Science.gov

Sample records for 3001-b 3004-b t-30

  1. Maintenance Action Readiness Assessment Plan for Waste Area Grouping 1 inactive Tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This Readiness Assessment Plan has been prepared to document operational readiness for the maintenance action consisting of remediation of four inactive liquid low-level radioactive tanks in Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The four tanks to be remediated are Tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013. Tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, and T-30 will be removed from the ground. Because of logistical issues associated with excavation and site access, Tank 3013 will be grouted in place and permanently closed. This project is being performed as a maintenance action rather than an action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, because the risk to human health and environment is well below the US Environmental Protection Agency`s level of concern. The decision to proceed as a maintenance action was documented by an interim action proposed plan, which is included in the administrative record. A Readiness Assessment Team has been assembled to review the criteria deemed necessary to conduct the remediation tasks. These criteria include approval of all plans, acquisition of needed equipment, completion of personnel training, and coordination with plant health and safety personnel. Once the criteria have been met and documented, the task will begin. The readiness assessment is expected to be completed by late July 1995, and the task will begin thereafter.

  2. Maintenance Action Work Plan for Waste Area Grouping 1 inactive tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This Maintenance Action Work Plan has been prepared to document the activities and procedures for the remediation of four inactive, low-level radioactive tanks at Waste Area Grouping 1, from the Category D list of tanks in the Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation (EPA et al. 1994). The four tanks to remediated are tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013. Three of the tanks (3001-B, 3004-B, and T-30) will be physically removed from the ground. Because of logistical issues associted with excavation and site access, the fourth tank (3013) will be grouted in place and permanently closed.

  3. Root cause analysis for waste area grouping 1, Batch I, Series 1 Tank T-30 project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    Four inactive liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks were scheduled for remedial actions as the Batch L Series I Tank Project during fiscal year (FY) 1995. These tanks are 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013. The initial tank remediation project was conducted as a maintenance action. One project objective was to gain experience in remediation efforts (under maintenance actions) to assist in conducting remedial action projects for the 33 remaining inactive LLLW tanks. Batch I, Series 1 project activities resulted in the successful remediation of tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, and 3013. Tank T-30 remedial actions were halted as a result of information obtained during waste characterization activities. The conditions discovered on tank T-30 would not allow completion of tank removal and smelting as originally planned. A decision was made to conduct a root cause analysis of Tank T-30 events to identify and, where possible, correct weaknesses that, if uncorrected, could result in similar delays for completion of future inactive tank remediation projects. The objective of the analysis was to determine why a portion of expected project end results for Tank T-30 were not fully achieved. The root cause analysis evaluates project events and recommends beneficial improvements for application to future projects. This report presents the results of the Batch I, Series root cause analysis results and makes recommendations based on that analysis.

  4. STS-31 crewmembers pose for informal portrait after T-30 briefing at JSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-03-22

    STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers pose for an informal portrait after the T-30 (thirty days before launch) briefing at JSC's Auditorium and Public Affairs Facility Bldg 2. Standing behind the conference table are (left to right) Mission Specialist (MS) Steven A. Hawley, MS Kathryn D. Sullivan, MS Bruce McCandless II, Pilot Charles F. Bolden, and Commander Loren J. Shriver.

  5. Laboratory and field evaluation of spinosad formulation Natular T30 against immature Culex mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Su, Tianyun; Cheng, Min-Lee; Thieme, Jennifer

    2014-07-01

    Spinosad consisting of spinosyn A and D is derived from a naturally occurring, soil-dwelling bacterium, Saccharopolyspora spinosa. Spinosyns are neurotoxins that activate postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors and cause rapid excitation of the insect nervous system and ultimately exhaustion and death of the targets. During the past 30 yr, numerous spinosad-based formulations have been developed and applied to control various arthropod pests of agricultural importance. Natular T-30 is a new slow-release formulation containing 8.33% spinosad for use in mosquito larval control programs. High-level larvicidal activity, as indicated by low LC50 and LC90 levels, was demonstrated against Culex quinquefasciatus Say in the laboratory. Larvicidal efficacy was evaluated in semifield microcosms, field mesocosms, and underground storm drains. Fair performance against larval populations of Culex spp. and other mosquito species was achieved, although low efficacy during the initial few days posttreatment was encountered. This slow-release formulation will play an important role in controlling mosquitoes in persistent breeding sources.

  6. Measurement of the MACS of 159Tb(n, γ) at kT = 30 keV by Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praena, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Pignatari, M.; Quesada, J. M.; Capote, R.; Morilla, Y.

    2014-06-01

    The measurement of the Maxwellian-Averaged Cross-Section (MACS) of the 159Tb(n, γ) reaction at kT = 30 keV by the activation technique is presented. An innovative method for the generation of Maxwellian neutron spectra at kT = 30 keV is used. An experimental value of 2166 ± 181 mb agrees well with the MACS value derived from the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation, but is higher than KADoNiS recommended value of 1580 ± 150 mb. Astrophysical implications are studied.

  7. Test wells T23, T29, and T30, White Sands Missile Range and Fort Bliss Military Reservation, Dona Ana County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, R.G.; Pinckley, K.M.

    1984-01-01

    Three test wells, T23, T29, and T30, were drilled in south-central New Mexico as part of a joint military training program sponsored by the U.S. Army in November 1982. Test well T23 was drilled as an exploratory and monitoring well in the proposed Soledad well field at the Fort Bliss Military Reservation. Test wells T29 and T30 were drilled at White Sands Missile Range. Test well T29 was drilled as an observation well in the vicinity of the outfall channel from the sewage treatment plant. Test well T30 was drilled as an observation well for a landfill south of the well site. Information obtained from these wells includes lithologic logs for all wells and borehole-geophysical logs from the cased wells for test wells T29 and T30. (USGS)

  8. Measurement of the MACS of {sup 159}Tb(n, γ) at kT=30 keV by Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Praena, J.; Mastinu, P.F.; Pignatari, M.; Quesada, J.M.; Capote, R.; Morilla, Y.

    2014-06-15

    The measurement of the Maxwellian-Averaged Cross-Section (MACS) of the {sup 159}Tb(n, γ) reaction at kT=30 keV by the activation technique is presented. An innovative method for the generation of Maxwellian neutron spectra at kT=30 keV is used. An experimental value of 2166±181 mb agrees well with the MACS value derived from the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation, but is higher than KADoNiS recommended value of 1580±150 mb. Astrophysical implications are studied.

  9. Small-Scale Trials Suggest Increasing Applications of Natular™ XRT and Natular™ T30 Larvicide Tablets May Not Improve Mosquito Reduction in Some Catch Basins

    PubMed Central

    Harbison, Justin E.; Henry, Marlon; Corcoran, Peter C.; Zazra, Dave; Xamplas, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Stormwater catch basins are commonly treated with larvicides by mosquito control agencies to reduce local populations of mosquito species capable of transmitting West Nile virus. Recent evidence suggests that extended-release larvicides formulated to last up to 180 days in catch basins may not be effective in some basins due to chronic flushing, rapid dissolution, or burying of treatment in sump debris. To investigate if increasing the number of applications could improve effectiveness, a small study was performed over 13 weeks in 2015 to evaluate two extended-release larvicides (Natular™ XRT 180-day tablets and Natular™ T30 30-day tablets) and a larvicide oil (CocoBear™). Over the course of 13 weeks, three groups of eight basins were monitored for mosquitoes, each group receiving Natular™ XRT, Natular™ T30, or CocoBear™ larvicides. All basins received a single application at the beginning of the study period. Once mosquitoes in a basin surpassed the treatment threshold during weekly monitoring, an additional application of the associated larvicide was given to that basin. The number of applications during the study period ranged from 1 to 10 for CocoBear™ basins, 1 to 7 for T30 basins, and 2 to 8 for XRT basins. Overall, the average number of applications and the cost of larvicide per basin were 4.4 applications at $0.66 per Coco-Bear™ basin, 4.4 applications at $6.26 per T30 basin, and 4 applications at $16.56 per XRT basin. Basins treated with XRT and T30 needed reapplications more often than expected, yet were no more effective than CocoBear™, suggesting that increasing the frequency of application of these larvicide formulations may not provide increased mosquito reduction in some basins. PMID:26792998

  10. Small-Scale Trials Suggest Increasing Applications of Natular™ XRT and Natular™ T30 Larvicide Tablets May Not Improve Mosquito Reduction in Some Catch Basins.

    PubMed

    Harbison, Justin E; Henry, Marlon; Corcoran, Peter C; Zazra, Dave; Xamplas, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Stormwater catch basins are commonly treated with larvicides by mosquito control agencies to reduce local populations of mosquito species capable of transmitting West Nile virus. Recent evidence suggests that extended-release larvicides formulated to last up to 180 days in catch basins may not be effective in some basins due to chronic flushing, rapid dissolution, or burying of treatment in sump debris. To investigate if increasing the number of applications could improve effectiveness, a small study was performed over 13 weeks in 2015 to evaluate two extended-release larvicides (Natular™ XRT 180-day tablets and Natular™ T30 30-day tablets) and a larvicide oil (CocoBear™). Over the course of 13 weeks, three groups of eight basins were monitored for mosquitoes, each group receiving Natular™ XRT, Natular™ T30, or CocoBear™ larvicides. All basins received a single application at the beginning of the study period. Once mosquitoes in a basin surpassed the treatment threshold during weekly monitoring, an additional application of the associated larvicide was given to that basin. The number of applications during the study period ranged from 1 to 10 for CocoBear™ basins, 1 to 7 for T30 basins, and 2 to 8 for XRT basins. Overall, the average number of applications and the cost of larvicide per basin were 4.4 applications at $0.66 per Coco-Bear™ basin, 4.4 applications at $6.26 per T30 basin, and 4 applications at $16.56 per XRT basin. Basins treated with XRT and T30 needed reapplications more often than expected, yet were no more effective than CocoBear™, suggesting that increasing the frequency of application of these larvicide formulations may not provide increased mosquito reduction in some basins.

  11. Measurement of the MACS of Ta181(n,γ) at kT=30 keV as a test of a method for Maxwellian neutron spectra generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praena, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Pignatari, M.; Quesada, J. M.; García-López, J.; Lozano, M.; Dzysiuk, N.; Capote, R.; Martín-Hernández, G.

    2013-11-01

    Measurement of the Maxwellian-Averaged Cross-Section (MACS) of the Ta(n,γ)181 reaction at kT=30 keV by the activation technique using an innovative method for the generation of Maxwellian neutron spectra is presented. The method is based on the shaping of the proton beam to produce a desired neutron spectrum using the 7Li(p,n) reaction as a neutron source. The characterization of neutron spectra has been performed by combining measured proton distributions, an analytical description of the differential neutron yield in angle and energy of the 7Li(p,n) reaction, and with Monte Carlo simulations of the neutron transport. A measured value equal to 815±73 mbarn is reported for the MACS of the reaction Ta(n,γ)181 at kT=30 keV. The MACS of the reaction Au(n,γ)197 provided by KADoNiS has been used as a reference.

  12. Final Regulatory Determination for Special Wastes From Mineral Processing (Mining Waste Exclusion) - Federal Register Notice, June 13, 1991

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This action presents the Agency's final regulatory determination required by section 3001(b)(3)(C) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) for 20 special wastes from the processing of ores and minerals.

  13. SU-E-T-30: A Factor for Converting Dose to a Gold Nanoparticle Mixture to a Biologically-Relevant Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Koger, B; Kirkby, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo studies of gold nanoparticle (GNP) dose enhancement on macroscopic scales in radiotherapy have modeled GNPs in tissue as a homogeneous mixture of gold and tissue. Using an explicit model of GNPs randomly positioned in a small volume (1 µm{sup 3}) of tissue, this study aims to quantify the dose to the biologically relevant component of a goldtissue mixture, enabling a conversion from macroscopically-scored dose. Methods: Using the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code with the penEasy package, we modeled a 1 µm{sup 3} volume containing either a tissue-gold mixture or GNPs suspended in ICRU 4-component tissue at various gold concentrations (0, 5, 10, and 15 mg Au/g tissue) and GNP diameters (20, 30, 40, 50 nm). The volume was irradiated with monoenergetic photon and electron beams, ranging from 110 eV to 6 MeV. Interaction forcing was utilized to increase simulation efficiency. Energy deposition was scored in the tissue for each case and was converted to dose. For each scenario, we calculated a conversion factor, the ratio of dose-to-tissue to dose-to-mixture as a function of energy. Results: The conversion factor was plotted as a function of energy for both photons and electrons. For electrons, the conversion factor was relatively unaffected by any of the parameters, including energy, ranging between 0.98–1.02. For photons, the factor was very energy dependent, with a range of 0.49–1.02. The factor was lowest for 10–100 keV photons. The conversion factor generally decreased with increasing GNP concentration and increasing GNP size. Conclusion: With a large variation in the conversion factor with incident energy, dose deposition is dependent on the spectrum incident on a volume. By scoring the energy spectrum in a given volume, one can provide a scenario-specific conversion factor, allowing fast, detailed Monte Carlo simulations without the need for explicit GNP-definition.

  14. SU-E-T-30: Absorbed Doses Determined by Texture Analysis of Gafchromic EBT3 Films Using Scanning Electron Microscopy: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S; Kim, H; Ye, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The texture analysis method is useful to estimate structural features of images as color, size, and shape. The study aims to determine a dose-response curve by texture analysis of Gafchromic EBT3 film images using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods: The uncoated Gafchromic EBT3 films were prepared to directly scan over the active surface layer of EBT3 film using SEM. The EBT3 films were exposed at a dose range of 0 to 10 Gy using a 6 MV photon beam. The exposed film samples were SEM-scanned at 100X, 1000X, and 3000X magnifications. The four texture features (Homogeneity, Correlation, Contrast, and Energy) were calculated based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) derived from the SEM images at each dose. To validate a correlation between delivered doses and texture features, an R-squared value in linear regression was tested. Results: The results showed that the Correlation index was more suitable as dose indices than the other three texture features due to higher linearity and sensitivity of the dose response curves. Further the Correlation index of 3000X magnified SEM images with 9 pixel offsets had an R-squared value of 0.964. The differences between the delivered doses and the doses measured by this method were 0.9, 1.2, 0.2, and 0.2 Gy at 5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: It seems to be feasible to convert micro-scale structural features of {sub χ}t{sub χχχ}he EBT3 films to absorbed doses using the texture analysis method.

  15. 30 CFR 935.15 - Approval of Ohio regulatory program amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...), -07; 13-4-03 through -05. January 6, 1983 May 24, 1983 ORC as amended by SB 240 and 323. June 10, 1983...-03, -04. July 18, 1983 October 13, 1983 ORC 1513:01(G)(2), (U); -13(A)(1), (C)(1), (3). January 30...-04(B)(5), (G)(15); and Division Advisory Memo No. 31. July 23, 1984 November 1, 1984 ORC contained in...

  16. 30 CFR 935.15 - Approval of Ohio regulatory program amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...), -07; 13-4-03 through -05. January 6, 1983 May 24, 1983 ORC as amended by SB 240 and 323. June 10, 1983...-03, -04. July 18, 1983 October 13, 1983 ORC 1513:01(G)(2), (U); -13(A)(1), (C)(1), (3). January 30...-04(B)(5), (G)(15); and Division Advisory Memo No. 31. July 23, 1984 November 1, 1984 ORC contained in...

  17. Health information technology: initial set of standards, implementation specifications, and certification criteria for electronic health record technology. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2010-01-13

    The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is issuing this interim final rule with a request for comments to adopt an initial set of standards, implementation specifications, and certification criteria, as required by section 3004(b)(1) of the Public Health Service Act. This interim final rule represents the first step in an incremental approach to adopting standards, implementation specifications, and certification criteria to enhance the interoperability, functionality, utility, and security of health information technology and to support its meaningful use. The certification criteria adopted in this initial set establish the capabilities and related standards that certified electronic health record (EHR) technology will need to include in order to, at a minimum, support the achievement of the proposed meaningful use Stage 1 (beginning in 2011) by eligible professionals and eligible hospitals under the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs.

  18. High-resolution HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies in 7823 Han marrow donors of Liaoning province, China.

    PubMed

    Shao, L-N; Zhang, S-T; Yu, W-J; Zhou, S-H; Duan, Y; Pan, L-Z; Wang, N; Liu, M

    2017-05-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system is the most polymorphic gene cluster in humans. High-resolution donor-recipient matching for HLA genes improves patient survival after unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In this study, we analyzed the high-resolution allele and haplotype frequencies at the HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 loci in the Liaoning Han population and analyzed its relationships with other populations. The 3 most frequent alleles at the HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 loci were A*24:02, A*02:01:01G, A*11:01; B*13:02, B*46:01, B*40:01:01G; DRB1*09:01, DRB1*15:01 and DRB1*07:01, respectively. The most frequent 2-locus haplotypes were A*30:01-B*13:02 and B*13:02-DRB1*07:01. A*30:01-B*13:02-DRB1*07:01 was determined to be the predominant 3-locus haplotype. Hot maps and multiple correspondence analyses based on the frequencies of HLA specificities, which allow statistical visualization of dependent and independent relationships among variables, indicate that the Liaoning Han population is closely related to Northern populations of China and shows relative close relationships with Asian populations. These data will provide an outline of the HLA characteristics of healthy individuals in our region and help bone marrow transplantation patients find suitable HLA-matched donors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Allele Polymorphism and Haplotype Diversity of HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 Loci in Sequence-Based Typing for Chinese Uyghur Ethnic Group

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chun-mei; Zhu, Bo-feng; Deng, Ya-jun; Ye, Shi-hui; Yan, Jiang-wei; Yang, Guang; Wang, Hong-dan; Qin, Hai-xia; Huang, Qi-zhao; Zhang, Jing-Jing

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies indicate that the frequency distributions of HLA alleles and haplotypes vary from one ethnic group to another or between the members of the same ethnic group living in different geographic areas. It is necessary and meaningful to study the high-resolution allelic and haplotypic distributions of HLA loci in different groups. Methodology/Principal Findings High-resolution HLA typing for the Uyghur ethnic minority group using polymerase chain reaction-sequence-based-typing method was first reported. HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 allelic distributions were determined in 104 unrelated healthy Uyghur individuals and haplotypic frequencies and linkage disequilibrium parameters for HLA loci were estimated using the maximum-likelihood method. A total of 35 HLA-A, 51 HLA-B and 33 HLA-DRB1 alleles were identified at the four-digit level in the population. High frequency alleles were HLA-A*1101 (13.46%), A*0201 (12.50%), A*0301 (10.10%); HLA-B*5101(8.17%), B*3501(6.73%), B*5001 (6.25%); HLA-DRB1*0701 (16.35%), DRB1*1501 (8.65%) and DRB1*0301 (7.69%). The two-locus haplotypes at the highest frequency were HLA-A*3001-B*1302 (2.88%), A*2402-B*5101 (2.86%); HLA-B*5001-DRB1*0701 (4.14%) and B*0702-DRB1*1501 (3.37%). The three-locus haplotype at the highest frequency was HLA-A*3001-B*1302-DRB1*0701(2.40%). Significantly high linkage disequilibrium was observed in six two-locus haplotypes, with their corresponding relative linkage disequilibrium parameters equal to 1. Neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree between the Uyghur group and other previously reported populations was constructed on the basis of standard genetic distances among the populations calculated using the four-digit sequence-level allelic frequencies at HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 loci. The phylogenetic analyses reveal that the Uyghur group belongs to the northwestern Chinese populations and is most closely related to the Xibe group, and then to Kirgiz, Hui, Mongolian and Northern Han. Conclusions

  20. 75 FR 35127 - Hazardous and Solid Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Special Wastes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ...The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or Agency) is proposing to regulate for the first time, coal combustion residuals (CCRs) under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) to address the risks from the disposal of CCRs generated from the combustion of coal at electric utilities and independent power producers. However, the Agency is considering two options in this proposal and, thus, is proposing two alternative regulations. Under the first proposal, EPA would reverse its August 1993 and May 2000 Bevill Regulatory Determinations regarding coal combustion residuals (CCRs) and list these residuals as special wastes subject to regulation under subtitle C of RCRA, when they are destined for disposal in landfills or surface impoundments. Under the second proposal, EPA would leave the Bevill determination in place and regulate disposal of such materials under subtitle D of RCRA by issuing national minimum criteria. Under both alternatives EPA is proposing to establish dam safety requirements to address the structural integrity of surface impoundments to prevent catastrophic releases. EPA is not proposing to change the May 2000 Regulatory Determination for beneficially used CCRs, which are currently exempt from the hazardous waste regulations under Section 3001(b)(3)(A) of RCRA. However, EPA is clarifying this determination and seeking comment on potential refinements for certain beneficial uses. EPA is also not proposing to address the placement of CCRs in mines, or non-minefill uses of CCRs at coal mine sites in this action.

  1. Molecular diversity of Citrus tristeza virus in California

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a serious citrus pathogen worldwide. Recent genetic studies have identified five standard CTV genotypic groups: T30, VT, T36, T3, and B165/T68. Field surveys performed in California in 2008-2010 identified primarily MCA13-negative CTV isolates with T30-like genotype. C...

  2. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): Tinker AFB (Soldier Creek/Bldg. 3001), OK. (First remedial action), August 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-16

    The 220-acre Tinker AFB (Soldier Creek/Building 3001) site, which includes an active military facility and the adjacent Soldier Creek is in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Surrounding land use is urban residential. Underlying the site is a surficial perched aquifer and a sole-source aquifer for the region. The Building 3001 (B3001) facility is used as an aircraft overhaul and modification complex for jet engine service, repair, and upgrades. From the 1940s to the 1970s, organic solvents were used to degrease metal parts in subsurface pits. Ground water contamination has occurred onsite as a result of seepage from these pits, direct discharge of solvents to storm drains, spills, and faulty drainage system connections. A North Tank Area contains several active and abandoned underground waste oil and fuel tanks. Contamination in the area has resulted from leaking tanks and fuel spills directly onto the ground. In addition, there is onsite Volatile Organic Compounds contamination, which may be the result of leaking utility lines in the area. Investigations by the Air Force from 1982 to 1989, documented ground water contamination under the B3001 complex; the potential threat of further contamination from Pit Q-51, one of the former degreasing pits; and leakage of underground storage tanks in the North Tank Area. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses remediation of onsite ground water, along with remedial actions relating to Pit Q-51 and the North Tank Area. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, debris and ground water are Volatile Organic Compounds including benzene, PCE, TCE, toluene, and xylenes; other organics including phenols; and metals including chromium and lead.

  3. Lewis M. Rutherfurd and the First Photograph of Solar Granulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.; Briggs, John W.; Prosser, Sian

    2017-08-01

    A major astronomical controversy of the mid-19th century was discordant descriptions of the small scale structure of the solar surface. Visual observers contradicted each other by describing the surface as consisting of “corrugations”, “willow leaves”, “rice grains”, “cumuli”, “thatch”, “granules”, etc. Early photographs of the solar surface were not good enough to settle the controversy. The French astronomer Jules Janssen is credited with the first 1876 photographs that clearly showed what we now call solar granulation (1876, CRAS 82, 1363). Upon seeing these images, New Yorker Lewis M. Rutherfurd (1878, MNRAS 38, 410) praised the high quality of Janssen’s images but asserted that he had also photographed granulation as early as 1871 using collodion wet plates. He sent copies of his best photograph to the Royal Astronomical Society to support his assertion. Curious about his claim, Briggs and Harvey set up Rutherfurd’s 13-inch achromatic refractor on Kitt Peak and found that it easily showed well-resolved solar granulation, so his claim might well have been justified. But without his plates we could not confirm the claim. For 140 years the copies of Rutherfurd’s best solar photograph remained in the archives of the Royal Astronomical Society and were recently discovered by Prosser (RAS Photographs A3/001B and A3/002). By coincidence a few days later, Briggs found the original August 11, 1871 plate. Despite poor condition these photographs show solar granulation. There are at least two other possible early claimants (Reade; Vogel) but their plates are almost certainly lost. Rutherfurd was a master of astronomical instrumentation and photography. He was reticent about his work, letting results speak for themselves, so it is satisfying to find that he was justified in making his claim of priority.

  4. On the nature of charge carrier scattering in Ag{sub 2}Se at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Jafarov, M. B.

    2010-10-15

    The electric and thermoelectric properties of silver selenide in the temperature range of 4.2-300 K have been studied. The data obtained are interpreted within the theory of one-type carriers and Kane dispersion relation, with allowance for the character of electron-electron interaction. It is established that, for the concentrations n {<=} 7.8 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}, charge carriers are scattered by impurity ions at T {<=} 30 K and by acoustic and optical phonons and point defects at T {>=} 30 K. Electron-electron interactions are found to be elastic at T < 30 K.

  5. HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 polymorphism in Koreans defined by sequence-based typing of 4128 cord blood units.

    PubMed

    Huh, J Y; Yi, D Y; Eo, S-H; Cho, H; Park, M H; Kang, M S

    2013-12-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and haplotypes differ significantly among different ethnic groups, and high-resolution typing methods allow for the detection of a wider spectrum of HLA variations. In this study, HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 genotypes were analysed in 4128 cord blood units obtained from Korean women using the sequence-based typing method. A total of 44 HLA-A, 67 HLA-B and 48 HLA-DRB1 most probable alleles were identified. Of these, high-frequency alleles found at a frequency of ≥5% were 6 HLA-A (A*02:01, A*02:06, A*11:01, A*24:02, A*31:01, A*33:03), 5 HLA-B (B*15:01, B*44:03, B*51:01, B*54:01, B*58:01) and 7 HLA-DRB1 (DRB1*01:01, DRB1*04:05, DRB1*07:01, DRB1*08:03, DRB1*09:01, DRB1*13:02, DRB1*15:01) alleles. At each locus, A*02, B*15 and DRB1*04 generic groups were most diverse at allelic level, consisting of 8, 11 and 10 different alleles, respectively. Two- and three-locus haplotypes estimated by the maximum likelihood method revealed 73 A-B, 74 B-DRB1 and 42 A-B-DRB1 haplotypes with frequencies of ≥0.3%. A total of 193 A-B-DRB1 haplotypes found at a frequency of ≥0.1% were presented, and the six most common haplotypes were A*33:03-B*44:03-DRB1*13:02 (4.6%), A*33:03-B*58:01-DRB1*13:02 (3.0%), A*24:02-B*07:02-DRB1*01:01 (2.7%), A*33:03-B*44:03-DRB1*07:01 (2.5%), A*30:01-B*13:02-DRB1*07:01 (2.2%) and A*24:02-B*52:01-DRB1*15:02 (2.1%). Compared with previous smaller scale studies, this study further delineated the allelic and haplotypic diversity in Koreans including low-frequency alleles and haplotypes. Information obtained in this study will be useful for the search for unrelated bone marrow donors and for anthropologic and disease association studies.

  6. Effect of hand-arm exercise on venous blood constituents during leg exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, N.; Silver, J. E.; Greenawalt, S.; Kravik, S. E.; Geelen, G.

    1985-01-01

    Contributions by ancillary hand and arm actions to the changes in blood constituents effected by leg exercises on cycle ergometer were assessed. Static or dynamic hand-arm exercises were added to the leg exercise (50 percent VO2 peak)-only control regimens for the subjects (19-27 yr old men) in the two experimental groups. Antecubital venous blood was analyzed at times 0, 15, and 30 min (T0, T15, and T30) for serum Na(+), K(+), osmolality, albumin, total CA(2+), and glucose; blood hemoglobin, hematocrit, and lactic acid; and change in plasma volume. Only glucose and lactate values were affected by additional arm exercise. Glucose decreased 4 percent at T15 and T30 after static exercise, and by 2 percent at T15 (with no change at T30) after dynamic arm exercise. Conversely, lactic acid increased by 20 percent at T30 after static exercise, and by 14 percent by T15 and 6 percent at T30 after dynamic arm exercise. It is concluded that additional arm movements, performed usually when gripping the handle-bar on the cycle ergometer, could introduce significant errors in measured venous concentrations of glucose and lactate in the leg-exercised subjects.

  7. Enhancing the Breadth of Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    HLA- A*02:01 T: 30,000 LN: 30,000 PBL : 220,000 T: 30,000 LN: 30,000 PBL : 250,000 Emulsion PCR, single cell sequencing BC48 Luminal ER/PR...HLA- A*02:01 LN: 10,000 PBL : 20,000 LN: 30,000 PBL : 30,000 Emulsion PCR, single cell sequencing BC35 Luminal B Stage IIA HLA- A*02:01 T...30,000 PBL : 80,000 T: 14,000 PBL : 80,000 Emulsion PCR, single cell sequencing BC47 Luminal ER/PR+ HLA- A*02:01 LN: 30,000 PBL : 30,000 LN

  8. Effects of adding supplemental tallow to diets containing distillers dried grains with solubles on fatty acid digestibility in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Davis, J M; Urriola, P E; Baidoo, S K; Johnston, L J; Shurson, G C

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to measure the apparent ileal digestibility (AID) and apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of fatty acids in diets containing 0 or 30% corn distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) and 0, 5, or 10% tallow. Barrows (n = 24; initial BW = 25 kg) were surgically fitted with a T-cannula at the distal ileum. Pigs (n = 4/diet) were randomly assigned to diets: corn-soybean meal control (CON), CON plus 5% tallow (5T0D), CON plus 10% tallow (10T0D), CON plus 30% DDGS (0T30D), CON plus 5% tallow and 30% DDGS (5T30D), and CON plus 10% tallow and 30% DDGS (10T30D). Eight replicates per treatment were achieved by randomizing diets among pigs for a second collection period. Each pig was fed their respective diet for a 5-d adaptation period followed by 3-d fecal collection and 2-d ileal digesta collection periods. The AID and ATTD of fatty acids was calculated using the index method and acid-insoluble ash as an indigestible marker. When tallow was added to diets with 0% DDGS, there was no effect on AID of palmitic acid (C16:0) or SFA, while AID of stearic acid (C18:0) was increased (66.87% for CON, 72.06% for 5T0D, and 76.81% for 10T0D; P < 0.01). However, when diets contained 30% DDGS, the AID of all SFA was reduced as levels of tallow increased C16:0 (77.62% for 0T30D, 69.66% for 5T30D, and 68.43% for 10T30D), C18:0 (85.87% for 0T30D, 64.08% for 5T30D, and 61.25% for 10T30D), and SFA (79.88% for 0T30D, 68.23% for 5T30D, and 66.29% for 10T30D). The AID of MUFA was not affected when tallow was added to diets with 30% DDGS but actually increased in 5T0D and 10T0D. The amount of apparent ileal digested fatty acids increased with the addition of DDGS and tallow regardless of their digestibility. Amounts of ileal digested MUFA and PUFA increased when both DDGS (P < 0.01) and tallow (P < 0.01) were included in the diet compared to when either ingredient was excluded. For ileal digestible SFA, an interaction (P < 0.01) between DDGS and tallow was

  9. The pathogenicity determinant of Citrus tristeza virus causing the seedling yellows syndrome maps at the 3'-terminal region of the viral genome.

    PubMed

    Albiach-Marti, Maria R; Robertson, Cecile; Gowda, Siddarame; Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Belliure, Belén; Garnsey, Stephen M; Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Moreno, Pedro; Dawson, William O

    2010-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) (genus Closterovirus, family Closteroviridae) causes some of the more important viral diseases of citrus worldwide. The ability to map disease-inducing determinants of CTV is needed to develop better diagnostic and disease control procedures. A distinctive phenotype of some isolates of CTV is the ability to induce seedling yellows (SY) in sour orange, lemon and grapefruit seedlings. In Florida, the decline isolate of CTV, T36, induces SY, whereas a widely distributed mild isolate, T30, does not. To delimit the viral sequences associated with the SY syndrome, we created a number of T36/T30 hybrids by substituting T30 sequences into different regions of the 3' half of the genome of an infectious cDNA of T36. Eleven T36/T30 hybrids replicated in Nicotiana benthamiana protoplasts. Five of these hybrids formed viable virions that were mechanically transmitted to Citrus macrophylla, a permissive host for CTV. All induced systemic infections, similar to that of the parental T36 clone. Tissues from these C. macrophylla source plants were then used to graft inoculate sour orange and grapefruit seedlings. Inoculation with three of the T30/T36 hybrid constructs induced SY symptoms identical to those of T36; however, two hybrids with T30 substitutions in the p23-3' nontranslated region (NTR) (nucleotides 18 394-19 296) failed to induce SY. Sour orange seedlings infected with a recombinant non-SY p23-3' NTR hybrid also remained symptomless when challenged with the parental virus (T36), demonstrating the potential feasibility of using engineered constructs of CTV to mitigate disease.

  10. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation on motor cortex plasticity in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Jin; Udupa, Kaviraja; Ni, Zhen; Moro, Elena; Gunraj, Carolyn; Mazzella, Filomena; Lozano, Andres M.; Hodaie, Mojgan; Lang, Anthony E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) will improve long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity in motor cortex in Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: We studied 8 patients with PD treated with STN-DBS and 9 age-matched healthy controls. Patients with PD were studied in 4 sessions in medication (Med) OFF/stimulator (Stim) OFF, Med-OFF/Stim-ON, Med-ON/Stim-OFF, and Med-ON/Stim-ON states in random order. Motor evoked potential amplitude and cortical silent period duration were measured at baseline before paired associated stimulation (PAS) and at 3 different time intervals (T0, T30, T60) up to 60 minutes after PAS in the abductor pollicis brevis and abductor digiti minimi muscles. Results: Motor evoked potential size significantly increased after PAS in controls (+67.7% of baseline at T30) and in patients in the Med-ON/Stim-ON condition (+55.8% of baseline at T30), but not in patients in the Med-OFF/Stim-OFF (−0.4% of baseline at T30), Med-OFF/Stim-ON (+10.3% of baseline at T30), and Med-ON/Stim-OFF conditions (+17.3% of baseline at T30). Cortical silent period duration increased after PAS in controls but not in patients in all test conditions. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that STN-DBS together with dopaminergic medications restore LTP-like plasticity in motor cortex in PD. Restoration of cortical plasticity may be one of the mechanisms of how STN-DBS produces clinical benefit. PMID:26156511

  11. Juvenile Rank Can Predict Male-Typical Adult Mating Behavior in Female Sheep Treated Prenatally with Testosterone1

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Eila K.; Flak, Jonathan N.; Ye, Wen; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Lee, Theresa M.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research with female sheep indicates that exposure to excess testosterone for 60 days (from Gestational Days 30–90 of the 147-day gestation) leads to virilized genitalia, severe neuroendocrine deficits, as well as masculinization and defeminization of sexual behavior (T60 females). In contrast, 30 days of testosterone exposure (Gestational Days 60–90) produce animals with female-typical genitalia, less severe neuroendocrine alterations, and variable gender patterns of sexual behavior (T30 females). Variation in adult sexual behavior of male ungulates is influenced by early social experience, but this has never been tested in females. Here we investigate the influence of rank in the dominance hierarchy on the expression of adult sexual behavior in females. Specifically, we hypothesized that juvenile rank would predict the amount of male- and female-typical mating behavior exhibited by adult female sheep. This hypothesis was tested in two treatment groups and their controls (group 1: T60 females; group 2: T30 females). Dominance hierarchies were determined by observing competition over resources. Both groups of prenatal testosterone-treated females were higher ranking than controls (T60: P = 0.05; T30: P < 0.01). During the breeding season, both T60 and T30 females exhibited more male-typical mating behavior than did controls; however, the T30 animals also exhibited female-typical behavior. For the T60 group, prenatal treatment, not juvenile rank, best predicted male-typical sex behavior (P = 0.007), while juvenile rank better predicted male mating behavior for the T30 group (P = 0.006). Rank did not predict female mating behavior in the hormone-treated or control ewes. We conclude that the effect of prenatal testosterone exposure on adult male-specific but not female-specific mating behavior is modulated by juvenile social experiences. PMID:19122184

  12. Hedgsim routines for Leadtime Variability Inventory Policy Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    actual D062 demand histories to estimate the parameters of a negative binomal distribution of requisition size. It also constructs the cumulative...demand history . Subroutine NEGBIN is called to initialize the negative binomal requisition size distribution by subroutine INITEM, while the ramdom...rIA T?0.’ COFF OF V--*.T30.FJ3.2/ 2660& T20, X( I ),T 30, 2OF 6. 2 2 615 IF( Ivl(3)J;F. I) ? 6H0& WUTE (0. 63) NPT, X9. V,S , SX9, XU)II INPT) 2690 03

  13. Differentiation between African populations is evidenced by the diversity of alleles and haplotypes of HLA class I loci.

    PubMed

    Cao, K; Moormann, A M; Lyke, K E; Masaberg, C; Sumba, O P; Doumbo, O K; Koech, D; Lancaster, A; Nelson, M; Meyer, D; Single, R; Hartzman, R J; Plowe, C V; Kazura, J; Mann, D L; Sztein, M B; Thomson, G; Fernández-Viña, M A

    2004-04-01

    The allelic and haplotypic diversity of the HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C loci was investigated in 852 subjects from five sub-Saharan populations from Kenya (Nandi and Luo), Mali (Dogon), Uganda, and Zambia. Distributions of genotypes at all loci and in all populations fit Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations. There was not a single allele predominant at any of the loci in these populations, with the exception of A*3002 [allele frequency (AF) = 0.233] in Zambians and Cw*1601 (AF = 0.283) in Malians. This distribution was consistent with balancing selection for all class I loci in all populations, which was evidenced by the homozygosity F statistic that was less than that expected under neutrality. Only in the A locus in Zambians and the C locus in Malians, the AF distribution was very close to neutrality expectations. There were six instances in which there were significant deviations of allele distributions from neutrality in the direction of balancing selection. All allelic lineages from each of the class I loci were found in all the African populations. Several alleles of these loci have intermediate frequencies (AF = 0.020-0.150) and seem to appear only in the African populations. Most of these alleles are widely distributed in the African continent and their origin may predate the separation of linguistic groups. In contrast to native American and other populations, the African populations do not seem to show extensive allelic diversification within lineages, with the exception of the groups of alleles A*02, A*30, B*57, and B*58. The alleles of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B are in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) with alleles of the C locus, and the sets of B/C haplotypes are found in several populations. The associations between A alleles with C-blocks are weaker, and only a few A/B/C haplotypes (A*0201-B*4501-Cw*1601; A*2301-B*1503-Cw*0202; A*7401-B* 1503-Cw*0202; A*2902-B*4201-Cw*1701; A*3001-B*4201-Cw*1701; and A*3601-B*5301-Cw*0401) are found in multiple

  14. First kinetic evidence for the CH/π and π/π solute-solvent interaction of C60 in the Diels-Alder reaction with cyclohexadiene.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Takumi; Mikie, Tsubasa; Ikuma, Naohiko; Yakuma, Hajime

    2012-03-07

    The first CH/π solute-solvent interaction of C(60) was evidenced by the kinetic solvent effects in the Diels-Alder reaction with 1,3-cyclohexadiene based on the evaluation of linear free energy relationship of log k(2) with empirical solvent polarity and basicity parameters, E(T)(30) and D(π), respectively.

  15. Preparation of graphene nanoflakes/polymer composites and their performances for actuation and energy harvesting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seveyrat, L.; Chalkha, A.; Guyomar, D.; Lebrun, L.

    2012-05-01

    Composites based on polyurethane (PU) or P(VDF-TrFE-CFE) terpolymer (T30) filled with various amounts of 60-nm thick graphene nanoflakes were prepared. The dielectric properties, including relative permittivity, loss tangent, and conductivity over a broad range of frequencies were presented and discussed according to the percolation theory. The percolation threshold was found to differ for the two systems, respectively, 7.2 and 3.0 vol. % for the PU and the T30 composites. Differential scanning calorimetry demonstrated that there was practically no interaction between the polymeric matrix and the fillers. The increase in permittivity could not be related to this very slight modification of the polymer but rather to the space charges induced by the graphene flakes. Moreover, measurements of the thickness strain under an applied electric field demonstrated a twofold increase of the actuation capability. The optimal value of the M33 electrostriction coefficient was for both systems obtained for a filler content somewhat lower than the percolation threshold. The PU-graphene composite exhibited better performances compared to its T30-graphene counterpart and this was attributed to the good ratio of relative permittivity to the Young modulus in addition to the specific morphology of the used polyurethane. The energy harvesting properties were investigated by monitoring the evolution of the current under a DC electric field and under AC mechanical strain. The T30-graphene composite was found to be the best material for energy harvesting as previously predicted based on its high permittivity.

  16. Nucleotide heterogeneity at the genomic 5’- and 3’-termini of California (CA) isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nucleotide (nt) sequences in the genomic ends of sense (+)-RNA viruses serve essential biological functions and are important considerations in the construction of infectious clones. Two isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) from California (CA) having a T30- and a T36-genotype were inoculated in ...

  17. Dramatic Change in Citrus tristeza virus populations in the Dominican Republic

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is the most destructive viral pathogen of citrus and has been an important concern for the citrus industry in the Dominican Republic. Earlier studies documented widespread distribution of mild isolates of the T30 genotype, which caused no disease in the infected trees, an...

  18. Genetic differentiation and biology of Citrus tristeza virus populations spreading in eradicative and non-eradicative areas of California

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous studies showed Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates collected from the 1970’s in California were closely related to the mild T30 isolate; only a few severe strains such as SY568 (Riverside) and Dekopon (Orange Cove) were found and subsequently eradicated. CTV is now spreading rapidly in so...

  19. 75 FR 67767 - Filing of Plats of Survey: Oregon/Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... Bureau of Land Management Filing of Plats of Survey: Oregon/Washington AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management... officially filed in the Bureau of Land Management Oregon/Washington State Office, Portland, Oregon, 30 days from the date of this publication. Willamette Meridian Oregon T. 30 S., R. 9 W., accepted September...

  20. 76 FR 56466 - Filing of Plats of Survey: Oregon/Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... Bureau of Land Management Filing of Plats of Survey: Oregon/Washington AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management... officially filed in the Bureau of Land Management Oregon/Washington State Office, Portland, Oregon, 30 days from the date of this publication. Willamette Meridian, Oregon T. 30 S., R. 2 W., accepted August...

  1. 76 FR 26314 - Filing of Plats of Survey: Oregon/Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... Bureau of Land Management Filing of Plats of Survey: Oregon/Washington AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management... officially filed in the Bureau of Land Management Oregon/Washington State Office, Portland, Oregon, 30 days from the date of this publication. Willamette Meridian Oregon T. 30 S., R. 11 W., accepted March...

  2. 76 FR 35908 - Filing of Plats of Survey; Oregon/Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ...-0249] Filing of Plats of Survey; Oregon/Washington AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION... filed in the Bureau of Land Management Oregon/Washington State Office, Portland, Oregon, 30 days from the date of this publication. Willamette Meridian Oregon T. 30 S., R. 3 W., accepted May 2, 2011....

  3. Sequences of Citrus tristeza virus separated in time and space are essentially identical.

    PubMed

    Albiach-Martí, M R; Mawassi, M; Gowda, S; Satyanarayana, T; Hilf, M E; Shanker, S; Almira, E C; Vives, M C; López, C; Guerri, J; Flores, R; Moreno, P; Garnsey, S M; Dawson, W O

    2000-08-01

    The first Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genomes completely sequenced (19.3-kb positive-sense RNA), from four biologically distinct isolates, are unexpectedly divergent in nucleotide sequence (up to 60% divergence). Understanding of whether these large sequence differences resulted from recent evolution is important for the design of disease management strategies, particularly the use of genetically engineered mild (essentially symptomless)-strain cross protection and RNA-mediated transgenic resistance. The complete sequence of a mild isolate (T30) which has been endemic in Florida for about a century was found to be nearly identical to the genomic sequence of a mild isolate (T385) from Spain. Moreover, samples of sequences of other isolates from distinct geographic locations, maintained in different citrus hosts and also separated in time (B252 from Taiwan, B272 from Colombia, and B354 from California), were nearly identical to the T30 sequence. The sequence differences between these isolates were within or near the range of variability of the T30 population. A possible explanation for these results is that the parents of isolates T30, T385, B252, B272, and B354 have a common origin, probably Asia, and have changed little since they were dispersed throughout the world by the movement of citrus. Considering that the nucleotide divergence among the other known CTV genomes is much greater than those expected for strains of the same virus, the remarkable similarity of these five isolates indicates a high degree of evolutionary stasis in some CTV populations.

  4. A novel thermoalkaliphilic xylanase from Gordonia sp. is salt, solvent and surfactant tolerant.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Radhika; Monika; Subudhi, Enketeswara

    2014-12-01

    Two aerobic bacterial consortia namely Con T and Con R were developed by enrichment technique from termite gut and cow dung respectively, using xylan as a sole carbon source. Molecular characterization of Con R based on 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed the presence of Pannonibacter sp. R-3 and Pseudoxanthomas sp. R-5. On the other hand, Con T showed the presence of Pseudoxanthomas sp. T-5, Cellulosimicrobium sp. T-21, and Gordonia sp. T-30. Being the maximum xylanase producer among the five isolates and being a novel xylanase producing bacterial genus, Gordonia sp. T-30 was selected. Xylanase produced by Gordonia sp. T-30 showed optimum activity at 60 °C and pH 9. Xylanase was 95% stable for 120 min at pH 9.0 and 98% stable at 60 °C for 90 min. Xylanase activity was stimulated in the presence of organic solvents such as petroleum ether, acetone, diethyl ether, n-hexane, and benzene. Detergent like cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and presence of NaCl also accelerated the xylanase function. Comparative evaluation was studied between sterilized and non-sterilized solid fermentation to produce xylanase by Gordonia sp. T-30 using various agricultural residues as growth substrate in cost effective manner. Industrially important features endowed by this xylanase make it a very promising candidate for food, feed, and fuel industry.

  5. The prevalence of the citrus tristeza virus trifoliate resistant breaking genotype among Puerto Rican isolates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates have been grouped previously into five genotypes: T3, T30, T36, VT, B165 based on symptoms, host range and genomic sequence data. A sixth genotype has recently been identified with the novel property of replicating in trifoliate orange trees, a non host for the o...

  6. Reliability and validity of a 20-s alternative to the wingate anaerobic test in team sport male athletes.

    PubMed

    Attia, Ahmed; Hachana, Younes; Chaabène, Helmi; Gaddour, Abdelmajid; Neji, Zied; Shephard, Roy J; Chelly, Mohamed Souhaiel

    2014-01-01

    The intent of this study was to evaluate relative and absolute reliability of the 20-s anaerobic test (WAnT20) versus the WAnT30 and to verify how far the various indices of the 30-s Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT30) could be predicted from the WAnT20 data in male athletes. The participants were Exercise Science majors (age: 21.5±1.6 yrs, stature: 0.183±0.08 m, body mass: 81.2±10.9 kg) who participated regularly in team sports. In Phase I, 41 participants performed duplicate WAnT20 and WAnT30 tests to assess reliability. In Phase II, 31 participants performed one trial each of the WAnT20 and WAnT30 to determine the ability of the WAnT20 to predict components of the WAnT30. In Phase III, 31 participants were used to cross-validate the prediction equations developed in Phase II. Respective intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) for peak power output (PPO) (ICC = 0.98 and 0.95) and mean power output (MPO) (ICC 0.98 and 0.90) did not differ significantly between WAnT20 and WAnT30. ICCs for minimal power output (POmin) and fatigue index (FI) were poor for both tests (range 0.53 to 0.76). Standard errors of the means (SEM) for PPO and MPO were less than their smallest worthwhile changes (SWC) in both tests; however, POmin and FI values were "marginal," with SEM values greater than their respective SWCs for both tests values. Stepwise regression analysis showed that MPO had the highest coefficient of predictability (R = 0.97), with POmin and FI considerable lower (R = 0.71 and 0.41 respectively). Cross-validation showed insignificant bias with limits of agreement of 0.99±1.04, 6.5±92.7 W, and 1.6±9.8% between measured and predicted MPO, POmin, and FI, respectively. WAnT20 offers a reliable and valid test of leg anaerobic power in male athletes and could replace the classic WAnT30.

  7. Motor cortex plasticity in Parkinson's disease and levodopa-induced dyskinesias.

    PubMed

    Morgante, Francesca; Espay, Alberto J; Gunraj, Carolyn; Lang, Anthony E; Chen, Robert

    2006-04-01

    Experimental models of Parkinson's disease have demonstrated abnormal synaptic plasticity in the corticostriatal system, possibly related to the development of levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID). We tested the hypothesis that LID in Parkinson's disease is associated with aberrant plasticity in the human motor cortex (M1). We employed the paired associative stimulation (PAS) protocol, an experimental intervention involving transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and median nerve stimulation capable of producing long-term potentiation (LTP) like changes in the sensorimotor system in humans. We studied the more affected side of 16 moderately affected patients with Parkinson's disease (9 dyskinetic, 7 non-dyskinetic) and the dominant side of 9 age-matched healthy controls. Motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes and cortical silent period (CSP) duration were measured at baseline before PAS and for up to 60 min (T0, T30 and T60) after PAS in abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles. PAS significantly increased MEP size in controls (+74.8% of baseline at T30) but not in patients off medication (T30: +0.07% of baseline in the non-dyskinetic, +27% in the dyskinetic group). Levodopa restored the potentiation of MEP amplitudes by PAS in the non-dyskinetic group (T30: +64.9% of baseline MEP) but not in the dyskinetic group (T30: -9.2% of baseline). PAS prolonged CSP duration in controls. There was a trend towards prolongation of CSP in the non-dyskinetic group off medications but not in the dyskinetic group. Levodopa did not restore CSP prolongation by PAS in the dyskinetic group. Our findings suggest that LTP-like plasticity is deficient in Parkinson's disease off medications and is restored by levodopa in non-dyskinetic but not in dyskinetic patients. Abnormal synaptic plasticity in the motor cortex may play a role in the development of LID.

  8. Steady-state nevirapine, lamivudine and stavudine levels in Malawian HIV-infected children on antiretroviral therapy using split Triomune 30 tablets.

    PubMed

    Poerksen, Goenke; Pollock, Louisa; Moons, Peter; Chesshyre, Emily; Burger, David; Khoo, Saye; Molyneux, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Children remain under-represented in national antiretroviral treatment (ART) programmes in settings with limited resources and high HIV prevalence. In Malawi, an increasing number of HIV-infected children have been started on ART with split tablets of an adult fixed-dose combination drug in the past few years. In 2006, the national paediatric ART regime was changed from Triomune 40 (T40) to Triomune 30 (T30). This was a cross-sectional study conducted at the paediatric ART clinic in Blantyre (Malawi) from September 2006 to July 2007. Children taking T30 for > 6 weeks from each dosing weight band (<5, 5-<8, 8-<12, 12-<14, 14-<19, 19-<26, 26-<30 and > or = 30 kg) were recruited. Plasma drug concentration, CD4+ T-cell count and HIV viral load were measured. A total of 74 children were analysed. The median nevirapine (NVP) concentration was 7.35 mg/l. A therapeutic NVP plasma level > 3 mg/l was found in 62 (87.8%) children. A subtherapeutic NVP level (< 3 mg/l) occurred significantly more often in children treated with T30 doses between one-quarter tablet once daily and one-half tablet twice daily (P=0.035). Median prescribed NVP dose was 342 mg/m(2)/day, but 13 (17.6%) children received a dose below the recommended dose of 300 mg/m(2)/day. Compared with a historical control, the median prescribed NVP dose was increased (from 243 to 342 mg/m(2)/day). Our findings indicate that with the Malawian T30-based ART regime, the majority (87.8%) of children in the study group achieved a therapeutic NVP level. However, treatment remains suboptimal especially for young children receiving T30 dosages less than or equal to one-half tablets twice daily and child appropriate formulations are warranted.

  9. Hydroxyl ionic liquids: the differentiating effect of hydroxyl on polarity due to ionic hydrogen bonds between hydroxyl and anions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiguo; Qi, Xiujuan; Ma, Xiangyuan; Lu, Liujin; Deng, Youquan

    2010-03-25

    The polarity of a series of ionic liquids (ILs) based on hydroxyethyl-imidazolium moiety with various anions ([PF(6)], [NTf(2)], [ClO(4)], [DCA], [NO(3)], [AC], and [Cl]) and their corresponding nonhydroxyl ILs was investigated by solvatochromic dyes and fluorescence probe molecules. Most of the nonhydroxyl ILs exhibit anion-independent polarity with similar E(T)(30) in the narrow range of 50.7-52.6 kcal/mol, except [EMIm][AC] (49.7 kcal/mol). However, the polarity of the hydroxyl ILs covers a rather wide range (E(T)(30) = 51.2-61.7 kcal/mol) and is strongly anion-dependent. According to their E(T)(30) or E(T)(33) values, the hydroxyl ILs can be further classified into the following three groups: (Iota) acetate-based hydroxyl ILs [HOEMIm][AC] exhibit polarity scale (E(T)(30) = 51.2 kcal/mol) similar to short chain alcohol and fall in the range of the nonhydroxyl ILs; (II) Hydroxyl ILs containing anions [NO(3)], [DCA], and [Cl] exhibit comparable polarity (E(T)(30) = 55.5-56.9 kcal/mol), moderately higher than those of their nonhydroxyl ILs; (III) Hydroxyl ILs containing anions [PF(6)], [NTf(2)], and [ClO(4)] possess unusual "hyperpolarity" (E(T)(30) = 60.3-61.7 kcal/mol) close to protic ILs and water. Kamlet-Taft parameters and density functional theory calculations indicated that the greatly expanded range of polarity of hydroxyl ILs is correlated to an intramolecular synergistic solvent effect of the ionic hydrogen-bonded HBD/HBA complexes generated by intrasolvent HBD/HBA association between the anions and the hydroxyl group on cations, wherein hydroxyl group exhibits a significant differentiating effect on the strength of H-bonding and thus the polarity. Spiropyran-merocyanine equilibrium acted as a model polarity-sensitive reaction indeed shows obviously polarity-dependent solvatochromism, photochromism, and thermal reversion in hydroxyl ILs.

  10. [Protective effect of verapamil and dopamine against cyclosporine-induced vasoconstriction in isolated glomeruli in rats].

    PubMed

    L'Azou, B; Lagroye, I; Plande, J; Lakhdar, B; Cambar, J

    1992-12-02

    Cyclosporin A (CsA)-induced nephrotoxicity is characterized by dramatic changes in glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow, largely limiting the clinical use of this drug. The vasoconstrictive response of CsA could explain, in part, these hemodynamic alterations. The present study compares the area changes in rat-isolated glomeruli incubated with CsA alone or after pre-treatment with verapamil and dopamine. In verapamil-pretreated CsA-intoxicated glomeruli, size decrease was reduced (-1.5 percent at T10, -3.1 percent at T20 and -4.8 percent at T30), when compared with CsA alone (-4.7 percent at T10, -10.1 percent at T20 and -12 percent at T30). The results obtained with dopamine were similar. In conclusion, verapamil and dopamine can be regarded as fair protective agents against CsA-induced vasoconstriction in rat-isolated glomeruli.

  11. Pulsed magnetic field study of the spin gap in intermediate valence compound SmB 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flachbart, K.; Bartkowiak, M.; Demishev, S.; Gabani, S.; Glushkov, V.; Herrmannsdorfer, T.; Moshchalkov, V.; Shitsevalova, N.; Sluchanko, N.

