Science.gov

Sample records for 3001-b 3004-b t-30

  1. Maintenance Action Readiness Assessment Plan for Waste Area Grouping 1 inactive Tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This Readiness Assessment Plan has been prepared to document operational readiness for the maintenance action consisting of remediation of four inactive liquid low-level radioactive tanks in Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The four tanks to be remediated are Tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013. Tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, and T-30 will be removed from the ground. Because of logistical issues associated with excavation and site access, Tank 3013 will be grouted in place and permanently closed. This project is being performed as a maintenance action rather than an action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, because the risk to human health and environment is well below the US Environmental Protection Agency`s level of concern. The decision to proceed as a maintenance action was documented by an interim action proposed plan, which is included in the administrative record. A Readiness Assessment Team has been assembled to review the criteria deemed necessary to conduct the remediation tasks. These criteria include approval of all plans, acquisition of needed equipment, completion of personnel training, and coordination with plant health and safety personnel. Once the criteria have been met and documented, the task will begin. The readiness assessment is expected to be completed by late July 1995, and the task will begin thereafter.

  2. Maintenance Action Work Plan for Waste Area Grouping 1 inactive tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This Maintenance Action Work Plan has been prepared to document the activities and procedures for the remediation of four inactive, low-level radioactive tanks at Waste Area Grouping 1, from the Category D list of tanks in the Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation (EPA et al. 1994). The four tanks to remediated are tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013. Three of the tanks (3001-B, 3004-B, and T-30) will be physically removed from the ground. Because of logistical issues associted with excavation and site access, the fourth tank (3013) will be grouted in place and permanently closed.

  3. Root cause analysis for waste area grouping 1, Batch I, Series 1 Tank T-30 project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    Four inactive liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks were scheduled for remedial actions as the Batch L Series I Tank Project during fiscal year (FY) 1995. These tanks are 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013. The initial tank remediation project was conducted as a maintenance action. One project objective was to gain experience in remediation efforts (under maintenance actions) to assist in conducting remedial action projects for the 33 remaining inactive LLLW tanks. Batch I, Series 1 project activities resulted in the successful remediation of tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, and 3013. Tank T-30 remedial actions were halted as a result of information obtained during waste characterization activities. The conditions discovered on tank T-30 would not allow completion of tank removal and smelting as originally planned. A decision was made to conduct a root cause analysis of Tank T-30 events to identify and, where possible, correct weaknesses that, if uncorrected, could result in similar delays for completion of future inactive tank remediation projects. The objective of the analysis was to determine why a portion of expected project end results for Tank T-30 were not fully achieved. The root cause analysis evaluates project events and recommends beneficial improvements for application to future projects. This report presents the results of the Batch I, Series root cause analysis results and makes recommendations based on that analysis.

  4. STS-34 Pilot Michael J. McCulley during T-30 press briefing at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-34 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Pilot Michael J. McCulley reflects on a question during the thirty days before launch (T-30) press briefing in the JSC Auditorium and Public Affairs Facility Bldg 2 briefing room.

  5. STS-32 crewmembers pose with LDEF model at T-30 press conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-32 crewmembers pose with a model of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) at T-30 preflight press conference in the JSC Auditorium and Public Affairs Facility Bldg 2. From right to left are Mission Specialist (MS) G. David Low, MS Marsha S. Ivins, MS Bonnie J. Dunbar, Pilot James D. Wetherbee, and Commander Daniel C. Brandenstein standing behind a LDEF scale model and in front of a mural of a space shuttle launch.

  6. Test wells T23, T29, and T30, White Sands Missile Range and Fort Bliss Military Reservation, Dona Ana County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, R.G.; Pinckley, K.M.

    1984-01-01

    Three test wells, T23, T29, and T30, were drilled in south-central New Mexico as part of a joint military training program sponsored by the U.S. Army in November 1982. Test well T23 was drilled as an exploratory and monitoring well in the proposed Soledad well field at the Fort Bliss Military Reservation. Test wells T29 and T30 were drilled at White Sands Missile Range. Test well T29 was drilled as an observation well in the vicinity of the outfall channel from the sewage treatment plant. Test well T30 was drilled as an observation well for a landfill south of the well site. Information obtained from these wells includes lithologic logs for all wells and borehole-geophysical logs from the cased wells for test wells T29 and T30. (USGS)

  7. Measurement of the MACS of {sup 159}Tb(n, γ) at kT=30 keV by Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Praena, J.; Mastinu, P.F.; Pignatari, M.; Quesada, J.M.; Capote, R.; Morilla, Y.

    2014-06-15

    The measurement of the Maxwellian-Averaged Cross-Section (MACS) of the {sup 159}Tb(n, γ) reaction at kT=30 keV by the activation technique is presented. An innovative method for the generation of Maxwellian neutron spectra at kT=30 keV is used. An experimental value of 2166±181 mb agrees well with the MACS value derived from the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation, but is higher than KADoNiS recommended value of 1580±150 mb. Astrophysical implications are studied.

  8. Small-Scale Trials Suggest Increasing Applications of Natular™ XRT and Natular™ T30 Larvicide Tablets May Not Improve Mosquito Reduction in Some Catch Basins

    PubMed Central

    Harbison, Justin E.; Henry, Marlon; Corcoran, Peter C.; Zazra, Dave; Xamplas, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Stormwater catch basins are commonly treated with larvicides by mosquito control agencies to reduce local populations of mosquito species capable of transmitting West Nile virus. Recent evidence suggests that extended-release larvicides formulated to last up to 180 days in catch basins may not be effective in some basins due to chronic flushing, rapid dissolution, or burying of treatment in sump debris. To investigate if increasing the number of applications could improve effectiveness, a small study was performed over 13 weeks in 2015 to evaluate two extended-release larvicides (Natular™ XRT 180-day tablets and Natular™ T30 30-day tablets) and a larvicide oil (CocoBear™). Over the course of 13 weeks, three groups of eight basins were monitored for mosquitoes, each group receiving Natular™ XRT, Natular™ T30, or CocoBear™ larvicides. All basins received a single application at the beginning of the study period. Once mosquitoes in a basin surpassed the treatment threshold during weekly monitoring, an additional application of the associated larvicide was given to that basin. The number of applications during the study period ranged from 1 to 10 for CocoBear™ basins, 1 to 7 for T30 basins, and 2 to 8 for XRT basins. Overall, the average number of applications and the cost of larvicide per basin were 4.4 applications at $0.66 per Coco-Bear™ basin, 4.4 applications at $6.26 per T30 basin, and 4 applications at $16.56 per XRT basin. Basins treated with XRT and T30 needed reapplications more often than expected, yet were no more effective than CocoBear™, suggesting that increasing the frequency of application of these larvicide formulations may not provide increased mosquito reduction in some basins. PMID:26792998

  9. Subtractive cDNA cloning using oligo(dT)30-latex and PCR: isolation of cDNA clones specific to undifferentiated human embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hara, E; Kato, T; Nakada, S; Sekiya, S; Oda, K

    1991-01-01

    The human embryonal carcinoma cell line NEC14 can be induced to differentiate by the addition of 10(-2)M N,N'-hexamethylene-bis-acetamide (HMBA). A subtractive cDNA library specific to undifferentiated NEC14 cells was constructed using oligo(dT)30-Latex and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The method was designed to improve the efficiency of subtraction and the enrichment of cDNA clones corresponding to low abundance mRNAs. The single strand of cDNA was made from mRNA prepared from the HMBA-treated NEC14 cells using an oligo(dT)30 primer covalently linked to Latex particles. After removal of the mRNA template by heat-denaturation and centrifugation, the subtractive hybridization was carried out between the cDNA-oligo(dT)30-Latex and mRNA from untreated NEC14 cells. Unhybridized mRNA collected by centrifugation was hybridized repeatedly to the cDNA-oligo(dT)30-Latex and subtractive mRNA was converted to cDNA. The subtractive cDNA was then amplified by PCR and cloned into pBluescript II KS-. The cDNA library thus constructed consisted of approximately 10,000 independent clones with cDNA inserts of 1.7 Kb on average. Differential hybridization of these transformants indicated that approximately 3% of them contained cDNA inserts specific to the undifferentiated EC cells, some of which were derived from low abundance mRNAs. Images PMID:1766870

  10. 76 FR 18652 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... 47 U.S.C. 901 et seq., Executive Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. at 158... Federal Radio Frequency Management, 75 FR 54790, 54791 (Sept. 9, 2010) (revising the Manual through May... Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp., p. 158. 0 2. Section 300.1 (b) is...

  11. 75 FR 54790 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... Radio Frequency Management, 75 FR 6818 (Feb. 11, 2010) (revising the Manual through September 2009... 47 U.S.C. 901 et seq., Executive Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. at 158... 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp., p. 158. 0 2. Section 300.1 (b) is revised to read...

  12. 77 FR 75567 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... Radio Frequency Management, 76 FR 56984, 56984-85 (Sept. 15, 2011) (revising the Manual through May 2011... 47 U.S.C. 901 et seq., Executive Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. at 158... (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp., p. 158. 0 2. Section 300.1 (b) is revised to read...

  13. 78 FR 52097 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... U.S.C. 901 et seq., Executive Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. at 158... (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp., p. 158. 0 2. Section 300.1(b) is revised to read as... of Spectrum Management, 1401 Constitution Avenue NW., Room 1087, Washington, DC 20230. FOR...

  14. 76 FR 56984 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... 47 U.S.C. 901 et seq., Executive Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. at 158... Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp., p. 158. 0 2. Section 300.1(b) is revised to... Avenue, NW., Room 1087, Washington, DC 20230. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: William Mitchell,...

  15. Molecular diversity of Citrus tristeza virus in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a serious citrus pathogen worldwide. Recent genetic studies have identified five standard CTV genotypic groups: T30, VT, T36, T3, and B165/T68. Field surveys performed in California in 2008-2010 identified primarily MCA13-negative CTV isolates with T30-like genotype. C...

  16. On the nature of charge carrier scattering in Ag{sub 2}Se at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Jafarov, M. B.

    2010-10-15

    The electric and thermoelectric properties of silver selenide in the temperature range of 4.2-300 K have been studied. The data obtained are interpreted within the theory of one-type carriers and Kane dispersion relation, with allowance for the character of electron-electron interaction. It is established that, for the concentrations n {<=} 7.8 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}, charge carriers are scattered by impurity ions at T {<=} 30 K and by acoustic and optical phonons and point defects at T {>=} 30 K. Electron-electron interactions are found to be elastic at T < 30 K.

  17. Home Ventilator Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... alarms, inadequate pressures for some people, higher electricity operating costs, and discomfort from EPAP. Many of the ... H Oxygen = O Monnal T30 Air Liquide Medical Systems, Inc. www. airliquidemedicalsystems. com v CPAP, S, ST, T, ...

  18. Pulmonary diffusing capacity after maximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Manier, G; Moinard, J; Stoïcheff, H

    1993-12-01

    To determine the effect of maximal exercise on alveolocapillary membrane diffusing capacity (Dm), 12 professional handball players aged 23.4 +/- 3.3 (SD) yr were studied before and during early recovery from a progressive maximal exercise [immediately (t0), 15 min, and 30 min (t30) after exercise]. Lung capillary blood volume and Dm were determined in a one-step maneuver by simultaneous measurement of CO and NO lung transfer (DLCO and DLNO, respectively) with use of the single-breath breath-hold method. At t0, DLCO was elevated (13.1 +/- 12.0%; P < 0.01) but both DLNO and Dm for CO remained unchanged. Between t0 and t30, both DLCO and DLNO decreased significantly. At t30, DLCO was not different from the control resting value. DLNO (and consequently Dm for CO) was significantly lower than the control value at t30 (-8.9 +/- 8.1%; P < 0.01). Lung capillary blood volume was elevated at t0 (18.0 +/- 19.0%; P < 0.01) but progressively decreased to near control resting values at t30. Differences in the postexercise kinetics of both DLCO and DLNO point to a role of the transient increase in pulmonary vascular recruitment during the recovery period. We concluded that Dm was somewhat decreased in the 30 min after maximal exercise of short duration, but the exact pulmonary mechanisms involved remain to be elucidated.

  19. Effect of hand-arm exercise on venous blood constituents during leg exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, N.; Silver, J. E.; Greenawalt, S.; Kravik, S. E.; Geelen, G.

    1985-01-01

    Contributions by ancillary hand and arm actions to the changes in blood constituents effected by leg exercises on cycle ergometer were assessed. Static or dynamic hand-arm exercises were added to the leg exercise (50 percent VO2 peak)-only control regimens for the subjects (19-27 yr old men) in the two experimental groups. Antecubital venous blood was analyzed at times 0, 15, and 30 min (T0, T15, and T30) for serum Na(+), K(+), osmolality, albumin, total CA(2+), and glucose; blood hemoglobin, hematocrit, and lactic acid; and change in plasma volume. Only glucose and lactate values were affected by additional arm exercise. Glucose decreased 4 percent at T15 and T30 after static exercise, and by 2 percent at T15 (with no change at T30) after dynamic arm exercise. Conversely, lactic acid increased by 20 percent at T30 after static exercise, and by 14 percent by T15 and 6 percent at T30 after dynamic arm exercise. It is concluded that additional arm movements, performed usually when gripping the handle-bar on the cycle ergometer, could introduce significant errors in measured venous concentrations of glucose and lactate in the leg-exercised subjects.

  20. Erythrobacter nanhaisediminis sp. nov., isolated from marine sediment of the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingshuang; Xin, Yuhua; Yu, Yong; Zhang, Jianli; Zhou, Yuguang; Liu, Hongcan; Tian, Jiesheng; Li, Ying

    2010-09-01

    A novel Gram-negative, orange-pigmented, slightly halophilic, rod-shaped bacterium, strain T30(T), was isolated from sediment from the South China Sea. Phylogenetic analysis showed that strain T30(T) was a member of the genus Erythrobacter, sharing highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Erythrobacter aquimaris JCM 12189(T) (99.5 %) and Erythrobacter vulgaris DSM 17792(T) (99.0 %). Levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain T30(T) and closely related strains of Erythrobacter species ranged from 14.5 to 56.9 %.The isolate lacked bacteriochlorophyll a and contained ubiquinone-10 as the predominant respiratory lipoquinone. The major fatty acids of this strain were C(18 : 1) ω(38.2 %) and C(16 : 1) ω 7c /C(16 : 1) ω 6c (17.4 %). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. The DNA G+C content of strain T30(T) was 59.5 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic and phylogenetic data, a novel species, Erythrobacter nanhaisediminis sp. nov., is proposed; the type strain is T30(T) (=CGMCC 1.7715(T)=JCM 16125(T)).

  1. The pathogenicity determinant of Citrus tristeza virus causing the seedling yellows syndrome maps at the 3'-terminal region of the viral genome.

    PubMed

    Albiach-Marti, Maria R; Robertson, Cecile; Gowda, Siddarame; Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Belliure, Belén; Garnsey, Stephen M; Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Moreno, Pedro; Dawson, William O

    2010-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) (genus Closterovirus, family Closteroviridae) causes some of the more important viral diseases of citrus worldwide. The ability to map disease-inducing determinants of CTV is needed to develop better diagnostic and disease control procedures. A distinctive phenotype of some isolates of CTV is the ability to induce seedling yellows (SY) in sour orange, lemon and grapefruit seedlings. In Florida, the decline isolate of CTV, T36, induces SY, whereas a widely distributed mild isolate, T30, does not. To delimit the viral sequences associated with the SY syndrome, we created a number of T36/T30 hybrids by substituting T30 sequences into different regions of the 3' half of the genome of an infectious cDNA of T36. Eleven T36/T30 hybrids replicated in Nicotiana benthamiana protoplasts. Five of these hybrids formed viable virions that were mechanically transmitted to Citrus macrophylla, a permissive host for CTV. All induced systemic infections, similar to that of the parental T36 clone. Tissues from these C. macrophylla source plants were then used to graft inoculate sour orange and grapefruit seedlings. Inoculation with three of the T30/T36 hybrid constructs induced SY symptoms identical to those of T36; however, two hybrids with T30 substitutions in the p23-3' nontranslated region (NTR) (nucleotides 18 394-19 296) failed to induce SY. Sour orange seedlings infected with a recombinant non-SY p23-3' NTR hybrid also remained symptomless when challenged with the parental virus (T36), demonstrating the potential feasibility of using engineered constructs of CTV to mitigate disease.

  2. Dramatic Change in Citrus tristeza virus populations in the Dominican Republic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is the most destructive viral pathogen of citrus and has been an important concern for the citrus industry in the Dominican Republic. Earlier studies documented widespread distribution of mild isolates of the T30 genotype, which caused no disease in the infected trees, an...

  3. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Method to Derive Pricing Multipliers and Uniform Amount

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... weighted average CAMELS component rating referred to in 12 CFR 327.9(d)(2)(i): Equation 7 PiT = + 30.211... Uniform Amount A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 327 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY ASSESSMENTS In General Pt. 327, Subpt. A, App....

  4. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 327

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... weighted average CAMELS component rating referred to in 12 CFR 327.9(d)(2)(i): Equation 7 PiT = + 30.211... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 327 A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 327 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS...

  5. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Method to Derive Pricing Multipliers and Uniform Amount

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... weighted average CAMELS component rating referred to in 12 CFR 327.9(d)(2)(i): Equation 7 PiT = + 30.211... Uniform Amount A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 327 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY ASSESSMENTS In General Pt. 327, Subpt. A, App....

  6. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Method to Derive Pricing Multipliers and Uniform Amount

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... weighted average CAMELS component rating referred to in 12 CFR 327.9(d)(2)(i): Equation 7 PiT = + 30.211... Uniform Amount A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 327 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY ASSESSMENTS In General Pt. 327, Subpt. A, App....

  7. 76 FR 33353 - Notice of Proposed Withdrawal Extension and Opportunity for Public Meeting; Colorado

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ...) proposing to extend the Fort Carson-Pi on Canyon Military Lands Withdrawal created by Subtitle A of Public... of federally owned minerals; and Pi on Canyon Maneuver Site which includes 2,517 acres of public... Highway 115. Surface and Minerals in the Pi on Canyon Maneuver Area T. 30 S., R. 59 W., Sec. 6, lot 4;...

  8. Nucleotide heterogeneity at the genomic 5’- and 3’-termini of California (CA) isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nucleotide (nt) sequences in the genomic ends of sense (+)-RNA viruses serve essential biological functions and are important considerations in the construction of infectious clones. Two isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) from California (CA) having a T30- and a T36-genotype were inoculated in ...

  9. Validation of a six second cycle test for the determination of peak power output.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Peter; Sculthorpe, Nick; Baker, Julien S; Grace, Fergal M

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the agreement between peak power output during a standard Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) and a six second 'all-out' test on a Wattbike Pro. Nine males (40.7 ± 19.4 yrs, 1.76 ± 0.03 cm, 82.11 ± 8.9 kg) underwent three testing protocols on separate days. The protocols consisted 30 second WAnT (WAnT30), a modified WAnT over 6 seconds (WAnT6) and a 6 second peak power test (PPT6). PPT6 was correlated with WAnT30 (r = 0.9; p < 0.001) with a mean bias of 105 W. PPT6 correlated with WAnT6 (r = 0.95; p < 0.001) with a mean bias of 74 W. WAnT6 correlated with WAnT30 (r = 0.99; p < 0.001) with a mean bias of 31 W. There was no difference in time to peak power between any trial. PPT6 resulted in significantly greater power outputs than in WAnT30 and WAnT6 (p < 0.001). We conclude that PPT6 and WAnT6 are valid measures of peak power output compared with WAnT30. This identifies that PPT6 and WAnT6 as short duration 'all-out' tests that have practical applications for researchers and coaches who wish to assess peak power output without the fatiguing effects associated with a standard WAnT.

  10. Depressive Symptoms and Associated Psychosocial Factors among Adolescent Survivors 30 Months after 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake: A Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xuliang; Yu, Nancy X.; Zhou, Ya; Geng, Fulei; Fan, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study longitudinally investigated the changes of depressive symptoms among adolescent survivors over 2 years and a half after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in China, as well as the predictive effects of demographic characteristics, earthquake exposure, negative life events, social support, and dispositional resilience on the risk of depressive symptoms at two time points after the earthquake. Methods: Participants were 1573 adolescent survivors (720 males and 853 females, mean age at initial survey = 15.00 ± 1.26 years), whose depressive symptoms were assessed at 6 months (T6m) and 30 months (T30m) post-earthquake. Data on demographics, earthquake exposure, and dispositional resilience were collected at T6m. Negative life events and social support were measured at T6m and 24 months (T24m) post-earthquake. Results: The prevalence rates of probable depression, 27.5 at T6m and 27.2% at T30m, maintained relatively stable over time. Female gender was related with higher risk of depressive symptoms at both T6m and T30m, while being only child could only predict higher risk of depressive symptoms at T30m. Negative life events and social support at T6m, as well as earthquake exposure, were concurrently associated with increased risk of depressive symptoms at T6m, but not associated with the risk of depressive symptoms at T30m, while negative life events and social support at T24m could predict depressive symptoms at T30m, all of which suggested that these variables may have strong but short-term effect on adolescents’ depressive symptoms post-earthquake. Besides, dispositional resilience was evidenced as a relatively stable negative predictor for depressive symptoms. Conclusions: These findings could inform mental health professionals regarding how to screen adolescent survivors at high risk for depression, so as to provide them with timely and appropriate mental health services based on the identified risk and protective factors for depressive symptoms

  11. Lacimonas salitolerans gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from surface water of a saline lake.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Ying; Wang, Fang; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Liu, Hong-Can; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2015-12-01

    A Gram-stain-negative bacterium, strain TS-T30T, was isolated from a saline lake (Lake Tuosu) in Qaidam basin, Qinghai province, China, and its taxonomic position was determined by using a polyphasic approach. Cells were non-spore-forming rods, non-motile, 0.8-1.4 μm wide and 1.9-4.0 μm long. Strain TS-T30T was strictly heterotrophic and aerobic. Catalase- and oxidase-positive. Growth was observed in the presence of 0.5-11.0 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3.0 %), and at 10-35 °C (optimum 25 °C) and pH 6.5-10.0 (optimum pH 8.5). Strain TS-T30T contained C18 : 1ω7c as the only predominant fatty acid. The major respiratory quinone was Q-10. The DNA G+C content was 62 mol% (Tm). Phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain TS-T30T formed a distinct lineage that was independent of other most closely related genera: Lutimaribacter (95.2-95.9 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities), Poseidonocella (95.4 %), Ruegeria (92.8-94.9 %), Marivita (93.6-94.9 %), Seohaeicola (94.7 %), Sediminimonas (94.7 %), Shimia (93.9-94.7 %), Oceanicola (92.6-94.5 %) and Roseicyclus (94.5 %). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, one unidentified phospholipid and an unknown aminolipid; phosphatidylcholine was not detected. These data demonstrated that strain TS-T30T represents a novel species of a new genus in the family Rhodobacteraceae, for which the name Lacimonas salitolerans gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is TS-T30T ( = CGMCC 1.12477T = NBRC 110969T).

  12. Measurement of the shape of the boson-transverse momentum distribution in pp --> Z/gamma* --> e+e- + X events produced at square root s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-03-14

    We present a measurement of the shape of the Z/gamma* boson transverse momentum (q(T)) distribution in pp --> Z/gamma* --> e(+)e(-) + X events at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using 0.98 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data are found to be consistent with the resummation prediction at low q(T), but above the perturbative QCD calculation in the region of q(T)>30 GeV/c. Using events with q(T)<30 GeV/c, we extract the value of g(2), one of the nonperturbative parameters for the resummation calculation. Data at large boson rapidity y are compared with the prediction of resummation and with alternative models that employ a resummed form factor with modifications in the small Bjorken x region of the proton wave function. PMID:18352175

  13. Pulsed magnetic field study of the spin gap in intermediate valence compound SmB 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flachbart, K.; Bartkowiak, M.; Demishev, S.; Gabani, S.; Glushkov, V.; Herrmannsdorfer, T.; Moshchalkov, V.; Shitsevalova, N.; Sluchanko, N.

    2009-10-01

    In this work, we report the behavior of electrical resistivity of SmB 6 at temperatures between 2.2 and 70 K in pulsed magnetic fields up to 54 T. A strong negative magnetoresistance was detected with increasing magnetic field, when lowering the temperature in the range T<30 K. We show that the amplitude of negative magnetoresistance reaches its maximum dR/R~70% at B=54 T, in the vicinity of phase transition occurring in this strongly correlated electron system at TC~5 K. The crossover from negative magnetoresistance to positive magnetoresistance found at intermediate temperatures at T>30 K is discussed within the framework of exciton-polaron model of local charge fluctuations in SmB 6 proposed by Kikoin and Mishchenko. It seems that these exciton-polaron in-gap states are influenced both by temperature and magnetic field.

  14. The effect of calcium-naloxone treatment on blood calcium, beta-endorphin, and acetylcholine in milk fever.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, A; Minoia, G; Ceci, E; Manca, R; Mutinati, M; Spedicato, M; Sciorsci, R L

    2008-09-01

    Milk fever is a postpartum syndrome of cows characterized by acute hypocalcemia, which reduces the release of acetylcholine (ACH), inducing flaccid paralysis and recumbency. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of calcium (Ca2+) combined with naloxone (Nx, an opioid antagonist; Ca2+-Nx) on plasma concentrations of ACH, beta-endorphin (betaE), and Ca2+ just before treatment (T0) and at 15, 30, and 90 min after treatment (T15, T30, and T90, respectively). Thirty cows were divided into 3 groups of 10 cows each. In group A1, cows affected by milk fever were treated (i.v.) with a combination of 0.2 mL/kg of body weight (BW) of Ca2+ borogluconate (20%) and 0.01 mg/kg of BW of Nx hydrochloride dihydrate. In group A2, cows affected by milk fever were treated (i.v.) with 2 mL/kg of BW of Ca2+ borogluconate (20%). In group C, healthy cows were treated (i.v.) with a combination of 0.2 mL/kg of BW of Ca2+ borogluconate (20%) and 0.01 mg/kg of BW of Nx hydrochloride dihydrate. Cows underwent treatments within 24 h of calving. Blood samples were collected at T0 and at T15, T30, and T90 for quantitative determination of ACH, betaE, and Ca2+. The cows in groups A1 and A2 recovered within a mean of 20 +/- 10 min, although 4 cows in group A2 underwent a relapse. Blood Ca2+ concentrations in group C increased slightly at T30 and at T90 (T30: 8.8 +/- 0.6 mg/dL; T90: 8.7 +/- 0.6 mg/dL) after treatment, whereas the response in groups affected by milk fever was similar, even though Ca2+ concentrations showed a sharp increase (A1: 8.9 +/- 0.8 mg/dL; A2: 6.0 +/- 0.7 mg/dL), particularly at T15 in group A1. Concentrations of betaE showed a similar pattern in groups A1 and C, with an increase at T15 (A1: 8.2 +/- 1.0 ng/mL; C: 2.7 +/- 0.4 ng/mL) and a subsequent decrease until T90 (A1: 1.4 +/- 0.3 ng/mL; C: 1.4 +/- 0.4 ng/mL), whereas betaE remained constant throughout in group A2. Concentrations of ACH in group A1 decreased significantly between T0 and T15, T30, and T90 (T0: 7.2 +/- 1.1 nmol

  15. Coefficient of thermal expansion of Fluorinert FC-86

    SciTech Connect

    Pane, A.J.

    1982-05-01

    The cubical coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) pf Fluorinert Fluid, FC-86 was measured before and after degassing. The CTE for the FC-86 before degassing is: ..beta.. = 9.282 x 10/sup -6/T + 1.6115 x 10/sup -3/ with T = -30 to + 75/sup 0/C. The CTE for the FC-86 (degassed) is: ..beta.. = 6.133 x 10/sup -6/T + 1.7643 x 10/sup -3/ with T = -30 to + 75/sup 0/C. Measurements were also made of the pressures required to prevent cavitation in the degassed FC-86 and in FC-86 containing 2.4 volume percent of air. At 71.0/sup 0/C the cavitational pressure of degassed FC-86 is 1285 torr and at 73.8/sup 0/C the cavitational pressure of the FC-86 containing 2.4 volume percent of air is 1229 torr.

  16. Sequences of Citrus Tristeza Virus Separated in Time and Space Are Essentially Identical†

    PubMed Central

    Albiach-Martí, María R.; Mawassi, Munir; Gowda, Siddarame; Satyanarayana, Tatineni; Hilf, Mark E.; Shanker, Savita; Almira, Ernesto C.; Vives, María C.; López, Carmelo; Guerri, Jose; Flores, Ricardo; Moreno, Pedro; Garnsey, Steve M.; Dawson, William O.

    2000-01-01

    The first Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genomes completely sequenced (19.3-kb positive-sense RNA), from four biologically distinct isolates, are unexpectedly divergent in nucleotide sequence (up to 60% divergence). Understanding of whether these large sequence differences resulted from recent evolution is important for the design of disease management strategies, particularly the use of genetically engineered mild (essentially symptomless)-strain cross protection and RNA-mediated transgenic resistance. The complete sequence of a mild isolate (T30) which has been endemic in Florida for about a century was found to be nearly identical to the genomic sequence of a mild isolate (T385) from Spain. Moreover, samples of sequences of other isolates from distinct geographic locations, maintained in different citrus hosts and also separated in time (B252 from Taiwan, B272 from Colombia, and B354 from California), were nearly identical to the T30 sequence. The sequence differences between these isolates were within or near the range of variability of the T30 population. A possible explanation for these results is that the parents of isolates T30, T385, B252, B272, and B354 have a common origin, probably Asia, and have changed little since they were dispersed throughout the world by the movement of citrus. Considering that the nucleotide divergence among the other known CTV genomes is much greater than those expected for strains of the same virus, the remarkable similarity of these five isolates indicates a high degree of evolutionary stasis in some CTV populations. PMID:10888625

  17. Past and future of a century old Citrus tristeza virus collection: a California citrus germplasm tale

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinbo; Bozan, Orhan; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Dang, Tyler; Rucker, Tavia; Yokomi, Raymond K.; Lee, Richard F.; Folimonova, Svetlana Y.; Krueger, Robert R.; Bash, John; Greer, Greg; Diaz, James; Serna, Ramon; Vidalakis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates collected from citrus germplasm, dooryard and field trees in California from 1914 have been maintained in planta under quarantine in the Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP), Riverside, California. This collection, therefore, represents populations of CTV isolates obtained over time and space in California. To determine CTV genetic diversity in this context, genotypes of CTV isolates from the CCPP collection were characterized using multiple molecular markers (MMM). Genotypes T30, VT, and T36 were found at high frequencies with T30 and T30+VT genotypes being the most abundant. The MMM analysis did not identify T3 and B165/T68 genotypes; however, biological and phylogenetic analysis suggested some relationships of CCPP CTV isolates with these two genotypes. Phylogenetic analysis of the CTV coat protein (CP) gene sequences classified the tested isolates into seven distinct clades. Five clades were in association with the standard CTV genotypes T30, T36, T3, VT, and B165/T68. The remaining two identified clades were not related to any standard CTV genotypes. Spatiotemporal analysis indicated a trend of reduced genotype and phylogenetic diversity as well as virulence from southern California (SC) at early (1907–1957) in comparison to that of central California (CC) isolates collected from later (1957–2009) time periods. CTV biological characterization also indicated a reduced number and less virulent stem pitting (SP) CTV isolates compared to seedling yellows isolates introduced to California. This data provides a historical insight of the introduction, movement, and genetic diversity of CTV in California and provides genetic and biological information useful for CTV quarantine, eradication, and disease management strategies such as CTV-SP cross protection. PMID:24339822

  18. Fructose modifies the hormonal response and modulates lipid metabolism during aerobic exercise after glucose supplementation.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Juan M; Da Silva-Grigoletto, Marzo E; Ruano-Ruíz, Juan A; Caballero-Villarraso, Javier; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Túnez-Fiñana, Isaac; Tasset-Cuevas, Inmaculada; Pérez-Martínez, Pablo; López-Miranda, José; Pérez-Jiménez, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic response when aerobic exercise is performed after the ingestion of glucose plus fructose is unclear. In the present study, we administered two beverages containing GluF (glucose+fructose) or Glu (glucose alone) in a randomized cross-over design to 20 healthy aerobically trained volunteers to compare the hormonal and lipid responses provoked during aerobic exercise and the recovery phase. After ingesting the beverages and a 15-min resting period, volunteers performed 30 min of moderate aerobic exercise. Urinary and blood samples were taken at baseline (t(-15)), during the exercise (t(0), t(15) and t(30)) and during the recovery phase (t(45), t(75) and t(105)). Plasma insulin concentrations were higher halfway through the exercise period and during acute recuperation (t(15) and t(75); P<0.05) following ingestion of GluF than after Glu alone, without any differences between the effects of either intervention on plasma glucose concentrations. Towards the end of the exercise period, urinary catecholamine concentrations were lower following GluF (t(45); P<0.05). Plasma triacylglycerol (triglyceride) concentrations were higher after the ingestion of GluF compared with Glu (t(15), t(30), t(45) and t(105); P<0.05). Furthermore, with GluF, we observed higher levels of lipoperoxides (t(15), t(30), t(45) and t(105); P<0.05) and oxidized LDL (low-density lipoprotein; t(30); P<0.05) compared with after the ingestion of Glu alone. In conclusion, hormonal and lipid alterations are provoked during aerobic exercise and recovery by the addition of a dose of fructose to the pre-exercise ingestion of glucose.

  19. Long Rest Interval Promotes Durable Testosterone Responses in High-Intensity Bench Press.

    PubMed

    Scudese, Estevão; Simão, Roberto; Senna, Gilmar; Vingren, Jakob L; Willardson, Jeffrey M; Baffi, Matheus; Miranda, Humberto

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of rest period duration (1 vs. 3 minute between sets) on acute hormone responses to a high-intensity and equal volume bench press workout. Ten resistance-trained men (25.2 ± 5.6 years; 78.2 ± 5.7 kg; 176.7 ± 5.4 cm; bench press relative strength: 1.3 ± 0.1 kg per kilogram of body mass) performed 2 bench press workouts separated by 1 week. Each workout consisted of 5 sets of 3 repetitions performed at 85% of 1 repetition maximum, with either 1- or 3-minute rest between sets. Circulating concentrations of total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT), cortisol (C), testosterone/cortisol ratio (TT/C), and growth hormone (GH) were measured at preworkout (PRE), and immediately (T0), 15 minutes (T15), and 30 minutes (T30) postworkout. Rating of perceived exertion was recorded before and after each set. For TT, both rest lengths enhanced all postexercise verifications (T0, T15, and T30) compared with PRE, with 1 minute showing decreases on T15 and T30 compared with T0. For FT, both 1- and 3-minute rest protocols triggered augmentations on distinct postexercise moments (T0 and T15 for 1 minute; T15 and T30 for 3-minute) compared with PRE. The C values did not change throughout any postexercise verification for either rests. The TT/C ratio was significantly elevated for both rests in all postexercise moments compared with PRE. Finally, GH values did not change for both rest lengths. In conclusion, although both short and long rest periods enhanced acute testosterone values, the longer rest promoted a long-lasting elevation for both TT and FT.

  20. Heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation of cyprodinil and fludioxonil in leaching water under solar irradiation.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, José; Ruiz, Encarnación; Hellín, Pilar; Flores, Pilar; Navarro, Simón

    2011-11-01

    The efficiency of ZnO and TiO(2) suspensions in the photocatalytic degradation of two fungicides (cyprodinil and fludioxonil) in leaching water was investigated. The experiments were carried out at pilot plant scale using compound parabolic collectors under natural sunlight. The blank experiments for both irradiated compounds solutions showed that both oxides strongly enhanced the removal of the fungicides. The addition of an oxidant (Na(2)S(2)O(8)) to the ZnO or TiO(2) increased the rate of photooxidation. The degradation of cyprodinil and fludioxonil followed first order kinetics according to the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. Complete degradation of both fungicides was achieved within 4 h (t(30W)=18 min) when treated with illuminated ZnO. The disappearance time (DT(75)), when referred to the normalized illumination time (t(30W)), was lower than 40 and 550 min (t(30W)=2 and 40 min) for both fungicides using ZnO or TiO(2), respectively. ZnO appeared to be more effective in cyprodinil and fludioxonil oxidation than TiO(2) probably due to its nonstoichiometry.

  1. Genetic Marker Analysis of a Global Collection of Isolates of Citrus tristeza virus: Characterization and Distribution of CTV Genotypes and Association with Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hilf, Mark E; Mavrodieva, Vessela A; Garnsey, Stephen M

    2005-08-01

    ABSTRACT Genetic markers amplified from three noncontiguous regions by sequence specific primers designed from the partial or complete genome sequences of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates T3, T30, T36, and VT were used to assess genetic relatedness of 372 isolates in an international collection. Eighty-five isolates were judged similar to the T3 isolate, 81 to T30, 11 to T36, and 89 to VT. Fifty-one isolates were mixed infections by two or more identifiable viral genotypes, and 55 isolates could not be assigned unequivocally to a group defined by marker patterns. Maximum parsimony analysis of aligned marker sequences supported the grouping of isolates on the basis of marker patterns only. Specific disease symptoms induced in select citrus host plants were shared across molecular groups, although symptoms were least severe among isolates grouped by markers with the T30 isolate and were most severe among isolates grouped by markers with the T3 isolate. Isolates assigned the same genotype showed variable symptoms and symptom severity. A classification strategy for CTV isolates is proposed that combines genetic marker patterns and nucleotide sequence data. PMID:18944413

  2. The application of a crosslinked pectin-based wafer matrix for gradual buccal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Rubina P; Pillay, Viness; Choonara, Yahya E; Du Toit, Lisa C; Ndesendo, Valence M K; Kumar, Pradeep; Khan, Riaz A

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop crosslinked wafer matrices and establish the influence of the crosslinker type and processing sequence on achieving gradual buccal drug delivery. Three sets of drug-loaded crosslinked pectin wafers were produced employing the model water-soluble antihistamine, diphenhydramine and were compared with noncrosslinked wafers. The formulations were crosslinked with CaCl(2), BaCl(2), or ZnSO(4) pre- or postlyophilization (sets 1 and 2) as well as pre- and postlyophilization (set 3), respectively. The surface morphology, porositometry, molecular vibrational transitions, textural attributes, thermal and in vitro drug release were characterized and supported by in silico molecular mechanics simulations. Results revealed that crosslinked wafers produced smaller pore sizes (107.63 Å) compared with noncrosslinked matrices (180.53 Å) due to molecular crosslinks formed between pectin chains. Drug release performance was dependent on the wafer crosslinking production sequence. Noncrosslinked wafers displayed burst-release with 82% drug released at t(30min) compared with first-order kinetic profiles obtained for prelyophilized crosslinked matrices (50% released at t(30min) followed by steady release). Wafers crosslinked postlyophilization displayed superior control of drug release (40% at t(30min)). Molecular mechanics simulations corroborated with the experimental data and established that Ba(++), having the largest atomic radii (1.35 Å) formed a number of ionic bridges producing wafers of higher porosity (0.048 cm(2)/g) and had more influence on drug release. PMID:22323418

  3. The effect of replacing corn with glycerol on ruminal bacteria in continuous culture fermenters.

    PubMed

    AbuGhazaleh, A A; Abo El-Nor, S; Ibrahim, S A

    2011-06-01

    The effects of substituting corn with glycerol on DNA concentration of selected ruminal bacteria were investigated using continuous fermenters. Four continuous culture fermenters were used in a 4 × 4 Latin Square design with four 10 days consecutive periods. Treatment diets (60:40 forage to concentrate) were fed at 45 g/day dry matter (DM) in three equal portions. Glycerol (0.995 g/g glycerol) was used to replace corn in a grain mix at proportions of 0% (T0; control), 15% (T15), 30% (T30) and 45% (T45). On day 10 of each period, samples were collected from each fermenter 3 h after the morning feeding and analysed for volatile fatty acid and bacterial DNA concentration. Glycerol substitution was related to significantly higher butyrate, valerate and isovalerate concentrations. Compared with the T0 diet, acetate concentration was significantly lower with the T30 and T45 diets whilst propionate concentration was higher only with the T45 diet. The DNA concentrations for Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens and Selenomonas ruminantium decreased with the T30 and T45 diets compared with the T0 diet. No differences in the DNA concentrations for Ruminococcus albus and Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens amongst diets were observed. The findings show that substituting 15% of the dietary corn with glycerol had no substantive effects on fermentation processing or ruminal bacteria. Higher substitution levels, however, may adversely affect ruminal bacteria and negatively impact acetate production. PMID:20880288

  4. Effect of seminal plasma vesicular structures in canine frozen-thawed semen.

    PubMed

    Goericke-Pesch, S; Hauck, S; Failing, K; Wehrend, A

    2015-12-01

    Membrane vesicles (MVs) in the ejaculate have been identified in various species and are considered to affect membrane fluidity due to their characteristic molecular composition. Addition of MV to human frozen semen has been shown to improve post-thaw motility. Similarly, a beneficial effect has been suggested for frozen equine semen. As post-thaw canine semen quality varies widely between dogs, the aim of our study was to test for the effect of addition of canine MV on post-thaw semen quality in dogs. Semen samples from 10 male dogs were purified from MV and prepared for freezing. In experiment 1, three groups were compared: sperm frozen (1) with MV (S1); (2) without MV, but MV added immediately after thawing (S2); and (3) without MV (C). Semen analysis included computer-assisted sperm analysis of motility parameters immediately after thawing (t0), after 10 (t10) and 30 minutes (t30), % living sperm, % membrane intact, % morphologically normal sperm (all t0 and t30). Computer-assisted sperm analysis motility distance and velocity parameters (all P < 0.05) and % living sperm (P < 0.001) were significantly affected by treatment with a temporary increase of distance and velocity parameters at t0 to t10, but a significant decrease of the aforementioned parameters at t30 in samples with MV. In experiment 2, different MV protein concentrations added after thawing were compared: 0.05 mg, 0.1 mg, and 0.2 mg/mL. Computer-assisted sperm motility analysis was performed at t0, t10, and t30. No differences between MV concentrations were identified, only a significant interaction between effect of treatment and time for progressive motility (P < 0.01). Our study identified a short-term beneficial effect of canine MV on post-thaw distance and velocity parameters, whereas at t30 progressive motility, motility parameters and % living sperm were reduced in samples with MV compared to C. The results point to species-specific differences regarding the MV effect on frozen

  5. Effect of seminal plasma vesicular structures in canine frozen-thawed semen.

    PubMed

    Goericke-Pesch, S; Hauck, S; Failing, K; Wehrend, A

    2015-12-01

    Membrane vesicles (MVs) in the ejaculate have been identified in various species and are considered to affect membrane fluidity due to their characteristic molecular composition. Addition of MV to human frozen semen has been shown to improve post-thaw motility. Similarly, a beneficial effect has been suggested for frozen equine semen. As post-thaw canine semen quality varies widely between dogs, the aim of our study was to test for the effect of addition of canine MV on post-thaw semen quality in dogs. Semen samples from 10 male dogs were purified from MV and prepared for freezing. In experiment 1, three groups were compared: sperm frozen (1) with MV (S1); (2) without MV, but MV added immediately after thawing (S2); and (3) without MV (C). Semen analysis included computer-assisted sperm analysis of motility parameters immediately after thawing (t0), after 10 (t10) and 30 minutes (t30), % living sperm, % membrane intact, % morphologically normal sperm (all t0 and t30). Computer-assisted sperm analysis motility distance and velocity parameters (all P < 0.05) and % living sperm (P < 0.001) were significantly affected by treatment with a temporary increase of distance and velocity parameters at t0 to t10, but a significant decrease of the aforementioned parameters at t30 in samples with MV. In experiment 2, different MV protein concentrations added after thawing were compared: 0.05 mg, 0.1 mg, and 0.2 mg/mL. Computer-assisted sperm motility analysis was performed at t0, t10, and t30. No differences between MV concentrations were identified, only a significant interaction between effect of treatment and time for progressive motility (P < 0.01). Our study identified a short-term beneficial effect of canine MV on post-thaw distance and velocity parameters, whereas at t30 progressive motility, motility parameters and % living sperm were reduced in samples with MV compared to C. The results point to species-specific differences regarding the MV effect on frozen

  6. Latent effect of passive static stretching on driver clubhead speed, distance, accuracy, and consistent ball contact in young male competitive golfers.

    PubMed

    Gergley, Jeffrey C

    2010-12-01

    This investigation was conducted to determine the effect of 2 different warm-up treatments over time on driver clubhead speed, distance, accuracy, and consistent ball contact in young male competitive golfers. Two supervised warm-up treatments, an active dynamic warm-up with golf clubs (AD) and a 20-minute total body passive static stretching routine plus an identical AD warm-up (PSS), were applied before each performance testing session using a counterbalanced design on nonconsecutive days. Immediately after the AD treatment, subjects were instructed to hit 3 full swing golf shots with their driver with 1-minute rest between trials. Immediately after the PSS treatment, subjects were instructed to hit 3 full-swing golf shots with their driver at t0 and thereafter at t15, t30, t45, and t60 minutes with 1-minute rest between swing trials to determine any latent effects of PSS on golf driver performance measures. Results of paired t-tests revealed significant (p < 0.05) decreases in clubhead speed at t0 (-4.92%), t15 (-2.59%), and t30 (-2.19%) but not at t45 (-0.95) or t60 (-0.99). Significant differences were also observed in distance at t0 (-7.26%), t15 (-5.19%), t30 (-5.47%), t45 (-3.30%), and t60 (-3.53%). Accuracy was significantly impaired at t0 (61.99%), t15 (58.78%), t30 (59.46%), and t45 (61.32%) but not at t60 (36.82%). Finally, consistent ball contact was significantly reduced at t0 (-31.29%), t15 (-31.29%), t30 (-23.56%), t45 (-27.49%), and t60 (-15.70%). Plausible explanations for observed performance decrements include a more compliant muscle-tendon unit (MTU) and an altered neurological state because of the PSS treatment. Further, the findings of this study provide evidence supporting the theory that the mechanical properties of the MTU may recover at a faster rate than any associated neurological changes. The results of this inquiry strongly suggest that a total-body passive static stretching routine should be avoided before practice or competition in

  7. Correlations between lactate and ventilatory thresholds and the maximal lactate steady state in elite cyclists.

    PubMed

    Van Schuylenbergh, R; Vanden Eynde, B; Hespel, P

    2004-08-01

    We investigated the validity of different lactate and ventilatory threshold methods, to estimate heart rate and power output corresponding with the maximal lactate steady-state (MLSS) in elite cyclists. Elite cyclists (n = 21; 21 +/- 0.4 y; VO2peak, 5.4 +/- 0.2 l x min (-1)) performed either one (n = 10) or two (n = 11) maximal graded exercise tests, as well as two to three 30-min constant-load tests to determine MLSS, on their personal race bicycle which was mounted on an ergometer. Initial workload for the graded tests was 100 Watt and was increased by either 5 % of body mass (in Watt) with every 30 s (T30 s), or 60 % of body mass (in Watt) with every 6 min (T6min). MLSS was defined as the highest constant workload during which lactate increased no more than 1 mmol x l (-1) from min 10 to 30. In T30 s and T6 min the 4 mmol (TH-La4), the Conconi (TH-Con) and dmax (TH-Dm) lactate threshold were determined. The dmax lactate threshold was defined as the point that yields the maximal distance from the lactate curve to the line formed by the lowest and highest lactate values of the curve. In T30 s also ventilatory (TH-Ve) and Vslope (TH-Vs) thresholds were calculated. Time to exhaustion was 36 +/- 1 min for T30 s versus 39 +/- 1 min for T6 min. None of the threshold measures in T30 s, except TH-Vs (r2 = 0.77 for heart rate) correlated with either MLSS heart rate or power output. During T6 min, power output at TH-Dm was closely correlated with MLSS power (r2=0.72). Low correlations were found between MLSS heart rate and heart rate measured at TH-Dm (r2=0.46) and TH-La4 (r2=0.25), respectively, during T6 min. It is concluded that it is not possible to precisely predict heart rate or power output corresponding with MLSS in elite cyclists, from a single graded exercise test causing exhaustion within 35-40 min. The validity of MLSS predicted from an incremental test must be verified by a 30-min constant-load test.

  8. Coal combustion waste management at landfills and surface impoundments 1994-2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.; Ranek, N. L.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-09-08

    On May 22, 2000, as required by Congress in its 1980 Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Regulatory Determination on Wastes from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels. On the basis of information contained in its 1999 Report to Congress: Wastes from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels, the EPA concluded that coal combustion wastes (CCWs), also known as coal combustion by-products (CCBs), did not warrant regulation under Subtitle C of RCRA, and it retained the existing hazardous waste exemption for these materials under RCRA Section 3001(b)(3)(C). However, the EPA also determined that national regulations under Subtitle D of RCRA were warranted for CCWs that are disposed of in landfills or surface impoundments. The EPA made this determination in part on the basis of its findings that 'present disposal practices are such that, in 1995, these wastes were being managed in 40 percent to 70 percent of landfills and surface impoundments without reasonable controls in place, particularly in the area of groundwater monitoring; and while there have been substantive improvements in state regulatory programs, we have also identified gaps in State oversight' (EPA 2000). The 1999 Report to Congress (RTC), however, may not have reflected the changes in CCW disposal practices that occurred since the cutoff date (1995) of its database and subsequent developments. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the EPA discussed this issue and decided to conduct a joint DOE/EPA study to collect new information on the recent CCW management practices by the power industry. It was agreed that such information would provide a perspective on the chronological adoption of control measures in CCW units based on State regulations. A team of experts from the EPA, industry, and DOE (with support from Argonne National Laboratory) was established to develop a mutually acceptable approach for collecting and analyzing data on CCW

  9. Differential effects of prenatal testosterone timing and duration on phenotypic and behavioral masculinization and defeminization of female sheep.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Eila K; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Lee, Theresa M

    2008-07-01

    The process of sexual differentiation leaves genetically female individuals at risk of being masculinized by exogenous androgens. Previous research with sheep indicates that exposure to excess testosterone from Gestational Day (GD) 30 to GD 90 of the 147-day gestation masculinizes and defeminizes behavior as well as genitalia. Lower doses and shorter durations produce animals with varying degrees of genital virilization and alterations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, but to our knowledge, the effects on complex behavior and its prediction by the amount of external virilization have not been explored. Previous research in rodents has suggested that sexual differentiation of the central nervous system and the external genitalia can be dissociated. Therefore, we hypothesized that the extent of virilization of external genitalia would not be predictive of the lack of female-typical, or the presence of male-typical, mating behavior. To test this hypothesis, we compared control females, females exposed to exogenous testosterone from GD 30 to GD 90 (T60 females) that have virilized genitalia, and females exposed to testosterone from GD 60 to GD 90 (T30 females) that have female-typical genitalia. Both natural behavioral estrus in the flock and hormonally controlled behavioral tests were used to explore reproductive behavior. The T60 and T30 females exhibited more masculinized reproductive behavior than the controls; however, the T30 females also exhibited feminine behavior. Neither testosterone-treated group was receptive or was mounted at rates comparable to those of controls. These data illustrate that variation in the timing or duration of exposure to prenatal testosterone during a critical period for masculinization can have variable effects on defeminization and that the effects of testosterone on genitalia are not entirely predictive of behavior.

  10. Improving spatial updating accuracy in absence of external feedback.

    PubMed

    Mackrous, I; Simoneau, M

    2015-08-01

    Updating the position of an earth-fixed target during whole-body rotation seems to rely on cognitive processes such as the utilization of external feedback. According to perceptual learning models, improvement in performance can also occur without external feedback. The aim of this study was to assess spatial updating improvement in the absence and in the presence of external feedback. While being rotated counterclockwise (CCW), participants had to predict when their body midline had crossed the position of a memorized target. Four experimental conditions were tested: (1) Pre-test: the target was presented 30° in the CCW direction from participant's midline. (2) Practice: the target was located 45° in the CCW direction from participant's midline. One group received external feedback about their spatial accuracy (Mackrous and Simoneau, 2014) while the other group did not. (3) Transfer T(30)CCW: the target was presented 30° in the CCW direction to evaluate whether improvement in performance, during practice, generalized to other target eccentricity. (4) Transfer T(30)CW: the target was presented 30° in the clockwise (CW) direction and participants were rotated CW. This transfer condition evaluated whether improvement in performance generalized to the untrained rotation direction. With practice, performance improved in the absence of external feedback (p=0.004). Nonetheless, larger improvement occurred when external feedback was provided (ps=0.002). During T(30)CCW, performance remained better for the feedback than the no-feedback group (p=0.005). However, no group difference was observed for the untrained direction (p=0.22). We demonstrated that spatial updating improved without external feedback but less than when external feedback was given. These observations are explained by a mixture of calibration processes and supervised vestibular learning.

  11. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in vec p + vec p collisions at sqrt s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Coll

    2007-10-07

    We report a new STAR measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL} for inclusive jet production at mid-rapidity in polarized p + p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 200 GeV. The data, which cover jet transverse momenta 5 < p{sub T} < 30 GeV/c, are substantially more precise than previous measurements. They provide significant new constraints on the gluon spin contribution to the nucleon spin through the comparison to predictions derived from one global fit of polarized deep-inelastic scattering measurements.

  12. Deep sequencing and analysis of small RNAs in sweet orange grafted on sour orange infected with two citrus tristeza virus isolates prevalent in Sicily.

    PubMed

    Licciardello, Grazia; Scuderi, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Rosario; Giampetruzzi, Annalisa; Russo, Marcella; Lombardo, Alessandro; Raspagliesi, Domenico; Bar-Joseph, Moshe; Catara, Antonino

    2015-10-01

    Two representative isolates of a citrus tristeza virus population in Sicily, SG29 (aggressive) and Bau282 (mild), were sequenced via viral small RNAs (vsRNA) produced in budlings of sweet orange grafted on sour orange. Phylogenetic relationships with Mediterranean and exotic isolates revealed that SG29 clustered within the "VT-Asian" subtype, whereas Bau282 belonged to the cluster T30. The study confirms that molecular data need to be integrated with bio-indexing in order to obtain adequate information for risk assessment.

  13. Laser-induced surface modification of metals and alloys in liquid argon medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakevich, V. S.; Kazakevich, P. V.; Yaresko, P. S.; Kamynina, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    Micro and nanostructuring of metals and alloys surfaces (Ti, Mo, Ni, T30K4) was considered by subnanocosecond laser radiation in stationary and dynamic mode in the liquid argon, ethanol and air. Depending of structures size on the samples surface from the energy density and the number of pulses were built. Non-periodic (NSS) and periodic (PSS) surface structures with periods about λ-λ/2 were obtained. PSS formation took place as at the target surface so at the NSS surface.

