenic systems except the nonconducting dewar have been completed. The refrigerator and converter are undergoing tests. The system is to be located at the BPA Tacoma Substation and operated by microwave link from Portland, OR.

  2. 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage stabilizing coil. Final report for construction

    SciTech Connect

    1983-03-01

    This report covers Phase II, Fabrication and Delivery of the 30 MJ Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Stabilizing Coil. A history of the manufacturing and assembly phase of the magnet is presented. Major problems and solutions are summarized, and illustrations of the major operations are provided. The Quality Assurance program is described with a listing of all nonconformance reports. Design documentation is provided, including a Design Document Index, monthly progress reports, and a list of papers given on the project. Appendices to the report contain copies of released and revised design calculations, test reports, assembly procedure, and nonconformance reports and engineering dispositions.

  3. 30-MJ SMES system operating experience: November 1982-June 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Schermer, R.I.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes performance measurements on the dewar, coil, and cryogenic system for the 30-MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit that has recently been tested at a Bonneville Power Administration substation in Tacoma, Washington. The cryostat, the world's largest fiber-reinforced plastic, open-mouthed dewar, boils off 12 l/h in accordance with previous calculations. Cyclic losses in the coil, 54 W for +-8.4-MW modulation at 1 Hz, are approximately 50% greater than calculated. Refrigerator capacity is adequate to handle the heat produced by the average modulation demand on the coil.

  4. Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) program, January 1-December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.D.

    1982-02-01

    Work reported is on the development of a 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit for use by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to stabilize power oscillations on their Pacific AC Intertie. The 30 MJ superconducting coil manufacture was completed. Design of the seismic mounting of the coil to the nonconducting dewar lid and a concrete foundation is complete. The superconducting application VAR (SAVAR) control study indicated a low economic advantage and the SAVAR program was terminated. An economic and technological evaluation of superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) was completed and the results are reported.

  5. Superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Willen, E.; Dahl, P.; Herrera, J.

    1985-01-01

    This report provides a self-consistent description of a magnetic field in the aperture of a superconducting magnet and details how this field can be calculated in a magnet with cos theta current distribution in the coils. A description of an apparatus that can be used to measure the field uniformity in the aperture has been given. Finally, a detailed description of the magnet being developed for use in the Superconducting Super Collider is given. When this machine is built, it will be by far the largest application of superconductivity to date and promises to make possible the experimental discoveries needed to understand the basic laws of nature governing the world in which we live.

  6. Superconducting magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Extensive computer based engineering design effort resulted in optimization of a superconducting magnet design with an average bulk current density of approximately 12KA/cm(2). Twisted, stranded 0.0045 inch diameter NbTi superconductor in a copper matrix was selected. Winding the coil from this bundle facilitated uniform winding of the small diameter wire. Test coils were wound using a first lot of the wire. The actual packing density was measured from these. Interwinding voltage break down tests on the test coils indicated the need for adjustment of the wire insulation on the lot of wire subsequently ordered for construction of the delivered superconducting magnet. Using the actual packing densities from the test coils, a final magnet design, with the required enhancement and field profile, was generated. All mechanical and thermal design parameters were then also fixed. The superconducting magnet was then fabricated and tested. The first test was made with the magnet immersed in liquid helium at 4.2K. The second test was conducted at 2K in vacuum. In the latter test, the magnet was conduction cooled from the mounting flange end.

  7. Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) program. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.D.

    1981-03-01

    Work is reported on the development of two superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) units. One is a 30-MJ unit for use by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to stabilize power oscillations on their Pacific AC Intertie, and the second is a 1- to 10-GWh unit for use as a diurnal load leveling device. Emphasis has been on the stabilizing system. The manufacturing phase of the 30-MJ superconducting coil was initiated and the coil fabrication has advanced rapidly. The two converter power transformers were manufactured, successfully factory tested, and shipped. One transformer reached the Tacoma Substation in good condition; the other was dropped enroute and has been returned to the factory for rebuilding. Insulation of the 30-MJ coil has been examined for high voltage effects apt to be caused by transients such as inductive voltage spikes from the protective dump circuit. The stabilizing system converter and protective energy dump system were completed, factory tested, and delivered.

  8. Superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Satti, John A.

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  9. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  10. Hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Tixador, P.; Hiebel, P.; Brunet, Y.

    1996-07-01

    Superconductors, especially high T{sub c} ones, are the most attractive materials to design stable and fully passive magnetic suspensions which have to control five degrees of freedom. The hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions present high performances and a simple cooling mode. They consist of a permanent magnet bearing, stabilized by a suitable magnet-superconductor structure. Several designs are given and compared in terms of forces and stiffnesses. The design of the magnet bearing plays an important part. The superconducting magnetic bearing participates less in levitation but must provide a high stabilizing stiffness. This is achieved by the magnet configuration, a good material in term of critical current density and field cooling. A hybrid superconducting suspension for a flywheel is presented. This system consists of a magnet thrust bearing stabilized by superconductors interacting with an alternating polarity magnet structure. First tests and results are reported. Superconducting materials are magnetically melt-textured YBaCuO.

  11. Rapid cycling superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbricatore, P.; Farinon, S.; Gambardella, U.; Greco, M.; Volpini, G.

    2006-04-01

    The paper deals with the general problematic related to the development of fast cycled superconducting magnets for application in particle accelerator machines. Starting from the requirements of SIS300 synchrotron under design at GSI and an envisaged future Super-SPS injector at CERN, it is shown which developments are mandatory in the superconducting wire technology and in the magnet design field.

  12. Development of superconductive magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurence, J. C.

    1970-01-01

    Survey of superconductive magnets considers - stabilization problems, advances in materials and their uses, and design evolution. Uses of superconducting magnets in particle accelerators and bubble chambers, as well as possible applications in magnetohydrodynamic and thermonuclear power generation and levitation are discussed.

  13. Magnetically levitated superconducting bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, B.R.; Lynds, L. Jr.

    1993-10-26

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet mounted on a shaft that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor supported on a stator in proximity to the magnet. The superconductor is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet and supports a load on the shaft. The interaction between the superconductor and magnet also produces surface screening currents that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature. The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet is supported on the stator and the superconductor is mounted on the shaft. The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field. 6 figures.

  14. Superconducting magnets 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics on Superconducting Magnets; SSC Magnet Industrialization; Collider Quadrupole Development; A Record-Setting Magnet; D20: The Push Beyond 10T; Nonaccelerator Applications; APC Materials Development; High-T{sub c} at Low Temperature; Cable and Cabling-Machine Development; and Analytical Magnet Design.

  15. Superconducting multipole corrector magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    A novel concept of superconducting multipole corrector magnet is discussed. This magnet assembled from 12 identical racetrack type coils and can generate any combination of dipole, quadrupole and sextupole magnetic fields. The coil groups are powered from separate power supplies. In the case of normal dipole, quadrupole and sextupole fields the total field is symmetrical relatively the magnet median plane and there are only five powered separately coil groups. This type multipole corrector magnet was proposed for BTeV, Fermilab project and has following advantages: universal configuration, simple manufacturing and high mechanical stability. The results of magnetic design including the field quality and magnetic forces in comparison with known shell type superconducting correctors are presented.

  16. Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing

    DOEpatents

    Weinberger, Bernard R.; Lynds, Jr., Lahmer

    1993-01-01

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

  17. TPX superconducting PF magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, H.; Christiansen, O.; Cizek, J.

    1995-12-31

    The Westinghouse team has extended the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory advanced conceptual design for the TPX PF magnets through preliminary design. This is the first time superconducting PF magnets have been designed for application in a tokamak. Particular challenges were encountered and solved in developing the coil insulation system, welding the helium stubs, and winding the coil. The authors fabricated a coil using copper stranded CIC conductor, to surface manufacturability issues and demonstrate the solutions.

  18. Superconducting magnetic quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.W.; Shepard, K.W.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    A design was developed for a 350 T/m, 2.6-cm clear aperture superconducting quadrupole focussing element for use in a very low q/m superconducting linac as discussed below. The quadrupole incorporates holmium pole tips, and a rectangular-section winding using standard commercially-available Nb-Ti wire. The magnet was modeled numerically using both 2D and 3D codes, as a basis for numerical ray tracing using the quadrupole as a linac element. Components for a prototype singlet are being procured during FY 1995.

  19. A superconducting magnetic gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    A comparison is made between a magnetic gear using permanent magnets and superconductors. The objective is to see if there are any fundamental reasons why superconducting magnets should not provide higher power densities than permanent magnets. The gear is based on the variable permeability design of Attilah and Howe (2001 IEEE Trans. Magn. 37 2844-46) in which a ring of permanent magnets surrounding a ring of permeable pole pieces with a different spacing gives an internal field component at the beat frequency. Superconductors can provide much larger fields and forces but will saturate the pole pieces. However the gear mechanism still operates, but in a different way. The magnetisation of the pole pieces is now constant but rotates with angle at the beat frequency. The result is a cylindrical Halbach array which produces an internal field with the same symmetry as in the linear regime, but has an analytic solution. In this paper a typical gear system is analysed with finite elements using FlexPDE. It is shown that the gear can work well into the saturation regime and that the Halbach array gives a good approximation to the results. Replacing the permanent magnets with superconducting tapes can give large increases in torque density, and for something like a wind turbine a combined gear and generator is possible. However there are major practical problems. Perhaps the most fundamental is the large high frequency field which is inevitably present and which will cause AC losses. Also large magnetic fields are required, with all the practical problems of high field superconducting magnets in rotating machines. Nevertheless there are ways of mitigating these difficulties and it seems worthwhile to explore the possibilities of this technology further.

  20. Superconducting Magnetic Projectile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell L.; Lawson, Daniel D.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed projectile launcher exploits Meissner effect to transfer much of kinetic energy of relatively massive superconducting plunger to smaller projectile, accelerating projectile to high speed. Because it operates with magnetic fields, launcher not limited by gas-expansion thermodynamics. Plunger energized mechanically and/or chemically, avoiding need for large electrical power supplies and energy-storage systems. Potential applications include launching of projectiles for military purposes and for scientific and industrial tests of hypervelocity impacts.

  1. Superconducting combined function magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.; Fernow, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    Superconducting accelerators and storage rings, presently under construction or in the design phase, are based on separate dipole and quadrupole magnets. It is here suggested that a hybrid lattice configuration consisting of dipoles and combined function gradient magnets would: (1) reduce the number of magnet units and their total cost; and (2) increase the filling factor and thus the energy at a given field. Coil cross sections are presented for the example of the Brookhaven Colliding Beam Accelerator. An asymmetric two-layer cable gradient magnet would have transfer functions of 10.42 G/A and 0.628 G cm/sup -1//A versus 15.77 G/A and 2.03 G cm/sup -1//A of the present separate dipoles and quadrupoles.

  2. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1999-06-22

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  3. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Aized, D.; Schwall, R.E.

    1999-06-22

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil. 15 figs.

  4. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1996-06-11

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  5. Superconducting pipes and levitating magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Yan; Rizzato, Felipe B.

    2006-12-01

    Motivated by a beautiful demonstration of the Faraday and the Lenz laws in which a small neodymium magnet falls slowly through a conducting nonferromagnetic tube, we consider the dynamics of a magnet falling coaxially through a superconducting pipe. Unlike the case of normal conducting pipes, in which the magnet quickly reaches the terminal velocity, inside a superconducting tube the magnet falls freely. On the other hand, to enter the pipe the magnet must overcome a large electromagnetic energy barrier. For sufficiently strong magnets, the barrier is so large that the magnet will not be able to penetrate it and will be levitated over the mouth of the pipe. We calculate the work that must done to force the magnet to enter a superconducting tube. The calculations show that superconducting pipes are very efficient at screening magnetic fields. For example, the magnetic field of a dipole at the center of a short pipe of radius a and length L≳a decays, in the axial direction, with a characteristic length ξ≈0.26a . The efficient screening of the magnetic field might be useful for shielding highly sensitive superconducting quantum interference devices. Finally, the motion of the magnet through a superconducting pipe is compared and contrasted to the flow of ions through a trans-membrane channel.

  6. Superconducting pipes and levitating magnets.

    PubMed

    Levin, Yan; Rizzato, Felipe B

    2006-12-01

    Motivated by a beautiful demonstration of the Faraday and the Lenz laws in which a small neodymium magnet falls slowly through a conducting nonferromagnetic tube, we consider the dynamics of a magnet falling coaxially through a superconducting pipe. Unlike the case of normal conducting pipes, in which the magnet quickly reaches the terminal velocity, inside a superconducting tube the magnet falls freely. On the other hand, to enter the pipe the magnet must overcome a large electromagnetic energy barrier. For sufficiently strong magnets, the barrier is so large that the magnet will not be able to penetrate it and will be levitated over the mouth of the pipe. We calculate the work that must done to force the magnet to enter a superconducting tube. The calculations show that superconducting pipes are very efficient at screening magnetic fields. For example, the magnetic field of a dipole at the center of a short pipe of radius a and length L approximately > a decays, in the axial direction, with a characteristic length xi approximately 0.26a. The efficient screening of the magnetic field might be useful for shielding highly sensitive superconducting quantum interference devices. Finally, the motion of the magnet through a superconducting pipe is compared and contrasted to the flow of ions through a trans-membrane channel. PMID:17280160

  7. Freely oriented portable superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Schmierer, Eric N.; Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.

    2010-01-12

    A freely oriented portable superconducting magnet is disclosed. Coolant is supplied to the superconducting magnet from a repository separate from the magnet, enabling portability of the magnet. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the magnet within a thermal shield. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the thermal shield within a vacuum vessel. The support assemblies restrain movement of the magnet resulting from energizing and cooldown, as well as from changes in orientation, enabling the magnet to be freely orientable.

  8. Superconducting energy storage magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boom, Roger W. (Inventor); Eyssa, Yehia M. (Inventor); Abdelsalam, Mostafa K. (Inventor); Huang, Xianrui (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A superconducting magnet is formed having composite conductors arrayed in coils having turns which lie on a surface defining substantially a frustum of a cone. The conical angle with respect to the central axis is preferably selected such that the magnetic pressure on the coil at the widest portion of the cone is substantially zero. The magnet structure is adapted for use as an energy storage magnet mounted in an earthen trench or tunnel where the strength the surrounding soil is lower at the top of the trench or tunnel than at the bottom. The composite conductor may be formed having a ripple shape to minimize stresses during charge up and discharge and has a shape for each ripple selected such that the conductor undergoes a minimum amount of bending during the charge and discharge cycle. By minimizing bending, the working of the normal conductor in the composite conductor is minimized, thereby reducing the increase in resistance of the normal conductor that occurs over time as the conductor undergoes bending during numerous charge and discharge cycles.

  9. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  10. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda; Mahale, Narayan K.

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  11. Magnetic Levitators With Superconductive Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin P.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic noncontact levitators that include superconductive components provide vibration-damping suspension for cryogenic instruments, according to proposal. Because superconductive components attached to levitated cryogenic instruments, no additional coolant liquid or refrigeration power needed. Also because vibration-damping components of levitators located outside cold chambers, in ambient environment, not necessary to waste coolant liquid or refrigeration power on dissipation of vibrational energy. At least three levitating magnets and three superconductors necessary for stable levitation.

  12. Improved superconducting magnet wire

    DOEpatents

    Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1983-08-16

    This invention is directed to a superconducting tape or wire composed of alternating layers of copper and a niobium-containing superconductor such as niobium of NbTi, Nb/sub 3/Sn or Nb/sub 3/Ge. In general, each layer of the niobium-containing superconductor has a thickness in the range of about 0.05 to 1.5 times its coherence length (which for Nb/sub 3/Si is 41 A) with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170 to 600 A. With the use of very thin layers of the niobium composition having a thickness within the desired range, the critical field (H/sub c/) may be increased by factors of 2 to 4. Also, the thin layers of the superconductor permit the resulting tape or wire to exhibit suitable ductility for winding on a magnet core. These compositions are also characterized by relatively high values of critical temperature and therefore will exhibit a combination of useful properties as superconductors.

  13. Superconductivity in magnetic multipole states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumita, Shuntaro; Yanase, Youichi

    2016-06-01

    Stimulated by recent studies of superconductivity and magnetism with local and global broken inversion symmetry, we investigate the superconductivity in magnetic multipole states in locally noncentrosymmetric metals. We consider a one-dimensional zigzag chain with sublattice-dependent antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling and suppose three magnetic multipole orders: monopole order, dipole order, and quadrupole order. It is demonstrated that the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer state, the pair-density wave (PDW) state, and the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) state are stabilized by these multipole orders, respectively. We show that the PDW state is a topological superconducting state specified by the nontrivial Z2 number and winding number. The origin of the FFLO state without macroscopic magnetic moment is attributed to the asymmetric band structure induced by the magnetic quadrupole order and spin-orbit coupling.

  14. Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; McConnell, B.W.; Phillips, B.A.

    1996-07-02

    A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit. 6 figs.

  15. Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; McConnell, Benjamin W.; Phillips, Benjamin A.

    1996-01-01

    A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit.

  16. Superconductivity from Emerging Magnetic Moments.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Shintaro; Werner, Philipp

    2015-12-11

    Multiorbital Hubbard models are shown to exhibit a spatially isotropic spin-triplet superconducting phase, where equal-spin electrons in different local orbitals are paired. This superconducting state is stabilized in the spin-freezing crossover regime, where local moments emerge in the metal phase, and the pairing is substantially assisted by spin anisotropy. The phase diagram features a superconducting dome below a non-Fermi-liquid metallic region and next to a magnetically ordered phase. We suggest that this type of fluctuating-moment-induced superconductivity, which is not originating from fluctuations near a quantum critical point, may be realized in spin-triplet superconductors such as strontium ruthenates and uranium compounds. PMID:26705649

  17. Superconductivity from Emerging Magnetic Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Shintaro; Werner, Philipp

    2015-12-01

    Multiorbital Hubbard models are shown to exhibit a spatially isotropic spin-triplet superconducting phase, where equal-spin electrons in different local orbitals are paired. This superconducting state is stabilized in the spin-freezing crossover regime, where local moments emerge in the metal phase, and the pairing is substantially assisted by spin anisotropy. The phase diagram features a superconducting dome below a non-Fermi-liquid metallic region and next to a magnetically ordered phase. We suggest that this type of fluctuating-moment-induced superconductivity, which is not originating from fluctuations near a quantum critical point, may be realized in spin-triplet superconductors such as strontium ruthenates and uranium compounds.

  18. Accelerator magnet designs using superconducting magnetic shields

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.C.

    1990-10-01

    Superconducting dipoles and quadrupoles for existing accelerators have a coil surrounded by an iron shield. The shield limits the fringe field of the magnet while having minimal effect on the field shape and providing a small enhancement of the field strength. Shields using superconducting materials can be thinner and lighter and will not experience the potential of a large de-centering force. Boundary conditions for these materials, material properties, mechanical force considerations, cryostat considerations and some possible geometrical configurations for superconducting shields will be described. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Superconducting magnet cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Vander Arend, Peter C.; Fowler, William B.

    1977-01-01

    A device is provided for cooling a conductor to the superconducting state. The conductor is positioned within an inner conduit through which is flowing a supercooled liquid coolant in physical contact with the conductor. The inner conduit is positioned within an outer conduit so that an annular open space is formed therebetween. Through the annular space is flowing coolant in the boiling liquid state. Heat generated by the conductor is transferred by convection within the supercooled liquid coolant to the inner wall of the inner conduit and then is removed by the boiling liquid coolant, making the heat removal from the conductor relatively independent of conductor length.

  20. Cryogenic structural materials for superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-02-22

    This paper reviews research in the United States and Japan on structural materials for high-field superconducting magnets. Superconducting magnets are used for magnetic fusion energy devices and for accelerators that are used in particle-physics research. The cryogenic structural materials that we review are used for magnet cases and support structures. We expect increased materials requirements in the future.

  1. Superconducting magnet for the Maglev transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi

    1994-07-01

    Magnetically levitated vehicles (Maglev) using superconducting magnets have been under development in Japan for the past 23 years. The superconducting magnets for the Maglev system are used in a special environment compared to other applications. They have to work stably subject to both mechanical and electromagnetic disturbances. The brief history of the Maglev development in Japan, the planning of new test line, the superconducting magnet's stability and the on-board refrigeration system will be presented.

  2. Superconducting magnet and fabrication method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, Ulf E. (Inventor); Strayer, Donald M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method of trapping a field in a block of superconductor material, includes providing (i) a block of material defining a bore, (ii) a high permeability core within the bore that defines a low reluctance path through the bore, (iii) a high permeability external structure on the exterior of the block of material that defines a low reluctance path between opposite ends of the core, and (iv) an electromagnet configured to apply a magnetic field around the high permeability core. The method proceeds by energizing the electromagnet to produce an applied magnetic field around the high permeability core, cooling the block of material sufficiently to render the block of material superconducting, de-energizing the electromagnet to result in a trapped magnetic field, and at least partially removing the low reluctance path defined by the core and the external structure in order to increase the magnetic flux density of the trapped magnetic field.

  3. BNL Direct Wind Superconducting Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, B.; Anerella, M.; Escallier, J.; Ghosh, A.; Jain, A.; Marone, A.; Muratore, A.; Wanderer, P.

    2011-09-12

    BNL developed Direct Wind magnet technology is used to create a variety of complex multi-functional multi-layer superconducting coil structures without the need for creating custom production tooling and fixturing for each new project. Our Direct Wind process naturally integrates prestress into the coil structure so external coil collars and yokes are not needed; the final coil package transverse size can then be very compact. Direct Wind magnets are produced with very good field quality via corrections applied during the course of coil winding. The HERA-II and BEPC-II Interaction Region (IR) magnet, J-PARC corrector and Alpha antihydrogen magnetic trap magnets and our BTeV corrector magnet design are discussed here along with a full length ILC IR prototype magnet presently in production and the coils that were wound for an ATF2 upgrade at KEK. A new IR septum magnet design concept for a 6.2 T combined-function IR magnet for eRHIC, a future RHIC upgrade, is introduced here.

  4. Freely Oriented, Portable Superconducting Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmierer, E. N.; Charles, B.; Efferson, R.; Hill, D.; Jankowski, T.; Laughon, G.; Prenger, C.

    2008-03-01

    A high-field low-temperature superconducting solenoidal magnet was developed that is portable and can be operated in any orientation relative to gravity. The design consists of several features that make this feasible; 1) bulk liquid cryogen storage occurs in a separate Dewar rather than as part of the magnet assembly, which allows single-person transport due to each component of the system having low relative weight, 2) vapor generated pressurization that circulates cryogenic fluid to and from the magnet with flexible transfer lines allowing operation in any orientation, and 3) composite, low-conducting structural members are used to suspend the magnet and shield layers within the vacuum vessel that provide a robust low heat loss design. Cooling is provided to the magnet through fluid channels that are in thermal contact with the magnet. The overall design of this magnet system, some of the analyses performed that address unique behavior of this system (pressure rise during a magnet quench and transient cooldown), and test results are presented.

  5. Superconducting magnet needs for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, J.C.; Kashikhin, Vl.; Parker, B.; Palmer, M.A. /; Clarke, J.A.; /Daresbury

    2007-06-01

    The ILC Reference Design Report was completed early in February 2007. The Magnet Systems Group was formed to translate magnetic field requirements into magnet designs and cost estimates for the Reference Design. As presently configured, the ILC will have more than 13,000 magnetic elements of which more than 2300 will be based on superconducting technology. This paper will describe the major superconducting magnet needs for the ILC as presently determined by the Area Systems Groups, responsible for beam line design, working with the Magnet Systems Group. The superconducting magnet components include Main Linac quadrupoles, Positron Source undulators, Damping Ring wigglers, a complex array of Final Focus superconducting elements in the Beam Delivery System, and large superconducting solenoids in the e{sup +} and e{sup -} Sources, and the Ring to Main Linac lines.

  6. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNET NEEDS FOR THE ILC.

    SciTech Connect

    PARKER,B.; TOMPKINS, J.C.; KASHIKHIN, VI.; PALMER, M.A.; CLARKE, J.A.

    2007-06-25

    The ILC Reference Design Report was completed early in February 2007. The Magnet Systems Group was formed to translate magnetic field requirements into magnet designs and cost estimates for the Reference Design. As presently configured, the lLC will have more than 13,000 magnetic elements of which more than 2300 will be based on superconducting technology. This paper will describe the major superconducting magnet needs for the ILC as presently determined by the Area Systems Groups, responsible for beam line design, working with the Magnet Systems Group. The superconducting magnet components include Main Linac quadrupoles, Positron Source undulators, Damping Ring wigglers, a complex array of Final Focus superconducting elements in the Beam Delivery System, and large superconducting solenoids in the e{sup +} and e{sup -} Sources, and the Ring to Main Linac lines.

  7. Space applications of superconductivity - High field magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fickett, F. R.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses developments in superconducting magnets and their applications in space technology. Superconducting magnets are characterized by high fields (to 15T and higher) and high current densities combined with low mass and small size. The superconducting materials and coil design are being improved and new high-strength composites are being used for magnet structural components. Such problems as maintaining low cooling temperatures (near 4 K) for long periods of time and degradation of existing high-field superconductors at low strain levels can be remedied by research and engineering. Some of the proposed space applications of superconducting magnets include: cosmic ray analysis with magnetic spectrometers, energy storage and conversion, energy generation by magnetohydrodynamic and thermonuclear fusion techniques, and propulsion. Several operational superconducting magnet systems are detailed.

  8. Static forces in a superconducting magnet bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Stoye, P.; Fuchs, G.; Gawalek, W.; Goernert, P.; Gladun, A.

    1995-11-01

    Static levitation forces and stiffnesses in a superconducting bearing consisting of concentric ring magnets and a superconducting YBaCuO ring are investigated. In the field-cooled mode a levitation force of 20 N has been achieved. The axial and radial stiffnesses have values of 15 N/mm and 10 N/mm, respectively. An arrangement with two bearings supporting a high speed shaft is now under development. A possible application of superconducting magnetic bearings is flywheels for energy storage.

  9. Field quality aspects of CBA superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, S.; Engelmann, R.; Fernow, R.; Greene, A.F.; Herrera, J.; Kirk, H.; Skaritka, J.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.

    1983-01-01

    A series of superconducting dipole magnets for the BNL Colliding Beam Accelerator which were manufactured to have the proper field quality characteristics has been tested. This report presents the analysis of the field harmonics of these magnets.

  10. High-field superconducting nested coil magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laverick, C.; Lobell, G. M.

    1970-01-01

    Superconducting magnet, employed in conjunction with five types of superconducting cables in a nested solenoid configuration, produces total, central magnetic field strengths approaching 70 kG. The multiple coils permit maximum information on cable characteristics to be gathered from one test.

  11. Field errors in superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M. Q.

    1982-01-01

    The mission of this workshop is a discussion of the techniques for tracking particles through arbitrary accelerator field configurations to look for dynamical effects that are suggested by various theoretical models but are not amenable to detailed analysis. A major motivation for this type of study is that many of our accelerator projects are based on the use of superconducting magnets which have field imperfections that are larger and of a more complex nature than those of conventional magnets. Questions such as resonances, uncorrectable closed orbit effects, coupling between planes, and diffusion mechanisms all assume new importance. Since, simultaneously, we are trying to do sophisticated beam manipulations such as stacking, high current accelerator, long life storage, and low loss extraction, we clearly need efficient and accurate tracking programs to proceed with confidence.

  12. Advanced Manufacturing of Superconducting Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senti, Mark W.

    1996-01-01

    The development of specialized materials, processes, and robotics technology allows for the rapid prototype and manufacture of superconducting and normal magnets which can be used for magnetic suspension applications. Presented are highlights of the Direct Conductor Placement System (DCPS) which enables automatic design and assembly of 3-dimensional coils and conductor patterns using LTS and HTS conductors. The system enables engineers to place conductors in complex patterns with greater efficiency and accuracy, and without the need for hard tooling. It may also allow researchers to create new types of coils and patterns which were never practical before the development of DCPS. The DCPS includes a custom designed eight-axis robot, patented end effector, CoilCAD(trademark) design software, RoboWire(trademark) control software, and automatic inspection.

  13. Topological Superconductivity with Magnetic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazman, Leonid

    2015-03-01

    Chains of magnetic impurities embedded in a conventional s-wave superconductor may induce the formation of a topologically non-trivial superconducting phase. If such a phase is formed along a chain, then its ends carry Majorana fermions. We investigate this possibility theoretically by developing a tight-binding Bogoliubov-de Gennes description, starting from the Shiba bound states induced by the individual magnetic impurities. While the resulting Hamiltonian has similarities with the Kitaev model for one-dimensional spinless p-wave superconductors, there are also important differences, most notably the long-range (power-law) nature of hopping and pairing as well as the complex hopping amplitudes. We develop an analytical theory, complemented by numerical approaches, which accounts for the electron long-range pairing and hopping along the chain, inhomogeneous magnetic order in the chain of embedded impurities or spin-orbit coupling in the host superconductor, and the possibility of direct electron hopping between the impurity atoms. This allows us to elucidate the domain of parameters favoring the formation of a topological phase and to find the spatial structure of Majorana states appearing in that phase. This talk is based on joint work with F. von Oppen, Falko Pientka, and Yang Peng.

  14. Improved thermal isolation for superconducting magnet systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiebe, E. R.

    1974-01-01

    Closed-cycle refrigerating system for superconductive magnet and maser is operated in vacuum environment. Each wire leading from external power source passes through cooling station which blocks heat conduction. In connection with these stations, switch with small incandescent light bulb, which generates heat, is used to stop superconduction.

  15. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clem, John R.; Clem, John R.

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped.

  16. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clem, J.R.; Clem, J.R.

    1983-10-11

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped. 5 figs.

  17. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clem, J.R.

    1982-07-09

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped.

  18. End fields of CBA superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, H.G.; Herrera, J.; Willen, E.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of the two dimensional harmonic content of the end fields generated by the Brookhaven CBA dipole and quadrupole superconducting magnets are presented. Both the local longitudinal structure and the integrated end effects are examined.

  19. Discoveries in Superconductivity, Persistent-Switch Magnets, and Magnetic Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, E. Dwight

    2016-07-01

    A historical review of developments in superconducting magnets begins with Kamerlingh Onnes' construction of the first one in 1914 and extends to the invention of the superconducting persistent switch reported in 1963. A section on magnetic cooling includes refrigeration by paramagnetic salts and by nuclei in metals, as well as direct nuclear demagnetization in which only the nuclei are cooled.

  20. Magnetic separation of organic dyes using superconducting bulk magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, N.; Yokoyama, K.; Hosaka, S.

    Organic dyes were separated from wastewater using superconducting bulk magnets. Two types of particles, magnetic activated carbon (MAC) and reactive nanoscale iron particles (RNIP), were used as magnetic seeds. We set up a magnetic separator consisting of an acrylic pipe located between the magnetic poles of a face-to-face superconducting bulk magnet. We tested the separator under both high-gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) and open-gradient magnetic separation (OGMS). Adsorption ratios greater than 95% were achieved for sufficient concentrations of both MAC and RNIP, and separation ratios greater than 90% were achieved in HGMS and OGMS for certain dye-particle combinations.

  1. Superconducting magnet system for the TPX Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.V.; Chaplin, M.R.; Heim, J.R.

    1993-09-15

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) will be the first Tokamak using superconducting magnets for both the poloidal and toroidal field. It is designed for advanced Tokamak physics experiments in steady-state and long-pulse operation. The TPX superconducting magnets use an advanced cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to that developed in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The toroidal field magnets provide 4.0 T at 2.25 m with a stored energy of 1.05 GJ. The poloidal field magnets provide 18.0 V-s to ohmically start and control long burns of a 2.0 MA plasma.

  2. Superconducting solenoid model magnet test results

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Dimarco, J.; Feher, S.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Hess, C.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Terechkine, I.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    Superconducting solenoid magnets suitable for the room temperature front end of the Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (formerly known as Proton Driver), an 8 GeV superconducting H- linac, have been designed and fabricated at Fermilab, and tested in the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility. We report here results of studies on the first model magnets in this program, including the mechanical properties during fabrication and testing in liquid helium at 4.2 K, quench performance, and magnetic field measurements. We also describe new test facility systems and instrumentation that have been developed to accomplish these tests.

  3. Magnetic Fields in Superconducting Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lander, S. K.

    2013-02-01

    The interior of a neutron star is likely to be predominantly a mixture of superfluid neutrons and superconducting protons. This results in the quantization of the star’s magnetic field into an array of thin flux tubes, producing a macroscopic force very different from the Lorentz force of normal matter. We show that in an axisymmetric superconducting equilibrium the behavior of a magnetic field is governed by a single differential equation. Solving this, we present the first self-consistent superconducting neutron star equilibria with poloidal and mixed poloidal-toroidal fields and also give the first quantitative results for the corresponding magnetically induced distortions to the star. The poloidal component is dominant in all our configurations. We suggest that the transition from normal to superconducting matter in a young neutron star may cause a large-scale field rearrangement.

  4. Superconducting, Magnetically Levitated Merry-Go-Round

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byer, R. L.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Reviews the basic theory underlying the lift and drag forces of a magnetically levitated vehicle riding over a continuous sheet guideway. Included are descriptions of the future vehicle characteristics and the students' construction of a superconducting magnetically levitated merry-go-round demonstration apparatus in a laboratory experiment. (CC)

  5. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.

    2015-03-24

    The work concentrates on few important tasks in enabling techniques for search of superconducting compressed hydrogen compounds and pure hydrogen, investigation of mechanisms of high-Tc superconductivity, and exploring new superconducting materials. Along that route we performed several challenging tasks, including discovery of new forms of polyhydrides of alkali metal Na at very high pressures. These experiments help us to establish the experimental environment that will provide important information on the high-pressure properties of hydrogen-rich compounds. Our recent progress in RIXS measurements opens a whole field of strongly correlated 3d materials. We have developed a systematic approach to measure major electronic parameters, like Hubbard energy U, and charge transfer energy Δ, as function of pressure. This technique will enable also RIXS studies of magnetic excitations in iridates and other 5d materials at the L edge, which attract a lot of interest recently. We have developed new magnetic sensing technique based on optically detected magnetic resonance from NV centers in diamond. The technique can be applied to study superconductivity in high-TC materials, to search for magnetic transitions in strongly correlated and itinerant magnetic materials under pressure. Summary of Project Activities; development of high-pressure experimentation platform for exploration of new potential superconductors, metal polyhydrides (including newly discovered alkali metal polyhydrides), and already known superconductors at the limit of static high-pressure techniques; investigation of special classes of superconducting compounds (high-Tc superconductors, new superconducting materials), that may provide new fundamental knowledge and may prove important for application as high-temperature/high-critical parameter superconductors; investigation of the pressure dependence of superconductivity and magnetic/phase transformations in 3d transition metal compounds, including

  6. Extended Magnetization of Superconducting Pellets in Highly Inhomogeneous Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynou, R.; López, J.; Granados, X.; Torres, R.; Bosch, R.

    The magnetization of superconducting pellets is a worth point in the development of trapped flux superconducting motors. Experimental and simulated data have been reported extensively according to the framework of one or several pulses of a homogeneous magnetizing field applied to a pellet or a set of pellets. In case of cylindrical rotors of low power motors with radial excitation, however, the use of the copper coils to produce the starting magnetization of the pellets produces a highly inhomogeneous magnetic field which cannot be reduced to a 2D standard model. In this work we present an analysis of the magnetization of the superconducting cylindrical rotor of a small motor by using a commercial FEM program, being the rotor magnetized by the working copper coils of the motor. The aim of the study is a report of the magnetization obtained and theheat generated in the HTSC pellets.

  7. Stable superconducting magnet. [high current levels below critical temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boom, R. W. (Inventor)

    1967-01-01

    Operation of a superconducting magnet is considered. A method is described for; (1) obtaining a relatively high current in a superconducting magnet positioned in a bath of a gas refrigerant; (2) operating a superconducting magnet at a relatively high current level without training; and (3) operating a superconducting magnet containing a plurality of turns of a niobium zirconium wire at a relatively high current level without training.

  8. Levitating a Magnet Using a Superconductive Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juergens, Frederick H.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Presented are the materials and a procedure for demonstrating the levitation of a magnet above a superconducting material. The demonstration can be projected with an overhead projector for a large group of students. Kits to simplify the demonstration can be purchased from the Institute for Chemical Education of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.…

  9. Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, V. Vasudeva

    2008-10-01

    This paper gives an Introduction to Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) systems and their applications along with an overview of their present status. Further a brief description to a Micro SMES/UPS system of 0.5 MJ capacity that was developed/tested at IIT, Kharagpur is also included.

  10. Superconducting magnet system for muon beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N.; Johnson, R.P.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Novitski, I.; Yonehara, K.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    A helical cooling channel has been proposed to quickly reduce the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams for muon colliders, neutrino factories, and intense muon sources. A novel superconducting magnet system for a muon beam cooling experiment is being designed at Fermilab. The inner volume of the cooling channel is filled with liquid helium where passing muon beam can be decelerated and cooled in a process of ionization energy loss. The magnet parameters are optimized to match the momentum of the beam as it slows down. The results of 3D magnetic analysis for two designs of magnet system, mechanical and quench protection considerations are discussed.

  11. Magnetic properties of ISABELLE superconducting quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Willen, E; Engelmann, R; Greene, A F; Herrera, J; Jaeger, K; Kirk, H; Robins, K

    1981-01-01

    A number of superconducting quadrupole magnets have been constructed in the ISABELLE project during the past year. With these quadrupoles, it was intended to test construction techniques, magnet performance and measuring capability in an effort to arrive at a quadrupole design satisfactory for use in the storage ring accelerator. While these magnets are designed to have dimensions and field properties close to those needed for regular cell ISABELLE quadrupoles, no effort was made to make them identical to one another. This report details the performance characteristics of one of these magnets, MQ3005.

  12. Superconducting Magnets for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feenan, Peter

    2000-03-01

    MRI is now a well established diagnostic technique in medicine. The richness of information provided by magnetic resonance gives rise to a variety of techniques which in turn leads to a variety of magnet designs. Magnet designers must consider suitable superconduting materials for the magnet, but need also to consider the overall fomat of the magnet to maximise patient comfort, access for clinicians and convenience of use - in some examples magnets are destined for use within the operating theatre and special considerations are required for this. Magnet types include; (1) low-field general purpose imagers, (2) extremity imaging, (3) open magnets with exellent all-round access often employing iron or permanent magnetic materials, (4) high-field magnets, and (5) very high-field (7 Tesla and more) magnets for spectroscopy and functional imaging research. Examples of these magnet varieties will be shown and some of the design challenges discussed.

  13. The superconducting magnet for the Maglev transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Hiroshi

    1994-07-01

    Magnetically levitated vehicles (Maglev) using superconducting magnets have been under development in Japan for the past 23 years. The superconducting magnets for the Maglev system are used in a special environment compared to other applications. They have to work stably subject to both mechanical and electromagnetic disturbances. The brief history of the Maglev development in Japan, the planning of new test line, the superconducting magnet`s stability and the on board refrigeration system will be presented.

  14. Superconducting vortex pinning with artificial magnetic nanostructures.

    SciTech Connect

    Velez, M.; Martin, J. I.; Villegas, J. E.; Hoffmann, A.; Gonzalez, E. M.; Vicent, J. L.; Schuller, I. K.; Univ. de Oviedo-CINN; Unite Mixte de Physique CNRS Univ. Paris-Sud; Univ.Complutense de Madrid; Univ. California at San Diego

    2008-11-01

    This review is dedicated to summarizing the recent research on vortex dynamics and pinning effects in superconducting films with artificial magnetic structures. The fabrication of hybrid superconducting/magnetic systems is presented together with the wide variety of properties that arise from the interaction between the superconducting vortex lattice and the artificial magnetic nanostructures. Specifically, we review the role that the most important parameters in the vortex dynamics of films with regular array of dots play. In particular, we discuss the phenomena that appear when the symmetry of a regular dot array is distorted from regularity towards complete disorder including rectangular, asymmetric, and aperiodic arrays. The interesting phenomena that appear include vortex-lattice reconfigurations, anisotropic dynamics, channeling, and guided motion as well as ratchet effects. The different regimes are summarized in a phase diagram indicating the transitions that take place as the characteristic distances of the array are modified respect to the superconducting coherence length. Future directions are sketched out indicating the vast open area of research in this field.

  15. Comparing superconducting and permanent magnets for magnetic refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørk, R.; Nielsen, K. K.; Bahl, C. R. H.; Smith, A.; Wulff, A. C.

    2016-05-01

    We compare the cost of a high temperature superconducting (SC) tape-based solenoid with a permanent magnet (PM) Halbach cylinder for magnetic refrigeration. Assuming a five liter active magnetic regenerator volume, the price of each type of magnet is determined as a function of aspect ratio of the regenerator and desired internal magnetic field. It is shown that to produce a 1 T internal field in the regenerator a permanent magnet of hundreds of kilograms is needed or an area of superconducting tape of tens of square meters. The cost of cooling the SC solenoid is shown to be a small fraction of the cost of the SC tape. Assuming a cost of the SC tape of 6000 /m2 and a price of the permanent magnet of 100 /kg, the superconducting solenoid is shown to be a factor of 0.3-3 times more expensive than the permanent magnet, for a desired field from 0.5-1.75 T and the geometrical aspect ratio of the regenerator. This factor decreases for increasing field strength, indicating that the superconducting solenoid could be suitable for high field, large cooling power applications.

  16. Novel Design of Superconducting Helical Dipole Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, R.; Senti, M.; Stelzer, G.

    1997-05-01

    Superconducting helical dipole magnets with a nominal field of 4 Tesla are needed for the spin physics program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The magnets are required to operate at a relatively low current of 400 A since many of these magnets have to be independently controlled. The Advanced Magnet Lab, Inc., in Palm Bay, FL has designed and built two prototype magnets using advanced computer controlled coil winding technology. The AML design is extremely cost effective since it avoids magnet specific tooling despite the required complex coil pattern and any precision machined inserts or spacers. It is the first time an accelerator magnet of this technology has reached a field above 4 Tesla. Results from the prototype testing at BNL are presented.

  17. Development of high magnetic field superconducting magnet technology and applications in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiuliang; Dai, Yingming; Zhao, Baozhi; Song, Shouseng; Lei, Yuanzhong; Wang, Houseng; Ye, Bai; Hu, Xinning; Huang, Tianbing; Wang, Hui; He, Chu; Shang, Muxi; Wang, Chao; Cui, Chunyan; Zhao, Shangwu; Zhang, Quan; Diao, Yanhua; Peng, Yan; Xu, Guoxin; Deng, Fanping; Weng, Peide; Kuang, Guangli; Gao, Bingjun; Lin, Liangzhen; Yan, Luguang

    2007-07-01

    High magnetic field superconducting magnet technology has been developed in the recent years for all kinds of applications in China. The superconducting magnets on the basis of the conduction-cooled high (HTS) and lower temperature superconductor (LTS) through GM cryocooler are designed, fabricated and operated for the magnetic separator, superconducting magnet energy storage system (SMES), material processing, gyrotron, electromagnetic launcher, space anti-matter detection, magnetic surgery system (MSS), heavy ion accelerator dipole magnet and test bed for characteristics of superconducting material in Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IEECAS). The EAST superconducting Tokamak is being fabricated in Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. In the paper, we report the successful development of high magnetic field superconducting magnet technology in China. Some new research projects, such as 40 T hybrid magnet, 25 T high magnetic field superconducting magnet, split-pair magnets for the pallation Neutron Source, high temperature superconducting coils for MSS and MRI are introduced.

  18. Mesoscopic magnetism and superconductivity: recent perspectives.

    SciTech Connect

    Basaran, Ali C.; Villegas, Javier E.; Jiang, J. S.; Hoffmann, Axel; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2015-11-01

    Mesoscopic Superconductivity and Magnetism at intermediate (“Mesoscopic”) length scales between atomic and bulk, have a long history of interesting new science. The existence of multiple length scales allows for the development of new science when different length scales become comparable to relevant geometric sizes. Different new phenomena appear due to topological interactions, geometric confinement, proximity between dissimilar materials, dimensional crossover, and collective effects induced by the periodicity. In this brief review we are not able to cover comprehensively this vast field. Instead we select a few recent exciting highlights, which illustrate the type of novel science which can be accomplished in superconducting and magnetic structures. Superconductors and magnetic materials can serve as model systems and provide new ideas, which can be extended to other systems such as ferroelectrics and multiferroics. In this paper we also highlight general open questions and new directions in which the field may move.

  19. High pressure superconducting radial magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eyssa, Y. M.; Huang, X.

    1990-01-01

    In a conventional radial magnetic bearing, the rotor (soft magnetic material) can only have attraction force from one of the electromagnets in the stator. The stator electromagnets consist of small copper windings with a soft magnetic material iron yoke. The maximum pressure obtainable is about 200 N/sq cm. It is shown that replacing the stator copper winding by a superconducting winding in the above configuration can increase the pressure to about 1000 N/sq cm. It is also shown that replacing the iron in the rotor by a group of superconducting windings in persistent mode and using a group of saddle coils in the stator can produce a pressure in excess of 2000 N/sq cm.

  20. The superconducting solenoid magnets for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2002-12-22

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a channel of superconducting solenoid magnets. The magnets in MICE are around the RF cavities, absorbers (liquid or solid) and the primary particle detectors [1], [2]. The MICE superconducting solenoid system consists of eighteen coils that are grouped in three types of magnet assemblies. The cooling channel consists of two complete cell of an SFOFO cooling channel. Each cell consists of a focusing coil pair around an absorber and a coupling coil around a RF cavity that re-accelerates the muons to their original momentum. At the ends of the experiment are uniform field solenoids for the particle detectors and a set of matching coils used to match the muon beam to the cooling cells. Three absorbers are used instead of two in order to shield the detectors from dark currents generated by the RF cavities at high operating acceleration gradients.

  1. The advantages and challenges of superconducting magnets in particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbershagen, Alexander; Calzolaio, Ciro; Meer, David; Sanfilippo, Stéphane; Schippers, Marco

    2016-08-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current developments in superconducting magnets for applications in proton and ion therapy. It summarizes the benefits and challenges regarding the utilization of these magnets in accelerating systems (e.g. superconducting cyclotrons) and gantries. The paper also provides examples of currently used superconducting particle therapy systems and proposed designs.

  2. A superconducting large-angle magnetic suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James R.; Anastas, George V., Jr.; Bushko, Dariusz A.; Flynn, Frederick J.; Goldie, James H.; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hawkey, Timothy J.; Hockney, Richard L.; Torti, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    SatCon Technology Corporation has completed a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 2 program to develop a Superconducting Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension (LAMS) for the NASA Langley Research Center. The Superconducting LAMS was a hardware demonstration of the control technology required to develop an advanced momentum exchange effector. The Phase 2 research was directed toward the demonstration for the key technology required for the advanced concept CMG, the controller. The Phase 2 hardware consists of a superconducting solenoid ('source coils') suspended within an array of nonsuperconducting coils ('control coils'), a five-degree-of-freedom positioning sensing system, switching power amplifiers, and a digital control system. The results demonstrated the feasibility of suspending the source coil. Gimballing (pointing the axis of the source coil) was demonstrated over a limited range. With further development of the rotation sensing system, enhanced angular freedom should be possible.

  3. Superconducting magnets for toroidal fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Haubenreich, P.N.

    1980-01-01

    Fusion reactors will soon be employing superconducting magnets to confine plasma in which deuterium and tritium (D-T) are fused to produce usable energy. At present there is one small confinement experiment with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils: Tokamak 7 (T-7), in the USSR, which operates at 4 T. By 1983, six different 2.5 x 3.5-m D-shaped coils from six manufacturers in four countries will be assembled in a toroidal array in the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for testing at fields up to 8 T. Soon afterwards ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT-P) will begin operation at Oak Ridge with superconducting TF coils. At the same time there will be tokamaks with superconducting TF coils 2 to 3 m in diameter in the USSR and France. Toroidal field strength in these machines will range from 6 to 9 T. NbTi and Nb/sub 3/Sn, bath cooling and forced flow, cryostable and metastable - various designs are being tried in this period when this new application of superconductivity is growing and maturing.

  4. Magnetic Field Reentrant Superconductivity in Aluminum Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz-Sullivan, Terence; Goldman, Allen

    Reentrance to the superconducting state through the application of a magnetic field to quasi-one dimensional superconductors driven resistive by current, is counter to the expected properties of superconductors. It was not until recently that a microscopic mechanism explaining the phenomenon was proposed in which superconductivity and phase slip driven dissipation coexist in a non-equilibrium state. Here we present additional results of magnetic field induced reentrance into the superconducting state in quasi-one-dimensional aluminum nanowires with an in-plane magnetic field both transverse to, and along the wire axis. The reentrant behavior is seen in the magnetic field dependence of the I-V characteristic and resistance vs. temperature, and in the wire's magnetoresistance at 450mK. This work was supported by DOE Basic Energy Sciences Grant DE-FG02-02ER46004. Samples were fabricated at the Minnesota Nanofabrication Center. Parts of this work were carried out in the University of Minnesota Characterization Facility, a member of the Materials Research Facilities Network (www.mrfn.org) funded via the NSF MRSEC program.

  5. Permanent magnet design for high-speed superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Uherka, Kenneth L.; Abdoud, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting bearing including a permanent magnet rotor levitated by a high temperature superconducting structure. The rotor preferably includes one or more concentric permanent magnet rings coupled to permanent magnet ring structures having substantially triangular and quadrangular cross-sections. Both alternating and single direction polarity magnet structures can be used in the bearing.

  6. Permanent magnet design for high-speed superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.; Uherka, K.L.; Abdoud, R.G.

    1996-09-10

    A high temperature superconducting bearing including a permanent magnet rotor levitated by a high temperature superconducting structure is disclosed. The rotor preferably includes one or more concentric permanent magnet rings coupled to permanent magnet ring structures having substantially triangular and quadrangular cross-sections. Both alternating and single direction polarity magnet structures can be used in the bearing. 9 figs.

  7. Superconducting magnets for space flight. [magnetic cosmic ray spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    The operating principle and application of superconducting magnetic spectrometers for cosmic ray analysis are described. Magnetic spectrometer experiments are thought to be possible in the areas of charge composition and its possible energy dependence, isotopic separation up to several GeV/n, electrons and positrons energy spectra, galactic secondary antiprotons, searches for primordial antimatter, searches for substructure in energy spectra, and gamma ray astronomy. Operational problems associated with the magnets are discussed, and a possible shuttle payload is also described.

  8. High temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage for future NASA missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faymon, Karl A.; Rudnick, Stanley J.

    1988-01-01

    Several NASA sponsored studies based on 'conventional' liquid helium temperature level superconductivity technology have concluded that superconducting magnetic energy storage has considerable potential for space applications. The advent of high temperature superconductivity (HTSC) may provide additional benefits over conventional superconductivity technology, making magnetic energy storage even more attractive. The proposed NASA space station is a possible candidate for the application of HTSC energy storage. Alternative energy storage technologies for this and other low Earth orbit missions are compared.

  9. Toroidal constant-tension superconducting magnetic energy storage units

    DOEpatents

    Herring, J. Stephen

    1992-01-01

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage unit is provided in which the magnet is wound in a toroidal fashion such that the magnetic field produced is contained only within the bore of the magnet, and thus producing a very low external field. The superconducting magnet includes a coolant channel disposed through the wire. The bore of the magnet comprises a storage volume in which cryogenic coolant is stored, and this volume supplies the coolant to be delivered to the coolant channel in the magnet.

  10. Magnetic field evolution in superconducting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graber, Vanessa; Andersson, Nils; Glampedakis, Kostas; Lander, Samuel K.

    2015-10-01

    The presence of superconducting and superfluid components in the core of mature neutron stars calls for the rethinking of a number of key magnetohydrodynamical notions like resistivity, the induction equation, magnetic energy and flux-freezing. Using a multifluid magnetohydrodynamics formalism, we investigate how the magnetic field evolution is modified when neutron star matter is composed of superfluid neutrons, type-II superconducting protons and relativistic electrons. As an application of this framework, we derive an induction equation where the resistive coupling originates from the mutual friction between the electrons and the vortex/fluxtube arrays of the neutron and proton condensates. The resulting induction equation allows the identification of two time-scales that are significantly different from those of standard magnetohydrodynamics. The astrophysical implications of these results are briefly discussed.

  11. Magnetic suspension using high temperature superconducting cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scurlock, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    The development of YBCO high temperature superconductors, in wire and tape forms, is rapidly approaching the point where the bulk transport current density j vs magnetic field H characteristics with liquid nitrogen cooling will enable its use in model cores. On the other hand, BSCCO high temperature superconductor in wire form has poor j-H characteristics at 77 K today, although with liquid helium or hydrogen cooling, it appears to be superior to NbTi superconductor. Since liquid nitrogen cooling is approx. 100 times cheaper than liquid helium cooling, the use of YBCO is very attractive for use in magnetic suspension. The design is discussed of a model core to accommodate lift and drag loads up to 6000 and 3000 N respectively. A comparison is made between the design performance of a liquid helium cooled NbTi (or BSCCO) superconducting core and a liquid nitrogen cooled YBCO superconducting core.

  12. Magnetic-Field-Tunable Superconducting Rectifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadleir, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Superconducting electronic components have been developed that provide current rectification that is tunable by design and with an externally applied magnetic field to the circuit component. The superconducting material used in the device is relatively free of pinning sites with its critical current determined by a geometric energy barrier to vortex entry. The ability of the vortices to move freely inside the device means this innovation does not suffer from magnetic hysteresis effects changing the state of the superconductor. The invention requires a superconductor geometry with opposite edges along the direction of current flow. In order for the critical current asymmetry effect to occur, the device must have different vortex nucleation conditions at opposite edges. Alternative embodiments producing the necessary conditions include edges being held at different temperatures, at different local magnetic fields, with different current-injection geometries, and structural differences between opposite edges causing changes in the size of the geometric energy barrier. An edge fabricated with indentations of the order of the coherence length will significantly lower the geometric energy barrier to vortex entry, meaning vortex passage across the device at lower currents causing resistive dissipation. The existing prototype is a two-terminal device consisting of a thin-film su - perconducting strip operating at a temperature below its superconducting transition temperature (Tc). Opposite ends of the strip are connected to electrical leads made of a higher Tc superconductor. The thin-film lithographic process provides an easy means to alter edge-structures, current-injection geo - metries, and magnetic-field conditions at the edges. The edge-field conditions can be altered by using local field(s) generated from dedicated higher Tc leads or even using the device s own higher Tc superconducting leads.

