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Sample records for 300i magnetic cell

  1. Magnetic needles and superparamagnetic cells

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, H C; Sergatskov, D A; Lovato, Debbie; Adolphi, Natalie L; Larson, Richard S; Flynn, Edward R

    2007-01-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles can be attached in great numbers to pathogenic cells using specific antibodies so that the magnetically-labeled cells themselves become superparamagnets. The cells can then be manipulated and drawn out of biological fluids, as in a biopsy, very selectively using a magnetic needle. We examine the origins and uncertainties in the forces exerted on magnetic nanoparticles by static magnetic fields, leading to a model for trajectories and collection times of dilute superparamagnetic cells in biological fluids. We discuss the design and application of such magnetic needles and the theory of collection times. We compare the mathematical model to measurements in a variety of media including blood. PMID:17664592

  2. First cell magnet system tests

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, W.J.; Brown, D.P.; Briggs, J.J.; Foerster, C.L.; Halama, H.J.; Schlafke, A.P.; Werner, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    The ISABELLE refrigeration system utilizes compressed liquid helium to supply refrigeration to nearly 1100 superconducting bending and focusing magnets. These magnets steer the proton orbits of the accelerator and are arranged into two interlocking rings. The total heat load that the refrigerator must provide is made up of the heat load of the magnets, magnet leads and vessels and the interconnecting piping to the refrigerator. The design and test results of the magnet system during various operating conditions in use on the ISABELLE prototype, the First Cell, are described.

  3. Multitarget magnetic activated cell sorter

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jonathan D.; Kim, Unyoung; Soh, H. Tom

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic selection allows high-throughput sorting of target cells based on surface markers, and it is extensively used in biotechnology for a wide range of applications from in vitro diagnostics to cell-based therapies. However, existing methods can only perform separation based on a single parameter (i.e., the presence or absence of magnetization), and therefore, the simultaneous sorting of multiple targets at high levels of purity, recovery, and throughput remains a challenge. In this work, we present an alternative system, the multitarget magnetic activated cell sorter (MT-MACS), which makes use of microfluidics technology to achieve simultaneous spatially-addressable sorting of multiple target cell types in a continuous-flow manner. We used the MT-MACS device to purify 2 types of target cells, which had been labeled via target-specific affinity reagents with 2 different magnetic tags with distinct saturation magnetization and size. The device was engineered so that the combined effects of the hydrodynamic force produced from the laminar flow and the magnetophoretic force produced from patterned ferromagnetic structures within the microchannel result in the selective purification of the differentially labeled target cells into multiple independent outlets. We demonstrate here the capability to simultaneously sort multiple magnetic tags with >90% purity and >5,000-fold enrichment and multiple bacterial cell types with >90% purity and >500-fold enrichment at a throughput of 109 cells per hour. PMID:19015523

  4. Cell labeling with magnetic nanoparticles: opportunity for magnetic cell imaging and cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Wilhelm, Claire; Clément, Olivier; Gazeau, Florence

    2013-01-01

    This tutorial describes a method of controlled cell labeling with citrate-coated ultra small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. This method may provide basically all kinds of cells with sufficient magnetization to allow cell detection by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to enable potential magnetic manipulation. In order to efficiently exploit labeled cells, quantify the magnetic load and deliver or follow-up magnetic cells, we herein describe the main requirements that should be applied during the labeling procedure. Moreover we present some recommendations for cell detection and quantification by MRI and detail magnetic guiding on some real-case studies in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Magnetic levitation of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Tekin, H. Cumhur; Guven, Sinan; Sridhar, Kaushik; Arslan Yildiz, Ahu; Calibasi, Gizem; Davis, Ronald W.; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-01-01

    Several cellular events cause permanent or transient changes in inherent magnetic and density properties of cells. Characterizing these changes in cell populations is crucial to understand cellular heterogeneity in cancer, immune response, infectious diseases, drug resistance, and evolution. Although magnetic levitation has previously been used for macroscale objects, its use in life sciences has been hindered by the inability to levitate microscale objects and by the toxicity of metal salts previously applied for levitation. Here, we use magnetic levitation principles for biological characterization and monitoring of cells and cellular events. We demonstrate that each cell type (i.e., cancer, blood, bacteria, and yeast) has a characteristic levitation profile, which we distinguish at an unprecedented resolution of 1 × 10−4 g⋅mL−1. We have identified unique differences in levitation and density blueprints between breast, esophageal, colorectal, and nonsmall cell lung cancer cell lines, as well as heterogeneity within these seemingly homogenous cell populations. Furthermore, we demonstrate that changes in cellular density and levitation profiles can be monitored in real time at single-cell resolution, allowing quantification of heterogeneous temporal responses of each cell to environmental stressors. These data establish density as a powerful biomarker for investigating living systems and their responses. Thereby, our method enables rapid, density-based imaging and profiling of single cells with intriguing applications, such as label-free identification and monitoring of heterogeneous biological changes under various physiological conditions, including antibiotic or cancer treatment in personalized medicine. PMID:26124131

  6. Magnetic levitation of single cells.

    PubMed

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Tekin, H Cumhur; Guven, Sinan; Sridhar, Kaushik; Arslan Yildiz, Ahu; Calibasi, Gizem; Ghiran, Ionita; Davis, Ronald W; Steinmetz, Lars M; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-07-14

    Several cellular events cause permanent or transient changes in inherent magnetic and density properties of cells. Characterizing these changes in cell populations is crucial to understand cellular heterogeneity in cancer, immune response, infectious diseases, drug resistance, and evolution. Although magnetic levitation has previously been used for macroscale objects, its use in life sciences has been hindered by the inability to levitate microscale objects and by the toxicity of metal salts previously applied for levitation. Here, we use magnetic levitation principles for biological characterization and monitoring of cells and cellular events. We demonstrate that each cell type (i.e., cancer, blood, bacteria, and yeast) has a characteristic levitation profile, which we distinguish at an unprecedented resolution of 1 × 10(-4) g ⋅ mL(-1). We have identified unique differences in levitation and density blueprints between breast, esophageal, colorectal, and nonsmall cell lung cancer cell lines, as well as heterogeneity within these seemingly homogenous cell populations. Furthermore, we demonstrate that changes in cellular density and levitation profiles can be monitored in real time at single-cell resolution, allowing quantification of heterogeneous temporal responses of each cell to environmental stressors. These data establish density as a powerful biomarker for investigating living systems and their responses. Thereby, our method enables rapid, density-based imaging and profiling of single cells with intriguing applications, such as label-free identification and monitoring of heterogeneous biological changes under various physiological conditions, including antibiotic or cancer treatment in personalized medicine.

  7. Development of magnetic device for cell separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haik, Yousef; Pai, Vinay; Chen, Ching-Jen

    1999-04-01

    A magnetic device that separates red blood cells from the whole blood on a continuous basis is presented. The device utilizes permanent magnets in alternating spatial arrangements. Red blood cells are coupled with magnetic microspheres to facilitate the magnetic separation. Effectiveness of red blood cells separation and purity of plasma solution was improved using the device over conventional centrifugal methods.

  8. [Magnetic nanoparticles as tools for cell therapy].

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Claire; Gazeau, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Labelling living cells with magnetic nanoparticles creates opportunities for numerous biomedical applications such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) cell tracking, cell manipulation, cell patterning for tissue engineering and magnetically-assisted cell delivery. The unique advantage of magnetic-based methods is to activate or monitor cell behavior by a remote stimulus, the magnetic field. Cell labelling methods using superparamagnetic nanoparticles have been widely developed, showing no adverse effect on cell proliferation and functionalities while conferring magnetic properties to various cell types. This paper first describes how cells can become responsive to magnetic field by safely internalizing magnetic nanoparticles. We next show how magnetic cells can be detected by MRI, giving the opportunity for non-invasive in vivo monitoring of cell migration. We exemplify the fact that MRI cell tracking has become a method of choice to follow the fate of administrated cells in cell therapy assay, whether the cells are grafted locally or administrated in the circulation. Finally we give different examples of magnetic manipulation of cells and their applications to regenerative medicine. Magnetic cell manipulation are forecasted to be more and more developed, in order to improve tissue engineering technique and assist cell-based therapies. Owing to the clinical approval of iron-oxide nanoparticles as MRI contrast agent, there is no major obstacle in the translation to human clinics of the magnetic methods summarized in this paper. © Société de Biologie, 2013.

  9. Magnetic tweezers for manipulation of magnetic particles in single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimian, H.; Giesguth, M.; Dietz, K.-J.; Reiss, G.; Herth, S.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic tweezers gain increasing interest for applications in biology. Here, a setup of magnetic tweezers is introduced using micropatterned conducting lines on transparent glass slides. Magnetic particles of 1 μm diameter were injected in barley cell vacuoles using a microinject system under microscopic control. Time dependent tracking of the particles after application of a magnetic field was used to determine the viscosity of vacuolar sap in vivo relative to water and isolated vacuolar fluid. The viscosity of vacuolar sap in cells was about 2-fold higher than that of extracted vacuolar fluid and 5 times higher than that of water.

  10. Magnetic actuation of hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, David; Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    The bullfrog sacculus contains mechanically sensitive hair cells whose stereociliary bundles oscillate spontaneously when decoupled from the overlying membrane. Steady-state offsets on the resting position of a hair bundle can suppress or modulate this native motility. To probe the dynamics of spontaneous oscillation in the proximity of the critical point, we describe here a method for mechanical actuation that avoids loading the bundles or contributing to the viscous drag. Magnetite beads were attached to the tips of the stereocilia, and a magnetic probe was used to impose deflections. This technique allowed us to observe the transition from multi-mode to single-mode state in freely oscillating bundles, as well as the crossover from the oscillatory to the quiescent state. PMID:22163368

  11. Magnetic resonance investigation of magnetic-labeled baker's yeast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoy Morais, J. P. M.; Azevedo, R. B.; Silva, L. P.; Lacava, Z. G. M.; Báo, S. N.; Silva, O.; Pelegrini, F.; Gansau, C.; Buske, N.; Safarik, I.; Safarikova, M.; Morais, P. C.

    2004-05-01

    In this study, the interaction of DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles (5 and 10 nm core-size) with Saccharomyces cerevisae was investigated using magnetic resonance (MR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM micrographs revealed magnetite nanoparticles attached externally to the cell wall. The MR data support the strong interaction among the nanoparticles supported by the cells. A remarkable shift in the resonance field was used as signature of particle attachment to the cell wall.

  12. Optical magnetic imaging of living cells

    PubMed Central

    Le Sage, D.; Arai, K.; Glenn, D. R.; DeVience, S. J.; Pham, L. M.; Rahn-Lee, L.; Lukin, M. D.; Yacoby, A.; Komeili, A.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic imaging is a powerful tool for probing biological and physical systems. However, existing techniques either have poor spatial resolution compared to optical microscopy and are hence not generally applicable to imaging of sub-cellular structure (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]1), or entail operating conditions that preclude application to living biological samples while providing sub-micron resolution (e.g., scanning superconducting quantum interference device [SQUID] microscopy2, electron holography3, and magnetic resonance force microscopy [MRFM]4). Here we demonstrate magnetic imaging of living cells (magnetotactic bacteria) under ambient laboratory conditions and with sub-cellular spatial resolution (400 nm), using an optically-detected magnetic field imaging array consisting of a nanoscale layer of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres implanted at the surface of a diamond chip. With the bacteria placed on the diamond surface, we optically probe the NV quantum spin states and rapidly reconstruct images of the vector components of the magnetic field created by chains of magnetic nanoparticles (magnetosomes) produced in the bacteria, and spatially correlate these magnetic field maps with optical images acquired in the same apparatus. Wide-field sCMOS acquisition allows parallel optical and magnetic imaging of multiple cells in a population with sub-micron resolution and >100 micron field-of-view. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the bacteria confirm that the correlated optical and magnetic images can be used to locate and characterize the magnetosomes in each bacterium. The results provide a new capability for imaging bio-magnetic structures in living cells under ambient conditions with high spatial resolution, and will enable the mapping of a wide range of magnetic signals within cells and cellular networks5, 6. PMID:23619694

  13. Biological cell manipulation by magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertz, Frederick; Khitun, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    We report a manipulation of biological cells (erythrocytes) by magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles in the presence of a magnetic field. The experiment was accomplished on the top of a micro-electromagnet consisting of two magnetic field generating contours. An electric current flowing through the contour(s) produces a non-uniform magnetic field, which is about 1.4 mT/μm in strength at 100 mA current in the vicinity of the current-carrying wire. In responses to the magnetic field, magnetic nanoparticles move towards the systems energy minima. In turn, magnetic nanoparticles drag biological cells in the same direction. We present experimental data showing cell manipulation through the control of electric current. This technique allows us to capture and move cells located in the vicinity (10-20 microns) of the current-carrying wires. One of the most interesting results shows a periodic motion of erythrocytes between the two conducting contours, whose frequency is controlled by an electric circuit. The obtained results demonstrate the feasibility of non-destructive cell manipulation by magnetic nanoparticles with micrometer-scale precision.

  14. Manipulating Cells with Static Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, J. M.; Guevorkian, K.

    2005-07-01

    We review our investigations of the use of static magnetic fields, B, for manipulating cells and cellular processes. We describe how B fields modify the cell division pattern of frog embryos and consequently can be used to probe the pattern determinants. We also observe that magnetic fields modify the swimming behavior of Paramecium Caudatum. We describe these modifications and their potential application to investigations of their swimming behavior.

  15. Cellular transfer of magnetic nanoparticles via cell microvesicles: impact on cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Silva, Amanda K Andriola; Wilhelm, Claire; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Luciani, Nathalie; Gazeau, Florence

    2012-05-01

    Cell labeling with magnetic nanoparticles can be used to monitor the fate of transplanted cells in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. However, nanoparticles initially internalized in administered cells might end up in other cells of the host organism. We investigated a mechanism of intercellular cross-transfer of magnetic nanoparticles to different types of recipient cells via cell microvesicles released under cellular stress. Three cell types (mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial cells and macrophages) were labeled with 8-nm iron oxide nanoparticles. Then cells underwent starvation stress, during which they produced microvesicles that were subsequently transferred to unlabeled recipient cells. The analysis of the magnetophoretic mobility of donor cells indicated that magnetic load was partially lost under cell stress. Microvesicles shed by stressed cells participated in the release of magnetic label. Moreover, such microvesicles were uptaken by naïve cells, resulting in cellular redistribution of nanoparticles. Iron load of recipient cells allowed their detection by MRI. Cell microvesicles released under stress may be disseminated throughout the organism, where they can be uptaken by host cells. The transferred cargo may be sufficient to allow MRI detection of these secondarily labeled cells, leading to misinterpretations of the effectiveness of transplanted cells.

  16. A magnetic cell-based sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Mahdavi, Alborz; Tirrell, David A; Hajimiri, Ali

    2012-11-07

    Cell-based sensing represents a new paradigm for performing direct and accurate detection of cell- or tissue-specific responses by incorporating living cells or tissues as an integral part of a sensor. Here we report a new magnetic cell-based sensing platform by combining magnetic sensors implemented in the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated microelectronics process with cardiac progenitor cells that are differentiated directly on-chip. We show that the pulsatile movements of on-chip cardiac progenitor cells can be monitored in a real-time manner. Our work provides a new low-cost approach to enable high-throughput screening systems as used in drug development and hand-held devices for point-of-care (PoC) biomedical diagnostic applications.

  17. Single Cell Magnetic Measurements with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmstrom, Johanna C.; Arps, Jennifer; Dwyer, Bo; Kalisky, Beena; Kirtley, John R.; Moler, Kathryn A.; Qian, Lisa C.; Rosenberg, Aaron J.; Rutt, Brian; Tee, Sui Seng; Theis, Eric; Urbach, Elana; Wang, Yihua

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles play an important role in numerous biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging and targeted drug delivery. There is a need for tools to characterize individual magnetic nanoparticles and the magnetic properties of individual cells. We use a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to observe the magnetic fields from single mammalian cells loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. We show that the SQUID is a useful tool for imaging biological magnetism and is capable of resolving cell to cell variations in magnetic dipole moments. We hope to correlate these magnetic images with real space imaging techniques such as optical and scanning electron microscopy. The visualization of single cell magnetism can be used to optimize biological magnetic imaging techniques, such as MRI, by quantifying the strength of magnetic dipole moments of in vitro magnetic labeling. This work is supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and a Gabilan Stanford Graduate Fellowship.

  18. Tracking stem cells using magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cromer Berman, Stacey M.; Walczak, Piotr; Bulte, Jeff W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell therapies offer great promise for many diseases, especially those without current effective treatments. It is believed that noninvasive imaging techniques, which offer the ability to track the status of cells after transplantation, will expedite progress in this field and help to achieve maximized therapeutic effect. Today’s biomedical imaging technology allows for real-time, noninvasive monitoring of grafted stem cells including their biodistribution, migration, survival, and differentiation, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of nanoparticle-labeled cells being one of the most commonly used techniques. Among the advantages of MR cell tracking are its high spatial resolution, no exposure to ionizing radiation, and clinical applicability. In order to track cells by MRI, the cells need to be labeled with magnetic nanoparticles, for which many types exist. There are several cellular labeling techniques available, including simple incubation, use of transfection agents, magnetoelectroporation, and magnetosonoporation. In this overview article, we will review the use of different magnetic nanoparticles and discuss how these particles can be used to track the distribution of transplanted cells in different organ systems. Caveats and limitations inherent to the tracking of nanoparticle-labeled stem cells are also discussed. PMID:21472999

  19. Stem cell labeling for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Himmelreich, Uwe; Hoehn, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    In vivo applications of cells for the monitoring of their cell dynamics increasingly use non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging. This imaging modality allows in particular to follow the migrational activity of stem cells intended for cell therapy strategies. All these approaches require the prior labeling of the cells under investigation for excellent contrast against the host tissue background in the imaging modality. The present review discusses the various routes of cell labeling and describes the potential to observe both cell localization and their cell-specific function in vivo. Possibilities for labeling strategies, pros and cons of various contrast agents are pointed out while potential ambiguities or problems of labeling strategies are emphasized.

  20. Multistage Magnetic Separator of Cells and Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Ken; Ainsworth, Mark; Daily, Bruce; Dunn, Scott; Metz, Bill; Vellinger, John; Taylor, Brock; Meador, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    The multistage electromagnetic separator for purifying cells and magnetic particles (MAGSEP) is a laboratory apparatus for separating and/or purifying particles (especially biological cells) on the basis of their magnetic susceptibility and magnetophoretic mobility. Whereas a typical prior apparatus based on similar principles offers only a single stage of separation, the MAGSEP, as its full name indicates, offers multiple stages of separation; this makes it possible to refine a sample population of particles to a higher level of purity or to categorize multiple portions of the sample on the basis of magnetic susceptibility and/or magnetophoretic mobility. The MAGSEP includes a processing unit and an electronic unit coupled to a personal computer. The processing unit includes upper and lower plates, a plate-rotation system, an electromagnet, an electromagnet-translation system, and a capture-magnet assembly. The plates are bolted together through a roller bearing that allows the plates to rotate with respect to each other. An interface between the plates acts as a seal for separating fluids. A lower cuvette can be aligned with as many as 15 upper cuvette stations for fraction collection during processing. A two-phase stepping motor drives the rotation system, causing the upper plate to rotate for the collection of each fraction of the sample material. The electromagnet generates a magnetic field across the lower cuvette, while the translation system translates the electromagnet upward along the lower cuvette. The current supplied to the electromagnet, and thus the magnetic flux density at the pole face of the electromagnet, can be set at a programmed value between 0 and 1,400 gauss (0.14 T). The rate of translation can be programmed between 5 and 2,000 m/s so as to align all sample particles in the same position in the cuvette. The capture magnet can be a permanent magnet. It is mounted on an arm connected to a stepping motor. The stepping motor rotates the arm to

  1. Magnetic studies of ferrofluid-modified microbial cells.

    PubMed

    Mosiniewicz-Szablewska, Ewa; Safarikova, Mirka; Safarik, Ivo

    2010-04-01

    Microbial cells (Kluyveromyces fragilis and Chlorella vulgaris) efficiently interacted with maghemite nanoparticles stabilized as low-pH ionic magnetic fluid, leading to the formation of magnetically labeled cells. This simple procedure allows to use the prepared materials as new cheap and easy to get magnetic affinity adsorbents to the removal of water-soluble dyes from polluted water sources using magnetic separation techniques. Magnetically modified cells were investigated by means of electron spin resonance spectroscopy and conventional magnetic methods over the temperature range 4-300 K. The magnetic behavior of these materials was dominated by the superparamagnetic relaxation of isolated single domain maghemite particles although a little amount of agglomerates was also present on the cell surface. However, these agglomerates were sufficiently small to show at static conditions the superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature. Therefore, the ferrofluid-modified microbial cells represent new interesting magnetic affinity adsorbents which could be applied for large-scale magnetic separation processes.

  2. Life on magnets: stem cell networking on micro-magnet arrays.

    PubMed

    Zablotskii, Vitalii; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka; Le-Roy, Damien; Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric; Givord, Dominique; Dempsey, Nora M; Syková, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between a micro-magnet array and living cells may guide the establishment of cell networks due to the cellular response to a magnetic field. To manipulate mesenchymal stem cells free of magnetic nanoparticles by a high magnetic field gradient, we used high quality micro-patterned NdFeB films around which the stray field's value and direction drastically change across the cell body. Such micro-magnet arrays coated with parylene produce high magnetic field gradients that affect the cells in two main ways: i) causing cell migration and adherence to a covered magnetic surface and ii) elongating the cells in the directions parallel to the edges of the micro-magnet. To explain these effects, three putative mechanisms that incorporate both physical and biological factors influencing the cells are suggested. It is shown that the static high magnetic field gradient generated by the micro-magnet arrays are capable of assisting cell migration to those areas with the strongest magnetic field gradient, thereby allowing the build up of tunable interconnected stem cell networks, which is an elegant route for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  3. Life on Magnets: Stem Cell Networking on Micro-Magnet Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Zablotskii, Vitalii; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka; Le-Roy, Damien; Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric; Givord, Dominique; Dempsey, Nora M.; Syková, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between a micro-magnet array and living cells may guide the establishment of cell networks due to the cellular response to a magnetic field. To manipulate mesenchymal stem cells free of magnetic nanoparticles by a high magnetic field gradient, we used high quality micro-patterned NdFeB films around which the stray field’s value and direction drastically change across the cell body. Such micro-magnet arrays coated with parylene produce high magnetic field gradients that affect the cells in two main ways: i) causing cell migration and adherence to a covered magnetic surface and ii) elongating the cells in the directions parallel to the edges of the micro-magnet. To explain these effects, three putative mechanisms that incorporate both physical and biological factors influencing the cells are suggested. It is shown that the static high magnetic field gradient generated by the micro-magnet arrays are capable of assisting cell migration to those areas with the strongest magnetic field gradient, thereby allowing the build up of tunable interconnected stem cell networks, which is an elegant route for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:23936425

  4. Rare cell separation and analysis by magnetic sorting.

    PubMed

    Zborowski, Maciej; Chalmers, Jeffrey J

    2011-11-01

    The separation and or isolation of rare cells using magnetic forces are commonly used and growing in use ranging from simple sample prep for further studies to a FDA approved, clinical diagnostic test. This growth is the result of both the demand to obtain homogeneous rare cells for molecular analysis and the dramatic increases in the power of permanent magnets that even allow the separation of some unlabeled cells based on intrinsic magnetic moments, such as malaria parasite-infected red blood cells.

  5. Magnetic characterization of isolated candidate vertebrate magnetoreceptor cells.

    PubMed

    Eder, Stephan H K; Cadiou, Hervé; Muhamad, Airina; McNaughton, Peter A; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Winklhofer, Michael

    2012-07-24

    Over the past 50 y, behavioral experiments have produced a large body of evidence for the existence of a magnetic sense in a wide range of animals. However, the underlying sensory physiology remains poorly understood due to the elusiveness of the magnetosensory structures. Here we present an effective method for isolating and characterizing potential magnetite-based magnetoreceptor cells. In essence, a rotating magnetic field is employed to visually identify, within a dissociated tissue preparation, cells that contain magnetic material by their rotational behavior. As a tissue of choice, we selected trout olfactory epithelium that has been previously suggested to host candidate magnetoreceptor cells. We were able to reproducibly detect magnetic cells and to determine their magnetic dipole moment. The obtained values (4 to 100 fAm(2)) greatly exceed previous estimates (0.5 fAm(2)). The magnetism of the cells is due to a μm-sized intracellular structure of iron-rich crystals, most likely single-domain magnetite. In confocal reflectance imaging, these produce bright reflective spots close to the cell membrane. The magnetic inclusions are found to be firmly coupled to the cell membrane, enabling a direct transduction of mechanical stress produced by magnetic torque acting on the cellular dipole in situ. Our results show that the magnetically identified cells clearly meet the physical requirements for a magnetoreceptor capable of rapidly detecting small changes in the external magnetic field. This would also explain interference of ac powerline magnetic fields with magnetoreception, as reported in cattle.

  6. Formulation and In Vitro Characterization of Composite Biodegradable Magnetic Nanoparticles for Magnetically Guided Cell Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Alferiev, Ivan S.; Fishbein, Ilia; Tengood, Jillian E.; Folchman-Wagner, Zoë; Forbes, Scott P.; Levy, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Cells modified with magnetically responsive nanoparticles (MNP) can provide the basis for novel targeted therapeutic strategies. However, improvements are required in the MNP design and cell treatment protocols to provide adequate magnetic properties in balance with acceptable cell viability and function. This study focused on select variables controlling the uptake and cell compatibility of biodegradable polymer-based MNP in cultured endothelial cells. Methods Fluorescent-labeled MNP were formed using magnetite and polylactide as structural components. Their magnetically driven sedimentation and uptake were studied fluorimetrically relative to cell viability in comparison to non-magnetic control conditions. The utility of surface-activated MNP forming affinity complexes with replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) for transduction achieved concomitantly with magnetic cell loading was examined using the green fluorescent protein reporter. Results A high-gradient magnetic field was essential for sedimentation and cell binding of albumin-stabilized MNP, the latter being rate-limiting in the MNP loading process. Cell loading up to 160 pg iron oxide per cell was achievable with cell viability >90%. Magnetically driven uptake of MNP-Ad complexes can provide high levels of transgene expression potentially useful for a combined cell/gene therapy. Conclusions Magnetically responsive endothelial cells for targeted delivery applications can be obtained rapidly and efficiently using composite biodegradable MNP. PMID:22274555

  7. DNA and cell resonance: magnetic waves enable cell communication.

    PubMed

    Meyl, Konstantin

    2012-04-01

    DNA generates a longitudinal wave that propagates in the direction of the magnetic field vector. Computed frequencies from the structure of DNA agree with those of the predicted biophoton radiation. The optimization of efficiency by minimizing the conduction losses leads to the double-helix structure of DNA. The vortex model of the magnetic scalar wave not only covers many observed structures within the nucleus perfectly, but also explains the hyperboloid channels in the matrix when two cells communicate with each other. Potential vortexes are an essential component of a scalar waves, as discovered in 1990. The basic approach for an extended field theory was confirmed in 2009 with the discovery of magnetic monopoles. For the first time, this provides the opportunity to explain the physical basis of life not only from the biological discipline. Nature covers the whole spectrum of known scientific fields of research, and interdisciplinary understanding is required to explain its complex relationships. The characteristics of the potential vortex are significant. With its concentration effect, it provides for miniaturization down to a few nanometers, which allows enormously high information density in the nucleus. With this first introduction of the magnetic scalar wave, it becomes clear that such a wave is suitable to use genetic code chemically stored in the base pairs of the genes and electrically modulate them, so as to "piggyback" information from the cell nucleus to another cell. At the receiving end, the reverse process takes place and the transported information is converted back into a chemical structure. The necessary energy required to power the chemical process is provided by the magnetic scalar wave itself.

  8. Using magnets and magnetic beads to dissect signaling pathways activated by mechanical tension applied to cells.

    PubMed

    Marjoram, R J; Guilluy, C; Burridge, K

    2016-02-01

    Cellular tension has implications in normal biology and pathology. Membrane adhesion receptors serve as conduits for mechanotransduction that lead to cellular responses. Ligand-conjugated magnetic beads are a useful tool in the study of how cells sense and respond to tension. Here we detail methods for their use in applying tension to cells and strategies for analyzing the results. We demonstrate the methods by analyzing mechanotransduction through VE-cadherin on endothelial cells using both permanent magnets and magnetic tweezers.

  9. Using Magnets and Magnetic Beads to Dissect Signaling Pathways Activated by Mechanical Tension Applied to Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marjoram, R.J.; Guilluy, C; Burridge, K.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular tension has implications in normal biology and pathology. Membrane adhesion receptors serve as conduits for mechanotransduction that lead to cellular responses. Ligand-conjugated magnetic beads are a useful tool in the study of how cells sense and respond to tension. Here we detail methods for their use in applying tension to cells and strategies for analyzing the results. We demonstrate the methods by analyzing mechanotransduction through VE-cadherin on endothelial cells using both permanent magnets and magnetic tweezers. PMID:26427549

  10. Magnetization of individual yeast cells by in situ formation of iron oxide on cell surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jinsu; Lee, Hojae; Choi, Insung S.; Yang, Sung Ho

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic functionalization of living cells has intensively been investigated with the aim of various bioapplications such as selective separation, targeting, and localization of the cells by using an external magnetic field. However, the magnetism has not been introduced to individual living cells through the in situ chemical reactions because of harsh conditions required for synthesis of magnetic materials. In this work, magnetic iron oxide was formed on the surface of living cells by optimizing reactions conditions to be mild sufficiently enough to sustain cell viability. Specifically, the reactive LbL strategy led to formation of magnetically responsive yeast cells with iron oxide shells. This facile and direct post-magnetization method would be a useful tool for remote manipulation of living cells with magnetic interactions, which is an important technique for the integration of cell-based circuits and the isolation of cell in microfluidic devices.

  11. Mobile magnetic traps for manipulation of magnetically labeled and unlabeled cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henighan, Thomas; Chen, Aaron; Vieira, Greg; Hauser, Adam; Yang, Fengyuan; Chalmers, Jeffrey; Sooryakumar, Ratnasingham

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic forces are frequently used for the manipulation of biological cells because magnetic fields are typically easier to use and have fewer effects on the cells than optical or electrical fields. While magnetic forces are typically used for bulk separation, it is considerably harder to magnetically manipulate a single cell, or a small number of cells. In this study we employ reprogrammable magnetization profiles created through lithographically patterned ferromagnetic disks as a template for producing highly localized trapping fields. The resulting magnetic field gradients can be modulated by an external magnetic field enabling directed forces to be applied on, (a) single, or a small number of immunomagnetically labeled biological cells and, (b) magnetic microspheres that act as magnetically actuated force transmitting probes to navigate fluid-borne unlabeled cells with micrometer precision. We demonstrate the mobile traps by remotely transporting and arranging, with programmed routines (a la joystick), T-lymphocyte and leukemia cells on the platform. Without producing damage, the forces transport the cells with speeds up to 20 microns/sec across a silicon platform to predetermined sites.

  12. Concentric Magnetic Structures for Magnetophoretic Bead Collection, Cell Trapping and Analysis of Cell Morphological Changes Caused by Local Magnetic Forces

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Concentric magnetic structures (ring and square) with domain wall (DW) pinning geometry are designed for biological manipulation. Magnetic beads collection was firstly demonstrated to analyse the local magnetic field generated by DWs and the effective regions to capture magnetic targets of size 1 μm. Primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) are magnetically labeled by internalizing poly (styrene sulfonic acid) stabilized magnetic nanoparticles (PSS-MNPs) and then are selectively trapped by head-to-tail DWs (HH DWs) or tail-to-tail DWs (TT DWs) to be arranged into linear shape or cross shape. The morphologies and the nuclear geometry of the cells growing on two kinds of concentric magnetic structures are shown to be distinctive. The intracellular magnetic forces generated by the local magnetic field of DWs are found to influence the behaviour of cells. PMID:26270332

  13. Three-dimensional Tissue Culture Based on Magnetic Cell Levitation

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Glauco R.; Molina, Jennifer R.; Raphael, Robert M.; Ozawa, Michael G.; Stark, Daniel J.; Levin, Carly S.; Bronk, Lawrence F.; Ananta, Jeyarama S.; Mandelin, Jami; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Bankson, James A.; Gelovani, Juri G.

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture is an essential tool for drug discovery, tissue engineering, and stem cell research. Conventional tissue culture produces two-dimensional (2D) cell growth with gene expression, signaling, and morphology that can differ from those in vivo and thus compromise clinical relevancy1–5. Here we report a three-dimensional (3D) culture of cells based on magnetic levitation in the presence of hydrogels containing gold and magnetic iron oxide (MIO) nanoparticles plus filamentous bacteriophage. This methodology allows for control of cell mass geometry and guided, multicellular clustering of different cell types in co-culture through spatial variance of the magnetic field. Moreover, magnetic levitation of human glioblastoma cells demonstrates similar protein expression profiles to those observed in human tumor xenografts. Taken together, these results suggest levitated 3D culture with magnetized phage-based hydrogels more closely recapitulates in vivo protein expression and allows for long-term multi-cellular studies. PMID:20228788

  14. Three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic cell levitation.

    PubMed

    Souza, Glauco R; Molina, Jennifer R; Raphael, Robert M; Ozawa, Michael G; Stark, Daniel J; Levin, Carly S; Bronk, Lawrence F; Ananta, Jeyarama S; Mandelin, Jami; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Bankson, James A; Gelovani, Juri G; Killian, T C; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2010-04-01

    Cell culture is an essential tool in drug discovery, tissue engineering and stem cell research. Conventional tissue culture produces two-dimensional cell growth with gene expression, signalling and morphology that can be different from those found in vivo, and this compromises its clinical relevance. Here, we report a three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic levitation of cells in the presence of a hydrogel consisting of gold, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and filamentous bacteriophage. By spatially controlling the magnetic field, the geometry of the cell mass can be manipulated, and multicellular clustering of different cell types in co-culture can be achieved. Magnetically levitated human glioblastoma cells showed similar protein expression profiles to those observed in human tumour xenografts. Taken together, these results indicate that levitated three-dimensional culture with magnetized phage-based hydrogels more closely recapitulates in vivo protein expression and may be more feasible for long-term multicellular studies.

  15. Three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic cell levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Glauco R.; Molina, Jennifer R.; Raphael, Robert M.; Ozawa, Michael G.; Stark, Daniel J.; Levin, Carly S.; Bronk, Lawrence F.; Ananta, Jeyarama S.; Mandelin, Jami; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Bankson, James A.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Killian, T. C.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2010-04-01

    Cell culture is an essential tool in drug discovery, tissue engineering and stem cell research. Conventional tissue culture produces two-dimensional cell growth with gene expression, signalling and morphology that can be different from those found in vivo, and this compromises its clinical relevance. Here, we report a three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic levitation of cells in the presence of a hydrogel consisting of gold, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and filamentous bacteriophage. By spatially controlling the magnetic field, the geometry of the cell mass can be manipulated, and multicellular clustering of different cell types in co-culture can be achieved. Magnetically levitated human glioblastoma cells showed similar protein expression profiles to those observed in human tumour xenografts. Taken together, these results indicate that levitated three-dimensional culture with magnetized phage-based hydrogels more closely recapitulates in vivo protein expression and may be more feasible for long-term multicellular studies.

  16. The effect of an external magnetic force on cell adhesion and proliferation of magnetically labeled mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As the strategy for tissue regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for transplantation, it is necessary that MSCs be accumulated and kept in the target area. To accumulate MSCs effectively, we developed a novel technique for a magnetic targeting system with magnetically labeled MSCs and an external magnetic force. In this study, we examined the effect of an external magnetic force on magnetically labeled MSCs in terms of cell adhesion and proliferation. Methods Magnetically labeled MSCs were plated at the bottom of an insert under the influence of an external magnetic force for 1 hour. Then the inserts were turned upside down for between 1 and 24 hours, and the number of MSCs which had fallen from the membrane was counted. The gene expression of MSCs affected magnetic force was analyzed with microarray. In the control group, the same procedure was done without the external magnetic force. Results At 1 hour after the inserts were turned upside down, the average number of fallen MSCs in the magnetic group was significantly smaller than that in the control group, indicating enhanced cell adhesion. At 24 hours, the average number of fallen MSCs in the magnetic group was also significantly smaller than that in control group. In the magnetic group, integrin alpha2, alpha6, beta3 BP, intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM-2), platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) were upregulated. At 1, 2 and 3 weeks after incubation, there was no statistical significant difference in the numbers of MSCs in the magnetic group and control group. Conclusions The results indicate that an external magnetic force for 1 hour enhances cell adhesion of MSCs. Moreover, there is no difference in cell proliferation after using an external magnetic force on magnetically labeled MSCs. PMID:20152029

  17. Magnetic manipulation of particles and cells in ferrofluid flow through straight microchannels using two magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jian

    Microfluidic devices have been increasingly used in the past two decades for particle and cell manipulations in many chemical and biomedical applications. A variety of force fields have been demonstrated to control particle and cell transport in these devices including electric, magnetic, acoustic, and optical forces etc. Among these particle handling techniques, the magnetic approach provides clear advantages over others such as low cost, noninvasive, and free of fluid heating issues. However, the current knowledge of magnetic control of particle transport is still very limited, especially lacking is the handling of diamagnetic particle. This thesis is focused on the magnetic manipulation of diamagnetic particles and cells in ferrofluid flow through the use of a pair of permanent magnets. By varying the configuration of the two magnets, diverse operations of particles and cells is implemented in a straight microchannel that can potentially be integrated into lab-on-a-chip devices for various applications. First, an approach for embedding two, symmetrically positioned, repulsive permanent magnets about a straight rectangular microchannel in a PDMS-based microfluidic device is developed for particle focusing. Focusing particles and cells into a tight stream is often required in order for continuous detection, counting, and sorting. The closest distance between the magnets is limited only by the size of the magnets involved in the fabrication process. The device is used to implement and investigate the three-dimensional magnetic focusing of polystyrene particles in ferrofluid microflow with both top-view and side-view visualizations. The effects of flow speed and particle size on the particle focusing effectiveness are studied. This device is also applied to magnetically focus yeast cells in ferrofluid, which proves to be biocompatible as verified by cell viability test. In addition, an analytical model is developed and found to be able to predict the experimentally

  18. Electro-magnetic Templates with Magnetic Nanoparticles for Cell-based Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertz, Frederick; Khitun, Alexander

    We discuss the possibility of a specially designed electro-magnetic template with magnetic nanoparticles for cell-based-assays. There is an urgent need for a special type of hardware allowing for biological cell manipulation. We have developed an original technique of using electro-magnetic templates with magnetic nanoparticles for biological cell manipulation. The essence of this approach is to generate a non-uniform magnetic field profile using a system of electric current carrying wires. The gradient of the magnetic field results in the movement of the nanoparticles towards the magnetic energy minima. In turn, the flow of magnetic nanoparticles drags biological cells in the same direction. We present experimental data on biological cells (erythrocytes) manipulations by magnetite (Fe3O4) on specially designed templates The results show controlled biological cell motion and destruction via haemolysis. This technique allows us to capture and to move cells located in the vicinity (10-20 microns) of the current-carrying wires. One of the most interesting results shows a periodic motion of erythrocytes between the two conducting contours, which frequency is controlled by the electric circuit. The obtained results demonstrate the feasibility of cell manipulation which can be utilized in cell-based assays.

  19. Targeted magnetic delivery and tracking of cells using a magnetic resonance imaging system.

    PubMed

    Riegler, Johannes; Wells, Jack A; Kyrtatos, Panagiotis G; Price, Anthony N; Pankhurst, Quentin A; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2010-07-01

    The success of cell therapies depends on the ability to deliver the cells to the site of injury. Targeted magnetic cell delivery is an emergent technique for localised cell transplantation therapy. The use of permanent magnets limits such a treatment to organs close to the body surface or an implanted magnetic source. A possible alternative method for magnetic cell delivery is magnetic resonance targeting (MRT), which uses magnetic field gradients inherent to all magnetic resonance imaging system, to steer ferromagnetic particles to their target region. In this study we have assessed the feasibility of such an approach for cell targeting, using a range of flow rates and different super paramagnetic iron oxide particles in a vascular bifurcation phantom. Using MRT we have demonstrated that 75% of labelled cells could be guided within the vascular bifurcation. Furthermore we have demonstrated the ability to image the labelled cells before and after magnetic targeting, which may enable interactive manipulation and assessment of the distribution of cellular therapy. This is the first demonstration of cellular MRT and these initial findings support the potential value of MRT for improved targeting of intravascular cell therapies.

  20. A novel permalloy based magnetic single cell micro array.

    PubMed

    Liu, William; Dechev, Nikolai; Foulds, Ian G; Burke, Robert; Parameswaran, Ash; Park, Edward J

    2009-08-21

    Devices capable of automatically aligning cells onto geometrical arrays are of great interest to biomedical researchers. Such devices can facilitate the study of numerous cells while the cells remain physically separated from one another. In this way, cell arrays reduce cell-to-cell interactions while the cells are all subjected to common stimuli, which allows individual cell behaviour to be revealed. The use of arrays allows for the parallel analysis of single cells, facilitates data logging, and opens the door to the use of automated machine-based single cell analysis techniques. A novel permalloy based magnetic single cell micro array (MSCMA) is presented in this paper. The MSCMA creates an array of magnetic traps by generating magnetic flux density peaks at predefined locations. When using cells labelled with immunomagnetic labels, the cells will interact with the magnetic fields, and can be captured at the magnetic trap sites. Prototypes of the MSCMA have been successfully fabricated and tested using both fixed and live Jurkat cells (10 microm average diameter) that were labelled. The prototypes performed as predicted during experimental trials. The experimental results show that the MSCMA can randomly array up to 136 single cells per square mm. The results also show that the number of single cells captured is a function of the trap site density of the MSCMA design and the cell density in the fluid sample.

  1. Effect of Static Magnetic Field on Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yuichiro; Kawasumi, Masashi; Saito, Masao

    The effect of magnetic field on cell has long been investigated, but there are few quantitative investigations of the migration of cells. Cell-migration is important as one of the fundamental activities of the cell. This study proposes a method to evaluate quantitatively the cell-diffusion constant and the effect of static magnetic field on cell migration. The cell-lines are neuroblastoma (NG108-15), fibroblastoma (NIH/3T3) and osteoblastoma (MC3T3-E1). The static magnetic field of 30 mT or 120 mT is impressed by a permanent magnet in vertical or horizontal direction to the dish. It is shown that the cell-diffusion constant can represent the cell migration as the cell activity. It is found that the cell migration is enhanced by exposure to the magnetic field, depending on the kind of cell. It is conjectured that the effect of static magnetic field affects the cell migration, which is at the downstream of the information transmission.

  2. Continuous flow magnetic cell fractionation based on antigen expression level.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Thomas; Moore, Lee R; Jing, Ying; Haam, Seungjoo; Williams, P Stephen; Fleischman, Aaron J; Roy, Shuvo; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Zborowski, Maciej

    2006-07-31

    Cell separation is important in medical and biological research and plays an increasingly important role in clinical therapy and diagnostics, such as rare cancer cell detection in blood. The immunomagnetic labeling of cells with antibodies conjugated to magnetic nanospheres gives rise to a proportional relationship between the number of magnetic nanospheres attached to the cell and the cell surface marker number. This enables the potential fractionation of cell populations by magnetophoretic mobility (MM). We exploit this feature with our apparatus, the Dipole Magnet Flow Fractionator (DMFF), which consists of an isodynamic magnetic field, an orthogonally-oriented thin ribbon of cell suspension in continuous sheath flow, and ten outlet flows. From a sample containing a 1:1 mixture of immunomagnetically labeled (label+) and unlabeled (label-) cells, we achieved an increase in enrichment of the label+ cell fraction with increasing outlet numbers in the direction of the magnetic field gradient (up to 10-fold). The total recovery of the ten outlet fractions was 90.0+/-7.7%. The mean MM of label+ cells increased with increasing outlet number by up to a factor of 2.3. The postulated proportionality between the number of attached magnetic beads and the number of cell surface markers was validated by comparison of MM measured by cell tracking velocimetry (CTV) with cell florescence intensity measured by flow cytometry.

  3. Modeling the efficiency of a magnetic needle for collecting magnetic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Kimberly S.; Adolphi, Natalie L.; Bryant, H. C.; Lovato, Debbie M.; Larson, Richard S.; Flynn, Edward R.

    2014-07-01

    As new magnetic nanoparticle-based technologies are developed and new target cells are identified, there is a critical need to understand the features important for magnetic isolation of specific cells in fluids, an increasingly important tool in disease research and diagnosis. To investigate magnetic cell collection, cell-sized spherical microparticles, coated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles, were suspended in (1) glycerine-water solutions, chosen to approximate the range of viscosities of bone marrow, and (2) water in which 3, 5, 10 and 100% of the total suspended microspheres are coated with magnetic nanoparticles, to model collection of rare magnetic nanoparticle-coated cells from a mixture of cells in a fluid. The magnetic microspheres were collected on a magnetic needle, and we demonstrate that the collection efficiency versus time can be modeled using a simple, heuristically-derived function, with three physically-significant parameters. The function enables experimentally-obtained collection efficiencies to be scaled to extract the effective drag of the suspending medium. The results of this analysis demonstrate that the effective drag scales linearly with fluid viscosity, as expected. Surprisingly, increasing the number of non-magnetic microspheres in the suspending fluid results increases the collection of magnetic microspheres, corresponding to a decrease in the effective drag of the medium.

  4. Varying the effective buoyancy of cells using magnetic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Valles, James M.

    2004-06-01

    We introduce a magnetic force buoyancy variation (MFBV) technique that employs intense inhomogeneous magnetic fields to vary the effective buoyancy of cells and other diamagnetic systems in solution. Nonswimming Paramecia have been suspended, forced to sediment and driven to rise in solution using MFBV. Details of their response to MFBV have been used to determine the magnetic susceptibility of a single Paramecium. The use of MFBV as a means by which to suspend cell cultures indefinitely is also described.

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Magnetization: Magnetic Multilayer Microcapsule Uptake, Toxicity, Impact on Functional Properties, and Perspectives for Magnetic Delivery.

    PubMed

    Lepik, Kirill V; Muslimov, Albert R; Timin, Alexander S; Sergeev, Vladislav S; Romanyuk, Dmitry S; Moiseev, Ivan S; Popova, Elena V; Radchenko, Igor L; Vilesov, Alexander D; Galibin, Oleg V; Sukhorukov, Gleb B; Afanasyev, Boris V

    2016-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely used in cell therapy due to their convenience, multiline differentiation potential, reproducible protocols, and biological properties. The potential of MSCs to impregnate magnetic microcapsules and their possible influence on cell function and ability to response to magnetic field have been explored. Interestingly, the cells suspended in media show much higher ability in internalization of microcapsules, then MSCs adhere into the surface. There is no significant effect of microcapsules on cell toxicity compared with other cell line-capsule internalization reported in literature. Due to internalization of magnetic capsules by the cells, such cell engineering platform is responsive to external magnetic field, which allows to manipulate MSC migration. Magnetically sorted MSCs are capable to differentiation as confirmed by their conversion to adipogenic and osteogenic cells using standard protocols. There is a minor effect of capsule internalization on cell adhesion, though MSCs are still able to form spheroid made by dozen of thousand MSCs. This work demonstrates the potential of use of microcapsule impregnated MSCs to carry internalized micron-sized vesicles and being navigated with external magnetic signaling. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Magnetic Cobalt Ferrite Nanocrystals For an Energy Storage Concentration Cell.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qilin; Patel, Ketan; Donatelli, Greg; Ren, Shenqiang

    2016-08-22

    Energy-storage concentration cells are based on the concentration gradient of redox-active reactants; the increased entropy is transformed into electric energy as the concentration gradient reaches equilibrium between two half cells. A recyclable and flow-controlled magnetic electrolyte concentration cell is now presented. The hybrid inorganic-organic nanocrystal-based electrolyte, consisting of molecular redox-active ligands adsorbed on the surface of magnetic nanocrystals, leads to a magnetic-field-driven concentration gradient of redox molecules. The energy storage performance of concentration cells is dictated by magnetic characteristics of cobalt ferrite nanocrystal carriers. The enhanced conductivity and kinetics of redox-active electrolytes could further induce a sharp concentration gradient to improve the energy density and voltage switching of magnetic electrolyte concentration cells. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. A direct technique for magnetic functionalization of living human cells.

    PubMed

    Dzamukova, Maria R; Zamaleeva, Alsu I; Ishmuchametova, Dilara G; Osin, Yuri N; Kiyasov, Andrey P; Nurgaliev, Danis K; Ilinskaya, Olga N; Fakhrullin, Rawil F

    2011-12-06

    Functionalized living cells are regarded as effective tools in directed cell delivery and tissue engineering. Here we report the facile functionalization of viable isolated HeLa cells with superparamagnetic cationic nanoparticles via a single-step biocompatible process. Nanoparticles are localized on the cellular membranes and do not penetrate into the cytoplasm. The magnetically responsive cells are viable and able to colonize and grow on substrates. Magnetically facilitated microorganization of functionalized cells into viable living clusters is demonstrated. We believe that the technique described here may find a number of potential applications in cell-based therapies and in development of whole-cell biosensors. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  8. Magnetic characterization of isolated candidate vertebrate magnetoreceptor cells

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Stephan H.K.; Cadiou, Hervé; Muhamad, Airina; McNaughton, Peter A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Winklhofer, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 50 y, behavioral experiments have produced a large body of evidence for the existence of a magnetic sense in a wide range of animals. However, the underlying sensory physiology remains poorly understood due to the elusiveness of the magnetosensory structures. Here we present an effective method for isolating and characterizing potential magnetite-based magnetoreceptor cells. In essence, a rotating magnetic field is employed to visually identify, within a dissociated tissue preparation, cells that contain magnetic material by their rotational behavior. As a tissue of choice, we selected trout olfactory epithelium that has been previously suggested to host candidate magnetoreceptor cells. We were able to reproducibly detect magnetic cells and to determine their magnetic dipole moment. The obtained values (4 to 100 fAm2) greatly exceed previous estimates (0.5 fAm2). The magnetism of the cells is due to a μm-sized intracellular structure of iron-rich crystals, most likely single-domain magnetite. In confocal reflectance imaging, these produce bright reflective spots close to the cell membrane. The magnetic inclusions are found to be firmly coupled to the cell membrane, enabling a direct transduction of mechanical stress produced by magnetic torque acting on the cellular dipole in situ. Our results show that the magnetically identified cells clearly meet the physical requirements for a magnetoreceptor capable of rapidly detecting small changes in the external magnetic field. This would also explain interference of ac powerline magnetic fields with magnetoreception, as reported in cattle. PMID:22778440

  9. Quantitative Magnetic Separation of Particles and Cells Using Gradient Magnetic Ratcheting.

    PubMed

    Murray, Coleman; Pao, Edward; Tseng, Peter; Aftab, Shayan; Kulkarni, Rajan; Rettig, Matthew; Di Carlo, Dino

    2016-04-13

    Extraction of rare target cells from biosamples is enabling for life science research. Traditional rare cell separation techniques, such as magnetic activated cell sorting, are robust but perform coarse, qualitative separations based on surface antigen expression. A quantitative magnetic separation technology is reported using high-force magnetic ratcheting over arrays of magnetically soft micropillars with gradient spacing, and the system is used to separate and concentrate magnetic beads based on iron oxide content (IOC) and cells based on surface expression. The system consists of a microchip of permalloy micropillar arrays with increasing lateral pitch and a mechatronic device to generate a cycling magnetic field. Particles with higher IOC separate and equilibrate along the miropillar array at larger pitches. A semi-analytical model is developed that predicts behavior for particles and cells. Using the system, LNCaP cells are separated based on the bound quantity of 1 μm anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) particles as a metric for expression. The ratcheting cytometry system is able to resolve a ±13 bound particle differential, successfully distinguishing LNCaP from PC3 populations based on EpCAM expression, correlating with flow cytometry analysis. As a proof-of-concept, EpCAM-labeled cells from patient blood are isolated with 74% purity, demonstrating potential toward a quantitative magnetic separation instrument.

  10. Rare Cell Separation and Analysis by Magnetic Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Zborowski, Maciej; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The separation and or isolation of rare cells using magnetic forces is commonly used and growing in use ranging from simple sample prep for further studies to a FDA approved, clinical diagnostic test. This grown is the result of both the demand to obtain homogeneous rare cells for molecular analysis and the dramatic increases in the power of permanent magnets that even allow the separation of some unlabeled cells based on intrinsic magnetic moments, such as malaria parasite-infected red blood cells. PMID:21812408

  11. On-chip cell sorting via patterned magnetic traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byvank, Tom; Prikockis, Michael; Chen, Aaron; Miller, Brandon; Chalmers, Jeffrey; Sooryakumar, Ratnasingham

    2015-03-01

    Due to their importance in research for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, numerous schemes have been developed to sort rare cell populations, e.g., circulating tumor cells (CTCs), from a larger ensemble of cells. Here, we improve upon a previously developed microfluidic device (Lab Chip 13, 1172, (2013)) to increase throughput and sorting purity of magnetically labeled cells. The separation mechanism involves controlling magnetic forces by manipulating the magnetic domain structures of embedded permalloy microdisks with weak external fields. These forces move labeled cells from the input flow stream into an adjacent buffer flow stream. Such magnetically activated transfer separates the magnetic entities from their non-magnetic counterparts as the two flow streams split apart and move toward their respective outputs. Purity of the magnetic output is modulated by the withdrawal rate of the non-magnetic output relative to the inputs. A proof of concept shows that CTCs from metastatic breast cancer patients can be sorted, recovered from the device, and confirmed as CTCs using separate immunofluorescence staining and analysis. With further optimizations, the channel could become a useful device for high purity final sorting of enriched patient cell samples.

  12. Quantitative Magnetic Separation of Particles and Cells using Gradient Magnetic Ratcheting

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Coleman; Pao, Edward; Tseng, Peter; Aftab, Shayan; Kulkarni, Rajan; Rettig, Matthew; Di Carlo, Dino

    2016-01-01

    Extraction of rare target cells from biosamples is enabling for life science research. Traditional rare cell separation techniques, such as magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS), are robust but perform coarse, qualitative separations based on surface antigen expression. We report a quantitative magnetic separation technology using high-force magnetic ratcheting over arrays of magnetically soft micro-pillars with gradient spacing, and use the system to separate and concentrate magnetic beads based on iron oxide content (IOC) and cells based on surface expression. The system consists of a microchip of permalloy micro-pillar arrays with increasing lateral pitch and a mechatronic device to generate a cycling magnetic-field. Particles with higher IOC separate and equilibrate along the miro-pillar array at larger pitches. We develop a semi-analytical model that predicts behavior for particles and cells. Using the system, LNCaP cells were separated based on the bound quantity of 1μm anti-EpCAM particles as a metric for expression. The ratcheting cytometry system was able to resolve a ±13 bound particle differential, successfully distinguishing LNCaP from PC3 populations based on EpCAM expression, correlating with flow cytometry analysis. As a proof of concept, EpCAM-labeled cells from patient blood were isolated with 74% purity, demonstrating potential towards a quantitative magnetic separation instrument. PMID:26890496

  13. Endowing carbon nanotubes with superparamagnetic properties: applications for cell labeling, MRI cell tracking and magnetic manipulations.

    PubMed

    Lamanna, Giuseppe; Garofalo, Antonio; Popa, Gabriela; Wilhelm, Claire; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie; Felder-Flesch, Delphine; Bianco, Alberto; Gazeau, Florence; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2013-05-21

    Coating of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) imparts novel magnetic, optical, and thermal properties with potential applications in the biomedical domain. Multi-walled CNTs have been decorated with iron oxide superparamagnetic NPs. Two different approaches have been investigated based on ligand exchange or "click chemistry". The presence of the NPs on the nanotube surface allows conferring magnetic properties to CNTs. We have evaluated the potential of the NP/CNT hybrids as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their interactions with cells. The capacity of the hybrids to magnetically monitor and manipulate cells has also been investigated. The NP/CNTs can be manipulated by a remote magnetic field with enhanced contrast in MRI. They are internalized into tumor cells without showing cytotoxicity. The labeled cells can be magnetically manipulated as they display magnetic mobility and are detected at a single cell level through high resolution MRI.

  14. Magnetic Wire Traps and Programmable Manipulation of Biological Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, G.; Henighan, T.; Chen, A.; Hauser, A. J.; Yang, F. Y.; Chalmers, J. J.; Sooryakumar, R.

    2009-09-01

    We present a multiplex method, based on microscopic programmable magnetic traps in zigzag wires patterned on a platform, to simultaneously apply directed forces on multiple fluid-borne cells or biologically inert magnetic microparticles or nanoparticles. The gentle tunable forces do not produce damage and retain cell viability. The technique is demonstrated with T-lymphocyte cells remotely manipulated (by a joystick) along desired trajectories on a silicon surface with average speeds up to 20μm/s.

  15. In situ single cell detection via microfluidic magnetic bead assay

    PubMed Central

    KC, Pawan; Zhang, Ge; Zhe, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    We present a single cell detection device based on magnetic bead assay and micro Coulter counters. This device consists of two successive micro Coulter counters, coupled with a high gradient magnetic field generated by an external magnet. The device can identify single cells in terms of the transit time difference of the cell through the two micro Coulter counters. Target cells are conjugated with magnetic beads via specific antibody and antigen binding. A target cell traveling through the two Coulter counters interacts with the magnetic field, and have a longer transit time at the 1st counter than that at the 2nd counter. In comparison, a non-target cell has no interaction with the magnetic field, and hence has nearly the same transit times through the two counters. Each cell passing through the two counters generates two consecutive voltage pulses one after the other; the pulse widths and magnitudes indicating the cell’s transit times through the counters and the cell’s size respectively. Thus, by measuring the pulse widths (transit times) of each cell through the two counters, each single target cell can be differentiated from non-target cells even if they have similar sizes. We experimentally proved that the target human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and non-target rat adipose-derived stem cells (rASCs) have significant different transit time distribution, from which we can determine the recognition regions for both cell groups quantitatively. We further demonstrated that within a mixed cell population of rASCs and HUVECs, HUVECs can be detected in situ and the measured HUVECs ratios agree well with the pre-set ratios. With the simple device structure and easy sample preparation, this method is expected to enable single cell detection in a continuous flow and can be applied to facilitate general cell detection applications such as stem cell identification and enumeration. PMID:28222140

  16. Evaluation of nano-magnetic fluid on malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongsheng; Zong, Hailiang; Ma, Chong; Ming, Xing; Shang, Ming; Li, Kai; He, Xiaoguang; Cao, Lei

    2017-01-01

    The temperature variation rule of nano-magnetic fluid in the specific magnetic field and the effect on the treatment of malignant glioma were examined. The temperature variation of nano-magnetic fluid in the specific magnetic field was investigated by heating in vitro, and cell morphology was observed through optical microscopy and electron microscopy. MTT detection also was used to detect the effect of Fe3O4 nanometer magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) on the proliferation of human U251 glioma cell line. The Fe3O4 nano MFH experiment was used to detect the inhibition rate of the tumor volume in nude mice with tumors. The results of the experiment showed that the heating ability of magnetic fluid was positively correlated with its concentration at the same intensity of the magnetic field. The results also indicated the prominent inhibitory effect of nanometer MFH on the proliferation of glioma cells, which was a dose-dependent relationship with nanometer magnetic fluid concentration. The hyperthermia experiment of nude mice with tumors displayed a significant inhibiting effect of Fe3O4 nanometer magnetic fluid in glioma volume. These results explain that iron (II, III) oxide (Fe3O4) nanometer MFH can inhibit the proliferation of U251 glioma cells, and has an obvious inhibitory effect on glioma volume, which plays a certain role in the treatment of brain glioma. PMID:28356945

  17. Evaluation of nano-magnetic fluid on malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongsheng; Zong, Hailiang; Ma, Chong; Ming, Xing; Shang, Ming; Li, Kai; He, Xiaoguang; Cao, Lei

    2017-02-01

    The temperature variation rule of nano-magnetic fluid in the specific magnetic field and the effect on the treatment of malignant glioma were examined. The temperature variation of nano-magnetic fluid in the specific magnetic field was investigated by heating in vitro, and cell morphology was observed through optical microscopy and electron microscopy. MTT detection also was used to detect the effect of Fe3O4 nanometer magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) on the proliferation of human U251 glioma cell line. The Fe3O4 nano MFH experiment was used to detect the inhibition rate of the tumor volume in nude mice with tumors. The results of the experiment showed that the heating ability of magnetic fluid was positively correlated with its concentration at the same intensity of the magnetic field. The results also indicated the prominent inhibitory effect of nanometer MFH on the proliferation of glioma cells, which was a dose-dependent relationship with nanometer magnetic fluid concentration. The hyperthermia experiment of nude mice with tumors displayed a significant inhibiting effect of Fe3O4 nanometer magnetic fluid in glioma volume. These results explain that iron (II, III) oxide (Fe3O4) nanometer MFH can inhibit the proliferation of U251 glioma cells, and has an obvious inhibitory effect on glioma volume, which plays a certain role in the treatment of brain glioma.

  18. Endowing carbon nanotubes with superparamagnetic properties: applications for cell labeling, MRI cell tracking and magnetic manipulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamanna, Giuseppe; Garofalo, Antonio; Popa, Gabriela; Wilhelm, Claire; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie; Felder-Flesch, Delphine; Bianco, Alberto; Gazeau, Florence; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2013-05-01

    Coating of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) imparts novel magnetic, optical, and thermal properties with potential applications in the biomedical domain. Multi-walled CNTs have been decorated with iron oxide superparamagnetic NPs. Two different approaches have been investigated based on ligand exchange or ``click chemistry''. The presence of the NPs on the nanotube surface allows conferring magnetic properties to CNTs. We have evaluated the potential of the NP/CNT hybrids as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their interactions with cells. The capacity of the hybrids to magnetically monitor and manipulate cells has also been investigated. The NP/CNTs can be manipulated by a remote magnetic field with enhanced contrast in MRI. They are internalized into tumor cells without showing cytotoxicity. The labeled cells can be magnetically manipulated as they display magnetic mobility and are detected at a single cell level through high resolution MRI.Coating of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) imparts novel magnetic, optical, and thermal properties with potential applications in the biomedical domain. Multi-walled CNTs have been decorated with iron oxide superparamagnetic NPs. Two different approaches have been investigated based on ligand exchange or ``click chemistry''. The presence of the NPs on the nanotube surface allows conferring magnetic properties to CNTs. We have evaluated the potential of the NP/CNT hybrids as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their interactions with cells. The capacity of the hybrids to magnetically monitor and manipulate cells has also been investigated. The NP/CNTs can be manipulated by a remote magnetic field with enhanced contrast in MRI. They are internalized into tumor cells without showing cytotoxicity. The labeled cells can be magnetically manipulated as they display magnetic mobility and are detected at a single cell level through high

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of transplanted stem cell fate in stroke.

    PubMed

    Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Soleimani, Masoud; Goodarzi, Parisa; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hasan; Larijani, Bagher; Arjmand, Babak

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, scientific findings in the field of regeneration of nervous system have revealed the possibility of stem cell based therapies for damaged brain tissue related disorders like stroke. Furthermore, to achieve desirable outcomes from cellular therapies, one needs to monitor the migration, engraftment, viability, and also functional fate of transplanted stem cells. Magnetic resonance imaging is an extremely versatile technique for this purpose, which has been broadly used to study stroke and assessment of therapeutic role of stem cells. In this review we searched in PubMed search engine by using following keywords; "Stem Cells", "Cell Tracking", "Stroke", "Stem Cell Transplantation", "Nanoparticles", and "Magnetic Resonance Imaging" as entry terms and based on the mentioned key words, the search period was set from 1976 to 2012. The main purpose of this article is describing various advantages of molecular and magnetic resonance imaging of stem cells, with focus on translation of stem cell research to clinical research.

  20. Single cell detection using a magnetic zigzag nanowire biosensor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao-Ting; Ger, Tzong-Rong; Lin, Ya-Hui; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2013-08-07

    A magnetic zigzag nanowire device was designed for single cell biosensing. Nanowires with widths of 150, 300, 500, and 800 nm were fabricated on silicon trenches by electron beam lithography, electron beam evaporation, and lift-off processes. Magnetoresistance measurements were performed before and after the attachment of a single magnetic cell to the nanowires to characterize the magnetic signal change due to the influence of the magnetic cell. Magnetoresistance responses were measured in different magnetic field directions, and the results showed that this nanowire device can be used for multi-directional detection. It was observed that the highest switching field variation occurred in a 150 nm wide nanowire when the field was perpendicular to the substrate plane. On the other hand, the highest magnetoresistance ratio variation occurred in a 800 nm wide nanowire also when the field was perpendicular to the substrate plane. Besides, the trench-structured substrate proposed in this study can fix the magnetic cell to the sensor in a fluid environment, and the stray field generated by the corners of the magnetic zigzag nanowires has the function of actively attracting the magnetic cells for detection.

