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Sample records for 30s ri beam

  1. {sup 30}S Beam Development and X-ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.; Binh, D. N.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Ohshiro, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Chen, A. A.; Chen, J.; Setoodeh nia, K.; Kaji, D.; Nishimura, S.; Kim, A.; Lee, N. H.; Wakabayashi, Y.

    2010-03-01

    Over the past three years, we have worked on developing a well-characterized {sup 30}S radioactive beam to be used in a future experiment aiming to directly measure to extrapolate the {sup 30}S(alpha,p) stellar reaction rate within the Gamow window of Type I X-ray bursts. The importance of the {sup 30}S(alpha,p) reaction to X-ray bursts is discussed. Given the astrophysical motivation, the successful results of and challenges involved in the production of a low-energy {sup 30}S beam are detailed. Finally, an overview of our future plans regarding this on-going project are presented.

  2. SAMURAI spectrometer for RI beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Chiga, N.; Isobe, T.; Kondo, Y.; Kubo, T.; Kusaka, K.; Motobayashi, T.; Nakamura, T.; Ohnishi, J.; Okuno, H.; Otsu, H.; Sako, T.; Sato, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Sekiguchi, K.; Takahashi, K.; Tanaka, R.; Yoneda, K.

    2013-12-01

    A large-acceptance multiparticle spectrometer SAMURAI has been constructed at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF) for RI beam experiments. It was designed primarily for kinematically complete experiments such as the invariant-mass spectroscopy of particle-unbound states in exotic nuclei, by detecting heavy fragments and projectile-rapidity nucleons in coincidence. The system consists of a superconducting dipole magnet, beam line detectors, heavy fragment detectors, neutron detectors, and proton detectors. The SAMURAI spectrometer was commissioned in March 2012, and a rigidity resolution of about 1/1500 was obtained for RI beams up to 2.4 GeV/c.

  3. Electron-beam-driven RI separator for SCRIT (ERIS) at RIKEN RI beam factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, T.; Ichikawa, S.; Koizumi, K.; Kurita, K.; Miyashita, Y.; Ogawara, R.; Tamaki, S.; Togasaki, M.; Wakasugi, M.

    2013-12-01

    We constructed a radioactive isotope (RI) separator named ERIS (electron-beam-driven RI separator for SCRIT) for the SCRIT (Self-Confinement RI Target) electron scattering facility at RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF). In ERIS, production rate of fission products in the photofission of uranium is estimated to be 2.2 ×1011 fissions/s with 30 g of uranium and a 1-kW electron beam. During the commissioning of ERIS, the mass resolution and overall efficiency, including ionization, extraction, and transmission, were found to be 1660 and 21%, respectively, using natural xenon gas. The preparation of uranium carbide (UC2) RI production targets is described from which a 132Sn beam was successfully separated in our first attempt at RI production.

  4. ZeroDegree spectrometer at RIKEN RI Beam Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Toshiyuki; Ohnishi, Tetsuya; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Naoki; Kameda, Daisuke; Kusaka, Kensuke; Yoshida, Atsushi; Yoshida, Koichi; Ohtake, Masao; Inabe, Naohito; Yanagisawa, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Kanenobu

    2009-10-01

    At RI Beam Factory (RIBF) [1] at RIKEN Nishina Center, a variety of fast rare isotope (RI) beams are produced using the BigRIPS in-flight separator [2] for studies of exotic nuclei. The beam line following BigRIPS is designed to work as a forward spectrometer named ZeroDegree, so that it can be used for reaction studies with RI beams. The ZeroDegree spectrometer consists of two dipoles and six superconducting quadrupole triplets, of which designs are essentially the same as those of BigRIPS. It analyzes and indentifies projectile reaction residues, often in coincidence with gamma rays, and can be operated in different optics modes, depending on experimental requirements. The ZeroDegree spectrometer has recently been commissioned and used for a series of full-dress RI-beam experiments. Overview and status of the ZeroDegree spectrometer will be reported.[4pt] [1] Y. Yano: Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 261 (2007) 1009. [0pt] [2] T. Kubo: Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 204 (2003) 97 and T. Ohnishi et al.: J. Phys. Soc. Japan, 77 (2008) 083201.

  5. Construction of rare-RI ring at RIKEN RI Beam Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Wakasugi, M.; Uesaka, T.; Ozawa, A.; Abe, Y.; Fujinawa, T.; Kase, M.; Komiyama, M.; Kubo, T.; Kumagai, K.; Maie, T.; Nagae, D.; Ohnishi, J.; Suzaki, F.; Tokuchi, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Yamada, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yamasawa, H.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Zenihiro, J.; Yano, Y.

    2013-12-01

    An isochronous mass spectroscopy system using a newly constructed storage ring named the “rare-RI ring” is expected to be implemented at the RIKEN Nishina Center to determine the masses of short-lived rare nuclei including those in the r-process region with a relative precision of the order of 10-6 even for only one particle. In an isochronous storage ring, the mass is determined by measuring the revolution time of each nucleus. Our rare-RI ring consists of six magnetic sectors, and each sector consists of four bending magnets. To precisely optimize the isochronous conditions of the circulating particles for large acceptance, we install ten trim coils to half of the bending magnets. A fast-response and fast-charging kicker system enables selective and efficient injection of the produced rare nuclei into the ring one by one, along with facilitating efficient extraction of the circulating particles for time-of-flight measurement. Construction of the rare-RI ring was begun in the middle of the fiscal year 2012 at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory, and the ring is expected to be fully functional by 2015.

  6. Spin-Isospin responses via charge exchange reactions of RI beams at SHARAQ

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoura, Susumu

    2012-11-12

    Nuclear spectroscopy via direct reactions of RI beams is discussed focusing on characteristics of charge-exchange reactions of RI beams. Recent experiments using the SHARAQ spectrometer at the RIBF are presented, where isovector spin monopole and spin-non-flip monopole responses are studied by charge exchange reaction of RI beams. Some experimental plans and perspectives are also presented.

  7. Study on astrophysical reactions using low-energy RI beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, low-energy RI beams can be produced in a good intensity and they have been used for studying many astrophysical reactions. One of the facilities producing low-energy RI beams is CRIB (CNS Radio-Isotope Beam separator) [1,2], an RI-beam separator of Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. Taking CRIB as an example, recent improvements on the RI-beam production and experimental results on astrophysical studies are presented. Several experimental approaches have been taken for the studies on astrophysical reactions.The feature of each method are discussed based on real measurements performed at CRIB. One is the direct method, applied for measurements of reactions such as (α,p) [3]. Another is the measurement of proton/alpha resonance scattering using the thick target method in inverse kinematics, by which we can obtain information on the resonances relevant in astrophysical reactions [4,5]. A recent fruitful result was from a measurement of proton resonance scattering using a ^7Be beam [5]. The energy level structure of ^8B, revealed by the experiment, is especially of interest as it is related with the ^7Be(p,γ) ^8B reaction, responsible for the production of ^8B neutrinos in the sun. We successfully determined parameters of resonances in ^8B below 6.7 MeV, which may affect the ^7Be(p,γ)^8B reaction rate at the solar temparature. Indirect methods, such as ANC and the Trojan Horse Method, were also used in some of the measurements.[4pt] [1] S. Kubono et al., Eur. Phys. J. A13 (2002) 217.[0pt] [2] Y. Yanagisawa et al., Nucl. Instrum. Meth. Phys. Res., Sect. A 539 (2005) 74.[0pt] [3] M. Notani et al., Nucl. Phys. A 764 (2004) 113c.[0pt] [4] T. Teranishi et al., Phys. Lett. B 650 (2007) 129.[0pt] [5] H. Yamaguchi et al., Phys. Lett. B 672 (2009) 230.

  8. Radiation protection system at the RIKEN RI beam factory.

    PubMed

    Uwamino, Y; Fujita, S; Sakamoto, H; Ito, S; Fukunishi, N; Yabutani, T; Yamano, T; Fukumura, A

    2005-01-01

    The RIKEN RI (radioactive isotope) Beam Factory is scheduled to commence operations in 2006, and its maximum energy will be 400 MeV u(-1) for ions lighter than Ar and 350 MeV u(-1) for uranium. The beam intensity will be 1 pmicroA (6 x 10(12) particles s(-1)) for any element at the goal. For the hands-on-maintenance and the rational shield thickness of the building, the beam loss must be controlled with several kinds of monitors. Three types of radiation monitors will be installed. The first one consists of a neutron dose equivalent monitor and an ionisation chamber, which are commercially available area monitors. The second one is a conventional hand-held dose equivalent monitor wherein the logarithmic signal is read by a programmable logic controller based on the radiation safety interlock system (HIS). The third one is a simple plastic scintillator called a beam loss monitor. All the monitors have threshold levels for alarm and beam stop, and HIS reads all these signals.

  9. RI-induced reaction studies by new energy-degrading beam line, OEDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michimasa, Shin'ichiro

    2014-09-01

    The RI beam factory (RIBF) has expanded variety of accessible nuclei, and provides very intense RI beams. However, the beams are energy range of above 100 MeV/u, and are not necessarily suitable to some kinds of nuclear reactions. Therefore, deceleration of intense RI beams from RIBF open potentially new scientific opportunities to access various states in exotic nuclei by using characteristics probes, such as transfer reactions at several ten MeV/u and fusion reactions at several MeV/u. For energy degrading of nuclear beams, the degrader is generally used. This method easily controls beam energy, while multiple scattering effect and energy straggling in the material broaden the beam spot size at the downstream foci. Therefore, a key issue for reaction measurements is achievement of ion transport to reduce the beam emittance at the secondary target. For this purpose, CNS has set up OEDO (Optimized Energy Degrading Optics for RI beam) project for production of high-quality low energy RI beams. The OEDO beam line scheme is planned to be achieved by re-arrangement of magnets of the high-resolution beam line, where the SHARAQ spectrometer is useful as a spectrograph for low-energy reaction spectroscopy. In this presentation, I will discuss scientific opportunities in the OEDO beam line and the SHARAQ spectrometer.

  10. Nuclear Astrophysics and Structure Studies Using Low-energy RI Beams at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Binh, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.

    2010-05-12

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Using the RI beams at CRIB, Many measurements on proton and alpha resonance scatterings, (alpha,p) reactions, and others were peformed in recent years, mainly for studying astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among them, the results on the {sup 7}Be+p and {sup 7}Li+alpha resonance scatterings are presented.

  11. Alpha-induced reaction studies using low-energy RI beams at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hu, J.; Kubono, S.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, T.

    2012-11-12

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Studies on proton and alpha resonance scatterings, ({alpha}, p) reactions, and other types of measurements ({beta}-decay lifetimes etc.) have been performed using RI beams at CRIB, motivated by interests on astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among the studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Li+{alpha}/{sup 7}Be+{alpha} resonant scatterings are presented.

  12. Studies on Nuclear Astrophysics and Exotic Structure at the Low-Energy RI Beam Facility CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Teranishi, T.; Kubono, S.; Cherubini, S.; Mazzocco, M.; Signorini, C.; Gulino, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; La Cognata, M.; Lattuada, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Torresi, D.; Lee, P. S.; Lee, C. S.; Komatsubara, T.; Iwasa, N.; Okoda, Y.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Parascandolo, C.; La Commara, M.; Strano, E.; Boiano, C.; Boiano, A.; Manea, C.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Miyatake, H.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Ishiyama, H.; Jeong, S. C.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Kimura, S.; Mukai, M.; Kim, Y. H.; Lin, C. J.; Jia, H. M.; Yan, L.; Yang, Y. Y.; Kawabata, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. N.

    Studies on nuclear astrophysics, resonant structure, and nuclear reaction are going on at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), a low-energy RI beam separator operated by Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. Two major methods used at CRIB to study nuclear reactions of astrophysical relevance are the resonant scattering, and direct measurements of (α,p) reactions using a thick-gas target. Several experiments for decay measurements and reaction mechanism are also performed using low-energy RI beams at CRIB. Some of the results from recent experiments at CRIB are discussed.

  13. Cryogenic gas target system for intense RI beam productions in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Amadio, G.; Fujikawa, H.; Binh, D. N.; He, J. J.; Kim, A.; Kubono, S.

    2008-05-01

    A cryogenic gas target system was newly developed to produce intense RI beams at the low-energy in-flight radio-isotope beam separator (CRIB) of the University of Tokyo. The main features of the cryogenic gas target system are the direct cooling of the target cell by a liquid N2 finger and the circulation of the target gas that goes through the liquid N2 tank. Hydrogen gas was cooled down to 85-90 K by liquid nitrogen and used as a secondary beam production target which has a thickness of 2.3 mg/cm2 at the gas pressure of 760 Torr. Intense RI beams, such as a 7Be beam of 2×108 particles per second, were successfully produced using the target.

  14. Cryogenic gas target system for intense RI beam productions in nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Amadio, G.; Fujikawa, H.; Kubono, S.; Binh, D. N.; He, J. J.; Kim, A.

    2008-05-21

    A cryogenic gas target system was newly developed to produce intense RI beams at the low-energy in-flight radio-isotope beam separator (CRIB) of the University of Tokyo. The main features of the cryogenic gas target system are the direct cooling of the target cell by a liquid N{sub 2} finger and the circulation of the target gas that goes through the liquid N{sub 2} tank. Hydrogen gas was cooled down to 85-90 K by liquid nitrogen and used as a secondary beam production target which has a thickness of 2.3 mg/cm{sup 2} at the gas pressure of 760 Torr. Intense RI beams, such as a {sup 7}Be beam of 2x10{sup 8} particles per second, were successfully produced using the target.

  15. Production of drip-line nuclei at RIKEN RI Beam Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Atsumi

    2014-09-01

    Production cross-sections and secondary-beam yields of very neutron rich nuclei near neutron drip-line at 200--250 MeV/u have been investigated at RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF). RIBF is the next generation RI beam facility, which can produce a variety of exotic nuclei with high intensity. The measurement of production yields of 19B, 22C, which are located on the neutron drip-line, and neighboring isotopes was made on the occasion of the Coulomb and nuclear breakup experiments of these halo nuclei at SAMURAI (Superconducting Analyzer for MUlti-particle from RAdioIsotope beams) facility at RIBF. We used 345 MeV/u 48Ca beam as primary beam, which impinged on 30 mm-thick Be target, to obtain secondary beams by projectile fragmentation. The projectile fragments were then separated through Superconducting RI beam separator BigRIPS, and were identified by measuring time of flight (TOF), energy loss (ΔE), and magnetic rigidity (Bρ) by the standard detectors at 2nd stage of BigRIPS. We thus obtained production cross-sections and yields of carbon and boron isotopes. The production cross-sections and yields extracted were compared with the simulation code LISE using EPAX. We discuss these results and comparisons in this poster presentation.

  16. RI beam facility project at RIKEN and physics programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, H.

    2008-08-01

    In the Radioactive-Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF) project in RIKEN, intense primary beams can be provided at the energies E = 350-400MeV over the whole range of atomic number in the cascade-cyclotron acceleration scheme, for which three cyclotrons, fRC, IRC, and SRC, have been newly constructed. The project proceeds through two phases. In the phase-I program, the superconducting in-flight radioactive-isotope beam separator BigRIPS and the following ZeroDegree spectrometer have been installed as well as the three cyclotrons. In the commissioning, after the successful extraction of a 238U beam from SRC at E = 345 A MeV in the cascade-acceleration scheme, radioactive-isotope beams were produced and isotope-separated with BigRIPS as designed. The RIBF project is fully capitalized in the phase-II program, in which the construction of several experimental key devices has been proposed. The upgrade of the former fragment separator RIPS is also included there. It allow for a scheme to use intense primary beams at the intermediate energy E = 115 A MeV with RIPS. Remarkably, the produced radioactive-isotope beams at this energy can be spin-polarized taking the advantage of the fragmentation-induced spin orientation phenomena.

  17. Construction of the SCRIT electron scattering facility at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakasugi, M.; Ohnishi, T.; Wang, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Adachi, T.; Amagai, T.; Enokizono, A.; Enomoto, A.; Haraguchi, Y.; Hara, M.; Hori, T.; Ichikawa, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Kitazawa, R.; Koizumi, K.; Kurita, K.; Miyamoto, T.; Ogawara, R.; Shimakura, Y.; Takehara, H.; Tamae, T.; Tamaki, S.; Togasaki, M.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yanagi, K.; Suda, T.

    2013-12-01

    The SCRIT electron scattering facility, aiming at electron scattering off short-lived unstable nuclei, has been constructed at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory. This facility consists of a racetrack microtron (RTM), an electron storage ring (SR2) equipped with the SCRIT system, and a low-energy RI separator (ERIS). SCRIT (self-confining radioactive isotope ion targeting) is a novel technique to form internal targets in an electron storage ring. Experiments for evaluating performance of the SCRIT system have been carried out using the stable 133Cs1+ beam and the 132Xe1+ beam supplied from ERIS. Target ions were successfully trapped in the SCRIT system with 90% efficiency at a 250 mA electron beam current, and luminosity exceeding 1026/(cm2 s) was maintained for more than 1 s. Electrons elastically scattered from the target ions were successfully measured. Applicability of the SCRIT system to electron scattering for unstable nuclei has been established in experiments.

  18. Superconducting Ring Cyclotron for Riken RI Beam Factory in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, H.; Dantsuka, T.; Yamada, K.; Kase, M.; Maie, T.; Kamigaito, O.

    2010-04-01

    Since 1997, RIKEN Nishina Center has been constructing the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF) and succeeded in beam commissioning of its accelerator complex at the end of 2006. The world's first superconducting ring cyclotron (SRC) is the final booster in the RIBF accelerator complex which is able to accelerate all-element heavy ions to a speed of about 70% of the velocity of light. The ring cyclotron consists of 6 major superconducting sector magnets with a maximum field of 3.8 T. The total stored energy is 235 MJ, and its overall sizes are 19 m diameter, 8 m height and 8,300 tons. The magnet system assembly was completed in August 2005, and successfully reached the maximum field in November 2005. The first beam was extracted at the end of 2006 and the first uranium beam was extracted in March 2007. However operation of the helium refrigerator was not satisfactory although the commissioning of SRC was successful. Operation was stopped every two month due to degradation of its cooling power. In February 2008 the reason of the degradation was revealed to be oil contamination. Operation of the cryogenic system was restarted from August 2008 after hard task to clean up the helium refrigerator and to add oil separators to the compressor. After restoration long-term steady operation to keep the magnet superconducting continued for about 8 months with no sign of degradation of cooling capacity.

  19. Nuclear Astrophysical studies using low-energy RI beams at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hayakawa, S.; Binh, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Kurihara, Y.; Kubono, S.; Niikura, M.; Teranishi, T.; He, J. J.; Kwon, Y. K.; Nishimura, S.; Togano, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Khiem, L. H.

    2009-05-04

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo, used for various studies covering nuclear-astrophysical topics. An application of the RI beam at CRIB for the astrophysical studies is a new measurement of the proton resonance scattering on {sup 7}Be. The measurement was performed up to the excitation energy of 6.8 MeV, ans the excitation function above 3.5 MeV was successfully measured for the first time, providing important information about the reaction rate of {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B, which is the key reaction in the solar {sup 8}B neutrino production. A preliminary result of the {sup 7}Be+p experiment is presented.

  20. Experimental Studies of Light-Ion Nuclear Reactions Using Low-Energy RI Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Abe, K.; Shimuzu, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Rapisarda, G. G.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Romano, S.; Kubono, S.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kawabata, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, T.; Coc, A.; de Sereville, N.; Hammache, F.; Kiss, G.; Bishop, S.

    CRIB (CNS Radio-Isotope Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator of Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. Studies on nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, and other interests have been performed using the RI beams at CRIB, forming international collaborations. A striking method to study astrophyiscal reactions involving radioactive nuclei is the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Several astrophysical alpha-induced reactions have been be studied with that method at CRIB. A recent example is on the α resonant scattering with a radioactive 7Be beam. This study is related to the astrophysical 7Be(α , γ ) reactions, important at hot p-p chain and ν p-process in supernovae. There have been measurements based on several indirect methods, such as the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) and Trojan horse method (THM). The first THM measurement using an RI beam has been performed at CRIB, to study the 18F(p, α )15O reaction at astrophysical energies via the three body reaction 2H(18F, α 15O)n. The 18F(p, α )15O reaction rate is crucial to understand the 511-keV γ -ray production in nova explosion phenomena, and we successfully evaluated the reaction cross section at novae temperature and below experimentally for the first time.

  1. Studying astrophysical reactions with low-energy RI beams at CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Rapisarda, G. G.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Romano, S.; Kubono, S.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kawabata, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, T.; Coc, A.; De Sereville, N.; Hammache, F.; Kiss, G.; Bishop, S.

    2016-05-01

    Studies on nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, and other interests have been performed using the radioactive-isotope (RI) beams at the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB, operated by Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. A typical measurement performed at CRIB is the elastic resonant scattering with the inverse kinematics. One recent experiment was on the α resonant scattering with 7Li and 7Be beams. This study is related to the astrophysical 7Li/7Be(α,γ) reactions, important at hot p-p chain and νp-process in supernovae. There have also been measurements based on other experimental methods. The first THM measurement using an RI beam has been performed at CRIB, to study the 18F(p, α)15O reaction at astrophysical energies via the three body reaction 2H(18F, α15O)n. The 18F(p, α) 15O reaction rate is crucial to understand the 511-keV γ-ray production in nova explosion phenomena, and we successfully evaluated the reaction cross section at novae temperature and below experimentally for the first time.

  2. Nuclear Astrophysics Programs with Low-Energy RI Beams at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Kubono, S.; Binh, Dam N.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Kahl, D. M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Teranishi, T.; Iwasa, N.; Komatsubara, T.; Kato, S.; Khiem, Le H.

    2010-04-30

    Nuclear astrophysics activities with CNS RI beam separator (CRIB) are reported together with the present status of the CRIB facility which is supported by the AVF upgrade project for the total development of the low-energy RIB facility. The activities include direct and indirect measurements of stellar reactions especially relevant to explosive burning processes such as nova and supernovae. Some recent results are discussed together with a scope of the facility.

  3. Ion-optical studies of BigRIPS separator and ZeroDegree spectrometer at RIKEN RI Beam Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Kubo, Toshiyuki; Ohnishi, Tetsuya; Fukuda, Naoki; Kameda, Daisuke; Kusaka, Kensuke; Yoshida, Atsushi; Yoshida, Koichi; Ohtake, Masao; Inabe, Naohito; Yanagisawa, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Kanenobu; Matsushita, Masafumi

    2009-10-01

    The BigRIPS in-flight separator[1] and the ZeroDegree spectrometer (ZDS) have been commissioned at RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF) recently. Intense radioactive isotope (RI) beams are produced, separated and analyzed by the BigRIPS and the ZDS. Both of them are operated in several optical modes according to experimental conditions. For particle identifications of RI beams, it is essentially important to achieve high resolutions in A/Q ratio because RI beams are produced in several charge states in our energy region especially for heavy RI beams. Ion optical calculation with realistic magnetic field maps is indispensable for our purpose and we use COSY INFINITY[2] for that. Measured field maps are incorporated in the COSY calculations. In 2008, the ZDS was commissioned for the first time in three different modes. Experimental results and comparison with the COSY calculations will be presented in this report. [1]T. Kubo: Nucl. Instr. Meth. B204, 97 (2003). [2]K. Makino, M. Berz: Nucl. Instr. Meth. A558, 346 (2006).

  4. Development of a long-pulse (30-s), high-energy (120-keV) ion source for neutral-beam applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Barber, G.C.; Blue, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Multimegawatt neutral beams of hydrogen or deuterium atoms are needed for fusion machine applications such as MFTB-B, TFTR-U, DIII-U, and FED (INTOR or ETR). For these applications, a duoPIGatron ion source is being developed to produce high-brightness deuterium beams at a beam energy of approx. 120 keV for pulse lengths up to 30 s. A long-pulse plasma generator with active water cooling has been operated at an arc level of 1200 A with 30-s pulse durations. The plasma density and uniformity are sufficient for supplying a 60-A beam of hydrogen ions to a 13- by 43-cm accelerator. A 10- by 25-cm tetrode accelerator has been operated to form 120-keV hydrogen ion beams. Using the two-dimensional (2-D) ion extraction code developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a 13- by 43-cm tetrode accelerator has been designed and is being fabricated. The aperture shapes of accelerator grids are optimized for 120-keV beam energy.

  5. Performance of ion surfing rf-carpets for RI beam gas catcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Fumiya; Ito, Yuta; Katayama, Ichirou; Schury, Peter; Sonoda, Tetsu; Wada, Michiharu; Wollnik, Hermann

    2014-09-01

    High-energy RI beams produced in-flight by fragmentation or fission are used in ion trap-based precision experiments after being stopped in a gas catcher. The stopped ions can be extracted from the gas catcher as a low energy ion beam. In order to transport and extract ions quickly and efficiently, an rf-carpet (RFC) method utilizing a dc potential gradient has been the standard technique. However, such a method is restricted by the transport time to longer half-life isotopes due to the maximum dc gradient that can be supported before electric discharges occur in the gas catcher. To avoid that limitation, a hybrid technique wherein the dc gradient is replaced by a traveling potential wave was proposed, called ``ion surfing''. Recently, we have demonstrated ion extraction using a circular RFC under low and intermediate pressures. For the first time we demonstrated the ion extraction using an rf-carpet in high-pressure He gas. An efficiency of nearly 100% was obtained at 200 mbar He gas pressure for K+ ions.

  6. A gas circulation and purification system for gas-cell-based low-energy RI-beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Sonoda, T.; Wada, M.; Katayama, I.; Kojima, T. M.; Reponen, M.; Tsubota, T.

    2016-06-15

    A gas circulation and purification system was developed at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory that can be used for gas-cell-based low-energy RI-beam production. A high-flow-rate gas cell filled with one atmosphere of buffer gas (argon or helium) is used for the deceleration and thermalization of high-energy RI-beams. The exhausted buffer gas is efficiently collected using a compact dry pump and returned to the gas cell with a recovery efficiency of >97%. The buffer gas is efficiently purified using two gas purifiers as well as collision cleaning, which eliminates impurities in the gas. An impurity level of one part per billion is achieved with this method.

  7. A gas circulation and purification system for gas-cell-based low-energy RI-beam production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonoda, T.; Tsubota, T.; Wada, M.; Katayama, I.; Kojima, T. M.; Reponen, M.

    2016-06-01

    A gas circulation and purification system was developed at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory that can be used for gas-cell-based low-energy RI-beam production. A high-flow-rate gas cell filled with one atmosphere of buffer gas (argon or helium) is used for the deceleration and thermalization of high-energy RI-beams. The exhausted buffer gas is efficiently collected using a compact dry pump and returned to the gas cell with a recovery efficiency of >97%. The buffer gas is efficiently purified using two gas purifiers as well as collision cleaning, which eliminates impurities in the gas. An impurity level of one part per billion is achieved with this method.

  8. Parasitic production of slow RI-beam from a projectile fragment separator by ion guide Laser Ion Source (PALIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonoda, Tetsu

    2009-10-01

    The projectile fragment separator BigRIPS of RIBF at RIKEN provides a wide variety of short-lived radioactive isotope (RI) ions without restrictions on their lifetime or chemical properties. A universal slow RI-beam facility (SLOWRI) to decelerate the beams from BigRIPS using an RF-carpet ion guide has been proposed as a principal facility of RIBF. However, beam time at such a modern accelerator facility is always limited and operational costs are high. We therefore propose an additional scheme as a complementary option to SLOWRI to drastically enhance the usability of such an expensive facility. In BigRIPS, a single primary beam produces thousands of isotopes but only one isotope is used for an experiment while the other >99.99% of isotopes are simply dumped in the slits or elsewhere in the fragment separator. We plan to locate a compact gas cell with 1 bar Ar at the slits. The thermalized ions in the cell will be quickly neutralized and transported to the exit by gas flow and resonantly re-ionized by lasers. Such low energy RI-beams will always be provided without any restriction to the main experiment. It will allow us to run parasitic experiments for precision atomic or decay spectroscopy, mass measurements. Furthermore, the resonance ionization in the cell itself can be used for high-sensitive laser spectroscopy, which will expand our knowledge of the ground state property of unstable nuclei.

  9. Low-energy RI beam technology and nuclear clusters in the explosive pp-chain breakout process

    SciTech Connect

    Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D. M.; Ohshiro, Y.; Watanabe, S.; Yamazaki, N.; Teranishi, T.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kase, M.; Hayakawa, S.; Kwon, Y. K.; Hashimoto, T.; Fukuda, Y.; He, J. J.; Goto, A.; Muto, H.

    2014-05-09

    The lecture includes two parts: One is a discussion on the technology for developing RIB beam facility based on the in-flight method and relevant experimental technology. The second part is a discussion on experimental efforts for studying the breakout process from the pp-chain region based on recent works with low energy RI beams. The discussion of the second part specifically covers the problem of the vp-process in type II supernovae in terms of alpha cluster nature for the reactions.

  10. SIM.RI(I)-K3 comparison of calibration coefficients at radiotherapy level for orthovoltage x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, M.; McCaffrey, J.; Shen, H.; Saraví, M.; Stefanic, A.; Montaño Ortiz, G.; Carlos, M.; da Silva, C.; Álvarez, J.; Tovar, V.

    2015-01-01

    Air-kerma calibration coefficients were compared at the radiotherapy level for orthovoltage x ray beams in the SIM.RI(I)-K3 comparison for members of the Sistema Interamericano de Metrología (SIM). Five SIM laboratories participated in the comparison: NIST, NRC, ININ, CNEA and LNMRI, the NIST being the pilot laboratory. Results from the comparison are linked to the BIPM.RI(I)-K3 key comparison reference value through the NIST-BIPM comparison made in 2003 and will meet requirements of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA) to support several CMCs (calibration and measurement capability claims) of the participants. The comparison began in October of 2007 and the measurements were completed in September 2008. The results reveal the degree to which the participating calibration facility can demonstrate proficiency in transferring air-kerma calibrations under the conditions of the said facility at the time of the measurements. The evaluation of the degrees of equivalence was performed as described in the comparison protocol. The comparison of the calibration coefficients for the four chambers is based on the average ratios of the calibration coefficients measured at the NIST and at each participating laboratory. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  11. Status of Beam Line Detectors for the BigRIPS Fragment Separator at RIKEN RI Beam Factory: Issues on High Rates and Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuki; Fukuda, Naoki; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Kameda, Daisuke; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Yohei; Ahn, DeukSoon; Murai, Daichi; Inabe, Naohito; Shimaoka, Takehiro; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Shikata, Shinichi; Kumagai, Hidekazu; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Sato, Hiromi; Yoshida, Koichi; Kubo, Toshiyuki

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) and parallel-plate avalanche counters (PPACs) were installed within the superconducting in-flight separator, named BigRIPS, at the RIKEN Nishina Center for particle identification of RI beams. The MUSIC detector showed negligible charge collection inefficiency from recombination of electrons and ions, up to a 99-kcps incidence rate for high-energy heavy ions. For the PPAC detectors, the electrical discharge durability for incident heavy ions was improved by changing the electrode material. Finally, we designed a single crystal diamond detector, which is under development for TOF measurements of high-energy heavy ions, that has a very fast response time (pulse width <1 ns).

  12. Mass Measurement with Rare-RI Rin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Akira

    2014-09-01

    Mass measurement with Rare-RI Ring in RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF) will be presented. The main purpose of Rare-RI Ring is to measure the mass for very neutron-rich nuclei, the production rate of which is very small (rare RI) and the life-time of which is predicted to be very short (less than 10 ms). In Rare-RI Ring, mass measurements will be performed based on isochronous mass spectrometry. There are two innovative apparatus in Rare-RI Ring: individual injection, which can realize the injection of 200 A MeV rare RI one-by-one, and a cyclotron-like storage ring, which allows high isochronous magnetic fields with large angular and momentum acceptances (~1%). By these apparatus, we will achieve a 10-6 mass resolution, and will be able to access rare RI, the production rate of which is down to 1 event/day/pnA in RIBF. Construction of Rare-RI Ring has started from the 2012 fiscal year. Construction of the storage ring itself was almost completed. In this fiscal year, we succeeded to store alphas from 241Am source and to check the production of isochronous fields in the storage ring. In this talk, present status of Rare-RI Ring and the possible mass measurement there will be presented.

  13. {sup 30}S({alpha}, p) in X-Ray Bursts at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.; Binh, D. N.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Ohshiro, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Chen, A. A.; Chen, J.; Setoodeh nia, K.; Kaji, D.; Nishimura, S.; Kim, A.; Lee, N. H.; Wakabayashi, Y.

    2010-08-12

    Over the past three years, we have worked on developing a well-characterized {sup 30}S radioactive beam to be used in a future experiment aiming to directly measure the {sup 30}S({alpha}, p) stellar reaction rate within the Gamow window of Type I X-ray bursts.

  14. Rare-RI ring for mass measurements at RIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Akira

    2014-05-02

    The rare-RI (radioactive isotope) ring at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory is described. The main purpose of the rare-RI ring is to measure the mass of short-lived rare RI. In the rare-RI ring, the mass is determined by measuring the revolution time of each nucleus based on isochronous mass spectrometry. The rare-RI ring consists of six magnetic sectors, and each sector consists of four dipole magnets. To precisely optimize the isochronous conditions of the circulating particles for large acceptance, we install 10 trim coils to half of the dipole magnets. Individual injection system enables efficient injection of the produced rare RI into the ring one by one. With facilitating efficient extraction of the circulating particles, time-of-flight measurements can be performed to the each rare RI. Construction of the rare-RI ring was begun in the middle of the fiscal year 2012, and the ring is expected to be fully functional by 2015, when we can start the mass measurements for unknown masses.

  15. Rare-RI ring for mass measurements at RIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Akira

    2014-05-01

    The rare-RI (radioactive isotope) ring at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory is described. The main purpose of the rare-RI ring is to measure the mass of short-lived rare RI. In the rare-RI ring, the mass is determined by measuring the revolution time of each nucleus based on isochronous mass spectrometry. The rare-RI ring consists of six magnetic sectors, and each sector consists of four dipole magnets. To precisely optimize the isochronous conditions of the circulating particles for large acceptance, we install 10 trim coils to half of the dipole magnets. Individual injection system enables efficient injection of the produced rare RI into the ring one by one. With facilitating efficient extraction of the circulating particles, time-of-flight measurements can be performed to the each rare RI. Construction of the rare-RI ring was begun in the middle of the fiscal year 2012, and the ring is expected to be fully functional by 2015, when we can start the mass measurements for unknown masses.

  16. Comparison of air kerma measurements for tungsten anode based mammography x-ray beam qualities (EURAMET.RI(I)-S4.1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csete, I.; Büermann, L.; Gomola, I.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of the air kerma standards for x-radiation qualities used in mammography was performed between the PTB and the IAEA. Two reference-class ionization chamber types Radcal RC6M and Magna A650 of the IAEA and tungsten anode based beam qualities with Mo and Al external filtrations (W+Mo, W+Al) established at both laboratories were selected for the comparison. The calibration coefficients, NK_air, were determined for the transfer chambers at the PTB in May 2015 and before and after this at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory. The results show good agreement, to be well within the 0.55 % standard uncertainty of the comparison. Correction factors to determine NK_air for these beam qualities based on calibration in RQR-M mammography beam qualities, established according to the IEC 61267 standard, were also calculated for the Radcal RC6M, 10X5-6M, and Magna A650 types of chambers. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  17. Assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Williamson, James R

    2005-11-01

    The assembly of ribosomes requires a significant fraction of the energy expenditure for rapidly growing bacteria. The ribosome is composed of three large RNA molecules and over 50 small proteins that must be rapidly and efficiently assembled into the molecular machine responsible for protein synthesis. For over 30 years, the 30S ribosome has been a key model system for understanding the process of ribosome biogenesis through in vitro assembly experiments. We have recently developed an isotope pulse-chase experiment using quantitative mass spectrometry that permits assembly kinetics to be measured in real time. Kinetic studies have revealed an assembly energy landscape that ensures efficient assembly by a flexible and robust pathway.

  18. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K6 of the standards for absorbed dose to water at 10 g cm-2 of the NMIJ, Japan and the BIPM in accelerator photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, S.; Burns, D. T.; Roger, P.; Shimizu, M.; Morishita, Y.; Kato, M.; Tanaka, T.; Kurosawa, T.; Saito, N.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of the dosimetry for accelerator photon beams was carried out between the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) and the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) from 9 to 23 April 2015. The comparison was based on the determination of absorbed dose to water at 10 g cm-2 for three radiation qualities at the NMIJ. The results, reported as ratios of the NMIJ and the BIPM evaluations (and with the combined standard uncertainties given in parentheses), are 0.9966 (47) at 6 MV, 0.9965 (60) at 10 MV and 0.9953 (50) at 15 MV. This result is the eighth in the on-going BIPM.RI(I)-K6 series of comparisons. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  19. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K6 of the standards for absorbed dose to water at 10 g cm-2 of the NPL, United Kingdom and the BIPM in accelerator photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, S.; Burns, D. T.; Roger, P.; Duane, S.; Bass, G. A.; Manning, J. W.; Shipley, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    A comparison of the dosimetry for accelerator photon beams was carried out between the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) from 23 September to 7 October 2014. The comparison was based on the determination of absorbed dose to water at 10 g cm-2 for three radiation qualities at the NPL. The results, reported as ratios of the NPL and the BIPM evaluations (and with the combined standard uncertainties given in parentheses), are 1.0000(62) at 6 MV, 0.9999(70) at 10 MV and 0.9993(80) at 25 MV. This result is the seventh in the on-going BIPM.RI(I)-K6 series of comparisons. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  20. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K6 of the standards for absorbed dose to water at 5 g cm-2 and 7 g cm-2 of the NPL, United Kingdom and the BIPM in accelerator photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, S.; Burns, D. T.; Roger, P.; Duane, S.; Bass, G. A.; Manning, J. W.; Shipley, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    A comparison of the dosimetry for accelerator photon beams was carried out between the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) in two periods from September to November 2013. The comparison was based on the determination of absorbed dose to water for three radiation qualities at the NPL. The results, reported as ratios of the NPL and the BIPM evaluations (and with the combined standard uncertainties given in parentheses), are 0.9973(62) at 6 MV, 0.9995(66) at 10 MV and 0.9957(81) at 25 MV. This result is the sixth in the on-going BIPM.RI(I)-K6 series of comparisons. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  1. Present status of Rare-RI Ring facility at RIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T Yamaguchithe Rare-RI Ring Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    A new storage ring facility called the Rare-RI Ring is currently under preparation at the RI Beam Factory (RIBF) in RIKEN. The storage ring is dedicated to the single-ion precision mass spectrometry of neutron-rich exotic nuclei. The masses are essential to elucidate the evolution of the nuclear shell structure far from the β stability and to determine the pathway of astrophysical nucleosynthesis. Such exotic nuclei are provided by the large-acceptance superconducting fragment separator, BigRIPS, at the RIBF accelerator complex. The experimental principle of the Rare-RI Ring mass measurements is based on isochronous mass spectrometry combined with the individual injection technique. This novel technique enables exotic species of interest to be produced randomly, in time to be sequentially stored in the storage ring. The Rare-RI Ring facility realizes the most efficient measurements for rare isotopes. An overview of the project is presented, along with its present status.

  2. Nuclear structure of 30S and its implications for nucleosynthesis in classical novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setoodehnia, K.; Chen, A. A.; Kahl, D.; Komatsubara, T.; José, J.; Longland, R.; Abe, Y.; Binh, D. N.; Chen, J.; Cherubini, S.; Clark, J. A.; Deibel, C. M.; Fukuoka, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, T.; Hendriks, J.; Ishibashi, Y.; Ito, Y.; Kubono, S.; Lennard, W. N.; Moriguchi, T.; Nagae, D.; Nishikiori, R.; Niwa, T.; Ozawa, A.; Parker, P. D.; Seiler, D.; Shizuma, T.; Suzuki, H.; Wrede, C.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yuasa, T.

    2013-06-01

    Background: The uncertainty in the 29P(p,γ)30S reaction rate over 0.1 ≤ T ≤ 1.3 GK was previously determined to span approximately four orders of magnitude due to the uncertain location of two previously unobserved 3+ and 2+ resonances in the Ex=4.7-4.8 MeV region in 30S. Therefore, the abundances of silicon isotopes synthesized in novae, which are relevant for the identification of presolar grains of putative nova origin, were uncertain by a factor of 3.Purpose: (a) To investigate the level structure of 30S above the proton threshold [4394.9(7) keV] via charged-particle spectroscopy using the 32S(p,t)30S reaction and in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy using the 28Si(3He, nγ)30S reaction to calculate the 29P(p,γ)30S reaction rate. (b) To explore the impact of this rate on the abundances of silicon isotopes synthesized in novae.Methods: Differential cross sections of the 32S(p,t)30S reaction were measured at 34.5 MeV. Distorted-wave Born approximation calculations were performed to constrain the spin-parity assignments of the observed levels, including the two astrophysically important levels. An energy-level scheme was deduced from γ-γ coincidence measurements using the 28Si(3He, nγ)30S reaction. Spin-parity assignments based on measurements of γ-ray angular distributions and γ-γ directional correlation from oriented nuclei were made for most of the observed levels of 30S.Results: The resonance energies corresponding to the states with 4.5 MeV ≲ Ex ≲ 6 MeV, including the two astrophysically important states predicted previously, are measured with significantly better precision than before. The spin-parity assignments of both astrophysically important resonances are confirmed. The uncertainty in the rate of the 29P(p,γ)30S reaction is substantially reduced over the temperature range of interest. Finally, the influence of this rate on the abundance ratios of silicon isotopes synthesized in novae are obtained via 1D hydrodynamic nova simulations

  3. 76 FR 50770 - Submission for Review: Financial Resources Questionnaire (RI 34-1, RI 34-17, and RI 34-18) and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

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  4. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Dao, E. Han; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; ...

    2015-04-30

    In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecondmore » X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.« less

  5. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dao, E. Han; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Lemke, Henrik T.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Coey, Aaron; Larsen, Kevin; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; DeMirci, Hasan

    2015-04-30

    In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecond X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.

  6. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals.

    PubMed

    Dao, E Han; Sierra, Raymond G; Laksmono, Hartawan; Lemke, Henrik T; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Coey, Aaron; Larsen, Kevin; Baxter, Elizabeth L; Cohen, Aina E; Soltis, S Michael; DeMirci, Hasan

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecond X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.

  7. 30S(α , p) Thermonuclear Reaction Rate from Experimental Level Structure of 34Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, D.; Chen, A. A.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Binh, D. N.; Chen, J.; Cherubini, S.; Duy, N. N.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Iwasa, N.; Jung, H. S.; Kato, S.; Kwon, Y. K.; Nishimura, S.; Ota, S.; Setoodehnia, K.; Teranishi, T.; Tokieda, H.; Yamada, T.; Yun, C. C.; Zhang, L. Y.

    Type I X-ray bursts are the most frequent thermonuclear explosions in the galaxy. Owing to their recurrence from known astronomical objects, burst morphology is extensively documented, and they are modeled very successfully as neutron-deficient, thermonuclear runaway on the surface of accreting neutron stars. While reaction networks include hundreds of isotopes and thousands of nuclear processes, only a small subset appear to play a pivotal role. One such reaction is the 30S(α , p) reaction, which is believed to be a crucial link in the explosive helium burning which is responsible for the large energy flux. However, very little experimental information is available concerning the cross section itself, nor the 34Ar compound nucleus at the relevant energies. We performed the first study of the entrance channel via 30S alpha resonant elastic scattering using a state-of-the-art, low-energy, 30S radioactive ion beam. The measurement was performed in inverse kinematics using a newly-developed active target. An R-matrix analysis of the excitation function reveals previously unknown resonances, including their quantum properties of spin, parity, width, and energy.

  8. FAT: Fully Automated TiRiFiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamphuis, P.; Józsa, G. I. G.; Oh, S.-. H.; Spekkens, K.; Urbancic, N.; Serra, P.; Koribalski, B. S.; Dettmar, R.-J.

    2015-07-01

    FAT (Fully Automated TiRiFiC) is an automated procedure that fits tilted-ring models to Hi data cubes of individual, well-resolved galaxies. The method builds on the 3D Tilted Ring Fitting Code (TiRiFiC, ascl:1208.008). FAT accurately models the kinematics and the morphologies of galaxies with an extent of eight beams across the major axis in the inclination range 20°-90° without the need for priors such as disc inclination. FAT's performance allows us to model the gas kinematics of many thousands of well-resolved galaxies, which is essential for future HI surveys, with the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders.

  9. An assembly landscape for the 30S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Talkington, Megan W T; Siuzdak, Gary; Williamson, James R

    2005-12-01

    Self-assembling macromolecular machines drive fundamental cellular processes, including transcription, messenger RNA processing, translation, DNA replication and cellular transport. The ribosome, which carries out protein synthesis, is one such machine, and the 30S subunit of the bacterial ribosome is the preeminent model system for biophysical analysis of large RNA-protein complexes. Our understanding of 30S assembly is incomplete, owing to the challenges of monitoring the association of many components simultaneously. Here we have developed a method involving pulse-chase monitored by quantitative mass spectrometry (PC/QMS) to follow the assembly of the 20 ribosomal proteins with 16S ribosomal RNA during formation of the functional particle. These data represent a detailed and quantitative kinetic characterization of the assembly of a large multicomponent macromolecular complex. By measuring the protein binding rates at a range of temperatures, we find that local transformations throughout the assembling subunit have similar but distinct activation energies. Thus, the prevailing view of 30S assembly as a pathway proceeding through a global rate-limiting conformational change must give way to one in which the assembly of the complex traverses a landscape dotted with various local conformational transitions.

  10. An assembly landscape for the 30S ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    Talkington, Megan W. T.; Siuzdak, Gary

    2005-01-01

    Self-assembling macromolecular machines drive fundamental cellular processes, including transcription, mRNA processing, translation, DNA replication, and cellular transport. The ribosome, which carries out protein synthesis, is one such machine, and the 30S subunit of the bacterial ribosome is the preeminent model system for biophysical analysis of large RNA-protein complexes. Our understanding of 30S assembly is incomplete, due to the challenges of monitoring the association of many components simultaneously. We have developed a new method involving pulse-chase monitored by quantitative mass spectrometry (PC/QMS) to follow the assembly of the 20 ribosomal proteins with 16S rRNA during formation of the functional particle. These data represent the first detailed and quantitative kinetic characterization of the assembly of a large multicomponent macromolecular complex. By measuring the protein binding rates at a range of temperatures, we have found that local transformations throughout the assembling subunit have similar but distinct activation energies. This observation shows that the prevailing view of 30S assembly as a pathway proceeding through a global rate-limiting conformational change must give way to a view in which the assembly of the complex traverses a landscape dotted with a variety of local conformational transitions. PMID:16319883

  11. Molecular mechanics of 30S subunit head rotation

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Srividya; Donohue, John Paul; Noller, Harry F.

    2014-01-01

    During ribosomal translocation, a process central to the elongation phase of protein synthesis, movement of mRNA and tRNAs requires large-scale rotation of the head domain of the small (30S) subunit of the ribosome. It has generally been accepted that the head rotates by pivoting around the neck helix (h28) of 16S rRNA, its sole covalent connection to the body domain. Surprisingly, we observe that the calculated axis of rotation does not coincide with the neck. Instead, comparative structure analysis across 55 ribosome structures shows that 30S head movement results from flexing at two hinge points lying within conserved elements of 16S rRNA. Hinge 1, although located within the neck, moves by straightening of the kinked helix h28 at the point of contact with the mRNA. Hinge 2 lies within a three-way helix junction that extends to the body through a second, noncovalent connection; its movement results from flexing between helices h34 and h35 in a plane orthogonal to the movement of hinge 1. Concerted movement at these two hinges accounts for the observed magnitudes of head rotation. Our findings also explain the mode of action of spectinomycin, an antibiotic that blocks translocation by binding to hinge 2. PMID:25187561

  12. Overview of the activities at the low-energy beam separator CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Yang, L.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Abe, K.; Shimizu, H.; CRIB Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    CRIB (CNS Radio-Isotope Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator of Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. Studies on nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, and other interests have been performed using the RI beams at CRIB, forming international collaborations. Measurements of proton and α resonant scatterings have been performed at CRIB for many nuclides using RI beams. Projects to study astrophysical reactions with direct and indirect methods are also in progress.

  13. RI 1170 advanced strapdown gyro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The major components of the RI 1170 gyroscope are described. A detailed functional description of the electronics including block diagrams and photographs of output waveshapes within the loop electronics are presented. An electronic data flow diagram is included. Those gyro subassemblies that were originally planned and subsequently changed or modified for one reason or another are discussed in detail. Variations to the original design included the capacitive pickoffs, torquer flexleads, magnetic suspension, gas bearings, electronic design, and packaging. The selection of components and changes from the original design and components selected are discussed. Device failures experienced throughout the program are reported and design corrections to eliminate the failure modes are noted. Major design deficiencies such as those of the MSE electronics are described in detail. Modifications made to the gas bearing parts and design improvements to the wheel are noted. Changes to the gas bearing prints are included as well as a mathematical analysis of the 1170 gas bearing wheel by computer analysis. The mean free-path effects on gas bearing performance is summarized.

  14. In vivo X-ray footprinting of pre-30S ribosomes reveals chaperone-dependent remodeling of late assembly intermediates.

    PubMed

    Clatterbuck Soper, Sarah F; Dator, Romel P; Limbach, Patrick A; Woodson, Sarah A

    2013-11-21

    Assembly of 30S ribosomal subunits from their protein and RNA components requires extensive refolding of the 16S rRNA and is assisted by 10-20 assembly factors in bacteria. We probed the structures of 30S assembly intermediates in E. coli cells, using a synchrotron X-ray beam to generate hydroxyl radical in the cytoplasm. Widespread differences between mature and pre-30S complexes in the absence of assembly factors RbfA and RimM revealed global reorganization of RNA-protein interactions prior to maturation of the 16S rRNA and showed how RimM reduces misfolding of the 16S 3' domain during transcription in vivo. Quantitative (14)N/(15)N mass spectrometry of affinity-purified pre-30S complexes confirmed the absence of tertiary assembly proteins and showed that N-terminal acetylation of proteins S18 and S5 correlates with correct folding of the platform and central pseudoknot. Our results indicate that cellular factors delay specific RNA folding steps to ensure the quality of assembly. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... health and development? More about Mutations and Health Inheritance Pattern Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis has a pseudoautosomal dominant pattern ... of the SHOX gene in each cell. The inheritance pattern of Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis is described as dominant ...

  16. 34. Boston switch interlocking tower. Central Falls, Providence Co., RI. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Boston switch interlocking tower. Central Falls, Providence Co., RI. Sec. 4116, mp 190.40. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between CT & MA state lines, Providence, Providence County, RI

  17. Real-time assembly landscape of bacterial 30S translation initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Milón, Pohl; Maracci, Cristina; Filonava, Liudmila; Gualerzi, Claudio O; Rodnina, Marina V

    2012-05-06

    Initiation factors guide the ribosome in the selection of mRNA and translational reading frame. We determined the kinetically favored assembly pathway of the 30S preinitiation complex (30S PIC), an early intermediate in 30S initiation complex formation in Escherichia coli. IF3 and IF2 are the first factors to arrive, forming an unstable 30S-IF2-IF3 complex. Subsequently, IF1 joins and locks the factors in a kinetically stable 30S PIC to which fMet-tRNA(fMet) is recruited. Binding of mRNA is independent of initiation factors and can take place at any time during 30S PIC assembly, depending on the cellular concentration of the mRNA and the structural determinants at the ribosome-binding site. The kinetic analysis shows both specific and cumulative effects of initiation factors as well as kinetic checkpoints of mRNA selection at the entry into translation.

  18. 77 FR 33007 - Submission for Review: Rollover Election (RI 38-117), Rollover Information (RI 38-118), and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Rollover Election (RI 38-117), Rollover Information (RI 38-118), and... change, of a currently approved collection information request (ICR) 3206-0212, Rollover Election (RI 38... other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses....

  19. 77 FR 66187 - Submission for Review: Rollover Election (RI 38-117), Rollover Information (RI 38-118), and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-02

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Rollover Election (RI 38-117), Rollover Information (RI 38-118), and... change, of a currently approved information collection request (ICR) 3206-0212, Rollover Election (RI 38... information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses. DATES: Comments are...

  20. Insights into structure and function of 30S Ribosomal Protein S2 (30S2) in Chlamydophila pneumoniae: A potent target of pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Koteswara Reddy, G; Nagamalleswara Rao, K; Yarrakula, Kiran

    2017-02-01

    The gene 30S ribosomal protein S2 (30S2) is identified as a potential drug and vaccine target for Pneumonia. Its structural characterization is an important to understand the mechanism of action for identifying its receptor and/or other binding partners. The comparative genomics and proteomics studies are useful for structural characterization of 30S2 in C. Pneumoniae using different bioinformatics tools and web servers. In this study, the protein 30S2 structure was modelled and validated by Ramachandran plot. It is found that the modelled protein under most favoured "core" region was 88.7% and overall G-factor statistics with average score was -0.20. However, seven sequential motifs have been identified for 30S2 with reference codes (PR0095, PF0038, TIGR01012, PTHR11489, SSF52313 and PTHR11489). In addition, seven structural highly conserved residues have been identified in the large cleft are Lys160, Gly161and Arg162 with volume 1288.83Å(3) and average depth of the cleft was 10.75Å. Moreover, biological functions, biochemical process and structural constituents of ribosome are also explored. The study will be helped us to understand the sequential, structural, functional and evolutionary clues of unknown proteins available in C. Pneumoniae.

  1. Streamlining the RI/FS process

    SciTech Connect

    Dumas, L.; Doss, R.C.

    1998-07-01

    In 1994, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) contracted with CH2M HILL to manage remedial investigations and feasibility studies (RI/FS) at its former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites in Chico, Willows, and Marysville, California. These three sites had similar histories, MGP-related contaminants, similar geologic settings, and geographically were close together. Recognizing the advantages that may be gained, both in time and money, by streamlining the RI/FS process, PG and E and CH2M HILL combined the sites into one project. From the start of the project, PG and E and CH2M HILL looked for an implemented changes to the RI/FS process to streamline the project. These changes included combining deliverables, linking field programs at the three sites, and negotiating bulk discounts on laboratory and other services by combining the work to be done at the three sites under one contract. CH2M HILL later proposed additional measures to streamline the project that were eventually adopted by both PG and E and the regulatory agencies. PG and E and CH2M HILL are currently working with the regulatory agencies to negotiate realistic measures to address contaminants in soil and groundwater, and are jointly preparing the FS with the regulatory agencies using a unique means of documentation.

  2. Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with Fast Heavy-Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motobayashi, Tohru

    Collaboration between France and Japan on studies with fast RI (radioactive isotope) beams and related technical developments started in 1980s, when the GANIL accelerators and RIKEN cyclotron complex started operation and RI beam production technique was developed. Several examples of collaboration on nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics experiments including related technical development are discussed.