  13. Design of superconducting magnets for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B. Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX )

    1991-05-01

    In order for a superconducting magnet to operate reliably at a given field the design should have sufficient superconductor to allow operation at currents significantly less than the cable critical current. In addition sufficient copper should be included in the cable to give stability. Such considerations, their basis, and their application to the design of the new 5 cm bore diameter SSC dipoles, are discussed. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Focus on Hybrid Magnetic/Superconducting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, L.; Li, Q.; Moshchalkov, V.

    2011-02-01

    Like antagonistic cousins from a common heritage, the competition between superconductivity and magnetism for correlated electron states, and coexistence in some rare cases, produces a rich variety of physical behavior, useful materials, and technologically important properties. Many pages of Superconductor Science and Technology are devoted to cuprates, pnictides, and other compounds where the mechanism of superconductivity itself is intertwined with magnetism. This focus issue explores another area, in which superconductivity and magnetism are combined as a hybrid system to create new properties not possible with either system alone, or to improve upon the properties of either system in dramatic ways. In recent years, great progress has been made in this exciting, relatively new field, followed by many workshops and special sessions in major international conferences. A concise and up-to-date focus issue of Superconductor Science and Technology is timely to summarize the latest developments. We, the Guest Editors, would like to thank those colleagues who contributed their most recent and interesting findings to this focus issue: Silhanek and co-workers reported both theoretical and experimental investigations of the dynamics of vortex chains for different arrangements of magnetic moments. Their approach of time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau formalism now replaces the previously proposed empirical models to explain the most relevant properties of the dynamics of these S/F hybrid systems. Hikino and co-workers presented a new route to observe the spin-wave excitation by the Josephson effect, through a theoretical investigation of the resistively shunted junction model, extended by considering the gauge invariance including magnetization. When the magnetization is driven by the microwave adjusted to the ferromagnetic resonance frequency, the dc supercurrent is induced in the junction, and the current-voltage curve shows step structures as a function of applied voltage

  15. Unusual magnetic properties of superconducting Bi/Ni bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hexin; Jin, Xiaofeng; Jin Group Team

    Superconductivity and ferromagnetism are two incompatible phenomena. However, the interaction between them attracts numerous physicists' interests for both theoretical and experimental purposes. Recently, increasing experimental discoveries reveal unconventional effects in superconductor and ferromagnet hybrids, which stimulates a new field called superconducting spintronics. In present work, we report various intriguing magnetic properties of an unexpected superconducting bilayer consisting of non-superconducting Bi and ferromagnetic Ni. A large spontaneous magnetization is induced when the temperature is decreased below the superconductivity transition temperature, which indicates a complex interaction between superconductivity and ferromagnetism in this bilayer. The zero field cooling results show normal Meissner effect while the field cooling results show paramagnetic Meissner effect. Besides, magnetic hysteresis loops in low temperatures show flux pinning and flux jumping effects. Our findings pave the way for exploring unconventional superconductivity coupled to ferromagnetism and potential applications in superconducting spintronics.

  16. A laboratory superconducting high gradient magnetic separator

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, L.G.; Yu, Y.J.; Wang, Z.K.; Kao, Z.Y.; Ye, Z.X.; Xue, C.L.; Ye, P.; Cheng, Y.L.; Li, X.M.; Kong, Q.M.

    1989-03-01

    In order to know the effectiveness of high gradient magnetic separation for Kaolin clay purification and coal desulfurization in China and to develop suitable technology, a superconducting HGMS facility has been constructed and put into operation at the Institute of Electrical Engineering of Chinese Academy of Sciences. The working separation chamber is 80mm in diameter and 400mm in length. the magnet is wound with 0.75 and 0.5 mm in diameter NbTi superconducting composite. The winding is compact and wax-filled. The test proves that the magnet can operate at 5T. Special attention has been paid in the design and construction of the magnet cryostat in order for it to work as long as possible. In the wet beneficiation mode, there are two separation systems available, one is the upward pumping feeding system and another is with the downward gravity feeding. The rate of flow and the linear velocity are 0-0.5L/s and 0-100 cm/s respectively. The preliminary sample test results for Kaolin clay purification and coal desulfurization show the good feasibility of magnetic separation.

  17. Superconducting magnets for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.

    1987-07-02

    Fusion magnet technology has made spectacular advances in the past decade; to wit, the Mirror Fusion Test Facility and the Large Coil Project. However, further advances are still required for advanced economical fusion reactors. Higher fields to 14 T and radiation-hardened superconductors and insulators will be necessary. Coupled with high rates of nuclear heating and pulsed losses, the next-generation magnets will need still higher current density, better stability and quench protection. Cable-in-conduit conductors coupled with polyimide insulations and better steels seem to be the appropriate path. Neutron fluences up to 10/sup 19/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/ in niobium tin are achievable. In the future, other amorphous superconductors could raise these limits further to extend reactor life or decrease the neutron shielding and corresponding reactor size.

  18. Torus CLAS12-Superconducting Magnet Quench Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V. S.; Elouadhiri, L.; Ghoshal, P. K.; Kashy, D.; Makarov, A.; Pastor, O.; Quettier, L.; Velev, G.; Wiseman, M.

    2014-01-01

    The JLAB Torus magnet system consists of six superconducting trapezoidal racetrack-type coils assembled in a toroidal configuration. These coils are wound with SSC-36 Nb-Ti superconductor and have the peak magnetic field of 3.6 T. The first coil manufacturing based on the JLAB design began at FNAL. The large magnet system dimensions (8 m diameter and 14 MJ of stored energy) dictate the need for quench protection. Each coil is placed in an aluminum case mounted inside a cryostat and cooled by 4.6 K supercritical helium gas flowing through a copper tube attached to the coil ID. The large coil dimensions and small cryostat thickness drove the design to challenging technical solutions, suggesting that Lorentz forces due to transport currents and eddy currents during quench and various failure scenarios are analyzed. The paper covers the magnet system quench analysis using the OPERA3d Quench code.

  19. Torus CLAS12-Superconducting Magnet Quench Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V S; Elouadhiri, L; Ghoshal, P K; Kashy, D; Makarov, A; Pastor, O; Quettier, L; Velev, G; Wiseman, M

    2014-06-01

    The JLAB Torus magnet system consists of six superconducting trapezoidal racetrack-type coils assembled in a toroidal configuration. These coils are wound with SSC-36 Nb-Ti superconductor and have the peak magnetic field of 3.6 T. The first coil manufacturing based on the JLAB design began at FNAL. The large magnet system dimensions (8 m diameter and 14 MJ of stored energy) dictate the need for quench protection. Each coil is placed in an aluminum case mounted inside a cryostat and cooled by 4.6 K supercritical helium gas flowing through a copper tube attached to the coil ID. The large coil dimensions and small cryostat thickness drove the design to challenging technical solutions, suggesting that Lorentz forces due to transport currents and eddy currents during quench and various failure scenarios are analyzed. The paper covers the magnet system quench analysis using the OPERA3d Quench code.

  20. Superconducting magnet technique for ASTROMAG on the space station

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1987-09-01

    This paper describes superconducting magnet systems which could be used as part of a Particle Astrophysics Experiment ASTROMAG on the space station. This report deals with issues of superconductor selection (should one consider the use of high critical temperature superconductor.), magnet coil and cryostat design, and the cryogenic cooling system for the superconducting magnet. 12 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Superconducting Sphere in an External Magnetic Field Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sazonov, Sergey N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to give the intelligible procedure for undergraduate students to grasp proof of the fact that the magnetic field outside the hollow superconducting sphere (superconducting shell) coincides with the field of a point magnetic dipole both when an uniform external magnetic field is applied as when a ferromagnetic sphere…

  2. Permanent superconducting magnets for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Roy

    1994-01-01

    Work has been done to develop superconducting trapped field magnets (TFM's) and to apply them to a bumper-tether device for magnetic docking of spacecraft. The quality parameters for TFM's are J(c), the critical current of the superconductor, and d, the diameter of the superconducting tile. During this year we have doubled d, for production models, from 1 cm to 2 cm. This was done by means of seeding, an improved temperature profile in processing, and the addition of 1 percent Pt to the superconductor chemistry. Using these tiles we have set increasing records for the fields' permanent magnets. Magnets fabricated from old 1 cm tiles trapped 1.52 Tesla at 77K, 4.0T at 65K and 7.0T at 55K. The second of these fields broke a 17 year old record set at Stanford. The third field broke our own record. More recently using 2 cm tiles, we have trapped 2.3T at 77K, and 5.3T at 65K. We expect to trap lOT at 55K in this magnet in the near future. We have also achieved increases in J(c) using a method we developed for seeding U-235, and subsequently bombarding with neutrons. This method doubles J(c). We have not yet fabricated magnets from these tiles. During this year we have increased production yields from 15 percent to 95 percent. We have explored the properties of a magnetic bumper-tether for spacecraft. We have measured the bumper forces, and their dependence on time, distance, and the field of the ordinary ferromagnet (used together with a TFM). We have accounted for 85 percent of the collision energy, and its transformation to magnetic energy and heat energy. We have learned to control the relative bumper and tether forces by controlling TFM and ferromagnetic field strengths.

  3. Superconducting flat tape cable magnet

    DOEpatents

    Takayasu, Makoto

    2015-08-11

    A method for winding a coil magnet with the stacked tape cables, and a coil so wound. The winding process is controlled and various shape coils can be wound by twisting about the longitudinal axis of the cable and bending following the easy bend direction during winding, so that sharp local bending can be obtained by adjusting the twist pitch. Stack-tape cable is twisted while being wound, instead of being twisted in a straight configuration and then wound. In certain embodiments, the straight length should be half of the cable twist-pitch or a multiple of it.

  4. Superconductivity and magnetism in rapidly solidified perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    O'Handley, R.C.; Kalonji, G.

    1991-01-01

    The report is divided into six parts, reflecting major thrusts of our work since 1987. The six areas are: molecular orbital theory of high {Tc} superconductivity; rapid solidification processing of oxide superconductors; time dependent magnetic and superconducting properties of these inhomogeneous materials; excess Gd in Gd{sub 1+x}Ba{sub 2-x}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} perovskites; rapid solidification and directional annealing to achieve high Jc; and Mossbauer studies of T = Fe, Co and Ni site selection in YBa{sub 2}(CuT){sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} and GdBa{sub 2}(CuT){sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}.

  5. A superconducting large-angle magnetic suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James; Goldie, James; Torti, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The component technologies were developed required for an advanced control moment gyro (CMG) type of slewing actuator for large payloads. The key component of the CMG is a large-angle magnetic suspension (LAMS). The LAMS combines the functions of the gimbal structure, torque motors, and rotor bearings of a CMG. The LAMS uses a single superconducting source coil and an array of cryoresistive control coils to produce a specific output torque more than an order of magnitude greater than conventional devices. The designed and tested LAMS system is based around an available superconducting solenoid, an array of twelve room-temperature normal control coils, and a multi-input, multi-output control system. The control laws were demonstrated for stabilizing and controlling the LAMS system.

  6. Novel Approach to Linear Accelerator Superconducting Magnet System

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2011-11-28

    Superconducting Linear Accelerators include a superconducting magnet system for particle beam transportation that provides the beam focusing and steering. This system consists of a large number of quadrupole magnets and dipole correctors mounted inside or between cryomodules with SCRF cavities. Each magnet has current leads and powered from its own power supply. The paper proposes a novel approach to magnet powering based on using superconducting persistent current switches. A group of magnets is powered from the same power supply through the common, for the group of cryomodules, electrical bus and pair of current leads. Superconducting switches direct the current to the chosen magnet and close the circuit providing the magnet operation in a persistent current mode. Two persistent current switches were fabricated and tested. In the paper also presented the results of magnetic field simulations, decay time constants analysis, and a way of improving quadrupole magnetic center stability. Such approach substantially reduces the magnet system cost and increases the reliability.

  7. THE SUPERCONDUCTION MAGNETS OF THE ILC BEAM DELIVERY SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    PARKER,B.; ANEREELA, M.; ESCALLIE, J.; HE, P.; JAIN, A.; MARONE, A.; NOSOCHKOV, Y.; SERYI, A.

    2007-06-25

    The ILC Reference Design Report was completed early in February 2007. The Magnet Systems Group was formed to translate magnetic field requirements into magnet designs and cost estimates for the Reference Design. As presently configured, the ILC will have more than 13,000 magnetic elements of which more than 2300 will be based on superconducting technology. This paper will describe the major superconducting magnet needs for the ILC as presently determined by the Area Systems Groups, responsible for beam line design, working with the Magnet Systems Group. The superconducting magnet components include Main Linac quadrupoles, Positron Source undulators, Damping Ring wigglers, a complex array of Final Focus superconducting elements in the Beam Delivery System, and large superconducting solenoids in the e{sup +} and e{sup -} Sources, and the Ring to Main Linac lines.

  8. Cooling system for superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, B.B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.

    1998-12-15

    A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir. 3 figs.

  9. Cooling system for superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed

    1998-01-01

    A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir.

  10. Transformer current sensor for superconducting magnetic coils

    DOEpatents

    Shen, Stewart S.; Wilson, C. Thomas

    1988-01-01

    A transformer current sensor having primary turns carrying a primary current for a superconducting coil and secondary turns only partially arranged within the primary turns. The secondary turns include an active winding disposed within the primary turns and a dummy winding which is not disposed in the primary turns and so does not experience a magnetic field due to a flow of current in the primary turns. The active and dummy windings are wound in opposite directions or connected in series-bucking relationship, and are exposed to the same ambient magnetic field. Voltages which might otherwise develop in the active and dummy windings due to ambient magnetic fields thus cancel out. The resultant voltage is purely indicative of the rate of change of current flowing in the primary turns.

  11. Critical Magnetic Field Determination of Superconducting Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Canabal, A.; Tajima, T.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Yamamoto, T.; /Tsukuba, Natl. Res. Lab. Metrol.

    2011-11-04

    Superconducting RF technology is becoming more and more important. With some recent cavity test results showing close to or even higher than the critical magnetic field of 170-180 mT that had been considered a limit, it is very important to develop a way to correctly measure the critical magnetic field (H{sup RF}{sub c}) of superconductors in the RF regime. Using a 11.4 GHz, 50-MW, <1 {mu}s, pulsed power source and a TE013-like mode copper cavity, we have been measuring critical magnetic fields of superconductors for accelerator cavity applications. This device can eliminate both thermal and field emission effects due to a short pulse and no electric field at the sample surface. A model of the system is presented in this paper along with a discussion of preliminary experimental data.

  12. Structural alloys for high field superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-08-01

    Research toward structural alloys for use in high field superconducting magnets is international in scope, and has three principal objectives: the selection or development of suitable structural alloys for the magnet support structure, the identification of mechanical phenomena and failure modes that may influence service behavior, and the design of suitable testing procedures to provide engineering design data. This paper reviews recent progress toward the first two of these objectives. The structural alloy needs depend on the magnet design and superconductor type and differ between magnets that use monolithic and those that employ force-cooled or ICCS conductors. In the former case the central requirement is for high strength, high toughness, weldable alloys that are used in thick sections for the magnet case. In the latter case the need is for high strength, high toughness alloys that are used in thin welded sections for the conductor conduit. There is productive current research on both alloy types. The service behavior of these alloys is influenced by mechanical phenomena that are peculiar to the magnet environment, including cryogenic fatigue, magnetic effects, and cryogenic creep. The design of appropriate mechanical tests is complicated by the need for testing at 4/sup 0/K and by rate effects associated with adiabatic heating during the tests. 46 refs.

  13. High-Field Superconducting Magnets Supporting PTOLEMY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Ann; Luo, Audrey; Osherson, Benjamin; Gentile, Charles; Tully, Chris; Cohen, Adam

    2013-10-01

    The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe, Massive Neutrino Yield (PTOLEMY) is an experiment planned to collect data on Big Bang relic neutrinos, which are predicted to be amongst the oldest and smallest particles in the universe. Currently, a proof-of-principle prototype is being developed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to test key technologies associated with the experiment. A prominent technology in the experiment is the Magnetic Adiabatic Collimation with an Electrostatic Filter (MAC-E filter), which guides tritium betas along magnetic field lines generated by superconducting magnets while deflecting those of lower energies. B field mapping is performed to ensure the magnets produce a minimum field at the midpoint of the configuration of the magnets and to verify accuracy of existing models. Preliminary tests indicate the required rapid decrease in B field strength from the bore of the more powerful 3.35 T magnet, with the field dropping to 0.18 T approximately 0.5 feet from the outermost surface of the magnet.

  14. Development of superconducting magnet systems for HIFExperiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbi, Gian Luca; Faltens, A.; Leitzke, A.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.; Martovets ky, N.; Chiesa, L.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Schultz, J.; Goodzeit, C.; Hwang, P.; Hinson, W.; Meinke, R.

    2004-07-27

    The U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion program is developing superconducting focusing quadrupoles for near-term experiments and future driver accelerators. Following the fabrication and testing of several models, a baseline quadrupole design was selected and further optimized. The first prototype of the optimized design achieved a conductor-limited gradient of 132 T/m in a 70 mm bore, with measured field harmonics within 10 parts in 10{sup 4}. In parallel, a compact focusing doublet was fabricated and tested using two of the first-generation quadrupoles. After assembly in the cryostat, both magnets reached their conductor-limited quench current. Further optimization steps are currently underway to improve the performance of the magnet system and reduce its cost. They include the fabrication and testing of a new prototype quadrupole with reduced field errors as well as improvements of the cryostat design for the focusing doublet. The prototype units will be installed in the HCX beamline at LBNL, to perform accelerator physics experiments and gain operational experience. Successful results in the present phase will make superconducting magnets a viable option for the next generation of integrated beam experiments.

  15. Ultralow Friction in a Superconducting Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornemann, Hans J.; Siegel, Michael; Zaitsev, Oleg; Bareiss, Martin; Laschuetza, Helmut

    1996-01-01

    Passive levitation by superconducting magnetic bearings can be utilized in flywheels for energy storage. Basic design criteria of such a bearing are high levitation force, sufficient vertical and horizontal stability and low friction. A test facility was built for the measurement and evaluation of friction in a superconducting magnetic bearing as a function of operating temperature and pressure in the vacuum vessel. The bearing consists of a commercial disk shaped magnet levitated above single grain, melt-textured YBCO high-temperature superconductor material. The superconductor was conduction cooled by an integrated AEG tactical cryocooler. The temperature could be varied from 50 K to 80 K. The pressure in the vacuum chamber was varied from 1 bar to 10(exp -5) mbar. At the lowest pressure setting, the drag torque shows a linear frequency dependence over the entire range investigated (0 less than f less than 40 Hz). Magnetic friction, the frequency independent contribution, is very low. The frequency dependent drag torque is generated by molecular friction from molecule-surface collisions and by eddy currents. Given the specific geometry of the set-up and gas pressure, the molecular drag torque can be estimated. At a speed of 40 Hz, the coefficient of friction (drag-to-lift ratio) was measured to be mu = 1.6 x 10(exp -7) at 10(exp -5) mbar and T = 60 K. This is equivalent to a drag torque of 7.6 x 10(exp -10) Nm. Magnetic friction causes approx. 1% of the total losses. Molecular friction accounts for about 13% of the frequency dependent drag torque, the remaining 87% being due to eddy currents and losses from rotor unbalance. The specific energy loss is only 0.3% per hour.

  16. 50 Hz rotating superconducting magnet for screening studies

    SciTech Connect

    Scurlock, R.G.; Stoll, R.; Stovold, R.

    1981-09-01

    A superconducting rotor facility has been constructed to study the magnetic shielding of superconducting ac machines. The superconducting dipolar magnet 128 mm diam, 515 mm long, 40 kg weight, is capable of providing a field of 1.5 T at a radius of 100 mm with 525 amp energizing current. Novel features include helical vapor-cooled current leads, antirecirculation baffles in the vapor space, vapor dump valves and liquid nitrogen cooling.

  17. Improved cable insulation for superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Anerella, M.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kelly, E.; Schmalzle, J.; Willen, E.; Fraivillig, J.; Ochsner, J.; Parish, D.J.

    1993-09-01

    Several years ago, Brookhaven joined with DuPont in a cooperative effort to develop improved cable insulation for SSC superconducting dipole magnets. The effort was supported by the SSC Central Design Group and later the SSC Laboratory. It was undertaken because turn-to-turn and midplane shorts were routinely being experienced during the assembly of magnets with coils made of the existing Kapton/Fiberglass (K/FG) system of Kapton film overwrapped with epoxy-impregnated fiberglass tape. Dissection of failed magnets showed that insulation disruption and punch-through was occurring near the inner edges of turns close to the magnet midplane. Coil pressures of greater than 17 kpsi were sufficient to disrupt the insulation at local high spots where wires in neighboring turns crossed one another and where the cable had been strongly compacted in the keystoning operation during cable manufacture. In the joint development program, numerous combinations of polyimide films manufactured by DuPont with varying configurations and properties (including thickness) were subjected to tests at Brookhaven. Early tests were bench trials using wrapped cable samples. The most promising candidates were used in coils and many of these assembled and tested as magnets in both the SSC and RHIC magnet programs currently underway. The Kapton CI (CI) system that has been adopted represents a suitable compromise of numerous competing factors. It exhibits improved performance in the critical parameter of compressive punch-through resistance as well as other advantages over the K/FG system.

  18. Superconducting magnetic energy storage for asynchronous electrical systems

    DOEpatents

    Boenig, H.J.

    1984-05-16

    It is an object of the present invention to provide superconducting magnetic energy storage for a plurality of asynchronous electrical systems. It is a further object of the present invention to provide load leveling and stability improvement in a plurality of independent ac systems using a single superconducting magnetic energy storage coil.

  19. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-08-05

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap. 4 figs.

  20. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap.

  1. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap.

  2. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1996-10-08

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap. 4 figs.

  3. Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Yung K.

    Many potential high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) military applications have been demonstrated by low-temperature superconductivity systems; they encompass high efficiency electric drives for naval vessels, airborne electric generators, energy storage systems for directed-energy weapons, electromechanical launchers, magnetic and electromagnetic shields, and cavity resonators for microwave and mm-wave generation. Further HST applications in militarily relevant fields include EM sensors, IR focal plane arrays, SQUIDs, magnetic gradiometers, high-power sonar sources, and superconducting antennas and inertial navigation systems. The development of SQUID sensors will furnish novel magnetic anomaly detection methods for ASW.

  4. Analysis of Voltage Signals from Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Lizarazo, J.; Caspi, S.; Ferracin, P.; Joseph, J.; Lietzke, A. F.; Sabbi, G. L.; Wang, X.

    2009-10-30

    We present two techniques used in the analysis of voltage tap data collected during recent tests of superconducting magnets developed by the Superconducting Magnet Program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The first technique was used on a quadrupole to provide information about quench origins that could not be obtained using the time-of-flight method. The second technique illustrates the use of data from transient flux imbalances occurring during magnet ramping to diagnose changes in the current-temperature margin of a superconducting cable. In both cases, the results of this analysis contributed to make improvements on subsequent magnets.

  5. Reliability of large superconducting magnets through design

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.

    1980-09-05

    As superconducting magnet systems grow larger and become the central component of major systems involving fusion, magnetohydrodynamics, and high-energy physics, their reliability must be commensurate with the enormous capital investment in the projects. Although the magnet may represent only 15% of the cost of a large system such as the Mirror Fusion Test Facility, its failure would be catastrophic to the entire investment. Effective quality control during construction is one method of ensuring success. However, if the design is unforgiving, even an inordinate amount of effort expended on quality control may be inadequate. Creative design is the most effective way of ensuring magnet reliability and providing a reasonable limit on the amount of quality control needed. For example, by subjecting the last drawing operation is superconductor manufacture to a stress larger than the magnet design stress, a 100% proof test is achieved; cabled conductors offer mechanical redundancy, as do some methods of conductor joining; ground-plane insulation should be multilayered to prevent arcs, and interturn and interlayer insulation spaced to be compatible with the self-extinguishing of arcs during quench voltages; electrical leads should be thermally protected; and guard vacuum spaces can be incorporated to control helium leaks. Many reliable design options are known to magnet designers. These options need to be documented and organized to produce a design guide. Eventually, standard procedures, safety factors, and design codes can lead to reliability in magnets comparable to that obtained in pressure vessels and other structures. Wihout such reliability, large-scale applications in major systems employing magnetic fusion energy, magnetohydrodynamics, or high-energy physics would present unacceptable economic risks.

  6. Toroidal constant-tension superconducting magnetic energy storage units

    DOEpatents

    Herring, J.S.

    1992-11-03

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage unit is provided in which the magnet is wound in a toroidal fashion such that the magnetic field produced is contained only within the bore of the magnet, and thus producing a very low external field. The superconducting magnet includes a coolant channel disposed through the wire. The bore of the magnet comprises a storage volume in which cryogenic coolant is stored, and this volume supplies the coolant to be delivered to the coolant channel in the magnet. 6 figs.

  7. TOWARDS FAST-PULSED SUPERCONDUCTING SYNCHROTRON MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect

    MORITZ,G.; MUEHLE,C.; ANERELLA,M.; GHOSH,A.; SAMPSON,W.; WANDERER,P.; WILLEN,E.; AGAPOV,N.; KHODZHIBAGIYAN,H.; KOVALENKO,A.; HASSENZAHL,W.V.; WILSON,M.N.

    2001-06-18

    The concept for the new GSI accelerator facilities is based on a large synchrotron designed for operation at BR=200 Tm and with the short cycle-time of about one second to achieve high average beam intensities. Superconducting magnets may reduce considerably investment and operating costs in comparison with conventional magnets. A R and D program was initiated to develop these magnets for a maximum field of 2-4 Tesla and a ramp rate of 4 T/s. In collaboration with JINR (Dubna), the window-frame type Nuclotron dipole, which has been operated with 4 T/s at a maximum field of 2 Tesla, shall be developed to reduce heat losses and to improve the magnetic field quality. Another collaboration with BNL (Brookhaven) was established to develop the one-layer-coil cos{theta}-type RHIC arc dipole designed for operation at 3.5 Tesla with a rather slow ramp-rate of 0.07 T/s towards the design ramp-rate of 4 T/s. The design concepts for both R and D programs are reported.

  8. Innovative insulation systems for superconducting fusion magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humer, K.; Bittner-Rohrhofer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Prokopec, R.; Weber, H. W.

    2006-03-01

    Glass fibre reinforced plastics (GFRPs) are usually employed as insulating materials for the superconducting coils of large fusion magnets, e.g. of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Both the radiation spectrum and the stresses at the magnet location significantly influence the mechanical behaviour of the magnet insulation and, therefore, impose high demands on the material performance. During the last few decades, advanced epoxy based GFRPs with improved mechanical properties and radiation hardness were introduced into fusion technology. More recently, cyanate ester (CE) matrix systems have become of special interest. In this paper, various magnet insulation systems containing boron-free R-glass fibre reinforcements in commercial and new epoxies as well as in pure CE and CE/epoxy blended matrix systems are presented. All systems were irradiated in a fission reactor at ambient temperature (~340 K) to a fast neutron fluence of 1 × 1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV). The mechanical properties were assessed at 77 K in tension as well as in interlaminar shear prior to and after irradiation under static and dynamic conditions.

  9. Magnetic field generated by shielding current in high Tc superconducting coils for NMR magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amemiya, Naoyuki; Akachi, Ken

    2008-09-01

    Numerical electromagnetic field analyses of high Tc superconducting tape in coils were carried out to calculate the magnetic field generated by the shielding (magnetization) current in superconducting tape. The numerical model employs the power law electric field-current density characteristic and the thin strip approximation, in which the current component normal to the wide face of the tape is neglected. The shielding (magnetization) currents lead to non-uniform current distributions in the superconducting tape in the coils. The magnetic field generated by the shielding (magnetization) current can deteriorate the field quality and could be a concern in insert coils for NMR magnets using high Tc superconducting tape.

  10. Superconducting magnetic energy storage for asynchronous electrical systems

    DOEpatents

    Boenig, Heinrich J.

    1986-01-01

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage coil connected in parallel between converters of two or more ac power systems provides load leveling and stability improvement to any or all of the ac systems. Control is provided to direct the charging and independently the discharging of the superconducting coil to at least a selected one of the ac power systems.

  11. Thermal expansion of several materials for superconducting magnets. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.F.; Fujii, G.; Ranney, M.A.

    1981-09-01

    The thermal expansion of several materials used in the construction of high field superconducting magnets has been measured from 4 K to room temperature. The materials were a NbTi and two A15 multifilamentary conductors and several nonmetallic composites made from linen/phenolic, fiberglass/epoxy and superconducting wire/epoxy.

  12. Method of constructing a superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Satti, John A.

    1981-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  13. Superconducting CICC for SST-1 tokamak magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, S.; Saxena, Y.C.

    1995-12-31

    The SST-1 tokamak is being designed for steady state operation with plasma durations in the range of 100--1,000s. Both the toroidal field coils (TFC) and the poloidal field coils (PFC) in the SST-1 tokamak are superconducting. TF coils are required to produce a magnetic field of 3 T at 1.05 m from machine axis. The maximum field seen by the TF coil conductor will be {le} 4.3 T. The cable for the TF coils has, therefore, been designed for a field of 5 T at the conductor. The PFC are used for plasma shaping and equilibrium and the magnetic field on the PFC conductor is estimated to be {le} 3.2 T. Hence a cable designed for 5 T operation will be suitable for PFC also subjected to the stability against the disturbances generated by the current ramping in the PFC. The authors have designed two Cable-in-conduit-conductor (CICC) type cables, one with copper conduit (to be preferably used with the TFC) and the other with Stainless Steel conduit to be used with PFC. They describe some design aspects of these cables and discuss the stability of these cables against disturbances.

  14. Coexistence of superconductivity and magnetism by chemical design.

    PubMed

    Coronado, Eugenio; Martí-Gastaldo, Carlos; Navarro-Moratalla, Efrén; Ribera, Antonio; Blundell, Stephen J; Baker, Peter J

    2010-12-01

    Although the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism in one compound is rare, some examples of such materials are known to exist. Methods to physically prepare hybrid structures with both competing phases are also known, which rely on the nanofabrication of alternating conducting layers. Chemical methods of building up hybrid materials with organic molecules (superconducting layers) and metal complexes (magnetic layers) have provided examples of superconductivity with some magnetic properties, but not fully ordered. Now, we report a chemical design strategy that uses the self assembly in solution of macromolecular nanosheet building blocks to engineer the coexistence of superconductivity and magnetism in [Ni(0.66)Al(0.33)(OH)(2)][TaS(2)] at ∼4 K. The method is further demonstrated in the isostructural [Ni(0.66)Fe(0.33)(OH)(2)][TaS(2)], in which the magnetic ordering is shifted from 4 K to 16 K. PMID:21107366

  15. Low temperature magnetic force microscopy on ferromagnetic and superconducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirohi, Anshu; Sheet, Goutam

    2016-05-01

    We report the observation of complex ferromagnetic domain structures on thin films of SrRuO3 and superconducting vortices in high temperature superconductors through low temperature magnetic force microscopy. Here we summarize the experimental details and results of magnetic imaging at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. We discuss these data in the light of existing theoretical concepts.

  16. Properties of Ni/Nb magnetic/superconducting multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Mattson, J.E.; Osgood III, R.M.; Potter, C.D.; Sowers, C.H.; Bader, S.D.

    1997-05-01

    We examine structural, magnetic, and superconducting properties of magnetic/superconducting Ni/Nb multilayers. The Ni(Nb) films are textured {l_brace}111{r_brace}({l_brace}110{r_brace}) and have smooth interfaces. The average moment of the Ni atoms in the structure drops by 80{percent} from that of bulk Ni for 19 {Angstrom} thick Ni layers in proximity to 140 {Angstrom} thick Nb layers, and goes to zero for smaller Ni thicknesses. The Nb layer is not superconducting for thicknesses {lt}100 {Angstrom} in the presence of a 19 {Angstrom} thick ferromagnetic Ni layer. The behavior of the superconducting critical temperature as a function of the superconducting layer thickness was fitted and an interfacial scattering parameter and scattering time for the paramagnetic Ni regime determined.

  17. Superconducting and hybrid systems for magnetic field shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozzelino, L.; Gerbaldo, R.; Ghigo, G.; Laviano, F.; Truccato, M.; Agostino, A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we investigate and compare the shielding properties of superconducting and hybrid superconducting/ferromagnetic systems, consisting of cylindrical cups with an aspect ratio of height/radius close to unity. First, we reproduced, by finite-element calculations, the induction magnetic field values measured along the symmetry axis in a superconducting (MgB2) and in a hybrid configuration (MgB2/Fe) as a function of the applied magnetic field and of the position. The calculations are carried out using the vector potential formalism, taking into account simultaneously the non-linear properties of both the superconducting and the ferromagnetic material. On the basis of the good agreement between the experimental and the computed data we apply the same model to study the influence of the geometric parameters of the ferromagnetic cup as well as of the thickness of the lateral gap between the two cups on the shielding properties of the superconducting cup. The results show that in the considered non-ideal geometry, where the edge effect in the flux penetration cannot be disregarded, the superconducting shield is always the most efficient solution at low magnetic fields. However, a partial recovery of the shielding capability of the hybrid configuration occurs if a mismatch in the open edges of the two cups is considered. In contrast, at high magnetic fields the hybrid configurations are always the most effective. In particular, the highest shielding factor was found for solutions with the ferromagnetic cup protruding over the superconducting one.

  18. Imprinting superconducting vortex footsteps in a magnetic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisbois, Jérémy; Motta, Maycon; Avila, Jonathan I.; Shaw, Gorky; Devillers, Thibaut; Dempsey, Nora M.; Veerapandian, Savita K. P.; Colson, Pierre; Vanderheyden, Benoît; Vanderbemden, Philippe; Ortiz, Wilson A.; Nguyen, Ngoc Duy; Kramer, Roman B. G.; Silhanek, Alejandro V.

    2016-06-01

    Local polarization of a magnetic layer, a well-known method for storing information, has found its place in numerous applications such as the popular magnetic drawing board toy or the widespread credit cards and computer hard drives. Here we experimentally show that a similar principle can be applied for imprinting the trajectory of quantum units of flux (vortices), travelling in a superconducting film (Nb), into a soft magnetic layer of permalloy (Py). In full analogy with the magnetic drawing board, vortices act as tiny magnetic scribers leaving a wake of polarized magnetic media in the Py board. The mutual interaction between superconducting vortices and ferromagnetic domains has been investigated by the magneto-optical imaging technique. For thick Py layers, the stripe magnetic domain pattern guides both the smooth magnetic flux penetration as well as the abrupt vortex avalanches in the Nb film. It is however in thin Py layers without stripe domains where superconducting vortices leave the clearest imprints of locally polarized magnetic moment along their paths. In all cases, we observe that the flux is delayed at the border of the magnetic layer. Our findings open the quest for optimizing magnetic recording of superconducting vortex trajectories.

  19. Imprinting superconducting vortex footsteps in a magnetic layer.

    PubMed

    Brisbois, Jérémy; Motta, Maycon; Avila, Jonathan I; Shaw, Gorky; Devillers, Thibaut; Dempsey, Nora M; Veerapandian, Savita K P; Colson, Pierre; Vanderheyden, Benoît; Vanderbemden, Philippe; Ortiz, Wilson A; Nguyen, Ngoc Duy; Kramer, Roman B G; Silhanek, Alejandro V

    2016-01-01

    Local polarization of a magnetic layer, a well-known method for storing information, has found its place in numerous applications such as the popular magnetic drawing board toy or the widespread credit cards and computer hard drives. Here we experimentally show that a similar principle can be applied for imprinting the trajectory of quantum units of flux (vortices), travelling in a superconducting film (Nb), into a soft magnetic layer of permalloy (Py). In full analogy with the magnetic drawing board, vortices act as tiny magnetic scribers leaving a wake of polarized magnetic media in the Py board. The mutual interaction between superconducting vortices and ferromagnetic domains has been investigated by the magneto-optical imaging technique. For thick Py layers, the stripe magnetic domain pattern guides both the smooth magnetic flux penetration as well as the abrupt vortex avalanches in the Nb film. It is however in thin Py layers without stripe domains where superconducting vortices leave the clearest imprints of locally polarized magnetic moment along their paths. In all cases, we observe that the flux is delayed at the border of the magnetic layer. Our findings open the quest for optimizing magnetic recording of superconducting vortex trajectories. PMID:27263660

  20. Imprinting superconducting vortex footsteps in a magnetic layer

    PubMed Central

    Brisbois, Jérémy; Motta, Maycon; Avila, Jonathan I.; Shaw, Gorky; Devillers, Thibaut; Dempsey, Nora M.; Veerapandian, Savita K. P.; Colson, Pierre; Vanderheyden, Benoît; Vanderbemden, Philippe; Ortiz, Wilson A.; Nguyen, Ngoc Duy; Kramer, Roman B. G.; Silhanek, Alejandro V.

    2016-01-01

    Local polarization of a magnetic layer, a well-known method for storing information, has found its place in numerous applications such as the popular magnetic drawing board toy or the widespread credit cards and computer hard drives. Here we experimentally show that a similar principle can be applied for imprinting the trajectory of quantum units of flux (vortices), travelling in a superconducting film (Nb), into a soft magnetic layer of permalloy (Py). In full analogy with the magnetic drawing board, vortices act as tiny magnetic scribers leaving a wake of polarized magnetic media in the Py board. The mutual interaction between superconducting vortices and ferromagnetic domains has been investigated by the magneto-optical imaging technique. For thick Py layers, the stripe magnetic domain pattern guides both the smooth magnetic flux penetration as well as the abrupt vortex avalanches in the Nb film. It is however in thin Py layers without stripe domains where superconducting vortices leave the clearest imprints of locally polarized magnetic moment along their paths. In all cases, we observe that the flux is delayed at the border of the magnetic layer. Our findings open the quest for optimizing magnetic recording of superconducting vortex trajectories. PMID:27263660

  1. The effects of magnetization process on levitation characteristics of a superconducting bulk magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Gong, Y. M.; Li, Y. H.; Liang, G.; Yang, X. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Zhao, Y.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a bulk YBCO superconductor was magnetized in a chosen magnetic field generated from a superconducting magnet (SM) after field cooling process. The effects of magnetization process with different magnetization intensities on levitation forces and relaxation characteristics were investigated. From the results, it can be confirmed that the superconducting bulk magnet (SBM) magnetized with proper magnetization intensity was beneficial to improve the levitation characteristics of the magnetic levitation system. Nevertheless, when the magnetization intensity exceeded 0.85T, the levitation forces and the relaxation characteristics of the SBM attained saturation.

  2. Superconductivity in Strong Magnetic Field (Greater Than Upper Critical Field)

    SciTech Connect

    Tessema, G.X.; Gamble, B.K.; Skove, M.J.; Lacerda, A.H.; Mielke, C.H.

    1998-08-22

    The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, funded by the National Science Foundation and other US federal Agencies, has in recent years built a wide range of magnetic fields, DC 25 to 35 Tesla, short pulse 50 - 60 Tesla, and quasi-continuous 60 Tesla. Future plans are to push the frontiers to 45 Tesla DC and 70 to 100 Tesla pulse. This user facility, is open for national and international users, and creates an excellent tool for materials research (metals, semiconductors, superconductors, biological systems ..., etc). Here we present results of a systematic study of the upper critical field of a novel superconducting material which is considered a promising candidate for the search for superconductivity beyond H{sub c2} as proposed by several new theories. These theories predict that superconductors with low carrier density can reenter the superconducting phase beyond the conventional upper critical field H{sub c2}. This negates the conventional thinking that superconductivity and magnetic fields are antagonistic.

  3. Whole-head SQUID system in a superconducting magnetic shield.

    PubMed

    Ohta, H; Matsui, T; Uchikawa, Y

    2004-01-01

    We have constructed a mobile whole-head SQUID system in a superconducting magnetic shield - a cylinder of high Tc superconductor BSCCO of 65 cm in diameter and 160 cm in length. We compared the noise spectra of several SQUID sensors of SNS Josephson junctions in the superconducting magnetic shield with those of the same SQUID sensors in a magnetically shielded room of Permalloy. The SQUID sensors in the superconducting magnetic shield are more than 100 times more sensitive than those in a magnetically shielded room of Permalloy below 1 Hz. We tested the whole-head SQUID system in the superconducting magnetic shield observing somatosensory signals evoked by stimulating the median nerve in the right wrist of patients by current pulses. We present data of 64 and 128 traces versus the common time axis for comparison. Most sensory responses of human brains phase out near 250 ms. However monotonic rhythms still remain even at longer latencies than 250 ms. The nodes of these rhythm are very narrow even at these longer latencies just indicating low noise characteristics of the SQUID system at low-frequencies. The current dipoles at the secondary somatosensory area SII are evoked at longer latencies than 250 ms contributing to a higher-level brain function. The SQUID system in a superconducting magnetic shield will also have advantages when it is used as a DC MEG to study very slow activities and function of the brain. PMID:16012595

  4. NASA superconducting magnetic mirror facility. [for thermonuclear research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.; Swanson, M. C.; Nichols, C. R.; Bloy, S. J.; Nagy, L. A.; Brady, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    The design details and initial test results of a superconducting magnetic mirror facility that has been constructed at NASA Lewis Research Center for use in thermonuclear research are summarized. The magnet system consists of four solenoidal coils which are individually rated at 5.0 T. Each coll is composed of an inner, middle, and outer winding. The inner winding is wound of stabilized Nb3Sn superconducting ribbon, and the middle and outer windings are wound of stabilized Nb-Ti superconducting wire. When arranged in the mirror geometry, the four coils will produce 8.7 T at the mirrors and a 1.8 mirror ratio. The magnet has a 41-cm diameter clear bore which is open to atmosphere. Distance between the mirrors is 111 cm. Presently there are only three magnets in the facility; the fourth magnet is being rebuilt.

  5. Focus on hybrid magnetic/superconducting systems Focus on hybrid magnetic/superconducting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, Lance; Moshchalkov, Victor; Li, Qiang

    2011-02-01

    Like antagonistic cousins from a common heritage, the competition between superconductivity and magnetism for correlated electron states, and coexistence in some rare cases, produces a rich variety of physical behavior, useful materials, and technologically important properties. Many pages of Superconductor Science and Technology are devoted to cuprates, pnictides, and other compounds where the mechanism of superconductivity itself is intertwined with magnetism. This focus issue explores another area, in which superconductivity and magnetism are combined as a hybrid system to create new properties not possible with either system alone, or to improve upon the properties of either system in dramatic ways. In recent years, great progress has been made in this exciting, relatively new field, followed by many workshops and special sessions in major international conferences. A concise and up-to-date focus issue of Superconductor Science and Technology is timely to summarize the latest developments. We, the Guest Editors, would like to thank those colleagues who contributed their most recent and interesting findings to this focus issue: Silhanek and co-workers reported both theoretical and experimental investigations of the dynamics of vortex chains for different arrangements of magnetic moments. Their approach of time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau formalism now replaces the previously proposed empirical models to explain the most relevant properties of the dynamics of these S/F hybrid systems. Hikino and co-workers presented a new route to observe the spin-wave excitation by the Josephson effect, through a theoretical investigation of the resistively shunted junction model, extended by considering the gauge invariance including magnetization. When the magnetization is driven by the microwave adjusted to the ferromagnetic resonance frequency, the dc supercurrent is induced in the junction, and the current-voltage curve shows step structures as a function of applied voltage

  6. Design study of the KIRAMS-430 superconducting cyclotron magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Wook; Kang, Joonsun; Hong, Bong Hwan; Jung, In Su

    2016-07-01

    Design study of superconducting cyclotron magnet for the carbon therapy was performed at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science (KIRAMS). The name of this project is The Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) project and a fixed frequency cyclotron with four spiral sector magnet was one of the candidate for the accelerator type. Basic parameters of the cyclotron magnet and its characteristics were studied. The isochronous magnetic field which can guide the 12C6+ ions up to 430 MeV/u was designed and used for the single particle tracking simulation. The isochronous condition of magnetic field was achieved by optimization of sector gap and width along the radius. Operating range of superconducting coil current was calculated and changing of the magnetic field caused by mechanical deformations of yokes was considered. From the result of magnetic field design, structure of the magnet yoke was planned.

  7. Thermal analysis of the cryocooled superconducting magnet for the liquid helium-free hybrid magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, Masayuki; Hamajima, Takataro; Itou, Tomoyuki; Sakuraba, Junji; Nishijima, Gen; Awaji, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2010-12-01

    The liquid helium-free hybrid magnet, which consists of an outer large bore cryocooled superconducting magnet and an inner water-cooled resistive magnet, was developed for magneto-science in high fields. The characteristic features of the cryogen-free outsert superconducting magnet are described in detail in this paper. The superconducting magnet cooled by Gifford-McMahon cryocoolers, which has a 360 mm room temperature bore in diameter, was designed to generate high magnetic fields up to 10 T. The hybrid magnet has generated the magnetic field of 27.5 T by combining 8.5 T generation of the cryogen-free superconducting magnet with 19 T generation of the water-cooled resistive magnet. The superconducting magnet was composed of inner NbSn coils and outer NbTi coils. In particular, inner NbSn coils were wound using high-strength CuNi-NbTi/NbSn wires in consideration of large hoop stress. Although the cryocooled outsert superconducting magnet achieved 9.5 T, we found that the outsert magnet has a thermal problem to generate the designed maximum field of 10 T in the hybrid magnet operation. This problem is associated with unexpected AC losses in NbSn wires.

  8. Developments of superconducting motor with YBCO bulk magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirakawa, M.; Inadama, S.; Kikukawa, K.; Suzuki, E.; Nakasima, H.

    2003-10-01

    We designed and manufactured a superconducting motor with YBCO superconductive bulk magnets. The motor, equipped with YBCO bulks as trapped field magnets and copper coils as armature windings, is an eight-poled synchronous motor of outer rotor type. The bulks are cooled to around 30 K by a refrigerator. This cooling operation is simpler than the other methods like cooling by liquid nitrogen. This paper presents the construction of the motor, the method of cooling bulks and the method of activating YBCO bulk magnets.

  9. The Superconducting Magnets of the ILC Beam Delivery System

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, B.; Anerella, M.; Escallier, J.; He, P.; Jain, A.; Marone, A.; Nosochkov, Y.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2007-09-28

    The ILC Beam Delivery System (BDS) uses a variety of superconducting magnets to maximize luminosity and minimize background. Compact final focus quadrupoles with multifunction correction coils focus incoming beams to few nanometer spot sizes while focusing outgoing disrupted beams into a separate extraction beam line. Anti-solenoids mitigate effects from overlapping focusing and the detector solenoid field. Far from the interaction point (IP) strong octupoles help minimize IP backgrounds. A low-field but very large aperture dipole is integrated with the detector solenoid to reduce backgrounds from beamstrahlung pairs generated at the IP. Physics requirements and magnetic design solutions for the BDS superconducting magnets are reviewed in this paper.

  10. Superconductivity from spoiling magnetism in the Kondo lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadzadeh, Mohammad Zhian; Fabrizio, Michele; Becca, Federico

    2014-11-01

    We find evidence that superconductivity intrudes into the paramagnetic-to-magnetic transition of the Kondo lattice model if magnetic frustration is added. Specifically, we study by the variational method the model on a square lattice in the presence of both nearest-neighbor (t ) and next-nearest-neighbor (t') hopping of the conduction electrons. We find that, when t'/t >0 , a d -wave superconducting dome emerges between the magnetic and paramagnetic metal phases and close to the compensated regime, i.e., the number of conduction electrons equals the number of localized spin-1/2 moments. Superconductivity is further strengthened by a direct antiferromagnetic exchange, JH, between the localized moments, to such an extent that we observe coexistence with magnetic order.

  11. Superconducting accelerator magnets: A review of their design and training

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B. |

    1992-08-01

    This paper reviews the basic mechanical designs of most of the superconducting magnets developed for high energy hadron accelerators. The training performance of these magnets is compared with an instability factor defined by the square of the current density in the stabilizing copper divided by the surface-to-volume ratio of the strands. A good correlation is observed.

  12. Superconducting Cable Development for Future High Energy Physics Detector Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, I. L.

    1995-11-01

    Under the leadership of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETHZ) an international ad hoc collaboration for superconducting cables developed an aluminium stabilised superconducting cable for future detector magnets. With the financial support of the Swiss government, this R&D work was carried out for the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN). In this report the manufacturing process is described and results of the quality control measurements are summarised. These tests showed that the industrial manufacturing of an aluminium stabilised superconducting cable is feasible.

  13. Operational experience with superconducting synchrotron magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.S.

    1987-03-01

    The operational experience with the Fermilab Tevatron is presented, with emphasis on reliability and failure modes. Comprisons are made between the operating efficiencies for the superconducting machine and for he conventional Main Ring.

  14. Present Status of the KSTAR Superconducting Magnet System Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Keeman; H, K. Park; K, R. Park; B, S. Lim; S, I. Lee; M, K. Kim; Y, Chu; W, H. Chung; S, H. Baek; J Y, Choi; H, Yonekawa; A, Chertovskikh; Y, B. Chang; J, S. Kim; C, S. Kim; D, J. Kim; N, H. Song; K, P. Kim; Y, J. Song; I, S. Woo; W, S. Han; D, K. Lee; Y, K. Oh; K, W. Cho; J, S. Park; G, S. Lee; H, J. Lee; T, K. Ko; S, J. Lee

    2004-10-01

    The mission of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) project is to develop an advanced steady-state superconducting tokamak for establishing a scientific and technological basis for an attractive fusion reactor. Because one of the KSTAR mission is to achieve a steady-state operation, the use of superconducting coils is an obvious choice for the magnet system. The KSTAR superconducting magnet system consists of 16 Toroidal Field (TF) coils and 14 Poloidal Field (PF) coils. Internally-cooled Cable-In-Conduit Conductors (CICC) are put into use in both the TF and PF coil systems. The TF coil system provides a field of 3.5 T at the plasma center and the PF coil system is able to provide a flux swing of 17 V-sec. The major achievement in KSTAR magnet-system development includes the development of CICC, the development of a full-size TF model coil, the development of a coil system for background magnetic-field generation, the construction of a large-scale superconducting magnet and CICC test facility. TF and PF coils are in the stage of fabrication to pave the way for the scheduled completion of KSTAR by the end of 2006.

  15. Interplay between superconductivity and magnetism in iron-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Chubukov, Andrey V

    2015-06-10

    This proposal is for theoretical work on strongly correlated electron systems, which are at the center of experimental and theoretical activities in condensed-matter physics. The interest to this field is driven fascinating variety of observed effects, universality of underlying theoretical ideas, and practical applications. I propose to do research on Iron-based superconductors (FeSCs), which currently attract high attention in the physics community. My goal is to understand superconductivity and magnetism in these materials at various dopings, the interplay between the two, and the physics in the phase in which magnetism and superconductivity co-exist. A related goal is to understand the origin of the observed pseudogap-like behavior in the normal state. My research explores the idea that superconductivity is of electronic origin and is caused by the exchange of spin-fluctuations, enhanced due to close proximity to antiferromagnetism. The multi-orbital/multi-band nature of FeSCs opens routes for qualitatively new superconducting states, particularly the ones which break time-reversal symmetry. By all accounts, the coupling in pnictdes is below the threshold for Mott physics and I intend to analyze these systems within the itinerant approach. My plan is to do research in two stages. I first plan to address several problems within weak-coupling approach. Among them: (i) what sets stripe magnetic order at small doping, (ii) is there a preemptive instability into a spin-nematic state, and how stripe order affects fermions; (iii) is there a co-existence between magnetism and superconductivity and what are the system properties in the co-existence state; (iv) how superconductivity emerges despite strong Coulomb repulsion and can the gap be s-wave but with nodes along electron FSs, (v) are there complex superconducting states, like s+id, which break time reversal symmetry. My second goal is to go beyond weak coupling and derive spin-mediated, dynamic interaction between

  16. Turn, layer and ground insulation for superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, D.

    2001-05-01

    The mechanical, electrical and thermal characteristics of insulating materials can have a significant influence on the performance and reliability of superconducting magnets. This paper considers the various ways in which ground, turn and layer insulation may be provided and the likely physical properties of such materials. A comparison between vacuum impregnated insulation and low pressure, pre-impregnated laminated materials is made and details are provided on the bond strength of insulating films that may be included in the insulation layer to provide electrical integrity. One method of providing electrically insulating ‘breaks’ in the liquid helium supply line for superconducting magnets is discussed.

  17. Thermal expansion of several materials for superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.F.; Fujii, G.; Ranney, M.A.

    1981-09-01

    The thermal expansion of several materials used in the consruction of high field superconducting magnets has been measured from 4 K to room temperature. The materials were a NbTi and two A15 multifilamentary conductors and several nonmetallic composites made from linen/phenolic, fiberglass/epoxy and superconducitng wire/epoxy. The conductor expansions are typical of metals and the composite expansions are highy anisotropic. Both graphic and tabular values are provided by a computer fitting of the experimental data. The importnce of thermal expansion differences in critical current measurement apparatus and superconducting magnet design are discussed. 12 refs.

  18. Hybrid Superconducting Magnetic Bearing (HSMB) for high load devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmichael, C. K.; Ma, K. B.; Lamb, M. A.; Lin, M. W.; Chow, L.; Meng, R. L.; Hor, P. H.; Chu, W. K.