  14. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in p(pol) + p(pol) collisions at {radical}{ovr s} = 200 GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; STAR Collaboration; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.

    2008-01-01

    We report a new STAR measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL} for inclusive jet production at midrapidity in polarized p+p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical} = 200 GeV. The data, which cover jet transverse momenta 5 < p{sub T} < 30 GeV/c, are substantially more precise than previous measurements. They provide significant new constraints on the gluon spin contribution to the nucleon spin through the comparison to predictions derived from one global fit to polarized deep-inelastic scattering measurements.

  15. Anomalous Schottky specific heat and structural distortion in ferromagnetic PrAl2.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Arjun K; Paudyal, D; Mudryk, Y; Gschneidner, K A; Pecharsky, V K

    2013-05-01

    Unique from other rare earth dialuminides, PrAl(2) undergoes a cubic to tetragonal distortion below T = 30 K in a zero magnetic field, but the system recovers its cubic symmetry upon the application of an external magnetic field of 10 kOe via a lifting of the 4f crystal field splitting. The nuclear Schottky specific heat in PrAl(2) is anomalously high compared to that of pure Pr metal. First principles calculations reveal that the 4f crystal field splitting in the tetragonally distorted phase of PrAl(2) underpins the observed unusual low temperature phenomena.

  16. Erratum to: Measurement of jet multiplicity distributions in $$\\mathrm {t}\\overline{\\mathrm {t}}$$ production in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 7\\,\\text {TeV} $$

    DOE PAGES

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2015-05-19

    Table 4 was incorrectly captioned in the originally published version. The correct caption is ‘Normalised differential tt- production cross section as a function of the number of additional jets with pT > 30 GeV in the lepton+jets channel. Furthermore, the statistical, systematic, and total uncertainties are also shown. Finally, the main experimental and model systematic uncertainties are displayed: JES and the combination of renormalisation and factorisation scales, jet-parton matching threshold, and hadronisation (in the table “Q2/Match./Had.”)’.

  17. Effect of TADs on the F-region of Low midlatitude ionosphere during intense geomagnetic storm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhayaya, Arun Kumar; Joshi, Shivani; Singh Dabas, Raj; Das, Rupesh M.; Yadav, Sneha

    Effect of TAD's on the F region ionosphere of low-mid latitude ionosphere during three intense storms of20 th Nov,2003(-422nT),30 th Oct 2003(-383nT),07Nov,2004(-373nT)respectively are studued using ionosonde data of Delhi(28ø N 77øE).It has been seen that the electon density profile in the F1 region are greatly influenced by the TAD's presence. Further the pre-existing F1 cusp become better devloped during the passage of TAD's.

  18. The complete mitochondrial DNA of the silky shark (Carcharhinus falciformis).

    PubMed

    Galván-Tirado, Carolina; Hinojosa-Alvarez, Silvia; Diaz-Jaimes, Pindaro; Marcet-Houben, Marina; García-De-León, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    The silky shark mitogenome (GeneBank accession number KF801102) has a total length of 17,774 bp, the base composition of the genomes was as follows: A (31.36%), T (30.18%), C (25.27%) and G (13.17%), which demonstrated an A + T-rich feature (61.64%), similar to other elasmobranch mitogenomes. The mitochondrial genome contained 13 protein-coding genes and 23 tRNA genes. The tRNA genes ranged from 70 to 72 bp. The gene order was the same as in other vertebrates and teleosts. PMID:24450712

  19. Complete mitochondrial genome of the ocellate river stingray (Potamotrygon motoro).

    PubMed

    Song, Hong-Mei; Mu, Xi-Dong; Wei, Min-Xia; Wang, Xue-Jie; Luo, Jian-Ren; Hu, Yin-Chang

    2015-01-01

    We determined the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Potamotrygon motoro from South American freshwater stingrays. The total length of P. motoro mitogenome is 17,448 bp, which consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and a control region, with the genome organization and gene order being identical to that of the typical vertebrate. The overall nucleotide composition is 32.3% A, 24.4% T, 30.5% C and 12.8% G. These data will provide useful molecular information for phylogenetic relationships within the family Potamotrygonidae species. PMID:24409899

  20. CPm gene diversity in field isolates of Citrus tristeza virus from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Oliveros-Garay, Oscar Arturo; Martinez-Salazar, Natalhie; Torres-Ruiz, Yanneth; Acosta, Orlando

    2009-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence diversity of the CPm gene from 28 field isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) was assessed by SSCP and sequence analyses. These isolates showed two major shared haplotypes, which differed in distribution: A1 was the major haplotype in 23 isolates from different geographic regions, whereas R1 was found in isolates from a discrete region. Phylogenetic reconstruction clustered A1 within an independent group, while R1 was grouped with mild isolates T30 from Florida and T385 from Spain. Some isolates contained several minor haplotypes, which were very similar to, and associated with, the major haplotype. PMID:19882104

  1. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in p[over -->] + p[over -->] collisions at sqrt[s]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Callner, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Clarke, R F; Codrington, M J M; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Elhalhuli, E; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Grube, B; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kurnadi, P; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lapointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, A; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, C; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qattan, I A; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Tram, V N; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Wada, M; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, J; Wu, Y; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Yurevich, V I; Zawisza, M; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2008-06-13

    We report a new STAR measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A(LL) for inclusive jet production at midrapidity in polarized p + p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt[s]=200 GeV. The data, which cover jet transverse momenta 5T)<30 GeV/c, are substantially more precise than previous measurements. They provide significant new constraints on the gluon spin contribution to the nucleon spin through the comparison to predictions derived from one global fit to polarized deep-inelastic scattering measurements. PMID:18643488

  2. 25. 'HANGAR SHEDS TRUSSES DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. 'HANGAR SHEDS - TRUSSES - DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS - PLANT AREA; MODIFICATION CENTER NO. 1, DAGGETT, CALIFORNIA.' Sections and details of trusses, ironwork, and joints, as modified to show ridge joint detail. As built. This blueline also shows the fire suppression system, added in orange pencil for 'Project 13: Bldgs. T-30, T-50, T-70, T-90' at a later, unspecified date. Contract no. W509 Eng. 2743; File no. 555/84, revision B, dated August 24, 1942. No sheet number. - Barstow-Daggett Airport, Hangar Shed No. 4, 39500 National Trails Highway, Daggett, San Bernardino County, CA

  3. Priming of mononuclear cells with a combination of growth factors enhances wound healing via high angiogenic and engraftment capabilities.

    PubMed

    Jin, Enze; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Sung-Whan

    2013-12-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that a specific combination of growth factors enhances the survival, adhesion and angiogenic potential of mononuclear cells (MNCs). In this study, we sought to investigate the changes of the angiogenic potential of MNCs after short-time priming with a specific combination of growth factors. MNCs were isolated using density gradient centrifugation and incubated with a priming cocktail containing epidermal growth factor (EGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, FMS-like tyrosine kinase (Flt)-3L , Angiopoietin (Ang)-1, granulocyte chemotactic protein (GCP)-2 and thrombopoietin (TPO) (all 400 ng/ml) for 15, 30 and 60 min. Wounds in nonobese diabetic-severe combined immune deficiency (NOD-SCID) mice were created by skin excision followed by cell transplantation. We performed a qRT-PCR analysis on the growth factor-primed cells. The angiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, FGF-2, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and interleukin (IL)-8 and the anti-apoptotic factors IGF-1 and transforming growth factor-β1 were significantly elevated in the MNCs primed for 30 min. (T30) compared with the non-primed MNCs (T0). The scratch wound assay revealed that T30- conditioned media (CM) significantly increased the rate of fibroblast-mediated wound closure compared with the rates from T0-CM and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC)-CM at 20 hrs. In vivo wound healing results revealed that the T30-treated wounds demonstrated accelerated wound healing at days 7 and 14 compared with those treated with T0. The histological analyses demonstrated that the number of engrafted cells and transdifferentiated keratinocytes in the wounds were significantly higher in the T30-transplanted group than in the T0-transplanted group. In conclusion, this study suggests that short-term priming of MNCs with growth factors might be alternative therapeutic option for cell

  4. Neutron capture cross sections for /sup 86,87/Sr at Stellar temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, R.W.; Mathews, G.J.; Becker, J.A.; Howe, R.E.

    1986-02-01

    Cross sections have been measured from 100 eV to 1 MeV by the neutron-time-of-flight technique. The capture events were recorded by detecting the prompt gamma-ray cascade with two C/sub 6/D/sub 6/ scintillators, and were normalized to standard gold cross sections. The background was determined experimentally by utilizing the ''black resonance'' technique. A /sup 6/Li-glass scintillator was used to monitor the neutron flux. A Maxwellian-averaged capture cross section at kT = 30 keV of 74 +- 3 mb for /sup 86/Sr, and 102 +- 4 mb for /sup 87/Sr. (LEW)

  5. Carbon nano-strings as reporters in lateral flow devices for DNA sensing by hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kalogianni, Despina P; Boutsika, Lemonia M; Kouremenou, Panagiota G; Christopoulos, Theodore K; Ioannou, Penelope C

    2011-05-01

    Presently, there is a growing interest in the development of lateral flow devices for nucleic acid analysis that enable visual detection of the target sequence (analyte) while eliminating several steps required for pipetting, incubation, and washing out the excess of reactants. In this paper, we present, for the first time, lateral flow tests exploiting oligonucleotide-functionalized and antibody-functionalized carbon nanoparticles (carbon nano-strings, CBNS) as reporters that enable confirmation of the target DNA sequence by hybridization. The CBNS reporters were applied to (a) the detection of PCR products and (b) visual genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms in human genomic DNA. Biotinylated PCR product was hybridized with a dA-tailed probe. In one assay configuration, the hybrid is captured at the test zone of the strip by immobilized streptavidin and detected by (dT)(30)-CBNS. In a second configuration, the hybrids are captured from immobilized (dA) strands and detected by antibiotin-CBNS. As low as 2.5 fmol of amplified DNA can be detected. For visual genotyping, allele-specific primers with a 5' oligo(dA) segment are extended by DNA polymerase with a concomitant incorporation of biotin moieties. Extension products are detected either by (dT)(30)-CBNS or by antibiotin-CBNS. Only three cycles of extension reaction are sufficient for detection. No purification of the PCR products or the extension product is required.

  6. Kinetic characterization of small DNA-binding molecules interacting with a DNA strand on a quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Hajime; Funasaki, Mariko; Okahata, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative studies of the binding of various DNA-binding antibiotics with dsDNA are useful for drug design, not only for effective antibiotics, but also for antitumor drugs. We studied the binding kinetics, association and dissociation rate constants, and association constants (kon, koff, and Ka, respectively) of intercalators and groove binders, including various antibiotics, to double-stranded DNA (dA30·dT30 and dG30·dC30) immobilized on a highly sensitive 27 MHz quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) in aqueous solution. Although a simple ethidium bromide intercalator bound to both dA30·dT30 and dG30·dC30, antibiotics that are side-binding intercalators, such as daunomycin, aclacinomycin A, and actinomycin D, with sugar or peptide moieties on the intercalator parts selectively bound to dG30·dC30 with high Ka and small koff values. Nogalamycin, a dumbbell-shaped penetrating intercalator, showed low kon and koff values owing to slow duplex unwinding during the penetration process. Groove binders (Hoechst 33258, distamycin A, and mithramycin) had high Ka values owing to the high kon values. Kinetic parameters depended largely on molecular shapes and DNA-binding molecule binding modes.

  7. Shape transformation of bimetallic Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes to multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets

    DOE PAGES

    Bhattarai, Nabraj; Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-11-05

    Transformation of metallic or bimetallic (BM) nanoparticles (NPs) from one shape to another desired shape is of importance to nanoscience and nanotechnology, where new morphologies of NPs lead to enhancement of their exploitable properties. In this report, we present the shape transformation of Au octahedral NPs to Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes, followed by their transformation to nanostars and finally to multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets in the presence of T30 DNA. The weaker binding affinity of T30 DNA directs the growth to favor the formation of lower energy {111} facets, changing the morphology from nanocubes to nanostar. The nanostars, exhibiting unusualmore » intermediate morphologies, are comprised two sets of shell layers and have Au core, Pd intermediate shell, and Au outer shell. Similarly, the hexagonal platelets, which also have Au core and inner Pd shell, are encased in an external gold shell. As a result, the formation of multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets from Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes via the multilayered nanostars is monitored using scanning/transmission electron microscopy analysis.« less

  8. Measurement of prompt ψ(2S) to J/ψ yield ratios in Pb-Pb and p-p collisions at sqrt[sNN]=2.76  TeV.

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Luyckx, S; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; Heracleous, N; Keaveney, J; Lowette, S; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dobur, D; Favart, L; Gay, A P R; Grebenyuk, A; Léonard, A; Mohammadi, A; Perniè, L; Reis, T; Seva, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Crucy, S; Dildick, S; Fagot, A; Garcia, G; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Salva Diblen, S; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Da Silveira, G G; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Perrini, L; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Aldá Júnior, W L; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Correa Martins Junior, M; Dos Reis Martins, T; Mora Herrera, C; Pol, M E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santaolalla, J; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Bernardes, C A; Dogra, S; Tomei, T R Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E M; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Aleksandrov, A; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Marinov, A; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Glushkov, I; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Du, R; Jiang, C H; Liang, S; Plestina, R; Tao, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Guo, Y; Li, Q; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Zhang, L; Zou, W; Avila, C; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Sudic, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Bodlak, M; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Ellithi Kamel, A; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Tiko, A; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Favaro, C; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dahms, T; Dalchenko, M; Dobrzynski, L; Filipovic, N; Florent, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Mastrolorenzo, L; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Regnard, S; Salerno, R; Sauvan, J B; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Yilmaz, Y; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Aubin, A; Bloch, D; Brom, J-M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Goetzmann, C; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Boudoul, G; Bouvier, E; Brochet, S; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fan, J; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Ruiz Alvarez, J D; Sabes, D; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Xiao, H; Tsamalaidze, Z; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Bontenackels, M; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Hindrichs, O; Klein, K; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Erdmann, M; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Klingebiel, D; Knutzen, S; Kreuzer, P; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Millet, P; Olschewski, M; Padeken, K; Papacz, P; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A

    2014-12-31

    The ratio between the prompt ψ(2S) and J/ψ yields, reconstructed via their decays into μ+ μ-, is measured in Pb-Pb and p-p collisions at sqrt[sNN]=2.76  TeV. The analysis is based on Pb-Pb and p-p data samples collected by CMS at the Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 150  μb(-1) and 5.4  pb(-1), respectively. The double ratio of measured yields (Nψ(2S)/N(J/ψ))(Pb-Pb)/(Nψ(2S)/N(J/ψ))(p-p) is computed in three Pb-Pb collision centrality bins and two kinematic ranges: one at midrapidity, |y|<1.6, covering the transverse momentum range 6.5T<30  GeV/c, and the other at forward rapidity, 1.6<|y|<2.4, extending to lower pT values, 3T<30  GeV/c. The centrality-integrated double ratio changes from 0.45±0.13(stat)±0.07(syst) in the first range to 1.67±0.34(stat)±0.27(syst) in the second. This difference is most pronounced in the most central collisions. PMID:25615312

  9. Selective differences in macrophage populations and monokine production in resolving pulmonary granuloma and fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, I.

    1991-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) and their production of interleukin-1-like activity (IL-1) and macrophage-derived growth factor for fibroblasts (MDGF) were examined during chronic inflammatory reactions leading to either granuloma formation or fibrosis. Groups of five rats each received, respectively, a single transtracheal injection of xonotlite, attapulgite, short chrysotile 4T30, UICC chrysotile B asbestos, or saline. One month later, such treatments induced either no change (xonotlite), granuloma formation (attapulgite and short chrysotile 4T30), or fibrosis (UICC chrysotile B). By 8 months, however, the granulomatous reactions had resolved or greatly diminished, whereas the fibrosis persisted irreversibly. Parallel examination of cell populations obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage revealed that multinucleated giant macrophages (MGC) were present in lavage fluids of animals with resolving granulomatous reactions but absent in those obtained from animals with lung fibrosis. Evaluation of monokine production by inflammatory macrophages also revealed significant differences. Enhanced production of IL-1-like activity was seen in both types of lung injury, although especially during the early stage (1 month) and decreased thereafter (8 months). By contrast, augmentation of MDGF production was observed in animals with lung fibrosis only and persisted up to 9 months. Taken together, these data indicate that production of selected cytokines, as well as AM differentiation along a given pathway, may modulate the outcome of a chronic inflammatory response. PMID:1992772

  10. Shape transformation of bimetallic Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes to multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattarai, Nabraj; Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-11-05

    Transformation of metallic or bimetallic (BM) nanoparticles (NPs) from one shape to another desired shape is of importance to nanoscience and nanotechnology, where new morphologies of NPs lead to enhancement of their exploitable properties. In this report, we present the shape transformation of Au octahedral NPs to Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes, followed by their transformation to nanostars and finally to multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets in the presence of T30 DNA. The weaker binding affinity of T30 DNA directs the growth to favor the formation of lower energy {111} facets, changing the morphology from nanocubes to nanostar. The nanostars, exhibiting unusual intermediate morphologies, are comprised two sets of shell layers and have Au core, Pd intermediate shell, and Au outer shell. Similarly, the hexagonal platelets, which also have Au core and inner Pd shell, are encased in an external gold shell. As a result, the formation of multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets from Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes via the multilayered nanostars is monitored using scanning/transmission electron microscopy analysis.

  11. Measurement of reverberation gain in an urban environment.

    PubMed

    Mijić, Miomir; Šumarac Pavlović, Dragana

    2012-09-01

    Multipath propagation within an urban area introduces a specific type of reverberation in response to sound excitation. That appearance affects the level of ambient noise produced by strong sound sources. In this paper, the signals recorded during the 1999 bombing of Belgrade were used to analyze the characteristics of reverberation in that urban environment. Six recorded signals were selected among more than 50 explosions recorded at that time. Due to the impulse nature of sound sources, the recorded signals represent the impulse responses of that area. The measured reverberation time T30 is about 7 ± 1 s in octaves between 31.5 Hz and 1 kHz. There is a variation of decay slope in time that is verified by differences between values of T10 and T30. The reverberation gain calculated from recorded signals is 2-7 dB, depending on the global position of the sound excitation point as well as its micro-location according to its position among the surrounding buildings. A variation of gain over octave bands is in the interval of approximately 3 dB. Information about reverberation gain in urban environment can be useful in a quick estimation of noise level produced by strong sound sources in a large area of urban environment.

  12. Acoustical study on the impact of sound absorptions, distances of workstations, and height of partitions in open plan offices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utami, Sentagi Sesotya; Al Rochmadi, Nurwachid; Sarwono, R. Sugeng Joko

    2015-09-01

    Low partitions are commonly found in open-plan offices as the boundaries of workstation islands or groups of workstations. This room layout often cause excessive speech intelligibility, which creates work distraction and reduce the quality of speech privacy. Sound absorption, distance between workstations, and height of partitions are factors that were investigated on their impact to the room acoustics condition, referred to ISO 3382-3:2012. Observed room acoustics conditions were speech intelligibility, speech privacy, and distraction to concentrate in work using parameters of T30, C50, and RASTI. Parameters of T30, C50, and RASTI were used to evaluate the speech intelligibility. The level of speech privacy was indicated by parameter of privacy distance (rP). Distraction to concentrate in work was indicated by distraction distance (rD). The results from 2 experimental setups show that sound absorption, distance between workstations, and partitions influenced the level of speech intelligibility, speech privacy, and distraction to concentration at work. The value of C50 decline, by 76.9% and 77.4%, each for scenario A and B. RASTI decline, by 18.7% and 14.8%. Difference in percentage of speech privacy, by 6% and 11%. Difference in percentage of distraction to concentration at work, by 79% and 70%.

  13. Measurement of prompt ψ(2S) to J/ψ yield ratios in Pb-Pb and p-p collisions at sqrt[sNN]=2.76  TeV.

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Luyckx, S; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; Heracleous, N; Keaveney, J; Lowette, S; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dobur, D; Favart, L; Gay, A P R; Grebenyuk, A; Léonard, A; Mohammadi, A; Perniè, L; Reis, T; Seva, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Crucy, S; Dildick, S; Fagot, A; Garcia, G; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Salva Diblen, S; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Da Silveira, G G; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Perrini, L; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Aldá Júnior, W L; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Correa Martins Junior, M; Dos Reis Martins, T; Mora Herrera, C; Pol, M E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santaolalla, J; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Bernardes, C A; Dogra, S; Tomei, T R Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E M; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Aleksandrov, A; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Marinov, A; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Glushkov, I; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Du, R; Jiang, C H; Liang, S; Plestina, R; Tao, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Guo, Y; Li, Q; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Zhang, L; Zou, W; Avila, C; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Sudic, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Bodlak, M; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Ellithi Kamel, A; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Tiko, A; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Favaro, C; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dahms, T; Dalchenko, M; Dobrzynski, L; Filipovic, N; Florent, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Mastrolorenzo, L; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Regnard, S; Salerno, R; Sauvan, J B; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Yilmaz, Y; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Aubin, A; Bloch, D; Brom, J-M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Goetzmann, C; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Boudoul, G; Bouvier, E; Brochet, S; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fan, J; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Ruiz Alvarez, J D; Sabes, D; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Xiao, H; Tsamalaidze, Z; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Bontenackels, M; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Hindrichs, O; Klein, K; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Erdmann, M; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Klingebiel, D; Knutzen, S; Kreuzer, P; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Millet, P; Olschewski, M; Padeken, K; Papacz, P; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Teyssier, D; Thüer, S; Weber, M; Cherepanov, V; Erdogan, Y; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Geisler, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Heister, A; Hoehle, F; Kargoll, B; Kress, T; Kuessel, Y; Lingemann, J; Nowack, A; Nugent, I M; Perchalla, L; Pooth, O; Stahl, A; Asin, I; Bartosik, N; Behr, J; Behrenhoff, W; Behrens, U; Bell, A J; Bergholz, M; Bethani, A; Borras, K; Burgmeier, A; Cakir, A; Calligaris, L; Campbell, A; Choudhury, S; Costanza, F; Diez Pardos, C; Dooling, S; Dorland, T; Eckerlin, G; Eckstein, D; Eichhorn, T; Flucke, G; Garay Garcia, J; Geiser, A; Gunnellini, P; Hauk, J; Hempel, M; Horton, D; Jung, H; Kalogeropoulos, A; Kasemann, M; Katsas, P; Kieseler, J; Kleinwort, C; Krücker, D; Lange, W; Leonard, J; Lipka, K; Lobanov, A; Lohmann, W; Lutz, B; Mankel, R; Marfin, I; Melzer-Pellmann, I-A; Meyer, A B; Mittag, G; Mnich, J; Mussgiller, A; Naumann-Emme, S; Nayak, A; Novgorodova, O; Nowak, F; Ntomari, E; Perrey, H; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Raspereza, A; Ribeiro Cipriano, P M; Ron, E; Sahin, M Ö; Salfeld-Nebgen, J; Saxena, P; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Seitz, C; Spannagel, S; Vargas Trevino, A D R; Walsh, R; Wissing, C; Aldaya Martin, M; Blobel, V; Centis Vignali, M; Draeger, A R; Erfle, J; Garutti, E; Goebel, K; Görner, M; Haller, J; Hoffmann, M; Höing, R S; Kirschenmann, H; Klanner, R; Kogler, R; Lange, J; Lapsien, T; Lenz, T; Marchesini, I; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Pietsch, N; Poehlsen, J; Poehlsen, T; Rathjens, D; Sander, C; Schettler, H; Schleper, P; Schlieckau, E; Schmidt, A; Seidel, M; Sola, V; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Troendle, D; Usai, E; Vanelderen, L; Barth, C; Baus, C; Berger, J; Böser, C; Butz, E; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Descroix, A; Dierlamm, A; Feindt, M; Frensch, F; Giffels, M; Hartmann, F; Hauth, T; Husemann, U; Katkov, I; Kornmayer, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lobelle Pardo, P; Mozer, M U; Müller, Th; Nürnberg, A; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Röcker, S; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Ulrich, R; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wayand, S; Weiler, T; Wolf, R; Anagnostou, G; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Giakoumopoulou, V A; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Psallidas, A; Topsis-Giotis, I; Agapitos, A; Kesisoglou, S; Panagiotou, A; Saoulidou, N; Stiliaris, E; Aslanoglou, X; Evangelou, I; Flouris, G; Foudas, C; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Paradas, E; Bencze, G; Hajdu, C; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Sikler, F; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Zsigmond, A J; Beni, N; Czellar, S; Karancsi, J; Molnar, J; Palinkas, J; Szillasi, Z; Raics, P; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Swain, S K; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Gupta, R; Bhawandeep, U; Kalsi, A K; Kaur, M; Mittal, M; Nishu, N; Singh, J B; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S; Bhardwaj, A; Choudhary, B C; Kumar, A; Malhotra, S; Naimuddin, M; Ranjan, K; Sharma, V; Banerjee, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chatterjee, K; Dutta, S; Gomber, B; Jain, Sa; Jain, Sh; Khurana, R; Modak, A; Mukherjee, S; Roy, D; Sarkar, S; Sharan, M; Abdulsalam, A; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kumar, V; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Banerjee, S; Bhowmik, S; Chatterjee, R M; Dewanjee, R K; Dugad, S; Ganguly, S; Ghosh, S; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Kole, G; Kumar, S; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Mohanty, G B; Parida, B; Sudhakar, K; Wickramage, N; Bakhshiansohi, H; Behnamian, H; Etesami, S M; Fahim, A; Goldouzian, R; Jafari, A; Khakzad, M; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Naseri, M; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Grunewald, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Calabria, C; Chhibra, S S; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Fiore, L; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; My, S; Nuzzo, S; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Radogna, R; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Singh, G; Venditti, R; Verwilligen, P; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Benvenuti, A C; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Brigliadori, L; Campanini, R; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Grandi, C; Guiducci, L; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Perrotta, A; Primavera, F; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G P; Tosi, N; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Cappello, G; Chiorboli, M; Costa, S; Giordano, F; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Gallo, E; Gonzi, S; Gori, V; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bianco, S; Fabbri, F; Piccolo, D; Ferro, F; Lo Vetere, M; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Dinardo, M E; Fiorendi, S; Gennai, S; Gerosa, R; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Lucchini, M T; Malvezzi, S; Manzoni, R A; Martelli, A; Marzocchi, B; Menasce, D; Moroni, L; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Di Guida, S; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Meola, S; Merola, M; Paolucci, P; Bellato, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Checchia, P; Dall'Osso, M; Dorigo, T; Fanzago, F; Galanti, M; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Gozzelino, A; Kanishchev, K; Lacaprara, S; Margoni, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Pazzini, J; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Ventura, S; Zucchetta, A; Zumerle, G; Gabusi, M; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Salvini, P; Vitulo, P; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Ciangottini, D; Fanò, L; Lariccia, P; Mantovani, G; Menichelli, M; Romeo, F; Saha, A; Santocchia, A; Spiezia, A; Androsov, K; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Boccali, T; Broccolo, G; Castaldi, R; Ciocci, M A; Dell'Orso, R; Donato, S; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Giassi, A; Grippo, M T; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Martini, L; Messineo, A; Moon, C S; Palla, F; Rizzi, A; Savoy-Navarro, A; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Squillacioti, P; Tenchini, R; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Vernieri, C; Barone, L; Cavallari, F; D'imperio, G; Del Re, D; Diemoz, M; Grassi, M; Jorda, C; Longo, E; Margaroli, F; Meridiani, P; Micheli, F; Nourbakhsh, S; Organtini, G; Paramatti, R; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Santanastasio, F; Soffi, L; Traczyk, P; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Bellan, R; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Casasso, S; Costa, M; Degano, A; Demaria, N; Finco, L; Mariotti, C; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Obertino, M M; Ortona, G; Pacher, L; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Pinna Angioni, G L; Potenza, A; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Tamponi, U; Belforte, S; Candelise, V; Casarsa, M; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; La Licata, C; Marone, M; Montanino, D; Schizzi, A; Umer, T; Zanetti, A; Chang, S; Kropivnitskaya, A; Nam, S K; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kim, M S; Kong, D J; Lee, S; Oh, Y D; Park, H; Sakharov, A; Son, D C; Kim, T J; Kim, J Y; Song, S; Choi, S; Gyun, D; Hong, B; Jo, M; Kim, H; Kim, Y; Lee, B; Lee, K S; Park, S K; Roh, Y; Choi, M; Kim, J H; Park, I C; Park, S; Ryu, G; Ryu, M S; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Goh, J; Kim, D; Kwon, E; Lee, J; Seo, H; Yu, I; Juodagalvis, A; Komaragiri, J R; Md Ali, M A B; Castilla-Valdez, H; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Heredia-de La Cruz, I; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Sanchez-Hernandez, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Vazquez Valencia, F; Pedraza, I; Salazar Ibarguen, H A; Casimiro Linares, E; Morelos Pineda, A; Krofcheck, D; Butler, P H; Reucroft, S; Ahmad, A; Ahmad, M; Hassan, Q; Hoorani, H R; Khalid, S; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Shah, M A; Shoaib, M; Bialkowska, H; Bluj, M; Boimska, B; Frueboes, T; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Romanowska-Rybinska, K; Szleper, M; Zalewski, P; Brona, G; Bunkowski, K; Cwiok, M; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Kalinowski, A; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Misiura, M; Olszewski, M; Wolszczak, W; Bargassa, P; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Gallinaro, M; Nguyen, F; Rodrigues Antunes, J; Seixas, J; Varela, J; Vischia, P; Afanasiev, S; Golutvin, I; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Korenkov, V; Kozlov, G; Lanev, A; Malakhov, A; Matveev, V; Mitsyn, V V; Moisenz, P; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Shmatov, S; Skatchkov, N; Smirnov, V; Tikhonenko, E; Zarubin, A; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Levchenko, P; Murzin, V; Oreshkin, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, An; Andreev, Yu; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Pashenkov, A; Tlisov, D; Toropin, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Lychkovskaya, N; Popov, V; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Spiridonov, A; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Andreev, V; Azarkin, M; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Leonidov, A; Mesyats, G; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Belyaev, A; Boos, E; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Kaminskiy, A; Kodolova, O; Korotkikh, V; Lokhtin, I; Obraztsov, S; Petrushanko, S; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Vardanyan, I; Azhgirey, I; Bayshev, I; Bitioukov, S; Kachanov, V; Kalinin, A; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Sobol, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Ekmedzic, M; Milosevic, J; Rekovic, V; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Battilana, C; Calvo, E; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Colino, N; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Domínguez Vázquez, D; Escalante Del Valle, A; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; Gonzalez Lopez, O; Goy Lopez, S; Hernandez, J M; Josa, M I; Merino, G; Navarro De Martino, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Puerta Pelayo, J; Quintario Olmeda, A; Redondo, I; Romero, L; Soares, M S; Albajar, C; de Trocóniz, J F; Missiroli, M; Moran, D; Brun, H; Cuevas, J; Fernandez Menendez, J; Folgueras, S; Gonzalez Caballero, I; Lloret Iglesias, L; Brochero Cifuentes, J A; Cabrillo, I J; Calderon, A; Duarte Campderros, J; Fernandez, M; Gomez, G; Graziano, A; Lopez Virto, A; Marco, J; Marco, R; Martinez Rivero, C; Matorras, F; Munoz Sanchez, F J; Piedra Gomez, J; Rodrigo, T; Rodríguez-Marrero, A Y; Ruiz-Jimeno, A; Scodellaro, L; Vila, I; Vilar Cortabitarte, R; Abbaneo, D; Auffray, E; Auzinger, G; Bachtis, M; Baillon, P; Ball, A H; Barney, D; Benaglia, A; Bendavid, J; Benhabib, L; Benitez, J F; Bernet, C; Bianchi, G; Bloch, P; Bocci, A; Bonato, A; Bondu, O; Botta, C; Breuker, H; Camporesi, T; Cerminara, G; Colafranceschi, S; D'Alfonso, M; d'Enterria, D; Dabrowski, A; David, A; De Guio, F; De Roeck, A; De Visscher, S; Dobson, M; Dordevic, M; Dupont-Sagorin, N; Elliott-Peisert, A; Eugster, J; Franzoni, G; Funk, W; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Giordano, D; Girone, M; Glege, F; Guida, R; Gundacker, S; Guthoff, M; Hammer, J; Hansen, M; Harris, P; Hegeman, J; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Kousouris, K; Krajczar, K; Lecoq, P; Lourenço, C; Magini, N; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Marrouche, J; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Moortgat, F; Morovic, S; Mulders, M; Musella, P; Orsini, L; Pape, L; Perez, E; Perrozzi, L; Petrilli, A; Petrucciani, G; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Pimiä, M; Piparo, D; Plagge, M; Racz, A; Rolandi, G; Rovere, M; Sakulin, H; Schäfer, C; Schwick, C; Sharma, A; Siegrist, P; Silva, P; Simon, M; Sphicas, P; Spiga, D; Steggemann, J; Stieger, B; Stoye, M; Takahashi, Y; Treille, D; Tsirou, A; Veres, G I; Vlimant, J R; Wardle, N; Wöhri, H K; Wollny, H; Zeuner, W D; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Renker, D; Rohe, T; Bachmair, F; Bäni, L; Bianchini, L; Bortignon, P; Buchmann, M A; Casal, B; Chanon, N; Deisher, A; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Donegà, M; Dünser, M; Eller, P; Grab, C; Hits, D; Lustermann, W; Mangano, B; Marini, A C; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P; Meister, D; Mohr, N; Nägeli, C; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pandolfi, F; Pauss, F; Peruzzi, M; Quittnat, M; Rebane, L; Rossini, M; Starodumov, A; Takahashi, M; Theofilatos, K; Wallny, R; Weber, H A; Amsler, C; Canelli, M F; Chiochia, V; De Cosa, A; Hinzmann, A; Hreus, T; Kilminster, B; Lange, C; Millan Mejias, B; Ngadiuba, J; Robmann, P; Ronga, F J; Taroni, S; Verzetti, M; Yang, Y; Cardaci, M; Chen, K H; Ferro, C; Kuo, C M; Lin, W; Lu, Y J; Volpe, R; Yu, S S; Chang, P; Chang, Y H; Chang, Y W; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Chen, P H; Dietz, C; Grundler, U; Hou, W-S; Kao, K Y; Lei, Y J; Liu, Y F; Lu, R-S; Majumder, D; Petrakou, E; Tzeng, Y M; Wilken, R; Asavapibhop, B; Srimanobhas, N; Suwonjandee, N; Adiguzel, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dozen, C; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gokbulut, G; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Kangal, E E; Kayis Topaksu, A; Onengut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatoz, A; Sogut, K; Sunar Cerci, D; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Vergili, M; Akin, I V; Bilin, B; Bilmis, S; Gamsizkan, H; Karapinar, G; Ocalan, K; Sekmen, S; Surat, U E; Yalvac, M; Zeyrek, M; Gülmez, E; Isildak, B; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Bahtiyar, H; Barlas, E; Cankocak, K; Vardarlı, F I; Yücel, M; Levchuk, L; Sorokin, P; Brooke, J J; Clement, E; Cussans, D; Flacher, H; Frazier, R; Goldstein, J; Grimes, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Jacob, J; Kreczko, L; Lucas, C; Meng, Z; Newbold, D M; Paramesvaran, S; Poll, A; Senkin, S; Smith, V J; Williams, T; Belyaev, A; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Harder, K; Harper, S; Olaiya, E; Petyt, D; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Thea, A; Tomalin, I R; Womersley, W J; Worm, S D; Baber, M; Bainbridge, R; Buchmuller, O; Burton, D; Colling, D; Cripps, N; Cutajar, M; Dauncey, P; Davies, G; Della Negra, M; Dunne, P; Ferguson, W; Fulcher, J; Futyan, D; Gilbert, A; Hall, G; Iles, G; Jarvis, M; Karapostoli, G; Kenzie, M; Lane, R; Lucas, R; Lyons, L; Magnan, A-M; Malik, S; Mathias, B; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Pela, J; Pesaresi, M; Petridis, K; Raymond, D M; Rogerson, S; Rose, A; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Tapper, A; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Cole, J E; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leggat, D; Leslie, D; Martin, W; Reid, I D; Symonds, P; Teodorescu, L; Turner, M; Dittmann, J; Hatakeyama, K; Kasmi, A; Liu, H; Scarborough, T; Charaf, O; Cooper, S I; Henderson, C; Rumerio, P; Avetisyan, A; Bose, T; Fantasia, C; Lawson, P; Richardson, C; Rohlf, J; Sperka, D; St John, J; Sulak, L; Alimena, J; Berry, E; Bhattacharya, S; Christopher, G; Cutts, D; Demiragli, Z; Dhingra, N; Ferapontov, A; Garabedian, A; Heintz, U; Kukartsev, G; Laird, E; Landsberg, G; Luk, M; Narain, M; Segala, M; Sinthuprasith, T; Speer, T; Swanson, J; Breedon, R; Breto, G; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Chauhan, S; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Conway, R; Cox, P T; Erbacher, R; Gardner, M; Ko, W; Lander, R; Miceli, T; Mulhearn, M; Pellett, D; Pilot, J; Ricci-Tam, F; Searle, M; Shalhout, S; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stolp, D; Tripathi, M; Wilbur, S; Yohay, R; Cousins, R; Everaerts, P; Farrell, C; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Rakness, G; Takasugi, E; Valuev, V; Weber, M; Babb, J; Burt, K; Clare, R; Ellison, J; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Heilman, J; Ivova Rikova, M; Jandir, P; Kennedy, E; Lacroix, F; Liu, H; Long, O R; Luthra, A; Malberti, M; Nguyen, H; Olmedo Negrete, M; Shrinivas, A; Sumowidagdo, S; Wimpenny, S; Andrews, W; Branson, J G; Cerati, G B; Cittolin, S; D'Agnolo, R T; Evans, D; Holzner, A; Kelley, R; Klein, D; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Macneill, I; Olivito, D; Padhi, S; Palmer, C; Pieri, M; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Sudano, E; Tadel, M; Tu, Y; Vartak, A; Welke, C; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Yoo, J; Barge, D; Bradmiller-Feld, J; Campagnari, C; Danielson, T; Dishaw, A; Flowers, K; Franco Sevilla, M; Geffert, P; George, C; Golf, F; Gouskos, L; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Mccoll, N; Richman, J; Stuart, D; To, W; West, C; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chen, Y; Di Marco, E; Duarte, J; Mott, A; Newman, H B; Pena, C; Rogan, C; Spiropulu, M; Timciuc, V; Wilkinson, R; Xie, S; Zhu, R Y; Azzolini, V; Calamba, A; Carlson, B; Ferguson, T; Iiyama, Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Alexander, J; Chatterjee, A; Chu, J; Dittmer, S; Eggert, N; Mirman, N; Nicolas Kaufman, G; Patterson, J R; Ryd, A; Salvati, E; Skinnari, L; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Thompson, J; Tucker, J; Weng, Y; Winstrom, L; Wittich, P; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Albrow, M; Anderson, J; Apollinari, G; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Cihangir, S; Elvira, V D; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gao, Y; Gottschalk, E; Gray, L; Green, D; Grünendahl, S; Gutsche, O; Hanlon, J; Hare, D; Harris, R M; Hirschauer, J; Hooberman, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Kaadze, K; Klima, B; Kreis, B; Kwan, S; Linacre, J; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Liu, T; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Martinez Outschoorn, V I; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Mishra, K; Mrenna, S; Musienko, Y; Nahn, S; Newman-Holmes, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sharma, S; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitbeck, A; Whitmore, J; Yang, F; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bourilkov, D; Carver, M; Cheng, T; Curry, D; Das, S; De Gruttola, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Field, R D; Fisher, M; Furic, I K; Hugon, J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kypreos, T; Low, J F; Matchev, K; Milenovic, P; Mitselmakher, G; Muniz, L; Rinkevicius, A; Shchutska, L; Snowball, M; Yelton, J; Zakaria, M; Hewamanage, S; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bochenek, J; Diamond, B; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Prosper, H; Veeraraghavan, V; Weinberg, M; Baarmand, M M; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Berry, D; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatyan, S; Kurt, P; Moon, D H; O'Brien, C; Silkworth, C; Turner, P; Varelas, N; Albayrak, E A; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Duru, F; Haytmyradov, M; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Penzo, A; Rahmat, R; Sen, S; Tan, P; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bolognesi, S; Fehling, D; Gritsan, A V; Maksimovic, P; Martin, C; Swartz, M; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Bruner, C; Gray, J; Kenny, R P; Malek, M; Murray, M; Noonan, D; Sanders, S; Sekaric, J; Stringer, R; Wang, Q; Wood, J S; Barfuss, A F; Chakaberia, I; Ivanov, A; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Saini, L K; Shrestha, S; Skhirtladze, N; Svintradze, I; Gronberg, J; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Baden, A; Belloni, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kolberg, T; Lu, Y; Marionneau, M; Mignerey, A C; Pedro, K; Skuja, A; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Barbieri, R; Bauer, G; Busza, W; Cali, I A; Chan, M; Di Matteo, L; Dutta, V; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Gulhan, D; Klute, M; Lai, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Ma, T; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Stephans, G S F; Stöckli, F; Sumorok, K; Velicanu, D; Veverka, J; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Zanetti, M; Zhukova, V; Dahmes, B; Gude, A; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Pastika, N; Rusack, R; Singovsky, A; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Oliveros, S; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Keller, J; Knowlton, D; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Malik, S; Meier, F; Snow, G R; Dolen, J; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Haley, J; Massironi, A; Morse, D M; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Trocino, D; Wang, R-J; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Sung, K; Velasco, M; Won, S; Brinkerhoff, A; Chan, K M; Drozdetskiy, A; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Lannon, K; Luo, W; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Ruchti, R; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Woodard, A; Antonelli, L; Brinson, J; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Smith, G; Winer, B L; Wolfe, H; Wulsin, H W; Driga, O; Elmer, P; Hebda, P; Hunt, A; Koay, S A; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zenz, S C; Zuranski, A; Brownson, E; Mendez, H; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; De Mattia, M; Hu, Z; Jha, M K; Jones, M; Jung, K; Kress, M; Leonardo, N; Lopes Pegna, D; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Radburn-Smith, B C; Shi, X; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Wang, F; Xie, W; Xu, L; Yoo, H D; Zablocki, J; Zheng, Y; Parashar, N; Stupak, J; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Khukhunaishvili, A; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Kaplan, S; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Patel, R; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Rose, K; Spanier, S; York, A; Bouhali, O; Castaneda Hernandez, A; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Krutelyov, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Rose, A; Safonov, A; Sakuma, T; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Kovitanggoon, K; Kunori, S; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Sharma, M; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wood, J; Clarke, C; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sturdy, J; Belknap, D A; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Friis, E; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Levine, A; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ross, I; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Vuosalo, C; Woods, N

    2014-12-31

    The ratio between the prompt ψ(2S) and J/ψ yields, reconstructed via their decays into μ+ μ-, is measured in Pb-Pb and p-p collisions at sqrt[sNN]=2.76  TeV. The analysis is based on Pb-Pb and p-p data samples collected by CMS at the Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 150  μb(-1) and 5.4  pb(-1), respectively. The double ratio of measured yields (Nψ(2S)/N(J/ψ))(Pb-Pb)/(Nψ(2S)/N(J/ψ))(p-p) is computed in three Pb-Pb collision centrality bins and two kinematic ranges: one at midrapidity, |y|<1.6, covering the transverse momentum range 6.5T<30  GeV/c, and the other at forward rapidity, 1.6<|y|<2.4, extending to lower pT values, 3T<30  GeV/c. The centrality-integrated double ratio changes from 0.45±0.13(stat)±0.07(syst) in the first range to 1.67±0.34(stat)±0.27(syst) in the second. This difference is most pronounced in the most central collisions.

  14. Effects of room temperature aging on two cryogenic temperature sensor models used in aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courts, S. Scott; Krause, John

    2012-06-01

    Cryogenic temperature sensors used in aerospace applications are typically procured far in advance of the mission launch date. Depending upon the program, the temperature sensors may be stored at room temperature for extended periods as installation and groundbased testing can take years before the actual flight. The effects of long term storage at room temperature are sometimes approximated by the use of accelerated aging at temperatures well above room temperature, but this practice can yield invalid results as the sensing material and/or electrical contacting method can be increasingly unstable with higher temperature exposure. To date, little data are available on the effects of extended room temperature aging on sensors commonly used in aerospace applications. This research examines two such temperature sensors models - the Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. model CernoxTM and DT-670-SD temperature sensors. Sample groups of each model type have been maintained for ten years or longer with room temperature storage between calibrations. Over an eighteen year period, the CernoxTM temperature sensors exhibited a stability of better than ±20 mK for T<30 K and better than ±0.1% of temperature for T>30 K. Over a ten year period the model DT-670-SD sensors exhibited a stability of better than ±140 mK for T<25 K and better than ±75 mK for T>25 K.

  15. Time of day affects heart rate recovery and variability after maximal exercise in pre-hypertensive men.

    PubMed

    Brito, Leandro; Peçanha, Tiago; Tinucci, Taís; Silva-Junior, Natan; Costa, Luiz; Forjaz, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) recovery (HRR) and variability (HRV) after exercise are non-invasive tools used to assess cardiac autonomic regulation and cardiovascular prognosis. Autonomic recovery is slower after evening than morning exercise in healthy individuals, but this influence is unknown in subjects with autonomic dysfunction, although it may affect prognostic evaluation. This study compared post-exercise HRR and HRV after maximal morning and evening exercise in pre-hypertensive men. Ten volunteers randomly underwent two maximal exercise tests conducted in the morning (8-10 a.m.) and evening (6-8 p.m.). HRR60s (HR reduction at 60 s of recovery - prognostic index), T30 (short-term time-constant of HRR - parasympathetic reactivation marker), rMSSD30s (square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent R-R intervals on subsequent 30 s segments - parasympathetic reactivation marker), and HRRτ (time constant of the first order exponential fitting of HRR - marker of sympathetic withdraw and parasympathetic reactivation) were measured. Paired t-test and two-way ANOVA were used. HRR60s and HRRτ were similar after exercise in the morning and evening (27 ± 7 vs. 29 ± 7 bpm, p = 0.111, and 79 ± 14 vs. 96 ± 29 s, p = 0.119, respectively). T30 was significantly greater after evening exercise (405 ± 215 vs. 295 ± 119 s, p = 0.002) and rMSSD30s was lower in the evening (main factor session, p = 0.009). In conclusion, in pre-hypertensive men, the prognostic index of HRR, HRR60s, is not affected by the time of day when exercise is conducted. However, post-exercise parasympathetic reactivation, evaluated by T30 and rMSSD30s, is blunted after evening exercise. PMID:26588261

  16. Measurement of tritium in natural water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meifen

    1985-06-01

    A detergent-scintillation liquid mixture applied to measure low specific activity of tritium in natural water was studied. The DYS-1 low level liquid scintillation counter designed and manufactured by our institute was employed. In comparing the Triton X-100 scintillation liquid mixture with the dioxane-based-scintillation liquid, a better formula for Triton X-100 scintillation liquid mixture was determined, the mixture possesses the quality of high water content; high efficiency and low back-ground in measuring tritium in water. Chemiluminescence of the Triton X-100 scintillation liquid mixture can be totally de-excited in short time. It can be employed at ambient temperature 11 28°C. For 20ml sample in quartz vials, counting efficiency is 15% with a background 2.17 cpm, Y=31 TU (t=30 min).

  17. Complete mitochondrial genome of the crested black macaque (Macaca nigra).

    PubMed

    Du, Li-Na; Shi, Fang-Lei; Liu, Zhi-Jin; Zhou, Qi-Hai

    2014-12-01

    Abstract The complete mitochondrial sequence of the crested black macaque (Macaca nigra) has been determined by mapping the raw data to previously published mitochondrial assemblies of the corresponding species. The total sequence length is 16,564 bp and includes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 1 D-loop control region. The base composition of mtDNA genome is 31.76% A, 25.27% T, 30.17% C, and 12.80% G, with an AT content of 57.03%. The arrangement of genes in M. nigra is identical to that of M. mulatta. All genes are encoded on the heavy strand with the exception of ND6 and eight tRNA genes. The mitochondrial genome of M. nigra presented here will contribute to a better understanding of the population genetics, help to protect its genetic diversity and resolve phylogenetic relationships within the family.

  18. Effect of diesel oxidation catalysts on the diesel particulate filter regeneration process.

    PubMed

    Lizarraga, Leonardo; Souentie, Stamatios; Boreave, Antoinette; George, Christian; D'Anna, Barbara; Vernoux, Philippe

    2011-12-15

    A Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) regeneration process was investigated during aftertreatment exhaust of a simulated diesel engine under the influence of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC). Aerosol mass spectrometry analysis showed that the presence of the DOC decreases the Organic Carbon (OC) fraction adsorbed to soot particles. The activation energy values determined for soot nanoparticles oxidation were 97 ± 5 and 101 ± 8 kJ mol(-1) with and without the DOC, respectively; suggesting that the DOC does not facilitate elementary carbon oxidation. The minimum temperature necessary for DPF regeneration was strongly affected by the presence of the DOC in the aftertreatment. The conversion of NO to NO(2) inside the DOC induced the DPF regeneration process at a lower temperature than O(2) (ΔT = 30 K). Also, it was verified that the OC fraction, which decreases in the presence of the DOC, plays an important role to ignite soot combustion.

  19. Neutron capture cross section measurement of 151Sm at the CERN neutron time of flight facility (n_TOF).

    PubMed

    Abbondanno, U; Aerts, G; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Alvarez-Pol, H; Andriamonje, S; Andrzejewski, J; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvár, F; Benlliure, J; Berthoumieux, E; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, E; Colonna, N; Cortes, G; Cortina, D; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dababneh, S; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dolfini, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Frais-Koelbl, H; Furman, W; Goncalves, I; Gallino, R; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Goverdovski, A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martinez, A; Isaev, S; Jericha, E; Käppeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Kerveno, M; Ketlerov, V; Koehler, P; Konovalov, V; Krticka, M; Lamboudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martinez-Val, J; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Molina-Coballes, A; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, H; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papaevangelou, T; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perlado, J M; Perrot, L; Pignatari, M; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Policarpo, A; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Raman, S; Rapp, W; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, C; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Soares, J C; Stephan, C; Tagliente, G; Tain, J; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarin, D; Vincente, M C; Vlachoudis, V; Voss, F; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2004-10-15

    The151Sm(n,gamma)152Sm cross section has been measured at the spallation neutron facility n_TOF at CERN in the energy range from 1 eV to 1 MeV. The new facility combines excellent resolution in neutron time-of-flight, low repetition rates, and an unsurpassed instantaneous luminosity, resulting in rather favorable signal/background ratios. The 151Sm cross section is of importance for characterizing neutron capture nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars. At a thermal energy of kT=30 keV the Maxwellian averaged cross section of this unstable isotope (t(1/2)=93 yr) was determined to be 3100+/-160 mb, significantly larger than theoretical predictions.

  20. Stellar neutron capture rates for /sup 46/Ca and /sup 48/Ca

    SciTech Connect

    Kaeppeller, F.; Walter, G.; Mathews, G.J.

    1985-04-01

    Stellar neutron capture rates for /sup 46/Ca and /sup 48/Ca have been measured by the activation technique. Both kT = 25 keV Maxwellian-like incident neutron spectra and non-Maxwellian higher energy spectra have been utilized to study the possible role of individual capture resonances. Maxwellian-averaged (kT = 30 keV) cross sections of 5.7 +- 0.5 and 0.95 +- 0.09 mb are derived for /sup 46/Ca and /sup 48/Ca, respectively. The possibility of a neutron capture origin for /sup 46/Ca and /sup 48/Ca is discussed in the light of these new cross sections, as well as a mechanism for the production of the observed isotopic anomalies in inclusion EK-1-4-1 from the Allende meteorite.

  1. Neutron capture cross sections of /sup 178/,/sup 179/,/sup 180/Hf and the origin of nature's rarest stable isotope /sup 180/Ta

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, H.; Macklin, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of /sup 178/,/sup 179/,/sup 180/Hf were measured in the energy range 2.6 keV to 2 MeV. The average capture cross sections were derived and fitted in terms of strength functions. Resonance parameters for the observed resonances below 10 keV were determined by shape analysis. Maxwellian-averaged capture cross sections were computed for thermal energies with kT between 5 and 100 keV. The cross sections for kT = 30 keV were used to determine the population probability of the 8- isomeric level in /sup 180/Hf by neutron capture as (1.24 +- 0.06)% and the r-process abundance of /sup 180/Hf as 0.0290 (Si = 10/sup 6/). These quantities served to analyze s- and r-process nucleosynthesis of /sup 180/Ta, nature's rarest stable isotope.

  2. Methane production from the red seaweed gracilaria tikvahiae

    SciTech Connect

    Hanisak, M.D.

    1981-01-01

    Stable continuous anaerobic digestion of the title seaweed was maintained in large (120 L) digesters for more than 20 months, with an average gas (60% CH4) production of 0.4 L/g volatile solids. The average bioconversion efficiency was approximately 48%. When the retention time, t, was increased (i.e., loading rate decreased) from 10 to 60 days the total production of biogas and CH4 (as well as the percent CH4 and the reduction of total volatile solids) increased to maximum at t = 30 days and decreased at t = 60 days. Biogas and CH4 production on the basis of volatile solids added increased to less than or equal to 60 days, as did the percent volatile solids reduction. The pH in the digesters increased with increasing t.

  3. Neutrino dynamics below the electroweak crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M.

    2016-07-01

    We estimate the thermal masses and damping rates of active (m < eV) and sterile (M ~ GeV) neutrinos with thermal momenta k~ 3T at temperatures below the electroweak crossover (5 GeV < T < 160 GeV) . These quantities fix the equilibration or ``washout'' rates of Standard Model lepton number densities. Sterile neutrinos interact via direct scatterings mediated by Yukawa couplings, and via their overlap with active neutrinos. Including all leading-order reactions we find that the washout rate generally exceeds the Hubble rate for 5 GeV < T < 30 GeV . Therefore it is challenging to generate a large lepton asymmetry facilitating dark matter computations operating at T < 5 GeV, whereas the generation of a baryon asymmetry at T > 130 GeV remains an option. Our differential rates are tabulated in a form suitable for studies of specific scenarios with given neutrino Yukawa matrices.