  3. Outreach and Education with Europlanet 2020 RI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heward, Anita R.; Barrosa, Mariana; Europlanet 2020 RI

    2016-10-01

    Since 2005, Europlanet has provided a framework to bring together Europe's widespread planetary science community. The project has evolved through a number of phases, and currently comprises a Research Infrastructure (RI) funded through the European Commission's Horizon 2020 program, as well as a self-sustaining membership organization. Launched in September 2015, Europlanet 2020 RI provides support, services, access to facilities, new research tools and a virtual planetary observatory. Europlanet 2020 RI's outreach and education program aims to engage members of the public, schools, teachers, policy makers and industrial partners across Europe with planetary science and the opportunities that it provides for innovation, inspiration and job creation. Europlanet's outreach and education activities are led by Science Office Ltd, a Portuguese-based SME, and a network of partners spread across nine countries including University College London, the University of Leiden, University of Latvia, Vilnius University, the Institute of Accelerating Systems and Applications, the Observatoire de Paris, CAB-INTA and the Austrian Space Forum.Europlanet supports educators and outreach providers within the planetary science community by organizing meetings, best practice workshops and communication training sessions, offering a seed-funding scheme for outreach activities, and awarding an annual prize for public engagement. Europlanet is also developing its own education and outreach resources, including an animation on 'Jupiter and its Icy Moons' (the first in a series of video "shorts") and kits for hands-on comparative planetology activities. The Europlanet Media Centre uses traditional and social media channels to communicate newsworthy results and activities to diverse audiences in Europe and worldwide. Using tools like Google Hangouts, the project connects planetary researchers directly with the public and school groups. In addition, Europlanet engages with policy makers in the

  4. Radio Meteors Observations Techniques at RI NAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, Vasyl; Kaliuzhnyi, Mykola

    2016-07-01

    The Solar system is inhabited with large number of celestial bodies. Some of them are well studied, such as planets and vast majority of big asteroids and comets. There is one group of objects which has received little attention. That is meteoroids with related to them meteors. Nowadays enough low-technology high-efficiency radio-technical solutions are appeared which allow to observe meteors daily. At RI NAO three methodologies for meteor observation are developed: single-station method using FM-receiver, correlation method using FM-receiver and Internet resources, and single-station method using low-cost SDR-receiver.

  5. Evaluation of the Hanford RI/FS cost projections

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The US Department of Energy-Richland Operations (DOE-RL) tasked the Environmental Management Operations (EMO) to review the cost estimates and implementation process for the Hanford Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Program as defined by the Hanford RCRA/CERLA Past Practices Cost Models. The purpose of the review was to determine if there were opportunities to reduce the RI/FS costs at Hanford, with a focus on the approach being taken at Hanford to implement and complete the RI/FS process. This volume contains 4 appendices for the evaluation of the Hanford RI/FS Cost Projections.

  6. 33 CFR 80.150 - Block Island, RI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Block Island, RI. 80.150 Section... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.150 Block Island, RI. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on the harbors of Block Island. ...

  7. 33 CFR 80.150 - Block Island, RI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Block Island, RI. 80.150 Section... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.150 Block Island, RI. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on the harbors of Block Island. ...

  8. 33 CFR 80.150 - Block Island, RI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Block Island, RI. 80.150 Section... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.150 Block Island, RI. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on the harbors of Block Island. ...

  9. 33 CFR 80.150 - Block Island, RI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Block Island, RI. 80.150 Section... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.150 Block Island, RI. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on the harbors of Block Island. ...

  10. 33 CFR 80.150 - Block Island, RI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Block Island, RI. 80.150 Section... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.150 Block Island, RI. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on the harbors of Block Island. ...

  11. Rescue of endogenous 30S retroviral sequences from mouse cells by baboon type C virus.

    PubMed Central

    Sherwin, S A; Rapp, U R; Benveniste, R E; Sen, A; Todaro, G J

    1978-01-01

    Mus musculus SC-1 cells were infected with M7 baboon type C virus. The progeny of this infection included viral pseudotypes that contained M7 helper virus and endogenous 30S retrovirus-associated sequences derived from SC-1 cells (RAS). The RAS sequences are unrelated by nucleic acid hybridization criteria to previously described types of murine retroviruses and do not code for known murine viral structural proteins. The RAS genome is present in multiple copies in the DNA of laboratory (M. musculus) and Asian (M. caroli and M. cervicolor) mice, is expressed in the RNA of uninfected mouse cells, and can be efficiently rescued by type C, but not type B, viruses. RAS is closely related to 30S virus-associated RNA in NIH/3T3 and BALB/c JLSV-9 cells and may be analogous to the defective 30S RNA sequences found in rats. PMID:207887

  12. The effect of ribosome assembly cofactors on in vitro 30S subunit reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Bunner, Anne E; Nord, Stefan; Wikström, P Mikael; Williamson, James R

    2010-04-23

    Ribosome biogenesis is facilitated by a growing list of assembly cofactors, including helicases, GTPases, chaperones, and other proteins, but the specific functions of many of these assembly cofactors are still unclear. The effect of three assembly cofactors on 30S ribosome assembly was determined in vitro using a previously developed mass-spectrometry-based method that monitors the rRNA binding kinetics of ribosomal proteins. The essential GTPase Era caused several late-binding proteins to bind rRNA faster when included in a 30S reconstitution. RimP enabled faster binding of S9 and S19 and inhibited the binding of S12 and S13, perhaps by blocking those proteins' binding sites. RimM caused proteins S5 and S12 to bind dramatically faster. These quantitative kinetic data provide important clues about the roles of these assembly cofactors in the mechanism of 30S biogenesis. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of Three New Glutaredoxin Genes in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Rhizophagus irregularis: Putative Role of RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 in Iron Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Elisabeth; Benabdellah, Karim; Ferrol, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Glutaredoxins (GRXs) are small ubiquitous oxidoreductases involved in the regulation of the redox state in living cells. In an attempt to identify the full complement of GRXs in the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis, three additional GRX homologs, besides the formerly characterized GintGRX1 (renamed here as RiGRX1), were identified. The three new GRXs (RiGRX4, RiGRX5 and RiGRX6) contain the CXXS domain of monothiol GRXs, but whereas RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 belong to class II GRXs, RiGRX6 belongs to class I together with RiGRX1. By using a yeast expression system, we observed that the newly identified homologs partially reverted sensitivity of the GRX deletion yeast strains to external oxidants. Furthermore, our results indicated that RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 play a role in iron homeostasis in yeast. Gene expression analyses revealed that RiGRX1 and RiGRX6 were more highly expressed in the intraradical (IRM) than in the extraradical mycelium (ERM). Exposure of the ERM to hydrogen peroxide induced up-regulation of RiGRX1, RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 gene expression. RiGRX4 expression was also up-regulated in the ERM when the fungus was grown in media supplemented with a high iron concentration. These data indicate the two monothiol class II GRXs, RiGRX4 and RiGRX5, might be involved in oxidative stress protection and in the regulation of fungal iron homeostasis. Increased expression of RiGRX1 and RiGRX6 in the IRM suggests that these GRXs should play a key role in oxidative stress protection of R. irregularis during its in planta phase.

  14. Characterization of Three New Glutaredoxin Genes in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Rhizophagus irregularis: Putative Role of RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 in Iron Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Tamayo, Elisabeth; Benabdellah, Karim; Ferrol, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Glutaredoxins (GRXs) are small ubiquitous oxidoreductases involved in the regulation of the redox state in living cells. In an attempt to identify the full complement of GRXs in the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis, three additional GRX homologs, besides the formerly characterized GintGRX1 (renamed here as RiGRX1), were identified. The three new GRXs (RiGRX4, RiGRX5 and RiGRX6) contain the CXXS domain of monothiol GRXs, but whereas RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 belong to class II GRXs, RiGRX6 belongs to class I together with RiGRX1. By using a yeast expression system, we observed that the newly identified homologs partially reverted sensitivity of the GRX deletion yeast strains to external oxidants. Furthermore, our results indicated that RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 play a role in iron homeostasis in yeast. Gene expression analyses revealed that RiGRX1 and RiGRX6 were more highly expressed in the intraradical (IRM) than in the extraradical mycelium (ERM). Exposure of the ERM to hydrogen peroxide induced up-regulation of RiGRX1, RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 gene expression. RiGRX4 expression was also up-regulated in the ERM when the fungus was grown in media supplemented with a high iron concentration. These data indicate the two monothiol class II GRXs, RiGRX4 and RiGRX5, might be involved in oxidative stress protection and in the regulation of fungal iron homeostasis. Increased expression of RiGRX1 and RiGRX6 in the IRM suggests that these GRXs should play a key role in oxidative stress protection of R. irregularis during its in planta phase. PMID:26900849

  15. Relationship between anaerobic capacity estimated using a single effort and 30-s tethered running outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Miyagi, Willian Eiji; Sousa, Filipe Antônio de Barros; Gobatto, Claudio Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the relationship between alternative anaerobic capacity method (MAODALT) and a 30-s all-out tethered running test. Fourteen male recreational endurance runners underwent a graded exercise test, a supramaximal exhaustive effort and a 30-s all-out test on different days, interspaced by 48h. After verification of data normality (Shapiro-Wilk test), the Pearson’s correlation test was used to verify the association between the anaerobic estimates from the MAODALT and the 30-s all-out tethered running outputs. Absolute MAODALT was correlated with mean power (r = 0.58; P = 0.03), total work (r = 0.57; P = 0.03), and mean force (r = 0.79; P = 0.001). In addition, energy from the glycolytic pathway (E[La-]) was correlated with mean power (r = 0.58; P = 0.03). Significant correlations were also found at each 5s interval between absolute MAODALT and force values (r between 0.75 and 0.84), and between force values and E[La-] (r between 0.73 to 0.80). In conclusion, the associations between absolute MAODALT and the mechanical outputs from the 30-s all-out tethered running test evidenced the importance of the anaerobic capacity for maintaining force during the course of time in short efforts. PMID:28182775

  16. Narragansett, RI Lab--Office of Research and Development

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA-ORD laboratory in Narragansett, RI is a recognized leader in scientific knowledge and expertise concerning the ecology of oceans, estuaries, and water-sheds, and the effects of human activities on that ecology.

  17. 75 FR 19666 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00007

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ... Island Disaster RI-00007 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice... Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated 04/08/2010. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding. Incident Period: 03/12...

  18. RadNet Air Data From Providence, RI

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Providence, RI from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  19. Development of An Ion Beam Cooler and Buncher for the SCRIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togasaki, Mamoru; Enokizono, Akitomo; Kurita, Kazuyoshi; Matsuo, Saki; Hara, Masahiro; Hori, Toshitada; Ichikawa, Shin'ichi; Ohnishi, Tetsuya; Wakasugi, Masanori; Haraguchi, Yuji; Suda, Toshimi; Tamae, Tadaaki; Tsukada, Kyo; Tsuru, Teruaki; Yoneyama, Shunpei; Wang, Shuo

    2014-09-01

    The SCRIT (Self-Confining RI Ion Target) is an internal target forming technique for electron scattering off short lived unstable nuclei. In the SCRIT electron scattering facility at RIKEN RI Beam Factory, we constructed an ISOL-type RI beam generator named ERIS (Electron-beam-driven RI separator for SCRIT). ERIS supplys continuous RI ion beam with the energy of 50 keV at maximum. In order to efficiently inject the RI beam into SCRIT, it is necessary to provide a pulsed beam. Therefore, we are developing a cooler buncher system. The principle of this device is based on a linear radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) trap. Required performance for the device is to convert 1-s continuous beam into 500- μs pulsed beam with high efficiency. Experiment for the performance study is now going on using the stable 133Cs and 23Na ions. In this talk, we will report the latest status of the development and the study of the cooler buncher.

  20. Visualizing ribosome biogenesis: parallel assembly pathways for the 30S subunit.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Anke M; Yoshioka, Craig; Beck, Andrea H; Bunner, Anne E; Milligan, Ronald A; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Williamson, James R

    2010-10-29

    Ribosomes are self-assembling macromolecular machines that translate DNA into proteins, and an understanding of ribosome biogenesis is central to cellular physiology. Previous studies on the Escherichia coli 30S subunit suggest that ribosome assembly occurs via multiple parallel pathways rather than through a single rate-limiting step, but little mechanistic information is known about this process. Discovery single-particle profiling (DSP), an application of time-resolved electron microscopy, was used to obtain more than 1 million snapshots of assembling 30S subunits, identify and visualize the structures of 14 assembly intermediates, and monitor the population flux of these intermediates over time. DSP results were integrated with mass spectrometry data to construct the first ribosome-assembly mechanism that incorporates binding dependencies, rate constants, and structural characterization of populated intermediates.

  1. Recognition of Cognate Transfer RNA by the 30S Ribosomal Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Ogle, James M.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; Clemons, William M.; Tarry, Michael J.; Carter, Andrew P.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2009-10-07

    Crystal structures of the 30S ribosomal subunit in complex with messenger RNA and cognate transfer RNA in the A site, both in the presence and absence of the antibiotic paromomycin, have been solved at between 3.1 and 3.3 angstroms resolution. Cognate transfer RNA (tRNA) binding induces global domain movements of the 30S subunit and changes in the conformation of the universally conserved and essential bases A1492, A1493, and G530 of 16S RNA. These bases interact intimately with the minor groove of the first two base pairs between the codon and anticodon, thus sensing Watson-Crick base-pairing geometry and discriminating against near-cognate tRNA. The third, or 'wobble,' position of the codon is free to accommodate certain noncanonical base pairs. By partially inducing these structural changes, paromomycin facilitates binding of near-cognate tRNAs.

  2. Neutron scattering and the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, P.B.; Engelman, D.M.; Langer, J.A.; Ramakrishnan, V.R.; Schindler, D.G.; Schoenborn, B.P.; Sillers, I.Y.; Yabuki, S.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the progress made in the study of the internal organization of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli by neutron scattering since 1975. A map of that particle showing the position of 14 of the subunit's 21 proteins is presented, and the methods currently used for collecting and analyzing such data are discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of extending the interpretation of neutron mapping data beyond the limits practical today. 30 references, 5 figures.

  3. Growth, Persistence, and Desistance of Alcohol Use for At-Risk Men in Their 30s.

    PubMed

    Capaldi, Deborah M; Tiberio, Stacey S; Washburn, Isaac J; Yoerger, Karen; Feingold, Alan

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about heterogeneity in men's drinking behaviors and their related consequences across mid-adulthood, and moreover, whether individual or social factors may predict such differences. This study examined 3 indicators of alcohol use, namely alcohol volume, heavy episodic drinking (HED), and drinking-related problems for men in their 30s. Participants were 197 at-risk men from the Oregon Youth Study assessed 5 times across ages 29 to 38 years. Growth mixture modeling with count outcomes was used to examine unobserved heterogeneity in alcohol trajectories. Associations of latent classes of alcohol users with (i) classes for the other alcohol indicators, (ii) alcohol use by peers and romantic partners, (iii) alcohol classes previously extracted from ages 18 to 29 years, and (iv) past year alcohol use disorder (AUD) diagnostic status at ages 35 to 36 years were examined. A 3-class solution afforded the best fit for each alcohol indicator. Alcohol problems were relatively established in the 30s, with an ascending use class found only for volume. Although relatively few men were in higher classes for all 3 indicators, 45% of the sample was in the highest class on at least 2 indicators of use. Peer drunkenness was a robust predictor of the alcohol classes. Concordance among classes of alcohol users was seen from the 20s to the 30s, with prior desistance likely to be maintained for alcohol volume and HED. AUD diagnoses at ages 35 to 36 years were more common in the higher classes obtained for alcohol volume and alcohol problems. Many men in their 30s engaged in a high volume of alcohol use without frequent engagement in HED, likely relating to continuing alcohol problems. The convergence of men's alcohol use with that of their peers found at younger ages was maintained into early mid-adulthood. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  4. Neutron Scattering and the 30 S Ribosomal Subunit of E. Coli

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Moore, P. B.; Engelman, D. M.; Langer, J. A.; Ramakrishnan, V. R.; Schindler, D. G.; Schoenborn, B. P.; Sillers, I. Y.; Yabuki, S.

    1982-06-01

    This paper reviews the progress made in the study of the internal organization of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli by neutron scattering since 1975. A map of that particle showing the position of 14 of the subunit's 21 proteins is presented, and the methods currently used for collecting and analyzing such data are discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of extending the interpretation of neutron mapping data beyond the limits practical today.

  5. Growth, Persistence, and Desistance of Alcohol Use for At-Risk Men in Their 30s

    PubMed Central

    Capaldi, Deborah M.; Tiberio, Stacey S.; Washburn, Isaac J.; Yoerger, Karen; Feingold, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about heterogeneity in men's drinking behaviors and their related consequences across midadulthood, and moreover, whether individual or social factors may predict such differences. The present study examined 3 indicators of alcohol use; namely, alcohol volume, heavy episodic drinking (HED), and drinking-related problems for men in their 30s. Methods Participants were 197 at-risk men from the Oregon Youth Study assessed 5 times across ages 29–38 years. Growth mixture modeling with count outcomes was used to examine unobserved heterogeneity in alcohol trajectories. Associations of latent classes of alcohol users with (i) classes for the other alcohol indicators, (ii) alcohol use by peers and romantic partners, (iii) alcohol classes previously extracted from ages 18–29 years, and (iv) past year alcohol use disorder (AUD) diagnostic status at ages 35–36 years was examined. Results A 3-class solution afforded the best fit for each alcohol indicator. Alcohol problems were relatively established in the 30s, with an ascending use class found only for volume. Although relatively few men were in higher classes for all 3 indicators, 45% of the sample was in the highest class on at least 2 indicators of use. Peer drunkenness was a robust predictor of the alcohol classes. Concordance among classes of alcohol users was seen from the 20s to the 30s, with prior desistance likely to be maintained for alcohol volume and HED. AUD diagnoses at ages 35–36 years were more common in the higher classes obtained for alcohol volume and alcohol problems. Conclusions Many men in their 30s engaged in high volume of alcohol without frequent engagement in HED, likely relating to continuing alcohol problems. The convergence of men's alcohol use with that of their peers found at younger ages was maintained into early midadulthood. PMID:26010338

  6. Differential assembly of 16S rRNA domains during 30S subunit formation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhili; Culver, Gloria M

    2010-10-01

    Rapid and accurate assembly of the ribosomal subunits, which are responsible for protein synthesis, is required to sustain cell growth. Our best understanding of the interaction of 30S ribosomal subunit components (16S ribosomal RNA [rRNA] and 20 ribosomal proteins [r-proteins]) comes from in vitro work using Escherichia coli ribosomal components. However, detailed information regarding the essential elements involved in the assembly of 30S subunits still remains elusive. Here, we defined a set of rRNA nucleotides that are critical for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit in E. coli. Using an RNA modification interference approach, we identified 54 nucleotides in 16S rRNA whose modification prevents the formation of a functional small ribosomal subunit. The majority of these nucleotides are located in the head and interdomain junction of the 30S subunit, suggesting that these regions are critical for small subunit assembly. In vivo analysis of specific identified sites, using engineered mutations in 16S rRNA, revealed defective protein synthesis capability, aberrant polysome profiles, and abnormal 16S rRNA processing, indicating the importance of these residues in vivo. These studies reveal that specific segments of 16S rRNA are more critical for small subunit assembly than others, and suggest a hierarchy of importance.

  7. Concurrent Nucleation of 16S Folding and Induced Fit in 30S Ribosome Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Adilakshmi, T.; Bellur, D; Woodson, S

    2008-01-01

    Rapidly growing cells produce thousands of new ribosomes each minute, in a tightly regulated process that is essential to cell growth. How the Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA and the 20 proteins that make up the 30S ribosomal subunit can assemble correctly in a few minutes remains a challenging problem, partly because of the lack of real-time data on the earliest stages of assembly. By providing snapshots of individual RNA and protein interactions as they emerge in real time, here we show that 30S assembly nucleates concurrently from different points along the rRNA. Time-resolved hydroxyl radical footprinting3 was used to map changes in the structure of the rRNA within 20 milliseconds after the addition of total 30S proteins. Helical junctions in each domain fold within 100 ms. In contrast, interactions surrounding the decoding site and between the 5', the central and the 3' domains require 2-200 seconds to form. Unexpectedly, nucleotides contacted by the same protein are protected at different rates, indicating that initial RNA-protein encounter complexes refold during assembly. Although early steps in assembly are linked to intrinsically stable rRNA structure, later steps correspond to regions of induced fit between the proteins and the rRNA.

  8. Defining A-Kinase Anchoring Protein (AKAP) Specificity for the Protein Kinase A Subunit RI (PKA-RI).

    PubMed

    Autenrieth, Karolin; Bendzunas, N George; Bertinetti, Daniela; Herberg, Friedrich W; Kennedy, Eileen J

    2016-04-15

    A-Kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) act as spatial and temporal regulators of protein kinase A (PKA) by localizing PKA along with multiple proteins into discrete signaling complexes. AKAPs interact with the PKA holoenzyme through an α-helix that docks into a groove formed on the dimerization/docking domain of PKA-R in an isoform-dependent fashion. In an effort to understand isoform selectivity at the molecular level, a library of protein-protein interaction (PPI) disruptors was designed to systematically probe the significance of an aromatic residue on the AKAP docking sequence for RI selectivity. The stapled peptide library was designed based on a high affinity, RI-selective disruptor of AKAP binding, RI-STAD-2. Phe, Trp and Leu were all found to maintain RI selectivity, whereas multiple intermediate-sized hydrophobic substitutions at this position either resulted in loss of isoform selectivity (Ile) or a reversal of selectivity (Val). As a limited number of RI-selective sequences are currently known, this study aids in our understanding of isoform selectivity and establishing parameters for discovering additional RI-selective AKAPs.

  9. Crystal Structure of the 30S Ribosomal Subunit from Thermus Thermophilus. Purification, Crystallization and Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Clemons, William M.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; McCutcheonn, John P.; May, Joanna L.C.; Carter, Andrew P.; Morgan-Warren, Robert J.; Wimberly, Brian T.; Ramakrishnan, Venki

    2009-10-07

    We describe the crystallization and structure determination of the 30 S ribosomal subunit from Thermus thermophilus. Previous reports of crystals that diffracted to 10 {angstrom} resolution were used as a starting point to improve the quality of the diffraction. Eventually, ideas such as the addition of substrates or factors to eliminate conformational heterogeneity proved less important than attention to detail in yielding crystals that diffracted beyond 3 {angstrom} resolution. Despite improvements in technology and methodology in the last decade, the structure determination of the 30 S subunit presented some very challenging technical problems because of the size of the asymmetric unit, crystal variability and sensitivity to radiation damage. Some steps that were useful for determination of the atomic structure were: the use of anomalous scattering from the LIII edges of osmium and lutetium to obtain the necessary phasing signal; the use of tunable, third-generation synchrotron sources to obtain data of reasonable quality at high resolution; collection of derivative data precisely about a mirror plane to preserve small anomalous differences between Bijvoet mates despite extensive radiation damage and multi-crystal scaling; the pre-screening of crystals to ensure quality, isomorphism and the efficient use of scarce third-generation synchrotron time; pre-incubation of crystals in cobalt hexaammine to ensure isomorphism with other derivatives; and finally, the placement of proteins whose structures had been previously solved in isolation, in conjunction with biochemical data on protein-RNA interactions, to map out the architecture of the 30 S subunit prior to the construction of a detailed atomic-resolution model.

  10. Optimal loads for a 30-s maximal power cycle ergometer test using a stationary start.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Nicole T; Robergs, Robert A; Klopp, Dawn M

    2015-05-01

    A stationary start modification to the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) has become increasingly common. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the traditional 85 g kg(-1) body weight (BW) load (TRAD), or an individualized optimal load (OPT), is more suitable for obtaining peak and mean power outputs (PPO and MPO, respectively) for a stationary start. Twelve recreationally active males and 10 females (mean age 30 ± 9.1 and 25 ± 5.5 years, respectively) completed three trials. The first determined the OPT load and included a familiarization of the 30-s stationary start test, followed by two randomized sessions testing the OPT and TRAD loads during the 30-s stationary start test on separate days. For each test, measures of power (watts), time, and cadence were collected to determine PPO, MPO, rate of power decline (rPD) and time to peak power (TtPP). All power data were corrected for flywheel moment of inertia. Results revealed significant differences between OPT and TRAD load settings for males (95.1 ± 10.7 and 85.06 ± 0.40 g kg(-1) BW; p = 0.008) but not for females (84.71 ± 8.72 and 85.2 ± 0.61 g kg(-1) BW; p = 0.813). Relative PPO was not different for OPT or TRAD loads for males (p = 0.485) or females (p = 0.488). It is not necessary to use an OPT load setting to acquire maximal PO for a 30-s cycle test using a stationary start. Instead, the traditional 85 g kg(-1) BW loading is suitable for both males and females.

  11. Regulation of FcεRI signaling by lipid phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kuhny, Marcel; Zorn, Carolin N; Huber, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are tissue-resident sentinels of hematopoietic origin that play a prominent role in allergic diseases. They express the high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI), which when cross-linked by multivalent antigens triggers the release of preformed mediators, generation of arachidonic acid metabolites, and the synthesis of cytokines and chemokines. Stimulation of the FcεRI with increasing antigen concentrations follows a characteristic bell-shaped dose-responses curve. At high antigen concentrations, the so-called supra-optimal conditions, repression of FcεRI-induced responses is facilitated by activation and incorporation of negative signaling regulators. In this context, the SH2-containing inositol-5'-phosphatase, SHIP1, has been demonstrated to be of particular importance. SHIP1 with its catalytic and multiple protein interaction sites provides several layers of control for FcεRI signaling. Regulation of SHIP1 function occurs on various levels, e.g., protein expression, receptor and membrane recruitment, competition for protein-protein interaction sites, and activating modifications enhancing the phosphatase function. Apart from FcεRI-mediated signaling, SHIP1 can be activated by diverse unrelated receptor systems indicating its involvement in the regulation of antigen-dependent cellular responses by autocrine feedback mechanisms or tissue-specific and/or (patho-) physiologically determined factors. Thus, pharmacologic engagement of SHIP1 may represent a beneficial strategy for patients suffering from acute or chronic inflammation or allergies.

  12. Structure of RiVax: a recombinant ricin vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Legler, Patricia M.; Brey, Robert N.; Smallshaw, Joan E.; Vitetta, Ellen S.; Millard, Charles B.

    2011-01-01

    RiVax is a recombinant protein that is currently under clinical development as part of a human vaccine to protect against ricin poisoning. RiVax includes ricin A-chain (RTA) residues 1–267 with two intentional amino-acid substitutions, V76M and Y80A, aimed at reducing toxicity. Here, the crystal structure of RiVax was solved to 2.1 Å resolution and it was shown that it is superposable with that of the ricin toxin A-chain from Ricinus communis with a root-mean-square deviation of 0.6 Å over 258 Cα atoms. The RiVax structure is also compared with the recently determined structure of another potential ricin-vaccine immunogen, RTA 1–33/44–198 R48C/T77C. Finally, the locations and solvent-exposure of two toxin-neutralizing B-cell epitopes were examined and it was found that these epitopes are within or near regions predicted to be involved in catalysis. The results demonstrate the composition of the RiVax clinical material and will guide ongoing protein-engineering strategies to develop improved immunogens. PMID:21904036

  13. Recovery of power output and muscle metabolites following 30 s of maximal sprint cycling in man.

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanis, G C; Nevill, M E; Boobis, L H; Lakomy, H K; Nevill, A M

    1995-01-01

    1. The recovery of power output and muscle metabolites was examined following maximal sprint cycling exercise. Fourteen male subjects performed two 30 s cycle ergometer sprints separated by 1.5, 3 and 6 min of recovery, on three separate occasions. On a fourth occasion eight of the subjects performed only one 30 s sprint and muscle biopsies were obtained during recovery. 2. At the end of the 30 s sprint phosphocreatine (PCr) and ATP contents were 19.7 +/- 1.2 and 70.5 +/- 6.5% of the resting values (rest), respectively, while muscle lactate was 119.0 +/- 4.6 mmol (kg dry wt)-1 and muscle pH was 6.72 +/- 0.06. During recovery, PCr increased rapidly to 65.0 +/- 2.8% of rest after 1.5 min, but reached only 85.5 +/- 3.5% of rest after 6 min of recovery. At the same time ATP and muscle pH remained low (19.5 +/- 0.9 mmol (kg dry wt)-1 and 6.79 +/- 0.02, respectively). Modelling of the individual PCr resynthesis using a power function curve gave an average half-time for PCr resynthesis of 56.6 +/- 7.3 s. 3. Recovery of peak power output (PPO), peak pedal speed (maxSp) and mean power during the initial 6 s (MPO6) of sprint 2 did not reach the control values after 6 min of rest, and occurred in parallel with the resynthesis of PCr, despite the low muscle pH. High correlations (r = 0.71-0.86; P < 0.05) were found between the percentage resynthesis of PCr and the percentage restoration of PPO, maxSp and MPO6 after 1.5 and 3 min of recovery. No relationship was observed between muscle pH recovery and power output restoration during sprint 2 (P > 0.05). 4. These data suggest that PCr resynthesis after 30 s of maximal sprint exercise is slower than previously observed after dynamic exercise of longer duration, and PCr resynthesis is important for the recovery of power during repeated bouts of sprint exercise. Images Figure 1 PMID:7714837

  14. Antimicrobial efficacy of alcohol-based hand gels with a 30-s application.

    PubMed

    do Prado, M F; Coelho, A C C; de Brito, J P B; Ferreira, D O; Junior, A W; Menecucci, C da Silva; de Queiroz, A B; Garcia, L B; Cardoso, C L; Tognim, M C B

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the antimicrobial efficacy of alcohol-based hand gels according to European Norm 1500 (EN 1500). We assessed the antimicrobial efficacy of 12 alcohol-based hand gels produced in Brazil, containing 70% w/w or v/v ethyl alcohol as the active ingredient, according to EN 1500, with a 30-s application. In addition, 70% w/w ethyl alcohol and three alcohol-based hand rubs commonly used in Europe and effective according to EN 1500 were also tested. Eight of 12 (67%) alcohol-based hand gels produced in Brazil failed by EN 1500. In contrast, 70% w/w ethyl alcohol and European alcohol-based hand rubs were approved by EN 1500. In this study, the majority of Brazilian alcohol-based hand gels showed limited efficacy on hand hygiene within 30 s. The findings of this study may be used as an important argument to motivate Brazilian manufacturers to improve the antimicrobial efficacy of alcohol-based hand gels, because it is prudent to suppose that alcohol-based hand gels can be recommended for use in healthcare settings only if they show antimicrobial activity at least similar to that of alcohol-based liquid preparations, including the traditional 70% w/w ethyl alcohol. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Changes in muscle metabolites in females with 30-s exhaustive exercise.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, I; Bar-Or, O; Karlsson, J; Dotan, R; Tesch, P; Kaiser, P; Inbar, O

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the changes in selected intramuscular metabolites associated with non-oxidative energy metabolism after performance of the Wingate Test (WT), a widely used, exhaustive, 30-s cycle test of short-time muscular power. Muscle biopsies were taken from the m. vastus lateralis of nine female physical education students at rest and immediately after performance of the WT. The concentrations of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), creatine phosphate (CP), lactate, and glycogen were determined. The ATP decreased from 20.9 to 13.8; CP decreased from 62.7 to 25.1; lactate increased from 9.0 to 60.5; and glycogen decreased from 360 to 278 (all concentrations are mmol X kg-1 dry muscle). The absolute changes in CP and lactate were not as large as those reported in other exercise studies. Based on the metabolite changes, it was concluded that the WT is a satisfactory test of the maximal muscular power that can be generated from non-oxidative metabolism, but that the 30-s duration of the test probably does not tax the maximal capacity of such energy metabolism.

  16. Does power indicate capacity? 30-s Wingate anaerobic test vs. maximal accumulated O2 deficit.

    PubMed

    Minahan, C; Chia, M; Inbar, O

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between anaerobic power and capacity. Seven men and seven women performed a 30-s Wingate Anaerobic Test on a cycle ergometer to determine peak power, mean power, and the fatigue index. Subjects also cycled at a work rate predicted to elicit 120 % of peak oxygen uptake to exhaustion to determine the maximal accumulated O (2) deficit. Peak power and the maximal accumulated O (2) deficit were significantly correlated (r = 0.782, p = 0.001). However, when the absolute difference in exercise values between groups (men and women) was held constant using a partial correlation, the relationship diminished (r = 0.531, p = 0.062). In contrast, we observed a significant correlation between fatigue index and the maximal accumulated O (2) deficit when controlling for gender (r = - 0.597, p = 0.024) and the relationship remained significant when values were expressed relative to active muscle mass. A higher anaerobic power does not indicate a greater anaerobic capacity. Furthermore, we suggest that the ability to maintain power output during a 30-s cycle sprint is related to anaerobic capacity.

  17. In vivo specificity of EcoRI DNA methyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D W; Crowder, S W; Reich, N O

    1992-01-01

    The EcoRI adenine DNA methyltransferase forms part of a bacterial restriction/modification system; the methyltransferase modifies the second adenine within the canonical site GAATTC, thereby preventing the EcoRI endonuclease from cleaving this site. We show that five noncanonical EcoRI sites (TAATTC, CAATTC, GTATTC, GGATTC and GAGTTC) are not methylated in vivo under conditions when the canonical site is methylated. Only when the methyltransferase is overexpressed is partial in vivo methylation of the five sites detected. Our results suggest that the methyltransferase does not protect host DNA against potential endonuclease-mediated cleavage at noncanonical sites. Our related in vitro analysis of the methyltransferase reveals a low level of sequence-discrimination. We propose that the high in vivo specificity may be due to the active removal of methylated sequences by DNA repair enzymes (J. Bacteriology (1987), 169 3243-3250). Images PMID:1461739

  18. Schedule Optimization Study, Hanford RI/FS Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    A Schedule Optimization Study (SOS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Program was conducted by an independent team of professionals from other federal agencies and the private sector experienced in environmental restoration. This team spent two weeks at Hanford in September 1992 examining the reasons for the lengthy RI/FS process at Hanford and developing recommendations to expedite the process. The need for the study arose out of a schedule dispute regarding the submission of the 1100-EM-1 Operable Unit RI/FS Work Plan. This report documents the study called for in the August 29, 1991, Dispute Resolution Committee Decision Statement. Battelle's Environmental Management Operations (EMO) coordinated the effort for DOE's Richland Field Office (RL).

  19. A new fission-fragment detector to complement the CACTUS-SiRi setup at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornyi, T. G.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Siem, S.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Csige, L.

    2014-02-01

    An array of Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC) for the detection of heavy ions has been developed. The new device, NIFF (Nuclear Instrument for Fission Fragments), consists of four individual detectors and covers 60% of 2π. It was designed to be used in conjunction with the SiRi array of ΔE-E silicon telescopes for light charged particles and fits into the CACTUS array of 28 large-volume NaI scintillation detectors at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory. The low-pressure gas-filled PPACs are sensitive for the detection of fission fragments, but are insensitive to scattered beam particles of light ions or light-ion ejectiles. The PPAC detectors of NIFF have good time resolution and can be used either to select or to veto fission events in in-beam experiments with light-ion beams and actinide targets. The powerful combination of SiRi, CACTUS, and NIFF provides new research opportunities for the study of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions in the actinide region. The new setup is particularly well suited to study the competition of fission and γ decay as a function of excitation energy.

  20. Characteristic views of E. coli and B. stearothermophilus 30S ribosomal subunits in the electron microscope.

    PubMed Central

    van Heel, M; Stöffler-Meilicke, M

    1985-01-01

    Large sets of electron microscopic images of the 30S ribosomal subunits of Bacillus stearothermophilus (914 molecules) and Escherichia coli (422 molecules) were analysed with image processing techniques. Using computer alignment and a new multivariate statistical classification scheme, three predominant views of the subunit were found for both species. These views, which together account for approximately 90% of the population of images, were determined to a reproducible resolution of up to 1.7 nm, thus elucidating many new structural details. The angular spread of the molecular orientations around the three main stable positions is remarkably small (less than 8 degrees). Some of the current models for the small ribosomal subunit are incompatible with our new results. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3908096

  1. The aminoglycoside resistance methyltransferases from the ArmA/Rmt family operate late in the 30S ribosomal biogenesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Zarubica, Tamara; Baker, Matthew R; Wright, H Tonie; Rife, Jason P

    2011-02-01

    Bacterial resistance to 4,6-type aminoglycoside antibiotics, which target the ribosome, has been traced to the ArmA/RmtA family of rRNA methyltransferases. These plasmid-encoded enzymes transfer a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to N7 of the buried G1405 in the aminoglycoside binding site of 16S rRNA of the 30S ribosomal subunit. ArmA methylates mature 30S subunits but not 16S rRNA, 50S, or 70S ribosomal subunits or isolated Helix 44 of the 30S subunit. To more fully characterize this family of enzymes, we have investigated the substrate requirements of ArmA and to a lesser extent its ortholog RmtA. We determined the Mg+² dependence of ArmA activity toward the 30S ribosomal subunits and found that the enzyme recognizes both low Mg+² (translationally inactive) and high Mg+² (translationally active) forms of this substrate. We tested the effects of LiCl pretreatment of the 30S subunits, initiation factor 3 (IF3), and gentamicin/kasugamycin resistance methyltransferase (KsgA) on ArmA activity and determined whether in vivo derived pre-30S ribosomal subunits are ArmA methylation substrates. ArmA failed to methylate the 30S subunits generated from LiCl washes above 0.75 M, despite the apparent retention of ribosomal proteins and a fully mature 16S rRNA. From our experiments, we conclude that ArmA is most active toward the 30S ribosomal subunits that are at or very near full maturity, but that it can also recognize more than one form of the 30S subunit.

  2. AKAP7gamma is a nuclear RI-binding AKAP.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebecca L; August, Shelley L; Williams, Carmen J; Moss, Stuart B

    2003-06-27

    Spatial regulation of protein kinase A (PKA) is accomplished by its sequestration via A-kinase anchor proteins (AKAPs). PKA activity is critical for mammalian oocyte development, suggesting that PKA must be appropriately positioned in these large cells. A screen for AKAPs in oocytes identified AKAP7gamma, an AKAP originally found in pancreas. Yeast two-hybrid analysis and co-immunoprecipitation studies showed that AKAP7gamma bound the type I PKA regulatory subunit (RI) and that the RI-binding domain overlapped the previously identified type II PKA regulatory subunit (RII) binding domain. Overexpressed AKAP7gamma localized to the nuclei of HEK 293 cells via a nuclear localization signal. In addition, endogenous AKAP7gamma protein was found in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of oocytes. This work identifies AKAP7gamma as the first nuclear AKAP to bind RI and suggests that AKAP7gamma may be responsible for positioning PKA via RI and/or RII to regulate PKA-mediated gene transcription in both somatic cells and oocytes.

  3. 78 FR 21492 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Rhode Island Disaster RI-00012 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4107-DR), dated 03/22/2013. Incident: Severe winter storm and snowstorm...

  4. 75 FR 18554 - Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00006

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ... ADMINISTRATION Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00006 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION... of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated 03/ 29/2010. Incident: Severe storms and flooding. Incident... INFORMATION: The notice of the Presidential disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island, dated 03/29...

  5. 78 FR 4967 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION Rhode Island Disaster RI-00010 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Island (FEMA-4089-DR), dated 11/ 14/2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident Period: 10/26/2012 through... the President's major disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island, dated 11/14/2012 is hereby...

  6. 75 FR 22872 - Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00006

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... ADMINISTRATION Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00006 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION... of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated 03/ 29/2010. Incident: Severe storms and flooding. Incident... of Rhode Island, dated 03/29/2010 is hereby amended to establish the incident period for this...

  7. 76 FR 61131 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00008

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... ADMINISTRATION Rhode Island Disaster RI-00008 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Rhode Island dated 09... Island: Bristol, Kent. Connecticut: Windham. Massachusetts: Bristol, Norfolk, Worcester. The Interest...

  8. 77 FR 67857 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Rhode Island Disaster RI-00011 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4089-DR), dated 11/03/2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident Period: 10...

  9. 75 FR 17178 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00006

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... ADMINISTRATION Rhode Island Disaster RI-00006 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Rhode Island.... Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Rhode Island: Bristol. Connecticut: New London, Windham...

  10. 77 FR 69915 - Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ... ADMINISTRATION Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00011 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION... Assistance Only for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4089-DR), dated 11/03/2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of RHODE ISLAND, dated 11/03/2012, is hereby amended to...

  11. 75 FR 22873 - Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00007

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... ADMINISTRATION Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00007 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION... Assistance Only for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated 04/08/2010. Incident: Severe storms and... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Rhode Island, dated 04/08/2010, is hereby amended to...

  12. 77 FR 70203 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION Rhode Island Disaster RI-00010 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Rhode Island...): Rhode Island: Kent. Connecticut: New London. Massachusetts: Bristol. The Interest Rates are: Percent For...

  13. Evaluation of the Hanford RI/FS cost projections

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The US Department of Energy-Richland Operations (DOE-RL) tasked the Environmental Management Operations (EMO) to review the cost estimates and implementation process for the Hanford Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Program as defined by the Hanford RCRA/CERCLA Past Particles Cost Model. The purpose of the review was to determine if there were opportunities to reduce the RI/FS costs at Hanford, with a focus on the approach being taken at Hanford to implement and complete the RI/FS process. Three specific tasks comprised the review. The first focused on the cost model assumptions to assess whether the assumptions and resulting estimates were representative of the cost of performing work at Hanford. The second involved a detailed review of the regulatory and other driving forces that define the scope and approach to be taken at Hanford. The purpose of the review was to develop recommendations on changes what would help streamline the past practices process and reduce the cost and schedule. The third (Task 1C) provided a review of the scope and approach planned for two operable units (OUs), 100-HR-1 and 100-HR-3, as contained in their detailed draft RI/FS work plans. These work plans were reviewed for appropriate application of and conformance to the regulations and other requirements examined in the first two tasks. 4 refs.

  14. Development of a beam line for radio-isotope production at the KOMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han-Sung

    2016-09-01

    A new beam line of the 100-MeV proton linac at the KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex), aiming for RI (radioisotope) production has been constructed reflecting the increasing demands for various RIs (radioisotopes), such as Sr-82 and Cu-67 for medical applications. Proton beam with beam energy of 100 MeV and an average current of 0.6 mA is directed to the 100-mm-diameter production target through a beam window made of aluminum-beryllium alloy. Major components of the newly-installed beam line include electromagnets for bending and focusing, beam diagnostic systems such as a BPM (beam position monitor) and a BCM (beam current monitor), and a vacuum pumping system based on an ion pump. In this paper, the design features and the installation of the RI-production beam line at the KOMAC are given.

  15. Structure of RiVax: a recombinant ricin vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Legler, Patricia M.; Brey, Robert N.; Smallshaw, Joan E.; Vitetta, Ellen S.; Millard, Charles B.

    2011-09-01

    The X-ray crystal structure (at 2.1 Å resolution) of an immunogen under development as part of a ricin vaccine for humans is presented and structure-based analysis of the results was conducted with respect to related proteins and the known determinants for inducing or suppressing the protective immune response. RiVax is a recombinant protein that is currently under clinical development as part of a human vaccine to protect against ricin poisoning. RiVax includes ricin A-chain (RTA) residues 1–267 with two intentional amino-acid substitutions, V76M and Y80A, aimed at reducing toxicity. Here, the crystal structure of RiVax was solved to 2.1 Å resolution and it was shown that it is superposable with that of the ricin toxin A-chain from Ricinus communis with a root-mean-square deviation of 0.6 Å over 258 C{sup α} atoms. The RiVax structure is also compared with the recently determined structure of another potential ricin-vaccine immunogen, RTA 1–33/44–198 R48C/T77C. Finally, the locations and solvent-exposure of two toxin-neutralizing B-cell epitopes were examined and it was found that these epitopes are within or near regions predicted to be involved in catalysis. The results demonstrate the composition of the RiVax clinical material and will guide ongoing protein-engineering strategies to develop improved immunogens.

  16. Beam-Beam Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sramek, Christopher

    2003-09-05

    At the interaction point of a particle accelerator, various phenomena occur which are known as beam-beam effects. Incident bunches of electrons (or positrons) experience strong electromagnetic fields from the opposing bunches, which leads to electron deflection, beamstrahlung and the creation of electron/positron pairs and hadrons due to two-photon exchange. In addition, the beams experience a ''pinch effect'' which focuses each beam and results in either a reduction or expansion of their vertical size. Finally, if a beam's disruption parameter is too large, the beam can develop a sinusoidal distortion, or two-stream (kink) instability. This project simulated and studied these effects as they relate to luminosity, deflection angles and energy loss in order to optimize beam parameters for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Using the simulation program Guinea-Pig, luminosity, deflection angle and beam energy data was acquired for different levels of beam offset and distortion. Standard deflection curves and luminosity plots agreed with theoretical models but also made clear the difficulties of e-e- feedback. Simulations emphasizing kink instability in modulated and straight beam collisions followed qualitative behavioral predictions and roughly fit recent analytic calculations. Finally, a study of e-e- collisions under design constraints for the NLC provided new estimates of how luminosity, beamstrahlung energy loss, upsilon parameter and deflection curve width scale with beam spotsizes.

  17. The GPU-enabled divide-expand-consolidate RI-MP2 method (DEC-RI-MP2).

    PubMed

    Bykov, Dmytro; Kjaergaard, Thomas

    2017-02-05

    We report porting of the Divide-Expand-Consolidate Resolution of the Identity second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (DEC-RI-MP2) method to the graphic processing units (GPUs) using OpenACC compiler directives. It is shown that the OpenACC compiler directives implementation efficiently accelerates the rate-determining step of the DEC-RI-MP2 method with minor implementation effort. Moreover, the GPU acceleration results in a better load balance and thus in an overall scaling improvement of the DEC algorithm. The resulting cross-platform hybrid MPI/OpenMP/OpenACC implementation has scalable and portable performance on heterogeneous HPC architectures. The GPU-enabled code was benchmarked using a reduced version of the S12L test set of Stefan Grimme (Grimme, Chem. Eur. J. 2012, 18, 9955) consisting of supramolecular complexes up to 158 atoms and 4292 contracted basis functions (cc-pVTZ). The test set results demonstrate the general applicability of the DEC-RI-MP2 method showing results consistent with the DEC-RI-MP2 introductory paper (Baudin et al., J. Chem. Phys. 2016, 144, 054102) on molecules of complicated electronic structures. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. BEAM-BEAM 2003 SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.SEN,T.

    2003-05-19

    This paper summarizes the presentations and discussions of the Beam-Beam'03 workshop, held in Montauk, Long Island, from May 19 to 23, 2003. Presentations and discussions focused on halo generation from beam-beam interactions; beam-beam limits, especially coherent limits and their effects on existing and future hadron colliders; beam-beam compensation techniques, particularly for long-range interactions; and beam-beam study tools in theory, simulation, and experiment.

  19. Conformational Response of 30S-bound IF3 to A-Site Binders Streptomycin and Kanamycin.

    PubMed

    Chulluncuy, Roberto; Espiche, Carlos; Nakamoto, Jose Alberto; Fabbretti, Attilio; Milón, Pohl

    2016-12-13

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are widely used to treat infectious diseases. Among them, streptomycin and kanamycin (and derivatives) are of importance to battle multidrug-resistant (MDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Both drugs bind the small ribosomal subunit (30S) and inhibit protein synthesis. Genetic, structural, and biochemical studies indicate that local and long-range conformational rearrangements of the 30S subunit account for this inhibition. Here, we use intramolecular FRET between the C- and N-terminus domains of the flexible IF3 to monitor real-time perturbations of their binding sites on the 30S platform. Steady and pre-steady state binding experiments show that both aminoglycosides bring IF3 domains apart, promoting an elongated state of the factor. Binding of Initiation Factor IF1 triggers closure of IF3 bound to the 30S complex, while both aminoglycosides revert the IF1-dependent conformation. Our results uncover dynamic perturbations across the 30S subunit, from the A-site to the platform, and suggest that both aminoglycosides could interfere with prokaryotic translation initiation by modulating the interaction between IF3 domains with the 30S platform.

  20. Conformational Response of 30S-bound IF3 to A-Site Binders Streptomycin and Kanamycin

    PubMed Central

    Chulluncuy, Roberto; Espiche, Carlos; Nakamoto, Jose Alberto; Fabbretti, Attilio; Milón, Pohl

    2016-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are widely used to treat infectious diseases. Among them, streptomycin and kanamycin (and derivatives) are of importance to battle multidrug-resistant (MDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Both drugs bind the small ribosomal subunit (30S) and inhibit protein synthesis. Genetic, structural, and biochemical studies indicate that local and long-range conformational rearrangements of the 30S subunit account for this inhibition. Here, we use intramolecular FRET between the C- and N-terminus domains of the flexible IF3 to monitor real-time perturbations of their binding sites on the 30S platform. Steady and pre-steady state binding experiments show that both aminoglycosides bring IF3 domains apart, promoting an elongated state of the factor. Binding of Initiation Factor IF1 triggers closure of IF3 bound to the 30S complex, while both aminoglycosides revert the IF1-dependent conformation. Our results uncover dynamic perturbations across the 30S subunit, from the A-site to the platform, and suggest that both aminoglycosides could interfere with prokaryotic translation initiation by modulating the interaction between IF3 domains with the 30S platform. PMID:27983590

  1. Switching off the tackiness of a nanocomposite adhesive in 30 s via infrared sintering.

    PubMed

    Gurney, Robert S; Dupin, Damien; Nunes, Juliana S; Ouzineb, Keltoum; Siband, Elodie; Asua, José M; Armes, Steven P; Keddie, Joseph L

    2012-10-24

    Soft adhesives require an optimum balance of viscous and elastic properties. Adhesion is poor when the material is either too solidlike or too liquidlike. The ability to switch tack adhesion off at a desired time has many applications, such as in recycling, disassembly of electronics, and painless removal of wound dressings. Here, we describe a new strategy to switch off the tack adhesion in a model nanocomposite adhesive in which temperature is the trigger. The nanocomposite comprises hard methacrylic nanoparticles blended with a colloidal dispersion of soft copolymer particles. At relatively low volume fractions, the nanoparticles (50 nm diameter) accumulate near the film surface, where they pack around the larger soft particles (270 nm). The viscoelasticity of the nanocomposite is adjusted via the nanoparticle concentration. When the nanocomposite is heated above the glass transition temperature of the nanoparticles (T(g) = 130 °C), they sinter together to create a rigid network that raises the elastic modulus at room temperature. The tackiness is switched off. Intense infrared radiation is used to heat the nanocomposites, leading to a fast temperature rise. Tack adhesion is switched off within 30 s in optimized compositions. These one-way switchable adhesives have the potential to be patterned through localized heating.

  2. Mesoscale Wind Regimes In The Elqui-valley/chile At 30 S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalthoff, N.; Bischoff-Gauß, I.; Fiebig-Wittmaack, M.; Fiedler, F.; Thürauf, J.; Novoa, E.; Pizarro, C.; Castillo, R.; Kohler, M.

    In November 1999, four permanent surface stations were installed in the vicinity of the surface ozone monitoring station on the summit of the Cerro Tololo (2200 m amsl) at 30 S. These stations were used to study the atmospheric flow conditions which are important for the interpretation of the ozone measurements at Cerro Tololo. Addi- tionally, radiosonde ascents were performed in March 2000 near the coast and about 60 km inland. Different wind regimes were distinguished. Above 4 km, large-scale westerly winds prevailed, while northerly winds were observed in a band along the coastline between 2 km and 4 km height. The upper boundary of the northerly wind regime corresponded with the mean height of the Andes. This wind regime resulted from the westerly winds being blocked and forced to flow parallel to the Andes (when Froude number Fr < 1). The phenomenon was also confirmed by model simulations. Seasonally varying thermally induced valley winds and a sea breeze developed be- low the northerly wind regime. In summer, the valley winds reached the Cerro Tololo. Diurnal variation of the top of the valley winds also influenced the lower boundary of the northerly wind regime, which was less than 2 km amsl during the night and greater than 2 km amsl during the day. Thus, this observational and modeling study has shown that in summer the baseline ozone monitoring site at Cerro Tololo can be contaminated by polluted air that is transported from the plains by the thermally induced wind systems.

  3. Muscle fibre conduction velocity during a 30-s Wingate anaerobic test.

    PubMed

    Stewart, David; Farina, Dario; Shen, Chao; Macaluso, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    Ten male volunteers (age 29.2 ± 5.2 years, mean ± SD) were recruited to test the hypothesis that muscle fibre conduction velocity (MFCV) would decrease with power output during a 30-s Wingate test on a mechanically-braked cycle ergometer. Prior to the main test, the optimal pre-fixed load corresponding to the highest power output was selected following a random series of six 10-s sprints. Surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were detected from the right vastus lateralis with linear adhesive arrays of eight electrodes. Power output decreased significantly from 6-s until the end of the test (860.9 ± 207.8 vs. 360.9 ± 11.4 W, respectively) and was correlated with MFCV (R=0.543, P<0.01), which also declined significantly by 26.8 ± 11% (P<0.05). There was a tendency for the mean frequency of the EMG power spectrum (MNF) to decrease, but average rectified values (ARV) remained unchanged throughout the test. The parallel decline of MFCV with power output suggests changes in fibre membrane properties. The unaltered ARV, together with the declined MFCV, would indicate either a decrease in discharge rate, de-recruitment of fatigued motor units or elongation of still present motor unit action potentials.

  4. Relative Contribution of Arms and Legs in 30 s Fully Tethered Front Crawl Swimming.

    PubMed

    Morouço, Pedro G; Marinho, Daniel A; Izquierdo, Mikel; Neiva, Henrique; Marques, Mário C

    2015-01-01

    The relative contribution of arm stroke and leg kicking to maximal fully tethered front crawl swimming performance remains to be solved. Twenty-three national level young swimmers (12 male and 11 female) randomly performed 3 bouts of 30 s fully tethered swimming (using the whole body, only the arm stroke, and only the leg kicking). A load-cell system permitted the continuous measurement of the exerted forces, and swimming velocity was calculated from the time taken to complete a 50 m front crawl swim. As expected, with no restrictions swimmers were able to exert higher forces than that using only their arm stroke or leg kicking. Estimated relative contributions of arm stroke and leg kicking were 70.3% versus 29.7% for males and 66.6% versus 33.4% for females, with 15.6% and 13.1% force deficits, respectively. To obtain higher velocities, male swimmers are highly dependent on the maximum forces they can exert with the arm stroke (r = 0.77, P < 0.01), whereas female swimmers swimming velocity is more related to whole-body mean forces (r = 0.81, P < 0.01). The obtained results point that leg kicking plays an important role over short duration high intensity bouts and that the used methodology may be useful to identify strength and/or coordination flaws.