  1. Granular cells in the presence of magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurčák, J.; Lemmerer, B.; van Noort, M.

    2017-10-01

    We present a statistical study of the dependencies of the shapes and sizes of the photospheric convective cells on the magnetic field properties. This analysis is based on a 2.5 hour long SST observations of active region NOAA 11768. We have blue continuum images taken with a cadence of 5.6 sec that are used for segmentation of individual granules and 270 maps of spectropolarimetric CRISP data allowing us to determine the properties of the magnetic field along with the line-of-sight velocities. The sizes and shapes of the granular cells are dependent on the the magnetic field strength, where the granules tend to be smaller in regions with stronger magnetic field. In the presence of highly inclined magnetic fields, the eccentricity of granules is high and we do not observe symmetric granules in these regions. The mean up-flow velocities in granules as well as the granules intensities decrease with increasing magnetic field strength.

  2. Magnetic domain wall conduits for single cell applications.

    PubMed

    Donolato, M; Torti, A; Kostesha, N; Deryabina, M; Sogne, E; Vavassori, P; Hansen, M F; Bertacco, R

    2011-09-07

    The ability to trap, manipulate and release single cells on a surface is important both for fundamental studies of cellular processes and for the development of novel lab-on-chip miniaturized tools for biological and medical applications. In this paper we demonstrate how magnetic domain walls generated in micro- and nano-structures fabricated on a chip surface can be used to handle single yeast cells labeled with magnetic beads. In detail, first we show that the proposed approach maintains the microorganism viable, as proven by monitoring the division of labeled yeast cells trapped by domain walls over 16 hours. Moreover, we demonstrate the controlled transport and release of individual yeast cells via displacement and annihilation of individual domain walls in micro- and nano-sized magnetic structures. These results pave the way to the implementation of magnetic devices based on domain walls technology in lab-on-chip systems devoted to accurate individual cell trapping and manipulation.

  3. Effects of Magnetic Field on Biological Cells and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Jen

    2001-03-01

    While there has been extensive research performed in the physics of magnetic fields and the physics and chemistry in life sciences, independent of each other, there has been a paucity of scientific research and development investigating the possible applications of magnetic fields in life sciences. The focus of this presentation is to present the stimulation mechanism by which magnetic fields affect (a) yeast cells (b) plant cells and (c) mammalian normal and cancer cells. Recently we have found that the Saccharomyces Cerevsa yeast growth increases by about 30to a 1 tesla field and the production of CO2 increases by about 30of yeast metabolism may be due to an increase in intercellular interaction and protein channel alignment, the introduction of an alteration in the DNA from the magnetic field exposure or a combination of these mechanisms. We also have found that the application of high magnetic fields (1 tesla and above) can have marked effects on the germination and growth of plants, especially corn, beans and peas. This finding has opened up the possibility of technology developments in botanical growth systems to accelerate seed germination and crop harvesting. Most recently we have investigated the application of high magnetic fields on leukemia, CaCoII and HEP G2 cancer cell lines. We found that when leukemia are exposed to a 12 tesla field for 2 hours has an increase in cell death by about 30that were not exposed to the magnetic field. Viability of CaCoII cells sandwiched between permanent magnets of maximum strength of 1.2 tesla was measured. A decrease in viable cells by 33unexposed cells. HSP 70 was measured for HEPG2 cells that were exposed to permanent magnetic field of 1.2 tesla for 40 minutes and for unexposed cells. It was found that the exposed cells produce 19 times more HSP70 compared to unexposed cells. Our results together with other investigators report suggest a strong evidence of a reduction in the cell growth rate for cancer cells when

  4. Micro-magnet arrays for specific single bacterial cell positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivetal, Jérémy; Royet, David; Ciuta, Georgeta; Frenea-Robin, Marie; Haddour, Naoufel; Dempsey, Nora M.; Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric; Simonet, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    In various contexts such as pathogen detection or analysis of microbial diversity where cellular heterogeneity must be taken into account, there is a growing need for tools and methods that enable microbiologists to analyze bacterial cells individually. One of the main challenges in the development of new platforms for single cell studies is to perform precise cell positioning, but the ability to specifically target cells is also important in many applications. In this work, we report the development of new strategies to selectively trap single bacterial cells upon large arrays, based on the use of micro-magnets. Escherichia coli bacteria were used to demonstrate magnetically driven bacterial cell organization. In order to provide a flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology, cells were magnetically and specifically labeled using two different strategies, namely immunomagnetic labeling and magnetic in situ hybridization. Results show that centimeter-sized arrays of targeted, isolated bacteria can be successfully created upon the surface of a flat magnetically patterned hard magnetic film. Efforts are now being directed towards the integration of a detection tool to provide a complete micro-system device for a variety of microbiological applications.

  5. Detection and Quantification of Magnetically Labeled Cells by Cellular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Frank, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    Labeling cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles, paramagnetic contrast agent (gadolinium) or perfluorocarbons allows for the possibility of tracking single or clusters of labeled cells within target tissues following either direct implantation or intravenous injection. This review summarizes the practical issues regarding detection and quantification of magnetically labeled cells with various MRI contrast agents with a focus on SPIO nanoparticles. PMID:18995978

  6. Magnetically driven microrobotic system for cancer cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Lucarini, G; Iacovacci, V; Ricotti, L; Comisso, N; Dario, P; Menciassi, A

    2015-08-01

    Lab-on-a-chip applications, such as single cell manipulation and targeted delivery of chemicals, could greatly benefit from mobile untethered microdevices able to move in fluidic environments by using magnetic fields. In this paper a magnetically driven microrobotic system enabling the controlled locomotion of objects placed at the air/liquid interface is proposed and exploited for cell manipulation. In particular authors report the design, fabrication and testing of a polymeric thin film-based magnetic microrobot (called "FilmBot") used as a support for navigating cancer cells. By finely controlling magnetic film locomotion, it is possible to navigate the cells by exploiting their adhesion to the film without affecting their integrity. Preliminary in vitro tests demonstrated that the magnetic thin film is able to act as substrate for T24 bladder cancer cells without affecting their viability and that film locomotion can be magnetically controlled (with a magnetic field and a gradient of 6 mT and 0.6 T/m, respectively) along specific directions, with a mean speed of about 3 mm/s.

  7. Scaffold-independent Patterning of Cells using Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Suvojit; Biswas, Moanaro; Elankumaran, Subbiah; Puri, Ishwar

    2013-03-01

    Spatial patterning of cells in vitro relies on direct contact of cells on to solid surfaces. Scaffold independent patterning of cells has never been achieved so far. Patterning of cells has wide applications including stem cell biology, tissue architecture and regenerative medicine besides fundamental biology. Magnetized cells in a suspension can be manipulated using an externally applied magnetic field enabling directed patterning. We magnetized mammalian cells by internalization of superparamagnetic nanoparticles coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA). A magnetic field is then used to arrange cells in a desired pattern on a substrate or in suspension. The control strategy is derived from the self-assembly of magnetic colloids in a liquid considering magnetostatic interactions. The range of achievable structural features promise novel experimental methods investigating the influence of tissue shape and size on cell population dynamics wherein Fickian diffusion of autocrine growth signals are known to play a significant role. By eliminating the need for a scaffold, intercellular adhesion mechanics and the effects of temporally regulated signals can be investigated. The findings can be applied to novel tissue engineering methods.

  8. Three-dimensional cell culturing by magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Haisler, William L; Timm, David M; Gage, Jacob A; Tseng, Hubert; Killian, T C; Souza, Glauco R

    2013-10-01

    Recently, biomedical research has moved toward cell culture in three dimensions to better recapitulate native cellular environments. This protocol describes one method for 3D culture, the magnetic levitation method (MLM), in which cells bind with a magnetic nanoparticle assembly overnight to render them magnetic. When resuspended in medium, an external magnetic field levitates and concentrates cells at the air-liquid interface, where they aggregate to form larger 3D cultures. The resulting cultures are dense, can synthesize extracellular matrix (ECM) and can be analyzed similarly to the other culture systems using techniques such as immunohistochemical analysis (IHC), western blotting and other biochemical assays. This protocol details the MLM and other associated techniques (cell culture, imaging and IHC) adapted for the MLM. The MLM requires 45 min of working time over 2 d to create 3D cultures that can be cultured in the long term (>7 d).

  9. Magnetically responsive yeast cells: methods of preparation and applications.

    PubMed

    Safarik, Ivo; Maderova, Zdenka; Pospiskova, Kristyna; Baldikova, Eva; Horska, Katerina; Safarikova, Mirka

    2015-01-01

    Magnetically modified yeast cells represent an interesting type of biocomposite material, applicable in various areas of bioanalysis, biotechnology and environmental technology. In this review, typical examples of magnetic modifications of yeast cells of the genera Saccharomyces, Kluyveromyces, Rhodotorula and Yarrowia are presented, as well as their possible applications as biocatalysts, active part of biosensors and biosorbents for the separation of organic xenobiotics, heavy metal ions and radionuclides. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Activation of Schwann cells in vitro by magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongyang; Huang, Liangliang; Liu, Liang; Luo, Beier; Liang, Miaomiao; Sun, Zhen; Zhu, Shu; Quan, Xin; Yang, Yafeng; Ma, Teng; Huang, Jinghui; Luo, Zhuojing

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) are attractive seed cells in neural tissue engineering, but their application is limited by attenuated biological activities and impaired functions with aging. Therefore, it is important to explore an approach to enhance the viability and biological properties of SCs. In the present study, a magnetic composite made of magnetically responsive magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and a biodegradable chitosan–glycerophosphate polymer were prepared and characterized. It was further explored whether such magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic fields would regulate SC biological activities. The magnetization of the magnetic nanocomposite was measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer. The compositional characterization of the magnetic nanocomposite was examined by Fourier-transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. The tolerance of SCs to the magnetic fields was tested by flow-cytometry assay. The proliferation of cells was examined by a 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine-labeling assay, a PrestoBlue assay, and a Live/Dead assay. Messenger ribonucleic acid of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF in SCs was assayed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The amount of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF secreted from SCs was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. It was found that magnetic nanocomposites containing 10% MNPs showed a cross-section diameter of 32.33±1.81 µm, porosity of 80.41%±0.72%, and magnetization of 5.691 emu/g at 8 kOe. The 10% MNP magnetic nanocomposites were able to support cell adhesion and spreading and further promote proliferation of SCs under magnetic field exposure. Interestingly, a magnetic field applied through the 10% MNP magnetic scaffold significantly increased the gene expression and protein secretion of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF. This work is the first stage in our understanding of how to precisely regulate the viability and biological properties of SCs in tissue-engineering grafts, which combined with additional

  11. Activation of Schwann cells in vitro by magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongyang; Huang, Liangliang; Liu, Liang; Luo, Beier; Liang, Miaomiao; Sun, Zhen; Zhu, Shu; Quan, Xin; Yang, Yafeng; Ma, Teng; Huang, Jinghui; Luo, Zhuojing

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) are attractive seed cells in neural tissue engineering, but their application is limited by attenuated biological activities and impaired functions with aging. Therefore, it is important to explore an approach to enhance the viability and biological properties of SCs. In the present study, a magnetic composite made of magnetically responsive magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and a biodegradable chitosan-glycerophosphate polymer were prepared and characterized. It was further explored whether such magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic fields would regulate SC biological activities. The magnetization of the magnetic nanocomposite was measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer. The compositional characterization of the magnetic nanocomposite was examined by Fourier-transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. The tolerance of SCs to the magnetic fields was tested by flow-cytometry assay. The proliferation of cells was examined by a 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine-labeling assay, a PrestoBlue assay, and a Live/Dead assay. Messenger ribonucleic acid of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF in SCs was assayed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The amount of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF secreted from SCs was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. It was found that magnetic nanocomposites containing 10% MNPs showed a cross-section diameter of 32.33±1.81 µm, porosity of 80.41%±0.72%, and magnetization of 5.691 emu/g at 8 kOe. The 10% MNP magnetic nanocomposites were able to support cell adhesion and spreading and further promote proliferation of SCs under magnetic field exposure. Interestingly, a magnetic field applied through the 10% MNP magnetic scaffold significantly increased the gene expression and protein secretion of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF. This work is the first stage in our understanding of how to precisely regulate the viability and biological properties of SCs in tissue-engineering grafts, which combined with additional

  12. Dynamic analysis of magnetic nanoparticles crossing cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedram, Maysam Z.; Shamloo, Amir; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Alasty, Aria

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, nanoparticles (NPs) are used in a variety of biomedical applications including brain disease diagnostics and subsequent treatments. Among the various types of NPs, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been implemented by many research groups for an array of life science applications. In this paper, we studied MNPs controlled delivery into the endothelial cells using a magnetic field. Dynamics equations of MNPs were defined in the continuous domain using control theory methods and were applied to crossing the cell membrane. This study, dedicated to clinical and biomedical research applications, offers a guideline for the generation of a magnetic field required for the delivery of MNPs.

  13. Dynamic analysis of magnetic nanoparticles crossing cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedram, Maysam Z.; Shamloo, Amir; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Alasty, Aria

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays, nanoparticles (NPs) are used in a variety of biomedical applications including brain disease diagnostics and subsequent treatments. Among the various types of NPs, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been implemented by many research groups for an array of life science applications. In this paper, we studied MNPs controlled delivery into the endothelial cells using a magnetic field. Dynamics equations of MNPs were defined in the continuous domain using control theory methods and were applied to crossing the cell membrane. This study, dedicated to clinical and biomedical research applications, offers a guideline for the generation of a magnetic field required for the delivery of MNPs.

  14. Quantitative intracellular magnetic nanoparticle uptake measured by live cell magnetophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Ying; Mal, Niladri; Williams, P. Stephen; Mayorga, Maritza; Penn, Marc S.; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Zborowski, Maciej

    2008-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles have been used successfully as an intracellular contrast agent for nuclear MRI cell tracking in vivo. We present a method of detecting intracellular SPIO colloid uptake in live cells using cell magnetophoresis, with potential applications in measuring intracellular MRI contrast uptake. The method was evaluated by measuring shifts in mean and distribution of the cell magnetophoretic mobility, and the concomitant changes in population frequency of the magnetically positive cells when compared to the unmanipulated negative control. Seven different transfection agent (TA) -SPIO complexes based on dendrimer, lipid, and polyethylenimine compounds were used as test standards, in combination with 3 different cell types: mesenchymal stem cells, cardiac fibroblasts, and cultured KG-1a hematopoietic stem cells. Transfectol (TRA) -SPIO incubation resulted in the highest frequency of magnetically positive cells (>90%), and Fugene 6 (FUG) -SPIO incubation the lowest, below that when using SPIO alone. A highly regular process of cell magnetophoresis was amenable to intracellular iron mass calculations. The results were consistent in all the cell types studied and with other reports. The cell magnetophoresis depends on the presence of high-spin iron species and is therefore expected to be directly related to the cell MRI contrast level.—Jing, Y., Mal, N., Williams, P. S., Mayorga, M., Penn, M. S., Chalmers, J. J., Zborowski, M. Quantitative intracellular magnetic nanoparticle uptake measured by live cell magnetophoresis. PMID:18725459

  15. Magnetic liposomes for colorectal cancer cells therapy by high-frequency magnetic field treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardiansyah, Andri; Huang, Li-Ying; Yang, Ming-Chien; Liu, Ting-Yu; Tsai, Sung-Chen; Yang, Chih-Yung; Kuo, Chih-Yu; Chan, Tzu-Yi; Zou, Hui-Ming; Lian, Wei-Nan; Lin, Chi-Hung

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we developed the cancer treatment through the combination of chemotherapy and thermotherapy using doxorubicin-loaded magnetic liposomes. The citric acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (CAMNP, ca. 10 nm) and doxorubicin were encapsulated into the liposome (HSPC/DSPE/cholesterol = 12.5:1:8.25) by rotary evaporation and ultrasonication process. The resultant magnetic liposomes ( ca. 90 to 130 nm) were subject to characterization including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometer, and fluorescence microscope. In vitro cytotoxicity of the drug carrier platform was investigated through 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay using L-929 cells, as the mammalian cell model. In vitro cytotoxicity and hyperthermia (inductive heating) studies were evaluated against colorectal cancer (CT-26 cells) with high-frequency magnetic field (HFMF) exposure. MTT assay revealed that these drug carriers exhibited no cytotoxicity against L-929 cells, suggesting excellent biocompatibility. When the magnetic liposomes with 1 μM doxorubicin was used to treat CT-26 cells in combination with HFMF exposure, approximately 56% cells were killed and found to be more effective than either hyperthermia or chemotherapy treatment individually. Therefore, these results show that the synergistic effects between chemotherapy (drug-controlled release) and hyperthermia increase the capability to kill cancer cells.

  16. Optimization of magnetic switches for single particle and cell transport

    SciTech Connect

    Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Yellen, Benjamin B.; Murdoch, David M.; Kim, CheolGi

    2014-06-28

    The ability to manipulate an ensemble of single particles and cells is a key aim of lab-on-a-chip research; however, the control mechanisms must be optimized for minimal power consumption to enable future large-scale implementation. Recently, we demonstrated a matter transport platform, which uses overlaid patterns of magnetic films and metallic current lines to control magnetic particles and magnetic-nanoparticle-labeled cells; however, we have made no prior attempts to optimize the device geometry and power consumption. Here, we provide an optimization analysis of particle-switching devices based on stochastic variation in the particle's size and magnetic content. These results are immediately applicable to the design of robust, multiplexed platforms capable of transporting, sorting, and storing single cells in large arrays with low power and high efficiency.

  17. Magnetic Field-Guided Cell Delivery with Nanoparticle-Loaded Human Corneal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moysidis, Stavros N.; Alvarez-Delfin, Karen; Peschansky, Veronica J.; Salero, Enrique; Weisman, Alejandra D.; Bartakova, Alena; Raffa, Gabriella A.; Merkhofer, Richard M.; Kador, Karl E.; Kunzevitzky, Noelia J.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    To improve the delivery and integration of cell therapy using magnetic cell guidance for replacement of corneal endothelium, here we assess magnetic nanoparticles’ (MNPs) effects on human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs) in vitro. Biocompatible, 50 nm superparamagnetic nanoparticles endocytosed by cultured HCECs induced no short- or long-term change in viability or identity. Assessment of guidance of the magnetic HCECs in the presence of different magnet shapes and field strengths showed a 2.4-fold increase in delivered cell density compared to gravity alone. After cell delivery, HCECs formed a functional monolayer, with no difference in tight junction formation between MNP-loaded and control HCECs. These data suggest that nanoparticle-mediated magnetic cell delivery may increase the efficiency of cell delivery without compromising HCEC survival, identity or function. Future studies may assess the safety and efficacy of this therapeutic modality in vivo. PMID:25596075

  18. Cytotoxicity of selected magnetic fluids on human adenocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilger, Ingrid; Frühauf, Sylvia; Linß, Werner; Hiergeist, Robert; Andrä, Wilfried; Hergt, Rudolf; Kaiser, Werner A.

    2003-04-01

    Based on the knowledge that the magnetite particles seem to be well tolerated by the human body, the cytotoxic potential of coated particles was investigated, which had been selected for potential applications regarding the minimal-invasive elimination of breast tumors by magnetic thermoablation. Human adenocarcinoma cells (BT-20) were exposed (24, 48 and 72 h) to different magnetite particles with diverging total size (8, 10 and 220 nm) and coating (cationic and anionic). One sample contained only non-coated magnetite particles. The magnetite concentration ranged between 0.2 and 20 ng/cell. Cytotoxicity was estimated by measuring the succinate dehydrogenase activity. The morphologic features resulting from the interaction of magnetic fluids with BT-20 cells was determined by transmission electron microscopy. As opposed to the non-coated magnetic particles, cationic particles induced the strongest decrease in cell survival rates depending on time and concentration. Morphologically, the cationic particle samples exerted a strong binding to cellular membranes. Changes in the subcellular structure were found in relation to the coated magnetic particles. In conclusion, our results show that the coated prototype magnetic particles, particularly those with a cationic surfactant, are cytotoxic to BT-20 cells. The cytotoxicity is attributed to electrostatic bindings with cellular membranes, influences of chemical components or non-physiologic pH. Considering the in vivo applications, adverse systemic effects are conceivable and more biocompatible coatings for the selected magnetic particles should be elaborated.

  19. Single cell magnetic imaging using a quantum diamond microscope

    PubMed Central

    Park, H.; Weissleder, R.; Yacoby, A.; Lukin, M. D.; Lee, H.; Walsworth, R. L.; Connolly, C. B.

    2015-01-01

    We apply a quantum diamond microscope to detection and imaging of immunomagnetically labeled cells. This instrument uses nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond for correlated magnetic and fluorescence imaging. Our device provides single-cell resolution and two orders of magnitude larger field of view (~1 mm2) than previous NV imaging technologies, enabling practical applications. To illustrate, we quantify cancer biomarkers expressed by rare tumor cells in a large population of healthy cells. PMID:26098019

  20. Single-cell magnetic imaging using a quantum diamond microscope.

    PubMed

    Glenn, David R; Lee, Kyungheon; Park, Hongkun; Weissleder, Ralph; Yacoby, Amir; Lukin, Mikhail D; Lee, Hakho; Walsworth, Ronald L; Connolly, Colin B

    2015-08-01

    We apply a quantum diamond microscope for detection and imaging of immunomagnetically labeled cells. This instrument uses nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond for correlated magnetic and fluorescence imaging. Our device provides single-cell resolution and a field of view (∼1 mm(2)) two orders of magnitude larger than that of previous NV imaging technologies, enabling practical applications. To illustrate, we quantified cancer biomarkers expressed by rare tumor cells in a large population of healthy cells.

  1. Patterned Magnetic Structures for Micro-/Nanoparticle and Cell Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Gregory Butler

    Remote manipulation of fluid-borne magnetic particles on a surface is useful to probe, assemble, and sort microscale and nanoscale objects. By patterning magnetic structures in shapes designed to exploit local heterogeneities in thin film magnetization, we have demonstrated effective trapping mechanisms for superparamagnetic micro- and nanoparticles. The features necessary for trapping are shown to arise at domain walls or indentations in microscale and smaller magnetic wires, at the periphery of magnetized disks, and at corners of magnetized triangles. Weak (<150 Oe) in- and out-of-plane external magnetic fields modify the energy landscape of the trapped particles, allowing for the objects to be remotely maneuvered along selected routes across the surface. The mechanism is multiplexed, allowing for simultaneous manipulation of many trapped particles, and their motion is directed using a handheld user interface. Particles are able to be transported over hundreds of micrometers with velocities of upwards of 200 µm/s and average forces of up to hundreds of picoNewtons. The magnetic fields, their spatial distribution, and resulting forces are estimated by modeling magnetization of the patterned structures using micromagnetic simulation or by approximating the traps as point sources of fields. The quality of these models and their relevance for describing particle manipulation under the experimental conditions is discussed. The applicability of these techniques is demonstrated for various biological, biomolecular, and nanoscale systems. Binding of magnetic particles to cells allows for guided cell transport. Composite micelle nanostructures, only tens of nm across, are simultaneously trapped and maneuvered magnetically and tracked fluorescently, despite their small size. The implications for use of this technology in lab-on-chip devices are discussed.

  2. Cancer cell labeling and tracking using fluorescent and magnetic nanodiamond.

    PubMed

    Lien, Zhi-Yi; Hsu, Tzu-Chia; Liu, Kuang-Kai; Liao, Wei-Siang; Hwang, Kuo-Chu; Chao, Jui-I

    2012-09-01

    Nanodiamond, a promising carbon nanomaterial, develops for biomedical applications such as cancer cell labeling and detection. Here, we establish the nanodiamond-bearing cancer cell lines using the fluorescent and magnetic nanodiamond (FMND). Treatment with FMND particles did not significantly induce cytotoxicity and growth inhibition in HFL-1 normal lung fibroblasts and A549 lung cancer cells. The fluorescence intensities and particle complexities were increased in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by treatment with FMND particles in lung cancer cells; however, the existence of FMND particles inside the cells did not alter cellular size distribution. The FMND-bearing lung cancer cells could be separated by the fluorescent and magnetic properties of FMNDs using the flow cytometer and magnetic device, respectively. The FMND-bearing cancer cells were identified by the existence of FMNDs using flow cytometer and confocal microscope analysis. More importantly, the cell morphology, viability, growth ability and total protein expression profiles in the FMND-bearing cells were similar to those of the parental cells. The separated FMND-bearing cells with various generations were cryopreservation for further applications. After re-thawing the FMND-bearing cancer cell lines, the cells still retained the cell survival and growth ability. Additionally, a variety of human cancer types including colon (RKO), breast (MCF-7), cervical (HeLa), and bladder (BFTC905) cancer cells could be used the same strategy to prepare the FMND-bearing cancer cells. These results show that the FMND-bearing cancer cell lines, which reserve the parental cell functions, can be applied for specific cancer cell labeling and tracking. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence on cell death of high frequency motion of magnetic nanoparticles during magnetic hyperthermia experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallali, N.; Clerc, P.; Fourmy, D.; Gigoux, V.; Carrey, J.

    2016-07-01

    Studies with transplanted tumors in animals and clinical trials have provided the proof-of-concept of magnetic hyperthermia (MH) therapy of cancers using iron oxide nanoparticles. Interestingly, in several studies, the application of an alternating magnetic field (AMF) to tumor cells having internalized and accumulated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into their lysosomes can induce cell death without detectable temperature increase. To explain these results, among other hypotheses, it was proposed that cell death could be due to the high-frequency translational motion of MNPs under the influence of the AMF gradient generated involuntarily by most inductors. Such mechanical actions of MNPs might cause cellular damages and participate in the induction of cell death under MH conditions. To test this hypothesis, we developed a setup maximizing this effect. It is composed of an anti-Helmholtz coil and two permanent magnets, which produce an AMF gradient and a superimposed static MF. We have measured the MNP heating power and treated tumor cells by a standard AMF and by an AMF gradient, on which was added or not a static magnetic field. We showed that the presence of a static magnetic field prevents MNP heating and cell death in standard MH conditions. The heating power of MNPs in an AMF gradient is weak, position-dependent, and related to the presence of a non-zero AMF. Under an AMF gradient and a static field, no MNP heating and cell death were measured. Consequently, the hypothesis that translational motions could be involved in cell death during MH experiments is ruled out by our experiments.

  4. High gradient magnetic field microstructures for magnetophoretic cell separation.

    PubMed

    Abdel Fattah, Abdel Rahman; Ghosh, Suvojit; Puri, Ishwar K

    2016-08-01

    Microfluidics has advanced magnetic blood fractionation by making integrated miniature devices possible. A ferromagnetic microstructure array that is integrated with a microfluidic channel rearranges an applied magnetic field to create a high gradient magnetic field (HGMF). By leveraging the differential magnetic susceptibilities of cell types contained in a host medium, such as paramagnetic red blood cells (RBCs) and diamagnetic white blood cells (WBCs), the resulting HGMF can be used to continuously separate them without attaching additional labels, such as magnetic beads, to them. We describe the effect of these ferromagnetic microstructure geometries have on the blood separation efficacy by numerically simulating the influence of microstructure height and pitch on the HGMF characteristics and resulting RBC separation. Visualizations of RBC trajectories provide insight into how arrays can be optimized to best separate these cells from a host fluid. Periodic microstructures are shown to moderate the applied field due to magnetic interference between the adjacent teeth of an array. Since continuous microstructures do not similarly weaken the resultant HGMF, they facilitate significantly higher RBC separation. Nevertheless, periodic arrays are more appropriate for relatively deep microchannels since, unlike continuous microstructures, their separation effectiveness is independent of depth. The results are relevant to the design of microfluidic devices that leverage HGMFs to fractionate blood by separating RBCs and WBCs.

  5. Magnetically Targeted Stem Cell Delivery for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cores, Jhon; Caranasos, Thomas G.; Cheng, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells play a special role in the body as agents of self-renewal and auto-reparation for tissues and organs. Stem cell therapies represent a promising alternative strategy to regenerate damaged tissue when natural repairing and conventional pharmacological intervention fail to do so. A fundamental impediment for the evolution of stem cell therapies has been the difficulty of effectively targeting administered stem cells to the disease foci. Biocompatible magnetically responsive nanoparticles are being utilized for the targeted delivery of stem cells in order to enhance their retention in the desired treatment site. This noninvasive treatment-localization strategy has shown promising results and has the potential to mitigate the problem of poor long-term stem cell engraftment in a number of organ systems post-delivery. In addition, these same nanoparticles can be used to track and monitor the cells in vivo, using magnetic resonance imaging. In the present review we underline the principles of magnetic targeting for stem cell delivery, with a look at the logic behind magnetic nanoparticle systems, their manufacturing and design variants, and their applications in various pathological models. PMID:26133387

  6. A Unit Cell Laboratory Experiment: Marbles, Magnets, and Stacking Arrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, David C.

    2011-01-01

    An undergraduate first-semester general chemistry laboratory experiment introducing face-centered, body-centered, and simple cubic unit cells is presented. Emphasis is placed on the stacking arrangement of solid spheres used to produce a particular unit cell. Marbles and spherical magnets are employed to prepare each stacking arrangement. Packing…

  7. An efficient magnetically modified microbial cell biocomposite for carbazole biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic modification of microbial cells enables to prepare smart biocomposites in bioremediation. In this study, we constructed an efficient biocomposite by assembling Fe3O4 nanoparticles onto the surface of Sphingomonas sp. XLDN2-5 cells. The average particle size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles was about 20 nm with 45.5 emu g-1 saturation magnetization. The morphology of Sphingomonas sp. XLDN2-5 cells before and after Fe3O4 nanoparticle loading was verified by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electronic microscopy. Compared with free cells, the microbial cell/Fe3O4 biocomposite had the same biodegradation activity but exhibited remarkable reusability. The degradation activity of the microbial cell/Fe3O4 biocomposite increased gradually during recycling processes. Additionally, the microbial cell/Fe3O4 biocomposite could be easily separated and recycled by an external magnetic field due to the super-paramagnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticle coating. These results indicated that magnetically modified microbial cells provide a promising technique for improving biocatalysts used in the biodegradation of hazardous compounds. PMID:24330511

  8. A Unit Cell Laboratory Experiment: Marbles, Magnets, and Stacking Arrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, David C.

    2011-01-01

    An undergraduate first-semester general chemistry laboratory experiment introducing face-centered, body-centered, and simple cubic unit cells is presented. Emphasis is placed on the stacking arrangement of solid spheres used to produce a particular unit cell. Marbles and spherical magnets are employed to prepare each stacking arrangement. Packing…

  9. An efficient magnetically modified microbial cell biocomposite for carbazole biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yufei; Du, Xiaoyu; Wu, Chao; Liu, Xueying; Wang, Xia; Xu, Ping

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic modification of microbial cells enables to prepare smart biocomposites in bioremediation. In this study, we constructed an efficient biocomposite by assembling Fe3O4 nanoparticles onto the surface of Sphingomonas sp. XLDN2-5 cells. The average particle size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles was about 20 nm with 45.5 emu g-1 saturation magnetization. The morphology of Sphingomonas sp. XLDN2-5 cells before and after Fe3O4 nanoparticle loading was verified by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electronic microscopy. Compared with free cells, the microbial cell/Fe3O4 biocomposite had the same biodegradation activity but exhibited remarkable reusability. The degradation activity of the microbial cell/Fe3O4 biocomposite increased gradually during recycling processes. Additionally, the microbial cell/Fe3O4 biocomposite could be easily separated and recycled by an external magnetic field due to the super-paramagnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticle coating. These results indicated that magnetically modified microbial cells provide a promising technique for improving biocatalysts used in the biodegradation of hazardous compounds.

  10. Open Gradient Magnetic Red Blood Cell Sorter Evaluation on Model Cell Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Lee R.; Nehl, Franzisca; Dorn, Jenny; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Zborowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The emerging applications of biological cell separation to rare circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection and separation from blood rely on efficient methods of red blood cell (RBC) debulking. The two most widely used methods of centrifugation and RBC lysis have been associated with the concomitant significant losses of the cells of interest (such as progenitor cells or circulating tumor cells). Moreover, RBC centrifugation and lysis are not well adapted to the emerging diagnostic applications, relying on microfluidics and micro-scale total analytical systems. Therefore, magnetic RBC separation appears a logical alternative considering the high iron content of the RBC (normal mean 105 fg) as compared to the white blood cell iron content (normal mean 1.6 fg). The typical magnetic forces acting on a RBC are small, however, as compared to typical forces associated with centrifugation or the forces acting on synthetic magnetic nanoparticles used in current magnetic cell separations. This requires a significant effort in designing and fabricating a practical magnetic RBC separator. Applying advanced designs to the low cost, high power permanent magnets currently available, and building on the accumulated knowledge of the immunomagnetic cell separation methods and devices, an open gradient magnetic red blood cell (RBC) sorter was designed, fabricated and tested on label-free cell mixtures, with potential applications to RBC debulking from whole blood samples intended for diagnostic tests. PMID:24910468

  11. Open Gradient Magnetic Red Blood Cell Sorter Evaluation on Model Cell Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lee R; Nehl, Franzisca; Dorn, Jenny; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Zborowski, Maciej

    2013-02-01

    The emerging applications of biological cell separation to rare circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection and separation from blood rely on efficient methods of red blood cell (RBC) debulking. The two most widely used methods of centrifugation and RBC lysis have been associated with the concomitant significant losses of the cells of interest (such as progenitor cells or circulating tumor cells). Moreover, RBC centrifugation and lysis are not well adapted to the emerging diagnostic applications, relying on microfluidics and micro-scale total analytical systems. Therefore, magnetic RBC separation appears a logical alternative considering the high iron content of the RBC (normal mean 105 fg) as compared to the white blood cell iron content (normal mean 1.6 fg). The typical magnetic forces acting on a RBC are small, however, as compared to typical forces associated with centrifugation or the forces acting on synthetic magnetic nanoparticles used in current magnetic cell separations. This requires a significant effort in designing and fabricating a practical magnetic RBC separator. Applying advanced designs to the low cost, high power permanent magnets currently available, and building on the accumulated knowledge of the immunomagnetic cell separation methods and devices, an open gradient magnetic red blood cell (RBC) sorter was designed, fabricated and tested on label-free cell mixtures, with potential applications to RBC debulking from whole blood samples intended for diagnostic tests.

  12. Instant magnetic labeling of tumor cells by ultrasound in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Runyang; Yang, Jian; Wu, Ed X.; Lin, Shuyu

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic labeling of living cells creates opportunities for numerous biomedical applications. Here we describe an instantly cell magnetic labeling method based on ultrasound. We present a detailed study on the ultrasound performance of a simple and efficient labeling protocol for H-22 cells in vitro. High frequency focus ultrasound was investigated as an alternative method to achieve instant cell labeling with the magnetic particles without the need for adjunct agents or initiating cell cultures. Mean diameter of 168 nm dextran-T40 coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles were prepared by means of classical coprecipitation in solution in our laboratory. H-22 tumor cells suspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, pH=7.2) were exposed to ultrasound at 1.37 MHz for up to 120 s in the presence of SPIOs. The cellular uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles was detected by prussion blue staining. The viability of cells was determined by a trypan blue exclusion test. At 2 W power and 60 s ultrasound exposure in presence of 410 μg/ml SPIOs, H-22 cell labeling efficiency reached 69.4±6.3% and the labeled cells exhibited an iron content of 10.38±2.43 pg per cell. Furthermore, 95.2±3.2% cells remained viable. The results indicated that the ultrasound protocol could be potentially applied to label cells with large-sized magnetic particles. We also calculated the shear stress at the 2 W power and 1.37 MHz used in experiments. The results showed that the shear stress threshold for ultrasonically induced H-22 cell reparable sonoporation was 697 Pa. These findings provide a quantitative guidance in designing ultrasound protocols for cell labeling.

  13. On-chip Magnetic Separation and Cell Encapsulation in Droplets†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron; Byvank, Tom; Chang, Woo-Jin; Bharde, Atul; Vieira, Greg; Miller, Brandon; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Bashir, Rashid; Sooryakumar, Ratnasingham

    2014-01-01

    The demand for high-throughput single cell assays is gaining importance because of the heterogeneity of many cell suspensions, even after significant initial sorting. These suspensions may display cell-to-cell variability at the gene expression level that could impact single cell functional genomics, cancer, stem-cell research and drug screening. The on-chip monitoring of individual cells in an isolated environment would prevent cross-contamination, provide high recovery yield, and enable study of biological traits at a single cell level. These advantages of on-chip biological experiments is a significant improvement for myriad of cell analyses over conventional methods, which require bulk samples providing only averaged information on cell metabolism. We report on a device that integrates mobile magnetic trap array with microfluidic technology to provide, combined functionality of separation of immunomagnetically labeled cells or magnetic beads and their encapsulation with reagents into pico-liter droplets. This scheme of simultaneous reagent delivery and compartmentalization of the cells immediately after sorting, all performed seamlessly within the same chip, offers unique advantages such as the ability to capture cell traits as originated from its native environment, reduced chance of contamination, minimal use and freshness of the reagent solution that reacts only with separated objects, and tunable encapsulation characteristics independent of the input flow. In addition to the demonstrated preliminary cell viability assay, the device can potentially be integrated with other up- or downstream on-chip modules to become a powerful single-cell analysis tool. PMID:23370785

  14. Diffusion of Magnetic Elements in a Supergranular Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannattasio, F.; Stangalini, M.; Berrilli, F.; Del Moro, D.; Bellot Rubio, L.

    2014-06-01

    Small scale magnetic fields (magnetic elements) are ubiquitous in the solar photosphere. Their interaction can provide energy to the upper atmospheric layers, and contribute to heat the solar corona. In this work, the dynamic properties of magnetic elements in the quiet Sun are investigated. The high number of magnetic elements detected in a supergranular cell allowed us to compute their displacement spectrum lang(Δr)2rangvpropτγ (with γ > 0, and τ the time since the first detection), separating the contribution of the network (NW) and the internetwork (IN) regions. In particular, we found γ = 1.27 ± 0.05 and γ = 1.08 ± 0.11 in NW (at smaller and larger scales, respectively), and γ = 1.44 ± 0.08 in IN. These results are discussed in light of the literature on the topic, as well as the implications for the build-up of the magnetic network.

  15. Diffusion of magnetic elements in a supergranular cell

    SciTech Connect

    Giannattasio, F.; Berrilli, F.; Del Moro, D.; Stangalini, M.; Rubio, L. Bellot

    2014-06-20

    Small scale magnetic fields (magnetic elements) are ubiquitous in the solar photosphere. Their interaction can provide energy to the upper atmospheric layers, and contribute to heat the solar corona. In this work, the dynamic properties of magnetic elements in the quiet Sun are investigated. The high number of magnetic elements detected in a supergranular cell allowed us to compute their displacement spectrum ((Δr){sup 2})∝τ{sup γ} (with γ > 0, and τ the time since the first detection), separating the contribution of the network (NW) and the internetwork (IN) regions. In particular, we found γ = 1.27 ± 0.05 and γ = 1.08 ± 0.11 in NW (at smaller and larger scales, respectively), and γ = 1.44 ± 0.08 in IN. These results are discussed in light of the literature on the topic, as well as the implications for the build-up of the magnetic network.

  16. Detection of molecules and cells using nuclear magnetic resonance with magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Mannherz, Hans Georg; Haase, Axel

    2015-04-01

    For the detection of small molecules, proteins or even cells in vitro, functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements can be applied. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with the size of 5-7 nm were functionalised with antibodies to detect two model systems of different sizes, the protein avidin and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the model organism. The synthesised magnetic nanoparticles showed a narrow size distribution, which was determined using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The magnetic nanoparticles were functionalised with the according antibodies via EDC/NHS chemistry. The binding of the antigen to magnetic nanoparticles was detected through the change in the NMR T2 relaxation time at 0.5 T (≈21.7 MHz). In case of a specific binding the particles cluster and the T2 relaxation time of the sample changes. The detection limit in buffer for FITC-avidin was determined to be 1.35 nM and 107 cells/ml for S. cerevisiae. For fluorescent microscopy the avidin molecules were labelled with FITC and for the detection of S. cerevisiae the magnetic nanoparticles were additionally functionalised with rhodamine. The binding of the particles to S. cerevisiae and the resulting clustering was also seen by transmission electron microscopy.

  17. Magnetic Bead Actuation of Saccular Hair Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, David; Ramunno-Johnson, Damien; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2011-11-01

    When decoupled from the overlying membrane, hair bundles of the amphibian sacculus exhibit spontaneous oscillation. To explore the dynamics of this innate motility without an imposed external load, we recorded their oscillations with a high-speed CMOS camera, and applied mechanical manipulation that minimally alters the geometry of an individual hair bundle. We present a technique that utilizes micron-sized magnetic particles to actuate the stereociliary bundle with a magnetized probe. Quasi-steady-state displacements were imposed on freely oscillating bundles. Our data indicate that deflection of the bundle affects both the frequency and the amplitude of the oscillations, with a crossing of the bifurcation that is dependent on the direction and speed of the applied offset.

  18. Detection of breast cancer cells using targeted magnetic nanoparticles and ultra-sensitive magnetic field sensors.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, Helen J; Butler, Kimberly S; Adolphi, Natalie L; Lovato, Debbie M; Belfon, Robert; Fegan, Danielle; Monson, Todd C; Trujillo, Jason E; Tessier, Trace E; Bryant, Howard C; Huber, Dale L; Larson, Richard S; Flynn, Edward R

    2011-11-03

    Breast cancer detection using mammography has improved clinical outcomes for many women, because mammography can detect very small (5 mm) tumors early in the course of the disease. However, mammography fails to detect 10 - 25% of tumors, and the results do not distinguish benign and malignant tumors. Reducing the false positive rate, even by a modest 10%, while improving the sensitivity, will lead to improved screening, and is a desirable and attainable goal. The emerging application of magnetic relaxometry, in particular using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors, is fast and potentially more specific than mammography because it is designed to detect tumor-targeted iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, magnetic relaxometry is theoretically more specific than MRI detection, because only target-bound nanoparticles are detected. Our group is developing antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles targeted to breast cancer cells that can be detected using magnetic relaxometry. To accomplish this, we identified a series of breast cancer cell lines expressing varying levels of the plasma membrane-expressed human epidermal growth factor-like receptor 2 (Her2) by flow cytometry. Anti-Her2 antibody was then conjugated to superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles using the carbodiimide method. Labeled nanoparticles were incubated with breast cancer cell lines and visualized by confocal microscopy, Prussian blue histochemistry, and magnetic relaxometry. We demonstrated a time- and antigen concentration-dependent increase in the number of antibody-conjugated nanoparticles bound to cells. Next, anti Her2-conjugated nanoparticles injected into highly Her2-expressing tumor xenograft explants yielded a significantly higher SQUID relaxometry signal relative to unconjugated nanoparticles. Finally, labeled cells introduced into breast phantoms were measured by magnetic relaxometry, and as few as 1 million labeled cells were detected at a distance of 4

  19. Detection of breast cancer cells using targeted magnetic nanoparticles and ultra-sensitive magnetic field sensors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer detection using mammography has improved clinical outcomes for many women, because mammography can detect very small (5 mm) tumors early in the course of the disease. However, mammography fails to detect 10 - 25% of tumors, and the results do not distinguish benign and malignant tumors. Reducing the false positive rate, even by a modest 10%, while improving the sensitivity, will lead to improved screening, and is a desirable and attainable goal. The emerging application of magnetic relaxometry, in particular using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors, is fast and potentially more specific than mammography because it is designed to detect tumor-targeted iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, magnetic relaxometry is theoretically more specific than MRI detection, because only target-bound nanoparticles are detected. Our group is developing antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles targeted to breast cancer cells that can be detected using magnetic relaxometry. Methods To accomplish this, we identified a series of breast cancer cell lines expressing varying levels of the plasma membrane-expressed human epidermal growth factor-like receptor 2 (Her2) by flow cytometry. Anti-Her2 antibody was then conjugated to superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles using the carbodiimide method. Labeled nanoparticles were incubated with breast cancer cell lines and visualized by confocal microscopy, Prussian blue histochemistry, and magnetic relaxometry. Results We demonstrated a time- and antigen concentration-dependent increase in the number of antibody-conjugated nanoparticles bound to cells. Next, anti Her2-conjugated nanoparticles injected into highly Her2-expressing tumor xenograft explants yielded a significantly higher SQUID relaxometry signal relative to unconjugated nanoparticles. Finally, labeled cells introduced into breast phantoms were measured by magnetic relaxometry, and as few as 1 million labeled cells

  20. Magnetic particle motions within living cells. Physical theory and techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Valberg, P A; Butler, J P

    1987-01-01

    Body tissues are not ferromagnetic, but ferromagnetic particles can be present as contaminants or as probes in the lungs and in other organs. The magnetic domains of these particles can be aligned by momentary application of an external magnetic field; the magnitude and time course of the resultant remanent field depend on the quantity of magnetic material and the degree of particle motion. The interpretation of magnetometric data requires an understanding of particle magnetization, agglomeration, random motion, and both rotation and translation in response to magnetic fields. We present physical principles relevant to magnetometry and suggest models for intracellular particle motion driven by thermal, elastic, or cellular forces. The design principles of instrumentation for magnetizing intracellular particles and for detecting weak remanent magnetic fields are described. Such magnetic measurements can be used for noninvasive studies of particle clearance from the body or of particle motion within body tissues and cells. Assumptions inherent to this experimental approach and possible sources of artifact are considered and evaluated. PMID:3676435

  1. Microfabricated atomic vapor cell arrays for magnetic field measurements.

    PubMed

    Woetzel, S; Schultze, V; Ijsselsteijn, R; Schulz, T; Anders, S; Stolz, R; Meyer, H-G

    2011-03-01

    We describe a method for charging atomic vapor cells with cesium and buffer gas. By this, it is possible to adjust the buffer gas pressure in the cells with good accuracy. Furthermore, we present a new design of microfabricated vapor cell arrays, which combine silicon wafer based microfabrication and ultrasonic machining to achieve the arrays of thermally separated cells with 50 mm(3) volume. With cells fabricated in the outlined way, intrinsic magnetic field sensitivities down to 300 fT∕Hz(1∕2) are reached.

  2. Vascular Repair by Circumferential Cell Therapy Using Magnetic Nanoparticles and Tailored Magnets.

    PubMed

    Vosen, Sarah; Rieck, Sarah; Heidsieck, Alexandra; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Zimmermann, Katrin; Bloch, Wilhelm; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Plank, Christian; Gleich, Bernhard; Pfeifer, Alexander; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Wenzel, Daniela

    2016-01-26

    Cardiovascular disease is often caused by endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction and atherosclerotic plaque formation at predilection sites. Also surgical procedures of plaque removal cause irreversible damage to the EC layer, inducing impairment of vascular function and restenosis. In the current study we have examined a potentially curative approach by radially symmetric re-endothelialization of vessels after their mechanical denudation. For this purpose a combination of nanotechnology with gene and cell therapy was applied to site-specifically re-endothelialize and restore vascular function. We have used complexes of lentiviral vectors and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to overexpress the vasoprotective gene endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in ECs. The MNP-loaded and eNOS-overexpressing cells were magnetic, and by magnetic fields they could be positioned at the vascular wall in a radially symmetric fashion even under flow conditions. We demonstrate that the treated vessels displayed enhanced eNOS expression and activity. Moreover, isometric force measurements revealed that EC replacement with eNOS-overexpressing cells restored endothelial function after vascular injury in eNOS(-/-) mice ex and in vivo. Thus, the combination of MNP-based gene and cell therapy with custom-made magnetic fields enables circumferential re-endothelialization of vessels and improvement of vascular function.

  3. Simulation of magnetic field effect on a seed embryo cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socorro, A.; García, F.

    2012-04-01

    The plant seed embryo tissue cell, including the cell membrane and the intracellular and extracellular regions, was modelled as a spherical body. Equations for the three components in spherical coordinates were developed to calculate potassiumions flux in the presence of a stationary magnetic field. Simultaneous mathematical simulations of radial flux for potassium, calcium and chloride ions as well as membrane potential and osmotic pressure were calculated. Results obtained by computerized simulation showed that a magnetic field of 200 mT provoked some changes in cellular ionic concentration with respect to exposure time during first 30 s, which also impacted on the membrane potential and osmotic pressure values.

  4. On-chip Magnetic Separation and Cell Encapsulation in Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A.; Byvank, T.; Bharde, A.; Miller, B. L.; Chalmers, J. J.; Sooryakumar, R.; Chang, W.-J.; Bashir, R.

    2012-02-01

    The demand for high-throughput single cell assays is gaining importance because of the heterogeneity of many cell suspensions, even after significant initial sorting. These suspensions may display cell-to-cell variability at the gene expression level that could impact single cell functional genomics, cancer, stem-cell research and drug screening. The on-chip monitoring of individual cells in an isolated environment could prevent cross-contamination, provide high recovery yield and ability to study biological traits at a single cell level These advantages of on-chip biological experiments contrast to conventional methods, which require bulk samples that provide only averaged information on cell metabolism. We report on a device that integrates microfluidic technology with a magnetic tweezers array to combine the functionality of separation and encapsulation of objects such as immunomagnetically labeled cells or magnetic beads into pico-liter droplets on the same chip. The ability to control the separation throughput that is independent of the hydrodynamic droplet generation rate allows the encapsulation efficiency to be optimized. The device can potentially be integrated with on-chip labeling and/or bio-detection to become a powerful single-cell analysis device.

  5. Tracking immune cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Eric T.; Bulte, Jeff W. M.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing complexity of in vivo imaging technologies, coupled with the development of cell therapies, has fuelled a revolution in immune cell tracking in vivo. Powerful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods are now being developed that use iron oxide- and 19F-based probes. These MRI technologies can be used for image-guided immune cell delivery and for the visualization of immune cell homing and engraftment, inflammation, cell physiology and gene expression. MRI-based cell tracking is now also being applied to evaluate therapeutics that modulate endogenous immune cell recruitment and to monitor emerging cellular immunotherapies. These recent uses show that MRI has the potential to be developed in many applications to follow the fate of immune cells in vivo. PMID:24013185

  6. Tracking immune cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Eric T; Bulte, Jeff W M

    2013-10-01

    The increasing complexity of in vivo imaging technologies, coupled with the development of cell therapies, has fuelled a revolution in immune cell tracking in vivo. Powerful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods are now being developed that use iron oxide- and ¹⁹F-based probes. These MRI technologies can be used for image-guided immune cell delivery and for the visualization of immune cell homing and engraftment, inflammation, cell physiology and gene expression. MRI-based cell tracking is now also being applied to evaluate therapeutics that modulate endogenous immune cell recruitment and to monitor emerging cellular immunotherapies. These recent uses show that MRI has the potential to be developed in many applications to follow the fate of immune cells in vivo.

  7. Bubble cell for magnetic bead trapping in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Gassner, Anne-Laure; Proczek, Gaëlle; Girault, Hubert H

    2011-12-01

    A bubble cell capillary classically used to extend the optical path length for UV-vis detection is employed here to trap magnetic beads. With this system, a large amount of beads can be captured without inducing a strong pressure drop, as it is the case with magnetic beads trapped in a standard capillary, thereby having less effect on the experimental conditions. Using numerical simulations and microscopic visualizations, the capture of beads inside a bubble cell was investigated with two magnet configurations. Pressure-driven and electro-osmotic flow velocities were measured for different amounts of protein-A-coated beads or C18-functionalized beads (RPC-18). Solid-phase extraction of a model antibody on protein-A beads and preconcentration of fluorescein on RPC-18 beads were performed as proof of concept experiments.

  8. Recent patents and advances on applications of magnetic nanoparticles and thin films in cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Eslamian, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    Cell manipulation is instrumental in most biological applications. One of the most promising methods in handling cells and other biological particles is the magnetic manipulation technique. In this technique, magnetic nanoparticles are employed to magnetize cells. Such cells then can be manipulated, sorted, or separated by applying an external magnetic field. In this work, first recent works and patents on the synthesis methods used for producing magnetic nanoparticles are investigated. These methods include co-precipitation, solvothermal, electrical wire explosion, microemulsion, laser pyrolysis, spray pyrolysis and carbon reduction. Then recent patents and articles on surface modification and functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles using polymers, dithiocarbamate, superparamagnetic shells, antibodies, graphene shells, and fluorescent materials are reviewed. Finally, different techniques on magnetic cell manipulation, such as direct attaching of magnetic particles to cells, employing intercellular markers or extra support molecules, as well as magnetic thin films, microfluidic channels and magnetic beads, are studied.

  9. Quantum dots incorporated magnetic nanoparticles for imaging colon carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Engineered multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) have made a tremendous impact on the biomedical sciences, with advances in imaging, sensing and bioseparation. In particular, the combination of optical and magnetic responses through a single particle system allows us to serve as novel multimodal molecular imaging contrast agents in clinical settings. Despite of essential medical imaging modalities and of significant clinical application, only few nanocomposites have been developed with dual imaging contrast. A new method for preparing quantum dots (QDs) incorporated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) based on layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly techniques have developed and used for cancer cells imaging. Methods Here, citrate - capped negatively charged Fe3O4 NPs were prepared and coated with positively - charged hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). Then, thiol - capped negatively charged CdTe QDs were electrostatically bound with CTAB. Morphological, optical and magnetic properties of the fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) were characterized. Prepared FMNPs were additionally conjugated with hCC49 antibodies fragment antigen binding (Fab) having binding affinity to sialylated sugar chain of TAG-72 region of LS174T cancer cells, which was prepared silkworm expression system, and then were used for imaging colon carcinoma cells. Results The prepared nanocomposites were magnetically responsive and fluorescent, simultaneously that are useful for efficient cellular imaging, optical sensing and magnetic separation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that the particle size is around 50 nm in diameter with inner magnetic core and outer CdTe QDs core-shell structure. Cytotoxicity test of prepared FMNPs indicates high viability in Vero cells. NPs conjugated with anti cancer antibodies were successfully labeled on colon carcinoma cells (LS174) in vitro and showed significant specificity to target cells

  10. Biosorption of water-soluble dyes on magnetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae subsp. uvarum cells.

    PubMed

    Safaríková, M; Ptácková, L; Kibriková, I; Safarík, I

    2005-05-01

    Brewer's yeast (bottom yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae subsp. uvarum) cells were magnetically modified using water based magnetic fluid stabilized with perchloric acid. Magnetically modified yeast cells efficiently adsorbed various water soluble dyes. The dyes adsorption can be described by the Langmuir adsorption model. The maximum adsorption capacity of the magnetic cells differed substantially for individual dyes; the highest value was found for aniline blue (approx. 220 mg per g of dried magnetic adsorbent).

  11. Biofunctionalized magnetic vortex microdisks for targeted cancer cell destruction.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.-H.; Rozhkova, E. A.; Ulasov, I. V.; Bader, S. D.; Rajh, T.; Lesniak, M. S.; Novosad, V.; Univ. of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine

    2010-01-01

    Nanomagnetic materials offer exciting avenues for probing cell mechanics and activating mechanosensitive ion channels, as well as for advancing cancer therapies. Most experimental works so far have used superparamagnetic materials. This report describes a first approach based on interfacing cells with lithographically defined microdiscs that possess a spin-vortex ground state. When an alternating magnetic field is applied the microdisc vortices shift, creating an oscillation, which transmits a mechanical force to the cell. Because reduced sensitivity of cancer cells toward apoptosis leads to inappropriate cell survival and malignant progression, selective induction of apoptosis is of great importance for the anticancer therapeutic strategies. We show that the spin-vortex-mediated stimulus creates two dramatic effects: compromised integrity of the cellular membrane, and initiation of programmed cell death. A low-frequency field of a few tens of hertz applied for only ten minutes was sufficient to achieve {approx}90% cancer-cell destruction in vitro.

  12. Magnetic hyperthermia enhances cell toxicity with respect to exogenous heating.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Beatriz; Calatayud, M Pilar; Torres, Teobaldo E; Fanarraga, Mónica L; Ibarra, M Ricardo; Goya, Gerardo F

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic hyperthermia is a new type of cancer treatment designed for overcoming resistance to chemotherapy during the treatment of solid, inaccessible human tumors. The main challenge of this technology is increasing the local tumoral temperature with minimal side effects on the surrounding healthy tissue. This work consists of an in vitro study that compared the effect of hyperthermia in response to the application of exogenous heating (EHT) sources with the corresponding effect produced by magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) at the same target temperatures. Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were loaded with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and packed into dense pellets to generate an environment that is crudely similar to that expected in solid micro-tumors, and the above-mentioned protocols were applied to these cells. These experiments showed that for the same target temperatures, MHT induces a decrease in cell viability that is larger than the corresponding EHT, up to a maximum difference of approximately 45% at T = 46 °C. An analysis of the data in terms of temperature efficiency demonstrated that MHT requires an average temperature that is 6 °C lower than that required with EHT to produce a similar cytotoxic effect. An analysis of electron microscopy images of the cells after the EHT and MHT treatments indicated that the enhanced effectiveness observed with MHT is associated with local cell destruction triggered by the magnetic nano-heaters. The present study is an essential step toward the development of innovative adjuvant anti-cancer therapies based on local hyperthermia treatments using magnetic particles as nano-heaters.

  13. Cell culture dosimetry for low-frequency magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, F.X.

    1996-04-01

    Calculations of the current density and electric field distributions induced in cell cultures by an applied low-frequency magnetic field have assumed that the medium is uniform. This paper calculates these distributions for a more realistic, inhomogeneous, anisotropic model in which the cells are regarded as conducting squares surrounded by insulating membranes. Separate parameters are used to specify the resistivities of the cell interior, the cell membrane parallel to its surface, the cell membrane perpendicular to its surface, and the intercellular junction parallel to the membrane. The presence of gap junctions connecting the interiors of adjacent cells is also considered. For vertical applied magnetic fields, the induced currents and field distributions may deviate considerably from the homogeneous medium model if there is sufficient tight binding of the cells to each other. The presence of gap junctions can produce relatively large transmembrane electric fields or intracellular current densities. These considerations are generally less important for horizontal applied fields. A simple microscopic model of the cell surface is also discussed.

  14. Local viscoelasticity of living cells measured by rotational magnetic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Berret, J-F

    2016-01-05

    When submitted to a magnetic field, micron-size wires with superparamagnetic properties behave as embedded rheometers and represent interesting sensors for microrheology. Here we use rotational magnetic spectroscopy to measure the shear viscosity of the cytoplasm of living cells. We address the question of whether the cytoplasm is a viscoelastic liquid or an elastic gel. The main result of the study is the observation of a rotational instability between a synchronous and an asynchronous regime of rotation, found for murine fibroblasts and human cancer cells. For wires of susceptibility 3.6, the transition occurs in the range 0.01-1 rad s(-1). The determination of the shear viscosity (10-100 Pa s) and elastic modulus (5-20 Pa) confirms the viscoelastic character of the cytoplasm. In contrast to earlier studies, it is concluded that the interior of living cells can be described as a viscoelastic liquid, and not as an elastic gel.

  15. Dipolar Rings of Microscopic Ellipsoids: Magnetic Manipulation and Cell Entrapment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Pedrero, Fernando; Cebers, Andrejs; Tierno, Pietro

    2016-09-01

    We study the formation and the dynamics of dipolar rings composed by microscopic ferromagnetic ellipsoids, which self-assemble in water by switching the direction of the applied field. We show how to manipulate these fragile structures and control their shape via the application of external static and oscillating magnetic fields. We introduce a theoretical framework which describes the ring deformation under an applied field, allowing us to understand the underlying physical mechanism. Our microscopic rings are finally used to capture, entrap, and later release a biological cell via a magnetic command, i.e., performing a simple operation which can be implemented in other microfluidic devices which make use of ferromagnetic particles.

  16. Advances in magnetic tweezers for single molecule and cell biophysics.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, Devrim; Lee, Gil U

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers (MTW) enable highly accurate forces to be transduced to molecules to study mechanotransduction at the molecular or cellular level. We review recent MTW studies in single molecule and cell biophysics that demonstrate the flexibility of this technique. We also discuss technical advances in the method on several fronts, i.e., from novel approaches for the measurement of torque to multiplexed biophysical assays. Finally, we describe multi-component nanorods with enhanced optical and magnetic properties and discuss their potential as future MTW probes.

  17. Morphological effect of oscillating magnetic nanoparticles in killing tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Dengfeng; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Guoxin; Shi, Hongcheng

    2014-04-01

    Forced oscillation of spherical and rod-shaped iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) via low-power and low-frequency alternating magnetic field (AMF) was firstly used to kill cancer cells in vitro. After being loaded by human cervical cancer cells line (HeLa) and then exposed to a 35-kHz AMF, MNPs mechanically damaged cell membranes and cytoplasm, decreasing the cell viability. It was found that the concentration and morphology of the MNPs significantly influenced the cell-killing efficiency of oscillating MNPs. In this preliminary study, when HeLa cells were pre-incubated with 100 μg/mL rod-shaped MNPs (rMNP, length of 200 ± 50 nm and diameter of 50 to 120 nm) for 20 h, MTT assay proved that the cell viability decreased by 30.9% after being exposed to AMF for 2 h, while the cell viability decreased by 11.7% if spherical MNPs (sMNP, diameter of 200 ± 50 nm) were used for investigation. Furthermore, the morphological effect of MNPs on cell viability was confirmed by trypan blue assay: 39.5% rMNP-loaded cells and 15.1% sMNP-loaded cells were stained after being exposed to AMF for 2 h. It was also interesting to find that killing tumor cells at either higher (500 μg/mL) or lower (20 μg/mL) concentration of MNPs was less efficient than that achieved at 100 μg/mL concentration. In conclusion, the relatively asymmetric morphological rod-shaped MNPs can kill cancer cells more effectively than spherical MNPs when being exposed to AMF by virtue of their mechanical oscillations.

  18. Boundaries in gravitational and magnetic activation of cells for sorting.

    PubMed

    Czerlinski, G H

    1991-06-01

    Standard deviations in the distribution of radii of cells and particles are considered to arrive at realistic limits in the use of gravitational and magnetic activation of cells for sorting. Using a specific fractionation design, it is shown that the radius of particles (or cells) may be fractionated down to a precision of +/- 0.76%. Although higher precisions could be obtained with other designs, the number of particles available per fraction is inversely proportional to the precision desired. Thus, one would prefer to keep the precision as moderate as permissible by the experiments.

  19. Trichoderma sp. Spores and Kluyveromyces marxianus Cells Magnetic Separation: Immobilization on Chitosan-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Ponce, Sócrates; Ramos-González, Rodolfo; Ruiz, Héctor A; Aguilar, Miguel A; Martínez-Hernández, José L; Segura-Ceniceros, Elda P; Aguilar, Cristóbal N; Michelena, Georgina; Ilyina, Anna

    2016-12-29

    In the present study, the interactions between chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles (C-MNP) and Trichoderma sp. spores as well as Kluyveromyces marxianus cells were studied. By means of Plackett-Burman design, it was demonstrated that factors which directly influenced on yeast cells immobilization and magnetic separation were: inoculum and C-MNP quantity, stirring speed, interaction time, and volume of medium, while in the case of fungal spores, the temperature also was disclosed as an influencing factor. Langmuir and Freundlich models were applied for the mathematical analysis of adsorption isotherms at 30 °C. For Trichoderma sp. spores adsorption isotherm, the highest correlation coefficient was observed for lineal function of Langmuir model with a maximum adsorption capacity at 5.00E+09 spores (C-MNP g(-1)). Adsorption isotherm of K. marxianus cells was better adjusted to Freundlich model with a constant (Kf) estimated as 2.05E+08 cells (C-MNP g(-1)). Both systems may have a novel application in fermentation processes assisted with magnetic separation of biomass.

  20. Magnetic levitating polymeric nano/microparticular substrates for three-dimensional tumor cell culture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woong Ryeol; Oh, Kyung Taek; Park, So Young; Yoo, Na Young; Ahn, Yong Sik; Lee, Don Haeng; Youn, Yu Seok; Lee, Deok-Keun; Cha, Kyung-Hoi; Lee, Eun Seong

    2011-07-01

    Herein, we describe magnetic cell levitation models using conventional polymeric microparticles or nanoparticles as a substrate for the three-dimensional tumor cell culture. When the magnetic force originating from the ring-shaped magnets overcame the gravitational force, the magnetic field-levitated KB tumor cells adhered to the surface area of magnetic iron oxide (Fe(3)O(4))-encapsulated nano/microparticles and concentrated clusters of levitated cells, ultimately developing tumor cells to tumor spheroids. These simple cell culture models may prove useful for the screening of anticancer drugs and their formulations.