  4. Recovery of Pyruvic Acid using Tri-n-butylamine Dissolved in Non-Toxic Diluent (Rice Bran Oil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Dharm; Keshav, Amit

    2016-04-01

    An attempt has been made to investigate the effectiveness of the vegetable oil based biocompatible solvent for the separation of pyruvic acid from fermentation broth, by using rice bran oil as natural, non-toxic diluent. Reactive extraction of pyruvic acid (0.1-0.5 k mol/m3) from aqueous solutions has been studied using tri-n-butylamine (TBA; 10-70 %) as an extractant dissolved in non toxic rice bran oil at T = 30 ± 1 °C. Results were presented in terms of distribution coefficient (Kd), extraction efficiency (E %), loading ratio (Z), and complexation constant (\\varphi_{α β }). Extraction equilibrium was interpreted using mass action modeling approach. Based on the extent of loading (Z < 0.5) only (1:1), pyruvic acid: TBA complex was proposed. Equilibrium complexation constant was evaluated to 1.22 m3/k mol. Results obtained are useful in understanding the extraction mechanism.

  5. SESAME 7363: A new Li(6)D equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, Daniel Glen; Kress, Joel David; Crockett, Scott; Collins, Lee A.; Greeff, Carl William

    2015-09-21

    A new Equation of State (EOS) for Lithium 6 Deuteride (6LiD) was created, sesame 7363. This EOS was released to the user community under “eos-developmental” as sesame 97363. The construction of this new EOS is a modification of a previously released EOS, sesame 73601. Sesame 7360 is too stiff (5-10% excess pressure) at high compressions and high temperatures (ρ = 4-110g/cm3, T = 30-10,000 eV) compared to orbital-free density-functional theory. Sesame 7363 is softer and gives a better representation of the physics over this range without compromising the agreement with the experimental and simulation data that sesame 7360 was based on.

  6. Crystal field and magnetization of canted antiferromagnet CoCO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshcheryakov, V. F.

    2007-11-01

    The magnetization of the canted antiferromagnet CoCO3 ( T N = 18.1 K) is calculated in the Weiss molecular field approximation taking into account the microscopic state of the Co2+ ion in the entire range of temperatures and magnetic fields. The values of T N, magnetic susceptibility in the basal plane, and ferromagnetic moment were used as parameters. It is shown that the anisotropy of the g factor and of the exchange interaction at low temperatures ( T < 30 K) including the magnetic ordering temperature is correctly described in the Abragam-Pryce approximation. At high temperatures, the g factor increases and becomes isotropic, but it cannot be described using the Abragam-Pryce approximation. The reasons for g factor variation and the magnitude of the magnetic moment are discussed.

  7. A high-field superferric NMR magnet.

    PubMed

    Huson, F R; Bryan, R N; MacKay, W W; Herrick, R C; Colvin, J; Ford, J J; Pissanetzky, S; Plishker, G A; Rocha, R; Schmidt, W

    1993-01-01

    Strong, extensive magnetic fringe fields are a significant problem with magnetic resonance imaging magnets. This is particularly acute with 4-T, whole-body research magnets. To date this problem has been addressed by restricting an extensive zone around the unshielded magnet or by placing external unsaturated iron shielding around the magnet. This paper describes a solution to this problem which uses superconducting coils closely integrated with fully saturated iron elements. A 4-T, 30-cm-bore prototype, based on this design principle, was built and tested. The 5 G fringe field is contained within 1 meter of the magnet bore along the z axis. Homogeneity of the raw magnetic field is 10 ppm over 30% of the magnet's diameter after passive shimming. Compared with an unshielded magnet, 20% less superconductor is required to generate the magnetic field. Images and spectra are presented to demonstrate the magnet's viability for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy.

  8. Substituent and Solvent Effects on Excited State Charge Transfer Behavior of Highly Fluorescent Dyes Containing Thiophenylimidazole-Based Aldehydes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos, Javier; Bu, Xiu R.; Mintz, Eric A.

    2001-01-01

    The excited state charge transfer for a series of highly fluorescent dyes containing thiophenylimidazole moiety was investigated. These systems follow the Twisted Intramolecular Charge Transfer (TICT) model. Dual fluorescence was observed for each substituted dye. X-ray structures analysis reveals a twisted ground state geometry for the donor substituted aryl on the 4 and 5 position at the imidazole ring. The excited state charge transfer was modeled by a linear solvation energy relationship using Taft's pi and Dimroth's E(sub T)(30) as solvent parameters. There is linear relation between the energy of the fluorescence transition and solvent polarity. The degree of stabilization of the excited state charge transfer was found to be consistent with the intramolecular molecular charge transfer. Excited dipole moment was studied by utilizing the solvatochromic shift method.

  9. In Situ Radiometric and Exposure Age Dating of the Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, K. A.; Malespin, C.; Mahaffy, P.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Vasconcelos, P. M.; Milliken, R. E.; Malin, M.; Edgett, K. S.; Pavlov, A. A.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Grant, J. A.; Miller, H. B.; Arvidson, R.; Beegle, L.; Calef, F.; Conrad, P. G.; Dietrich, W. E.; Eigenbrode, J.; Gellert, R.; Gupta, S.; Hamilton, V.; Hassler, D. M.; Lewis, K. W.; McLennan, S. M.; Ming, D. M.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Steele, A.; Stolper, E. M.; Sumner, D. Y.; Vaniman, D.; Vasavada, A.; Williford, K.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2014-01-01

    We determined radiogenic and cosmogenic noble gases in a mudstone on the floor of Gale Crater. A K-Ar age of 4.21 +/- 0.35 billion years represents a mixture of detrital and authigenic components and confirms the expected antiquity of rocks comprising the crater rim. Cosmic-ray-produced 3He, 21Ne, and 36Ar yield concordant surface exposure ages of 78 T 30 million years. Surface exposure occurred mainly in the present geomorphic setting rather than during primary erosion and transport. Our observations are consistent with mudstone deposition shortly after the Gale impact or possibly in a later event of rapid erosion and deposition. The mudstone remained buried until recent exposure by wind-driven scarp retreat. Sedimentary rocks exposed by this mechanism may thus offer the best potential for organic biomarker preservation against destruction by cosmic radiation.

  10. Interaction of near-IR laser radiation with plasma of a continuous optical discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimakov, V. P.; Kuznetsov, V. A.; Solovyov, N. G.; Shemyakin, A. N.; Shilov, A. O.; Yakimov, M. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of 1.07-μm laser radiation with plasma of a continuous optical discharge (COD) in xenon and argon at a pressure of p = 3-25 bar and temperature of T = 15 kK has been studied. The threshold power required to sustain COD is found to decrease with increasing gas pressure to P t < 30 W in xenon at p > 20 bar and to P t < 350 W in argon at p > 15 bar. This effect is explained by an increase in the coefficient of laser radiation absorption to 20-25 cm-1 in Xe and 1-2 cm-1 in Ar due to electronic transitions between the broadened excited atomic levels. The COD characteristics also depend on the laser beam refraction in plasma. This effect can be partially compensated by a tighter focusing of the laser beam. COD is applied as a broadband light source with a high spectral brightness.

  11. Neutron capture cross section measurement of 151Sm at the CERN neutron time of flight facility (n_TOF).

    PubMed

    Abbondanno, U; Aerts, G; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Alvarez-Pol, H; Andriamonje, S; Andrzejewski, J; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvár, F; Benlliure, J; Berthoumieux, E; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, E; Colonna, N; Cortes, G; Cortina, D; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dababneh, S; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dolfini, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Frais-Koelbl, H; Furman, W; Goncalves, I; Gallino, R; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Goverdovski, A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martinez, A; Isaev, S; Jericha, E; Käppeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Kerveno, M; Ketlerov, V; Koehler, P; Konovalov, V; Krticka, M; Lamboudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martinez-Val, J; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Molina-Coballes, A; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, H; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papaevangelou, T; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perlado, J M; Perrot, L; Pignatari, M; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Policarpo, A; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Raman, S; Rapp, W; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, C; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Soares, J C; Stephan, C; Tagliente, G; Tain, J; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarin, D; Vincente, M C; Vlachoudis, V; Voss, F; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2004-10-15

    The151Sm(n,gamma)152Sm cross section has been measured at the spallation neutron facility n_TOF at CERN in the energy range from 1 eV to 1 MeV. The new facility combines excellent resolution in neutron time-of-flight, low repetition rates, and an unsurpassed instantaneous luminosity, resulting in rather favorable signal/background ratios. The 151Sm cross section is of importance for characterizing neutron capture nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars. At a thermal energy of kT=30 keV the Maxwellian averaged cross section of this unstable isotope (t(1/2)=93 yr) was determined to be 3100+/-160 mb, significantly larger than theoretical predictions. PMID:15524972

  12. Overview of KSTAR ICRF Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. K.; An, C. Y.; Kwak, J. G.

    2011-12-01

    At magnetic field of 2 T, 30 MHz, 500 kW of RF power was injected for the central ion and electron heating for D(H) plasmas of KSTAR tokamak. Clear evidence of plasma temperature and stored energy elevation were observed with less impurity generation compared to the previous campaign. With a RF injection period, sawtooth stabilization was observed and this effect is thought to be caused by conductivity perturbation at sawtooth inversion radius as maximum power deposition layer is located at slightly inside of sawtooth inversion layer inferred from the profile measurement of increase in electron temperature. In contrast with previous results showing increasing RF loading resistance with RF power, stable loading resistance was obtained during the whole operation. This effect and less impurity contents suggests that the stray power absorption was lowered quite a lot.

  13. Damping of charge-density waves in NbSe 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, J.; Chen, J.

    1993-05-01

    We have performed DC conductivity measurements in high electric field, and "Narrow-band noise" measurements up to 400 MHz, for temperatures in the range 15-55K, and in magnetic field 0-7 T. From the saturating value of dE/dv obtained in high electric field we have deduced the total damping parameter τ -1 which decreases with decreasing temperature. We analyse our data with the Wonneberger's theory for the ac response of the collective mode, which predicts in the low frequency range, τ1 = τ0-1(1+ α)+ βϱqp, where τ 0-1 is the bare phason damping coefficient and ϱ qp the quasiparticle resistivity. From our measurements we deduce the thermal variation of τ 0-1 which seems to verify for T < 30 K the theoretical prediction of Takada, Wong and Holstein in the low temperature limit, τ 0-1 ≌ A 1T 5.

  14. Ferromagnetic correlations in Yb2Ti2O7 as revealed by small angle neutron scattering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhariwalla, Connor; Ma, Qianli; Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa; Dabkowska, Hanna; Gaulin, Bruce

    We report low temperature SANS measurements on frustrated Seff=1/2 XY pyrochlore magnet Yb2Ti2O7. The ground state of this material has been proposed as a realization of a quantum spin ice; however, the low temperature phase behaviour has been complicated by sample dependencies believed to be related to weak ``stuffing''. Our SANS study focuses on the low Q structure of elastic ``rods'' of magnetic scattering which extend from Q=0 along the 111 direction. Using a single crystal sample, we characterize the low Q (<0.2Å-1) temperature dependence of this structured diffuse scattering intensity to T=30mK, passing through the enigmatic heat capacity anomaly near Tc=200mK. The temperature dependence of this diffuse scattering near Q=0 is largely consistent with that measured previously near 111.

  15. Dirac and Pauli form factors based on consideration of the gluon effect in light-cone wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaei, Mohammad Reza; Nikkhoo, Negin Sattary

    2015-11-01

    We discuss Dirac and Pauli form factors based on a generalized parton distribution framework in the range of high momentum transfers of t < 30 GeV2 and calculate the electromagnetic form factors, GE and GM, for the proton. In previous work, Gaussian parameterization has been used in wave functions for calculating electromagnetic form factors at intermediate-high momentum transfers of 1 GeV2 < t < 10 GeV2; in this paper, by considering an improved Gaussian ansatz, we not only calculate the electromagnetic form factors at moderately high momentum transfers t but also can calculate these quantities at high momentum transfers, achieving reasonable agreement with experimental data and other previous work.

  16. Cloud point extraction of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol from cannabis resin.

    PubMed

    Ameur, S; Haddou, B; Derriche, Z; Canselier, J P; Gourdon, C

    2013-04-01

    A cloud point extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC/UV) method was developed for the determination of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in micellar phase. The nonionic surfactant "Dowfax 20B102" was used to extract and pre-concentrate THC from cannabis resin, prior to its determination with a HPLC-UV system (diode array detector) with isocratic elution. The parameters and variables affecting the extraction were investigated. Under optimum conditions (1 wt.% Dowfax 20B102, 1 wt.% Na2SO4, T = 318 K, t = 30 min), this method yielded a quite satisfactory recovery rate (~81 %). The limit of detection was 0.04 μg mL(-1), and the relative standard deviation was less than 2 %. Compared with conventional solid-liquid extraction, this new method avoids the use of volatile organic solvents, therefore is environmentally safer.

  17. A measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections for W and Z bosons in association with jets with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.

    2014-12-02

    In this study, the ratio of the production cross sections for W and Z bosons in association with jets has been measured in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The measurement is based on the entire 2011 dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6fb–1. Inclusive and differential cross-section ratios for massive vector bosons decaying to electrons and muons are measured in association with jets with transverse momentum pT > 30GeV and jet rapidity |y| < 4.4. The measurements are compared to next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations and to predictions from differentmore » Monte Carlo generators implementing leading-order matrix elements supplemented by parton showers.« less

  18. The Met Office NWP-based Nowcasting Demonstration Project for the summer 2012 floods and London Olympics 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Susan P.; Li, Zhihong; Simonin, David; Tubbs, Robert; Kelly, Graeme; Caron, Jean-Francois

    2013-04-01

    The Met Office developed a high resolution (1.5km) NWP system covering southern England and Wales for nowcasting (NDP) for the London Olympics 2012 using the Unified Model and hourly cycling 4D-Var data assimilation. The system produces 6 hour forecasts every hour. This has been running near-real-time since March 2012 on the IBM Power 6 and moved to the new IBM Power 7 in September 2012. The system uses latent heat nudging of radar derived rain rates provided every 15mins, direct assimilation in VAR of an hourly 3D cloud cover analysis and high time frequency subhourly radar Doppler winds (6 per hour), wind profiler and MSG SEVIRI upper tropospheric water vapour channels every 15mins as well as hourly surface synoptic reports and AMDAR reports. Eumetsat Satellite winds (AMVs) are used but they are very coarse horizontally and temporally eg at T-30mins only. The domain includes 8 of the UK network radars of which 5 were providing Doppler radial winds by the time of the Olympics and 4 wind. Boundary condition updates were provided every 30mins from 1.5km resolution 6hourly forecasts from a 3hourly cycling 3-km 3D-VAR for the UK region, UKV model. The NDP uses a 4D-Var data assimilation system with 1/2 UM resolution (i.e. 3km), hourly assimilation windows with 10 minute LS states, and 100 second timestep. The PF model and its adjoint have dimensions of 180 x 144 x 70. Observations are extracted in the observation time window T-30 mins to T+30 mins. The 1.5km UM (360 x 288 x 70) uses 50 sec time-stepping on 6 nodes in 12 x16 decomposition. 4D-Var increments are added to UM at the initial forecast time T-30 mins (at first UM time step). A 45 minute data cutoff was used and forecasts were available within 1 hour of nominal analysis time ie taking 15mins for observation processing, data assimilation and forecast. Summer 2012 was an excellent time to assess the skill of the system for flash flood prediction due to the extreme weather over the UK during that period

  19. INMS-derived composition of Titan's upper atmosphere: Analysis methods and model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Brian A.; Waite, J. Hunter; Mandt, Kathleen E.; Westlake, Joseph; Bell, Jared; Gell, David A.

    2009-12-01

    The Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) has recorded full altitude profile data from 20 low-altitude Titan encounters during the nominal mission (July 2004-2008). These encounters were TA, T5, T16, T18, T19, T21, T23, T25, T26, T28, T29, T30, T32, T36, T37, T39, T40, T41, T42, and T43. In this work we present an analysis of the data observed by INMS during these encounters to derive the neutral composition of Titan's upper atmosphere between 1000 and 1100 km. Analysis methods are described for the determination and correction of instrument effects as well as the composition derivation processes. Results are compared to independent INMS analysis efforts and a selected survey of photochemical models of Titan's upper atmosphere.

  20. Measurement of the production cross section of jets in association with a Z boson in pp collisions at √{s}=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boek, T. T.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Colas, J.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Daniells, A. C.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delemontex, T.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dinut, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dodd, J.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edson, W.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, M. J.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Florez Bustos, A. C.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fowler, A. J.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, C.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Gan, K. K.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Gao, Y. S.; Gaponenko, A.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerlach, P.; Gershon, A.; Geweniger, C.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giunta, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glazov, A.; Glonti, G. L.; Goddard, J. R.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Goeringer, C.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez Silva, M. L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Göpfert, T.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Gozpinar, S.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Gray, J. A.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Greenshaw, T.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grybel, K.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guicheney, C.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gunther, J.; Guo, B.; Guo, J.; Gutierrez, P.; Guttman, N.; Gutzwiller, O.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haas, S.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haefner, P.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Handel, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Harkusha, S.; Harper, D.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Hartert, J.; Hartjes, F.; Haruyama, T.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayakawa, T.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heinemann, B.; Heisterkamp, S.; Helary, L.; Heller, C.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henke, M.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hensel, C.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernandez, C. M.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hofmann, J. I.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holmgren, S. O.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huettmann, A.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Hurwitz, M.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idarraga, J.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikematsu, K.; Ikeno, M.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ivashin, A. V.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, J. N.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansen, H.; Janssen, J.; Jantsch, A.; Janus, M.; Jared, R. C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jeanty, L.; Jeng, G.-Y.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jeske, C.; Jež, P.; Jézéquel, S.; Jha, M. K.; Ji, H.; Ji, W.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jimenez Belenguer, M.; Jin, S.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Joffe, D.; Johansen, M.; Johansson, K. E.; Johansson, P.; Johnert, S.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Joram, C.; Jorge, P. M.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Jovin, T.; Ju, X.; Jung, C. A.; Jungst, R. M.; Jussel, P.; Juste Rozas, A.; Kabana, S.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kadlecik, P.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalinin, S.; Kama, S.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kanno, T.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karagounis, M.; Karakostas, K.; Karnevskiy, M.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Katzy, J.; Kaushik, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Kazarinov, M. Y.; Keeler, R.; Keener, P. T.; Kehoe, R.; Keil, M.; Keller, J. S.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Kessoku, K.; Keung, J.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharchenko, D.; Khodinov, A.; Khomich, A.; Khoo, T. J.; Khoriauli, G.; Khoroshilov, A.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kim, H.; Kim, S. H.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, R. S. B.; King, S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, T.; Kittelmann, T.; Kiuchi, K.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klemetti, M.; Klier, A.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. A.; Klinkby, E. B.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Klok, P. F.; Klous, S.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koenig, S.; Koetsveld, F.; Koevesarki, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kogan, L. A.; Kohlmann, S.; Kohn, F.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Koi, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Koletsou, I.; Koll, J.; Komar, A. A.; Komori, Y.; Kondo, T.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; Kono, T.; Kononov, A. I.; Konoplich, R.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopeliansky, R.; Koperny, S.; Köpke, L.; Kopp, A. K.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korol, A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Korotkov, V. A.; Kortner, O.; Kortner, S.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotov, S.; Kotov, V. M.; Kotwal, A.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouskoura, V.; Koutsman, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kral, V.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kraus, J. K.; Kravchenko, A.; Kreiss, S.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kreutzfeldt, K.; Krieger, N.; Krieger, P.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Kruker, T.; Krumnack, N.; Krumshteyn, Z. V.; Kruse, M. K.; Kubota, T.; Kuday, S.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kuna, M.; Kunkle, J.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurata, M.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kus, V.; Kuwertz, E. S.; Kuze, M.; Kvita, J.; Kwee, R.; La Rosa, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Labarga, L.; Lablak, S.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacey, J.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V. R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Laier, H.; Laisne, E.; Lambourne, L.; Lampen, C. L.; Lampl, W.; Lançon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lang, V. S.; Lange, C.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Lanza, A.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Larner, A.; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavorini, V.; Lavrijsen, W.; Laycock, P.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Menedeu, E.; LeCompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, L.; Lefebvre, M.; Legendre, M.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehmacher, M.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Leister, A. G.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; Lemmer, B.; Lendermann, V.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzen, G.; Lenzi, B.; Leonhardt, K.; Leontsinis, S.; Lepold, F.; Leroy, C.; Lessard, J.-R.; Lester, C. G.; Lester, C. M.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Lewis, A.; Lewis, G. H.; Leyko, A. M.; Leyton, M.; Li, B.; Li, B.; Li, H.; Li, H. L.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Liang, Z.; Liao, H.; Liberti, B.; Lichard, P.; Lie, K.; Liebal, J.; Liebig, W.; Limbach, C.; Limosani, A.; Limper, M.; Lin, S. C.; Linde, F.; Lindquist, B. E.; Linnemann, J. T.; Lipeles, E.; Lipniacka, A.; Lisovyi, M.; Liss, T. M.; Lissauer, D.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, D.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, K.; Liu, L.; Liu, M.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Livermore, S. S. A.; Lleres, A.; Llorente Merino, J.; Lloyd, S. L.; Lo Sterzo, F.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loch, P.; Lockman, W. S.; Loddenkoetter, T.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loevschall-Jensen, A. E.; Loginov, A.; Loh, C. W.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Lombardo, V. P.; Long, R. E.; Lopes, L.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Lorenz, J.; Lorenzo Martinez, N.; Losada, M.; Loscutoff, P.; Losty, M. J.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Loureiro, K. F.; Love, J.; Love, P. A.; Lowe, A. J.; Lu, F.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Ludwig, D.; Ludwig, I.; Ludwig, J.; Luehring, F.; Lukas, W.; Luminari, L.; Lund, E.; Lundberg, B.; Lundberg, J.; Lundberg, O.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lundquist, J.; Lungwitz, M.; Lynn, D.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Maček, B.; Machado Miguens, J.; Macina, D.; Mackeprang, R.; Madar, R.; Madaras, R. J.; Maddocks, H. J.; Mader, W. F.; Madsen, A.; Maeno, M.; Maeno, T.; Magnoni, L.; Magradze, E.; Mahboubi, K.; Mahlstedt, J.; Mahmoud, S.; Mahout, G.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maio, A.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P.; Malaescu, B.; Malecki, Pa.; Malecki, P.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Malone, C.; Maltezos, S.; Malyshev, V.; Malyukov, S.; Mamuzic, J.; Mandelli, L.; Mandić, I.; Mandrysch, R.; Maneira, J.; Manfredini, A.; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, L.; Manjarres Ramos, J. A.; Mann, A.; Manning, P. M.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mantifel, R.; Mapelli, L.; March, L.; Marchand, J. F.; Marchese, F.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marino, C. P.; Marroquim, F.; Marshall, Z.; Marti, L. F.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Martin, B.; Martin, B.; Martin, J. P.; Martin, T. A.; Martin, V. J.; Martin dit Latour, B.; Martinez, H.; Martinez, M.; Martin-Haugh, S.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Marx, M.; Marzano, F.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Massa, I.; Massol, N.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Matsunaga, H.; Matsushita, T.; Mättig, P.; Mättig, S.; Mattravers, C.; Maurer, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Maximov, D. A.; Mazini, R.; Mazur, M.; Mazzaferro, L.; Mazzanti, M.; Mc Kee, S. P.; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCarthy, T. G.; McCubbin, N. A.; McFarlane, K. W.; Mcfayden, J. A.; Mchedlidze, G.; Mclaughlan, T.; McMahon, S. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Meade, A.; Mechnich, J.; Mechtel, M.; Medinnis, M.; Meehan, S.; Meera-Lebbai, R.; Meguro, T.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meineck, C.; Meirose, B.; Melachrinos, C.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Meloni, F.; Mendoza Navas, L.; Mengarelli, A.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Mercurio, K. M.; Meric, N.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Merritt, H.; Messina, A.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, J.; Michal, S.; Middleton, R. P.; Migas, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, W. J.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Milstein, D.; Minaenko, A. A.; Miñano Moya, M.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mirabelli, G.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Mitsui, S.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Moa, T.; Moeller, V.; Mohapatra, S.; Mohr, W.; Moles-Valls, R.; Molfetas, A.; Mönig, K.; Monini, C.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Morange, N.; Morel, J.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Morgenstern, M.; Morii, M.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Morvaj, L.; Möser, N.; Moser, H. G.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, T.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Müller, T. A.; Munwes, Y.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Mussche, I.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, K.; Nagarkar, A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagel, M.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Nanava, G.; Napier, A.; Narayan, R.; Nash, M.; Nattermann, T.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Negri, A.; Negri, G.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nelson, A.; Nelson, T. K.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neusiedl, A.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newcomer, F. M.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nguyen Thi Hong, V.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicquevert, B.; Niedercorn, F.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforou, N.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolics, K.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Novakova, J.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A.-E.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; O'Brien, B. J.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakes, L. B.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, M. I.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Odier, J.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohshima, T.; Okamura, W.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Olchevski, A. G.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira, M.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olivito, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Osuna, C.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Ottersbach, J. P.; Ouchrif, M.; Ouellette, E. A.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Owen, S.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Paleari, C. P.; Palestini, S.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J. D.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Papadelis, A.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Park, W.; Parker, M. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pashapour, S.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedraza Morales, M. I.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penson, A.; Penwell, J.; Perez Cavalcanti, T.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Perrodo, P.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petschull, D.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Phan, A.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Piec, S. M.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinder, A.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pizio, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Poblaguev, A.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Pohl, M.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Portell Bueso, X.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospisil, S.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Prell, S.; Pretzl, K.; Price, D.; Price, J.; Price, L. E.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przybycien, M.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quilty, D.; Raas, M.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radloff, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Randle-Conde, A. S.; Randrianarivony, K.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rao, K.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, T. C.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Roe, A.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, A.; Rose, M.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Saddique, A.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarrazin, B.; Sarri, F.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Sauvan, J. B.; Savard, P.; Savinov, V.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaelicke, A.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherwood, P.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, HS.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Tuna, A. N.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Berg, R.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M. S.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-07-01

    Measurements of the production of jets of particles in association with a Z boson in pp collisions at √{s}=7 TeV are presented, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb-1 collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Inclusive and differential jet cross sections in Z events, with Z decaying into electron or muon pairs, are measured for jets with transverse momentum p T > 30 GeV and rapidity | y| < 4 .4. The results are compared to next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations, and to predictions from different Monte Carlo generators based on leading-order and next-to-leading-order matrix elements supplemented by parton showers. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and structural properties of NiCu/Cu multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruotolo, A.; Bell, C.; Leung, C. W.; Blamire, M. G.

    2004-07-01

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) was studied at low temperature (T=30 K) in dc-magnetron sputtered Ni60Cu40/Cu multilayers. PMA has been observed in many multilayer structures for ferromagnetic layer thicknesses less than a certain thickness t⊥. In general cases t⊥ is less than a few nanometers, making such structures unsuitable for low-cost fabrication techniques. Our results show a strong perpendicular easy direction of magnetization for NiCu layer thickness between 4.2 nm and 34 nm. The thickness t⊥ at which the multilayers change the preferential orientation from perpendicular to in-plane is estimated to be 55 nm. Structural studies show that the low magnetostatic energy density is likely to be the main reason for the large t⊥ value obtained in this system.

  2. Observations of Soft Gamma Repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2004-01-01

    Magnetars (Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars) are a subclass of neutron stars characterized by their recurrent X-ray bursts. While in an active (bursting) state (lasting anywhere between days and years), they are emit&ng hundreds of predominantly soft (kT=30 kev), short (0.1-100 ms long) events. Their quiescent source x-ray light ewes exhibit puhlions rotational period rate changes (spin-down) indicate that their magnetic fields are extremely high, of the order of 10^14- 10^l5 G. Such high B-field objects, dubbed "magnetars", had been predicted to exist in 1992, but the first concrete observational evidence were obtained in 1998 for two of these sources. I will discuss here the history of Soft Gamma Repeaters, and their spectral, timing and flux characteristics both in the persistent and their burst emission.

  3. Magnetic ordering in magnetic shape memory alloy Ni-Mn-In-Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollefs, K.; Schöppner, Ch.; Titov, I.; Meckenstock, R.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.; Liu, J.; Gutfleisch, O.; Farle, M.; Wende, H.; Acet, M.

    2015-12-01

    Structural and magnetic properties across the martensite-austenite phase transitions in the shape memory alloy Ni-Mn-In-Co are studied using complementary experimental techniques: ferromagnetic resonance, macroscopic magnetization measurements, and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism in the temperature range from 5 to 450 K. Ferromagnetic resonance experiments show coexisting antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic correlations for the martensite phase and ferromagnetic and paramagnetic correlations in the austenite phase. Magnetization measurements reveal spin-glass-like behavior for T <30 K and Ni and Co K -edge x-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements confirm an assignment of a ferromagnetic resonance line purely to Ni (and Co) for a wide temperature range from 125 to 225 K. Hence a combined analysis of ferromagnetic resonance and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism allows us to attribute particular magnetic resonance signals to individual elemental species in the alloy.

  4. [Research on Fenton treatment of the biochemical processes effluent of bamboo industry wastewater].

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing-Wen; Zhang, Min; Wang, Wei; Yang, Zhi-Zhong; Wu, Dong-Lei

    2013-06-01

    The decolorization and organic matter reduction of bamboo wastewater using Fenton oxidation was studied. Considering the cost and the removal efficiency, the optimal conditions were t = 30 degrees C, pH = 3.5, p(H2O2) = 1 665 mg x L(-1), c(Fe2+)/c(H2O2) = 0.072 and reaction time 3 h, with an initial COD and color concentration of wastewater of 430 mg x L(-1) and 1 500 times, under these conditions, the removal efficiency of COD and color could achieve 87.5% and 94.4%, respectively. It was found that the color reduction was higher than that of organics, and less affected by operation factors. The GC-MS analysis revealed that the chromophoric groups and auxochromic groups were greatly removed after Fenton treatment. The intermediates were mainly ester derivatives, and the by-products included 1-iodo-tridecane and 1,1'-oxybisoctane.

  5. High-intensity, high-contrast laser pulses generated from the fully diode-pumped Yb:glass laser system POLARIS.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Marco; Keppler, Sebastian; Bödefeld, Ragnar; Kessler, Alexander; Liebetrau, Hartmut; Körner, Jörg; Hellwing, Marco; Schorcht, Frank; Jäckel, Oliver; Sävert, Alexander; Polz, Jens; Arunachalam, Ajay Kawshik; Hein, Joachim; Kaluza, Malte C

    2013-03-01

    We report on the first generation of high-contrast, 164 fs duration pulses from the laser system POLARIS reaching focused peak intensities in excess of 2×10(20) W/cm2. To our knowledge, this is the highest peak intensity reported so far that has been achieved with a diode-pumped, solid-state laser. Several passive contrast enhancement techniques have been specially developed and implemented, achieving a relative prepulse intensity smaller than 10(-8) at t=-30 ps before the main pulse. Furthermore a closed-loop adaptive-optics system has been installed. Together with angular chirp compensation, this method has led to a significant reduction of the focal spot size and an increase of the peak intensity.

  6. Repetitive titin epitopes with a 42 nm spacing coincide in relative position with known A band striations also identified by major myosin-associated proteins. An immunoelectron-microscopical study on myofibrils.

    PubMed

    Fürst, D O; Nave, R; Osborn, M; Weber, K

    1989-09-01

    A direct titin-thick filament interaction in certain regions of the A band is suggested by results using four new monoclonal antibodies specific for titin in immunoelectron microscopy. Antibodies T30, T31 and T32 identify quasi-repeats in the titin molecule characterized by a 42-43 nm repeat spacing. These stripes seem to coincide with striations established by others on negatively stained cryosections of the A band. Antibodies T30 and T32 recognize epitopes matching five or two of the seven striations per half sacromere known to harbor both the myosin-associated C-protein and an 86K (K = 10(3) Mr) protein. Antibody T31 labels two stripes in the P zone, which correspond to the two positions where decoration is seen with 86K protein, but not with C-protein. The single titin epitope defined by antibody T33 is located 55 nm prior to the center of the M band. This position seems to coincide with the M7 striation defined by others on negatively stained A bands. The T33 epitope position proves that the titin molecule, which is known to be anchored at the Z line, also penetrates into the complex architecture of the M band. The titin epitopes described here enable us to begin to correlate known ultrastructural aspects of the interior part of the A band with the disposition of the titin molecule in the sarcomere. They raise the question of whether there is a regular interaction pattern between titin and the thick filaments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Background Noise Characteristics in the Western Part of Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grecu, B.; Neagoe, C.; Tataru, D.; Stuart, G.

    2012-04-01

    The seismological database of the western part of Romania increased significantly during the last years, when 33 broadband seismic stations provided by SEIS-UK (10 CMG 40 T's - 30 s, 9 CMG 3T's - 120 s, 14 CMG 6T's - 30 s) were deployed in the western part of the country in July 2009 to operate autonomously for two years. These stations were installed within a joint project (South Carpathian Project - SCP) between University of Leeds, UK and National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP), Romania that aimed at determining the lithospheric structure and geodynamical evolution of the South Carpathian Orogen. The characteristics of the background seismic noise recorded at the SCP broadband seismic network have been studied in order to identify the variations in background seismic noise as a function of time of day, season, and particular conditions at the stations. Power spectral densities (PSDs) and their corresponding probability density functions (PDFs) are used to characterize the background seismic noise. At high frequencies (> 1 Hz), seismic noise seems to have cultural origin, since notable variations between daytime and nighttime noise levels are observed at most of the stations. The seasonal variations are seen in the microseisms band. The noise levels increase during the winter and autumn months and decrease in summer and spring seasons, while the double-frequency peak shifts from lower periods in summer to longer periods in winter. The analysis of the probability density functions for stations located in different geologic conditions points out that the noise level is higher for stations sited on softer formations than those sited on hard rocks. Finally, the polarization analysis indicates that the main sources of secondary microseisms are found in the Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Ocean.

  8. Transcutaneous spinal cord direct current stimulation inhibits the lower limb nociceptive flexion reflex in human beings.

    PubMed

    Cogiamanian, Filippo; Vergari, Maurizio; Schiaffi, Elena; Marceglia, Sara; Ardolino, Gianluca; Barbieri, Sergio; Priori, Alberto

    2011-02-01

    Aiming at developing a new, noninvasive approach to spinal cord neuromodulation, we evaluated whether transcutaneous direct current (DC) stimulation induces long-lasting changes in the central pain pathways in human beings. A double-blind crossover design was used to investigate the effects of anodal direct current (2mA, 15min) applied on the skin overlying the thoracic spinal cord on the lower-limb flexion reflex in a group of 11 healthy volunteers. To investigate whether transcutaneous spinal cord DC stimulation (tsDCS) acts indirectly on the nociceptive reflex by modulating excitability in mono-oligosynaptic segmental reflex pathways, we also evaluated the H-reflex size from soleus muscle after tibial nerve stimulation. In our healthy subjects, anodal thoracic tsDCS reduced the total lower-limb flexion reflex area by 40.25% immediately after stimulation (T0) and by 46.9% 30min after stimulation offset (T30). When we analyzed the 2 lower-limb flexion reflex components (RII tactile and RIII nociceptive) separately, we found that anodal tsDCS induced a significant reduction in RIII area with a slight but not significant effect on RII area. After anodal tsDCS, the RIII area decreased by 27% at T0 and by 28% at T30. Both sham and active tsDCS left all the tested H-reflex variables unchanged. None of our subjects reported adverse effects after active stimulation. These results suggest that tsDCS holds promise as a tool that is complementary or alternative to drugs and invasive spinal cord electrical stimulation for managing pain. Thoracic transcutaneous direct current stimulation induces depression of nociceptive lower limb flexion reflex in human beings that persists after stimulation offset; this form of stimulation holds promise as a tool that is complementary or alternative to drugs and invasive spinal cord electrical stimulation for managing pain.

  9. Insulin-like growth factor 2 silencing restores taxol sensitivity in drug resistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Brouwer-Visser, Jurriaan; Lee, Jiyeon; McCullagh, KellyAnne; Cossio, Maria J; Wang, Yanhua; Huang, Gloria S

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is an obstacle to the effective treatment of ovarian cancer. We and others have shown that the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway is a novel potential target to overcome drug resistance. The purpose of this study was to validate IGF2 as a potential therapeutic target in drug resistant ovarian cancer and to determine the efficacy of targeting IGF2 in vivo. An analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data in the serous ovarian cancer cohort showed that high IGF2 mRNA expression is significantly associated with shortened interval to disease progression and death, clinical indicators of drug resistance. In a genetically diverse panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, the IGF2 mRNA levels measured in cell lines resistant to various microtubule-stabilizing agents including Taxol were found to be significantly elevated compared to the drug sensitive cell lines. The effect of IGF2 knockdown on Taxol resistance was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Transient IGF2 knockdown significantly sensitized drug resistant cells to Taxol treatment. A Taxol-resistant ovarian cancer xenograft model, developed from HEY-T30 cells, exhibited extreme drug resistance, wherein the maximal tolerated dose of Taxol did not delay tumor growth in mice. Blocking the IGF1R (a transmembrane receptor that transmits signals from IGF1 and IGF2) using a monoclonal antibody did not alter the response to Taxol. However, stable IGF2 knockdown using short-hairpin RNA in HEY-T30 effectively restored Taxol sensitivity. These findings validate IGF2 as a potential therapeutic target in drug resistant ovarian cancer and show that directly targeting IGF2 may be a preferable strategy compared with targeting IGF1R alone.

  10. CO-dark gas and molecular filaments in Milky Way-type galaxies - II. The temperature distribution of the gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Simon C. O.; Smith, Rowan J.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the temperature distribution of CO-dark molecular hydrogen (H2) in a series of disc galaxies simulated using the AREPO moving-mesh code. In conditions similar to those in the Milky Way, we find that H2 has a flat temperature distribution ranging from 10 to 100 K. At T < 30 K, the gas is almost fully molecular and has a high CO content, whereas at T > 30 K, the H2 fraction spans a broader range and the CO content is small, allowing us to classify gas in these two regimes as CO-bright and CO-dark, respectively. The mean sound speed in the CO-dark H2 is cs, dark = 0.64 km s-1, significantly lower than the value in the cold atomic gas (cs, CNM = 1.15 km s-1), implying that the CO-dark molecular phase is more susceptible to turbulent compression and gravitational collapse than its atomic counterpart. We further show that the temperature of the CO-dark H2 is highly sensitive to the strength of the interstellar radiation field, but that conditions in the CO-bright H2 remain largely unchanged. Finally, we examine the usefulness of the [C II] and [O I] fine-structure lines as tracers of the CO-dark gas. We show that in Milky Way-like conditions, diffuse [C II] emission from this gas should be detectable. However, it is a problematic tracer of this gas, as there is only a weak correlation between the brightness of the emission and the H2 surface density. The situation is even worse for the [O I] line, which shows no correlation with the H2 surface density.

  11. Dietary composition and its associations with insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in youth.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Mélanie; Benedetti, Andrea; Gray-Donald, Katherine

    2014-02-01

    The objectives of the present study were to examine the associations between macronutrient intake and insulin sensitivity (IS) and insulin secretion (ISct), taking into consideration moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), fitness and sedentary behaviour. Caucasian youth (n 630) aged 8-10 years at recruitment, with at least one obese biological parent, were studied (QUebec Adipose and Lifestyle InvesTigation in Youth cohort). IS was measured using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) of insulin resistance and Matsuda IS index. ISct was measured using HOMA2%-β, the ratio of the AUC of insulin:glucose over the first 30 min (AUC I/G(t= 30 min)) of the oral glucose tolerance test and AUC I/G(t= 120 min) over 2 h. Fitness was measured using VO₂(peak), percentage of fat mass by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and 7 d MVPA using accelerometry; screen time (ST) by average daily hours of self-reported television, video game or computer use. Dietary composition was measured using three non-consecutive dietary recalls. Non-parametric smoothing splines were used to model non-linear associations; all models were adjusted for age, sex, season, pubertal stage, MVPA, fitness, ST and adiposity. The percentage of total daily energy from dietary protein, fat, saturated fat and carbohydrate and the consumption of dietary vitamin D, sugar-sweetened beverages, fibre and portions of fruits and vegetables were taken into consideration. No dietary component was associated with any measure of IS after adjusting for MVPA, fitness, ST and adiposity. For every 1% increase in daily protein intake (%), AUC I/G(t= 30 min) decreased by 1·1% (P= 0·033). Otherwise, dietary composition was not associated with ISct. While long-term excess of energy intake has been shown to lead to overweight and obesity, dietary macronutrient composition is not independently correlated with IS or ISct in youth.

  12. Diode Characterization of Rockwell LWIR HgCdTe Detector Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, Candice; Pipher, Judith L.; Forrest, William J.; McMurtry, Craig W.; Garnett, James D.

    2003-03-01

    Future infrared space missions will undoubtedly employ passively cooled focal planes (T ~ 30K), as well as passively cooled telescopes. Most long-wave detector arrays (e.g. Si:As IBC) require cooling to temperatures of ~ 6-8K. We have been working with Rockwell to produce 10μm cutoff HgCdTe detector arrays that, at temperatures of ~ 30K, exhibit sufficiently low dark current and sufficiently high detective quantum efficiency to be interesting for astronomy. In pursuit of these goals, Rockwell Scientific Company has delivered twelve 256 x 256 arrays (several of them engineering arrays), with cutoff wavelengths at 30K between 7.4 and 11μm for characterization at Rochester. Seven of these arrays utilize advanced structure diodes with differing capacitances arranged in rows (banded arrays), and the materials properties of the HgCdTe also vary significantly from array to array. Of ultimate interest to astronomy is the fraction of pixels with dark current below the target value of ~ 100e-/s with 10-60mV of actual reverse bias across the diodes at T ~ 30K. These arrays were developed for the purpose of selecting diode architecture: we use this fraction as one criterion for selection. We have determined from these experiments the optimal diode architecture for future array development. Measurement of the dark current as a function of reverse bias and temperature allows us to ascertain the extent to which trap-to-band tunneling dominates the dark current at this temperature. We present the results for one representative array, UR008.

  13. Electrophysiological correlates of higher states of consciousness during sleep in long-term practitioners of the Transcendental Meditation program.

    PubMed

    Mason, L I; Alexander, C N; Travis, F T; Marsh, G; Orme-Johnson, D W; Gackenbach, J; Mason, D C; Rainforth, M; Walton, K G

    1997-02-01

    Standard ambulatory night sleep electroencephalograph (EEG) of 11 long-term practitioners of the Transcendental Meditation (TM) program reporting "higher states of consciousness" during sleep (the experimental group) was compared to that of nine short-term practitioners and 11 non-practitioners. EEG tracings during stages 3 and 4 sleep showed the experimental group to have: 1) theta-alpha activity simultaneously with delta activity and 2) decreased chin electromyograph (EMG) during deep sleep (p = 0.002) compared to short-term practitioners. Spectral analysis fast Fourier transform (FFT) data of the first three cycles showed that: 3) the experimental subjects had significantly greater theta 2 (6-8 Hz)-alpha 1 (8-10 Hz) relative power during stages 3 and 4 than the combined control groups [t(30) = 5.5, p = 0.0000008] with no difference in time in delta; 4) there was a graded difference across groups during stages 3 and 4 in theta 2-alpha 1 power, with experimentals having greater power than short-term practitioners, who in turn had greater power than non-practitioners [t(30) = 5.08, p = 0.00002]; and 5) experimentals also had increased rapid eye movement (REM) density during REM periods compared to short-term practitioners (p = 0.04). Previous studies have found increased theta-alpha EEG activity during reported periods of "transcendental consciousness" during the TM technique. In the Vedic tradition, as described by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, transcendental consciousness is the first of a sequence of higher states. The maintenance of transcendental consciousness along with deep sleep is said to be a distinctive criterion of further, stabilized higher states of consciousness. The findings of this study are interpreted as physiological support for this model.

  14. The Preventive Role of Low-Dose Intravenous Ketamine on Postoperative Shivering in Children: A Placebo Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sanie, Mohammad Sadegh; Kalani, Navid; Ghobadifar, Mohamed Amin; Zabetian, Hassan; Hosseini, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative shivering is a major problem in children undergoing general anesthesia. Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of low-dose intravenous ketamine for prevention of shivering after induction of general anesthesia in children who had undergone tonsillectomy. Patients and Methods This was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial including 80 children, of American society of anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I or II, scheduled for tonsillectomy under general anesthesia who were randomly assigned to an intravenous ketamine (0.5 mg/kg, n = 40; group K) group or matched dose placebo (n = 40; group N) group. Surgical and demographic data, unexpected side effects, and the occurrence of shivering for each child were assessed by a blinded observer at the following time points: T0, in the recovery room; T10, at 10 minutes; T20, at 20 minutes; T30, and at 30 minutes. Results With regards to the demographic and surgical data, no significant differences between the two study groups were observed (P ≥ 0.05). Shivering intensity in children who had received ketamine was significantly lower than children who had not received ketamine, at T0, T10, T20, and T30 after arrival (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in hallucination, nausea, vomiting, hemodynamic dysfunction, blurred vision, and seizure in the K group compared with the N group (P ≥ 0.05). Conclusions Administration of intravenous ketamine at a dosage of 0.5 mg/kg immediately after anesthesia induction had a preventive effect on shivering intensity without hemodynamic alterations in children undergoing general anesthesia for tonsillectomy. PMID:27635389

  15. Termination of dobutamine infusion causes transient rebound left heart diastolic dysfunction in healthy elderly women but not in men: a cardiac magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Ahtarovski, Kiril A; Iversen, Kasper K; Lønborg, Jacob T; Madsen, Per L; Engstrøm, Thomas; Vejlstrup, Niels G

    2013-10-01

    Men and women are known to react differently to stress. Thus, stress cardiomyopathy almost solely strikes women. Stress cardiomyopathy is suggested to relate to sex differences in catecholamine reaction. Left heart function during dobutamine stress is well described, but sex-specific inotropic and lusitropic response to abrupt termination of dobutamine stress is not. We aimed to investigate sex differences in left ventricular (LV) and atrial (LA) function during and after dobutamine stress. We enrolled 20 healthy elderly subjects (60-70 yr, 10 females) and measured their LV and LA volumes throughout the cardiac cycle by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging at rest, during dobutamine stress (15 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1)), 15 min after termination (T15), and 30 min after termination (T30) of dobutamine stress. We calculated LV ejection fractions, LV stroke volumes, LV peak filling rates, and LA passive, active, and conduit volumes. Sex differences were not observed at rest or during dobutamine stress. Compared with prestress values, at T15 a rebound decrease in LV peak filling rate was observed in women (-22 ± 3%, P < 0.001) but not in men. This was reflected in reduced LA passive emptying volume (-40 ± 3%, P < 0.001) and a corresponding increase in LA active emptying volume (36 ± 2%, P < 0.001). At T30 there were no differences between the sexes. We conclude that dobutamine causes greater stress to the female heart. This is revealed after termination of dobutamine stress where the left heart recovers in men, whereas women experience rebound LV stiffening with reduced diastolic relaxation. This is the first report of a sex-specific transient rebound phenomenon in cardiovascular response to catecholamines.

  16. Determining phosphorus release rates to runoff from selected Alberta soils using laboratory rainfall simulation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Charles R; Amrani, Mohamed; Akbar, Muhammad A; Heaney, Danial J; Vanderwel, Douwe S

    2006-01-01

    Phosphorus losses from agricultural land can cause accelerated eutrophication of surface water bodies. This study evaluated the use of soil test phosphorus (STP) levels to predict dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) concentrations in runoff water from agricultural soils using laboratory rainfall simulation. The objectives of this study were to determine (i) to what extent STP concentrations can be used as a basis to predict P losses from Alberta soils and (ii) how extended rainfall simulation run times affected DIP losses. Soil samples collected from a total of 38 field sites, widely scattered throughout the southern half of Alberta, were subjected to rainfall simulation in the laboratory. The STP concentrations were determined using Miller-Axley, Norwest, Kelowna, Modified Kelowna Mehlich-III, and distilled water extraction methods. Each rainfall simulation event lasted for at least 90 min. Runoff samples were collected in time series for the duration of each simulation, during two distinct runoff intervals: (i) for the first 30 min of continuous runoff (T30) and (ii) for 40 min during runoff equilibrium (Teq). For all the STP extractants and both runoff intervals, the relationship with DIP-flow-weighted mean concentration (FWMC) was linear and highly significant with r2 values ranging from 0.74 to 0.96. However, the slopes of the resulting regression lines were, on average, 1.85 times greater for the T30 runoff interval over those computed for the Teq interval. Thus experimental methodology greatly influenced regression parameters, suggesting that more work was needed to verify these relationships under natural conditions. In addition, with many of the r2 values greater than 0.90 there would be little, if any, benefit derived by including soil properties in regression analysis.

  17. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 2 Silencing Restores Taxol Sensitivity in Drug Resistant Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer-Visser, Jurriaan; Lee, Jiyeon; McCullagh, KellyAnne; Cossio, Maria J.; Wang, Yanhua; Huang, Gloria S.

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is an obstacle to the effective treatment of ovarian cancer. We and others have shown that the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway is a novel potential target to overcome drug resistance. The purpose of this study was to validate IGF2 as a potential therapeutic target in drug resistant ovarian cancer and to determine the efficacy of targeting IGF2 in vivo. An analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data in the serous ovarian cancer cohort showed that high IGF2 mRNA expression is significantly associated with shortened interval to disease progression and death, clinical indicators of drug resistance. In a genetically diverse panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, the IGF2 mRNA levels measured in cell lines resistant to various microtubule-stabilizing agents including Taxol were found to be significantly elevated compared to the drug sensitive cell lines. The effect of IGF2 knockdown on Taxol resistance was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Transient IGF2 knockdown significantly sensitized drug resistant cells to Taxol treatment. A Taxol-resistant ovarian cancer xenograft model, developed from HEY-T30 cells, exhibited extreme drug resistance, wherein the maximal tolerated dose of Taxol did not delay tumor growth in mice. Blocking the IGF1R (a transmembrane receptor that transmits signals from IGF1 and IGF2) using a monoclonal antibody did not alter the response to Taxol. However, stable IGF2 knockdown using short-hairpin RNA in HEY-T30 effectively restored Taxol sensitivity. These findings validate IGF2 as a potential therapeutic target in drug resistant ovarian cancer and show that directly targeting IGF2 may be a preferable strategy compared with targeting IGF1R alone. PMID:24932685

  18. Adsorption and photocatalytic degradation of dyes on polyacrylamide/calcium alginate/TiO2 composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuxin; Zhao, Kongyin; Zhang, Xinxin; Fu, Yifan; Li, Zhihui; Xu, Sai; Wei, Junfu

    2015-03-01

    A casting solution was prepared by dispersing titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in the sodium alginate and acrylamide aqueous solution. The casting solution was spread on a glass plate by a glass rod enlaced with brass wires to control the thickness of the sticky solution. Then polyacrylamide/calcium alginate/TiO2 (PAM/CA/T) composite film was obtained after UV irradiation and cross-linking by CaCl2. The PAM/CA/T film was characterized by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. The PAM/CA/T film had good strength and toughness. And they did not rupture after swelling in 5 wt.% NaCl solution and still had good mechanical properties. The adsorption properties of the PAM/CA/T film were investigated by using different dyes as the adsorbates. The photocatalytic degradation properties of these dyes on the PAM/CA/T films were also researched. The results indicated that there was no difference in the adsorption efficiency of PAM/CA film and PAM/CA/T-30 film. The adsorption rates of all the dyes were fast. The pre-adsorption of dyes had little effect on the catalytic degradation of dyes on PAM/CA/T film. The PAM/CA/T hydrogel film provided a suitable carrier for TiO2 in the photocatalytic degradation of dyes and the degradation efficiency of PAM/CA/T-30 film for methyl orange reached 80.76%. The PAM/CA/T film had good reusability and could degrade dyes in NaCl solution.

  19. Rectal temperature as an indicator for heat tolerance in chickens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing Y; Wei, Pei P; Xu, Shen Y; Geng, Zhao Y; Jiang, Run S

    2013-11-01

    High environmental temperature is perhaps the most important inhibiting factor to poultry production in hot regions. The objective of this study was to test adaptive responses of chickens to high ambient temperatures and identify suitable indicators for selection of heat-tolerant individuals. Full-sib or half-sib Anak-40 pullets (n = 55) with similar body weights were raised in a room with a temperature ranging from 24°C to 28°C, and relative humidity of 50% from 61 to 65 days of age. On day 66, the ambient temperature was increased within 60 min to 35 ± 1°C which was defined as the initial of heat stress (0 h). Rectal temperature (RT) was measured on each pullet at 0, 6, 18, 30, 42, 54 and 66 h. After 66 h the ambient temperature was increased within 30 min to 41 ± 1°C and survival time (HSST) as well as lethal rectal temperatures (LRT) were recorded for each individual. The gap between the RT and initial RT was calculated as ΔTn (ΔT6, ΔT18, ΔT30, ΔT42, ΔT54 and ΔT66), and the interval between LRT and initial RT as ΔTT, respectively. A negative correlation was found between HSST and ΔTn as well as ΔTT (rΔ T 18  = -0.28 and rΔ TT  = -0.31, respectively, P < 0.05; rΔT30  = -0.36, rΔ T 42  = -0.38, rΔT54  = -0.56, P < 0.01). Importantly, pullets with low ΔT18 showed a longer HSST (256.0 ± 208.4 min) than those with high ΔT18 (HSST = 123.7 ± 78.3 min). This observation suggested that the ΔT18 or early increment of RT under heat stress might be considered as a reliable indicator for evaluation of heat resistance in chickens.