  5. Genetic transformation of Begonia tuberhybrida by Ri rol genes.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, S; Kikuchi, Y; Kamada, H; Harada, H

    1996-04-01

    We have developed an Agrobacterium -mediated transformation system for commercial Begonia species. The leaf explants of Begonia semperflorens, Begonia x hiemalis and B. tuberhybrida were inoculated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404 harboring a binary vector pBI121 which contains rolA, B and C genes of an agropine type Ri plasmid (pRiA4b). Kanamycin resistant shoots of B. tuberhybrida were obtained on MS agar medium supplemented with 0.1 mg/l NAA, 0.5 mg/l BA, 500 mg/l claforan and 100 mg/l kanamycin. These shoots exhibited GUS activity and Southern analysis showed a single copy insertion into the genome. When the transgenic plants were transferred to soil, they displayed the phenotype specific to the transgenic plants by A. rhizogenes such as dwarfness, delay of flowering, and wrinkled leaves and petals.

  6. Assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit: positioning ribosomal protein S13 in the S7 assembly branch.

    PubMed

    Grondek, Joel F; Culver, Gloria M

    2004-12-01

    Studies of Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit assembly have revealed a hierarchical and cooperative association of ribosomal proteins with 16S ribosomal RNA; these results have been used to compile an in vitro 30S subunit assembly map. In single protein addition and omission studies, ribosomal protein S13 was shown to be dependent on the prior association of ribosomal protein S20 for binding to the ribonucleoprotein particle. While the overwhelming majority of interactions revealed in the assembly map are consistent with additional data, the dependency of S13 on S20 is not. Structural studies position S13 in the head of the 30S subunit > 100 A away from S20, which resides near the bottom of the body of the 30S subunit. All of the proteins that reside in the head of the 30S subunit, except S13, have been shown to be part of the S7 assembly branch, that is, they all depend on S7 for association with the assembling 30S subunit. Given these observations, the assembly requirements for S13 were investigated using base-specific chemical footprinting and primer extension analysis. These studies reveal that S13 can bind to 16S rRNA in the presence of S7, but not S20. Additionally, interaction between S13 and other members of the S7 assembly branch have been observed. These results link S13 to the 3' major domain family of proteins, and the S7 assembly branch, placing S13 in a new location in the 30S subunit assembly map where its position is in accordance with much biochemical and structural data.

  7. Quarry residuals RI/FS scoping document. [Weldon Spring quarry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to serve as a planning tool for the implementation of the Quarry Residual Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process and to provide direct input to revising and updating the 1988 Work Plan for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study-Environmental Impact Statement for the Weldon Spring Site (RI/FS-EIS) (Peterson et al. 1988) for this effort. The scoping process is intended to outline the tasks necessary to develop and implement activities in compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act-National Environmental Policy Act (CERCLA-NEPA) process from detailed planning through the appropriate decision document. In addition to scoping the entire process, this document will serve as the primary tool for planning and accomplishing all activities to be developed in the Quarry Residual RI/FS Work Plan. Subsequent tasks are difficult to plan at this time. 10 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Standards for Reporting Implementation Studies (StaRI) Statement.

    PubMed

    Pinnock, Hilary; Barwick, Melanie; Carpenter, Christopher R; Eldridge, Sandra; Grandes, Gonzalo; Griffiths, Chris J; Rycroft-Malone, Jo; Meissner, Paul; Murray, Elizabeth; Patel, Anita; Sheikh, Aziz; Taylor, Stephanie J C

    2017-03-06

    Implementation studies are often poorly reported and indexed, reducing their potential to inform initiatives to improve healthcare services. The Standards for Reporting Implementation Studies (StaRI) initiative aimed to develop guidelines for transparent and accurate reporting of implementation studies. Informed by the findings of a systematic review and a consensus-building e-Delphi exercise, an international working group of implementation science experts discussed and agreed the StaRI Checklist comprising 27 items. It prompts researchers to describe both the implementation strategy (techniques used to promote implementation of an underused evidence-based intervention) and the effectiveness of the intervention that was being implemented. An accompanying Explanation and Elaboration document (published in BMJ Open, doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013318) details each of the items, explains the rationale, and provides examples of good reporting practice. Adoption of StaRI will improve the reporting of implementation studies, potentially facilitating translation of research into practice and improving the health of individuals and populations.

  9. Divergent marijuana trajectories among men: Socioeconomic, relationship, and life satisfaction outcomes in the mid-30s.

    PubMed

    White, Helene R; Bechtold, Jordan; Loeber, Rolf; Pardini, Dustin

    2015-11-01

    Given recent changes in marijuana policy in the United States, it is important to understand the long-term effects of marijuana use on adult functioning. We examined whether men who displayed different trajectories of marijuana use from adolescence through emerging adulthood (age ∼15-26) differed in terms of socioeconomic, social, and life satisfaction outcomes in their mid-30s. Data came from a longitudinal sample of men who were recruited in early adolescence (N=506) and followed into adulthood. Four trajectory groups based on patterns of marijuana use from adolescence into emerging adulthood were compared on adult outcomes (age ∼36) before and after controlling for co-occurring use of other substances and several pre-existing confounding factors in early adolescence. The potential moderating effect of race was also examined. Although there were initially group differences across all domains, once pre-existing confounds and co-occurring other substance use were included in the model, groups only differed in terms of partner and friend marijuana use. Chronic marijuana users reported the highest proportions of both. Frequent and persistent marijuana use was associated with lower socioeconomic status (SES) for Black men only. After statistically accounting for confounding variables, chronic marijuana users were not at a heightened risk for maladjustment in adulthood except for lower SES among Black men. Chronic users were more likely to have friends and partners who also used marijuana. Future studies should take into account pre-existing differences when examining outcomes of marijuana use. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. Divergent marijuana trajectories among men: Socioeconomic, relationship, and life satisfaction outcomes in the mid-30s

    PubMed Central

    White, Helene R.; Bechtold, Jordan; Loeber, Rolf; Pardini, Dustin

    2016-01-01

    Background Given recent changes in marijuana policy in the United States, it is important to understand the long-term effects of marijuana use on adult functioning. We examined whether men who displayed different trajectories of marijuana use from adolescence through emerging adulthood (age ~15–26) differed in terms of socioeconomic, social, and life satisfaction outcomes in their mid-30s. Methods Data came from a longitudinal sample of men who were recruited in early adolescence (N = 506) and followed into adulthood. Four trajectory groups based on patterns of marijuana use from adolescence into emerging adulthood were compared on adult outcomes (age ~36) before and after controlling for co-occurring use of other substances and several pre-existing confounding factors in early adolescence. The potential moderating effect of race was also examined. Results Although there were initially group differences across all domains, once pre-existing confounds and co-occurring other substance use were included in the model, groups only differed in terms of partner and friend marijuana use. Chronic marijuana users reported the highest proportions of both. Frequent and persistent marijuana use was associated with lower socioeconomic status (SES) for Black men only. Conclusions After statistically accounting for confounding variables, chronic marijuana users were not at a heightened risk for maladjustment in adulthood except for lower SES among Black men. Chronic users were more likely to have friends and partners who also used marijuana. Future studies should take into account pre-existing differences when examining outcomes of marijuana use. PMID:26365837

  11. Quantitation of ten 30S ribosomal assembly intermediates using fluorescence triple correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ridgeway, William K; Millar, David P; Williamson, James R

    2012-08-21

    The self-assembly of bacterial 30S ribosomes involves a large number of RNA folding and RNA-protein binding steps. The sequence of steps determines the overall assembly mechanism and the structure of the mechanism has ramifications for the robustness of biogenesis and resilience against kinetic traps. Thermodynamic interdependencies of protein binding inferred from omission-reconstitution experiments are thought to preclude certain assembly pathways and thus enforce ordered assembly, but this concept is at odds with kinetic data suggesting a more parallel assembly landscape. A major challenge is deconvolution of the statistical distribution of intermediates that are populated during assembly at high concentrations approaching in vivo assembly conditions. To specifically resolve the intermediates formed by binding of three ribosomal proteins to the full length 16S rRNA, we introduce Fluorescence Triple-Correlation Spectroscopy (F3CS). F3CS identifies specific ternary complexes by detecting coincident fluctuations in three-color fluorescence data. Triple correlation integrals quantify concentrations and diffusion kinetics of triply labeled species, and F3CS data can be fit alongside auto-correlation and cross-correlation data to quantify the populations of 10 specific ribosome assembly intermediates. The distribution of intermediates generated by binding three ribosomal proteins to the entire native 16S rRNA included significant populations of species that were not previously thought to be thermodynamically accessible, questioning the current interpretation of the classic omission-reconstitution experiments. F3CS is a general approach for analyzing assembly and function of macromolecular complexes, especially those too large for traditional biophysical methods.

  12. Cross-validation of the 20- versus 30-s Wingate anaerobic test.

    PubMed

    Laurent, C Matthew; Meyers, Michael C; Robinson, Clay A; Green, J Matt

    2007-08-01

    The 30-s Wingate anaerobic test (30-WAT) is the most widely accepted protocol for measuring anaerobic response, despite documented physical side effects. Abbreviation of the 30-WAT without loss of data could enhance subject compliance while maintaining test applicability. The intent of this study was to quantify the validity of the 20-s Wingate anaerobic test (20-WAT) versus the traditional 30-WAT. Fifty males (mean +/- SEM; age = 20.5 +/- 0.3 years; Ht = 1.6 +/- 0.01 m; Wt = 75.5 +/- 2.6 kg) were randomly selected to either a validation (N = 35) or cross-validation group (N = 15) and completed a 20-WAT and 30-WAT in double blind, random order on separate days to determine peak power (PP; W kg(-1)), mean power (MP; W kg(-1)), and fatigue index (FI; %). Utilizing power outputs (relative to body mass) recorded during each second of both protocols, a non-linear regression equation (Y (20WAT+10 )= 31.4697 e(-0.5)[ln(X (second)/1174.3961)/2.6369(2)]; r (2) = 0.97; SEE = 0.56 W kg(-1)) successfully predicted (error approximately 10%) the final 10 s of power outputs in the cross-validation population. There were no significant differences between MP and FI between the 20-WAT that included the predicted 10 s of power outputs (20-WAT+10) and the 30-WAT. When derived data were subjected to Bland-Altman analyses, the majority of plots (93%) fell within the limits of agreement (+/-2SD). Therefore, when compared to the 30-WAT, the 20-WAT may be considered a valid alternative when used with the predictive non-linear regression equation to derive the final power output values.

  13. Beam-beam simulations for separated beams

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, Miguel A.

    2000-04-10

    We present beam-beam simulation results from a strong-strong gaussian code for separated beams for the LHC and RHIC. The frequency spectrum produced by the beam-beam collisions is readily obtained and offers a good opportunity for experimental comparisons. Although our results for the emittance blowup are preliminary, we conclude that, for nominal parameter values, there is no significant difference between separated beams and center-on-center collisions.

  14. Analysis of conformational changes in 16 S rRNA during the course of 30 S subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Kristi L; Culver, Gloria M

    2005-11-25

    Ribosome biogenesis involves an integrated series of binding events coupled with conformational changes that ultimately result in the formation of a functional macromolecular complex. In vitro, Escherichia coli 30 S subunit assembly occurs in a cooperative manner with the ordered addition of 20 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) with 16 S rRNA. The assembly pathway for 30 S subunits has been dissected in vitro into three steps, where specific r-proteins associate with 16 S rRNA early in 30 S subunit assembly, followed by a mid-assembly conformational rearrangement of the complex that then enables the remaining r-proteins to associate in the final step. Although the three steps of 30 S subunit assembly have been known for some time, few details have been elucidated about changes that occur as a result of these three specific stages. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the concerted early and late stages of small ribosomal subunit assembly. Conformational changes, roles for base-pairing and r-proteins at specific stages of assembly, and a polar nature to the assembly process have been revealed. This work has allowed a more comprehensive and global view of E.coli 30 S ribosomal subunit assembly to be obtained.

  15. PPARA intron polymorphism associated with power performance in 30-s anaerobic Wingate Test.

    PubMed

    Petr, Miroslav; Stastny, Petr; Št'astný, Petr; Pecha, Ondřej; Šteffl, Michal; Šeda, Ondřej; Kohlíková, Eva

    2014-01-01

    To date, polymorphisms in several genes have been associated with a strength/power performance including alpha 3 actinin, ciliary neurotrophic factor, vitamin D receptor, or angiotensin I converting enzyme, underlining the importance of genetic component of the multifactorial strength/power-related phenotypes. The single nucleotide variation in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha gene (PPARA) intron 7 G/C (rs4253778; g.46630634G>C) has been repeatedly found to play a significant role in response to different types of physical activity. We investigated the effect of PPARA intron 7 G/C polymorphism specifically on anaerobic power output in a group of 77 elite male Czech ice hockey players (18-36 y). We determined the relative peak power per body weight (Pmax.kg(-1)) and relative peak power per fat free mass (W.kg(-1)FFM) during the 30-second Wingate Test (WT30) on bicycle ergometer (Monark 894E Peak bike, MONARK, Sweden). All WT30s were performed during the hockey season. Overall genotype frequencies were 50.6% GG homozygotes, 40.3% CG heterozygotes, and 9.1% CC homozygotes. We found statistically significant differences in Pmax.kg(-1) and marginally significant differences in Pmax.kg(-1)FFM values in WT30 between carriers and non-carriers for C allele (14.6 ± 0.2 vs. 13.9 ± 0.3 W.kg(-1) and 15.8 ± 0.2 vs. 15.2 ± 0.3 W.kg(-1)FFM, P = 0.036 and 0.12, respectively). Furthermore, Pmax.kg(-1)FFM strongly positively correlated with the body weight only in individuals with GG genotypes (R = 0.55; p<0.001). Our results indicate that PPARA 7C carriers exhibited higher speed strength measures in WT30. We hypothesize that C allele carriers within the cohort of trained individuals may possess a metabolic advantage towards anaerobic metabolism.

  16. 77 FR 5581 - Submission for Review: Financial Resources Questionnaire (RI 34-1, RI 34-17) and Notice of Amount...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Due Because of Annuity Overpayment (RI 34-3, RI 34-19) AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management... Street NW., Washington, DC 20503, Attention: Desk Officer for the Office of Personnel Management or sent...., Washington, DC 20503, Attention: Desk Officer for the Office of Personnel Management or sent via...

  17. 76 FR 18811 - Submission for Review: Letter Reply To Request for Information (RI 20-64), Former Spouse Survivor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... Annuity Election (RI 20-64A), Information on Electing a Survivor Annuity for Your Former Spouse (RI 20-64B... Reply to Request for Information, RI 20-64, and Former Spouse Survivor Annuity Election, RI 20-64A. As... information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses. DATES: Comments are...

  18. Improving Forecast Skill by Assimilation of AIRS Cloud Cleared Radiances RiCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Rosenberg, Robert I.; Iredell, Lena

    2015-01-01

    ECMWF, NCEP, and GMAO routinely assimilate radiosonde and other in-situ observations along with satellite IR and MW Sounder radiance observations. NCEP and GMAO use the NCEP GSI Data Assimilation System (DAS).GSI DAS assimilates AIRS, CrIS, IASI channel radiances Ri on a channel-by-channel, case-by-case basis, only for those channels i thought to be unaffected by cloud cover. This test excludes Ri for most tropospheric sounding channels under partial cloud cover conditions. AIRS Version-6 RiCC is a derived quantity representative of what AIRS channel i would have seen if the AIRS FOR were cloud free. All values of RiCC have case-by-case error estimates RiCC associated with them. Our experiments present to the GSI QCd values of AIRS RiCC in place of AIRS Ri observations. GSI DAS assimilates only those values of RiCC it thinks are cloud free. This potentially allows for better coverage of assimilated QCd values of RiCC as compared to Ri.

  19. THE UBV(RI){sub C} COLORS OF THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, I.; Michel, R.; Schuster, W. J.; Sefako, R.; Van Wyk, F.; Tucci Maia, M.; Melendez, J.; Castilho, B. V.

    2012-06-10

    Photometric data in the UBV(RI){sub C} system have been acquired for 80 solar analog stars for which we have previously derived highly precise atmospheric parameters T{sub eff}, log g, and [Fe/H] using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra. UBV and (RI){sub C} data for 46 and 76 of these stars, respectively, are published for the first time. Combining our data with those from the literature, colors in the UBV(RI){sub C} system, with {approx_equal} 0.01 mag precision, are now available for 112 solar analogs. Multiple linear regression is used to derive the solar colors from these photometric data and the spectroscopically derived T{sub eff}, log g, and [Fe/H] values. To minimize the impact of systematic errors in the model-dependent atmospheric parameters, we use only the data for the 10 stars that most closely resemble our Sun, i.e., the solar twins, and derive the following solar colors: (B - V){sub Sun} = 0.653 {+-} 0.005, (U - B){sub Sun} = 0.166 {+-} 0.022, (V - R){sub Sun} = 0.352 {+-} 0.007, and (V - I){sub Sun} = 0.702 {+-} 0.010. These colors are consistent, within the 1{sigma} errors, with those derived using the entire sample of 112 solar analogs. We also derive the solar colors using the relation between spectral-line-depth ratios and observed stellar colors, i.e., with a completely model-independent approach, and without restricting the analysis to solar twins. We find (B - V){sub Sun} = 0.653 {+-} 0.003, (U - B){sub Sun} = 0.158 {+-} 0.009, (V - R){sub Sun} = 0.356 {+-} 0.003, and (V - I){sub Sun} = 0.701 {+-} 0.003, in excellent agreement with the model-dependent analysis.

  20. Developmental Trajectories of Marijuana Use among Men: Examining Linkages with Criminal Behavior and Psychopathic Features into the Mid-30s

    PubMed Central

    Pardini, Dustin; Bechtold, Jordan; Loeber, Rolf; White, Helene

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Examine whether young men who chronically use marijuana are at risk for engaging in drug-related and non-drug-related criminal offending and exhibiting psychopathic personality features in their mid-30s. Methods Patterns of marijuana use were delineated in a sample of predominately Black and White young men from adolescence to the mid-20s using latent class growth curve analysis. Self-report and official records of criminal offending and psychopathic personality features were assessed in the mid-30s. Analyses controlled for multiple factors indicative of a preexisting antisocial lifestyle and co-occurring use of other substances and tested for moderation by race. Results Four latent marijuana trajectory groups were identified: chronic high, adolescence-limited, late increasing, and low/nonusers. Relative to low/nonusers, chronic high and late increasing marijuana users exhibited more adult psychopathic features and were more likely to engage in drug-related offending during their mid-30s. Adolescence-limited users were similar to low/nonusers in terms of psychopathic features but were more likely to be arrested for drug-related crimes. No trajectory group differences were found for violence or theft, and the group differences were not moderated by race. Conclusions Young men who engage in chronic marijuana use from adolescence into their 20s are at increased risk for exhibiting psychopathic features, dealing drugs, and enduring drug-related legal problems in their mid-30s relative to men who remain abstinent or use infrequently. PMID:26568641

  1. Coordinates and RI photometry of Large Magellanic Cloud carbon stars

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, E. )

    1990-07-01

    Coordinates and photoelectric RI magnitudes are given for 86 carbon stars discovered by Blanco et al. in four selected 0.12 deg sq areas of the LMC. A comparison with the photometry of Blanco et al. for carbon stars in three different fields of the LMC suggests that the luminosity distribution of the carbon stars may change from center to center in the LMC. This possibility is supported by the differences in the mean I magnitude of the carbon stars detected between the four areas studied. 16 refs.

  2. Differences in Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome by Breastfeeding Experience of Women in Their 30s and 40s.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Kim, Hee-Seung

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the differences in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in women in their 30s and 40s by breastfeeding experience, using the the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010) data. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 1,053 healthy women in their 30s and 40s, who had given birth was analyzed. To compare women with and without breastfeeding experience, chi-square test and t test were used. The relationship between metabolic syndrome and breastfeeding was assessed using logistic regression analysis adjusted demographic and lifestyle covariates. The breastfeeding experience of women in their 30s was associated with a decreased risk of elevated triglyceride after controlling for income, education, exercise and the last childbirth age [odds ratio (OR) = 0.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.21, 0.95)]. In addition, women who breastfed more children had high odds of metabolic syndrome [OR = 4.03, 95%CI (2.03, 8.00)], and components of metabolic syndrome [abdominal obesity: OR = 2.02, 95%CI (1.17, 3.51), elevated triglyceride: OR = 1.98, 95%CI (1.14, 3.45), elevated blood pressure: OR = 2.65, 95%CI (1.28, 5.49)] than those who never breastfed children. This study found that postpartum breastfeeding may play a significant role in reducing the risk of metabolic syndrome and also that childbearing is associated with a higher incidence of metabolic syndrome among women in their 30s. For women in their 40s, the risk of metabolic syndrome did not significantly differ depending on the breastfeeding experience. This study indicated that breastfeeding can be a way to reduce metabolic health burdens in women in their 30s. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. High Precision Measurement of Resonance States in 18Ne , 30S , and 38Ca Nuclei using the (p,t) Reaction, and Reaction Rates in the αp- and rp-Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, T.; Berg, G. P. A.; Buthelezi, E. Z.; Carter, J.; Couder, M.; Fearick, R.; Förtsch, S. V.; Görres, J.; Kheswa, Y.; Mira, J.; Murray, S.; Neveling, R.; Papka, P.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Smit, F. D.; Swartz, J. A.; Talwar, R.; Usman, I.; van Zyl, J. J.; Wiescher, M.; O'Brien, S.

    2011-10-01

    Thermonuclear runaway reactions in type 1 X-ray burst are trigged by the breakout from the hot CNO cycles and is subsequently driven by αp- and rp-processes. These time scales for the αp- and rp-process are determined by the associated reaction rates, which depend exponentially on the associated resonance energies. High precision (p,t) measurement were preformed at iThemba LABS to examine resonance states in 18Ne , 30S , and 38Ca nuclei using the K600 spectrometer with a dispersion matched beam. Preliminary analysis will be presented.

  4. RiBAC: Role Interaction Based Access Control Model for Community Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Youna; Masoumzadeh, Amirreza; Joshi, James B. D.; Kim, Minkoo

    Community computing is an agent-based development paradigm for ubiquitous computing systems. In a community computing system, ubiquitous services are provided by cooperation among agents. While agents cooperate, they interact with each other continuously to access data of other agents and/or to execute other agent’s actions. However, in cases of security-critical ubiquitous services such as medical or military services, an access control mechanism is necessary to prevent unauthorized access to critical data or action. In this paper, we propose a family of Role interaction Based Access Control (RiBAC) models for Community Computing, by extending the existing RBAC model to consider role interactions. As a basic model, we propose the core RiBAC model. For the convenience of management and to provide more fine-grained access control, we propose Hierarchical RiBAC (H-RiBAC), Constrained RiBAC (C-RiBAC), and Constrained Hierarchical RiBAC (CH-RiBAC) models. Finally, we extend the existing community computing framework to accommodate the specification and enforcement of RiBAC policies.

  5. Measurement of Electric Quadrupole Moments for 31Al Using Spin Polarized RI Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Nagae, D.; Asahi, K.; Takemura, M.; Takase, K.; Uchida, M.; Shimada, K.; Arai, T.; Inoue, T.; Kagami, S.; Hatakeyama, N.; Ueno, H.; Kameda, D.; Yoshimi, A.; Sugimoto, T.; Nagatomo, T.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2007-06-13

    The electromagnetic moment is a sensitive probe to investigate microscopic structure. In order to measure the electromagnetic moment, {beta}-NMR and {beta}-NQR methods are employed taking advantage of the fragment spin polarization produced by the fragmentation reaction. The measurement of the electric quadrupole moment for ground-state 31Al has been been carried out by {beta}-NQR method. Spin-polarized 31Al nuclei were obtained from the fragmentation of 40Ar projectiles, and were implanted in {alpha}-Al2O3 stopper. The electric quadrupole moment was deduced from the measured quadrupole coupling constant. The obtained value is |Q(31Al)| 104(9) e{center_dot}mb.

  6. Performance of Ion Surfing Rf-carpets for High-Energy RI Beam Gas Catcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Fumiya; Ito, Yuta; Katayama, Ichiro; Schury, Peter; Sonoda, Tetsu; Wada, Michiharu; Wollnik, Hermann

    A new concept for the transport of ions in gas by means of a traveling potential wave super-imposed on an rf-carpet (RFC), known as ion surfing, has recently been proposed. We demonstrated, for the first time, the transport and extraction of K+ and Cs+ ions using a circular rf-carpet in high pressure He gas. An efficiency of nearly 100% was obtained . In addition, we compared an RFC of a fine pitch (0.16 mm) and the one of a rough pitch (0.32 mm). For higher pressure, the fine RFC was found to be better than the rough RFC.

  7. Gamma Putty dosimetric studies in electron beam

    PubMed Central

    Gloi, Aime M.

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, lead has been used for field shaping in megavoltage electron beams in radiation therapy. In this study, we analyze the dosimetric parameters of a nontoxic, high atomic number (Z = 83), bismuth-loaded material called Gamma Putty that is malleable and can be easily molded to any desired shape. First, we placed an ionization chamber at different depths in a solid water phantom under a Gamma Putty shield of thickness (t = 0, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 mm, respectively) and measured the ionizing radiation on the central axis (CAX) for electron beam ranging in energies from 6 to 20 MeV. Next, we investigated the relationship between the relative ionization (RI) measured at a fixed depth for several Gamma Putty shield at different cutout diameters ranging from 2 to 5 cm for various beam energies and derived an exponential fitting equation for clinical purposes. The dose profiles along the CAX show that bremsstrahlung dominates for Gamma Putty thickness >15 mm. For high-energy beams (12–20 MeV) and all Gamma Putty thicknesses up to 25 mm, RI below 5% could not be achieved due to the strong bremsstrahlung component. However, Gamma Putty is a very suitable material for reducing the transmission factor below 5% and protecting underlying normal tissues for low-energy electron beams (6–9 MeV). PMID:27651563

  8. Cartesian beams.

    PubMed

    Bandres, Miguel A; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2007-12-01

    A new and very general beam solution of the paraxial wave equation in Cartesian coordinates is presented. We call such a field a Cartesian beam. The complex amplitude of the Cartesian beams is described by either the parabolic cylinder functions or the confluent hypergeometric functions, and the beams are characterized by three parameters that are complex in the most general situation. The propagation through complex ABCD optical systems and the conditions for square integration are studied in detail. Applying the general expression of the Cartesian beams, we also derive two new and meaningful beam structures that, to our knowledge, have not yet been reported in the literature. Special cases of the Cartesian beams are the standard, elegant, and generalized Hermite-Gauss beams, the cosine-Gauss beams, the Lorentz beams, and the fractional order beams.

  9. Characterization of the optical constants and dispersion parameters of chalcogenide Te40Se30S30 thin film: thickness effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Elrahman, M. I.; Hafiz, M. M.; Qasem, Ammar; Abdel-Rahim, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    Chalcogenide Te40Se30S30 thin films of different thickness (100-450 nm) are prepared by thermal evaporation of the Te40Se30S30 bulk. X-ray examination of the film shows some prominent peaks relate to crystalline phases indicating the crystallization process. The calculated particles of crystals from the X-ray diffraction peaks are found to be from 11 to 26 nm. As the thickness increases, the transmittance decreases and the reflectance increases. This could be attributed to the increment of the absorption of photons as more states will be available for absorbance in the case of thicker films. The decrease in the direct band gap with thickness is accompanied with an increase in energy of localized states. The obtained data for the refractive index could be fit to the dispersion model based on the single oscillator equation. The single-oscillator energy decreases, while the dispersion energy increases as the thickness increases.

  10. Single crystal XRD structure and theoretical analysis of the chiral Au30S(S-t-Bu)18 cluster.

    PubMed

    Crasto, David; Malola, Sami; Brosofsky, Grace; Dass, Amala; Häkkinen, Hannu

    2014-04-02

    Au30S(S-t-Bu)18 cluster, related closely to the recently isolated "green gold" compound Au30(S-t-Bu)18, has been structurally solved via single-crystal XRD and analyzed by density functional theory calculations. The molecular protecting layer shows a combination of monomeric (RS-Au-SR) and trimeric (RS-Au-SR-Au-SR-Au-SR) gold-thiolate units, bridging thiolates, and a single sulfur (sulfide) in a novel μ3-coordinating position. The chiral gold core has a geometrical component that is identical to the core of the recently reported Au28(SPh-t-Bu)20. Both enantiomers of Au30S(S-t-Bu)18 are found in the crystal unit cell. The calculated CD spectrum bears a close resemblance to that of Au28(SPh-t-Bu)20. This is the first time when two structurally characterized thiol-stabilized gold clusters are found to have such closely related metal core structures and the results may increase understanding of the formation of gold clusters when stabilized by bulky thiolates.

  11. Ethanol Inhibits High-Affinity Immunoglobulin E Receptor (FcεRI) Signaling in Mast Cells by Suppressing the Function of FcεRI-Cholesterol Signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Draberova, Lubica; Paulenda, Tomas; Halova, Ivana; Potuckova, Lucie; Bugajev, Viktor; Bambouskova, Monika; Tumova, Magda; Draber, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol has multiple effects on biochemical events in a variety of cell types, including the high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (FcεRI) signaling in antigen-activated mast cells. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown. To get better understanding of the effect of ethanol on FcεRI-mediated signaling we examined the effect of short-term treatment with non-toxic concentrations of ethanol on FcεRI signaling events in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells. We found that 15 min exposure to ethanol inhibited antigen-induced degranulation, calcium mobilization, expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-13), and formation of reactive oxygen species in a dose-dependent manner. Removal of cellular cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin had a similar effect and potentiated some of the inhibitory effects of ethanol. In contrast, exposure of the cells to cholesterol-saturated methyl-β-cyclodextrin abolished in part the inhibitory effect of ethanol on calcium response and production of reactive oxygen species, supporting lipid-centric theories of ethanol action on the earliest stages of mast cell signaling. Further studies showed that exposure to ethanol and/or removal of cholesterol inhibited early FcεRI activation events, including tyrosine phosphorylation of the FcεRI β and γ subunits, SYK kinases, LAT adaptor protein, phospholipase Cγ, STAT5, and AKT and internalization of aggregated FcεRI. Interestingly, ethanol alone, and particularly in combination with methyl-β-cyclodextrin, enhanced phosphorylation of negative regulatory tyrosine 507 of LYN kinase. Finally, we found that ethanol reduced passive cutaneous anaphylactic reaction in mice, suggesting that ethanol also inhibits FcεRI signaling under in vivo conditions. The combined data indicate that ethanol interferes with early antigen-induced signaling events in mast cells by suppressing the function of FcεRI

  12. Ethanol Inhibits High-Affinity Immunoglobulin E Receptor (FcεRI) Signaling in Mast Cells by Suppressing the Function of FcεRI-Cholesterol Signalosome.

    PubMed

    Draberova, Lubica; Paulenda, Tomas; Halova, Ivana; Potuckova, Lucie; Bugajev, Viktor; Bambouskova, Monika; Tumova, Magda; Draber, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol has multiple effects on biochemical events in a variety of cell types, including the high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (FcεRI) signaling in antigen-activated mast cells. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown. To get better understanding of the effect of ethanol on FcεRI-mediated signaling we examined the effect of short-term treatment with non-toxic concentrations of ethanol on FcεRI signaling events in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells. We found that 15 min exposure to ethanol inhibited antigen-induced degranulation, calcium mobilization, expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-13), and formation of reactive oxygen species in a dose-dependent manner. Removal of cellular cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin had a similar effect and potentiated some of the inhibitory effects of ethanol. In contrast, exposure of the cells to cholesterol-saturated methyl-β-cyclodextrin abolished in part the inhibitory effect of ethanol on calcium response and production of reactive oxygen species, supporting lipid-centric theories of ethanol action on the earliest stages of mast cell signaling. Further studies showed that exposure to ethanol and/or removal of cholesterol inhibited early FcεRI activation events, including tyrosine phosphorylation of the FcεRI β and γ subunits, SYK kinases, LAT adaptor protein, phospholipase Cγ, STAT5, and AKT and internalization of aggregated FcεRI. Interestingly, ethanol alone, and particularly in combination with methyl-β-cyclodextrin, enhanced phosphorylation of negative regulatory tyrosine 507 of LYN kinase. Finally, we found that ethanol reduced passive cutaneous anaphylactic reaction in mice, suggesting that ethanol also inhibits FcεRI signaling under in vivo conditions. The combined data indicate that ethanol interferes with early antigen-induced signaling events in mast cells by suppressing the function of FcεRI

  13. Anti-Ri-associated paraneoplastic cerebellar and brainstem degenerative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tay, J K; Miller, J; Joshi, A; Athey, R J

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a female patient with a subacute paraneoplastic brainstem neurological syndrome associated with breast cancer and the development of anti-Ri antineuronal antibodies (ANNAs). It is an important syndrome to identify because of the need for urgent investigation and management to reduce progressive and irreversible neurological deterioration and to recognise the associated risks of bulbar and central respiratory failure. Diagnosis can be confounded if the anticipated normality of imaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) studies is not appreciated. Positive antineuronal screening can provide rapid support for a paraneoplastic aetiology. Urgent and extensive investigation to identify the underlying tumour is imperative since neurological outcome is dependent on the rapidity of commencement and efficacy of tumour therapy. We discuss the symptoms, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes.

  14. The Birth Satisfaction Scale-Revised Indicator (BSS-RI).

    PubMed

    Martin, Colin R; Hollins Martin, Caroline; Redshaw, Maggie

    2017-08-29

    The current study sought to develop a short birth satisfaction indicator utilising items from the Birth Satisfaction Scale-Revised (BSS-R) for use as a brief measure of birth satisfaction and as a possible key performance indicator for perinatal service delivery evaluation. Building on the recently developed BSS-R, the study aimed to develop a simplified version of the instrument to assess birth satisfaction easily that could work as a short evaluative measure of clinical service delivery for labour and birth that is consistent with policy documents, placing women at the centre of the birth experience. The six item Birth Satisfaction Scale-Revised Indicator (BSS-RI) was embedded within the 2014 National Maternity Survey for England. A random selection of mothers who had given birth in a two week period in England were surveyed three months after the birth. Using a two-stage design and split-half dataset, exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, internal consistency, convergent, divergent and known-groups discriminant validity evaluation were conducted in a secondary analysis of the survey data. Using this large population based survey of recent mothers the short revised measure was found to comprise two distinct domains of birth satisfaction, 'stress and emotional response to labour and birth' and 'quality of care'. The psychometric qualities of the tool were robust as were the indices of validity and reliability evaluated. The BSS-RI represents a short easily administered and scored measure of women's satisfaction with care and the experience of labour and birth. The instrument is potentially useful for researchers, service evaluation and policy makers.

  15. 76 FR 82001 - Submission for Review: Alternative Annuity Election, RI 20-80

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Alternative Annuity Election, RI 20-80 AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel... on a revised information collection request (ICR) 3206-0168, Alternative Annuity Election, RI 20-80... other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses....

  16. 76 FR 18812 - Submission for Review: RI 30-10, Disabled Dependent Questionnaire

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: RI 30-10, Disabled Dependent Questionnaire AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel... INFORMATION: The RI 30-10, Disabled Dependent Questionnaire, is used to collect sufficient information...

  17. 76 FR 82000 - Submission for Review: Marital Status Certification Survey, RI 25-7

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Marital Status Certification Survey, RI 25-7 AGENCY: U.S. Office of... Survey, RI 25-7. As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, (Pub. L. 104-13, 44 U.S.C. chapter... collection. The information collection was previously published in the Federal Register on July 7, 2011...

  18. 76 FR 39927 - Submission for Review: Marital Status Certification Survey, RI 25-7

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Marital Status Certification Survey, RI 25-7 AGENCY: U.S. Office of... to (202) 606-0910. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: RI 25-7, Marital Status Certification Survey, is...

  19. 33 CFR 110.47 - Little Narragansett Bay, Watch Hill, R.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Hill, R.I. 110.47 Section 110.47 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Hill, R.I. All of the navigable waters of Watch Hill Cove southeasterly of a line beginning at the shore end of the United States project groin on the southerly shore of the cove and running 41°30′...

  20. 33 CFR 110.47 - Little Narragansett Bay, Watch Hill, R.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Hill, R.I. 110.47 Section 110.47 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Hill, R.I. All of the navigable waters of Watch Hill Cove southeasterly of a line beginning at the shore end of the United States project groin on the southerly shore of the cove and running 41°30′...

  1. 78 FR 55124 - Submission for Review: Death Benefit Payment Rollover Election, RI 94-7

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Death Benefit Payment Rollover Election, RI 94-7 AGENCY: U.S. Office of... (ICR) 3206-0218, Death Benefit Payment Rollover Election, RI 94-7. As required by the Paperwork... Services, Office of Personnel Management. Title: Death Benefit Payment Rollover Election. OMB: 3206-0218...

  2. 33 CFR 100.119 - Newport-Bermuda Regatta, Narragansett Bay, Newport, RI

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Newport-Bermuda Regatta, Narragansett Bay, Newport, RI 100.119 Section 100.119 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...-Bermuda Regatta, Narragansett Bay, Newport, RI (a) Regulated area. The regulated area includes all...

  3. The Humanities and Interrater Reliability: A Response to R. Stephen RiCharde

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flick, Arend

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the author's critique of R. Stephen RiCharde's argument in his essay on the humanities and interrater reliability in the July-August 2008 issue of "Assessment Update." RiCharde suggests that the humanities' historical commitment to a dialectical pedagogy, a "nonlinear" process that values disagreement and debate, is at odds…

  4. RI-1: a chemical inhibitor of RAD51 that disrupts homologous recombination in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Budke, Brian; Logan, Hillary L.; Kalin, Jay H.; Zelivianskaia, Anna S.; Cameron McGuire, William; Miller, Luke L.; Stark, Jeremy M.; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Bishop, Douglas K.; Connell, Philip P.

    2012-01-01

    Homologous recombination serves multiple roles in DNA repair that are essential for maintaining genomic stability. We here describe RI-1, a small molecule that inhibits the central recombination protein RAD51. RI-1 specifically reduces gene conversion in human cells while stimulating single strand annealing. RI-1 binds covalently to the surface of RAD51 protein at cysteine 319 that likely destabilizes an interface used by RAD51 monomers to oligomerize into filaments on DNA. Correspondingly, the molecule inhibits the formation of subnuclear RAD51 foci in cells following DNA damage, while leaving replication protein A focus formation unaffected. Finally, it potentiates the lethal effects of a DNA cross-linking drug in human cells. Given that this inhibitory activity is seen in multiple human tumor cell lines, RI-1 holds promise as an oncologic drug. Furthermore, RI-1 represents a unique tool to dissect the network of reaction pathways that contribute to DNA repair in cells. PMID:22573178

  5. Measurement of the longitudinal momentum distribution of {sup 30}S after one-proton removal from {sup 31}Cl

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Fang, D. Q.; Ma, Y. G.; Cai, X. Z.; Tian, W. D.; Wang, H. W.; Guo, W.; Liu, G. H.; Ma, C. W.; Fan, R. R.; Fu, F.; Gao, H.; Gao, Q.; Guo, W. T.; Han, J. L.; Hu, Z. G.; Huang, T. H.; Jia, F.; Li, B.; Lei, X. G.

    2011-09-15

    The breakup reactions of {sup 31}Cl+{sup 12}C at 44A MeV are investigated experimentally. The longitudinal momentum distribution of {sup 30}S after one-proton removal from {sup 31}Cl has been obtained. By assuming core plus a valence proton structure, the momentum distribution is studied using the few-body Glauber model. The calculation shows that the width of momentum distribution for a valence proton with l=2 is consistent with the experimental data, which indicates a dominant d-wave component for the valence proton in {sup 31}Cl.

  6. On the sequences ri, si, ti ∈ ℤ related to extended Euclidean algorithm and continued fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, Khairun Nisak; Kamarulhaili, Hailiza

    2016-06-01

    The extended Euclidean Algorithm is a practical technique used in many cryptographic applications, where it computes the sequences ri, si, ti ∈ ℤ that always satisfy ri = si a+ tib. The integer ri is the remainder in the ith sequences. The sequences si and ti arising from the extended Euclidean algorithm are equal, up to sign, to the convergents of the continued fraction expansion of a/b. The values of (ri, si, ti) satisfy various properties which are used to solve the shortest vector problem in representing point multiplications in elliptic curves cryptography, namely the GLV (Gallant, Lambert & Vanstone) integer decomposition method and the ISD (integer sub decomposition) method. This paper is to extend the proof for each of the existing properties on (ri, si, ti). We also generate new properties which are relevant to the sequences ri, si, ti ∈ ℤ. The concepts of Euclidean algorithm, extended Euclidean algorithm and continued fractions are intertwined and the properties related to these concepts are proved. These properties together with the existing properties of the sequence (ri, si, ti) are regarded as part and parcel of the building blocks of a new generation of an efficient cryptographic protocol.

  7. Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process, elements and techniques guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This manual provides detailed guidance on Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FSs) conducted pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The purpose of the RI/FS, to assess the risk posed by a hazardous waste site and to determine the best way to reduce that risk, and its structure (site characterization, risk assessment, screening and detailed analysis of alternatives, etc.) is defined in the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) and further explained in the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies Under CERCLA (Interim Final) 540/G-89/004, OSWER Directive 9355.3-01, October 1988. Though issued in 1988, the EPA guidance remains an excellent source of information on the conduct and structure of an RI/FS. This document makes use of supplemental RI/FS-related guidance that EPA has developed since its initial document was issued in 1988, incorporates practical lessons learned in more than 12 years of experience in CERCLA hazardous site remediation, and drawing on those lessons, introduces the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER), developed by DOE as a way to proceed quickly and efficiently through the RI/FS process at DOE facilities. Thus as its title implies, this guidance is intended to describe in detail the process and component elements of an RI/FS, as well as techniques to manage the RI/FS effectively.

  8. Understanding ribosome assembly: the structure of in vivo assembled immature 30S subunits revealed by cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jomaa, Ahmad; Stewart, Geordie; Martín-Benito, Jaime; Zielke, Ryszard; Campbell, Tracey L; Maddock, Janine R; Brown, Eric D; Ortega, Joaquin

    2011-04-01

    Four decades after early in vitro assembly studies demonstrated that ribosome assembly is a controlled process, our understanding of ribosome assembly is still incomplete. Just as structure determination has been so important to understanding ribosome function, so too will it be critical to sorting out the assembly process. Here, we used a viable deletion in the yjeQ gene, a recognized ribosome assembly factor, to isolate and structurally characterize immature 30S subunits assembled in vivo. These small ribosome subunits contained unprocessed 17S rRNA and lacked some late ribosomal proteins. Cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions revealed that the presence of precursor sequences in the rRNA induces a severe distortion in the 3' minor domain of the subunit involved in the decoding of mRNA and interaction with the large ribosome subunit. These findings suggest that rRNA processing events induce key local conformational changes directing the structure toward the mature assembly. We concluded that rRNA processing, folding, and the entry of tertiary r-proteins are interdependent events in the late stages of 30S subunit assembly. In addition, we demonstrate how studies of emerging assembly factors in ribosome biogenesis can help to elucidate the path of subunit assembly in vivo.

  9. Stable isotope pulse-chase monitored by quantitative mass spectrometry applied to E. coli 30S ribosome assembly kinetics.

    PubMed

    Bunner, Anne E; Williamson, James R

    2009-10-01

    Stable isotope mass spectrometry has become a widespread tool in quantitative biology. Pulse-chase monitored by quantitative mass spectrometry (PC/QMS) is a recently developed stable isotope approach that provides a powerful means of studying the in vitro self-assembly kinetics of macromolecular complexes. This method has been applied to the Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit, but could be applied to any stable self-assembling complex that can be reconstituted from its component parts and purified from a mixture of components and complex. The binding rates of 18 out of the 20 ribosomal proteins have been measured at several temperatures using PC/QMS. Here, PC/QMS experiments on 30S ribosomal subunit assembly are described, and the potential application of the method to other complexes is discussed. A variation on the PC/QMS experiment is introduced that enables measurement of kinetic cooperativity between proteins. In addition, several related approaches to stable isotope labeling and quantitative mass spectrometry data analysis are compared and contrasted.

  10. Heterogeneity in Men’s Marijuana Use in the 20s: Adolescent Antecedents and Consequences in the 30s

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, Isaac J.; Capaldi, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent psychopathology is commonly connected to marijuana use. How changes in these adolescent antecedents and in adolescent marijuana use are connected to patterns of marijuana use in the 20s is little understood. Also not clearly understood is psychopathology in the 30s as predicted by marijuana use in the 20s. This study sought to examine these two issues – and associations with marijuana disorder diagnoses – using a longitudinal dataset of 205 men with essentially annual reports. Individual psychopathology and family characteristics from the men’s adolescence were used to predict their patterns of marijuana use across their 20s, and aspects of the men’s psychopathology in their mid 30s were predicted from these patterns. Three patterns of marijuana use in the 20s were identified using growth mixture modeling and were associated with diagnoses of marijuana disorders at age 26 years. Parental marijuana use predicted chronic use for the men in adulthood. Patterns of marijuana use in the 20s predicted antisocial behavior and deviant peer association at age 36 years (controlling for adolescent levels of the outcomes by residualization). These findings indicate that differential patterns of marijuana use in early adulthood are associated with psychopathology toward midlife. PMID:25017389

  11. Stability of EcoRI restriction-modification enzymes in vivo differentiates the EcoRI restriction-modification system from other postsegregational cell killing systems.

    PubMed

    Ichige, Asao; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2005-10-01

    Certain type II restriction modification gene systems can kill host cells when these gene systems are eliminated from the host cells. Such ability to cause postsegregational killing of host cells is the feature of bacterial addiction modules, each of which consists of toxin and antitoxin genes. With these addiction modules, the differential stability of toxin and antitoxin molecules in cells plays an essential role in the execution of postsegregational killing. We here examined in vivo stability of the EcoRI restriction enzyme (toxin) and modification enzyme (antitoxin), the gene system of which has previously been shown to cause postsegregational host killing in Escherichia coli. Using two different methods, namely, quantitative Western blot analysis and pulse-chase immunoprecipitation analysis, we demonstrated that both the EcoRI restriction enzyme and modification enzyme are as stable as bulk cellular proteins and that there is no marked difference in their stability. The numbers of EcoRI restriction and modification enzyme molecules present in a host cell during the steady-state growth were estimated. We monitored changes in cellular levels of the EcoRI restriction and modification enzymes during the postsegregational killing. Results from these analyses together suggest that the EcoRI gene system does not rely on differential stability between the toxin and the antitoxin molecules for execution of postsegregational cell killing. Our results provide insights into the mechanism of postsegregational killing by restriction-modification systems, which seems to be distinct from mechanisms of postsegregational killing by other bacterial addiction modules.

  12. Effect of nanoparticles on the RII -RI -RV rotator phase transitions of alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Prabir K.

    2017-08-01

    Experimental studies have shown that nanoparticles play an important role on the rotator phase transitions of n-alkanes. A phenomenological model for predicting the RII -RI -RV phase transitions in mixtures of alkanes and nanoparticles has been proposed by combining Flory-Huggins free energy of isotropic mixing and Landau free energy. The impact of nanoparticles on the RII -RI -RV phase transitions and their transition temperatures is discussed by means of phenomenological theory. The possibility of the tricritical behavior of the RI -RV phase transition in the mixtures of alkanes and nanoparticles is discussed. The theoretical predictions are in good qualitative agreement with available experimental results.

  13. Optical observations of meteors in RI Nikolaev Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulga, Alexander; Sybiryakova, Yevgeniya; Kulichenko, Nikolay; Vovk, Vasyl

    2015-08-01

    Video observations of meteors at the RI NAO are conducted using meteor patrol, which includes 6 optical telescopes (4 lenses: f = 85 mm, f/1.8; 2 lenses: f = 100 mm, f/2.0) equipped with a TV CCD cameras WAT-902H2 (768×576, 8.6×8.3µ). The field of view of 4 telescopes is 3.2°×4.2° and 2.7°×3.6° for 2 telescopes. System doesn't have any intensifier. Each video system is contained in a hermetic capsule to prevent it from rain and other aggressive meteorological conditions. Cameras work in the interlace mode with rate 50 half-frames per second.During 2011-2014 4135 single station meteors were observed. The mean duration of observed meteor trajectories are in 0.05-0.6 s. Double station observation campaigns has been started in September 2013 and it is still working with baseline 11.8 km. During September 2013 - September 2014 total number of observed meteor trajectories was 1757. Number of double station meteors - 328. The mean accuracy of visible radiant determination is less than 0.5 arc sec, more than 80% of radiates have standard deviation less than 0.2 arc sec.

  14. Initial Measurements of Radiocarbon In Atmospheric Formaldehyde at Narragansett, RI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H.; Heikes, B. G.; Xu, L.; McNichol, A. P.; Olson, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    Formaldehyde is an intermediate in the atmospheric oxidation of nearly every volatile organic compound (VOC) and is important to odd-hydrogen radicals and ozone chemistry. It is directly observed from space and its distributions are used to constrain biogenic emissions of VOCs, specifically isoprene. The relative contribution of fossil VOCs and biogenic VOCs to formaldehyde, to isoprene emission estimates and subsequently to ozone and oxidant chemistry is expected to vary seasonally and spatially due to VOC speciation, emission patterns, and reactivity. The radiocarbon, 14C, content of formaldehyde is useful in assessing the relative contributions of fossil and biogenic VOC groups to formaldehyde. We report a compound specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA) method for formaldehyde based upon gaseous formaldehyde collection, derivatization to thiazolidine, preparative capillary gas chromatography separation, and AMS analysis. Ambient measurements from Narragansett, RI, made in winter and summer 2007 are presented. On 11 of 13 samples, we find 80 to >95% of the collected formaldehyde is of fossil origin and, contrary to our initial hypothesis, we see no seasonal shift in proportion. The remaining 2 samples, one each from winter and summer, are 30-40% biogenic carbon. The measurements are interpreted considering fossil-biogenic source attribution and local transport conditions and contrasted with prior measurements from Nova Scotia. Further, CSRA measurement of acetaldehyde is feasible with the method.

  15. CCD UBV(RI)C photometry of twenty open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oralhan, İnci Akkaya; Karataş, Yüksel; Schuster, William J.; Michel, Raúl; Chavarría, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental astrophysical parameters have been derived for 20 open clusters (OCs) using CCD UBV(RI)C photometric data observed with the 84 cm telescope at the San Pedro Mártir National Astronomical Observatory, México. The interstellar reddenings, metallicities, distances, and ages have been compared to the literature values. Significant differences are usually due to the usage of diverse empirical calibrations and differing assumptions, such as concerning cluster metallicity, as well as distinct isochrones which correspond to differing element-abundance ratios, internal stellar physics, and photometric systems. Different interstellar reddenings, as well as varying reduction and cluster-membership techniques, are also responsible for these kinds of systematic differences and errors. The morphological ages, which are derived from the morphological indices (δV and δ1) in the CM diagrams, are in good agreement with the isochrone ages of 12 OCs, those with good red clump (RC) and red giant (RG) star candidates. No metal abundance gradient is detected for the range 6.82⩽RGC⩽15.37 kpc, nor any correlation between the cluster ages and metal abundances for these 20 OCs. Young, metal-poor OCs, observed here in the third Galactic quadrant, may be associated with stellar over-densities, such as that in Canis Major (Martin et al.) and the Monoceros Ring (Newberg et al.), or signatures of past accretion events, as discussed by Yong et al. and Carraro et al.

  16. Beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-08-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the {open_quotes}Booster{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ATLAS{close_quotes} linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates.

  17. A Soluble Form of the High Affinity IgE Receptor, Fc-Epsilon-RI, Circulates in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Dehlink, Eleonora; Platzer, Barbara; Baker, Alexandra H.; LaRosa, Jessica; Pardo, Michael; Dwyer, Peter; Yen, Elizabeth H.; Szépfalusi, Zsolt

    2011-01-01

    Soluble IgE receptors are potential in vivo modulators of IgE-mediated immune responses and are thus important for our basic understanding of allergic responses. We here characterize a novel soluble version of the IgE-binding alpha-chain of Fc-epsilon-RI (sFcεRI), the high affinity receptor for IgE. sFcεRI immunoprecipitates as a protein of ∼40 kDa and contains an intact IgE-binding site. In human serum, sFcεRI is found as a soluble free IgE receptor as well as a complex with IgE. Using a newly established ELISA, we show that serum sFcεRI levels correlate with serum IgE in patients with elevated IgE. We also show that serum of individuals with normal IgE levels can be found to contain high levels of sFcεRI. After IgE-antigen-mediated crosslinking of surface FcεRI, we detect sFcεRI in the exosome-depleted, soluble fraction of cell culture supernatants. We further show that sFcεRI can block binding of IgE to FcεRI expressed at the cell surface. In summary, we here describe the alpha-chain of FcεRI as a circulating soluble IgE receptor isoform in human serum. PMID:21544204

  18. A combined quantitative mass spectrometry and electron microscopy analysis of ribosomal 30S subunit assembly in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Sashital, Dipali G; Greeman, Candacia A; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Williamson, James R

    2014-10-14

    Ribosome assembly is a complex process involving the folding and processing of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), concomitant binding of ribosomal proteins (r-proteins), and participation of numerous accessory cofactors. Here, we use a quantitative mass spectrometry/electron microscopy hybrid approach to determine the r-protein composition and conformation of 30S ribosome assembly intermediates in Escherichia coli. The relative timing of assembly of the 3' domain and the formation of the central pseudoknot (PK) structure depends on the presence of the assembly factor RimP. The central PK is unstable in the absence of RimP, resulting in the accumulation of intermediates in which the 3'-domain is unanchored and the 5'-domain is depleted for r-proteins S5 and S12 that contact the central PK. Our results reveal the importance of the cofactor RimP in central PK formation, and introduce a broadly applicable method for characterizing macromolecular assembly in cells.

  19. Automatic evaluation of the 30-s chair stand test using inertial/magnetic-based technology in an older prefrail population.

    PubMed

    Millor, Nora; Lecumberri, Pablo; Gomez, Marisol; Martinez-Ramirez, Alicia; Rodriguez-Manas, Leocadio; Garcia-Garcia, Francisco José; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the inertial measures of the 30-s chair stand test using modern body-fixed motion sensors. Polynomial data fitting was used to correct the drift effect in the position estimation. Thereafter, the three most important test cycles phases ("impulse," "stand up," and "sit down") were characterized and automatically analyzed. Automated test control is provided, making it possible for researchers without engineering knowledge to run the test. A collection of meaningful data based on kinematic variables is selected for further research. The proposed methodology for data analysis is a feasible tool for use in clinical settings. This method may not only improve rehabilitation therapies but also identify people at risk for falls more accurately than simply evaluating the number of cycles.