    1992-01-01

    Lifting capacities greater than 41 N/cm(exp 2) (60 psi) at 77 K have been achieved with a new type of levitation (hybrid) using a combination of permanent magnets and high quality melt-mixtured YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) (YBCO). The key concept of the hybrid superconducting magnetic bearing (HSMB) is the use of strong magnetic repulsion and attraction from permanent magnets for high levitation or suspension forces in conjunction with a superconductor's flux pinning characteristics to counteract the inherent instabilities in a system consisting of magnets only. To illustrate this concept, radial and axial forces between magnet/superconductor, magnet/magnet, and magnet/superconductor/magnet, were measured and compared for the thrust bearing configuration

  19. Coexistence of Incommensurate Magnetism and Superconductivity in the Two-Dimensional Hubbard Model.

    PubMed

    Yamase, Hiroyuki; Eberlein, Andreas; Metzner, Walter

    2016-03-01

    We analyze the competition of magnetism and superconductivity in the two-dimensional Hubbard model with a moderate interaction strength, including the possibility of incommensurate spiral magnetic order. Using an unbiased renormalization group approach, we compute magnetic and superconducting order parameters in the ground state. In addition to previously established regions of Néel order coexisting with d-wave superconductivity, the calculations reveal further coexistence regions where superconductivity is accompanied by incommensurate magnetic order. PMID:26991188

  20. Vibration-induced field fluctuations in a superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, J. W.; Bohnet, J. G.; Sawyer, B. C.; Uys, H.; Biercuk, M. J.; Bollinger, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting magnets enable precise control of nuclear and electron spins, and are used in experiments that explore biological and condensed-matter systems, and fundamental atomic particles. In high-precision applications, a common view is that slow (<1 Hz ) drift of the homogeneous magnetic-field limits control and measurement precision. We report on previously undocumented higher-frequency field noise (10-200 Hz) that limits the coherence time of Be+9 electron-spin qubits in the 4.46 -T field of a superconducting magnet. We measure a spin-echo T2 coherence time of ˜6 ms for the Be+9 electron-spin resonance at 124 GHz , limited by part-per-billion fractional fluctuations in the magnet's homogeneous field. Vibration isolation of the magnet improved T2 to ˜50 ms.

  1. Theoretical and experimental investigations of superconductivity. Amorphous semiconductors, superconductivity and magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    The research activities from 1 March 1963 to 28 February 1973 are summarized. Major lectures are listed along with publications on superconductivity, superfluidity, electronic structures and Fermi surfaces of metals, optical spectra of solids, electronic structure of insulators and semiconductors, theory of magnetic metals, physics of surfaces, structures of metals, and molecular physics.

  2. Route to Topological Superconductivity via Magnetic Field Rotation.

    PubMed

    Loder, Florian; Kampf, Arno P; Kopp, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    The verification of topological superconductivity has become a major experimental challenge. Apart from the very few spin-triplet superconductors with p-wave pairing symmetry, another candidate system is a conventional, two-dimensional (2D) s-wave superconductor in a magnetic field with a sufficiently strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling. Typically, the required magnetic field to convert the superconductor into a topologically non-trivial state is however by far larger than the upper critical field H(c2), which excludes its realization. In this article, we argue that this problem can be overcome by rotating the magnetic field into the superconducting plane. We explore the character of the superconducting state upon changing the strength and the orientation of the magnetic field and show that a topological state, established for a sufficiently strong out-of-plane magnetic field, indeed extends to an in-plane field orientation. We present a three-band model applicable to the superconducting interface between LaAlO3 and SrTiO3, which should fulfil the necessary conditions to realize a topological superconductor. PMID:26477669

  3. Route to Topological Superconductivity via Magnetic Field Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Loder, Florian; Kampf, Arno P.; Kopp, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    The verification of topological superconductivity has become a major experimental challenge. Apart from the very few spin-triplet superconductors with p-wave pairing symmetry, another candidate system is a conventional, two-dimensional (2D) s-wave superconductor in a magnetic field with a sufficiently strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling. Typically, the required magnetic field to convert the superconductor into a topologically non-trivial state is however by far larger than the upper critical field Hc2, which excludes its realization. In this article, we argue that this problem can be overcome by rotating the magnetic field into the superconducting plane. We explore the character of the superconducting state upon changing the strength and the orientation of the magnetic field and show that a topological state, established for a sufficiently strong out-of-plane magnetic field, indeed extends to an in-plane field orientation. We present a three-band model applicable to the superconducting interface between LaAlO3 and SrTiO3, which should fulfil the necessary conditions to realize a topological superconductor. PMID:26477669

  4. Magnetic forces in high-Tc superconducting bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, F. C.

    1991-01-01

    In September 1987, researchers at Cornell levitated a small rotor on superconducting bearings at 10,000 rpm. In April 1989, a speed of 120,000 rpm was achieved in a passive bearing with no active control. The bearing material used was YBa2Cu307. There is no evidence that the rotation speed has any significant effect on the lift force. Magnetic force measurements between a permanent rare-earth magnet and high T(sub c) superconducting material versus vertical and lateral displacements were made. A large hysteresis loop results for large displacements, while minor loops result for small displacements. These minor loops seem to give a slope proportional to the magnetic stiffness, and are probably indicative of flux pinning forces. Experiments of rotary speed versus time show a linear decay in a vacuum. Measurements of magnetic dipole over a high-T(sub c) superconducting disc of YBCO show that the lateral vibrations of levitated rotors were measured which indicates that transverse flux motion in the superconductor will create dissipation. As a result of these force measurements, an optimum shape for the superconductor bearing pads which gives good lateral and axial stability was designed. Recent force measurements on melt-quench processed superconductors indicate a substantial increase in levitation force and magnetic stiffness over free sintered materials. As a result, application of high-T(sub c) superconducting bearings are beginning to show great promise at this time.

  5. Possible Frohlich superconductivity in strong magnetic fields.

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, C. H.; Harrison, N.; Ardavan, A.; Goddard, P.; Singleton, J.; Narduzzo, A.; Montgomery, Lawrence; Balicas, L.; Brooks, J. S.; Tokumoto, M.

    2001-01-01

    A brief review of some of the arguments pointing towards the possibility of organic conductors of the form {alpha}-(BEDT-TTF)&J3g(SCN)4 (where M=K, T1 and Rb) being candidates for Frohlich superconductivity is given.

  6. Cryogen free superconducting splittable quadrupole magnet for linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.S.; Andreev, N.; Kerby, J.; Orlov, Y.; Solyak, N.; Tartaglia, M.; Velev, G.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    A new superconducting quadrupole magnet for linear accelerators was fabricated at Fermilab. The magnet is designed to work inside a cryomodule in the space between SCRF cavities. SCRF cavities must be installed inside a very clean room adding issues to the magnet design, and fabrication. The designed magnet has a splittable along the vertical plane configuration and could be installed outside of the clean room around the beam pipe previously connected to neighboring cavities. For more convenient assembly and replacement a 'superferric' magnet configuration with four racetrack type coils was chosen. The magnet does not have a helium vessel and is conductively cooled from the cryomodule LHe supply pipe and a helium gas return pipe. The quadrupole generates 36 T integrated magnetic field gradient, has 600 mm effective length, and the peak gradient is 54 T/m. In this paper the quadrupole magnetic, mechanical, and thermal designs are presented, along with the magnet fabrication overview and first test results.

  7. Proximity superconductivity in ballistic graphene at high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prance, J. R.; Ben Shalom, M.; Zhu, M. J.; Fal'Ko, V. I.; Mishchenko, A.; Kretinin, A. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Woods, C. R.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Geim, A. K.

    We present measurements of the superconducting proximity effect in graphene-based Josephson junctions with a mean free path of several microns, which exceeds the junctions' length. The junctions exhibit low contact resistance and large supercurrents. We observe Fabry-Pérot oscillations in the normal-state resistance and the critical current of the junctions. The proximity effect is mostly suppressed in magnetic fields of <10 mT showing the conventional Fraunhofer interference pattern; however, unexpectedly, a weak proximity effect survives in magnetic fields as high as 1 T. Superconducting states randomly appear and disappear as a function of field and carrier concentration, and each exhibits a supercurrent carrying capacity close to the universal limit of e Δ/h where Δ is the superconducting gap of the contacts. We attribute the high-field supercurrent to mesoscopic Andreev states that persist near graphene edges. Our work reveals new proximity regimes that can be controlled by quantum confinement and cyclotron motion.

  8. Cryogenic techniques for large superconducting magnets in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    A large superconducting magnet is proposed for use in a particle astrophysics experiment, ASTROMAG, which is to be mounted on the United States Space Station. This experiment will have a two-coil superconducting magnet with coils which are 1.3 to 1.7 meters in diameter. The two-coil magnet will have zero net magnetic dipole moment. The field 15 meters from the magnet will approach earth's field in low earth orbit. The issue of high Tc superconductor will be discussed in the paper. The reasons for using conventional niobium-titanium superconductor cooled with superfluid helium will be presented. Since the purpose of the magnet is to do particle astrophysics, the superconducting coils must be located close to the charged particle detectors. The trade off between the particle physics possible and the cryogenic insulation around the coils is discussed. As a result, the ASTROMAG magnet coils will be operated outside of the superfluid helium storage tank. The fountain effect pumping system which will be used to cool the coil is described in the report. Two methods for extending the operating life of the superfluid helium dewar are discussed. These include: operation with a third shield cooled to 90 K with a sterling cycle cryocooler, and a hybrid cryogenic system where there are three hydrogen-cooled shields and cryostat support heat intercept points.

  9. A facility to test short superconducting accelerator magnets at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, M.J.; Hess, C.; Lewis, D.; Jaffery, T.; Kinney, W.; Ozelis, J.P.; Strait, J.; Butteris, J.; McInturff, A.D.; Coulter, K.J.

    1992-10-01

    During the past four years the Superconducting Magnet R&D facility at Fermilab (Lab 2) has successfully tested superconducting dipole, quadrupole, and correction coil magnets less than 2 meters in length for the SSC project and the Tevatron D0/B0 Low-{beta} Insertion. During this time several improvements have been made to the facility that have greatly enhanced its magnet testing capabilities. Among the upgrades have been a new rotating coil and data acquisition system for measuring magnetic fields, a controlled flow liquid helium transfer line using an electronically actuated cryo valve, and stand-alone systems for measuring AC loss and training low current Tevatron correction coil packages. A description of the Lab 2 facilities is presented.

  10. A facility to test short superconducting accelerator magnets at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, M.J.; Hess, C.; Lewis, D.; Jaffery, T.; Kinney, W.; Ozelis, J.P.; Strait, J. ); Butteris, J.; McInturff, A.D. ); Coulter, K.J. )

    1992-10-01

    During the past four years the Superconducting Magnet R D facility at Fermilab (Lab 2) has successfully tested superconducting dipole, quadrupole, and correction coil magnets less than 2 meters in length for the SSC project and the Tevatron D0/B0 Low-[beta] Insertion. During this time several improvements have been made to the facility that have greatly enhanced its magnet testing capabilities. Among the upgrades have been a new rotating coil and data acquisition system for measuring magnetic fields, a controlled flow liquid helium transfer line using an electronically actuated cryo valve, and stand-alone systems for measuring AC loss and training low current Tevatron correction coil packages. A description of the Lab 2 facilities is presented.

  11. Helium cooling systems for large superconducting physics detector magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. A.

    The large superconducting detector magnets used for high energy physics experiments are virtually all indirectly cooled. In general, these detector magnets are not cryogenically stabilized. Therefore, there are a number of choices for cooling large indirectly cooled detector magnets. These choices include; 1) forced two-phase helium cooling driven by the helium refrigerator J-T circuit, 2) forced two-phase helium cooling driven by a helium pump, and 3) a peculation gravity feed cooling system which uses liquid helium from a large storage dewar. The choices for the cooling of a large detector magnet are illustrated by applying these concepts to a 4.2 meter diameter 0.5 tesla thin superconducting solenoid for an experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  12. Survey of high field superconducting material for accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Scahlan, R.; Greene, A.F.; Suenaga, M.

    1986-05-01

    The high field superconductors which could be used in accelerator dipole magnets are surveyed, ranking these candidates with respect to ease of fabrication and cost as well as superconducting properties. Emphasis is on Nb/sub 3/Sn and NbTi. 27 refs., 2 figs. (LEW)

  13. Superconducting Super Collider Magnet System requirements. Revision A

    SciTech Connect

    1986-10-23

    This report discusses the Superconducting Super Collider magnet system requirements when the following categories: Functions; operational performance requirements; system configuration and essential features; structural requirements; availability/reliability; instrumentation and control requirements; design life; environment; maintenance requirements; interface systems; quality assurance; safety; and applicable codes and standards.

  14. Superconductive combinational logic circuit using magnetically coupled SQUID array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanashi, Y.; Umeda, K.; Sai, K.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we propose the development of superconductive combinational logic circuits. One of the difficulties in designing superconductive single-flux-quantum (SFQ) digital circuits can be attributed to the fundamental nature of the SFQ circuits, in which all logic gates have latching functions and are based on sequential logic. The design of ultralow-power superconductive digital circuits can be facilitated by the development of superconductive combinational logic circuits in which the output is a function of only the present input. This is because superconductive combinational logic circuits do not require determination of the timing adjustment and clocking scheme. Moreover, semiconductor design tools can be used to design digital circuits because CMOS logic gates are based on combinational logic. The proposed superconductive combinational logic circuits comprise a magnetically coupled SQUID array. By adjusting the circuit parameters and coupling strengths between neighboring SQUIDs, fundamental combinational logic gates, including the AND, OR, and NOT gates, can be built. We have verified the accuracy of the operations of the fundamental logic gates by analog circuit simulations.

  15. Superconductivity, magnetism, and pairing symmetry in Fe-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, Ilya

    2009-03-01

    We analyze antiferromagnetism and superconductivity within the renormalization group(RG) technique in novel Fe-based superconductors using the itinerant model of small electron and hole pockets near (0; 0) and (π,π), respectively, originating from the two strongly hybridized orbitals. We find that, for this model, the bare interactions in the Cooper channel are repulsive, and superconductivity does not occur at the mean-field level. However, under RG the effective interaction in the superconducting channel changes sign and becomes attractive. Furthermore, the effective interactions in antiferromagnetic and superconducting channels logarithmically flow towards the same absolute values at low energies, i.e., both must be treated on equal footings. The magnetic instability comes first for equal sizes of the two pockets, but looses to superconductivity upon doping. The superconducting gap has no nodes, but changes sign between the two Fermi surfaces (extended s-wave symmetry). We argue that the T dependencies of the spin susceptibility and NMR relaxation rate for such state are exponential only at very low T, and can be well fitted by power-laws over a wide T range below Tc. We further show that below Tc excitonic resonance appears in the spin excitations spectrum. [4pt] [1] M. Korshunov, and I. Eremin, Phys. Rev. B 78, 140509(R) (2008) [0pt] [2] A.V. Chubukov, D. Efremov, I. Eremin, Phys. Rev. B 78, 134512 (2008). [0pt] [3] M.M. Korshunov and I. Eremin, Europhys. Lett. 83, 67003 (2008).

  16. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Snitchler, Gregory L.; Gamble, Bruce B.; Voccio, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  17. SERPENTINE COIL TOPOLOGY FOR BNL DIRECT WIND SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect

    PARKER, B.; ESCALLIER, J.

    2005-05-16

    Serpentine winding, a recent innovation developed at BNL for direct winding superconducting magnets, allows winding a coil layer of arbitrary multipolarity in one continuous winding process and greatly simplifies magnet design and production compared to the planar patterns used before. Serpentine windings were used for the BEPC-II Upgrade and JPARC magnets and are proposed to make compact final focus magnets for the EC. Serpentine patterns exhibit a direct connection between 2D body harmonics and harmonics derived from the integral fields. Straightforward 2D optimization yields good integral field quality with uniformly spaced (natural) coil ends. This and other surprising features of Serpentine windings are addressed in this paper.

  18. HERA LUMINOSITY UPGRADE SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNET PRODUCTION AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    PARKER,B.; ANERELLA,M.; ESCALLIER,J.; GHOSH,A.; JAIN,A.; MARONE,A.; MURATORE,J.; PRODELL,A.; THOMPSON,P.; WANDERER,P.; WU,K.C.

    2000-09-17

    Production of two types of superconducting multi-function magnets, needed for the HEX4 Luminosity Upgrade is underway at BNL. Coil winding is now completed and cryostat assembly is in progress. Magnet type GO and type GG cold masses have been satisfactorily cold tested in vertical dewars and the first fully assembled GO magnet system has been horizontally cold tested and shipped to DESY. Warm measurements confirm that the coils meet challenging harmonic content targets. In this paper we discuss GO and GG magnet design and construction solutions, field harmonic measurements and quench test results.

  19. Superconducting magnet for K-500 cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Subimal; Choudhury, Jayanta; Pal, Gautam; Hajra, D. P.; Dey, R.; Sur, Amitava; Bhandari, R. K.

    2009-06-01

    K-500 superconducting cyclotron is in the advanced stage of commissioning at VECC, Kolkata. Superconducting magnet is one of the major and critical component of the cyclotron. It has been successfully fabricated, installed, cooled down to 4.2 K by interfacing with LHe plant and energized to its rated current on 30th April, 2005 producing magnetic field of 4.8 T at median plane of cyclotron. The superconducting magnet (stored energy of 22MJ) consists of two coils (α and β), which were wound on a sophisticated coil winding machine set-up at VECC. The superconducting cable used for winding the coils is multi filamentary composite superconducting wire (1.29 mm diameter) having 500 filaments of 40 μm diameter Nb-Ti in copper matrix which is embedded in OFHC grade copper channel (2.794 mm × 4.978 mm) for cryogenic stability. The basic structure of coil consists of layer type helical winding on a SS bobbin of 1475 mm ID × 1930 mm OD × 1170 mm height. The bobbin was afterwards closed by SS sheet to form the LHe chamber. The total weight of the coil with bobbin was about 6 tonne and the total length of the superconducting cable wound was about 35 km. Winding was done at very high tension (2000 PSI) and close tolerance to restrict the movement of conductor and coil during energization. After coil winding, all four coils (two each on upper and lower half of median plane of cyclotron) were banded by aluminium strip (2.7 mm × 5 mm) at higher tension (20,000 PSI) to give more compressive force after cool down to 4.2 K for restricting the movement of coil while energizing and thereby eliminating the chances of quench during ramping of current. After completion of coil winding by October, 2003, cryostat assembly was taken up in house. The assembly of cryostat (13 tonne) with support links (9 Nos.) refrigeration port, instrumentation port, helium vapour cooled current loads, etc. was completed by June, 2004. Meanwhile assembly of magnet frame was taken up and the cryostat

  20. PREFACE: International Conference on Superconductivity and Magnetism-ICSM2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencer, Ali; Grasso, Gianni

    2009-03-01

    The International Conference on Superconductivity and Magnetism (ICSM2008) was held at the congress centre of Ankara University in Side, Antalya, between 25-29 August 2008. The conference was the first conference on the combined fields of superconductivity and magnetism organized in Turkey at international level, and it had broad international participation from 42 countries, with registered delegates numbering over 400. A quarter of the attendees were research students. The conference attracted many of the best known leading scientists and experts in the field of superconductivity and magnetism from all over the world. The scientific program involved the presentation and discussion of 336 papers, classified as 65 invited, 81 oral and 190 posters. Submission of papers for the proceedings was on a volunteer basis and we therefore had nearly half of the presented papers, i.e. 30 submitted invited papers, peer-reviewed by Superconductor Science and Technology, and 85 submitted contributing papers, peer-reviewed by the organizers through processes administered by the Editorial Board and Scientific Committee. Reviews were conducted by expert referees at professional level and with the scientific standards expected of a proceedings journal issue published by IOP Publishing. The invited papers on superconductivity and magnetism with superconductivity were considered and processed for Superconductor Science and Technology by IOP itself. Although there are missing papers from some of the plenary speakers, we believe that this special issue of Superconductor Science and Technology (SUST) and the corresponding issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) reflect most of the booming research in the fields of superconductivity and magnetism. We are very pleased to have worked with IOP on the conference proceedings, with special thanks to Dr Tom Miller and Dr Graham Douglas. Based on a refereed evaluation of all the papers and posters submitted, about 93 papers were

  1. Development of a superconducting bulk magnet for NMR and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Tamada, Daiki; Yanagi, Yousuke; Itoh, Yoshitaka; Nemoto, Takahiro; Utumi, Hiroaki; Kose, Katsumi

    2015-10-01

    A superconducting bulk magnet composed of six vertically stacked annular single-domain c-axis-oriented Eu-Ba-Cu-O crystals was energized to 4.74 T using a conventional superconducting magnet for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. Shim coils, gradient coils, and radio frequency coils for high resolution NMR and MRI were installed in the 23 mm-diameter room-temperature bore of the bulk magnet. A 6.9 ppm peak-to-peak homogeneous region suitable for MRI was achieved in the central cylindrical region (6.2 mm diameter, 9.1 mm length) of the bulk magnet by using a single layer shim coil. A 21 Hz spectral resolution that can be used for high resolution NMR spectroscopy was obtained in the central cylindrical region (1.3 mm diameter, 4 mm length) of the bulk magnet by using a multichannel shim coil. A clear 3D MR image dataset of a chemically fixed mouse fetus with (50 μm)3 voxel resolution was obtained in 5.5 h. We therefore concluded that the cryogen-free superconducting bulk magnet developed in this study is useful for high-resolution desktop NMR, MRI and mobile NMR device.

  2. Development of a superconducting bulk magnet for NMR and MRI.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Tamada, Daiki; Yanagi, Yousuke; Itoh, Yoshitaka; Nemoto, Takahiro; Utumi, Hiroaki; Kose, Katsumi

    2015-10-01

    A superconducting bulk magnet composed of six vertically stacked annular single-domain c-axis-oriented Eu-Ba-Cu-O crystals was energized to 4.74 T using a conventional superconducting magnet for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. Shim coils, gradient coils, and radio frequency coils for high resolution NMR and MRI were installed in the 23 mm-diameter room-temperature bore of the bulk magnet. A 6.9 ppm peak-to-peak homogeneous region suitable for MRI was achieved in the central cylindrical region (6.2 mm diameter, 9.1 mm length) of the bulk magnet by using a single layer shim coil. A 21 Hz spectral resolution that can be used for high resolution NMR spectroscopy was obtained in the central cylindrical region (1.3 mm diameter, 4 mm length) of the bulk magnet by using a multichannel shim coil. A clear 3D MR image dataset of a chemically fixed mouse fetus with (50 μm)(3) voxel resolution was obtained in 5.5 h. We therefore concluded that the cryogen-free superconducting bulk magnet developed in this study is useful for high-resolution desktop NMR, MRI and mobile NMR device. PMID:26295170

  3. A homogeneous superconducting magnet design using a hybrid optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Zhipeng; Wang, Qiuliang; Liu, Feng; Yan, Luguang

    2013-12-01

    This paper employs a hybrid optimization algorithm with a combination of linear programming (LP) and nonlinear programming (NLP) to design the highly homogeneous superconducting magnets for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The whole work is divided into two stages. The first LP stage provides a global optimal current map with several non-zero current clusters, and the mathematical model for the LP was updated by taking into account the maximum axial and radial magnetic field strength limitations. In the second NLP stage, the non-zero current clusters were discretized into practical solenoids. The superconducting conductor consumption was set as the objective function both in the LP and NLP stages to minimize the construction cost. In addition, the peak-peak homogeneity over the volume of imaging (VOI), the scope of 5 Gauss fringe field, and maximum magnetic field strength within superconducting coils were set as constraints. The detailed design process for a dedicated 3.0 T animal MRI scanner was presented. The homogeneous magnet produces a magnetic field quality of 6.0 ppm peak-peak homogeneity over a 16 cm by 18 cm elliptical VOI, and the 5 Gauss fringe field was limited within a 1.5 m by 2.0 m elliptical region.

  4. Study on magnetic separation system using high Tc superconducting bulk magnets for water purification technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, T.; Kanayama, H.; Tanaka, K.; Fukui, S.; Ogawa, J.; Sato, T.; Yamaguchi, M.; Ooizumi, M.; Yokoyama, K.; Noto, K.

    2009-03-01

    The application of superconducting bulk magnets to the magnetic separation techniques has been investigated for the Mn-bearing waste water drained from the university laboratories. The research has been conducted in comparison with the electromagnets, and the cryo-cooled superconducting solenoid magnet. The separation ratios of ferrite precipitates including Mn element in the waste slurry were estimated by means of the high gradient magnetic separation method with ferromagnetic iron filters in the water channel and open gradient magnetic separation without them. As the magnetic force acting on the particles is given by the product of a magnetization of particles and a gradient of magnetic field, and a superconducting bulk magnet shows a sharp gradient of the magnetic field on the surface, the performances of the bulk magnet system were almost equivalent to those of the superconducting solenoid magnet with wide bore with respect to the magnetic separation ratios. The separation ratios for Mn have reached over 80 % for HGMS and 10 % for OGMS under the flow rates less than 3 liter/min.

  5. Recent improvements in superconducting cable for accelerator dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlan, R.M.; Royet, J.M.

    1991-05-01

    The superconducting magnets required for the SSC have provided a focus and substantial challenge for the development of superconducting wire and cable. The number of strands in the cables have been increased from 23 for the Tevatron to 30 for the SSC inner layer cable and 36 for the SSC outer cable. Critical current degradation associated with cabling has been reduced from 15% for the Tevatron to less than 5%. R D which has led to these improvements will be described and the opportunities for further advances will be discussed. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Construction of a 25-T cryogen-free superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Awaji, S.; Oguro, H.; Tsuchiya, Y.; Hanai, S.; Miyazaki, H.; Tosaka, T.; Takahashi, M.; Ioka, S.

    2014-12-01

    The construction of a 25-T cryogen-free superconducting magnet (25T-CSM) has started in 2013 at the High Field Laboratory for Superconducting Materials, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University. The 25T-CSM consists of a low-T superconducting (LTS) coil and a high-Tc superconducting (HTS) coil. A high-strength CuNb/Nb3Sn Rutherford cable with the reinforcing stabilizer CuNb composite is adopted for the middle LTS section coil. The characteristic feature of the new technology using a CuNb/Nb3Sn Rutherford cable is a react-and-wind method for the coil-winding process. The LTS coil of 300-mm winding inner diameter is fabricated, and a central magnetic field of 14 T is generated at an operation current of 851 A. The HTS insert coil wound with GdBa2Cu3Oy (Gd123) tape has a 52-mm experimental room temperature bore, and a central magnetic field of 25.5 T will be generated at an operation current of 150 A in a background field of 14 T.

  7. Highly efficient magnetic separation using five-aligned superconducting bulk magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishiro, Hiroyuki; Miura, Takashi; Naito, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Hidemi

    2010-06-01

    We have constructed the highly efficient magnetic separation system using five-aligned superconducting bulk magnets, which has ten usable magnetic poles on both sides in open space. We applied the bulk magnet system to the magnetic separation of ferromagnetic particles (magnetite; Fe3O4) and paramagnetic ones (α-hematite Fe2O3) dispersed in water for various average particle diameters d, flow speeds VF and initial concentrations C0 of the particles. The multi-bulk magnet system has been confirmed to be effective for the magnetic separation and the efficiency of the magnetic separation per one magnetic pole has been estimated using the theoretical relation.

  8. Vortices in magnetically coupled superconducting layered systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, Roman G.; Kogan, Vladimir G.; Clem, John R.

    2000-01-01

    Pancake vortices in stacks of thin superconducting films or layers are considered. It is stressed that in the absence of Josephson coupling topological restrictions upon possible configurations of vortices are removed and various examples of structures forbidden in bulk superconductors are given. In particular, it is shown that vortices may skip surface layers in samples of less than a certain size R{sub c} which might be macroscopic. The Josephson coupling suppresses R{sub c} estimates. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  9. Magnetic signature of granular superconductivity in electrodeposited Pb nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Riminucci, Alberto; Schwarzacher, Walther

    2014-06-14

    Nanocrystalline freestanding Pb nanowires ∼200 nm in diameter were fabricated by electrodeposition into track etched polycarbonate membranes in order to study their superconducting properties. Their superconducting critical temperature, as determined by measuring the Meissner effect, was the same as for bulk Pb, but their critical field was greatly enhanced up to ∼3000 Oe. By assuming the wires consisted of spherical superconducting grains, an estimated grain size r = 60 ± 25 nm was obtained from the magnetization measured as a function of the applied magnetic field at a fixed temperature. An independent estimate for r = 47 ± 12 nm, in good agreement with the previous one, was obtained from the magnetization measured as a function of temperature at a fixed applied magnetic field. Transmission electron microscopy was used to characterize grain size at the wire edges, where a grain size in agreement with the magnetic studies was observed.

  10. The superconducting magnet system for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, D.D.; Bulmer, R.J.; Chaplin, M.R.

    1994-06-18

    The superconducting magnet system for the Tokamak Physics experiment (TPX) will be the first all superconducting magnet system for a Tokamak, where the poloidal field coils, in addition to the toroidal field coils are superconducting. The magnet system is designed to operate in a steady state mode, and to initiate the plasma discharge ohmically. The toroidal field system provides a peak field of 4.0 Tesla on the plasma axis at a plasma major radius of 2.25 m. The peak field on the niobium 3-tin, cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductor is 8.4 Tesla for the 16 toroidal field coils. The toroidal field coils must absorb approximately 5 kW due to nuclear heating, eddy currents, and other sources. The poloidal field system provides a total of 18 volt seconds to initiate the plasma and drive a plasma current up to 2 MA. The poloidal field system consists of 14 individual coils which are arranged symmetrically above and below the horizontal mid plane. Four pairs of coils make up the central solenoid, and three paris of poloidal ring coils complete the system. The poloidal field coils all use a cable-in-conduit conductor, using either niobium 3-tin (NB{sub 3}Sn) or niobium titanium (NbTi) superconducting strands depending on the operating conditions for that coil. All of the coils are cooled by flowing supercritical helium, with inlet and outlet connections made on each double pancake. The superconducting magnet system has gone through a conceptual design review, and is in preliminary design started by the LLNL/MIT/PPPL collaboration. A number of changes have been made in the design since the conceptual design review, and are described in this paper.

  11. On nematicity, magnetism and superconductivity in FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhmer, Anna

    FeSe is unique among iron-based superconductors, notably regarding the interrelationships of structure, magnetism, and superconductivity. At ambient pressure, FeSe exhibits a tetragonal-to-orthorhombic (nematic) phase transition at Ts = 90 K, similar to other iron-based materials, but unlike them, no long-range magnetic order. One consequence is the unique possibility to study the in-plane resistivity anisotropy, arguably the most investigated 'nematic property', without interfering effects from the Fermi surface reconstruction induced by antiferromagnetic order. Recent findings pose the question whether nematicity in FeSe is driven by magnetic fluctuations, as often assumed in other iron-based systems. In particular, magnetic fluctuations, which are prominent at low temperatures, are not observed above Ts in FeSe by NMR, even though indicated by inelastic neutron scattering. The pressure-temperature phase diagram, recently obtained in new comprehensiveness using vapor-grown single crystals, shows that the structural transition is suppressed at 2 GPa and a new, likely magnetic phase is stabilized above 0.8 GPa, where Tc has a local maximum. Various theoretical scenarios have been proposed to explain this nematic transition far away from the magnetic order. Surprisingly, the degree of the orthorhombic distortion does not decrease below the superconducting transition at Tc = 8 K, suggesting that nematic and superconducting ``channels'' do not compete. Our new results on the superconducting state under pressure, show a non-monotonic pressure dependence of the upper critical field, which is well explained by the Fermi surface evolution. Further, we have successfully detwinned FeSe crystals and measured the in-plane resistivity anisotropy and elastoresistivity coefficients and compared them with model calculations of inelastic scattering from spin fluctuations. This work was supported by the Ames Laboratory, US DOE, under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  12. Magnetic forces in high-T(sub c) superconducting bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, F. C.

    1990-01-01

    In September 1987 research at Cornell levitated a small rotor on superconducting bearing at 10,000 rpm. In April 1989 a speed of 120,000 rpm was achieved in a passive bearing with no active control. The bearing material used was YBa2Cu3O7. There is no evidence that the rotation speed has any significant effect on the lift force. Magnetic force measurements between a permanent rare-earth magnet and high T(sub c) superconducting material versus vertical and lateral displacements were made. A large hysteresis loop results for large displacements, while minor loops result for small displacements. These minor loops seem to give a slope proportional to the magnetic stiffness, and are probably indicative of flux pinning forces. Experiments of rotary speed versus time show a linear decay in a vacuum. Measurements of magnetic drag forces of a magnetic dipole over a high-T(sub c) superconducting disc of YBCO show that the drag force reaches a constant value, independent of the speed. Dampling of lateral vibrations of levitated rotors were measured which indicates that transverse flux motion in the superconductor will create dissipation. As a result of these force measurements, an optimum shape for the superconductor bearing pads which gives good lateral and axial stability was designed. Recent force measurements on melt-quench processed superconductors indicate a substantial increase in levitation force and magnetic stiffness over free sintered materials. As a result, application of high-T(sub c) superconducting bearings are beginning to show great promise at this time.

  13. Superconducting Magnet Technology for the Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Todesco, E.; Ambrosio, G.; Ferracin, P.; Rifflet, J. M.; Sabbi, G. L.; Segreti, M.; Nakamoto, T.; van Weelderen, R.; Xu, Q.

    2015-10-01

    In this section we present the magnet technology for the High Luminosity LHC. After a short review of the project targets and constraints, we discuss the main guidelines used to determine the technology, the field/gradients, the operational margins, and the choice of the current density for each type of magnet. Then we discuss the peculiar aspects of each class of magnet, with special emphasis on the triplet.

  14. The design considerations for a superconducting magnetic bearing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cansiz, Ahmet; Yildizer, Irfan

    2014-09-01

    In this paper a high temperature superconducting magnetic bearing is studied with various design considerations. The design of the bearing consists of a rotor with 7.5 kg mass. The stable levitation of the rotor is provided with the Evershed type and superconducting components. The dynamic stability of the rotor is strengthened with the electromagnetic and electrodynamic levitation techniques. The force on the rotor is predicted in terms of semi-analytical frozen image model. The designed driving system sustains stable levitation during the rotation of the rotor and achieves higher rotational speed than that of the torque driver. The results indicate that the designed rotor and driving system have potential solutions for the development of the superconducting flywheel energy storage.

  15. Progress on Superconducting Magnets for the MICE Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P.; Li, Derun; Zisman, Michael S.; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, XingLong; Xu, FengYu; Liu, X. K.; Zheng, S. X.; Bradshaw, Thomas; Baynham, Elwyn; Cobb, John; Lau, Wing; Lau, Peter; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2009-09-09

    The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) consists of a target, a beam line, a pion decay channel, the MICE cooling channel. Superconducting magnets are used in the pion decay channel and the MICE cooling channel. This report describes the MICE cooling channel magnets and the progress in the design and fabrication of these magnets. The MICE cooling channel consists of three types of superconducting solenoids; the spectrometer solenoids, the coupling solenoids and the focusing solenoids. The three types of magnets are being fabricated in he United States, China, and the United Kingdom respectively. The spectrometer magnets are used to analyze the muon beam before and after muon cooling. The coupling magnets couple the focusing sections and keep the muon beam contained within the iris of the RF cavities that re used to recover the muon momentum lost during ionization cooling. The focusing magnets focus the muon beam in the center of a liquid hydrogen absorber. The first of the cooling channel magnets will be operational in MICE in the spring of 2010.

  16. Thermo-magnetic instabilities in Nb3Sn superconducting accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Bordini, Bernardo; /Pisa U.

    2006-09-01

    The advance of High Energy Physics research using circulating accelerators strongly depends on increasing the magnetic bending field which accelerator magnets provide. To achieve high fields, the most powerful present-day accelerator magnets employ NbTi superconducting technology; however, with the start up of Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2007, NbTi magnets will have reached the maximum field allowed by the intrinsic properties of this superconductor. A further increase of the field strength necessarily requires a change in superconductor material; the best candidate is Nb{sub 3}Sn. Several laboratories in the US and Europe are currently working on developing Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator magnets, and although these magnets have great potential, it is suspected that their performance may be fundamentally limited by conductor thermo-magnetic instabilities: an idea first proposed by the Fermilab High Field Magnet group early in 2003. This thesis presents a study of thermo-magnetic instability in high field Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator magnets. In this chapter the following topics are described: the role of superconducting magnets in High Energy Physics; the main characteristics of superconductors for accelerator magnets; typical measurements of current capability in superconducting strands; the properties of Nb{sub 3}Sn; a description of the manufacturing process of Nb{sub 3}Sn strands; superconducting cables; a typical layout of superconducting accelerator magnets; the current state of the art of Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator magnets; the High Field Magnet program at Fermilab; and the scope of the thesis.

  17. Phase structure of cold magnetized color superconducting quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, PG; Grunfeld, AG; Scoccola, NN

    2016-04-01

    The influence of intense magnetic fields on the behavior of color superconducting cold quark matter is investigated using an SU(2) f NJL-type model for which a novel regulation scheme is introduced. In such a scheme the contributions which are explicitly dependent on the magnetic field turn out to be finite and, thus, do not require to be regularized. As a result of this, non-physical oscillations that arise from regularizing magnetic field dependent terms are naturally removed, and oscillations that are actually physical can be better appreciated. The phase diagrams in the ẽB – μ plane are presented for different values of the diquark coupling.

  18. A Superconducting Magnet UCN Trap for Precise Neutron Lifetime Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Picker, R.; Altarev, I.; Bröcker, J.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Hartmann, J.; Müller, A.; Paul, S.; Schott, W.; Trinks, U.; Zimmer, O.

    2005-01-01

    Finite-element methods along with Monte Carlo simulations were used to design a magnetic storage device for ultracold neutrons (UCN) to measure their lifetime. A setup was determined which should make it possible to confine UCN with negligible losses and detect the protons emerging from β-decay with high efficiency: stacked superconducting solenoids create the magnetic storage field, an electrostatic extraction field inside the storage volume assures high proton collection efficiency. Alongside with the optimization of the magnetic and electrostatic design, the properties of the trap were investigated through extensive Monte Carlo simulation. PMID:27308150

  19. Modular transportable superconducting magnetic energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieurance, Dennis; Kimball, Foster; Rix, Craig

    1995-01-01

    Design and cost studies were performed for the magnet components of mid-size (1-5 MWh), cold supported SMES systems using alternative configurations. The configurations studied included solenoid magnets, which required onsite assembly of the magnet system, and toroid and racetrack configurations which consisted of factory assembled modules. For each configuration, design concepts and cost information were developed for the major features of the magnet system including the conductor, electrical insulation, and structure. These studies showed that for mid-size systems, the costs of solenoid and toroid magnet configurations are comparable and that the specific configuration to be used for a given application should be based upon customer requirements such as limiting stray fields or minimizing risks in development or construction.

  20. Modular transportable superconducting magnetic Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lieurance, D.; Kimball, F.; Rix, C.

    1994-12-31

    Design and cost studies were performed for the magnet components of mid-size (1-5 MWh), cold supported SMES systems using alternative configurations. The configurations studied included solenoid magnets, which required onsite assembly of the magnet system, and toroid and racetrack configurations which consisted of factory assembled modules. For each configuration, design concepts and cost information were developed for the major features of the magnet system including the conductor, electrical insulation, and structure. These studies showed that for mid-size systems, the costs of solenoid and toroid magnet configurations are comparable and that the specific configuration to be used for a given application should be based upon customer requirements such as limiting stray fields or minimizing risks in development or construction.

  1. Analysis of voltage spikes in superconducting Nb3Sn magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Rahimzadeh-Kalaleh, S.; Ambrosio, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Donnelly, C.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has been developing a new generation of superconducting accelerator magnets based on Niobium Tin (Nb{sub 3}Sn). The performance of these magnets is influenced by thermo-magnetic instabilities, known as flux jumps, which can lead to premature trips of the quench detection system due to large voltage transients or quenches at low current. In an effort to better characterize and understand these instabilities, a system for capturing fast voltage transients was developed and used in recent tests of R&D model magnets. A new automated voltage spike analysis program was developed for the analysis of large amount of voltage-spike data. We report results from the analysis of large statistics data samples for short model magnets that were constructed using MJR and RRP strands having different sub-element size and structure. We then assess the implications for quench protection of Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets.

  2. Superconducting magnetic sensors for mine detection and classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clem, Ted R.; Koch, Roger H.; Keefe, George A.

    1995-06-01

    Sensors incorporating Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) provide the greatest sensitivity for magnetic anomaly detection available with current technology. During the 1980's, the Naval Surface Warfare Center Coastal Systems Station (CSS) developed a superconducting magnetic sensor capable of operation outside of the laboratory environment. This sensor demonstrated rugged, reliable performance even onboard undersea towed platforms. With this sensor, the CSS was able to demonstrate buried mine detection for the US Navy. Subsequently the sensor was incorporated into a multisensor suite onboard an underwater towed vehicle to provide a robust mine hunting capability for the Magnetic and Acoustic Detection of Mines (MADOM) project. This sensor technology utilized niobium superconducting componentry cooled by liquid helium to temperatures on the order of 4 degrees Kelvin (K). In the late 1980's a new class of superconductors was discovered with critical temperatures above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77K). This advance has opened up new opportunities, especially for mine reconnaissance and hunting from small unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs). This paper describes the magnetic sensor detection and classification concept developed for MADOM. In addition, opportunities for UUV operations made possible with high Tc technology and the Navy's current efforts in this area will be addressed.

  3. Mechanical alignment of particles for use in fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials

    DOEpatents

    Nellis, William J.; Maple, M. Brian

    1992-01-01

    A method for mechanically aligning oriented superconducting or permanently magnetic materials for further processing into constructs. This pretreatment optimizes the final crystallographic orientation and, thus, properties in these constructs. Such materials as superconducting fibers, needles and platelets are utilized.

  4. Magnetic preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Capone, Donald W.; Dunlap, Bobby D.; Veal, Boyd W.

    1990-01-01

    A superconductor comprised of a polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-X (where 0superconducting properties and is capable of conducting very large current densities. By aligning the two-dimensional Cu-O layers which carry the current in the superconducting state in the a- and b-directions, i.e., within the basal plane, a high degree of crystalline axes alignment is provided between adjacent grains permitting the conduction of high current densities. The highly anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibility of the polycrystalline metal oxide material permits the use of an applied magnetic field to orient the individual crystals when in the superconducting state to substantially increase current transport between adjacent grains. In another embodiment, the anisotropic paramagnetic susceptibility of rare-earth ions substituted into the oxide material is made use of as an applied magnetic field orients the particles in a preferential direction. This latter operation can be performed with the material in the normal (non-superconducting) state.

  5. Magnetic preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Capone, D.W.; Dunlap, B.D.; Veal, B.W.

    1990-07-17

    A superconductor comprised of a polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]X] (where 0 < X < 0.5) exhibits superconducting properties and is capable of conducting very large current densities. By aligning the two-dimensional Cu-O layers which carry the current in the superconducting state in the a- and b-directions, i.e., within the basal plane, a high degree of crystalline axes alignment is provided between adjacent grains permitting the conduction of high current densities. The highly anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibility of the polycrystalline metal oxide material permits the use of an applied magnetic field to orient the individual crystals when in the superconducting state to substantially increase current transport between adjacent grains. In another embodiment, the anisotropic paramagnetic susceptibility of rare-earth ions substituted into the oxide material is made use of as an applied magnetic field orients the particles in a preferential direction. This latter operation can be performed with the material in the normal (non-superconducting) state. 4 figs.

  6. Magnetic field effects on superconductivity in alkali metal intercalates of MoS2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Flood, D. J.; Wagoner, D. E.; Somoano, R. B.; Rembaum, A.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of a magnetic field on the superconducting transition in MoS2 intercalated with potassium and sodium were studied. It was found that the potassium intercalated MoS2 has better properties in a magnetic field. In zero magnetic field the transition to superconductivity begins near 6.4 K. Diagrams of the basic circuitry for superconducting transition studies, and charts showing critical magnetic field versus critical temperature for the intercalated MoS2 are included.

  7. Superconducting magnetic energy storage apparatus structural support system

    DOEpatents

    Withers, Gregory J.; Meier, Stephen W.; Walter, Robert J.; Child, Michael D.; DeGraaf, Douglas W.

    1992-01-01

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage apparatus comprising a cylindrical superconducting coil; a cylindrical coil containment vessel enclosing the coil and adapted to hold a liquid, such as liquefied helium; and a cylindrical vacuum vessel enclosing the coil containment vessel and located in a restraining structure having inner and outer circumferential walls and a floor; the apparatus being provided with horizontal compression members between (1) the coil and the coil containment vessel and (2) between the coil containment vessel and the vacuum vessel, compression bearing members between the vacuum vessel and the restraining structure inner and outer walls, vertical support members (1) between the coil bottom and the coil containment vessel bottom and (2) between the coil containment vessel bottom and the vacuum vessel bottom, and external supports between the vacuum vessel bottom and the restraining structure floor, whereby the loads developed by thermal and magnetic energy changes in the apparatus can be accommodated and the structural integrity of the apparatus be maintained.

  8. Magnetic properties of electrospun non-woven superconducting fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblischka, Michael R.; Zeng, Xian Lin; Karwoth, Thomas; Hauet, Thomas; Hartmann, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Non-woven superconducting fabrics were prepared by the electrospinning technique, consisting of Bi2Sr2CaCuO8 (Bi-2212) nanowires. The individual nanowires have a diameter of ˜150-200 nm and lengths of up to 100 μm. A non-woven fabric forming a network with a large number of interconnects results, which enables the flow of transport currents through the entire network. We present here magnetization data [M(T) and M(H)-loops] of this new class of superconducting material. The magnetic properties of these nanowire networks are discussed including the irreversibility line and effects of different field sweep rates, regarding the microstructure of the nanowire networks investigated by electron microscopy.

  9. Application of superconducting coils to the NASA prototype magnetic balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haldeman, C. W.; Kraemer, R. A.; Phey, S. W.; Alishahi, M. M.; Covert, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    Application of superconducting coils to a general purpose magnetic balance was studied. The most suitable currently available superconducting cable for coils appears to be a bundle of many fine wires which are transposed and are mechanically confined. Sample coils were tested at central fields up to .5 Tesla, slewing rates up to 53 Tesla/ sec and frequencies up to 30 Hz. The ac losses were measured from helium boil-off and were approximately 20% higher than those calculated. Losses were dominated by hysteresis and a model for loss calculation which appears suitable for design purposes is presented along with computer listings. Combinations of two coils were also tested and interaction losses are reported. Two feasible geometries are also presented for prototype magnetic balance using superconductors.

  10. Superconducting magnets for muon capture and phase rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Weggel, R.J.

    1999-07-26

    There are two key systems that must operate efficiently, in order for a muon collider to be a viable option for high energy physics. These systems are the muon production and collection system and the muon cooling system. Both systems require the use of high field superconducting solenoid magnets. This paper describes the supcrconducting solenoid system used for the capture and phase rotation of the pions that are produced on a target in a high intensity proton beam.

  11. Zinc contamination from brass upon heat treating a superconducting magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D.W.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

    1994-07-01

    Theoretical calculations predicted that zinc outgassing from brass spacers during a planned heat treatment would likely damage a lab-scale superconducting magnet. This specter was reinforced by a simulated heat treatment, the samples of which were analyzed by gravimetry, metallography, and microprobe chemical analysis. It was found that zinc escaping from the brass could diffuse 80 {mu}m into copper electrical conductors and degrade their conductivity. To avoid this, steel was temporarily substituted for the brass during the heat treatment process.

  12. Magnetism and superconductivity of uranium and intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, J. C.; Gay, E. C.; Hanrahan, R. J.; Hults, W. L.; Lashley, J. C.; Manley, M. E.; McPheeters, C. C.; Schmiedeshoff, G. M.; Thoma, D. J.; Touton, S.; Smith, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    Heat capacity, resistivity, and phonon density of states have been measured on uranium and reported already. Many of the results are on single crystals of purity that has been unavailable before. Some intermetallic compounds have been measured that are in the class of so-called heavy-fermion materials. We present here the latest results along with a discussion of the occurrence of superconductivity or magnetism in these materials.

  13. Superconducting (radiation hardened) magnets for mirror fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Miller, J.R.; Perkins, J.R.

    1983-12-07

    Superconducting magnets for mirror fusion have evolved considerably since the Baseball II magnet in 1970. Recently, the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) yin-yang has been tested to a full field of 7.7 T with radial dimensions representative of a full scale reactor. Now the emphasis has turned to the manufacture of very high field solenoids (choke coils) that are placed between the tandem mirror central cell and the yin-yang anchor-plug set. For MFTF-B the choke coil field reaches 12 T, while in future devices like the MFTF-Upgrade, Fusion Power Demonstration and Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) reactor the fields are doubled. Besides developing high fields, the magnets must be radiation hardened. Otherwise, thick neutron shields increase the magnet size to an unacceptable weight and cost. Neutron fluences in superconducting magnets must be increased by an order of magnitude or more. Insulators must withstand 10/sup 10/ to 10/sup 11/ rads, while magnet stability must be retained after the copper has been exposed to fluence above 10/sup 19/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/.

  14. Influence of neutron irradiation on conduction cooling superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Ogitsu, T.; Makida, Y.; Nakamoto, T.; Okamura, T.; Sasaki, K.; Sugano, M.

    2015-12-01

    The conduction-cooled superconducting magnets are now widely used in various applications due to their minimum usage of helium. In the accelerator science, they also play an increasingly important role in particle detector solenoids because they can minimize the materials needed for the magnet such that they can be more transparent against irradiated particles. For the same reason they are currently used in high radiation environments because they can reduce the heat load from the irradiation. However, the hadronic reactions, such as neutron or proton irradiation, can create degradation on the thermal conductivity of pure aluminum which is used as a cooling path. It leads to a poor cooling condition of the magnets. In Japan, there are two conduction-cooled superconducting magnets for muon production; one is already constructed and under operation, the other is now under construction. This paper briefly reports the influence of the irradiation on those magnets and discusses the possibilities of HTS based conduction-cooled magnets under high irradiation environments.

  15. 3-D Numerical Field Calculations of CESR's Upgraded Superconducting Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Zipi; Greenwald, Shlomo

    1997-05-01

    A 3-D numerical code( Z. Greenwald, ``BST.c 3-D Magnetic Field Calculation Numerical Code'', Cornell University Note 96-09) was used to calculate the spatial magnetic fields generated by a current carrying wire. In particular, the code calculates the fields of wire loops wrapped on a pipe similar to superconductive magnet structures. The arrangement and dimensions of the loops can be easily modified to create dipoles, quadrupoles, skew magnets etc., and combinations of the above. In this paper we show the calculated 3-D fields of ironless superconducting quadrupole dipole combination designed for CESR phase III upgrade (which will be manufactured by TESLA). Since the magnet poles are made of loops, the fields at the edges are not only distorted but have a component, B_z, in the z direction as well. This Bz field can cause X-Y coupling of the beam. In order to calculate the coupling, the particle trajectories through the whole magnet were computed. The code is also used to calculate local fields errors due to possible manufacturing imperfections. An example of a rotational error of one pole, and an example of an error in the winding width are shown.

  16. Tests of prototype SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, J.; Brown, B.C.; Hanft, R.; Koepke, K.; Kuchnir, M.; Lundy, R.; Mantsch, P.; Mazur, P.O.; McInturff, A.; Orr, J.R.

    1987-09-21

    Results are presented from tests of the third full scale development dipole magnet for the Superconducting Super Collider and from a retest of a 4.5 m model magnet of the same design mounted in an SSC cryostat. The 4.5 m magnet shows consistent quench performance between its original tests in boiling liquid helium in a vertical dewar and the current tests in forced flow helium in a horizontal cryostat. Little or no retraining is observed over several thermal cycles. The full length magnet requires 12 quenches to train to its short sample limit of 6800 A and displays a reasonably stable quench plateau following training. This represents a great improvement over the performance of the first two full length magnets. Data are presented on quench behavior as a function of current and temperature and on azimuthal and longitudinal loading of the coil by the support structure. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Magnet coil system for a superconducting spectrometer (HISS)

    SciTech Connect

    Reimers, R.M.; Wolgast, R.C.; Yamamoto, R.M.

    1983-03-01

    The Heavy Ion Superconducting Spectrometer (HISS) facility and coils are briefly described while most of the paper discusses the support structures consisting of flanged doubly tapered stainless steel cylinders having a Z-shaped cross-section with average diameter of approximately 2.35 meters and height of approx. .49 meters. This member serves as a one piece coil support to resist gravitational, seismic, and magnetic forces with an approximate heat leak to helium of 59 watts per cylinder during operation of magnet at 4 degrees K. Maximum magnetic forces on each coil are over 11 meganewtons at 3T excitation. Magnetic forces attracting the coils to the core vary with excitation in direction as well as in magnitude. Radial magnetic forces produce stresses internal to the coil bobbin.

  18. Maximum field capability of Energy-Saver superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Turkot, F.; Cooper, W.E.; Hanft, R.; McInturff, A.

    1983-03-01

    At an energy of 1 TeV, the superconducting cable in the Energy Saver dipole magnets will be operating at approx. 96% of its nominal short sample limit; the corresponding number in the quadrupole magnets is 81%. All magnets for the Saver are individually tested for maximum current capability under two modes of operation; some 900 dipoles and 275 quadrupoles have now been measured. The dipole winding is composed of four individually wound coils. In general, the cable in the four coils comes from four different reels of cable. As part of magnet fabrication quality control, a short piece of cable from both ends of each reel has its critical current (rho = 1 x 10/sup -12/'..cap omega..-cm) measured at 5T and 4.3/sup 0/K. We present the statistical results of the maximum field tests on Saver magnets and explore the correlation with cable critical current.

  19. Dynamical Tests in a Linear Superconducting Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, D. H. N.; Sotelo, G. G.; Sass, F.; Motta, E. S.; , R. de Andrade, Jr.; Stephan, R. M.

    The unique properties of high critical temperature superconductors (HTS) make possible the development of an effective and self-stable magnetic levitation (MagLev) transportation system. In this context, a full scale MagLev vehicle, named MagLev-Cobra, has been developed at the Laboratory for Applied Superconductivity (LASUP/UFRJ). The vehicle is borne by a linear superconducting magnetic bearing (LSMB). The most important design constraint of the levitation system is the force that appears due to the interaction between the HTS and the permanent magnetic (PM) rail, which composes the LSMB. Static and dynamic characteristics of this force must be studied. The static behavior was already reported in previous work. The dynamic operation of this kind of vehicle, which considers the entry and exit of passengers and vibration movements, may result in the decrease of the gap between the superconductor and the PM rail in LSMB. In order to emulate the vehicle operation and to study the gap variation with time, the superconductors are submitted to a series of vertical displacements performed with the help of an experimental test rig. These movements are controlled by a time-variant reference force that reproduces the vehicle dynamic. In the present work, the results obtained for the dynamic gap behavior are presented. These measurements are essential to the commissioning process of a superconducting MagLev full scale vehicle.

  20. Design principles for prototype and production magnetic measurements of superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.C.