    2009-10-01

    In this work, we report the behavior of electrical resistivity of SmB 6 at temperatures between 2.2 and 70 K in pulsed magnetic fields up to 54 T. A strong negative magnetoresistance was detected with increasing magnetic field, when lowering the temperature in the range T<30 K. We show that the amplitude of negative magnetoresistance reaches its maximum dR/R~70% at B=54 T, in the vicinity of phase transition occurring in this strongly correlated electron system at TC~5 K. The crossover from negative magnetoresistance to positive magnetoresistance found at intermediate temperatures at T>30 K is discussed within the framework of exciton-polaron model of local charge fluctuations in SmB 6 proposed by Kikoin and Mishchenko. It seems that these exciton-polaron in-gap states are influenced both by temperature and magnetic field.

  12. Measurement of the shape of the boson-transverse momentum distribution in pp --> Z/gamma* --> e+e- + X events produced at square root s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-03-14

    We present a measurement of the shape of the Z/gamma* boson transverse momentum (q(T)) distribution in pp --> Z/gamma* --> e(+)e(-) + X events at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using 0.98 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data are found to be consistent with the resummation prediction at low q(T), but above the perturbative QCD calculation in the region of q(T)>30 GeV/c. Using events with q(T)<30 GeV/c, we extract the value of g(2), one of the nonperturbative parameters for the resummation calculation. Data at large boson rapidity y are compared with the prediction of resummation and with alternative models that employ a resummed form factor with modifications in the small Bjorken x region of the proton wave function.

  13. Investigation to Study the Aerodynamic Ship Wake Turbulence Generated by a DD963 Destroyer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    me up of tw quartz covered platinum split- film elements operated at constant te erature, which produce a heat - flux differential when placed in a flow...application of smoke and helium/soap bubble flow visual- ization techniques. on the basis of having either met or exceeded the contractural ...TUFBULENCE TEST PROBES IN FLUX 2.54 M ABOVE SHIP yAW ANGLE (#) t30 DEGREES; DIRECTIO SHIP ROLL ANGLE (0) al DEGREES WIND TUMMU vZLOCITY 20 XTS. XTY

  14. Sequences of Citrus Tristeza Virus Separated in Time and Space Are Essentially Identical†

    PubMed Central

    Albiach-Martí, María R.; Mawassi, Munir; Gowda, Siddarame; Satyanarayana, Tatineni; Hilf, Mark E.; Shanker, Savita; Almira, Ernesto C.; Vives, María C.; López, Carmelo; Guerri, Jose; Flores, Ricardo; Moreno, Pedro; Garnsey, Steve M.; Dawson, William O.

    2000-01-01

    The first Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genomes completely sequenced (19.3-kb positive-sense RNA), from four biologically distinct isolates, are unexpectedly divergent in nucleotide sequence (up to 60% divergence). Understanding of whether these large sequence differences resulted from recent evolution is important for the design of disease management strategies, particularly the use of genetically engineered mild (essentially symptomless)-strain cross protection and RNA-mediated transgenic resistance. The complete sequence of a mild isolate (T30) which has been endemic in Florida for about a century was found to be nearly identical to the genomic sequence of a mild isolate (T385) from Spain. Moreover, samples of sequences of other isolates from distinct geographic locations, maintained in different citrus hosts and also separated in time (B252 from Taiwan, B272 from Colombia, and B354 from California), were nearly identical to the T30 sequence. The sequence differences between these isolates were within or near the range of variability of the T30 population. A possible explanation for these results is that the parents of isolates T30, T385, B252, B272, and B354 have a common origin, probably Asia, and have changed little since they were dispersed throughout the world by the movement of citrus. Considering that the nucleotide divergence among the other known CTV genomes is much greater than those expected for strains of the same virus, the remarkable similarity of these five isolates indicates a high degree of evolutionary stasis in some CTV populations. PMID:10888625

  15. Past and future of a century old Citrus tristeza virus collection: a California citrus germplasm tale.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinbo; Bozan, Orhan; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Dang, Tyler; Rucker, Tavia; Yokomi, Raymond K; Lee, Richard F; Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Krueger, Robert R; Bash, John; Greer, Greg; Diaz, James; Serna, Ramon; Vidalakis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates collected from citrus germplasm, dooryard and field trees in California from 1914 have been maintained in planta under quarantine in the Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP), Riverside, California. This collection, therefore, represents populations of CTV isolates obtained over time and space in California. To determine CTV genetic diversity in this context, genotypes of CTV isolates from the CCPP collection were characterized using multiple molecular markers (MMM). Genotypes T30, VT, and T36 were found at high frequencies with T30 and T30+VT genotypes being the most abundant. The MMM analysis did not identify T3 and B165/T68 genotypes; however, biological and phylogenetic analysis suggested some relationships of CCPP CTV isolates with these two genotypes. Phylogenetic analysis of the CTV coat protein (CP) gene sequences classified the tested isolates into seven distinct clades. Five clades were in association with the standard CTV genotypes T30, T36, T3, VT, and B165/T68. The remaining two identified clades were not related to any standard CTV genotypes. Spatiotemporal analysis indicated a trend of reduced genotype and phylogenetic diversity as well as virulence from southern California (SC) at early (1907-1957) in comparison to that of central California (CC) isolates collected from later (1957-2009) time periods. CTV biological characterization also indicated a reduced number and less virulent stem pitting (SP) CTV isolates compared to seedling yellows isolates introduced to California. This data provides a historical insight of the introduction, movement, and genetic diversity of CTV in California and provides genetic and biological information useful for CTV quarantine, eradication, and disease management strategies such as CTV-SP cross protection.

  16. Using Abstraction in Explicity Parallel Programs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    used as a design language, and our presumption is that programmers can be trained to recognize good designs at the speci- fication level, and then...Definition. Two histories H1 and H 2 are equivalent if for every thread T, HIIT = H21T. 30 When a history contains pending invocations, a complication...instead, parallelism is added to the program level by overlapping the Pi’s, then the periods of low utilization in one P may be masked , effectively

  17. Stochastic and Centrifuge Modelling of Jointed Rock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-31

    1b Maxmu Tensile Prnia StesVcos fSeie * t 30󈨏 Preextin- Frcue and -ne a Wine Crck Subec toUix.Cmrsie* tesi Vetia Direction- Noe Hg eniesteslee i oe...34 30 - .-- rCo - 0.0024, A - 0.785 C"P.. ow’ tod 0. A 30 avo . exp. 25 - A 30comp, 20 13 45 avo . oxp. "o AN 45 comp. is A. O 60 avo xp) to,’ 10 60 comp

  18. Using a fluorescence quenching method to detect DNA adsorption onto single-walled carbon nanotube surfaces.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Kazuo; Sato, Shizuma; Bustamante, Gilbert; Ye, Jing Yong

    2017-09-12

    Surface modification of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with DNA molecules has attracted much attention in recent years to increase SWNT solubility and make various SWNT-based nanobiodevices. Therefore, there is a critical need to quantify the interaction between DNA molecules and SWNT surfaces, particularly the intermediate structures during DNA adsorption. In this study, we demonstrate the ability to detect the adsorption of DNA oligomers on SWNT surfaces by fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescein-labelled, 30mer, thymine oligonucleotides (F-T30) were employed as a fluorescent probe to study the interaction of DNA with SWNTs. A clear quenching effect was observed when F-T30 was adsorbed onto SWNT surfaces. Using this method, the amount of DNA adsorbed onto the SWNT surfaces was measured under different sonication conditions to correlate adsorption efficiency with sonication strength and duration. When a bath-type sonicator was used, mild adsorption of F-T30 on SWNT surfaces was observed. Furthermore, a two-step adsorption was observed in this condition. In contrast, we observed rapid adsorption of F-T30 to SWNT surfaces at the higher sonication amplitude (60% maximal) using a probe-type sonicator, while only slight adsorption of DNA molecules was observed at the lower amplitude (20% maximal). Our data revealed that the quenching effect can be used to evaluate DNA adsorption onto SWNT surfaces. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) were conducted to provide complementary information on the DNA-SWNT nanoconjugates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ultralight Metallic Panels with Textile Cores Designed for Blast Mitigation and Load Retention/Topologically Structured Materials: Blast and Multifunctional Implementations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Assembly of machined truss core and braze coated face sheets Ti-6AI-4V face sheet k—- /. A J TiCuNi-60 brazing alloy * /"" coating on face...fabrication of these structures can be extended from steel and aluminum alloys to high performance materials such as metal matrix composites and...sheets (d) Face sheets attachment ( brazing ) Heat Applied pressure is Heat T = 975 C, Applied pressure = 0.01-0 05 MPa, t = 30 min

  20. Long Rest Interval Promotes Durable Testosterone Responses in High-Intensity Bench Press.

    PubMed

    Scudese, Estevão; Simão, Roberto; Senna, Gilmar; Vingren, Jakob L; Willardson, Jeffrey M; Baffi, Matheus; Miranda, Humberto

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of rest period duration (1 vs. 3 minute between sets) on acute hormone responses to a high-intensity and equal volume bench press workout. Ten resistance-trained men (25.2 ± 5.6 years; 78.2 ± 5.7 kg; 176.7 ± 5.4 cm; bench press relative strength: 1.3 ± 0.1 kg per kilogram of body mass) performed 2 bench press workouts separated by 1 week. Each workout consisted of 5 sets of 3 repetitions performed at 85% of 1 repetition maximum, with either 1- or 3-minute rest between sets. Circulating concentrations of total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT), cortisol (C), testosterone/cortisol ratio (TT/C), and growth hormone (GH) were measured at preworkout (PRE), and immediately (T0), 15 minutes (T15), and 30 minutes (T30) postworkout. Rating of perceived exertion was recorded before and after each set. For TT, both rest lengths enhanced all postexercise verifications (T0, T15, and T30) compared with PRE, with 1 minute showing decreases on T15 and T30 compared with T0. For FT, both 1- and 3-minute rest protocols triggered augmentations on distinct postexercise moments (T0 and T15 for 1 minute; T15 and T30 for 3-minute) compared with PRE. The C values did not change throughout any postexercise verification for either rests. The TT/C ratio was significantly elevated for both rests in all postexercise moments compared with PRE. Finally, GH values did not change for both rest lengths. In conclusion, although both short and long rest periods enhanced acute testosterone values, the longer rest promoted a long-lasting elevation for both TT and FT.

  1. Past and future of a century old Citrus tristeza virus collection: a California citrus germplasm tale

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinbo; Bozan, Orhan; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Dang, Tyler; Rucker, Tavia; Yokomi, Raymond K.; Lee, Richard F.; Folimonova, Svetlana Y.; Krueger, Robert R.; Bash, John; Greer, Greg; Diaz, James; Serna, Ramon; Vidalakis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates collected from citrus germplasm, dooryard and field trees in California from 1914 have been maintained in planta under quarantine in the Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP), Riverside, California. This collection, therefore, represents populations of CTV isolates obtained over time and space in California. To determine CTV genetic diversity in this context, genotypes of CTV isolates from the CCPP collection were characterized using multiple molecular markers (MMM). Genotypes T30, VT, and T36 were found at high frequencies with T30 and T30+VT genotypes being the most abundant. The MMM analysis did not identify T3 and B165/T68 genotypes; however, biological and phylogenetic analysis suggested some relationships of CCPP CTV isolates with these two genotypes. Phylogenetic analysis of the CTV coat protein (CP) gene sequences classified the tested isolates into seven distinct clades. Five clades were in association with the standard CTV genotypes T30, T36, T3, VT, and B165/T68. The remaining two identified clades were not related to any standard CTV genotypes. Spatiotemporal analysis indicated a trend of reduced genotype and phylogenetic diversity as well as virulence from southern California (SC) at early (1907–1957) in comparison to that of central California (CC) isolates collected from later (1957–2009) time periods. CTV biological characterization also indicated a reduced number and less virulent stem pitting (SP) CTV isolates compared to seedling yellows isolates introduced to California. This data provides a historical insight of the introduction, movement, and genetic diversity of CTV in California and provides genetic and biological information useful for CTV quarantine, eradication, and disease management strategies such as CTV-SP cross protection. PMID:24339822

  2. International Hydrogenase Conference (7th) Held at the University of Reading on August 24th to 29th 2004.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-19

    Seibert T30 j The Tat protein transport system required for the biogenesis of extracytoplasmic hydrogenases. 13 7th International Hydrogenase Conference...Physiology and Nutrition , Polish Academy of Sciences, Jablonna, Poland. I Institute of Animal Physiology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Kosice, Slovakia...nuclear, but not of mitochondrial, Fe/S proteins. Narl p-depleted cells do not accumulate iron in mitochondria , distinguishing these cells from mutants

  3. Degradation of cyanide by Trichoderma mutants constructed by restriction enzyme mediated integration (REMI).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoying; Xu, Shufa; Liu, Lixing; Chen, Jie

    2007-11-01

    REMI technique was used to construct mutants with improved cyanide-degradation ability from biocontrol fungus Trichoderma koningii strain T30. The plasmid pV2 transformation was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analysis. Out of 21 transformants, 15 single-copied transformants (71.4%) were found. To compare enzyme activities of rhodanese and cyanide hydratase, T. atroviride T23, T. harzianum T21 and their transformants constructed by REMI previously were also included. Transformants TkB6 (0.173 micromols thiocyanate formed min(-1)mg protein(-1)) from T30 and TaK1 (0.174 micromols thiocyanate formed min(-1)mg protein(-1)) from T23 showed higher rhodanese activity than other transformants and their wild strains. TkA9 (5.53 micromols formamide formed h(-1)mg protein(-1)) from T30 and Th64 (5.35 micromols formamide formed h(-1)mg protein(-1)) from T21 had higher cyanide hydratase activity than other transformants and their wild strains.

  4. Characterization of the mixture of genotypes of a Citrus tristeza virus isolate by reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Ananthakrishnan, G; Venkataprasanna, T; Roy, Avijit; Brlansky, R H

    2010-03-01

    A multiplex real-time PCR assay was developed to detect and quantify the Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genotypic mixture present in infected plants. CTV isolate FS627, a complex Florida isolate containing T36, T30 and VT genotypes and its aphid transmitted subisolates was used. The relative quantitative assay was carried out using specific primers and probes developed from the genotypes of three CTV virus isolates and included the coat protein region of isolate T36 and the 5' end, ORF 1a and ORF 2 region of isolates T36, T30 and VT. Among the three genotypes present in the aphid transmitted subisolates, the T30 genotype showed higher overall relative quantitation in all specific regions compared to other isolates. The profiles of the some aphid transmitted subisolates were different from the parent source from which they transmitted. The 2(-DeltaDeltaCt) method (the amount of target, normalized to an endogenous control and relative to a calibrator) was used to analyze the relative titers of the three reference genotypes in the aphid transmitted plants infected with FS627. This protocol enabled assessments of CTV genetic diversity in the aphid transmitted subisolates. This simple quantitative assay was sensitive, efficient, and took less time than other existing methods. This relative quantitative assay will be a reliable tool for diagnosis, detection and genetic diversity studies on CTV. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation of cyprodinil and fludioxonil in leaching water under solar irradiation.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, José; Ruiz, Encarnación; Hellín, Pilar; Flores, Pilar; Navarro, Simón

    2011-11-01

    The efficiency of ZnO and TiO(2) suspensions in the photocatalytic degradation of two fungicides (cyprodinil and fludioxonil) in leaching water was investigated. The experiments were carried out at pilot plant scale using compound parabolic collectors under natural sunlight. The blank experiments for both irradiated compounds solutions showed that both oxides strongly enhanced the removal of the fungicides. The addition of an oxidant (Na(2)S(2)O(8)) to the ZnO or TiO(2) increased the rate of photooxidation. The degradation of cyprodinil and fludioxonil followed first order kinetics according to the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. Complete degradation of both fungicides was achieved within 4 h (t(30W)=18 min) when treated with illuminated ZnO. The disappearance time (DT(75)), when referred to the normalized illumination time (t(30W)), was lower than 40 and 550 min (t(30W)=2 and 40 min) for both fungicides using ZnO or TiO(2), respectively. ZnO appeared to be more effective in cyprodinil and fludioxonil oxidation than TiO(2) probably due to its nonstoichiometry.

  6. Rat lung reactivity to natural and man-made fibrous silicates following short-term exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lemaire, I. ); Dionne, P.G. ); Nadeau, D.; Dunnigan, J. )

    1989-04-01

    The inflammatory and fibrogenic potential of three naturally occurring and two man-made industrial minerals were compared. Groups of five rats each received respectively a single intratracheal instillation of saline (control), UICC chrysotile B asbestos, short chrysotile 4T30, attapulgite, xonotlite (a calcium silicate), and Fiberfrax (an aluminum silicate) at doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg. One month after the treatment, assessment of lung morphology and bronchoalveolar lavage were performed on each animal. Under these conditions, UICC chrysotile B at all doses tested (1, 5, and 10 mg) induced fibrotic lesions in bronchiolar tissues while short chrysotile 4T30 (1, 5, and 10 mg) caused focal accumulation of inflammatory cells in the alveolar structures but no apparent fibrosis. Compared to these positive reactions with different fibrogenicity, xonotlite caused minimal inflammatory reactions detectable only at high dose (10 mg) and by bronchoalveolar analysis. By contrast, the rat lung reacted more significantly to attapulgite and Fiberfrax although the tissue reaction differed considerably for these two materials. While attapulgite, at doses up to 10 mg caused minimal reactions characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration mainly in the alveolar structures, Fiberfrax at 1 mg and higher caused significant granulomatous reactions and the appearance of early fibrosis. Overall the order of lung biological reactivity observed for the various silicates was xonotlite T30

  7. Changes in serum markers indicative of health effects in vineyard workers following exposure to the fungicide mancozeb: an Italian study.

    PubMed

    Colosio, Claudio; Fustinoni, Silvia; Corsini, Emanuela; Bosetti, Cristina; Birindelli, Sarah; Boers, Daisy; Campo, Laura; La Vecchia, Carlo; Liesivuori, Jyrki; Pennanen, Sirpa; Vergieva, Tatjana; Van Amelsvoort, Ludovic G P M; Steerenberg, Peter; Swaen, Gerard M H; Zaikov, Christo; Van Loveren, Henk

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the health effects induced by exposure to the fungicide mancozeb in Italian vineyard workers. Ninety-three Italian subjects entered the study - 48 vine-growers intermittently exposed to mancozeb and 45 healthy controls. The subjects were investigated three times: before the seasonal application of pesticides (T0), 30 days after the beginning of the application period (T30), and 45 days after T0 (T45). At T0 the comparison between agricultural workers and controls showed a higher prevalence of cold or flu symptoms, a statistically significant lower percentage of monocytes, higher absolute count of T lymphocytes, CD4 and natural killer cells, and lower plasma levels of IgA and IgM in workers. Such differences were not confirmed at T30 and T45. In fact at T30 in exposed workers, besides a significant increase of urinary ethylenethiourea, confirming mancozeb exposure, T lymphocytes, CD4 and natural killer cells, IgA and IgM returned to values comparable to those observed in controls. Moreover, no other differences in clinical signs, haematological, and immune parameters, such as the immune functional capability evaluated as a response to hepatitis B vaccination, was observed. Altogether the differences between exposed and controls were not consistently correlated to any clinical impairment and suggest that the seasonal application of mancozeb does not pose a significant health risk to exposed subjects.

  8. A class V chitin synthase gene, chsA is essential for conidial and hyphal wall strength in the fungus Colletotrichum graminicola (Glomerella graminicola).

    PubMed

    Amnuaykanjanasin, Alongkorn; Epstein, Lynn

    2003-04-01

    The Colletotrichum graminicola tagged mutant T30 has conidia that burst and hyphal tips that swell in media with low osmotic pressure. The disrupted gene in T30 was identified as a class V chitin synthase (CSV) "chsA," which has an open reading frame of 1783 amino acids and two introns that are 52 and 54 bp. C. graminicola has one copy of chsA and no other highly homologous class V CHSs. Reverse transcriptase PCR indicated that the T30 mutant does not express the chsA transcript fragment in the conserved region in CSVs. Complementation of the mutant with chsA indicates that the encoded protein is responsible for approximately 29% of the chitin in conidial walls, is essential for conidial wall strength in media with high water potential and contributes to strength of hyphal tips. Analysis of the aligned deduced amino acid sequences of the 10 fully sequenced CSVs suggests that they are in two subgroups.

  9. Effects of ropivacaine combined with morphine at 0.15 and 0.2 mg kg(-1) in bitches undergoing epidural anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Verônica Batista de; Araújo, Marcelo Augusto de; Ferreira, Gabriel Thadeu Nogueira Martins; Fonseca, Mariana Werneck; Arruda, André Moreira Martins; ShiChen, Lu; Oliva, Valéria Nobre Leal de Souza

    2015-03-01

    To investigate cardiorespiratory effects and serum concentration of ropivacaine combined with morphine at different doses. Sixteen healthy adult female dogs weighting 9.8 ± 4.1 kg were included in the study. Twenty minutes after being premedicated with acepromazine and midazolam, the animals were randomly assigned to receive an epidural injection according to each group: RM0.15 = ropivacaine + morphine (0.15 mg kg(-1)) and RM0.2 = ropivacaine + morphine (0.2 mg kg(-1)). Variables recorded consisted of: heart rate and cardiac rhythm, respiratory rate, oxyhemoglobin saturation, inspired oxygen fraction, end-tidal carbon dioxide tension, systolic, mean and diastolic arterial pressures, serum cortisol, plasma ropivacaine and morphine. SAP, MAP and DAP were significantly increased at TPR in RM0.15 but returned to normal values at the end of the procedure. Arterial pH was decreased in T30 and TESu in both groups and also returned to acceptable ranges at TR. Both PaO2 and PaCO2 were increased along the duration period of the epidural blockade (T30 and TESu) and returned to acceptable values at TR. Serum cortisol was lower at TB, T30 and TR when compared to TESu. The procedures were performed safely and minimal changes in cardiovascular and respiratory variables.

  10. Effect of seminal plasma vesicular structures in canine frozen-thawed semen.

    PubMed

    Goericke-Pesch, S; Hauck, S; Failing, K; Wehrend, A

    2015-12-01

    Membrane vesicles (MVs) in the ejaculate have been identified in various species and are considered to affect membrane fluidity due to their characteristic molecular composition. Addition of MV to human frozen semen has been shown to improve post-thaw motility. Similarly, a beneficial effect has been suggested for frozen equine semen. As post-thaw canine semen quality varies widely between dogs, the aim of our study was to test for the effect of addition of canine MV on post-thaw semen quality in dogs. Semen samples from 10 male dogs were purified from MV and prepared for freezing. In experiment 1, three groups were compared: sperm frozen (1) with MV (S1); (2) without MV, but MV added immediately after thawing (S2); and (3) without MV (C). Semen analysis included computer-assisted sperm analysis of motility parameters immediately after thawing (t0), after 10 (t10) and 30 minutes (t30), % living sperm, % membrane intact, % morphologically normal sperm (all t0 and t30). Computer-assisted sperm analysis motility distance and velocity parameters (all P < 0.05) and % living sperm (P < 0.001) were significantly affected by treatment with a temporary increase of distance and velocity parameters at t0 to t10, but a significant decrease of the aforementioned parameters at t30 in samples with MV. In experiment 2, different MV protein concentrations added after thawing were compared: 0.05 mg, 0.1 mg, and 0.2 mg/mL. Computer-assisted sperm motility analysis was performed at t0, t10, and t30. No differences between MV concentrations were identified, only a significant interaction between effect of treatment and time for progressive motility (P < 0.01). Our study identified a short-term beneficial effect of canine MV on post-thaw distance and velocity parameters, whereas at t30 progressive motility, motility parameters and % living sperm were reduced in samples with MV compared to C. The results point to species-specific differences regarding the MV effect on frozen

  11. Latent effect of passive static stretching on driver clubhead speed, distance, accuracy, and consistent ball contact in young male competitive golfers.

    PubMed

    Gergley, Jeffrey C

    2010-12-01

    This investigation was conducted to determine the effect of 2 different warm-up treatments over time on driver clubhead speed, distance, accuracy, and consistent ball contact in young male competitive golfers. Two supervised warm-up treatments, an active dynamic warm-up with golf clubs (AD) and a 20-minute total body passive static stretching routine plus an identical AD warm-up (PSS), were applied before each performance testing session using a counterbalanced design on nonconsecutive days. Immediately after the AD treatment, subjects were instructed to hit 3 full swing golf shots with their driver with 1-minute rest between trials. Immediately after the PSS treatment, subjects were instructed to hit 3 full-swing golf shots with their driver at t0 and thereafter at t15, t30, t45, and t60 minutes with 1-minute rest between swing trials to determine any latent effects of PSS on golf driver performance measures. Results of paired t-tests revealed significant (p < 0.05) decreases in clubhead speed at t0 (-4.92%), t15 (-2.59%), and t30 (-2.19%) but not at t45 (-0.95) or t60 (-0.99). Significant differences were also observed in distance at t0 (-7.26%), t15 (-5.19%), t30 (-5.47%), t45 (-3.30%), and t60 (-3.53%). Accuracy was significantly impaired at t0 (61.99%), t15 (58.78%), t30 (59.46%), and t45 (61.32%) but not at t60 (36.82%). Finally, consistent ball contact was significantly reduced at t0 (-31.29%), t15 (-31.29%), t30 (-23.56%), t45 (-27.49%), and t60 (-15.70%). Plausible explanations for observed performance decrements include a more compliant muscle-tendon unit (MTU) and an altered neurological state because of the PSS treatment. Further, the findings of this study provide evidence supporting the theory that the mechanical properties of the MTU may recover at a faster rate than any associated neurological changes. The results of this inquiry strongly suggest that a total-body passive static stretching routine should be avoided before practice or competition in

  12. Coal combustion waste management at landfills and surface impoundments 1994-2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.; Ranek, N. L.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-09-08

    On May 22, 2000, as required by Congress in its 1980 Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Regulatory Determination on Wastes from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels. On the basis of information contained in its 1999 Report to Congress: Wastes from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels, the EPA concluded that coal combustion wastes (CCWs), also known as coal combustion by-products (CCBs), did not warrant regulation under Subtitle C of RCRA, and it retained the existing hazardous waste exemption for these materials under RCRA Section 3001(b)(3)(C). However, the EPA also determined that national regulations under Subtitle D of RCRA were warranted for CCWs that are disposed of in landfills or surface impoundments. The EPA made this determination in part on the basis of its findings that 'present disposal practices are such that, in 1995, these wastes were being managed in 40 percent to 70 percent of landfills and surface impoundments without reasonable controls in place, particularly in the area of groundwater monitoring; and while there have been substantive improvements in state regulatory programs, we have also identified gaps in State oversight' (EPA 2000). The 1999 Report to Congress (RTC), however, may not have reflected the changes in CCW disposal practices that occurred since the cutoff date (1995) of its database and subsequent developments. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the EPA discussed this issue and decided to conduct a joint DOE/EPA study to collect new information on the recent CCW management practices by the power industry. It was agreed that such information would provide a perspective on the chronological adoption of control measures in CCW units based on State regulations. A team of experts from the EPA, industry, and DOE (with support from Argonne National Laboratory) was established to develop a mutually acceptable approach for collecting and analyzing data on CCW

  13. Altitude distribution of tropospheric ozone over the Northern Hemisphere during 1996, simulated with a chemistry-general circulation model at two different horizontal resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kentarchos, A. S.; Roelofs, G. J.; Lelieveld, J.

    2001-01-01

    The spatial/temporal variability of the vertical distribution of tropospheric ozone in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) over a period of 1 year (1996) is studied with a coupled chemistry-general circulation model. The model is used at two different horizontal resolutions (T30: 3.75°×3.75° and T63: 1.875°×1.875°) and is nudged towards European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts analyses for 1996, using a four-dimensional assimilation technique (newtonian relaxation), to enable direct comparisons of observations and model results. Overall, the model reproduces satisfactorily the magnitude and seasonal variability of the vertical ozone distribution observed at six selected locations. Discrepancies occur, however, at remote locations in the subtropical Atlantic and tropical Pacific where ozone concentrations throughout the free troposphere are overestimated by the fourth version of the European Centre Hamburg Model (ECHAM4)-T30. A considerable improvement is evident at T63, which can be attributed, at least partially, to less efficient transport of ozone precursors from the polluted continents at higher resolution. In the upper troposphere/tropopause region, short-term ozone variations are better reproduced at higher resolution. The origin of tropospheric ozone is examined by decomposing its seasonal variation in the model into ozone from the stratosphere and ozone produced within the troposphere. Differences in the NH annual tropospheric ozone budget for 1996, between T30 and T63 mean amounts are relatively small. The tropospheric ozone budget is dominated by photochemical production and destruction (2716 and 2684 Tg, respectively), while the net ozone flux from the stratosphere is estimated to be 436 Tg, and dry deposition is estimated to be 487 Tg.

  14. Effects of reduction of inspired oxygen fraction or application of positive end-expiratory pressure after an alveolar recruitment maneuver on respiratory mechanics, gas exchange, and lung aeration in dogs during anesthesia and neuromuscular blockade.

    PubMed

    De Monte, Valentina; Grasso, Salvatore; De Marzo, Carmelinda; Crovace, Antonio; Staffieri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of reduction of inspired oxygen fraction (Fio(2)) or application of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) after an alveolar recruitment maneuver (ARM) in minimizing anesthesia-induced atelectasis in dogs. 30 healthy female dogs. During anesthesia and neuromuscular blockade, dogs were mechanically ventilated under baseline conditions (tidal volume, 12 mL/kg; inspiratory-to-expiratory ratio, 1:2; Fio(2), 1; and zero end-expiratory pressure [ZEEP]). After 40 minutes, lungs were inflated (airway pressure, 40 cm H(2)O) for 20 seconds. Dogs were then exposed to baseline conditions (ZEEP100 group), baseline conditions with Fio(2) reduced to 0.4 (ZEEP40 group), or baseline conditions with PEEP at 5 cm H(2)O (PEEP100 group; 10 dogs/group). For each dog, arterial blood gas variables and respiratory system mechanics were evaluated and CT scans of the thorax were obtained before and at 5 (T5) and 30 (T30) minutes after the ARM. Compared with pre-ARM findings, atelectasis decreased and Pao(2):Fio(2) ratio increased at T5 in all groups. At T30, atelectasis and oxygenation returned to pre-ARM findings in the ZEEP100 group but remained similar to T5 findings in the other groups. At T5 and T30, lung static compliance in the PEEP100 group was higher than values in the other groups. Application of airway pressure of 40 cm H(2)O for 20 seconds followed by Fio(2) reduction to 0.4 or ventilation with PEEP (5 cm H(2)O) was effective in diminishing anesthesia-induced atelectasis and maintaining lung function in dogs, compared with the effects of mechanical ventilation providing an Fio(2) of 1.

  15. Investigating the use of in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy to explore DNA-mediated gold nanoparticle growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguy, Amanda

    Engineering nanoparticles with desired shape-dependent properties is the key to many applications in nanotechnology. Although many synthetic procedures exist to produce anisotropic gold nanoparticles, the dynamics of growth are typically unknown or hypothetical. In the case of seed-mediated growth in the presence of DNA into anisotropic nanoparticles, it is not known exactly how DNA directs growth into specific morphologies. A series of preliminary experiments were carried out to contribute to the investigation of the possible mechanism of DNA-mediated growth of gold nanoprisms into gold nanostars using liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Imaging in the liquid phase was achieved through the use of a liquid cell platform and liquid cell holder that allow the sample to be contained within a “chip sandwich” between two electron transparent windows. Ex situ growth experiments were performed using Au-T30 NPrisms (30-base thymine oligonucleotide-coated gold nanoprisms) that are expected to grow into gold nanostars. Growth to form these nanostars were imaged using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and liquid cell STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy). An attempt to perform in situ growth experiments with the same Au-T30 nanoprisms revealed challenges in obtaining desired morphology results due to the environmental differences within the liquid cell compared to the ex situ environment. Different parameters in the experimental method were explored including fluid line set up, simultaneous and alternating reagent addition, and the effect of different liquid cell volumes to ensure adequate flow of reagents into the liquid cell. Lastly, the binding affinities were compared for T30 and A30 DNA incubated with gold nanoparticles using zeta potential measurements, absorption spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). It was previously reported thymine bases have a lower binding affinity to gold surfaces than

  16. Investigating the use of in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nguy, Amanda

    2016-02-19

    Engineering nanoparticles with desired shape-dependent properties is the key to many applications in nanotechnology. Although many synthetic procedures exist to produce anisotropic gold nanoparticles, the dynamics of growth are typically unknown or hypothetical. In the case of seed-mediated growth in the presence of DNA into anisotropic nanoparticles, it is not known exactly how DNA directs growth into specific morphologies. A series of preliminary experiments were carried out to contribute to the investigation of the possible mechanism of DNA-mediated growth of gold nanoprisms into gold nanostars using liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Imaging in the liquid phase was achieved through the use of a liquid cell platform and liquid cell holder that allow the sample to be contained within a “chip sandwich” between two electron transparent windows. Ex situ growth experiments were performed using Au-T30 NPrisms (30-base thymine oligonucleotide-coated gold nanoprisms) that are expected to grow into gold nanostars. Growth to form these nanostars were imaged using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and liquid cell STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy). An attempt to perform in situ growth experiments with the same Au-T30 nanoprisms revealed challenges in obtaining desired morphology results due to the environmental differences within the liquid cell compared to the ex situ environment. Different parameters in the experimental method were explored including fluid line set up, simultaneous and alternating reagent addition, and the effect of different liquid cell volumes to ensure adequate flow of reagents into the liquid cell. Lastly, the binding affinities were compared for T30 and A30 DNA incubated with gold nanoparticles using zeta potential measurements, absorption spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). It was previously reported thymine bases have a lower binding affinity to gold surfaces than adenine

  17. Rat lung reactivity to natural and man-made fibrous silicates following short-term exposure.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, I; Dionne, P G; Nadeau, D; Dunnigan, J

    1989-04-01

    The inflammatory and fibrogenic potential of three naturally occurring and two man-made industrial minerals were compared. Groups of five rats each received respectively a single intratracheal instillation of saline (control), UICC chrysotile B asbestos, short chrysotile 4T30, attapulgite, xonotlite (a calcium silicate), and Fiberfrax (an aluminum silicate) at doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg. One month after the treatment, assessment of lung morphology and bronchoalveolar lavage were performed on each animal. Under these conditions, UICC chrysotile B at all doses tested (1, 5, and 10 mg) induced fibrotic lesions in bronchiolar tissues while short chrysotile 4T30 (1, 5, and 10 mg) caused focal accumulation of inflammatory cells in the alveolar structures but no apparent fibrosis. Compared to these positive reactions with different fibrogenicity, xonotlite caused minimal inflammatory reactions detectable only at high dose (10 mg) and by bronchoalveolar analysis. By contrast, the rat lung reacted more significantly to attapulgite and Fiberfrax although the tissue reaction differed considerably for these two materials. While attapulgite, at doses up to 10 mg caused minimal reactions characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration mainly in the alveolar structures, Fiberfrax at 1 mg and higher caused significant granulomatous reactions and the appearance of early fibrosis. Overall the order of lung biological reactivity observed for the various silicates was xonotlite much less than attapulgite less than short chrysotile 4T30 less than Fiberfrax less than UICC chrysotile B. These observations indicate that Fiberfrax, attapulgite, and, to a lesser extent, xonotlite are biologically active within the time span studied and potentially deleterious for lung tissue.

  18. Percutaneous nerve stimulation in chronic neuropathic pain patients due to spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kopsky, David Jos; Ettema, Frank Willem Leo; van der Leeden, Marike; Dekker, Joost; Stolwijk-Swüste, Janneke Marjan

    2014-03-01

    The long-term prognosis for neuropathic pain resolution following spinal cord injury (SCI) is often poor. In many SCI patients, neuropathic pain continues or even worsens over time. Thus, new treatment approaches are needed. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility and effect of percutaneous (electrical) nerve stimulation (P(E)NS) in SCI patients with chronic neuropathic pain. In 18 weeks, 12 P(E)NS treatments were scheduled. Assessment with questionnaires was performed at baseline (T0), after 8 weeks (T8), 18 weeks (T18), and 12 weeks post-treatment (T30). From 26 screened patients, 17 were included. In total, 91.2% questionnaires were returned, 2 patients dropped out, and 4.2% of the patients reported minor side effects. Pain scores on the week pain diary measured with the numerical rating scale improved significantly at T8, from 6.5 at baseline to 5.4, and were still significantly improved at T18. Pain reduction of ≥ 30% directly after a session was reported in 64.6% sessions. In total, 6 patients experienced reduction in size of the pain areas at T18 and T30, with a mean reduction of 45.8% at T18 and 45.3% at T30. P(E)NS is feasible as an intervention in SCI patients and might have a positive effect on pain reduction in a part of this patient group. © 2013 The Authors Pain Practice © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  19. Cocaine Up-regulation of the Norepinephrine Transporter Requires Threonine 30 Phosphorylation by p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; Arapulisamy, Obulakshmi; Shippenberg, Toni S .; Ramamoorthy, Sammanda; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D.

    2011-01-01

    The norepinephrine (NE) transporter (NET) regulates NE signaling by rapidly clearing synaptic NE. Cocaine binds NET and modulates NE transport. These actions contribute to rewarding effects and abuse liability of cocaine. Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades is implicated in cocaine-induced neuroadaptations. However, the role of MAPK and the mechanisms involved in cocaine modulation of NET are not clear. Acute intra-peritoneal injections of cocaine (20 mg/kg body weight) to rats resulted in increased NE uptake by prefrontal cortex (PFC) synaptosomes with a parallel increase in the surface expression of endogenous NET. Cocaine also enhanced the immunoreactivity of phospho-p38 MAPK in the PFC synaptosomes without affecting the total p38 MAPK. In vitro cocaine (30–50 μm) treatment of rat PFC synaptosomes increased native NET function, surface expression, and phosphorylation in a manner sensitive to p38 MAPK inhibition by PD169316. We next examined cocaine-elicited effects on wild-type human NET (hNET) expressed heterologously in human placental trophoblast cells to gain more insights into the mechanisms involved. Cocaine treatment of hNET expressing human placental trophoblast cells up-regulated the function, surface expression, and phosphorylation of hNET in a PD169316-sensitive manner. In addition, cocaine inhibited constitutive endocytosis of hNET. Mutational analysis of serine and threonine residues revealed that substitution of threonine 30, located at the amino terminus of hNET with alanine (T30A-hNET), abolished cocaine-induced up-regulation of NET function, surface expression, and phosphorylation. Furthermore, cocaine did not alter T30A-hNET endocytosis. These studies identify a novel molecular mechanism that cocaine-activated p38 MAPK-mediated phosphorylation of NET-T30 dictates surface NET availability, and hence, NE transport. PMID:21498515

  20. Cocaine up-regulation of the norepinephrine transporter requires threonine 30 phosphorylation by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; Arapulisamy, Obulakshmi; Shippenberg, Toni S; Ramamoorthy, Sammanda; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D

    2011-06-10

    The norepinephrine (NE) transporter (NET) regulates NE signaling by rapidly clearing synaptic NE. Cocaine binds NET and modulates NE transport. These actions contribute to rewarding effects and abuse liability of cocaine. Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades is implicated in cocaine-induced neuroadaptations. However, the role of MAPK and the mechanisms involved in cocaine modulation of NET are not clear. Acute intra-peritoneal injections of cocaine (20 mg/kg body weight) to rats resulted in increased NE uptake by prefrontal cortex (PFC) synaptosomes with a parallel increase in the surface expression of endogenous NET. Cocaine also enhanced the immunoreactivity of phospho-p38 MAPK in the PFC synaptosomes without affecting the total p38 MAPK. In vitro cocaine (30-50 μM) treatment of rat PFC synaptosomes increased native NET function, surface expression, and phosphorylation in a manner sensitive to p38 MAPK inhibition by PD169316. We next examined cocaine-elicited effects on wild-type human NET (hNET) expressed heterologously in human placental trophoblast cells to gain more insights into the mechanisms involved. Cocaine treatment of hNET expressing human placental trophoblast cells up-regulated the function, surface expression, and phosphorylation of hNET in a PD169316-sensitive manner. In addition, cocaine inhibited constitutive endocytosis of hNET. Mutational analysis of serine and threonine residues revealed that substitution of threonine 30, located at the amino terminus of hNET with alanine (T30A-hNET), abolished cocaine-induced up-regulation of NET function, surface expression, and phosphorylation. Furthermore, cocaine did not alter T30A-hNET endocytosis. These studies identify a novel molecular mechanism that cocaine-activated p38 MAPK-mediated phosphorylation of NET-T30 dictates surface NET availability, and hence, NE transport.

  1. The Breaking of Ocean Surface Waves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-06

    only in a qualitative sense and the mathematics are quite complex . : Cokelet (1977) has summarized most of the attempts to develop numerical... complex velocity potential. Then 9.. the complex Bernoulli equation and the kinematic equations at the free surface are integrated in time. A time...proifi l 41’i1o’ 4 k 611 .0 t30t t , Frigure- 12tti A’~ # coprio of a sefsiia anlyi aproiato of an Overturning gravity wave with the observed profile in

  2. Deep sequencing and analysis of small RNAs in sweet orange grafted on sour orange infected with two citrus tristeza virus isolates prevalent in Sicily.

    PubMed

    Licciardello, Grazia; Scuderi, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Rosario; Giampetruzzi, Annalisa; Russo, Marcella; Lombardo, Alessandro; Raspagliesi, Domenico; Bar-Joseph, Moshe; Catara, Antonino

    2015-10-01

    Two representative isolates of a citrus tristeza virus population in Sicily, SG29 (aggressive) and Bau282 (mild), were sequenced via viral small RNAs (vsRNA) produced in budlings of sweet orange grafted on sour orange. Phylogenetic relationships with Mediterranean and exotic isolates revealed that SG29 clustered within the "VT-Asian" subtype, whereas Bau282 belonged to the cluster T30. The study confirms that molecular data need to be integrated with bio-indexing in order to obtain adequate information for risk assessment.

  3. CPm gene diversity in field isolates of Citrus tristeza virus from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Oliveros-Garay, Oscar Arturo; Martinez-Salazar, Natalhie; Torres-Ruiz, Yanneth; Acosta, Orlando

    2009-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence diversity of the CPm gene from 28 field isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) was assessed by SSCP and sequence analyses. These isolates showed two major shared haplotypes, which differed in distribution: A1 was the major haplotype in 23 isolates from different geographic regions, whereas R1 was found in isolates from a discrete region. Phylogenetic reconstruction clustered A1 within an independent group, while R1 was grouped with mild isolates T30 from Florida and T385 from Spain. Some isolates contained several minor haplotypes, which were very similar to, and associated with, the major haplotype.

  4. The genotypes of citrus tristeza virus isolates from China revealed by sequence analysis of multiple molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guan-Wei; Pan, Song; Wang, Guo-Ping; Tang, Min; Liu, Yong; Yang, Fan; Hong, Ni

    2013-01-01

    The genotypes of ten citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates from central China were determined by examining multiple molecular markers (MMMs) using 11 primer pairs. The results revealed that one isolate contained a single T30 genotype, two isolates contained a single VT genotype, and the other seven isolates were mixtures of two or more genotypes. Sequence analysis of amplified MMMs showed a high genetic diversity in Chinese CTV populations. The genotypes resembling T36, RB and B165 were identified from Chinese CTV isolates for the first time. Our results suggest that genotype assignment of CTV cannot be based solely on the amplification profiles of MMMs, and sequencing of MMMs is required.

  5. Priming of mononuclear cells with a combination of growth factors enhances wound healing via high angiogenic and engraftment capabilities.

    PubMed

    Jin, Enze; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Sung-Whan

    2013-12-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that a specific combination of growth factors enhances the survival, adhesion and angiogenic potential of mononuclear cells (MNCs). In this study, we sought to investigate the changes of the angiogenic potential of MNCs after short-time priming with a specific combination of growth factors. MNCs were isolated using density gradient centrifugation and incubated with a priming cocktail containing epidermal growth factor (EGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, FMS-like tyrosine kinase (Flt)-3L , Angiopoietin (Ang)-1, granulocyte chemotactic protein (GCP)-2 and thrombopoietin (TPO) (all 400 ng/ml) for 15, 30 and 60 min. Wounds in nonobese diabetic-severe combined immune deficiency (NOD-SCID) mice were created by skin excision followed by cell transplantation. We performed a qRT-PCR analysis on the growth factor-primed cells. The angiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, FGF-2, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and interleukin (IL)-8 and the anti-apoptotic factors IGF-1 and transforming growth factor-β1 were significantly elevated in the MNCs primed for 30 min. (T30) compared with the non-primed MNCs (T0). The scratch wound assay revealed that T30- conditioned media (CM) significantly increased the rate of fibroblast-mediated wound closure compared with the rates from T0-CM and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC)-CM at 20 hrs. In vivo wound healing results revealed that the T30-treated wounds demonstrated accelerated wound healing at days 7 and 14 compared with those treated with T0. The histological analyses demonstrated that the number of engrafted cells and transdifferentiated keratinocytes in the wounds were significantly higher in the T30-transplanted group than in the T0-transplanted group. In conclusion, this study suggests that short-term priming of MNCs with growth factors might be alternative therapeutic option for cell

  6. Anomalous Schottky specific heat and structural distortion in ferromagnetic PrAl2.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Arjun K; Paudyal, D; Mudryk, Y; Gschneidner, K A; Pecharsky, V K

    2013-05-03

    Unique from other rare earth dialuminides, PrAl(2) undergoes a cubic to tetragonal distortion below T = 30 K in a zero magnetic field, but the system recovers its cubic symmetry upon the application of an external magnetic field of 10 kOe via a lifting of the 4f crystal field splitting. The nuclear Schottky specific heat in PrAl(2) is anomalously high compared to that of pure Pr metal. First principles calculations reveal that the 4f crystal field splitting in the tetragonally distorted phase of PrAl(2) underpins the observed unusual low temperature phenomena.

  7. STS-39 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, SPAS II IBSS computer animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-39 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Shuttle Pallet Satellite (SPAS) II Infrared Background Signature Survey (IBSS) and Chemical Release Observation (CRO) experiment illustrated with computer graphics. Views include SPAS II (in foreground) deployed by OV-103 (27771), orbital maneuvering system (OMS) primary reaction control system (PRCS) plume firings after SPAS II deployment (27772), Chemical Release Observation (CRO) experiment in orbit (27773), and CRO deployed from OV-103 payload bay (27774). View (27772) used in the STS-39 Press Information (PUB 3546-V Rev 4-91) p27, April 1991 and for T-30 flight directors' briefing.

  8. Signature of surface state coupling in thin films of the topological Kondo insulator SmB6 from anisotropic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaviv Petrushevsky, M.; Rout, P. K.; Levi, G.; Kohn, A.; Dagan, Y.

    2017-02-01

    The temperature and thickness dependencies of the in-plane anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) of SmB6 thin films are reported. We find that the AMR changes sign from negative (ρ||<ρ⊥ ) at high temperatures to positive (ρ||>ρ⊥ ) at low temperatures. The temperature, Ts, at which this sign change occurs, decreases with increasing film thickness t and Ts vanishes for t > 30 nm. We interpret our results in the framework of a competition between two components: a negative bulk contribution and a positive surface AMR.

  9. In Situ Observation of Reversible Nanomagnetic Switching Induced by Electric Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-12

    run using saturation magnetization (Msat) ) 1.360 × 106 A/m, exchange stiffness (A) ) 1.4 × 10-11 J /m, and thickness ( t ) ) 30 nm, values independently...P. A.; Ahn, J . S.; Guha, S.; Cheong, S. W. Nature 2004, 429 (6990), 392–395. (4) Lottermoser, T .; Lonkai, T .; Amann, U.; Hohlwein, D.; Ihringer, J ...19), 92. (7) Chung, T . K.; Keller, S.; Carman, G. P. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2009, (13), 94. (8) Molegraaf, H. J . A.; Hoffman, J .; Vaz, C. A. F.; Gariglio, S

  10. 25. 'HANGAR SHEDS TRUSSES DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. 'HANGAR SHEDS - TRUSSES - DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS - PLANT AREA; MODIFICATION CENTER NO. 1, DAGGETT, CALIFORNIA.' Sections and details of trusses, ironwork, and joints, as modified to show ridge joint detail. As built. This blueline also shows the fire suppression system, added in orange pencil for 'Project 13: Bldgs. T-30, T-50, T-70, T-90' at a later, unspecified date. Contract no. W509 Eng. 2743; File no. 555/84, revision B, dated August 24, 1942. No sheet number. - Barstow-Daggett Airport, Hangar Shed No. 4, 39500 National Trails Highway, Daggett, San Bernardino County, CA

  11. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in p[over -->] + p[over -->] collisions at sqrt[s]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Callner, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Clarke, R F; Codrington, M J M; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Elhalhuli, E; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Grube, B; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kurnadi, P; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lapointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, A; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, C; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qattan, I A; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Tram, V N; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Wada, M; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, J; Wu, Y; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Yurevich, V I; Zawisza, M; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2008-06-13

    We report a new STAR measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A(LL) for inclusive jet production at midrapidity in polarized p + p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt[s]=200 GeV. The data, which cover jet transverse momenta 5T)<30 GeV/c, are substantially more precise than previous measurements. They provide significant new constraints on the gluon spin contribution to the nucleon spin through the comparison to predictions derived from one global fit to polarized deep-inelastic scattering measurements.

  12. Studies on bacteriocin (thermophilin T) production by Streptococcus thermophilus ACA-DC 0040 in batch and fed-batch fermentation modes.

    PubMed

    Aktypis, Anastasios; Tychowski, Matheus; Kalantzopoulos, George; Aggelis, George

    2007-08-01

    Growth conditions that support bacteriocin (thermophilin T) production by Streptococcus thermophilus ACA-DC 0040 were identified. Synthesis of thermophilin T occurred during primary metabolic growth, while its specific rate of synthesis seemed to be optimal at T = 30 degrees C. Thermophilin T activity rapidly decreased in the stationary phase, especially at high growth temperature (i.e. T = 42 degrees C). In media with high content of complex nitrogen sources, high amounts of bacteriocin were detected in the growth environment, while about an 8-fold increase of thermophilin T titer and a 2-fold increase of specific synthesis rate was achieved when a fed-batch fermentation mode was applied.

  13. Pressure and concentration dependence of the quantum corrections to the resistivity in CuTi alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dyckhoff, W.; Fritsch, G.; Luescher, E. )

    1990-02-08

    We present a full set of pressure- and temperature-dependent resistivity data for the regions 0 < P < 10 GPa, 1.4 < T < 30 K, and 43 < x < 88, Here, x denotes the concentration of the amorphous alloy Cu{sub x}Ti{sub 100-x}. These results are analyzed in terms of a temperature-independent Boltzmann resistivity and additive quantum corrections, such as the quantum interference and the Coulomb correction. It is shown how the various parameters involved in these contributions vary with pressure. Certain arguments are given in an effort to understand qualitatively the observed behavior.

  14. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in vec p + vec p collisions at sqrt s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Coll

    2007-10-07

    We report a new STAR measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL} for inclusive jet production at mid-rapidity in polarized p + p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 200 GeV. The data, which cover jet transverse momenta 5 < p{sub T} < 30 GeV/c, are substantially more precise than previous measurements. They provide significant new constraints on the gluon spin contribution to the nucleon spin through the comparison to predictions derived from one global fit of polarized deep-inelastic scattering measurements.

  15. Use of Holographic Linear Fringe Linearization Interferometry (FLI) for Detection of Defects.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    System. The irradiance in the hologram plane of Figure I-1 is H(x) = [eikxsin(go/f) + f(x,t)12 , (I-i) where . denotes a Fourier transform. If a prism of...THEN 800 l.,, L20 100 400 1:’ 2+( SfR (4+(X+S)* 2+I’+..2) ) 410 ... 2fS0R(4+(X-S)**2+Y**2) 4 0I k.- TURNa:0𔃺 Y=Yf5 191:t0 1=0 2) .’ IF Y= THEN 8,0 t30

  16. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in p(pol) + p(pol) collisions at {radical}{ovr s} = 200 GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; STAR Collaboration; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.

    2008-01-01

    We report a new STAR measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL} for inclusive jet production at midrapidity in polarized p+p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical} = 200 GeV. The data, which cover jet transverse momenta 5 < p{sub T} < 30 GeV/c, are substantially more precise than previous measurements. They provide significant new constraints on the gluon spin contribution to the nucleon spin through the comparison to predictions derived from one global fit to polarized deep-inelastic scattering measurements.

  17. Erratum to: Measurement of jet multiplicity distributions in $$\\mathrm {t}\\overline{\\mathrm {t}}$$ production in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 7\\,\\text {TeV} $$

    DOE PAGES

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2015-05-19

    Table 4 was incorrectly captioned in the originally published version. The correct caption is ‘Normalised differential tt- production cross section as a function of the number of additional jets with pT > 30 GeV in the lepton+jets channel. Furthermore, the statistical, systematic, and total uncertainties are also shown. Finally, the main experimental and model systematic uncertainties are displayed: JES and the combination of renormalisation and factorisation scales, jet-parton matching threshold, and hadronisation (in the table “Q2/Match./Had.”)’.

  18. Complete mitochondrial genome of the ocellate river stingray (Potamotrygon motoro).

    PubMed

    Song, Hong-Mei; Mu, Xi-Dong; Wei, Min-Xia; Wang, Xue-Jie; Luo, Jian-Ren; Hu, Yin-Chang

    2015-01-01

    We determined the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Potamotrygon motoro from South American freshwater stingrays. The total length of P. motoro mitogenome is 17,448 bp, which consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and a control region, with the genome organization and gene order being identical to that of the typical vertebrate. The overall nucleotide composition is 32.3% A, 24.4% T, 30.5% C and 12.8% G. These data will provide useful molecular information for phylogenetic relationships within the family Potamotrygonidae species.

  19. STS-39 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, SPAS II IBSS computer animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-39 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Shuttle Pallet Satellite (SPAS) II Infrared Background Signature Survey (IBSS) and Chemical Release Observation (CRO) experiment illustrated with computer graphics. Views include SPAS II (in foreground) deployed by OV-103 (27771), orbital maneuvering system (OMS) primary reaction control system (PRCS) plume firings after SPAS II deployment (27772), Chemical Release Observation (CRO) experiment in orbit (27773), and CRO deployed from OV-103 payload bay (27774). View (27772) used in the STS-39 Press Information (PUB 3546-V Rev 4-91) p27, April 1991 and for T-30 flight directors' briefing.

  20. High Durability Missile Domes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    LE"VEL ~i SWHIGH DURABILITY MISSILE DOMES.) SRaytheon Company ,4 Research Division "Waltham, MA 02154 F R. / man, E. /Maguire J. / pappi / D- ,ec s t_...30 Sept 1978 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPqprNUMBER S-2439 " 7. AUTHOR(s) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) R. Gentilman E. Maguire N00014-76-C-0635 J. Pappis 9...Arthur M. Diness is the project scientist. The work was carried out at Raytheon Research Division, Advanced Materials Department. Dr. J. Pappis is the

  1. Optical and transport study of Ge wells and dots on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokhinson, L. P.; Tsui, D. C.; Benton, J. L.; Xie, Y.-H.

    1998-03-01

    Despite intensive studies of self-assembled Ge-rich islands on Si there remain unanswered questions about their energy structure. We performed both optical and transport measurements of molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) grown Ge layers embedded in Si. An increase of Ge layer thickness from 2Å to 10Å changes the growth mechanism from two-dimensional (2D) growth of strained wells to three-dimensional (3D) Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. Photoluminescence spectroscopy shows a clear transition from 2D to 3D growth at ~ 5Åin agreement with measurements reported by Schittenhelm et.al.(P. Schittenhelm, M. Gail, J. Brunner, J. F. Nutzel, and G. Abstraiter, APL 67), 1292 (1995). Far-infrared spectroscopy shows a strong photocurrent response at ≈200 meV. The temperature dependence of the resistance at T<30 K is best described by variable range hopping, while at T>30 K, the transport is thermally activated with an activation energy of ~35 meV.