  20. [Desperately seeking decentralisation: Mexican health policies in two periods of reform: the 1920s-30s and the 1980s].

    PubMed

    Birn, Anne-Emannuelle

    2005-01-01

    This article compares public health policy reforms in Mexico during the 1920s and 1930s with subsequent reforms initiated in the 1980s. The attempts at decentralization in the 1920s-30s were supported by the Rockefeller Foundation, which was interested in the formation of local cooperative health units. In the 1980s, the aim of the Mexican government and international financial agencies, such as the Inter-American Development Bank, was to reduce public spending (as part of "structural adjustment" policies). One of the hypotheses of this article is that, in the end, the public health reforms were unable to overcome the limitations imposed by Mexico's political centralization and longstanding inequities in public spending. At the same time, one of the unforeseen achievements of these reforms was an increase in local capabilities to demand a better distribution of social services.

  1. R.I. Officials, EPA Celebrate Successful Climate Showcase Communities Partnership

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    RI's Congressional delegation today joined the EPA, elected officials, & community leaders to celebrate innovative work accomplished by 4 Ocean State communities to reduce energy consumption & greenhouse gas emissions in municipal & residential buildings.

  2. City of Newport, R.I. Industrial Pretreatment Program Recognized for Excellence

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Newport, R.I. Water Pollution Control Plant was recently selected by EPA for a 2014 Regional Industrial Pretreatment Program Excellence Award. The pretreatment program staff at the Newport facility, led by Industrial Pretreatment

  3. Agreement Ensures Groundwater Study at No. Smithfield, R.I. Superfund Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The owner/operators & parties responsible for hazardous substance disposal at the Landfill & Resource Recovery Superfund Site in N. Smithfield, RI, have agreed to perform & pay for an investigation & study to evaluate the extent of, & cleanup options...

  4. 77 FR 49029 - Submission for Review: Annuity Supplement Earnings Report, RI 92-22

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ... Personnel Management, 1900 E Street NW., Room 4332, Washington, DC 20415, Attention: Cyrus S. Benson or sent via electronic mail to Cyrus.Benson@opm.gov or faxed to (202) 606-0910. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: RI...

  5. 33 CFR 100.119 - Newport-Bermuda Regatta, Narragansett Bay, Newport, RI

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of Narragansett Bay, Newport, RI, within the following points (NAD 83): Latitude Longitude 41°27′51... will begin offshore and the following regulated area applies (NAD 83): Latitude Longitude 41°26′04″...

  6. 33 CFR 100.119 - Newport-Bermuda Regatta, Narragansett Bay, Newport, RI

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of Narragansett Bay, Newport, RI, within the following points (NAD 83): Latitude Longitude 41°27′51... will begin offshore and the following regulated area applies (NAD 83): Latitude Longitude 41°26′04″...

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: RR Gem BV(RI)c differential photometry (Jurcsik+, 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurcsik, J.; Sodor, A.; Varadi, M.; Szeidl, B.; Washuettl, A.; Weber, M.; Dekany, I.; Hurta, Zs.; Lakatos, B.; Posztobanyi, K.; Szing, A.; Vida, K.

    2004-10-01

    The observations were obtained with the automated 60cm telescope of Konkoly Observatory, Svabhegy, Budapest equiped with a Wright 750x1100 CCD using BV(RI)c filters, between 14 January and 4 May 2004. (4 data files).

  8. Single protein omission reconstitution studies of tetracycline binding to the 30S subunit of Escherichia coli ribosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, M.; Cooperman, B.S. )

    1990-06-05

    In previous work the authors showed that on photolysis of Escherichia coli ribosomes in the presence of ({sup 3}H)tetracycline (TC) the major protein labeled is S7, and they presented strong evidence that such labeling takes place from a high-affinity site related to the inhibitory action of TC. In this work they use single protein omission reconstitution (SPORE) experiments to identify those proteins that are important for high-affinity TC binding to the 30S subunit, as measured by both cosedimentation and filter binding assays. With respect to both sedimentation coefficients and relative Phe-tRNA{sup Phe} binding, the properties of the SPORE particles they obtain parallel very closely those measured earlier, with the exception of the SPORE particle lacking S13. A total of five proteins, S3, S7, S8, S14, and S19, are shown to be important for TC binding, with the largest effects seen on omission of proteins S7 and S14. Determination of the protein compositions of the corresponding SPORE particles demonstrates that the observed effects are, for the most part, directly attributable to the omission of the given protein rather than reflecting an indirect effect of omitting one protein on the uptake of another. A large body of evidence supports the notion that four of these proteins, S3, S7, S14, and S19, are included, along with 16S rRNA bases 920-1,396, in one of the major domains of the 30S subunit. The results support the conclusion that the structure of this domain is important for the binding of TC and that, within this domain, TC binds directly to S7.

  9. Europlanet-RI IDIS - A Data Network in Support of Planetary Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Walter; Capria, Maria Teresa; Chanteur, Gérard

    2010-05-01

    The "Europlanet Research Infrastructure - Europlanet RI", supported by the European Commission's Framework Program 7, aims at integrating major parts of the distributed European Planetary Research infrastructure with as diverse components as space exploration, ground-based observations, laboratory experiments and numerical modeling teams. A central part of Europlanet RI is the "Integrated and Distributed Information Service" (IDIS), a network of data and information access facilities in Europe via which information relevant for planetary research can be easily found and retrieved. This covers the wide range from contact addresses of possible research partners, laboratories and test facilities to the access of data collected with space missions or during laboratory or simulation tests and to model software useful for their interpretation. During the following three years the capabilities of the network will be extended to allow the combination of many different data sources for comperative studies including the results of modeling calculations and simulations of instrument observations. Together with the access to complex databases for spectra of atmospheric molecules and planetary surface material IDIS will offer a versatile working environment for making the scientific exploitation of the resources put into planetary research in the past and future more effective. Many of the mentioned capabilities are already available now. List of contact web-sites: Technical node for support and management aspects: http://www.idis.europlanet-ri.eu/ Planetary Surfaces and Interiors node: http://www.idis-interiors.europlanet-ri.eu/ Planetary Plasma node: http://www.idis-plasma.europlanet-ri.eu/ Planetary Atmospheres node: http://www.idis-atmos.europlanet-ri.eu/ Small Bodies and Dust node: http://www.idis-sbdn.europlanet-ri.eu/ Planetary Dynamics and Extraterrestrial Matter node: http://www.idis-dyn.europlanet-ri.eu/

  10. Planetary GIS and EuroPlanet-RI H2020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, A. P.; Cecconi, B.; Manaud, N.; Erard, S.; Marmo, C.

    2015-10-01

    Geographic Information System (GIS) practice and applications within Planetary Science became in the last decade a major component for studying solid surfaces of Solar System bodies [e.g. 1,2,3]: from earlier mainly Mars-focused efforts limited to few datasets, the availability of high-quality spatial data grew enormously and its accessibility is also enhanced by the use of OGC web standards. Higher-level, calibrated georeferenced datasets are the prime target for geologic and related thematic mapping [e.g. 4], although the communities potentially benefiting from a GIS-based approach are beyond and they include most closely Atmospheric science, as well as Magnetospheric and Plasma Physics, to quote only few. In the upcoming EuroPlanet-RI H2020 project Planetary GIS efforts are embedded within the VESPA activity [5] and they allow for a tight integration of OGC and VO-based tools and interfaces [6]. Nowadays GIS-based analyses are used for carrying out research tasks and systematic mapping on planetary bodies, but also for a wide range of analyses related [e.g. 7] to landing site selection, ranging from scientific merit to safety [e.g.8] Community building is a key part of VESPA [5], but also independently followed by other actors like ESA PSA [9]. Recently a workshop on Planetary GIS in broad sense and with particular reference to ESA data archives has been organized [10]. Such workshop has been strongly supported by ESA and the broad planetary community, both directly and through its official channel for Planetary Science archive science access and exploitation-related needs, the PSA User Group [11]. Its outcomes, also in terms of use case development, might be instrumental to VESPA GIS/VO future activities

  11. Fast, accurate evaluation of exact exchange: The occ-RI-K algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Manzer, Samuel; Horn, Paul R.; Mardirossian, Narbe; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2015-07-14

    Construction of the exact exchange matrix, K, is typically the rate-determining step in hybrid density functional theory, and therefore, new approaches with increased efficiency are highly desirable. We present a framework with potential for greatly improved efficiency by computing a compressed exchange matrix that yields the exact exchange energy, gradient, and direct inversion of the iterative subspace (DIIS) error vector. The compressed exchange matrix is constructed with one index in the compact molecular orbital basis and the other index in the full atomic orbital basis. To illustrate the advantages, we present a practical algorithm that uses this framework in conjunction with the resolution of the identity (RI) approximation. We demonstrate that convergence using this method, referred to hereafter as occupied orbital RI-K (occ-RI-K), in combination with the DIIS algorithm is well-behaved, that the accuracy of computed energetics is excellent (identical to conventional RI-K), and that significant speedups can be obtained over existing integral-direct and RI-K methods. For a 4400 basis function C{sub 68}H{sub 22} hydrogen-terminated graphene fragment, our algorithm yields a 14 × speedup over the conventional algorithm and a speedup of 3.3 × over RI-K.

  12. Fast, accurate evaluation of exact exchange: The occ-RI-K algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Manzer, Samuel; Horn, Paul R.; Mardirossian, Narbe; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Construction of the exact exchange matrix, K, is typically the rate-determining step in hybrid density functional theory, and therefore, new approaches with increased efficiency are highly desirable. We present a framework with potential for greatly improved efficiency by computing a compressed exchange matrix that yields the exact exchange energy, gradient, and direct inversion of the iterative subspace (DIIS) error vector. The compressed exchange matrix is constructed with one index in the compact molecular orbital basis and the other index in the full atomic orbital basis. To illustrate the advantages, we present a practical algorithm that uses this framework in conjunction with the resolution of the identity (RI) approximation. We demonstrate that convergence using this method, referred to hereafter as occupied orbital RI-K (occ-RI-K), in combination with the DIIS algorithm is well-behaved, that the accuracy of computed energetics is excellent (identical to conventional RI-K), and that significant speedups can be obtained over existing integral-direct and RI-K methods. For a 4400 basis function C68H22 hydrogen-terminated graphene fragment, our algorithm yields a 14 × speedup over the conventional algorithm and a speedup of 3.3 × over RI-K. PMID:26178096

  13. IL-1RI participates in normal growth plate development and bone modeling.

    PubMed

    Simsa-Maziel, Stav; Zaretsky, Janna; Reich, Adi; Koren, Yoav; Shahar, Ron; Monsonego-Ornan, Efrat

    2013-07-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) signals through IL-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) and induces osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption mainly during pathological conditions. Little is known about the effect of excess or absence of IL-1 signaling on the physiological development of the growth plate and bone. In this study, we examine growth plate morphology, bone structure, and mechanical properties as well as osteoclast number in IL-1RI knockout mice to evaluate the role of IL-1RI in the normal development of the growth plate and bone. We show for the first time that IL-1RI knockout mice have narrower growth plates due to a smaller hypertrophic zone, suggesting a role for this cytokine in hypertrophic differentiation, together with higher proteoglycan content. The bones of theses mice exhibit higher trabecular and cortical mass, increased mineral density, and superior mechanical properties. In addition, IL-1RI knockout mice have significantly reduced osteoclast numbers in the chondro-osseous junction, trabecular bone, and cortical bone. These results suggest that IL-1RI is involved in normal growth plate development and ECM homeostasis and that it is significant in the physiological process of bone modeling.

  14. A new low-energy radioactive beam line for nuclear astrophysics studies in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. J.; Xu, S. W.; Ma, P.; Wang, J. S.; Yang, Y. Y.; Ma, J. B.; Zhang, L. Y.; Li, L.; Yu, X. Q.; Jin, S. L.; Hu, J.; Kubono, S.; Chen, S. Z.; Zhang, N. T.; Liu, M. L.; Lei, X. G.; Sun, Z. Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhou, X. H.; Xu, H. S.; Xiao, G. Q.

    2012-07-01

    A gas-target system has been newly developed and installed at a Radioactive Ion Beam Line in Lanzhou (RIBLL), which makes RIBLL capable of delivering intense, low-energy RIBs for nuclear astrophysics studies. A 1.7×104-pps intensity 22Na RI beam has been achieved in a commissioning run. With further improvements, a 105-pps intensity of some RI beams with mass A<30 (close to the line of β-stability) can be expected in the near future. Some detection equipment including Germanium and Silicon arrays (or balls) available (or to be constructed) at IMP are briefly introduced. A new low-energy radioactive beam line in China is now ready for nuclear astrophysics studies.

  15. Beam-energy inequality in the beam-beam interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnagopal, S.; Siemann, R. )

    1990-03-01

    Conditions for energy transparency,'' unequal-energy beams having the same beam-beam behavior, are derived for round beams from a Hamiltonian model of the beam-beam interaction. These conditions are equal fractional betatron tunes, equal synchrotron tunes, equal beam-beam strength parameters, equal nominal sizes, equal {beta}{sup *}'s and equal bunch lengths. With these conditions the only way to compensate for unequal energies is with the number of particles per bunch.

  16. A combined quantitative mass spectrometry and electron microscopy analysis of ribosomal 30S subunit assembly in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Sashital, Dipali G; Greeman, Candacia A; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Williamson, James R

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is a complex process involving the folding and processing of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), concomitant binding of ribosomal proteins (r-proteins), and participation of numerous accessory cofactors. Here, we use a quantitative mass spectrometry/electron microscopy hybrid approach to determine the r-protein composition and conformation of 30S ribosome assembly intermediates in Escherichia coli. The relative timing of assembly of the 3′ domain and the formation of the central pseudoknot (PK) structure depends on the presence of the assembly factor RimP. The central PK is unstable in the absence of RimP, resulting in the accumulation of intermediates in which the 3′-domain is unanchored and the 5′-domain is depleted for r-proteins S5 and S12 that contact the central PK. Our results reveal the importance of the cofactor RimP in central PK formation, and introduce a broadly applicable method for characterizing macromolecular assembly in cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04491.001 PMID:25313868

  17. Beam tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.; Zinkann, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    A program for configuring the linac, based on previously run configurations for any desired beam was used during the past year. This program uses only a small number of empirical tunes to scale resonator fields to properly accelerate a beam with a different charge-to-mass (q/A) ratio from the original tune configuration. The program worked very well for the PII linac section where we can easily match a new beam`s arrival phase and velocity to the tuned value. It was also fairly successful for the Booster and ATLAS sections of the linac, but not as successful as for the PII linac. Most of the problems are associated with setting the beam arrival time correctly for each major linac section. This problem is being addressed with the development of the capacitive pickup beam phase monitor discussed above. During the next year we expect to improve our ability to quickly configure the linac for new beams and reduce the time required for linac tuning. Already the time required for linac tuning as a percentage of research hours has decreased from 22% in FY 1993 to 15% in the first quarter of FY 1995.

  18. Emdogain-regulated gene expression in palatal fibroblasts requires TGF-βRI kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Stähli, Alexandra; Bosshardt, Dieter; Sculean, Anton; Gruber, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide microarrays have suggested that Emdogain regulates TGF-β target genes in gingival and palatal fibroblasts. However, definitive support for this contention and the extent to which TGF-β signaling contributes to the effects of Emdogain has remained elusive. We therefore studied the role of the TGF-β receptor I (TGF-βRI) kinase to mediate the effect of Emdogain on palatal fibroblasts. Palatal fibroblasts were exposed to Emdogain with and without the inhibitor for TGF-βRI kinase, SB431542. Emdogain caused 39 coding genes to be differentially expressed in palatal fibroblasts by microarray analysis (p<0.05; >10-fold). Importantly, in the presence of the TGF-βRI kinase inhibitor SB431542, Emdogain failed to cause any significant changes in gene expression. Consistent with this mechanism, three independent TGF-βRI kinase inhibitors and a TGF-β neutralizing antibody abrogated the increased expression of IL-11, a selected Emdogain target gene. The MAPK inhibitors SB203580 and U0126 lowered the impact of Emdogain on IL-11 expression. The data support that TGF-βRI kinase activity is necessary to mediate the effects of Emdogain on gene expression in vitro.

  19. [Bacteria and viruses modulate FcεRI-dependent mast cell activity].

    PubMed

    Słodka, Aleksandra; Brzezińska-Błaszczyk, Ewa

    2013-03-08

    Undoubtedly, mast cells play a central role in allergic processes. Specific allergen cross-linking of IgE bound to the high affinity receptors (FcεRI) on the mast cell surface leads to the release of preformed mediators and newly synthesized mediators, i.e. metabolites of arachidonic acid and cytokines. More and more data indicate that bacteria and viruses can influence FcεRI-dependent mast cell activation. Some bacterial and viral components can reduce the surface expression of FcεRI. There are also findings that ligation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) by bacterial or viral antigens can affect IgE-dependent mast cell degranulation and preformed mediator release as well as eicosanoid production. The synergistic interaction of TLR ligands and allergen can also modify cytokine synthesis by mast cells stimulated via FcεRI. Moreover, data suggest that specific IgE for bacterial or viral antigens can influence mast cell activity. What is more, some bacterial and viral components or some endogenous proteins produced during viral infection can act as superantigens by interacting with the VH3 domain of IgE. All these observations indicate that bacterial and viral infections modify the course of allergic diseases by affecting FcεRI-dependent mast cell activation. 

  20. BspRI restriction endonuclease: cloning, expression in Escherichia coli and sequential cleavage mechanism.

    PubMed

    Raskó, Tamás; Dér, András; Klement, Eva; Slaska-Kiss, Krystyna; Pósfai, Eszter; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Marshak, Daniel R; Roberts, Richard J; Kiss, Antal

    2010-11-01

    The GGCC-specific restriction endonuclease BspRI is one of the few Type IIP restriction endonucleases, which were suggested to be a monomer. Amino acid sequence information obtained by Edman sequencing and mass spectrometry analysis was used to clone the gene encoding BspRI. The bspRIR gene is located adjacently to the gene of the cognate modification methyltransferase and encodes a 304 aa protein. Expression of the bspRIR gene in Escherichia coli was dependent on the replacement of the native TTG initiation codon with an ATG codon, explaining previous failures in cloning the gene using functional selection. A plasmid containing a single BspRI recognition site was used to analyze kinetically nicking and second-strand cleavage under steady-state conditions. Cleavage of the supercoiled plasmid went through a relaxed intermediate indicating sequential hydrolysis of the two strands. Results of the kinetic analysis of the first- and second-strand cleavage are consistent with cutting the double-stranded substrate site in two independent binding events. A database search identified eight putative restriction-modification systems in which the predicted endonucleases as well as the methyltransferases share high sequence similarity with the corresponding protein of the BspRI system. BspRI and the related putative restriction endonucleases belong to the PD-(D/E)XK nuclease superfamily.

  1. SWAP-70 regulates mast cell FcεRI-mediated signaling and anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Sivalenka, Raja Rajeswari; Sinha, Manoj; Jessberger, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Mast cells, perhaps best known by their ability to trigger allergic reactions after stimulation through the FcεRI, express the unusual phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent, Rac-binding protein SWAP-70. Here we show that the IgE-mediated passive cutaneous and the systemic anaphylactic responses are strongly reduced in SWAP-70−/− mice. Cultured SWAP-70−/− immature bone marrow mast cells (BMMC) are also impaired in FcεRI-mediated degranulation, which can be restored by expression of exogenous wild-type SWAP-70, but less so if a phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate (PIP3) binding mutant is expressed. SWAP-70 itself supports inositol-3-phosphate and PIP3 production, the latter indicating a potential feedback from SWAP-70 towards PI3K. FcεRI-stimulated transcription and release of cytokines is controlled by SWAP-70. Key FcεRI signal transduction events like activation of LAT by phosphorylation, activation of Akt/PKB and of p38 MAPKinase are reduced in SWAP-70−/− BMMC, but ERK is strongly hyperactivated. Some requirements for SWAP-70 were apparent only under limited-strength signaling conditions. We suggest that SWAP-70 defines a new element of efficient mast cell activation upon FcεRI signaling, important for the control of mast cell dependent anaphylaxis. PMID:18236401

  2. RI in central retinal artery as assessed by CDI does not correspond to retinal vascular resistance.

    PubMed

    Polska, E; Kircher, K; Ehrlich, P; Vecsei, P V; Schmetterer, L

    2001-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between ultrasound Doppler measurements of resistive index (RI) in the central retinal artery and retinal vascular resistance (R) assessed with laser Doppler velocimetry, vessel size measurement, and calculation of ocular perfusion pressure (PP) in healthy subjects. An increase in vascular resistance was induced by inhalation of 100% O(2). During hyperoxia no significant changes in PP were observed. Mean flow velocity in main retinal veins was reduced by -27.5 +/- 2.0%. The average decrease in diameter was -11.5 +/- 1.0%. R, which was calculated as the ratio of PP to flow rate, increased by 97.6 +/- 7.7%. RI increased as well, but the effect was much smaller (6.6 +/- 2.2%). In addition, a negative correlation was found between baseline values of R and RI (r = -0.83). During hyperoxia R and RI were not associated. In conclusion, our data indicate that RI as assessed with color Doppler imaging in the central retinal artery is not an adequate measure of R.

  3. RiPPAS: A Ring-Based Privacy-Preserving Aggregation Scheme in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kejia; Han, Qilong; Cai, Zhipeng; Yin, Guisheng

    2017-02-07

    Recently, data privacy in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) has been paid increased attention. The characteristics of WSNs determine that users' queries are mainly aggregation queries. In this paper, the problem of processing aggregation queries in WSNs with data privacy preservation is investigated. A Ring-based Privacy-Preserving Aggregation Scheme (RiPPAS) is proposed. RiPPAS adopts ring structure to perform aggregation. It uses pseudonym mechanism for anonymous communication and uses homomorphic encryption technique to add noise to the data easily to be disclosed. RiPPAS can handle both s u m ( ) queries and m i n ( ) / m a x ( ) queries, while the existing privacy-preserving aggregation methods can only deal with s u m ( ) queries. For processing s u m ( ) queries, compared with the existing methods, RiPPAS has advantages in the aspects of privacy preservation and communication efficiency, which can be proved by theoretical analysis and simulation results. For processing m i n ( ) / m a x ( ) queries, RiPPAS provides effective privacy preservation and has low communication overhead.

  4. RiPPAS: A Ring-Based Privacy-Preserving Aggregation Scheme in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kejia; Han, Qilong; Cai, Zhipeng; Yin, Guisheng

    2017-01-01

    Recently, data privacy in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) has been paid increased attention. The characteristics of WSNs determine that users’ queries are mainly aggregation queries. In this paper, the problem of processing aggregation queries in WSNs with data privacy preservation is investigated. A Ring-based Privacy-Preserving Aggregation Scheme (RiPPAS) is proposed. RiPPAS adopts ring structure to perform aggregation. It uses pseudonym mechanism for anonymous communication and uses homomorphic encryption technique to add noise to the data easily to be disclosed. RiPPAS can handle both sum() queries and min()/max() queries, while the existing privacy-preserving aggregation methods can only deal with sum() queries. For processing sum() queries, compared with the existing methods, RiPPAS has advantages in the aspects of privacy preservation and communication efficiency, which can be proved by theoretical analysis and simulation results. For processing min()/max() queries, RiPPAS provides effective privacy preservation and has low communication overhead. PMID:28178197

  5. Nonbridging phosphate oxygens in 16S rRNA important for 30S subunit assembly and association with the 50S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Srikanta; Joseph, Simpson

    2005-05-01

    Ribosomes are composed of RNA and protein molecules that associate together to form a supramolecular machine responsible for protein biosynthesis. Detailed information about the structure of the ribosome has come from the recent X-ray crystal structures of the ribosome and the ribosomal subunits. However, the molecular interactions between the rRNAs and the r-proteins that occur during the intermediate steps of ribosome assembly are poorly understood. Here we describe a modification-interference approach to identify nonbridging phosphate oxygens within 16S rRNA that are important for the in vitro assembly of the Escherichia coli 30S small ribosomal subunit and for its association with the 50S large ribosomal subunit. The 30S small subunit was reconstituted from phosphorothioate-substituted 16S rRNA and small subunit proteins. Active 30S subunits were selected by their ability to bind to the 50S large subunit and form 70S ribosomes. Analysis of the selected population shows that phosphate oxygens at specific positions in the 16S rRNA are important for either subunit assembly or for binding to the 50S subunit. The X-ray crystallographic structures of the 30S subunit suggest that some of these phosphate oxygens participate in r-protein binding, coordination of metal ions, or for the formation of intersubunit bridges in the mature 30S subunit. Interestingly, however, several of the phosphate oxygens identified in this study do not participate in any interaction in the mature 30S subunit, suggesting that they play a role in the early steps of the 30S subunit assembly.

  6. Thermoplastic elastomer with advanced hydrophilization and bonding performances for rapid (30 s) and easy molding of microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Lachaux, Julie; Alcaine, Clara; Gómez-Escoda, Blanca; Perrault, Cécile M; Duplan, David Olea; Wu, Pei-Yun Jenny; Ochoa, Iñaki; Fernandez, Luis; Mercier, Olaf; Coudreuse, Damien; Roy, Emmanuel

    2017-07-25

    One of the most important areas of research on microfluidic technologies focuses on the identification and characterisation of novel materials with enhanced properties and versatility. Here we present a fast, easy and inexpensive microstructuration method for the fabrication of novel, flexible, transparent and biocompatible microfluidic devices. Using a simple hot press, we demonstrate the rapid (30 s) production of various microfluidic prototypes embossed in a commercially available soft thermoplastic elastomer (sTPE). This styrenic block copolymer (BCP) material is as flexible as PDMS and as thermoformable as classical thermoplastics. It exhibits high fidelity of replication using SU-8 and epoxy master molds in a highly convenient low-isobar (0.4 bar) and iso-thermal process. Microfluidic devices can then be easily sealed using either a simple hot plate or even a room-temperature assembly, allowing them to sustain liquid pressures of 2 and 0.6 bar, respectively. The excellent sorption and biocompatibility properties of the microchips were validated via a standard rhodamine dye assay as well as a sensitive yeast cell-based assay. The morphology and composition of the surface area after plasma treatment for hydrophilization purposes are stable and show constant and homogenous distribution of block nanodomains (∼22° after 4 days). These domains, which are evenly distributed on the nanoscale, therefore account for the uniform and convenient surface of a "microfluidic scale device". To our knowledge, this is the first thermoplastic elastomer material that can be used for fast and reliable fabrication and assembly of microdevices while maintaining a high and stable hydrophilicity.

  7. The dynamics of distance, velocity and acceleration of power output in the 30-s Wingate Anaerobic Test.

    PubMed

    Bell, W; Cobner, D

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyse the dynamics of distance, velocity and acceleration of the 30-s Wingate Anaerobic Test. Participants were 53 young adult Rugby Union football players of mean age 21.6±2.5 yr, 180.5±7.2 cm height and 89.3±12.7 kg body mass. Measurements of power were obtained using a friction-belt cycle ergometer (Monark 864, Varberg, Sweden). Individual data were aligned according to peak power output, which resulted in a mean value of 1 216±256 W, compared with one of 1 180±256 W when calculated cross-sectionally (p<0.0001). The derivatives of velocity and acceleration were obtained using the mathematical software Mathcad. Distance, velocity and acceleration curves were plotted simultaneously at 1 s intervals before and after peak power output (-4 s to +28 s). The initial rise of the distance curve was the result of a general trend in decreasing positive velocities as far as peak power output, followed thereafter by a gradual deterioration of power, the result of negative velocities from peak power output to +28 s peak power output. The initial values of the acceleration curve showed a fluctuating decelerating trend of negative values to peak power output; subsequently all values remained positive running along the zero acceleration time axis. Coefficients of correlation between peak power output and power values at -1 s to -3 s were 0.80, 0.65 and 0.63 respectively (p<0.001). The relationship between velocity and acceleration was - 0.968 (p<0.01).

  8. Family Planning and Preconception Health Among Men in Their Mid-30s: Developing Indicators and Describing Need.

    PubMed

    Casey, Frances E; Sonenstein, Freya L; Astone, Nan M; Pleck, Joseph H; Dariotis, Jacinda K; Marcell, Arik V

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Healthy People 2020 call for improvements in meeting men's reproductive health needs but little is known about the proportion of men in need. This study describes men aged 35 to 39 in need of family planning and preconception care, demographic correlates of these needs, and contraception use among men in need of family planning. Using data from Wave 4 (2008-2010) of the National Survey of Adolescent Males, men were classified in need of family planning and preconception care if they reported sex with a female in the last year and believed that they and their partner were fecund; the former included men who were neither intentionally pregnant nor intending future children and the latter included men intending future children. Men were classified as being in need of both if they reported multiple sex partners in the past year. About 40% of men aged 35 to 39 were in need of family planning and about 33% in need of preconception care with 12% in need of both. Current partner's age, current union type, and sexually transmitted infection health risk differentiated men in need of family planning and preconception care (all ps < .01) and participants' race/ethnicity further differentiated men in need of preconception care (p < .01). More than half of men in need of family planning reported none of the time current partner hormonal use (55%) or condom use (52%) during the past year. This study identified that many men in their mid-30s are in need of family planning or preconception care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Reactive Collisions in Crossed Molecular Beams

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Herschbach, D. R.

    1962-02-01

    The distribution of velocity vectors of reaction products is discussed with emphasis on the restrictions imposed by the conservation laws. The recoil velocity that carries the products away from the center of mass shows how the energy of reaction is divided between internal excitation and translation. Similarly, the angular distributions, as viewed from the center of mass, reflect the partitioning of the total angular momentum between angular momenta of individual molecules and orbital angular momentum associated with their relative motion. Crossed-beam studies of several reactions of the type M + RI yields R + MI are described, where M = K, Rb, Cs, and R = CH{sub 3}, C{sub 3}H{sub 5}, etc. The results show that most of the energy of reaction goes into internal excitation of the products and that the angular distribution is quite anisotropic, with most of the MI recoiling backward (and R forward) with respect to the incoming K beam. (auth)

  10. Foldable beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Coyner, J. V.; Crawford, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    A foldable beam possessing superior qualities of light weight, compactness for transportation, quick deployment with minimum use of force, and high strength is described. These qualities are achieved through the use of a series of longitudinally rigid segments, hinged along one side and threaded by one or two cables along the opposite side. Tightening the cables holds the beam extended. Loosening the cables permits the segments to fold away from the threaded side. In one embodiment the segments are connected by canted hinges with the result that the beam may be folded in a helix-like configuration around a cylinder. In another embodiment the segments themselves may be hinged to fold flat laterally as the beam is folded, resulting in a configuration that may be helixed around a shorter cylinder.

  11. Beam-beam deflection and signature curves for elliptic beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemann, V.

    1990-10-22

    In this note we will present closed expressions for the beam-beam deflection angle for arbitrary elliptic beams including tilt. From these expressions signature curves, i.e., systematic deviations from the round beam deflection curve due to ellipticity or tilt are derived. In the course of the presentation we will prove that it is generally impossible to infer individual beam sizes from beam-beam deflection scans. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  12. The erudite humility of the historian: The 'critical epistemology' of Georges Lantéri-Laura.

    PubMed

    Basso Lorini, Elisabetta

    2017-02-01

    This paper analyses the historical and epistemological work of the French psychiatrist Georges Lantéri-Laura (1930-2004) within the context of the French 'tradition' of history and philosophy of sciences, with special reference to Georges Canguilhem and Michel Foucault. After an introduction devoted to a critical survey of the most recent works on the history and historiography of psychiatry in French, the paper outlines Lantéri-Laura's approach by focusing especially on the role played by the methodological concept of 'semiology' as regards the relation between medicine and psychiatry. The last part of the paper draws attention to the relation between the history and philosophy of psychiatry in light of Lantéri-Laura's 'critical epistemology'.

  13. Schedule Optimization Study, Hanford RI/FS Program. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    A Schedule Optimization Study (SOS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Program was conducted by an independent team of professionals from other federal agencies and the private sector experienced in environmental restoration. This team spent two weeks at Hanford in September 1992 examining the reasons for the lengthy RI/FS process at Hanford and developing recommendations to expedite the process. The need for the study arose out of a schedule dispute regarding the submission of the 1100-EM-1 Operable Unit RI/FS Work Plan. This report documents the study called for in the August 29, 1991, Dispute Resolution Committee Decision Statement. Battelle`s Environmental Management Operations (EMO) coordinated the effort for DOE`s Richland Field Office (RL).

  14. Design study on the beam line for radioisotope production at KOMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyeok-Jung

    2015-10-01

    A beam line for radioisotope (RI) production was designed for the 100-MeV proton linear accelerator at Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC). The specifications of the beam line are such that the energy is 100 MeV and the average current is 0.6 mA for a target size of 100 mm in diameter. The system consists of a beam transport system including a magnet, a vacuum system, beam diagnostics, power supplies and a control system. The key components of the system are the high-field 45 bending magnet, the beam scanning system and beam window. In this paper, the design of the beam line and its key components are presented.

  15. RFI/RI work plan for the Road A Chemical Basin 904-111G

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetz, T.F.

    2000-03-07

    This Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI)/Remedial Investigation (RI) Work Plan has been prepared for the Road A Chemical Basin Operable Unit (RdACB OU) (904-111G). This unit is subject to the requirements of both RCRA and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This Work Plan presents the initial evaluation of existing unit data, applicable background data, the regulatory framework for the unit investigation, and the evaluations and decisions made during the determination of the scope and objectives of the planned Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) activities.

  16. BV RI CCD photometry of 361,281 objects in the field of M 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnier, E. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Van Paradijs, J.; Hasinger, G.; Jain, A.; Pietsch, W.; Truemper, J.

    1992-01-01

    Deep BV RI CCD photometry was performed on a 1 sq deg region of M 31. A catalog of photometry and astrometry of a total of 361,281 stars is presented, with typical completion limits of BV RI = (22.3, 22.2, 22.2, 20.9). Photometric accuracy is about 2 percent at V = 19. This catalog allows detailed studies of stellar populations and reddening. The data are currently being used to assist in finding the optical counterparts of Einstein and ROSAT X-ray sources.

  17. BV RI CCD photometry of 361,281 objects in the field of M 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnier, E. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Van Paradijs, J.; Hasinger, G.; Jain, A.; Pietsch, W.; Truemper, J.

    1992-01-01

    Deep BV RI CCD photometry was performed on a 1 sq deg region of M 31. A catalog of photometry and astrometry of a total of 361,281 stars is presented, with typical completion limits of BV RI = (22.3, 22.2, 22.2, 20.9). Photometric accuracy is about 2 percent at V = 19. This catalog allows detailed studies of stellar populations and reddening. The data are currently being used to assist in finding the optical counterparts of Einstein and ROSAT X-ray sources.

  18. DoRiNA 2.0--upgrading the doRiNA database of RNA interactions in post-transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Blin, Kai; Dieterich, Christoph; Wurmus, Ricardo; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Landthaler, Markus; Akalin, Altuna

    2015-01-01

    The expression of almost all genes in animals is subject to post-transcriptional regulation by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and microRNAs (miRNAs). The interactions between both RBPs and miRNAs with mRNA can be mapped on a whole-transcriptome level using experimental and computational techniques established in the past years. The combined action of RBPs and miRNAs is thought to form a post-transcriptional regulatory code. Here we present doRiNA 2.0, available at http://dorina.mdc-berlin.de. In this highly improved new version, we have completely reworked the user interface and expanded the database to improve the usability of the website. Taking into account user feedback over the past years, the input forms for both the simple and the combinatorial search function have been streamlined and combined into a single web page that will also display the search results. Especially, custom uploads is one of the key new features in doRiNA 2.0. To enable the inclusion of doRiNA into third-party analysis pipelines, all operations are accessible via a REST API. Alternatively, local installations can be queried using a Python API. Both the web application and the APIs are available under an OSI-approved Open Source license that allows research and commercial access and re-use. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. DoRiNA 2.0—upgrading the doRiNA database of RNA interactions in post-transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Blin, Kai; Dieterich, Christoph; Wurmus, Ricardo; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Landthaler, Markus; Akalin, Altuna

    2015-01-01

    The expression of almost all genes in animals is subject to post-transcriptional regulation by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and microRNAs (miRNAs). The interactions between both RBPs and miRNAs with mRNA can be mapped on a whole-transcriptome level using experimental and computational techniques established in the past years. The combined action of RBPs and miRNAs is thought to form a post-transcriptional regulatory code. Here we present doRiNA 2.0, available at http://dorina.mdc-berlin.de. In this highly improved new version, we have completely reworked the user interface and expanded the database to improve the usability of the website. Taking into account user feedback over the past years, the input forms for both the simple and the combinatorial search function have been streamlined and combined into a single web page that will also display the search results. Especially, custom uploads is one of the key new features in doRiNA 2.0. To enable the inclusion of doRiNA into third-party analysis pipelines, all operations are accessible via a REST API. Alternatively, local installations can be queried using a Python API. Both the web application and the APIs are available under an OSI-approved Open Source license that allows research and commercial access and re-use. PMID:25416797

  20. Three-dimensional placement of the conserved 530 loop of 16 S rRNA and of its neighboring components in the 30 S subunit.

    PubMed

    Wang, R; Alexander, R W; VanLoock, M; Vladimirov, S; Bukhtiyarov, Y; Harvey, S C; Cooperman, B S

    1999-02-19

    Nucleotides 518-533 form a loop in ribosomal 30 S subunits that is almost universally conserved. Both biochemical and genetic evidence clearly implicate the 530 loop in ribosomal function, with respect both to the accuracy control mechanism and to tRNA binding. Here, building on earlier work, we identify proteins and nucleotides (or limited sequences) site-specifically photolabeled by radioactive photolabile oligoDNA probes targeted toward the 530 loop of 30 S subunits. The probes we employ are complementary to 16 S rRNA nucleotides 517-527, and have aryl azides attached to nucleotides complementary to nucleotides 518, 522, and 525-527, positioning the photogenerated nitrene a maximum of 19-26 A from the complemented rRNA base. The crosslinks obtained are used as constraints to revise an earlier model of 30 S structure, using the YAMMP molecular modeling package, and to place the 530 loop region within that structure. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  1. Quantitative analysis and QTL mapping for agronomic and fiber traits in an RI population of Upland cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this present study, we evaluated a RI population including 188 RI lines developed from 94 F2-derived families and their two parental lines, ‘HS 46’ and MARCABUCAG8US-1-88 (Gossypium hirsutum L.), at Mississippi State, MS, for two years. Fourteen agronomic and fiber traits were measured. One hundr...

  2. 78 FR 55121 - Submission for Review: Self-Certification of Full-Time School Attendance for the School Year, RI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Self-Certification of Full-Time School Attendance for the School Year, RI 25-14 and Information; and Instructions for Completing the Self-Certification of Full-Time School Attendance for the School Year, RI 25-14A AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: 60-Day Notice...

  3. 77 FR 71200 - Submission for Review: 3206-0140, Representative Payee Application (RI 20-7) and Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... Necessary for a Competency Determination (RI 30-3) AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: 60... Necessary for a Competency Determination (RI 30-3). As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (Pub... other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting...

  4. 76 FR 29805 - Submission for Review: Verification of Full-Time School Attendance, RI 25-49

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Verification of Full-Time School Attendance, RI 25-49 AGENCY: U.S. Office... opportunity to comment on a revised information collection request (ICR) 3206-0215, Verification of Full-Time...@opm.gov or faxed to (202) 606-0910. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: RI 25-49, Verification of Full-Time...

  5. 77 FR 71200 - Submission for Review: Initial Certification of Full-Time School Attendance, RI 25-41

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Initial Certification of Full-Time School Attendance, RI 25-41 AGENCY: U.S... Full-Time School Attendance. As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, (Pub. L. 104-13, 44 U... to (202) 395-6974. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: RI 25-41, Initial Certification of Full-Time School...

  6. 78 FR 55123 - Submission for Review: We Need Information About Your Missing Payment, RI 38-31

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: We Need Information About Your Missing Payment, RI 38-31 AGENCY: U.S... (ICR) 3206-0187, We Need Information About Your Missing Payment, RI 38-31. As required by the Paperwork... Services, Office of Personnel Management. Title: We Need Information About Your Missing Payment. OMB:...

  7. Coherent beam-beam interaction with four colliding beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podobedov, B.; Siemann, R. H.

    1995-09-01

    The coherent beam-beam interaction in the absence of Landau damping is studied with a computer simulation of four space-charge-compensated colliding beams. Results are presented for the modes, phase space structures, widths, and growth rates of coherent beam-beam resonances. These results are compared with solutions of the Vlasov equation, and with measurements made at the Dispositif de Collisions dans l'Igloo (DCI) storage ring in Orsay, France, which operated with space-charge-compensated colliding beams.

  8. 33 CFR 100.112 - Swim the Bay, Narragansett Bay, Narragansett, RI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Swim the Bay, Narragansett Bay, Narragansett, RI. 100.112 Section 100.112 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.112 Swim the Bay...

  9. Membrane nanoclusters of FcγRI segregate from inhibitory SIRPα upon activation of human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Valvo, Salvatore; Felce, James H.

    2017-01-01

    Signal integration between activating Fc receptors and inhibitory signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) controls macrophage phagocytosis. Here, using dual-color direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, we report that Fcγ receptor I (FcγRI), FcγRII, and SIRPα are not homogeneously distributed at macrophage surfaces but are organized in discrete nanoclusters, with a mean radius of 71 ± 11 nm, 60 ± 6 nm, and 48 ± 3 nm, respectively. Nanoclusters of FcγRI, but not FcγRII, are constitutively associated with nanoclusters of SIRPα, within 62 ± 5 nm, mediated by the actin cytoskeleton. Upon Fc receptor activation, Src-family kinase signaling leads to segregation of FcγRI and SIRPα nanoclusters to be 197 ± 3 nm apart. Co-ligation of SIRPα with CD47 abrogates nanocluster segregation. If the balance of signals favors activation, FcγRI nanoclusters reorganize into periodically spaced concentric rings. Thus, a nanometer- and micron-scale reorganization of activating and inhibitory receptors occurs at the surface of human macrophages concurrent with signal integration. PMID:28289091

  10. 75 FR 47881 - Noise Exposure Map Notice, T.F.Green Airport, Warwick, RI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice, T.F.Green Airport, Warwick, RI AGENCY: Federal... its determination that the noise exposure maps for T.F.Green Airport as submitted by the Rhode Island... INFORMATION: This notice announces that the FAA finds that the noise exposure maps submitted for...

  11. 77 FR 20330 - Disestablishment of Restricted Area; Rhode Island Sound off Newport, RI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... Sound off Newport, RI AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, DoD. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The U.S... located in the waters of Rhode Island Sound, 4 nautical miles due south of Lands End in Newport, Rhode... area in Rhode Island Sound, 4 nautical miles due south of Lands End in Newport, Rhode Island....

  12. 76 FR 15246 - Anchorage Regulations; Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound, RI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ... Sound, RI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard... an offshore anchorage in Rhode Island Sound south of Brenton Point, Rhode Island, for use by vessels... Sound that under current informal practice is routinely used by mariners as an anchorage while...

  13. MaRiMba: a software application for spectral library-based MRM transition list assembly.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Carly A; Eastham, Ashley; Lee, Lik Wee; Peterson, Amelia; Eng, Jimmy K; Shteynberg, David; Mendoza, Luis; Deutsch, Eric W; Risler, Jenni; Tasman, Natalie; Aebersold, Ruedi; Lam, Henry; Martin, Daniel B

    2009-10-01

    Multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) is a targeted analysis method that has been increasingly viewed as an avenue to explore proteomes with unprecedented sensitivity and throughput. We have developed a software tool, called MaRiMba, to automate the creation of explicitly defined MRM transition lists required to program triple quadrupole mass spectrometers in such analyses. MaRiMba creates MRM transition lists from downloaded or custom-built spectral libraries, restricts output to specified proteins or peptides, and filters based on precursor peptide and product ion properties. MaRiMba can also create MRM lists containing corresponding transitions for isotopically heavy peptides, for which the precursor and product ions are adjusted according to user specifications. This open-source application is operated through a graphical user interface incorporated into the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline, and it outputs the final MRM list to a text file for upload to MS instruments. To illustrate the use of MaRiMba, we used the tool to design and execute an MRM-MS experiment in which we targeted the proteins of a well-defined and previously published standard mixture.

  14. MaRiMba: A Software Application for Spectral Library-Based MRM Transition List Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Carly A.; Eastham, Ashley; Lee, Lik Wee; Peterson, Amelia; Eng, Jimmy K.; Shteynberg, David; Mendoza, Luis; Deutsch, Eric W.; Risler, Jenni; Tasman, Natalie; Aebersold, Ruedi; Lam, Henry; Martin, Daniel B.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) is a targeted analysis method that has been increasingly viewed as an avenue to explore proteomes with unprecedented sensitivity and throughput. We have developed a software tool, called MaRiMba, to automate the creation of explicitly defined MRM transition lists required to program triple quadrupole mass spectrometers in such analyses. MaRiMba creates MRM transition lists from downloaded or custom-built spectral libraries, restricts output to specified proteins or peptides, and filters based on precursor peptide and product ion properties. MaRiMba can also create MRM lists containing corresponding transitions for isotopically heavy peptides, for which the precursor and product ions are adjusted according to user specifications. This open-source application is operated through a graphical user interface incorporated into the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline, and it outputs the final MRM list to a text file for upload to MS instruments. To illustrate the use of MaRiMba, we used the tool to design and execute an MRM-MS experiment in which we targeted the proteins of a well-defined and previously published standard mixture. PMID:19603829

  15. 33 CFR 80.145 - Race Point, MA, to Watch Hill, RI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Race Point, MA, to Watch Hill, RI... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.145 Race Point, MA, to Watch Hill... and Rhode Island from Race Point to Watch Hill. (b) A line drawn from Nobska Point Light to Tarpaulin...

  16. 76 FR 34108 - Submission for Review: Alternative Annuity Election (RI 20-80)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Alternative Annuity Election (RI 20-80) AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel... on a revised information collection request (ICR) 3206-0168, Alternative Annuity Election. As... other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses....

  17. Measuring and Monitoring in the South African "Kha Ri Gude" Mass Literacy Campaign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    After many previous failed attempts to reach illiterate adults, the award-winning South African "Kha Ri Gude" mass literacy campaign, launched in 2008, undertook to ensure that learners seized the opportunity to learn--for many adults, this was a "last chance". Written from an insider perspective by the campaign's founding…

  18. 77 FR 34414 - Submission for Review: Annuitant's Report of Earned Income, RI 30-2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Annuitant's Report of Earned Income, RI 30-2 AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: 60-Day Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Retirement Services, Office of Personnel Management (OPM) offers the general public and other federal agencies the opportunity to...

  19. 77 FR 7025 - Safety Zones; America's Cup World Series, East Passage, Narragansett Bay, RI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones; America's Cup World Series, East Passage... Bay, Rhode Island, during the America's Cup World Series sailing vessel racing event. This safety zone... and spectators involved with the America's Cup World Series in the vicinity of Newport, RI. Discussion...

  20. Quantifying aggregation of IgE-FcepsilonRI by multivalent antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Hlavacek, W S; Perelson, A S; Sulzer, B; Bold, J; Paar, J; Gorman, W; Posner, R G

    1999-01-01

    Aggregation of cell surface receptors by multivalent ligand can trigger a variety of cellular responses. A well-studied receptor that responds to aggregation is the high affinity receptor for IgE (FcepsilonRI), which is responsible for initiating allergic reactions. To quantify antigen-induced aggregation of IgE-FcepsilonRI complexes, we have developed a method based on multiparameter flow cytometry to monitor both occupancy of surface IgE combining sites and association of antigen with the cell surface. The number of bound IgE combining sites in excess of the number of bound antigens, the number of bridges between receptors, provides a quantitative measure of IgE-FcepsilonRI aggregation. We demonstrate our method by using it to study the equilibrium binding of a haptenated fluorescent protein, 2,4-dinitrophenol-coupled B-phycoerythrin (DNP25-PE), to fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled anti-DNP IgE on the surface of rat basophilic leukemia cells. The results, which we analyze with the aid of a mathematical model, indicate how IgE-FcepsilonRI aggregation depends on the total concentrations of DNP25-PE and surface IgE. As expected, we find that maximal aggregation occurs at an optimal antigen concentration. We also find that aggregation varies qualitatively with the total concentration of surface IgE as predicted by an earlier theoretical analysis. PMID:10233059

  1. Measuring and Monitoring in the South African "Kha Ri Gude" Mass Literacy Campaign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    After many previous failed attempts to reach illiterate adults, the award-winning South African "Kha Ri Gude" mass literacy campaign, launched in 2008, undertook to ensure that learners seized the opportunity to learn--for many adults, this was a "last chance". Written from an insider perspective by the campaign's founding…

  2. 33 CFR 100.112 - Swim the Bay, Narragansett Bay, Narragansett, RI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Swim the Bay, Narragansett Bay, Narragansett, RI. 100.112 Section 100.112 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.112 Swim the...

  3. A new EcoRI polymorphism for the insulin receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Accili, D.; Elbein, S.; McKeon, C.; Taylor, S.I. )

    1989-01-25

    A 550 bp BamHI-Pst I fragment encompassing bp 1,926-2,476 of the human insulin receptor cDNA was obtained. EcoRI identifies a two allele polymorphism, with bands of 5.8 and 5.5 kb. Co-dominant segregation was demonstrated in one Venezuelan pedigree.

  4. 77 FR 27115 - Newport to Bermuda Regatta, Narragansett Bay, Newport, RI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 Newport to Bermuda Regatta, Narragansett Bay, Newport, RI AGENCY... Special Local Regulation for the biennial Newport to Bermuda Regatta, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, from... Guard will enforce the special local regulation for the biennial Newport/Bermuda Regatta,...

  5. Assessing the Kha Ri Gude Mass Literacy Campaign: A Developmental Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romm, Norma R. A.; Dichaba, Mpho M.

    2015-01-01

    In this article we explicate our way of assessing the South African Kha Ri Gude Mass Literacy Campaign, and in particular its impact in the Eastern Cape. We provide an account primarily of focus group sessions conducted in 2013 and again in 2014 with volunteer educators and past learners in the campaign. We concentrate on the way in which…

  6. Dual-wavelength Digital Holography for quantification of cell volume and integral refractive index (RI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Daniel; Kuehn, Jonas; Depeursinge, Christian; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Marquet, Pierre

    2011-07-01

    Quantitative Phase Imaging techniques such as DHM have emerged recently in life sciences and can be aimed at monitoring and quantifying non-invasively dynamic cellular processes modifying cell morphology and/or content. Concretely, the DHM phase signal depends on two cell parameters: cell thickness and integral refractive index. Consequently, due to its dual origin, the interpretation of the phase signal variations remain difficult. Since a net water flux across the cell membrane causes a variation of both parameters, the phase signal cannot be related directly to cellular RI or thickness variations, but must be understood as a coupled signal of these two parameters. We have developped a Dual-wavelength Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) setup to separately measure in a single shot fashion cellular thickness and integral RI of living cells. The method is based on the use of an absorbing dye that causes a high RI dispersion in the extracellular medium at the two recording wavelength. Consequently, the phase signals measured at the two wavelengths, differ significantly from each other. Practically, both cell RI and thickness can be univocally determined from the two phase measurements. Important biophysical parameters of living cells, including dry mass concentrations and water membrane permeability can be deduced.

  7. 33 CFR 110.47 - Little Narragansett Bay, Watch Hill, R.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Little Narragansett Bay, Watch... SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.47 Little Narragansett Bay, Watch Hill, R.I. All of the navigable waters of Watch Hill Cove southeasterly of a line beginning at...

  8. 33 CFR 110.47 - Little Narragansett Bay, Watch Hill, R.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Little Narragansett Bay, Watch... SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.47 Little Narragansett Bay, Watch Hill, R.I. All of the navigable waters of Watch Hill Cove southeasterly of a line beginning at...

  9. 33 CFR 110.47 - Little Narragansett Bay, Watch Hill, R.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Little Narragansett Bay, Watch... SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.47 Little Narragansett Bay, Watch Hill, R.I. All of the navigable waters of Watch Hill Cove southeasterly of a line beginning at...

  10. 76 FR 14696 - Ananke, Inc., Providence, RI; Notice of Negative Determination on Reconsideration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... Employment and Training Administration Ananke, Inc., Providence, RI; Notice of Negative Determination on... initial negative determination was based on the findings that neither the subject firm nor a declining..., I affirm the original notice of negative determination of eligibility to apply for worker...

  11. RiBOMS: RFID-based object management system for home environments.

    PubMed

    Iraola, Hodei; Schafer, James; Yu, Xunyi; Mullett, Gary; Ganz, Aura

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a RFID-based object management system, RiBOMS, for home environments. The system has an easy to use pictorial user interface aimed at older adults with associative memory impairments. The system technical correctness was successfully tested in a lab environment.

  12. 76 FR 15350 - Submission for Review: Representative Payee Survey, RI 38-115

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Representative Payee Survey, RI 38-115 AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel... Personnel Management (OPM) offers the general public and other Federal agencies the opportunity to comment... information collection to U.S. Office of Personnel Management, Linda Bradford (Acting), Deputy...

  13. 76 FR 36582 - Submission for Review: Disabled Dependent Questionnaire, RI 30-10

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Disabled Dependent Questionnaire, RI 30-10 AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel... Personnel Management (OPM) offers the general public and other Federal agencies the opportunity to comment..., NW., Washington, DC 20503, Attention: Desk Officer for the Office of Personnel Management or sent...

  14. Tetraspanin CD151 Is a Negative Regulator of FcεRI-Mediated Mast Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; Bryce, Paul J; Schleimer, Robert P; Wechsler, Joshua B; Loffredo, Lucas F; Cook-Mills, Joan M; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Berdnikovs, Sergejs

    2015-08-15

    Mast cells are critical in the pathogenesis of allergic disease due to the release of preformed and newly synthesized mediators, yet the mechanisms controlling mast cell activation are not well understood. Members of the tetraspanin family are recently emerging as modulators of FcεRI-mediated mast cell activation; however, mechanistic understanding of their function is currently lacking. The tetraspanin CD151 is a poorly understood member of this family and is specifically induced on mouse and human mast cells upon FcεRI aggregation but its functional effects are unknown. In this study, we show that CD151 deficiency significantly exacerbates the IgE-mediated late phase inflammation in a murine model of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Ex vivo, FcεRI stimulation of bone marrow-derived mast cells from CD151(-/-) mice resulted in significantly enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-13, and TNF-α compared with wild-type controls. However, FcεRI-induced mast cell degranulation was unaffected. At the molecular signaling level, CD151 selectively regulated IgE-induced activation of ERK1/2 and PI3K, associated with cytokine production, but had no effect on the phospholipase Cγ1 signaling, associated with degranulation. Collectively, our data indicate that CD151 exerts negative regulation over IgE-induced late phase responses and cytokine production in mast cells.