    1989-02-01

    The magnetic field strength and shape for SSC superconducting magnets will determine critical properties of the accelerator systems. This paper will enumerate the relations between magnetic field properties and magnet material selection and assembly techniques. Magnitudes of various field errors will be explored along with operating parameters which can affect them. Magnetic field quality requirements will be compared to available measuring techniques and the relation between magnetic field measurements and other quality control efforts will be discussed. This will provide a framework for designing a complete magnet measurement plan for the SSC project. 17 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  1. High-temperature-superconducting magnetic susceptibility bolometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasunas, J.; Lakew, B.; Lee, C.

    1992-01-01

    An infrared detector called the magnetic susceptibility bolometer is introduced which is based on the tmperature dependence of the diamagnetic screening of a high-Tc superconductor film near Tc. Results are reported for the response of a prototype model to modulated blackbody radiation. Possible improvements are discussed as is the potential sensitivity of an improved device.

  2. FIELD QUALITY IMPROVEMENTS IN SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    GUPTA,R.; JAIN,A.; KAHN,S.; MORGAN,G.; THOMPSON,P.; WANDERER,P.; WILLEN,E.

    1994-06-27

    A number of techniques have been developed and tested to improve the field quality in the superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets to be used in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). These include adjustment in the coil midplane gap to compensate for the allowed and non-allowed harmonics, inclusion of holes and cutouts in the iron yoke to reduce the saturation-induced harmonics, and magnetic tuning shims to correct for the residual errors. We compare the measurements with the calculations to test the validity of these concepts.

  3. Superconductivity and magnetism of complex rhodium borides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhanov, G. S.; Lachenkov, S. A.; Khlybov, E. P.; Dankin, D. G.; Kulikova, L. F.

    2013-05-01

    A number of complex rhodium borides with an LuRu4B4-type structure is synthesized; these are DyRh4B4 (samples HP) with T c ≈ 4.5 K, DyRh3.8Ru0.2B4 (samples AM) with T c ≈ 4.5 K, Dy0.8Er0.2Rh3.8Ru0.2B4 (samples AM) with T c ≈ 6.3 K, and HoRh3.8Ru0.2B4 (samples AM) with T c ≈ 6.0 K. The temperature dependence of upper critical field B c2( T) for all the samples under study exhibits an anomalous behavior. In all cases, the curve B c2( T) demonstrates a point of inflection, after which the curve deviates from the classical parabolic law abruptly upward for DyRh4B4 and DyRh3.8Ru0.2B4 (the 1st group of compounds) and downward for the Dy0.8Er0.2Rh3.8Ru0.2B4 and HoRh3.8Ru0.2B4 compounds (the 2nd group). These compounds are found to be characterized by of the following phase transitions: paramagnet → ferrimagnet → superconductor (retained ferrimagnetism) → antiferromagnet (retained superconductivity). The latter transition to the antiferromagnetic state occurs only in the compounds of the 1st group. It is found that, for the DyRh3.8Ru0.2B4 compound, no traditional Meissner effect is observed but the so-called Volleben effect (paramagnetic Meissner effect) takes place.

  4. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of High Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounce, Andrew M.

    The high temperature superconductors HgBa2CuO 4+delta (Hg1201) and Bi2SrCa2Cu2O 8+delta (Bi2212) have been treated with 17O for both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensitivity and various electronic properties. Subsequently, NMR experiments were performed on Hg1201 and Bi2212 to reveal the nature of the pseudogap, in the normal state, and vortex phases, in the superconducting state. NMR has been performed on 17O in an underdoped Hg1201 crystal with a superconducting transition transition temperature of 74 K to look for circulating orbital currents proposed theoretically and inferred from neutron scattering. The measurements reveal narrow spectra which preclude static local fields in the pseudogap phase at the apical site, suggesting that the moments observed with neutrons are fluctuating or the orbital current ordering is not the correct model for the neutron scattering observation. The fine detail of the NMR frequency shifts at the apical oxygen site are consistent with a dipolar field from the Cu+2 site and diamagnetism below the superconducting transition. It has been predicted that superconducting vortices should be electrically charged and that this effect is particularly enhanced for high temperature superconductors. Here it is shown that the Abrikosov vortex lattice, characteristic of the mixed state of superconductors, will become unstable at sufficiently high magnetic field if there is charge trapped on the vortex core for highly anisotropic superconductors. NMR measurements of the magnetic fields generated by vortices in Bi2212 single crystals provide evidence for an electro-statically driven vortex lattice reconstruction with the magnitude of charge on each vortex pancake of 2x10-3e, depending on doping, in line with theoretical estimates. Competition with magnetism is at the heart of high temperature superconductivity, most intensely felt near a vortex core. To investigate vortex magnetism spatially resolved NMR has been used, finding a strongly non

  5. Test equipment for a flywheel energy storage system using a magnetic bearing composed of superconducting coils and superconducting bulks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, M.; Matsue, H.; Yamashita, T.; Hasegawa, H.; Nagashima, K.; Maeda, T.; Matsuoka, T.; Mukoyama, S.; Shimizu, H.; Horiuchi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Energy storage systems are necessary for renewable energy sources such as solar power in order to stabilize their output power, which fluctuates widely depending on the weather. Since ‘flywheel energy storage systems’ (FWSSs) do not use chemical reactions, they do not deteriorate due to charge or discharge. This is an advantage of FWSSs in applications for renewable energy plants. A conventional FWSS has capacity limitation because of the mechanical bearings used to support the flywheel. Therefore, we have designed a superconducting magnetic bearing composed of a superconducting coil stator and a superconducting bulk rotor in order to solve this problem, and have experimentally manufactured a large scale FWSS with a capacity of 100 kWh and an output power of 300 kW. The superconducting magnetic bearing can levitate 4 tons and enables the flywheel to rotate smoothly. A performance confirmation test will be started soon. An overview of the superconducting FWSS is presented in this paper.

  6. Superconductivity and unusual magnetic behavior in amorphous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felner, Israel

    2014-03-01

    Traces of superconductivity (SC) at elevated temperatures (up to 65 K) were observed by magnetic measurements in three different inhomogeneous sulfur doped amorphous carbon (a-C) systems: (a) in commercial and (b) synthesized powders and (c) in a-C thin films. (a) Studies performed on a commercial (a-C) powder, which contains 0.21% sulfur, revealed traces of non-percolated superconducting phases below T c = 65 K. The SC volume fraction is enhanced by the sulfur doping. (b) The a-C powder obtained by pyrolytic decomposition of sucrose did not show any sign of SC above 5 K. This powder was mixed with sulfur and synthesized at 400 °C (a-CS). The inhomogeneous products obtained show traces of SC phases at T c = 17 and 42 K. (c) Non-superconducting composite a-C-W thin films were grown by electron-beam induced deposition. SC emerged at T c = 34.4 K only after heat treatment with sulfur. Other parts of the pyrolytic a-CS powder show unusual magnetic features. (i) Pronounced irreversible peaks around 55-75 K appear in the first zero-field-cooled (ZFC) sweep only. Their origin is not known. (ii) Unexpectedly, these peaks are totally suppressed in the second ZFC runs measured a few minutes later. (iii) Around the peak position the field-cooled (FC) curves cross the ZFC plots (ZFC > FC). These peculiar magnetic observations are also ascribed to an a-CS powder prepared from the commercial a-C powder and are connected to each other. All SC and magnetic phenomena observed are intrinsic properties of the sulfur doped a-C materials. It is proposed that the a-CS systems behave similarly to well-known high T c curates and/or pnictides in which SC emerges from magnetic states.

  7. REAL-WORLD SORTING OF RHIC SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; GUPTA,R.; HARRISON,M.; JAIN,A.; PEGGS,S.; THOMPSON,P.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; WANDERER,P.

    1999-03-29

    During the seven-year construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), more than 1700 superconducting dipoles, quadrupoles, sextupoles, and multi-layer correctors have been constructed and installed. These magnets have been sorted at several production stages to optimize their performance and reliability. For arc magnets, priorities have been put first on quench performance and operational risk minimization, second on field transfer function and other first-order quantities, and finally on nonlinear field errors which were painstakingly optimized at design. For Interaction-Region (IR) magnets, sorting is applied to select the best possible combination of magnets for the low-{beta}* interaction points (IP). This paper summarizes the history of this real-world sorting process.

  8. Optimized configurations of autostable superconducting magnetic bearings for practical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schoechlin, A.; Ritter, T.; Bornemann, H.J.

    1995-11-01

    In order to establish an optimized bearing design for a flywheel for energy storage, the authors have studied model bearing configurations involving bulk YBCO pellets and double-dipole magnet configurations. They were interested to see what is the correlation between the maximum attainable levitation force, measured for a typical bearing gap of 3 mm, and the separation between the magnetic poles. Equal polarity (north-north) and alternate polarity (north-south) configurations were investigated. The maximum levitation force was obtained with the alternate polarity arrangement for a separation between the magnetic poles of 6 mm. It represents an increase of 19% compared to a non-optimized configuration. The experiments demonstrate that configurations of superconducting magnetic bearings can be optimized to obtain better levitation properties.

  9. Performance of Conduction Cooled Splittable Superconducting Magnet Package for Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimire S.; Andreev, N.; Cheban, S.; DiMarco, J.; Kimura, N.; Makarov, A.; Orlov, Y.; Poloubotko. V., Poloubotko. V.; Tartaglia, M.; Yamamoto, A.

    2015-01-01

    New Linear Superconducting Accelerators need a superconducting magnet package installed inside SCRF Cryomodules to focus and steer electron or proton beams. A superconducting magnet package was designed and built as a collaborative effort of FNAL and KEK. The magnet package includes one quadrupole, and two dipole windings. It has a splittable in the vertical plane configuration, and features for conduction cooling. The magnet was successfully tested at room temperature, in a liquid He bath, and in a conduction cooling experiment. The paper describes the design and test results including: magnet cooling, training, and magnetic measurements by rotational coils. The effects of superconductor and iron yoke magnetization, hysteresis, and fringe fields are discussed.

  10. Tunnel-diode resonator and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of low-dimensional magnetic and superconducting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yeninas, Steven Lee

    2013-01-01

    This thesis emphasizes two frequency-domain techniques which uniquely employ radio frequency (RF) excitations to investigate the static and dynamic properties of novel magnetic and superconducting materials.

  11. Transformer current sensor for superconducting magnetic coils

    DOEpatents

    Shen, S.S.; Wilson, C.T.

    1985-04-16

    The present invention is a current transformer for operating currents larger than 2kA (two kiloamps) that is capable of detecting a millivolt level resistive voltage in the presence of a large inductive voltage. Specifically, the present invention includes substantially cylindrical primary turns arranged to carry a primary current and substantially cylindrical secondary turns arranged coaxially with and only partially within the primary turns, the secondary turns including an active winding and a dummy winding, the active and dummy windings being coaxial, longitudinally separated and arranged to mutually cancel voltages excited by commonly experienced magnetic fields, the active winding but not the dummy winding being arranged within the primary turns.

  12. Design optimization of superconducting magnetic energy storage coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Uttam; Saha, Subimal; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-05-01

    An optimization formulation has been developed for a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) solenoid-type coil with niobium titanium (Nb-Ti) based Rutherford-type cable that minimizes the cryogenic refrigeration load into the cryostat. Minimization of refrigeration load reduces the operating cost and opens up the possibility to adopt helium re-condensing system using cryo-cooler especially for small-scale SMES system. Dynamic refrigeration load during charging or discharging operational mode of the coil dominates over steady state load. The paper outlines design optimization with practical design constraints like actual critical characteristics of the superconducting cable, maximum allowable hoop stress on winding, etc., with the objective to minimize refrigeration load into the SMES cryostat. Effect of design parameters on refrigeration load is also investigated.

  13. Enhanced Antiferromagnetic Exchange between Magnetic Impurities in a Superconducting Host

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, N. Y.; Glazman, L. I.; Demler, E. A.; Lukin, M. D.; Sau, J. D.

    2014-08-01

    It is generally believed that superconductivity only weakly affects the indirect exchange between magnetic impurities. If the distance r between impurities is smaller than the superconducting coherence length (r≲ξ), this exchange is thought to be dominated by Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interactions, identical to the those in a normal metallic host. This perception is based on a perturbative treatment of the exchange interaction. Here, we provide a nonperturbative analysis and demonstrate that the presence of Yu-Shiba-Rusinov bound states induces a strong 1/r2 antiferromagnetic interaction that can dominate over conventional RKKY even at distances significantly smaller than the coherence length (r≪ξ). Experimental signatures, implications, and applications are discussed.

  14. Pareto optimal design of sectored toroidal superconducting magnet for SMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Uttam; Saha, Subimal; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-10-01

    A novel multi-objective optimization design approach for sectored toroidal superconducting magnetic energy storage coil has been developed considering the practical engineering constraints. The objectives include the minimization of necessary superconductor length and torus overall size or volume, which determines a significant part of cost towards realization of SMES. The best trade-off between the necessary conductor length for winding and magnet overall size is achieved in the Pareto-optimal solutions, the compact magnet size leads to increase in required superconducting cable length or vice versa The final choice among Pareto optimal configurations can be done in relation to other issues such as AC loss during transient operation, stray magnetic field at outside the coil assembly, and available discharge period, which is not considered in the optimization process. The proposed design approach is adapted for a 4.5 MJ/1 MW SMES system using low temperature niobium-titanium based Rutherford type cable. Furthermore, the validity of the representative Pareto solutions is confirmed by finite-element analysis (FEA) with a reasonably acceptable accuracy.

  15. New power-conditioning systems for superconducting magnetic energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Byung Moon

    1992-06-01

    This dissertation presents the development of new power-conditioning systems for superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES), which can regulate fast and independently the active and reactive powers demanded in the ac network. Three new power-conditioning systems were developed through a systematic approach to match the requirements of the superconducting coil and the ac power network. Each of these new systems is composed of ten 100-MW modules connected in parallel to handle the large current through the superconducting coil. The first system, which was published in the IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion, consists of line-commutated 24-pulse converter, a thyristor-switched tap-changing transformer, and a thyristor-switched capacitor bank. The second system, which was accepted for publication in the IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion, consists of a 12-pulse GTO (gate turn-off thyristor) converter and a thyristor-switched tap-changing transformer. The third system, which was submitted to the International Journal of Energy System, consists of a dc chopper and a voltage-source PWM (pulse width modulation) converter. The operational concept of each new system is verified through mathematical analyses and computer simulations. The dynamic interaction of each new system with the ac network and the superconducting coil is analyzed using a simulation model with EMTP (electro-magnetic transients program). The analysis results prove that each new system is feasible and realizable. Each system can regulate the active and reactive powers of the utility network rapidly and independently, and each offer a significant reduction of the system rating by reducing the reactive power demand in the converter. Feasible design for each new system was introduced using a modular design approach based on the 1000 MW/5000 MWH plant, incorporating commercially available components and proven technologies.

  16. A Superconducting Magnet Upgrade of the ATF2 Final Focus

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Brett; Anerella, Michael; Escallier, John; He, Ping; Jain, Animesh; Marone, Andrew; Wanderer, Peter; Wu, Kuo-Chen; Bambade, Philip; Bolzon, Benoit; Jeremie, Andrea; Coe, Paul; Urner, David Hauviller, Claude; Marin, Eduardo; Tomas, Rogelio; Zimmermann, Frank; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kume, Tatsuya Kuroda, Shigeru; /KEK, Tsukuba /KEK, Tsukuba /KEK, Tsukuba /KEK, Tsukuba /KEK, Tsukuba /KEK, Tsukuba /KEK, Tsukuba /KEK, Tsukuba /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC

    2012-07-05

    The ATF2 facility at KEK is a proving ground for linear collider technology with a well instrumented extracted beam line and Final Focus (FF). The primary ATF2 goal is to demonstrate the extreme beam demagnification and spot stability needed for a linear collider FF. But the ATF2 FF uses water cooled magnets and the ILC baseline has a superconducting (SC) FF. We plan to upgrade ATF2 and replace some of the warm FF magnets with SC FF magnets. The ATF2 SC magnets, like the ILC FF, will made via direct wind construction. ATF2 coil winding is in progress at BNL and warm magnetic measurements indicate we have achieved good field quality. Studies indicate that having ATF2 FF magnets with larger aperture and better field quality should allow reducing the ATF2 FF beta function for study of focusing regimes relevant to CLIC. The ATF2 magnet cryostat will have laser view ports for directly monitoring cold mass movement. We plan to make stability measurements at BNL and KEK to relate ATF2 FF magnet performance to that of a full length ILC QD0 R&D FF prototype under construction at BNL.

  17. A Superconducting Magnet Upgrade of the ATF2 Final Focus

    SciTech Connect

    Parker B.; Anerella M.; Escallier J.; He P.; Jain A.; Marone A.; Wanderer P.; Wu K.C.; Hauviller C.; Marin E.; Tomas R.; Zimmermann F.; Bolzon B.; Jeremie A.; Kimura N.; Kubo K.; Kume T.; Kuroda S.; Okugi T.; Tauchi T.; Terunuma N.; Tomaru T.; Tsuchiya K.; Urakawa J.; Yamamoto A.; Bambabe P.; Coe P.; Urner D.; Seryi A.; Spencer C.; White G.

    2010-05-23

    The ATF2 facility at KEK is a proving ground for linear collider technology with a well instrumented extracted beam line and Final Focus (FF). The primary ATF2 goal is to demonstrate the extreme beam demagnification and spot stability needed for a linear collider FF. But the ATF2 FF uses water cooled magnets and the ILC baseline has a superconducting (SC) FF. We plan to upgrade ATF2 and replace some of the warm FF magnets with SC FF magnets. The ATF2 SC magnets, like the ILC FF, will made via direct wind construction. ATF2 coil winding is in progress at BNL and warm magnetic measurements indicate we have achieved good field quality. Studies indicate that having ATF2 FF magnets with larger aperture and better field quality should allow reducing the ATF2 FF beta function for study of focusing regimes relevant to CLIC. The ATF2 magnet cryostat will have laser view ports for directly monitoring cold mass movement. We plan to make stability measurements at BNL and KEK to relate ATF2 FF magnet performance to that of a full length ILC QD0 R and D FF prototype under construction at BNL.

  18. Magnetic and levitation characteristics of bulk high-temperature superconducting magnets above a permanent magnet guideway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Zheng, Botian; He, Dabo; Sun, Ruixue; Deng, Zigang; Xu, Xun; Dou, Shixue

    2016-09-01

    Due to the large levitation force or the large guidance force of bulk high-temperature superconducting magnets (BHTSMs) above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG), it is reasonable to employ pre-magnetized BHTSMs to replace applied-magnetic-field-cooled superconductors in a maglev system. There are two combination modes between the BHTSM and the PMG, distinguished by the different directions of the magnetization. One is the S-S pole mode, and the other is the S-N pole mode combined with a unimodal PMG segment. A multi-point magnetic field measurement platform was employed to acquire the magnetic field signals of the BHTSM surface in real time during the pre-magnetization process and the re-magnetization process. Subsequently, three experimental aspects of levitation, including the vertical movement due to the levitation force, the lateral movement due to the guidance force, and the force relaxation with time, were explored above the PMG segment. Moreover, finite element modeling by COMSOL Multiphysics has been performed to simulate the different induced currents and the potentially different temperature rises with different modes inside the BHTSM. It was found that the S-S pole mode produced higher induced current density and a higher temperature rise inside the BHTSM, which might escalate its lateral instability above the PMG. The S-N pole mode exhibits the opposite characteristics. In general, this work is instructive for understanding and connecting the magnetic flux, the inner current density, the levitation behavior, and the temperature rise of BHTSMs employed in a maglev system.

  19. Magnetized neutron stars with superconducting cores: effect of entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palapanidis, K.; Stergioulas, N.; Lander, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    We construct equilibrium configurations of magnetized, two-fluid neutron stars using an iterative numerical method. Working in Newtonian framework we assume that the neutron star has two regions: the core, which is modelled as a two-component fluid consisting of type-II superconducting protons and superfluid neutrons, and the crust, a region composed of normal matter. Taking a new step towards more complete equilibrium models, we include the effect of entrainment, which implies that a magnetic force acts on neutrons, too. We consider purely poloidal field cases and present improvements to an earlier numerical scheme for solving equilibrium equations, by introducing new convergence criteria. We find that entrainment results in qualitative differences in the structure of field lines along the magnetic axis.

  20. Magnetic flux studies in horizontally cooled elliptical superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Martinello, M. Checchin, M.; Grassellino, A. Crawford, A. C.; Melnychuk, O.; Romanenko, A.; Sergatskov, D. A.

    2015-07-28

    Previous studies on magnetic flux expulsion as a function of cooldown procedures for elliptical superconducting radio frequency (SRF) niobium cavities showed that when the cavity beam axis is placed parallel to the helium cooling flow and sufficiently large thermal gradients are achieved, all magnetic flux could be expelled and very low residual resistance could be achieved. In this paper, we investigate flux trapping for the case of resonators positioned perpendicularly to the helium cooling flow, which is more representative of how SRF cavities are cooled in accelerators and for different directions of the applied magnetic field surrounding the resonator. We show that different field components have a different impact on the surface resistance, and several parameters have to be considered to fully understand the flux dynamics. A newly discovered phenomenon of concentration of flux lines at the cavity top leading to temperature rise at the cavity equator is presented.

  1. A novel rotating experimental platform in a superconducting magnet.

    PubMed

    Chen, Da; Cao, Hui-Ling; Ye, Ya-Jing; Dong, Chen; Liu, Yong-Ming; Shang, Peng; Yin, Da-Chuan

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces a novel platform designed to be used in a strong static magnetic field (in a superconducting magnet). The platform is a sample holder that rotates in the strong magnetic field. Any samples placed in the platform will rotate due to the rotation of the sample holder. With this platform, a number of experiments such as material processing, culture of biological systems, chemical reactions, or other processes can be carried out. In this report, we present some preliminary experiments (protein crystallization, cell culture, and seed germination) conducted using this platform. The experimental results showed that the platform can affect the processes, indicating that it provides a novel environment that has not been investigated before and that the effects of such an environment on many different physical, chemical, or biological processes can be potentially useful for applications in many fields. PMID:27587133

  2. The University of Virginia superconducting magnetic suspension and balance facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapata, R. N.

    1973-01-01

    A prototype facility comprising a superconducting magnetic suspension and balance and a supersonic wind tunnel was developed with the objectives of (1) establishing the feasibility of applying the 3-component magnetic balance concept to dynamic stability studies, and (2) investigating design concepts and parameters that are critical for extrapolation to large-scale systems. Many important design and operational aspects as well as safety considerations are dictated by the cryogenic nature of this advanced-technology facility. Results of initial tests demonstrate that super-conductors can be utilized safely and efficiently for wind tunnel magnetic suspensions. At the present stage of development of this facility, controlled one-dimensional support of a spherical model was achieved.

  3. The University of Virginia superconducting magnetic suspension and balance facility.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapata, R. N.

    1971-01-01

    Description of a prototype facility comprising a superconducting magnetic suspension and balance and a supersonic wind tunnel. This facility was developed with the objectives of establishing the feasibility of applying the three-component magnetic balance concept to dynamic stability studies, and investigating design concepts and parameters that are critical for extrapolation to large-scale systems. Many important design and operational aspects, as well as safety considerations, are dictated by the cryogenic nature of this advanced-technology facility. Results of initial tests demonstrate that superconductors can be utilized safely and efficiently for wind-tunnel magnetic suspensions. At the present stage of development of this facility, controlled one-dimensional support of a spherical model has been achieved.

  4. A novel rotating experimental platform in a superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Da; Cao, Hui-Ling; Ye, Ya-Jing; Dong, Chen; Liu, Yong-Ming; Shang, Peng; Yin, Da-Chuan

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces a novel platform designed to be used in a strong static magnetic field (in a superconducting magnet). The platform is a sample holder that rotates in the strong magnetic field. Any samples placed in the platform will rotate due to the rotation of the sample holder. With this platform, a number of experiments such as material processing, culture of biological systems, chemical reactions, or other processes can be carried out. In this report, we present some preliminary experiments (protein crystallization, cell culture, and seed germination) conducted using this platform. The experimental results showed that the platform can affect the processes, indicating that it provides a novel environment that has not been investigated before and that the effects of such an environment on many different physical, chemical, or biological processes can be potentially useful for applications in many fields.

  5. Performance of a 12-coil superconducting 'bumpy torus' magnet facility.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.; Holmes, A. D.; Keller, T. A.; Krawczonek, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    The NASA-Lewis 'bumpy torus' facility consists of 12 superconducting coils, each 19 cm ID and capable of 3.0 tesla on their axes. The coils are equally spaced around a toroidal array with a major diameter of 1.52 m, and are mounted with the major axis of the torus vertical in a single vacuum tank 2.6 m in diameter. Final shakedown tests of the facility mapped out its magnetic, cryogenic, vacuum, mechanical, and electrical performance. The facility is now ready for use as a plasma physics research facility. A maximum magnetic field on the magnetic axis of 3.23 teslas has been held for a period of more than sixty minutes without a coil normalcy.

  6. Superconducting magnets in high-radiation environment at supercolliders

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Chichili, D.R.; Gourlay, S.A.; Van Sciver, S.; Zeller, A.

    2006-07-01

    The principal challenges arising from beam-induced energy deposition in superconducting (SC) magnets at high-energy high-luminosity hadron and lepton colliders are described. Radiation constraints are analyzed that include quench stability, dynamic heat loads on the cryogenic system, radiation damage limiting the component lifetime, and residual dose rates related to hands-on maintenance. These issues are especially challenging for the interaction regions (IR), particularly for the considered upgrade layouts of the Large Hadron Collider. Up to a few kW of beam power can dissipate in a single SC magnet, and a local peak power density can substantially exceed the quench levels. Just formally, the magnet lifetime is limited to a few months under these conditions. Possible solutions and the ways to mitigate these problems are described in this paper along with R&D needed.

  7. Voltage spike detection in high field superconducting accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Orris, D.F.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.M.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    A measurement system for the detection of small magnetic flux changes in superconducting magnets, which are due to either mechanical motion of the conductor or flux jump, has been developed at Fermilab. These flux changes are detected as small amplitude, short duration voltage spikes, which are {approx}15mV in magnitude and lasts for {approx}30 {micro}sec. The detection system combines an analog circuit for the signal conditioning of two coil segments and a fast data acquisition system for digitizing the results, performing threshold detection, and storing the resultant data. The design of the spike detection system along with the modeling results and noise analysis will be presented. Data from tests of high field Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets at currents up to {approx}20KA will also be shown.

  8. MAGNETIC PARAMETERS OF A NB3SN SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNET FOR A 56 HGz ECR ION SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ferracin, P.; Caspi, S.; Felice, H.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Prestemon, S.; Sabbi, G. L.; Todd, D. S.

    2009-05-04

    Third generation Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion sources operate at microwave frequencies between 20 and 30 GHz and employ NbTi superconducting magnets with a conductor peak field of 6-7 T. A significant gain in performance can be achieved by replacing NbTi with Nb{sub 3}Sn, allowing solenoids and sextupole coils to reach a field of 15 T in the windings. In this paper we describe the design of a Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting magnet for a fourth generation ECR source operating at a microwave frequency of 56 GHz. The magnet design features a configuration with an internal sextupole magnet surrounded by three solenoids. A finite element magnetic model has been used to investigate conductor peak fields and the operational margins. Results of the numerical analysis are presented and discussed.

  9. The use of superconductivity in magnetic balance design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, F. E.

    1973-01-01

    The magnetic field and field gradient requirements for magnetic suspension in a Mach 3, 6-in. diameter wind tunnel are stated, along with the power requirements for gradient coil pairs wound of copper operating at room temperature and aluminum cooled to 20 K. The power dissipated is large enough that the use of superconductivity in the coil design becomes an attractive alternative. The problems of stability and ac losses are outlined along with the properties of stabilized superconductors. A brief review of a simplified version of the critical state model of C. P. Bean is presented, and the problems involved in calculations of the ac losses in superconducting coils are outlined. A summary of ac loss data taken on pancake coils wound of commercially available Nb3Sn partially stabilized tape is presented and shown as leading to the U.Va. gradient coil design. The actual coil performance is compared with predictions based on the BNL results. Finally, some remarks are presented concerning scaling of the ac losses to larger magnetic suspension systems as well as prospects for improved performance using newer multifilament superconductors.

  10. Magnetic field dependence of critical currents in superconducting polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, K.I.; Lisovskaya, T.Y. ); Mints, R.G. )

    1992-02-10

    The authors study the dependence of critical current j{sub c} on magnetic field H in superconducting polycrystals which are considered as system of superconducting crystallites (isotropic or anisotropic) with Josephson contacts between them. Isotropy or anisotropy of contacts depends on the orientation of their crystallographic axes relatively to edges of contact planes. In this paper it is shown that for a system of randomly oriented isotropic contacts, the dependence j{sub c}(H) in a relatively wide field range has the asymptotic form j{sub c} {approximately} (InH)/H{sup 2}. This differs drastically from j{sub c}(H) for single contacts. Anisotropy effects due to large differences in London penetration depth {lambda} values corresponding to external magnetic field directed along different axes are analyzed in detail. It is shown that for uniaxal crystals with {lambda}{sub 1} = {lambda}{sub 2} {lt} {lambda}{sub 3}, this anisotropy leads to the relation j{sub c} {approximately} {radical}{lambda}{sub 3}/{lambda}{sub 1} for chaotic orientation of crystallites. The form of j{sub c}(H) curves for two different orientations of the magnetic field relatively to the transport current through the sample is found.

  11. Testing beam-induced quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchmann, B.; Baer, T.; Bednarek, M.; Bellodi, G.; Bracco, C.; Bruce, R.; Cerutti, F.; Chetvertkova, V.; Dehning, B.; Granieri, P. P.; Hofle, W.; Holzer, E. B.; Lechner, A.; Nebot Del Busto, E.; Priebe, A.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua, B.; Sapinski, M.; Schmidt, R.; Shetty, N.; Skordis, E.; Solfaroli, M.; Steckert, J.; Valuch, D.; Verweij, A.; Wenninger, J.; Wollmann, D.; Zerlauth, M.

    2015-06-01

    In the years 2009-2013 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been operated with the top beam energies of 3.5 and 4 TeV per proton (from 2012) instead of the nominal 7 TeV. The currents in the superconducting magnets were reduced accordingly. To date only seventeen beam-induced quenches have occurred; eight of them during specially designed quench tests, the others during injection. There has not been a single beam-induced quench during normal collider operation with stored beam. The conditions, however, are expected to become much more challenging after the long LHC shutdown. The magnets will be operating at near nominal currents, and in the presence of high energy and high intensity beams with a stored energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In this paper we summarize our efforts to understand the quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets. We describe beam-loss events and dedicated experiments with beam, as well as the simulation methods used to reproduce the observable signals. The simulated energy deposition in the coils is compared to the quench levels predicted by electrothermal models, thus allowing one to validate and improve the models which are used to set beam-dump thresholds on beam-loss monitors for run 2.

  12. High temperature superconducting current leads for fusion magnet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J. L.; Dederer, J. T.; Singh, S. K.; Hull, J. R.

    Superconducting magnets for fusion applications typically have very high operating currents. These currents are transmitted from the room temperature power supplies to the low temperature superconducting coils by way of helium-vapor-cooled current leads. Because of the high current magnitude and the resistive characteristics associated with the normal metallic lead conductors, a substantial amount of power is dissipated in the lead. To maintain a stable operation, a high rate of helium vapor flow, generated by the boil-off of liquid helium, is required to cool the lead conductors. This helium boil-off substantially increases both the installation capacity and the operating cost of the helium refrigerator/liquefier. The boil-off of liquid helium can be significantly reduced by employing ceramic high temperature superconductors, such as Y-Ba-Cu-O, in the low temperature part of the lead conductor structure. This concept utilizes the superconducting, as well as the low thermal conductivity properties of the superconductor materials in eliminating power dissipation in part of the current lead and in inhibiting heat conduction into the liquid helium pool, resulting in reduced helium boil-off. This design concept has been conclusively demonstrated by a 2-kA current lead test model using Y-Ba-Cu-O (123) material which, although not optimized in design, has significantly reduced the rate of helium boil-off in comparison to optimized conventional leads. There appear to be no major technological barriers for scaling up this design to higher current levels for applications in fusion magnet systems or in fusion related testing activities. The theoretical basis of the current lead concept, as well as the important design and technology issues are addressed. The potential cost saving derived from employing these leads in fusion magnets is also discussed. In addition, a design concept for a 10-kA lead is presented.

  13. Magnetic response measurements of mesoscopic superconducting and normal metal rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluhm, Hendrik

    The main part of this thesis reports three experiments on the magnetic response of mesoscopic superconducting and normal metal rings using a scanning SQUID microscope. The first experiment explores the magnetic response and fluxoid transitions of superconducting, mesoscopic bilayer aluminum rings in the presence of two coupled order parameters arising from the layered structure. For intermediate couplings, metastable states that have different phase winding numbers around the ring in each of the two order parameters were observed. Larger coupling locks the relative phase, so that the two order parameters are only manifest in the temperature dependence of the response. With increasing proximitization, this signature gradually disappears. The data can be described with a two-order-parameter Ginzburg-Landau theory. The second experiment concentrates on fluxoid transitions in similar, but single-layer rings. Near the critical temperature, the transitions, which are induced by applying a flux to the ring, only admit a single fluxoid at a time. At lower temperatures, several fluxoids enter or leave at once, and the final state approaches the ground state. Currently available theoretical frameworks cannot quantitatively explain the data. Heating and quasiparticle diffusion are likely important for a quantitative understanding of this experiment, which could provide a model system for studying the nonlinear dynamics of superconductors far from equilibrium. The third and most important scanning SQUID study concerns 33 individual mesoscopic gold rings. All measured rings show a paramagnetic linear susceptibility and a poorly understood anomaly around zero field, both of which are likely due to unpaired defect spins. The response of sufficiently small rings also has a component that is periodic in the flux through the ring, with a period close to h/e. Its amplitude varies in sign and magnitude from ring to ring, and its typical value and temperature dependence agree with

  14. Structure, Magnetism and Superconductivity in oxide based Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaria, Jacobo

    2002-03-01

    Artificial superlattices can be used as model systems to study various condensed matter physics problems due to the possibility of matching layer thickness and /or modulation length to characteristic length scales of the phenomena under study. Many interesting new phenomena have been observed due to the reduced dimensionality in one direction; examples are giant magnetoresistance, low dimensional superconductivity, magnetic surface anisotropy, anomalous mechanical properties, etc. Since in modern growth techniques (sputtering, MBE...) film growths in conditions far from the thermodynamic equilibrium, film properties can seriously differ from those of the bulk. Additionally, depending on the constituent materials and on the growth conditions, significant disorder can appear at the interfaces like step disorder, interdiffusion, strain, etc. Consequently a detailed structural characterization is a necessary step before going into the dimensionality problems. X ray diffraction and electron microscopy are complementary techniques to obtain quantitative information at atomic scale. In the first part of this talk I will discuss dimensional effects in high Tc [YBa2Cu3O7/PrBa2Cu3O7] superconducting superlattices. Optimally doped YBa2Cu3O7 is a 3D strongly anisotropic superconductor due to the Josephson coupling of CuO planes in neighboring cells. Introducing a 5 unit cells PrBa2Cu3O7 spacer between one unit cell thick YBa2Cu3O7 layers decouples CuO blocks and the superconductor turns into 2D. The reduction of the vortex length in the c direction has important implications in the magnetotransport properties in this system which is similar to the strongly anisotropic Tl or Bi based superconductors but with a much smaller critical temperature. In a second part I will present data on [YBa2Cu3O7/ La0.7Ca0.3MnO3] superlattices showing magnetism and superconductivity. Interestingly, magnetism and superconductivity persist down to nanometric thicknesses of the individual layers

  15. Fermi surface, magnetic, and superconducting properties in actinide compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Settai, Rikio; Haga, Yoshinori; Machida, Yo; Izawa, Koichi; Honda, Fuminori; Aoki, Dai

    2014-08-01

    The de Haas-van Alphen effect, which is a powerful method to explore Fermi surface properties, has been observed in cerium, uranium, and nowadays even in neptunium and plutonium compounds. Here, we present the results of several studies concerning the Fermi surface properties of the heavy fermion superconductors UPt3 and NpPd5Al2, and of the ferromagnetic pressure-induced superconductor UGe2, together with those of some related compounds for which fascinating anisotropic superconductivity, magnetism, and heavy fermion behavior has been observed. xml:lang="fr"

  16. Magnetic Exchange Coupling in Ferromagnetic/Superconducting/Ferromagnetic Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo, C. A. R. Sa

    2001-03-01

    The possibility of magnetic exchange coupling between ferromagnets (F) separated by superconductor (S) spacers in F/S/F multilayers is analysed theoretically [1,2]. Ideal systems for the observation of magnetic coupling through superconductors are complex oxide multilayers consisting of Colossal Magneto-Resistance (CMR) Ferromagnets and High Critical Temperature Cuprate Superconductors. For this coupling to occur, three "prima facie" conditions need to be satisfied. First, an indirect exchange coupling between the ferromagnets must exist when the superconductor is in its normal state. Second, superconductivity must not be destroyed due to the proximity of ferromagnetic boundaries. Third, roughness of the F/S interfaces must be small. Under these conditions, when the superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature T_c, the magnetic coupling changes. The appearance of the superconducting gap introduces a new length scale (the coherence length of the superconductor) and modifies the temperature dependence of the indirect exchange coupling existent in the normal state. The magnetic coupling is oscillatory both above and below T_c, as well as strongly temperature-dependent. However at low temperatures the indirect exchange coupling decay length is controlled by the coherence length of the superconductor, while at temperatures close to and above Tc the magnetic coupling decay length is controlled by the thermal length. [I would like to thank the Georgia Institute of Technology, NSF (Grant No. DMR-9803111) and NATO (Grant No. CRG-972261) for financial support.] [1] C. A. R. Sa de Melo, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 1933 (1997). [2] C. A. R. Sa de Melo, Phys. Rev. B 62, 12303 (2000).

  17. Magnetic conveyor belt transport of ultracold atoms to a superconducting atomchip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minniberger, Stefan; Diorico, Fritz; Haslinger, Stefan; Hufnagel, Christoph; Novotny, Christian; Lippok, Nils; Majer, Johannes; Koller, Christian; Schneider, Stephan; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2014-09-01

    We report the realization of a robust magnetic transport scheme to bring >3 × 108 ultracold 87Rb atoms into a cryostat. The sequence starts with standard laser cooling and trapping of 87Rb atoms, transporting first horizontally and then vertically through the radiation shields into a cryostat by a series of normal- and superconducting magnetic coils. Loading the atoms in a superconducting microtrap paves the way for studying the interaction of ultracold atoms with superconducting surfaces and quantum devices requiring cryogenic temperatures.

  18. CABLE DESIGN FOR FAST RAMPED SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS (COS-0 DESIGN).

    SciTech Connect

    GHOSH,A.

    2004-03-22

    The new heavy ion synchrotron facility proposed by GSI will have two superconducting magnet rings in the same tunnel, with rigidities of 300 T-m and 100 T-m. Fast ramp times are needed, which can cause significant problems for the magnets, particularly in the areas of ac loss and magnetic field distortion. The development of the low loss Rutherford cable that can be used is described, together with a novel insulation scheme designed to promote efficient cooling. Measurements of contact resistance in the cable are presented and the results of these measurements are used to predict the ac losses, in the magnets during fast ramp operation. For the high energy ring, a lm model dipole magnet was built, based on the RHIC dipole design. This magnet was tested under boiling liquid helium in a vertical cryostat. The quench current showed very little dependence on ramp rate. The ac losses, measured by an electrical method, were fitted to straight line plots of loss/cycle versus ramp rate, thereby separating the eddy current and hysteresis components. These results were compared with calculated values, using parameters which had previously been measured on short samples of cable. Reasonably good agreement between theory and experiment was found, although the measured hysteresis loss is higher than expected in ramps to the highest field levels.

  19. PREFACE: International Conference on Superconductivity and Magnetism-ICSM2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencer, Ali; Grasso, Gianni

    2009-03-01

    The International Conference on Superconductivity and Magnetism (ICSM2008) was held at the congress centre of Ankara University in Side, Antalya, between 25-29 August 2008. The conference was the first conference on the combined fields of superconductivity and magnetism organized in Turkey at international level, and it had broad international participation from 42 countries, with registered delegates numbering over 400. A quarter of the attendees were research students. The conference attracted many of the best known leading scientists and experts in the field of superconductivity and magnetism from all over the world. The scientific program involved the presentation and discussion of 336 papers, classified as 65 invited, 81 oral and 190 posters. Submission of papers for the proceedings was on a volunteer basis and we therefore had nearly half of the presented papers, i.e. 30 submitted invited papers, peer-reviewed by Superconductor Science and Technology, and 85 submitted contributing papers, peer-reviewed by the organizers through processes administered by the Editorial Board and Scientific Committee. Reviews were conducted by expert referees at professional level and with the scientific standards expected of a proceedings journal issue published by IOP Publishing. The invited papers on superconductivity and magnetism with superconductivity were considered and processed for Superconductor Science and Technology by IOP itself. Although there are missing papers from some of the plenary speakers, we believe that this special issue of Superconductor Science and Technology (SUST) and the corresponding issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) reflect most of the booming research in the fields of superconductivity and magnetism. We are very pleased to have worked with IOP on the conference proceedings, with special thanks to Dr Tom Miller and Dr Graham Douglas. Based on a refereed evaluation of all the papers and posters submitted, about 93 papers were

  20. Construction of Superconducting Magnet System for the J-PARC Neutrino Beam Line

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamoto, T.; Wanderer, P.; Sasaki, K.; Ajima, Y.; Araoka, O.; Fujii, Y.; Hastings, N.; Higashi, N.; Iida, M.; Ishii, T.; Kimura, N.; Kobayashi, T.; Makida, Y.; Nakadaira, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Ohhata, H.; Okamura, T.; Sakashita, K.; Sugawara, S.; Suzuki, S.; Tanaka, K.; Tomaru, T.; Terashima, A.; Yamamoto, A.; Ichikawa, A.; Kakuno, H.; Anerella, M.; Escallier, J.; Ganetis, G.; gupta, R.; Jain, A.; Muratore, J.; Parker, B.; Boussuge, T.; Charrier, J.-P.; Arakawa, M.; Ichihara, T.; Minato, T.; Okada, Y.; Itou, A.; Kumaki, T.; Nagami, M.; Takahashi, T.

    2009-10-18

    Following success of a prototype R&D, construction of a superconducting magnet system for J-PARC neutrino beam line has been carried out since 2005. A new conceptual beam line with the superconducting combined function magnets demonstrated the successful beam transport to the neutrino production target.

  1. Beating liquid helium: the technologies of cryogen-free superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgoyne, John

    2015-03-01

    Cryogen-free superconducting magnets have been available now for almost 15 years, but have only become standard commercial products in more recent years. In this review we will consider the pros and cons of ``dry'' design including superconducting wire development and selection, thermal budgeting, and the alternative methods for achieving magnet cooling.

  2. Muon spin relaxation studies of the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in heavy fermion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffner, R. H.

    The interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in heavy fermion systems is discussed and the role of muon spin relaxation in elucidating these properties is emphasized. Relevant properties of all six heavy fermion superconductors are briefly surveyed and instances where superconductivity and magnetism compete, coexist, and couple with one another are pointed out. Current theoretical concepts underlying these phenomena are highlighted.

  3. Muon spin relaxation studies of the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in heavy fermion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, R.H.

    1993-10-01

    The interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in heavy fermion systems is discussed and the role of muon spin relaxation in elucidating these properties is emphasized. Relevant properties of all six heavy fermion superconductors are briefly surveyed and instances where superconductivity and magnetism compete, coexist and couple with one another are pointed out. Current theoretical concepts underlying these phenomena are highlighted.

  4. High Temperature Superconducting Reciprocating Magnetic Separator Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    James F. Maguire

    2008-06-05

    In 2001, under DOE's Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI), E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. (Dupont) was awarded a cost-share contract to build a fully functional full-scale model high temperature superconducting reciprocating magnet unit specifically designed for the koalin clay industry. After competitive bidding, American Superconductor (AMSC) was selected to provide the coil for the magnet. Dupont performed the statement of work until September 2004, when it stopped work, with the concurrence of DOE, due to lack of federal funds. DOE had paid all invoices to that point, and Dupont had provided all cost share. At this same time, Dupont determined that this program did not fit with its corporate strategies and notified DOE that it was not interesting in resuming the program when funding became available. AMSC expressed interest in assuming performance of the Agreement to Dupont and DOE, and in March 2005, this project was transferred to AMSC by DOE amendment to the original contract and Novation Agreement between AMSC and Dupont. Design drawings and some hardware components and subassemblies were transferred to AMSC. However, no funding was obligated by DOE and AMSC never performed work on the project. This report contains a summary of the work performed by Dupont up to the September 04 timeframe.

  5. A helium based pulsating heat pipe for superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Luis Diego; Miller, Franklin; Pfotenhauer, John

    2014-01-01

    This study was inspired to investigate an alternative cooling system using a helium-based pulsating heat pipes (PHP), for low temperature superconducting magnets. In addition, the same approach can be used for exploring other low temperature applications. The advantages of PHP for transferring heat and smoothing temperature profiles in various room temperature applications have been explored for the past 20 years. An experimental apparatus has been designed, fabricated and operated and is primarily composed of an evaporator and a condenser; in which both are thermally connected by a closed loop capillary tubing. The main goal is to measure the heat transfer properties of this device using helium as the working fluid. The evaporator end of the PHP is comprised of a copper winding in which heat loads up to 10 watts are generated, while the condenser is isothermal and can reach 4.2 K via a two stage Sumitomo RDK408A2 GM cryocooler. Various experimental design features are highlighted. Additionally, performance results in the form of heat transfer and temperature characteristics are provided as a function of average condenser temperature, PHP fill ratio, and evaporator heat load. Results are summarized in the form of a dimensionless correlation and compared to room temperature systems. Implications for superconducting magnet stability are highlighted.

  6. A novel high temperature superconducting magnetic flux pump for MRI magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhiming; Yan, Guo; Wu, Chunli; Ding, Shufang; Chen, Chuan

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a kind of minitype magnetic flux pump made of high temperature superconductor. This kind of novel high temperature superconducting (HTS) flux pump has not any mechanical revolving parts or thermal switches. The excitation current of copper coils in magnetic pole system is controlled by a singlechip. The structure design and operational principle have been described. The operating performance of the new model magnetic flux pump has been preliminarily tested. The experiments show that the maximum pumping current is approximately 200 A for Bi2223 flux pump and 80 A for MgB 2 flux pump operating at 20 K. By comparison, it is discovered that the operating temperature range is wider, the ripple is smaller and the pumping frequency is higher in Bi2223 flux pump than those in MgB 2 flux pump. These results indicate that the newly developed Bi2223 magnetic flux pump may efficiently compensate the magnetic field decay in HTS magnet and make the magnet operate in persistent current mode, this point is significant to the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnets. This new flux pump is under construction presently. It is expected that the Bi2223 flux pump would be applied to the superconducting MRI magnets by further optimizing structure and improving working process.

  7. Magnetism and superconductivity of some Tl-Cu oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Timir

    1991-01-01

    Many copper oxide based Thallium compounds are now known. In comparison to the Bi-compounds, the Tl-system shows a richer diversity; i.e., High Temperature Superconductors (HTSC) can be obtained with either one or two Tl-0 layers (m = 1,2); also, the triple-digit phases are easier to synthesize. The value of d, oxygen stoichiometry, is critical to achieving superconductivity. The Tl system is robust to oxygen loss; Tl may be lost or incorporated by diffusion. A diffusion coefficient equal to 10 ms at 900 C was determined. Both ortho-rhombic and tetragonal structures are found, but HTSC behavior is indifferent to the crystal symmetry. This system has the highest T(sub c) confirmed. T(sub c) generally increases with p, the number of CuO layers, but tends to saturate at p = 3. Zero resistance was observed at temperatures as great as 125 K. Most of these HTSC's are hole type, but the Ce-doped specimens may be electronic. The magnetic aspects were studied; because in addition to defining the perfectly diamagnetic ground state as in conventional superconductors, magnetism of the copper oxides show a surprising variety. This is true of both the normal and the superconducting states. Also, due to the large phonon contribution to the specific heat at the high T(sub c) jump, electronic density of states, D(Ef), and coherence length are uncertain, and thus, are estimated from the magnetic results. Results from the Tl-system CuO, LaBaCuO,120 and the Bi-CuO compounds are discussed. The emphasis is on the role of magnetism in the Tl-CuO HTSC, but technological aspects are also pointed out.

  8. Magnetism and superconductivity of some Tl-Cu oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Timir

    1990-01-01

    Many copper oxide based Thallium compounds have now been discovered. In comparison to the Bi-compounds, the Tl-system shows a richer diversity; viz., High Temperature Superconductors (HTSC) can be obtained with either one or two Tl-0 layers (m = 1,2); also, the triple-digit phases are easier to synthesize. The value of d, oxygen stoichiometry, is critical to achieving superconductivity. The Tl system is robust to oxygen loss; Tl may be lost or incorporated by diffusion. A diffusion coefficient equal to 10 ms at 900 C was determined. Both ortho-rhombic and tetragonal structures are evidenced, but HTSC behavior is indifferent to the crystal symmetry. This system has the highest T(sub c) confirmed. T(sub c) generally increases with p, the number of CuO layers, but tends to saturate at p = 3. Zero resistance as high as 125K has been observed. Most of these HTSC's are hole type, but the Ce-doped specimens may be electronic. The magnetic aspects were studied; because in addition to defining the perfectly diamagnetic ground state as in the conventional superconductors, magnetism of the copper oxides show a surprising variety. This is true of both the normal and the superconducting states. Also, due to the large phonon contribution to the specific heat at the high T(sub c) accurate thermal measurement of important parameters such as the sp. heat jump, electronic density of states, D(Ef) and coherence length are uncertain, and thus, are estimated from the magnetic results. Results from the Tl-system CuO, LaBaCuO, 120 and the Bi-CuO compounds are discussed. The emphasis is on the role of magnetism in the TlCuO HTSC, but technological aspects are also pointed out.

  9. Design and investigations of the superconducting magnet system for the multipurpose superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tinschert, K.; Lang, R.; Maeder, J.; Rossbach, J.; Spaedtke, P.; Komorowski, P.; Meyer-Reumers, M.; Krischel, D.; Fischer, B.; Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.; Celona, L.

    2012-02-15

    The production of intense beams of heavy ions with electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) is an important request at many accelerators. According to the ECR condition and considering semi-empirical scaling laws, it is essential to increase the microwave frequency together with the magnetic flux density of the ECRIS magnet system. A useful frequency of 28 GHz, therefore, requires magnetic flux densities above 2.2 T implying the use of superconducting magnets. A cooperation of European institutions initiated a project to build a multipurpose superconducting ECRIS (MS-ECRIS) in order to achieve an increase of the performances in the order of a factor of ten. After a first design of the superconducting magnet system for the MS-ECRIS, the respective cold testing of the built magnet system reveals a lack of mechanical performance due to the strong interaction of the magnetic field of the three solenoids with the sextupole field and the magnetization of the magnetic iron collar. Comprehensive structural analysis, magnetic field calculations, and calculations of the force pattern confirm thereafter these strong interactions, especially of the iron collar with the solenoidal fields. The investigations on the structural analysis as well as suggestions for a possible mechanical design solution are given.

  10. High temperature superconducting axial field magnetic coupler: realization and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belguerras, L.; Mezani, S.; Lubin, T.; Lévêque, J.; Rezzoug, A.

    2015-09-01

    Contactless torque transmission through a large airgap is required in some industrial applications in which hermetic isolation is necessary. This torque transmission usually uses magnetic couplers, whose dimension strongly depends on the airgap flux density. The use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils to create a strong magnetic field may constitute a solution to reduce the size of the coupler. It is also possible to use this coupler to replace a torque tube in transmitting the torque produced by a HTS motor to its load. This paper presents the detailed construction and tests of an axial field HTS magnetic coupler. Pancake coils have been manufactured from BSCCO tape and used in one rotor of the coupler. The second rotor is mainly composed of NdFeB permanent magnets. Several tests have been carried out showing that the constructed coupler is working properly. A 3D finite element (FE) model of the studied coupler has been developed. Airgap magnetic field and torque measurements have been carried out and compared to the FE results. It has been shown that the measured and the computed quantities are in satisfactory agreement.

  11. Novel technologies and configurations of superconducting magnets for MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lvovsky, Yuri; Stautner, Ernst Wolfgang; Zhang, Tao

    2013-09-01

    A review of non-traditional approaches and emerging trends in superconducting magnets for MRI is presented. Novel technologies and concepts have arisen in response to new clinical imaging needs, changes in market cost structure, and the realities of newly developing markets. Among key trends are an increasing emphasis on patient comfort and the need for ‘greener’ magnets with reduced helium usage. The paper starts with a brief overview of the well-optimized conventional MR magnet technology that presently firmly occupies the dominant position in the imaging market up to 9.4 T. Non-traditional magnet geometries, with an emphasis on openness, are reviewed. The prospects of MgB2 and high-temperature superconductors for MRI applications are discussed. In many cases the introduction of novel technologies into a cost-conscious commercial market will be stimulated by growing needs for advanced customized procedures, and specialty scanners such as orthopedic or head imagers can lead the way due to the intrinsic advantages in their design. A review of ultrahigh-field MR is presented, including the largest 11.7 T Iseult magnet. Advanced cryogenics approaches with an emphasis on low-volume helium systems, including hermetically sealed self-contained cryostats requiring no user intervention, as well as future non-traditional non-helium cryogenics, are presented.

  12. Performance of a 12-coil superconducting bumpy torus magnet facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.; Holmes, A. D.; Keller, T. A.; Krawczonek, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    The bumpy torus facility consists of 12 superconducting coils, each 19 cm i.d. and capable of 3.0 teslas on their axes. The coils are equally spaced around a toroidal array with a major diameter of 1.52 m, and are mounted with the major axis of the torus vertical in a single vacuum tank 2.6 m in diameter. Final shakedown tests of the facility mapped out its magnetic, cryogenic, vacuum, mechanical, and electrical performance. The facility is now ready for use as a plasma physics research facility. A maximum magnetic field on the magnetic axis of 3.23 teslas was held for a period of more than sixty minutes without a coil normalcy. The design field was 3.00 teslas. The steady-state liquid helium boil-off rate was 87 liters per hour of liquid helium without the coils charged. The coil array was stable when subjected to an impulsive loading, even with the magnets fully charged. When the coils were charged to a maximum magnetic field of 3.35 teslas, the system was driven normal without damage.