  20. Baseline plasma corticosterone, haematological and biochemical results in nesting and rehabilitating loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta)

    PubMed Central

    Flower, Jennifer E.; Norton, Terry M.; Andrews, Kimberly M.; Nelson, Steven E.; Parker, Clare E.; Romero, L. Michael; Mitchell, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of hormonal responses to stress in reptiles relies on acquisition of baseline corticosterone concentrations; however, the stress associated with the restraint needed to collect the blood samples can affect the results. The purpose of this study was to determine a time limit for the collection of blood samples to evaluate baseline corticosterone, haematological and biochemical results in nesting (n = 11) and rehabilitating (n = 16) loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta). Blood samples were collected from the dorsal cervical sinus of each turtle immediately after touching the animal (t0; 0–3 min) and 3 (t3; 3–6 min), 6 (t6; 6–9 min; nesting turtles only), 10 (t10; 10–13 min) and 30 min (t30; rehabilitating turtles only) after the initial hands-on time. Consistent between the rehabilitating and nesting turtles, there was a subtle yet significant increase in white blood cell counts over time. Despite the fact that white blood cell counts increased during the sampling period, there was no direct correlation between white blood cell count and corticosterone in the sampled turtles. In the nesting turtles, significant elevations in corticosterone were noted between t0 and t3 (P = 0.014) and between t0 and t6 (P = 0.022). Values at t10 were not significantly different from those at t0 (P = 0.102); however, there was a trend for the corticosterone values to continue to increase. These results suggest that sampling of nesting loggerhead sea turtles within 3 min of handling will provide baseline corticosterone concentrations in their natural environment. Significant elevations in corticosterone were also noted in the rehabilitating loggerhead sea turtles between t0 and t10 (P = 0.02) and between t0 and t30 of sampling (P = 0.0001). These results suggest that sampling of loggerhead sea turtles within 6 min of handling should provide baseline corticosterone concentrations in a rehabilitation setting. The delay in

  1. Homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations of lymphotactin.

    PubMed Central

    Buyong; Xiong, J.; Lubkowski, J.; Nussinov, R.

    2000-01-01

    We have modeled the structure of human lymphotactin (hLpnt), by homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. This chemokine is unique in having a single disulfide bond and a long C-terminal tail. Because other structural classes of chemokines have two pairs of Cys residues, compared to one in Lpnt, and because it has been shown that both disulfide bonds are required for stability and function, the question arises how the Lpnt maintains its structural integrity. The initial structure of hLpnt was constructed by homology modeling. The first 63 residues in the monomer of hLpnt were modeled using the structure of the human CC chemokine, RANTES, whose sequence appeared most similar. The structure of the long C-terminal tail, missing in RANTES, was taken from the human muscle fatty-acid binding protein. In a Protein Data Bank search, this protein was found to contain a sequence that was most homologous to the long tail. Consequently, the modeled hLpnt C-terminal tail consisted of both alpha-helical and beta-motifs. The complete model of the hLpnt monomer consisted of two alpha-helices located above the five-stranded beta-sheet. Molecular dynamics simulations of the solvated initial model have indicated that the stability of the predicted fold is related to the geometry of Pro78. The five-stranded beta-sheet appeared to be preserved only when Pro78 was modeled in the cis conformation. Simulations were also performed both for the C-terminal truncated forms of the hLpnt that contained one or two (CC chemokine-like) disulfide bonds, and for the chicken Lpnt (cLpnt). Our MD simulations indicated that the turn region (T30-G34) in hLpnt is important for the interactions with the receptor, and that the long C-terminal region stabilizes both the turn (T30-G34) and the five-stranded beta-sheet. The major conclusion from our theoretical studies is that the lack of one disulfide bond and the extension of the C-terminus in hLptn are mutually complementary. It is very likely

  2. The aluminum phosphate zone in the Peace River area, land-pebble phosphate field, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cathcart, James B.

    1953-01-01

    The Peace River area, comprising T. 30 and 31 S., R. 24 and 25 E., contains a thicker and more persistent aluminum phosphate zone, and one that is higher in P2O5 and uranium content than is known elsewhere in the land-pebble phosphate district. This report has been prepared to bring together all of the information on the aluminum phosphate zone in the area where the first plant to treat this material will probably be located. The area may be divided into three physiographic units, (1) the ridge, (2) the flatwoods, and (3) the valley. Maps showing distribution and grade of the aluminum phosphate zone indicate that the zone is thin or absent in the ridge unit, thickest and most persistent, and of the best grade in P2O5 and uranium in the flatwoods unit, and absent or very low in grade in the valley unit. Maps of thickness and of chemical composition show that even in favorable areas there are places where the aluminum phosphate zone is missing or of questionable economic importance. The distribution maps also show that areas of high P2O5 and high uranium content coincide closely. Areas containing thick aluminum phosphate material usually have high uranium and P2O5 contents. It is estimated that an average of 13,000 tons per day of aluminum phosphate material might be mined from this area. This figure is based on the probable amount of time, per year, that mining would be in favorable ground. When all mines in the area are in favorable ground, the tonnage per day might be about 23,000 tons. Tonnages of aluminum phosphate material have been computed for about 36 percent of the area of T. 30 S., R. 25 E., and for 18 percent of the area of T. 31 S., R. 25 E. The total inferred tonnage is about 150,000,000 short tons, with an average grade of 0.012 percent U3O8.

  3. Baseline plasma corticosterone, haematological and biochemical results in nesting and rehabilitating loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta).

    PubMed

    Flower, Jennifer E; Norton, Terry M; Andrews, Kimberly M; Nelson, Steven E; Parker, Clare E; Romero, L Michael; Mitchell, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of hormonal responses to stress in reptiles relies on acquisition of baseline corticosterone concentrations; however, the stress associated with the restraint needed to collect the blood samples can affect the results. The purpose of this study was to determine a time limit for the collection of blood samples to evaluate baseline corticosterone, haematological and biochemical results in nesting (n = 11) and rehabilitating (n = 16) loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta). Blood samples were collected from the dorsal cervical sinus of each turtle immediately after touching the animal (t 0; 0-3 min) and 3 (t 3; 3-6 min), 6 (t 6; 6-9 min; nesting turtles only), 10 (t 10; 10-13 min) and 30 min (t 30; rehabilitating turtles only) after the initial hands-on time. Consistent between the rehabilitating and nesting turtles, there was a subtle yet significant increase in white blood cell counts over time. Despite the fact that white blood cell counts increased during the sampling period, there was no direct correlation between white blood cell count and corticosterone in the sampled turtles. In the nesting turtles, significant elevations in corticosterone were noted between t 0 and t 3 (P = 0.014) and between t 0 and t 6 (P = 0.022). Values at t 10 were not significantly different from those at t 0 (P = 0.102); however, there was a trend for the corticosterone values to continue to increase. These results suggest that sampling of nesting loggerhead sea turtles within 3 min of handling will provide baseline corticosterone concentrations in their natural environment. Significant elevations in corticosterone were also noted in the rehabilitating loggerhead sea turtles between t 0 and t 10 (P = 0.02) and between t 0 and t 30 of sampling (P = 0.0001). These results suggest that sampling of loggerhead sea turtles within 6 min of handling should provide baseline corticosterone concentrations in a rehabilitation setting. The

  4. N2O emission from urine in the soil in the beef production in Southeast Brazil: soil moisture content and temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões Barneze, Arlete; Mancebo Mazzetto, Andre; Fernandes Zani, Caio; Siqueira Neto, Marcos; Clemente Cerri, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Pasture expansion in Brazil has shown an increase in 4.5% per year, and a total cattle herd of about 200 millions in 2010. Associated to animal husbandry there are emissions of N2O (nitrous oxide) and other gases to the atmosphere. The liquid manure contributes to emitte 5% of the total N2O emissions. The urea content of cattle urine will readily hydrolyze to form ammonium after deposition to the soil. Nitrous oxide may then be emitted through the microbiological processes of nitrification and denitrification. Important factors can influence on these processes and consequently in nitrous oxide emissions, as soil water content and temperature (Bolan et al., 2004; Luo et al., 2008). The main goal of this research was to determine the soil water content and temperature influence on N2O emissions from urine depositions on the soil. In order to achieve the objective, soil incubation experiment was conducted in laboratory conditions at three levels of water-filled pore space (40%, 60% and 80% WFPS) and two temperatures (25ºC and 35ºC) with and without urine, with five replicates each. The soil used in this study was collected from the 0-10 cm layer of a grassland field in Southeast of Brazil and classified as Nitisols. For each measurement, the Kilner jar was hermetically sealed by replacing the lid and a first gas sample was immediately taken (time-zero, t0 sample) using a syringe and stored in a pre-evacuated gas vial. After 30 minutes the headspace of each jar was sampled again (time-thirty, t_30 sample). The lids were then removed and kept off until the next sampling day. Nitrous oxide concentrations in the sampled air were measured using a SRI Gas Chromatograph (Model 8610C). Gas fluxes were calculated by fitting linear regressions through the data collected at t0 and t_30 and were corrected for temperature and amount of soil incubated. Gas measurements were carried out up to 55 days. To determine the statistical significance, Tukey tests were carried out at 0

  5. Relationship Between Repeated Sprint Performance and both Aerobic and Anaerobic Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Dardouri, Wajdi; Selmi, Mohamed Amin; Sassi, Radhouane Haj; Gharbi, Zied; Rebhi, Ahmed; Yahmed, Mohamed Haj; Moalla, Wassim

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were firstly, to examine the relationship between repeated sprint performance indices and anaerobic speed reserve (AnSR), aerobic fitness and anaerobic power and secondly, to identify the best predictors of sprinting ability among these parameters. Twenty nine subjects (age: 22.5 ± 1.6 years, body height: 1.8 ± 0.1 m, body mass: 68.8 ± 8.5 kg, body mass index (BMI): 22.2 ± 2.1 kg•m-2, fat mass: 11.3 ± 2.9 %) participated in this study. All participants performed a 30 m sprint test (T30) from which we calculated the maximal anaerobic speed (MAnS), vertical and horizontal jumps, 20m multi-stage shuttle run test (MSRT) and repeated sprint test (10 × 15 m shuttle run). AnSR was calculated as the difference between MAnS and the maximal speed reached in the MSRT. Blood lactate sampling was performed 3 min after the RSA protocol. There was no significant correlation between repeated sprint indices (total time (TT); peak time (PT), fatigue index (FI)) and both estimated VO2max and vertical jump performance). TT and PT were significantly correlated with T30 (r=0.63, p=0.001 and r=0.62, p=0.001; respectively), horizontal jump performance (r = −0.47, p = 0.001 and r = −0.49, p = 0.006; respectively) and AnSR (r=−0.68, p= 0.001 and r=−0.70, p=0.001, respectively). Significant correlations were found between blood lactate concentration and TT, PT, and AnSR (r=−0.44, p=0.017; r=−0.43, p=0.018 and r=0.44, p=0.016; respectively). Stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated that AnSR was the only significant predictor of the TT and PT, explaining 47% and 50% of the shared variance, respectively. Our findings are of particular interest for coaches and fitness trainers in order to predict repeated sprint performance by using AnSR that can easily identify the respective upper performance limits supported by aerobic and anaerobic power of a player involved in multi-sprint team sports. PMID:25031682

  6. Effects of extremely low frequency magnetic field on the parameters of oxidative stress in heart.

    PubMed

    Goraca, A; Ciejka, E; Piechota, A

    2010-06-01

    Increasing production of free radicals in organisms is one of the putative mechanisms by which a extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF) may affect biological systems. The present study was designated to assess if ELF-MF applied in the magnetotherapy, affects generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in heart tissue and antioxidant capacity of plasma according to its working time. The experiments were performed on 3 groups of animals: group I - control; group II - exposed to 40 Hz, 7 mT, 30 min/day for 14 days (this field is commonly applied in magnetotherapy); group III - exposed to 40 Hz, 7 mT, 60 min/day for 14 days. Control rats were housed in a separate room without exposure to ELF-MF. Immediately after the last exposure, blood was taken from the tail vein and hearts were removed under anesthesia. The effect of the exposure to ELF-MF on oxidative stress was assessed on the basis of the measurements of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), total free sulphydryl groups (-SH groups) and reduced glutathione (GSH) concentrations in heart homogenates. The total antioxidant capacity of plasma was measured using ferric reducing ability method (FRAP). Exposure to ELF-MF (40 Hz, 7 mT, 30 min/day for 2 weeks) did not significantly alter tissue TBARS, H(2)O(2), total free -SH groups, reduced glutathione (GSH) and total antioxidant capacity of plasma. By contrast, ELF-MF with the same frequency and induction but used for 60 min/day for 14 days caused significant increase in TBARS and H(2)O(2) concentration (P<0.01) and decrease in the concentration of GSH (P<0.05) and total free -SH groups in heart homogenates. Moreover, exposure of rats to ELF-MF (40 Hz, 7 mT, 60 min/day for 2 weeks) resulted in the decrease of plasma antioxidant capacity. Our results indicate that effects of ELF-MF on ROS generation in the heart tissue and antioxidant capacity of plasma depend on its working time. PMID:20610864

  7. A Role for p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase-mediated Threonine 30-dependent Norepinephrine Transporter Regulation in Cocaine Sensitization and Conditioned Place Preference*

    PubMed Central

    Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; NarasimhaNaidu, Kamalakkannan; Damaj, Mohamad Imad; Ramamoorthy, Sammanda; Jayanthi, Lankupalle Damodara

    2015-01-01

    The noradrenergic and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) systems are implicated in cocaine-elicited behaviors. Previously, we demonstrated a role for p38 MAPK-mediated norepinephrine transporter (NET) Thr30 phosphorylation in cocaine-induced NET up-regulation (Mannangatti, P., Arapulisamy, O., Shippenberg, T. S., Ramamoorthy, S., and Jayanthi, L. D. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 20239–20250). The present study explored the functional interaction between p38 MAPK-mediated NET regulation and cocaine-induced behaviors. In vitro cocaine treatment of mouse prefrontal cortex synaptosomes resulted in enhanced NET function, surface expression, and phosphorylation. Pretreatment with PD169316, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, completely blocked cocaine-mediated NET up-regulation and phosphorylation. In mice, in vivo administration of p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 completely blocked cocaine-induced NET up-regulation and p38 MAPK activation in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. When tested for cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and conditioned place preference (CPP), mice receiving SB203580 on cocaine challenge day or on postconditioning test day exhibited significantly reduced cocaine sensitization and CPP. A transactivator of transcription (TAT) peptide strategy was utilized to test the involvement of the NET-Thr30 motif. In vitro treatment of synaptosomes with TAT-NET-Thr30 (wild-type peptide) completely blocked cocaine-mediated NET up-regulation and phosphorylation. In vivo administration of TAT-NET-Thr30 peptide but not TAT-NET-T30A (mutant peptide) completely blocked cocaine-mediated NET up-regulation and phosphorylation. In the cocaine CPP paradigm, mice receiving TAT-NET-Thr30 but not TAT-NET-T30A on postconditioning test day exhibited significantly reduced cocaine CPP. Following extinction, TAT-NET-Thr30 when given prior to cocaine challenge significantly reduced reinstatement of cocaine CPP. These results demonstrate that the direct inhibition of p38

  8. Relationship Between Repeated Sprint Performance and both Aerobic and Anaerobic Fitness.

    PubMed

    Dardouri, Wajdi; Selmi, Mohamed Amin; Sassi, Radhouane Haj; Gharbi, Zied; Rebhi, Ahmed; Yahmed, Mohamed Haj; Moalla, Wassim

    2014-03-27

    The aims of this study were firstly, to examine the relationship between repeated sprint performance indices and anaerobic speed reserve (AnSR), aerobic fitness and anaerobic power and secondly, to identify the best predictors of sprinting ability among these parameters. Twenty nine subjects (age: 22.5 ± 1.6 years, body height: 1.8 ± 0.1 m, body mass: 68.8 ± 8.5 kg, body mass index (BMI): 22.2 ± 2.1 kg•m-2, fat mass: 11.3 ± 2.9 %) participated in this study. All participants performed a 30 m sprint test (T30) from which we calculated the maximal anaerobic speed (MAnS), vertical and horizontal jumps, 20m multi-stage shuttle run test (MSRT) and repeated sprint test (10 × 15 m shuttle run). AnSR was calculated as the difference between MAnS and the maximal speed reached in the MSRT. Blood lactate sampling was performed 3 min after the RSA protocol. There was no significant correlation between repeated sprint indices (total time (TT); peak time (PT), fatigue index (FI)) and both estimated VO2max and vertical jump performance). TT and PT were significantly correlated with T30 (r=0.63, p=0.001 and r=0.62, p=0.001; respectively), horizontal jump performance (r = -0.47, p = 0.001 and r = -0.49, p = 0.006; respectively) and AnSR (r=-0.68, p= 0.001 and r=-0.70, p=0.001, respectively). Significant correlations were found between blood lactate concentration and TT, PT, and AnSR (r=-0.44, p=0.017; r=-0.43, p=0.018 and r=0.44, p=0.016; respectively). Stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated that AnSR was the only significant predictor of the TT and PT, explaining 47% and 50% of the shared variance, respectively. Our findings are of particular interest for coaches and fitness trainers in order to predict repeated sprint performance by using AnSR that can easily identify the respective upper performance limits supported by aerobic and anaerobic power of a player involved in multi-sprint team sports.

  9. Nuclear structure of 30S and its implications for nucleosynthesis in classical novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setoodehnia, K.; Chen, A. A.; Kahl, D.; Komatsubara, T.; José, J.; Longland, R.; Abe, Y.; Binh, D. N.; Chen, J.; Cherubini, S.; Clark, J. A.; Deibel, C. M.; Fukuoka, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, T.; Hendriks, J.; Ishibashi, Y.; Ito, Y.; Kubono, S.; Lennard, W. N.; Moriguchi, T.; Nagae, D.; Nishikiori, R.; Niwa, T.; Ozawa, A.; Parker, P. D.; Seiler, D.; Shizuma, T.; Suzuki, H.; Wrede, C.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yuasa, T.

    2013-06-01

    Background: The uncertainty in the 29P(p,γ)30S reaction rate over 0.1 ≤ T ≤ 1.3 GK was previously determined to span approximately four orders of magnitude due to the uncertain location of two previously unobserved 3+ and 2+ resonances in the Ex=4.7-4.8 MeV region in 30S. Therefore, the abundances of silicon isotopes synthesized in novae, which are relevant for the identification of presolar grains of putative nova origin, were uncertain by a factor of 3.Purpose: (a) To investigate the level structure of 30S above the proton threshold [4394.9(7) keV] via charged-particle spectroscopy using the 32S(p,t)30S reaction and in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy using the 28Si(3He, nγ)30S reaction to calculate the 29P(p,γ)30S reaction rate. (b) To explore the impact of this rate on the abundances of silicon isotopes synthesized in novae.Methods: Differential cross sections of the 32S(p,t)30S reaction were measured at 34.5 MeV. Distorted-wave Born approximation calculations were performed to constrain the spin-parity assignments of the observed levels, including the two astrophysically important levels. An energy-level scheme was deduced from γ-γ coincidence measurements using the 28Si(3He, nγ)30S reaction. Spin-parity assignments based on measurements of γ-ray angular distributions and γ-γ directional correlation from oriented nuclei were made for most of the observed levels of 30S.Results: The resonance energies corresponding to the states with 4.5 MeV ≲ Ex ≲ 6 MeV, including the two astrophysically important states predicted previously, are measured with significantly better precision than before. The spin-parity assignments of both astrophysically important resonances are confirmed. The uncertainty in the rate of the 29P(p,γ)30S reaction is substantially reduced over the temperature range of interest. Finally, the influence of this rate on the abundance ratios of silicon isotopes synthesized in novae are obtained via 1D hydrodynamic nova simulations

  10. Somatic growth effects of intramuscular injection of growth hormone in androgen-treated juvenile Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (Perciformes: Cichlidae).

    PubMed

    Liñán-Cabello, Marco A; Robles-Basto, Cindy M; Mena-herrera, Alfredo

    2013-03-01

    Little is known about the effects of the interaction of growth hormone (GH) with 17 alpha-methyltestosterone (17-MT) during fish growth. We evaluated this in the present study to assess the effect on fish growth. Fish in two batches of juvenile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) (approximately 5.0cm in length) were randomly assigned in triplicate to three treatments and a control group, distributed among 12 fiberglass tanks of 1 000L capacity (50 fish per tank) in an experiment covering a period of six weeks. The experimental groups were: a) fish treated with 17-MT and GH in mineral oil (RGH); b) fish treated with 17-MT and mineral oil without the addition of GH (R); c) fish treated with GH in mineral oil but not 17-MT (NGH); and d) fish of the control group, which were treated with mineral oil but not 17-MT or GH (N). The GH was injected into the fish at a rate of 0.625mg/g body weight. Morphometric data were recorded at the beginning of the experiment (T0) and at 15, 30 and 45 days (T15, T30 and T45), and various indicators of growth were assessed: condition factor (K); survival percentage (S), feed conversion rate (FCR), percentage weight gain (WG) and (v) daily weight gain. The optimum dietary level was calculated assuming 5% food conversion to total weight in each group. During the experiment, the fish were provided with a commercial food containing 45% protein. The data showed that GH injection resulted in a greater weight gain in fish treated with 17-MT (the RGH treatment group), being particularly significant increase in weight during T15 and T30 (p<0.05). High values of K were found in the R and RGH treatments during the initial days of the experiment, which may have been a consequence of the better nutritional status affecting both weight gain and growth in body length, as a result of the additive effects of 17-MT and GH. The fish in groups not treated with 17-MT and treated with 17-MT and added GH showed greater increases in WG per day, higher K values and

  11. In vivo Raman spectroscopy of biochemical changes in human skin by cosmetic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosato, Maira Gaspar; dos Santos, Edson Pereira; Alves, Rani de Souza; Raniero, Leandro; Menezes, Priscila Fernanda C.; Kruger, Odivânia; Praes, Carlos Eduardo O.; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2010-02-01

    The skin aging process is mainly accelerated by external agents such as sunlight, air humidity and surfactants action. Changes in protein structures and hydration during the aging process are responsible for skin morphological variations. In this work the human skin was investigated by in vivo Raman spectroscopy before and after the topical applications of a cosmetic on 17 healthy volunteers (age 60 to 75). In vivo Raman spectra of the skin were obtained with a Spectrometer SpectraPro- 2500i (Pi-Acton), CCD detector and a 785 nm laser excitation source, collected at the beginning of experiment without cream (T0), after 30 (T30) and 60 (T60) days using the product. The primary changes occurred in the following spectral regions: 935 cm-1 (νCC), 1060 cm-1 (lipids), 1174 to 1201 cm-1 (tryptofan, phenylalanine and tyrosine), 1302 cm-1 (phospholipids), 1520 to 1580 cm-1 (C=C) and 1650 cm-1 (amide I). These findings indicate that skin positive effects were enhanced by a continuous cream application.

  12. Enhanced malignant transformation is accompanied by increased survival recovery after ionizing radiation in Chinese hamster embryo fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Boothman, D.A.

    1994-04-01

    Transformed Chinese hamster embryo fibroblasts (CHEF), which gradually increase in tumor-forming ability in nude mice, were isolated from normal diploid CHEF/18 cells. Transformed CHEF cells (i.e., T30-4 > 21-2M3 > 21-2 > normal CHEF/18) showed gradual increases in potentially lethal damage (PLD) survival recovery. {beta}-Lapachone and camptothecin, modulators of topoisomerase I (Topo I) activity, not only prevented survival recovery in normal as well as in tumor cells, but enhanced unscheduled DNA synthesis. These seemingly conflicting results are due to the fact that Topo I activity can be modulated by inhibitors to convert single-stranded DNA lesions into double-stranded breaks. Increases in unscheduled DNA synthesis may result from a continual supply of free ends, on which DNA repair processes may act. Altering Topo I activity with modulators appears to increase X-ray lethality via a DNA lesion modification suicide pathway. Cells down-regulate Topo I immediately after ionizing radiation to prevent Topo I-mediated lesion modification and to enhance survival recovery. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Measurement of prompt ψ(2S) to J/ψ yield ratios in Pb-Pb and p-p collisions at sNN=2.76TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; et al

    2014-12-31

    The ratio between the prompt ψ(2S) and J/ψ yields, reconstructed via their decays into μ⁺μ⁻, is measured in Pb-Pb and p-p collisions at √sNN = 2.76  TeV. The analysis is based on Pb-Pb and p-p data samples collected by CMS at the Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 150  μb⁻¹ and 5.4  pb⁻¹, respectively. The double ratio of measured yields (Nψ(2S)/NJ/ψ)Pb−Pb/(Nψ(2S)/NJ/ψ)p−p is computed in three Pb-Pb collision centrality bins and two kinematic ranges: one at midrapidity, |y| < 1.6, covering the transverse momentum range 6.5 < pT < 30  GeV/c, and the other at forward rapidity, 1.6<|y|<2.4, extending to lower pT values,more » 3« less

  14. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Gansu zokor, Eospalax cansus (Rodentia, Spalacidae).

    PubMed

    Su, Junhu; Wang, Jing; Hua, Limin; Gleeson, Dianne; Ji, Weihong

    2013-12-01

    Mysopalacinae (zokors) is a group of fossorial rodents for which the taxonomy has yet to reach consensus. Furthermore, due to their fossorial lifestyle, little is known about their ecology. Molecular data are important to elucidate such aspects. In this paper, the complete mitochondrial DNA genome of Gansu zokor (Eospalax cansus) of the type found in Lintan, China was determined. The genome is 16,354 bp in length and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and two main non-coding regions (the control region and the origin of the light strand replication), the gene composition and order of which are similar to most other mammals. The overall base composition is T 30.0%, C 24.2%, A 33.5%, and G 12.3%, with an A + T bias of 63.5%. These mitogenome sequence data are potentially important for evolutionary, population genetic, and ecological studies of the Mysopalacinae.

  15. Differential viability response of prokaryotes and eukaryotes to high strength pulsed magnetic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Boda, Sunil Kumar; Ravikumar, K; Saini, Deepak K; Basu, Bikramjit

    2015-12-01

    The present study examines the efficacy of a high strength pulsed magnetic field (PMF) towards bacterial inactivation in vitro, without compromising eukaryotic cell viability. The differential response of prokaryotes [Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Escherichia coli], and eukaryotes [C2C12 mouse myoblasts and human mesenchymal stem cells, hMSCs] upon exposure to varying PMF stimuli (1-4 T, 30 pulses, 40 ms pulse duration) is investigated. Among the prokaryotes, ~60% and ~70% reduction was recorded in the survival of staphylococcal species and E. coli, respectively at 4 T PMF as evaluated by colony forming unit (CFU) analysis and flow cytometry. A 2-5 fold increase in intracellular ROS (reactive oxygen species) levels suggests oxidative stress as the key mediator in PMF induced bacterial death/injury. The 4 T PMF treated staphylococci also exhibited longer doubling times. Both TEM and fluorescence microscopy revealed compromised membranes of PMF exposed bacteria. Under similar PMF exposure conditions, no immediate cytotoxicity was recorded in C2C12 mouse myoblasts and hMSCs, which can be attributed to the robust resistance towards oxidative stress. The ion interference of iron containing bacterial proteins is invoked to analytically explain the PMF induced ROS accumulation in prokaryotes. Overall, this study establishes the potential of PMF as a bactericidal method without affecting eukaryotic viability. This non-invasive stimulation protocol coupled with antimicrobial agents can be integrated as a potential methodology for the localized treatment of prosthetic infections.

  16. Expression and purification of the modification-dependent restriction enzyme BisI and its homologous enzymes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuang-Yong; Klein, Pernelle; Degtyarev, Sergey Kh; Roberts, Richard J

    2016-06-29

    The methylation-dependent restriction endonuclease (REase) BisI (G(m5)C ↓ NGC) is found in Bacillus subtilis T30. We expressed and purified the BisI endonuclease and 34 BisI homologs identified in bacterial genomes. 23 of these BisI homologs are active based on digestion of (m5)C-modified substrates. Two major specificities were found among these BisI family enzymes: Group I enzymes cut GCNGC containing two to four (m5)C in the two strands, or hemi-methylated sites containing two (m5)C in one strand; Group II enzymes only cut GCNGC sites containing three to four (m5)C, while one enzyme requires all four cytosines to be modified for cleavage. Another homolog, Esp638I cleaves GCS ↓ SGC (relaxed specificity RCN ↓ NGY, containing at least four (m5)C). Two BisI homologs show degenerate specificity cleaving unmodified DNA. Many homologs are small proteins ranging from 150 to 190 amino acid (aa) residues, but some homologs associated with mobile genetic elements are larger and contain an extra C-terminal domain. More than 156 BisI homologs are found in >60 bacterial genera, indicating that these enzymes are widespread in bacteria. They may play an important biological function in restricting pre-modified phage DNA.

  17. Construction of transgenic Trichoderma koningi with chit42 of Metarhizium anisopliae and analysis of its activity against the Asian corn borer.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying Y; Tang, Jun; Fu, Ke H; Gao, Shi G; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Jie

    2012-01-01

    The chit42 gene was cloned from Metarhizium anisopliae CY1 and was inserted into Trichoderma koningii T30 genome by protoplast transformation. Sixteen transgenic isolates were identified by polymerase chain reaction analysis. The chit42 gene was 1275 bp in length and its coded protein was approximately 42 kDa in size. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis and the measurement of the chitinase activity under induced conditions were conducted. Mortality of the Asian corn borer (Ostrinia furnacalis) was used for assessing efficacy of culture filtrates and conidial suspensions of transgenic Trichoderma strains against the insect. The results indicated that the transgenic Trichoderma strain harboring chit42 gene from Metarhizium anisopliae CY1 showed significant lethal effect on the Asian corn borer larvae. Study on growth inhibition of silkworm (Bombyx mori) larvae was carried out. The transgenic Trichoderma could better hinder the growth and development of the silkworm larvae than the wild-type Trichoderma did. The inhibition to the expression of three genes associated with development and anti-stress response in the mid-gut of the Asian corn borer larvae was more significant in the transcriptional level after larvae were fed with transgenic biomass than with the wild type. Evaluation of inhibition on the growth of maize ear rot pathogens was carried out in vitro test and the transgenic strains kept antagonistic activity against Fusarium verticilloides.

  18. The energy input mechanism into the lower transition regions between stellar chromospheres and coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1988-01-01

    The ratio of the emission line fluxes for the C II and C IV lines in the lower transition regions (T = 30,000 to 100,000 K) between stellar chromospheres and transition layers is shown to depend mainly on the temperature gradient in the line emitting regions which can therefore be determined from this line ratio. From the observed constant (within the limits of observational error) ratio of the emission line fluxes of the C II (1335 A) and C IV (1550 A) lines it is concluded that the temperature gradients in the lower transition layers are similar for the large majority of stars independently of T sub eff, L, and degree of activity. This means that the temperature dependence of the damping length for the mechanical flux must be the same for all these stars. Since for different kinds of mechanical fluxes the dependence of the damping length on gas pressure and temperature is quite different, it is concluded that the same heating mechanism must be responsible for the heating of all the lower transition layers of these stars, regardless of their chromospheric activity. Only the amount of mechanical flux changes. The T Tauri stars are exceptions: their emission lines are probably mainly due to circumstellar material.

  19. Geographic distribution of phylogenetically-distinct legume pod borer, Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Pyraloidea: Crambidae).

    PubMed

    Margam, Venu M; Coates, Brad S; Ba, Malick N; Sun, Weilin; Binso-Dabire, Clementine L; Baoua, Ibrahim; Ishiyaku, Mohammad F; Shukle, John T; Hellmich, Richard L; Covas, Fernando G; Ramasamy, Srinivasan; Armstrong, Joel; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Murdock, Larry L

    2011-02-01

    Maruca vitrata Fabricius is a pantropical lepidopteran pest of legumes. Phylogenetic analysis of a mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase-I gene (cox1) fragment indicates that three Maruca sp. mitochondrial lineages have unique geographic distributions [lineages 1 and 2: Australia, Taiwan, and West Africa (Niger, Nigeria, and Burkina Faso), and lineage 3: Puerto Rico]. The haplotype (T30, T114) is specific to lineages 1&2 and was assayed by NsiI and SacI polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) within population samples; it was not observed in the Puerto Rican samples, but was nearly fixed among samples from West Africa, Australia and Taiwan (85.5-100%). Re-sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of PCR-RFLP defined cox1 haplotypes indicate that nucleotide diversity is highest among samples from West Africa. Phylogenetic reconstruction based upon ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer-2 (ITS-2) sequences provided additional evidence for three Maruca sp. clades. These data suggest that multiple unique Maruca species or subspecies are present worldwide, which has implications for the management of this pest species-complex.

  20. Are fat acids of human milk impacted by pasteurization and freezing?

    PubMed

    Borgo, Luiz Antônio; Coelho Araújo, Wilma Maria; Conceição, Maria Hosana; Sabioni Resck, Inês; Mendonça, Márcio Antonio

    2014-10-03

    The Human Milk Bank undergo human milk to pasteurization, followed by storage in a freezer at -18° C for up to six months to thus keep available the stocks of this product in maternal and infant hospitals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of processing on the lipid fraction of human milk. A sample of human milk was obtained from a donor and was subdivided into ten sub-samples that was subjected to the following treatments: LC = raw milk; T0 = milk after pasteurization; T30 = milk after pasteurization and freezing for 30 days; T60 = milk after pasteurization and freeze for 60 days, and so on every 30 days until T240 = milk after pasteurization and freezing for 240 days, with 3 repetitions for each treatment. Lipids were extracted, methylated and fatty acid profiles determined by gas chromatography. The fatty acids were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance and functional groups were identified by infrared spectroscopy. There were variations in the concentration of fatty acids. For unsaturated fatty acids there was increasing trend in their concentrations. The IR and NMR analyze characterized and identified functional groups presents in fatty acids.

  1. Regulation of the sacPA operon of Bacillus subtilis: identification of phosphotransferase system components involved in SacT activity.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, M; Vary, P; Zagorec, M; Klier, A; Debarbouille, M; Postma, P; Rapoport, G

    1992-05-01

    The sacT gene which controls the sacPA operon of Bacillus subtilis encodes a polypeptide homologous to the B. subtilis SacY and the Escherichia coli BglG antiterminators. Expression of the sacT gene is shown to be constitutive. The DNA sequence upstream from sacP contains a palindromic sequence which functions as a transcriptional terminator. We have previously proposed that SacT acts as a transcriptional antiterminator, allowing transcription of the sacPA operon. In strains containing mutations inactivating ptsH or ptsI, the expression of sacPA and sacB is constitutive. In this work, we show that this constitutivity is due to a fully active SacY antiterminator. In the wild-type sacT+ strain or in the sacT30 mutant, SacT requires both enzyme I and HPr of the phosphotransferase system (PTS) for antitermination. It appears that the PTS exerts different effects on the sacB gene and the sacPA operon. The general proteins of the PTS are not required for the activity of SacY while they are necessary for SacT activity. PMID:1577686

  2. Bidirectional frequency-dependent effect of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field on E. coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Varsik; Baghdasaryan, Naira; Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2013-09-01

    In the present work, the frequency-dependent effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF) on Escherichia coli K-12 growth have been studied. The frequency-dependent effects of ELF EMF have shown that it can either stimulate or inhibit the growth of microbes. However, the mechanism by which the ELF EMF affects the bacterial cells is not clear yet. It was suggested that the aqua medium can serve as a target through which the biological effect of ELF EMF on microbes may be realized. To check this hypothesis, the frequency-dependent effects (2, 4, 6, 8, 10 Hz, B = 0.4 mT, 30 min) of ELF EMF on the bacterial growth were studied in both cases where the microbes were in the culture media during the exposure and where culture media was preliminarily exposed to the ELF EMF before the addition of bacteria. For investigating the cell proliferation, the radioactive [(3)H]-thymidine assay was carried out. It has been shown that EMF at 4 Hz exposure has pronounced stimulation while at 8 Hz it has inhibited cell proliferation.

  3. Antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity of endophytes from Scapania verrucosa Heeg.

    PubMed

    Wu, J-G; Peng, W; Zeng, P-Y; Wu, Y-B; Yi, J; Wu, J-Z

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity of endophytes isolated from Scapania verrucosa Heeg., which belongs to the liverwort class. A total of 49 endophytic fungi were isolated from S. verrucosa and classified into seven genera and one family in our previous study. In this study, the cytotoxic activity of the endophytes was assessed using the brine shrimp lethality bioassay, seven of which showed potent toxicity against the brine shrimp with 50% lethal concentration values less than 20 µg/mL. T-30 was the most toxic, with a 50% lethal concentration value of 7.15 µg/mL. Moreover, T-27 exhibited the strongest antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, with minimal inhibitory concentrations below 0.25 and 4 mg/mL, which can inhibit the growth of two standard strains - ATCC 25923 (methicillin-sensitive S. aureus) and ATCC 43300 (methicillin-resistant S. aureus) - in a time-dependent manner, respectively. These results suggest that endophytes in S. verrucosa are the sources for the production of natural bioactive products and thus warrant further investigation. PMID:23613238

  4. In situ observation and analysis of crystal growth process of GdBCO superconductive oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Y.; Inokawa, T.; Mori, N.; Ogi, K.

    2006-10-01

    To clarify the nucleation and growth process of 123 crystals, growth of faceted Gd123(GdBa2Cu3O7-δ) crystals was observed in situ on MgO(1 0 0) by using a high temperature optical microscope with zoom lens (×50-500). Gd123 crystals nucleated and grew at each undercooling (ΔT = 30, 35, 40, 45 K). Growth rate (u) and incubation time (tinc) for nucleation were obtained from the relationship between time and position of faceted interface. u was approximated by a function of ΔT: u =Agp ΔTr2 / η (T) , where Agp is a constant, Agp = 1.0 × 10-5. Nucleation rate (Iv) was obtained from the relationship between time and number of nucleated crystals. Iv was approximated by an exponential function: Iv = {An / η (T) } exp (- B / ΔTr2) , where An and B are constants, An = 1.3 × 107, B = 2.7 × 10-3. The nucleation and growth process of Gd123 crystals were expressed quantitatively by the above equations.

  5. Postseismic deformation due to subcrustal viscoelastic relaxation following dip-slip earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    The deformation of the Earth following a dip-slip earthquake is calculated using a three layer rheological model and finite element techniques. The three layers are an elastic upper lithosphere, a standard linear solid lower lithosphere, and a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere-a model previously analyzed in the strike-clip case (Cohen, 1981, 1982). Attention is focused on the magnitude of the postseismic subsidence and the width of the subsidence zone that can develop due to the viscoelastic response to coseismic reverse slip. Detailed analysis for a fault extending from the surface to 15 km with a 45 deg dip reveals that postseismic subsidence is sensitive to the depth to the asthenosphere but is only weakly dependent on lower lithosphere depth. The greatest subsidence occurs when the elastic lithosphere is about 30 km thick and the asthenosphere lies just below this layer (asthenosphere depth = 2 times the fault depth). The extremum in the subsidence pattern occurs at about 5 km from the surface trace of the fault and lies over the slip plane. In a typical case after a time t = 30 tau (tau = Maxwell time) following the earthquake the subsidence at this point is 60% of the coseismic uplift. Unlike the horizontal deformation following a strike slip earthquake, significant vertical deformation due to asthenosphere flow persists for many times tau and the magnitude of the vertical deformation is not necessarily enhanced by having a partially relaxing lower lithosphere.

  6. Centrality dependence of charged particle production at large transverse momentum in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Aguilar Salazar, S.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahn, S. A.; Ahn, S. U.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaráz Aviña, E.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldit, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Bock, N.; Böttger, S.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bose, S.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Boyer, B.; Braidot, E.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caballero Orduna, D.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carlin Filho, N.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castillo Hernandez, J. F.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chawla, I.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Coccetti, F.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Constantin, P.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Alaniz, E.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de, S.; de Barros, G. O. V.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gruttola, D.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Demanov, V.; De Marco, N.; Dénes, E.; de Pasquale, S.; Deppman, A.; D Erasmo, G.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; di Bari, D.; Dietel, T.; di Giglio, C.; di Liberto, S.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domínguez, I.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Driga, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, M. R.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fearick, R.; Fedunov, A.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Ferretti, R.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Geuna, C.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Girard, M. R.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; Ferreiro, E. G.; González-Trueba, L. H.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Goswami, A.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerra Gutierrez, C.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Gutbrod, H.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Han, B. H.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harmanová-Tóthová, Z.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Hasegan, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hille, P. T.; Hippolyte, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hwang, D. S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, P. G.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Janik, R.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Jha, D. M.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jirden, L.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kaidalov, A. B.; Kakoyan, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kaliňák, P.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, S. A.; Khan, P.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, M.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, B.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Koch, K.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Korneev, A.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Krawutschke, T.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladrón de Guevara, P.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; La Pointe, S. L.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lechman, M.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, G. R.; Lefèvre, F.; Lehnert, J.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; León, H.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Lévai, P.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, L.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohn, S.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Loo, K. K.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luquin, L.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, R.; Ma, K.; Madagodahettige-Don, D. M.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Mangotra, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Markert, C.; Martashvili, I.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez Davalos, A.; Martínez García, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Moon, T.; Morando, M.; Moreira de Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Musa, L.; Musso, A.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Naumov, N. P.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Niida, T.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Nilsson, M. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nystrand, J.; Ochirov, A.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Oleniacz, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Ortona, G.; Oskarsson, A.; Ostrowski, P.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Pastirčák, B.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira da Costa, H.; Pereira de Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Planinic, M.; Płoskoń, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puchagin, S.; Puddu, G.; Pulvirenti, A.; Punin, V.; Putiš, M.; Putschke, J.; Quercigh, E.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Räihä, T. S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Ramírez Reyes, A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rodrigues Fernandes Rabacal, B.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, S.; Sano, M.; Santo, R.; Santoro, R.; Sarkamo, J.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schreiner, S.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senyukov, S.; Seo, J.; Serci, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, S.; Sharma, N.; Rohni, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siciliano, M.; Sicking, E.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Son, H.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strabykin, K.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vásquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhorukov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szostak, A.; Szymański, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Trubnikov, V.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Ulrich, J.; Uras, A.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Vikhlyantsev, O.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, Y.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, A.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vranic, D.; Øvrebekk, G.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, V.; Wagner, B.; Wan, R.; Wang, D.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, A.; Wilk, G.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, S.; Yang, H.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J.; Yu, W.; Yuan, X.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, D.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.; Zyzak, M.; Alice Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    The inclusive transverse momentum (pT) distributions of primary charged particles are measured in the pseudo-rapidity range | η | < 0.8 as a function of event centrality in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV with ALICE at the LHC. The data are presented in the pT range 0.15 T > 30 GeV / c. In peripheral collisions (70-80%), only moderate suppression (RAA = 0.6- 0.7) and a weak pT dependence is observed. The measured nuclear modification factors are compared to other measurements and model calculations.

  7. Role of androgen, estrogen and sexual experience on the female rat's partner preference.

    PubMed

    Vega Matuszczyk, J; Larsson, K

    1991-07-01

    Virgin ovariectomized rats were implanted with Silastic tubings containing estradiol (E2, 5 mm), testosterone (T, 30 mm), dihydrotestosterone (DHT, 30 mm), or injected daily SC with the synthetic nonaromatizable androgen, methyltrienelone (R 1881, 5 mg.kg-1) daily for three weeks. Animals were tested for partner preference behavior (staying in the vicinity of a sexually active male, an estrous female or staying elsewhere) before and after they had been tested for feminine and masculine sexual behavior. All naive androgen-treated groups showed a male-oriented preference, while the naive E2-treated females did not show any consistent partner preference. Sexual experience abolished the male-directed orientation of the androgen-treated groups while E2 treatment induced a male-directed orientation. E2-treated females spent significantly longer time elsewhere in both tests compared to the other groups which might be due to insufficient levels of E2. Feminine sexual behavior was seen after treatment with E2 or T but not after treatment with DHT or R 1881. It was concluded, 1) that the effect of treatment with an androgen on the partner preference behavior differs according to whether the females are virgins or sexually experienced, and 2) the effect of the hormone treatment on the partner preference behavior is independent of whether the hormone stimulates feminine sexual behavior.

  8. Actively Shielded Gradient Coils and Echo-Planar MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elekes, Almos A.

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI), which produces images in 25-100 msec, is the fastest magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique. Its implementation is hampered by the demands it places on the scanner components. It requires strong magnetic gradient fields, produced by rapidly switched gradient coils; therefore the coils must have low inductance. They also have to be accommodated without inducing eddy currents in the magnet's metallic structure, otherwise the images would be degraded. All the major technical problems of echo-planar imaging are solved. Two transverse, actively shielded gradient coils were designed, built and tested. The coils were designed by the combined application of the minimum inductance and target field methods. The gradient strengths are 10 and 13 G/cm, unusually high for EPI, but well suited for microimaging, MR spectroscopy and petrochemical core analysis. The gradient time constants are short, so high resolution images are possible under 50 ms. The research was carried out at on a 4.5T/30cm superconducting, superferric shielded magnet located at the Texas Accelerator Center. The results of EPI and microimaging are presented.

  9. The noctilucent cloud (NLC) display during the ECOMA/MASS sounding rocket flights on 3 August 2007: morphology on global to local scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarten, G.; Fiedler, J.; Fricke, K. H.; Gerding, M.; Hervig, M.; Hoffmann, P.; Müller, N.; Pautet, P.-D.; Rapp, M.; Robert, C.; Rusch, D.; von Savigny, C.; Singer, W.

    2009-03-01

    During the ECOMA/MASS rocket campaign large scale NLC/PMC was observed by satellite, lidar and camera from polar to mid latitudes. We examine the observations from different instruments to investigate the morphology of the cloud. Satellite observations show a planetary wave 2 structure. Lidar observations from Kühlungsborn (54° N), Esrange (68° N) and ALOMAR (69° N) show a highly dynamic NLC layer. Under favorable solar illumination the cloud is also observable by ground-based cameras. The cloud was detected by cameras from Trondheim (63° N), Juliusruh (55° N) and Kühlungsborn. We investigate planetary scale morphology and local scale gravity wave structures, important for the interpretation of the small scale rocket soundings. We compare in detail the lidar observations with the NLC structure observed by the camera in Trondheim. The ALOMAR RMR-lidar observed only a faint NLC during the ECOMA launch window, while the camera in Trondheim showed a strong NLC display in the direction of ALOMAR. Using the high resolution camera observations (t~30 s, Δx<5 km) and the wind information from the meteor radar at ALOMAR we investigate the formation and destruction of NLC structures. We observe that the NLC brightness is reduced by a factor of 20-40 within 100 s which can be caused by a temperature about 15 K above the frostpoint temperature. A horizontal temperature gradient of more than 3 K/km is estimated.

  10. Authentication of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) using real time PCR.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Beatriz; Madriñán, María; Vieites, Juan M; Espiñeira, Montserrat

    2010-04-28

    This work describes the development of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) system for the detection and identification of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Among the advantages of this technique, it is worth highlighting that this is reliable in terms of specificity and sensitivity. The TaqMan real-time PCR is the simplest, fastest testing process and has the highest potential for automation, therefore representing the currently most suitable method for screening, allowing the detection of fraudulent or unintentional mislabeling of this species. The method can be applied to all kinds of products, fresh, frozen, and processed products, including those undergoing intensive processes of transformation. The developed methodology using specific primer-probe set was validated and further applied to 40 commercial samples labeled as cod in order to determinate if the species used for their manufacturing corresponded to G. morhua, detecting 20% that were incorrectly labeled. A C(t) value of about 19 was obtained when G. morhua was present. In samples with a species mixture, all samples that had a fluorescence signal were positive (C(t) < 30) for the presence of G. morhua by conventional end-point RT-PCR, and the estimated limit of detection for these type of samples was of 20 pg of DNA. The methodology herein developed is useful to check the fulfilment of labeling regulations for seafood products and verify the correct traceability in commercial trade and for fisheries control.

  11. On the simulation of seat-dip effect using geometrical acoustics software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirillo, Ettore; Martellotta, Francesco

    2001-05-01

    A group of Italian churches was surveyed in order to measure the most important acoustic parameters according to ISO 3382 Standard. Computer models of the same churches were made using acoustic simulation software. Absorption coefficients found in the literature were used and later calibrated to match predicted and measured T30 values. The results of the simulations were compared with the observed values, showing some discrepancies at mid-low frequencies. This discrepancy appeared to be due to a lack of direct sound in the measured responses, particularly at the 250-Hz and 500-Hz octave bands, indicating the probable presence of a seat-dip effect caused by the wooden pews. Since the acoustic simulation software provided the possibility to use acoustically semitransparent planes, this feature was used to simulate the effect of selective absorption of the direct sound due to the seat-dip effect. The comparison between measured acoustic parameters and those predicted including the simulation of the seat-dip effect showed that an improvement in the prediction accuracy can be achieved. Different configurations were tested in order to define the optimal placing of the semitransparent plane, and a criterion to choose the transparency coefficients is finally proposed.

  12. Expression and purification of the modification-dependent restriction enzyme BisI and its homologous enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuang-yong; Klein, Pernelle; Degtyarev, Sergey Kh.; Roberts, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The methylation-dependent restriction endonuclease (REase) BisI (Gm5C ↓ NGC) is found in Bacillus subtilis T30. We expressed and purified the BisI endonuclease and 34 BisI homologs identified in bacterial genomes. 23 of these BisI homologs are active based on digestion of m5C-modified substrates. Two major specificities were found among these BisI family enzymes: Group I enzymes cut GCNGC containing two to four m5C in the two strands, or hemi-methylated sites containing two m5C in one strand; Group II enzymes only cut GCNGC sites containing three to four m5C, while one enzyme requires all four cytosines to be modified for cleavage. Another homolog, Esp638I cleaves GCS ↓ SGC (relaxed specificity RCN ↓ NGY, containing at least four m5C). Two BisI homologs show degenerate specificity cleaving unmodified DNA. Many homologs are small proteins ranging from 150 to 190 amino acid (aa) residues, but some homologs associated with mobile genetic elements are larger and contain an extra C-terminal domain. More than 156 BisI homologs are found in >60 bacterial genera, indicating that these enzymes are widespread in bacteria. They may play an important biological function in restricting pre-modified phage DNA. PMID:27353146

  13. Measurement of differential J/ψ production cross sections and forward-backward ratios in p + Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charfeddine, D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dwuznik, M.; Dyndal, M.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guttman, N.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holmes, T. R.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S. -C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikematsu, K.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Inamaru, Y.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Ivarsson, J.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jeng, G. -Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Jung, C. A.; Jussel, P.; Juste Rozas, A.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karamaoun, A.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Kazarinov, M. Y.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keller, J. S.; Kempster, J. J.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Keyes, R. A.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Khodinov, A.; Khomich, A.; Khoo, T. J.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, H.; Kim, S. H.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O. M.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, R. S. B.; King, S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kiss, F.; Kiuchi, K.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. A.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Klok, P. F.; Kluge, E. -E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Kobayashi, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kogan, L. A.; Kohlmann, S.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Koi, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Koletsou, I.; Komar, A. A.; Komori, Y.; Kondo, T.; Kondrashova, N.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; König, S.; Kono, T.; Konoplich, R.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopeliansky, R.; Koperny, S.; Köpke, L.; Kopp, A. K.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korol, A. A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kortner, O.; Kortner, S.; Kosek, T.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotov, V. M.; Kotwal, A.; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, A.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouskoura, V.; Koutsman, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasnopevtsev, D.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kraus, J. K.; Kravchenko, A.; Kreiss, S.; Kretz, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kreutzfeldt, K.; Krieger, P.; Krizka, K.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Krumnack, N.; Krumshteyn, Z. V.; Kruse, A.; Kruse, M. C.; Kruskal, M.; Kubota, T.; Kucuk, H.; Kuday, S.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuger, F.; Kuhl, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kuna, M.; Kunigo, T.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kurumida, R.; Kus, V.; Kuwertz, E. S.; Kuze, M.; Kvita, J.; Kwan, T.; Kyriazopoulos, D.; La Rosa, A.; La Rosa Navarro, J. L.; La Rotonda, L.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacey, J.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V. R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Laier, H.; Lambourne, L.; Lammers, S.; Lampen, C. L.; Lampl, W.; Lançon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lang, V. S.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Lasagni Manghi, F.; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavrijsen, W.; Law, A. T.; Laycock, P.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Menedeu, E.; LeCompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, C. A.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, L.; Lefebvre, G.; Lefebvre, M.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehan, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Lei, X.; Leight, W. A.; Leisos, A.; Leister, A. G.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; Lemmer, B.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzi, B.; Leone, R.; Leone, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Leontsinis, S.; Leroy, C.; Lester, C. G.; Levchenko, M.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Levy, M.; Lewis, A.; Leyko, A. M.; Leyton, M.; Li, B.; Li, B.; Li, H.; Li, H. L.; Li, L.; Li, L.; Li, S.; Li, Y.; Liang, Z.; Liao, H.; Liberti, B.; Lichard, P.; Lie, K.; Liebal, J.; Liebig, W.; Limbach, C.; Limosani, A.; Lin, S. C.; Lin, T. H.; Linde, F.; Lindquist, B. E.; Linnemann, J. T.; Lipeles, E.; Lipniacka, A.; Lisovyi, M.; Liss, T. M.; Lissauer, D.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, B.; Liu, D.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, K.; Liu, L.; Liu, M.; Liu, M.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Lleres, A.; Llorente Merino, J.; Lloyd, S. L.; Lo Sterzo, F.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loch, P.; Lockman, W. S.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loevschall-Jensen, A. E.; Loginov, A.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Long, B. A.; Long, J. D.; Long, R. E.; Looper, K. A.; Lopes, L.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Lopez Paredes, B.; Lopez Paz, I.; Lorenz, J.; Lorenzo Martinez, N.; Losada, M.; Loscutoff, P.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Love, J.; Love, P. A.; Lowe, A. J.; Lu, N.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lukas, W.; Luminari, L.; Lundberg, O.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lungwitz, M.; Lynn, D.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Machado Miguens, J.; Macina, D.; Madaffari, D.; Madar, R.; Maddocks, H. J.; Mader, W. F.; Madsen, A.; Maeno, T.; Maevskiy, A.; Magradze, E.; Mahboubi, K.; Mahlstedt, J.; Mahmoud, S.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maier, A. A.; Maio, A.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makovec, N.; Malaescu, B.; Malecki, Pa.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Malone, C.; Maltezos, S.; Malyshev, V. M.; Malyukov, S.; Mamuzic, J.; Mandelli, B.; Mandelli, L.; Mandić, I.; Mandrysch, R.; Maneira, J.; Manfredini, A.; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, L.; Manjarres Ramos, J.; Mann, A.; Manning, P. M.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mantifel, R.; Mantoani, M.; Mapelli, L.; March, L.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marino, C. P.; Marjanovic, M.; Marroquim, F.; Marsden, S. P.; Marshall, Z.; Marti, L. F.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Martin, B.; Martin, T. A.; Martin, V. J.; Martin dit Latour, B.; Martinez, H.; Martinez, M.; Martin-Haugh, S.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Marx, M.; Marzano, F.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Massa, I.; Massa, L.; Massol, N.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Mättig, P.; Mattmann, J.; Maurer, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Maximov, D. A.; Mazini, R.; Mazza, S. M.; Mazzaferro, L.; Mc Goldrick, G.; Mc Kee, S. P.; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCarthy, T. G.; McCubbin, N. A.; McFarlane, K. W.; Mcfayden, J. A.; Mchedlidze, G.; McMahon, S. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Mechnich, J.; Medinnis, M.; Meehan, S.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meineck, C.; Meirose, B.; Melachrinos, C.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Meloni, F.; Mengarelli, A.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Mercurio, K. M.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meric, N.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Merritt, H.; Messina, A.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, J-P.; Meyer, J.; Middleton, R. P.; Migas, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Milic, A.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Minaenko, A. A.; Minami, Y.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mirabelli, G.; Mitani, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Miucci, A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Moa, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Mohapatra, S.; Mohr, W.; Molander, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Mönig, K.; Monini, C.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Morange, N.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Morgenstern, M.; Morii, M.; Morisbak, V.; Moritz, S.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Morton, A.; Morvaj, L.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Motohashi, K.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Muanza, S.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Mullen, P.; Munwes, Y.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Musheghyan, H.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, K.; Nagarkar, A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagata, K.; Nagel, M.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Nanava, G.; Naranjo Garcia, R. F.; Narayan, R.; Nattermann, T.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Nef, P. D.; Negri, A.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nellist, C.; Nelson, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicquevert, B.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforou, N.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, S.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O'Brien, B. J.; O'grady, F.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, I.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Oide, H.; Okamura, W.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Olchevski, A. G.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ouellette, E. A.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pires, S.; Pitt, M.; Pizio, C.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M. -A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poddar, S.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, J.; Price, L. E.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Qureshi, A.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Rave, T. C.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Rieger, J.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodrigues, L.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saimpert, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of differential cross sections for J/ψ production in p+Pb collisions at √sNN=5.02TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider with the ATLAS detector are presented. The data set used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 28.1 nb-1. The J/ψ mesons are reconstructed in the dimuon decay channel over the transverse momentum range 8T<30GeV and over the center-of-mass rapidity range -2.87

  14. Development of lead salt semiconductor lasers for the 9-17 micron spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, K. J.; Butler, J. F.; Nill, K. W.; Reeder, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Improved diode lasers of Pb sub 1-x Sn sub x Se operating in the 9-17 micrometers spectral region were developed. The performance characteristics of the best lasers exceeded the contract goals of 500 microW/mode at T 30K in the 9-12 micrometers region and 200 microW/mode at T 18K in the 16-17 micrometers region. Increased reliability and device yields resulted from processing improvements which evolved from a series of diagnostic studies. By means of Auger electron spectroscopy, laser shelf storage degradation was shown to be characterized by the presence of In metal on the semiconductor crystal surfaces. Studies of various metal barrier layers between the crystals and the In metal led to the development of an improved metallurgical contacting technology which has resulted in devices with performance stability values exceeding the contract goal of a one year shelf life. Lasers cycled over 500 times between 300K and 77K were also shown to be stable. Studies on improved methods of fabricating striped geometry lasers indicated that good spectral mode characteristics resulted from lasers which stripe widths of 12 and 25 micrometers.

  15. Measurement of the Bbar0-B0 and Bbars0- Bs0 production asymmetries in pp collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R. F.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Bbar0-B0 and Bbars0- Bs0 production asymmetries, AP (B0) and AP (Bs0), are measured by means of a time-dependent analysis of B0 → J / ψK*0, B0 →D-π+ and Bs0 → Ds- π+ decays, using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb-1, collected by LHCb in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The measurements are performed as a function of transverse momentum and pseudorapidity of the B0 and Bs0 mesons within the LHCb acceptance. The production asymmetries, integrated over pT and η in the range 4 T < 30 GeV / c and 2.5 < η < 4.5, are determined to be AP (B0) = (- 0.35 ± 0.76 ± 0.28)% and AP (Bs0) = (1.09 ± 2.61 ± 0.66)%, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic.

  16. Magnetized Mars: Spatial distribution of oxygen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallio, Esa; Barabash, Stas

    2012-02-01

    We have studied the spatial distribution of oxygen ions near Mars assuming that the planet had a weak intrinsic magnetic field sometimes in the past. The study has been performed by using a global self-consistent numerical hybrid model HYB-Mars by simulating four magnetization cases when the strength of the dipole magnetic field on surface at the magnetic equator was 0 nT, 10 nT, 30 nT and 60 nT. In all cases the upstream solar wind conditions were assumed to be present day nominal values. Two different regions were found: (1) a closed magnetic field line region where the density of oxygen ions was high and the ion velocity small and (2) an open magnetic region near the magnetic poles where both the density and the velocity of planetary oxygen ions were high. The former region has similarities with Earth's plasmasphere and the latter with Earth's magnetic cusps. The size of the closed magnetic field region increases with increasing dipolar field. The oxygen ions originating from the ionosphere were found to escape easily along the magnetic field from the magnetic cusps but become trapped within the closed magnetic field line region. The model used does not include a self-consistent ionosphere but it is interesting to note that the total loss rate had a local maximum at a small non-zero value of the magnetic dipole field (10 nT).

  17. Spectral behaviour of eosin Y in different solvents and aqueous surfactant media.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Moumita; Panda, Amiya Kumar

    2011-10-15

    Photophysical behaviour of the anionic xanthene dye, eosin Y (EY) was investigated in solvents of different polarities as well as in the presence of aqueous cationic surfactants. From the correlation between E(T)(30) and Kosower Z values of EY in different solvents, subsequent parameters for EY were determined in the presence of surfactants. A red shift, both in the absorption and emission spectra of EY, was observed with decreasing solvent polarity. Dimerisation of EY was found to be dependent on solvent polarity. Cationic surfactants retarded the process of dimerisation, which were evident from the lower dimerisation constant (K(D)) values, compared to that of in pure water. Dye-surfactant interaction constants were determined at different temperatures (298-318 K) and subsequently the thermodynamic parameters, viz., ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° were evaluated using the interaction constant values. The fluorescence spectra of EY followed the same trend as in the absorption spectra, although with lesser extents. Stokes shifts were calculated and correlated with the polarity of the medium. Fluorescence of EY was initially quenched by the cationic surfactants in their pre-micellar region, which then followed a red shift with intensity enhancement. Fluorescence quenching was found to be of Stern-Volmer type where the excited state lifetime of EY remained unchanged in different surfactant media. However, the anisotropy value of EY was changed in the post micellar region of surfactants.

  18. Threshold selection for classification of MR brain images by clustering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovanu, Simona; Obreja, Cristian; Moraru, Luminita

    2015-12-01

    Given a grey-intensity image, our method detects the optimal threshold for a suitable binarization of MR brain images. In MR brain image processing, the grey levels of pixels belonging to the object are not substantially different from the grey levels belonging to the background. Threshold optimization is an effective tool to separate objects from the background and further, in classification applications. This paper gives a detailed investigation on the selection of thresholds. Our method does not use the well-known method for binarization. Instead, we perform a simple threshold optimization which, in turn, will allow the best classification of the analyzed images into healthy and multiple sclerosis disease. The dissimilarity (or the distance between classes) has been established using the clustering method based on dendrograms. We tested our method using two classes of images: the first consists of 20 T2-weighted and 20 proton density PD-weighted scans from two healthy subjects and from two patients with multiple sclerosis. For each image and for each threshold, the number of the white pixels (or the area of white objects in binary image) has been determined. These pixel numbers represent the objects in clustering operation. The following optimum threshold values are obtained, T = 80 for PD images and T = 30 for T2w images. Each mentioned threshold separate clearly the clusters that belonging of the studied groups, healthy patient and multiple sclerosis disease.

  19. The Structural Properties of Vapor Deposited Water Ice and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Blake, D. F.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Films of vapor deposited water ice at low temperature (T<30 K) show a number of interesting structural changes during a gradual warmup. We would like to talk about the structure of the low temperature high density amorphous form of water ice, the process of crystallization, and some recent work on the morphological changes of water ice films at high temperature. The studies of the high density amorphous form are from in-situ electron microscopy as well as numerical simulations of molecular dynamics and have lead to new insights into the physical distinction between this high density amorphous form and the low density amorphous form. For the process of crystallization, we propose a model that describes the crystallization of water ice from the amorphous phase to cubic ice in terms of the nucleation of small domains in the ice. This model agrees well with the behavior of water ice in our electron microscopy studies and finds that pure water above the glass transition is a strong liquid. In more recent work, we have concentrated on temperatures above the crystallization temperature and we find interesting morphological changes related to the decrease in viscosity of the amorphous component in the cubic crystalline regime. Given enough time, we would like to put these results in an astrophysical context and discuss some observed features of the frost on interstellar grains and the bulk ice in comets.

  20. Two-Component Self-Diffusion in Solutions: Trehalose and Sucrose in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feick, E. J.; von Meerwall, E. D.; Ekdawi, N.; de Pablo, J.

    2001-03-01

    Trehalose is now recognized as a superior substitute for sucrose in solution as a cryoprotectant, for preserving organs destined for transplantation. To explore some aspects of this superiority, we have used the proton NMR pulsed-gradient spin-echo method at T = 30, 50, and 85 deg. C to study the self-diffusion of solvent and solute in aqueous solutions of these molecules as function of their concentration, c. We find that both solute molecules diffuse substantially more slowly than water at the same c and T; that addition of water accelerates solute diffusion more rapidly than that of water; and that while at a given c and T water diffusion is insensitive to solute identity, trehalose diffusion is somewhat slower than sucrose diffusion, an effect which reaches a factor near two at the highest c. The results of our extensive MC and MD molecular simulations of diffusion in sucrose solutions agree quantitatively with our experimental findings at corresponding c. Free-volume theory is also employed to explore the cooperative interactions between solvent and solutes, and to guide the interpretation of both experiment and simulation.

  1. Diffusion of Trehalose and Sucrose in Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feick, E.; von Meerwall, E.; Ekdawi, N.; de Pablo, J.

    2000-10-01

    Trehalose is emerging as superior substitute for sucrose in solution as a cryoprotectant, e. g., to preserve organs destined for transplantation. We have used the proton NMR pulsed-gradient spin-echo method between T = 30 and 85 deg. C to study the self-diffusion of solvent and solute in aqueous solutions of these molecules as function of their concentration, c. We find that both solute molecules diffuse substantially more slowly than water at corresponding c and T; that addition of water accelerates solute diffusion more rapidly than that of water; and that while at a given c and T water diffusion is insensitive to solute identity, trehalose diffusion is slower than sucrose diffusion. The latter effect increases with c, approaching a factor of two at the highest c. In these respects our results correspond closely to those of our extensive numerical simulations of these systems. Free-volume theory is employed to explore the cooperative kinetic interactions between solvent and solutes, and to account tentatively for part of the superiority of trehalose to sucrose as preservation agent. Differences in crystallization behavior also seem to be involved.

  2. Caregiver Stigma and Burden in Memory Disorders: An Evaluation of the Effects of Caregiver Type and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Phoebe V.; Wishart, Heather A.; Randolph, Jennifer S.; Santulli, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite considerable gains in public awareness of dementia, dementia patients and their caregivers continue to be stigmatized. Previous work has explored stigma and burden among adult children of persons with dementia in Israel, but no similar data exist for spousal caregivers or caregivers in general in the United States. This study examines the differences in stigma and burden experienced by spousal and adult child caregivers and male and female caregivers of persons with dementia. Eighty-two caregivers were given the Zarit Burden Inventory Short Form (ZBI) and the Caregiver Section of the Family Stigma in Alzheimer's Disease Scale (FS-ADS-C). Scores on the FS-ADS-C and ZBI were positively correlated (rs = .51, p < .001). Female caregivers reported experiencing more stigma on the FS-ADS-C (t(80) = −4.37, p < .001) and more burden on the ZBI (t(80) = −2.68, p = .009) compared to male caregivers, and adult child caregivers reported experiencing more stigma on the FS-ADS-C (t(30.8) = −2.22, p = .034) and more burden on the ZBI (t(80) = −2.65, p = .010) than spousal caregivers. These results reinforce the importance of support for caregivers, particularly adult child and female caregivers who may experience higher levels of stigma and burden. PMID:26941795

  3. Thomson scattering as a method for laser plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Alayi, Y.

    1983-12-01

    The Thomson scattering has been used to determine the density and temperature of an inhomogeneous nonstationary plasma. A common method to calibrate the Thomson scattering device consists in replacing the plasma by a gas and measuring the Rayleigh scattering cross section. The angular distribution of the scattered light in Argon is measured, the incident light is a ruby laser with ..delta..t = 30ns and lambda = 6943nm and vertically polarized. We have found that angular distribution is strongly favored in the forward direction (30/sup 0/, 45/sup 0/, 60/sup 0/) and defavored for backward direction (90/sup 0/, 120/sup 0/, 135/sup 0/, 150/sup 0/) in agreement with the results of George, et al, but in disagreement with the Rayleigh theory which assumes a uniform distribution. Our results may be related to the form of the scattered light spectrum which undergoes a dramatic change through the kinetic-hydrodynamic transition. The general form of the spectrum is determined by the parameter y = 1/Kl (where K = 4..pi.. sin (theta/2)/lambda, theta is the scattering angle and l is the free path path), which increases in the direction of the hydrodynamic regime (small angles). By analogy, the Thomson scattering presents the same aspects with ..cap alpha.. = 1/Klambda /SUB D/ (where lambda /SUB D/ is the Debye length). The deviation from the uniform distribution provides the possibility to determine the plasma turbulence spectrum from the scattered light.

  4. On-line characterization using ultrasound of pectin hydrolysis catalyzed by the enzyme pectinmethylesterase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, C.; Resa, P.; Sierra, C.; Elvira, L.

    2012-12-01

    The major problem in the fruit juice industry is associated with juice quality deterioration due to the cloud loss of juice concentrates by the enzymatic reaction of pectinmethylesterase enzyme (PME, EC 3.1.1.11). During pectin hydrolysis, pectin and water are transformed into polygalacturonic acid (pectate) and methanol by the action of PME. In this work, a low-intensity ultrasonic technique is used to monitor this enzymatic reaction, with PME both from orange peel and from Aspergillus niger. Changes in sound velocity during pectin hydrolysis (1% concentration of pectin, T = 30°C and pH = 4.5 and 7) with 0.25 ml of enzyme solution (PME) have been measured using a through-transmission technique. Sound velocity decreases as pectin is transformed into pectate and methanol and at the end of the process, the change in sound velocity reaches 0.3 m/s with PME from orange peel and 0.33 m/s with PME from Aspergillus niger.

  5. EPR STUDIES OF THERMALLY STERILIZED VASELINUM ALBUM.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Paweł; Pilawa, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used for examination of free radicals in thermally treated vaselinum album (VA). Thermal treatment in hot air as sterilization process was tested. Conditions of thermal sterilization were chosen according to the pharmaceutical norms. Vaselinum album was heated at the following conditions (T--temperature, t--time): T = 160°C and t = 120 min, T = 170°C and t = 60 min and T = 180°C and t = 30 min. The aim of this work was to determine concentration and free radical properties of thermally sterilized VA. EPR analysis for VA was done 15 min after sterilization. EPR measurements were done at room temperature. EPR spectra were recorded in the range of microwave power of 2.2-70 mW. g-Factor, amplitudes (A) and line width (ΔBpp) of the spectra were determined. The shape of the EPR spectra was analyzed. Free radical concentration (N) in the heated samples was determined. EPR spectra were not obtained for the non heated VA. EPR spectra were detected for all thermally sterilized samples. The spectra revealed complex character, their asymmetry depends on microwave power. The lowest free radicals concentration was found for the VA sterilized at 180°C during 30 min. EPR spectroscopy is proposed as the method useful for optimization of sterilization process of drugs. PMID:26647625

  6. Evaluation of enhanced coagulation pretreatment to improve ozone oxidation efficiency in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wert, Eric C; Gonzales, Sarah; Dong, Mei Mei; Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando L

    2011-10-15

    Enhanced coagulation (EC) using ferric chloride was evaluated as a pretreatment process to improve the efficiency of ozone (O3) for the oxidation of trace organic contaminants in wastewater. At the applied dosages (10-30 mg/L as Fe), EC pretreatment removed between 10 and 47% of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from the three wastewaters studied. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) showed that EC preferentially removed higher apparent molecular weight (AMW) compounds. Subsequent O3 testing was performed using an O3:DOC ratio of 1. Results showed that O3 exposures were similar even though the required doses were reduced by 10-47% by the EC pretreatment process. Hydroxyl radical (HO·) exposure, measured by parachlorobenzoic acid (pCBA), showed 10% reduction when using a FeCl3 dose of 30 mg/L, likely due to the lower O3 dose and decreased production of HO· during the initial phase of O3 decomposition (t<30 s). The oxidation of 13 trace organic contaminants (including atenolol, carbamazepine, DEET, diclofenac, dilantin, gemfibrozil, ibuprofen, meprobamate, naproxen, primidone, sulfamethoxazole, triclosan, and trimethoprim) was evaluated after EC and O3 treatment. EC was ineffective at removing any of the contaminants, while O3 oxidation reduced the concentration of compounds according to their reaction rate constants with O3 and HO·.

  7. Informatics in radiology: integration of the medical imaging resource center into a teaching hospital network to allow single sign-on access.

    PubMed

    Prevedello, Luciano M; Andriole, Katherine P; Khorasani, Ryan Roobian Ramin

    2009-01-01

    The RSNA Medical Imaging Resource Center (MIRC) software is an open-source program that allows users to identify, index, and retrieve images, teaching files, and other radiologic data that share a common underlying structure. The software is being continually improved as new challenges and different needs become apparent. Although version T30 is easily installed on a stand-alone computer, its implementation at healthcare enterprises with complex network architecture may be challenging with respect to security because users cannot log on by using a standard enterprise-wide authentication protocol. Instead, authentication takes place through the local MIRC database, creating security concerns and potential organizational problems. In this setting, the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) can be used to provide a single sign-on environment and increase authentication security. A commercial directory service using LDAP has been successfully integrated with MIRC in a large multifacility enterprise to provide single sign-on capability compatible with the institutional networking policies for password security.

  8. Titan's surface at 2.2-cm wavelength imaged by the Cassini RADAR radiometer: Calibration and first results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janssen, M.A.; Lorenz, R.D.; West, R.; Paganelli, F.; Lopes, R.M.; Kirk, R.L.; Elachi, C.; Wall, S.D.; Johnson, W.T.K.; Anderson, Y.; Boehmer, R.A.; Callahan, P.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.A.; Kelleher, K.D.; Roth, L.; Stiles, B.; Le, Gall A.

    2009-01-01

    The first comprehensive calibration and mapping of the thermal microwave emission from Titan's surface is reported based on radiometric data obtained at 2.2-cm wavelength by the passive radiometer included in the Cassini Radar instrument. The data reported were accumulated from 69 separate observational segments in Titan passes from Ta (October 2004) through T30 (May 2007) and include emission from 94% of Titan's surface. They are diverse in the key observing parameters of emission angle, polarization, and spatial resolution, and their reduction into calibrated global mosaic maps involved several steps. Analysis of the polarimetry obtained at low to moderate resolution (50+ km) enabled integration of the radiometry into a single mosaic of the equivalent brightness temperature at normal incidence with a relative precision of about 1 K. The Huygens probe measurement of Titan's surface temperature and radiometry obtained on Titan's dune fields allowed us to infer an absolute calibration estimated to be accurate to a level approaching 1 K. The results provide evidence for a surface that is complex and varied on large scales. The radiometry primarily constrains physical properties of the surface, where we see strong evidence for subsurface (volume) scattering as a dominant mechanism that determines the emissivity, with the possibility of a fluffy or graded-density surface layer in many regions. The results are consistent with, but not necessarily definitive of a surface composition resulting from the slow deposition and processing of organic compounds from the atmosphere. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc.

  9. Threshold selection for classification of MR brain images by clustering method

    SciTech Connect

    Moldovanu, Simona; Obreja, Cristian; Moraru, Luminita

    2015-12-07

    Given a grey-intensity image, our method detects the optimal threshold for a suitable binarization of MR brain images. In MR brain image processing, the grey levels of pixels belonging to the object are not substantially different from the grey levels belonging to the background. Threshold optimization is an effective tool to separate objects from the background and further, in classification applications. This paper gives a detailed investigation on the selection of thresholds. Our method does not use the well-known method for binarization. Instead, we perform a simple threshold optimization which, in turn, will allow the best classification of the analyzed images into healthy and multiple sclerosis disease. The dissimilarity (or the distance between classes) has been established using the clustering method based on dendrograms. We tested our method using two classes of images: the first consists of 20 T2-weighted and 20 proton density PD-weighted scans from two healthy subjects and from two patients with multiple sclerosis. For each image and for each threshold, the number of the white pixels (or the area of white objects in binary image) has been determined. These pixel numbers represent the objects in clustering operation. The following optimum threshold values are obtained, T = 80 for PD images and T = 30 for T2w images. Each mentioned threshold separate clearly the clusters that belonging of the studied groups, healthy patient and multiple sclerosis disease.

  10. Thickness of the particle swarm in cosmic ray air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsley, J.

    1985-01-01

    The average dispersion in arrival time of air shower particles detected with a scintillator at an impact parameter r is described with accuracy 5-10% by the empirical formula sigma = Sigma sub to (1+r/r sub t) sup b, where Sigma sub to = 2.6 ns, r sub t = 30m and b = (1.94 + or - .08) (0.39 + or - .06) sec Theta, for r 2 km, 10 to the 8th power E 10 to the 11th power GeV, and Theta 60 deg. (E is the primary energy and theta is the zenith angle). The amount of fluctuation in sigma sub t due to fluctuations in the level of origin and shower development is less than 20%. These results provide a basis for estimating the impact parameters of very larger showers with data from very small detector arrays (mini-arrays). The energy of such showers can then be estimated from the local particle density. The formula also provides a basis for estimating the angular resolution of air shower array-telescopes.

  11. Effects of steady-state noise and temperature conditions on environmental perception and acceptability.

    PubMed

    Pellerin, N; Candas, V

    2004-04-01

    The combined effects of noise and temperature on environmental perception and acceptability were studied on 18 lightly clothed subjects (0.6 clo), individually exposed for 2 h in a climatic chamber. Three homogeneous climatic conditions were chosen (air temperature at 18, 24 or 30 degrees C, air velocity =0.1 m/s). For each of them, three different noise levels were continuously maintained (35, 60, 75 dBA, recorded fan noise). The 18 subjects were divided into three groups and each group experienced only one single thermal condition, at each level of noise, during three different experimental sessions. Subjective answers about perception and comfort were obtained at t = 30 and 120 min. Main results indicate that acoustic perception decreases when thermal environment is far from thermoneutrality. Although the combined effects of noise and temperature did not influence the physiological data, our results show that whatever the ambient temperature, thermal unpleasantness is higher when noise level increases. Finally, equivalence between acoustic and thermal sensations is proposed for short-term exposure (1 degree C = 2.6 dBA) and for steady state (1 degrees C = 2.9 dBA). In conclusion, this study strongly suggests that interactions between environmental components do exist, right from perceptual level, and might explain some combined effects on cognitive performance.

  12. Nanomagnetic field-driven thermal mobility of emergent monopoles in artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Sophie; Rosamond, Mark C.; Alba Venero, Diego; Hrabec, Ales; Porro, Jose Maria; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Langridge, Sean; Marrows, Christopher H.

    Artificial spin ices are nanomagnetic islands confined in 2D and their size means they can be considered as single domain and Ising-like. In the square geometry, each vertex has four nanomagnets which can point either in or out. The lowest energy arrangement consists of two-in and two-out and obeys the so-called `ice-rule'. It is possible to construct an ordered state by tiling such vertices, above which it is possible to have ice-rule-violating excitations known as emergent magnetic monopoles. It is their propagation which has been imaged with a transmission X-ray microscope and, due to a novel on-membrane heater, elevated temperatures applied up to 700 K. Square ice arrays were fabricated on a SiN membrane, the CoFeB islands were 80x250 nm, 10nm thick and had lattice spacings in the 350-500nm. Increased avalanche length and faster string velocities were observed for both stronger interaction and increased temperature. We have also been able to define a magnetic mobility in our systems and observed increased mobility in more interacting systems or elevated temperature. The largest change in the magnetic mobility was found for the most strongly interacting array, increasing by 1.70.7mm2A-1s-1for ΔT ~ 30 K.

  13. Stellar (n,{gamma}) cross sections of p-process isotopes. II. {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Marganiec, J.; Dillmann, I.; Pardo, C. Domingo; Kaeppeler, F.; Walter, S.

    2010-09-15

    The neutron-capture cross sections of {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg have been measured by means of the activation technique. The samples were irradiated in a quasistellar neutron spectrum of kT=25 keV, which was produced at the Karlsruhe 3.7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator via the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction. Systematic uncertainties were investigated in repeated activations with different samples and by variation of the experimental parameters, that is, irradiation times, neutron fluxes, and {gamma}-ray counting conditions. The measured data were converted into Maxwellian-averaged cross sections at kT=30 keV, yielding 1214{+-}61, 624{+-}54, 590{+-}43, 511{+-}46, and 201{+-}11 mb for {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg, respectively. The present results either represent first experimental data ({sup 168}Yb, {sup 184}Os, and {sup 196}Hg) or could be determined with significantly reduced uncertainties ({sup 180}W and {sup 190}Pt). These measurements are part of a systematic study of stellar (n,{gamma}) cross sections of the stable p isotopes.

  14. Multi-mode Fabry-Pérot Interferences in SiO2-supported Single Layer Graphene, in Large Aspect Ratio 2-terminal Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Joseph; Carabello, Steven; Ramos, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    The Fabry-Pérot (F-P) interference of charge carriers in graphene occur in 2-dimensional cavities defined between pn interfaces. Typically, pn interfaces form by local doping of metallic contacts, and serve as partially reflecting mirrors for ballistic charge carriers. Here, we report on observed F-P resonances in very large aspect ratio devices. For all devices studied, the inter-lead distance is L ~ 0 . 2 μm, and the graphene channel widths range from W ~ 5 to 17 μm, resulting in aspect ratios up to W / L ~ 74 . In maps of conductance versus source-drain and gate voltages, we observe long-range tapestry patterns, extending over the gate voltage range from Vg = - 60 V to 20 V. These features onset at a temperature of T ~ 20 K. Upon lowering the temperature, an additional mode appears around T ~ 3 K, and remains fairly unchanged down to T ~ 30 mK. From the lowest energy features, we estimate the phase coherence length to be on the order of 1 to 2 μm. Using FFT, we have identified two modes: the fundamental longitudinal, and one of the transverse modes, which we propose is a result of smaller cavities formed by the disorder-induced charge puddles. We gratefully acknowledge Prof. Fred Wellstood, University of Maryland, for access to fabrication facilities.

  15. Normal faulting origin for the Cordillera and Outer Rook Rings of Orientale Basin, the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahm, Amanda L.; Öhman, Teemu; Kring, David A.

    2013-02-01

    Orientale Basin is the youngest and best-preserved large impact basin on the Moon with at least four topographic rings contained within the topographic rim marked by the Cordillera Ring (diameter = 930 km). Its well-exposed interior makes this basin a prime location to study basin formation processes. Forward mechanical modeling of basin ring topography shows that the outermost rings, the Cordillera Ring (CR) and Outer Rook Ring (ORR) are large-scale normal faults with displacements (D) of 0.8 to 5.2 km, fault dip angles (δ) of 54° to 80°, and vertical depth of faulting (T) between 19 and 37 km with most faults having T = 30 ± 5 km. These faults and the distribution of maria inside the basin suggest that the transient crater, important for determining many impact-related characteristics such as projectile size, was contained entirely within the ORR and likely had a diameter between 500 and 550 km. The difference in crustal thickness between the western and eastern sides of the basin is not a result of the basin-forming event, which indicates the formation of the hemispheric crustal thickness asymmetry was likely before the formation of Orientale Basin 3.68 to 3.85 Ga.

  16. Magnetic field effect on growth, arsenic uptake, and total amylolytic activity on mesquite (Prosopis juliflora x P. velutina) seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Tavizón, Edith; Mokgalaka-Matlala, Ntebogeng S.; Elizalde Galindo, José T.; Castillo-Michelle, Hiram; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic field is closely related to the cell metabolism of plants [N. A. Belyavskaya, Adv. Space Res. 34, 1566 (2004)]. In order to see the effect of magnetic field on the plant growth, arsenic uptake, and total amylolytic activity of mesquite (Prosopis juliflora x P. velutina) seeds, ten sets of 80 seeds were selected to be oriented with the long axis parallel or randomly oriented to an external magnetic field. The external magnetic field magnitude was 1 T, and the exposition time t = 30 min. Then, the seeds were stored for three days in a plastic bag and then sown on paper towels in a modified Hoagland's nutrient solution. After three days of germination in the dark and three days in light, seedlings were grown hydroponically in modified Hoagland's nutrient solution (high PO42-) containing 0, 10, or 20 ppm of arsenic as As (III) and (V). The results show that the germination ratios, growth, elongation, arsenic uptake, and total amylolytic activity of the long axis oriented mesquite seeds were much higher than those of the randomly oriented seeds. Also, these two sets of seeds showed higher properties than the ones that were not exposed to external magnetic field.

  17. EVIDENCE FOR MULTIPLE PATHWAYS TO DEUTERIUM ENHANCEMENTS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Karin I.; Qi, Chunhua; Wilner, David J.; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.

    2012-04-20

    The distributions of deuterated molecules in protoplanetary disks are expected to depend on the molecular formation pathways. We use observations of spatially resolved DCN emission from the disk around TW Hya, acquired during ALMA science verification with a {approx}3'' synthesized beam, together with comparable DCO{sup +} observations from the Submillimeter Array, to investigate differences in the radial distributions of these species and hence differences in their formation chemistry. In contrast to DCO{sup +}, which shows an increasing column density with radius, DCN is better fit by a model that is centrally peaked. We infer that DCN forms at a smaller radii and thus at higher temperatures than DCO{sup +}. This is consistent with chemical network model predictions of DCO{sup +} formation from H{sub 2}D{sup +} at T < 30 K and DCN formation from additional pathways involving CH{sub 2}D{sup +} at higher temperatures. We estimate a DCN/HCN abundance ratio of {approx}0.017, similar to the DCO{sup +}/HCO{sup +} abundance ratio. Deuterium fractionation appears to be efficient at a range of temperatures in this protoplanetary disk. These results suggest caution in interpreting the range of deuterium fractions observed in solar system bodies, as multiple formation pathways should be taken into account.

  18. Preparation of gluten free bread enriched with green mussel (Perna canaliculus) protein hydrolysates and characterization of peptides responsible for mussel flavour.

    PubMed

    Vijaykrishnaraj, M; Roopa, B S; Prabhasankar, P

    2016-11-15

    Green mussel protein hydrolysates (GMPH) utilization for the enrichment of gluten-free bread followed by characterization of flavour peptides using chromatography and electronic nose techniques have been done. The degree of hydrolysis was carried out in each protease digest, and the higher degree of hydrolysis was observed in pepsin digestion. Gluten-free (GF) bread was formulated by using buckwheat flour (BWF), rice flour (RF) and chickpea flour (CPF) (70:20:10) and GMPH were added in the range of 0-20% in the GF bread for enrichment with GMPH. Radar plot of the electronic nose analysis showed that the sensors P30/2, T30/1 and T70/2 had a higher response to the GF bread and GMPH. Consequently, the peptide sequence was obtained manually by ESI-MS spectra of GMPH (KGYSSYICDK) and F-II (SSYCIVKICDK). Flavour quality was 97% discriminately comparable to the GMPH and F-II fractions. Mussel flavoured GF bread can be included in the celiac diet. PMID:27283688

  19. Anaerobic degradation of alcohol ethoxylates and polyethylene glycols in marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Traverso-Soto, Juan M; Rojas-Ojeda, Patricia; Sanz, José Luis; González-Mazo, Eduardo; Lara-Martín, Pablo A

    2016-02-15

    This research is focused on alcohol polyethoxylates (AEOs), nonionic surfactants used in a wide variety of products such as household cleaners and detergents. Our main objective in this work was to study the anaerobic degradation of these compounds and their main aerobic degradation products and precursors (polyethylene glycols, PEGs, which are also used for many other applications) in marine sediments, providing the first data available on this topic. First, we observed that average AEO sediment-water partition coefficients (Kd) increased towards those homologs having longer alkyl chains (from 257 L/kg for C12 to 5772 L/kg for C18),which were less susceptible to undergo biodegradation. Overall, AEO and PEG removal percentages reached up to 99.7 and 93%, respectively, after 169 days of incubation using anaerobic conditions in sediments ([O2] = 0 ppm, Eh = -170 to -380 mV and T = 30 °C). Average half-life was estimated to be in a range from 10 to 15 days for AEO homologs (C12AEO8-C18AEO8), and 18 days for PEGEO8.Methanogenic activity proved to be intense during the experiment, confirming the occurrence of anaerobic conditions. This is the first study showing that AEOs and PEGs can be degraded in absence of oxygen in marine sediments, so this new information should be taken into account for future environmental risk assessments on these chemicals. PMID:26657255

  20. Binding of environmental carcinogens to asbestos and mineral fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, G; Pagé, M; Dumas, L

    1984-01-01

    A rapid method has been developed for measuring the binding capacity of asbestos and other mineral fibres for environmental carcinogens. Benzo(alpha)pyrene (B(alpha)P), nitrosonornicotine (NNN), and N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene (NAAF) were assayed in the presence of Canadian grade 4T30 chrysotile, chrysotile A, amosite, crocidolite, glass microfibres, glasswool, attapulgite, and titanium dioxide. Chrysotile binds significantly more carcinogens than the other mineral fibres. This binding assay is reproducible with coefficients of variation of less than 8% and 6% respectively for inter and intra assay. The influence of pH was also studied, and there is good correlation between the carcinogen binding and the charge of the tested mineral fibres. The in vitro cytotoxicity on macrophage like cell line P388D1 and the haemolytic activity of various mineral fibres were also measured; a good correlation was found between the binding capacity and the cytotoxicity of tested mineral fibres on P388D1 cells. These results give some explanations for the reported synergism between exposure to asbestos and the smoking habits of workers. PMID:6331497

  1. Determination of the stellar (n,γ) cross section of Ca40 with accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Heil, M.; Käppeler, F.; Wallner, A.; Forstner, O.; Golser, R.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Steier, P.; Mengoni, A.; Gallino, R.; Paul, M.; Vockenhuber, C.

    2009-06-01

    The stellar (n,γ) cross section of Ca40 at kT=25 keV has been measured with a combination of the activation technique and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This combination is required when direct off-line counting of the produced activity is compromised by the long half-life and/or missing γ-ray transitions. The neutron activations were performed at the Karlsruhe Van de Graaff accelerator using the quasistellar neutron spectrum of kT=25 keV produced by the Li7(p,n)Be7 reaction. The subsequent AMS measurements were carried out at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) with a 3 MV tandem accelerator. The doubly magic Ca40 is a bottle-neck isotope in incomplete silicon burning, and its neutron capture cross section determines the amount of leakage, thus impacting on the eventual production of iron group elements. Because of its high abundance, Ca40 can also play a secondary role as “neutron poison” for the s-process. Previous determinations of this value at stellar energies were based on time-of-flight measurements. Our method uses an independent approach, and yields for the Maxwellian-averaged cross section at kT=30 keV a value of <σ>30keV=5.73±0.34 mb.

  2. Analysis of NAO In A 500-year Long Climate Simulation With Variable Radiative Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezolt, S.; Lionello, P.; Zorita, E.

    This study is based on a 500-year long simulation carried out with an AOGCM. The model, called ECHO-G model, consists of the ECHAM4 at T30 resolution and of the HOPE-G model at T42 resolution for the global atmospheric and ocean circulation, respectively. The simulation includes a VRF (Variable Radiative Forcing) based on historical records and proxies of solar activity, volcanic eruptions and GHG (Green House Gases, CO2 and methane) concentrations. A 1000-year long CTR (ConTRol) simulation has been carried out, using a fixed radiative forcing corresponding to the 1990 situation. The correlation between the NAO index and the spatial distribution of the surface temperature and of the atmospheric precipitation over Europe are similar in the VRF and CTR simulation. However, the characteristics of the time variability of the NAO index in the VRF and CTR simulations are different and the corresponding NAO spectra present significantly different features. A low, but statistically significant, correlation between the NAO index and the radiative forcing is identified. Though the NAO variability is underestimated in both the VRF and the CTR simulation, the VRF simulation appears to produce more realistic results.

  3. Patterns of northern emisphere mid-latitude temperature variability in a 500-year climate simulation with variable radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionello, P.; de Zolt, S.; Zorita, E.

    2003-04-01

    This study is based on a 500-year long simulation carried out with an AOGCM which computes the climate evolution from the 15th to the end of the 20th century. The simulation includes a VRF (Variable Radiative Forcing) which accounts for variations of the solar activity, volcanic eruptions and recent increase of GHG (Green House Gases) concentration. The results are compared with a 1000-year long CTR (ConTRol) simulation which is based on a constant radiative forcing, corresponding to the 1990 level. The model, called ECHO-G model, consists of the global atmospheric model ECHAM4, at T30 resolution, and of the ocean circulation model HOPE-G, at 2.8 degs resolution. A clear (seasonal) signature of the radiative forcing variability on the temperature distribution is identified from the analysis of the fields associated with extreme radiative forcing values. The effect is present, though smaller, also on the sea level pressure fields. The dynamics behind these temperature and sea level pressure patterns are described and their importance for the temperature of the mid-latitudes in the Northern emisphere is shown.

  4. RSM based optimized enzyme-assisted extraction of antioxidant phenolics from underutilized watermelon (Citrullus lanatus Thunb.) rind.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Muhammad; Sultana, Bushra; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Asghar, Muhammad

    2015-08-01

    Enzyme assisted solvent extraction (EASE) of phenolic compounds from watermelon (C. lanatus) rind (WMR) was optimized using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) with Rotatable Central Composite Design (RCCD). Four variables each at five levels i.e. enzyme concentration (EC) 0.5-6.5 %, pH 6-9, temperature (T) 25-75 °C and treatment time (t) 30-90 min, were augmented to get optimal yield of polyphenols with maximum retained antioxidant potential. The polyphenol extracts obtained under optimum conditions were evaluated for their in-vitro antioxidant activities and characterized for individual phenolic profile by RP-HPLC-DAD. The results obtained indicated that optimized EASE enhanced the liberation of antioxidant phenolics up to 3 folds on fresh weight basis (FW) as compared to conventional solvent extraction (CSE), with substantial level of total phenolics (173.70 mg GAE/g FW), TEAC 279.96 mg TE/g FW and DPPH radical scavenging ability (IC50) 112.27 mg/mL. Chlorogenic acid (115.60-1611.04), Vanillic acid (26.13-2317.01) and Sinapic acid (113.01-241.12 μg/g) were major phenolic acid found in EASEx of WMR. Overall, it was concluded that EASE might be efficient and green technique to revalorize under-utilized WMR into potent antioxidant phenolic for their further application in food and nutraceutical industries. PMID:26243925

  5. The Falcon I Launch Vehicle - Steps to and Results from the First Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenigsmann, H.; Shotwell, G. E.

    Falcon 1 was launched on March 25, 2006 from Omelek, a small island which is part of the Kwajalein Atoll of the Marshall Islands. Though the vehicle lifted off with a first stage engine fire, for the first 30 seconds the vehicle performed nominally. At T=+30 seconds, the main engine shut down. The vehicle landed 150 m downrange from the launch pad. Three days prior to the launch, a system test was conducted which included a static firing of the first stage engine to verify vehicle and pad operation, vehicle fueling and de-tanking, as well as exercising the interfaces to the Range, such as telemetry links, video and flight safety. This test was successful with no anomalies. The customer for this flight was the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the USAF under the joint USAF and DARPA Falcon Program. The objectives of the flight were to demonstrate responsive operations including rapid payload integration and collect data on the both the vehicle and the operations.

  6. Stellar neutron capture cross sections of 41K and 45Sc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, M.; Plag, R.; Uberseder, E.; Bisterzo, S.; Käppeler, F.; Mengoni, A.; Pignatari, M.

    2016-05-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of light nuclei (A <56 ) are important for s -process scenarios since they act as neutron poisons. We report on measurements of the neutron capture cross sections of 41K and 45Sc, which were performed at the Karlsruhe 3.7 MV Van de Graaff accelerator via the activation method in a quasistellar neutron spectrum corresponding to a thermal energy of k T =25 keV. Systematic effects were controlled by repeated irradiations, resulting in overall uncertainties of less than 3%. The measured spectrum-averaged data have been used to normalize the energy-dependent (n ,γ ) cross sections from the main data libraries JEFF-3.2, JENDL-4.0, and ENDF/B-VII.1, and a set of Maxwellian averaged cross sections was calculated for improving the s -process nucleosynthesis yields in AGB stars and in massive stars. At k T =30 keV, the new Maxwellian averaged cross sections of 41K and 45Sc are 19.2 ±0.6 mb and 61.3 ±1.8 mb, respectively. Both values are 20% lower than previously recommended. The effect of neutron poisons is discussed for nuclei with A <56 in general and for the investigated isotopes in particular.

  7. RSM based optimized enzyme-assisted extraction of antioxidant phenolics from underutilized watermelon (Citrullus lanatus Thunb.) rind.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Muhammad; Sultana, Bushra; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Asghar, Muhammad

    2015-08-01

    Enzyme assisted solvent extraction (EASE) of phenolic compounds from watermelon (C. lanatus) rind (WMR) was optimized using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) with Rotatable Central Composite Design (RCCD). Four variables each at five levels i.e. enzyme concentration (EC) 0.5-6.5 %, pH 6-9, temperature (T) 25-75 °C and treatment time (t) 30-90 min, were augmented to get optimal yield of polyphenols with maximum retained antioxidant potential. The polyphenol extracts obtained under optimum conditions were evaluated for their in-vitro antioxidant activities and characterized for individual phenolic profile by RP-HPLC-DAD. The results obtained indicated that optimized EASE enhanced the liberation of antioxidant phenolics up to 3 folds on fresh weight basis (FW) as compared to conventional solvent extraction (CSE), with substantial level of total phenolics (173.70 mg GAE/g FW), TEAC 279.96 mg TE/g FW and DPPH radical scavenging ability (IC50) 112.27 mg/mL. Chlorogenic acid (115.60-1611.04), Vanillic acid (26.13-2317.01) and Sinapic acid (113.01-241.12 μg/g) were major phenolic acid found in EASEx of WMR. Overall, it was concluded that EASE might be efficient and green technique to revalorize under-utilized WMR into potent antioxidant phenolic for their further application in food and nutraceutical industries.

  8. Ketocyanine dyes as sensors for proticity and pH of a medium.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Niraja; Sarkar, Amrita; Purkayastha, Pradipta; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2012-09-01

    Photophysical properties of two structurally similar ketocyanine dyes have been studied in aprotic+protic (dioxane+water, tetrahydrofuran+water) and protic+protic (methanol+water) solvent mixtures. The observed photophysical properties of these dyes show different trends with an increase in solvent polarity (in the E(T)(30) scale) in aprotic and protic media. The H-bonding at the carbonyl centres of the dyes in the excited state presumably plays a role in modifying the emitting state and hence the photophysical properties show similar trend in a protic solvent or in a mixed aprotic+protic solvent at higher percentage of the later. Thus the dyes are supposed to act as useful probes for studying H-bonding ability of a medium. Absorption and fluorescence spectral characteristics of these dyes have been found to get modified in the presence of strong acid. The presence of H(+) ions persists the dyes to exist in equilibrium with the protonated forms having different absorption and fluorescence characteristics. Reversible change of the equilibrium with pH of the medium makes the dyes, particularly the symmetric one, good probes for indicating the pH of the medium.

  9. Neutron capture of /sup 122/Te, /sup 123/Te, /sup 124/Te, /sup 125/Te, and /sup 126/Te

    SciTech Connect

    Macklin, R.L.; Winters, R.R.

    1989-07-01

    Isotopically enriched samples of the tellurium isotopes from mass 122 to mass 126 were used to measure neutron capture in the energy range 2.6 keV to 600 keV at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator pulsed neutron source. Starting at 2.6 keV, over 200 Breit-Wigner resonances for each isotope were used to describe the capture data. Least-squares adjustment gave parameters and their uncertainties for a total of 1659 resonances. Capture cross sections averaged over Maxwellian neutron distributions with temperatures ranging from kT = 5 keV to kT = 100 keV were derived for comparison with stellar nucleosynthesis calculations. For the three isotopes shielded from the astrophysical r-process, /sup 122/Te, /sup 123/Te and /sup 124/Te at kT = 30 keV the respective values were (280 /plus minus/ 10) mb, (819 /plus minus/ 30) mb and (154 /plus minus/ 6) mb. The corresponding products of cross section and solar system abundance are nearly equal in close agreement with s-process nucleosynthesis calculations. 26 refs., 8 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. Magnetars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2005-01-01

    Magnetars (Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars) are a subclass of neutron stars characterized by their recurrent X-ray bursts. While in an active (bursting) state, they are emitting hundreds of predominantly soft (kT=30 keV), short (0.1-100 ms long) events. Active states last anywhere between days and years. Their quiescent source X-ray light curves exhibit pulsations in the narrow range of 5-11 s; estimates of their rotational period rate changes (spin-down) indicate that their magnetic fields are extremely high, of the order of 10^14-10^15 G. Such high B-field objects, dubbed "magnetars", had been predicted to exist in 1992, but the first ccncrete observational evidence was obtained in 1998 for two of these sources. I will discuss here the recent spectacular results from SGR 1806-20, as well as the history of magnetars, and their spectral, timing and flux characteristics both in the persistent and their burst emission.

  11. Enzyme-assisted extraction of lycopene from tomato processing waste.

    PubMed

    Zuorro, Antonio; Fidaleo, Marcello; Lavecchia, Roberto

    2011-12-10

    A central composite design was used to optimize the enzyme-assisted extraction of lycopene from the peel fraction of tomato processing waste. Tomato skins were pretreated by a food-grade enzyme preparation with pectinolytic and cellulolytic activities and then subjected to hexane extraction. The factors investigated included extraction temperature (10-50 °C), pretreatment time (0.5-6.5 h), extraction time (0.5-4.5 h), enzyme solution-to-solid ratio (10-50 dm³/kg) and enzyme load (0-0.2 kg/kg). Overall, an 8- to 18-fold increase in lycopene recovery was observed compared to the untreated plant material. From a response surface analysis of the data, a second-degree polynomial equation was developed which provided the following optimal extraction conditions: T=30 °C, extraction time=3.18 h and enzyme load=0.16 kg/kg. The obtained results strongly support the idea of using cell-wall degrading enzymes as an effective means for recovering lycopene from tomato waste.

  12. Do tunneling states and boson peak persist or disappear in extremely stabilized glasses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, M. A.; Pérez-Castañeda, T.; Jiménez-Riobóo, R. J.; Rodríguez-Tinoco, C.; Rodríguez-Viejo, J.

    2015-06-01

    We review and concurrently discuss two recent works conducted by us, which apparently give opposite results. Specifically, we have investigated how extreme thermal histories in glasses can affect their universal properties at low temperatures, by studying: (i) amber, the fossilized natural resin, which is a glass which has experienced a hyperaging process for about one hundred million years; and (ii) ultrastable thin-film glasses of indomethacin. Specific heat Cp measurements in the temperature range 0.07 K < T < 30 K showed that the amount of two-level systems, assessed from the linear term at the lowest temperatures, was exactly the same for the pristine hyperaged amber glass as for the subsequently rejuvenated samples, whereas just a modest increase of the boson-peak height (in Cp/T3) with increasing rejuvenation was observed, related to a corresponding increase of the Debye coefficient. On the other hand, we have observed an unexpected suppression of the two-level systems in the ultrastable glass of indomethacin, whereas conventionally prepared thin films of the same material exhibit the usual linear term in the specific heat below 1 K ascribed to these universal two-level systems in glasses. By comparing both highly-stable kinds of glass, we conclude that the disappearance of the tunneling two-level systems in ultrastable thin films of indomethacin may be due to the quasi-2D and anisotropic behavior of this glass, what could support the idea of a phonon-mediated interaction between two-level systems.

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Xizang Plateau frog, Nanorana parkeri (Anura: Dicroglossidae).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lichun; Ruan, Qiping; Chen, Wei

    2016-09-01

    The Xizang Plateau frog (Nanorana parkeri) belongs to the family Dicroglossidae, which distributes in southern and eastern Xizang, southern-most Qinghai in China, high elevations of north-central Nepal, Himalayan Bhutan, northeastern Kashmir and India. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of N. parkeri was sequenced. The mitogenome was 17,837 bp in length, consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and a non-coding control region (CR). As in other vertebrates, most mitochondrial genes are encoded on the heavy strand, except for ND6 and eight tRNA genes, which are encoded on the light strand. The overall base composition of the N. parkeri is A: 27.7 % A, T: 30.1 % T, C: 26.6% and G: 15.6%. The alignment of the Nanorana species CRs exhibited high genetic variability and rich A + T content. In comparison with the mtDNA sequences typical of vertebrates, a tandem duplication of the tRNA(Met) gene and a rearrangement of the tRNA(Thr), tRNA(Pro) and tRNA(Leu) (CUN) genes were found. The complete mitogenome of N. parkeri can provided an important data for the studies on phylogenetic relationship and population genetics to further explore the taxonomic status of this species.

  14. A reliable monitoring of the biocompatibility of an effluent along an oxidative pre-treatment by sequential bioassays and chemical analyses.

    PubMed

    Amat, A M; Arques, A; García-Ripoll, A; Santos-Juanes, L; Vicente, R; Oller, I; Maldonado, M I; Malato, S

    2009-02-01

    A new approach to assess biocompatibility of an effluent, based on combination of different bioassays and chemical analyses, has been tested using a mixture of four commercial pesticides treated by a solar photo-Fenton as target effluent. A very fast elimination of the pesticides occurred (all of them were below detection limit at t30W=36 min), but mineralisation was a more time-consuming process, due to the formation of organic intermediates and to the presence of solvents, as shown by GC-MS analysis. Measurements based on activated sludge indicated that detoxification was coincident with the removal of the active ingredients, while more sensitive Vibrio fischeri bacterium showed significant toxicity until the end of the experiment, although the effluent might be compatible with biological processes. Biodegradability of the solutions was enhanced by the photochemical process, to reach BOD5/COD ratios above 0.8. Longer time bioassays, such as the Zahn-Wellens' test, support the applicability of coupling photochemical with activated sludge-based biological processes to deal with these effluents.

  15. Constraining the physical properties of Titan's empty lake basins using nadir and off-nadir Cassini RADAR backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelides, R. J.; Hayes, A. G.; Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Zebker, H. A.; Farr, T. G.; Malaska, M. J.; Poggiali, V.; Mullen, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    We use repeat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations and complementary altimetry passes acquired by the Cassini spacecraft to study the scattering properties of Titan's empty lake basins. The best-fit coefficients from fitting SAR data to a quasi-specular plus diffuse backscatter model suggest that the bright basin floors have a higher dielectric constant, but similar facet-scale rms surface facet slopes, to surrounding terrain. Waveform analysis of altimetry returns reveals that nadir backscatter returns from basin floors are greater than nadir backscatter returns from basin surroundings and have narrower pulse widths. This suggests that floor deposits are structurally distinct from their surroundings, consistent with the interpretation that some of these basins may be filled with evaporitic and/or sedimentary deposits. Basin floor deposits also express a larger diffuse component to their backscatter, which is likely due to variations in subsurface structure or an increase in roughness at the wavelength scale (Hayes, A.G. et al. [2008]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, 9). We generate a high-resolution altimetry radargram of the T30 altimetry pass over an empty lake basin, with which we place geometric constraints on the basin's slopes, rim heights, and depth. Finally, the importance of these backscatter observations and geometric measurements for basin formation mechanisms is briefly discussed.