  1. Thermal therapy with magnetic nanoparticles for cell destruction

    PubMed Central

    Vegerhof, Adi; Motei, Menachem; Rudinzky, Arkady; Malka, Dror; Popovtzer, Rachela; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2016-01-01

    In this article we suggest a new concept for cell destruction based upon manipulating magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) by applying external, low frequency alternating magnetic field (AMF) that oscillates the particles, together with focused laser illumination. Assessment of temperature profiles in a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma sample showed that cells with MNPs, treated with AMF (3 Hz, 300 mW) and laser irradiation (30 mW), reached 42°C after 4.5 min, as opposed to cells treated with laser but without AMF. Moreover, a theoretical model was developed to assess the overall theoretical temperature rise, which was shown to be 50% lower than the experimental temperature. Furthermore, we found that the combination of laser irradiation and AMF decreased the number of live cells by ~50%. Thus, the concentrated assembly of laser heating with AMF-induced MNP oscillations leads to more rapid and efficient cell death. These results suggest that the manipulated MNP technique can serve as a superior agent for PTT, with improved cell death capabilities. PMID:27895997

  2. In vitro cytotoxicity of Selol-loaded magnetic nanocapsules against neoplastic cell lines under AC magnetic field activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falqueiro, A. M.; Siqueira-Moura, M. P.; Jardim, D. R.; Primo, F. L.; Morais, P. C.; Mosiniewicz-Szablewska, E.; Suchocki, P.; Tedesco, A. C.

    2012-04-01

    The goals of this study are to evaluate invitro compatibility of magnetic nanomaterials and their therapeutic potential against cancer cells. Highly stable ionic magnetic fluid sample (maghemite, γ-Fe2O3) and Selol were incorporated into polymeric nanocapsules by nanoprecipitation method. The cytotoxic effect of Selol-loaded magnetic nanocapsules was assessed on murine melanoma (B16-F10) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines following AC magnetic field application. The influence of different nanocapsules on cell viability was investigated by colorimetric MTT 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. In the absence of AC magnetic field Selol-loaded magnetic nanocapsules, containing 100 µg/mL Selol plus 5 × 1012 particle/mL, showed antitumoral activity of about 50% on B16-F10 melanoma cells while OSCC carcinoma cells demonstrated drug resistance at all concentrations of Selol and magnetic fluid (range of 100-500 µg/mL Selol and 5 × 1012-2.5 × 1013 particle/mL). On the other hand, under AC applied fields (1 MHz and 40 Oe amplitude) B16-F10 cell viability was reduced down to 40.5% (±3.33) at the highest concentration of nanoencapsulated Selol. The major effect, however, was observed on OSCC cells since the cell viability drops down to about 33.3% (±0.38) under application of AC magnetic field. These findings clearly indicate that the Selol-loaded magnetic nanocapsules present different toxic effects on neoplastic cell lines. Further, the cytotoxic effect was maximized under AC magnetic field application on OSCC, which emphasizes the effectiveness of the magnetohyperthermia approach.

  3. Photothermal therapy of cancer cells using magnetic carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardarajan, V.; Gu, L.; Kanneganti, A.; Mohanty, S. K.; Koymen, A. R.

    2011-03-01

    Photothermal therapy offers a solution for the destruction of cancer cells without significant collateral damage to otherwise healthy cells. Several attempts are underway in using carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) and nanotubes due to their excellent absorption properties in the near-infrared spectrum of biological window. However, minimizing the required number of injected nanoparticles, to ensure minimal cytotoxicity, is a major challenge. We report on the introduction of magnetic carbon nanoparticles (MCNPs) onto cancer cells, localizing them in a desired region by applying an external magnetic field and irradiating them with a near-infrared laser beam. The MCNPs were prepared in Benzene, using an electric plasma discharge, generated in the cavitation field of an ultrasonic horn. The CNPs were made ferromagnetic by use of Fe-electrodes to dope the CNPs, as confirmed by magnetometry. Transmission electron microscopy measurements showed the size distribution of these MCNPs to be in the range of 5-10 nm. For photothermal irradiation, a tunable continuous wave Ti: Sapphire laser beam was weakly focused on to the cell monolayer under an inverted fluorescence microscope. The response of different cell types to photothermal irradiation was investigated. Cell death in the presence of both MCNPs and laser beam was confirmed by morphological changes and propidium iodide fluorescence inclusion assay. The results of our study suggest that MCNP based photothermal therapy is a promising approach to remotely guide photothermal therapy.

  4. Magnetic and fluorescence-encoded polystyrene microparticles for cell separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradbury, Diana; Anglin, Emily J.; Bailey, Sheree; Macardle, Peter J.; Fenech, Michael; Thissen, Helmut; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2008-12-01

    Materials assisting with the efforts of cell isolation are attractive for numerous biomedical applications including tissue engineering and cell therapy. Here, we have developed surface modification methods on microparticles for the purposes of advanced cell separation. Iron oxide nanoparticles were incorporated into 200 ım polystyrene microparticles for separation of particle-bound cells from non-bound cells in suspension by means of a permanent magnet. The polystyrene microparticles were further encoded with fluorescent quantum dots (QD) as identification tags to distinguish between specific microparticles in a mixture. Cluster of differentiation (CD) antibodies were displayed on the surface of the microparticles through direct adsorption and various methods of covalent attachment. In addition, a protein A coating was used to orientate the antibodies on the microparticle surface and to maximise accessibility of the antigen-binding sites. Microparticles which carried CD antibodies via covalent attachment showed greater cell attachment over those modifications that were only adsorbed to the surface through weak electrostatic interactions. Greatest extent of cell attachment was observed on microparticles modified with protein A - CD antibody conjugates. B and T lymphocytes were successfully isolated from a mixed population using two types of microparticles displaying B and T cell specific CD antibodies, respectively. Our approach will find application in preparative cell separation from tissue isolates and for microcarrier-based cell expansion.

  5. Chapter 16: Magnetic manipulation for force measurements in cell biology.

    PubMed

    Tim O'Brien, E; Cribb, Jeremy; Marshburn, David; Taylor, Russell M; Superfine, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Life is a mechanical process. Cells, tissues, and bodies must act within their environments to grow, divide, move, communicate, and defend themselves. The stiffness and viscosity of cells and biologic materials will vary depending upon a wide variety of variables including for example environmental conditions, activation of signaling pathways, stage of development, gene expression. By pushing and pulling cells or materials such as mucus or extracellular matrix, one can learn about their mechanical properties. By varying the conditions, signaling pathways or genetic background, one can also assess how the response of the cell or material is modulated by that pathway. Magnetic particles are available commercially in many useful sizes, magnetic contents, and surface chemistries. The variety of surface chemistries allow forces to be applied to a specimen through specific linkages such as receptors or particular proteins, allowing the biologist to ask fundamental questions about the role of those linkages in the transduction of force or motion. In this chapter, we discuss the use of a magnetic system designed to apply a wide range of forces and force patterns fully integrated into a high numerical aperture inverted fluorescence microscope. Fine, thin and flat magnetic poles allow the use of high magnification microscope objectives, and flexible software to control the direction and pattern of applied forces supports a variety of experimental situations. The system can be coupled with simple video acquisition for medium-bandwidth, two-dimensional particle tracking. Alternatively, the system can be coupled with a laser tracking and position feedback system for higher resolution, high bandwidth, three-dimensional tracking.

  6. In vivo quantification of magnetically labelled cells by MRI relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Ulysse; Lajous, Hélène; El Atifi, Michèle; Bidart, Marie; Auboiroux, Vincent; Fries, Pascal Henry; Berger, François; Lahrech, Hana

    2016-11-01

    Cellular MRI, which visualizes magnetically labelled cells (cells*), is an active research field for in vivo cell therapy and tracking. The simultaneous relaxation rate measurements (R2 *, R2 , R1 ) are the basis of a quantitative cellular MRI method proposed here. U937 cells were labelled with Molday ION Rhodamine B, a bi-functional superparamagnetic and fluorescent nanoparticle (U937*). U937* viability and proliferation were not affected in vitro. In vitro relaxometry was performed in a cell concentration range of [2.5 × 10(4) -10(8) ] cells/mL. These measurements show the existence of complementary cell concentration intervals where these rates vary linearly. The juxtaposition of these intervals delineates a wide cell concentration range over which one of the relaxation rates in a voxel of an in vivo image can be converted into an absolute cell concentration. The linear regime was found at high concentrations for R1 in the range of [10(6) - 2 × 10(8) ] cells/mL, at intermediate concentrations for R2 in [2.5 × 10(5) - 5 × 10(7) ] cells/mL and at low concentrations for R2 * in [8 × 10(4) - 5 × 10(6) ] cells/mL. In vivo relaxometry was performed in a longitudinal study, with labelled U937 cells injected into a U87 glioma mouse model. Using in vitro data, maps of in vivo U937* concentrations were obtained by converting one of the in vivo relaxation rates to cell concentration maps. MRI results were compared with the corresponding optical images of the same brains, showing the usefulness of our method to accurately follow therapeutic cell biodistribution in a longitudinal study. Results also demonstrate that the method quantifies a large range of magnetically labelled cells*. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Microrheology of cells with magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rebêlo, L M; de Sousa, J S; Mendes Filho, J; Schäpe, J; Doschke, H; Radmacher, M

    2014-04-07

    We propose a magnetic force modulation method to measure the stiffness and viscosity of living cells using a modified AFM apparatus. An oscillating magnetic field makes a magnetic cantilever oscillate in contact with the sample, producing a small AC indentation. By comparing the amplitude of the free cantilever motion (A0) with the motion of the cantilever in contact with the sample (A1), we determine the sample stiffness and viscosity. To test the method, the frequency-dependent stiffness of 3T3 fibroblasts was determined as a power law k(s)(f) = α + β(f/f¯)(γ) (α = 7.6 × 10(-4) N m(-1), β = 1.0 × 10(-4) N m(-1), f¯ = 1 Hz, γ = 0.6), where the coefficient γ = 0.6 is in good agreement with rheological data of actin solutions with concentrations similar to those in cells. The method also allows estimation of the internal friction of the cells. In particular we found an average damping coefficient of 75.1 μN s m(-1) for indentation depths ranging between 1.0 μm and 2.0 μm.

  8. 3He spin exchange cells for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, R. E.; Morgan, S. W.; Saam, B.

    2002-08-01

    We present a protocol for the consistent fabrication of glass cells to provide hyperpolarized (HP) 3He for pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging. The method for producing HP 3He is spin-exchange optical pumping. The valved cells must hold of order 1 atm[middle dot]L of gas at up to 15 atm pressure. Because characteristic spin-exchange times are several hours, the longitudinal nuclear relaxation time T1 for 3He must be several tens of hours and robust with respect to repeated refilling and repolarization. Collisions with the cell wall are a significant and often dominant cause of relaxation. Consistent control of wall relaxation through cell fabrication procedures has historically proven difficult. With the help of the discovery of an important mechanism for wall relaxation that involves magnetic surface sites in the glass, and with the further confirmation of the importance of Rb metal to long wall-relaxation times, we have developed a successful protocol for fabrication of 3He spin exchange cells from inexpensive and easily worked borosilicate (Pyrex) glass. The cells are prepared under vacuum using a high-vacuum oil-free turbomolecular pumping station, and they are sealed off under vacuum after [greater-than-or-equal, slanted]100 mg of distilled Rb metal is driven in. Filling of cells with the requisite 3He-N2 mixture is done on an entirely separate gas-handling system. Our cells can be refilled and the gas repolarized indefinitely with no significant change in their wall properties. Relaxation data are presented for about 30 cells; the majority of these reach a "40/40" benchmark: T1>40 h, and 3He polarizations reach or exceed 40%. Typical polarization times range from 12 to 20 h; 20% polarization can be achieved in 3-5 h.

  9. Zero loss magnetic metamaterials using powered active unit cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yu; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2009-08-31

    We report the design and experimental measurement of a powered active magnetic metamaterial with tunable permeability. The unit cell is based on the combination of an embedded radiofrequency amplifier and a tunable phase shifter, which together control the response of the medium. The measurements show that a negative permeability metamaterial with zero loss or even gain can be achieved through an array of such metamaterial cells. This kind of active metamaterial can find use in applications that are performance limited due to material losses.

  10. Establishment and implications of a characterization method for magnetic nanoparticle using cell tracking velocimetry and magnetic susceptibility modified solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huading; Moore, Lee R; Zborowski, Maciej; Williams, P Stephen; Margel, Shlomo; Chalmers, Jeffrey J

    2005-04-01

    Magnetic micro and nanoparticles conjugated to affinity labels have become a significant, commercial reagent. It has been demonstrated that the performance of cell separation systems using magnetic labels is a function of the magnitude of the magnetic force that can be generated through labeling. This magnetic force is proportional to the number of magnetic particles bound to the cell, the magnetic energy gradient, and the particle-field interaction parameter. This particle-field interaction parameter, which is the product of the relative volumetric, magnetic susceptibility and the volume of the micro or nanoparticle, is a fundamental parameter which can be used to characterize the magnetic particles. An experimental technique is presented which measures the volumetric magnetic susceptibility of particles through the use of susceptibility modified solutions and an experimental instrument, Cell Tracking Velocimetry, CTV. Experimental studies were conducted on polystyrene microspheres alone and those bound to four different magnetic nanoparticles. The experimentally determined values of the magnetic susceptibility of the polystyrene microspheres are consistent with values found from literature. Consequently, magnetic susceptibility measurements of these polystyrene microspheres bound with the magnetic nanoparticles combined with particle size measurements using commercial dynamic light scattering instrument allowed estimates of the particle-field interaction parameter to be made for four commercial, magnetic nanoparticles. The value found for MACS beads is close to what is reported from an independent study. The values for MACS beads and Imag beads are found to agree with what is observed from experiments. Finally, an experimental demonstration of the impact that differences in this field interaction parameter has on the labeling of human lymphocytes is presented.

  11. Magnetic field enhancement of organic photovoltaic cells performance.

    PubMed

    Oviedo-Casado, S; Urbina, A; Prior, J

    2017-06-27

    Charge separation is a critical process for achieving high efficiencies in organic photovoltaic cells. The initial tightly bound excitonic electron-hole pair has to dissociate fast enough in order to avoid photocurrent generation and thus power conversion efficiency loss via geminate recombination. Such process takes place assisted by transitional states that lie between the initial exciton and the free charge state. Due to spin conservation rules these intermediate charge transfer states typically have singlet character. Here we propose a donor-acceptor model for a generic organic photovoltaic cell in which the process of charge separation is modulated by a magnetic field which tunes the energy levels. The impact of a magnetic field is to intensify the generation of charge transfer states with triplet character via inter-system crossing. As the ground state of the system has singlet character, triplet states are recombination-protected, thus leading to a higher probability of successful charge separation. Using the open quantum systems formalism we demonstrate that the population of triplet charge transfer states grows in the presence of a magnetic field, and discuss the impact on carrier population and hence photocurrent, highlighting its potential as a tool for research on charge transfer kinetics in this complex systems.

  12. Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles for the Detection and Quantitative Analysis of Cell Surface Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Abdolahi, Mohammad; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Sayyed Hamid; Laurent, Sophie; Sermeus, Corine; Gruettner, Cordula

    2013-01-01

    Cell surface antigens as biomarkers offer tremendous potential for early diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic response in a variety of diseases such as cancers. In this research, a simple, rapid, accurate, inexpensive, and easily available in vitro assay based on magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic cell separation principle was applied to identify and quantitatively analyze the cell surface antigen expression in the case of prostate cancer cells. Comparing the capability of the assay with flow cytometry as a gold standard method showed similar results. The results showed that the antigen-specific magnetic cell separation with antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles has high potential for quantitative cell surface antigen detection and analysis. PMID:23484112

  13. Biomedical Applications of Magnetic Nanoparticles: Delivering Genes and Remote Control of Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Jon

    2013-03-01

    The use of magnetic micro- and nanoparticles for biomedical applications was first proposed in the 1920s as a way to measure the rehological properties of the cell's cytoplasm. Since that time, magnetic micro- and nanoparticle synthesis, coating and bio-functionalization have advanced significantly, as have the applications for these particles. Magnetic micro- and nanoparticles are now used in a variety of biomedical techniques such as targeted drug delivery, MRI contrast enhancement, gene transfection, immno-assay and cell sorting. More recently, magnetic micro- and nanoparticles have been used to investigate and manipulate cellular processes both in vitro and in vivo. This talk will focus on magnetic nanoparticle targeting to and actuation of cell surface receptors to control cell signaling cascades to control cell behavior. This technology has applications in disease therapy, cell engineering and regenerative medicine. The use of magnetic nanoparticles and oscillating magnet arrays for enhanced gene delivery will also be discussed.

  14. Multifunctional fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for lung cancer stem cells research.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Chen, Lisha; Wang, Anxin; Ma, Yufei; Zhang, Hailu; Zhu, Yimin

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a multifunctional peptide-fluorescent-magnetic nanocomposites (Fe₃O₄@PEI@Cy5.5@PEG@HCBP-1 NPs) was synthesized via a layer-by-layer approach for potential application to cancer diagnoses. The multifunctional nanocomposites have great dispersibility and homogeneous particle sizes in aqueous solution. Meanwhile, it has perfect hemocompatibility and satisfying cytocompatibility in a relatively high concentration. Data from in vitro cytotoxicity assay indicated that the nanocomposites could recognize the lung cancer stem cells (CSCs) specifically and enrich the HCBP-1 positive CSCs from H460 tumor xenografts effectively. Additionally, the results of in vivo live fluorescent imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed that the nanocomposites could identify lung CSCs in tumor xenografts. These results suggested that the nanocomposites could be used as a potential cancer diagnostic agent through modifying diverse fluorescence dyes and targeting ligands on its surface.

  15. Novel platform for minimizing cell loss on separation process: Droplet-based magnetically activated cell separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngho; Hong, Su; Lee, Sang Ho; Lee, Kangsun; Yun, Seok; Kang, Yuri; Paek, Kyeong-Kap; Ju, Byeong-Kwon; Kim, Byungkyu

    2007-07-01

    To reduce the problem of cell loss due to adhesion, one of the basic phenomena in microchannel, we proposed the droplet-based magnetically activated cell separator (DMACS). Based on the platform of the DMACS—which consists of permanent magnets, a coverslip with a circle-shaped boundary, and an injection tube—we could collect magnetically (CD45)-labeled (positive) cells with high purity and minimize cell loss due to adhesion. To compare separation efficiency between the MACS and the DMACS, the total number of cells before and after separation with both the separators was counted by flow cytometry. We could find that the number (3241/59940) of cells lost in the DMACS is much less than that (22360/59940) in the MACS while the efficiency of cell separation in the DMACS (96.07%) is almost the same as that in the MACS (96.72%). Practically, with fluorescent images, it was visually confirmed that the statistical data are reliable. From the viability test by using Hoechst 33 342, it was also demonstrated that there was no cell damage on a gas-liquid interface. Conclusively, DMACS will be a powerful tool to separate rare cells and applicable as a separator, key component of lab-on-a-chip.

  16. Monitoring the endocytosis of magnetic nanoparticles by cells using permanent micro-flux sources.

    PubMed

    Osman, O; Zanini, L F; Frénéa-Robin, M; Dumas-Bouchiat, F; Dempsey, N M; Reyne, G; Buret, F; Haddour, N

    2012-10-01

    Trapping of cells is essential to perform basic handling operations in cell-based microsystems, such as media exchange, concentration, cell isolation and cell sorting. Cell trapping by magnetophoresis typically requires cell labeling with magnetic nanoparticles. Here we report on endocytotic uptake of 100 nm magnetic nanoparticles by Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells. The attraction of labeled cells by micro-magnet arrays characterised by very high magnetic field gradients (≤10⁶ T/m) was studied as a function of labeling conditions (nanoparticle concentration in the extracellular medium, incubation time). The threshold incubation conditions for effective magnetophoretic trapping were established. This simple technique may be exploited to minimise the quantity of magnetic nanoparticles needed for efficient cell trapping, thus reducing stress or nanoparticle-mediated toxicity. Nanoparticle internalization into cells was confirmed using both confocal and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinxian; Li, Chenglong; Li, Qiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is the result of altered genetic make up due to hereditary encounter and its form as homozygous sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe. The disease is characterized by chronic anemia, recurrent pain crises and vascular occlusion. Neurologically, there is a high incidence of stroke in childhood, as well as cognitive dysfunction. Newborn screening programmes and preventative treatments have allowed a much longer lifespan. However, recently, neurological research has shifted to characterizing more subtle aspects of brain development and functioning that may be critically important to the individual's quality of life. The present review article examines the neurological and neurocognitive complications of sickle cell disease, and discusses the importance of magnetic resonance imaging scans in the management of the disease. PMID:27446243

  18. Individual Mammalian Cell Magnetic Measurements with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmstrom, Johanna C.; Brewer, Kimberly; Tee, Sui Seng; Theis, Eric; Rutt, Brian; Moler, Kathryn A.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetism can be introduced into otherwise nonmagnetic cells by the uptake of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles. SPIO nanoparticles are used in numerous biomedical applications including cellular therapies and targeted drug delivery. Currently there are few tools capable of characterizing individual magnetic nanoparticles and the magnetic properties of individual mammalian cells loaded with SPIO. Our scanning superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are good candidates for these measurements due to their high sensitivity to magnetic dipole moments (approx. 200 μb/ √Hz) In this study, we use a scanning SQUID to image the magnetic flux from SPIO loaded H1299 lung cancer cells. We find that the magnetic moment spatially varies inside the cell with each cell having a unique distribution of moments. We also correlate these magnetic images with optical and scanning electron microscope images. These results show that the SQUID is a useful tool for imaging biological magnetism. The visualization of single cell magnetism and the quantification of magnetic dipole moments in magnetically labeled cells can be used to optimize conventional biological magnetic imaging techniques, such as MRI.

  19. Cell-Based Therapy in TBI: Magnetic Retention of Neural Stem Cells In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei-Bin; Plachez, Céline; Tsymbalyuk, Orest; Tsymbalyuk, Natalya; Xu, Su; Smith, Aaron M; Michel, Sarah L J; Yarnell, Deborah; Mullins, Roger; Gullapalli, Rao P; Puche, Adam; Simard, J Marc; Fishman, Paul S; Yarowsky, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is under active investigation for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Noninvasive stem cell delivery is the preferred method, but retention of stem cells at the site of injury in TBI has proven challenging and impacts effectiveness. To investigate the effects of applying a magnetic field on cell homing and retention, we delivered human neuroprogenitor cells (hNPCs) labeled with a superparamagnetic nanoparticle into post-TBI animals in the presence of a static magnetic field. We have previously devised a method of loading hNPCs with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles Molday ION Rhodamine B (MIRB™). Labeling of hNPCs (MIRB-hNPCs) does not affect hNPC viability, proliferation, or differentiation. The 0.6 tesla (T) permanent magnet was placed ∼4 mm above the injured parietal cortex prior to intracarotid injection of 4 × 10(4) MIRB-hNPCs. Fluorescence imaging, Perls' Prussian blue histochemistry, immunocytochemistry with SC121, a human-specific antibody, and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging ex vivo revealed there was increased homing and retention of MIRB-hNPCs in the injured cortex as compared to the control group in which MIRB-hNPCs were injected in the absence of a static magnetic field. Fluoro-Jade C staining and immunolabeling with specific markers confirmed the viability status of MIRB-hNPCs posttransplantation. These results show that increased homing and retention of MIRB-hNPCs post-TBI by applying a static magnetic field is a promising technique to deliver cells into the CNS for treatment of neurological injuries and neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Local viscoelasticity of living cells measured by rotational magnetic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Berret, J.-F.

    2016-01-01

    When submitted to a magnetic field, micron-size wires with superparamagnetic properties behave as embedded rheometers and represent interesting sensors for microrheology. Here we use rotational magnetic spectroscopy to measure the shear viscosity of the cytoplasm of living cells. We address the question of whether the cytoplasm is a viscoelastic liquid or an elastic gel. The main result of the study is the observation of a rotational instability between a synchronous and an asynchronous regime of rotation, found for murine fibroblasts and human cancer cells. For wires of susceptibility 3.6, the transition occurs in the range 0.01–1 rad s−1. The determination of the shear viscosity (10–100 Pa s) and elastic modulus (5–20 Pa) confirms the viscoelastic character of the cytoplasm. In contrast to earlier studies, it is concluded that the interior of living cells can be described as a viscoelastic liquid, and not as an elastic gel. PMID:26729062

  1. Effectiveness of magnetic fluid hyperthermia against Candida albicans cells.

    PubMed

    Chudzik, Barbara; Miaskowski, Arkadiusz; Surowiec, Zbigniew; Czernel, Grzegorz; Duluk, Tomasz; Marczuk, Andrzej; Gagoś, Mariusz

    2016-12-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most frequently isolated fungal pathogens causing opportunistic infections in humans. Targeted magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a promising method in thermal therapy facilitating selective heating of pathogen cells like C. albicans. In the paper, we used meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA)-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and functionalised anti-C. albicans immunomagnetic nanoparticles (IMNPs) to investigate the potential of MFH in combating C. albicans cells in vitro. Using Mössbauer spectroscopy it was found that synthesised MNPs exhibited superparamagnetic phenomena. On the basis of calorimetric experiments, the maximum SAR (specific absorption rate) was found and a proper concentration of MNPs was established to control the temperature. MFH based on both DMSA-coated MNPs and functionalised anti-C. albicans IMNPs was more effective in combating C. albicans cells in vitro than thermostat hyperthermia. Especially promising results were obtained using functionalised IMNPs, which eradicated most of the pathogen colonies at the temperature of 43 °C.

  2. Fundamentals and Application of Magnetic Particles in Cell Isolation and Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Plouffe, Brian D.; Murthy, Shashi K.; Lewis, Laura H.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic sorting using magnetic beads has become a routine methodology for the separation of key cell populations from biological suspensions. Due to the inherent ability of magnets to provide forces at a distance, magnetic cell manipulation is now a standardized process step in numerous processes in tissue engineering, medicine, and in fundamental biological research. Herein we review the current status of magnetic particles to enable isolation and separation of cells, with a strong focus on the fundamental governing physical phenomena, properties and syntheses of magnetic particles and on current applications of magnet-based cell separation in laboratory and clinical settings. We highlight the contribution of cell separation to biomedical research and medicine and detail modern cell separation methods (both magnetic and non-magnetic). In addition to a review of the current state-of-the-art in magnet-based cell sorting, we discuss current challenges and available opportunities for further research, development and commercialization of magnetic particle-based cell separation systems. PMID:25471081

  3. Fundamentals and application of magnetic particles in cell isolation and enrichment: a review.

    PubMed

    Plouffe, Brian D; Murthy, Shashi K; Lewis, Laura H

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic sorting using magnetic beads has become a routine methodology for the separation of key cell populations from biological suspensions. Due to the inherent ability of magnets to provide forces at a distance, magnetic cell manipulation is now a standardized process step in numerous processes in tissue engineering, medicine, and in fundamental biological research. Herein we review the current status of magnetic particles to enable isolation and separation of cells, with a strong focus on the fundamental governing physical phenomena, properties and syntheses of magnetic particles and on current applications of magnet-based cell separation in laboratory and clinical settings. We highlight the contribution of cell separation to biomedical research and medicine and detail modern cell-separation methods (both magnetic and non-magnetic). In addition to a review of the current state-of-the-art in magnet-based cell sorting, we discuss current challenges and available opportunities for further research, development and commercialization of magnetic particle-based cell-separation systems.

  4. Fundamentals and application of magnetic particles in cell isolation and enrichment: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plouffe, Brian D.; Murthy, Shashi K.; Lewis, Laura H.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic sorting using magnetic beads has become a routine methodology for the separation of key cell populations from biological suspensions. Due to the inherent ability of magnets to provide forces at a distance, magnetic cell manipulation is now a standardized process step in numerous processes in tissue engineering, medicine, and in fundamental biological research. Herein we review the current status of magnetic particles to enable isolation and separation of cells, with a strong focus on the fundamental governing physical phenomena, properties and syntheses of magnetic particles and on current applications of magnet-based cell separation in laboratory and clinical settings. We highlight the contribution of cell separation to biomedical research and medicine and detail modern cell-separation methods (both magnetic and non-magnetic). In addition to a review of the current state-of-the-art in magnet-based cell sorting, we discuss current challenges and available opportunities for further research, development and commercialization of magnetic particle-based cell-separation systems.

  5. Cell death induced by the application of alternating magnetic fields to nanoparticle-loaded dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos-Campos, I.; Asín, L.; Torres, T. E.; Marquina, C.; Tres, A.; Ibarra, M. R.; Goya, G. F.

    2011-05-01

    In this work, the capability of primary, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to uptake iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is assessed and a strategy to induce selective cell death in these MNP-loaded DCs using external alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) is reported. No significant decrease in the cell viability of MNP-loaded DCs, compared to the control samples, was observed after five days of culture. The number of MNPs incorporated into the cytoplasm was measured by magnetometry, which confirmed that 1-5 pg of the particles were uploaded per cell. The intracellular distribution of these MNPs, assessed by transmission electron microscopy, was found to be primarily inside the endosomic structures. These cells were then subjected to an AMF for 30 min and the viability of the blank DCs (i.e. without MNPs), which were used as control samples, remained essentially unaffected. However, a remarkable decrease of viability from approximately 90% to 2-5% of DCs previously loaded with MNPs was observed after the same 30 min exposure to an AMF. The same results were obtained using MNPs having either positive (NH2 + ) or negative (COOH - ) surface functional groups. In spite of the massive cell death induced by application of AMF to MNP-loaded DCs, the number of incorporated magnetic particles did not raise the temperature of the cell culture. Clear morphological changes at the cell structure after magnetic field application were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, local damage produced by the MNPs could be the main mechanism for the selective cell death of MNP-loaded DCs under an AMF. Based on the ability of these cells to evade the reticuloendothelial system, these complexes combined with an AMF should be considered as a potentially powerful tool for tumour therapy.

  6. Magnetic targeting of human peripheral blood CD133+ cells for skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, Shingo; Kamei, Naosuke; Kamei, Goki; Shi, Ming; Adachi, Nobuo; Deie, Masataka; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2013-08-01

    Skeletal muscle injuries often leave lasting functional damage or pain. Muscle injuries are routinely treated conservatively, but the most effective treatment to promote the repair of injured muscles has not yet been established. Our previous report demonstrated that human peripheral blood-derived CD133(+) cell transplantation to rat skeletal muscle injury models inhibited fibrosis and enhanced myogenesis after injury. However, the acquisition of a sufficient number of cells remains the limitation for clinical application, as the CD133(+) population is rare in human blood. In this study, we applied a magnetic cell targeting system to accumulate transplanted cells in the muscle injury site and to enhance the regenerative effects of CD133(+) cell transplantation, focusing on the fact that CD133(+) cells are labeled with a magnetic bead for isolation. For the magnetic cell targeting, the magnet field generator was set up to adjust the peak of the magnetic gradient to the injury site of the tibialis anterior muscle, and 1×10(4) human peripheral blood CD133(+) cells were locally injected into the injury site. This cell number is 10% of that used in the previous study. In another group, the same number of CD133(+) cells was injected without magnetic force. The CD133(+) cells transplanted with the magnetic force were more accumulated in the muscle injury site compared with the CD133(+) cells transplanted without the magnetic force. In addition, the transplantation of CD133(+) cells under the magnetic control inhibited fibrous scar formation and promoted angiogenesis and myogenesis, and also upregulated the mRNA expression of myogenic transcription factors, including Pax7, MyoD1 and Myogenin. However, the transplantation of CD133(+) cells without the magnetic force failed to demonstrate these effects. Thus, our magnetic cell targeting system enables transplantation of a limited number of CD133(+) cells to promote the repair of skeletal muscle injury.

  7. Red blood cells as carriers in magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Antonella; Sfara, Carla; Rahmer, Jürgen; Gleich, Bernhard; Borgert, Jörn; Magnani, Mauro

    2013-12-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) represent intravascular carriers for drugs, biologics, and other therapeutic agents, characterized by their unique longevity in the bloodstream, availability, considerable surface and volume, high biocompatibility, and natural mechanisms for safe elimination. Recently, the potential of RBCs loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles as a tracer material for magnetic particle imaging (MPI) to realize a blood-pool tracer agent with longer blood retention time for imaging of the circulatory system, has been investigated. MPI is a new tomographic imaging approach that can quantitatively map magnetic nanoparticle distributions in vivo. However, SPIO contrast agents, such as Resovist, have a short blood half-life due to rapid uptake by the reticuloendothelial system, which limits the applicability of such compounds for certain applications such as long-term monitoring. Here, we report the in vitro magnetic characterization study of human SPIO-loaded RBCs and the first MPI results obtained after intravenous injection of murine SPIO-loaded RBCs in an in vivo MPI experiment.

  8. Magnetic force microscopy analysis of apoptosis of HL-60 cells induced by complex of antisense oligonucleotides and magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shen, He-bai; Long, De-hong; Zhu, Long-zhang; Li, Xing-Yu; Dong, Ya-ming; Jia, Neng-qin; Zhou, Hai-qing; Xin, Xi; Sun, Yang

    2006-06-20

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) has been employed to observe antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs)-coupled silica-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SMNPs) internalized into human leukemia (HL-60) cells. The experiment demonstrated that the ASOs-coupled SMNPs delivery into the cells really occurred. The nanoparticles were internalized into the cells and the apoptotic topography can be directly visualized simultaneously with MFM technology. These present observations offer direct morphology evidence on studying the apoptosis of tumor cells and provide useful information for better design of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools in tumor treatment.

  9. Optical study of magnetic sedimentation and orientable properties of blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norina, Svetlana B.; Shalygin, Alexander N.; Rastopov, Stanislav F.

    2000-05-01

    Magnetic sedimentation processes near ferromagnetic wire were applied for the cellular and the biotechnological monitoring. Numerous biological applications of magnetic sedimentation, or high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS), achieved mainly for human blood cells, have shown that it is possible to distinguish between the diamagnetic Fe-zero-spin oxidized states and the paramagnetic Fe-high-spin reduced ones in red blood cells. The precision methods of the measurements of capture travelling (magnetic diffusion) time or accumulation (magnetic sedimentation) radius in HGMS have shown that it is really to determine the weak dia- or paramagnetic shifts of magnetic susceptibility up to 0.7 (DOT) 10-10 (SI). The capture and sedimentation of particles with 5 - 40 micrometers sizes on single magnetized wires were investigated using microscopic video-recording type. Magnetic susceptibility bars for cells in normal and disturbed states demonstrated the high reproducibility and narrow distribution patterns.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Biomarker for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Kwon, Young Suk; Labib, Mina; Foran, David J.; Singer, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    As the most common neoplasm arising from the kidney, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) continues to have a significant impact on global health. Conventional cross-sectional imaging has always served an important role in the staging of RCC. However, with recent advances in imaging techniques and postprocessing analysis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now has the capability to function as a diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic biomarker for RCC. For this narrative literature review, a PubMed search was conducted to collect the most relevant and impactful studies from our perspectives as urologic oncologists, radiologists, and computational imaging specialists. We seek to cover advanced MR imaging and image analysis techniques that may improve the management of patients with small renal mass or metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26609190

  11. Analysis of cell mechanics in single vinculin-deficient cells using a magnetic tweezer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alenghat, F. J.; Fabry, B.; Tsai, K. Y.; Goldmann, W. H.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    A magnetic tweezer was constructed to apply controlled tensional forces (10 pN to greater than 1 nN) to transmembrane receptors via bound ligand-coated microbeadswhile optically measuring lateral bead displacements within individual cells. Use of this system with wild-type F9 embryonic carcinoma cells and cells from a vinculin knockout mouse F9 Vin (-/-) revealed much larger differences in the stiffness of the transmembrane integrin linkages to the cytoskeleton than previously reported using related techniques that measured average mechanical properties of large cell populations. The mechanical properties measured varied widely among cells, exhibiting an approximately log-normal distribution. The median lateral bead displacement was 2-fold larger in F9 Vin (-/-) cells compared to wild-type cells whereas the arithmetic mean displacement only increased by 37%. We conclude that vinculin serves a greater mechanical role in cells than previously reported and that this magnetic tweezer device may be useful for probing the molecular basis of cell mechanics within single cells. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  12. Neural stem cells harvested from live brains by antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lui, C N P; Tsui, Y P; Ho, A S L; Shum, D K Y; Chan, Y S; Wu, C T; Li, H W; Tsang, S C Edman; Yung, K K L

    2013-11-18

    It stems from the magnetism: The extraction of stem/progenitor cells from the brain of live animals is possible using antibodies conjugated to magnetic nanoparticles (Ab-MNPs). The Ab-MNPs are introduced to a rat's brain with a superfine micro-syringe. The stem cells attach to the Ab-MNPs and are magnetically isolated and removed. They can develop into neurospheres and differentiate into different types of cells outside the subject body. The rat remains alive and healthy.

  13. Clinically viable magnetic poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) particles for MRI-based cell tracking

    PubMed Central

    Granot, Dorit; Nkansah, Michael K.; Bennewitz, Margaret F.; Tang, Kevin S.; Markakis, Eleni A.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To design, fabricate, characterize and in vivo assay clinically viable magnetic particles for MRI-based cell tracking. Methods PLGA encapsulated magnetic nano- and microparticles were fabricated. Multiple biologically relevant experiments were performed to assess cell viability, cellular performance and stem cell differentiation. In vivo MRI experiments were performed to separately test cell transplantation and cell migration paradigms, as well as in vivo biodegradation. Results Highly magnetic nano- (~100 nm) and microparticles (~1–2 μm) were fabricated. Magnetic cell labeling in culture occurred rapidly achieving 3–50 pg Fe/cell at 3 hrs for different particles types, and >100 pg Fe/cell after 10 hours, without the requirement of a transfection agent, and with no effect on cell viability. The capability of magnetically labeled mesenchymal or neural stem cells to differentiate down multiple lineages, or for magnetically labeled immune cells to release cytokines following stimulation, was uncompromised. An in vivo biodegradation study revealed that NPs degraded ~80% over the course of 12 weeks. MRI detected as few as 10 magnetically labeled cells, transplanted into the brains of rats. Also, these particles enabled the in vivo monitoring of endogenous neural progenitor cell migration in rat brains over 2 weeks. Conclusion The robust MRI properties and benign safety profile of these particles make them promising candidates for clinical translation for MRI-based cell tracking. PMID:23568825

  14. Magnetic assembly-mediated enhancement of differentiation of mouse bone marrow cells cultured on magnetic colloidal assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianfei; Liu, Xuan; Huang, Jiqing; Song, Lina; Chen, Zihao; Liu, Haoyu; Li, Yan; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2014-05-01

    Here we reported an interesting phenomenon that the field-induced assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles can promote the differentiation of primary mouse bone marrow cells into osteoblasts. The reason was thought to lie in the remnant magnetic interaction inside the assemblies which resulted from the magnetic field-directed assembly. Influence of the assemblies on the cells was realized by means of interface effect rather than the internalization effect. We fabricated a stripe-like assemblies array on the glass plate and cultured cells on this surface. We characterized the morphology of assemblies and measured the mechanic property as well as the magnetic property. The cellular differentiation was measured by staining and quantitative PCR. Finally, Fe uptake was excluded as the reason to cause the phenomenon.

  15. Magnetic assembly-mediated enhancement of differentiation of mouse bone marrow cells cultured on magnetic colloidal assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianfei; Liu, Xuan; Huang, Jiqing; Song, Lina; Chen, Zihao; Liu, Haoyu; Li, Yan; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Here we reported an interesting phenomenon that the field-induced assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles can promote the differentiation of primary mouse bone marrow cells into osteoblasts. The reason was thought to lie in the remnant magnetic interaction inside the assemblies which resulted from the magnetic field-directed assembly. Influence of the assemblies on the cells was realized by means of interface effect rather than the internalization effect. We fabricated a stripe-like assemblies array on the glass plate and cultured cells on this surface. We characterized the morphology of assemblies and measured the mechanic property as well as the magnetic property. The cellular differentiation was measured by staining and quantitative PCR. Finally, Fe uptake was excluded as the reason to cause the phenomenon. PMID:24874764

  16. How a High-Gradient Magnetic Field Could Affect Cell Life

    PubMed Central

    Zablotskii, Vitalii; Polyakova, Tatyana; Lunov, Oleg; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2016-01-01

    The biological effects of high-gradient magnetic fields (HGMFs) have steadily gained the increased attention of researchers from different disciplines, such as cell biology, cell therapy, targeted stem cell delivery and nanomedicine. We present a theoretical framework towards a fundamental understanding of the effects of HGMFs on intracellular processes, highlighting new directions for the study of living cell machinery: changing the probability of ion-channel on/off switching events by membrane magneto-mechanical stress, suppression of cell growth by magnetic pressure, magnetically induced cell division and cell reprograming, and forced migration of membrane receptor proteins. By deriving a generalized form for the Nernst equation, we find that a relatively small magnetic field (approximately 1 T) with a large gradient (up to 1 GT/m) can significantly change the membrane potential of the cell and thus have a significant impact on not only the properties and biological functionality of cells but also cell fate. PMID:27857227

  17. How a High-Gradient Magnetic Field Could Affect Cell Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zablotskii, Vitalii; Polyakova, Tatyana; Lunov, Oleg; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2016-11-01

    The biological effects of high-gradient magnetic fields (HGMFs) have steadily gained the increased attention of researchers from different disciplines, such as cell biology, cell therapy, targeted stem cell delivery and nanomedicine. We present a theoretical framework towards a fundamental understanding of the effects of HGMFs on intracellular processes, highlighting new directions for the study of living cell machinery: changing the probability of ion-channel on/off switching events by membrane magneto-mechanical stress, suppression of cell growth by magnetic pressure, magnetically induced cell division and cell reprograming, and forced migration of membrane receptor proteins. By deriving a generalized form for the Nernst equation, we find that a relatively small magnetic field (approximately 1 T) with a large gradient (up to 1 GT/m) can significantly change the membrane potential of the cell and thus have a significant impact on not only the properties and biological functionality of cells but also cell fate.

  18. Disruptive effect of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction on the magnetic memory cell performance

    SciTech Connect

    Sampaio, J.; Cubukcu, M.; Cros, V.; Reyren, N.; Khvalkovskiy, A. V.; Kuteifan, M.; Lomakin, V.; Apalkov, D.

    2016-03-14

    In order to increase the thermal stability of a magnetic random access memory cell, materials with high spin-orbit interaction are often introduced in the storage layer. As a side effect, a strong Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) may arise in such systems. Here, we investigate the impact of DMI on the magnetic cell performance, using micromagnetic simulations. We find that DMI strongly promotes non-uniform magnetization states and non-uniform switching modes of the magnetic layer. It appears to be detrimental for both the thermal stability of the cell and its switching current, leading to considerable deterioration of the cell performance even for a moderate DMI amplitude.

  19. Iron oxide nanoparticles for neuronal cell applications: uptake study and magnetic manipulations.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Michal; Karni, Moshe; Baranes, Koby; Levy, Itay; Alon, Noa; Margel, Shlomo; Shefi, Orit

    2016-05-14

    The ability to direct and manipulate neuronal cells has important potential in therapeutics and neural network studies. An emerging approach for remotely guiding cells is by incorporating magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into cells and transferring the cells into magnetic sensitive units. Recent developments offer exciting possibilities of magnetic manipulations of MNPs-loaded cells by external magnetic fields. In the present study, we evaluated and characterized uptake properties for optimal loading of cells by MNPs. We examined the interactions between MNPs of different cores and coatings, with primary neurons and neuron-like cells. We found that uncoated-maghemite iron oxide nanoparticles maximally interact and penetrate into cells with no cytotoxic effect. We observed that the cellular uptake of the MNPs depends on the time of incubation and the concentration of nanoparticles in the medium. The morphology patterns of the neuronal cells were not affected by MNPs uptake and neurons remained electrically active. We theoretically modeled magnetic fluxes and demonstrated experimentally the response of MNP-loaded cells to the magnetic fields affecting cell motility. Furthermore, we successfully directed neurite growth orientation along regeneration. Applying mechanical forces via magnetic mediators is a useful approach for biomedical applications. We have examined several types of MNPs and studied the uptake behavior optimized for magnetic neuronal manipulations.

  20. Erythrocyte Enrichment in Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Cultures Based on Magnetic Susceptibility of the Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiaoxia; Abbot, Stewart; Zhang, Xiaokui; Kang, Lin; Voskinarian-Berse, Vanessa; Zhao, Rui; Kameneva, Marina V.; Moore, Lee R.; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Zborowski, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Using novel media formulations, it has been demonstrated that human placenta and umbilical cord blood-derived CD34+ cells can be expanded and differentiated into erythroid cells with high efficiency. However, obtaining mature and functional erythrocytes from the immature cell cultures with high purity and in an efficient manner remains a significant challenge. A distinguishing feature of a reticulocyte and maturing erythrocyte is the increasing concentration of hemoglobin and decreasing cell volume that results in increased cell magnetophoretic mobility (MM) when exposed to high magnetic fields and gradients, under anoxic conditions. Taking advantage of these initial observations, we studied a noninvasive (label-free) magnetic separation and analysis process to enrich and identify cultured functional erythrocytes. In addition to the magnetic cell separation and cell motion analysis in the magnetic field, the cell cultures were characterized for cell sedimentation rate, cell volume distributions using differential interference microscopy, immunophenotyping (glycophorin A), hemoglobin concentration and shear-induced deformability (elongation index, EI, by ektacytometry) to test for mature erythrocyte attributes. A commercial, packed column high-gradient magnetic separator (HGMS) was used for magnetic separation. The magnetically enriched fraction comprised 80% of the maturing cells (predominantly reticulocytes) that showed near 70% overlap of EI with the reference cord blood-derived RBC and over 50% overlap with the adult donor RBCs. The results demonstrate feasibility of label-free magnetic enrichment of erythrocyte fraction of CD34+ progenitor-derived cultures based on the presence of paramagnetic hemoglobin in the maturing erythrocytes. PMID:22952572

  1. Erythrocyte enrichment in hematopoietic progenitor cell cultures based on magnetic susceptibility of the hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoxia; Abbot, Stewart; Zhang, Xiaokui; Kang, Lin; Voskinarian-Berse, Vanessa; Zhao, Rui; Kameneva, Marina V; Moore, Lee R; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Zborowski, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Using novel media formulations, it has been demonstrated that human placenta and umbilical cord blood-derived CD34+ cells can be expanded and differentiated into erythroid cells with high efficiency. However, obtaining mature and functional erythrocytes from the immature cell cultures with high purity and in an efficient manner remains a significant challenge. A distinguishing feature of a reticulocyte and maturing erythrocyte is the increasing concentration of hemoglobin and decreasing cell volume that results in increased cell magnetophoretic mobility (MM) when exposed to high magnetic fields and gradients, under anoxic conditions. Taking advantage of these initial observations, we studied a noninvasive (label-free) magnetic separation and analysis process to enrich and identify cultured functional erythrocytes. In addition to the magnetic cell separation and cell motion analysis in the magnetic field, the cell cultures were characterized for cell sedimentation rate, cell volume distributions using differential interference microscopy, immunophenotyping (glycophorin A), hemoglobin concentration and shear-induced deformability (elongation index, EI, by ektacytometry) to test for mature erythrocyte attributes. A commercial, packed column high-gradient magnetic separator (HGMS) was used for magnetic separation. The magnetically enriched fraction comprised 80% of the maturing cells (predominantly reticulocytes) that showed near 70% overlap of EI with the reference cord blood-derived RBC and over 50% overlap with the adult donor RBCs. The results demonstrate feasibility of label-free magnetic enrichment of erythrocyte fraction of CD34+ progenitor-derived cultures based on the presence of paramagnetic hemoglobin in the maturing erythrocytes.

  2. Guidance of stem cells to a target destination in vivo by magnetic nanoparticles in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jialong; Huang, Nan; Ma, Baolong; Maitz, Manfred F; Wang, Juan; Li, Jingan; Li, Quanli; Zhao, Yuancong; Xiong, Kaiqin; Liu, Xin

    2013-07-10

    Stem cells contribute to physiological processes such as postischemic neovascularization and vascular re-endothelialization, which help regenerate myocardial defects or repair vascular injury. However, therapeutic efficacy of stem cell transplantation is often limited by inefficient homing of systemically administered cells, which results in a low number of cells accumulating at sites of pathology. In this study, anti-CD34 antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@PEG-CD34) are shown to have high affinity to stem cells. The results of hemolysis rate and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) tests indicate that such nanoparticle may be used safely in the blood system. In vitro studies showed that a nanoparticle concentration of 100 μg/mL gives rise to a significant increase in cell retention using an applicable permanent magnet, exerting minimal negative effect on cell viability and migration. Subsequent in vivo studies indicate that nanopartical can specifically bind stem cells with good magnetic response. Anti-CD34 antibody coated magnetic nanoparticle may be used to help deliver stem cells to a lesion site in the body for better treatment.

  3. Reduction of the Earth's magnetic field inhibits growth rates of model cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Martino, Carlos F; Portelli, Lucas; McCabe, Kevin; Hernandez, Mark; Barnes, Frank

    2010-12-01

    Small alterations in static magnetic fields have been shown to affect certain chemical reaction rates ex vivo. In this manuscript, we present data demonstrating that similar small changes in static magnetic fields between individual cell culture incubators results in significantly altered cell cycle rates for multiple cancer-derived cell lines. This change as assessed by cell number is not a result of apoptosis, necrosis, or cell cycle alterations. While the underlying mechanism is unclear, the implications for all cell culture experiments are clear; static magnetic field conditions within incubators must be considered and/or controlled just as one does for temperature, humidity, and carbon dioxide concentration.

  4. Hydrodynamic instability in a magnetically driven suspension of paramagnetic red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Kashevsky, B E; Zholud, A M; Kashevsky, S B

    2015-09-07

    We investigate the magnetically driven motion in suspensions of paramagnetic particles. Our object is diluted deoxygenated whole blood with paramagnetic red blood cells (RBCs). We use direct observations in a closed vertical Hele-Shaw channel, and a well-defined magnetic force field applied horizontally in the channel plane. At very low cell concentrations, we register single-particle motion mode, track individual cells and determine their hydrodynamic and magnetic characteristics. Above 0.2 volume percent concentration, we observe local swirls and a global transient quasi-periodic vortex structure, intensifying with increasing cell concentration, but surprisingly this does not influence the time and purity of the magnetic extraction of RBCs. Our observations shed light on the behavioral complexity of magnetically driven submagnetic suspensions, an important issue for the emerging microfluidic technology of direct magnetic cell separation and intriguing for the mechanics of particulate soft matter.

  5. Detecting molecules and cells labeled with magnetic particles using an atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dindi; Ruangchaithaweesuk, Songtham; Yao, Li; Xu, Shoujun

    2012-09-01

    The detection of magnetically labeled molecules and cells involves three essential parameters: sensitivity, spatial resolution, and molecular specificity. We report on the use of atomic magnetometry and its derivative techniques to achieve high performance in terms of all these parameters. With a sensitivity of 80 fT/√Hz for dc magnetic fields, we show that 7,000 streptavidin-conjugated magnetic microparticles magnetized by a permanent magnet produce a magnetic field of 650 pT; this result predicts that a single such particle can be detected during one second of signal averaging. Spatial information is obtained using a scanning magnetic imaging scheme. The spatial resolution is 20 μm with a detection distance of more than 1 cm; this distance is much longer than that in previous reports. The molecular specificity is achieved using force-induced remnant magnetization spectroscopy, which currently uses an atomic magnetometer for detection. As an example, we perform measurement of magnetically labeled human CD4+ T cells, whose count in the blood is the diagnostic criterion for human immunodeficiency virus infection. Magnetic particles that are specifically bound to the cells are resolved from nonspecifically bound particles and quantitatively correlate with the number of cells. The magnetic particles have an overall size of 2.8 μm, with a magnetic core in nanometer regime. The combination of our techniques is predicted to be useful in molecular and cellular imaging.

  6. Innovative fluorescent magnetic albumin microbead-assisted cell labeling and intracellular imaging of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqin; Wei, Fang; Yan, Shuang; Zhang, Huiru; Tan, Xiaorong; Zhang, Lu; Zhou, Guangzhou; Cui, Liuqing; Li, Cuixiang; Wang, Liang; Li, Yatao

    2014-04-15

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticle-based polymer microbeads utilized as carriers are attractive materials widely applied in the biomedical field. However, the deficiency of toxicity, biocompatibility, and biodegradability for polymer materials often limits the application of these microbeads. In the present study, magnetic albumin microbeads (MAMbs), i.e., human serum albumin-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, are synthesized to label human U251 glioblastoma multiforme cells. The effects of MAMbs on the biological behavior of U251 glioblastoma cells, including their proliferation, cell viability, cytoskeletal structure, cell cycle, and apoptosis rate, are investigated. Moreover, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-MAMbs are fabricated by reaction with fluorescent dye FITC used for intracellular imaging of U251 glioblastoma cells. MAMbs possess undetectable cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility with U251 glioblastoma cells, as demonstrated by the biological behavior and morphology of U251 cells exposed to MAMbs. Furthermore, the constructed fluorescent MAMbs allow effective intracellular imaging, as illustrated by fluorescence microscopic analysis. The fabricated fluorescent MAMbs have promising perspectives in biomedical research, especially in cell-targeted labeling and intracellular fluorescence magnetic dual-mode imaging in cancer-targeted diagnosis and therapy. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Microfabricated magnetic structures for future medicine: from sensors to cell actuators.

    PubMed

    Vitol, Elina A; Novosad, Valentyn; Rozhkova, Elena A

    2012-10-01

    In this review, we discuss the prospective medical application of magnetic carriers microfabricated by top-down techniques. Physical methods allow the fabrication of a variety of magnetic structures with tightly controlled magnetic properties and geometry, which makes them very attractive for a cost-efficient mass-production in the fast growing field of nanomedicine. Stand-alone fabricated particles along with integrated devices combining lithographically defined magnetic structures and synthesized magnetic tags will be considered. Applications of microfabricated multifunctional magnetic structures for future medicinal purposes range from ultrasensitive in vitro diagnostic bioassays, DNA sequencing and microfluidic cell sorting to magnetomechanical actuation, cargo delivery, contrast enhancement and heating therapy.

  8. Microfabricated magnetic structures for future medicine: from sensors to cell actuators

    PubMed Central

    Vitol, Elina A; Novosad, Valentyn; Rozhkova, Elena A

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the prospective medical application of magnetic carriers microfabricated by top-down techniques. Physical methods allow the fabrication of a variety of magnetic structures with tightly controlled magnetic properties and geometry, which makes them very attractive for a cost-efficient mass-production in the fast growing field of nanomedicine. Stand-alone fabricated particles along with integrated devices combining lithographically defined magnetic structures and synthesized magnetic tags will be considered. Applications of microfabricated multifunctional magnetic structures for future medicinal purposes range from ultrasensitive in vitro diagnostic bioassays, DNA sequencing and microfluidic cell sorting to magnetomechanical actuation, cargo delivery, contrast enhancement and heating therapy. PMID:23148542

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of mesenchymal stem cells homing to pulmonary metastases using biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Loebinger, Michael R; Kyrtatos, Panagiotis G; Turmaine, Mark; Price, Anthony N; Pankhurst, Quentin; Lythgoe, Mark F; Janes, Sam M

    2010-01-01

    The ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to specifically home to tumors has suggested their potential use as a delivery vehicle for cancer therapeutics. MSC integration into tumors has been demonstrated in animal models using histopathological techniques after animal sacrifice. Tracking the delivery and engraftment of MSCs into human tumors will need in vivo imaging techniques. We hypothesized that labeling MSCs with iron oxide nanoparticles would enable in vivo tracking with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Human MSCs were labeled in vitro with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, with no effect on differentiation potential, proliferation, survival or migration of the cells. In initial experiments we demonstrated that as few as 1000 MSCs carrying iron oxide nanoparticles can be detected by MRI one month after their coinjection with breast cancer cells which formed sub-cutaneous tumors. Subsequently we show that intravenously injected iron-labeled MSCs could be tracked in vivo to multiple lung metastases using MRI, observations that were confirmed histologically. This is the first study to utilize MRI to track MSCs to lung metastases in vivo. This technique has the potential to demonstrate MSC integration into human tumors, allowing early phase clinical studies examining MSC homing in patients with metastatic tumors. PMID:19920196

  10. Harvesting of Dunaliella tertiolecta cells by magnetic filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manousakis, Emmanouil; Manariotis, Ioannis D.

    2015-04-01

    The rising cost and reduced reserves of fossil fuels have enhanced the interest for finding alterative energy sources. Microalgae are considered to be the only sustainable option in biodiesel production for two key points. The energy yield from microalgae is much higher than that of oil producing crops, and the cultivation of algae it is not antagonistic with food supply chain. Because of the small size of microalgae and the dilute nature of algal cultures, the harvesting cost of microalgae is so far a limiting step for the scale up of microalgal biofuel production. It is estimated that the algal harvesting cost is at least 20-30% of the total biomass production cost. Traditional methods, which have been employed for the recovery of microalgal biomass, include centrifugation, gravity separation, filtration, flocculation, and flotation. Alternative approaches, other than conventional methods, capable of processing large cultures volume at a low cost, and reducing effluent toxicity are essential for microalgal biomass production. Magnetic separation is a promising technology and has been applied for algal removal in the mid of 1970s. The aim of this study was to investigate the harvesting of microalgae cells using magnetic microparticles (MPs). Dunaliella tertiolecta was selected as a representative for marine microalgae. The cultivation of microalgae was conducted under continuous artificial light, in 20 L flasks. Iron oxide microparticles were prepared by microwave irradiation of FeSO4 7H2O in an alkaline solution. Samples were taken at different operation intervals to conduct harvesting studies. Batch and flow-through experiments were conducted in order to investigate the effect of the magnetic material on microalgae removal. Algal removal in flow through experiments ranged from 70 to 85% depending on the initial MPs concentration even at very short hydraulic retention times (i.e. 2 min). In batch tests, algal removal was up to 97% at MPs concentration of 490 mg/L.

  11. Tracking of iron-labeled human neural stem cells by magnetic resonance imaging in cell replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Gómez, Milagros; Martínez-Serrano, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Human neural stem cells (hNSCs) derived from the ventral mesencephalon are powerful research tools and candidates for cell therapies in Parkinson's disease. However, their clinical translation has not been fully realized due, in part, to the limited ability to track stem cell regional localization and survival over long periods of time after in vivo transplantation. Magnetic resonance imaging provides an excellent non-invasive method to study the fate of transplanted cells in vivo. For magnetic resonance imaging cell tracking, cells need to be labeled with a contrast agent, such as magnetic nanoparticles, at a concentration high enough to be easily detected by magnetic resonance imaging. Grafting of human neural stem cells labeled with magnetic nanoparticles allows cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging without impairment of cell survival, proliferation, self-renewal, and multipotency. However, the results reviewed here suggest that in long term grafting, activated microglia and macrophages could contribute to magnetic resonance imaging signal by engulfing dead labeled cells or iron nanoparticles dispersed freely in the brain parenchyma over time.

  12. Magnetic Relaxometry with an Atomic Magnetometer and SQUID Sensors on Targeted Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Cort; Adolphi, Natalie L.; Butler, Kimberly L.; Debbie M, Lovato; Larson, Richard; Schwindt, Peter D.D.; Flynn, Edward R.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic relaxometry methods have been shown to be very sensitive in detecting cancer cells and other targeted diseases. Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) sensors are one of the primary sensor systems used in this methodology because of their high sensitivity with demonstrated capabilities of detecting fewer than 100,000 magnetically-labeled cancer cells. The emerging technology of atomic magnetometers (AM) represents a new detection method for magnetic relaxometry with high sensitivity and without the requirement for cryogens. We report here on a study of magnetic relaxometry using both AM and SQUID sensors to detect cancer cells that are coated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles through antibody targeting. The AM studies conform closely to SQUID sensor results in the measurement of the magnetic decay characteristics following a magnetization pulse. The AM and SQUID sensor data are well described theoretically for superparamagnetic particles bound to cells and the results can be used to determine the number of cells in a cell culture or tumor. The observed fields and magnetic moments of cancer cells are linear with the number of cells over a very large range. The AM sensor demonstrates very high sensitivity for detecting magnetically labeled cells does not require cryogenic cooling and is relatively inexpensive. PMID:22773885

  13. Magnetic relaxometry with an atomic magnetometer and SQUID sensors on targeted cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Cort; Adolphi, Natalie L.; Butler, Kimberly L.; Lovato, Debbie M.; Larson, Richard; Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Flynn, Edward R.

    2012-08-01

    Magnetic relaxometry methods have been shown to be very sensitive in detecting cancer cells and other targeted diseases. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors are one of the primary sensor systems used in this methodology because of their high sensitivity with demonstrated capabilities of detecting fewer than 100,000 magnetically-labeled cancer cells. The emerging technology of atomic magnetometers (AMs) represents a new detection method for magnetic relaxometry with high sensitivity and without the requirement for cryogens. We report here on a study of magnetic relaxometry using both AM and SQUID sensors to detect cancer cells that are coated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles through antibody targeting. The AM studies conform closely to SQUID sensor results in the measurement of the magnetic decay characteristics following a magnetization pulse. The AM and SQUID sensor data are well described theoretically for superparamagnetic particles bound to cells and the results can be used to determine the number of cells in a cell culture or tumor. The observed fields and magnetic moments of cancer cells are linear with the number of cells over a very large range. The AM sensor demonstrates very high sensitivity for detecting magnetically labeled cells, does not require cryogenic cooling and is relatively inexpensive.

  14. Purification of Definitive Endoderm Generated from Pluripotent Stem Cells by Magnetic Cell Sorting.

    PubMed

    Diekmann, Ulf; Davenport, Claudia; Kresse, Jasmin; Naujok, Ortwin

    2017-02-02

    Pluripotent stem cells have the capability to differentiate into any somatic cell type of the human body. The generation of surrogate cells for the treatment of liver, lung, and pancreatic diseases is of great medical interest. First, the in vitro formation into cells of the definitive endoderm is required. Upon commitment into this lineage, the cells express transcription factors such as FOXA2, SOX17, HNF1B; GATA family members; and the surface protein CXCR4. Unfortunately, some pluripotent stem cells resist the differentiation and contaminate the culture. Thus, we describe here an endoderm differentiation protocol, which yields endoderm-committed cells in high numbers in a 4-day treatment protocol. Second, a method for the purification of CXCR4-positive endoderm cells by magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) is described. The purification by MACS is quick and reliable and can be used to obtain pure endoderm cells either meant for downstream analysis such as omics or further differentiation experiments into endoderm-derived somatic cells. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Magnetic Studies of Photovoltaic Processes in Organic Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zang, Huidong; Ivanov, Ilia N; Hu, Bin

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we use magnetic field effects of photocurrent (MFEPC ) to study the photovoltaic processes in pristine conjugated polymer, bulk heterojunction, and double-layer solar cells, respectively, based on poly(3-alkylthiophene) (P3HT). The MFEPC reveals that the photocurrent generation undergoes the dissociation in polaron pair states and the charge reaction in excitonic states in pristine conjugated polymers. As for the bulk-heterojunction solar cells consisting of electron donor P3HT and electron acceptor [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), the MFEPC indicates that the dissociated electrons and holes inevitably form the intermolecular charge-transfer (CT) complexes at donor and acceptor interfaces. Essentially, the photocurrent generation relies on the further dissociation of intermolecular CT complexes. Moreover, we use double-layer solar cell to further study the intermolecular CT complexes with well-controlled donor acceptor interfaces based on double-layer P3HT/TiOx design. We find that the increase in free energies can significantly reduce the density of CT complexes upon thermal annealing.

  16. Magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS): utility in assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Makker, Kartikeya; Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh K

    2008-07-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques (ART) have now been extensively incorporated in the management of infertile couples. But even after rapid methodological and technological advances the success rates of these procedures have been below expectations. This has led to development of many sperm preparation protocols to obtain an ideal semen sample for artificial reproduction. Sperm apoptosis has been heavily linked to failures in reproductive techniques. One of the earliest changes shown by apoptotic spermatozoa is externalization of phosphatidyl serine. Magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) is a novel sperm preparation technique that separates apoptotic and non-apoptotic spermatozoa based on the expression of phosphatidylserine. This has led to the incorporation of MACS as a sperm preparation technique. The review highlights the principle and mechanism of this novel technique and enumerates its advantages as a sperm preparation technique. Its utility in ART as an efficient tool for sperm recovery and its application in cryopreservation of semen samples is also explained.