  15. 33 CFR 100.119 - Newport-Bermuda Regatta, Narragansett Bay, Newport, RI

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Newport-Bermuda Regatta, Narragansett Bay, Newport, RI 100.119 Section 100.119 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.119...

  16. Low-energy radioactive ion beam production of 22Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duy, N. N.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Teranishi, T.; Iwasa, N.; Kwon, Y. K.; Khiem, L. H.; Kim, Y. H.; Song, J. S.; Hu, J.; Ayyad, Y.

    2013-09-01

    The 22Mg nucleus plays an important role in nuclear astrophysics, specially in the 22Mg(α,p)25Al and proton capture 22Mg(p,γ)23Al reactions. It is believed that 22Mg is a waiting point in the αp-process of nucleosynthesis in novae. We proposed a direct measurement of the 22Mg+α resonance reaction in inverse kinematics using a radioactive ion (RI) beam. A 22Mg beam of 3.73 MeV/u was produced at CRIB (Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) low-energy RI Beam) facility of the University of Tokyo located at RIKEN (Japan) in 2011. In this paper we present the results about the production of the 22Mg beam used for the direct measurement of the scattering reaction 22Mg(α,α)22Mg, and the stellar reaction 22Mg(α,p)25Al in the energy region concerning an astrophysical temperature of T9=1-3 GK.

  17. BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR DOUBLE-GAUSSIAN BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG, C.; MALITSKY, N.; BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-05-16

    Electron cooling together with intra-beam scattering results in a transverse distribution that can best be described by a sum of two gaussians, one for the high-density core and one for the tails of the distribution. Simulation studies are being performed to understand the beam-beam interaction of these double-gaussian beams. Here we report the effect of low-frequency random tune modulations on diffusion in double-gaussian beams and compare the effects to those in beam-beam interactions with regular gaussian beams and identical tune shift parameters.

  18. Dissecting the in vivo assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit reveals the role of RimM and general features of the assembly process.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiang; Goto, Simon; Chen, Yuling; Feng, Boya; Xu, Yanji; Muto, Akira; Himeno, Hyouta; Deng, Haiteng; Lei, Jianlin; Gao, Ning

    2013-02-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a tightly regulated, multi-stepped process. The assembly of ribosomal subunits is a central step of the complex biogenesis process, involving nearly 30 protein factors in vivo in bacteria. Although the assembly process has been extensively studied in vitro for over 40 years, very limited information is known for the in vivo process and specific roles of assembly factors. Such an example is ribosome maturation factor M (RimM), a factor involved in the late-stage assembly of the 30S subunit. Here, we combined quantitative mass spectrometry and cryo-electron microscopy to characterize the in vivo 30S assembly intermediates isolated from mutant Escherichia coli strains with genes for assembly factors deleted. Our compositional and structural data show that the assembly of the 3'-domain of the 30S subunit is severely delayed in these intermediates, featured with highly underrepresented 3'-domain proteins and large conformational difference compared with the mature 30S subunit. Further analysis indicates that RimM functions not only to promote the assembly of a few 3'-domain proteins but also to stabilize the rRNA tertiary structure. More importantly, this study reveals intriguing similarities and dissimilarities between the in vitro and the in vivo assembly pathways, suggesting that they are in general similar but with subtle differences.

  19. Direct monitoring of initiation factor dynamics through formation of 30S and 70S translation-initiation complexes on a quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shuntaro; Isobe, Hidemi; Ueda, Takuya; Okahata, Yoshio

    2013-05-17

    Translation initiation is a dynamic and complicated process requiring the building a 70S initiation complex (70S-IC) composed of a ribosome, mRNA, and an initiator tRNA. During the formation of the 70S-IC, initiation factors (IFs: IF1, IF2, and IF3) interact with a ribosome to form a 30S initiation complex (30S-IC) and a 70S-IC. Although some spectroscopic analyses have been performed, the mechanism of binding and dissociation of IFs remains unclear. Here, we employed a 27 MHz quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to evaluate the process of bacterial IC formation in translation initiation by following frequency changes (mass changes). IFs (IF1, IF2, and IF3), N-terminally fused to biotin carboxyl carrier protein (bio-BCCP), were immobilized on a Neutravidin-covered QCM plate. By using bio-BCCP-IF2 immobilized to the QCM, three steps of the formation of ribosomal initiation complex could be sequentially observed as simple mass changes in real time: binding of a 30S complex to the immobilized IF2, a recruitment of 50S to the 30S-IC, and formation of the 70S-IC. The kinetic parameters implied that the release of IF2 from the 70S-IC could be the rate-limiting step in translation initiation. The IF3-immobilized QCM revealed that the affinity of IF3 for the 30S complex decreased upon the addition of mRNA and fMet-tRNA(fMet) but did not lead to complete dissociation from the 30S-IC. These results suggest that IF3 binds and stays bound to ICs, and its interaction mode is altered during the formation of 30S-IC and 70S-IC and is finally induced to dissociate from ICs by 50S binding. This methodology demonstrated here is applicable to investigate the role of IFs in translation initiation driven by other pathways. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Anti-Ri: an antibody associated with paraneoplastic opsoclonus and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Luque, F A; Furneaux, H M; Ferziger, R; Rosenblum, M K; Wray, S H; Schold, S C; Glantz, M J; Jaeckle, K A; Biran, H; Lesser, M

    1991-03-01

    The serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 8 women with ataxia, 6 of whom also had eye movement abnormalities believed to be opsoclonus, were found to contain a highly specific antineuronal antibody we call anti-Ri. Seven of the 8 women also had or developed cancer: carcinoma of the breast in 5, adenocarcinoma in an axillary lymph node in 1, and carcinoma of the fallopian tube in 1. Four patients presented with the neurological disorder; the cancer was diagnosed first in the other 4. Immunohistochemical studies using serum or CSF from all 8 patients revealed a highly specific antibody interaction with central nervous system neuronal nuclei but not with glial or other cells; the titer ranged from 1:5,000 to 1:320,000 in serum and from 1:2,000 to 1:16,000 in CSF. Biotinylated IgG from the patients' serum reacted with the tumors of 3 of 4 patients with anti-Ri antibody but not with breast cancers from patients without anti-Ri antibody. Immunoblots against cerebral cortex neuronal extracts identified protein antigens of 55-kd and 80-kd relative molecular mass. Serum titers by immunoblot ranged from 1:500 to more than 1:40,000 and CSF titers, from 1:10 to 1:2,000. The relative amount of anti-Ri was always higher in CSF than in serum. The antibody was not present in sera from normal individuals; patients with breast cancer without opsoclonus; other patients with opsoclonus; or patients with other paraneoplastic syndromes related to breast, ovarian, or small-cell lung cancer. We conclude that the presence of anti-Ri antibody identifies a subset of patients with paraneoplastic ataxia and eye movement disorders (opsoclonus) who usually suffer from breast or other gynecological cancer; the antibody when present is a useful marker for an underlying malignancy.

  1. The C-terminal helix in the YjeQ zinc-finger domain catalyzes the release of RbfA during 30S ribosome subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Jeganathan, Ajitha; Razi, Aida; Thurlow, Brett; Ortega, Joaquin

    2015-06-01

    YjeQ (also called RsgA) and RbfA proteins in Escherichia coli bind to immature 30S ribosome subunits at late stages of assembly to assist folding of the decoding center. A key step for the subunit to enter the pool of actively translating ribosomes is the release of these factors. YjeQ promotes dissociation of RbfA during the final stages of maturation; however, the mechanism implementing this functional interplay has not been elucidated. YjeQ features an amino-terminal oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding domain, a central GTPase module and a carboxy-terminal zinc-finger domain. We found that the zinc-finger domain is comprised of two functional motifs: the region coordinating the zinc ion and a carboxy-terminal α-helix. The first motif is essential for the anchoring of YjeQ to the 30S subunit and the carboxy-terminal α-helix facilitates the removal of RbfA once the 30S subunit reaches the mature state. Furthermore, the ability of the mature 30S subunit to stimulate YjeQ GTPase activity also depends on the carboxy-terminal α-helix. Our data are consistent with a model in which YjeQ uses this carboxy-terminal α-helix as a sensor to gauge the conformation of helix 44, an essential motif of the decoding center. According to this model, the mature conformation of helix 44 is sensed by the carboxy-terminal α-helix, which in turn stimulates the YjeQ GTPase activity. Hydrolysis of GTP is believed to assist the release of YjeQ from the mature 30S subunit through a still uncharacterized mechanism. These results identify the structural determinants in YjeQ that implement the functional interplay with RbfA. © 2015 Jeganathan et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  2. Sugar exchanges in arbuscular mycorrhiza: RiMST5 and RiMST6, two novel Rhizophagus irregularis monosaccharide transporters, are involved in both sugar uptake from the soil and from the plant partner.

    PubMed

    Ait Lahmidi, Nassima; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Brulé, Daphnée; Chatagnier, Odile; Arnould, Christine; Doidy, Joan; Berta, Graziella; Lingua, Guido; Wipf, Daniel; Bonneau, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are associated with about 80% of land plants. AM fungi provide inorganic nutrients to plants and in return up to 20% of the plant-fixed CO2 is transferred to the fungal symbionts. Since AM fungi are obligate biotrophs, unraveling how sugars are provided to the fungus partner is a key for understanding the functioning of the symbiosis. In this study, we identified two new monosaccharide transporters from Rhizophagus irregularis (RiMST5 and RiMST6) that we characterized as functional high affinity monosaccharide transporters. RiMST6 was characterized as a glucose specific, high affinity H(+) co-transporter. We provide experimental support for a primary role of both RiMST5 and RiMST6 in sugar uptake directly from the soil. The expression patterns of RiMSTs in response to partial light deprivation and to interaction with different host plants were investigated. Expression of genes coding for RiMSTs was transiently enhanced after 48 h of shading and was unambiguously dependent on the host plant species. These results cast doubt on the 'fair trade' principle under carbon-limiting conditions. Therefore, in light of these findings, the possible mechanisms involved in the modulation between mutualism and parasitism in plant-AM fungus interactions are discussed.

  3. The Transcription Factor Ehf Is Involved in TGF-β-Induced Suppression of FcεRI and c-Kit Expression and FcεRI-Mediated Activation in Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Susumu; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Honjo, Asuka; Hara, Mutsuko; Maeda, Keiko; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Kitaura, Jiro; Ohtsuka, Yoshikazu; Okumura, Ko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2015-10-01

    FcεRI, which is composed of α, β, and γ subunits, plays an important role in IgE-mediated allergic responses. TGF-β1 has been reported to suppress FcεRI and stem cell factor receptor c-Kit expression on mast cell surfaces and to suppress mast cell activation induced by cross-linking of FcεRI. However, the molecular mechanism by which these expressions and activation are suppressed by TGF-β1 remains unclear. In this study, we found that the expression of Ets homologous factor (Ehf), a member of the Ets family transcriptional factors, is upregulated by TGF-β/Smad signaling in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Forced expression of Ehf in BMMCs repressed the transcription of genes encoding FcεRIα, FcεRIβ, and c-Kit, resulting in a reduction in cell surface FcεRI and c-Kit expression. Additionally, forced expression of Ehf suppressed FcεRI-mediated degranulation and cytokine production. Ehf inhibited the promoter activity of genes encoding FcεRIα, FcεRIβ, and c-Kit by binding to these gene promoters. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of Gata1, Gata2, and Stat5b were lower in BMMCs stably expressing Ehf compared with control cells. Because GATA-1 and GATA-2 are positive regulators of FcεRI and c-Kit expression, decreased expression of GATAs may be also involved in the reduction of FcεRI and c-Kit expression. Decreased expression of Stat5 may contribute to the suppression of cytokine production by BMMCs. In part, mast cell response to TGF-β1 was mimicked by forced expression of Ehf, suggesting that TGF-β1 suppresses FcεRI and c-Kit expression and suppresses FcεRI-mediated activation through upregulation of Ehf.

  4. Coherent beam-beam effects, theory & observations

    SciTech Connect

    Yuri I Alexahin

    2003-07-16

    Current theoretical understanding of the coherent beam-beam effect as well as its experimental observations are discussed: conditions under which the coherent beambeam modes may appear, possibility of their resonant interaction (coherent resonances), stability of beam-beam oscillations in the presence of external impedances. A special attention is given to the coherent beam-beam modes of finite length bunches: the synchro-betatron coupling is shown to provide reduction in the coherent tuneshift and--at the synchrotron tune values smaller than the beam-beam parameter--Landau damping by overlapping synchrotron satellites.

  5. Achyranthes japonica Nakai Water Extract Suppresses Binding of IgE Antibody to Cell Surface FcɛRI

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Sun Yup; Lee, Mina; Lee, Kyung Dong

    2016-01-01

    Achyranthes japonica Nakai (AJN) water extract has a variety of physiological properties, including anti-diabetic, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, and anti-oxidative activities. In the present study, the inhibitory effects of AJN extract were investigated in high affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (FcɛRI)-mediated KU812F cells activation. AJN extract showed suppressive effects on histamine release and intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i elevation from anti-FcɛRI antibody (CRA-1)-stimulated cells in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis showed that AJN extract treatment caused a dose-dependent decrease in the cell surface FcɛRI expression and the binding between the cell surface FcɛRI and the IgE antibody. Moreover, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that levels of the mRNA for the FcɛRI α chain was decreased by treatment with AJN extract. These results indicate that AJN extract may exert anti-allergic effects via the inhibition of calcium influx and histamine release, which occurs as a result from the down-regulation of the binding of IgE antibody to cell surface FcɛRI. This mechanism may occur through FcɛRI expression inhibition. PMID:28078254

  6. Quorum sensing in Aeromonas hydrophila and Aeromonas salmonicida: identification of the LuxRI homologs AhyRI and AsaRI and their cognate N-acylhomoserine lactone signal molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Swift, S; Karlyshev, A V; Fish, L; Durant, E L; Winson, M K; Chhabra, S R; Williams, P; Macintyre, S; Stewart, G S

    1997-01-01

    Spent culture supernatants from both Aeromonas hydrophila and Aeromonas salmonicida activate a range of biosensors responsive to N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). The genes for a quorum sensing signal generator and a response regulator were cloned from each Aeromonas species and termed ahyRI and asaRI, respectively. Protein sequence homology analysis places the gene products within the growing family of LuxRI homologs. ahyR and asaR are transcribed divergently from ahyI and asaI, respectively, and in both Aeromonas species, the genes downstream have been identified by DNA sequence and PCR analysis. Downstream of both ahyI and asaI is a gene with close homology to iciA, an inhibitor of chromosome replication in Escherichia coli, a finding which implies that in Aeromonas, cell division may be linked to quorum sensing. The major signal molecule synthesized via both AhyI and AsaI was purified from spent culture supernatants and identified as N-(butanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (BHL) by thin-layer chromatography, high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis, and mass spectrometry. In addition, a second, minor AHL, N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone, was identified. Transcriptional reporter studies with ahyI::luxCDABE fusions indicate that AhyR and BHL are both required for ahyI transcription. For A. salmonicida, although the addition of exogenous BHL gives only a small stimulation of the production of serine protease with comparison to the control culture, the incorporation of a longer-chain AHL, N-(3-oxodecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone, reduced the final level (by approximately 50%) and delayed the appearance (from an A650 of 0.9 in the control to an A650 of 1.2 in the test) of protease in the culture supernatant. These data add A. hydrophila and A. salmonicida to the growing family of gram-negative bacteria now known to control gene expression through quorum sensing. PMID:9286976

  7. Joint trajectories of cigarette smoking and depressive symptoms from the mid-20s to the mid-30s predicting generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Yeon; Brook, Judith S; Finch, Stephen J; De La Rosa, Mario; Brook, David W

    2017-03-10

    The current study examines longitudinal patterns of cigarette smoking and depressive symptoms as predictors of generalized anxiety disorder using data from the Harlem Longitudinal Development Study. There were 674 African American (53%) and Puerto Rican (47%) participants. Among the 674 participants, 60% were females. In the logistic regression analyses, the indicators of membership in each of the joint trajectories of cigarette smoking and depressive symptoms from the mid-20s to the mid-30s were used as the independent variables, and the diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder in the mid-30s was used as the dependent variable. The high cigarette smoking with high depressive symptoms group and the low cigarette smoking with high depressive symptoms group were associated with an increased likelihood of having generalized anxiety disorder as compared to the no cigarette smoking with low depressive symptoms group. The findings shed light on the prevention and treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

  8. RiSA: A Science Festival for the Bilingual and Bicultural Rio Grande Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Joey Shapiro; Torres, Cristina; Stone, Robert

    2014-03-01

    The Rio Grande Science and Arts (RiSA) Festival organized by the Center for Gravitational Wave Astronomy (CGWA) at the University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB) will use a wide variety of artforms to bring physics and science topics to the bilingual and bicultural population of the Rio Grande Valley of South Texas. The science and art faculty at UTB will partner with art and education professionals to create an annual community event celebrating science though art. Music, dance, poetry, and visual arts will headline the festival activities. Festival events and products will be produced in both English and Spanish to attract and inform the bilingual local community. The RiSA Festival is supported by the Science Festival Alliance and the Sloan Foundation. Supported by the Science Festival Alliance and the Sloan Foundation.

  9. CCD UBV(RI)C and 2MASS photometry of seven open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkaya Oralhan, {İ.; Michel, R.

    Fundamental astrophysical parameters have been derived for Be 45, Be 55, Di 07, Feib 01, Ki 02, NGC 457 and NGC 1548 open clusters (OCs) using CCD U BV (RI)_C photometric data and PPMXL database. CCD U BV (RI)_C photometric data observed with the 84 cm telescope at the San Pedro Mártir National Astronomical Observatory (SPMO), México. The cluster members and field stars in the cluster regions have separated through their Proper Motion (PM) vector point diagrams. We have used JH{Ks} photometry of 2MASS data taken from PPMXL catalogue to have stellar Radial Density Profile (RDP) and determine limit radius of these seven clusters. Five different Color-Magnitude diagrams ane one color-color diagram have been used together with Padova isochrones and intrinsic-colour calibrations to obtain reddenings, metallicities, distance moduli, and ages for these seven clusters.

  10. Optical CT scanner for in-air readout of gels for external radiation beam 3D dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Ramm, Daniel; Rutten, Thomas P; Shepherd, Justin; Bezak, Eva

    2012-06-21

    Optical CT scanners for a 3D readout of externally irradiated radiosensitive hydrogels currently require the use of a refractive index (RI) matching liquid bath to obtain suitable optical ray paths through the gel sample to the detector. The requirement for a RI matching liquid bath has been negated by the design of a plastic cylindrical gel container that provides parallel beam geometry through the gel sample for the majority of the projection. The design method can be used for various hydrogels. Preliminary test results for the prototype laser beam scanner with ferrous xylenol-orange gel show geometric distortion of 0.2 mm maximum, spatial resolution limited to beam spot size of about 0.4 mm and 0.8% noise (1 SD) for a uniform irradiation. Reconstruction of a star pattern irradiated through the cylinder walls demonstrates the suitability for external beam applications. The extremely simple and cost-effective construction of this optical CT scanner, together with the simplicity of scanning gel samples without RI matching fluid increases the feasibility of using 3D gel dosimetry for clinical external beam dose verifications.

  11. Structural and Thermodynamic Basis for Enhanced DNA Binding by a Promiscuous Mutant EcoRI Endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Sapienza, Paul J.; Rosenberg, John M.; Jen-Jacobson, Linda

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Promiscuous mutant EcoRI endonucleases bind to the canonical site GAATTC more tightly than does the wild-type endonuclease, yet cleave variant (EcoRI*) sites more rapidly than does wild-type. The crystal structure of the A138T promiscuous mutant homodimer in complex with a GAATTC site is nearly identical to that of the wild-type complex, except that the Thr138 side chains make novel packing interactions with bases in the 5′-flanking regions outside the recognition hexanucleotide, while excluding two bound water molecules seen in the wild-type complex. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm exclusion of these waters. The structure and simulations suggest multiple possible reasons why binding of A138T protein to the GAATTC site has ΔS° more favorable and ΔH° less favorable than for wild-type endonuclease binding. The novel interactions of Thr138 with flanking bases may permit A138T, unlike wild-type enzyme, to form complexes with EcoRI* sites that structurally resemble the specific wild-type complex with GAATTC. PMID:17997963

  12. Gene Ontology density estimation and discourse analysis for automatic GeneRiF extraction.

    PubMed

    Gobeill, Julien; Tbahriti, Imad; Ehrler, Frédéric; Mottaz, Anaïs; Veuthey, Anne-Lise; Ruch, Patrick

    2008-04-11

    This paper describes and evaluates a sentence selection engine that extracts a GeneRiF (Gene Reference into Functions) as defined in ENTREZ-Gene based on a MEDLINE record. Inputs for this task include both a gene and a pointer to a MEDLINE reference. In the suggested approach we merge two independent sentence extraction strategies. The first proposed strategy (LASt) uses argumentative features, inspired by discourse-analysis models. The second extraction scheme (GOEx) uses an automatic text categorizer to estimate the density of Gene Ontology categories in every sentence; thus providing a full ranking of all possible candidate GeneRiFs. A combination of the two approaches is proposed, which also aims at reducing the size of the selected segment by filtering out non-content bearing rhetorical phrases. Based on the TREC-2003 Genomics collection for GeneRiF identification, the LASt extraction strategy is already competitive (52.78%). When used in a combined approach, the extraction task clearly shows improvement, achieving a Dice score of over 57% (+10%). Argumentative representation levels and conceptual density estimation using Gene Ontology contents appear complementary for functional annotation in proteomics.

  13. Gene Ontology density estimation and discourse analysis for automatic GeneRiF extraction

    PubMed Central

    Gobeill, Julien; Tbahriti, Imad; Ehrler, Frédéric; Mottaz, Anaïs; Veuthey, Anne-Lise; Ruch, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Background This paper describes and evaluates a sentence selection engine that extracts a GeneRiF (Gene Reference into Functions) as defined in ENTREZ-Gene based on a MEDLINE record. Inputs for this task include both a gene and a pointer to a MEDLINE reference. In the suggested approach we merge two independent sentence extraction strategies. The first proposed strategy (LASt) uses argumentative features, inspired by discourse-analysis models. The second extraction scheme (GOEx) uses an automatic text categorizer to estimate the density of Gene Ontology categories in every sentence; thus providing a full ranking of all possible candidate GeneRiFs. A combination of the two approaches is proposed, which also aims at reducing the size of the selected segment by filtering out non-content bearing rhetorical phrases. Results Based on the TREC-2003 Genomics collection for GeneRiF identification, the LASt extraction strategy is already competitive (52.78%). When used in a combined approach, the extraction task clearly shows improvement, achieving a Dice score of over 57% (+10%). Conclusions Argumentative representation levels and conceptual density estimation using Gene Ontology contents appear complementary for functional annotation in proteomics. PMID:18426554

  14. Temperature effect on IgE binding to CD23 versus Fc epsilon RI.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing-Hung; Kilmon, Michelle A; Ma, Check; Caven, Timothy H; Chan-Li, Yee; Shelburne, Anne E; Tombes, Robert M; Roush, Eric; Conrad, Daniel H

    2003-02-15

    A chimeric soluble CD23, consisting of the extracellular domain of mouse CD23 and a modified leucine zipper (lz-CD23), has been shown to inhibit IgE binding to the FcepsilonRI. A similar human CD23 construct was also shown to inhibit binding of human IgE to human FcepsilonRI. In both systems, the inhibition was found to be temperature dependent; a 10-fold molar excess of lz-CD23 gave 90-98% inhibition at 4 degrees C, dropping to 20-30% inhibition at 37 degrees C. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of lz-CD23 binding to an IgE-coated sensor chip suggested that the effective concentration of lz-CD23 was lower at the higher temperatures. Analysis of (125)I-IgE binding to CD23(+)-Chinese hamster ovary cells also indicated that increased temperature resulted in a lower percentage of IgE capable of interacting with CD23. In contrast, IgE interacts more effectively with FcepsilonRI(+)-rat basophilic leukemia cells at 37 degrees C compared with 4 degrees C. The results support the concept that the open and closed IgE structures found by crystallography interact differently with the two IgE receptors and suggest that temperature influences the relative percentage of IgE in the respective structural forms. Changes in CD23 oligomerization also plays a role in the decreased binding seen at physiological temperatures.

  15. [Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis with positive anti-RI antibodies and mediastinal seminoma].

    PubMed

    Launay, M; Bozzolo, E; Venissac, N; Delmont, E; Fredenrich, A; Thomas, P

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of a 49-year-old man who was admitted for progressive behaviorial disorders with frontal elements. There was no sensorial nor motor deficiency. Clinical examination revealed android obesity, cutaneous and mucous paleness, pubic and axillary depilation and gynecomastia. Encephalic MRI found a lesion of the left amygdalian region with high T2 intensity and low T1 intensity associated with gadolinium-enhancement. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed a lymphocytic meningitis. Panhypopituitarism was found on the endocrine investigations. Anti-RI antibodies were positive, leading to the diagnosis of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis. The CT-scan showed a node of the lower part of the thymic area. Surgical resection revealed an ectopic mediastinal seminoma. The evolution consisted of paraneoplastic fever and crossed-syndrome with right hemiparesia and left common oculomotor nerve paralysis. Treatment was completed by two cycles of carboplatin, corticosteroids and substitutive opotherapy. Paraneoplastic fever disappeared, but behavioral disorders and palsy remain unchanged. The patient died two years later in a bedridden state. This case of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis associated with positive anti-RI antibodies and mediastinal seminoma is exceptional and has not to our knowledge been described in the literature. Cancers usually associated with anti-RI antibody are breast and lung cancer. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is not the classical clinical presentation, which usually is brainstem encephalitis. Hypothalamic involvement, uncommon in paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is mainly associated with positive antineuronal anti-Ma2 antibodies. Finally, the gadolinium enhancement on encephalic MRI is unusual in paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis.

  16. Structure of D-AKAP2:PKA RI Complex: Insights into AKAP Specificity and Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, Ganapathy N.; Kinderman, Francis S.; Kim, Choel; von Daake, Sventja; Chen, Lirong; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Taylor, Susan S.

    2010-11-22

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) regulate cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) signaling in space and time. Dual-specific AKAP 2 (D-AKAP2) binds to the dimerization/docking (D/D) domain of both RI and RII regulatory subunits of PKA with high affinity. Here we have determined the structures of the RI{alpha} D/D domain alone and in complex with D-AKAP2. The D/D domain presents an extensive surface for binding through a well-formed N-terminal helix, and this surface restricts the diversity of AKAPs that can interact. The structures also underscore the importance of a redox-sensitive disulfide in affecting AKAP binding. An unexpected shift in the helical register of D-AKAP2 compared to the RII{alpha}:D-AKAP2 complex structure makes the mode of binding to RI{alpha} novel. Finally, the comparison allows us to deduce a molecular explanation for the sequence and spatial determinants of AKAP specificity.

  17. Characterization of highly and moderately repetitive 500 bp Eco RI fragments from Xenopus laevis DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, S; Meyerhof, W; Korge, E; Knöchel, W

    1984-01-01

    Three different types of repetitive Eco RI fragments, which comigrate within a visible band of approximately 500 bp at gel electrophoresis of Xenopus laevis DNA Eco RI digests have been cloned and sequenced. These sequences are designated as Repetitive Eco RI Monomers: REM 1, REM 2 and REM 3. The sequences contain direct repeats, inverted repeats and palindromic elements. Genomic organization of the most abundant sequence (REM 1; 0.4% of total DNA) is that of an interspersed sequence. REM 2 (0.08%) is partly organized as an interspersed element and partly found in tandem arrangement, whereas REM 3 (0.02%) represents the tandemly repeated monomeric unit of a satellite DNA. In situ hybridization has shown that REM 1 and REM 2 sequences are found on most chromosomes, REM 1 being preferentially located on specific chromosomal loci. REM 3 is located near the centromere region of only one chromosome pair (presumably number 1). Hybridization of Northern blots from RNAs of different developmental stages revealed that REM 1, REM 2 and REM 3 sequences are transcribed and that transcription is under developmental control. Images PMID:6330690

  18. Cellular trafficking of the IL-1RI-associated kinase-1 requires intact kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Boel, Gaby-Fleur . E-mail: boel@mail.dife.de; Jurrmann, Nadine; Brigelius-Flohe, Regina

    2005-06-24

    Upon stimulation of cells with interleukin-1 (IL-1) the IL-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) associated kinase-1 (IRAK-1) transiently associates to and dissociates from the IL-1RI and thereafter translocates into the nucleus. Here we show that nuclear translocation of IRAK-1 depends on its kinase activity since translocation was not observed in EL-4 cells overexpressing a kinase negative IRAK-1 mutant (EL-4{sup IRAK-1-K239S}). IRAK-1 itself, an endogenous substrate with an apparent molecular weight of 24 kDa (p24), and exogenous substrates like histone and myelin basic protein are phosphorylated by nuclear located IRAK-1. Phosphorylation of p24 cannot be detected in EL-4{sup IRAK-1-K239S} cells. IL-1-dependent recruitment of IRAK-1 to the IL-1RI and subsequent phosphorylation of IRAK-1 is a prerequisite for nuclear translocation of IRAK-1. It is therefore concluded that intracellular localization of IRAK-1 depends on its kinase activity and that IRAK-1 may also function as a kinase in the nucleus as shown by a new putative endogenous substrate.

  19. Actin restricts FcεRI diffusion and facilitates antigen-induced receptor immobilisation

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Nicholas L.; Lidke, Keith A.; Pfeiffer, Janet R.; Burns, Alan R.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Oliver, Janet M.; Lidke, Diane S.

    2010-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton has been implicated in restricting diffusion of plasma membrane components. Here, simultaneous observations of quantum dot-labelled FcεRI motion and GFP-tagged actin dynamics provide direct evidence that actin filament bundles define micron-sized domains that confine mobile receptors. Dynamic reorganisation of actin structures occurs over seconds, making the location and dimensions of actin-defined domains time dependent. Multiple FcεRI often maintain extended close proximity without detectable correlated motion, suggesting that they are co-confined within membrane domains. FcεRI signalling is activated by cross-linking with multivalent antigen. We show that receptors become immobilised within seconds of cross-linking. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton results in delayed immobilisation kinetics and increased diffusion of cross-linked clusters. These results implicate actin in membrane partitioning that not only restricts diffusion of membrane proteins, but also dynamically influences their long-range mobility, sequestration, and response to ligand binding. PMID:18641640

  20. Uncertainties in NDE Reliability and Assessing the Impact on RI-ISI

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2010-08-01

    A major thrust in the past 20 years has been to upgrade nondestructive examinations (NDE) for use in inservice inspection (ISI) programs to more effectively manage degradation at operating nuclear power plants. Risk-informed ISI (RI-ISI) is one of the outcomes of this work, and this approach relies heavily on the reliability of NDE, when properly applied, to detect sources of expected degradation. There have been a number of improvements in the reliability of NDE, specifically in ultrasonic testing (UT), through training of examiners, and improved equipment and procedure development. However, the most significant improvements in UT were derived by moving from prescriptive requirements to performance based requirements. Even with these substantial improvements, NDE contains significant uncertainties and RI-ISI programs need to address and accommodate this factor. As part of the work that PNNL is conducting for the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, we are examining the impact of these uncertainties on the effectiveness of RI-ISI programs.

  1. Dating the Bibong-ri Neolithic site in Korea: Excavating the oldest ancient boat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gyujun; Kim, Jong-Chan; Youn, Minyoung; Yun, Chongcheol; Kang, Jin; Song, Yong-Mi; Song, Su-Jin; Noh, Hye-Jin; Kim, Do-Kyun; Im, Hack-Jong

    2010-04-01

    The remains of an ancient wooden boat were unearthed at the Bibong-ri shell mound site. The site was located at Bibong-ri, Bugog-myeon, Changnyeong-gun, Gyeongsangnam-do in South Korea. A substantial fragment of the vessel was discovered in the lowest layer of the site. We collected 17 samples of charcoal and wood from pebble, sand, and shell layers. Sample preparation extracted the carbon from each sample material and converted it into graphite for AMS radiocarbon dating. Radiocarbon dates of the samples indicate that they belong to the Neolithic period and that the boat dates from ca. 5700 BC. To this point, the oldest known boat in the world has been a wooden boat dating from ca. 5500 BC in China. Other ancient boats from around the world include a logboat dating from ca. 3600 BC in Japan and a fleet of wooden boats dating from ca. 3000 BC in Egypt. The Bibong-ri boat is the first boat from the Neolithic period ever found in South Korea and must represent one of the world's oldest known boats.

  2. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect

    Popple, Richard A. Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify

  3. Some Challenges of an “Upside Down” Nitrogen Budget – Science and Management in Greenwich Bay, RI (USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    When nutrients impact estuarine water quality, scientists and managers instinctively focus on quantifying and controlling land-based sources. However, in Greenwich Bay, RI, the estuary opens onto a larger and more intensively fertilized coastal water body (Narragansett Bay). Prev...

  4. Some Challenges of an “Upside Down” Nitrogen Budget – Science and Management in Greenwich Bay, RI (USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    When nutrients impact estuarine water quality, scientists and managers instinctively focus on quantifying and controlling land-based sources. However, in Greenwich Bay, RI, the estuary opens onto a larger and more intensively fertilized coastal water body (Narragansett Bay). Prev...

  5. 78 FR 52580 - Submission for Review: Request for Case Review for Enhanced Disability Annuity Benefit, RI 20-123

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... Publications Team, 1900 E Street NW., Room 4445, Washington, DC 20415, Attention: Cyrus S. Benson, or sent by email to Cyrus.Benson@opm.gov or faxed to (202) 606- 0910. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: RI 20-123 is...

  6. A comment on the paper by R.I. Khrapko 'On the possibility of an experiment on 'nonlocality' of electrodynamics'

    SciTech Connect

    Venediktov, V Yu

    2015-04-30

    This methodological note is dedicated to the analysis of the imaginary experiment proposed in the paper by R.I. Khrapko 'On the possibility of an experiment on 'nonlocality' of electrodynamics' [Quantum Electronics, 42, 1133 (2012)]. (discussion)

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: V823 Cas BV(RI)c differential photometry (Jurcsik+, 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurcsik, J.; Szeidl, B.; Varadi, M.; Henden, A.; Hurta, Zs.; Lakatos, B.; Posztobanyi, K.; Klagyivik, P.; Sodor, A.

    2005-09-01

    The observations were obtained with the automated 60cm telescope of Konkoly Observatory, Svabhegy, Budapest equiped with a Wright 750x1100 CCD using BV(RI)c filters, between 25 September and 14 December in 2003. (5 data files).

  8. Peanut-induced intestinal allergy is mediated through a mast cell-IgE-FcepsilonRI-IL-13 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meiqin; Takeda, Katsuyuki; Shiraishi, Yoshiki; Okamoto, Masakazu; Dakhama, Azzeddine; Joetham, Anthony; Gelfand, Erwin W

    2010-08-01

    Although implicated in the disease, the specific contributions of FcepsilonRI and IL-13 to the pathogenesis of peanut-induced intestinal allergy are not well defined. We sought to determine the contributions of FcepsilonRI, IL-13, and mast cells to the development of intestinal mucosal responses in a murine model of peanut-induced intestinal allergy. Sensitized wild-type (WT), FcepsilonRI-deficient (FcepsilonRI(-/-)), and mast cell-deficient (Kit(W-sh/W-sh)) mice received peanut orally every day for 1 week. Bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) from WT, FcepsilonRI(-/-), IL-4(-/-), IL-13(-/-), and IL-4/IL-13(-/-) mice were differentiated and transferred into WT, FcepsilonRI(-/-), and Kit(W-sh/W-sh) recipients. BMMCs from WT and UBI-GFP/BL6 mice were differentiated and transferred into WT and Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice. Blockade of IL-13 was achieved by using IL-13 receptor alpha2 (IL-13Ralpha2)-IgG fusion protein. FcepsilonRI(-/-) mice showed decreased intestinal inflammation (mast cell and eosinophil numbers) and goblet cell metaplasia and reduced levels of IL4, IL6, IL13, and IL17A mRNA expression in the jejunum. Transfer of WT BMMCs to FcepsilonRI(-/-) recipients restored their ability to develop intestinal allergic responses unlike transfer of FcepsilonRI(-/-), IL-13(-/-), or IL-4/IL-13(-/-) BMMCs. FcepsilonRI(-/-) mice exhibited lower IL-13 levels and treatment of WT mice with IL-13 receptor alpha2 prevented peanut-induced intestinal allergy and inflammation. These data indicate that the development of peanut-induced intestinal allergy is mediated through a mast cell-dependent IgE-FcepsilonRI-IL-13 pathway. Targeting IL-13 might be a potential treatment for IgE-mediated peanut-induced allergic responses in the intestine. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Beam-Bem interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Jin; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    In high energy storage-ring colliders, the nonlinear effect arising from beam-beam interactions is a major source that leads to the emittance growth, the reduction of beam life time, and limits the collider luminosity. In this paper, two models of beam-beam interactions are introduced, which are weak-strong and strong-strong beam-beam interactions. In addition, space-charge model is introduced.

  10. Orai and TRPC channel characterization in FcεRI-mediated calcium signaling and mediator secretion in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Wajdner, Hannah E; Farrington, Jasmine; Barnard, Claire; Peachell, Peter T; Schnackenberg, Christine G; Marino, Joseph P; Xu, Xiaoping; Affleck, Karen; Begg, Malcolm; Seward, Elizabeth P

    2017-03-01

    Inappropriate activation of mast cells via the FcεRI receptor leads to the release of inflammatory mediators and symptoms of allergic disease. Calcium influx is a critical regulator of mast cell signaling and is required for exocytosis of preformed mediators and for synthesis of eicosanoids, cytokines and chemokines. Studies in rodent and human mast cells have identified Orai calcium channels as key contributors to FcεRI-initiated mediator release. However, until now the role of TRPC calcium channels in FcεRI-mediated human mast cell signaling has not been published. Here, we show evidence for the expression of Orai 1,2, and 3 and TRPC1 and 6 in primary human lung mast cells and the LAD2 human mast cell line but, we only find evidence of functional contribution of Orai and not TRPC channels to FcεRI-mediated calcium entry. Calcium imaging experiments, utilizing an Orai selective antagonist (Synta66) showed the contribution of Orai to FcεRI-mediated signaling in human mast cells. Although, the use of a TRPC3/6 selective antagonist and agonist (GSK-3503A and GSK-2934A, respectively) did not reveal evidence for TRPC6 contribution to FcεRI-mediated calcium signaling in human mast cells. Similarly, inactivation of STIM1-regulated TRPC1 in human mast cells (as tested by transfecting cells with STIM1-KK(684-685)EE - TRPC1 gating mutant) failed to alter FcεRI-mediated calcium signaling in LAD2 human mast cells. Mediator release assays confirm that FcεRI-mediated calcium influx through Orai is necessary for histamine and TNFα release but is differentially involved in the generation of cytokines and eicosanoids.

  11. Suppressive effect of Elf-1 on FcepsilonRI alpha-chain expression in primary mast cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Hui; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Shimokawa, Naomi; Hara, Mutsuko; Kanada, Shunsuke; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko

    2008-10-01

    The high-affinity receptor for immunoglobulin E (IgE), FcepsilonRI, is specifically expressed in mast cells and basophils and plays a key role in IgE-mediated allergic reactions. The transcription factor Elf-1 has been previously identified to bind to the promoter of the human FcepsilonRI alpha-chain, which is essential for the function and expression of FcepsilonRI. In the present study, Elf-1 siRNA was conducted to evaluate the effects of Elf-1 on FcepsilonRI alpha-chain expression in the primary mouse mast cells, bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC). Introduction of Elf-1 siRNA effectively reduced expression levels of Elf-1 mRNA and protein in BMMC. Transient reporter assay showed that the knockdown of Elf-1 by siRNA resulted in increased FcepsilonRI alpha-chain promoter activity, while overexpression of Elf-1 suppressed alpha-chain promoter activity in BMMC. Elf-1 siRNA-treated BMMC exhibited marked upregulation of FcepsilonRI alpha-chain transcription, whereas beta-chain mRNA was not affected by Elf-1 siRNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that the amount of transcription factor PU.1, recognizing the cis-element close to the Elf-1-site on the FcepsilonRI alpha-chain promoter, was significantly increased by introduction of Elf-1 siRNA. These results indicate that Elf-1 negatively regulates FcepsilonRI alpha-chain expression by suppressing PU.1-mediated transcription of the alpha-chain in BMMC.

  12. Homology mapping of T-DNA regions on three Agrobacterium rhizogenes Ri plasmids by electron microscope heteroduplex studies.

    PubMed

    Brevet, J; Tempé, J

    1988-03-01

    Recombinant plasmids carrying segments of the Agrobacterium rhizogenes T-DNA regions of the three Ri plasmids 1855 (TL-DNA only), 8196, and 2659 were used for establishing homology maps by electron microscope examination of heteroduplexes. Plasmid DNA was linearized by digestion with suitable restriction endonucleases in order to generate large T-DNA segments. Heteroduplexes were prepared in 50% formamide and spread under standard conditions. Measurements of double and single strands allowed the drawing of homology maps. The three T-DNAs share mainly two homologous sequences of respectively about 2.5 and 1.5 kb, bracketing a largely nonhomologous central part which is about 5.5 kb long. The T-DNAs from pRi1855 and pRi2659 appear to be more related to each other than to that of pRi8196. With reference to the published nucleotide sequence of the TL-DNA of pRiA4 (probably identical to that of pRi1855), ORFs 8 and 14 seem to be the most conserved sequences of the three T-DNAs. The significance of these conserved sequences is unclear since the genetic loci involved in rhizogenicity of agropine strains identified previously are located in nonhomologous regions.

  13. Simple beam profile monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B.

    2012-12-19

    An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

  14. An evaluation of the 30-s chair stand test in older adults: frailty detection based on kinematic parameters from a single inertial unit

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A growing interest in frailty syndrome exists because it is regarded as a major predictor of co-morbidities and mortality in older populations. Nevertheless, frailty assessment has been controversial, particularly when identifying this syndrome in a community setting. Performance tests such as the 30-second chair stand test (30-s CST) are a cornerstone for detecting early declines in functional independence. Additionally, recent advances in body-fixed sensors have enhanced the sensors’ ability to automatically and accurately evaluate kinematic parameters related to a specific movement performance. The purpose of this study is to use this new technology to obtain kinematic parameters that can identify frailty in an aged population through the performance the 30-s CST. Methods Eighteen adults with a mean age of 54 years, as well as sixteen pre-frail and thirteen frail patients with mean ages of 78 and 85 years, respectively, performed the 30-s CST while threir trunk movements were measured by a sensor-unit at vertebra L3. Sit-stand-sit cycles were determined using both acceleration and orientation information to detect failed attempts. Movement-related phases (i.e. impulse, stand-up, and sit-down) were differentiated based on seat off and seat on events. Finally, the kinematic parameters of the impulse, stand-up and sit-down phases were obtained to identify potential differences across the three frailty groups. Results For the stand-up and sit-down phases, velocity peaks and “modified impulse” parameters clearly differentiated subjects with different frailty levels (p < 0.001). The trunk orientation range during the impulse phase was also able to classify a subject according to his frail syndrome (p < 0.001). Furthermore, these parameters derived from the inertial units (IUs) are sensitive enough to detect frailty differences not registered by the number of completed cycles which is the standard test outcome. Conclusions This study shows

  15. An evaluation of the 30-s chair stand test in older adults: frailty detection based on kinematic parameters from a single inertial unit.

    PubMed

    Millor, Nora; Lecumberri, Pablo; Gómez, Marisol; Martínez-Ramírez, Alicia; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2013-08-01

    A growing interest in frailty syndrome exists because it is regarded as a major predictor of co-morbidities and mortality in older populations. Nevertheless, frailty assessment has been controversial, particularly when identifying this syndrome in a community setting. Performance tests such as the 30-second chair stand test (30-s CST) are a cornerstone for detecting early declines in functional independence. Additionally, recent advances in body-fixed sensors have enhanced the sensors' ability to automatically and accurately evaluate kinematic parameters related to a specific movement performance. The purpose of this study is to use this new technology to obtain kinematic parameters that can identify frailty in an aged population through the performance the 30-s CST. Eighteen adults with a mean age of 54 years, as well as sixteen pre-frail and thirteen frail patients with mean ages of 78 and 85 years, respectively, performed the 30-s CST while their trunk movements were measured by a sensor-unit at vertebra L3. Sit-stand-sit cycles were determined using both acceleration and orientation information to detect failed attempts. Movement-related phases (i.e. impulse, stand-up, and sit-down) were differentiated based on seat off and seat on events. Finally, the kinematic parameters of the impulse, stand-up and sit-down phases were obtained to identify potential differences across the three frailty groups. For the stand-up and sit-down phases, velocity peaks and "modified impulse" parameters clearly differentiated subjects with different frailty levels (p < 0.001). The trunk orientation range during the impulse phase was also able to classify a subject according to his frail syndrome (p < 0.001). Furthermore, these parameters derived from the inertial units (IUs) are sensitive enough to detect frailty differences not registered by the number of completed cycles which is the standard test outcome. This study shows that IUs can enhance the information gained from

  16. Relativistic electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

    1975-11-11

    A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

  17. Laser beam monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Bradley S.; Wetherington, Jr., Grady R.

    1985-01-01

    Laser beam monitoring systems include laser-transparent plates set at an angle to the laser beam passing therethrough and light sensor for detecting light reflected from an object on which the laser beam impinges.

  18. Asia Rice Crop Estimation and Monitoring (Asia-RiCE) for GEOGLAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyoshi, K.; Tomiyama, N.; Okumura, T.; Sobue, S.

    2013-12-01

    Food security is a critical issue for the international community because of rapid population and economic growth, and climate change. In June 2011, the meeting of G20 agriculture ministers was held to discuss food security and food price volatility, and they agreed on an 'Action Plan on Food Price Volatility and Agriculture'. This plan includes a GEO Global Agricultural Monitoring (GEOGLAM) initiative. The aim of GEOGLAM is to reinforce the international community's ability to produce and disseminate relevant, timely, and accurate forecasts of agricultural production on regional, national, and global scales by utilizing remote sensing technology. GEOGLAM focused on four major grain crops, wheat, maize, soybeans and rice. In particular, Asian countries are responsible for approximately 90% of the world rice production and consumption, rice is the most significant cereal crop in Asian region. Hence, Asian space and agricultural agencies with an interest in the development of rice crop monitoring technology launched an Asia-Rice Crop Estimation & Monitoring (Asia-RiCE) component for the GEOGLAM initiative. In Asian region, rice is mainly cultivated in rainy season, and a large amount of cloud limits rice crop monitoring with optical sensors. But, Synthetic Aperture RADAR (SAR) is all-weather sensor and can observe land surface even if the area is covered by cloud. Therefore, SAR technology would be powerful tool to monitor rice crop in Asian region. Asia-RiCE team required mainly SAR observation data including ALOS-2, RISAT-1, Sentinel-1 and RADARSAT, TerraSAR-X, COSMO-SkyMed for Asia-RiCE GEOGLAM Phase 1 implementation (2013-2015) to the Committee on Earth Observations (CEOS) in the GEOGLAM-CEOS Global Agricultural Monitoring Co-community Meeting held in June 2013. And also, rice crop has complicated cropping systems such as rein-fed or irrigated cultivation, single, double or sometimes triple cropping. In addition, each agricultural field is smaller than that of

  19. Beam imaging sensor

    DOEpatents

    McAninch, Michael D.; Root, Jeffrey J.

    2016-07-05

    The present invention relates generally to the field of sensors for beam imaging and, in particular, to a new and useful beam imaging sensor for use in determining, for example, the power density distribution of a beam including, but not limited to, an electron beam or an ion beam. In one embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other items, a circumferential slit that is either circular, elliptical or polygonal in nature.

  20. Tunable beam displacer

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar-Serrano, Luis José; Valencia, Alejandra; Torres, Juan P.

    2015-03-15

    We report the implementation of a tunable beam displacer, composed of a polarizing beam splitter (PBS) and two mirrors, that divides an initially polarized beam into two parallel beams whose separation can be continuously tuned. The two output beams are linearly polarized with either vertical or horizontal polarization and no optical path difference is introduced between them. The wavelength dependence of the device as well as the maximum separation between the beams achievable is limited mainly by the PBS characteristics.

  1. Accelerated dissociation of IgE:FcεRI complexes by disruptive inhibitors actively desensitizes allergic effector cells

    PubMed Central

    Eggel, Alexander; Baravalle, Günther; Hobi, Gabriel; Kim, Beomkyu; Buschor, Patrick; Forrer, Patrik; Shin, Jeoung-Sook; Vogel, Monique; Stadler, Beda M.; Dahinden, Clemens A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2014-01-01

    Background The remarkably stable interaction of immunoglobulin E (IgE) with its high-affinity receptor FcεRI on basophils and mast cells is critical for the induction of allergic hypersensitivity reactions. Due to the exceptionally slow dissociation rate of IgE:FcεRI complexes such allergic effector cells permanently display allergen-specific IgE on their surface and immediately respond to allergen challenge by releasing inflammatory mediators. We have recently described a novel macromolecular inhibitor that actively promotes the dissociation of IgE from FcεRI through a molecular mechanism termed facilitated dissociation. Objective Here, we assessed the therapeutic potential of this non-immunoglobulin based IgE inhibitor DARPin E2_79 as well as a novel engineered biparatopic DARPin bi53_79 and directly compared them to the established anti-IgE antibody omalizumab. Methods: IgE:FcεRI complex dissociation was analyzed in vitro using recombinant proteins in ELISA and surface plasmon resonance, ex vivo using human primary basophils with flow cytometry and in vivo using human FcεRI transgenic mice in a functional passive cutaneous anaphylaxis test. Results We show that E2_79 mediated removal of IgE from primary human basophils fully abrogates IgE-dependent cell activation and release of pro-inflammatory mediators ex vivo. Furthermore, we report that omalizumab also accelerates the dissociation of IgE from FcεRI albeit much less efficiently than E2_79. Using the biparatopic IgE targeting approach we further improved the disruptive potency of E2_79 by ~100 fold and show that disruptive IgE inhibitors efficiently prevent passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice expressing the human FcεRI alpha chain. Conclusion Our findings highlight the potential of such novel IgE inhibitors as important diagnostic and therapeutic tools to managing allergic diseases. PMID:24642143

  2. Fyn kinase controls Fc{epsilon}RI receptor-operated calcium entry necessary for full degranulation in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Miranda, Elizabeth; Ibarra-Sanchez, Alfredo; Gonzalez-Espinosa, Claudia

    2010-01-22

    IgE-antigen-dependent crosslinking of the high affinity IgE receptor (Fc{epsilon}RI) on mast cells leads to degranulation, leukotriene synthesis and cytokine production. Calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) mobilization is a sine qua non requisite for degranulation, allowing the rapid secretion of stored pro-inflammatory mediators responsible for allergy symptoms. Fyn is a Src-family kinase that positively controls Fc{epsilon}RI-induced mast cell degranulation. However, our understanding of the mechanism connecting Fyn activation to secretion of pre-synthesized mediators is very limited. We analyzed Fc{epsilon}RI-dependent Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) differentiated from WT and Fyn -/- knock out mice. Fyn -/- BMMCs showed a marked defect in extracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx after Fc{epsilon}RI crosslinking but not after thapsigargin addition. High concentrations of Gadolinium (Gd{sup 3+}) partially blocked Fc{epsilon}RI-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx in WT cells but, in contrast, completely inhibited Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in Fyn -/- cells. Low concentrations of an inhibitor of the canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) Ca{sup 2+} channels (2-aminoethoxyphenyl-borane, 2-APB) blocked Fc{epsilon}RI-induced maximal Ca{sup 2+} rise in WT but not in Fyn -/- cells. Ca{sup 2+} entry through Fyn-controlled, 2-APB sensitive channels was found to be important for full degranulation and IL-2 mRNA accumulation in WT cells. Immunoprecipitation assays showed that Fyn kinase interacts with TRPC 3/6/7 channels after IgE-antigen stimulation, but its association is not related to protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Results indicate Fyn kinase mediates the receptor-dependent activation of TRPC channels that contribute to degranulation in Fc{epsilon}RI-stimulated mast cells.

  3. t-Darpp stimulates protein kinase A activity by forming a complex with its RI regulatory subunit.

    PubMed

    Theile, Dirk; Geng, Shuhui; Denny, Erin C; Momand, Jamil; Kane, Susan E

    2017-09-01

    t-Darpp is the truncated form of the dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32kDa (Darpp-32) and has been demonstrated to confer resistance to trastuzumab, a Her2-targeted anticancer agent, via sustained signaling through the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway and activation of protein kinase A (PKA). The mechanism of t-Darpp-mediated PKA activation is poorly understood. In the PKA holoenzyme, when the catalytic subunits are bound to regulatory subunits RI or RII, kinase activity is inhibited. We investigated PKA activity and holoenzyme composition in cell lines overexpressing t-Darpp (SK.tDp) or a T39A phosphorylation mutant (SK.tDp(T39A)), as well as an empty vector control cell line (SK.empty). We also evaluated protein-protein interactions between t-Darpp and PKA catalytic (PKAc) or regulatory subunits RI and RII in those cell lines. SK.tDp cells had elevated PKA activity and showed diminished association of RI with PKAc, whereas SK.tDp(T39A) cells did not have these properties. Moreover, wild type t-Darpp associates with RI. Concurrent expression of Darpp-32 reversed t-Darrp's effects on PKA holoenzyme state, consistent with earlier observations that Darpp-32 reverses t-Darpp's activation of PKA. Together, t-Darpp phosphorylation at T39 seems to be crucial for t-Darpp-mediated PKA activation and this activation appears to occur through an association with RI and sequestering of RI away from PKAc. The t-Darpp-RI interaction could be a druggable target to reduce PKA activity in drug-resistant cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies and synthetic peptides define the active site of FcepsilonRI and a potential receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Rigby, L J; Trist, H; Snider, J; Hulett, M D; Hogarth, P M; Rigby, L J; Epa, V C

    2000-07-01

    Defining the structure of the human high-affinity receptor for IgE, Fc,RI, is crucial to understand the receptor:ligand interaction, and to develop drugs to prevent IgE-dependent allergic diseases. To this end, a series of four anti-FcepsilonRI monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), including three new mAbs, 47, 54, and 3B4, were used in conjunction with synthetic FcepsilonRI peptides to define functional regions of the Fc IgE-binding site and identify an antagonist of IgE binding. The spatial orientation of the epitopes detected by these antibodies and their relationship to the IgE-binding region of FcepsilonRI was defined by a homology model based on the closely related FcepsilonRIIa. Using recombinant soluble FcRI-alpha as well as FcepsilonRI-alpha expressed on the cell surface, a series of direct and competitive binding experiments indicated that the mAbs detected nonoverlapping epitopes. One antibody (15-1), previously thought to be located close to the IgE-binding site, was precisely mapped to a single loop within the IgE-binding site by both mutagenesis and overlapping synthetic peptides encompassing the entire extracellular domain. A synthetic peptide epsilonRI-11, containing the amino acids 101-120 and the mAb 15-1 epitope, inhibited IgE binding and may form the basis for the development of a useful receptor-based therapy.