  16. Caffeine Ingestion Increases Estimated Glycolytic Metabolism during Taekwondo Combat Simulation but Does Not Improve Performance or Parasympathetic Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of caffeine ingestion on performance and estimated energy system contribution during simulated taekwondo combat and on post-exercise parasympathetic reactivation. Methods Ten taekwondo athletes completed two experimental sessions separated by at least 48 hours. Athletes consumed a capsule containing either caffeine (5 mg∙kg-1) or placebo (cellulose) one hour before the combat simulation (3 rounds of 2 min separated by 1 min passive recovery), in a double-blind, randomized, repeated-measures crossover design. All simulated combat was filmed to quantify the time spent fighting in each round. Lactate concentration and rating of perceived exertion were measured before and after each round, while heart rate (HR) and the estimated contribution of the oxidative (WAER), ATP-PCr (WPCR), and glycolytic (W[La-]) systems were calculated during the combat simulation. Furthermore, parasympathetic reactivation after the combat simulation was evaluated through 1) taking absolute difference between the final HR observed at the end of third round and the HR recorded 60-s after (HRR60s), 2) taking the time constant of HR decay obtained by fitting the 6-min post-exercise HRR into a first-order exponential decay curve (HRRτ), or by 3) analyzing the first 30-s via logarithmic regression analysis (T30). Results Caffeine ingestion increased estimated glycolytic energy contribution in relation to placebo (12.5 ± 1.7 kJ and 8.9 ± 1.2 kJ, P = 0.04). However, caffeine did not improve performance as measured by attack number (CAF: 26. 7 ± 1.9; PLA: 27.3 ± 2.1, P = 0.48) or attack time (CAF: 33.8 ± 1.9 s; PLA: 36.6 ± 4.5 s, P = 0.58). Similarly, RPE (CAF: 11.7 ± 0.4 a.u.; PLA: 11.5 ± 0.3 a.u., P = 0.62), HR (CAF: 170 ± 3.5 bpm; PLA: 174.2 bpm, P = 0.12), oxidative (CAF: 109.3 ± 4.5 kJ; PLA: 107.9 kJ, P = 0.61) and ATP-PCr energy contributions (CAF: 45.3 ± 3.4 kJ; PLA: 46.8 ± 3.6 kJ, P = 0.72) during the combat simulation

  17. Evaluation of sexual dimorphism by discriminant function analysis of toe length (1T–5T) of adult Igbo populace in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Alabi, Stephen A.; Didia, Blessing C.; Oladipo, Gabriel Sunday; Aigbogun, Eric O.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sex determination is an important and one of the foremost criteria in establishing the identity of an individual, and this is achieved by investigating various anatomical structures to establish sex discriminatory features. The present study conducted baseline data for the toe with a view of finding discriminatory sex characteristics. Materials and Methods: A total of 420 subjects were studied by direct linear measurements of the toe length (big toe [1T] to the fifth toes [5T]) of both feet using a digital Vernier caliper with accuracy of 0.01 mm. Statistical Package for Social Sciences  (IBM, version 23, Armonk, New York, USA), Levene's ANOVA outcome informed the use of t-tests to compare mean differences. Discriminant function analysis (DFA) was used to evaluate the possibility of sex categorization. The significance level was set at 95%. Results: The mean ± standard deviation values of the right (R) toes for the males were 49.63 ± 4.43 mm (1T), 36.92 ± 5.14 mm (2T), 30.35 ± 4.95 mm (3T), 25.55 ± 3.97 mm (4T) and 22.21 ± 2.94 mm (5T), whereas the female values were 45.73 ± 4.07 mm (1T), 33.31 ± 4.66 mm (2T), 26.63 ± 4.02 mm (3T), 22.89 ± 3.43 mm (4T), and 19.77 ± 2.70 mm (5T). The left male values were 49.16 ± 4.32 mm (1T), 36.82 ± 5.16 mm (2T), 30.88 ± 4.91 mm (3T), 26.13 ± 3.99 mm (4T), and 22.46 ± 3.24 mm (5T), whereas the female values were 45.33 ± 4.05 mm (1T), 33.05 ± 4.70 mm (2T), 27.27 ± 4.29 mm (3T), 23.10 ± 3.36 mm (4T), 19.81 ± 2.59 mm (5T). From the results, males displayed significantly higher mean values than females in all measured parameters (t = 2.405, P = 0.018) with no asymmetry (P > 0.05); although T3 and T4 were larger on the left foot. The DFA model when tested with the present data derived a significant F likelihood ratio test (P < 0.001), a Wilks’ lambda predictability value of 0.759 having a model accuracy of 69.5% with a better prediction for female (70%) than males (69%). Conclusion: The use of toe

  18. Evaluation of sexual dimorphism by discriminant function analysis of toe length (1T–5T) of adult Igbo populace in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Alabi, Stephen A.; Didia, Blessing C.; Oladipo, Gabriel Sunday; Aigbogun, Eric O.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sex determination is an important and one of the foremost criteria in establishing the identity of an individual, and this is achieved by investigating various anatomical structures to establish sex discriminatory features. The present study conducted baseline data for the toe with a view of finding discriminatory sex characteristics. Materials and Methods: A total of 420 subjects were studied by direct linear measurements of the toe length (big toe [1T] to the fifth toes [5T]) of both feet using a digital Vernier caliper with accuracy of 0.01 mm. Statistical Package for Social Sciences  (IBM, version 23, Armonk, New York, USA), Levene's ANOVA outcome informed the use of t-tests to compare mean differences. Discriminant function analysis (DFA) was used to evaluate the possibility of sex categorization. The significance level was set at 95%. Results: The mean ± standard deviation values of the right (R) toes for the males were 49.63 ± 4.43 mm (1T), 36.92 ± 5.14 mm (2T), 30.35 ± 4.95 mm (3T), 25.55 ± 3.97 mm (4T) and 22.21 ± 2.94 mm (5T), whereas the female values were 45.73 ± 4.07 mm (1T), 33.31 ± 4.66 mm (2T), 26.63 ± 4.02 mm (3T), 22.89 ± 3.43 mm (4T), and 19.77 ± 2.70 mm (5T). The left male values were 49.16 ± 4.32 mm (1T), 36.82 ± 5.16 mm (2T), 30.88 ± 4.91 mm (3T), 26.13 ± 3.99 mm (4T), and 22.46 ± 3.24 mm (5T), whereas the female values were 45.33 ± 4.05 mm (1T), 33.05 ± 4.70 mm (2T), 27.27 ± 4.29 mm (3T), 23.10 ± 3.36 mm (4T), 19.81 ± 2.59 mm (5T). From the results, males displayed significantly higher mean values than females in all measured parameters (t = 2.405, P = 0.018) with no asymmetry (P > 0.05); although T3 and T4 were larger on the left foot. The DFA model when tested with the present data derived a significant F likelihood ratio test (P < 0.001), a Wilks’ lambda predictability value of 0.759 having a model accuracy of 69.5% with a better prediction for female (70%) than males (69%). Conclusion: The use of toe

  19. Optimized performance for neutron interrogation to detect SNM

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D R; Asztalos, S J; Biltoft, P J; Church, J A; Descalle, M; Hall, J M; Luu, T C; Manatt, D R; Mauger, G J; Norman, E B; Petersen, D C; Pruet, J A; Prussin, S G

    2007-02-14

    A program of simulations and validating experiments was utilized to evaluate a concept for neutron interrogation of commercial cargo containers that would reliably detect special nuclear material (SNM). The goals were to develop an interrogation system capable of detecting a 5 kg solid sphere of high-enriched uranium (HEU) even when deeply embedded in commercial cargo. Performance goals included a minimum detection probability, P{sub d} {ge} 95%, a maximum occurrence of false positive indications, P{sub fA} {le} 0.001, and maximum scan duration of t {le} 1 min. The conditions necessary to meet these goals were demonstrated in experimental measurements even when the SNM is deeply buried in any commercial cargo, and are projected to be met successfully in the most challenging cases of steel or hydrocarbons at areal density {rho}L {le} 150 g/cm{sup 2}. Optimal performance was obtained with a collimated ({Delta}{Theta} = {+-} 15{sup o}) neutron beam at energy E{sub n} = 7 MeV produced by the D(d,n) reaction with the deuteron energy E{sub d} = 4 MeV. Two fission product signatures are utilized to uniquely identify SNM, including delayed neutrons detected in a large array of polyethylene moderated 3He proportional counters and high energy {beta}-delayed fission product {gamma}-radiation detected in a large array of 61 x 61 x 25 cm{sup 3} plastic scintillators. The latter detectors are nearly blind to normal terrestrial background radiation by setting an energy threshold on the detection at E{sub min} {ge} 3 MeV. Detection goals were attained with a low beam current (I{sub d} = 15-65 {micro}A) source up to {rho}L = 75 g/cm{sup 2} utilizing long irradiations, T = 30 sec, and long counting times, t = 30-100 sec. Projecting to a higher beam current, I{sub d} {ge} 600 {micro}A and larger detector array the detection and false alarm goals would be attained even with intervening cargo overburden as large as {rho}L {le} 150 g/cm{sup 2}. The latter cargo thickness corresponds to

  20. Performance evaluation of different solar advanced oxidation processes applied to the treatment of a real textile dyeing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Diego R; Soares, Petrick A; Silva, Tânia F C V; Módenes, Aparecido N; Espinoza-Quiñones, Fernando R; Bergamasco, Rosângela; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2015-01-01

    The performance of different solar-driven advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), such as TiO2/UV, TiO2/H2O2/UV, and Fe(2+)/H2O2/UV-visible in the treatment of a real textile effluent using a pilot plant with compound parabolic collectors (CPCs), was investigated. The influence of the main photo-Fenton reaction variables such as iron concentration (20-100 mg Fe(2+) L(-1)), pH (2.4-4.5), temperature (10-50 °C), and irradiance (22-68 WUV m(-2)) was evaluated in a lab-scale prototype using artificial solar radiation. The real textile wastewater presented a beige color, with a maximum absorbance peak at 641 nm, alkaline pH (8.1), moderate organic content (dissolved organic carbon (DOC) = 129 mg C L(-1) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) = 496 mg O2 L(-1)), and high conductivity mainly associated to the high concentration of chloride (1.1 g Cl(-) L(-1)), sulfate (0.4 g SO 4 (2 -) L(- 1)), and sodium (1.2 g Na(+) L(-1)) ions. Although all the processes tested contributed to complete decolorization and effective mineralization, the most efficient process was the solar photo-Fenton with an optimum catalyst concentration of 60 mg Fe(2+) L(-1), leading to 70 % mineralization (DOCfinal = 41 mg C L(-1); CODfinal < 150 mg O2 L(-1)) at pH 3.6, requiring a UV energy dose of 3.5 kJUV L(-1) (t 30 W = 22.4 min; [Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]) and consuming 18.5 mM of H2O2.

  1. Modulation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific immune response by using efavirenz, nelfinavir, and stavudine in a rescue therapy regimen for HIV-infected, drug-experienced patients.

    PubMed

    Trabattoni, Daria; Lo Caputo, Sergio; Biasin, Mara; Seminari, Elena; Di Pietro, Massimo; Ravasi, Giovanni; Mazzotta, Francesco; Maserati, Renato; Clerici, Mario

    2002-09-01

    Analysis of the virologic and immunomodulatory effects of an association of efavirenz (EFV), nelfinavir (NFV), and stavudine (d4T) was performed in 18 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-experienced patients who failed multiple therapeutic protocols. Patients (<500 CD4(+) cells/ micro l; >10,000 HIV copies/ml) were nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-naive and were treated for 10 months with EFV (600 mg/day) in association with NFV (750 mg three times daily) and d4T (30 or 40 mg twice daily). Measurement of HIV peptide- and mitogen-stimulated production of interleukin-2 (IL-2), gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), IL-4, and IL-10 as well as quantitation of mRNA for the same cytokines in unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells were performed at baseline and 2 weeks (t1), 2 months (t2), and 10 months (t3) into therapy. The results showed that HIV-specific (but not mitogen-stimulated) IL-2 and IFN-gamma production was augmented and IL-10 production was reduced in patients who received EFV, NFV, and d4T. Therapy was also associated with a reduction in HIV RNA in plasma and an increase in CD4(+) cell count. These changes occurred in the first year of therapy (t2 and t3) and were confirmed by quantitation of cytokine-specific mRNA. Therapy with EFV, NFV, and d4T increases HIV-specific type 1 cytokine production as well as CD4 counts and reduces plasma viremia. This therapeutic regimen may be considered for use in cases of advanced HIV infection.

  2. Modulation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Specific Immune Response by Using Efavirenz, Nelfinavir, and Stavudine in a Rescue Therapy Regimen for HIV-Infected, Drug-Experienced Patients

    PubMed Central

    Trabattoni, Daria; Lo Caputo, Sergio; Biasin, Mara; Seminari, Elena; Di Pietro, Massimo; Ravasi, Giovanni; Mazzotta, Francesco; Maserati, Renato; Clerici, Mario

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the virologic and immunomodulatory effects of an association of efavirenz (EFV), nelfinavir (NFV), and stavudine (d4T) was performed in 18 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-experienced patients who failed multiple therapeutic protocols. Patients (<500 CD4+ cells/μl; >10,000 HIV copies/ml) were nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-naive and were treated for 10 months with EFV (600 mg/day) in association with NFV (750 mg three times daily) and d4T (30 or 40 mg twice daily). Measurement of HIV peptide- and mitogen-stimulated production of interleukin-2 (IL-2), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-4, and IL-10 as well as quantitation of mRNA for the same cytokines in unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells were performed at baseline and 2 weeks (t1), 2 months (t2), and 10 months (t3) into therapy. The results showed that HIV-specific (but not mitogen-stimulated) IL-2 and IFN-γ production was augmented and IL-10 production was reduced in patients who received EFV, NFV, and d4T. Therapy was also associated with a reduction in HIV RNA in plasma and an increase in CD4+ cell count. These changes occurred in the first year of therapy (t2 and t3) and were confirmed by quantitation of cytokine-specific mRNA. Therapy with EFV, NFV, and d4T increases HIV-specific type 1 cytokine production as well as CD4 counts and reduces plasma viremia. This therapeutic regimen may be considered for use in cases of advanced HIV infection. PMID:12204968

  3. TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION DURING THE MIGRATION AND RESONANCE CROSSINGS OF THE GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Lykawka, Patryk Sofia; Ito, Takashi

    2013-08-10

    The newly formed giant planets may have migrated and crossed a number of mutual mean motion resonances (MMRs) when smaller objects (embryos) were accreting to form the terrestrial planets in the planetesimal disk. We investigated the effects of the planetesimal-driven migration of Jupiter and Saturn, and the influence of their mutual 1:2 MMR crossing on terrestrial planet formation for the first time, by performing N-body simulations. These simulations considered distinct timescales of MMR crossing and planet migration. In total, 68 high-resolution simulation runs using 2000 disk planetesimals were performed, which was a significant improvement on previously published results. Even when the effects of the 1:2 MMR crossing and planet migration were included in the system, Venus and Earth analogs (considering both orbits and masses) successfully formed in several runs. In addition, we found that the orbits of planetesimals beyond a {approx} 1.5-2 AU were dynamically depleted by the strengthened sweeping secular resonances associated with Jupiter's and Saturn's more eccentric orbits (relative to the present day) during planet migration. However, this depletion did not prevent the formation of massive Mars analogs (planets with more than 1.5 times Mars's mass). Although late MMR crossings (at t > 30 Myr) could remove such planets, Mars-like small mass planets survived on overly excited orbits (high e and/or i), or were completely lost in these systems. We conclude that the orbital migration and crossing of the mutual 1:2 MMR of Jupiter and Saturn are unlikely to provide suitable orbital conditions for the formation of solar system terrestrial planets. This suggests that to explain Mars's small mass and the absence of other planets between Mars and Jupiter, the outer asteroid belt must have suffered a severe depletion due to interactions with Jupiter/Saturn, or by an alternative mechanism (e.g., rogue super-Earths)

  4. Alfaxalone versus propofol in dogs: a randomised trial to assess effects on peri-induction tear production, intraocular pressure and globe position.

    PubMed

    Costa, Daniel; Leiva, Marta; Moll, Xavier; Aguilar, Adrià; Peña, Teresa; Andaluz, Anna

    2015-01-17

    The purpose of this randomised trial was to compare the effects of alfaxalone and propofol on tear production (STT-1), intraocular pressure (IOP) and globe position (GP) in healthy dogs. Fourteen Beagles were randomly divided into two groups; dogs in one group received alfaxalone (3 mg/kg) (n=7) and dogs in the other group received propofol (6 mg/kg) (n=7), both administered intravenously. IOP and GP were evaluated at basal time (Tb) and T2,5,10,15,20,25&30 (minutes after complete drug administration). STT-1 was evaluated at Tb and T10,20&30. STT-1 and IOP results were analysed using analysis of variance and GP was analysed using the likelihood ratio χ(2) test. Dogs in the alfaxalone group showed a significant reduction in STT-1 at T10&20 (P<0.05), while the propofol group did not show statistically significant differences in this parameter over time. Both anaesthetic drugs produced a transient elevation of IOP at T2 (P>0.05), which then decreased (P<0.01). While alfaxalone caused a ventral globe deviation that lasted from T2 to T10 (P<0.05) and was fully recovered at T30, propofol induced a ventral globe deviation from T2 to T5 (P<0.05), being restored at T20. These results suggest that both alfaxalone and propofol can be safely used for intraocular surgery, as they significantly reduce IOP. Furthermore, anaesthetic induction with propofol would be especially recommended for dogs with tear deficiencies. PMID:25324218

  5. Tear Oxygen Under Hydrogel and Silicone Hydrogel Contact Lenses in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, Joseph A.; Clark, Christopher; Pruitt, John; Alvord, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the tear oxygen tension under a variety of conventional and silicone hydrogel contact lenses in human subjects. Methods Three hydrogel and five silicone hydrogel lenses (Dk/t = 17 to 329) were coated on the back surface with an oxygen sensitive, bovine serum albumin-Pd meso-tetra (4-carboxyphenyl) porphine complex (BSA-porphine). Each lens type was placed on the right eye of 15 non-contact lens wearers to obtain a steady-state open eye tear oxygen tension using oxygen sensitive phosphorescence decay of BSA-porphine. A closed-eye oxygen tension estimate was obtained by measuring the change in tear oxygen tension after 5 min of eye closure. In separate experiments, a goggle was placed over the lens wearing eye and a gas mixture (PO2 = 51 torr) flowed over the lens to simulate anterior lens oxygen tension during eye closure. Results Mean open eye oxygen tension ranged from 58 to 133 torr. Closed eye estimates ranged from 11 to 42 torr. Oxygen tension under the goggle ranged from 8 to 48 torr and was higher than the closed eye estimate for six out of the eight lenses, suggesting that the average closed eye anterior lens surface oxygen tension is <51 torr. For Dk/t >30, the measured tear oxygen tension is significantly lower than that predicted from previous studies. Conclusions The phosphorescence decay methodology is capable of directly measuring the in vivo post lens PO2 of high Dk/t lenses without disturbing the contact lens or cornea. Our data indicate that increasing Dk/t up to and beyond 140 continues to yield increased flux into the central cornea. PMID:19609230

  6. High-Resolution Submillimeter and Near-Infrared Studies of the Transition Disk around Sz 91

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Momose, Munetake; Hashimoto, Jun; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Andrews, Sean; Saito, Masao; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Wilner, David; Kawabe, Ryohei; Abe, Lyu; Akiyama, Eiji; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph; Currie, Thayne; Enger, Sebastian E.; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Kwon, Jungmi; McElwain, Michael W.; Matsuo, Taro; Mayama, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    To reveal the structures of a transition disk around a young stellar object in Lupus, Sz 91, we have performed aperture synthesis 345 GHz continuum and CO(32) observations with the Submillimeter Array ( 13 resolution), and high-resolution imaging of polarized intensity at the Ks-band by using the Hi-CIAO instrument on the Subaru Telescope (0.25 resolution). Our observations successfully resolved the inner and outer radii of the dust disk to be 65 and 170AU, respectively, which indicates that Sz 91 is a transition disk source with one of the largest known inner holes. The model fitting analysis of the spectral energy distribution reveals an H2 mass of 2.4 103 M in the cold (T 30 K) outer part at 65 r 170 AU by assuming a canonical gas-to-dust mass ratio of 100, although a small amount ( 3109 M) of hot (T 180 K) dust possibly remains inside the inner hole of the disk. The structure of the hot component could be interpreted as either an unresolved self-luminous companion body (not directly detected in our observations) or a narrow ring inside the inner hole. Significant CO(32) emission with a velocity gradient along the major axis of the dust disk is concentrated on the Sz 91 position, suggesting a rotating gas disk with a radius of 420 AU. The Sz 91 disk is possibly a rare disk in an evolutionary stage immediately after the formation of protoplanets because of the large inner hole and the lower disk mass than other transition disks studied thus far.

  7. Interfacing Detectors to Triggers And DAQ Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Crosetto, Dario B.

    1999-05-03

    The complete design of the front-end electronics interfacing LHCb detectors, Level-0 trigger and higher levels of trigger with flexible configuration parameters has been made for (a) ASIC implementation, and (b) FPGA implementation. The importance of approaching designs in technology-independent form becomes essential with the actual rapid electronics evolution. Being able to constrain the entire design to a few types of replicated components: (a) the fully programmable 3D-Flow system, and (b) the configurable front-end circuit described in this article, provides even further advantages because only one or two types of components will need to migrate to the newer technologies. To base on today's technology the design of a system such as the LHCb project that is to begin working in 2006 is not cost-effective. The effort required to migrate to a higher-performance will, in that case, be almost equivalent to completely redesigning the architecture from scratch. The proposed technology independent design with the current configurable front-end module described in this article and the scalable 3D-Flow fully programmable system described elsewhere, based on the study of the evolution of electronics during the past few years and the forecasted advances in the years to come, aims to provide a technology-independent design which lends itself to any technology at any time. In this case, technology independence is based mainly on generic-HDL reusable code which allows a very rapid realization of the state-of-the-art circuits in terms of gate density, power dissipation, and clock frequency. The design of four trigger towers presently fits into an OR3T30 FPGA. Preliminary test results (provided in this paper) meet the functional requirements of LHCb and provide sufficient flexibility to introduce future changes. The complete system design is also provided along with the integration of the front-end design in the entire system and the cost and dimension of the electronics.

  8. Increases in fruit intakes in older low consumers of fruit following two community-based repeated exposure interventions.

    PubMed

    Appleton, K M

    2013-03-14

    The present study investigated the value of two repeated exposure interventions for increasing intakes of fruit in older people. A total of ninety-five participants (aged 65 years and over) were randomised to receive either one (E1), five (E5) or five plus (E5+) exposures to fruit over a 5-week period. Fruit exposures occurred in community-based church and social groups, through fruit-tasting sessions involving familiar fruits and novel fruit products and dishes (E1, E5, E5+), and through fruit provision (E5+). Daily intakes of fruit and vegetables were assessed before and after all interventions. Liking for all fruits was also measured during repeated exposure (E5, E5+). In low consumers of fruit (one portion/d or less), fruit intakes increased significantly in the repeated exposure groups (E5, E5+) (t(30) = 5·79, P< 0·01), but did not change in the E1 group (t(16) = 0·29, P= 0·78). No differences were found between E5 and E5+ groups (F(3,87) = 1·22, P= 0·31). Similar effects were also found in fruit and vegetable intakes. No effects were found in other participants. Also, no changes in liking were found. These findings suggest that compared to single exposure, repeated exposure to fruit via fruit-tasting sessions once per week for 5 weeks in a community setting significantly improved fruit intakes, and fruit and vegetable intakes in older low consumers of fruit, although no benefits of additional fruit provision were found. Repeated exposure was also easy to implement, of low cost and enjoyable.

  9. In vivo protection against soman toxicity by known inhibitors of acetylcholine synthesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sterling, G H; Doukas, P H; Sheldon, R J; O'Neill, J J

    1988-02-01

    Soman inhibits the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, essentially irreversibly, producing an accumulation of acetylcholine (ACh) which is responsible for many of its toxic effects. Current approaches to treatment include: (1) atropine, a muscarinic receptor blocker; (2) pyridine-2-aldoxime methylchloride (2-PAM), an enzyme reactivator; and (3) carbamate protection of the enzyme. However, no fully satisfactory regimen has been found, primarily because of the rapid aging process. In this study, compounds known to inhibit ACh synthesis in vitro were evaluated in combination with atropine and 2-PAM so as to assess their potential utility in protection against soman toxicity in rats. Acetylsecohemicholinium (100 micrograms/kg, i.c.v.t., 30 min prior to soman), an inhibitor of high affinity choline uptake (HAChU) and cholineacetyltransferase (ChAT) activity in vitro, enhanced the protective effects of atropine and 2-PAM, reducing the mortality within the first 2 hr following soman. N-Hydroxyethylnaphthylvinylpyridine (NHENVP), a quaternary ChAT inhibitor (1.7 mumol/kg, i.m.), significantly reduced the overall percent mortality due to soman from 80% to 20%. The compound was most effective when administered 2-3 min prior to soman and was effective only by the intramuscular route. N-Allyl-3-quinuclidinol, a potent HAChU inhibitor (1 mumol/kg, i.m.) was the most effective quinuclidine analog evaluated, also reducing the percent mortality for a 24-hr period. Unlike NHENVP, it was most effective when given 30-60 min prior to soman. It is suggested from the data that compounds that disrupt presynaptic ACh synthesis in vitro may prove effective in treating organophosphate poisoning. The results demonstrate interesting differences among the compounds studied and provide insight for the design of protectants against soman toxicity. These findings further underscore the need to examine the structure activity and pharmacokinetic properties of these compounds, i.e. comparison of routes of

  10. Two-stage electrochemical treatment of bio-digested distillery spent wash using stainless steel and aluminum electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pinki; Joshi, Himanshu; Srivastava, Vimal C

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of two-stage electro-coagulation (EC) process using multi-parameter optimization for treating bio-digested distillery spent wash by stainless steel (SS) and aluminum (Al) electrodes. Operating parameters have been optimized and treatment efficiency of SS and Al electrodes have been compared by central composite design of response surface analysis in terms of COD, color and total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Individual and interactive effects of four independent parameters namely initial pH (pHo: 2-10 and 4-10 for SS and Al electrodes, respectively), current density (j: 30.86-154.32 A m(-2)), inter-electrode distance (g: 0.5-2.5 cm) and electrolysis time (t: 30-150 min) on the COD, color and TOC removal efficiency were evaluated for both the electrodes. SS electrode was found to be more effective for the removal of COD, color and TOC with removal efficiencies of 70%, 93% and 72%, respectively, as compared to Al electrode, which showed respective removal efficiencies of 59%, 80% and 55%. A two-stage EC process was also conducted to study the predominance of different types of electrodes, and to increase the efficiency of EC process. Results shows that SS followed by Al electrode (with total COD, color and TOC removal efficiency of 81%, 94% and 78%, respectively) was found to be more effective than Al followed by SS electrode combination (with total COD, color and TOC removal efficiency of 78%, 89% and 76%, respectively). Present study shows that EC process can be used as an additional step to bio-methanation process so as to meet effluent discharge standards in distilleries. PMID:25837564

  11. Microwave plasma activation of a polyvinylidene fluoride surface for protein immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, C.; Baican, M. C.; Tibirna, C. M.; Tuchilus, C.; Debarnot, D.; Pâslaru, E.; Poncin-Epaillard, F.

    2011-11-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) was modified by CO2, N2 or N2/H2 plasmas, which permitted the attachment of short carboxyl or amino groups. A variation of the discharge parameters was performed, for their optimization, as well as for minimizing degradation in favour of acidic, amphiphilic or basic functionalization, respectively. The optimum parameters of discharge for CO2, N2 or N2/H2 plasmas were P = 50 W, gas flow rate Q = 16 × 10-8 m3 s-1, exposure time t = 30-60 s, d = 0.1 m, pressure 15 Pa. The new surfaces were characterized by wettability measurements, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods. In a second step, the proteins (triglycine (TG) and protein A) were adsorbed or chemically grafted onto the carboxyl or amino functionalized surface, after EDC/NHS (1-ethyl-3-(-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide) activation of proteins. ATR-FTIR, XPS and AFM investigations confirmed the presence of protein on the surface. The XPS C1s core levels at 286.3 eV (C-N), 288 eV (amide bond) and 298 eV (carboxylic acid), together with variation of the O1s and N1s signals, illustrated the immobilization of proteins. It was established that TG was better attached on surfaces activated with N2/H2 plasma, while protein A was more tightly anchored on CO2, N2 plasma-activated surfaces. The former procedure allowed higher surface densities, while the latter permitted a better chemical control. The results proved that plasma-treated PVDF is a good substrate for protein coating, which can be further used for microorganisms' detection, as evidenced by the immunoassay test.

  12. IGR J18293-1213 is an eclipsing cataclysmic variable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavel, M.; Tomsick, J. A.; Bodaghee, A.; Chiu, J.-L.; Fornasini, F. M.; Hong, J.; Krivonos, R.; Ponti, G.; Rahoui, F.; Stern, D.

    2016-09-01

    Studying the population of faint hard X-ray sources along the plane of the Galaxy is challenging because of high extinction and crowding, which make the identification of individual sources more difficult. IGR J18293-1213 is part of the population of persistent sources which have been discovered by the INTEGRAL satellite. We report on NuSTAR and Swift/XRT observations of this source, performed on 2015 September 11. We detected three eclipsing intervals in the NuSTAR light curve, allowing us to constrain the duration of these eclipses, Δ t= 30.8^{+6.3}_{-0.0} min, and the orbital period of the system, T = 6.92 ± 0.01 h. Even though we only report an upper limit on the amplitude of a putative spin modulation, the orbital period and the hard thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum of IGR J18293-1213 provide strong evidence that this source is a magnetic cataclysmic variable. Our NuSTAR and Swift/XRT joint spectral analysis places strong constraints on the white dwarf mass M_wd = 0.78^{+0.10}_{-0.09} M⊙. Assuming that the mass to radius ratio of the companion star M⋆/R⋆ = 1 (solar units) and using T, Δt, and Mwd, we derived the mass of the companion star M⋆ = 0.82 ± 0.01 M⊙, the orbital separation of the binary system a = 2.14 ± 0.04 R⊙, and its orbital inclination compared to the line of sight i=(72.2°^{+2.4}_{-0.0})± 1.0°.

  13. In vivo protection against soman toxicity by known inhibitors of acetylcholine synthesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sterling, G H; Doukas, P H; Sheldon, R J; O'Neill, J J

    1988-02-01

    Soman inhibits the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, essentially irreversibly, producing an accumulation of acetylcholine (ACh) which is responsible for many of its toxic effects. Current approaches to treatment include: (1) atropine, a muscarinic receptor blocker; (2) pyridine-2-aldoxime methylchloride (2-PAM), an enzyme reactivator; and (3) carbamate protection of the enzyme. However, no fully satisfactory regimen has been found, primarily because of the rapid aging process. In this study, compounds known to inhibit ACh synthesis in vitro were evaluated in combination with atropine and 2-PAM so as to assess their potential utility in protection against soman toxicity in rats. Acetylsecohemicholinium (100 micrograms/kg, i.c.v.t., 30 min prior to soman), an inhibitor of high affinity choline uptake (HAChU) and cholineacetyltransferase (ChAT) activity in vitro, enhanced the protective effects of atropine and 2-PAM, reducing the mortality within the first 2 hr following soman. N-Hydroxyethylnaphthylvinylpyridine (NHENVP), a quaternary ChAT inhibitor (1.7 mumol/kg, i.m.), significantly reduced the overall percent mortality due to soman from 80% to 20%. The compound was most effective when administered 2-3 min prior to soman and was effective only by the intramuscular route. N-Allyl-3-quinuclidinol, a potent HAChU inhibitor (1 mumol/kg, i.m.) was the most effective quinuclidine analog evaluated, also reducing the percent mortality for a 24-hr period. Unlike NHENVP, it was most effective when given 30-60 min prior to soman. It is suggested from the data that compounds that disrupt presynaptic ACh synthesis in vitro may prove effective in treating organophosphate poisoning. The results demonstrate interesting differences among the compounds studied and provide insight for the design of protectants against soman toxicity. These findings further underscore the need to examine the structure activity and pharmacokinetic properties of these compounds, i.e. comparison of routes of

  14. High-resolution Submillimeter and Near-infrared Studies of the Transition Disk around Sz 91

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Momose, Munetake; Hashimoto, Jun; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Andrews, Sean; Saito, Masao; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Wilner, David; Kawabe, Ryohei; Abe, Lyu; Akiyama, Eiji; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian E.; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Kwon, Jungmi; McElwain, Mike; Matsuo, Taro; Mayama, Satoshi; Miyama, Shoken; Morino, Jun-ichi; Moro-Martín, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuro; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Takami, Hideki; Takami, Michihiro; Takato, Naruhisa; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Tomono, Daigo; Turner, Edwin L.; Usuda, Tomonori; Watanabe, Makoto; Wisniewski, John P.; Yamada, Toru; Tamura, Motohide

    2014-03-01

    To reveal the structures of a transition disk around a young stellar object in Lupus, Sz 91 , we have performed aperture synthesis 345 GHz continuum and CO(3-2) observations with the Submillimeter Array (~1''-3'' resolution) and high-resolution imaging of polarized intensity at the Ks -band using the HiCIAO instrument on the Subaru Telescope (0.''25 resolution). Our observations successfully resolved the inner and outer radii of the dust disk to be 65 and 170 AU, respectively, which indicates that Sz 91 is a transition disk source with one of the largest known inner holes. The model fitting analysis of the spectral energy distribution reveals an H2 mass of 2.4 × 10-3 M ⊙ in the cold (T < 30 K) outer part at 65 AU 3 × 10-9 M ⊙) of hot (T ~ 180 K) dust possibly remains inside the inner hole of the disk. The structure of the hot component could be interpreted as either an unresolved self-luminous companion body (not directly detected in our observations) or a narrow ring inside the inner hole. Significant CO(3-2) emission with a velocity gradient along the major axis of the dust disk is concentrated on the Sz 91 position, suggesting a rotating gas disk with a radius of 420 AU. The Sz 91 disk is possibly a rare disk in an evolutionary stage immediately after the formation of protoplanets because of the large inner hole and the lower disk mass than other transition disks studied thus far.

  15. Unconventional Thin-Film Thermoelectric Converters: Structure, Simulation, and Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haras, Maciej; Lacatena, Valeria; Monfray, Stéphane; Robillard, Jean-François; Skotnicki, Thomas; Dubois, Emmanuel

    2014-06-01

    Bi2Te3 or Sb2Te3 are the materials most widely used in thermoelectric generators (TEG) operating near room temperature. These materials are, however, environmentally harmful, expensive, and incompatible with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology, in contrast to silicon (Si), germanium (Ge), or silicon-germanium (SiGe). Although the thermopower ( S) and electrical conductivity ( σ) of Si and Ge are high, use in thermoelectricity is severely hindered by their high thermal conductivity ( κ). By altering the phonon band structure of this Si films by use of an artificial phononic pattern, spectacular reduction of κ by two orders of magnitude has been demonstrated. To take full advantage of phonon band modification and scattering in thin films, converter structure based on thin-film membranes is proposed for κ reduction. To consolidate the position of Si-based materials, coupled charge and heat-transport simulations have been conducted to demonstrate the potential of the materials for thermoelectric conversion compared with such widespread materials as Bi2Te3. The effect of contact resistance on generator performance has been carefully taken into consideration to reflect integration constraints at the TEG level. For a temperature difference Δ T = 30 K, the maximum electrical power density reaches approximately 6 W/cm2 for Si and Ge, and approximately 3 W/cm2 for Si0.7Ge0.3, values which are similar to those for Bi2Te3. Finally, it is emphasized that the proposed approach is compatible with conventional Si technology and naturally provides augmented mechanical flexibility that substantially widens the field of application of thermal harvesting.

  16. Prevention of sevoflurane related emergence agitation in children undergoing adenotonsillectomy: A comparison of dexmedetomidine and propofol

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Monaz Abdulrahman; Abdellatif, Ashraf Abualhasan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Emergence agitation (EA) in children is increased after sevoflurane anesthesia. Propofol and dexmedetomidine have been used for prophylactic treatment with controversial results. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of a single dose of propofol or dexmedetomidine prior to termination of sevoflurane-based anesthesia on the incidence and severity of EA in children. Methods: One hundred and twenty children, American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II, 2-6 years old undergoing adenotonsillectomy under sevoflurane based anesthesia were enrolled in the study. Children were randomly allocated to one of the three equal groups: (Group C) received 10 ml saline 0.9%, (Group P) received propofol 1 mg/kg or (group D) received dexmedetomidine 0.3 ug/kg-1. The study drugs were administered 5 min before the end of surgery. In post anesthesia care unit (PACU), the incidence of EA was assessed with Aonos four point scale and the severity of EA was assessed with pediatric anesthesia emergence delirium scale upon admission (T0), after 5 min (T5), 15 min (T15) and 30 min (T30). Extubation time, emergence time, duration of PACU stay and pain were assessed. Results: The incidence and severity of EA were lower in group P and group D compared to group C at T0, T5 and T15. The incidence and severity of EA in group P were significantly higher than group D at the same times. The incidence and severity of EA decreased significantly over time in all groups. The modified Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale was significantly lower in group D compared to group C and group P. Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine 0.3 ug/kg1 was more effective than propofol 1 mg/kg in decreasing the incidence and severity of EA, when administered 5 min before the end of surgery in children undergoing adenotonsillectomy under sevoflurane anesthesia. PMID:24015133

  17. Impact on bacterial community in midguts of the Asian corn borer larvae by transgenic Trichoderma strain overexpressing a heterologous chit42 gene with chitin-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingying; Fu, Kehe; Gao, Shigang; Wu, Qiong; Fan, Lili; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2013-01-01

    This paper is the first report of the impact on the bacterial community in the midgut of the Asian corn borer (Ostrinia furnacalis) by the chitinase from the transgenic Trichoderma strain. In this study, we detected a change of the bacterial community in the midgut of the fourth instar larvae by using a culture-independent method. Results suggested that Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were the most highly represented phyla, being present in all the midgut bacterial communities. The observed species richness was simple, ranging from four to five of all the 16S rRNA clone libraries. When using Trichoderma fermentation liquids as additives, the percentages of the dominant flora in the total bacterial community in larval midgut changed significantly. The community of the genus Ochrobactrum in the midgut decreased significantly when the larvae were fed with the fermentation liquids of the transgenic Trichoderma strain Mc4. However, the Enterococcus community increased and then occupied the vacated niche of the Ochrobactrum members. Furthermore, the Shannon-Wiener (H) and the Simpson (1-D) indexes of the larval midgut bacterial library treated by feeding fermentation liquids of the transgenic Trichoderma strain Mc4 was the lowest compared with the culture medium, fermentation liquids of the wild type strain T30, and the sterile artificial diet. The Enterococcus sp. strain was isolated and characterized from the healthy larvae midgut of the Asian corn borer. An infection study of the Asian corn borer larvae using Enterococcus sp. ACB-1 revealed that a correlation existed between the increased Enterococcus community in the larval midgut and larval mortality. These results demonstrated that the transgenic Trichoderma strain could affect the composition of the midgut bacterial community. The change of the midgut bacterial community might be viewed as one of the factors resulting in the increased mortality of the Asian corn borer larvae.

  18. Low-intermediate dose testosterone replacement therapy by different pharmaceutical preparations improves frailty score in elderly hypogonadal hyperglycaemic patients.

    PubMed

    Strollo, Felice; Strollo, Giovanna; Morè, Massimo; Magni, Paolo; Macchi, Chiara; Masini, Maria Angela; Carucci, Iarba; Celotti, Fabio; Ruscica, Massimiliano; Gentile, Sandro

    2013-06-01

    An open-label follow-up study of low-to-intermediate dose testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) was conducted in 64 overweight patients (aged 65-75 years) with late onset hypogonadism (LOH) and increased fasting plasma glucose (FPG). Patients were subdivided into four treatment groups: oral testosterone (T) (T undecanoate, 80 mg/d), transmucosal T (60 mg/d), transdermal T (30 mg/d) or no treatment (control), and evaluated at 0 and 6 months. FPG, hemoglobin (Hb), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and total T were measured and the Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) index was calculated. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, fitness level (6-min walking test), Aging Males' Symptoms (AMS) scale, handgrip strength and energy expenditure with physical activity (Minnesota questionnaire for Leisure Time Physical Activity (LTPA)) were evaluated and a "frailty score" (based on: grip strength, gait speed and LTPA) was calculated. T levels increased in all treatment groups; the oral T group had values still in the hypogonadal range (5.9 ± 1.1 nmol/L). PSA and Hb concentrations did not change in any group. BMI, waist circumference, FPG and HOMA-IR improved in all T-treated groups after 6 months, with a greater effect seen with transmucosal and transdermal T compared with oral T. This study indicates that low-to-intermediate dose TRT may be safely utilized in LOH patients to ameliorate somatic and psychological frailty symptoms in association with improved anthropometric and glycometabolic parameters in aging, overweight men with LOH and impaired fasting glucose. PMID:23517433

  19. High-resolution submillimeter and near-infrared studies of the transition disk around Sz 91

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Momose, Munetake; Hashimoto, Jun; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Saito, Masao; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Kawabe, Ryohei; Akiyama, Eiji; Andrews, Sean; Wilner, David; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian E.; Guyon, Olivier; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol; and others

    2014-03-10

    To reveal the structures of a transition disk around a young stellar object in Lupus, Sz 91 , we have performed aperture synthesis 345 GHz continuum and CO(3-2) observations with the Submillimeter Array (∼1''-3'' resolution) and high-resolution imaging of polarized intensity at the K{sub s} -band using the HiCIAO instrument on the Subaru Telescope (0.''25 resolution). Our observations successfully resolved the inner and outer radii of the dust disk to be 65 and 170 AU, respectively, which indicates that Sz 91 is a transition disk source with one of the largest known inner holes. The model fitting analysis of the spectral energy distribution reveals an H{sub 2} mass of 2.4 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} in the cold (T < 30 K) outer part at 65 AU 3 × 10{sup –9} M {sub ☉}) of hot (T ∼ 180 K) dust possibly remains inside the inner hole of the disk. The structure of the hot component could be interpreted as either an unresolved self-luminous companion body (not directly detected in our observations) or a narrow ring inside the inner hole. Significant CO(3-2) emission with a velocity gradient along the major axis of the dust disk is concentrated on the Sz 91 position, suggesting a rotating gas disk with a radius of 420 AU. The Sz 91 disk is possibly a rare disk in an evolutionary stage immediately after the formation of protoplanets because of the large inner hole and the lower disk mass than other transition disks studied thus far.

  20. Gastric emptying, postprandial blood pressure, glycaemia and splanchnic flow in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Trahair, Laurence G; Kimber, Thomas E; Flabouris, Katerina; Horowitz, Michael; Jones, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine gastric emptying, blood pressure, mesenteric artery blood flow, and blood glucose responses to oral glucose in Parkinson’s disease. METHODS: Twenty-one subjects (13 M, 8 F; age 64.2 ± 1.6 years) with mild to moderate Parkinson’s disease (Hoehn and Yahr score 1.4 ± 0.1, duration of known disease 6.3 ± 0.9 years) consumed a 75 g glucose drink, labelled with 20 MBq 99mTc-calcium phytate. Gastric emptying was quantified with scintigraphy, blood pressure and heart rate with an automated device, superior mesenteric artery blood flow by Doppler ultrasonography and blood glucose by glucometer for 180 min. Autonomic nerve function was evaluated with cardiovascular reflex tests and upper gastrointestinal symptoms by questionnaire. RESULTS: The mean gastric half-emptying time was 106 ± 9.1 min, gastric emptying was abnormally delayed in 3 subjects (14%). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure fell (P < 0.001) and mesenteric blood flow and blood glucose (P < 0.001 for both) increased, following the drink. Three subjects (14%) had definite autonomic neuropathy and 8 (38%) had postprandial hypotension. There were no significant relationships between changes in blood pressure, heart rate or mesenteric artery blood flow with gastric emptying. Gastric emptying was related to the score for autonomic nerve function (R = 0.55, P < 0.01). There was an inverse relationship between the blood glucose at t = 30 min (R = -0.52, P < 0.05), while the blood glucose at t = 180 min was related directly (R = 0.49, P < 0.05), with gastric emptying. CONCLUSION: In mild to moderate Parkinson’s disease, gastric emptying is related to autonomic dysfunction and a determinant of the glycaemic response to oral glucose. PMID:27239112

  1. Terrestrial Planet Formation during the Migration and Resonance Crossings of the Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykawka, Patryk Sofia; Ito, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    The newly formed giant planets may have migrated and crossed a number of mutual mean motion resonances (MMRs) when smaller objects (embryos) were accreting to form the terrestrial planets in the planetesimal disk. We investigated the effects of the planetesimal-driven migration of Jupiter and Saturn, and the influence of their mutual 1:2 MMR crossing on terrestrial planet formation for the first time, by performing N-body simulations. These simulations considered distinct timescales of MMR crossing and planet migration. In total, 68 high-resolution simulation runs using 2000 disk planetesimals were performed, which was a significant improvement on previously published results. Even when the effects of the 1:2 MMR crossing and planet migration were included in the system, Venus and Earth analogs (considering both orbits and masses) successfully formed in several runs. In addition, we found that the orbits of planetesimals beyond a ~ 1.5-2 AU were dynamically depleted by the strengthened sweeping secular resonances associated with Jupiter's and Saturn's more eccentric orbits (relative to the present day) during planet migration. However, this depletion did not prevent the formation of massive Mars analogs (planets with more than 1.5 times Mars's mass). Although late MMR crossings (at t > 30 Myr) could remove such planets, Mars-like small mass planets survived on overly excited orbits (high e and/or i), or were completely lost in these systems. We conclude that the orbital migration and crossing of the mutual 1:2 MMR of Jupiter and Saturn are unlikely to provide suitable orbital conditions for the formation of solar system terrestrial planets. This suggests that to explain Mars's small mass and the absence of other planets between Mars and Jupiter, the outer asteroid belt must have suffered a severe depletion due to interactions with Jupiter/Saturn, or by an alternative mechanism (e.g., rogue super-Earths).

  2. Terrestrial Planet Formation During the Migration and Resonance Crossings of the Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykawka, Patryk S.; Ito, T.

    2013-10-01

    The newly formed giant planets may have migrated and crossed a number of mutual mean motion resonances (MMRs) when smaller objects (embryos) were accreting to form the terrestrial planets in the planetesimal disk. We investigated the effects of the planetesimal-driven migration of Jupiter and Saturn, and the influence of their mutual 1:2 MMR crossing on terrestrial planet formation for the first time, by performing N-body simulations. These simulations considered distinct timescales of MMR crossing and planet migration. In total, 68 high-resolution simulation runs using 2000 disk planetesimals were performed, which was a significant improvement on previously published results. Even when the effects of the 1:2 MMR crossing and planet migration were included in the system, Venus and Earth analogs (considering both orbits and masses) successfully formed in several runs. In addition, we found that the orbits of planetesimals beyond a ~1.5-2 AU were dynamically depleted by the strengthened sweeping secular resonances associated with Jupiter’s and Saturn’s more eccentric orbits (relative to present-day) during planet migration. However, this depletion did not prevent the formation of massive Mars analogs (planets with more than 1.5 times Mars’ mass). Although late MMR crossings (at t > 30 Myr) could remove such planets, Mars-like small mass planets survived on overly excited orbits (high e and/or i), or were completely lost in these systems. We conclude that the orbital migration and crossing of the mutual 1:2 MMR of Jupiter and Saturn are unlikely to provide suitable orbital conditions for the formation of solar system terrestrial planets. This suggests that to explain Mars’ small mass and the absence of other planets between Mars and Jupiter, the outer asteroid belt must have suffered a severe depletion due to interactions with Jupiter/Saturn, or by an alternative mechanism (e.g., rogue super-Earths).

  3. Micellization and related behavior of sodium dodecylsulfate in mixed binary solvent media of tetrahydrofuran (Tf) and formamide (Fa) with water: a detailed physicochemical investigation.

    PubMed

    Pan, A; Naskar, B; Prameela, G K S; Kumar, B V N Phani; Aswal, V K; Bhattacharya, S C; Mandal, A B; Moulik, S P

    2014-08-21

    The detailed aggregation behavior of sodiumdodecyl sulfate (SDS) in tetrahydrofuran (Tf)-water (W) and formamide (Fa)-water (W) media at varied volume percent compositions has been investigated. Surface tension (ST), conductance (Cond), viscosity (Visc), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) were used in this study. The presence of nonaqueous solvents affected the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of SDS, the counter-ion binding of the micelle, the energetics of the air/water interfacial adsorption and micellization of the amphiphiles in the bulk, the ion-association (ion-pair, triple-ion, quadruple, etc. between Na(+) and DS(-) ions) as well as the weakly soluble (aggregation less) amphiphile solution. Tf has been observed to produce a "dead zone" or "non-micelle formation zone" in the mixed Tf-W domain of 10-40 vol%. Fa influenced the SDS aggregation up to 70 vol%, at higher proportions (below the Krafft temperature (K(T))), instead of the micelle, "randomly arranged globular assembly" (RAGA) was formed. The correlation of the standard free energy of micellization (ΔG(m)(0)) with different solvent parameters (1) dielectric constant (ε), (2) viscosity (η0), (3) Reichardt parameter (E(T)(30)), (4) Gordon parameter (G), and (5) Hansen-Hildebrand hydrogen bonding parameter (δ(h)) has been attempted. It has been found that δ(h) produced a master correlation between ΔG(m)(0) and δ(h) for different binary mixtures such as Tf-W, Fa-W, Ml-W and Dn-W.

  4. Distribution and interplay of geologic processes on Titan from Cassini radar data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, R.M.C.; Stofan, E.R.; Peckyno, R.; Radebaugh, J.; Mitchell, K.L.; Mitri, G.; Wood, C.A.; Kirk, R.L.; Wall, S.D.; Lunine, J.I.; Hayes, A.; Lorenz, R.; Farr, Tom; Wye, L.; Craig, J.; Ollerenshaw, R.J.; Janssen, M.; LeGall, A.; Paganelli, F.; West, R.; Stiles, B.; Callahan, P.; Anderson, Y.; Valora, P.; Soderblom, L.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper is providing an unprecedented view of Titan's surface geology. Here we use Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image swaths (Ta-T30) obtained from October 2004 to December 2007 to infer the geologic processes that have shaped Titan's surface. These SAR swaths cover about 20% of the surface, at a spatial resolution ranging from ???350 m to ???2 km. The SAR data are distributed over a wide latitudinal and longitudinal range, enabling some conclusions to be drawn about the global distribution of processes. They reveal a geologically complex surface that has been modified by all the major geologic processes seen on Earth - volcanism, tectonism, impact cratering, and erosion and deposition by fluvial and aeolian activity. In this paper, we map geomorphological units from SAR data and analyze their areal distribution and relative ages of modification in order to infer the geologic evolution of Titan's surface. We find that dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are more widespread than lakes, putative cryovolcanic features, mottled plains, and craters and crateriform structures that may be due to impact. Undifferentiated plains are the largest areal unit; their origin is uncertain. In terms of latitudinal distribution, dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are located mostly at low latitudes (less than 30??), with no dunes being present above 60??. Channels formed by fluvial activity are present at all latitudes, but lakes are at high latitudes only. Crateriform structures that may have been formed by impact appear to be uniformly distributed with latitude, but the well-preserved impact craters are all located at low latitudes, possibly indicating that more resurfacing has occurred at higher latitudes. Cryovolcanic features are not ubiquitous, and are mostly located between 30?? and 60?? north. We examine temporal relationships between units wherever possible, and conclude that aeolian and fluvial/pluvial/lacustrine processes are the

  5. Disribution and interplay of geologic processes on Titan from Cassini radar data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, R.M.C.; Stofan, E.R.; Peckyno, R.; Radebaugh, J.; Mitchell, K.L.; Mitri, G.; Wood, C.A.; Kirk, R.L.; Wall, S.D.; Lunine, J.I.; Hayes, A.; Lorenz, R.; Farr, Tom; Wye, L.; Craig, J.; Ollerenshaw, R.J.; Janssen, M.; LeGall, A.; Paganelli, F.; West, R.; Stiles, B.; Callahan, P.; Anderson, Y.; Valora, P.; Soderblom, L.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper is providing an unprecedented view of Titan's surface geology. Here we use Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image swaths (Ta-T30) obtained from October 2004 to December 2007 to infer the geologic processes that have shaped Titan's surface. These SAR swaths cover about 20% of the surface, at a spatial resolution ranging from ~350 m to ~2 km. The SAR data are distributed over a wide latitudinal and longitudinal range, enabling some conclusions to be drawn about the global distribution of processes. They reveal a geologically complex surface that has been modified by all the major geologic processes seen on Earth - volcanism, tectonism, impact cratering, and erosion and deposition by fluvial and aeolian activity. In this paper, we map geomorphological units from SAR data and analyze their areal distribution and relative ages of modification in order to infer the geologic evolution of Titan's surface. We find that dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are more widespread than lakes, putative cryovolcanic features, mottled plains, and craters and crateriform structures that may be due to impact. Undifferentiated plains are the largest areal unit; their origin is uncertain. In terms of latitudinal distribution, dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are located mostly at low latitudes (less than 30 degrees), with no dunes being present above 60 degrees. Channels formed by fluvial activity are present at all latitudes, but lakes are at high latitudes only. Crateriform structures that may have been formed by impact appear to be uniformly distributed with latitude, but the well-preserved impact craters are all located at low latitudes, possibly indicating that more resurfacing has occurred at higher latitudes. Cryovolcanic features are not ubiquitous, and are mostly located between 30 degrees and 60 degrees north. We examine temporal relationships between units wherever possible, and conclude that aeolian and fluvial

  6. Muscle oxygenation trends after tapering in trained cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Neary, J Patrick; McKenzie, Donald C; Bhambhani, Yagesh N

    2005-01-01

    Background This study examined muscle deoxygenation trends before and after a 7-day taper using non-invasive near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Methods Eleven cyclists performed an incremental cycle ergometer test to determine maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max = 4.68 ± 0.57 L·min-1) prior to the study, and then completed two or three high intensity (85–90% VO2max) taper protocols after being randomly assigned to a taper group: T30 (n = 5), T50 (n = 5), or T80 (n = 5) [30%, 50%, 80% reduction in training volume, respectively]. Physiological measurements were recorded during a simulated 20 km time trials (20TT) performed on a set of wind-loaded rollers. Results and Discussion The results showed that the physiological variables of oxygen consumption (VO2), carbon dioxide (VCO2) and heart rate (HR) were not significantly different after tapering, except for a decreased ventilatory equivalent for oxygen (VE/VO2) in T50 (p ≤ 0.05). However, during the 20TT muscle deoxygenation measured continuously in the vastus medialis was significantly lower (-749 ± 324 vs. -1140 ± 465 mV) in T50 after tapering, which was concomitant with a 4.53% improvement (p = 0.057) in 20TT performance time, and a 0.18 L·min-1 (4.5%) increase in VO2. Furthermore, when changes in performance time and tissue deoxygenation (post- minus pre-taper) were plotted (n = 11), a moderately high correlation was found (r = 0.82). Conclusion It was concluded that changes in simulated 20TT performance appeared to be related, in part, to changes in muscle deoxygenation following tapering, and that NIRS can be used effectively to monitor muscle deoxygenation during a taper period. PMID:15790400

  7. ARAC dispersion modeling support for January--March 1995 Vandenberg AFB launches

    SciTech Connect

    Baskett, R.L.; Pace, J.C.

    1995-05-01

    The Glory Trip (GT) 17-PA Peacekeeper launch originally scheduled at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) between 15 and 20 November 1994 was cancelled based on modeled toxic exhaust cloud calculations. The Missile Flight Control Branch, 30th Space Wing Safety Office (30 SW/SEY), made several successive ``No Go`` decisions using Version 7. 05 Rocket Exhaust Effluent Dispersion Model (REEDM) with forecasted meteorological conditions. REEDM runs made from T-14 hours to T-30 minutes predicted that ground-level concentrations of hydrogen chloride (HCl) gas from the catastrophic abort case would exceed 5 ppM, the ``instantaneous`` ambient air concentration ``Tier 2`` limit at that time, modeled as a peak 1-minute cloud centerline concentration. Depending on the forecasted wind direction and speed at launch time, this limit was predicted to be exceeded sometimes at Base Housing, approximately 10 km southeast of the launch, and during other launch windows at the town of Casmalia, about 5 km east- southeast. In late December 1994, the LLNL Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) program modeled the aborted November 1994 Peacekeeper launch and compared its results with REEDM. This initial comparison showed that the ARAC model predicted values about 1/3 as large as REEDM for the limiting case at Base Housing. Subsequently ARAC was asked to provide real-time modeling support to 30 SW/SEY during the rescheduled Peacekeeper GT 17-PA launch in January 1995 and two Minuteman launches in February and March. This report first briefly discusses the model differences and then summarizes the results of the three supported launches.