  17. Magnetic nanoparticle effects on the red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creangă, D. E.; Culea, M.; Nădejde, C.; Oancea, S.; Curecheriu, L.; Racuciu, M.

    2009-05-01

    In vitro tests on magnetite colloidal nanoparticles effects upon animal red blood cells were carried out. Magnetite cores were stabilized with citric acid in the form of biocompatible magnetic fluid administrated in different dilutions in the whole blood samples. The hemolysis extent was found increased up to 2.75 in horse blood and respectively up to 2.81 in the dog blood. The electronic transitions assigned to the heme group were found shifted with about 500 cm-1 or, respectively, affected by supplementary vibronic structures. The Raman vibrations assigned to oxyhemoglobin were much diminished in intensity probably due to the bonding of OH group from citrate shell to the heme iron ion.

  18. Hydrogen peroxide removal with magnetically responsive Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Safarik, Ivo; Sabatkova, Zdenka; Safarikova, Mirka

    2008-09-10

    Hydrogen peroxide (HP) is a promising chemical sanitizer for use in the food industry. Its residues have to be decomposed, usually using an enzyme process employing catalase. In order to offer an inexpensive biocatalyst and to simplify subsequent manipulation, we have prepared magnetically responsive alginate beads containing entrapped Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and magnetite microparticles. Larger beads (2-3 mm in diameter) were prepared by dropping the mixture into calcium chloride solution, while microbeads (the diameter of majority of particles ranged between 50 and 100 microm) were prepared using the water in oil emulsification process. In general, microbeads enabled more efficient HP decomposition. The prepared microparticulate biocatalyst caused efficient decomposition of HP in water solutions (up to 2% concentration), leaving very low residual HP concentration after treatment (below 0.001% under appropriate conditions). The biocatalyst was stable; the same catalytic activity was observed after one month storage at 4 degrees C, and the microbeads could be used at least five times.

  19. Turning Diamagnetic Microbes into Multinary Micro-Magnets: Magnetophoresis and Spatio-Temporal Manipulation of Individual Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hojae; Hong, Daewha; Cho, Hyeoncheol; Kim, Ji Yup; Park, Ji Hun; Lee, Sang Hee; Kim, Ho Min; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.; Choi, Insung S.

    2016-12-01

    Inspired by the biogenic magnetism found in certain organisms, such as magnetotactic bacteria, magnetic nanomaterials have been integrated into living cells for bioorthogonal, magnetic manipulation of the cells. However, magnetized cells have so far been reported to be only binary system (on/off) without any control of magnetization degree, limiting their applications typically to the simple accumulation or separation of cells as a whole. In this work, the magnetization degree is tightly controlled, leading to the generation of multiple subgroups of the magnetized cells, and each subgroup is manipulated independently from the other subgroups in the pool of heterogeneous cell-mixtures. This work will provide a strategic approach to tailor-made fabrication of magnetically functionalized living cells as micro-magnets, and open new vistas in biotechnological and biomedical applications, which highly demand the spatio-temporal manipulation of living cells.

  20. Turning Diamagnetic Microbes into Multinary Micro-Magnets: Magnetophoresis and Spatio-Temporal Manipulation of Individual Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hojae; Hong, Daewha; Cho, Hyeoncheol; Kim, Ji Yup; Park, Ji Hun; Lee, Sang Hee; Kim, Ho Min; Fakhrullin, Rawil F; Choi, Insung S

    2016-12-05

    Inspired by the biogenic magnetism found in certain organisms, such as magnetotactic bacteria, magnetic nanomaterials have been integrated into living cells for bioorthogonal, magnetic manipulation of the cells. However, magnetized cells have so far been reported to be only binary system (on/off) without any control of magnetization degree, limiting their applications typically to the simple accumulation or separation of cells as a whole. In this work, the magnetization degree is tightly controlled, leading to the generation of multiple subgroups of the magnetized cells, and each subgroup is manipulated independently from the other subgroups in the pool of heterogeneous cell-mixtures. This work will provide a strategic approach to tailor-made fabrication of magnetically functionalized living cells as micro-magnets, and open new vistas in biotechnological and biomedical applications, which highly demand the spatio-temporal manipulation of living cells.

  1. Turning Diamagnetic Microbes into Multinary Micro-Magnets: Magnetophoresis and Spatio-Temporal Manipulation of Individual Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hojae; Hong, Daewha; Cho, Hyeoncheol; Kim, Ji Yup; Park, Ji Hun; Lee, Sang Hee; Kim, Ho Min; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.; Choi, Insung S.

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the biogenic magnetism found in certain organisms, such as magnetotactic bacteria, magnetic nanomaterials have been integrated into living cells for bioorthogonal, magnetic manipulation of the cells. However, magnetized cells have so far been reported to be only binary system (on/off) without any control of magnetization degree, limiting their applications typically to the simple accumulation or separation of cells as a whole. In this work, the magnetization degree is tightly controlled, leading to the generation of multiple subgroups of the magnetized cells, and each subgroup is manipulated independently from the other subgroups in the pool of heterogeneous cell-mixtures. This work will provide a strategic approach to tailor-made fabrication of magnetically functionalized living cells as micro-magnets, and open new vistas in biotechnological and biomedical applications, which highly demand the spatio-temporal manipulation of living cells. PMID:27917922

  2. A thermoresponsive and magnetic colloid for 3D cell expansion and reconfiguration.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Aram; Francini, Nora; White, Lisa; Dixon, James; Gould, Toby; Rashidi, Hassan; Al Ghanami, Racha Cheikh; Hruschka, Veronika; Redl, Heinz; Saunders, Brian R; Alexander, Cameron; Shakesheff, Kevin M

    2015-01-27

    A dual thermoresponsive and magnetic colloidal gel matrix is described for enhanced stem-cell culture. The combined properties of the material allow enzyme-free passaging and expansion of mesenchymal stem cells, as well as isolation of cells postculture by the simple process of lowering the temperature and applying an external magnetic field. The colloidal gel can be reconfigured with thermal and magnetic stimuli to allow patterning of cells in discrete zones and to control movement of cells within the porous matrix during culture.

  3. Lab on a chip for continuous-flow magnetic cell separation.

    PubMed

    Hejazian, Majid; Li, Weihua; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2015-02-21

    Separation of cells is a key application area of lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices. Among the various methods, magnetic separation of cells utilizing microfluidic devices offers the merits of biocompatibility, efficiency, and simplicity. This review discusses the fundamental physics involved in using magnetic force to separate particles, and identifies the optimisation parameters and corresponding methods for increasing the magnetic force. The paper then elaborates the design considerations of LOC devices for continuous-flow magnetic cell separation. Examples from the recently published literature illustrate these state-of-the-art techniques.

  4. Magnetically driven spinning nanowires as effective materials for eradicating living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Daniel S.; Hopkins, Xiaoping; Kringel, Rosemarie; Park, Jungrae; Jeon, In Tak; Keun Kim, Young

    2012-04-01

    We present a method to inflame cells, in vitro, by applying an alternating current (ac) magnetic field to ferromagnetic nanowires (NWs) internalized by living cells. Nickel (Ni) NWs were internalized by human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293). The application of ac magnetic field to the cells induced spinning of the cells via the motion of internalized NWs. This resulted in cell death by physically causing damage. A study of the response of cytokine to cells with spinning NWs shows increased interleukin-6 effects when compared with responses from non-spinning cells. The spinning effect of cells caused by the application of magnetic field can be used to target and inflame the cells. Such experiments suggest the possibility of inflaming cells for the treatment of cancer.

  5. One-step magnetic modification of yeast cells by microwave-synthesized iron oxide microparticles.

    PubMed

    Pospiskova, K; Prochazkova, G; Safarik, I

    2013-06-01

    Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells were magnetically modified with magnetic iron oxide particles prepared by microwave irradiation of iron(II) sulfate at high pH. The modification procedure was very simple and fast. Both non-cross-linked and glutaraldehyde cross-linked magnetic cells enabled efficient sucrose conversion into glucose and fructose, due to the presence of active intracellular invertase. The prepared magnetic whole-cell biocatalyst was stable; almost the same catalytic activity was observed after 1-month storage at 4°C. Simple magnetic separation and stability of the developed biocatalyst enabled its reusability without significant loss of enzyme activity. Magnetic whole yeast cell biocatalyst containing intracellular invertase in its natural environment has been prepared. Magnetic properties enable its easy separation from reaction mixture. Magnetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells have been used for invert sugar production, hydrolysing sucrose into glucose and fructose. The described magnetization procedure employing microwave-synthesized iron oxide microparticles is a low-cost and easy-to-perform alternative to already existing magnetization techniques. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Application of magnetic carriers to two examples of quantitative cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Qian, Zhixi; Choi, Young Suk; David, Allan E.; Todd, Paul; Hanley, Thomas R.

    2017-04-01

    The use of magnetophoretic mobility as a surrogate for fluorescence intensity in quantitative cell analysis was investigated. The objectives of quantitative fluorescence flow cytometry include establishing a level of labeling for the setting of parameters in fluorescence activated cell sorters (FACS) and the determination of levels of uptake of fluorescently labeled substrates by living cells. Likewise, the objectives of quantitative magnetic cytometry include establishing a level of labeling for the setting of parameters in flowing magnetic cell sorters and the determination of levels of uptake of magnetically labeled substrates by living cells. The magnetic counterpart to fluorescence intensity is magnetophoretic mobility, defined as the velocity imparted to a suspended cell per unit of magnetic ponderomotive force. A commercial velocimeter available for making this measurement was used to demonstrate both applications. Cultured Gallus lymphoma cells were immunolabeled with commercial magnetic beads and shown to have adequate magnetophoretic mobility to be separated by a novel flowing magnetic separator. Phagocytosis of starch nanoparticles having magnetic cores by cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells, a CHO line, was quantified on the basis of magnetophoretic mobility.

  7. Sequential CD34 cell fractionation by magnetophoresis in a magnetic dipole flow sorter

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Thomas; Karl, Stephan; Moore, Lee R.; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Williams, P. Stephen; Zborowski, Maciej

    2010-01-01

    Cell separation and fractionation based on fluorescent and magnetic labeling procedures are common tools in contemporary research. These techniques rely on binding of fluorophores or magnetic particles conjugated to antibodies to target cells. Cell surface marker expression levels within cell populations vary with progression through the cell cycle. In an earlier work we showed the reproducible magnetic fractionation (single pass) of the Jurkat cell line based on the population distribution of CD45 surface marker expression. Here we present a study on magnetic fractionation of a stem and progenitor cell (SPC) population using the established acute myelogenous leukemia cell line KG-1a as a cell model. The cells express a CD34 cell surface marker associated with the hematopoietic progenitor cell activity and the progenitor cell lineage commitment (related to the CD34 marker expression level). The CD34 expression level is approximately an order of magnitude lower than that of the CD45 marker, which required further improvements of the magnetic fractionation apparatus. The cells were immuno-magnetically labeled using a sandwich of anti CD34 antibody-phycoerythrin (PE) conjugate and anti PE magnetic nanobead and fractionated into eight components using a continuous flow dipole magnetophoresis apparatus. The CD34 marker expression distribution between sorted fractions was measured by quantitative PE flow cytometry (using QuantiBRITE™ PE calibration beads), and it was shown to be correlated with the cell magnetophoretic mobility distribution. A flow outlet addressing scheme based on the concept of the transport lamina thickness was used to control cell distribution between the eight outlet ports. The fractional cell distributions showed good agreement with numerical simulations of the fractionation based on the cell magnetophoretic mobility distribution in the unsorted sample. PMID:20024182

  8. Using injection molding and reversible bonding for easy fabrication of magnetic cell trapping and sorting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royet, David; Hériveaux, Yoann; Marchalot, Julien; Scorretti, Riccardo; Dias, André; Dempsey, Nora M.; Bonfim, Marlio; Simonet, Pascal; Frénéa-Robin, Marie

    2017-04-01

    Magnetism and microfluidics are two key elements for the development of inexpensive and reliable tools dedicated to high-throughput biological analysis and providing a large panel of applications in domains ranging from fundamental biology to medical diagnostics. In this work, we introduce a simple protocol, relying on injection molding and reversible bonding for fabrication of magnetic cell trapping and sorting devices using only standard soft-lithography equipment. Magnetic strips or grids made of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) doped with hard (NdFeB) or soft (carbonyl iron) magnetic powders were integrated at the bottom of whole PDMS chips. Preliminary results show the effective deviation/trapping of magnetic beads or magnetically-labeled bacteria as the sample flows through the microchannel, proving the potential of this rapid prototyping approach for easy fabrication of magnetic cell sorters.

  9. Controlled Payload Release by Magnetic Field Triggered Neural Stem Cell Destruction for Malignant Glioma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Muroski, Megan E; Morshed, Ramin A; Cheng, Yu; Vemulkar, Tarun; Mansell, Rhodri; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Aboody, Karen S; Cowburn, Russell P; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells have recently garnered attention as drug and particle carriers to sites of tumors, due to their natural ability to track to the site of interest. Specifically, neural stem cells (NSCs) have demonstrated to be a promising candidate for delivering therapeutics to malignant glioma, a primary brain tumor that is not curable by current treatments, and inevitably fatal. In this article, we demonstrate that NSCs are able to internalize 2 μm magnetic discs (SD), without affecting the health of the cells. The SD can then be remotely triggered in an applied 1 T rotating magnetic field to deliver a payload. Furthermore, we use this NSC-SD delivery system to deliver the SD themselves as a therapeutic agent to mechanically destroy glioma cells. NSCs were incubated with the SD overnight before treatment with a 1T rotating magnetic field to trigger the SD release. The potential timed release effects of the magnetic particles were tested with migration assays, confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry for apoptosis. After the magnetic field triggered SD release, glioma cells were added and allowed to internalize the particles. Once internalized, another dose of the magnetic field treatment was administered to trigger mechanically induced apoptotic cell death of the glioma cells by the rotating SD. We are able to determine that NSC-SD and magnetic field treatment can achieve over 50% glioma cell death when loaded at 50 SD/cell, making this a promising therapeutic for the treatment of glioma.

  10. Controlled Payload Release by Magnetic Field Triggered Neural Stem Cell Destruction for Malignant Glioma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Muroski, Megan E.; Morshed, Ramin A.; Cheng, Yu; Vemulkar, Tarun; Mansell, Rhodri; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Aboody, Karen S.; Cowburn, Russell P.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells have recently garnered attention as drug and particle carriers to sites of tumors, due to their natural ability to track to the site of interest. Specifically, neural stem cells (NSCs) have demonstrated to be a promising candidate for delivering therapeutics to malignant glioma, a primary brain tumor that is not curable by current treatments, and inevitably fatal. In this article, we demonstrate that NSCs are able to internalize 2 μm magnetic discs (SD), without affecting the health of the cells. The SD can then be remotely triggered in an applied 1 T rotating magnetic field to deliver a payload. Furthermore, we use this NSC-SD delivery system to deliver the SD themselves as a therapeutic agent to mechanically destroy glioma cells. NSCs were incubated with the SD overnight before treatment with a 1T rotating magnetic field to trigger the SD release. The potential timed release effects of the magnetic particles were tested with migration assays, confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry for apoptosis. After the magnetic field triggered SD release, glioma cells were added and allowed to internalize the particles. Once internalized, another dose of the magnetic field treatment was administered to trigger mechanically induced apoptotic cell death of the glioma cells by the rotating SD. We are able to determine that NSC-SD and magnetic field treatment can achieve over 50% glioma cell death when loaded at 50 SD/cell, making this a promising therapeutic for the treatment of glioma. PMID:26734932

  11. Water Permeability of Chlorella Cell Membranes by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Darryl G.; Steponkus, Peter L.; Bustard, Larry D.; Cotts, Robert M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurement by two nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques of the mean residence time τa of water molecules inside Chlorella vulgaris (Beijerinck) var. “viridis” (Chodot) is reported. The first is the Conlon and Outhred (1972 Biochim Biophys Acta 288: 354-361) technique in which extracellular water is doped with paramagnetic Mn2+ ions. Some complications in application of this technique are identified as being caused by the affinity of Chlorella cell walls for Mn2+ ions which shortens the NMR relaxation times of intra- and extracellular water. The second is based upon observations of effects of diffusion on the spin echo of intra- and extracellular water. Echo attenuation of intracellular water is distinguished from that of extracellular water by the extent to which diffusive motion is restricted. Intracellular water, being restricted to the cell volume, suffers less echo attenuation. From the dependence of echo amplitude upon gradient strength at several values of echo time, the mean residence time of intracellular water can be determined. From the mean residence time of intracellular water, the diffusional water permeability coefficient of the Chlorella membrane is calculated to be 2.1 ± 0.4 × 10−3 cm sec−1. PMID:16660456

  12. High-throughput generation of spheroids using magnetic nanoparticles for three-dimensional cell culture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Ah; Choi, Jong-Ho; Kim, Minsoo; Rhee, Won Jong; Son, Boram; Jung, Hyun-Kyo; Park, Tai Hyun

    2013-11-01

    Various attempts have been made to develop three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture methods because 3-D cells mimic the structures and functional properties of real tissue compared with those of monolayer cultures. Here, we report on a highly simple and efficient 3-D spheroid generation method based on a magnetic pin-array system to concentrate magnetic nanoparticle-incorporated cells in a focal direction. This system was comprised only of external magnets and magnetically induced iron pins to generate a concentrated magnetic field for attracting cells in a focused direction. 3-D spheroid generation was achieved simply by adding magnetic nanoparticle-incorporated cells into a well and covering the plate with a magnetic lid. Cell clustering occurred rapidly within 5 min and created more compact cells with time through the focused magnetic force. This system ensured not only reproducible and size-controlled generation of spheroids but also versatile types of spheroids such as random mixed, core-shell, and fused spheroids, providing a very useful tool for various biological applications.

  13. Magnetic stromal layers for enhanced and unbiased recovery of co-cultured hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Savvateeva, Maria V; Demin, Alexander M; Krasnov, Victor P; Belyavsky, Alexander V

    2016-09-15

    Cell co-culture systems have a long history of application in hematology and hold promise for successful hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell expansion. Here we report that various types of stromal cells used in such co-cultures can be rapidly and efficiently labeled with l-lysine-modified Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles. Hematopoiesis-supporting activity does not seem to be compromised after magnetic labeling of stromal cells, and the loss of the label by stromal layers during extended culturing is negligible. Magnetic labeling allows for simple and efficient removal of stromal component, yielding unbiased hematopoietic cell populations. When Lin(-) bone mouse marrow fraction was co-cultured with magnetic stromal layers and resulting cell populations were harvested by trypsinization, the yields of total nucleated cells, colony forming cells, and phenotypically primitive Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-kit(+) subset were substantially higher as compared with nonadherent cell fractions harvested after conventional stromal co-culture. The advantage offered by the magnetic stroma approach over the traditional one was even more significant after a second round of co-culture and was more dramatic for more primitive hematopoietic cells. We conclude that magnetic stromal layers represent a simple, efficient, and convenient tool for co-culturing and subsequent recovery of sufficiently pure unbiased populations of hematopoietic cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of sinusoidal magnetic field observed on cell proliferation, ion concentration, and osmolarity in two human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lingzhen; Dong, Liang; Chen, Yantian; Qi, Hanshi; Xiao, Dengming

    2006-01-01

    Low frequency magnetic fields have previously been shown to affect cell functions. In this article, the effects of 20 mT, 50 Hz sinusoidal magnetic field on cell proliferation, ion concentration, and osmolarity in two human cancer cell lines (HL-60 and SK-Hep-1) were investigated. Inhibition of cell growth was observed. On the other hand, the exposure also increased the Na+, K+ ion concentration and osmolarity in cell supernatant compared to the control group. To our knowledge, this is the first study on cancer cells where magnetic fields affect osmolarity in cell supernatant. In addition, a model of cells exposed to the oscillating magnetic field is described as well as the characteristics of ions in and out of cells. The experimental data appears to be consistent with the theoretical analysis. The results are also discussed in terms of the relationships among cell growth, ion concentration, and osmolarity. Magnetic field inhibitions of cell growth in vitro may relate to changes in cell ion concentration and osmolarity.

  15. Response of animal and vegetative cells to the effect of a typical magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talikina, M. G.; Izyumov, Yu. G.; Krylov, V. V.

    2013-12-01

    Experimentally reproduced fluctuations of a low-frequency magnetic field in a nanotesla range (magnetic storm) affect the mitosis of animals and vegetative cells. Action of this factor during twenty four hours leads to a significant increase in the proliferative activity of embryo cells in roach ( Rutilus rutilus L.) and meristem cells of onion rootlets ( Allium cepa). The clastogenic effect statistically confirmed only in the Allium test seems to reflect the species specificity of the response and higher sensitivity of the cell association of the onion meristem to magnetic storm.

  16. Magnetic Labelling of Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Iron-Doped Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles as Tool for Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Panseri, Silvia; Montesi, Monica; Iafisco, Michele; Adamiano, Alessio; Ghetti, Martina; Cenacchi, Giovanna; Tampieri, Anna

    2016-05-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles offer several opportunities in nanomedicine and magnetic cell targeting. They are considered to be an extremely promising approach for the translation of cell-based therapies from the laboratory to clinical studies. In fact, after injection, the magnetic labeled cells could be driven by a static magnetic field and localized to the target site where they can perform their specific role. In this study, innovative iron-doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (FeHA NPs) were tested with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as tools for cell therapy. Results showed that FeHA NPs could represent higher cell viability in'respect to commercial superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) at four different concentrations ranging from 10 μg/ml up to 200 μg/ml and would also upregulate an early marker involved in commitment and differentiation of MSCs. Moreover, FeHA NPs were uptaken without negatively affecting the cell behavior and their ultrastructure. Thus obtained magnetic cells were easily guided by application of a static magnetic field. This work demonstrates the promising opportunities of FeHA NPs in MSCs labeling due to the unique features of fast degradation and very low iron content of FeHA NPs compared to SPIONs. Likewise, due to the intrinsic properties of FeHA NPs, this approach could be simply transferred to different cell types as an effective magnetic carrier of drugs, growth factors, miRNA, etc., offering favorable prospects in nanomedicine.

  17. High-throughput magnetic flow sorting of human cells selected on the basis of magnetophoretic mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, Lisa M.; Sanders, Lehanna; Kennedy, David; Guernsey, Byron; Todd, Paul; Leary, James F.

    2010-02-01

    We have shown the potential of a new method for optimizing the separation of human stem cell subsets from peripheral blood based on a novel cell labeling technique that leverages the capabilities of a new commercially available high speed magnetic cell sorting system (IKOTECH LLC, New Albany, IN). This new system sorts cells in a continuously flowing manner using a Quadrupole Magnetic cell Sorter (QMS). The sorting mechanism is based upon the magnetophoretic mobility of the cells, a property related to the relative binding distributions of magnetic particles per cell, as determined by the utilization of a Magnetic Cell Tracking Velocimeter (MCTV). KG-1 cells were competitively labeled with anti-CD34 magnetic beads and anti-CD34 FITC to obtain an optimal level of magnetophoretic mobility as visualized by the MCTV for high throughput sort recovery in the QMS. In QMS sorting, the concept of split-flow thin channel (SPLITT) separation technology is applied by having a sample stream enter a vertical annular flow channel near the channel's interior wall followed by another sheath flow entering near the exterior wall. The two flows are initially separated by a flow splitter. They pass through the bore of a Halbach permanent quadrupole magnet assembly, which draws magnetized cells outward and deflects them into a positive outflow, while negative cells continue straight out via the inner flow lamina. QMS sorts cells based upon their magnetophoretic mobility, or the velocity of a cell per unit ponderomotive force, the counterpart of fluorescence intensity in flow cytometry. The magnetophoretic mobility distribution of a cell population, measured by automated MCTV, is used as input data for the algorithmic control of sample, sheath, and outlet flow velocities of the QMS. In this study, the relative binding distributions of magnetic particles per cell were determined by MCTV using novel sorting and sizing algorithms. The resulting mobility histograms were used to set the QMS

  18. Exposure to strong static magnetic field slows the growth of human cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Raylman, R R; Clavo, A C; Wahl, R L

    1996-01-01

    Proposals to enhance the amount of radiation dose delivered to small tumors with radioimmunotherapy by constraining emitted electrons with very strong homogeneous static magnetic fields has renewed interest in the cellular effects of prolonged exposures to such fields. Past investigations have not studied the effects on tumor cell growth of lengthy exposures to very high magnetic fields. Three malignant human cell lines, HTB 63 (melanoma), HTB 77 IP3 (ovarian carcinoma), and CCL 86 (lymphoma: Raji cells), were exposed to a 7 Tesla uniform static magnetic field for 64 hours. Following exposure, the number of viable cells in each group was determined. In addition, multicycle flow cytometry was performed on all cell lines, and pulsed-field electrophoresis was performed solely on Raji cells to investigate changes in cell cycle patterns and the possibility of DNA fragmentation induced by the magnetic field. A 64 h exposure to the magnetic field produced a reduction in viable cell number in each of the three cell lines. Reductions of 19.04 +/- 7.32%, 22.06 +/- 6.19%, and 40.68 +/- 8.31% were measured for the melanoma, ovarian carcinoma, and lymphoma cell lines, respectively, vs. control groups not exposed to the magnetic field. Multicycle flow cytometry revealed that the cell cycle was largely unaltered. Pulsed-field electrophoresis analysis revealed no increase in DNA breaks related to magnetic field exposure. In conclusion, prolonged exposure to a very strong magnetic field appeared to inhibit the growth of three human tumor cell lines in vitro. The mechanism underlying this effect has not, as yet, been identified, although alteration of cell growth cycle and gross fragmentation of DNA have been excluded as possible contributory factors. Future investigations of this phenomenon may have a significant impact on the future understanding and treatment of cancer.

  19. Magnetic assembly of 3D cell clusters: visualizing the formation of an engineered tissue.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Kumar, S R P; Puri, I K; Elankumaran, S

    2016-02-01

    Contactless magnetic assembly of cells into 3D clusters has been proposed as a novel means for 3D tissue culture that eliminates the need for artificial scaffolds. However, thus far its efficacy has only been studied by comparing expression levels of generic proteins. Here, it has been evaluated by visualizing the evolution of cell clusters assembled by magnetic forces, to examine their resemblance to in vivo tissues. Cells were labeled with magnetic nanoparticles, then assembled into 3D clusters using magnetic force. Scanning electron microscopy was used to image intercellular interactions and morphological features of the clusters. When cells were held together by magnetic forces for a single day, they formed intercellular contacts through extracellular fibers. These kept the clusters intact once the magnetic forces were removed, thus serving the primary function of scaffolds. The cells self-organized into constructs consistent with the corresponding tissues in vivo. Epithelial cells formed sheets while fibroblasts formed spheroids and exhibited position-dependent morphological heterogeneity. Cells on the periphery of a cluster were flattened while those within were spheroidal, a well-known characteristic of connective tissues in vivo. Cells assembled by magnetic forces presented visual features representative of their in vivo states but largely absent in monolayers. This established the efficacy of contactless assembly as a means to fabricate in vitro tissue models. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Composite ceramic anvil cell for high-pressure magnetic properties measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanaswamy, Suresh; Tallon, Jeff

    2013-06-01

    A ceramic-anvil based non-magnetic high-pressure cell has been developed for the magnetic properties measurement system (SQUID). The purpose of the development of this new cell is to undertake high-pressure measurements on samples like spin-crossover compounds, and antiferromagnetic materials with very weak magnetization beyond the existing capability of 1.2 GPa1. This new design is a combination of the diamond anvil cell (DAC) and piston-cylinder cell but very simplified by removing the laborious anvil-alignment procedure and making it user-friendly. A maximum pressure of 5 GPa was attained with this new cell using a 1.0 mm diameter culet composite anvils and a pre-indented CuBe gasket. We report the results of the magnetization on the CaFe2As2 single crystal sample using this new pressure-cell. Research Support: The Marsden Fund

  1. Effects of static magnetic field on human leukemic cell line HL-60.

    PubMed

    Sabo, J; Mirossay, L; Horovcak, L; Sarissky, M; Mirossay, A; Mojzis, J

    2002-05-15

    A number of structures with magnetic moments exists in living organisms that may be oriented by magnetic field. While most experimental efforts belong to the area of effects induced by weak and extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields, we attempt to give an attention to the biological effects of strong static magnetic fields. The influence of static magnetic field (SMF) on metabolic activity of cells was examined. The metabolic activity retardation is observed in human leukemic cell line HL-60 exposed to 1-T SMF for 72 h. The retardation effect was observed as well as in the presence of the mixture of the antineoplastic drugs 5 fluorouracil, cisplatin, doxorubicin and vincristine.

  2. Characterization of rat hair follicle stem cells selected by vario magnetic activated cell sorting system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Enyi; Lian, Xiaohua; Chen, Wei; Yang, Tian; Yang, Li

    2009-10-30

    Hair follicle stem cells (HfSCs) play crucial roles in hair follicle morphogenesis and hair cycling. These stem cells are self-renewable and have the multi-lineage potential to generate epidermis, sebaceous glands, and hair follicle. The separation and identification of hair follicle stem cells are important for further research in stem cell biology. In this study, we report on the successful enrichment of rat hair follicle stem cells through vario magnetic activated cell sorting (Vario MACS) and the biological characteristics of the stem cells. We chose the HfSCs positive surface markers CD34, alpha 6-integrin and the negative marker CD71 to design four isolation strategies: positive selection with single marker of CD34, positive selection with single marker of alpha 6-integrin, CD71 depletion followed by CD34 positive selection, and CD71 depletion followed by alpha 6-integrin positive selection. The results of flow cytometry analysis showed that all four strategies had ideal effects. Specifically, we conducted a series of researches on HfSCs characterized by their high level of CD34, termed CD34(bri) cells, and low to undetectable expression of CD34, termed CD34(dim) cells. CD34(bri) cells had greater proliferative potential and higher colony-forming ability than CD34(dim) cells. Furthermore, CD34(bri) cells had some typical characteristics as progenitor cells, such as large nucleus, obvious nucleolus, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio and few cytoplasmic organelles. Our findings clearly demonstrated that HfSCs with high purity and viability could be successfully enriched with Vario MACS.

  3. Sequential CD34 cell fractionation by magnetophoresis in a magnetic dipole flow sorter.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Thomas; Karl, Stephan; Moore, Lee R; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Williams, P Stephen; Zborowski, Maciej

    2010-01-01

    Cell separation and fractionation based on fluorescent and magnetic labeling procedures are common tools in contemporary research. These techniques rely on binding of fluorophores or magnetic particles conjugated to antibodies to target cells. Cell surface marker expression levels within cell populations vary with progression through the cell cycle. In an earlier work we showed the reproducible magnetic fractionation (single pass) of the Jurkat cell line based on the population distribution of CD45 surface marker expression. Here we present a study on magnetic fractionation of a stem and progenitor cell (SPC) population using the established acute myelogenous leukemia cell line KG-1a as a cell model. The cells express a CD34 cell surface marker associated with the hematopoietic progenitor cell activity and the progenitor cell lineage commitment. The CD34 expression level is approximately an order of magnitude lower than that of the CD45 marker, which required further improvements of the magnetic fractionation apparatus. The cells were immunomagnetically labeled using a sandwich of anti-CD34 antibody-phycoerythrin (PE) conjugate and anti-PE magnetic nanobead and fractionated into eight components using a continuous flow dipole magnetophoresis apparatus. The CD34 marker expression distribution between sorted fractions was measured by quantitative PE flow cytometry (using QuantiBRITE PE calibration beads), and it was shown to be correlated with the cell magnetophoretic mobility distribution. A flow outlet addressing scheme based on the concept of the transport lamina thickness was used to control cell distribution between the eight outlet ports. The fractional cell distributions showed good agreement with numerical simulations of the fractionation based on the cell magnetophoretic mobility distribution in the unsorted sample.

  4. Measurement of the Magnetic and Electrical Activity of Individual Cells In Vitro

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-26

    AD- A2 6 4 517 MEASUREMENT OF THE MAGNETIC AND ELECTRICAL ACTIVITY OF INDIVIDUAL CELLS IN VITRO DTIC FINAL REPORT- ELECTF CHRISTOPHER C. DAVIS S C...NUMBERS Measurement of the Magnetic and Electrical DAMD17-90-Z-0052 Activity of Individual Cells In Vitro 61102A...This report describes the development of both incoherent and coherent fiber optic sensors for monitoring the electrical activity of cells and tissue. The

  5. Role of nanoparticle valency in the nondestructive magnetic-relaxation-mediated detection and magnetic isolation of cells in complex media.

    PubMed

    Kaittanis, Charalambos; Santra, Santimukul; Perez, J Manuel

    2009-09-09

    Nanoparticle-based diagnostics typically involve the conjugation of targeting ligands to the nanoparticle to create a sensitive and specific nanosensor that can bind and detect the presence of a target, such as a bacterium, cancer cell, protein, or DNA sequence. Studies that address the effect of multivalency on the binding and detection pattern of these nanosensors, particularly on magnetic relaxation nanosensors that sense the presence of a target in a dose-dependent manner by changes in the water relaxation times (DeltaT2), are scarce. Herein, we study the effect of multivalency on the detection profile of cancer cells and bacteria in complex media, such as blood and milk. In these studies, we conjugated folic acid at two different densities (low-folate and high-folate) on polyacrylic-acid-coated iron oxide nanoparticles and studied the interaction of these magnetic nanosensors with cancer cells expressing the folate receptor. Results showed that the multivalent high-folate magnetic relaxation nanosensor performed better than its low folate counterpart, achieving single cancer cell detection in blood samples within 15 min. Similar results were also observed when a high molecular weight anti-folate antibody (MW 150 kDa) was used instead of the low molecular weight folic acid ligand (MW 441.4 kDa), although better results in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range, and speed of detection were obtained when the folate ligand was used. Studies using bacteria in milk suspensions corroborated the results observed with cancer cells. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that nanoparticle multivalency plays a key role in the interaction of the nanoparticle with the cellular target and modulate the behavior and sensitivity of the assay. Furthermore, as detection with magnetic relaxation nanosensors is a nondestructive technique, magnetic isolation and further characterization of the cancer cells is possible.

  6. Isolation of dendritic cells from umbilical cord blood using magnetic activated cell sorting or adherence.

    PubMed

    Bie, Yachun; Xu, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a highly specialized type of antigen-presenting cell. The present study describes and compares two methods for preparing DCs from umbilical cord blood. The first method involves the isolation of DCs by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS). This technique isolates CD34(+) cells from cord blood and induces the formation of DCs by the addition of cytokines, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4. The second method involves the generation of large numbers of DCs from cord blood using an adherent method, which isolates umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and induces DCs in the same conditions as those used in MACS. The DCs were harvested following 7 days of incubation and observed with an inverted microscope. The phenotype of the cells was then analyzed by flow cytometry. The results revealed that, subsequent to 7 days of incubation, the differentiated DCs obtained using the adherent method were more mature than those isolated using MACS. However, these cells were unable to be maintained in culture for more than 9-10 days. By contrast, the DCs derived from CD34(+) cells by MACS were phenotypically stable and could be maintained for up to 3 weeks in culture. Either method produced DCs from cord blood. However, the DCs isolated using the MACS method demonstrated higher homogeneity, yield and viability than those obtained using the adherent method. Due to the various compositions of the monocyte subsets isolated, isolation methods affect the phenotypes and functions of the resultant DCs.

  7. An effective strategy of magnetic stem cell delivery for spinal cord injury therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tukmachev, Dmitry; Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskii, Vitalii; Dejneka, Alexandr; Babic, Michal; Syková, Eva; Kubinová, Šárka

    2015-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition that results in significant mortality and morbidity. Treatment of SCI utilizing stem cell transplantation represents a promising therapy. However, current conventional treatments are limited by inefficient delivery strategies of cells into the injured tissue. In this study, we designed a magnetic system and used it to accumulate stem cells labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) at a specific site of a SCI lesion. The loading of stem cells with engineered SPIONs that guarantees sufficient attractive magnetic forces was achieved. Further, the magnetic system allowed rapid guidance of the SPION-labelled cells precisely to the lesion location. Histological analysis of cell distribution throughout the cerebrospinal channel showed a good correlation with the calculated distribution of magnetic forces exerted onto the transplanted cells. The results suggest that focused targeting and fast delivery of stem cells can be achieved using the proposed non-invasive magnetic system. With future implementation the proposed targeting and delivery strategy bears advantages for the treatment of disease requiring fast stem cell transplantation.Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition that results in significant mortality and morbidity. Treatment of SCI utilizing stem cell transplantation represents a promising therapy. However, current conventional treatments are limited by inefficient delivery strategies of cells into the injured tissue. In this study, we designed a magnetic system and used it to accumulate stem cells labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) at a specific site of a SCI lesion. The loading of stem cells with engineered SPIONs that guarantees sufficient attractive magnetic forces was achieved. Further, the magnetic system allowed rapid guidance of the SPION-labelled cells precisely to the lesion location. Histological analysis of cell distribution throughout the cerebrospinal

  8. Magnet-Bead Based MicroRNA Delivery System to Modify CD133+ Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wiekhorst, Frank; Steinhoff, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    Aim. CD133+ stem cells bear huge potential for regenerative medicine. However, low retention in the injured tissue and massive cell death reduce beneficial effects. In order to address these issues, we intended to develop a nonviral system for appropriate cell engineering. Materials and Methods. Modification of human CD133+ stem cells with magnetic polyplexes carrying microRNA was studied in terms of efficiency, safety, and targeting potential. Results. High microRNA uptake rates (~80–90%) were achieved without affecting CD133+ stem cell properties. Modified cells can be magnetically guided. Conclusion. We developed a safe and efficient protocol for CD133+ stem cell modification. Our work may become a basis to improve stem cell therapeutical effects as well as their monitoring with magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27795713

  9. Positive selection of human blood cells using improved high gradient magnetic separation filters.

    PubMed

    Thomas, T E; Richards, A J; Roath, O S; Watson, J H; Smith, R J; Lansdorp, P M

    1993-01-01

    High gradient magnetic separators (HGMS) create magnetic field gradients that can be used to attract much smaller and less magnetic particles than those required for conventional magnetic separation techniques. As a result cells can be labeled with submicron magnetic particles and still be separated using an HGMS filter. Typically, HGMS filters consist of random arrays of wire such as stainless steel wool. Wire elements arranged regularly in a filter should allow more efficient separation of cells. Filters were constructed containing ordered wire arrays composed of 430 series stainless steel wire mesh with wire diameters of 50, 100, or 150 microns. The ability of these filters to separate T cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cell suspensions was tested and found superior to random arrays of 302 series stainless steel wire (Thomas et al, 1992). Target cells recognized by OKT5 monoclonal antibody were cross-linked to dextran-iron particles of approximately 20 nm in diameter. Separation conditions were optimized and after one passage through the filter 88% of the OKT5+ cells were recovered in the enriched fraction with 85% purity (%OKT5+). Multiple passages (3 times) could achieve 99% purity with 68% recovery. Variations in separation flow rate had a large effect on the balance between purity and recovery. Optimum separation efficiencies were achieved only when > 10(8) cells were processed. The primarily cause of nonspecific entrapment of CD8- cells was not nonspecific magnetic labeling of cells but the physical (nonmagnetic) characteristics of the filter/filter chamber.

  10. The effect of magnetic targeting on the uptake of magnetic-fluid-loaded liposomes by human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Martina, Marie-Sophie; Wilhelm, Claire; Lesieur, Sylviane

    2008-10-01

    Interactions of magnetic-fluid-loaded liposomes (MFL) with human adenocarcinoma prostatic cell line PC3 were investigated in vitro. MFL consisted of unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles (mean hydrodynamic diameter close to 180 nm) encapsulating 8-nm nanocrystals of maghemite (gamma-Fe(2)O(3)) and sterically stabilized by introducing 5 mol.% of distearylphosphatidylcholine poly(ethylene glycol)(2000) (DSPE-PEG(2000)) in the vesicle bilayer. The association processes with living cells, including binding and effective internalization, were followed versus time at two levels. On one hand, the lipid vesicles labeled by 1 mol.% of rhodamine-marked phosphatidylethanolamine were imaged by confocal fluorescence microscopy. On the other hand, the iron oxide particles associated with cells were independently quantified by magnetophoresis. This allowed modeling of MFL uptake kinetics as a two-step process involving first binding adsorption onto the outer cell membrane followed by subsequent internalization. Capture efficiency was significantly improved by guiding MFL in the near vicinity of the cells by means of a 0.29-T external magnet developing a magnetic field gradient close to 30 mT/mm. Double detection of lipids by fluorescence tracking and of iron oxide by magnetophoresis showed excellent correlation. This demonstrated that MFL associate with tumor cells as intact vesicle structures which conserve their internal content.

  11. Magnetic labeling of non-phagocytic adherent cells with iron oxide nanoparticles: a comprehensive study.

    PubMed

    Boutry, Sébastien; Brunin, Stéphanie; Mahieu, Isabelle; Laurent, Sophie; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N

    2008-01-01

    Small particles of iron oxide (SPIO) and ultrasmall particles of iron oxide (USPIO), inducing a strong negative contrast on T(2) and T(2)*-weighted MR images, are the most commonly used systems for the magnetic labeling of cultured cells and their subsequent detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this work is to study the influence of iron incubation concentration, nanoparticle size and nanoparticle coating on the magnetic labeling and the viability of non-phagocytic adherent cells in culture. The magnetic labeling of 3T6 fibroblasts was studied by T(2)-weighted MRI at 4.7 T and by dosing-or cytochemical revealing-of iron through methods based on Perl's Prussian blue staining. Cells were incubated for 48 h with increasing iron concentrations of SPIO (25-1000 microg Fe/ml Endorem. Sinerem, a USPIO (20-40 nm) coated with neutral dextran, and Resovist (65 nm), a SPIO bearing an anionic carboxydextran coating, were compared with Endorem (dextran-coated, 80-150 nm) as magnetic tags. The iron loading of marrow stromal cell primary cultures (MSCs) isolated from rat femurs was compared with that of 3T6 fibroblasts. The SPIO-labeling of cells with Endorem was found to be dependent on the iron incubation concentration. MSCs, more sparsely distributed in the culture, exhibited higher iron contents than more densely populated 3T6 fibroblast cultures. A larger iron loading was achieved with Resovist than with Endorem, which in turn was more efficient than Sinerem as a magnetic tag. The magnetic labeling of cultured non-phagocytic adherent cells with iron oxide nanoparticles was thus found to be dependent on the relative concentration of the magnetic tag and of the cells in culture, on the nanoparticle size, and on the coating type. The viability of cells, estimated by methods assessing cell membrane permeability, was not affected by magnetic labeling in the conditions used in this work.

  12. Degradation of Carbazole by Microbial Cells Immobilized in Magnetic Gellan Gum Gel Beads▿

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xia; Gai, Zhonghui; Yu, Bo; Feng, Jinhui; Xu, Changyong; Yuan, Yong; Lin, Zhixin; Xu, Ping

    2007-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic heterocycles, such as carbazole, are environmental contaminants suspected of posing human health risks. In this study, we investigated the degradation of carbazole by immobilized Sphingomonas sp. strain XLDN2-5 cells. Four kinds of polymers were evaluated as immobilization supports for Sphingomonas sp. strain XLDN2-5. After comparison with agar, alginate, and κ-carrageenan, gellan gum was selected as the optimal immobilization support. Furthermore, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were prepared by a coprecipitation method, and the average particle size was about 20 nm with 49.65-electromagnetic-unit (emu) g−1 saturation magnetization. When the mixture of gellan gel and the Fe3O4 nanoparticles served as an immobilization support, the magnetically immobilized cells were prepared by an ionotropic method. The biodegradation experiments were carried out by employing free cells, nonmagnetically immobilized cells, and magnetically immobilized cells in aqueous phase. The results showed that the magnetically immobilized cells presented higher carbazole biodegradation activity than nonmagnetically immobilized cells and free cells. The highest biodegradation activity was obtained when the concentration of Fe3O4 nanoparticles was 9 mg ml−1 and the saturation magnetization of magnetically immobilized cells was 11.08 emu g−1. Additionally, the recycling experiments demonstrated that the degradation activity of magnetically immobilized cells increased gradually during the eight recycles. These results support developing efficient biocatalysts using magnetically immobilized cells and provide a promising technique for improving biocatalysts used in the biodegradation of not only carbazole, but also other hazardous organic compounds. PMID:17827304

  13. Magnetically labeled cells with surface-modified fe3 o4 spherical and rod-shaped magnetic nanoparticles for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Gil, Sara; Correia, Clara R; Mano, João F

    2015-04-22

    Magnetically targeted cells with internalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) could allow the success of cell transplantation and cell-based therapies, overcoming low cell retention that occurs when delivering cells by intravenous or local injection. Upon magnetization, these cells could then accumulate and stimulate the regeneration of the tissue in situ. Magnetic targeting of cells requires a detailed knowledge between interactions of engineered nanomaterials and cells, in particular the influence of shape and surface functionalization of MNPs. For the first time, cellular internalization of amino surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles of two different shapes (nanospheres or nanorods) is studied. MNPs show high cellular uptake and labeled cells could exhibit a strong reaction with external magnetic fields. Compared to nanorods, nanospheres show better internalization efficiency, and labeled cells exhibit strong transportation reaction with external magnetic fields. Contiguous viable cell-sheets are developed by magnetic-force-based tissue engineering. The results confirm that the developed magnetic-responsive nano-biomaterials have potential applicability in tissue engineering or cellular therapies. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Pulsed taut-wire measurement of the magnetic alignment of the ITS induction cells

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, J.G.; Burns, M.J.; Honaberger, D.J.

    1993-06-01

    The mechanical and magnetic alignment of the first eight induction-cell, solenoid magnets of the Integrated Test Stand (ITS) for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility were measured by observing the deflection of a fine, taut wire carrying a pulsed current. To achieve the required alignment (less than 0.25 mm offset and less than 5 mrad tilt), the magnet design uses quadrufilar windings and iron field-smoothing rings. After detailed measurements of each solenoid magnet, the cells are assembled and then mechanically aligned using a laser and an alignment target moved along the cell centerline. After the cells are in final position, the pulsed wire method is used to verify the magnetic alignment. The measurements show an average offset of the magnetic axes from the mechanical axis of 0. 15 mm, with a maximum offset of 0.3 mm. The average tilt of the magnetic axis was 0.7 mrad with a maximum tilt of 1.4 mrad. Tilts are corrected to less than 0.3 mrad, using dipole trim magnets assembled into each cell. Correction is limited noise.

  15. ELF magnetic fields do not affect cell survival and DNA damage induced by ultraviolet B.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kohei; Narita, Eijiro; Yamada, Masaru; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2014-02-01

    We investigated whether extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic field exposure has modification effects on cell survival after ultraviolet B (UV-B) irradiation and on repair process of DNA damage induced by UV-B irradiation in WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA and XP2OS(SV) cells. The ELF magnetic field exposure was conducted using a Helmholtz coil-based system that was designed to generate a sinusoidal magnetic field at 5 mT and 60 Hz. Cell survival was assessed by WST assay after UV-B irradiation at 20-80 J/m(2) , ELF magnetic field exposure for 24 h, followed by incubation for 48 h. DNA damage was assessed by quantification of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation and 6-4 photoproduct formation using ELISA after UV-B irradiation at 20-80 J/m(2) followed by ELF magnetic field exposure for 24 h. No significant changes were observed in cell survival between ELF magnetic field and sham exposures. Similarly, DNA damage induced by UV-B irradiation did not change significantly following ELF magnetic field exposure. Our results suggest that ELF magnetic field exposure at 5 mT does not have modification effect on cell survival after UV-B irradiation and on repair process of DNA damage induced by UV-B irradiation.

  16. Effects of 13 T Static Magnetic Fields (SMF) in the Cell Cycle Distribution and Cell Viability in Immortalized Hamster Cells and Human Primary Fibroblasts Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guoping; Chen, Shaopeng; Zhao, Ye; Zhu, Lingyan; Huang, Pei; Bao, Lingzhi; Wang, Jun; Wang, Lei; Wu, Lijun; Wu, Yuejin; Xu, An

    2010-02-01

    Magnetic resonance image (MRI) systems with a much higher magnetic flux density were developed and applied for potential use in medical diagnostic. Recently, much attention has been paid to the biological effects of static, strong magnetic fields (SMF). With the 13 T SMF facility in the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, the present study focused on the cellular effects of the SMF with 13 T on the cell viability and the cell cycle distribution in immortalized hamster cells, such as human-hamster hybrid (AL) cells, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, DNA double-strand break repair deficient mutant (XRS-5) cells, and human primary skin fibroblasts (AG1522) cells. It was found that the exposure of 13 T SMF had less effect on the colony formation in either nonsynchronized or synchronized AL cells. Moreover, as compared to non-exposed groups, there were slight differences in the cell cycle distribution no matter in either synchronized or nonsynchronized immortalized hamster cells after exposure to 13 T SMF. However, it should be noted that the percentage of exposed AG1522 cells at G0/G1 phase was decreased by 10% as compared to the controls. Our data indicated that although 13 T SMF had minimal effects in immortalized hamster cells, the cell cycle distribution was slightly modified by SMF in human primary fibroblasts.

  17. Magnetic field effects in dye-sensitized solar cells controlled by different cell architecture

    PubMed Central

    Klein, M.; Pankiewicz, R.; Zalas, M.; Stampor, W.

    2016-01-01

    The charge recombination and exciton dissociation are generally recognized as the basic electronic processes limiting the efficiency of photovoltaic devices. In this work, we propose a detailed mechanism of photocurrent generation in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) examined by magnetic field effect (MFE) technique. Here we demonstrate that the magnitude of the MFE on photocurrent in DSSCs can be controlled by the radius and spin coherence time of electron-hole (e-h) pairs which are experimentally modified by the photoanode morphology (TiO2 nanoparticles or nanotubes) and the electronic orbital structure of various dye molecules (ruthenium N719, dinuclear ruthenium B1 and fully organic squaraine SQ2 dyes). The observed MFE is attributed to magnetic-field-induced spin-mixing of (e-h) pairs according to the Δg mechanism. PMID:27440452

  18. Magnetic field effects in dye-sensitized solar cells controlled by different cell architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, M.; Pankiewicz, R.; Zalas, M.; Stampor, W.

    2016-07-01

    The charge recombination and exciton dissociation are generally recognized as the basic electronic processes limiting the efficiency of photovoltaic devices. In this work, we propose a detailed mechanism of photocurrent generation in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) examined by magnetic field effect (MFE) technique. Here we demonstrate that the magnitude of the MFE on photocurrent in DSSCs can be controlled by the radius and spin coherence time of electron-hole (e-h) pairs which are experimentally modified by the photoanode morphology (TiO2 nanoparticles or nanotubes) and the electronic orbital structure of various dye molecules (ruthenium N719, dinuclear ruthenium B1 and fully organic squaraine SQ2 dyes). The observed MFE is attributed to magnetic-field-induced spin-mixing of (e-h) pairs according to the Δg mechanism.

  19. EGFR-targeted magnetic nanoparticle heaters kill cancer cells without a perceptible temperature rise.

    PubMed

    Creixell, Mar; Bohórquez, Ana C; Torres-Lugo, Madeline; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2011-09-27

    It is currently believed that magnetic nanoparticle heaters (MNHs) can kill cancer cells only when the temperature is raised above 43 °C due to energy dissipation in an alternating magnetic field. On the other hand, simple heat conduction arguments indicate that in small tumors or single cells the relative rates of energy dissipation and heat conduction result in a negligible temperature rise, thus limiting the potential of MNHs in treating small tumors and metastatic cancer. Here we demonstrate that internalized MNHs conjugated to epidermal growth factor (EGF) and which target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) do result in a significant (up to 99.9%) reduction in cell viability and clonogenic survival in a thermal heat dose dependent manner, without the need for a perceptible temperature rise. The effect appears to be cell type specific and indicates that magnetic nanoparticles in alternating magnetic fields may effectively kill cancer cells under conditions previously considered as not possible.

  20. Facile fabrication of tissue-engineered constructs using nanopatterned cell sheets and magnetic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penland, Nisa; Choi, Eunpyo; Perla, Mikael; Park, Jungyul; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2017-02-01

    We report a simple and versatile method for in vitro fabrication of scaffold-free tissue-engineered constructs with predetermined cellular alignment, by combining magnetic cell levitation with thermoresponsive nanofabricated substratum (TNFS) based cell sheet engineering technique. The TNFS based nanotopography provides contact guidance cues for regulation of cellular alignment and enables cell sheet transfer, while magnetic nanoparticles facilitate the magnetic levitation of the cell sheet. The temperature-mediated change in surface wettability of the thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), substratum enables the spontaneous detachment of cell monolayers, which can then be easily manipulated through use of a ring or disk shaped magnet. Our developed platform could be readily applicable to production of tissue-engineered constructs containing complex physiological structures for the study of tissue structure-function relationships, drug screening, and regenerative medicine.

  1. Facile fabrication of tissue-engineered constructs using nanopatterned cell sheets and magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Penland, Nisa; Choi, Eunpyo; Perla, Mikael; Park, Jungyul; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2017-02-17

    We report a simple and versatile method for in vitro fabrication of scaffold-free tissue-engineered constructs with predetermined cellular alignment, by combining magnetic cell levitation with thermoresponsive nanofabricated substratum (TNFS) based cell sheet engineering technique. The TNFS based nanotopography provides contact guidance cues for regulation of cellular alignment and enables cell sheet transfer, while magnetic nanoparticles facilitate the magnetic levitation of the cell sheet. The temperature-mediated change in surface wettability of the thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), substratum enables the spontaneous detachment of cell monolayers, which can then be easily manipulated through use of a ring or disk shaped magnet. Our developed platform could be readily applicable to production of tissue-engineered constructs containing complex physiological structures for the study of tissue structure-function relationships, drug screening, and regenerative medicine.

  2. Remote Actuation of Magnetic Nanoparticles For Cancer Cell Selective Treatment Through Cytoskeletal Disruption.

    PubMed

    Master, Alyssa M; Williams, Philise N; Pothayee, Nikorn; Pothayee, Nipon; Zhang, Rui; Vishwasrao, Hemant M; Golovin, Yuri I; Riffle, Judy S; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2016-09-20

    Motion of micron and sub-micron size magnetic particles in alternating magnetic fields can activate mechanosensitive cellular functions or physically destruct cancer cells. However, such effects are usually observed with relatively large magnetic particles (>250 nm) that would be difficult if at all possible to deliver to remote sites in the body to treat disease. Here we show a completely new mechanism of selective toxicity of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SMNP) of 7 to 8 nm in diameter to cancer cells. These particles are coated by block copolymers, which facilitates their entry into the cells and clustering in the lysosomes, where they are then magneto-mechanically actuated by remotely applied alternating current (AC) magnetic fields of very low frequency (50 Hz). Such fields and treatments are safe for surrounding tissues but produce cytoskeletal disruption and subsequent death of cancer cells while leaving healthy cells intact.

  3. Remote Actuation of Magnetic Nanoparticles For Cancer Cell Selective Treatment Through Cytoskeletal Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Master, Alyssa M.; Williams, Philise N.; Pothayee, Nikorn; Pothayee, Nipon; Zhang, Rui; Vishwasrao, Hemant M.; Golovin, Yuri I.; Riffle, Judy S.; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Motion of micron and sub-micron size magnetic particles in alternating magnetic fields can activate mechanosensitive cellular functions or physically destruct cancer cells. However, such effects are usually observed with relatively large magnetic particles (>250 nm) that would be difficult if at all possible to deliver to remote sites in the body to treat disease. Here we show a completely new mechanism of selective toxicity of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SMNP) of 7 to 8 nm in diameter to cancer cells. These particles are coated by block copolymers, which facilitates their entry into the cells and clustering in the lysosomes, where they are then magneto-mechanically actuated by remotely applied alternating current (AC) magnetic fields of very low frequency (50 Hz). Such fields and treatments are safe for surrounding tissues but produce cytoskeletal disruption and subsequent death of cancer cells while leaving healthy cells intact. PMID:27644858

  4. Static Magnetic Field Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation in Pulp Cells by Affecting Cell Membrane Stability

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Jeng-Ting; Lee, Lin-Wen; Lin, Che-Tong

    2015-01-01

    One of the causes of dental pulpitis is lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced inflammatory response. Following pulp tissue inflammation, odontoblasts, dental pulp cells (DPCs), and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) will activate and repair damaged tissue to maintain homeostasis. However, when LPS infection is too serious, dental repair is impossible and disease may progress to irreversible pulpitis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine whether static magnetic field (SMF) can attenuate inflammatory response of dental pulp cells challenged with LPS. In methodology, dental pulp cells were isolated from extracted teeth. The population of DPSCs in the cultured DPCs was identified by phenotypes and multilineage differentiation. The effects of 0.4 T SMF on DPCs were observed through MTT assay and fluorescent anisotropy assay. Our results showed that the SMF exposure had no effect on surface markers or multilineage differentiation capability. However, SMF exposure increases cell viability by 15%. In addition, SMF increased cell membrane rigidity which is directly related to higher fluorescent anisotropy. In the LPS-challenged condition, DPCs treated with SMF demonstrated a higher tolerance to LPS-induced inflammatory response when compared to untreated controls. According to these results, we suggest that 0.4 T SMF attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory response to DPCs by changing cell membrane stability. PMID:25884030

  5. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron energization in laser-driven magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Guo, Fan; Sheng, Zhengming; Wang, Huanyu; Wang, Shui

    2016-01-25

    Electrons can be energized during laser-driven magnetic reconnection, and the energized electrons form three super-Alfvénic electron jets in the outflow region (Lu et al 2014 New J. Phys. 16 083021). In this paper, by performing two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we find that the electrons can also be significantly energized before magnetic reconnection occurs. When two plasma bubbles with toroidal magnetic fields expand and squeeze each other, the electrons in the magnetic ribbons are energized through betatron acceleration due to the enhancement of the magnetic field, and an electron temperature anisotropy ${T}_{{\\rm{e}}\\perp }\\gt {T}_{{\\rm{e}}| | }$ develops. Meanwhile, some electrons are trapped and bounced repeatedly between the two expanding/approaching bubbles and get energized through a Fermi-like process. Furthermore, the energization before magnetic reconnection is more significant (or important) than that during magnetic reconnection.

  6. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron energization in laser-driven magnetic reconnection

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Guo, Fan; ...

    2016-01-25

    Electrons can be energized during laser-driven magnetic reconnection, and the energized electrons form three super-Alfvénic electron jets in the outflow region (Lu et al 2014 New J. Phys. 16 083021). In this paper, by performing two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we find that the electrons can also be significantly energized before magnetic reconnection occurs. When two plasma bubbles with toroidal magnetic fields expand and squeeze each other, the electrons in the magnetic ribbons are energized through betatron acceleration due to the enhancement of the magnetic field, and an electron temperature anisotropymore » $${T}_{{\\rm{e}}\\perp }\\gt {T}_{{\\rm{e}}| | }$$ develops. Meanwhile, some electrons are trapped and bounced repeatedly between the two expanding/approaching bubbles and get energized through a Fermi-like process. Furthermore, the energization before magnetic reconnection is more significant (or important) than that during magnetic reconnection.« less

  7. Directing cell therapy to anatomic target sites in vivo with magnetic resonance targeting.

    PubMed

    Muthana, Munitta; Kennerley, Aneurin J; Hughes, Russell; Fagnano, Ester; Richardson, Jay; Paul, Melanie; Murdoch, Craig; Wright, Fiona; Payne, Christopher; Lythgoe, Mark F; Farrow, Neil; Dobson, Jon; Conner, Joe; Wild, Jim M; Lewis, Claire

    2015-08-18

    Cell-based therapy exploits modified human cells to treat diseases but its targeted application in specific tissues, particularly those lying deep in the body where direct injection is not possible, has been problematic. Here we use a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system to direct macrophages carrying an oncolytic virus, Seprehvir, into primary and metastatic tumour sites in mice. To achieve this, we magnetically label macrophages with super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and apply pulsed magnetic field gradients in the direction of the tumour sites. Magnetic resonance targeting guides macrophages from the bloodstream into tumours, resulting in increased tumour macrophage infiltration and reduction in tumour burden and metastasis. Our study indicates that clinical MRI scanners can not only track the location of magnetically labelled cells but also have the potential to steer them into one or more target tissues.

  8. Directing cell therapy to anatomic target sites in vivo with magnetic resonance targeting

    PubMed Central

    Muthana, Munitta; Kennerley, Aneurin J.; Hughes, Russell; Fagnano, Ester; Richardson, Jay; Paul, Melanie; Murdoch, Craig; Wright, Fiona; Payne, Christopher; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Farrow, Neil; Dobson, Jon; Conner, Joe; Wild, Jim M.; Lewis, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapy exploits modified human cells to treat diseases but its targeted application in specific tissues, particularly those lying deep in the body where direct injection is not possible, has been problematic. Here we use a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system to direct macrophages carrying an oncolytic virus, Seprehvir, into primary and metastatic tumour sites in mice. To achieve this, we magnetically label macrophages with super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and apply pulsed magnetic field gradients in the direction of the tumour sites. Magnetic resonance targeting guides macrophages from the bloodstream into tumours, resulting in increased tumour macrophage infiltration and reduction in tumour burden and metastasis. Our study indicates that clinical MRI scanners can not only track the location of magnetically labelled cells but also have the potential to steer them into one or more target tissues. PMID:26284300

  9. Magnetic Field-Activated Sensing of mRNA in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Saira F; Guz, Nataliia; Zakharchenko, Andrey; Deng, Han; Tumanov, Alexei V; Woodworth, Craig D; Minko, Sergiy; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M; Katz, Evgeny

    2017-08-25

    Detection of specific mRNA in living cells has attracted significant attention in the past decade. Probes that can be easily delivered into cells and activated at the desired time can contribute to understanding translation, trafficking and degradation of mRNA. Here we report a new strategy termed magnetic field-activated binary deoxyribozyme (MaBiDZ) sensor that enables both efficient delivery and temporal control of mRNA sensing by magnetic field. MaBiDZ uses two species of magnetic beads conjugated with different components of a multicomponent deoxyribozyme (DZ) sensor. The DZ sensor is activated only in the presence of a specific target mRNA and when a magnetic field is applied. Here we demonstrate that MaBiDZ sensor can be internalized in live MCF-7 breast cancer cells and activated by a magnetic field to fluorescently report the presence of specific mRNA, which are cancer biomarkers.

  10. Noninvasive Microsurgery Using Aptamer-Functionalized Magnetic Microdisks for Tumor Cell Eradication.

    PubMed

    Zamay, Tatiana N; Zamay, Galina S; Belyanina, Irina V; Zamay, Sergey S; Denisenko, Valery V; Kolovskaya, Olga S; Ivanchenko, Tatiana I; Grigorieva, Valentina L; Garanzha, Irina V; Veprintsev, Dmitry V; Glazyrin, Yury E; Shabanov, Alexandr V; Prinz, Viktor Y; Seleznev, Vladimir A; Sokolov, Alexey E; Prokopenko, Vladimir S; Kim, Petr D; Gargaun, Ana; Berezovski, Maxim V; Zamay, Anna S

    2017-04-01

    Magnetomechanical cell disruption using nano- and microsized structures is a promising biomedical technology used for noninvasive elimination of diseased cells. It applies alternating magnetic field (AMF) for ferromagnetic microdisks making them oscillate and causing cell membrane disruption with cell death followed by apoptosis. In this study, we functionalized the magnetic microdisks with cell-binding DNA aptamers and guided the microdisks to recognize cancerous cells in a mouse tumor in vivo. Only 10 min of the treatment with a 100 Hz AMF was enough to eliminate cancer cells from a malignant tumor. Our results demonstrate a good perspective of using aptamer-modified magnetic microdisks for noninvasive microsurgery for tumors.

  11. Bio-Nano-Magnetic Materials for Localized Mechanochemical Stimulation of Cell Growth and Death.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, Devrim; Dennis, Cindi L; Lee, Gil U

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are promising new tools for therapeutic applications, such as magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia therapy and targeted drug delivery. Recent in vitro studies have demonstrated that a force application with magnetic tweezers can also affect cell fate, suggesting a therapeutic potential for magnetically modulated mechanical stimulation. The magnetic properties of nanoparticles that induce physical responses and the subtle responses that result from mechanically induced membrane damage and/or intracellular signaling are evaluated. Magnetic particles with various physical, geometric, and magnetic properties and specific functionalization can now be used to apply mechanical force to specific regions of cells, which permit the modulation of cellular behavior through the use of spatially and time controlled magnetic fields. On one hand, mechanochemical stimulation has been used to direct the outgrowth on neuronal growth cones, indicating a therapeutic potential for neural repair. On the other hand, it has been used to kill cancer cells that preferentially express specific receptors. Advances made in the synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanomaterials and a better understanding of cellular mechanotransduction mechanisms may support the translation of mechanochemical stimulation into the clinic as an emerging therapeutic approach.