  13. Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Langone, J.

    1989-01-01

    This book explains the theoretical background of superconductivity. Includes discussion of electricity, material fabrication, maglev trains, the superconducting supercollider, and Japanese-US competition. The authors reports the latest discoveries.

  14. High-T/sub c/ superconductor and its use in superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1988-02-01

    Many of the proposed uses for the high-T/sub c/ superconductor involve the creation of a magnetic field using superconducting coils. This report will assess what is known about the high-T/sub c/ superconductors and take a realistic look at their potential use in various kinds of superconducting magnets. Based on what is known about the high-T/sub c/ superconductors, one can make a ''wish list'' of things that will make such materials useful for magnets. Then, the following question is asked. If one had a high-T/sub c/ superconductor with the same properties as modern niobium-titanium superconductor, how would the superconductor work in a magnet environment. Finally, this report will show the potential impact of the ideal high-T/sub c/ superconductor on: 1) accelerator dipole and quadrupole magnets, 2) superconducting magnets for use in space, and 3) superconducting solenoids for magnetic resonance imaging. 78 refs., 11 tabs.

  15. Magnetic Microscopy Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Randall Christopher

    1995-01-01

    I describe the design, development, and operation of two different scanning probe microscopes which use a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) as the sensor. Because of the unprecedented magnetic flux sensitivity of the SQUID, these microscopes can image spatial distributions of magnetic fields on a microscopic scale with an exceptional combination of spatial resolution (currently about 10 μm) and static magnetic field sensitivity (about 34 pT Hz^{ -1/2} at 100 Hz). Both microscopes use thin -film high transition-temperature YBa_2Cu _3O_7 SQUIDs. Unlike other SQUID -based techniques which detect weak magnetic fields by coupling a superconducting pickup-coil to the SQUID and using the SQUID as a current amplifier, the scanning SQUID microscopes described here use the loop of the SQUID directly as the sensor, thus achieving the maximum possible spatial resolution, flux sensitivity, and bandwidth. To achieve high spatial resolution, the SQUID must be correspondingly small and close to the surface of the sample being imaged. In the first instrument, the sample is immersed directly in the liquid nitrogen used to cool the SQUID. In the second microscope, a thin sapphire window in a close-spaced dewar allows the imaging of room -temperature samples in air with a spatial resolution as fine as 50 mum. In addition to using the microscope to image static magnetic fields, I developed three other imaging techniques which use the large detection bandwidth of the SQUID. Eddy currents which are induced in metallic samples by an alternating magnetic field can be imaged at frequencies up to about 1 MHz. Using the SQUID as a field rectifier, I am also able to image radio- and microwave-frequency magnetic fields produced by oscillating currents in samples. Finally, by using the oscillating microwave Josephson currents in the SQUID body, I can obtain voltage-tunable microwave eddy-current images of metallic sample up to about 200 GHz. To demonstrate the imaging

  16. Superconducting magnets for SCRF cryomodules at front end of linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.S.; Andreev, N.; Orlov, Y.; Orris, D.F.; Tartaglia, M.A.

    2010-05-01

    Linear accelerators based on a superconducting technology need various superconducting magnets mounted inside SCRF Cryomodules. Relatively weak iron-dominated magnets are installed at the front end of linear accelerators. The focusing quadrupoles have integrated gradients in the range of 1-4 T, and apertures in the range 35-90 mm. Superconducting dipole correctors and quadrupoles were designed at Fermilab for various projects. In this paper these magnet designs, and test results of a fabricated dipole corrector, are presented. Also briefly discussed are magnetic and mechanical designs, quench protection, cooling, fabrication, and assembly into cryomodule.

  17. Magnetic Ordering In Superconducting Nb-doped Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbae, Paul; Lawson, Benjamin; Li, Gang; Yu, Fan; Asaba, Tomoya; Tinsman, Colin; Qui, Yusheng; Hor, Yew San; Li, Lu

    Coexistence of superconductivity and magnetic order has been suggested by early studies of topological superconductor candidate, niobium doped Bi2Se3. In order to elucidate the interesting physics of this coexistence, we performed highly sensitive torque magnetometry to study the material's magnetization. We observed a bump feature in the magnetization around 8 Tesla in both the superconducting and non-superconducting samples. This is distinct from the paramagnetic torque response of the parent compound, Bi2Se3, suggesting some interesting magnetic order in Nb-doped Bi2Se3.

  18. Magnetic Energy Storage System: Superconducting Magnet Energy Storage System with Direct Power Electronics Interface

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    GRIDS Project: ABB is developing an advanced energy storage system using superconducting magnets that could store significantly more energy than today’s best magnetic storage technologies at a fraction of the cost. This system could provide enough storage capacity to encourage more widespread use of renewable power like wind and solar. Superconducting magnetic energy storage systems have been in development for almost 3 decades; however, past devices were designed to supply power only for short durations—generally less than a few minutes. ABB’s system would deliver the stored energy at very low cost, making it ideal for eventual use in the electricity grid as a costeffective competitor to batteries and other energy storage technologies. The device could potentially cost even less, on a per kilowatt basis, than traditional lead-acid batteries.

  19. Magnetic characteristics and measurements of filamentary Nb-Ti wire for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, R.B.; Spomer, R.L.

    1989-12-31

    In synchrotron accelerator applications, such as the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), superconducting magnets are cycled in magnetic field. Desirable properties of the magnets include field uniformity, field stability with time, small residual field, and fairly small energy losses upon cycling. This paper discusses potential sources of problems in achieving these goals, describes important magnetic characteristics to be considered, and reviews measurement techniques for magnetic evaluation of candidate SSC wires. Instrumentation that might be practical for use in a wire-fabrication environment is described. The authors report on magnetic measurements of prototype SSC wires and cables and speculate on causes for instability in multipole fields of dipole magnets constructed with such cables.

  20. Pressure-induced electronic phase separation of magnetism and superconductivity in CrAs

    SciTech Connect

    Khasanov, Rustem; Guguchia, Zurab; Eremin, Ilya; Luetkens, Hubertus; Amato, Alex; Biswas, Pabitra K.; Ruegg, Christian; Susner, Michael A.; Sefat, Athena S.; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D.; Morenzoni, Elvezio

    2015-09-08

    We report that the recent discovery of pressure (p) induced superconductivity in the binary helimagnet CrAs has raised questions on how superconductivity emerges from the magnetic state and on the mechanism of the superconducting pairing. In the present work the suppression of magnetism and the occurrence of superconductivity in CrAs were studied by means of muon spin rotation. The magnetism remains bulk up to p ≃ 3.5 kbar while its volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing pressure until it vanishes at p ≃ 7 kbar. At 3.5 kbar superconductivity abruptly appears with its maximum Tc ≃ 1.2 K which decreases upon increasing the pressure. In the intermediate pressure region (3.5≲ p ≲ 7 kbar) the superconducting and the magnetic volume fractions are spatially phase separated and compete for phase volume. Our results indicate that the less conductive magnetic phase provides additional carriers (doping) to the superconducting parts of the CrAs sample thus leading to an increase of the transition temperature (Tc) and of the superfluid density (ρs). A scaling of ρs with Tc3.2 as well as the phase separation between magnetism and superconductivity point to a conventional mechanism of the Cooper-pairing in CrAs.

  1. Pressure-induced electronic phase separation of magnetism and superconductivity in CrAs.

    PubMed

    Khasanov, Rustem; Guguchia, Zurab; Eremin, Ilya; Luetkens, Hubertus; Amato, Alex; Biswas, Pabitra K; Rüegg, Christian; Susner, Michael A; Sefat, Athena S; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D; Morenzoni, Elvezio

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of pressure (p) induced superconductivity in the binary helimagnet CrAs has raised questions on how superconductivity emerges from the magnetic state and on the mechanism of the superconducting pairing. In the present work the suppression of magnetism and the occurrence of superconductivity in CrAs were studied by means of muon spin rotation. The magnetism remains bulk up to p ≃ 3.5 kbar while its volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing pressure until it vanishes at p ≃ 7 kbar. At 3.5 kbar superconductivity abruptly appears with its maximum Tc ≃ 1.2 K which decreases upon increasing the pressure. In the intermediate pressure region (3.5 < or ~  p < or ~ 7 kbar) the superconducting and the magnetic volume fractions are spatially phase separated and compete for phase volume. Our results indicate that the less conductive magnetic phase provides additional carriers (doping) to the superconducting parts of the CrAs sample thus leading to an increase of the transition temperature (Tc) and of the superfluid density (ρs). A scaling of ρs with Tc(3.2) as well as the phase separation between magnetism and superconductivity point to a conventional mechanism of the Cooper-pairing in CrAs. PMID:26346548

  2. Pressure-induced electronic phase separation of magnetism and superconductivity in CrAs

    PubMed Central

    Khasanov, Rustem; Guguchia, Zurab; Eremin, Ilya; Luetkens, Hubertus; Amato, Alex; Biswas, Pabitra K.; Rüegg, Christian; Susner, Michael A.; Sefat, Athena S.; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D.; Morenzoni, Elvezio

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of pressure (p) induced superconductivity in the binary helimagnet CrAs has raised questions on how superconductivity emerges from the magnetic state and on the mechanism of the superconducting pairing. In the present work the suppression of magnetism and the occurrence of superconductivity in CrAs were studied by means of muon spin rotation. The magnetism remains bulk up to p  3.5 kbar while its volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing pressure until it vanishes at p  7 kbar. At 3.5 kbar superconductivity abruptly appears with its maximum Tc  1.2 K which decreases upon increasing the pressure. In the intermediate pressure region (3.5  p  7 kbar) the superconducting and the magnetic volume fractions are spatially phase separated and compete for phase volume. Our results indicate that the less conductive magnetic phase provides additional carriers (doping) to the superconducting parts of the CrAs sample thus leading to an increase of the transition temperature (Tc) and of the superfluid density (ρs). A scaling of ρs with as well as the phase separation between magnetism and superconductivity point to a conventional mechanism of the Cooper-pairing in CrAs. PMID:26346548

  3. Pressure-induced electronic phase separation of magnetism and superconductivity in CrAs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khasanov, Rustem; Guguchia, Zurab; Eremin, Ilya; Luetkens, Hubertus; Amato, Alex; Biswas, Pabitra K.; Ruegg, Christian; Susner, Michael A.; Sefat, Athena S.; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D.; et al

    2015-09-08

    We report that the recent discovery of pressure (p) induced superconductivity in the binary helimagnet CrAs has raised questions on how superconductivity emerges from the magnetic state and on the mechanism of the superconducting pairing. In the present work the suppression of magnetism and the occurrence of superconductivity in CrAs were studied by means of muon spin rotation. The magnetism remains bulk up to p ≃ 3.5 kbar while its volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing pressure until it vanishes at p ≃ 7 kbar. At 3.5 kbar superconductivity abruptly appears with its maximum Tc ≃ 1.2 K which decreasesmore » upon increasing the pressure. In the intermediate pressure region (3.5≲ p ≲ 7 kbar) the superconducting and the magnetic volume fractions are spatially phase separated and compete for phase volume. Our results indicate that the less conductive magnetic phase provides additional carriers (doping) to the superconducting parts of the CrAs sample thus leading to an increase of the transition temperature (Tc) and of the superfluid density (ρs). A scaling of ρs with Tc3.2 as well as the phase separation between magnetism and superconductivity point to a conventional mechanism of the Cooper-pairing in CrAs.« less

  4. Levitation performance of the magnetized bulk high- Tc superconducting magnet with different trapped fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Wang, J. S.; Liao, X. L.; Zheng, S. J.; Ma, G. T.; Zheng, J.; Wang, S. Y.

    2011-03-01

    To a high- Tc superconducting (HTS) maglev system which needs large levitation force density, the magnetized bulk high- Tc superconductor (HTSC) magnet is a good candidate because it can supply additional repulsive or attractive force above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG). Because the induced supercurrent within a magnetized bulk HTSC is the key parameter for the levitation performance, and it is sensitive to the magnetizing process and field, so the magnetized bulk HTSC magnets with different magnetizing processes had various levitation performances, not only the force magnitude, but also its force relaxation characteristics. Furthermore, the distribution and configuration of the induced supercurrent are also important factor to decide the levitation performance, especially the force relaxation characteristics. This article experimentally investigates the influences of different magnetizing processes and trapped fields on the levitation performance of a magnetized bulk HTSC magnet with smaller size than the magnetic inter-pole distance of PMG, and the obtained results are qualitatively analyzed by the Critical State Model. The test results and analyses of this article are useful for the suitable choice and optimal design of magnetized bulk HTSC magnets.

  5. Microtesla magnetic resonance imaging with a superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Robert; Lee, SeungKyun; ten Haken, Bennie; Trabesinger, Andreas H.; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2004-03-15

    We have constructed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner based on a dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) configured as a second-derivative gradiometer. The magnetic field sensitivity of the detector is independent of frequency; it is therefore possible to obtain high-resolution images by prepolarizing the nuclear spins in a field of 300 mT and detecting the signal at 132 fYT, corresponding to a proton Larmor frequency of 5.6 kHz. The reduction in the measurement field by a factor of 10,000 compared with conventional scanners eliminates inhomogeneous broadening of the nuclear magnetic resonance lines, even in fields with relatively poor homogeneity. The narrow linewidths result in enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution for a fixed strength of the magnetic field gradients used to encode the image. We present two-dimensional images of phantoms and pepper slices, obtained in typical magnetic field gradients of 100 fYT/m, with a spatial resolution of about 1mm. We further demonstrate a slice-selected image of an intact pepper. By varying the time delay between removal of the polarizing field and initiation of the spin echo sequence we acquire T1-weighted contrast images of water phantoms, some of which are doped with a paramagnetic salt; here, T1 is the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time. The techniques presented here could readily be adapted to existing multichannel SQUID systems used for magnetic source imaging of brain signals. Further potential applications include low-cost systems for tumor screening and imaging peripheral regions of the body.

  6. Cryogenic expansion joint for large superconducting magnet structures

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Robert L.

    1978-01-01

    An expansion joint is provided that accommodates dimensional changes occurring during the cooldown and warm-up of large cryogenic devices such as superconducting magnet coils. Flattened tubes containing a refrigerant such as gaseous nitrogen (N.sub.2) are inserted into expansion spaces in the structure. The gaseous N.sub.2 is circulated under pressure and aids in the cooldown process while providing its primary function of accommodating differential thermal contraction and expansion in the structure. After lower temperatures are reached and the greater part of the contraction has occured, the N.sub.2 liquefies then solidifies to provide a completely rigid structure at the cryogenic operating temperatures of the device.

  7. Using fiberglass volumes for VPI of superconductive magnetic systems' insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, I. S.; Bezrukov, A. A.; Bursikov, A. S.; Klimchenko, Y. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Pischugin, A. B.; Rodin, I. Y.; Stepanov, D. B.

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes the method of manufacturing fiberglass molds for vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI) of high-voltage insulation of superconductive magnetic systems (SMS) with epoxidian hot-setting compounds. The basic advantages of using such vacuum volumes are improved quality of insulation impregnation in complex-shaped areas, and considerable cost-saving of preparing VPI of large-sized components due to dispensing with the stage of fabricating a metal impregnating volume. Such fiberglass vacuum molds were used for VPI of high-voltage insulation samples of an ITER reactor's PF1 poloidal coil. Electric insulation of these samples has successfully undergone a wide range of high-voltage and mechanical tests at room and cryogenic temperatures. Some results of the tests are also given in this paper.

  8. Epoxy resin developments for large superconducting magnets impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, J. M.; Gallet, B.; Kircher, F.; Lottin, J. C.

    The future detectors ATLAS and CMS of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will use two huge superconducting magnets. Both are now under design, and their electrical insulation could be realized using epoxy resin and a wet impregnation technique. Because of their large dimensions, and the indirect cooling of the superconductor, the strengths of the resin and of the resin/conductor interface are of major importance. A new generation of epoxy resins for vacuum/pressure impregnation methods has been tested, and compared with some classical and well-known epoxy resins used in impregnation techniques. In order to understand the mechanical behaviour at 4 K, the complete evolution from liquid state to low temperature service condition is considered. The paper will present some results on the mechanical properties, the density and the chemical shrinkage occurring during the polymerization and the thermal contraction between room temperature and 4 K for these different types of epoxy resins.

  9. Using fiberglass volumes for VPI of superconductive magnetic systems’ insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, I. S.; Bezrukov, A. A.; Pischugin, A. B.; Bursikov, A. S.; Klimchenko, Y. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Rodin, I. Y.; Stepanov, D. B.

    2014-01-29

    The paper describes the method of manufacturing fiberglass molds for vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI) of high-voltage insulation of superconductive magnetic systems (SMS) with epoxidian hot-setting compounds. The basic advantages of using such vacuum volumes are improved quality of insulation impregnation in complex-shaped areas, and considerable cost-saving of preparing VPI of large-sized components due to dispensing with the stage of fabricating a metal impregnating volume. Such fiberglass vacuum molds were used for VPI of high-voltage insulation samples of an ITER reactor’s PF1 poloidal coil. Electric insulation of these samples has successfully undergone a wide range of high-voltage and mechanical tests at room and cryogenic temperatures. Some results of the tests are also given in this paper.

  10. Low cost composite structures for superconducting magnetic energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rix, C. ); McColskey, D. ); Acree, R. )

    1994-07-01

    As part of the Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage/Engineering Test Model (SMES-ETM) programs, design, analysis, fabrication and test programs were conducted to evaluate the low cost manufacturing of Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic (FRP) beams for usage as major components of the structural and electrical insulation systems. These studies utilized pultrusion process technologies and vinylester resins to produce large net sections at costs significantly below that of conventional materials. Demonstration articles incorporating laminate architectures and design details representative of SMES-ETM components were fabricated using the pultrusion process and epoxy, vinylester, and polyester resin systems. The mechanical and thermal properties of these articles were measured over the temperature range from 4 K to 300 K. The results of these tests showed that the pultruded, vinylester components have properties comparable to those of currently used materials, such as G-10, and are capable of meeting the design requirements for the SMES-ETM system.

  11. Low cost composite structures for superconducting magnetic energy storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rix, Craig; McColskey, David; Acree, Robert

    1994-07-01

    As part of the Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage/Engineering Test Model (SMES-ETM) program, design, analysis, fabrication and test programs were conducted to evaluate the low cost manufacturing of Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic (FRP) beams for usage as major components of the structural and electrical insulation systems. These studies utilized pultrusion process technologies and vinylester resins to produce large net sections at costs significantly below that of conventional materials. Demonstration articles incorporating laminate architectures and design details representative of SMES-ETM components were fabricated using the pultrusion process and epoxy, vinylester, and polyester resin systems. The mechanical and thermal properties of these articles were measured over the temperature range from 4 K to 300 K. The results of these tests showed that the pultruded, vinylester components have properties comparable to those of currently used materials, such as G-10, and are capable of meeting the design requirements for the SMES-ETM system.

  12. Improved capacitive stress transducers for high-field superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Christopher Pete; Holik, Eddie Frank, III; Jaisle, Andrew; McInturff, A.; McIntyre, P.

    2012-06-01

    High-field (12-18 Tesla) superconducting magnets are required to enable an increase in the energy of future colliders. Such field strength requires the use of Nb3Sn superconductor, which has limited tolerance for compressive and shear strain. A strategy for stress management has been developed at Texas A&M University and is being implemented in TAMU3, a short-model 14 Tesla stress-managed Nb3Sn block dipole. The strategy includes the use of laminar capacitive stress transducers to monitor the stresses within the coil package. We have developed fabrication techniques and fixtures, which improve the reproducibility of the transducer response both at room temperature and during cryogenic operation. This is a report of the status of transducer development.

  13. The fabrication and characterization of high temperature superconducting magnetic shields

    SciTech Connect

    Purpura, J.W.; Clem, T.R.

    1989-03-01

    Tubes fabricated of polycrystalline YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-x/ are characterized and details of the fabrication procedure are discussed. The microstructure of the tubes determined by scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffractometry is described. Resistive measurements of T/sub c/ and /Delta/T/sub c/ have been made. The tubes have also been characterized by means of SQUID magnetometry. The temperature dependence of magnetic fields trapped axially in the tubes has been measured and estimates of penetration depth are given. Moreover, measurements of transverse shielding effectiveness of the tubes have been made and are compared with theoretical predictions. Studies on flux penetration into the tubes are described. Findings from the microstructure studies are correlated with the observed superconductivity properties. The results on the high temperature materials are compared to results obtained previously on tubes made from conventional superconductors.

  14. Acoustic emission during quench training of superconducting accelerator magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchevsky, M.; Sabbi, G.; Bajas, H.; Gourlay, S.

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) sensing is a viable tool for superconducting magnet diagnostics. Using in-house developed cryogenic amplified piezoelectric sensors, we conducted AE studies during quench training of the US LARP's high-field quadrupole HQ02 and the LBNL's high-field dipole HD3. For both magnets, AE bursts were observed, with spike amplitude and frequency increasing toward the quench current during current up-ramps. In the HQ02, the AE onset upon current ramping is distinct and exhibits a clear memory of the previously-reached quench current (Kaiser effect). On the other hand, in the HD3 magnet the AE amplitude begins to increase well before the previously-reached quench current (felicity effect), suggesting an ongoing progressive mechanical motion in the coils. A clear difference in the AE signature exists between the untrained and trained mechanical states in HD3. Time intervals between the AE signals detected at the opposite ends of HD3 coils were processed using a combination of narrow-band pass filtering; threshold crossing and correlation algorithms, and the spatial distributions of AE sources and the mechanical energy release were calculated. Both distributions appear to be consistent with the quench location distribution. Energy statistics of the AE spikes exhibits a power-law scaling typical for the self-organized critical state.

  15. Superconducting FCL using a combined inducted magnetic field trigger and shunt coil

    DOEpatents

    Tekletsadik, Kasegn D.

    2007-10-16

    A single trigger/shunt coil is utilized for combined induced magnetic field triggering and shunt impedance. The single coil connected in parallel with the high temperature superconducting element, is designed to generate a circulating current in the parallel circuit during normal operation to aid triggering the high temperature superconducting element to quench in the event of a fault. The circulating current is generated by an induced voltage in the coil, when the system current flows through the high temperature superconducting element.

  16. Superconducting magnetic Wollaston prism for neutron spin encoding

    SciTech Connect

    Li, F. Parnell, S. R.; Wang, T.; Baxter, D. V.; Hamilton, W. A.; Maranville, B. B.; Semerad, R.; Cremer, J. T.; Pynn, R.

    2014-05-15

    A magnetic Wollaston prism can spatially split a polarized neutron beam into two beams with different neutron spin states, in a manner analogous to an optical Wollaston prism. Such a Wollaston prism can be used to encode the trajectory of neutrons into the Larmor phase associated with their spin degree of freedom. This encoding can be used for neutron phase-contrast radiography and in spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME). In this paper, we show that magnetic Wollaston prisms with highly uniform magnetic fields and low Larmor phase aberration can be constructed to preserve neutron polarization using high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials. The Meissner effect of HTS films is used to confine magnetic fields produced electromagnetically by current-carrying HTS tape wound on suitably shaped soft iron pole pieces. The device is cooled to ∼30 K by a closed cycle refrigerator, eliminating the need to replenish liquid cryogens and greatly simplifying operation and maintenance. A HTS film ensures that the magnetic field transition within the prism is sharp, well-defined, and planar due to the Meissner effect. The spin transport efficiency across the device was measured to be ∼98.5% independent of neutron wavelength and energizing current. The position-dependent Larmor phase of neutron spins was measured at the NIST Center for Neutron Research facility and found to agree well with detailed simulations. The phase varies linearly with horizontal position, as required, and the neutron beam shows little depolarization. Consequently, the device has advantages over existing devices with similar functionality and provides the capability for a large neutron beam (20 mm × 30 mm) and an increase in length scales accessible to SESAME to beyond 10 μm. With further improvements of the external coupling guide field in the prototype device, a larger neutron beam could be employed.

  17. Superconducting magnetic Wollaston prism for neutron spin encoding.

    PubMed

    Li, F; Parnell, S R; Hamilton, W A; Maranville, B B; Wang, T; Semerad, R; Baxter, D V; Cremer, J T; Pynn, R

    2014-05-01

    A magnetic Wollaston prism can spatially split a polarized neutron beam into two beams with different neutron spin states, in a manner analogous to an optical Wollaston prism. Such a Wollaston prism can be used to encode the trajectory of neutrons into the Larmor phase associated with their spin degree of freedom. This encoding can be used for neutron phase-contrast radiography and in spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME). In this paper, we show that magnetic Wollaston prisms with highly uniform magnetic fields and low Larmor phase aberration can be constructed to preserve neutron polarization using high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials. The Meissner effect of HTS films is used to confine magnetic fields produced electromagnetically by current-carrying HTS tape wound on suitably shaped soft iron pole pieces. The device is cooled to ~30 K by a closed cycle refrigerator, eliminating the need to replenish liquid cryogens and greatly simplifying operation and maintenance. A HTS film ensures that the magnetic field transition within the prism is sharp, well-defined, and planar due to the Meissner effect. The spin transport efficiency across the device was measured to be ~98.5% independent of neutron wavelength and energizing current. The position-dependent Larmor phase of neutron spins was measured at the NIST Center for Neutron Research facility and found to agree well with detailed simulations. The phase varies linearly with horizontal position, as required, and the neutron beam shows little depolarization. Consequently, the device has advantages over existing devices with similar functionality and provides the capability for a large neutron beam (20 mm × 30 mm) and an increase in length scales accessible to SESAME to beyond 10 μm. With further improvements of the external coupling guide field in the prototype device, a larger neutron beam could be employed. PMID:24880360

  18. Potential damage to dc superconducting magnets due to high frequency electromagnetic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, G. J.; Burkhart, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Studies of a d.c. superconducting magnet coil indicate that the large coil behaves as a straight waveguide structure. Voltages between layers within the coil sometimes exceeded those recorded at terminals where protective resistors are located. Protection of magnet coils against these excessive voltages could be accomplished by impedance matching throughout the coil system. The wave phenomenon associated with superconducting magnetic coils may create an instability capable of converting the energy of a quiescent d.c. superconducting coil into dissipative a.c. energy, even in cases when dielectric breakdown does not take place.

  19. Test of copper-braid-stabilized bus lines for superconducting dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, M.; Kabe, A.; Kojima, Y.

    1996-12-31

    A high cryogenic stability suprconducting bus-line has been developed to connect a superconducting dipole magnet with a full length of 13 m to a current lead approximately 2 meters from the magnet. The superconducting bus-line is made of NbTi strand cables for magnet use soldered to copper braid. The copper braid has a large surface area to improve cooling efficiency and increase cryogenic stability. Three kinds of bus-line are prepared on experimental basis: a bare superconducting cable, a superconducting cable joined copper braid with a thin layer of solder, and one made by filling the inside of copper braid with solder. Cryogenic stability tests confirmed that a bus-line equipped with a copper braid provides twice the cryogenic stability as a bare superconducting cable.

  20. Polaronic pinning of vortex in magnetic superconductors and magnetic-superconducting multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Bulaevskii, Lev

    2013-03-01

    We present a new type of vortex pinning by enhancing the viscosity of vortex in magnetic superconductors with long relaxation time of magnetization and large magnetic susceptibility. In the absence of current, vortices are dressed by nonuniform magnetic polarization and form vortex-polarons. Under a small current and consequently low Lorentz force, the magnetic polarization follows the vortex motion. However, at long magnetic relaxation time of magnetization, there is additional dragging force by the magnetization besides the Bardeen-Stephen one, thus the effective viscosity of vortex is significantly enhanced resulting in suppression of dissipation. For a large current, the magnetic polarization cannot follow the vortex motion and the vortex-polaron dissociates, i.e. the magnetization and vortex become decoupled. In the IV characteristic, the decoupling transition shows as a voltage jump and can be identified as a depinning transition. The polaronic pinning mechanism successfully explains the observed enhancement of critical current in the ErNiBC superconductor at low temperatures. The polaronic pinning can be optimized in magnetic-superconducting multilayers. We show also that vortex-polaron creep is suppressed at low temperatures. This publication was made possible by funding from the Los Alamos Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program, project number 20110138ER.

  1. Interplay between superconductivity and magnetism in Fe(1-x)Pd(x)Te.

    PubMed

    Karki, Amar B; Garlea, V Ovidiu; Custelcean, Radu; Stadler, Shane; Plummer, E W; Jin, Rongying

    2013-06-01

    The attractive/repulsive relationship between superconductivity and magnetic ordering has fascinated the condensed matter physics community for a century. In the early days, magnetic impurities doped into a superconductor were found to quickly suppress superconductivity. Later, a variety of systems, such as cuprates, heavy fermions, and Fe pnictides, showed superconductivity in a narrow region near the border to antiferromagnetism (AFM) as a function of pressure or doping. However, the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetic (FM) or AFM ordering is found in a few compounds [RRh4B4 (R = Nd, Sm, Tm, Er), R'Mo6X8 (R' = Tb, Dy, Er, Ho, and X = S, Se), UMGe (M = Ge, Rh, Co), CeCoIn5, EuFe2(As(1-x)P(x))2, etc.], providing evidence for their compatibility. Here, we present a third situation, where superconductivity coexists with FM and near the border of AFM in Fe(1-x)Pd(x)Te. The doping of Pd for Fe gradually suppresses the first-order AFM ordering at temperature T(N/S), and turns into short-range AFM correlation with a characteristic peak in magnetic susceptibility at T'(N). Superconductivity sets in when T'(N) reaches zero. However, there is a gigantic ferromagnetic dome imposed in the superconducting-AFM (short-range) cross-over regime. Such a system is ideal for studying the interplay between superconductivity and two types of magnetic (FM and AFM) interactions. PMID:23690601

  2. Interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in iron-chalcogenide superconductors: crystal growth and characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jinsheng; Xu, Guangyong; Gu, Genda; Tranquada, J. M.; Birgeneau, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    In this review, we present a summary of results on single crystal growth of two types of iron-chalcogenide superconductors, Fe1+yTe1-xSex (11), and AxFe2-ySe2 (A = K, Rb, Cs, Tl, Tl/K, Tl/Rb), using Bridgman, zone-melting, vapor self-transport and flux techniques. The superconducting and magnetic properties (the latter gained mainly from neutron scattering measurements) of these materials are reviewed to demonstrate the connection between magnetism and superconductivity. It will be shown that for the 11 system, while static magnetic order around the reciprocal lattice position (0.5, 0) competes with superconductivity, spin excitations centered around (0.5, 0.5) are closely coupled to the materials' superconductivity; this is made evident by the strong correlation between the spectral weight around (0.5, 0.5) and the superconducting volume fraction. The observation of a spin resonance below the superconducting temperature, Tc, and the magnetic-field dependence of the resonance emphasize the close interplay between spin excitations and superconductivity, similar to cuprate superconductors. In AxFe2-ySe2, superconductivity with Tc ~ 30 K borders an antiferromagnetic insulating phase; this is closer to the behavior observed in the cuprates but differs from that in other iron-based superconductors.

  3. Interplay between superconductivity and magnetism in Fe1−xPdxTe

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Amar B.; Garlea, V. Ovidiu; Custelcean, Radu; Stadler, Shane; Plummer, E. W.; Jin, Rongying

    2013-01-01

    The attractive/repulsive relationship between superconductivity and magnetic ordering has fascinated the condensed matter physics community for a century. In the early days, magnetic impurities doped into a superconductor were found to quickly suppress superconductivity. Later, a variety of systems, such as cuprates, heavy fermions, and Fe pnictides, showed superconductivity in a narrow region near the border to antiferromagnetism (AFM) as a function of pressure or doping. However, the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetic (FM) or AFM ordering is found in a few compounds [RRh4B4 (R = Nd, Sm, Tm, Er), R′Mo6X8 (R′ = Tb, Dy, Er, Ho, and X = S, Se), UMGe (M = Ge, Rh, Co), CeCoIn5, EuFe2(As1−xPx)2, etc.], providing evidence for their compatibility. Here, we present a third situation, where superconductivity coexists with FM and near the border of AFM in Fe1−xPdxTe. The doping of Pd for Fe gradually suppresses the first-order AFM ordering at temperature TN/S, and turns into short-range AFM correlation with a characteristic peak in magnetic susceptibility at T′N. Superconductivity sets in when T′N reaches zero. However, there is a gigantic ferromagnetic dome imposed in the superconducting-AFM (short-range) cross-over regime. Such a system is ideal for studying the interplay between superconductivity and two types of magnetic (FM and AFM) interactions. PMID:23690601

  4. Interplay between Superconductivity and Magnetism in Fe1-xPdxTe

    SciTech Connect

    Karki, A B; Garlea, Vasile O; Custelcean, Radu; Stadler, S.; Plummer, E. W.; Jin, Rongying

    2013-01-01

    The love/hate relationship between superconductivity and magnetic ordering has fascinated the condensed matter physics community for a century. In the early days, magnetic impurities doped into a superconductor were found to quickly suppress superconductivity. Later, a variety of systems, such as cuprates, heavy fermions and Fe pnictides, show superconductivity in a narrow region near the border to antiferromagnetism (AFM) as a function of pressure or doping. On the other hand, the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetic (FM) or AFM ordering is found in a few compounds (RRh4B4 (R = Nd, Sm, Tm, Er), R'Mo6X8 (R' = Tb, Dy, Er, Ho, and X = S, Se), UMGe (M = Ge, Rh, Co), CeCoIn5, EuFe2(As1-xPx)2 etc.), providing evidence for their compatibility. Here, we present a third situation, where superconductivity coexists with FM and near the border of AFM in Fe1-xPdxTe. The doping of Pd for Fe gradually suppresses the first-order AFM ordering at temperature TN/S, and turns into short-range (SR) AFM correlation with a characteristic peak in magnetic susceptibility at T'N. Superconductivity sets in when T'N reaches zero. However, there is a gigantic ferromagnetic dome imposed in the superconducting-AFM (SR) crossover regime. Such a system is ideal for studying the interplay between superconductivity and two types of magnetic interactions (FM and AFM).

  5. Crossed-magnetic-field experiments on stacked second generation superconducting tapes: Reduction of the demagnetization effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdadi, M.; Ruiz, H. S.; Coombs, T. A.

    2014-06-01

    The crossed-magnetic-field effect on the demagnetization factor of stacked second generation (2G) high temperature superconducting tapes is presented. The superconducting sample was initially magnetized along the c-axis by the field cooling magnetization method and after achieving the magnetic relaxation of the sample, an extensive set of experimental measurements for different amplitudes of an applied ac magnetic field parallel to the ab-plane was performed. On the one hand, a striking reduction of the demagnetization factor compared with the reported values for superconducting bulks is reported. On the other hand, the demagnetization factor increases linearly with the amplitude of the ac transverse magnetic field confirming the universal linear behavior for the magnetic susceptibility predicted by Brandt [Phys. Rev. B 54, 4246 (1996)]. The study has been also pursued at different frequencies of the ac transverse magnetic field in order to determine the influence of this parameter on the demagnetization factor measurements. We report an even lower demagnetization factor as long as the frequency of the transverse magnetic field increases. Thus, the significant reduction on the demagnetization factor that we have found by using stacked 2G-superconducting tapes, with higher mechanical strength compared with the one of superconducting bulks, makes to this configuration a highly attractive candidate for the future development of more efficient high-power density rotating machines and strong magnet applications.

  6. Performance of conduction cooled splittable superconducting magnet package for linear accelerators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kashikhin, Vladimire S.; Andreev, N.; Cheban, S.; DiMarco, J.; Kimura, N.; Makarov, A.; Orlov, Y.; V. Poloubotko; Tartaglia, M.; Yamamoto, A.

    2016-02-19

    New Linear Superconducting Accelerators need a superconducting magnet package installed inside SCRF Cryomodules to focus and steer electron or proton beams. A superconducting magnet package was designed and built as a collaborative effort of FNAL and KEK. The magnet package includes one quadrupole, and two dipole windings. It has a splittable in the vertical plane configuration, and features for conduction cooling. The magnet was successfully tested at room temperature, in a liquid He bath, and in a conduction cooling experiment. The paper describes the design and test results including: magnet cooling, training, and magnetic measurements by rotational coils. Furthermore, themore » effects of superconductor and iron yoke magnetization, hysteresis, and fringe fields are discussed.« less

  7. Method and apparatus for making superconductive magnet coils

    DOEpatents

    Borden, Albert R.

    1985-01-01

    A curved, shell-type magnet coil, adapted to be used in a superconducting magnet, is wound by providing a mandrel having a tubular cylindrical mid-portion terminating at both ends in tapered end portions formed with longitudinal slots having flexible fingers therebetween. An elongated electrical conductor is wound around an elongated oval-shaped pole island engaged with the outside of the cylindrical mid-portion, to form a multiplicity of oval-shaped turns engaged with a 180-degree segment of the mandrel. The coil turns have longitudinal portions with curved portions therebetween, engaging the tapered end portions of the mandrel. Upon completion of the winding, tapered expansion members are fully inserted into the tapered end portions, to displace the flexible fingers outwardly into a cylindrical form and to displace the curved portions of the turns into a shape conforming to such cylindrical form while also exerting increased tension upon the turns to minimize draping of the turns and to enhance the mechanical integrity of the coil. A half cylinder clamp may then be employed to clamp the coil, whereupon the coil may be solified by the use of an epoxy adhesive.

  8. Development of Pre-Preg Ceramic Insulation for Superconducting Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Codell, D.E.; Fabian, P.E.

    2004-06-28

    A new pre-impregnated (pre-preg) ceramic-based electrical insulation system capable of surviving high superconductor reaction temperatures has been developed for use in superconducting magnets. The use of Nb3Sn superconductors holds great promise for increased magnet performance for high energy physics, fusion, and other applications. A robust, cost-effective manufacturing process is critical to the successful implementation of these coils. Due to its embrittlement after the high temperature reaction cycle, Nb3Sn cable is usually insulated and wound into the coil prior to heat treatment. An earlier ceramic-based insulation system, applied using wet-winding or vacuum impregnation, has been successfully used in the 'wind and react' fabrication process. Use of the new pre-preg system will further simplify the manufacturing process while improving control over the insulation properties. Pre-preg insulation offers several advantages including improved dimensional control of the insulation, controllable and uniform fiber to matrix ratio, and certainty that the insulation does not infiltrate the superconductor. This paper describes the pre-preg development process, processing properties, as well as insulation performance data at cryogenic temperatures.

  9. Development of Pre-Preg Ceramic Insulation for Superconducting Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codell, D. E.; Fabian, P. E.

    2004-06-01

    A new pre-impregnated (pre-preg) ceramic-based electrical insulation system capable of surviving high superconductor reaction temperatures has been developed for use in superconducting magnets. The use of Nb3Sn superconductors holds great promise for increased magnet performance for high energy physics, fusion, and other applications. A robust, cost-effective manufacturing process is critical to the successful implementation of these coils. Due to its embrittlement after the high temperature reaction cycle, Nb3Sn cable is usually insulated and wound into the coil prior to heat treatment. An earlier ceramic-based insulation system, applied using wet-winding or vacuum impregnation, has been successfully used in the "wind and react" fabrication process. Use of the new pre-preg system will further simplify the manufacturing process while improving control over the insulation properties. Pre-preg insulation offers several advantages including improved dimensional control of the insulation, controllable and uniform fiber to matrix ratio, and certainty that the insulation does not infiltrate the superconductor. This paper describes the pre-preg development process, processing properties, as well as insulation performance data at cryogenic temperatures.

  10. Two-dimensional Magnetism in Arrays of Superconducting Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Daniel H.

    1996-03-01

    An array of superconducting rings in an applied field corresponding to a flux of Φ0 /2 per ring behaves like a 2D Ising antiferromagnet. Each ring has two energetically equivalent states with equal and opposite magnetic moments due to fluxoid quantization, and the dipolar coupling between rings favors antiparallel alignment of the moments. Using SQUID magnetometry and scanning Hall probe microscopy, we have studied the dynamics and magnetic configurations of micron-size aluminum rings on square, triangular, honeycomb, and kagomé lattices. We have found that there are significant antiferromagnetic correlations between rings, and that effects of geometrical frustration can be observed on the triangular and kagomé lattices. Long range correlations on the other lattices are suppressed by the analog of spin freezing that locks the rings in metastable states at low temperatures, and by quenched disorder due to imperfections in the fabrication. This disorder produces a roughly 1% variation in the rings' areas, which translates into an effective random field on the spins. The ring arrays are thus an extremely good realization of the 2D random-field Ising model. (Performed in collaboration with D. Davidović, S. Kumar, J. Siegel, S. B. Field, R. C. Tiberio, R. Hey, and K. Ploog.) (Supported by NSF grants DMR-9222541, and DMR-9357518, and by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.)

  11. Method and apparatus for making superconductive magnet coils

    DOEpatents

    Borden, A.R.

    1983-11-07

    A curved, shell-type magnet coil, adapted to be used in a superconducting magnet, is wound by providing a mandrel having a tubular cylindrical mid-portion terminating at both ends in tapered end portions formed with longitudinal slots having flexible fingers therebetween. An elongated electrical conductor is wound around an elongated oval-shaped pole island engaged with the outside of the cylindrical mid-portion, to form a multiplicity of oval-shaped turns engaged with a 180-degree segment of the mandrel. The coil turns have longitudinal portions with curved portions therebetween, engaging the tapered end portions of the mandrel. Upon completion of the winding, tapered expansion members are fully inserted into the tapered end portions, to displace the flexible fingers outwardly into a cylindrical form and to displace the curved portions of the turns into a shape conforming to such cylindrical form while also exerting increased tension upon the turns to minimize draping of the turns and to enhance the mechanical integrity of the coil. A half cylinder clamp may then be employed to clamp the coil, whereupon the coil may be solidified by the use of an epoxy adhesive.

  12. Development of a compact superconducting magnet with a GdBCO magnetic lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. Y.; Matsumoto, S.; Teranishi, R.; Kiyoshi, T.

    2013-10-01

    Concentration of a magnetic field has been achieved using a Gd-Ba-Cu-O (GdBCO) magnetic lens. A conduction-cooled compact high-field superconducting magnet with a GdBCO magnetic lens was developed. The magnet possessed a 10-mm room-temperature bore and consisted of two Nb-Ti solenoid coils and a GdBCO magnetic lens, which was installed at the center of the Nb-Ti coils in order to concentrate the background field generated by the Nb-Ti coils. The Nb-Ti coils and the GdBCO magnetic lens were cooled using a two-stage pulse-tube cryocooler. A concentrated magnetic field of 10.3 T was obtained at a background field of 5.6 T provided by the Nb-Ti coils. No degradation was found in the magnet during repeat excitation. The large field gradient generated by the GdBCO magnetic lens is expected to be used for the levitation of diamagnetic materials.

  13. Mercury removal from solution by superconducting magnetic separation with nanostructured magnetic adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, T.; Tachibana, S.; Miura, O.; Takeuchi, M.

    2011-11-01

    Recently, mercury Hg concentration in human blood increases due to expanding the global mercury contamination. Excess mercury bioaccumulation poses a significant health risk. In order to decrease mercury concentration in the environment and human blood, we have developed two different kinds of nanostructured magnetic adsorbents for mercury to apply them to superconducting magnetic separation instead of conventional filtration. One is magnetic beads (MBs) which have nanosize magnetite particles in the core and a lot of SH radicals on the surface to adsorb Hg ions effectively. MBs were developed mainly to remove mercury from human blood. The maximum amount of the adsorption for MBs is 6.3 mg/g in the solution in less than a minute. Dithiothreitol can easily remove mercury adsorbed to MBs, hence MBs can be reusable. The other is nanostructured magnetic activated carbon (MAC) which is activated carbon with mesopores and nanosize magnetite. The maximum amount of the adsorption for MAC is 38.3 mg/g in the solution. By heat-treatment mercury can be easily removed from MAC. We have studied superconducting magnetic separation using each adsorbent for mercury removal from solution.

  14. Assessment of some of the problems in the USA of superconducting magnets for fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Cornish, D.N.

    1981-11-05

    This paper discusses some of the general difficulties and problems encountered during the development of the technology of superconductors and superconducting magnets for fusion and expresses some personal concerns.

  15. Study of some superconducting and magnetic materials on high T sub c oxide superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, M. K.

    1987-01-01

    On the basis of existing data it appears that the high-temperature superconductivity above 77 K reported here, occurs only in compound systems consisting of a phase other than the K2NiF4 phase. A narrow superconducting transition was obtained with T sub c0 = 98 K and T sub c1 = 94 K in Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO). Preliminary results indicate that YBCO is rather different from the layered LaBCO, LaSCO, and LaCCO. While electron-photon interaction cannot be absent from this compound system, nonconventional enhanced superconducting interactions due to interfaces, Resonating Valence Bond (RVB) states, or even a superconducting state beyond the BCS framework, may be required to account for the high T sub c in YBCO. It is believed that study of the possible subtle correlation between magnetism and superconductivity will definitely provide important insight into the superconducting mechanism in YBCO and other oxides.

  16. High Tc superconducting magnetic multivibrators for fluxgate magnetic-field sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Mohri, K.; Uchiyama, T.; Ozeki, A. . Faculty of Engineering)

    1989-09-01

    Sensitive and quick-response nonlinear inductance characteristics are found for high Tc superconducting (YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-chi/) disk cores at 77K in which soft magnetic BH hysteresis loops are observed. Various quick response magnetic devices such as modulators, amplifiers and sensors are built using these cores. The magnetizing frequency can be set to more than 20 MHz, which is difficult for conventional ferromagnetic bulk materials such as Permalloy amorphous alloys and ferrite. New quick-response fluxgate type magnetic-field sensors are made using ac and dc voltage sources. The former is used for second-harmonic type sensors, while the latter is for voltage-output multivibrator type sensors. Stable and quick-response sensor characteristics were obtained for two-core type multivibrators.

  17. Influence of azimuthal coil size variations on magnetic field harmonics of superconducting particle accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ogitsu, T. ); Devred, A. )

    1994-06-01

    The superconducting super collider (SSC) would have required dipole and quadrupole magnets with a very high field quality. The field quality is determined mainly by the dimensions of the magnet coils and their positions with respect to the iron yoke. It is thus very sensitive to manufacturing errors. A model is here developed to estimate the field distortions in a dipole magnet due to azimuthal coil size variations. This model is applied to the data collected during the fabrication and testing of a series of 5 cm aperture, 15 m long SSC dipole magnet prototypes. A clear correlation is observed between the predicted field distortions from the azimuthal coil sizes and the measured skew quadrupole and skew sextupole coefficients.

  18. Fabrication and test results of a high field, Nb3Sn superconducting racetrack dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Benjegerdes, R.; Bish, P.; Byford, D.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D.R.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia, R.; Hannaford, R.; Higley, H.; Jackson, A.; Lietzke, A.; Liggins, N.; McInturff, A.D.; O'Neill, J.; Palmerston, E.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R.M.; Swanson, J.

    2001-06-15

    The LBNL Superconducting Magnet Program is extending accelerator magnet technology to the highest possible fields. A 1 meter long, racetrack dipole magnet, utilizing state-of-the-art Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor, has been built and tested. A record dipole filed of 14.7 Tesla has been achieved. Relevant features of the final assembly and tested results are discussed.

  19. Mini-beta superconducting quadrupole magnet system for the TRISTAN main ring

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, K.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ohuchi, N.; Morita, Y.; Egawa, K.; Sugahara, R.; Fukuma, H.; Kabe, A.; Kubo, T.; Ohsawa, Y. )

    1992-01-01

    After several years of developing a superconducting magnet system (QCS system), including a cryogenic system, mini-beta magnets were installed at all interaction points during the summer of 1990. The final tests were continued until the end of January, 1991, followed immediately by beam operation. In this paper performances of QCS magnets and cryogenic systems are mainly described.

  20. The Fabrication Technique and Property Analysis of Racetrack-Type High Temperature Superconducting Magnet for High Power Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, D. Y.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Li, L.; Li, Y. N.; Chen, P. M.

    2013-03-01

    The superconducting motor is now the focus of the research on the application of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials. In this manuscript, we mainly introduce the recent progress on the fabrication technique and property research of the superconducting motor magnet in Luoyang Ship Material Research Institute (LSMRI) in China, including the materials, the winding and impregnation technique, and property measurement of magnet. Several techniques and devices were developed to manufacture the magnet, including the technique of insulation and thermal conduction, the device for winding the racetrack-type magnet, etc. At last, the superconducting magnet used for the MW class motor were successfully developed, which is the largest superconducting motor magnet in china at present. The critical current of the superconducting magnet exceeds the design value (90 A at 30 K).

  1. Analytical design of a superconducting magnetic energy storage for pulsed power peak

    SciTech Connect

    Netter, D.; Leveque, J.; Rezzoug, A.; Caron, J.P.; Sargos, F.M.

    1996-09-01

    A Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage can be used to produce very high pulsed power peak. A superconducting coil is magnetically coupled with another coil linked to the load. During the storage phase, the current is constant. In order to transfer the energy to the load, the authors cause the quench of the superconducting coil. It is very important to know the efficiency of the transfer and how much energy is discharged in the Helium vessel. In this paper, they propose an analytical method which enables to calculate very quickly the electrical parameters of such a device.

  2. Magnetism, structure and superconductivity in CaFe2As2

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Tuson O; Lee, Han; Ronning, Filip; Bauer, Eric D; Thompson, Joe D

    2008-01-01

    Tbe spin-density-wave (SDW) anti ferromagnet CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} becomes superconducting under pressure. By measuring electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility under pressure, we show that bulk superconductivity is present in a narrow pressure range where a collapsed tetrgaonal structure is favored. At higher pressures, a new low-temperature structure appears, with the boundary between this new structure and the collapsed tetragonal structure strongly dependent on pressure history. Magnetic fluctuations in the collapsed phase appear to be important for superconductivity.

  3. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, F.; Hoard, R.W.

    1994-05-10

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla are disclosed. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field. 4 figures.

  4. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Hoard, Ronald W.

    1994-01-01

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field.

  5. Magnetic excitations in Kondo liquid: superconductivity and hidden magnetic quantum critical fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yifeng; Urbano, Ricardo; Nicholas, Curro; Pines, David

    2009-01-01

    We report Knight shift experiments on the superconducting heavy electron material CeCoIn{sub 5} that allow one to track with some precision the behavior of the heavy electron Kondo liquid in the superconducting state with results in agreement with BCS theory. An analysis of the {sup 115}In nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spin-lattice relaxation rate T{sub 1}{sup -1} measurements under pressure reveals the presence of 2d magnetic quantum critical fluctuations in the heavy electron component that are a promising candidate for the pairing mechanism in this material. Our results are consistent with an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point (QCP) located at slightly negative pressure in CeCoIn{sub 5} and provide additional evidence for significant similarities between the heavy electron materials and the high T{sub c} cuprates.

  6. Biological effects of magnetic fields from superconducting magnetic energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1989-12-01

    Physical interaction mechanisms and potential biological effects of static and slowly time-varying magnetic fields are summarized. The results of laboratory and human health studies on this topic are related to the fringe magnetic field levels anticipated to occur in the proximity of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems. The observed biological effects of magnetic fields include: (1) magnetic induction of electrical potentials in the circulatory system and other tissues, (2) magneto-orientation of macromolecules and membranes in strong magnetic fields, and (3) Zeeman interactions with electronic spin states in certain classes of charge transfer reactions. In general, only the first of these interactions is relevant to the establishment of occupational exposure guidelines. Physical hazards posed by the interactions of magnetic fields with cardiac pacemakers and other implanted medical devices, e.g., aneurysm clips and prostheses, are important factors that must also be considered in establishing exposure guidelines. Proposed guidelines for limiting magnetic field exposure are discussed. 50 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Research & Development on Superconducting Niobium Materials via Magnetic Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    S. B. Roy, V. C. Sahni, and G. R. Myneni

    2011-03-01

    We present a study of superconducting properties of both large grain (1 mm average grain size) and small grain (50 micron average grain size) Niobium materials containing varying amounts of Tantalum impurities that have been used in the fabrication of high accelerating gradient superconducting radio frequency cavities. We found that a buffered chemical polishing of these Niobium samples causes a distinct reduction in the superconducting parameters like TC, wt- ppm to 1300 wt-ppm. Implications of these results on the performance of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities are discussed, especially the anomalous high field RF losses that have been reported in the literature.

  8. Suppression of superconductivity by strong magnetic fields in PbTe/PbS heterostructures with a superconducting interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengus, S. V.; Sipatov, A. Yu.; Yuzephovich, S. I.

    2013-08-01

    This is a comprehensive study of the effect of strong magnetic fields on superconductivity in PbTe/PbS heterostructures with semiconducting layers of different thicknesses. Metallic conductivity and superconductivity (critical temperature Tc ≤ 6.5 K) in PbTe/PbS heterostructures are caused by inversion of bands along a continuous network of misfit dislocations that develops at the interfaces between semiconductor layers of sufficient thickness (d > 80 nm). With decreasing d the continuity of the superconducting interface is disrupted, Tc decreases, and the metallic conductivity changes to a semiconducting type. Disruption of the continuity of the superconducting interface is found to be a necessary condition for observing a magnetic-field induced superconductor-insulator transition (SIT) and has a significant influence on its features: a fan-like set of resistance curves R(T); intersection of the R(B) curves for fields perpendicular, as well as parallel, to the interface; and, negative magnetoresistance. A scaling analysis based on Fisher's theoretical model is carried out for these samples. No evidence of a SIT was observed in heterostructures with a perfect interface. It appears that the SIT effect is related to percolation phenomena characteristic of granular superconductors.

  9. Superconducting radio-frequency resonator in magnetic fields up to 6 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, M. S.; Stallkamp, N.; Quint, W.; Wiesel, M.; Vogel, M.; Martin, A.; Birkl, G.

    2016-07-01

    We have measured the characteristics of a superconducting radio-frequency resonator in an external magnetic field. The magnetic field strength has been varied with 10 mT resolution between zero and 6 T. The resonance frequency and the quality factor of the resonator have been found to change significantly as a function of the magnetic field strength. Both parameters show a hysteresis effect which is more pronounced for the resonance frequency. Quantitative knowledge of such behaviour is particularly important when experiments require specific values of resonance frequency and quality factor or when the magnetic field is changed while the resonator is in the superconducting state.