  2. Response of DNA fragments to potentiometric sensors studied using HPLC.

    PubMed

    Nagels, Luc J; Everaert, Joseph; Bohets, Hugo; Del Favero, Jurgen; Goossens, Dirk; Robbens, Johan; Pietraszkiewicz, Marek; Pietraszkiewicz, Oksana

    2007-08-01

    Potentiometric sensors are studied as viable candidates for the construction of high throughput DNA arrays. For preliminary investigations, such sensors were used in an HPLC setup in the present work. This avoided errors due to ionic contaminants or additives in the commercial samples. The oligonucleotides dT(10), dT(20) and dT(30) were used as test substances. The potentiometric sensors were of the coated wire type, containing PVC, DOP, MTDDACl and a synthetic podand urea receptor. The HPLC system consisted of a reversed phase column eluted with a phosphate buffer, triethylammoniumacetate (TEAA), and an acetonitrile gradient. Molar responses and sensitivities increased with increasing chain length of oligonucleotides, yielding detection limits as low as 10(-6)M (dT(30), injected concentration). The slopes of the calibration graphs were at least 23 mV/decade (dT(10)), which was much higher than expected. The results are discussed in view of the potential use of this sensor type in high throughput microarrays.

  3. Structured dietary intervention to facilitate weight loss after bariatric surgery: A randomized, controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kalarchian, Melissa A; Marcus, Marsha D; Courcoulas, Anita P; Lutz, Calvin; Cheng, Yu; Sweeny, Gina

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the potential utility of a structured dietary intervention to assist bariatric surgery patients with weight management. Participants who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery 1 year previously were randomly assigned to a structured dietary intervention incorporating portion-controlled foods (intervention, n = 20) or a comparison group (control, n = 20). Both groups received instruction in behavioral weight loss (one 60-min session) followed by four monthly coaching telephone calls. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 4 months (post-intervention), and 6 months. Participants were 85% female and 80% White. Average age was 46.9 (11.1) years, and body mass index was 31.3 (5.4) kg/m(2) at enrollment. Percent weight change from enrollment was significantly greater for intervention compared with control participants at 4 months [-4.56% vs. -0.13%, t(30)  = -3.29, P = 0.003] and 6 months [-4.07% vs. -0.14%, t(31)  = -2.03, P = 0.05]. Change in average daily calorie intake was greater among intervention compared with control [-108 vs. 116, t(30)  = -2.01, P = 0.05] at 4 months only. A structured dietary intervention increased weight loss and reduced calorie intake when initiated 1 year following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. This approach holds promise for optimizing postsurgery lifestyle change. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  4. Preventing opioid-induced nausea and vomiting: Rest your head and close your eyes?

    PubMed Central

    Heuser, Fabian; Schulz, Christian; Sağlam, Murat; Ramaioli, Cecilia; Heuberger, Maria; Wagner, Klaus J.; Jahn, Klaus; Schneider, Erich; Brandt, Thomas; Glasauer, Stefan; Lehnen, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    Although opioid-induced nausea and vomiting (OINV) is common and debilitating, its mechanism is still unclear. Recently, we suggested that opioids affect semicircular canal function and that this leads to a mismatch between canal input and other sensory information during head motion, which triggers OINV. Here, we assess if visual input is relevant for this mismatch. In a randomized-controlled crossover study 14 healthy men (26.9±3.4 years, mean±SD) were tested twice, once blindfolded and once with eyes open, with at least one-day washout. The opioid remifentanil was administered intravenously (0.15 μg/kg/min) for 60 minutes. After a thirty-minutes resting period, subjects’ head and trunk were passively moved. Nausea was rated before remifentanil start (T0), before the movement intervention (T30) and after 60 minutes (T60) of administration. At rest (T0, T30), median nausea ratings were zero whether subjects were blindfolded or not. Movement triggered nausea independently of visual input (nausea rating 1.5/3.0 (median/interquartile range) in the blindfolded, 2.5/6 in the eyes-open condition, χ2(1) = 1.3, p = 0.25). As movement exacerbates OINV independently of visual input, a clash between visual and semicircular canal information is not the relevant trigger for OINV. To prevent OINV, emphasis should be put on head-rest, eye-closure is less important. PMID:28291842

  5. Effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-1 on the blood pressure, heart rate, mesenteric blood flow, and glycemic responses to intraduodenal glucose in healthy older subjects.

    PubMed

    Trahair, Laurence G; Horowitz, Michael; Hausken, Trygve; Feinle-Bisset, Christine; Rayner, Christopher K; Jones, Karen L

    2014-12-01

    Studies relating to the cardiovascular effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and its agonists, which slow gastric emptying, have not discriminated between fasting and postprandial, blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). To determine whether exogenous GLP-1 modulates the effects of an intraduodenal (ID) glucose infusion on BP, HR, and splanchnic blood flow in healthy older subjects. A double-blind randomized trial was conducted. Community-dwelling residents attended a clinical research laboratory. Ten healthy "older" subjects (9 male, 1 female; age 73.2 ± 1.5 y) were studied. Intravenous infusion of GLP-1 (0.9 pmol/kg/min), or saline (0.9%) for 90 min (t = -30-60 min). Between t = 0-60 min, ID glucose was infused at 3 kcal/min. BP, HR, superior mesenteric artery (SMA) flow, blood glucose, and serum insulin were measured. During the fasting period (t = -30-0 min), GLP-1 had no effect on BP or HR. In response to ID glucose (t = 0-60 min), systolic BP decreased (P < .001), and both HR (P < .001) and SMA flow (P < .05) increased, on both days. GLP-1 attenuated the maximum decrease in systolic BP (P < .05), tended to increase HR (P = .09), and increased SMA flow (P < .01). GLP-1 diminished the glycemic response (P < .05). In healthy older subjects, acute administration of GLP-1 attenuates the hypotensive response to ID glucose, and potentiates the increase in SMA flow.

  6. Acoustical study on the impact of sound absorptions, distances of workstations, and height of partitions in open plan offices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utami, Sentagi Sesotya; Al Rochmadi, Nurwachid; Sarwono, R. Sugeng Joko

    2015-09-01

    Low partitions are commonly found in open-plan offices as the boundaries of workstation islands or groups of workstations. This room layout often cause excessive speech intelligibility, which creates work distraction and reduce the quality of speech privacy. Sound absorption, distance between workstations, and height of partitions are factors that were investigated on their impact to the room acoustics condition, referred to ISO 3382-3:2012. Observed room acoustics conditions were speech intelligibility, speech privacy, and distraction to concentrate in work using parameters of T30, C50, and RASTI. Parameters of T30, C50, and RASTI were used to evaluate the speech intelligibility. The level of speech privacy was indicated by parameter of privacy distance (rP). Distraction to concentrate in work was indicated by distraction distance (rD). The results from 2 experimental setups show that sound absorption, distance between workstations, and partitions influenced the level of speech intelligibility, speech privacy, and distraction to concentration at work. The value of C50 decline, by 76.9% and 77.4%, each for scenario A and B. RASTI decline, by 18.7% and 14.8%. Difference in percentage of speech privacy, by 6% and 11%. Difference in percentage of distraction to concentration at work, by 79% and 70%.

  7. Measurement of Prompt $$\\psi(2S) \\to J/\\psi$$ Yield Ratios in Pb-Pb and $p-p$ Collisions at $$\\sqrt {s_{NN}}=$$ 2.76 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-12-31

    The ratio between the prompt ψ(2S) and J/ψ yields, reconstructed via their decays into μ+μ-, is measured in Pb-Pb and p-p collisions at √sNN=2.76 TeV. Likewise, the analysis is based on Pb-Pb and p-p data samples collected by CMS at the Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 150 μb-1 and 5.4 pb-1, respectively. The double ratio of measured yields (Nψ(2S)/NJ/ψ)Pb-Pb/(Nψ(2S)/NJ/ψ)p-p is computed in three Pb-Pb collision centrality bins and two kinematic ranges: one at midrapidity, |y|<1.6, covering the transverse momentum range 6.5T<30 GeV/c, and the other at forward rapidity, 1.6<|y|<2.4, extending to lower pT values, 3T<30 GeV/c. Furthermore,more » the centrality-integrated double ratio changes from 0.45±0.13(stat)±0.07(syst) in the first range to 1.67±0.34(stat)±0.27(syst) in the second. This difference is most pronounced in the most central collisions.« less

  8. Influence of bouncing and assisted autogenic drainage on acid gastro-oesophageal reflux in infants.

    PubMed

    Van Ginderdeuren, Filip; Vandenplas, Yvan; Deneyer, Michel; Vanlaethem, Sylvie; Buyl, Ronald; Kerckhofs, Eric

    2017-08-01

    To determine the influence of modern airway clearance techniques using assisted autogenic drainage (AAD), whether or not combined with bouncing, on acid gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) in infants <1 year. In this controlled trial with intra-subject design infants were studied using oesophageal pH monitoring over 24 h, during which they received one 15 min session of bouncing, AAD or bouncing combined with AAD (BAAD). The number of reflux episodes (RE) and the refluxindex (RI) were the outcome measures. The results obtained during (T15) and 15 min after the intervention (T30) were compared to a period of 15 min before treatment (T0). The results of 150 infants, evenly distributed over the three treatment groups, were analyzed. No significant differences were found in number of RE at T15 and T30 compared to T0 in the bouncing group (P = 0.42), the AAD group (P = 0.14), and the BAAD group (P = 0.91). RI was significantly lower in the AAD group at T15 compared to T0 (P < 0.01). No differences in RI were found in the bouncing group (P = 0.28), nor in the BAAD group (P = 0.81). Bouncing, AAD and BAAD do not induce, nor aggravate acid GOR in infants under the age of 1 year. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Relative Modification of Prompt ψ (2 S ) and J /ψ Yields from p p to PbPb Collisions at √{sN N }=5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Strauss, J.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Chekhovsky, V.; Dvornikov, O.; Dydyshka, Y.; Emeliantchik, I.; Litomin, A.; Makarenko, V.; Mossolov, V.; Stefanovitch, R.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Zykunov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Alderweireldt, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Skovpen, K.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Vannerom, D.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Cimmino, A.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Khvastunov, I.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Schöfbeck, R.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Krintiras, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Aldá Júnior, W. 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P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; González Fernández, J. R.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Sanchez Cruz, S.; Suárez Andrés, I.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras De Saa, J. R.; Curras, E.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cepeda, M.; Cerminara, G.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; De Gruttola, M.; De Roeck, A.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dorney, B.; du Pree, T.; Duggan, D.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Everaerts, P.; Fartoukh, S.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Gulhan, D.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kirschenmann, H.; Knünz, V.; Kornmayer, A.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krammer, M.; Lange, C.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Meijers, F.; Merlin, J. A.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Milenovic, P.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Sauvan, J. B.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Tosi, M.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veckalns, V.; Veres, G. I.; Verweij, M.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; De Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Zucchetta, A.; Candelise, V.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Paganis, E.; Psallidas, A.; Tsai, J. f.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Cerci, S.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kara, O.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Kiminsu, U.; Oglakci, M.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Turkcapar, S.; Zorbakir, I. S.; Zorbilmez, C.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Burns, D.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Di Maria, R.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Haddad, Y.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; James, T.; Lane, R.; Laner, C.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Penning, B.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Summers, S.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wright, J.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; West, C.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Benelli, G.; Berry, E.; Cutts, D.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Hogan, J. M.; Jesus, O.; Kwok, K. H. M.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Spencer, E.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Burns, D.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Flores, C.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mclean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Bravo, C.; Cousins, R.; Dasgupta, A.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Mccoll, N.; Saltzberg, D.; Schnaible, C.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Bouvier, E.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Ghiasi Shirazi, S. M. A.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Shrinivas, A.; Si, W.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Derdzinski, M.; Gerosa, R.; Holzner, A.; Klein, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Amin, N.; Bhandari, R.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Franco Sevilla, M.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Heller, R.; Incandela, J.; Mullin, S. D.; Ovcharova, A.; Qu, H.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Lawhorn, J. M.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Weinberg, M.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Mcdermott, K.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Tan, S. M.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Wittich, P.; Zientek, M.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cremonesi, M.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, M.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Magini, N.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Ristori, L.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strait, J.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Wu, Y.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Low, J. F.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Shchutska, L.; Sperka, D.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Diamond, B.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Santra, A.; Yohay, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Jung, K.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wang, H.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Boren, S.; Bowen, J.; Bruner, C.; Castle, J.; Forthomme, L.; Kenny, R. P.; Khalil, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Abercrombie, D.; Allen, B.; Apyan, A.; Azzolini, V.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; D'Alfonso, M.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krajczar, K.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Maier, B.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Tatar, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Kravchenko, I.; Malta Rodrigues, A.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Charaf, O.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Kumar, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Lange, D.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mei, K.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Folgueras, S.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Khatiwada, A.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Schulte, J. F.; Shi, X.; Sun, J.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. t.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Agapitos, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Delannoy, A. G.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Juska, E.; Kamon, T.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; De Guio, F.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Gurpinar, E.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Peltola, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Buchanan, J.; Caillol, C.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    The relative modification of the prompt ψ (2 S ) and J /ψ yields from p p to PbPb collisions, at the center-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV per nucleon pair, is presented. The analysis is based on p p and PbPb data samples collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2015, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 28.0 pb-1 and 464 μ b-1 , respectively. The double ratio of measured yields of prompt charmonia reconstructed through their decays into muon pairs, (Nψ (2 S )/NJ /ψ)PbPb/(Nψ (2 S )/NJ /ψ)p p , is determined as a function of PbPb collision centrality and charmonium transverse momentum pT, in two kinematic intervals: |y | <1.6 covering 6.5 T<30 GeV /c and 1.6 <|y | <2.4 covering 3 T<30 GeV /c . The centrality-integrated double ratios are 0.36 ±0.08 (stat ) ±0.05 (syst ) in the first interval and 0.24 ±0.22 (stat ) ±0.09 (syst ) in the second. The double ratio is lower than unity in all the measured bins, suggesting that the ψ (2 S ) yield is more suppressed than the J /ψ yield in the explored phase space.

  10. Shape transformation of bimetallic Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes to multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets

    DOE PAGES

    Bhattarai, Nabraj; Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-11-05

    Transformation of metallic or bimetallic (BM) nanoparticles (NPs) from one shape to another desired shape is of importance to nanoscience and nanotechnology, where new morphologies of NPs lead to enhancement of their exploitable properties. In this report, we present the shape transformation of Au octahedral NPs to Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes, followed by their transformation to nanostars and finally to multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets in the presence of T30 DNA. The weaker binding affinity of T30 DNA directs the growth to favor the formation of lower energy {111} facets, changing the morphology from nanocubes to nanostar. The nanostars, exhibiting unusualmore » intermediate morphologies, are comprised two sets of shell layers and have Au core, Pd intermediate shell, and Au outer shell. Similarly, the hexagonal platelets, which also have Au core and inner Pd shell, are encased in an external gold shell. As a result, the formation of multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets from Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes via the multilayered nanostars is monitored using scanning/transmission electron microscopy analysis.« less

  11. Shape transformation of bimetallic Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes to multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattarai, Nabraj; Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-11-05

    Transformation of metallic or bimetallic (BM) nanoparticles (NPs) from one shape to another desired shape is of importance to nanoscience and nanotechnology, where new morphologies of NPs lead to enhancement of their exploitable properties. In this report, we present the shape transformation of Au octahedral NPs to Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes, followed by their transformation to nanostars and finally to multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets in the presence of T30 DNA. The weaker binding affinity of T30 DNA directs the growth to favor the formation of lower energy {111} facets, changing the morphology from nanocubes to nanostar. The nanostars, exhibiting unusual intermediate morphologies, are comprised two sets of shell layers and have Au core, Pd intermediate shell, and Au outer shell. Similarly, the hexagonal platelets, which also have Au core and inner Pd shell, are encased in an external gold shell. As a result, the formation of multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets from Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes via the multilayered nanostars is monitored using scanning/transmission electron microscopy analysis.

  12. Chemical and physical compatibility of levalbuterol inhalation solution concentrate mixed with budesonide, ipratropium bromide, cromolyn sodium, or acetylcysteine sodium.

    PubMed

    Bonasia, Philip J; McVicar, William K; Bill, Williams; Ong, Shaowei

    2008-12-01

    Medications are frequently combined in the nebulizer cup, so it is important to determine their chemical and physical compatibility. To determine the chemical and physical compatibility of levalbuterol with ipratropium bromide, cromolyn sodium, acetylcysteine sodium, and budesonide. We mixed one dose of levalbuterol inhalation solution concentrate (1.25 mg/0.5 mL) with one dose of ipratropium bromide (0.5 mg/2.5 mL), cromolyn sodium (20 mg/2 mL), acetylcysteine sodium (1,000 mg/5 mL), or budesonide (0.5 mg/2 mL). Immediately after mixing the 2 drugs (time zero [T(0)]), and again after 30 min at room temperature (T(30)), we visually inspected the admixtures, measured their pH, and conducted high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). There was no evidence of physical incompatibility with these drugs combinations. With all the admixtures, both drugs were chemically stable for at least 30-min. Admixture pH had not changed significantly at T(30). Drug recovery was 93.2-102.6% of the initial or control values. The 2-drug admixtures we studied were compatible for at least 30 min at room temperature.

  13. Substitutions of Thr30 provide mechanistic insight into tryptophan-mediated activation of TRAP binding to RNA.

    PubMed

    Payal, Vandana; Gollnick, Paul

    2006-01-01

    TRAP is an 11 subunit RNA binding protein that regulates expression of genes involved in tryptophan biosynthesis and transport in Bacillus subtilis. TRAP is activated to bind RNA by binding up to 11 molecules of l-tryptophan in pockets formed by adjacent subunits. The precise mechanism by which tryptophan binding activates TRAP is not known. Thr30 is in the tryptophan binding pocket. A TRAP mutant in which Thr30 is substituted with Val (T30V) does not bind tryptophan but binds RNA constitutively, suggesting that Thr30 plays a key role in the activation mechanism. We have examined the effects of other substitutions of Thr30. TRAP proteins with small beta-branched aliphatic side chains at residue 30 bind RNA constitutively, whereas those with a small polar side chain show tryptophan-dependent RNA binding. Several mutant proteins exhibited constitutive RNA binding that was enhanced by tryptophan. Although the tryptophan and RNA binding sites on TRAP are distinct and are separated by approximately 7.5 A, several substitutions of residues that interact with the bound RNA restored tryptophan binding to T30V TRAP. These observations support the hypothesis that conformational changes in TRAP relay information between the tryptophan and RNA binding sites of the protein.

  14. Relative Modification of Prompt ψ(2S) and J/ψ Yields from pp to PbPb Collisions at sNN=5.02 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; ...

    2017-04-20

    The relative modification of the prompt ψ(2S) and J/ψ yields from pp to PbPb collisions, at the center-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV per nucleon pair, is presented. The analysis is based on pp and PbPb data samples collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2015, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 28.0 pb-1 and 464 μb-1, respectively. The double ratio of measured yields of prompt charmonia reconstructed through their decays into muon pairs, (Nψ(2S)/NJ/ψ)PbPb/(Nψ(2S)/NJ/ψ)pp, is determined as a function of PbPb collision centrality and charmonium transverse momentum pT, in two kinematic intervals: |y|<1.6 covering 6.5T<30 GeV/c and 1.6<|y|<2.4 covering 3T<30more » GeV/c. The centrality-integrated double ratios are 0.36 ± 0.08(stat) ±0.05 (syst) in the first interval and 0.24 ± 0.22(stat) ± 0.09 (syst) in the second. The double ratio is lower than unity in all the measured bins, suggesting that the ψ(2S) yield is more suppressed than the J/ψ yield in the explored phase space.« less

  15. Ram seminal plasma improves pregnancy rates in ewes cervically inseminated with ram semen stored at 5 °C for 24 hours.

    PubMed

    López-Pérez, A; Pérez-Clariget, R

    2012-01-15

    In this study, we compared pregnancy rates obtained using ram semen stored at 5 °C for 24 h, with ram or bull seminal plasma (SP) added to TRIS-egg yolk extender. During the breeding period, 670 adult Corriedale ewes were cervically inseminated with semen (2 × 10(8) sperm in a volume of 0.2 mL) from eight adult Corriedale rams. Ejaculates, obtained using an artificial vagina, were split into three aliquots and diluted with the following: TRIS-egg yolk based extender (T), T + 30% ram SP (R), or T + 30% bull SP (B). Samples were refrigerated and stored at 5 °C for 24 h until used for AI. Pregnancy was assessed by ultrasonography 35 to 40 d after AI. Pregnancy rate was not affected by ram (P = 0.77) or breeding period (P = 0.43), and there were no interactions between extender and ram (P = 0.94), or extender and breeding period (P = 0.24). However, there was an effect of extender (P = 0.0009) on pregnancy rates; ram SP, but not bull SP, increased pregnancy rates compared with extender without SP (49.7, 38.1, and 31.1%, for R, B, and T respectively). In conclusion, ram SP added to TRIS-egg yolk extender had a beneficial effect on the pregnancy rate of ram sperm stored at 5 °C for 24 h and used for cervical insemination of ewes.

  16. Measurement of prompt ψ(2S) to J/ψ yield ratios in Pb-Pb and p-p collisions at sqrt[sNN]=2.76  TeV.

    PubMed

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Gundacker, S; Guthoff, M; Hammer, J; Hansen, M; Harris, P; Hegeman, J; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Kousouris, K; Krajczar, K; Lecoq, P; Lourenço, C; Magini, N; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Marrouche, J; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Moortgat, F; Morovic, S; Mulders, M; Musella, P; Orsini, L; Pape, L; Perez, E; Perrozzi, L; Petrilli, A; Petrucciani, G; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Pimiä, M; Piparo, D; Plagge, M; Racz, A; Rolandi, G; Rovere, M; Sakulin, H; Schäfer, C; Schwick, C; Sharma, A; Siegrist, P; Silva, P; Simon, M; Sphicas, P; Spiga, D; Steggemann, J; Stieger, B; Stoye, M; Takahashi, Y; Treille, D; Tsirou, A; Veres, G I; Vlimant, J R; Wardle, N; Wöhri, H K; Wollny, H; Zeuner, W D; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Renker, D; Rohe, T; Bachmair, F; Bäni, L; Bianchini, L; Bortignon, P; Buchmann, M A; Casal, B; Chanon, N; Deisher, A; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Donegà, M; Dünser, M; Eller, P; Grab, C; Hits, D; Lustermann, W; 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Zhu, R Y; Azzolini, V; Calamba, A; Carlson, B; Ferguson, T; Iiyama, Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Alexander, J; Chatterjee, A; Chu, J; Dittmer, S; Eggert, N; Mirman, N; Nicolas Kaufman, G; Patterson, J R; Ryd, A; Salvati, E; Skinnari, L; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Thompson, J; Tucker, J; Weng, Y; Winstrom, L; Wittich, P; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Albrow, M; Anderson, J; Apollinari, G; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Cihangir, S; Elvira, V D; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gao, Y; Gottschalk, E; Gray, L; Green, D; Grünendahl, S; Gutsche, O; Hanlon, J; Hare, D; Harris, R M; Hirschauer, J; Hooberman, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Kaadze, K; Klima, B; Kreis, B; Kwan, S; Linacre, J; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Liu, T; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Martinez Outschoorn, V I; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Mishra, K; Mrenna, S; Musienko, Y; Nahn, S; Newman-Holmes, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sharma, S; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitbeck, A; Whitmore, J; Yang, F; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bourilkov, D; Carver, M; Cheng, T; Curry, D; Das, S; De Gruttola, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Field, R D; Fisher, M; Furic, I K; Hugon, J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kypreos, T; Low, J F; Matchev, K; Milenovic, P; Mitselmakher, G; Muniz, L; Rinkevicius, A; Shchutska, L; Snowball, M; Yelton, J; Zakaria, M; Hewamanage, S; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bochenek, J; Diamond, B; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Prosper, H; Veeraraghavan, V; Weinberg, M; Baarmand, M M; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Berry, D; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; 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Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Sharma, M; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wood, J; Clarke, C; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sturdy, J; Belknap, D A; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Friis, E; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Levine, A; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ross, I; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Vuosalo, C; Woods, N

    2014-12-31

    The ratio between the prompt ψ(2S) and J/ψ yields, reconstructed via their decays into μ+ μ-, is measured in Pb-Pb and p-p collisions at sqrt[sNN]=2.76  TeV. The analysis is based on Pb-Pb and p-p data samples collected by CMS at the Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 150  μb(-1) and 5.4  pb(-1), respectively. The double ratio of measured yields (Nψ(2S)/N(J/ψ))(Pb-Pb)/(Nψ(2S)/N(J/ψ))(p-p) is computed in three Pb-Pb collision centrality bins and two kinematic ranges: one at midrapidity, |y|<1.6, covering the transverse momentum range 6.5T<30  GeV/c, and the other at forward rapidity, 1.6<|y|<2.4, extending to lower pT values, 3T<30  GeV/c. The centrality-integrated double ratio changes from 0.45±0.13(stat)±0.07(syst) in the first range to 1.67±0.34(stat)±0.27(syst) in the second. This difference is most pronounced in the most central collisions.

  17. Selective differences in macrophage populations and monokine production in resolving pulmonary granuloma and fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, I.

    1991-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) and their production of interleukin-1-like activity (IL-1) and macrophage-derived growth factor for fibroblasts (MDGF) were examined during chronic inflammatory reactions leading to either granuloma formation or fibrosis. Groups of five rats each received, respectively, a single transtracheal injection of xonotlite, attapulgite, short chrysotile 4T30, UICC chrysotile B asbestos, or saline. One month later, such treatments induced either no change (xonotlite), granuloma formation (attapulgite and short chrysotile 4T30), or fibrosis (UICC chrysotile B). By 8 months, however, the granulomatous reactions had resolved or greatly diminished, whereas the fibrosis persisted irreversibly. Parallel examination of cell populations obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage revealed that multinucleated giant macrophages (MGC) were present in lavage fluids of animals with resolving granulomatous reactions but absent in those obtained from animals with lung fibrosis. Evaluation of monokine production by inflammatory macrophages also revealed significant differences. Enhanced production of IL-1-like activity was seen in both types of lung injury, although especially during the early stage (1 month) and decreased thereafter (8 months). By contrast, augmentation of MDGF production was observed in animals with lung fibrosis only and persisted up to 9 months. Taken together, these data indicate that production of selected cytokines, as well as AM differentiation along a given pathway, may modulate the outcome of a chronic inflammatory response. PMID:1992772

  18. Measurement of reverberation gain in an urban environment.

    PubMed

    Mijić, Miomir; Šumarac Pavlović, Dragana

    2012-09-01

    Multipath propagation within an urban area introduces a specific type of reverberation in response to sound excitation. That appearance affects the level of ambient noise produced by strong sound sources. In this paper, the signals recorded during the 1999 bombing of Belgrade were used to analyze the characteristics of reverberation in that urban environment. Six recorded signals were selected among more than 50 explosions recorded at that time. Due to the impulse nature of sound sources, the recorded signals represent the impulse responses of that area. The measured reverberation time T30 is about 7 ± 1 s in octaves between 31.5 Hz and 1 kHz. There is a variation of decay slope in time that is verified by differences between values of T10 and T30. The reverberation gain calculated from recorded signals is 2-7 dB, depending on the global position of the sound excitation point as well as its micro-location according to its position among the surrounding buildings. A variation of gain over octave bands is in the interval of approximately 3 dB. Information about reverberation gain in urban environment can be useful in a quick estimation of noise level produced by strong sound sources in a large area of urban environment.

  19. Population dynamics of a Florida Citrus tristeza virus isolate and aphid-transmitted subisolates: identification of three genotypic groups and recombinants after aphid transmission.

    PubMed

    Roy, Avijit; Brlansky, R H

    2009-11-01

    Tristeza is an important citrus disease affecting the viability and productivity of citrus worldwide. The causal agent, Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), usually occurs as a mixture of genotypes in nature, with one of the genotypes often dominating the population. CTV has a monopartite, positive-sense RNA genome of approximately 19.3 kb and exhibits over 30% diversity in the 5' half and less than 10% in the 3' half among different genotypes. A Florida CTV isolate, FS627, was selected for this study. Isolate FS627 was analyzed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using primers to three regions: 788-bp region in the 5' (697 to 1,484 nucleotides), open reading frame (ORF)1a, 696 or 718 bp from the overlapping region of the RdRp (ORF1b) and p33 (ORF2) gene, and a 672-bp major coat protein gene (ORF7) in the 3' end of the CTV genome. The presence of T36, T30, and VT genotypes in isolate FS627 was confirmed utilizing the genotype specific overlapping region of RdRp primer pairs for RT-PCR amplification followed by cloning and sequence analysis. Analysis of single-strand conformational polymorphisms and sequences of RT-PCR-amplified products of the above regions were used to determine the presence of genotypes in both the parent and aphid-transmitted (AT) subisolates. Although the parent isolate had T36 as the major genotype, T30 was the major genotype in most of the AT subisolates. Some intermediate genotypes were detected that differed from the parental or AT subisolates. These intermediate genotypes were considered to be recombinants of the T30 and T36 genotypes and also were observed in the second level of AT subisolates generated from the of first-level AT subisolates of CTV-FS627. This work provides advance information on the population dynamics in CTV mixtures and the generation of virus recombinants after aphid transmission.

  20. Studies of single walled carbon nanotubes for biomedical, mechanical and electrical applications using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiji, Roya Roientan

    The promise of carbon nanotubes to provide high-strength composites implies that carbon nanotubes might find widespread use throughout the world, implying that humans everywhere will be exposed to carbon nanotube-containing materials. In order to study what effects if any carbon nanotubes might have on the function of living cells, we have studied the association of single stranded DNA (ssDNA) with single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a first step toward understanding the interaction of SWCNTs with living matter. Studies have been performed on both as-received and chemically oxidized SWCNTs to better understand the preferential association of ssDNA with SWCNTs. Samples of T30 ssDNA:SWCNT were examined under ambient conditions using non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)) techniques. AFM images of well-dispersed, as-received SWCNTs revealed isolated features on the SWCNT that are 1.4 to 2.8 nm higher than the bare SWCNT itself. X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed these features to be T30 ssDNA in nature. Chemically oxidizing SWCNTs before dispersion by sonication is found to be an effective way to increase the number of T30 ssDNA features. A series of experiments showed that free radical scavengers such as ascorbic acid and trolox can effectively prevent the conjugation of ssDNA to SWCNTs, suggesting a significant role of free radicals in this association. Also hybridization of the complimentary ssDNA sequences showed the covalent nature of this association. These results are important to understanding the precise mechanism of ssDNA:SWCNT association and provide valuable information for future use in electronics, biosensors and as a possible drug carrier into individual cells. If SWCNTs are used in biosensor or circuit design applications then it is important to note how much energy can be stored in a SWCNT based on its shape and configuration before a permanent damage is introduced to it. Therefore a study has been done on bending SWCNTs into

  1. The effects of noise and reverberation on listening effort for adults with normal hearing

    PubMed Central

    Picou, Erin M.; Gordon, Julia; Ricketts, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of background noise and reverberation on listening effort. Four specific research questions were addressed related to listening effort. These questions were: A) with comparable word recognition performance across levels of reverberation, what are the effects of noise and reverberation on listening effort? (B) what is the effect of background noise when reverberation time is constant? (C) what is the effect of increasing reverberation from low to moderate when signal-to-noise ratio is constant? (D) what is the effect of increasing reverberation from moderate to high when signal-to-noise ratio is constant? Design Eighteen young adults (mean age 24.8 years) with normal hearing participated. A dual-task paradigm was used to simultaneously assess word recognition and listening effort. The primary task was monosyllable word recognition and the secondary task was word categorization (press a button if the word heard was judged to be a noun). Participants were tested in quiet and in background noise in three levels of reverberation (T30 < 100 ms, T30 = 475 ms, and T30 = 834 ms). Signal-to-noise ratios used were chosen individually for each participant and varied by reverberation to address the specific research questions. Results As expected, word recognition performance was negatively affected by both background noise and by increases in reverberation. Furthermore, analysis of mean response times revealed that background noise increased listening effort, regardless of degree of reverberation. Conversely, reverberation did not affect listening effort, regardless of whether word recognition performance was comparable or signal-to-noise ratio was constant. Conclusions The finding that reverberation did not affect listening effort, even when word recognition performance was degraded, is inconsistent with current models of listening effort. The reasons for this surprising finding are unclear and warrant

  2. Individual match playing time during the season affects fitness-related parameters of male professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Silva, João R; Magalhães, José F; Ascensão, António A; Oliveira, Eduardo M; Seabra, André F; Rebelo, António N

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of an entire season on physical fitness parameters (PFPs) in male professional soccer players (N = 18). Performance in 5- and 30-m sprint (T5 and T30), countermovement jump (CMJ), agility (T-test), knee extensor (KE) and knee flexor (KF) isokinetic strength, hamstrings/quadriceps strength ratio (H/Q) and bilateral differences (BDs), and Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test 2 (YYIE2) was evaluated in 4 moments (E1-E4) throughout the season. Individual match playing time was quantified. Significant improvements in CMJ and YYIE2 from E1 to E2 were observed (p < 0.05-0.01). The T30 improved from E2 to E3 (p < 0.01). The CMJ decreased from E2 to E3 and E4, and YYIE2 from E2 to E4 (p < 0.05). There were increments in the H/Q ratio and Agility from E1 and E2 to E3 and E4 (p < 0.05-0.01). Significant correlations were found in all evaluation points between different PFPs and between changes in strength parameters and agility, T5 and T30, CMJ, and YYIE2 (p < 0.05-0.001). Influence of individual match playing time was correlated to changes in T5 (E1 to E3; r = -0.705), KE nondominant leg (KEND; E2 to E3; r = 0.786), and KF (E3 to E4; r = 0.575-0.590). The interrelationship between muscle strength (e.g., KE), sprint (e.g., T5), and jump abilities (CMJ) suggests the importance of muscle strength and power training for soccer. This study suggests that the systematic participation of the players in soccer matches favors the increase and maintenance of soccer players KE and KF muscle strength and sprint ability (T5). Thus, given the unique demands of actual match play, coaches should try to incorporate a competitive friendly match in the weekly training cycle of nonstarter players.

  3. Effects of Two Different Exogenous Surfactant Preparations on Serial Peripheral Perfusion Index and Tissue Carbon Monoxide Measurements in Preterm Infants with Severe Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Terek, Demet; Gonulal, Deniz; Koroglu, Ozge Altun; Yalaz, Mehmet; Akisu, Mete; Kultursay, Nilgun

    2015-08-01

    Administration of an exogenous surfactant may affect both ventilatory and hemodynamic parameters in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Peripheral perfusion may be expected to be influenced, and serial perfusion index (PI) values may show this effect. Noninvasive transcutaneous carbon monoxide (TCO) monitoring may show RDS severity, oxidative and inflammatory stress, and response to surfactant treatment. This randomized controlled nonblinded study was performed in 30 preterm infants with RDS, treated with poractant alfa (n = 15) or beractant (n = 15); 18 preterm infants without RDS served as a control group. Oxygenation and hemodynamic parameters were recorded and compared through the first 6 hours of treatment. PI and TCO values were measured prior to (Tp), immediately after (T0), and at 5 minutes (T5), 30 minutes (T30), 60 minutes (T60), and 360 minutes (T360) after the bolus surfactant administration. The mean arterial pressure, oxygenation index, pH, and lactate levels were recorded simultaneously. Both study groups had lower Tp PI and higher Tp TCO levels than controls. Both surfactant preparations improved the PI, TCO, mean arterial pressure, oxygenation index, pH, and lactate levels at the end point of T360. However, the median Tp PI value of 1.3 first decreased to 0.86 at T0 (P < 0.001), and then it increased to 0.99 at T5 (p < 0.001) and to 1.25 at T30 (p = 0.037). The median Tp TCO value of 3 decreased to 2, 1.5, 0, and 0 at T0, T5, T30, and T60, respectively (p < 0.001). PI more quickly recovered to Tp values (30 minutes vs. 60 minutes) and reached the control group values (30 minutes vs. 360 minutes) with beractant compared to that with poractant alfa. TCO recovered to Tp values in both groups at the same time (5 minutes vs. 5 minutes), but reached the control group values more quickly (5 minutes vs. 30 minutes) with poractant alfa than with beractant. Patients with RDS had poor perfusion, and PI improved with both surfactant

  4. Time of day affects heart rate recovery and variability after maximal exercise in pre-hypertensive men.

    PubMed

    Brito, Leandro; Peçanha, Tiago; Tinucci, Taís; Silva-Junior, Natan; Costa, Luiz; Forjaz, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) recovery (HRR) and variability (HRV) after exercise are non-invasive tools used to assess cardiac autonomic regulation and cardiovascular prognosis. Autonomic recovery is slower after evening than morning exercise in healthy individuals, but this influence is unknown in subjects with autonomic dysfunction, although it may affect prognostic evaluation. This study compared post-exercise HRR and HRV after maximal morning and evening exercise in pre-hypertensive men. Ten volunteers randomly underwent two maximal exercise tests conducted in the morning (8-10 a.m.) and evening (6-8 p.m.). HRR60s (HR reduction at 60 s of recovery - prognostic index), T30 (short-term time-constant of HRR - parasympathetic reactivation marker), rMSSD30s (square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent R-R intervals on subsequent 30 s segments - parasympathetic reactivation marker), and HRRτ (time constant of the first order exponential fitting of HRR - marker of sympathetic withdraw and parasympathetic reactivation) were measured. Paired t-test and two-way ANOVA were used. HRR60s and HRRτ were similar after exercise in the morning and evening (27 ± 7 vs. 29 ± 7 bpm, p = 0.111, and 79 ± 14 vs. 96 ± 29 s, p = 0.119, respectively). T30 was significantly greater after evening exercise (405 ± 215 vs. 295 ± 119 s, p = 0.002) and rMSSD30s was lower in the evening (main factor session, p = 0.009). In conclusion, in pre-hypertensive men, the prognostic index of HRR, HRR60s, is not affected by the time of day when exercise is conducted. However, post-exercise parasympathetic reactivation, evaluated by T30 and rMSSD30s, is blunted after evening exercise.

  5. Improvement of aluminum drilling efficiency and precision by shaped femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Ying; Qi, Hongxia; Chen, Anmin; Hu, Zhan

    2014-10-01

    Shaped femtosecond laser pulses with the plain phase (transform-limited pulse) and sine phase (A = 1.2566, T = 30, T = 10, and T = 5) were used to drill Al sheet in vacuum. Using different phase, the number of pulses required to drill through the sheet was different. With lower laser pulse energy, the ablation rate was the highest when plain phase (corresponding to transform limited pulse) was used. With higher laser energy, the optimized ablation rate can be achieved by increasing the time separation between the subpulses of pulse train produced from the sine phase function. And, with the shaped femtosecond laser, the diameter of ablation holes produced was smaller, the ablation precision was also improved. The results showed that shaped femtosecond laser pulse has great advantages in the context of femtosecond laser drilling.

  6. Hemoglobin, Growth, and Attention of Infants in Southern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Aubuchon-Endsley, Nicki L.; Grant, Stephanie L.; Berhanu, Getenesh; Thomas, David G.; Schrader, Sarah E.; Eldridge, Devon; Kennedy, Tay; Hambidge, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Researchers tested male and female infants from rural Ethiopia to investigate relations among hemoglobin, anthropometry, and attention. They utilized a longitudinal design to examine differences in attention performance from 6 (M = 24.9 weeks, n = 89) to 9 months of age (M = 40.6 weeks, n = 85), differences hypothesized to be related to changes in iron status and growth delays. Stunting (length-for-age z-scores < −2.0) and attention performance [t(30) = −2.42, p = .022] worsened over time. Growth and hemoglobin predicted attention at 9 months [R2 = .15, p < .05], but not at 6. The use of the attention task at 9 months was supported. The study contributes to the knowledge base of hemoglobin, growth, and attention. PMID:21545582

  7. Genetic diversity and evolution of two capsid protein genes of citrus tristeza virus isolates from China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guan-Wei; Tang, Min; Wang, Guo-Ping; Jin, Feng-Yin; Yang, Zuo-Kun; Cheng, Li-Jing; Hong, Ni

    2015-03-01

    The genetic diversity and population structure of citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates from China were investigated based on partial sequences spanning the C-terminal end of p61 and the complete sequences of the CPm and CP genes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed five known groups (RB, T30, T36, HA and VT) and one new group (VI) consisting of only Chinese CTV isolates. Incongruent phylogenetic trees coupled with recombination analysis suggested several recombination events in the CPm gene. Positive selection was detected at codon 9 of CPm and codons 31, 41 and 68 of CP. The widespread CTV subpopulation AT-1 found in China has a unique amino acid insertion at the C-terminus of p61, which could increase CTV population complexity with implications for the evolutionary history of the virus. Our results suggest relevant roles for gene flow, purifying selection and recombination in shaping the CTV population in China.

  8. Isolates of Citrus tristeza virus that overcome Poncirus trifoliata resistance comprise a novel strain.

    PubMed

    Harper, S J; Dawson, T E; Pearson, M N

    2010-04-01

    The economically important rootstock species Poncirus trifoliata is resistant to most isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), but not to members of the CTV resistance-breaking (RB) strain presently found in New Zealand. In this study, five known and suspected RB isolates were separated from field mixtures, and their genomes were sequenced in full. It was found that the RB isolates are members of a single phylogenetically distinct clade with an average of 90.3% genomic nucleotide sequence identity to the closest extant isolate, T36. These isolates also show evidence of multiple recombination events throughout their evolutionary history, with T36, T30 and VT-like isolates, and with each other. Finally, the genomic sequences of these isolates show that several genes contain unique polymorphisms that may or may not be involved in overcoming resistance. These data will aid in the understanding of host-virus interactions, and the mechanism of resistance in P. trifoliata.

  9. Neutrino dynamics below the electroweak crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M.

    2016-07-12

    We estimate the thermal masses and damping rates of active (m< eV) and sterile (M∼ GeV) neutrinos with thermal momenta k∼3T at temperatures below the electroweak crossover (5 GeV T<30 GeV. Therefore it is challenging to generate a large lepton asymmetry facilitating dark matter computations operating at T<5 GeV, whereas the generation of a baryon asymmetry at T>130 GeV remains an option. Our differential rates are tabulated in a form suitable for studies of specific scenarios with given neutrino Yukawa matrices.

  10. Neutrino dynamics below the electroweak crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M.

    2016-07-01

    We estimate the thermal masses and damping rates of active (m < eV) and sterile (M ~ GeV) neutrinos with thermal momenta k~ 3T at temperatures below the electroweak crossover (5 GeV < T < 160 GeV) . These quantities fix the equilibration or ``washout'' rates of Standard Model lepton number densities. Sterile neutrinos interact via direct scatterings mediated by Yukawa couplings, and via their overlap with active neutrinos. Including all leading-order reactions we find that the washout rate generally exceeds the Hubble rate for 5 GeV < T < 30 GeV . Therefore it is challenging to generate a large lepton asymmetry facilitating dark matter computations operating at T < 5 GeV, whereas the generation of a baryon asymmetry at T > 130 GeV remains an option. Our differential rates are tabulated in a form suitable for studies of specific scenarios with given neutrino Yukawa matrices.

  11. Recovery of Pyruvic Acid using Tri-n-butylamine Dissolved in Non-Toxic Diluent (Rice Bran Oil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Dharm; Keshav, Amit

    2016-04-01

    An attempt has been made to investigate the effectiveness of the vegetable oil based biocompatible solvent for the separation of pyruvic acid from fermentation broth, by using rice bran oil as natural, non-toxic diluent. Reactive extraction of pyruvic acid (0.1-0.5 k mol/m3) from aqueous solutions has been studied using tri-n-butylamine (TBA; 10-70 %) as an extractant dissolved in non toxic rice bran oil at T = 30 ± 1 °C. Results were presented in terms of distribution coefficient (Kd), extraction efficiency (E %), loading ratio (Z), and complexation constant (\\varphi_{α β }). Extraction equilibrium was interpreted using mass action modeling approach. Based on the extent of loading (Z < 0.5) only (1:1), pyruvic acid: TBA complex was proposed. Equilibrium complexation constant was evaluated to 1.22 m3/k mol. Results obtained are useful in understanding the extraction mechanism.

  12. Methane production from the red seaweed gracilaria tikvahiae

    SciTech Connect

    Hanisak, M.D.

    1981-01-01

    Stable continuous anaerobic digestion of the title seaweed was maintained in large (120 L) digesters for more than 20 months, with an average gas (60% CH4) production of 0.4 L/g volatile solids. The average bioconversion efficiency was approximately 48%. When the retention time, t, was increased (i.e., loading rate decreased) from 10 to 60 days the total production of biogas and CH4 (as well as the percent CH4 and the reduction of total volatile solids) increased to maximum at t = 30 days and decreased at t = 60 days. Biogas and CH4 production on the basis of volatile solids added increased to less than or equal to 60 days, as did the percent volatile solids reduction. The pH in the digesters increased with increasing t.

  13. STS-31 preflight press conference with SSIP participant Gregory S. Peterson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    During STS-31 thirty days before launch (T-30) press conference, Shuttle Student Involvement Project (SSIP) participant Gregory S. Peter (right), a senior at Utah State University in Logan, fields questions about his student experiment (SE) to be flown on STS-31. Others pictured are Ed Mason (left) of Morton-Thiokol and Jeff Blakely of Utah State Space Dynamics Laboratory. A model of the experiment titled 'Ion Arc Behavior in Microgravity' SE 82-16 was used during the briefing (pictured). SE 82-16 will be located on Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, middeck to observe the effects of microgravity on an electric arc. The absence of convection currents in a weightless environment will keep the arc from rising. SE 82-16 will also study the effect of a magnetic field on an arc without correction. An Arriflex 16mm camera will be used to photograph the experiment.

  14. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Ussurian moose, Alces alces cameloides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Jiang, Guangshun

    2016-11-01

    Ussurian moose (Alces alces cameloides) in Northeast China, which is on the southmost edge of the species' Eurasian range, are facing dramatic decline in population size and distribution areas. We undertook the first sequencing of the entire mitogenome of Ussurian moose, which is thought as the oldest moose subspecies to better understand the evolutionary history of this circumboreal sole extant species. The mitogenome is 16,418 bp in length, consisting of two ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, 13 protein-coding genes, and one control region. The overall base composition is A: 33.7%, T: 30.1%, C: 23.2%, and G: 13.0%, with a much higher A + T content. The phylogenetic tree of moose and 10 other most closely related Cervidae species was built.

  15. The decay of triple systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynova, A. I.; Orlov, V. V.

    2014-10-01

    Numerical simulations have been carried out in the general three-body problem with equal masses with zero initial velocities, to investigate the distribution of the decay times T based on a representative sample of initial conditions. The distribution has a power-law character on long time scales, f( T) ∝ T - α , with α = 1.74. Over small times T < 30 T cr ( T cr is the mean crossing time for a component of the triple system), a series of local maxima separated by about 1.0 T cr is observed in the decay-time distribution. These local peaks correspond to zones of decay after one or a few triple encounters. Figures showing the arrangement of these zones in the domain of the initial conditions are presented.

  16. The effect of boundary shape to acoustic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prawirasasra, M. S.; Sampurna, R.; Suwandi

    2016-11-01

    To design a room in term of acoustic, many variables need to be considered such as volume, acoustic characteristics & surface area of material and also boundary shape. Modifying each variable possibly change the sound field character. To find impact of boundary shape, every needed properties is simulated through acoustic prediction software. The simulation is using three models with different geometry (asymmetry and symmetry) to produce certain objective parameters. By applying just noticeable difference (JND), the effect is considered known. Furthermore, individual perception is needed to gain subjective parameter. The test is using recorded speech that is convoluted with room impulse of each model. The result indicates that 84% of participants could not recognize the speech which is emit from different geometry properties. In contrast, JND value of T30 is exceed 5%. But for D50, every model has JND below 5%.

  17. Clinton Co AFB, Wilmington, Ohio. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-08-12

    CEILING I FEEl >,-_.>,/ >z-’ __>_ To " 66 .2/ 1..= 11NO CEILING 09, 301 -1 - I 5!?9 083>2-,0000 I SNO A5,? $, 35 IF, ,12, 00 1 4𔄀 0 4j 6j miik 9 0’ 6...3,f? Sfo 7 t J400 ~Oe69,O 6771 OA g 7T 1 f9, 6p !t t30" 40#6 f 6 1 1 -S! io, _ 00Q , Mi,8 9of 4, tIpo 00 _> oo ___T _9 ,o. ,_ ft 00,0’ TOTAL .UMBER...FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) CEILING Vl5I1ITY 13TATUE MILZ ; FEEl ) ’- -T....... a 10 26 5: 2 t 3 2’A 2 1 6 tI. tI I 2t1 1 ZI 5/8 itA i

  18. An Interactive Computerized Approach for Tabulating and Evaluating MIL-STD-105D.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    L.OR.RN.CE. L )THEN C:: THIS SE~T(ON CONTAINS THE FORMAT STATEMENTS C:: NEEDED TO SET UP TABLES FOR THE PLAN STATISTICS C:: AT THE DIFFRENT INSPECTION LEVELS...20) DIMENSION N(30).PR(30).V(100.50).PC3O).TPA(30.4).ASN(30,4) DIMENSION AOO3(30.4).ATI(30,4).NN(4).Th(20.20). ZP(20@20) DIMENSION ASNC(30).AOOC(30...FULL RANGE OF INCOMING FRACTION DEFECTIVE. C DIMENSION U(11)*T(30).P(3O).LINE(101) INTEGER ASTERK. BLANK. PLUS DATA ASTERK. BLANK. PLUS/’.’ .’’ DO 1 K-1

  19. Substituent and Solvent Effects on Excited State Charge Transfer Behavior of Highly Fluorescent Dyes Containing Thiophenylimidazole-Based Aldehydes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos, Javier; Bu, Xiu R.; Mintz, Eric A.

    2001-01-01

    The excited state charge transfer for a series of highly fluorescent dyes containing thiophenylimidazole moiety was investigated. These systems follow the Twisted Intramolecular Charge Transfer (TICT) model. Dual fluorescence was observed for each substituted dye. X-ray structures analysis reveals a twisted ground state geometry for the donor substituted aryl on the 4 and 5 position at the imidazole ring. The excited state charge transfer was modeled by a linear solvation energy relationship using Taft's pi and Dimroth's E(sub T)(30) as solvent parameters. There is linear relation between the energy of the fluorescence transition and solvent polarity. The degree of stabilization of the excited state charge transfer was found to be consistent with the intramolecular molecular charge transfer. Excited dipole moment was studied by utilizing the solvatochromic shift method.

  20. Modeling Concept Dependencies for Event Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-04

    approach to model concept dependencies. An MRF is commonly used in the machine learning domain and is an undirected graph- ical model. It models the...Repairing an appliance, (E015) Working on a sewing project. The EC collection has 2,062 videos each of which is relevant to an event. The DevT...30.4 34.7 29.7 E014 63.6 43.2 37.5 75.0 34.1 28.4 36.4 26.1 32.9 23.2 E015 80.5 68.3 58.5 80.5 52.4 43.9 43.9 45.1 48.7 42.1 sewing project”. When we

  1. Interaction of near-IR laser radiation with plasma of a continuous optical discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimakov, V. P.; Kuznetsov, V. A.; Solovyov, N. G.; Shemyakin, A. N.; Shilov, A. O.; Yakimov, M. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of 1.07-μm laser radiation with plasma of a continuous optical discharge (COD) in xenon and argon at a pressure of p = 3-25 bar and temperature of T = 15 kK has been studied. The threshold power required to sustain COD is found to decrease with increasing gas pressure to P t < 30 W in xenon at p > 20 bar and to P t < 350 W in argon at p > 15 bar. This effect is explained by an increase in the coefficient of laser radiation absorption to 20-25 cm-1 in Xe and 1-2 cm-1 in Ar due to electronic transitions between the broadened excited atomic levels. The COD characteristics also depend on the laser beam refraction in plasma. This effect can be partially compensated by a tighter focusing of the laser beam. COD is applied as a broadband light source with a high spectral brightness.

  2. Measurement of the production cross section for Z/γ* in association with jets in pp collisions at s=7TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, D.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. 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A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shichi, H.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Sondericker, J.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sorbi, M.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiriti, E.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockmanns, T.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, Hs.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suita, K.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szeless, B.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Thadome, J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Tobias, J.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Traynor, D.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tyrvainen, H.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walbersloh, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wunstorf, R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, G.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, Yo. K.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2012-02-01

    Results are presented on the production of jets of particles in association with a Z/γ* boson, in proton-proton collisions at s=7TeV with the ATLAS detector. The analysis includes the full 2010 data set, collected with a low rate of multiple proton-proton collisions in the accelerator, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36pb-1. Inclusive jet cross sections in Z/γ* events, with Z/γ* decaying into electron or muon pairs, are measured for jets with transverse momentum pT>30GeV and jet rapidity |y|<4.4. The measurements are compared to next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations, and to predictions from different Monte Carlo generators implementing leading-order matrix elements supplemented by parton showers.

  3. Influence of ceramide on the internal structure and hydration of the phospholipid bilayer studied by neutron and X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, M. A.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Ryabova, N. Y.; Hauss, T.; Almasy, L.; Funari, S. S.; Zbytovska, J.; Lombardo, D.

    2014-07-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS), neutron diffraction and X-ray powder diffraction were used to investigate influence of N-stearoyl phytosphingosine (CER[NP]) and α-hydroxy- N-stearoyl phytosphingosine (CER[AP]) on the internal structure and hydration of DMPC membrane in fully and partly hydrated states at T = 30 °C. Application of Fourier analysis for diffraction data and model calculations for the SANS data evidence that addition of both CER[NP] and CER[AP] in small concentrations promotes significant changes in the organization of DMPC bilayers, such as the increase of the hydrophobic core region. SANS data evidence a decrease in the average radius and polydispersity of the vesicles that can be ascribed to hydrogen bonds interactions that favor tight lipid packing with a compact, more rigid character.

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome of the common lizard Zootoca vivipara (Squamata: Lacertidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Zhu, Dan; Zhao, Wen-Ge; Ji, Xiang

    2016-05-01

    The mitochondrial genome of Zootoca vivipara (Squamata: Lacertidae) is a circular molecule of 17,046 bp in size and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs, 2 ribosomal RNAs and a control region. The A + T content of the overall base composition of H-strand is 63.43% (T: 30.95%, C: 24.03%, A: 32.48%, G: 12.54%). Protein-coding genes begin with ATG as start codon except COII with GTG. ND1, ATP8, ATP6, ND4L, ND5 and Cyt b genes are terminated with TAA as stop codon, ND2 ends with TAG, COI and ND6 end with AGG, and the other four protein-coding genes end with an incomplete stop codon (a single stop nucleotide T).