  12. In situ labeling and magnetic resonance imaging of transplanted human hepatic stem cells.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Randall; Wauthier, Eliane; Tallheden, Tommi; Reid, Lola M; Hsu, Edward

    2011-10-01

    The purpose is to address the problem in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of contrast agent dilution. In situ magnetic labeling of cells and MRI were used to assess distribution and growth of human hepatic stem cells (hHpSCs) transplanted into severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)/non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. It was done with commercially available magnetic microbeads coupled to an antibody to a surface antigen, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), uniquely expressed in the liver by hepatic progenitors. We validated the microbead connection to cells and related MRI data to optical microscopy observations in order to develop a means to quantitatively estimate cell numbers in the aggregates detected. Cell counts of hHpSCs at different times post-transplantation revealed quantifiable evidence of cell engraftment and expansion. This magnetic labeling methodology can be used with any antibody coupled to a magnetic particle to target any surface antigen that distinguishes transplanted cells from host cells, thus facilitating studies that define methods and strategies for clinical cell therapy programs.

  13. In Situ Labeling and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of transplanted Human Hepatic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Randall; Wauthier, Eliane; Tallheden, Tommi; Reid, Lola; Hsu, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose is to address the problem in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of contrast agent dilution. Procedures In situ magnetic labeling of cells and MRI were used to assess distribution and growth of human hepatic stem cells (hHpSCs) transplanted into SCID/nod mice. It was done with commercially available magnetic microbeads coupled to an antibody to a surface antigen, Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM), uniquely expressed in the liver by hepatic progenitors. Results We validated the microbead connection to cells and related MRI data to optical microscopy observations in order to develop a means to quantitatively estimate cell numbers in the aggregates detected. Cell counts of hHpSCs at different times post-transplantation revealed quantifiable evidence of cell engraftment and expansion. Conclusions This magnetic labeling methodology can be used with any antibody coupled to a magnetic particle to target any surface antigen that distinguishes transplanted cells from host cells, thus facilitating studies that define methods and strategies for clinical cell therapy programs. PMID:20890665

  14. X-ray scattering study of the interactions between magnetic nanoparticles and living cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Isaac; Cipriano, Bani H.; Ehrman, Sheryl H.; Williams, Darryl N.; Pulliam Holoman, Tracey R.; Martinez-Miranda, L. J.

    2005-04-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have found increased applicability in drug delivery, cancer treatment, and immunoassays. There is a need for an improved understanding of how MNPs interact with living cell membranes in applied magnetic fields to use them effectively. The interactions between Escherichia coli (E. coli) and SiO{sub 2}/{gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite particles in magnetic fields were studied using x-ray scattering. Magnetic field strengths up to 423 mT were applied to the samples to see the effects of the magnetic fields on the E. coli membranes in the presence of the magnetic particles in the cell cultures. X-ray scattering results from continuous cultures of E. coli showed two peaks, a sharp peak at q=0.528 A{sup -1} (1.189 nm) up to 362 mT of magnetic field strength and a diffuse one at q=0.612 A{sup -1} (1.027 nm). The sharp peak was shifted to the smaller side of q when magnetic particles were added and the magnitude of the applied magnetic field strength was increased from 227 to 298 mT, to 362 mT, whereas the diffuse peak did not changed. A critical magnetic field strength where the sharp peak disappears was found at 362 mT.

  15. Theoretical Development, Design and Testing of a Magnetic Fuel Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    magnetic gas passing through a magnetic field is described for generation of electrical power. The first stage of this thesis explores the...Colorado, 1992 Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING from the...Gamani Kurunasiri Thesis Co-Advisor John Powers Chairman Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering iii

  16. Ultrasensitive detection of microbial cells using magnetic focus enhanced lateral flow sensors.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wen; Cho, Il-Hoon; Zhou, Zhongwu; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2016-04-07

    We report on an improved lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) sensor with a magnetic focus for ultrasensitive naked-eye detection of pathogenic microorganisms at a near single cell limit without any pre-enrichment steps, by allowing the magnetic probes to focus the labelled pathogens to the target zone of the LF strip.

  17. THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN.
    Harland and Liburdy (1) reported that 1.2-uT, 60-Hz magnetic fields could significantly block the inhibitory action of pharmacological levels of tamoxifen (10-7 M) on the growth of MCF-7 human br...

  18. THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN.
    Harland and Liburdy (1) reported that 1.2-uT, 60-Hz magnetic fields could significantly block the inhibitory action of pharmacological levels of tamoxifen (10-7 M) on the growth of MCF-7 human br...

  19. Rapid cell isolation by magnetic flow sorting for applications in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zborowski, M; Sun, L; Moore, L R; Chalmers, J J

    1999-01-01

    Rapid and efficient cell sorting methods are important for tissue progenitor cell isolation. We built and evaluated a laboratory prototype of a continuous flow, quadrupole magnetic cell sorter. The sorter was tested on a model cell system of human peripheral lymphocytes. The helper T cell subpopulation was targeted by primary, mouse anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody conjugated to a fluorochrome (FITC), and magnetized by secondary, anti-FITC antibody magnetic colloid. The purities and recoveries of the cell fractions were measured by flow cytometry and an automated cell counter. Cells were spread across the flow according to their magnetophoretic mobilities. The purity of the CD4 cell enriched fraction was 99.6%, and the purity of the CD4 cell depleted fraction was 2% for an initial CD4 cell purity of 36%; the corresponding recovery of the enriched CD4 cell fraction was 59% at a sorting speed of 4,200 cells/s (four experiments). The recovery could be increased to 90% with a concomitant decrease in the purity of CD4 cell enriched fraction to 66%. This type of sorting should be applicable to any cells in suspension for which a suitable antibody exists, in particular, to large, fragile cells.

  20. Preparing substrates encoding cell patterning and localized intracellular magnetic particle stimulus for high-throughput experimentation.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Peter; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic particles, beyond the simple cell sorting and drug delivery applications for which they are typically known, have become a powerful tool in permitting remote control of biological activity. While this functionality is traditionally accomplished by linking particles to extracellular, membrane localized moieties (such as ion channels and integrins), the intracellular stimulation of cells via magnetic nanoparticles has recently shown to be a unique and powerful method by which to spatially polarize cell behavior. More traditional magnetic stimulation approaches, whereby single magnetic tweezers or permanent magnets are placed in proximity to cells growing on substrates lack resolution, control, and scalability. Conventional single cell-patterning approaches, while having large precision and scalability, typically allow the evaluation of the response of cells to only their immediate extracellular, protein environment. Here, we detail the protocol combining the above approaches to resolve the problems hampering many biomagnetic studies. By integrating the scalability and resolution of traditional silicon microfabrication with modern surface patterning capabilities, we demonstrate a method of conducting thousands of biomagnetic experiments in parallel, whereby individual cells with designed, patterned matrix are subjected to controlled, repetitive magnetic stimulus introduced by electroplated, micromagnetic elements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Magnetic Targeting Enhances Engraftment and Functional Benefit of Iron-Labeled Cardiosphere-Derived Cells in Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ke; Li, Tao-Sheng; Malliaras, Konstantinos; Davis, Darryl; Zhang, Yiqiang; Marbán, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The success of cardiac stem cell therapies is limited by low cell retention, due at least in part to washout via coronary veins. Objective We sought to counter the efflux of transplanted cells by rendering them magnetically-responsive and imposing an external magnetic field on the heart during and immediately after injection. Methods and Results Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) were labeled with superparamagnetic microspheres (SPMs). In vitro studies revealed that cell viability and function were minimally affected by SPM labeling. SPM-labeled rat CDCs were injected intramyocardially, with and without a superimposed magnet. With magnetic targeting, cells were visibly attracted towards the magnet and accumulated around the ischemic zone. In contrast, the majority of non-targeted cells washed out immediately after injection. Fluorescence imaging revealed more retention of transplanted cells in the heart, and less migration into other organs, in the magnetically-targeted group. Quantitative PCR confirmed that magnetic targeting enhanced cell retention (at 24 hours) and engraftment (at 3 weeks) in the recipient hearts by ∼3-fold compared to non-targeted cells. Morphometric analysis revealed maximal attenuation of LV remodeling, and echocardiography showed the greatest functional improvement, in the magnetic targeting group. Histologically, more engrafted cells were evident with magnetic targeting, but there was no incremental inflammation. Conclusion Magnetic targeting enhances cell retention, engraftment and functional benefit. This novel method to improve cell therapy outcomes offers the potential for rapid translation into clinical applications. PMID:20378859

  2. Nonmagnetic indenter-type high-pressure cell for magnetic measurements.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T C; Hidaka, H; Kotegawa, H; Fujiwara, K; Eremets, M I

    2007-02-01

    An indenter-type high-pressure cell has been developed for electric and magnetic measurements in low-temperature and high-magnetic-field environments. The maximum pressure achieved at low temperatures is more than 4.5 GPa, which is higher than that of a conventional piston-cylinder cell. The typical sample space at maximum pressure is 1.6 mm in diameter and approximately 0.7 mm in depth, and magnetic measurements such as ac-susceptibility and nuclear magnetic resonance can be performed using a miniature coil. All the components of the indenter cell are made of nonmagnetic materials that have enough thermal conductivity for low-temperature experiments using a 3He/4He dilution refrigerator. Another indenter-type cell designed for a commercial superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer is also reported.

  3. Botryococcus braunii cells: ultrasound-intensified outdoor cultivation integrated with in situ magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Kai; Wang, Feng; Stiles, Amanda R; Guo, Chen; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2014-09-01

    An integrated system combining ultrasound-intensified outdoor cultivation of Botryococcus braunii with in situ magnetic harvesting of the algal cells was developed. The algal cells were cultivated in 200 L plastic bag reactors, and seven five-minute ultrasonic treatments at a four-day interval using a fixed frequency of 40 kHz and a total power of 300 W improved algal cell biomass and hydrocarbon productivity. The algal cells were harvested using functional magnetic particles and a magnetic separator, and a recovery efficiency of 90% was obtained under continuous operation at a flow rate of 100mL/min using the in situ magnetic separation system. The overall production cost using the integrated system was US$ 25.14 per kilogram of B. braunii dry biomass. The system developed in this study provides a base for the industrial production of B. braunii.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Characteristics of Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Ding, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Yuan; Gu, Yajia; Peng, Weijun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To probe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC). Methods This study retrospectively collected MRI data for 21 pathology-confirmed OCCCs from 19 female patients. The MRI findings were analyzed to determine the tumor size, shape/edge, shape and number of protrusions within the cyst, cystic or necrotic components, signal intensity (SI) and enhancement features. Results The age of the 19 patients ranged from 28 to 63 years (mean age: 53 years). Unilateral tumors were found in 17 patients (17/19, 89%); the average size of all tumors was 10.8 cm. The tumors on MRI were classified into two categories: (a) “cystic adnexal mass with solid protrusions” in 12 (57%) and (b) “solid adnexal mass with cystic areas or necrosis” in 9 (43%). For group a, high to very high SI was observed for most tumors (10/12, 83%) on T1-weighted images (T1WIs), and very high SI was observed on T2-weighted images (T2WIs) for all 12 tumors. Most solid protrusions were irregular and few in number and exhibited heterogeneous intermediate SI on T1WIs and T2WIs and prolonged enhanced SI in the contrast study. All 9 OCCCs in group b were predominantly solid masses with unequally sized necrotic or cystic areas in which some cysts were located at the periphery of the tumor (4/9, 44%). The solid components in all 9 tumors showed iso- or slightly high SI on T1WIs, heterogeneous iso-high SI on T2WIs and heterogeneous prolonged enhancement. According to FIGO classification, 14 tumors (14/19, 74%) were stages I-II, and 5 (5/19, 26%) were stages III-IV. Conclusions On MRI, OCCCs present as large unilateral multilocular or unilocular cystic masses with irregular intermediate SI solid protrusions or predominantly solid masses with cysts or necrosis at an early FIGO stage. PMID:26161555

  5. Biosynthesis of magnetic nanoparticles by human mesenchymal stem cells following transfection with the magnetotactic bacterial gene mms6.

    PubMed

    Elfick, Alistair; Rischitor, Grigore; Mouras, Rabah; Azfer, Asim; Lungaro, Lisa; Uhlarz, Marc; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas; Lucocq, John; Gamal, Wesam; Bagnaninchi, Pierre; Semple, Scott; Salter, Donald M

    2017-01-04

    The use of stem cells to support tissue repair is facilitated by loading of the therapeutic cells with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) enabling magnetic tracking and targeting. Current methods for magnetizing cells use artificial MNPs and have disadvantages of variable uptake, cellular cytotoxicity and loss of nanoparticles on cell division. Here we demonstrate a transgenic approach to magnetize human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs are genetically modified by transfection with the mms6 gene derived from Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, a magnetotactic bacterium that synthesises single-magnetic domain crystals which are incorporated into magnetosomes. Following transfection of MSCs with the mms6 gene there is bio-assimilated synthesis of intracytoplasmic magnetic nanoparticles which can be imaged by MR and which have no deleterious effects on cell proliferation, migration or differentiation. The assimilation of magnetic nanoparticle synthesis into mammalian cells creates a real and compelling, cytocompatible, alternative to exogenous administration of MNPs.

  6. Biosynthesis of magnetic nanoparticles by human mesenchymal stem cells following transfection with the magnetotactic bacterial gene mms6

    PubMed Central

    Elfick, Alistair; Rischitor, Grigore; Mouras, Rabah; Azfer, Asim; Lungaro, Lisa; Uhlarz, Marc; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas; Lucocq, John; Gamal, Wesam; Bagnaninchi, Pierre; Semple, Scott; Salter, Donald M

    2017-01-01

    The use of stem cells to support tissue repair is facilitated by loading of the therapeutic cells with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) enabling magnetic tracking and targeting. Current methods for magnetizing cells use artificial MNPs and have disadvantages of variable uptake, cellular cytotoxicity and loss of nanoparticles on cell division. Here we demonstrate a transgenic approach to magnetize human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs are genetically modified by transfection with the mms6 gene derived from Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, a magnetotactic bacterium that synthesises single-magnetic domain crystals which are incorporated into magnetosomes. Following transfection of MSCs with the mms6 gene there is bio-assimilated synthesis of intracytoplasmic magnetic nanoparticles which can be imaged by MR and which have no deleterious effects on cell proliferation, migration or differentiation. The assimilation of magnetic nanoparticle synthesis into mammalian cells creates a real and compelling, cytocompatible, alternative to exogenous administration of MNPs. PMID:28051139

  7. Antibody conjugated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for cancer cell separation in fresh whole blood.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hengyi; Aguilar, Zoraida P; Yang, Lily; Kuang, Min; Duan, Hongwei; Xiong, Yonghua; Wei, Hua; Wang, Andrew

    2011-12-01

    A highly efficient process using iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (IO)-based immunomagnetic separation of tumor cells from fresh whole blood has been developed. The process involved polymer coated 30 nm IO that was modified with antibodies (Ab) against human epithelial growth factor receptor 2 (anti-HER2 or anti-HER2/neu) forming IO-Ab. HER2 is a cell membrane protein that is overexpressed in several types of human cancer cells. Using a HER2/neu overexpressing human breast cancer cell line, SK-BR3, as a model cell, the IO-Ab was used to separate 73.6% (with a maximum capture of 84%) of SK-BR3 cells that were spiked in 1 mL of fresh human whole blood. The IO-Ab preferentially bound to SK-BR3 cells over normal cells found in blood due to the high level of HER2/neu receptor on the cancer cells unlike the normal cell surfaces. The results showed that the nanosized magnetic nanoparticles exhibited an enrichment factor (cancer cells over normal cells) of 1:10,000,000 in a magnetic field (with gradient of 100 T/m) through the binding of IO-Ab on the cell surface that resulted in the preferential capture of the cancer cells. This research holds promise for efficient separation of circulating cancer cells in fresh whole blood. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Antibody Conjugated Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Cancer Cell Separation in Fresh Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hengyi; Aguilar, Zoraida P.; Yang, Lily; Kuang, Min; Duan, Hongwei; Xiong, Yonghua; Wei, Hua; Wang, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    A highly efficient process using iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (IO)-based immunomagnetic separation of tumor cells from fresh whole blood has been developed. The process involved polymer coated 30 nm IO that was modified with antibodies (Ab) against human epithelial growth factor receptor 2 (anti-HER2 or anti-HER2/neu) forming IO-Ab. HER2 is a cell membrane protein that is over expressed in several types of human cancer cells. Using a HER2/neu over expressing human breast cancer cell line, SK-BR3, as a model cell, the IO-Ab was used to separate 73.6 % (with a maximum capture of 84%) of SK-BR3 cells that were spiked in 1 mL of fresh human whole blood. The IO-Ab preferentially bound to SK-BR3 cells over normal cells found in blood due to the high level of HER2/neu receptor on the cancer cells unlike the normal cell surfaces. The results showed that the nanosized magnetic nanoparticles exhibited an enrichment factor (cancer cells over normal cells) of 1:10,000,000 in a magnetic field (with gradient of 100 T/m) through the binding of IO-Ab on the cell surface that resulted in the preferential capture of the cancer cells. This research holds promise for efficient separation of circulating cancer cells in fresh whole blood. PMID:21920599

  9. Microwave-synthesized magnetic chitosan microparticles for the immobilization of yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Safarik, Ivo; Pospiskova, Kristyna; Maderova, Zdenka; Baldikova, Eva; Horska, Katerina; Safarikova, Mirka

    2015-01-01

    An extremely simple procedure has been developed for the immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells on magnetic chitosan microparticles. The magnetic carrier was prepared using an inexpensive, simple, rapid, one-pot process, based on the microwave irradiation of chitosan and ferrous sulphate at high pH. Immobilized yeast cells have been used for sucrose hydrolysis, hydrogen peroxide decomposition and the adsorption of selected dyes.

  10. Can Lucifer Yellow Indicate Correct Permeability of Biological Cell Membrane under An Electric and Magnetic Field?

    PubMed Central

    Pourmirjafari Firoozabadi, Tahereh; Shankayi, Zeinab; Izadi, Azam; Pourmirjafari Firoozabadi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The effect of external magnetic and electric fields, in the range of electroporation and magnetoporation, on Lucifer Yellow (LY) fluorescence in the absence of cells is studied. Electric-field-induced quenching and magnetic field-induced increase are observed for fluorescence intensity of LY. Regard to the fact that the variation of field-induced fluorescence, even in the absence of cells, can be observed, the application of LY, as a marker, is debatable in electroporation and magnetoporation techniques. PMID:25685747

  11. Can Lucifer Yellow Indicate Correct Permeability of Biological Cell Membrane under An Electric and Magnetic Field?

    PubMed

    Pourmirjafari Firoozabadi, Tahereh; Shankayi, Zeinab; Izadi, Azam; Pourmirjafari Firoozabadi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The effect of external magnetic and electric fields, in the range of electroporation and magnetoporation, on Lucifer Yellow (LY) fluorescence in the absence of cells is studied. Electric-field-induced quenching and magnetic field-induced increase are observed for fluorescence intensity of LY. Regard to the fact that the variation of field-induced fluorescence, even in the absence of cells, can be observed, the application of LY, as a marker, is debatable in electroporation and magnetoporation techniques.

  12. Lymphocyte fractionation using immunomagnetic colloid and a dipole magnet flow cell sorter.

    PubMed

    Moore, L R; Zborowski, M; Sun, L; Chalmers, J J

    1998-09-24

    The relationship between cell function and surface marker expression is a subject of active investigation in biology and medicine. These investigations require separating cells of a homogeneous subset into multiple fractions of varying marker expression. We have developed a novel cell sorter, the dipole magnet flow sorter (DMFS), which separates selected T lymphocyte subpopulations, targeted by immunomagnetic colloid, into multiple fractions according to cell surface marker expression, as determined by flow cytometry. A narrow stream of cells is introduced into a sheath of carrier fluid in a rectangular channel while subjected to a perpendicular magnetic force. The special design of the pole pieces ensures a constant magnetic force acting on the magnetically labeled cells in the separation area. Cells are spread across the flow in relation to their magnetophoretic mobility. Separation is achieved by control of the positions of the effluent stream boundaries, which separate fluid volumes with cells of different magnetophoretic mobility. CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes labeled with primary antibody-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) conjugate and anti-FITC-magnetic colloid are the chosen cell systems. Flow cytometry analysis shows that, for CD4 cells, a three-fold increase in total marker number per cell is observed when comparing the highest to the lowest fluorescence fractions. Similarly, a four-fold increase in total marker number is observed for CD8 cells. We also observed the separation of two dissimilar cell types that differed in expression of the CD4 marker, monocytes and T helper lymphocytes. We believe that this type of separation is applicable to any cells in suspension for which a suitable antibody exists and, due to the comparatively gentle nature of the process, is particularly suitable for the sorting of fragile cells.

  13. Effects of high-gradient magnetic fields on living cell machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zablotskii, V.; Lunov, O.; Kubinova, S.; Polyakova, T.; Sykova, E.; Dejneka, A.

    2016-12-01

    A general interest in biomagnetic effects is related to fundamental studies of the influence of magnetic fields on living objects on the cellular and whole organism levels. Emerging technologies offer new directions for the use of high-gradient magnetic fields to control cell machinery and to understand the intracellular biological processes of the emerging field of nanomedicine. In this review we aim at highlighting recent advances made in identifying fundamental mechanisms by which magnetic gradient forces act on cell fate specification and cell differentiation. The review also provides an analysis of the currently available magnetic systems capable of generating magnetic fields with spatial gradients of up to 10 MT m-1, with the focus on their suitability for use in cell therapy. Relationships between experimental factors and underlying biophysical mechanisms and assumptions that would ultimately lead to a deeper understanding of cell machinery and the development of more predictive models for the evaluation of the effects of magnetic fields on cells, tissue and organisms are comprehensively discussed.

  14. Particle-In-Cell Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Crustal Magnetic Anomalies: Magnetic Cusp Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppe, A. R.; Halekas, J. S.; Delory, G. T.; Farrell, W. M.

    2012-01-01

    As the solar wind is incident upon the lunar surface, it will occasionally encounter lunar crustal remanent magnetic fields. These magnetic fields are small-scale, highly non-dipolar, have strengths up to hundreds of nanotesla, and typically interact with the solar wind in a kinetic fashion. Simulations, theoretical analyses, and spacecraft observations have shown that crustal fields can reflect solar wind protons via a combination of magnetic and electrostatic reflection; however, analyses of surface properties have suggested that protons may still access the lunar surface in the cusp regions of crustal magnetic fields. In this first report from a planned series of studies, we use a 1 1/2-dimensional, electrostatic particle-in-cell code to model the self-consistent interaction between the solar wind, the cusp regions of lunar crustal remanent magnetic fields, and the lunar surface. We describe the self-consistent electrostatic environment within crustal cusp regions and discuss the implications of this work for the role that crustal fields may play regulating space weathering of the lunar surface via proton bombardment.

  15. Magnetic Cell Labeling of Primary and Stem Cell-Derived Pig Hepatocytes for MRI-Based Cell Tracking of Hepatocyte Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Dwayne R.; Garrett, Wesley M.; Welch, Glenn; Caperna, Thomas J.; Talbot, Neil C.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2015-01-01

    Pig hepatocytes are an important investigational tool for optimizing hepatocyte transplantation schemes in both allogeneic and xenogeneic transplant scenarios. MRI can be used to serially monitor the transplanted cells, but only if the hepatocytes can be labeled with a magnetic particle. In this work, we describe culture conditions for magnetic cell labeling of cells from two different pig hepatocyte cell sources; primary pig hepatocytes (ppHEP) and stem cell-derived hepatocytes (PICM-19FF). The magnetic particle is a micron-sized iron oxide particle (MPIO) that has been extensively studied for magnetic cell labeling for MRI-based cell tracking. ppHEP could endocytose MPIO with labeling percentages as high as 70%, achieving iron content as high as ~55 pg/cell, with >75% viability. PICM-19FF had labeling >97%, achieving iron content ~38 pg/cell, with viability >99%. Extensive morphological and functional assays indicated that magnetic cell labeling was benign to the cells. The results encourage the use of MRI-based cell tracking for the development and clinical use of hepatocyte transplantation methodologies. Further, these results generally highlight the importance of functional cell assays in the evaluation of contrast agent biocompatibility. PMID:25856627

  16. Magnetic cell labeling of primary and stem cell-derived pig hepatocytes for MRI-based cell tracking of hepatocyte transplantation.

    PubMed

    Roach, Dwayne R; Garrett, Wesley M; Welch, Glenn; Caperna, Thomas J; Talbot, Neil C; Shapiro, Erik M

    2015-01-01

    Pig hepatocytes are an important investigational tool for optimizing hepatocyte transplantation schemes in both allogeneic and xenogeneic transplant scenarios. MRI can be used to serially monitor the transplanted cells, but only if the hepatocytes can be labeled with a magnetic particle. In this work, we describe culture conditions for magnetic cell labeling of cells from two different pig hepatocyte cell sources; primary pig hepatocytes (ppHEP) and stem cell-derived hepatocytes (PICM-19FF). The magnetic particle is a micron-sized iron oxide particle (MPIO) that has been extensively studied for magnetic cell labeling for MRI-based cell tracking. ppHEP could endocytose MPIO with labeling percentages as high as 70%, achieving iron content as high as ~55 pg/cell, with >75% viability. PICM-19FF had labeling >97%, achieving iron content ~38 pg/cell, with viability >99%. Extensive morphological and functional assays indicated that magnetic cell labeling was benign to the cells. The results encourage the use of MRI-based cell tracking for the development and clinical use of hepatocyte transplantation methodologies. Further, these results generally highlight the importance of functional cell assays in the evaluation of contrast agent biocompatibility.

  17. Magnetic trapping with simultaneous photoacoustic detection of molecularly targeted rare circulating tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chen-Wei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been widely used in molecular imaging to detect diseased cells by targeting them with nanoparticle-based contrast agents. However, the sensitivity and specificity are easily degraded because contrast agent signals can be masked by the background. Magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging uses a new type of multifunctional composite particle combining an optically absorptive gold nanorod core and magnetic nanospheres, which can potentially accumulate and concentrate targeted cells while simultaneously enhancing their specific contrast compared to background signals. In this study, HeLa cells molecularly targeted using nanocomposites with folic acid mimicking targeted rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were circulated at a 6 ml/min flow rate for trapping and imaging studies. Preliminary results show that the cells accumulate rapidly in the presence of an externally applied magnetic field produced by a dual magnet system. The sensitivity of the current system can reach up to 1 cell/ml in clear water. By manipulating the trapped cells magnetically, the specificity of detecting cells in highly absorptive ink solution can be enhanced with 16.98 dB background suppression by applying motion filtering on PA signals to remove unwanted background signals insensitive to the magnetic field. The results appear promising for future preclinical studies on a small animal model and ultimate clinical detection of rare CTCs in the vasculature.

  18. Electrochemical biotin detection based on magnetic beads and a new magnetic flow cell for screen printed electrode.

    PubMed

    Biscay, Julien; González García, María Begoña; Costa García, Agustín

    2015-01-01

    The use of the first flow-cell for magnetic assays with an integrated magnet is reported here. The flow injection analysis system (FIA) is used for biotin determination. The reaction scheme is based on a one step competitive assay between free biotin and biotin labeled with horseradish peroxidase (B-HRP). The mixture of magnetic beads modified with streptavidin (Strep-MB), biotin and B-HRP is left 15 min under stirring and then a washing step is performed. After that, 100 μL of the mixture is injected and after 30s 100 μL of 3,3',5,5'-Tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) is injected and the FIAgram is recorded applying a potential of -0.2V. The linear range obtained is from 0.01 to 1 nM of biotin and the sensitivity is 758 nA/nM. The modification and cleaning of the electrode are performed in an easy way due to the internal magnet of the flow cell.

  19. Disaggregation of stacked red blood cells under strong pulse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Do-Guwn; Park, Hyeji; Kim, Woori; Lee, Jinyoung; Lee, Hyun Sook

    2015-05-01

    We have investigated the dependence of magnetic field intensity and stimulation time on stacking formation of red blood cells (RBCs) to study blood circulation in human body. The pulse magnetic field with the maximum intensity of 0.27-0.07 T, pulse transition time of 0.102 ms, and pulse intervals of 1 s was applied to the distal end of palm for 5-20 min. The aggregation of RBCs was measured using microscopy. After the magnetic stimulation for 10 min, the fully stacked RBCs were almost separated from each other and moved much faster than those in unstimulated state. The disaggregation was maintained at a decreasing intensity of 0.19 T, and a few cells were stacked at the weak intensity of 0.07 T. In this work, we investigated the degree of RBCs aggregation and activity time by varying the intensity and time of magnetic stimulation to get the optimum condition of pulse magnetic field stimulus.

  20. Geometrically pinned magnetic domain wall for multi-bit per cell storage memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahri, M. Al; Sbiaa, R.

    2016-06-01

    Spintronic devices currently rely on magnetic switching or controlled motion of domain walls (DWs) by an external magnetic field or a spin-polarized current. Controlling the position of DW is essential for defining the state/information in a magnetic memory. During the process of nanowire fabrication, creating an off-set of two parts of the device could help to pin DW at a precise position. Micromagnetic simulation conducted on in-plane magnetic anisotropy materials shows the effectiveness of the proposed design for pinning DW at the nanoconstriction region. The critical current for moving DW from one state to the other is strongly dependent on nanoconstricted region (width and length) and the magnetic properties of the material. The DW speed which is essential for fast writing of the data could reach values in the range of hundreds m/s. Furthermore, evidence of multi-bit per cell memory is demonstrated via a magnetic nanowire with more than one constriction.

  1. Combining magnetic nanoparticles with cell derived microvesicles for drug loading and targeting.

    PubMed

    Silva, Amanda K A; Luciani, Nathalie; Gazeau, Florence; Aubertin, Kelly; Bonneau, Stéphanie; Chauvierre, Cédric; Letourneur, Didier; Wilhelm, Claire

    2015-04-01

    Inspired by microvesicle-mediated intercellular communication, we propose a hybrid vector for magnetic drug delivery. It consists of macrophage-derived microvesicles engineered to enclose different therapeutic agents together with iron oxide nanoparticles. Here, we investigated in vitro how magnetic nanoparticles may influence the vector effectiveness in terms of drug uptake and targeting. Human macrophages were loaded with iron oxide nanoparticles and different therapeutic agents: a chemotherapeutic agent (doxorubicin), tissue-plasminogen activator (t-PA) and two photosensitizers (disulfonated tetraphenyl chlorin-TPCS2a and 5,10,15,20-tetra(m-hydroxyphenyl)chlorin-mTHPC). The hybrid cell microvesicles were magnetically responsive, readily manipulated by magnetic forces and MRI-detectable. Using photosensitizer-loaded vesicles, we showed that the uptake of microvesicles by cancer cells could be kinetically modulated and spatially controlled under magnetic field and that cancer cell death was enhanced by the magnetic targeting. From the clinical editor: In this article, the authors devised a biogenic method using macrophages to produce microvesicles containing both iron oxide and chemotherapeutic agents. They showed that the microvesicles could be manipulated by magnetic force for targeting and subsequent delivery of the drug payload against cancer cells. This smart method could provide a novel way for future fight against cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Biomechanics of cell membrane under low-frequency time-varying magnetic field: a shell model.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hui; Curcuru, Austen

    2016-12-01

    Cell membrane deforms in the electromagnetic field, suggesting an interesting control of cellular physiology by the field. Previous research has focused on the biomechanical analysis of membrane deformation under electric fields that are generated by electrodes. An alternative, noninvasive method to generate an electric field is the use of electromagnetic induction with a time-varying magnetic field, such as that used for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Although references reporting the magnetic control of cellular mechanics have recently emerged, theoretical analysis of the membrane biomechanics under a time-varying magnetic field is inadequate. We developed a cell model that included the membrane as a low-conductive, capacitive shell and investigated the electric pressure generated on the membrane by a low-frequency magnetic field (0-200 kHz). Our results show that externally applied magnetic field induced surface charges on both sides of the membrane. The charges interacted with the induced electric field to produce a radial pressure upon the membrane. Under the low-frequency range, the radial pressure pulled the cell membrane along the axis that was defined by the magnetically induced electric field. The radial pressure was a function of the field frequency, the conductivity ratio of the cytoplasm to the medium, and the size of the cell. It is quantitatively insignificant in deforming the membrane at the frequency used in TMS, but could be significant at a relatively higher-frequency range (>100 kHz).

  3. Invitro toxicity test and searching the possibility of cancer cell line extermination by magnetic heating with using Fe3O4 magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoai Linh, Pham; Thuan, Nguyen Chi; Tuan, Nguyen Anh; Van Thach, Pham; Cong Yen, Tran; Thi Quy, Nguyen; Nhung, Hoang Thi My; Thi Xuyen, Phi; Phuc, Nguyen Xuan; Van Hong, Le

    2009-09-01

    A Fe3O4 based magnetic fluid with different concentrations ranged between 0.15 ng/cell to 10 ng/cell (nano gram/cell) was used in the in vitro toxicity test on several cancer cell lines, Sarcoma 180, HeLa and H358. It shows that the fluid with a concentration of Fe3O4 below 1.2 ng/cell is completely non-toxic for these cell lines. Even through in the presence of the highest concentration of 10 ng/cell, the cell viability still reaches more than 60%. The magnetic fluid with Fe3O4 concentration of about 0.1 ng/cell was also used to search ex-vivo the possibility of Sarcoma 180 extermination by magnetic heating with an AC field of 120Oe and 184 KHz. The result shows that after a heat treatment for 30 min., 40% of Sarcoma 180 cells was killed.

  4. Impact of magnetic labeling on human and mouse stem cells and their long-term magnetic resonance tracking in a rat model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Stroh, Albrecht; Boltze, Johannes; Sieland, Katharina; Hild, Katharina; Gutzeit, Cindy; Jung, Tobias; Kressel, Jenny; Hau, Susann; Reich, Doreen; Grune, Tilman; Zimmer, Claus

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of magnetically labeled stem cells has become a valuable tool in the understanding and evaluation of experimental stem cell-based therapies of degenerative central nervous system disorders. This comprehensive study assesses the impact of magnetic labeling of both human and rodent stem cell-containing populations on multiple biologic parameters as maintenance of stemness and oxidative stress levels. Cells were efficiently magnetically labeled with very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles. Only under the condition of tailored labeling strategies can the impact of magnetic labeling on vitality, proliferation, pluripotency, and oxidative stress levels be minimized. In a rat model of Parkinson disease, magnetically labeled mouse embryonic stem cells were tracked by high-field MRI for 6 months. Significant interindividual differences concerning the spatial distribution of cells became evident. Histologically, transplanted green fluorescent protein-positive iron oxide-labeled cells were clearly identified. No significant increase in oxidative stress levels at the implantation site and no secondary uptake of magnetic label by host phagocytotic cells were observed. Our study strongly suggests that molecular MRI approaches must be carefully tailored to the respective cell population to exert minimal physiologic impact, ensuring the feasibility of this imaging approach for clinical applications.

  5. Further studies on calculation method of magnetic field in aluminum reduction cell

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guohua; Li Dexiang; Li Dianfeng

    1996-10-01

    On the basis of studies on the theory of using the two scalar potentials method for calculating magnetic fields in aluminum reduction cells, the authors further studied various techniques of this method to calculate magnetic fields in aluminum reduction cells. These techniques include the following items: discretization of the region to be solved in the aluminum reduction cell; derivation of formulas of calculating the elemental characteristics; configuration and storage of the total systematic equation; process for the nonlinear problem in aluminum reduction cell; derivation of formulas for calculating the magnetic fields intensities in aluminum reduction cell by using the scalar potentials (total scalar potential and reduced scalar potential). These techniques determine the degree of putting the method into practical use. Also, the verification and application of this method are given in the paper.

  6. Optical Pumping Spin Exchange {sup 3}He Gas Cells for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, W.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Kim, A.; Jung, Y.; Woo, S.; Yurov, M.; Jang, J.

    2009-08-04

    We present a device for spin-exchange optical pumping system to produce large quantities of polarized noble gases for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). A method and design of apparatus for pumping the polarization of noble gases is described. The method and apparatus enable production, storage and usage of hyperpolarized noble gases for different purposes, including Magnetic Resonance Imaging of human and animal subjects. Magnetic imaging agents breathed into lungs can be observed by the radio waves of the MRI scanner and report back physical and functional information about lung's health and desease. The technique known as spin exchange optical pumping is used. Nuclear magnetic resonance is implemented to measure the polarization of hyperpolarized gas. The cells prepared and sealed under high vacuum after handling Alkali metals into the cell and filling with the {sup 3}He-N{sub 2} mixture. The cells could be refilled. The {sup 3}He reaches around 50% polarization in 5-15 hours.

  7. Magnetic particle motions within living cells. Measurement of cytoplasmic viscosity and motile activity.

    PubMed Central

    Valberg, P A; Feldman, H A

    1987-01-01

    Submicrometer magnetic particles, ingested by cells and monitored via the magnetic fields they generate, provide an alternative to optical microscopy for probing movement and viscosity of living cytoplasm, and can be used for cells both in vitro and in vivo. We present methods for preparing lung macrophages tagged with magnetic particles for magnetometric study. Interpretation of the data involves fitting experimental remanent-field decay curves to nonlinear mechanistic models of intracellular particle motion. The model parameters are sensitive to mobility and apparent cytoplasmic viscosity experienced by particle-containing organelles. We present results of parameter estimation for intracellular particle behavior both within control cells and after (a) variable magnetization duration, (b) incubation with cytochalasin D, and (c) particle twisting by external fields. Magnetometric analysis showed cytoplasmic elasticity, dose-dependent motion inhibition by cytochalasin D, and a shear-thinning apparent viscosity. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:3676436

  8. Magnetic and photoresponsive theranosomes: translating cell-released vesicles into smart nanovectors for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Amanda K A; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Bonneau, Stephanie; Marangon, Iris; Boggetto, Nicole; Aubertin, Kelly; Clément, Olivier; Bureau, Michel Francis; Luciani, Nathalie; Gazeau, Florence; Wilhelm, Claire

    2013-06-25

    Cell-released vesicles are natural carriers that circulate in body fluids and transport biological agents to distal cells. As nature uses vesicles in cell communication to promote tumor progression, we propose to harness their unique properties and exploit these biogenic carriers as Trojan horses to deliver therapeutic payloads to cancer cells. In a theranostic approach, cell-released vesicles were engineered by a top-down procedure from precursor cells, previously loaded with a photosensitizer and magnetic nanoparticles. The double exogenous cargo provided vesicles with magnetic and optical responsiveness allowing therapeutic and imaging functions. This new class of cell-derived smart nanovectors was named "theranosomes". Theranosomes enabled efficient photodynamic tumor therapy in a murine cancer model in vivo. Moreover the distribution of this biogenic vector could be monitored by dual-mode imaging, combining fluorescence and MRI. This study reports the first success in translating a cell communication mediator into a smart theranostic nanovector.

  9. Doxorubicin-loaded mesoporous magnetic nanoparticles to induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yan; Liu, Pin; Liu, Chuan-He; Zhi, Xu-Ting

    2015-02-01

    Selective targeting of chemotherapeutic drugs toward the cancer cells overcomes the limitations involved in chemotherapy. Ideally, targeted delivery system holds great potential in cancer therapy due to specific release of drug in the cancer tissues. In this regard, DOX-loaded chitosan coated mesoporous magnetic nanoparticles (DOX-CMMN) were prepared and evaluated for its physicochemical and biological characteristics. Nanosized magnetic nanoparticles were observed with a high loading capacity for DOX. The drug-loaded nanoparticles exhibited a controlled and sustained release of drug without any burst release phenomenon. The DOX-DMMN showed a concentration-dependent cell proliferation inhibitory action against breast cancer cells. The blank nanoparticles showed excellent biocompatibility with cell viability >85% at the maximum tested concentration. Our results showed that chitosan coated magnetic system has high potential for breast cancer targeting under an alternating current magnetic field (ACMF). The present study showed that magnetic nanoparticles can be targeted to tumor cells under the presence of oscillating magnetic field. The combined effect of chemotherapy and thermotherapy can have a promising clinical potential for the treatment of breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of magnetic nanoparticles on apoptosis and cell cycle induced by wogonin in Raji cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Haijun; Chen, Baoan; Xia, Guohua; Wang, Shuai; Cheng, Jian; Shao, Zeye; Gao, Chong; Bao, Wen; Tian, Liang; Ren, Yanyan; Xu, Peipei; Cai, Xiaohui; Liu, Ran; Wang, Xuemei

    2012-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine is gradually becoming a new source of anticancer drugs. One such example is wogonin, which is cytotoxic to various cancer cell lines in vitro. However, due to its low water solubility, wogonin is restricted to clinical administration. Recently, the application of drug-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to increase water solubility of the drug and to enhance its chemotherapeutic efficiency has attracted much attention. In this study, wogonin was conjugated with the drug delivery system of MNPs by mechanical absorption polymerization to fabricate wogonin-loaded MNPs. It was demonstrated that MNPs could strengthen wogonin-induced cell inhibition, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in Raji cells by methylthiazol tetrazolium assay, flow cytometer assay, and nuclear 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms of these phenomena were explored by western blot, in which the protein levels of caspase 8 and caspase 3 were increased significantly while those of survivin and cyclin E were decreased significantly in wogonin-MNPs group. These findings suggest that the combination of wogonin and MNPs provides a promising strategy for lymphoma therapy.

  11. Intracellular Delivery by Shape Anisotropic Magnetic Particle-Induced Cell Membrane Cuts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Yu; Wu, Yi-Chien; Lee, Ji-Ann; Tung, Kuan-Wen; Zhou, Jessica; Teitell, Michael A; Yeh, J Andrew; Chiou, Pei Yu

    2016-08-01

    Introducing functional macromolecules into a variety of living cells is challenging but important for biology research and cell-based therapies. We report a novel cell delivery platform based on rotating shape anisotropic magnetic particles (SAMPs), which make very small cuts on cell membranes for macromolecule delivery with high efficiency and high survivability. SAMP delivery is performed by placing commercially available nickel powder onto cells grown in standard cell culture dishes. Application of a uniform magnetic field causes the magnetic particles to rotate because of mechanical torques induced by shape anisotropic magnetization. Cells touching these rotating particles are nicked, which generates transient membrane pores that enable the delivery of macromolecules into the cytosol of cells. Calcein dye, 3 and 40 kDa dextran polymers, a green fluorescence protein (GFP) plasmid, siRNA, and an enzyme (β-lactamase) were successfully delivered into HeLa cells, primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs), and mouse cortical neurons that can be difficult to transfect. The SAMP approach offers several advantages, including easy implementation, low cost, high throughput, and efficient delivery of a broad range of macromolecules. Collectively, SAMP delivery has great potential for a broad range of academic and industrial applications. © 2016 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  12. SELECTION WITH THE MAGNET AND CULTIVATION OF RETICULO-ENDOTHELIAL CELLS (KUPFFER CELLS)

    PubMed Central

    Rous, Peyton; Beard, J. W.

    1934-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are described where with living Kupffer cells can be procured from the liver of the rabbit and the dog for study and cultivation in vitro. Almost none of these cells can be dislodged from the normal liver by forcible perfusion; but after they have taken up finely particulate matter (India ink, iron oxide), they come away in great numbers. When they have phagocyted ferromagnetic iron oxide they can be selected with a magnet from amongst the blood elements present in suspension with them; and they are obtainable in quantity by this means. They do poorly when plated in a thin plasma clot, failing to multiply or to assume their characteristic shape; but they flourish when allowed to attach themselves to strands of lens paper bathed in serum that is frequently changed. Bacterial infection of serum cultures of Kupffer cells from normal rabbits and dogs occurs only as the result of secondary contamination of the materials, whereas it regularly develops in cultures from animals with fever induced by the injection of nucleic acid or of killed B. prodigiosus. Kupffer cells obtained under such conditions are abnormally active, and some can be washed out of the liver of sick animals in the absence of any preliminary phagocytosis of particulate matter. The facts have a bearing both on the conditions conducing to blood invasion and on the response of the Kupffer cells in the emergency. The characters of the isolated Kupffer cells and the results of tests of their presumptive functions will be described in later papers. PMID:19870267

  13. [The influence of a magnetic field on chromosome sets and cell division].

    PubMed

    Tsoneva, M T; Penchev, P R; Karev, G B; Gishin, S S

    1975-01-01

    An effect of stable magnetic field on karyotype and cell division of human lymphocytes from peripheral blood was studied in tissue culture. Comparative investigations were carried out with lymphocytes, whoch were treated with magnetic field of different tension (0,179; 0,391 and 0,600 Ts) and continuance (30 sec, 30 and 60 min). Lymphocytes, treated with stable magnetic field, were suspended in donor plasma and immediately cultivated after the treatment. The stable magnetic field was found to have a distinct mutagenic effect on cultivated lymphocytes of human peripheral blood. The increase in structural impairements of chromosomes correlated with tension of magnetic field and continuance of its effect. In structural impairements of chromosomes the chromatid gaps and breaks were more often observed but chromosome ruptures and pericentric clearances occurred more rarely. The effect of stable magnetic field on lymphocytes proliferation was studie. Under weak and transient using of magnetic field the proliferation was stimulated, but in rigid conditions--mitosis and blastic transformation were decreased. Continuous effect of magnetic field with weak tension did not inhibite the blastic transformation but influenced on the survival rate of cells in tissue culture, enhancing their lethality.

  14. Magnetic bioinspired hybrid nanostructured collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds supporting cell proliferation and tuning regenerative process.

    PubMed

    Tampieri, Anna; Iafisco, Michele; Sandri, Monica; Panseri, Silvia; Cunha, Carla; Sprio, Simone; Savini, Elisa; Uhlarz, Marc; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas

    2014-09-24

    A bioinspired mineralization process was applied to develop biomimetic hybrid scaffolds made of (Fe(2+)/Fe(3+))-doped hydroxyapatite nanocrystals nucleated on self-assembling collagen fibers and endowed with super-paramagnetic properties, minimizing the formation of potentially cytotoxic magnetic phases such as magnetite or other iron oxide phases. Magnetic composites were prepared at different temperatures, and the effect of this parameter on the reaction yield in terms of mineralization degree, morphology, degradation, and magnetization was investigated. The influence of scaffold properties on cells was evaluated by seeding human osteoblast-like cells on magnetic and nonmagnetic materials, and differences in terms of viability, adhesion, and proliferation were studied. The synthesis temperature affects mainly the chemical-physical features of the mineral phase of the composites influencing the degradation, the microstructure, and the magnetization values of the entire scaffold and its biological performance. In vitro investigations indicated the biocompatibility of the materials and that the magnetization of the super-paramagnetic scaffolds, induced applying an external static magnetic field, improved cell proliferation in comparison to the nonmagnetic scaffold.

  15. Process optimization and biocompatibility of cell carriers suitable for automated magnetic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Krejci, I; Piana, C; Howitz, S; Wegener, T; Fiedler, S; Zwanzig, M; Schmitt, D; Daum, N; Meier, K; Lehr, C M; Batista, U; Zemljic, S; Messerschmidt, J; Franzke, J; Wirth, M; Gabor, F

    2012-03-01

    There is increasing demand for automated cell reprogramming in the fields of cell biology, biotechnology and the biomedical sciences. Microfluidic-based platforms that provide unattended manipulation of adherent cells promise to be an appropriate basis for cell manipulation. In this study we developed a magnetically driven cell carrier to serve as a vehicle within an in vitro environment. To elucidate the impact of the carrier on cells, biocompatibility was estimated using the human adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2. Besides evaluation of the quality of the magnetic carriers by field emission scanning electron microscopy, the rate of adherence, proliferation and differentiation of Caco-2 cells grown on the carriers was quantified. Moreover, the morphology of the cells was monitored by immunofluorescent staining. Early generations of the cell carrier suffered from release of cytotoxic nickel from the magnetic cushion. Biocompatibility was achieved by complete encapsulation of the nickel bulk within galvanic gold. The insulation process had to be developed stepwise and was controlled by parallel monitoring of the cell viability. The final carrier generation proved to be a proper support for cell manipulation, allowing proliferation of Caco-2 cells equal to that on glass or polystyrene as a reference for up to 10 days. Functional differentiation was enhanced by more than 30% compared with the reference. A flat, ferromagnetic and fully biocompatible carrier for cell manipulation was developed for application in microfluidic systems. Beyond that, this study offers advice for the development of magnetic cell carriers and the estimation of their biocompatibility. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effective induction of death in mesothelioma cells with magnetite nanoparticles under an alternating magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shofu; Nakajima, Eri; Nakanishi, Takuya; Hitsuji, Airi; Zhang, Hong; Tanaka, Akane; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Momma, Toshiyuki; Osaka, Tetsuya

    2017-12-01

    With the objective of finding an avenue for development of magnetic hyperthermia as an effective mesothelioma treatment, the influence of heating by magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) with a diameter of ~40nm, which were incorporated into cells and then subjected to AC magnetic field, on induction of cell death was investigated in all three histological subtypes of human mesothelioma cells (i.e., epithelioid NCI-H28, sarcomatoid NCI-H2052, and biphasic MSTO-211H cells). Cellular uptake of MNPs was observed in all cell types, but the amount of MNPs incorporated per cell into MSTO-211H cells was smaller than in NCI-H28 and NCI-H2052 cells. On the other hand, cell death induced by cellular uptake of MNPs was observed specifically in MSTO-211H cells. Hence, when cells are heated by intracellular MNPs under AC magnetic field, a high degree of cell mortality in NCI-H28 and NCI-H2052 cells is induced by the temperature increase derived from the high amount of intracellular MNPs, but the combination of intracellular heating and cell-type-specific toxicity of MNPs induced high rates of cell death in MSTO-211H cells even at a lower temperature. Almost all of the heated cells were dead after 24-h incubation at 37°C in all histological subtypes. Additionally, higher mortalities were observed in all three types of mesothelioma cells after MNPs-heating, as compared to the heating with a thermostatic bath. Herein, the significance of cellular uptake of MNPs for effectively inducing cell death in mesothelioma has been demonstrated in vitro. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Half cell SSC'' 40mm aperture magnet string

    SciTech Connect

    McInturff, A.D.; Flora, R.; Norris, B.; Theilacker, J.; Wolff, D.A. ); Augustynowicz, S.A.; Dickey, C.E.; Tool, G.; Wallis, D.B.; Weisend, J.G. II )

    1991-08-01

    The data given here were obtained during a controls and system check out run. This run basically had all of the proper accelerator controls as well as, in the background, an independent magnet test facility monitor and protection. Early data are presented on the heat loads of some circuits and quench performance of the two magnet string used. The heat loads found were high and the quench performance appeared to be better than expected. After disassembly occurred, obvious causes were present for some of the heat load. 6 refs.

  18. Transverse high gradient magnetic filter cell with bounded flow field

    SciTech Connect

    Badescu, V.; Rotariu, O.; Murariu, V.; Rezlescu, N.

    1997-11-01

    The capture of fine paramagnetic particles from a fluid suspension in a magnetic filter element of a novel design is analyzed. Unlike the systems previously analyzed, in the model the flow is bounded by two by two parallel planar plates, and the ferromagnetic wires are installed outside these spaces, within planes parallel with the plates. The analysis is based on the study of particle trajectories, considering the laminar flow of carrier fluid. From these the authors establish the conditions for the maximum recovery of the particles in suspension. This study is useful in designing magnetic filter batteries with corrosion-protected ferromagnetic wires.

  19. Labyrinthine instabilities of miscible magnetic fluids in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mei-Yu; Chen, Li-Que; Li, Huanhao; Wen, Chih-Yung

    2017-02-01

    This study presents the first experimental results of confining miscible magnetic fluids in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell. Variations in the prominence of labyrinthine instabilities are observed under a range of experimental conditions, with different magnetic field strengths, gap depths, and rotation speeds. These instabilities are characterized by two modified Péclect numbers, namely, Pem (the ratio of the characteristic magnetic advection rate and the diffusion rate) and Pec (the ratio of characteristic rotation advection and the diffusion rate). The magnetic effect is characterized by dipolar repulsion, which triggers a distinctive fingering pattern differing from the progressive diffusion pattern that occurs without magnetic fields or rotation. Under the same rotation speed, the magnetoviscous effect will hinder the growth rate of the magnetic drops at the later stage. However, both the rotation effect and the gap depth greatly enhance the growth rate of the magnetic drops, as these conditions help to intensify the labyrinthine instabilities. In contrast, the countering pressure gradient produces an opposite force that constrains the trend toward expansion. Two major phases in the growth of instabilities are defined: a magnetization phase and a rotation phase, which are dominated by the magnetic and the rotation effect, respectively. The significance of the rotation effect is confirmed by the linear regression between the rotation growth rate and Pec. Finally, main fingering structures that evolve from the secondary waves are verified as having a wavelength λ to gap depth h relation of λ ≈(7 ±1 ) h .

  20. Magnetic nanoparticle-mediated massively-parallel mechanical modulation of single-cell behavior

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Peter; Judy, Jack W.; Di Carlo, Dino

    2012-01-01

    We report a technique for generating controllable, time-varying and localizable forces on arrays of cells in a massively parallel fashion. To achieve this, we grow magnetic nanoparticle-dosed cells in defined patterns on micro-magnetic substrates. By manipulating and coalescing nanoparticles within cells, we apply localized nanoparticle-mediated forces approaching cellular yield tensions on the cortex of HeLa cells. We observed highly coordinated responses in cellular behavior, including the p21-activated kinase (PAK)-dependent generation of active, leading-edge type filopodia, and biasing of the metaphase plate during mitosis. The large sample size and rapid sample generation inherent to this approach allow the analysis of cells at an unprecedented rate; a single experiment can potentially stimulate tens of thousands of cells for high statistical accuracy in measurements. This technique shows promise as a tool for both cell analysis and control. PMID:23064517

  1. Influence of physicochemical properties and PEG modification of magnetic liposomes on their interaction with intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kono, Yusuke; Jinzai, Hitomi; Kotera, Yota; Fujita, Takuya

    2017-09-30

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of particle size (100 and 500 nm), surface charge (cationic, neutral and anionic) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) modification of magnetic liposomes on their interaction with the human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2. The cellular associated amount of all the magnetic liposomes was significantly increased by the presence of a magnetic field. The highest association and internalization into Caco-2 cells was observed with magnetic cationic liposomes. Moreover, small magnetic liposomes were more efficiently associated and taken up into the cells, than large ones. In contrast, PEG modification significantly attenuated the enhancing effect of the magnetic field on the cellular association of magnetic liposomes. We also found that magnetic cationic liposomes had the highest retention properties to Caco-2 cells. Moreover, the retention of large magnetic liposomes to the cells was much longer than that of small ones. In addition, magnetic cationic and neutral liposomes had relatively high stability in Caco-2 cells, whereas magnetic anionic liposomes rapidly degraded. These results indicate that the physicochemical properties and PEG modification of magnetic liposomes greatly influences their intestinal epithelial transport.

  2. Cell uptake and in vitro toxicity of magnetic nanoparticles suitable for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Häfeli, Urs O; Riffle, Judy S; Harris-Shekhawat, Linda; Carmichael-Baranauskas, Anita; Mark, Framin; Dailey, James P; Bardenstein, David

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic targeting is useful for intravascular or intracavitary drug delivery, including tumor chemotherapy or intraocular antiangiogenic therapy. For all such in vivo applications, the magnetic drug carrier must be biocompatible and nontoxic. In this work, we investigated the toxic properties of magnetic nanoparticles coated with polyethylenoxide (PEO) triblock copolymers. Such coatings prevent the aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles and guarantee consistent magnetic and nonmagnetic flow properties. It was found that the PEO tail block length inversely correlates with toxicity. The nanoparticles with the shortest 0.75 kDa PEO tails were the most toxic, while particles coated with the 15 kDa PEO tail block copolymers were the least toxic. Toxicity responses of the tested prostate cancer cell lines (PC3 and C4-2), human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and human retinal pigment epithelial cells (HRPEs) were similar. Furthermore, all cell types took up the coated magnetic nanoparticles. It is concluded that magnetite nanoparticles coated with triblock copolymers containing PEO tail lengths of above 2 kDa are biocompatible and appropriate for in vivo application.

  3. ORIENTATION REQUIREMENT TO DETECT MAGNETIC FIELD-INDUCTED ALTERATION OF GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICATION IN EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ORIENTATION REQUIREMENT TO DETECT MAGNETIC FIELD-INDUCED ALTERATION OF GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICATION IN EPITHELIAL CELLS.
    OBJECTIVE: We have shown that functional gap junction communication as measured by Lucifer yellow dye transfer (DT) in Clone-9 rat liver epithelial cells, c...

  4. GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICATON IN A TRANSFECTED HUMAN CELL LINE: ACTION OF MELATONIN AND MAGNETIC FIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICTION IN TRANSFECTED HUMAN CELL LINE: ACTION OF MELATONIN AND MAGNETIC FIELDS.

    OBJECTIVE: We previously showed that functional gap junction communication (GJC), as monitored by dye transfer (DT), could be enhanced in mouse C3H 10T112 cells and in mouse...

  5. ORIENTATION REQUIREMENT TO DETECT MAGNETIC FIELD-INDUCTED ALTERATION OF GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICATION IN EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ORIENTATION REQUIREMENT TO DETECT MAGNETIC FIELD-INDUCED ALTERATION OF GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICATION IN EPITHELIAL CELLS.
    OBJECTIVE: We have shown that functional gap junction communication as measured by Lucifer yellow dye transfer (DT) in Clone-9 rat liver epithelial cells, c...

  6. GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICATON IN A TRANSFECTED HUMAN CELL LINE: ACTION OF MELATONIN AND MAGNETIC FIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICTION IN TRANSFECTED HUMAN CELL LINE: ACTION OF MELATONIN AND MAGNETIC FIELDS.

    OBJECTIVE: We previously showed that functional gap junction communication (GJC), as monitored by dye transfer (DT), could be enhanced in mouse C3H 10T112 cells and in mouse...

  7. Exploration of the Use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for the Study of Ricin Toxicity in Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    ricin. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 3T3 Cells Ricinus communis Cell Toxicity Nuclear Magnetic Resonance NMR Ricin 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT u...Ricin Preparation. The Ricin communis agglutinin II (ricin) stock solution was prepared by dialyzing ricin (Vector Laboratories, Burlingame, CA

  8. Observation of magnetic field-induced contraction of fission yeast cells using optical projection microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Beckwith, A. W.

    2005-03-01

    The charges in live cells interact with or produce electric fields, which results in enormous dielectric responses, flexoelectricity, and related phenomena. Here we report on a contraction of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast) cells induced by magnetic fields, as observed using a phase-sensitive projection imaging technique. Unlike electric fields, magnetic fields only act on moving charges. The observed behavior is therefore quite remarkable, and may result from a contractile Lorentz force acting on diamagnetic screening currents. This would indicate extremely high intracellular charge mobilities. Besides, we observed a large electro-optic response from fission yeast cells.

  9. Moissanite anvil cell design for giga-pascal nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Thomas; Herzig, Tobias; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-04-01

    A new design of a non-magnetic high-pressure anvil cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at Giga-Pascal pressures is presented, which uses a micro-coil inside the pressurized region for high-sensitivity NMR. The comparably small cell has a length of 22 mm and a diameter of 18 mm, so it can be used with most NMR magnets. The performance of the cell is demonstrated with external-force vs. internal-pressure experiments, and the cell is shown to perform well at pressures up to 23.5 GPa using 800 μm 6H-SiC large cone Boehler-type anvils. 1H, 23Na, 27Al, 69Ga, and 71Ga NMR test measurements are presented, which show a resolution of better than 4.5 ppm, and an almost maximum possible signal-to-noise ratio.

  10. Moissanite anvil cell design for Giga-Pascal nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Meier, Thomas; Herzig, Tobias; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-04-01

    A new design of a non-magnetic high-pressure anvil cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at Giga-Pascal pressures is presented, which uses a micro-coil inside the pressurized region for high-sensitivity NMR. The comparably small cell has a length of 22 mm and a diameter of 18 mm, so it can be used with most NMR magnets. The performance of the cell is demonstrated with external-force vs. internal-pressure experiments, and the cell is shown to perform well at pressures up to 23.5 GPa using 800 μm 6H-SiC large cone Boehler-type anvils. (1)H, (23)Na, (27)Al, (69)Ga, and (71)Ga NMR test measurements are presented, which show a resolution of better than 4.5 ppm, and an almost maximum possible signal-to-noise ratio.

  11. Increasing the sensitivity for stem cell monitoring in system-function based magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Them, Kolja; Salamon, J.; Szwargulski, P.; Sequeira, S.; Kaul, M. G.; Lange, C.; Ittrich, H.; Knopp, Tobias

    2016-05-01

    The use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) has provided new possibilities in biophysics and biomedical imaging technologies. The magnetization dynamics of SPIONs, which can be influenced by the environment, are of central interest. In this work, different biological SPION environments are used to investigate three different calibration methods for stem cell monitoring in magnetic particle imaging. It is shown that calibrating using SPIONs immobilized via agarose gel or intracellular uptake results in superior stem cell image quality compared to mobile SPIONs in saline. This superior image quality enables more sensitive localization and identification of a significantly smaller number of magnetically labeled stem cells. The results are important for cell tracking and monitoring of future SPION based therapies such as hyperthermia based cancer therapies, targeted drug delivery, or tissue regeneration approaches where it is crucial to image a sufficiently small number of SPIONs interacting with biological matter.

  12. Power Tests of a String of Magnets Comprising a Full Cell of the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Burgett, W.; Cromer, L.; Haenni, D.; Hentges, M.; Jaffrey, T.; Kraushaar, P.; Levin, M.; Mulholland, G.; Richter, D.; Robinson, W.; Weisend II, J.; Zapotek, J.

    1995-06-28

    In this paper we describe the operation and testing of a string of magnets comprising a full cell of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The full cell configuration composed of ten dipoles, two quadrupoles, and three spool pieces is the longest SSC magnet string ever tested. Although the tests of the full cell were undertaken after the SSC project was marked for termination, their completion was deemed necessary and useful to future efforts at other accelerator laboratories utilizing Superconducting magnets. The focus of this work is on the electrical and cryogenic performance of the string components and the quench protection system with an emphasis on solving some of the questions concerning electrical performance raised during the previous two experimental runs involving a half cell configuration.

  13. Increasing the sensitivity for stem cell monitoring in system-function based magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Them, Kolja; Salamon, J; Szwargulski, P; Sequeira, S; Kaul, M G; Lange, C; Ittrich, H; Knopp, Tobias

    2016-05-07

    The use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) has provided new possibilities in biophysics and biomedical imaging technologies. The magnetization dynamics of SPIONs, which can be influenced by the environment, are of central interest. In this work, different biological SPION environments are used to investigate three different calibration methods for stem cell monitoring in magnetic particle imaging. It is shown that calibrating using SPIONs immobilized via agarose gel or intracellular uptake results in superior stem cell image quality compared to mobile SPIONs in saline. This superior image quality enables more sensitive localization and identification of a significantly smaller number of magnetically labeled stem cells. The results are important for cell tracking and monitoring of future SPION based therapies such as hyperthermia based cancer therapies, targeted drug delivery, or tissue regeneration approaches where it is crucial to image a sufficiently small number of SPIONs interacting with biological matter.

  14. Tracking the dynamics of circulating tumour cell phenotypes using nanoparticle-mediated magnetic ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudineh, Mahla; Aldridge, Peter M.; Ahmed, Sharif; Green, Brenda J.; Kermanshah, Leyla; Nguyen, Vivian; Tu, Carmen; Mohamadi, Reza M.; Nam, Robert K.; Hansen, Aaron; Sridhar, Srikala S.; Finelli, Antonio; Fleshner, Neil E.; Joshua, Anthony M.; Sargent, Edward H.; Kelley, Shana O.

    2017-03-01

    Profiling the heterogeneous phenotypes of rare circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in whole blood is critical to unravelling the complex and dynamic properties of these potential clinical markers. This task is challenging because these cells are present at parts per billion levels among normal blood cells. Here we report a new nanoparticle-enabled method for CTC characterization, called magnetic ranking cytometry, which profiles CTCs on the basis of their surface expression phenotype. We achieve this using a microfluidic chip that successfully processes whole blood samples. The approach classifies CTCs with single-cell resolution in accordance with their expression of phenotypic surface markers, which is read out using magnetic nanoparticles. We deploy this new technique to reveal the dynamic phenotypes of CTCs in unprocessed blood from mice as a function of tumour growth and aggressiveness. We also test magnetic ranking cytometry using blood samples collected from cancer patients.