  10. Thermal busbar assembly in a cryostat dual penetration for refrigerated superconductive magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Herd, K.G.; Laskaris, T.E.

    1993-06-29

    A thermal busbar assembly for refrigerated superconductive magnets is described, said assembly comprised of: a vacuum enclosure means; a thermal shield means; a superconductive magnet; a first and second heat station means; a lead busbar means electrically connected to said magnet means and thermally connected to said first heat station means; a first thermal busbar means thermally connected to said magnet means and said second heat station means; and a second thermal busbar means thermally connected to said thermal shield means and said first heat station means.

  11. Magnetic and superconducting phase diagrams in ErNi2B2C

    SciTech Connect

    Galvis, J.A.; Crespo, M.; Guillamon, I.; Suderow, Hermann; Vieira, S.; Garcia Hernandez, M.; Budko, Serguei; Canfield, Paul

    2012-03-30

    We present measurements of the superconducting upper critical field Hc2(T) and the magneticphasediagram of the superconductor ErNi2B2C made with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The magnetic field was applied in the basal plane of the tetragonal crystal structure. We have found large gapless regions in the superconductingphasediagram of ErNi2B2C, extending between different magnetic transitions. A close correlation between magnetic transitions and Hc2(T) is found, showing that superconductivity is strongly linked to magnetism.

  12. Jefferson Lab CLAS12 Superconducting Solenoid magnet Requirements and Design Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Rajput-Ghoshal, Renuka; Hogan, John P.; Fair, Ruben J.; Ghoshal, Probir K.; Luongo, Cesar; Elouadrhiri, Latifa

    2014-12-01

    As part of the Jefferson Lab 12GeV accelerator upgrade project, one of the experimental halls (Hall B) requires two superconducting magnets. One is a magnet system consisting of six superconducting trapezoidal racetrack-type coils assembled in a toroidal configuration and the second is an actively shielded solenoidal magnet system consisting of 5 coils. In this presentation the physics requirements for the 5 T solenoid magnet, design constraints, conductor decision, and cooling choice will be discussed. The various design iterations to meet the specification will also be discussed in this presentation.

  13. Superconducting electromagnets for large wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance systems

    SciTech Connect

    Boom, R.W.; Abdelsalam, M.K.; Bakerek, K.; Britcher, C.P.; Esking, J.; Eyssa, Y.M.; Goodyer, M.J.; McIntosh, G.E.; Scurlock, R.G.; Wu, Y.Y.

    1985-03-01

    This paper presents a new design study of a Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (MSBS) for airplane models in a large 8 ft x 8 ft wind tunnel. New developments in the design include: use of a superconducting solenoid as a model core instead of magnetized iron; combination of permanent magnet material in the model wings along with four race-track coils to produce the required roll torque; and mounting of all the magnets in an integral cold structure instead of in separate cryostats. Design of superconducting solenoid model cores and practical experience with a small-scale prototype are discussed.

  14. Superconductivity and magnetism in K-doped EuFe(2)As(2).

    PubMed

    Anupam; Paulose, P L; Jeevan, H S; Geibel, C; Hossain, Z

    2009-07-01

    Superconductivity is found in 50% K-doped EuFe(2)As(2) samples below 33 K. Our results from electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility and (57)Fe and (151)Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy provide clear evidence that the ordering of the Fe moments observed at 190 K in undoped EuFe(2)As(2) is completely suppressed in our 50% K-doped sample; thus there is no coexistence of the Fe magnetic order and the superconducting state. However, short range ordering of the Eu moments coexists with the superconducting state below 15 K. A bump in the susceptibility well below T(c) as well as the broadening of the Fe Mössbauer line below 27 K evidence an interplay between the Eu magnetism and the superconducting state. PMID:21828476

  15. Superconductivity and magnetism and their interplay in quaternary borocarbides RNi2B2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, L. C.

    2006-12-01

    Since 1986, most of the interest in superconductivity became focused on high-Tc cuprates. The discovery of the superconducting quaternary borocarbide system Y Ni B C with Tc as high as ˜12 K inspired research into intermetallic superconductors (IMS) once again. Several reasons can be attributed to this revival of interest in IMS: (i) In the tetragonal quaternary magnetic superconductors RNi2B2C, superconductivity and magnetism occur with Tc and TN ˜ 10 K, thereby allowing studies of exotic phenomena associated with, and arising from, the interplay of superconductivity and magnetism. (ii) High TN's and a variety of commensurate and incommensurate magnetic structures in RNi2B2C (Fermi surface nesting playing a central role) strongly suggest that R-spins are coupled via the RKKY-exchange interaction. Hence, unlike in most other magnetic superconductors known so far, conduction electrons take part in superconductivity and magnetism. (iii) Quaternary borocarbides open up new pathways to try and synthesize multicomponent intermetallic superconductors. Their remarkable intrinsic superconducting and magnetic properties and the availability of high quality samples (bulk polycrystalline, large single crystals and thin films) make RNi2B2C particularly special to investigate. Several unusual phenomena have been reported, such as, to name a few, dramatic phonon mode softening at Tc, Hc2(T) exhibiting a positive curvature near Tc and a four-fold anisotropy in the basal plane; a variety of exceptional and fascinating flux line lattice (FLL) related effects — FLL-symmetry transformations and alignments with the underlying crystal lattice as a function of applied field (manifestation of nonlocal electrodynamics despite high κ ˜ 10, and thermal fluctuation effects even though Tc, ˜ 16 K, is not too high) and a four-fold symmetric star-shaped (in real space) vortex core. RNi2B2C are strong coupling s-wave BCS superconductors and, remarkably, have a

  16. Manufacturing, characterization and stability of magnesium diboride superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessandrini, Matteo

    Some of the interesting features of MgB2 such as low cost, compatibility with existing processing methods and intermediate critical temperatures induced the scientific community to invest in its development with large efforts. In order to promote the use of this compound for military and aerospace activities requiring lightweight devices, we tested titanium as a sheath material. We fabricated Ti-sheathed MgB2 through the powder-in-tube (PIT) process. These wires showed similar results to those sheathed with steel. At 4 K and self field, the critical current density Jc is well above 7x105 A/cm2. Analyses of the interface reaction layer between titanium and MgB2 were carried out using XRD, SEM-EDS and EMPA equipment. In addition to wire development, investigation of the so-called quench events is needed. Quench detection and protection systems depend on how fast the normal zone propagates through the coil, after a disturbance occurs. During this doctorate program two codes were developed. The first is designed to compute the magnetic field of a multilayer solenoid, find the maximum field the superconductor is exposed to and define the critical quench current. Results are used to minimize the wire length required to reach the desired magnetic field. The second code simulates quench events by solving the heat transfer equation for a monodimensional case under adiabatic conditions. Among others, two solenoids were built and tested in order to investigate quench events under different conditions. The first was made with 500 m of commercial MgB2 tape and generates up to 1 T at 16 K. The second was wound with 40 m of the same tape. This thesis was supported by the State of Texas through the Texas Center for Superconductivity and by Ad Astra Rocket company (Houston, TX).

  17. A superconducting bending magnet system for a compact synchrotron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Garren, A.A.; Leung, E.M.; Madura, D.D.; Cline, D.B.; Kolonko, J.J.; Schachinger, L.C.

    1995-07-01

    High intensity, high energy X-rays for use in protein crystallography, nano-machining and medical applications, such as non invasive coronary angiography, can be produced by a 1.2 to 1.5 GeV electron storage ring compact light source with 6 to 8 tesla superconducting bending magnets. Because the bending magnets are to be superconducting, the storage ring energy can be over factor of two lower than a conventional storage ring that delivers same photon energy. The ring, which has superconducting bending magnets, is smaller in circumference and has the advantage of having fewer particles in the ring for a given x ray source intensity. The proposed storage ring is a separated function accelerator ring with six superconducting bending magnet units. Conventional quadruples and correction elements would be located between the bending magnets. Because the synchrotron radiation is generated in the bend, the superconducting bending magnets must have a warm vacuum chamber for the electron beam. Variations of a superferric magnet design have been studied for this application. This report presents a superferric H magnet design that can produce good quality magnetic field in a region that is 50 mm high by 100 mm wide. This modified superferric H magnet design has saturated iron poles but the magnetic flux is returned from one pole to the other through an unsaturated iron return path. The dipole magnet required for a compact storage ring must be physically short (380 mm long), and the field must fall off rapidly at the ends of the magnet. This report describes a preliminary design for a pair of 6.894 tesia, thirty degree bending magnets in a common vacuum vessel for use in a 1.5 GeV compact storage ring light source.

  18. Tests of a 3 meter curved superconducting beam transport dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Allinger, J E; Carroll, A S; Danby, G T; DeVito, B; Jackson, J W; Leonhardt, W J; Prodell, A G; Weisenbloom, J

    1981-01-01

    Initial tests of one of the curved 3 m long superconducting dipole magnets intended to generate 6.0 T and produce a 20.4/sup 0/ bend in the primary proton beam to a new D-target station at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS have been completed. Although this magnet, whose window frame design generally follows that of the successful 8/sup 0/ and Model T superconducting dipoles, demonstrates many of the desirable characteristics of these earlier magnets such as excellent quench propagation and good ramping properties, it has only reached a disappointingly low magnetic field of 3.5 to 4.0 T. Because of the great interest in superconducting magnet technology, this report will describe the diagnostic tests performed and plans for future modifications.

  19. Development of superconducting magnet for high-field MR systems in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zanming; van Oort, Johannes M.; Zou, Mark X.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we describe the development of superconducting magnets for high-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) by various businesses and institutions in China. As the Chinese MR market rapidly expands, many foreign and domestic companies and research institutions are joining the race to meet the burgeoning demand by developing key MRI components for various magnetic field configurations. After providing a brief introduction to research on MRI superconducting magnets that dates back to the 1980s, the first large-bore 1.5 T superconducting magnet with 50-cm DSV for whole-body MRI - successfully developed and manufactured by AllTech Medical Systems in Chengdu, China-is presented and its specifications are described.

  20. Superconducting magnet and on-board refrigeration system on Japanese MAGLEV vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchishima, H.; Herai, T. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on a superconducting magnet and on-board refrigeration system on Japanese MAGLEV vehicles. Running tests on the Miyazaki test track are repeatedly carried out at speeds over 300 km/h using the MAGLEV vehicle, MLU002. The development of the MAGLEV system for the new test line has already started, and a new superconducting magnet for it has been manufactured. An on-board refrigerator is installed in the superconducting magnet to keep the liquid helium temperature without the loss of liquid helium. The helium gas produced when energizing or de-energizing the magnet is stored in on-board gas helium tanks temporarily. The on-board refrigerator is connected directly to the liquid helium tank of the magnet.

  1. Stability improvement of AC superconducting magnet by forced-convection cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Ishigohka, T.; Kasuya, A.; Ninomiya, A.

    1996-07-01

    The authors propose a new improved cooling system of an AC(50/60Hz) superconducting magnet introducing a forced-convection flow of liquid helium. In this system, the flow through the cooling channel between the winding layers is generated by a screw rotating in a cylinder surrounding the magnet. A small experimental device composed of an AC superconducting magnet and a rotating screw was manufactured. The screw was rotated by an extended driving shaft. The experimental result shows that the stability of the magnet is improved by the rotation of the screw. That is, the thermal disturbance (heater input power) which generates the quench of the magnet increases as the rotational speed of the screw does. It is expected that this technique can be successfully applied to superconducting AC power apparatuses as transformers or reactors.

  2. Canted-Cosine-Theta Superconducting Accelerator Magnets for High Energy Physics and Ion Beam Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, Lucas Nathan

    Advances in superconducting magnet technology have historically enabled the construction of new, higher energy hadron colliders. Looking forward to the needs of a potential future collider, a significant increase in magnet field and performance is required. Such a task requires an open mind to the investigation of new design concepts for high field magnets. Part I of this thesis will present an investigation of the Canted-Cosine-Theta (CCT) design for high field Nb3Sn magnets. New analytic and finite element methods for analysis of CCT magnets will be given, along with a discussion on optimization of the design for high field. The design, fabrication, and successful test of the 2.5 T NbTi dipole CCT1 will be presented as a proof-of-principle step towards a high field Nb3Sn magnet. Finally, the design and initial steps in the fabrication of the 16 T Nb3Sn dipole CCT2 will be described. Part II of this thesis will investigate the CCT concept extended to a curved magnet for use in an ion beam therapy gantry. The introduction of superconducting technology in this field shows promise to reduce the weight and cost of gantries, as well as open the door to new beam optics solutions with high energy acceptance. An analytic approach developed for modeling curved CCT magnets will be presented, followed by a design study of a superconducting magnet for a proton therapy gantry. Finally, a new magnet concept called the "Alternating Gradient CCT" (AG-CCT) will be introduced. This concept will be shown to be a practical magnet solution for achieving the alternating quadrupole fields desired for an achromatic gantry, allowing for the consideration of treatment with minimal field changes in the superconducting magnets. The primary motivation of this thesis is to share new developments for Canted-Cosine-Theta superconducting magnets, with the hope this design will improve technology for high energy physics and ion beam cancer therapy.

  3. Design of a horizonal liquid helium cryostat for refrigerating a flying superconducting magnet in a wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Y. Y.

    1982-01-01

    The design of a horizontal liquid helium cryostat for refrigerating a flying superconducting magnet in a wind tunnel is presented. The basic principles of magnetic suspension theory are described and theoretical calculations of the superconducting magnet are provided. The experimental results of the boil-off of liquid nitrogen and liquid helium in the cryostat are reported.

  4. Model SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) dipole magnet cryostat assembly at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.

    1989-03-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) magnet development program includes the design, fabrication and testing of full length model dipole magnets. A result of the program has been the development of a magnet cryostat design. The cryostat subsystems consist of cold mass connection-slide, suspension, thermal shields, insulation, vacuum vessel and interconnections. Design details are presented along with model magnet production experience. 6 refs., 13 figs.

  5. Beam heating studies on an early model is a superconducting cosine theta magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Bozoki, G; Bunce, G; Danby, G; Foelsche, H; Jackson, J; Prodell, A; Soukas, A; Stevens, A; Stoehr, R; Weisenbloom, J

    1980-01-01

    Superconducting magnets for accelerators can be accidentally quenched by heat resulting from beam losses in the magnet. The threshold for such quenches is determined by the time structure of the beam loss and by details of the magnet application, construction and cooling. A 4.25 m long superconducting cosine theta dipole magnet, MARK VI, constructed during the research and development phase of the ISABELLE Project at BNL was installed in the 28.5 GeV/c primary proton beam line from the AGS. By energizing the magnet, the proton beam could be deflected into the magnet. The beam intensity required to quench the magnet was observed for different beam sizes and at several values of magnet current up to 2400 A or approximately 70% of the highest magnet operating current. The maximum current was limited by the gas-cooled power lead flow available using pool-boiling helium rather than single phase forced-flow helium at 5 atm for which the magnet system was designed. Details of the experimental setup including the magnet and cryogenic system, the beam-monitoring equipment and instrumentation are described. The measurements are discussed and compared with beam heating measurements made on another superconducting magnet and interpreted using the Cascade Simulation Program, CASIM.

  6. Superconductivity and magnetism in intermetallic Bi3Ni1-xFex superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsalves, Silvio Henrique; Opata, Yuri Aparecido; Pinheiro, Lincoln Brum Leite Gusmão; Da Silva Leal, Adriane Consuelo; Monteiro, João Frederico Haas Leandro; Siqueira, Ezequiel Costa; de Andrade, André Vitor Chaves; Jurelo, Alcione Roberto

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we investigated the apparent coexistence of superconductivity and magnetism in polycrystalline Bi3Ni1-xFex samples for low concentrations of iron (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.10). The compound was synthesized by the solid-state reaction method and characterized by X-ray diffraction and magnetic measurements. From X-ray, it was observed that the main phase corresponds to an orthorhombic structure with space group Pnma and shows no dependence on the Fe concentration. From magnetic measurements, it was observed that the critical temperature was not affected by iron doping and that ferromagnetism and superconductivity coexist apparently in an interesting interplay.

  7. CHANGE IN FIELD HARMONICS AFTER QUENCH AND THERMAL CYCLES IN SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect

    GUPTA,R.; JAIN,A.; MURATORE,J.; WANDERER,P.; WILLEN,E.; WYSS,C.

    1997-05-12

    A change in field harmonics after quench and thermal cycles has been observed in superconducting magnets for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This paper presents the results of a systematic investigation of this effect in a number of RHIC dipole and quadrupole magnets. These changes in field harmonics may limit the ultimate field quality and its reproducibility in superconducting magnets. A change in pre-stress has also been observed after quench and thermal cycles. A possible link between these two changes is explored.

  8. A novel design of iron dominated superconducting multipole magnets with circular coils

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    Linear accelerators based on superconducting magnet technology use a large number of relatively weak superconducting quadrupoles. In this case an iron dominated quadrupole is the most cost effective solution. The field quality in this magnet is defined by iron poles; the magnet air gap is minimal as are coil ampere-turns. Nevertheless, it has long racetrack type coils, which must be rigid and fixed by a mechanical structure to provide the needed mechanical stability. The novel concept of using circular superconducting coils in such a quadrupole type is described, with a discussion of quadrupole parameters, and results of 3D magnetic designs. Variants of short and long sectional quadrupoles and multipoles are presented.

  9. Superconductivity and magnetism in (Ho xY 1- x)Ni 2B 2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eversmann, K.; Handstein, A.; Fuchs, G.; Cao, L.; Müller, K.-H.

    1996-02-01

    Superconducting and magnetic properties of polycrystalline samples of the pseudoquarternary system (Ho xY 1- x)Ni 2B 2C have been investigated by resistance and susceptibility measurements. A linear depression of the superconducting transition temperature with increasing magnetic ordering temperatures was found by variation of the Ho content providing evidence for magnetic pair breaking. This behaviour is analogous to the known scaling with the de Gennes factor of the rare earth elements in the family of quaternary RNi 2B 2C compounds. Both cases are described by a common scaling behaviour including the superconducting and magnetic transition temperatures. A reetrrant behaviour observed for Ho contents x>0.5 results in maximum in the temperature dependence of the upper critical field Hc2( T). These results are compared with Hc2( T) data of the RNi 2B 2C family ( R=Tm,Er).

  10. Anisotropic magnetic responses of a 2D-superconducting Bi2Te3/FeTe heterostructure.

    PubMed

    He, Qing Lin; He, Mingquan; Shen, Junying; Lai, Ying Hoi; Liu, Yi; Liu, Hongchao; He, Hongtao; Wang, Gan; Wang, Jiannong; Lortz, Rolf; Sou, Iam Keong

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the anisotropic magnetic responses of a 2D-superconducting Bi2Te3/FeTe heterostructure. Cross-sectional STEM imaging revealed that the excess Fe atoms in the FeTe layer occupy specific interstitial sites. They were found to show strong anisotropic magnetic responses under a magnetic field either perpendicular or parallel to the sample surface. Under perpendicular magnetic fields within 1000 Oe, conventional paramagnetic Meissner effect, superconducting diamagnetism, and anomalous enhancement of magnetization successively occur as the magnetic field increases. In contrast, under parallel magnetic fields, superconducting diamagnetism was not observed explicitly in the magnetization measurements and the anomalous enhancement of magnetization appears only for fields higher than 1000 Oe. The observed strong magnetic anisotropy provides further evidence that the induced superconductivity at the interface of the Bi2Te3/FeTe heterostucture has a 2D nature. PMID:26252506

  11. Anisotropic magnetic responses of a 2D-superconducting Bi2Te3/FeTe heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qing Lin; He, Mingquan; Shen, Junying; Lai, Ying Hoi; Liu, Yi; Liu, Hongchao; He, Hongtao; Wang, Gan; Wang, Jiannong; Lortz, Rolf; Keong Sou, Iam

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the anisotropic magnetic responses of a 2D-superconducting Bi2Te3/FeTe heterostructure. Cross-sectional STEM imaging revealed that the excess Fe atoms in the FeTe layer occupy specific interstitial sites. They were found to show strong anisotropic magnetic responses under a magnetic field either perpendicular or parallel to the sample surface. Under perpendicular magnetic fields within 1000 Oe, conventional paramagnetic Meissner effect, superconducting diamagnetism, and anomalous enhancement of magnetization successively occur as the magnetic field increases. In contrast, under parallel magnetic fields, superconducting diamagnetism was not observed explicitly in the magnetization measurements and the anomalous enhancement of magnetization appears only for fields higher than 1000 Oe. The observed strong magnetic anisotropy provides further evidence that the induced superconductivity at the interface of the Bi2Te3/FeTe heterostucture has a 2D nature.

  12. Superconducting magnet performance for 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source developed at the Korea Basic Science Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin Yong; Choi, Seyong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Ok, Jung-Woo; Shin, Chang Seouk; Won, Mi-Sook; Kim, Byoung Chul; Ahn, Jung Keun

    2014-02-15

    A superconducting magnet for use in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source was developed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The superconducting magnet is comprised of three solenoids and a hexapole magnet. According to the design value, the solenoid magnets can generate a mirror field, resulting in axial magnetic fields of 3.6 T at the injection area and 2.2 T at the extraction region. A radial field strength of 2.1 T can also be achieved by hexapole magnet on the plasma chamber wall. NbTi superconducting wire was used in the winding process following appropriate techniques for magnet structure. The final assembly of the each magnet involved it being vertically inserted into the cryostat to cool down the temperature using liquid helium. The performance of each solenoid and hexapole magnet was separately verified experimentally. The construction of the superconducting coil, the entire magnet assembly for performance testing and experimental results are reported herein.

  13. Superconductivity of magnetic Sm-substituted LaCo{sub 2}B{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Ren, W. J. Duan, T. F.; Li, D.; Li, J.; Zhang, Z. D.

    2015-05-07

    In this work, superconductivity with a maximum superconducting transition onset temperature T{sub C} of 3.6 K is reported in La{sub 1-x}Sm{sub x}Co{sub 2}B{sub 2} in the concentration range 0.12 ≤ x ≤ 0.20. Substitution of magnetic Sm ions with 4f electrons for La is beneficial for superconductivity in the system. The low upper critical field of La{sub 0.8}Sm{sub 0.2}Co{sub 2}B{sub 2} suggests that the dominant magnetic-field suppressing superconducting mechanism is the orbit pair-breaking effect. A special specific-heat anomaly is observed around T{sub C}.

  14. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Magnetic excitations of Fe1 + ySexTe1 - x in magnetic and superconductive phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babkevich, P.; Bendele, M.; Boothroyd, A. T.; Conder, K.; Gvasaliya, S. N.; Khasanov, R.; Pomjakushina, E.; Roessli, B.

    2010-04-01

    We have used inelastic neutron scattering and muon-spin rotation to compare the low energy magnetic excitations in single crystals of superconducting Fe1.01Se0.50Te0.50 and non-superconducting Fe1.10Se0.25Te0.75. We confirm the existence of a spin resonance in the superconducting phase of Fe1.01Se0.50Te0.50, at an energy of 7 meV and a wavevector of (1/2, 1/2, 0). The non-superconducting sample exhibits two incommensurate magnetic excitations at (1/2, 1/2, 0) ± (0.18, - 0.18, 0) which rise steeply in energy, but no resonance is observed at low energies. A strongly dispersive low energy magnetic excitation is also observed in Fe1.10Se0.25Te0.75 close to the commensurate antiferromagnetic ordering wavevector (1/2 - δ, 0, 1/2), where δ≈0.03. The magnetic correlations in both samples are found to be quasi-two-dimensional in character and persist well above the magnetic (Fe1.10Se0.25Te0.75) and superconducting (Fe1.01Se0.50Te0.50) transition temperatures.

  15. Neutron scattering study on the magnetic and superconducting phases of MnP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Shinichiro; Lancon, Diane; Ronnow, Henrik; Hansen, Thomas; Gardner, Jason

    We have performed series of neutron scattering experiments on MnP. MnP has been investigated for decades because of its rich magnetic phase diagram. The magnetic structure of MnP is ferromagnetic (FM) below TC = 291 K. It transforms into a helimagnetic structure at TS = 47 K with a propagation vector q = 0 . 117a* . Superconductivity was found in MnP under pressures of 8 GPa with a TSC around 1 K by J.-G. Cheng. Since Mn-based superconductors are rare, and the superconducting phase occurs in the vicinity of FM, new magnetic and helimagnetic phases, there is a need to understand how the magnetism evolves as one approach the superconducting state. MnP is believed to be a double helix magnetic structure at TS = 47 K. We observed new 2 δ and 3 δ satellite peaks whose intensity are 200 ~ 1000 times smaller than these of 1 δ satellite peaks on the cold triple axis spectrometer SIKA under zero magnetic fields. We also found the periods of helimagnetic structure changes as a function of temperature. If time permits, we will discuss recent experiments under pressure. However, we have complete picture of magnetic structure of this system with and without applied pressure, revealing the interplay between the magnetic and superconducting phases.

  16. Spin superconductivity and ac-Josephson effect in Graphene system under strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiwen; Jiang, Hua; Sun, Qing-Feng; Xie, X. C.; Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing, China Collaboration

    We study the spin superconductivity in Graphene system under strong magnetic field. From the microscopically Gor'kov method combined with the Aharonov-Casher effect, we derive the effective Landau-Ginzburg free energy and analyze the time evolution of order parameter, which is confirmed to be the off-diagonal long range order. Meanwhile, we compare the ground state of spin superconductivity to the canted-antiferromagnetic state, and demonstrate the equivalence between these two states. Moreover, we give out the pseudo-field flux quantization condition of spin supercurrent, and propose an experimental measurable ac-Josephson effect of spin superconductivity in this system.

  17. Superconductive material and magnetic field for damping and levitation support and damping of cryogenic instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A superconductive load bearing support without a mechanical contact and vibration damping for cryogenic instruments in space is presented. The levitation support and vibration damping is accomplished by the use of superconducting magnets and the 'Meissner' effect. The assembly allows for transfer of vibration energy away from the cryogenic instrument which then can be damped by the use of either an electronic circuit or conventional vibration damping mean.

  18. Battery energy storage and superconducting magnetic energy storage for utility applications: A qualitative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Akhil, A.A.; Butler, P.; Bickel, T.C.

    1993-11-01

    This report was prepared at the request of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management for an objective comparison of the merits of battery energy storage with superconducting magnetic energy storage technology for utility applications. Conclusions are drawn regarding the best match of each technology with these utility application requirements. Staff from the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program and the superconductivity Programs at Sandia National contributed to this effort.

  19. Superconductivity:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacchetti, N.

    In this paper a short historical account of the discovery of superconductivity and of its gradual development is given. The physical interpretation of its various aspects took about forty years (from 1911 to 1957) to reach a successful description of this phenomenon in terms of a microscopic theory At the very end it seemed that more or less everything could be reasonably interpreted even if modifications and refinements of the original theory were necessary. In 1986 the situation changed abruptly when a cautious but revolutionary paper appeared showing that superconductivity was found in certain ceramic oxides at temperatures above those up to then known. A rush of frantic experimental activity started world-wide and in less than one year it was shown that superconductivity is a much more widespread phenomenon than deemed before and can be found at temperatures well above the liquid air boiling point. The complexity and the number of the substances (mainly ceramic oxides) involved call for a sort of modern alchemy if compounds with the best superconducting properties are to be manufactured. We don't use the word alchemy in a deprecatory sense but just to emphasise that till now nobody can say why these compounds are what they are: superconductors.

  20. Local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic impurities in mesoscopic iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Ji, Min; Schwarz, Tobias; Ke, Xiaoxing; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Yuan, Jie; Pereira, Paulo J.; Huang, Ya; Zhang, Gufei; Feng, Hai-Luke; Yuan, Ya-Hua; Hatano, Takeshi; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Yamaura, Kazunari; Wang, Hua-Bing; Wu, Pei-Heng; Takayama-Muromachi, Eiji; Vanacken, Johan; Moshchalkov, Victor V.

    2015-07-01

    The determination of the pairing symmetry is one of the most crucial issues for the iron-based superconductors, for which various scenarios are discussed controversially. Non-magnetic impurity substitution is one of the most promising approaches to address the issue, because the pair-breaking mechanism from the non-magnetic impurities should be different for various models. Previous substitution experiments demonstrated that the non-magnetic zinc can suppress the superconductivity of various iron-based superconductors. Here we demonstrate the local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic zinc impurities in Ba0.5K0.5Fe2As2 by exploring phase-slip phenomena in a mesoscopic structure with 119 × 102 nm2 cross-section. The impurities suppress superconductivity in a three-dimensional `Swiss cheese'-like pattern with in-plane and out-of-plane characteristic lengths slightly below ~1.34 nm. This causes the superconducting order parameter to vary along abundant narrow channels with effective cross-section of a few square nanometres. The local destruction of superconductivity can be related to Cooper pair breaking by non-magnetic impurities.

  1. Local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic impurities in mesoscopic iron-based superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Ji, Min; Schwarz, Tobias; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Yuan, Jie; Pereira, Paulo J.; Huang, Ya; Zhang, Gufei; Feng, Hai-Luke; Yuan, Ya-Hua; Hatano, Takeshi; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Yamaura, Kazunari; Wang, Hua-Bing; Wu, Pei-Heng; Takayama-Muromachi, Eiji; Vanacken, Johan; Moshchalkov, Victor V.

    2015-01-01

    The determination of the pairing symmetry is one of the most crucial issues for the iron-based superconductors, for which various scenarios are discussed controversially. Non-magnetic impurity substitution is one of the most promising approaches to address the issue, because the pair-breaking mechanism from the non-magnetic impurities should be different for various models. Previous substitution experiments demonstrated that the non-magnetic zinc can suppress the superconductivity of various iron-based superconductors. Here we demonstrate the local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic zinc impurities in Ba0.5K0.5Fe2As2 by exploring phase-slip phenomena in a mesoscopic structure with 119 × 102 nm2 cross-section. The impurities suppress superconductivity in a three-dimensional ‘Swiss cheese'-like pattern with in-plane and out-of-plane characteristic lengths slightly below ∼1.34 nm. This causes the superconducting order parameter to vary along abundant narrow channels with effective cross-section of a few square nanometres. The local destruction of superconductivity can be related to Cooper pair breaking by non-magnetic impurities. PMID:26139568

  2. Controlling the magnetic state of a carbon nanotube Josephson junction with the superconducting phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delagrange, Raphaelle; Weil, R.; Kasumov, A.; Bouchiat, H.; Deblock, R.; Luitz, D. J.; Meden, V.

    The Kondo effect is a many-body phenomenon that screens the magnetic moment of an impurity in a metal. The associated singlet state can be probed in a single impurity by electronic transport in a quantum dot (QD), here made of a carbon nanotube (CNT), which provides a localized electron between the two contacts. Using superconducting leads, one can investigate the competition between the Kondo effect and the superconductivity induced in the CNT. The superconductivity can destroy the Kondo singlet in favor of a magnetic doublet, leading to a sign reversal of the supercurrent in the S-CNT-S junction. This singlet-doublet transition depends on the Kondo temperature and the superconducting gap, as well as the position of the impurity level. We demonstrate experimentally that the superconducting phase difference across the QD can also control this magnetic transition. We use the measurement of the relation between the supercurrent and this superconducting phase as a tool to probe the transition. We show that it has a distinctly anharmonic behavior, that reveals the phase-mediated singlet to doublet transition, in good agreement with finite temperature quantum Monte Carlo calculations. We extract as well a phase diagram of the phase-controlled quantum transition at zero temperature.

  3. Alternating-gradient canted cosine theta superconducting magnets for future compact proton gantries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Weishi; Brouwer, Lucas; Caspi, Shlomo; Prestemon, Soren; Gerbershagen, Alexander; Schippers, Jacobus Maarten; Robin, David

    2015-10-01

    We present a design of superconducting magnets, optimized for application in a gantry for proton therapy. We have introduced a new magnet design concept, called an alternating-gradient canted cosine theta (AG-CCT) concept, which is compatible with an achromatic layout. This layout allows a large momentum acceptance. The 15 cm radius of the bore aperture enables the application of pencil beam scanning in front of the SC-magnet. The optical and dynamic performance of a gantry based on these magnets has been analyzed using the fields derived (via Biot-Savart law) from the actual windings of the AG-CCT combined with the full equations of motion. The results show that with appropriate higher order correction, a large 3D volume can be rapidly scanned with little beam shape distortion. A very big advantage is that all this can be done while keeping the AG-CCT fields fixed. This reduces the need for fast field ramping of the superconducting magnets between the successive beam energies used for the scanning in depth and it is important for medical application since this reduces the technical risk (e.g., a quench) associated with fast field changes in superconducting magnets. For proton gantries the corresponding superconducting magnet system holds promise of dramatic reduction in weight. For heavier ion gantries there may furthermore be a significant reduction in size.

  4. New levitation scheme with AC superconducting magnet for EDS MAGLEV system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.H.; Lee, J.K.; Hahn, S.Y.; Cha, G.

    1996-09-01

    This paper proposes a new magnetic levitation scheme which is able to generate levitation force for all speeds including a standstill. Auxiliary wheels which are needed in EDS MAGLEV vehicle can be eliminated. This scheme uses AC superconducting magnets to generate levitation force. In this paper, magnetic fields, forces and power dissipations generated by AC magnets moving above a conducting slab are calculated analytically. Results of calculation show characteristics of EDS system with AC magnet, such as levitation force and loss, are superior to those of EDS system with DC magnets for all speeds.

  5. Levitation and lateral forces between a point magnetic dipole and a superconducting sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H, M. Al-Khateeb; M, K. Alqadi; F, Y. Alzoubi; B, Albiss; M, K. Hasan (Qaseer; N, Y. Ayoub

    2016-05-01

    The dipole–dipole interaction model is employed to investigate the angular dependence of the levitation and lateral forces acting on a small magnet in an anti-symmetric magnet/superconducting sphere system. Breaking the symmetry of the system enables us to study the lateral force which is important in the stability of the magnet above a superconducting sphere in the Meissner state. Under the assumption that the lateral displacement of the magnet is small compared to the physical dimensions of our proposed system, analytical expressions are obtained for the levitation and lateral forces as a function of the geometrical parameters of the superconductor as well as the height, the lateral displacement, and the orientation of the magnetic moment of the magnet. The dependence of the levitation force on the height of the levitating magnet is similar to that in the symmetric magnet/superconducting sphere system within the range of proposed lateral displacements. It is found that the levitation force is linearly dependent on the lateral displacement whereas the lateral force is independent of this displacement. A sinusoidal variation of both forces as a function of the polar and azimuthal angles specifying the orientation of the magnetic moment is observed. The relationship between the stability and the orientation of the magnetic moment is discussed for different orientations.

  6. Development of superconducting high gradient magnetic separation system for highly viscous fluid for practical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, S.; Mishima, F.; Akiyama, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2011-11-01

    In the industrial plants processing highly viscous fluid such as foods or industrial products, it is necessary to remove the metallic wear debris originating from pipe in manufacturing line which triggers quality loss. In this study, we developed a high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) system which consists of superconducting magnet to remove the metallic wear debris. The magnetic separation experiment and the particle trajectory simulation were conducted with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a model material (viscosity coefficient was 10 Pa s, which is 10,000 times higher than that in water). In order to develop a magnetic separation system for practical use, the particle trajectory simulation by using solenoidal superconducting magnet was conducted, and the possibility of the magnetic separation for removing ferromagnetic stainless steel (SUS) particles in highly viscous fluid of 10 Pa s was indicated. Based on the results, the number of filters to obtain required separation efficiency was examined to design the practical separation system.

  7. Light weight, high field, stable, superconducting magnets for advanced transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lubell, M.S.; Dresner, L.; Kenney, W.J.; Lue, J.W.; Luton, J.N.; Schwenterly, S.W.

    1991-01-01

    Although the Guideway may be the most expensive component of a MAGLEV system, the importance of a suitable magnet system should not be underestimated. The reliability of operation of MAGLEV depends on the superconducting magnets performing to their specifications in a reliable manner (i.e., without training or quenching). Besides reliability the magnets should produce high field, be sufficiently stable to withstand reasonable perturbations, be light weight, be protected in the event of a quench, and be economical (although performance should outweigh cost). We propose to develop superconducting magnets that have these features. Our magnet designs are based on internally cooled, cable-in-conduit superconductor with Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC) as the structural reinforcement. Although the initial work is with metallic superconductors such as NbTi, the processes being developed will be applicable to the High Temperature Ceramic Superconductors when they become suitable for magnet applications.

  8. Improving the design and analysis of superconducting magnets for particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R C

    1996-11-01

    High energy particle accelerators are now the primary means of discovering the basic building blocks of matter and understanding the forces between them. In order to minimize the cost of building these machines, superconducting magnets are used in essentially all present day high energy proton and heavy ion colliders. The cost of superconducting magnets is typically in the range of 20--30% of the total cost of building such machines. The circulating particle beam goes through these magnets a large number of times (over hundreds of millions). The luminosity performance and life time of the beam in these machines depends significantly on the field quality in these magnets. Therefore, even a small error in the magnetic field shape may create a large cumulative effect in the beam trajectory to throw the particles of the magnet aperture. The superconducting accelerator magnets must, therefore, be designed and constructed so that these errors are small. In this thesis the research and development work will be described 3which has resulted in significant improvements in the field quality of the superconducting magnets for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The design and the field quality improvements in the prototype of the main collider dipole magnet for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will also be presented. RHIC will accelerate and collide two counter rotating beams of heavy ions up to 100 GeV/u and protons up to 250 GeV. It is expected that RHIC will create a hot, dense quark-gluon plasma and the conditions which, according to the Big Bang theory, existed in the early universe.

  9. Magnetism and superconductivity driven by identical 4f states in a heavy-fermion metal

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Joe E; Nair, S; Stockert, O; Witte, U; Nicklas, M; Schedler, R; Bianchi, A; Fisk, Z; Wirth, S; Steglich, K

    2009-01-01

    The apparently inimical relationship between magnetism and superconductivity has come under increasing scrutiny in a wide range of material classes, where the free energy landscape conspires to bring them in close proximity to each other. Particularly enigmatic is the case when these phases microscopically interpenetrate, though the manner in which this can be accomplished remains to be fully comprehended. Here, we present combined measurements of elastic neutron scattering, magnetotransport, and heat capacity on a prototypical heavy fermion system, in which antiferromagnetism and superconductivity are observed. Monitoring the response of these states to the presence of the other, as well as to external thermal and magnetic perturbations, points to the possibility that they emerge from different parts of the Fermi surface. Therefore, a single 4f state could be both localized and itinerant, thus accounting for the coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity.

  10. Conceptual design of large-bore superconducting quadrupoles with active magnetic shielding for the AHF

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Kashikhin et al.

    2003-06-09

    The Advanced Hydrotest Facility, under study by LANL, uses large-bore superconducting quadrupole magnets. In the paper we discuss the conceptual design of such quadrupoles using active shielding. The magnets are specified to achieve gradients of up to 24 T/m with a 28-cm warm bore and to have 0.01% field quality. Concepts for quench protection and the magnet cryosystems are also briefly discussed to confirm the viability of the proposed design.

  11. Aspects of passive magnetic levitation based on high-T(sub c) superconducting YBCO thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenhuber, P.; Moon, F. C.

    1995-01-01

    Passive magnetic levitation systems reported in the past were mostly confined to bulk superconducting materials. Here we present fundamental studies on magnetic levitation employing cylindrical permanent magnets floating above high-T(sub c) superconducting YBCO thin films (thickness about 0.3 mu m). Experiments included free floating rotating magnets as well as well-established flexible beam methods. By means of the latter, we investigated levitation and drag force hysteresis as well as magnetic stiffness properties of the superconductor-magnet arrangement. In the case of vertical motion of the magnet, characteristic high symmetry of repulsive (approaching) and attractive (withdrawing) branches of the pronounced force-displacement hysteresis could be detected. Achievable force levels were low as expected but sufficient for levitation of permanent magnets. With regard to magnetic stiffness, thin films proved to show stiffness-force ratios about one order of magnitude higher than bulk materials. Phenomenological models support the measurements. Regarding the magnetic hysteresis of the superconductor, the Irie-Yamafuji model was used for solving the equation of force balance in cylindrical coordinates allowing for a macroscopic description of the superconductor magnetization. This procedure provided good agreement with experimental levitation force and stiffness data during vertical motion. For the case of (lateral) drag force basic qualitative characteristics could be recovered, too. It is shown that models, based on simple asymmetric magnetization of the superconductor, describe well asymptotic transition of drag forces after the change of the magnet motion direction. Virgin curves (starting from equilibrium, i.e. symmetric magnetization) are approximated by a linear approach already reported in literature only. This paper shows that basic properties of superconducting thin films allow for their application to magnetic levitation or - without need of levitation

  12. How the Performance of a Superconducting Magnet is affected by theConnection between a small cooler and the Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2005-09-08

    As low temperature cryocoolers become more frequently used to cool superconducting magnets, it becomes increasingly apparent that the connection between the cooler and the magnet has an effect on the design and performance of the magnet. In general, the use of small coolers can be considered in two different temperature ranges; (1) from 3.8 to 4.8 K for magnet fabricated with LTS conductor and (2) from 18 to 35 K for magnets fabricated using HTS conductor. In general, both temperature ranges call for the use of a two-stage cooler. The best method for connecting a cooler to the magnet depends on a number of factors. The factors include: (1) whether the cooler must be used to cool down the magnet from room temperature, (2) whether the magnet must have one or more reservoirs of liquid cryogen to keep the magnet cold during a loss of cooling, and (3) constraints on the distance from the cooler cold heads and the magnet and its shield. Two methods for connecting low temperature coolers to superconducting magnets have been studied. The first method uses a cold strap to connect the cold heads directly to the loads. This method is commonly used for cryogen-free magnets. The second method uses a thermal siphon and liquid cryogens to make the connection between the load being cooled and the cold head. The two methods of transferring heat from the magnet to the cooler low temperature cold head are compared for the two temperature ranges given above.

  13. Microstructural magnetic phases in superconducting FeTe0.65Se0.35

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittlin, A.; Aleshkevych, P.; Przybylińska, H.; Gawryluk, D. J.; Dłużewski, P.; Berkowski, M.; Puźniak, R.; Gutowska, M. U.; Wiśniewski, A.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we address a number of outstanding issues concerning the nature and the role of magnetic inhomogeneities in the iron chalcogenide system FeTe1-xSex and their correlation with superconductivity in this system. We report morphology of superconducting single crystals of FeTe0.65Se0.35 studied with transmission electron microscopy, high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy and their magnetic and superconducting properties characterized with magnetization, specific heat and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Our data demonstrate the presence of nanoscale hexagonal regions coexisting with a tetragonal host lattice, a chemical disorder demonstrating a nonhomogeneous distribution of host atoms in the crystal lattice, as well as iron-deficient bands hundreds of nanometres in length. From the magnetic data and ferromagnetic resonance temperature dependence, we attribute magnetic phases in Fe-Te-Se to Fe3O4 inclusions and to hexagonal symmetry nanoscale regions with a structure of the Fe7Se8 type. Our results suggest that a nonhomogeneous distribution of host atoms might be an intrinsic feature of superconducting Fe-Te-Se chalcogenides and we find a surprising correlation indicating that a faster grown crystal of inferior crystallographic properties is a better superconductor.

  14. Purification of condenser water in thermal power station by superconducting magnetic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, D. W.; Kwon, J. M.; Baik, S. K.; Lee, Y. J.; Han, K. S.; Ko, R. K.; Sohn, M. H.; Seong, K. C.

    2011-11-01

    Thermal power station is made up of a steam turbine and a steam condenser which need a lot of water. The water of steam condenser should be replaced, since scales consisting of iron oxide mainly are accumulated on the surface of condenser pipes as it goes. Superconducting high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) system has merits to remove paramagnetic substance like iron oxides because it can generate higher magnetic field strength than electromagnet or permanent magnet. In this paper, cryo-cooled Nb-Ti superconducting magnet that can generate up to 6 T was used for HGMS systems. Magnetic filters were designed by the analysis of magnetic field distribution at superconducting magnets. The result of X-ray analysis showed contaminants were mostly α-Fe 2O 3 (hematite) and γ-Fe 2O 3 (maghemite). The higher magnetic field was applied up to 6 T, the more iron oxides were removed. As the wire diameter of magnetic filter decreased, the turbidity removal of the sample was enhanced.

  15. Effect of superconducting solenoid model cores on spanwise iron magnet roll control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with conventional ferromagnetic fuselage cores, superconducting solenoid cores appear to offer significant reductions in the projected cost of a large wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system. The provision of sufficient magnetic roll torque capability has been a long-standing problem with all magnetic suspension and balance systems; and the spanwise iron magnet scheme appears to be the most powerful system available. This scheme utilizes iron cores which are installed in the wings of the model. It was anticipated that the magnetization of these cores, and hence the roll torque generated, would be affected by the powerful external magnetic field of the superconducting solenoid. A preliminary study has been made of the effect of the superconducting solenoid fuselage model core concept on the spanwise iron magnet roll torque generation schemes. Computed data for one representative configuration indicate that reductions in available roll torque occur over a range of applied magnetic field levels. These results indicate that a 30-percent increase in roll electromagnet capacity over that previously determined will be required for a representative 8-foot wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system design.

  16. Chain of Majorana states from superconducting Dirac fermions at a magnetic domain wall.

    PubMed

    Neupert, Titus; Onoda, Shigeki; Furusaki, Akira

    2010-11-12

    We study theoretically a strongly type-II s-wave superconducting state of two-dimensional Dirac fermions in proximity to a ferromagnet having in-plane magnetization. It is shown that a magnetic domain wall can host a chain of equally spaced vortices in the superconducting order parameter, each of which binds a Majorana-fermion state. The overlap integral of neighboring Majorana states is sensitive to the position of the chemical potential of the Dirac fermions. Thermal transport and scanning tunneling microscopy experiments to probe the Majorana fermions are discussed. PMID:21231252

  17. Thermodynamics of the interplay between magnetism and high-temperature superconductivity

    PubMed Central

    Kivelson, Steven A.; Aeppli, G.; Emery, Victor J.

    2001-01-01

    Copper–oxide-based high-temperature superconductors have complex phase diagrams with multiple ordered phases. It even appears that the highest superconducting transition temperatures for certain cuprates are found in samples that display simultaneous onset of magnetism and superconductivity. We show here how the thermodynamics of fluid mixtures—a touchstone for chemistry as well as hard and soft condensed matter physics—accounts for this startling observation, as well as many other properties of the cuprates in the vicinity of the instability toward “striped” magnetism. PMID:11593001

  18. Magnetic flux shielding for the precision muon g-2 storage ring superconducting inflector

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.T.; Meng, W.; Sampson, W.B.; Woodle, K.

    1993-12-31

    A muon g-2 experiment (E821) at the AGS requires knowledge of the magnetic field over muon orbits at the level of 0.1 ppM. The superconducting inflector involves a double cosine theta winding; this design approximately cancels its fringe field. Nevertheless its residual field would effect the homogeneity of the storage ring magnetic field. A method of using a superconducting sheet surrounding the inflector to further reduce the fringe field was proposed by one of the authors, W. Meng. An experimental program to explore this technique is described. Part of the test results are presented.

  19. Concepts of flywheels for energy storage using autostable high-T(sub c) superconducting magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornemann, Hans J.; Zabka, R.; Boegler, P.; Urban, C.; Rietschel, H.

    1994-01-01

    A flywheel for energy storage using autostable high-T(sub c) superconducting magnetic bearings has been built. The rotating disk has a total weight of 2.8 kg. The maximum speed is 9240 rpm. A process that allows accelerated, reliable and reproducible production of melt-textured superconducting material used for the bearings has been developed. In order to define optimum configurations for radial and axial bearings, interaction forces in three dimensions and vertical and horizontal stiffness have been measured between superconductors and permanent magnets in different geometries and various shapes. Static as well as dynamic measurements have been performed. Results are being reported and compared to theoretical models.

  20. Feasibility of turbidity removal by high-gradient superconducting magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hua; Li, Yiran; Xu, Fengyu; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have focused on pollutant removal by magnetic seeding and high-gradient superconducting magnetic separation (HGSMS). However, few works reported the application of HGSMS for treating non-magnetic pollutants by an industrial large-scale system. The feasibility of turbidity removal by a 600 mm bore superconducting magnetic separation system was evaluated in this study. The processing parameters were evaluated by using a 102 mm bore superconducting magnetic separation system that was equipped with the same magnetic separation chamber that was used in the 600 mm bore system. The double-canister system was used to process water pollutants. Analytical grade magnetite was used as a magnetic seed and the turbidity of the simulated raw water was approximately 110 NTU, and the effects of polyaluminum chloride (PAC) and magnetic seeds on turbidity removal were evaluated. The use of more PAC and magnetic seeds had few advantages for the HGSMS at doses greater than 8 and 50 mg/l, respectively. A magnetic intensity of 5.0 T was beneficial for HGSMS, and increasing the flow rate through the steel wool matrix decreased the turbidity removal efficiency. In the breakthrough experiments, 90% of the turbidity was removed when 100 column volumes were not reached. The processing capacity of the 600 mm bore industry-scale superconducting magnetic separator for turbidity treatment was approximately 78.0 m(3)/h or 65.5 × 10(4) m(3)/a. The processing cost per ton of water for the 600 mm bore system was 0.1 $/t. Thus, the HGSMS separator could be used in the following special circumstances: (1) when adequate space is not available for traditional water treatment equipment, especially the sedimentation tank, and (2) when decentralized sewage treatment HGSMS systems are easier to transport and install. PMID:25828094

  1. Cold test facility for 1.8 m superconducting model magnets at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    LaBarge, A.

    1993-07-01

    A new facility has been constructed to measure the characteristic features of superconducting model magnets and cable at cryogenic temperatures -- a function which supports the design and development process for building full-scale accelerator magnets. There are multiple systems operating in concert to test the model magnets, namely: cryogenic, magnet power, data acquisition and system control. A typical model magnet test includes the following items: (1) warm measurements of magnet coils, strain gauges and voltage taps; (2) hipot testing of insulation integrity; (3) cooling with liquid nitrogen and then liquid helium; (4) measuring quench current and magnetic field; (5) magnet warm-up. While the magnet is being cooled to 4.22 K, the mechanical stress is monitored through strain gauges. Current is then ramped into the magnet until it reaches some maximum value and the magnet transitions from the superconducting state to the normal state. Normal-zone propagation is monitored using voltage taps on the magnet coils during this process, thus indicating where the transition began. The current ramp is usually repeated until a plateau current is reached, where the magnet has mechanically settled.

  2. Aspects of passive magnetic levitation based on high-T{sub c} superconducting YBCO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenhuber, P.; Moon, F.C.

    1995-04-01

    Passive magnetic levitation systems reported in the past were mostly confined to bulk superconducting materials. Here the authors present fundamental studies on magnetic levitation employing cylindrical permanent magnets floating above high-T{sub c} superconducting YBCO thin films (thickness about 0.3 mu m). Experiments included free floating rotating magnets as well as well-established flexible beam methods. By means of the latter, the authors investigated levitation and drag force hysteresis as well as magnetic stiffness properties of the superconductor-magnet arrangement. In the case of vertical motion of the magnet, characteristic high symmetry of repulsive (approaching) and attractive (withdrawing) branches of the pronounced force-displacement hysteresis could be detected. Achievable force levels were low as expected but sufficient for levitation of permanent magnets. With regard to magnetic stiffness, thin films proved to show stiffness-force ratios about one order of magnitude higher than bulk materials. Phenomenological models support the measurements. Regarding the magnetic hysteresis of the superconductor, the Irie-Yamafuji model was used for solving the equation of force balance in cylindrical coordinates allowing for a macroscopic description of the superconductor magnetization. This procedure provided good agreement with experimental levitation force and stiffness data during vertical motion. For the case of (lateral) drag force basic qualitative characteristics could be recovered, too. It is shown that models, based on simple asymmetric magnetization of the superconductor, describe well asymptotic transition of drag forces after the change of the magnet motion direction. Virgin curves (starting from equilibrium, i.e. symmetric magnetization) are approximated by a linear approach already reported in literature only. This paper shows that basic properties of superconducting thin films allow for their application to magnetic levitation.

  3. Coexistence of superconductivity and magnetism in spin-fermion model of ferrimagnetic spinel in an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karchev, Naoum

    2015-04-01

    A two-sublattice spin-fermion model of ferrimagnetic spinel, with spin-1/2 itinerant electrons at the sublattice A site and spin-s localized electrons at the sublattice B site is considered. The exchange between itinerant and localized electrons is antiferromagnetic. As a result, the external magnetic field, applied along the magnetization of the localized electrons, compensates the Zeeman splitting due to the spin-fermion exchange and magnon-fermion interaction induces spin antiparallel p-wave superconductivity which coexists with magnetism. We have obtained five characteristic values of the applied field (in units of energy) H cr1 < H 3 < H 0 < H 4 < H cr2. At H 0 the external magnetic field compensates the Zeeman splitting. When H cr1 < H < H cr2 the spin antiparallel p-wave superconductivity with T 1u configuration coexists with magnetism. The superconductor-to-normal magnet transition at finite temperature is second order when H runs the interval (H_3,H_4) . It is an abrupt transition when H cr1 < H < H 3 or H 4 < H < H cr2. This is proved calculating the temperature dependence of the gap for three different values of the external magnetic field H cr1 < H < H 3, H 4 < H < H cr2 and H=H0 . In the first two cases the abrupt fall to zero of the gap at superconducting critical temperature shows that the superconductor-to-normal magnet transition is first order. The Hubbard term (Coulomb repulsion), in a weak-coupling regime, does not significantly affect the magnon-induced superconductivity. Relying on the above results one can formulate a recipe for preparing a superconductor from ferrimagnetic spinel: i) hydrostatic pressure above the critical value of insulator-metal transition; ii) external magnetic field along the sublattice magnetization with higher amplitude.

  4. Superconducting Magnets for the 12 GeV Upgrade at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, Ruben J.; Young, Glenn R.

    2015-06-01

    Jefferson Laboratory is embarked on an energy upgrade to its flagship continuous electron beam accelerator in order to expand the scope of its research capabilities and probe further into the structure of nuclear particles. The 12 GeV upgrade includes the design, manufacture, integration, installation and commissioning of eight different superconducting magnets in three separate experimental halls. The effort involves other national laboratories, universities and industry spanning three countries. This paper will summarize the key characteristics of these magnets, ranging in size from 0.2 to 23 MJ in stored energy, and featuring many different types and configurations. The paper will also give an overview of the specific technical challenges for each magnet, and a status report on magnet manufacture and expected delivery dates. The 12GeV upgrade at J-Lab represents the largest superconducting magnet fabrication and installation program currently ongoing in the United States and this paper will present the breadth of collaborations supporting it.

  5. A superconducting quadrupole magnet array for a heavy ion fusion driver

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Bangerter, r.; Chow, K.; Faltens, A.; Gourley, S.; Hinkins, R.; Gupta, R.; Lee, E.; McInturff, A.; Scanlan, R.; Taylor, C.; Wolgast, D.

    2000-06-27

    A multi-channel quadrupole array has been proposed to increase beam intensity and reduce space charge effects in a Heavy Ion Fusion Driver. A single array unit composed of several quadrupole magnets, each with its own beam line, will be placed within a ferromagnetic accelerating core whose cost is directly affected by the array size. A large number of focusing arrays will be needed along the accelerating path. The use of a superconducting quadrupole magnet array will increase the field and reduce overall cost. We report here on the design of a compact 3 x 3 superconducting quadrupole magnet array. The overall array diameter and length including the cryostat is 900 x 700 mm. Each of the 9 quadrupole magnets has a 78 mm warm bore and an operating gradient of 50 T/m over an effective magnetic length of 320 mm.

  6. Fabrication and Test Results of a Nb3Sn Superconducting Racetrack Dipole Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, K.; Dietderich, D.R.; Gourlay, S.A.; Gupta, R.; Harnden, W.; Lietzke, A.F.; McInturff, A.D.; Millos, G.A.; Morrison, L.; Morrison, M.; Scanlan, R.M.

    1999-03-22

    A 'proof-of-principle' Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting dual-bore dipole magnet was built from racetrack coils, as a first step in a program to develop an economical, 15 Tesla, accelerator-quality magnet. The mechanical design and magnet fabrication procedures are discussed. No training was required to achieve temperature-dependent plateau currents, despite several thermal cycles that involved partial magnet disassembly and substantial pre-load variations. Subsequent magnets are expected to approach 15 Tesla with substantially improved conductor.

  7. Fabrication and Test Results of a Nb3Sn Superconducting Racetrack Dipole Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, K.; Dietderich, D.R.; Gourlay, S.A.; Gupta, R.; Harnden, W.; Lietzke, A. F.; McInturff, A.D.; Millos, G.A.; Morrison, L.; Morrison, M.; Scanlan, R.M.

    2000-02-06

    A 'proof-of-principle' Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting dual-bore dipole magnet was built from racetrack coils, as a first step in a program to develop an economical, 15 Tesla, accelerator-quality magnet. The mechanical design and magnet fabrication procedures are discussed. No training was required to achieve temperature-dependent plateau currents, despite several thermal cycles that involved partial magnet disassembly and substantial pre-load variations. Subsequent magnets are expected to approach 15 Tesla with substantially improved conductor.

  8. First Operational Results with the SST-1 Superconducting Magnet & its Cryogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, S.; Tanna, V.; Sharma, A.; Khan, Z.; Prasad, U.; Doshi, K.; Khristi, Y.; Parghi, B.; Banoudha, M.; Mahesuria, G.; Patel, R.; Panchal, P.; Panchal, R.; Tank, J.; Sonara, D.; Sharma, D.; Vora, M.; Varadarajulu, A.

    The Steady State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) at the Institute for Plasma Research was commissioned in 2013 with the successful experimental validations of its magnets and cryogenic systems. Subsequently, the first plasma in SST-1 has been obtained on June 20, 2013. Since then, the cryo-magnetic systems of SST-1 have been operating reliably, in successive plasma campaigns. Unlike other contemporary cable-in-conduit-conductor (CICC) based superconducting Tokamak magnets, SST-1 CICC in Toroidal Field (TF) winding packs are cooled with two phase helium from a dedicated 1.3 kW helium refrigerator liquefier plant. The TF magnets in SST-1 together with other magnets have been supporting creditable plasma operational scenarios since then, with the TF magnets being charged up to a maximum of 2.0 T on the plasma major radius so far. The vapour cooled current leads of SST-1 are also uniquely operated with cooled helium vapour all along, instead of liquid helium being stored in the lower superconducting sections. The operational experiences with SST-1 TF magnets, PF magnets, and the supporting 5 K and 80 K cryogenic systems contributing towards successful operations of SST-1 plasma experiments are elaborated in this paper.

  9. Effect of coupling currents on the dynamic inductance during fast transient in superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinozzi, V.; Sorbi, M.; Manfreda, G.; Bellina, F.; Bajas, H.; Chlachidze, G.

    2015-03-01

    We present electromagnetic models aiming to calculate the variation of the inductance in a magnet due to dynamic effects such as the variation of magnetization or the coupling with eddy currents. The models are studied with special regard to the calculation of the inductance in superconducting magnets which are affected by interfilament coupling currents. The developed models have been compared with experimental data coming from tests of prototype Nb3Sn magnets designed for the new generation of accelerators. This work is relevant for the quench protection study of superconducting magnets: quench is an unwanted event, when part of the magnet becomes resistive; in these cases, the current should be discharged as fast as possible, in order to maintain the resistive zone temperature under a safe limit. The magnet inductance is therefore a relevant term for the description of the current discharge, especially for the high-field new generation superconducting magnets for accelerators, and this work shows how to calculate the correct value during rapid current changes, providing a mean for simulations of the reached temperature.

  10. Enhancement of magnetic flux distribution in a DC superconducting electric motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, N. A.; Ewe, L. S.; Chin, K. M.

    2013-06-01

    Most motor designs require an air gap between the rotor and stator to enable the armature to rotate freely. The interaction of magnetic flux from rotor and stator within the air gap will provide the thrust for rotational motion. Thus, the understanding of magnetic flux in the vicinity of the air gap is very important to mathematically calculate the magnetic flux generated in the area. In this work, a finite element analysis was employed to study the behavior of the magnetic flux in view of designing a synchronous DC superconducting electric motor. The analysis provides an ideal magnetic flux distribution within the components of the motor. From the flux plot analysis, it indicates that flux losses are mainly in the forms of leakage and fringe effect. The analysis also shows that the flux density is high at the area around the air gap and the rotor. The high flux density will provide a high force area that enables the rotor to rotate. In contrast, the other parts of the motor body do not show high flux density indicating low distribution of flux. Consequently, a bench top model of a DC superconducting motor was developed where by motor with a 2-pole type winding was chosen. Each field coil was designed with a racetrack-shaped double pancake wound using DI-BSCCO Bi-2223 superconducting tapes. The performance and energy efficiency of the superconducting motor was superior when compared to the conventional motor with similar capacity.

  11. Superconducting layer thickness dependence of magnetic relaxation property in CVD processed YGdBCO coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Kiuchi, M.; Otabe, E. S.; Matsushita, T.; Shikimachi, K.; Watanabe, T.; Kashima, N.; Nagaya, S.

    2011-11-01

    One of the most important properties of coated conductors for Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) is the relaxation property of persistent superconducting current. This property can be quantitatively characterized by the apparent pinning potential U0∗. In this paper, the dependence of U0∗ on the thickness of superconducting layer d is investigated in the range of 0.33-1.43 μm at the temperature range of 20-30 K and in magnetic fields up to 6.5 T for Y 0.7Gd 0.3Ba 2Cu 3O 7- δ coated conductors. It was found that the value of critical current density did not appreciably depend on d at 20 K. This indicates that no structural deterioration of superconducting layer occurs during the process of increasing thickness. U0∗ increases and then tends to decrease with an increasing magnetic field. The magnetic field at which U0∗ starts to decrease increases with increasing thickness. This property was analyzed using the flux creep-flow model. Application of scaling law is examined for the dependence of U0∗ on magnetic field and temperature. It was found that the dependence could be expressed using scaling parameters B,U0 peak∗ in the temperature range 20-30 K.

  12. Magnetic levitation using high temperature superconducting pancake coils as composite bulk cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, A.; Hopkins, S. C.; Baskys, A.; Kalitka, V.; Molodyk, A.; Glowacki, B. A.

    2015-11-01

    Stacks of superconducting tape can be used as composite bulk superconductors for both trapped field magnets and for magnetic levitation. Little previous work has been done on quantifying the levitation force behavior between stacks of tape and permanent magnets. This paper reports the axial levitation force properties of superconducting tape wound into pancake coils to act as a composite bulk cylinder, showing that similar stable forces to those expected from a uniform bulk cylinder are possible. Force creep was also measured and simulated for the system. The geometry tested is a possible candidate for a rotary superconducting bearing. Detailed finite element modeling in COMSOL Multiphysics was also performed including a full critical state model for induced currents, with temperature and field dependent properties and 3D levitation force models. This work represents one of the most complete levitation force modeling frameworks yet reported using the H-formulation and helps explain why the coil-like stacks of tape are able to sustain levitation forces. The flexibility of geometry and consistency of superconducting properties offered by stacks of tapes, make them attractive for superconducting levitation applications.

  13. A Cryogenic Magnetostrictive Actuator Using a Persistent High Temperature Superconducting Magnet. Part 1; Concept and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horner, Garnett; Bromberg, Leslie; Teter, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    Cryogenic magnetostrictive materials, such as rare earth zinc crystals, offer high strains and high forces with minimally applied magnetic fields, making the material ideally suited for deformable optics applications. For cryogenic temperature applications the use of superconducting magnets offer the possibility of a persistent mode of operation, i.e., the magnetostrictive material will maintain a strain field without power. High temperature superconductors (HTS) are attractive options if the temperature of operation is higher than 10 degrees Kelvin (K) and below 77 K. However, HTS wires have constraints that limit the minimum radius of winding, and even if good wires can be produced, the technology for joining superconducting wires does not exist. In this paper, the design and capabilities of a rare earth zinc magnetostrictive actuator using bulk HTS is described. Bulk superconductors can be fabricated in the sizes required with excellent superconducting properties. Equivalent permanent magnets, made with this inexpensive material, are persistent, do not require a persistent switch as in HTS wires, and can be made very small. These devices are charged using a technique which is similar to the one used for charging permanent magnets, e.g., by driving them into saturation. A small normal conducting coil can be used for charging or discharging. Because of the magnetic field capability of the superconductor material, a very small amount of superconducting magnet material is needed to actuate the rare earth zinc. In this paper, several designs of actuators using YBCO and BSCCO 2212 superconducting materials are presented. Designs that include magnetic shielding to prevent interaction between adjacent actuators will also be described. Preliminary experimental results and comparison with theory for BSCCO 2212 with a magnetostrictive element will be discussed.

  14. Study on magnetic separation for decontamination of cesium contaminated soil by using superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Susumu; Nomura, Naoki; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko

    2014-09-01

    The accident of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant caused the diffusion of radioactive cesium over the wide area. We examined the possibility of applying magnetic separation method using the superconducting magnet, which can process a large amount of the soil in high speed, to the soil decontamination and volume reduction of the radioactive cesium contaminated soil. Clay minerals are classified as 2:1 and 1:1 types by the difference of their layer structures, and these types of minerals are respectively paramagnetic and diamagnetic including some exception. It is known that most of the radioactive cesium is strongly adsorbed on the clay, especially on 2:1 type clay minerals. It is expected that the method which can separate only 2:1 type clay minerals selectively from the mixture clay minerals can enormously contribute to the volume reduction of the contaminated soil. In this study, the components in the clay before and after separation were evaluated to estimate the magnetic separation efficiency by using X-ray diffraction. From the results, the decontamination efficiency and the volume reduction ratio were estimated in order to examine the appropriate separation conditions for the practical decontamination of the soil.

  15. A design of novel type superconducting magnet for super-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging by using the harmonic analysis method of magnetic vector potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Dong-Lin; Guo, Hua; Song, Xiao-Yu; Bao, Shang-Lian

    2002-10-01

    The approach of expanding the magnetic scalar potential in a series of Legendre polynomials is suitable for designing a conventional superconducting magnetic resonance imaging magnet of distributed solenoidal configuration. Whereas the approach of expanding the magnetic vector potential in associated Legendre harmonics is suitable for designing a single-solenoid magnet that has multiple tiers, in which each tier may have multiple layers with different winding lengths. A set of three equations to suppress some of the lowest higher-order harmonics is found. As an example, a 4T single-solenoid magnetic resonance imaging magnet with 4×6 layers of superconducting wires is designed. The degree of homogeneity in the 0.5m diameter sphere volume is better than 5.8 ppm. The same degree of homogeneity is retained after optimal integralization of turns in each correction layer. The ratio Bm/B0 in the single-solenoid magnet is 30% lower than that in the conventional six-solenoid magnet. This tolerates higher rated superconducting current in the coil. The Lorentz force of the coil in the single-solenoid system is also much lower than in the six-solenoid system. This novel type of magnet possesses significant advantage over conventional magnets, especially when used as a super-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging magnet.

  16. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  17. Competing magnetic double-Q phases and superconductivity-induced reentrance of C2 magnetic stripe order in iron pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastiasoro, Maria N.; Andersen, Brian M.

    2015-10-01

    We perform a microscopic theoretical study of the generic properties of competing magnetic phases in iron pnictides. As a function of electron filling and temperature, the magnetic stripe (single-Q ) order forms a dome, but competing noncollinear and nonuniform double-Q phases exist at the foot of the dome, in agreement with recent experiments. We compute and compare the electronic properties of the different magnetic phases, investigate the role of competing superconductivity, and show how disorder may stabilize double-Q order. Superconductivity is shown to compete more strongly with double-Q magnetic phases, which can lead to reentrance of the C2 (single-Q ) order, in agreement with recent thermal expansion measurements on K-doped Ba-122 crystals.

  18. Magnetic susceptibility of the normal-superconducting transition in high-purity single-crystal α-uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, J. L.; Hamilton, A. R.; Clark, R. G.; Mielke, C. H.; Smith, J. L.; Cooley, J. C.; Rickel, D. G.; Starrett, R. P.; Reilly, D. J.; Lumpkin, N. E.; Hanrahan, R. J.; Hults, W. L.

    2002-08-01

    We report complex ac magnetic susceptibility measurements of a superconducting transition in very high-quality single-crystal α-uranium using microfabricated coplanar magnetometers. We identify an onset of superconductivity at T~0.7 K in both the real and imaginary components of the susceptibility which is confirmed by resistivity data. A superconducting volume fraction argument, based on a comparison with a calibration YBa2Cu3O7-δ sample, indicates that superconductivity in these samples may be filamentary. Our data also demonstrate the sensitivity of the coplanar micro-magnetometers, which are ideally suited to measurements in pulsed magnetic fields exceeding 100 T.

  19. Alternating current loss of second-generation high-temperature superconducting coils with magnetic and non-magnetic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Kvitkovic, J.; Kim, Jae-Ho.; Kim, C. H.; Pamidi, S. V.; Coombs, T. A.

    2012-09-01

    It is widely believed that the second-generation high-temperature superconducting (2G HTS) tapes with magnetic substrates suffer higher transport loss compared to those with non-magnetic substrates. To test this, we prepared two identical coils with magnetic and non-magnetic substrates, respectively. The experimental result was rather surprising that they generated roughly the same amount of transport loss. We used finite element method to understand this result. It is found that, unlike in the single tape where the magnetic field-dependent critical current characteristic can be neglected and the effect of magnetic substrate dominates, the magnetic field-dependent critical current characteristic of 2G tape plays as an equally important role as magnetic substrate in terms of HTS coils.

  20. ASTROMAG: A superconducting particle astrophysics magnet facility for the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. A.; Smoot, G. F.; Golden, R. L.; Israel, M. H.; Kephart, R.; Niemann, R.; Mewalt, R. A.; Ormes, J. F.; Spillantini, P.; Widenbeck, M. E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a superconducting magnet system which is the heart of a particle astrophysics facility to be mounted on a portion of the proposed NASA space station. This facility will complete the studies done by the electromagnetic observatories now under development and construction by NASA. The paper outlines the selection process of the type of magnet to be used to analyze the energy and momentum of charged particles from deep space. The ASTROMAG superconducting magnet must meet all the criteria for a shuttle launch and landing, and it must meet safety standards for use in or near a manned environment such as the space station. The magnet facility must have a particle gathering aperture of at least 1 square meter steradian and the facility should be capable of resolving heavy nuclei with a total energy of 10 Tev or more.

  1. Superconductivity and Magnetism in Organic Materials Studied with μSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Francis

    2016-09-01

    A review is given of the current status and recent progress in the use of μSR for the study of superconductivity and magnetism in organic materials. For organic superconductors, important factors are discussed that influence the observed μSR line widths and their field and temperature dependences in the superconducting state. The accumulated μSR results give direct information about the scaling relationship between superfluid stiffness and transition temperature that provides a strong constraint for theories of organic superconductors. For organic magnetism, μSR offers a sensitive probe for detecting various weak magnetic phenomena ranging from spin-density-wave transitions through spin dynamics and 3D ordering of Heisenberg chain systems to field induced magnetism of quantum spin liquids. Finally, experiments are described that focus on two current issues in organic spintronics: direct measurement of the spin coherence length and the identification of the relative importance of different mechanisms of spin decoherence.

  2. Flux penetration in a ferromagnetic/superconducting bilayer utilizing perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marta Z.; Adamus, Z.; Abal'Oshev, A.; Berkowski, M.; Konczykowski, M.; Cheng, X. M.; Zhu, L. Y.; Chien, C. L.

    2006-03-01

    The Hall sensor array is a useful tool for measuring local magnetic fields. An array of miniature Hall sensors has been used to study the flux penetration in a ferromagnetic/superconducting (F/S) bilayer consisting of Nb as the S layer and Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy as the F layer, separated by an amorphous Si layer to avoid proximity effect. The F layer is first premagnetized to different magnetization reversal stages to obtain various magnetic domain patterns. The effect of these domain patterns on the flux behavior in the S layer is then studied at various temperatures in the superconducting state. We have observed that, in addition to the vortex pinning enhancement, some domain patterns strongly increase the first penetration field and induce large thermomagnetic instabilities (flux jumps), which are not detectable by magnetometry. We also discuss the profiles of the flux distribution across these F/S bilayers.

  3. A 12-coil superconducting 'bumpy torus' magnet facility for plasma research.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.; Holmes, A. D.; Keller, T. A.; Krawczonek, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    A retrospective summary is presented of the performance of the two-coil superconducting pilot rig which preceded the NASA Lewis bumpy torus. The NASA Lewis bumpy torus facility consists of 12 superconducting coils, each with a 19 cm i.d. and capable of producing magnetic field strengths of 3.0 teslas on their axes. The magnets are equally spaced around a major circumference 1.52 m in diameter, and are mounted with the major axis of the torus vertical in a single vacuum tank 2.59 m in diameter. The design value of maximum magnetic field on the magnetic axis (3.0 T) has been reached and exceeded.

  4. Superconductivity and Magnetism in iron-pnictides: co-existence or not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorontsov, Anton

    2011-03-01

    In this talk I will review the weak-coupling approach to describe the interplay of two electronic orders: superconductivity (SC) in the form of Cooper pairs, and magnetism in the form of the spin-density waves (SDW). The two orders, traditionally thought as incompatible, are close neighbors in magnetically-active Fe-based superconductors with surprisingly high Tc . Complex multi-band structure, multiple interactions and many families of these materials create a range of possible states of mingling between superconductivity and magnetism. I will present a list of different parameters, including (a) the Fermi surface shape, (b) the order parameter structure, (c) the relative strength of SC and SDW interactions, (d) the external magnetic field, and describe which properties, or their combinations, lead to co-existence or avoidance of SC and SDW orders, and how transition between the two orders occurs upon doping.

  5. Soft magnetic lithography and giant magnetoresistance in superconducting/ferromagnetic hybrids.

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasko-Vlasov, V.; Welp, U.; Imre, A.; Rosenmann, D.; Pearson, J.; Kwok, W. K.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate an approach to create a tunable pinning potential in a superconducting/ferromagnetic (SC/FM) hybrid, allowing the switching of their electronic properties through the application of a small magnetic field. Using direct magneto-optical imaging, macroscopic transport, and magnetic measurements, we show that the alignment of stripe domains in the ferromagnet provides a remarkable directionality for the superconducting vortex motion. An analysis of the anisotropic flux motion demonstrates a substantial critical current anisotropy in the superconductor. The possibility of aligning stable lattices of stripe domains in select directions using in-plane magnetic fields allows the realization of soft magnetic lithography for efficient manipulation of supercurrent flow in SC/FM bilayers. Furthermore, in our samples we observed a pronounced magnetoresistance effect yielding 4 orders of magnitude resistivity change in a few millitesla in-plane field.

  6. Rotating coil field measurement of superconducting magnet for BEPCII interaction region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Quanling; Ren, Fanglin; Yin, Baogui; Wu, Yingzhi; Dong, Lan; Sun, Zhirui

    2011-06-01

    Two multifunction superconducting magnets in the interaction region (IR) for Beijing electron positron collider upgrade project (BEPCII) have been measured in BESIII detector hall in 2007. Each superconducting magnet package contains multiple concentric layers with several function magnets called as a vertical focusing quadrupole (SCQ), a horizontal corrector (HDC/SCB), a vertical corrector (VDC), a skew quadrupole (SKQ) and three anti-solenoids (AS1, AS2 and AS3) to compensate the experimental detector solenoid field. All these function magnets SCQs, SCB/HDCs, VDCs and SKQs have been measured using two rotating coils. Their integral fields, their high order harmonics contents and the local fields along the beam line are obtained in detail with the rotating coil probe system. Comparing the results to the stretched wire, the differences for the integral fields are less than 0.2%. As a result, the method presented in this paper can be used as an absolute field measurement in our lab.

  7. Quench protection design of a 9.4 T whole-body MRI superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shunzhong; Li, Yi; Dai, Yinming; Lei, Yuanzhong; Yan, Luguang

    2014-02-01

    A 9.4 T MRI superconducting magnet with a 800 mm clear warm bore in diameter is designed and fabricated for bioscience research. The superconducting magnet consisting of five coaxial solenoid coils is fabricated with NbTi Wire-in-Channel (WIC) conductor where the ratios of copper to non-copper are from 5 to 10. The four compensation solenoid coils are with rectangular NbTi/Cu strand wires. The magnet will be operated in a relative low nominal current of 224.5 A with a high level of stored energy, about 138 MJ. A protection method with the cold diodes and resistors in series across the subdivided sections and active trigger heater to accelerate quench is adopted to avoid the damage of the magnet. In the paper, the quench simulation results of currents, voltages and hot-spot temperatures based on the protection scheme are analyzed in details.

  8. Remotely induced magnetism in a normal metal using a superconducting spin-valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flokstra, M. G.; Satchell, N.; Kim, J.; Burnell, G.; Curran, P. J.; Bending, S. J.; Cooper, J. F. K.; Kinane, C. J.; Langridge, S.; Isidori, A.; Pugach, N.; Eschrig, M.; Luetkens, H.; Suter, A.; Prokscha, T.; Lee, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting spintronics has emerged in the past decade as a promising new field that seeks to open a new dimension for nanoelectronics by utilizing the internal spin structure of the superconducting Cooper pair as a new degree of freedom. Its basic building blocks are spin-triplet Cooper pairs with equally aligned spins, which are promoted by proximity of a conventional superconductor to a ferromagnetic material with inhomogeneous macroscopic magnetization. Using low-energy muon spin-rotation experiments we find an unanticipated effect, in contradiction with the existing theoretical models of superconductivity and ferromagnetism: the appearance of a magnetization in a thin layer of a non-magnetic metal (gold), separated from a ferromagnetic double layer by a 50-nm-thick superconducting layer of Nb. The effect can be controlled either by temperature or by using a magnetic field to control the state of the remote ferromagnetic elements, and may act as a basic building block for a new generation of quantum interference devices based on the spin of a Cooper pair.

  9. Design and cost of a utility scale superconducting magnetic energy storage plant

    SciTech Connect

    Loyd, R.J.; Nakamura, T.; Schoenung, S.M.; Lieurance, D.W.; Hilal, M.A.; Rogers, J.D.; Purcell, J.R.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

    1985-01-01

    Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) has potential as a viable technology for use in electric utility load leveling. The advantage of SMES over other energy storage technologies is its high net roundtrip energy efficiency. This paper reports the major features and costs of a jointly developed 5000 MWh SMES plant design.

  10. Preliminary design of a superconducting coil array for NASA prototype magnetic balance. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alishahi, M. M.

    1980-01-01

    Using a computer program a partly optimized configuration for a supeconducting version of side and lift coil system of NASA-MIT prototype is presented. Cable size for the mentioned coils and also for superconducting drag and magnetizing coils regarding the overall computed field was determined.

  11. One-phase dual converter for two quadrant power control of superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ehsani, M.; Kustom, R.I.; Boom, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental development of a new dc-ac-dc converter for superconducting magnet power supplies. The basic operating principles of the circuit are described followed by a theoretical treatment of the dynamics and control of the system. The successful results of the first experimental operation and control of such a circuit are presented and discussed.

  12. Finite Element Model of Training in the superconducting quadrupole magnet SQ02

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, Shlomo; Ferracin, Paolo

    2007-11-01

    This paper describes the use of 3D finite element models to study training in superconducting magnets. The simulations are used to examine coil displacements when the electromagnetic forces are cycled, and compute the frictional energy released during conductor motion with the resulting temperature rise. A computed training curve is then presented and discussed. The results from the numerical computations are compared with test results of the Nb{sub 3}Sn racetrack quadrupole magnet SQ02.

  13. Electromagnetic Design of HTS D-shaped Coils for a Toroidal-type Superconducting Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Deng, X.; Ren, L.; Xu, Y.; He, J.; Tang, Y.

    High current and magnetic field are essential for achieving MCF (magnetic confinement fusion). Superconducting materials and technology have unique advantages to achieve high magnetic field and large-current transmission. With the commercialization of 2G HTS tapes, they are paid wide attention to in Tokamak magnet application. In order to investigate the feasibility of applying HTS into Tokamak magnets, a toroidal-type magnet has been designed using YBCO tapes by means of FEM analysis combining with Matlab. The effects of the coil number and coil arrangements on the critical current, the maximum parallel magnetic field, the inductance and the storage capacity of the magnet are analyzed. Based on that, key technological points of the electromagnetic design are discussed.

  14. Structural performance of the first SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) Design B dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, T.H.

    1989-09-01

    The first Design B Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipole magnet has been successfully tested. This magnet was heavily instrumented with temperature and strain gage sensors in order to evaluate its adherence to design constraints and design calculations. The instrumentation and associated data acquisition system allowed monitoring of the magnet during cooldown, warmup, and quench testing. This paper will focus on the results obtained from structural measurements on the suspension system during normal and rapid cooldowns and during quench studies at full magnet current. 4 refs., 9 figs.

  15. Magnetic shielding in a low temperature torsion pendulum experiment. [superconducting cylinders for attenuation earth field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, P. R.

    1979-01-01

    A new type of ether drift experiment searches for anomalous torques on a permanent magnet. A torsion pendulum is used at liquid helium temperature, so that superconducting cylinders can be used to shield magnetic fields. Lead shields attenuate the earth's field, while Nb-Sn shields fastened to the pendulum contain the fields of the magnet. The paper describes the technique by which the earth's field can be reduced below 0.0001 G while simultaneously the moment of the magnet can be reduced by a factor 7 x 10 to the 4th.

  16. Electromagnetic superconductivity of vacuum induced by strong magnetic field: Numerical evidence in lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braguta, V. V.; Buividovich, P. V.; Chernodub, M. N.; Kotov, A. Yu.; Polikarpov, M. I.

    2012-12-01

    Using numerical simulations of quenched SU (2) gauge theory we demonstrate that an external magnetic field leads to spontaneous generation of quark condensates with quantum numbers of electrically charged ρ mesons if the strength of the magnetic field exceeds the critical value eBc = 0.927 (77) GeV2 or Bc = (1.56 ± 0.13) ṡ1016 Tesla. The condensation of the charged ρ mesons in strong magnetic field is a key feature of the magnetic-field-induced electromagnetic superconductivity of the vacuum.

  17. A short model excitation of an asymmetric force free superconducting transmission line magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Wake, M.; Sato, H.; Carcagno, R.; Foster, W.; Hays, S.; Kashikhin, V.; Oleck, A.; Piekarz, H.; Rabehl, R,; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    A short model of asymmetric force free magnet with single beam aperture was tested at Fermilab together with the excitation test of VLHC transmission line magnet. The design concept of asymmetric force free superconducting magnet was verified by the test. The testing reached up to 104 kA current and no indication of force imbalance was observed. Since the model magnet length was only 10cm, A 0.75m model was constructed and tested at KEK with low current to ensure the validity of the design. The cool down and the excitation at KEK were also successful finding very small thermal contraction of the conductor and reasonable field homogeneity.

  18. The role of superconductivity in magnetic bearings for high-load applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James; Eisenhaure, David

    1993-01-01

    Slewing of large payloads will require control torque and angular momentum storage capacities that are large in comparison to the capabilities of available control moment gyros (CMG's). SatCon Technology Corporation is currently designing a CMG which may be employed as a slew actuator for large spacecraft or other payloads. The slew actuator employs a type of magnetic bearing which may be used in high load applications. The magnetic bearing is also used to fully gimbal the suspended rotor of the slew actuator. The use of magnetic bearings in angular momentum exchange actuators has the primary advantage that physical contact between the rotor and stator is eliminated. This leads to greatly extended life, increased reliability, and reduced vibrations. Several actuators operating on magnetic bearings have been demonstrated in previous research efforts. These were sized for use in small satellites. For conventional magnetic bearings, which employ magnetic cores, high torsional loading may require that the magnetic structure be excessively massive. An alternative magnetic bearing design which employs a superconducting coil and eliminates conventional magnetic structures is discussed. The baseline approach is to replace the field coil of a conventional magnetic bearing with the superconducting coil.

  19. Measuring the Magnetic Center Behavior of an ILC Superconducting Quadrupole Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Cherrill M.; Adolphsen, Chris; Berndt, Martin; Jensen, David R.; Rogers, Ron; Sheppard, John C.; Lorant, Steve St; Weber, Thomas B.; Weisend, John, II; Brueck, Heinrich; Toral, Fernando; /Madrid, CIEMAT

    2011-02-07

    The main linacs of the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) consist of superconducting cavities operated at 2K. The accelerating cavities are contained in a contiguous series of cryogenic modules that also house the main linac quadrupoles, thus the quadrupoles also need to be superconducting. In an early ILC design, these magnets are about 0.6 m long, have cos (2{theta}) coils, and operate at constant field gradients up to 60 T/m. In order to preserve the small beam emittances in the ILC linacs, the e+ and e- beams need to traverse the quadrupoles near their magnetic centers. A quadrupole shunting technique is used to measure the quadrupole alignment with the beams; this process requires the magnetic centers move by no more than about 5 micrometers when their strength is changed. To determine if such tight stability is achievable in a superconducting quadrupole, we at SLAC measured the magnetic center motions in a prototype ILC quadrupole built at CIEMAT in Spain. A rotating coil technique was used with a better than 0.1 micrometer precision in the relative field center position, and less than a 2 micrometer systematic error over 30 minutes. This paper describes the warm-bore cryomodule that houses the quadrupole in its Helium vessel, the magnetic center measurement system, the measured center data and strength and harmonics magnetic data.

  20. Superconducting/magnetic Three-state Nanodevice for Memory and Reading Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Valle, J.; Gomez, A.; Gonzalez, E. M.; Osorio, M. R.; Granados, D.; Vicent, J. L.

    2015-10-01

    We present a simple nanodevice that can operate in two modes: i) non-volatile three-state memory and ii) reading device. The nanodevice can retain three well defined states -1, 0 and +1 and can operate in a second mode as a sensor for external magnetic fields. The nanodevice is fabricated with an array of ordered triangular-shaped nanomagnets embedded in a superconducting thin film gown on Si substrates. The device runs based on the combination of superconducting vortex ratchet effect (superconducting film) with the out of plane magnetization (nanomagnets). The input signals are ac currents and the output signal are dc voltages. The memory mode is realized without applying a magnetic field and the nanomagnet stray magnetic fields govern the effect. In the sensor mode an external magnetic field is applied. The main characteristic of this mode is that the output signal is null for a precise value of the external magnetic field that only depends on the fabrication characteristics of the nanodevice.

  1. SUPERCONDUCTING COMBINED FUNCTION MAGNET SYSTEM FOR J-PARC NEUTRINO EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    OGITSU, T.; AJIMA, Y.; ANERELLA, M.; ESCALLIER, J.; GANETIS, G.; GUPTA, R.; HAGEDOM, D.; HARRISON, M.; HIGASHI, N.; IWAMOTO, Y.; ICHIKAWA, A.; JAIN, A.; KIMURA, N.; KOBAYASHI, T.; MAKIDA, Y.; MURATORE, J.; NAKAMOTO, T.; OHHATA, H.; TAKASAKI, N.; TANAKA, K.; TERASHIMA, A.; YAMOMOTO, A.; OBANA, T.; PARKER, B.; WANDERER, P.

    2004-10-03

    The J-PARC Neutrino Experiment, the construction of which starts in JFY 2004, will use a superconducting magnet system for its primary proton beam line. The system, which bends the 50 GeV 0.75 MW proton beam by about 80 degrees, consists of 28 superconducting combined function magnets. The magnets utilize single layer left/right asymmetric coils that generate a dipole field of 2.6 T and a quadrupole field of 18.6 T/m with the operation current of about 7.35 kA. The system also contains a few conduction cooled superconducting corrector magnets that serve as vertical and horizontal steering magnets. All the magnets are designed to provide a physical beam aperture of 130 mm in order to achieve a large beam acceptance. Extensive care is also required to achieve safe operation with the high power proton beam. The paper summarizes the system design as well as some safety analysis results.

  2. Stability of bellows used as expansion joints between superconducting magnets in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Shutt, R.P.; Rehak, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    For superconducting magnets, one needs many bellows for connection of various helium cooling transfer lines. There could be approximately 20,000 magnet interconnection bellows in the SSC exposed to an internal pressure. When axially compressed, internally pressurized, or insufficiently supported at their ends, bellows can become unstable, leading to gross distortion or complete failure. If several bellows are contained in a magnet assembly, failure modes might interact. If designed properly large bellows can be used to connect the large tubular shells that support the magnet iron yokes and superconducting coils and contain supercritical helium for magnet cooling. We investigate here bellows design features and end supports to insure that instabilities will not occur in the bellows pressure operating region, including some margin. A model of three superconducting accelerator magnets connected by two large bellows is analyzed in order to ascertain that support requirements are satisfied and in order to study interaction effects between the two bellows. Specific details of large and small bellows design and reliability for our application will be addressed.

  3. Superconducting/magnetic Three-state Nanodevice for Memory and Reading Applications.

    PubMed

    del Valle, J; Gomez, A; Gonzalez, E M; Osorio, M R; Granados, D; Vicent, J L

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple nanodevice that can operate in two modes: i) non-volatile three-state memory and ii) reading device. The nanodevice can retain three well defined states -1, 0 and +1 and can operate in a second mode as a sensor for external magnetic fields. The nanodevice is fabricated with an array of ordered triangular-shaped nanomagnets embedded in a superconducting thin film gown on Si substrates. The device runs based on the combination of superconducting vortex ratchet effect (superconducting film) with the out of plane magnetization (nanomagnets). The input signals are ac currents and the output signal are dc voltages. The memory mode is realized without applying a magnetic field and the nanomagnet stray magnetic fields govern the effect. In the sensor mode an external magnetic field is applied. The main characteristic of this mode is that the output signal is null for a precise value of the external magnetic field that only depends on the fabrication characteristics of the nanodevice. PMID:26469373

  4. Interplay of structure, magnetism and superconductivity in the 112 Fe based superconducting family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Ni

    Both cuprates and Fe-based superconductors, the two known high Tc superconducting families, show rich emergent phenomena near the superconductivity (SC). To understand the mechanism of unconventional SC, it is crucial to unravel the nature of these emergent orders. The 112 Fe pnictide superconductor (FPS), Ca1-xRExFeAs2 (CaRE112), shows SC up to 42 K, the highest bulk Tc among all nonoxide FPS [2]. Being an exceptional FPS where the global C4 rotational symmetry is broken even at room temperature, it is important to extract the similarities and differences between 112 and other FPS so that critical ingredients in inducing SC in FPS can be filtered. In this talk, I will review current progress in the study of 112. The comparison between Co doped CaLa112 and Co doped 10-3-8 will be made and the importance of interlayer coupling will be discussed. The work on 112 is supported by NSF while the work on 10-3-8 is supported by DOE.

  5. Mechanical design and analysis of an eight-pole superconducting vector magnet for soft x-ray magnetic dichroism measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Arbelaez, D.; Black, A.; Prestemon, S.O.; Wang, S.; Chen, J.; Arenholz, E.

    2010-01-13

    An eight-pole superconducting magnet is being developed for soft x-ray magnetic dichroism (XMD) experiments at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory (LBNL). Eight conical Nb{sub 3}Sn coils with Holmium poles are arranged in octahedral symmetry to form four dipole pairs that provide magnetic fields of up to 5 T in any direction relative to the incoming x-ray beam. The dimensions of the magnet yoke as well as pole taper, diameter, and length were optimized for maximum peak field in the magnet center using the software package TOSCA. The structural analysis of the magnet is performed using ANSYS with the coil properties derived using a numerical homogenization scheme. It is found that the use of orthotropic material properties for the coil has an important influence in the design of the magnet.

  6. Conceptual design of a superconducting magnet ECR ion source for the Korean rare isotope accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Byung-Hoon; In, Sang-Ryul; Lee, Kwang-Won; Lee, Cheol Ho; Jeong, Seung-Ho; Chang, Dae-Sik; Seo, Chang Seog

    2013-11-01

    Based on proven technology, an upgraded 28-GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is suggested to produce a wide range of different ion beams from protons for isotope separator on-line to uranium for in-flight fragmentation. The suggested ion source has the following characteristics: (1) The shapes of the minimum B z layer can be controlled using five superconducting solenoid coils. (2) Two solenoid lenses, the first one side a cryostat and the second one outside it, control the beam envelope at the entrance of the analyzing magnet.

  7. Sudden flux change studies in high field superconducting accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Feher, S.; Bordini, B.; Carcagno, R.; Makulski, A.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.M.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    As part of the High Field Magnet Program at Fermilab many magnets have been tested which utilize multi strand Rutherford type cable made of state-of-the art Nb{sub 3}Sn strands. During these magnet tests we observed sudden flux changes by monitoring coil voltages and the magnetic field close to the magnets. These flux changes might be linked to magnet instabilities. The voltage spike signals were correlated with quench antenna signals, a strong indication that these are magnet phenomena. With a new high resolution voltage spike detection system, we were able to observe the detailed structure of the spikes. Two fundamentally different signal shapes were distinguished, most likely generated by different mechanisms.

  8. Magnetic field penetration depth of superconducting aluminum-substituted Ba8Si42Al4 clathrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Garcia, Jose; Franco, Giogiovanni

    2014-03-01

    During past years, efforts have been made to explore the superconductivity of Group IV clathrates with particular attention to the sp3 hybridized networks. In the study, we report on the superconductivity of Al-substituted type-I silicon clathrates. Pure phase samples of the general formula Ba8Si46-xAlx with different values of x were synthesized. The magnetic susceptibility measurements show that Ba8Si42Al4 is a bulk superconductor, with an onset at Tc =6 K. Al substitution results in a large decrease of the electronic density of states at the Fermi level, which explains the decreased superconducting critical temperature within the BCS framework. To further characterize the superconducting state, we carried out magnetic measurements showing Ba8Si42Al4 to be a type II superconductor. The critical magnetic fields were measured to be Hc1 = 77 Oe and Hc2 = 40 kOe. We deduce the London penetration depth 2900 Å and the coherence length 90 Å. Our estimate of the electron-phonon coupling reveals that Ba8Si42Al4 is a moderate phonon-mediated BCS superconductor. NASA PRSG IDEAS-ER Program(Granted No. NNX10AM80H).

  9. Fabrication and Test Results of a Prototype, Nb3Sn Superconducting Racetrack Dipole Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Gourlay, S. A.; Chow, K.; Dietderich, D.R.; Gupta, R.; Hannaford, R.; Harnden, W.; Lietzke, A.; McInturff, A.D.; Millos, G.A.; Morrison, L.; Morrison, M.; Scanlan, R.M.

    1998-09-01

    A prototype, Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting magnet, utilizing a racetrack coil design has been built and tested. This magnet represents the first step in a recently implemented program to develop a high field, accelerator quality magnet. This magnet was constructed with coils wound from conductor developed for the ITER project, limiting the magnet to a field of 6-7 Tesla. Subsequent magnets in the program will utilize improved conductor, culminating in a magnet design capable of producing fields approaching 15 Tesla. The simple geometry is more suitable for the use of brittle superconductors necessary to eventually reach high field levels. In addition, fewer and simpler parts are used in fabricating these coils compared with the more conventional cosine theta cross section coils. The general fabrication steps, mechanical design and quench performance are discussed.

  10. Structural safety assessment under the low temperature of KSTAR superconducting magnet-supporting post

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Her, N. I.; Sa, J. W.; Cho, S.; Do, C. J.; Choi, C. H.; Kim, B. C.; Im, K. H.; Kyum, M.; Kim, W. C.; Kim, G. H.; Yoo, B. J.; Oh, Y. K.; Kim, D. L.; Kwon, M.; Lee, G. S.; Kstar Team

    2001-01-01

    A magnet-supporting post installed between the lower TF coil cooled by 4.5 K supercritical helium and the cryostat base is one of the most important components of the superconducting magnet-supporting structure for KSTAR Tokamak. This structure should be flexible to absorb thermal shrink of the magnet and should also be rigid to support the magnet weight and the plasma disruption load. The post was designed with stainless steel (SS) 316 LN and carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) that has low thermal conductivity and high structural strength at low temperature. In order to verify the fabricability and the structural safety, a whole scale prototype of the KSTAR magnet-supporting post was manufactured and tested. Both static and compressive cyclic load tests under the maximum plasma vertical disruption load and the magnet dead weight were performed. The test results showed that the magnet-supporting post of KSTAR Tokamak was fabricable and structurally rigid.

  11. Strong correlations between vacancy and magnetic ordering in superconducting K0.8Fe2 -ySe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Duan, C.; Huang, Q.; Brown, C.; Neuefeind, J.; Louca, Despina

    2016-07-01

    The coexistence of magnetic and nonmagnetic phases in the superconducting potassium iron selenide, KxFe2 -ySe2 , has been intensely debated. With superconductivity proposed to appear in a stoichiometric, nonmagnetic phase with I4/mmm crystal symmetry, the proposed nonsuperconducting phase is magnetic and has a lower symmetry, I4/m. The latter consists of Fe vacancies that go through a disordered-to-ordered transition in which the partially filled Fe sites create a supercell upon ordering. We show, using neutron scattering on the optimally doped composition, K0.8Fe2 -ySe2 , that the absence of magnetism does not signal the presence of superconductivity. Moreover, the degree of vacancy order is coupled to the strength of the magnetic order. Superconductivity coincides with the presence of the magnetic order parameter, albeit the latter is significantly weaker than previously reported, contradicting the current understanding of this ˜30 K superconductor.

  12. Design, Fabrication, and Test of a Superconducting Dipole Magnet Based on Tilted Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D. R.; Ferracin, P.; Finney, N. R.; Fuery, M. J.; Gourlay, S. A.; Hafalia, A. R.

    2007-06-01

    It can be shown that, by superposing two solenoid-like thin windings that are oppositely skewed (tilted) with respect to the bore axis, the combined current density on the surface is 'cos-theta' like and the resulting magnetic field in the bore is a pure dipole. As a proof of principle, such a magnet was designed, built and tested as part of a summer undergraduate intern project. The measured field in the 25mm bore, 4 single strand layers using NbTi superconductor, exceeded 1 T. The simplicity of this high field quality design, void of typical wedges end-spacers and coil assembly, is especially suitable for insert-coils using High Temperature Superconducting wire as well as for low cost superconducting accelerator magnets for High Energy Physics. Details of the design, construction and test are reported.

  13. MAGNETIC MEASUREMENT SYSTEM FOR THE NSLS SUPERCONDUCTING UNDULATOR VERTICAL TEST FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect

    HARDER, D.; CHOUHAN, S.; LEHECKA, M.; RAKOWSKY, G.; SKARITKA, J.; TANABE, T.

    2005-05-16

    One of the challenges of small-gap superconducting undulators is measurement of magnetic fields within the cold bore to characterize the device performance and to determine magnetic field errors for correction or shimming, as is done for room-temperature undulators. Both detailed field maps and integrated field measurements are required. This paper describes a 6-element, cryogenic Hall probe field mapper for the NSLS superconducting undulator Vertical Test Facility (VTF) [1]. The probe is designed to work in an aperture only 3 mm high. A pulsed-wire insert is also being developed, for visualization of the trajectory, for locating steering errors and for determining integrated multi-pole errors. The pulsed-wire insert will be interchangeable with the Hall probe mapper. The VTF and the magnetic measurement systems can accommodate undulators up to 0.4 m in length.

  14. Development of superconducting magnets for RAON 28 GHz ECR ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Jeongil; Choi, Sukjin; Kim, Yonghwan; Hong, In-Seok

    2016-02-01

    RAON, a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECR IS), was designed and tested as a Rare Isotope Science Project. It is expected that RAON would provide not only rare-isotope beams but also stable heavy ions ranging from protons to uranium. In order to obtain the steady heavy-ion beam required for ECR IS, we must use a 28 GHz microwave source as well as a high magnetic field. A superconducting magnet using a NbTi wire was designed and manufactured for producing the ECR IS and a test was conducted. In this paper, the design and fabrication of the superconducting magnet for the ECR IS are presented. Experimental results show that the quench current increases whenever quenching occurs, but it has not yet reached the designed current. The experiment is expected to reveal the ideal conditions required to reach the designed current.

  15. Development of superconducting magnets for RAON 28 GHz ECR ion source.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jeongil; Choi, Sukjin; Kim, Yonghwan; Hong, In-Seok

    2016-02-01

    RAON, a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECR IS), was designed and tested as a Rare Isotope Science Project. It is expected that RAON would provide not only rare-isotope beams but also stable heavy ions ranging from protons to uranium. In order to obtain the steady heavy-ion beam required for ECR IS, we must use a 28 GHz microwave source as well as a high magnetic field. A superconducting magnet using a NbTi wire was designed and manufactured for producing the ECR IS and a test was conducted. In this paper, the design and fabrication of the superconducting magnet for the ECR IS are presented. Experimental results show that the quench current increases whenever quenching occurs, but it has not yet reached the designed current. The experiment is expected to reveal the ideal conditions required to reach the designed current. PMID:26931952

  16. Superconducting electromagnets for large wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boom, R. W.; Eyssa, Y. M.; Mcintosh, G. E.; Abdelsalam, M. K.; Scurlock, R. G.; Wu, Y. Y.; Goodyer, M. J.; Balcerek, K.; Eskins, J.; Britcher, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    A superconducting electromagnetic suspension and balance system for an 8 x 8-ft, Mach 0.9 wind tunnel is presented. The system uses a superconducting solenoid as a model core 70 cm long and with a 11.5 cm OD, and a combination of permanent magnet material in the model wings to produce the required roll torque. The design, which uses an integral cold structure rather than separate cryostats for mounting all control magnets, has 14 external magnets, including 4 racetrack-shaped roll coils. Helium capacity of the system is 3.0 to 3.5 l with idling boiloff rate predicted at 0.147 to 0.2 l/h. The improvements yielded a 50-percent reduction in the system size, weight, and cost.

  17. Improving homogeneity of the magnetic field by a high-temperature superconducting shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, E.; Agapov, N.; Drobin, V.; Smirnov, A.; Trubnikov, G.; Dorofeev, G.; Malinowski, H.

    2014-05-01

    The shielding opportunity of the magnetic field perpendicular component by the high-temperature superconducting tape (HTS) is shown experimentally for the first time. The tapes are laid closely to each other with a shift of pieces from layer to layer equal to a half of the tape width at the experimental set-up. This multilayer cylindrical structure inserted into the solenoid is similar to the unclosed shield from a uniform piece of the superconducting foil with the corresponding current-carrying capacity. It has been found that the maximum shielding field is proportional to the number of layers and a half of the full magnetization field of one tape for the regular multilayer structure of the HTS segments. The obtained results are necessary to construct systems with the high magnetic field homogeneity, in particular, for the electron cooling system of charged particle beams at the new accelerator complex which is being developed at JINR in Dubna, Russia.

  18. Soldered joints—an essential component of demountable high temperature superconducting fusion magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Yeekin; Surrey, Elizabeth; Hampshire, Damian

    2016-07-01

    Demountable superconducting magnet coils would offer significant benefits to commercial nuclear fusion power plants. Whether large pressed joints or large soldered joints provide the solution for demountable fusion magnets, a critical component or building block for both will be the many, smaller-scale joints that enable the supercurrent to leave the superconducting layer, cross the superconducting tape and pass into the solder that lies between the tape and the conductor that eventually provides one of the demountable surfaces. This paper considers the electrical and thermal properties of this essential component part of demountable high temperature superconducting (HTS) joints by considering the fabrication and properties of jointed HTSs consisting of a thin layer of solder (In52Sn48 or Pb38Sn62) sandwiched between two rare-earth-Ba2Cu3O7 (REBCO) second generation HTS coated conductors (CCs). The HTS joints are analysed using numerical modelling, critical current and resistivity measurements on the joints from 300 to 4.2 K in applied magnetic fields up to 12 T, as well as scanning electron microscopy studies. Our results show that the copper/silver layers significantly reduce the heating in the joints to less than a few hundred mK. When the REBCO alone is superconducting, the joint resistivity (R J) predominantly has two sources, the solder layer and an interfacial resistivity at the REBCO/silver interface (∼25 nΩ cm2) in the as-supplied CCs which together have a very weak magnetoresistance in fields up to 12 T. We achieved excellent reproducibility in the R J of the In52Sn48 soldered joints of better than 10% at temperatures below T c of the REBCO layer which can be compared to variations of more than two orders of magnitude in the literature. We also show that demountable joints in fusion energy magnets are viable and need only add a few percent to the total cryogenic cost for a fusion tokamak.

  19. Magnetic field dependence of Interface Superconductivity in LSCO/LCO bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, Scott; Balakirev, Fedor; Migliori, Albert; Boebinger, Greg; Logvenov, Gena; Bollinger, Anthony; Gozar, Adrian; Bozovic, Ivan

    2008-03-01

    Interface superconductivity (IS) with a high Tc has been discovered recently in bi-layer films consisting of a thin layer of La1.55Sr0.45CuO4 (overdoped and metallic but not superconducting) covered with a thin layer of La2CuO4 (undoped, insulating, and antiferromagnetic) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE)^1. Here we report on a study of magneto-transport properties in such IS systems. By measuring the magnetic-field dependence of in-plane longitudinal and Hall resistivities we find the temperature dependence of the upper critical field (Hc2). Other findings and inferences on the nature of IS and Tc enhancement will be discussed as well. ^1A. Gozar, G. Logvenov, A. T. Bollinger and I. Bozovic, ``Interface superconductivity between a metal and a Mott insulator'', submitted for publication.

  20. Magnetism and superconductivity in heavy-electron metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, H.R.

    1994-12-31

    All the data and features of properties of heavy-electron systems mentioned in this presentation represent only a fraction of recent results obtained in this field. Nevertheless they should demonstrate that interesting physics may be explored in studies of these materials. Most results that are obtained are important with regard to the understanding of metals in general. These substances are suited for studies of all aspects of many-body effects among conduction electrons in metals and are an important link to quantum fluids or solids like {sup 3}He. The quite well established occurrence of unconventional superconductivity is among the most prominent features of heavy-electron physics and, also here, provides a merging of interest with another hot topic of condensed-matter physics, the phenomenon of superconductivity in oxides at relatively high temperatures and in organic substances. As a final comment the author recalls the importance of the materials-science aspects in these problems. The demonstrated strong influence of small amounts of impurities or imperfections on the physical properties of these substances certainly deserves further attention in future experimental and theoretical work.

  1. Superconducting and normal state magnetic properties of RNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, D.C.; Borsa, F.; Cho, B.K. |

    1995-10-01

    The authors` studies of the magnetic properties of RNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C single crystals (R = Y, Gd-Tm, Lu) are reviewed. Of particular interest are the ordered magnetic structures when R is a magnetic rare earth atom, the interaction between magnetism and superconductivity, the influence of crystalline electric fields of the magnetic rare earth ions on these behaviors, and the magnetic character of the Ni sublattice.

  2. IMPROVING THE DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS FOR PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    GUPTA,R.C.

    1996-11-01

    The field quality in superconducting magnets has been improved to a level that it does not appear to be a limiting factor on the performance of RHIC. The many methods developed, improved and adopted during the course of this work have contributed significantly to that performance. One can not only design and construct magnets with better field quality than in one made before but can also improve on that quality after construction. The relative field error ({Delta}B/B) can now be made as low as a few parts in 10{sup {minus}5} at 2/3 of the coil radius. This is about an order of magnitude better than what is generally expected for superconducting magnets. This extra high field quality is crucial to the luminosity performance of RHIC. The research work described here covers a number of areas which all must be addressed to build the production magnets with a high field quality. The work has been limited to the magnetic design of the cross section which in most cases essentially determines the field quality performance of the whole magnet since these magnets are generally long. Though the conclusions to be presented in this chapter have been discussed at the end of each chapter, a summary of them might be useful to present a complete picture. The lessons learned from these experiences may be useful in the design of new magnets. The possibilities of future improvements will also be presented.

  3. Core/coil assembly for use in superconducting magnets and method for assembling the same

    DOEpatents

    Kassner, David A.

    1979-01-01

    A core/coil assembly for use in a superconducting magnet of the focusing or bending type used in syncronous particle accelerators comprising a coil assembly contained within an axial bore of the stacked, washer type, carbon steel laminations which comprise the magnet core assembly, and forming an interference fit with said laminations at the operating temperature of said magnet. Also a method for making such core/coil assemblies comprising the steps of cooling the coil assembly to cryogenic temperatures and drawing it rapidly upwards into the bore of said stacked laminations.

  4. Fiber Bragg grating sensor as valuable technological platform for new generation of superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiuchiolo, A.; Bajko, M.; Perez, J. C.; Bajas, H.; Viret, P.; Consales, M.; Giordano, M.; Breglio, G.; Cusano, A.

    2014-05-01

    New generation of superconducting magnets for high energy applications designed, manufactured and tested at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) require the implementation of reliable sensors able to monitor the mechanical stresses affecting the winding from fabrication to operation in magnetic field of 13 T. This work deals with the embedding of Fiber Bragg Grating sensors in a short model Nb3Sn dipole magnet in order to monitor the strain developed in the coil during the cool down to 1.9 K, the powering up to 15.8 kA and the warm up, offering perspectives for the replacement of standard strain gauges.

  5. Radiation-induced electrical breakdown of helium in fusion reactor superconducting magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.J.

    1983-12-02

    A comprehensive theoretical study has been performed on the reduction of the electrical breakdown potential of liquid and gaseous helium under neutron and gamma radiation. Extension of the conventional Townsend breakdown theory indicates that radiation fields at the superconducting magnets of a typical fusion reactor are potentially capable of significantly reducing currently established (i.e., unirradiated) helium breakdown voltages. Emphasis is given to the implications of these results including future deployment choices of magnet cryogenic methods (e.g., pool-boiling versus forced-flow), the possible impact on magnet shielding requirements and the analogous situation for radiation-induced electrical breakdown in fusion RF transmission systems.

  6. Magnetic field measurements of a superconducting undulator for a Harmonic Generation FEL experiment at the NSLS

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, L.; Ingold, G.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Krinsky, S.; Yu, L.H.; Sampson, W.; Robins, K.

    1993-07-01

    An 18mm period, 0.54 Tesla, 8mm gap superconducting undulator with both horizontal and vertical focusing has been built and tested. This magnet, which is fabricated in 25 cm length sections, is being tested for use in the radiator section (total magnet length of 1.5 m) of the Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser experiment at the National Synchrotron Light Source - Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Lab., in collaboration with Grumman Corp. The measurement system is outlined, sources and estimates of errors are described, and some magnetic field data are presented and discussed.

  7. The Ginzburg-Landau theory for a thin superconducting loop in a large magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Tien-Tsan

    When a temperature is lower than a certain critical value, a superconducting sample undergoes a phase transition from a normal state to a superconducting state. This onset process of superconductivity can be studied as a Rayleigh quotient under the framework of the Ginzburg-Landau theory. In particular, I study the onset problem for a thin superconducting loop in a large magnetic field. This double limit problem was first carried out by Richardson and Rubinstein by using formal asymptotic expansions. I rigorously show that a one-dimensional Rayleigh quotient in the spirit of Gamma-convergence. The full Gamma-convergence of the Ginzburg-Landau functional for a thin domain and a large field is also obtained. The rigorous analysis in this thesis shows the validity of Richardson and Rubinstein's formal results. It is also shown that the Rayleigh quotient related to this onset problem has a periodic variation with a parabolic background. The parabolic background effect can be explained by a non-ignorable effect if finite-width cross-section of a thin superconducting sample. This illustrate the observation of the Little-Parks experiment.

  8. Extended use of superconducting magnets for bio-medical development

    SciTech Connect

    Stoynev, Stoyan E.

    2015-05-19

    Magnetic fields interact with biological cells affecting them in variety of ways which are usually hard to predict. Among them, it was observed that strong fields can align dividing cells in a preferred direction. It was also demonstrated that dividing cancer cells are effectively destroyed by applying electric fields in vivo with a success rate dependent on the cell-to-field orientation. Based on these facts, the present note aims to suggest the use of magnetic and electric fields for improved cancer treatment. Several possibilities of generating the electric fields inside the magnetic field volume are reviewed, main tentative approaches are described and discussed. Most if not all of them require special magnet configuration research which can be based on existing magnet systems in operation or in development.

  9. AC loss measurement of superconducting dipole magnets by the calorimetric method

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Y.; Hara, K.; Higashi, N.; Kabe, A.

    1996-12-31

    AC losses of superconducting dipole magnets were measured by the calorimetric method. The magnets were model dipole magnets designed for the SSC. These were fabricated at KEK with 50-mm aperture and 1.3-m overall length. The magnet was set in a helium cryostat and cooled down to 1.8 K with 130 L of pressurized superfluid helium. Heat dissipated by the magnet during ramp cycles was measured by temperature rise of the superfluid helium. Heat leakage into the helium cryostat was 1.6 W and was subtracted from the measured heat to obtain AC loss of the magnet. An electrical measurement was carried out for calibration. Results of the two methods agreed within the experimental accuracy. The authors present the helium cryostat and measurement system in detail, and discuss the results of AC loss measurement.

  10. The effect of magnetic field on the intrinsic detection efficiency of superconducting single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Renema, J. J.; Rengelink, R. J.; Komen, I.; Wang, Q.; Kes, P.; Aarts, J.; Exter, M. P. van; Dood, M. J. A. de; Gaudio, R.; Hoog, K. P. M. op 't; Zhou, Z.; Fiore, A.; Sahin, D.; Driessen, E. F. C.

    2015-03-02

    We experimentally investigate the effect of a magnetic field on photon detection in superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs). At low fields, the effect of a magnetic field is through the direct modification of the quasiparticle density of states of the superconductor, and magnetic field and bias current are interchangeable, as is expected for homogeneous dirty-limit superconductors. At the field where a first vortex enters the detector, the effect of the magnetic field is reduced, up until the point where the critical current of the detector starts to be determined by flux flow. From this field on, increasing the magnetic field does not alter the detection of photons anymore, whereas it does still change the rate of dark counts. This result points at an intrinsic difference in dark and photon counts, and also shows that no enhancement of the intrinsic detection efficiency of a straight SSPD wire is achievable in a magnetic field.

  11. A test of a 2 Tesla superconducting transmission line magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; Carcagno, Ruben; Claypool, Brad; Foster, George W.; Hays, Steven L.; Huang, Yuenian; Kashikhin, Vladimir; Malamud, Ernest; Mazur, Peter O.; Nehring, Roger; Oleck, Andrew; Rabehl, Roger; Schlabach, Phil; Sylvester, Cosmore; Velev, Gueorgui; Volk, James; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    Superconducting transmission line magnet test system for an injector accelerator of a staged VLHC proton-proton colliding beam accelerator has been built and operated at Fermilab. The 1.5 m long, twin-aperture, combined function dipole magnet of 2 Tesla field is excited by a single turn 100 kA transmission line superconductor. The 100 kA dc current is generated using dc-dc switching converters powered by a bulk 240 kW supply. A pair of horizontally placed conventional leads facilitates transfer of this current to the magnet transmission line superconductor operating at liquid helium temperature. Fabrication of magnet components and magnet assembly work are described. The magnet test system and its operation are presented, and the performance is summarized.

  12. A flying superconducting magnet and cryostat for magnetic suspension of wind-tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, C.; Goodyer, M. J.; Scurlock, R. G.; Wu, Y. Y.

    1984-01-01

    The engineering practicality of a persistent high-field superconducting solenoid cryostat as a magnetic suspension and balance system (MSBS) for wind-tunnel testing of aircraft and missile models is examined. The test apparatus is a simple solenoid of filamentary NbTi superconductor with a cupronickel matrix. The apparatus, with a length-to-diameter ratio of 6 to 1 and a radius of 32 mm, used a 0.25 mm wire with a critical current of 27 A in an external field of 6 T. The total heat inleak of 150 mW was achieved. Helium boiloff rates were tested over a range of operating conditions, including pitch attitudes from 10 deg nose down to 90 deg nose up; the rate was estimated as low, but the aerodynamic acceptability of venting gaseous helium has not been determined. It is shown that the effectiveness of the concept increases with increasing scale, and performance in excess of that of conventional ferromagnets is achievable with reduction in size and costs, and with aptness to transonic wind-tunnel testing. Detailed specifications and schematics are included.

  13. From magnetism to superconductivity in FeTe1-x Se x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyriou, Dimitri

    2011-03-01

    The iron chalcogenide FeTe 1-x Se x is structurally the simplest of the Fe-based superconductors and exhibits a Fermi surface similar to iron pnictides. Despite this similarity, the parent compound Fe 1+y Te orders antiferromagnetically with an in-plane magnetic wave vector (π ,0) with an ordered moment of ~ 2 μB /Fe, suggestive of a localized rather than itinerant character of the magnetic order. This contrasts the pnictide parent compounds where the magnetic order has an in-plane magnetic wave vector (π , π) that likely arises from Fermi Surface nesting. Regardless both the pnictide and chalcogenide Fe superconductors exhibit a superconducting spin resonance around (π , π) as probed by neutron scattering. A central question in this burgeoning field is therefore how (π , π) superconductivity emerges from a (π ,0) magnetic instability ? Using neutron scattering we show that incommensurate magnetic excitations around (π , π) are found even in the undoped parent compound Fe 1+y Te. With increasing x , the (π ,0)-type magnetic long-range order becomes unstable and correlates with a weak charge carrier localization, while the mode at (π , π) becomes dominant for x>0.29. Our results suggest a common magnetic origin for superconductivity in iron chalcogenide and pnictide superconductors. This work was carried out in close collaboration with the groups of W.Bao (Renmin), Arno Hies (ILL), Zhiqiang Mao (Tulane), C. Brohom (John Hopkins) and I. Eremin (MPI-Dresden/Bochum). Authors thanks Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin and the DFG (under SPP 1458) for support.

  14. Superconducting-magnetic heterostructures: a method of decreasing AC losses and improving critical current density in multifilamentary conductors.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, B A; Majoros, M

    2009-06-24

    Magnetic materials can help to improve the performance of practical superconductors on the macroscale/microscale as magnetic diverters and also on the nanoscale as effective pinning centres. It has been established by numerical modelling that magnetic shielding of the filaments reduces AC losses in self-field conditions due to decoupling of the filaments and, at the same time, it increases the critical current of the composite. This effect is especially beneficial for coated conductors, in which the anisotropic properties of the superconductor are amplified by the conductor architecture. However, ferromagnetic coatings are often chemically incompatible with YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) and (Pb,Bi)(2)Sr(2)Ca(2)Cu(3)O(9) conductors, and buffer layers have to be used. In contrast, in MgB(2) conductors an iron matrix may remain in direct contact with the superconducting core. The application of superconducting-magnetic heterostructures requires consideration of the thermal and electromagnetic stability of the superconducting materials used. On one hand, magnetic materials reduce the critical current gradient across the individual filaments but, on the other hand, they often reduce the thermal conductivity between the superconducting core and the cryogen, which may cause destruction of the conductor in the event of thermal instability. A possible nanoscale method of improving the critical current density of superconducting conductors is the introduction of sub-micron magnetic pinning centres. However, the volumetric density and chemical compatibility of magnetic inclusions has to be controlled to avoid suppression of the superconducting properties. PMID:21828430

  15. Magnetism and superconductivity in Eu(Ho)Mo/sub 6/S/sub 8/

    SciTech Connect

    Capone, D.W. II; Lai Fook, M.S.; Guertin, R.P.; Hinks, D.G.; Dunlap, B.D.; Foner, S.; Abou-Aly, A.I.; Brooks, J.S.

    1984-10-01

    A variety of ambient and high pressure experimental results reveal the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in Ho doped samples of the pressure induced superconductor, EuMo/sub 6/S/sub 8/. Ho concentrations up to 50 atomic percent of the rare earth ions were used. High resolution magnetic measurements are consistent with the crystalline electric field ground state for the Ho/sup 3 +/ ions being a magnetic doublet consisting largely of J/sub z/ = 18. The results of high pressure magnetization experiments reveal negligible effects of reduced lattice constant on the rare earth-rare earth interactions. Resistivity in a 10 atomic percent sample for P = 10 kbar shows the suppression of a P = 0 structural transition, metallic conductivity down to low temperatures, and finally superconductivity at 8 K. The upper critical field, H/sub c2/(T), for this sample was measured for P = 7, 10 and 12 kbar and showed strong reentrant behavior (dH/sub c2/(T)/dT > 0 as T ..-->.. 0 K). A minimum with field in the resistivity above H/sub c2/ was also observed at lowest temperatures. The H/sub c2/(T) data are compared with those of EuMo/sub 6/S/sub 8/ at high pressure, which shows positive curvature, and HoMo/sub 6/S/sub 8/, in which superconductivity is quenched by ferromagnetism at low temperatures. 14 references, 4 figures.

  16. Magnetic field tuned reentrant superconductivity in out-of-equilibrium aluminum nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz-Sullivan, Terence M.; Goldman, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    Perpendicular-to-the-plane magnetic field tuned reentrant superconductivity in out-of-equilibrium, quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) planar nanowires is a novel, counterintuitive phenomenon. It was not until recently that a microscopic mechanism explaining the phenomenon as arising from the coexistence of superconductivity with phase-slip driven dissipation was developed. Here we present results on reentrance phenomena in quasi-1D aluminum nanowires with in-plane magnetic fields, transverse and longitudinal to the nanowire axis. The response to in-plane transverse magnetic fields in this geometry is qualitatively different from that previously reported for perpendicular-to-the-plane field experiments and for in-plane longitudinal field studies. The different feature in the data is an abrupt return to the superconducting state with increasing field at values of field corresponding to a single flux quantum for a short wire and a fractional flux quantum for a long wire. Since these findings are dramatically different from those involving perpendicular-to-the-plane magnetic fields, a different mechanism, as yet unidentified, may be at work.

  17. Superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr3Ir4Sn13

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Biswas, P. K.; Amato, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, C.; Cook, R. M.; Lees, M. R.; Morenzoni, E.

    2014-10-10

    In this research, magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (µSR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr₃Ir₄Sn₁₃. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr₃Ir₄Sn₁₃ are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field µSR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr₃Ir₄Sn₁₃. Transverse-field µSR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth λ. The dependence of λ⁻² with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr₃Ir₄Sn₁₃ withmore » a gap value of 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature λ(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio Δ(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr₃Ir₄Sn₁₃ should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.« less

  18. New generation of cryogen free advanced superconducting magnets for neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichek, O.; Brown, J.; Adroja, D. T.; Manuel, P.; Kouzmenko, G.; Bewley, R. I.; Wotherspoon, R.

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in superconducting technology and cryocooler refrigeration have resulted in a new generation of advanced superconducting magnets for neutron beam applications. These magnets have outstanding parameters such as high homogeneity and stability at highest magnetic fields possible, a reasonably small stray field, low neutron scattering background and larger exposure to neutron detectors. At the same time the pulse tube refrigeration technology provides a complete re-condensing regime which allows to minimise the requirements for cryogens without introducing additional noise and mechanical vibrations. The magnets can be used with dilution refrigerator insert which expands the temperature range from 20mK to 300K. Here we are going to present design, test results and the operational data of the 14T magnet for neutron diffraction and the 9T wide angle chopper magnet for neutron spectroscopy developed by Oxford Instruments in collaboration with ISIS neutron source. First scientific results obtained from the neutron scattering experiments with these magnets are also going to be discussed.

  19. Preliminary investigation of force-reduced superconducting magnet configurations for advanced technology applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bouillard, J.X.

    1992-12-01

    The feasibility of new high-field low specific weight superconducting magnet designs using force-free fields is being explored analytically and numerically. This report attempts to assess the technical viability of force-free field concepts to produce high-field, low specific weight and large bore volume magnets, which could promote the use of high temperature superconductors. Several force-free/force-reduced magnet configurations are first reviewed, then discussed and assessed. Force-free magnetic fields, fields for which the current flows parallel to the field, have well-known mathematical solutions extending upon infinite domains. These solutions, however, are no longer force-free everywhere for finite geometries. In this preliminary study, force-free solutions such as the Lundquist solutions truncated to a size where the internal field of the coil matches an externally cylindrical magnetic field (also called a Lundquist coil) are numerically modeled and explored. Significant force-reduction for such coils was calculated, which may have some importance for the design of lighter toroidal magnets used in thermonuclear fusion power generation, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES), and mobile MHD power generation and propulsion.

  20. Recent progress towards developing a high field, high-T(sub c) superconducting magnet for magnetic suspension and balance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derochemont, L. Pierre; Oakes, Carlton E.; Squillante, Michael R.; Duan, Hong-Min; Hermann, Allen M.; Andrews, Robert J.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Maroni, Victor A.; Carlberg, Ingrid A.; Kelliher, Warren C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews superconducting magnets and high T(sub c) superconducting oxide ceramic materials technology to identify areas of fundamental impasse to the fabrication of components and devices that tap what are believed to be the true potential of these new materials. High T(sub c) ceramics pose problems in fundamentally different areas which need to be solved unlike low T(sub c) materials. The authors map out an experimental plan designed to research process technologies which, if suitably implemented, should allow these deficiencies to be solved. Finally, assessments are made of where and on what regimes magnetic system designers should focus their attention to advance the practical development of systems based on these new materials.

  1. Individual Mammalian Cell Magnetic Measurements with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmstrom, Johanna C.; Brewer, Kimberly; Tee, Sui Seng; Theis, Eric; Rutt, Brian; Moler, Kathryn A.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetism can be introduced into otherwise nonmagnetic cells by the uptake of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles. SPIO nanoparticles are used in numerous biomedical applications including cellular therapies and targeted drug delivery. Currently there are few tools capable of characterizing individual magnetic nanoparticles and the magnetic properties of individual mammalian cells loaded with SPIO. Our scanning superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are good candidates for these measurements due to their high sensitivity to magnetic dipole moments (approx. 200 μb/ √Hz) In this study, we use a scanning SQUID to image the magnetic flux from SPIO loaded H1299 lung cancer cells. We find that the magnetic moment spatially varies inside the cell with each cell having a unique distribution of moments. We also correlate these magnetic images with optical and scanning electron microscope images. These results show that the SQUID is a useful tool for imaging biological magnetism. The visualization of single cell magnetism and the quantification of magnetic dipole moments in magnetically labeled cells can be used to optimize conventional biological magnetic imaging techniques, such as MRI.

  2. Performance measurements of a pilot superconducting solenoid model core for a wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.; Britcher, C. P.

    1983-01-01

    The results of experimental demonstrations of a superconducting solenoid model core in the Southampton University Magnetic Suspension and Balance System are detailed. Technology and techniques relevant to large-scale wind tunnel MSBSs comprise the long term goals. The magnetic moment of solenoids, difficulties peculiar to superconducting solenoid cores, lift force and pitching moment, dynamic lift calibration, and helium boil-off measurements are discussed.

  3. The non-magnetic collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 and superconductivity in the iron pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, J. H.; Tucker, G. S.; Pratt, D. K.; Abernathy, D. L.; Stone, M. B.; Ran, S.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; McQueeney, R. J.; Goldman, A. I.

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations and superconductivity has become a central topic of research in studies of superconductivity in the iron pnictides. We present unambiguous evidence of the absence of magnetic fluctuations in the non-superconducting collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 via inelastic neutron scattering time-of-flight data, which is consistent with the view that spin fluctuations are a necessary ingredient for unconventional superconductivity in the iron pnictides. We demonstrate that the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 is non-magnetic, and discuss this result in light of recent reports of high-temperature superconductivity in the collapsed tetragonal phase of closely related compounds. Work at the Ames Laboratory was supported by the Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Work at ORNL's Spallation Neutron Source was sponsored by the Scientific User Facilities Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  4. Generation of strong magnetic field using 60 mm∅ superconducting bulk magnet and its application to magnetron sputtering device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Hazama, H.; Yokouchi, K.; Yoshikawa, M.; Itoh, Y.; Oka, T.; Ikuta, H.; Mizutani, U.

    2005-10-01

    To make a practical application of a superconducting bulk magnet (SBM), it is necessary that the SBM generates a strong and stable magnetic field in a working space and the magnet can be handled without any special care that would be needed because of the use of a superconductor. To satisfy these requirements, we have designed a portable and user-friendly magnet system consisting of a small air-cooled type refrigerator and a bulk superconductor. By using the stress-controlling magnetization technique, we could achieve a magnetic flux density of 8.0 T on the bulk surface and 6.5 T over the vacuum chamber surface of the refrigerator, when a 60 mm∅ Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk superconductor reinforced with a 5 mm thick stainless steel ring was magnetized by field cooling in 8.5 T to 27 K. We have confirmed that the bulk magnet system coupled with a battery is quite portable and can be delivered to any location by using a car with an electric power outlet in the cabin. We have constructed a magnetron sputtering device that employs a bulk magnet system delivered from the place of magnetization by this method. This sputtering device exhibits several unique features such as deposition at a very low Ar gas pressure because the magnetic field is 20 times stronger than that obtained by a conventional device in the working space.

  5. Magnetism and superconductivity in U2PtxRh1-xC2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wakeham, N.; Ni, Ni; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Tegtmeier, E.; Ronning, F.

    2015-01-09

    We report the phase diagram of the doping series U₂PtxRh(1–x)C₂, studied through measurements of resistivity, specific heat, and magnetic susceptibility. The Néel temperature of U₂Rh₂C₂ of ~ 22 K is suppressed with increasing Pt content, reaching zero temperature close to x = 0.7, where we observed signatures of increased quantum fluctuations. Additionally, evidence is presented that the antiferromagnetic state undergoes a spin-reorientation transition upon application of an applied magnetic field. This transition shows non-monotonic behavior as a function of x, peaking at around x = 0.3. Superconductivity is observed for x ≥ 0.9, with Tc increasing with increasing x. Themore » reduction in Tc and increase in residual resistivity with decreasing Pt content is inconsistent with the extension of the Abrikosov-Gor'kov theory to unconventional superconductivity.« less

  6. A universal scaling behavior in magnetic resonance peak in high temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seung Joon; Salk, Sung-Ho Suck

    2015-08-01

    Eminent inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements of high temperature cuprates currently lacking theoretical interpretations are the observed temperature dependence of magnetic resonance peak and linear scaling relation between the resonance peak energy, Eres and the superconducting transition temperature, Tc. Using our slave-boson approach of the t-J Hamiltonian (Phys. Rev. 64, 052501 (2001)) for this study, we show that starting from the pseudogap temperature T∗, the magnetic resonance peak increases with decreasing temperature, revealing its inflection point at Tc and that spin pairing correlations are responsible for d-wave superconductivity. We find that there exists a universal linear scaling behavior of Eres/Tc = const., irrespective of the Heisenberg exchange coupling.

  7. Impact of the tetrahedral distortion in the superconducting and magnetic properties of iron pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, Belen; Calderon, Maria Jose; Bascones, Elena

    2010-03-01

    The origin of magnetism and superconductivity in iron pnictides is unknown. An added complexity in these materials is the strong impact in the electronic properties brought by small distortions of the As-Fe tetrahedra. We have proposed a five orbital tight binding model using the Slater-Koster framework that with just four parameters reproduce the bands and Fermi surface found with first principle calculations [1]. The good agreement between our results and DFT predictions extends to the orbital weight of each band. Using this model we study the magnetic and superconducting state and analyze how it depends on the distortion of the tetrahedron.[4pt] [1] M.J. Calder'on, B. Valenzuela and E. Bascones, Phys. Rev. B 80, 94531 (2009)

  8. Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials

    DOEpatents

    Nellis, William J.; Geballe, Theodore H.; Maple, M. Brian

    1990-01-01

    Shock wave formation of thin layers of materials with improved superconducting and permanent magnetic properties and improved microstructures. The material fabrication system includes a sandwiched structure including a powder material placed between two solid members to enable explosive shock consolidation. The two solid members are precooled to about 80.degree.-100.degree. K. to reduce the residual temperatures attained as a result of the shock wave treatment, and thereby increase the quench rate of the consolidated powder.

  9. Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials

    DOEpatents

    Nellis, W.J.; Geballe, T.H.; Maple, M.B.

    1990-03-13

    Shock wave formation of thin layers of materials with improved superconducting and permanent magnetic properties and improved microstructures is disclosed. The material fabrication system includes a sandwiched structure including a powder material placed between two solid members to enable explosive shock consolidation. The two solid members are precooled to about 80--100 K to reduce the residual temperatures attained as a result of the shock wave treatment, and thereby increase the quench rate of the consolidated powder. 9 figs.

  10. Magnetism, f-electron localization and superconductivity in 122-type heavy-fermion metals.

    PubMed

    Steglich, F; Arndt, J; Stockert, O; Friedemann, S; Brando, M; Klingner, C; Krellner, C; Geibel, C; Wirth, S; Kirchner, S; Si, Q

    2012-07-25

    Both CeCu2Si2 and YbRh2Si2 crystallize in the tetragonal ThCr2Si2 crystal structure. Recent neutron-scattering results on normal-state CeCu2Si2 reveal a slowing down of the quasielastic response which complies with the scaling expected for a quantum critical point (QCP) of itinerant, i.e., three-dimensional spin-density-wave (SDW), type. This interpretation is in full agreement with the non-Fermi-liquid behavior observed in transport and thermodynamic measurements. The momentum dependence of the magnetic excitation spectrum reveals two branches of an overdamped dispersive mode whose coupling to the heavy charge carriers is strongly retarded. These overdamped spin fluctuations are considered to be the driving force for superconductivity in CeCu2Si2 (Tc = 600 mK). The weak antiferromagnet YbRh2Si2 (TN = 70 mK) exhibits a magnetic-field-induced QCP at BN = 0.06 T (B⊥c). There is no indication of superconductivity down to T = 10 mK. The magnetic QCP appears to concur with a breakdown of the Kondo effect. Doping-induced variations of the average unit-cell volume result in a detachment of the magnetic and electronic instabilities. A comparison of the properties of these isostructural compounds suggests that 3D SDW QCPs are favorable for unconventional superconductivity. The question whether a Kondo-breakdown QCP may also give rise to superconductivity, however, remains to be clarified. PMID:22773300

  11. High field superconducting magnets (12 T and greater) for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.R.; Summers, L.T.; Kerns, J.A.

    1986-07-09

    The technology for producing high fields in large superconducting magnets has increased greatly in recent years, but must increase still more in the future. In this paper, we examine the present state of the art vis-a-vis the needs of a next-generation fusion machine and outline a program to provide for those needs. We also highlight recent developments that suggest the program goals are within reach.

  12. Magnetism, f-electron localization and superconductivity in 122-type heavy-fermion metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steglich, F.; Arndt, J.; Stockert, O.; Friedemann, S.; Brando, M.; Klingner, C.; Krellner, C.; Geibel, C.; Wirth, S.; Kirchner, S.; Si, Q.

    2012-07-01

    Both CeCu2Si2 and YbRh2Si2 crystallize in the tetragonal ThCr2Si2 crystal structure. Recent neutron-scattering results on normal-state CeCu2Si2 reveal a slowing down of the quasielastic response which complies with the scaling expected for a quantum critical point (QCP) of itinerant, i.e., three-dimensional spin-density-wave (SDW), type. This interpretation is in full agreement with the non-Fermi-liquid behavior observed in transport and thermodynamic measurements. The momentum dependence of the magnetic excitation spectrum reveals two branches of an overdamped dispersive mode whose coupling to the heavy charge carriers is strongly retarded. These overdamped spin fluctuations are considered to be the driving force for superconductivity in CeCu2Si2 (Tc = 600 mK). The weak antiferromagnet YbRh2Si2 (TN = 70 mK) exhibits a magnetic-field-induced QCP at BN = 0.06 T (B⊥c). There is no indication of superconductivity down to T = 10 mK. The magnetic QCP appears to concur with a breakdown of the Kondo effect. Doping-induced variations of the average unit-cell volume result in a detachment of the magnetic and electronic instabilities. A comparison of the properties of these isostructural compounds suggests that 3D SDW QCPs are favorable for unconventional superconductivity. The question whether a Kondo-breakdown QCP may also give rise to superconductivity, however, remains to be clarified.

  13. A large superconducting detector magnet without an iron return path

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1989-02-01

    This paper describes a detector magnet which returns flux between the coils rather than through an iron return path. This actively shielded, uniform field 2 T magnet can be fabricated in separate parts which can be manufactured on the SSC site. This magnet can be built so that central field is uniform enough to permit a TPC detector to be used without iron poles. The field outside of the coil can be made to fall of as R/sup /minus/N/ power where N approaches 9. A major advantage of the magnet described in the paper is that there is no pole piece to block the particle jets emanating from the collision region in the forward and backward directions. Inexpensive materials such as earth and concrete can be used to provide the mass needed to analyze particles such as mu mesons. As a result, problems such as experimental hall subsidence can be reduced. Perhaps the cost of such an experiment can also be reduced. This type of magnet would require experimenters to rethink their experimental concepts. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. New vertical cryostat for the high field superconducting magnet test station at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Vande Craen, A.; Atieh, S.; Bajko, M.; Benda, V.; Rijk, G. de; Favre, G.; Giloux, C.; Minginette, P.; Parma, V.; Perret, P.; Pirotte, O.; Ramos, D.; Viret, P.; Hanzelka, P.

    2014-01-29

    In the framework of the R and D program for new superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider accelerator upgrades, CERN is building a new vertical test station to test high field superconducting magnets of unprecedented large size. This facility will allow testing of magnets by vertical insertion in a pressurized liquid helium bath, cooled to a controlled temperature between 4.2 K and 1.9 K. The dimensions of the cryostat will allow testing magnets of up to 2.5 m in length with a maximum diameter of 1.5 m and a mass of 15 tons. To allow for a faster insertion and removal of the magnets and reducing the risk of helium leaks, all cryogenics supply lines are foreseen to remain permanently connected to the cryostat. A specifically designed 100 W heat exchanger is integrated in the cryostat helium vessel for a controlled cooling of the magnet from 4.2 K down to 1.9 K in a 3 m{sup 3} helium bath. This paper describes the cryostat and its main functions, focusing on features specifically developed for this project. The status of the construction and the plans for assembly and installation at CERN are also presented.

  15. New vertical cryostat for the high field superconducting magnet test station at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vande Craen, A.; Atieh, S.; Bajko, M.; Benda, V.; de Rijk, G.; Favre, G.; Giloux, C.; Hanzelka, P.; Minginette, P.; Parma, V.; Perret, P.; Pirotte, O.; Ramos, D.; Viret, P.

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of the R&D program for new superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider accelerator upgrades, CERN is building a new vertical test station to test high field superconducting magnets of unprecedented large size. This facility will allow testing of magnets by vertical insertion in a pressurized liquid helium bath, cooled to a controlled temperature between 4.2 K and 1.9 K. The dimensions of the cryostat will allow testing magnets of up to 2.5 m in length with a maximum diameter of 1.5 m and a mass of 15 tons. To allow for a faster insertion and removal of the magnets and reducing the risk of helium leaks, all cryogenics supply lines are foreseen to remain permanently connected to the cryostat. A specifically designed 100 W heat exchanger is integrated in the cryostat helium vessel for a controlled cooling of the magnet from 4.2 K down to 1.9 K in a 3 m3 helium bath. This paper describes the cryostat and its main functions, focusing on features specifically developed for this project. The status of the construction and the plans for assembly and installation at CERN are also presented.

  16. A 12 coil superconducting bumpy torus magnet facility for plasma research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.; Holmes, A. D.; Keller, T. A.; Krawczonek, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    A summary is presented of the performance of the two-coil superconducting pilot rig which preceded the NASA Lewis bumpy torus. This pilot rig was operated for 550 experimental runs over a period of 7 years. The NASA Lewis bumpy torus facility consists of 12 superconducting coils, each with a 19 cm in diameter and capable of producing magnetic field strengths of 3.0 teslas on their axes. The magnets are equally spaced around a major circumference 1.52 m in diameter, and are mounted with the major axis of the torus vertical in a single vacuum tank 2.59 m in diameter. The design value of maximum magnetic field on the magnetic axis (3.0 teslas) was reached and exceeded. A maximum magnetic field of 3.23 teslas was held for a period of 60 minutes, and the coils did not go to normal. When the coils were charged to a maximum magnetic field of 3.35 teslas, the coil system was driven normal without damage to the facility.

  17. Electronic disorder and magnetic-field-induced superconductivity enhancement in Fe1+y(Te1-xSex)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jin; Liu, Tijiang; Qian, Bin; Mao, Zhiqiang

    2012-02-01

    The iron chalcogenide Fe1+y(Te1-xSex) superconductor system exhibits a unique electronic and magnetic phase diagram distinct from those seen in iron pnictides: bulk superconductivity does not appear immediately following the suppression of long-range (π,0) AFM order. Instead, an intermediate phase with weak charge carrier localization appears between AFM order and bulk superconductivity (Liu et al., Nat. Mater. 9, 719 (2010)). In this talk, we report our recent studies on the relationship between the normal state and superconducting properties in Fe1+y(Te1-xSex). We show that the superconducting volume fraction VSC and normal state metallicity significantly increase while the normal state Sommerfeld coefficient γ and Hall coefficient RH drop drastically with increasing Se content in the underdoped superconducting region. Additionally, VSC is surprisingly enhanced by magnetic field in heavily underdoped superconducting samples. The implications of these results will be discussed. Our analyses suggest that the suppression of superconductivity in the underdoped region is associated with electronic disorder caused by incoherent magnetic scattering arising from (π,0) magnetic fluctuations.

  18. Characteristics and performance of a superconducting bumpy-torus magnet facility for plasma research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.; Holmes, A. D.; Keller, T. A.; Krawczonek, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The NASA Lewis bumpy-torus facility consists of 12 superconducting coils, each 19 cm i.d. and capable of 3.0 T on its axis. The coils are equally spaced around a toroidal array with a major diameter of 1.52 m; they are mounted with the major axis of the torus vertical in a single vacuum tank 2.6 m in diameter. Tests of the facility mapped out its magnetic, cryogenic, vacuum, mechanical, and electrical performance. The design value of the maximum magnetic field on the magnetic axis, 3.0 T, was reached and exceeded. A maximum magnetic field of 3.23 T was held for a period of 60 minutes. When the coils were charged to a maximum magnetic field of 3.35 T, the coil system went normal without apparent damage or degradation of performance.

  19. Magnetic field measurement of superconducting dipolemagnets with harmonic coil and Hall probe

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, Hirotaka; Kabe, Atsushi; Terashima, Akio

    1996-12-31

    Magnetic field measurements and field analyses of 1-m long superconducting dipole magnets fabricated at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK) have been carried out using a harmonic coil with the bucking scheme. Conditions of the data acquisition are optimized to achieve the accurate and efficient measurements. Not only in the steady state of the magnet excitation by constant currents, but also on the way the excite current increases until the magnet quenches the field measurements have been tried, and the results are discussed in this paper on the possibility of the {open_quotes}on-the-fly{close_quotes} measurement using a harmonic coil. Some results on the so-called remnant field of the magnets measured with a Hall probe are also described.

  20. Analysis of coupled electromagnetic-thermal effects in superconducting accelerator magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, E.; Kurnyshov, R.; Shcherbakov, P.

    2008-02-01

    FAIR will built 5 magnet rings including two superconducting synchotrons. The SIS100 is the core component of the facility and will be equipped with 2 Tesla dipole magnets pulsed with 4 Tesla/s. The cable of the magnet coils is made of a hollow NbTi composite cable of about 7 mm outer diameter, cooled with two phase helium flow at 4.5 K. We calculate the heat load, the eddy and the hysteresis losses, investigate the impact of the ramping on the magnetic field, on the safety margin of the conductor and the required cooling for all different elements of the magnet including: the coil, the yoke, the bus bars and the beam pipe. This analysis is based on properties measured at cryogenic temperatures and fine detailed FEM models.

  1. TEST OF A MODEL SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNET FOR THE HERA EP INTERACTION REGIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    PARKER,B.; ANERELLA,M.; ESCALLIER,J.; GHOSH,A.; JAIN,A.; MARONE,A.; MURATORE,J.; PRODELL,A.; THOMAS,R.; THOMPSON,P.; WANDERER,P.

    1999-09-26

    For the HERA luminosity upgrade two types of compact multifunction superconducting magnets, denoted GO and GG, are needed for installation inside the existing ZEUS and Hl experimental detectors in the year 2000. These magnets contain multiple concentric coil layers organized into independently powered quadrupole, dipole, skew quadrupole and skew dipole coil windings. Production of the first of three GO magnets using a newly constructed coil winding machine is currently in progress at BNL. The GG design is being completed and parallel production at BNL of three GG units will start soon. In this paper we highlight HERA upgrade magnet design challenges, present our production solutions and relate experience and results gained from warm and cold testing of short model magnets.

  2. Mathematical formulation to predict the harmonics of the superconducting Large Hadron Collider magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammut, Nicholas; Bottura, Luca; Micallef, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    CERN is currently assembling the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) that will accelerate and bring in collision 7 TeV protons for high energy physics. Such a superconducting magnet-based accelerator can be controlled only when the field errors of production and installation of all magnetic elements are known to the required accuracy. The ideal way to compensate the field errors obviously is to have direct diagnostics on the beam. For the LHC, however, a system solely based on beam feedback may be too demanding. The present baseline for the LHC control system hence requires an accurate forecast of the magnetic field and the multipole field errors to reduce the burden on the beam-based feedback. The field model is the core of this magnetic prediction system, that we call the field description for the LHC (FIDEL). The model will provide the forecast of the magnetic field at a given time, magnet operating current, magnet ramp rate, magnet temperature, and magnet powering history. The model is based on the identification and physical decomposition of the effects that contribute to the total field in the magnet aperture of the LHC dipoles. Each effect is quantified using data obtained from series measurements, and modeled theoretically or empirically depending on the complexity of the physical phenomena involved. This paper presents the developments of the new finely tuned magnetic field model and, using the data accumulated through series tests to date, evaluates its accuracy and predictive capabilities over a sector of the machine.

  3. Superconducting proximity effect in three-dimensional topological insulators in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burset, Pablo; Lu, Bo; Tkachov, Grigory; Tanaka, Yukio; Hankiewicz, Ewelina M.; Trauzettel, Björn

    2015-11-01

    The proximity-induced pair potential in a topological insulator-superconductor hybrid features an interesting superposition of a conventional spin-singlet component from the superconductor and a spin-triplet one induced by the surface state of the topological insulator. This singlet-triplet superposition can be altered by the presence of a magnetic field. We study the interplay between topological order and superconducting correlations performing a symmetry analysis of the induced pair potential, using Green functions techniques to theoretically describe ballistic junctions between superconductors and topological insulators under magnetic fields. We relate a change in the conductance from a gapped profile into one with a zero-energy peak with the transition into a topologically nontrivial regime where the odd-frequency triplet pairing becomes the dominant component in the pair potential. The nontrivial regime, which provides a signature of odd-frequency triplet superconductivity, is reached for an out-of-plane effective magnetization with strength comparable to the chemical potential of the superconductor or for an in-plane one, parallel to the normal-superconductor interface, with strength of the order of the superconducting gap. Strikingly, in the latter case, a misalignment with the interface yields an asymmetry with the energy in the conductance unless the total contribution of the topological surface state is considered.

  4. Superconducting magnets for induction linac phase rotation in a neutrino factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. A.; Yu, S.

    2002-05-01

    The neutrino factory [1-3] consists of a target section where pions are produced and captured in a solenoidal magnetic field. Pions in a range of energies from 100 Mev to 400 MeV decay into muons in an 18-meter long channel of 1.25 T superconducting solenoids. The warm bore diameter of these solenoids is about 600 mm. The phase rotation section slows down the high-energy muon and speeds up the low energy muons to an average momentum of 200 MeV/c. The phase-rotation channel consists of three induction linac channels with a short cooling section and a magnetic flux reversal section between the first and second induction linacs and a drift space between the second and third induction linacs. The length of the phase rotation channel will be about 320 meters. The superconducting coils in the channel are 0.36 m long with a gap of 0.14 m between the coils. The magnetic induction within the channel will be 1.25 T. For 260 meters of the 320-meter long channel, the solenoids are inside the induction linac. This paper discusses the design parameters for the superconducting solenoids in the neutrino factory phase-rotation channel.

  5. AC Loss Analysis on the Superconducting Coupling Magnet in MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Wang, Li; Green, Michael; Li, LanKai; Xu, FengYu; Liu, XiaoKun; Jia, LinXinag

    2008-07-08

    A pair of coupling solenoids is used in MICE experiment to generate magnetic field which keeps the muons within the iris of thin RF cavity windows. The coupling solenoids have a 1.5-meter inner diameter and will produce 7.4 T peak magnetic field. Three types of AC losses in coupling solenoid are discussed. The affect of AC losses on the temperature distribution within the cold mass during charging and rapid discharging process is analyzed also. The analysis result will be further confirmed by the experiment of the prototype solenoid for coupling solenoid, which will be designed, fabricated and tested at ICST.

  6. Quasi permanent superconducting magnet of very high field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, Y.; Liu, J.; Weinstein, R.; Chen, I. G.; Parks, D.; Xu, J.; Obot, V.; Foster, C.

    1993-01-01

    We report on persistent field in a quasi-permanent magnet made of high temperature superconductor. The material has an average of 40 percent molar excess of Y, relative to Y1Ba2Cu3O7 and has been irradiated with high energy light ions at 200 MeV. The magnet, which traps 1.52 T at 77.3 K, traps nearly 4 T at 64.5 K. No evidence of giant flux jump or sample cracking was observed.

  7. Superconductivity tuned through magnetic irreversibility in two-dimensional Co/Nb/Co trilayers under a parallel magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamopoulos, D.; Aristomenopoulou, E.

    2014-12-01

    In ferromagnetic/superconducting (FM/SC) planar hybrids, a reentrance of the upper-critical field line Hc2(T) is observed close to Tc. The effect is generally ascribed to the so-called domain-wall superconductivity and has been theoretically explored in great detail. Experimental investigations are limited mostly to FM/SC bilayers in which the FM layers host out-of-plane magnetic domains of strong anisotropy and large width (>300 nm), the SC layer is quite thick (>30 nm), and the external magnetic field was applied normal. To expand our knowledge to until now unexplored conditions, we study a series of Co(dCo)/Nb(dNb)/Co(dCo) trilayers under a parallel magnetic field; Co outer layers exhibit out-of-plane magnetic domains of weak anisotropy and small width (<150 nm) and the Nb interlayer is very thin (<20 nm). We demonstrate a strong reentrance of Hc2(T) that can be tuned through the irreversible magnetization processes of the FM outer layers, the two-dimensional character of the SC interlayer, and the matching between the interfering SC and FM length scales. These results refine the nature of the reentrance of Hc2(T) in FM/SC hybrids and can motivate new theoretical and experimental investigations.

  8. Removal of less biodegradable dissolved organic matters in water by superconducting magnetic separation with magnetic mesoporous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, K.; Jin, T.; Miura, O.

    2010-11-01

    Less biodegradable dissolved organic matters in water as typified by humic substances are known as precursors of carcinogenic trihalomethanes, and are removed about 60% by current advanced water treatments. However, further increase of the removal ratio is demand. In this study, magnetic mesoporous carbon (MMPC), which can adsorb the substances physically and be efficiently collected by using superconducting high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS), has been synthesized with coconut-shell-based activated carbon and ferric nitrate solution by the gas activation method. The MMPC has the maximum magnetization value of 30.7 emu/g and an adsorption ability of 87% to 10 mg/L humic acid in a short time. The standard MMPC having a magnetization of 6.43 emu/g was able to be separated at magnetic field of 2 T. Used MMPC regained the adsorption ability to 93.1% by N 2 reactivation heat treatment. These results show promise for application of current water treatments by superconducting HGMS, which is suitable for high-speed water treatment without secondary wastes.

  9. Design Considerations of Fast-cycling Synchrotrons Based on Superconducting Transmission Line Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, H.; Hays, S.; Huang, Y.; Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Fast-cycling synchrotrons are key instruments for accelerator based nuclear and high-energy physics programs. We explore a possibility to construct fast-cycling synchrotrons by using super-ferric, {approx}2 Tesla B-field dipole magnets powered with a superconducting transmission line. We outline both the low temperature (LTS) and the high temperature (HTS) superconductor design options and consider dynamic power losses for an accelerator with operation cycle of 0.5 Hz. We also briefly outline possible power supply system for such accelerator, and discuss the quench protection system for the magnet string powered by a transmission line conductor.

  10. Determination of the magnetic penetration depth in a superconducting Pb film

    SciTech Connect

    Brisbois, J. Silhanek, A. V.; Raes, B.; Van de Vondel, J.; Moshchalkov, V. V.

    2014-03-14

    By means of scanning Hall probe microscopy technique, we accurately map the magnetic field pattern produced by Meissner screening currents in a thin superconducting Pb stripe. The obtained field profile allows us to quantitatively estimate the Pearl length Λ without the need of pre-calibrating the Hall sensor. This fact contrasts with the information acquired through the spatial field dependence of an individual flux quantum where the scanning height and the magnetic penetration depth combine in a single inseparable parameter. The derived London penetration depth λ{sub L} coincides with the values previously reported for bulk Pb once the kinetic suppression of the order parameter is properly taken into account.

  11. Pressure rise during the quench of a superconducting magnet using internally cooled conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.R.; Dresner, L.; Lue, J.W.; Shen, S.S.; Yeh, H.T.

    1980-01-01

    Superconducting magnets cooled by supercritical helium flowing through internal conductor passages are an alternative to magnets cooled in a boiling pool. This alternative involves a possible large pressure increase in the captured volume of helium during a quench. In the US Large Coil Program (LCP), three of six coils to be tested will use internally cooled conductors. This paper describes experiments performed to understand the quench behavior of the Westinghouse coil. Agreement between experiment and theory is good. Also discussed is the extension of this work to the EURATOM coil and the Swiss coil, as well as to any coils wound with internally cooled conductors.

  12. Control and readout of current-induced magnetic flux quantization in a superconducting transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, C.; Hackens, B.; Golubović, D. S.; Poli, S.; Faniel, S.; Magnus, W.; Schoenmaker, W.; Bayot, V.; Maes, H.

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate a simple and robust method for inducing and detecting changes of magnetic flux quantization in the absence of an externally applied magnetic field. In our device, an isolated ring is interconnected with two access loops via permalloy cores, forming a superconducting transformer. By applying and tuning a direct current at the first access loop, the number of flux quanta trapped in the isolated ring is modified without the aid of an external field. The flux state of the isolated ring is simply detected by recording the evolution of the critical current of the second access loop.

  13. Eddy Current Analysis and Optimization for Superconducting Magnetic Bearing of Flywheel Energy Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Yuuki; Yamashita, Tomohisa; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; Matsuoka, Taro; Kaimori, Hiroyuki; Ishihara, Terumasa

    Levitation and guidance force is electromagnetic generated between a superconducting coil and zero field cooled bulk superconductors used in our flywheel energy storage system (FESS). Because the magnetic field depends on the configuration of the coil and the bulks, the eccentricity and the vibration of a rotor cause fluctuation in the magnetic field which induces eddy current and consequent Joule heat on electric conductors such as cooling plates. Heat generation in the cryogenic region critically reduces the efficiency of the FESS. In this paper, we will report the result of the electromagnetic analysis of the SMB and propose an optimal divided cooling plate for reducing the eddy current and Joule heat.

  14. Experimental magnetization evidence for two superconducting phases in Bi bicrystals with large crystallite disorientation angles

    SciTech Connect

    Muntyanu, F. M.; Gilewski, A.; Nenkov, K.; Warchulska, J.; Zaleski, A. J.

    2006-04-01

    Magnetization measurements prove that the magnetic properties of large-angle ({theta}>30 deg. ) bismuth bicrystals with a crystallite interface (CI) of twisting types essentially differ from well-known results on single-crystalline specimens. Two superconducting phases with T{sub c}{approx}8.4 K and {approx}4.3 K were observed at the CI of bicrystals while ordinary rhombohedral Bi is not a superconductor. We conclude that these phases have to do with the central part and the adjacent layers of the CI of bicrystals.

  15. Thermal analysis of the APT power coupler and similarities to superconducting magnet current leads

    SciTech Connect

    Waynert, J.A.; Daney, D.E.; Prenger, F.C.

    1998-12-31

    A detailed thermal analysis has been performed of the 210 kW, 700 MHz RF power coupler (PC) which transfers microwave energy from high power klystrons to the superconducting (SC) resonant cavities for the acceleration of protons. The work is part of the design for Accelerator Production of Tritium funded by the US Department of Energy. The PC is a co-axial design with the RF power transmitted in the annular region between two concentric cylinders. The PC provides a thermal connection from room temperature to superconducting niobium operating at 2.15 K. Heat transfer mechanisms considered are conduction, infra-red radiation, RF joule heating in normal and superconducting materials, and, forced and natural convection cooling. The objective of the thermal analysis is to minimize the required refrigeration power subject to manufacturability and reliability concerns. The problem is reminiscent of the optimization of superconducting magnet leads. The similarities and differences in the results between SC leads and PCs are discussed as well as the critical parameters in the PC optimization.

  16. Design of a Superconducting Magnetic Suspension System for a Liquid Helium Flow Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael R.; Eyssa, Yehia M.; VanSciver, Steven W.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss a preliminary design for a superconducting magnetic suspension system for measurement of drag on rotationally symmetric bodies in liquid helium. Superconducting materials are a natural choice for liquid helium studies, since temperatures are well below most critical temperatures, so that the resulting heat load is negligible. Also, due to its diamagnetic properties, a superconducting model (for example made or coated with Nb) is inherently stable against disturbances. Issues which we consider include model placement during initial cool-down, maintaining placement during anticipated drag and lift forces, and force measurement. This later can be achieved by a passive technique, where the body is allowed to deflect under the influence of drag from its neutral position. The resulting shift in flux is detected via a superconducting pickup coil. The pickup coil may be connected either to a SQUID, or a secondary loop wound around a Hall probe. Both options are discussed. The objective of this work is to gain a better understanding of the nature of turbulent fields in normal and superfluid helium for potential application to problems in classical high Reynolds number turbulence.

  17. Pressure dependent resistivity and magnetic measurements on superconducting KFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluarachchi, Udhara; Taufour, Valentin; Tanatar, Makariy A.; Kim, Stella K.; Liu, Yong; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Bud'Ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Foroozani, Neda; Lim, Jinhyuk; Schilling, James S.

    2014-03-01

    Ba1-xKxFe2As2 shows superconductivity at Tc ~ 38 K at the optimal doping (x ~ 0 . 4). However, superconductivity is still observed up to the extreme hole doping (x = 1) in KFe2As2 with a reduced Tc ~ 3 . 4 K. At this extreme limit, there is no observed electron pocket in this compound. The superconducting state is believed to be of a different symmetry than in the other 122 iron based superconductors. By means of resistivity, magnetization and AC susceptibility under pressure, we investigate the properties of this material. The pressure dependence of Tc has a change of slope around 2 GPa possibly consistent with a transition to a superconducting state of a different symmetry [F. F. Tafti, et al., Nature Physics 9, 349 (2013)]. We will compare measurements performed in different pressure media and discuss the evolution of the electronic correlations with applied pressure. Work at Ames Laboratory supported by AFOSR-MURI grant FA9550-09-1-0603 and by US DOE under the Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358. Work at Washington University supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-1104742 and by the Carnegie/DOE Alliance Center through NNSA/DOE Grant No. DE-FC52-08NA28554.

  18. Test results from two 5m two-in-one superconducting magnets for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Cottingham, J.G.; Dahl, P.F.; Fernow, R.C.; Garber, M.; Ghosh, A.K.; Goodzeit, C.L.; Greene, A.F.; Herrera, J.C.; Kahn, S.A.; Kelly, E.R.

    1984-01-01

    Two 5m long superconducting dipole magnets with specifications similar to the reference design for the proposed Superconducting Super Collider have been successfully tested. The cos theta coils of the magnets were made from two layers of standard CBA/Tevatron NbTi superconductor, keystoned to an angle of 2.8 degrees. The inner diameter of the inner layer was 3.2 cm. The ends of the coils were flared to increase the minimum bending radius so that future magnets can be wound from prereacted Nb/sub 3/Sn. The windings of the two-aperture magnets were clamped in a two-in-one iron yoke with a tensioned stainless steel shell. The fields of the two apertures were closely coupled, since the flux in one aperture returned through the other. The inner and outer layers of the coil were powered separately so that their short-sample limits would be reached simultaneously. With minimal training the magnets reached a central field of 6 T, the short sample limit of the conductor at the 4.5 K temperature of the liquid helium bath. At 2.6 K, a central field in excess of 7 T was reached, again with minimal training. The measured values of the allowed sextupole and decapole harmonics are within 10% of the calculated values and the non-allowed harmonics are all small or zero, as predicted. 3 references, 6 figures.

  19. The influence of magnetic domain landscape on the flux pinning in ferromagnetic/superconducting bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marta Z.; Adamus, Z.; Konczykowski, M.; Zhu, L. Y.; Chien, C. L.

    2009-03-01

    A line of miniature Hall sensors has been used to study the influence of the disorder in the magnetic domain landscape on flux pinning in the ferromagnetic/superconducting (F/S) bilayers. The bilayers consist of Nb as the S layer and Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy as the F layer, separated by a Si buffer layer to avoid the proximity effect. By changing of the Pt layer thickness, the magnetic domain landscape with different degree of disorder, ranging from uniformly distributed narrow domains (quasi-ordered landscape) to highly disordered landscape with domains of different sizes, can be predefined in the F layer. The flux behavior is then measured in the superconducting state using the Hall sensors. It is found that the quasi-ordered landscape with domains width comparable to the magnetic penetration depth produces large enhancement of the vortex pinning and smooth flux penetration. The more disordered magnetic domain patterns cause less pinning and create large edge barrier for vortex entry followed by strongly inhomogeneous flux penetration. The possible origins of this behavior will be discussed.

  20. Enhancing the design of a superconducting coil for magnetic energy storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indira, Gomathinayagam; UmaMaheswaraRao, Theru; Chandramohan, Sankaralingam

    2015-01-01

    Study and analysis of a coil for Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) system is presented in this paper. Generally, high magnetic flux density is adapted in the design of superconducting coil of SMES to reduce the size of the coil and to increase its energy density. With high magnetic flux density, critical current density of the coil is degraded and so the coil is wound with High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) made of different materials. A comparative study is made to emphasize the relationship between the energy storage and length of the coil wound by Bi2223, SF12100, SCS12100 and YBCO tapes. Recently for the construction of HTS magnets, YBCO tapes have been used. Simulation models for various designs have been developed to analyze the magnetic field distribution for the optimum design of energy storage. The design which gives the maximum stored energy in the coil has been used with a certain length of second-generation HTS. The performance analysis and the results of comparative study are done.