  8. Two-dimensional Tomographic Inversion Model of Ross Island, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraj, S.; Aster, R. C.; Knox, H. A.; Zandomeneghi, D.; Snelson, C. M.; Kyle, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    A controlled-source seismic refraction experiment (Tomo-Erebus; TE) was undertaken during the 2008-09 Austral summer field season to examine the magmatic system beneath the active Erebus volcano (TE-3D) and the crustal structure beneath Ross Island, including details of the Terror Rift (TE-2D). Previous geophysical studies north of Ross Island have determined the north-south trending Terror Rift within the broader Victoria Land Basin, which are part of the intraplate West Antarctic Rift System. For TE-2D, 21 seismic recorders (Ref Tek 130) with three-component 4.5 Hz geophones (Sercel L-28-3D) were deployed along a 77-km east-west line between Capes Royds and Crozier. For TE-3D, 79 similar instruments were deployed in a 3 x 3 km grid around the crater of Erebus, an array of 8 permanent short period and broadband sensors and 23 three-component sensors (Guralp CMG-40T, 30s-100 Hz) were positioned around the flanks and summit of Erebus. Fifteen chemical sources ranging from 75 to 600 kg of ANFO were used. An additional shot was detonated in the sea (McMurdo Sound) using 200 kg of dynamite. Although the station spacing is ~5 km, the data have a high signal to noise ratio with clear first arrivals and wide-angle reflections across the array. Forward modelling ray tracing was used to develop 1-D P-wave velocity models by matching layers of known velocities with the P-wave first arrival times. 1-D velocity models developed for 3 sources and show ~3 layers with a velocity of ~7 km/s below 6-8 km depth. The 1-D models were used as the starting model for a the P-wave tomographic velocity model.

  9. Sustained AS160 and TBC1D1 phosphorylations in human skeletal muscle 30 min after a single bout of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Vendelbo, M. H.; Møller, A. B.; Treebak, J. T.; Gormsen, L. C.; Goodyear, L. J.; Wojtaszewski, J. F. P.; Jørgensen, J. O. L.; Møller, N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: phosphorylation of AS160 and TBC1D1 plays an important role for GLUT4 mobilization to the cell surface. The phosphorylation of AS160 and TBC1D1 in humans in response to acute exercise is not fully characterized. Objective: to study AS160 and TBC1D1 phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle after aerobic exercise followed by a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. Design: eight healthy men were studied on two occasions: 1) in the resting state and 2) in the hours after a 1-h bout of ergometer cycling. A hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp was initiated 240 min after exercise and in a time-matched nonexercised control condition. We obtained muscle biopsies 30 min after exercise and in a time-matched nonexercised control condition (t = 30) and after 30 min of insulin stimulation (t = 270) and investigated site-specific phosphorylation of AS160 and TBC1D1. Results: phosphorylation on AS160 and TBC1D1 was increased 30 min after the exercise bout, whereas phosphorylation of the putative upstream kinases, Akt and AMPK, was unchanged compared with resting control condition. Exercise augmented insulin-stimulated phosphorylation on AS160 at Ser341 and Ser704 270 min after exercise. No additional exercise effects were observed on insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Thr642 and Ser588 on AS160 or Ser237 and Thr596 on TBC1D1. Conclusions: AS160 and TBC1D1 phosphorylations were evident 30 min after exercise without simultaneously increased Akt and AMPK phosphorylation. Unlike TBC1D1, insulin-stimulated site-specific AS160 phosphorylation is modified by prior exercise, but these sites do not include Thr642 and Ser588. Together, these data provide new insights into phosphorylation of key regulators of glucose transport in human skeletal muscle. PMID:24876356

  10. Hybrid control and acquisition system for distributed sensors for environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garufi, Fabio; Acernese, Fausto; Boiano, Alfonso; De Rosa, Rosario; Romano, Rocco; Barone, Fabrizio

    2007-04-01

    In this paper we describe the architecture and the performances of a hybrid modular acquisition and control system prototype we developed in Napoli for the implementation of geographycally distributed monitoring and control systems. The system, an improvement of a VME-UDP/IP based system developed by our group for interferometric detectors of gravitational waves, is based on a dual-channel 18-bit low noise ADC and 16-bit DAC module at 1 MHz, managed by an ALTERA FPGA, that can be used standalone or mounted as mezzanine (also in parallel with other modules) on a motherboard. Both the modules and the motherboard can send/receive the configuration and the acquired/correction data for control through a standard EPP parallel port to an external PC, where the real-time computation is performed. Experimental tests have demonstrated that this architeture allows the implementation of distributed control systems, using a standard laptop PC for the realtime computation, with delay time Δt < 30 μs on a single channel, that is a sustained sampling frequency f c > 30kHz. Each module is also equipped with a 20-bit slower ADC necessary for the acquisition of an external calibration signal. The system is now under extensive test in two different experiments, i.e. the control of a Michelson Interferometer to be used as Velocimeter for Seismic Waves in Geophysics and the control of the end mirrors a suspended Michelson Interferometer through electrostatic actuators, a prototype for mirror control for Interferometric Detectors of Gravitational Waves.

  11. Plastic responses of Abies pinsapo xylogenesis to drought and competition.

    PubMed

    Linares, Juan Carlos; Camarero, J Julio; Carreira, José Antonio

    2009-12-01

    Radial growth and xylogenesis were studied to investigate the influence of climate variability and intraspecific competition on secondary growth in Abies pinsapo Boiss., a relic Mediterranean fir. We monitored the responses to three thinning treatments (unthinned control -C-, 30% -T30- and 60% -T60- of basal area removed) to test the hypothesis that they may improve the adaptation capacity of tree growth to climatic stress. We also assessed whether xylogenesis was differentially affected by tree-to-tree competition. Secondary growth was assessed using manual band dendrometers from 2005 to 2007. In 2006, xylogenesis (phases of tracheid formation) was also investigated by taking microcores and performing histological analyses. Seasonal dynamics of radial increment were modeled using Gompertz functions and correlations with microclimate and radiation were performed. Histological analyses revealed it as fundamental to calibrate the dendrometer estimates of radial increment and to establish the actual onset and end dates of tracheid production. The lower radial-increment rates and number of produced tracheids were observed in the trees subjected to high competition in the unthinned plots. The growing season differed among the plots, and its duration ranged from an average of 78 days in unthinned plots to 115 days in thinned ones (T60). Variations in the beginning of the growing season (13 April to 22 May) and earlywood-latewood transition (early August) were mainly determined by the temperature pattern, while the onset and the end of the growing season were related to both annual precipitation and tree-to-tree competition. The tracheid-formation phases of radial enlargement and cell-wall thickening showed similar patterns in the trees from thinned and unthinned plots subjected to low and high competition, respectively, but the mean number of tracheids in each phase was always higher in the trees from the thinned plots. The reduction of competition through thinning

  12. Postprandial hyperglycemia was ameliorated by taking metformin 30 min before a meal than taking metformin with a meal; a randomized, open-label, crossover pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Muhei; Okada, Hiroshi; Mistuhashi, Kazuteru; Kimura, Toshihiro; Kitagawa, Noriyuki; Fukuda, Takuya; Majima, Saori; Fukuda, Yukiko; Tanaka, Yoshimitsu; Yamada, Shunji; Senmaru, Takafumi; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Asano, Mai; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Oda, Yohei; Hasegawa, Goji; Nakamura, Naoto; Fukui, Michiaki

    2016-05-01

    Taking metformin with a meal has been shown to decrease bioavailability of metformin. We hypothesized that taking metformin 30 min before a meal improves glucose metabolism. As an animal model, 18 Zucker-rats were divided into three groups as follows: no medication (Control), metformin (600 mg/kg) with meal (Met), and metformin 10 min before meal (pre-Met). In addition, five diabetic patients were recruited and randomized to take metformin (1000 mg) either 30 min before a meal (pre-Met protocol) or with a meal (Met protocol). In the animal model, the peak glucose level of pre-Met (7.8 ± 1.5 mmol/L) was lower than that of Control (12.6 ± 2.5 mmol/L, P = 0.010) or Met (14.1 ± 2.9 mmol/L, P = 0.020). Although there was no statistical difference among the three groups, total GLP-1 level at t = 0 min of pre-Met (7.4 ± 2.7 pmol/L) tended to be higher than that of Control (3.7 ± 2.0 pmol/L, P = 0.030) or Met (3.9 ± 1.2 pmol/L, P = 0.020). In diabetic patients, the peak glucose level of pre-Met protocol (7.0 ± 0.4 mmol/L) was lower than that of Met protocol (8.5 ± 0.9 mmol/L, P = 0.021). Total GLP-1 level at t = 30 min of pre-Met protocol (11.0 ± 6.1 pmol/L) was higher than that of Met protocol (6.7 ± 3.9 pmol/L, P = 0.033). Taking metformin 30 min before a meal ameliorated postprandial hyperglycemia. This promises to be a novel approach for postprandial hyperglycemia.

  13. Structural basis for the ligand-binding specificity of fatty acid-binding proteins (pFABP4 and pFABP5) in gentoo penguin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Woo; Kim, Jung Eun; Do, Hackwon; Kim, Ryeo-Ok; Lee, Sung Gu; Park, Hyun Ho; Chang, Jeong Ho; Yim, Joung Han; Park, Hyun; Kim, Il-Chan; Lee, Jun Hyuck

    2015-09-11

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are involved in transporting hydrophobic fatty acids between various aqueous compartments of the cell by directly binding ligands inside their β-barrel cavities. Here, we report the crystal structures of ligand-unbound pFABP4, linoleate-bound pFABP4, and palmitate-bound pFABP5, obtained from gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua), at a resolution of 2.1 Å, 2.2 Å, and 2.3 Å, respectively. The pFABP4 and pFABP5 proteins have a canonical β-barrel structure with two short α-helices that form a cap region and fatty acid ligand binding sites in the hydrophobic cavity within the β-barrel structure. Linoleate-bound pFABP4 and palmitate-bound pFABP5 possess different ligand-binding modes and a unique ligand-binding pocket due to several sequence dissimilarities (A76/L78, T30/M32, underlining indicates pFABP4 residues) between the two proteins. Structural comparison revealed significantly different conformational changes in the β3-β4 loop region (residues 57-62) as well as the flipped Phe60 residue of pFABP5 than that in pFABP4 (the corresponding residue is Phe58). A ligand-binding study using fluorophore displacement assays shows that pFABP4 has a relatively strong affinity for linoleate as compared to pFABP5. In contrast, pFABP5 exhibits higher affinity for palmitate than that for pFABP4. In conclusion, our high-resolution structures and ligand-binding studies provide useful insights into the ligand-binding preferences of pFABPs based on key protein-ligand interactions.

  14. Host-seeking activity and avian host preferences of mosquitoes associated with West Nile virus transmission in the northeastern U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suom, Channsotha; Ginsberg, Howard S.; Bernick, Andrew; Klein, Coby; Buckley, P.A.; Salvatore, Christa; LeBrun, Roger A.

    2010-01-01

    Mosquito host-seeking activity was studied using a custom-designed trap to explore: (1) at which time interval of the night adult mosquito abatement would be most effective, and (2) if there exists an avian-specific host-seeking preference. Overnight trials using traps baited with dry ice showed that Aedes taeniorhynchus (Wiedemann) was most active at dusk and was then captured throughout the night. In contrast, Culex spp. (Cx. pipiens (Linnaeus) and Cx. restuans (Theobald) delayed most activity until about two h after dusk and were then captured through the night. This pattern suggests that management activities directed at adult Culex spp. would be most effective if initiated well after sunset. Mosquito capture rates in traps baited with birds in net bags were significantly greater than those with empty net bags, indicating that mosquitoes were attracted to the birds and not incidentally being sucked in by the custom trap's strong fan motor (Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test, n = 24, t = 30, p 2 = 0.21, p = 0.02). Trials with paired traps that contained different native bird species showed that Gray Catbirds, Dumatella carolinensis, attracted more mosquitoes than the heavier Northern Cardinals, Cardinalis cardinalis (paired samples t-test, t = 2.58, df = 7, p = 0.04). However, attractiveness did not differ substantially among bird species, and Gray Catbirds did not attract more mosquitoes than all other birds combined as a group. American Robins, Turdus migratorius (n = 4) were comparable in attractiveness to other bird species, but not enough American Robins were captured for a comprehensive study of mosquito avian preference.

  15. Quantification of rapid environmental redox processes with quick-scanning x-ray absorption spectroscopy (Q-XAS).

    PubMed

    Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Landrot, Gautier; Fischel, Jason S; Sparks, Donald L

    2009-09-22

    Quantification of the initial rates of environmental reactions at the mineral/water interface is a fundamental prerequisite to determining reaction mechanisms and contaminant transport modeling and predicting environmental risk. Until recently, experimental techniques with adequate time resolution and elemental sensitivity to measure initial rates of the wide variety of environmental reactions were quite limited. Techniques such as electron paramagnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies suffer from limited elemental specificity and poor sensitivity to inorganic elements, respectively. Ex situ analysis of batch and stirred-flow systems provides high elemental sensitivity; however, their time resolution is inadequate to characterize rapid environmental reactions. Here we apply quick-scanning x-ray absorption spectroscopy (Q-XAS), at sub-second time-scales, to measure the initial oxidation rate of As(III) to As(V) by hydrous manganese(IV) oxide. Using Q-XAS, As(III) and As(V) concentrations were determined every 0.98 s in batch reactions. The initial apparent As(III) depletion rate constants (t < 30 s) measured with Q-XAS are nearly twice as large as rate constants measured with traditional analytical techniques. Our results demonstrate the importance of developing analytical techniques capable of analyzing environmental reactions on the same time scale as they occur. Given the high sensitivity, elemental specificity, and time resolution of Q-XAS, it has many potential applications. They could include measuring not only redox reactions but also dissolution/precipitation reactions, such as the formation and/or reductive dissolution of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, solid-phase transformations (i.e., formation of layered-double hydroxide minerals), or almost any other reaction occurring in aqueous media that can be measured using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. PMID:19805269

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF PHARMACEUTICAL EXCIPIENT BEHAVIOR OF CHICKPEA (CICER ARIETINUM) STARCH IN GLICLAZIDE IMMEDIATE RELEASE TABLETS.

    PubMed

    Meka, Venkata Srikanth; Yee, Phung; Sheshala, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, there are number of researchers carrying out their research on the excipients derived from polysaccharides and some of these researches show that natural excipients are comparable and can serve as an alternative to the synthetic excipients. Hence, the objectives of this research are to characterize the naturally sourced chickpea starch powder and to study the pharmaceutical excipient behavior of chickpea starch in gliclazide immediate release (IR) tablets. In this research, the binding properties of chickpea starch were compared to that of povidone, whereas the disintegrant properties of chickpea starch were compared to those of crospovidone, croscarmellose sodium and sodium starch glycolate. Flow property of chickpea starch was assessed with the measurement of bulk density, tapped density, compressibility index and angle of repose. Calibration curve for gliclazide in phosphate buffer pH 7.4 was developed. Gliclazide IR tablets were then produced with direct compression method. Physicochemical characteristics of the tablets, including thickness, tablet weight uniformity, hardness, disintegration time and friability were evaluated. Then, in vitro dissolution studies were performed by following United States Pharmacopeia (USP) dissolution method. The dissolution results were analyzed and compared with t30, t50, dissolution efficiency (DE). Lastly, drug-excipient compatibility studies, including Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) analysis were carried out. Fair flow property was observed in the chickpea starch powder. Furthermore, the tablets produced passed all the tests in physicochemical characteristics evaluation except hardness and disintegration test. Additionally, in vitro dissolution studies show that chickpea starch acted as a disintegrant instead of a binder in gliclazide IR tablets and its disintegrant properties were comparable to those of crospovidone, croscarmellose

  17. Postprandial hyperglycemia was ameliorated by taking metformin 30 min before a meal than taking metformin with a meal; a randomized, open-label, crossover pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Muhei; Okada, Hiroshi; Mistuhashi, Kazuteru; Kimura, Toshihiro; Kitagawa, Noriyuki; Fukuda, Takuya; Majima, Saori; Fukuda, Yukiko; Tanaka, Yoshimitsu; Yamada, Shunji; Senmaru, Takafumi; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Asano, Mai; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Oda, Yohei; Hasegawa, Goji; Nakamura, Naoto; Fukui, Michiaki

    2016-05-01

    Taking metformin with a meal has been shown to decrease bioavailability of metformin. We hypothesized that taking metformin 30 min before a meal improves glucose metabolism. As an animal model, 18 Zucker-rats were divided into three groups as follows: no medication (Control), metformin (600 mg/kg) with meal (Met), and metformin 10 min before meal (pre-Met). In addition, five diabetic patients were recruited and randomized to take metformin (1000 mg) either 30 min before a meal (pre-Met protocol) or with a meal (Met protocol). In the animal model, the peak glucose level of pre-Met (7.8 ± 1.5 mmol/L) was lower than that of Control (12.6 ± 2.5 mmol/L, P = 0.010) or Met (14.1 ± 2.9 mmol/L, P = 0.020). Although there was no statistical difference among the three groups, total GLP-1 level at t = 0 min of pre-Met (7.4 ± 2.7 pmol/L) tended to be higher than that of Control (3.7 ± 2.0 pmol/L, P = 0.030) or Met (3.9 ± 1.2 pmol/L, P = 0.020). In diabetic patients, the peak glucose level of pre-Met protocol (7.0 ± 0.4 mmol/L) was lower than that of Met protocol (8.5 ± 0.9 mmol/L, P = 0.021). Total GLP-1 level at t = 30 min of pre-Met protocol (11.0 ± 6.1 pmol/L) was higher than that of Met protocol (6.7 ± 3.9 pmol/L, P = 0.033). Taking metformin 30 min before a meal ameliorated postprandial hyperglycemia. This promises to be a novel approach for postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:26518190

  18. Mechanistic Insight into DNA-Guided Control of Nanoparticle Morphologies.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li Huey; Yue, Yuan; Satyavolu, Nitya Sai Reddy; Ali, Arzeena Sultana; Wang, Zidong; Wu, Yuqing; Lu, Yi

    2015-11-18

    Although shapes and surface characteristics of nanoparticles are known to play important roles in defining their properties, it remains challenging to fine-tune the morphologies systematically and predictably. Recently, we have shown that DNA molecules can serve as programmable ligands to fine-tune the morphologies of nanomaterials. Despite this discovery, the mechanism of how the morphology can be controlled and the roles of the DNA molecules in contributing to such control are not understood. We herein report mechanistic investigation of DNA-mediated morphological evolution of gold nanoprism seeds into nonagon, hexagon, and six-pointed stars, some of which display rough surfaces, in the presence of homo-oligomeric T30, G20, C30, and A30. The growth, elucidated through various analytical methods including UV-vis, SEM, TEM, zeta potential, fluorescence, and cyclic voltammetry, is found to occur in two stages: control of shape, followed by control of thickness. A careful analysis of diffraction patterns of the nanoprism seeds as well as the resulting intermediate shapes by TEM allowed us to deduce the exact sequence of shape evolution. Through systematic comparison of the nanoparticle growth process, the DNA molecules were found to play important roles by influencing diffusion of the Au precursor to the seed and modulating the growth through differences in DNA desorption, density, and mobility on the seed surface. These insights into the mechanism of DNA-guided control of nanomaterial morphologies provide deeper understanding of the interactions between the DNA and nanomaterials and will allow better control of the shapes and surface properties of many nanomaterials. PMID:26492515

  19. Spot activity on HD 89546 (FG UMa) from long-term photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdarcan, O.; Evren, S.; Henry, G. W.

    2012-02-01

    We present the analysis of 20 years of time-series BV photometry of the SB1 RS CVn binary HD 89546. The system's yearly mean V brightness, the B-V color index, the photometric period, and the light curve amplitude all show clear cyclic variability with an ≈9-year time scale. We also find some evidence for brightness variability on a time scale longer than the 20-year time span of our observations, perhaps indicating a longer cycle analogous to the solar Gleissberg cycle. We estimate the unspotted V magnitude of HD 89546 to be 7.154m, which is ≈0.2m brighter than the observed maximum brightness. Spot modelling of the system shows that spot temperature variations affect the observed B-V color as well as the V brightness. Two active longitudes are observed, centered around 180° and 360° longitude on the G9 III primary, each covering a longitude range of 120°. Furthermore, two inactive longitude zones are seen spanning only 60° between the two active longitudes. The longitudinal distribution of the spots exhibits no strong cyclic variability but does show rapid jumps of 120° that look like the flip-flop phenomenon. We estimate the differential rotation coefficient of the star as k=0.086 by considering the range of observed photometric period variations and assumed latitudinal spot variations over 45°. Based on data obtained with the Tennessee State University T3 0.4 m APT at Fairborn Observatory, operated by Tennessee State University, and T30 0.3 m telescope of the Ege University Observatory in Izmir.

  20. GJB2 Mutations and Degree of Hearing Loss: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Snoeckx, Rikkert L.; Huygen, Patrick L. M.; Feldmann, Delphine; Marlin, Sandrine; Denoyelle, Françoise; Waligora, Jaroslaw; Mueller-Malesinska, Malgorzata; Pollak, Agneszka; Ploski, Rafal; Murgia, Alessandra; Orzan, Eva; Castorina, Pierangela; Ambrosetti, Umberto; Nowakowska-Szyrwinska, Ewa; Bal, Jerzy; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Janecke, Andreas R.; Nekahm-Heis, Doris; Seeman, Pavel; Bendova, Olga; Kenna, Margaret A.; Frangulov, Anna; Rehm, Heidi L.; Tekin, Mustafa; Incesulu, Armagan; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M.; du Sart, Desirée; Jenkins, Lucy; Lucas, Deirdre; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Avraham, Karen B.; Brownstein, Zippora; del Castillo, Ignacio; Moreno, Felipe; Blin, Nikolaus; Pfister, Markus; Sziklai, Istvan; Toth, Timea; Kelley, Philip M.; Cohn, Edward S.; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Hilbert, Pascale; Roux, Anne-Françoise; Mondain, Michel; Hoefsloot, Lies H.; Cremers, Cor W. R. J.; Löppönen, Tuija; Löppönen, Heikki; Parving, Agnete; Gronskov, Karen; Schrijver, Iris; Roberson, Joseph; Gualandi, Francesca; Martini, Alessandro; Lina-Granade, Geneviève; Pallares-Ruiz, Nathalie; Correia, Céu; Fialho, Graça; Cryns, Kim; Hilgert, Nele; Van de Heyning, Paul; Nishimura, Carla J.; Smith, Richard J. H.; Van Camp, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Hearing impairment (HI) affects 1 in 650 newborns, which makes it the most common congenital sensory impairment. Despite extraordinary genetic heterogeneity, mutations in one gene, GJB2, which encodes the connexin 26 protein and is involved in inner ear homeostasis, are found in up to 50% of patients with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss. Because of the high frequency of GJB2 mutations, mutation analysis of this gene is widely available as a diagnostic test. In this study, we assessed the association between genotype and degree of hearing loss in persons with HI and biallelic GJB2 mutations. We performed cross-sectional analyses of GJB2 genotype and audiometric data from 1,531 persons, from 16 different countries, with autosomal recessive, mild-to-profound nonsyndromic HI. The median age of all participants was 8 years; 90% of persons were within the age range of 0–26 years. Of the 83 different mutations identified, 47 were classified as nontruncating, and 36 as truncating. A total of 153 different genotypes were found, of which 56 were homozygous truncating (T/T), 30 were homozygous nontruncating (NT/NT), and 67 were compound heterozygous truncating/nontruncating (T/NT). The degree of HI associated with biallelic truncating mutations was significantly more severe than the HI associated with biallelic nontruncating mutations (P<.0001). The HI of 48 different genotypes was less severe than that of 35delG homozygotes. Several common mutations (M34T, V37I, and L90P) were associated with mild-to-moderate HI (median 25–40 dB). Two genotypes—35delG/R143W (median 105 dB) and 35delG/dela(GJB6-D13S1830) (median 108 dB)—had significantly more-severe HI than that of 35delG homozygotes. PMID:16380907

  1. Macromolecular Design via an Organocatalytic, Monomer-Specific and Temperature-Dependent “On/Off Switch”. High Precision Synthesis of Polyester/Polycarbonate Multiblock Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The employment of a monomer-specific “on/off switch” was used to synthesize a nine-block copolymer with a predetermined molecular weight and narrow distribution (Đ = 1.26) in only 2.5 h. The monomers consisted of a six-membered cyclic carbonate (i.e., 2-allyloxymethyl-2-ethyl-trimethylene carbonate (AOMEC)) and ε-caprolactone (εCL), which were catalyzed by 1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]-dec-5-ene (TBD). The dependence of polymerization rate with temperature was different for the two monomers. Under similar reaction conditions, the ratio of the apparent rate constant of AOMEC and εCL [kpapp(AOMEC)/kpapp(εCL)] changes from 400 at T = −40 °C to 50 at T = 30 °C and 10 at T = 100 °C. Therefore, by decreasing the copolymerization temperature from 30 °C to −40 °C, the conversion of εCL can be switched “off”, and by increasing the temperature to 30 °C, the conversion of εCL can be switched “on” again. The addition of AOMEC at T = −40 °C results in the formation of a pure carbonate block. The cyclic addition of AOMEC to a solution of εCL along with a simultaneous temperature change leads to the formation of multiblock copolymers. This result provides a new straightforward synthetic route to degradable multiblock copolymers, yielding new interesting materials with endless structural possibilities. PMID:26294800

  2. Coordination chemistry of two heavy metals: I, Ligand preferences in lead(II) complexation, toward the development of therapeutic agents for lead poisoning: II, Plutonium solubility and speciation relevant to the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Neu, M.P.

    1993-11-01

    The coordination chemistry and solution behavior of the toxic ions lead(II) and plutonium(IV, V, VI) have been investigated. The ligand pK{sub a}s and ligand-lead(II) stability constants of one hydroxamic acid and four thiohydroaxamic acids were determined. Solution thermodynamic results indicate that thiohydroxamic acids are more acidic and slightly better lead chelators than hydroxamates, e.g., N-methylthioaceto-hydroxamic acid, pK{sub a} = 5.94, log{beta}{sub 120} = 10.92; acetohydroxamic acid, pK{sub a} = 9.34, log{beta}{sub l20} = 9.52. The syntheses of lead complexes of two bulky hydroxamate ligands are presented. The X-ray crystal structures show the lead hydroxamates are di-bridged dimers with irregular five-coordinate geometry about the metal atom and a stereochemically active lone pair of electrons. Molecular orbital calculations of a lead hydroxamate and a highly symmetric pseudo octahedral lead complex were performed. The thermodynamic stability of plutonium(IV) complexes of the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFO), and two octadentate derivatives of DFO were investigated using competition spectrophotometric titrations. The stability constant measured for the plutonium(IV) complex of DFO-methylterephthalamide is log{beta}{sub 110} = 41.7. The solubility limited speciation of {sup 242}Pu as a function of time in near neutral carbonate solution was measured. Individual solutions of plutonium in a single oxidation state were added to individual solutions at pH = 6.0, T = 30.0, 1.93 mM dissolved carbonate, and sampled over intervals up to 150 days. Plutonium solubility was measured, and speciation was investigated using laser photoacoustic spectroscopy and chemical methods.

  3. [Characteristics of Nitrogen Removal by a Heterotrophic Nitrification-Aerobic Denitrification Bacterium YL].

    PubMed

    Liang, Xian; Ren, Yong-xiang; Yang, Lei; Zhao, Si-qi; Xia, Zhi-hong

    2015-05-01

    Traditional process of autotrophic nitrification-anaerobic denitrification usually has problems of long procedure and low efficiency. To overcome these problems, a heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium YL was isolated from a domesticated mature SBR reactor with efficient simultaneous nitrification and denitrification ability, and was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa YL. Meanwhile, the characteristics of the nitrogen removal of strain YL was investigated through single-factor experiments and an orthogonal experiment. The results showed that the preferred conditions were: succinate as the carbon source, C/N ratio of 10, pH of 7.0, temperature of 30°C, and the shaking speed of 160-200 r · min(-1), while the removal rate of ammonia oxidation was 5. 05 mg · (g · h)(-1), the transformation rate of TOC was 45.95 mg · (g · h)(-1), and the removal rates of nitrogen and TOC were 100% and 90.8%, respectively. Nitrite, nitrate and hydroxylamine could also be metabolized by strain YL, and the removal rates were 92.7%, 93.6% and 94.8%, respectively. The most important influencing factor on aerobic denitrification of strain YL was C/N ratio. Under the optimal conditions (C/N = 10, T = 30°C , r = 200 r · min(-1), pH = 7), the removal rates of nitrate and total nitrogen were 94.6% and 76.3%, respectively. Hence, strain YL could remove nitrogen by heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification independently, quickly, and effectively.

  4. Assessment of high-rate GPS time series at long periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelevitz, Krisztina; Houlié, Nicolas; Boschi, Lapo; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; Giardini, Domenico; Rothacher, Markus

    2015-04-01

    High-rate GPS has been proven to be sensitive to ground motions that are induced by surface waves from large earthquakes even hundreds kilometers from the epicenter (Larson et al. (2003a)). Since the broadband seismometers are less sensitive to the long period surface waves (T > 300 seconds), the seismic velocity tomography models start to diverge for depths larger than 400 km (Becker and Boschi (2002); Ritsema et al. (2011)). Because of their good accuracy at long-periods (detecting ground displacements above 2 mm), GPS measurements could be used to support broadband seismometer networks (Houliè et al. (2011); Bilich et al. (2008)) and strong motion networks in near field (Houliè et al. (2014)) by providing high-quality waveforms in displacement for periods T > 3s. We present the comparison of 1Hz high-rate GPS data, very broadband seismograms and super-conductivity gravimeter data for various period bands (T > 30 s) using the observations collected during three mega-thrust events: 2003 Hokkaido, 2004 Sumatra and 2011 Tohoku-Oki. We assess the performance of each dataset at the light of comparison with synthetic waveforms that were computed using the AXISEM and SPECFEM algorithms. With this study we aim at filling the gap between the surface wave (T < 60 seconds) and normal mode (T 1200 seconds) period ranges. We find that GPS is well capable on recovering millimeter ground motion oscillations in a wide range of periods, providing valuable information on the lithosphere and mantle heterogeneities on a scale of 300 to 3000 km.

  5. IDENTIFICATION OF PHARMACEUTICAL EXCIPIENT BEHAVIOR OF CHICKPEA (CICER ARIETINUM) STARCH IN GLICLAZIDE IMMEDIATE RELEASE TABLETS.

    PubMed

    Meka, Venkata Srikanth; Yee, Phung; Sheshala, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, there are number of researchers carrying out their research on the excipients derived from polysaccharides and some of these researches show that natural excipients are comparable and can serve as an alternative to the synthetic excipients. Hence, the objectives of this research are to characterize the naturally sourced chickpea starch powder and to study the pharmaceutical excipient behavior of chickpea starch in gliclazide immediate release (IR) tablets. In this research, the binding properties of chickpea starch were compared to that of povidone, whereas the disintegrant properties of chickpea starch were compared to those of crospovidone, croscarmellose sodium and sodium starch glycolate. Flow property of chickpea starch was assessed with the measurement of bulk density, tapped density, compressibility index and angle of repose. Calibration curve for gliclazide in phosphate buffer pH 7.4 was developed. Gliclazide IR tablets were then produced with direct compression method. Physicochemical characteristics of the tablets, including thickness, tablet weight uniformity, hardness, disintegration time and friability were evaluated. Then, in vitro dissolution studies were performed by following United States Pharmacopeia (USP) dissolution method. The dissolution results were analyzed and compared with t30, t50, dissolution efficiency (DE). Lastly, drug-excipient compatibility studies, including Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) analysis were carried out. Fair flow property was observed in the chickpea starch powder. Furthermore, the tablets produced passed all the tests in physicochemical characteristics evaluation except hardness and disintegration test. Additionally, in vitro dissolution studies show that chickpea starch acted as a disintegrant instead of a binder in gliclazide IR tablets and its disintegrant properties were comparable to those of crospovidone, croscarmellose

  6. Titan Topography: A Comparison Between Cassini Altimeter and SAR Imaging from Two Titan Flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Y.; Stiles, B.; Callahan, P. S.; Johnson, W. T.; Hensley, S.; Hamilton, G.; West, R.; Alberti, G.; Flamini, E.; Lorenz, R. D.; Zebker, H. A.; Cassini RADAR Team

    2007-12-01

    The Cassini RADAR has collected twelve altimeter data sets of Titan since the beginning of the Saturn Tour in 2004. Most of the altimeter measurements were made at high altitudes, from 4,000 km to 15,000 km, resulting in low spatial resolutions due to beam footprint sizes larger than 20 km, as well as short ground tracks less than 600 km. One flyby (T30) was dedicated to altimeter data collection from 15,000 km to the closest approach altitude of 950 km. This produced a beam footprint size of 6 km at the lowest altitude and an altimeter ground track of about 3,500 km covering Titan's surface from near the equator to high latitude areas near Titan's north pole. More importantly, the ground track is located inside the SAR swath viewed from an earlier Titan flyby (T28). This provides a rare opportunity to investigate Titan topography with a relatively high spatial resolution and compare nadir-looking altimeter data with side-looking SAR imaging. From altimeter data, we have measured the mean Titan radius of 2575.1 km +/- 0.1 km and observed rather complex topographical variations over a short distance. By comparing altimeter data and SAR images at altitudes below 2,000 km, we have found that there is a strong correlation between SAR brightness and altimeter waveform; SAR dark areas correspond to strong and sharp altimeter waveforms while SAR bright areas correspond to weak and diffused altimeter waveforms. The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  7. Measuring and Characterizing the Human Nasal Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kahana-Zweig, Roni; Geva-Sagiv, Maya; Weissbrod, Aharon; Secundo, Lavi; Soroker, Nachum; Sobel, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Nasal airflow is greater in one nostril than in the other because of transient asymmetric nasal passage obstruction by erectile tissue. The extent of obstruction alternates across nostrils with periodicity referred to as the nasal cycle. The nasal cycle is related to autonomic arousal and is indicative of asymmetry in brain function. Moreover, alterations in nasal cycle periodicity have been linked to various diseases. There is therefore need for a tool allowing continuous accurate measurement and recording of airflow in each nostril separately. Here we provide detailed instructions for constructing such a tool at minimal cost and effort. We demonstrate application of the tool in 33 right-handed healthy subjects, and derive several statistical measures for nasal cycle characterization. Using these measures applied to 24-hour recordings we observed that: 1: subjects spent slightly longer in left over right nostril dominance (left = 2.63 ± 0.89 hours, right = 2.17 ± 0.89 hours, t(32) = 2.07, p < 0.05), 2: cycle duration was shorter in wake than in sleep (wake = 2.02 ± 1.7 hours, sleep = 4.5 ± 1.7 hours, (t(30) = 5.73, p < 0.0001). 3: slower breathing was associated with a more powerful cycle (the extent of difference across nostrils) (r = 0.4, p < 0.0001), and 4: the cycle was influenced by body posture such that lying on one side was associated with greater flow in the contralateral nostril (p < 0.002). Finally, we provide evidence for an airflow cycle in each nostril alone. These results provide characterization of an easily obtained measure that may have diagnostic implications for neurological disease and cognitive state. PMID:27711189

  8. Two-stage electrochemical treatment of bio-digested distillery spent wash using stainless steel and aluminum electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pinki; Joshi, Himanshu; Srivastava, Vimal C

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of two-stage electro-coagulation (EC) process using multi-parameter optimization for treating bio-digested distillery spent wash by stainless steel (SS) and aluminum (Al) electrodes. Operating parameters have been optimized and treatment efficiency of SS and Al electrodes have been compared by central composite design of response surface analysis in terms of COD, color and total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Individual and interactive effects of four independent parameters namely initial pH (pHo: 2-10 and 4-10 for SS and Al electrodes, respectively), current density (j: 30.86-154.32 A m(-2)), inter-electrode distance (g: 0.5-2.5 cm) and electrolysis time (t: 30-150 min) on the COD, color and TOC removal efficiency were evaluated for both the electrodes. SS electrode was found to be more effective for the removal of COD, color and TOC with removal efficiencies of 70%, 93% and 72%, respectively, as compared to Al electrode, which showed respective removal efficiencies of 59%, 80% and 55%. A two-stage EC process was also conducted to study the predominance of different types of electrodes, and to increase the efficiency of EC process. Results shows that SS followed by Al electrode (with total COD, color and TOC removal efficiency of 81%, 94% and 78%, respectively) was found to be more effective than Al followed by SS electrode combination (with total COD, color and TOC removal efficiency of 78%, 89% and 76%, respectively). Present study shows that EC process can be used as an additional step to bio-methanation process so as to meet effluent discharge standards in distilleries.

  9. Experimental Study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability of Incompressible Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niederhaus, Charles; Jacobs, Jeffrey W.

    2002-01-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a low Atwood number, miscible, two-liquid system is investigated experimentally. The initially stratified fluids are contained within a rectangular tank mounted to a sled that rides on a vertical set of rails. The instability is generated by dropping the sled onto a coil spring, producing a nearly impulsive upward acceleration. The subsequent freefall that occurs as the container travels upward and then downward on the rails allows the instability to evolve in the absence of gravity. The interface separating the two liquids initially has a well-defined, sinusoidal perturbation that quickly inverts and then grows in amplitude after undergoing the impulsive acceleration. Disturbance amplitudes are measured and compared to theoretical predictions. Linear stability theory gives excellent agreement with the measured initial growth rate, a(sub 0), for single-mode perturbations with the predicted amplitudes differing by less than 10% from experimental measurements up to a nondimensional time ka(sub 0)t = 0.7, where k is the wavenumber. Linear stability theory also provides excellent agreement for the individual mode amplitudes of multi-mode initial perturbations up until the interface becomes multi-valued. Comparison with previously published weakly nonlinear single-mode models shows good agreement up to ka(sub 0)t = 3, while published nonlinear single-mode models provide good agreement up to ka(sub 0)t = 30. The effects of Reynolds number on the vortex core evolution and overall growth rate of the interface are also investigated. Measurements of the overall amplitude are found to be unaffected by the Reynolds number for the range of values studied here. However, experiments carried out at lower values of Reynolds numbers were found to have decreased vortex core rotation rates. In addition, an instability in the vortex cores is observed.

  10. Observational capabilities of solar satellite "Coronas-Photon"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Yu.

    Coronas-Photon mission is the third satellite of the Russian Coronas program on solar activity observation The main goal of the Coronas-Photon is the study of solar hard electromagnetic radiation in the wide energy range from UV up to high energy gamma-radiation sim 2000MeV Scientific payload for solar radiation observation consists of three type of instruments 1 monitors Natalya-2M Konus-RF RT-2 Penguin-M BRM Phoka Sphin-X Sokol for spectral and timing measurements of full solar disk radiation with timing in flare burst mode up to one msec Instruments Natalya-2M Konus-RF RT-2 will cover the wide energy range of hard X-rays and soft Gamma rays 15keV to 2000MeV and will together constitute the largest area detectors ever used for solar observations Detectors of gamma-ray monitors are based on structured inorganic scintillators with energy resolution sim 5 for nuclear gamma-line band to 35 for GeV-band PSD analysis is used for gamma neutron separation for solar neutron registration T 30MeV Penguin-M has capability to measure linear polarization of hard X-rays using azimuth are measured by Compton scattering asymmetry in case of polarization of an incident flux For X-ray and EUV monitors the scintillation phoswich detectors gas proportional counter CZT assembly and Filter-covered Si-diodes are used 2 Telescope-spectrometer TESIS for imaging solar spectroscopy in X-rays with angular resolution up to 1 in three spectral lines and RT-2 CZT assembly of CZT

  11. Physico-chemical and microbiological characteristics of water for fish production using small ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntengwe, Felix W.; Edema, Mojisola O.

    The physical-chemical and biological characteristics of water in fish ponds were investigated with a view to optimise the conditions for fish productivity using small ponds. Five fish ponds were used in the study. The water samples were collected in each pond at a depth of 10-15 cm from the surface over a period of six months and analysed for pH, temperature, DO, alkalinity. The fish activity and growth rates were also assessed. The results showed that the ponds were slightly acidic to neutral (pH 6.69-7.66). The mean lowest and highest values of DO were 9.05 and 9.93 mg/L while the values for alkalinity were 67.86 and 90.57 mg/L respectively. The bacterial counts were in the order of 10 6 and the populations comprised Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Azotobacter, Arthrobacter species and Escherichia coli. It was also observed that the fish activity increased as the temperature of the water varied from April to September as given by the activity ranges of 55-95, 40-80, 55-80, 70-95 and 55-95/m 2 for ponds P1, P2, P3, P4 and P5, respectively. The lowest values were in the months of April, May and June and highest values were in the months of July, August and September. The optimum conditions for increased fish productivity were found to be the warm temperatures (20 < t < 30 °C), adequate DO level (>4 mg/L) and appropriate pH (6 < pH < 9) and alkalinity (Alk) (80 < Alk < 200 mg/L). The correlations between characteristics were significant at 0.01 and 0.05 levels (2 tailed). Therefore, the fish productivity can be enhanced if the conditions in the ponds were maintained at optimum levels.

  12. Dopamine D1 and D5 Receptors Modulate Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity at Medial Perforant Path to Dentate Granule Cell Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kechun

    2014-01-01

    Although evidence suggests that DA modulates hippocampal function, the mechanisms underlying that dopaminergic modulation are largely unknown. Using perforated-patch electrophysiological techniques to maintain the intracellular milieu, we investigated how the activation of D1-type DA receptors regulates spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) of the medial perforant path (mPP) synapse onto dentate granule cells. When D1-type receptors were inhibited, a relatively mild STDP protocol induced LTP only within a very narrow timing window between presynaptic stimulation and postsynaptic response. The stimulus protocol produced timing-dependent LTP (tLTP) only when the presynaptic stimulation was followed 30 ms later by depolarization-induced postsynaptic action potentials. That is, the time between presynaptic stimulation and postsynaptic response was 30 ms (Δt = +30 ms). When D1-type receptors were activated, however, the same mild STDP protocol induced tLTP over a much broader timing window: tLTP was induced when −30 ms ≤ Δt ≤ +30 ms. The result indicated that D1-type receptor activation enabled synaptic potentiation even when postsynaptic activity preceded presynaptic stimulation within this Δt range. Results with null mice lacking the Kv4.2 potassium channel and with the potassium channel inhibitor, 4-aminopyridine, suggested that D1-type receptors enhanced tLTP induction by suppressing the transient IA-type K+ current. Results obtained with antagonists and DA receptor knock-out mice indicated that endogenous activity of both D1 and D5 receptors modulated plasticity in the mPP. The DA D5 receptors appeared particularly important in regulating plasticity of the mPP onto the dentate granule cells. PMID:25429131

  13. Optimization of thermo-chemical pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of kitchen wastes.

    PubMed

    Vavouraki, Aikaterini I; Volioti, Vassiliki; Kornaros, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    The use of abundant waste materials with high carbohydrate content may contribute substantially to reduction of biofuels production cost. The present study aimed at optimizing the combined effect of thermo-chemical pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of kitchen wastes (KW) for maximizing the production of fermentable soluble sugars. To this end, acid pretreatment of KW samples was performed with hydrochloric acid (0-3% HCl) at 30-100 °C for 0-120 min treatment time. Alternatively, alkaline pretreatment of KW samples was performed with potassium hydroxide solution (0-11%) at constant temperature and time (0 °C and 20 min, respectively). KOH pretreatment at such conditions targets to degrade the resistant starch of KW samples. Both acid and alkaline pretreatments were followed by addition of variable levels of enzyme dosage (0-3.6% v/v α-amylase and 0-3.2% v/v amyloglucosidase-AMG) at constant pH, temperature and time (pH = 5, T = 50 °C and t = 30 min, respectively). Based on our results, glucose concentration increased by ~300% after pretreatment with either acid or KOH in combination with enzymatic hydrolysis (2% HCl, 85 °C, 80 min, 0.1% α-amylase, AMG, and 1% KOH, 0 °C, 20 min, 1.1% α-amylase, 0.4% AMG) compared to raw (untreated) KW. Estimating the different YG yields at KW loading of 5%, an increase of 192% and 121% for total soluble monosugars and total soluble sugars, respectively, was succeeded compared to untreated KW. The effect of solids loading on the obtained sugar yields using the optimum conditions for thermo-chemical pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis was also tested resulting to 27.5% increase of the soluble glucose yield when half of the solids loading (2.5%) was used. A decrease of total soluble sugars yield by 32.2% was observed when solely acid hydrolysis at optimum conditions from our previous study was applied at 30% solids loading.

  14. Evaluation of a butorphanol, detomidine, and midazolam combination for immobilization of captive Nile lechwe antelopes (Kobus magaceros).

    PubMed

    Laricchiuta, Pietro; De Monte, Valentina; Campolo, Marco; Grano, Fabio; Iarussi, Fabrizio; Crovace, Antonio; Staffieri, Francesco

    2012-07-01

    Field immobilization of captive antelope may be required for medical examination, blood sample collection, and animal identification. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a combination of butorphanol, detomidine, and midazolam (BDM) and its partial reversibility in Nile lechwe antelope (Kobus megaceros). Nine captive lechwes, weighing 28-64 kg, were immobilized, in February 2011, with butorphanol 0.20 ± 0.05 (mean ± SD) mg/kg, detomidine 0.20 ± 0.05 mg/kg, and midazolam 0.31 ± 0.08 mg/kg administered intramuscularly (IM) with a blowpipe. Physiologic parameters and depth of anesthesia were recorded when the animals became recumbent at 19.55 ± 8.36 min after darting (T0) and after 10 (T10), 20 (T20), and 30 (T30) min. An arterial blood sample was collected at T20. At the end of the procedures, immobilization was partially reversed with atipamezole 0.25 mg/kg IM. Quality of induction, immobilization, and recovery was scored. The BDM combination induced immobilization and lateral recumbency in 13.44 ± 5.61 min. Median induction score (scored 1 [excellent] to 4 [poor]) was 1 (range 1-2). Heart rate varied 40-104 beats/min, respiratory rate 16-108 breaths/min, and rectal temperature 36.5-40.3 C. Hyperthermia was observed and rapidly treated in three animals that demonstrated insufficient immobilization after darting. Arterial blood gas analyses revealed a mean pH of 7.43 ± 0.07, partial arterial pressure of CO(2) of 44.1 ± 6.0 mmHg, partial arterial pressure of O(2) of 74.0 ± 13.5 mmHg, and an arterial O(2) saturation of 94.77 ± 3.96%. Recovery was smooth and animals were walking in 13.44 ± 7.85 min. Median recovery score (1 = excellent to 4 = poor) was 1 (range 1-2). The BDM was effective in immobilizing captive healthy lechwes with minimal cardiorespiratory changes.

  15. Correlations between VIMS and RADAR data over the surface of Titan: Implications for Titan's surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, F.; Orosei, R.; Seu, R.; Coradini, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Brown, R. H.; Cassini Vims; Radar Teams

    2010-04-01

    We present new results combining the VIMS and RADAR data on Titan's surface. In RADAR data we consider two geophysical quantities: the normalized backscatter cross-section obtained from the scatterometer measurement, corrected for the incidence angle, and the calibrated antenna temperature determined from the radiometer measurement, as found in publicly available data products. In VIMS data, combining spatial and spectral information, we have selected some atmospheric windows in the spectral range between 2 and 5 μm, providing the best optical depth to measure surface reflectance. The two RADAR parameters are combined with VIMS data, with estimated errors, to produce an aggregate data set, that we process using multivariate classification methods to identify homogeneous taxonomic units in the multivariate space of the samples. The use of data sets from different instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft has the potential to deepen our understanding of the nature of the surface. Our analysis relies on the G-mode method, which has been successfully used in the past for the classification of such diverse data sets as lunar rock samples, asteroids and planetary surfaces. Due to the large number of data of Titan, the classification work proceeds in several steps. In a previous work (Tosi et al., 2010), we analyzed the data acquired in Titan flybys: T3, T4, T8, T13 and T16, covering mostly the major bright and dark features seen around the equator, combined with VIMS infrared data, in order to validate the classification method. Now we focus on flybys: T23, T25, T28, T30, and T43, covering also regions of Titan located at higher latitudes, and partly including the polar regions. The obtained results are generally in agreement with previous work devoted both to the analysis of the scatterometry data through physical models and to the correlation between SAR and radiometry data at a high resolution scale. This evidence, evaluated for the first time through a multivariate

  16. Correlations between VIMS and RADAR data over the surface of Titan: Implications for Titan's surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, F.; Orosei, R.; Seu, R.; Coradini, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Flamini, E.; Brown, R. H.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Lopes, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    We present new results combining the VIMS and RADAR medium resolution data on Titan’s surface. In RADAR data we consider two geophysical quantities: the normalized backscatter cross-section obtained from the scatterometer measurement, corrected for the incidence angle, and the calibrated antenna temperature determined from the radiometer measurement, as found in publicly available data products. In VIMS data, combining spatial and spectral information, we have selected some atmospheric windows in the spectral range between 2 and 5 μm, providing the best optical depth to measure surface reflectance. The two RADAR parameters are combined with VIMS data, with estimated errors, to produce an aggregate data set, that we process using multivariate classification methods to identify homogeneous taxonomic units in the multivariate space of the samples. Such units in fact reveal compositional trends in the surface, that are likely related to different abundances of simple ices and/or hydrocarbons. Our analysis relies on the G-mode method, which has been successfully used in the past for the classification of such diverse data sets as lunar rock samples, asteroids and planetary surfaces. Due to the large number of data of Titan, the classification work proceeds in several steps. In a previous work (Tosi et al., 2010), we analyzed the data acquired in Titan flybys: T3, T4, T8, T13 and T16, covering mostly the major bright and dark features seen around the equator, combined with VIMS infrared data, in order to validate the classification method. Now we focus on flybys: T23, T25, T28, T30, and T43, covering also regions of Titan located at higher latitudes, and partly including the polar regions. The obtained results are generally in agreement with previous work devoted both to the analysis of the scatterometry data through physical models and to the correlation between SAR and radiometry data at a high resolution scale. This classification can be expanded and refined as new

  17. Correlations between VIMS and RADAR data over the surface of Titan: Implications for Titan's surface properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Federico; Orosei, Roberto; Seu, Roberto; Coradini, Angioletta; Lunine, Jonathan; Filacchione, Gianrico; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Cerroni, Priscilla; Brown, Robert

    2010-05-01

    We present new results combining the VIMS and RADAR data on Titan's surface. In RADAR data we consider two geophysical quantities: the normalized backscatter cross-section obtained from the scatterometer measurement, corrected for the incidence angle, and the calibrated antenna temperature determined from the radiometer measurement, as found in publicly available data products. In VIMS data, combining spatial and spectral information, we have selected some atmospheric windows in the spectral range between 2 and 5 μm, providing the best optical depth to measure surface reflectance. The two RADAR parameters are combined with VIMS data, with estimated errors, to produce an aggregate data set, that we process using multivariate classification methods to identify homogeneous taxonomic units in the multivariate space of the samples. The use of data sets from different instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft has the potential to deepen our understanding of the nature of the surface. Our analysis relies on the G-mode method, which has been successfully used in the past for the classification of such diverse data sets as lunar rock samples, asteroids and planetary surfaces. Due to the large number of data of Titan, the classification work proceeds in several steps. In a previous work (Tosi et al., 2010), we analyzed the data acquired in Titan flybys: T3, T4, T8, T13 and T16, covering mostly the major bright and dark features seen around the equator, combined with VIMS infrared data, in order to validate the classification method. Now we focus on flybys: T23, T25, T28, T30, and T43, covering also regions of Titan located at higher latitudes, and partly including the polar regions. The obtained results are generally in agreement with previous work devoted both to the analysis of the scatterometry data through physical models and to the correlation between SAR and radiometry data at a high resolution scale. This evidence, evaluated for the first time through a multivariate

  18. Transcription of TIR1-Controlled Genes Can be Regulated within 10 Min by an Auxin-Induced Process. Can TIR1 be the Receptor?

    PubMed Central

    Labusch, Corinna; Effendi, Yunus; Fulda, Martin; Scherer, Günther F. E.

    2016-01-01

    ABP1 and TIR1/AFBs are known as auxin receptors. ABP1 is linked to auxin responses several of which are faster than 10 min. TIR1 regulates auxin-induced transcription of early auxin genes also within minutes. We use transcription of such TIR1-dependent genes as indicator of TIR1 activity to show the rapid regulation of TIR1 by exogenous auxin. To this end, we used quantification of transcription of a set of fifteen early auxin-induced reporter genes at t = 10 and t = 30 min to measure this as a TIR1-dependent auxin response. We conducted this study in 22 mutants of auxin transporters (pin5, abcb1, abcb19, and aux1/lax3), protein kinases and phosphatases (ibr5, npr1, cpk3, CPK3-OX, d6pk1, d6pkl1-1, d6pkl3-2, d6pkl1-1/d6pkl2-2, and d6pkl1-1/d6pkl3-2), of fatty acid metabolism (fad2-1, fad6-1, ssi2, lacs4, lacs9, and lacs4/lacs9) and receptors (tir1, tir1/afb2, and tir1/afb3) and compared them to the wild type. After 10 min auxin application, in 18 out of 22 mutants mis-regulated expression of at least one reporter was found, and in 15 mutants transcription of two-to-three out of five selected auxin reporter genes was mis-regulated. After 30 min of auxin application to mutant plants, mis-regulation of reporter genes ranged from one to 13 out of 15 tested reporter genes. Those genes chosen as mutants were themselves not regulated in their expression by auxin for at least 1 h, excluding an influence of TIR1/AFBs on their transcription. The expression of TIR1/AFB genes was also not modulated by auxin for up to 3 h. Together, this excludes a feedback or feedforward of these mutant genes/proteins on TIR1/AFBs output of transcription in this auxin-induced response. However, an auxin-induced response needed an as yet unknown auxin receptor. We suggest that the auxin receptor necessary for the fast auxin-induced transcription modulation could be, instead, ABP1. The alternative hypothesis would be that auxin-induced expression of a protein, initiated by TIR1/AFBs receptors

  19. Transcription of TIR1-Controlled Genes Can be Regulated within 10 Min by an Auxin-Induced Process. Can TIR1 be the Receptor?