  5. Neutron capture cross section measurement of 151Sm at the CERN neutron time of flight facility (n_TOF).

    PubMed

    Abbondanno, U; Aerts, G; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Alvarez-Pol, H; Andriamonje, S; Andrzejewski, J; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvár, F; Benlliure, J; Berthoumieux, E; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, E; Colonna, N; Cortes, G; Cortina, D; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dababneh, S; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dolfini, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Frais-Koelbl, H; Furman, W; Goncalves, I; Gallino, R; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Goverdovski, A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martinez, A; Isaev, S; Jericha, E; Käppeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Kerveno, M; Ketlerov, V; Koehler, P; Konovalov, V; Krticka, M; Lamboudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martinez-Val, J; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Molina-Coballes, A; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, H; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papaevangelou, T; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perlado, J M; Perrot, L; Pignatari, M; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Policarpo, A; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Raman, S; Rapp, W; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, C; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Soares, J C; Stephan, C; Tagliente, G; Tain, J; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarin, D; Vincente, M C; Vlachoudis, V; Voss, F; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2004-10-15

    The151Sm(n,gamma)152Sm cross section has been measured at the spallation neutron facility n_TOF at CERN in the energy range from 1 eV to 1 MeV. The new facility combines excellent resolution in neutron time-of-flight, low repetition rates, and an unsurpassed instantaneous luminosity, resulting in rather favorable signal/background ratios. The 151Sm cross section is of importance for characterizing neutron capture nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars. At a thermal energy of kT=30 keV the Maxwellian averaged cross section of this unstable isotope (t(1/2)=93 yr) was determined to be 3100+/-160 mb, significantly larger than theoretical predictions.

  6. Complete mitochondrial genome of the crested black macaque (Macaca nigra).

    PubMed

    Du, Li-Na; Shi, Fang-Lei; Liu, Zhi-Jin; Zhou, Qi-Hai

    2016-11-01

    The complete mitochondrial sequence of the crested black macaque (Macaca nigra) has been determined by mapping the raw data to previously published mitochondrial assemblies of the corresponding species. The total sequence length is 16,564 bp and includes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 1 D-loop control region. The base composition of mtDNA genome is 31.76% A, 25.27% T, 30.17% C, and 12.80% G, with an AT content of 57.03%. The arrangement of genes in M. nigra is identical to that of M. mulatta. All genes are encoded on the heavy strand with the exception of ND6 and eight tRNA genes. The mitochondrial genome of M. nigra presented here will contribute to a better understanding of the population genetics, help to protect its genetic diversity and resolve phylogenetic relationships within the family.

  7. Ferromagnetic correlations in Yb2Ti2O7 as revealed by small angle neutron scattering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhariwalla, Connor; Ma, Qianli; Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa; Dabkowska, Hanna; Gaulin, Bruce

    We report low temperature SANS measurements on frustrated Seff=1/2 XY pyrochlore magnet Yb2Ti2O7. The ground state of this material has been proposed as a realization of a quantum spin ice; however, the low temperature phase behaviour has been complicated by sample dependencies believed to be related to weak ``stuffing''. Our SANS study focuses on the low Q structure of elastic ``rods'' of magnetic scattering which extend from Q=0 along the 111 direction. Using a single crystal sample, we characterize the low Q (<0.2Å-1) temperature dependence of this structured diffuse scattering intensity to T=30mK, passing through the enigmatic heat capacity anomaly near Tc=200mK. The temperature dependence of this diffuse scattering near Q=0 is largely consistent with that measured previously near 111.

  8. Observations of Soft Gamma Repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2004-01-01

    Magnetars (Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars) are a subclass of neutron stars characterized by their recurrent X-ray bursts. While in an active (bursting) state (lasting anywhere between days and years), they are emit&ng hundreds of predominantly soft (kT=30 kev), short (0.1-100 ms long) events. Their quiescent source x-ray light ewes exhibit puhlions rotational period rate changes (spin-down) indicate that their magnetic fields are extremely high, of the order of 10^14- 10^l5 G. Such high B-field objects, dubbed "magnetars", had been predicted to exist in 1992, but the first concrete observational evidence were obtained in 1998 for two of these sources. I will discuss here the history of Soft Gamma Repeaters, and their spectral, timing and flux characteristics both in the persistent and their burst emission.

  9. In Situ Radiometric and Exposure Age Dating of the Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, K. A.; Malespin, C.; Mahaffy, P.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Vasconcelos, P. M.; Milliken, R. E.; Malin, M.; Edgett, K. S.; Pavlov, A. A.; Hurowitz, J. A.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We determined radiogenic and cosmogenic noble gases in a mudstone on the floor of Gale Crater. A K-Ar age of 4.21 +/- 0.35 billion years represents a mixture of detrital and authigenic components and confirms the expected antiquity of rocks comprising the crater rim. Cosmic-ray-produced 3He, 21Ne, and 36Ar yield concordant surface exposure ages of 78 T 30 million years. Surface exposure occurred mainly in the present geomorphic setting rather than during primary erosion and transport. Our observations are consistent with mudstone deposition shortly after the Gale impact or possibly in a later event of rapid erosion and deposition. The mudstone remained buried until recent exposure by wind-driven scarp retreat. Sedimentary rocks exposed by this mechanism may thus offer the best potential for organic biomarker preservation against destruction by cosmic radiation.

  10. Cloud point extraction of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol from cannabis resin.

    PubMed

    Ameur, S; Haddou, B; Derriche, Z; Canselier, J P; Gourdon, C

    2013-04-01

    A cloud point extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC/UV) method was developed for the determination of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in micellar phase. The nonionic surfactant "Dowfax 20B102" was used to extract and pre-concentrate THC from cannabis resin, prior to its determination with a HPLC-UV system (diode array detector) with isocratic elution. The parameters and variables affecting the extraction were investigated. Under optimum conditions (1 wt.% Dowfax 20B102, 1 wt.% Na2SO4, T = 318 K, t = 30 min), this method yielded a quite satisfactory recovery rate (~81 %). The limit of detection was 0.04 μg mL(-1), and the relative standard deviation was less than 2 %. Compared with conventional solid-liquid extraction, this new method avoids the use of volatile organic solvents, therefore is environmentally safer.

  11. A measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections for W and Z bosons in association with jets with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.

    2014-12-02

    In this study, the ratio of the production cross sections for W and Z bosons in association with jets has been measured in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The measurement is based on the entire 2011 dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6fb–1. Inclusive and differential cross-section ratios for massive vector bosons decaying to electrons and muons are measured in association with jets with transverse momentum pT > 30GeV and jet rapidity |y| < 4.4. The measurements are compared to next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations and to predictions from differentmore » Monte Carlo generators implementing leading-order matrix elements supplemented by parton showers.« less

  12. Application of a hybrid modular acquisition system to the control of a suspended interferometer with electrostatic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acernese, F.; Barone, F.; Boiano, A.; Rosa, R. D.; Garufi, F.; Milano, L.; Mosca, S.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Romano, R.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we describe the architecture and the performances of a hybrid modular acquisition and control system prototype developed for the implementation of distributed monitoring and control systems. The system, an alternative to the VME-UDP/IP based system, is based on a dual-channel 18-bit low noise ADC and 16-bit DAC module at 800 kHz, managed by an ALTERA FPGA. Experimental tests have demonstrated that this architecture allows the implementation of distributed control systems with delay time t < 30μs, on single channel, using a standard laptop PC for the real-time computation. The system was used for the longitudinal control of the end mirror of a suspended Michelson Interferometer, performed through an electrostatic actuators, giving effective performances. The preliminary results are also reported.

  13. Crystal field and magnetization of canted antiferromagnet CoCO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshcheryakov, V. F.

    2007-11-01

    The magnetization of the canted antiferromagnet CoCO3 ( T N = 18.1 K) is calculated in the Weiss molecular field approximation taking into account the microscopic state of the Co2+ ion in the entire range of temperatures and magnetic fields. The values of T N, magnetic susceptibility in the basal plane, and ferromagnetic moment were used as parameters. It is shown that the anisotropy of the g factor and of the exchange interaction at low temperatures ( T < 30 K) including the magnetic ordering temperature is correctly described in the Abragam-Pryce approximation. At high temperatures, the g factor increases and becomes isotropic, but it cannot be described using the Abragam-Pryce approximation. The reasons for g factor variation and the magnitude of the magnetic moment are discussed.

  14. Dirac and Pauli form factors based on consideration of the gluon effect in light-cone wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaei, Mohammad Reza; Nikkhoo, Negin Sattary

    2015-11-01

    We discuss Dirac and Pauli form factors based on a generalized parton distribution framework in the range of high momentum transfers of t < 30 GeV2 and calculate the electromagnetic form factors, GE and GM, for the proton. In previous work, Gaussian parameterization has been used in wave functions for calculating electromagnetic form factors at intermediate-high momentum transfers of 1 GeV2 < t < 10 GeV2; in this paper, by considering an improved Gaussian ansatz, we not only calculate the electromagnetic form factors at moderately high momentum transfers t but also can calculate these quantities at high momentum transfers, achieving reasonable agreement with experimental data and other previous work.

  15. In Situ Radiometric and Exposure Age Dating of the Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, K. A.; Malespin, C.; Mahaffy, P.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Vasconcelos, P. M.; Milliken, R. E.; Malin, M.; Edgett, K. S.; Pavlov, A. A.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Grant, J. A.; Miller, H. B.; Arvidson, R.; Beegle, L.; Calef, F.; Conrad, P. G.; Dietrich, W. E.; Eigenbrode, J.; Gellert, R.; Gupta, S.; Hamilton, V.; Hassler, D. M.; Lewis, K. W.; McLennan, S. M.; Ming, D. M.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Steele, A.; Stolper, E. M.; Sumner, D. Y.; Vaniman, D.; Vasavada, A.; Williford, K.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2014-01-01

    We determined radiogenic and cosmogenic noble gases in a mudstone on the floor of Gale Crater. A K-Ar age of 4.21 +/- 0.35 billion years represents a mixture of detrital and authigenic components and confirms the expected antiquity of rocks comprising the crater rim. Cosmic-ray-produced 3He, 21Ne, and 36Ar yield concordant surface exposure ages of 78 T 30 million years. Surface exposure occurred mainly in the present geomorphic setting rather than during primary erosion and transport. Our observations are consistent with mudstone deposition shortly after the Gale impact or possibly in a later event of rapid erosion and deposition. The mudstone remained buried until recent exposure by wind-driven scarp retreat. Sedimentary rocks exposed by this mechanism may thus offer the best potential for organic biomarker preservation against destruction by cosmic radiation.

  16. Resonant and deep impurity levels under hydrostatic pressure in pure n-type InAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadri, A.; Aulombard, R. L.; Zitouni, K.; Konczewicz, L.

    1986-05-01

    Hall coefficient ( RH) and electrical resistivity (ϱ 0) were measured as a function of hydrostatic pressure up to 18 kbar, in the 4.2 K-120 K temperature range, on nominally undopted n-type InAs with free carrier concentration ∼2 × 10 16 cm -3. In the 4.2-30 K range, RH and ϱ 0 versus pressure variations indicate the deionization of impurity states which are resonant in the Γ 1c band at normal pressure. The position and the pressure variation of the resonant impurity level are discussed. At T>30 K, evidence is made for the existence of a donor-like impurity level lying ∼10 meV below the Γ 1c band minimum and moving with pressure at the rate of -1.8 meV/kbar with respect to this band.

  17. Sr-88 and Y-89 - The s-process at magic neutron number N = 50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaeppeler, F.; Zhao, W. R.; Beer, H.; Ratzel, U.

    1990-05-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of Sr-88 and Y-89 were measured in a quasi-stellar neutron spectrum for kT = 25 keV via the activation method. Relevant systematic uncertainties were determined experimentally by repeated activations under different conditions and with different samples. Gold was used as a cross section standard. The resulting stellar cross sections for kT = 30 keV are 6.13 + or - 0.18 mbarn for Sr-88 and 19.0 + or - 0.6 mbarn for Y-89. The partial cross section Sr-86(n, gamma) Sr-87m was measured to 48.1 + or - 1.2 mbarn. Compared to previous data, the associated uncertainties are reduced by factors of 3 and 5, respectively. The implications for s-process nucleosynthesis around magic neutron number N = 50 are discussed in the light of new information on neutron density and temperature.

  18. Equipment Model for the Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Polysilicon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    sir3Oll, del X1301), max-del-si, max-delX; doL’)-le lpt, tl, opt, tc, apt, te; doucle ).±’ etica (), injectionV () ,I itg,.uessO velocityO conv-dif fO...r(3011; double dal-si[3011, kl(3011. Ks(3011, Xh[3011, D(301), Ct*3t(30l1; /* n: #of nodes; sill: ’old’ value of the potential, which is actually the...Silane, which is actually the ’guessed’ X() for the first iteration. On return of ’cony diffo’, X(I carries the ’new’ values of Silane concenitration

  19. Turn structures in CGRP C-terminal analogues promote stable arrangements of key residue side chains.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, K A; Schmidt, R; von Mentzer, B; Haglund, U; Roberts, E; Walpole, C

    2001-07-27

    The 37-amino acid calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a potent endogenous vasodilator thought to be implicated in the genesis of migraine attack. CGRP antagonists may thus have therapeutic value for the treatment of migraine. The CGRP C-terminally derived peptide [D(31),P(34),F(35)]CGRP(27-37)-NH(2) was recently identified as a high-affinity hCGRP(1) receptor selective antagonist. Reasonable CGRP(1) affinity has also been demonstrated for several related analogues, including [D(31),A(34),F(35)]CGRP(27-37)-NH(2). In the study presented here, conformational and structural features in CGRP(27-37)-NH(2) analogues that are important for hCGRP(1) receptor binding were explored. Structure-activity studies carried out on [D(31),P(34),F(35)]CGRP(27-37)-NH(2) resulted in [D(31),P(34),F(35)]CGRP(30-37)-NH(2), the shortest reported CGRP C-terminal peptide analogue exhibiting reasonable hCGRP(1) receptor affinity (K(i) = 29.6 nM). Further removal of T(30) from the peptide's N-terminus greatly reduced receptor affinity from the nanomolar to micromolar range. Additional residues deemed critical for hCGRP(1) receptor binding were identified from an alanine scan of [A(34),F(35)]CGRP(28-37)-NH(2) and included V(32) and F(37). Replacement of the C-terminal amide in this same peptide with a carboxyl, furthermore, resulted in a greater than 50-fold reduction in hCGRP(1) affinity, thus suggesting a direct role for the amide moiety in receptor binding. The conformational properties of two classes of CGRP(27-37)-NH(2) peptides, [D(31),X(34),F(35)]CGRP(27-37)-NH(2) (X is A or P), were examined by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling. A beta-turn centered on P(29) was a notable feature consistently observed among active peptides in both series. This turn led to exposure of the critical T(30) residue to the surrounding environment. Peptides in the A(34) series were additionally characterized by a stable C-terminal helical turn that resulted in the three important residues (T(30), V

  20. Results of the liquid scintillation detector of the Mont Blanc Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglietta, M.; Badino, G.; Bologna, G. F.; Castagnoli, C.; Fulgione, W.

    1986-04-01

    Preliminary results research on collapsing-star neutrino bursts and cosmic-ray muons, obtained using the 90-ton 72 element liquid-scintillation detector (LSD) at Mt. Blanc Laboratory since October 1984, are presented in tables and graphs and characterized. The theoretically expected energy and time values for neutrinos from collapsing stars of 2 solar mass are calculated, and it is shown that no burst with multiplicity 6 or greater and Delta t 30 s or less was detected in 4 mo of LSD live time, corresponding to a preliminary upper limit of 3/yr for Galactic stellar collapses. About 3 muons/h crossing at least two counters were observed, and detection of aobut 700 muon bundles per year of multiplicity 2 or greater or 90 bundles per year of multiplicity 3 or greater is predicted. The possible use of the LSD to search for nucleon instability (proton decay into muons) is considered.

  1. Design of a 15N Molecular Unit to Achieve Long Retention of Hyperpolarized Spin State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; Hirano, Masashi; Imakura, Yuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Sando, Shinsuke

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear hyperpolarization is a phenomenon that can be used to improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance molecular sensors. However, such sensors typically suffer from short hyperpolarization lifetime. Herein we report that [15N, D14]trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) has a remarkably long spin-lattice relaxation time (1128 s, 14.1 T, 30 °C, D2O) on its 15N nuclei and achieves a long retention of the hyperpolarized state. [15N, D14]TMPA-based hyperpolarized sensor for carboxylesterase allowed the highly sensitive analysis of enzymatic reaction by 15N NMR for over 40 min in phophate-buffered saline (H2O, pH 7.4, 37 °C).

  2. Design of a 15N Molecular Unit to Achieve Long Retention of Hyperpolarized Spin State

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; Hirano, Masashi; Imakura, Yuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Sando, Shinsuke

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear hyperpolarization is a phenomenon that can be used to improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance molecular sensors. However, such sensors typically suffer from short hyperpolarization lifetime. Herein we report that [15N, D14]trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) has a remarkably long spin–lattice relaxation time (1128 s, 14.1 T, 30 °C, D2O) on its 15N nuclei and achieves a long retention of the hyperpolarized state. [15N, D14]TMPA-based hyperpolarized sensor for carboxylesterase allowed the highly sensitive analysis of enzymatic reaction by 15N NMR for over 40 min in phophate-buffered saline (H2O, pH 7.4, 37 °C). PMID:28067292

  3. SESAME 7363: A new Li(6)D equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, Daniel Glen; Kress, Joel David; Crockett, Scott; Collins, Lee A.; Greeff, Carl William

    2015-09-21

    A new Equation of State (EOS) for Lithium 6 Deuteride (6LiD) was created, sesame 7363. This EOS was released to the user community under “eos-developmental” as sesame 97363. The construction of this new EOS is a modification of a previously released EOS, sesame 73601. Sesame 7360 is too stiff (5-10% excess pressure) at high compressions and high temperatures (ρ = 4-110g/cm3, T = 30-10,000 eV) compared to orbital-free density-functional theory. Sesame 7363 is softer and gives a better representation of the physics over this range without compromising the agreement with the experimental and simulation data that sesame 7360 was based on.

  4. Transcutaneous trigeminal nerve stimulation induces a long-term depression-like plasticity of the human blink reflex.

    PubMed

    Pilurzi, Giovanna; Mercante, Beniamina; Ginatempo, Francesca; Follesa, Paolo; Tolu, Eusebio; Deriu, Franca

    2016-02-01

    The beneficial effects of trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS) on several neurological disorders are increasingly acknowledged. Hypothesized mechanisms include the modulation of excitability in networks involved by the disease, and its main site of action has been recently reported at brain stem level. Aim of this work was to test whether acute TNS modulates brain stem plasticity using the blink reflex (BR) as a model. The BR was recorded from 20 healthy volunteers before and after 20 min of cyclic transcutaneous TNS delivered bilaterally to the infraorbital nerve. Eleven subjects underwent sham-TNS administration and were compared to the real-TNS group. In 12 subjects, effects of unilateral TNS were tested. The areas of the R1 and R2 components of the BR were recorded before and after 0 (T0), 15 (T15), 30 (T30), and 45 (T45) min from TNS. In three subjects, T60 and T90 time points were also evaluated. Ipsi- and contralateral R2 areas were significantly suppressed after bilateral real-TNS at T15 (p = 0.013), T30 (p = 0.002), and T45 (p = 0.001), while R1 response appeared unaffected. The TNS-induced inhibitory effect on R2 responses lasted up to 60 min. Real- and sham-TNS protocols produced significantly different effects (p = 0.005), with sham-TNS being ineffective at any time point tested. Bilateral TNS was more effective (p = 0.009) than unilateral TNS. Acute TNS induced a bilateral long-lasting inhibition of the R2 component of the BR, which resembles a long-term depression-like effect, providing evidence of brain stem plasticity produced by transcutaneous TNS. These findings add new insight into mechanisms of TNS neuromodulation and into physiopathology of those neurological disorders where clinical benefits of TNS are recognized.

  5. Jet energy scale and resolution in the CMS experiment in pp collisions at 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; ...

    2017-02-22

    Improved jet energy scale corrections, based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fbmore » $$^{-1}$$ collected by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, are presented. The corrections as a function of pseudorapidity $$\\eta$$ and transverse momentum $$p_{\\mathrm{T}}$$ are extracted from data and simulated events combining several channels and methods. They account successively for the effects of pileup, uniformity of the detector response, and residual data-simulation jet energy scale differences. Further corrections, depending on the jet flavor and distance parameter (jet size) $R$, are also presented. The jet energy resolution is measured in data and simulated events and is studied as a function of pileup, jet size, and jet flavor. Typical jet energy resolutions at the central rapidities are 15-20% at 30 GeV, about 10% at 100 GeV, and 5% at 1 TeV. The studies exploit events with dijet topology, as well as photon+jet, Z+jet and multijet events. Several new techniques are used to account for the various sources of jet energy scale corrections, and a full set of uncertainties, and their correlations, are provided.The final uncertainties on the jet energy scale are below 3% across the phase space considered by most analyses ($$p_{\\mathrm{T}}> $$ 30 GeV and $$| \\eta| < $$ 5.0). In the barrel region ($$| \\eta| < $$ 1.3) an uncertainty below 1% for $$p_{\\mathrm{T}}> $$ 30 GeV is reached, when excluding the jet flavor uncertainties, which are provided separately for different jet flavors. Finally, a new benchmark for jet energy scale determination at hadron colliders is achieved with 0.32% uncertainty for jets with $$p_{\\mathrm{T}}$$ of the order of 165-330 GeV, and $$| \\eta| < $$ 0.8.« less

  6. CO-dark gas and molecular filaments in Milky Way-type galaxies - II. The temperature distribution of the gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Simon C. O.; Smith, Rowan J.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the temperature distribution of CO-dark molecular hydrogen (H2) in a series of disc galaxies simulated using the AREPO moving-mesh code. In conditions similar to those in the Milky Way, we find that H2 has a flat temperature distribution ranging from 10 to 100 K. At T < 30 K, the gas is almost fully molecular and has a high CO content, whereas at T > 30 K, the H2 fraction spans a broader range and the CO content is small, allowing us to classify gas in these two regimes as CO-bright and CO-dark, respectively. The mean sound speed in the CO-dark H2 is cs, dark = 0.64 km s-1, significantly lower than the value in the cold atomic gas (cs, CNM = 1.15 km s-1), implying that the CO-dark molecular phase is more susceptible to turbulent compression and gravitational collapse than its atomic counterpart. We further show that the temperature of the CO-dark H2 is highly sensitive to the strength of the interstellar radiation field, but that conditions in the CO-bright H2 remain largely unchanged. Finally, we examine the usefulness of the [C II] and [O I] fine-structure lines as tracers of the CO-dark gas. We show that in Milky Way-like conditions, diffuse [C II] emission from this gas should be detectable. However, it is a problematic tracer of this gas, as there is only a weak correlation between the brightness of the emission and the H2 surface density. The situation is even worse for the [O I] line, which shows no correlation with the H2 surface density.

  7. Image-Guided Radiation Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder with Cone Beam CT Scan: Use of Individualized Internal Target Volumes for a Single Patient.

    PubMed

    Saini, Gagan; Aggarwal, Anchal; Srivastava, Roopam; Sharma, Pramod K; Garg, Madhur; Nangia, Sapna; Chomal, Manish

    2012-09-01

    While planning radiation therapy (RT) for a carcinoma of the urinary bladder (CaUB), the intra-fractional variation of the urinary bladder (UB) volume due to filling-up needs to be accounted for. This internal target volume (ITV) is obtained by adding internal margins (IM) to the contoured bladder. This study was planned to propose a method of acquiring individualized ITVs for each patient and to verify their reproducibility. One patient with CaUB underwent simulation with the proposed 'bladder protocol'. After immobilization, a planning CT scan on empty bladder was done. He was then given 300 ml of water to drink and the time (T) was noted. Planning CT scans were performed after 20 min (T+20), 30 min (T+30) and 40 min (T+40). The CT scan at T+20 was co-registered with the T+30 and T+40 scans. The bladder volumes at 20, 30 and 40 min were then contoured as CTV20, CTV30 and CTV40 to obtain an individualized ITV for our patient. For daily treatment, he was instructed to drink water as above, and the time was noted; treatment was started after 20 min. Daily pre- and post-treatment cone beam CT (CBCT) scans were done. The bladder visualized on the pre-treatment CBCT scan was compared with CTV20 and on the post-treatment CBCT scan with CTV30. In total, there were 65 CBCT scans (36 pre- and 29 post-treatment). Individualized ITVs were found to be reproducible in 93.85% of all instances and fell outside in 4 instances. The proposed bladder protocol can yield a reproducible estimation of the ITV during treatment; this can obviate the need for taking standard IMs.

  8. Spectrophotometric Analysis of Coronal Tooth Discoloration Induced by Various Bioceramic Cements and Other Endodontic Materials.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Meetu R; Yamaguchi, Maimi; Setzer, Frank C; Karabucak, Bekir

    2015-11-01

    Coronal tooth discoloration induced by various endodontic materials was evaluated in vitro. Eighty extracted human maxillary anterior teeth were accessed, instrumented, and sectioned to standardized root lengths of 10 mm below the cementoenamel junction. Pulp chambers were cleaned chemomechanically to ensure complete tissue removal. Specimens were filled with experimental materials in 8 random groups: RRM, EndoSequence RRM putty (Brasseler, Savannah, GA); RRMF, EndoSequence RRM fast set paste (Brasseler); BD, Biodentine (Septodont, Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, France); WMTA, white MTA (Dentsply, York, PA), GMTA, gray MTA (Dentsply); AH+, AH Plus sealer (Dentsply); TAP, triple antibiotic paste (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, and minocycline); and NF, no filling (negative control group). After incubation in 100% humidity at 37°C, color changes were evaluated with a spectrophotometer (Ocean Optics, Dunedin, FL) on days 0, 7, 30, 60, and 180 after material placement (T0-T180). Data were transformed into Commission International de I'Eclairage's L*a*b color values, and corresponding ΔE values were calculated. Two-way analysis of variance and the Bonferroni method were performed. Visual discoloration was observed in all specimens in the GMTA, WMTA, and TAP groups at T7, increasing with time. The ΔE value between the initial color at T0 and at T7, T30, T60, and T180 was significantly different for GMTA, WMTA, and TAP (P < .001). ΔE values for the BD, RRM, RRMF, AH+, and NF groups were not statistically significantly different between T0 and T7, T30, T60, and T180, respectively, except for 3 samples below the human perceptible threshold. Values of L* dropped significantly from T0 to T180 in the TAP, GMTA, and WMTA groups. Significant coronal tooth discoloration was caused by TAP, GMTA, and WMTA but not by BD, RRM, and RRMF. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Analgesic effect of intravenous ketamine in cancer patients on morphine therapy: a randomized, controlled, double-blind, crossover, double-dose study.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, S; Arcuri, E; Tirelli, W; Casuccio, A

    2000-10-01

    Pain not responsive to morphine is often problematic. Animal and clinical studies have suggested that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists, such as ketamine, may be effective in improving opioid analgesia in difficult pain syndromes, such as neuropathic pain. A slow bolus of subhypnotic doses of ketamine (0.25 mg/kg or 0.50 mg/kg) was given to 10 cancer patients whose pain was unrelieved by morphine in a randomized, double-blind, crossover, double-dose study. Pain intensity on a 0 to 10 numerical scale; nausea and vomiting, drowsiness, confusion, and dry mouth, using a scale from 0 to 3 (not at all, slight, a lot, awful); Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) (0-30); and arterial pressure were recorded before administration of drugs (T0) and after 30 minutes (T30), 60 minutes (T60), 120 minutes (T120), and 180 minutes (T180). Ketamine, but not saline solution, significantly reduced the pain intensity in almost all the patients at both doses. This effect was more relevant in patients treated with higher doses. Hallucinations occurred in 4 patients, and an unpleasant sensation ("empty head") was also reported by 2 patients. These episodes reversed after the administration of diazepam 1 mg intravenously. Significant increases in drowsiness were reported in patients treated with ketamine in both groups and were more marked with ketamine 0.50 mg/kg. A significant difference in MMSE was observed at T30 in patients who received 0.50 mg/kg of ketamine. Ketamine can improve morphine analgesia in difficult pain syndromes, such as neuropathic pain. However, the occurrence of central adverse effects should be taken into account, especially when using higher doses. This observation should be tested in studies of prolonged ketamine administration.

  10. Jet energy scale and resolution in the CMS experiment in pp collisions at 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Damiao, D. De Jesus; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Mohammed, Y.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. 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M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Fanzago, F.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Maron, G.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Ventura, S.; Zanetti, M.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. 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D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Gastler, D.; Lawson, P.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova PANEVA, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Sevilla, M. Franco; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Kaufman, G. Nicolas; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Jung, A. W.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Low, J. F.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P., III; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2017-02-01

    Improved jet energy scale corrections, based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 collected by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, are presented. The corrections as a function of pseudorapidity η and transverse momentum pT are extracted from data and simulated events combining several channels and methods. They account successively for the effects of pileup, uniformity of the detector response, and residual data-simulation jet energy scale differences. Further corrections, depending on the jet flavor and distance parameter (jet size) R, are also presented. The jet energy resolution is measured in data and simulated events and is studied as a function of pileup, jet size, and jet flavor. Typical jet energy resolutions at the central rapidities are 15-20% at 30 GeV, about 10% at 100 GeV, and 5% at 1 TeV. The studies exploit events with dijet topology, as well as photon+jet, Z+jet and multijet events. Several new techniques are used to account for the various sources of jet energy scale corrections, and a full set of uncertainties, and their correlations, are provided.The final uncertainties on the jet energy scale are below 3% across the phase space considered by most analyses (pT>30 GeV and 0| η| <5.). In the barrel region (| η| <1.3) an uncertainty below 1% for pT>30 GeV is reached, when excluding the jet flavor uncertainties, which are provided separately for different jet flavors. A new benchmark for jet energy scale determination at hadron colliders is achieved with 0.32% uncertainty for jets with \\pt of the order of 165-330\\GeV, and | η| <0.8.

  11. Phagocytosis by Acanthamoeba castellanii: ionic strength dependence of the probability of cell attachment; ingestion and contact seam morphology.

    PubMed

    Obaray, N; Coakley, W T.

    2001-10-01

    The phagocytosis of glutaraldehyde-fixed horse erythrocytes by Acanthamoeba castellanii has been examined in iso-osmolal phosphate buffered saline/sucrose suspending phases of ionic strength, I, ranging from 0.17 to 0.0017. The erythrocytes were exposed, at a ratio of 15:1, to 5x10(6) amoeba in 0.2 ml volumes. The average number of erythrocytes forming a contact with an amoeba over 30 min (T(30)) was well described by T(30)=5.2 exp(-0.112xI(-0.5)). The index of the exponential 'probability of attachment' term may also be expressed in terms of either surface potential (psi(0)) or the Debye length (kappa(-1)). The probability term is formally similar to a Bolzmann factor. Electron microscopy showed that contact spreading of the amoeba over the erythrocyte took place by formation of discrete contacts and that the lateral separation distance between contacts was 0.66, 1.36 and 1.59 &mgr;m for ionic strengths 0.17, 0.052 and 0.0017, respectively. The direction of change in lateral contact separation distance was consistent with published changes in focal contact separation when amoeba move over glass or when human erythrocyte-erythrocyte adhesion occurs in different ionic strength media. The direction was also consistent with interfacial instability theory predictions for the dependence of localised membrane contact formation on interaction potential. The proportion of attached cells that were subsequently ingested correlated more strongly with the number of contacts formed along the cell-cell contact region (seam) than with the seam length at different ionic strengths.

  12. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 2 Silencing Restores Taxol Sensitivity in Drug Resistant Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer-Visser, Jurriaan; Lee, Jiyeon; McCullagh, KellyAnne; Cossio, Maria J.; Wang, Yanhua; Huang, Gloria S.

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is an obstacle to the effective treatment of ovarian cancer. We and others have shown that the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway is a novel potential target to overcome drug resistance. The purpose of this study was to validate IGF2 as a potential therapeutic target in drug resistant ovarian cancer and to determine the efficacy of targeting IGF2 in vivo. An analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data in the serous ovarian cancer cohort showed that high IGF2 mRNA expression is significantly associated with shortened interval to disease progression and death, clinical indicators of drug resistance. In a genetically diverse panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, the IGF2 mRNA levels measured in cell lines resistant to various microtubule-stabilizing agents including Taxol were found to be significantly elevated compared to the drug sensitive cell lines. The effect of IGF2 knockdown on Taxol resistance was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Transient IGF2 knockdown significantly sensitized drug resistant cells to Taxol treatment. A Taxol-resistant ovarian cancer xenograft model, developed from HEY-T30 cells, exhibited extreme drug resistance, wherein the maximal tolerated dose of Taxol did not delay tumor growth in mice. Blocking the IGF1R (a transmembrane receptor that transmits signals from IGF1 and IGF2) using a monoclonal antibody did not alter the response to Taxol. However, stable IGF2 knockdown using short-hairpin RNA in HEY-T30 effectively restored Taxol sensitivity. These findings validate IGF2 as a potential therapeutic target in drug resistant ovarian cancer and show that directly targeting IGF2 may be a preferable strategy compared with targeting IGF1R alone. PMID:24932685

  13. Electrophysiological correlates of higher states of consciousness during sleep in long-term practitioners of the Transcendental Meditation program.

    PubMed

    Mason, L I; Alexander, C N; Travis, F T; Marsh, G; Orme-Johnson, D W; Gackenbach, J; Mason, D C; Rainforth, M; Walton, K G

    1997-02-01

    Standard ambulatory night sleep electroencephalograph (EEG) of 11 long-term practitioners of the Transcendental Meditation (TM) program reporting "higher states of consciousness" during sleep (the experimental group) was compared to that of nine short-term practitioners and 11 non-practitioners. EEG tracings during stages 3 and 4 sleep showed the experimental group to have: 1) theta-alpha activity simultaneously with delta activity and 2) decreased chin electromyograph (EMG) during deep sleep (p = 0.002) compared to short-term practitioners. Spectral analysis fast Fourier transform (FFT) data of the first three cycles showed that: 3) the experimental subjects had significantly greater theta 2 (6-8 Hz)-alpha 1 (8-10 Hz) relative power during stages 3 and 4 than the combined control groups [t(30) = 5.5, p = 0.0000008] with no difference in time in delta; 4) there was a graded difference across groups during stages 3 and 4 in theta 2-alpha 1 power, with experimentals having greater power than short-term practitioners, who in turn had greater power than non-practitioners [t(30) = 5.08, p = 0.00002]; and 5) experimentals also had increased rapid eye movement (REM) density during REM periods compared to short-term practitioners (p = 0.04). Previous studies have found increased theta-alpha EEG activity during reported periods of "transcendental consciousness" during the TM technique. In the Vedic tradition, as described by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, transcendental consciousness is the first of a sequence of higher states. The maintenance of transcendental consciousness along with deep sleep is said to be a distinctive criterion of further, stabilized higher states of consciousness. The findings of this study are interpreted as physiological support for this model.

  14. Mitomycin C Pharmacokinetics as Predictor of Severe Neutropenia in Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kemmel, Véronique; Mercoli, Henri-Alexis; Meyer, Nicolas; Brumaru, Daniel; Romain, Benoit; Lessinger, Jean-Marc; Brigand, Cécile

    2015-12-01

    Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) is an approach to overcome peritoneal carcinomatosis from colorectal adenocarcinoma. Mitomycin C (MMC) is frequently used but not devoid of toxicity, of which the most common and feared is neutropenia. Our study explores the clinical and surgical risk factors of neutropenia and a possible link between MMC pharmacokinetics and neutropenia as HIPEC's supervention. A total of 45 patients undergoing CRS-HIPEC for peritoneal carcinomatosis of colorectal origin between 2004 and 2010 were followed. For each patient, MMC was measured in plasma at different times during HIPEC and the area under the MMC concentration-time curve (MMC-AUC) was calculated. The incidence of neutropenia was 40 %. No demographic, clinical, or surgical factors increased the risk of neutropenia. However, we found that the occurrence of neutropenia and its gravity increased in direct correlation with an increase in MMC plasma concentration 30 min (T30) and 45 min (T45) after the start of HIPEC. The same correlation was observed between the MMC-AUC and the risk of neutropenia. Neutropenia is a frequent complication associated with MMC-HIPEC. The results of our study indicate the feasibility and the potential benefit of a protocol including the MMC dosage at T30 after the start of HIPEC. A threshold of 572 µg/L gives a predictive sensitivity of 86 % and a specificity of 80 %. These results must be considered in the management of patients undergoing MMC-HIPEC in order to place high-risk patients under neutropenic monitoring while the other patients can undergo simple hematological monitoring.

  15. Adsorption and photocatalytic degradation of dyes on polyacrylamide/calcium alginate/TiO2 composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuxin; Zhao, Kongyin; Zhang, Xinxin; Fu, Yifan; Li, Zhihui; Xu, Sai; Wei, Junfu

    2015-03-01

    A casting solution was prepared by dispersing titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in the sodium alginate and acrylamide aqueous solution. The casting solution was spread on a glass plate by a glass rod enlaced with brass wires to control the thickness of the sticky solution. Then polyacrylamide/calcium alginate/TiO2 (PAM/CA/T) composite film was obtained after UV irradiation and cross-linking by CaCl2. The PAM/CA/T film was characterized by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. The PAM/CA/T film had good strength and toughness. And they did not rupture after swelling in 5 wt.% NaCl solution and still had good mechanical properties. The adsorption properties of the PAM/CA/T film were investigated by using different dyes as the adsorbates. The photocatalytic degradation properties of these dyes on the PAM/CA/T films were also researched. The results indicated that there was no difference in the adsorption efficiency of PAM/CA film and PAM/CA/T-30 film. The adsorption rates of all the dyes were fast. The pre-adsorption of dyes had little effect on the catalytic degradation of dyes on PAM/CA/T film. The PAM/CA/T hydrogel film provided a suitable carrier for TiO2 in the photocatalytic degradation of dyes and the degradation efficiency of PAM/CA/T-30 film for methyl orange reached 80.76%. The PAM/CA/T film had good reusability and could degrade dyes in NaCl solution.

  16. Influence of seminal plasma on cryopreservation of human spermatozoa in a biological material-free medium: study of normal and low-quality semen.

    PubMed

    Grizard, G; Chevalier, V; Griveau, J F; Le Lannou, D; Boucher, D

    1999-06-01

    The objective was to evaluate the efficiency of a biological material-free medium and the role of seminal plasma (SP) in the cryopreservation of human spermatozoa. Normal semen samples and low-quality semen samples were used for this study. After centrifugation of 300 microL fractions of whole semen, pellets were resuspended either in autologous SP or in a chemically defined medium (BM) supplemented or not with 3% bovine serum albumin (BSA); after 15 min at 37 degrees C, the samples were diluted (V/V) with cryoprotective medium (30 mM NaCl; 22 mM sodium citrate, 19.4 mM fructose; 80 mM glutamine; 14%, V/V, glycerol) and maintained for 15 min at room temperature before freezing. Assessment of viability and motility was performed using fresh semen (T0), after centrifugation and resuspension prior to adding the cryoprotectant (T15), after adding the cryoprotectant (T30) and after freezing and thawing (Tpost). In all three resuspending media used, sperm viability and motility (forward and total) decreased (p < 0.05) during both the equilibration period especially before addition of the cryoprotective medium (between T0 and T15) and during the freeze-thaw process comparison between T30 and Tpost. The recovery of viable and motile spermatozoa (post-thaw values/values of fresh samples) was higher (p < 0.05) in normal semen than in low-quality semen. In both groups, the recovery was slightly, but significantly, higher with SP than with BM and the presence of BSA has no beneficial effect. To conclude, these data suggest that SP may reduce the deleterious effects of cryopreservation. Nevertheless cryopreservation of spermatozoa in a medium containing neither SP nor biological substances could offer an acceptable cryoprotection of spermatozoa to be used in assisted fertilization procedures, especially for intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  17. Relative Modification of Prompt ψ(2S) and J/ψ Yields from pp to PbPb Collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=5.02  TeV.

    PubMed

    Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Asilar, E; Bergauer, T; Brandstetter, J; Brondolin, E; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Flechl, M; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; König, A; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Matsushita, T; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rad, N; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schieck, J; Strauss, J; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Dydyshka, Y; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Mossolov, V; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Zykunov, V; Shumeiko, N; Alderweireldt, S; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Lauwers, J; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Abu Zeid, S; Blekman, F; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; De Bruyn, I; Deroover, K; Lowette, S; Moortgat, S; Moreels, L; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Skovpen, K; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Parijs, I; Brun, H; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Delannoy, H; Fasanella, G; Favart, L; Goldouzian, R; Grebenyuk, A; Karapostoli, G; 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Fernandez Menendez, J; Gonzalez Caballero, I; González Fernández, J R; Palencia Cortezon, E; Sanchez Cruz, S; Suárez Andrés, I; Vizan Garcia, J M; Cabrillo, I J; Calderon, A; Castiñeiras De Saa, J R; Curras, E; Fernandez, M; Garcia-Ferrero, J; Gomez, G; Lopez Virto, A; Marco, J; Martinez Rivero, C; Matorras, F; Piedra Gomez, J; Rodrigo, T; Ruiz-Jimeno, A; Scodellaro, L; Trevisani, N; Vila, I; Vilar Cortabitarte, R; Abbaneo, D; Auffray, E; Auzinger, G; Bachtis, M; Baillon, P; Ball, A H; Barney, D; Bloch, P; Bocci, A; Bonato, A; Botta, C; Camporesi, T; Castello, R; Cepeda, M; Cerminara, G; d'Enterria, D; Dabrowski, A; Daponte, V; David, A; De Gruttola, M; De Roeck, A; Di Marco, E; Dobson, M; Dorney, B; du Pree, T; Duggan, D; Dünser, M; Dupont, N; Elliott-Peisert, A; Everaerts, P; Fartoukh, S; Franzoni, G; Fulcher, J; Funk, W; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Girone, M; Glege, F; Gulhan, D; Gundacker, S; Guthoff, M; Hammer, J; Harris, P; Hegeman, J; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Kieseler, J; Kirschenmann, H; 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Masciovecchio, M; Meinhard, M T; Meister, D; Micheli, F; Musella, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pandolfi, F; Pata, J; Pauss, F; Perrin, G; Perrozzi, L; Quittnat, M; Rossini, M; Schönenberger, M; Starodumov, A; Tavolaro, V R; Theofilatos, K; Wallny, R; Aarrestad, T K; Amsler, C; Caminada, L; Canelli, M F; De Cosa, A; Galloni, C; Hinzmann, A; Hreus, T; Kilminster, B; Ngadiuba, J; Pinna, D; Rauco, G; Robmann, P; Salerno, D; Yang, Y; Zucchetta, A; Candelise, V; Doan, T H; Jain, Sh; Khurana, R; Konyushikhin, M; Kuo, C M; Lin, W; Lu, Y J; Pozdnyakov, A; Yu, S S; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P; Chang, Y H; Chang, Y W; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Chen, P H; Dietz, C; Fiori, F; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y; Liu, Y F; Lu, R-S; Miñano Moya, M; Paganis, E; Psallidas, A; Tsai, J F; Tzeng, Y M; Asavapibhop, B; Singh, G; Srimanobhas, N; Suwonjandee, N; Adiguzel, A; Cerci, S; Damarseckin, S; Demiroglu, Z S; Dozen, C; Dumanoglu, I; Girgis, S; Gokbulut, G; Guler, Y; Hos, I; Kangal, E E; Kara, O; Kayis Topaksu, A; Kiminsu, U; Oglakci, M; 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Lipton, R; Liu, M; Liu, T; Lopes De Sá, R; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Magini, N; Marraffino, J M; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Merkel, P; Mrenna, S; Nahn, S; O'Dell, V; Pedro, K; Prokofyev, O; Rakness, G; Ristori, L; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Stoynev, S; Strait, J; Strobbe, N; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vernieri, C; Verzocchi, M; Vidal, R; Wang, M; Weber, H A; Whitbeck, A; Wu, Y; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bortignon, P; Bourilkov, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Carnes, A; Carver, M; Curry, D; Das, S; Field, R D; Furic, I K; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Low, J F; Ma, P; Matchev, K; Mei, H; Mitselmakher, G; Rank, D; Shchutska, L; Sperka, D; Thomas, L; Wang, J; Wang, S; Yelton, J; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Ackert, A; Adams, J R; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bein, S; Diamond, B; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Prosper, H; Santra, A; Yohay, R; Baarmand, M M; Bhopatkar, V; Colafranceschi, S; Hohlmann, M; Noonan, D; Roy, T; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Berry, D; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Jung, K; Kurt, P; O'Brien, C; Sandoval Gonzalez, I D; Turner, P; Varelas, N; Wang, H; Wu, Z; Zakaria, M; Zhang, J; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Durgut, S; Gandrajula, R P; Haytmyradov, M; Khristenko, V; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Penzo, A; Snyder, C; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yi, K; Anderson, I; Blumenfeld, B; Cocoros, A; Eminizer, N; Fehling, D; Feng, L; Gritsan, A V; Maksimovic, P; Martin, C; Osherson, M; Roskes, J; Sarica, U; Swartz, M; Xiao, M; Xin, Y; You, C; Al-Bataineh, A; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Boren, S; Bowen, J; Bruner, C; Castle, J; Forthomme, L; Kenny, R P; Khalil, S; Kropivnitskaya, A; Majumder, D; Mcbrayer, W; Murray, M; Sanders, S; Stringer, R; Tapia Takaki, J D; Wang, Q; Ivanov, A; Kaadze, K; Maravin, Y; Mohammadi, A; Saini, L K; Skhirtladze, N; Toda, S; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Anelli, C; Baden, A; Baron, O; Belloni, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Ferraioli, C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Jabeen, S; Kellogg, R G; Kolberg, T; Kunkle, J; Lu, Y; Mignerey, A C; Ricci-Tam, F; Shin, Y H; Skuja, A; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Abercrombie, D; Allen, B; Apyan, A; Azzolini, V; Barbieri, R; Baty, A; Bi, R; Bierwagen, K; Brandt, S; Busza, W; Cali, I A; D'Alfonso, M; Demiragli, Z; Di Matteo, L; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Hsu, D; Iiyama, Y; Innocenti, G M; Klute, M; Kovalskyi, D; Krajczar, K; Lai, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Maier, B; Marini, A C; Mcginn, C; Mironov, C; Narayanan, S; Niu, X; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Salfeld-Nebgen, J; Stephans, G S F; Tatar, K; Varma, M; Velicanu, D; Veverka, J; Wang, J; Wang, T W; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Zhukova, V; Benvenuti, A C; Chatterjee, R M; Evans, A; Finkel, A; Gude, A; Hansen, P; Kalafut, S; Kao, S C; Kubota, Y; Lesko, Z; Mans, J; Nourbakhsh, S; Ruckstuhl, N; Rusack, R; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Oliveros, S; 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Lanaro, A; Levine, A; Long, K; Loveless, R; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ruggles, T; Savin, A; Smith, N; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Woods, N

    2017-04-21

    The relative modification of the prompt ψ(2S) and J/ψ yields from pp to PbPb collisions, at the center-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV per nucleon pair, is presented. The analysis is based on pp and PbPb data samples collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2015, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 28.0  pb^{-1} and 464  μb^{-1}, respectively. The double ratio of measured yields of prompt charmonia reconstructed through their decays into muon pairs, (N_{ψ(2S)}/N_{J/ψ})_{PbPb}/(N_{ψ(2S)}/N_{J/ψ})_{pp}, is determined as a function of PbPb collision centrality and charmonium transverse momentum p_{T}, in two kinematic intervals: |y|<1.6 covering 6.5T}<30  GeV/c and 1.6<|y|<2.4 covering 3T}<30  GeV/c. The centrality-integrated double ratios are 0.36±0.08(stat)±0.05(syst) in the first interval and 0.24±0.22(stat)±0.09(syst) in the second. The double ratio is lower than unity in all the measured bins, suggesting that the ψ(2S) yield is more suppressed than the J/ψ yield in the explored phase space.

  18. Biological monitoring and questionnaire for assessing exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamates in a multicenter European field study.

    PubMed

    Fustinoni, S; Campo, L; Liesivuori, J; Pennanen, S; Vergieva, T; van Amelsvoort, Lgpm; Bosetti, C; Van Loveren, H; Colosio, C

    2008-09-01

    This study deals with pesticide exposure profile in some European countries with a specific focus on ethylenebisdithiocarbamates (EBDC). In all, 55 Bulgarian greenhouse workers, 51 Finnish potato farmers, 48 Italian vineyard workers, 42 Dutch floriculture farmers, and 52 Bulgarian zineb producers entered the study. Each group was matched with a group of not occupationally exposed subjects. Exposure data were gained through self-administered questionnaires and measuring ethylenethiourea (ETU) in two spot urine samples collected, respectively, before the beginning of seasonal exposure (T0), and after 30 days, at the end of the exposure period (T30). Controls underwent a similar protocol. Study agriculture workers were involved in mixing and loading pesticides, application of pesticide mixture with mechanical or manual equipments, re-entry activities, and cleaning equipments. Chemical workers were involved in synthesis, quality controls, and packing activities. The number of pesticides to whom these subjects were exposed varied from one (zineb production) to eight (potato farmers). The use of personal protective devices was variegate and regarded both aerial and dermal penetration routes. EBDC exposure, assessed by T30 urinary ETU, was found to follow the order: greenhouse workers, zineb producers, vineyard workers, potato farmers, floriculture farmers with median levels of 49.6, 23.0, 11.8, 7.5, and 0.9 microg/g creatinine; the last group having ETU at the same level of controls (approximately 0.5 microg/g creatinine). Among agriculture workers, pesticide application, especially using manual equipment, seems to be the major determinant in explaining internal dose. Although the analysis of self-administered questionnaires evidenced difficulties especially related to lack and/or poor quality of reported data, biological monitoring confirms to be a powerful tool in assessing pesticide exposure.

  19. Effects of Velocity Loss During Resistance Training on Performance in Professional Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Pareja-Blanco, Fernando; Sánchez-Medina, Luis; Suárez-Arrones, Luis; González-Badillo, Juan José

    2017-04-01

    To analyze the effects of 2 resistance-training (RT) programs that used the same relative loading but different repetition volume, using the velocity loss during the set as the independent variable: 15% (VL15) vs 30% (VL30). Sixteen professional soccer players with RT experience (age 23.8 ± 3.5 y, body mass 75.5 ± 8.6 kg) were randomly assigned to 2 groups, VL15 (n = 8) or VL30 (n = 8), that followed a 6-wk (18-session) velocity-based squat-training program. Repetition velocity was monitored in all sessions. Assessments performed before (Pre) and after training (Post) included estimated 1-repetition maximum (1RM) and change in average mean propulsive velocity (AMPV) against absolute loads common to Pre and Post tests, countermovement jump (CMJ), 30-m sprint (T30), and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test (YIRT). Null-hypothesis significance testing and magnitude-based-inference statistical analyses were performed. VL15 obtained greater gains in CMJ height than VL30 (P < .05), with no significant differences between groups for the remaining variables. VL15 showed a likely/possibly positive effect on 1RM (91/9/0%), AMPV (73/25/2%), and CMJ (87/12/1%), whereas VL30 showed possibly/unclear positive effects on 1RM (65/33/2%) and AMPV (46/36/18%) and possibly negative effects on CMJ (4/38/57%). The effects on T30 performance were unclear/unlikely for both groups, whereas both groups showed most likely/likely positive effects on YIRT. A velocity-based RT program characterized by a low degree of fatigue (15% velocity loss in each set) is effective to induce improvements in neuromuscular performance in professional soccer players with previous RT experience.

  20. Jet energy scale and resolution in the CMS experiment in pp collisions at 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2016-07-13

    Improved jet energy scale corrections, based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, are presented. The corrections as a function of pseudorapidity $\\eta$ and transverse momentum $p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ are extracted from data and simulated events combining several channels and methods. They account successively for the effects of pileup, uniformity of the detector response, and residual data-simulation jet energy scale differences. Further corrections, depending on the jet flavor and distance parameter (jet size) $R$, are also presented. The jet energy resolution is measured in data and simulated events and is studied as a function of pileup, jet size, and jet flavor. Typical jet energy resolutions at the central rapidities are 15-20% at 30 GeV, about 10% at 100 GeV, and 5% at 1 TeV. The studies exploit events with dijet topology, as well as photon+jet, Z+jet and multijet events. Several new techniques are used to account for the various sources of jet energy scale corrections, and a full set of uncertainties, and their correlations, are provided.The final uncertainties on the jet energy scale are below 3% across the phase space considered by most analyses ($p_{\\mathrm{T}}> $ 30 GeV and $| \\eta| < $ 5.0). In the barrel region ($| \\eta| < $ 1.3) an uncertainty below 1% for $p_{\\mathrm{T}}> $ 30 GeV is reached, when excluding the jet flavor uncertainties, which are provided separately for different jet flavors. A new benchmark for jet energy scale determination at hadron colliders is achieved with 0.32% uncertainty for jets with $p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ of the order of 165-330 GeV, and $| \\eta| < $ 0.8.

  1. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on anesthesia-induced atelectasis and gas exchange in anesthetized and mechanically ventilated sheep.

    PubMed

    Staffieri, Francesco; Driessen, Bernd; Monte, Valentina De; Grasso, Salvatore; Crovace, Antonio

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of 10 cm H(2)O of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on lung aeration and gas exchange in mechanically ventilated sheep during general anesthesia induced and maintained with propofol. 10 healthy adult Bergamasca sheep. Sheep were sedated with diazepam (0.4 mg/kg, IV). Anesthesia was induced with propofol (5 mg/kg, IV) and maintained with propofol via constant rate infusion (0.4 mg/kg/min). Muscular paralysis was induced by administration of vecuronium (25 microg/kg, bolus IV) to facilitate mechanical ventilation. After intubation, sheep were positioned in right lateral recumbency and mechanically ventilated with pure oxygen and zero end-expiratory pressure (ZEEP). After 60 minutes, 10 cm H(2)O of PEEP was applied for 20 minutes. Spiral computed tomography of the thorax was performed, and data were recorded for hemodynamic and gas exchange variables and indicators of respiratory mechanics after 15 (T(15)), 30 (T(30)), and 60 (T(60)) minutes of ZEEP and after 20 minutes of PEEP (T(PEEP)). Computed tomography images were analyzed to determine the extent of atelectasis before and after PEEP application. At T(PEEP), the volume of poorly aerated and atelectatic compartments was significantly smaller than at T(15), T(30), and T(60), which indicated that there was PEEP-induced alveolar recruitment and clearance of anesthesia-induced atelectasis. Arterial oxygenation and static respiratory system compliance were significantly improved by use of PEEP. Pulmonary atelectasis can develop in anesthetized and mechanically ventilated sheep breathing pure oxygen; application of 10 cm H(2)O of PEEP significantly improved lung aeration and gas exchange.

  2. Evolution of Determinant Factors of Repeated Sprint Ability.

    PubMed

    Pareja-Blanco, Fernando; Suarez-Arrones, Luis; Rodríguez-Rosell, David; López-Segovia, Manuel; Jiménez-Reyes, Pedro; Bachero-Mena, Beatriz; González-Badillo, Juan José

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in the relationships between repeated sprint ability (RSA) and anthropometric measures as well as fitness qualities in soccer players. Twenty-one professional soccer players performed several anthropometric and physical tests including countermovement vertical jumps (CMJs), a straight-line 30 m sprint (T30), an RSA test (6 x 20 + 20 m with 20 s recovery), a progressive isoinertial loading test in a full squat, a Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level-1 (YYIRT-1) and a 20 m shuttle run test (20mSRT). The mean (RSAmean), the fastest (RSAbest), each single sprint time, and the percentage in a sprint decrease (%Dec) in the RSA test were calculated. RSAbest correlated significantly with RSAmean (r = .82) and with all single sprints (p < 0.05), showing a downward trend as the number of sprints performed increased. No significant relationship was observed between the %Dec and RSA performance. CMJs and the T30 also showed a correlation with RSA performance, whereas lower limb strength did not show any relationship with RSA performance. RSAmean showed significant (p < 0.05) relationships with body mass (r = .44), adiposity (r = .59) and the YYIRT-1 (r = -.62), increasing as the number of repeated sprints increased. The 20mSRT showed minimal relationships with RSA performance. In conclusion, maximal sprint capacity seems to be relevant for the RSA performance, mainly in the first sprints. However, high intermittent endurance capacity and low adiposity might help enhance the RSA performance when increasing the number of repeated sprints.