  15. Tracking the dynamics of circulating tumour cell phenotypes using nanoparticle-mediated magnetic ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudineh, Mahla; Aldridge, Peter M.; Ahmed, Sharif; Green, Brenda J.; Kermanshah, Leyla; Nguyen, Vivian; Tu, Carmen; Mohamadi, Reza M.; Nam, Robert K.; Hansen, Aaron; Sridhar, Srikala S.; Finelli, Antonio; Fleshner, Neil E.; Joshua, Anthony M.; Sargent, Edward H.; Kelley, Shana O.

    2016-11-01

    Profiling the heterogeneous phenotypes of rare circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in whole blood is critical to unravelling the complex and dynamic properties of these potential clinical markers. This task is challenging because these cells are present at parts per billion levels among normal blood cells. Here we report a new nanoparticle-enabled method for CTC characterization, called magnetic ranking cytometry, which profiles CTCs on the basis of their surface expression phenotype. We achieve this using a microfluidic chip that successfully processes whole blood samples. The approach classifies CTCs with single-cell resolution in accordance with their expression of phenotypic surface markers, which is read out using magnetic nanoparticles. We deploy this new technique to reveal the dynamic phenotypes of CTCs in unprocessed blood from mice as a function of tumour growth and aggressiveness. We also test magnetic ranking cytometry using blood samples collected from cancer patients.

  16. USING CORONAL CELLS TO INFER THE MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE AND CHIRALITY OF FILAMENT CHANNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheeley, N. R. Jr.; Warren, H. P.; Martin, S. F.; Panasenco, O.

    2013-08-01

    Coronal cells are visible at temperatures of {approx}1.2 MK in Fe XII coronal images obtained from the Solar Dynamics Observatory and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft. We show that near a filament channel, the plumelike tails of these cells bend horizontally in opposite directions on the two sides of the channel like fibrils in the chromosphere. Because the cells are rooted in magnetic flux concentrations of majority polarity, these observations can be used with photospheric magnetograms to infer the direction of the horizontal field in filament channels and the chirality of the associated magnetic field. This method is similar to the procedure for inferring the direction of the magnetic field and the chirality of the fibril pattern in filament channels from H{alpha} observations. However, the coronal cell observations are easier to use and provide clear inferences of the horizontal field direction for heights up to {approx}50 Mm into the corona.

  17. Recover vigorous cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 by capillary magnetic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinhua; Ge, Xin; Zhang, Xiaokui; Chen, Guanjun; Pan, Yongxin

    2010-07-01

    Cultivable magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) in laboratory can provide sufficient samples for molecular microbiological and magnetic studies. However, a cold-stored MTB strain, such as Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, often loses its ability to synthesize magnetosomes and consequently fails to sense the external magnetic field. It is therefore important to quickly recover vigorous bacteria cells that highly capable of magnetosome producing. In this study, a modified capillary magnetic separation system was designed to recover a deteriorating strain of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 that long-term cold-stored in a refrigerator. The results show that all cells obtained after a 3-cycle treatment were vigorous and had the ability to produce magnetosomes. Moreover, the 3rd-cycle recovered cells were able to form more magnetosome crystals. Compared with the colony formation method, this new method is time-saving, easily operated, and more efficient for recovering vigorous MTB cells.

  18. [Comparison of sorting of fluorescently and magnetically labelled dental pulp stem cells].

    PubMed

    Kerényi, Farkas; Tarapcsák, Szabolcs; Hrubi, Edit; Baráthne, Szabó Ágnes; Hegedüs, Viktória; Balogh, Sára; Bágyi, Kinga; Varga, Gábor; Hegedüs, Csaba

    2016-03-01

    Stem cells are present in many tissues, such as dental pulp. Stem cells can be easily isolated from dental pulp because third molars are often removed from patients. Stem cells could be separated from the tissue derived heterogeneous cell population. There are two main methods to separate a cell type from the other ones: the fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and the magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS). The aim of this study was to compare these methods' effect on cell surviving and population growth after sorting on dental pulp cells. The anti-STRO-1 antibody was used as primary antibody to specifically label stem cells. Two secondary antibodies were used: magnetic or fluorescent labelled. We sorted the cells by MACS or by FACS or by combination of both (MACS-FACS). Our results show that the effectivity of MACS and FACS sorting are comparable while of MACS-FACS was significantly higher (MACS 79.53 ± 5.78%, FACS 88.27 ± 3.70%, MACS-FACS 98.43 ± 0.67%). The cell surviving and the post-sorting population growth, on the contrary, are very different. The cell population is growing on first week after MACS but after FACS did not. Moreover, after MACS-FACS, on first week the cell number of population decreased. Taken together, our results suggest to use MACS instead of FACS, at least in case of sorting dental pulp stem cells with anti-STRO-1 antibody.

  19. Magnetic Enrichment of Dendritic Cell Vaccine in Lymph Node with Fluorescent-Magnetic Nanoparticles Enhanced Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Honglin; Qian, Yuan; Dai, Yanfeng; Qiao, Sha; Huang, Chuan; Lu, Lisen; Luo, Qingming; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) migration to the lymph node is a key component of DC-based immunotherapy. However, the DC homing rate to the lymphoid tissues is poor, thus hindering the DC-mediated activation of antigen-specific T cells. Here, we developed a system using fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (α-AP-fmNPs; loaded with antigen peptide, iron oxide nanoparticles, and indocyanine green) in combination with magnetic pull force (MPF) to successfully manipulate DC migration in vitro and in vivo. α-AP-fmNPs endowed DCs with MPF-responsiveness, antigen presentation, and simultaneous optical and magnetic resonance imaging detectability. We showed for the first time that α-AP-fmNP-loaded DCs were sensitive to MPF, and their migration efficiency could be dramatically improved both in vitro and in vivo through MPF treatment. Due to the enhanced migration of DCs, MPF treatment significantly augmented antitumor efficacy of the nanoparticle-loaded DCs. Therefore, we have developed a biocompatible approach with which to improve the homing efficiency of DCs and subsequent anti-tumor efficacy, and track their migration by multi-modality imaging, with great potential applications for DC-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27698936

  20. Optimization of the magnetic labeling of human neural stem cells and MRI visualization in the hemiparkinsonian rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Gómez, Milagros; Seiz, Emma G; Martínez-Serrano, Alberto

    2015-03-05

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the ideal modality for non-invasive in vivo cell tracking allowing for longitudinal studies over time. Cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been shown to induce sufficient contrast for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging enabling the in vivo analysis of the final location of the transplanted cells. For magnetic nanoparticles to be useful, a high internalization efficiency of the particles is required without compromising cell function, as well as validation of the magnetic nanoparticles behaviour inside the cells. In this work, we report the development, optimization and validation of an efficient procedure to label human neural stem cells with commercial nanoparticles in the absence of transfection agents. Magnetic nanoparticles used here do not affect cell viability, cell morphology, cell differentiation or cell cycle dynamics. Moreover, human neural stem cells progeny labeled with magnetic nanoparticles are easily and non-invasively detected long time after transplantation in a rat model of Parkinson's disease (up to 5 months post-grafting) by magnetic resonance imaging. These findings support the use of commercial MNPs to track cells for short- and mid-term periods after transplantation for studies of brain cell replacement therapy. Nevertheless, long-term MR images should be interpreted with caution due to the possibility that some MNPs may be expelled from the transplanted cells and internalized by host microglial cells.

  1. Magnetic Field-Induced T Cell Receptor Clustering by Nanoparticles Enhances T Cell Activation and Stimulates Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Iron–dextran nanoparticles functionalized with T cell activating proteins have been used to study T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. However, nanoparticle triggering of membrane receptors is poorly understood and may be sensitive to physiologically regulated changes in TCR clustering that occur after T cell activation. Nano-aAPC bound 2-fold more TCR on activated T cells, which have clustered TCR, than on naive T cells, resulting in a lower threshold for activation. To enhance T cell activation, a magnetic field was used to drive aggregation of paramagnetic nano-aAPC, resulting in a doubling of TCR cluster size and increased T cell expansion in vitro and after adoptive transfer in vivo. T cells activated by nano-aAPC in a magnetic field inhibited growth of B16 melanoma, showing that this novel approach, using magnetic field-enhanced nano-aAPC stimulation, can generate large numbers of activated antigen-specific T cells and has clinically relevant applications for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:24564881

  2. Design features of the solenoid magnets for the central cell of the MFTF-B

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlwend, J.W.; Tatro, R.E.; Ring, D.S.

    1981-10-23

    The 14 superconducting solenoid magnets which form the central cell of the MFTF-B are being designed and fabricated by General Dynamics for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Each solenoid coil has a mean diameter of five meters and contains 600 turns of a proven conductor type. Structural loading resulting from credible fault events, cooldown and warmup requirements, and manufacturing processes consistent with other MFTF-B magnets have been considered in the selection of 304 LN as the structural material for the magnet. The solenoid magnets are connected by 24 intercoil beams and 20 solid struts which resist the longitudinal seismic and electromagnetic attractive forces and by 24 hanger/side supports which react magnet dead weight and seismic loads. A modular arrangement of two solenoid coils within a vacuum vessel segment allow for sequential checkout and installation.

  3. Synthesis of bacterial magnetic particles during cell cycle of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1.

    PubMed

    Yang, C D; Takeyama, H; Tanaka, T; Hasegawa, A; Matsunaga, T

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the synthesis of bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs) and the transcription of magA gene-encoding iron transport protein using synchronous culture of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. Synchronously cultured cells were subjected to transmission electron microscopic observation and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The average number of BMPs slowly increased in the cell with increasing cell size. A sharp increase in BMPs occurred just before cell division and resulted in maximum BMP production of 30 particles/cell. The transcription of magA was regulated immediately before and after cell division.

  4. Inhibition of cellular proliferation and enhancement of hydrogen peroxide production in fibrosarcoma cell line by weak radio frequency magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Castello, Pablo R; Hill, Iain; Sivo, Frank; Portelli, Lucas; Barnes, Frank; Usselman, Robert; Martino, Carlos F

    2014-12-01

    This study presents experimental data for the effects of weak radio frequency (RF) magnetic fields on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and cellular growth rates of fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells in vitro. Cells were exposed either to 45 µT static magnetic fields (SMFs)-oriented vertical to the plane of growth or to SMFs combined with weak 5 and 10 MHz RF magnetic fields of 10 µTRMS intensity perpendicular to the static field. Cell numbers were reduced up to 30% on Day 2 for the cells exposed to the combination of SMF and a 10 MHz RF magnetic field compared with the SMF control cells. In addition, cells exposed to 10 MHz RF magnetic fields for 8 h increased H2O2 production by 55%. The results demonstrate an overall magnetic field-induced biological effect that shows elevated H2O2 levels with accompanying decrease in cellular growth rates.

  5. Magnetic Levitation of MC3T3 Osteoblast Cells as a Ground-Based Simulation of Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Kidder, Louis S.; Williams, Philip C.; Xu, Wayne Wenzhong

    2009-01-01

    Diamagnetic samples placed in a strong magnetic field and a magnetic field gradient experience a magnetic force. Stable magnetic levitation occurs when the magnetic force exactly counter balances the gravitational force. Under this condition, a diamagnetic sample is in a simulated microgravity environment. The purpose of this study is to explore if MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells can be grown in magnetically simulated hypo-g and hyper-g environments and determine if gene expression is differentially expressed under these conditions. The murine calvarial osteoblastic cell line, MC3T3-E1, grown on Cytodex-3 beads, were subjected to a net gravitational force of 0, 1 and 2 g in a 17 T superconducting magnet for 2 days. Microarray analysis of these cells indicated that gravitational stress leads to up and down regulation of hundreds of genes. The methodology of sustaining long-term magnetic levitation of biological systems are discussed. PMID:20052306

  6. Magnetic Levitation of MC3T3 Osteoblast Cells as a Ground-Based Simulation of Microgravity.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Bruce E; Kidder, Louis S; Williams, Philip C; Xu, Wayne Wenzhong

    2009-11-01

    Diamagnetic samples placed in a strong magnetic field and a magnetic field gradient experience a magnetic force. Stable magnetic levitation occurs when the magnetic force exactly counter balances the gravitational force. Under this condition, a diamagnetic sample is in a simulated microgravity environment. The purpose of this study is to explore if MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells can be grown in magnetically simulated hypo-g and hyper-g environments and determine if gene expression is differentially expressed under these conditions. The murine calvarial osteoblastic cell line, MC3T3-E1, grown on Cytodex-3 beads, were subjected to a net gravitational force of 0, 1 and 2 g in a 17 T superconducting magnet for 2 days. Microarray analysis of these cells indicated that gravitational stress leads to up and down regulation of hundreds of genes. The methodology of sustaining long-term magnetic levitation of biological systems are discussed.

  7. Sub-Kelvin magnetic and electrical measurements in a diamond anvil cell with in situ tunability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, A.; Silevitch, D. M.; Feng, Yejun; Wang, Yishu; Jaramillo, R.; Banerjee, A.; Ren, Y.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2015-09-01

    We discuss techniques for performing continuous measurements across a wide range of pressure-field-temperature phase space, combining the milli-Kelvin temperatures of a helium dilution refrigerator with the giga-Pascal pressures of a diamond anvil cell and the Tesla magnetic fields of a superconducting magnet. With a view towards minimizing remnant magnetic fields and background magnetic susceptibility, we characterize high-strength superalloy materials for the pressure cell assembly, which allows high fidelity measurements of low-field phenomena such as superconductivity below 100 mK at pressures above 10 GPa. In situ tunability and measurement of the pressure permit experiments over a wide range of pressure, while at the same time making possible precise steps across abrupt phase transitions such as those from insulator to metal.

  8. Local mechanical response of cells to the controlled rotation of magnetic nanorods.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Matias; Ebensperger, Roberto; Wirtz, Denis; Walczak, Magdalena; Hurtado, Daniel E; Celedon, Alfredo

    2014-11-01

    The mechanical response of the cytoplasm was investigated by the intracellular implantation of magnetic nanorods and exposure to low-frequency rotatory magnetic fields. Nanorods (Pt-Ni, ∼200 nm diameter) fabricated by electrodeposition in templates of porous alumina with lengths of approximately 2 and 5 µm were inserted into NIH/3T3 fibroblasts and manipulated with a rotational magnetic field. Nanorod rotation was observed only for torques greater than 3.0 × 10(-16) Nm, suggesting a Bingham-type behavior of the cytoplasm. Higher torques produced considerable deformation of the intracellular material. The cell nucleus and cell membrane were significantly deformed by nanorods actuated by 4.5 × 10(-15) Nm torques. Our results demonstrate that nanorods under magnetic fields are an effective tool to mechanically probe the intracellular environment. We envision that our findings may contribute to the noninvasive and direct mechanical characterization of the cytoplasm.

  9. Magnetic Field-Assisted Perovskite Film Preparation for Enhanced Performance of Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haoxu; Lei, Jie; Gao, Fei; Yang, Zhou; Yang, Dong; Jiang, Jiexuan; Li, Juan; Hu, Xihong; Ren, Xiaodong; Liu, Bin; Liu, Jing; Lei, Hairui; Liu, Zhike; Liu, Shengzhong Frank

    2017-07-05

    Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) are promising low-cost photovoltaic technologies with high power conversion efficiency (PCE). The crystalline quality of perovskite materials is crucial to the photovoltaic performance of the PSCs. Herein, a simple approach is introduced to prepare high-quality CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films with larger crystalline grains and longer carriers lifetime by using magnetic field to control the nucleation and crystal growth. The fabricated planar CH3NH3PbI3 solar cells have an average PCE of 17.84% and the highest PCE of 18.56% using an optimized magnetic field at 80 mT. In contrast, the PSCs fabricated without the magnetic field give an average PCE of 15.52% and the highest PCE of 16.72%. The magnetic field action produces an ordered arrangement of the perovskite ions, improving the crystallinity of the perovskite films and resulting in a higher PCE.

  10. Sub-Kelvin magnetic and electrical measurements in a diamond anvil cell with in situ tunability

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, A; Silevitch, D M; Feng, Yejun; Wang, Y; Jaramillo, R.; Banerjee, A.; Ren, Y.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2015-09-01

    We discuss techniques for performing continuous measurements across a wide range of pressure–field–temperature phase space, combining the milli-Kelvin temperatures of a helium dilution refrigerator with the giga-Pascal pressures of a diamond anvil cell and the Tesla magnetic fields of a superconducting magnet. With a view towards minimizing remnant magnetic fields and background magnetic susceptibility, we characterize high-strength superalloy materials for the pressure cell assembly, which allows high fidelity measurements of low-field phenomena such as superconductivity below 100 mK at pressures above 10 GPa. In situ tunability and measurement of the pressure permit experiments over a wide range of pressure, while at the same time making possible precise steps across abrupt phase transitions such as those from insulator to metal.

  11. Sub-Kelvin magnetic and electrical measurements in a diamond anvil cell with in situ tunability.

    PubMed

    Palmer, A; Silevitch, D M; Feng, Yejun; Wang, Yishu; Jaramillo, R; Banerjee, A; Ren, Y; Rosenbaum, T F

    2015-09-01

    We discuss techniques for performing continuous measurements across a wide range of pressure-field-temperature phase space, combining the milli-Kelvin temperatures of a helium dilution refrigerator with the giga-Pascal pressures of a diamond anvil cell and the Tesla magnetic fields of a superconducting magnet. With a view towards minimizing remnant magnetic fields and background magnetic susceptibility, we characterize high-strength superalloy materials for the pressure cell assembly, which allows high fidelity measurements of low-field phenomena such as superconductivity below 100 mK at pressures above 10 GPa. In situ tunability and measurement of the pressure permit experiments over a wide range of pressure, while at the same time making possible precise steps across abrupt phase transitions such as those from insulator to metal.

  12. Direct cell entry of gold/iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles in adenovirus mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Kazumasa; Mukai, Yohei; Kojima, Hiroki; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Yoshikawa, Mai; Kiyohara, George; Yamamoto, Takao A; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Okada, Naoki; Seino, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Shinsaku

    2009-03-01

    Gold/iron-oxide MAgnetic Nanoparticles (GoldMAN) imparts useful magnetic properties to various biomolecules. Gold nanoparticles immobilized on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles allow for the conjugation of biomolecules via an Au-S bond. Here, we present a practical application by utilizing GoldMAN and a magnetic field to induce intracellular transduction. This method has great potential for application of the adenovirus gene delivery vector (Ad), widely used for in vitro/in vivo gene transfer, to Ad-resistant cells. We demonstrated that Ad was easily immobilized on GoldMAN and the Ad/GoldMAN complex was introduced into the cell by the magnetic field, which increased gene expression over 1000 times that of Ad alone. The GoldMAN penetrated the plasma membrane directly, independent of the cell-surface virus receptors and endocytosis pathway. This mechanism will contribute to improve the gene expression efficiency of Ad. This technology is a useful tool for extending Ad tropism and enhancing transduction efficiency. GoldMAN also makes possible the effective use of various biomolecules within the cell because of its interesting cell-entry mechanism.

  13. Longitudinal Tracking of Human Dendritic Cells in Murine Models Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Briley-Saebo, Karen C.; Leboeuf, Marylene; Dickson, Stephen; Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi A.; Palucka, A. Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Merad, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Ex vivo generated dendritic cells are currently used to induce therapeutic immunity in solid tumors. Effective immune response requires dendritic cells to home and remain in lymphoid organs to allow for adequate interaction with T lymphocytes. The aim of the current study was to detect and track Feridex labeled human dendritic cells in murine models using magnetic resonance imaging. Human dendritic cells were incubated with Feridex and the effect of labeling on dendritic cells immune function was evaluated. Ex vivo dendritic cell phantoms were used to estimate sensitivity of the magnetic resonance methods and in vivo homing was evaluated after intravenous or subcutaneous injection. R2*-maps of liver, spleen, and draining lymph nodes were obtained and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or relaxometry methods were used to quantify the Feridex tissue concentrations. Correlations between in vivo R2* values and iron content were then determined. Feridex labeling did not affect dendritic cell maturation or function. Phantom results indicated that it was possible to detect 125 dendritic cells within a given slice. Strong correlation between in vivo R2* values and iron deposition was observed. Importantly, Feridex-labeled dendritic cells were detected in the spleen for up to 2 weeks postintravenous injection. This study suggests that magnetic resonance imaging may be used to longitudinally track Feridex-labeled human dendritic cells for up to 2 weeks after injection. PMID:20593373

  14. Tracking Transplanted Stem Cells Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and the Nanoparticle Labeling Method in Urology

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon; Lee, Hong J.; Song, Yun Seob

    2015-01-01

    A reliable in vivo imaging method to localize transplanted cells and monitor their viability would enable a systematic investigation of cell therapy. Most stem cell transplantation studies have used immunohistological staining, which does not provide information about the migration of transplanted cells in vivo in the same host. Molecular imaging visualizes targeted cells in a living host, which enables determining the biological processes occurring in transplanted stem cells. Molecular imaging with labeled nanoparticles provides the opportunity to monitor transplanted cells noninvasively without sacrifice and to repeatedly evaluate them. Among several molecular imaging techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides high resolution and sensitivity of transplanted cells. MRI is a powerful noninvasive imaging modality with excellent image resolution for studying cellular dynamics. Several types of nanoparticles including superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles have been used to magnetically label stem cells and monitor viability by MRI in the urologic field. This review focuses on the current role and limitations of MRI with labeled nanoparticles for tracking transplanted stem cells in urology. PMID:26413510

  15. Cell type-specific response to high intracellular loading of polyacrylic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lojk, Jasna; Bregar, Vladimir B; Rajh, Maruša; Miš, Katarina; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Pirkmajer, Sergej; Veranič, Peter; Pavlin, Mojca

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are a special type of NP with a ferromagnetic, electron-dense core that enables several applications such as cell tracking, hyperthermia, and magnetic separation, as well as multimodality. So far, superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (SPIONs) are the only clinically approved type of metal oxide NPs, but cobalt ferrite NPs have properties suitable for biomedical applications as well. In this study, we analyzed the cellular responses to magnetic cobalt ferrite NPs coated with polyacrylic acid (PAA) in three cell types: Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO), mouse melanoma (B16) cell line, and primary human myoblasts (MYO). We compared the internalization pathway, intracellular trafficking, and intracellular fate of our NPs using fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as quantified NP uptake and analyzed uptake dynamics. We determined cell viability after 24 or 96 hours’ exposure to increasing concentrations of NPs, and quantified the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon 24 and 48 hours’ exposure. Our NPs have been shown to readily enter and accumulate in cells in high quantities using the same two endocytic pathways; mostly by macropinocytosis and partially by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The cell types differed in their uptake rate, the dynamics of intracellular trafficking, and the uptake capacity, as well as in their response to higher concentrations of internalized NPs. The observed differences in cell responses stress the importance of evaluation of NP–cell interactions on several different cell types for better prediction of possible toxic effects on different cell and tissue types in vivo. PMID:25733835

  16. Cell type-specific response to high intracellular loading of polyacrylic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lojk, Jasna; Bregar, Vladimir B; Rajh, Maruša; Miš, Katarina; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Pirkmajer, Sergej; Veranič, Peter; Pavlin, Mojca

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are a special type of NP with a ferromagnetic, electron-dense core that enables several applications such as cell tracking, hyperthermia, and magnetic separation, as well as multimodality. So far, superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (SPIONs) are the only clinically approved type of metal oxide NPs, but cobalt ferrite NPs have properties suitable for biomedical applications as well. In this study, we analyzed the cellular responses to magnetic cobalt ferrite NPs coated with polyacrylic acid (PAA) in three cell types: Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO), mouse melanoma (B16) cell line, and primary human myoblasts (MYO). We compared the internalization pathway, intracellular trafficking, and intracellular fate of our NPs using fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as quantified NP uptake and analyzed uptake dynamics. We determined cell viability after 24 or 96 hours' exposure to increasing concentrations of NPs, and quantified the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon 24 and 48 hours' exposure. Our NPs have been shown to readily enter and accumulate in cells in high quantities using the same two endocytic pathways; mostly by macropinocytosis and partially by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The cell types differed in their uptake rate, the dynamics of intracellular trafficking, and the uptake capacity, as well as in their response to higher concentrations of internalized NPs. The observed differences in cell responses stress the importance of evaluation of NP-cell interactions on several different cell types for better prediction of possible toxic effects on different cell and tissue types in vivo.

  17. Tracking Transplanted Stem Cells Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and the Nanoparticle Labeling Method in Urology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Heon; Lee, Hong J; Song, Yun Seob

    2015-01-01

    A reliable in vivo imaging method to localize transplanted cells and monitor their viability would enable a systematic investigation of cell therapy. Most stem cell transplantation studies have used immunohistological staining, which does not provide information about the migration of transplanted cells in vivo in the same host. Molecular imaging visualizes targeted cells in a living host, which enables determining the biological processes occurring in transplanted stem cells. Molecular imaging with labeled nanoparticles provides the opportunity to monitor transplanted cells noninvasively without sacrifice and to repeatedly evaluate them. Among several molecular imaging techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides high resolution and sensitivity of transplanted cells. MRI is a powerful noninvasive imaging modality with excellent image resolution for studying cellular dynamics. Several types of nanoparticles including superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles have been used to magnetically label stem cells and monitor viability by MRI in the urologic field. This review focuses on the current role and limitations of MRI with labeled nanoparticles for tracking transplanted stem cells in urology.

  18. MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  19. Retinoic acid inhibits the cytoproliferative response to weak 50-Hz magnetic fields in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    TRILLO, MARÍA ÁNGELES; MARTÍNEZ, MARÍA ANTONIA; CID, MARÍA ANTONIA; ÚBEDA, ALEJANDRO

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that intermittent exposure to a 50-Hz magnetic field (MF) at 100 μT stimulates cell proliferation in the human neuroblastoma cell line NB69. The present study aimed to investigate whether the magnetic field-induced growth promotion also occurs at a lower magnetic flux density of 10 μT. To this purpose, NB69 cells were subjected for 42 h to intermittent exposure, 3 h on/3 h off, to a 50-Hz MF at a 10 or 100 μT magnetic flux density. The field exposure took place either in the presence or in the absence of the antiproliferative agent retinoic acid. At the end of the treatment and/or incubation period, the cell growth was estimated by hemocytometric counting and spectrophotometric analysis of total protein and DNA contents. Potential changes in DNA synthesis were also assessed through proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunolabeling. The results confirmed previously reported data that a 42-h exposure to a 50-Hz sine wave MF at 100 μT promotes cell growth in the NB69 cell line, and showed that 10 μT induces a similar proliferative response. This effect, which was significantly associated and linearly correlated with PCNA expression, was abolished by the presence of retinoic acid in the culture medium. PMID:23292364

  20. Endothelialization of Magnetic Graft Materials using SPION-labeled Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Brant R.; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Harbuzariu, Adriana; McIntosh, Malcolm; Harburn, J. Jonathan; Parakka, Anthony; Kalra, Manju; Holmes, David; Simari, Robert D.; Sandhu, Gurpreet S.

    2010-12-01

    Seeding vascular grafts with autologous endothelial cells (EC) has been shown to improve in vivo patency, but high cost and development time have prevented widespread clinical use. A technique for loading EC with superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanospheres (SPIONs) was recently described. SPION-loaded EC experience magnetic attractive forces in the presence of sufficient magnetic field gradients. Using a multi-factorial design of experiments approach, the quantity and spatial distribution of magnetizable metal particles within a poly (ether urethane) matrix were systematically varied to produce unique material specimens. Specimens were seeded with SPION-loaded ECs, and cell coverage was quantified at various post-seeding time intervals using micrographic image analysis. The effects of changing design parameters on cell capture and sustained cell viability on magnetic substrates were statistically examined. Magnetized ferrites and samarium cobalt demonstrated cell capture, though cytotoxicity prevented sustained cell growth. Cobalt chromium substrates showed effective cell capture and growth to near complete confluence for up to one month.

  1. Evaluation of In-Situ Magnetic Signals from Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Labeled PC12 Cells by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijun; Min, Yue; Wang, Zhigang; Riggio, Cristina; Calatayud, M Pilar; Pinkernelle, Josephine; Raffa, Vittoria; Goya, Gerardo F; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2015-03-01

    The magnetic signals from magnetite nanoparticle-labeled PC12 cells were assessed by magnetic force microscopy by deploying a localized external magnetic field to magnetize the nanoparticles and the magnetic tip simultaneously so that the interaction between the tip and PC12 cell-associated Fe3O4 nanoparticles could be detected at lift heights (the distance between the tip and the sample) larger than 100 nm. The use of large lift heights during the raster scanning of the probe eliminates the non-magnetic interference from the complex and rugged cell surface and yet maintains the sufficient sensitivity for magnetic detection. The magnetic signals of the cell-bound nanoparticles were semi-quantified by analyzing cell surface roughness upon three-dimensional reconstruction generated by the phase shift of the cantilever oscillation. The obtained data can be used for the evaluation of the overall cellular magnetization as well as the maximum magnetic forces from magnetic nanoparticle-labeled cells which is crucial for the biomedical application of these nanomaterials.

  2. Magneto-impedance based detection of magnetically labeled cancer cells and bio-proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devkota, J.; Howell, M.; Mohapatra, S.; Nhung, T. H.; Mukherjee, P.; Srikanth, H.; Phan, M. H.

    2015-03-01

    A magnetic biosensor with enhanced sensitivity and immobilized magnetic markers is essential for a reliable analysis of the presence of a biological entity in a fluid. Based on conventional approaches, however, it is quite challenging to create such a sensor. We report on a novel magnetic biosensor using the magneto-impedance (MI) effect of a Co-based amorphous ribbon with a microhole-patterned surface that fulfils these requirements. The sensor probe was fabricated by patterning four microholes, each of diameter 2 μm and depth 2 μm, on the ribbon surface using FIB lithography. The magnetically labeled Luis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) cancer cells and Bovine serum albumin (BSA) proteins were drop-casted on the ribbon surface, and MI was measured over 0.1 - 10 MHz frequency range. As the analytes were trapped into the microholes, their physical motion was minimized and interaction among the magnetic fields was strengthened, thus yielding a more reliable and sensitive detection of the biological entities. The presence of magnetically labeled LLC cells (8.25x105 cells/ml, 10 μl) and BSA proteins (2x1011 particles/ml, 10 μl) were found to result in a ~ 2% change in MI with respect to the reference signal.

  3. Differences in magnetically induced motion of diamagnetic, paramagnetic, and superparamagnetic microparticles detected by cell tracking velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Yang; Richardson, Aaron; Moore, Lee; Williams, P Stephen; Zborowski, Maciej; Chalmers, Jeffrey J

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic separation in biomedical applications is based on differential magnetophoretic mobility (MM) of microparticulate matter in viscous media. Typically, the difference in MM is obtained by selectively labeling the target cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). We have measured the MM of monodisperse, polystyrene microspheres (PSMs), with and without attached SPIONs as a model of cell motion induced by nanoparticle magnetization, using variable H field and cell tracking velocimetry (CTV). As a model of paramagnetic microparticle motion, the MM measurements were performed on the same PSMs in paramagnetic gadolinium solutions, and on spores of a prokaryotic organism, Bacillus globigii (shown to contain paramagnetic manganese). The CTV analysis was sensitive to the type of the microparticle magnetization, producing a value of MM independent of the applied H field for the paramagnetic species, and a decreasing MM value with an increasing field for superparamagnetic species, as predicted from theory. The SPION-labeled PSMs exhibited a saturation magnetization above H approximately = 64,000 A m(-1) (or 0.08 tesla). Based on those data, the average saturation magnetizations of the SPIONs was calculated and shown to vary between different commercial sources. The results demonstrate sensitivity of the CTV analysis to different magnetization mechanisms of the microparticles.

  4. Differences in magnetically induced motion of diamagnetic, paramagnetic, and superparamagnetic microparticles detected by Cell Tracking Velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Yang; Richardson, Aaron; Moore, Lee; Williams, P. Stephen; Zborowski, Maciej; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic separation in biomedical applications is based on differential magnetophoretic mobility (MM) of microparticulate matter in viscous media. Typically, the difference in MM is obtained by selectively labeling the target cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles(SPIONs). We have measured the MM of monodisperse, polystyrene microspheres (PSMs), with and without attached SPIONs as a model of cell motion induced by nanoparticle magnetization, using variable H field and Cell Tracking Velocimetry (CTV). As a model of paramagnetic microparticle motion, the MM measurements were performed on the same PSMs in paramagnetic gadolinium solutions, and on spores of a prokaryotic organism, Bacillus globigii (shown to contain paramagnetic manganese). The CTV analysis was sensitive to the type of the microparticle magnetization, producing a value of MM independent of the applied H field for the paramagnetic species, and a decreasing MM value with an increasing field for superparamagnetic species, as predicted from theory. The SPION-labeled PSMs exhibited a saturation magnetization above H ≅ 64,000 A m−1 (or 0.08 tesla). Based on those data, the average saturation magnetizations of the SPIONs was calculated and shown to vary between different commercial sources. The results demonstrate sensitivity of the CTV analysis to different magnetization mechanisms of the microparticles. PMID:19082082

  5. Characterization of interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Calero, Macarena; Chiappi, Michele; Lazaro-Carrillo, Ana; Rodríguez, María José; Chichón, Francisco Javier; Crosbie-Staunton, Kieran; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Volkov, Yuri; Villanueva, Angeles; Carrascosa, José L

    2015-02-26

    Different superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been tested for their potential use in cancer treatment, as they enter into cells with high effectiveness, do not induce cytotoxicity, and are retained for relatively long periods of time inside the cells. We have analyzed the interaction, internalization and biocompatibility of dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with an average diameter of 15 nm and negative surface charge in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Cells were incubated with dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for different time intervals, ranging from 0.5 to 72 h. These nanoparticles showed efficient internalization and relatively slow clearance. Time-dependent uptake studies demonstrated the maximum accumulation of dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles after 24 h of incubation, and afterwards they were slowly removed from cells. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were internalized by energy dependent endocytosis and localized in endosomes. Transmission electron microscopy studies showed macropinocytosis uptake and clathrin-mediated internalization depending on the nanoparticles aggregate size. MCF-7 cells accumulated these nanoparticles without any significant effect on cell morphology, cytoskeleton organization, cell cycle distribution, reactive oxygen species generation and cell viability, showing a similar behavior to untreated control cells. All these findings indicate that dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have excellent properties in terms of efficiency and biocompatibility for application to target breast cancer cells.

  6. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance of intact friend leukemia cells: phosphorylcholine increase during differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Agris, P.F.; Campbell, I.D.

    1982-06-18

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance of intact Friend leukemia cells was used to analyze their erythroid-like differentiation. The technique, which requires only 10/sup 8/ to 10/sup 9/ cells and approximately 2 minutes for acquisition of each spectrum, demonstrated the occurrence of many signal changes during differentiation. With cell extracts, 64 signals were assigned to 12 amino acids and 19 other intermediary metabolites, and a dramatic signal change was attributed to a fourfrease in cytoplasmic phosphorylcholines.

  7. Experimental determination of the magnetic dipole moment of candidate magnetoreceptor cells in trout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winklhofer, M.; Eder, S.; Cadioiu, H.; McNaughton, P. A.; Kirschvink, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Based on histological, physiological, and physical evidence, Walker et al (1997) and Diebel et al (2000) have identified distinctive cells in the olfactory epithelium of the rainbow trout (Onchorynchus mykiss) that contain magnetite and are closely associated with neurons that respond to changes in magnetic field. To put biophysical constraints on the possible transduction mechanism of magnetic signals, and in particular, to find out if the intracellular magnet is free to rotate or rather firmly anchored within the cell body, we have studied the magneto-mechanical response of isolated candidate receptor cells in suspension using a light microscope equipped with two pairs of Helmholtz coils. From the characteristic re-orientation time of suspended cells after a change in magnetic field direction, we have determined the magnitude of the magnetic dipole moment of the cells in function of the external field strength (0.4 mT to 3.2 mT) in order to find out whether or not the natural magnetic moment is remanence-based or induced (i.e., single-domain vs. superparamagnetic/multi-domain). Results: 1) The mechanical response of isolated cells to a change in magnetic field direction was always immediate, irrespective of the direction of change, which implies that the intracellular magnet is not free to rotate in the cell, but rather rigidly attached, probably to the plasma membrane, which is also suggested by our confocal fluorescence-microscope studies. 2) The cellular dipole moment turned out to be independent of the external field strength. Thus, the natural magnetic dipole moment is based on magnetic remanence, which points to single-domain particles and corroborates the results by Diebel et al (2000), who obtained switching fields consistent with single-domain magnetite. 3). The magnetic dipole moment is found to be of the order of several tens of fAm2, which greatly exceeds previous estimates (0.5 fAm2), and thus is similar to values reported for the most strongly

  8. Lucifer Yellow uptake by CHO cells exposed to magnetic and electric pulses

    PubMed Central

    Towhidi, Leila; Firoozabadi, Seyed Mohammad P; Mozdarani, Hossein; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2012-01-01

    Background The cell membrane acts as a barrier that hinders free entrance of most hydrophilic molecules into the cell. Due to numerous applications in medicine, biology and biotechnology, the introduction of impermeant molecules into biological cells has drawn considerable attention in the past years. One of the most famous methods in this field is electroporation, in which electric pulses with high intensity and short duration are applied to the cells. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of time-varying magnetic field with different parameters on transmembrane molecular transport. Materials and methods. ‘Moreover, a comparison was made between the uptake results due to magnetic pulse exposure and electroporation mediated uptake.’ at the end of Background part. The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were exposed to magnetic pulses of 2.2 T peak strength and 250 μs duration delivered by Magstim stimulator and double 70 mm coil. Three different frequencies of 0.25, 1 and 10 Hz pulses with 112, 56 and 28 number of pulses were applied (altogether nine experimental groups) and Lucifer Yellow uptake was measured in each group. Moreover, maximum uptake of Lucifer Yellow obtained by magnetic pulses was compared to the measured uptake due to electroporation with typical parameters of 8 pulses of 100 μs, repetition frequency of 1 Hz and electric field intensities of 200 to 600 V/cm. Results and conclusions. Our results show that time-varying magnetic field exposure increases transmembrane molecular transport and this uptake is greater for lower frequencies and larger number of pulses. Besides, the comparison shows that electroporation is more effective than pulsed magnetic field, but the observed uptake enhancement due to magnetic exposure is still considerable. PMID:23077448

  9. Lucifer Yellow uptake by CHO cells exposed to magnetic and electric pulses.

    PubMed

    Towhidi, Leila; Firoozabadi, Seyed Mohammad P; Mozdarani, Hossein; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2012-06-01

    The cell membrane acts as a barrier that hinders free entrance of most hydrophilic molecules into the cell. Due to numerous applications in medicine, biology and biotechnology, the introduction of impermeant molecules into biological cells has drawn considerable attention in the past years. One of the most famous methods in this field is electroporation, in which electric pulses with high intensity and short duration are applied to the cells. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of time-varying magnetic field with different parameters on transmembrane molecular transport. 'Moreover, a comparison was made between the uptake results due to magnetic pulse exposure and electroporation mediated uptake.' at the end of Background part. The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were exposed to magnetic pulses of 2.2 T peak strength and 250 μs duration delivered by Magstim stimulator and double 70 mm coil. Three different frequencies of 0.25, 1 and 10 Hz pulses with 112, 56 and 28 number of pulses were applied (altogether nine experimental groups) and Lucifer Yellow uptake was measured in each group. Moreover, maximum uptake of Lucifer Yellow obtained by magnetic pulses was compared to the measured uptake due to electroporation with typical parameters of 8 pulses of 100 μs, repetition frequency of 1 Hz and electric field intensities of 200 to 600 V/cm. Our results show that time-varying magnetic field exposure increases transmembrane molecular transport and this uptake is greater for lower frequencies and larger number of pulses. Besides, the comparison shows that electroporation is more effective than pulsed magnetic field, but the observed uptake enhancement due to magnetic exposure is still considerable.

  10. Measuring collective cell movement and extracellular matrix interactions using magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Dodd, Stephen J.; Tangrea, Michael A.; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Koretsky, Alan P.

    2013-01-01

    Collective cell behaviors in migration and force generation were studied at the mesoscopic-level using cells grown in a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) simulating tissues. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was applied to investigate dynamic cell mechanics at this level. MDCK, NBT2, and MEF cells were embedded in 3D ECM, forming clusters that then migrated and generated forces affecting the ECM. The cells demonstrated MRI contrast due to iron accumulation in the clusters. Timelapse-MRI enabled the measurement of dynamic stress fields generated by the cells, as well as simultaneous monitoring of the cell distribution and ECM deformation/remodeling. We found cell clusters embedded in the 3D ECM can exert translational forces to pull and push, as well as torque, their surroundings. We also observed that the sum of forces generated by multiple cell clusters may result in macroscopic deformation. In summary, MRI can be used to image cell-ECM interactions mesoscopically. PMID:23698816

  11. Measuring collective cell movement and extracellular matrix interactions using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Dodd, Stephen J; Tangrea, Michael A; Emmert-Buck, Michael R; Koretsky, Alan P

    2013-01-01

    Collective cell behaviors in migration and force generation were studied at the mesoscopic-level using cells grown in a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) simulating tissues. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was applied to investigate dynamic cell mechanics at this level. MDCK, NBT2, and MEF cells were embedded in 3D ECM, forming clusters that then migrated and generated forces affecting the ECM. The cells demonstrated MRI contrast due to iron accumulation in the clusters. Timelapse-MRI enabled the measurement of dynamic stress fields generated by the cells, as well as simultaneous monitoring of the cell distribution and ECM deformation/remodeling. We found cell clusters embedded in the 3D ECM can exert translational forces to pull and push, as well as torque, their surroundings. We also observed that the sum of forces generated by multiple cell clusters may result in macroscopic deformation. In summary, MRI can be used to image cell-ECM interactions mesoscopically.

  12. Spatial control of chromosomal location in a live cell with functionalized magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Juhee; Purwar, Prashant; Cha, Misun; Lee, Junghoon

    2015-11-01

    Long-range chromosomal travel is a phenomenon unique to cell division. Methods for non-invasive, artificial manipulation of chromosomes, such as optical or magnetic tweezers, have difficulty in producing the motion of whole chromosomes in live cells. Here, we report the spatial control of chromosomes over 10 μm in a live mouse oocyte using magnetic particles driven by an external magnetic field. Selective capture of the chromosomes was achieved using antibodies specific for histone H1 in the chromosome that were conjugated to magnetic particles (H1-BMPs). When an external magnetic field was applied, the chromosomes captured by the H1-BMPs traveled through the cytosol and accumulated near the cell membrane though the movement of the chromosomes captured by H1-BMPs was strongly disturbed by the distribution of the cytoskeleton (e.g. actin filaments). Being non-invasive in nature, our approach will enable new opportunities in the remote manipulation of subcellular elements.Long-range chromosomal travel is a phenomenon unique to cell division. Methods for non-invasive, artificial manipulation of chromosomes, such as optical or magnetic tweezers, have difficulty in producing the motion of whole chromosomes in live cells. Here, we report the spatial control of chromosomes over 10 μm in a live mouse oocyte using magnetic particles driven by an external magnetic field. Selective capture of the chromosomes was achieved using antibodies specific for histone H1 in the chromosome that were conjugated to magnetic particles (H1-BMPs). When an external magnetic field was applied, the chromosomes captured by the H1-BMPs traveled through the cytosol and accumulated near the cell membrane though the movement of the chromosomes captured by H1-BMPs was strongly disturbed by the distribution of the cytoskeleton (e.g. actin filaments). Being non-invasive in nature, our approach will enable new opportunities in the remote manipulation of subcellular elements. Electronic supplementary

  13. Viscoelastic Properties Measurement of Human Lymphocytes by Atomic Force Microscopy Based on Magnetic Beads Cell Isolation.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lianqing; Xiao, Xiubin; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2016-03-28

    Cell mechanics has been proved to be an effective biomarker for indicating cellular states. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides an exciting instrument for measuring the mechanical properties of single cells. However, current AFM single-cell mechanical measurements are commonly performed on cell lines cultured in vitro which are quite different from the primary cells in the human body. Investigating the mechanical properties of primary cells from clinical environments can help us to better understand cell behaviors. Here, by combining AFM with magnetic beads cell isolation, the viscoelastic properties of human primary B lymphocytes were quantitatively measured. B lymphocytes were isolated from the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers by density gradient centrifugation and CD19 magnetic beads cell isolation. The activity and specificity of the isolated cells were confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. AFM imaging revealed the surface topography and geometric parameters of B lymphocytes. The instantaneous modulus and relaxation time of living B lymphocytes were measured by AFM indenting technique, showing that the instantaneous modulus of human normal B lymphocytes was 2~3 kPa and the relaxation times were 0.03~0.06 s and 0.35~0.55 s. The differences in cellular visocoelastic properties between primary B lymphocytes and cell lines cultured in vitro were analyzed. The study proves the capability of AFM in quantifying the viscoelastic properties of individual specific primary cells from the blood sample of clinical patients, which will improve our understanding of the behaviors of cells in the human body.

  14. Influence of pulsed magnetic fields on the morphology of bone cells in early stages of growth.

    PubMed

    Noriega-Luna, Berenice; Sabanero, Myrna; Sosa, Modesto; Avila-Rodriguez, Mario

    2011-08-01

    The effect of electromagnetic fields on living systems has been studied both in vivo and in vitro in a wide range of organisms, cells and tissues. However, the mechanism of action of electromagnetic fields is not yet clearly defined. This paper presents the results of applying a pulsed magnetic field of 70ms width, intensity of 0.65mT at 4Hz in human osteoblasts, during 45min. The magnetic field application was conducted on crops of both 24 and 48h of proliferation. The effect of applying magnetic fields was assessed using parameters such as cell density, protein content, distribution of F-actin fibrils and β-tubulin and integrity of nuclear structure. The results indicate no alteration in either protein synthesis or nuclear structure, or in the number of cells. However, we observed that exposure to these fields induces changes in the distribution of cytoskeletal proteins of osteoblasts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Endocytotic potential governs magnetic particle loading in dividing neural cells: studying modes of particle inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Tickle, Jacqueline A; Jenkins, Stuart I; Polyak, Boris; Pickard, Mark R; Chari, Divya M

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To achieve high and sustained magnetic particle loading in a proliferative and endocytotically active neural transplant population (astrocytes) through tailored magnetite content in polymeric iron oxide particles. Materials & methods: MPs of varying magnetite content were applied to primary-derived rat cortical astrocytes ± static/oscillating magnetic fields to assess labeling efficiency and safety. Results: Higher magnetite content particles display high but safe accumulation in astrocytes, with longer-term label retention versus lower/no magnetite content particles. Magnetic fields enhanced loading extent. Dynamic live cell imaging of dividing labeled astrocytes demonstrated that particle distribution into daughter cells is predominantly ‘asymmetric’. Conclusion: These findings could inform protocols to achieve efficient MP loading into neural transplant cells, with significant implications for post-transplantation tracking/localization. PMID:26785794

  16. Endocytotic potential governs magnetic particle loading in dividing neural cells: studying modes of particle inheritance.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Jacqueline A; Jenkins, Stuart I; Polyak, Boris; Pickard, Mark R; Chari, Divya M

    2016-02-01

    To achieve high and sustained magnetic particle loading in a proliferative and endocytotically active neural transplant population (astrocytes) through tailored magnetite content in polymeric iron oxide particles. MPs of varying magnetite content were applied to primary-derived rat cortical astrocytes ± static/oscillating magnetic fields to assess labeling efficiency and safety. Higher magnetite content particles display high but safe accumulation in astrocytes, with longer-term label retention versus lower/no magnetite content particles. Magnetic fields enhanced loading extent. Dynamic live cell imaging of dividing labeled astrocytes demonstrated that particle distribution into daughter cells is predominantly 'asymmetric'. These findings could inform protocols to achieve efficient MP loading into neural transplant cells, with significant implications for post-transplantation tracking/localization.

  17. A type of novel fluorescent magnetic carbon quantum dots for cells imaging and detection.

    PubMed

    Su, Xi; Xu, Yi; Che, Yulan; Liao, Xin; Jiang, Yan

    2015-12-01

    A new type of multifunctional fluorescent magnetic carbon quantum dots SPIO@CQDs(n) ([superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO), carbon quantum dots, (CQDs)]) with magnetic and fluorescence properties was designed and prepared through layer-by-layer self-assembly method. The as-synthesized SPIO@CQDs(n) exhibited different emission colors including blue, green, and red when they were excited at different excitation wavelengths, and its fluorescent intensity increased as the increase of CQD layer (n). SPIO@CQDs(n) with quite low toxicity could mark cytoplasm with fluorescence by means of nonimmune markers. The mixture sample of liver cells L02 and hepatoma carcinoma cells HepG2 was taken as an example, and HepG2 cells were successfully separated and detected effectively by SPIO@CQDs(n), with a separation rate of 90.31%. Importantly, the designed and prepared SPIO@CQDs( n ) are certified to be wonderful biological imaging and magnetic separation regents.

  18. Magnetic microposts for mechanical stimulation of biological cells: Fabrication, characterization, and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sniadecki, Nathan J.; Lamb, Corinne M.; Liu, Yaohua; Chen, Christopher S.; Reich, Daniel H.

    2008-04-01

    Cells use force as a mechanical signal to sense and respond to their microenvironment. Understanding how mechanical forces affect living cells requires the development of tool sets that can apply nanoscale forces and also measure cellular traction forces. However, there has been a lack of techniques that integrate actuation and sensing components to study force as a mechanical signal. Here, we describe a system that uses an array of elastomeric microposts to apply external forces to cells through cobalt nanowires embedded inside the microposts. We first biochemically treat the posts' surfaces to restrict cell adhesion to the posts' tips. Then by applying a uniform magnetic field (B<0.3T), we induce magnetic torque on the nanowires that is transmitted to a cell's adhesion site as an external force. We have achieved external forces of up to 45nN, which is in the upper range of current nanoscale force-probing techniques. Nonmagnetic microposts, similarly prepared but without nanowires, surround the magnetic microposts and are used to measure the traction forces and changes in cell mechanics. We record the magnitude and direction of the external force and the traction forces by optically measuring the deflection of the microposts, which linearly deflect as cantilever springs. With this approach, we can measure traction forces before and after force stimulation in order to monitor cellular response to forces. We present the fabrication methods, magnetic force characterization, and image analysis techniques used to achieve the measurements.

  19. In vivo magnetic enrichment and multiplex photoacoustic detection of circulating tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Shashkov, Evgeny V.; Kelly, Thomas; Kim, Jin-Woo; Yang, Lily; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2009-12-01

    The spread of cancer cells between organs, a process known as metastasis, is the cause of most cancer deaths. Detecting circulating tumour cells-a common marker for the development of metastasis-is difficult because ex vivo methods are not sensitive enough owing to limited blood sample volume and in vivo diagnosis is time-consuming as large volumes of blood must be analysed. Here, we show a way to magnetically capture circulating tumour cells in the bloodstream of mice followed by rapid photoacoustic detection. Magnetic nanoparticles, which were functionalized to target a receptor commonly found in breast cancer cells, bound and captured circulating tumour cells under a magnet. To improve detection sensitivity and specificity, gold-plated carbon nanotubes conjugated with folic acid were used as a second contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging. By integrating in vivo multiplex targeting, magnetic enrichment, signal amplification and multicolour recognition, our approach allows circulating tumour cells to be concentrated from a large volume of blood in the vessels of tumour-bearing mice, and this could have potential for the early diagnosis of cancer and the prevention of metastasis in humans.

  20. Development of pressure cell for specific heat measurement at low temperature and high Magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawae, T.; Yaita, K.; Yoshida, Y.; Inagaki, Y.; Ohashi, M.; Oomi, G.; Matsubayashi, K.; Matsumoto, T.; Uwatoko, Y.

    2009-02-01

    We report the performance of Ag-Pd-Cu alloy as the material of a pressure cell to carry out specific heat measurements at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. The Ag-Pd-Cu alloy is advantageous to reduce the background due to the nuclear specific heat in the pressure cell growing at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. We prepared 70-20-10 alloy composed of 70 mass % of Ag, 20 mass % of Pd, and 10 mass % of Cu. The maximum hardness over 100 HRB (Rockwell-B scale) is achieved by the heat treatment. The magnetization and susceptibility results show that the alloy includes a small amount of magnetic ions, whose concentration is smaller than that in the Be-Cu alloy. We confirm that the specific heat of a piston cylinder cell made of the 70-20-10 alloy increases smoothly from 0.2 to 9 K and the nuclear specific heat decreases drastically in magnetic field compared to that expected in the Be-Cu alloy. The pressure value in the cell at low temperature increases almost linearly up to P =0.4 GPa, which is nearly the limit of the inner piston made of the 70-20-10 alloy, with increasing of the load applied at room temperature.

  1. Magnetic poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and cellulose particles for MRI-based cell tracking

    PubMed Central

    Nkansah, Michael K.; Thakral, Durga; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradable, superparamagnetic micro- and nanoparticles of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and cellulose were designed, fabricated and characterized for magnetic cell labeling. Monodisperse nanocrystals of magnetite were incorporated into micro- and nanoparticles of PLGA and cellulose with high efficiency using an oil-in-water single emulsion technique. Superparamagnetic cores had high magnetization (72.1 emu/g). The resulting polymeric particles had smooth surface morphology and high magnetite content (43.3 wt% for PLGA and 69.6 wt% for cellulose). While PLGA and cellulose nanoparticles displayed highest r2* values per millimole of iron (399 s-1mM-1 for cellulose and 505 s-1mM-1 for PLGA), micron-sized PLGA particles had a much higher r2* per particle than either. After incubation for a month in citrate buffer (pH 5.5), magnetic PLGA particles lost close to 50% of their initial r2* molar relaxivity, while magnetic cellulose particles remained intact, preserving over 85% of their initial r2* molar relaxivity. Lastly, mesenchymal stem cells and human breast adenocarcinoma cells were magnetically labeled using these particles with no detectable cytotoxicity. These particles are ideally suited for non-invasive cell tracking in vivo via MRI and due to their vastly different degradation properties, offer unique potential for dedicated use for either short (PLGA-based particles) or long term (cellulose-based particles) experiments. PMID:21404328

  2. Application of a Halbach magnetic array for long-range cell and particle separations in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Joo H.; Driscoll, Harry; Super, Michael; Ingber, Donald E.

    2016-05-01

    Here, we describe a versatile application of a planar Halbach permanent magnet array for an efficient long-range magnetic separation of living cells and microparticles over distances up to 30 mm. A Halbach array was constructed from rectangular bar magnets using 3D-printed holders and compared to a conventional alternating array of identical magnets. We theoretically predicted the superiority of the Halbach array for a long-range magnetic separation and then experimentally validated that the Halbach configuration outperforms the alternating array for isolating magnetic microparticles or microparticle-bound bacterial cells at longer distances. Magnetophoretic velocities (ymag) of magnetic particles (7.9 μm diameter) induced by the Halbach array in a microfluidic device were significantly higher and extended over a larger area than those induced by the alternating magnet array (ymag = 178 versus 0 μm/s at 10 mm, respectively). When applied to 50 ml tubes (˜30 mm diameter), the Halbach array removed >95% of Staphylococcus aureus bacterial cells bound with 1 μm magnetic particles compared to ˜70% removed using the alternating array. In addition, the Halbach array enabled manipulation of 1 μm magnetic beads in a deep 96-well plate for ELISA applications, which was not possible with the conventional magnet arrays. Our analysis demonstrates the utility of the Halbach array for the future design of devices for high-throughput magnetic separations of cells, molecules, and toxins.

  3. Combination of hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy on mesenchymal stem cell line treated with chloroaluminum phthalocyanine magnetic-nanoemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, Leonardo B.; Primo, Fernando L.; Pinto, Marcelo R.; Morais, Paulo C.; Tedesco, Antonio C.

    2015-04-01

    The present study reports on the preparation and the cell viability assay of two nanoemulsions loaded with magnetic nanoparticle and chloroaluminum phthalocyanine. The preparations contain equal amount of chloroaluminum phthalocyanine (0.05 mg/mL) but different contents of magnetic nanoparticle (0.15×1013 or 1.50×1013 particle/mL). The human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell line was used as the model to assess the cell viability and this type of cell can be used as a model to mimic cancer stem cells. The cell viability assays were performed in isolated as well as under combined magnetic hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy treatments. We found from the cell viability assay that under the hyperthermia treatment (1 MHz and 40 Oe magnetic field amplitude) the cell viability reduction was about 10%, regardless the magnetic nanoparticle content within the magnetic nanoparticle/chloroaluminum phthalocyanine formulation. However, cell viability reduction of about 50% and 60% were found while applying the photodynamic therapy treatment using the magnetic nanoparticle/chloroaluminum phthalocyanine formulation containing 0.15×1013 or 1.50×1013 magnetic particle/mL, respectively. Finally, an average reduction in cell viability of about 66% was found while combining the hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy treatments.

  4. Magnetic-based multi-layer microparticles for endothelial progenitor cell isolation, enrichment, and detachment.

    PubMed

    Wadajkar, Aniket S; Santimano, Sonia; Tang, Liping; Nguyen, Kytai T

    2014-01-01

    Although endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are useful in many applications including cell-based therapies, their use is still limited due to issues associated with cell culture techniques like a low isolation efficiency, use of harmful proteolytic enzymes in cell cultures, and difficulty in ex vivo expansion. Here, we report a tool to simultaneously isolate, enrich, and detach EPCs without the use of harmful chemicals. In particular, we developed magnetic-based multi-layer microparticles (MLMPs) that (1) magnetically isolate EPCs via anti-CD34 antibodies to avoid the use of Ficoll and harsh shear forces; (2) provide a 3D surface for cell attachment and growth; (3) produce sequential releases of growth factors (GFs) to enrich ex vivo expansion of cells; and (4) detach cells without using trypsin. MLMPs were successful in isolating EPCs from a cell suspension and provided a sequential release of GFs for EPC proliferation and differentiation. The cell enrichment profiles indicated steady cell growth on MLMPs in comparison to commercial Cytodex3 microbeads. Further, the cells were detached from MLMPs by lowering the temperature below 32 °C. Results indicate that the MLMPs have potential to be an effective tool towards efficient cell isolation, fast expansion, and non-chemical detachment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Magnetic Particle Spectroscopy Reveals Dynamic Changes in the Magnetic Behavior of Very Small Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles During Cellular Uptake and Enables Determination of Cell-Labeling Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Poller, Wolfram C; Löwa, Norbert; Wiekhorst, Frank; Taupitz, Matthias; Wagner, Susanne; Möller, Konstantin; Baumann, Gert; Stangl, Verena; Trahms, Lutz; Ludwig, Antje

    2016-02-01

    In vivo tracking of nanoparticle-labeled cells by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) crucially depends on accurate determination of cell-labeling efficacy prior to transplantation. Here, we analyzed the feasibility and accuracy of magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) for estimation of cell-labeling efficacy in living THP-1 cells incubated with very small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (VSOP). Cell viability and proliferation capacity were not affected by the MPS measurement procedure. In VSOP samples without cell contact, MPS enabled highly accurate quantification. In contrast, MPS constantly overestimated the amount of cell associated and internalized VSOP. Analyses of the MPS spectrum shape expressed as harmonic ratio A₅/A₃ revealed distinct changes in the magnetic behavior of VSOP in response to cellular uptake. These changes were proportional to the deviation between MPS and actual iron amount, therefore allowing for adjusted iron quantification. Transmission electron microscopy provided visual evidence that changes in the magnetic properties correlated with cell surface interaction of VSOP as well as with alterations of particle structure and arrangement during the phagocytic process. Altogether, A₅/A₃-adjusted MPS enables highly accurate, cell-preserving VSOP quantification and furthermore provides information on the magnetic characteristics of internalized VSOP.

  6. Molecular extraction in single live cells by sneaking in and out magnetic nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Deng, Liangzi; Lan, Yucheng; Zhang, Xiaoliu; Gao, Zhonghong; Chu, Ching-Wu; Cai, Dong; Ren, Zhifeng

    2014-07-29

    Extraction of intracellular molecules is crucial to the study of cellular signal pathways. Disruption of the cellular membrane remains the established method to release intracellular contents, which inevitably terminates the time course of biological processes. Also, conventional laboratory extractions mostly use bulky materials that ignore the heterogeneity of each cell. In this work, we developed magnetized carbon nanotubes that can be sneaked into and out of cell bodies under a magnetic force. Using a testing model with overexpression of GFP, the nanotubes successfully transported the intracellular GFP out at the single-cell level. The confined nanoscale invasiveness did not change cell viability or proliferation. This study presents the proof of concept of a previously unidentified real-time and single-cell approach to investigate cellular biology, signal messengers, and therapeutic effects with nanomaterials.

  7. Magnetic field effects on viscous fingering of a ferrofluid in a radial Hele Shaw cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herreman, Wietze; Molho, Pierre; Neveu, Sophie

    2005-03-01

    We have studied the effects of a magnetic field on viscous fingering when a ferrofluid is pushed in a more viscous liquid in a circular Hele-Shaw cell. The main effect of the magnetic field, as already known, is to stabilize interfaces parallel to the field and to destabilize interfaces normal to the field. Depending on the growth regime (quasi static, fingering, dendritic growth), which depends on parameters like the cell thickness and oil viscosity, the combination of field effect and anisotropy is analyzed through the various observed patterns.

  8. 2D and 3D fault basis for fuel cell diagnosis by external magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifrek, Lyes; Cauffet, Gilles; Chadebec, Olivier; Bultel, Yann; Rosini, Sébastien; Rouveyre, Luc

    2017-07-01

    An original approach used for the identification of faults in fuel cell stacks is presented. It is based on the 3D reconstruction of the current density from external magnetic field measurements which is an ill-posed magnetostatic linear inverse problem. A suitable and original current density and magnetic field basis are proposed in order to define both local and global faults on a fuel cell stack. The inverse problem is regularized by truncated singular value decomposition (SVD) to ensure the uniqueness of the solution. Contribution to the topical issue "Electrical Engineering Symposium (SGE 2016)", edited by Adel Razek

  9. Design and fabrication of a magnetic fluid micropump for applications in direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shi-Min; Kuan, Yean-Der; Sung, Min-Feng

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are widely considered to have great potential for portable electric applications, and the power requirements for many of them are only a few watts. Therefore, a low power liquid pump is especially desirable for driving the methanol solution fuel for an active direct methanol fuel. The main objective of this paper is to design and fabricate a magnetic fluid micropump that has characteristics of low operation voltage and current and is suitable for use in DMFCs. Two prototypes were developed and tested. The magnetic fluid micropumps are successfully applied to drive the fuel to a DMFC, and measurements of the cell performance are also conducted.

  10. Invert sugar formation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells encapsulated in magnetically responsive alginate microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarik, Ivo; Sabatkova, Zdenka; Safarikova, Mirka

    2009-05-01

    Invert sugar (an equimolar mixture of glucose and fructose prepared by sucrose hydrolysis) is a very important food component. We have prepared magnetically responsive alginate microbeads containing entrapped Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and magnetite microparticles which can be easily separated in an appropriate magnetic separator. The microbeads (typical diameter between 50 and 100 μm) were prepared using the water-in-oil emulsification process. The prepared microbeads containing yeast cells with invertase activity enabled efficient sucrose conversion. The biocatalyst was quite stable; the same catalytic activity was observed after one month storage at 4 °C and the microbeads could be used at least six times.

  11. Kinetic of magnetic nanoparticles uptake evaluated by morphometry of mice peritoneal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, L. P.; Kuckelhaus, S.; Guedes, M. H. A.; Lacava, Z. G. M.; Tedesco, A. C.; Morais, P. C.; Azevedo, R. B.

    2005-03-01

    The development of magnetic fluids (MFs) has led to a wide range of new biomedical applications. Nevertheless, few studies have examined the kinetics of the magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) internalization by phagocytes. In this study, we present morphometry as a method to quantify the cell surface covered by MNPs. The maximum cell surface covered by MNPs aggregates was 32.5% (8.5 min), 18.3% (24.1 min), and 18.0% (20.2 min) in DMSA, citric acid and dextran-coated MNPs, respectively. We concluded that the phagocytosis process of MNPs is strongly dependent upon the coating species.

  12. Increasing magnetite contents of polymeric magnetic particles dramatically improves labeling of neural stem cell transplant populations.

    PubMed

    Adams, Christopher F; Rai, Ahmad; Sneddon, Gregor; Yiu, Humphrey H P; Polyak, Boris; Chari, Divya M

    2015-01-01

    Safe and efficient delivery of therapeutic cells to sites of injury/disease in the central nervous system is a key goal for the translation of clinical cell transplantation therapies. Recently, 'magnetic cell localization strategies' have emerged as a promising and safe approach for targeted delivery of magnetic particle (MP) labeled stem cells to pathology sites. For neuroregenerative applications, this approach is limited by the lack of available neurocompatible MPs, and low cell labeling achieved in neural stem/precursor populations. We demonstrate that high magnetite content, self-sedimenting polymeric MPs [unfunctionalized poly(lactic acid) coated, without a transfecting component] achieve efficient labeling (≥90%) of primary neural stem cells (NSCs)-a 'hard-to-label' transplant population of major clinical relevance. Our protocols showed high safety with respect to key stem cell regenerative parameters. Critically, labeled cells were effectively localized in an in vitro flow system by magnetic force highlighting the translational potential of the methods used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells cultured on magnetic nanowire substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Jose E.; Ravasi, Timothy; Kosel, Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    Stem cells have been shown to respond to extracellular mechanical stimuli by regulating their fate through the activation of specific signaling pathways. In this work, an array of iron nanowires (NWs) aligned perpendicularly to the surface was fabricated by pulsed electrodepositon in porous alumina templates followed by a partial removal of the alumina to reveal 2-3 μm of the NWs. This resulted in alumina substrates with densely arranged NWs of 33 nm in diameter separated by 100 nm. The substrates were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) energy dispersive x-ray analysis and vibrating sample magnetometer. The NW array was then used as a platform for the culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The cells were stained for the cell nucleus and actin filaments, as well as immuno-stained for the focal adhesion protein vinculin, and then observed by fluorescence microscopy in order to characterize their spreading behavior. Calcein AM/ethidium homodimer-1 staining allowed the determination of cell viability. The interface between the cells and the NWs was studied using SEM. Results showed that hMSCs underwent a re-organization of actin filaments that translated into a change from an elongated to a spherical cell shape. Actin filaments and vinculin accumulated in bundles, suggesting the attachment and formation of focal adhesion points of the cells on the NWs. Though the overall number of cells attached on the NWs was lower compared to the control, the attached cells maintained a high viability (>90%) for up to 6 d. Analysis of the interface between the NWs and the cells confirmed the re-organization of F-actin and revealed the adhesion points of the cells on the NWs. Additionally, a net of filopodia surrounded each cell, suggesting the probing of the array to find additional adhesion points. The cells maintained their round shape for up to 6 d of culture. Overall, the NW array is a promising nanostructured platform for studying and influencing h

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells cultured on magnetic nanowire substrates.

    PubMed

    Perez, Jose E; Ravasi, Timothy; Kosel, Jürgen

    2017-02-03

    Stem cells have been shown to respond to extracellular mechanical stimuli by regulating their fate through the activation of specific signaling pathways. In this work, an array of iron nanowires (NWs) aligned perpendicularly to the surface was fabricated by pulsed electrodepositon in porous alumina templates followed by a partial removal of the alumina to reveal 2-3 μm of the NWs. This resulted in alumina substrates with densely arranged NWs of 33 nm in diameter separated by 100 nm. The substrates were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) energy dispersive x-ray analysis and vibrating sample magnetometer. The NW array was then used as a platform for the culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The cells were stained for the cell nucleus and actin filaments, as well as immuno-stained for the focal adhesion protein vinculin, and then observed by fluorescence microscopy in order to characterize their spreading behavior. Calcein AM/ethidium homodimer-1 staining allowed the determination of cell viability. The interface between the cells and the NWs was studied using SEM. Results showed that hMSCs underwent a re-organization of actin filaments that translated into a change from an elongated to a spherical cell shape. Actin filaments and vinculin accumulated in bundles, suggesting the attachment and formation of focal adhesion points of the cells on the NWs. Though the overall number of cells attached on the NWs was lower compared to the control, the attached cells maintained a high viability (>90%) for up to 6 d. Analysis of the interface between the NWs and the cells confirmed the re-organization of F-actin and revealed the adhesion points of the cells on the NWs. Additionally, a net of filopodia surrounded each cell, suggesting the probing of the array to find additional adhesion points. The cells maintained their round shape for up to 6 d of culture. Overall, the NW array is a promising nanostructured platform for studying and influencing h

  15. The effects of functional magnetic nanotubes with incorporated nerve growth factor in neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jining; Chen, Linfeng; Varadan, Vijay K.; Yancey, Justin; Srivatsan, Malathi

    2008-03-01

    In this in vitro study the efficiency of magnetic nanotubes to bind with nerve growth factor (NGF) and the ability of NGF-incorporated magnetic nanotubes to release the bound NGF are investigated using rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12 cells). It is found that functional magnetic nanotubes with NGF incorporation enabled the differentiation of PC12 cells into neurons exhibiting growth cones and neurite outgrowth. Microscope observations show that filopodia extending from neuron growth cones were in close proximity to the NGF-incorporated magnetic nanotubes, at times appearing to extend towards or into them. These results show that magnetic nanotubes can be used as a delivery vehicle for NGF and thus may be exploited in attempts to treat neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease with neurotrophins. Further neurite outgrowth can be controlled by manipulating magnetic nanotubes with external magnetic fields, thus helping in directed regeneration.

  16. Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pingping; Yin, Ruochun; Chen, Zhiyou; Wu, Lifang; Yu, Zengliang

    2007-04-01

    The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation. The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1, 3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla. The seeds were germinated at 23oC after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field. The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method. The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN), chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs. Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups, a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome, triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla, respectively. The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration, but no linear relationship was observed. Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T.

  17. Magnetic field effects in a polymer/fullerene blend photovoltaic cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyuk-Jae; Basham, James I.; Gundlach, David J.; Richter, Curt A.

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) systems based on blends of conjugated polymers and fullerene derivatives have shown great promise for low-cost and efficient photovoltaic applications. Recent findings suggest that a weak external magnetic field can disturb the spin configuration of excited states and subsequently change properties of OPV cells such as photocurrent. These changes are referred to as magnetic field effects (MFEs). In order to have a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the MFEs in polymer/fullerene blend photovoltaic systems, we fabricated poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) cells and carried out photovoltaic device performance and impedance spectroscopy measurements with and without an externally applied magnetic field. A significant reduction in short circuit current (JSC) as well as open circuit voltage (VOC) was observed with an applied magnetic field of a 0.1 tesla compared to those measured without a magnetic field under the same intensity of illumination. Impedance spectroscopy data gives insights into the influence of an external magnetic field on charge generation and recombination near normal photovoltaic operating conditions.

  18. Does Magnetic Field Affect Malaria Parasite Replication in Human Red Blood Cells?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chanturiya, Alexandr N.; Glushakova, Svetlana; Yin, Dan; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2004-01-01

    Digestion of red blood cell (RBC) hemoglobin by the malaria parasite results in the formation of paramagnetic hemazoin crystals inside the parasite body. A number of reports suggest that magnetic field interaction with hamazoin crystals significantly reduces the number of infected cells in culture, and thus magnetic field can be used to combat malaria. We studies the effects of magnetic filed on the Plasmodium falciparum asexual life cycle inside RBCs under various experimental conditions. No effect was found during prolonged exposure of infected RBCs to constant magnetic fields up to 6000 Gauss. Infected RBCs were also exposed, under temperature-controlled conditions, to oscillating magnetic fields with frequencies in the range of 500-20000 kHz, and field strength 30-600 Gauss. This exposure often changed the proportion of different parasite stages in treated culture compared to controls. However, no significant effect on parasitemia was observed in treated cultures. This result indicates that the magnetic field effect on Plasmodium falciparum is negligible, or that hypothetical negative and positive effects on different stages within one 48-hour compensate each other.

  19. Physical Stimuli-Induced Chondrogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Son, Boram; Kim, Hwan D; Kim, Minsoo; Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Jinkyu; Shin, Heungsoo; Hwang, Nathaniel S; Park, Tai Hyun

    2015-06-24

    Chondrogenic commitments of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) require 3D cellular organization. Furthermore, recent progresses in bioreactor technology have contributed to the development of various biophysical stimulation platforms for efficient cartilage tissue formation. Here, an approach is reported to drive 3D cellular organization and enhance chondrogenic commitment of bone-marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (BM-hMSCs) via magnetic nanoparticle (MNP)-mediated physical stimuli. MNPs isolated from Magnetospirillum sp. AMB-1 are endocytosed by the BM-hMSCs in a highly efficient manner. MNPs-incorporated BM-hMSCs are pelleted and then subjected to static magnetic field and/or magnet-derived shear stress. Magnetic-based stimuli enhance level of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) and collagen synthesis, and facilitate the chondrogenic differentiation of BM-hMSCs. In addition, both static magnetic field and magnet-derived shear stress applied for the chondrogenic differentiation of BM-hMSCs do not show increament of hypertrophic differentiation. This MNP-mediated physical stimulation platform demonstrates a promising strategy for efficient cartilage tissue engineering. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies of mast cell histamine

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Ludowyke, R.; Lagunoff, D.

    1987-11-03

    The state of histamine in mast cells was studied by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. Spectra were measured for histamine in situ in intact mast cells, for histamine in suspensions of mast cell granule matrices that had been stripped of their membranes, and for histamine in solutions of heparin. The /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of intact mast cells is relatively simple, consisting predominantly of resonances for intracellular histamine superimposed on a weaker background of resonances from heparin and proteins of the cells. All of the intracellular histamine contributes of the NMR signals, indicating it must be relatively mobile and not rigidly associated with the negatively charged granule matrix. Spectra for intracellular histamine and for histamine in granule matrices are similar, indicating the latter to be a reasonable model for the in situ situation. The dynamics of binding of histamine by granule matrices and by heparin are considerably different; exchange of histamine between the bulk water and the granule matrices is slow on the /sup 1/H NMR time scale, whereas exchange between the free and bound forms in heparin solution is fast. The chemical shifts of resonances for histamine in mast cells are pH dependent, decreasing as the intragranule pH increases without splitting or broadening. The results are interpreted to indicate that histamine in mast cells is relatively labile, with rapid exchange between histamine and pools of free histamine in water compartments confined in the granule matrix.

  1. In vivo magnetic enrichment and multiplex photoacoustic detection of circulating tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Shashkov, Evgeny V.; Kelly, Thomas; Kim, Jin-Woo; Yang, Lily; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    The spread of cancer cells between organs, a process known as metastasis, is the cause of most cancer deaths1,2. Detecting circulating tumour cells—a common marker for the development of metastasis3,4—is difficult because ex vivo methods are not sensitive enough owing to limited blood sample volume and in vivo diagnosis is time-consuming as large volumes of blood must be analysed5–7. Here, we show a way to magnetically capture circulating tumour cells in the bloodstream of mice followed by rapid photoacoustic detection. Magnetic nanoparticles, which were functionalized to target a receptor commonly found in breast cancer cells, bound and captured circulating tumour cells under a magnet. To improve detection sensitivity and specificity, gold-plated carbon nanotubes conjugated with folic acid were used as a second contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging. By integrating in vivo multiplex targeting, magnetic enrichment, signal amplification and multicolour recognition, our approach allows circulating tumour cells to be concentrated from a large volume of blood in the vessels of tumour-bearing mice, and this could have potential for the early diagnosis of cancer and the prevention of metastasis in humans. PMID:19915570

  2. Bone marrow metastases in small cell lung cancer: detection with magnetic resonance imaging and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Trillet, V.; Revel, D.; Combaret, V.; Favrot, M.; Loire, R.; Tabib, A.; Pages, J.; Jacquemet, P.; Bonmartin, A.; Mornex, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The detection of bone marrow involvement might be of prognostic value and may influence therapeutic decisions in small cell lung cancer. By unilateral bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, evidence of bone marrow metastases is seen in 15-30% of patients with this disease. Since magnetic resonance imaging of the lower body and immunostaining with monoclonal antibodies have recently been shown to be very sensitive detection methods, we investigated the value of these two techniques in detecting bone marrow involvement in 35 consecutive patients with small cell lung cancer. The results were compared to those obtained with conventional cytohistological analysis. In all cases when cytology and/or bone marrow biopsy were positive, monoclonal antibodies immunostaining and magnetic resonance imaging also detected malignant cells. Furthermore, evidence of bone marrow involvement was shown with magnetic resonance imaging and/or immunostaining in 10 of 26 cases (38%) where routine procedures were unable to detect malignant cells. In one of these 26 patients, magnetic resonance imaging and immunostaining provided the only evidence of metastatic disease. These data suggest that the rate of bone marrow metastases is underestimated by routine procedures. Further investigation is needed to determine whether or not these new non-invasive methods have prognostic value or affect therapeutic choices in small cell lung carcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2553088

  3. Magnetically Tuning Tether Mobility of Integrin Ligand Regulates Adhesion, Spreading, and Differentiation of Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dexter S H; Li, Jinming; Yan, Xiaohui; Wang, Ben; Li, Rui; Zhang, Li; Bian, Liming

    2017-03-08

    Cells sense and respond to the surrounding microenvironment through binding of membranous integrin to ligands such as the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide. Previous studies show that the RGD tether properties on substrate influence cell adhesion and spreading, but few studies have reported strategies to control the tether mobility of RGD on substrate via a physical and noncontact approach. Herein, we demonstrate a novel strategy to tune the tether mobility of RGD on substrate via magnetic force. We conjugate a monolayer of RGD-bearing magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on a glass substrate via the flexible and coiled poly(ethylene glycol) linker of large molecular weight (PEG, average MW: 2000), and this increases the RGD tether mobility, which can be significantly reduced by applying magnetic attraction on MNPs. Our data show that high RGD tether mobility delays the early adhesion and spreading of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), leading to compromised osteogenic differentiation at later stage. In contrast, hMSCs cultured on substrate with restricted RGD tether mobility, achieved either via a shorter PEG linker (MW: 200) or magnetic force, show significantly better adhesion, spreading, and osteogenic differentiation. The control utilizing RGD-bearing nonmagnetic nanoparticles shows no such enhancing effect of magnetic field on cellular events, further supporting our conjecture of magnetic tuning of RGD tether mobility. We hypothesize that high tether mobility of RGD entails additional time and effort by the cells to fully develop traction force and mechanical feedback, thereby delaying the maturation of FAs and activation of subsequent mechanotransduction signaling. Our staining results of vinculin, a critical component of FAs, and Yes-associated protein (YAP), an important mechanosensitive transcriptional factor, support our hypothesis. We believe that our work not only sheds light on the impact of dynamic presentation of cell adhesive ligands on cellular behaviors

  4. Investigation of potential fluctuating intra-unit cell magnetic order in cuprates by μ SR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, A.; Akintola, K.; Potma, M.; Ishikado, M.; Eisaki, H.; Hardy, W. N.; Bonn, D. A.; Liang, R.; Sonier, J. E.

    2016-10-01

    We report low temperature muon spin relaxation (μ SR ) measurements of the high-transition-temperature (Tc) cuprate superconductors Bi2 +xSr2 -xCaCu2O8 +δ and YBa2Cu3O6.57 , aimed at detecting the mysterious intra-unit cell (IUC) magnetic order that has been observed by spin-polarized neutron scattering in the pseudogap phase of four different cuprate families. A lack of confirmation by local magnetic probe methods has raised the possibility that the magnetic order fluctuates slowly enough to appear static on the time scale of neutron scattering, but too fast to affect μ SR or nuclear magnetic resonance signals. The IUC magnetic order has been linked to a theoretical model for the cuprates, which predicts a long-range ordered phase of electron-current loop order that terminates at a quantum crictical point (QCP). Our study suggests that lowering the temperature to T ˜25 mK and moving far below the purported QCP does not cause enough of a slowing down of fluctuations for the IUC magnetic order to become detectable on the time scale of μ SR . Our measurements place narrow limits on the fluctuation rate of this unidentified magnetic order.

  5. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Global Relativistic Jets with Helical Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duţan, Ioana; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Mizuno, Yosuke; Niemiec, Jacek; Kobzar, Oleh; Pohl, Martin; Gómez, Jose L.; Pe'er, Asaf; Frederiksen, Jacob T.; Nordlund, Åke; Meli, Athina; Sol, Helene; Hardee, Philip E.; Hartmann, Dieter H.

    We study the interaction of relativistic jets with their environment, using 3-dimen- sional relativistic particle-in-cell simulations for two cases of jet composition: (i) electron-proton (e - - p +) and (ii) electron-positron (e +/-) plasmas containing helical magnetic fields. We have performed simulations of ``global'' jets containing helical magnetic fields in order to examine how helical magnetic fields affect kinetic instabilities such as the Weibel instability, the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and the Mushroom instability. We have found that these kinetic instabilities are suppressed and new types of instabilities can grow. For the e - - p + jet, a recollimation-like instability occurs and jet electrons are strongly perturbed, whereas for the e +/- jet, a recollimation-like instability occurs at early times followed by kinetic instability and the general structure is similar to a simulation without a helical magnetic field. We plan to perform further simulations using much larger systems to confirm these new findings.

  6. Fast electron energy deposition in a magnetized plasma: Kinetic theory and particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Robiche, J.; Rax, J.-M.; Bonnaud, G.; Gremillet, L.

    2010-03-15

    The collisional dynamics of a relativistic electron jet in a magnetized plasma are investigated within the framework of kinetic theory. The relativistic Fokker-Planck equation describing slowing down, pitch angle scattering, and cyclotron rotation is derived and solved. Based on the solution of this Fokker-Planck equation, an analytical formula for the root mean square spot size transverse to the magnetic field is derived and this result predicts a reduction in radial transport. Some comparisons with particle-in-cell simulation are made and confirm striking agreement between the theory and the simulation. For fast electron with 1 MeV typical kinetic energy interacting with a solid density hydrogen plasma, the energy deposition density in the transverse direction increases by a factor 2 for magnetic field of the order of 1 T. Along the magnetic field, the energy deposition profile is unaltered compared with the field-free case.

  7. Magnetic glyconanoparticles as a versatile platform for selective immunolabeling and imaging of cells.

    PubMed

    García, Isabel; Gallo, Juan; Genicio, Nuria; Padro, Daniel; Penadés, Soledad

    2011-02-16

    A versatile nanoplatform based on magnetic glyconanoparticles (glyco-ferrites) to attach well-oriented antibodies is described. An efficient ligand exchange process has been used to prepare water-soluble 6-nm-sized core-shell Fe(3)O(4)@Au nanoparticles bearing amphiphilic carbohydrates and aliphatic ethylene glycol chains ended in a carboxyl group. The covalent immobilization through the carboxyl group of an Fc receptor (protein G) enables successful well-oriented capture of immunoglobulins G onto the magnetic glyconanoparticle. A thorough characterization of structure and biofunctionality of the constructs is carried out by different techniques. The selective immunolabeling of cells by the antibody-magnetic glyconanoparticle conjugates is demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as by fluorescence techniques.

  8. Selective isolation of magnetic nanoparticle-mediated heterogeneity subpopulation of circulating tumor cells using magnetic gradient based microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Bongseop; Lee, Jaehun; Lee, Dongkyu; Lee, Kangho; Kwon, Ohwon; Kang, Shinwon; Kim, Youngwoo

    2017-02-15

    Relocation mechanisms of the circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from the primary site to the secondary site through the blood vessel network cause tumor metastasis. Despite of the importance to diagnose the cancer metastasis by CTCs, still it is formidable challenge to use in the clinical purpose because of the rarity and the heterogeneity of CTCs in the cancer patient's peripheral blood sample. In this study we have developed magnetic force gradient based microfluidic chip (Mag-Gradient Chip) for isolating the total number of CTCs in the sample and characterizing the state of CTCs simultaneously with respect to the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) expression level. We have synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) using hydrothermal method and functionalized anti-EpCAM on their surface for the specific binding with CTCs. The Mag-Gradient Chip designed to isolate and classify the CTCs by isolating at the different location in the chip using magnetic force differences depending on the EpCAM expression level. We observed 95.7% of EpCAM positive and 79.3% of EpCAM negative CTCs isolated in the Mag-Gradient Chip. At the same time, the 71.3% of isolated EpCAM positive CTCs were isolated at the first half area whereas the 76.9% of EpCAM negative CTCs were collected at the latter half area. The Mag-Gradient Chip can isolate the 3ml of heterogeneous CTCs sample in 1h with high isolating yield. The EpCAM expression level dose not means essential condition of the metastatic CTCs, but the Mag-Gradient Chip can shorten the date to diagnose the cancer metastasis in clinic.

  9. PEG/RGD-modified magnetic polymeric liposomes for controlled drug release and tumor cell targeting.

    PubMed

    Su, Wenya; Wang, Hanjie; Wang, Sheng; Liao, Zhenyu; Kang, Shiyin; Peng, Yao; Han, Lei; Chang, Jin

    2012-04-15

    Polymeric liposomes (PEG/RGD-MPLs), composed of amphiphilic polymer octadecyl-quaternized modified poly (γ-glutamic acid) (OQPGA), PEGylated OQPGA, RGD peptide grafted OQPGA and magnetic nanoparticles, was prepared successfully. These PEG/RGD-MPLs could be used as a multifunctional platform for targeted drug delivery. The results showed that PEG/RGD-MPLs were multilamellar spheres with nano-size (50-70 nm) and positive surface charge (28-42 mV). Compared with magnetic conventional liposomes (MCLs), PEG/RGD-MPLs exhibited sufficient size and zeta potential stability, low initial burst release and less magnetic nanoparticles leakage. The cell uptake results suggested that the PEG/RGD-MPLs (with RGD and magnetic particles) exhibited more drug cellular uptake than non RGD and non magnetism carriers in MCF-7 cells. MTT assay revealed that PEG/RGD-MPLs showed lower in vitro cytotoxicity to GES-1cells at ≤ 100 μg/mL. These data indicated that the multifunctional PEG/RGD-MPLs may be an alternative formulation for drug delivery system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Isolation and mutational analysis of circulating tumor cells from lung cancer patients with magnetic sifters and biochips†

    PubMed Central

    Earhart, Christopher M.; Hughes, Casey E.; Gaster, Richard S.; Ooi, Chin Chun; Wilson, Robert J.; Zhou, Lisa Y.; Humke, Eric W.; Xu, Lingyun; Wong, Dawson J.; Willingham, Stephen B.; Schwartz, Erich J.; Weissman, Irving L.; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Neal, Joel W.; Rohatgi, Rajat; Wakelee, Heather A.; Wang, Shan X.

    2014-01-01

    Detection and characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) may reveal insights into the diagnosis and treatment of malignant disease. Technologies for isolating CTCs developed thus far suffer from one or more limitations, such as low throughput, inability to release captured cells, and reliance on expensive instrumentation for enrichment or subsequent characterization. We report a continuing development of a magnetic separation device, the magnetic sifter, which is a miniature microfluidic chip with a dense array of magnetic pores. It offers high efficiency capture of tumor cells, labeled with magnetic nanoparticles, from whole blood with high throughput and efficient release of captured cells. For subsequent characterization of CTCs, an assay, using a protein chip with giant magnetoresistive nanosensors, has been implemented for mutational analysis of CTCs enriched with the magnetic sifter. The use of these magnetic technologies, which are separate devices, may lead the way to routine preparation and characterization of “liquid biopsies” from cancer patients. PMID:23969419

  11. Crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticle assisted photothermal delivery into cells using CW near-infrared laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ling; Koymen, Ali R.; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2014-05-01

    Efficient and targeted delivery of impermeable exogenous material such as small molecules, proteins, and plasmids into cells in culture as well as in vivo is of great importance for drug, vaccine and gene delivery for different therapeutic strategies. Though advent of optoporation by ultrafast laser microbeam has allowed spatial targeting in cells, the requirement of high peak power to create holes on the cell membrane is not practical and also challenging in vivo. Here, we report development and use of uniquely non-reactive crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticles (CMCNPs) for photothermal delivery (PTD) of impermeable dyes and plasmids encoding light-sensitive proteins into cells using low power continuous wave near-infrared (NIR) laser beam. Further, we utilized the magnetic nature of these CMCNPs to localize them in desired region by external magnetic field, thus minimizing the required number of nanoparticles. We discovered that irradiation of the CMCNPs near the desired cell(s) with NIR laser beam leads to temperature rise that not only stretch the cell-membrane to ease delivery, it also creates fluid flow to allow mobilization of exogenous substances to the delivery. Due to significant absorption properties of the CMCNPs in the NIR therapeutic window, PTD under in vivo condition is highly possible.

  12. Crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticle assisted photothermal delivery into cells using CW near-infrared laser beam.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ling; Koymen, Ali R; Mohanty, Samarendra K

    2014-05-29

    Efficient and targeted delivery of impermeable exogenous material such as small molecules, proteins, and plasmids into cells in culture as well as in vivo is of great importance for drug, vaccine and gene delivery for different therapeutic strategies. Though advent of optoporation by ultrafast laser microbeam has allowed spatial targeting in cells, the requirement of high peak power to create holes on the cell membrane is not practical and also challenging in vivo. Here, we report development and use of uniquely non-reactive crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticles (CMCNPs) for photothermal delivery (PTD) of impermeable dyes and plasmids encoding light-sensitive proteins into cells using low power continuous wave near-infrared (NIR) laser beam. Further, we utilized the magnetic nature of these CMCNPs to localize them in desired region by external magnetic field, thus minimizing the required number of nanoparticles. We discovered that irradiation of the CMCNPs near the desired cell(s) with NIR laser beam leads to temperature rise that not only stretch the cell-membrane to ease delivery, it also creates fluid flow to allow mobilization of exogenous substances to the delivery. Due to significant absorption properties of the CMCNPs in the NIR therapeutic window, PTD under in vivo condition is highly possible.

  13. On-chip magnetic separation and encapsulation of cells in droplets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aaron; Byvank, Tom; Chang, Woo-Jin; Bharde, Atul; Vieira, Greg; Miller, Brandon L; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Bashir, Rashid; Sooryakumar, Ratnasingham

    2013-03-21

    Single cell study is gaining importance because of the cell-to-cell variation that exists within cell population, even after significant initial sorting. Analysis of such variation at the gene expression level could impact single cell functional genomics, cancer, stem-cell research, and drug screening. The on-chip monitoring of individual cells in an isolated environment would prevent cross-contamination, provide high recovery yield, and enable study of biological traits at a single cell level. These advantages of on-chip biological experiments is a significant improvement for a myriad of cell analyses methods, compared to conventional methods, which require bulk samples and provide only averaged information on cell structure and function. We report on a device that integrates a mobile magnetic trap array with microfluidic technology to provide the possibility of separation of immunomagnetically labeled cells and their encapsulation with reagents into picoliter droplets for single cell analysis. The simultaneous reagent delivery and compartmentalization of the cells immediately following sorting are all performed seamlessly within the same chip. These steps offer unique advantages such as the ability to capture cell traits as originated from its native environment, reduced chance of contamination, minimal use of the reagents, and tunable encapsulation characteristics independent of the input flow. Preliminary assay on cell viability demonstrates the potential for the device to be integrated with other up- or downstream on-chip modules to become a powerful single-cell analysis tool.

  14. Blood progenitor cell separation from clinical leukapheresis product by magnetic nanoparticle binding and magnetophoresis.

    PubMed

    Jing, Ying; Moore, Lee R; Williams, P Stephen; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Farag, Sherif S; Bolwell, Brian; Zborowski, Maciej

    2007-04-15

    Positive selection of CD34+ blood progenitor cells from circulation has been reported to improve patient recovery in applications of autologous transplantation. Current magnetic separation methods rely on cell capture and release on solid supports rather than sorting from flowing suspensions, which limits the range of therapeutic applications and the process scale up. We tested CD34+ cell immunomagnetic labeling and isolation from fresh leukocyte fraction of peripheral blood (leukapheresis) using the continuous quadrupole magnetic flow sorter (QMS), consisting of a flow channel (SHOT, Greenville, IN) and a quadrupole magnet with a maximum field intensity (B(o)) of 1.42 T and a mean force field strength (S(m)) of 1.45 x 10(8) TA/m(2). Both the sample magnetophoretic mobility (m) and the inlet and outlet flow patterns highly affect the QMS performance. Seven commercial progenitor cell labeling reagent combinations were quantitatively evaluated by measuring magnetophoretic mobility of a high CD34 expression cell line, KG-1a, using the cell tracking velocimeter (CTV). The CD34 Progenitor Cell Isolation Kit (Miltenyi Biotec, Bergisch Gladbach, Germany) showed the strongest labeling of KG-1a cells and was selected for progenitor cell enrichment from 11 fresh and 11 cryopreserved clinical leukapheresis samples derived from different donors. The CD34+ cells were isolated with a purity of 60-96%, a recovery of 18-60%, an enrichment rate of 12-169, and a throughput of (1.7-9.3) x 10(4) cells/s. The results also showed a highly regular dependence of the QMS performance on the flow conditions that agreed with the theoretical predictions based on the CD34+ cell magnetophoretic mobility.

  15. Diode/magnetic tunnel junction cell for fully scalable matrix-based biochip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, F. A.; Ferreira, H. A.; Conde, J. P.; Chu, V.; Freitas, P. P.; Vidal, D.; Germano, J.; Sousa, L.; Piedade, M. S.; Costa, B. A.; Lemos, J. M.

    2006-04-01

    Magnetoresistive biochips have been recently introduced for the detection of biomolecular recognition. In this work, the detection site incorporates a thin-film diode in series with a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), leading to a matrix-based biochip that can be easily scaled up to screen large numbers of different target analytes. The fabricated 16×16 cell matrix integrates hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) diodes with aluminum oxide barrier MTJ. Each detection site also includes a U-shaped current line for magnetically assisted target concentration at probe sites. The biochip is being integrated in a portable, credit card size electronics control platform. Detection of 250 nm diameter magnetic nanoparticles by one of the matrix cells is demonstrated.

  16. Structural and function changes in organelles of liver cells in rats exposed to magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gorczynska, E. ); Wegrzynowicz, R. )

    1991-08-01

    Exposure of rats to magnetic fields of 10{sup {minus}3} and 10{sup {minus}2} T for 1 hr daily generated structural changes in hepatocytes mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and ribosomes. Simultaneously there was an increase in the activities of the mitochondrial respiratory enzymes: NADH dehydrogenase, succinic dehydrogenase, and cytochrome oxidase. The extent of the changes in liver cell properties following exposure depend on the duration of exposure to and the strength of the applied magnetic fields. Ultrastructural studies did not reveal any changes in external membranes of hepatocytes or in the membranes of cell nuclei. An increase in the amount of glycogen in hepatocytes of rats exposed to both 10{sup {minus}3} and 10{sup {minus}2} T was noted. The high level of cortisol in serum of exposed rats suggests that magnetic field may be a stress generating factor.

  17. The influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, W.; Ding, J.; Duan, W.; Zhu, Y. M.

    2004-11-01

    The aim of present work was to investigate the influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The neurite number per cell, length of neurites and directions of neurite growth with respect to the direction of the magnetic field were analyzed after exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic field for 96 h. A promotion was observed under a weak field (0.23 mT), as the average number of neurites per cell increased to 2.38±0.06 compared to 1.91±0.07 neurites/cell of the control dishes, while inhibition and directional outgrowth was evident under a relatively stronger field (1.32 mT). Our work shows that biological systems can be very sensitive to the strength of electromagnetic field.

  18. Splenic red pulp macrophages are intrinsically superparamagnetic and contaminate magnetic cell isolates

    PubMed Central

    Franken, Lars; Klein, Marika; Spasova, Marina; Elsukova, Anna; Wiedwald, Ulf; Welz, Meike; Knolle, Percy; Farle, Michael; Limmer, Andreas; Kurts, Christian

    2015-01-01

    A main function of splenic red pulp macrophages is the degradation of damaged or aged erythrocytes. Here we show that these macrophages accumulate ferrimagnetic iron oxides that render them intrinsically superparamagnetic. Consequently, these cells routinely contaminate splenic cell isolates obtained with the use of MCS, a technique that has been widely used in immunological research for decades. These contaminations can profoundly alter experimental results. In mice deficient for the transcription factor SpiC, which lack red pulp macrophages, liver Kupffer cells take over the task of erythrocyte degradation and become superparamagnetic. We describe a simple additional magnetic separation step that avoids this problem and substantially improves purity of magnetic cell isolates from the spleen. PMID:26260698

  19. Magnetic approaches to study collective three-dimensional cell mechanics in long-term cultures (invited)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ruogang; Boudou, Thomas; Wang, Wei-Gang; Chen, Christopher S.; Reich, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Contractile forces generated by cells and the stiffness of the surrounding extracellular matrix are two central mechanical factors that regulate cell function. To characterize the dynamic evolution of these two mechanical parameters during tissue morphogenesis, we developed a magnetically actuated micro-mechanical testing system in which fibroblast-populated collagen microtissues formed spontaneously in arrays of microwells that each contains a pair of elastomeric microcantilevers. We characterized the magnetic actuation performance of this system and evaluated its capacity to support long-term cell culture. We showed that cells in the microtissues remained viable during prolonged culture periods of up to 15 days, and that the mechanical properties of the microtissues reached and maintained at a stable state after a fast initial increase stage. Together, these findings demonstrate the utility of this microfabricated bio-magneto-mechanical system in extended mechanobiological studies in a physiologically relevant 3D environment. PMID:24803684

  20. Whole-animal senescent cytotoxic T cell removal using antibodies linked to magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rebo, Justin; Causey, Keith; Zealley, Ben; Webb, Tim; Hamalainen, Mark; Cook, Brian; Schloendorn, John

    2010-01-01

    A major type of unwanted cells that accumulate in aging are anergic cytotoxic T cells. These cells often have virus-specific T cell receptors, as well as other surface markers that distinguish them from their youthful counterparts, and they are thought to play a major role in the decline of the immune system with age. Here we consider two surface markers thought to define these cells in mice, CD8 and Killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1), and a means we developed to remove these cells from the blood of aged C57BL/6 mice. Using antibodies with magnetic nanoparticles linked to their Fc domains, we first developed a method to use magnets to filter out the unwanted cells from the blood and later constructed a device that does this automatically. We demonstrated that this device could reduce the KLRG1-positive CD8 cell count in aged mouse blood by a factor of 7.3 relative to the total CD8 cell compartment, reaching a level typically seen only in very young animals.

  1. The protective effect of a constant magnetic field. [reduction of molecular cell pathology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosunov, A. V.; Tripuzov, A. N.

    1974-01-01

    The protective effect of a constant magnetic field sharply reduced spontaneous lysis of E. coli cells when subjected to ultraviolet radiation. A protective effect of a CMF was found in a study of tissue cultures of normally growing cells (kidney epithelium) and cancer cells (cells from a cancer of the larynx). The protective effect of a CMF is also seen in a combined exposure of tissue cultures to X-rays and CMF energy (strength of the CMF was 2000 oersteds with a gradient of 500 oersteds/cm). The data obtained are of interest to experimental oncology (development of new methods of treating malignant tumors).

  2. The protective effect of a constant magnetic field. [reduction of molecular cell pathology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosunov, A. V.; Tripuzov, A. N.

    1974-01-01

    The protective effect of a constant magnetic field sharply reduced spontaneous lysis of E. coli cells when subjected to ultraviolet radiation. A protective effect of a CMF was found in a study of tissue cultures of normally growing cells (kidney epithelium) and cancer cells (cells from a cancer of the larynx). The protective effect of a CMF is also seen in a combined exposure of tissue cultures to X-rays and CMF energy (strength of the CMF was 2000 oersteds with a gradient of 500 oersteds/cm). The data obtained are of interest to experimental oncology (development of new methods of treating malignant tumors).

  3. Effects of strong magnetic fields on cell growth and radiation response of human T-lymphocytes in culture.

    PubMed

    Norimura, T; Imada, H; Kunugita, N; Yoshida, N; Nikaido, M

    1993-06-01

    Experiments were undertaken in order to verify whether or not a strong magnetic field would have any biological effects on the cell growth, viability and radiation response of mammalian cells. Magnetic field exposures were conducted using a superconducting magnet with freshly-isolated human peripheral blood T-lymphocytes maintained at their normal growing temperature of 37 degrees C. The static magnetic fields with intensities up to 6.3-tesla (T) exerted little influence on the cell growth and viability of actively-growing T-lymphocytes under normal cell-culture conditions. On the other hand, the T cells exposed to the magnetic fields (4 T-6.3 T) during PHA stimulation were inhibited in their cell growth when compared to controls. The effects of the magnetic fields with intensities up to 2 T on cell growth properties, however, were minimal in this system. Also, the radiosensitivity of T-lymphocytes previously exposed to the strong magnetic fields was more sensitive than that of control cells. These results suggest that exposure to a static magnetic field of 4 T or stronger might lead to physiological and growth abnormalities at the cellular level.

  4. Magnetically enhanced cell delivery for accelerating recovery of the endothelium in injured arteries

    PubMed Central

    Adamo, Richard F.; Fishbein, Ilia; Zhang, Kehan; Wen, Justin; Levy, Robert J.; Alferiev, Ivan S.; Chorny, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Arterial injury and disruption of the endothelial layer are an inevitable consequence of interventional procedures used for treating obstructive vascular disease. The slow and often incomplete endothelium regrowth after injury is the primary cause of serious short- and long-term complications, including thrombosis, restenosis and neoatherosclerosis. Rapid endothelium restoration has the potential to prevent these sequelae, providing a rationale for developing strategies aimed at accelerating the reendothelialization process. The present studies focused on magnetically guided delivery of endothelial cells (EC) functionalized with biodegradable magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) as an experimental approach for achieving rapid and stable cell homing and expansion in stented arteries. EC laden with polylactide-based MNP exhibited strong magnetic responsiveness, capacity for cryopreservation and rapid expansion, and the ability to disintegrate internalized MNP in both proliferating and contact-inhibited states. Intracellular decomposition of BODIPY558/568-labeled MNP monitored non-invasively based on assembly state-dependent changes in the emission spectrum demonstrated cell proliferation rate-dependent kinetics (average disassembly rates: 6.6 ± 0.8% and 3.6 ± 0.4% per day in dividing and contact-inhibited EC, respectively). With magnetic guidance using a transient exposure to a uniform 1-kOe field, stable localization and subsequent propagation of MNP-functionalized EC, markedly enhanced in comparison to non-magnetic delivery conditions, were observed in stented rat carotid arteries. In conclusion, magnetically guided delivery is a promising experimental strategy for accelerating endothelial cell repopulation of stented blood vessels after angioplasty. PMID:26704936

  5. Magnetically levitated nano-robots: an application to visualization of nerve cells injuries.

    PubMed

    Lou, Mingji; Jonckheere, Edmond

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a swarm of magnetically levitated nano-robots with high sensitivity nano-sensors as a mean to detect chemical sources, specifically the chemical signals released by injured nervous cells. In the aftermath of the process, further observation by these nano-robots would be used to monitor the healing process and assess the amount of regeneration, if any, or even the repair, of the injured nervous cells.

  6. A X-Ray Scattering Study of the Interactions Between Magnetic Nanoparticles and Biological Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Miranda, Luz J.; Koh, Isaac; Cipriano, B.; Williams, D.; Ehrman, S.; Pulliam-Holoman, T.

    2003-03-01

    The study of the interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with cell membranes is of interest for drug delivery processes and for the development of additional medical diagnostic and treatment options. We have studied the structures formed by magnetic nanoparticles made of silicon oxide and iron oxide with cells to determine how they interact with the cells. Preliminary studies with E. coli have shown no toxicity effects and an increase in the magnetic response to fields higher than 350mT. For these fields a change in the layer spacing and in the intensity of the x-ray signal indicates a rotation with the magnetic nanoparticles. Future studies will investigate the possibility of doing magnetoporation on cells. A phenomenum similar to magnetoporation has been observed in the so-called ferrosmectics.[1-3] 1.P. Fabre, C. Casagrande, and M. Veyssie, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 539 (1990). 2.Virginie Ponsinet, Pascale Fabre, Madeleine Veyssie and Loïc Auvray, J. Phys. II France 3, 1021 (1993). 3.D. Spoliansky, V. Ponsinet, J. Ferré, and J-P Jamet, Eur. Phys. J. E 1, 227 (2000).

  7. Electrostatically Stabilized Magnetic Nanoparticles - An Optimized Protocol to Label Murine T Cells for in vivo MRI.

    PubMed

    Wuerfel, Eva; Smyth, Maureen; Millward, Jason M; Schellenberger, Eyk; Glumm, Jana; Prozorovski, Timour; Aktas, Orhan; Schulze-Topphoff, Ulf; Schnorr, Jörg; Wagner, Susanne; Taupitz, Matthias; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Wuerfel, Jens

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel highly efficient protocol to magnetically label T cells applying electrostatically stabilized very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOP). Our long-term aim is to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate T cell dynamics in vivo during the course of neuroinflammatory disorders such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. Encephalitogenic T cells were co-incubated with VSOP, or with protamine-complexed VSOP (VProt), respectively, at different conditions, optimizing concentrations and incubation times. Labeling efficacy was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry as well as histologically, and evaluated on a 7 T MR system. Furthermore, we investigated possible alterations of T cell physiology caused by the labeling procedure. T cell co-incubation with VSOP resulted in an efficient cellular iron uptake. T2 times of labeled cells dropped significantly, resulting in prominent hypointensity on T2*-weighted scans. Optimal labeling efficacy was achieved by VProt (1 mM Fe/ml, 8 h incubation; T2 time shortening of ∼80% compared to untreated cells). Although VSOP promoted T cell proliferation and altered the ratio of T cell subpopulations toward a CD4(+) phenotype, no effects on CD4 T cell proliferation or phenotypic stability were observed by labeling in vitro differentiated Th17 cells with VProt. Yet, high concentrations of intracellular iron oxide might induce alterations in T cell function, which should be considered in cell tagging studies. Moreover, we demonstrated that labeling of encephalitogenic T cells did not affect pathogenicity; labeled T cells were still capable of inducing EAE in susceptible recipient mice.

  8. Modulation of monocytic leukemia cell function and survival by high gradient magnetic fields and mathematical modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Zablotskii, Vitalii; Syrovets, Tatiana; Schmidt, Zoe W; Dejneka, Alexandr; Simmet, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The influence of spatially modulated high gradient magnetic fields on cellular functions of human THP-1 leukemia cells is studied. We demonstrate that arrays of high-gradient micrometer-sized magnets induce i) cell swelling, ii) prolonged increased ROS production, and iii) inhibit cell proliferation, and iv) elicit apoptosis of THP-1 monocytic leukemia cells in the absence of chemical or biological agents. Mathematical modeling indicates that mechanical stress exerted on the cells by high magnetic gradient forces is responsible for triggering cell swelling and formation of reactive oxygen species followed by apoptosis. We discuss physical aspects of controlling cell functions by focused magnetic gradient forces, i.e. by a noninvasive and nondestructive physical approach.

  9. The magnetic introduction of magnetite nanoparticles into live cells for radiosensibility enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurenya, Anton Y.; Polikarpov, Mikhail A.; Chukalova, Aynur A.; Moskaleva, Elizaveta Y.; Taldenkov, Alexander N.; Panchenko, Vladislav Y.

    2017-04-01

    Earlier we proposed a new radiotherapy enhancement method that entails the administration of 57Fe iron-oxide nanoparticles into the cells [5]. Within this work we were prompt to investigate the capability of iron oxide nanoparticles with monolayer coating to penetrate into live cells. Magnetite particle samples were synthesized and stabilized with HCl or citric acid. The cells were incubated in the presence of nanoparticles for 1 h, washed and dried. To distinguish inside-cell particles from outside ones a set of experiments with low temperature incubation was carried out. Several cell samples were prepared in the presence of an external magnetic field in order to study the possibility of the nanoparticle uptake enhancement. To evaluate the amount of particles in each cell sample we used a SQUID-magnetometer. The nanoparticle suspension with HCl stabilization turned to be inadequate for intracellular introduction. Approximately 2·105 particles with citric acid covering conjugated with each cell after incubation at normal conditions. An application of an external magnetic field increased this amount up to 107 particles/cell. Most probably much of these particles penetrated into cells.

  10. Biofunctionalized magnetic-vortex microdiscs for targeted cancer-cell destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Rozhkova, Elena A.; Ulasov, Ilya V.; Bader, Samuel D.; Rajh, Tijana; Lesniak, Maciej S.; Novosad, Valentyn

    2010-02-01

    Nanomagnetic materials offer exciting avenues for probing cell mechanics and activating mechanosensitive ion channels, as well as for advancing cancer therapies. Most experimental works so far have used superparamagnetic materials. This report describes a first approach based on interfacing cells with lithographically defined microdiscs that possess a spin-vortex ground state. When an alternating magnetic field is applied the microdisc vortices shift, creating an oscillation, which transmits a mechanical force to the cell. Because reduced sensitivity of cancer cells toward apoptosis leads to inappropriate cell survival and malignant progression, selective induction of apoptosis is of great importance for the anticancer therapeutic strategies. We show that the spin-vortex-mediated stimulus creates two dramatic effects: compromised integrity of the cellular membrane, and initiation of programmed cell death. A low-frequency field of a few tens of hertz applied for only ten minutes was sufficient to achieve ~90% cancer-cell destruction in vitro.

  11. Real-Time Analysis of Magnetic Hyperthermia Experiments on Living Cells under a Confocal Microscope.

    PubMed

    Connord, Vincent; Clerc, Pascal; Hallali, Nicolas; El Hajj Diab, Darine; Fourmy, Daniel; Gigoux, Véronique; Carrey, Julian

    2015-05-01

    Combining high-frequency alternating magnetic fields (AMF) and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is an efficient way to induce biological responses through several approaches: magnetic hyperthermia, drug release, controls of gene expression and neurons, or activation of chemical reactions. So far, these experiments cannot be analyzed in real-time during the AMF application. A miniaturized electromagnet fitting under a confocal microscope is built, which produces an AMF of frequency and amplitude similar to the ones used in magnetic hyperthermia. AMF application induces massive damages to tumoral cells having incorporated nanoparticles into their lysosomes without affecting the others. Using this setup, real-time analyses of molecular events occurring during AMF application are performed. Lysosome membrane permeabilization and reactive oxygen species production are detected after only 30 min of AMF application, demonstrating they occur at an early stage in the cascade of events leading eventually to cell death. Additionally, lysosomes self-assembling into needle-shaped organization under the influence of AMF is observed in real-time. This experimental approach will permit to get a deeper insight into the physical, molecular, and biological process occurring in several innovative techniques used in nanomedecine based on the combined use of MNPs and high-frequency magnetic fields.

  12. Diagnosing an atypical site of giant cell arteritis with magnetic resonance angiography: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tan, Boon L; Liu, Jonathan J; Yong, Tuck Y; Tan, Chrismin C; Li, Jordan Y

    2016-06-23

    Giant cell arteritis typically involves the temporal arteries, but can involve other cranial arteries. Temporal artery biopsy is the mainstay for the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis; however, biopsy may be problematic if giant cell arteritis involves other cranial arteries that are inaccessible for sampling. In these situations, magnetic resonance angiography is a useful, non-invasive adjunctive method in the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis. In this case report, we describe a case of giant cell arteritis involving only the occipital artery which was revealed by magnetic resonance angiography. A 67-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to our hospital with a 4-week history of malaise, fever, and mild occipital headaches. There were no other positive findings on physical examination. Laboratory studies were remarkable for normocytic anemia, raised inflammatory markers, and mildly deranged liver function tests. To exclude intracranial pathology, he underwent a cranial magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium, which demonstrated a thickened wall and mural enhancement of his right occipital artery, consistent with giant cell arteritis. His temporal arteries were normal. His occipital arteries were not accessible for biopsy and he was commenced on high-dose prednisolone (60 mg daily). His symptoms resolved completely after a week of glucocorticoid steroid treatment and he was well on 5 mg of prednisolone once a day on follow-up. While magnetic resonance angiography may not replace the need for biopsy, it may have a diagnostic role in suspected giant cell arteritis, such as when the involved arteries are inaccessible for biopsy.

  13. Electromagnetically induced transparency of 87Rb in a buffer gas cell with magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hong; Wang, Han-Mu; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Xin, Pei-Pei; Luo, Jun; Liu, Hong-Ping

    2017-05-01

    We have studied the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) of 87Rb vapor at room temperature in a magnetic field with an arbitrary angle to the laser propagation direction. Rather than exposing atoms to a parallelled or transverse magnetic field as usual, in our work, we apply a magnetic field (up to 45 Gauss) with an arbitrary angle to the laser propagation direction and the spectra become much more complex. More EIT dips are observed due to the Zeeman splitting on the D 2 line of 87Rb in a {{Λ }}-type configuration. With a 5 Torr N2 buffer gas in the thermal 2 cm vapor cell, the state {5}2{P}3/2 has a very short effective lifetime, corresponding to a large energy broadening, which removes the velocity selective optical pumping effect almost completely and keeps the high resolution EIT spectrum for the energy splitting of 87Rb in magnetic fields. The shifting of the EIT resonances with the strength of the applied magnetic field coincides well with the theory based on a full matrix Hamiltonian combined with a spectral decomposition method. Our work can be extended to measure the magnetic field vector in space. The effects of the detuning of the probe and coupling beams on the spectral lines are also investigated.

  14. Geometrically pinned magnetic domain wall for multi-bit per cell storage memory

    PubMed Central

    Bahri, M. Al; Sbiaa, R.

    2016-01-01

    Spintronic devices currently rely on magnetic switching or controlled motion of domain walls (DWs) by an external magnetic field or a spin-polarized current. Controlling the position of DW is essential for defining the state/information in a magnetic memory. During the process of nanowire fabrication, creating an off-set of two parts of the device could help to pin DW at a precise position. Micromagnetic simulation conducted on in-plane magnetic anisotropy materials shows the effectiveness of the proposed design for pinning DW at the nanoconstriction region. The critical current for moving DW from one state to the other is strongly dependent on nanoconstricted region (width and length) and the magnetic properties of the material. The DW speed which is essential for fast writing of the data could reach values in the range of hundreds m/s. Furthermore, evidence of multi-bit per cell memory is demonstrated via a magnetic nanowire with more than one constriction. PMID:27334038

  15. Effect of Adjuvant Magnetic Fields in Radiotherapy on Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jianguo; Sheng, Huaying; Zhu, Chihong; Jiang, Hao; Ma, Shenglin

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To explore sensitization and possible mechanisms of adjuvant magnetic fields (MFs) in radiotherapy (RT) of non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods. Human A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells were treated with MF, RT, and combined MF-RT. Colony-forming efficiency was calculated, cell cycle and apoptosis were measured, and changes in cell cycle- and apoptosis-related gene expression were measured by microarray. Results. A 0.5 T, 8 Hz stationary MF showed a duration-dependent inhibitory effect lasting for 1–4 hours. The MF-treated groups had significantly greater cell inhibition than did controls (P < 0.05). Surviving fractions and growth curves derived from colony-forming assay showed that the MF-only, RT-only, and MF-RT groups had inhibited cell growth; the MF-RT group showed a synergetic effect. Microarray of A549 cells exposed for 1 hour to MF showed that 19 cell cycle- and apoptosis-related genes had 2-fold upregulation and 40 genes had 2-fold downregulation. MF significantly arrested cells in G2 and M phases, apparently sensitizing the cells to RT. Conclusions. MF may inhibit A549 cells and can increase their sensitivity to RT, possibly by affecting cell cycle- and apoptosis-related signaling pathways. PMID:24224175

  16. Biotechnological promises of Fe-filled CNTs for cell shepherding and magnetic fluid hyperthermia applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineux, Florent; Marega, Riccardo; Stopin, Antoine; La Torre, Alessandro; Garcia, Yann; Devlin, Eamonn; Michiels, Carine; N. Khlobystov, Andrei; Bonifazi, Davide

    2015-12-01

    Fe-filled carbon nanotubes (Fe@CNTs) recently emerged as an effective class of hybrid nanoparticles for biotechnological applications, such as magnetic cell sorting and magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Aiming at studying the effects of both the Fe loading and the magnetocrystalline characteristics in these applications, we describe herein the preparation of Fe@CNTs containing different Fe phases that, upon functionalization with the antibody Cetuximab (Ctxb), allow the targeting of cancer cells. Our experimental findings reveal that an optimal Ctxb/Fe weight ratio of 1.2 is needed for efficient magnetic cell shepherding, whereas enhanced MFH-induced mortality (70 vs. 15%) can be reached with hybrids enriched in the coercive Fe3C phase. These results suggest that a synergistic effect between the Ab loading and the Fe distribution in each nanotube exists, for which the maximum shepherding and hyperthermia effects are observed when higher densities of Fe@CNTs featuring the more coercive phase are interfaced with the cells.Fe-filled carbon nanotubes (Fe@CNTs) recently emerged as an effective class of hybrid nanoparticles for biotechnological applications, such as magnetic cell sorting and magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Aiming at studying the effects of both the Fe loading and the magnetocrystalline characteristics in these applications, we describe herein the preparation of Fe@CNTs containing different Fe phases that, upon functionalization with the antibody Cetuximab (Ctxb), allow the targeting of cancer cells. Our experimental findings reveal that an optimal Ctxb/Fe weight ratio of 1.2 is needed for efficient magnetic cell shepherding, whereas enhanced MFH-induced mortality (70 vs. 15%) can be reached with hybrids enriched in the coercive Fe3C phase. These results suggest that a synergistic effect between the Ab loading and the Fe distribution in each nanotube exists, for which the maximum shepherding and hyperthermia effects are observed when higher densities of Fe

  17. Cell nucleus targeting for living cell extraction of nucleic acid associated proteins with intracellular nanoprobes of magnetic carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Hu, Zhengyan; Qin, Hongqiang; Liu, Fangjie; Cheng, Kai; Wu, Ren'an; Zou, Hanfa

    2013-08-06

    Since nanoparticles could be ingested by cells naturally and target at a specific cellular location as designed, the extraction of intracellular proteins from living cells for large-scale analysis by nanoprobes seems to be ideally possible. Nucleic acid associated proteins (NAaP) take the crucial position during biological processes in maintaining and regulating gene structure and gene related behaviors, yet there are still challenges during the global investigation of intracellular NAaP, especially from living cells. In this work, a strategy to extract intracellular proteins from living cells with the magnetic carbon nanotube (oMWCNT@Fe3O4) as an intracellular probe is developed, to achieve the high throughput analysis of NAaP from living human hepatoma BEL-7402 cells with a mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach. Due to the specific intracellular localization of the magnetic carbon nanotubes around nuclei and its strong interaction with nucleic acids, the highly efficient extraction was realized for cellular NAaP from living cells, with the capability of identifying 2383 intracellular NAaP from only ca. 10,000 living cells. This method exhibited potential applications in dynamic and in situ analysis of intracellular proteins.

  18. An Assessment of Gadonanotubes as Magnetic Nanolabels for Improved Stem Cell Detection and Retention in Cardiomyoplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Lesa A.

    In this work, gadolinium-based carbon nanocapsules are developed as a novel nanotechnology that addresses the shortcomings of current diagnostic and therapeutic methods of stem cell-based cardiomyoplasty. With cardiovascular disease (CVD) responsible for approximately 30% of deaths worldwide, the growing need for improved cardiomyoplasty has spurred efforts in nanomedicine to develop innovative techniques to enhance the therapeutic retention and diagnostic tracking of transplanted cells. Having previously been demonstrated as a high-performance T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent, Gadonanotubes (GNTs) are shown for the first time to intracellularly label pig bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Without the use of a transfection agent, micromolar concentrations of GNTs deliver up to 109 Gd3+ ions per cell, allowing for MSCs to be visualized in a 1.5 T clinical MRI scanner. The cellular response to the intracellular incorporation of GNTs is also assessed, revealing that GNTs do not compromise the viability, differentiation potential, or phenotype characteristics of the MSCs. However, it is also found that GNT-labeled MSCs exhibit a decreased response to select cell adhesion proteins and experience a nonapoptotic, non-proliferative cell cycle arrest, from which the cells recover 48 h after GNT internalization. In tandem with developing GNTs as a new stem cell diagnostic agent, this current work also explores for the first time the therapeutic application of the magnetically-active GNTs as a magnetic facilitator to increase the retention of transplanted stem cells during cardiomyoplasty. In vitro flow chamber assays, ex vivo perfusion experiments, and in vivo porcine injection procedures all demonstrate the increased magnetic-assisted retention of GNT-labeled MSCs in the presence of an external magnetic field. These studies prove that GNTs are a powerful 'theranostic' agent that provides a novel platform to simultaneously monitor

  19. Microfluidic Synthesis of Microfibers for Magnetic-Responsive Controlled Drug Release and Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yung-Sheng; Huang, Keng-Shiang; Yang, Chih-Hui; Wang, Chih-Yu; Yang, Yuh-Shyong; Hsu, Hsiang-Chen; Liao, Yu-Ju; Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2012-01-01

    This study demonstrated the fabrication of alginate microfibers using a modular microfluidic system for magnetic-responsive controlled drug release and cell culture. A novel two-dimensional fluid-focusing technique with multi-inlets and junctions was used to spatiotemporally control the continuous laminar flow of alginate solutions. The diameter of the manufactured microfibers, which ranged from 211 µm to 364 µm, could be well controlled by changing the flow rate of the continuous phase. While the model drug, diclofenac, was encapsulated into microfibers, the drug release profile exhibited the characteristic of a proper and steady release. Furthermore, the diclofenac release kinetics from the magnetic iron oxide-loaded microfibers could be controlled externally, allowing for a rapid drug release by applying a magnetic force. In addition, the successful culture of glioblastoma multiforme cells in the microfibers demonstrated a good structural integrity and environment to grow cells that could be applied in drug screening for targeting cancer cells. The proposed microfluidic system has the advantages of ease of fabrication, simplicity, and a fast and low-cost process that is capable of generating functional microfibers with the potential for biomedical applications, such as drug controlled release and cell culture. PMID:22470443

  20. Vortex or whorl formation of cultured human corneal epithelial cells induced by magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Dua, H S; Singh, A; Gomes, J A; Laibson, P R; Donoso, L A; Tyagi, S

    1996-01-01

    The terms 'vortex keratopathy' and 'hurricane keratopathy' describe two similar conditions affecting the corneal surface. In the former, a vortex or whorl pattern is seen on the corneal surface and is due to the deposition of substances such as pigment, iron or drugs in the epithelial cells. In the latter, a similar pattern is presented by migrating epithelial cells but, unlike the former, the pattern is rendered more visible by fluorescein staining. Both represent the migratory pattern of normal epithelial cells which is otherwise not visible due to the slow rate of epithelial turnover and migration. The whorl pattern has a clockwise predisposition in the majority of cases and is hypothesised to be due to the influence of ocular electro-magnetic fields on the migrating epithelial cells. In this study we tested in vitro the effect of static magnetic fields on corneal epithelial cells. We were able to reproduce dramatic vortex or whorl patterns in response to magnetic fields, but without preferential migration towards the North or South Pole.

  1. Functionalized magnetic dextran-spermine nanocarriers for targeted delivery of doxorubicin to breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tarvirdipour, Shabnam; Vasheghani-Farahani, Ebrahim; Soleimani, Masoud; Bardania, Hassan

    2016-03-30

    In recent decades, targeted drug delivery systems for breast cancer treatment emerged as an ideal alternative and promising solution to reduce systemic side effects of chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, the preparation and characterization of cationic doxorubicin (DOX) loaded magnetic dextran-spermine (DEX-SP) nanocarriers (DEX-SP-DOX) by ionic gelation were fully investigated. Then, anti-HER2 as a monoclonal antibody (mAb) and targeting ligand was conjugated via EDC/NHS reagents. The binding was confirmed by Bradford assay and further assessments were carried out by size and zeta potential measurements. Cytotoxicity effect and internalization of magnetic nanocarriers were assessed by MTT and Prussian blue assays and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. DLS measurements indicated that the size of nanocarriers increased from 62 to 84 nm by conjugation of anti-HER2 to them. The in vitro release of DOX from mAb conjugated magnetic nanocarriers at pHs 5 and 7.4 was found to be 85 and 55.5%, respectively. The MTT and Prussian blue assays demonstrated enhanced and selective uptake of DEX-SP-DOX-mAb by SKBR cell (HER2 overexpressed cells) in comparison with unconjugated nanocarriers due to higher cellular binding. The TEM result also confirmed cellular internalization of DEX-SP-DOX-mAb magnetic nanocarriers. These results are very promising for targeted delivery of DOX to HER2 positive breast cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A newly designed experimental system for exposure of mammalian cells to extremely low frequency magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Miyakoshi, J; Ohtsu, S; Tatsumi-Miyajima, J; Takebe, H

    1994-03-01

    To examine the biological effects of extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELFMF), we have designed and manufactured a new equipment for long-term and high-density exposure of cells to ELFMF. The ELFMF exposure system consists of a generator of magnets with a built-in CO2 incubator, an alternating current (AC) power supply, a gas compressor and a thermocontroller for the incubator, and a cooling unit for the magnets. The CO2 incubator made of acrylic resin is inserted into the inner-space of the silicon steel strip-cores. In this system, the temperature of the incubator is maintained at 37 +/- 0.5 degrees C. The maximum magnetic flux density on the exposure area of the incubator is 500 mT (T; tesla) at a current of 556 Arms (rms; root mean square) at 50 Hz. The long-term (up to 120 hr) exposure of 400 mT ELFMF did not affect the growth of both HL60RG and CCRF-CEM cells originated from human leukemia. The post-X-irradiation exposure of 400 mT ELFMF for 2 hr also did not affect the radiation sensitivity of GM0637 and TAT2SF cells originated from a normal human and an ataxia telangiectasia patient.

  3. Isolation of Osteoprogenitors from Human Jaw Periosteal Cells: A Comparison of Two Magnetic Separation Methods

    PubMed Central

    Olbrich, Marcus; Rieger, Melanie; Reinert, Siegmar; Alexander, Dorothea

    2012-01-01

    Human jaw periosteum tissue contains osteoprogenitors that have potential for tissue engineering applications in oral and maxillofacial surgeries. To isolate osteoprogenitor cells from heterogeneous cell populations, we used the specific mesenchymal stem cell antigen-1 (MSCA-1) antibody and compared two magnetic separation methods. We analyzed the obtained MSCA-1+ and MSCA-1− fractions in terms of purity, yield of positive/negative cells and proliferative and mineralization potentials. The analysis of cell viability after separation revealed that the EasySep method yielded higher viability rates, whereas the flow cytometry results showed a higher purity for the MACS-separated cell fractions. The mineralization capacity of the osteogenic induced MSCA-1+ cells compared with the MSCA-1− controls using MACS was 5-fold higher, whereas the same comparison after EasySep showed no significant differences between both fractions. By analyzing cell proliferation, we detected a significant difference between the proliferative potential of the osteogenic cells versus untreated cells after the MACS and EasySep separations. The differentiated cells after MACS separation adjusted their proliferative capacity, whereas the EasySep-separated cells failed to do so. The protein expression analysis showed small differences between the two separation methods. Our findings suggest that MACS is a more suitable separation method to isolate osteoprogenitors from the entire jaw periosteal cell population. PMID:23094035

  4. Tracking of adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells using two magnetic nanoparticle types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasten, Annika; Siegmund, Birte J.; Grüttner, Cordula; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Frerich, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to be considered as an emerging detection technique for cell tracking experiments to evaluate the fate of transplanted progenitor cells and develop successful cell therapies for tissue engineering. Adipose tissue engineering using adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells has been advocated for the cure of soft tissue defects or for persistent soft tissue augmentation. Adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells were differentiated into the adipogenic lineage and labeled with two different types of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in varying concentrations which resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction of gene expression of adipogenic differentiation markers, adiponectin and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), whereas the metabolic activity was not altered. As a result, only low nanoparticle concentrations for labeling were used for in vivo experiments. Cells were seeded onto collagen scaffolds and subcutaneously implanted into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. At 24 h as well as 28 days after implantation, MRI analyses were performed visualizing nanoparticle-labeled cells using T2-weighted sequences. The quantification of absolute volume of the scaffolds revealed a decrease of volume over time in all experimental groups. The distribution of nanoparticle-labeled cells within the scaffolds varied likewise over time.

  5. Modelling induced currents in biological cells exposed to low-frequency magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Stuchly, M A; Xi, W

    1994-09-01

    Interactions of low-frequency magnetic fields with biological systems have been a subject of intense scientific inquiry and public concern. Most research has been done at powerline frequencies of 50 Hz or 60 Hz. One of the key questions related to interactions of low-frequency magnetic fields with biological systems is which parameters of the exposure field are responsible for observed effects. Knowledge of the induced electric field and current in various experimental in vitro systems is important for this purpose. The 3D impedance method is used in this research to model spatial patterns of induced electric fields and current in two preparations of cells. A cell monolayer with a random distribution of cells and a confluent monolayer of cells with gap junctions are considered; because of the limitations of the computational method, biological cells are represented by cubes rather than more realistic shapes (e.g. spheres). The random model indicates that for higher cell densities the pattern of the induced current flow has a limited dependence on the size and shape of the container in which the cells are placed, it depends mostly on the actual cell placement. Gap junctions, not surprisingly, are shown to increase the current density, but only if their resistance is sufficiently low. The highest current density occurs in the gaps.