  5. TRAF6 specifically contributes to FcepsilonRI-mediated cytokine production but not mast cell degranulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong Jun; Chen, Wei; Carrigan, Svetlana O; Chen, Wei-Min; Roth, Kristy; Akiyama, Taishin; Inoue, Jun-ichiro; Marshall, Jean S; Berman, Jason N; Lin, Tong-Jun

    2008-11-14

    TRAF6 (tumor necrosis factor-associated factor 6) is an essential adaptor downstream from the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor and Toll-like receptor superfamily members. This molecule is critical for dendritic cell maturation and T cell homeostasis. Here we show that TRAF6 is important in high affinity IgE receptor, FcepsilonRI-mediated mast cell activation. In contrast to dendritic cells and T cells, TRAF6-deficient mast cells matured normally and showed normal IgE-dependent degranulation. Importantly, TRAF6-deficient mast cells showed impaired production of cytokine interleukin-6, CCL-9, interleukin-13, and TNF following FcepsilonRI aggregation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed decreased NF-kappaB p65 binding to CCL-9 and TNF promoters in TRAF6-deficient mast cells. Antigen and IgE-induced IkappaB phosphorylation and NF-kappaB p65 translocation to the nucleus were diminished in TRAF6-deficient mast cells. NF-kappaB luciferase activity in response to antigen and IgE stimulation was severely impaired in TRAF6-deficient mast cells. In addition, antigen and IgE-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 and JNK, but not ERK1/2, was significantly reduced in TRAF6-deficient mast cells. These results identified TRAF6 as an important signal transducer in FcepsilonRI-mediated signaling in mast cells. Our findings implicate TRAF6 as a new adaptor/regulator molecule for allergen-mediated inflammation in allergy.

  6. Transcriptome networks in the mouse retina: An exon level BXD RI database

    PubMed Central

    King, Rebecca; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Differences in gene expression provide diverse retina phenotypes and may also contribute to susceptibility to injury and disease. The present study defines the transcriptome of the retina in the BXD RI strain set, using the Affymetrix Mouse Gene 2.0 ST array to investigate all exons of traditional protein coding genes, non-coding RNAs, and microRNAs. These data are presented in a highly interactive database on the GeneNetwork website. Methods In the Normal Retina Database, the mRNA levels of the transcriptome from retinas was quantified using the Affymetrix Mouse Gene 2.0 ST array. This database consists of data from male and female mice. The data set includes a total of 52 BXD RI strains, the parental strains (C57BL/6J and DBA/2J), and a reciprocal cross. Results In combination with GeneNetwork, the Department of Defense (DoD) Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP) Normal Retina Database provides a large resource for mapping, graphing, analyzing, and testing complex genetic networks. Protein-coding and non-coding RNAs can be used to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that contribute to expression differences among the BXD strains and to establish links between classical ocular phenotypes associated with differences in the genomic sequence. Using this resource, we extracted transcriptome signatures for retinal cells and defined genetic networks associated with the maintenance of the normal retina. Furthermore, we examined differentially expressed exons within a single gene. Conclusions The high level of variation in mRNA levels found among the BXD RI strains makes it possible to identify expression networks that underline differences in retina structure and function. Ultimately, we will use this database to define changes that occur following blast injury to the retina. PMID:26604663

  7. The antibiotic Furvina® targets the P-site of 30S ribosomal subunits and inhibits translation initiation displaying start codon bias

    PubMed Central

    Fabbretti, Attilio; Brandi, Letizia; Petrelli, Dezemona; Pon, Cynthia L.; Castañedo, Nilo R.; Medina, Ricardo; Gualerzi, Claudio O.

    2012-01-01

    Furvina®, also denominated G1 (MW 297), is a synthetic nitrovinylfuran [2-bromo-5-(2-bromo-2-nitrovinyl)-furan] antibiotic with a broad antimicrobial spectrum. An ointment (Dermofural®) containing G1 as the only active principle is currently marketed in Cuba and successfully used to treat dermatological infections. Here we describe the molecular target and mechanism of action of G1 in bacteria and demonstrate that in vivo G1 preferentially inhibits protein synthesis over RNA, DNA and cell wall synthesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that G1 targets the small ribosomal subunit, binds at or near the P-decoding site and inhibits its function interfering with the ribosomal binding of fMet-tRNA during 30S initiation complex (IC) formation ultimately inhibiting translation. Notably, this G1 inhibition displays a bias for the nature (purine vs. pyrimidine) of the 3′-base of the codon, occurring efficiently only when the mRNA directing 30S IC formation and translation contains the canonical AUG initiation triplet or the rarely found AUA triplet, but hardly occurs when the mRNA start codon is either one of the non-canonical triplets AUU or AUC. This codon discrimination by G1 is reminiscent, though of opposite type of that displayed by IF3 in its fidelity function, and remarkably does not occur in the absence of this factor. PMID:22941660

  8. Propagation-invariant beams with quantum pendulum spectra: from Bessel beams to Gaussian beam-beams.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Mark R; Ring, James D

    2013-09-01

    We describe a new class of propagation-invariant light beams with Fourier transform given by an eigenfunction of the quantum mechanical pendulum. These beams, whose spectra (restricted to a circle) are doubly periodic Mathieu functions in azimuth, depend on a field strength parameter. When the parameter is zero, pendulum beams are Bessel beams, and as the parameter approaches infinity, they resemble transversely propagating one-dimensional Gaussian wave packets (Gaussian beam-beams). Pendulum beams are the eigenfunctions of an operator that interpolates between the squared angular momentum operator and the linear momentum operator. The analysis reveals connections with Mathieu beams, and insight into the paraxial approximation.

  9. BEAM INSTRUMENTATION FOR HIGH POWER HADRON BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will describe developments in the beam diagnostics which support the understanding and operation of high power hadron accelerators. These include the measurement of large dynamic range transverse and longitudinal beam profiles, beam loss detection, and non-interceptive diagnostics.

  10. U BV RI PHOTOMETRIC STANDARD STARS AROUND THE SKY AT +50 deg DECLINATION

    SciTech Connect

    Landolt, Arlo U.

    2013-11-01

    U BV RI photoelectric observations have been made of 335 stars around the sky, and centered approximately at +50 deg declination. The majority of the stars fall in the magnitude range 9 < V < 16, and in the color range –0.3 < (B – V) < +1.8. Those 243 stars best suited as new broadband photometric standard stars average 12.5 measures each from data taken on 98 different nights over a period of 17 years at the Kitt Peak National and Lowell Observatories.

  11. Polymer nanocomposite films with extremely high nanoparticle loadings via capillary rise infiltration (CaRI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yun-Ru; Jiang, Yijie; Hor, Jyo Lyn; Gupta, Rohini; Zhang, Lei; Stebe, Kathleen J.; Feng, Gang; Turner, Kevin T.; Lee, Daeyeon

    2014-12-01

    Polymer nanocomposite films (PNCFs) with extremely high concentrations of nanoparticles are important components in energy storage and conversion devices and also find use as protective coatings in various applications. PNCFs with high loadings of nanoparticles, however, are difficult to prepare because of the poor processability of polymer-nanoparticle mixtures with high concentrations of nanoparticles even at an elevated temperature. This problem is exacerbated when anisotropic nanoparticles are the desired filler materials. Here we report a straightforward method for generating PNCFs with extremely high loadings of nanoparticles. Our method is based on what we call capillary rise infiltration (CaRI) of polymer into a dense packing of nanoparticles. CaRI consists of two simple steps: (1) the preparation of a two-layer film, consisting of a porous layer of nanoparticles and a layer of polymer and (2) annealing of the bilayer structure above the temperature that imparts mobility to the polymer (e.g., glass transition of the polymer). The second step leads to polymer infiltration into the interstices of the nanoparticle layer, reminiscent of the capillary rise of simple fluid into a narrow capillary or a packing of granules. We use in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry and a three-layer Cauchy model to follow the capillary rise of polystyrene into the random network of nanoparticles. The infiltration of polystyrene into a densely packed TiO2 nanoparticle layer is shown to follow the classical Lucas-Washburn type of behaviour. We also demonstrate that PNCFs with densely packed anisotropic TiO2 nanoparticles can be readily generated by spin coating anisotropic TiO2 nanoparticles atop a polystyrene film and subsequently thermally annealing the bilayer film. We show that CaRI leads to PNCFs with modulus, hardness and scratch resistance that are far superior to the properties of films of the component materials. In addition, CaRI fills in cracks that may exist in the

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: UBV(RI)c photometry of Stock 16 (Vazquez+, 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, R. A.; Baume, G. L.; Feinstein, C.; Nunez, J. A.; Vergne, M. M.

    2005-02-01

    CCD UBV(RI)c imaging photometry was carried out in the field of Stock 16 along two observational runs at the University of Toronto Southern Observatory, Las Campanas, Chile, using the Hellen Sawyer Hogg 60-cm telescope: on the nights of 1994 April 13, 14 and 16, we obtained UBVRI photometry for four frames with the nitrogen-cooled detector PM METHACROME UV coated (0.45"/pix) covering 4' on a side; three more frames were exposed on the nights of 1996 February 25 and 26 in the UBV(I)c bands (this time, the detector was glycol-refrigerated). (1 data file).

  13. Antenna Beam Coverage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, Polly; Motamedi, Masoud

    1990-01-01

    The strawman Personal Access Satellite System (PASS) design calls for the use of a CONUS beam for transmission between the supplier and the satellite and for fixed beams for transmission between the basic personal terminal and the satellite. The satellite uses a 3 m main reflector for transmission at 20 GHz and a 2 m main reflector for reception at 30 GHz. There are several types of spot beams under consideration for the PASS system besides fixed beams. The beam pattern of a CONUS coverage switched beam is shown along with that of a scanning beam. A switched beam refers to one in which the signal from the satellite is connected alternatively to various feed horns. Scanning beams are taken to mean beams whose footprints are moved between contiguous regions in the beam's coverage area. The advantages and disadvantages of switched and/or scanning beams relative to fixed beams. The consequences of using switched/scanning in lieu of fixed beams in the PASS design and attempts are made to evaluate the listed advantages and disadvantages. Two uses of switched/scanning beams are examined. To illustrate the implications of switched beams use on PASS system design, operation at two beam scan rates is explored.

  14. Beam Stop for Electron Accelerator Beam Characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, Greg; Sharp, Vic; Tickner, James; Uher, Josef

    2009-08-01

    Electron linear accelerator applications involving the generation of hard X-rays frequently require accurate knowledge of the electron beam parameters. We developed a beam stop device which houses a tungsten Bremsstrahlung target and enables the electron beam current, energy and position to be monitored. The beam stop consisted of four plates. The first was a removable aluminium (Al) transmission plate. Then followed the tungsten target. Behind the target there were four Al quadrant plates for beam position measurement. The last plate was a thick Al back-stop block. Currents from the four quadrants and the back-stop were measured and the beam lateral position, energy and current were calculated. The beam stop device was optimised using Monte-Carlo simulation, manufactured (including custom-made electronics and software) in our laboratory and tested at the ARPANSA (Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency) linear accelerator in Melbourne. The electron beam energy was determined with a precision of 60 keV at beam energies between 11 and 21 MeV and the lateral beam position was controlled with a precision of 200 mum. The relative changes of the beam current were monitored as well.

  15. A symplectic coherent beam-beam model

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    1989-05-01

    We consider a simple one-dimensional model to study the effects of the beam-beam force on the coherent dynamics of colliding beams. The key ingredient is a linearized beam-beam kick. We study only the quadrupole modes, with the dynamical variables being the 2nd-order moments of the canonical variables q, p. Our model is self-consistent in the sense that no higher order moments are generated by the linearized beam-beam kicks, and that the only source of violation of symplecticity is the radiation. We discuss the round beam case only, in which vertical and horizontal quantities are assumed to be equal (though they may be different in the two beams). Depending on the values of the tune and beam intensity, we observe steady states in which otherwise identical bunches have sizes that are equal, or unequal, or periodic, or behave chaotically from turn to turn. Possible implications of luminosity saturation with increasing beam intensity are discussed. Finally, we present some preliminary applications to an asymmetric collider. 8 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Beam Techniques - Beam Control and Manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, Michiko G

    2003-04-24

    We describe commonly used strategies for the control of charged particle beams and the manipulation of their properties. Emphasis is placed on relativistic beams in linear accelerators and storage rings. After a brief review of linear optics, we discuss basic and advanced beam control techniques, such as transverse and longitudinal lattice diagnostics, matching, orbit correction and steering, beam-based alignment, and linac emittance preservation. A variety of methods for the manipulation of particle beam properties are also presented, for instance, bunch length and energy compression, bunch rotation, changes to the damping partition number, and beam collimation. The different procedures are illustrated by examples from various accelerators. Special topics include injection and extraction methods, beam cooling, spin transport and polarization.

  17. Electron beam control for barely separated beams

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David R.; Ament, Lucas J. P.

    2017-04-18

    A method for achieving independent control of multiple beams in close proximity to one another, such as in a multi-pass accelerator where coaxial beams are at different energies, but moving on a common axis, and need to be split into spatially separated beams for efficient recirculation transport. The method for independent control includes placing a magnet arrangement in the path of the barely separated beams with the magnet arrangement including at least two multipole magnets spaced closely together and having a multipole distribution including at least one odd multipole and one even multipole. The magnetic fields are then tuned to cancel out for a first of the barely separated beams to allow independent control of the second beam with common magnets. The magnetic fields may be tuned to cancel out either the dipole component or tuned to cancel out the quadrupole component in order to independently control the separate beams.

  18. An Interaction Library for the FcεRI Signaling Network

    DOE PAGES

    Chylek, Lily A.; Holowka, David A.; Baird, Barbara A.; ...

    2014-04-15

    Antigen receptors play a central role in adaptive immune responses. Although the molecular networks associated with these receptors have been extensively studied, we currently lack a systems-level understanding of how combinations of non-covalent interactions and post-translational modifications are regulated during signaling to impact cellular decision-making. To fill this knowledge gap, it will be necessary to formalize and piece together information about individual molecular mechanisms to form large-scale computational models of signaling networks. To this end, we have developed an interaction library for signaling by the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI. The library consists of executable rules for protein–protein and protein–lipid interactions.more » This library extends earlier models for FcεRI signaling and introduces new interactions that have not previously been considered in a model. Thus, this interaction library is a toolkit with which existing models can be expanded and from which new models can be built. As an example, we present models of branching pathways from the adaptor protein Lat, which influence production of the phospholipid PIP3 at the plasma membrane and the soluble second messenger IP3. We find that inclusion of a positive feedback loop gives rise to a bistable switch, which may ensure robust responses to stimulation above a threshold level. In addition, the library is visualized to facilitate understanding of network circuitry and identification of network motifs.« less

  19. Tim-3 enhances FcεRI-proximal signaling to modulate mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Phong, Binh L; Avery, Lyndsay; Sumpter, Tina L; Gorman, Jacob V; Watkins, Simon C; Colgan, John D; Kane, Lawrence P

    2015-12-14

    T cell (or transmembrane) immunoglobulin and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3) has attracted significant attention as a novel immune checkpoint receptor (ICR) on chronically stimulated, often dysfunctional, T cells. Antibodies to Tim-3 can enhance antiviral and antitumor immune responses. Tim-3 is also constitutively expressed by mast cells, NK cells and specific subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells. There is ample evidence for a positive role for Tim-3 in these latter cell types, which is at odds with the model of Tim-3 as an inhibitory molecule on T cells. At this point, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which Tim-3 regulates the function of T cells or other cell types. We have focused on defining the effects of Tim-3 ligation on mast cell activation, as these cells constitutively express Tim-3 and are activated through an ITAM-containing receptor for IgE (FcεRI), using signaling pathways analogous to those in T cells. Using a variety of gain- and loss-of-function approaches, we find that Tim-3 acts at a receptor-proximal point to enhance Lyn kinase-dependent signaling pathways that modulate both immediate-phase degranulation and late-phase cytokine production downstream of FcεRI ligation.

  20. Differences between EcoRI nonspecific and "star" sequence complexes revealed by osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Sidorova, Nina Y; Rau, Donald C

    2004-10-01

    The binding of the restriction endonuclease EcoRI to DNA is exceptionally specific. Even a single basepair change ("star" sequence) from the recognition sequence, GAATTC, decreases the binding free energy of EcoRI to values nearly indistinguishable from nonspecific binding. The difference in the number of waters sequestered by the protein-DNA complexes of the "star" sequences TAATTC and CAATTC and by the specific sequence complex determined from the dependence of binding free energy on water activity is also practically indistinguishable at low osmotic pressures from the 110 water molecules sequestered by nonspecific sequence complexes. Novel measurements of the dissociation rates of noncognate sequence complexes and competition equilibrium show that sequestered water can be removed from "star" sequence complexes by high osmotic pressure, but not from a nonspecific complex. By 5 Osm, the TAATTC "star" sequence complex has lost almost 90 of the approximately 110 waters initially present. It is more difficult to remove water from the CAATTC "star" sequence complex. The sequence dependence of water loss correlates with the known sequence dependence of "star" cleavage activity.

  1. Structural consequences of aglycosylated IgG Fc variants evolved for FcγRI binding.

    PubMed

    Ju, Man-Seok; Na, Jung-Hyun; Yu, Yeon Gyu; Kim, Jae-Yeol; Jeong, Cherlhyun; Jung, Sang Taek

    2015-10-01

    In contrast to the glycosylated IgG antibodies secreted by human plasma cells, the aglycosylated IgG antibodies produced by bacteria are unable to bind FcγRs expressed on the surface of immune effector cells and cannot trigger immune effector functions. To avoid glycan heterogeneity problems, elicit novel effector functions, and produce therapeutic antibodies with effector function using a simple bacterial expression system, FcγRI-specific Fc-engineered aglycosylated antibodies, Fc11 (E382V) and Fc (E382V/M428I), containing mutations in the CH3 region, were isolated in a previous study. To elucidate the relationship between FcγRI binding affinity and the structural dynamics of the upper CH2 region of Fc induced by the CH3 mutations, the conformational variation of Fc variants was observed by single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis using alternating-laser excitation (ALEX). In sharp contrast to wild-type Fc, which exhibits a highly dynamic upper CH2 region, the mutations in the CH3 region significantly stabilized the upper CH2 region. The results indicate that conformational plasticity, as well as the openness of the upper CH2 region, is critical for FcγR binding and therapeutic effector functions of IgG antibodies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An Interaction Library for the FcεRI Signaling Network

    PubMed Central

    Chylek, Lily A.; Holowka, David A.; Baird, Barbara A.; Hlavacek, William S.

    2014-01-01

    Antigen receptors play a central role in adaptive immune responses. Although the molecular networks associated with these receptors have been extensively studied, we currently lack a systems-level understanding of how combinations of non-covalent interactions and post-translational modifications are regulated during signaling to impact cellular decision-making. To fill this knowledge gap, it will be necessary to formalize and piece together information about individual molecular mechanisms to form large-scale computational models of signaling networks. To this end, we have developed an interaction library for signaling by the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI. The library consists of executable rules for protein–protein and protein–lipid interactions. This library extends earlier models for FcεRI signaling and introduces new interactions that have not previously been considered in a model. Thus, this interaction library is a toolkit with which existing models can be expanded and from which new models can be built. As an example, we present models of branching pathways from the adaptor protein Lat, which influence production of the phospholipid PIP3 at the plasma membrane and the soluble second messenger IP3. We find that inclusion of a positive feedback loop gives rise to a bistable switch, which may ensure robust responses to stimulation above a threshold level. In addition, the library is visualized to facilitate understanding of network circuitry and identification of network motifs. PMID:24782869

  3. Assessing the Combinatorial Potential of the RiPP Cyanobactin tru Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomally produced natural products, the RiPPs, exhibit features that are potentially useful in the creation of large chemical libraries using simple mutagenesis. RiPPs are encoded on ribosomal precursor peptides, but they are extensively posttranslationally modified, endowing them with properties that are useful in drug discovery and biotechnology. In order to determine which mutations are acceptable, strategies are required to determine sequence selectivity independently of the context of flanking amino acids. Here, we examined the absolute sequence selectivity of the trunkamide cyanobactin pathway, tru. A series of random double and quadruple simultaneous mutants were synthesized and produced in Escherichia coli. Out of a total of 763 mutated amino acids examined in 325 unique sequences, 323 amino acids were successfully incorporated in 159 sequences, leading to >300 new compounds. Rules for tru sequence selectivity were determined, which will be useful for the design and synthesis of combinatorial biosynthetic libraries. The results are also interpreted in comparison to the known natural products of tru and pat cyanobactin pathways. PMID:25140729

  4. Streamlining the RI/FS for CERCLA municipal landfill sites. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Approximately 20 percent of the sites on the National Priorities List (NPL) are municipal landfills which typically share similar characteristics. Because of the similarity the Superfund Program anticipates that their remediation will involve similar waste management approaches. As stated in the National Contingency Plan, EPA expects that containment technologies will generally be appropriate for waste that poses a relatively low long-term threat or where treatment is impracticable (Sec. 300.430(a)(1)(iii)(B),55FR8846(March 8, 1990)). In addition, EPA expects treatment to be considered for identifiable areas of highly toxic and/or mobile material that constitute the principal threat(s) posed by the site (Sec. 300.430(a)(1)(iii)(A)). The similarity in landfill characteristics and the NCP expectations make it possible to streamline the RI/FS for municipal landfills with respect to site characterization, risk assessment, and the development of remedial action alternatives. The fact sheet outlines available streamlining techniques for each of these three phases of an RI/FS. Additional information, including tools to assist in scoping activities, will be included in the document Conducting Remedial Investigations/Feasibility Studies for CERCLA Municipal Landfill Sites (November 1990, Directive No. 9355.3-11). The document will be available from the Center for Environmental Research Information (FTS 684-7562 or 513-569-7562).

  5. Standards for Reporting Implementation Studies (StaRI): explanation and elaboration document

    PubMed Central

    Pinnock, Hilary; Barwick, Melanie; Carpenter, Christopher R; Eldridge, Sandra; Grandes, Gonzalo; Griffiths, Chris J; Rycroft-Malone, Jo; Meissner, Paul; Murray, Elizabeth; Patel, Anita; Sheikh, Aziz; Taylor, Stephanie J C

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Implementation studies are often poorly reported and indexed, reducing their potential to inform the provision of healthcare services. The Standards for Reporting Implementation Studies (StaRI) initiative aims to develop guidelines for transparent and accurate reporting of implementation studies. Methods An international working group developed the StaRI guideline informed by a systematic literature review and e-Delphi prioritisation exercise. Following a face-to-face meeting, the checklist was developed iteratively by email discussion and critical review by international experts. Results The 27 items of the checklist are applicable to the broad range of study designs employed in implementation science. A key concept is the dual strands, represented as 2 columns in the checklist, describing, on the one hand, the implementation strategy and, on the other, the clinical, healthcare or public health intervention being implemented. This explanation and elaboration document details each of the items, explains the rationale and provides examples of good reporting practice. Conclusions Previously published reporting statements have been instrumental in improving reporting standards; adoption by journals and authors may achieve a similar improvement in the reporting of implementation strategies that will facilitate translation of effective interventions into routine practice. PMID:28373250

  6. Functional nanoscale coupling of Lyn kinase with IgE-FcεRI is restricted by the actin cytoskeleton in early antigen-stimulated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shelby, Sarah A.; Veatch, Sarah L.; Holowka, David A.; Baird, Barbara A.

    2016-01-01

    The allergic response is initiated on the plasma membrane of mast cells by phosphorylation of the receptor for immunoglobulin E (IgE), FcεRI, by Lyn kinase after IgE-FcεRI complexes are cross-linked by multivalent antigen. Signal transduction requires reorganization of receptors and membrane signaling proteins, but this spatial regulation is not well defined. We used fluorescence localization microscopy (FLM) and pair-correlation analysis to measure the codistribution of IgE-FcεRI and Lyn on the plasma membrane of fixed cells with 20- to 25-nm resolution. We directly visualized Lyn recruitment to IgE-FcεRI within 1 min of antigen stimulation. Parallel FLM experiments captured stimulation-induced FcεRI phosphorylation and colocalization of a saturated lipid-anchor probe derived from Lyn’s membrane anchorage. We used cytochalasin and latrunculin to investigate participation of the actin cytoskeleton in regulating functional interactions of FcεRI. Inhibition of actin polymerization by these agents enhanced colocalization of IgE-FcεRI with Lyn and its saturated lipid anchor at early stimulation times, accompanied by augmented phosphorylation within FcεRI clusters. Ising model simulations provide a simplified model consistent with our results. These findings extend previous evidence that IgE-FcεRI signaling is initiated by colocalization with Lyn in ordered lipid regions and that the actin cytoskeleton regulates this functional interaction by influencing the organization of membrane lipids. PMID:27682583

  7. High-resolution abundance analysis of very metal-poor r-I stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira Mello, C.; Hill, V.; Barbuy, B.; Spite, M.; Spite, F.; Beers, T. C.; Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.; Cayrel, R.; François, P.; Schatz, H.; Wanajo, S.

    2014-05-01

    Context. Moderately r-process-enriched stars (r-I; +0.3 ≤ [Eu/Fe] ≤ +1.0) are at least four times as common as those that are greatly enriched in r-process elements (r-II; [Eu/Fe] > +1.0), and the abundances in their atmospheres are important tools for obtaining a better understanding of the nucleosynthesis processes responsible for the origin of the elements beyond the iron peak. Aims: The main aim of this work is to derive abundances for a sample of seven metal-poor stars with -3.4 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ -2.4 classified as r-I stars, to understand the role of these stars for constraining the astrophysical nucleosynthesis event(s) that is (are) responsible for the production of the r-process, and to investigate whether they differ, in any significant way, from the r-II stars. Methods: We carried out a detailed abundance analysis based on high-resolution spectra obtained with the VLT/UVES spectrograph, using spectra in the wavelength ranges 3400-4500 Å, 6800-8200 Å, and 8700-10 000 Å, with resolving power R ~ 40 000 (blue arm) and R ~ 55 000 (red arm). The OSMARCS LTE 1D model atmosphere grid was employed, along with the spectrum synthesis code Turbospectrum. Results: We have derived abundances of the light elements Li, C, and N, the α-elements Mg, Si, S, Ca, and Ti, the odd-Z elements Al, K, and Sc, the iron-peak elements V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni, and the trans-iron elements from the first peak (Sr, Y, Zr, Mo, Ru, and Pd), the second peak (Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb), the third peak (Os and Ir, as upper limits), and the actinides (Th) regions. The results are compared with values for these elements for r-II and "normal" very and extremely metal-poor stars reported in the literature, ages based on radioactive chronometry are explored using different models, and a number of conclusions about the r-process and the r-I stars are presented. Hydrodynamical models were used for some elements, and general behaviors for the 3D corrections

  8. Telecommunication using muon beams

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Richard C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location.

  9. Analysis of orthotropic beams

    Treesearch

    Jen Y. Liu; S. Cheng

    1979-01-01

    A plane-stress analysis of orthotropic or isotropic beams is presented. The loading conditions considered are: (1) a concentrated normal load arbitrarily located on the beam, and (2) a distributed normal load covering an arbitrary length of the beam. exhibit close agreement with existing experimental data from Sitka spruce beams. Other loading conditions can similarly...

  10. LANSCE beam current limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1996-06-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the Beam Current Limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beam line below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described.

  11. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature using an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Hasan; Sierra, Raymond G; Laksmono, Hartawan; Shoeman, Robert L; Botha, Sabine; Barends, Thomas R M; Nass, Karol; Schlichting, Ilme; Doak, R Bruce; Gati, Cornelius; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Jogl, Gerwald; Dahlberg, Albert E; Gregory, Steven T; Bogan, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    High-resolution ribosome structures determined by X-ray crystallography have provided important insights into the mechanism of translation. Such studies have thus far relied on large ribosome crystals kept at cryogenic temperatures to reduce radiation damage. Here, the application of serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain diffraction data from ribosome microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature is described. 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals diffracted to beyond 6 Å resolution, demonstrating the feasibility of using SFX for ribosome structural studies. The ability to collect diffraction data at near-physiological temperatures promises to provide fundamental insights into the structural dynamics of the ribosome and its functional complexes.

  12. A Woman in Her 30s With a Past History of HIV Disease Presented With Recurrent Fever, Night Sweats, and Small Bilateral Pulmonary Nodules.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Hafiz Rizwan Talib; Niazi, Masooma; Adrish, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    A woman in her 30s presented with recurrent low-grade fever and cough (onset, 1 week). She reported occasional night sweats and weight loss of approximately 20 pounds over the past 4 months. She denied nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or any urinary complaints. Her past medical history was significant for chronic hepatitis C and HIV infection, the latter diagnosed in 2001. She was noncompliant with highly active antiretroviral therapy for more than 4 years and had pneumocystis pneumonia 2 years prior to this presentation. She had a 10-pack per year smoking history and reported active use of cocaine and heroin. The patient denied any occupational exposures. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature using an X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Hasan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Shoeman, Robert L.; Botha, Sabine; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Nass, Karol; Schlichting, Ilme; Doak, R. Bruce; Gati, Cornelius; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Jogl, Gerwald; Dahlberg, Albert E.; Gregory, Steven T.; Bogan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution ribosome structures determined by X-ray crystallography have provided important insights into the mechanism of translation. Such studies have thus far relied on large ribosome crystals kept at cryogenic temperatures to reduce radiation damage. Here, the application of serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain diffraction data from ribosome microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature is described. 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals diffracted to beyond 6 Å resolution, demonstrating the feasibility of using SFX for ribosome structural studies. The ability to collect diffraction data at near-physiological temperatures promises to provide fundamental insights into the structural dynamics of the ribosome and its functional complexes. PMID:23989164

  14. Long range surface plasmon resonance with ultra-high penetration depth for self-referenced sensing and ultra-low detection limit using diverging beam approach

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, Sivan Abdulhalim, Ibrahim

    2015-05-11

    Using an insulator-metal-insulator structure with dielectric having refractive index (RI) larger than the analyte, long range surface plasmon (SP) resonance exhibiting ultra-high penetration depth is demonstrated for sensing applications of large bioentities at wavelengths in the visible range. Based on the diverging beam approach in Kretschmann-Raether configuration, one of the SP resonances is shown to shift in response to changes in the analyte RI while the other is fixed; thus, it can be used as a built in reference. The combination of the high sensitivity, high penetration depth and self-reference using the diverging beam approach in which a dark line is detected of the high sensitivity, high penetration depth, self-reference, and the diverging beam approach in which a dark line is detected using large number of camera pixels with a smart algorithm for sub-pixel resolution, a sensor with ultra-low detection limit is demonstrated suitable for large bioentities.

  15. Mutations of ribosomal protein S5 suppress a defect in late-30S ribosomal subunit biogenesis caused by lack of the RbfA biogenesis factor

    PubMed Central

    Nord, Stefan; Bhatt, Monika J.; Tükenmez, Hasan; Farabaugh, Philip J.; Wikström, P. Mikael

    2015-01-01

    The in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits requires assistance by maturation proteins that are not part of mature ribosomes. One such protein, RbfA, associates with the 30S ribosomal subunits. Loss of RbfA causes cold sensitivity and defects of the 30S subunit biogenesis and its overexpression partially suppresses the dominant cold sensitivity caused by a C23U mutation in the central pseudoknot of 16S rRNA, a structure essential for ribosome function. We have isolated suppressor mutations that restore partially the growth of an RbfA-lacking strain. Most of the strongest suppressor mutations alter one out of three distinct positions in the carboxy-terminal domain of ribosomal protein S5 (S5) in direct contact with helix 1 and helix 2 of the central pseudoknot. Their effect is to increase the translational capacity of the RbfA-lacking strain as evidenced by an increase in polysomes in the suppressed strains. Overexpression of RimP, a protein factor that along with RbfA regulates formation of the ribosome's central pseudoknot, was lethal to the RbfA-lacking strain but not to a wild-type strain and this lethality was suppressed by the alterations in S5. The S5 mutants alter translational fidelity but these changes do not explain consistently their effect on the RbfA-lacking strain. Our genetic results support a role for the region of S5 modified in the suppressors in the formation of the central pseudoknot in 16S rRNA. PMID:26089326

  16. The effect of acute hypoxia at low altitude and acute normoxia at high altitude on performance during a 30-s Wingate test in children.

    PubMed

    Blonc, S; Falgairette, G; Bedu, M; Fellmann, N; Spielvogel, H; Coudert, J

    1994-10-01

    The effect of acute hypoxia (FIO2 = 0.137 +/- 0.001) at Low Altitude (LA: Clermont-Ferrand, 330 m) and acute normoxia (FIO2 = 0.306 +/- 0.006) at High Altitude (HA: La Paz, 3600 m) on performance during a 30-s Wingate test has been investigated in prepubertal children (Tanner stage 1). Twenty five boys (LA, n = 10; HA, n = 15) aged from 10.6 to 12.7 years performed two Wingate tests at random: at LA, one in normoxia (ambient air) and one in acute hypoxia and at HA, one in chronic hypoxia (ambient air) and one in acute normoxia. The subjects performed the two tests using the same calibrated cycle ergometer. Peak Power (PP), Mean Power (MP), O2 uptake during the 30 s (VO2) and blood lactate accumulation (delta [L]s) were measured. Compared to normoxia, acute hypoxia at LA did not alter PP (8.0 +/- 1.1 vs 7.9 +/- 1.3 W.kg-1 BW) and MP (6.1 +/- 0.7 vs 6.1 +/- 1.1 W.kg-1 BW). Similarly, compared to chronic hypoxia, acute normoxia at HA did not modify these parameters (PP: 7.4 +/- 1.5 vs 7.3 +/- 1.8; MP: 5.4 +/- 1.2 vs 5.5 +/- 1.1; W.kg-1 BW). VO2 and delta [L]s were neither significantly changed by acute hypoxia at LA (520 +/- 50 vs 550 +/- 60 ml O2; 5.3 +/- 1.7 vs 4.8 +/- 1.7 mmol.l-1) nor by acute normoxia at HA (530 +/- 110 vs 500 +/- 90 ml O2; 3.4 +/- 1.3 vs 3.3 +/- 1.0 mmol.l-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. RiVax, a recombinant ricin subunit vaccine, protects mice against ricin delivered by gavage or aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Smallshaw, Joan E.; Richardson, James A.; Vitetta, Ellen S.

    2007-01-01

    Ricin is a plant toxin that is a CDC level B biothreat. Our recombinant ricin A chain vaccine (RiVax), which contains mutations in both known toxic sites, has no residual toxicity at doses at least 800 times the immunogenic dose. RiVax without adjuvant given intramuscularly (i.m.) protected mice against intraperitoneally administered ricin. Furthermore the vaccine without alum was safe and immunogenic in human volunteers. Here we describe the development of gavage and aerosol ricin challenge models in mice and demonstrate that i.m. vaccination protects mice against ricin delivered by either route. Also RiVax protects against aerosol-induced lung damage as determined by histology and lung function tests. PMID:17875350

  18. SUMMARY OF BEAM BEAM OBSERVATIONS DURING STORES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.

    2003-05-19

    During stores, the beam-beam interaction has a significant impact on the beam and luminosity lifetimes in RHIC. This was observed in heavy ion, and even more pronounced in proton collisions. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. In addition, RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. Coherent beam-beam modes were observed, and suppressed by tune changes. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made during stores so far.

  19. Partially coherent nonparaxial beams.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kailiang; Lü, Baida

    2004-04-15

    The concept of a partially coherent nonparaxial beam is proposed. A closed-form expression for the propagation of nonparaxial Gaussian Schell model (GSM) beams in free space is derived and applied to study the propagation properties of nonparaxial GSM beams. It is shown that for partially coherent nonparaxial beams a new parameter f(sigma) has to be introduced, which together with the parameter f, determines the beam nonparaxiality.

  20. Automated beam builder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muench, W. K.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements for the space fabrication of large space structures are considered with emphasis on the design, development, manufacture, and testing of a machine which automatically produces a basic building block aluminum beam. Particular problems discussed include those associated with beam cap forming; brace storage, dispensing, and transporting; beam component fastening; and beam cut-off. Various critical process tests conducted to develop technology for a machine to produce composite beams are also discussed.

  1. Effector-Mediated Interaction of CbbRI and CbbRII Regulators with Target Sequences in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Dubbs, Padungsri; Dubbs, James M.; Tabita, F. Robert

    2004-01-01

    In Rhodobacter capsulatus, genes encoding enzymes of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham reductive pentose phosphate pathway are located in the cbbI and cbbII operons. Each operon contains a divergently transcribed LysR-type transcriptional activator (CbbRI and CbbRII) that regulates the expression of its cognate cbb promoter in response to an as yet unidentified effector molecule(s). Both CbbRI and CbbRII were purified, and the ability of a variety of potential effector molecules to induce changes in their DNA binding properties at their target promoters was assessed. The responses of CbbRI and CbbRII to potential effectors were not identical. In gel mobility shift assays, the affinity of both CbbRI and CbbRII for their target promoters was enhanced in the presence of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP), phosphoenolpyruvate, 3-phosphoglycerate, 2-phosphoglycolate. ATP, 2-phosphoglycerate, and KH2PO4 were found to enhance only CbbRI binding, while fructose-1,6-bisphosphate enhanced the binding of only CbbRII. The DNase I footprint of CbbRI was reduced in the presence of RuBP, while reductions in the CbbRII DNase I footprint were induced by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, 3-phosphoglycerate, and KH2PO4. The current in vitro results plus recent in vivo studies suggest that CbbR-mediated regulation of cbb transcription is controlled by multiple metabolic signals in R. capsulatus. This control reflects not only intracellular levels of Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle metabolic intermediates but also the fixed (organic) carbon status and energy charge of the cell. PMID:15547275

  2. KEY COMPARISON: APMP/TCRI key comparison report of measurement of air kerma for medium-energy x-rays (APMP.RI(I)-K3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hwang, W. S.; Kotler, L. H.; Webb, D. V.; Büermann, L.; Burns, D. T.; Takeyeddin, M.; Shaha, V. V.; Srimanoroth, S.; Meghzifene, A.; Hah, S. H.; Chun, K. J.; Kadni, T. B.; Takata, N.; Msimang, Z.

    2008-01-01

    The APMP/TCRI Dosimetry Working Group performed the APMP.RI(I)-K3 key comparison of measurement of air kerma for medium-energy x-rays (100 kV to 250 kV) between 2000 and 2003. In total, 11 institutes took part in the comparison, among which 8 were APMP member laboratories. Two commercial cavity ionization chambers were used as transfer instruments and circulated among the participants. All the participants established the 100 kV, 135 kV, 180 kV and 250 kV x-ray beam qualities equivalent to those of the BIPM. The results showed that the maximum difference between the participants and the BIPM in the medium-energy x ray range, evaluated using the comparison data of the linking laboratories ARPANSA and PTB, is less than 1.4%. The degrees of equivalence between the participants are presented and this comparison confirms the calibration capabilities of the participating laboratories. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI Section I, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  3. The Rhode Island Consortium for Autism Research and Treatment (RI-CART): a new statewide autism collaborative.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Alan; Morrow, Eric; Sheinkopf, Stephen J; Anders, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by core deficits in social interaction, language and repetitive behaviors. The need for services is rising sharply as the number of children identified with autism increases. The Rhode Island Consortium for Autism Research and Treatment (RI-CART) was founded in 2009 with the goal of increasing communication among autism researchers throughout the state and improving treatment for children with autism. RI-CART members have several exciting projects in progress, with its larger aim being the creation of a statewide research registry. A statewide registry would benefit research in Rhode Island and allow for larger collaborations nationally.

  4. Tevatron beam-beam compensation project progress

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Zhang, X.L.; Kuznetsov, G.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Tiunov, M.; Bishofberger, K.; Bogdanov, I.; Kashtanov, E.; Kozub, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tkachenko, L.; /Serpukhov, IHEP

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we report the progress of the Tevatron Beam-Beam Compensation (BBC) project [1]. Electron beam induced proton and antiproton tuneshifts have been reported in [2], suppression of an antiproton emittance growth has been observed, too [1]. Currently, the first electron lens (TEL1) is in operational use as the Tevatron DC beam cleaner. We have made a lot of the upgrades to improve its stability [3]. The 2nd Tevatron electron lens (TEL2) is under the final phase of development and preparation for installation in the Tevatron.

  5. Activity measurements of the radionuclides 18F and 99mTc for the NMISA, South Africa in the ongoing comparisons BIPM.RI(II)-K4.F-18 and BIPM.RI(II)-K4.Tc-99m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michotte, C.; Nonis, M.; Van Rooy, M. W.; Van Staden, M. J.; Lubbe, J.

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, comparisons of activity measurements of 18F and 99mTc using the Transfer Instrument of the International Reference System (SIRTI) took place at the National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA, South Africa). Ampoules containing about 25 kBq of 18F and 99mTc solutions were measured in the SIRTI for more than two half-lives. The NMISA standardized the activity in the ampoules by ionization chamber measurements traceable to 4π(LS)β-γ coincidence measurements. The comparisons, identifiers BIPM.RI(II)-K4.F-18 and BIPM.RI(II)-K4.Tc-99m, are linked to the corresponding BIPM.RI(II)-K1.F-18 and BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Tc-99m comparisons and degrees of equivalence with the respective key comparison reference values have been evaluated. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  6. Development of new auxiliary basis functions of the Karlsruhe segmented contracted basis sets including diffuse basis functions (def2-SVPD, def2-TZVPPD, and def2-QVPPD) for RI-MP2 and RI-CC calculations.

    PubMed

    Hellweg, Arnim; Rappoport, Dmitrij

    2015-01-14

    We report optimized auxiliary basis sets for use with the Karlsruhe segmented contracted basis sets including moderately diffuse basis functions (Rappoport and Furche, J. Chem. Phys., 2010, 133, 134105) in resolution-of-the-identity (RI) post-self-consistent field (post-SCF) computations for the elements H-Rn (except lanthanides). The errors of the RI approximation using optimized auxiliary basis sets are analyzed on a comprehensive test set of molecules containing the most common oxidation states of each element and do not exceed those of the corresponding unaugmented basis sets. During these studies an unsatisfying performance of the def2-SVP and def2-QZVPP auxiliary basis sets for Barium was found and improved sets are provided. We establish the versatility of the def2-SVPD, def2-TZVPPD, and def2-QZVPPD basis sets for RI-MP2 and RI-CC (coupled-cluster) energy and property calculations. The influence of diffuse basis functions on correlation energy, basis set superposition error, atomic electron affinity, dipole moments, and computational timings is evaluated at different levels of theory using benchmark sets and showcase examples.

  7. NEW BV(RI){sub C} PHOTOMETRY FOR PRAESEPE: FURTHER TESTS OF BROADBAND PHOTOMETRIC CONSISTENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Joner, Michael D.; Taylor, Benjamin J.; Laney, C. David; Van Wyk, Francois

    2011-11-15

    New BV(RI){sub C} measurements of Praesepe made at the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) are presented. When those measurements are combined with those reported in previous papers in this series, it is found that they support previously determined V zero points for Praesepe, M67, and the Hyades. Support is also found for joint (V - R){sub C} and (R - I){sub C} zero points established previously for Praesepe and NGC 752. For the SAAO system of standard stars, a B - V correction to the Johnson system of about -9 mmag appears to be reasonably well established. The preferred (though not definitive) V correction is about +7 mmag. For the Landolt V system, zero-point identity with the Johnson system at a 2{sigma} level of 4.8 mmag is found, and no color term as large as 4 mmag (mag){sup -1} is detected. Updated CDS data files for Praesepe are briefly described.

  8. LANSCE beam current limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallegos, Floyd R.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the beam current limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beamline below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described.

  9. Beam position monitor

    DOEpatents

    Alkire, Randy W.; Rosenbaum, Gerold; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2003-07-22

    An apparatus for determining the position of an x-ray beam relative to a desired beam axis. Where the apparatus is positioned along the beam path so that a thin metal foil target intersects the x-ray beam generating fluorescent radiation. A PIN diode array is positioned so that a portion of the fluorescent radiation is intercepted by the array resulting in an a series of electrical signals from the PIN diodes making up the array. The signals are then analyzed and the position of the x-ray beam is determined relative to the desired beam path.

  10. Beam position monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Alkire, Randy W.; Rosenbaum, Gerold; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2000-09-21

    An apparatus for determining the position of an x-ray beam relative to a desired beam axis where the apparatus is positioned along the beam path so that a thin metal foil target intersects the x-ray beam generating fluorescent radiation. A PIN diode array is positioned so that a portion of the fluorescent radiation is intercepted by the array resulting in a series of electrical signals from the PIN diodes making up the array. The signals are then analyzed and the position of the x-ray beam is determined relative to the desired beam path.

  11. LANSCE beam current limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the beam current limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beamline below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Pyramid beam splitter

    DOEpatents

    McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.; Fairer, George

    1992-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention provides means for obtaining accurate, dependable, measurement of bearings and directions for geologic mapping in subterranean shafts, such as, for example, nuclear waste storage investigations. In operation, a laser beam is projected along a reference bearing. A pyramid is mounted such that the laser beam is parallel to the pyramid axis and can impinge on the apex of the pyramid thus splitting the beam several ways into several beams at right angles to each other and at right angles to the reference beam. The pyramid is also translatable and rotatable in a plane perpendicular to the reference beam.

  13. Macrophages activated by C-reactive protein through Fc gamma RI transfer suppression of immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Marjon, Kristopher D; Marnell, Lorraine L; Mold, Carolyn; Du Clos, Terry W

    2009-02-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase protein with therapeutic activity in mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus and other inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. To determine the mechanism by which CRP suppresses immune complex disease, an adoptive transfer system was developed in a model of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Injection of 200 microg of CRP 24 h before induction of ITP markedly decreased thrombocytopenia induced by anti-CD41. CRP-treated splenocytes also provided protection from ITP in adoptive transfer. Splenocytes from C57BL/6 mice were treated with 200 microg/ml CRP for 30 min, washed, and injected into mice 24 h before induction of ITP. Injection of 10(6) CRP-treated splenocytes protected mice from thrombocytopenia, as did i.v. Ig-treated but not BSA-treated splenocytes. The suppressive cell induced by CRP was found to be a macrophage by depletion, enrichment, and the use of purified bone marrow-derived macrophages. The induction of protection by CRP-treated cells was dependent on FcRgamma-chain and Syk activation, indicating an activating effect of CRP on the donor cell. Suppression of ITP by CRP-treated splenocytes required Fc gamma RI on the donor cell and Fc gamma RIIb in the recipient mice. These findings suggest that CRP generates suppressive macrophages through Fc gamma RI, which then act through an Fc gamma RIIb-dependent pathway in the recipient to decrease platelet clearance. These results provide insight into the mechanism of CRP regulatory activity in autoimmunity and suggest a potential new therapeutic approach to ITP.

  14. Efficient linear-scaling second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory: The divide-expand-consolidate RI-MP2 model.

    PubMed

    Baudin, Pablo; Ettenhuber, Patrick; Reine, Simen; Kristensen, Kasper; Kjærgaard, Thomas

    2016-02-07

    The Resolution of the Identity second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (RI-MP2) method is implemented within the linear-scaling Divide-Expand-Consolidate (DEC) framework. In a DEC calculation, the full molecular correlated calculation is replaced by a set of independent fragment calculations each using a subset of the total orbital space. The number of independent fragment calculations scales linearly with the system size, rendering the method linear-scaling and massively parallel. The DEC-RI-MP2 method can be viewed as an approximation to the DEC-MP2 method where the RI approximation is utilized in each fragment calculation. The individual fragment calculations scale with the fifth power of the fragment size for both methods. However, the DEC-RI-MP2 method has a reduced prefactor compared to DEC-MP2 and is well-suited for implementation on massively parallel supercomputers, as demonstrated by test calculations on a set of medium-sized molecules. The DEC error control ensures that the standard RI-MP2 energy can be obtained to the predefined precision. The errors associated with the RI and DEC approximations are compared, and it is shown that the DEC-RI-MP2 method can be applied to systems far beyond the ones that can be treated with a conventional RI-MP2 implementation.

  15. Efficient linear-scaling second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory: The divide-expand-consolidate RI-MP2 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudin, Pablo; Ettenhuber, Patrick; Reine, Simen; Kristensen, Kasper; Kjærgaard, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The Resolution of the Identity second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (RI-MP2) method is implemented within the linear-scaling Divide-Expand-Consolidate (DEC) framework. In a DEC calculation, the full molecular correlated calculation is replaced by a set of independent fragment calculations each using a subset of the total orbital space. The number of independent fragment calculations scales linearly with the system size, rendering the method linear-scaling and massively parallel. The DEC-RI-MP2 method can be viewed as an approximation to the DEC-MP2 method where the RI approximation is utilized in each fragment calculation. The individual fragment calculations scale with the fifth power of the fragment size for both methods. However, the DEC-RI-MP2 method has a reduced prefactor compared to DEC-MP2 and is well-suited for implementation on massively parallel supercomputers, as demonstrated by test calculations on a set of medium-sized molecules. The DEC error control ensures that the standard RI-MP2 energy can be obtained to the predefined precision. The errors associated with the RI and DEC approximations are compared, and it is shown that the DEC-RI-MP2 method can be applied to systems far beyond the ones that can be treated with a conventional RI-MP2 implementation.

  16. The translational fidelity function of IF3 during transition from the 30 S initiation complex to the 70 S initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Grigoriadou, Christina; Marzi, Stefano; Pan, Dongli; Gualerzi, Claudio O; Cooperman, Barry S

    2007-10-26

    IF3 has a fidelity function in the initiation of translation, inducing the dissociation of fMet-tRNA(fMet) from the 30 S initiation complexes (30SIC) containing a non-canonical initiation triplet (e.g. AUU) in place of a canonical initiation triplet (e.g., AUG). IF2 has a complementary role, selectively promoting initiator tRNA binding to the ribosome. Here, we used parallel rapid kinetics measurements of GTP hydrolysis, Pi release, light-scattering, and changes in intensities of fluorophore-labeled IF2 and fMet-tRNA(fMet) to determine the effects on both 30SIC formation and 30SIC conversion to 70 S initiation complexes (70SIC) of (a) substituting AUG with AUU, and/or (b) omitting IF3, and/or (c) replacing GTP with the non-hydrolyzable analog GDPCP. We demonstrate that the presence or absence of IF3 has, at most, minor effects on the rate of 30SIC formation using either AUG or AUU as the initiation codon, and conclude that the high affinity of IF2 for both 30 S subunit and initiator tRNA overrides any perturbation of the codon-anticodon interaction resulting from AUU for AUG substitution. In contrast, replacement of AUG by AUU leads to a dramatic reduction in the rate of 70SIC formation from 30SIC upon addition of 50 S subunits. Interpreting our results in the framework of a quantitative kinetic scheme leads to the conclusion that, within the overall process of 70SIC formation, the step most affected by substituting AUU for AUG involves the conversion of an initially labile 70 S ribosome into a more stable complex. In the absence of IF3, the difference between AUG and AUU largely disappears, with each initiation codon affording rapid 70SIC formation, leading to the hypothesis that it is the rate of IF3 dissociation from the 70 S ribosome during IC70S formation that is critical to its fidelity function.

  17. Beam-beam issues in asymmetric colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    We discuss generic beam-beam issues for proposed asymmetric e{sup +}- e{sup -} colliders. We illustrate the issues by choosing, as examples, the proposals by Cornell University (CESR-B), KEK, and SLAC/LBL/LLNL (PEP-II).

  18. Beam-Beam Experience at DAPHINE

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, Pantaleo

    2002-08-21

    This paper summarizes the results of experimental observations and measurements of beam-beam interactions in DAPHINE, the Frascati Phi-factory. The achieved results are reported with analysis of present limitations in both single and multibunch operation modes and compared with numerical simulations.

  19. Characterization of Temperate Bacteriophages of Bacillus subtilis by the Restriction Endonuclease EcoRI: Evidence for Three Different Temperate Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, G. A.; Williams, M. T.; Baney, H. W.; Young, F. E.

    1974-01-01

    Temperate bacteriophages of Bacillus subtilis were characterized according to host range and digestion of the bacteriophage genome by endonuclease EcoRI. The three bacteriophages, φ3T, SPO2, and φ105, were all heteroimmune, and the DNA digests showed dissimilar patterns by agarose-ethidium bromide gel electrophoresis. Images PMID:4213607

  20. The high-affinity receptor for IgG, FcγRI, of humans and non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, Alicia M; Trist, Halina M; Tan, Peck-Szee; Wines, Bruce D; Hogarth, P Mark

    2015-11-01

    Non-human primate (NHP) models, especially involving macaques, are considered important models of human immunity and have been essential in preclinical testing for vaccines and therapeutics. Despite this, much less characterization of macaque Fc receptors has occurred compared to humans or mice. Much of the characterization of macaque Fc receptors so far has focused on the low-affinity Fc receptors, particularly FcγRIIIa. From these studies, it is clear that there are distinct differences between the human and macaque low-affinity receptors and their interaction with human IgG. Relatively little work has been performed on the high-affinity IgG receptor, FcγRI, especially in NHPs. This review will focus on what is currently known of how FcγRI interacts with IgG, from mutation studies and recent crystallographic studies of human FcγRI, and how amino acid sequence differences in the macaque FcγRI may affect this interaction. Additionally, this review will look at the functional consequences of differences in the amino acid sequences between humans and macaques. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. 78 FR 13914 - Submission for Review: Survivor Annuity Election for a Spouse, RI 20-63; Cover Letter Giving...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-01

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Survivor Annuity Election for a Spouse, RI 20-63; Cover Letter Giving... Management. ACTION: 60-Day Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Retirement Services, Office of Personnel Management (OPM), is offering the general public and other Federal agencies the opportunity...