  3. Evolution of Determinant Factors of Repeated Sprint Ability

    PubMed Central

    Suarez-Arrones, Luis; Rodríguez-Rosell, David; López-Segovia, Manuel; Jiménez-Reyes, Pedro; Bachero-Mena, Beatriz; González-Badillo, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in the relationships between repeated sprint ability (RSA) and anthropometric measures as well as fitness qualities in soccer players. Twenty-one professional soccer players performed several anthropometric and physical tests including countermovement vertical jumps (CMJs), a straight-line 30 m sprint (T30), an RSA test (6 x 20 + 20 m with 20 s recovery), a progressive isoinertial loading test in a full squat, a Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level-1 (YYIRT-1) and a 20 m shuttle run test (20mSRT). The mean (RSAmean), the fastest (RSAbest), each single sprint time, and the percentage in a sprint decrease (%Dec) in the RSA test were calculated. RSAbest correlated significantly with RSAmean (r = .82) and with all single sprints (p < 0.05), showing a downward trend as the number of sprints performed increased. No significant relationship was observed between the %Dec and RSA performance. CMJs and the T30 also showed a correlation with RSA performance, whereas lower limb strength did not show any relationship with RSA performance. RSAmean showed significant (p < 0.05) relationships with body mass (r = .44), adiposity (r = .59) and the YYIRT-1 (r = -.62), increasing as the number of repeated sprints increased. The 20mSRT showed minimal relationships with RSA performance. In conclusion, maximal sprint capacity seems to be relevant for the RSA performance, mainly in the first sprints. However, high intermittent endurance capacity and low adiposity might help enhance the RSA performance when increasing the number of repeated sprints. PMID:28031763

  4. Transcutaneous spinal cord direct current stimulation inhibits the lower limb nociceptive flexion reflex in human beings.

    PubMed

    Cogiamanian, Filippo; Vergari, Maurizio; Schiaffi, Elena; Marceglia, Sara; Ardolino, Gianluca; Barbieri, Sergio; Priori, Alberto

    2011-02-01

    Aiming at developing a new, noninvasive approach to spinal cord neuromodulation, we evaluated whether transcutaneous direct current (DC) stimulation induces long-lasting changes in the central pain pathways in human beings. A double-blind crossover design was used to investigate the effects of anodal direct current (2mA, 15min) applied on the skin overlying the thoracic spinal cord on the lower-limb flexion reflex in a group of 11 healthy volunteers. To investigate whether transcutaneous spinal cord DC stimulation (tsDCS) acts indirectly on the nociceptive reflex by modulating excitability in mono-oligosynaptic segmental reflex pathways, we also evaluated the H-reflex size from soleus muscle after tibial nerve stimulation. In our healthy subjects, anodal thoracic tsDCS reduced the total lower-limb flexion reflex area by 40.25% immediately after stimulation (T0) and by 46.9% 30min after stimulation offset (T30). When we analyzed the 2 lower-limb flexion reflex components (RII tactile and RIII nociceptive) separately, we found that anodal tsDCS induced a significant reduction in RIII area with a slight but not significant effect on RII area. After anodal tsDCS, the RIII area decreased by 27% at T0 and by 28% at T30. Both sham and active tsDCS left all the tested H-reflex variables unchanged. None of our subjects reported adverse effects after active stimulation. These results suggest that tsDCS holds promise as a tool that is complementary or alternative to drugs and invasive spinal cord electrical stimulation for managing pain. Thoracic transcutaneous direct current stimulation induces depression of nociceptive lower limb flexion reflex in human beings that persists after stimulation offset; this form of stimulation holds promise as a tool that is complementary or alternative to drugs and invasive spinal cord electrical stimulation for managing pain. Copyright © 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Development and application of a multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay for screening a global collection of Citrus tristeza virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Roy, Avijit; Ananthakrishnan, G; Hartung, John S; Brlansky, R H

    2010-10-01

    The emerging diversity of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genotypes has complicated detection and diagnostic measures and prompted the search for new differentiation methods. To simplify the identification and differentiation of CTV genotypes, a multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique for the screening of CTV isolates was developed. Variable regions within the open reading frame (ORF)-1a of diverse CTV genotypes were identified to develop first a simplex (S) and then a hexaplex (H) RT-PCR. CTV isolates have been grouped previously into five genotypes (namely, T3, T30, T36, VT, and B165) based on the nucleotide sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses. Nucleotide sequences from GenBank were used to design species and genotype-specific primers (GSPs). The GSPs were initially used for reliable detection of all CTV genotypes using S-RT-PCR. Furthermore, detection of all five recognized CTV genotypes was established using the H-RT-PCR. Six amplicons, one generic to all CTV isolates and one for each of the five recognized genotypes, were identified on the basis of their size and were confirmed by sequence analysis. In all, 175 CTV isolates from 29 citrus-growing countries were successfully analyzed by S- and H-RT-PCR. Of these, 97 isolates contained T36 genotypes, 95 contained T3 genotypes, 76 contained T30 genotypes, 71 contained VT genotypes, and 24 contained B165 genotype isolates. In total, 126 isolates contained mixed infections of 2 to 5 of the known CTV genotypes. Two of the CTV isolates could not be assigned to a known genotype. H-RT-PCR provides a sensitive, specific, reliable, and rapid way to screen for CTV genotypes compared with other methods for CTV genotype detection. Efficient identification of CTV genotypes will facilitate a better understanding of CTV isolates, including the possible interaction of different genotypes in causing or preventing diseases. The methods described can also be used in virus-free citrus

  6. Genome analysis of an orange stem pitting citrus tristeza virus isolate reveals a novel recombinant genotype.

    PubMed

    Roy, Avijit; Brlansky, R H

    2010-08-01

    An orange stem pitting citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolate CTV-B165 was found to be symptomatically similar to other known CTV-VT isolates however molecular methods failed to classify it as an identifiable CTV genotype. The sequence variation of the Indian CTV-B165 isolate was compared to the three well known CTV genotypes, T36, T30, and VT. The genome of the predominant component of CTV-B165 was 19,247 nt in length with 12 open reading frames (ORFs) and was structurally identical to the other CTV isolates. All the completely sequenced CTV isolates except the VT isolate were 2-55 nt longer than the CTV-B165. In comparison to the other fully sequenced T36, T30 and VT genotypic isolates, CTV-B165 had nucleotide identity of 72-86% in ORF1 and 92-99% in ORFs 2-11. Sequence data of independent overlapping clones from the CTV-B165 genome showed highly divergent sequences of the overlapping region of 5'-UTR and ORF1a, the inter-domain region of ORF1a and the partial regions of ORF2. Phylogenetic analysis of five domains of ORF1a, ORF1b, and ORF2 revealed that CTV-B165 isolate distinctly segregates from the existing three genotypes in the dendrograms and was supported by high bootstrap values and robust tree topology. The PHYLPRO graphical analysis showed multiple recombination signals with significant correlation values. The precise detection of recombination sites for different genomic regions in CTV sequences was supported by several recombination-detecting methods. Collectively, the phylogenetic and recombination analyses suggest that the observed CTV-B165 genotype variation is an outcome of inter-genotype recombination. To determine the presence of the CTV-B165 genotype a pair of genome specific primers was designed and standardized for reliable detection of the novel CTV genotype by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Nuclear structure of 30S and its implications for nucleosynthesis in classical novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setoodehnia, K.; Chen, A. A.; Kahl, D.; Komatsubara, T.; José, J.; Longland, R.; Abe, Y.; Binh, D. N.; Chen, J.; Cherubini, S.; Clark, J. A.; Deibel, C. M.; Fukuoka, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, T.; Hendriks, J.; Ishibashi, Y.; Ito, Y.; Kubono, S.; Lennard, W. N.; Moriguchi, T.; Nagae, D.; Nishikiori, R.; Niwa, T.; Ozawa, A.; Parker, P. D.; Seiler, D.; Shizuma, T.; Suzuki, H.; Wrede, C.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yuasa, T.

    2013-06-01

    Background: The uncertainty in the 29P(p,γ)30S reaction rate over 0.1 ≤ T ≤ 1.3 GK was previously determined to span approximately four orders of magnitude due to the uncertain location of two previously unobserved 3+ and 2+ resonances in the Ex=4.7-4.8 MeV region in 30S. Therefore, the abundances of silicon isotopes synthesized in novae, which are relevant for the identification of presolar grains of putative nova origin, were uncertain by a factor of 3.Purpose: (a) To investigate the level structure of 30S above the proton threshold [4394.9(7) keV] via charged-particle spectroscopy using the 32S(p,t)30S reaction and in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy using the 28Si(3He, nγ)30S reaction to calculate the 29P(p,γ)30S reaction rate. (b) To explore the impact of this rate on the abundances of silicon isotopes synthesized in novae.Methods: Differential cross sections of the 32S(p,t)30S reaction were measured at 34.5 MeV. Distorted-wave Born approximation calculations were performed to constrain the spin-parity assignments of the observed levels, including the two astrophysically important levels. An energy-level scheme was deduced from γ-γ coincidence measurements using the 28Si(3He, nγ)30S reaction. Spin-parity assignments based on measurements of γ-ray angular distributions and γ-γ directional correlation from oriented nuclei were made for most of the observed levels of 30S.Results: The resonance energies corresponding to the states with 4.5 MeV ≲ Ex ≲ 6 MeV, including the two astrophysically important states predicted previously, are measured with significantly better precision than before. The spin-parity assignments of both astrophysically important resonances are confirmed. The uncertainty in the rate of the 29P(p,γ)30S reaction is substantially reduced over the temperature range of interest. Finally, the influence of this rate on the abundance ratios of silicon isotopes synthesized in novae are obtained via 1D hydrodynamic nova simulations

  8. The aluminum phosphate zone in the Peace River area, land-pebble phosphate field, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cathcart, James B.

    1953-01-01

    The Peace River area, comprising T. 30 and 31 S., R. 24 and 25 E., contains a thicker and more persistent aluminum phosphate zone, and one that is higher in P2O5 and uranium content than is known elsewhere in the land-pebble phosphate district. This report has been prepared to bring together all of the information on the aluminum phosphate zone in the area where the first plant to treat this material will probably be located. The area may be divided into three physiographic units, (1) the ridge, (2) the flatwoods, and (3) the valley. Maps showing distribution and grade of the aluminum phosphate zone indicate that the zone is thin or absent in the ridge unit, thickest and most persistent, and of the best grade in P2O5 and uranium in the flatwoods unit, and absent or very low in grade in the valley unit. Maps of thickness and of chemical composition show that even in favorable areas there are places where the aluminum phosphate zone is missing or of questionable economic importance. The distribution maps also show that areas of high P2O5 and high uranium content coincide closely. Areas containing thick aluminum phosphate material usually have high uranium and P2O5 contents. It is estimated that an average of 13,000 tons per day of aluminum phosphate material might be mined from this area. This figure is based on the probable amount of time, per year, that mining would be in favorable ground. When all mines in the area are in favorable ground, the tonnage per day might be about 23,000 tons. Tonnages of aluminum phosphate material have been computed for about 36 percent of the area of T. 30 S., R. 25 E., and for 18 percent of the area of T. 31 S., R. 25 E. The total inferred tonnage is about 150,000,000 short tons, with an average grade of 0.012 percent U3O8.

  9. Plasma carnitine concentrations after chronic alcohol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kępka, Alina; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Chojnowska, Sylwia; Płudowski, Paweł; Konarzewska, Emilia; Szulc, Agata; Ladny, Jerzy Robert; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2013-05-31

    Carnitine transports fatty acids from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial matrix, where the fatty acids are oxidized. Chronic alcohol consumption reduces the concentration of carnitine and interferes with oxidative processes occurring in the cell. The assessment of carnitine concentrations in plasma of chronically intoxicated alcohol dependent persons in a 49-day abstinence period. The study included 31 patients (5 women and 27 men) aged from 26 to 60 years (44.6 ± 8.9) and 32 healthy subjects (15 women and 17 men) aged 22-60 years (39.8 ± 9.4). The patients' alcohol dependence ranged from 2 to 30 years (13.6 ± 7.5). Examined subjects consumed 75-700 g of ethanol/day (226.9 ± 151.5). Plasma concentrations of free and total carnitine were measured three times: at the first (T0), 30th (T30) and 49th (T49) day of hospital detoxification. Free (FC) and total (TC) carnitine were determined by the spectrophotometric method. Plasma acylcarnitine (AC) concentration was calculated from the difference between TC and FC; then the AC/FC ratio was calculated. To determine statistically significant differences for related variables, Student's t-test was used. At T0, alcoholics had significantly lower concentration of FC and TC (p < 0.05) in plasma, as compared to the control group. In comparison to controls, at T30, plasma TC and FC (p < 0.01) as well as AC (p < 0.001) were reduced. The lowest concentration of TC, FC and AC (p < 0.001)was found at T49. The ratio of AC/FC at T0 had a tendency to be higher in alcoholics than in the control group (p = 0.05), whereas at T49 it was significantly lower in alcoholics as compared to the control subjects (p < 0.05). Chronic alcohol intoxication causes a plasma deficiency of carnitine. Forty-nine days of abstinence showed a significant decrease in the concentration of TC, FC and AC. Further research is necessary to clarify whether a low level of plasma carnitine after chronic alcohol intoxication is caused by the uptake of blood

  10. N2O emission from urine in the soil in the beef production in Southeast Brazil: soil moisture content and temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões Barneze, Arlete; Mancebo Mazzetto, Andre; Fernandes Zani, Caio; Siqueira Neto, Marcos; Clemente Cerri, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Pasture expansion in Brazil has shown an increase in 4.5% per year, and a total cattle herd of about 200 millions in 2010. Associated to animal husbandry there are emissions of N2O (nitrous oxide) and other gases to the atmosphere. The liquid manure contributes to emitte 5% of the total N2O emissions. The urea content of cattle urine will readily hydrolyze to form ammonium after deposition to the soil. Nitrous oxide may then be emitted through the microbiological processes of nitrification and denitrification. Important factors can influence on these processes and consequently in nitrous oxide emissions, as soil water content and temperature (Bolan et al., 2004; Luo et al., 2008). The main goal of this research was to determine the soil water content and temperature influence on N2O emissions from urine depositions on the soil. In order to achieve the objective, soil incubation experiment was conducted in laboratory conditions at three levels of water-filled pore space (40%, 60% and 80% WFPS) and two temperatures (25ºC and 35ºC) with and without urine, with five replicates each. The soil used in this study was collected from the 0-10 cm layer of a grassland field in Southeast of Brazil and classified as Nitisols. For each measurement, the Kilner jar was hermetically sealed by replacing the lid and a first gas sample was immediately taken (time-zero, t0 sample) using a syringe and stored in a pre-evacuated gas vial. After 30 minutes the headspace of each jar was sampled again (time-thirty, t_30 sample). The lids were then removed and kept off until the next sampling day. Nitrous oxide concentrations in the sampled air were measured using a SRI Gas Chromatograph (Model 8610C). Gas fluxes were calculated by fitting linear regressions through the data collected at t0 and t_30 and were corrected for temperature and amount of soil incubated. Gas measurements were carried out up to 55 days. To determine the statistical significance, Tukey tests were carried out at 0

  11. Rectal temperature as an indicator for heat tolerance in chickens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing Y; Wei, Pei P; Xu, Shen Y; Geng, Zhao Y; Jiang, Run S

    2013-11-01

    High environmental temperature is perhaps the most important inhibiting factor to poultry production in hot regions. The objective of this study was to test adaptive responses of chickens to high ambient temperatures and identify suitable indicators for selection of heat-tolerant individuals. Full-sib or half-sib Anak-40 pullets (n = 55) with similar body weights were raised in a room with a temperature ranging from 24°C to 28°C, and relative humidity of 50% from 61 to 65 days of age. On day 66, the ambient temperature was increased within 60 min to 35 ± 1°C which was defined as the initial of heat stress (0 h). Rectal temperature (RT) was measured on each pullet at 0, 6, 18, 30, 42, 54 and 66 h. After 66 h the ambient temperature was increased within 30 min to 41 ± 1°C and survival time (HSST) as well as lethal rectal temperatures (LRT) were recorded for each individual. The gap between the RT and initial RT was calculated as ΔTn (ΔT6, ΔT18, ΔT30, ΔT42, ΔT54 and ΔT66), and the interval between LRT and initial RT as ΔTT, respectively. A negative correlation was found between HSST and ΔTn as well as ΔTT (rΔ T 18  = -0.28 and rΔ TT  = -0.31, respectively, P < 0.05; rΔT30  = -0.36, rΔ T 42  = -0.38, rΔT54  = -0.56, P < 0.01). Importantly, pullets with low ΔT18 showed a longer HSST (256.0 ± 208.4 min) than those with high ΔT18 (HSST = 123.7 ± 78.3 min). This observation suggested that the ΔT18 or early increment of RT under heat stress might be considered as a reliable indicator for evaluation of heat resistance in chickens. © 2013 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  12. Relationship Between Repeated Sprint Performance and both Aerobic and Anaerobic Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Dardouri, Wajdi; Selmi, Mohamed Amin; Sassi, Radhouane Haj; Gharbi, Zied; Rebhi, Ahmed; Yahmed, Mohamed Haj; Moalla, Wassim

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were firstly, to examine the relationship between repeated sprint performance indices and anaerobic speed reserve (AnSR), aerobic fitness and anaerobic power and secondly, to identify the best predictors of sprinting ability among these parameters. Twenty nine subjects (age: 22.5 ± 1.6 years, body height: 1.8 ± 0.1 m, body mass: 68.8 ± 8.5 kg, body mass index (BMI): 22.2 ± 2.1 kg•m-2, fat mass: 11.3 ± 2.9 %) participated in this study. All participants performed a 30 m sprint test (T30) from which we calculated the maximal anaerobic speed (MAnS), vertical and horizontal jumps, 20m multi-stage shuttle run test (MSRT) and repeated sprint test (10 × 15 m shuttle run). AnSR was calculated as the difference between MAnS and the maximal speed reached in the MSRT. Blood lactate sampling was performed 3 min after the RSA protocol. There was no significant correlation between repeated sprint indices (total time (TT); peak time (PT), fatigue index (FI)) and both estimated VO2max and vertical jump performance). TT and PT were significantly correlated with T30 (r=0.63, p=0.001 and r=0.62, p=0.001; respectively), horizontal jump performance (r = −0.47, p = 0.001 and r = −0.49, p = 0.006; respectively) and AnSR (r=−0.68, p= 0.001 and r=−0.70, p=0.001, respectively). Significant correlations were found between blood lactate concentration and TT, PT, and AnSR (r=−0.44, p=0.017; r=−0.43, p=0.018 and r=0.44, p=0.016; respectively). Stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated that AnSR was the only significant predictor of the TT and PT, explaining 47% and 50% of the shared variance, respectively. Our findings are of particular interest for coaches and fitness trainers in order to predict repeated sprint performance by using AnSR that can easily identify the respective upper performance limits supported by aerobic and anaerobic power of a player involved in multi-sprint team sports. PMID:25031682

  13. Metabolic changes in four beat gaited horses after field marcha simulation.

    PubMed

    Wanderley, E K; Manso Filho, H C; Manso, H E C C C; Santiago, T A; McKeever, K H

    2010-11-01

    Mangalarga-Marchador is a popular 4-gaited Brazilian horse breed; however, there is little information about their metabolic and physiological response to exercise. To measure physiological and metabolic responses of the Mangalarga-Marchador to a simulated marcha field test and to compare these responses between 2 types of marcha gaits (picada and batida). Thirteen horses were used in the study and randomly assigned to either the picada or batida gait for the simulated marcha field test (speed ∼ 3.2 m/s; 30 min; load ∼ 80 kg). Included body composition, heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), glucose (GLUC), lactate (LACT), packed cell volume (PCV), total plasma protein (TPP), albumin, urea, creatinine, total and HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, creatine kinase, alanine, glutamate and glutamine (GLN). Measurements were obtained pretest (control/fasting), immediately after simulation (T(0)), and 15 (T(15)), 30 (T(30)) and 240 (T(240)) min after the simulation. Lactate (LACT) was measured at T(0), T(15) and T(30). Data were analysed using ANOVA, Tukey's test and t tests with significance set at P < 0.05. Significant acute changes were observed in HR, RR, [GLUC], [LACT], [TPP], PCV and [GLN] (P<0.05) relative to control. Heart rate fell below 60 beats/min at T(15) and RR recovered to pretest values by T(240). Significant increases in [GLUC], [LACT], PCV and [TPP] and a decrease in [GLN] were observed at T(0). Treatment and interaction effects were also observed between marcha types and time of sampling for HR, RF, PCV, and [LACT] (P < 0.05). These parameters were large in picada. The simulation of field-test produced changes in some physiological and blood parameters in marcha horses, with some degree of dehydration during recovery period. Also, it was demonstrated that picada horses spend more energy when compared with batida horses at the the same speed. Batida horses spend less energy when compared with picada horses, which will need special attention in their

  14. Nonlinear effects on western boundary current structure and separation: a laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, S.; Falco, P.; Zambardino, G.; McClimans, T. A.; Ellingsen, I.

    2009-04-01

    The role played by nonlinear effects in shaping the structure of barotropic western boundary currents (WBCs) and in determining WBC separation from the coast has been investigated through laboratory simulations by means of the 5-m-diameter Coriolis rotating basin at SINTEF (Trondheim, Norway) in the framework of the HYDRALAB-III project. The laboratory setup consists of two parallel rectangular channels separated by an island and linked by two curved connections: in the first channel, a piston is forced at a constant speed U ranging from 0.05 to 3 cm/s over a distance of 2.5 m, producing a virtually unsheared current at the entrance of the second channel. In the latter, a linear reduction of the water depth provides the topographic beta-effect that produces the westward intensification. Nearly steady currents are obtained and measured photogrammetrically over a region of about 1 m2. The broad range of piston speeds permitted by the mechanical apparatus has allowed us to achieve an unprecedented coverage of the range of nonlinearity for WBCs in terms of experimental data, so that the cross-stream WBC profile could be analyzed from the nearly linear Munk-type case (e.g., for U=0.1 cm/s with T=30 s, where T is the rotation period of the basin) up to the more realistic highly nonlinear limit (particularly significant is the case U=1 cm/s and T=30 s, which is close to be dynamically similar to the Gulf Stream). Thanks to the large size of the rotating basin, cross-stream widths of the simulated WBC as large as 80 cm could be obtained. Moreover, in order to analyze the process of WBC separation, coastal variations have been introduced along the western boundary in the form of wedge-shaped continents with different coastline orientations, whose northern limit corresponds to an idealized Cape Hatteras. While weak WBCs follow the coast also past the cape, for sufficiently strong nonlinear effects the current detaches from the coast as a consequence of flow deceleration

  15. Intermittency of solar wind on scale 0.01-16 Hz.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riazantseva, Maria; Zastenker, Georgy; Chernyshov, Alexander; Petrosyan, Arakel

    Magnetosphere of the Earth is formed in the process of solar wind flow around earth's magnetic field. Solar wind is a flow of turbulent plasma that displays a multifractal structure and an intermittent character. That is why the study of the characteristics of solar wind turbulence is very important part of the solution of the problem of the energy transport from the solar wind to magnetosphere. A large degree of intermittency is observed in the solar wind ion flux and magnetic field time rows. We investigated the intermittency of solar wind fluctuations under large statistics of high time resolution measurements onboard Interball-1 spacecraft on scale from 0.01 to 16 Hz. Especially it is important that these investigation is carry out for the first time for the earlier unexplored (by plasma data) region of comparatively fast variations (frequency up to 16 Hz), so we significantly extend the range of intermittency observations for solar wind plasma. The intermittency practically absent on scale more then 1000 s and it grows to the small scales right up till t 30-60 s. The behavior of the intermittency for the scale less then 30-60 s is rather changeable. The boundary between these two rates of intermittency is quantitatively near to the well-known boundary between the dissipation and inertial scales of fluctuations, what may point to their possible relation. Special attention is given to a comparison of intermittency for solar wind observation intervals containing SCIF (Sudden Changes of Ion Flux) to ones for intervals without SCIF. Such a comparison allows one to reveal the fundamental turbulent properties of the solar wind regions in which SCIF is observed more frequently. We use nearly incompressible model of the solar wind turbulence for obtained data interpretation. The regime when density fluctuations are passive scalar in a hydrodynamic field of velocity is realized in turbulent solar wind flows according to this model. This hypothesis can be verified

  16. Baseline plasma corticosterone, haematological and biochemical results in nesting and rehabilitating loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta).

    PubMed

    Flower, Jennifer E; Norton, Terry M; Andrews, Kimberly M; Nelson, Steven E; Parker, Clare E; Romero, L Michael; Mitchell, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of hormonal responses to stress in reptiles relies on acquisition of baseline corticosterone concentrations; however, the stress associated with the restraint needed to collect the blood samples can affect the results. The purpose of this study was to determine a time limit for the collection of blood samples to evaluate baseline corticosterone, haematological and biochemical results in nesting (n = 11) and rehabilitating (n = 16) loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta). Blood samples were collected from the dorsal cervical sinus of each turtle immediately after touching the animal (t 0; 0-3 min) and 3 (t 3; 3-6 min), 6 (t 6; 6-9 min; nesting turtles only), 10 (t 10; 10-13 min) and 30 min (t 30; rehabilitating turtles only) after the initial hands-on time. Consistent between the rehabilitating and nesting turtles, there was a subtle yet significant increase in white blood cell counts over time. Despite the fact that white blood cell counts increased during the sampling period, there was no direct correlation between white blood cell count and corticosterone in the sampled turtles. In the nesting turtles, significant elevations in corticosterone were noted between t 0 and t 3 (P = 0.014) and between t 0 and t 6 (P = 0.022). Values at t 10 were not significantly different from those at t 0 (P = 0.102); however, there was a trend for the corticosterone values to continue to increase. These results suggest that sampling of nesting loggerhead sea turtles within 3 min of handling will provide baseline corticosterone concentrations in their natural environment. Significant elevations in corticosterone were also noted in the rehabilitating loggerhead sea turtles between t 0 and t 10 (P = 0.02) and between t 0 and t 30 of sampling (P = 0.0001). These results suggest that sampling of loggerhead sea turtles within 6 min of handling should provide baseline corticosterone concentrations in a rehabilitation setting. The

  17. Comparison between two methods for cardiac output measurement in propofol-anesthetized dogs: thermodilution and Doppler.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Patricia Cristina Ferro; Sousa, Marlos Gonçalves; Camacho, Aparecido Antonio; Carareto, Roberta; Nishimori, Celina T D; Santos, Paulo S P; Nunes, Newton

    2010-09-01

    To compare cardiac output (CO) measured by Doppler echocardiography and thermodilution techniques in spontaneously breathing dogs during continuous infusion of propofol. To do so, CO was obtained using the thermodilution method (CO(TD)) and Doppler evaluation of pulmonary flow (CO(DP)) and aortic flow (CO(DA)). Prospective cohort study. Eight adult dogs weighing 8.3 +/- 2.0 kg. Propofol was used for induction (7.5 +/- 1.9 mg kg(-1) IV) followed by a continuous rate infusion at 0.7 mg kg(-1) minute(-1). The animals were positioned in left lateral recumbency on an echocardiography table that allowed for positioning of the transducer at the 3rd and 5th intercostal spaces of the left hemithorax for Doppler evaluation of pulmonary and aortic valves, respectively. CO(DP) and CO(DA) were calculated from pulmonary and aortic velocity spectra, respectively. A pulmonary artery catheter was inserted via the jugular vein and positioned inside the lumen of the pulmonary artery in order to evaluate CO(TD). The first measurement of CO(TD), CO(DP) and CO(DA) was performed 30 minutes after beginning continuous infusion (T0) and then at 15-minute intervals (T15, T30, T45 and T60). Numeric data were submitted to two-way anova for repeated measurements, Pearson's correlation coefficient and Bland & Altman analysis. Data are presented as mean +/- SD. At T0, CO(TD) was lower than CO(DA). CO(DA) was higher than CO(TD) and CO(DP) at T30, T45 and T60. The difference between the CO(TD) and CO(DP), when all data were included, was -0.04 +/- 0.22 L minute(-1) and Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) was 0.86. The difference between the CO(TD) and CO(DA) was -0.87 +/- 0.54 L minute(-1) and r = 0.69. For CO(TD) and CO(DP), the difference was -0.82 +/- 0.59 L minute(-1) and r = 0.61. Doppler evaluation of pulmonary flow was a clinically acceptable method for assessing the CO in propofol-anesthetized dogs.

  18. Cardiopulmonary effects of reverse Trendelenburg position at 5° and 10° in sevoflurane-anesthetized steers.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Marcelo A; Deschk, Maurício; Wagatsuma, Juliana T; Floriano, Beatriz P; Siqueira, Carlos E; Oliva, Valéria Nls; Santos, Paulo Sp

    2017-04-26

    To assess the cardiopulmonary effects caused by reverse Trendelenburg position (RTP) at 5° and 10° in sevoflurane-anesthetized yearling steers. Prospective, experimental study. Eight Holstein steers aged (mean ± standard deviation) 12 ± 2 months and weighing 145 ± 26 kg. In the first phase of the study, the individual minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane was determined using electrical stimulation. In the second phase, the effects of RTP were assessed. The animals were anesthetized on three separate events separated by ≥7 days in an incomplete crossover design: control treatment using a table without tilt (RTP0); treatment with the table at 5° RTP (RTP5) and table tilted 10° RTP (RTP10). Subjects were physically restrained in dorsal recumbency on the table, which was already tilted according to each treatment. Anesthesia was induced with sevoflurane at 8% in 5 L minute(-1) oxygen via face mask followed by maintenance with sevoflurane at 1.3 MAC and spontaneous breathing. Cardiopulmonary variables were obtained immediately after instrumentation (T0) and then after 30, 60, 120 and 180 minutes (T30, T60, T120 and T180, respectively). The mean sevoflurane MAC for the eight steers was 2.12 ± 0.31%. Cardiac output was lower at all time points and the systemic vascular resistance index was higher at T120 and T180 in RTP10 compared with RTP0. Oxygen consumption was lower at T0 and at T180 in RTP10 compared with RTP0 and at all time points except T30 compared with RTP5. Oxygen extraction was lower at T0 in RTP10 compared with RTP0 and RTP5, and at T60 and T180 compared with RTP5. RTP 5° and 10° did not improve ventilatory and oxygenation variables in sevoflurane-anesthetized steers when compared with no tilt, however the cardiovascular variables were adversely affected in RTP10. Copyright © 2017 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Computer simulations of the solvatochromism of betaine-30

    SciTech Connect

    Mente, S.R.; Maroncelli, M.

    1999-09-09

    Monte Carlo simulations of the pyridinium N-phenolate dye betaine-30 in 12 solvents (20 solvent representations) were performed in order to explore the molecular basis of the E{sub T}(30) scale of solvent polarity. Ab initio (HF/6-31G{sup *}) and semiempirical (AM1 and INDO/S) electronic structure calculations were used to determine the geometry and charge distribution of betaine-30 in its S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} states. The solvent effect on the betaine absorption spectrum was assumed to derive from electrostatic interactions between the effective charge distributions of solvent molecules and the charge shift brought about by the S{sub 0} {r_arrow} S{sub 1} transition. Two models for this charge shift, one obtained from INDO/S calculations and the other an idealized two-site model, were used for the spectral calculations. Good agreement between simulated and observed {Delta}E{sub T} shifts (E{sub T}(30) values measured relative to the nonpolar standard tetramethylsilane) was found for both charge-shift models. In water and other hydroxylic solvents, the O atom of the betaine solute was observed to form moderately strong hydrogen bonds to between one and two solvent molecules. The contribution of these specifically coordinated molecules to the {Delta}E{sub T} shift was found to be large, (30--60%) and comparable to experimental estimates. Additional simulations of acetonitrile and methanol in equilibrium with the S{sub 1} state of betaine-30 were used to determine reorganization energies in these solvents and to decide the extent to which the solvent response to the S{sub 0} {leftrightarrow} S{sub 1} transition conforms to linear response predictions. In both solvents, the spectral distributions observed in the S{sub 0} state simulations were {approximately} 15% narrower than those in the S{sub 1} simulations, indicating only a relatively small departure from linear behavior. Reorganization energies were also estimated for a number of other solvents and compared to

  20. A Role for p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase-mediated Threonine 30-dependent Norepinephrine Transporter Regulation in Cocaine Sensitization and Conditioned Place Preference*

    PubMed Central

    Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; NarasimhaNaidu, Kamalakkannan; Damaj, Mohamad Imad; Ramamoorthy, Sammanda; Jayanthi, Lankupalle Damodara

    2015-01-01

    The noradrenergic and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) systems are implicated in cocaine-elicited behaviors. Previously, we demonstrated a role for p38 MAPK-mediated norepinephrine transporter (NET) Thr30 phosphorylation in cocaine-induced NET up-regulation (Mannangatti, P., Arapulisamy, O., Shippenberg, T. S., Ramamoorthy, S., and Jayanthi, L. D. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 20239–20250). The present study explored the functional interaction between p38 MAPK-mediated NET regulation and cocaine-induced behaviors. In vitro cocaine treatment of mouse prefrontal cortex synaptosomes resulted in enhanced NET function, surface expression, and phosphorylation. Pretreatment with PD169316, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, completely blocked cocaine-mediated NET up-regulation and phosphorylation. In mice, in vivo administration of p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 completely blocked cocaine-induced NET up-regulation and p38 MAPK activation in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. When tested for cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and conditioned place preference (CPP), mice receiving SB203580 on cocaine challenge day or on postconditioning test day exhibited significantly reduced cocaine sensitization and CPP. A transactivator of transcription (TAT) peptide strategy was utilized to test the involvement of the NET-Thr30 motif. In vitro treatment of synaptosomes with TAT-NET-Thr30 (wild-type peptide) completely blocked cocaine-mediated NET up-regulation and phosphorylation. In vivo administration of TAT-NET-Thr30 peptide but not TAT-NET-T30A (mutant peptide) completely blocked cocaine-mediated NET up-regulation and phosphorylation. In the cocaine CPP paradigm, mice receiving TAT-NET-Thr30 but not TAT-NET-T30A on postconditioning test day exhibited significantly reduced cocaine CPP. Following extinction, TAT-NET-Thr30 when given prior to cocaine challenge significantly reduced reinstatement of cocaine CPP. These results demonstrate that the direct inhibition of p38

  1. Baseline plasma corticosterone, haematological and biochemical results in nesting and rehabilitating loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta)

    PubMed Central

    Flower, Jennifer E.; Norton, Terry M.; Andrews, Kimberly M.; Nelson, Steven E.; Parker, Clare E.; Romero, L. Michael; Mitchell, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of hormonal responses to stress in reptiles relies on acquisition of baseline corticosterone concentrations; however, the stress associated with the restraint needed to collect the blood samples can affect the results. The purpose of this study was to determine a time limit for the collection of blood samples to evaluate baseline corticosterone, haematological and biochemical results in nesting (n = 11) and rehabilitating (n = 16) loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta). Blood samples were collected from the dorsal cervical sinus of each turtle immediately after touching the animal (t0; 0–3 min) and 3 (t3; 3–6 min), 6 (t6; 6–9 min; nesting turtles only), 10 (t10; 10–13 min) and 30 min (t30; rehabilitating turtles only) after the initial hands-on time. Consistent between the rehabilitating and nesting turtles, there was a subtle yet significant increase in white blood cell counts over time. Despite the fact that white blood cell counts increased during the sampling period, there was no direct correlation between white blood cell count and corticosterone in the sampled turtles. In the nesting turtles, significant elevations in corticosterone were noted between t0 and t3 (P = 0.014) and between t0 and t6 (P = 0.022). Values at t10 were not significantly different from those at t0 (P = 0.102); however, there was a trend for the corticosterone values to continue to increase. These results suggest that sampling of nesting loggerhead sea turtles within 3 min of handling will provide baseline corticosterone concentrations in their natural environment. Significant elevations in corticosterone were also noted in the rehabilitating loggerhead sea turtles between t0 and t10 (P = 0.02) and between t0 and t30 of sampling (P = 0.0001). These results suggest that sampling of loggerhead sea turtles within 6 min of handling should provide baseline corticosterone concentrations in a rehabilitation setting. The delay in

  2. Relationship Between Repeated Sprint Performance and both Aerobic and Anaerobic Fitness.

    PubMed

    Dardouri, Wajdi; Selmi, Mohamed Amin; Sassi, Radhouane Haj; Gharbi, Zied; Rebhi, Ahmed; Yahmed, Mohamed Haj; Moalla, Wassim

    2014-03-27

    The aims of this study were firstly, to examine the relationship between repeated sprint performance indices and anaerobic speed reserve (AnSR), aerobic fitness and anaerobic power and secondly, to identify the best predictors of sprinting ability among these parameters. Twenty nine subjects (age: 22.5 ± 1.6 years, body height: 1.8 ± 0.1 m, body mass: 68.8 ± 8.5 kg, body mass index (BMI): 22.2 ± 2.1 kg•m-2, fat mass: 11.3 ± 2.9 %) participated in this study. All participants performed a 30 m sprint test (T30) from which we calculated the maximal anaerobic speed (MAnS), vertical and horizontal jumps, 20m multi-stage shuttle run test (MSRT) and repeated sprint test (10 × 15 m shuttle run). AnSR was calculated as the difference between MAnS and the maximal speed reached in the MSRT. Blood lactate sampling was performed 3 min after the RSA protocol. There was no significant correlation between repeated sprint indices (total time (TT); peak time (PT), fatigue index (FI)) and both estimated VO2max and vertical jump performance). TT and PT were significantly correlated with T30 (r=0.63, p=0.001 and r=0.62, p=0.001; respectively), horizontal jump performance (r = -0.47, p = 0.001 and r = -0.49, p = 0.006; respectively) and AnSR (r=-0.68, p= 0.001 and r=-0.70, p=0.001, respectively). Significant correlations were found between blood lactate concentration and TT, PT, and AnSR (r=-0.44, p=0.017; r=-0.43, p=0.018 and r=0.44, p=0.016; respectively). Stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated that AnSR was the only significant predictor of the TT and PT, explaining 47% and 50% of the shared variance, respectively. Our findings are of particular interest for coaches and fitness trainers in order to predict repeated sprint performance by using AnSR that can easily identify the respective upper performance limits supported by aerobic and anaerobic power of a player involved in multi-sprint team sports.

  3. Extremely large electronic anisotropy caused by electronic phase separation in Ca3(Ru0.97Ti0.03)2O7 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jing; Wu, Xiaoshan; Mao, Zhiqiang

    2015-03-01

    Bilayered ruthenate Ca3 Ru2O7 exhibits rich electronic and magnetic properties. It orders at 56K, with FM bilayers antiferromagnetically coupled along c-axis (AFM-a). The AFM transition is closely followed by a first-order metal-insulator (MI) transition at 48K where spin directions switch to the b-axis (AFM-b). While this MI transition is accompanied by the opening of anisotropic charge gap; small Fermi pockets survive from the MI transition, thus resulting in quasi-2D metallic transport behavior for T<30K. We previously showed such a quasi-2D metal with the AFM-b order composed of FM bilayers can be tuned to a Mott-insulating state with a nearest-neighbor AFM order via Ti doping. Ca3(Ru0 . 97 Ti0 . 03) 2O7 is close to the critical composition for the AFM-b-to-G-AFM phase transition. Our recent studies show the sample with this composition is characterized by an electronic phase separation between the insulating G-AFM phase (major) and the localized AFM-b phase (minor). The minor AFM-b phase forms a conducting path through electronic percolation within the ab-plane, but not along the c-axis, thus resulting in extremely large electronic anisotropy with ρab /ρc ~109 , which may be the largest among bulk materials.

  4. Enzyme-assisted extraction of lycopene from tomato processing waste.

    PubMed

    Zuorro, Antonio; Fidaleo, Marcello; Lavecchia, Roberto

    2011-12-10

    A central composite design was used to optimize the enzyme-assisted extraction of lycopene from the peel fraction of tomato processing waste. Tomato skins were pretreated by a food-grade enzyme preparation with pectinolytic and cellulolytic activities and then subjected to hexane extraction. The factors investigated included extraction temperature (10-50 °C), pretreatment time (0.5-6.5 h), extraction time (0.5-4.5 h), enzyme solution-to-solid ratio (10-50 dm³/kg) and enzyme load (0-0.2 kg/kg). Overall, an 8- to 18-fold increase in lycopene recovery was observed compared to the untreated plant material. From a response surface analysis of the data, a second-degree polynomial equation was developed which provided the following optimal extraction conditions: T=30 °C, extraction time=3.18 h and enzyme load=0.16 kg/kg. The obtained results strongly support the idea of using cell-wall degrading enzymes as an effective means for recovering lycopene from tomato waste.

  5. Spectroscopic investigation of the solvatochromic behavior of a new synthesized non symmetric viologen dye: study of the solvent-solute interactions.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Raffaello; Deligkiozi, Ioanna; Tsolomitis, Athanase

    2010-07-01

    This work deals with the design, synthesis, and characterization of a new solvatochromic dye. The intense solvatochromic behavior of this new synthesized non symmetric viologen was investigated using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. A further purpose was the study of the interactions between the solvent and solute molecules responsible for the solvatochromism. Several protic and aprotic solvents were used, and the resulting absorption maxima wavenumbers obtained via UV-Vis spectrophotometry, were correlated with the solvent polarity parameters, E(T)(30) (Dimroth-Reichardt solvent polarity parameter) and the Gutmann's donor number (DN) using the biparametric model introduced by Krygowski and Fawcett. The analysis of the relative contribution of each parameter has clearly shown that the dominating interaction responsible for the solvatochromic behavior observed is the proton donation by the solute molecules to the solvent molecules, the latter acting as a Lewis bases. This is an interaction which can be described by DN. Additionally, the good correlation with the Kamlet-Taft parameter beta is in good agreement.

  6. Effect of instant controlled pressure drop treatments on the oligosaccharides extractability and microstructure of Tephrosia purpurea seeds.

    PubMed

    Amor, Bouthaina Ben; Lamy, Cécile; Andre, Patrice; Allaf, Karim

    2008-12-12

    The study of the oligosaccharides extracted from Tephrosia purpurea seeds was undertaken using the instant controlled pressure drop (DIC) as a pre-treatment prior to conventional solvent extraction. This DIC procedure provided structural modification in terms of expansion, higher porosity and improvement of specific surface area; diffusion of solvent inside such seeds and availability of oligosaccharides increase notably. In this paper, we investigated and quantified the impact of the different DIC operative parameters on the yields of ciceritol and stachyose extracted from T. purpurea seeds. The treatment could be optimized with a steam pressure (P) (P=0.2 MPa), initial water content (W) (W=30% dry basis (DB)) and thermal treatment time (t) (t=30s). By applying DIC treatment in these conditions, the classic process of extraction was intensified in both aspects of yields (145% of ciceritol and 185% of stachyose), and kinetics (1h of extraction time instead of 4h for conventional process). The scanning electron microscopy micrographs provided evident modifications of structure of seeds due to the DIC treatment.

  7. Summary of Synoptic Meteorological Observations. Indonesian Coastal Marine Areas. Volume 2. Area 8 - West Borneo, Area 9 - Karimata Strait, Area 10 - Southwest Java Sea, Area 11 - South Central Java, Area 12 - Southeast Java, Area 13 - Southeast Java Sea, Area 14 - Northeast Java Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    PRE Cc COW CLOUDS (EIGHTHS) TOTAL C 1 2 3 4 q 6 7 a 625O OaS 2.1 7?.A 10.’ 12.4 1,2.5 10.6 .3 6.7 17.6 0 193 P606j 002 77 fIr JANUARY P...75 60.1 191 126lS .0 .0 .0 28.6 37.1 %6.3 84 35 Istal 4’ 0) 02 80 76 7. 72 70.5 302 16±21 .0 .0 5.’ 21.6 5t.4 P1.6 It 37 TrT 94 37 8 80 77 75 69 80...20.1 21.5 21.3 21.5 1P ETOTAL 2t 30 30 2O 32 32 󈧮 32 TOTAL NUMBER Olt ClIS8 49 Per F4EG NN ɝ/81 74.5 TAICI 7A PERCENTAGE FRIG OR COW CLOUD

  8. Structure and electrical properties of epitaxial SrRuO3 thin films controlled by oxygen partial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan; Zhong, Ni; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Qi, Rui-Juan; Huang, Rong; Tang, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Ping-Xiong; Xiang, Ping-Hua; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2016-12-01

    SrRuO3 (SRO) thin films have been grown on (001)-oriented SrTiO3 substrate under various oxygen partial pressures (PO2). A typical step-and-terrace surface morphology and coherent epitaxy characteristics are found in the SRO films for high oxygen pressure growth (PO2 ≥ 10 Pa). Under such high PO2, SRO films exhibit metallic behavior over a temperature range of 10 K ≤ T ≤ 300 K. A detailed study on the transport properties of the metallic SRO films reveals that the resistivity (ρ) follows the law ρ(T)-ρ0 ∝ Tx (x = 0.5, 1.5, or 2). Below ferromagnetic transition temperature (Tc), ρ(T) follows T2 dependence below 30 K and T1.5 dependence at T > 30 K, respectively. This result demonstrates that a transition between the Fermi-liquid (FL) and non-Fermi-liquid (NFL) behavior occurs at ˜30 K. Furthermore, ρ(T) follows T0.5 dependence at T > Tc in the paramagnetic metal state. We have found that the FL to NFL transitions as well as the ferromagnetic transition are corresponding to the abnormal peaks in the magnetoresistance curves, suggesting the coupling of electronic and magnetic properties. The transition temperature of FL to NFL for metallic SRO films is almost independent on PO2, while Tc slightly increases with PO2.

  9. Neutron capture of /sup 122/Te, /sup 123/Te, /sup 124/Te, /sup 125/Te, and /sup 126/Te

    SciTech Connect

    Macklin, R.L.; Winters, R.R.

    1989-07-01

    Isotopically enriched samples of the tellurium isotopes from mass 122 to mass 126 were used to measure neutron capture in the energy range 2.6 keV to 600 keV at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator pulsed neutron source. Starting at 2.6 keV, over 200 Breit-Wigner resonances for each isotope were used to describe the capture data. Least-squares adjustment gave parameters and their uncertainties for a total of 1659 resonances. Capture cross sections averaged over Maxwellian neutron distributions with temperatures ranging from kT = 5 keV to kT = 100 keV were derived for comparison with stellar nucleosynthesis calculations. For the three isotopes shielded from the astrophysical r-process, /sup 122/Te, /sup 123/Te and /sup 124/Te at kT = 30 keV the respective values were (280 /plus minus/ 10) mb, (819 /plus minus/ 30) mb and (154 /plus minus/ 6) mb. The corresponding products of cross section and solar system abundance are nearly equal in close agreement with s-process nucleosynthesis calculations. 26 refs., 8 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. Contribution of recombination and selection to molecular evolution of Citrus tristeza virus.

    PubMed

    Martín, Susana; Sambade, Adrián; Rubio, Luis; Vives, María C; Moya, Patricia; Guerri, José; Elena, Santiago F; Moreno, Pedro

    2009-06-01

    The genetic variation of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) was analysed by comparing the predominant sequence variants in seven genomic regions (p33, p65, p61, p18, p13, p20 and p23) of 18 pathogenically distinct isolates from seven different countries. Analyses of the selective constraints acting on each codon suggest that most regions were under purifying selection. Phylogenetic analysis shows diverse patterns of molecular evolution for different genomic regions. A first clade composed of isolates that are genetically close to the reference mild isolates T385 or T30 was inferred from all genomic regions. A second clade, mostly comprising virulent isolates, was defined from regions p33, p65, p13 and p23. For regions p65, p61, p18, p13 and p23, a third clade that mostly included South American isolates could not be related to any reference genotype. Phylogenetic relationships among isolates did not reflect their geographical origin, suggesting significant gene flow between geographically distant areas. Incongruent phylogenetic trees for different genomic regions suggested recombination events, an extreme that was supported by several recombination-detecting methods. A phylogenetic network incorporating the effect of recombination showed an explosive radiation pattern for the evolution of some isolates and also grouped isolates by virulence. Taken together, the above results suggest that negative selection, gene flow, sequence recombination and virulence may be important factors driving CTV evolution.

  11. Time-resolved and temperature tuneable measurements of fluorescent intensity using a smartphone fluorimeter.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Arafat; Canning, John; Yu, Zhikang; Ast, Sandra; Rutledge, Peter J; Wong, Joseph K-H; Jamalipour, Abbas; Crossley, Maxwell J

    2017-05-30

    A smartphone fluorimeter capable of time-based fluorescence intensity measurements at various temperatures is reported. Excitation is provided by an integrated UV LED (λex = 370 nm) and detection obtained using the in-built CMOS camera. A Peltier is integrated to allow measurements of the intensity over T = 10 to 40 °C. All components are controlled using a smartphone battery powered Arduino microcontroller and a customised Android application that allows sequential fluorescence imaging and quantification every δt = 4 seconds. The temperature dependence of fluorescence intensity for four emitters (rhodamine B, rhodamine 6G, 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin and 6-(1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane)2-ethyl-naphthalimide) are characterised. The normalised fluorescence intensity over time of the latter chemosensor dye complex in the presence of Zn(2+) is observed to accelerate with an increasing rate constant, k = 1.94 min(-1) at T = 15 °C and k = 3.64 min(-1) at T = 30 °C, approaching a factor of ∼2 with only a change in temperature of ΔT = 15 °C. Thermally tuning these twist and bend associated rates to optimise sensor approaches and device applications is proposed.

  12. Bidirectional frequency-dependent effect of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field on E. coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Varsik; Baghdasaryan, Naira; Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2013-09-01

    In the present work, the frequency-dependent effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF) on Escherichia coli K-12 growth have been studied. The frequency-dependent effects of ELF EMF have shown that it can either stimulate or inhibit the growth of microbes. However, the mechanism by which the ELF EMF affects the bacterial cells is not clear yet. It was suggested that the aqua medium can serve as a target through which the biological effect of ELF EMF on microbes may be realized. To check this hypothesis, the frequency-dependent effects (2, 4, 6, 8, 10 Hz, B = 0.4 mT, 30 min) of ELF EMF on the bacterial growth were studied in both cases where the microbes were in the culture media during the exposure and where culture media was preliminarily exposed to the ELF EMF before the addition of bacteria. For investigating the cell proliferation, the radioactive [(3)H]-thymidine assay was carried out. It has been shown that EMF at 4 Hz exposure has pronounced stimulation while at 8 Hz it has inhibited cell proliferation.

  13. Thickness of the particle swarm in cosmic ray air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsley, J.

    1985-01-01

    The average dispersion in arrival time of air shower particles detected with a scintillator at an impact parameter r is described with accuracy 5-10% by the empirical formula sigma = Sigma sub to (1+r/r sub t) sup b, where Sigma sub to = 2.6 ns, r sub t = 30m and b = (1.94 + or - .08) (0.39 + or - .06) sec Theta, for r 2 km, 10 to the 8th power E 10 to the 11th power GeV, and Theta 60 deg. (E is the primary energy and theta is the zenith angle). The amount of fluctuation in sigma sub t due to fluctuations in the level of origin and shower development is less than 20%. These results provide a basis for estimating the impact parameters of very larger showers with data from very small detector arrays (mini-arrays). The energy of such showers can then be estimated from the local particle density. The formula also provides a basis for estimating the angular resolution of air shower array-telescopes.

  14. Do tunneling states and boson peak persist or disappear in extremely stabilized glasses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, M. A.; Pérez-Castañeda, T.; Jiménez-Riobóo, R. J.; Rodríguez-Tinoco, C.; Rodríguez-Viejo, J.

    2015-06-01

    We review and concurrently discuss two recent works conducted by us, which apparently give opposite results. Specifically, we have investigated how extreme thermal histories in glasses can affect their universal properties at low temperatures, by studying: (i) amber, the fossilized natural resin, which is a glass which has experienced a hyperaging process for about one hundred million years; and (ii) ultrastable thin-film glasses of indomethacin. Specific heat Cp measurements in the temperature range 0.07 K < T < 30 K showed that the amount of two-level systems, assessed from the linear term at the lowest temperatures, was exactly the same for the pristine hyperaged amber glass as for the subsequently rejuvenated samples, whereas just a modest increase of the boson-peak height (in Cp/T3) with increasing rejuvenation was observed, related to a corresponding increase of the Debye coefficient. On the other hand, we have observed an unexpected suppression of the two-level systems in the ultrastable glass of indomethacin, whereas conventionally prepared thin films of the same material exhibit the usual linear term in the specific heat below 1 K ascribed to these universal two-level systems in glasses. By comparing both highly-stable kinds of glass, we conclude that the disappearance of the tunneling two-level systems in ultrastable thin films of indomethacin may be due to the quasi-2D and anisotropic behavior of this glass, what could support the idea of a phonon-mediated interaction between two-level systems.

  15. Informatics in radiology: integration of the medical imaging resource center into a teaching hospital network to allow single sign-on access.

    PubMed

    Prevedello, Luciano M; Andriole, Katherine P; Khorasani, Ryan Roobian Ramin

    2009-01-01

    The RSNA Medical Imaging Resource Center (MIRC) software is an open-source program that allows users to identify, index, and retrieve images, teaching files, and other radiologic data that share a common underlying structure. The software is being continually improved as new challenges and different needs become apparent. Although version T30 is easily installed on a stand-alone computer, its implementation at healthcare enterprises with complex network architecture may be challenging with respect to security because users cannot log on by using a standard enterprise-wide authentication protocol. Instead, authentication takes place through the local MIRC database, creating security concerns and potential organizational problems. In this setting, the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) can be used to provide a single sign-on environment and increase authentication security. A commercial directory service using LDAP has been successfully integrated with MIRC in a large multifacility enterprise to provide single sign-on capability compatible with the institutional networking policies for password security.

  16. Preparation of gluten free bread enriched with green mussel (Perna canaliculus) protein hydrolysates and characterization of peptides responsible for mussel flavour.

    PubMed

    Vijaykrishnaraj, M; Roopa, B S; Prabhasankar, P

    2016-11-15

    Green mussel protein hydrolysates (GMPH) utilization for the enrichment of gluten-free bread followed by characterization of flavour peptides using chromatography and electronic nose techniques have been done. The degree of hydrolysis was carried out in each protease digest, and the higher degree of hydrolysis was observed in pepsin digestion. Gluten-free (GF) bread was formulated by using buckwheat flour (BWF), rice flour (RF) and chickpea flour (CPF) (70:20:10) and GMPH were added in the range of 0-20% in the GF bread for enrichment with GMPH. Radar plot of the electronic nose analysis showed that the sensors P30/2, T30/1 and T70/2 had a higher response to the GF bread and GMPH. Consequently, the peptide sequence was obtained manually by ESI-MS spectra of GMPH (KGYSSYICDK) and F-II (SSYCIVKICDK). Flavour quality was 97% discriminately comparable to the GMPH and F-II fractions. Mussel flavoured GF bread can be included in the celiac diet. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Facsimile transmission standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudry, Andrew; Poulin, Brad

    1993-10-01

    Modern tactical communications systems are becoming increasingly compatible with existing civilian systems. This compatibility allows the military to take advantage of the equipment available commercially and spare the expense of developing costly customized systems. It also increases the interoperability of various communications systems employed by allies involved in multinational operations. Finally, the compatibility allows the military to augment its telecommunications assets with existing commercial equipment and networks during times of conflict. One civilian communication standard that has recently been adopted by the military for tactical communications is that of facsimile. Facsimile is now commonly used on the battlefield for the transmission of tactical maps and situation reports. This technical note examines the requirements for facsimile transmission. An overview of the various facsimile standards are given, followed by a detailed description of the most commonly used standard; CCITT Group III. The Group III specifications are a composite of various CCITT modulation and encoding standards. These consist of V.21, V.27ter, and V.29 modulations, as well as T.4 image encoding standards, and T.30 signalling specifications. Each of these standards is described in the context of facsimile transmissions. A complete description of the handshaking which occurs between the facsimile transmitter and receiver is given.