  6. Flexible programming of cell-free protein synthesis using magnetic bead-immobilized plasmids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ka-Young; Lee, Kyung-Ho; Park, Ji-Woong; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2012-01-01

    The use of magnetic bead-immobilized DNA as movable template for cell-free protein synthesis has been investigated. Magnetic microbeads containing chemically conjugated plasmids were used to direct cell-free protein synthesis, so that protein generation could be readily programmed, reset and reprogrammed. Protein synthesis by using this approach could be ON/OFF-controlled through repeated addition and removal of the microbead-conjugated DNA and employed in sequential expression of different genes in a same reaction mixture. Since the incubation periods of individual template plasmids are freely controllable, relative expression levels of multiple proteins can be tuned to desired levels. We expect that the presented results will find wide application to the flexible design and execution of synthetic pathways in cell-free chassis.

  7. Enhancing cold atmospheric plasma treatment of cancer cells by static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaoqian; Rajjoub, Kenan; Shashurin, Alexey; Yan, Dayun; Sherman, Jonathan H; Bian, Ka; Murad, Ferid; Keidar, Michael

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported since late 1970 that magnetic field interacts strongly with biological systems. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has also been widely studied over the past few decades in physics, biology, and medicine. In this study, we propose a novel idea to combine static magnetic field (SMF) with CAP as a tool for cancer therapy. Breast cancer cells and wild type fibroblasts were cultured in 96-well plates and treated by CAP with or without SMF. Breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 showed a significant decrease in viability after direct plasma treatment with SMF (compared to only plasma treatment). In addition, cancer cells treated by the CAP-SMF-activated medium (indirect treatment) also showed viability decrease but was slightly weaker than the direct plasma-SMF treatment. By integrating the use of SMF and CAP, we were able to discover their advantages that have yet to be utilized. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:53-62, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Interfacing living unicellular algae cells with biocompatible polyelectrolyte-stabilised magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fakhrullin, Rawil F; Shlykova, Lubov V; Zamaleeva, Alsu I; Nurgaliev, Danis K; Osin, Yuri N; García-Alonso, Javier; Paunov, Vesselin N

    2010-10-08

    Green algae are a promising platform for the development of biosensors and bioelectronic devices. Here we report a reliable single-step technique for the functionalisation of living unicellular green algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa with biocompatible 15 nm superparamagnetic nanoparticles stabilised with poly(allylamine hydrochloride). The magnetised algae cells can be manipulated and immobilised using external permanent magnets. The distribution of the nanoparticles on the cell walls of C. pyrenoidosa was studied by optical and fluorescence microscopy, TEM, SEM and EDX spectroscopy. The viability and the magnetic properties of the magnetised algae are studied in comparison with the native cells. The technique may find a number of potential applications in biotechnology and bioelectronics.

  9. A novel field generator for magnetic stimulation in cell culture experiments.

    PubMed

    Vogt, G; Schrefl, A; Mitteregger, R; Falkenhagen, D

    1997-06-01

    A novel field generator specially designed to examine the influence of low frequency magnetic fields on specific cell material was constructed and characterized. The exposure unit described in this paper consists of a controller unit and three sets of coils. The field generator permits a precious definition of the revelant signal parameters and allows the superposition of alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) magnetic fields. Critical system parameters were monitored continuously. The three sets of coils, each arranged in the Helmholtz Configuration were characterized. After data processing and visualization the results showed a constant and homogeneous field within the experimental area. The special coil design also allows their use in an incubator.

  10. Particle-in-cell simulations of ambipolar and nonambipolar diffusion in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.; Boswell, R. W.

    2012-05-15

    Using a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, we investigate cross-field diffusion in low-pressure magnetized plasmas both in the presence and absence of conducting axial boundaries. With no axial boundary, the cross-field diffusion is observed to be ambipolar, as expected. However, when axial boundaries are added, the diffusion becomes distinctly nonambipolar. Electrons are prevented from escaping to the transverse walls and are preferentially removed from the discharge along the magnetic field lines, thus allowing quasi-neutrality to be maintained via a short-circuit effect at the axial boundaries.

  11. Particle-in-cell simulations on spontaneous thermal magnetic field fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Simões, F. J. R. Jr.; Pavan, J.; Gaelzer, R.; Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.

    2013-10-15

    In this paper an electromagnetic particle code is used to investigate the spontaneous thermal emission. Specifically we perform particle-in-cell simulations employing a non-relativistic isotropic Maxwellian particle distribution to show that thermal fluctuations are related to the origin of spontaneous magnetic field fluctuation. These thermal fluctuations can become seed for further amplification mechanisms and thus be considered at the origin of the cosmological magnetic field, at microgauss levels. Our numerical results are in accordance with theoretical results presented in the literature.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Iron Oxide-Labeled Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Rhys J.P.; Khoja, Suhail; Almeida, Shone; Rapacchi, Stanislas; Han, Fei; Engel, James; Zhao, Peng; Hu, Peng; Stanley, Edouard G.; Elefanty, Andrew G.; Kwon, Murray

    2016-01-01

    Given the limited regenerative capacity of the heart, cellular therapy with stem cell-derived cardiac cells could be a potential treatment for patients with heart disease. However, reliable imaging techniques to longitudinally assess engraftment of the transplanted cells are scant. To address this issue, we used ferumoxytol as a labeling agent of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiac progenitor cells (hESC-CPCs) to facilitate tracking by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a large animal model. Differentiating hESCs were exposed to ferumoxytol at different time points and varying concentrations. We determined that treatment with ferumoxytol at 300 μg/ml on day 0 of cardiac differentiation offered adequate cell viability and signal intensity for MRI detection without compromising further differentiation into definitive cardiac lineages. Labeled hESC-CPCs were transplanted by open surgical methods into the left ventricular free wall of uninjured pig hearts and imaged both ex vivo and in vivo. Comprehensive T2*-weighted images were obtained immediately after transplantation and 40 days later before termination. The localization and dispersion of labeled cells could be effectively imaged and tracked at days 0 and 40 by MRI. Thus, under the described conditions, ferumoxytol can be used as a long-term, differentiation-neutral cell-labeling agent to track transplanted hESC-CPCs in vivo using MRI. Significance The development of a safe and reproducible in vivo imaging technique to track the fate of transplanted human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiac progenitor cells (hESC-CPCs) is a necessary step to clinical translation. An iron oxide nanoparticle (ferumoxytol)-based approach was used for cell labeling and subsequent in vivo magnetic resonance imaging monitoring of hESC-CPCs transplanted into uninjured pig hearts. The present results demonstrate the use of ferumoxytol labeling and imaging techniques in tracking the location and dispersion of cell grafts

  13. Evidence of magnetic field switch-off in Particle In Cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection with guide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, M. E.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-12-01

    The long term evolution of large domain Particle In Cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection is investigated following observations that show two possible outcomes for collisionless reconnection: towards a Petschek-like configuration (Gosling 2007) or towards multiple X points (Eriksson et al. 2014). In the simulations presented here and described in [Innocenti2015*], a mixed scenario develops. At earlier time, plasmoids are emitted, disrupting the formation of Petschek-like structures. Later, an almost stationary monster plasmoid forms, preventing the emission of other plasmoids. A situation reminding of Petschek's switch-off then ensues. Switch-off is obtained through a slow shock / rotational discontinuity (SS/RD) compound structure, with the rotation discontinuity downstreamthe slow shock. Two external slow shocks located in correspondence of the separatrices reduce the in plane tangential component of the magnetic field, but not to zero. Two transitions reminding of rotational discontinuities in the internal part of the exhausts then perform the final switch-off. Both the slow shocks and the rotational discontinuities are characterized as such through the analysis of their Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. A moderate guide field is used to suppress the development of the firehose instability in the exhaust that prevented switch off in [Liu2012]. Compound SS/RD structures, with the RD located downstream the SS, have been observed in both the solar wind and the magnetosphere in Wind and Geotail data respectively [Whang1998, Whang2004]. Ion trajectiories across the SS/RD structure are followed and the kinetic origin of the SS/RD structure is investigated. * Innocenti, Goldman, Newman, Markidis, Lapenta, Evidence of magnetic field switch-off in collisionless magnetic reconnection, accepted in Astrophysical Journal Letters, 2015 Acknowledgements: NERSC, a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of

  14. Electrochemical cell for in situ electrodeposition of magnetic thin films in a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Topolovec, Stefan; Krenn, Heinz; Würschum, Roland

    2015-06-01

    An electrochemical cell is designed and applied for in situ electrodeposition of magnetic thin films in a commercial SQUID magnetometer system. The cell is constructed in such a way that any parasitic contribution of the cell and of the substrate for electrodeposition to the magnetic moment of the deposited film is reduced to a minimum. A remanent minor contribution is readily taken into account by a proper analysis of the detected signal. Thus, a precise determination of the absolute magnetic moment of the electrodeposited magnetic film during its growth and dissolution is achieved. The feasibility of the cell design is demonstrated by performing Co electrodeposition using cyclic voltammetry. For an average Co film thickness of (35.6 ± 3.0) atomic layers, a magnetic moment per Co atom of (1.75 ± 0.11) μ(B) was estimated, in good agreement with the literature bulk value.

  15. Electrochemical cell for in situ electrodeposition of magnetic thin films in a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Topolovec, Stefan Würschum, Roland; Krenn, Heinz

    2015-06-15

    An electrochemical cell is designed and applied for in situ electrodeposition of magnetic thin films in a commercial SQUID magnetometer system. The cell is constructed in such a way that any parasitic contribution of the cell and of the substrate for electrodeposition to the magnetic moment of the deposited film is reduced to a minimum. A remanent minor contribution is readily taken into account by a proper analysis of the detected signal. Thus, a precise determination of the absolute magnetic moment of the electrodeposited magnetic film during its growth and dissolution is achieved. The feasibility of the cell design is demonstrated by performing Co electrodeposition using cyclic voltammetry. For an average Co film thickness of (35.6 ± 3.0) atomic layers, a magnetic moment per Co atom of (1.75 ± 0.11) μ{sub B} was estimated, in good agreement with the literature bulk value.

  16. Magnetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboud, Essam; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef; Alqahtani, Faisal; Moufti, Mohammed R. H.

    2015-06-01

    The Rahat volcanic field represents one of the widely distributed Cenozoic volcanic fields across the western regions of the Arabian Peninsula. Its human significance stems from the fact that its northern fringes, where the historical eruption of 1256 A.D. took place, are very close to the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. In the present work, we analyzed aeromagnetic data from the northern part of Rahat volcanic field as well as carried out a ground gravity survey. A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth to basement using various geophysical methods, such as Tilt Derivative, Euler Deconvolution and 2D modeling inversion. Results indicated that the thickness of the lava flows in the study area ranges between 100 m (above Sea Level) at the eastern and western boundaries of Rahat Volcanic field and getting deeper at the middle as 300-500 m. It also showed that, major structural trend is in the NW direction (Red Sea trend) with some minor trends in EW direction.

  17. Monitoring of Liver Cell Transplantation in a Preclinical Swine Model Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Raschzok, Nathanael; Teichgräber, Ulf; Billecke, Nils; Zielinski, Anja; Steinz, Kirsten; Kammer, Nora N.; Morgul, Mehmet H.; Schmeisser, Sarah; Adonopoulou, Michaela K.; Morawietz, Lars; Hiebl, Bernhard; Schwartlander, Ruth; Rüdinger, Wolfgang; Hamm, Bernd; Neuhaus, Peter; Sauer, Igor M.

    2010-01-01

    Liver cell transplantation (LCT) is a promising treatment approach for certain liver diseases, but clinical implementation requires methods for noninvasive follow-up. Labeling with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles can enable the detection of cells with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We investigated the feasibility of monitoring transplanted liver cells by MRI in a preclinical swine model and used this approach to evaluate different routes for cell application. Liver cells were isolated from landrace piglets and labeled with micron-sized iron oxide particles (MPIO) in adhesion. Labeled cells (n = 10), native cells (n = 3), or pure particles (n = 4) were transplanted to minipigs via intraportal infusion into the liver, direct injection into the splenic parenchyma, or intra-arterial infusion to the spleen. Recipients were investigated by repeated 3.0 Tesla MRI and computed tomography angiography up to 8 weeks after transplantation. Labeling with MPIO, which are known to have a strong effect on the magnetic field, enabled noninvasive detection of cell aggregates by MRI. Following intraportal application, which is commonly applied for clinical LCT, MRI was able to visualize the microembolization of transplanted cells in the liver that were not detected by conventional imaging modalities. Cells directly injected into the spleen were retained, whereas cell infusions intra-arterially into the spleen led to translocation and engraftment of transplanted cells in the liver, with significantly fewer microembolisms compared to intraportal application. These findings demonstrate that MRI can be a valuable tool for noninvasive elucidation of cellular processes of LCT and—if clinically applicable MPIO are available—for monitoring of LCT under clinical conditions. Moreover, the results clarify mechanisms relevant for clinical practice of LCT, suggesting that the intra-arterial route to the spleen deserves further evaluation. PMID:27004132

  18. Highly efficient mesenchymal stem cell proliferation on poly-ε-caprolactone nanofibers with embedded magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Daňková, Jana; Buzgo, Matej; Vejpravová, Jana; Kubíčková, Simona; Sovková, Věra; Vysloužilová, Lucie; Mantlíková, Alice; Nečas, Alois; Amler, Evžen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have developed a combined approach to accelerate the proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro, using a new nanofibrous scaffold made by needleless electrospinning from a mixture of poly-ε-caprolactone and magnetic particles. The biological characteristics of porcine MSCs were investigated while cultured in vitro on composite scaffold enriched with magnetic nanoparticles. Our data indicate that due to the synergic effect of the poly-ε-caprolactone nanofibers and magnetic particles, cellular adhesion and proliferation of MSCs is enhanced and osteogenic differentiation is supported. The cellular and physical attributes make this new scaffold very promising for the acceleration of efficient MSC proliferation and regeneration of hard tissues. PMID:26677321

  19. Particle-in-cell simulations of laser beat-wave magnetization of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D. R.; Genoni, T. C.; Thoma, C.; Rose, D. V.; Hsu, S. C.

    2014-03-15

    The interaction of two lasers with a difference frequency near that of the ambient plasma frequency produces beat waves that can resonantly accelerate thermal electrons. These beat waves can be used to drive electron current and thereby embed magnetic fields into the plasma [Welch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 225002 (2012)]. In this paper, we present two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the beat-wave current-drive process over a wide range of angles between the injected lasers, laser intensities, and plasma densities. We discuss the application of this technique to the magnetization of dense plasmas, motivated in particular by the problem of forming high-β plasma targets in a standoff manner for magneto-inertial fusion. The feasibility of a near-term experiment embedding magnetic fields using lasers with micron-scale wavelengths into a ∼10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}-density plasma is assessed.

  20. Particle distributions in collisionless magnetic reconnection: An implicit Particle-In-Cell (PIC) description

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, D.W.; Francis, G.E.; Max, C.E.

    1990-06-29

    Evidence from magnetospheric and solar flare research supports the belief that collisionless magnetic reconnection can proceed on the Alfven-wave crossing timescale. Reconnection behavior that occurs this rapidly in collisionless plasmas is not well understood because underlying mechanisms depend on the details of the ion and electron distributions in the vicinity of the emerging X-points. We use the direct implicit Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code AVANTI to study the details of these distributions as they evolve in the self-consistent E and B fields of magnetic reconnection. We first consider a simple neutral sheet model. We observe rapid movement of the current-carrying electrons away from the emerging X-point. Later in time an oscillation of the trapped magnetic flux is found, superimposed upon continued linear growth due to plasma inflow at the ion sound speed. The addition of a current-aligned and a normal B field widen the scope of our studies.

  1. Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Evaluate Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Peter M.; Slocombe, Angela; Tilley, Richard D.; Hermans, Ian F.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy with antigen-loaded dendritic cell-based vaccines can induce clinical responses in some patients, but further optimization is required to unlock the full potential of this strategy in the clinic. Optimization is dependent on being able to monitor the cellular events that take place once the dendritic cells have been injected in vivo, and to establish whether antigen-specific immune responses to the tumour have been induced. Here we describe the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a simple, non-invasive approach to evaluate vaccine success. By loading the dendritic cells with highly magnetic iron nanoparticles it is possible to assess whether the injected cells drain to the lymph nodes. It is also possible to establish whether an antigen-specific response is initiated by assessing migration of successive rounds of antigen-loaded dendritic cells; in the face of a successfully primed cytotoxic response, the bulk of antigen-loaded cells are eradicated on-route to the node, whereas cells without antigen can reach the node unchecked. It is also possible to verify the induction of a vaccine-induced response by simply monitoring increases in draining lymph node size as a consequence of vaccine-induced lymphocyte trapping, which is an antigen-specific response that becomes more pronounced with repeated vaccination. Overall, these MRI techniques can provide useful early feedback on vaccination strategies, and could also be used in decision making to select responders from non-responders early in therapy. PMID:23734246

  2. A finite element model of cell deformation during magnetic bead twisting.

    PubMed

    Mijailovich, Srboljub M; Kojic, Milos; Zivkovic, Miroslav; Fabry, Ben; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2002-10-01

    Magnetic twisting cytometry probes mechanical properties of an adherent cell by applying a torque to a magnetic bead that is tightly bound to the cell surface. Here we have used a three-dimensional finite element model of cell deformation to compute the relationships between the applied torque and resulting bead rotation and lateral bead translation. From the analysis, we computed two coefficients that allow the cell elastic modulus to be estimated from measurements of either bead rotation or lateral bead translation, respectively, if the degree of bead embedding and the cell height are known. Although computed strains in proximity of the bead can be large, the relationships between applied torque and bead rotation or translation remain virtually linear up to bead rotations of 15 degrees, above which geometrical nonlinearities become significant. This appreciable linear range stands in contrast to the intrinsically nonlinear force-displacement relationship that is observed when cells are indented during atomic force microscopy. Finally, these computations support the idea that adhesive forces are sufficient to keep the bead firmly attached to the cell surface throughout the range of working torques.

  3. Specific labelling of cell populations in blood with targeted immuno-fluorescent/magnetic glyconanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Juan; García, Isabel; Genicio, Nuria; Padro, Daniel; Penadés, Soledad

    2011-12-01

    Current performance of iron oxide nanoparticle-based contrast agents in clinical use is based on the unspecific accumulation of the probes in certain organs or tissues. Specific targeted biofunctional nanoparticles would significantly increase their potential as diagnostic and therapeutic tools in vivo. In this study, multimodal fluorescent/magnetic glyco-nanoparticles were synthesized from gold-coated magnetite (glyco-ferrites) and converted into specific probes by the covalent coupling of protein G and subsequent incubation with an IgG antibody. The immuno-magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles were applied to the specific labelling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in a complex biological medium, as human blood. We have been able to label specifically PBMCs present in blood in a percentage as low as 0.10-0.17%. Red blood cells (RBCs) were also clearly labelled, even though the inherent T(2) contrast arising from the high iron content of these cells (coming mainly from haemoglobin). The labelling was further assessed at cellular level by fluorescence microscopy. In conclusion, we have developed new contrast agents able to label specifically a cell population under adverse biological conditions (low abundance, low intrinsic T(2), high protein content). These findings open the door to the application of these probes for the labelling and tracking of endogenous cell populations like metastatic cancer cells, or progenitor stem cells that exist in very low amount in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of Multifunctional Magnetic Nanoparticles for Genetic Engineering and Tracking of Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Adams, Christopher; Israel, Liron Limor; Ostrovsky, Stella; Taylor, Arthur; Poptani, Harish; Lellouche, Jean-Paul; Chari, Divya

    2016-04-06

    Genetic modification of cell transplant populations and cell tracking ability are key underpinnings for effective cell therapies. Current strategies to achieve these goals utilize methods which are unsuitable for clinical translation because of related safety issues, and multiple protocol steps adding to cost and complexity. Multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) offering dual mode gene delivery and imaging contrast capacity offer a valuable tool in this context. Despite their key benefits, there is a critical lack of neurocompatible and multifunctional particles described for use with transplant populations for neurological applications. Here, a systematic screen of MNPs (using a core shown to cause contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) bearing various surface chemistries (polyethylenimine (PEI) and oxidized PEI and hybrids of oxidized PEI/alginic acid, PEI/chitosan and PEI/polyamidoamine) is performed to test their ability to genetically engineer neural stem cells (NSCs; a cell population of high clinical relevance for central nervous system disorders). It is demonstrated that gene delivery to NSCs can be safely achieved using two of the developed formulations (PEI and oxPEI/alginic acid) when used in conjunction with oscillating magnetofection technology. After transfection, intracellular particles can be detected by histological procedures with labeled cells displaying contrast in MRI (for real time cell tracking).

  5. Phagocytosis of dying cells: influence of smoking and static magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Dini, Luciana

    2010-09-01

    It is becoming evident that failure in the removal of dying cells causes and/or promotes the onset of chronic diseases. Impairment of phagocytosis of apoptotic cells can be due not only to genetic or molecular malfunctioning but also to external/environmental factors. Two of these environmental factors have been recently reported to down regulate the clearance of apoptotic cells: cigarette smoke and static magnetic fields. Cigarette smoke contains highly reactive carbonyls that modify proteins which directly/indirectly affects cellular function. Human macrophages interacting with carbonyl or cigarette smoke modified extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins dramatically down regulated their ability to phagocytose apoptotic neutrophils. It was postulated that changes in the ECM environment as a result of cigarette smoke affect the ability of macrophages to remove apoptotic cells. This decreased phagocytic activity was as a result of sequestration of receptors involved in the uptake of apoptotic cells towards that of recognition of carbonyl adducts on the modified ECM proteins leading to increased macrophage adhesion. Downregulation of the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells was also described when performed in presence of static magnetic fields (SMFs) of moderate intensity. SMFs have been reported to perturb distribution of membrane proteins and glycoproteins, receptors, cytoskeleton and trans-membrane fluxes of different ions, especially calcium [Ca(2+)]i, that in turn, interfere with many different physiological activities, including phagocytosis. The effects of cigarette smoke and SMF on the phagocytosis of dying cells will be here discussed.

  6. Targeting of peptide conjugated magnetic nanoparticles to urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expressing cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Line; Unmack Larsen, Esben Kjær; Nielsen, Erik Holm; Iversen, Frank; Liu, Zhuo; Thomsen, Karen; Pedersen, Michael; Skrydstrup, Troels; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Ploug, Michael; Kjems, Jørgen

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles are currently being used as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in vivo, mainly by their passive accumulation in tissues of interest. However, a higher specificity can ideally be achieved when the nanoparticles are targeted towards cell specific receptors and this may also facilitate specific drug delivery by an enhanced target-mediated endocytosis. We report efficient peptide-mediated targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to cells expressing the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), a surface biomarker for poor patient prognosis shared by several cancers including breast, colorectal, and gastric cancers. Conjugation of a uPAR specific targeting peptide onto polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated USPIO nanoparticles by click chemistry resulted in a five times higher uptake in vitro in a uPAR positive cell line compared to nanoparticles carrying a non-binding control peptide. In accordance with specific receptor-mediated recognition, a low uptake was observed in the presence of an excess of ATF, a natural ligand for uPAR. The uPAR specific magnetic nanoparticles can potentially provide a useful supplement for tumor patient management when combined with MRI and drug delivery.Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles are currently being used as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in vivo, mainly by their passive accumulation in tissues of interest. However, a higher specificity can ideally be achieved when the nanoparticles are targeted towards cell specific receptors and this may also facilitate specific drug delivery by an enhanced target-mediated endocytosis. We report efficient peptide-mediated targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to cells expressing the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), a surface biomarker for poor patient prognosis shared by several cancers including breast, colorectal, and gastric cancers. Conjugation of a uPAR specific

  7. Facile synthetic route for surface-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles: cell labeling and magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyun Jung; Lee, Haeshin; Bae, Ki Hyun; Lee, Yuhan; Park, Jongnam; Cho, Seung-Woo; Hwang, Jin Young; Park, Hyunwook; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Tae Gwan

    2011-06-28

    Currently available methods to stably disperse iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in aqueous solution need to be improved due to potential aggregation, reduction of superparamagnetism, and the use of toxic reagents. Herein, we present a facile strategy for aqueous transfer and dispersion of organic-synthesized IONPs using only polyethylene glycol (PEG), a biocompatible polymer. A library of PEG derivatives was screened, and it was determined that amine-functionalized six-armed PEG, 6(PEG-NH(2)), was the most effective dispersion agent. The 6(PEG-NH(2))-modified IONPs (IONP-6PEG) were stable after extensive washing, exhibited high superparamagnetism, and could be used as a platform material for secondary surface functionalization with bioactive polymers. IONP-6PEG biofunctionalized with hyaluronic acid (IONP-6PEG-HA) was shown to specifically label mesenchymal stem cells and demonstrate MR contrast potential with high r(2) relaxivity (442.7 s(-1)mM(-1)) compared to the commercially available Feridex (182.1 s(-1)mM(-1)).

  8. Fe3O4/BSA particles induce osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells under static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pengfei; Zhang, Yixian; Zhu, Chaonan; Zhang, Wenjing; Mao, Zhengwei; Gao, Changyou

    2016-12-01

    Differentiation of stem cells is influenced by many factors, yet uptake of the magnetic particles with or without magnetic field is rarely tackled. In this study, iron oxide nanoparticles-loaded bovine serum albumin (BSA) (Fe3O4/BSA) particles were prepared, which showed a spherical morphology with a diameter below 200 nm, negatively charged surface, and tunable magnetic property. The particles could be internalized into bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and their release from the cells was significantly retarded under external magnetic field, resulting in almost twice intracellular amount of the particles within 21 d compared to that of the magnetic field free control. Uptake of the Fe3O4/BSA particles enhanced significantly the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs under a static magnetic field, as evidenced by elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium deposition, and expressions of collagen type I and osteocalcin at both mRNA and protein levels. Therefore, uptake of the Fe3O4/BSA particles brings significant influence on the differentiation of MSCs under magnetic field, and thereby should be paid great attention for practical applications. Differentiation of stem cells is influenced by many factors, yet uptake of the magnetic particles with or without magnetic field is rarely tackled. In this study, iron oxide nanoparticles-loaded bovine serum albumin (BSA) (Fe3O4/BSA) particles with a diameter below 200nm, negatively charged surface, tunable Fe3O4 content and subsequently adjustable magnetic property were prepared. The particles could be internalized into bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and their release from the cells was significantly retarded under external magnetic field. Uptake of the Fe3O4/BSA particles enhanced significantly the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs under a constant static magnetic field, while the magnetic particles and external magnetic field alone do not influence significantly the osteogenic differentiation

  9. MPQ-cytometry: a magnetism-based method for quantification of nanoparticle-cell interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipunova, V. O.; Nikitin, M. P.; Nikitin, P. I.; Deyev, S. M.

    2016-06-01

    Precise quantification of interactions between nanoparticles and living cells is among the imperative tasks for research in nanobiotechnology, nanotoxicology and biomedicine. To meet the challenge, a rapid method called MPQ-cytometry is developed, which measures the integral non-linear response produced by magnetically labeled nanoparticles in a cell sample with an original magnetic particle quantification (MPQ) technique. MPQ-cytometry provides a sensitivity limit 0.33 ng of nanoparticles and is devoid of a background signal present in many label-based assays. Each measurement takes only a few seconds, and no complicated sample preparation or data processing is required. The capabilities of the method have been demonstrated by quantification of interactions of iron oxide nanoparticles with eukaryotic cells. The total amount of targeted nanoparticles that specifically recognized the HER2/neu oncomarker on the human cancer cell surface was successfully measured, the specificity of interaction permitting the detection of HER2/neu positive cells in a cell mixture. Moreover, it has been shown that MPQ-cytometry analysis of a HER2/neu-specific iron oxide nanoparticle interaction with six cell lines of different tissue origins quantitatively reflects the HER2/neu status of the cells. High correlation of MPQ-cytometry data with those obtained by three other commonly used in molecular and cell biology methods supports consideration of this method as a prospective alternative for both quantifying cell-bound nanoparticles and estimating the expression level of cell surface antigens. The proposed method does not require expensive sophisticated equipment or highly skilled personnel and it can be easily applied for rapid diagnostics, especially under field conditions.Precise quantification of interactions between nanoparticles and living cells is among the imperative tasks for research in nanobiotechnology, nanotoxicology and biomedicine. To meet the challenge, a rapid method

  10. Magnetic Orientation in Biology:. Virus Structure - Blood Clot Assembly - Cell Guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbet, J.

    2005-07-01

    Our childhood games with permanent magnets leave us with the impression that matter, in general, does not respond to a magnetic field. In reality, virtually everything is subjected to minute forces of attraction, repulsion or orientation. Strong fields combined with better understanding allow us to exploit these effects to tackle biological problems. In particular, the very weak diamagnetic anisotropy associated with individual molecules can give rise to high orientation of well organized structures such as crystals, liquid-crystals, semi-rigid polymers and individual cells. High orientation is often accompanied by better data and superior properties. In some circumstances, such as in crystallization, the orientating torque might induce effects over and above simple orientation. Magnetic field orientation has a number of advantages over other orienting techniques. Drawing or spinning produce fibers and can alter structure or cause damage while template methods invariable work only over a short range. The application of an electric field can cause heating and electrophoresis. In contrast, a magnetic field acts at a distance allowing uniform orientation in bulk and the creation of composites with components having different orientations. The contribution that magnetic orientation has made to a range of biological topics is illustrated by briefly describing a number of examples. For example, it has been a boon to x-ray studies of some non-crystalline filamentous complexes (e.g. fibrin, actin, microtubules, bacterial flagella and filamentous viruses) and is being vigorously exploited in NMR. The blood-clot polymer, fibrin, forms highly oriented gels when polymerized in a strong field and a number of its properties have been elucidated as a result. Magnetically oriented scaffolds of collagen, the major connective tissue protein, and fibrin are being used to study cell contact guidance. Oriented biomaterials might eventually be incorporated into specialized wound

  11. Synthesis, Characterization, and Preliminary Investigation of Cell Interaction of Magnetic Nanoparticles with Catechol-Containing Shells

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Kerstin; Seemann, Thomas; Wyrwa, Ralf; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Clement, Joachim H.; Mueller, Robert; Nietzsche, Sandor

    2010-12-02

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide cores were synthesized by co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts and subsequently stabilized by coating with different catechols (levodopa, dopamine, hydrocaffeic acid, dopamine-containing carboxymethyl dextran) known to act as high-affinity, bidentate ligands for Fe(III). The prepared stable magnetic fluids were characterized with regard to their chemical composition (content of iron and shell material, Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio) and their physical properties (size, surface charge, magnetic parameters). The nanoparticles showed no or only slight cytotoxic effects within 1 and 4 days of incubation with 3T3 fibroblast cells. Preliminary experiments were performed to study the interaction of the prepared nanoparticles with human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and leukocytes. An intense interaction of the MCF-7 cells with these particles was found whereas the leukocytes showed a lower tendency of interaction. Based on these finding, the novel magnetic nanoparticles possess the potential for use in depletion of tumor cells from peripheral blood.

  12. Functionalized magnetic nanowires for chemical and magneto-mechanical induction of cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Banderas, Aldo Isaac; Aires, Antonio; Teran, Francisco J.; Perez, Jose Efrain; Cadenas, Jael F.; Alsharif, Nouf; Ravasi, Timothy; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting and combining different properties of nanomaterials is considered a potential route for next generation cancer therapies. Magnetic nanowires (NWs) have shown good biocompatibility and a high level of cellular internalization. We induced cancer cell death by combining the chemotherapeutic effect of doxorubicin (DOX)-functionalized iron NWs with the mechanical disturbance under a low frequency alternating magnetic field. (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were separately used for coating NWs allowing further functionalization with DOX. Internalization was assessed for both formulations by confocal reflection microscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. From confocal analysis, BSA formulations demonstrated higher internalization and less agglomeration. The functionalized NWs generated a comparable cytotoxic effect in breast cancer cells in a DOX concentration-dependent manner, (~60% at the highest concentration tested) that was significantly different from the effect produced by free DOX and non-functionalized NWs formulations. A synergistic cytotoxic effect is obtained when a magnetic field (1 mT, 10 Hz) is applied to cells treated with DOX-functionalized BSA or APTES-coated NWs, (~70% at the highest concentration). In summary, a bimodal method for cancer cell destruction was developed by the conjugation of the magneto-mechanical properties of iron NWs with the effect of DOX producing better results than the individual effects. PMID:27775082

  13. Synthesis, Characterization, and Preliminary Investigation of Cell Interaction of Magnetic Nanoparticles with Catechol-Containing Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Kerstin; Seemann, Thomas; Wyrwa, Ralf; Clement, Joachim H.; Müller, Robert; Nietzsche, Sandor; Schnabelrauch, Matthias

    2010-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide cores were synthesized by co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts and subsequently stabilized by coating with different catechols (levodopa, dopamine, hydrocaffeic acid, dopamine-containing carboxymethyl dextran) known to act as high-affinity, bidentate ligands for Fe(III). The prepared stable magnetic fluids were characterized with regard to their chemical composition (content of iron and shell material, Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio) and their physical properties (size, surface charge, magnetic parameters). The nanoparticles showed no or only slight cytotoxic effects within 1 and 4 days of incubation with 3T3 fibroblast cells. Preliminary experiments were performed to study the interaction of the prepared nanoparticles with human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and leukocytes. An intense interaction of the MCF-7 cells with these particles was found whereas the leukocytes showed a lower tendency of interaction. Based on these finding, the novel magnetic nanoparticles possess the potential for use in depletion of tumor cells from peripheral blood.

  14. Short-Term Application of Magnetic Core-Shell Nanoparticles—Effect on Immune Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wotschadlo, Jana; Müller, Bianca; Kühn, Julia; Nikolajski, Melanie; Pachmann, Katharina; Buske, Norbert; Müller, Robert; Liebert, Tim; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Heinze, Thomas; Hochhaus, Andreas; Clement, Joachim H.

    2010-12-01

    The effect of magnetic nanoparticles on the survival of leukocytes in general and especially the lymphocytes as important parts of the immune system during incubation and separation was analyzed. Primary leukocytes were inoculated with magnetic core/carboxymethyl-dextran (CMD) nanoparticles for 4 to 30 minutes. Labelled cells were separated by MACS, counted and analyzed by FACS. T-Lymphocytes were identified by CD3 and B-Lymphocytes by CD19. After magnetic separation granulocytes represented the majority of cells in both, the positive and negative fraction. Most of the lymphocytes were detected in the negative fraction. The number of T-Lymphocytes in the positive fraction increased 2.5-fold from 4 to 16 minutes, whereas the amount of B-Lymphocytes remains constant. T cells could be expanded after short-term incubation with nanoparticles indicating full biological activity. Our enrichment procedure of tumor cells from peripheral blood preserves the integrity and biological activity of leukocytes in the negative fraction.

  15. Functionalized magnetic nanowires for chemical and magneto-mechanical induction of cancer cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Banderas, Aldo Isaac; Aires, Antonio; Teran, Francisco J.; Perez, Jose Efrain; Cadenas, Jael F.; Alsharif, Nouf; Ravasi, Timothy; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    Exploiting and combining different properties of nanomaterials is considered a potential route for next generation cancer therapies. Magnetic nanowires (NWs) have shown good biocompatibility and a high level of cellular internalization. We induced cancer cell death by combining the chemotherapeutic effect of doxorubicin (DOX)-functionalized iron NWs with the mechanical disturbance under a low frequency alternating magnetic field. (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were separately used for coating NWs allowing further functionalization with DOX. Internalization was assessed for both formulations by confocal reflection microscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. From confocal analysis, BSA formulations demonstrated higher internalization and less agglomeration. The functionalized NWs generated a comparable cytotoxic effect in breast cancer cells in a DOX concentration-dependent manner, (~60% at the highest concentration tested) that was significantly different from the effect produced by free DOX and non-functionalized NWs formulations. A synergistic cytotoxic effect is obtained when a magnetic field (1 mT, 10 Hz) is applied to cells treated with DOX-functionalized BSA or APTES-coated NWs, (~70% at the highest concentration). In summary, a bimodal method for cancer cell destruction was developed by the conjugation of the magneto-mechanical properties of iron NWs with the effect of DOX producing better results than the individual effects.

  16. Dual-Color Fluorescence Imaging of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Live Cancer Cells Using Conjugated Polymer Probes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Minjie; Sun, Bin; Liu, Yun; Shen, Qun-Dong; Jiang, Shaojun

    2016-03-02

    Rapid growth in biological applications of nanomaterials brings about pressing needs for exploring nanomaterial-cell interactions. Cationic blue-emissive and anionic green-emissive conjugated polymers are applied as dual-color fluorescence probes to the surface of negatively charged magnetic nanoparticles through sequentially electrostatic adsorption. These conjugated polymers have large extinction coefficients and high fluorescence quantum yield (82% for PFN and 62% for ThPFS). Thereby, one can visualize trace amount (2.7 μg/mL) of fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles within cancer cells by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Fluorescence labeling by the conjugated polymers is also validated for quantitative determination of the internalized nanoparticles in each individual cell by flow cytometry analysis. Extensive overlap of blue and green fluorescence signals in the cytoplasm indicates that both conjugated polymer probes tightly bind to the surface of the nanoparticles during cellular internalization. The highly charged and fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles non-specifically bind to the cell membranes, followed by cellular uptake through endocytosis. The nanoparticles form aggregates inside endosomes, which yields a punctuated staining pattern. Cellular internalization of the nanoparticles is dependent on the dosage and time. Uptake efficiency can be enhanced three-fold by application of an external magnetic field. The nanoparticles are low cytotoxicity and suitable for simultaneously noninvasive fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging application.

  17. Dual-responsive magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for nonviral gene delivery and cell separation.

    PubMed

    Majewski, Alexander P; Schallon, Anja; Jérôme, Valérie; Freitag, Ruth; Müller, Axel H E; Schmalz, Holger

    2012-03-12

    We present the synthesis of dual-responsive (pH and temperature) magnetic core-shell nanoparticles utilizing the grafting-from approach. First, oleic acid stabilized superparamagnetic maghemite (γ-Fe(2)O(3)) nanoparticles (NPs), prepared by thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl, were surface-functionalized with ATRP initiating sites bearing a dopamine anchor group via ligand exchange. Subsequently, 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) was polymerized from the surface by ATRP, yielding dual-responsive magnetic core-shell NPs (γ-Fe(2)O(3)@PDMAEMA). The attachment of the dopamine anchor group on the nanoparticle's surface is shown to be reversible to a certain extent, resulting in a grafting density of 0.15 chains per nm(2) after purification. Nevertheless, the grafted NPs show excellent long-term stability in water over a wide pH range and exhibit a pH- and temperature-dependent reversible agglomeration, as revealed by turbidimetry. The efficiency of γ-Fe(2)O(3)@PDMAEMA hybrid nanoparticles as a potential transfection agent was explored under standard conditions in CHO-K1 cells. Remarkably, γ-Fe(2)O(3)@PDMAEMA led to a 2-fold increase in the transfection efficiency without increasing the cytotoxicity, as compared to polyethyleneimine (PEI), and yielded on average more than 50% transfected cells. Moreover, after transfection with the hybrid nanoparticles, the cells acquired magnetic properties that could be used for selective isolation of transfected cells.

  18. Dual-Color Fluorescence Imaging of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Live Cancer Cells Using Conjugated Polymer Probes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Minjie; Sun, Bin; Liu, Yun; Shen, Qun-Dong; Jiang, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Rapid growth in biological applications of nanomaterials brings about pressing needs for exploring nanomaterial-cell interactions. Cationic blue-emissive and anionic green-emissive conjugated polymers are applied as dual-color fluorescence probes to the surface of negatively charged magnetic nanoparticles through sequentially electrostatic adsorption. These conjugated polymers have large extinction coefficients and high fluorescence quantum yield (82% for PFN and 62% for ThPFS). Thereby, one can visualize trace amount (2.7 μg/mL) of fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles within cancer cells by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Fluorescence labeling by the conjugated polymers is also validated for quantitative determination of the internalized nanoparticles in each individual cell by flow cytometry analysis. Extensive overlap of blue and green fluorescence signals in the cytoplasm indicates that both conjugated polymer probes tightly bind to the surface of the nanoparticles during cellular internalization. The highly charged and fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles non-specifically bind to the cell membranes, followed by cellular uptake through endocytosis. The nanoparticles form aggregates inside endosomes, which yields a punctuated staining pattern. Cellular internalization of the nanoparticles is dependent on the dosage and time. Uptake efficiency can be enhanced three-fold by application of an external magnetic field. The nanoparticles are low cytotoxicity and suitable for simultaneously noninvasive fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging application. PMID:26931282

  19. Biotechnological promises of Fe-filled CNTs for cell shepherding and magnetic fluid hyperthermia applications.

    PubMed

    Pineux, Florent; Marega, Riccardo; Stopin, Antoine; La Torre, Alessandro; Garcia, Yann; Devlin, Eamonn; Michiels, Carine; Khlobystov, Andrei N; Bonifazi, Davide

    2015-12-28

    Fe-filled carbon nanotubes (Fe@CNTs) recently emerged as an effective class of hybrid nanoparticles for biotechnological applications, such as magnetic cell sorting and magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Aiming at studying the effects of both the Fe loading and the magnetocrystalline characteristics in these applications, we describe herein the preparation of Fe@CNTs containing different Fe phases that, upon functionalization with the antibody Cetuximab (Ctxb), allow the targeting of cancer cells. Our experimental findings reveal that an optimal Ctxb/Fe weight ratio of 1.2 is needed for efficient magnetic cell shepherding, whereas enhanced MFH-induced mortality (70 vs. 15%) can be reached with hybrids enriched in the coercive Fe(3)C phase. These results suggest that a synergistic effect between the Ab loading and the Fe distribution in each nanotube exists, for which the maximum shepherding and hyperthermia effects are observed when higher densities of Fe@CNTs featuring the more coercive phase are interfaced with the cells.

  20. Design of microfluidic channels for magnetic separation of malaria-infected red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Martin, Andrea Blue; Gandini, Alberto; Aubry, Nadine; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Antaki, James F.

    2016-01-01

    This study is motivated by the development of a blood cell filtration device for removal of malaria-infected, parasitized red blood cells (pRBCs). The blood was modeled as a multi-component fluid using the computational fluid dynamics discrete element method (CFD-DEM), wherein plasma was treated as a Newtonian fluid and the red blood cells (RBCs) were modeled as soft-sphere solid particles which move under the influence of drag, collisions with other RBCs, and a magnetic force. The CFD-DEM model was first validated by a comparison with experimental data from Han et al. 2006 (Han and Frazier 2006) involving a microfluidic magnetophoretic separator for paramagnetic deoxygenated blood cells. The computational model was then applied to a parametric study of a parallel-plate separator having hematocrit of 40% with a 10% of the RBCs as pRBCs. Specifically, we investigated the hypothesis of introducing an upstream constriction to the channel to divert the magnetic cells within the near-wall layer where the magnetic force is greatest. Simulations compared the efficacy of various geometries upon the stratification efficiency of the pRBCs. For a channel with nominal height of 100 µm, the addition of an upstream constriction of 80% improved the proportion of pRBCs retained adjacent to the magnetic wall (separation efficiency) by almost 2 fold, from 26% to 49%. Further addition of a downstream diffuser reduced remixing, hence improved separation efficiency to 72%. The constriction introduced a greater pressure drop (from 17 to 495 Pa), which should be considered when scaling-up this design for a clinical-sized system. Overall, the advantages of this design include its ability to accommodate physiological hematocrit and high throughput – which is critical for clinical implementation as a blood-filtration system. PMID:27761107

  1. Design of microfluidic channels for magnetic separation of malaria-infected red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Martin, Andrea Blue; Gandini, Alberto; Aubry, Nadine; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Antaki, James F

    2016-01-01

    This study is motivated by the development of a blood cell filtration device for removal of malaria-infected, parasitized red blood cells (pRBCs). The blood was modeled as a multi-component fluid using the computational fluid dynamics discrete element method (CFD-DEM), wherein plasma was treated as a Newtonian fluid and the red blood cells (RBCs) were modeled as soft-sphere solid particles which move under the influence of drag, collisions with other RBCs, and a magnetic force. The CFD-DEM model was first validated by a comparison with experimental data from Han et al. 2006 (Han and Frazier 2006) involving a microfluidic magnetophoretic separator for paramagnetic deoxygenated blood cells. The computational model was then applied to a parametric study of a parallel-plate separator having hematocrit of 40% with a 10% of the RBCs as pRBCs. Specifically, we investigated the hypothesis of introducing an upstream constriction to the channel to divert the magnetic cells within the near-wall layer where the magnetic force is greatest. Simulations compared the efficacy of various geometries upon the stratification efficiency of the pRBCs. For a channel with nominal height of 100 µm, the addition of an upstream constriction of 80% improved the proportion of pRBCs retained adjacent to the magnetic wall (separation efficiency) by almost 2 fold, from 26% to 49%. Further addition of a downstream diffuser reduced remixing, hence improved separation efficiency to 72%. The constriction introduced a greater pressure drop (from 17 to 495 Pa), which should be considered when scaling-up this design for a clinical-sized system. Overall, the advantages of this design include its ability to accommodate physiological hematocrit and high throughput - which is critical for clinical implementation as a blood-filtration system.

  2. The effect of cryoprotection on the use of PLGA encapsulated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic cell labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Kevin S.; Hashmi, Sarah M.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic PLGA nanoparticles are a significant advancement in the quest to translate MRI-based cell tracking to the clinic. The benefits of these types of particles are that they encapsulate large amounts of iron oxide nanocrystals within an FDA-approved polymer matrix, combining the best aspects of inert micron-sized iron oxide particles, or MPIOs, and biodegradable small particles of iron oxide, or SPIOs. Practically, PLGA nanoparticle fabrication and storage requires some form of cryoprotectant to both protect the particle during freeze drying and to promote resuspension. While this is a commonly employed procedure in the fabrication of drug loaded PLGA nanoparticles, it has yet to be investigated for magnetic particles and what effect this might have on internalization of magnetic particles. As such, in this study, magnetic PLGA nanoparticles were fabricated with various concentrations of two common cryoprotectants, dextrose and sucrose, and analyzed for their ability to magnetically label cells. It was found that cryoprotection with either sugar significantly enhanced the ability to resuspend nanoparticles without aggregation. Magnetic cell labeling was impacted by sugar concentration, with higher sugar concentrations used during freeze drying more significantly reducing magnetic cell labeling than lower concentrations. These studies suggest that cryoprotection with 1% dextrose is an optimal compromise that preserves monodispersity following resuspension and high magnetic cell labeling.

  3. The Effect of Iron Oxide Magnetic Nanoparticles on Smooth Muscle Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Song; Chen, Xiangjian; Gu, Chunrong; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Jindan; Bian, Zhiping; Yang, Di; Gu, Ning

    2009-01-01

    Recently, magnetic nanoparticles of iron oxide (Fe3O4, γ-Fe2O3) have shown an increasing number of applications in the field of biomedicine, but some questions have been raised about the potential impact of these nanoparticles on the environment and human health. In this work, the three types of magnetic nanoparticles (DMSA-Fe2O3, APTS-Fe2O3, and GLU-Fe2O3) with the same crystal structure, magnetic properties, and size distribution was designed, prepared, and characterized by transmission electronic microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, zeta potential analyzer, vibrating sample magnetometer, and Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy. Then, we have investigated the effect of the three types of magnetic nanoparticles (DMSA-Fe2O3, APTS-Fe2O3, and GLU-Fe2O3) on smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Cellular uptake of nanoparticles by SMC displays the dose, the incubation time and surface property dependent patterns. Through the thin section TEM images, we observe that DMSA-Fe2O3 is incorporated into the lysosome of SMCs. The magnetic nanoparticles have no inflammation impact, but decrease the viability of SMCs. The other questions about metabolism and other impacts will be the next subject of further studies.

  4. Monitoring Dendritic Cell Migration using 19F / 1H Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Waiczies, Helmar; Guenther, Martin; Skodowski, Julia; Lepore, Stefano; Pohlmann, Andreas; Niendorf, Thoralf; Waiczies, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Continuous advancements in noninvasive imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have greatly improved our ability to study physiological or pathological processes in living organisms. MRI is also proving to be a valuable tool for capturing transplanted cells in vivo. Initial cell labeling strategies for MRI made use of contrast agents that influence the MR relaxation times (T1, T2, T2*) and lead to an enhancement (T1) or depletion (T2*) of signal where labeled cells are present. T2* enhancement agents such as ultrasmall iron oxide agents (USPIO) have been employed to study cell migration and some have also been approved by the FDA for clinical application. A drawback of T2* agents is the difficulty to distinguish the signal extinction created by the labeled cells from other artifacts such as blood clots, micro bleeds or air bubbles. In this article, we describe an emerging technique for tracking cells in vivo that is based on labeling the cells with fluorine (19F)-rich particles. These particles are prepared by emulsifying perfluorocarbon (PFC) compounds and then used to label cells, which subsequently can be imaged by 19F MRI. Important advantages of PFCs for cell tracking in vivo include (i) the absence of carbon-bound 19F in vivo, which then yields background-free images and complete cell selectivityand(ii) the possibility to quantify the cell signal by 19F MR spectroscopy. PMID:23542739

  5. Separation of a breast cancer cell line from human blood using a quadrupole magnetic flow sorter.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, M; Decker, K; Chosy, J; Comella, K; Melnik, K; Moore, L; Lasky, L C; Zborowski, M; Chalmers, J J

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a quadrupole magnetic flow sorter (QMS) to facilitate high-throughput binary cell separation. Optimized QMS operation requires the adjustment of three flow parameters based on the immunomagnetic characteristics of the target cell sample. To overcome the inefficiency of semiempirical operation/optimization of QMS flow parameters, a theoretical model of the QMS sorting process was developed. Application of this model requires measurement of the magnetophoretic mobility distribution of the cell sample by the cell tracking velocimetry (CTV) technique developed in our laboratory. In this work, the theoretical model was experimentally tested using breast carcinoma cells (HCC1954) overexpressing the HER-2/neu gene, and peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs). The magnetophoretic mobility distribution of immunomagnetically labeled HCC1954 cells was measured using the CTV technique, and then theoretical predictions of sorting recoveries were calculated. Mean magnetophoretic mobilities of (1-3) x 10(-4) mm(3)/(T A s) were obtained depending on the labeling conditions. Labeled HCC1954 cells were mixed with unlabeled PBLs to form a "spiked" sample to be separated by the QMS. Fractional recoveries of cells for different flow parameters were examined and compared with theoretical predictions. Experimental results showed that the theoretical model accurately predicted fractional recoveries of HCC1954 cells. High-throughput (3.29 x 10(5) cells/s) separations with high recovery (0.89) of HCC1954 cells were achieved.

  6. A smart fully integrated micromachined separator with soft magnetic micro-pillar arrays for cell isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Tao; Su, Qianhua; Yang, Zhaochu; Zhang, Yulong; Egeland, Eirik B.; Gu, Dan D.; Calabrese, Paolo; Kapiris, Matteo J.; Karlsen, Frank; Minh, Nhut T.; Wang, K.; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2010-11-01

    A smart fully integrated micromachined separator with soft magnetic micro-pillar arrays has been developed and demonstrated, which can merely employ one independent lab-on-chip to realize cell isolation. The simulation, design, microfabrication and test for the new electromagnetic micro separator were executed. The simulation results of the electromagnetic field in the separator show that special soft magnetic micro-pillar arrays can amplify and redistribute the electromagnetic field generated by the micro-coils. The separator can be equipped with a strong magnetic field to isolate the target cells with a considerably low input current. The micro separator was fabricated by micro-processing technology. An electroplating bath was hired to deposit NiCo/NiFe to fabricate the micro-pillar arrays. An experimental system was set up to verify the function of the micro separator by isolating the lymphocytes, in which the human whole blood mixed with Dynabeads® FlowComp Flexi and monoclonal antibody MHCD2704 was used as the sample. The results show that the electromagnetic micro separator with an extremely low input current can recognize and capture the target lymphocytes with a high efficiency, the separation ratio reaching more than 90% at a lower flow rate. For the electromagnetic micro separator, there is no external magnetizing field required, and there is no extra cooling system because there is less Joule heat generated due to the lower current. The magnetic separator is totally reusable, and it can be used to separate cells or proteins with common antigens.

  7. Magnetic resonance histology: in situ single cell imaging of receptor cells in an invertebrate (Lolliguncula brevis, Cephalopoda) sense organ.

    PubMed

    Gozansky, Elliott K; Ezell, Edward L; Budelmann, Bernd U; Quast, Michael J

    2003-11-01

    Utilizing contrast-enhanced MR histology, individual cell bodies were identified in situ and compared one-to-one with conventional histology. The squid Lolliguncula brevis served as a model where the receptor cells of the proprioceptive neck receptor organ were labeled with paramagnetic cobalt(II) ions by conventional cobalt iontophoresis. Stimulated echo images were obtained using a 9.4 T magnet and followed by conventional histologic treatment and light microscopy. Images obtained from both these techniques match well and validate MR histology.

  8. A Peltier cell calorimeter for the direct measurement of the isothermal entropy change in magnetic materials.

    PubMed

    Basso, Vittorio; Küpferling, Michaela; Sasso, Carlo P; Giudici, Laura

    2008-06-01

    We developed a calorimetric technique to measure the isothermal magnetocaloric entropy change. The method consists in the use of Peltier cells as heat flow sensor and heat pump at the same time. In this paper, we describe the setup, the constitutive equations of the Peltier cell as sensor and actuator, and the calibration procedure. The Peltier heat is used to keep the sample isothermal when magnetic field is changed. The temperature difference between the sample and the thermal reservoir is kept by a digital control within 5 mK for a magnetic field rate of 20 mT s(-1). The heat flux sensitivity around 1 microW. With this method, it is possible to measure the magnetocaloric effect in magnetic materials by tracing the curves of the exchanged entropy Delta(e)s as a function of the magnetic field H. The method proves to be, in particular, suitable to reveal the role of the entropy production Delta(i)s, which is connected with hysteresis. Measurement examples are shown for Gd, BaFe(12)O(19) ferrite, and Gd-Si-Ge.

  9. A Peltier cell calorimeter for the direct measurement of the isothermal entropy change in magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Vittorio; Küpferling, Michaela; Sasso, Carlo P.; Giudici, Laura

    2008-06-01

    We developed a calorimetric technique to measure the isothermal magnetocaloric entropy change. The method consists in the use of Peltier cells as heat flow sensor and heat pump at the same time. In this paper, we describe the setup, the constitutive equations of the Peltier cell as sensor and actuator, and the calibration procedure. The Peltier heat is used to keep the sample isothermal when magnetic field is changed. The temperature difference between the sample and the thermal reservoir is kept by a digital control within 5mK for a magnetic field rate of 20mTs-1. The heat flux sensitivity around 1μW. With this method, it is possible to measure the magnetocaloric effect in magnetic materials by tracing the curves of the exchanged entropy Δes as a function of the magnetic field H. The method proves to be, in particular, suitable to reveal the role of the entropy production Δis, which is connected with hysteresis. Measurement examples are shown for Gd, BaFe12O19 ferrite, and Gd-Si-Ge.

  10. Hyperthermic potentiation of cisplatin by magnetic nanoparticle heaters is correlated with an increase in cell membrane fluidity.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Berríos, Merlis P; Castillo, Amalchi; Mendéz, Janet; Soto, Orlando; Rinaldi, Carlos; Torres-Lugo, Madeline

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia as a cancer treatment method is an attractive alternative to other forms of hyperthermia. It is based on the heat released by magnetic nanoparticles subjected to an alternating magnetic field. Recent studies have shown that magnetic fluid hyperthermia-treated cells respond significantly better to chemotherapeutic treatment compared with cells treated with hot water hyperthermia under the same temperature conditions. We hypothesized that this synergistic effect is due to an additional stress on the cellular membrane, independent of the thermal heat dose effect that is induced by nanoparticles exposed to an alternating magnetic field. This would result in an increase in Cis-diammine-dichloroplatinum (II) (cDDP, cisplatin) uptake via passive transport. To test this hypothesis, we exposed cDDP-treated cells to extracellular copper in order to hinder the human cell copper transporter (hCTR1)-mediated active transport of cDDP. This, in turn, can increase the passive transport of the drug through the cell membrane. Our results did not show statistically significant differences in surviving fractions for cells treated concomitantly with magnetic fluid hyperthermia and cDDP, in the presence or absence of copper. Nonetheless, significant copper-dependent variations in cell survival were observed for samples treated with combined cDDP and hot water hyperthermia. These results correlated with platinum uptake studies, which showed that cells treated with magnetic fluid hyperthermia had higher platinum uptake than cells treated with hot water hyperthermia. Changes in membrane fluidity were tested through fluorescence anisotropy measurements using trimethylamine-diphenylhexatriene. Additional uptake studies were conducted with acridine orange and measured by flow cytometry. These studies indicated that magnetic fluid hyperthermia significantly increases cell membrane fluidity relative to hot water hyperthermia and untreated cells, and hence this could

  11. Magnetic Particle Imaging tracks the long-term fate of in vivo neural cell implants with high image contrast.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bo; Vazin, Tandis; Goodwill, Patrick W; Conway, Anthony; Verma, Aradhana; Saritas, Emine Ulku; Schaffer, David; Conolly, Steven M

    2015-09-11

    We demonstrate that Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) enables monitoring of cellular grafts with high contrast, sensitivity, and quantitativeness. MPI directly detects the intense magnetization of iron-oxide tracers using low-frequency magnetic fields. MPI is safe, noninvasive and offers superb sensitivity, with great promise for clinical translation and quantitative single-cell tracking. Here we report the first MPI cell tracking study, showing 200-cell detection in vitro and in vivo monitoring of human neural graft clearance over 87 days in rat brain.

  12. Magnetic Particle Imaging tracks the long-term fate of in vivo neural cell implants with high image contrast

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bo; Vazin, Tandis; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Conway, Anthony; Verma, Aradhana; Ulku Saritas, Emine; Schaffer, David; Conolly, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) enables monitoring of cellular grafts with high contrast, sensitivity, and quantitativeness. MPI directly detects the intense magnetization of iron-oxide tracers using low-frequency magnetic fields. MPI is safe, noninvasive and offers superb sensitivity, with great promise for clinical translation and quantitative single-cell tracking. Here we report the first MPI cell tracking study, showing 200-cell detection in vitro and in vivo monitoring of human neural graft clearance over 87 days in rat brain. PMID:26358296

  13. Action of a 50 Hz magnetic field on proliferation of cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmelpfeng, J.; Dertinger, H.

    1997-05-01

    Proliferation of SV40-3T3 mouse fibroblasts and human HL-60 promyelocytes was studied after treatment with a sinusoidal 2 mT{sub rms} 50 Hz magnetic field. A single exposure of 60 minutes caused quasicyclic changes in the cell number of SV40-3T3 cultures as function of time after treatment, which was interpreted to be due to the induction of chronobiological mechanisms by the field. Moreover, small variations in cell cycle distribution were measured during postexposure incubation for both cell lines. To discriminate between the effect of the magnetic vector and the induced electric field, HL-60 cell exposure was also performed on organ culture dishes. These dishes consist of two coaxially centered, isolated compartments in which different electric field levels are induced in the medium during treatment. Cell growth was affected in the outer compartment only where the induced electric field ranged from 8 to 12 mV{sub peak}/meter at 2 mT, but it was not affected in the inner compartment (field range 0--4 mV{sub peak}/meter). This suggests that the effects on cell growth are due to the induced electric field and are expressed only above a threshold of between 4 and 8 mV{sub peak}/meter.

  14. Magnetic-field-assisted photothermal therapy of cancer cells using Fe-doped carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ling; Vardarajan, Vijaylakshmi; Koymen, Ali R.; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2012-01-01

    Photothermal therapy with assistance of nanoparticles offers a solution for the destruction of cancer cells without significant collateral damage to otherwise healthy cells. However, minimizing the required number of injected nanoparticles is a major challenge. Here, we introduce the use of magnetic carbon nanoparticles (MCNPs), localizing them in a desired region by applying an external magnetic-field, and irradiating the targeted cancer cells with a near-infrared laser beam. The MCNPs were prepared in benzene, using an electric plasma discharge, generated in the cavitation field of an ultrasonic horn. The CNPs were made ferromagnetic by use of Fe-electrodes to dope the CNPs, as confirmed by magnetometry. Transmission electron microscopy measurements showed the size distribution of these MCNPs to be in the range of 5 to 10 nm. For photothermal irradiation, a tunable continuous wave Ti: Sapphire laser beam was weakly focused on to the cell monolayer under an inverted fluorescence microscope. The response of different cell types to photothermal irradiation was investigated. Cell death in the presence of both MCNPs and laser beam was confirmed by morphological changes and propidium iodide fluorescence inclusion assay. The results of our study suggest that MCNP based photothermal therapy is a promising approach to remotely guide photothermal therapy.

  15. Stem cell-based gene therapy activated using magnetic hyperthermia to enhance the treatment of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Perry T.; Shah, Shreyas; Pasquale, Nicholas J.; Garbuzenko, Olga B.; Minko, Tamara; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based gene therapies, wherein stem cells are genetically engineered to express therapeutic molecules, have shown tremendous potential for cancer applications owing to their innate ability to home to tumors. However, traditional stem cell-based gene therapies are hampered by our current inability to control when the therapeutic genes are actually turned on, thereby resulting in detrimental side effects. Here, we report the novel application of magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for the dual purpose of delivering and activating a heat-inducible gene vector that encodes TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs). By combining the tumor tropism of the AD-MSCs with the spatiotemporal MCNP-based delivery and activation of TRAIL expression, this platform provides an attractive means with which to enhance our control over the activation of stem cell-based gene therapies. In particular, we found that these engineered AD-MSCs retained their innate ability to proliferate, differentiate, and, most importantly, home to tumors, making them ideal cellular carriers. Moreover, exposure of the engineered AD-MSCS to mild magnetic hyperthermia resulted in the selective expression of TRAIL from the engineered AD-MSCs and, as a result, induced significant ovarian cancer cell death in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26720500

  16. Stem cell-based gene therapy activated using magnetic hyperthermia to enhance the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Perry T; Shah, Shreyas; Pasquale, Nicholas J; Garbuzenko, Olga B; Minko, Tamara; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2016-03-01

    Stem cell-based gene therapies, wherein stem cells are genetically engineered to express therapeutic molecules, have shown tremendous potential for cancer applications owing to their innate ability to home to tumors. However, traditional stem cell-based gene therapies are hampered by our current inability to control when the therapeutic genes are actually turned on, thereby resulting in detrimental side effects. Here, we report the novel application of magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for the dual purpose of delivering and activating a heat-inducible gene vector that encodes TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs). By combining the tumor tropism of the AD-MSCs with the spatiotemporal MCNP-based delivery and activation of TRAIL expression, this platform provides an attractive means with which to enhance our control over the activation of stem cell-based gene therapies. In particular, we found that these engineered AD-MSCs retained their innate ability to proliferate, differentiate, and, most importantly, home to tumors, making them ideal cellular carriers. Moreover, exposure of the engineered AD-MSCS to mild magnetic hyperthermia resulted in the selective expression of TRAIL from the engineered AD-MSCs and, as a result, induced significant ovarian cancer cell death in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Possible promotion of neuronal differentiation in fetal rat brain neural progenitor cells after sustained exposure to static magnetism.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Noritaka; Ishioka, Yukichi; Hirai, Takao; Ozawa, Shusuke; Tachibana, Masaki; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Takarada, Takeshi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2009-08-15

    We have previously shown significant potentiation of Ca(2+) influx mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, along with decreased microtubules-associated protein-2 (MAP2) expression, in hippocampal neurons cultured under static magnetism without cell death. In this study, we investigated the effects of static magnetism on the functionality of neural progenitor cells endowed to proliferate for self-replication and differentiate into neuronal, astroglial, and oligodendroglial lineages. Neural progenitor cells were isolated from embryonic rat neocortex and hippocampus, followed by culture under static magnetism at 100 mT and subsequent determination of the number of cells immunoreactive for a marker protein of particular progeny lineages. Static magnetism not only significantly decreased proliferation of neural progenitor cells without affecting cell viability, but also promoted differentiation into cells immunoreactive for MAP2 with a concomitant decrease in that for an astroglial marker, irrespective of the presence of differentiation inducers. In neural progenitors cultured under static magnetism, a significant increase was seen in mRNA expression of several activator-type proneural genes, such as Mash1, Math1, and Math3, together with decreased mRNA expression of the repressor type Hes5. These results suggest that sustained static magnetism could suppress proliferation for self-renewal and facilitate differentiation into neurons through promoted expression of activator-type proneural genes by progenitor cells in fetal rat brain.

  18. Multifunctional magnetic-hollow gold nanospheres for bimodal cancer cell imaging and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ling-Yu; Yang, Xiao-Quan; An, Jie; Zhang, Lin;