  2. Scituate R.I. High School Teacher Recognized by President Obama and EPA, Yarmouth, Maine teacher received honorable mention

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BOSTON - A teacher at the Ponaganset High School in Scituate, R.I., was recognized by the federal government for his work that has energized environmental education for students, as well as the school system and community. Teacher Ross McCurdy recei

  3. Narratives of Agency: The Experiences of Braille Literacy Practitioners in the "Kha Ri Gude" South African Mass Literacy Campaign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Veronica I.; Romm, Norma R. A.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we locate the "Kha Ri Gude" South African Mass Literacy Campaign within the context of the problem of illiteracy and exclusion in South Africa, while concentrating on various post-apartheid initiatives designed to give visually challenged adults the opportunity to become literate. We shall provide a detailed account of…

  4. Narratives of Agency: The Experiences of Braille Literacy Practitioners in the "Kha Ri Gude" South African Mass Literacy Campaign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Veronica I.; Romm, Norma R. A.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we locate the "Kha Ri Gude" South African Mass Literacy Campaign within the context of the problem of illiteracy and exclusion in South Africa, while concentrating on various post-apartheid initiatives designed to give visually challenged adults the opportunity to become literate. We shall provide a detailed account of…

  5. Effect of particle size on conformation and enzymatic activity of EcoRI adsorbed on CdS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Song, Yonghai; Zhong, Dandan; Luo, Dan; Huang, Mei; Huang, Zhenzhong; Tan, Hongliang; Sun, Lanlan; Wang, Li

    2014-02-01

    Better understanding of the interaction between nanoparticles (NPs) and protein is the basis for biological and biomedical applications of NPs. Water-soluble fluorescent CdS NPs have been widely used in the biological and biomedical fields and the study on effect of CdS NPs size on conformation and enzymatic activity of protein might be very important in its application. In this work, the interaction of CdS NPs with different size with type II restriction endonuclease (EcoRI) were investigated by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, fluorescence quenching method, CD spectra, laser scanning confocal microscopy and gel electrophoresis. It was found that the equilibrium constant (kD) as well as the cooperativity degree of CdS NPs-EcoRI binding (Hill constant, n) strongly depended on the CdS NPs size. The different curvature of CdS NPs surface could result in different changes of EcoRI conformation. The gel electrophoresis indicated that the decrease in α-helix content more or less affected the activity of EcoRI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 76 FR 50771 - Submission for Review: RI 25-37, Evidence To Prove Dependency of a Child, 3206-0206

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: RI 25-37, Evidence To Prove Dependency of a Child, 3206-0206 AGENCY: U.S... Dependency of a Child. As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-13, 44 U.S.C. chapter... techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of...

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: LDN 1570 BV(RI)c polarisation and photometry (Eswaraiah+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eswaraiah, C.; Maheswar, G.; Pandey, A. K.; Jose, J.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Bhatt, H. C.

    2013-05-01

    Polarimetric observations of the field containing L1570 were carried out on ten nights; namely, 23, 24, 25, 26 November 2009; 23, 24, 27, 28 December 2009 and 27, 31 December 2010 using the ARIES Imaging Polarimeter (AIMPOL) mounted at the Cassegrain focus of the 1.04-m Sampurnanand telescope (ST) of the Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, India. The CCD optical photometric observations of the central region (RA=06:07:33.043; DE=+19:30:52.70, 2000) of L1570 were carried out in BVRI-bands using the 1.04-m ST on 27 November 2010. Results based on optical broad-band (BV(RI)c) photometric and polarimetric observations are presented. The polarization results of various polarized standard stars (taken from Schmidt et al. 1992AJ....104.1563S) are presented along with their standard values (Table 1). Rc-band polarization data of 127 stars along with their 2MASS data (JHKs) is presented (Table 2). Polarization and Serkowski fit parameters for the 42 stars with V(RI)c pass-band data is presented (Table 3). Polarization and Serkowski fit parameters for the 15 stars with BV(RI)c pass-band data is presented (Table 4). Photometric data of 144 stars with good signal-noise-ratio (with BV(RI)c and 2MASS JHKs-photometric errors <0.1mag) is also presented (Table 6). (6 data files).

  8. Quantitative measurement of absolute cell volume and intracellular integral refractive index (RI) with dual-wavelength digital holographic microscopy (DHM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Daniel; Kühn, Jonas; Depeursinge, Christian; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Marquet, Pierre

    2012-06-01

    Quantitative Phase Imaging techniques including DHM have been applied recently in the field of cell imaging to monitor and quantify non-invasively dynamic cellular processes modifying cell morphology and/or content . Concretely, the DHM phase signal is highly sensitive to cell thickness and intracellular integral RI variations associated with transmembrane water movements. As net water flow across the cell membrane leads at the same time to changes in cell thickness and intracellular RI, the interpretation of phase signal variations remains difficult. To overcome this drawback, we have developed a Dual-wavelength Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) setup allowing to separately measure, with a single CCD camera acquisition, thickness and integral RI of living cells. The method is based on the use of an absorbing dye that enhances the refractive index dispersion of the extracellular medium. Practically, two significantly different phase signals can be obtained when measuring at two appropriate wavelengths. From the two phase measurements, both cell RI and thickness can be univocally determined.

  9. 77 FR 33007 - Submission for Review: Initial Certification of Full-Time School Attendance, RI 25-41

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Initial Certification of Full-Time School Attendance, RI 25-41 AGENCY: U.S... Full-Time School Attendance. As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, (Pub. L. 104-13, 44 U... other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g.,...

  10. 76 FR 54810 - Submission for Review: 3206-0215, Verification of Full-Time School Attendance, RI 25-49

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: 3206-0215, Verification of Full-Time School Attendance, RI 25-49 AGENCY: U..., Verification of Full-Time School Attendance. As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-13... technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting...

  11. EPA Awards $91,000 Environmental Education Grant to Woonasquatucket River Watershed Council in Providence, R.I.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded a $91,000 environmental education grant to the Woonasquatucket River Watershed Council in Providence, R.I. to work on a two-year effort to educate K-12 students in greater Providence about environmental

  12. 78 FR 28007 - Submission for Review: Representative Payee Application (RI 20-7) and Information Necessary for a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... Competency Determination (RI 30-3) AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: 30-Day Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Retirement Services, Office of Personnel Management (OPM) offers the... Office of Personnel Management or sent via email to oira_submission@omb.eop.gov or faxed to (202)...

  13. 77 FR 73114 - Draft Written Re-Evaluation for Environmental Impact Statement: T.F. Green Airport, Warwick, RI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... January 7, 2013. Issued on: November 26, 2012. Richard Doucette, Environmental Program Manager, Airports... Federal Aviation Administration Draft Written Re-Evaluation for Environmental Impact Statement: T.F. Green Airport, Warwick, RI AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of...

  14. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  15. Successful Beam-Beam Tuneshift Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Bishofberger, Kip Aaron

    2005-01-01

    The performance of synchrotron colliders has been limited by the beam-beam limit, a maximum tuneshift that colliding bunches could sustain. Due to bunch-to-bunch tune variation and intra-bunch tune spread, larger tuneshifts produce severe emittance growth. Breaking through this constraint has been viewed as impossible for several decades. This dissertation introduces the physics of ultra-relativistic synchrotrons and low-energy electron beams, with emphasis placed on the limits of the Tevatron and the needs of a tuneshift-compensation device. A detailed analysis of the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) is given, comparing theoretical models to experimental data whenever possible. Finally, results of Tevatron operations with inclusion of the TEL are presented and analyzed. It is shown that the TEL provides a way to shatter the previously inescapable beam-beam limit.

  16. Accelerated dissociation of IgE-FcεRI complexes by disruptive inhibitors actively desensitizes allergic effector cells.

    PubMed

    Eggel, Alexander; Baravalle, Günther; Hobi, Gabriel; Kim, Beomkyu; Buschor, Patrick; Forrer, Patrik; Shin, Jeoung-Sook; Vogel, Monique; Stadler, Beda M; Dahinden, Clemens A; Jardetzky, Theodore S

    2014-06-01

    The remarkably stable interaction of IgE with its high-affinity receptor FcεRI on basophils and mast cells is critical for the induction of allergic hypersensitivity reactions. Because of the exceptionally slow dissociation rate of IgE-FcεRI complexes, such allergic effector cells permanently display allergen-specific IgE on their surface and immediately respond to allergen challenge by releasing inflammatory mediators. We have recently described a novel macromolecular inhibitor that actively promotes the dissociation of IgE from FcεRI through a molecular mechanism termed facilitated dissociation. Here we assessed the therapeutic potential of this non-immunoglobulin-based IgE inhibitor E2_79, a designed ankyrin repeat protein (DARPin), as well as a novel engineered biparatopic DARPin bi53_79, and directly compared them with the established anti-IgE antibody omalizumab. IgE-FcεRI complex dissociation was analyzed in vitro by using recombinant proteins in ELISA and surface plasmon resonance, ex vivo by using human primary basophils with flow cytometry, and in vivo by using human FcεRI α-chain transgenic mice in a functional passive cutaneous anaphylaxis test. We show that E2_79-mediated removal of IgE from primary human basophils fully abrogates IgE-dependent cell activation and release of proinflammatory mediators ex vivo. Furthermore, we report that omalizumab also accelerates the dissociation of IgE from FcεRI, although much less efficiently than E2_79. Using the biparatopic IgE targeting approach, we further improved the disruptive potency of E2_79 by approximately 100-fold and show that disruptive IgE inhibitors efficiently prevent passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice expressing the human FcεRI α-chain. Our findings highlight the potential of such novel IgE inhibitors as important diagnostic and therapeutic tools for management of allergic diseases. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  17. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) is a process by which NASA hopes to build metal parts in zero gravity environments. It's a layer-additive process that uses an electron beam and a solid wi...

  18. Interplanetary particle beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews observations of interplanetary particle beams of the kind that frequently accompany a solar flare. It is shown that the most frequently observed beams are beams of electrons which are associated with radio bursts of type III, but occasionally with flares and X-ray bursts. Although the main features of these beams and their associated plasma waves and radio bursts are known, uncertainties remain in terms of the correlation between electron beams and filamentary structures, the relative importance of the quasi-linear and the nonlinear wave emissions as the dominant process, and the mechanism of conversion of some of the Langmuir wave energy into radio emissions. Other particle beams discussed are those composed of protons, neutrons, He ions, or heavy ions. While most of these beams originate from sun flares, the source of some of particle beams may be the earth, Jupiter, or other planets as well as comets.

  19. High energy beam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetto, M.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ISAC post accelerator comprises an RFQ, DTL and SC-linac. The high energy beam lines connect the linear accelerators as well as deliver the accelerated beams to two different experimental areas. The medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line connects the RFQ to the DTL. The high energy beam transport (HEBT) line connects the DTL to the ISAC-I experimental stations (DRAGON, TUDA-I, GPS). The DTL to superconducting beam (DSB) transport line connects the ISAC-I and ISAC-II linacs. The superconducting energy beam transport (SEBT) line connects the SC linac to the ISAC-II experimental station (TUDA-II, HERACLES, TIGRESS, EMMA and GPS). All these lines have the function of transporting and matching the beams to the downstream sections by manipulating the transverse and longitudinal phase space. They also contain diagnostic devices to measure the beam properties.

  20. Lithium- and boron-bearing brines in the Central Andes: exploring hydrofacies on the eastern Puna plateau between 23° and 23°30'S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, R. L. López

    2017-01-01

    Internally drained basins of the Andean Plateau are lithium- and boron-bearing systems. The exploration of ionic facies and parental links in a playa lake located in the eastern Puna (23°-23°30'S) was assessed by hydrochemical determinations of residual brines, feed waters and solutions from weathered rocks. Residual brines have been characterized by the Cl- (SO4 =)/Na+ (K+) ratio. Residual brines from the playa lake contain up to 450 mg/l of boron and up to 125 mg/l of lithium, and the Las Burras River supplies the most concentrated boron (20 mg/l) and lithium (3.75 mg/l) inflows of the basin. The hydro-geochemical assessment allowed for the identification of three simultaneous sources of boron: (1) inflow originating from granitic areas of the Aguilar and Tusaquillas ranges; (2) weathering of the Ordovician basement; and (3) boron-rich water from the Las Burras River. Most of the lithium input of the basin is likely generated by present geothermal sources rather than by weathering and leaching of ignimbrites and plutonic rocks. However, XRD analyses of playa lake sediments revealed the presence of lithian micas of clastic origin, including taeniolite and eucriptite. This study is the first to document these rare Li-micas from the Puna basin. Thus, both residual brines and lithian micas contribute to the total Li content in the studied hydrologic system.

  1. Structure of FcγRI in complex with Fc reveals the importance of glycan recognition for high-affinity IgG binding

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jinghua; Chu, Jonathan; Zou, Zhongcheng; Hamacher, Nels B.; Rixon, Mark W.; Sun, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Fc gamma receptor I (FcγRI) contributes to protective immunity against bacterial infections, but exacerbates certain autoimmune diseases. The sole high-affinity IgG receptor, FcγRI plays a significant role in immunotherapy. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of its high-affinity IgG binding, we determined the crystal structure of the extracellular domains of human FcγRI in complex with the Fc domain of human IgG1. FcγRI binds to the Fc in a similar mode as the low-affinity FcγRII and FcγRIII receptors. In addition to many conserved contacts, FcγRI forms additional hydrogen bonds and salt bridges with the lower hinge region of Fc. Unique to the high-affinity receptor-Fc complex, however, is the conformation of the receptor D2 domain FG loop, which enables a charged KHR motif to interact with proximal carbohydrate units of the Fc glycans. Both the length and the charge of the FcγRI FG loop are well conserved among mammalian species. Ala and Glu mutations of the FG loop KHR residues showed significant contributions of His-174 and Arg-175 to antibody binding, and the loss of the FG loop–glycan interaction resulted in an ∼20- to 30-fold decrease in FcγRI affinity to all three subclasses of IgGs. Furthermore, deglycosylation of IgG1 resulted in a 40-fold loss in FcγRI binding, demonstrating involvement of the receptor FG loop in glycan recognition. These results highlight a unique glycan recognition in FcγRI function and open potential therapeutic avenues based on antibody glycan engineering or small molecular glycan mimics to target FcγRI for certain autoimmune diseases. PMID:25561553

  2. Beam Dynamics for ARIA

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr.

    2014-10-14

    Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

  3. PARTICLE BEAM TRACKING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, O.A.

    1959-05-01

    >A particle-beam tracking and correcting circuit is described. Beam induction electrodes are placed on either side of the beam, and potentials induced by the beam are compared in a voltage comparator or discriminator. This comparison produces an error signal which modifies the fm curve at the voltage applied to the drift tube, thereby returning the orbit to the preferred position. The arrangement serves also to synchronize accelerating frequency and magnetic field growth. (T.R.H.)

  4. Electron beam focusing system

    SciTech Connect

    Dikansky, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    The high energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. Thus, the electron beam focusing system is very important for the performance of electron cooling. A system with and without longitudinal magnetic field is presented for discussion. Interaction of electron beam with the vacuum chamber as well as with the background ions and stored antiprotons can cause the coherent electron beam instabilities. Focusing system requirements needed to suppress these instabilities are presented.

  5. Vaccinium angustifolium Root Extract Suppresses FcɛRI Expression in Human Basophilic KU812F Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Sun Yup; Lee, Kyung Dong; Lee, Mina

    2017-01-01

    Vaccinium angustifolium, commonly known as the lowbush blueberry, is a rich source of flavonoids, with which various human physiological activities have been associated. The present study focuses on the investigation of the effect of the methanolic extract of V. angustifolium root extract (VAE) on high affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (FcɛRI) α chain antibody (CRA-1)-induced allergic reaction in human basophilic KU812F cells. The total phenolic content of VAE was found to be 170±1.9 mg gallic acid equivalents/g. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the cell surface expression of FcɛRI was suppressed in a concentration-dependent manner upon culture with VAE. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the mRNA level of the FcɛRI α chain was reduced in a concentration-dependent manner as a result of VAE treatment. Western blot analysis revealed that the protein expression of FcɛRI and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 were concentration-dependently inhibited by VAE. We determined that VAE inhibited anti-CRA-1-induced histamine release, in addition to the elevation of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), in a concentration-dependent manner. These results indicate that VAE may exert an anti-allergic effect via the inhibition of calcium influx and histamine release, which occurs as a result of the down-regulation of FcɛRI expression through inhibition of ERK 1/2 activation. PMID:28401082

  6. Vaccinium angustifolium Root Extract Suppresses FcɛRI Expression in Human Basophilic KU812F Cells.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sun Yup; Lee, Kyung Dong; Lee, Mina

    2017-03-01

    Vaccinium angustifolium, commonly known as the lowbush blueberry, is a rich source of flavonoids, with which various human physiological activities have been associated. The present study focuses on the investigation of the effect of the methanolic extract of V. angustifolium root extract (VAE) on high affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (FcɛRI) α chain antibody (CRA-1)-induced allergic reaction in human basophilic KU812F cells. The total phenolic content of VAE was found to be 170±1.9 mg gallic acid equivalents/g. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the cell surface expression of FcɛRI was suppressed in a concentration-dependent manner upon culture with VAE. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the mRNA level of the FcɛRI α chain was reduced in a concentration-dependent manner as a result of VAE treatment. Western blot analysis revealed that the protein expression of FcɛRI and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 were concentration-dependently inhibited by VAE. We determined that VAE inhibited anti-CRA-1-induced histamine release, in addition to the elevation of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), in a concentration-dependent manner. These results indicate that VAE may exert an anti-allergic effect via the inhibition of calcium influx and histamine release, which occurs as a result of the down-regulation of FcɛRI expression through inhibition of ERK 1/2 activation.

  7. Beam spreading of vortex beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Lukin, Vladimir P; Konyaev, Peter A; Sennikov, Victor A

    2012-04-01

    We present some results obtained by numerical modeling of the propagation of vortex beams LG(0l) through a randomly inhomogeneous medium. The vortex beams are the lower order Laguerre-Gaussian modes. Such beams, if propagated under conditions of weak turbulence, also experience distortions, like a Gaussian beam. However, the statistically averaged vortex beams (LG(0l)) conserve the central intensity dip with a nonzero intensity on the beam axis. The beam broadening of vortex beams is analyzed. The average vortex beams are found to be broadened less than the Gaussian beam while propagated through a randomly inhomogeneous medium. The higher the topological charge l is, the smaller the beam broadening is.

  8. A planar, chip-based, dual-beam refractometer using an integrated organic light-emitting diode (OLED) light source and organic photovoltaic (OPV) detectors.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, Erin L; Veneman, P Alex; Simmonds, Adam; Zacher, Brian; Huebner, Daniel; Saavedra, S Scott; Armstrong, Neal R

    2010-04-01

    We present a simple chip-based refractometer with a central organic light-emitting diode (OLED) light source and two opposed organic photovoltaic (OPV) detectors on an internal reflection element (IRE) substrate, creating a true dual-beam sensor platform. For first-generation platforms, we demonstrate the use of a single heterojunction OLED based on electroluminescence from an Alq(3)/TPD heterojunction (tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum/N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine) and light detection with planar heterojunction pentacene/C(60) OPVs. The sensor utilizes the considerable fraction of emitted light from conventional thin-film OLEDs that is coupled into guided modes in the IRE, instead of into the forward (display) direction. A ray-optics description is used to describe light throughput and efficiency-limiting factors for light coupling from the OLED into the substrate modes, light traversing through the IRE substrate, and light coupling into the OPV detectors. The arrangement of the OLED at the center of the chip provides for two sensing regions: a "sample" channel and a "reference" channel, with detection of light by independent OPV detectors. This configuration allows for normalization of the sensor response against fluctuations in OLED light output, stability, and local fluctuations (temperature) that might influence sensor response. The dual-beam configuration permits significantly enhanced sensitivity to refractive index changes, relative to single-beam protocols, and is easily integrated into a field-portable instrumentation package. Changes in refractive index (DeltaRI) between 10(-2) and 10(-3) RI units could be detected for single beam operation, with sensitivity increased to DeltaRI approximately 10(-4) RI units when the dual-beam configuration is employed.

  9. Electron beam device

    DOEpatents

    Beckner, E.H.; Clauser, M.J.

    1975-08-12

    This patent pertains to an electron beam device in which a hollow target is symmetrically irradiated by a high energy, pulsed electron beam about its periphery and wherein the outer portion of the target has a thickness slightly greater than required to absorb the electron beam pulse energy. (auth)

  10. Cooling of Stored Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, F.

    1986-06-10

    Beam cooling methods developed for the accumulation of antiprotons are being employed to assist in the performance of experiments in Nuclear and Particle Physics with ion beams stored in storage rings. The physics of beam cooling, and the ranges of utility of stochastic and electron cooling are discussed in this paper.

  11. Electromagnetic nonuniformly correlated beams.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhisong; Korotkova, Olga

    2012-10-01

    A class of electromagnetic sources with nonuniformly distributed field correlations is introduced. The conditions on source parameters guaranteeing that the source generates a physical beam are derived. It is shown that the new sources are capable of producing beams with polarization properties that evolve on propagation in a manner much more complex compared to the well-known electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model beams.

  12. Beam injection into RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

    1997-07-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

  13. Dual beam optical interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A dual beam interferometer device is disclosed that enables moving an optics module in a direction, which changes the path lengths of two beams of light. The two beams reflect off a surface of an object and generate different speckle patterns detected by an element, such as a camera. The camera detects a characteristic of the surface.

  14. ATA beam director experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.; Younger, F.C.; Cruz, G.E.; Nolting, E.

    1986-06-23

    This report describes beam director elements for an experiment at the Advanced Test Accelerator. The elements described include a vernier magnet for beam aiming, an achromat magnet, and an isolation system for the beam interface. These components are built at small scale for concept testing. (JDH)

  15. Beam-beam interaction working group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.

    1995-03-01

    The limit in hadron colliders is understood phenomenologically. The beam-beam interaction produces nonlinear resonances and makes the transverse tunes amplitude dependent. Tune spreads result from the latter, and as long as these tune spreads do not overlap low order resonances, the lifetime and performance is acceptable. Experience is that tenth and sometimes twelfth order resonances must be avoided, and the hadron collider limit corresponds roughly to the space available between resonances of that and lower order when operating near the coupling resonance. The beam-beam interaction in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} colliders is not understood well. This affects the performance of existing colliders and could lead to surprises in new ones. For example. a substantial amount of operator tuning is usually required to reach the performance limit given above, and this tuning has to be repeated after each major shutdown. The usual interpretation is that colliding beam performance is sensitive to small lattice errors, and these are being reduced during tuning. It is natural to ask what these errors are, how can a lattice be characterized to minimize tuning time, and what aspects of a lattice should receive particular attention when a new collider is being designed. The answers to this type of question are not known, and developing ideas for calculations, simulations and experiments that could illuminate the details of the beam-beam interaction was the primary working group activity.

  16. Halo formation from mismatched beam-beam interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji

    2003-05-23

    In this paper, we report on the halo formation and emittance growth driven by a parametric resonance during mismatched beam-beam collisions. In the regime of the weak-strong beam-beam interaction, if two beams have the same machine tunes, on-axis head-on collisions between a mismatched strong beam and a weak beam will not cause the formation of halo. However, if the two beams collide with an initial offset, the beam-beam force from the mismatched strong beam can cause halo formation and emittance growth in the weak beam. Meanwhile, if two beams have different machine tunes, for opposite charged colliding beams, when the machine tune of the weak beam is smaller than that of strong beam, there is emittance growth in the weak beam. When the machine tune of the weak beam is larger than that of the strong beam, there is little emittance growth. In the regime of strong-strong beam-beam interaction, halo is formed in both beams even when the two beams collide head-on on the axis with equal machine tunes. This puts a strong requirement for a good beam match during the injection to colliders in order to avoid the emittance growth.

  17. EURAMET.RI(I)-S7 comparison of alanine dosimetry systems for absorbed dose to water measurements in gamma- and x-radiation at radiotherapy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Tristan; Anton, Mathias; Sharpe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The National Physical Laboratory (NPL), the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB) are involved in the European project 'External Beam Cancer Therapy', a project of the European Metrology Research Programme. Within this project, the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)/alanine dosimetric method has been chosen for performing measurements in small fields such as those used in IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy). In this context, these three National Metrology Institutes (NMI) wished to compare the result of their alanine dosimetric systems (detector, modus operandi etc) at radiotherapy dose levels to check their consistency. This EURAMET.RI(I)-S7 comparison has been performed with the support of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) which collected and distributed the results as a neutral organization, to ensure the comparison was 'blind'. Irradiations have been made under reference conditions by each laboratory in a 60Co beam and in an accelerator beam (10 MV or 12 MV) in a water phantom of 30 cm × 30 cm × 30 cm in a square field of 10 cm × 10 cm at the reference depth. Irradiations have been performed at known values of absorbed dose to water (Dw) within 10% of nominal doses of 5 Gy and 10 Gy, i.e. between 4.5 Gy and 5.5 Gy and between 9 Gy and 11 Gy, respectively. Each participant read out their dosimeters and assessed the doses using their own protocol (calibration curve, positioning device etc) as this comparison aims at comparing the complete dosimetric process. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the EPR/alanine dosimetry systems operated by National Metrology Institutes as a method of assuring therapy level doses with the accuracy required. The maximum deviation in the ratio of measured to applied dose is less than 1%. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key

  18. The Tla protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis W50: a homolog of the RI protease precursor (PrpRI) is an outer membrane receptor required for growth on low levels of hemin.

    PubMed

    Aduse-Opoku, J; Slaney, J M; Rangarajan, M; Muir, J; Young, K A; Curtis, M A

    1997-08-01

    The prpR1 gene of Porphyromonas gingivalis W50 encodes the polyprotein precursor (PrpRI) of an extracellular arginine-specific protease. PrpRI is organized into four distinct domains (pro, alpha, beta, and gamma) and is processed to a heterodimeric protease (RI) which comprises the alpha and beta components in a noncovalent association. The alpha component contains the protease active site, whereas the beta component appears to have a role in adherence and hemagglutination processes. DNA sequences homologous to the coding region for the RI beta component are present at multiple loci on the P. gingivalis chromosome and may represent a family of related genes. In this report, we describe the cloning, sequence analysis, and characterization of one of these homologous loci isolated in plasmid pJM7. The 6,041-bp P. gingivalis DNA fragment in pJM7 contains a major open reading frame of 3,291 bp with coding potential for a protein with an Mr 118,700. An internal region of the deduced sequence (V304 to N768) shows 98% identity to the beta domain of PrpRI, and the recombinant product of pJM7 is immunoreactive with an antibody specific to the RI beta component. The N terminus of the deduced sequence has regional similarity to TonB-linked receptors which are frequently involved in periplasmic translocation of hemin, iron, colicins, or vitamin B12 in other bacteria. We have therefore designated this gene tla (TonB-linked adhesin). In contrast to the parent strain, an isogenic mutant of P. gingivalis W50 in which the tla was insertionally inactivated was unable to grow in medium containing low concentrations of hemin (<2.5 mg liter(-1)), and hemin-depleted cells of this mutant failed to respond to hemin in an agar diffusion plate assay. These data suggest a role for this gene product in hemin acquisition and utilization. Furthermore, the mutant produced significantly less arginine- and lysine-specific protease activities than the parent strain, indicating that there may be a

  19. BEAM CONTROL PROBE

    DOEpatents

    Chesterman, A.W.

    1959-03-17

    A probe is described for intercepting a desired portion of a beam of charged particles and for indicating the spatial disposition of the beam. The disclosed probe assembly includes a pair of pivotally mounted vanes moveable into a single plane with adjacent edges joining and a calibrated mechanical arrangement for pivoting the vancs apart. When the probe is disposed in the path of a charged particle beam, the vanes may be adjusted according to the beam current received in each vane to ascertain the dimension of the beam.

  20. Europlanet-RI: Access to Planetary Data, Tools, Models and Support Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, W.; Capria, M. T.; Chanteur, G.

    2012-04-01

    information is collected in the data access system of IDIS. By the end of the project in 2012 data from most planetary missions can be accessed, combined and correlated with spectral data bases for atmospheric gases and solids, laboratory measurements related to space observations and the results of model runs simulating the observations of different parameters around and at planets under various boundary conditions. The VO-structure will allow the access to these data through graphical interfaces including optimized visualization tools or alternatively through a command interface for further integration into other applications. Reference: [1] Details to IDIS and the Europlanet-RI via Web-site: http://www.idis.europlanet-ri.eu/ [2] Demonstrator implementation for Plasma-VO AMDA: http://cdpp-amda.cesr.fr/DDHTML/index.html [3] Demonstrator implementation for the IDIS-VO: http://www.idis-dyn.europlanet-ri.eu/vodev.shtml

  1. Hyperfine structure measurement of 87Rb atoms injected into superfluid helium as highly energetic ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Kei; Furukawa, Takeshi; Yang, Xiaofei; Fujita, Tomomi; Wakui, Takashi; Mitsuya, Yousuke; Hayasaka, Miki; Ichikawa, Yuichi; Hatakeyama, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Tohru; Odashima, Hitoshi; Ueno, Hideki; Matsuo, Yukari; Orochi Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a new nuclear laser spectroscopy technique that is called OROCHI (Optical RI-atoms Observation in Condensed Helium as Ioncatcher). In OROCHI, highly energetic ion beam is injected into superfluid helium (He II) and is trapped as atoms. Hyperfine structure (HFS) and Zeeman splitting of trapped atoms is measured using laser-microwave (MW)/radiofrequency (RF) double resonance method. We deduce nuclear moments and spin values from the measured splittings, respectively So far, we measured Zeeman splitting of 84-87Rb atoms To evaluate the validity of the OROCHI method, it is necessary to investigate the following two points not only for Zeeman but also for HFS splitings. (i) What is the accuracy in frequency in our measurement? (ii) How high beam intensity is necessary to observe resonance spectra? For this purpose we conducted online experiment using 87Rb beam and measured the HFS splitting of injected 87Rb atoms in He II.

  2. Beam envelope matching for beam guidance systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.L.

    1980-08-01

    Ray optics and phase ellipse optics are developed as tools for designing charged particle beam guidance systems. Specific examples of basic optical systems and of phase ellipse matching are presented as illustrations of these mathematical techniques.

  3. Beam-beam experience in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.; Heimerle, M.

    2010-07-29

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC consists of two superconducting storage rings that intersect at six locations around the ring circumference. Two of these interaction regions are currently equipped with experiment detectors, namely STAR at the “6 o’clock” interaction point (IP), and PHENIX at “8 o’clock”. The two beams collide only at these two interaction regions, while they are vertically separated by typically 6-10mm at the other IPs. Together with the separator dipoles located at roughly 10m from the IP, and a distance between bunches of 30m, this avoids any parasitic beam-beam collisions. RHIC is capable of colliding any ion species at magnetic rigidities up to B × r = 830T × m , corresponding to 250 GeV for proton beams, or 100 GeV/n for fully stripped gold ions.

  4. Refractive beam shapers for focused laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2016-09-01

    Focusing of laser radiation is most often used approach in various industrial micromachining applications like scribing, PCB drilling, and is important in scientific researches like laser heating in geophysics experiments with diamond anvil cells (DAC). Control of intensity distribution in focal spot is important task since optimum intensity profiles are rather flat-top, doughnut or "inverse-Gauss" than typical for lasers Gaussian profile. Because of high intensity of modern CW and pulsed lasers it is advisable to use refractive beam shaping optics with smooth optical surfaces providing high radiation resistance. Workable optical solutions can be built on the base of diffraction theory conclusion that flat-top intensity profile in focal plane of a lens is created when input beam has Airy-disk intensity distribution. It is suggested to apply refractive beam shapers converting, with minimum wavefront deformation, Gaussian profile of TEM00 beam to a beam with Airy disk intensity distribution, thereby optimizing conditions of interference near the focal plane of a lens after the beam shaper and providing flat-top, doughnut, "inverse-Gauss" profiles. This approach allows operation with CW and ultra-short pulse lasers, using F-theta lenses and objectives, mirror scanners, provides extended depth of field similar to Rayleigh length of comparable TEM00 beam, easy integration in industrial equipment, simple adjustment procedure and switching between profiles, telescope and collimator implementations. There will be considered design basics of beam shapers, analysis of profile behaviour near focal plane, examples of implementations in micromachining systems and experimental DAC setups, results of profile measurements and material processing.

  5. Colliding crystalline beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Sessler, A.M.

    1998-08-01

    The understanding of crystalline beams has advanced to the point where one can now, with reasonable confidence, undertake an analysis of the luminosity of colliding crystalline beams. Such a study is reported here. It is necessary to observe the criteria, previously stated, for the creation and stability of crystalline beams. This requires, firstly, the proper design of a lattice. Secondly, a crystal must be formed, and this can usually be done at various densities. Thirdly, the crystals in a colliding-beam machine are brought into collision. The authors study all of these processes using the molecular dynamics (MD) method. The work parallels what was done previously, but the new part is to study the crystal-crystal interaction in collision. They initially study the zero-temperature situation. If the beam-beam force (or equivalent tune shift) is too large then overlapping crystals can not be created (rather two spatially separated crystals are formed). However, if the beam-beam force is less than but comparable to that of the space-charge forces between the particles, they find that overlapping crystals can be formed and the beam-beam tune shift can be of the order of unity. Operating at low but non-zero temperature can increase the luminosity by several orders of magnitude over that of a usual collider. The construction of an appropriate lattice, and the development of adequately strong cooling, although theoretically achievable, is a challenge in practice.

  6. Bolt beam propagation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokair, I. R.

    BOLT (Beam on Laser Technology) is a rocket experiment to demonstrate electron beam propagation on a laser ionized plasma channel across the geomagnetic field in the ion focused regime (IFR). The beam parameters for BOLT are: beam current I(sub b) = 100 Amps, beam energy of 1--1.5 MeV (gamma =3-4), and a Gaussian beam and channel of radii r(sub b) = r(sub c) = 1.5 cm. The N+1 ionization scheme is used to ionize atomic oxygen in the upper atmosphere. This scheme utilizes 130 nm light plus three IR lasers to excite and then ionize atomic oxygen. The limiting factor for the channel strength is the energy of the 130 nm laser, which is assumed to be 1.6 mJ for BOLT. At a fixed laser energy and altitude (fixing the density of atomic oxygen), the range can be varied by adjusting the laser tuning, resulting in a neutralization fraction axial profile of the form: f(z) = f(sub 0) e(exp minus z)/R, where R is the range. In this paper we consider the propagation of the BOLT beam and calculate the range of the electron beam taking into account the fact that the erosion rates (magnetic and inductive) vary with beam length as the beam and channel dynamically respond to sausage and hose instabilities.

  7. Molecular hydrogen suppresses FcepsilonRI-mediated signal transduction and prevents degranulation of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Tomohiro; Fujita, Yasunori; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Ohno, Kinji; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Kojima, Toshio; Nozawa, Yoshinori; Ito, Masafumi

    2009-11-27

    Molecular hydrogen ameliorates oxidative stress-associated diseases in animal models. We found that oral intake of hydrogen-rich water abolishes an immediate-type allergic reaction in mice. Using rat RBL-2H3 mast cells, we demonstrated that hydrogen attenuates phosphorylation of the FcepsilonRI-associated Lyn and its downstream signal transduction, which subsequently inhibits the NADPH oxidase activity and reduces the generation of hydrogen peroxide. We also found that inhibition of NADPH oxidase attenuates phosphorylation of Lyn in mast cells, indicating the presence of a feed-forward loop that potentiates the allergic responses. Hydrogen accordingly inhibits all tested signaling molecule(s) in the loop. Hydrogen effects have been solely ascribed to exclusive removal of hydroxyl radical. In the immediate-type allergic reaction, hydrogen exerts its beneficial effect not by its radical scavenging activity but by modulating a specific signaling pathway. Effects of hydrogen in other diseases are possibly mediated by modulation of yet unidentified signaling pathways. Our studies also suggest that hydrogen is a gaseous signaling molecule like nitric oxide.

  8. Structure of D-AKAP2:PKA RI complex: insights into AKAP specificity and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Ganapathy N; Kinderman, Francis S; Kim, Choel; von Daake, Sventja; Chen, Lirong; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Taylor, Susan S

    2010-02-10

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) regulate cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) signaling in space and time. Dual-specific AKAP 2 (D-AKAP2) binds to the dimerization/docking (D/D) domain of both RI and RII regulatory subunits of PKA with high affinity. Here we have determined the structures of the RIalpha D/D domain alone and in complex with D-AKAP2. The D/D domain presents an extensive surface for binding through a well-formed N-terminal helix, and this surface restricts the diversity of AKAPs that can interact. The structures also underscore the importance of a redox-sensitive disulfide in affecting AKAP binding. An unexpected shift in the helical register of D-AKAP2 compared to the RIIalpha:D-AKAP2 complex structure makes the mode of binding to RIalpha novel. Finally, the comparison allows us to deduce a molecular explanation for the sequence and spatial determinants of AKAP specificity.

  9. The R.I. Pimenov unified gravitation and electromagnetism field theory as semi-Riemannian geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gromov, N. A.

    2009-05-15

    More than forty years ago R.I. Pimenov introduced a new geometry-semi-Riemannian one-as a set of geometrical objects consistent with a fibering pr: M{sub n} {yields} M{sub m}. He suggested the heuristic principle according to which the physically different quantities (meter, second, Coulomb, etc.) are geometrically modelled as space coordinates that are not superposed by automorphisms. As there is only one type of coordinates in Riemannian geometry and only three types of coordinates in pseudo-Riemannian one, a multiple-fibered semi-Riemannian geometry is the most appropriate one for the treatment of more than three different physical quantities as unified geometrical field theory. Semi-Euclidean geometry {sup 3}R{sub 5}{sup 4} with 1-dimensional fiber x{sup 5} and 4-dimensional Minkowski space-time as a base is naturally interpreted as classical electrodynamics. Semi-Riemannian geometry {sup 3}V{sub 5}{sup 4} with the general relativity pseudo-Riemannian space-time {sup 3}V{sub 4}, and 1-dimensional fiber x{sup 5}, responsible for the electromagnetism, provides the unified field theory of gravitation and electromagnetism. Unlike Kaluza-Klein theories, where the fifth coordinate appears in nondegenerate Riemannian or pseudo-Riemannian geometry, the theory based on semi-Riemannian geometry is free from defects of the former. In particular, scalar field does not arise.

  10. The EnRiCH Community Resilience Framework for High-Risk Populations

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, Tracey L.; Kuziemsky, Craig E.; Corneil, Wayne; Lemyre, Louise; Franco, Zeno

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Resilience has been described in many ways and is inherently complex. In essence, it refers to the capacity to face and do well when adversity is encountered. There is a need for empirical research on community level initiatives designed to enhance resilience for high-risk groups as part of an upstream approach to disaster management. In this study, we address this issue, presenting the EnRiCH Community Resilience Framework for High-Risk Populations. Methods: The framework presented in this paper is empirically-based, using qualitative data from focus groups conducted as part of an asset-mapping intervention in five communities in Canada, and builds on extant literature in the fields of disaster and emergency management, health promotion, and community development. Results: Adaptive capacity is placed at the centre of the framework as a focal point, surrounded by four strategic areas for intervention (awareness/communication, asset/resource management, upstream-oriented leadership, and connectedness/engagement). Three drivers of adaptive capacity (empowerment, innovation, and collaboration) cross-cut the strategic areas and represent levers for action which can influence systems, people and institutions through expansion of asset literacy. Each component of the framework is embedded within the complexity and culture of a community. Discussion: We present recommendations for how this framework can be used to guide the design of future resilience-oriented initiatives with particular emphasis on inclusive engagement across a range of functional capabilities. PMID:25642373

  11. 76 FR 82000 - Submission for Review: Request for Change to Unreduced Annuity, RI 20-120

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ...The Retirement Services, Office of Personnel Management (OPM) offers the general public and other federal agencies the opportunity to comment on a revised information collection request (ICR) 3206-0245, Request for Change to Unreduced Annuity, RI 20-120. As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, (Pub. L. 104-13, 44 U.S.C. chapter 35) as amended by the Clinger-Cohen Act (Pub. L. 104-106), OPM is soliciting comments for this collection. The information collection was previously published in the Federal Register on June 7, 2011 at Volume 76 FR 32997 allowing for a 60-day public comment period. No comments were received for this information collection. The purpose of this notice is to allow an additional 30 days for public comments. The Office of Management and Budget is particularly interested in comments that: 1. Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; 2. Evaluate the accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; 3. Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and 4. Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses.

  12. Microwave-optical study of an As(III) derivative of Eco RI methylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, August H.; Tsao, Desiree H. H.

    1991-06-01

    The authors report on the formation of an unusually stable As(III)-thiolate with a single 'high- affinity' cysteine (Cys) of E. coli RI methylase, monitored via its influence on a neighboring tryptophan (Trp) residue in the enzyme structure. The binding was studied by Trp fluorescence quenching, low temperature phosphorescence and triplet state optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) of the intrinsic Trp residue(s). The affected Trp is subject to an external heavy atom effect (HAE) from arsenic, quenching its fluorescence and reducing its phosphorescence lifetime from 6 sec to ca. 70 msec. The enzyme high affinity binding site has at least 27 times the affinity for As(III) as does a typical sulfhydryl reagent, HSCH2CONH2. The accessibility of the arsenical to this Cys site was reduced upon formation of the ternary complex methylase-DNA-sinefungin, suggesting a local conformational change in the enzyme when DNA is bound. The enzymatic activity assay of methylase is not affected by the addition of a 1:1 molar ratio of the arsenical to the methylase, but incubation with an excess of As(III) causes complete loss of enzymatic activity. This suggests that the high- affinity Cys residue is not a part of the active site of the enzyme, but the addition of a molar excess of arsenical to the enzyme derivatizes the Cys residue known to be located in the active site.

  13. Electron Beam Irradiation of Cellulosic Materials—Opportunities and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Henniges, Ute; Hasani, Merima; Potthast, Antje; Westman, Gunnar; Rosenau, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The irradiation of pulp is of interest from different perspectives. Mainly it is required when a modification of cellulose is needed. Irradiation could bring many advantages, such as chemical savings and, therefore, cost savings and a reduction in environmental pollutants. In this account, pulp and dissociated celluloses were analyzed before and after irradiation by electron beaming. The focus of the analysis was the oxidation of hydroxyl groups to carbonyl and carboxyl groups in pulp and the degradation of cellulose causing a decrease in molar mass. For that purpose, the samples were labeled with a selective fluorescence marker and analyzed by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) coupled with multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS), refractive index (RI), and fluorescence detectors. Degradation of the analyzed substrates was the predominant result of the irradiation; however, in the microcrystalline samples, oxidized cellulose functionalities were introduced along the cellulose chain, making this substrate suitable for further chemical modification. PMID:28809230

  14. Particle beam injection system

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.; Kulsrud, Russell M.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a poloidal divertor for stacking counterstreaming ion beams to provide high intensity colliding beams. To this end, method and apparatus are provided that inject high energy, high velocity, ordered, atomic deuterium and tritium beams into a lower energy, toroidal, thermal equilibrium, neutral, target plasma column that is magnetically confined along an endless magnetic axis in a strong restoring force magnetic field having helical field lines to produce counterstreaming deuteron and triton beams that are received bent, stacked and transported along the endless axis, while a poloidal divertor removes thermal ions and electrons all along the axis to increase the density of the counterstreaming ion beams and the reaction products resulting therefrom. By balancing the stacking and removal, colliding, strong focused particle beams, reaction products and reactions are produced that convert one form of energy into another form of energy.

  15. Craft Stick Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karplus, Alan K.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this exercise is to provide a phenomenological 'hands-on' experience that shows how geometry can affect the load carrying capacity of a material used in construction, how different materials have different failure characteristics, and how construction affects the performance of a composite material. This will be accomplished by building beams of a single material and composite beams of a mixture of materials (popsicle sticks, fiberboard sheets, and tongue depressors); testing these layered beams to determine how and where they fail; and based on the failure analysis, designing a layered beam that will fail in a predicted manner. The students will learn the effects of lamination, adhesion, and geometry in layered beam construction on beam strength and failure location.

  16. Focused Bessel beams

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P V

    2000-04-30

    The diffraction broadening of a focused beam with a Bessel amplitude distribution is examined. Calculations are reported not only of the traditional differential characteristics (radial distributions of the electric-energy densities and of the axial total electromagnetic energy flux in the beam), but also of integral quantities characterising the degree of transverse localisation of the radiation in a tube of specified radius within the beam. It is shown that in a large-aperture Bessel beam only a very small fraction of the total beam power is concentrated in its central core and that a focal point is also observed on intense focusing of the Bessel beam. This spot is not in the geometric-optical focal plane but is displaced from the latter by a certain distance. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  17. Photochemistry of a dual-bacteriorhodopsin system in Haloarcula marismortui: HmbRI and HmbRII.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Fu-Kuo; Fu, Hsu-Yuan; Yang, Chii-Shen; Chu, Li-Kang

    2014-07-03

    Recently, a dual-bacteriorhodopsin system, containing HmbRI and HmbRII, has been found in Haloarcula marismortui (Mol. Microbiol. 2013, 88, 551-561), and the light-driven proton pump activities were intrinsically different in a wide pH range. Compared with bacteriorhodopsin in H. salinarum (HsbR), the identical steady-state absorption contours of HsbR and HmbRs in the visible range indicated similarities in the retinal pocket. In addition, other reactive residues, including the proton relay channel, proton release group, and proton collecting funnel at the cytoplasm, were mostly conserved. We employed transient absorption spectroscopy and global analysis to characterize the photocycle intermediates and kinetics of HmbRI and HmbRII in the pH range of 4-8. The features of the time-resolved difference spectra of HmbRI indicated that the photocycle of HmbRI mainly followed the conventional pathway, including intermediates M, N, and O. A minute bypassed pathway from intermediate M needed to be included to better match the experimental data. The corresponding intermediate M' is attributed to the all-trans deprotonated Schiff base retinal, indicating the occurrence of retinal reisomerization prior to the reprotonation of the deprotonated Schiff base following the decay of intermediate M. Regarding HmbRII, its photocycle only followed the intermediates M and N, without intermediate O. The plausible molecular mechanisms, including the effects of the lengths of the loops and the distribution of the charged residues in the bacterio-opsin interior, were proposed to explain the differences in the photocycles. The pH-dependent photocycles were also investigated, and the results supported our proposed mechanism. Unravelling the photocycles of the HmbRs in the Haloarcula marismortui provided evidence that not only expanding the functional pH ranges but also the turnover kinetics are the strategies of the dual-bR system in the evolution of microbes in extreme environments.

  18. Repeated FcεRI triggering reveals modified mast cell function related to chronic allergic responses in tissue.

    PubMed

    Suurmond, Jolien; Habets, Kim L L; Tatum, Zuotian; Schonkeren, Joris J; Hoen, Peter A C 't; Huizinga, Tom W J; Laros, Jeroen F J; Toes, René E M; Kurreeman, Fina

    2016-09-01

    Activation of mast cells through FcεRI plays an important role in acute allergic reactions. However, little is known about the function of mast cells in patients with chronic allergic inflammation or the effect of repeated FcεRI triggering occurring in such responses. We aimed to identify changes in mast cell function after repeated FcεRI triggering and to correlate these changes to chronic allergic responses in tissue. Human cord blood-derived mast cells were treated for 2 weeks with anti-IgE. The function of naive or treated mast cells was analyzed by means of RNA sequencing, quantitative RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and functional assays. Protein secretion was measured with ELISAs and multiplex assays. We observed several changes in mast cell function after repeated anti-IgE triggering. Although the acute response was dampened, we identified 289 genes significantly upregulated after repeated anti-IgE. Most of these genes (84%) were not upregulated after a single anti-IgE stimulus, indicating a significantly different response mode characterized by increased antigen presentation, response to bacteria, and chemotaxis. Changes in mast cell function were related to changes in expression of the transcription factors RXRA and BATF and others. Importantly, we found a substantial overlap between genes upregulated after repeated anti-IgE triggering and genes upregulated in tissue from patients with chronic allergy, in particular those of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. Our study provides evidence for intrinsic modulation of mast cell function on repeated FcεRI-mediated activation. The overlap with gene expression in tissues is suggestive of a direct link between repeated IgE-mediated activation of mast cells and chronic allergy. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Primer on Beam Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-27

    emphasis on neutral particle beam (NPB) optical devices. It explains how the motion of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields is...Inc. San Diego, California Table of Contents Page 1. Introduction 1 1.1 Organization of Primer 1 1.2 Introduction to Neutral Particle Beam...102 Figures Figure Pag© 1. Generic Neutral Particle Beam Device 4 2. An orthogonal three dimensional coordinate system 11 3. Trajectory of a

  20. Mechanical beam isolator

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.; Vann, C.S.

    1996-10-01

    Back-reflections from a target, lenses, etc. can gain energy passing backwards through a laser just like the main beam gains energy passing forwards. Unless something blocks these back-reflections early in their path, they can seriously damage the laser. A Mechanical Beam Isolator is a device that blocks back-reflections early, relatively inexpensively, and without introducing aberrations to the laser beam.

  1. Bigelow BEAM Contract

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-16

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver and President and founder of Bigelow Aerospace Robert T. Bigelow talk while standing next to the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) during a media briefing where it is was announced that the BEAM expandable space habitat technology will be tested on the International Space Station, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013 in Las Vegas. BEAM is scheduled to arrive at the space station in 2015 for a two-year technology demonstration. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Bigelow BEAM Contract

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-16

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver and President and founder of Bigelow Aerospace Robert T. Bigelow talk while standing next to the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) during a media briefing where is was announced that the BEAM expandable space habitat technology will be tested on the International Space Station, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013 in Las Vegas. BEAM is scheduled to arrive at the space station in 2015 for a two-year technology demonstration. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Computational challenges for beam-beam simulation for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.

    2010-10-01

    In this article we will review the computational challenges in the beam-beam simulation for the polarized proton run of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The difficulties in our multi-particle and million turn tracking to calculate the proton beam lifetime and proton beam emittance growth due to head-on beam-beam interaction and head-on beam-beam compensation are presented and discussed. Solutions to obtain meaningful physics results from these trackings are proposed and tested. In the end we will present the progress in the benchmarking of the RHIC operational proton beam lifetime.

  4. Positive and negative regulation of FcepsilonRI-mediated signaling by the adaptor protein LAB/NTAL.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Minghua; Liu, Yan; Koonpaew, Surapong; Granillo, Olivia; Zhang, Weiguo

    2004-10-18

    Linker for activation of B cells (LAB, also called NTAL; a product of wbscr5 gene) is a newly identified transmembrane adaptor protein that is expressed in B cells, NK cells, and mast cells. Upon BCR activation, LAB is phosphorylated and interacts with Grb2. LAB is capable of rescuing thymocyte development in LAT-deficient mice. To study the in vivo function of LAB, LAB-deficient mice were generated. Although disruption of the Lab gene did not affect lymphocyte development, it caused mast cells to be hyperresponsive to stimulation via the FcepsilonRI, evidenced by enhanced Erk activation, calcium mobilization, degranulation, and cytokine production. These data suggested that LAB negatively regulates mast cell function. However, mast cells that lacked both linker for activation of T cells (LAT) and LAB proteins had a more severe block in FcepsilonRI-mediated signaling than LAT(-/-) mast cells, demonstrating that LAB also shares a redundant function with LAT to play a positive role in FcepsilonRI-mediated signaling.

  5. Integration of human health and ecological risk assessments in the RI/FS process. Part A: Overview and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Pueuler, E.A.; Clarkson, J.R.; Mazzera, D.M.; Cura, J.K.; Menzie, C.A.; Morrisey, D.; Sarmiento, R.

    1995-12-31

    In the US, human health and ecological risk assessments are required components of remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) efforts at Superfund sites. However, these assessments are often conducted as independent evaluations rather than being optimally integrated into the RI/FS process. The purpose of this presentation is to describe how these independent assessments can be coordinated and ultimately used together in remedial action decision-making. Part A of this presentation will provide an overview of the approach and the methods used to integrate the human health and ecological risk assessments. An RI/FS conducted at a coastal Superfund site will be used to illustrate this integrated evaluation of potential human and ecological risk. Initial investigation of soils, sediment, water, and fish tissue data at the site indicated potential for adverse effects to human health and potential ecological receptors. A multi-component field investigation was designed to allow qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the potential for adverse impacts to biota at the site. The field investigation elements were primarily focused on acquiring data to support the ecological assessment. However, additional consideration was given to the concurrent collection of data to supplement human health risk decision-making. This included analyses of fish samples analyzed for whole-body and edible portions. The results were combined with site-specific field observations on the use and activities at the site by local human and ecological populations in order to support conservative, yet realistic site-specific exposure assumptions.

  6. Power beaming options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rather, John D. G.

    1989-01-01

    Some large scale power beaming applications are proposed for the purpose of stimulating research. The first proposal is for a combination of large phased arrays on the ground near power stations and passive reflectors in geostationary orbit. The systems would beam excess electrical power in microwave form to areas in need of electrical power. Another proposal is to build solar arrays in deserts and beam the energy around the world. Another proposal is to use lasers to beam energy from earth to orbiting spacecraft.

  7. Plasma Beam Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    GUN PLASMA BEAM / ,I 21 cm diameter = 0 GLASS DRIFT TUBE 50 cm diameter MCP CAMERA CLASS CROSSES (a) Gun muzzle /"- PLASA BEAM / TAROT z = 10 m MCP...discusses some of the hydrodynamic issues related to the calcula- tions. The reader may well wonder why hydrodynamics should be an issue in a 116 WL-TR-90...answer is yes for the slow beam cases and no for the fast beam cases. This is explained further. 118 WL-TR-90-83 The reader will recall the

  8. ALEX neutral beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pourrezaei, K.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beam probe capable of measuring plasma space potential in a fully 3-dimensional magnetic field geometry has been developed. This neutral beam was successfully used to measure an arc target plasma contained within the ALEX baseball magnetic coil. A computer simulation of the experiment was performed to refine the experimental design and to develop a numerical model for scaling the ALEX neutral beam probe to other cases of fully 3-dimensional magnetic field. Based on this scaling a 30 to 50 keV neutral cesium beam probe capable of measuring space potential in the thermal barrier region of TMX Upgrade was designed.

  9. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  10. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  11. Electromagnetic ion beam instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Foosland, D. W.; Smith, C. W.; Lee, M. A.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    The linear theory of electromagnetic instabilities driven by an energetic ion beam streaming parallel to a magnetic field in a homogeneous Vlasov plasma is considered. Numerical solutions of the full dispersion equation are presented. At propagation parallel to the magnetic field, there are four distinct instabilities. A sufficiently energetic beam gives rise to two unstable modes with right-hand polarization, one resonant with the beam, the other nonresonant. A beam with sufficiently large T (perpendicular to B)/T (parallel to B) gives rise to the left-hand ion cyclotron anisotropy instability at relatively small beam velocities, and a sufficiently hot beam drives unstable a left-hand beam resonant mode. The parametric dependences of the growth rates for the three high beam velocity instabilities are presented here. In addition, some properties at oblique propagation are examined. It is demonstrated that, as the beam drift velocity is increased, relative maxima in growth rates can arise at harmonics of the ion cyclotron resonance for both right and left elliptically polarized modes.

  12. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, John B.