  18. Extraordinary behavioral entrainment following circadian rhythm bifurcation in mice.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Elizabeth M; Walbeek, Thijs J; Sun, Jonathan; Johnson, Jeremy; Poonawala, Qays; Gorman, Michael R

    2016-12-08

    The mammalian circadian timing system uses light to synchronize endogenously generated rhythms with the environmental day. Entrainment to schedules that deviate significantly from 24 h (T24) has been viewed as unlikely because the circadian pacemaker appears capable only of small, incremental responses to brief light exposures. Challenging this view, we demonstrate that simple manipulations of light alone induce extreme plasticity in the circadian system of mice. Firstly, exposure to dim nocturnal illumination (<0.1 lux), rather than completely dark nights, permits expression of an altered circadian waveform wherein mice in light/dark/light/dark (LDLD) cycles "bifurcate" their rhythms into two rest and activity intervals per 24 h. Secondly, this bifurcated state enables mice to adopt stable activity rhythms under 15 or 30 h days (LDLD T15/T30), well beyond conventional limits of entrainment. Continuation of dim light is unnecessary for T15/30 behavioral entrainment following bifurcation. Finally, neither dim light alone nor a shortened night is sufficient for the extraordinary entrainment observed under bifurcation. Thus, we demonstrate in a non-pharmacological, non-genetic manipulation that the circadian system is far more flexible than previously thought. These findings challenge the current conception of entrainment and its underlying principles, and reveal new potential targets for circadian interventions.

  19. EFFECTS OF AGE AND ACUTE MUSCLE FATIGUE ON REACTIVE POSTURAL CONTROL IN HEALTHY ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Evan V.; Foreman, K. Bo; Dibble, Lee E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Falls can cause moderate to severe injuries such as hip fractures and head trauma in older adults. While declines in muscle strength and sensory function contribute to increased falls in older adults, skeletal muscle fatigue is often overlooked as an additional contributor to fall risk. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of acute lower extremity muscle fatigue and age on reactive postural control in healthy adults. METHODS A sample of 16 individuals participated in this study (8 healthy older adults and 8 healthy young persons). Whole body kinematic and kinetic data were collected during anterior and posterior reproducible fall tests before (T0) and immediately after (T1) eccentric muscle fatiguing exercise, as well as after 15-minutes (T15) and 30-minutes (T30) of rest. FINDINGS Lower extremity joint kinematics of the stepping limb during the support (landing) phase of the anterior fall were significantly altered by the presence of acute muscle fatigue. Step velocity was significantly decreased during the anterior falls. Statistically significant main effects of age were found for step length in both fall directions. Effect sizes for all outcomes were small. No statistically significant interaction effects were found. INTERPRETATION Muscle fatigue has a measurable effect on lower extremity joint kinematics during simulated falls. These alterations appear to resolve within 15 minutes of recovery. The above deficits, coupled with a reduced step length, may help explain the increased fall risk in older adults. PMID:26351001

  20. Increase in prostate stem cell antigen expression in prostatic hyperplasia induced by testosterone and 17β-estradiol in C57BL mice.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Nariaki; Kanno, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Estradiol (E2) is known to act synergistically with testosterone (T) for the development of prostatic hyperplasia in rats and dogs, but murine prostate is less responsive to hormonal stimulation. However, a recent study revealed that the combined administration of E2 and T induced prostatic hyperplasia with bladder outlet obstruction in C57BL mice. To understand the mechanisms underlying the hormonal induction of prostatic hyperplasia, the expression of growth factors and their receptors, androgen receptor, estrogen receptor (ER), and prostatic secretory proteins was investigated. Ten-week-old male C57BL mice were treated with T (30mg) or T+E2 (0.5mg) for 10 weeks, and prostatic lobes were dissected and subjected to quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting analysis. T administration appeared to induce glandular prostatic growth, while with T+E2 administration this growth was greater and accompanied by extreme bladder enlargement. The expression of prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) mRNA and protein was increased in prostate tissue in the T group. The combined administration of E2 with T prominently enhanced PSCA expression, along with increased insulin growth factor 1 mRNA levels and decreased estrogen receptor β mRNA expression. The synergistic effect of E2 on the expression of PSCA suggests that this protein may play an important role in the hormone-induced development of prostatic hyperplasia.

  1. Plasma-Filled Rod-Pinch Diode for HEDLP Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Andrew; Weber, Bruce; Swanekamp, Stephen; Schumer, Joseph; Pereira, Nino; Seely, John; Mosher, David

    2016-10-01

    This poster describes recent progress on research into using the plasma-filled rod-pinch (PFRP) at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) for warm dense matter (WDM) studies. The objective of this project is to utilize the PFRP diode and associated diagnostics to experimentally quantify the pressure, temperature, and ionization state via independent measurements in WDM comprised of ionized high-Z materials (tungsten). Previous experiments and preliminary results show that the parameters of the PFRP plasma are approximately Z = 17 , ρm = 0.7 g/cm3, T = 30 eV, P = 16 Mb, and Γ = 35 . The experiments and simulations currently underway will allow for more accurate determination of these parameters, which will contribute to an enhanced understanding of these high-Z materials in a WDM state. To achieve this objective, new diagnostics are being developed and current diagnostics are being refined, experiments are being performed, and numerical modeling is being carried out. This project will refine a new technique for producing WDM that can be replicated on pulsed power generators at several US universities and government laboratories, provide data for benchmarking numerical analysis codes, and develop diagnostics that should prove useful on many other WDM sources. This work was supported under the Department of Energy Office of Science Project DE-SC0014331.

  2. J-integral of circumferential crack in large diameter pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Wei; Chao, Yuh J.; Sutton, M.A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Lam, P.S.; Mertz, G.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Large diameter thin-walled pipes are encountered in low pressure nuclear power piping system. Fracture parameters such as K and J, associated with postulated cracks are needed to assess the safety of the structure, for example, prediction of the onset of tile crack growth and the stability of the crack. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has completed a comprehensive study of cracks in pipes and handbook-type data is available. However, for some large diameter, thin-walled pipes the needed information is not included in the handbook. This paper reports our study of circumferential cracks in large diameter, thin-walled pipes (R/t=30 to 40) under remote bending or tension loads. Elastic-Plastic analyses using finite element method were performed to determine the elastic and fully plastic J values for various pipe/crack geometries. A non-linear Ramberg-Osgood material model is used, with strain hardening exponents(n) ranging from 3 to 10. A number of circumferential, through thickness cracks were studied with half crack angles ranging from 0.063[pi] to 0.5[pi]. Results are tabulated for use with the EPRI estimation scheme.

  3. J-integral of circumferential crack in large diameter pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Wei; Chao, Yuh J.; Sutton, M.A.; Lam, P.S.; Mertz, G.E.

    1992-12-01

    Large diameter thin-walled pipes are encountered in low pressure nuclear power piping system. Fracture parameters such as K and J, associated with postulated cracks are needed to assess the safety of the structure, for example, prediction of the onset of tile crack growth and the stability of the crack. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has completed a comprehensive study of cracks in pipes and handbook-type data is available. However, for some large diameter, thin-walled pipes the needed information is not included in the handbook. This paper reports our study of circumferential cracks in large diameter, thin-walled pipes (R/t=30 to 40) under remote bending or tension loads. Elastic-Plastic analyses using finite element method were performed to determine the elastic and fully plastic J values for various pipe/crack geometries. A non-linear Ramberg-Osgood material model is used, with strain hardening exponents(n) ranging from 3 to 10. A number of circumferential, through thickness cracks were studied with half crack angles ranging from 0.063{pi} to 0.5{pi}. Results are tabulated for use with the EPRI estimation scheme.

  4. Anthropometric characteristics and sex influence magnitude of skin cooling following exposure to whole body cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hammond, L E; Cuttell, S; Nunley, P; Meyler, J

    2014-01-01

    This study explored whether anthropometric measures influence magnitude of skin cooling following exposure to whole body cryotherapy (WBC). Height, weight, body fat percentage, and lean mass were measured in 18 male and 14 female participants. Body surface area, body surface area to mass ratio, body mass index, fat-free mass index, and fat mass index were calculated. Thermal images were captured before and after WBC (-60°C for 30 seconds, -110°C for 2 minutes). Skin temperature was measured at the chest, arm, thigh, and calf. Mean skin temperature before and after WBC and change in mean skin temperature (ΔT sk) were calculated. ΔT sk was significantly greater in females (12.07 ± 1.55°C) than males (10.12 ± 1.86°C; t(30) = -3.09, P = .004). A significant relationship was observed between body fat percentage and ΔT sk in the combined dataset (P = .002, r = .516) and between fat-free mass index and ΔT sk in males (P = .005, r = .622). No other significant associations were found. Skin response of individuals to WBC appears to depend upon anthropometric variables and sex, with individuals with a higher adiposity cooling more than thinner individuals. Effects of sex and anthompometrics should be considered when designing WBC research or treatment protocols.

  5. Anthropometric Characteristics and Sex Influence Magnitude of Skin Cooling following Exposure to Whole Body Cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, L. E.; Cuttell, S.; Nunley, P.; Meyler, J.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored whether anthropometric measures influence magnitude of skin cooling following exposure to whole body cryotherapy (WBC). Height, weight, body fat percentage, and lean mass were measured in 18 male and 14 female participants. Body surface area, body surface area to mass ratio, body mass index, fat-free mass index, and fat mass index were calculated. Thermal images were captured before and after WBC (−60°C for 30 seconds, −110°C for 2 minutes). Skin temperature was measured at the chest, arm, thigh, and calf. Mean skin temperature before and after WBC and change in mean skin temperature (ΔTsk) were calculated. ΔTsk was significantly greater in females (12.07 ± 1.55°C) than males (10.12 ± 1.86°C; t(30) = −3.09, P = .004). A significant relationship was observed between body fat percentage and ΔTsk in the combined dataset (P = .002, r = .516) and between fat-free mass index and ΔTsk in males (P = .005, r = .622). No other significant associations were found. Skin response of individuals to WBC appears to depend upon anthropometric variables and sex, with individuals with a higher adiposity cooling more than thinner individuals. Effects of sex and anthompometrics should be considered when designing WBC research or treatment protocols. PMID:25061612

  6. Induction Cell Design Tradeoffs and Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reginato, Louis L.; Briggs*, Richard J.

    A brief history of induction accelerator development was covered in Chap. 2. The induction accelerators constructed since the early 1960s can be categorized as short-pulse if the pulse duration is less than 100 ns and long-pulse if it is longer. The distinction between short-pulse and long-pulse is arbitrary; it mainly reflects the type of magnetic material that was typically used in the cell. Examples of short-pulse induction accelerators are the electron ring accelerator (ERA, Δ t=30 ns) [1], the advanced test accelerator (ATA, Δ t=70 ns) [2] and the experimental test accelerator (ETA-II, Δ t=70 ns) [3]. Examples of long-pulse accelerators are the Astron (Δ t=400 ns) [4, 5] and the second axis of the dual axis radiographic hydro test accelerator (DARHT-II, Δ t=2{,}000 ns) [6]. In this chapter the cell design of several of these accelerators will be described in detail. We will discuss how the physics, economics, and space requirements often lead to a non-optimum design from the accelerator systems vantage point. Although modulators are covered in Chap. 4 , some specific designs will be discussed on how the constant voltage (flat-top) was achieved in concert with the cell design and compensation network .

  7. Induction Cell Design Tradeoffs and Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reginato, Louis L.; Briggs*, Richard J.

    A brief history of induction accelerator development was covered in Chap. 2 10.1007/978-3-642-13917-8_2". The induction accelerators constructed since the early 1960s can be categorized as short-pulse if the pulse duration is less than 100 ns and long-pulse if it is longer. The distinction between short-pulse and long-pulse is arbitrary; it mainly reflects the type of magnetic material that was typically used in the cell. Examples of short-pulse induction accelerators are the electron ring accelerator (ERA, Δ t=30 ns) [1], the advanced test accelerator (ATA, Δ t=70 ns) [2] and the experimental test accelerator (ETA-II, Δ t=70 ns) [3]. Examples of long-pulse accelerators are the Astron (Δ t=400 ns) [4, 5] and the second axis of the dual axis radiographic hydro test accelerator (DARHT-II, Δ t=2{,}000 ns) [6]. In this chapter the cell design of several of these accelerators will be described in detail. We will discuss how the physics, economics, and space requirements often lead to a non-optimum design from the accelerator systems vantage point. Although modulators are covered in Chap. 4 10.1007/978-3-642-13917-8_4, some specific designs will be discussed on how the constant voltage (flat-top) was achieved in concert with the cell design and compensation network .

  8. The energy input mechanism into the lower transition regions between stellar chromospheres and coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1988-01-01

    The ratio of the emission line fluxes for the C II and C IV lines in the lower transition regions (T = 30,000 to 100,000 K) between stellar chromospheres and transition layers is shown to depend mainly on the temperature gradient in the line emitting regions which can therefore be determined from this line ratio. From the observed constant (within the limits of observational error) ratio of the emission line fluxes of the C II (1335 A) and C IV (1550 A) lines it is concluded that the temperature gradients in the lower transition layers are similar for the large majority of stars independently of T sub eff, L, and degree of activity. This means that the temperature dependence of the damping length for the mechanical flux must be the same for all these stars. Since for different kinds of mechanical fluxes the dependence of the damping length on gas pressure and temperature is quite different, it is concluded that the same heating mechanism must be responsible for the heating of all the lower transition layers of these stars, regardless of their chromospheric activity. Only the amount of mechanical flux changes. The T Tauri stars are exceptions: their emission lines are probably mainly due to circumstellar material.

  9. Differential viability response of prokaryotes and eukaryotes to high strength pulsed magnetic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Boda, Sunil Kumar; Ravikumar, K; Saini, Deepak K; Basu, Bikramjit

    2015-12-01

    The present study examines the efficacy of a high strength pulsed magnetic field (PMF) towards bacterial inactivation in vitro, without compromising eukaryotic cell viability. The differential response of prokaryotes [Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Escherichia coli], and eukaryotes [C2C12 mouse myoblasts and human mesenchymal stem cells, hMSCs] upon exposure to varying PMF stimuli (1-4 T, 30 pulses, 40 ms pulse duration) is investigated. Among the prokaryotes, ~60% and ~70% reduction was recorded in the survival of staphylococcal species and E. coli, respectively at 4 T PMF as evaluated by colony forming unit (CFU) analysis and flow cytometry. A 2-5 fold increase in intracellular ROS (reactive oxygen species) levels suggests oxidative stress as the key mediator in PMF induced bacterial death/injury. The 4 T PMF treated staphylococci also exhibited longer doubling times. Both TEM and fluorescence microscopy revealed compromised membranes of PMF exposed bacteria. Under similar PMF exposure conditions, no immediate cytotoxicity was recorded in C2C12 mouse myoblasts and hMSCs, which can be attributed to the robust resistance towards oxidative stress. The ion interference of iron containing bacterial proteins is invoked to analytically explain the PMF induced ROS accumulation in prokaryotes. Overall, this study establishes the potential of PMF as a bactericidal method without affecting eukaryotic viability. This non-invasive stimulation protocol coupled with antimicrobial agents can be integrated as a potential methodology for the localized treatment of prosthetic infections.

  10. Top-quark p T -spectra at CMS and flavor independence of z-scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarev, M.; Zborovský, I.

    2017-09-01

    We present new results of analysis of top-quark differential cross sections obtained by the CMS Collaboration in pp collisions in the framework of the z-scaling approach. The spectra are measured over a wide range of collision energy √ s = 7,8,13TeV and transverse momentum p T = 30-500 GeV/ c of top-quark using leptonic and jet decay modes. Flavor independence of the scaling function ψ( z) is verified in the new kinematic range. The results of analysis of the top-quark spectra obtained at the LHC are compared with similar spectra measured in \\overline p p collisions at the Tevatron energy √ s = 1.96TeV. A tendency to saturation of ψ(z) for the process at low z and a power-law behavior of ψ( z) at high z is observed. The measurements of high- p T is observed. The measurements of highspectra of the top-quark production at highest LHC energy is of interest for verification of self-similarity of particle production, understanding flavor origin and search for new physics symmetries with top-quark probe.

  11. Low-energy spin fluctuations in the metallic spinel compound LiV{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Yushankhai, V. Yu.; Thalmeier, P.; Takimoto, T.

    2009-08-20

    In the family of transition metal oxides the spinel compound LiV{sub 2}O{sub 4} is a rare metallic system showing heavy fermion behavior. In particular, an anomalously large specific heat coefficient gamma = C/T and strongly enhanced magnetic susceptibility chi{sub s} were detected in the low temperature limit, T<30 K. Recently we have proposed a model which allowed us to relate such an anomalous behavior of LiV{sub 2}O{sub 4} to the proximity of the underlying 3d-electron system to a magnetic instability at T->0. The emergence of a rather peculiar paramagnetic ground state with largely degenerate lowenergy 'critical' antiferromagnetic fluctuations in LiV{sub 2}O{sub 4} is the combined effect of strong electron correlations and the geometrical frustration of V-ion pyrochlore lattice forming the metallic system in this compound. A self-consistent renormalization theory was developed to describe effects of strong coupling between spin fluctuation modes and their evolution with varying temperature and external pressure. The theory was shown to provide a firm basis for understanding many peculiar properties of spin dynamics obtained in the inelastic neutron scattering and NMR measurements on LiV{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  12. The effects of motor rehabilitation training on clinical symptoms and serum BDNF levels in Parkinson's disease subjects.

    PubMed

    Angelucci, Francesco; Piermaria, Jacopo; Gelfo, Francesca; Shofany, Jacob; Tramontano, Marco; Fiore, Marco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Peppe, Antonella

    2016-04-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that motor rehabilitation may delay Parkinson's disease (PD) progression. Moreover, parallel treatments in animals up-regulate brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Thus, we investigated the effect of a motor rehabilitation protocol on PD symptoms and BDNF serum levels. Motor rehabilitation training consisted of a cycle of 20 days/month of physiotherapy divided in 3 daily sessions. Clinical data were collected at the beginning, at the end, and at 90 days follow-up. BDNF serum levels were detected by ELISA at 0, 7, 14, 21, 30, and 90 days. The follow-up period had a duration of 60 days (T30-T90). The results showed that at the end of the treatment (day 30), an improvement in extrapyramidal signs (UPDRS III; UPDRS III - Gait and Balance items), motor (6 Minute Walking Test), and daily living activities (UPDRS II; PDQ-39) was observed. BDNF levels were increased at day 7 as compared with baseline. After that, no changes in BDNF were observed during the treatment and in the successive follow-up. This study demonstrates that motor rehabilitation training is able to ameliorate PD symptoms and to increase temporarily BDNF serum levels. The latter effect may potentially contribute to the therapeutic action.

  13. Solvent effect on 1,2-O-(1-ethylpropylidene)-alpha-D-glucofuranose organogel properties.

    PubMed

    Bielejewski, M; Lapiński, A; Luboradzki, R; Tritt-Goc, J

    2009-07-21

    The solvent effect on organogel formation in nitrobenzene and chlorobenzene using 1,2-O-(1-ethylpropylidene)-alpha-d-glucofuranose (1) as the gelator is presented. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy revealed that hydrogen bonding between the molecules of gelator 1 is the main driving force for gelator self-aggregation. The gels are characterized by different hydrogen-bonding patterns, which are reflected in a different microstructure of the networks. The morphology of fibers of nitrobenzene organogel consists of straight, rod-like, and thinner fibers, in comparison to the elongated but generally not straight and thicker fibers in chlorobenzene organogel. The thermal stability of gels also differs, and the DeltaH is equal to 50.1 and 65.0 kJ/mol for nitrobenzene and chlorobenzene gels, respectively. The properties of the gels reported here were compared to benzene and toluene gels of 1 presented in previous work and correlated with different solvent parameters: epsilon, delta, and E(T)(30). We have shown that the polarity of the solvent influences the thermal stability of the gel, the hydrogen-bonding network, and finally the structure of gel network. Therefore, in the studied sugar-based gelator, the hydrogen bonding alone is insufficient to fully describe the gelation process.

  14. The Structural Properties of Vapor Deposited Water Ice and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Blake, D. F.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Films of vapor deposited water ice at low temperature (T<30 K) show a number of interesting structural changes during a gradual warmup. We would like to talk about the structure of the low temperature high density amorphous form of water ice, the process of crystallization, and some recent work on the morphological changes of water ice films at high temperature. The studies of the high density amorphous form are from in-situ electron microscopy as well as numerical simulations of molecular dynamics and have lead to new insights into the physical distinction between this high density amorphous form and the low density amorphous form. For the process of crystallization, we propose a model that describes the crystallization of water ice from the amorphous phase to cubic ice in terms of the nucleation of small domains in the ice. This model agrees well with the behavior of water ice in our electron microscopy studies and finds that pure water above the glass transition is a strong liquid. In more recent work, we have concentrated on temperatures above the crystallization temperature and we find interesting morphological changes related to the decrease in viscosity of the amorphous component in the cubic crystalline regime. Given enough time, we would like to put these results in an astrophysical context and discuss some observed features of the frost on interstellar grains and the bulk ice in comets.

  15. EVIDENCE FOR MULTIPLE PATHWAYS TO DEUTERIUM ENHANCEMENTS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Karin I.; Qi, Chunhua; Wilner, David J.; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.

    2012-04-20

    The distributions of deuterated molecules in protoplanetary disks are expected to depend on the molecular formation pathways. We use observations of spatially resolved DCN emission from the disk around TW Hya, acquired during ALMA science verification with a {approx}3'' synthesized beam, together with comparable DCO{sup +} observations from the Submillimeter Array, to investigate differences in the radial distributions of these species and hence differences in their formation chemistry. In contrast to DCO{sup +}, which shows an increasing column density with radius, DCN is better fit by a model that is centrally peaked. We infer that DCN forms at a smaller radii and thus at higher temperatures than DCO{sup +}. This is consistent with chemical network model predictions of DCO{sup +} formation from H{sub 2}D{sup +} at T < 30 K and DCN formation from additional pathways involving CH{sub 2}D{sup +} at higher temperatures. We estimate a DCN/HCN abundance ratio of {approx}0.017, similar to the DCO{sup +}/HCO{sup +} abundance ratio. Deuterium fractionation appears to be efficient at a range of temperatures in this protoplanetary disk. These results suggest caution in interpreting the range of deuterium fractions observed in solar system bodies, as multiple formation pathways should be taken into account.

  16. Stellar (n,{gamma}) cross sections of p-process isotopes. II. {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Marganiec, J.; Dillmann, I.; Pardo, C. Domingo; Kaeppeler, F.; Walter, S.

    2010-09-15

    The neutron-capture cross sections of {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg have been measured by means of the activation technique. The samples were irradiated in a quasistellar neutron spectrum of kT=25 keV, which was produced at the Karlsruhe 3.7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator via the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction. Systematic uncertainties were investigated in repeated activations with different samples and by variation of the experimental parameters, that is, irradiation times, neutron fluxes, and {gamma}-ray counting conditions. The measured data were converted into Maxwellian-averaged cross sections at kT=30 keV, yielding 1214{+-}61, 624{+-}54, 590{+-}43, 511{+-}46, and 201{+-}11 mb for {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg, respectively. The present results either represent first experimental data ({sup 168}Yb, {sup 184}Os, and {sup 196}Hg) or could be determined with significantly reduced uncertainties ({sup 180}W and {sup 190}Pt). These measurements are part of a systematic study of stellar (n,{gamma}) cross sections of the stable p isotopes.

  17. Magnetically responsive nanoparticles for drug delivery applications using low magnetic field strengths.

    PubMed

    McGill, Shayna L; Cuylear, Carla L; Adolphi, Natalie L; Osiński, Marek; Smyth, Hugh D C

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential of magnetic nanoparticles for enhancing drug delivery using a low oscillating magnetic field (OMF) strength. We investigated the ability of magnetic nanoparticles to cause disruption of a viscous biopolymer barrier to drug delivery and the potential to induce triggered release of drug conjugated to the surfaces of these particles. Various magnetic nanoparticles were screened for thermal response under a 295-kHz OMF with an amplitude of 3.1 kA/m. Based on thermal activity of particles screened, we selected the nanoparticles that displayed desired characteristics for evaluation in a simplified model of an extracellular barrier to drug delivery, using lambda DNA/HindIII. Results indicate that nanoparticles could be used to induce DNA breakage to enhance local diffusion of drugs, despite low temperatures of heating. Additional studies showed increased diffusion of quantum dots in this model by single-particle tracking methods. Bimane was conjugated to the surface of magnetic nanoparticles. Fluorescence and transmission electron microscope images of the conjugated nanoparticles indicated little change in the overall appearance of the nanoparticles. A release study showed greater drug release using OMF, while maintaining low bulk heating of the samples (T = 30 degrees C). This study indicates that lower magnetic field strengths may be successfully utilized for drug delivery applications as a method for drug delivery transport enhancement and drug release switches.

  18. Development of lead salt semiconductor lasers for the 9-17 micron spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, K. J.; Butler, J. F.; Nill, K. W.; Reeder, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Improved diode lasers of Pb sub 1-x Sn sub x Se operating in the 9-17 micrometers spectral region were developed. The performance characteristics of the best lasers exceeded the contract goals of 500 microW/mode at T 30K in the 9-12 micrometers region and 200 microW/mode at T 18K in the 16-17 micrometers region. Increased reliability and device yields resulted from processing improvements which evolved from a series of diagnostic studies. By means of Auger electron spectroscopy, laser shelf storage degradation was shown to be characterized by the presence of In metal on the semiconductor crystal surfaces. Studies of various metal barrier layers between the crystals and the In metal led to the development of an improved metallurgical contacting technology which has resulted in devices with performance stability values exceeding the contract goal of a one year shelf life. Lasers cycled over 500 times between 300K and 77K were also shown to be stable. Studies on improved methods of fabricating striped geometry lasers indicated that good spectral mode characteristics resulted from lasers which stripe widths of 12 and 25 micrometers.

  19. Titan's surface at 2.2-cm wavelength imaged by the Cassini RADAR radiometer: Calibration and first results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janssen, M.A.; Lorenz, R.D.; West, R.; Paganelli, F.; Lopes, R.M.; Kirk, R.L.; Elachi, C.; Wall, S.D.; Johnson, W.T.K.; Anderson, Y.; Boehmer, R.A.; Callahan, P.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.A.; Kelleher, K.D.; Roth, L.; Stiles, B.; Le, Gall A.

    2009-01-01

    The first comprehensive calibration and mapping of the thermal microwave emission from Titan's surface is reported based on radiometric data obtained at 2.2-cm wavelength by the passive radiometer included in the Cassini Radar instrument. The data reported were accumulated from 69 separate observational segments in Titan passes from Ta (October 2004) through T30 (May 2007) and include emission from 94% of Titan's surface. They are diverse in the key observing parameters of emission angle, polarization, and spatial resolution, and their reduction into calibrated global mosaic maps involved several steps. Analysis of the polarimetry obtained at low to moderate resolution (50+ km) enabled integration of the radiometry into a single mosaic of the equivalent brightness temperature at normal incidence with a relative precision of about 1 K. The Huygens probe measurement of Titan's surface temperature and radiometry obtained on Titan's dune fields allowed us to infer an absolute calibration estimated to be accurate to a level approaching 1 K. The results provide evidence for a surface that is complex and varied on large scales. The radiometry primarily constrains physical properties of the surface, where we see strong evidence for subsurface (volume) scattering as a dominant mechanism that determines the emissivity, with the possibility of a fluffy or graded-density surface layer in many regions. The results are consistent with, but not necessarily definitive of a surface composition resulting from the slow deposition and processing of organic compounds from the atmosphere. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc.

  20. Interaction of near-IR laser radiation with plasma of a continuous optical discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Zimakov, V. P.; Kuznetsov, V. A.; Solovyov, N. G.; Shemyakin, A. N.; Shilov, A. O.; Yakimov, M. Yu.

    2016-01-15

    The interaction of 1.07-μm laser radiation with plasma of a continuous optical discharge (COD) in xenon and argon at a pressure of p = 3–25 bar and temperature of T = 15 kK has been studied. The threshold power required to sustain COD is found to decrease with increasing gas pressure to P{sub t} < 30 W in xenon at p > 20 bar and to P{sub t} < 350 W in argon at p > 15 bar. This effect is explained by an increase in the coefficient of laser radiation absorption to 20−25 cm{sup –1} in Xe and 1−2 cm{sup –1} in Ar due to electronic transitions between the broadened excited atomic levels. The COD characteristics also depend on the laser beam refraction in plasma. This effect can be partially compensated by a tighter focusing of the laser beam. COD is applied as a broadband light source with a high spectral brightness.

  1. J-integral of circumferential crack in large diameter pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Chao, Yuh J.; Sutton, M. A.; Lam, P. S.; Mertz, G. E.

    Large diameter thin-walled pipes are encountered in a low pressure nuclear power piping system. Fracture parameters such as K and J, associated with postulated cracks, are needed to assess the safety of the structure, for example, prediction of the onset of tile crack growth and the stability of the crack. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has completed a comprehensive study of cracks in pipes and handbook-type data is available. However, for some large diameter, thin-walled pipes the needed information is not included in the handbook. This paper reports our study of circumferential cracks in large diameter, thin-walled pipes (R/t=30 to 40) under remote bending or tension loads. Elastic-Plastic analyses using the finite element method were performed to determine the elastic and fully plastic J values for various pipe/crack geometries. A non-linear Ramberg-Osgood material model is used with strain hardening exponents (n) that range from 3 to 10. A number of circumferential, through thickness cracks were studied with half crack angles ranging from 0.063(pi) to 0.5(pi). Results are tabulated for use with the EPRI estimation scheme.

  2. Classical Impossibility of DT Reactor below 120 KeV and Design of DT Micro-Reactor for Land Mine Detection by Fast Neutron Gamma Activation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maglich, B. C.

    1996-11-01

    There is an industrial demand for a multipurpose 20 KeV, 100 cc DT micro reactor but charge exchange renders beam-heated DT reactors unworkable [1-3] or classically impossible [4] below 120 keV. We describe a 150 KeV autocollider in Alternating Gradient Strong Focusing Migma field [5] based on cryo-cooled NiSn, designed for midplane B=5 T [6], stabilized by nonlinear electron oscillations effect [7]. Ion density: 3 × 10^12cm-3/cc. Method to enhance N^14 ``signature'' of explosive in γ-spectrum by a factor of 10 will be presented. 1. B. Maglich et al., presentations to CTR/AEC, 6/18/74 and 11/3/74; 2. J. Treglio, J. Appl. Phys., 46, 4344 (1975); 3. Decision (based on ref. 2) to cancel Tokamak T-30 program in USSR (1/7/76); 4. D.W. Scott and B.C. Maglich, this Meeting, Sess. 5.1.1.1 TFTR; 5. J.P. Blewett, Part. Acc. 34, 13 (1990) U.S.Pat. 5,034,183; 6. D.A. Gross, GE Corp. R and D Center; 7. Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 299 (1993) U.S.Pat. 4,788,024.

  3. Streptomyces hypolithicus sp. nov., isolated from an Antarctic hypolith community.

    PubMed

    Le Roes-Hill, Marilize; Rohland, Jeffrey; Meyers, Paul R; Cowan, Don A; Burton, Stephanie G

    2009-08-01

    As part of an enzyme-screening programme, an actinobacterium, strain HSM#10T, was isolated from a sample collected from the base of a translucent quartz rock in Miers Valley, eastern Antarctica. The isolate produced branching vegetative mycelium that was characteristic of filamentous actinobacteria. The chemotaxonomic characteristics of the strain suggested that HSM#10T should be classified as a member of the genus Streptomyces. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strain was closely related to members of the genus Streptomyces, which supports the classification of this strain within the family Streptomycetaceae. Phenotypic and phylogenetic results allowed strain HSM#10T to be differentiated from known streptomycetes. DNA-DNA hybridization data also showed that strain HSM#10T could be differentiated from its nearest phylogenetic neighbours Streptomyces chryseus DSM 40420T (53.55+/-3.15% DNA relatedness), Streptomyces helvaticus DSM 40431T (38.75+/-2.75%), Streptomyces flavidovirens DSM 40150T (30.7+/-2.90%) and Streptomyces albidochromogenes DSM 41800T (33.9+/-0.10%). Therefore, the name Streptomyces hypolithicus sp. nov. is proposed, with HSM#10T (=DSM 41950T=NRRL B-24669T) as the type strain.

  4. Selected Manpower Statistics, FY-1970

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1971-04-15

    31,27 31 Dect 195 (:26,3 226 29i 2131,660 1,25 3,7 ,058Q #2 0961 75 9 396,059 1.2,M5 608,0490 31,61 4766e -0 Ji 18,3L196211 L W L -o3,1 -T, -8569T5) Y ...86196 8r*0i 435 31- duty 1,159,019 626 340 17.5e 51.e t 30J e 96 5e355h 197 litcdt 865 ud 1,26 ,224 e in30- Y .out 11.1,20 81.52 !7,4 11 (C8ta70.21...1939 21310 S1,54 9n0112/ 666,p "a 311 61115 11,90 111,25630 .is 19)3 2,15ඔ,3 31 Iks 1960 32,30,Uk A*7, 9710, 6 31 JUN 1961 2.൓ y f5,3 I1,3 MAW35

  5. Centrality dependence of charged particle production at large transverse momentum in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Aguilar Salazar, S.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahn, S. A.; Ahn, S. U.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaráz Aviña, E.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldit, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Bock, N.; Böttger, S.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bose, S.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Boyer, B.; Braidot, E.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caballero Orduna, D.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carlin Filho, N.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castillo Hernandez, J. F.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chawla, I.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Coccetti, F.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Constantin, P.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Alaniz, E.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de, S.; de Barros, G. O. V.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gruttola, D.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Demanov, V.; De Marco, N.; Dénes, E.; de Pasquale, S.; Deppman, A.; D Erasmo, G.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; di Bari, D.; Dietel, T.; di Giglio, C.; di Liberto, S.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domínguez, I.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Driga, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, M. R.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fearick, R.; Fedunov, A.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Ferretti, R.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Geuna, C.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Girard, M. R.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; Ferreiro, E. G.; González-Trueba, L. H.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Goswami, A.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerra Gutierrez, C.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Gutbrod, H.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Han, B. H.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harmanová-Tóthová, Z.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Hasegan, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hille, P. T.; Hippolyte, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hwang, D. S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, P. G.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Janik, R.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Jha, D. M.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jirden, L.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kaidalov, A. B.; Kakoyan, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kaliňák, P.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, S. A.; Khan, P.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, M.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, B.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Koch, K.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Korneev, A.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Krawutschke, T.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladrón de Guevara, P.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; La Pointe, S. L.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lechman, M.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, G. R.; Lefèvre, F.; Lehnert, J.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; León, H.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Lévai, P.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, L.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohn, S.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Loo, K. K.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luquin, L.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, R.; Ma, K.; Madagodahettige-Don, D. M.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Mangotra, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Markert, C.; Martashvili, I.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez Davalos, A.; Martínez García, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Moon, T.; Morando, M.; Moreira de Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Musa, L.; Musso, A.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Naumov, N. P.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Niida, T.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Nilsson, M. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nystrand, J.; Ochirov, A.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Oleniacz, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Ortona, G.; Oskarsson, A.; Ostrowski, P.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Pastirčák, B.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira da Costa, H.; Pereira de Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Planinic, M.; Płoskoń, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puchagin, S.; Puddu, G.; Pulvirenti, A.; Punin, V.; Putiš, M.; Putschke, J.; Quercigh, E.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Räihä, T. S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Ramírez Reyes, A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rodrigues Fernandes Rabacal, B.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, S.; Sano, M.; Santo, R.; Santoro, R.; Sarkamo, J.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schreiner, S.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senyukov, S.; Seo, J.; Serci, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, S.; Sharma, N.; Rohni, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siciliano, M.; Sicking, E.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Son, H.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strabykin, K.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vásquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhorukov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szostak, A.; Szymański, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Trubnikov, V.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Ulrich, J.; Uras, A.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Vikhlyantsev, O.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, Y.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, A.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vranic, D.; Øvrebekk, G.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, V.; Wagner, B.; Wan, R.; Wang, D.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, A.; Wilk, G.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, S.; Yang, H.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J.; Yu, W.; Yuan, X.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, D.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.; Zyzak, M.; Alice Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    The inclusive transverse momentum (pT) distributions of primary charged particles are measured in the pseudo-rapidity range | η | < 0.8 as a function of event centrality in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV with ALICE at the LHC. The data are presented in the pT range 0.15 T > 30 GeV / c. In peripheral collisions (70-80%), only moderate suppression (RAA = 0.6- 0.7) and a weak pT dependence is observed. The measured nuclear modification factors are compared to other measurements and model calculations.

  6. Impact dynamics of porcine drip bloodstains on fabrics.

    PubMed

    Williams, Elisabeth M P; Dodds, Margaret; Taylor, Michael C; Li, Jingyao; Michielsen, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    As a passive blood drop impacts a hard surface, it is observed to collapse and spread laterally, then retract and settle. During the spreading phase, the edge of the drop may rise forming a crown extending into spines and breaking up into secondary drops. When a similar drop falls onto a textile surface these same processes may occur, but the process of blood wicking into the fabric complicates stain formation. These processes are described within for passive drip stains collected under controlled conditions using anticoagulated porcine blood. Three stages of this impact process were identified and could be separated into distinct time zones: (1) spreading (time t≤2.5ms) and (2) retraction (2.5≤t≤12ms) on the surface with potential splashing at the periphery, and (3) wicking (30ms ≤t≤30min) of the blood into the fabric. Although wetting and wicking may also occur for t<30ms, the vast majority of wetting and wicking occur after this time and thus the short-time wicking can be ignored. In addition, the number of satellite stains correlates with the surface roughness with the number of satellites for jersey knit>plain-woven>cardboard. Conversely, the size of the satellite stains correlates with the amount of wicking in the fabric with the satellite stain size for plain-woven>jersey knit>cardboard.

  7. Effect of the artificial sweetener, sucralose, on small intestinal glucose absorption in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Chang, Jessica; Checklin, Helen L; Young, Richard L; Jones, Karen L; Horowitz, Michael; Rayner, Christopher K

    2010-09-01

    It has been reported that the artificial sweetener, sucralose, stimulates glucose absorption in rodents by enhancing apical availability of the transporter GLUT2. We evaluated whether exposure of the proximal small intestine to sucralose affects glucose absorption and/or the glycaemic response to an intraduodenal (ID) glucose infusion in healthy human subjects. Ten healthy subjects were studied on two separate occasions in a single-blind, randomised order. Each subject received an ID infusion of sucralose (4 mM in 0.9% saline) or control (0.9% saline) at 4 ml/min for 150 min (T = - 30 to 120 min). After 30 min (T = 0), glucose (25 %) and its non-metabolised analogue, 3-O-methylglucose (3-OMG; 2.5 %), were co-infused intraduodenally (T = 0-120 min; 4.2 kJ/min (1 kcal/min)). Blood was sampled at frequent intervals. Blood glucose, plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and serum 3-OMG concentrations increased during ID glucose/3-OMG infusion (P < 0.005 for each). However, there were no differences in blood glucose, plasma GLP-1 or serum 3-OMG concentrations between sucralose and control infusions. In conclusion, sucralose does not appear to modify the rate of glucose absorption or the glycaemic or incretin response to ID glucose infusion when given acutely in healthy human subjects.

  8. Caregiver Stigma and Burden in Memory Disorders: An Evaluation of the Effects of Caregiver Type and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Phoebe V.; Wishart, Heather A.; Randolph, Jennifer S.; Santulli, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite considerable gains in public awareness of dementia, dementia patients and their caregivers continue to be stigmatized. Previous work has explored stigma and burden among adult children of persons with dementia in Israel, but no similar data exist for spousal caregivers or caregivers in general in the United States. This study examines the differences in stigma and burden experienced by spousal and adult child caregivers and male and female caregivers of persons with dementia. Eighty-two caregivers were given the Zarit Burden Inventory Short Form (ZBI) and the Caregiver Section of the Family Stigma in Alzheimer's Disease Scale (FS-ADS-C). Scores on the FS-ADS-C and ZBI were positively correlated (rs = .51, p < .001). Female caregivers reported experiencing more stigma on the FS-ADS-C (t(80) = −4.37, p < .001) and more burden on the ZBI (t(80) = −2.68, p = .009) compared to male caregivers, and adult child caregivers reported experiencing more stigma on the FS-ADS-C (t(30.8) = −2.22, p = .034) and more burden on the ZBI (t(80) = −2.65, p = .010) than spousal caregivers. These results reinforce the importance of support for caregivers, particularly adult child and female caregivers who may experience higher levels of stigma and burden. PMID:26941795

  9. Inactivation of the DMH selectively inhibits the ACTH and corticosterone responses to hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Evans, Scott B; Wilkinson, Charles W; Gronbeck, Pam; Bennett, Jennifer L; Zavosh, Aryana; Taborsky, Gerald J; Figlewicz, Dianne P

    2004-01-01

    We have previously reported that repeated bouts of insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH) in the rat result in blunted activation of the paraventricular, arcuate, and dorsomedial hypothalamic (DMH) nuclei. Because DMH activation has been implicated in the sympathoadrenal and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) responses to stressors, we hypothesized that its blunted activation may play a role in the impaired counterregulatory response that is also observed with repeated bouts of IIH. In the present study, we evaluated the role of normal DMH activation in the counterregulatory response to a single bout of IIH. Local infusion of lidocaine (n = 8) to inactivate the DMH during a 2-h bout of IIH resulted in a significant overall decrease of the ACTH response and a delay of onset of the corticosterone response compared with vehicle-infused controls (n = 9). We observed suppression of the ACTH response at time (t) = 90 and 120 min (50 +/- 12 and 63 +/- 6%, respectively, of control levels) and early suppression of the corticosterone response at t = 30 min (59 +/- 13% of the control level). The epinephrine, norepinephrine, and glucagon responses were not altered by DMH inactivation. Our finding suggests that DMH inactivation may play a specific role in decreasing the HPA axis response after repeated bouts of IIH.

  10. Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in (311)A GaAs 2D holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau, Jeng-Bang; de Poortere, E. P.; Shayegan, M.

    2001-03-01

    We report the observation of Aharonov-Bohm (A-B) oscillations in high mobility (311)A GaAs two-dimensional (2D) holes. The 2D holes in GaAs have been demonstrated to exhibit a significant spin-orbit induced spin-splitting which can be tuned by changing the front/back gate voltages.(Papadakis et al.), Science 283, 2056 (1999). In addition to the A-B phase, a spin wave function acquires a geometrical phase, the Berry's phase,(M. V. Berry, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 392, 45 (1984).) when it travels adiabatically in a magnetic field. A-B rings made of this 2D material are therefore good candidates for the measurement of Berry's phase as proposed by Aronov et al..(A. G. Aronov et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 343 (1993). We defined the A-B ring with a 2000 Åwide channel by electron beam lithography and deposited Ti/Au as the front gate. At T ~= 30 mK, we observe A-B oscillations with periods matching the geometry of the ring, providing evidence for the phase-coherent transport of 2D holes. By changing the front gate voltage, we observe changes in the magnitude and period of the oscillations. Furthermore, the Fourier spectra of some of the traces reveal a splitting of the peak, which may be a manifestation of the Berry's phase.

  11. Enhanced malignant transformation is accompanied by increased survival recovery after ionizing radiation in Chinese hamster embryo fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Boothman, D.A.

    1994-04-01

    Transformed Chinese hamster embryo fibroblasts (CHEF), which gradually increase in tumor-forming ability in nude mice, were isolated from normal diploid CHEF/18 cells. Transformed CHEF cells (i.e., T30-4 > 21-2M3 > 21-2 > normal CHEF/18) showed gradual increases in potentially lethal damage (PLD) survival recovery. {beta}-Lapachone and camptothecin, modulators of topoisomerase I (Topo I) activity, not only prevented survival recovery in normal as well as in tumor cells, but enhanced unscheduled DNA synthesis. These seemingly conflicting results are due to the fact that Topo I activity can be modulated by inhibitors to convert single-stranded DNA lesions into double-stranded breaks. Increases in unscheduled DNA synthesis may result from a continual supply of free ends, on which DNA repair processes may act. Altering Topo I activity with modulators appears to increase X-ray lethality via a DNA lesion modification suicide pathway. Cells down-regulate Topo I immediately after ionizing radiation to prevent Topo I-mediated lesion modification and to enhance survival recovery. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Olive mill wastewater treatment: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Bettazzi, E; Morelli, M; Caffaz, S; Caretti, C; Azzari, E; Lubello, C

    2006-01-01

    Olive oil production, one of the main agro-industries in Mediterranean countries, generates significant amounts of olive mill wastewaters (OMWs), which represent a serious environmental problem, because of their high organic load, the acidic pH and the presence of recalcitrant and toxic substances such as phenolic and lipidic compounds (up to several grams per litre). In Italy, traditional disposal on the soil is the most common way to discharge OMWs. This work is aimed at investigating the efficiency and feasibility of AOPs and biological processes for OMW treatment. Trials have been carried out on wastewaters taken from one of the largest three-phase mills of Italy, located in Quarrata (Tuscany), as well as on synthetic solutions. Ozone and Fenton's reagents applied both on OMWs and on phenolic synthetic solutions guaranteed polyphenol removal efficiency up to 95%. Aerobic biological treatment was performed in a batch reactor filled with raw OMWs (pH = 4.5, T = 30 degrees C) without biomass inoculum. A biomass rich of fungi, developed after about 30 days, was able to biodegrade phenolic compounds reaching a removal efficiency of 70%. Pretreatment of OMWs by means of oxidation increased their biological treatability.

  13. Relationships between vertical jump and full squat power outputs with sprint times in u21 soccer players.

    PubMed

    López-Segovia, Manuel; Marques, Mário C; van den Tillaar, Roland; González-Badillo, Juan J

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between power variables in the vertical jump and full squat with the sprint performance in soccer players. Fourteen under-21 soccer players were evaluated in two testing sessions separated by 7 days. In the first testing session, vertical jump height in countermovement was assessed, and power output for both loaded countermovement jump (CMJL) and full squat (FS) exercises in two progressive load tests. The second testing session included sprinting at 10, 20, and 30m (T10, T20, T30, T10-20, T10-30, T20-30). Power variables obtained in the loaded vertical jump with 20kg and full squat exercise with 70kg showed significant relationships with all split times (r=-0.56/-0.79; p≤ 0.01/0.01). The results suggest that power produced either with vertical jump or full squat exercises is an important factor to explain short sprint performance in soccer players. These findings might suggest that certain levels of neuromuscular activation are more related with sprint performance reflecting the greater suitability of loads against others for the improvement of short sprint ability in under-21 soccer players.

  14. Choristoneura fumiferana nucleopolyhedrovirus encodes a functional 3'-5' exonuclease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dan-Hui; de Jong, Jondavid G; Makhmoudova, Amina; Arif, Basil M; Krell, Peter J

    2004-12-01

    The Choristoneura fumiferana nucleopolyhedrovirus (CfMNPV) encodes an ORF homologous to type III 3'-5' exonucleases. The CfMNPV v-trex ORF was cloned into the Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression-vector system, expressed in insect Sf21 cells with an N-terminal His tag and purified to homogeneity by using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Biochemical characterization of the purified V-TREX confirmed that this viral protein is a functional 3'-5' exonuclease that cleaves oligonucleotides from the 3' end in a stepwise, distributive manner, suggesting a role in proofreading during viral DNA replication and DNA repair. Enhanced degradation of a 5'-digoxigenin- or 5'-(32)P-labelled oligo(dT)(30) substrate was observed at increasing incubation times or increased amounts of V-TREX. The 3'-excision activity of V-TREX was maximal at alkaline pH (9.5) in the presence of 5 mM MgCl(2), 2 mM dithiothreitol and 0.1 mg BSA ml(-1).

  15. Postseismic deformation due to subcrustal viscoelastic relaxation following dip-slip earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    The deformation of the Earth following a dip-slip earthquake is calculated using a three layer rheological model and finite element techniques. The three layers are an elastic upper lithosphere, a standard linear solid lower lithosphere, and a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere-a model previously analyzed in the strike-clip case (Cohen, 1981, 1982). Attention is focused on the magnitude of the postseismic subsidence and the width of the subsidence zone that can develop due to the viscoelastic response to coseismic reverse slip. Detailed analysis for a fault extending from the surface to 15 km with a 45 deg dip reveals that postseismic subsidence is sensitive to the depth to the asthenosphere but is only weakly dependent on lower lithosphere depth. The greatest subsidence occurs when the elastic lithosphere is about 30 km thick and the asthenosphere lies just below this layer (asthenosphere depth = 2 times the fault depth). The extremum in the subsidence pattern occurs at about 5 km from the surface trace of the fault and lies over the slip plane. In a typical case after a time t = 30 tau (tau = Maxwell time) following the earthquake the subsidence at this point is 60% of the coseismic uplift. Unlike the horizontal deformation following a strike slip earthquake, significant vertical deformation due to asthenosphere flow persists for many times tau and the magnitude of the vertical deformation is not necessarily enhanced by having a partially relaxing lower lithosphere.

  16. Influence of isoflurane on the diastolic pressure-flow relationship and critical occlusion pressure during arterial CABG surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hinz, José; Mansur, Ashham; Hanekop, Gerd G; Weyland, Andreas; Popov, Aron F; Schmitto, Jan D; Grüne, Frank F G; Bauer, Martin; Kazmaier, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The effects of isoflurane on the determinants of blood flow during Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) surgery are not completely understood. This study characterized the influence of isoflurane on the diastolic Pressure-Flow (P-F) relationship and Critical Occlusion Pressure (COP) during CABG surgery. Twenty patients undergoing CABG surgery were studied. Patients were assigned to an isoflurane or control group. Hemodynamic and flow measurements during CABG surgery were performed twice (15 minutes after the discontinuation of extracorporeal circulation (T15) and again 15 minutes later (T30)). The zero flow pressure intercept (a measure of COP) was extrapolated from a linear regression analysis of the instantaneous diastolic P-F relationship. In the isoflurane group, the application of isoflurane significantly increased the slope of the diastolic P-F relationship by 215% indicating a mean reduction of Coronary Vascular Resistance (CVR) by 46%. Simultaneously, the Mean Diastolic Aortic Pressure (MDAP) decreased by 19% mainly due to a decrease in the systemic vascular resistance index by 21%. The COP, cardiac index, heart rate, Left Ventricular End-Diastolic Pressure (LVEDP) and Coronary Sinus Pressure (CSP) did not change significantly. In the control group, the parameters remained unchanged. In both groups, COP significantly exceeded the CSP and LVEDP at both time points. We conclude that short-term application of isoflurane at a sedative concentration markedly increases the slope of the instantaneous diastolic P-F relationship during CABG surgery implying a distinct decrease with CVR in patients undergoing CABG surgery.

  17. An electro-conductive fluid as a responsive implant for the controlled stimuli-release of diclofenac sodium.

    PubMed

    Bijukumar, Divya; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an electro-responsive co-polymeric (ERP) implantable gel from polyethylene glycol (PEG), sodium polystyrene sulphonate (NaPss), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and diethyl acetomidomalonate (DAA) for electro-liberation of the model drug diclofenac sodium. Various physicochemical and physicomechanical characterization tests were undertaken on the synthesized drug-free gel (ERP G1) and drug-loaded gel (ERP G2). The ability of the gel to release diclofenac sodium following electrical stimulation was evaluated using a galvanostat while Molecular Mechanics (MM) simulations were performed to elucidate the experimental mechanisms. A stable electro-active gel exhibiting superior cycling stability was produced with desirable rheological properties, rigidity (BHN = 35.4 N ± 0.33 N/mm(2); resilience = 10.91 ± 0.11%), thermal properties (Tg ≈ 70 °C; Tc ≈ 200 °C) and homogeneous morphology. "ON-OFF" pursatile gradual drug release (37-94% from t30 min-t180 min) kinetics was observed upon applying electric stimulation intermittently, indicating that drug release from the gel was electrically controlled. Overall, the galvanometric and MM evaluation ascertained the suitability of the PEG/NaPss/PVA ERP-Gel for application as a subcutaneously injectable drug delivery implant.

  18. Measurement of differential J/ψ production cross sections and forward-backward ratios in p + Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-14

    Measurements of differential cross sections for J/ψ production in p + Pb collisions at √sNN=5.02 TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider with the ATLAS detector are presented. The data set used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 28.1 nb-1. The J/ψ mesons are reconstructed in the dimuon decay channel over the transverse momentum range 8< pT< 30GeV and over the center-of-mass rapidity range -2.87 < y*< 1.94. Prompt J/ψ are separated from J/ψ resulting from b-hadron decays through an analysis of the distance between the J/ψ decay vertex and the event primary vertex. The differential cross section for productionmore » of nonprompt J/ψ is compared to a FONLL calculation that does not include nuclear effects. Forward-backward production ratios are presented and compared to theoretical predictions. These results complement previously published results by covering a region of higher transverse momentum and more central rapidity. They constrain the kinematic dependence of nuclear modifications of charmonium and b-quark production in p + Pb collisions.« less

  19. Measurement of differential J/ψ production cross sections and forward-backward ratios in p + Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. 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P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of differential cross sections for J/ψ production in p+Pb collisions at √sNN=5.02TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider with the ATLAS detector are presented. The data set used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 28.1 nb-1. The J/ψ mesons are reconstructed in the dimuon decay channel over the transverse momentum range 8T<30GeV and over the center-of-mass rapidity range -2.87

  20. Modelling Changes in Mediterranean Potential Vegetation in the Last 6000 Years Employing a Time-Slice Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körper, Janina; Wagner, Sebastian; Cubasch, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Due to the high computational costs long climate simulations, e.g. of the last 6000 years, using comprehensive atmosphere-ocean general circulation models [AOGCMs] are currently carried out either for selected time slices with high spatial resolution or transiently with a low resolution. This study aims at regionalization of transient AOGCM simulations of the Holocene focussing on the Mediterranean region. Sea surface temperatures and sea ice coverage of a coarsely resolved T30 transient simulation of the Holocene are used as lower boundary conditions for time slice experiments for different higher horizontal resolutions with the atmospheric model ECHAM5 for selected time slices in the Holocene. In the low resolution simulations the climate in transition zones, e.g. ranging from the summer-dry Mediterranean climate to the desert climate, is poorly reflected. This is not only due to orographic effects but also due to averaging over large areas. In the horizontally higher resolved time-slice experiments the simulated potential vegetation, represented by biomes, generally improves. Our time-slice experiments indicate that in most parts of the Mediterranean area the potential vegetation is close to thresholds and therefore very sensitive to small temperature or precipitation changes. According to this model study, over the northern part of the region Mid-Holocene minus Pre-industrial biome changes are similar in the spatial structure to the anthropogenically influenced Present-day minus Pre-industrial patterns. Implications for a future climate will be discussed.

  1. Discrimination between ethanol inhibition models in a continuous alcoholic fermentation process using flocculating yeast.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, S C; Paiva, T C; Visconti, A E; Giudici, R

    1998-09-01

    Discrimination between different rival models for describing the inhibitory effect of ethanol both on yeast growth and on fermentation was studied for a continuous process of alcoholic fermentation in a tower reactor with recycling of flocculating cells. Models tested include linear, parabolic, hyperbolic, exponential, and generalized nonlinear power-law types. The best expressions were identified under the criteria that all the kinetic parameters should assume acceptable values in a feasible range and should result in the best fit of the experimental data. The kinetic parameters were estimated from steady-state data of several sugar concentrations in feeding stream (S0 = 160, 170, 180, 190, 200 g/L), constant dilution rate (D = 0.2 h-1), recycle ratio (alpha = 13.6), and temperature (T = 30 degrees C). The best model for the yeast growth was of power-law type, whereas for the product formation the best model was of linear type. These models were able to reproduce the trends of the process variables satisfactorily.

  2. Pressure and temperature dependence of growth and morphology of Escherichia coli: experiments and stochastic model.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Libchaber, Albert

    2013-08-06

    We have investigated the growth of Escherichia coli, a mesophilic bacterium, as a function of pressure (P) and temperature (T). Escherichia coli can grow and divide in a wide range of pressure (1-400 atm) and temperature (23-40°C). For T > 30°C, the doubling time of E. coli increases exponentially with pressure and exhibits a departure from exponential behavior at pressures between 250 and 400 atm for all the temperatures studied in our experiments. The sharp change in doubling time is followed by a sharp change in phenotypic transition of E. coli at high pressures where bacterial cells switch to an elongating cell type. We propose a model that this phenotypic change in bacteria at high pressures is an irreversible stochastic process, whereas the switching probability to elongating cell type increases with increasing pressure. The model fits well the experimental data. We discuss our experimental results in the light of structural and thus functional changes in proteins and membranes.

  3. XPS investigation of monatomic and cluster argon ion sputtering of tantalum pentoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Robin; White, Richard G.; Watts, John F.; Baker, Mark A.

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) have become the cutting edge of ion beam technology to sputter etch organic materials in surface analysis. However, little is currently known on the ability of argon cluster ions (Arn+) to etch metal oxides and other technologically important inorganic compounds and no depth profiles have previously been reported. In this work, XPS depth profiles through a certified (European standard BCR-261T) 30 nm thick Ta2O5 layer grown on Ta foil using monatomic Ar+ and Ar1000+ cluster ions have been performed at different incident energies. The preferential sputtering of oxygen induced using 6 keV Ar1000+ ions is lower relative to 3 keV and 500 eV Ar+ ions. Ar+ ions exhibit a steady state O/Ta ratio through the bulk oxide but Ar1000+ ions show a gradual decrease in the O/Ta ratio as a function of depth. The depth resolution and etch rate is substantially better for the monatomic beam compared to the cluster beam. Higher O concentrations are observed when the underlying Ta bulk metal is sputtered for the Ar1000+ profiles compared to the Ar+ profiles.

  4. Changing the 30-min Rule in Canada: The Effect of Room Temperature on Bacterial Growth in Red Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Arcos, Sandra; Kou, Yuntong; Ducas, Éric; Thibault, Louis

    2016-11-01

    To maintain product quality and safety, the '30-min rule' requires the discard of red blood cells (RBCs) that are exposed to uncontrolled temperatures for more than 30 min. Recent studies suggest this rule may safely be extended to a 60-min rule. A pool-and-split design study (N = 4) was run in parallel at Canadian Blood Services (SAGM RBCs) and Héma-Québec (AS-3 RBCs). RBCs were spiked with ∼1 colony-forming unit/ml of mesophilic and psychrophilic bacteria. Control units remained in storage at 1-6 °C for 42 days. Test 30 (T30) and T60 units were exposed to room temperature (RT) six times during storage, each time for 30 and 60 min, respectively. Bacterial proliferation was monitored. Mesophilic bacteria do not proliferate in RBCs. The growth of psychrophilic bacteria is not significantly different in RBCs exposed for 30 or 60 min to RT (p < 0.05). The study findings were the final evidence to support extension from a 30-min rule to a 60-min rule in Canada.

  5. Quantitative Defect Analysis of PAN-based Carbon Fibers Treated by Single and Dual HF RF-CCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erözbek Güngör, Ümmügül

    2016-09-01

    This work states the effects of single (40.68 MHz) and dual (40.68/2.1 MHz) RF-CCPs on defect structure of the PAN-based carbon fibers. The fibers were treated between two identical aluminum electrodes with R 200 mm in a 78.5 L stainless steel cylindrical reactor (R 500 mm, H 400 mm). The gap distance was 4 cm. In SRF mode, PHF = 50-200 W, p = 0.3, 0.5, 0.75 and 1 Torr, t = 30, 60 and 90 min. In DRF mode, PLF = 50-200 W, p = 0.1-0.9 Torr and t = 15, 30, 45 and 60 min at fixed PHF = 50 W. The structural analyses of the treated fibers were done by using high sensitive confocal Raman spectroscopy and the surfaces were excited by 532 nm-100 mW He-Ne (2.33 eV) laser. The average defect size and density of the treated fibers were calculated according to the following formulas; LD (size) = (1 . 8 ×10-9λL4 IG /ID)1/2 and nD (density) = (1 . 8 ×1022 /λL4) ×ID /IG where λL is the laser wavelength, ID is the intensity of D-band (˜1350 cm-1) and IG is the intensity of G-band ( 1580 cm-1) .

  6. A measurement of the ratio of the W and Z cross sections with exactly one associated jet in pp collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, D.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Böser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Buira-Clark, D.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Byatt, T.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carrillo Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernandez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Cevenini, F.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciba, K.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Clifft, R. W.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coe, P.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocaru, C. D.; Colas, J.; Colijn, A. P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Côté, D.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; da Silva, P. V. M.; da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Daum, C.; Dauvergne, J. P.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J. W.; Daya, R. K.; de, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Castro, S.; de Castro Faria Salgado, P. E.; de Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; de Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; de La Taille, C.; de la Torre, H.; de Lotto, B.; de Mora, L.; de Nooij, L.; de Pedis, D.; de Salvo, A.; de Sanctis, U.; de Santo, A.; de Vivie de Regie, J. B.; Dean, S.; Debbe, R.; Dedovich, D. 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C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walbersloh, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wunstorf, R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, G.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, Yo. K.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2012-02-01

    The ratio of production cross sections of the W and Z bosons with exactly one associated jet is presented as a function of jet transverse momentum threshold. The measurement has been designed to maximise cancellation of experimental and theoretical uncertainties, and is reported both within a particle-level kinematic range corresponding to the detector acceptance and as a total cross-section ratio. Results are obtained with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using an integrated luminosity of 33 pb-1. The results are compared with perturbative leading-order, leading-log, and next-to-leading-order QCD predictions, and are found to agree within experimental and theoretical uncertainties. The ratio is measured for events with a single jet with pT > 30 GeV to be 8.73 ± 0.30(stat) ± 0.40(syst) in the electron channel, and 8.49 ± 0.23(stat) ± 0.33(syst) in the muon channel.

  7. Droplet Size and Liquid Water Characteristics of the USAAEFA (CH-47) Helicopter Spray System and Natural Clouds as Sampled by a JUH-1H Helicopter.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    2 AF +n7 u*rL-nl I.1521nI 5. 32. 30 *2eiuE+07 *Q’J7L,(’b *’J02L>01 *13𔃻E- P1 S. 4J3. 33 .22E#)7 *773F*Ot . a 3ft-o I . Ius[ -f0I 5.*1 3o .11IE4(𔄁...P + t .30f -n I . 13 0 F- 01 a.64. 6 0 *3 92 E + .19 bF # 5 . ail 3F-0 1 .2211-n2 5. b9. 81itt+ 3e 64#a .363E-01 8l2f -02 4. 73. 100 A* P1 4 5 . 4 3’*1...MASSG(’-1) FAASS(GM-3J-1 PERCLNI cum PjwctfNI 3 .244JE+08 .(413f*07 .IUSF-cs �F-03 0. 0, Illf +0Q .34ts *0’.950f - P1 .1501-01 s. it. t’Q4L+*0m .?Ib

  8. On the simulation of seat-dip effect using geometrical acoustics software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirillo, Ettore; Martellotta, Francesco

    2004-05-01

    A group of Italian churches was surveyed in order to measure the most important acoustic parameters according to ISO 3382 Standard. Computer models of the same churches were made using acoustic simulation software. Absorption coefficients found in the literature were used and later calibrated to match predicted and measured T30 values. The results of the simulations were compared with the observed values, showing some discrepancies at mid-low frequencies. This discrepancy appeared to be due to a lack of direct sound in the measured responses, particularly at the 250-Hz and 500-Hz octave bands, indicating the probable presence of a seat-dip effect caused by the wooden pews. Since the acoustic simulation software provided the possibility to use acoustically semitransparent planes, this feature was used to simulate the effect of selective absorption of the direct sound due to the seat-dip effect. The comparison between measured acoustic parameters and those predicted including the simulation of the seat-dip effect showed that an improvement in the prediction accuracy can be achieved. Different configurations were tested in order to define the optimal placing of the semitransparent plane, and a criterion to choose the transparency coefficients is finally proposed.

  9. Extraordinary behavioral entrainment following circadian rhythm bifurcation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Elizabeth M.; Walbeek, Thijs J.; Sun, Jonathan; Johnson, Jeremy; Poonawala, Qays; Gorman, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian circadian timing system uses light to synchronize endogenously generated rhythms with the environmental day. Entrainment to schedules that deviate significantly from 24 h (T24) has been viewed as unlikely because the circadian pacemaker appears capable only of small, incremental responses to brief light exposures. Challenging this view, we demonstrate that simple manipulations of light alone induce extreme plasticity in the circadian system of mice. Firstly, exposure to dim nocturnal illumination (<0.1 lux), rather than completely dark nights, permits expression of an altered circadian waveform wherein mice in light/dark/light/dark (LDLD) cycles “bifurcate” their rhythms into two rest and activity intervals per 24 h. Secondly, this bifurcated state enables mice to adopt stable activity rhythms under 15 or 30 h days (LDLD T15/T30), well beyond conventional limits of entrainment. Continuation of dim light is unnecessary for T15/30 behavioral entrainment following bifurcation. Finally, neither dim light alone nor a shortened night is sufficient for the extraordinary entrainment observed under bifurcation. Thus, we demonstrate in a non-pharmacological, non-genetic manipulation that the circadian system is far more flexible than previously thought. These findings challenge the current conception of entrainment and its underlying principles, and reveal new potential targets for circadian interventions. PMID:27929128

  10. New green synthesis and formulations of acyclovir prodrugs.

    PubMed

    de Regil-Hernández, Rubén; Martínez-Lagos, Fernando; Rodríguez-Bayón, Amalia; Sinisterra, José-Vicente

    2011-01-01

    Different green synthesis of alkyl esters of acyclovir (acyclovir prodrugs) is described. Hexanoic, decanoic, dodecanoic and tetradecanoic acyclovir esters were synthesized reacting acyclovir and the respective acid anhydride in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), in solvents from renewable sources and without solvent (T=30 °C). Yields in prodrugs after 10 min of reaction were >95% using DMSO as solvent. The purification methodology was very simple, shorter and greener than previously described. The biosolvent, N,N-dimethylamide of decanoic acid, let us to obtain >95% yield at 24 h. This oily biosolvent is not dermotoxic and the reaction crude can directly be used in topic formulations. Syntheses without solvent proceeded successfully for acyclovir esters. Indeed, dodecanoate and tetradecanoate yielding >98% conversion of reactants in 30 min. In spite of requiring mild temperature (65 °C), substrate molar ratios were lowered to 1 : 1, thus conducing to a more efficient use of raw materials. The synthetic procedures were scaled up to a 300 g batch (yield 98-99% isolated ester). These esters can be used as acyclovir prodrugs in topic formulations. The esters release from an oil/water micro-emulsion and a hydrogel formulation were tested with good results.

  11. Hogg 12 and NGC 3590: A New Open Cluster Binary System Candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, Andrés E.; Clariá, Juan J.; Ahumada, Andrea V.

    2010-05-01

    We have obtained CCD UBVIKC photometry down to V ∼ 22.0 for the open clusters Hogg 12 and NGC 3590 and the fields surrounding them. Based on photometric and morphological criteria, as well as on the stellar density in the region, our evidence is sufficient to confirm that Hogg 12 is a genuine open cluster. NGC 3590 was used as a control cluster. The color-magnitude diagrams of Hogg 12, cleaned from field star contamination, reveal that this is a solar metal content cluster, affected by E(B - V) = 0.40 ± 0.05, located at a heliocentric distance d = 2.0 ± 0.5 kpc, and of an age similar to that of NGC 3590 (t = 30 Myr). Both clusters are surprisingly small objects whose radii are barely ∼1 pc, andthey are separated in the sky by scarcely 3.6 pc. These facts, added to their similar ages, reddenings, and metallicities, allow us to consider them a new open cluster binary system candidate. Of the ∼180 open cluster binary systems estimated to exist in the Galaxy, of which 27 are actually well known, Hogg 12 and NGC 3590 appear to be one of the two closest pairs.

  12. Changing the 30-min Rule in Canada: The Effect of Room Temperature on Bacterial Growth in Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Arcos, Sandra; Kou, Yuntong; Ducas, Éric; Thibault, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Background To maintain product quality and safety, the ‘30-min rule’ requires the discard of red blood cells (RBCs) that are exposed to uncontrolled temperatures for more than 30 min. Recent studies suggest this rule may safely be extended to a 60-min rule. Methods A pool-and-split design study (N = 4) was run in parallel at Canadian Blood Services (SAGM RBCs) and Héma-Québec (AS-3 RBCs). RBCs were spiked with ∼1 colony-forming unit/ml of mesophilic and psychrophilic bacteria. Control units remained in storage at 1-6 °C for 42 days. Test 30 (T30) and T60 units were exposed to room temperature (RT) six times during storage, each time for 30 and 60 min, respectively. Bacterial proliferation was monitored. Results Mesophilic bacteria do not proliferate in RBCs. The growth of psychrophilic bacteria is not significantly different in RBCs exposed for 30 or 60 min to RT (p < 0.05). Conclusion The study findings were the final evidence to support extension from a 30-min rule to a 60-min rule in Canada. PMID:27994525

  13. A baseline evaluation of casino air quality after enactment of Nevada's Clean Indoor Air Act.

    PubMed

    York, Nancy L; Lee, Kiyoung

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Surgeon General reports that there is no safe level of exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS). The purpose of this study was to measure levels of fine particulate matter in nonsmoking casino restaurants after enactment of Nevada's Clean Indoor Air Act (NCIAA). Fine particulate matter<2.5 microm in diameter (PM2.5) concentrations were measured in 16 casino hotel restaurants and gaming areas for a total of 32 venues. A battery-operated SidePak aerosol monitor was discreetly used for at least 30 min in each venue. Nonsmoking restaurant PM2.5 levels ranged from 5 to 101 microg/m3 (M=31; SD=22.9) while gaming areas ranged from 20 to 73 microg/m3 (M=48; SD=15.9). There was a significant difference in PM2.5 between restaurants and gaming areas, t30=-2.54, p=.017. There was also a strong correlation between the levels of restaurant PM2.5 and gaming area PM2.5 (r=.71; p=.005). Fine PM2.5 in all casino areas was above what the Environmental Protection Agency recommends as healthy. This information can be used to educate policy decision makers when discussing potential strengthening of the law.

  14. Are fat acids of human milk impacted by pasteurization and freezing?

    PubMed

    Borgo, Luiz Antônio; Coelho Araújo, Wilma Maria; Conceição, Maria Hosana; Sabioni Resck, Inês; Mendonça, Márcio Antonio

    2014-10-03

    The Human Milk Bank undergo human milk to pasteurization, followed by storage in a freezer at -18° C for up to six months to thus keep available the stocks of this product in maternal and infant hospitals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of processing on the lipid fraction of human milk. A sample of human milk was obtained from a donor and was subdivided into ten sub-samples that was subjected to the following treatments: LC = raw milk; T0 = milk after pasteurization; T30 = milk after pasteurization and freezing for 30 days; T60 = milk after pasteurization and freeze for 60 days, and so on every 30 days until T240 = milk after pasteurization and freezing for 240 days, with 3 repetitions for each treatment. Lipids were extracted, methylated and fatty acid profiles determined by gas chromatography. The fatty acids were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance and functional groups were identified by infrared spectroscopy. There were variations in the concentration of fatty acids. For unsaturated fatty acids there was increasing trend in their concentrations. The IR and NMR analyze characterized and identified functional groups presents in fatty acids.

  15. The Structural Properties of Vapor Deposited Water Ice and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Blake, D. F.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Films of vapor deposited water ice at low temperature (T<30 K) show a number of interesting structural changes during a gradual warmup. We would like to talk about the structure of the low temperature high density amorphous form of water ice, the process of crystallization, and some recent work on the morphological changes of water ice films at high temperature. The studies of the high density amorphous form are from in-situ electron microscopy as well as numerical simulations of molecular dynamics and have lead to new insights into the physical distinction between this high density amorphous form and the low density amorphous form. For the process of crystallization, we propose a model that describes the crystallization of water ice from the amorphous phase to cubic ice in terms of the nucleation of small domains in the ice. This model agrees well with the behavior of water ice in our electron microscopy studies and finds that pure water above the glass transition is a strong liquid. In more recent work, we have concentrated on temperatures above the crystallization temperature and we find interesting morphological changes related to the decrease in viscosity of the amorphous component in the cubic crystalline regime. Given enough time, we would like to put these results in an astrophysical context and discuss some observed features of the frost on interstellar grains and the bulk ice in comets.

  16. Threshold selection for classification of MR brain images by clustering method

    SciTech Connect

    Moldovanu, Simona; Obreja, Cristian; Moraru, Luminita

    2015-12-07

    Given a grey-intensity image, our method detects the optimal threshold for a suitable binarization of MR brain images. In MR brain image processing, the grey levels of pixels belonging to the object are not substantially different from the grey levels belonging to the background. Threshold optimization is an effective tool to separate objects from the background and further, in classification applications. This paper gives a detailed investigation on the selection of thresholds. Our method does not use the well-known method for binarization. Instead, we perform a simple threshold optimization which, in turn, will allow the best classification of the analyzed images into healthy and multiple sclerosis disease. The dissimilarity (or the distance between classes) has been established using the clustering method based on dendrograms. We tested our method using two classes of images: the first consists of 20 T2-weighted and 20 proton density PD-weighted scans from two healthy subjects and from two patients with multiple sclerosis. For each image and for each threshold, the number of the white pixels (or the area of white objects in binary image) has been determined. These pixel numbers represent the objects in clustering operation. The following optimum threshold values are obtained, T = 80 for PD images and T = 30 for T2w images. Each mentioned threshold separate clearly the clusters that belonging of the studied groups, healthy patient and multiple sclerosis disease.

  17. Magnetic characterization of a hydrogen phase trapped inside deep dislocation cores in a hydrogen-cycled PdH{sub x} (x {approx} 4.5 x 10{sup -4}) single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Lipson, A. G. Heuser, B. J.; Castano, C. H.; Lyakhov, B. F.; Tsivadze, A. Yu.

    2006-09-15

    The magnetic characterization of Pd single crystals deformed by cycling in a hydrogen atmosphere has been performed. Based on evidence obtained from thermal desorption analysis, it is shown that the condensed hydrogen phase formed inside deep dislocation cores in PdH{sub x} (x = H/Pd {approx} 4.5 x 10{sup -4}) is tightly bound with a Pd matrix. The activation energy of hydrogen desorption from these cores was found to be as high as e = 1.6eV/H-atom, suggesting the occurrence of a strong band overlapping between Pd and H atoms. SQUID measurements carried out in a weak magnetic field (H < 5.0 Oe) showed an anomalous diamagnetic contribution to the DC and AC magnetic susceptibilities of the PdH{sub x} sample at T < 30 K resulting in the presence of the hydrogen phase. It is suggested that the anomalous diamagnetic response in PdH{sub x} is caused by the presence of a hydrogen dominant phase, tightly bound with a Pd matrix inside the dislocation cores (nanotubes)

  18. Two-Component Self-Diffusion in Solutions: Trehalose and Sucrose in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feick, E. J.; von Meerwall, E. D.; Ekdawi, N.; de Pablo, J.

    2001-03-01

    Trehalose is now recognized as a superior substitute for sucrose in solution as a cryoprotectant, for preserving organs destined for transplantation. To explore some aspects of this superiority, we have used the proton NMR pulsed-gradient spin-echo method at T = 30, 50, and 85 deg. C to study the self-diffusion of solvent and solute in aqueous solutions of these molecules as function of their concentration, c. We find that both solute molecules diffuse substantially more slowly than water at the same c and T; that addition of water accelerates solute diffusion more rapidly than that of water; and that while at a given c and T water diffusion is insensitive to solute identity, trehalose diffusion is somewhat slower than sucrose diffusion, an effect which reaches a factor near two at the highest c. The results of our extensive MC and MD molecular simulations of diffusion in sucrose solutions agree quantitatively with our experimental findings at corresponding c. Free-volume theory is also employed to explore the cooperative interactions between solvent and solutes, and to guide the interpretation of both experiment and simulation.

  19. Diffusion of Trehalose and Sucrose in Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feick, E.; von Meerwall, E.; Ekdawi, N.; de Pablo, J.

    2000-10-01

    Trehalose is emerging as superior substitute for sucrose in solution as a cryoprotectant, e. g., to preserve organs destined for transplantation. We have used the proton NMR pulsed-gradient spin-echo method between T = 30 and 85 deg. C to study the self-diffusion of solvent and solute in aqueous solutions of these molecules as function of their concentration, c. We find that both solute molecules diffuse substantially more slowly than water at corresponding c and T; that addition of water accelerates solute diffusion more rapidly than that of water; and that while at a given c and T water diffusion is insensitive to solute identity, trehalose diffusion is slower than sucrose diffusion. The latter effect increases with c, approaching a factor of two at the highest c. In these respects our results correspond closely to those of our extensive numerical simulations of these systems. Free-volume theory is employed to explore the cooperative kinetic interactions between solvent and solutes, and to account tentatively for part of the superiority of trehalose to sucrose as preservation agent. Differences in crystallization behavior also seem to be involved.

  20. Monoterpene emissions from ornamental trees in urban areas: a case study of Barcelona, Spain.

    PubMed

    Noe, S M; Peñuelas, J; Niinemets, U

    2008-01-01

    Research on biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions has mainly focused on native species in natural ecosystems. However, much of the ozone and aerosol formation occurs in city atmospheres due to BVOC emissions by local urban vegetation. Plant composition of urban habitats is often dominated by non-native ornamental plant species, for which only limited data on BVOC emissions are available. To gain insight into the influence of ornamental vegetation on the urban atmospheric reactivity in Barcelona, Spain, we studied volatile isoprenoid emissions in 11 widespread ornamental tree species (three conifers and nine angiosperms). We found significant monoterpene emissions in all studied species, with normalized emission potentials (T=30 degrees C, photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD)=1000 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1)) ranging between 0.2 to 110 microg x g(-1) (dry weight) h(-1). Depending on species, the emissions were dominated by alpha- and beta-pinene, myrcene, alpha- and beta-phellandrene, carene, limonene and eucalyptol. These data demonstrate that ornamental plants may significantly contribute to the BVOC load in urban atmospheres and also underscore the importance of broadleaf angiosperms as significant monoterpene emitters.

  1. On the nature of photo charge carriers in ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, V. F.; Khusnatdinov, N. N.

    1994-06-01

    A method of photoelectromotive force (PEMF) was developed to find the charge sign, mobility, and lifetime of photo charge carriers in ice generated by photons with energy hν≳6.5 eV. It was determined that the most mobile photo charge carriers are negative ones, with mobility μ increasing from 2×10-3 cm2/V s at T=-10 °C to 4×10-2 cm2/V s at T=-30 °C, and with their lifetime decreasing from 30 to 10 s in the same temperature range. Activation energies of the mobility and the lifetime are Eμ=-0.77 eV and Eτ=0.32 eV, respectively. In addition to the negative photo charge carriers positive ones arise with mobility μ=2.3×10-4 cm2/V s and lifetime τ=26 min at T=-15 °C. We suggest that the negative photo charge carriers in ice are mobile complexes of an electron, vacancy and D-defect (e-+V+D). To take into account a specific mechanism of charge transport in ice, configurational vector Ω, and the generation of complexes (e-+V+D), a reaction of ``autoionization'' was modified for ice, 2H2O+hν→H3O++OH•int(e-+V+D).

  2. Three thiamine analogues differently alter thiamine transport and metabolism in nervous tissue: an in vivo kinetic study using rats.

    PubMed

    Rindi, G; Patrini, C; Nauti, A; Bellazzi, R; Magni, P

    2003-12-01

    Thiamine (T) analogues pyrithiamine, oxythiamine or amprolium in amounts 10-1000 times higher than labelled T, were i.p. injected into rats together with 14C-T (30 microg; 46.25 KBq). The radioactivity associated with T and its phosphoesters in the plasma and cerebral cortex, brainstem, cerebellum, and sciatic nerve were determined at time intervals from 0.25 to 240 h from injection. The experimental data obtained were processed with a mathematical compartmental model that calculated the fractional rate constants. These are the amount of content in a given compartment that is replaced in 1 h and expressed in per hour. The results showed that all three analogues inhibited thiamine entry from plasma. Instead, oxythiamine enhanced T phosphorylation to T pyrophosphate (TPP); amprolium and oxythiamine enhanced TPP dephosphorylation to monophosphate (TMP); pyrithiamine reduced TPP dephosphorylation and TMP formation, while none of the analogues modified TMP dephosphorylation to T. In conclusion, in living rats, the action of T analogues was much more complex than could be expected from their structure and action in vitro.

  3. Magnetars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2005-01-01

    "Magnetars (Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars) are a subclass of neutron stars characterized by their recurrent X-ray bursts. While in an active (bursting) state, they are emitting hundreds of predominantly soft (kT=30 keV), short (0.1-100 ms long) events. Active states last anywhere between days and years. Their quiescent source X-ray light curves exhibit pulsations in the narrow range of 5-11 s; estimates of these rotational period rate changes (spin-down) indicate that their magnetic fields are extremely high, of the order of 10^14-10^15 G. Such high B-field objects, dubbed "magnetars", had been predicted to exist in 1992, but the first concrete observational evidence was obtained in 1998 for two of these sources. I will discuss here the recent spectacular results from SGR 1806-20, as well as the history of magnetars, and their spectral, timing and flux characteristics both in the persistent and their burst emission."

  4. Measurements of the production cross section of a $Z$ boson in association with jets in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 13$$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2017-05-31

    Measurements of the production cross section of a Z boson in association with jets in proton–proton collisions at √s = 13 TeV are presented, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.16 fb–1 collected by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider in 2015. Inclusive and differential cross sections are measured for events containing a Z boson decaying to electrons or muons and produced in association with up to seven jets with pT > 30 GeV and |y| < 2.5. Predictions from different Monte Carlo generators based on leading-order and next-to-leading-order matrix elements for up to twomore » additional partons interfaced with parton shower and fixed-order predictions at next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading order are compared with the measured cross sections. Good agreement within the uncertainties is observed for most of the modelled quantities, in particular with the generators which use next-to-leading-order matrix elements and the more recent next-to-next-to-leading-order fixed-order predictions.« less

  5. Measurement of the production cross section of a W boson in association with two b jets in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 8{\\,\\mathrm{{TeV}}} $$

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; ...

    2017-02-11

    The production cross section of a W boson in association with two b jets is measured using a sample of proton–proton collisions at √s = 8TeV collected by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.8 fb-1 . We then reconstructed W bosons via their leptonic decays, W→ℓν, where ℓ=μ or e . The fiducial region studied contains exactly one lepton with transverse momentum pmore » $$ℓ\\atop{T}$$>30GeV and pseudorapidity |ηℓ|<2.1, with exactly two b jets with pT>25Geand |η|<2.4 and no other jets with pT>25GeV and |η|<4.7. Finally, the cross section is measured to be σ(pp→W(ℓν)+ b$$\\bar{b}$$)=0.64±0.03(stat)±0.10(syst)±0.06(theo)±0.02(lumi)pb, in agreement with standard model predictions.« less

  6. Measurements of the production cross section of a Z boson in association with jets in pp collisions at √{s} = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antrim, D. J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Bajic, M.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. 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R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. 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A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cueto, A.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'amen, G.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Via, C. Da; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Maria, A.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Regie, J. B. De Vivie; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. 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S.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karamaoun, A.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karentzos, E.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kasahara, K.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Kato, C.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kawade, K.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazanin, V. F.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keller, J. S.; Kempster, J. J.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Keyes, R. A.; Khader, M.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khanov, A.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Kharlamova, T.; Khoo, T. J.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kido, S.; Kilby, C. R.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O. M.; King, B. T.; King, M.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kiss, F.; Kiuchi, K.; Kivernyk, O.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M. 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T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shirabe, S.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Saadi, D. Shoaleh; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shope, D. R.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sideras Haddad, E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, J. W.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, I. M.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Stark, S. H.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Suster, C. J. E.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Swift, S. P.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanioka, R.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Tornambe, P.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tulbure, T. T.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turgeman, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usui, J.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vasquez, G. A.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolff, R.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xi, Z.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zacharis, G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2017-06-01

    Measurements of the production cross section of a Z boson in association with jets in proton-proton collisions at √{s} = 13 TeV are presented, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.16 fb^{-1} collected by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider in 2015. Inclusive and differential cross sections are measured for events containing a Z boson decaying to electrons or muons and produced in association with up to seven jets with p_{ {T}} > 30 GeV and |y| <2.5. Predictions from different Monte Carlo generators based on leading-order and next-to-leading-order matrix elements for up to two additional partons interfaced with parton shower and fixed-order predictions at next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading order are compared with the measured cross sections. Good agreement within the uncertainties is observed for most of the modelled quantities, in particular with the generators which use next-to-leading-order matrix elements and the more recent next-to-next-to-leading-order fixed-order predictions.

  7. Measurement of the Sm151(n,γ) cross section from 0.6 eV to 1 MeV via the neutron time-of-flight technique at the CERN n_TOF facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrone, S.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Benlliure, J.; Berthomieux, E.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Cortina, D.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dababneh, S.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Duran-Escribano, I.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W. I.; Gallino, R.; Goncalves, I. F.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Koehler, P. E.; Konovalov, V.; Kritĉka, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Martinez-Val, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Molina-Coballes, A.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papaevangelou, T.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perlado, J. M.; Perrot, L.; Pignatari, M.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Policarpo, A.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J. M.; Raman, S.; Rapp, W.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Soares, J. C.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L. M. N.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin-Fernandez, D.; Vincente-Vincente, M.; Vlachoudis, V.; Voss, F.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2006-03-01

    The Sm151(n,γ) cross section was measured with the time-of-flight technique from 0.6 eV up to 1 MeV relative to the Au standard with an overall uncertainty of typically 6%. Neutrons were produced by spallation at the innovative n_TOF facility at CERN; the γ rays from capture events were detected with organic C6D6 scintillators. Experimental setup and data analysis procedures are described with emphasis on the corrections for detection efficiency, background subtraction, and neutron flux determination. At low energies, resonances could be resolved up to about 1 keV, yielding a resonance integral of 3575±210 b, an average s-wave resonance spacing of =1.49±0.07 eV, and a neutron strength function of =(3.87±0.33)×10-4. Maxwellian-averaged capture cross sections are reported for thermal energies between 5 and 100 keV. These results are of relevance for nuclear structure studies, nuclear astrophysics, and nuclear technology. The new value of the Maxwellian-averaged cross section at kT=30 keV is 3.08±0.15 b, considerably larger than previous theoretical estimates, and provides better constraints for the thermodynamic conditions during the occurrence of the slow neutron capture process in low-mass stars during their asymptotic giant branch phase.

  8. A randomized, controlled trial of nebulized 5% hypertonic saline and mixed 5% hypertonic saline with epinephrine in bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Tinsa, Faten; Abdelkafi, Sana; Bel Haj, Imen; Hamouda, Samia; Brini, Ines; Zouari, Bechir; Boussetta, Khadija

    2014-11-01

    Bronchiolitis is a public health problem in the word and in Tunisia. Nebulized hypertonic saline seems to have some benefits in bronchiolitis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of nebulized 5% hypertonic saline alone or mixed with epinephrine in bronchiolitis as measured by improvement in clinical score, oxygen saturation or reduction in duration of hospitalization. This prospective, double blind, placebo controlled, randomized clinical trial was performed at Children's Hospital of Tunis from February 2012 to Mars 2012. A total of 94 patients less than 12 months of age with diagnosis of moderately severe bronchiolitis were enrolled and assigned to receive 5% nebulized hypertonic saline, mixed 5% hypertonic saline with standard epinephrine 0,1% or normal saline (placebo) at admission and every 4 hours during hospitalization. There were no significant difference between nebulized 5% hypertonic saline, mixed 5% hypertonic saline with epinephrine or normal saline at baseline, T30 min, T60 min, and T120 min after start study in Wang severity score, oxygen saturation in room air, rate respiratory and heart rate. There was no difference in duration of hospitalization. Nebulized 5% hypertonic saline or mixed 5% hypertonic saline with epinephrine are safety but does not appear effective in treating moderately ill infants with the first acute bronchiolitis.

  9. Lipid metabolism during bacterial growth, sporulation, and germination: differential synthesis of individual branched- and normal-chain fatty acids during spore germination and outgrowth of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, K W; Bulla, L A; Mounts, T L

    1975-12-01

    The biosynthesis of individual branched- and normal-chain fatty acids during Bacillus thuringiensis spore germination and outgrowth was studied by comparing pulsed and continuous labeling of these fatty acids with [U-14C]acetate. The relative specific activity of each fatty acid varies with time as the cell progresses through outgrowth. However, fatty acid synthesis does occur in two distinct phases. Upon germination, acetate is incorporated only into the iso-isomers i-C13, i-C14, and i-C16; no normal or anteiso synthesis occurs. Subsequent to T30, the full complement of branched- and normal-chain homologues is formed and there is a dramatic enhancement in the overall rate of fatty acid synthesis. Significantly, this rate increase coincides with a marked shift from the synthesis of short-chain to long-chain fatty acids. These findings illustrate a dichotomy in synthesis that may result from initial fatty acid formation by preexisting spore fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes in the absence of de novo protein synthesis. Elucidation of the timing and kinetics of individual fatty acid formation provides a biochemical profile of activities directly related to membrane differentiation and cellular development.

  10. Coordinated investigation of midlatitude upper mesospheric temperature inversion layers and the associated gravity wave forcing by Na lidar and Advanced Mesospheric Temperature Mapper in Logan, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Tao; Pautet, P.-D.; Zhao, Y.; Cai, X.; Criddle, N. R.; Taylor, M. J.; Pendleton, W. R.

    2014-04-01

    Mesospheric inversion layers (MIL) are well studied in the literature but their relationship to the dynamic feature associated with the breaking of atmospheric waves in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) region are not well understood. Two strong MIL events (ΔT ~30 K) were observed above 90 km during a 6 day full diurnal cycle Na lidar campaign conducted from 6 August to 13 August Logan, Utah (42°N, 112°W). Colocated Advanced Mesospheric Temperature Mapper observations provided key information on concurrent gravity wave (GW) events and their characteristics during the nighttime observations. The study found both MILs were well correlated with the development and presence of an unstable region ~2 km above the MIL peak altitudes and a highly stable region below, implicating the strengthening of MIL is likely due to the increase of downward heat flux by the enhanced saturation of gravity wave, when it propagates through a highly stable layer. Each MIL event also exhibited distinct features: one showed a downward progression most likely due to tidal-GW interaction, while the peak height of the other event remained constant. During further investigation of atmospheric stability surrounding the MIL structure, lidar measurements indicate a sharp enhancement of the convective stability below the peak altitude of each MIL. We postulate that the sources of these stable layers were different; one was potentially triggered by concurrent large tidal wave activity and the other during the passage of a strong mesospheric bore.

  11. Self-Diffusion of Trehalose and Sucrose in Water: Analysis and Simulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feick, E.; von Meerwall, E. D.; Ekdawi-Sever, N.; de Pablo, J. J.

    2001-04-01

    We continue our analysis of possible causes for the superiority of trehalose over sucrose in aqueous solution as a cryoprotectant, e. g., for preserving organs for transplanting. We previously reported the results of our proton pulsed-gradient NMR measurements at T = 30, 50, and 85 deg. C of the self-diffusion D of solvent and solute in aqueous solutions of these molecules as function of their concentration c. We found that both solute molecules diffuse much more slowly than water at corresponding c and T; that addition of water accelerates solute diffusion more than that of water; that water diffusion is insensitive to solute identity, but trehalose diffusion is slower than sucrose diffusion at high c. Our extensive MC/MD simulations for these systems are in good agreement with our experimental results. Application of the free-volume theory to solvent and solutes shows that the difference in D between the diglyceride molecules can be explained by a differential accessibility of the unoccupied neighboring volume, accounting for the higher glass transition temperature in trehalose.

  12. Complete mitochondrial genome of Zebra tilapia, Tilapia buttikoferi.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xi-Dong; Liu, Chao; Wang, Xue-Jie; Liu, Yi; Hu, Yin-Chang; Luo, Jian-Ren

    2016-01-01

    We determined the complete mitochondrial genome of Tilapia buttikoferi, which was 16,577 bp in length with an A + T content of 53.0%, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNAs, 22 tRNAs and a complete control region. The gene arrangement was similar to that of typical fishes. The total base composition of the mitogenome was 25.6% T, 30.8% C, 27.4% A and 16.2% G. Of the 13 protein-coding genes, 12 genes start with an ATG codon, except for COX1 with GTG. Seven (ND1, ND2, COX1, ATPase8, ATPase6, ND4L and ND6) used TAA or AGA as the termination codon, whereas six (COX2, COX3, ND3, ND4, ND5 and cyt b) had incomplete stop codon T. Its control region was atypical in being short at 861 bp, and contained TACAT motif and one microsatellite-like region (TA)7. This mitogenome sequence data may be useful for phylogenetic and systematic analyses within the family Cichlaidae.

  13. Measurement of the stellar 58Ni(n ,γ )59Ni cross section with accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Peter; Rugel, Georg; Dillmann, Iris; Faestermann, Thomas; Fimiani, Leticia; Hain, Karin; Korschinek, Gunther; Lachner, Johannes; Poutivtsev, Mikhail; Knie, Klaus; Heil, Michael; Käppeler, Franz; Wallner, Anton

    2017-03-01

    The 58Ni(n ,γ )59Ni cross section was measured with a combination of the activation technique and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The neutron activations were performed at the Karlsruhe 3.7 MV Van de Graaff accelerator using the quasistellar neutron spectrum at k T =25 keV produced by the 7Li(p ,n )7Be reaction. The subsequent AMS measurements were carried out at the 14 MV tandem accelerator of the Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory in Garching using the gas-filled analyzing magnet system (GAMS). Three individual samples were measured, yielding a Maxwellian-averaged cross section at k T =30 keV of <σ> 30 keV = 30.4 (23)syst(9)stat mbarn. This value is slightly lower than two recently published measurements using the time-of-flight (TOF) method, but agrees within the uncertainties. Our new results also resolve the large discrepancy between older TOF measurements and our previous value.

  14. Relationships Between Vertical Jump and Full Squat Power Outputs With Sprint Times in U21 Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    López-Segovia, Manuel; Marques, Mário C.; van den Tillaar, Roland; González-Badillo, Juan J

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between power variables in the vertical jump and full squat with the sprint performance in soccer players. Fourteen under-21 soccer players were evaluated in two testing sessions separated by 7 days. In the first testing session, vertical jump height in countermovement was assessed, and power output for both loaded countermovement jump (CMJL) and full squat (FS) exercises in two progressive load tests. The second testing session included sprinting at 10, 20, and 30m (T10, T20, T30, T10–20, T10–30, T20–30). Power variables obtained in the loaded vertical jump with 20kg and full squat exercise with 70kg showed significant relationships with all split times (r=−0.56/–0.79; p≤ 0.01/0.01). The results suggest that power produced either with vertical jump or full squat exercises is an important factor to explain short sprint performance in soccer players. These findings might suggest that certain levels of neuromuscular activation are more related with sprint performance reflecting the greater suitability of loads against others for the improvement of short sprint ability in under-21 soccer players. PMID:23487438

  15. Electronic nose guided determination of frying disposal time of sunflower oil using fuzzy logic analysis.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Rohit; Sehwag, Sneha; Mishra, Hari Niwas

    2017-04-15

    An electronic nose (e-nose), having 18 metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) sensors, guided determination of frying disposal time of sunflower oil is reported. The ranking and screening of MOS sensors, specific for volatile organic compounds, was performed using fuzzy logic. A correlation was examined between rancidity indices of fried oil (total polar compounds (TPC), and triglyceride dimers-polymers (TGDP), among others) and e-nose based odor index. Fuzzy logic screened 6 MOS sensors (LY2/G, LY2/AA, LY2/GH, LY2/gCT1, T30/1, and P30/1) to deconvolute the rancid fried oils using hierarchical clustering on principal component space. A good relationship was noted between rancidity indices and odor index (R(2)>0.85). Based on maximum discard limits of rancidity indices (25% TPC and 10% TGDP), the frying disposal time of 15.2h (TPC) vs. 15.8h (e-nose) and 15.5h (TGDP) vs. 16.3h (e-nose) was determined. The demonstrated methodology holds a potential extension to different fried oils and products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. On-line characterization using ultrasound of pectin hydrolysis catalyzed by the enzyme pectinmethylesterase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, C.; Resa, P.; Sierra, C.; Elvira, L.

    2012-12-01

    The major problem in the fruit juice industry is associated with juice quality deterioration due to the cloud loss of juice concentrates by the enzymatic reaction of pectinmethylesterase enzyme (PME, EC 3.1.1.11). During pectin hydrolysis, pectin and water are transformed into polygalacturonic acid (pectate) and methanol by the action of PME. In this work, a low-intensity ultrasonic technique is used to monitor this enzymatic reaction, with PME both from orange peel and from Aspergillus niger. Changes in sound velocity during pectin hydrolysis (1% concentration of pectin, T = 30°C and pH = 4.5 and 7) with 0.25 ml of enzyme solution (PME) have been measured using a through-transmission technique. Sound velocity decreases as pectin is transformed into pectate and methanol and at the end of the process, the change in sound velocity reaches 0.3 m/s with PME from orange peel and 0.33 m/s with PME from Aspergillus niger.

  17. Donor-acceptor substituted phenylethynyltriphenylenes – excited state intramolecular charge transfer, solvatochromic absorption and fluorescence emission

    PubMed Central

    Nandy, Ritesh

    2010-01-01

    Summary Several 2-(phenylethynyl)triphenylene derivatives bearing electron donor and acceptor substituents on the phenyl rings have been synthesized. The absorption and fluorescence emission properties of these molecules have been studied in solvents of different polarity. For a given derivative, solvent polarity had minimal effect on the absorption maxima. However, for a given solvent the absorption maxima red shifted with increasing conjugation of the substituent. The fluorescence emission of these derivatives was very sensitive to solvent polarity. In the presence of strongly electron withdrawing (–CN) and strongly electron donating (–NMe2) substituents large Stokes shifts (up to 130 nm, 7828 cm−1) were observed in DMSO. In the presence of carbonyl substituents (–COMe and –COPh), the largest Stokes shift (140 nm, 8163 cm−1) was observed in ethanol. Linear correlation was observed for the Stokes shifts in a Lippert–Mataga plot. Linear correlation of Stokes shift was also observed with E T(30) scale for protic and aprotic solvents but with different slopes. These results indicate that the fluorescence emission arises from excited state intramolecular charge transfer in these molecules where the triphenylene chromophore acts either as a donor or as an acceptor depending upon the nature of the substituent on the phenyl ring. HOMO–LUMO energy gaps have been estimated from the electrochemical and spectral data for these derivatives. The HOMO and LUMO surfaces were obtained from DFT calculations. PMID:21085512

  18. Photocatalytic degradation of eight pesticides in leaching water by use of ZnO under natural sunlight.

    PubMed

    Navarro, S; Fenoll, J; Vela, N; Ruiz, E; Navarro, G

    2009-12-30

    Photodegradation of eight pesticides in leaching water at pilot plant scale using the tandem ZnO/Na(2)S(2)O(8) as photosensitizer/oxidant and compound parabolic collectors under natural sunlight is reported. The pesticides, habitually used on pepper culture and belonging to different chemical groups were azoxyxtrobin, kresoxim-methyl, hexaconazole, tebuconazole, triadimenol, and pyrimethanil (fungicides), primicarb (insecticide), and propyzamide (herbicide). As expected, the influence of the semiconductor used at 150 mg L(-1) on the degradation of pesticides was very significant in all cases. Photocatalytic experiments show that the addition of photosensitizer strongly improves the elimination of pesticides in comparison with photolytic tests; significantly increasing the reaction rates. The use of Na(2)S(2)O(8) implies a significant reduction in treatment time showing a quicker reaction time than ZnO alone. On the contrary, the addition of H(2)O(2) into illuminated ZnO suspensions does not improve the rate of photooxidation. The disappearance of the pesticides followed first-order kinetics according to Langmuir-Hinshelwood model and complete degradation occurs from 60 to 120 min. The disappearance time (DT(75)), referred to the normalized illumination time (t(30 W)) was lower than 3 min in all cases.

  19. Effects of age and acute muscle fatigue on reactive postural control in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Papa, Evan V; Foreman, K Bo; Dibble, Leland E

    2015-12-01

    Falls can cause moderate to severe injuries such as hip fractures and head trauma in older adults. While declines in muscle strength and sensory function contribute to increased falls in older adults, skeletal muscle fatigue is often overlooked as an additional contributor to fall risk. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of acute lower extremity muscle fatigue and age on reactive postural control in healthy adults. A sample of 16 individuals participated in this study (8 healthy older adults and 8 healthy young persons). Whole body kinematic and kinetic data were collected during anterior and posterior reproducible fall tests before (T0) and immediately after (T1) eccentric muscle fatiguing exercise, as well as after 15-min (T15) and 30-min (T30) of rest. Lower extremity joint kinematics of the stepping limb during the support (landing) phase of the anterior fall were significantly altered by the presence of acute muscle fatigue. Step velocity was significantly decreased during the anterior falls. Statistically significant main effects of age were found for step length in both fall directions. Effect sizes for all outcomes were small. No statistically significant interaction effects were found. Muscle fatigue has a measurable effect on lower extremity joint kinematics during simulated falls. These alterations appear to resolve within 15 min of recovery. The above deficits, coupled with a reduced step length, may help explain the increased fall risk in older adults. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Gansu zokor, Eospalax cansus (Rodentia, Spalacidae).

    PubMed

    Su, Junhu; Wang, Jing; Hua, Limin; Gleeson, Dianne; Ji, Weihong

    2013-12-01

    Mysopalacinae (zokors) is a group of fossorial rodents for which the taxonomy has yet to reach consensus. Furthermore, due to their fossorial lifestyle, little is known about their ecology. Molecular data are important to elucidate such aspects. In this paper, the complete mitochondrial DNA genome of Gansu zokor (Eospalax cansus) of the type found in Lintan, China was determined. The genome is 16,354 bp in length and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and two main non-coding regions (the control region and the origin of the light strand replication), the gene composition and order of which are similar to most other mammals. The overall base composition is T 30.0%, C 24.2%, A 33.5%, and G 12.3%, with an A + T bias of 63.5%. These mitogenome sequence data are potentially important for evolutionary, population genetic, and ecological studies of the Mysopalacinae.

  1. Stellar (n ,γ ) cross sections of neutron-rich nuclei: Completing the isotope chains of Yb, Os, Pt, and Hg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marganiec, J.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Käppeler, F.

    2014-12-01

    The (n ,γ ) cross sections of the most neutron-rich stable isotopes of Yb, Os, Pt, and Hg have been determined in a series of activation measurements at the Karlsruhe 3.7 MV Van de Graaff accelerator, using the quasistellar neutron spectrum for k T =25 keV that can be produced with the 7Li(p ,n ) 7Be reaction. In this way, Maxwellian averaged cross sections could be directly obtained with only minor corrections. After irradiation the induced activities were counted with a HPGe detector via the strongest γ -ray lines. The stellar neutron capture cross sections of Yb,176174, Os,192190, Pt,198196, and Hg,204202, extrapolated to k T =30 keV, were found to be 157 ±6 mb, 114 ±8 mb, 278 ±11 mb, 160 ±7 mb, 171 ±19 mb, 94 ±4 mb, 62 ±2 mb, and 32 ±15 mb, respectively. In the case of 196Pt the partial cross section to the isomeric state at 399.5 keV could be determined as well. With these results the cross section data for long isotopic chains could be completed for a discussion of the predictive power of statistical model calculations towards the neutron-rich and proton-rich sides of the stability valley.

  2. Measurement of prompt ψ(2S) to J/ψ yield ratios in Pb-Pb and p-p collisions at sNN=2.76TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; ...

    2014-12-31

    The ratio between the prompt ψ(2S) and J/ψ yields, reconstructed via their decays into μ⁺μ⁻, is measured in Pb-Pb and p-p collisions at √sNN = 2.76  TeV. The analysis is based on Pb-Pb and p-p data samples collected by CMS at the Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 150  μb⁻¹ and 5.4  pb⁻¹, respectively. The double ratio of measured yields (Nψ(2S)/NJ/ψ)Pb−Pb/(Nψ(2S)/NJ/ψ)p−p is computed in three Pb-Pb collision centrality bins and two kinematic ranges: one at midrapidity, |y| < 1.6, covering the transverse momentum range 6.5 < pT < 30  GeV/c, and the other at forward rapidity, 1.6<|y|<2.4, extending to lower pT values,more » 3« less

  3. Use of a High-Temperature Superconducting Coil for Magnetic Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagnard, J.-F.; Crate, D.; Jamoye, J.-F.; Laurent, Ph; Mattivi, B.; Cloots, R.; Ausloos, M.; Genon, A.; Vanderbemden, Ph

    2006-06-01

    A high temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage device (SMES) has been realised using a 350 m-long BSCCO tape wound as a ''pancake'' coil. The coil is mounted on a cryocooler allowing temperatures down to 17.2 K to be achieved. The temperature dependence of coil electrical resistance R(T) shows a superconducting transition at T = 102.5 K. Measurements of the V(I) characteristics were performed at several temperatures between 17.2 K and 101.5 K to obtain the temperature dependence of the critical current (using a 1 µV/cm criterion). Critical currents were found to exceed 100 A for T < 30 K. An electronic DC-DC converter was built in order to control the energy flow in and out of the superconducting coil. The converter consists of a MOS transistor bridge switching at a 80 kHz frequency and controlled with standard Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) techniques. The system was tested using a 30 V squared wave power supply as bridge input voltage. The coil current, the bridge input and output voltages were recorded simultaneously. Using a 10 A setpoint current in the superconducting coil, the whole system (coil + DC-DC converter) can provide a stable output voltage showing uninterruptible power supply (UPS) capabilities over 1 s.

  4. Nucleosynthesis at the termination point of the s process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratzel, U.; Arlandini, C.; Käppeler, F.; Couture, A.; Wiescher, M.; Reifarth, R.; Gallino, R.; Mengoni, A.; Travaglio, C.

    2004-12-01

    Stellar cross sections of importance with respect to the termination of the s -process reaction chain have been determined for the two cases, 208Pb (n,γ) 209Pb and 209Bi (n,γ) 210Big , yielding kT=30 keV values of <σv> / vT =0.31±0.2 mb and 2.54±0.14 mb , respectively. The measurements were carried out by activation of Pb and Bi samples in a quasistellar neutron spectrum using gold as a cross section standard. With this technique the uncertainties reported in previous works could be considerably reduced. The measurements are complemented by a discussion of the recycling at the termination point of the s -process neutron capture chain in a 3 M⊙ and [Fe/H] =-1.3 asymptotic giant branch star. At this metallicity, AGB stars give rise to the maximum production of s -process lead. The sensitivity of the isotopic lead abundances is discussed with respect to the remaining cross section uncertainties. The information obtained in this work is also of relevance for an assessment of the α activity due to a buildup of 210Po in Pb/Bi cooled fast reactor systems.

  5. Comparative jet wake structure and swimming performance of salps.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Kelly R; Madin, Laurence P

    2010-09-01

    Salps are barrel-shaped marine invertebrates that swim by jet propulsion. Morphological variations among species and life-cycle stages are accompanied by differences in swimming mode. The goal of this investigation was to compare propulsive jet wakes and swimming performance variables among morphologically distinct salp species (Pegea confoederata, Weelia (Salpa) cylindrica, Cyclosalpa sp.) and relate swimming patterns to ecological function. Using a combination of in situ dye visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements, we describe properties of the jet wake and swimming performance variables including thrust, drag and propulsive efficiency. Locomotion by all species investigated was achieved via vortex ring propulsion. The slow-swimming P. confoederata produced the highest weight-specific thrust (T=53 N kg(-1)) and swam with the highest whole-cycle propulsive efficiency (eta(wc)=55%). The fast-swimming W. cylindrica had the most streamlined body shape but produced an intermediate weight-specific thrust (T=30 N kg(-1)) and swam with an intermediate whole-cycle propulsive efficiency (eta(wc)=52%). Weak swimming performance variables in the slow-swimming C. affinis, including the lowest weight-specific thrust (T=25 N kg(-1)) and lowest whole-cycle propulsive efficiency (eta(wc)=47%), may be compensated by low energetic requirements. Swimming performance variables are considered in the context of ecological roles and evolutionary relationships.

  6. Magnetic field effect on growth, arsenic uptake, and total amylolytic activity on mesquite (Prosopis juliflora x P. velutina) seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Tavizón, Edith; Mokgalaka-Matlala, Ntebogeng S.; Elizalde Galindo, José T.; Castillo-Michelle, Hiram; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic field is closely related to the cell metabolism of plants [N. A. Belyavskaya, Adv. Space Res. 34, 1566 (2004)]. In order to see the effect of magnetic field on the plant growth, arsenic uptake, and total amylolytic activity of mesquite (Prosopis juliflora x P. velutina) seeds, ten sets of 80 seeds were selected to be oriented with the long axis parallel or randomly oriented to an external magnetic field. The external magnetic field magnitude was 1 T, and the exposition time t = 30 min. Then, the seeds were stored for three days in a plastic bag and then sown on paper towels in a modified Hoagland's nutrient solution. After three days of germination in the dark and three days in light, seedlings were grown hydroponically in modified Hoagland's nutrient solution (high PO42-) containing 0, 10, or 20 ppm of arsenic as As (III) and (V). The results show that the germination ratios, growth, elongation, arsenic uptake, and total amylolytic activity of the long axis oriented mesquite seeds were much higher than those of the randomly oriented seeds. Also, these two sets of seeds showed higher properties than the ones that were not exposed to external magnetic field.

  7. Stellar neutron capture cross sections of 41K and 45Sc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, M.; Plag, R.; Uberseder, E.; Bisterzo, S.; Käppeler, F.; Mengoni, A.; Pignatari, M.

    2016-05-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of light nuclei (A <56 ) are important for s -process scenarios since they act as neutron poisons. We report on measurements of the neutron capture cross sections of 41K and 45Sc, which were performed at the Karlsruhe 3.7 MV Van de Graaff accelerator via the activation method in a quasistellar neutron spectrum corresponding to a thermal energy of k T =25 keV. Systematic effects were controlled by repeated irradiations, resulting in overall uncertainties of less than 3%. The measured spectrum-averaged data have been used to normalize the energy-dependent (n ,γ ) cross sections from the main data libraries JEFF-3.2, JENDL-4.0, and ENDF/B-VII.1, and a set of Maxwellian averaged cross sections was calculated for improving the s -process nucleosynthesis yields in AGB stars and in massive stars. At k T =30 keV, the new Maxwellian averaged cross sections of 41K and 45Sc are 19.2 ±0.6 mb and 61.3 ±1.8 mb, respectively. Both values are 20% lower than previously recommended. The effect of neutron poisons is discussed for nuclei with A <56 in general and for the investigated isotopes in particular.

  8. Endogenously released GLP-1 is not sufficient to alter postprandial glucose regulation in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Tiffany; Schurr, Kathleen; Donahue, E. Patrick; Farmer, Ben; Neal, Doss; Cherrington, Alan D.

    2017-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is secreted from the L cell of the gut in response to oral nutrient delivery. To determine if endogenously released GLP-1 contributes to the incretin effect and postprandial glucose regulation, conscious dogs (n = 8) underwent an acclimation period (t = −60 to −20 min), followed by a basal sampling period (t = −20 to 0 min) and an experimental period (t = 0–320 min). At the beginning of the experimental period, t = 0 min, a peripheral infusion of either saline or GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) antagonist, exendin (9–39) (Ex-9, 500 pmol/kg/min), was started. At t = 30 min, animals consumed a liquid mixed meal, spiked with acetaminophen. All animals were studied twice (± Ex-9) in random fashion, and the experiments were separated by a 1–2-week washout period. Antagonism of the GLP-1R did not have an effect, as indicated by repeated-measures MANOVA analysis of the Δ AUC from t = 45–320 min of arterial plasma glucose, GLP-1, insulin, glucagon, and acetaminophen levels. Therefore, endogenous GLP-1 is not sufficient to alter postprandial glucose regulation in the dog. PMID:21547512

  9. Measurement of the B± production asymmetry and the C P asymmetry in B±→J /ψ K± decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baryshnikov, F.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betancourt, C.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, Ia.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bordyuzhin, I.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D. H.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Chamont, D.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Demmer, M.; Dendek, A.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Déléage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Funk, W.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, H.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kozachuk, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, T.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marinangeli, M.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurice, E.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Morgunova, O.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Mussini, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nogay, A.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Placinta, V.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Ratnikov, F.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Soares Lavra, l.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevens, H.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viana Barbosa, J. V.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Viemann, H.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vitti, M.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yao, Y.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    The B± meson production asymmetry in p p collisions is measured using B+→D¯ 0 π+ decays. The data were recorded by the LHCb experiment during Run 1 of the LHC at center-of-mass energies of √{s }=7 and 8 TeV. The production asymmetries, integrated over transverse momenta in the range 2 T<30 GeV /c , and rapidities in the range 2.1

  10. Effects of load and type of physical training on resting and postexercise cardiac autonomic control.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Zaqueline F; Peçanha, Tiago; Moreira, Débora N; Silva, Lilian P; Laterza, Mateus C; Nakamura, Fábio Y; Lima, Jorge R P

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of training load and exercise mode on heart rate variability and heart rate recovery (HRR) in healthy individuals. The subjects were divided into three groups: sedentary (SED), resistance trained (RT) and aerobically trained (RT). Resting and postmaximal exercise RR intervals were recorded on supine and seated position, respectively. The HRV indices calculated in the resting position were RMSSD and LF and HF power densities. The following HRR indices were calculated throughout the 5-minute postmaximal recovery period: semi-logarithmic regression analysis of the first 30 s (T30); absolute difference between the peak and 60 s HR (HRR(60s)); and mono-exponential time constant of HRR (HRRτ). The RMSSD on subsequent 30-s segments (RMSSD(30s)) on recovery period was also calculated. Both RT and AT groups presented faster HRR than SED (P<0·05). The aerobic trained group was the only group that presented vagal reactivation, when analysing the RMSSD(30s). There were no correlations between the Baecke sport score and the HRV vagal-related indices. However, it was significantly correlated with HRR. It was concluded that that the training load positively influences the HRR, but has no effect on the HRV at rest and that the type of exercise, showed a marked influence on HRV recovery.

  11. Interpreting the physical background of empirical solvent polarity via photodetachment spectroscopy of microsolvated aromatic ketyl anions.

    PubMed

    Maeyama, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Keiji; Yagi, Izumi; Fujii, Asuka; Mikami, Naohiko

    2009-10-08

    The physical background of empirical solvent polarity is explored in regard to trends in solute-solvent intermolecular potential energy functions. Aromatic ketyl anions, benzophenone, and 9-fluorenone radical anions, are chosen for a model solute molecule showing solvatochromic behavior similar to betaine-30 dye, which provides the most established solvent polarity scale, E(T)(30). Common features among the ketyl anions and betaine-30 were examined with quantum chemical calculations for the electronic states and solvation structure. Vertical photodetachment and photoabsorption energies were determined for the ketyl anions microsolvated with a single solvent molecule by measuring photoelectron spectra as well as photodetachment excitation spectra for several aprotic and protic solvents. The spectroscopic data were analyzed through quantum chemical calculations based on density functional theory, and their relationship with the characteristics of intermolecular potential energies was considered. As a result, the typical solvent polarity parameter can be interpreted to reflect essentially the gradient of a potential energy function (namely, the strength of force) between a negative charge and the solvent molecules in the attractive region. A large polarity for protic solvents is attributed to an effective interaction of a proton-like hydrogen atom with the negative charge in a short-range.

  12. Assessment of High-rate GPS time series at long periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelevitz, K.; Houlie, N.; Giardini, D.; Rothacher, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present the comparison of 1 Hz GPS waveforms and very broadband seismic waveforms recorded during and after three mega-thrust earthquakes (2003 Hokkaido, 2004 Sumatra and 2011 Tohoku-Oki) for various period bands (T > 30 s) and distances from the epicenter. With this study we aim at providing valuable data between periods of 300s and 1200s, corresponding to long-period surface waves and the first normal mode of the free oscillation of the Earth, respectively. We assess the performance of each dataset at the light of comparisons with synthetic seismic displacement waveforms. We find that GPS is well capable of recovering millimetre ground motion oscillations in a wide range of periods (30 - 1300 s), potentially providing valuable information on the lithosphere and upper-mantle heterogeneities on a scale of 300 - 3000 km. With the aim of building a database of GPS waveforms we have conducted a study of different processing techniques with the GAMIT and Bernese GPS data processing packages. We show the outline of the planned GPS waveform database, which consists of long period surface wave records of large earthquakes (Mw > 7) of the last decades, and could be used for various seismological applications.

  13. Threshold selection for classification of MR brain images by clustering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovanu, Simona; Obreja, Cristian; Moraru, Luminita

    2015-12-01

    Given a grey-intensity image, our method detects the optimal threshold for a suitable binarization of MR brain images. In MR brain image processing, the grey levels of pixels belonging to the object are not substantially different from the grey levels belonging to the background. Threshold optimization is an effective tool to separate objects from the background and further, in classification applications. This paper gives a detailed investigation on the selection of thresholds. Our method does not use the well-known method for binarization. Instead, we perform a simple threshold optimization which, in turn, will allow the best classification of the analyzed images into healthy and multiple sclerosis disease. The dissimilarity (or the distance between classes) has been established using the clustering method based on dendrograms. We tested our method using two classes of images: the first consists of 20 T2-weighted and 20 proton density PD-weighted scans from two healthy subjects and from two patients with multiple sclerosis. For each image and for each threshold, the number of the white pixels (or the area of white objects in binary image) has been determined. These pixel numbers represent the objects in clustering operation. The following optimum threshold values are obtained, T = 80 for PD images and T = 30 for T2w images. Each mentioned threshold separate clearly the clusters that belonging of the studied groups, healthy patient and multiple sclerosis disease.

  14. Binding of environmental carcinogens to asbestos and mineral fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, G; Pagé, M; Dumas, L

    1984-01-01

    A rapid method has been developed for measuring the binding capacity of asbestos and other mineral fibres for environmental carcinogens. Benzo(alpha)pyrene (B(alpha)P), nitrosonornicotine (NNN), and N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene (NAAF) were assayed in the presence of Canadian grade 4T30 chrysotile, chrysotile A, amosite, crocidolite, glass microfibres, glasswool, attapulgite, and titanium dioxide. Chrysotile binds significantly more carcinogens than the other mineral fibres. This binding assay is reproducible with coefficients of variation of less than 8% and 6% respectively for inter and intra assay. The influence of pH was also studied, and there is good correlation between the carcinogen binding and the charge of the tested mineral fibres. The in vitro cytotoxicity on macrophage like cell line P388D1 and the haemolytic activity of various mineral fibres were also measured; a good correlation was found between the binding capacity and the cytotoxicity of tested mineral fibres on P388D1 cells. These results give some explanations for the reported synergism between exposure to asbestos and the smoking habits of workers. PMID:6331497

  15. In vivo Raman spectroscopy of biochemical changes in human skin by cosmetic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosato, Maira Gaspar; dos Santos, Edson Pereira; Alves, Rani de Souza; Raniero, Leandro; Menezes, Priscila Fernanda C.; Kruger, Odivânia; Praes, Carlos Eduardo O.; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2010-02-01

    The skin aging process is mainly accelerated by external agents such as sunlight, air humidity and surfactants action. Changes in protein structures and hydration during the aging process are responsible for skin morphological variations. In this work the human skin was investigated by in vivo Raman spectroscopy before and after the topical applications of a cosmetic on 17 healthy volunteers (age 60 to 75). In vivo Raman spectra of the skin were obtained with a Spectrometer SpectraPro- 2500i (Pi-Acton), CCD detector and a 785 nm laser excitation source, collected at the beginning of experiment without cream (T0), after 30 (T30) and 60 (T60) days using the product. The primary changes occurred in the following spectral regions: 935 cm-1 (νCC), 1060 cm-1 (lipids), 1174 to 1201 cm-1 (tryptofan, phenylalanine and tyrosine), 1302 cm-1 (phospholipids), 1520 to 1580 cm-1 (C=C) and 1650 cm-1 (amide I). These findings indicate that skin positive effects were enhanced by a continuous cream application.

  16. [Early recognition of deteriorating patient program in department of cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Qin, Chunxiang; Mao, Ping; Xiao, Peng; Zeng, Sainan; Xie, Jianfei; Ding, Siqing

    2014-03-01

    To explore the application and the effect of early recognition of deteriorating patient program in department of cardiac surgery. We used the early recognition of deteriorating patient program in the cardiac surgery groups, including cardiac surgeons, nurses in ward, ICU and operation rooms of the cardiac surgery department, and compared the satisfaction of nurses and doctors, handover time, handover score of critical patients, and rate of unplanned ICU admission before and after the intervention. After using the early recognition of deteriorating patient program, the satisfaction of doctors and nurses was increased, the handover time was lowered 0.56 min/time (t=2.22, P<0.05), the handover score of critical patients enhanced by 19.59 points (t=30.57, P<0.001), the rate of unplanned ICU readmission after the operation reduced by 4.8% (χ2=4.14, P<0.05). Early recognition of deteriorating patient program can improve the safety of cardiac patients, enhance the self-confidence of nurses and work efficiency.

  17. A reliable monitoring of the biocompatibility of an effluent along an oxidative pre-treatment by sequential bioassays and chemical analyses.

    PubMed

    Amat, A M; Arques, A; García-Ripoll, A; Santos-Juanes, L; Vicente, R; Oller, I; Maldonado, M I; Malato, S

    2009-02-01

    A new approach to assess biocompatibility of an effluent, based on combination of different bioassays and chemical analyses, has been tested using a mixture of four commercial pesticides treated by a solar photo-Fenton as target effluent. A very fast elimination of the pesticides occurred (all of them were below detection limit at t30W=36 min), but mineralisation was a more time-consuming process, due to the formation of organic intermediates and to the presence of solvents, as shown by GC-MS analysis. Measurements based on activated sludge indicated that detoxification was coincident with the removal of the active ingredients, while more sensitive Vibrio fischeri bacterium showed significant toxicity until the end of the experiment, although the effluent might be compatible with biological processes. Biodegradability of the solutions was enhanced by the photochemical process, to reach BOD5/COD ratios above 0.8. Longer time bioassays, such as the Zahn-Wellens' test, support the applicability of coupling photochemical with activated sludge-based biological processes to deal with these effluents.

  18. Evaluation of sexual dimorphism by discriminant function analysis of toe length (1T–5T) of adult Igbo populace in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Alabi, Stephen A.; Didia, Blessing C.; Oladipo, Gabriel Sunday; Aigbogun, Eric O.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sex determination is an important and one of the foremost criteria in establishing the identity of an individual, and this is achieved by investigating various anatomical structures to establish sex discriminatory features. The present study conducted baseline data for the toe with a view of finding discriminatory sex characteristics. Materials and Methods: A total of 420 subjects were studied by direct linear measurements of the toe length (big toe [1T] to the fifth toes [5T]) of both feet using a digital Vernier caliper with accuracy of 0.01 mm. Statistical Package for Social Sciences  (IBM, version 23, Armonk, New York, USA), Levene's ANOVA outcome informed the use of t-tests to compare mean differences. Discriminant function analysis (DFA) was used to evaluate the possibility of sex categorization. The significance level was set at 95%. Results: The mean ± standard deviation values of the right (R) toes for the males were 49.63 ± 4.43 mm (1T), 36.92 ± 5.14 mm (2T), 30.35 ± 4.95 mm (3T), 25.55 ± 3.97 mm (4T) and 22.21 ± 2.94 mm (5T), whereas the female values were 45.73 ± 4.07 mm (1T), 33.31 ± 4.66 mm (2T), 26.63 ± 4.02 mm (3T), 22.89 ± 3.43 mm (4T), and 19.77 ± 2.70 mm (5T). The left male values were 49.16 ± 4.32 mm (1T), 36.82 ± 5.16 mm (2T), 30.88 ± 4.91 mm (3T), 26.13 ± 3.99 mm (4T), and 22.46 ± 3.24 mm (5T), whereas the female values were 45.33 ± 4.05 mm (1T), 33.05 ± 4.70 mm (2T), 27.27 ± 4.29 mm (3T), 23.10 ± 3.36 mm (4T), 19.81 ± 2.59 mm (5T). From the results, males displayed significantly higher mean values than females in all measured parameters (t = 2.405, P = 0.018) with no asymmetry (P > 0.05); although T3 and T4 were larger on the left foot. The DFA model when tested with the present data derived a significant F likelihood ratio test (P < 0.001), a Wilks’ lambda predictability value of 0.759 having a model accuracy of 69.5% with a better prediction for female (70%) than males (69%). Conclusion: The use of toe

  19. Optimized performance for neutron interrogation to detect SNM

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D R; Asztalos, S J; Biltoft, P J; Church, J A; Descalle, M; Hall, J M; Luu, T C; Manatt, D R; Mauger, G J; Norman, E B; Petersen, D C; Pruet, J A; Prussin, S G

    2007-02-14

    A program of simulations and validating experiments was utilized to evaluate a concept for neutron interrogation of commercial cargo containers that would reliably detect special nuclear material (SNM). The goals were to develop an interrogation system capable of detecting a 5 kg solid sphere of high-enriched uranium (HEU) even when deeply embedded in commercial cargo. Performance goals included a minimum detection probability, P{sub d} {ge} 95%, a maximum occurrence of false positive indications, P{sub fA} {le} 0.001, and maximum scan duration of t {le} 1 min. The conditions necessary to meet these goals were demonstrated in experimental measurements even when the SNM is deeply buried in any commercial cargo, and are projected to be met successfully in the most challenging cases of steel or hydrocarbons at areal density {rho}L {le} 150 g/cm{sup 2}. Optimal performance was obtained with a collimated ({Delta}{Theta} = {+-} 15{sup o}) neutron beam at energy E{sub n} = 7 MeV produced by the D(d,n) reaction with the deuteron energy E{sub d} = 4 MeV. Two fission product signatures are utilized to uniquely identify SNM, including delayed neutrons detected in a large array of polyethylene moderated 3He proportional counters and high energy {beta}-delayed fission product {gamma}-radiation detected in a large array of 61 x 61 x 25 cm{sup 3} plastic scintillators. The latter detectors are nearly blind to normal terrestrial background radiation by setting an energy threshold on the detection at E{sub min} {ge} 3 MeV. Detection goals were attained with a low beam current (I{sub d} = 15-65 {micro}A) source up to {rho}L = 75 g/cm{sup 2} utilizing long irradiations, T = 30 sec, and long counting times, t = 30-100 sec. Projecting to a higher beam current, I{sub d} {ge} 600 {micro}A and larger detector array the detection and false alarm goals would be attained even with intervening cargo overburden as large as {rho}L {le} 150 g/cm{sup 2}. The latter cargo thickness corresponds to

  20. Caffeine Ingestion Increases Estimated Glycolytic Metabolism during Taekwondo Combat Simulation but Does Not Improve Performance or Parasympathetic Reactivation.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Silva, João Paulo; Silva Santos, Jonatas Ferreira da; Branco, Braulio Henrique Magnani; Abad, César Cavinato Cal; Oliveira, Luana Farias de; Loturco, Irineu; Franchini, Emerson

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of caffeine ingestion on performance and estimated energy system contribution during simulated taekwondo combat and on post-exercise parasympathetic reactivation. Ten taekwondo athletes completed two experimental sessions separated by at least 48 hours. Athletes consumed a capsule containing either caffeine (5 mg∙kg-1) or placebo (cellulose) one hour before the combat simulation (3 rounds of 2 min separated by 1 min passive recovery), in a double-blind, randomized, repeated-measures crossover design. All simulated combat was filmed to quantify the time spent fighting in each round. Lactate concentration and rating of perceived exertion were measured before and after each round, while heart rate (HR) and the estimated contribution of the oxidative (WAER), ATP-PCr (WPCR), and glycolytic (W[La-]) systems were calculated during the combat simulation. Furthermore, parasympathetic reactivation after the combat simulation was evaluated through 1) taking absolute difference between the final HR observed at the end of third round and the HR recorded 60-s after (HRR60s), 2) taking the time constant of HR decay obtained by fitting the 6-min post-exercise HRR into a first-order exponential decay curve (HRRτ), or by 3) analyzing the first 30-s via logarithmic regression analysis (T30). Caffeine ingestion increased estimated glycolytic energy contribution in relation to placebo (12.5 ± 1.7 kJ and 8.9 ± 1.2 kJ, P = 0.04). However, caffeine did not improve performance as measured by attack number (CAF: 26. 7 ± 1.9; PLA: 27.3 ± 2.1, P = 0.48) or attack time (CAF: 33.8 ± 1.9 s; PLA: 36.6 ± 4.5 s, P = 0.58). Similarly, RPE (CAF: 11.7 ± 0.4 a.u.; PLA: 11.5 ± 0.3 a.u., P = 0.62), HR (CAF: 170 ± 3.5 bpm; PLA: 174.2 bpm, P = 0.12), oxidative (CAF: 109.3 ± 4.5 kJ; PLA: 107.9 kJ, P = 0.61) and ATP-PCr energy contributions (CAF: 45.3 ± 3.4 kJ; PLA: 46.8 ± 3.6 kJ, P = 0.72) during the combat simulation were unaffected

  1. Caffeine Ingestion Increases Estimated Glycolytic Metabolism during Taekwondo Combat Simulation but Does Not Improve Performance or Parasympathetic Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of caffeine ingestion on performance and estimated energy system contribution during simulated taekwondo combat and on post-exercise parasympathetic reactivation. Methods Ten taekwondo athletes completed two experimental sessions separated by at least 48 hours. Athletes consumed a capsule containing either caffeine (5 mg∙kg-1) or placebo (cellulose) one hour before the combat simulation (3 rounds of 2 min separated by 1 min passive recovery), in a double-blind, randomized, repeated-measures crossover design. All simulated combat was filmed to quantify the time spent fighting in each round. Lactate concentration and rating of perceived exertion were measured before and after each round, while heart rate (HR) and the estimated contribution of the oxidative (WAER), ATP-PCr (WPCR), and glycolytic (W[La-]) systems were calculated during the combat simulation. Furthermore, parasympathetic reactivation after the combat simulation was evaluated through 1) taking absolute difference between the final HR observed at the end of third round and the HR recorded 60-s after (HRR60s), 2) taking the time constant of HR decay obtained by fitting the 6-min post-exercise HRR into a first-order exponential decay curve (HRRτ), or by 3) analyzing the first 30-s via logarithmic regression analysis (T30). Results Caffeine ingestion increased estimated glycolytic energy contribution in relation to placebo (12.5 ± 1.7 kJ and 8.9 ± 1.2 kJ, P = 0.04). However, caffeine did not improve performance as measured by attack number (CAF: 26. 7 ± 1.9; PLA: 27.3 ± 2.1, P = 0.48) or attack time (CAF: 33.8 ± 1.9 s; PLA: 36.6 ± 4.5 s, P = 0.58). Similarly, RPE (CAF: 11.7 ± 0.4 a.u.; PLA: 11.5 ± 0.3 a.u., P = 0.62), HR (CAF: 170 ± 3.5 bpm; PLA: 174.2 bpm, P = 0.12), oxidative (CAF: 109.3 ± 4.5 kJ; PLA: 107.9 kJ, P = 0.61) and ATP-PCr energy contributions (CAF: 45.3 ± 3.4 kJ; PLA: 46.8 ± 3.6 kJ, P = 0.72) during the combat simulation

  2. Amphibians and ultra high diluted thyroxine--further experiments and re-analysis of data.

    PubMed

    Endler, Peter Christian; Scherer-Pongratz, Waltraud; Harrer, Bernhard; Lingg, Gerhard; Lothaller, Harald

    2015-10-01

    A model of thyroxine and metamorphosis of highland amphibians is frequently mentioned as an example of experiments on extremely diluted substances in discussions around 'homeopathy'. The model was scrutinized by reanalysing the results of the initial researcher A and a second researcher B as well as of 5 external researchers C between 1990 and 2013. Rana temporaria larvae were taken from an alpine highland biotope. The test solution was thyroxine 10(-30) (T30x), tetra-iodo-thyronine sodium pentahydrate diluted with pure water in 26 steps of 1:10, being agitated after each step. Analogously prepared water (W30x) was used for control. Tadpoles were observed from the 2-legged to the 4-legged stage. Experiments were performed in different years, at different times of season, and their duration could vary. Frequencies of 4-legged animals, effect sizes and areas under the curves (AUCs) were calculated and regression analyses were performed to investigate possible correlations between year, season, duration etc. Experiments were in line with animal protection guidelines. The total set of data A + B + C as well as subsets A (initial researcher, N=286+293), B (second centre, 965 + 965) and C (5 external researchers, 690 + 690) showed an effect of extremely diluted agitated thyroxine reverse to that known of molecular thyroxin, i.e. test values were below control by 11.4% for A, 9.5% for B and 7.0% for C (p<0.001 for each of the subsets). The effect size (Cohen's d) was >0.8 (large) for both A and B and 0.74 (medium) for C. Although a perfect reproducibility was not obtained, this paradoxical phenomenon was generally consistent in different observations. Correlations were found between details of laboratory handling, as well as environment temperature, and the size of the results. Copyright © 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of virtual reality distraction on pain among patients with hand injury undergoing dressing change.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chunlan; Deng, Hongyan; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    To assess the effect of virtual reality distraction on pain among patients with a hand injury undergoing a dressing change. Virtual reality distraction can effectively alleviate pain among patients undergoing a dressing change. Clinical research has not addressed pain control during a dressing change. A randomised controlled trial was performed. In the first dressing change sequence, 98 patients were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group, with 49 cases in each group. Pain levels were compared between the two groups before and after the dressing change using a visual analog scale. The sense of involvement in virtual environments was measured using the Pearson correlation coefficient analysis, which determined the relationship between the sense of involvement and pain level. The difference in visual analog scale scores between the two groups before the dressing change was not statistically significant (t = 0·196, p > 0·05), but the scores became statistically significant after the dressing change (t = -30·792, p < 0·01). The correlation between the sense of involvement in a virtual environment and pain level during the dressing was statistically significant (R(2) = 0·5538, p < 0·05). Virtual reality distraction can effectively alleviate pain among patients with a hand injury undergoing a dressing change. Better results can be obtained by increasing the sense of involvement in a virtual environment. Virtual reality distraction can effectively relieve pain without side effects and is not reliant on a doctor's prescription. This tool is convenient for nurses to use, especially when analgesics are unavailable. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION DURING THE MIGRATION AND RESONANCE CROSSINGS OF THE GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Lykawka, Patryk Sofia; Ito, Takashi

    2013-08-10

    The newly formed giant planets may have migrated and crossed a number of mutual mean motion resonances (MMRs) when smaller objects (embryos) were accreting to form the terrestrial planets in the planetesimal disk. We investigated the effects of the planetesimal-driven migration of Jupiter and Saturn, and the influence of their mutual 1:2 MMR crossing on terrestrial planet formation for the first time, by performing N-body simulations. These simulations considered distinct timescales of MMR crossing and planet migration. In total, 68 high-resolution simulation runs using 2000 disk planetesimals were performed, which was a significant improvement on previously published results. Even when the effects of the 1:2 MMR crossing and planet migration were included in the system, Venus and Earth analogs (considering both orbits and masses) successfully formed in several runs. In addition, we found that the orbits of planetesimals beyond a {approx} 1.5-2 AU were dynamically depleted by the strengthened sweeping secular resonances associated with Jupiter's and Saturn's more eccentric orbits (relative to the present day) during planet migration. However, this depletion did not prevent the formation of massive Mars analogs (planets with more than 1.5 times Mars's mass). Although late MMR crossings (at t > 30 Myr) could remove such planets, Mars-like small mass planets survived on overly excited orbits (high e and/or i), or were completely lost in these systems. We conclude that the orbital migration and crossing of the mutual 1:2 MMR of Jupiter and Saturn are unlikely to provide suitable orbital conditions for the formation of solar system terrestrial planets. This suggests that to explain Mars's small mass and the absence of other planets between Mars and Jupiter, the outer asteroid belt must have suffered a severe depletion due to interactions with Jupiter/Saturn, or by an alternative mechanism (e.g., rogue super-Earths)

  5. Distal limb desensitisation following analgesia of the digital flexor tendon sheath in horses using four different techniques.

    PubMed

    Jordana, M; Martens, A; Duchateau, L; Vanderperren, K; Saunders, J; Oosterlinck, M; Pille, F

    2014-07-01

    Controversy exists about the desensitisation obtained after diagnostic analgesia of the digital flexor tendon sheath (DFTS) during lameness examinations. To determine whether DFTS analgesia results in inadvertent desensitisation of the palmar/plantar digital nerves and whether this depends on the injection technique used. Crossover experimental study. The DFTS of 9 horses were injected with local anaesthetic solution and radiodense contrast medium using one of the following techniques: Proximal (at lateral proximal recess of the DFTS), Axial (axial to the lateral proximal sesamoid bone), Base (at base of the lateral proximal sesamoid bone), and Distal (at palmar/plantar mid-pastern). In total, 72 injections were performed. Skin desensitisation at the heel bulbs was tested with a dynamometer before and at 15, 30, 90 and 120 min after injection. Overall, complete desensitisation of a heel bulb at one or more time points after injection occurred in 22 limbs (30.6%). An additional 7 limbs were partially desensitised. Complete skin desensitisation occurred in 10, 3, 4 and 5 limbs using the Proximal, Axial, Base and Distal techniques respectively. Significant differences between techniques were only found at T30. The probability of skin desensitisation at the heel bulbs was 4 times higher when using the Proximal compared with the Axial and Base techniques in the forelimbs, and 3 times higher compared with the Axial and Distal techniques in the hindlimbs. Skin desensitisation nearly always occurred exclusively on the lateral heel bulb. Bilateral desensitisation only occurred in 5 limbs. Anaesthesia of the palmar/plantar digital nerves with distal limb desensitisation often occurs after DFTS analgesia. A higher chance of desensitisation exists when injecting the proximal DFTS recess. It is advisable to verify skin sensitivity at the heel bulbs after DFTS analgesia to avoid false interpretations about the origin of pain causing lameness. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  6. Infection with strains of Citrus tristeza virus does not exclude superinfection by other strains of the virus.

    PubMed

    Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Robertson, Cecile J; Shilts, Turksen; Folimonov, Alexey S; Hilf, Mark E; Garnsey, Stephen M; Dawson, William O

    2010-02-01

    Superinfection exclusion or homologous interference, a phenomenon in which a primary viral infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely related virus, has been observed commonly for viruses in various systems, including viruses of bacteria, plants, and animals. With plant viruses, homologous interference initially was used as a test of virus relatedness to define whether two virus isolates were "strains" of the same virus or represented different viruses, and subsequently purposeful infection with a mild isolate was implemented as a protective measure against isolates of the virus causing severe disease. In this study we examined superinfection exclusion of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a positive-sense RNA closterovirus. Thirteen naturally occurring isolates of CTV representing five different virus strains and a set of isolates originated from virus constructs engineered based on an infectious cDNA clone of T36 isolate of CTV, including hybrids containing sequences from different isolates, were examined for their ability to prevent superinfection by another isolate of the virus. We show that superinfection exclusion occurred only between isolates of the same strain and not between isolates of different strains. When isolates of the same strain were used for sequential plant inoculation, the primary infection provided complete exclusion of the challenge isolate, whereas isolates from heterologous strains appeared to have no effect on replication, movement or systemic infection by the challenge virus. Surprisingly, substitution of extended cognate sequences from isolates of the T68 or T30 strains into T36 did not confer the ability of resulting hybrid viruses to exclude superinfection by those donor strains. Overall, these results do not appear to be explained by mechanisms proposed previously for other viruses. Moreover, these observations bring an understanding of some previously unexplained fundamental features of CTV biology and, most

  7. Population structure and diversity of citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates in Hunan province, China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Cui; Yao, Run-Xian; Li, Fang; Dai, Su-Ming; Licciardello, Grazia; Catara, Antonino; Gentile, Alessandra; Deng, Zi-Niu

    2017-02-01

    Stem-pitting (SP) is the main type of citrus tristeza virus (CTV) that causes severe damage to citrus trees, especially those of sweet orange, in Hunan province, China. Understanding the local CTV population structure should provide clues for effective mild strain cross-protection (MSCP) of the SP strain of CTV. In this study, markers for the p23 gene, multiple molecular markers (MMMs), and sequence analysis of the three silencing suppressor genes (p20, p23 and p25) were employed to analyze the genetic diversity and genotype composition of the CTV population based on 51 CTV-positive samples collected from 14 citrus orchards scattered around six major citrus-growing areas of Hunan. The results indicated that the CTV population structure was extremely complex and that infection was highly mixed. In total, p23 gene markers resulted in six profiles, and MMMs demonstrated 25 profiles. The severe VT and T3 types appeared to be predominantly associated with SP, while the mild T30 and RB types were related to asymptomatic samples. Based on phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequences of p20, p23 and p25, 19 representative CTV samples were classified into seven recently established CTV groups and a potentially novel one. A high level of genetic diversity, as well as potential recombination, was revealed among different CTV isolates. Five pure SP severe and two pure mild strains were identified by genotype composition analysis. Taken together, the results update the genetic diversity of CTV in Hunan with the detection of one possible novel strain, and this information might be applicable for the selection of appropriate mild CTV strains for controlling citrus SP disease through cross-protection.

  8. Infection with Strains of Citrus Tristeza Virus Does Not Exclude Superinfection by Other Strains of the Virus▿

    PubMed Central

    Folimonova, Svetlana Y.; Robertson, Cecile J.; Shilts, Turksen; Folimonov, Alexey S.; Hilf, Mark E.; Garnsey, Stephen M.; Dawson, William O.

    2010-01-01

    Superinfection exclusion or homologous interference, a phenomenon in which a primary viral infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely related virus, has been observed commonly for viruses in various systems, including viruses of bacteria, plants, and animals. With plant viruses, homologous interference initially was used as a test of virus relatedness to define whether two virus isolates were “strains” of the same virus or represented different viruses, and subsequently purposeful infection with a mild isolate was implemented as a protective measure against isolates of the virus causing severe disease. In this study we examined superinfection exclusion of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a positive-sense RNA closterovirus. Thirteen naturally occurring isolates of CTV representing five different virus strains and a set of isolates originated from virus constructs engineered based on an infectious cDNA clone of T36 isolate of CTV, including hybrids containing sequences from different isolates, were examined for their ability to prevent superinfection by another isolate of the virus. We show that superinfection exclusion occurred only between isolates of the same strain and not between isolates of different strains. When isolates of the same strain were used for sequential plant inoculation, the primary infection provided complete exclusion of the challenge isolate, whereas isolates from heterologous strains appeared to have no effect on replication, movement or systemic infection by the challenge virus. Surprisingly, substitution of extended cognate sequences from isolates of the T68 or T30 strains into T36 did not confer the ability of resulting hybrid viruses to exclude superinfection by those donor strains. Overall, these results do not appear to be explained by mechanisms proposed previously for other viruses. Moreover, these observations bring an understanding of some previously unexplained fundamental features of CTV biology and, most

  9. Comparison of multiple viral population characterization methods on a candidate cross-protection Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) source.

    PubMed

    Kleynhans, Jackie; Pietersen, Gerhard

    2016-11-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is the most economically important virus found on citrus and influences production worldwide. The 3' half of the RNA genome is generally conserved amongst sources, whereas the 5' portion is more divergent, allowing for the classification of the virus into a number of genotypes based on sequence diversity. The acknowledged genotypes of CTV are continually being expanded, and thus far include T36, T30, T3, VT, B165, HA16-5, T68 and RB. The genotype composition of the CTV populations of a potential cross protection source in Mexican lime was studied whilst comparing different techniques of viral population characterization. Cloning and sequencing of an ORF 1a fragment, genotype specific RT-PCRs and Illumina sequencing of the p33 gene as well as RNA template enrichment through immuno-capture was done. Primers used in the cloning and sequencing proved to be biased towards detection of the VT genotype. RT-PCR and Illumina sequencing using the two different templates provided relatively comparable results, even though the immuno-captured enriched template provided less than expected CTV specific data, while the RT-PCRs and p33 sequencing cannot be used to make inferences about the rest of the genome; which may vary due to recombination. The source was found to contain multiple genotypes, including RB and VT. When choosing a characterization method, the features of the virus under study should be considered. It was found that Illumina sequencing offers an opportunity to gain a large amount of information regarding the entire viral genome, but challenges encountered are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Characteristics of Nitrogen Removal by a Heterotrophic Nitrification-Aerobic Denitrification Bacterium YL].

    PubMed

    Liang, Xian; Ren, Yong-xiang; Yang, Lei; Zhao, Si-qi; Xia, Zhi-hong

    2015-05-01

    Traditional process of autotrophic nitrification-anaerobic denitrification usually has problems of long procedure and low efficiency. To overcome these problems, a heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium YL was isolated from a domesticated mature SBR reactor with efficient simultaneous nitrification and denitrification ability, and was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa YL. Meanwhile, the characteristics of the nitrogen removal of strain YL was investigated through single-factor experiments and an orthogonal experiment. The results showed that the preferred conditions were: succinate as the carbon source, C/N ratio of 10, pH of 7.0, temperature of 30°C, and the shaking speed of 160-200 r · min(-1), while the removal rate of ammonia oxidation was 5. 05 mg · (g · h)(-1), the transformation rate of TOC was 45.95 mg · (g · h)(-1), and the removal rates of nitrogen and TOC were 100% and 90.8%, respectively. Nitrite, nitrate and hydroxylamine could also be metabolized by strain YL, and the removal rates were 92.7%, 93.6% and 94.8%, respectively. The most important influencing factor on aerobic denitrification of strain YL was C/N ratio. Under the optimal conditions (C/N = 10, T = 30°C , r = 200 r · min(-1), pH = 7), the removal rates of nitrate and total nitrogen were 94.6% and 76.3%, respectively. Hence, strain YL could remove nitrogen by heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification independently, quickly, and effectively.

  11. Disribution and interplay of geologic processes on Titan from Cassini radar data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, R.M.C.; Stofan, E.R.; Peckyno, R.; Radebaugh, J.; Mitchell, K.L.; Mitri, G.; Wood, C.A.; Kirk, R.L.; Wall, S.D.; Lunine, J.I.; Hayes, A.; Lorenz, R.; Farr, Tom; Wye, L.; Craig, J.; Ollerenshaw, R.J.; Janssen, M.; LeGall, A.; Paganelli, F.; West, R.; Stiles, B.; Callahan, P.; Anderson, Y.; Valora, P.; Soderblom, L.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper is providing an unprecedented view of Titan's surface geology. Here we use Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image swaths (Ta-T30) obtained from October 2004 to December 2007 to infer the geologic processes that have shaped Titan's surface. These SAR swaths cover about 20% of the surface, at a spatial resolution ranging from ~350 m to ~2 km. The SAR data are distributed over a wide latitudinal and longitudinal range, enabling some conclusions to be drawn about the global distribution of processes. They reveal a geologically complex surface that has been modified by all the major geologic processes seen on Earth - volcanism, tectonism, impact cratering, and erosion and deposition by fluvial and aeolian activity. In this paper, we map geomorphological units from SAR data and analyze their areal distribution and relative ages of modification in order to infer the geologic evolution of Titan's surface. We find that dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are more widespread than lakes, putative cryovolcanic features, mottled plains, and craters and crateriform structures that may be due to impact. Undifferentiated plains are the largest areal unit; their origin is uncertain. In terms of latitudinal distribution, dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are located mostly at low latitudes (less than 30 degrees), with no dunes being present above 60 degrees. Channels formed by fluvial activity are present at all latitudes, but lakes are at high latitudes only. Crateriform structures that may have been formed by impact appear to be uniformly distributed with latitude, but the well-preserved impact craters are all located at low latitudes, possibly indicating that more resurfacing has occurred at higher latitudes. Cryovolcanic features are not ubiquitous, and are mostly located between 30 degrees and 60 degrees north. We examine temporal relationships between units wherever possible, and conclude that aeolian and fluvial

  12. Distribution and interplay of geologic processes on Titan from Cassini radar data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, R.M.C.; Stofan, E.R.; Peckyno, R.; Radebaugh, J.; Mitchell, K.L.; Mitri, G.; Wood, C.A.; Kirk, R.L.; Wall, S.D.; Lunine, J.I.; Hayes, A.; Lorenz, R.; Farr, Tom; Wye, L.; Craig, J.; Ollerenshaw, R.J.; Janssen, M.; LeGall, A.; Paganelli, F.; West, R.; Stiles, B.; Callahan, P.; Anderson, Y.; Valora, P.; Soderblom, L.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper is providing an unprecedented view of Titan's surface geology. Here we use Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image swaths (Ta-T30) obtained from October 2004 to December 2007 to infer the geologic processes that have shaped Titan's surface. These SAR swaths cover about 20% of the surface, at a spatial resolution ranging from ???350 m to ???2 km. The SAR data are distributed over a wide latitudinal and longitudinal range, enabling some conclusions to be drawn about the global distribution of processes. They reveal a geologically complex surface that has been modified by all the major geologic processes seen on Earth - volcanism, tectonism, impact cratering, and erosion and deposition by fluvial and aeolian activity. In this paper, we map geomorphological units from SAR data and analyze their areal distribution and relative ages of modification in order to infer the geologic evolution of Titan's surface. We find that dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are more widespread than lakes, putative cryovolcanic features, mottled plains, and craters and crateriform structures that may be due to impact. Undifferentiated plains are the largest areal unit; their origin is uncertain. In terms of latitudinal distribution, dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are located mostly at low latitudes (less than 30??), with no dunes being present above 60??. Channels formed by fluvial activity are present at all latitudes, but lakes are at high latitudes only. Crateriform structures that may have been formed by impact appear to be uniformly distributed with latitude, but the well-preserved impact craters are all located at low latitudes, possibly indicating that more resurfacing has occurred at higher latitudes. Cryovolcanic features are not ubiquitous, and are mostly located between 30?? and 60?? north. We examine temporal relationships between units wherever possible, and conclude that aeolian and fluvial/pluvial/lacustrine processes are the

  13. Correlation of lactate and pH in human skeletal muscle after exercise by 1H NMR.

    PubMed

    Pan, J W; Hamm, J R; Hetherington, H P; Rothman, D L; Shulman, R G

    1991-07-01

    We have made in vivo 1H NMR measurements of the time course of pH and lactate in human skeletal muscle after exercise. Spectra were obtained in a 4.7-T 30-cm bore Bruker Biospec spectrometer with a 2.5-cm diameter single surface coil. pH was determined from the shift of the endogenous carnosine H-C2 peak while lactate concentrations were determined by comparison with endogenous total creatine, taken to be 28.5 mM/kg wet wt. Fitting the data shows that the exponential decay of lactate (-0.094 +/- 0.014 min-1. t1/2 = 10.6 min) is slower than that of pH (-0.147 +/- 0.015 min-1, t1/2 = 4.7 min), n = 7 with two different volunteers. These values are significantly different with P less than 0.0005. Relaxation times of lactate and creatine were also measured for lactate quantitation; creatine T1, 1.23 +/- 12 s, T2, 136.2 +/- 26.4 ms (both in resting human muscle); lactate T1 (in postmortem rabbit muscle), 1.0 +/- 11 s and T2, 80 ms (in postexercise human muscle). At the end of intense exercise, the lactate level reached was 25.3 +/- 4.0 mM and the average pH drop was 1.0 pH unit. We discuss the implications of these measurements in conjunction with existing data on other sources of H+ flux, phosphocreatine resynthesis, H+ transport, and contribution of inorganic phosphate to buffering.

  14. Performance evaluation of different solar advanced oxidation processes applied to the treatment of a real textile dyeing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Diego R; Soares, Petrick A; Silva, Tânia F C V; Módenes, Aparecido N; Espinoza-Quiñones, Fernando R; Bergamasco, Rosângela; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2015-01-01

    The performance of different solar-driven advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), such as TiO2/UV, TiO2/H2O2/UV, and Fe(2+)/H2O2/UV-visible in the treatment of a real textile effluent using a pilot plant with compound parabolic collectors (CPCs), was investigated. The influence of the main photo-Fenton reaction variables such as iron concentration (20-100 mg Fe(2+) L(-1)), pH (2.4-4.5), temperature (10-50 °C), and irradiance (22-68 WUV m(-2)) was evaluated in a lab-scale prototype using artificial solar radiation. The real textile wastewater presented a beige color, with a maximum absorbance peak at 641 nm, alkaline pH (8.1), moderate organic content (dissolved organic carbon (DOC) = 129 mg C L(-1) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) = 496 mg O2 L(-1)), and high conductivity mainly associated to the high concentration of chloride (1.1 g Cl(-) L(-1)), sulfate (0.4 g SO 4 (2 -) L(- 1)), and sodium (1.2 g Na(+) L(-1)) ions. Although all the processes tested contributed to complete decolorization and effective mineralization, the most efficient process was the solar photo-Fenton with an optimum catalyst concentration of 60 mg Fe(2+) L(-1), leading to 70 % mineralization (DOCfinal = 41 mg C L(-1); CODfinal < 150 mg O2 L(-1)) at pH 3.6, requiring a UV energy dose of 3.5 kJUV L(-1) (t 30 W = 22.4 min; [Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]) and consuming 18.5 mM of H2O2.

  15. Structural basis for the ligand-binding specificity of fatty acid-binding proteins (pFABP4 and pFABP5) in gentoo penguin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Woo; Kim, Jung Eun; Do, Hackwon; Kim, Ryeo-Ok; Lee, Sung Gu; Park, Hyun Ho; Chang, Jeong Ho; Yim, Joung Han; Park, Hyun; Kim, Il-Chan; Lee, Jun Hyuck

    2015-09-11

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are involved in transporting hydrophobic fatty acids between various aqueous compartments of the cell by directly binding ligands inside their β-barrel cavities. Here, we report the crystal structures of ligand-unbound pFABP4, linoleate-bound pFABP4, and palmitate-bound pFABP5, obtained from gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua), at a resolution of 2.1 Å, 2.2 Å, and 2.3 Å, respectively. The pFABP4 and pFABP5 proteins have a canonical β-barrel structure with two short α-helices that form a cap region and fatty acid ligand binding sites in the hydrophobic cavity within the β-barrel structure. Linoleate-bound pFABP4 and palmitate-bound pFABP5 possess different ligand-binding modes and a unique ligand-binding pocket due to several sequence dissimilarities (A76/L78, T30/M32, underlining indicates pFABP4 residues) between the two proteins. Structural comparison revealed significantly different conformational changes in the β3-β4 loop region (residues 57-62) as well as the flipped Phe60 residue of pFABP5 than that in pFABP4 (the corresponding residue is Phe58). A ligand-binding study using fluorophore displacement assays shows that pFABP4 has a relatively strong affinity for linoleate as compared to pFABP5. In contrast, pFABP5 exhibits higher affinity for palmitate than that for pFABP4. In conclusion, our high-resolution structures and ligand-binding studies provide useful insights into the ligand-binding preferences of pFABPs based on key protein-ligand interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. High-resolution submillimeter and near-infrared studies of the transition disk around Sz 91

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Momose, Munetake; Hashimoto, Jun; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Saito, Masao; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Kawabe, Ryohei; Akiyama, Eiji; Andrews, Sean; Wilner, David; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian E.; Guyon, Olivier; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol; and others

    2014-03-10

    To reveal the structures of a transition disk around a young stellar object in Lupus, Sz 91 , we have performed aperture synthesis 345 GHz continuum and CO(3-2) observations with the Submillimeter Array (∼1''-3'' resolution) and high-resolution imaging of polarized intensity at the K{sub s} -band using the HiCIAO instrument on the Subaru Telescope (0.''25 resolution). Our observations successfully resolved the inner and outer radii of the dust disk to be 65 and 170 AU, respectively, which indicates that Sz 91 is a transition disk source with one of the largest known inner holes. The model fitting analysis of the spectral energy distribution reveals an H{sub 2} mass of 2.4 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} in the cold (T < 30 K) outer part at 65 AU 3 × 10{sup –9} M {sub ☉}) of hot (T ∼ 180 K) dust possibly remains inside the inner hole of the disk. The structure of the hot component could be interpreted as either an unresolved self-luminous companion body (not directly detected in our observations) or a narrow ring inside the inner hole. Significant CO(3-2) emission with a velocity gradient along the major axis of the dust disk is concentrated on the Sz 91 position, suggesting a rotating gas disk with a radius of 420 AU. The Sz 91 disk is possibly a rare disk in an evolutionary stage immediately after the formation of protoplanets because of the large inner hole and the lower disk mass than other transition disks studied thus far.

  17. Simulations of the Eemian interglacial and the subsequent glacial inception with an OAGCM driven by orbitally-induced changes in insolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, F.; Cubasch, U.

    2005-12-01

    The Eemian was the last interglacial prior to the Holocene and is linked to marine isotope stage (MIS) 5e. We present multi-centennial climate simulations of the Eemian and the subsequent glacial inception. These simulations were performed with the coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model ECHO-G (atmosphere model ECHAM 4 at T30 resolution coupled to the HOPE-G ocean model at T42). The simulations are performed as equilibrium experiments with orbital parameters and greenhouse gas concentrations set to values of 125,000 and 115,000 years before present (BP). These dates represent periods with enhanced and weakened seasonal cycles of insolation on the northern hemisphere. Comparisons with pollen-based reconstructions of European temperatures show that the model simulates realistic spatial temperature patterns for the warm phase of the Eemian (GRL, 2005, L11703). Especially winter temperatures are affected by changes in atmospheric circulation and Arctic sea ice coverage. The reduction in summer insolation at 115,000 years BP leads to a perennial snow-coverage over parts of North America, which is continuously expanding during the simulated period of 3000 years. This is connected with a continuous increase of Arctic sea ice volume and a long-term global cooling trend. Consistent with geological records the snow accumulation starts in north-eastern Canada. In this region southward winds transport cold Arctic air into the continent. The accumulation of snow on the North American continent is equivalent to a decrease in oceanic sea level at a rate of 18 cm/century at the end of the simulation. In summary, in these simulations orbitally-induced changes in insolation are sufficient to explain the reconstructed temperature patterns as well as to trigger the onset of a glaciation.

  18. Pilot scale-up and shelf stability of hydrogel wound dressings obtained by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Dulce María; Rodríguez, Yanet; Correa, Hector; Moreno, Ailed; Carrizales, Lila

    2012-08-01

    This study is aimed of producing pilot batches of hydrogel wound dressings by gamma radiation and evaluating their shelf stability. Six batches of 3L capacity were prepared based on poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), agar and polyethylene glycol and they were dispensed in polyester trays, covered with polyester films and sealed in two types of materials: polyethylene bags and vacuum polyethylene bags. Dressings were formed in a single step process for the hydrogel formation and sterilization at 25-30 kGy gamma radiation dose in a JS-9500 Gamma Irradiator (Nordion, Canada). The six batches were initially physicochemical characterized in terms of dimensions and appearance, gel fraction, morphology analysis, hydrogel strength, moisture retention capability and swelling capacity. They were kept under two storage conditions: room temperature (T: 30±2 °C/RH: 70± 5%) and refrigerated temperature (T: 5±3 °C) during 24 months and sterility test was performed. The appearance of membranes was transparent, clear, uncut and flexible; the gel fraction of batches was higher than 75% and the hydrogel surface showed a porous structure. There was a slow decrease of the compression rate 20% until 7 h and about 70% at 24 h. Moisture retention capability in 5 h was similar for all the batches, about 40% and 60% at 37 °C and at room temperature respectively. The swelling of hydrogels in acidic media was strong and in alkaline media the weight variation remains almost stable until 24 h and then there is a loss of weight. The six batches remained sterile during the stability study in the conditions tested. The pilot batches were consistent from batch to batch and remained stable during 24 months.

  19. Titan Topography: A Comparison Between Cassini Altimeter and SAR Imaging from Two Titan Flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Y.; Stiles, B.; Callahan, P. S.; Johnson, W. T.; Hensley, S.; Hamilton, G.; West, R.; Alberti, G.; Flamini, E.; Lorenz, R. D.; Zebker, H. A.; Cassini RADAR Team

    2007-12-01

    The Cassini RADAR has collected twelve altimeter data sets of Titan since the beginning of the Saturn Tour in 2004. Most of the altimeter measurements were made at high altitudes, from 4,000 km to 15,000 km, resulting in low spatial resolutions due to beam footprint sizes larger than 20 km, as well as short ground tracks less than 600 km. One flyby (T30) was dedicated to altimeter data collection from 15,000 km to the closest approach altitude of 950 km. This produced a beam footprint size of 6 km at the lowest altitude and an altimeter ground track of about 3,500 km covering Titan's surface from near the equator to high latitude areas near Titan's north pole. More importantly, the ground track is located inside the SAR swath viewed from an earlier Titan flyby (T28). This provides a rare opportunity to investigate Titan topography with a relatively high spatial resolution and compare nadir-looking altimeter data with side-looking SAR imaging. From altimeter data, we have measured the mean Titan radius of 2575.1 km +/- 0.1 km and observed rather complex topographical variations over a short distance. By comparing altimeter data and SAR images at altitudes below 2,000 km, we have found that there is a strong correlation between SAR brightness and altimeter waveform; SAR dark areas correspond to strong and sharp altimeter waveforms while SAR bright areas correspond to weak and diffused altimeter waveforms. The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  20. Solvothermal synthesis, multi-temperature crystal structures and physical properties of isostructural coordination polymers, 2C4H12N+[M3(C8H4O4)4]2-.3C5H11NO, M = Co, Zn.

    PubMed

    Damgaard Poulsen, Rasmus; Bentien, Anders; Christensen, Mogens; Brummerstedt Iversen, Bo

    2006-04-01

    Two isostructural metal organic framework (MOF) structures have been synthesized by solvothermal methods and examined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. A microcrystal of 2C4H12N+[Co3(C8H4O4)4]2-.3C5H11NO (1) was investigated at T = 120 K using synchrotron radiation. 2C4H12N+[Zn3(C8H4O4)4]2-.3C5H11NO (2) was investigated at multiple temperatures (T = 30, 100, 200 and 300 K) on a conventional diffractometer. The thermal expansion of the structure of (2) is anisotropic and along the a axis, which corresponds to the metal chain direction. The structures contain anionic frameworks with cations and solvent molecules trapped in the voids. The magnetic susceptibility (chi) and heat capacity (C(p)) have been measured from 1.8 to 350 K. Compound (1) orders ferromagnetically with a broad phase transition observed in C(p) at approximately 6 K. The magnetic moment reaches a value of 3 micro(B) per Co at 2 K in a magnetic field of 9 T, and a Curie-Weiss fit to chi(T) gives an effective moment (mu(eff)) of 4.2 mu(B) and a Weiss temperature (theta) of 23 K. The exchange mechanism for the magnetic coupling is suggested to involve the Co-O-Co bridges in the individual three-metal-atom subchains. The three-dimensional magnetism presumably is due to super-exchange through two out of the three unique C8H4O4 linker molecules, which have the carboxylate and benzene pi systems well aligned.

  1. Gastric emptying, postprandial blood pressure, glycaemia and splanchnic flow in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Trahair, Laurence G; Kimber, Thomas E; Flabouris, Katerina; Horowitz, Michael; Jones, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine gastric emptying, blood pressure, mesenteric artery blood flow, and blood glucose responses to oral glucose in Parkinson’s disease. METHODS: Twenty-one subjects (13 M, 8 F; age 64.2 ± 1.6 years) with mild to moderate Parkinson’s disease (Hoehn and Yahr score 1.4 ± 0.1, duration of known disease 6.3 ± 0.9 years) consumed a 75 g glucose drink, labelled with 20 MBq 99mTc-calcium phytate. Gastric emptying was quantified with scintigraphy, blood pressure and heart rate with an automated device, superior mesenteric artery blood flow by Doppler ultrasonography and blood glucose by glucometer for 180 min. Autonomic nerve function was evaluated with cardiovascular reflex tests and upper gastrointestinal symptoms by questionnaire. RESULTS: The mean gastric half-emptying time was 106 ± 9.1 min, gastric emptying was abnormally delayed in 3 subjects (14%). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure fell (P < 0.001) and mesenteric blood flow and blood glucose (P < 0.001 for both) increased, following the drink. Three subjects (14%) had definite autonomic neuropathy and 8 (38%) had postprandial hypotension. There were no significant relationships between changes in blood pressure, heart rate or mesenteric artery blood flow with gastric emptying. Gastric emptying was related to the score for autonomic nerve function (R = 0.55, P < 0.01). There was an inverse relationship between the blood glucose at t = 30 min (R = -0.52, P < 0.05), while the blood glucose at t = 180 min was related directly (R = 0.49, P < 0.05), with gastric emptying. CONCLUSION: In mild to moderate Parkinson’s disease, gastric emptying is related to autonomic dysfunction and a determinant of the glycaemic response to oral glucose. PMID:27239112

  2. The non-linearity of the cross-polar cap potential during high solar wind driving: GUMICS-4 results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakka, Antti; Pulkkinen, Tuija; Dimmock, Andrew; Honkonen, Ilja; Palmroth, Minna

    2