    PubMed

    Labusch, Corinna; Effendi, Yunus; Fulda, Martin; Scherer, Günther F E

    2016-01-01

    ABP1 and TIR1/AFBs are known as auxin receptors. ABP1 is linked to auxin responses several of which are faster than 10 min. TIR1 regulates auxin-induced transcription of early auxin genes also within minutes. We use transcription of such TIR1-dependent genes as indicator of TIR1 activity to show the rapid regulation of TIR1 by exogenous auxin. To this end, we used quantification of transcription of a set of fifteen early auxin-induced reporter genes at t = 10 and t = 30 min to measure this as a TIR1-dependent auxin response. We conducted this study in 22 mutants of auxin transporters (pin5, abcb1, abcb19, and aux1/lax3), protein kinases and phosphatases (ibr5, npr1, cpk3, CPK3-OX, d6pk1, d6pkl1-1, d6pkl3-2, d6pkl1-1/d6pkl2-2, and d6pkl1-1/d6pkl3-2), of fatty acid metabolism (fad2-1, fad6-1, ssi2, lacs4, lacs9, and lacs4/lacs9) and receptors (tir1, tir1/afb2, and tir1/afb3) and compared them to the wild type. After 10 min auxin application, in 18 out of 22 mutants mis-regulated expression of at least one reporter was found, and in 15 mutants transcription of two-to-three out of five selected auxin reporter genes was mis-regulated. After 30 min of auxin application to mutant plants, mis-regulation of reporter genes ranged from one to 13 out of 15 tested reporter genes. Those genes chosen as mutants were themselves not regulated in their expression by auxin for at least 1 h, excluding an influence of TIR1/AFBs on their transcription. The expression of TIR1/AFB genes was also not modulated by auxin for up to 3 h. Together, this excludes a feedback or feedforward of these mutant genes/proteins on TIR1/AFBs output of transcription in this auxin-induced response. However, an auxin-induced response needed an as yet unknown auxin receptor. We suggest that the auxin receptor necessary for the fast auxin-induced transcription modulation could be, instead, ABP1. The alternative hypothesis would be that auxin-induced expression of a protein, initiated by TIR1/AFBs receptors

  20. Dynamic nightside electron precipitation at Mars: ggeographical and solar wind dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillis, R. J.; Brain, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    -30 nT, 30-50 nT and >50 nT. The left and right columns are for IMF direction proxy ranges of 320-140° and 140-320°. Contour lines are represented on the vertical color bars by horizontal lines.

  1. The Wildland Fire Emission Inventory: emission estimates and an evaluation of uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanski, S. P.; Hao, W. M.; Nordgren, B.

    2011-08-01

    We present the Wildland Fire Emission Inventory (WFEI), a high resolution model for non-agricultural open biomass burning (hereafter referred to as wildland fires) in the contiguous United States (CONUS). WFEI was used to estimate emissions of CO and PM2.5 for the western United States from 2003-2008. The estimated annual CO emitted ranged from 436 Gg yr-1 in 2004 to 3107 Gg yr-1 in 2007. The extremes in estimated annual PM2.5 emitted were 65 Gg yr-1 in 2004 and 454 Gg yr-1 in 2007. Annual wildland fire emissions were significant compared to other emission sources in the western United States as estimated in a national emission inventory. In the peak fire year of 2007, fire emissions were ~20 % of total CO emissions and ~39 % of total PM2.5 emissions. During the months with the greatest fire activity, wildland fires accounted for the majority of CO and PM2.5 emitted across the study region. The uncertainty in the inventory estimates of CO and PM2.5 emissions (ECO and EPM2.5, respectively) have been quantified across spatial and temporal scales relevant to regional and global modeling applications. The uncertainty in annual, domain wide emissions was 28 % to 51 % for CO and 40 % to 65 % for PM2.5. Sensitivity of the uncertainty in ECO and EPM2.5 to the emission model components depended on scale. At scales relevant to regional modeling applications (Δx = 10 km, Δt = 1 day) WFEI estimates 50 % of total ECO with an uncertainty <133 % and half of total EPM2.5 with an uncertainty <146 %. The uncertainty in ECO and EPM2.5 is significantly reduced at the scale of global modeling applications (Δx = 100 km, Δt = 30 day). Fifty percent of total emissions are estimated with an uncertainty <50 % for CO and <64 % for PM2.5. Uncertainty in the burned area drives the emission uncertainties at regional scales. At global scales the uncertainty in ECO is most sensitive to uncertainties in the fuel load consumed while the uncertainty in the emission factor for PM2.5 drives the

  2. The Madden-Julian oscillation in ECHAM4 coupled and uncoupled general circulation models

    DOE PAGES

    Sperber, Kenneth R.; Gualdi, Silvio; Legutke, Stephanie; Gayler, Veronika

    2005-06-29

    flux anomalies. However, the integrations with ECHO-G and SINTEX, which used T30 atmospheres, produce westward propagation of the latent heat flux anomalies, contrary to reanalysis. Furthermore, it is suggested that the differing ability of the models to represent the near-surface westerlies over the Indian Ocean is related to the different horizontal resolutions of the atmospheric model employed.« less

  3. Controlled-source seismic investigations of the crustal structure beneath Erebus volcano and Ross Island, Antarctica: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraj, S.; Kyle, P. R.; Zandomeneghi, D.; Knox, H. A.; Aster, R. C.; Snelson, C. M.; Miller, P. E.; Kaip, G. M.

    2009-12-01

    During the 2008-09 Austral summer field season we undertook a controlled-source seismic experiment (Tomo-Erebus, TE) to examine the shallow magmatic system beneath the active Erebus volcano (TE-3D) and the crustal structure beneath Ross Island. Here we report on the TE-2D component, which was designed to produce a two-dimensional P-wave velocity model along an east-west profile across Ross Island. Marine geophysical observations near Ross Island have identified the north-south trending Terror Rift within the older and broader Victoria Land Basin, which are a component of the intraplate West Antarctic Rift System. Mount Erebus and Ross Island are circumstantially associated with the Terror Rift and its thin (~20 km) crust. The nature, extent and role of the Terror Rift in controlling the evolution of Ross Island volcanism and the on-going eruptive activity of Erebus volcano are unknown. In TE-2D, we deployed 21 seismic recorders (Ref Tek 130) with three-component 4.5 Hz geophones (Sercel L-28-3D) along a 90-km east-west line between Capes Royds and Crozier. These were supplemented by 79 similar instruments deployed for the high-resolution TE-3D experiment within a 3 x 3 km grid around the summit crater of Erebus, an array of 8 permanent short period and broadband sensors used to monitor the activity of Erebus and 23 three-component sensors (Guralp CMG-40T, 30s-100 Hz) positioned around the flanks and summit of Erebus. Fifteen chemical sources were loaded in holes drilled about 15 m deep in the snow and ice. The size of these shots ranged from 75 to 600 kg of ANFO with the largest shots at the ends of the profile. An additional shot was detonated in the sea (McMurdo Sound) using 200 kg of dynamite. Due to the rugged terrain, short field seasons and large area to be covered, the seismometer spacing along the TE-2D profile is quite large (~ 5 km spacing), resulting in poor near-surface data resolution. However, the data have a high signal to noise ratio with clear

  4. Variability of matric potential measurements in evaporation experiments and its influence on the derived hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spieckermann, Mathias; Scharnagl, Benedikt; Pertassek, Thomas; von Unold, Georg; Durner, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    significantly increased during the transition from stage-1 to stage-2 evaporation (t = 30 h), reaching its maximum at the end of the measurement (cv = 6% to 8%). Despite differences in the tensiometer readings, the calculated hydraulic functions are very similar and associated only with very small uncertainties. The horizontally and vertically aligned tensiometers showed no systematic differences. We conclude that matric potentials measured with individual tensiometers can be reliably regarded as representative for the measurement plane. The increasing scattering of the upper tensiometers during stage-2 evaporation had a negligible effect on the identified hydraulic functions. The orientation of the tensiometers had no influence on the measured values.

  5. An efficient climate model with water isotope physics: NEEMY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Emile-Geay, J.

    2015-12-01

    This work describes the development of an isotope-enabled atmosphere-ocean global climate model, NEEMY. This is a model of intermediate complexity, which can run 100 model years in 30 hours using 33 CPUs. The atmospheric component is the SPEEDY-IER (Molteni et al. 2003; Dee et al. 2015a), which is a water isotope-enabled (with equilibrium and kinetic fractionation schemes in precipitation, evaporation and soil moisture) simplified atmospheric general circulation model, with T30 horizontal resolution and 8 vertical layers. The oceanic component is NEMO 3.4 (Madec 2008), a state-of-the-art oceanic model (~2° horizontal resolution and 31 vertical layers) with an oceanic isotope module (a passive tracer scheme). A 1000-year control run shows that NEEMY is stable and its energy is conserved. The mean state is comparable to that of CMIP3-era CGCMs, though much cheaper to run. Atmospheric teleconnections such as the NAO and PNA are simulated very well. NEEMY also simulates the oceanic meridional overturning circulation well. The tropical climate variability is weaker than observations, and the climatology exhibits a double ITCZ problem despite bias corrections. The standard deviation of the monthly mean Nino3.4 index is 0.61K, compared to 0.91K in observations (Reynolds et al. 2002). We document similarities and differences with a close cousin, SPEEDY-NEMO (Kucharski et al. 2015). With its fast speed and relatively complete physical processes, NEEMY is suitable for paleoclimate studies ; we will present some forced simulations of the past millennium and their use in forward-modeling climate proxies, via proxy system models (PSMs, Dee et al 2015b). References Dee, S., D. Noone, N. Buenning, J. Emile-Geay, and Y. Zhou, 2015a: SPEEDY-IER: A fast atmospheric GCM with water isotope physics. J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 120: 73-91. doi:10.1002/2014JD022194. Dee, S. G., J. Emile-Geay, M. N. Evans, Allam, A., D. M. Thompson, and E. J. Steig, 2015b: PRYSM: an open-source framework

  6. Comparing and correlating solubility parameters governing the self-assembly of molecular gels using 1,3:2,4-dibenzylidene sorbitol as the gelator.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yaqi; Corradini, Maria G; Liu, Xia; May, Tim E; Borondics, Ferenc; Weiss, Richard G; Rogers, Michael A

    2014-12-01

    Solvent properties play a central role in mediating the aggregation and self-assembly of molecular gelators and their growth into fibers. Numerous attempts have been made to correlate the solubility parameters of solvents and gelation abilities of molecular gelators, but a comprehensive comparison of the most important parameters has yet to appear. Here, the degree to which partition coefficients (log P), Henry's law constants (HLC), dipole moments, static relative permittivities (ε(r)), solvatochromic E(T)(30) parameters, Kamlet-Taft parameters (β, α, and π), Catalan's solvatochromic parameters (SPP, SB, and SA), Hildebrand solubility parameters (δ(i)), and Hansen solubility parameters (δ(p), δ(d), δ(h)) and the associated Hansen distance (R(ij)) of 62 solvents (covering a wide range of properties) can be correlated with the self-assembly and gelation of 1,3:2,4-dibenzylidene sorbitol (DBS) gelation, a classic molecular gelator, is assessed systematically. The approach presented describes the basis for each of the parameters and how it can be applied. As such, it is an instructional blueprint for how to assess the appropriate type of solvent parameter for use with other molecular gelators as well as with molecules forming other types of self-assembled materials. The results also reveal several important insights into the factors favoring the gelation of solvents by DBS. The ability of a solvent to accept or donate a hydrogen bond is much more important than solvent polarity in determining whether mixtures with DBS become solutions, clear gels, or opaque gels. Thermodynamically derived parameters could not be correlated to the physical properties of the molecular gels unless they were dissected into their individual HSPs. The DBS solvent phases tend to cluster in regions of Hansen space and are highly influenced by the hydrogen-bonding HSP, δ(h). It is also found that the fate of this molecular gelator, unlike that of polymers, is influenced not only by

  7. Consequence of dexmedetomidine on emergence delirium following sevoflurane anesthesia in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Kang, Dao-Lin; Na, He-Yi; Li, Bi-Lian; Xu, Ying-Yi; Ni, Jin; Wu, Jun-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy can demonstrate irritability following emergence from general anaesthesia. As well, an elevated rate of emergence delirium (ED) in children has been associated with the application of sevoflurane. The current study's intent is to administer dexmedetomidine, in a single dosage administration, at the initial phase of sevoflurane based anesthesia with regard to the occurrence and severity of ED in children afflicted with cerebral palsy. Participating in the study (American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II) are eighty children ranging in ages two through twelve years. They would be anaesthetised with sevoflurane based anesthesia while undergoing lower limb surgical procedures. The participants were equally distributed to either Group c or Group D. Group C was administered 10 ml saline 0.9%, and Group D was administered dexmedetomidine 0.5 μg•kg(-1). Five minutes prior to commencement of the surgical procedures, the participants received the prescribed pharmaceutical dosages under the anesthesia of sevoflurane. In order to sustain the BIS values in a range of 45 and 55, at 60 second increments, endtidal sevoflurane concentrations (ETsev) were modified. After conclusion of the surgical procedures, in post anesthesia care unit (PACU), the frequency of ED was gauged with Aonos four point scale and the severity of ED was gauged with pediatric anesthesia emergence delirium scale upon admission (T0), after intervals of five minutes (T5), fifteen minutes (T15) and thirty minutes (T30). Extubation time, emergence time and length of at stay at the PACU were assessed. Relative to Group C, participants of Group D exhibited noticeably shortened times of emergence, extubation and PACU duration of stay. Prior to surgical incision, ETsev was elevated in the control group, (1.9±0.2 vs 1.6±0.3; P = 0.023) and amid the initial 20 minutes following the surgical incision (1.6±0.2 vs 1.1±0.2; P = 0.016). At intervals of commencement, T0, of five minutes

  8. A Double-Disruption Substorm Model - The Growth Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofko, G. J.; McWilliams, K. A.; Hussey, G. C.

    2014-12-01

    When the IMF turns from Bz- to Bz+, dayside merging forms open lobe field lines at low latitudes. These lobe lines are populated with shocked solar wind and dayside magnetospheric plasma from the reconnection inflow. As those lobe flux tubes pass tailward over the polar caps, they are also populated with outflow from the north and south polar cap ionospheres. As the lobe lines move tailward, they acquire a convex curvature that blocks the westward-flowing cross-tail current (XTJ). This constitutes the first stage of XTJ disruption, and it begins less than 10 min after the frontside merging.The disrupted XTJ closes dawn-to-dusk in the transition plasmasheet (TPS), where it produces a downward FAC to the ionosphere. This causes the proton arc, which is seen for the period from about 10 - 80 min after frontside merging begins at time t=0. The lobe lines eventually reconnect well downtail at about t=30 minutes. The middle section that closes the lobe lines has concave curvature and is called the Neutral Sheet (NSh). The resulting stretched field lines thus have a central NSh which separates the two convex-curvature regions to the north and south, regions which are called the Disruption Zones (DZs); the overall combination of the NDZ, NSh and SDZ is called the Stretched Plasmasheet (SPS). As the SPS continues to grow and the stretched lines are pulled earthward to relieve the magnetic tension, the filling of the NSh occurs both from the DTNL with the higher energy magnetospheric particle population on the lobe lines, but eventually also at about 25 earth radii when the polar cap ionospheric outflow (PCO) component finally reaches the NSh. A NSh FAC system forms, from which electrons flow down to the auroral ionosphere to create the pre-onset arc, starting at about t=65 min. At the same time, the Lyons-Speiser mechanism is initiated in the inner NSh, causing the PCO ions to become trapped and accelerated in the inner NSh region. Eventually, when the SPS grows earthward

  9. Effect of ozone exposure on the oxidation of trace organic contaminants in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wert, Eric C; Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando L; Snyder, Shane A

    2009-03-01

    Three tertiary-treated wastewater effluents were evaluated to determine the impact of wastewater quality (i.e. effluent organic matter (EfOM), nitrite, and alkalinity) on ozone (O(3)) decomposition and subsequent removal of 31 organic contaminants including endocrine disrupting compounds, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products. The O(3) dose was normalized based upon total organic carbon (TOC) and nitrite to allow comparison between the different wastewaters with respect to O(3) decomposition. EfOM with higher molecular weight components underwent greater transformation, which corresponded to increased O(3) decomposition when compared on a TOC basis. Hydroxyl radical (()OH) exposure, measured by parachlorobenzoic acid (pCBA), showed that limited ()OH was available for contaminant destruction during the initial stage of O(3) decomposition (t<30s) due to the effect of the scavenging by the water quality. Advanced oxidation using O(3) and hydrogen peroxide did not increase the net production of ()OH compared to O(3) under the conditions studied. EfOM reactivity impacted the removal of trace contaminants when evaluated based on the O(3):TOC ratio. Trace contaminants with second order reaction rate constants with O(3)(k(O)(3))>10(5)M(-1)s(-1) and ()OH (k(OH))>10(9)M(-1)s(-1), including carbamazepine, diclofenac, naproxen, sulfamethoxazole, and triclosan, were >95% removed independent of water quality when the O(3) exposure (integralO(3)t) was measurable (0-0.8mgmin/L). O(3) exposure would be a conservative surrogate to assess the removal of trace contaminants that are fast-reacting with O(3). Removal of contaminants with k(O)(3) < 10M(-1)S(-1) , and k(OH)>10(9)M(-1)s(-1), including atrazine, iopromide, diazepam, and ibuprofen, varied when O(3) exposure could not be measured, and appeared to be dependent upon the compound specific k(OH). Atrazine, diazepam, ibuprofen and iopromide provided excellent linear correlation with pCBA (R(2)>0.86) making them good

  10. Astrochemistry of transition metals? The selected cases of [FeN](+), [FeNH](+) and [(CO)2FeN](+): pathways toward CH3NH2 and HNCO.

    PubMed

    Fioroni, Marco

    2014-11-28

    Transition metals (TMs) are proposed to play a role in astrophysical environments in both gas and solid state astrochemistry by co-determining the homogeneous/heterogeneous chemistry represented by the gas-gas and gas-dust grain interactions. Their chemistry is a function of temperature, radiation field and chemical composition/coordination sphere and as a consequence, dependent on the astrophysical object in which TMs are localized. Here five main categories of TM compounds are proposed and classified as: (a) pure bulk and clusters; (b) TM naked ions; (c) TM oxides/minerals or inorganic compounds; (d) TM-L (L = ligand) with L = (σ and/or π)-donor/acceptor species like H/H2, N/N2, CO, and H2O and (e) TM-organoligands such as Cp, PAH, and R1=˙=˙=R2. Each of the classes is correlated to their possible localization within astrophysical objects. Because of this variety coupled with their ability to modulate reactivity and regio/enantioselectivity by ligand sphere composition, TM compounds can introduce a fine organic synthesis in astrochemistry. For the selection of small TM parental compounds to be analyzed as first examples, by constraining the TMs and the second element/molecule on the basis of their cosmic abundance and mutual reactivity, Fe atoms coupled with N and CO are studied by developing the chemistry of [FeN](+), [FeNH](+) and [(CO)2FeN](+). These molecules, due to their ability to perform C-C and C-H bond activation, are able to open the pathway toward nitrogenation/amination and carbonylation of organic substrates. By considering the simplest organic substrate CH4, the parental reaction schemes (gas phase, T = 30 K): (I) [FeN](+) + CH4 + H → [Fe](+) + H3C-NH2; (II) [FeNH](+) + CH4 → [Fe](+) + H3C-NH2 and (III) [(CO)2FeN](+) + H → [FeCO](+) + HNCO are analyzed by theoretical methods (B2PLYP double hybrid functional/TZVPPP basis set). All reactions are thermodynamically favored and first step transition states can follow a minimal energy path by

  11. A Theoretical Light-Curve Model for the 1999 Outburst of U Scorpii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Izumi; Kato, Mariko; Kato, Taichi; Matsumoto, Katsura

    2000-01-01

    A theoretical light curve for the 1999 outburst of U Scorpii is presented in order to obtain various physical parameters of the recurrent nova. Our U Sco model consists of a very massive white dwarf (WD) with an accretion disk and a lobe-filling, slightly evolved, main-sequence star (MS). The model includes a reflection effect by the companion and the accretion disk together with a shadowing effect on the companion by the accretion disk. The early visual light curve (with a linear phase of t~1-15 days after maximum) is well reproduced by a thermonuclear runaway model on a very massive WD close to the Chandrasekhar limit (MWD=1.37+/-0.01 Msolar), in which optically thick winds blowing from the WD play a key role in determining the nova duration. The ensuing plateau phase (t~15-30 days) is also reproduced by the combination of a slightly irradiated MS and a fully irradiated flaring-up disk with a radius ~1.4 times the Roche lobe size. The cooling phase (t~30-40 days) is consistent with a low-hydrogen content of X~0.05 of the envelope for the 1.37 Msolar WD. The best-fit parameters are the WD mass of MWD~1.37 Msolar, the companion mass of MMS~1.5 Msolar (0.8-2.0 Msolar is acceptable), the inclination angle of the orbit (i~80deg), and the flaring-up edge, the vertical height of which is ~0.30 times the accretion disk radius. The duration of the strong wind phase (t~0-17 days) is very consistent with the BeppoSAX supersoft X-ray detection at t~19-20 days because supersoft X-rays are self-absorbed by the massive wind. The envelope mass at the peak is estimated to be ~3×10-6 Msolar, which is indicates an average mass accretion rate of ~2.5×10-7 Msolar yr-1 during the quiescent phase between 1987 and 1999. These quantities are exactly the same as those predicted in a new progenitor model of Type Ia supernovae.

  12. The Madden-Julian oscillation in ECHAM4 coupled and uncoupled general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, Kenneth R.; Gualdi, Silvio; Legutke, Stephanie; Gayler, Veronika

    2005-06-29

    anomalies. However, the integrations with ECHO-G and SINTEX, which used T30 atmospheres, produce westward propagation of the latent heat flux anomalies, contrary to reanalysis. Furthermore, it is suggested that the differing ability of the models to represent the near-surface westerlies over the Indian Ocean is related to the different horizontal resolutions of the atmospheric model employed.

  13. The Madden-Julian Oscillation in ECHAM4 Coupled and Uncoupled GCMs

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K R; Gualdi, S; Legutke, S; Gayler, V

    2004-10-13

    with ECHO-G and SINTEX, which used T30 atmospheres, produce westward propagation of the latent heat flux anomalies, contrary to reanalysis. It is suggested that the differing ability of the models to represent the near-surface westerlies over the Indian Ocean is related to the different horizontal resolutions of the atmospheric model employed.

  14. Consequence of dexmedetomidine on emergence delirium following sevoflurane anesthesia in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Kang, Dao-Lin; Na, He-Yi; Li, Bi-Lian; Xu, Ying-Yi; Ni, Jin; Wu, Jun-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy can demonstrate irritability following emergence from general anaesthesia. As well, an elevated rate of emergence delirium (ED) in children has been associated with the application of sevoflurane. The current study’s intent is to administer dexmedetomidine, in a single dosage administration, at the initial phase of sevoflurane based anesthesia with regard to the occurrence and severity of ED in children afflicted with cerebral palsy. Participating in the study (American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II) are eighty children ranging in ages two through twelve years. They would be anaesthetised with sevoflurane based anesthesia while undergoing lower limb surgical procedures. The participants were equally distributed to either Group c or Group D. Group C was administered 10 ml saline 0.9%, and Group D was administered dexmedetomidine 0.5 μg•kg-1. Five minutes prior to commencement of the surgical procedures, the participants received the prescribed pharmaceutical dosages under the anesthesia of sevoflurane. In order to sustain the BIS values in a range of 45 and 55, at 60 second increments, endtidal sevoflurane concentrations (ETsev) were modified. After conclusion of the surgical procedures, in post anesthesia care unit (PACU), the frequency of ED was gauged with Aonos four point scale and the severity of ED was gauged with pediatric anesthesia emergence delirium scale upon admission (T0), after intervals of five minutes (T5), fifteen minutes (T15) and thirty minutes (T30). Extubation time, emergence time and length of at stay at the PACU were assessed. Relative to Group C, participants of Group D exhibited noticeably shortened times of emergence, extubation and PACU duration of stay. Prior to surgical incision, ETsev was elevated in the control group, (1.9±0.2 vs 1.6±0.3; P = 0.023) and amid the initial 20 minutes following the surgical incision (1.6±0.2 vs 1.1±0.2; P = 0.016). At intervals of commencement, T0, of five minutes

  15. Cold-batter mincing of hot-boned and crust-freezing air-chilled turkey breast improved meat turnover time and product quality.

    PubMed

    Medellin-Lopez, M; Sansawat, T; Strasburg, G; Marks, B P; Kang, I

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the combined effects of turkey hot-boning and cold-batter mincing technology on acceleration of meat turnover and meat quality improvement. For each of 3 replications, 15 turkeys were slaughtered and eviscerated. Three of the eviscerated carcasses were randomly assigned to water-immersion chilling for chill-boning (CB) and the remaining were immediately hot-boned (HB), half of which were used without chilling whereas the remaining were subjected to crust-freezing air chilling (CFAC) in an air-freezing room (1.0 m/s, -12°C) with/without 1/4; sectioning (HB-1/4;CFAC, HB-CFAC). As a result, CB and HB breasts were minced using 1 of 5 treatments: (1) CB and traditional mincing (CB-T), (2) HB and mincing with no chilling (HB-NC), (3) HB and mincing with CO2 (HB-CO2), (4) HB and mincing after CFAC (HB-CFAC), and (5) HB and mincing after quarter sectioning and CFAC (HB-1/4;CFAC). Traditional water-immersion chilling took an average of 5.5 h to reduce the breast temperature to 4°C, whereas HB-CFAC and HB-1/4;CFAC took 1.5 and 1 h, respectively. The breast of HB-CFAC and HB-1/4;CFAC showed significantly higher pH (6.0-6.1), higher fragmentation index (196-198), and lower R-value (1.0-1.1; P < 0.05) than those of the CB controls. No significant differences (P > 0.05) in sarcomere length were seen between CB-T and HB-CFAC filets regardless of quarter sectioning. When muscle was minced, the batter pH (5.9) of CB-T was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those (6.1-6.3) of HB-NC, HB-CO2, and HB-1/4;CFAC, with the intermediate pH (6.0) seen for the HB-CFAC. When meat batters were cooked, higher cooking yield (90 - 91%; P < 0.05) was found in HB-CFAC, HB-1/4;CFAC, and HB-CO2, followed by HB-NC (90%) and finally CB-T (86%). Stress values (47-51 kPa) of HB-CFAC gels were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of CB-T (30 kPa) and HB-NC (36 kPa). A similar trend was found in strain values.

  16. Seasonal and spatial variability of heterogeneous ice formation in stratiform clouds and its possible impact on precipitation formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, P.; Ansmann, A.; Baars, H.; Buehl, J.; Kanitz, T.; Bohlmann, S.; Engelmann, R.; Kunz, C.

    2015-12-01

    freezing efficiencies, the formation of precipitation via the ice phase (cold rain) is possibly affected as well. This may especially be the case for the approximately 50% of precipitation formed at T > -30°C, as it was found for the Leipzig dataset.

  17. Time-and temperature-dependent conduit wall porosity: A key control on degassing and explosivity at Tarawera volcano, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, B. M.; Jellinek, A. M.; Russell, J. K.; Nichols, A. R. L.; Vigouroux, N.

    2010-10-01

    The permeability of volcanic conduit walls and overlying plug can govern the degassing and explosivity of eruptions. At volcanoes characterized by a protracted history of episodic volcanism, conduit walls are commonly constructed of quenched magma. During each successive eruptive phase, reheating by ascending magma can modify the porosity, permeability and H 2O content of the conduit wall rocks and overlying plug. We investigate whether the unusual explosivity of the 1886 basaltic eruption at Tarawera volcano is related to the heating and degassing of the AD1314 Kaharoa rhyolitic rocks, through which it erupted. We heat cores of perlitic Tarawera dome rhyolite to 300 °C-1200 °C for 30 min to 3 days at atmospheric pressure. We characterize time ( t)- and temperature ( T)-dependent variations in porosity, volatile content and texture through SEM image analyses. We also directly measure pre- and post-experimental connected and isolated porosity and water content. We identify four textural/outgassing regimes: Regime 1 ( T ≤ 800 °C, t ≤ 2 h), with negligible textural changes and a significant loss of meteoric water (1.4-0.72 wt.% H 2O); Regime 2 (800 ≤ T ≤ 1100 °C, t ≤ 6 h), with cracking and vesicle growth and a 5-10% increase in connected porosity; Regime 3 (800 ≤ T ≤ 1200 °C, t ≥ 30 min), with healed cracks, coalesced and collapsed vesicles, and overall reduced porosity; and Regime 4 ( T ≥ 1200 °C, t > 30 min), with a collapse of all connected porosity. These regimes are governed by the temperature of the event ( T) relative to the glass transition temperature ( Tg) and the time scale of the event ( t) relative to a critical relaxation time for structural failure of the melt (τr) . We identify a quantitative transition from predominantly brittle behavior such as cracking, which enhances connected porosity and permeability, to viscous processes including crack healing and vesicle collapse, which act to reduce connected porosity. Applied to the

  18. The effect of volcanic eruptions on the North Atlantic ocean temperatures over the past millennium (800-2000 AD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrina, M.; Wagner, S.; Zorita, E.

    2014-12-01

    Several studies suggest that the North Atlantic Ocean is of particular importance for the climate variability, especially that of western Europe (Schlesinger M. E. & Ramankutty 1994, Knight J., Folland C. K. & Scaife A. 2006). The changes in North Atlantic sea surface temperatures are related to the thermohaline's circulation strength (Kushnir Y., 1994) and affected by volcanic eruptions (Church J.A, White N.J. & Arblaster J.M. 2005), due to their release of aerosols into the stratosphere. In this study we examine the signal of tropical volcanic eruptions in the temperatures of the North Atlantic Ocean in various depths (6, 100, 560 and 3070 m from the sea surface), for the past millennium. The temperatures are derived from the comprehensive COSMOS Earth System Model (ECHAM5-OM at T30 spatial resolution) and are presented for a control run and for three fully forced ensemble simulations including changes in orbital, solar, volcanic, land use and greenhouse gas changes. The model shows a response in the years following volcanic eruptions, being mostly pronounced after the large eruptions that took place between 1200 and 1300 AD, as well as at the beginning of the 19thcentury. The strongest impact on the ocean temperatures, due to the increased atmospheric optical depth, is evident in the uppermost level, especially for two out of the three ensemble simulations. In these simulations a pronounced decrease in the ocean temperature between 1400 and 1500 AD is observed due to the increase of the aerosol effective radius. In the mixed ocean layers the response to volcanic aerosols is more obvious in the third ensemble simulation, whereas in the deep ocean the temperatures do not seem to be strongly affected by volcanic eruptions. Schlesinger, M. E. & Ramankutty, N. An oscillation in the global climate system of period 65-70 years. Nature 367, 723-726 (1994). Kushnir, Y. Interdecadal variations in North Atlantic sea surface temperature and associated atmospheric conditions

  19. Characterizing the audibility of sound field with diffusion in architectural spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utami, Sentagi Sesotya

    The significance of diffusion control in room acoustics is that it attempts to avoid echoes by dispersing reflections while removing less valuable sound energy. Some applications place emphasis on the enhancement of late reflections to promote a sense of envelopment, and on methods required to measure the performance of diffusers. What still remains unclear is the impact of diffusion on the audibility quality due to the geometric arrangement of architectural elements. The objective of this research is to characterize the audibility of the sound field with diffusion in architectural space. In order to address this objective, an approach utilizing various methods and new techniques relevant to room acoustics standards was applied. An array of microphones based on beam forming (i.e., an acoustic camera) was utilized for field measurements in a recording studio, classrooms, auditoriums, concert halls and sport arenas. Given the ability to combine a visual image with acoustical data, the impulse responses measured were analyzed to identify the impact of diffusive surfaces on the early, late, and reverberant sound fields. The effects of the room geometry and the proportions of the diffusive and absorptive surfaces were observed by utilizing geometrical room acoustics simulations. The degree of diffuseness in each space was measured by coherences from different measurement positions along with the acoustical conditions predicted by well-known objective parameters such as T30, EDT, C80, and C50. Noticeable differences of the auditory experience were investigated by utilizing computer-based survey techniques, including the use of an immersive virtual environment system, given the current software auralization capabilities. The results based on statistical analysis demonstrate the users' ability to localize the sound and to distinguish the intensity, clarity, and reverberation created within the virtual environment. Impact of architectural elements in diffusion control is

  20. Pharmacokinetics of ceftazidime in serum and suction blister fluid during continuous and intermittent infusions in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Mouton, J W; Horrevorts, A M; Mulder, P G; Prens, E P; Michel, M F

    1990-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ceftazidime were investigated during intermittent (II) and continuous (CI) infusion in eight healthy male volunteers in a crossover fashion. The total daily dose was 75 mg/kg of body weight per 24 h in both regimens, given in three doses of 25 mg/kg/8 h (II) or 60 mg/kg/24 h with 15 mg/kg as a loading dose (CI). After the third dose (II) and during CI, serum and blister fluid samples were taken. Seven new blisters were raised for each timed sample by a suction blister technique. Blisters took 90 min to form. Samples were then taken from four blisters (A samples) and 1 h later were taken from the remaining three (B samples). The concentration of ceftazidime was determined using a high-performance liquid chromatography method. After II, the concentrations in serum immediately after infusion (t = 30 min) and 8 h after the start of the infusion were 137.9 (standard deviation [SD], 27.5) and 4.0 (SD, 0.7) micrograms/ml, respectively. The half-life at alpha phase (t1/2 alpha) was 9.6 min (SD, 4.6), t1/2 beta was 94.8 min (SD, 5.4), area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) was 285.4 micrograms.h/ml (SD, 22.7), total body clearance was 0.115 liter/h.kg (SD, 0.022), and volume of distribution at steady state was 0.178 liter/kg (SD, 0.023). The blister fluid (A) samples showed a decline in concentration parallel to that of the concentrations in serum during the elimination phase with a ratio of 1:1. The t1/2 of the A samples was 96.4 min (SD, 3.2). The concentration of ceftazidime in the B blister fluid samples was significantly higher (27%) than in the A samples over time. This shows that blisters may behave as a separate compartment and establishes the need to raise new blisters for each timed sample. The mean AUC/h during continuous infusion was 21.3 micrograms . h/ml (SD, 3.0). The total body clearance was 0.113 liter/h . kg (SD, 0.018), the urinary clearance was 0.105 liter/h . kg (SD, 0.012), and the ceftazidime/creatinine clearance ratio

  1. Development of a practical tool for the flood risk assessment in highly urbanized areas: The case of the Arno River, Firenze (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, S.; Segoni, S.; Catani, F.; Battistini, A.; Manzo, G.; Ermini, L.

    2011-12-01

    The dynamic evolution of a river and the adjacent morphological environment are particularly important especially if there are communities that concentrate in these areas their socio-economic activities. So a proper hydraulic risk management is an increasingly felt necessity, but when working at small scales no established fast methodology exists to map the position and the height of the various elements with centimetric accuracy. In the current work an operative methodology likely to obtain this purpose is proposed on the basis of data obtained from a real test area. It is along the Arno river (Italy) which could be considered on the whole a representative case study of other realities in the world. Various issues have been deepened. Firstly RTK-GPS measurements and information about all the natural and artificial elements, connected to hydraulic risk and fluvial dynamics, were collected. All these elements were mapped with high accuracy, in particular a local geoid model, related only to the study area, was developed to obtain orthometric heights affected with errors ≤ 0.05 m. Consequently a GIS geodatabase was built to visualize the spatial distribution of the mapped elements and to store the most important technical data. Such geodatabase provides an overview of the territories connected with the fluvial dynamics of the main rivers near the city of Firenze. This is confirmed by some applications, realized to verify the capability of the instrument. First of all the real hydraulic risk in the study area has been checked out. So the comparison between the measured dike height and the hydraulic modeling conducted by the Arno River Basin Authority has identified areas at risk of overflowing for various return periods (T30, T100, T200 , T500). Subsequently a deeper analysis of hydraulic hazards has been carried out in the urban area of Firenze. A model of surface-water flows concentrated on the historic center has provided a comprehensive response of this area to

  2. Recovery of 29 Second Oscillations in Hubble Space Telescope Eclipse Observations of the Cataclysmic Variable UX Ursae Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knigge, Christian; Drake, Nick; Long, Knox S.; Wade, Richard A.; Horne, Keith; Baptista, Raymundo

    1998-05-01

    Low-amplitude (~=0.5%) 29 s oscillations have been detected in Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph eclipse observations of the nova-like cataclysmic variable UX UMa. These are the same dwarf nova-type oscillations that were originally discovered in this system by Warner & Nather in 1972. The 29 s oscillations are seen in one pair of eclipse sequences obtained with the FOS/PRISM in 1994 November but not in a similar pair obtained with the FOS/G160L grating in August of the same year. The oscillations in the PRISM data are sinusoidal to within the small observational errors and undergo an approximately -360° phase shift during eclipses (i.e., one cycle is lost). The amplitudes are highest at preeclipse orbital phases and exhibit a rather gradual eclipse whose shape is roughly similar to, although perhaps slightly narrower than, UX UMa's overall light curve in the PRISM bandpass (2000-8000 Å). Spectra of the oscillations have been constructed from pre-, mid, and posteclipse data segments of the November observations. The spectra obtained from the out-of-eclipse segments are extremely blue, and only lower limits can be placed on the temperature of the source that dominates the modulated flux at these orbital phases. Lower limits derived from blackbody (stellar atmosphere) model fits to these data are >=95,000 K (>=85,000 K); the corresponding upper limits on the projected area of this source are all less than 2% of the white dwarf (WD) surface area. By contrast, oscillation spectra derived from mideclipse data segments are much redder. Fits to these spectra yield temperature estimates in the range 20,000 K <~ T <~ 30,000 K for both blackbody and stellar atmosphere models and corresponding projected areas of a few percent of the WD surface area. These estimates are subject to revision if the modulated emission is optically thin. We suggest that the ultimate source of the oscillations is a hot, compact region near disk center, but that a significant

  3. Short- and medium-term effects of three fire fighting chemicals on the properties of a burnt soil.

    PubMed

    Couto-Vázquez, A; González-Prieto, S J

    2006-12-01

    The impact of three fire fighting chemicals (FFC) on 11 chemical soil properties and on soil recovery (0-2 cm depth) was evaluated 1, 30, 90 and 365 days after a prescribed fire. Five treatments were considered: unburnt soil (US) and burnt soil with 2 l m(-2) of water alone (BS) or mixed with the foaming agent Auxquímica RFC-88 at 1% (BS+Fo), Firesorb at 1.5% (BS+Fi) and FR Cross ammonium polyphosphate at 20% (BS+Ap). At t=1 day, soil pH increases in the order USt=30 and t=90 days due to the nitrification of its large NH(4)(+)-N pool. Except in BS+Ap, whose soil P levels were 70-140x (t=1 days) and 10-20x (t=365 days) higher than in the other treatments, available P content in BS and BS+FFC was not

  4. Phosphorus losses to water from lowland rice fields under rice-wheat double cropping system in the Tai Lake region.

    PubMed

    Cao, Z H; Zhang, H C

    2004-01-01

    To assess P losses to surface water by runoff during the rice season and by drainage flow during the winter wheat season, serial field trials were conducted in different types of paddy soils in the Tai Lake Region (TLR) during 2000 and 2001. Four P application rates were set as 0 (CK), 30, 150, and 300 kg P/hm2 for flooded rice trials and 0 (CK), 20, 80, 160 kg P/hm2 for winter wheat trials respectively. Field experiments were done in two locations with a plot size of 30 m2 and four replications in a randomized complete block design. A simplified lysimeter was installed for each plot to collect all the runoff or drainage flow from each event. Total P (TP) losses to surface water during rice season by runoff flow from four treatments were 150 (CK), 220 (T30), 395 (T150), 670 (T300) g P/ hm2 in year 2000, and 298, 440, 1828, 3744 g P/hm2 in year 2001 respectively in Wuxi station, here the soil is permeable paddy soil derived from loam clay deposit. While the losses were 102, 140, 210, 270 in year 2000, and 128, 165, 359, 589 g P/hm2 in year 2001 respectively in Changshu station, here the soil is waterlogged paddy soil derived from silt loam deposit. During the winter wheat season, total P lost from the fields by drainage flow in the four treatments were 253 (CK), 382 (T20), 580 (T89), 818 (T160) g P/hm2 in year 2000--2001, and 573.3, 709.4, 1123.2, 1552.4 g P/hm2 in year 2001--2002 at the Wuxi station. While these were 395.6, 539.1, 1356.8, 1972.1 g P/hm2 in year 2000--2001, and 811.5, 1184.6, 3001.2, 5333.1 g P/hm2 in year 2001--2002 at the Changshu station. Results revealed that P fertilizer application rates significantly affected the TP concentrations and TP loads in runoff during the rice season, and by drainage flow during the winter wheat season. Both TP loads were significantly increased as the P application rate increases. The data indicate that TP losses to surface water were much higher during the winter wheat season than during the rice season in two

  5. Pathway Study of Cl-cycle on Mars, Step-I & II: Oxychlorine Salts and Electrostatic Discharge Phenomenon in a Mars Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z.; Wang, A.; Ling, Z.; Li, B.; Zhang, J.; Xu, W.

    2015-12-01

    The directly measured high ClO4-/Cl- ratio (4.3-8.75) at Phoenix site and the implied ClO4- existences at Curiosity and Viking sites reminded Mars science community on the importance of (1) the global distribution of ClO4-/Cl- ratio; (2) the mechanisms that are responsible for Cl- to ClOy- (y=1,2,3,4) transformation; and (3) the current and historical Cl- cycle on Mars. Our goal is to study electrostatic discharge (ESD) in a Mars Chamber, as one of the four proposed mechanisms for the formation of Martian perchlorate. ESD was anticipated during dust storm/devil on Mars. A model estimated that ESD generated oxidants can be 200 times of those produced by photochemistry. Our study is conducted in three steps. Firstly, oxychlorine salts, NaClOy, Mg(ClO4)2.xH2O (x=0,6), and Ca(ClO4)2.xH2O (x=0,4), were analyzed at ambient conditions using MIR, NIR (1.4-2.6 µm), Raman spectroscopy, and in a Mars Chamber using in-situ NIR and Raman spectroscopy. Our purpose is to understand their phase transition and spectral change at Mars pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions. We have found: (1) Under current surface/subsurface P-T conditions in mid-latitudes/equatorial regions on Mars, Mg(ClO4)2.6H2O and Ca(ClO4)2.4H2O are stable, while the hydration degree of NaClO4.H2O would increase at T<-30℃ and decrease in 5

  6. Influence of various environmental parameters on sweat gland activity.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Roger L; Gillece, Tim; Lu, Guojin; Laura, Donna; Chen, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The choice of environmental conditions when conducting antiperspirant studies greatly affects the quantity of sweat output. Our initial goal in this work was to develop an in-house procedure to test the efficacy of antiperspirant products using replica techniques in combination with image analysis. To ameliorate the skin replica method, we conducted rheological studies using dynamic mechanical analysis of the replica formulation. In terms of sweat output quantification, our preliminary results revealed a considerable amount of variation using the replica technique, leading us to conduct more fundamental studies of the factors that influence sweating behavior and how to best design the experimental strategy. In accordance with the FDA's protocol for antiperspirant testing, we carried out gravimetric analyses of axillae sweating under a variety of environmental conditions including temperature and humidity control. Subjects were first acclimatized in an environmentally controlled room for 30 min, and then placed in a sauna for an additional 30 or 45 min, depending on which test we administered. In Test 1 (30 min total in the sauna), the first 10 min in the sauna was another equilibration period, followed by a 20 min sweat production stage. We monitored axillae sweating during the last 20 min in the sauna by gravimetric analysis. At time (t) = 30 min in the sauna, skin replicas were taken and later analyzed using imaging and image analysis techniques. Test 1 was carried out on over 25 subjects, both male and female, from various racial backgrounds. In Test 2, subjects spent 45 min in the sauna after the initial 30-min period in the environmental room. During the 45 min, we obtained gravimetric readings of absorbent pads placed in the axillae. We conducted studies at various temperature and relative humidity settings. We also studied the influence of several external parameters on sudoriferous activity. Test 2 was a range-finding experiment on two subjects to determine

  7. Addressing Value and Belief Systems on Climate Literacy in the Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeal, K. S.

    2012-12-01

    The southeast (SEUS; AL, AR, GA, FL, KY, LA, NC, SC, TN, E. TX) faces the greatest impacts as a result of climate change of any region in the U.S. which presents considerable and costly adaptation challenges. Paradoxically, people in the SEUS hold attitudes and perceptions that are more dismissive of climate change than those of any other region. An additional mismatch exists between the manner in which climate science is generally communicated and the underlying core values and beliefs held by a large segment of people in the SEUS. As a result, people frequently misinterpret and/or distrust information sources, inhibiting efforts to productively discuss and consider climate change and related impacts on human and environmental systems, and possible solutions and outcomes. The Climate Literacy Partnership in the Southeast (CLiPSE) project includes an extensive network of partners throughout the SEUS from faith, agriculture, culturally diverse, leisure, and K-20 educator communities that aim to address this educational need through a shared vision. CLiPSE has conducted a Climate Stewardship Survey (CSS) to determine the knowledge and perceptions of individuals in and beyond the CLiPSE network. The descriptive results of the CSS indicate that religion, predominantly Protestantism, plays a minor role in climate knowledge and perceptions. Likewise, political affiliation plays a minimal role in climate knowledge and perceptions between religions. However, when Protestants were broken out by political affiliation, statistically significant differences (t(30)=2.44, p=0.02) in knowledge related to the causes of climate change exist. Those Protestants affiliated with the Democratic Party (n=206) tended to maintain a statistically significant stronger knowledge of the causes of global climate change than their Republican counterparts. When SEUS educator (n=277) group was only considered, similar trends were evidenced, indicating that strongly held beliefs potentially

  8. Radiative association of He{sup +} with H{sub 2} at temperatures below 100 K

    SciTech Connect

    Mrugala, Felicja; Kraemer, Wolfgang P.

    2005-06-08

    The paper presents a theoretical study of the low-energy dynamics of radiative association processes in the He{sup +}+H{sub 2} collision system. Formation of the triatomic HeH{sub 2}{sup +} ion in its bound rotation-vibration states on the potential-energy surfaces of the ground and of the first excited electronic states is investigated. Close-coupling calculations are performed to determine detailed state-to-state characteristics (bound<-free transition rates, radiative and dissociative widths of resonances) as well as temperature-average characteristics (rate constants, photon emission spectra) of the two-state (X<-A) reaction He{sup +}({sup 2}S)+H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}){yields}HeH{sub 2}{sup +}(X{sup 2}A{sup '})+h{nu} and of the single-state (A<-A) reaction He{sup +}({sup 2}S)+H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}){yields}HeH{sub 2}{sup +}(A{sup 2}A{sup '})+h{nu}. The potential-energy surfaces of the X- and A-electronic states of HeH{sub 2}{sup +} and the dipole moment surfaces determined ab initio in an earlier work [Kraemer, Spirko, and Bludsky, Chem. Phys. 276, 225 (2002)] are used in the calculations. The rate constants k(T) as functions of temperature are calculated for the temperature interval 1{<=}T{<=}100 K. The maximum k(T) values are predicted as 3.3x10{sup -15} s{sup -1} cm{sup 3} for the X<-A reaction and 2.3x10{sup -20} s{sup -1} cm{sup 3} for the A<-A reaction at temperatures around 2 K. Rotationally predissociating states of the He{sup +}-H{sub 2} complex, correlating with the {upsilon}=0, j=2 state of free H{sub 2}, are found to play a crucial role in the dynamics of the association reactions at low temperatures; their contribution to the k(T) function of the X<-A reaction at T<30 K is estimated as larger than 80%. The calculated partial rate constants and emission spectra show that in the X<-A reaction the HeH{sub 2}{sup +}(X) ion is formed in its highly excited vibrational states. This is in contrast with the vibrational state

  9. Influence of various environmental parameters on sweat gland activity.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Roger L; Gillece, Tim; Lu, Guojin; Laura, Donna; Chen, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The choice of environmental conditions when conducting antiperspirant studies greatly affects the quantity of sweat output. Our initial goal in this work was to develop an in-house procedure to test the efficacy of antiperspirant products using replica techniques in combination with image analysis. To ameliorate the skin replica method, we conducted rheological studies using dynamic mechanical analysis of the replica formulation. In terms of sweat output quantification, our preliminary results revealed a considerable amount of variation using the replica technique, leading us to conduct more fundamental studies of the factors that influence sweating behavior and how to best design the experimental strategy. In accordance with the FDA's protocol for antiperspirant testing, we carried out gravimetric analyses of axillae sweating under a variety of environmental conditions including temperature and humidity control. Subjects were first acclimatized in an environmentally controlled room for 30 min, and then placed in a sauna for an additional 30 or 45 min, depending on which test we administered. In Test 1 (30 min total in the sauna), the first 10 min in the sauna was another equilibration period, followed by a 20 min sweat production stage. We monitored axillae sweating during the last 20 min in the sauna by gravimetric analysis. At time (t) = 30 min in the sauna, skin replicas were taken and later analyzed using imaging and image analysis techniques. Test 1 was carried out on over 25 subjects, both male and female, from various racial backgrounds. In Test 2, subjects spent 45 min in the sauna after the initial 30-min period in the environmental room. During the 45 min, we obtained gravimetric readings of absorbent pads placed in the axillae. We conducted studies at various temperature and relative humidity settings. We also studied the influence of several external parameters on sudoriferous activity. Test 2 was a range-finding experiment on two subjects to determine

  10. The Earth's palaeorotation, postglacial rebound and lower mantle viscosity from analysis of ancient Chinese eclipse records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Kevin D.; Yau, Kevin; Chou, Hung-Hsiang

    1995-09-01

    160,000 oracle bones unearthed from the Shang dynasty capital Anyang (36.1°N, 114.3°E). Four of the 12th-century-B.C. inscriptions have cyclic days of 18, 42, 17 and 25. The chinese 60-day cycle is like our week in design, and has been in continuous use from time immemorial. These records have been uniquely matched to the sunrise eclipses of June 7, 1172 B.C. and October 31, 1161 B.C., and sunset eclipses of October 21, 1198 B.C. and June 27, 1163 B.C., respectively. Using visibility constraints on the rising and setting eclipsed Sun from Anyang we have derived upper or lower limits on Δ T. Three of them cluster around 7 hr 10 min, consistent with a Δ T of 7 hr 20 min, from the analysis of a record of the June 5, 1302 B.C. total solar eclipse, which states that “three flames ate the Sun, big stars were seen”. Analysis of our data gave an equation of best-fit of Δ T=(30±2.5) t 2, for the secular lunar acceleration ratedot n_{moon} = - 26''/cen^2 ( Williams et al., 1992). From this we derived andot ω /ω of -(19±1.6)×10-11/yr, where ω is the angular velocity of the Earth's rotation. Subtracting a tidaldot ω /ω of -27.8×10-11/yr ( Lambeck, 1980) gave a nontidaldot ω /ω of (9±1.6)×10-11/yr, which is equivalent to adot J_2 of -(4.5±0.8)×10-11/yr. The averagedot J_2 for the past 3,300 yr is larger than the presentdot J_2 from satellite laser ranging, -3×10-11/yr ( Cheng et al., 1989), as expected. Bothdot J_2 values are consistent with postglacial rebound from an upper mantle of viscosity 1021 Pa s, and a lower mantle of viscosity (2 4)×1021 Pa s, deformed by Pleistocene ice sheet loading ( Peltier, 1985). Our mantle viscosity values are consistent with those from the analyses of free air gravity anomalies and relative sea-level variations ( Mitrovica and Peltier, 1991, 1992). Accurate values of the mantle viscosity are critical to our understanding of thermal convection patterns, that are responsible for plate tectonics ( Peltier, 1986). Finally

  11. The wildland fire emission inventory: western United States emission estimates and an evaluation of uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanski, S. P.; Hao, W. M.; Nordgren, B.

    2011-12-01

    . The estimated annual, domain wide ECO ranged from 436 Gg yr-1 in 2004 to 3107 Gg yr-1 in 2007. The extremes in estimated annual, domain wide EPM2.5 were 65 Gg yr-1 in 2004 and 454 Gg yr-1 in 2007. Annual WF emissions were a significant share of total emissions from non-WF sources (agriculture, dust, non-WF fire, fuel combustion, industrial processes, transportation, solvent, and miscellaneous) in the western United States as estimated in a national emission inventory. In the peak fire year of 2007, WF emissions were ~20% of total (WF + non-WF) CO emissions and ~39% of total PM2.5 emissions. During the months with the greatest fire activity, WF accounted for the majority of total CO and PM2.5 emitted across the study region. Uncertainties in annual, domain wide emissions was 28% to 51% for CO and 40% to 65% for PM2.5. Sensitivity of ũECO and ũEPM2.5 to the emission model components depended on scale. At scales relevant to regional modeling applications (Δx = 10 km, Δt = 1 day) WFEI estimates 50% of total ECO with an uncertainty <133% and half of total EPM2.5 with an uncertainty <146%. ũECO and ũEPM2.5 are reduced by more than half at the scale of global modeling applications (Δ x = 100 km, Δ t = 30 day) where 50% of total emissions are estimated with an uncertainty <50% for CO and <64% for PM2.5. Uncertainties in the estimates of burned area drives the emission uncertainties at regional scales. At global scales ũECO is most sensitive to uncertainties in the fuel load consumed while the uncertainty in the emission factor for PM2.5 plays the dominant role in ũEPM2.5. Our analysis indicates that the large scale aggregate uncertainties (e.g. the uncertainty in annual CO emitted for CONUS) typically reported for biomass burning emission inventories may not be appropriate for evaluating and interpreting results of regional scale modeling applications that employ the emission estimates. When feasible, biomass burning emission inventories should be evaluated and