    1996-01-01

    An improved magnetically-confined anode plasma pulsed ion beam source. Beam rotation effects and power efficiency are improved by a magnetic design which places the separatrix between the fast field flux structure and the slow field structure near the anode of the ion beam source, by a gas port design which localizes the gas delivery into the gap between the fast coil and the anode, by a pre-ionizer ringing circuit connected to the fast coil, and by a bias field means which optimally adjusts the plasma formation position in the ion beam source.

  13. Magnetic beam position monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Varfolomeev, A.A.; Ivanchenkov, S.N.; Khlebnikov, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    Many nondestructive beam position monitors are known. However, these devices can not be used for DC particle beam diagnostics. We investigated a method of beam diagnostics applicable for the operative control of DC high power e-beam inside closed waveguide. A design of the detector for determination of{open_quote} center of mass {close_quote} position of DC particle beam was developed. It was shown that the monitor can be used as a nondestructive method for the beam position control in resonators. Magnetic field of the particle beam outside a resonator is used. The detector consists of the steel yokes and magnetic field sensors. The sensors measure magnetic fluxes in the steel yokes fixed outside the resonator. When the particle beam changes its position, these magnetic fluxes also change. Beam displacement sensitivity of the monitor depends on the steel yoke dimensions. The detector sensitivity is equal to 1 Gauss/mm for the conditions adequate to the FOM-FEM project.

  14. (Pulsed electron beam precharger)

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on electron beam guns: Precharger Modification; Installation of Charge vs. Radius Apparatus; High Concentration Aerosol Generation; and Data Acquisition and Analysis System.

  15. Model of interaction of the IL-1 receptor accessory protein IL-1RAcP with the IL-1beta/IL-1R(I) complex.

    PubMed

    Casadio, R; Frigimelica, E; Bossù, P; Neumann, D; Martin, M U; Tagliabue, A; Boraschi, D

    2001-06-15

    A preliminary model has been calculated for the activating interaction of the interleukin 1 receptor (IL-1R) accessory protein IL-1RAcP with the ligand/receptor complex IL-1beta/IL-1R(I). First, IL-1RAcP was modeled on the crystal structure of IL-1R(I) bound to IL-1beta. Then, the IL-1RAcP model was docked using specific programs to the crystal structure of the IL-1beta/IL-1R(I) complex. Two types of models were predicted, with comparable probability. Experimental data obtained with the use of IL-1beta peptides and antibodies, and with mutated IL-1beta proteins, support the BACK model, in which IL-1RAcP establishes contacts with the back of IL-1R(I) wrapped around IL-1beta.

  16. Human eosinophils express the high affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, in bullous pemphigoid.

    PubMed

    Messingham, Kelly N; Holahan, Heather M; Frydman, Alexandra S; Fullenkamp, Colleen; Srikantha, Rupasree; Fairley, Janet A

    2014-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune blistering disease mediated by autoantibodies targeting BP180 (type XVII collagen). Patient sera and tissues typically have IgG and IgE autoantibodies and elevated eosinophil numbers. Although the pathogenicity of the IgE autoantibodies is established in BP, their contribution to the disease process is not well understood. Our aims were two-fold: 1) To establish the clinical relationships between total and BP180-specific IgE, eosinophilia and other markers of disease activity; and 2) To determine if eosinophils from BP patients express the high affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, as a potential mechanism of action for IgE in BP. Our analysis of 48 untreated BP patients revealed a correlation between BP180 IgG and both BP180 IgE and peripheral eosinophil count. Additionally, we established a correlation between total IgE concentration and both BP180 IgE levels and eosinophil count. When only sera from patients (n = 16) with total IgE ≥ 400 IU/ml were analyzed, BP180 IgG levels correlated with disease severity, BP230 IgG, total circulating IgE and BP180 IgE. Finally, peripheral eosinophil count correlated more strongly with levels of BP180 IgE then with BP180 IgG. Next, eosinophil FcεRI expression was investigated in the blood and skin using several methods. Peripheral eosinophils from BP patients expressed mRNA for all three chains (α, β and γ) of the FcεRI. Surface expression of the FcεRIα was confirmed on both peripheral and tissue eosinophils from most BP patients by immunostaining. Furthermore, using a proximity ligation assay, interaction of the α- and β-chains of the FcεRI was observed in some biopsy specimens, suggesting tissue expression of the trimeric receptor form in some patients. These studies provide clinical support for the relevance of IgE in BP disease and provide one mechanism of action of these antibodies, via binding to the FcεRI on eosinophils.

  17. The efficacy of an IL-1alpha vaccine depends on IL-1RI availability and concomitant myeloid-derived suppressor cell reduction.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Tobias; Vitacolonna, Mario; Zöller, Margot

    2009-01-01

    We recently reported that tumor-derived interleukin (IL)-1beta strongly promotes tumor growth by inducing myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) and regulatory T-cell (T(reg)) expansion. To see whether redirection of an immune response can be achieved through immune response-supporting IL-1alpha application, IL-1RI competent (IL-1RI(comp)) and IL-1RI-deficient (IL-1RI(-/-)) mice received IL-1alpha cDNA-transformed attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (SL-IL-1alpha) and/or lysates from methycholanthrene-induced IL-1(comp) or IL-1(-/-) fibrosarcoma cells. Vaccination with SL-IL-1alpha and/or tumor lysate exerted only a minor effect on the survival of IL-1alpha/beta(-/-) and none on IL-1alpha(comp) tumor-bearing mice despite induction of a potent antitumor response, that was overridden by intratumoral and systemic expansion of MDSC. Application of all-trans-retinoic acid together with anti-CD25 efficiently coped with MDSC and T(reg) expansion. Vaccination concomitantly with application of all-trans-retinoic acid and anti-CD25 treatment significantly increased the survival time and rate of IL-1alpha/beta(comp), but even of IL-1alpha(-/-)beta(comp) IL-1RI(comp) tumor-bearing mice. Instead, in IL-1RI(-/-) mice, though MDSC expansion was weaker, SL-IL-1alpha application hardly displayed any therapeutic efficacy, which implies signal transduction through IL-1alpha binding to the IL-1RI as an essential component for immune response induction. Taken together, IL-1alpha can efficiently support tumor vaccination, as far as expansion of MDSC and T(reg) is controlled. However, care should be taken to interfere with MDSC expansion/activation not through a blockade of the IL-1RI, which is the preferential target of IL-1alpha.

  18. Genetic variability to diet-induced hippocampal dysfunction in BXD recombinant inbred (RI) mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yueqiang; Li, JingJing; Yan, Lei; Lu, Lu; Liao, Francesca-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has emerged suggesting that diet-induced obesity can have a negative effect on cognitive function. Here, we exploited a mouse genetic reference population to look for the linkage between these two processes on a genome-wide scale. The focus of this report is to determine whether the various BXD RI strains exhibited different behavioral performance and hippocampal function under high fat dietary (HFD) condition. We quantified genetic variation in body weight gain and consequent influences on behavioral tests in a cohort of 14 BXD strains of mice (8–12 mice/strain, n=153), for which we have matched data on gene expression and neuroanatomical changes in the hippocampus. It showed that BXD66 was the most susceptible, whereas BXD77 was the least susceptible strain to dietary influences. The performance of spatial reference memory tasks was strongly correlated with body weight gain (P<0.05). The obesity-prone strains displayed more pronounced spatial memory defects compared to the obesity-resistant strains. These abnormalities were associated with neuro inflammation, synaptic dysfunction, and neuronal loss in the hippocampus. The biological relevance of DSCAM gene polymorphism was assessed using the trait correlation analysis tool in Genenet work. Further more, a significant strain-dependent gene expression difference of DSCAM was detected in the hippocampus of obese BXD strains by real-time quantitative PCR. In conclusion, a variety of across-strain hippocampal alterations and genetic predispositions to diet-induced obesity were found in a set of BXD strains. The obesity-prone and obesity-resistant lines we have identified should be highly useful to study the molecular genetics of diet-induced cognitive decline. PMID:26092713

  19. Measuring and monitoring in the South African Kha Ri Gude mass literacy campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Veronica

    2015-06-01

    After many previous failed attempts to reach illiterate adults, the award-winning South African Kha Ri Gude mass literacy campaign, launched in 2008, undertook to ensure that learners seized the opportunity to learn - for many adults, this was a "last chance". Written from an insider perspective by the campaign's founding Chief Executive Officer, this article outlines the features which contributed to its success despite the many challenges it initially faced. The author outlines the social and legislative backdrop, notably the South African National Qualifications Framework (NQF) providing the scaffold for the continuum of adult learning and the assessment of learning outcomes, and examines the various components which influenced the design of the campaign. She focuses, in particular, on the learning outcomes measurement model tailored to the campaign's specific context, namely a structured and standardised learner assessment portfolio (LAP). Designed as a tool to be administered universally for both formative and diagnostic purposes, the portfolio enables continuous assessment, forming an integral part of the process of learning and teaching. After many initial challenges encountered in introducing this mode of learner assessment, it was eventually institutionalised and found to be a non-threatening way of assessing learning outcomes while also functioning as a tool for monitoring and ensuring accountability in the campaign. This article gives an account of the development considerations and explains the role of the assessment process within the broader context of the campaign. It also refers to ways in which the mass-based assessments were administered under difficult campaign conditions with a view to assessing for learning.

  20. Molecular and morphological diversity of Narragansett Bay (RI, USA) Ulva (Ulvales, Chlorophyta) populations.

    PubMed

    Guidone, Michele; Thornber, Carol; Wysor, Brian; O'Kelly, Charles J

    2013-10-01

    Macroalgal bloom-forming species occur in coastal systems worldwide. However, due to overlapping morphologies in some taxa, accurate taxonomic assessment and classification of these species can be quite challenging. We investigated the molecular and morphological characteristics of 153 specimens of bloom-forming Ulva located in and around Narragansett Bay, RI, USA. We analyzed sequences of the nuclear internal transcribed spacer 1 region (ITS1) and the chloroplast-encoded rbcL; based on the ITS1 data, we grouped the specimens into nine operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Eight of these OTUs have been previously reported to exist, while one is novel. Of the eight OTUs, all shared sequence identity with previously published sequences or differed by less than 1.5% sequence divergence for two molecular markers. Previously, 10 species names were reported for Ulva in Rhode Island (one blade and nine tube-forming species) based upon morphological classification alone. Of our nine OTUs, three contained blade-forming specimens (U. lactuca, U. compressa, U. rigida), one OTU had a blade with a tubular stipe, and six contained unbranched and/or branched tubular morphologies (one of these six, U. compressa, had both a blade and a tube morphology). While the three blade-forming OTUs in Narragansett Bay can frequently be distinguished by careful observations of morphological characteristics, and spatial/temporal distribution, it is much more difficult to distinguish among the tube-forming specimens based upon morphology or distribution alone. Our data support the molecular species concept for Ulva, and indicate that molecular-based classifications of Ulva species are critical for proper species identification, and subsequent ecological assessment or mitigation of Ulva blooms.

  1. Implementation of depolarization due to beam-beam effects in the beam-beam interaction simulation tool GUINEA-PIG++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimbault, C.; Le Meur, G.; Blampuy, F.; Bambade, P.; Schulte, D.

    2009-12-01

    Depolarization is a new feature in the beam-beam simulation tool GUINEA-PIG++ (GP++). The results of this simulation are studied and compared with another beam-beam simulation tool, CAIN, considering different beam parameters for the International Linear Collider (ILC) with a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV.

  2. In vivo effector functions of high-affinity mouse IgG receptor FcγRI in disease and therapy models.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Caitlin M; Zenatti, Priscila P; Mancardi, David A; Beutier, Héloïse; Fiette, Laurence; Macdonald, Lynn E; Murphy, Andrew J; Celli, Susanna; Bousso, Philippe; Jönsson, Friederike; Bruhns, Pierre

    2016-10-10

    Two activating mouse IgG receptors (FcγRs) have the ability to bind monomeric IgG, the high-affinity mouse FcγRI and FcγRIV. Despite high circulating levels of IgG, reports using FcγRI(-/-) or FcγRIV(-/-) mice or FcγRIV-blocking antibodies implicate these receptors in IgG-induced disease severity or therapeutic Ab efficacy. From these studies, however, one cannot conclude on the effector capabilities of a given receptor, because different activating FcγRs possess redundant properties in vivo, and cooperation between FcγRs may occur, or priming phenomena. To help resolve these uncertainties, we used mice expressing only FcγRI to determine its intrinsic properties in vivo. FcγRI(only) mice were sensitive to IgG-induced autoimmune thrombocytopenia and anti-CD20 and anti-tumour immunotherapy, but resistant to IgG-induced autoimmune arthritis, anaphylaxis and airway inflammation. Our results show that the in vivo roles of FcγRI are more restricted than initially reported using FcγRI(-/-) mice, but confirm effector capabilities for this high-affinity IgG receptor in vivo.

  3. Activated IL-1RI Signaling Pathway Induces Th17 Cell Differentiation via Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 Signaling in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Yonggang; Markovic-Plese, Silva

    2016-01-01

    IL-1β plays a crucial role in the differentiation of human Th17 cells. We report here that IL-1RI expression is significantly increased in both naive and memory CD4+ T cells derived from relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR MS) patients in comparison to healthy controls. Interleukin 1 receptor (IL-1R)I expression is upregulated in the in vitro-differentiated Th17 cells from RR MS patients in comparison to the Th1 and Th2 cell subsets, indicating the role of IL-1R signaling in the Th17 cell differentiation in RR MS. When IL-1RI gene expression was silenced using siRNA, human naive CD4+ T cells cultured in the presence of Th17-polarizing cytokines had a significantly decreased expression of interleukin regulatory factor 4 (IRF4), RORc, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, IL-22, and IL-23R genes, confirming that IL-1RI signaling induces Th17 cell differentiation. Since IL-1R gene expression silencing inhibited IRF4 expression and Th17 differentiation, and IRF4 gene expression silencing inhibited Th17 cell differentiation, our results indicate that IL-1RI induces human Th17 cell differentiation in an IRF4-dependant manner. Our study has identified that IL-1RI-mediated signaling pathway is constitutively activated, leading to an increased Th17 cell differentiation in IRF4-dependent manner in patients with RR MS. PMID:27965670

  4. Ion Beam Propulsion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Ion Beam Propulsion Study was a joint high-level study between the Applied Physics Laboratory operated by NASA and ASRC Aerospace at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and Berkeley Scientific, Berkeley, California. The results were promising and suggested that work should continue if future funding becomes available. The application of ion thrusters for spacecraft propulsion is limited to quite modest ion sources with similarly modest ion beam parameters because of the mass penalty associated with the ion source and its power supply system. Also, the ion source technology has not been able to provide very high-power ion beams. Small ion beam propulsion systems were used with considerable success. Ion propulsion systems brought into practice use an onboard ion source to form an energetic ion beam, typically Xe+ ions, as the propellant. Such systems were used for steering and correction of telecommunication satellites and as the main thruster for the Deep Space 1 demonstration mission. In recent years, "giant" ion sources were developed for the controlled-fusion research effort worldwide, with beam parameters many orders of magnitude greater than the tiny ones of conventional space thruster application. The advent of such huge ion beam sources and the need for advanced propulsion systems for exploration of the solar system suggest a fresh look at ion beam propulsion, now with the giant fusion sources in mind.

  5. Experiments with isomeric beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfützner, M.; Grzywacz, R.; Lewitowicz, M.; Rykaczewski, K.

    1997-02-01

    The results of the search for μs-isomers performed with 112Sn and 86Kr beams at 60 MeV/nucleon with the LISE3 spectrometer at GANIL are summarized. Planned extension of these studies to high energy fragmentation reactions with the FRS separator at GSI is described. Some perspectives for experiments with isomeric beams at GSI are mentioned.

  6. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1994-02-15

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

  7. Picosecond beam monitor

    DOEpatents

    Schutt, D.W.; Beck, G.O.

    1974-01-01

    The current in the beam of a particle accelerator is monitored with picosecond resolution by causing the beam to impinge upon the center conductor of a coaxial line, generating a pulse of electromagnetic energy in response thereto. This pulse is detected by means such as a sampling oscilloscope. (Official Gazette)

  8. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Duncan, David B.

    1994-01-01

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect).

  9. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Duncan, David B.

    1993-01-01

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect).

  10. Beam Injection into RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mackay, W. W.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. We describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks, the application program to steer the beam and the injection kickers. We report on the commissioning of the injection systems and on measurements of the kickers.

  11. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1993-12-28

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

  12. Durnin-Whitney beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesús Cabrera-Rosas, Omar; Espíndola-Ramos, Ernesto; Alejandro Juárez-Reyes, Salvador; Julián-Macías, Israel; Ortega-Vidals, Paula; Rickenstorff-Parrao, Carolina; Silva-Ortigoza, Gilberto; Silva-Ortigoza, Ramón; Sosa-Sánchez, Citlalli Teresa

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present work is to define a Durnin-Whitney beam as a nondiffracting beam such that its associated caustic locally only has singularities of the fold and cusp types. Since the caustic is structurally stable then the intensity pattern of this beam is also stable and this property is what makes its definition and its theoretical and experimental study worthwhile. These properties are important in applications such as uniform optical drilling in waveguides and communications through weak turbulent atmosphere. We find that in accordance with Whitney's theorem on the stability of maps from a two-dimensional manifold to a two-dimensional manifold the phase g({{Φ }}), of the complex function A({{Φ }}) characterizing the beam, locally is given by g({{Φ }})=a{{Φ }} for a fold and g({{Φ }})=b{{{Φ }}}2 for a cusp. This result implies that the Bessel beam of order zero is not stable and that any other Bessel beam is stable because locally it has a caustic of fold type. Finally, we present an example of a Durnin-Whitney beam given by g({{Φ }})=m{{Φ }}+b{{{Φ }}}2, which is a natural generalization of the Bessel beam of order m with a singularity of cusp ridge type.

  13. Beam Diagnostics for FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.Z.; Hogan, M.J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to about 20 {micro}m long and focussed to about 10 {micro}m wide. Characterization of the beam-plasma interaction requires complete knowledge of the incoming beam parameters on a pulse-to-pulse basis. FACET diagnostics include Beam Position Monitors, Toroidal current monitors, X-ray and Cerenkov based energy spectrometers, optical transition radiation (OTR) profile monitors and coherent transition radiation (CTR) bunch length measurement systems. The compliment of beam diagnostics and their expected performance are reviewed. Beam diagnostic measurements not only provide valuable insights to the running and tuning of the accelerator but also are crucial for the PWFA experiments in particular. Beam diagnostic devices are being set up at FACET and will be ready for beam commissioning in summer 2011.

  14. Atomic Ferris wheel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lembessis, Vasileios E.

    2017-07-01

    We study the generation of atom vortex beams in the case where a Bose-Einstein condensate, released from a trap and moving in free space, is diffracted from a properly tailored light mask with a spiral transverse profile. We show how such a diffraction scheme could lead to the production of an atomic Ferris wheel beam.

  15. Multisegment coherent beam combining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Daniel R.; Tucker, Steve D.; Morgan, R.; Smith, Tony G.; Warren, Mial E.; Gruetzner, James K.; Rosenthal, R. R.; Bentley, A. E.

    1995-08-01

    Scaling laser systems to large sizes for power beaming and other applications can sometimes be simplified by combining a number of smaller lasers. However, to fully utilize this scaling, coherent beam combination is necessary. This requires measuring and controlling each beam's pointing and phase relative to adjacent beams using an adaptive optical system. We have built a sub-scale brass-board to evaluate various methods for beam-combining. It includes a segmented adaptive optic and several different specialized wavefront sensors that are fabricated using diffractive optics methods. We have evaluated a number of different phasing algorithms, including hierarchical and matrix methods, and have demonstrated phasing of several elements. The system is currently extended to a large number of segments to evaluate various scaling methodologies.

  16. Laser beam alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Kasner, William H.; Racki, Daniel J.; Swenson, Clark E.

    1984-01-01

    A plurality of pivotal reflectors direct a high-power laser beam onto a workpiece, and a rotatable reflector is movable to a position wherein it intercepts the beam and deflects a major portion thereof away from its normal path, the remainder of the beam passing to the pivotal reflectors through an aperture in the rotating reflector. A plurality of targets are movable to positions intercepting the path of light traveling to the pivotal reflectors, and a preliminary adjustment of the latter is made by use of a low-power laser beam reflected from the rotating reflector, after which the same targets are used to make a final adjustment of the pivotal reflectors with the portion of the high-power laser beam passed through the rotating reflector.

  17. Entangled vector vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Carvacho, Gonzalo; Graffitti, Francesco; Vitelli, Chiara; Piccirillo, Bruno; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    Light beams having a vectorial field structure, or polarization, that varies over the transverse profile and a central optical singularity are called vector vortex (VV) beams and may exhibit specific properties such as focusing into "light needles" or rotation invariance. VV beams have already found applications in areas ranging from microscopy to metrology, optical trapping, nano-optics, and quantum communication. Individual photons in such beams exhibit a form of single-particle quantum entanglement between different degrees of freedom. On the other hand, the quantum states of two photons can be also entangled with each other. Here, we combine these two concepts and demonstrate the generation of quantum entanglement between two photons that are both in VV states: a form of entanglement between two complex vectorial fields. This result may lead to quantum-enhanced applications of VV beams as well as to quantum information protocols fully exploiting the vectorial features of light.

  18. Ion Beam Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvas, Taneli

    2005-11-08

    IBSimu(Ion Beam Simulator) is a computer program for making two and three dimensional ion optical simulations. The program can solve electrostatic field in a rectangular mesh using Poisson equation using Finite Difference method (FDM). The mesh can consist of a coarse and a fine part so that the calculation accuracy can be increased in critical areas of the geometry, while most of the calculation is done quickly using the coarse mesh. IBSimu can launch ion beam trajectories into the simulation from an injection surface or fomo plasma. Ion beam space charge of time independent simulations can be taken in account using Viasov iteration. Plasma is calculated by compensating space charge with electrons having Boltzmann energy distribution. The simulation software can also be used to calculate time dependent cases if the space charge is not calculated. Software includes diagnostic tools for plotting the geometry, electric field, space charge map, ion beam trajectories, emittance data and beam profiles.

  19. Beam director design report

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, F.C.

    1986-08-01

    A design and fabrication effort for a beam director is documented. The conceptual design provides for the beam to pass first through a bending and focusing system (or ''achromat''), through a second achromat, through an air-to-vacuum interface (the ''beam window''), and finally through the vernier steering system. Following an initial concept study for a beam director, a prototype permanent magnet 30/sup 0/ beam-bending achromat and prototype vernier steering magnet were designed and built. In volume II, copies are included of the funding instruments, requests for quotations, purchase orders, a complete set of as-built drawings, magnetic measurement reports, the concept design report, and the final report on the design and fabrication project. (LEW)

  20. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Matthew; Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of applied 3D fields in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous slowing down, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database. Elementary benchmark calculations are presented to verify the collisionless particle orbits, NBI model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields. Notice: this manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  1. Diffraction of a Laser Beam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jodoin, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the effect of the nonuniform irradiance across a laser beam on diffraction of the beam, specifically the Fraunhofer diffraction of a laser beam with a Gaussian irradiance profile as it passes through a circular aperture. (GA)

  2. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA of cro rI from the white pine blister rust fungus Cronartium ribicola.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xueshu; Ekramoddoullah, Abul K M; Taylor, Doug W; Piggott, Nina

    2002-02-01

    White pine blister rust (WPBR) is caused by the fungus Cronartium ribicola which has five spore stages on two unrelated hosts, the five-needle pines and Ribes spp. Recently, during the molecular analysis of the proteins and genes involved in host-pathogen interaction, the WPBR fungal protein Cro rI was identified in infected white pine tissues. To further characterize Cro rI, an expression cDNA library from poly(A)(+) mRNA of C. ribicola axenic mycelial culture was constructed and immunoscreened and the cDNA was cloned. Sequence analysis indicated an open reading frame of 462 bases, which encodes a protein of 153 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 16.7 kDa and a predicted isoelectric point (pI) of 8.93. Based on the N-terminal amino acid sequences of Cro rI, the secreted portion of Cro rI protein should be 136 amino acids long with several putative posttranslational modification sites and a molecular mass of 14.8 kDa. The predicted pI for the secreted portion was 9.34. The predicted N-terminal signal peptide was 17 amino acids long. The N-terminal 42-amino acid sequence of the predicted mature protein (secreted portion) was identical to the amino terminal sequence of Cro rI that was previously determined. Southern blot hybridizations indicated that the C. ribicola genome contained at least two copies of the cro rI gene. Isolation of the genomic PCR fragment, which was approximately 400 bp longer than the cDNA, and subsequent cloning and sequencing analyses confirmed that there were three introns within the coding regions. Western immunoblot analyses revealed that Cro rI protein accumulated in large amounts only in the infected white pine tissues while no trace was detectable in the alternate Ribes stage or the five different spores, suggesting a critical role of Cro rI in the haploid stage of the fungus (in pine). The translocation of Cro rI was only found to occur in cankered trees, and not in the young infected seedlings. The implications of Cro rI in

  3. CRYSTALLINE BEAMS AT HIGH ENERGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.; OKAMOTO, H.; YURI, Y.; SESSLER, A.; MACHIDA, S.

    2006-06-23

    Previously it was shown that by crystallizing each of the two counter-circulating beams, a much larger beam-beam tune shift can be tolerated during the beam-beam collisions; thus a higher luminosity can be reached for colliding beams [1]. On the other hand, crystalline beams can only be formed at energies below the transition energy ({gamma}{sub T}) of the accelerators [2]. In this paper, we investigate the formation of crystals in a high-{gamma}{sub T} lattice that also satisfies the maintenance condition for a crystalline beam [3].

  4. Beam distributions beyond RMS

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.

    1995-05-05

    The beam is often represented only by its position (mean) and the width (rms=root mean squared) of its distribution. To achieve these beam parameters in a noisy condition with high backgrounds, a Gaussian distribution with offset (4 parameters) is fitted to the measured beam distribution. This gives a very robust answer and is not very sensitive to background subtraction techniques. To get higher moments of the distribution, like skew or kurtosis, a fitting function with one or two more parameters is desired which would model the higher moments. In this paper we will concentrate on an Asymmetric Gaussian and a Super Gaussian function that will give something like the skew and the kurtosis of the distribution. This information is used to quantify special beam distribution. Some are unwanted like beam tails (skew) from transverse wakefields, higher order dispersive aberrations or potential well distortion in a damping ring. A negative kurtosis of a beam distribution describes a more rectangular, compact shape like with an over-compressed beam in {ital z} or a closed to double-horned energy distribution, while a positive kurtosis looks more like a ``Christmas tree`` and can quantify a beam mismatch after filamentation. Besides the advantages of the quantification, there are some distributions which need a further investigation like long flat tails which create background particles in a detector. In particle simulations on the other hand a simple rms number might grossly overestimate the effective size (e.g. for producing luminosity) due to a few particles which are far away from the core. This can reduce the practical gain of a big theoretical improvement in the beam size. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  5. Beam distributions beyond RMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, F.-J.

    1995-05-01

    The beam is often represented only by its position (mean) and the width (rms=root mean squared) of its distribution. To achieve these beam parameters in a noisy condition with high backgrounds, a Gaussian distribution with offset (4 parameters) is fitted to the measured beam distribution. This gives a very robust answer and is not very sensitive to background subtraction techniques. To get higher moments of the distribution, like skew or kurtosis, a fitting function with one or two more parameters is desired which would model the higher moments. In this paper we will concentrate on an Asymmetric Gaussian and a Super Gaussian function that will give something like the skew and the kurtosis of the distribution. This information is used to quantify special beam distribution. Some are unwanted like beam tails (skew) from transverse wakefields, higher order dispersive aberrations or potential well distortion in a damping ring. A negative kurtosis of a beam distribution describes a more rectangular, compact shape like with an over-compressed beam in z or a closed to double-horned energy distribution, while a positive kurtosis looks more like a ``Christmas tree'' and can quantify a beam mismatch after filamentation. Besides the advantages of the quantification, there are some distributions which need a further investigation like long flat tails which create background particles in a detector. In particle simulations on the other hand a simple rms number might grossly overestimate the effective size (e.g. for producing luminosity) due to a few particles which are far away from the core. This can reduce the practical gain of a big theoretical improvement in the beam size.

  6. Beam distributions beyond RMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, F. J.

    1994-09-01

    The beam is often represented only by its position (mean) and the width (rms = root mean squared) of its distribution. To achieve these beam parameters in a noisy condition with high backgrounds, a Gaussian distribution with offset (4 parameters) is fitted to the measured beam distribution. This gives a very robust answer and is not very sensitive to background subtraction techniques. To get higher moments of the distribution, like skew or kurtosis, a fitting function with one or two more parameters is desired which would model the higher moments. In this paper we will concentrate on an Asymmetric Gaussian and a Super Gaussian function that will give something like the skew and the kurtosis of the distribution. This information is used to quantify special beam distribution. Some are unwanted like beam tails (skew) from transverse wakefields, higher order dispersive aberrations or potential well distortion in a damping ring. A negative kurtosis of a beam distribution describes a more rectangular, compact shape like with an over-compressed beam in z or a closed to double-homed energy distribution, while a positive kurtosis looks more like a 'Christmas tree' and can quantify a beam mismatch after filamentation. Besides the advantages of the quantification, there are some distributions which need a further investigation like long flat tails which create background particles in a detector. In particle simulations on the other hand a simple rms number might grossly overestimate the effective size (e.g. for producing luminosity) due to a few particles which are far away from the core. This can reduce the practical gain of a big theoretical improvement in the beam size.

  7. Beam distributions beyond RMS

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.J.

    1994-09-01

    The beam is often represented only by its position (mean) and the width (rms = root mean squared) of its distribution. To achieve these beam parameters in a noisy condition with high backgrounds, a Gaussian distribution with offset (4 parmeters) is fitted to the measured beam distribution. This gives a very robust answer and is not very sensitive to background subtraction techniques. To get higher moments of the distribution, like skew or kurtosis, a fitting function with one or two more parameters is desired which would model the higher moments. In this paper we will concentrate on an Asymmetric Gaussian and a Super Gaussian function that will give something like the skew and the kurtosis of the distribution. This information is used to quantify special beam distribution. Some are unwanted like beam tails (skew) from transverse wakefields, higher order dispersive aberrations or potential well distortion in a damping ring. A negative kurtosis of a beam distribution describes a more rectangular, compact shape like with an over-compressed beam in z or a closed to double-homed energy distribution, while a positive kurtosis looks more like a ``Christmas tree`` and can quantify a beam mismatch after filamentation. Besides the advantages of the quantification, there are some distributions which need a further investigation like long flat tails which create background particles in a detector. In particle simulations on the other hand a simple rms number might grossly overestimate the effective size (e.g. for producing luminosity) due to a few particles which are far away from the core. This can reduce the practical gain of a big theoretical improvement in the beam size.

  8. Simulations of beam-beam and beam-wire interactions in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung J.; Sen, Tanaji; Abreu, Natalia P.; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

    2009-02-01

    The beam-beam interaction is one of the dominant sources of emittance growth and luminosity lifetime deterioration. A current carrying wire has been proposed to compensate long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC and strong localized long-range beam-beam effects are experimentally investigated in the RHIC collider. Tune shift, beam transfer function, and beam loss rate are measured in dedicated experiments. In this paper, they report on simulations to study the effect of beam-wire interactions based on diffusive apertures, beam loss rates, and beam transfer function using a parallelized weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIMC). The simulation results are compared with measurements performed in RHIC during 2007 and 2008.

  9. Free Energy Analysis of Protein-DNA Binding: The EcoRI Endonuclease-DNA Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaram, B.; McConnell, K. J.; Dixit, Surjit B.; Beveridge, D. L.

    1999-05-01

    A detailed theoretical analysis of the thermodynamics and functional energetics of protein-DNA binding in the EcoRI endonuclease-DNA complex is presented. The standard free energy of complexation is considered in terms of a thermodynamic cycle of seven distinct steps decomposed into a total of 24 well-defined components. The model we employ involves explicit all-atom accounts of the energetics of structural adaptation of the protein and the DNA upon complex formation; the van der Waals and electrostatic interactions between the protein and the DNA; and the electrostatic polarization and screening effects, van der Waals components, and cavitation effects of solvation. The ion atmosphere of the DNA is described in terms of a counterion condensation model combined with a Debye-Huckel treatment of added salt effects. Estimates of entropy loss due to decreased translational and rotational degrees of freedom in the complex relative to the unbound species based on classical statistical mechanics are included, as well as corresponding changes in the vibrational and configurational entropy. The magnitudes and signs of the various components are estimated from the AMBER parm94 force field, generalized Born theory, solvent accessibility measures, and empirical estimates of quantities related to ion release. The calculated standard free energy of formation, -11.5 kcal/mol, agrees with experiment to within 5 kcal/mol. This net binding free energy is discerned to be the resultant of a balance of several competing contributions associated with chemical forces as conventionally defined, with 10 out of 24 terms favoring complexation. Contributions to binding compounded from subsets of the 24 components provide a basis for advancing a molecular perspective of binding in terms of structural adaptation, electrostatics, van der Waals interactions, hydrophobic effects, and small ion reorganization and release upon complexation. The van der Waals interactions and water release favor

  10. First flight of SMASH, the SwRI Miniature Assembly for Solar Hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, Amir; Laurent, Glenn Thomas; Shoffner, Michael; Higuera Caubilla, David; Meurisse, Jeremie; Smith, Kelly; Shih, Albert Y.; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; DeForest, Craig; Mansour, Nagi N.; Hathaway, David H.

    2016-05-01

    The SwRI Miniature Assembly for Solar Hard X-rays (SMASH) was successfully flown from Antarctica in January (19-30) 2016, as a piggy-back instrument on the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) high altitude balloon payload. SMASH is a technological demonstration of a new miniaturized hard X-ray (HXR) detector for use on CubeSats and other small spacecraft, including the proposed CubeSat Imaging X-ray Solar Spectrometer (CubIXSS).HXRs are the observational signatures of energetic processes on the Sun, including plasma heating and particle acceleration. One of the goals of CubIXSS will be to address the question of how plasma is heated during solar flares, including the relationship between thermal plasma and non-thermal particles. SMASH demonstrated the space-borne application of the commercial off-the-shelf Amptek X123-CdTe, a miniature cadmium telluride photon-counting HXR spectrometer. The CdTe detector has a physical area of 25 mm^2 and 1 mm fully-depleted thickness, with a ~100 micron Be window; with on-board thermoelectric cooling and pulse pile-up rejection, it is sensitive to solar photons from ~5 to ~100 keV with ~0.5-1.0 keV FWHM resolution. Photons are accumulated into histogram spectra with customizable energy binning and integration time. With modest resource requirements (~1/8 U, ~200 g, ~2.5 W) and low cost (~$10K), the X123-CdTe is an attractive solution for HXR measurements from budget- and resource-limited platforms such as CubeSats. SMASH flew two identical X123-CdTe detectors for redundancy and increased collecting area; the supporting electronics (power, CPU) were largely build-to-print using the Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat design.We review the SMASH mission, design, and detector performance during the 12-day Antarctic flight. We present current progress on our data analysis of observed solar flares, and discuss future applications of the space-qualified X123-CdTe detector, including the CubIXSS mission

  11. MeRiT repair verification using in-die phase metrology Phame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttgereit, Ute; Birkner, Robert; Stelzner, Robert

    2009-01-01

    With the transition of lithography into 45nm node and beyond the industry faces the challenge that mask complexity increases steadily, mask specifications tighten and process control becomes extremely important. The use of Phase Shifting Masks (PSM), combined with off-axis illumination schemes, is essential to print feature sizes going beyond the lithographic wavelength. In conjunction with the shrinking feature size the tolerable defect size shrinks as well. This goes along with rising mask costs and therefore a high first pass yield becomes more important than ever. Repair strategies are required which have the potential to support the trend of decreasing tolerable defect sizes for both clear and opaque defects. In case of PSM it is not only important to remove material, of special interest is the capability to repair phase defects. This requires material deposition and etching accounting for transmission and phase as well. The ebeam repair system MeRiT(R) MG 45 is based on the GEMINI(R) column and allows etching and deposition to repair both clear and opaque defects with high resolution and edge placement precision. In this paper we focus on repair of phase defects on 6% att. PSM. We concentrate on 45nm lines/spaces looking into different defect dimensions. At feature sizes of 45nm CD, corresponding to 180nm CD at mask, feature topography already impacts the phase shift. Therefore a base line investigation is performed evaluating the correlation between deposited PSM layer height and phase shift covering also the impact of 3D mask effects on phase shift. The deposited layer height is measured using AFM. For phase evaluation the newly developed phase metrology system Phame® was used. Phame(R) enables optical phase shift measurement with high spatial resolution down to 120nm half pitch on mask. On-axis and off-axis illumination can be applied according to the required scanner settings during wafer printing. Phame(R) captures imaging effects as well as 3D mask

  12. Beam Purification by Photodetachment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Beene, James R; Havener, Charles C; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Andersson, P.; Lindahl, A. O.; Hanstorp, D.; Forstner, Dr. Oliver; Gottwald, T.; Wendt, K.

    2012-01-01

    Ion beam purity is of crucial importance to many basic and applied studies. Selective photodetachment has been proposed to suppress unwanted species in negative ion beams while preserving the intensity of the species of interest. A highly efficient technique based on photodetachment in a gas-filled radio frequency quadrupole ion cooler has been demonstrated. In off-line experiments with stable ions, up to 104 times suppression of the isobar contaminants in a number of interesting radioactive negative ion beams has been demonstrated. For selected species, this technique promises experimental possibilities in studies on exotic nuclei, accelerator mass spectrometry, and fundamental properties of negative atomic and molecular ions.

  13. Agile beam laser

    SciTech Connect

    Valley, G. C.

    1985-01-08

    A laser system for providing a rapidly steerable laser output beam. The laser system includes a phase conjugate reflector, laser gain medium and its associated pump source, an output coupling device, and an optical element which selectably controls the transverse lasing mode of the laser system. The components are arranged to form a laser oscillator between the phase conjugate reflector and the optical device, and is operated in such a manner that each selected transverse mode of laser operation generates an output beam from the system which has a different wavefront tilt. Accordingly, the output beam is steerable and is dependent upon the selected transverse mode which is currently lasing in the oscillator.

  14. Ion beam lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-08-02

    A maskless plasma-formed ion beam lithography tool provides for patterning of sub-50 nm features on large area flat or curved substrate surfaces. The system is very compact and does not require an accelerator column and electrostatic beam scanning components. The patterns are formed by switching beamlets on or off from a two electrode blanking system with the substrate being scanned mechanically in one dimension. This arrangement can provide a maskless nano-beam lithography tool for economic and high throughput processing.

  15. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids (16, 18) with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets (20) along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam (14). An accelerator electrode device (22) downstream from the extraction grids, is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam.

  16. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam. An accelerator electrode device downstream from the extraction grids is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam. The application of the system to ion implantation is mentioned.

  17. Beam scanning binary logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Hideo; Mukai, Seiji; Watanabe, Masanobu; Mori, Masahiko; Yajima, Hiroyoshi

    1990-07-01

    A beam-scanning laser diode (BSLD) is presently applied to a novel optoelectronic logic operation, designated 'beam-scanning binary logic' (BSBL), that covers the implementation of both the basic logic gates and a spatial code encoder for photodetection, while allowing a greater reduction of the number of active devices than ordinary binary logic operations. BSBL executes multifunctional logic operations simultaneously. The data connections between logic gates in BSLD are flexible, due to the ability to electrically control both output power and laser-beam direction.

  18. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  19. Caution -- Beam Crossing Ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, Kenneth L.

    2008-04-02

    There are times when a laser beam needs to cross between tables or even go from one room to another. This presents an interesting traffic-flow and safety challenge to both the laser safety officer and laser user. Fortunately it is a challenge that has several solutions But the simplest solution may not be the best one. For example, the simplest way to get a beam from one optical table to another is just to put a sturdy tube around it. That's a permanent solution, and it completely contains the laser beam. While this is laser safe, there can be egress issues if it blocks a walkway. One comment this author often hears is, 'We can just duck under the tube.' The fire marshal, as well as the laser safety officer, might have issues with this. Especially in the case of a darkened lab, a blocked walkway can present a hazard of its own. One good solution is to transport the beam from Point A to Point B through a fiberoptic cable, when that is possible. One should easily be able to run the fiber up and over any walkway or down through a conduit on the floor. An important concern often overlooked with fibers is a label at the termination end indicating disconnection may expose one to laser radiation. Suppose there's an experiment that is usually confined to a single optical table, but sometimes needs to expand to a second table. It's inconvenient to install a permanent tube between the tables, so some sort of temporary arrangement is desirable. I have often seen people casually lay a beam tube across support arms, and remove it when it's not needed. The problem with this approach is that there's no mechanism to prevent the beam from crossing if somebody's forgotten the tube, or if the tube gets knocked out of place. A better solution is a mechanism that only allows the beam to cross when the beam protection is in place. A swing shutter, or a guillotine and swing arm, are examples (Figures 1 and 2). Another alternative is a sensor, maybe a little microswitch, that activates a

  20. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  1. RiPEIP1, a gene from the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis, is preferentially expressed in planta and may be involved in root colonization.

    PubMed

    Fiorilli, Valentina; Belmondo, Simone; Khouja, Hassine Radhouane; Abbà, Simona; Faccio, Antonella; Daghino, Stefania; Lanfranco, Luisa

    2016-08-01

    Transcriptomics and genomics data recently obtained from the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis have offered new opportunities to decipher the contribution of the fungal partner to the establishment of the symbiotic association. The large number of genes which do not show similarity to known proteins witnesses the uniqueness of this group of plant-associated fungi. In this work, we characterize a gene that was called RiPEIP1 (Preferentially Expressed In Planta). Its expression is strongly induced in the intraradical phase, including arbuscules, and follows the expression profile of the Medicago truncatula phosphate transporter MtPT4, a molecular marker of a functional symbiosis. Indeed, mtpt4 mutant plants, which exhibit low mycorrhizal colonization and an accelerated arbuscule turnover, also show a reduced RiPEIP1 mRNA abundance. To further characterize RiPEIP1, in the absence of genetic transformation protocols for AM fungi, we took advantage of two different fungal heterologous systems. When expressed as a GFP fusion in yeast cells, RiPEIP1 localizes in the endomembrane system, in particular to the endoplasmic reticulum, which is consistent with the in silico prediction of four transmembrane domains. We then generated RiPEIP1-expressing strains of the fungus Oidiodendron maius, ericoid endomycorrhizal fungus for which transformation protocols are available. Roots of Vaccinium myrtillus colonized by RiPEIP1-expressing transgenic strains showed a higher mycorrhization level compared to roots colonized by the O. maius wild-type strain, suggesting that RiPEIP1 may regulate the root colonization process.

  2. Application of STORMTOOLS's simplified flood inundation model with sea level rise to assess impacts to RI coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaulding, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    The vision for STORMTOOLS is to provide access to a suite of coastal planning tools (numerical models et al), available as a web service, that allows wide spread accessibly and applicability at high resolution for user selected coastal areas of interest. The first product developed under this framework were flood inundation maps, with and without sea level rise, for varying return periods for RI coastal waters. The flood mapping methodology is based on using the water level vs return periods at a primary NOAA water level gauging station and then spatially scaling the values, based on the predictions of high resolution, storm and wave simulations performed by Army Corp of Engineers, North Atlantic Comprehensive Coastal Study (NACCS) for tropical and extratropical storms on an unstructured grid, to estimate inundation levels for varying return periods. The scaling for the RI application used Newport, RI water levels as the reference point. Predictions are provided for once in 25, 50, and 100 yr return periods (at the upper 95% confidence level), with sea level rises of 1, 2, 3, and 5 ft. Simulations have also been performed for historical hurricane events including 1938, Carol (1954), Bob (1991), and Sandy (2012) and nuisance flooding events with return periods of 1, 3, 5, and 10 yr. Access to the flooding maps is via a web based, map viewer that seamlessly covers all coastal waters of the state at one meter resolution. The GIS structure of the map viewer allows overlays of additional relevant data sets (roads and highways, wastewater treatment facilities, schools, hospitals, emergency evacuation routes, etc.) as desired by the user. The simplified flooding maps are publically available and are now being implemented for state and community resilience planning and vulnerability assessment activities in response to climate change impacts.

  3. Engineered selective plant male sterility through pollen-specific expression of the EcoRI restriction endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Millwood, Reginald J; Moon, Hong S; Poovaiah, Charleson R; Muthukumar, Balasubramaniam; Rice, John Hollis; Abercrombie, Jason M; Abercrombie, Laura L; Green, William Derek; Stewart, Charles Neal

    2016-05-01

    Unintended gene flow from transgenic plants via pollen, seed and vegetative propagation is a regulatory concern because of potential admixture in food and crop systems, as well as hybridization and introgression to wild and weedy relatives. Bioconfinement of transgenic pollen would help address some of these concerns and enable transgenic plant production for several crops where gene flow is an issue. Here, we demonstrate the expression of the restriction endonuclease EcoRI under the control of the tomato pollen-specific LAT52 promoter is an effective method for generating selective male sterility in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco). Of nine transgenic events recovered, four events had very high bioconfinement with tightly controlled EcoRI expression in pollen and negligible-to-no expression other plant tissues. Transgenic plants had normal morphology wherein vegetative growth and reproductivity were similar to nontransgenic controls. In glasshouse experiments, transgenic lines were hand-crossed to both male-sterile and emasculated nontransgenic tobacco varieties. Progeny analysis of 16 000-40 000 seeds per transgenic line demonstrated five lines approached (>99.7%) or attained 100% bioconfinement for one or more generations. Bioconfinement was again demonstrated at or near 100% under field conditions where four transgenic lines were grown in close proximity to male-sterile tobacco, and 900-2100 seeds per male-sterile line were analysed for transgenes. Based upon these results, we conclude EcoRI-driven selective male sterility holds practical potential as a safe and reliable transgene bioconfinement strategy. Given the mechanism of male sterility, this method could be applicable to any plant species. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. LEDA beam diagnostics instrumentation: Beam position monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, D.; Day, L.; Gilpatrick, J. D.; Kasemir, K.-U.; Martinez, D.; Power, J. F.; Shurter, R.; Stettler, M.

    2000-11-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) facility located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) accelerates protons to an energy of 6.7 MeV and current of 100 mA operating in either a pulsed or cw mode. Of key importance to the commissioning and operations effort is the Beam Position Monitor system (BPM). The LEDA BPM system uses five micro-stripline beam position monitors processed by log ratio processing electronics with data acquisition via a series of custom TMS320C40 Digital Signal Processing (DSP) boards. Of special interest to this paper is the operation of the system, the log ratio processing, and the system calibration technique. This paper will also cover the DSP system operations and their interaction with the main accelerator control system.

  5. LEDA BEAM DIAGNOSTICS INSTRUMENTATION: BEAM POSITION MONITORS

    SciTech Connect

    D. BARR; ET AL

    2000-05-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) facility located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) accelerates protons to an energy of 6.7-MeV and current of 100-mA operating in either a pulsed or cw mode. Of key importance to the commissioning and operations effort is the Beam Position Monitor system (BPM). The LEDA BPM system uses five micro-stripline beam position monitors processed by log ratio processing electronics with data acquisition via a series of custom TMS32OC40 Digital Signal Processing (DSP) boards. Of special interest to this paper is the operation of the system, the log ratio processing, and the system calibration technique. This paper will also cover the DSP system operations and their interaction with the main accelerator control system.

  6. Production of a thermal stress resistant mutant Euglena gracilis strain using Fe-ion beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Koji; Kazama, Yusuke; Mitra, Sharbanee; Marukawa, Yuka; Arashida, Ryo; Abe, Tomoko; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Suzuki, Kengo

    2016-08-01

    Euglena gracilis is a common phytoplankton species, which also has motile flagellate characteristics. Recent research and development has enabled the industrial use of E. gracilis and selective breeding of this species is expected to further expand its application. However, the production of E. gracilis nuclear mutants is difficult because of the robustness of its genome. To establish an efficient mutation induction procedure for E. gracilis, we employed Fe-ion beam irradiation in the RIKEN RI beam factory. A decrease in the survival rate was observed with the increase in irradiation dose, and the upper limit used for E. gracilis selective breeding was around 50 Gy. For a practical trial of Fe-ion irradiation, we conducted a screening to isolate high-temperature-tolerant mutants. The screening yielded mutants that proliferated faster than the wild-type strain at 32 °C. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of heavy-ion irradiation on E. gracilis selective breeding.

  7. Tangent map analysis of the beam-beam interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Tepikian, S.

    1989-01-01

    We studied the tangent map of the beam-beam interaction and found no evidence of beam-beam instability for /epsilon/ = 0.04. Tracking study with tune modulation shows however large emittance growth due to the sum resonances. The emittance growth is due to the multiple crossing of the sum resonances. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Beam-beam tuneshift during the TEVATRON squeeze

    SciTech Connect

    Mane, S.R.

    1988-11-01

    We calculate the beam-beam tuneshift during the squeeze of the beam in the Tevatron from injection to mini-beta. We find that for the beam emittances typically used, there is little variation of the tuneshift, in either plane, during the squeeze. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Population trends and flight behavior of the American burying beetle, Nicrophorus americanus (Coleoptera: Silphidae), on Block Island, RI

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raithel, C.J.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Prospero, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    The endangered American burying beetle, Nicrophorus americanus, was monitored on Block Island, RI, USA, from 1991-2003 using mark-recapture population estimates of adults collected in pitfall traps. Populations increased through time, especially after 1994 when a program was initiated that provided carrion for beetle production. Beetle captures increased with increasing temperature and dew point, and decreased with increasing wind speed. Short distance movement was not related to wind direction, while longer distance flights tended to be downwind. Although many individuals flew considerable distances along transects, most recaptures were in traps near the point of release. These behaviors probably have counterbalancing effects on population estimates.

  10. Constraint on Nuclear Symmetry Energy through Heavy RI Collision Experiment by Using SπRIT Device at RIBF-SAMURAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Tadaaki

    The symmetry energy of the nuclear Equation of State (EoS) is essential in many aspects of the astrophysics. However it has large ambiguity mainly for the dense region of ρ > ρ0. In order to give a constraint on the dencity dependent nuclear symmetry energy, an international experimental project at RIKEN-RIBF: SπRIT was launched. By using newly developed Time Projection Chamber (TPC) as a main device of SπRIT experiment, first heavy RI collision experiment was performed in the spring of 2016. In this experiment, charged π meson was measured as main observable as it is expected to be most sensitive to the symmetry energy.

  11. Focused ion beam system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.; Gough, R.A.; Ji, Q.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1999-08-31

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 {mu}m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 m or less. 13 figs.

  12. Single Beam Holography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsuan; Ruterbusch, Paul H.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses how holography can be used as part of undergraduate physics laboratories. The authors propose a single beam technique of holography, which will reduce the recording scheme as well as relax the isolation requirements. (HM)

  13. Bunch beam cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryzgunov, M. I.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Li, J.; Mao, L. J.; Parkhomchuk, V. V.; Reva, V. B.; Yang, X. D.; Zhao, H.

    2017-07-01

    Electron cooling is used for damping both transverse and longitudinal oscillations of heavy particle. The cooling of bunch ion beam (with RF voltage on) is important part of experiments with inner target, ion collision system, stacking and RF manipulation. The short length of an ion bunch increases the peak luminosity, gives a start-time point for using of the time-of-flight methods and obtains a short extraction beam pulse. This article describes the review of last experiments with electron cooling carried out on the CSRm, CSRe (China) and COSY (Germany) storage rings. The accumulated experience may be used for the project of electron cooler on 2.5 MeV (NICA) and 0.5 MeV HIAF for obtaining high luminosity, depressing beam-beam effects and RF manipulation.

  14. Focused ion beam system

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.; Gough, R.A.; Ji, Q.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1999-08-31

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 {mu}m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 m or less. 13 figs.

  15. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Electron beam precharging of a high resistivity aerosol was successfully demonstrated during this reporting period (Quarters Five and Six). The initial E-beam particle precharging experiments completed this term were designed to confirm and extend some of the work performed under the previous contract. There are several reasons for doing this: (1) to re-establish a baseline performance criterion for comparison to other runs, (2) to test several recently upgraded or repaired subsystems, and (3) to improve upon the collection efficiency of the electron beam precipitator when testing precharging effectiveness with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high concentration dust load. In addition, these shakedown runs were used to determine a set of suitable operational parameters for the wind tunnel, the electrostatic collecting sections, and the MINACC E-beam accelerator. These parameters will generally be held constant while the precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge.

  16. Beam-foil spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, H.G.; Hass, M.

    1982-01-01

    A brief survey of some applications of beam-foil spectroscopy is presented. Among the topics covered are lifetime and magnetic moment measurements, nuclear alignment, and polarized light production. (AIP)

  17. Ion beam texturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    A microscopic surface texture is created by sputter etching a surface while simultaneously sputter depositing a lower sputter yield material onto the surface. A xenon ion beam source has been used to perform this texturing process on samples as large as three centimeters in diameter. Ion beam textured surface structures have been characterized with SEM photomicrographs for a large number of materials including Cu, Al, Si, Ti, Ni, Fe, Stainless steel, Au, and Ag. Surfaces have been textured using a variety of low sputter yield materials - Ta, Mo, Nb, and Ti. The initial stages of the texture creation have been documented, and the technique of ion beam sputter removal of any remaining deposited material has been studied. A number of other texturing parameters have been studied such as the variation of the texture with ion beam power, surface temperature, and the rate of texture growth with sputter etching time.

  18. Bunched beam stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jie.

    1992-01-01

    The scaling laws for bunched-beam stochastic cooling has been derived in terms of the optimum cooling rate and the mixing condition. In the case that particles occupy the entire sinusoidal rf bucket, the optimum cooling rate of the bunched beam is shown to be similar to that predicted from the coasting-beam theory using a beam of the same average density and mixing factor. However, in the case that particles occupy only the center of the bucket, the optimum rate decrease in proportion to the ratio of the bunch area to the bucket area. The cooling efficiency can be significantly improved if the synchrotron side-band spectrum is effectively broadened, e.g. by the transverse tune spread or by using a double rf system.

  19. Bunched beam stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jie

    1992-09-01

    The scaling laws for bunched-beam stochastic cooling has been derived in terms of the optimum cooling rate and the mixing condition. In the case that particles occupy the entire sinusoidal rf bucket, the optimum cooling rate of the bunched beam is shown to be similar to that predicted from the coasting-beam theory using a beam of the same average density and mixing factor. However, in the case that particles occupy only the center of the bucket, the optimum rate decrease in proportion to the ratio of the bunch area to the bucket area. The cooling efficiency can be significantly improved if the synchrotron side-band spectrum is effectively broadened, e.g. by the transverse tune spread or by using a double rf system.

  20. Final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration.