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Sample records for 30s ribosomal subunits

  1. Assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Williamson, James R

    2005-11-01

    The assembly of ribosomes requires a significant fraction of the energy expenditure for rapidly growing bacteria. The ribosome is composed of three large RNA molecules and over 50 small proteins that must be rapidly and efficiently assembled into the molecular machine responsible for protein synthesis. For over 30 years, the 30S ribosome has been a key model system for understanding the process of ribosome biogenesis through in vitro assembly experiments. We have recently developed an isotope pulse-chase experiment using quantitative mass spectrometry that permits assembly kinetics to be measured in real time. Kinetic studies have revealed an assembly energy landscape that ensures efficient assembly by a flexible and robust pathway.

  2. An assembly landscape for the 30S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Talkington, Megan W T; Siuzdak, Gary; Williamson, James R

    2005-12-01

    Self-assembling macromolecular machines drive fundamental cellular processes, including transcription, messenger RNA processing, translation, DNA replication and cellular transport. The ribosome, which carries out protein synthesis, is one such machine, and the 30S subunit of the bacterial ribosome is the preeminent model system for biophysical analysis of large RNA-protein complexes. Our understanding of 30S assembly is incomplete, owing to the challenges of monitoring the association of many components simultaneously. Here we have developed a method involving pulse-chase monitored by quantitative mass spectrometry (PC/QMS) to follow the assembly of the 20 ribosomal proteins with 16S ribosomal RNA during formation of the functional particle. These data represent a detailed and quantitative kinetic characterization of the assembly of a large multicomponent macromolecular complex. By measuring the protein binding rates at a range of temperatures, we find that local transformations throughout the assembling subunit have similar but distinct activation energies. Thus, the prevailing view of 30S assembly as a pathway proceeding through a global rate-limiting conformational change must give way to one in which the assembly of the complex traverses a landscape dotted with various local conformational transitions.

  3. An assembly landscape for the 30S ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    Talkington, Megan W. T.; Siuzdak, Gary

    2005-01-01

    Self-assembling macromolecular machines drive fundamental cellular processes, including transcription, mRNA processing, translation, DNA replication, and cellular transport. The ribosome, which carries out protein synthesis, is one such machine, and the 30S subunit of the bacterial ribosome is the preeminent model system for biophysical analysis of large RNA-protein complexes. Our understanding of 30S assembly is incomplete, due to the challenges of monitoring the association of many components simultaneously. We have developed a new method involving pulse-chase monitored by quantitative mass spectrometry (PC/QMS) to follow the assembly of the 20 ribosomal proteins with 16S rRNA during formation of the functional particle. These data represent the first detailed and quantitative kinetic characterization of the assembly of a large multicomponent macromolecular complex. By measuring the protein binding rates at a range of temperatures, we have found that local transformations throughout the assembling subunit have similar but distinct activation energies. This observation shows that the prevailing view of 30S assembly as a pathway proceeding through a global rate-limiting conformational change must give way to a view in which the assembly of the complex traverses a landscape dotted with a variety of local conformational transitions. PMID:16319883

  4. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Dao, E. Han; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; ...

    2015-04-30

    In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecondmore » X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.« less

  5. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dao, E. Han; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Lemke, Henrik T.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Coey, Aaron; Larsen, Kevin; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; DeMirci, Hasan

    2015-04-30

    In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecond X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.

  6. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals.

    PubMed

    Dao, E Han; Sierra, Raymond G; Laksmono, Hartawan; Lemke, Henrik T; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Coey, Aaron; Larsen, Kevin; Baxter, Elizabeth L; Cohen, Aina E; Soltis, S Michael; DeMirci, Hasan

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecond X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.

  7. Visualizing ribosome biogenesis: parallel assembly pathways for the 30S subunit.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Anke M; Yoshioka, Craig; Beck, Andrea H; Bunner, Anne E; Milligan, Ronald A; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Williamson, James R

    2010-10-29

    Ribosomes are self-assembling macromolecular machines that translate DNA into proteins, and an understanding of ribosome biogenesis is central to cellular physiology. Previous studies on the Escherichia coli 30S subunit suggest that ribosome assembly occurs via multiple parallel pathways rather than through a single rate-limiting step, but little mechanistic information is known about this process. Discovery single-particle profiling (DSP), an application of time-resolved electron microscopy, was used to obtain more than 1 million snapshots of assembling 30S subunits, identify and visualize the structures of 14 assembly intermediates, and monitor the population flux of these intermediates over time. DSP results were integrated with mass spectrometry data to construct the first ribosome-assembly mechanism that incorporates binding dependencies, rate constants, and structural characterization of populated intermediates.

  8. Assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit: positioning ribosomal protein S13 in the S7 assembly branch.

    PubMed

    Grondek, Joel F; Culver, Gloria M

    2004-12-01

    Studies of Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit assembly have revealed a hierarchical and cooperative association of ribosomal proteins with 16S ribosomal RNA; these results have been used to compile an in vitro 30S subunit assembly map. In single protein addition and omission studies, ribosomal protein S13 was shown to be dependent on the prior association of ribosomal protein S20 for binding to the ribonucleoprotein particle. While the overwhelming majority of interactions revealed in the assembly map are consistent with additional data, the dependency of S13 on S20 is not. Structural studies position S13 in the head of the 30S subunit > 100 A away from S20, which resides near the bottom of the body of the 30S subunit. All of the proteins that reside in the head of the 30S subunit, except S13, have been shown to be part of the S7 assembly branch, that is, they all depend on S7 for association with the assembling 30S subunit. Given these observations, the assembly requirements for S13 were investigated using base-specific chemical footprinting and primer extension analysis. These studies reveal that S13 can bind to 16S rRNA in the presence of S7, but not S20. Additionally, interaction between S13 and other members of the S7 assembly branch have been observed. These results link S13 to the 3' major domain family of proteins, and the S7 assembly branch, placing S13 in a new location in the 30S subunit assembly map where its position is in accordance with much biochemical and structural data.

  9. Neutron scattering and the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, P.B.; Engelman, D.M.; Langer, J.A.; Ramakrishnan, V.R.; Schindler, D.G.; Schoenborn, B.P.; Sillers, I.Y.; Yabuki, S.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the progress made in the study of the internal organization of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli by neutron scattering since 1975. A map of that particle showing the position of 14 of the subunit's 21 proteins is presented, and the methods currently used for collecting and analyzing such data are discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of extending the interpretation of neutron mapping data beyond the limits practical today. 30 references, 5 figures.

  10. Neutron Scattering and the 30 S Ribosomal Subunit of E. Coli

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Moore, P. B.; Engelman, D. M.; Langer, J. A.; Ramakrishnan, V. R.; Schindler, D. G.; Schoenborn, B. P.; Sillers, I. Y.; Yabuki, S.

    1982-06-01

    This paper reviews the progress made in the study of the internal organization of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli by neutron scattering since 1975. A map of that particle showing the position of 14 of the subunit's 21 proteins is presented, and the methods currently used for collecting and analyzing such data are discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of extending the interpretation of neutron mapping data beyond the limits practical today.

  11. Characteristic views of E. coli and B. stearothermophilus 30S ribosomal subunits in the electron microscope.

    PubMed Central

    van Heel, M; Stöffler-Meilicke, M

    1985-01-01

    Large sets of electron microscopic images of the 30S ribosomal subunits of Bacillus stearothermophilus (914 molecules) and Escherichia coli (422 molecules) were analysed with image processing techniques. Using computer alignment and a new multivariate statistical classification scheme, three predominant views of the subunit were found for both species. These views, which together account for approximately 90% of the population of images, were determined to a reproducible resolution of up to 1.7 nm, thus elucidating many new structural details. The angular spread of the molecular orientations around the three main stable positions is remarkably small (less than 8 degrees). Some of the current models for the small ribosomal subunit are incompatible with our new results. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3908096

  12. Recognition of Cognate Transfer RNA by the 30S Ribosomal Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Ogle, James M.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; Clemons, William M.; Tarry, Michael J.; Carter, Andrew P.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2009-10-07

    Crystal structures of the 30S ribosomal subunit in complex with messenger RNA and cognate transfer RNA in the A site, both in the presence and absence of the antibiotic paromomycin, have been solved at between 3.1 and 3.3 angstroms resolution. Cognate transfer RNA (tRNA) binding induces global domain movements of the 30S subunit and changes in the conformation of the universally conserved and essential bases A1492, A1493, and G530 of 16S RNA. These bases interact intimately with the minor groove of the first two base pairs between the codon and anticodon, thus sensing Watson-Crick base-pairing geometry and discriminating against near-cognate tRNA. The third, or 'wobble,' position of the codon is free to accommodate certain noncanonical base pairs. By partially inducing these structural changes, paromomycin facilitates binding of near-cognate tRNAs.

  13. Crystal Structure of the 30S Ribosomal Subunit from Thermus Thermophilus. Purification, Crystallization and Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Clemons, William M.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; McCutcheonn, John P.; May, Joanna L.C.; Carter, Andrew P.; Morgan-Warren, Robert J.; Wimberly, Brian T.; Ramakrishnan, Venki

    2009-10-07

    We describe the crystallization and structure determination of the 30 S ribosomal subunit from Thermus thermophilus. Previous reports of crystals that diffracted to 10 {angstrom} resolution were used as a starting point to improve the quality of the diffraction. Eventually, ideas such as the addition of substrates or factors to eliminate conformational heterogeneity proved less important than attention to detail in yielding crystals that diffracted beyond 3 {angstrom} resolution. Despite improvements in technology and methodology in the last decade, the structure determination of the 30 S subunit presented some very challenging technical problems because of the size of the asymmetric unit, crystal variability and sensitivity to radiation damage. Some steps that were useful for determination of the atomic structure were: the use of anomalous scattering from the LIII edges of osmium and lutetium to obtain the necessary phasing signal; the use of tunable, third-generation synchrotron sources to obtain data of reasonable quality at high resolution; collection of derivative data precisely about a mirror plane to preserve small anomalous differences between Bijvoet mates despite extensive radiation damage and multi-crystal scaling; the pre-screening of crystals to ensure quality, isomorphism and the efficient use of scarce third-generation synchrotron time; pre-incubation of crystals in cobalt hexaammine to ensure isomorphism with other derivatives; and finally, the placement of proteins whose structures had been previously solved in isolation, in conjunction with biochemical data on protein-RNA interactions, to map out the architecture of the 30 S subunit prior to the construction of a detailed atomic-resolution model.

  14. Understanding ribosome assembly: the structure of in vivo assembled immature 30S subunits revealed by cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jomaa, Ahmad; Stewart, Geordie; Martín-Benito, Jaime; Zielke, Ryszard; Campbell, Tracey L; Maddock, Janine R; Brown, Eric D; Ortega, Joaquin

    2011-04-01

    Four decades after early in vitro assembly studies demonstrated that ribosome assembly is a controlled process, our understanding of ribosome assembly is still incomplete. Just as structure determination has been so important to understanding ribosome function, so too will it be critical to sorting out the assembly process. Here, we used a viable deletion in the yjeQ gene, a recognized ribosome assembly factor, to isolate and structurally characterize immature 30S subunits assembled in vivo. These small ribosome subunits contained unprocessed 17S rRNA and lacked some late ribosomal proteins. Cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions revealed that the presence of precursor sequences in the rRNA induces a severe distortion in the 3' minor domain of the subunit involved in the decoding of mRNA and interaction with the large ribosome subunit. These findings suggest that rRNA processing events induce key local conformational changes directing the structure toward the mature assembly. We concluded that rRNA processing, folding, and the entry of tertiary r-proteins are interdependent events in the late stages of 30S subunit assembly. In addition, we demonstrate how studies of emerging assembly factors in ribosome biogenesis can help to elucidate the path of subunit assembly in vivo.

  15. Nonbridging phosphate oxygens in 16S rRNA important for 30S subunit assembly and association with the 50S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Srikanta; Joseph, Simpson

    2005-05-01

    Ribosomes are composed of RNA and protein molecules that associate together to form a supramolecular machine responsible for protein biosynthesis. Detailed information about the structure of the ribosome has come from the recent X-ray crystal structures of the ribosome and the ribosomal subunits. However, the molecular interactions between the rRNAs and the r-proteins that occur during the intermediate steps of ribosome assembly are poorly understood. Here we describe a modification-interference approach to identify nonbridging phosphate oxygens within 16S rRNA that are important for the in vitro assembly of the Escherichia coli 30S small ribosomal subunit and for its association with the 50S large ribosomal subunit. The 30S small subunit was reconstituted from phosphorothioate-substituted 16S rRNA and small subunit proteins. Active 30S subunits were selected by their ability to bind to the 50S large subunit and form 70S ribosomes. Analysis of the selected population shows that phosphate oxygens at specific positions in the 16S rRNA are important for either subunit assembly or for binding to the 50S subunit. The X-ray crystallographic structures of the 30S subunit suggest that some of these phosphate oxygens participate in r-protein binding, coordination of metal ions, or for the formation of intersubunit bridges in the mature 30S subunit. Interestingly, however, several of the phosphate oxygens identified in this study do not participate in any interaction in the mature 30S subunit, suggesting that they play a role in the early steps of the 30S subunit assembly.

  16. The effect of ribosome assembly cofactors on in vitro 30S subunit reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Bunner, Anne E; Nord, Stefan; Wikström, P Mikael; Williamson, James R

    2010-04-23

    Ribosome biogenesis is facilitated by a growing list of assembly cofactors, including helicases, GTPases, chaperones, and other proteins, but the specific functions of many of these assembly cofactors are still unclear. The effect of three assembly cofactors on 30S ribosome assembly was determined in vitro using a previously developed mass-spectrometry-based method that monitors the rRNA binding kinetics of ribosomal proteins. The essential GTPase Era caused several late-binding proteins to bind rRNA faster when included in a 30S reconstitution. RimP enabled faster binding of S9 and S19 and inhibited the binding of S12 and S13, perhaps by blocking those proteins' binding sites. RimM caused proteins S5 and S12 to bind dramatically faster. These quantitative kinetic data provide important clues about the roles of these assembly cofactors in the mechanism of 30S biogenesis. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mutations of ribosomal protein S5 suppress a defect in late-30S ribosomal subunit biogenesis caused by lack of the RbfA biogenesis factor

    PubMed Central

    Nord, Stefan; Bhatt, Monika J.; Tükenmez, Hasan; Farabaugh, Philip J.; Wikström, P. Mikael

    2015-01-01

    The in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits requires assistance by maturation proteins that are not part of mature ribosomes. One such protein, RbfA, associates with the 30S ribosomal subunits. Loss of RbfA causes cold sensitivity and defects of the 30S subunit biogenesis and its overexpression partially suppresses the dominant cold sensitivity caused by a C23U mutation in the central pseudoknot of 16S rRNA, a structure essential for ribosome function. We have isolated suppressor mutations that restore partially the growth of an RbfA-lacking strain. Most of the strongest suppressor mutations alter one out of three distinct positions in the carboxy-terminal domain of ribosomal protein S5 (S5) in direct contact with helix 1 and helix 2 of the central pseudoknot. Their effect is to increase the translational capacity of the RbfA-lacking strain as evidenced by an increase in polysomes in the suppressed strains. Overexpression of RimP, a protein factor that along with RbfA regulates formation of the ribosome's central pseudoknot, was lethal to the RbfA-lacking strain but not to a wild-type strain and this lethality was suppressed by the alterations in S5. The S5 mutants alter translational fidelity but these changes do not explain consistently their effect on the RbfA-lacking strain. Our genetic results support a role for the region of S5 modified in the suppressors in the formation of the central pseudoknot in 16S rRNA. PMID:26089326

  18. Single protein omission reconstitution studies of tetracycline binding to the 30S subunit of Escherichia coli ribosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, M.; Cooperman, B.S. )

    1990-06-05

    In previous work the authors showed that on photolysis of Escherichia coli ribosomes in the presence of ({sup 3}H)tetracycline (TC) the major protein labeled is S7, and they presented strong evidence that such labeling takes place from a high-affinity site related to the inhibitory action of TC. In this work they use single protein omission reconstitution (SPORE) experiments to identify those proteins that are important for high-affinity TC binding to the 30S subunit, as measured by both cosedimentation and filter binding assays. With respect to both sedimentation coefficients and relative Phe-tRNA{sup Phe} binding, the properties of the SPORE particles they obtain parallel very closely those measured earlier, with the exception of the SPORE particle lacking S13. A total of five proteins, S3, S7, S8, S14, and S19, are shown to be important for TC binding, with the largest effects seen on omission of proteins S7 and S14. Determination of the protein compositions of the corresponding SPORE particles demonstrates that the observed effects are, for the most part, directly attributable to the omission of the given protein rather than reflecting an indirect effect of omitting one protein on the uptake of another. A large body of evidence supports the notion that four of these proteins, S3, S7, S14, and S19, are included, along with 16S rRNA bases 920-1,396, in one of the major domains of the 30S subunit. The results support the conclusion that the structure of this domain is important for the binding of TC and that, within this domain, TC binds directly to S7.

  19. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature using an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Hasan; Sierra, Raymond G; Laksmono, Hartawan; Shoeman, Robert L; Botha, Sabine; Barends, Thomas R M; Nass, Karol; Schlichting, Ilme; Doak, R Bruce; Gati, Cornelius; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Jogl, Gerwald; Dahlberg, Albert E; Gregory, Steven T; Bogan, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    High-resolution ribosome structures determined by X-ray crystallography have provided important insights into the mechanism of translation. Such studies have thus far relied on large ribosome crystals kept at cryogenic temperatures to reduce radiation damage. Here, the application of serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain diffraction data from ribosome microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature is described. 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals diffracted to beyond 6 Å resolution, demonstrating the feasibility of using SFX for ribosome structural studies. The ability to collect diffraction data at near-physiological temperatures promises to provide fundamental insights into the structural dynamics of the ribosome and its functional complexes.

  20. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature using an X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Hasan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Shoeman, Robert L.; Botha, Sabine; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Nass, Karol; Schlichting, Ilme; Doak, R. Bruce; Gati, Cornelius; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Jogl, Gerwald; Dahlberg, Albert E.; Gregory, Steven T.; Bogan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution ribosome structures determined by X-ray crystallography have provided important insights into the mechanism of translation. Such studies have thus far relied on large ribosome crystals kept at cryogenic temperatures to reduce radiation damage. Here, the application of serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain diffraction data from ribosome microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature is described. 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals diffracted to beyond 6 Å resolution, demonstrating the feasibility of using SFX for ribosome structural studies. The ability to collect diffraction data at near-physiological temperatures promises to provide fundamental insights into the structural dynamics of the ribosome and its functional complexes. PMID:23989164

  1. Dissecting the in vivo assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit reveals the role of RimM and general features of the assembly process.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiang; Goto, Simon; Chen, Yuling; Feng, Boya; Xu, Yanji; Muto, Akira; Himeno, Hyouta; Deng, Haiteng; Lei, Jianlin; Gao, Ning

    2013-02-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a tightly regulated, multi-stepped process. The assembly of ribosomal subunits is a central step of the complex biogenesis process, involving nearly 30 protein factors in vivo in bacteria. Although the assembly process has been extensively studied in vitro for over 40 years, very limited information is known for the in vivo process and specific roles of assembly factors. Such an example is ribosome maturation factor M (RimM), a factor involved in the late-stage assembly of the 30S subunit. Here, we combined quantitative mass spectrometry and cryo-electron microscopy to characterize the in vivo 30S assembly intermediates isolated from mutant Escherichia coli strains with genes for assembly factors deleted. Our compositional and structural data show that the assembly of the 3'-domain of the 30S subunit is severely delayed in these intermediates, featured with highly underrepresented 3'-domain proteins and large conformational difference compared with the mature 30S subunit. Further analysis indicates that RimM functions not only to promote the assembly of a few 3'-domain proteins but also to stabilize the rRNA tertiary structure. More importantly, this study reveals intriguing similarities and dissimilarities between the in vitro and the in vivo assembly pathways, suggesting that they are in general similar but with subtle differences.

  2. A combined quantitative mass spectrometry and electron microscopy analysis of ribosomal 30S subunit assembly in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Sashital, Dipali G; Greeman, Candacia A; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Williamson, James R

    2014-10-14

    Ribosome assembly is a complex process involving the folding and processing of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), concomitant binding of ribosomal proteins (r-proteins), and participation of numerous accessory cofactors. Here, we use a quantitative mass spectrometry/electron microscopy hybrid approach to determine the r-protein composition and conformation of 30S ribosome assembly intermediates in Escherichia coli. The relative timing of assembly of the 3' domain and the formation of the central pseudoknot (PK) structure depends on the presence of the assembly factor RimP. The central PK is unstable in the absence of RimP, resulting in the accumulation of intermediates in which the 3'-domain is unanchored and the 5'-domain is depleted for r-proteins S5 and S12 that contact the central PK. Our results reveal the importance of the cofactor RimP in central PK formation, and introduce a broadly applicable method for characterizing macromolecular assembly in cells.

  3. The C-terminal helix in the YjeQ zinc-finger domain catalyzes the release of RbfA during 30S ribosome subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Jeganathan, Ajitha; Razi, Aida; Thurlow, Brett; Ortega, Joaquin

    2015-06-01

    YjeQ (also called RsgA) and RbfA proteins in Escherichia coli bind to immature 30S ribosome subunits at late stages of assembly to assist folding of the decoding center. A key step for the subunit to enter the pool of actively translating ribosomes is the release of these factors. YjeQ promotes dissociation of RbfA during the final stages of maturation; however, the mechanism implementing this functional interplay has not been elucidated. YjeQ features an amino-terminal oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding domain, a central GTPase module and a carboxy-terminal zinc-finger domain. We found that the zinc-finger domain is comprised of two functional motifs: the region coordinating the zinc ion and a carboxy-terminal α-helix. The first motif is essential for the anchoring of YjeQ to the 30S subunit and the carboxy-terminal α-helix facilitates the removal of RbfA once the 30S subunit reaches the mature state. Furthermore, the ability of the mature 30S subunit to stimulate YjeQ GTPase activity also depends on the carboxy-terminal α-helix. Our data are consistent with a model in which YjeQ uses this carboxy-terminal α-helix as a sensor to gauge the conformation of helix 44, an essential motif of the decoding center. According to this model, the mature conformation of helix 44 is sensed by the carboxy-terminal α-helix, which in turn stimulates the YjeQ GTPase activity. Hydrolysis of GTP is believed to assist the release of YjeQ from the mature 30S subunit through a still uncharacterized mechanism. These results identify the structural determinants in YjeQ that implement the functional interplay with RbfA. © 2015 Jeganathan et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  4. A combined quantitative mass spectrometry and electron microscopy analysis of ribosomal 30S subunit assembly in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Sashital, Dipali G; Greeman, Candacia A; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Williamson, James R

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is a complex process involving the folding and processing of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), concomitant binding of ribosomal proteins (r-proteins), and participation of numerous accessory cofactors. Here, we use a quantitative mass spectrometry/electron microscopy hybrid approach to determine the r-protein composition and conformation of 30S ribosome assembly intermediates in Escherichia coli. The relative timing of assembly of the 3′ domain and the formation of the central pseudoknot (PK) structure depends on the presence of the assembly factor RimP. The central PK is unstable in the absence of RimP, resulting in the accumulation of intermediates in which the 3′-domain is unanchored and the 5′-domain is depleted for r-proteins S5 and S12 that contact the central PK. Our results reveal the importance of the cofactor RimP in central PK formation, and introduce a broadly applicable method for characterizing macromolecular assembly in cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04491.001 PMID:25313868

  5. The antibiotic Furvina® targets the P-site of 30S ribosomal subunits and inhibits translation initiation displaying start codon bias

    PubMed Central

    Fabbretti, Attilio; Brandi, Letizia; Petrelli, Dezemona; Pon, Cynthia L.; Castañedo, Nilo R.; Medina, Ricardo; Gualerzi, Claudio O.

    2012-01-01

    Furvina®, also denominated G1 (MW 297), is a synthetic nitrovinylfuran [2-bromo-5-(2-bromo-2-nitrovinyl)-furan] antibiotic with a broad antimicrobial spectrum. An ointment (Dermofural®) containing G1 as the only active principle is currently marketed in Cuba and successfully used to treat dermatological infections. Here we describe the molecular target and mechanism of action of G1 in bacteria and demonstrate that in vivo G1 preferentially inhibits protein synthesis over RNA, DNA and cell wall synthesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that G1 targets the small ribosomal subunit, binds at or near the P-decoding site and inhibits its function interfering with the ribosomal binding of fMet-tRNA during 30S initiation complex (IC) formation ultimately inhibiting translation. Notably, this G1 inhibition displays a bias for the nature (purine vs. pyrimidine) of the 3′-base of the codon, occurring efficiently only when the mRNA directing 30S IC formation and translation contains the canonical AUG initiation triplet or the rarely found AUA triplet, but hardly occurs when the mRNA start codon is either one of the non-canonical triplets AUU or AUC. This codon discrimination by G1 is reminiscent, though of opposite type of that displayed by IF3 in its fidelity function, and remarkably does not occur in the absence of this factor. PMID:22941660

  6. Structural insights into the assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit in vivo: functional role of S5 and location of the 17S rRNA precursor sequence.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhixiu; Guo, Qiang; Goto, Simon; Chen, Yuling; Li, Ningning; Yan, Kaige; Zhang, Yixiao; Muto, Akira; Deng, Haiteng; Himeno, Hyouta; Lei, Jianlin; Gao, Ning

    2014-05-01

    The in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits is a highly complex process, with a tight coordination between protein assembly and rRNA maturation events, such as folding and processing of rRNA precursors, as well as modifications of selected bases. In the cell, a large number of factors are required to ensure the efficiency and fidelity of subunit production. Here we characterize the immature 30S subunits accumulated in a factor-null Escherichia coli strain (∆rsgA∆rbfA). The immature 30S subunits isolated with varying salt concentrations in the buffer system show interesting differences on both protein composition and structure. Specifically, intermediates derived under the two contrasting salt conditions (high and low) likely reflect two distinctive assembly stages, the relatively early and late stages of the 3' domain assembly, respectively. Detailed structural analysis demonstrates a mechanistic coupling between the maturation of the 5' end of the 17S rRNA and the assembly of the 30S head domain, and attributes a unique role of S5 in coordinating these two events. Furthermore, our structural results likely reveal the location of the unprocessed terminal sequences of the 17S rRNA, and suggest that the maturation events of the 17S rRNA could be employed as quality control mechanisms on subunit production and protein translation.

  7. Differential assembly of 16S rRNA domains during 30S subunit formation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhili; Culver, Gloria M

    2010-10-01

    Rapid and accurate assembly of the ribosomal subunits, which are responsible for protein synthesis, is required to sustain cell growth. Our best understanding of the interaction of 30S ribosomal subunit components (16S ribosomal RNA [rRNA] and 20 ribosomal proteins [r-proteins]) comes from in vitro work using Escherichia coli ribosomal components. However, detailed information regarding the essential elements involved in the assembly of 30S subunits still remains elusive. Here, we defined a set of rRNA nucleotides that are critical for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit in E. coli. Using an RNA modification interference approach, we identified 54 nucleotides in 16S rRNA whose modification prevents the formation of a functional small ribosomal subunit. The majority of these nucleotides are located in the head and interdomain junction of the 30S subunit, suggesting that these regions are critical for small subunit assembly. In vivo analysis of specific identified sites, using engineered mutations in 16S rRNA, revealed defective protein synthesis capability, aberrant polysome profiles, and abnormal 16S rRNA processing, indicating the importance of these residues in vivo. These studies reveal that specific segments of 16S rRNA are more critical for small subunit assembly than others, and suggest a hierarchy of importance.

  8. Molecular mechanics of 30S subunit head rotation

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Srividya; Donohue, John Paul; Noller, Harry F.

    2014-01-01

    During ribosomal translocation, a process central to the elongation phase of protein synthesis, movement of mRNA and tRNAs requires large-scale rotation of the head domain of the small (30S) subunit of the ribosome. It has generally been accepted that the head rotates by pivoting around the neck helix (h28) of 16S rRNA, its sole covalent connection to the body domain. Surprisingly, we observe that the calculated axis of rotation does not coincide with the neck. Instead, comparative structure analysis across 55 ribosome structures shows that 30S head movement results from flexing at two hinge points lying within conserved elements of 16S rRNA. Hinge 1, although located within the neck, moves by straightening of the kinked helix h28 at the point of contact with the mRNA. Hinge 2 lies within a three-way helix junction that extends to the body through a second, noncovalent connection; its movement results from flexing between helices h34 and h35 in a plane orthogonal to the movement of hinge 1. Concerted movement at these two hinges accounts for the observed magnitudes of head rotation. Our findings also explain the mode of action of spectinomycin, an antibiotic that blocks translocation by binding to hinge 2. PMID:25187561

  9. The ribosomal subunit assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Dlakić, Mensur

    2005-01-01

    Recent proteomic studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified nearly 200 proteins, other than the structural ribosomal proteins, that participate in the assembly of ribosomal subunits and their transport from the nucleus. In a separate line of research, proteomic studies of mature plant ribosomes have revealed considerable variability in the protein composition of individual ribosomes. PMID:16207363

  10. The aminoglycoside resistance methyltransferases from the ArmA/Rmt family operate late in the 30S ribosomal biogenesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Zarubica, Tamara; Baker, Matthew R; Wright, H Tonie; Rife, Jason P

    2011-02-01

    Bacterial resistance to 4,6-type aminoglycoside antibiotics, which target the ribosome, has been traced to the ArmA/RmtA family of rRNA methyltransferases. These plasmid-encoded enzymes transfer a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to N7 of the buried G1405 in the aminoglycoside binding site of 16S rRNA of the 30S ribosomal subunit. ArmA methylates mature 30S subunits but not 16S rRNA, 50S, or 70S ribosomal subunits or isolated Helix 44 of the 30S subunit. To more fully characterize this family of enzymes, we have investigated the substrate requirements of ArmA and to a lesser extent its ortholog RmtA. We determined the Mg+² dependence of ArmA activity toward the 30S ribosomal subunits and found that the enzyme recognizes both low Mg+² (translationally inactive) and high Mg+² (translationally active) forms of this substrate. We tested the effects of LiCl pretreatment of the 30S subunits, initiation factor 3 (IF3), and gentamicin/kasugamycin resistance methyltransferase (KsgA) on ArmA activity and determined whether in vivo derived pre-30S ribosomal subunits are ArmA methylation substrates. ArmA failed to methylate the 30S subunits generated from LiCl washes above 0.75 M, despite the apparent retention of ribosomal proteins and a fully mature 16S rRNA. From our experiments, we conclude that ArmA is most active toward the 30S ribosomal subunits that are at or very near full maturity, but that it can also recognize more than one form of the 30S subunit.

  11. Effects of detergents on ribosomal precursor subunits of Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Body, A; Brownstein, B H

    1978-01-01

    Cell extracts prepared by osmotic lysis of protoplasts were analyzed by sucrose gradient sedimentation. In the absence of detergents, ribosomal precursor particles were found in a gradient fraction which sedimented faster than mature 50S subunits and in two other fractions coincident with mature 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits. Phospholipid, an indicator of membrane, was shown to be associated with only the fastest-sedimenting ribosomal precursor particle fraction. After the extracts were treated with detergents, all phospholipid was found at the top of the gradients. Brij 58, Triton X-100, and Nonidet P-40 did not cause a change in the sedimentation values of precursors; however, the detergents deoxycholate or LOC (Amway Corp.) disrupted the fastest-sedimenting precursor and converted the ribosomal precursor subunits which sedimented at the 50S and 30S positions to five different classes of more slowly sedimenting particles. Earlier reports on the in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits have shown that several stages of ribosomal precursor subunits exist, and, in the presence of the detergents deoxycholate and LOC, which had been used to prepare cell extracts, the precursors sedimented more slowly. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that those detergents selectively modify the structure of ribosomal precursors and lend further support to the hypothesis that the in vivo ribosomal precursor subunits have 50S and 30S sedimentation values. In addition, these data support the idea that the ribosomal precursor particles found in the fast-sedimenting fraction may constitute a unique precursor fraction.

  12. Effects of Detergents on Ribosomal Precursor Subunits of Bacillus megaterium

    PubMed Central

    Body, Barbara A.; Brownstein, Bernard H.

    1978-01-01

    Cell extracts prepared by osmotic lysis of protoplasts were analyzed by sucrose gradient sedimentation. In the absence of detergents, ribosomal precursor particles were found in a gradient fraction which sedimented faster than mature 50S subunits and in two other fractions coincident with mature 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits. Phospholipid, an indicator of membrane, was shown to be associated with only the fastest-sedimenting ribosomal precursor particle fraction. After the extracts were treated with detergents, all phospholipid was found at the top of the gradients. Brij 58, Triton X-100, and Nonidet P-40 did not cause a change in the sedimentation values of precursors; however, the detergents deoxycholate or LOC (Amway Corp.) disrupted the fastest-sedimenting precursor and converted the ribosomal precursor subunits which sedimented at the 50S and 30S positions to five different classes of more slowly sedimenting particles. Earlier reports on the in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits have shown that several stages of ribosomal precursor subunits exist, and, in the presence of the detergents deoxycholate and LOC, which had been used to prepare cell extracts, the precursors sedimented more slowly. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that those detergents selectively modify the structure of ribosomal precursors and lend further support to the hypothesis that the in vivo ribosomal precursor subunits have 50S and 30S sedimentation values. In addition, these data support the idea that the ribosomal precursor particles found in the fast-sedimenting fraction may constitute a unique precursor fraction. PMID:412833

  13. Analysis of conformational changes in 16 S rRNA during the course of 30 S subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Kristi L; Culver, Gloria M

    2005-11-25

    Ribosome biogenesis involves an integrated series of binding events coupled with conformational changes that ultimately result in the formation of a functional macromolecular complex. In vitro, Escherichia coli 30 S subunit assembly occurs in a cooperative manner with the ordered addition of 20 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) with 16 S rRNA. The assembly pathway for 30 S subunits has been dissected in vitro into three steps, where specific r-proteins associate with 16 S rRNA early in 30 S subunit assembly, followed by a mid-assembly conformational rearrangement of the complex that then enables the remaining r-proteins to associate in the final step. Although the three steps of 30 S subunit assembly have been known for some time, few details have been elucidated about changes that occur as a result of these three specific stages. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the concerted early and late stages of small ribosomal subunit assembly. Conformational changes, roles for base-pairing and r-proteins at specific stages of assembly, and a polar nature to the assembly process have been revealed. This work has allowed a more comprehensive and global view of E.coli 30 S ribosomal subunit assembly to be obtained.

  14. Concurrent Nucleation of 16S Folding and Induced Fit in 30S Ribosome Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Adilakshmi, T.; Bellur, D; Woodson, S

    2008-01-01

    Rapidly growing cells produce thousands of new ribosomes each minute, in a tightly regulated process that is essential to cell growth. How the Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA and the 20 proteins that make up the 30S ribosomal subunit can assemble correctly in a few minutes remains a challenging problem, partly because of the lack of real-time data on the earliest stages of assembly. By providing snapshots of individual RNA and protein interactions as they emerge in real time, here we show that 30S assembly nucleates concurrently from different points along the rRNA. Time-resolved hydroxyl radical footprinting3 was used to map changes in the structure of the rRNA within 20 milliseconds after the addition of total 30S proteins. Helical junctions in each domain fold within 100 ms. In contrast, interactions surrounding the decoding site and between the 5', the central and the 3' domains require 2-200 seconds to form. Unexpectedly, nucleotides contacted by the same protein are protected at different rates, indicating that initial RNA-protein encounter complexes refold during assembly. Although early steps in assembly are linked to intrinsically stable rRNA structure, later steps correspond to regions of induced fit between the proteins and the rRNA.

  15. Features of 80S mammalian ribosome and its subunits

    PubMed Central

    Budkevich, Tatyana V.; El'skaya, Anna V.; Nierhaus, Knud H.

    2008-01-01

    It is generally believed that basic features of ribosomal functions are universally valid, but a systematic test still stands out for higher eukaryotic 80S ribosomes. Here we report: (i) differences in tRNA and mRNA binding capabilities of eukaryotic and bacterial ribosomes and their subunits. Eukaryotic 40S subunits bind mRNA exclusively in the presence of cognate tRNA, whereas bacterial 30S do bind mRNA already in the absence of tRNA. 80S ribosomes bind mRNA efficiently in the absence of tRNA. In contrast, bacterial 70S interact with mRNA more productively in the presence rather than in the absence of tRNA. (ii) States of initiation (Pi), pre-translocation (PRE) and post-translocation (POST) of the ribosome were checked and no significant functional differences to the prokaryotic counterpart were observed including the reciprocal linkage between A and E sites. (iii) Eukaryotic ribosomes bind tetracycline with an affinity 15 times lower than that of bacterial ribosomes (Kd 30 μM and 1–2 μM, respectively). The drug does not effect enzymatic A-site occupation of 80S ribosomes in contrast to non-enzymatic tRNA binding to the A-site. Both observations explain the relative resistance of eukaryotic ribosomes to this antibiotic. PMID:18632761

  16. Protein synthesis by ribosomes with tethered subunits.

    PubMed

    Orelle, Cédric; Carlson, Erik D; Szal, Teresa; Florin, Tanja; Jewett, Michael C; Mankin, Alexander S

    2015-08-06

    The ribosome is a ribonucleoprotein machine responsible for protein synthesis. In all kingdoms of life it is composed of two subunits, each built on its own ribosomal RNA (rRNA) scaffold. The independent but coordinated functions of the subunits, including their ability to associate at initiation, rotate during elongation, and dissociate after protein release, are an established model of protein synthesis. Furthermore, the bipartite nature of the ribosome is presumed to be essential for biogenesis, since dedicated assembly factors keep immature ribosomal subunits apart and prevent them from translation initiation. Free exchange of the subunits limits the development of specialized orthogonal genetic systems that could be evolved for novel functions without interfering with native translation. Here we show that ribosomes with tethered and thus inseparable subunits (termed Ribo-T) are capable of successfully carrying out protein synthesis. By engineering a hybrid rRNA composed of both small and large subunit rRNA sequences, we produced a functional ribosome in which the subunits are covalently linked into a single entity by short RNA linkers. Notably, Ribo-T was not only functional in vitro, but was also able to support the growth of Escherichia coli cells even in the absence of wild-type ribosomes. We used Ribo-T to create the first fully orthogonal ribosome-messenger RNA system, and demonstrate its evolvability by selecting otherwise dominantly lethal rRNA mutations in the peptidyl transferase centre that facilitate the translation of a problematic protein sequence. Ribo-T can be used for exploring poorly understood functions of the ribosome, enabling orthogonal genetic systems, and engineering ribosomes with new functions.

  17. Bacterial ribosomal subunit assembly is an antibiotic target.

    PubMed

    Champney, W Scott

    2003-01-01

    A substantial number of antimicrobial agents target some activity of the bacterial ribosome for inhibition. Mechanistic studies and recent structural investigations of the ribosome have identified the binding sites and presumed mechanism of inhibitory activity for some compounds. A second target for many of these antibiotics has recently been examined. Formation of both 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits in bacterial cells is impaired by translational inhibitors. For many antimicrobial agents, inhibition of this target is equivalent to inhibition of translation in preventing cell growth. This review will describe features of this new target including the types of compounds which affect particle assembly and differences in the process in different microorganisms. The characteristics of this new target will be identified and aspects of a model to explain this new inhibitory activity will be explored.

  18. Stable isotope pulse-chase monitored by quantitative mass spectrometry applied to E. coli 30S ribosome assembly kinetics.

    PubMed

    Bunner, Anne E; Williamson, James R

    2009-10-01

    Stable isotope mass spectrometry has become a widespread tool in quantitative biology. Pulse-chase monitored by quantitative mass spectrometry (PC/QMS) is a recently developed stable isotope approach that provides a powerful means of studying the in vitro self-assembly kinetics of macromolecular complexes. This method has been applied to the Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit, but could be applied to any stable self-assembling complex that can be reconstituted from its component parts and purified from a mixture of components and complex. The binding rates of 18 out of the 20 ribosomal proteins have been measured at several temperatures using PC/QMS. Here, PC/QMS experiments on 30S ribosomal subunit assembly are described, and the potential application of the method to other complexes is discussed. A variation on the PC/QMS experiment is introduced that enables measurement of kinetic cooperativity between proteins. In addition, several related approaches to stable isotope labeling and quantitative mass spectrometry data analysis are compared and contrasted.

  19. In vivo X-ray footprinting of pre-30S ribosomes reveals chaperone-dependent remodeling of late assembly intermediates.

    PubMed

    Clatterbuck Soper, Sarah F; Dator, Romel P; Limbach, Patrick A; Woodson, Sarah A

    2013-11-21

    Assembly of 30S ribosomal subunits from their protein and RNA components requires extensive refolding of the 16S rRNA and is assisted by 10-20 assembly factors in bacteria. We probed the structures of 30S assembly intermediates in E. coli cells, using a synchrotron X-ray beam to generate hydroxyl radical in the cytoplasm. Widespread differences between mature and pre-30S complexes in the absence of assembly factors RbfA and RimM revealed global reorganization of RNA-protein interactions prior to maturation of the 16S rRNA and showed how RimM reduces misfolding of the 16S 3' domain during transcription in vivo. Quantitative (14)N/(15)N mass spectrometry of affinity-purified pre-30S complexes confirmed the absence of tertiary assembly proteins and showed that N-terminal acetylation of proteins S18 and S5 correlates with correct folding of the platform and central pseudoknot. Our results indicate that cellular factors delay specific RNA folding steps to ensure the quality of assembly. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Three-dimensional placement of the conserved 530 loop of 16 S rRNA and of its neighboring components in the 30 S subunit.

    PubMed

    Wang, R; Alexander, R W; VanLoock, M; Vladimirov, S; Bukhtiyarov, Y; Harvey, S C; Cooperman, B S

    1999-02-19

    Nucleotides 518-533 form a loop in ribosomal 30 S subunits that is almost universally conserved. Both biochemical and genetic evidence clearly implicate the 530 loop in ribosomal function, with respect both to the accuracy control mechanism and to tRNA binding. Here, building on earlier work, we identify proteins and nucleotides (or limited sequences) site-specifically photolabeled by radioactive photolabile oligoDNA probes targeted toward the 530 loop of 30 S subunits. The probes we employ are complementary to 16 S rRNA nucleotides 517-527, and have aryl azides attached to nucleotides complementary to nucleotides 518, 522, and 525-527, positioning the photogenerated nitrene a maximum of 19-26 A from the complemented rRNA base. The crosslinks obtained are used as constraints to revise an earlier model of 30 S structure, using the YAMMP molecular modeling package, and to place the 530 loop region within that structure. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  1. Are there proteins between the ribosomal subunits? Hot tritium bombardment experiments.

    PubMed

    Yusupov, M M; Spirin, A S

    1986-03-03

    The hot tritium bombardment technique [(1976) Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 228, 1237-1238] was used for studying the surface localization of ribosomal proteins on Escherichia coli ribosomes. The degree of tritium labeling of proteins was considered as a measure of their exposure (surface localization). Proteins S1, S4, S7, S9 and/or S11, S12 and/or L20, S13, S18, S20, S21, L5, L6, L7/L12, L10, L11, L16, L17, L24, L26 and L27 were shown to be the most exposed on the ribosome surface. The sets of exposed ribosomal proteins on the surface of 70 S ribosomes, on the one hand, and the surfaces of 50 S and 30 S ribosomal subunits in the dissociated state, on the other, were compared. It was found that the dissociation of ribosomes into subunits did not result in exposure of additional ribosomal proteins. The conclusion was drawn that proteins are absent from the contacting surfaces of the ribosomal subunits.

  2. Proteopedia Entry: The Large Ribosomal Subunit of "Haloarcula Marismortui"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decatur, Wayne A.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a "Proteopedia" page that shows the refined version of the structure of the "Haloarcula" large ribosomal subunit as solved by the laboratories of Thomas Steitz and Peter Moore. The landmark structure is of great impact as it is the first atomic-resolution structure of the highly conserved ribosomal subunit which harbors…

  3. Proteopedia Entry: The Large Ribosomal Subunit of "Haloarcula Marismortui"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decatur, Wayne A.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a "Proteopedia" page that shows the refined version of the structure of the "Haloarcula" large ribosomal subunit as solved by the laboratories of Thomas Steitz and Peter Moore. The landmark structure is of great impact as it is the first atomic-resolution structure of the highly conserved ribosomal subunit which harbors…

  4. Compilation of small ribosomal subunit RNA structures.

    PubMed Central

    Neefs, J M; Van de Peer, Y; De Rijk, P; Chapelle, S; De Wachter, R

    1993-01-01

    The database on small ribosomal subunit RNA structure contained 1804 nucleotide sequences on April 23, 1993. This number comprises 365 eukaryotic, 65 archaeal, 1260 bacterial, 30 plastidial, and 84 mitochondrial sequences. These are stored in the form of an alignment in order to facilitate the use of the database as input for comparative studies on higher-order structure and for reconstruction of phylogenetic trees. The elements of the postulated secondary structure for each molecule are indicated by special symbols. The database is available on-line directly from the authors by ftp and can also be obtained from the EMBL nucleotide sequence library by electronic mail, ftp, and on CD ROM disk. PMID:8332525

  5. Insights into structure and function of 30S Ribosomal Protein S2 (30S2) in Chlamydophila pneumoniae: A potent target of pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Koteswara Reddy, G; Nagamalleswara Rao, K; Yarrakula, Kiran

    2017-02-01

    The gene 30S ribosomal protein S2 (30S2) is identified as a potential drug and vaccine target for Pneumonia. Its structural characterization is an important to understand the mechanism of action for identifying its receptor and/or other binding partners. The comparative genomics and proteomics studies are useful for structural characterization of 30S2 in C. Pneumoniae using different bioinformatics tools and web servers. In this study, the protein 30S2 structure was modelled and validated by Ramachandran plot. It is found that the modelled protein under most favoured "core" region was 88.7% and overall G-factor statistics with average score was -0.20. However, seven sequential motifs have been identified for 30S2 with reference codes (PR0095, PF0038, TIGR01012, PTHR11489, SSF52313 and PTHR11489). In addition, seven structural highly conserved residues have been identified in the large cleft are Lys160, Gly161and Arg162 with volume 1288.83Å(3) and average depth of the cleft was 10.75Å. Moreover, biological functions, biochemical process and structural constituents of ribosome are also explored. The study will be helped us to understand the sequential, structural, functional and evolutionary clues of unknown proteins available in C. Pneumoniae.

  6. Quantitation of ten 30S ribosomal assembly intermediates using fluorescence triple correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ridgeway, William K; Millar, David P; Williamson, James R

    2012-08-21

    The self-assembly of bacterial 30S ribosomes involves a large number of RNA folding and RNA-protein binding steps. The sequence of steps determines the overall assembly mechanism and the structure of the mechanism has ramifications for the robustness of biogenesis and resilience against kinetic traps. Thermodynamic interdependencies of protein binding inferred from omission-reconstitution experiments are thought to preclude certain assembly pathways and thus enforce ordered assembly, but this concept is at odds with kinetic data suggesting a more parallel assembly landscape. A major challenge is deconvolution of the statistical distribution of intermediates that are populated during assembly at high concentrations approaching in vivo assembly conditions. To specifically resolve the intermediates formed by binding of three ribosomal proteins to the full length 16S rRNA, we introduce Fluorescence Triple-Correlation Spectroscopy (F3CS). F3CS identifies specific ternary complexes by detecting coincident fluctuations in three-color fluorescence data. Triple correlation integrals quantify concentrations and diffusion kinetics of triply labeled species, and F3CS data can be fit alongside auto-correlation and cross-correlation data to quantify the populations of 10 specific ribosome assembly intermediates. The distribution of intermediates generated by binding three ribosomal proteins to the entire native 16S rRNA included significant populations of species that were not previously thought to be thermodynamically accessible, questioning the current interpretation of the classic omission-reconstitution experiments. F3CS is a general approach for analyzing assembly and function of macromolecular complexes, especially those too large for traditional biophysical methods.

  7. Altered 40 S ribosomal subunits in omnipotent suppressors of yeast.

    PubMed

    Eustice, D C; Wakem, L P; Wilhelm, J M; Sherman, F

    1986-03-20

    The five suppressors SUP35, SUP43, SUP44, SUP45 and SUP46, each mapping at a different chromosomal locus in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suppress a wide range of mutations, including representatives of all three types of nonsense mutations, UAA, UAG and UGA. We have demonstrated that ribosomes from the four suppressors SUP35, SUP44, SUP45 and SUP46 translate polyuridylate templates in vitro with higher errors than ribosomes from the normal stain, and that this misreading is substantially enhanced by the antibiotic paromomycin. Furthermore, ribosomal subunit mixing experiments established that the 40 S ribosomal subunit, and this subunit only, is responsible for the higher levels of misreading. Thus, the gene products of SUP35, SUP44, SUP45 and SUP46 are components of the 40 S subunit or are enzymes that modify the subunit. In addition, a protein from the 40 S subunit of the SUP35 suppressor has an altered electrophoretic mobility; this protein is distinct from the altered protein previously uncovered in the 40 S subunit of the SUP46 suppressor. In contrast to the ribosomes from the four suppressors SUP35, SUP44, SUP45 and SUP46, the ribosomes from the SUP43 suppressor do not significantly misread polyuridylate templates in vitro, suggesting that this locus may not encode a ribosomal component or that the misreading is highly specific.

  8. Head swivel on the ribosome facilitates translocation via intra-subunit tRNA hybrid sites

    PubMed Central

    Ratje, Andreas H.; Loerke, Justus; Mikolajka, Aleksandra; Brünner, Matthias; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Starosta, Agata L.; Dönhöfer, Alexandra; Connell, Sean R.; Fucini, Paola; Mielke, Thorsten; Whitford, Paul C.; Onuchic, Jose’ N; Yu, Yanan; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.; Hartmann, Roland K.; Penczek, Pawel A.; Wilson, Daniel N.; Spahn, Christian M.T.

    2011-01-01

    The elongation cycle of protein synthesis involves the delivery of aminoacyl-tRNAs to the A-site of the ribosome, followed by peptide-bond formation and translocation of the tRNAs through the ribosome to reopen the A-site1,2. The translocation reaction is catalyzed by elongation factor G (EF-G) in a GTP-dependent fashion3. Despite the availability of structures of various EF-G-ribosome complexes, the precise mechanism by which tRNAs move through the ribosome still remains unclear. Here we use multiparticle cryo-EM analysis to resolve two previously unseen subpopulations within EF-G-ribosome complexes at sub-nanometer resolution, one of them with a partially translocated tRNA. Comparison of these sub-states reveals that translocation of tRNA on the 30S subunit parallels the swiveling of the 30S-head and is coupled to un-ratcheting of the 30S-body. Since the tRNA maintains contact with the P-site on the 30S-head and simultaneously establishes interaction with the E-site on the 30S-platform, a novel intra-subunit pe/E hybrid state is formed. This state is stabilized by domain IV of EF-G, which interacts with the swiveled 30S-head conformation. These findings provide direct structural and mechanistic insight into the “missing link” in terms of tRNA intermediates involved in the universally conserved translocation process. PMID:21124459

  9. Database on the structure of large ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    De Rijk, P; Van de Peer, Y; Chapelle, S; De Wachter, R

    1994-01-01

    A database on large ribosomal subunit RNA is made available. It contains 258 sequences. It provides sequence, alignment and secondary structure information in computer-readable formats. Files can be obtained using ftp. PMID:7524023

  10. A process yields large quantities of pure ribosome subunits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, M.; Lu, P.; Rich, A.

    1972-01-01

    Development of process for in-vitro protein synthesis from living cells followed by dissociation of ribosomes into subunits is discussed. Process depends on dialysis or use of chelating agents. Operation of process and advantages over previous methods are outlined.

  11. Inhibition of Escherichia coli ribosome subunit dissociation by chloramphenicol and Blasticidin: a new mode of action of the antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Pathak, B K; Mondal, S; Barat, C

    2017-01-01

    The ability of the ribosome to assist in folding of proteins both in vitro and in vivo is well documented and is a nontranslational function of the ribosome. The interaction of the unfolded protein with the peptidyl transferase centre (PTC) of the bacterial large ribosomal subunit is followed by release of the protein in the folding competent state and rapid dissociation of ribosomal subunits. Our study demonstrates that the PTC-specific antibiotics, chloramphenicol and blasticidin S inhibit unfolded protein-mediated subunit dissociation. During post-termination stage of translation in bacteria, ribosome recycling factor (RRF) is used together with elongation factor G to recycle the 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits for the next round of translation. Ribosome dissociation mediated by RRF and induced at low magnesium concentration was also inhibited by the antibiotics indicating that the PTC antibiotics exert an associative effect on ribosomal subunits. In vivo, the antibiotics can also reduce the ribosomal degradation during carbon starvation, a process requiring ribosome subunit dissociation. This study reveals a new mode of action of the broad-spectrum antibiotics chloramphenicol and blasticidin. Ribosome synthesizes protein in all organisms and is the target for multiple antimicrobial agents. Our study demonstrates that chloramphenicol and blasticidin S that target the peptidyl transferase centre of the bacterial ribosome can then inhibit dissociation of 70S ribosome mediated by (i) unfolded protein, (ii) translation factors or (iii) low Mg(+2) concentrations in vitro and thereby suppresses ribosomal degradation during carbon starvation in vivo. The demonstration of this new mode of action furthers the understanding of these broad-spectrum antibiotics that differentially inhibit protein synthesis in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Ribosomes lacking protein S20 are defective in mRNA binding and subunit association.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Christina; Mandava, Chandra Sekhar; Ehrenberg, Måns; Andersson, Dan I; Sanyal, Suparna

    2010-04-02

    The functional significance of ribosomal proteins is still relatively unclear. Here, we examined the role of small subunit protein S20 in translation using both in vivo and in vitro techniques. By means of lambda red recombineering, the rpsT gene, encoding S20, was removed from the chromosome of Salmonella enterica var. Typhimurium LT2 to produce a DeltaS20 strain that grew markedly slower than the wild type while maintaining a wild-type rate of peptide elongation. Removal of S20 conferred a significant reduction in growth rate that was eliminated upon expression of the rpsT gene on a high-copy-number plasmid. The in vitro phenotype of mutant ribosomes was investigated using a translation system composed of highly active, purified components from Escherichia coli. Deletion of S20 conferred two types of initiation defects to the 30S subunit: (i) a significant reduction in the rate of mRNA binding and (ii) a drastic decrease in the yield of 70S complexes caused by an impairment in association with the 50S subunit. Both of these impairments were partially relieved by an extended incubation time with mRNA, fMet-tRNA(fMet), and initiation factors, indicating that absence of S20 disturbs the structural integrity of 30S subunits. Considering the topographical location of S20 in complete 30S subunits, the molecular mechanism by which it affects mRNA binding and subunit docking is not entirely obvious. We speculate that its interaction with helix 44 of the 16S ribosomal RNA is crucial for optimal ribosome function. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. On the specificity of antibiotics targeting the large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Daniel N

    2011-12-01

    The peptidyltransferase center of the large ribosomal subunit is responsible for catalyzing peptide bonds. This active site is the target of a variety of diverse antibiotics, many of which are used clinically. The past decade has seen a plethora of structures of antibiotics in complex with the large ribosomal subunit, providing unprecedented insight into the mechanism of action of these inhibitors. Ten distinct antibiotics (chloramphenicol, clindamycin, linezolid, tiamulin, sparsomycin, and five macrolides) have been crystallized in complex with four distinct ribosomal species, three bacterial, and one archaeal. This review aims to compare these structures in order to provide insight into the conserved and species-specific modes of interaction for particular members of each class of antibiotics. Coupled with the wealth of biochemical data, a picture is emerging defining the specific functional states of the ribosome that antibiotics preferentially target. Such mechanistic insight into antibiotic inhibition will be important for the development of the next generation of antimicrobial agents.

  14. Translation initiation factor 3 regulates switching between different modes of ribosomal subunit joining.

    PubMed

    MacDougall, Daniel D; Gonzalez, Ruben L

    2015-05-08

    Ribosomal subunit joining is a key checkpoint in the bacterial translation initiation pathway during which initiation factors (IFs) regulate association of the 30S initiation complex (IC) with the 50S subunit to control formation of a 70S IC that can enter into the elongation stage of protein synthesis. The GTP-bound form of IF2 accelerates subunit joining, whereas IF3 antagonizes subunit joining and plays a prominent role in maintaining translation initiation fidelity. The molecular mechanisms through which IF2 and IF3 collaborate to regulate the efficiency of 70S IC formation, including how they affect the dynamics of subunit joining, remain poorly defined. Here, we use single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to monitor the interactions between IF2 and the GTPase-associated center (GAC) of the 50S subunit during real-time subunit joining reactions in the absence and presence of IF3. In the presence of IF3, IF2-mediated subunit joining becomes reversible, and subunit joining events cluster into two distinct classes corresponding to formation of shorter- and longer-lifetime 70S ICs. Inclusion of IF3 within the 30S IC was also found to alter the conformation of IF2 relative to the GAC, suggesting that IF3's regulatory effects may stem in part from allosteric modulation of IF2-GAC interactions. The results are consistent with a model in which IF3 can exert control over the efficiency of subunit joining by modulating the conformation of the 30S IC, which in turn influences the formation of stabilizing intersubunit contacts and thus the reaction's degree of reversibility.

  15. Cycloheximide resistance can be mediated through either ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, C A; Ares, M; Hallberg, R L

    1978-01-01

    Two cycloheximide-resistant mutants of Tetrahymena thermophila were analyzed to determine the site of their cycloheximide resistance. The mutations in both strains had been previously shown to be genetically dominant and located at separate loci (denoted Chx-A and Chx-B). Strains carrying these mutations were readily distinguished by the extent to which they were resistant to the drug. The homozygous double mutant was more resistant than either single mutant. Cell-free extracts of wild type and of the three mutant strains, assayed for protein synthetic activity by both runoff of natural mRNA and poly(U)-dependent phenylalanine polymerization, demonstrated that in vitro the mutants were all more resistant than the wild type. Further fractionation of the cell-free systems into ribosomes and supernates localized cycloheximide resistance to the ribosome for both Chx-A and Chx-B homozygotes. Ribosome dissociation and pairwise subunit mixing in the in vitro system indicated that ribosome resistance was conferred by the 60S subunit from one strain whereas resistance in the other strain was mediated through the 40S subunit. This was further confirmed by reconstruction of all four cycloheximide-resistance "phenotypes" by mixing ribosomal subunits from appropriate strains. This finding suggests that the mechanisms by which these mutations confer resistance to cycloheximide are different. PMID:277918

  16. Effects of cations and cosolvents on eukaryotic ribosomal subunit conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.N.; Spremulli, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of various cations and cosolvents on the conformation of wheat germ ribosomes and ribosomal subunits have been investigated by using the techniques of circular dichroism and differential hydrogen exchange. A class of hydrogens on both the 40S and 60S subunits exchange out more rapidly as the Mg/sup 2 +/ concentration is raised, indicating that Mg/sup 2 +/ causes a change in subunit conformation. Ca/sup 2 +/ and the polyamines produce a similar increase in the rate of hydrogen exchange. These results suggest that increases in cation concentrations permit a tightening of ribosome structure and a greater degree of internalization of the rRNA. The cosolvent glycerol causes an alteration in the CD spectrum of 80S ribosomes in both the nucleic acid and protein portions of the spectrum. Glycerol also causes a decrease in the rate of exchange of a number of hydrogens on both the 40S and 60S subunits. These results are interpreted to mean that glycerol favors a more native, less denatured structure in the ribosome.

  17. Functional dichotomy of ribosomal proteins during the synthesis of mammalian 40S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    O'Donohue, Marie-Françoise; Choesmel, Valérie; Faubladier, Marlène; Fichant, Gwennaële; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2010-09-06

    Our knowledge of the functions of metazoan ribosomal proteins in ribosome synthesis remains fragmentary. Using siRNAs, we show that knockdown of 31 of the 32 ribosomal proteins of the human 40S subunit (ribosomal protein of the small subunit [RPS]) strongly affects pre-ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing, which often correlates with nucleolar chromatin disorganization. 16 RPSs are strictly required for initiating processing of the sequences flanking the 18S rRNA in the pre-rRNA except at the metazoan-specific early cleavage site. The remaining 16 proteins are necessary for progression of the nuclear and cytoplasmic maturation steps and for nuclear export. Distribution of these two subsets of RPSs in the 40S subunit structure argues for a tight dependence of pre-rRNA processing initiation on the folding of both the body and the head of the forming subunit. Interestingly, the functional dichotomy of RPS proteins reported in this study is correlated with the mutation frequency of RPS genes in Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

  18. Protein-RNA Dynamics in the Central Junction Control 30S Ribosome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kris Ann; Lamichhane, Rajan; Lamichhane, Tek; Rueda, David; Cunningham, Philip R

    2016-09-11

    Interactions between ribosomal proteins (rproteins) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) facilitate the formation of functional ribosomes. S15 is a central domain primary binding protein that has been shown to trigger a cascade of conformational changes in 16S rRNA, forming the functional structure of the central domain. Previous biochemical and structural studies in vitro have revealed that S15 binds a three-way junction of helices 20, 21, and 22, including nucleotides 652-654 and 752-754. All junction nucleotides except 653 are highly conserved among the Bacteria. To identify functionally important motifs within the junction, we subjected nucleotides 652-654 and 752-754 to saturation mutagenesis and selected and analyzed functional mutants. Only 64 mutants with greater than 10% ribosome function in vivo were isolated. S15 overexpression complemented mutations in the junction loop in each of the partially active mutants, although mutations that produced inactive ribosomes were not complemented by overexpression of S15. Single-molecule Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) was used to study the Mg(2+)- and S15-induced conformational dynamics of selected junction mutants. Comparison of the structural dynamics of these mutants with the wild type in the presence and absence of S15 revealed specific sequence and structural motifs in the central junction that are important in ribosome function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. GTP hydrolysis by EF-G synchronizes tRNA movement on small and large ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Holtkamp, Wolf; Cunha, Carlos E; Peske, Frank; Konevega, Andrey L; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V

    2014-01-01

    Elongation factor G (EF-G) promotes the movement of two tRNAs and the mRNA through the ribosome in each cycle of peptide elongation. During translocation, the tRNAs transiently occupy intermediate positions on both small (30S) and large (50S) ribosomal subunits. How EF-G and GTP hydrolysis control these movements is still unclear. We used fluorescence labels that specifically monitor movements on either 30S or 50S subunits in combination with EF-G mutants and translocation-specific antibiotics to investigate timing and energetics of translocation. We show that EF-G–GTP facilitates synchronous movements of peptidyl-tRNA on the two subunits into an early post-translocation state, which resembles a chimeric state identified by structural studies. EF-G binding without GTP hydrolysis promotes only partial tRNA movement on the 50S subunit. However, rapid 30S translocation and the concomitant completion of 50S translocation require GTP hydrolysis and a functional domain 4 of EF-G. Our results reveal two distinct modes for utilizing the energy of EF-G binding and GTP hydrolysis and suggest that coupling of GTP hydrolysis to translocation is mediated through rearrangements of the 30S subunit. PMID:24614227

  20. Identification of nucleotides in E. coli 16S rRNA essential for ribosome subunit association

    PubMed Central

    Pulk, Arto; Maiväli, Ülo; Remme, Jaanus

    2006-01-01

    The ribosome consists of two unequal subunits, which associate via numerous intersubunit contacts. Medium-resolution structural studies have led to grouping of the intersubunit contacts into 12 directly visualizable intersubunit bridges. Most of the intersubunit interactions involve RNA. We have used an RNA modification interference approach to determine Escherichia coli 16S rRNA positions that are essential for the association of functionally active 70S ribosomes. Modification of the N1 position of A702, A1418, and A1483 with DMS, and of the N3 position of U793, U1414, and U1495 with CMCT in 30S subunits strongly interferes with 70S ribosome formation. Five of these positions localize into previously recognized intersubunit bridges, namely, B2a (U1495), B2b (U793), B3 (A1483), B5 (A1418), and B7a (A702). The remaining position displaying interference, U1414, forms a base pair with G1486, which is a part of bridge B3. We contend that these five intersubunit bridges are essential for reassociation of the 70S ribosome, thus forming the functional core of the intersubunit contacts. PMID:16556933

  1. Identification of nucleotides in E. coli 16S rRNA essential for ribosome subunit association.

    PubMed

    Pulk, Arto; Maiväli, Ulo; Remme, Jaanus

    2006-05-01

    The ribosome consists of two unequal subunits, which associate via numerous intersubunit contacts. Medium-resolution structural studies have led to grouping of the intersubunit contacts into 12 directly visualizable intersubunit bridges. Most of the intersubunit interactions involve RNA. We have used an RNA modification interference approach to determine Escherichia coli 16S rRNA positions that are essential for the association of functionally active 70S ribosomes. Modification of the N1 position of A702, A1418, and A1483 with DMS, and of the N3 position of U793, U1414, and U1495 with CMCT in 30S subunits strongly interferes with 70S ribosome formation. Five of these positions localize into previously recognized intersubunit bridges, namely, B2a (U1495), B2b (U793), B3 (A1483), B5 (A1418), and B7a (A702). The remaining position displaying interference, U1414, forms a base pair with G1486, which is a part of bridge B3. We contend that these five intersubunit bridges are essential for reassociation of the 70S ribosome, thus forming the functional core of the intersubunit contacts.

  2. Database on the structure of large ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    De Rijk, P; Caers, A; Van de Peer, Y; De Wachter, R

    1998-01-01

    The rRNA WWW Server at URL http://rrna.uia.ac.be/ now provides a database of 496 large subunit ribosomal RNA sequences. All these sequences are aligned, incorporate secondary structure information, and can be obtained in a number of formats. Other information about the sequences, such as literature references, accession numbers and taxonomic information is also available and searchable. If necessary, the data on the server can also be obtained by anonymous ftp. PMID:9399830

  3. Database on the structure of small ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Peer, Y; Caers, A; De Rijk, P; De Wachter, R

    1998-01-01

    About 8600 complete or nearly complete sequences are now available from the Antwerp database on small ribosomal subunit RNA. All these sequences are aligned with one another on the basis of the adopted secondary structure model, which is corroborated by the observation of compensating substitutions in the alignment. Literature references, accession numbers and detailed taxonomic information are also compiled. The database can be consulted via the World Wide Web at URL http://rrna.uia.ac.be/ssu/ PMID:9399829

  4. Database on the structure of large ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    De Rijk, P; Van de Peer, Y; De Wachter, R

    1996-01-01

    Our database on large ribosomal subunit RNA contained 334 sequences in July, 1995. All sequences in the database are aligned, taking into account secondary structure. The aligned sequences are provided, together with incorporated secondary structure information, in several computer-readable formats. These data can easily be obtained through the World Wide Web. The files in the database are also available via anonymous ftp. PMID:8594610

  5. Ribosome Subunit Stapling for Orthogonal Translation in E.  coli.

    PubMed

    Fried, Stephen D; Schmied, Wolfgang H; Uttamapinant, Chayasith; Chin, Jason W

    2015-10-19

    The creation of orthogonal large and small ribosomal subunits, which interact with each other but not with endogenous ribosomal subunits, would extend our capacity to create new functions in the ribosome by making the large subunit evolvable. To this end, we rationally designed a ribosomal RNA that covalently links the ribosome subunits via an RNA staple. The stapled ribosome is directed to an orthogonal mRNA, allowing the introduction of mutations into the large subunit that reduce orthogonal translation, but have minimal effects on cell growth. Our approach provides a promising route towards orthogonal subunit association, which may enable the evolution of key functional centers in the large subunit, including the peptidyl-transferase center, for unnatural polymer synthesis in cells.

  6. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O'Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-02-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2‧OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit.

  7. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    PubMed Central

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O’Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-01-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2′OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit. PMID:26876483

  8. Specific interaction between EF-G and RRF and its implication for GTP-dependent ribosome splitting into subunits

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ning; Zavialov, Andrey V.; Ehrenberg, Måns; Frank, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Summary After termination of protein synthesis, the bacterial ribosome is split into its 30S and 50S subunits by the action of ribosome recycling factor (RRF) and elongation factor G (EF-G) in a GTP-hydrolysis dependent manner. Based on a previous cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) study of ribosomal complexes, we have proposed that the binding of EF-G to an RRF containing post-termination ribosome triggers an inter-domain rotation of RRF, which destabilizes two strong intersubunit bridges (B2a and B3) and, ultimately, separates the two subunits. Here, we present a 9 Å (FSC at 0.5 cutoff) cryo-EM map of a 50S EFG GDPNP RRF complex and a quasi-atomic model derived from it, showing the interaction between EF-G and RRF on the 50S subunit in the presence of the non-cleavable GTP analogue GDPNP. The detailed information in this model and a comparative analysis of EF-G structures in various nucleotide- and ribosome-bound states show how rotation of the RRF head domain may be triggered by various domains of EF-G. For validation of our structural model, all known mutations in EF-G and RRF that relate to ribosome recycling have been taken into account. More importantly, our results indicate a substantial conformational change in the Switch I region of EF-G, suggesting that a conformational signal transduction mechanism, similar to that employed in tRNA translocation on the ribosome by EF-G, translates a large-scale movement of EF-G’s domain IV, induced by GTP hydrolysis, into the domain rotation of RRF that eventually splits the ribosome into subunits. PMID:17996252

  9. Structure of the large ribosomal subunit from human mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alan; Amunts, Alexey; Bai, Xiao-chen; Sugimoto, Yoichiro; Edwards, Patricia C; Murshudov, Garib; Scheres, Sjors H W; Ramakrishnan, V

    2014-11-07

    Human mitochondrial ribosomes are highly divergent from all other known ribosomes and are specialized to exclusively translate membrane proteins. They are linked with hereditary mitochondrial diseases and are often the unintended targets of various clinically useful antibiotics. Using single-particle cryogenic electron microscopy, we have determined the structure of its large subunit to 3.4 angstrom resolution, revealing 48 proteins, 21 of which are specific to mitochondria. The structure unveils an adaptation of the exit tunnel for hydrophobic nascent peptides, extensive remodeling of the central protuberance, including recruitment of mitochondrial valine transfer RNA (tRNA(Val)) to play an integral structural role, and changes in the tRNA binding sites related to the unusual characteristics of mitochondrial tRNAs.

  10. Structure of the large ribosomal subunit from human mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiao-chen; Sugimoto, Yoichiro; Edwards, Patricia C.; Murshudov, Garib; Scheres, Sjors H. W.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2014-01-01

    Human mitochondrial ribosomes are highly divergent from all other known ribosomes and are specialized to exclusively translate membrane proteins. They are linked with hereditary mitochondrial diseases, and are often the unintended targets of various clinically useful antibiotics. Using single-particle electron cryo-microscopy we have determined the structure of its large subunit to 3.4 angstrom resolution, revealing 48 proteins, 21 of which are specific to mitochondria. The structure unveils an adaptation of the exit tunnel for hydrophobic nascent peptides, extensive remodeling of the central protuberance including recruitment of mitochondrial tRNAVal to play an integral structural role, and changes in the tRNA binding sites related to the unusual characteristics of mitochondrial tRNAs. PMID:25278503

  11. Database on the structure of small ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Peer, Y; Nicolaï, S; De Rijk, P; De Wachter, R

    1996-01-01

    The Antwerp database on small ribosomal subunit RNA offers over 4300 nucleotide sequences (August 1995). All these sequences are stored in the form of an alignment based on the adopted secondary structure model, which in turn is corroborated by the observation of compensating substitutions in the alignment. Besides the primary and secondary structure information, literature references, accession numbers and detailed taxonomic information are also compiled. The complete database is made available to the scientific community through anonymous ftp and World Wide Web(WWW). PMID:8594609

  12. Database on the structure of large ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    De Rijk, P; Van de Peer, Y; De Wachter, R

    1997-01-01

    The latest release of the large ribosomal subunit RNA database contains 429 sequences. All these sequences are aligned, and incorporate secondary structure information. The rRNA WWW Server at URL http://rrna.uia.ac.be/ provides researchers with an easily accessible resource to obtain the data in this database in a number of computer-readable formats. A new query interface has been added to the server. If necessary, the data can also be obtained by anonymous ftp from the same site. PMID:9016517

  13. Database on the structure of small ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Peer, Y; Jansen, J; De Rijk, P; De Wachter, R

    1997-01-01

    The Antwerp database on small ribosomal subunit RNA now offers more than 6000 nucleotide sequences (August 1996). All these sequences are stored in the form of an alignment based on the adopted secondary structure model, which is corroborated by the observation of compensating substitutions in the alignment. Besides the primary and secondary structure information, literature references, accession numbers and detailed taxonomic information are also compiled. For ease of use, the complete database is made available to the scientific community via World Wide Web at URL http://rrna.uia.ac.be/ssu/ . PMID:9016516

  14. Database on the structure of small ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Peer, Y; Van den Broeck, I; De Rijk, P; De Wachter, R

    1994-01-01

    The database on small ribosomal subunit RNA structure contains (June 1994) 2824 nucleotide sequences. All these sequences are stored in the form of an alignment based on the adopted secondary structure model, which in turn is corroborated by the observation of compensating substitutions in the alignment. The complete database is made available to the scientific community through anonymous ftp on our server in Antwerp. A special effort was made to improve electronic retrieval and a program is supplied that allows to create different file formats. The database can also be obtained from the EMBL nucleotide sequence library. PMID:7524022

  15. Disassembly of yeast 80S ribosomes into subunits is a concerted action of ribosome-assisted folding of denatured protein.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Biprashekhar; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-22

    It has been shown by several groups that ribosome can assist folding of denatured protein in vitro and the process is conserved across the species. Domain V of large ribosomal rRNA which occupies the intersubunit side of the large subunit was identified as the key player responsible for chaperoning the folding process. Thus, it is conceivable that denatured protein needs to access the intersubunit space of the ribosome in order to get folded. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism of release of the protein from the eukaryotic ribosome following reactivation. We have observed significant splitting of yeast 80S ribosome when incubated with the denatured BCAII protein. Energy-free disassembly mechanism functions in low Mg(+2) ion concentration for prokaryotic ribosomes. Eukaryotic ribosomes do not show significant splitting even at low Mg(+2) ion concentration. In this respect, denatured protein-induced disassembly of eukaryotic ribosome without the involvement of any external energy source is intriguing. For prokaryotic ribosomes, it was reported that the denatured protein induces ribosome splitting into subunits in order to access domain V-rRNA. In contrast, our results suggest an alternative mechanism for eukaryotic ribosomal rRNA-mediated protein folding and subsequent separation of the subunits by which release of the activated-protein occurs.

  16. Principles of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly emerging from recent studies in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Konikkat, Salini; Woolford, John L.

    2017-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis requires the intertwined processes of folding, modification, and processing of ribosomal RNA, together with binding of ribosomal proteins. In eukaryotic cells, ribosome assembly begins in the nucleolus, continues in the nucleoplasm, and is not completed until after nascent particles are exported to the cytoplasm. The efficiency and fidelity of ribosome biogenesis are facilitated by >200 assembly factors and ~76 different small nucleolar RNAs. The pathway is driven forward by numerous remodeling events to rearrange the ribonucleoprotein architecture of pre-ribosomes. Here, we describe principles of ribosome assembly that have emerged from recent studies of biogenesis of the large ribosomal subunit in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We describe tools that have empowered investigations of ribosome biogenesis, and then summarize recent discoveries about each of the consecutive steps of subunit assembly. PMID:28062837

  17. Principles of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly emerging from recent studies in yeast.

    PubMed

    Konikkat, Salini; Woolford, John L

    2017-01-15

    Ribosome biogenesis requires the intertwined processes of folding, modification, and processing of ribosomal RNA, together with binding of ribosomal proteins. In eukaryotic cells, ribosome assembly begins in the nucleolus, continues in the nucleoplasm, and is not completed until after nascent particles are exported to the cytoplasm. The efficiency and fidelity of ribosome biogenesis are facilitated by >200 assembly factors and ∼76 different small nucleolar RNAs. The pathway is driven forward by numerous remodeling events to rearrange the ribonucleoprotein architecture of pre-ribosomes. Here, we describe principles of ribosome assembly that have emerged from recent studies of biogenesis of the large ribosomal subunit in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae We describe tools that have empowered investigations of ribosome biogenesis, and then summarize recent discoveries about each of the consecutive steps of subunit assembly. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  18. Cryo-EM structure of the large subunit of the spinach chloroplast ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tofayel; Yin, Zhan; Bhushan, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis in the chloroplast is mediated by the chloroplast ribosome (chloro-ribosome). Overall architecture of the chloro-ribosome is considerably similar to the Escherichia coli (E. coli) ribosome but certain differences are evident. The chloro-ribosome proteins are generally larger because of the presence of chloroplast-specific extensions in their N- and C-termini. The chloro-ribosome harbours six plastid-specific ribosomal proteins (PSRPs); four in the small subunit and two in the large subunit. Deletions and insertions occur throughout the rRNA sequence of the chloro-ribosome (except for the conserved peptidyl transferase center region) but the overall length of the rRNAs do not change significantly, compared to the E. coli. Although, recent advancements in cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) have provided detailed high-resolution structures of ribosomes from many different sources, a high-resolution structure of the chloro-ribosome is still lacking. Here, we present a cryo-EM structure of the large subunit of the chloro-ribosome from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) at an average resolution of 3.5 Å. High-resolution map enabled us to localize and model chloro-ribosome proteins, chloroplast-specific protein extensions, two PSRPs (PSRP5 and 6) and three rRNA molecules present in the chloro-ribosome. Although comparable to E. coli, the polypeptide tunnel and the tunnel exit site show chloroplast-specific features. PMID:27762343

  19. A hierarchical model for assembly of eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit domains.

    PubMed

    Gamalinda, Michael; Ohmayer, Uli; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Kumcuoglu, Beril; Woolford, Joshua; Mbom, Bertrade; Lin, Lawrence; Woolford, John L

    2014-01-15

    Despite having high-resolution structures for eukaryotic large ribosomal subunits, it remained unclear how these ribonucleoprotein complexes are constructed in living cells. Nevertheless, knowing where ribosomal proteins interact with ribosomal RNA (rRNA) provides a strategic platform to investigate the connection between spatial and temporal aspects of 60S subunit biogenesis. We previously found that the function of individual yeast large subunit ribosomal proteins (RPLs) in precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing correlates with their location in the structure of mature 60S subunits. This observation suggested that there is an order by which 60S subunits are formed. To test this model, we used proteomic approaches to assay changes in the levels of ribosomal proteins and assembly factors in preribosomes when RPLs functioning in early, middle, and late steps of pre-60S assembly are depleted. Our results demonstrate that structural domains of eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunits are formed in a hierarchical fashion. Assembly begins at the convex solvent side, followed by the polypeptide exit tunnel, the intersubunit side, and finally the central protuberance. This model provides an initial paradigm for the sequential assembly of eukaryotic 60S subunits. Our results reveal striking differences and similarities between assembly of bacterial and eukaryotic large ribosomal subunits, providing insights into how these RNA-protein particles evolved.

  20. A hierarchical model for assembly of eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit domains

    PubMed Central

    Gamalinda, Michael; Ohmayer, Uli; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Kumcuoglu, Beril; Woolford, Joshua; Mbom, Bertrade; Lin, Lawrence; Woolford, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite having high-resolution structures for eukaryotic large ribosomal subunits, it remained unclear how these ribonucleoprotein complexes are constructed in living cells. Nevertheless, knowing where ribosomal proteins interact with ribosomal RNA (rRNA) provides a strategic platform to investigate the connection between spatial and temporal aspects of 60S subunit biogenesis. We previously found that the function of individual yeast large subunit ribosomal proteins (RPLs) in precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing correlates with their location in the structure of mature 60S subunits. This observation suggested that there is an order by which 60S subunits are formed. To test this model, we used proteomic approaches to assay changes in the levels of ribosomal proteins and assembly factors in preribosomes when RPLs functioning in early, middle, and late steps of pre-60S assembly are depleted. Our results demonstrate that structural domains of eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunits are formed in a hierarchical fashion. Assembly begins at the convex solvent side, followed by the polypeptide exit tunnel, the intersubunit side, and finally the central protuberance. This model provides an initial paradigm for the sequential assembly of eukaryotic 60S subunits. Our results reveal striking differences and similarities between assembly of bacterial and eukaryotic large ribosomal subunits, providing insights into how these RNA–protein particles evolved. PMID:24449272

  1. Secondary structure features of ribosomal RNA species within intact ribosomal subunits and efficiency of RNA-protein interactions in thermoacidophilic (Caldariella acidophila, Bacillus acidocaldarius) and mesophilic (Escherichia coli) bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cammarano, P; Mazzei, F; Londei, P; Teichner, A; de Rosa, M; Gambacorta, A

    1983-08-02

    RNA from Celite-bound E. coli ribosomes. Compared to E. coli the C. acidophila 50 and 30 S ribosomal subunits are considerably less susceptible to treatment designed to promote ribosome unfolding through depletion of magnesium ions.

  2. Structural basis for translational surveillance by the large ribosomal subunit-associated protein quality control complex

    PubMed Central

    Lyumkis, Dmitry; Oliveira dos Passos, Dario; Tahara, Erich B.; Webb, Kristofor; Bennett, Eric J.; Vinterbo, Staal; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget; Joazeiro, Claudio A. P.

    2014-01-01

    All organisms have evolved mechanisms to manage the stalling of ribosomes upon translation of aberrant mRNA. In eukaryotes, the large ribosomal subunit-associated quality control complex (RQC), composed of the listerin/Ltn1 E3 ubiquitin ligase and cofactors, mediates the ubiquitylation and extraction of ribosome-stalled nascent polypeptide chains for proteasomal degradation. How RQC recognizes stalled ribosomes and performs its functions has not been understood. Using single-particle cryoelectron microscopy, we have determined the structure of the RQC complex bound to stalled 60S ribosomal subunits. The structure establishes how Ltn1 associates with the large ribosomal subunit and properly positions its E3-catalytic RING domain to mediate nascent chain ubiquitylation. The structure also reveals that a distinguishing feature of stalled 60S particles is an exposed, nascent chain-conjugated tRNA, and that the Tae2 subunit of RQC, which facilitates Ltn1 binding, is responsible for selective recognition of stalled 60S subunits. RQC components are engaged in interactions across a large span of the 60S subunit surface, connecting the tRNA in the peptidyl transferase center to the distally located nascent chain tunnel exit. This work provides insights into a mechanism linking translation and protein degradation that targets defective proteins immediately after synthesis, while ignoring nascent chains in normally translating ribosomes. PMID:25349383

  3. Structural basis for translational surveillance by the large ribosomal subunit-associated protein quality control complex.

    PubMed

    Lyumkis, Dmitry; Oliveira dos Passos, Dario; Tahara, Erich B; Webb, Kristofor; Bennett, Eric J; Vinterbo, Staal; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Joazeiro, Claudio A P

    2014-11-11

    All organisms have evolved mechanisms to manage the stalling of ribosomes upon translation of aberrant mRNA. In eukaryotes, the large ribosomal subunit-associated quality control complex (RQC), composed of the listerin/Ltn1 E3 ubiquitin ligase and cofactors, mediates the ubiquitylation and extraction of ribosome-stalled nascent polypeptide chains for proteasomal degradation. How RQC recognizes stalled ribosomes and performs its functions has not been understood. Using single-particle cryoelectron microscopy, we have determined the structure of the RQC complex bound to stalled 60S ribosomal subunits. The structure establishes how Ltn1 associates with the large ribosomal subunit and properly positions its E3-catalytic RING domain to mediate nascent chain ubiquitylation. The structure also reveals that a distinguishing feature of stalled 60S particles is an exposed, nascent chain-conjugated tRNA, and that the Tae2 subunit of RQC, which facilitates Ltn1 binding, is responsible for selective recognition of stalled 60S subunits. RQC components are engaged in interactions across a large span of the 60S subunit surface, connecting the tRNA in the peptidyl transferase center to the distally located nascent chain tunnel exit. This work provides insights into a mechanism linking translation and protein degradation that targets defective proteins immediately after synthesis, while ignoring nascent chains in normally translating ribosomes.

  4. The Putative GTPase Encoded by MTG3 Functions in a Novel Pathway for Regulating Assembly of the Small Subunit of Yeast Mitochondrial Ribosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Marie-Françoise; Alushin, Gregory M.; Barros, Mario H.; Rak, Malgorzata; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Very little is known about biogenesis of mitochondrial ribosomes. The GTPases encoded by the nuclear MTG1 and MTG2 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been reported to play a role in assembly of the ribosomal 54 S subunit. In the present study biochemical screens of a collection of respiratory deficient yeast mutants have enabled us to identify a third gene essential for expression of mitochondrial ribosomes. This gene codes for a member of the YqeH family of GTPases, which we have named MTG3 in keeping with the earlier convention. Mutations in MTG3 cause the accumulation of the 15 S rRNA precursor, previously shown to have an 80-nucleotide 5′ extension. Sucrose gradient sedimentation of mitochondrial ribosomes from temperature-sensitive mtg3 mutants grown at the permissive and restrictive temperatures, combined with immunobloting with subunit-specific antibodies, indicate that Mtg3p is required for assembly of the 30 S but not 54 S ribosomal subunit. The respiratory deficient growth phenotype of an mtg3 null mutant is partially rescued by overexpression of the Mrpl4p constituent located at the peptide exit site of the 54 S subunit. The rescue is accompanied by an increase in processed 15 S rRNA. This suggests that Mtg3p and Mrpl4p jointly regulate assembly of the small subunit by modulating processing of the 15 S rRNA precursor. PMID:22621929

  5. The putative GTPase encoded by MTG3 functions in a novel pathway for regulating assembly of the small subunit of yeast mitochondrial ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Paul, Marie-Françoise; Alushin, Gregory M; Barros, Mario H; Rak, Malgorzata; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2012-07-13

    Very little is known about biogenesis of mitochondrial ribosomes. The GTPases encoded by the nuclear MTG1 and MTG2 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been reported to play a role in assembly of the ribosomal 54 S subunit. In the present study biochemical screens of a collection of respiratory deficient yeast mutants have enabled us to identify a third gene essential for expression of mitochondrial ribosomes. This gene codes for a member of the YqeH family of GTPases, which we have named MTG3 in keeping with the earlier convention. Mutations in MTG3 cause the accumulation of the 15 S rRNA precursor, previously shown to have an 80-nucleotide 5' extension. Sucrose gradient sedimentation of mitochondrial ribosomes from temperature-sensitive mtg3 mutants grown at the permissive and restrictive temperatures, combined with immunobloting with subunit-specific antibodies, indicate that Mtg3p is required for assembly of the 30 S but not 54 S ribosomal subunit. The respiratory deficient growth phenotype of an mtg3 null mutant is partially rescued by overexpression of the Mrpl4p constituent located at the peptide exit site of the 54 S subunit. The rescue is accompanied by an increase in processed 15 S rRNA. This suggests that Mtg3p and Mrpl4p jointly regulate assembly of the small subunit by modulating processing of the 15 S rRNA precursor.

  6. Electron microscopy and computer image averaging of ice-embedded large ribosomal subunits from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wagenknecht, T; Grassucci, R; Frank, J

    1988-01-05

    Electron micrographs of frozen-hydrated, large ribosomal subunits from Escherichia coli have been analyzed by computer image processing. Images of subunits in the so-called "crown" orientation were analyzed by correlation alignment procedures developed for negatively stained specimens. Averages of the aligned images showed both similarities and differences to averages determined for negatively stained specimens. The L1 ridge is more dense and stalk-like in frozen-hydrated as compared with negatively stained subunits, possibly because it is associated with ribosomal RNA. The results show that it should be feasible to determine the three-dimensional structure of the large ribosomal subunit from micrographs of individual, frozen-hydrated subunits that have been tilted in the electron microscope.

  7. Multiple GTPases participate in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Laura; Uicker, William C; Wicker-Planquart, Catherine; Foucher, Anne-Emmanuelle; Jault, Jean-Michel; Britton, Robert A

    2006-12-01

    GTPases have been demonstrated to be necessary for the proper assembly of the ribosome in bacteria and eukaryotes. Here, we show that the essential GTPases YphC and YsxC are required for large ribosomal subunit biogenesis in Bacillus subtilis. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation of large ribosomal subunits isolated from YphC-depleted cells and YsxC-depleted cells indicates that they are similar to the 45S intermediate previously identified in RbgA-depleted cells. The sedimentation of the large-subunit intermediate isolated from YphC-depleted cells was identical to the intermediate found in RbgA-depleted cells, while the intermediate isolated from YsxC-depleted cells sedimented slightly slower than 45S, suggesting that it is a novel intermediate. Analysis of the protein composition of the large-subunit intermediates isolated from either YphC-depleted cells or YsxC-depleted cells indicated that L16 and L36 are missing. Purified YphC and YsxC are able to interact with the ribosome in vitro, supporting a direct role for these two proteins in the assembly of the 50S subunit. Our results indicate that, as has been demonstrated for Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosome biogenesis, bacterial 50S ribosome assembly requires the function of multiple essential GTPases.

  8. Use of Eukaryotic Native Small Ribosomal Subunits for the Translation of Globin Messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Freienstein, Christoph; Blobel, Günter

    1974-01-01

    A highly active in vitro system for the translation of globin mRNA, resulting in more than 10 rounds of translation, is described. The reconstituted system consists of native small ribosomal subunits of rabbit reticulocytes (as a source of initiation factors as well as small ribosomal subunits), large subunits derived from rat liver polysomes by the puromycin-KCl procedure, and a pH 5 fraction obtained from a Krebs ascites cell high speed supernatant. In this system no differences were found between globin messenger ribonucleoprotein and globin mRNA. Images PMID:4530315

  9. Non-ribosomal factors in ribosome subunit assembly are emerging targets for new antibacterial drugs.

    PubMed

    Comartin, David J; Brown, Eric D

    2006-10-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that bacterial ribosome assembly is catalyzed by a variety of non-ribosomal factors. Newly characterized factors in bacterial ribosome biogenesis are broadly conserved and often indispensable proteins that can be classified either as chaperones facilitating assembly, or enzymes with ribosomal RNA- and ribosomal protein-modifying functions. Accumulating evidence indicates that the proteins Era, Obg, YjeQ, YlqF and RimM are chaperones which may be crucial to bacterial ribosome assembly, and therefore represent novel targets for modern antibacterial drug discovery. Ongoing work aimed at understanding ribosome biogenesis is expected to continue to yield additional factors crucial to this process, and provide new targets with drug discovery potential.

  10. Modular Assembly of the Bacterial Large Ribosomal Subunit.

    PubMed

    Davis, Joseph H; Tan, Yong Zi; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Williamson, James R

    2016-12-01

    The ribosome is a complex macromolecular machine and serves as an ideal system for understanding biological macromolecular assembly. Direct observation of ribosome assembly in vivo is difficult, as few intermediates have been isolated and thoroughly characterized. Herein, we deploy a genetic system to starve cells of an essential ribosomal protein, which results in the accumulation of assembly intermediates that are competent for maturation. Quantitative mass spectrometry and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy reveal 13 distinct intermediates, which were each resolved to ∼4-5 Å resolution and could be placed in an assembly pathway. We find that ribosome biogenesis is a parallel process, that blocks of structured rRNA and proteins assemble cooperatively, and that the entire process is dynamic and can be "re-routed" through different pathways as needed. This work reveals the complex landscape of ribosome assembly in vivo and provides the requisite tools to characterize additional assembly pathways for ribosomes and other macromolecular machines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Purification of 70S ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Maria C; Maguire, Bruce; Lake, James A

    2015-03-02

    Here we describe the further purification of prokaryotic ribosomal particles obtained after the centrifugation of a crude cell lysate through a sucrose cushion. In this final purification step, a fraction containing ribosomes, ribosomal subunits, and polysomes is centrifuged through a 7%-30% (w/w) linear sucrose gradient to isolate tight couple 70S ribosomes, as well as dissociated 30S and 50S subunits. The tight couples fraction, or translationally active ribosome fraction, is composed of intact vacant ribosomes that can be used in cell-free translation systems.

  12. Involvement of ribosomal protein L6 in assembly of functional 50S ribosomal subunit in Escherichia coli cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shigeno, Yuta; Uchiumi, Toshio; Nomura, Takaomi

    2016-04-22

    Ribosomal protein L6, an essential component of the large (50S) subunit, primarily binds to helix 97 of 23S rRNA and locates near the sarcin/ricin loop of helix 95 that directly interacts with GTPase translation factors. Although L6 is believed to play important roles in factor-dependent ribosomal function, crucial biochemical evidence for this hypothesis has not been obtained. We constructed and characterized an Escherichia coli mutant bearing a chromosomal L6 gene (rplF) disruption and carrying a plasmid with an arabinose-inducible L6 gene. Although this ΔL6 mutant grew more slowly than its wild-type parent, it proliferated in the presence of arabinose. Interestingly, cell growth in the absence of arabinose was biphasic. Early growth lasted only a few generations (LI-phase) and was followed by a suspension of growth for several hours (S-phase). This suspension was followed by a second growth phase (LII-phase). Cells harvested at both LI- and S-phases contained ribosomes with reduced factor-dependent GTPase activity and accumulated 50S subunit precursors (45S particles). The 45S particles completely lacked L6. Complete 50S subunits containing L6 were observed in all growth phases regardless of the L6-depleted condition, implying that the ΔL6 mutant escaped death because of a leaky expression of L6 from the complementing plasmid. We conclude that L6 is essential for the assembly of functional 50S subunits at the late stage. We thus established conditions for the isolation of L6-depleted 50S subunits, which are essential to study the role of L6 in translation. - Highlights: • We constructed an in vivo functional assay system for Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L6. • Growth of an E. coli ΔL6 mutant was biphasic when L6 levels were depleted. • The ΔL6 mutant accumulated 50S ribosomal subunit precursors that sedimented at 45S. • L6 is a key player in the late stage of E. coli 50S subunit assembly.

  13. Ribosomal protein L2 is involved in the association of the ribosomal subunits, tRNA binding to A and P sites and peptidyl transfer

    PubMed Central

    Diedrich, Gundo; Spahn, Christian M.T.; Stelzl, Ulrich; Schäfer, Markus A.; Wooten, Tammy; Bochkariov, Dmitry E.; Cooperman, Barry S.; Traut, Robert R.; Nierhaus, Knud H.

    2000-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins L2, L3 and L4, together with the 23S RNA, are the main candidates for catalyzing peptide bond formation on the 50S subunit. That L2 is evolutionarily highly conserved led us to perform a thorough functional analysis with reconstituted 50S particles either lacking L2 or harboring a mutated L2. L2 does not play a dominant role in the assembly of the 50S subunit or in the fixation of the 3′-ends of the tRNAs at the peptidyl-transferase center. However, it is absolutely required for the association of 30S and 50S subunits and is strongly involved in tRNA binding to both A and P sites, possibly at the elbow region of the tRNAs. Furthermore, while the conserved histidyl residue 229 is extremely important for peptidyl-transferase activity, it is apparently not involved in other measured functions. None of the other mutagenized amino acids (H14, D83, S177, D228, H231) showed this strong and exclusive participation in peptide bond formation. These results are used to examine critically the proposed direct involvement of His229 in catalysis of peptide synthesis. PMID:11013226

  14. A translation-like cycle is a quality control checkpoint for maturing 40S ribosome subunits.

    PubMed

    Strunk, Bethany S; Novak, Megan N; Young, Crystal L; Karbstein, Katrin

    2012-07-06

    Assembly factors (AFs) prevent premature translation initiation on small (40S) ribosomal subunit assembly intermediates by blocking ligand binding. However, it is unclear how AFs are displaced from maturing 40S ribosomes, if or how maturing subunits are assessed for fidelity, and what prevents premature translation initiation once AFs dissociate. Here we show that maturation involves a translation-like cycle whereby the translation factor eIF5B, a GTPase, promotes joining of large (60S) subunits with pre-40S subunits to give 80S-like complexes, which are subsequently disassembled by the termination factor Rli1, an ATPase. The AFs Tsr1 and Rio2 block the mRNA channel and initiator tRNA binding site, and therefore 80S-like ribosomes lack mRNA or initiator tRNA. After Tsr1 and Rio2 dissociate from 80S-like complexes Rli1-directed displacement of 60S subunits allows for translation initiation. This cycle thus provides a functional test of 60S subunit binding and the GTPase site before ribosomes enter the translating pool.

  15. Eukaryote-specific extensions in ribosomal proteins of the small subunit: Structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arnab; Komar, Anton A

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution structures of yeast ribosomes have improved our understanding of the architecture and organization of eukaryotic rRNA and proteins, as well as eukaryote-specific extensions present in some conserved ribosomal proteins. Despite this progress, assignment of specific functions to individual proteins and/or eukaryote-specific protein extensions remains challenging. It has been suggested that eukaryote-specific extensions of conserved proteins from the small ribosomal subunit may facilitate eukaryote-specific reactions in the initiation phase of protein synthesis. This review summarizes emerging data describing the structural and functional significance of eukaryote-specific extensions of conserved small ribosomal subunit proteins, particularly their possible roles in recruitment and spatial organization of eukaryote-specific initiation factors. PMID:26779416

  16. rRNA maturation as a "quality" control step in ribosomal subunit assembly in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Chiaberge, S; Bulfone, S

    1997-10-31

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, newly assembled ribosomal subunits enter polyribosomes while they still contain immature rRNA. rRNA maturation requires the engagement of the subunits in protein synthesis and leads to stabilization of their structure. Maturation of pre-17 S rRNA occurs only after the newly formed 40 S ribosomal particle has entered an 80 S ribosome and participated at least in the formation of one peptide bond or in one translocation event; maturation of pre-26 S rRNA requires the presence on the 80 S particle of a peptidyl-tRNA containing at least 6 amino acids. Newly assembled particles that cannot fulfill these requirements for structural reasons are disassembled into free immature rRNA and ribosomal proteins.

  17. High resolution structure of the large ribosomal subunit from a Mesophilic Eubacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, Joerg; Schluenzen, Frank; Zarivach, Raz; Bashan, Anat; Gat, Sharon; Agmon, Ilana; Bartels, Heike; Franceschi, Francois; Yonath, Ada

    2009-10-07

    We describe the high resolution structure of the large ribosomal subunit from Deinococcus radiodurans (D50S), a gram-positive mesophile suitable for binding of antibiotics and functionally relevant ligands. The over-all structure of D50S is similar to that from the archae bacterium Haloarcula marismortui (H50S); however, a detailed comparison revealed significant differences, for example, in the orientation of nucleotides in peptidyl transferase center and in the structures of many ribosomal proteins. Analysis of ribosomal features involved in dynamic aspects of protein biosynthesis that are partially or fully disordered in H50S revealed the conformations of intersubunit bridges in unbound subunits, suggesting how they may change upon subunit association and how movements of the L1-stalk may facilitate the exit of tRNA.

  18. Structures of Triacetyloleandomycin and Mycalamide A Bound to the Large Ribosomal Subunit of Haloarcula marismortui

    SciTech Connect

    Gurel, G.; Blaha, G; Steitz, T; Moore, P

    2009-01-01

    Structures have been obtained for the complexes that triacetyloleandomycin and mycalamide A form with the large ribosomal subunit of Haloarcula marismortui. Triacetyloleandomycin binds in the nascent peptide tunnel and inhibits the activity of ribosomes by blocking the growth of the nascent peptide chain. Mycalamide A binds to the E site and inhibits protein synthesis by occupying the space normally occupied by the CCA end of E-site-bound tRNAs.

  19. Structures of Triacetyloleandomycin and Mycalamide A Bind to the Large Ribosomal Subunit of Haloarcula marismortui

    SciTech Connect

    Gürel, Güliz; Blaha, Gregor; Steitz, Thomas A.; Moore, Peter B.

    2010-01-14

    Structures have been obtained for the complexes that triacetyloleandomycin and mycalamide A form with the large ribosomal subunit of Haloarcula marismortui. Triacetyloleandomycin binds in the nascent peptide tunnel and inhibits the activity of ribosomes by blocking the growth of the nascent peptide chain. Mycalamide A binds to the E site and inhibits protein synthesis by occupying the space normally occupied by the CCA end of E-site-bound tRNAs.

  20. Nuclear export of the small ribosomal subunit requires the Ran–GTPase cycle and certain nucleoporins

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Terence I.; Silver, Pamela A.

    1999-01-01

    After their assembly in the nucleolus, ribosomal subunits are exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. After export, the 20S rRNA in the small ribosomal subunit is cleaved to yield 18S rRNA and the small 5′ ITS1 fragment. The 5′ ITS1 RNA is normally degraded by the cytoplasmic Xrn1 exonuclease, but in strains lacking XRN1, the 5′ ITS1 fragment accumulates in the cytoplasm. Using the cytoplasmic localization of the 5′ ITS1 fragment as an indicator for the export of the small ribosomal subunit, we have identified genes that are required for ribosome export. Ribosome export is dependent on the Ran–GTPase as mutations in Ran or its regulators caused 5′ ITS1 to accumulate in the nucleoplasm. Mutations in the genes encoding the nucleoporin Nup82 and in the NES exporter Xpo1/Crm1 also caused the nucleoplasmic accumulation of 5′ ITS1. Mutants in a subset of nucleoporins and in the nuclear transport factors Srp1, Kap95, Pse1, Cse1, and Mtr10 accumulate the 5′ ITS1 in the nucleolus and affect ribosome assembly. In contrast, we did not detect nuclear accumulation of 5′ ITS1 in 28 yeast strains that have mutations in other genes affecting nuclear trafficking. PMID:10465789

  1. Mammalian mitochondrial ribosomal small subunit (MRPS) genes: A putative role in human disease.

    PubMed

    Gopisetty, Gopal; Thangarajan, Rajkumar

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria are prominently understood as power houses producing ATP the primary energy currency of the cell. However, mitochondria are also known to play an important role in apoptosis and autophagy, and mitochondrial dysregulation can lead to pathological outcomes. Mitochondria are known to contain 1500 proteins of which only 13 are coded by mitochondrial DNA and the rest are coded by nuclear genes. Protein synthesis in mitochondria involves mitochondrial ribosomes which are 55-60S particles and are composed of small 28S and large 39S subunits. A feature of mammalian mitoribosome which differentiate it from bacterial ribosomes is the increased protein content. The human mitochondrial ribosomal protein (MRP) gene family comprises of 30 genes which code for mitochondrial ribosomal small subunit and 50 genes for the large subunit. The present review focuses on the mitochondrial ribosomal small subunit genes (MRPS), presents an overview of the literature and data gleaned from publicly available gene and protein expression databases. The survey revealed aberrations in MRPS gene expression patterns in varied human diseases indicating a putative role in their etiology.

  2. YphC and YsxC GTPases assist the maturation of the central protuberance, GTPase associated region and functional core of the 50S ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xiaodan; Davis, Joseph H.; Jain, Nikhil; Razi, Aida; Benlekbir, Samir; McArthur, Andrew G.; Rubinstein, John L.; Britton, Robert A.; Williamson, James R.; Ortega, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    YphC and YsxC are GTPases in Bacillus subtilis that facilitate the assembly of the 50S ribosomal subunit, however their roles in this process are still uncharacterized. To explore their function, we used strains in which the only copy of the yphC or ysxC genes were under the control of an inducible promoter. Under depletion conditions, they accumulated incomplete ribosomal subunits that we named 45SYphC and 44.5SYsxC particles. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis and the 5–6 Å resolution cryo-EM maps of the 45SYphC and 44.5SYsxC particles revealed that the two GTPases participate in the maturation of the central protuberance, GTPase associated region and key RNA helices in the A, P and E functional sites of the 50S subunit. We observed that YphC and YsxC bind specifically to the two immature particles, suggesting that they represent either on-pathway intermediates or that their structure has not significantly diverged from that of the actual substrate. These results describe the nature of these immature particles, a widely used tool to study the assembly process of the ribosome. They also provide the first insights into the function of YphC and YsxC in 50S subunit assembly and are consistent with this process occurring through multiple parallel pathways, as it has been described for the 30S subunit. PMID:27484475

  3. Crystal Structure of the Oxazolidinone Antibiotic Linezolid Bound to the 50S Ribosomal Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Ippolito,J.; Kanyo, Z.; Wang, D.; Franceschi, F.; Moore, P.; Steitz, T.; Duffy, E.

    2008-01-01

    The oxazolidinone antibacterials target the 50S subunit of prokaryotic ribosomes. To gain insight into their mechanism of action, the crystal structure of the canonical oxazolidinone, linezolid, has been determined bound to the Haloarcula marismortui 50S subunit. Linezolid binds the 50S A-site, near the catalytic center, which suggests that inhibition involves competition with incoming A-site substrates. These results provide a structural basis for the discovery of improved oxazolidinones active against emerging drug-resistant clinical strains.

  4. Pea chloroplast DNA encodes homologues of Escherichia coli ribosomal subunit S2 and the beta'-subunit of RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Cozens, A L; Walker, J E

    1986-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence has been determined of a segment of 4680 bases of the pea chloroplast genome. It adjoins a sequence described elsewhere that encodes subunits of the F0 membrane domain of the ATP-synthase complex. The sequence contains a potential gene encoding a protein which is strongly related to the S2 polypeptide of Escherichia coli ribosomes. It also encodes an incomplete protein which contains segments that are homologous to the beta'-subunit of E. coli RNA polymerase and to yeast RNA polymerases II and III. PMID:3530249

  5. Satratoxin G interaction with 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits precedes apoptosis in the macrophage

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Hee Kyong; Shinozuka, Junko; Islam, Zahidul; Pestka, James J.

    2009-06-01

    Satratoxin G (SG) and other macrocyclic trichothecene mycotoxins are potent inhibitors of eukaryotic translation that are potentially immunosuppressive. The purpose of this research was to test the hypothesis that SG-induced apoptosis in the macrophage correlates with binding of this toxin to the ribosome. Exposure of RAW 264.7 murine macrophages to SG at concentrations of 10 to 80 ng/ml induced DNA fragmentation within 4 h that was indicative of apoptosis. To relate these findings to ribosome binding of SG, RAW cells were exposed to different toxin concentrations for various time intervals, ribosomal fractions isolated by sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation and resultant fractions analyzed for SG by competitive ELISA. SG was found to specifically interact with 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits as early as 5 min and that, at high concentrations or extended incubation times, the toxin induced polysome disaggregation. While co-incubation with the simple Type B trichothecene DON had no effect on SG uptake into cell cytoplasm, it inhibited SG binding to the ribosome, suggesting that the two toxins bound to identical sites and that SG binding was reversible. Although both SG and DON induced mobilization of p38 and JNK 1/2 to the ribosome, phosphorylation of ribosomal bound MAPKs occurred only after DON treatment. SG association with the 40S and 60S subunits was also observed in the PC-12 neuronal cell model which is similarly susceptible to apoptosis. To summarize, SG rapidly binds small and large ribosomal subunits in a concentration- and time-dependent manner that was consistent with induction of apoptosis.

  6. Initial bridges between two ribosomal subunits are formed within 9.4 milliseconds, as studied by time-resolved cryo-EM.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Tanvir R; Yassin, Aymen S; Lu, Zonghuan; Barnard, David; Meng, Xing; Lu, Toh-Ming; Wagenknecht, Terence; Agrawal, Rajendra K

    2014-07-08

    Association of the two ribosomal subunits during the process of translation initiation is a crucial step of protein synthesis. The two subunits (30S and 50S) of the bacterial 70S ribosome are held together by 12 dynamic bridges involving RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, and protein-protein interactions. The process of bridge formation, such as whether all these bridges are formed simultaneously or in a sequential order, is poorly understood. To understand such processes, we have developed and implemented a class of microfluidic devices that mix two components to completion within 0.4 ms and spray the mixture in the form of microdroplets onto an electron microscopy grid, yielding a minimum reaction time of 9.4 ms before cryofixation. Using these devices, we have obtained cryo-EM data corresponding to reaction times of 9.4 and 43 ms and have determined 3D structures of ribosomal subunit association intermediates. Molecular analyses of the cryo-EM maps reveal that eight intersubunit bridges (bridges B1a, B1b, B2a, B2b, B3, B7a, B7b, and B8) form within 9.4 ms, whereas the remaining four bridges (bridges B2c, B4, B5, and B6) take longer than 43 ms to form, suggesting that bridges are formed in a stepwise fashion. Our approach can be used to characterize sequences of various dynamic functional events on complex macromolecular assemblies such as ribosomes.

  7. Group I introns in small subunit ribosomal DNA of several Phaeosphaeria species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In a study of small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) gene sequences in Phaeosphaeria species, group I introns were found in 9 of 10 P. avenaria f.sp. avenaria (Paa) isolates, 1 of 2 Phaeosphaeria sp. (P-rye) isolates from Polish rye (Sn48-1), 1 Phaeosphaeria sp. from dallis grass (P-dg) (S-93-48) an...

  8. Morphology and Small-Subunit Ribosomal DNA Sequence of Henneguya Adiposa (Myxosporea) From Ictalurus punctatus (Siluriformes)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The original description of Henneguya adiposa, a myxozoan parasitizing channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, is supplemented with new data on spore morphology, including photomicrographs and line drawings, as well as 18S small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence. Elongate, translucent, linear...

  9. Studies on the Assembly Characteristics of Large Subunit Ribosomal Proteins in S. cerevisae

    PubMed Central

    Ohmayer, Uli; Gamalinda, Michael; Sauert, Martina; Ossowski, Julius; Pöll, Gisela; Linnemann, Jan; Hierlmeier, Thomas; Perez-Fernandez, Jorge; Kumcuoglu, Beril; Leger-Silvestre, Isabelle; Faubladier, Marlène; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Woolford, John; Tschochner, Herbert; Milkereit, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    During the assembly process of ribosomal subunits, their structural components, the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and the ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) have to join together in a highly dynamic and defined manner to enable the efficient formation of functional ribosomes. In this work, the assembly of large ribosomal subunit (LSU) r-proteins from the eukaryote S. cerevisiae was systematically investigated. Groups of LSU r-proteins with specific assembly characteristics were detected by comparing the protein composition of affinity purified early, middle, late or mature LSU (precursor) particles by semi-quantitative mass spectrometry. The impact of yeast LSU r-proteins rpL25, rpL2, rpL43, and rpL21 on the composition of intermediate to late nuclear LSU precursors was analyzed in more detail. Effects of these proteins on the assembly states of other r-proteins and on the transient LSU precursor association of several ribosome biogenesis factors, including Nog2, Rsa4 and Nop53, are discussed. PMID:23874617

  10. Mutations in RNAs of both ribosomal subunits cause defects in translation termination.

    PubMed Central

    Arkov, A L; Freistroffer, D V; Ehrenberg, M; Murgola, E J

    1998-01-01

    Mutations in RNAs of both subunits of the Escherichia coli ribosome caused defects in catalysis of peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis in a realistic in vitro termination system. Assaying the two codon-dependent cytoplasmic proteins that drive termination, RF1 and RF2, we observed large defects with RF2 but not with RF1, a result consistent with the in vivo properties of the mutants. Our study presents the first direct in vitro evidence demonstrating the involvement of RNAs from both the large and the small ribosomal subunits in catalysis of peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis during termination of protein biosynthesis. The results and conclusions are of general significance since the rRNA nucleotides studied have been virtually universally conserved throughout evolution. Our findings suggest a novel role for rRNAs of both subunits as molecular transmitters of a signal for termination. PMID:9482747

  11. Single-particle tracking reveals that free ribosomal subunits are not excluded from the Escherichia coli nucleoid.

    PubMed

    Sanamrad, Arash; Persson, Fredrik; Lundius, Ebba G; Fange, David; Gynnå, Arvid H; Elf, Johan

    2014-08-05

    Biochemical and genetic data show that ribosomes closely follow RNA polymerases that are transcribing protein-coding genes in bacteria. At the same time, electron and fluorescence microscopy have revealed that ribosomes are excluded from the Escherichia coli nucleoid, which seems to be inconsistent with fast translation initiation on nascent mRNA transcripts. The apparent paradox can be reconciled if translation of nascent mRNAs can start throughout the nucleoid before they relocate to the periphery. However, this mechanism requires that free ribosomal subunits are not excluded from the nucleoid. Here, we use single-particle tracking in living E. coli cells to determine the fractions of free ribosomal subunits, classify individual subunits as free or mRNA-bound, and quantify the degree of exclusion of bound and free subunits separately. We show that free subunits are not excluded from the nucleoid. This finding strongly suggests that translation of nascent mRNAs can start throughout the nucleoid, which reconciles the spatial separation of DNA and ribosomes with cotranscriptional translation. We also show that, after translation inhibition, free subunit precursors are partially excluded from the compacted nucleoid. This finding indicates that it is active translation that normally allows ribosomal subunits to assemble on nascent mRNAs throughout the nucleoid and that the effects of translation inhibitors are enhanced by the limited access of ribosomal subunits to nascent mRNAs in the compacted nucleoid.

  12. Human ERAL1 is a mitochondrial RNA chaperone involved in the assembly of the 28S small mitochondrial ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    Dennerlein, Sven; Rozanska, Agata; Wydro, Mateusz; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M. A.; Lightowlers, Robert N.

    2010-01-01

    The bacterial Ras-like protein Era has been reported previously to bind 16S rRNA within the 30S ribosomal subunit and to play a crucial role in ribosome assembly. An orthologue of this essential GTPase ERAL1 (Era G-protein-like 1) exists in higher eukaryotes and although its exact molecular function and cellular localization is unknown, its absence has been linked to apoptosis. In the present study we show that human ERAL1 is a mitochondrial protein important for the formation of the 28S small mitoribosomal subunit. We also show that ERAL1 binds in vivo to the rRNA component of the small subunit [12S mt (mitochondrial)-rRNA]. Bacterial Era associates with a 3′ unstructured nonanucleotide immediately downstream of the terminal stem–loop (helix 45) of 16S rRNA. This site contains an AUCA sequence highly conserved across all domains of life, immediately upstream of the anti-Shine–Dalgarno sequence, which is conserved in bacteria. Strikingly, this entire region is absent from 12S mt-rRNA. We have mapped the ERAL1-binding site to a 33 nucleotide section delineating the 3′ terminal stem–loop region of 12S mt-rRNA. This loop contains two adenine residues that are reported to be dimethylated on mitoribosome maturation. Furthermore, and also in contrast with the bacterial orthologue, loss of ERAL1 leads to rapid decay of nascent 12S mt-rRNA, consistent with a role as a mitochondrial RNA chaperone. Finally, whereas depletion of ERAL1 leads to apoptosis, cell death occurs prior to any appreciable loss of mitochondrial protein synthesis or reduction in the stability of mitochondrial mRNA. PMID:20604745

  13. Sequential domain assembly of ribosomal protein S3 drives 40S subunit maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mitterer, Valentin; Murat, Guillaume; Réty, Stéphane; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Stanborough, Tamsyn; Bergler, Helmut; Leulliot, Nicolas; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes assemble by association of ribosomal RNA with ribosomal proteins into nuclear precursor particles, which undergo a complex maturation pathway coordinated by non-ribosomal assembly factors. Here, we provide functional insights into how successive structural re-arrangements in ribosomal protein S3 promote maturation of the 40S ribosomal subunit. We show that S3 dimerizes and is imported into the nucleus with its N-domain in a rotated conformation and associated with the chaperone Yar1. Initial assembly of S3 with 40S precursors occurs via its C-domain, while the N-domain protrudes from the 40S surface. Yar1 is replaced by the assembly factor Ltv1, thereby fixing the S3 N-domain in the rotated orientation and preventing its 40S association. Finally, Ltv1 release, triggered by phosphorylation, and flipping of the S3 N-domain into its final position results in the stable integration of S3. Such a stepwise assembly may represent a new paradigm for the incorporation of ribosomal proteins. PMID:26831757

  14. Cytoplasmic transport of ribosomal subunits microinjected into the Xenopus laevis oocyte nucleus: a generalized, facilitated process

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    To study the biochemistry of ribonucleoprotein export from the nucleus, we characterized an in vivo assay in which the cytoplasmic appearance of radiolabeled ribosomal subunits was monitored after their microinjection into Xenopus oocyte nuclei. Denaturing gel electrophoresis and sucrose density gradient sedimentation demonstrated that injected subunits were transported intact. Consistent with the usual subcellular distribution of ribosomes, transport was unidirectional, as subunits injected into the cytoplasm did not enter the nucleus. Transport displayed properties characteristic of a facilitated, energy-dependent process; the rate of export was saturable and transport was completely inhibited either by lowering the temperature or by depleting nuclei of ATP; the effect of lowered temperature was completely reversible. Transport of injected subunits was likely a process associated with the nuclear pore complex, since export was also inhibited by prior or simultaneous injection of wheat germ agglutinin, a lectin known to inhibit active nuclear transport by binding to N-acetyl glucosamine-containing glycoproteins present in the NPC (Hart, G. W., R. S. Haltiwanger, G. D. Holt, and W. G. Kelly. 1989. Annu. Rev. Biochem. 58:841-874). Although GlcNAc modified proteins exist on both the nuclear and cytoplasmic sides of the nuclear pore complex, ribosomal subunit export was inhibited only when wheat germ agglutinin was injected into the nucleus. Finally, we found that ribosomal subunits from yeast and Escherichia coli were efficiently exported from Xenopus oocyte nuclei, suggesting that export of some RNP complexes may be directed by a collective biochemical property rather than by specific macromolecular primary sequences or structures. PMID:2211825

  15. Yeast ribosomal protein L10 helps coordinate tRNA movement through the large subunit

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Alexey N.; Meskauskas, Arturas; Roshwalb, Sara C.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2008-01-01

    Yeast ribosomal protein L10 (E. coli L16) is located at the center of a topological nexus that connects many functional regions of the large subunit. This essential protein has previously been implicated in processes as diverse as ribosome biogenesis, translational fidelity and mRNA stability. Here, the inability to maintain the yeast Killer virus was used as a proxy for large subunit defects to identify a series of L10 mutants. These mapped to roughly four discrete regions of the protein. A detailed analysis of mutants located in the N-terminal ‘hook’ of L10, which inserts into the bulge of 25S rRNA helix 89, revealed strong effects on rRNA structure corresponding to the entire path taken by the tRNA 3′ end as it moves through the large subunit during the elongation cycle. The mutant-induced structural changes are wide-ranging, affecting ribosome biogenesis, elongation factor binding, drug resistance/hypersensitivity, translational fidelity and virus maintenance. The importance of L10 as a potential transducer of information through the ribosome, and of a possible role of its N-terminal domain in switching between the pre- and post-translocational states are discussed. PMID:18824477

  16. Initiation factor 2, tRNA, and 50S subunits cooperatively stabilize mRNAs on the ribosome during initiation

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Tomoaki; Petrov, Alexey N.; Iizuka, Ryo; Funatsu, Takashi; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Uemura, Sotaro

    2012-01-01

    Initiation factor 2 (IF2) is a key factor in initiation of bacterial protein synthesis. It recruits initiator tRNA to the small ribosomal subunit and facilitates joining of the large ribosomal subunit. Using reconstituted translation system of Escherichia coli and optical tweezers, we directly measure the rupture force between single ribosomal complexes and mRNAs for initiation complexes in the presence and the absence of IF2. We demonstrate that IF2 together with codon recognition by initiator tRNA increases the force required to dislocate mRNA from the ribosome complexes; mRNA stabilization by IF2 required the presence of a joined 50S subunit, and was independent of bound guanine nucleotide. IF2 thus helps lock the 70S ribosome over the start codon during initiation, thus maintaining reading frame. Our results show how mRNA is progressively stabilized on the ribosome through distinct steps of initiation. PMID:22411833

  17. A protein inventory of human ribosome biogenesis reveals an essential function of exportin 5 in 60S subunit export.

    PubMed

    Wild, Thomas; Horvath, Peter; Wyler, Emanuel; Widmann, Barbara; Badertscher, Lukas; Zemp, Ivo; Kozak, Karol; Csucs, Gabor; Lund, Elsebet; Kutay, Ulrike

    2010-10-26

    The assembly of ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes is a complex, multistep process so far mostly studied in yeast. In S. cerevisiae, more than 200 factors including ribosomal proteins and trans-acting factors are required for the ordered assembly of 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits. To date, only few human homologs of these yeast ribosome synthesis factors have been characterized. Here, we used a systematic RNA interference (RNAi) approach to analyze the contribution of 464 candidate factors to ribosomal subunit biogenesis in human cells. The screen was based on visual readouts, using inducible, fluorescent ribosomal proteins as reporters. By performing computer-based image analysis utilizing supervised machine-learning techniques, we obtained evidence for a functional link of 153 human proteins to ribosome synthesis. Our data show that core features of ribosome assembly are conserved from yeast to human, but differences exist for instance with respect to 60S subunit export. Unexpectedly, our RNAi screen uncovered a requirement for the export receptor Exportin 5 (Exp5) in nuclear export of 60S subunits in human cells. We show that Exp5, like the known 60S exportin Crm1, binds to pre-60S particles in a RanGTP-dependent manner. Interference with either Exp5 or Crm1 function blocks 60S export in both human cells and frog oocytes, whereas 40S export is compromised only upon inhibition of Crm1. Thus, 60S subunit export is dependent on at least two RanGTP-binding exportins in vertebrate cells.

  18. Induction of ribosomal subunits misassembly by antisense RNAs to control cell growth.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G

    2000-08-25

    The assembly of ribosomal subunits starting from free ribosomal RNA and protein of Dictyostelium discoideum was induced in vitro in the presence of several oligoribonucleotides complementary to defined sequences of ribosomal RNA. The reconstituted particles had a full complement of ribosomal proteins, but did not function in an in vitro protein synthesis system and were disassembled following interaction with mRNA. The same result was obtained in vivo by fusing the oligodeossiribonucleotides coding for the selected oligoribonucleotides to the promoter of the gene coding for contact site A protein. This gene is expressed only in the first part of development. Transfected growing cells, transferred in developing buffer in the presence of pulses of cAMP, accumulated significant amounts of the oligoribonucleotides. When retransferred to the growth medium, they grew progressively more slowly, until their doubling time doubled, apparently due to the availability of a limiting amount of functional ribosomes. To avoid disassembly of misassembled subunits (G. Mangiarotti et al., 1997, J. Biol. Chem. 272, 27818-27822), two oligoribonucleotides complementary to sequences present at the 5' ends of pre-17S and pre-26S RNAs were also induced to accumulate during early development with the same technique. When transfected cells were retransferred to the growth medium, their rate of growth declined rapidly to zero and cells died, apparently because they were unable to disassemble misassembled ribosomal subunits and avoid their entry into polyribosomes. This technique to perturb protein synthesis, arrest cell growth, and cause cell suicide will be tested in abnormally growing animal cells.

  19. Has1 regulates consecutive maturation and processing steps for assembly of 60S ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Dembowski, Jill A.; Kuo, Benjamin; Woolford, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis requires ∼200 assembly factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The pre-ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing defects associated with depletion of most of these factors have been characterized. However, how assembly factors drive the construction of ribonucleoprotein neighborhoods and how structural rearrangements are coupled to pre-rRNA processing are not understood. Here, we reveal ATP-independent and ATP-dependent roles of the Has1 DEAD-box RNA helicase in consecutive pre-rRNA processing and maturation steps for construction of 60S ribosomal subunits. Has1 associates with pre-60S ribosomes in an ATP-independent manner. Has1 binding triggers exonucleolytic trimming of 27SA3 pre-rRNA to generate the 5′ end of 5.8S rRNA and drives incorporation of ribosomal protein L17 with domain I of 5.8S/25S rRNA. ATP-dependent activity of Has1 promotes stable association of additional domain I ribosomal proteins that surround the polypeptide exit tunnel, which are required for downstream processing of 27SB pre-rRNA. Furthermore, in the absence of Has1, aberrant 27S pre-rRNAs are targeted for irreversible turnover. Thus, our data support a model in which Has1 helps to establish domain I architecture to prevent pre-rRNA turnover and couples domain I folding with consecutive pre-rRNA processing steps. PMID:23788678

  20. Ribosome formation from subunits studied by stopped-flow and Rayleigh light scattering.

    PubMed

    Antoun, Ayman; Pavlov, Michael Y.; Tenson, Tanel; Ehrenberg M, M åNs

    2004-01-01

    Light scattering and standard stopped-flow techniques were used to monitor rapid association of ribosomal subunits during initiation of eubacterial protein synthesis. The effects of the initiation factors IF1, IF2, IF3 and buffer conditions on subunit association were studied along with the role of GTP in this process. The part of light scattering theory that is essential for kinetic measurements is high-lighted in the main text and a more general treatment of Rayleigh scattering from macromolecules is given in an appendix.

  1. Ribosome formation from subunits studied by stopped-flow and Rayleigh light scattering

    PubMed Central

    Antoun, Ayman; Pavlov, Michael Y.; Tenson, Tanel

    2004-01-01

    Light scattering and standard stopped-flow techniques were used to monitor rapid association of ribosomal subunits during initiation of eubacterial protein synthesis. The effects of the initiation factors IF1, IF2, IF3 and buffer conditions on subunit association were studied along with the role of GTP in this process. The part of light scattering theory that is essential for kinetic measurements is high-lighted in the main text and a more general treatment of Rayleigh scattering from macromolecules is given in an appendix. PMID:15103398

  2. Secondary structure and molecular evolution of the mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal RNA in Agaricales (Euagarics clade, Homobasidiomycota).

    PubMed

    Barroso, Gérard; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Mouhamadou, Bello; Labarère, Jacques

    2003-10-01

    The complete sequences and secondary structures of the mitochondrial small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNAs of both mostly cultivated mushrooms Agaricus bisporus (1930 nt) and Lentinula edodes (2164 nt) were achieved. These secondary structures and that of Schizophyllum commune (1872 nt) were compared to that previously established for Agrocybe aegerita. The four structures are near the model established for Archae, Bacteria, plastids, and mitochondria; particularly the helices 23 and 37, described as specific to bacteria, are present. Within the four Agaricales (Homobasidiomycota), the SSU-rRNA "core" is conserved in size (966 to 1009 nt) with the exception of an unusual extension of 40 nt in the H17 helix of S. commune. The four core sequences possess 76% of conserved positions and a cluster of C in their 3' end, which could constitute a signal involved in the RNA maturation process. Among the nine putative variable domains, three (V3, V5, V7) do not show significant length variations and possess similar percentages of conserved positions (69%) than the core. The other six variable domains show important length variations, due to independent large size inserted/deleted sequences, and higher rates of nucleotide substitutions than the core (only 31% of conserved positions between the four species). Interestingly, the inserted/deleted sequences are located in few preferential sites (hot spots for insertion/deletion) where they seem to arise or disappear haphazardly during evolution. These sites are located on the surface of the tertiary structure of the 30S ribosomal subunit, at the beginning of hairpin loops; the insertions lead to a lengthening of existing hairpins or to branching loops bearing up to five additional helices.

  3. Molecular architecture of the 90S small subunit pre-ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qi; Zhu, Xing; Qi, Jia; An, Weidong; Lan, Pengfei; Tan, Dan; Chen, Rongchang; Wang, Bing; Zheng, Sanduo; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Xining; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jing; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Ye, Keqiong

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic small ribosomal subunits are first assembled into 90S pre-ribosomes. The complete 90S is a gigantic complex with a molecular mass of approximately five megadaltons. Here, we report the nearly complete architecture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 90S determined from three cryo-electron microscopy single particle reconstructions at 4.5 to 8.7 angstrom resolution. The majority of the density maps were modeled and assigned to specific RNA and protein components. The nascent ribosome is assembled into isolated native-like substructures that are stabilized by abundant assembly factors. The 5' external transcribed spacer and U3 snoRNA nucleate a large subcomplex that scaffolds the nascent ribosome. U3 binds four sites of pre-rRNA, including a novel site on helix 27 but not the 3' side of the central pseudoknot, and crucially organizes the 90S structure. The 90S model provides significant insight into the principle of small subunit assembly and the function of assembly factors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22086.001 PMID:28244370

  4. Molecular architecture of the 90S small subunit pre-ribosome.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Zhu, Xing; Qi, Jia; An, Weidong; Lan, Pengfei; Tan, Dan; Chen, Rongchang; Wang, Bing; Zheng, Sanduo; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Xining; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jing; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Ye, Keqiong

    2017-02-28

    Eukaryotic small ribosomal subunits are first assembled into 90S pre-ribosomes. The complete 90S is a gigantic complex with a molecular mass of approximately five megadaltons. Here, we report the nearly complete architecture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 90S determined from three cryo-electron microscopy single particle reconstructions at 4.5 to 8.7 angstrom resolution. The majority of the density maps were modeled and assigned to specific RNA and protein components. The nascent ribosome is assembled into isolated native-like substructures that are stabilized by abundant assembly factors. The 5' external transcribed spacer and U3 snoRNA nucleate a large subcomplex that scaffolds the nascent ribosome. U3 binds four sites of pre-rRNA, including a novel site on helix 27 but not the 3' side of the central pseudoknot, and crucially organizes the 90S structure. The 90S model provides significant insight into the principle of small subunit assembly and the function of assembly factors.

  5. Dynamic contact network between ribosomal subunits enables rapid large-scale rotation during spontaneous translocation

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Lars V.; Blau, Christian; Vaiana, Andrea C.; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    During ribosomal translation, the two ribosomal subunits remain associated through intersubunit bridges, despite rapid large-scale intersubunit rotation. The absence of large barriers hindering rotation is a prerequisite for rapid rotation. Here, we investigate how such a flat free-energy landscape is achieved, in particular considering the large shifts the bridges undergo at the periphery. The dynamics and energetics of the intersubunit contact network are studied using molecular dynamics simulations of the prokaryotic ribosome in intermediate states of spontaneous translocation. Based on observed occupancies of intersubunit contacts, residues were grouped into clusters. In addition to the central contact clusters, peripheral clusters were found to maintain strong steady interactions by changing contacts in the course of rotation. The peripheral B1 bridges are stabilized by a changing contact pattern of charged residues that adapts to the rotational state. In contrast, steady strong interactions of the B4 bridge are ensured by the flexible helix H34 following the movement of protein S15. The tRNAs which span the subunits contribute to the intersubunit binding enthalpy to an almost constant degree, despite their different positions in the ribosome. These mechanisms keep the intersubunit interaction strong and steady during rotation, thereby preventing dissociation and enabling rapid rotation. PMID:26109353

  6. Substitution rate calibration of small subunit ribosomal RNA identifies chlorarachniophyte endosymbionts as remnants of green algae.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Peer, Y; Rensing, S A; Maier, U G; De Wachter, R

    1996-01-01

    Chlorarachniophytes are amoeboid algae with chlorophyll a and b containing plastids that are surrounded by four membranes instead of two as in plants and green algae. These extra membranes form important support for the hypothesis that chlorarachniophytes have acquired their plastids by the ingestion of another eukaryotic plastid-containing alga. Chlorarachniophytes also contain a small nucleus-like structure called the nucleomorph situated between the two inner and the two outer membranes surrounding the plastid. This nucleomorph is a remnant of the endosymbiont's nucleus and encodes, among other molecules, small subunit ribosomal RNA. Previous phylogenetic analyses on the basis of this molecule provided unexpected and contradictory evidence for the origin of the chlorarachniophyte endosymbiont. We developed a new method for measuring the substitution rates of the individual nucleotides of small subunit ribosomal RNA. From the resulting substitution rate distribution, we derived an equation that gives a more realistic relationship between sequence dissimilarity and evolutionary distance than equations previously available. Phylogenetic trees constructed on the basis of evolutionary distances computed by this new method clearly situate the chlorarachniophyte nucleomorphs among the green algae. Moreover, this relationship is confirmed by transversion analysis of the Chlorarachnion plastid small subunit ribosomal RNA. PMID:8755544

  7. Movements and associations of ribosomal subunits in a secretory cell during growth inhibition by starvation

    PubMed Central

    Lonn, U; Edstrom, JE

    1977-01-01

    In Chironomus tentans salivary gland cells, the cytoplasm can be dissected into concentric zones situated at increasing distances from the nuclear envelope. After RNA labeling, the newly made ribosomal subunits are found in the cytoplasm mainly in the neighborhood of the nucleus with a gradient of increasing abundance towards the periphery of the cell. The gradient for the small subunit lasts for a few hours and disappears entirely after treatment with puromycin. The large subunit also forms a gradient but one which is only partially abolished by puromycin. The residual gradient which which is resistant to the addition of the drug is probably due to the binding of some large ribosomal units to the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum (J.-E. Edstrom and u. Lonn. 1976. J. Cell Biol. 70:562-572, and U. Lonn and J.-E. Edstrom. 1976. J. Cell. Biol. 70:573-580). If growth is inhibited by starvation, only the puromycin-sensitive type gradient is observed for the large subunit, suggesting that the attachment of these newly made subunits to the endoplasmic reticulum membranes will not occur. If, on the other hand, the drug-resistant gradient is allowed to form in feeding animals, it is conserved during a subsequent starvation for longer periods than in control feeding animals. This observation provides a further support for an effect of starvation on the normal turnover of the large subunits associated with the endoplasmic reticulum. These results also indicate a considerable structural stability in the cytoplasm of these cells worth little or no gross redistribution of cytoplasmic structures over a period of at least 6 days. PMID:873995

  8. The A1 Subunit of Shiga Toxin 2 Has Higher Affinity for Ribosomes and Higher Catalytic Activity than the A1 Subunit of Shiga Toxin 1

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Debaleena; Li, Xiao-Ping; Kahn, Jennifer N.; May, Kerrie L.; Kahn, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections can lead to life-threatening complications, including hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), which is the most common cause of acute renal failure in children in the United States. Stx1 and Stx2 are AB5 toxins consisting of an enzymatically active A subunit associated with a pentamer of receptor binding B subunits. Epidemiological evidence suggests that Stx2-producing E. coli strains are more frequently associated with HUS than Stx1-producing strains. Several studies suggest that the B subunit plays a role in mediating toxicity. However, the role of the A subunits in the increased potency of Stx2 has not been fully investigated. Here, using purified A1 subunits, we show that Stx2A1 has a higher affinity for yeast and mammalian ribosomes than Stx1A1. Biacore analysis indicated that Stx2A1 has faster association and dissociation with ribosomes than Stx1A1. Analysis of ribosome depurination kinetics demonstrated that Stx2A1 depurinates yeast and mammalian ribosomes and an RNA stem-loop mimic of the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) at a higher catalytic rate and is a more efficient enzyme than Stx1A1. Stx2A1 depurinated ribosomes at a higher level in vivo and was more cytotoxic than Stx1A1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Stx2A1 depurinated ribosomes and inhibited translation at a significantly higher level than Stx1A1 in human cells. These results provide the first direct evidence that the higher affinity for ribosomes in combination with higher catalytic activity toward the SRL allows Stx2A1 to depurinate ribosomes, inhibit translation, and exhibit cytotoxicity at a significantly higher level than Stx1A1. PMID:26483409

  9. The A1 Subunit of Shiga Toxin 2 Has Higher Affinity for Ribosomes and Higher Catalytic Activity than the A1 Subunit of Shiga Toxin 1.

    PubMed

    Basu, Debaleena; Li, Xiao-Ping; Kahn, Jennifer N; May, Kerrie L; Kahn, Peter C; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2015-10-19

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections can lead to life-threatening complications, including hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), which is the most common cause of acute renal failure in children in the United States. Stx1 and Stx2 are AB5 toxins consisting of an enzymatically active A subunit associated with a pentamer of receptor binding B subunits. Epidemiological evidence suggests that Stx2-producing E. coli strains are more frequently associated with HUS than Stx1-producing strains. Several studies suggest that the B subunit plays a role in mediating toxicity. However, the role of the A subunits in the increased potency of Stx2 has not been fully investigated. Here, using purified A1 subunits, we show that Stx2A1 has a higher affinity for yeast and mammalian ribosomes than Stx1A1. Biacore analysis indicated that Stx2A1 has faster association and dissociation with ribosomes than Stx1A1. Analysis of ribosome depurination kinetics demonstrated that Stx2A1 depurinates yeast and mammalian ribosomes and an RNA stem-loop mimic of the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) at a higher catalytic rate and is a more efficient enzyme than Stx1A1. Stx2A1 depurinated ribosomes at a higher level in vivo and was more cytotoxic than Stx1A1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Stx2A1 depurinated ribosomes and inhibited translation at a significantly higher level than Stx1A1 in human cells. These results provide the first direct evidence that the higher affinity for ribosomes in combination with higher catalytic activity toward the SRL allows Stx2A1 to depurinate ribosomes, inhibit translation, and exhibit cytotoxicity at a significantly higher level than Stx1A1.

  10. Inferring the Ancient History of the Translation Machinery and Genetic Code via Recapitulation of Ribosomal Subunit Assembly Orders

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Gregory P.; Neumann, Justin E.; Gogarten, J. Peter

    2010-01-01

    Universally conserved positions in ribosomal proteins have significant biases in amino acid usage, likely indicating the expansion of the genetic code at the time leading up to the most recent common ancestor(s) (MRCA). Here, we apply this principle to the evolutionary history of the ribosome before the MRCA. It has been proposed that the experimentally determined order of assembly for ribosomal subunits recapitulates their evolutionary chronology. Given this model, we produce a probabilistic evolutionary ordering of the universally conserved small subunit (SSU) and large subunit (LSU) ribosomal proteins. Optimizing the relative ordering of SSU and LSU evolutionary chronologies with respect to minimizing differences in amino acid usage bias, we find strong compositional evidence for a more ancient origin for early LSU proteins. Furthermore, we find that this ordering produces several trends in specific amino acid usages compatible with models of genetic code evolution. PMID:20208990

  11. Inferring the ancient history of the translation machinery and genetic code via recapitulation of ribosomal subunit assembly orders.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Gregory P; Neumann, Justin E; Gogarten, J Peter

    2010-03-01

    Universally conserved positions in ribosomal proteins have significant biases in amino acid usage, likely indicating the expansion of the genetic code at the time leading up to the most recent common ancestor(s) (MRCA). Here, we apply this principle to the evolutionary history of the ribosome before the MRCA. It has been proposed that the experimentally determined order of assembly for ribosomal subunits recapitulates their evolutionary chronology. Given this model, we produce a probabilistic evolutionary ordering of the universally conserved small subunit (SSU) and large subunit (LSU) ribosomal proteins. Optimizing the relative ordering of SSU and LSU evolutionary chronologies with respect to minimizing differences in amino acid usage bias, we find strong compositional evidence for a more ancient origin for early LSU proteins. Furthermore, we find that this ordering produces several trends in specific amino acid usages compatible with models of genetic code evolution.

  12. The reduction in small ribosomal subunit abundance in ethanol-stressed cells of Bacillus subtilis is mediated by a SigB-dependent antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Mars, Ruben A T; Mendonça, Karoline; Denham, Emma L; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2015-10-01

    One of the best-characterized general stress responses in bacteria is the σB-mediated stress response of the Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis. The σB regulon contains approximately 200 protein-encoding genes and 136 putative regulatory RNAs. One of these σB-dependent RNAs, named S1136-S1134, was recently mapped as being transcribed from the S1136 promoter on the opposite strand of the essential rpsD gene, which encodes the ribosomal primary-binding protein S4. Accordingly, S1136-S1134 transcription results in an rpsD-overlapping antisense RNA (asRNA). Upon exposure of B. subtilis to ethanol, the S1136 promoter was found to be induced, while rpsD transcription was downregulated. By quantitative PCR, we show that the activation of transcription from the S1136 promoter is directly responsible for the downregulation of rpsD upon ethanol exposure. We also show that this downregulation of rpsD leads to a reduced level of the small (30S) ribosomal subunit upon ethanol stress. The activation of the S1136 promoter thus represents the first example of antisense transcription-mediated regulation in the general stress response of B. subtilis and implicates the reduction of ribosomal protein abundance as a new aspect in the σB-dependent stress response. We propose that the observed reduction in the level of the small ribosomal subunit, which contains the ribosome-decoding center, may protect B. subtilis cells against misreading and spurious translation of possibly toxic aberrant peptides under conditions of ethanol stress.

  13. Defining the pathway of cytoplasmic maturation of the 60S ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Kai-Yin; Li, Zhihua; Bussiere, Cyril; Bresson, Stefan; Marcotte, Edward M; Johnson, Arlen W.

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells the final maturation of ribosomes occurs in the cytoplasm, where trans-acting factors are removed and critical ribosomal proteins are added for functionality. Here, we have carried out a comprehensive analysis of cytoplasmic maturation, ordering the known steps into a coherent pathway. Maturation is initiated by the ATPase Drg1. Downstream, assembly of the ribosome stalk is essential for the release of Tif6. The stalk recruits GTPases during translation. Because the GTPase Efl1, which is required for the release of Tif6, resembles the translation elongation factor eEF2, we suggest that assembly of the stalk recruits Efl1, triggering a step in 60S biogenesis that mimics aspects of translocation. Efl1 could thereby provide a mechanism to functionally check the nascent subunit. Finally, the release of Tif6 is a prerequisite for the release of the nuclear export adapter Nmd3. Establishing this pathway provides an important conceptual framework for understanding ribosome maturation. PMID:20670889

  14. Energetics of codon-anticodon recognition on the small ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Almlöf, Martin; Andér, Martin; Aqvist, Johan

    2007-01-09

    Recent crystal structures of the small ribosomal subunit have made it possible to examine the detailed energetics of codon recognition on the ribosome by computational methods. The binding of cognate and near-cognate anticodon stem loops to the ribosome decoding center, with mRNA containing the Phe UUU and UUC codons, are analyzed here using explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations together with the linear interaction energy (LIE) method. The calculated binding free energies are in excellent agreement with experimental binding constants and reproduce the relative effects of mismatches in the first and second codon position versus a mismatch at the wobble position. The simulations further predict that the Leu2 anticodon stem loop is about 10 times more stable than the Ser stem loop in complex with the Phe UUU codon. It is also found that the ribosome significantly enhances the intrinsic stability differences of codon-anticodon complexes in aqueous solution. Structural analysis of the simulations confirms the previously suggested importance of the universally conserved nucleotides A1492, A1493, and G530 in the decoding process.

  15. Assembly of bacterial ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Shajani, Zahra; Sykes, Michael T; Williamson, James R

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of ribosomes from a discrete set of components is a key aspect of the highly coordinated process of ribosome biogenesis. In this review, we present a brief history of the early work on ribosome assembly in Escherichia coli, including a description of in vivo and in vitro intermediates. The assembly process is believed to progress through an alternating series of RNA conformational changes and protein-binding events; we explore the effects of ribosomal proteins in driving these events. Ribosome assembly in vivo proceeds much faster than in vitro, and we outline the contributions of several of the assembly cofactors involved, including Era, RbfA, RimJ, RimM, RimP, and RsgA, which associate with the 30S subunit, and CsdA, DbpA, Der, and SrmB, which associate with the 50S subunit.

  16. Phylogenetic classification of the frog pathogen Amphibiothecum (Dermosporidium) penneri based on small ribosomal subunit sequencing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feldman, S.H.; Wimsatt, J.H.; Green, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    We determined 1,600 base pairs of DNA sequence in the 18S small ribosomal subunit from two geographically distinct isolates of Dermosporidium penneri. Maximum likelihood and parsimony analysis of these sequences place D. penneri in the order Dermocystida of the class Mesomycetozoea. The 18S rRNA sequences from these two isolates only differ within a single region of 16 contiguous nucleotides. Based on the distant phylogenetic relationship of these organisms to Amphibiocystidium ranae and similarity to Sphaerothecum destruens we propose the organism be renamed Amphibiothecum penneri.

  17. Activation of initiation factor 2 by ligands and mutations for rapid docking of ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Zorzet, Anna; Andersson, Dan I; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2011-01-19

    We previously identified mutations in the GTPase initiation factor 2 (IF2), located outside its tRNA-binding domain, compensating strongly (A-type) or weakly (B-type) for initiator tRNA formylation deficiency. We show here that rapid docking of 30S with 50S subunits in initiation of translation depends on switching 30S subunit-bound IF2 from its inactive to active form. Activation of wild-type IF2 requires GTP and formylated initiator tRNA (fMet-tRNA(i)). In contrast, extensive activation of A-type IF2 occurs with only GTP or with GDP and fMet-tRNA(i), implying a passive role for initiator tRNA as activator of IF2 in subunit docking. The theory of conditional switching of GTPases quantitatively accounts for all our experimental data. We find that GTP, GDP, fMet-tRNA(i) and A-type mutations multiplicatively increase the equilibrium ratio, K, between active and inactive forms of IF2 from a value of 4 × 10(-4) for wild-type apo-IF2 by factors of 300, 8, 80 and 20, respectively. Functional characterization of the A-type mutations provides keys to structural interpretation of conditional switching of IF2 and other multidomain GTPases.

  18. Activation of initiation factor 2 by ligands and mutations for rapid docking of ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Zorzet, Anna; Andersson, Dan I; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2011-01-01

    We previously identified mutations in the GTPase initiation factor 2 (IF2), located outside its tRNA-binding domain, compensating strongly (A-type) or weakly (B-type) for initiator tRNA formylation deficiency. We show here that rapid docking of 30S with 50S subunits in initiation of translation depends on switching 30S subunit-bound IF2 from its inactive to active form. Activation of wild-type IF2 requires GTP and formylated initiator tRNA (fMet-tRNAi). In contrast, extensive activation of A-type IF2 occurs with only GTP or with GDP and fMet-tRNAi, implying a passive role for initiator tRNA as activator of IF2 in subunit docking. The theory of conditional switching of GTPases quantitatively accounts for all our experimental data. We find that GTP, GDP, fMet-tRNAi and A-type mutations multiplicatively increase the equilibrium ratio, K, between active and inactive forms of IF2 from a value of 4 × 10−4 for wild-type apo-IF2 by factors of 300, 8, 80 and 20, respectively. Functional characterization of the A-type mutations provides keys to structural interpretation of conditional switching of IF2 and other multidomain GTPases. PMID:21151095

  19. Protein L5 is crucial for in vivo assembly of the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit central protuberance.

    PubMed

    Korepanov, Alexey P; Korobeinikova, Anna V; Shestakov, Sergey A; Garber, Maria B; Gongadze, George M

    2012-10-01

    In the present work, ribosomes assembled in bacterial cells in the absence of essential ribosomal protein L5 were obtained. After arresting L5 synthesis, Escherichia coli cells divide a limited number of times. During this time, accumulation of defective large ribosomal subunits occurs. These 45S particles lack most of the central protuberance (CP) components (5S rRNA and proteins L5, L16, L18, L25, L27, L31, L33 and L35) and are not able to associate with the small ribosomal subunit. At the same time, 5S rRNA is found in the cytoplasm in complex with ribosomal proteins L18 and L25 at quantities equal to the amount of ribosomes. Thus, it is the first demonstration that protein L5 plays a key role in formation of the CP during assembly of the large ribosomal subunit in the bacterial cell. A possible model for the CP assembly in vivo is discussed in view of the data obtained.

  20. Structural dynamics of ribosome subunit association studied by mixing-spraying time-resolved cryo-EM

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Kaledhonkar, Sandip; Sun, Ming; Shen, Bingxin; Lu, Zonghuan; Barnard, David; Lu, Toh-Ming; Gonzalez, Ruben L.; Frank, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal subunit association is a key checkpoint in translation initiation, but its structural dynamics are poorly understood. Here, we used a recently developed mixing-spraying, time-resolved, cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) method to study ribosomal subunit association in the sub-second time range. We have improved this method and increased the cryo-EM data yield by tenfold. Pre-equilibrium states of the association reaction were captured by reacting the mixture of ribosomal subunits for 60 ms and 140 ms. We also identified three distinct ribosome conformations in the associated ribosomes. The observed proportions of these conformations are the same in these two time points, suggesting that ribosomes equilibrate among the three conformations within less than 60 ms upon formation. Our results demonstrate that the mixing-spraying method can capture multiple states of macromolecules during a sub-second reaction. Other fast processes, such as translation initiation, decoding and ribosome recycling, are amenable to study with this method. PMID:26004440

  1. The N-terminal extension of yeast ribosomal protein L8 is involved in two major remodeling events during late nuclear stages of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly

    PubMed Central

    Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Wu, Shan; Gao, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Assaying effects on pre-rRNA processing and ribosome assembly upon depleting individual ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) provided an initial paradigm for assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo—that each structural domain of ribosomal subunits assembles in a hierarchical fashion. However, two features suggest that a more complex pathway may exist: (i) Some r-proteins contain extensions that reach long distances across ribosomes to interact with multiple rRNA domains as well as with other r-proteins. (ii) Individual r-proteins may assemble in a stepwise fashion. For example, the globular domain of an r-protein might assemble separately from its extensions. Thus, these extensions might play roles in assembly that could not be revealed by depleting the entire protein. Here, we show that deleting or mutating extensions of r-proteins L7 (uL30) and L35 (uL29) from yeast reveal important roles in early and middle steps during 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Detailed analysis of the N-terminal terminal extension of L8 (eL8) showed that it is necessary for late nuclear stages of 60S subunit assembly involving two major remodeling events: removal of the ITS2 spacer; and reorganization of the central protuberance (CP) containing 5S rRNA and r-proteins L5 (uL18) and L11 (uL5). Mutations in the L8 extension block processing of 7S pre-rRNA, prevent release of assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 from pre-ribosomes, which is required for rotation of the CP, and block association of Sda1, the Rix1 complex, and the Rea1 ATPase involved in late steps of remodeling. PMID:27390266

  2. Stepwise and dynamic assembly of the earliest precursors of small ribosomal subunits in yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liman; Wu, Chen; Cai, Gaihong; Chen, She; Ye, Keqiong

    2016-03-15

    The eukaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is associated cotranscriptionally with numerous factors into an enormous 90S preribosomal particle that conducts early processing of small ribosomal subunits. The assembly pathway and structure of the 90S particle is poorly understood. Here, we affinity-purified and analyzed the constituents of yeast 90S particles that were assembled on a series of plasmid-encoded 3'-truncated pre-18S RNAs. We determined the assembly point of 65 proteins and the U3, U14, and snR30 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), revealing a stepwise and dynamic assembly map. The 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS) alone can nucleate a large complex. When the 18S rRNA is nearly complete, the 90S structure undergoes a dramatic reorganization, releasing U14, snR30, and 14 protein factors that bind earlier. We also identified a reference state of 90S that is fully assembled yet has not undergone 5'ETS processing. The assembly map present here provides a new framework to understand small subunit biogenesis. © 2016 Zhang et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  3. Integrative structural analysis of the UTPB complex, an early assembly factor for eukaryotic small ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Sun, Qi; Chen, Rongchang; Chen, Xining; Lin, Jinzhong; Ye, Keqiong

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is an essential and conserved cellular process in eukaryotes that requires numerous assembly factors. The six-subunit UTPB complex is an essential component of the 90S precursor of the small ribosomal subunit. Here, we analyzed the molecular architecture of UTPB using an integrative structural biology approach. We mapped the major interactions that associate each of six UTPB proteins. Crystallographic studies showed that Utp1, Utp21, Utp12 and Utp13 are evolutionarily related and form a dimer of dimers (Utp1–Utp21, Utp12–Utp13) through their homologous helical C-terminal domains. Molecular docking with crosslinking restraints showed that the WD domains of Utp12 and Utp13 are associated, as are the WD domains of Utp1, Utp21 and Utp18. Electron microscopy images of the entire UTPB complex revealed that it predominantly adopts elongated conformations and possesses internal flexibility. We also determined crystal structures of the WD domain of Utp18 and the HAT and deviant HAT domains of Utp6. A structural model of UTPB was derived based on these data. PMID:27330138

  4. Stepwise and dynamic assembly of the earliest precursors of small ribosomal subunits in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liman; Wu, Chen; Cai, Gaihong; Chen, She

    2016-01-01

    The eukaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is associated cotranscriptionally with numerous factors into an enormous 90S preribosomal particle that conducts early processing of small ribosomal subunits. The assembly pathway and structure of the 90S particle is poorly understood. Here, we affinity-purified and analyzed the constituents of yeast 90S particles that were assembled on a series of plasmid-encoded 3′-truncated pre-18S RNAs. We determined the assembly point of 65 proteins and the U3, U14, and snR30 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), revealing a stepwise and dynamic assembly map. The 5′ external transcribed spacer (ETS) alone can nucleate a large complex. When the 18S rRNA is nearly complete, the 90S structure undergoes a dramatic reorganization, releasing U14, snR30, and 14 protein factors that bind earlier. We also identified a reference state of 90S that is fully assembled yet has not undergone 5′ETS processing. The assembly map present here provides a new framework to understand small subunit biogenesis. PMID:26980190

  5. RNA tertiary interactions in the large ribosomal subunit: The A-minor motif

    SciTech Connect

    Nissen, Poul; Ippolito, Joseph A.; Ban, Nenad; Moore, Peter B.; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2009-10-07

    Analysis of the 2.4-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the large ribosomal subunit from Haloarcula marismortui reveals the existence of an abundant and ubiquitous structural motif that stabilizes RNA tertiary and quaternary structures. This motif is termed the A-minor motif, because it involves the insertion of the smooth, minor groove edges of adenines into the minor groove of neighboring helices, preferentially at C-G base pairs, where they form hydrogen bonds with one or both of the 2' OHs of those pairs. A-minor motifs stabilize contacts between RNA helices, interactions between loops and helices, and the conformations of junctions and tight turns. The interactions between the 3' terminal adenine of tRNAs bound in either the A site or the P site with 23S rRNA are examples of functionally significant A-minor interactions. The A-minor motif is by far the most abundant tertiary structure interaction in the large ribosomal subunit; 186 adenines in 23S and 5S rRNA participate, 68 of which are conserved. It may prove to be the universally most important long-range interaction in large RNA structures.

  6. Integrative structural analysis of the UTPB complex, an early assembly factor for eukaryotic small ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Sun, Qi; Chen, Rongchang; Chen, Xining; Lin, Jinzhong; Ye, Keqiong

    2016-09-06

    Ribosome assembly is an essential and conserved cellular process in eukaryotes that requires numerous assembly factors. The six-subunit UTPB complex is an essential component of the 90S precursor of the small ribosomal subunit. Here, we analyzed the molecular architecture of UTPB using an integrative structural biology approach. We mapped the major interactions that associate each of six UTPB proteins. Crystallographic studies showed that Utp1, Utp21, Utp12 and Utp13 are evolutionarily related and form a dimer of dimers (Utp1-Utp21, Utp12-Utp13) through their homologous helical C-terminal domains. Molecular docking with crosslinking restraints showed that the WD domains of Utp12 and Utp13 are associated, as are the WD domains of Utp1, Utp21 and Utp18. Electron microscopy images of the entire UTPB complex revealed that it predominantly adopts elongated conformations and possesses internal flexibility. We also determined crystal structures of the WD domain of Utp18 and the HAT and deviant HAT domains of Utp6. A structural model of UTPB was derived based on these data.

  7. C7orf30 is necessary for biogenesis of the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Rorbach, Joanna; Gammage, Payam A.; Minczuk, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Defects of the translation apparatus in human mitochondria are known to cause disease, yet details of how protein synthesis is regulated in this organelle remain to be unveiled. Here, we characterize a novel human protein, C7orf30 that contributes critically to mitochondrial translation and specifically associates with the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome (mt-LSU). Inactivation of C7orf30 in human cells by RNA interference results in respiratory incompetence owing to reduced mitochondrial translation rates without any appreciable effects on the steady-state levels of mitochondrial mRNAs and rRNAs. Ineffective translation in C7orf30-depleted cells or cells overexpressing a dominant-negative mutant of the protein results from aberrant assembly of mt-LSU and consequently reduced formation of the monosome. These findings lead us to propose that C7orf30 is a human assembly and/or stability factor involved in the biogenesis of the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome. PMID:22238376

  8. Rice Ribosomal Protein Large Subunit Genes and Their Spatio-temporal and Stress Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Moin, Mazahar; Bakshi, Achala; Saha, Anusree; Dutta, Mouboni; Madhav, Sheshu M.; Kirti, P. B.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs) are well-known for their role in mediating protein synthesis and maintaining the stability of the ribosomal complex, which includes small and large subunits. In the present investigation, in a genome-wide survey, we predicted that the large subunit of rice ribosomes is encoded by at least 123 genes including individual gene copies, distributed throughout the 12 chromosomes. We selected 34 candidate genes, each having 2–3 identical copies, for a detailed characterization of their gene structures, protein properties, cis-regulatory elements and comprehensive expression analysis. RPL proteins appear to be involved in interactions with other RP and non-RP proteins and their encoded RNAs have a higher content of alpha-helices in their predicted secondary structures. The majority of RPs have binding sites for metal and non-metal ligands. Native expression profiling of 34 ribosomal protein large (RPL) subunit genes in tissues covering the major stages of rice growth shows that they are predominantly expressed in vegetative tissues and seedlings followed by meiotically active tissues like flowers. The putative promoter regions of these genes also carry cis-elements that respond specifically to stress and signaling molecules. All the 34 genes responded differentially to the abiotic stress treatments. Phytohormone and cold treatments induced significant up-regulation of several RPL genes, while heat and H2O2 treatments down-regulated a majority of them. Furthermore, infection with a bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae, which causes leaf blight also induced the expression of 80% of the RPL genes in leaves. Although the expression of RPL genes was detected in all the tissues studied, they are highly responsive to stress and signaling molecules indicating that their encoded proteins appear to have roles in stress amelioration besides house-keeping. This shows that the RPL gene family is a valuable resource for manipulation of stress tolerance in

  9. The DEAD box protein Mrh4 functions in the assembly of the mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2013-11-05

    Proteins in a cell are universally synthesized by ribosomes. Mitochondria contain their own ribosomes, which specialize in the synthesis of a handful of proteins required for oxidative phosphorylation. The pathway of mitoribosomal biogenesis and factors involved are poorly characterized. An example is the DEAD box proteins, widely known to participate in the biogenesis of bacterial and cytoplasmic eukaryotic ribosomes as either RNA helicases or RNA chaperones, whose mitochondrial counterparts remain completely unknown. Here, we have identified the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DEAD box protein Mrh4 as essential for large mitoribosome subunit biogenesis. Mrh4 interacts with the 21S rRNA, mitoribosome subassemblies, and fully assembled mitoribosomes. In the absence of Mrh4, the 21S rRNA is matured and forms part of a large on-pathway assembly intermediate missing proteins Mrpl16 and Mrpl39. We conclude that Mrh4 plays an essential role during the late stages of mitoribosome assembly by promoting remodeling of the 21S rRNA-protein interactions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The HCV IRES pseudoknot positions the initiation codon on the 40S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Berry, Katherine E; Waghray, Shruti; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2010-08-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) genomic RNA contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) in its 5' untranslated region, the structure of which is essential for viral protein translation. The IRES includes a predicted pseudoknot interaction near the AUG start codon, but the results of previous studies of its structure have been conflicting. Using mutational analysis coupled with activity and functional assays, we verified the importance of pseudoknot base pairings for IRES-mediated translation and, using 35 mutants, conducted a comprehensive study of the structural tolerance and functional contributions of the pseudoknot. Ribosomal toeprinting experiments show that the entirety of the pseudoknot element positions the initiation codon in the mRNA binding cleft of the 40S ribosomal subunit. Optimal spacing between the pseudoknot and the start site AUG resembles that between the Shine-Dalgarno sequence and the initiation codon in bacterial mRNAs. Finally, we validated the HCV IRES pseudoknot as a potential drug target using antisense 2'-OMe oligonucleotides.

  11. Nop6, a component of 90S pre-ribosomal particles, is required for 40S ribosomal subunit biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, Juan José; Babiano, Reyes; Lebaron, Simon; Froment, Carine; Monsarrat, Bernard; Henry, Yves; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ribosome biogenesis requires, in addition to rRNA and ribosomal proteins, a myriad of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and over two hundred protein trans-acting factors. There are protein trans-acting factors predicted to participate in ribosome biogenesis that have not been so far characterized. Here, we report the functional analysis of the Nucleolar protein 6 (Nop6) in ribosome biogenesis. Our results show that Nop6 is needed for optimal 40S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Deletion of NOP6 leads to an appropriate 20% reduction in 18S rRNA levels and therefore in 40S ribosomal subunits. This is due to mild inhibition of pre-rRNA processing at cleavage site A 2. Tandem affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry and northern blot analyses indicate that Nop6 is a component of 90S pre-ribosomal particles. rDNA chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments and analysis of the intracellular localisation of Nop6-eGFP after in vivo shut down of pre-rRNA transcription strongly suggest that Nop6 binds to the pre-rRNA early during transcription. Genetic data suggest that Nop6 and the snoRNA snR57 both interact similarly with the protein trans-acting factor Nep1. It has been proposed that snR57 and Nep1 participate in a pre-rRNA conformational switch that allows the proper assembly of 40S ribosomal protein S19. Our results strongly suggest that the role Nop6 might have in this conformational switch is independent of snR57.

  12. Structural model of the 50S subunit of E.Coli ribosomes from solution scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Svergun, D.I.; Koch, M.H.J.; Pedersen, J.S.; Serdyuk, I.N.

    1994-12-31

    The application of new methods of small-angle scattering data interpretation to a contrast variation study of the 50S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli in solution is described. The X-ray data from contrast variation with sucrose are analyzed in terms of the basic scattering curves from the volume inaccessible to sucrose and from the regions inside this volume occupied mainly by RNA and by proteins. From these curves models of the shape of the 50S and its RNA-rich core are evaluated and positioned so that their difference produces a scattering curve which is in good agreement with the scattering from the protein moiety. Basing on this preliminary model, the X-ray and neutron contrast variation data of the 50S subunit in aqueous solutions are interpreted in the frame of the advanced two-phase model described by the shapes of the 50S subunit and its RNA-rich core taking into account density fluctuations inside the RNA and the protein moiety. The shape of the envelope of the 50S subunit and of the RNA-rich core are evaluated with a resolution of about 40A. The shape of the envelope is in good agreement with the models of the 50S subunit obtained from electron microscopy on isolated particles. The shape of the RNA-rich core correlates well with the model of the entire particle determined by the image reconstruction from ordered sheets indicating that the latter model which is based on the subjective contouring of density maps is heavily biased towards the RNA.

  13. Time course of large ribosomal subunit assembly in E. coli cells overexpressing a helicase inactive DbpA protein.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Riley C; Childs, Jared J; Gevorkyan, Jirair; Gerasimova, Yulia V; Koculi, Eda

    2016-07-01

    DbpA is a DEAD-box RNA helicase implicated in Escherichia coli large ribosomal subunit assembly. Previous studies have shown that when the ATPase and helicase inactive DbpA construct, R331A, is expressed in E. coli cells, a large ribosomal subunit intermediate accumulates. The large subunit intermediate migrates as a 45S particle in a sucrose gradient. Here, using a number of structural and fluorescent assays, we investigate the ribosome profiles of cells lacking wild-type DbpA and overexpressing the R331A DbpA construct. Our data show that in addition to the 45S particle previously described, 27S and 35S particles are also present in the ribosome profiles of cells overexpressing R331A DbpA. The 27S, 35S, and 45S independently convert to the 50S subunit, suggesting that ribosome assembly in the presence of R331A and the absence of wild-type DbpA occurs via multiple pathways. © 2016 Gentry et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  14. Late-assembly of human ribosomal protein S20 in the cytoplasm is essential for the functioning of the small subunit ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Lin-Ru; Chou, Chang-Wei; Wu, Jing-Ying; Kirby, Ralph; Lin, Alan

    2013-11-15

    Using immuno-fluorescent probing and Western blotting analysis, we reveal the exclusive cytoplasm nature of the small subunit ribosomal protein S20. To illustrate the importance of the cellular compartmentation of S20 to the function of small subunit 40S, we created a nuclear resident S20{sub NLS} mutant gene and examined polysome profile of cells that had been transfected with the S20{sub NLS} gene. As a result, we observed the formation of recombinant 40S carried S20{sub NLS} but this recombinant 40S was never found in the polysome, suggesting such a recombinant 40S was translation incompetent. Moreover, by the tactic of the energy depletion and restoration, we were able to restrain the nuclear-resided S20{sub NLS} in the cytoplasm. Yet, along a progressive energy restoration, we observed the presence of recombinant 40S subunits carrying the S20{sub NLS} in the polysome. This proves that S20 needs to be cytoplasmic in order to make a functional 40S subunit. Furthermore, it also implies that the assembly order of ribosomal protein in eukaryote is orderly regulated. - Highlights: • The step of S20 assembled on 40S is happened in the cytoplasm. • A small subunit assembled with a nuclear S20{sub NLS} is translational incompetence. • Using energy depletion and recovery to manipulate the cellular compartment of S20{sub NLS}. • Cytoplasm-retained S20{sub NLS} is crucial for creating a functional small subunit.

  15. Ribosome-stalk biogenesis is coupled with recruitment of nuclear-export factor to the nascent 60S subunit.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Anshuk; Pech, Markus; Thoms, Matthias; Beckmann, Roland; Hurt, Ed

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear export of preribosomal subunits is a key step during eukaryotic ribosome formation. To efficiently pass through the FG-repeat meshwork of the nuclear pore complex, the large pre-60S subunit requires several export factors. Here we describe the mechanism of recruitment of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA-export receptor Mex67-Mtr2 to the pre-60S subunit at the proper time. Mex67-Mtr2 binds at the premature ribosomal-stalk region, which later during translation serves as a binding platform for translational GTPases on the mature ribosome. The assembly factor Mrt4, a structural homolog of cytoplasmic-stalk protein P0, masks this site, thus preventing untimely recruitment of Mex67-Mtr2 to nuclear pre-60S particles. Subsequently, Yvh1 triggers Mrt4 release in the nucleus, thereby creating a narrow time window for Mex67-Mtr2 association at this site and facilitating nuclear export of the large subunit. Thus, a spatiotemporal mark on the ribosomal stalk controls the recruitment of an RNA-export receptor to the nascent 60S subunit.

  16. The eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension of ribosomal protein S31 contributes to the assembly and function of 40S ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Martín-Villanueva, Sara; Murat, Guillaume; Lacombe, Thierry; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    The archaea-/eukaryote-specific 40S-ribosomal-subunit protein S31 is expressed as an ubiquitin fusion protein in eukaryotes and consists of a conserved body and a eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension. In yeast, S31 is a practically essential protein, which is required for cytoplasmic 20S pre-rRNA maturation. Here, we have studied the role of the N-terminal extension of the yeast S31 protein. We show that deletion of this extension partially impairs cell growth and 40S subunit biogenesis and confers hypersensitivity to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Moreover, the extension harbours a nuclear localization signal that promotes active nuclear import of S31, which associates with pre-ribosomal particles in the nucleus. In the absence of the extension, truncated S31 inefficiently assembles into pre-40S particles and two subpopulations of mature small subunits, one lacking and another one containing truncated S31, can be identified. Plasmid-driven overexpression of truncated S31 partially suppresses the growth and ribosome biogenesis defects but, conversely, slightly enhances the hypersensitivity to aminoglycosides. Altogether, these results indicate that the N-terminal extension facilitates the assembly of S31 into pre-40S particles and contributes to the optimal translational activity of mature 40S subunits but has only a minor role in cytoplasmic cleavage of 20S pre-rRNA at site D. PMID:27422873

  17. Small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences of Phaeodarea challenge the monophyly of Haeckel's Radiolaria.

    PubMed

    Polet, Stephane; Berney, Cédric; Fahrni, José; Pawlowski, Jan

    2004-03-01

    In his grand monograph of Radiolaria, Ernst Haeckel originally included Phaeodarea together with Acantharea and Polycystinea, all three taxa characterized by the presence of a central capsule and the possession of axopodia. Cytological and ultrastructural studies, however, questioned the monophyly of Radiolaria, suggesting an independent evolutionary origin of the three taxa, and the first molecular data on Acantharea and Polycystinea brought controversial results. To test further the monophyly of Radiolaria, we sequenced the complete small subunit ribosomal RNA gene of three phaeodarians and three polycystines. Our analyses reveal that phaeodarians clearly branch among the recently described phylum Cercozoa, separately from Acantharea and Polycystinea. This result enhances the morphological variability within the phylum Cercozoa, which already contains very heterogeneous groups of protists. Our study also confirms the common origin of Acantharea and Polycystinea, which form a sister-group to the Cercozoa, and allows a phylogenetic reinterpretation of the morphological features of the three radiolarian groups.

  18. Structure of the 40S ribosomal subunit of Plasmodium falciparum by homology and de novo modeling.

    PubMed

    Mwangi, Harrison Ndung'u; Wagacha, Peter; Mathenge, Peterson; Sijenyi, Fredrick; Mulaa, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Generation of three dimensional structures of macromolecules using in silico structural modeling technologies such as homology and de novo modeling has improved dramatically and increased the speed by which tertiary structures of organisms can be generated. This is especially the case if a homologous crystal structure is already available. High-resolution structures can be rapidly created using only their sequence information as input, a process that has the potential to increase the speed of scientific discovery. In this study, homology modeling and structure prediction tools such as RNA123 and SWISS-MODEL were used to generate the 40S ribosomal subunit from Plasmodium falciparum. This structure was modeled using the published crystal structure from Tetrahymena thermophila, a homologous eukaryote. In the absence of the Plasmodium falciparum 40S ribosomal crystal structure, the model accurately depicts a global topology, secondary and tertiary connections, and gives an overall root mean square deviation (RMSD) value of 3.9 Å relative to the template׳s crystal structure. Deviations are somewhat larger in areas with no homology between the templates. These results demonstrate that this approach has the power to identify motifs of interest in RNA and identify potential drug targets for macromolecules whose crystal structures are unknown. The results also show the utility of RNA homology modeling software for structure determination and lay the groundwork for applying this approach to larger and more complex eukaryotic ribosomes and other RNA-protein complexes. Structures generated from this study can be used in in silico screening experiments and lead to the determination of structures for targets/hit complexes.

  19. A new fungal large subunit ribosomal RNA primer for high throughput sequencing surveys

    DOE PAGES

    Mueller, Rebecca C.; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-12-09

    The inclusion of phylogenetic metrics in community ecology has provided insights into important ecological processes, particularly when combined with high-throughput sequencing methods; however, these approaches have not been widely used in studies of fungal communities relative to other microbial groups. Two obstacles have been considered: (1) the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has limited utility for constructing phylogenies and (2) most PCR primers that target the large subunit (LSU) ribosomal unit generate amplicons that exceed current limits of high-throughput sequencing platforms. We designed and tested a PCR primer (LR22R) to target approximately 300–400 bp region of the D2 hypervariable regionmore » of the fungal LSU for use with the Illumina MiSeq platform. Both in silico and empirical analyses showed that the LR22R–LR3 pair captured a broad range of fungal taxonomic groups with a small fraction of non-fungal groups. Phylogenetic placement of publically available LSU D2 sequences showed broad agreement with taxonomic classification. Comparisons of the LSU D2 and the ITS2 ribosomal regions from environmental samples and known communities showed similar discriminatory abilities of the two primer sets. Altogether, these findings show that the LR22R–LR3 primer pair has utility for phylogenetic analyses of fungal communities using high-throughput sequencing methods.« less

  20. Are stop codons recognized by base triplets in the large ribosomal RNA subunit?

    PubMed

    Liang, Han; Landweber, Laura F; Fresco, Jacques R

    2005-10-01

    The precise mechanism of stop codon recognition in translation termination is still unclear. A previously published study by Ivanov and colleagues proposed a new model for stop codon recognition in which 3-nucleotide Ter-anticodons within the loops of hairpin helices 69 (domain IV) and 89 (domain V) in large ribosomal subunit (LSU) rRNA recognize stop codons to terminate protein translation in eubacteria and certain organelles. We evaluated this model by extensive bioinformatic analysis of stop codons and their putative corresponding Ter-anticodons across a much wider range of species, and found many cases for which it cannot explain the stop codon usage without requiring the involvement of one or more of the eight possible noncomplementary base pairs. Involvement of such base pairs may not be structurally or thermodynamically damaging to the model. However, if, according to the model, Ter-anticodon interaction with stop codons occurs within the ribosomal A-site, the structural stringency which that site imposes on sense codon.tRNA anticodon interaction should also extend to stop codon.Ter-anticodon interactions. Moreover, with Ter-tRNA in place of an aminoacyl-tRNA, for each of the various Ter-anticodons there is a sense codon that can interact with it preferentially by complementary and wobble base-pairing. Both these considerations considerably weaken the arguments put forth previously.

  1. The molecular basis for ANE syndrome revealed by the large ribosomal subunit processome interactome

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Kathleen L; Teramoto, Takamasa; Zhang, Jun; Tanaka Hall, Traci M; Baserga, Susan J

    2016-01-01

    ANE syndrome is a ribosomopathy caused by a mutation in an RNA recognition motif of RBM28, a nucleolar protein conserved to yeast (Nop4). While patients with ANE syndrome have fewer mature ribosomes, it is unclear how this mutation disrupts ribosome assembly. Here we use yeast as a model system and show that the mutation confers growth and pre-rRNA processing defects. Recently, we found that Nop4 is a hub protein in the nucleolar large subunit (LSU) processome interactome. Here we demonstrate that the ANE syndrome mutation disrupts Nop4’s hub function by abrogating several of Nop4’s protein-protein interactions. Circular dichroism and NMR demonstrate that the ANE syndrome mutation in RRM3 of human RBM28 disrupts domain folding. We conclude that the ANE syndrome mutation generates defective protein folding which abrogates protein-protein interactions and causes faulty pre-LSU rRNA processing, thus revealing one aspect of the molecular basis of this human disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16381.001 PMID:27077951

  2. A new fungal large subunit ribosomal RNA primer for high throughput sequencing surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Rebecca C.; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-12-09

    The inclusion of phylogenetic metrics in community ecology has provided insights into important ecological processes, particularly when combined with high-throughput sequencing methods; however, these approaches have not been widely used in studies of fungal communities relative to other microbial groups. Two obstacles have been considered: (1) the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has limited utility for constructing phylogenies and (2) most PCR primers that target the large subunit (LSU) ribosomal unit generate amplicons that exceed current limits of high-throughput sequencing platforms. We designed and tested a PCR primer (LR22R) to target approximately 300–400 bp region of the D2 hypervariable region of the fungal LSU for use with the Illumina MiSeq platform. Both in silico and empirical analyses showed that the LR22R–LR3 pair captured a broad range of fungal taxonomic groups with a small fraction of non-fungal groups. Phylogenetic placement of publically available LSU D2 sequences showed broad agreement with taxonomic classification. Comparisons of the LSU D2 and the ITS2 ribosomal regions from environmental samples and known communities showed similar discriminatory abilities of the two primer sets. Altogether, these findings show that the LR22R–LR3 primer pair has utility for phylogenetic analyses of fungal communities using high-throughput sequencing methods.

  3. Unexpected Diagnosis of Cerebral Toxoplasmosis by 16S and D2 Large-Subunit Ribosomal DNA PCR and Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kvich, Lasse; Eickhardt, Steffen; Omland, Lars H.; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Moser, Claus

    2015-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii causes severe opportunistic infections. Here, we report an unexpected diagnosis of cerebral toxoplasmosis. T. gondii was diagnosed by 16S and D2 large-subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing of a cerebral biopsy specimen and confirmed by T. gondii-specific PCR and immunohistochemistry. The patient was later diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. PMID:25854484

  4. C7orf30 specifically associates with the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome and is involved in translation.

    PubMed

    Wanschers, Bas F J; Szklarczyk, Radek; Pajak, Aleksandra; van den Brand, Mariël A M; Gloerich, Jolein; Rodenburg, Richard J T; Lightowlers, Robert N; Nijtmans, Leo G; Huynen, Martijn A

    2012-05-01

    In a comparative genomics study for mitochondrial ribosome-associated proteins, we identified C7orf30, the human homolog of the plant protein iojap. Gene order conservation among bacteria and the observation that iojap orthologs cannot be transferred between bacterial species predict this protein to be associated with the mitochondrial ribosome. Here, we show colocalization of C7orf30 with the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome using isokinetic sucrose gradient and 2D Blue Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) analysis. We co-purified C7orf30 with proteins of the large subunit, and not with proteins of the small subunit, supporting interaction that is specific to the large mitoribosomal complex. Consistent with this physical association, a mitochondrial translation assay reveals negative effects of C7orf30 siRNA knock-down on mitochondrial gene expression. Based on our data we propose that C7orf30 is involved in ribosomal large subunit function. Sequencing the gene in 35 patients with impaired mitochondrial translation did not reveal disease-causing mutations in C7orf30.

  5. Removal of ribosomal subunits (and rRNA) from cytoplasmic extracts before solubilization with SDS and deproteinization.

    PubMed

    Rio, Donald C; Ares, Manuel; Hannon, Gregory J; Nilsen, Timothy W

    2010-06-01

    More than 95% of total RNA is composed of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) (28S, 18S, 5.8S, and 5S). Here, we present a method that is effective in removing rRNA before extraction and purification of total RNA. If you choose to prepare cytoplasmic RNA and wish to analyze any RNA other than rRNA, it is desirable to eliminate the rRNAs by taking advantage of the fact that the ribosomal subunits are very large (40S and 60S). Few, if any, other cellular RNAs are present in such large macromolecular complexes. The vast majority of rRNAs can be removed by sedimentation. Of course, steps must be taken to avoid co-sedimentation of desired RNAs. Co-sedimentation can be greatly reduced by first dissociating ribosomes into their respective subunits by EDTA treatment. The subunits are then "cleaned" by treatment with high salt and nonionic detergent. Ribosomal subunits remain intact under these conditions and can be sedimented free of other RNAs. Subsequently, the remaining RNAs (messenger RNAs [mRNAs] and all other RNAs) can be purified and analyzed by a variety of methods.

  6. RNA folding and ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Woodson, Sarah A

    2008-12-01

    Ribosome synthesis is a tightly regulated process that is crucial for cell survival. Chemical footprinting, mass spectrometry, and cryo-electron microscopy are revealing how these complex cellular machines are assembled. Rapid folding of the rRNA provides a platform for protein-induced assembly of the bacterial 30S ribosome. Multiple assembly pathways increase the flexibility of the assembly process, while accessory factors and modification enzymes chaperone the late stages of assembly and control the quality of the mature subunits.

  7. Analysis of the interaction between bovine mitochondrial 28 S ribosomal subunits and mRNA.

    PubMed

    Farwell, M A; Schirawski, J; Hager, P W; Spremulli, L L

    1996-11-11

    The small subunit of the bovine mitochondrial ribosome forms a tight complex with mRNAs. This [28 S:mRNA] complex forms as readily on circular mRNAs as on linear mRNAs indicating that a free 5' end on the mRNA is not required for the interaction observed. The effects of monovalent cations on the equilibrium association constant and on the forward and reverse rate constants governing this interaction have been determined. Monovalent cations have a strong effect on the forward rate constant. Increasing the KCl concentration from 1 mM to 100 mM reduces kon by nearly 100-fold. Monovalent cations have only a small effect on the reverse rate constant, koff'. Analysis of these data indicates that the rate laws governing the formation and dissociation of the [28 S:mRNA] complex cannot be deduced from the chemical equation. This observation suggests that there are "hidden intermediates' in the formation and dissociation of this complex. The implications of these observations are discussed in terms of a model for the interaction between the mitochondrial 28 S subunit and mRNAs.

  8. Conditionally lethal ribosomal protein mutants: characterization of a locus required for modification of 50S subunit proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, S R; Maples, V F; Champney, W S

    1977-01-01

    Mutagenized P1 bacteriophage were used to transduce a marker (aroE) adjacent to the cluster or ribosomal protein genes located at 72 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome. Linked temperature-sensitive transductants were isolated and characterized. A mutant unable to grow at 44 degrees was found to be defective in protein synthesis both in vivo and in vitro. At the restrictive temperature mutant cells lost all polyribosomes. Analysis of the ribosomal proteins revealed alterations in at least four 50S subunit proteins. The mutation (called rimE1, ribosomal protein modification) mapped between rpsE and aroE. It is suggested that the rimE locus is the structural gene for an activity that modifies a selected number of ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:322127

  9. 13-Deoxytedanolide, a marine sponge-derived antitumor macrolide, binds to the 60S large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Shinichi; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Yoshida, Minoru; Hirota, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Fusetani, Nobuhiro

    2005-01-17

    13-Deoxytedanolide is a potent antitumor macrolide isolated from the marine sponge Mycale adhaerens. In spite of its remarkable activity, the mode of action of 13-deoxytedanolide has not been elucidated. [11-3H]-(11S)-13-Deoxydihydrotedanolide derived from the macrolide was used for identifying the target molecule from the yeast cell lysate. Fractionation of the binding protein revealed that the labeled 13-deoxytedanolide derivative strongly bound to the 80S ribosome as well as to the 60S large subunit, but not to the 40S small subunit. In agreement with this observation, 13-deoxytedanolide efficiently inhibited the polypeptide elongation. Interestingly, competition studies demonstrated that 13-deoxytedanolide shared the binding site on the 60S large subunit with pederin and its marine-derived analogues. These results indicate that 13-deoxytedanolide is a potent protein synthesis inhibitor and is the first macrolide to inhibit the eukaryotic ribosome.

  10. Direct mass spectrometric analysis of intact proteins of the yeast large ribosomal subunit using capillary LC/FTICR

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Won; Berger, Scott J.; Martinović, Suzana; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shen, Yufeng; Zhao, Rui; Smith, Richard D.

    2002-01-01

    Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry coupled with capillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography was used to characterize intact proteins from the large subunit of the yeast ribosome. High mass measurement accuracy, achieved by “mass locking” with an internal standard from a dual electrospray ionization source, allowed identification of ribosomal proteins. Analyses of the intact proteins revealed information on cotranslational and posttranslational modifications of the ribosomal proteins that included loss of the initiating methionine, acetylation, methylation, and proteolytic maturation. High-resolution separations permitted differentiation of protein isoforms having high structural similarity as well as proteins from their modified forms, facilitating unequivocal assignments. The study identified 42 of the 43 core large ribosomal subunit proteins and 58 (of 64 possible) core large subunit protein isoforms having unique masses in a single analysis. These results demonstrate the basis for the high-throughput analyses of complex mixtures of intact proteins, which we believe will be an important complement to other approaches for defining protein modifications and their changes resulting from physiological processes or environmental perturbations. PMID:11983894

  11. Insights into remodeling events during eukaryotic large ribosomal subunit assembly provided by high resolution cryo-EM structures.

    PubMed

    Biedka, Stephanie; Wu, Shan; LaPeruta, Amber J; Gao, Ning; Woolford, John L

    2017-03-07

    Ribosomes are responsible for translating the genome, in the form of mRNA, into the proteome in all organisms. Biogenesis of ribosomes in eukaryotes is a complex process involving numerous remodeling events driven in part by the concerted actions of hundreds of protein assembly factors. A major challenge in studying eukaryotic ribosome assembly has, until recently, been a lack of structural data to facilitate understanding of the conformational and compositional changes the pre-ribosome undergoes during its construction. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has begun filling these gaps; recent advances in cryo-EM have enabled the determination of several high resolution pre-ribosome structures. This review focuses mainly on lessons learned from the study of pre-60S particles purified from yeast using the assembly factor Nog2 as bait. These Nog2 particles provide insight into many aspects of nuclear stages of 60S subunit assembly, including construction of major 60S subunit functional centers and processing of the ITS2 spacer RNA.

  12. Characterization of Mg2+-induced conformational change in the 50S ribosomal subunit by differential hydrogen exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, D; Begard, E; Grunberg-Manago, M; Hui Bon Hoa, G

    1980-01-01

    The technique of differential hydrogen exchange allows detection of a conformational change in the 50S subunit of Escherichia coli ribosome when the magnesium concentration is lowered in a range where ribosomal activity is fully preserved. This change is characterized by a seventy-fold acceleration of about thirty labile hydrogens in the case of a Mg2+ jump from 10 mM to 2 mM. The small number of hydrogens involved can explain the difficulty in detecting this change by other methods. PMID:7003535

  13. [Study of the surface of Escherichia coli ribosomes and ribosomal particles by the tritium bombardment method].

    PubMed

    Iusupov, M M; Spirin, A S

    1986-11-01

    A new technique of atomic tritium bombardment has been used to study the surface topography of Escherichia coli ribosomes and ribosomal subunits. The technique provides for the labeling of proteins exposed on the surface of ribosomal particles, the extent of protein labeling being proportional to the degree of exposure. The following proteins were considerably tritiated in the 70S ribosomes: S1, S4, S7, S9 and/or S11, S12 and/or L20, S13, S18, S20, S21, L1, L5, L6, L7/L12, L10, L11, L16, L17, L24, L26 and L27. A conclusion is drawn that these proteins are exposed on the ribosome surface to an essentially greater extent than the others. Dissociation of 70S ribosomes into the ribosomal subunits by decreasing Mg2+ concentration does not lead to the exposure of additional ribosomal proteins. This implies that there are no proteins on the contacting surfaces of the subunits. However, if a mixture of subunits has been subjected to centrifugation in a low Mg2+ concentration at high concentrations of a monovalent cation, proteins S3, S5, S7, S14, S18 and L16 are more exposed on the surface of the isolated 30S and 50S subunits than in the subunit mixture or in the 70S ribosomes. The exposure of additional proteins is explained by distortion of the native quaternary structure of ribosomal subunits as a result of the separation procedure. Reassociation of isolated subunits at high Mg2+ concentration results in shielding of proteins S3, S5, S7 and S18 and can be explained by reconstitution of the intact 30S subunit structure.

  14. A group I intron in the nuclear small subunit ribosomal DNA of Gaeumannomyces graminis.

    PubMed

    Fouly, H M; Wilkinson, H T

    2000-05-01

    The length of the small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) differs among isolates of species and varieties of Gaeumannomyces. The sequence of the 3' region of the SSU rDNA revealed 340-, 365-, and 520-bp insertions for G. graminis varieties avenae, tritici, and graminis, respectively. The intron sequences from varities tritici and avenae were similar, except there was an insert of 23 nucleotides at base 328 from the 5' end of the G. g. var. tritici intron. The G. g. var. graminis intron sequences had 92.4% homology compared with the intron sequences of varieties tritici and avenae. In addition, the intron sequence of variety graminis is larger, having an insert of 155 nucleotides at base 365 of the 5' end of the intron. Little variation in the DNA sequences flanking the introns has been detected among the isolates of Gaeumannomyces that either have or lack an intron. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) indicated the absence of the intron in the mature rRNA. The intron sequence had both a conserved sequence and secondary structural elements classifying it as a group I intron.

  15. Phylogenetic position of Gromia oviformis Dujardin inferred from nuclear-encoded small subunit ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Burki, Fabien; Berney, Cédric; Pawlowski, Jan

    2002-09-01

    Gromia oviformis Dujardin is a common marine protist characterised by a large, globular test and filose pseudopodia. First considered a foraminifer, Gromia was later placed within the Filosea and recently included among amoebae of uncertain affinities. In order to clarify the phylogenetic position of this genus, we sequenced the complete small-subunit ribosomal DNA gene of G. oviformis collected at five different geographic localities. The high divergence of obtained sequences suggests that G. oviformis is a species complex composed of several genetically distinct sibling species. Sequence analyses show Gromia to be a member of the Cercozoa, a heterogeneous assemblage which includes filose amoebae, the amoeboflagellate cercomonads, the chlorarachniophytes and the plasmodiophorid plant pathogens. Contrary to traditional classification, Gromia is not closely related to other testate filose amoebae (the Euglyphida), but seems to branch early among the Cercozoa. Our analyses also show a close relationship between the Cercozoa and the Acantharea. Because the Cercozoa are related to the Foraminifera based on other molecular data, we propose that most protists possessing filopodia, reticulopodia and axopodia have a common origin.

  16. One step engineering of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA using CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Krishna; Tsvetanova, Billyana; Chuang, Ray-Yuan; Noskov, Vladimir N; Assad-Garcia, Nacyra; Ma, Li; Hutchison Iii, Clyde A; Smith, Hamilton O; Glass, John I; Merryman, Chuck; Venter, J Craig; Gibson, Daniel G

    2016-08-04

    Bacteria are indispensable for the study of fundamental molecular biology processes due to their relatively simple gene and genome architecture. The ability to engineer bacterial chromosomes is quintessential for understanding gene functions. Here we demonstrate the engineering of the small-ribosomal subunit (16S) RNA of Mycoplasma mycoides, by combining the CRISPR/Cas9 system and the yeast recombination machinery. We cloned the entire genome of M. mycoides in yeast and used constitutively expressed Cas9 together with in vitro transcribed guide-RNAs to introduce engineered 16S rRNA genes. By testing the function of the engineered 16S rRNA genes through genome transplantation, we observed surprising resilience of this gene to addition of genetic elements or helix substitutions with phylogenetically-distant bacteria. While this system could be further used to study the function of the 16S rRNA, one could envision the "simple" M. mycoides genome being used in this setting to study other genetic structures and functions to answer fundamental questions of life.

  17. One step engineering of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA using CRISPR/Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Krishna; Tsvetanova, Billyana; Chuang, Ray-Yuan; Noskov, Vladimir N.; Assad-Garcia, Nacyra; Ma, Li; Hutchison III, Clyde A.; Smith, Hamilton O.; Glass, John I.; Merryman, Chuck; Venter, J. Craig; Gibson, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria are indispensable for the study of fundamental molecular biology processes due to their relatively simple gene and genome architecture. The ability to engineer bacterial chromosomes is quintessential for understanding gene functions. Here we demonstrate the engineering of the small-ribosomal subunit (16S) RNA of Mycoplasma mycoides, by combining the CRISPR/Cas9 system and the yeast recombination machinery. We cloned the entire genome of M. mycoides in yeast and used constitutively expressed Cas9 together with in vitro transcribed guide-RNAs to introduce engineered 16S rRNA genes. By testing the function of the engineered 16S rRNA genes through genome transplantation, we observed surprising resilience of this gene to addition of genetic elements or helix substitutions with phylogenetically-distant bacteria. While this system could be further used to study the function of the 16S rRNA, one could envision the “simple” M. mycoides genome being used in this setting to study other genetic structures and functions to answer fundamental questions of life. PMID:27489041

  18. Combined large and small subunit ribosomal RNA phylogenies support a basal position of the acoelomorph flatworms.

    PubMed Central

    Telford, Maximilian J; Lockyer, Anne E; Cartwright-Finch, Chloë; Littlewood, D Timothy J

    2003-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of the phylum Platyhelminthes has been re-evaluated in the past decade by analysis of diverse molecular datasets. The consensus is that the Rhabditophora + Catenulida, which includes most of the flatworm taxa, are not primitively simple basal bilaterians but are related to coelomate phyla such as molluscs. The status of two other groups of acoelomate worms, Acoela and Nemertodermatida, is less clear. Although many characteristics unite these two groups, initial molecular phylogenetic studies placed the Nemertodermatida within the Rhabditophora, but placed the Acoela at the base of the Bilateria, distant from other flatworms. This contradiction resulted in scepticism about the basal position of acoels and led to calls for further data. We have sequenced large subunit ribosomal RNA genes from 13 rhabditophorans + catenulids, three acoels and one nemertodermatid, tripling the available data. Our analyses strongly support a basal position of both acoels and nemertodermatids. Alternative hypotheses are significantly less well supported by the data. We conclude that the Nemertodermatida and Acoela are basal bilaterians and, owing to their unique body plan and embryogenesis, should be recognized as a separate phylum, the Acoelomorpha. PMID:12803898

  19. Combined large and small subunit ribosomal RNA phylogenies support a basal position of the acoelomorph flatworms.

    PubMed

    Telford, Maximilian J; Lockyer, Anne E; Cartwright-Finch, Chloë; Littlewood, D Timothy J

    2003-05-22

    The phylogenetic position of the phylum Platyhelminthes has been re-evaluated in the past decade by analysis of diverse molecular datasets. The consensus is that the Rhabditophora + Catenulida, which includes most of the flatworm taxa, are not primitively simple basal bilaterians but are related to coelomate phyla such as molluscs. The status of two other groups of acoelomate worms, Acoela and Nemertodermatida, is less clear. Although many characteristics unite these two groups, initial molecular phylogenetic studies placed the Nemertodermatida within the Rhabditophora, but placed the Acoela at the base of the Bilateria, distant from other flatworms. This contradiction resulted in scepticism about the basal position of acoels and led to calls for further data. We have sequenced large subunit ribosomal RNA genes from 13 rhabditophorans + catenulids, three acoels and one nemertodermatid, tripling the available data. Our analyses strongly support a basal position of both acoels and nemertodermatids. Alternative hypotheses are significantly less well supported by the data. We conclude that the Nemertodermatida and Acoela are basal bilaterians and, owing to their unique body plan and embryogenesis, should be recognized as a separate phylum, the Acoelomorpha.

  20. The gene coding for small ribosomal subunit RNA in the basidiomycete Ustilago maydis contains a group I intron.

    PubMed Central

    De Wachter, R; Neefs, J M; Goris, A; Van de Peer, Y

    1992-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for small ribosomal subunit RNA in the basidiomycete Ustilago maydis was determined. It revealed the presence of a group I intron with a length of 411 nucleotides. This is the third occurrence of such an intron discovered in a small subunit rRNA gene encoded by a eukaryotic nuclear genome. The other two occurrences are in Pneumocystis carinii, a fungus of uncertain taxonomic status, and Ankistrodesmus stipitatus, a green alga. The nucleotides of the conserved core structure of 101 group I intron sequences present in different genes and genome types were aligned and their evolutionary relatedness was examined. This revealed a cluster including all group I introns hitherto found in eukaryotic nuclear genes coding for small and large subunit rRNAs. A secondary structure model was designed for the area of the Ustilago maydis small ribosomal subunit RNA precursor where the intron is situated. It shows that the internal guide sequence pairing with the intron boundaries fits between two helices of the small subunit rRNA, and that minimal rearrangement of base pairs suffices to achieve the definitive secondary structure of the 18S rRNA upon splicing. PMID:1561081

  1. eIF3j is located in the decoding center of the human 40S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Christopher S; Berry, Katherine E; Hershey, John W B; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2007-06-22

    Protein synthesis in all cells begins with the ordered binding of the small ribosomal subunit to messenger RNA (mRNA) and transfer RNA (tRNA). In eukaryotes, translation initiation factor 3 (eIF3) is thought to play an essential role in this process by influencing mRNA and tRNA binding through indirect interactions on the backside of the 40S subunit. Here we show by directed hydroxyl radical probing that the human eIF3 subunit eIF3j binds to the aminoacyl (A) site and mRNA entry channel of the 40S subunit, placing eIF3j directly in the ribosomal decoding center. eIF3j also interacts with eIF1A and reduces 40S subunit affinity for mRNA. A high affinity for mRNA is restored upon recruitment of initiator tRNA, even though eIF3j remains in the mRNA-binding cleft in the presence of tRNA. These results suggest that eIF3j functions in part by regulating access of the mRNA-binding cleft in response to initiation factor binding.

  2. Identification of Egyptian Fasciola species by PCR and restriction endonucleases digestion of the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene.

    PubMed

    El-Gozamy, Bothina R; Shoukry, Nahla M

    2009-08-01

    Fascioliasis is one of the familiar zoonotic health problems of worldwide distribution including Egypt. In this study, a simple and rapid polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR/RFLPs) assay, using the common restriction endonucleases Aval, EcoRI, Eael, Sac11 and Avail was applied to differentiate between both Fasciola gigantica and F. hepatica. The five restriction endonucleases were used to differentiate between the two species of Fasciola based on -1950 bp long sequence of the 18S nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. Aval and EcoRI restriction endonucleases failed to differentiate between the two Fasciola species when each restriction enzyme gave the same restriction patterns in both of them. However, F. gigantica and F. hepatica were well-differentiated when their small subunit ribosomal DNA were digested with Eael and Sac 11 restriction endonucleases.

  3. Multiple in vivo pathways for E. coli small ribosomal subunit assembly occur on one pre-rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Processing of transcribed precursor ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) to a mature state is a conserved aspect of ribosome biogenesis in vivo. We developed an affinity purification system to isolate and analyze in vivo formed pre-rRNA containing ribonucleoprotein particles (rRNPs) from wild-type E. coli. We observed that the first processing intermediate of pre-SSU rRNA is a platform for biogenesis. These pre-SSU containing RNPs have differing ribosomal protein and auxiliary factors association and rRNA folding. Each RNP lacks the proper architecture in functional regions suggesting that checkpoints preclude immature subunits from entering the translational cycle. This work offers in vivo snapshots of SSU biogenesis and reveals that multiple pathways exist for the entire SSU biogenesis process in wild-type E. coli. These findings have important implications in understanding SSU biogenesis in vivo and offer a general strategy for analysis of RNP biogenesis. PMID:25195050

  4. Unexpected Diagnosis of Cerebral Toxoplasmosis by 16S and D2 Large-Subunit Ribosomal DNA PCR and Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Alexandra Y C; Kvich, Lasse; Eickhardt, Steffen; Omland, Lars H; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Moser, Claus

    2015-06-01

    The protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii causes severe opportunistic infections. Here, we report an unexpected diagnosis of cerebral toxoplasmosis. T. gondii was diagnosed by 16S and D2 large-subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing of a cerebral biopsy specimen and confirmed by T. gondii-specific PCR and immunohistochemistry. The patient was later diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Chlamydia abortus YhbZ, a truncated Obg family GTPase, associates with the Escherichia coli large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Polkinghorne, Adam; Vaughan, Lloyd

    2011-01-01

    The stringent stress response is vital for bacterial survival under adverse environmental conditions. Obligate intracellular Chlamydia lack key stringent response proteins, but nevertheless can interrupt the cell cycle and enter stasis or persistence upon amino acid starvation. A possible key protein retained is YhbZ, a homologue of the ObgE guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) superfamily connecting the stringent stress response to ribosome maturation. Curiously, chlamydial YhbZ lacks the ObgE C-terminal domain thought to be essential for binding the large ribosomal subunit. We expressed recombinant Chlamydia abortus YhbZ and showed it to be a functional GTPase, with similar activity to other Obg GTPase family members. As Chlamydia are resistant to genetic manipulation, we performed heterologous expression and gradient centrifugation experiments in Escherichia coli and found that, despite the missing C-terminal domain, C. abortus YhbZ co-fractionates with the E. coli 50S large ribosomal subunit. In addition, overexpression of chlamydial YhbZ in E. coli leads to growth defects and elongation, as reported for other Obg members. YhbZ did not complement an E. coli obgE temperature-sensitive mutant, indicating the C-terminal acidic domain may have an additional role. This data supports a role for YhbZ linking the chlamydial stress response to ribosome function and cellular growth.

  6. The C-terminus of ribosomal protein uS4 contributes to small ribosomal subunit biogenesis and the fidelity of translation.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Divya; Allgeyer, Benjamin B; Gregory, Steven T; Bielski, Margaret C; Roelofsz, David M; Sabapathypillai, Sharon L; Vaid, Nikhil; O'Connor, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Ribosomal protein uS4 is an essential ribosomal component involved in multiple functions, including mRNA decoding. Structural analyses indicate that during decoding, the interface between the C-terminus of uS4 and protein uS5 is disrupted and in agreement with this, C-terminal uS4 truncation mutants are readily isolated on the basis of their increased miscoding phenotypes. The same mutants can also display defects in small subunit assembly and 16S rRNA processing and some are temperature sensitive for growth. Starting with one such temperature sensitive Escherichia coli uS4 mutant, we have isolated temperature insensitive derivatives carrying additional, intragenic mutations that restore the C-terminus and ameliorate the ribosomal defects. At least one of these suppressors has no detectable ribosome biogenesis phenotype, yet still miscodes, suggesting that the C-terminal requirements for ribosome assembly are less rigid than for mRNA decoding. In contrast to the uS4 C-terminal mutants that increase miscoding, two Salmonella enterica uS4 mutants with altered C-termini have been reported as being error-restrictive. Here, reconstruction experiments demonstrate that contrary to the previous reports, these mutants have a distinct error-prone, increased misreading phenotype, consistent with the behavior of the equivalent E. coli mutants and their likely structural effects on uS4-uS5 interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  7. Coupled release of eukaryotic translation initiation factors 5B and 1A from 80S ribosomes following subunit joining.

    PubMed

    Fringer, Jeanne M; Acker, Michael G; Fekete, Christie A; Lorsch, Jon R; Dever, Thomas E

    2007-03-01

    The translation initiation GTPase eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B (eIF5B) binds to the factor eIF1A and catalyzes ribosomal subunit joining in vitro. We show that rapid depletion of eIF5B in Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in the accumulation of eIF1A and mRNA on 40S subunits in vivo, consistent with a defect in subunit joining. Substituting Ala for the last five residues in eIF1A (eIF1A-5A) impairs eIF5B binding to eIF1A in cell extracts and to 40S complexes in vivo. Consistently, overexpression of eIF5B suppresses the growth and translation initiation defects in yeast expressing eIF1A-5A, indicating that eIF1A helps recruit eIF5B to the 40S subunit prior to subunit joining. The GTPase-deficient eIF5B-T439A mutant accumulated on 80S complexes in vivo and was retained along with eIF1A on 80S complexes formed in vitro. Likewise, eIF5B and eIF1A remained associated with 80S complexes formed in the presence of nonhydrolyzable GDPNP, whereas these factors were released from the 80S complexes in assays containing GTP. We propose that eIF1A facilitates the binding of eIF5B to the 40S subunit to promote subunit joining. Following 80S complex formation, GTP hydrolysis by eIF5B enables the release of both eIF5B and eIF1A, and the ribosome enters the elongation phase of protein synthesis.

  8. An HflX-type GTPase from Sulfolobus solfataricus binds to the 50S ribosomal subunit in all nucleotide-bound states.

    PubMed

    Blombach, Fabian; Launay, Helene; Zorraquino, Violeta; Swarts, Daan C; Cabrita, Lisa D; Benelli, Dario; Christodoulou, John; Londei, Paola; van der Oost, John

    2011-06-01

    HflX GTPases are found in all three domains of life, the Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. HflX from Escherichia coli has been shown to bind to the 50S ribosomal subunit in a nucleotide-dependent manner, and this interaction strongly stimulates its GTPase activity. We recently determined the structure of an HflX ortholog from the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus (SsoHflX). It revealed the presence of a novel HflX domain that might function in RNA binding and is linked to a canonical G domain. This domain arrangement is common to all archaeal, bacterial, and eukaryotic HflX GTPases. This paper shows that the archaeal SsoHflX, like its bacterial orthologs, binds to the 50S ribosomal subunit. This interaction does not depend on the presence of guanine nucleotides. The HflX domain is sufficient for ribosome interaction. Binding appears to be restricted to free 50S ribosomal subunits and does not occur with 70S ribosomes engaged in translation. The fingerprint (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear correlation nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of SsoHflX reveals a large number of well-resolved resonances that are broadened upon binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit. The GTPase activity of SsoHflX is stimulated by crude fractions of 50S ribosomal subunits, but this effect is lost with further high-salt purification of the 50S ribosomal subunits, suggesting that the stimulation depends on an extrinsic factor bound to the 50S ribosomal subunit. Our results reveal common properties but also marked differences between archaeal and bacterial HflX proteins.

  9. The D1-D2 region of the large subunit ribosomal DNA as barcode for ciliates.

    PubMed

    Stoeck, T; Przybos, E; Dunthorn, M

    2014-05-01

    Ciliates are a major evolutionary lineage within the alveolates, which are distributed in nearly all habitats on our planet and are an essential component for ecosystem function, processes and stability. Accurate identification of these unicellular eukaryotes through, for example, microscopy or mating type reactions is reserved to few specialists. To satisfy the demand for a DNA barcode for ciliates, which meets the standard criteria for DNA barcodes defined by the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL), we here evaluated the D1-D2 region of the ribosomal DNA large subunit (LSU-rDNA). Primer universality for the phylum Ciliophora was tested in silico with available database sequences as well as in the laboratory with 73 ciliate species, which represented nine of 12 ciliate classes. Primers tested in this study were successful for all tested classes. To test the ability of the D1-D2 region to resolve conspecific and congeneric sequence divergence, 63 Paramecium strains were sampled from 24 mating species. The average conspecific D1-D2 variation was 0.18%, whereas congeneric sequence divergence averaged 4.83%. In pairwise genetic distance analyses, we identified a D1-D2 sequence divergence of <0.6% as an ideal threshold to discriminate Paramecium species. Using this definition, only 3.8% of all conspecific and 3.9% of all congeneric sequence comparisons had the potential of false assignments. Neighbour-joining analyses inferred monophyly for all taxa but for two Paramecium octaurelia strains. Here, we present a protocol for easy DNA amplification of single cells and voucher deposition. In conclusion, the presented data pinpoint the D1-D2 region as an excellent candidate for an official CBOL barcode for ciliated protists.

  10. Genetic characterization of clinical acanthamoeba isolates from Japan using nuclear and mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Moshiur; Yagita, Kenji; Kobayashi, Akira; Oikawa, Yosaburo; Hussein, Amjad I A; Matsumura, Takahiro; Tokoro, Masaharu

    2013-08-01

    Because of an increased number of Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) along with associated disease burdens, medical professionals have become more aware of this pathogen in recent years. In this study, by analyzing both the nuclear 18S small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) and mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene loci, 27 clinical Acanthamoeba strains that caused AK in Japan were classified into 3 genotypes, T3 (3 strains), T4 (23 strains), and T5 (one strain). Most haplotypes were identical to the reference haplotypes reported from all over the world, and thus no specificity of the haplotype distribution in Japan was found. The T4 sub-genotype analysis using the 16S rRNA gene locus also revealed a clear sub-conformation within the T4 cluster, and lead to the recognition of a new sub-genotype T4i, in addition to the previously reported sub-genotypes T4a-T4h. Furthermore, 9 out of 23 strains in the T4 genotype were identified to a specific haplotype (AF479533), which seems to be a causal haplotype of AK. While heterozygous nuclear haplotypes were observed from 2 strains, the mitochondrial haplotypes were homozygous as T4 genotype in the both strains, and suggested a possibility of nuclear hybridization (mating reproduction) between different strains in Acanthamoeba. The nuclear 18S rRNA gene and mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene loci of Acanthamoeba spp. possess different unique characteristics usable for the genotyping analyses, and those specific features could contribute to the establishment of molecular taxonomy for the species complex of Acanthamoeba.

  11. The Rqc2/Tae2 subunit of the ribosome-associated quality control (RQC) complex marks ribosome-stalled nascent polypeptide chains for aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Yonashiro, Ryo; Tahara, Erich B; Bengtson, Mario H; Khokhrina, Maria; Lorenz, Holger; Chen, Kai-Chun; Kigoshi-Tansho, Yu; Savas, Jeffrey N; Yates, John R; Kay, Steve A; Craig, Elizabeth A; Mogk, Axel; Bukau, Bernd; Joazeiro, Claudio AP

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome stalling during translation can potentially be harmful, and is surveyed by a conserved quality control pathway that targets the associated mRNA and nascent polypeptide chain (NC). In this pathway, the ribosome-associated quality control (RQC) complex promotes the ubiquitylation and degradation of NCs remaining stalled in the 60S subunit. NC stalling is recognized by the Rqc2/Tae2 RQC subunit, which also stabilizes binding of the E3 ligase, Listerin/Ltn1. Additionally, Rqc2 modifies stalled NCs with a carboxy-terminal, Ala- and Thr-containing extension—the 'CAT tail'. However, the function of CAT tails and fate of CAT tail-modified ('CATylated') NCs has remained unknown. Here we show that CATylation mediates formation of detergent-insoluble NC aggregates. CATylation and aggregation of NCs could be observed either by inactivating Ltn1 or by analyzing NCs with limited ubiquitylation potential, suggesting that inefficient targeting by Ltn1 favors the Rqc2-mediated reaction. These findings uncover a translational stalling-dependent protein aggregation mechanism, and provide evidence that proteins can become specifically marked for aggregation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11794.001 PMID:26943317

  12. The Rqc2/Tae2 subunit of the ribosome-associated quality control (RQC) complex marks ribosome-stalled nascent polypeptide chains for aggregation.

    PubMed

    Yonashiro, Ryo; Tahara, Erich B; Bengtson, Mario H; Khokhrina, Maria; Lorenz, Holger; Chen, Kai-Chun; Kigoshi-Tansho, Yu; Savas, Jeffrey N; Yates, John R; Kay, Steve A; Craig, Elizabeth A; Mogk, Axel; Bukau, Bernd; Joazeiro, Claudio A P

    2016-03-04

    Ribosome stalling during translation can potentially be harmful, and is surveyed by a conserved quality control pathway that targets the associated mRNA and nascent polypeptide chain (NC). In this pathway, the ribosome-associated quality control (RQC) complex promotes the ubiquitylation and degradation of NCs remaining stalled in the 60S subunit. NC stalling is recognized by the Rqc2/Tae2 RQC subunit, which also stabilizes binding of the E3 ligase, Listerin/Ltn1. Additionally, Rqc2 modifies stalled NCs with a carboxy-terminal, Ala- and Thr-containing extension-the 'CAT tail'. However, the function of CAT tails and fate of CAT tail-modified ('CATylated') NCs has remained unknown. Here we show that CATylation mediates formation of detergent-insoluble NC aggregates. CATylation and aggregation of NCs could be observed either by inactivating Ltn1 or by analyzing NCs with limited ubiquitylation potential, suggesting that inefficient targeting by Ltn1 favors the Rqc2-mediated reaction. These findings uncover a translational stalling-dependent protein aggregation mechanism, and provide evidence that proteins can become specifically marked for aggregation.

  13. Mapping the interaction of SmpB with ribosomes by footprinting of ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Natalia; Pavlov, Michael Y.; Bouakaz, Elli; Ehrenberg, Måns; Schiavone, Lovisa Holmberg

    2005-01-01

    In trans-translation transfer messenger RNA (tmRNA) and small protein B (SmpB) rescue ribosomes stalled on truncated or in other ways problematic mRNAs. SmpB promotes the binding of tmRNA to the ribosome but there is uncertainty about the number of participating SmpB molecules as well as their ribosomal location. Here, the interaction of SmpB with ribosomal subunits and ribosomes was studied by isolation of SmpB containing complexes followed by chemical modification of ribosomal RNA with dimethyl sulfate, kethoxal and hydroxyl radicals. The results show that SmpB binds 30S and 50S subunits with 1:1 molar ratios and the 70S ribosome with 2:1 molar ratio. SmpB-footprints are similar on subunits and the ribosome. In the 30S subunit, SmpB footprints nucleotides that are in the vicinity of the P-site facing the E-site, and in the 50S subunit SmpB footprints nucleotides that are located below the L7/L12 stalk in the 3D structure of the ribosome. Based on these results, we suggest a mechanism where two molecules of SmpB interact with tmRNA and the ribosome during trans-translation. The first SmpB molecule binds near the factor-binding site on the 50S subunit helping tmRNA accommodation on the ribosome, whereas the second SmpB molecule may functionally substitute for a missing anticodon stem–loop in tmRNA during later steps of trans-translation. PMID:15972795

  14. Immature large ribosomal subunits containing the 7S pre-rRNA can engage in translation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; García-Gómez, Juan J; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Evolution has provided eukaryotes with mechanisms that impede immature and/or aberrant ribosomes to engage in translation. These mechanisms basically either prevent the nucleo-cytoplasmic export of these particles or, once in the cytoplasm, the release of associated assembly factors, which interfere with the binding of translation initiation factors and/or the ribosomal subunit joining. We have previously shown that aberrant yeast 40S ribosomal subunits containing the 20S pre-rRNA can engage in translation. In this study, we describe that cells harbouring the dob1-1 allele, encoding a mutated version of the exosome-assisting RNA helicase Mtr4, accumulate otherwise nuclear pre-60S ribosomal particles containing the 7S pre-rRNA in the cytoplasm. Polysome fractionation analyses revealed that these particles are competent for translation and do not induce elongation stalls. This phenomenon is rather specific since most mutations in other exosome components or co-factors, impairing the 3' end processing of the mature 5.8S rRNA, accumulate 7S pre-rRNAs in the nucleus. In addition, we confirm that pre-60S ribosomal particles containing either 5.8S + 30 or 5.8S + 5 pre-rRNAs also engage in translation elongation. We propose that 7S pre-rRNA processing is not strictly required for pre-60S r-particle export and that, upon arrival in the cytoplasm, there is no specific mechanism to prevent translation by premature pre-60S r-particles containing 3' extended forms of mature 5.8S rRNA.

  15. Immature large ribosomal subunits containing the 7S pre-rRNA can engage in translation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; García-Gómez, Juan J; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Evolution has provided eukaryotes with mechanisms that impede immature and/or aberrant ribosomes to engage in translation. These mechanisms basically either prevent the nucleo-cytoplasmic export of these particles or, once in the cytoplasm, the release of associated assembly factors, which interfere with the binding of translation initiation factors and/or the ribosomal subunit joining. We have previously shown that aberrant yeast 40S ribosomal subunits containing the 20S pre-rRNA can engage in translation. In this study, we describe that cells harbouring the dob1–1 allele, encoding a mutated version of the exosome-assisting RNA helicase Mtr4, accumulate otherwise nuclear pre-60S ribosomal particles containing the 7S pre-rRNA in the cytoplasm. Polysome fractionation analyses revealed that these particles are competent for translation and do not induce elongation stalls. This phenomenon is rather specific since most mutations in other exosome components or co-factors, impairing the 3′ end processing of the mature 5.8S rRNA, accumulate 7S pre-rRNAs in the nucleus. In addition, we confirm that pre-60S ribosomal particles containing either 5.8S + 30 or 5.8S + 5 pre-rRNAs also engage in translation elongation. We propose that 7S pre-rRNA processing is not strictly required for pre-60S r-particle export and that, upon arrival in the cytoplasm, there is no specific mechanism to prevent translation by premature pre-60S r-particles containing 3′ extended forms of mature 5.8S rRNA. PMID:26151772

  16. Nuclear Export of Pre-Ribosomal Subunits Requires Dbp5, but Not as an RNA-Helicase as for mRNA Export.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Bettina; Wu, Haijia; Hackmann, Alexandra; Krebber, Heike

    2016-01-01

    The DEAD-box RNA-helicase Dbp5/Rat8 is known for its function in nuclear mRNA export, where it displaces the export receptor Mex67 from the mRNA at the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Here we show that Dbp5 is also required for the nuclear export of both pre-ribosomal subunits. Yeast temperature-sensitive dbp5 mutants accumulate both ribosomal particles in their nuclei. Furthermore, Dbp5 genetically and physically interacts with known ribosomal transport factors such as Nmd3. Similar to mRNA export we show that also for ribosomal transport Dbp5 is required at the cytoplasmic side of the NPC. However, unlike its role in mRNA export, Dbp5 does not seem to undergo its ATPase cycle for this function, as ATPase-deficient dbp5 mutants that selectively inhibit mRNA export do not affect ribosomal transport. Furthermore, mutants of GLE1, the ATPase stimulating factor of Dbp5, show no major ribosomal export defects. Consequently, while Dbp5 uses its ATPase cycle to displace the export receptor Mex67 from the translocated mRNAs, Mex67 remains bound to ribosomal subunits upon transit to the cytoplasm, where it is detectable on translating ribosomes. Therefore, we propose a model, in which Dbp5 supports ribosomal transport by capturing ribosomal subunits upon their cytoplasmic appearance at the NPC, possibly by binding export factors such as Mex67. Thus, our findings reveal that although different ribonucleoparticles, mRNAs and pre-ribosomal subunits, use shared export factors, they utilize different transport mechanisms.

  17. Nuclear Export of Pre-Ribosomal Subunits Requires Dbp5, but Not as an RNA-Helicase as for mRNA Export

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Bettina; Wu, Haijia; Hackmann, Alexandra; Krebber, Heike

    2016-01-01

    The DEAD-box RNA-helicase Dbp5/Rat8 is known for its function in nuclear mRNA export, where it displaces the export receptor Mex67 from the mRNA at the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Here we show that Dbp5 is also required for the nuclear export of both pre-ribosomal subunits. Yeast temperature-sensitive dbp5 mutants accumulate both ribosomal particles in their nuclei. Furthermore, Dbp5 genetically and physically interacts with known ribosomal transport factors such as Nmd3. Similar to mRNA export we show that also for ribosomal transport Dbp5 is required at the cytoplasmic side of the NPC. However, unlike its role in mRNA export, Dbp5 does not seem to undergo its ATPase cycle for this function, as ATPase-deficient dbp5 mutants that selectively inhibit mRNA export do not affect ribosomal transport. Furthermore, mutants of GLE1, the ATPase stimulating factor of Dbp5, show no major ribosomal export defects. Consequently, while Dbp5 uses its ATPase cycle to displace the export receptor Mex67 from the translocated mRNAs, Mex67 remains bound to ribosomal subunits upon transit to the cytoplasm, where it is detectable on translating ribosomes. Therefore, we propose a model, in which Dbp5 supports ribosomal transport by capturing ribosomal subunits upon their cytoplasmic appearance at the NPC, possibly by binding export factors such as Mex67. Thus, our findings reveal that although different ribonucleoparticles, mRNAs and pre-ribosomal subunits, use shared export factors, they utilize different transport mechanisms. PMID:26872259

  18. DnaK-facilitated ribosome assembly in Escherichia coli revisited

    PubMed Central

    ALIX, JEAN-HERVÉ; NIERHAUS, KNUD H.

    2003-01-01

    Assembly helpers exist for the formation of ribosomal subunits. Such a function has been suggested for the DnaK system of chaperones (DnaK, DnaJ, GrpE). Here we show that 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits from an Escherichia coli dnaK-null mutant (containing a disrupted dnaK gene) grown at 30°C are physically and functionally identical to wild-type ribosomes. Furthermore, ribosomal components derived from mutant 30S and 50S subunits are fully competent for in vitro reconstitution of active ribosomal subunits. On the other hand, the DnaK chaperone system cannot circumvent the necessary heat-dependent activation step for the in vitro reconstitution of fully active 30S ribosomal subunits. It is therefore questionable whether the requirement for DnaK observed during in vivo ribosome assembly above 37°C implicates a direct or indirect role for DnaK in this process. PMID:12810912

  19. Negamycin induces translational stalling and miscoding by binding to the small subunit head domain of the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Nelson B; Altman, Roger B; Noeske, Jonas; Basarab, Gregory S; Code, Erin; Ferguson, Andrew D; Gao, Ning; Huang, Jian; Juette, Manuel F; Livchak, Stephania; Miller, Matthew D; Prince, D Bryan; Cate, Jamie H D; Buurman, Ed T; Blanchard, Scott C

    2014-11-18

    Negamycin is a natural product with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity and efficacy in animal models of infection. Although its precise mechanism of action has yet to be delineated, negamycin inhibits cellular protein synthesis and causes cell death. Here, we show that single point mutations within 16S rRNA that confer resistance to negamycin are in close proximity of the tetracycline binding site within helix 34 of the small subunit head domain. As expected from its direct interaction with this region of the ribosome, negamycin was shown to displace tetracycline. However, in contrast to tetracycline-class antibiotics, which serve to prevent cognate tRNA from entering the translating ribosome, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer investigations revealed that negamycin specifically stabilizes near-cognate ternary complexes within the A site during the normally transient initial selection process to promote miscoding. The crystal structure of the 70S ribosome in complex with negamycin, determined at 3.1 Å resolution, sheds light on this finding by showing that negamycin occupies a site that partially overlaps that of tetracycline-class antibiotics. Collectively, these data suggest that the small subunit head domain contributes to the decoding mechanism and that small-molecule binding to this domain may either prevent or promote tRNA entry by altering the initial selection mechanism after codon recognition and before GTPase activation.

  20. MRM2 and MRM3 are involved in biogenesis of the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Rorbach, Joanna; Boesch, Pierre; Gammage, Payam A.; Nicholls, Thomas J. J.; Pearce, Sarah F.; Patel, Dipali; Hauser, Andreas; Perocchi, Fabiana; Minczuk, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Defects of the translation apparatus in human mitochondria are known to cause disease, yet details of how protein synthesis is regulated in this organelle remain to be unveiled. Ribosome production in all organisms studied thus far entails a complex, multistep pathway involving a number of auxiliary factors. This includes several RNA processing and modification steps required for correct rRNA maturation. Little is known about the maturation of human mitochondrial 16S rRNA and its role in biogenesis of the mitoribosome. Here we investigate two methyltransferases, MRM2 (also known as RRMJ2, encoded by FTSJ2) and MRM3 (also known as RMTL1, encoded by RNMTL1), that are responsible for modification of nucleotides of the 16S rRNA A-loop, an essential component of the peptidyl transferase center. Our studies show that inactivation of MRM2 or MRM3 in human cells by RNA interference results in respiratory incompetence as a consequence of diminished mitochondrial translation. Ineffective translation in MRM2- and MRM3-depleted cells results from aberrant assembly of the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome (mt-LSU). Our findings show that MRM2 and MRM3 are human mitochondrial methyltransferases involved in the modification of 16S rRNA and are important factors for the biogenesis and function of the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome. PMID:25009282

  1. Ribosomal proteins L7 and L8 function in concert with six A3 assembly factors to propagate assembly of domains I and II of 25S rRNA in yeast 60S ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Jakovljevic, Jelena; Ohmayer, Uli; Gamalinda, Michael; Talkish, Jason; Alexander, Lisa; Linnemann, Jan; Milkereit, Philipp; Woolford, John L.

    2012-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a complex multistep process that involves alternating steps of folding and processing of pre-rRNAs in concert with assembly of ribosomal proteins. Recently, there has been increased interest in the roles of ribosomal proteins in eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis in vivo, focusing primarily on their function in pre-rRNA processing. However, much less is known about participation of ribosomal proteins in the formation and rearrangement of preribosomal particles as they mature to functional subunits. We have studied ribosomal proteins L7 and L8, which are required for the same early steps in pre-rRNA processing during assembly of 60S subunits but are located in different domains within ribosomes. Depletion of either leads to defects in processing of 27SA3 to 27SB pre-rRNA and turnover of pre-rRNAs destined for large ribosomal subunits. A specific subset of proteins is diminished from these residual assembly intermediates: six assembly factors required for processing of 27SA3 pre-rRNA and four ribosomal proteins bound to domain I of 25S and 5.8S rRNAs surrounding the polypeptide exit tunnel. In addition, specific sets of ribosomal proteins are affected in each mutant: In the absence of L7, proteins bound to domain II, L6, L14, L20, and L33 are greatly diminished, while proteins L13, L15, and L36 that bind to domain I are affected in the absence of L8. Thus, L7 and L8 might establish RNP structures within assembling ribosomes necessary for the stable association and function of the A3 assembly factors and for proper assembly of the neighborhoods containing domains I and II. PMID:22893726

  2. Topography and stoichiometry of acidic proteins in large ribosomal subunits from Artemia salina as determined by crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiumi, T.; Wahba, A.J.; Traut, R.R.

    1987-08-01

    The 60S subunits isolated from Artemia salina ribosomes were treated with the crosslinking reagent 2-iminothiolane under mild conditions. Proteins were extracted and fractions containing crosslinked acidic proteins were obtained by stepwise elution from CM-cellulose. Each fraction was analyzed by diagonal (two-dimensional nonreducing-reducing) NaDodSO/sub 4//polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Crosslinked proteins below the diagonal were radioiodinated and identified by two-dimensional acidic urea-NaDodSO/sub 4/ gel electrophoresis. Each of the acidic proteins P1 and P2 was crosslinked individually to the same third protein, PO. The fractions containing acidic proteins were also analyzed by two-dimensional nonequilibrium isoelectric focusing-NaDodSO/sub 4//polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two crosslinked complexes were observed that coincide in isoelectric positions with monomeric P1 and P2, respectively. Both P1 and P2 appear to form crosslinked homodimers. These results suggest the presence in the 60S subunit of (P1)/sub 2/ and (P2)/sub 2/ dimers, each of which is anchored to PO. Protein PO appears to play the same role as L10 in Escherichia coli ribosomes and may form a pentameric complex with the two dimers in the 60S subunits.

  3. Cryo-EM structures of the late-stage assembly intermediates of the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Li, Ningning; Chen, Yuling; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Yixiao; Yuan, Yi; Ma, Chengying; Deng, Haiteng; Lei, Jianlin; Gao, Ning

    2013-08-01

    Ribosome assembly is a process fundamental for all cellular activities. The efficiency and accuracy of the subunit assembly are tightly regulated and closely monitored. In the present work, we characterized, both compositionally and structurally, a set of in vivo 50S subunit precursors (45S), isolated from a mutant bacterial strain. Our qualitative mass spectrometry data indicate that L28, L16, L33, L36 and L35 are dramatically underrepresented in the 45S particles. This protein spectrum shows interesting similarity to many qualitatively analyzed 50S precursors from different genetic background, indicating the presence of global rate-limiting steps in the late-stage assembly of 50S subunit. Our structural data reveal two major intermediate states for the 45S particles. Consistently, both states severally lack those proteins, but they also differ in the stability of the functional centers of the 50S subunit, demonstrating that they are translationally inactive. Detailed analysis indicates that the orientation of H38 accounts for the global conformational differences in these intermediate structures, and suggests that the reorientation of H38 to its native position is rate-limiting during the late-stage assembly. Especially, H38 plays an essential role in stabilizing the central protuberance, through the interaction with the 5S rRNA, and the correctly orientated H38 is likely a prerequisite for further maturation of the 50S subunit.

  4. Cryo-EM structures of the late-stage assembly intermediates of the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ningning; Chen, Yuling; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Yixiao; Yuan, Yi; Ma, Chengying; Deng, Haiteng; Lei, Jianlin; Gao, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is a process fundamental for all cellular activities. The efficiency and accuracy of the subunit assembly are tightly regulated and closely monitored. In the present work, we characterized, both compositionally and structurally, a set of in vivo 50S subunit precursors (45S), isolated from a mutant bacterial strain. Our qualitative mass spectrometry data indicate that L28, L16, L33, L36 and L35 are dramatically underrepresented in the 45S particles. This protein spectrum shows interesting similarity to many qualitatively analyzed 50S precursors from different genetic background, indicating the presence of global rate-limiting steps in the late-stage assembly of 50S subunit. Our structural data reveal two major intermediate states for the 45S particles. Consistently, both states severally lack those proteins, but they also differ in the stability of the functional centers of the 50S subunit, demonstrating that they are translationally inactive. Detailed analysis indicates that the orientation of H38 accounts for the global conformational differences in these intermediate structures, and suggests that the reorientation of H38 to its native position is rate-limiting during the late-stage assembly. Especially, H38 plays an essential role in stabilizing the central protuberance, through the interaction with the 5S rRNA, and the correctly orientated H38 is likely a prerequisite for further maturation of the 50S subunit. PMID:23700310

  5. Mitochondrial and cytoplasmic ribosomes from mammalian tissues. Further characterization of ribosomal subunits and validity of buoyant-density methods for determination of the chemical composition and partial specific volume of ribonucleoprotein particles

    PubMed Central

    Sacchi, Ada; Ferrini, Ugo; Londei, Paola; Cammarano, Piero; Maraldi, Nadir

    1977-01-01

    1. At 0–4°C mitochondrial ribosomes (55S) dissociate into 39S and 29S subunits after exposure to 300mm-K+ in the presence of 3.0mm-Mg2+. When these subunits are placed in a medium containing a lower concentration of K+ ions (25mm), approx. 75% of the subparticles recombine giving 55S monomers. 2. After negative staining the large subunits (20.3nm width) usually show a roundish profile, whereas the small subunits (12nm width) show an elongated, often bipartite, profile. The dimensions of the 55S ribosomes are 25.5nm×20.0nm×21.0nm, indicating a volume ratio of mitochondrial to cytosol ribosomes of 1:1.5. 3. The 39S and 29S subunits obtained in high-salt media at 0–4°C have a buoyant density of 1.45g/cm3; from the rRNA content calculated from buoyant density and from the rRNA molecular weights it is confirmed that the two subparticles have weights of 2.0×106 daltons and 1.20×106 daltons; the weights of the two subunits of cytosol ribosomes are 2.67×106 and 1.30×106 daltons. 4. The validity of the isodensity-equilibrium-centrifugation methods used to calculate the chemical composition of ribosomes was reinvestigated; it is confirmed that (a) reaction of ribosomal subunits with 6.0% (v/v) formaldehyde at 0°C is sufficient to fix the particles, so that they remain essentially stable after exposure to dodecyl sulphate or centrifugation in CsCl, and (b) the partial specific volume of ribosomal subunits is a simple additive function of the partial specific volumes of RNA and protein. The RNA content is linearly related to buoyant density by the equation RNA (% by wt.)=349.5−(471.2×1/ρCsCl), where 1/ρCsCl=[unk]RNP (partial specific volume of ribonucleoprotein). 5. The nucleotide compositions of the two subunit rRNA species of mitochondrial ribosomes from rodents (42% and 43% G+C) are distinctly different from those of cytoplasmic ribosomes. ImagesPLATE 1PLATE 2 PMID:563718

  6. Identification of the binding site of Rlp7 on assembling 60S ribosomal subunits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Dembowski, Jill A.; Ramesh, Madhumitha; McManus, C. Joel; Woolford, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosome assembly requires over 200 assembly factors that facilitate rRNA folding, ribosomal protein binding, and pre-rRNA processing. One such factor is Rlp7, an essential RNA binding protein required for consecutive pre-rRNA processing steps for assembly of yeast 60S ribosomal subunits: exonucleolytic processing of 27SA3 pre-rRNA to generate the 5′ end of 5.8S rRNA and endonucleolytic cleavage of the 27SB pre-rRNA to initiate removal of internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2). To better understand the functions of Rlp7 in 27S pre-rRNA processing steps, we identified where it crosslinks to pre-rRNA. We found that Rlp7 binds at the junction of ITS2 and the ITS2-proximal stem, between the 3′ end of 5.8S rRNA and the 5′ end of 25S rRNA. Consistent with Rlp7 binding to this neighborhood during assembly, two-hybrid and affinity copurification assays showed that Rlp7 interacts with other assembly factors that bind to or near ITS2 and the proximal stem. We used in vivo RNA structure probing to demonstrate that the proximal stem forms prior to Rlp7 binding and that Rlp7 binding induces RNA conformational changes in ITS2 that may chaperone rRNA folding and regulate 27S pre-rRNA processing. Our findings contradict the hypothesis that Rlp7 functions as a placeholder for ribosomal protein L7, from which Rlp7 is thought to have evolved in yeast. The binding site of Rlp7 is within eukaryotic-specific RNA elements, which are not found in bacteria. Thus, we propose that Rlp7 coevolved with these RNA elements to facilitate eukaryotic-specific functions in ribosome assembly and pre-rRNA processing. PMID:24129494

  7. Listerin-dependent nascent protein ubiquitination relies on ribosome subunit dissociation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Sichen; von der Malsburg, Karina; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2013-06-06

    Quality control of defective mRNAs relies on their translation to detect the lesion. Aberrant proteins are therefore an obligate byproduct of mRNA surveillance and must be degraded to avoid disrupting protein homeostasis. These defective translation products are thought to be ubiquitinated at the ribosome, but the mechanism of ubiquitin ligase selectivity for these ribosomes is not clear. Here, we in vitro reconstitute ubiquitination of nascent proteins produced from aberrant mRNAs. Stalled 80S ribosome-nascent chain complexes are dissociated by the ribosome recycling factors Hbs1/Pelota/ABCE1 to a unique 60S-nascent chain-tRNA complex. The ubiquitin ligase Listerin preferentially recognizes 60S-nascent chains and triggers efficient nascent chain ubiquitination. Interfering with Hbs1 function stabilizes 80S complexes, precludes efficient Listerin recruitment, and reduces nascent chain ubiquitination. Thus, ribosome recycling factors control Listerin localization, explaining how translation products of mRNA surveillance are efficiently ubiquitinated while sparing translating ribosomes.

  8. Transcriptional repressor NIR functions in the ribosome RNA processing of both 40S and 60S subunits.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianguo; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yingshuang; Kong, Ruirui; Hu, Lelin; Schuele, Roland; Du, Xiaojuan; Ke, Yang

    2012-01-01

    NIR was identified as an inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase and it represses transcriptional activation of p53. NIR is predominantly localized in the nucleolus and known as Noc2p, which is involved in the maturation of the 60S ribosomal subunit. However, how NIR functions in the nucleolus remains undetermined. In the nucleolus, a 47S ribosomal RNA precursor (pre-rRNA) is transcribed and processed to produce 18S, 5.8S and 28S rRNAs. The 18S rRNA is incorporated into the 40S ribosomal subunit, whereas the 28S and 5.8S rRNAs are incorporated into the 60S subunit. U3 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) directs 18S rRNA processing and U8 snoRNA mediates processing of 28S and 5.8 S rRNAs. Functional disruption of nucleolus often causes p53 activation to inhibit cell proliferation. Western blotting showed that NIR is ubiquitously expressed in different human cell lines. Knock-down of NIR by siRNA led to inhibition of the 18S, 28S and 5.8S rRNAs evaluated by pulse-chase experiment. Pre-rRNA particles (pre-rRNPs) were fractionated from the nucleus by sucrose gradient centrifugation and analysis of the pre-RNPs components showed that NIR existed in the pre-RNPs of both the 60S and 40S subunits and co-fractionated with 32S and 12S pre-rRNAs in the 60S pre-rRNP. Protein-RNA binding experiments demonstrated that NIR is associated with the 32S pre-rRNA and U8 snoRNA. In addition, NIR bound U3 snoRNA. It is a novel finding that depletion of NIR did not affect p53 protein level but de-repressed acetylation of p53 and activated p21. We provide the first evidence for a transcriptional repressor to function in the rRNA biogenesis of both the 40S and 60S subunits. Our findings also suggested that a nucleolar protein may alternatively signal to p53 by affecting the p53 modification rather than affecting p53 protein level.

  9. Transcriptional Repressor NIR Functions in the Ribosome RNA Processing of Both 40S and 60S Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingshuang; Kong, Ruirui; Hu, Lelin; Schuele, Roland; Du, Xiaojuan; Ke, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Background NIR was identified as an inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase and it represses transcriptional activation of p53. NIR is predominantly localized in the nucleolus and known as Noc2p, which is involved in the maturation of the 60S ribosomal subunit. However, how NIR functions in the nucleolus remains undetermined. In the nucleolus, a 47S ribosomal RNA precursor (pre-rRNA) is transcribed and processed to produce 18S, 5.8S and 28S rRNAs. The 18S rRNA is incorporated into the 40S ribosomal subunit, whereas the 28S and 5.8S rRNAs are incorporated into the 60S subunit. U3 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) directs 18S rRNA processing and U8 snoRNA mediates processing of 28S and 5.8 S rRNAs. Functional disruption of nucleolus often causes p53 activation to inhibit cell proliferation. Methodology/Principal Findings Western blotting showed that NIR is ubiquitously expressed in different human cell lines. Knock-down of NIR by siRNA led to inhibition of the 18S, 28S and 5.8S rRNAs evaluated by pulse-chase experiment. Pre-rRNA particles (pre-rRNPs) were fractionated from the nucleus by sucrose gradient centrifugation and analysis of the pre-RNPs components showed that NIR existed in the pre-RNPs of both the 60S and 40S subunits and co-fractionated with 32S and 12S pre-rRNAs in the 60S pre-rRNP. Protein-RNA binding experiments demonstrated that NIR is associated with the 32S pre-rRNA and U8 snoRNA. In addition, NIR bound U3 snoRNA. It is a novel finding that depletion of NIR did not affect p53 protein level but de-repressed acetylation of p53 and activated p21. Conclusions We provide the first evidence for a transcriptional repressor to function in the rRNA biogenesis of both the 40S and 60S subunits. Our findings also suggested that a nucleolar protein may alternatively signal to p53 by affecting the p53 modification rather than affecting p53 protein level. PMID:22363708

  10. Structure and function of the yeast listerin (Ltn1) conserved N-terminal domain in binding to stalled 60S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Doamekpor, Selom K; Lee, Joong-Won; Hepowit, Nathaniel L; Wu, Cheng; Charenton, Clement; Leonard, Marilyn; Bengtson, Mario H; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Sachs, Matthew S; Lima, Christopher D; Joazeiro, Claudio A P

    2016-07-19

    The Ltn1 E3 ligase (listerin in mammals) has emerged as a paradigm for understanding ribosome-associated ubiquitylation. Ltn1 binds to 60S ribosomal subunits to ubiquitylate nascent polypeptides that become stalled during synthesis; among Ltn1's substrates are aberrant products of mRNA lacking stop codons [nonstop translation products (NSPs)]. Here, we report the reconstitution of NSP ubiquitylation in Neurospora crassa cell extracts. Upon translation in vitro, ribosome-stalled NSPs were ubiquitylated in an Ltn1-dependent manner, while still ribosome-associated. Furthermore, we provide biochemical evidence that the conserved N-terminal domain (NTD) plays a significant role in the binding of Ltn1 to 60S ribosomal subunits and that NTD mutations causing defective 60S binding also lead to defective NSP ubiquitylation, without affecting Ltn1's intrinsic E3 ligase activity. Finally, we report the crystal structure of the Ltn1 NTD at 2.4-Å resolution. The structure, combined with additional mutational studies, provides insight to NTD's role in binding stalled 60S subunits. Our findings show that Neurospora extracts can be used as a tool to dissect mechanisms underlying ribosome-associated protein quality control and are consistent with a model in which Ltn1 uses 60S subunits as adapters, at least in part via its NTD, to target stalled NSPs for ubiquitylation.

  11. Structure and function of the yeast listerin (Ltn1) conserved N-terminal domain in binding to stalled 60S ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Doamekpor, Selom K.; Lee, Joong-Won; Hepowit, Nathaniel L.; Wu, Cheng; Charenton, Clement; Leonard, Marilyn; Bengtson, Mario H.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Sachs, Matthew S.; Lima, Christopher D.; Joazeiro, Claudio A. P.

    2016-01-01

    The Ltn1 E3 ligase (listerin in mammals) has emerged as a paradigm for understanding ribosome-associated ubiquitylation. Ltn1 binds to 60S ribosomal subunits to ubiquitylate nascent polypeptides that become stalled during synthesis; among Ltn1’s substrates are aberrant products of mRNA lacking stop codons [nonstop translation products (NSPs)]. Here, we report the reconstitution of NSP ubiquitylation in Neurospora crassa cell extracts. Upon translation in vitro, ribosome-stalled NSPs were ubiquitylated in an Ltn1-dependent manner, while still ribosome-associated. Furthermore, we provide biochemical evidence that the conserved N-terminal domain (NTD) plays a significant role in the binding of Ltn1 to 60S ribosomal subunits and that NTD mutations causing defective 60S binding also lead to defective NSP ubiquitylation, without affecting Ltn1’s intrinsic E3 ligase activity. Finally, we report the crystal structure of the Ltn1 NTD at 2.4-Å resolution. The structure, combined with additional mutational studies, provides insight to NTD’s role in binding stalled 60S subunits. Our findings show that Neurospora extracts can be used as a tool to dissect mechanisms underlying ribosome-associated protein quality control and are consistent with a model in which Ltn1 uses 60S subunits as adapters, at least in part via its NTD, to target stalled NSPs for ubiquitylation. PMID:27385828

  12. Ribonuclease Sensitivity of Escherichia coli Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Santer, Melvin; Smith, Josephine R.

    1966-01-01

    Santer, Melvin (Haverford College, Haverford, Pa.), and Josephine R. Smith. Ribonuclease sensitivity of Escherichia coli ribosomes. J. Bacteriol. 92:1099–1110. 1966.—The ribonucleic acid (RNA) contained in 70S ribosomes and in 50S and 30S subunits was hydrolyzed by pancreatic ribonuclease. A 7% amount of the RNA was removed from the 70S particle; at 10−4m magnesium concentration, a maximum of 24 and 30% of the RNA in the 50S and the 30S fractions, respectively, was removed by ribonuclease. At the two lower magnesium ion concentrations, 50S ribosomes did not lose any protein, whereas 30S ribosomes lost protein as a result of ribonuclease treatment. A number of proteins were removed from the 30S particles by ribonuclease, and these proteins were antigenically related to proteins present in 50S ribosomes. The differential effect of ribonuclease on 50S and 30S ribosomes suggested that they have structural dissimilarities. Images PMID:5332866

  13. DNAJC21 Mutations Link a Cancer-Prone Bone Marrow Failure Syndrome to Corruption in 60S Ribosome Subunit Maturation.

    PubMed

    Tummala, Hemanth; Walne, Amanda J; Williams, Mike; Bockett, Nicholas; Collopy, Laura; Cardoso, Shirleny; Ellison, Alicia; Wynn, Rob; Leblanc, Thierry; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Kelsell, David P; van Heel, David A; Payne, Elspeth; Plagnol, Vincent; Dokal, Inderjeet; Vulliamy, Tom

    2016-07-07

    A substantial number of individuals with bone marrow failure (BMF) present with one or more extra-hematopoietic abnormality. This suggests a constitutional or inherited basis, and yet many of them do not fit the diagnostic criteria of the known BMF syndromes. Through exome sequencing, we have now identified a subgroup of these individuals, defined by germline biallelic mutations in DNAJC21 (DNAJ homolog subfamily C member 21). They present with global BMF, and one individual developed a hematological cancer (acute myeloid leukemia) in childhood. We show that the encoded protein associates with rRNA and plays a highly conserved role in the maturation of the 60S ribosomal subunit. Lymphoblastoid cells obtained from an affected individual exhibit increased sensitivity to the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D and reduced amounts of rRNA. Characterization of mutations revealed impairment in interactions with cofactors (PA2G4, HSPA8, and ZNF622) involved in 60S maturation. DNAJC21 deficiency resulted in cytoplasmic accumulation of the 60S nuclear export factor PA2G4, aberrant ribosome profiles, and increased cell death. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that mutations in DNAJC21 cause a cancer-prone BMF syndrome due to corruption of early nuclear rRNA biogenesis and late cytoplasmic maturation of the 60S subunit.

  14. Single methylation of 23S rRNA triggers late steps of 50S ribosomal subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Arai, Taiga; Ishiguro, Kensuke; Kimura, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Yuriko; Suzuki, Takeo; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2015-08-25

    Ribosome biogenesis requires multiple assembly factors. In Escherichia coli, deletion of RlmE, the methyltransferase responsible for the 2'-O-methyluridine modification at position 2552 (Um2552) in helix 92 of the 23S rRNA, results in slow growth and accumulation of the 45S particle. We demonstrate that the 45S particle that accumulates in ΔrlmE is a genuine precursor that can be assembled into the 50S subunit. Indeed, 50S formation from the 45S precursor could be promoted by RlmE-mediated Um2552 formation in vitro. Ribosomal protein L36 (encoded by rpmJ) was completely absent from the 45S precursor in ΔrlmE, and we observed a strong genetic interaction between rlmE and rpmJ. Structural probing of 23S rRNA and high-salt stripping of 45S components revealed that RlmE-mediated methylation promotes interdomain interactions via the association between helices 92 and 71, stabilized by the single 2'-O-methylation of Um2552, in concert with the incorporation of L36, triggering late steps of 50S subunit assembly.

  15. Single methylation of 23S rRNA triggers late steps of 50S ribosomal subunit assembly

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Taiga; Ishiguro, Kensuke; Kimura, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Yuriko; Suzuki, Takeo; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis requires multiple assembly factors. In Escherichia coli, deletion of RlmE, the methyltransferase responsible for the 2′-O-methyluridine modification at position 2552 (Um2552) in helix 92 of the 23S rRNA, results in slow growth and accumulation of the 45S particle. We demonstrate that the 45S particle that accumulates in ΔrlmE is a genuine precursor that can be assembled into the 50S subunit. Indeed, 50S formation from the 45S precursor could be promoted by RlmE-mediated Um2552 formation in vitro. Ribosomal protein L36 (encoded by rpmJ) was completely absent from the 45S precursor in ΔrlmE, and we observed a strong genetic interaction between rlmE and rpmJ. Structural probing of 23S rRNA and high-salt stripping of 45S components revealed that RlmE-mediated methylation promotes interdomain interactions via the association between helices 92 and 71, stabilized by the single 2′-O-methylation of Um2552, in concert with the incorporation of L36, triggering late steps of 50S subunit assembly. PMID:26261349

  16. Magnesium chelatase: association with ribosomes and mutant complementation studies identify barley subunit Xantha-G as a functional counterpart of Rhodobacter subunit BchD.

    PubMed

    Kannangara, C G; Vothknecht, U C; Hansson, M; von Wettstein, D

    1997-03-18

    Magnesium chelatase catalyses the insertion of Mg2+ into protoporphyrin and is found exclusively in organisms which synthesise chlorophyll or bacteriochlorophyll. Soluble protein preparations containing >10 mg protein/ml, obtained by gentle lysis of barley plastids and Rhodobacter sphaeroplasts, inserted Mg2+ into deuteroporphyrin IX in the presence of ATP at rates of 40 and 8 pmoles/mg protein per min, respectively. With barley extracts optimal activity was observed with 40 mM Mg2+. The activity was inhibited by micromolar concentrations of chloramphenicol. Mutations in each of three genetic loci, Xantha-f, -g and -h, in barley destroyed the activity. However, Mg-chelatase activity was reconstituted in vitro by combining pairwise the plastid stroma protein preparations from non-leaky xantha-f -g and -h mutants. This establishes that, as in Rhodobacter, three proteins are required for the insertion of magnesium into protoporphyrin IX in barley. These three proteins, Xantha-F, -G and -H, are referred to as Mg-chelatase subunits and they appear to exist separate from each other in vivo. Active preparations from barley and Rhodobacter yielded pellet and supernatant fractions upon centrifugation for 90 min at 272,000 x g. The pellet and the supernatant were inactive when assayed separately, but when they were combined activity was restored. Differential distribution of the Mg-chelatase subunits in the fractions was established by in vitro complementation assays using stroma protein from the xantha-f, -g, and -h mutants. Xantha-G protein was confined to the pellet fraction, while Xantha-H was confined to the supernatant. Reconstitution assays using purified recombinant BchH, BchI and partially purified BchD revealed that the pellet fraction from Rhodobacter contained the BchD subunit. The pellet fractions from both barley and Rhodobacter contained ribosomes and had an A260:A280 ratio of 1.8. On sucrose density gradients both Xantha-G and BchD subunits migrated with the

  17. Dealing with stable structures at ribosome binding sites: bacterial translation and ribosome standby.

    PubMed

    Unoson, Cecilia; Wagner, E Gerhart H

    2007-11-01

    Bacterial ribosomes have great difficulties to initiate translation on stable structures within mRNAs. Translational coupling and induced structure changes are strategies to open up inhibitory RNA structures encompassing ribosome binding sites (RBS). There are, however, mRNAs in which stable structures are not unfolded, but that are nevertheless efficiently initiated at high rates. de Smit and van Duin(1) proposed a "ribosome standby" model to theoretically solve this paradox: the 30S ribosome binds nonspecifically to an accessible site on the mRNA (standby site), waiting for a transient opening of a stable RBS hairpin. Upon unfolding, the 30S subunit relocates to form a productive initiation complex. Recent reports have provided experimental support for this model. This review will describe and compare two different flavors of standby sites, their properties, and their likely implications. We also discuss the possibility that ribosome standby may be a more general strategy to obtain high translation rates.

  18. A Comparison of Structural and Evolutionary Attributes of Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus Small Ribosomal Subunits: Signatures of Thermal Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Mallik, Saurav; Kundu, Sudip

    2013-01-01

    Here we compare the structural and evolutionary attributes of Thermus thermophilus and Escherichia coli small ribosomal subunits (SSU). Our results indicate that with few exceptions, thermophilic 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) is densely packed compared to that of mesophilic at most of the analogous spatial regions. In addition, we have located species-specific cavity clusters (SSCCs) in both species. E. coli SSCCs are numerous and larger compared to T. thermophilus SSCCs, which again indicates densely packed thermophilic 16S rRNA. Thermophilic ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) have longer disordered regions than their mesophilic homologs and they experience larger disorder-to-order transitions during SSU-assembly. This is reflected in the predicted higher conformational changes of thermophilic r-proteins compared to their mesophilic homologs during SSU-assembly. This high conformational change of thermophilic r-proteins may help them to associate with the 16S ribosomal RNA with high complementary interfaces, larger interface areas, and denser molecular contacts, compared to those of mesophilic. Thus, thermophilic protein-rRNA interfaces are tightly associated with 16S rRNA than their mesophilic homologs. Densely packed 16S rRNA interior and tight protein-rRNA binding of T. thermophilus (compared to those of E. coli) are likely the signatures of its thermal adaptation. We have found a linear correlation between the free energy of protein-RNA interface formation, interface size, and square of conformational changes, which is followed in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic SSU. Disorder is associated with high protein-RNA interface polarity. We have found an evolutionary tendency to maintain high polarity (thereby disorder) at protein-rRNA interfaces, than that at rest of the protein structures. However, some proteins exhibit exceptions to this general trend. PMID:23940533

  19. Contributions of the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of initiation factor 3 towards its functions in the fidelity of initiation and anti-association of the ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Ayyub, Shreya; Dobriyal, Divya; Varshney, Umesh

    2017-03-20

    Initiation factor 3 (IF3) is one of the three conserved prokaryotic translation initiation factors essential for protein synthesis and cellular survival. Bacterial IF3 is composed of a conserved architecture of N- and C- terminal globular domains (NTD and CTD) joined by a linker region. IF3 is a ribosome anti-association factor which also modulates selection of start codon and initiator tRNA. All the functions of IF3 have been attributed to its CTD by in vitro studies. However, in vivo relevance of these findings has not been investigated. By generating complete and partial IF3 (infC) knockouts in Escherichia coli, and complementation analyses using various deletion constructs, we show that while the CTD is essential for E. coli survival, the NTD is not. Polysome profiles reaffirm that CTD alone can bind to the 30S ribosomal subunit and carry out ribosome anti-association function. Importantly, in the absence of NTD, bacterial growth is compromised, indicating a role for NTD in the fitness of cellular growth. Using reporter assays for in vivo initiation, we show that the NTD plays a crucial role in the fidelity function of IF3 by avoiding, (a) initiation from non-AUG codons and, (b) initiation by initiator tRNAs lacking the highly conserved three consecutive GC pairs (in the anticodon stem) known to function in concert with IF3.Importance Initiation factor 3 regulates the fidelity of eubacterial translation initiation by ensuring the formation of an initiation complex with an mRNA bearing a canonical start codon and with an initiator tRNA at the ribosomal P site. Additionally, IF3 prevents premature association of the 50S ribosomal subunit to the 30S pre-initiation complex. The significance of our work in Escherichia coli is in demonstrating that while the C-terminal domain alone sustains E. coli for its growth, the N-terminal domain adds to the fidelity of initiation of protein synthesis and to the fitness of the bacterial growth.

  20. Multiple RNA interactions position Mrd1 at the site of the small subunit pseudoknot within the 90S pre-ribosome.

    PubMed

    Segerstolpe, Åsa; Granneman, Sander; Björk, Petra; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Andersson, Charlotta; Högbom, Martin; Tollervey, David; Wieslander, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal subunit biogenesis in eukaryotes is a complex multistep process. Mrd1 is an essential and conserved small (40S) ribosomal subunit synthesis factor that is required for early cleavages in the 35S pre-ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Yeast Mrd1 contains five RNA-binding domains (RBDs), all of which are necessary for optimal function of the protein. Proteomic data showed that Mrd1 is part of the early pre-ribosomal complexes, and deletion of individual RBDs perturbs the pre-ribosomal structure. In vivo ultraviolet cross-linking showed that Mrd1 binds to the pre-rRNA at two sites within the 18S region, in helix 27 (h27) and helix 28. The major binding site lies in h27, and mutational analyses shows that this interaction requires the RBD1-3 region of Mrd1. RBD2 plays the dominant role in h27 binding, but other RBDs also contribute directly. h27 and helix 28 are located close to the sequences that form the central pseudoknot, a key structural feature of the mature 40S subunit. We speculate that the modular structure of Mrd1 coordinates pseudoknot formation with pre-rRNA processing and subunit assembly.

  1. Multiple RNA interactions position Mrd1 at the site of the small subunit pseudoknot within the 90S pre-ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Segerstolpe, Åsa; Granneman, Sander; Björk, Petra; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Andersson, Charlotta; Högbom, Martin; Tollervey, David; Wieslander, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal subunit biogenesis in eukaryotes is a complex multistep process. Mrd1 is an essential and conserved small (40S) ribosomal subunit synthesis factor that is required for early cleavages in the 35S pre-ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Yeast Mrd1 contains five RNA-binding domains (RBDs), all of which are necessary for optimal function of the protein. Proteomic data showed that Mrd1 is part of the early pre-ribosomal complexes, and deletion of individual RBDs perturbs the pre-ribosomal structure. In vivo ultraviolet cross-linking showed that Mrd1 binds to the pre-rRNA at two sites within the 18S region, in helix 27 (h27) and helix 28. The major binding site lies in h27, and mutational analyses shows that this interaction requires the RBD1-3 region of Mrd1. RBD2 plays the dominant role in h27 binding, but other RBDs also contribute directly. h27 and helix 28 are located close to the sequences that form the central pseudoknot, a key structural feature of the mature 40S subunit. We speculate that the modular structure of Mrd1 coordinates pseudoknot formation with pre-rRNA processing and subunit assembly. PMID:23193268

  2. Dbp9p, a putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase involved in 60S-ribosomal-subunit biogenesis, functionally interacts with Dbp6p.

    PubMed Central

    Daugeron, M C; Kressler, D; Linder, P

    2001-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis is a highly complex process and constitutes a major cellular activity. The biogenesis of this ribonucleoprotein assembly requires a multitude of protein trans-acting factors including several putative ATP-dependent RNA helicases of the DEAD-box and related protein families. Here we show that the previously uncharacterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae open reading frame YLR276C, hereafter named DBP9 (DEAD-box protein 9), encodes an essential nucleolar protein involved in 60S-ribosomal-subunit biogenesis. Genetic depletion of Dbp9p results in a deficit in 60S ribosomal subunits and the appearance of half-mer polysomes. This terminal phenotype is likely due to the instability of early pre-ribosomal particles, as evidenced by the low steady-state levels and the decreased synthesis of the 27S precursors to mature 25S and 5.8S rRNAs. In agreement with a role of Dbp9p in 60S subunit synthesis, we find that increased Dbp9p dosage efficiently suppresses certain dbp6 alleles and that dbp6/dbp9 double mutants show synthetic lethality. Furthermore, Dbp6p and Dbp9p weakly interact in a yeast two-hybrid assay. Altogether, our findings indicate an intimate functional interaction between Dbp6p and Dbp9p during the process of 60S-ribosomal-subunit assembly. PMID:11565753

  3. Human C4orf14 interacts with the mitochondrial nucleoid and is involved in the biogenesis of the small mitochondrial ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    He, J.; Cooper, H. M.; Reyes, A.; Di Re, M.; Kazak, L.; Wood, S. R.; Mao, C. C.; Fearnley, I. M.; Walker, J. E.; Holt, I. J.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial homologue of C4orf14, YqeH, has been linked to assembly of the small ribosomal subunit. Here, recombinant C4orf14 isolated from human cells, co-purified with the small, 28S subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome and the endogenous protein co-fractionated with the 28S subunit in sucrose gradients. Gene silencing of C4orf14 specifically affected components of the small subunit, leading to decreased protein synthesis in the organelle. The GTPase of C4orf14 was critical to its interaction with the 28S subunit, as was GTP. Therefore, we propose that C4orf14, with bound GTP, binds to components of the 28S subunit facilitating its assembly, and GTP hydrolysis acts as the release mechanism. C4orf14 was also found to be associated with human mitochondrial nucleoids, and C4orf14 gene silencing caused mitochondrial DNA depletion. In vitro C4orf14 is capable of binding to DNA. The association of C4orf14 with mitochondrial translation factors and the mitochondrial nucleoid suggests that the 28S subunit is assembled at the mitochondrial nucleoid, enabling the direct transfer of messenger RNA from the nucleoid to the ribosome in the organelle. PMID:22447445

  4. Protein synthesis. Rqc2p and 60S ribosomal subunits mediate mRNA-independent elongation of nascent chains.

    PubMed

    Shen, Peter S; Park, Joseph; Qin, Yidan; Li, Xueming; Parsawar, Krishna; Larson, Matthew H; Cox, James; Cheng, Yifan; Lambowitz, Alan M; Weissman, Jonathan S; Brandman, Onn; Frost, Adam

    2015-01-02

    In Eukarya, stalled translation induces 40S dissociation and recruitment of the ribosome quality control complex (RQC) to the 60S subunit, which mediates nascent chain degradation. Here we report cryo-electron microscopy structures revealing that the RQC components Rqc2p (YPL009C/Tae2) and Ltn1p (YMR247C/Rkr1) bind to the 60S subunit at sites exposed after 40S dissociation, placing the Ltn1p RING (Really Interesting New Gene) domain near the exit channel and Rqc2p over the P-site transfer RNA (tRNA). We further demonstrate that Rqc2p recruits alanine- and threonine-charged tRNA to the A site and directs the elongation of nascent chains independently of mRNA or 40S subunits. Our work uncovers an unexpected mechanism of protein synthesis, in which a protein--not an mRNA--determines tRNA recruitment and the tagging of nascent chains with carboxy-terminal Ala and Thr extensions ("CAT tails").

  5. The NMR Structure of an Internal Loop from 23S Ribosomal RNA Differs from its Structure in Crystals of 50S Ribosomal Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Neelaabh; Kennedy, Scott D.; Chen, Gang; Krugh, Thomas R.; Turner, Douglas H.

    2014-01-01

    Internal loops play an important role in structure and folding of RNA and in RNA recognition by other molecules such as proteins and ligands. An understanding of internal loops with propensities to form a particular structure will help predict RNA structure, recognition, and function. The structures of internal loops 5'1009CUAAG10133'3'1168GAAGC11645' and 5'998CUAAG10023'3'1157GAAGC11535' from helix 40 of the large subunit rRNA in Deinococcus radiodurans and Escherichia coli, respectively, are phylogenetically conserved, suggesting functional relevance. The energetics and NMR solution structure of the loop were determined in the duplex, 5'1GGCUAAGAC93'3'18CCGAAGCUG105' The internal loop forms a different structure in solution than in the crystal structures of the ribosomal subunits. In particular, the crystal structures have a bulged out adenine at the equivalent of position A15 and a reverse Hoogsteen UA pair (trans Watson-Crick/Hoogsteen UA) at the equivalent of U4 and A14, whereas the solution structure has a single hydrogen bond UA pair (cis Watson-Crick/sugar edge A15U4) between U4 and A15 and a sheared AA pair (trans Hoogsteen/sugar edge A14A5) between A5 and A14. There is cross-strand stacking between A6 and A14 (A6/A14/A15 stacking pattern) in the NMR structure. All three structures have a sheared GA pair (trans Hoogsteen/sugar edge A6G13) at the equivalent of A6 and G13. The internal loop has contacts with ribosomal protein L20 and other parts of the RNA in the crystal structures. These contacts presumably provide the free energy to rearrange the base pairing in the loop. Evidently, molecular recognition of this internal loop involves induced fit binding, which could confer several advantages. The predicted thermodynamic stability of the loop agrees with the experimental value, even though the thermodynamic model assumes a Watson–Crick UA pair. PMID:17002278

  6. Posttranscriptional down-regulation of small ribosomal subunit proteins correlates with reduction of 18S rRNA in RPS19 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Badhai, Jitendra; Fröjmark, Anne-Sophie; Razzaghian, Hamid Reza; Davey, Edward; Schuster, Jens; Dahl, Niklas

    2009-06-18

    Ribosomal protein S19 (RPS19) is mutated in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA). We hypothesized that decreased levels of RPS19 lead to a coordinated down-regulation of other ribosomal (r-)proteins at the subunit level. We show that small interfering RNA (siRNA) knock-down of RPS19 results in a relative decrease of small subunit (SSU) r-proteins (S20, S21 and S24) when compared to large subunit (LSU) r-proteins (L3, L9, L30 and L38). This correlates with a relative decrease in 18S rRNA with respect to 28S rRNA. The r-protein mRNA levels remain relatively unchanged indicating a post transcriptional regulation of r-proteins at the level of subunit formation.

  7. A preliminary phylogeny of the scale insects (Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha: Coccoidea) based on nuclear small-subunit ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Cook, Lyn G; Gullan, Penny J; Trueman, Holly E

    2002-10-01

    Scale insects (Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha: Coccoidea) are a speciose and morphologically specialized group of plant-feeding bugs in which evolutionary relationships and thus higher classification are controversial. Sequences derived from nuclear small-subunit ribosomal DNA were used to generate a preliminary molecular phylogeny for the Coccoidea based on 39 species representing 14 putative families. Monophyly of the archaeococcoids (comprising Ortheziidae, Margarodidae sensu lato, and Phenacoleachia) was equivocal, whereas monophyly of the neococcoids was supported. Putoidae, represented by Puto yuccae, was found to be outside the remainder of the neococcoid clade. These data are consistent with a single origin (in the ancestor of the neococcoid clade) of a chromosome system involving paternal genome elimination in males. Pseudococcidae (mealybugs) appear to be sister to the rest of the neococcoids and there are indications that Coccidae (soft scales) and Kerriidae (lac scales) are sister taxa. The Eriococcidae (felt scales) was not recovered as a monophyletic group and the eriococcid genus Eriococcus sensu lato was polyphyletic.

  8. Molecular analysis of lungworms from European bison (Bison bonasus) on the basis of small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU).

    PubMed

    Pyziel, Anna M

    2014-03-01

    Dictyocaulosis (Nematoda: Trichostrongyloidea) is a widespread parasitosis of the European bison (Bison bonasus) inhabiting Bialowieza Primeval Forest. Bearing in mind the current coexistence of bison with wild cervids, and with domestic ruminants in the 19th and 20th century, the need arose for molecular identification of lungworm species. Molecular analysis was done on adult lungworms that were obtained from the respiratory track of four free-roaming bison euthanized as a part of the population health control program. As the result of the study four identical small subunit-ribosomal RNA gene sequences from the lungworms were obtained and deposited in GenBank as sequence, 1708 bp long (GenBank KC771250). Comparative analysis of the SSU rRNA sequences revealed the European bison to be a host for the bovine lungworm Dictyocaulus viviparus.

  9. Spb4p, an essential putative RNA helicase, is required for a late step in the assembly of 60S ribosomal subunits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    de la Cruz, J; Kressler, D; Rojo, M; Tollervey, D; Linder, P

    1998-01-01

    Spb4p is a putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase that is required for synthesis of 60S ribosomal subunits. Polysome analyses of strains genetically depleted of Spb4p or carrying the cold-sensitive spb4-1 mutation revealed an underaccumulation of 60S ribosomal subunits. Analysis of pre-rRNA processing by pulse-chase labeling, northern hybridization, and primer extension indicated that these strains exhibited a reduced synthesis of the 25S/5.8S rRNAs, due to inhibition of processing of the 27SB pre-rRNAs. At later times of depletion of Spb4p or following transfer of the spb4-1 strain to more restrictive temperatures, the early pre-rRNA processing steps at sites A0, Al, and A2 were also inhibited. Sucrose gradient fractionation showed that the accumulated 27SB pre-rRNAs are associated with a high-molecular-weight complex, most likely the 66S pre-ribosomal particle. An HA epitope-tagged Spb4p is localized to the nucleolus and the adjacent nucleoplasmic area. On sucrose gradients, HA-Spb4p was found almost exclusively in rapidly sedimenting complexes and showed a peak in the fractions containing the 66S pre-ribosomes. We propose that Spb4p is involved directly in a late and essential step during assembly of 60S ribosomal subunits, presumably by acting as an rRNA helicase. PMID:9769101

  10. Recognition of chimeric small-subunit ribosomal DNAs composed of genes from uncultivated microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopczynski, E. D.; Bateson, M. M.; Ward, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    When PCR was used to recover small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes from a hot spring cyanobacterial mat community, chimeric SSU rRNA sequences which exhibited little or no secondary structural abnormality were recovered. They were revealed as chimeras of SSU rRNA genes of uncultivated species through separate phylogenetic analysis of short sequence domains.

  11. Recognition of chimeric small-subunit ribosomal DNAs composed of genes from uncultivated microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopczynski, E. D.; Bateson, M. M.; Ward, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    When PCR was used to recover small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes from a hot spring cyanobacterial mat community, chimeric SSU rRNA sequences which exhibited little or no secondary structural abnormality were recovered. They were revealed as chimeras of SSU rRNA genes of uncultivated species through separate phylogenetic analysis of short sequence domains.

  12. Rrp5p, Noc1p and Noc2p form a protein module which is part of early large ribosomal subunit precursors in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Hierlmeier, Thomas; Merl, Juliane; Sauert, Martina; Perez-Fernandez, Jorge; Schultz, Patrick; Bruckmann, Astrid; Hamperl, Stephan; Ohmayer, Uli; Rachel, Reinhard; Jacob, Anja; Hergert, Kristin; Deutzmann, Rainer; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Hurt, Ed; Milkereit, Philipp; Baßler, Jochen; Tschochner, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis requires more than 150 auxiliary proteins, which transiently interact with pre-ribosomal particles. Previous studies suggest that several of these biogenesis factors function together as modules. Using a heterologous expression system, we show that the large ribosomal subunit (LSU) biogenesis factor Noc1p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can simultaneously interact with the LSU biogenesis factor Noc2p and Rrp5p, a factor required for biogenesis of the large and the small ribosomal subunit. Proteome analysis of RNA polymerase-I-associated chromatin and chromatin immunopurification experiments indicated that all members of this protein module and a specific set of LSU biogenesis factors are co-transcriptionally recruited to nascent ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursors in yeast cells. Further ex vivo analyses showed that all module members predominantly interact with early pre-LSU particles after the initial pre-rRNA processing events have occurred. In yeast strains depleted of Noc1p, Noc2p or Rrp5p, levels of the major LSU pre-rRNAs decreased and the respective other module members were associated with accumulating aberrant rRNA fragments. Therefore, we conclude that the module exhibits several binding interfaces with pre-ribosomes. Taken together, our results suggest a co- and post-transcriptional role of the yeast Rrp5p–Noc1p–Noc2p module in the structural organization of early LSU precursors protecting them from non-productive RNase activity. PMID:23209026

  13. The Structures of Antibiotics Bound to the E Site Region of the 50 S Ribosomal Subunit of Haloarcula marismortui: 13-Deoxytedanolide and Girodazole

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder,S.; Blaha, G.; Tirado-Rives, J.; Steitz, T.; Moore, P.

    2007-01-01

    Crystal structures of the 50 S ribosomal subunit from Haloarcula marismortui complexed with two antibiotics have identified new sites at which antibiotics interact with the ribosome and inhibit protein synthesis. 13-Deoxytedanolide binds to the E site of the 50 S subunit at the same location as the CCA of tRNA, and thus appears to inhibit protein synthesis by competing with deacylated tRNAs for E site binding. Girodazole binds near the E site region, but is somewhat buried and may inhibit tRNA binding by interfering with conformational changes that occur at the E site. The specificity of 13-deoxytedanolide for eukaryotic ribosomes is explained by its extensive interactions with protein L44e, which is an E site component of archaeal and eukaryotic ribosomes, but not of eubacterial ribosomes. In addition, protein L28, which is unique to the eubacterial E site, overlaps the site occupied by 13-deoxytedanolide, precluding its binding to eubacterial ribosomes. Girodazole is specific for eukarytes and archaea because it makes interactions with L15 that are not possible in eubacteria.

  14. Phylogenetic Analysis of Myobia musculi (Schranck, 1781) by Using the 18S Small Ribosomal Subunit Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Sanford H; Ntenda, Abraham M

    2011-01-01

    We used high-fidelity PCR to amplify 2 overlapping regions of the ribosomal gene complex from the rodent fur mite Myobia musculi. The amplicons encompassed a large portion of the mite's ribosomal gene complex spanning 3128 nucleotides containing the entire 18S rRNA, internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1, 5.8S rRNA, ITS2, and a portion of the 5′-end of the 28S rRNA. M. musculi’s 179-nucleotide 5.8S rRNA nucleotide sequence was not conserved, so this region was identified by conservation of rRNA secondary structure. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference phylogenetic analyses were performed by using multiple sequence alignment consisting of 1524 nucleotides of M. musculi 18S rRNA and homologous sequences from 42 prostigmatid mites and the tick Dermacentor andersoni. The phylograms produced by both methods were in agreement regarding terminal, secondary, and some tertiary phylogenetic relationships among mites. Bayesian inference discriminated most infraordinal relationships between Eleutherengona and Parasitengona mites in the suborder Anystina. Basal relationships between suborders Anystina and Eupodina historically determined by comparing differences in anatomic characteristics were less well-supported by our molecular analysis. Our results recapitulated similar 18S rRNA sequence analyses recently reported. Our study supports M. musculi as belonging to the suborder Anystina, infraorder Eleutherenona, and superfamily Cheyletoidea. PMID:22330574

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of Myobia musculi (Schranck, 1781) by using the 18S small ribosomal subunit sequence.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Sanford H; Ntenda, Abraham M

    2011-12-01

    We used high-fidelity PCR to amplify 2 overlapping regions of the ribosomal gene complex from the rodent fur mite Myobia musculi. The amplicons encompassed a large portion of the mite's ribosomal gene complex spanning 3128 nucleotides containing the entire 18S rRNA, internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1,5.8S rRNA, ITS2, and a portion of the 5'-end of the 28S rRNA. M. musculi's 179-nucleotide 5.8S rRNA nucleotide sequence was not conserved, so this region was identified by conservation of rRNA secondary structure. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference phylogenetic analyses were performed by using multiple sequence alignment consisting of 1524 nucleotides of M. musculi 18S rRNA and homologous sequences from 42 prostigmatid mites and the tick Dermacentor andersoni. The phylograms produced by both methods were in agreement regarding terminal, secondary, and some tertiary phylogenetic relationships among mites. Bayesian inference discriminated most infraordinal relationships between Eleutherengona and Parasitengona mites in the suborder Anystina. Basal relationships between suborders Anystina and Eupodina historically determined by comparing differences in anatomic characteristics were less well-supported by our molecular analysis. Our results recapitulated similar 18S rRNA sequence analyses recently reported. Our study supports M. musculi as belonging to the suborder Anystina, infraorder Eleutherenona, and superfamily Cheyletoidea.

  16. Rqc2p and 60S ribosomal subunits mediate mRNA-independent elongation of nascent chains

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Peter S.; Park, Joseph; Qin, Yidan; Li, Xueming; Parsawar, Krishna; Larson, Matthew H.; Cox, James; Cheng, Yifan; Lambowitz, Alan M.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Brandman, Onn; Frost, Adam

    2015-01-01

    In Eukarya, stalled translation induces 40S dissociation and recruitment of the Ribosome Quality control Complex (RQC) to the 60S subunit, which mediates nascent chain degradation. Here, we report cryoEM structures revealing that the RQC components Rqc2p (YPL009C/Tae2) and Ltn1p (YMR247C/Rkr1) bind to the 60S at sites exposed after 40S dissociation, placing the Ltn1p RING domain near the exit channel and Rqc2p over the P-site tRNA. We further demonstrate that Rqc2p recruits alanine and threonine charged tRNA to the A-site and directs elongation of nascent chains independently of mRNA or 40S subunits. Our work uncovers an unexpected mechanism of protein synthesis in which a protein—not an mRNA—determines tRNA recruitment and the tagging of nascent chains with Carboxy-terminal Ala and Thr extensions (“CAT tails”). PMID:25554787

  17. Characterization of the ribosome biogenesis landscape in E. coli using quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Stephen S; Williamson, James R

    2013-02-22

    The ribosome is an essential and highly complex biological system in all living cells. A large body of literature on the assembly of the ribosome in vitro is available, but a clear picture of this process inside the cell has yet to emerge. Here, we directly characterized in vivo ribosome assembly intermediates and associated assembly factors from wild-type Escherichia coli cells using a general quantitative mass spectrometry (qMS) approach. The presence of distinct populations of ribosome assembly intermediates was verified using an in vivo stable isotope pulse-labeling approach, and their exact ribosomal protein contents were characterized against an isotopically labeled standard. The model-free clustering analysis of the resultant protein levels for the different ribosomal particles produced four 30S assembly groups that correlate very well with previous in vitro assembly studies of the small ribosomal subunit and six 50S assembly groups that clearly define an in vivo assembly landscape for the larger ribosomal subunit. In addition, de novo proteomics identified a total of 21 known and potentially new ribosome assembly factors co-localized with various ribosomal particles. These results represent new in vivo assembly maps of the E. coli 30S and 50S subunits, and the general qMS approach should prove to be a solid platform for future studies of ribosome biogenesis across a host of model organisms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Small subunit ribosomal metabarcoding reveals extraordinary trypanosomatid diversity in Brazilian bats

    PubMed Central

    Dario, Maria Augusta; Moratelli, Ricardo; Schwabl, Philipp; Jansen, Ana Maria; Llewellyn, Martin S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Bats are a highly successful, globally dispersed order of mammals that occupy a wide array of ecological niches. They are also intensely parasitized and implicated in multiple viral, bacterial and parasitic zoonoses. Trypanosomes are thought to be especially abundant and diverse in bats. In this study, we used 18S ribosomal RNA metabarcoding to probe bat trypanosome diversity in unprecedented detail. Methodology/Principal Findings Total DNA was extracted from the blood of 90 bat individuals (17 species) captured along Atlantic Forest fragments of Espírito Santo state, southeast Brazil. 18S ribosomal RNA was amplified by standard and/or nested PCR, then deep sequenced to recover and identify Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) for phylogenetic analysis. Blood samples from 34 bat individuals (13 species) tested positive for infection by 18S rRNA amplification. Amplicon sequences clustered to 14 OTUs, of which five were identified as Trypanosoma cruzi I, T. cruzi III/V, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma dionisii, and seven were identified as novel genotypes monophyletic to basal T. cruzi clade types of the New World. Another OTU was identified as a trypanosome like those found in reptiles. Surprisingly, the remaining OTU was identified as Bodo saltans–closest non-parasitic relative of the trypanosomatid order. While three blood samples featured just one OTU (T. dionisii), all others resolved as mixed infections of up to eight OTUs. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates the utility of next-generation barcoding methods to screen parasite diversity in mammalian reservoir hosts. We exposed high rates of local bat parasitism by multiple trypanosome species, some known to cause fatal human disease, others non-pathogenic, novel or yet little understood. Our results highlight bats as a long-standing nexus among host-parasite interactions of multiple niches, sustained in part by opportunistic and incidental infections

  19. Physicochemical characterization of the ribosomal RNA species of the Mollusca. Molecular weight, integrity and secondary-structure features of the RNA of the large and small ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Cammarano, P; Londei, P; Mazzei, F; Felsani, A

    1980-01-01

    1. The rRNA species of the Cephalopoda Octopus vulgaris and Loligo vulgaris were found to have unexpectedly high sedimentation coefficients and molecular weights. In 0.1 M-NaCl the L-rRNA (RNA from large ribosomal subunit) has the same s20 value as the L-rRNA of the mammals (30.7S), whereas the S-rRNA (RNA from small ribosomal subunit) sediments at a faster rate (20.1S) than the S-rRNA of both the mammals and the fungi (Neurospora crassa) (17.5S). The molecular weights of the L-rRNA were determined by gel electrophoresis in formamide and found to be 1.66 X 10(6) (Octupus) and 1.89 X 10(6) (Loligo); the mol.wt. of the S-rRNA of both species is 0.96 X 10(6), i.e. much larger than that of the mammals (0.65 X 10(6)) and almost coincident with that of the '23S' RNA of the prokaryotes. 2. By contrast, the less evolved Gastropoda and Lamellibranchiata (Murex trunculus and Macrocallista chione) have S-rRNA and L-rRNA species with mol.wts. of 0.65 X 10(6) and approx. 1.40 X 10(6).3. All the mature L-rRNA molecules of the cephalopoda are composed of two unequal fragments held together by regions of hydrogen-bonding having a similar, low, thermal stability in the two species; the molecular weights of the two fragments composing the L-rRNA are estimated to be 0.96 X 10(6) and 0.88 X 10(6) (Loligo) and 0.96 X 10(6) and 0.65 X 10(6) (Octupus). THe S-rRNA of both species is a continuous chain with exactly the same molecular weight (0.96 X 10(6)) as the heavier of the two fragments of the L-rRNA. 4. The secondary-structure features of the L-rRNA and S-rRNA species of the Caphalopoda were investigated by thermal 'melting' analysis in 4.0 M-guanidinium chloride; 60-70% of the residues are estimated to form short, independently 'melting' bihelical segments not more than 10 base-pairs in length. 5. Bases are unevenly distributed between non-helical and bihelical portions of the rRNA molecules, G and C residues being preferentially concentrated in bihelical comains. 6. The secondary

  20. Phylogenetic position of the genus Perkinsus (Protista, Apicomplexa) based on small subunit ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Goggin, C L; Barker, S C

    1993-07-01

    Parasites of the genus Perkinsus destroy marine molluscs worldwide. Their phylogenetic position within the kingdom Protista is controversial. Nucleotide sequence data (1792 bp) from the small subunit rRNA gene of Perkinsus sp. from Anadara trapezia (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from Moreton Bay, Queensland, was used to examine the phylogenetic affinities of this enigmatic genus. These data were aligned with nucleotide sequences from 6 apicomplexans, 3 ciliates, 3 flagellates, a dinoflagellate, 3 fungi, maize and human. Phylogenetic trees were constructed after analysis with maximum parsimony and distance matrix methods. Our analyses indicate that Perkinsus is phylogenetically closer to dinoflagellates and to coccidean and piroplasm apicomplexans than to fungi or flagellates.

  1. Synthetic Lethality with Conditional dbp6 Alleles Identifies Rsa1p, a Nucleoplasmic Protein Involved in the Assembly of 60S Ribosomal Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Kressler, Dieter; Doère, Monique; Rojo, Manuel; Linder, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Dbp6p is an essential putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase that is required for 60S-ribosomal-subunit assembly in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (D. Kressler, J. de la Cruz, M. Rojo, and P. Linder, Mol. Cell. Biol. 18:1855–1865, 1998). To identify factors that are functionally interacting with Dbp6p, we have performed a synthetic lethal screen with conditional dbp6 mutants. Here, we describe the cloning and the phenotypic analysis of the previously uncharacterized open reading frame YPL193W, which we renamed RSA1 (ribosome assembly 1). Rsa1p is not essential for cell viability; however, rsa1 null mutant strains display a slow-growth phenotype, which is exacerbated at elevated temperatures. The rsa1 null allele synthetically enhances the mild growth defect of weak dbp6 alleles and confers synthetic lethality when combined with stronger dbp6 alleles. Polysome profile analysis shows that the absence of Rsa1p results in the accumulation of half-mer polysomes. However, the pool of free 60S ribosomal subunits is only moderately decreased; this is reminiscent of polysome profiles from mutants defective in 60S-to-40S subunit joining. Pulse-chase labeling of pre-rRNA in the rsa1 null mutant strain indicates that formation of the mature 25S rRNA is decreased at the nonpermissive temperature. Interestingly, free 60S ribosomal subunits of a rsa1 null mutant strain that was grown for two generations at 37°C are practically devoid of the 60S-ribosomal-subunit protein Qsr1p/Rpl10p, which is required for joining of 60S and 40S subunits (D. P. Eisinger, F. A. Dick, and B. L. Trumpower, Mol. Cell. Biol. 17:5136–5145, 1997). Moreover, the combination of the Δrsa1 and qsr1-1 mutations leads to a strong synthetic growth inhibition. Finally, a hemagglutinin epitope-tagged Rsa1p localizes predominantly to the nucleoplasm. Together, these results point towards a function for Rsa1p in a late nucleoplasmic step of 60S-ribosomal-subunit assembly. PMID:10567587

  2. [Fragment reaction catalyzed by E. coli ribosomes].

    PubMed

    Kotusov, V V; Kukhanova, M K; Sal'nikova, N E; Nikolaeva, L V; Kraevskiĭ, A A

    1977-01-01

    It has been shown that 50S subunits of E. coli MRE-600 ribosomes catalyze the reaction of N-(formyl)-methionyl ester of adenosine 5'-phosphate acting as peptide donor, with Phe-tRNA or CACCA-Phe serving as a peptide acceptor. The reaction is stimulated by cytidine 5'phosphate and inhibited by lincomycin, puromycin and chloramphenicol. The obtained results show that the structure of the donor site of peptidyltransferase is completely assembled on the 50S subunit and 30S subunit is not required for its formation.

  3. Secondary structure of two regions in expansion segments ES3 and ES6 with the potential of forming a tertiary interaction in eukaryotic 40S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Alkemar, Gunnar; Nygård, Odd

    2004-03-01

    The 18S rRNA of the small eukaryotic ribosomal subunit contains several expansion segments. Electron microscopy data indicate that two of the largest expansion segments are juxtaposed in intact 40S subunits, and data from phylogenetic sequence comparisons indicate that these two expansion segments contain complementary sequences that could form a direct tertiary interaction on the ribosome. We have investigated the secondary structure of the two expansion segments in the region around the putative tertiary interaction. Ribosomes from yeast, wheat, and mouse-three organisms representing separate eukaryotic kingdoms-were isolated, and the structure of ES3 and part of the ES6 region were analyzed using the single-strand-specific chemical reagents CMCT and DMS and the double-strand-specific ribonuclease V1. The modification patterns were analyzed by primer extension and gel electrophoresis on an ABI 377 automated DNA sequencer. The investigated sequences were relatively exposed to chemical and enzymatic modification. This is in line with their indicated location on the surface at the solvent side of the subunit. The complementary ES3 and ES6 sequences were clearly inaccessible to single-strand modification, but available for cleavage by double-strand-specific RNase V1. The results are compatible with a direct helical interaction between bases in ES3 and ES6. Almost identical results were obtained with ribosomes from the three organisms investigated.

  4. Secondary structure of two regions in expansion segments ES3 and ES6 with the potential of forming a tertiary interaction in eukaryotic 40S ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    ALKEMAR, GUNNAR; NYGÅRD, ODD

    2004-01-01

    The 18S rRNA of the small eukaryotic ribosomal subunit contains several expansion segments. Electron microscopy data indicate that two of the largest expansion segments are juxtaposed in intact 40S subunits, and data from phylogenetic sequence comparisons indicate that these two expansion segments contain complementary sequences that could form a direct tertiary interaction on the ribosome. We have investigated the secondary structure of the two expansion segments in the region around the putative tertiary interaction. Ribosomes from yeast, wheat, and mouse—three organisms representing separate eukaryotic kingdoms—were isolated, and the structure of ES3 and part of the ES6 region were analyzed using the single-strand-specific chemical reagents CMCT and DMS and the double-strand-specific ribonuclease V1. The modification patterns were analyzed by primer extension and gel electrophoresis on an ABI 377 automated DNA sequencer. The investigated sequences were relatively exposed to chemical and enzymatic modification. This is in line with their indicated location on the surface at the solvent side of the subunit. The complementary ES3 and ES6 sequences were clearly inaccessible to single-strand modification, but available for cleavage by double-strand-specific RNase V1. The results are compatible with a direct helical interaction between bases in ES3 and ES6. Almost identical results were obtained with ribosomes from the three organisms investigated. PMID:14970386

  5. Dbp7p, a putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is required for 60S ribosomal subunit assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Daugeron, M C; Linder, P

    1998-01-01

    Putative ATP-dependent RNA helicases are ubiquitous, highly conserved proteins that are found in most organisms and they are implicated in all aspects of cellular RNA metabolism. Here we present the functional characterization of the Dbp7 protein, a putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase of the DEAD-box protein family from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The complete deletion of the DBP7 ORF causes a severe slow-growth phenotype. In addition, the absence of Dbp7p results in a reduced amount of 60S ribosomal subunits and an accumulation of halfmer polysomes. Subsequent analysis of pre-rRNA processing indicates that this 60S ribosomal subunit deficit is due to a strong decrease in the production of 27S and 7S precursor rRNAs, which leads to reduced levels of the mature 25S and 5.8S rRNAs. Noticeably, the overall decrease of the 27S pre-rRNA species is neither associated with the accumulation of preceding precursors nor with the emergence of abnormal processing intermediates, suggesting that these 27S pre-rRNA species are degraded rapidly in the absence of Dbp7p. Finally, an HA epitope-tagged Dbp7 protein is localized in the nucleolus. We propose that Dbp7p is involved in the assembly of the pre-ribosomal particle during the biogenesis of the 60S ribosomal subunit. PMID:9582098

  6. The GTP-binding protein YlqF participates in the late step of 50 S ribosomal subunit assembly in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yoshitaka; Morimoto, Takuya; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Loh, Pek Chin; Oshima, Taku; Ogasawara, Naotake

    2006-03-24

    Bacillus subtilis YlqF belongs to the Era/Obg subfamily of small GTP-binding proteins and is essential for bacterial growth. Here we report that YlqF participates in the late step of 50 S ribosomal subunit assembly. YlqF was co-fractionated with the 50 S subunit, depending on the presence of noncleavable GTP analog. Moreover, the GTPase activity of YlqF was stimulated specifically by the 50 S subunit in vitro. Dimethyl sulfate footprinting analysis disclosed that YlqF binds to a unique position in 23 S rRNA. Yeast two-hybrid data revealed interactions between YlqF and the B. subtilis L25 protein (Ctc). The interaction was confirmed by the pull-down assay of the purified proteins. Specifically, YlqF is positioned around the A-site and P-site on the 50 S subunit. Proteome analysis of the abnormal 50 S subunits that accumulated in YlqF-depleted cells showed that L16 and L27 proteins, located near the YlqF-binding domain, are missing. Our results collectively indicate that YlqF will organize the late step of 50 S ribosomal subunit assembly.

  7. Small subunit ribosomal DNA suggests that the xenophyophorean Syringammina corbicula is a foraminiferan.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Jan; Holzmann, Maria; Fahrni, Jose; Richardson, Susan L

    2003-01-01

    Xenophyophorea are giant deep-sea rhizopodial protists of enigmatic origins. Although species were described as Foraminifera or sponges in the early literature, the xenophyophoreans are currently classified either as a class of Rhizopoda or an independent phylum. To establish the phylogenetic position of Xenophyophorea, we analysed the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequence of Syringammina corbicula Richardson, a newly described xenophyophorean species from the Cape Verde Plateau. The SSUrDNA analyses showed that S. corbicula is closely related to Rhizammina algaeformis, a tubular deep-sea foraminiferan. Both species branch within a group of monothalamous (single-chambered) Foraminifera, which include also such agglutinated genera as Toxisarcon, Rhabdammina, and Saccammina, and the organic-walled genera Gloiogullmia and Cylindrogullmia. Our results are congruent with observations of similar cytoplasmic organisation in Rhizammina and Syringammina. Thus, the Xenophyophorea appear to be a highly specialised group of deep-sea Foraminifera.

  8. Added resolution among ordinal level relationships of tapeworms (Platyhelminthes: Cestoda) with complete small and large subunit nuclear ribosomal RNA genes.

    PubMed

    Waeschenbach, Andrea; Webster, Bonnie L; Bray, Rodney A; Littlewood, D T J

    2007-10-01

    The addition of large subunit ribosomal DNA (lsrDNA) to small subunit ribosomal DNA (ssrDNA) has been shown to add resolution to phylogenies at various taxonomic levels for a diversity of phyla. We added nearly complete lsrDNA (4057-4593bp) sequences to ssrDNA (1940-2228bp) for 26 ingroup and 3 outgroup taxa in an attempt to provide an improved ordinal phylogeny for the Cestoda. Ten lsrDNA and seven ssrDNA sequences were generated from new taxa and 13 existing partial lsrDNA sequences were sequenced to completion. The majority of phylogenetic signal in the combined analysis came from lsrDNA (69.6% of parsimonious informative sites, as opposed to 30.4% obtained from ssrDNA), resulting in almost identical topologies for lsrDNA and lsr+ssrDNA (pairwise symmetric distance=6) in model-based analyses. Topology testing found trees based on partial lsrDNA (domains D1-D3)+ssrDNA and complete lsr+ssrDNA to differ significantly; the addition of lsrDNA domains D4-D12 had a significant effect on topology. Overall nodal support was greatest in the combined analysis and weakest for ssrDNA only. Our molecular phylogenies differed significantly from those based on morphology alone. Acetabulate lineages form a monophyletic group, with the Tetraphyllidea being paraphyletic. Support for the combined data was high for the following topology: (Litobothriidea (Lecanicephalidea (Rhinebothrium/Rhodobothrium (Clistobothrium (Pachybothrium(Acanthobothrium Proteocephalidea) (Mesocestoididae, Nippotaeniidea, Cyclophyllidea, Tetrabothriidea)))))); all genus names refer to tetraphyllidean lineages. Although the interrelationships among the four most derived taxa remain uncertain, overall ambiguity of the acetabulate interrelationships was reduced. The Pseudophyllidea were recovered as polyphyletic, with support for a sister-group relationship between Diphyllobothriidae and Haplobothriidea. The monophyly of the Trypanorhyncha was recovered for the first time based on molecular data. The positions

  9. Crystal Structures of EF-G-Ribosome Complexes Trapped in Intermediate States of Translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jie; Lancaster, Laura; Donohue, John Paul; Noller, Harry F.

    2013-11-12

    Translocation of messenger and transfer RNA (mRNA and tRNA) through the ribosome is a crucial step in protein synthesis, whose mechanism is not yet understood. The crystal structures of three Thermus ribosome-tRNA-mRNA–EF-G complexes trapped with β,γ-imidoguanosine 5'-triphosphate (GDPNP) or fusidic acid reveal conformational changes occurring during intermediate states of translocation, including large-scale rotation of the 30S subunit head and body. In all complexes, the tRNA acceptor ends occupy the 50S subunit E site, while their anticodon stem loops move with the head of the 30S subunit to positions between the P and E sites, forming chimeric intermediate states. Two universally conserved bases of 16S ribosomal RNA that intercalate between bases of the mRNA may act as “pawls” of a translocational ratchet. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of ribosomal translocation.

  10. Cryo-EM structure of the spinach chloroplast ribosome reveals the location of plastid-specific ribosomal proteins and extensions.

    PubMed

    Graf, Michael; Arenz, Stefan; Huter, Paul; Dönhöfer, Alexandra; Nováček, Jiří; Wilson, Daniel N

    2016-12-15

    Ribosomes are the protein synthesizing machines of the cell. Recent advances in cryo-EM have led to the determination of structures from a variety of species, including bacterial 70S and eukaryotic 80S ribosomes as well as mitoribosomes from eukaryotic mitochondria, however, to date high resolution structures of plastid 70S ribosomes have been lacking. Here we present a cryo-EM structure of the spinach chloroplast 70S ribosome, with an average resolution of 5.4 Å for the small 30S subunit and 3.6 Å for the large 50S ribosomal subunit. The structure reveals the location of the plastid-specific ribosomal proteins (RPs) PSRP1, PSRP4, PSRP5 and PSRP6 as well as the numerous plastid-specific extensions of the RPs. We discover many features by which the plastid-specific extensions stabilize the ribosome via establishing additional interactions with surrounding ribosomal RNA and RPs. Moreover, we identify a large conglomerate of plastid-specific protein mass adjacent to the tunnel exit site that could facilitate interaction of the chloroplast ribosome with the thylakoid membrane and the protein-targeting machinery. Comparing the Escherichia coli 70S ribosome with that of the spinach chloroplast ribosome provides detailed insight into the co-evolution of RP and rRNA.

  11. An overview of the secondary structure of the V4 region of eukaryotic small-subunit ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Nickrent, D L; Sargent, M L

    1991-01-01

    The V4 region of the small subunit (18S) ribosomal RNA was examined in 72 different sequences representing a broad sample eukaryotic diversity. This domain is the most variable region of the 18S rRNA molecule and ranges in length from ca. 230 to over 500 bases. Based upon comparative analysis, secondary structural models were constructed for all sequences and the resulting generalized model shows that most organisms possess seven helices for this region. The protists and two insects show from one to as many as four helices in addition to the above seven. In this report, we summarize secondary structure information presented elsewhere for the V4 region, describe the general features for helical and apical regions, and identify signature sequences useful in helix identification. Our model generally agrees with other current concepts; however, we propose modifications or alternative structures for the start of the V4 region, the large protist inserts, and the sector that may possibly contain a pseudoknot. PMID:2014163

  12. Phylogenetics of Bonamia parasites based on small subunit and internal transcribed spacer region ribosomal DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kristina M; Stokes, Nancy A; Webb, Stephen C; Hine, P Mike; Kroeck, Marina A; Moore, James D; Morley, Margaret S; Reece, Kimberly S; Burreson, Eugene M; Carnegie, Ryan B

    2014-07-24

    The genus Bonamia (Haplosporidia) includes economically significant oyster parasites. Described species were thought to have fairly circumscribed host and geographic ranges: B. ostreae infecting Ostrea edulis in Europe and North America, B. exitiosa infecting O. chilensis in New Zealand, and B. roughleyi infecting Saccostrea glomerata in Australia. The discovery of B. exitiosa-like parasites in new locations and the observation of a novel species, B. perspora, in non-commercial O. stentina altered this perception and prompted our wider evaluation of the global diversity of Bonamia parasites. Samples of 13 oyster species from 21 locations were screened for Bonamia spp. by PCR, and small subunit and internal transcribed spacer regions of Bonamia sp. ribosomal DNA were sequenced from PCR-positive individuals. Infections were confirmed histologically. Phylogenetic analyses using parsimony and Bayesian methods revealed one species, B. exitiosa, to be widely distributed, infecting 7 oyster species from Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, eastern and western USA, and Tunisia. More limited host and geographic distributions of B. ostreae and B. perspora were confirmed, but nothing genetically identifiable as B. roughleyi was found in Australia or elsewhere. Newly discovered diversity included a Bonamia sp. in Dendostrea sandvicensis from Hawaii, USA, that is basal to the other Bonamia species and a Bonamia sp. in O. edulis from Tomales Bay, California, USA, that is closely related to both B. exitiosa and the previously observed Bonamia sp. from O. chilensis in Chile.

  13. Prevalent ciliate symbiosis on copepods: high genetic diversity and wide distribution detected using small subunit ribosomal RNA gene.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiling; Liu, Sheng; Hu, Simin; Li, Tao; Huang, Yousong; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2012-01-01

    Toward understanding the genetic diversity and distribution of copepod-associated symbiotic ciliates and the evolutionary relationships with their hosts in the marine environment, we developed a small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (18S rDNA)-based molecular method and investigated the genetic diversity and genotype distribution of the symbiotic ciliates on copepods. Of the 10 copepod species representing six families collected from six locations of Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, 9 were found to harbor ciliate symbionts. Phylogenetic analysis of the 391 ciliate 18S rDNA sequences obtained revealed seven groups (ribogroups), six (containing 99% of all the sequences) belonging to subclass Apostomatida, the other clustered with peritrich ciliate Vorticella gracilis. Among the Apostomatida groups, Group III were essentially identical to Vampyrophrya pelagica, and the other five groups represented the undocumented ciliates that were close to Vampyrophrya/Gymnodinioides/Hyalophysa. Group VI ciliates were found in all copepod species but one (Calanus sinicus), and were most abundant among all ciliate sequences obtained, indicating that they are the dominant symbiotic ciliates universally associated with copepods. In contrast, some ciliate sequences were found only in some of the copepods examined, suggesting the host selectivity and geographic differentiation of ciliates, which requires further verification by more extensive sampling. Our results reveal the wide occurrence and high genetic diversity of symbiotic ciliates on marine copepods and highlight the need to systematically investigate the host- and geography-based genetic differentiation and ecological roles of these ciliates globally.

  14. Prevalent Ciliate Symbiosis on Copepods: High Genetic Diversity and Wide Distribution Detected Using Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiling; Liu, Sheng; Hu, Simin; Li, Tao; Huang, Yousong; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2012-01-01

    Toward understanding the genetic diversity and distribution of copepod-associated symbiotic ciliates and the evolutionary relationships with their hosts in the marine environment, we developed a small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (18S rDNA)-based molecular method and investigated the genetic diversity and genotype distribution of the symbiotic ciliates on copepods. Of the 10 copepod species representing six families collected from six locations of Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, 9 were found to harbor ciliate symbionts. Phylogenetic analysis of the 391 ciliate 18S rDNA sequences obtained revealed seven groups (ribogroups), six (containing 99% of all the sequences) belonging to subclass Apostomatida, the other clustered with peritrich ciliate Vorticella gracilis. Among the Apostomatida groups, Group III were essentially identical to Vampyrophrya pelagica, and the other five groups represented the undocumented ciliates that were close to Vampyrophrya/Gymnodinioides/Hyalophysa. Group VI ciliates were found in all copepod species but one (Calanus sinicus), and were most abundant among all ciliate sequences obtained, indicating that they are the dominant symbiotic ciliates universally associated with copepods. In contrast, some ciliate sequences were found only in some of the copepods examined, suggesting the host selectivity and geographic differentiation of ciliates, which requires further verification by more extensive sampling. Our results reveal the wide occurrence and high genetic diversity of symbiotic ciliates on marine copepods and highlight the need to systematically investigate the host- and geography-based genetic differentiation and ecological roles of these ciliates globally. PMID:23024768

  15. Hepatitis-C-virus-like internal ribosome entry sites displace eIF3 to gain access to the 40S subunit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashem, Yaser; Des Georges, Amedee; Dhote, Vidya; Langlois, Robert; Liao, Hstau Y.; Grassucci, Robert A.; Pestova, Tatyana V.; Hellen, Christopher U. T.; Frank, Joachim

    2013-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and classical swine fever virus (CSFV) messenger RNAs contain related (HCV-like) internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) that promote 5'-end independent initiation of translation, requiring only a subset of the eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) needed for canonical initiation on cellular mRNAs. Initiation on HCV-like IRESs relies on their specific interaction with the 40S subunit, which places the initiation codon into the P site, where it directly base-pairs with eIF2-bound initiator methionyl transfer RNA to form a 48S initiation complex. However, all HCV-like IRESs also specifically interact with eIF3 (refs 2, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12), but the role of this interaction in IRES-mediated initiation has remained unknown. During canonical initiation, eIF3 binds to the 40S subunit as a component of the 43S pre-initiation complex, and comparison of the ribosomal positions of eIF3 and the HCV IRES revealed that they overlap, so that their rearrangement would be required for formation of ribosomal complexes containing both components. Here we present a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of a 40S ribosomal complex containing eIF3 and the CSFV IRES. Remarkably, although the position and interactions of the CSFV IRES with the 40S subunit in this complex are similar to those of the HCV IRES in the 40S-IRES binary complex, eIF3 is completely displaced from its ribosomal position in the 43S complex, and instead interacts through its ribosome-binding surface exclusively with the apical region of domain III of the IRES. Our results suggest a role for the specific interaction of HCV-like IRESs with eIF3 in preventing ribosomal association of eIF3, which could serve two purposes: relieving the competition between the IRES and eIF3 for a common binding site on the 40S subunit, and reducing formation of 43S complexes, thereby favouring translation of viral mRNAs.

  16. A possible tertiary rRNA interaction between expansion segments ES3 and ES6 in eukaryotic 40S ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    ALKEMAR, GUNNAR; NYGÅRD, ODD

    2003-01-01

    Eukaryotic 16S-like ribosomal RNAs contain 12 so-called expansion segments, i.e., sequences not included in the RNA secondary structure core common to eubacteria, archaea, and eukarya. Two of these expansion segments, ES3 and ES6, are juxtaposed in the recent three-dimensional model of the eukaryotic 40S ribosomal subunit. We have analyzed ES3 and ES6 sequences from more than 2900 discrete eukaryotic species, for possible sequence complementarity between the two expansion segments. The data show that ES3 and ES6 could interact by forming a helix consisting of seven to nine contiguous base pairs in almost all analyzed species. We, therefore, suggest that ES3 and ES6 form a direct RNA–RNA contact in the ribosome. PMID:12554872

  17. A possible tertiary rRNA interaction between expansion segments ES3 and ES6 in eukaryotic 40S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Alkemar, Gunnar; Nygård, Odd

    2003-01-01

    Eukaryotic 16S-like ribosomal RNAs contain 12 so-called expansion segments, i.e., sequences not included in the RNA secondary structure core common to eubacteria, archaea, and eukarya. Two of these expansion segments, ES3 and ES6, are juxtaposed in the recent three-dimensional model of the eukaryotic 40S ribosomal subunit. We have analyzed ES3 and ES6 sequences from more than 2900 discrete eukaryotic species, for possible sequence complementarity between the two expansion segments. The data show that ES3 and ES6 could interact by forming a helix consisting of seven to nine contiguous base pairs in almost all analyzed species. We, therefore, suggest that ES3 and ES6 form a direct RNA-RNA contact in the ribosome.

  18. Short Proline-Rich Antimicrobial Peptides Inhibit Either the Bacterial 70S Ribosome or the Assembly of its Large 50S Subunit.

    PubMed

    Krizsan, Andor; Prahl, Caroline; Goldbach, Tina; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2015-11-02

    Short proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs) are a promising class of antibiotics that use novel mechanisms, thus offering the potential to overcome the health threat of multiresistant pathogens. The peptides bind to the bacterial 70S ribosome and can inhibit protein translation. We report that PrAMPs can be divided into two classes, with each class binding to a different site, and thus use different lethal mechanisms. Oncocin-type peptides inhibit protein translation in Escherichia coli by binding to the exit tunnel of the 70S ribosome with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50 values) of around 2 to 6 μmol  L(-1), whereas apidaecin-type peptides block the assembly of the large (50S) subunit of the ribosome, resulting in similar IC50 values. The revealed mechanisms should allow the design of new antibiotics to overcome current bacterial resistance mechanisms. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. On the pathway of ribosomal translocation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2016-11-01

    The translocation of tRNAs coupled with mRNA in the ribosome is a critical process in the elongation cycle of protein synthesis. The translocation entails large-scale conformational changes of the ribosome and involves several intermediate states with tRNAs in different positions with respect to 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits. However, the detailed role of the intermediate states is unknown and the detailed mechanism and pathway of translocation is unclear. Here based on previous structural, biochemical and single-molecule data we present a translocation pathway by incorporating several intermediate states. With the pathway, we study theoretically (i) the kinetics of 30S head rotation associated with translocation catalyzed by wild-type EF-G, (ii) the dynamics of fluctuations between different tRNA states during translocation interfered with EF-G mutants and translocation-specific antibiotics, (iii) the kinetics of tRNA movement in 50S subunit and mRNA movement in 30S subunit in the presence of wild-type EF-G, EF-G mutants and translocation-specific antibiotics, (iv) the dynamics of EF-G sampling to the ribosome during translocation, etc., providing consistent and quantitative explanations of various available biochemical and single-molecule experimental data published in the literature. Moreover, we study the kinetics of 30S head rotation in the presence of EF-G mutants, providing predicted results. These have significant implications for the molecular mechanism and pathway of ribosomal translocation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of clinically important ascomycetous yeasts based on nucleotide divergence in the 5' end of the large-subunit (26S) ribosomal DNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kurtzman, C P; Robnett, C J

    1997-01-01

    Clinically important species of Candida and related organisms were compared for extent of nucleotide divergence in the 5' end of the large-subunit (26S) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene. This rDNA region is sufficiently variable to allow reliable separation of all known clinically significant yeast species. Of the 204 described species examined, 21 appeared to be synonyms of previously described organisms. Phylogenetic relationships among the species are presented. PMID:9114410

  1. A Single Acetylation of 18 S rRNA Is Essential for Biogenesis of the Small Ribosomal Subunit in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Satoshi; Akamatsu, Yu; Noma, Akiko; Kimura, Satoshi; Miyauchi, Kenjyo; Ikeuchi, Yoshiho; Suzuki, Takeo; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Biogenesis of eukaryotic ribosome is a complex event involving a number of non-ribosomal factors. During assembly of the ribosome, rRNAs are post-transcriptionally modified by 2′-O-methylation, pseudouridylation, and several base-specific modifications, which are collectively involved in fine-tuning translational fidelity and/or modulating ribosome assembly. By mass-spectrometric analysis, we demonstrated that N4-acetylcytidine (ac4C) is present at position 1773 in the 18 S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, we found an essential gene, KRE33 (human homolog, NAT10), that we renamed RRA1 (ribosomal RNA cytidine acetyltransferase 1) encoding an RNA acetyltransferase responsible for ac4C1773 formation. Using recombinant Rra1p, we could successfully reconstitute ac4C1773 in a model rRNA fragment in the presence of both acetyl-CoA and ATP as substrates. Upon depletion of Rra1p, the 23 S precursor of 18 S rRNA was accumulated significantly, which resulted in complete loss of 18 S rRNA and small ribosomal subunit (40 S), suggesting that ac4C1773 formation catalyzed by Rra1p plays a critical role in processing of the 23 S precursor to yield 18 S rRNA. When nuclear acetyl-CoA was depleted by inactivation of acetyl-CoA synthetase 2 (ACS2), we observed temporal accumulation of the 23 S precursor, indicating that Rra1p modulates biogenesis of 40 S subunit by sensing nuclear acetyl-CoA concentration. PMID:25086048

  2. gar2 is a nucleolar protein from Schizosaccharomyces pombe required for 18S rRNA and 40S ribosomal subunit accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Gulli, M P; Girard, J P; Zabetakis, D; Lapeyre, B; Melese, T; Caizergues-Ferrer, M

    1995-01-01

    Several nucleolar proteins, such as nucleolin, NOP1/fibrillarin, SSB1, NSR1 and GAR1 share a common glycine and arginine rich structural motif called the GAR domain. To identify novel nucleolar proteins from fission yeast we screened Schizosaccharomyces pombe genomic DNA libraries with a probe encompassing the GAR structural motif. Here we report the identification and characterization of a S.pombe gene coding for a novel nucleolar protein, designated gar2. The structure of the fission yeast gar2 is reminiscent of that of nucleolin from vertebrates and NSR1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, like these proteins, gar2 has a nucleolar localisation. The disruption of the gar2+ gene affects normal cell growth, leads to an accumulation of 35S pre-rRNA and a decrease of mature 18S rRNA steady state levels. Moreover, ribosomal profiles of the mutant show an increase of free 60S ribosomal subunits and an absence of free 40S ribosomal subunits. gar2 is able to rescue a S.cerevisiae mutant lacking NSR1, thus establishing gar2 as a functional homolog of NSR1. We propose that gar2 helps the assembly of pre-ribosomal particles containing 18S rRNA. Images PMID:7596817

  3. Rrp12 and the Exportin Crm1 Participate in Late Assembly Events in the Nucleolus during 40S Ribosomal Subunit Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Moriggi, Giulia; Nieto, Blanca; Dosil, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    During the biogenesis of small ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes, the pre-40S particles formed in the nucleolus are rapidly transported to the cytoplasm. The mechanisms underlying the nuclear export of these particles and its coordination with other biogenesis steps are mostly unknown. Here we show that yeast Rrp12 is required for the exit of pre-40S particles to the cytoplasm and for proper maturation dynamics of upstream 90S pre-ribosomes. Due to this, in vivo elimination of Rrp12 leads to an accumulation of nucleoplasmic 90S to pre-40S transitional particles, abnormal 35S pre-rRNA processing, delayed elimination of processing byproducts, and no export of intermediate pre-40S complexes. The exportin Crm1 is also required for the same pre-ribosome maturation events that involve Rrp12. Thus, in addition to their implication in nuclear export, Rrp12 and Crm1 participate in earlier biosynthetic steps that take place in the nucleolus. Our results indicate that, in the 40S subunit synthesis pathway, the completion of early pre-40S particle assembly, the initiation of byproduct degradation and the priming for nuclear export occur in an integrated manner in late 90S pre-ribosomes. PMID:25474739

  4. Human AATF/Che-1 forms a nucleolar protein complex with NGDN and NOL10 required for 40S ribosomal subunit synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bammert, Lukas; Jonas, Stefanie; Ungricht, Rosemarie; Kutay, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian AATF/Che-1 is essential for embryonic development, however, the underlying molecular mechanism is unclear. By immunoprecipitation of human AATF we discovered that AATF forms a salt-stable protein complex together with neuroguidin (NGDN) and NOL10, and demonstrate that the AATF-NGDN-NOL10 (ANN) complex functions in ribosome biogenesis. All three ANN complex members localize to nucleoli and display a mutual dependence with respect to protein stability. Mapping of protein-protein interaction domains revealed the importance of both the evolutionary conserved WD40 repeats in NOL10 and the UTP3/SAS10 domain in NGDN for complex formation. Functional analysis showed that the ANN complex supports nucleolar steps of 40S ribosomal subunit biosynthesis. All complex members were required for 18S rRNA maturation and their individual depletion affected the same nucleolar cleavage steps in the 5′ETS and ITS1 regions of the ribosomal RNA precursor. Collectively, we identified the ANN complex as a novel functional module supporting the nucleolar maturation of 40S ribosomal subunits. Our data help to explain the described role of AATF in cell proliferation during mouse development as well as its requirement for malignant tumor growth. PMID:27599843

  5. Global eukaryote phylogeny: Combined small- and large-subunit ribosomal DNA trees support monophyly of Rhizaria, Retaria and Excavata.

    PubMed

    Moreira, David; von der Heyden, Sophie; Bass, David; López-García, Purificación; Chao, Ema; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    Resolution of the phylogenetic relationships among the major eukaryotic groups is one of the most important problems in evolutionary biology that is still only partially solved. This task was initially addressed using a single marker, the small-subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA), although in recent years it has been shown that it does not contain enough phylogenetic information to robustly resolve global eukaryotic phylogeny. This has prompted the use of multi-gene analyses, especially in the form of long concatenations of numerous conserved protein sequences. However, this approach is severely limited by the small number of taxa for which such a large number of protein sequences is available today. We have explored the alternative approach of using only two markers but a large taxonomic sampling, by analysing a combination of SSU and large-subunit (LSU) rDNA sequences. This strategy allows also the incorporation of sequences from non-cultivated protists, e.g., Radiozoa (=radiolaria minus Phaeodarea). We provide the first LSU rRNA sequences for Heliozoa, Apusozoa (both Apusomonadida and Ancyromonadida), Cercozoa and Radiozoa. Our Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses for 91 eukaryotic combined SSU+LSU sequences yielded much stronger support than hitherto for the supergroup Rhizaria (Cercozoa plus Radiozoa plus Foraminifera) and several well-recognised groups and also for other problematic clades, such as the Retaria (Radiozoa plus Foraminifera) and, with more moderate support, the Excavata. Within opisthokonts, the combined tree strongly confirms that the filose amoebae Nuclearia are sisters to Fungi whereas other Choanozoa are sisters to animals. The position of some bikont taxa, notably Heliozoa and Apusozoa, remains unresolved. However, our combined trees suggest a more deeply diverging position for Ancyromonas, and perhaps also Apusomonas, than for other bikonts, suggesting that apusozoan zooflagellates may be central for understanding the early evolution of

  6. Conformational Response of 30S-bound IF3 to A-Site Binders Streptomycin and Kanamycin.

    PubMed

    Chulluncuy, Roberto; Espiche, Carlos; Nakamoto, Jose Alberto; Fabbretti, Attilio; Milón, Pohl

    2016-12-13

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are widely used to treat infectious diseases. Among them, streptomycin and kanamycin (and derivatives) are of importance to battle multidrug-resistant (MDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Both drugs bind the small ribosomal subunit (30S) and inhibit protein synthesis. Genetic, structural, and biochemical studies indicate that local and long-range conformational rearrangements of the 30S subunit account for this inhibition. Here, we use intramolecular FRET between the C- and N-terminus domains of the flexible IF3 to monitor real-time perturbations of their binding sites on the 30S platform. Steady and pre-steady state binding experiments show that both aminoglycosides bring IF3 domains apart, promoting an elongated state of the factor. Binding of Initiation Factor IF1 triggers closure of IF3 bound to the 30S complex, while both aminoglycosides revert the IF1-dependent conformation. Our results uncover dynamic perturbations across the 30S subunit, from the A-site to the platform, and suggest that both aminoglycosides could interfere with prokaryotic translation initiation by modulating the interaction between IF3 domains with the 30S platform.

  7. Conformational Response of 30S-bound IF3 to A-Site Binders Streptomycin and Kanamycin

    PubMed Central

    Chulluncuy, Roberto; Espiche, Carlos; Nakamoto, Jose Alberto; Fabbretti, Attilio; Milón, Pohl

    2016-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are widely used to treat infectious diseases. Among them, streptomycin and kanamycin (and derivatives) are of importance to battle multidrug-resistant (MDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Both drugs bind the small ribosomal subunit (30S) and inhibit protein synthesis. Genetic, structural, and biochemical studies indicate that local and long-range conformational rearrangements of the 30S subunit account for this inhibition. Here, we use intramolecular FRET between the C- and N-terminus domains of the flexible IF3 to monitor real-time perturbations of their binding sites on the 30S platform. Steady and pre-steady state binding experiments show that both aminoglycosides bring IF3 domains apart, promoting an elongated state of the factor. Binding of Initiation Factor IF1 triggers closure of IF3 bound to the 30S complex, while both aminoglycosides revert the IF1-dependent conformation. Our results uncover dynamic perturbations across the 30S subunit, from the A-site to the platform, and suggest that both aminoglycosides could interfere with prokaryotic translation initiation by modulating the interaction between IF3 domains with the 30S platform. PMID:27983590

  8. Conserved Arginines at the P-Protein Stalk Binding Site and the Active Site Are Critical for Ribosome Interactions of Shiga Toxins but Do Not Contribute to Differences in the Affinity of the A1 Subunits for the Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Basu, Debaleena; Kahn, Jennifer N; Li, Xiao-Ping; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2016-12-01

    The A1 subunits of Shiga toxin 1 (Stx1A1) and Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2A1) interact with the conserved C termini of ribosomal-stalk P-proteins to remove a specific adenine from the sarcin/ricin loop. We previously showed that Stx2A1 has higher affinity for the ribosome and higher catalytic activity than Stx1A1. To determine if conserved arginines at the distal face of the active site contribute to the higher affinity of Stx2A1 for the ribosome, we mutated Arg172, Arg176, and Arg179 in both toxins. We show that Arg172 and Arg176 are more important than Arg179 for the depurination activity and toxicity of Stx1A1 and Stx2A1. Mutation of a single arginine reduced the depurination activity of Stx1A1 more than that of Stx2A1. In contrast, mutation of at least two arginines was necessary to reduce depurination by Stx2A1 to a level similar to that of Stx1A1. R176A and R172A/R176A mutations eliminated interaction of Stx1A1 and Stx2A1 with ribosomes and with the stalk, while mutation of Arg170 at the active site reduced the binding affinity of Stx1A1 and Stx2A1 for the ribosome, but not for the stalk. These results demonstrate that conserved arginines at the distal face of the active site are critical for interactions of Stx1A1 and Stx2A1 with the stalk, while a conserved arginine at the active site is critical for non-stalk-specific interactions with the ribosome. Arginine mutations at either site reduced ribosome interactions of Stx1A1 and Stx2A1 similarly, indicating that conserved arginines are critical for ribosome interactions but do not contribute to the higher affinity of Stx2A1 for the ribosome. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. A Local Role for the Small Ribosomal Subunit Primary Binder rpS5 in Final 18S rRNA Processing in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Neueder, Andreas; Jakob, Steffen; Pöll, Gisela; Linnemann, Jan; Deutzmann, Rainer; Tschochner, Herbert; Milkereit, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    In vivo depletion of the yeast small ribosomal subunit (SSU) protein S5 (rpS5) leads to nuclear degradation of nascent SSUs and to a perturbed global assembly state of the SSU head domain. Here, we report that rpS5 plays an additional local role at the head/platform interface in efficient SSU maturation. We find that yeast small ribosomal subunits which incorporated an rpS5 variant lacking the seven C-terminal amino acids have a largely assembled head domain and are exported to the cytoplasm. On the other hand, 3′ processing of 18S rRNA precursors is inhibited in these ribosomal particles, although they associate with the putative endonuclease Nob1p and other late acting 40S biogenesis factors. We suggest that the SSU head component rpS5 and platform components as rpS14 are crucial constituents of a highly defined spatial arrangement in the head – platform interface of nascent SSUs, which is required for efficient processing of the therein predicted SSU rRNA 3′ end. Positioning of rpS5 in nascent SSUs, including its relative orientation towards platform components in the head-platform cleft, will depend on the general assembly and folding state of the head domain. Therefore, the suggested model can explain 18S precursor rRNA 3′ processing phenotypes observed in many eukaryotic SSU head assembly mutants. PMID:20419091

  10. Quantitative proteomic analysis of ribosome assembly and turnover in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Michael T; Shajani, Zahra; Sperling, Edit; Beck, Andrea H; Williamson, James R

    2010-10-29

    Although high-resolution structures of the ribosome have been solved in a series of functional states, relatively little is known about how the ribosome assembles, particularly in vivo. Here, a general method is presented for studying the dynamics of ribosome assembly and ribosomal assembly intermediates. Since significant quantities of assembly intermediates are not present under normal growth conditions, the antibiotic neomycin is used to perturb wild-type Escherichia coli. Treatment of E. coli with the antibiotic neomycin results in the accumulation of a continuum of assembly intermediates for both the 30S and 50S subunits. The protein composition and the protein stoichiometry of these intermediates were determined by quantitative mass spectrometry using purified unlabeled and (15)N-labeled wild-type ribosomes as external standards. The intermediates throughout the continuum are heterogeneous and are largely depleted of late-binding proteins. Pulse-labeling with (15)N-labeled medium time-stamps the ribosomal proteins based on their time of synthesis. The assembly intermediates contain both newly synthesized proteins and proteins that originated in previously synthesized intact subunits. This observation requires either a significant amount of ribosome degradation or the exchange or reuse of ribosomal proteins. These specific methods can be applied to any system where ribosomal assembly intermediates accumulate, including strains with deletions or mutations of assembly factors. This general approach can be applied to study the dynamics of assembly and turnover of other macromolecular complexes that can be isolated from cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Structure of Ribosomal Silencing Factor Bound to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojun; Sun, Qingan; Jiang, Cai; Yang, Kailu; Hung, Li-Wei; Zhang, Junjie; Sacchettini, James C

    2015-10-06

    The ribosomal silencing factor RsfS slows cell growth by inhibiting protein synthesis during periods of diminished nutrient availability. The crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) RsfS, together with the cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structure of the large subunit 50S of Mtb ribosome, reveals how inhibition of protein synthesis by RsfS occurs. RsfS binds to the 50S at L14, which, when occupied, blocks the association of the small subunit 30S. Although Mtb RsfS is a dimer in solution, only a single subunit binds to 50S. The overlap between the dimer interface and the L14 binding interface confirms that the RsfS dimer must first dissociate to a monomer in order to bind to L14. RsfS interacts primarily through electrostatic and hydrogen bonding to L14. The EM structure shows extended rRNA density that it is not found in the Escherichia coli ribosome, the most striking of these being the extended RNA helix of H54a.

  12. Resonance assignment of the ribosome binding domain of E. coli ribosomal protein S1.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Pierre; Créchet, Jean-Bernard; Uzan, Marc; Bontems, François; Sizun, Christina

    2015-04-01

    Ribosomal protein S1 is an essential actor for protein synthesis in Escherichia coli. It is involved in mRNA recruitment by the 30S ribosomal subunit and recognition of the correct start codon during translation initiation. E. coli S1 is a modular protein that contains six repeats of an S1 motif, which have distinct functions despite structural homology. Whereas the three central repeats have been shown to be involved in mRNA recognition, the two first repeats that constitute the N-terminal domain of S1 are responsible for binding to the 30S subunit. Here we report the almost complete (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignment of two fragments of the 30S binding region of S1. The first fragment comprises only the first repeat. The second corresponds to the entire ribosome binding domain. Since S1 is absent from all high resolution X-ray structures of prokaryotic ribosomes, these data provide a first step towards atomic level structural characterization of this domain by NMR. Chemical shift analysis of the first repeat provides evidence for structural divergence from the canonical OB-fold of an S1 motif. In contrast the second domain displays the expected topology for an S1 motif, which rationalizes the functional specialization of the two subdomains.

  13. A comparison of the yeast and rabbit 80 S ribosome reveals the topology of the nascent chain exit tunnel, inter-subunit bridges and mammalian rRNA expansion segments.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D G; Ménétret, J F; Radermacher, M; Neuhof, A; Akey, I V; Rapoport, T A; Akey, C W

    2000-08-11

    Protein synthesis in eukaryotes is mediated by both cytoplasmic and membrane-bound ribosomes. During the co-translational translocation of secretory and membrane proteins, eukaryotic ribosomes dock with the protein conducting channel of the endoplasmic reticulum. An understanding of these processes will require the detailed structure of a eukaryotic ribosome. To this end, we have compared the three-dimensional structures of yeast and rabbit ribosomes at 24 A resolution. In general, we find that the active sites for protein synthesis and translocation have been highly conserved. It is interesting that a channel was visualized in the neck of the small subunit whose entrance is formed by a deep groove. By analogy with the prokaryotic small subunit, this channel may provide a conserved portal through which mRNA is threaded into the decoding center. In addition, both the small and large subunits are built around a dense tubular network. Our analysis further suggests that the nascent chain exit tunnel and the docking surface for the endoplasmic reticulum channel are formed by this network. We surmise that many of these features correspond to rRNA, based on biochemical and structural data. Ribosomal function is critically dependent on the specific association of small and large subunits. Our analysis of eukaryotic ribosomes reveals four conserved inter-subunit bridges with a geometry similar to that found in prokaryotes. In particular, a double-bridge connects the small subunit platform with the interface canyon on the large subunit. Moreover, a novel bridge is formed between the platform and the base of the L1 domain. Finally, size differences between mammalian and yeast large subunit rRNAs have been correlated with five expansion segments that form two large spines and three extended fingers. Overall, we find that expansion segments within the large subunit rRNA have been incorporated at positions distinct from the active sites for protein synthesis and translocation.

  14. Direct chemical probing of the conformation of the 3' functional domain of rabbit 18S rRNA in 40S subunits, 80S ribosomes and polyribosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Rubino, H.M.; Rairkar, A.; Lockard, R.E.

    1987-05-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the 3' minor domain of eukaryotic 18S rRNA, as in prokaryotes, is directly involved in protein biosynthesis. To determine regions of possible functional importance, they have probed the higher order structure of rabbit 18S rRNA in both 40S subunits and 80S ribosomes, as well as polyribosomes using the single-strand specific chemical probes dimethyl sulfate (DMS) and diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC) which react with unpaired guanosine and adenosine residues, respectively. The modified 18S rRNA was isolated from these particles and the resultant modified nucleotides identified on polyacrylamide sequencing gels upon either aniline-induced strand scission of /sup 32/P-end-labeled intact rRNA or by DNA primer extension using sequence specific deoxyoligomers with reverse transcriptase. Their results indicate a decreased reactivity of residue C-1692 in rabbit 18S rRNA (corresponding to C-1400 E. coli) within the putative tRNA contact site in polyribosomes as compared with 40S subunits and 80S ribosomes. They have also determined varying reactivities of a number of other residues within specific regions of the 3' functional domain when 40S, 80S, and polyribosomes are compared, which may be important for both subunit association as well as mRNA binding.

  15. The use of large and small subunits of ribosomal DNA in evaluating phylogenetic relationships between species of Cornudiscoides Kulkarni, 1969 (Monogenoidea: Dactylogyridae) from India.

    PubMed

    Verma, J; Agrawal, N; Verma, A K

    2017-03-01

    Two partial regions of ribosomal DNA (28S and 18S) were used to evaluate genetic variations among the species of Cornudiscoides, viz. C. proximus, C. geminus and C. agarwali, all parasites of Mystus vittatus (Bagridae) from River Gomati, Ganges River basin, India. Our findings demonstrated that both the large and small ribosomal subunits are useful for species identification and genetic characterization of parasites, leading to resolution of inter/intra-relationships at generic and specific levels. The secondary structures of all three species for 28S and 18S rRNA genes contained exact pattern matches (EMPs) displaying the high degree of similarity among them. The phylogenetic analyses within the members of Dactylogyridae demonstrated that species of Cornudiscoides cluster together for 28S rRNA and 18S rRNA genes.

  16. Final Pre-40S Maturation Depends on the Functional Integrity of the 60S Subunit Ribosomal Protein L3

    PubMed Central

    García-Gómez, Juan J.; Rosado, Iván V.; Tollervey, David; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L3 is an evolutionarily conserved protein that participates in the assembly of early pre-60S particles. We report that the rpl3[W255C] allele, which affects the affinity and function of translation elongation factors, impairs cytoplasmic maturation of 20S pre-rRNA. This was not seen for other mutations in or depletion of L3 or other 60S ribosomal proteins. Surprisingly, pre-40S particles containing 20S pre-rRNA form translation-competent 80S ribosomes, and translation inhibition partially suppresses 20S pre-rRNA accumulation. The GTP-dependent translation initiation factor Fun12 (yeast eIF5B) shows similar in vivo binding to ribosomal particles from wild-type and rpl3[W255C] cells. However, the GTPase activity of eIF5B failed to stimulate processing of 20S pre-rRNA when assayed with ribosomal particles purified from rpl3[W255C] cells. We conclude that L3 plays an important role in the function of eIF5B in stimulating 3′ end processing of 18S rRNA in the context of 80S ribosomes that have not yet engaged in translation. These findings indicate that the correct conformation of the GTPase activation region is assessed in a quality control step during maturation of cytoplasmic pre-ribosomal particles. PMID:24603549

  17. Reductive alkylation of ribosomes as a probe to the topography of ribosomal proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Graham; Crichton, Robert R.

    1974-01-01

    Escherichia coli ribosomes were treated with a number of different aldehydes of various sizes in the presence of NaBH4. After incorporation of either 3H or 14C, the ribosomal proteins were separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and the extent of alkylation of the lysine residues in each protein was measured. The same pattern of alkylation was observed with the four reagents used, namely formaldehyde, acetone, benzaldehyde and 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzaldehyde. Every protein in 30S and 50S subunits was modified, although there was considerable variation in the degree of alkylation of individual proteins. A topographical classification of ribosomal proteins is presented, based on the degree of exposure of lysine residues. The data indicate that every protein of the ribosome has at least one lysine residue exposed at or near the surface of the ribonucleo-protein complex. PMID:4462744

  18. Cold stress-induced protein Rbm3 binds 60S ribosomal subunits, alters microRNA levels, and enhances global protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dresios, John; Aschrafi, Armaz; Owens, Geoffrey C; Vanderklish, Peter W; Edelman, Gerald M; Mauro, Vincent P

    2005-02-08

    The expression of Rbm3, a glycine-rich RNA-binding protein, is enhanced under conditions of mild hypothermia, and Rbm3 has been postulated to facilitate protein synthesis at colder temperatures. To investigate this possibility, Rbm3 was overexpressed as a c-Myc fusion protein in mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells. Cells expressing this fusion protein showed a 3-fold increase in protein synthesis at both 37 degrees C and 32 degrees C compared with control cells. Although polysome profiles of cells expressing the fusion protein and control cells were similar, several differences were noted, suggesting that Rbm3 might enhance the association of 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits at 32 degrees C. Studies to assess a direct interaction of Rbm3 with ribosomes showed that a fraction of Rbm3 was associated with 60S ribosomal subunits in an RNA-independent manner. It appeared unlikely that this association could explain the global enhancement of protein synthesis, however, because cells expressing the Rbm3 fusion protein showed no substantial increase in the size of their monosome and polysome peaks, suggesting that similar numbers of mRNAs were being translated at approximately the same rates. In contrast, a complex that sedimented between the top of the gradient and 40S subunits was less abundant in cells expressing recombinant Rbm3. Further analysis showed that the RNA component of this fraction was microRNA. We discuss the possibility that Rbm3 expression alters global protein synthesis by affecting microRNA levels and suggest that both Rbm3 and microRNAs are part of a homeostatic mechanism that regulates global levels of protein synthesis under normal and cold-stress conditions.

  19. Alteration of a novel dispensable mitochondrial ribosomal small-subunit protein, Rsm28p, allows translation of defective COX2 mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Williams, Elizabeth H; Bsat, Nada; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Butler, Christine A; Fox, Thomas D

    2005-02-01

    Mutations affecting the RNA sequence of the first 10 codons of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial gene COX2 strongly reduce translation of the mRNA, which encodes the precursor of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II. A dominant chromosomal mutation that suppresses these defects is an internal in-frame deletion of 67 codons from the gene YDR494w. Wild-type YDR494w encodes a 361-residue polypeptide with no similarity to proteins of known function. The epitope-tagged product of this gene, now named RSM28, is both peripherally associated with the inner surface of the inner mitochondrial membrane and soluble in the matrix. Epitope-tagged Rsm28p from Triton X-100-solubilized mitochondria sedimented with the small subunit of mitochondrial ribosomes in a sucrose gradient containing 500 mM NH4Cl. Complete deletion of RSM28 caused only a modest decrease in growth on nonfermentable carbon sources in otherwise wild-type strains and enhanced the respiratory defect of the suppressible cox2 mutations. The rsm28 null mutation also reduced translation of an ARG8m reporter sequence inserted at the COX1, COX2, and COX3 mitochondrial loci. We tested the ability of RSM28-1 to suppress a variety of cox2 and cox3 mutations and found that initiation codon mutations in both genes were suppressed. We conclude that Rsm28p is a dispensable small-subunit mitochondrial ribosomal protein previously undetected in systematic investigations of these ribosomes, with a positive role in translation of several mitochondrial mRNAs.

  20. Sensitive proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of large proteins with selective CH3 labelling: application to the 50S ribosome subunit

    PubMed Central

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Crublet, Elodie; Macek, Pavel; Kerfah, Rime; Gauto, Diego F.; Boisbouvier, Jérôme; Schanda, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy allows the characterization of structure, interactions and dynamics of insoluble and/or very large proteins. Sensitivity and resolution are often major challenges for obtaining atomic-resolution information, in particular for very large protein complexes. Here we show that the use of deuterated, specifically CH3-labelled proteins result in significant sensitivity gains compared to previously employed CHD2 labelling, while line widths only marginally increase. We apply this labelling strategy to a 468 kDa-large dodecameric aminopeptidase, TET2, and the 1.6 MDa-large 50S ribosome subunit of Thermus thermophilus. PMID:27385633

  1. Discovery of a small molecule that inhibits bacterial ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jonathan M; Davis, Joseph H; Mangat, Chand S; Williamson, James R; Brown, Eric D

    2014-09-18

    While small molecule inhibitors of the bacterial ribosome have been instrumental in understanding protein translation, no such probes exist to study ribosome biogenesis. We screened a diverse chemical collection that included previously approved drugs for compounds that induced cold sensitive growth inhibition in the model bacterium Escherichia coli. Among the most cold sensitive was lamotrigine, an anticonvulsant drug. Lamotrigine treatment resulted in the rapid accumulation of immature 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits at 15 °C. Importantly, this was not the result of translation inhibition, as lamotrigine was incapable of perturbing protein synthesis in vivo or in vitro. Spontaneous suppressor mutations blocking lamotrigine activity mapped solely to the poorly characterized domain II of translation initiation factor IF2 and prevented the binding of lamotrigine to IF2 in vitro. This work establishes lamotrigine as a widely available chemical probe of bacterial ribosome biogenesis and suggests a role for E. coli IF2 in ribosome assembly.

  2. Crystal structure of elongation factor 4 bound to a clockwise ratcheted ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, M. G.; Lin, J.; Bulkley, D.; Steitz, T. A.

    2014-08-08

    Elongation factor 4 (EF4/LepA) is a highly conserved guanosine triphosphatase translation factor. It was shown to promote back-translocation of tRNAs on posttranslocational ribosome complexes and to compete with elongation factor G for interaction with pretranslocational ribosomes, inhibiting the elongation phase of protein synthesis. Here, we report a crystal structure of EF4–guanosine diphosphate bound to the Thermus thermophilus ribosome with a P-site tRNA at 2.9 angstroms resolution. The C-terminal domain of EF4 reaches into the peptidyl transferase center and interacts with the acceptor stem of the peptidyl-tRNA in the P site. The ribosome is in an unusual state of ratcheting with the 30S subunit rotated clockwise relative to the 50S subunit, resulting in a remodeled decoding center. The structure is consistent with EF4 functioning either as a back-translocase or a ribosome sequester.

  3. Fal1p is an essential DEAD-box protein involved in 40S-ribosomal-subunit biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kressler, D; de la Cruz, J; Rojo, M; Linder, P

    1997-01-01

    A previously uncharacterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, FAL1, was found by sequence comparison as a homolog of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4A (eIF4A). Fal1p has 55% identity and 73% similarity on the amino acid level to yeast eIF4A, the prototype of ATP-dependent RNA helicases of the DEAD-box protein family. Although clearly grouped in the eIF4A subfamily, the essential Fal1p displays a different subcellular function and localization. An HA epitope-tagged Fal1p is localized predominantly in the nucleolus. Polysome analyses in a temperature-sensitive fal1-1 mutant and a Fal1p-depleted strain reveal a decrease in the number of 40S ribosomal subunits. Furthermore, these strains are hypersensitive to the aminoglycoside antibiotics paromomycin and neomycin. Pulse-chase labeling of pre-rRNA and steady-state-level analysis of pre-rRNAs and mature rRNAs by Northern hybridization and primer extension in the Fal1p-depleted strain show that Fal1p is required for pre-rRNA processing at sites A0, A1, and A2. Consequently, depletion of Fal1p leads to decreased 18S rRNA levels and to an overall deficit in 40S ribosomal subunits. Together, these results implicate Fal1p in the 18S rRNA maturation pathway rather than in translation initiation. PMID:9372960

  4. UVB and gamma-radiation induce the expression of mRNAs encoding the ribosomal subunit L13A in rat keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Shahmolky, N; Lefebvre, D L; Poon, R; Bai, Y; Sharma, M; Rosen, C F

    1999-09-01

    Ultraviolet B radiation produces an array of cellular perturbations in the skin. We isolated a keratinocyte cDNA encoding the rat 60S ribosomal subunit protein L13a following differential cDNA library screening with UVB-enriched probes. In contrast to the reported structure of liver L13a, the keratinocyte L13a cDNA contains a longer 3'-untranslated region. Northern blot analysis detected two L13a mRNA transcripts, approximately 800 bp and approximately 1.2 kb, in keratinocytes and a variety of rat tissues. Both L13a mRNA transcripts were induced by UVB irradiation, forskolin and gamma-irradiation. In contrast, no induction of L13a mRNA transcript levels was observed following exposure of keratinocytes to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, serum and the DNA damage-inducing agents methyl methanesulfonate or 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide. These observations suggest that increased expression of ribosomal subunit genes may be a molecular component of the keratinocyte response to UVB in particular and not part of a nonspecific response to DNA damage.

  5. Natural-abundance stable carbon isotopes of small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) from Guaymas Basin (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGregor, B. J.; Mendlovitz, H.; Albert, D.; Teske, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    Small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) is a phylogenetically informative molecule found in all species. Because it is poorly preserved in most environments, it is a useful marker for active microbial populations. We are using the natural-abundance stable carbon isotopic composition of specific microbial groups to help identify the carbon substrates contributing to microbial biomass in a variety of marine environments. At Guaymas Basin, hydrothermal fluids interact with abundant sedimentary organic carbon to produce natural gas and petroleum. Where this reaches the sediment surface, it can support dense patches of seafloor life, including Beggiatoa mats. We report here on the stable carbon isotopic composition of SSU rRNA from a Beggiatoa mat transect, a cold background site, a warm site with high oil concentration, and a second Beggiatoa mat. The central part of the transect mat overlay the steepest temperature gradient, and was visually dominated by orange Beggiatoa. This was fringed by white Beggiatoa mat and bare, but still warm, sediment. Methane concentrations were saturating beneath the orange and white mats and at the oily site, lower beneath bare sediment, and below detection at the background site. Our initial hypotheses were that rRNA isotopic composition would be strongly influenced by methane supply, and that archaeal rRNA might be lighter than bacterial due to contributions from methanogens and anaerobic methane oxidizers. We used biotin-labeled oligonucleotides to capture Bacterial and Archaeal SSU rRNA for isotopic determination. Background-site rRNA was isotopically heaviest, and bacterial RNA from below 2 cm at the oily site was lightest, consistent with control by methane. Within the transect mat, however, the pattern was more complicated; at some sediment depths, rRNA from the mat periphery was isotopically lightest. Part of this may be due to the spatially and temporally variable paths followed by hydrothermal fluid, which can include horizontal

  6. Chlamydophila pneumoniae HflX belongs to an uncharacterized family of conserved GTPases and associates with the Escherichia coli 50S large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Polkinghorne, Adam; Ziegler, Urs; González-Hernández, Yanela; Pospischil, Andreas; Timms, Peter; Vaughan, Lloyd

    2008-11-01

    Predicted members of the HflX subfamily of phosphate-binding-loop guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) are widely distributed in the bacterial kingdom but remain virtually uncharacterized. In an attempt to understand mechanisms used for regulation of growth and development in the chlamydiae, obligate intracellular and developmentally complex bacteria, we have begun investigations into chlamydial GTPases; we report here what appears to be the first analysis of a HflX family GTPase using a predicted homologue from Chlamydophila pneumoniae. In agreement with phylogenetic predictions for members of this GTPase family, purified recombinant Cp. pneumoniae HflX was specific for guanine nucleotides and exhibited a slow intrinsic GTPase activity when incubated with [gamma-(32)P]GTP. Using HflX-specific monoclonal antibodies, HflX could be detected by Western blotting and high-resolution confocal microscopy throughout the vegetative growth cycle of Cp. pneumoniae and, at early time points, appeared to partly localize to the membrane. Ectopic expression of Cp. pneumoniae HflX in Escherichia coli revealed co-sedimentation of HflX with the E. coli 50S large ribosomal subunit. The results of this work open up some intriguing possibilities for the role of GTPases belonging to this previously uncharacterized family of bacterial GTPases. Ribosome association is a feature shared by other important conserved GTPase families and more detailed investigations will be required to delineate the role of HflX in bacterial ribosome function.

  7. Antibiotics that bind to the A site of the large ribosomal subunit can induce mRNA translocation.

    PubMed

    Ermolenko, Dmitri N; Cornish, Peter V; Ha, Taekjip; Noller, Harry F

    2013-02-01

    In the absence of elongation factor EF-G, ribosomes undergo spontaneous, thermally driven fluctuation between the pre-translocation (classical) and intermediate (hybrid) states of translocation. These fluctuations do not result in productive mRNA translocation. Extending previous findings that the antibiotic sparsomycin induces translocation, we identify additional peptidyl transferase inhibitors that trigger productive mRNA translocation. We find that antibiotics that bind the peptidyl transferase A site induce mRNA translocation, whereas those that do not occupy the A site fail to induce translocation. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that translocation-inducing antibiotics do not accelerate intersubunit rotation, but act solely by converting the intrinsic, thermally driven dynamics of the ribosome into translocation. Our results support the idea that the ribosome is a Brownian ratchet machine, whose intrinsic dynamics can be rectified into unidirectional translocation by ligand binding.

  8. A definition of the domains Archaea, Bacteria and Eucarya in terms of small subunit ribosomal RNA characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Winker, S.; Woese, C.R.

    1994-11-01

    The number of small subunit rRNA sequences is not great enough that the three domains Archaea, Bacteria, and Eucarya (Woese, et al., 1990) can be reliably defined in terms of their sequence ``signatures.`` Approximately 50 homologous positions (or nucleotide pairs) in the small subunit rRNA characterized and distinguish among the three. In addition, the three can be recognized by a variety of nonhomologous rRNA characters, either individual positions and/or higher-order structural features. The Crenarchaeota and the Euryarchaeota, the two archaeal kingdoms, can also be defined and distinguished by their characteristic composition at approximately fifteen positions in the small subunit rRNA molecule.

  9. A definition of the domains Archaea, Bacteria and Eucarya in terms of small subunit ribosomal RNA characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winker, S.; Woese, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    The number of small subunit rRNA sequences is now great enough that the three domains Archaea, Bacteria and Eucarya (Woese et al., 1990) can be reliably defined in terms of their sequence "signatures". Approximately 50 homologous positions (or nucleotide pairs) in the small subunit rRNA characterize and distinguish among the three. In addition, the three can be recognized by a variety of nonhomologous rRNA characters, either individual positions and/or higher-order structural features. The Crenarchaeota and the Euryarchaeota, the two archaeal kingdoms, can also be defined and distinguished by their characteristic compositions at approximately fifteen positions in the small subunit rRNA molecule.

  10. A definition of the domains Archaea, Bacteria and Eucarya in terms of small subunit ribosomal RNA characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winker, S.; Woese, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    The number of small subunit rRNA sequences is now great enough that the three domains Archaea, Bacteria and Eucarya (Woese et al., 1990) can be reliably defined in terms of their sequence "signatures". Approximately 50 homologous positions (or nucleotide pairs) in the small subunit rRNA characterize and distinguish among the three. In addition, the three can be recognized by a variety of nonhomologous rRNA characters, either individual positions and/or higher-order structural features. The Crenarchaeota and the Euryarchaeota, the two archaeal kingdoms, can also be defined and distinguished by their characteristic compositions at approximately fifteen positions in the small subunit rRNA molecule.

  11. A definition of the domains Archaea, Bacteria and Eucarya in terms of small subunit ribosomal RNA characteristics.

    PubMed

    Winker, S; Woese, C R

    1991-01-01

    The number of small subunit rRNA sequences is now great enough that the three domains Archaea, Bacteria and Eucarya (Woese et al., 1990) can be reliably defined in terms of their sequence "signatures". Approximately 50 homologous positions (or nucleotide pairs) in the small subunit rRNA characterize and distinguish among the three. In addition, the three can be recognized by a variety of nonhomologous rRNA characters, either individual positions and/or higher-order structural features. The Crenarchaeota and the Euryarchaeota, the two archaeal kingdoms, can also be defined and distinguished by their characteristic compositions at approximately fifteen positions in the small subunit rRNA molecule.

  12. Identification of Novel RNA-Protein Contact in Complex of Ribosomal Protein S7 and 3'-Terminal Fragment of 16S rRNA in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Golovin, A V; Khayrullina, G A; Kraal, B; Kopylov, Capital A Cyrillic М

    2012-10-01

    For prokaryotes in vitro, 16S rRNA and 20 ribosomal proteins are capable of hierarchical self- assembly yielding a 30S ribosomal subunit. The self-assembly is initiated by interactions between 16S rRNA and three key ribosomal proteins: S4, S8, and S7. These proteins also have a regulatory function in the translation of their polycistronic operons recognizing a specific region of mRNA. Therefore, studying the RNA-protein interactions within binary complexes is obligatory for understanding ribosome biogenesis. The non-conventional RNA-protein contact within the binary complex of recombinant ribosomal protein S7 and its 16S rRNA binding site (236 nucleotides) was identified. UV-induced RNA-protein cross-links revealed that S7 cross-links to nucleotide U1321 of 16S rRNA. The careful consideration of the published RNA- protein cross-links for protein S7 within the 30S subunit and their correlation with the X-ray data for the 30S subunit have been performed. The RNA - protein cross-link within the binary complex identified in this study is not the same as the previously found cross-links for a subunit both in a solution, and in acrystal. The structure of the binary RNA-protein complex formed at the initial steps of self-assembly of the small subunit appears to be rearranged during the formation of the final structure of the subunit.

  13. rRNA suppressor of a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B/initiation factor 2 mutant reveals a binding site for translational GTPases on the small ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Shin, Byung-Sik; Kim, Joo-Ran; Acker, Michael G; Maher, Kathryn N; Lorsch, Jon R; Dever, Thomas E

    2009-02-01

    The translational GTPases promote initiation, elongation, and termination of protein synthesis by interacting with the ribosome. Mutations that impair GTP hydrolysis by eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B/initiation factor 2 (eIF5B/IF2) impair yeast cell growth due to failure to dissociate from the ribosome following subunit joining. A mutation in helix h5 of the 18S rRNA in the 40S ribosomal subunit and intragenic mutations in domain II of eIF5B suppress the toxic effects associated with expression of the eIF5B-H480I GTPase-deficient mutant in yeast by lowering the ribosome binding affinity of eIF5B. Hydroxyl radical mapping experiments reveal that the domain II suppressors interface with the body of the 40S subunit in the vicinity of helix h5. As the helix h5 mutation also impairs elongation factor function, the rRNA and eIF5B suppressor mutations provide in vivo evidence supporting a functionally important docking of domain II of the translational GTPases on the body of the small ribosomal subunit.

  14. A comparison of the unfolding and dissociation of the large ribosome subunits from Rhodopseudomonas spheroides N.C.I.B. 8253 and Escherichia coli M.R.E. 600.

    PubMed

    Robinson, A; Sykes, J

    1973-08-01

    1. The behaviour of the large ribosomal subunit from Rhodopseudomonas spheroides (45S) has been compared with the 50S ribosome from Escherichia coli M.R.E. 600 (and E. coli M.R.E. 162) during unfolding by removal of Mg(2+) and detachment of ribosomal proteins by high univalent cation concentrations. The extent to which these processes are reversible with these ribosomes has also been examined. 2. The R. spheroides 45S ribosome unfolds relatively slowly but then gives rise directly to two ribonucleoprotein particles (16.6S and 13.7S); the former contains the intact primary structure of the 16.25S rRNA species and the latter the 15.00S rRNA species of the original ribosome. No detectable protein loss occurs during unfolding. The E. coli ribosome unfolds via a series of discrete intermediates to a single, unfolded ribonucleoprotein unit (19.1S) containing the 23S rRNA and all the protein of the original ribosome. 3. The two unfolded R. spheroides ribonucleoproteins did not recombine when the original conditions were restored but each simply assumed a more compact configuration. Similar treatments reversed the unfolding of the E. coli 50S ribosomes; replacement of Mg(2+) caused the refolding of the initial products of unfolding and in the presence of Ni(2+) the completely unfolded species (19.1S) again sedimented at the same rate as the original ribosomes (44S). 4. Ribosomal proteins (25%) were dissociated from R. spheroides 45S ribosomes by dialysis against a solution with a Na(+)/Mg(2+) ratio of 250:1. During this process two core particles were formed (21.2S and 14.2S) and the primary structures of the two original rRNA species were conserved. This dissociation was not reversed. With E. coli 50S approximately 15% of the original ribosomal protein was dissociated, a single 37.6S core particle was formed, the 23S rRNA remained intact and the ribosomal proteins would reassociate with the core particle to give a 50S ribosome. 5. The ribonuclease activities in R

  15. RibAlign: a software tool and database for eubacterial phylogeny based on concatenated ribosomal protein subunits.

    PubMed

    Teeling, Hanno; Gloeckner, Frank Oliver

    2006-02-13

    Until today, analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences has been the de-facto gold standard for the assessment of phylogenetic relationships among prokaryotes. However, the branching order of the individual phlya is not well-resolved in 16S rRNA-based trees. In search of an improvement, new phylogenetic methods have been developed alongside with the growing availability of complete genome sequences. Unfortunately, only a few genes in prokaryotic genomes qualify as universal phylogenetic markers and almost all of them have a lower information content than the 16S rRNA gene. Therefore, emphasis has been placed on methods that are based on multiple genes or even entire genomes. The concatenation of ribosomal protein sequences is one method which has been ascribed an improved resolution. Since there is neither a comprehensive database for ribosomal protein sequences nor a tool that assists in sequence retrieval and generation of respective input files for phylogenetic reconstruction programs, RibAlign has been developed to fill this gap. RibAlign serves two purposes: First, it provides a fast and scalable database that has been specifically adapted to eubacterial ribosomal protein sequences and second, it provides sophisticated import and export capabilities. This includes semi-automatic extraction of ribosomal protein sequences from whole-genome GenBank and FASTA files as well as exporting aligned, concatenated and filtered sequence files that can directly be used in conjunction with the PHYLIP and MrBayes phylogenetic reconstruction programs. Up to now, phylogeny based on concatenated ribosomal protein sequences is hampered by the limited set of sequenced genomes and high computational requirements. However, hundreds of full and draft genome sequencing projects are on the way, and advances in cluster-computing and algorithms make phylogenetic reconstructions feasible even with large alignments of concatenated marker genes. RibAlign is a first step in this

  16. RibAlign: a software tool and database for eubacterial phylogeny based on concatenated ribosomal protein subunits

    PubMed Central

    Teeling, Hanno; Gloeckner, Frank Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Background Until today, analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences has been the de-facto gold standard for the assessment of phylogenetic relationships among prokaryotes. However, the branching order of the individual phlya is not well-resolved in 16S rRNA-based trees. In search of an improvement, new phylogenetic methods have been developed alongside with the growing availability of complete genome sequences. Unfortunately, only a few genes in prokaryotic genomes qualify as universal phylogenetic markers and almost all of them have a lower information content than the 16S rRNA gene. Therefore, emphasis has been placed on methods that are based on multiple genes or even entire genomes. The concatenation of ribosomal protein sequences is one method which has been ascribed an improved resolution. Since there is neither a comprehensive database for ribosomal protein sequences nor a tool that assists in sequence retrieval and generation of respective input files for phylogenetic reconstruction programs, RibAlign has been developed to fill this gap. Results RibAlign serves two purposes: First, it provides a fast and scalable database that has been specifically adapted to eubacterial ribosomal protein sequences and second, it provides sophisticated import and export capabilities. This includes semi-automatic extraction of ribosomal protein sequences from whole-genome GenBank and FASTA files as well as exporting aligned, concatenated and filtered sequence files that can directly be used in conjunction with the PHYLIP and MrBayes phylogenetic reconstruction programs. Conclusion Up to now, phylogeny based on concatenated ribosomal protein sequences is hampered by the limited set of sequenced genomes and high computational requirements. However, hundreds of full and draft genome sequencing projects are on the way, and advances in cluster-computing and algorithms make phylogenetic reconstructions feasible even with large alignments of concatenated marker genes. Rib

  17. Escherichia coli Ribosomal Protein S1 Unfolds Structured mRNAs Onto the Ribosome for Active Translation Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Mélodie; Korepanov, Alexey; Fuchsbauer, Olivier; Fechter, Pierre; Haller, Andrea; Fabbretti, Attilio; Choulier, Laurence; Micura, Ronald; Klaholz, Bruno P.; Romby, Pascale; Springer, Mathias; Marzi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of translation initiation is well appropriate to adapt cell growth in response to stress and environmental changes. Many bacterial mRNAs adopt structures in their 5′ untranslated regions that modulate the accessibility of the 30S ribosomal subunit. Structured mRNAs interact with the 30S in a two-step process where the docking of a folded mRNA precedes an accommodation step. Here, we used a combination of experimental approaches in vitro (kinetic of mRNA unfolding and binding experiments to analyze mRNA–protein or mRNA–ribosome complexes, toeprinting assays to follow the formation of ribosomal initiation complexes) and in vivo (genetic) to monitor the action of ribosomal protein S1 on the initiation of structured and regulated mRNAs. We demonstrate that r-protein S1 endows the 30S with an RNA chaperone activity that is essential for the docking and the unfolding of structured mRNAs, and for the correct positioning of the initiation codon inside the decoding channel. The first three OB-fold domains of S1 retain all its activities (mRNA and 30S binding, RNA melting activity) on the 30S subunit. S1 is not required for all mRNAs and acts differently on mRNAs according to the signals present at their 5′ ends. This work shows that S1 confers to the ribosome dynamic properties to initiate translation of a large set of mRNAs with diverse structural features. PMID:24339747

  18. RIBOSOME-MEMBRANE INTERACTION

    PubMed Central

    Adelman, M. R.; Sabatini, David D.; Blobel, Günter

    1973-01-01

    In a medium of high ionic strength, rat liver rough microsomes can be nondestructively disassembled into ribosomes and stripped membranes if nascent polypeptides are discharged from the bound ribosomes by reaction with puromycin. At 750 mM KCl, 5 mM MgCl2, 50 mM Tris·HCl, pH 7 5, up to 85% of all bound ribosomes are released from the membranes after incubation at room temperature with 1 mM puromycin. The ribosomes are released as subunits which are active in peptide synthesis if programmed with polyuridylic acid. The ribosome-denuded, or stripped, rough microsomes (RM) can be recovered as intact, essentially unaltered membranous vesicles Judging from the incorporation of [3H]puromycin into hot acid-insoluble material and from the release of [3H]leucine-labeled nascent polypeptide chains from bound ribosomes, puromycin coupling occurs almost as well at low (25–100 mM) as at high (500–1000 mM) KCl concentrations. Since puromycin-dependent ribosome release only occurs at high ionic strength, it appears that ribosomes are bound to membranes via two types of interactions: a direct one between the membrane and the large ribosomal subunit (labile at high KCl concentration) and an indirect one in which the nascent chain anchors the ribosome to the membrane (puromycin labile). The nascent chains of ribosomes specifically released by puromycin remain tightly associated with the stripped membranes. Some membrane-bound ribosomes (up to 40%) can be nondestructively released in high ionic strength media without puromycin; these appear to consist of a mixture of inactive ribosomes and ribosomes containing relatively short nascent chains. A fraction (∼15%) of the bound ribosomes can only be released from membranes by exposure of RM to ionic conditions which cause extensive unfolding of ribosomal subunits, the nature and significance of these ribosomes is not clear. PMID:4682341

  19. Mutations in the 50S ribosomal subunit of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae associated with altered minimum inhibitory concentrations of pleuromutilins.

    PubMed

    Hillen, Sonja; Willems, Hermann; Herbst, Werner; Rohde, Judith; Reiner, Gerald

    2014-08-06

    Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, the causative agent of swine dysentery, is responsible for severe mucohaemorrhagic colitis with considerable financial loss to worldwide swine production. Antimicrobial resistance against macrolides and lincosamides is widespread and the mechanisms are well known. Currently, the most common treatment for swine dysentery is the use of pleuromutilins and resistance to these drugs also is increasingly being reported. Although resistance mechanisms against pleuromutilins are less clear than for other drugs, they seem to involve alterations of the peptidyl transferase centre (PTC), including ribosomal RNA and the ribosomal protein L3. The present study was conducted to examine molecular mechanisms of resistance on a representative set of B. hyodysenteriae field strains with different resistance patterns. In total, we identified 24 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 23S rRNA gene and genes of the ribosomal proteins L3, L4, L2 and L22. The SNP in the ribosomal protein gene L3 at position 443 led to an amino acid substitution of asparagine (Asn) by serine (Ser) at position 148, significantly associated with MICs for pleuromutilins. Based on this SNP a correct assignment of 71% of the strains with respect to a threshold of >0.625 μg tiamulin/ml was reached. Unexpectedly low MICs in some of the Asn-strains were explained by a second SNP at position 2535 of the 23S rRNA. Our results clearly show the associations between MICs for pleuromutilins and mutations in their binding site. A complete list of SNPs that influence MICs of B. hyodysenteriae strains is needed to enable the interpretation of future molecular susceptibility testing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Atomic mutagenesis at the ribosomal decoding site.

    PubMed

    Schrode, Pius; Huter, Paul; Clementi, Nina; Erlacher, Matthias

    2017-01-02

    Ribosomal decoding is an essential process in every living cell. During protein synthesis the 30S ribosomal subunit needs to accomplish binding and accurate decoding of mRNAs. From mutational studies and high-resolution crystal structures nucleotides G530, A1492 and A1493 of the 16S rRNA came into focus as important elements for the decoding process. Recent crystallographic data challenged the so far accepted model for the decoding mechanism. To biochemically investigate decoding in greater detail we applied an in vitro reconstitution approach to modulate single chemical groups at A1492 and A1493. The modified ribosomes were subsequently tested for their ability to efficiently decode the mRNA. Unexpectedly, the ribosome was rather tolerant toward modifications of single groups either at the base or at the sugar moiety in terms of translation activity. Concerning translation fidelity, the elimination of single chemical groups involved in a hydrogen bonding network between the tRNA, mRNA and rRNA did not change the accuracy of the ribosome. These results indicate that the contribution of those chemical groups and the formed hydrogen bonds are not crucial for ribosomal decoding.

  1. Atomic mutagenesis at the ribosomal decoding site

    PubMed Central

    Schrode, Pius; Huter, Paul; Clementi, Nina; Erlacher, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ribosomal decoding is an essential process in every living cell. During protein synthesis the 30S ribosomal subunit needs to accomplish binding and accurate decoding of mRNAs. From mutational studies and high-resolution crystal structures nucleotides G530, A1492 and A1493 of the 16S rRNA came into focus as important elements for the decoding process. Recent crystallographic data challenged the so far accepted model for the decoding mechanism. To biochemically investigate decoding in greater detail we applied an in vitro reconstitution approach to modulate single chemical groups at A1492 and A1493. The modified ribosomes were subsequently tested for their ability to efficiently decode the mRNA. Unexpectedly, the ribosome was rather tolerant toward modifications of single groups either at the base or at the sugar moiety in terms of translation activity. Concerning translation fidelity, the elimination of single chemical groups involved in a hydrogen bonding network between the tRNA, mRNA and rRNA did not change the accuracy of the ribosome. These results indicate that the contribution of those chemical groups and the formed hydrogen bonds are not crucial for ribosomal decoding. PMID:27841727

  2. A recent intermezzo at the Ribosome Club.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Liljas, Anders; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2017-03-19

    Two sets of ribosome structures have recently led to two different interpretations of what limits the accuracy of codon translation by transfer RNAs. In this review, inspired by this intermezzo at the Ribosome Club, we briefly discuss accuracy amplification by energy driven proofreading and its implementation in genetic code translation. We further discuss general ways by which the monitoring bases of 16S rRNA may enhance the ultimate accuracy (d-values) and how the codon translation accuracy is reduced by the actions of Mg(2+) ions and the presence of error inducing aminoglycoside antibiotics. We demonstrate that complete freezing-in of cognate-like tautomeric states of ribosome-bound nucleotide bases in transfer RNA or messenger RNA is not compatible with recent experiments on initial codon selection by transfer RNA in ternary complex with elongation factor Tu and GTP. From these considerations, we suggest that the sets of 30S subunit structures from the Ramakrishnan group and 70S structures from the Yusupov/Yusupova group may, after all, reflect two sides of the same coin and how the structurally based intermezzo at the Ribosome Club may be resolved simply by taking the dynamic aspects of ribosome function into account.This article is part of the themed issue 'Perspectives on the ribosome'.

  3. Discrimination between Gyrodactylus salaris, G. derjavini and G. truttae (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) using restriction fragment length polymorphisms and an oligonucleotide probe within the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, C O; McGillivray, D M; MacKenzie, K; Melvin, W T

    1995-07-01

    The small subunit ribosomal RNA (srRNA) gene was amplified from Gyrodactylus salaris using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloned, and the complete gene sequence of 1966 bp determined. The V4 region of the srRNA gene was identified and amplified from single specimens of G. salaris, G. derjavini and G. truttae. Comparison of the V4 sequences from these three species revealed sequence differences from which restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) were predicted and an oligonucleotide probe (GsV4) specific to G. salaris designed. Digestion of the amplified V4 region of the srRNA gene with Hae III and either Alw I, BstY I, Dde I or Mbo I provided a means of discriminating between G. salaris, G. derjavini and G. truttae. The GsV4 probe was used to detect the srRNA gene from G. salaris in Southern and dot blots of the amplified V4 region.

  4. Cryptosporidium is more closely related to the gregarines than to coccidia as shown by phylogenetic analysis of apicomplexan parasites inferred using small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Carreno, R A; Martin, D S; Barta, J R

    1999-11-01

    The phylogenetic placement of gregarine parasites (Apicomplexa: Gregarinasina) within the Apicomplexa was derived by comparison of small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences. Gregarine sequences were obtained from Gregarina niphandrodes Clopton, Percival, and Janovy, 1991, and Monocystis agilis Stein, 1848 (Eugregarinorida Léger 1900), as well as from Ophriocystis elektroscirrha McLaughlin and Myers, 1970 (Neogregarinorida Grassé 1953). The sequences were aligned with several other gregarine and apicomplexan sequences from GenBank and the resulting data matrix analyzed by parsimony and maximum-likelihood methods. The gregarines form a monophyletic clade that is a sister group to Cryptosporidium spp. The gregarine/ Cryptosporidium clade is separate from the other major apicomplexan clade containing the coccidia, adeleids, piroplasms, and haemosporinids. The trees indicate that the genus Cryptosporidium has a closer phylogenetic affinity with the gregarines than with the coccidia. These results do not support the present classification of the Cryptosporidiidae in the suborder Eimerioirina Léger, 1911.

  5. Identification and Typing of Malassezia Species by Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism and Sequence Analyses of the Internal Transcribed Spacer and Large-Subunit Regions of Ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aditya K.; Boekhout, Teun; Theelen, Bart; Summerbell, Richard; Batra, Roma

    2004-01-01

    Malassezia yeasts are associated with several dermatological disorders. The conventional identification of Malassezia species by phenotypic methods is complicated and time-consuming, and the results based on culture methods are difficult to interpret. A comparative molecular approach based on the use of three molecular techniques, namely, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis, sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer, and sequencing of the D1 and D2 domains of the large-subunit ribosomal DNA region, was applied for the identification of Malassezia species. All species could be correctly identified by means of these methods. The results of AFLP analysis and sequencing were in complete agreement with each other. However, some discrepancies were noted when the molecular methods were compared with the phenotypic method of identification. Specific genotypes were distinguished within a collection of Malassezia furfur isolates from Canadian sources. AFLP analysis revealed significant geographical differences between the North American and European M. furfur strains. PMID:15365020

  6. The discovery of the two types of small subunit ribosomal RNA gene in Eimeria mitis contests the existence of E. mivati as an independent species.

    PubMed

    Vrba, Vladimir; Poplstein, Martin; Pakandl, Michal

    2011-12-29

    Although the validity of the coccidian species, Eimeria mivati, has been questioned by many researchers for a long time there has not been any molecular analysis that would help resolve this issue. Here we report on the discovery of the two types of small ribosomal subunit (18S) gene within the Eimeria mitis genome that correspond to the known 18S sequences of E. mitis and E. mivati, and this is in conflict with the existence of E. mivati as an independent species. We have carried out five single oocyst isolations to obtain five single-oocyst-derived strains of E. mitis and these were analyzed by the sequencing of 18S and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I genes. The two types of 18S gene were found to be present in each strain in roughly equal ratios. This indicates that if the strains carrying only one or the other 18S type exist, they will likely cross-breed and still represent a single species. However, the more probable explanation is that all strains of E. mitis contain two types of 18S gene and that the occasional detection of only one or the other type by sequencing might be caused by insufficient sampling. This is also the first report of the two types of 18S gene in Eimeria, which has already been described in some other apicomplexan species, most notably Plasmodium. We also found that these two types of ribosomal RNA differ significantly in their secondary structure. The biological significance of the two 18S gene variants in E. mitis is not known, however, we hypothesize that these variants might be used in different stages of the parasite's life-cycle as it is in other apicomplexan species investigated so far.

  7. The mitochondrial ribosomal protein of the large subunit, Afo1p, determines cellular longevity through mitochondrial back-signaling via TOR1

    PubMed Central

    Heeren, Gino; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Laun, Peter; von Seyerl, Phyllis; Kössler, Sonja; Klinger, Harald; Jarolim, Stefanie; Simon-Nobbe, Birgit; Hager, Matthias; Schüller, Christoph; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Breitenbach-Koller, Lore; Mück, Christoph; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder; Criollo, Alfredo; Kroemer, Guido; Madeo, Frank; Breitenbach, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Yeast mother cell-specific aging constitutes a model of replicative aging as it occurs in stem cell populations of higher eukaryotes. Here, we present a new long-lived yeast deletion mutation,afo1 (for aging factor one), that confers a 60% increase in replicative lifespan. AFO1/MRPL25 codes for a protein that is contained in the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome. Double mutant experiments indicate that the longevity-increasing action of the afo1 mutation is independent of mitochondrial translation, yet involves the cytoplasmic Tor1p as well as the growth-controlling transcription factor Sfp1p. In their final cell cycle, the long-lived mutant cells do show the phenotypes of yeast apoptosis indicating that the longevity of the mutant is not caused by an inability to undergo programmed cell death. Furthermore, the afo1 mutation displays high resistance against oxidants. Despite the respiratory deficiency the mutant has paradoxical increase in growth rate compared to generic petite mutants. A comparison of the single and double mutant strains for afo1 and fob1 shows that the longevity phenotype of afo1 is independent of the formation of ERCs (ribosomal DNA minicircles). AFO1/MRPL25 function establishes a new connection between mitochondria, metabolism and aging. PMID:20157544

  8. The mitochondrial ribosomal protein of the large subunit, Afo1p, determines cellular longevity through mitochondrial back-signaling via TOR1.

    PubMed

    Heeren, Gino; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Laun, Peter; von Seyerl, Phyllis; Kössler, Sonja; Klinger, Harald; Hager, Matthias; Bogengruber, Edith; Jarolim, Stefanie; Simon-Nobbe, Birgit; Schüller, Christoph; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Breitenbach-Koller, Lore; Mück, Christoph; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder; Criollo, Alfredo; Kroemer, Guido; Madeo, Frank; Breitenbach, Michael

    2009-07-13

    Yeast mother cell-specific aging constitutes a model of replicative aging as it occurs in stem cell populations of higher eukaryotes. Here, we present a new long-lived yeast deletion mutation,afo1 (for aging factor one), that confers a 60% increase in replicative lifespan. AFO1/MRPL25 codes for a protein that is contained in the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome. Double mutant experiments indicate that the longevity-increasing action of the afo1 mutation is independent of mitochondrial translation, yet involves the cytoplasmic Tor1p as well as the growth-controlling transcription factor Sfp1p. In their final cell cycle, the long-lived mutant cells do show the phenotypes of yeast apoptosis indicating that the longevity of the mutant is not caused by an inability to undergo programmed cell death. Furthermore, the afo1 mutation displays high resistance against oxidants. Despite the respiratory deficiency the mutant has paradoxical increase in growth rate compared to generic petite mutants. A comparison of the single and double mutant strains for afo1 and fob1 shows that the longevity phenotype of afo1 is independent of the formation of ERCs (ribosomal DNA minicircles). AFO1/MRPL25 function establishes a new connection between mitochondria, metabolism and aging.

  9. Non-FG mediated transport of the large pre-ribosomal subunit through the nuclear pore complex by the mRNA export factor Gle2

    PubMed Central

    Occhipinti, Laura; Chang, Yiming; Altvater, Martin; Menet, Anna M.; Kemmler, Stefan; Panse, Vikram G.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple export receptors passage bound pre-ribosomes through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) by transiently interacting with the Phe-Gly (FG) meshwork of their transport channels. Here, we reveal how the non-FG interacting yeast mRNA export factor Gly-Leu-FG lethal 2 (Gle2) functions in the export of the large pre-ribosomal subunit (pre-60S). Structure-guided studies uncovered conserved platforms used by Gle2 to export pre-60S: an uncharacterized basic patch required to bind pre-60S, and a second surface that makes non-FG contacts with the nucleoporin Nup116. A basic patch mutant of Gle2 is able to function in mRNA export, but not pre-60S export. Thus, Gle2 provides a distinct interaction platform to transport pre-60S to the cytoplasm. Notably, Gle2’s interaction platforms become crucial for pre-60S export when FG-interacting receptors are either not recruited to pre-60S or are impaired. We propose that large complex cargos rely on non-FG as well as FG-interactions for their efficient translocation through the nuclear pore complex channel. PMID:23907389

  10. Non-FG mediated transport of the large pre-ribosomal subunit through the nuclear pore complex by the mRNA export factor Gle2.

    PubMed

    Occhipinti, Laura; Chang, Yiming; Altvater, Martin; Menet, Anna M; Kemmler, Stefan; Panse, Vikram G

    2013-09-01

    Multiple export receptors passage bound pre-ribosomes through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) by transiently interacting with the Phe-Gly (FG) meshwork of their transport channels. Here, we reveal how the non-FG interacting yeast mRNA export factor Gly-Leu-FG lethal 2 (Gle2) functions in the export of the large pre-ribosomal subunit (pre-60S). Structure-guided studies uncovered conserved platforms used by Gle2 to export pre-60S: an uncharacterized basic patch required to bind pre-60S, and a second surface that makes non-FG contacts with the nucleoporin Nup116. A basic patch mutant of Gle2 is able to function in mRNA export, but not pre-60S export. Thus, Gle2 provides a distinct interaction platform to transport pre-60S to the cytoplasm. Notably, Gle2's interaction platforms become crucial for pre-60S export when FG-interacting receptors are either not recruited to pre-60S or are impaired. We propose that large complex cargos rely on non-FG as well as FG-interactions for their efficient translocation through the nuclear pore complex channel.

  11. De novo Synthesis and Assembly of rRNA into Ribosomal Subunits during Cold Acclimation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Piersimoni, Lolita; Giangrossi, Mara; Marchi, Paolo; Brandi, Anna; Gualerzi, Claudio O; Pon, Cynthia L

    2016-04-24

    During the cold adaptation that follows a cold stress, bacterial cells undergo many physiological changes and extensive reprogramming of their gene expression pattern. Bulk gene expression is drastically reduced, while a set of cold shock genes is selectively and transiently expressed. The initial stage of cold acclimation is characterized by the establishment of a stoichiometric imbalance of the translation initiation factors (IFs)/ribosomes ratio that contributes to the preferential translation of cold shock transcripts. Whereas de novo synthesis of the IFs following cold stress has been documented, nothing was known concerning the activity of the rrn operons during the cold acclimation period. In this work, we focus on the expression of the rrn operons and the fate of rRNA after temperature downshift. We demonstrate that in Escherichia coli, rRNA synthesis does not stop during the cold acclimation phase, but continues with greater contribution of the P2 compared to the P1 promoter and all seven rrn operons are active, although their expression levels change with respect to pre-stress conditions. Eight hours after the 37°→10 °C temperature downshift, the newly transcribed rRNA represents up to 20% of total rRNA and is preferentially found in the polysomes. However, with respect to the de novo synthesis of the IFs, both rRNA transcription and maturation are slowed down drastically by cold stress, thereby accounting in part for the stoichiometric imbalance of the IFs/ribosomes. Overall, our data indicate that new ribosomes, which are possibly suitable to function at low temperature, are slowly assembled during cold acclimation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Megraft: A software package to graft ribosomal small subunit (16S/18S) fragments onto full-length sequences for accurate species richness and sequencing depth analysis in pyrosequencing-length metagenomes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Metagenomic libraries represent subsamples of the total DNA found at a study site and offer unprecedented opportunities to study ecological and functional aspects of microbial communities. To examine the depth of the sequencing effort, rarefaction analysis of the ribosomal small sub-unit (SSU/16S/18...

  13. Ribosome recycling defects modify the balance between the synthesis and assembly of specific subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Jelena; Panozzo, Cristina; Bourand-Plantefol, Alexa; Herbert, Christopher J; Dujardin, Geneviève; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2016-07-08

    Mitochondria have their own translation machinery that produces key subunits of the OXPHOS complexes. This machinery relies on the coordinated action of nuclear-encoded factors of bacterial origin that are well conserved between humans and yeast. In humans, mutations in these factors can cause diseases; in yeast, mutations abolishing mitochondrial translation destabilize the mitochondrial DNA. We show that when the mitochondrial genome contains no introns, the loss of the yeast factors Mif3 and Rrf1 involved in ribosome recycling neither blocks translation nor destabilizes mitochondrial DNA. Rather, the absence of these factors increases the synthesis of the mitochondrially-encoded subunits Cox1, Cytb and Atp9, while strongly impairing the assembly of OXPHOS complexes IV and V. We further show that in the absence of Rrf1, the COX1 specific translation activator Mss51 accumulates in low molecular weight forms, thought to be the source of the translationally-active form, explaining the increased synthesis of Cox1. We propose that Rrf1 takes part in the coordination between translation and OXPHOS assembly in yeast mitochondria. These interactions between general and specific translation factors might reveal an evolutionary adaptation of the bacterial translation machinery to the set of integral membrane proteins that are translated within mitochondria. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Phylogeny of organisms investigated by the base-pair changes in the stem regions of small and large ribosomal subunit RNAs.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, J; Terai, G; Nakano, T

    1999-02-01

    In order to obtain the evolutionary distance data that are as purely additive as possible, we have developed a novel method for evaluating the evolutionary distances from the base-pair changes in stem regions of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs). The application of this method to small-subunit (SSU) and large-subunit (LSU) rRNAs provides the distance data, with which both the unweighted pair group method of analysis and the neighbor-joining method give almost the same tree topology of most organisms except for some Protoctista, thermophilic bacteria, parasitic organisms, and endosymbionts. Although the evolutionary distances calculated with LSU rRNAs are somewhat longer than those with SSU rRNAs, the difference, probably due to a slight difference in functional constraint, is substantially decreased when the distances are converted into the divergence times of organisms by the measure of the time scale estimated in each type of rRNAs. The divergence times of main branches agree fairly well with the geological record of organisms, at least after the appearance of oxygen-releasing photosynthesis, although the divergence times of Eukaryota, Archaebacteria, and Eubacteria are somewhat overestimated in comparison with the geological record of Earth formation. This result is explained by considering that the mutation rate is determined by the accumulation of misrepairs for DNA damage caused by radiation and that the effect of radiation had been stronger before the oxygen molecules became abundant in the atmosphere of the Earth.

  15. The Intersubunit Bridge B1b of the Bacterial Ribosome Facilitates Initiation of Protein Synthesis and Maintenance of Translational Fidelity.

    PubMed

    Lilleorg, Silva; Reier, Kaspar; Remme, Jaanus; Liiv, Aivar

    2017-04-07

    In bacteria, ribosomal subunits are connected via 12 intersubunit bridges involving RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, and protein-protein interactions. The only protein-protein bridge in the ribosome is ribosomal intersubunit bridge 1b (B1b), which is mainly formed by the bacterial protein L31 (bL31) and connects the head domain of 30S subunit and the central protuberance of the 50S subunit. It is known to be the most dynamic intersubunit bridge. Here, we have evaluated the role of bL31 and thereby the bridge B1b in the working cycle of the ribosome. First, bL31-deficient ribosomes are severely compromised in their ability to ensure translational fidelity particularly in reading frame maintenance in vivo. Second, in the absence of bL31, the rate of initiation is significantly reduced both in vivo and in vitro. Third, polysome profile and subunit reassociation assays demonstrate that bL31 is important for stabilizing subunit joining in vivo and in vitro. Together, our results demonstrate that bL31 is important for determining translational fidelity and stabilizing subunit association. We conclude that the only protein-protein intersubunit bridge of the bacterial ribosome facilitates translation initiation and is essential for maintaining the reading frame of mRNA translation.

  16. Tobacco etch virus Protein P1 Traffics to the Nucleolus and Associates with the Host 60S Ribosomal Subunits during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genus Potyvirus comprises a large group of positive-strand RNA plant viruses whose genome encodes a large polyprotein processed by three viral proteinases. P1 protein, the most amino-terminal product of the polyprotein, is an accessory factor stimulating viral genome amplification whose role during infection is not well understood. We infected plants with Tobacco etch virus (TEV; genus Potyvirus) clones in which P1 was tagged with a fluorescent protein to track its expression and subcellular localization or with an affinity tag to identify host proteins involved in complexes in which P1 also takes part during infection. Our results showed that TEV P1 exclusively accumulates in infected cells at an early stage of infection and that the protein displays a dynamic subcellular localization, trafficking in and out of the nucleus and nucleolus during infection. Inside the nucleolus, P1 particularly targets the dense granular component. Consistently, we found functional nucleolar localization and nuclear export signals in TEV P1 sequence. Our results also indicated that TEV P1 physically interacts with the host 80S cytoplasmic ribosomes and specifically binds to the 60S ribosomal subunits during infection. In vitro translation assays of reporter proteins suggested that TEV P1 stimulates protein translation, particularly when driven from the TEV internal ribosome entry site. These in vitro assays also suggested that TEV helper-component proteinase (HC-Pro) inhibits protein translation. Based on these findings, we propose that TEV P1 stimulates translation of viral proteins in infected cells. IMPORTANCE In this work, we researched the role during infection of tobacco etch virus P1 protease. P1 is the most mysterious protein of potyviruses, a relevant group of RNA viruses infecting plants. Our experiments showed that the viral P1 protein exclusively accumulates in infected cells at an early stage of infection and moves in and out of the nucleus of infected cells

  17. Subribosomal particle analysis reveals the stages of bacterial ribosome assembly at which rRNA nucleotides are modified

    PubMed Central

    Siibak, Triinu; Remme, Jaanus

    2010-01-01

    Modified nucleosides of ribosomal RNA are synthesized during ribosome assembly. In bacteria, each modification is made by a specialized enzyme. In vitro studies have shown that some enzymes need the presence of ribosomal proteins while other enzymes can modify only protein-free rRNA. We have analyzed the addition of modified nucleosides to rRNA during ribosome assembly. Accumulation of incompletely assembled ribosomal particles (25S, 35S, and 45S) was induced by chloramphenicol or erythromycin in an exponentially growing Escherichia coli culture. Incompletely assembled ribosomal particles were isolated from drug-treated and free 30S and 50S subunits and mature 70S ribosomes from untreated cells. Nucleosides of 16S and 23S rRNA were prepared and analyzed by reverse-phase, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Pseudouridines were identified by the chemical modification/primer extension method. Based on the results, the rRNA modifications were divided into three major groups: early, intermediate, and late assembly specific modifications. Seven out of 11 modified nucleosides of 16S rRNA were late assembly specific. In contrast, 16 out of 25 modified nucleosides of 23S rRNA were made during early steps of ribosome assembly. Free subunits of exponentially growing bacteria contain undermodified rRNA, indicating that a specific set of modifications is synthesized during very late steps of ribosome subunit assembly. PMID:20719918

  18. Subribosomal particle analysis reveals the stages of bacterial ribosome assembly at which rRNA nucleotides are modified.

    PubMed

    Siibak, Triinu; Remme, Jaanus

    2010-10-01

    Modified nucleosides of ribosomal RNA are synthesized during ribosome assembly. In bacteria, each modification is made by a specialized enzyme. In vitro studies have shown that some enzymes need the presence of ribosomal proteins while other enzymes can modify only protein-free rRNA. We have analyzed the addition of modified nucleosides to rRNA during ribosome assembly. Accumulation of incompletely assembled ribosomal particles (25S, 35S, and 45S) was induced by chloramphenicol or erythromycin in an exponentially growing Escherichia coli culture. Incompletely assembled ribosomal particles were isolated from drug-treated and free 30S and 50S subunits and mature 70S ribosomes from untreated cells. Nucleosides of 16S and 23S rRNA were prepared and analyzed by reverse-phase, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Pseudouridines were identified by the chemical modification/primer extension method. Based on the results, the rRNA modifications were divided into three major groups: early, intermediate, and late assembly specific modifications. Seven out of 11 modified nucleosides of 16S rRNA were late assembly specific. In contrast, 16 out of 25 modified nucleosides of 23S rRNA were made during early steps of ribosome assembly. Free subunits of exponentially growing bacteria contain undermodified rRNA, indicating that a specific set of modifications is synthesized during very late steps of ribosome subunit assembly.

  19. Comprehensive Analysis of Phosphorylated Proteins of E. coli Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Soung, George Y.; Miller, Jennifer L.; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in twenty-four E. coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Specific detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr, or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and the loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given site of the phosphorylation in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins. PMID:19469554

  20. Comprehensive analysis of phosphorylated proteins of Escherichia coli ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Soung, George Y; Miller, Jennifer L; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C

    2009-07-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in 24 Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining, and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr; or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, and L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given phosphorylation sites in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins.

  1. Immunogenicity Analysis of a Novel Subunit Vaccine Candidate Molecule-Recombinant L7/L12 Ribosomal Protein of Brucella suis.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Xin; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2016-08-01

    Brucella was an intracellular parasite, which could infect special livestock and humans. After infected by Brucella, livestock's reproductive system could be affected and destroyed resulting in huge economic losses. More seriously, it could be contagious from livestock to humans. So far, there is no available vaccine which is safe enough for humans. On this point, subunit vaccine has become the new breakthrough of conquering brucellosis. In this study, Brucella rL7/L12-BLS fusion protein was used as an antigen to immunize rabbits to detect the immunogenicity. The results of antibody level testing assay of rabbit antiserum indicated rL7/L12-BLS fusion protein could elicit rabbits to produce high-level IgG. And gamma interferon (IFN-γ) concentrations in rabbit antiserum were obviously up-regulated in both the rL7/L12 group and rL7/L12-BLS group. Besides, the results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed the IFN-γ gene's expression levels of both the rL7/L12 group and rL7/L12-BLS group were obviously up-regulated. All these results suggested Brucella L7/L12 protein was an ideal subunit vaccine candidate and possessed good immunogenicity. And Brucella lumazine synthase (BLS) molecule was a favorable transport vector for antigenic protein.

  2. Paradigms of ribosome synthesis: Lessons learned from ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gamalinda, Michael; Woolford, John L

    2015-01-01

    The proteome in all cells is manufactured via the intricate process of translation by multimolecular factories called ribosomes. Nevertheless, these ribonucleoprotein particles, the largest of their kind, also have an elaborate assembly line of their own. Groundbreaking discoveries that bacterial ribosomal subunits can be self-assembled in vitro jumpstarted studies on how ribosomes are constructed. Until recently, ribosome assembly has been investigated almost entirely in vitro with bacterial small subunits under equilibrium conditions. In light of high-resolution ribosome structures and a more sophisticated toolkit, the past decade has been defined by a burst of kinetic studies in vitro and, importantly, also a shift to examining ribosome maturation in living cells, especially in eukaryotes. In this review, we summarize the principles governing ribosome assembly that emerged from studies focusing on ribosomal proteins and their interactions with rRNA. Understanding these paradigms has taken center stage, given the linkage between anomalous ribosome biogenesis and proliferative disorders. PMID:26779413

  3. 90S pre-ribosomes include the 35S pre-rRNA, the U3 snoRNP, and 40S subunit processing factors but predominantly lack 60S synthesis factors.

    PubMed

    Grandi, Paola; Rybin, Vladimir; Bassler, Jochen; Petfalski, Elisabeth; Strauss, Daniela; Marzioch, Martina; Schäfer, Thorsten; Kuster, Bernhard; Tschochner, Herbert; Tollervey, David; Gavin, Anne Claude; Hurt, Ed

    2002-07-01

    We report the characterization of early pre-ribosomal particles. Twelve TAP-tagged components each showed nucleolar localization, sedimented at approximately 90S on sucrose gradients, and coprecipitated both the 35S pre-rRNA and the U3 snoRNA. Thirty-five non-ribosomal proteins were coprecipitated, including proteins associated with U3 (Nop56p, Nop58p, Sof1p, Rrp9, Dhr1p, Imp3p, Imp4p, and Mpp10p) and other factors required for 18S rRNA synthesis (Nop14p, Bms1p, and Krr1p). Mutations in components of the 90S pre-ribosomes impaired 40S subunit assembly and export. Strikingly, few components of recently characterized pre-60S ribosomes were identified in the 90S pre-ribosomes. We conclude that the 40S synthesis machinery predominately associates with the 35S pre-rRNA factors, whereas factors required for 60S subunit synthesis largely bind later, showing an unexpected dichotomy in binding.

  4. A recent intermezzo at the Ribosome Club

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Michael Y.; Liljas, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Two sets of ribosome structures have recently led to two different interpretations of what limits the accuracy of codon translation by transfer RNAs. In this review, inspired by this intermezzo at the Ribosome Club, we briefly discuss accuracy amplification by energy driven proofreading and its implementation in genetic code translation. We further discuss general ways by which the monitoring bases of 16S rRNA may enhance the ultimate accuracy (d-values) and how the codon translation accuracy is reduced by the actions of Mg2+ ions and the presence of error inducing aminoglycoside antibiotics. We demonstrate that complete freezing-in of cognate-like tautomeric states of ribosome-bound nucleotide bases in transfer RNA or messenger RNA is not compatible with recent experiments on initial codon selection by transfer RNA in ternary complex with elongation factor Tu and GTP. From these considerations, we suggest that the sets of 30S subunit structures from the Ramakrishnan group and 70S structures from the Yusupov/Yusupova group may, after all, reflect two sides of the same coin and how the structurally based intermezzo at the Ribosome Club may be resolved simply by taking the dynamic aspects of ribosome function into account. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Perspectives on the ribosome’. PMID:28138071

  5. RRP1, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene affecting rRNA processing and production of mature ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, G R; Hopper, A K

    1987-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant ts351 had been shown to affect processing of 27S pre-rRNA to mature 25S and 5.8S rRNAs (C. Andrew, A. K. Hopper, and B. D. Hall, Mol. Gen. Genet. 144:29-37, 1976). We showed that this strain contains two mutations leading to temperature-sensitive lethality. The rRNA-processing defect, however, is a result of only one of the two mutations. We designated the lesion responsible for the rRNA-processing defect rrp1 and showed that it is located on the right arm of chromosome IV either allelic to or tightly linked to mak21. This rrp1 lesion also results in hypersensitivity to aminoglycoside antibiotics and a reduced 25S/18S rRNA ratio at semipermissive temperatures. We cloned the RRP1 gene and provide evidence that it encodes a moderately abundant mRNA which is in lower abundance and larger than most mRNAs encoding ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:3549696

  6. [Study of the binding of the S7 protein with 16S rRNA fragment 926-986/1219-1393 as a key step in the assembly of the small subunit of prokaryotic ribosomes].

    PubMed

    Rassokhin, T I; Golovin, A V; Petrova, E B; Spiridonova, V A; Karginova, O A; Rozhdestvenskiĭ, T S; Brosius, J; Kopylov, A M

    2001-01-01

    Both structural and thermodynamic studies are necessary to understand the ribosome assembly. An initial step was made in studying the interaction between a 16S rRNA fragment and S7, a key protein in assembling the prokaryotic ribosome small subunit. The apparent dissociation constant was obtained for complexes of recombinant Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus S7 with a fragment of the 3' domain of the E. coli 16S rRNA. Both proteins showed a high rRNA-binding activity, which was not observed earlier. Since RNA and proteins are conformationally labile, their folding must be considered to correctly describe the RNA-protein interactions.

  7. An Introduction to the Structure and Function of the Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Dunkle, Jack A; Cate, Jamie H D

    2013-02-01

    E. coli continues to serve as a key model for the structure and function of the ribosome, structures of ribosome from other organisms and domains of life have also greatly contributed to our knowledge of protein synthesis. Many structural models of the ribosome in a number of steps of the protein synthesis cycle have been solved by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and x-ray crystallography. This chapter introduces the structure and dynamics of the ribosome based on these structures and ends with a brief discussion of the many questions that the structures leave unanswered. Protein synthesis is a multistep process, and the structural features of the ribosome along with the large number of cofactors reflect the complexity of translation. Numerous protein factors in addition to the ribosome contribute to translation in bacteria during the steps of initiation, elongation, termination, and recycling. These protein factors make intimate contacts to key regions of the ribosome, and this aspect is discussed in the chapter in light of our present understanding of the structure and function of the ribosome. The intact ribosome contains three binding sites for substrate tRNAs that are termed as the aminoacyl-tRNA site (A site), peptidyl-tRNA site (P site), and exit-tRNA site (E site). These three binding sites span the interface between the 30S and 50S subunits. The central activity of the ribosome is catalysis of peptide bond formation. The region of the ribosome responsible for catalyzing the reaction is called the peptidyl transferase center (PTC).

  8. The origin and evolution of variable-region helices in V4 and V7 of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA of branchiopod crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Crease, T J; Taylor, D J

    1998-11-01

    We sequenced the V4 and V7 regions of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) from 38 species of branchiopod crustaceans (e.g., Artemia, Daphnia, Triops) representing all eight extant orders. Ancestral large-bodied taxa in the orders Anostraca, Notostraca, Laevicaudata, and Spinicaudata (limnadiids and cyzicids) possess the typical secondary structure in these regions, whereas the spinicaudatan Cyclestheria and all of the cladocerans (Anomopoda, Ctenopoda, Onychopoda, and Haplopoda) possess three unique helices. Although the lengths and primary sequences of the distal ends of these helices are extremely variable, their locations, secondary structures, and primary sequences at the proximal end are conserved, indicating that they are homologous. This evidence supports the classical view that Cladocera is a monophyletic group and that the cyclestheriids are transitional between spinicaudatans and cladocerans. The single origin and persistence since the Permian of the unique cladoceran helices suggests that births and deaths of variable region helices have been rare. The broad range of sequence divergences observed among the cladoceran helices permitted us to make inferences about their evolution. Although their proximal ends are very GC-biased, there is a significant negative correlation between length and GC content due to an increasing proportion of U at their distal ends. Slippage-like processes occurring at unpaired nucleotides or bulges, which are very U-biased, are associated with both helix origin and runaway length expansion. The overall GC contents and lengths of V4 and V7 are highly correlated. More surprisingly, the lengths of these SSU rRNA variable regions are also highly correlated with the length of the large-subunit rRNA expansion segment, D2, indicating that mechanisms affecting length variation do so both across single genes and across genes in the rRNA gene family.

  9. The Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein EMB2654 Is Essential for Trans-Splicing of a Chloroplast Small Ribosomal Subunit Transcript1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sanglard, Lilian Vincis Pereira; Bussell, John D.; Howell, Katharine A.

    2017-01-01

    We report the partial complementation and subsequent comparative molecular analysis of two nonviable mutants impaired in chloroplast translation, one (emb2394) lacking the RPL6 protein, and the other (emb2654) carrying a mutation in a gene encoding a P-class pentatricopeptide repeat protein. We show that EMB2654 is required for the trans-splicing of the plastid rps12 transcript and that therefore the emb2654 mutant lacks Rps12 protein and fails to assemble the small subunit of the plastid ribosome, explaining the loss of plastid translation and consequent embryo-lethal phenotype. Predictions of the EMB2654 binding site match a small RNA “footprint” located on the 5′ half of the trans-spliced intron that is almost absent in the partially complemented mutant. EMB2654 binds sequence specifically to this target sequence in vitro. Altered patterns in nuclease-protected small RNA fragments in emb2654 show that EMB2654 binding must be an early step in, or prior to, the formation of a large protein-RNA complex covering the free ends of the two rps12 intron halves. PMID:28011633

  10. Genetic variation of Gongylonema pulchrum from wild animals and cattle in Japan based on ribosomal RNA and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I genes.

    PubMed

    Makouloutou, P; Setsuda, A; Yokoyama, M; Tsuji, T; Saita, E; Torii, H; Kaneshiro, Y; Sasaki, M; Maeda, K; Une, Y; Hasegawa, H; Sato, H

    2013-09-01

    The gullet worm (Gongylonema pulchrum) has been recorded from a variety of mammals worldwide, including monkeys and humans. Due to its wide host range, it has been suggested that the worm may be transmitted locally to any mammalian host by chance. To investigate this notion, the ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA), mainly regions of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) 1 and 2, and a cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) region of mitochondrial DNA of G. pulchrum were characterized using parasites from the following hosts located in Japan: cattle, sika deer, wild boars, Japanese macaques, a feral Reeves's muntjac and captive squirrel monkeys. The rDNA nucleotide sequences of G. pulchrum were generally well conserved regardless of their host origin. However, a few insertions/deletions of nucleotides along with a few base substitutions in the ITS1 and ITS2 regions were observed in G. pulchrum from sika deer, wild boars and Japanese macaques, and those differed from G. pulchrum in cattle, the feral Reeves's muntjac and captive squirrel monkeys. The COI sequences of G. pulchrum were further divided into multiple haplotypes and two groups of haplotypes, i.e. those from a majority of sika deer, wild boars and Japanese macaques and those from cattle and zoo animals, were clearly differentiated. Our findings indicate that domestic and sylvatic transmission cycles of the gullet worm are currently present, at least in Japan.

  11. The HIV-1 Nef protein interacts with two components of the 40S small ribosomal subunit, the RPS10 protein and the 18S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Wasim; Dichamp, Isabelle; Herbein, Georges

    2012-07-10

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Nef-encoded protein plays key functions at almost all stages of the viral life cycle, but its role in translation is largely unknown. To determine the effect of Nef on translation we used an in vitro translation assay. The detection of Nef/RPS10 complexes and the presence of 18S rRNA and tRNAs in the complexes were performed by coimmunoprecipitation and RT-PCR assay. We observed that the HIV-1 Nef protein specifically impaired translation in vitro. We observed the interaction of Nef with RPS10 by coimmunoprecipitation assay. In addition 18S rRNA and tRNAs were present in the Nef/RPS10 complexes. Our results are consistent with a model in which the Nef protein by binding to two components of the 40S small ribosomal subunit, RPS10 and 18S rRNA, and to a lesser extent to tRNAs, could lead to decreased protein synthesis.

  12. Prevalence, Genetic Characterization, and 18S Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA Diversity of Trypanosoma rangeli in Triatomine and Mammal Hosts in Endemic Areas for Chagas Disease in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofia; Aguirre-Villacis, Fernanda; Pinto, C. Miguel; Vallejo, Gustavo A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Trypanosoma rangeli is a nonpathogenic parasite for humans; however, its medical importance relies in its similarity and overlapping distribution with Trypanosoma cruzi, causal agent of Chagas disease in the Americas. The genetic diversity of T. rangeli and its association with host species (triatomines and mammals) has been identified along Central and the South America; however, it has not included data of isolates from Ecuador. This study reports infection with T. rangeli in 18 genera of mammal hosts and five species of triatomines in three environments (domestic, peridomestic, and sylvatic). Higher infection rates were found in the sylvatic environment, in close association with Rhodnius ecuadoriensis. The results of this study extend the range of hosts infected with this parasite and the geographic range of the T. rangeli genotype KP1(−)/lineage C in South America. It was not possible to detect variation on T. rangeli from the central coastal region and southern Ecuador with the analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) gene, even though these areas are ecologically different and a phenotypic subdivision of R. ecuadoriensis has been found. R. ecuadoriensis is considered one of the most important vectors for Chagas disease transmission in Ecuador due to its wide distribution and adaptability to diverse environments. An extensive knowledge of the trypanosomes circulating in this species of triatomine, and associated mammal hosts, is important for delineating transmission dynamics and preventive measures in the endemic areas of Ecuador and Northern Peru. PMID:26645579

  13. Babesia canis canis, Babesia canis vogeli, Babesia canis rossi: differentiation of the three subspecies by a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis on amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA genes.

    PubMed

    Carret, C; Walas, F; Carcy, B; Grande, N; Précigout, E; Moubri, K; Schetters, T P; Gorenflot, A

    1999-01-01

    The parasites Babesia canis and Babesia gibsoni (phylum Apicomplexa) are responsible for canine babesiosis throughout the world. Babesia canis was previously described as a group of three biologically different subspecies, namely B. canis canis, B. canis vogeli, and B. canis rossi. We report partial sequences of small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (ssu-rDNA) of each subspecies amplified in vitro with primers derived from a semi-conserved region of the ssu-rDNA genes in other Babesia species. The polymerase chain reaction combined with a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, using HinfI and TaqI restriction enzymes, confirmed the separation of B. canis into three subspecies. These sequences were compared with previously published sequences of other Babesia species. A phylogenetic approach showed that the three subspecies of B. canis belong to the clade of Babesia species sensu stricto where B. canis canis clusters with B. canis rossi whereas B. canis vogeli might form a monophyletic group with the cluster B. divergens and B. odocoilei. Our results show that the three subspecies of B. canis can readily be differentiated at the molecular level and suggest that they might be considered as true species.

  14. Small subunit ribosomal DNA-based phylogenetic analysis of foliar nematodes (Aphelenchoides spp.) and their quantitative detection in complex DNA backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Rybarczyk-Mydłowska, Katarzyna; Mooyman, Paul; van Megen, Hanny; van den Elsen, Sven; Vervoort, Mariëtte; Veenhuizen, Peter; van Doorn, Joop; Dees, Robert; Karssen, Gerrit; Bakker, Jaap; Helder, Johannes

    2012-12-01

    Foliar nematodes, plant-parasitic representatives of the genus Aphelenchoides, constitute a minority in a group dominated by fungivorous species. Distinction between (mostly harmless) fungal feeding Aphelenchoides species and high impact plant parasites such as A. besseyi, A. fragariae, A. ritzemabosi, and A. subtenuis is severely hampered by the scarcity of informative morphological characters, some of which are only observable in specific developmental stages. Poor description of a number of non-plant-parasitic Aphelenchoides species further complicates identification. Based on (nearly) full-length small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) sequences (≈1,700 bp), a phylogenetic tree was generated, and the four target species appeared as distinct, well-supported groups. Notably, this genus does not constitute a monophyletic group: A. besseyi and A. ritzemabosi cluster together and they are phylogenetically isolated from A. fragariae, A. subtenuis, and most other fungivorous species. A phylum-wide SSU rDNA framework was used to identify species-specific DNA motifs. For the molecular detection of four plant-parasitic Aphelenchoides species, polymerase chain reaction primers were developed with high, identical annealing temperatures (63°C). Within the molecular framework presented here, these primers can be used for the rapid screening of plant material and soil for the presence of one or multiple foliar nematode species.

  15. Prevalence, Genetic Characterization, and 18S Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA Diversity of Trypanosoma rangeli in Triatomine and Mammal Hosts in Endemic Areas for Chagas Disease in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofia; Aguirre-Villacis, Fernanda; Pinto, C Miguel; Vallejo, Gustavo A; Grijalva, Mario J

    2015-12-01

    Trypanosoma rangeli is a nonpathogenic parasite for humans; however, its medical importance relies in its similarity and overlapping distribution with Trypanosoma cruzi, causal agent of Chagas disease in the Americas. The genetic diversity of T. rangeli and its association with host species (triatomines and mammals) has been identified along Central and the South America; however, it has not included data of isolates from Ecuador. This study reports infection with T. rangeli in 18 genera of mammal hosts and five species of triatomines in three environments (domestic, peridomestic, and sylvatic). Higher infection rates were found in the sylvatic environment, in close association with Rhodnius ecuadoriensis. The results of this study extend the range of hosts infected with this parasite and the geographic range of the T. rangeli genotype KP1(-)/lineage C in South America. It was not possible to detect variation on T. rangeli from the central coastal region and southern Ecuador with the analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) gene, even though these areas are ecologically different and a phenotypic subdivision of R. ecuadoriensis has been found. R. ecuadoriensis is considered one of the most important vectors for Chagas disease transmission in Ecuador due to its wide distribution and adaptability to diverse environments. An extensive knowledge of the trypanosomes circulating in this species of triatomine, and associated mammal hosts, is important for delineating transmission dynamics and preventive measures in the endemic areas of Ecuador and Northern Peru.

  16. Specific contacts between protein S4 and ribosomal RNA are required at multiple stages of ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Mayerle, Megan; Woodson, Sarah A

    2013-04-01

    Assembly of bacterial 30S ribosomal subunits requires structural rearrangements to both its 16S rRNA and ribosomal protein components. Ribosomal protein S4 nucleates 30S assembly and associates rapidly with the 5' domain of the 16S rRNA. In vitro, transformation of initial S4-rRNA complexes to long-lived, mature complexes involves refolding of 16S helix 18, which forms part of the decoding center. Here we use targeted mutagenesis of Geobacillus stearothermophilus S4 to show that remodeling of S4-rRNA complexes is perturbed by ram alleles associated with reduced translational accuracy. Gel mobility shift assays, SHAPE chemical probing, and in vivo complementation show that the S4 N-terminal extension is required for RNA binding and viability. Alanine substitutions in Y47 and L51 that interact with 16S helix 18 decrease S4 affinity and destabilize the helix 18 pseudoknot. These changes to the protein-RNA interface correlate with no growth (L51A) or cold-sensitive growth, 30S assembly defects, and accumulation of 17S pre-rRNA (Y47A). A third mutation, R200A, over-stabilizes the helix 18 pseudoknot yet results in temperature-sensitive growth, indicating that complex stability is finely tuned by natural selection. Our results show that early S4-RNA interactions guide rRNA folding and impact late steps of 30S assembly.

  17. Binding of Dihydrostreptomycin to Escherichia coli Ribosomes: Kinetics of the Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, F. N.; Flaks, Joel G.

    1972-01-01

    Investigations were carried out on the binding of dihydrostreptomycin to purified (and reassociated) 70S ribosomes and 30S subunits from streptomycin-susceptible strains, and the results were compared with those of similar studies with native (run-off) 70S ribosomes. At 0 C, only a small fraction of purified 70S ribosomes and 30S sub-units bound 1 molecule of the antibiotic tightly, and at a rate comparable to the binding occurring with native 70S ribosomes. At temperatures of 10 C and above, there was a temperature-dependent increase in the extent of antibiotic binding to purified 70S and 30S particles up to a maximum of 1 molecule/ribosomal particle, but the kinetics of binding was slow in comparison to that taking place at 0 C. These and other results suggest that a major fraction of 30S subunits and purified (or reassociated) 70S ribosomes are inactive in binding the antibiotic. This has been localized to an instability of the free 30S subunit, which in solution at 0 C has a half-life of 5 hr or less. Inactive 30S or 70S particles could be thermally activated, with the latter being identical in their streptomycin-binding properties to native 70S ribosomes. The activation kinetics were slow in comparison to the binding kinetics for the antibiotic and were indicative of a conformational change in ribosomal structure. There thus appears to be a reversible transition between active and inactive forms of the ribosomal particles for streptomycin binding, but additional binding sites for the antibiotic are not created by the transitions. The active form of the 30S subunit can be stabilized in the presence of polyuridylic acid, but much more effectively by association with the 50S subunit to form a 70S ribosome. The kinetics of dihydrostreptomycin binding were studied in both directions of the reaction, and the reaction in the direction of binding was found to be several orders of magnitude faster than that of the reverse, or debinding, direction. The kinetics of the

  18. Dynamics of Ribosomal Protein S1 on a Bacterial Ribosome with Cross-Linking and Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Lauber, Matthew A.; Rappsilber, Juri; Reilly, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S1 has been shown to be a significant effector of prokaryotic translation. The protein is in fact capable of efficiently initiating translation, regardless of the presence of a Shine-Dalgarno sequence in mRNA. Structural insights into this process have remained elusive, as S1 is recalcitrant to traditional techniques of structural analysis, such as x-ray crystallography. Through the application of protein cross-linking and high resolution mass spectrometry, we have detailed the ribosomal binding site of S1 and have observed evidence of its dynamics. Our results support a previous hypothesis that S1 acts as the mRNA catching arm of the prokaryotic ribosome. We also demonstrate that in solution the major domains of the 30S subunit are remarkably flexible, capable of moving 30–50Å with respect to one another. PMID:23033476

  19. Time-dependent Effects of Transcription- and Translation-halting Drugs on the Spatial Distributions of the E. coli Chromosome and Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Somenath; Choi, Heejun; Mondal, Jagannath; Weisshaar, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Previously observed effects of rifampicin and chloramphenicol indicate that transcription and translation activity strongly affect the coarse spatial organization of the bacterial cytoplasm. Single-cell, time-resolved, quantitative imaging of chromosome and ribosome spatial distributions and ribosome diffusion in live E. coli provides insight into the underlying mechanisms. Monte Carlo simulations of model DNA-ribosome mixtures support a novel nucleoid-ribosome mixing hypothesis. In normal conditions, 70S-polysomes and the chromosomal DNA segregate, while 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits are able to penetrate the nucleoids. Growth conditions and drug treatments determine the partitioning of ribosomes into 70S-polysomes vs free 30S and 50S subunits. Entropic and excluded volume effects then dictate the resulting chromosome and ribosome spatial distributions. Direct observation of radial contraction of the nucleoids 0-5 min after treatment with either transcription- or translation-halting drugs supports the hypothesis that simultaneous transcription, translation, and insertion of proteins into the membrane (“transertion”) exerts an expanding force on the chromosomal DNA. Breaking of the DNA-RNA polymerase-mRNA-ribosome-membrane chain in either of two ways causes similar nucleoid contraction on a similar timescale. We suggest that chromosomal expansion due to transertion enables co-transcriptional translation throughout the nucleoids. PMID:25250841

  20. New insights into the enzymatic role of EF-G in ribosome recycling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dejiu; Yan, Kaige; Zhang, Yiwei; Liu, Guangqiao; Cao, Xintao; Song, Guangtao; Xie, Qiang; Gao, Ning; Qin, Yan

    2015-12-02

    During translation, elongation factor G (EF-G) plays a catalytic role in tRNA translocation and a facilitative role in ribosome recycling. By stabilizing the rotated ribosome and interacting with ribosome recycling factor (RRF), EF-G was hypothesized to induce the domain rotations of RRF, which subsequently performs the function of splitting the major intersubunit bridges and thus separates the ribosome into subunits for recycling. Here, with systematic mutagenesis, FRET analysis and cryo-EM single particle approach, we analyzed the interplay between EF-G/RRF and post termination complex (PoTC). Our data reveal that the two conserved loops (loop I and II) at the tip region of EF-G domain IV possess distinct roles in tRNA translocation and ribosome recycling. Specifically, loop II might be directly involved in disrupting the main intersubunit bridge B2a between helix 44 (h44 from the 30S subunit) and helix 69 (H69 from the 50S subunit) in PoTC. Therefore, our data suggest a new ribosome recycling mechanism which requires an active involvement of EF-G. In addition to supporting RRF, EF-G plays an enzymatic role in destabilizing B2a via its loop II. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. New insights into the enzymatic role of EF-G in ribosome recycling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dejiu; Yan, Kaige; Zhang, Yiwei; Liu, Guangqiao; Cao, Xintao; Song, Guangtao; Xie, Qiang; Gao, Ning; Qin, Yan

    2015-01-01

    During translation, elongation factor G (EF-G) plays a catalytic role in tRNA translocation and a facilitative role in ribosome recycling. By stabilizing the rotated ribosome and interacting with ribosome recycling factor (RRF), EF-G was hypothesized to induce the domain rotations of RRF, which subsequently performs the function of splitting the major intersubunit bridges and thus separates the ribosome into subunits for recycling. Here, with systematic mutagenesis, FRET analysis and cryo-EM single particle approach, we analyzed the interplay between EF-G/RRF and post termination complex (PoTC). Our data reveal that the two conserved loops (loop I and II) at the tip region of EF-G domain IV possess distinct roles in tRNA translocation and ribosome recycling. Specifically, loop II might be directly involved in disrupting the main intersubunit bridge B2a between helix 44 (h44 from the 30S subunit) and helix 69 (H69 from the 50S subunit) in PoTC. Therefore, our data suggest a new ribosome recycling mechanism which requires an active involvement of EF-G. In addition to supporting RRF, EF-G plays an enzymatic role in destabilizing B2a via its loop II. PMID:26432831

  2. Key Intermediates in Ribosome Recycling Visualized by Time-Resolved Cryoelectron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ziao; Kaledhonkar, Sandip; Borg, Anneli; Sun, Ming; Chen, Bo; Grassucci, Robert A; Ehrenberg, Måns; Frank, Joachim

    2016-12-06

    Upon encountering a stop codon on mRNA, polypeptide synthesis on the ribosome is terminated by release factors, and the ribosome complex, still bound with mRNA and P-site-bound tRNA (post-termination complex, PostTC), is split into ribosomal subunits, ready for a new round of translational initiation. Separation of post-termination ribosomes into subunits, or "ribosome recycling," is promoted by the joint action of ribosome-recycling factor (RRF) and elongation factor G (EF-G) in a guanosine triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis-dependent manner. Here we used a mixing-spraying-based method of time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to visualize the short-lived intermediates of the recycling process. The two complexes that contain (1) both RRF and EF-G bound to the PostTC or (2) deacylated tRNA bound to the 30S subunit are of particular interest. Our observations of the native form of these complexes demonstrate the strong potential of time-resolved cryo-EM for visualizing previously unobservable transient structures.

  3. The structure of Erb1-Ytm1 complex reveals the functional importance of a high-affinity binding between two β-propellers during the assembly of large ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Wegrecki, Marcin; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; de la Cruz, Jesús; Bravo, Jeronimo

    2015-12-15

    Ribosome biogenesis is one of the most essential pathways in eukaryotes although it is still not fully characterized. Given the importance of this process in proliferating cells, it is obvious that understanding the macromolecular details of the interactions that take place between the assembly factors, ribosomal proteins and nascent pre-rRNAs is essentially required for the development of new non-genotoxic treatments for cancer. Herein, we have studied the association between the WD40-repeat domains of Erb1 and Ytm1 proteins. These are essential factors for the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes that form a heterotrimeric complex together with the also essential Nop7 protein. We provide the crystal structure of a dimer formed by the C-terminal part of Erb1 and Ytm1 from Chaetomium thermophilum at 2.1 Å resolution. Using a multidisciplinary approach we show that the β-propeller domains of these proteins interact in a novel manner that leads to a high-affinity binding. We prove that a point mutation within the interface of the complex impairs the interaction between the two proteins and negatively affects growth and ribosome production in yeast. Our study suggests insights into the association of the Erb1-Ytm1 dimer with pre-ribosomal particles.

  4. The structure of Erb1-Ytm1 complex reveals the functional importance of a high-affinity binding between two β-propellers during the assembly of large ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Wegrecki, Marcin; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; de la Cruz, Jesús; Bravo, Jeronimo

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is one of the most essential pathways in eukaryotes although it is still not fully characterized. Given the importance of this process in proliferating cells, it is obvious that understanding the macromolecular details of the interactions that take place between the assembly factors, ribosomal proteins and nascent pre-rRNAs is essentially required for the development of new non-genotoxic treatments for cancer. Herein, we have studied the association between the WD40-repeat domains of Erb1 and Ytm1 proteins. These are essential factors for the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes that form a heterotrimeric complex together with the also essential Nop7 protein. We provide the crystal structure of a dimer formed by the C-terminal part of Erb1 and Ytm1 from Chaetomium thermophilum at 2.1 Å resolution. Using a multidisciplinary approach we show that the β-propeller domains of these proteins interact in a novel manner that leads to a high-affinity binding. We prove that a point mutation within the interface of the complex impairs the interaction between the two proteins and negatively affects growth and ribosome production in yeast. Our study suggests insights into the association of the Erb1-Ytm1 dimer with pre-ribosomal particles. PMID:26476442

  5. Nuclear/nucleolar GTPase 2 proteins as a subfamily of YlqF/YawG GTPases function in pre-60S ribosomal subunit maturation of mono- and dicotyledonous plants.

    PubMed

    Im, Chak Han; Hwang, Sung Min; Son, Young Sim; Heo, Jae Bok; Bang, Woo Young; Suwastika, I Nengah; Shiina, Takashi; Bahk, Jeong Dong

    2011-03-11

    The YlqF/YawG families are important GTPases involved in ribosome biogenesis, cell proliferation, or cell growth, however, no plant homologs have yet to be characterized. Here we isolated rice (Oryza sativa) and Arabidopsis nuclear/nucleolar GTPase 2 (OsNug2 and AtNug2, respectively) that belong to the YawG subfamily and characterized them for pre-60S ribosomal subunit maturation. They showed typical intrinsic YlqF/YawG family GTPase activities in bacteria and yeasts with k(cat) values 0.12 ± 0.007 min(-1) (n = 6) and 0.087 ± 0.002 min(-1) (n = 4), respectively, and addition of 60S ribosomal subunits stimulated their activities in vitro. In addition, OsNug2 rescued the lethality of the yeast nug2 null mutant through recovery of 25S pre-rRNA processing. By yeast two-hybrid screening five clones, including a putative one of 60S ribosomal proteins, OsL10a, were isolated. Subcellular localization and pulldown assays resulted in that the N-terminal region of OsNug2 is sufficient for nucleolar/nuclear targeting and association with OsL10a. OsNug2 is physically associated with pre-60S ribosomal complexes highly enriched in the 25S, 5.8S, and 5S rRNA, and its interaction was stimulated by exogenous GTP. Furthermore, the AtNug2 knockdown mutant constructed by the RNAi method showed defective growth on the medium containing cycloheximide. Expression pattern analysis revealed that the distribution of AtNug2 mainly in the meristematic region underlies its potential role in active plant growth. Finally, it is concluded that Nug2/Nog2p GTPase from mono- and didicotyledonous plants is linked to the pre-60S ribosome complex and actively processed 27S into 25S during the ribosomal large subunit maturation process, i.e. prior to export to the cytoplasm.

  6. A new technique for the characterization of long-range tertiary contacts in large RNA molecules: insertion of a photolabel at a selected position in 16S rRNA within the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    PubMed Central

    Baranov, P V; Dokudovskaya, S S; Oretskaya, T S; Dontsova, O A; Bogdanov, A A; Brimacombe, R

    1997-01-01

    A new approach for inserting a photo-label at a selected position within the long ribosomal RNA molecules has been developed. The Escherichia coli 16S rRNA was cleaved at a single internucleotide bond, 1141-1142, with RNase H in the presence of a complementary chimeric oligonucleotide. 4-Thiouridine 5', 3'-diphosphate was ligated to the 3'-end of the 5'fragment at the cleavage site with T4 RNA ligase. The 16S rRNA fragments containing this added photo-reactive nucleotide were assembled together with total 30S ribosomal proteins into small ribosomal subunits. The ability of such 30S particles containing fragmented rRNA to form 70S ribosomes has been demonstrated previously. Crosslinks were induced within the 30S subunits by mild UV irradiation. The sites of crosslinking within the 16S rRNA were then analyzed using RNase H digestion and reverse transcription. Two crosslinks from the thio-nucleotide attached to nt C1141 of 16S rRNA were observed, namely to nt U1295 and G1272. These results are in agreement with the established proximity of helix 39 and 41 in the 3D structure of the 30S ribosomal subunit, as shown by other intra RNA crosslinking data. These data furthermore allow us to refine the structural arrangement of helices 41 and 39 relative to one another. PMID:9171076

  7. Using Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA to Follow Dark Incorporation of 14C-bicarbonate by Bacteria and Archaea in Sandy Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGregor, B. J.; Musat, N.; Kuypers, M. M.

    2007-12-01

    Small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) and the genes encoding it have become the basis of modern microbial phylogeny, and of numerous methods for characterizing the composition of bacterial, archaeal, and even eukaryotic communities as they occur in nature. A limitation of this approach has been that phylogeny alone is not a reliable guide to physiology, particularly for groups with no close relatives in culture. We have been developing ways of using the SSU rRNA molecule itself to identify and (eventually) quantify the carbon sources incorporated by particular phylogenetic groups. This can be done by taking advantage of natural variations in carbon isotopic composition among growth substrates, or by following incorporation of 13C- or 14C-labeled compounds. 14C has the advantage that natural background levels are negligible. In the present study, our goal is to identify species responsible for non-photosynthetic CO2 incorporation in sandy sediments of the German Wadden Sea. Sediment cores collected from the Janssand sand flats were percolated with 14C-bicarbonate at in situ temperature for 36-38h in the dark, total RNA isolated, and domain-specific oligonucleotide probes used to capture bacterial and archaeal SSU rRNA. Total and/or captured RNA was separated by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and 14C detected by phosphor imager, autoradiography, or beta imager. Detection was fastest and most sensitive with the beta imager. Both Bacteria and Archaea had incorporated label, suggesting both groups may harbor non-photosynthetic autotrophs. The next step will be to use more specific capture probes. We are currently working to separate the captured domain-specific SSU rRNA on non-denaturing gels, with detection by the high-resolution mode of the beta imager, so that individual species incorporating label can be identified by RT-PCR and sequencing of labeled bands.

  8. A Sequence-Specific Interaction between the Saccharomyces cerevisiae rRNA Gene Repeats and a Locus Encoding an RNA Polymerase I Subunit Affects Ribosomal DNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Cahyani, Inswasti; Cridge, Andrew G.; Engelke, David R.; Ganley, Austen R. D.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial organization of eukaryotic genomes is linked to their functions. However, how individual features of the global spatial structure contribute to nuclear function remains largely unknown. We previously identified a high-frequency interchromosomal interaction within the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome that occurs between the intergenic spacer of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeats and the intergenic sequence between the locus encoding the second largest RNA polymerase I subunit and a lysine tRNA gene [i.e., RPA135-tK(CUU)P]. Here, we used quantitative chromosome conformation capture in combination with replacement mapping to identify a 75-bp sequence within the RPA135-tK(CUU)P intergenic region that is involved in the interaction. We demonstrate that the RPA135-IGS1 interaction is dependent on the rDNA copy number and the Msn2 protein. Surprisingly, we found that the interaction does not govern RPA135 transcription. Instead, replacement of a 605-bp region within the RPA135-tK(CUU)P intergenic region results in a reduction in the RPA135-IGS1 interaction level and fluctuations in rDNA copy number. We conclude that the chromosomal interaction that occurs between the RPA135-tK(CUU)P and rDNA IGS1 loci stabilizes rDNA repeat number and contributes to the maintenance of nucleolar stability. Our results provide evidence that the DNA loci involved in chromosomal interactions are composite elements, sections of which function in stabilizing the interaction or mediating a functional outcome. PMID:25421713

  9. Molecular identification of veterinary yeast isolates by use of sequence-based analysis of the D1/D2 region of the large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Garner, Cherilyn D; Starr, Jennifer K; McDonough, Patrick L; Altier, Craig

    2010-06-01

    Conventional methods of yeast identification are often time-consuming and difficult; however, recent studies of sequence-based identification methods have shown promise. Additionally, little is known about the diversity of yeasts identified from various animal species in veterinary diagnostic laboratories. Therefore, in this study, we examined three methods of identification by using 109 yeast samples isolated during a 1-year period from veterinary clinical samples. Comparison of the three methods-traditional substrate assimilation, fatty acid profile analysis, and sequence-based analysis of the region spanning the D1 and D2 regions (D1/D2) of the large ribosomal subunit-showed that sequence analysis provided the highest percent identification among the three. Sequence analysis identified 87% of isolates to the species level, whereas substrate assimilation and fatty acid profile analysis identified only 54% and 47%, respectively. Less-stringent criteria for identification increased the percentage of isolates identified to 98% for sequence analysis, 62% for substrate assimilation, and 55% for fatty acid profile analysis. We also found that sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region provided further identification for 36% of yeast not identified to the species level by D1/D2 sequence analysis. Additionally, we identified a large variety of yeast from animal sources, with at least 30 different species among the isolates tested, and with the majority not belonging to the common Candida spp., such as C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and the C. parapsilosis group. Thus, we determined that sequence analysis of the D1/D2 region was the best method for identification of the variety of yeasts found in a veterinary population.

  10. RBF1, a Plant Homolog of the Bacterial Ribosome-Binding Factor RbfA, Acts in Processing of the Chloroplast 16S Ribosomal RNA1[W

    PubMed Central

    Fristedt, Rikard; Scharff, Lars B.; Clarke, Cornelia A.; Wang, Qin; Lin, Chentao; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Bock, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Plastids (chloroplasts) possess 70S ribosomes that are very similar in structure and function to the ribosomes of their bacterial ancestors. While most components of the bacterial ribosome (ribosomal RNAs [rRNAs] and ribosomal proteins) are well conserved in the plastid ribosome, little is known about the factors mediating the biogenesis of plastid ribosomes. Here, we have investigated a putative homolog of the bacterial RbfA (for ribosome-binding factor A) protein that was identified as a cold-shock protein and an auxiliary factor acting in the 5′ maturation of the 16S rRNA. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the vascular plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) both encode a single RbfA-like protein in their nuclear genomes. By generating specific antibodies against this protein, we show that the plant RbfA-like protein functions exclusively in the plastid, where it is associated with thylakoid membranes. Analysis of mutants for the corresponding gene (termed RBF1) reveals that the gene function is essential for photoautotrophic growth. Weak mutant alleles display reduced levels of plastid ribosomes, a specific depletion in 30S ribosomal subunits, and reduced activity of plastid protein biosynthesis. Our data suggest that, while the function in ribosome maturation and 16S rRNA 5′ end processing is conserved, the RBF1 protein has assumed an additional role in 3′ end processing. Together with the apparent absence of a homologous protein from plant mitochondria, our findings illustrate that the assembly process of the 70S ribosome is not strictly conserved and has undergone some modifications during organelle evolution. PMID:24214533

  11. Ribosomal protein L3 functions as a ‘rocker switch’ to aid in coordinating of large subunit-associated functions in eukaryotes and Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Meskauskas, Arturas

    2008-01-01

    Although ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) comprise the bulk of the ribosome and carry out its main functions, ribosomal proteins also appear to play important structural and functional roles. Many ribosomal proteins contain long, nonglobular domains that extend deep into the rRNA cores. In eukaryotes and Archaea, ribosomal protein L3 contains two such extended domains tethered to a common globular hub, thus providing an excellent model to address basic questions relating to ribosomal protein structure/function relationships. Previous work in our laboratory identified the central ‘W-finger’ extension of yeast L3 in helping to coordinate ribosomal functions. New studies on the ‘N-terminal’ extension in yeast suggest that it works with the W-finger to coordinate opening and closing of the corridor through which the 3′ end of aa-tRNA moves during the process of accommodation. Additionally, the effect of one of the L3 N-terminal extension mutants on the interaction between C75 of the aa-tRNA and G2921 (Escherichia coli G2553) of 25S rRNA provides the first evidence of the effect of a ribosomal protein on aa-tRNA positioning and peptidyltransfer, possibly through the induced fit model. A model is presented describing how all three domains of L3 may function together as a ‘rocker switch’ to coordinate the stepwise processes of translation elongation. PMID:18832371

  12. Structural insights into ribosome translocation

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Clarence

    2016-01-01

    During protein synthesis, tRNA and mRNA are translocated from the A to P to E sites of the ribosome thus enabling the ribosome to translate one codon of mRNA after the other. Ribosome translocation along mRNA is induced by the universally conserved ribosome GTPase, elongation factor G (EF‐G) in bacteria and elongation factor 2 (EF‐2) in eukaryotes. Recent structural and single‐molecule studies revealed that tRNA and mRNA translocation within the ribosome is accompanied by cyclic forward and reverse rotations between the large and small ribosomal subunits parallel to the plane of the intersubunit interface. In addition, during ribosome translocation, the ‘head’ domain of small ribosomal subunit undergoes forward‐ and back‐swiveling motions relative to the rest of the small ribosomal subunit around the axis that is orthogonal to the axis of intersubunit rotation. tRNA/mRNA translocation is also coupled to the docking of domain IV of EF‐G into the A site of the small ribosomal subunit that converts the thermally driven motions of the ribosome and tRNA into the forward translocation of tRNA/mRNA inside the ribosome. Despite recent and enormous progress made in the understanding of the molecular mechanism of ribosome translocation, the sequence of structural rearrangements of the ribosome, EF‐G and tRNA during translocation is still not fully established and awaits further investigation. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:620–636. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1354 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27117863

  13. Topography of Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins. The order of reactivity of thiol groups*

    PubMed Central

    Bakardjieva, Anastasia; Crichton, Robert R.

    1974-01-01

    1. 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits of Escherichia coli were treated with N-[2,3-14C]-ethylmaleimide and iodo[14C]acetamide. 2. The proteins in the native subunits which reacted with the reagents were S1,‡ S2, S12, S13, S18, S21, L2, L5, L6, L10, L11, L15, L17, L20, L26+28 and L27. 3. Several proteins, such as S1, S12, S14, S18, L2, L6, L10, L11 and either L26 or 28, had thiol groups in an oxidized form and reacted to a greater extent after reduction with β-mercaptoethanol or dithiothreitol. 4. The total number of thiol groups in 30S and 50S subunits was determined as 16–17 and 26–27 respectively. The total number of thiol groups in each ribosomal protein was also determined. 5. The reaction of 30S and 50S subunits with iodoacetamide under several different conditions established the order of reactivity of thiol groups. PMID:4618476

  14. Conformation of yeast 18S rRNA. Direct chemical probing of the 5' domain in ribosomal subunits and in deproteinized RNA by reverse transcriptase mapping of dimethyl sulfate-accessible.

    PubMed Central

    Lempereur, L; Nicoloso, M; Riehl, N; Ehresmann, C; Ehresmann, B; Bachellerie, J P

    1985-01-01

    The structure of the 5' domain of yeast 18S rRNA has been probed by dimethyl sulfate (DMS), either in "native" deproteinized molecules or in the 40S ribosomal subunits. DMS-reacted RNA has been used as a template for reverse transcription and a large number of reactive sites, corresponding to all types of bases have been mapped by a primer extension procedure, taking advantage of blocks in cDNA elongation immediately upstream from bases methylated at atom positions involved in the base-pair recognition of the template. Since the same atom positions are protected from DMS in base-paired nucleotides, the secondary structure status of each nucleotide can be directly assessed in this procedure, thus allowing to evaluate the potential contribution of proteins in modulating subunit rRNA conformation. While the DMS probing of deproteinized rRNA confirms a number of helical stems predicted by phylogenetic comparisons, it is remarkable that a few additional base-pairings, while proven by the comparative analysis, appear to require the presence of the bound ribosomal subunit proteins to be stabilized. Images PMID:2417197

  15. Simulating activity of the bacterial ribosome.

    PubMed

    Trylska, Joanna

    2009-11-01

    Computational modeling studies that investigate activity of the bacterial ribosome were reviewed. Computational approaches became possible with the availability of three-dimensional atomic resolution structures of the ribosomal subunits. However, due to the enormous size of the system, theoretical efforts to study the ribosome are few and challenging. For example, to extend the simulation timescales to biologically relevant ones, often, reduced models that require tedious parameterizations need to be applied. To that end, modeling of the ribosome focused on its internal dynamics, electrostatic properties, inhibition by antibiotics, polypeptide folding in the ribosome tunnel and assembly mechanisms driving the formation of the small ribosomal subunit.

  16. Concentric-Flow Electrokinetic Injector Enables Serial Crystallography of Ribosome and Photosystem-II

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Raymond G.; Gati, Cornelius; Laksmono, Hartawan; Dao, E. Han; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin; Kern, Jan; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Brewster, Aaron S.; Young, Iris D.; Michels-Clark, Tara; Aquila, Andrew; Liang, Mengning; Hunter, Mark S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Boutet, Sébastien; Junco, Elia A.; Hayes, Brandon; Bogan, Michael J.; Hampton, Christina Y.; Puglisi, Elisabetta V.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Stan, Claudiu A.; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Soltis, S. Michael; Puglisi, Joseph D.; DeMirci, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a concentric-flow electrokinetic injector delivered microcrystals of Geobacillus stearothermophilus thermolysin (2.2 Å structure), Thermosynechococcus elongatus photosystem II (< 3 Å diffraction) and Thermus thermophilus small ribosomal subunit (3.4 Å structure). The first ambient-temperature X-ray crystal structure of the 30S subunit bound to the antibiotic paromomycin was obtained in its native mother liquor. Compared to previous cryo-cooled structures, this new structure showed that paromomycin binds to the decoding center in a different conformation. PMID:26619013

  17. Completion of the sequence of the nuclear ribosomal DNA subunit of Simulium sanctipauli, with descriptions of the 18S, 28S genes and the IGS.

    PubMed

    Morales-Hojas, R; Post, R J; Wilson, M D; Cheke, R A

    2002-12-01

    We describe the IGS-ETS, 18S and 28S ribosomal gene sequences of Simulium sanctipauli Vajime & Dunbar, a member of the S. damnosum Theobald (Diptera: Simuliidae) complex of blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae). These regions, together with the ITS-1, ITS-2 and 5.8S rDNA presented elsewhere (accession number U36206), constitute the composite sequence of the entire rDNA unit, making S. sanctipauli the second dipteran species of medical importance for which the entire rDNA has been sequenced. Despite the lack of sequence identity, the IGS of S. sanctipauli showed some structural similarities to other Diptera, i.e. the mosquito Aedes albopictus Skuse (Culicidae), the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Drosophilidae) and the tsetse Glossina (Glossinidae). Two blocks of tandemly repeated subunits were present in the IGS of S. sanctipauli and, unlike other species of Diptera, they contained no duplications of promoter-like sequences. However, two promoter-like sequences were identified in the unique DNA stretches of the IGS by their sequence similarity to the promoter of Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae). The observed sequence variation can be explained, as in the case of Drosophila spp., by the occurrence of slippage-like and point mutation processes, with unequal crossing-over homogenizing (to a certain extent) the region throughout the gene family and blackfly population. The 18S and 28S rDNA genes show more intraspecific variability within the expansion segments than in the core regions. This is also the case in the interspecific comparison of these genes from S. sanctipauli with those of Simulium vittatum, Ae. albopictus and D. melanogaster. This pattern is typical of many eukaryotes and likely to be the result of a more relaxed functional selection in the expansion segments than on the core regions. The A + T content of the S. sanctipauli genes is high and similar to those of other Diptera. This could be the result of a change in the mutation pressure towards

  18. Structures and dynamics of hibernating ribosomes from Staphylococcus aureus mediated by intermolecular interactions of HPF.

    PubMed

    Khusainov, Iskander; Vicens, Quentin; Ayupov, Rustam; Usachev, Konstantin; Myasnikov, Alexander; Simonetti, Angelita; Validov, Shamil; Kieffer, Bruno; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat; Hashem, Yaser

    2017-07-14

    In bacteria, ribosomal hibernation shuts down translation as a response to stress, through reversible binding of stress-induced proteins to ribosomes. This process typically involves the formation of 100S ribosome dimers. Here, we present the structures of hibernating ribosomes from human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus containing a long variant of the hibernation-promoting factor (SaHPF) that we solved using cryo-electron microscopy. Our reconstructions reveal that the N-terminal domain (NTD) of SaHPF binds to the 30S subunit as observed for shorter variants of HPF in other species. The C-terminal domain (CTD) of SaHPF protrudes out of each ribosome in order to mediate dimerization. Using NMR, we characterized the interactions at the CTD-dimer interface. Secondary interactions are provided by helix 26 of the 16S ribosomal RNA We also show that ribosomes in the 100S particle adopt both rotated and unrotated conformations. Overall, our work illustrates a specific mode of ribosome dimerization by long HPF, a finding that may help improve the selectivity of antimicrobials. © 2017 The Authors.

  19. Real-time assembly landscape of bacterial 30S translation initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Milón, Pohl; Maracci, Cristina; Filonava, Liudmila; Gualerzi, Claudio O; Rodnina, Marina V

    2012-05-06

    Initiation factors guide the ribosome in the selection of mRNA and translational reading frame. We determined the kinetically favored assembly pathway of the 30S preinitiation complex (30S PIC), an early intermediate in 30S initiation complex formation in Escherichia coli. IF3 and IF2 are the first factors to arrive, forming an unstable 30S-IF2-IF3 complex. Subsequently, IF1 joins and locks the factors in a kinetically stable 30S PIC to which fMet-tRNA(fMet) is recruited. Binding of mRNA is independent of initiation factors and can take place at any time during 30S PIC assembly, depending on the cellular concentration of the mRNA and the structural determinants at the ribosome-binding site. The kinetic analysis shows both specific and cumulative effects of initiation factors as well as kinetic checkpoints of mRNA selection at the entry into translation.

  20. Crystal structure of the eukaryotic ribosome.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shem, Adam; Jenner, Lasse; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2010-11-26

    Crystal structures of prokaryotic ribosomes have described in detail the universally conserved core of the translation mechanism. However, many facets of the translation process in eukaryotes are not shared with prokaryotes. The crystal structure of the yeast 80S ribosome determined at 4.15 angstrom resolution reveals the higher complexity of eukaryotic ribosomes, which are 40% larger than their bacterial counterparts. Our model shows how eukaryote-specific elements considerably expand the network of interactions within the ribosome and provides insights into eukaryote-specific features of protein synthesis. Our crystals capture the ribosome in the ratcheted state, which is essential for translocation of mRNA and transfer RNA (tRNA), and in which the small ribosomal subunit has rotated with respect to the large subunit. We describe the conformational changes in both ribosomal subunits that are involved in ratcheting and their implications in coordination between the two associated subunits and in mRNA and tRNA translocation.

  1. Discovery of a small molecule that inhibits bacterial ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Jonathan M; Davis, Joseph H; Mangat, Chand S; Williamson, James R; Brown, Eric D

    2014-01-01

    While small molecule inhibitors of the bacterial ribosome have been instrumental in understanding protein translation, no such probes exist to study ribosome biogenesis. We screened a diverse chemical collection that included previously approved drugs for compounds that induced cold sensitive growth inhibition in the model bacterium Escherichia coli. Among the most cold sensitive was lamotrigine, an anticonvulsant drug. Lamotrigine treatment resulted in the rapid accumulation of immature 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits at 15°C. Importantly, this was not the result of translation inhibition, as lamotrigine was incapable of perturbing protein synthesis in vivo or in vitro. Spontaneous suppressor mutations blocking lamotrigine activity mapped solely to the poorly characterized domain II of translation initiation factor IF2 and prevented the binding of lamotrigine to IF2 in vitro. This work establishes lamotrigine as a widely available chemical probe of bacterial ribosome biogenesis and suggests a role for E. coli IF2 in ribosome assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03574.001 PMID:25233066

  2. Steric interactions lead to collective tilting motion in the ribosome during mRNA-tRNA translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Kien; Whitford, Paul C.

    2016-02-01

    Translocation of mRNA and tRNA through the ribosome is associated with large-scale rearrangements of the head domain in the 30S ribosomal subunit. To elucidate the relationship between 30S head dynamics and mRNA-tRNA displacement, we apply molecular dynamics simulations using an all-atom structure-based model. Here we provide a statistical analysis of 250 spontaneous transitions between the A/P-P/E and P/P-E/E ensembles. Consistent with structural studies, the ribosome samples a chimeric ap/P-pe/E intermediate, where the 30S head is rotated ~18°. It then transiently populates a previously unreported intermediate ensemble, which is characterized by a ~10° tilt of the head. To identify the origins of head tilting, we analyse 781 additional simulations in which specific steric features are perturbed. These calculations show that head tilting may be attributed to specific steric interactions between tRNA and the 30S subunit (PE loop and protein S13). Taken together, this study demonstrates how molecular structure can give rise to large-scale collective rearrangements.

  3. Steric interactions lead to collective tilting motion in the ribosome during mRNA–tRNA translocation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kien; Whitford, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Translocation of mRNA and tRNA through the ribosome is associated with large-scale rearrangements of the head domain in the 30S ribosomal subunit. To elucidate the relationship between 30S head dynamics and mRNA–tRNA displacement, we apply molecular dynamics simulations using an all-atom structure-based model. Here we provide a statistical analysis of 250 spontaneous transitions between the A/P–P/E and P/P–E/E ensembles. Consistent with structural studies, the ribosome samples a chimeric ap/P–pe/E intermediate, where the 30S head is rotated ∼18°. It then transiently populates a previously unreported intermediate ensemble, which is characterized by a ∼10° tilt of the head. To identify the origins of head tilting, we analyse 781 additional simulations in which specific steric features are perturbed. These calculations show that head tilting may be attributed to specific steric interactions between tRNA and the 30S subunit (PE loop and protein S13). Taken together, this study demonstrates how molecular structure can give rise to large-scale collective rearrangements. PMID:26838673

  4. Structural basis for the rescue of stalled ribosomes: structure of YaeJ bound to the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Matthieu G; Seetharaman, Sai V; Bulkley, David; Steitz, Thomas A

    2012-03-16

    In bacteria, the hybrid transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) rescues ribosomes stalled on defective messenger RNAs (mRNAs). However, certain gram-negative bacteria have evolved proteins that are capable of rescuing stalled ribosomes in a tmRNA-independent manner. Here, we report a 3.2 angstrom-resolution crystal structure of the rescue factor YaeJ bound to the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome in complex with the initiator tRNA(i)(fMet) and a short mRNA. The structure reveals that the C-terminal tail of YaeJ functions as a sensor to discriminate between stalled and actively translating ribosomes by binding in the mRNA entry channel downstream of the A site between the head and shoulder of the 30S subunit. This allows the N-terminal globular domain to sample different conformations, so that its conserved GGQ motif is optimally positioned to catalyze the hydrolysis of peptidyl-tRNA. This structure gives insights into the mechanism of YaeJ function and provides a basis for understanding how it rescues stalled ribosomes.

  5. Structural Basis for the Rescue of Stalled Ribosomes: Structure of YaeJ Bound to the Ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, Matthieu G.; Seetharaman, Sai V.; Bulkley, David; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2012-06-19

    In bacteria, the hybrid transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) rescues ribosomes stalled on defective messenger RNAs (mRNAs). However, certain gram-negative bacteria have evolved proteins that are capable of rescuing stalled ribosomes in a tmRNA-independent manner. Here, we report a 3.2 angstrom-resolution crystal structure of the rescue factor YaeJ bound to the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome in complex with the initiator tRNA{sub i}{sup fMet} and a short mRNA. The structure reveals that the C-terminal tail of YaeJ functions as a sensor to discriminate between stalled and actively translating ribosomes by binding in the mRNA entry channel downstream of the A site between the head and shoulder of the 30S subunit. This allows the N-terminal globular domain to sample different conformations, so that its conserved GGQ motif is optimally positioned to catalyze the hydrolysis of peptidyl-tRNA. This structure gives insights into the mechanism of YaeJ function and provides a basis for understanding how it rescues stalled ribosomes.

  6. The path of messenger RNA through the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Yusupova, G Z; Yusupov, M M; Cate, J H; Noller, H F

    2001-07-27

    Using X-ray crystallography, we have directly observed the path of mRNA in the 70S ribosome in Fourier difference maps at 7 A resolution. About 30 nucleotides of the mRNA are wrapped in a groove that encircles the neck of the 30S subunit. The Shine-Dalgarno helix is bound in a large cleft between the head and the back of the platform. At the interface, only about eight nucleotides (-1 to +7), centered on the junction between the A and P codons, are exposed, and bond almost exclusively to 16S rRNA. The mRNA enters the ribosome around position +13 to +15, the location of downstream pseudoknots that stimulate -1 translational frame shifting.

  7. Structural Basis for Translation Termination on the 70S Ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Laurberg, M.; Asahara, H.; Korostelev, A.; Zhu, J.; Trakhanov, S.; Noller, H.F.

    2009-05-20

    At termination of protein synthesis, type I release factors promote hydrolysis of the peptidyl-transfer RNA linkage in response to recognition of a stop codon. Here we describe the crystal structure of the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome in complex with the release factor RF1, tRNA and a messenger RNA containing a UAA stop codon, at 3.2 {angstrom} resolution. The stop codon is recognized in a pocket formed by conserved elements of RF1, including its PxT recognition motif, and 16S ribosomal RNA. The codon and the 30S subunit A site undergo an induced fit that results in stabilization of a conformation of RF1 that promotes its interaction with the peptidyl transferase centre. Unexpectedly, the main-chain amide group of Gln 230 in the universally conserved GGQ motif of the factor is positioned to contribute directly to peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis.

  8. Toxocara canis and Toxocara vitulorum: molecular characterization, discrimination, and phylogenetic analysis based on mitochondrial (ATP synthase subunit 6 and 12S) and nuclear ribosomal (ITS-2 and 28S) genes.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, Susiji; Yatawara, Lalani; Rajapakse, R P V J; Agatsuma, Takeshi

    2009-06-01

    Toxocara canis and Toxocara vitulorum are two important parasites of dogs and buffaloes with public health concern. The objectives of the present study are to identify molecular markers to discriminate these closely related parasites and to determine their phylogenetic position and genetic diversity within the genus Toxocara. Thus, two mitochondrial genes (complete ATPase 6 and partial small subunit ribosomal RNA (12S rDNA)), two nuclear ribosomal genes (second internal transcribed spacer region (ITS-2)), and part of the large subunit 28S region were analyzed. Nucleotide sequence (597 bp) and predicted amino acid sequences of the complete ATPase 6 gene (199 amino acids) of both species (T. canis and T. vitulorum) are similar in size with the Toxocara cati and Toxocara malaysiensis. There was 88% nucleotide similarity between T. canis and T. vitulorum and many transversions present in the 12S gene. Analyses of the ITS-2 and 28S regions revealed that the 28S region was more conserved (95% nucleotide similarity between T. canis and T. vitulorum) than the ITS-2 region (85%). This study has provided useful molecular markers for the molecular epidemiological investigation of Toxocara species. Further, phylogenetic analyses of the ITS-2 and 28S genes have indicated that the members of the genus Toxocara form a distinct group with reference to their definitive hosts.

  9. The interaction between human initiation factor eIF3 subunit c and heat-shock protein 90: a necessary factor for translation mediated by the hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site.

    PubMed

    Ujino, Saneyuki; Nishitsuji, Hironori; Sugiyama, Ryuichi; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Hishiki, Takayuki; Sugiyama, Kazuo; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone that plays a key role in the conformational maturation of various transcription factors and protein kinases in signal transduction. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNA drives translation by directly recruiting the 40S ribosomal subunits that bind to eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3). Our data indicate that Hsp90 binds indirectly to eIF3 subunit c by interacting with it through the HCV IRES RNA, and the functional consequence of this Hsp90-eIF3c-HCV-IRES RNA interaction is the prevention of ubiquitination and the proteasome-dependent degradation of eIF3c. Hsp90 activity interference by Hsp90 inhibitors appears to be the result of the dissociation of eIF3c from Hsp90 in the presence of HCV IRES RNA and the resultant induction of the degradation of the free forms of eIF3c. Moreover, the interaction between Hsp90 and eIF3c is dependent on HCV IRES RNA binding. Furthermore, we demonstrate, by knockdown of eIF3c, that the silencing of eIF3c results in inhibitory effects on translation of HCV-derived RNA but does not affect cap-dependent translation. These results indicate that the interaction between Hsp90 and eIF3c may play an important role in HCV IRES-mediated translation.

  10. Mutant DnaK chaperones cause ribosome assembly defects in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Alix, J H; Guérin, M F

    1993-01-01

    To determine whether the biogenesis of ribosomes in Escherichia coli is the result of the self-assembly of their different constituents or involves the participation of additional factors, we have studied the influence of a chaperone, the product of the gene dnaK, on ribosome assembly in vivo. Using three thermosensitive (ts) mutants carrying the mutations dnaK756-ts, dnaK25-ts, and dnaK103-ts, we have observed the accumulation at nonpermissive temperature (45 degrees C) of ribosomal particles with different sedimentation constants--namely, 45S, 35S, and 25S along with the normal 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits. This is the result of a defect not in thermostability but in ribosome assembly at the nonpermissive temperature. These abnormal ribosomal particles are rescued if the mutant cells are returned to 30 degrees C. Thus, the product of the dnaK gene is implicated in ribosome biogenesis at high temperature. PMID:8105482

  11. Reconstitution of functional eukaryotic ribosomes from Dictyostelium discoideum ribosomal proteins and RNA.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Chiaberge, S

    1997-08-08

    40 and 60 S ribosomal subunits have been reconstituted in vitro from purified ribosomal RNA and ribosomal proteins of Dictyostelium discoideum. The functionality of the reconstituted ribosomes was demonstrated in in vitro mRNA-directed protein synthesis. The reassembly proceeded well with immature precursors of ribosomal RNA but poorly if at all with mature cytoplasmic RNA species. Reassembly also required a preparation of small nuclear RNA(s), acting as morphopoietic factor(s).

  12. Role of Protein L25 and Its Contact with Protein L16 in Maintaining the Active State of Escherichia coli Ribosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Anikaev, A Y; Isaev, A B; Korobeinikova, A V; Garber, M B; Gongadze, G M

    2016-01-01

    A ribosomal protein of the L25 family specifically binding to 5S rRNA is an evolutionary feature of bacteria. Structural studies showed that within the ribosome this protein contacts not only 5S rRNA, but also the C-terminal region of protein L16. Earlier we demonstrated that ribosomes from the ΔL25 strain of Escherichia coli have reduced functional activity. In the present work, it is established that the reason for this is a fraction of functionally inactive 50S ribosomal subunits. These subunits have a deficit of protein L16 and associate very weakly with 30S subunits. To study the role of the contact of these two proteins in the formation of the active ribosome, we created a number of E. coli strains containing protein L16 with changes in its C-terminal region. We found that some mutations (K133L or K127L/K133L) in this protein lead to a noticeable slowing of cell growth and decrease in the activity of their translational apparatus. As in the case of the ribosomes from the ΔL25 strain, the fraction of 50S subunits, which are deficient in protein L16, is present in the ribosomes of the mutant strains. All these data indicate that the contact with protein L25 is important for the retention of protein L16 within the E. coli ribosome in vivo. In the light of these findings, the role of the protein of the L25 family in maintaining the active state of the bacterial ribosome is discussed.

  13. Structural characterization of an alternative mode of tigecycline binding to the bacterial ribosome.

    PubMed

    Schedlbauer, Andreas; Kaminishi, Tatsuya; Ochoa-Lizarralde, Borja; Dhimole, Neha; Zhou, Shu; López-Alonso, Jorge P; Connell, Sean R; Fucini, Paola

    2015-05-01

    Although both tetracycline and tigecycline inhibit protein synthesis by sterically hindering the binding of tRNA to the ribosomal A site, tigecycline shows increased efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo activity assays and escapes the most common resistance mechanisms associated with the tetracycline class of antibiotics. These differences in activities are attributed to the tert-butyl-glycylamido side chain found in tigecycline. Our structural analysis by X-ray crystallography shows that tigecycline binds the bacterial 30S ribosomal subunit with its tail in an extended conformation and makes extensive interactions with the 16S rRNA nucleotide C1054. These interactions restrict the mobility of C1054 and contribute to the antimicrobial activity of tigecycline, including its resistance to the ribosomal protection proteins. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Identification of Novel RNA-Protein Contact in Complex of Ribosomal Protein S7 and 3’-Terminal Fragment of 16S rRNA in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Golovin, A.V.; Khayrullina, G.A.; Kraal, B.; Kopylov, А.М.

    2012-01-01

    For prokaryotes in vitro, 16S rRNA and 20 ribosomal proteins are capable of hierarchical self- assembly yielding a 30S ribosomal subunit. The self-assembly is initiated by interactions between 16S rRNA and three key ribosomal proteins: S4, S8, and S7. These proteins also have a regulatory function in the translation of their polycistronic operons recognizing a specific region of mRNA. Therefore, studying the RNA–protein interactions within binary complexes is obligatory for understanding ribosome biogenesis. The non-conventional RNA–protein contact within the binary complex of recombinant ribosomal protein S7 and its 16S rRNA binding site (236 nucleotides) was identified. UV–induced RNA–protein cross-links revealed that S7 cross-links to nucleotide U1321 of 16S rRNA. The careful consideration of the published RNA– protein cross-links for protein S7 within the 30S subunit and their correlation with the X-ray data for the 30S subunit have been performed. The RNA – protein cross–link within the binary complex identified in this study is not the same as the previously found cross-links for a subunit both in a solution, and in acrystal. The structure of the binary RNA–protein complex formed at the initial steps of self-assembly of the small subunit appears to be rearranged during the formation of the final structure of the subunit. PMID:23346381

  15. Powering through ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Strunk, Bethany S.; Karbstein, Katrin

    2009-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is required for cell growth in all organisms. Classic in vitro work in bacteria has led to a detailed understanding of the biophysical, thermodynamic, and structural basis for the ordered and correct assembly of ribosomal proteins on ribosomal RNA. Furthermore, it has enabled reconstitution of active subunits from ribosomal RNA and proteins in vitro. Nevertheless, recent work has shown that eukaryotic ribosome assembly requires a large macromolecular machinery in vivo. Many of these assembly factors such as ATPases, GTPases, and kinases hydrolyze nucleotide triphosphates. Because these enzymes are likely regulatory proteins, much work to date has focused on understanding their role in the assembly process. Here, we review these factors, as well as other sources of energy, and their roles in the ribosome assembly process. In addition, we propose roles of energy-releasing enzymes in the assembly process, to explain why energy is used for a process that occurs largely spontaneously in bacteria. Finally, we use literature data to suggest testable models for how these enzymes could be used as targets for regulation of ribosome assembly. PMID:19850913

  16. Probing the structure of 16 S ribosomal RNA from Bacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Kop, J; Kopylov, A M; Magrum, L; Siegel, R; Gupta, R; Woese, C R; Noller, H F

    1984-12-25

    A majority (approximately 89%) of the nucleotide sequence of Bacillus brevis 16 S rRNA has been determined by a combination of RNA sequencing methods. Several experimental approaches have been used to probe its structure, including (a) partial RNase digestion of 30 S ribosomal subunits, followed by two-dimensional native/denatured gel electrophoresis, in which base-paired fragments were directly identified; (b) identification of positions susceptible to cleavage by RNase A and RNase T1 in 30 S subunits; (c) sites of attack by cobra venom RNase on naked 16 S rRNA; and (d) nucleotides susceptible to attack by bisulfite in 16 S rRNA. These data are discussed with respect to a secondary structure model for B. brevis 16 S rRNA derived by comparative sequence analysis.

  17. Conserved Bacterial RNase YbeY Plays Key Roles in 70S Ribosome Quality Control and 16S rRNA Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Asha Ivy; Köhrer, Caroline; Davies, Bryan William; RajBhandary, Uttam Lal; Walker, Graham Charles

    2012-01-01

    Quality control of ribosomes is critical for cellular function since protein mistranslation leads to severe physiological consequences. We report the first evidence of a ribosome quality control system in bacteria that operates at the level of 70S to remove defective ribosomes. YbeY, a previously unidentified endoribonuclease, and the exonuclease RNase R act together by a process mediated specifically by the 30S ribosomal subunit, to degrade defective 70S ribosomes but not properly matured 70S ribosomes or individual subunits. Furthermore, there is essentially no fully matured 16S rRNA in a ΔybeY mutant at 45°C, making YbeY the first endoribonuclease to be implicated in the critically important processing of the 16S rRNA 3' terminus. These key roles in ribosome quality control and maturation indicate why YbeY is a member of the minimal bacterial gene set and suggest that it could be a potential target for antibacterial drugs. PMID:23273979

  18. Yeast eIF4B binds to the head of the 40S ribosomal subunit and promotes mRNA recruitment through its N-terminal and internal repeat domains

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Sarah E.; Zhou, Fujun; Mitchell, Sarah F.; Larson, Victoria S.; Valasek, Leos; Hinnebusch, Alan G.; Lorsch, Jon R.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF)4B stimulates recruitment of mRNA to the 43S ribosomal pre-initiation complex (PIC). Yeast eIF4B (yeIF4B), shown previously to bind single-stranded (ss) RNA, consists of an N-terminal domain (NTD), predicted to be unstructured in solution; an RNA-recognition motif (RRM); an unusual domain comprised of seven imperfect repeats of 26 amino acids; and a C-terminal domain. Although the mechanism of yeIF4B action has remained obscure, most models have suggested central roles for its RRM and ssRNA-binding activity. We have dissected the functions of yeIF4B’s domains and show that the RRM and its ssRNA-binding activity are dispensable in vitro and in vivo. Instead, our data indicate that the 7-repeats and NTD are the most critical domains, which mediate binding of yeIF4B to the head of the 40S ribosomal subunit via interaction with Rps20. This interaction induces structural changes in the ribosome’s mRNA entry channel that could facilitate mRNA loading. We also show that yeIF4B strongly promotes productive interaction of eIF4A with the 43S•mRNA PIC in a manner required for efficient mRNA recruitment. PMID:23236192

  19. The nucleolar protein Nop19p interacts preferentially with Utp25p and Dhr2p and is essential for the production of the 40S ribosomal subunit in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Choque, Elodie; Marcellin, Marlène; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotes, ribosome biogenesis is a process of major interest that requires more than 200 factors acting coordinately in time and space. Using genetic and proteomic studies, most of the components have now been identified. Based on its nucleolar localization, we characterized the protein encoded by the open reading frame YGR251W, we renamed Nop19p as playing an essential role in ribosome biogenesis. Depletion of the Nop19p in yeast impairs pre-rRNA processing at sites A0, A1 and A2, leading to a strong decrease in 18S rRNA and 40S subunit levels. Nop19p is a component of 90S preribosomes which assembly is believed to result from stepwise incorporation of UTP modules. We show that Nop19p depletion does not impair the incorporation of UTP subcomplexes on preribosomes and conversely that depletion of UTP subcomplexes does not affect Nop19p recruitment on 90S preribosomes. TAP experiments under stringent conditions revealed that Nop19p interacts preferentially with the DEAH-box RNA helicase Dhr2p and Utp25p, both required for A0, A1 and A2 cleavages. Nop19p appeared essential for the incorporation of Utp25p in preribosomes. In addition, our results suggest that in absence of Nop19p, Dhr2p remains trapped within aberrant preribosomes. PMID:21941128

  20. Preparation and proteomic analysis of chloroplast ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kenichi

    2011-01-01

    Proteomics of chloroplast ribosomes in spinach and Chlamydomonas revealed unique protein composition and structures of plastid ribosomes. These studies have suggested the presence of some ribosomal proteins unique to plastid ribosomes which may be involved in plastid-unique translation regulation. Considering the strong background of genetic analysis and molecular biology in Arabidopsis, the in-depth proteomic characterization of Arabidopsis plastid ribosomes would facilitate further understanding of plastid translation in higher plants. Here, I describe simple and rapid methods for the preparation of plastid ribosomes from Chlamydomonas and Arabidopsis using sucrose gradients. I also describe purity criteria and methods for yield estimation of the purified plastid ribosomes and subunits, methods for the preparation of plastid ribosomal proteins, as well as the identification of some Arabidopsis plastid ribosomal proteins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

  1. Massively convergent evolution for ribosomal protein gene content in plastid and mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Maier, Uwe-G; Zauner, Stefan; Woehle, Christian; Bolte, Kathrin; Hempel, Franziska; Allen, John F; Martin, William F

    2013-01-01

    Plastid and mitochondrial genomes have undergone parallel evolution to encode the same functional set of genes. These encode conserved protein components of the electron transport chain in their respective bioenergetic membranes and genes for the ribosomes that express them. This highly convergent aspect of organelle genome evolution is partly explained by the redox regulation hypothesis, which predicts a separate plastid or mitochondrial location for genes encoding bioenergetic membrane proteins of either photosynthesis or respiration. Here we show that convergence in organelle genome evolution is far stronger than previously recognized, because the same set of genes for ribosomal proteins is independently retained by both plastid and mitochondrial genomes. A hitherto unrecognized selective pressure retains genes for the same ribosomal proteins in both organelles. On the Escherichia coli ribosome assembly map, the retained proteins are implicated in 30S and 50S ribosomal subunit assembly and initial rRNA binding. We suggest that ribosomal assembly imposes functional constraints that govern the retention of ribosomal protein coding genes in organelles. These constraints are subordinate to redox regulation for electron transport chain components, which anchor the ribosome to the organelle genome in the first place. As organelle genomes undergo reduction, the rRNAs also become smaller. Below size thresholds of approximately 1,300 nucleotides (16S rRNA) and 2,100 nucleotides (26S rRNA), all ribosomal protein coding genes are lost from organelles, while electron transport chain components remain organelle encoded as long as the organelles use redox chemistry to generate a proton motive force.

  2. Massively Convergent Evolution for Ribosomal Protein Gene Content in Plastid and Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Uwe-G; Zauner, Stefan; Woehle, Christian; Bolte, Kathrin; Hempel, Franziska; Allen, John F.; Martin, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Plastid and mitochondrial genomes have undergone parallel evolution to encode the same functional set of genes. These encode conserved protein components of the electron transport chain in their respective bioenergetic membranes and genes for the ribosomes that express them. This highly convergent aspect of organelle genome evolution is partly explained by the redox regulation hypothesis, which predicts a separate plastid or mitochondrial location for genes encoding bioenergetic membrane proteins of either photosynthesis or respiration. Here we show that convergence in organelle genome evolution is far stronger than previously recognized, because the same set of genes for ribosomal proteins is independently retained by both plastid and mitochondrial genomes. A hitherto unrecognized selective pressure retains genes for the same ribosomal proteins in both organelles. On the Escherichia coli ribosome assembly map, the retained proteins are implicated in 30S and 50S ribosomal subunit assembly and initial rRNA binding. We suggest that ribosomal assembly imposes functional constraints that govern the retention of ribosomal protein coding genes in organelles. These constraints are subordinate to redox regulation for electron transport chain components, which anchor the ribosome to the organelle genome in the first place. As organelle genomes undergo reduction, the rRNAs also become smaller. Below size thresholds of approximately 1,300 nucleotides (16S rRNA) and 2,100 nucleotides (26S rRNA), all ribosomal protein coding genes are lost from organelles, while electron transport chain components remain organelle encoded as long as the organelles use redox chemistry to generate a proton motive force. PMID:24259312

  3. Evolutionarily Conserved Function of RRP36 in Early Cleavages of the Pre-rRNA and Production of the 40S Ribosomal Subunit ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gérus, Marie; Bonnart, Chrystelle; Caizergues-Ferrer, Michèle; Henry, Yves; Henras, Anthony K.

    2010-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis in eukaryotes is a major cellular activity mobilizing the products of over 200 transcriptionally coregulated genes referred to as the rRNA and ribosome biosynthesis regulon. We investigated the function of an essential, uncharacterized gene of this regulon, renamed RRP36. We show that the Rrp36p protein is nucleolar and interacts with 90S and pre-40S preribosomal particles. Its depletion affects early cleavages of the 35S pre-rRNA and results in a rapid decrease in mature 18S rRNA levels. Rrp36p is a novel component of the 90S preribosome, the assembly of which has been suggested to result from the stepwise incorporation of several modules, including the tUTP/UTP-A, PWP2/UTP-B, and UTP-C subcomplexes. We show that Rrp36p depletion does not impair the incorporation of these subcomplexes and the U3 small nucleolar RNP into preribosomes. In contrast, depletion of components of the UTP-A or UTP-B modules, but not Rrp5p, prevents Rrp36p recruitment and reduces its accumulation levels. In parallel, we studied the human orthologue of Rrp36p in HeLa cells, and we show that the function of this protein in early cleavages of the pre-rRNA has been conserved through evolution in eukaryotes. PMID:20038530

  4. The phosphorylation of protein S6 modulates the interaction of the 40 S ribosomal subunit with the 5'-untranslated region of a dictyostelium pre-spore-specific mRNA and controls its stability.

    PubMed

    Chiaberge, S; Cassarino, E; Mangiarotti, G

    1998-10-16

    AC914 mRNA, a pre-spore-specific mRNA that accumulates only in the post-aggregation stage of development, is transcribed constitutively as shown by nuclear run-off experiments and by fusing its promoter to the luciferase reporter gene. The same mRNA disappears quickly from disaggregated cells. If the 5'-untranslated region (5'UTR) of the constitutively expressed Actin 15 mRNA is substituted for the 5'UTR of AC914 mRNA, this can no longer be destabilized and accumulates both in growing and disaggregated cells. If the 5'UTR of AC914 mRNA is substituted for the 5'UTR of Actin 15 mRNA, the latter accumulates only in aggregated cells. Pactamycin, but not other inhibitors of protein synthesis, prevents AC914 mRNA from being destabilized in disaggregated cells, suggesting a role of 40 S subunits in the destabilization. This has been confirmed by using an in vitro system in which the in vivo stability of different mRNAs is reproduced. A protein kinase A-dependent phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 determines whether 40 S subunits are capable or not of destabilizing AC914 mRNA in the in vitro system.

  5. Direct Interaction of the N-Terminal Domain of Ribosomal Protein S1 with Protein S2 in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Byrgazov, Konstantin; Manoharadas, Salim; Kaberdina, Anna C.; Vesper, Oliver; Moll, Isabella

    2012-01-01

    Despite of the high resolution structure available for the E. coli ribosome, hitherto the structure and localization of the essential ribosomal protein S1 on the 30 S subunit still remains to be elucidated. It was previously reported that protein S1 binds to the ribosome via protein-protein interaction at the two N-terminal domains. Moreover, protein S2 was shown to be required for binding of protein S1 to the ribosome. Here, we present evidence that the N-terminal domain of S1 (amino acids 1–106; S1106) is necessary and sufficient for the interaction with protein S2 as well as for ribosome binding. We show that over production of protein S1106 affects E. coli growth by displacing native protein S1 from its binding pocket on the ribosome. In addition, our data reveal that the coiled-coil domain of protein S2 (S2α2) is sufficient to allow protein S1 to bind to the ribosome. Taken together, these data uncover the crucial elements required for the S1/S2 interaction, which is pivotal for translation initiation on canonical mRNAs in Gram-negative bacteria. The results are discussed in terms of a model wherein the S1/S2 interaction surface could represent a possible target to modulate the selectivity of the translational machinery and thereby alter the translational program under distinct conditions. PMID:22412910

  6. Role of GTPases in bacterial ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Britton, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    The assembly of the ribosome, a complex molecular machine composed of RNA and protein, is a poorly understood process. Recent work has demonstrated that GTPases are likely to play key roles in the assembly of ribosomes in bacteria and eukaryotes. This review highlights several bacterial ribosome assembly GTPases (RA-GTPases) and discusses possible functions for these proteins in the biogenesis of individual ribosomal subunits and subunit joining. RA-GTPases appear to link various aspects of the cell cycle and metabolism with translation. How these RA-GTPases may coordinate these connections are discussed.

  7. Dissociation of eIF1 from the 40S ribosomal subunit is a key step in start codon selection in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Yuen-Nei; Maag, David; Mitchell, Sarah F.; Fekete, Christie A.; Algire, Mikkel A.; Takacs, Julie E.; Shirokikh, Nikolay; Pestova, Tatyana; Lorsch, Jon R.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2007-01-01

    Selection of the AUG start codon is a key step in translation initiation requiring hydrolysis of GTP in the eIF2•GTP•Met-tRNAiMet ternary complex (TC) and subsequent Pi release from eIF2•GDP•Pi. It is thought that eIF1 prevents recognition of non-AUGs by promoting scanning and blocking Pi release at non-AUG codons. We show that Sui− mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae eIF1, which increase initiation at UUG codons, reduce interaction of eIF1 with 40S subunits in vitro and in vivo, and both defects are diminished in cells by overexpressing the mutant proteins. Remarkably, Sui− mutation ISQLG93–97ASQAA (abbreviated 93–97) accelerates eIF1 dissociation and Pi release from reconstituted preinitiation complexes (PICs), whereas a hyperaccuracy mutation in eIF1A (that suppresses Sui− mutations) decreases the eIF1 off-rate. These findings demonstrate that eIF1 dissociation is a critical step in start codon selection, which is modulated by eIF1A. We also describe Gcd− mutations in eIF1 that impair TC loading on 40S subunits or destabilize the multifactor complex containing eIF1, eIF3, eIF5, and TC, showing that eIF1 promotes PIC assembly in vivo beyond its important functions in AUG selection. PMID:17504939

  8. Discovery of a Katablepharis sp. in the Columbia River estuary that is abundant during the spring and bears a unique large ribosomal subunit sequence element

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Peter; Herfort, Lydie; Peterson, Tawnya D; Zuber, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrophic protists play significant roles in pelagic food webs as bacterivorous and herbivorous consumers. However, heterotrophic protists—unlike autotrophic ones—are often difficult to track since they tend to lack features such as photosynthetic pigments that allow for remote sensing or for bulk characterization. Difficulty in the identification of heterotrophic protists has often resulted in lumping them into broad groups, but there is a strong need to develop methods that increase the spatial and temporal resolution of observations applied to particular organisms in order to discover the drivers of population structure and ecological function. In surveys of small subunit rRNA, gene (SSU) sequences of microbial eukaryotes from the Columbia River to the Pacific Ocean, the heterotrophic flagellate Katablepharis sp. were found to dominate protist assemblages (including autotrophic and heterotrophic fractions) in the spring, prior to the freshet. We discovered a 332 base pair unique sequence element (USE) insertion in the large subunit rRNA gene (28S) that is not present in other katablepharids or in any other eukaryote. Using this USE, we were able to detect Katablepharis within mixed assemblages in river, estuarine, and oceanic samples and determine spatial and temporal patterns in absolute abundance through quantitative PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Given their high abundance and repeatable temporal patterns of occurrence, we hypothesize that the Columbia River Estuary Katablepharis (Katablepharis CRE) plays an important role in estuarine biogeochemical and ecosystem function. PMID:25168204

  9. Amebic colitis in an antigenically and serologically negative patient: usefulness of a small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene-based polymerase chain reaction in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Solaymani-Mohammadi, Shahram; Coyle, Christina M; Factor, Stephen M; Petri, William A

    2008-11-01

    Specific identification of Entamoeba histolytica in clinical specimens is an essential confirmatory diagnostic step in the management of amebiasis. Here, we report an unusual case of amebic colitis in a 20-year-old female immigrant from South China. The patient had experienced diarrhea, crampy abdominal pain, and fever for approximately 3 weeks prior to admission to hospital and had treated herself at home with metronidazole. On admission, stool microscopy and serology for E. histolytica were negative. Because the clinical findings raised the suspicion of Clostridium difficile fulminant colitis, she underwent a subtotal colectomy. Histopathology revealed flask-shaped ulcers characteristic of amebic colitis. Consequently, E. histolytica DNA was detected by a sensitive small-subunit rRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from feces, and the patient was successfully treated for amebiasis with metronidazole. This case exemplifies the relative insensitivity of serologic tests for the diagnosis of intestinal amebiasis and the difficulties encountered in detecting the parasite antigen in a patient partially treated with metronidazole. We conclude that when the possibility of invasive intestinal amebiasis is suspected, detecting the parasite DNA directly in the stool sample by PCR using E. histolytica-specific primers may be an alternative, noninvasive, and reliable tool for the specific diagnosis of the disease.

  10. Metaxa: a software tool for automated detection and discrimination among ribosomal small subunit (12S/16S/18S) sequences of archaea, bacteria, eukaryotes, mitochondria, and chloroplasts in metagenomes and environmental sequencing datasets.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Johan; Eriksson, K Martin; Hartmann, Martin; Wang, Zheng; Shenoy, Belle Damodara; Grelet, Gwen-Aëlle; Abarenkov, Kessy; Petri, Anna; Rosenblad, Magnus Alm; Nilsson, R Henrik

    2011-10-01

    The ribosomal small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene has emerged as an important genetic marker for taxonomic identification in environmental sequencing datasets. In addition to being present in the nucleus of eukaryotes and the core genome of prokaryotes, the gene is also found in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and in the chloroplasts of photosynthetic eukaryotes. These three sets of genes are conceptually paralogous and should in most situations not be aligned and analyzed jointly. To identify the origin of SSU sequences in complex sequence datasets has hitherto been a time-consuming and largely manual undertaking. However, the present study introduces Metaxa ( http://microbiology.se/software/metaxa/ ), an automated software tool to extract full-length and partial SSU sequences from larger sequence datasets and assign them to an archaeal, bacterial, nuclear eukaryote, mitochondrial, or chloroplast origin. Using data from reference databases and from full-length organelle and organism genomes, we show that Metaxa detects and scores SSU sequences for origin with very low proportions of false positives and negatives. We believe that this tool will be useful in microbial and evolutionary ecology as well as in metagenomics.

  11. Structure of ERA in Complex with the 3 End of 16s rRNBA Implications for Ribosome Biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, C.; Zhou, X; Tropea, J; Austin, B; Waugh, D; Court, D; Ji, X

    2009-01-01

    ERA, composed of an N-terminal GTPase domain followed by an RNA-binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal subunit. However, its RNA-binding site, the functional relationship between the two domains, and its role in ribosome biogenesis remain unclear. We have determined two crystal structures of ERA, a binary complex with GDP and a ternary complex with a GTP-analog and the 1531AUCACCUCCUUA1542 sequence at the 3? end of 16S rRNA. In the ternary complex, the first nine of the 12 nucleotides are recognized by the protein. We show that GTP binding is a prerequisite for RNA recognition by ERA and that RNA recognition stimulates its GTP-hydrolyzing activity. Based on these and other data, we propose a functional cycle of ERA, suggesting that the protein serves as a chaperone for processing and maturation of 16S rRNA and a checkpoint for assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The AUCA sequence is highly conserved among bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, whereas the CCUCC, known as the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence, is conserved in noneukaryotes only. Therefore, these data suggest a common mechanism for a highly conserved ERA function in all three kingdoms of life by recognizing the AUCA, with a 'twist' for noneukaryotic ERA proteins by also recognizing the CCUCC.

  12. Structure of ERA in complex with the 3′ end of 16S rRNA: Implications for ribosome biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Chao; Zhou, Xiaomei; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Waugh, David S.; Court, Donald L.; Ji, Xinhua

    2009-10-09

    ERA, composed of an N-terminal GTPase domain followed by an RNA-binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal subunit. However, its RNA-binding site, the functional relationship between the two domains, and its role in ribosome biogenesis remain unclear. We have determined two crystal structures of ERA, a binary complex with GDP and a ternary complex with a GTP-analog and the {sub 1531}AUCACCUCCUUA{sub 1542} sequence at the 3' end of 16S rRNA. In the ternary complex, the first nine of the 12 nucleotides are recognized by the protein. We show that GTP binding is a prerequisite for RNA recognition by ERA and that RNA recognition stimulates its GTP-hydrolyzing activity. Based on these and other data, we propose a functional cycle of ERA, suggesting that the protein serves as a chaperone for processing and maturation of 16S rRNA and a checkpoint for assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The AUCA sequence is highly conserved among bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, whereas the CCUCC, known as the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence, is conserved in noneukaryotes only. Therefore, these data suggest a common mechanism for a highly conserved ERA function in all three kingdoms of life by recognizing the AUCA, with a 'twist' for noneukaryotic ERA proteins by also recognizing the CCUCC.

  13. Lack of WDR36 leads to preimplantation embryonic lethality in mice and delays the formation of small subunit ribosomal RNA in human cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gallenberger, Martin; Meinel, Dominik M; Kroeber, Markus; Wegner, Michael; Milkereit, Philipp; Bösl, Michael R; Tamm, Ernst R

    2011-02-01

    Mutations in WD repeat domain 36 gene (WDR36) play a causative role in some forms of primary open-angle glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness worldwide. WDR36 is characterized by the presence of multiple WD40 repeats and shows homology to Utp21, an essential protein component of the yeast small subunit (SSU) processome required for maturation of 18S rRNA. To clarify the functional role of WDR36 in the mammalian organism, we generated and investigated mutant mice with a targeted deletion of Wdr36. In parallel experiments, we used RNA interference to deplete WDR36 mRNA in mouse embryos and cultured human trabecular meshwork (HTM-N) cells. Deletion of Wdr36 in the mouse caused preimplantation embryonic lethality, and essentially similar effects were observed when WDR36 mRNA was depleted in mouse embryos by RNA interference. Depletion of WDR36 mRNA in HTM-N cells caused apoptotic cell death and upregulation of mRNA for BAX, TP53 and CDKN1A. By immunocytochemistry, staining for WDR36 was observed in the nucleolus of cells, which co-localized with that of nucleolar proteins such as nucleophosmin and PWP2. In addition, recombinant and epitope-tagged WDR36 localized to the nucleolus of HTM-N cells. By northern blot analysis, a substantial decrease in 21S rRNA, the precursor of 18S rRNA, was observed following knockdown of WDR36. In addition, metabolic-labeling experiments consistently showed a delay of 18S rRNA maturation in WDR36-depleted cells. Our results provide evidence that WDR36 is an essential protein in mammalian cells which is involved in the nucleolar processing of SSU 18S rRNA.

  14. Identification of proteins important for tetracycline (TC) binding to ribosomes by single protein omission reconstitution (SPORE) experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, M.; Cooperman, B.S.

    1987-05-01

    TC inhibits protein synthesis in E. coli by interfering with aminoacyl-tRNA binding to the ribosomal A site, and there is strong evidence that such inhibition results from TC binding to a high affinity site on the 30S subunit. The SPORE approach has been used to define those 30S proteins that are potentially important for high affinity TC binding, measured as the (/sup 3/H)-TC co-sedimenting with the reconstitution particle through a sucrose density gradient. Reverse phase-HPLC has been used both to prepare ribosomal proteins and to analyze the protein content of reconstituted particles. The results obtained so far show that protein S7, as well as some proteins linked to S7 in the 30S assembly map, are important for TC binding, whereas other ribosomal proteins are not. These results are in very good accord with their earlier photoaffinity labeling studies that strongly implicated S7 as forming part of the TC binding site. Interestingly, protein S18, which is photolabeled by TC to a high extent but in a non-site specific manner, appears to be unimportant for TC binding.

  15. ArfA recognizes the lack of mRNA in the mRNA channel after RF2 binding for ribosome rescue.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Daisuke; Chadani, Yuhei; Muto, Akira; Abo, Tatsuhiko; Himeno, Hyouta

    2014-12-01

    Although trans-translation mediated by tmRNA-SmpB has long been known as the sole system to relieve bacterial stalled ribosomes, ArfA has recently been identified as an alternative factor for ribosome rescue in Escherichia coli. This process requires hydrolysis of nascent peptidyl-tRNA by RF2, which usually acts as a stop codon-specific peptide release factor. It poses a fascinating question of how ArfA and RF2 recognize and rescue the stalled ribosome. Here, we mapped the location of ArfA in the stalled ribosome by directed hydroxyl radical probing. It revealed an ArfA-binding site around the neck region of the 30S subunit in which the N- and C-terminal regions of ArfA are close to the decoding center and the mRNA entry channel, respectively. ArfA and RF2 sequentially enter the ribosome stalled in either the middle or 3' end of mRNA, whereas RF2 induces a productive conformational change of ArfA only when ribosome is stalled at the 3' end of mRNA. On the basis of these results, we propose that ArfA functions as the sensor to recognize the target ribosome after RF2 binding. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. ArfA recognizes the lack of mRNA in the mRNA channel after RF2 binding for ribosome rescue

    PubMed Central

    Kurita, Daisuke; Chadani, Yuhei; Muto, Akira; Abo, Tatsuhiko; Himeno, Hyouta

    2014-01-01

    Although trans-translation mediated by tmRNA-SmpB has long been known as the sole system to relieve bacterial stalled ribosomes, ArfA has recently been identified as an alternative factor for ribosome rescue in Escherichia coli. This process requires hydrolysis of nascent peptidyl-tRNA by RF2, which usually acts as a stop codon-specific peptide release factor. It poses a fascinating question of how ArfA and RF2 recognize and rescue the stalled ribosome. Here, we mapped the location of ArfA in the stalled ribosome by directed hydroxyl radical probing. It revealed an ArfA-binding site around the neck region of the 30S subunit in which the N- and C-terminal regions of ArfA are close to the decoding center and the mRNA entry channel, respectively. ArfA and RF2 sequentially enter the ribosome stalled in either the middle or 3′ end of mRNA, whereas RF2 induces a productive conformational change of ArfA only when ribosome is stalled at the 3′ end of mRNA. On the basis of these results, we propose that ArfA functions as the sensor to recognize the target ribosome after RF2 binding. PMID:25355516

  17. [About the ribosomal biogenesis in human].

    PubMed

    Tafforeau, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes are cellular ribonucleoprotein particles required for a fundamental mechanism, translation of the genetic information into proteins. Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex pathway involving many maturation steps: ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, rRNA processing, pre-rRNA modifications, its assembly with ribosomal proteins in the nuceolus, export of the subunit precursors to the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm. Ribosome biogenesis has mainly being investigated in yeast during these last 25 years. However, recent works have shown that, despite many similarities between yeast and human ribosome structure and biogenesis, human pre-rRNA processing is far more complex than in yeast. In order to better understand diseases related to a malfunction in ribosome synthesis, the ribosomopathies, research should be conducted directly in human cells and animal models. © 2015 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  18. Ribosome engineering to promote new crystal forms

    SciTech Connect

    Selmer, Maria; Gao, Yong-Gui; Weixlbaumer, Albert; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2012-05-01

    Truncation of ribosomal protein L9 in T. thermophilus allows the generation of new crystal forms and the crystallization of ribosome–GTPase complexes. Crystallographic studies of the ribosome have provided molecular details of protein synthesis. However, the crystallization of functional complexes of ribosomes with GTPase translation factors proved to be elusive for a decade after the first ribosome structures were determined. Analysis of the packing in different 70S ribosome crystal forms revealed that regardless of the species or space group, a contact between ribosomal protein L9 from the large subunit and 16S rRNA in the shoulder of a neighbouring small subunit in the crystal lattice competes with the binding of GTPase elongation factors to this region of 16S rRNA. To prevent the formation of this preferred crystal contact, a mutant strain of Thermus thermophilus, HB8-MRCMSAW1, in which the ribosomal protein L9 gene has been truncated was constructed by homologous recombination. Mutant 70S ribosomes were used to crystallize and solve the structure of the ribosome with EF-G, GDP and fusidic acid in a previously unobserved crystal form. Subsequent work has shown the usefulness of this strain for crystallization of the ribosome with other GTPase factors.

  19. Ribosome-inactivating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Matthew J; Dodd, Jennifer E; Hautbergue, Guillaume M

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were first isolated over a century ago and have been shown to be catalytic toxins that irreversibly inactivate protein synthesis. Elucidation of atomic structures and molecular mechanism has revealed these proteins to be a diverse group subdivided into two classes. RIPs have been shown to exhibit RNA N-glycosidase activity and depurinate the 28S rRNA of the eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit. In this review, we compare archetypal RIP family members with other potent toxins that abolish protein synthesis: the fungal ribotoxins which directly cleave the 28S rRNA and the newly discovered Burkholderia lethal factor 1 (BLF1). BLF1 presents additional challenges to the current classification system since, like the ribotoxins, it does not possess RNA N-glycosidase activity but does irreversibly inactivate ribosomes. We further discuss whether the RIP classification should be broadened to include toxins achieving irreversible ribosome inactivation with similar turnovers to RIPs, but through different enzymatic mechanisms. PMID:24071927

  20. Functional analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal protein Rpl3p in ribosome synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Iván V.; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2007-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis in eukaryotes requires a multitude of trans-acting factors. These factors act at many steps as the pre-ribosomal particles travel from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm. In contrast to the well-studied trans-acting factors, little is known about the contribution of the ribosomal proteins to ribosome biogenesis. Herein, we have analysed the role of ribosomal protein Rpl3p in 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. In vivo depletion of Rpl3p results in a deficit in 60S ribosomal subunits and the appearance of half-mer polysomes. This phenotype is likely due to the instability of early and intermediate pre-ribosomal particles, as evidenced by the low steady-state levels of 27SA3, 27SBS and 7SL/S precursors. Furthermore, depletion of Rpl3p impairs the nucleocytoplasmic export of pre-60S ribosomal particles. Interestingly, flow cytometry analysis indicates that Rpl3p-depleted cells arrest in the G1 phase. Altogether, we suggest that upon depletion of Rpl3p, early assembly of 60S ribosomal subunits is aborted and subsequent steps during their maturation and export prevented. PMID:17569673

  1. S1 ribosomal protein and the interplay between translation and mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Delvillani, Francesco; Papiani, Giulia; Dehò, Gianni; Briani, Federica

    2011-01-01

    S1 is an ‘atypical’ ribosomal protein weakly associated with the 30S subunit that has been implicated in translation, transcription and control of RNA stability. S1 is thought to participate in translation initiation complex formation by assisting 30S positioning in the translation initiation region, but little is known about its role in other RNA transactions. In this work, we have analysed in vivo the effects of different intracellular S1 concentrations, from depletion to overexpression, on translation, decay and intracellular distribution of leadered and leaderless messenger RNAs (mRNAs). We show that the cspE mRNA, like the rpsO transcript, may be cleaved by RNase E at multiple sites, whereas the leaderless cspE transcript may also be degraded via an alternative pathway by an unknown endonuclease. Upon S1 overexpression, RNase E-dependent decay of both cspE and rpsO mRNAs is suppressed and these transcripts are stabilized, whereas cleavage of leaderless cspE mRNA by the unidentified endonuclease is not affected. Overall, our data suggest that ribosome-unbound S1 may inhibit translation and that part of the Escherichia coli ribosomes may actually lack S1. PMID:21685451

  2. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  3. Biphasic character of ribosomal translocation and non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics of translation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2014-12-01

    We study theoretically the kinetics of mRNA translocation in the wild-type (WT) Escherichia coli ribosome, which is composed of a small 30S and large 50S subunit, and the ribosomes with mutations to some intersubunit bridges such as B1a, B4, B7a, and B8. The theoretical results reproduce well the available in vitro experimental data on the biphasic kinetics of the forward mRNA translocation catalyzed by elongation factor G (EF-G) hydrolyzing GTP, which can be best fit by the sum of two exponentials, and the monophasic kinetics of the spontaneous reverse mRNA translocation in the absence of the elongation factor, which can be best fit by a single-exponential function, in both the WT and mutant ribosomes. We show that both the mutation-induced increase in the maximal rate of the slow phase for the forward mRNA translocation and that in the rate of the spontaneous reverse mRNA translocation result from a reduction in the intrinsic energy barrier to resist the rotational movements between the two subunits, giving the same degree of increase in the two rates. The mutation-induced increase in the maximal rate of the fast phase for the forward mRNA translocation results mainly from the increase in the rate of the ribosomal unlocking, a conformational change in the ribosome that widens the mRNA channel for the mRNA translocation to take place, which could be partly due to the effect of the mutation on the intrasubunit 30S head rotation. Moreover, we study the translation rate of the WT and mutant ribosomes. It is shown that the translation rate versus the concentration of EF-G-GTP does not follow the Michaelis-Menten (MM) kinetics, which is in sharp contrast to the general property of other enzymes that the rate of the enzymatic reaction versus the concentration of a substrate follows the MM kinetics. The physical origin of this non-MM kinetics for the ribosome is revealed.

  4. Biphasic character of ribosomal translocation and non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics of translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ping

    2014-12-01

    We study theoretically the kinetics of mRNA translocation in the wild-type (WT) Escherichia coli ribosome, which is composed of a small 30 S and large 50 S subunit, and the ribosomes with mutations to some intersubunit bridges such as B1a, B4, B7a, and B8. The theoretical results reproduce well the available in vitro experimental data on the biphasic kinetics of the forward mRNA translocation catalyzed by elongation factor G (EF-G) hydrolyzing GTP, which can be best fit by the sum of two exponentials, and the monophasic kinetics of the spontaneous reverse mRNA translocation in the absence of the elongation factor, which can be best fit by a single-exponential function, in both the WT and mutant ribosomes. We show that both the mutation-induced increase in the maximal rate of the slow phase for the forward mRNA translocation and that in the rate of the spontaneous reverse mRNA translocation result from a reduction in the intrinsic energy barrier to resist the rotational movements between the two subunits, giving the same degree of increase in the two rates. The mutation-induced increase in the maximal rate of the fast phase for the forward mRNA translocation results mainly from the increase in the rate of the ribosomal unlocking, a conformational change in the ribosome that widens the mRNA channel for the mRNA translocation to take place, which could be partly due to the effect of the mutation on the intrasubunit 30S head rotation. Moreover, we study the translation rate of the WT and mutant ribosomes. It is shown that the translation rate versus the concentration of EF-G-GTP does not follow the Michaelis-Menten (MM) kinetics, which is in sharp contrast to the general property of other enzymes that the rate of the enzymatic reaction versus the concentration of a substrate follows the MM kinetics. The physical origin of this non-MM kinetics for the ribosome is revealed.

  5. A Possible Role of the Full-Length Nascent Protein in Post-Translational Ribosome Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debasis; Samanta, Dibyendu; Bhattacharya, Arpita; Basu, Arunima; Das, Anindita; Ghosh, Jaydip; Chakrabarti, Abhijit; Das Gupta, Chanchal

    2017-01-01

    Each cycle of translation initiation in bacterial cell requires free 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits originating from the post-translational dissociation of 70S ribosome from the previous cycle. Literature shows stable dissociation of 70S from model post-termination complexes by the concerted action of Ribosome Recycling Factor (RRF) and Elongation Factor G (EF-G) that interact with the rRNA bridge B2a/B2b joining 50S to 30S. In such experimental models, the role of full-length nascent protein was never considered seriously. We observed relatively slow release of full-length nascent protein from 50Sof post translation ribosome, and in that process, its toe prints on the rRNA in vivo and in in vitro translation with E.coli S30 extract. We reported earlier that a number of chemically unfolded proteins like bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), lysozyme, ovalbumin etc., when added to free 70Sin lieu of the full length nascent proteins, also interact with identical RNA regions of the 23S rRNA. Interestingly the rRNA nucleotides that slow down release of the C-terminus of full-length unfolded protein were found in close proximity to the B2a/B2b bridge. It indicated a potentially important chemical reaction conserved throughout the evolution. Here we set out to probe that conserved role of unfolded protein conformation in splitting the free or post-termination 70S. How both the RRF-EFG dependent and the plausible nascent protein–EFG dependent ribosome recycling pathways might be relevant in bacteria is discussed here. PMID:28099529

  6. A Possible Role of the Full-Length Nascent Protein in Post-Translational Ribosome Recycling.

    PubMed

    Das, Debasis; Samanta, Dibyendu; Bhattacharya, Arpita; Basu, Arunima; Das, Anindita; Ghosh, Jaydip; Chakrabarti, Abhijit; Das Gupta, Chanchal

    2017-01-01

    Each cycle of translation initiation in bacterial cell requires free 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits originating from the post-translational dissociation of 70S ribosome from the previous cycle. Literature shows stable dissociation of 70S from model post-termination complexes by the concerted action of Ribosome Recycling Factor (RRF) and Elongation Factor G (EF-G) that interact with the rRNA bridge B2a/B2b joining 50S to 30S. In such experimental models, the role of full-length nascent protein was never considered seriously. We observed relatively slow release of full-length nascent protein from 50Sof post translation ribosome, and in that process, its toe prints on the rRNA in vivo and in in vitro translation with E.coli S30 extract. We reported earlier that a number of chemically unfolded proteins like bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), lysozyme, ovalbumin etc., when added to free 70Sin lieu of the full length nascent proteins, also interact with identical RNA regions of the 23S rRNA. Interestingly the rRNA nucleotides that slow down release of the C-terminus of full-length unfolded protein were found in close proximity to the B2a/B2b bridge. It indicated a potentially important chemical reaction conserved throughout the evolution. Here we set out to probe that conserved role of unfolded protein conformation in splitting the free or post-termination 70S. How both the RRF-EFG dependent and the plausible nascent protein-EFG dependent ribosome recycling pathways might be relevant in bacteria is discussed here.

  7. Analysis of ribosome biogenesis factor-modules in yeast cells depleted from pre-ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Merl, Juliane; Jakob, Steffen; Ridinger, Katrin; Hierlmeier, Thomas; Deutzmann, Rainer; Milkereit, Philipp; Tschochner, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    Formation of eukaryotic ribosomes requires more than 150 biogenesis factors which transiently interact with the nascent ribosomal subunits. Previously, many pre-ribosomal intermediates could be distinguished by their protein composition and rRNA precursor (pre-rRNA) content. We purified complexes of ribosome biogenesis factors from yeast cells in which de novo synthesis of rRNA precursors was down-regulated by genetic means. We compared the protein composition of these largely pre-rRNA free assemblies with the one of analogous pre-ribosomal preparations by semi-quantitative mass spectrometry. The experimental setup minimizes the possibility that the analysed pre-rRNA free protein modules were derived from (partially) disrupted pre-ribosomal particles and provides thereby strong evidence for their pre-ribosome independent existence. In support of the validity of this approach (i) the predicted composition of the analysed protein modules was in agreement with previously described rRNA-free complexes and (ii) in most of the cases we could identify new candidate members of reported protein modules. An unexpected outcome of these analyses was that free large ribosomal subunits are associated with a specific set of ribosome biogenesis factors in cells where neo-production of nascent ribosomes was blocked. The data presented strengthen the idea that assembly of eukaryotic pre-ribosomal particles can result from transient association of distinct building blocks. PMID:20100801

  8. Complementary roles of initiation factor 1 and ribosome recycling factor in 70S ribosome splitting

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Antoun, Ayman; Lovmar, Martin; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that ribosomes containing a messenger RNA (mRNA) with a strong Shine–Dalgarno sequence are rapidly split into subunits by initiation factors 1 (IF1) and 3 (IF3), but slowly split by ribosome recycling factor (RRF) and elongation factor G (EF-G). Post-termination-like (PTL) ribosomes containing mRNA and a P-site-bound deacylated transfer RNA (tRNA) are split very rapidly by RRF and EF-G, but extremely slowly by IF1 and IF3. Vacant ribosomes are split by RRF/EF-G much more slowly than PTL ribosomes and by IF1/IF3 much more slowly than mRNA-containing ribosomes. These observations reveal complementary splitting of different ribosomal complexes by IF1/IF3 and RRF/EF-G, and suggest the existence of two major pathways for ribosome splitting into subunits in the living cell. We show that the identity of the deacylated tRNA in the PTL ribosome strongly affects the rate by which it is split by RRF/EF-G and that IF3 is involved in the mechanism of ribosome splitting by IF1/IF3 but not by RRF/EF-G. With support from our experimental data, we discuss the principally different mechanisms of ribosome splitting by IF1/IF3 and by RRF/EF-G. PMID:18497739

  9. Ribosomal History Reveals Origins of Modern Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Harish, Ajith; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the ribosome is central to our understanding of the cellular world. Most hypotheses posit that the ribosome originated in the peptidyl transferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. However, these proposals do not link protein synthesis to RNA recognition and do not use a phylogenetic comparative framework to study ribosomal evolution. Here we infer evolution of the structural components of the ribosome. Phylogenetic methods widely used in morphometrics are applied directly to RNA structures of thousands of molecules and to a census of protein structures in hundreds of genomes. We find that components of the small subunit involved in ribosomal processivity evolved earlier than the catalytic peptidyl transferase center responsible for protein synthesis. Remarkably, subunit RNA and proteins coevolved, starting with interactions between the oldest proteins (S12 and S17) and the oldest substructure (the ribosomal ratchet) in the small subunit and ending with the rise of a modern multi-subunit ribosome. Ancestral ribonucleoprotein components show similarities to in vitro evolved RNA replicase ribozymes and protein structures in extant replication machinery. Our study therefore provides important clues about the chicken-or-egg dilemma associated with the central dogma of molecular biology by showing that ribosomal history is driven by the gradual structural accretion of protein and RNA structures. Most importantly, results suggest that functionally important and conserved regions of the ribosome were recruited and could be relics of an ancient ribonucleoprotein world. PMID:22427882

  10. Ribosomal history reveals origins of modern protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Harish, Ajith; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the ribosome is central to our understanding of the cellular world. Most hypotheses posit that the ribosome originated in the peptidyl transferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. However, these proposals do not link protein synthesis to RNA recognition and do not use a phylogenetic comparative framework to study ribosomal evolution. Here we infer evolution of the structural components of the ribosome. Phylogenetic methods widely used in morphometrics are applied directly to RNA structures of thousands of molecules and to a census of protein structures in hundreds of genomes. We find that components of the small subunit involved in ribosomal processivity evolved earlier than the catalytic peptidyl transferase center responsible for protein synthesis. Remarkably, subunit RNA and proteins coevolved, starting with interactions between the oldest proteins (S12 and S17) and the oldest substructure (the ribosomal ratchet) in the small subunit and ending with the rise of a modern multi-subunit ribosome. Ancestral ribonucleoprotein components show similarities to in vitro evolved RNA replicase ribozymes and protein structures in extant replication machinery. Our study therefore provides important clues about the chicken-or-egg dilemma associated with the central dogma of molecular biology by showing that ribosomal history is driven by the gradual structural accretion of protein and RNA structures. Most importantly, results suggest that functionally important and conserved regions of the ribosome were recruited and could be relics of an ancient ribonucleoprotein world.

  11. Characterization of the Dominant and Rare Members of a Young Hawaiian Soil Bacterial Community with Small-Subunit Ribosomal DNA Amplified from DNA Fractionated on the Basis of Its Guanine and Cytosine Composition

    PubMed Central

    Nüsslein, Klaus; Tiedje, James M.

    1998-01-01

    The small-subunit ribosomal DNA (rDNA) diversity was found to be very high in a Hawaiian soil community that might be expected to have lower diversity than the communities in continental soils because the Hawaiian soil is geographically isolated and only 200 years old, is subjected to a constant climate, and harbors low plant diversity. Since an underlying community structure could not be revealed by analyzing the total eubacterial rDNA, we first fractionated the DNA on the basis of guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) content by using bis-benzimidazole and equilibrium centrifugation and then analyzed the bacterial rDNA amplified from a fraction with a high biomass (63% G+C fraction) and a fraction with a low biomass (35% G+C fraction). The rDNA clone libraries were screened by amplified rDNA restriction analysis to determine phylotype distribution. The dominant biomass reflected by the 63% G+C fraction contained several dominant phylotypes, while the community members that were less successful (35% G+C fraction) did not show dominance but there was a very high diversity of phylotypes. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed taxa belonging to the groups expected for the G+C contents used. The dominant phylotypes in the 63% G+C fraction were members of the Pseudomonas, Rhizobium-Agrobacterium, and Rhodospirillum assemblages, while all of the clones sequenced from the 35% G+C fraction were affiliated with several Clostridium assemblages. The two-step rDNA analysis used here uncovered more diversity than can be detected by direct rDNA analysis of total community DNA. The G+C separation step is also a way to detect some of the less dominant organisms in a community. PMID:9546163

  12. Testing the conservation of the translational machinery over evolution in diverse environments: assaying Thermus thermophilus ribosomes and initiation factors in a coupled transcription-translation system from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jill; Dahlberg, Albert E

    2004-01-01

    Ribosomes from the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus are capable of translation in a coupled transcription-translation system derived from Escherichia coli. At 45 degrees C, T.thermophilus ribosomes translate at approximately 25-30% of the maximal rate of E.coli ribosomes, and synthesize full-length protein. T.thermophilus and E.coli subunits can be combined to effect translation, with the spectrum of proteins produced depending upon the source of the 30S subunit. In this system, T.thermophilus ribosomes function in concert with E.coli translational factors and tRNAs, with elongation and release factors being supplied from the E.coli extract, and purified initiation factors (IFs) being added exogenously. Cloned and purified T.thermophilus IF1, IF2 and IF3 supported the synthesis of the same products in vitro as the E.coli factors, although the relative levels of some polypeptides were factor dependent. We conclude that, at least between these two phylogenetically distant species, translational factor function and subunit-subunit interactions are conserved. This functional compatibility is remarkable given the extreme and highly divergent environments to which these species have adapted.

  13. Distribution and diversity of ribosome binding sites in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Omotajo, Damilola; Tate, Travis; Cho, Hyuk; Choudhary, Madhusudan

    2015-08-14

    Prokaryotic translation initiation involves the proper docking, anchoring, and accommodation of mRNA to the 30S ribosomal subunit. Three initiation factors (IF1, IF2, and IF3) and some ribosomal proteins mediate the assembly and activation of the translation initiation complex. Although the interaction between Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence and its complementary sequence in the 16S rRNA is important in initiation, some genes lacking an SD ribosome binding site (RBS) are still well expressed. The objective of this study is to examine the pattern of distribution and diversity of RBS in fully sequenced bacterial genomes. The following three hypotheses were tested: SD motifs are prevalent in bacterial genomes; all previously identified SD motifs are uniformly distributed across prokaryotes; and genes with specific cluster of orthologous gene (COG) functions differ in their use of SD motifs. Data for 2,458 bacterial genomes, previously generated by Prodigal (PROkaryotic DYnamic programming Gene-finding ALgorithm) and currently available at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), were analyzed. Of the total genes examined, ~77.0% use an SD RBS, while ~23.0% have no RBS. Majority of the genes with the most common SD motifs are distributed in a manner that is representative of their abundance for each COG functional category, while motifs 13 (5'-GGA-3'/5'-GAG-3'/5'-AGG-3') and 27 (5'-AGGAGG-3') appear to be predominantly used by genes for information storage and processing, and translation and ribosome biogenesis, respectively. These findings suggest that an SD sequence is not obligatory for translation initiation; instead, other signals, such as the RBS spacer, may have an overarching influence on translation of mRNAs. Subsequent analyses of the 5' secondary structure of these mRNAs may provide further insight into the translation initiation mechanism.

  14. Mechanistic insight into the ribosome biogenesis functions of the ancient protein KsgA

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Keith; Rife, Jason P.; Culver, Gloria

    2009-01-01

    Summary While the general blueprint of ribosome biogenesis is evolutionarily conserved, most details have diverged considerably. A striking exception to this divergence is the universally conserved KsgA/Dim1p enzyme family, which modifies two adjacent adenosines in the terminal helix of small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA). While localization of KsgA on 30S subunits (SSUs) and genetic interaction data have suggested that KsgA acts as a ribosome biogenesis factor, mechanistic details and a rationale for its extreme conservation are still lacking. To begin to address these questions we have characterized the function of E. coli KsgA in vivo using both a ksgA deletion strain and a methyltransferase deficient form of this protein. Our data reveals cold sensitivity and altered ribosomal profiles are associated with a ΔksgA genotype in E. coli. Our work also indicates that loss of KsgA alters 16S rRNA processing. These findings allow KsgAs role in SSU biogenesis to be integrated into the network of other identified factors. Moreover, a methyltransferase-inactive form of KsgA, which we show to be deleterious to cell growth, profoundly impairs ribosome biogenesis prompting discussion of KsgA as a possible anti-microbial drug target. These unexpected data suggest that methylation is a second layer of function for KsgA and that its critical role is as a supervisor of biogenesis of SSUs in vivo. These new findings and this proposed regulatory role offer a mechanistic explanation for the extreme conservation of the KsgA/Dim1p enzyme family. PMID:18990185

  15. Gateway role for rRNA precursors in ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Gutgsell, Nancy S; Jain, Chaitanya

    2012-12-01

    In Escherichia coli, rRNAs are initially transcribed with precursor sequences, which are subsequently removed through processing reactions. To investigate the role of precursor sequences, we analyzed ribosome assembly in strains containing mutations in the processing RNases. We observed that defects in 23S rRNA processing resulted in an accumulation of ribosomal subunits and caused a significant delay in ribosome assembly. These observations suggest that precursor residues in 23S rRNA control ribosome assembly and could be serving a regulatory role to couple ribosome assembly to rRNA processing. The possible mechanisms through which rRNA processing and ribosome assembly could be linked are discussed.

  16. Structural basis for selectivity and toxicity of ribosomal antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Böttger, Erik C.; Springer, Burkhard; Prammananan, Therdsak; Kidan, Yishak; Sander, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Ribosomal antibiotics must discriminate between bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes to various extents. Despite major differences in bacterial and eukaryotic ribosome structure, a single nucleotide or amino acid determines the selectivity of drugs affecting protein synthesis. Analysis of resistance mutations in bacteria allows the prediction of whether cytoplasmic or mitochondrial ribosomes in eukaryotic cells will be sensitive to the drug. This has important implications for drug specificity and toxicity. Together with recent data on the structure of ribosomal subunits these data provide the basis for development of new ribosomal antibiotics by rationale drug design. PMID:11306553

  17. Characterizing inactive ribosomes in translational profiling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Botao; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The broad impact of translational regulation has emerged explosively in the last few years in part due to the technological advance in genome-wide interrogation of gene expression. During mRNA translation, the majority of actively translating ribosomes exist as polysomes in cells with multiple ribosomes loaded on a single transcript. The importance of the monosome, however, has been less appreciated in translational profiling analysis. Here we report that the monosome fraction isolated by sucrose sedimentation contains a large quantity of inactive ribosomes that do not engage on mRNAs to direct translation. We found that the elongation factor eEF2, but not eEF1A, stably resides in these non-translating ribosomes. This unique feature permits direct evaluation of ribosome status under various stress conditions and in the presence of translation inhibitors. Ribosome profiling reveals that the monosome has a similar but not identical pattern of ribosome footprints compared to the polysome. We show that the association of free ribosomal subunits minimally contributes to ribosome occupancy outside of the coding region. Our results not only offer a quantitative method to monitor ribosome availability, but also uncover additional layers of ribosome status needed to be considered in translational profiling analysis. PMID:27335722

  18. Dynamic reorganization of the functionally active ribosome explored by normal mode analysis and cryo-electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tama, Florence; Valle, Mikel; Frank, Joachim; Brooks, Charles L., III

    2003-08-01

    Combining structural data for the ribosome from x-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy with dynamic models based on elastic network normal mode analysis, an atomically detailed picture of functionally important structural rearrangements that occur during translocation is elucidated. The dynamic model provides a near-atomic description of the ratchet-like rearrangement of the 70S ribosome seen in cryo-electron microscopy, and permits the identification of bridging interactions that either facilitate the conformational switching or maintain structural integrity of the 50S/30S interface. Motions of the tRNAs residing in the A and P sites also suggest the early stages of tRNA translocation as a result of this ratchet-like movement. Displacement of the L1 stalk, alternately closing and opening the intersubunit space near the E site, is observed in the dynamic model, in line with growing experimental evidence for the role of this structural component in facilitating the exiting of tRNA. Finally, a hinge-like transition in the 30S ribosomal subunit, similar to that observed in crystal structures of this complex, is also manifest as a dynamic mode of the ribosome. The coincidence of these dynamic transitions with the individual normal modes of the ribosome and the good correspondence between these motions and those observed in experiment suggest an underlying principle of nature to exploit the shape of molecular assemblies such as the ribosome to provide robustness to functionally important motions. dynamical transitions | ratchet-like reorganization | translocation | molecular machines

  19. The translational fidelity function of IF3 during transition from the 30 S initiation complex to the 70 S initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Grigoriadou, Christina; Marzi, Stefano; Pan, Dongli; Gualerzi, Claudio O; Cooperman, Barry S

    2007-10-26

    IF3 has a fidelity function in the initiation of translation, inducing the dissociation of fMet-tRNA(fMet) from the 30 S initiation complexes (30SIC) containing a non-canonical initiation triplet (e.g. AUU) in place of a canonical initiation triplet (e.g., AUG). IF2 has a complementary role, selectively promoting initiator tRNA binding to the ribosome. Here, we used parallel rapid kinetics measurements of GTP hydrolysis, Pi release, light-scattering, and changes in intensities of fluorophore-labeled IF2 and fMet-tRNA(fMet) to determine the effects on both 30SIC formation and 30SIC conversion to 70 S initiation complexes (70SIC) of (a) substituting AUG with AUU, and/or (b) omitting IF3, and/or (c) replacing GTP with the non-hydrolyzable analog GDPCP. We demonstrate that the presence or absence of IF3 has, at most, minor effects on the rate of 30SIC formation using either AUG or AUU as the initiation codon, and conclude that the high affinity of IF2 for both 30 S subunit and initiator tRNA overrides any perturbation of the codon-anticodon interaction resulting from AUU for AUG substitution. In contrast, replacement of AUG by AUU leads to a dramatic reduction in the rate of 70SIC formation from 30SIC upon addition of 50 S subunits. Interpreting our results in the framework of a quantitative kinetic scheme leads to the conclusion that, within the overall process of 70SIC formation, the step most affected by substituting AUU for AUG involves the conversion of an initially labile 70 S ribosome into a more stable complex. In the absence of IF3, the difference between AUG and AUU largely disappears, with each initiation codon affording rapid 70SIC formation, leading to the hypothesis that it is the rate of IF3 dissociation from the 70 S ribosome during IC70S formation that is critical to its fidelity function.

  20. Mutations in ribosomal proteins S4 and S12 influence the higher order structure of 16 S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Allen, P N; Noller, H F

    1989-08-05

    We have studied the effects of protein mutations on the higher order structure of 16 S rRNA in Escherichia coli ribosomes, using a set of structure-sensitive chemical probes. Ten mutant strains were studied, which contained alterations in ribosomal proteins S4 and S12, including double mutants containing both altered S4 and S12. Two ribosomal ambiguity (ram) S4 mutant strains, four streptomycin resistant (SmR) S12 mutant strains, one streptomycin pseudodependent (SmP) S12 mutant strain, one streptomycin dependent (SmD) S12 mutant strain and two streptomycin independent (Sm1) double mutants (containing both-SmD and ram mutations) were probed and compared to an isogenic wild-type strain. In ribosomes from strains containing S4 ram mutations, nucleotides A8 and A26 become more reactive to dimethyl sulfate (DMS) at their N-1 positions. In ribosomes from strains bearing the SmD allele, A908, A909, A1413 and G1487 are significantly less reactive to chemical probes. These same effects are observed when the S4 and S12 mutations are present simultaneously in the double mutants. An interesting correlation is found between the reactivity of A908 and the miscoding potential of SmR, SmD, SmP and wild-type ribosomes; the reactivity of A908 increases as the translational error frequency of the ribosomes increases. In the case of ram ribosomes, the reactivity of A908 resembles that of wild-type, unless tRNA is bound, in which case it becomes hyper-reactive. Similarly, streptomycin has little effect on A908 in wild-type ribosomes unless tRNA is bound, in which case its reactivity increases to resemble that of ram ribosomes with bound tRNA. Finally, interaction of streptomycin with SmP and SmD ribosomes causes the reactivity of A908 to increase to near-wild-type levels. A simple model is proposed, in which the reactivity of A908 reflects the position of an equilibrium between two conformational states of the 30 S subunit, one of which is DMS-reactive, and the other DMS

  1. Crystal structure of release factor RF3 trapped in the GTP state on a rotated conformation of the ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jie; Lancaster, Laura; Trakhanov, Sergei; Noller, Harry F.

    2012-03-26

    The class II release factor RF3 is a GTPase related to elongation factor EF-G, which catalyzes release of class I release factors RF1 and RF2 from the ribosome after termination of protein synthesis. The 3.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of the RF3 {center_dot} GDPNP {center_dot} ribosome complex provides a high-resolution description of interactions and structural rearrangements that occur when binding of this translational GTPase induces large-scale rotational movements in the ribosome. RF3 induces a 7{sup o} rotation of the body and 14{sup o} rotation of the head of the 30S ribosomal subunit, and itself undergoes inter- and intradomain conformational rearrangements. We suggest that ordering of critical elements of switch loop I and the P loop, which help to form the GTPase catalytic site, are caused by interactions between the G domain of RF3 and the sarcin-ricin loop of 23S rRNA. The rotational movements in the ribosome induced by RF3, and its distinctly different binding orientation to the sarcin-ricin loop of 23S rRNA, raise interesting implications for the mechanism of action of EF-G in translocation.

  2. Role of ribosomal protein S12 in peptide chain elongation: analysis of pleiotropic, streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Zengel, J M; Young, R; Dennis, P P; Nomura, M

    1977-01-01

    Some of the spontaneous streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli strain C600 exhibit pleiotropic effects in addition to the antibiotic resistance. These effects include decreased growth rates, reduced levels of certain enzymes, and poor support of bacteriophage growth. One of these mutants, strain SM3, was studied further. We have examined the question of whether the reduced growth rate of the mutant SM3 is related to the reduction in relative amounts of ribosomes or to the reduction in the efficiency of ribosomes in protein synthesis. Measurements of alpha, the differential synthesis rate of ribosomal protein, revealed that the protein synthesis effeciency of ribosomes from the mutant strain SM3 was reduced about twofold relative to that of the parent strain C600. Measurements of the induction lag for beta-galactosidase and of the synthesis time of several different molecular-weight classes of proteins indicated that the mutation resulted in a marked reduction in the peptide chain growth rate. This reduction in the chain growth rate probably accounted for most of the observed reduction in the growth rate of the mutant strain. These experimental results show that the strA gene product, the S12 protein of the 30S subunit, is involved in some aspect of protein chain elongation. Presumably this involvement occurs during the messenger ribonucleic acid-directed binding of transfer ribonucleic acid to the ribosome. PMID:321423

  3. Role of ribosomal protein S12 in peptide chain elongation: analysis of pleiotropic, streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zengel, J M; Young, R; Dennis, P P; Nomura, M

    1977-03-01

    Some of the spontaneous streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli strain C600 exhibit pleiotropic effects in addition to the antibiotic resistance. These effects include decreased growth rates, reduced levels of certain enzymes, and poor support of bacteriophage growth. One of these mutants, strain SM3, was studied further. We have examined the question of whether the reduced growth rate of the mutant SM3 is related to the reduction in relative amounts of ribosomes or to the reduction in the efficiency of ribosomes in protein synthesis. Measurements of alpha, the differential synthesis rate of ribosomal protein, revealed that the protein synthesis effeciency of ribosomes from the mutant strain SM3 was reduced about twofold relative to that of the parent strain C600. Measurements of the induction lag for beta-galactosidase and of the synthesis time of several different molecular-weight classes of proteins indicated that the mutation resulted in a marked reduction in the peptide chain growth rate. This reduction in the chain growth rate probably accounted for most of the observed reduction in the growth rate of the mutant strain. These experimental results show that the strA gene product, the S12 protein of the 30S subunit, is involved in some aspect of protein chain elongation. Presumably this involvement occurs during the messenger ribonucleic acid-directed binding of transfer ribonucleic acid to the ribosome.

  4. Proteomic characterization of archaeal ribosomes reveals the presence of novel archaeal-specific ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Viter; Fröhlich, Thomas; Armache, Jean-Paul; Sohmen, Daniel; Dönhöfer, Alexandra; Mikolajka, Aleksandra; Berninghausen, Otto; Thomm, Michael; Beckmann, Roland; Arnold, Georg J; Wilson, Daniel N

    2011-02-04

    Protein synthesis occurs in macromolecular particles called ribosomes. All ribosomes are composed of RNA and proteins. While the protein composition of bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes has been well-characterized, a systematic analysis of archaeal ribosomes has been lacking. Here we report the first comprehensive two-dimensional PAGE and mass spectrometry analysis of archaeal ribosomes isolated from the thermophilic Pyrobaculum aerophilum and the thermoacidophilic Sulfolobus acidocaldarius Crenarchaeota. Our analysis identified all 66 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) of the P. aerophilum small and large subunits, as well as all but two (62 of 64; 97%) r-proteins of the S. acidocaldarius small and large subunits that are predicted genomically. Some r-proteins were identified with one or two lysine methylations and N-terminal acetylations. In addition, we identify three hypothetical proteins that appear to be bona fide r-proteins of the S. acidocaldarius large subunit. Dissociation of r-proteins from the S. acidocaldarius large subunit indicates that the novel r-proteins establish tighter interactions with the large subunit than some integral r-proteins. Furthermore, cryo electron microscopy reconstructions of the S. acidocaldarius and P. aerophilum 50S subunits allow for a tentative localization of the binding site of the novel r-proteins. This study illustrates not only the potential diversity of the archaeal ribosomes but also the necessity to experimentally analyze the archaeal ribosomes to ascertain their protein composition. The discovery of novel archaeal r-proteins and factors may be the first step to understanding how archaeal ribosomes cope with extreme environmental conditions.

  5. Erythromycin- and chloramphenicol-induced ribosomal assembly defects are secondary effects of protein synthesis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Siibak, Triinu; Peil, Lauri; Xiong, Liqun; Mankin, Alexander; Remme, Jaanus; Tenson, Tanel

    2009-02-01

    Several protein synthesis inhibitors are known to inhibit ribosome assembly. This may be a consequence of direct binding of the antibiotic to ribosome precursor particles, or it could result indirectly from loss of coordination in the production of ribosomal components due to the inhibition of protein synthesis. Here we demonstrate that erythromycin and chloramphenicol, inhibitors of the large ribosomal subunit, affect the assembly of both the large and small subunits. Expression of a small erythromycin resistance peptide acting in cis on mature ribosomes relieves the erythromycin-mediated assembly defect for both subunits. Erythromycin treatment of bacteria expressing a mixture of erythromycin-sensitive and -resistant ribosomes produced comparable effects on subunit assembly. These results argue in favor of the view that erythromycin and chloramphenicol affect the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit indirectly.

  6. Interaction between Bacillus subtilis YsxC and ribosomes (or rRNAs).

    PubMed

    Wicker-Planquart, Catherine; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2015-04-13

    YsxC is an essential P-loop GTPase, that binds to the 50S ribosomal subunit, and is required for the proper assembly of the ribosome. The aim of this study was to characterize YsxC ribosome interactions. The stoichiometry of YsxC ribosome subunit complex was evaluated. We showed that YsxC binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit is not affected by GTP, but in the presence of GDP the stoichiometry of YsxC-ribosome is decreased. YsxC GTPase activity was stimulated upon 50S ribosomal subunit binding. In addition, it is shown for the first time that YsxC binds both 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Ribosomal protein methyltransferases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadid, Qais; White, Jonelle; Clarke, Steven

    2016-02-12

    A significant percentage of the methyltransferasome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes is devoted to methylation of the translational machinery. Methylation of the RNA components of the translational machinery has been studied extensively and is important for structure stability, ribosome biogenesis, and translational fidelity. However, the functional effects of ribosomal protein methylation by their cognate methyltransferases are still largely unknown. Previous work has shown that the ribosomal protein Rpl3 methyltransferase, histidine protein methyltransferase 1 (Hpm1), is important for ribosome biogenesis and translation elongation fidelity. In this study, yeast strains deficient in each of the ten ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae were examined for potential defects in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Like Hpm1-deficient cells, loss of four of the nine other ribosomal protein methyltransferases resulted in defects in ribosomal subunit synthesis. All of the mutant strains exhibited resistance to the ribosome inhibitors anisomycin and/or cycloheximide in plate assays, but not in liquid culture. Translational fidelity assays measuring stop codon readthrough, amino acid misincorporation, and programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, revealed that eight of the ten enzymes are important for translation elongation fidelity and the remaining two are necessary for translation termination efficiency. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

  8. High-resolution structure of the Escherichia coli ribosome

    DOE PAGES

    Noeske, Jonas; Wasserman, Michael R.; Terry, Daniel S.; ...

    2015-03-16

    Protein synthesis by the ribosome is highly dependent on the ionic conditions in the cellular environment, but the roles of ribosome solvation remain poorly understood. Moreover, the function of modifications to ribosomal RNA and ribosomal proteins are unclear. Here we present the structure of the Escherichia coli 70S ribosome to 2.4 Å resolution. The structure reveals details of the ribosomal subunit interface that are conserved in all domains of life, and suggest how solvation contributes to ribosome integrity and function. The structure also suggests how the conformation of ribosomal protein uS12 likely impacts its contribution to messenger RNA decoding. Inmore » conclusion, this structure helps to explain the phylogenetic conservation of key elements of the ribosome, including posttranscriptional and posttranslational modifications and should serve as a basis for future antibiotic development.« less

  9. Fluorescence-based monitoring of ribosome assembly landscapes.

    PubMed

    Nikolay, Rainer; Schloemer, Renate; Mueller, Silke; Deuerling, Elke

    2015-02-25

    Ribosomes and functional complexes of them have been analyzed at the atomic level. Far less is known about the dynamic assembly and degradation events that define the half-life of ribosomes and guarantee their quality control. We developed a system that allows visualization of intact ribosomal subunits and assembly intermediates (i.e. assembly landscapes) by convenient fluorescence-based analysis. To this end, we labeled the early assembly ribosomal proteins L1 and S15 with the fluorescent proteins mAzami green and mCherry, respectively, using chromosomal gene insertion. The reporter strain harbors fluorescently labeled ribosomal subunits that operate wild type-like, as shown by biochemical and growth assays. Using genetic and chemical perturbations by depleting genes encoding the ribosomal proteins L3 and S17, respectively, or using ribosome-targeting antibiotics, we provoked ribosomal subunit assembly defects. These defects were readily identified by fluorometric analysis after sucrose density centrifugation in unprecedented resolution. This strategy is useful to monitor and characterize subunit specific assembly defects caused by ribosome-targeting drugs that are currently used and to characterize new molecules that affect ribosome assembly and thereby constitute new classes of antibacterial agents.

  10. Targeting ricin to the ribosome.

    PubMed

    May, Kerrie L; Yan, Qing; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2013-07-01

    The plant toxin ricin is highly toxic for mammalian cells and is of concern for bioterrorism. Ricin belongs to a family of functionally related toxins, collectively referred to as ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs), which disable ribosomes and halt protein synthesis. Currently there are no specific antidotes against ricin or related RIPs. The catalytic subunit of ricin is an N-glycosidase that depurinates a universally conserved adenine residue within the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) of the 28S rRNA. This depurination activity inhibits translation and its biochemistry has been intensively studied. Yet, recent developments paint a more complex picture of toxicity, with ribosomal proteins and cellular signaling pathways contributing to the potency of ricin. In particular, several studies have now established the importance of the ribosomal stalk structure in facilitating the depurination activity and ribosome specificity of ricin and other RIPs. This review highlights recent developments defining toxin-ribosome interactions and examines the significance of these interactions for toxicity and therapeutic intervention.

  11. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of ribosomes in a eukaryotic system: Is there a facilitated transport process

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna-Gupta, A.; Ware, V.C. )

    1989-03-01

    The authors have examined the kinetics of the process by which ribosomes are exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm using Xenopus laevis oocytes microinjected into the germinal vesicle with radiolabeled ribosomes or ribosomal subunits from X. laevis, Tetrahymena thermophila, or Escherichia coli. Microinjected eukaryotic mature ribosomes are redistributed into the oocyte cytoplasm by an apparent carrier-mediated transport process that exhibits saturation kinetics as increasing amounts of ribosomes are injected. T. thermophila ribosomes are competent to traverse the Xenopus nuclear envelope, suggesting that the basic mechanism underlying ribosome transport is evolutionarily conserved. Microinjected E. coli ribosomes are not transported in this system, indicating that prokaryotic ribosomes lack the signals required for transport. Surprisingly, coinjected small (40S) and large (60S) subunits from T. thermophila are transported significantly faster than individual subunits. These observations support a facilitated transport model for the translocation of ribosomal subunits as separate units across the nuclear envelope whereby the transport rate of 60S or 40S subunits is enhanced by the presence of the partner subunit. Although the basic features of the transport mechanism have been preserved through evolution, other aspects of the process may be mediated through species-specific interactions. They hypothesize that a species-specific nuclear 40S-60S subunit association may expedite the transport of individual subunits across the nuclear envelope.

  12. Interrelationships between yeast ribosomal protein assembly events and transient ribosome biogenesis factors interactions in early pre-ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Steffen; Ohmayer, Uli; Neueder, Andreas; Hierlmeier, Thomas; Perez-Fernandez, Jorge; Hochmuth, Eduard; Deutzmann, Rainer; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Tschochner, Herbert; Milkereit, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    Early steps of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis require a large set of ribosome biogenesis factors which transiently interact with nascent rRNA precursors (pre-rRNA). Most likely, concomitant with that initial contacts between ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) and ribosome precursors (pre-ribosomes) are established which are converted into robust interactions between pre-rRNA and r-proteins during the course of ribosome maturation. Here we analysed the interrelationship between r-protein assembly events and the transient interactions of ribosome biogenesis factors with early pre-ribosomal intermediates termed 90S pre-ribosomes or small ribosomal subunit (SSU) processome in yeast cells. We observed that components of the SSU processome UTP-A and UTP-B sub-modules were recruited to early pre-ribosomes independently of all tested r-proteins. On the other hand, groups of SSU processome components were identified whose association with early pre-ribosomes was affected by specific r-protein assembly events in the head-platform interface of the SSU. One of these components, Noc4p, appeared to be itself required for robust incorporation of r-proteins into the SSU head domain. Altogether, the data reveal an emerging network of specific interrelationships between local r-protein assembly events and the functional interactions of SSU processome components with early pre-ribosomes. They point towards some of these components being transient primary pre-rRNA in vivo binders and towards a role for others in coordinating the assembly of major SSU domains.

  13. Eukaryotic Ribosome Assembly and Nuclear Export.

    PubMed

    Nerurkar, Purnima; Altvater, Martin; Gerhardy, Stefan; Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Weirich, Christine; Panse, Vikram Govind

    2015-01-01

    Accurate translation of the genetic code into functional polypeptides is key to cellular growth and proliferation. This essential process is carried out by the ribosome, a ribonucleoprotein complex of remarkable size and intricacy. Although the structure of the mature ribosome has provided insight into the mechanism of translation, our knowledge regarding the assembly, quality control, and intracellular targeting of this molecular machine is still emerging. Assembly of the eukaryotic ribosome begins in the nucleolus and requires more than 350 conserved assembly factors, which transiently associate with the preribosome at specific maturation stages. After accomplishing their tasks, early-acting assembly factors are released, preparing preribosomes for nuclear export. Export competent preribosomal subunits are transported through nuclear pore complexes into the cytoplasm, where they undergo final maturation steps, which are closely connected to quality control, before engaging in translation. In this chapter, we focus on the final events that commit correctly assembled ribosomal subunits for translation.

  14. Site-Specific Cleavage of Ribosomal RNA in Escherichia coli-Based Cell-Free Protein Synthesis Systems

    PubMed Central

    Failmezger, Jurek; Nitschel, Robert; Sánchez-Kopper, Andrés; Kraml, Michael; Siemann-Herzberg, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis, which mimics the biological protein production system, allows rapid expression of proteins without the need to maintain a viable cell. Nevertheless, cell-free protein expression relies on active in vivo translation machinery including ribosomes and translation factors. Here, we examined the integrity of the protein synthesis machinery, namely the functionality of ribosomes, during (i) the cell-free extract preparation and (ii) the performance of in vitro protein synthesis by analyzing crucial components involved in translation. Monitoring the 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, elongation factors and ribosomal protein S1, we show that processing of a cell-free extract results in no substantial alteration of the translation machinery. Moreover, we reveal that the 16S rRNA is specifically cleaved at helix 44 during in vitro translation reactions, resulting in the removal of the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence. These defective ribosomes accumulate in the cell-free system. We demonstrate that the specific cleavage of the 16S rRNA is triggered by the decreased concentrations of Mg2+. In addition, we provide evidence that helix 44 of the 30S ribosomal subunit serves as a point-of-entry for ribosome degradation in Escherichia coli. Our results suggest that Mg2+ homeostasis is fundamental to preserving functional ribosomes in cell-free protein synthesis systems, which is of major importance for cell-free protein synthesis at preparative scale, in order to create highly efficient technical in vitro systems. PMID:27992588

  15. Comparative anatomy of a regulatory ribosomal protein.

    PubMed

    Worbs, Michael; Wahl, Markus C; Lindahl, Lasse; Zengel, Janice M

    2002-08-01

    Ribosomal protein L4 is a crucial folding mediator and an important architectural component of the large ribosomal subunit. Furthermore, Escherichia coli L4 produced in excess of its rRNA binding sites downregulates the transcription and translation of its own S10 operon, encoding 11 ribosomal proteins. Genetic experiments and the crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima L4 had implicated separable regions on L4 in ribosome association and expression control while RNA competition experiments and the regulatory capacity of heterologous L4 had suggested an overlap of the protein sequences involved in the two functions. We report herein that contrary to other foreign bacterial L4 proteins, L4 from T. maritima only weakly controlled expression of the S10 operon in E. coli. Also, wildtype T. maritima L4 was more weakly associated with E. coli ribosomes than with the E. coli analog. Rational mutageneses were performed to try to increase the regulatory competence of T. maritima L4. The ribosome incorporation of the mutant proteins was also investigated. Two different deletions removing T. maritima-specific sequences had little effects on regulation although one did improve ribosome association. Interestingly, a set of multiple mutations, which rendered the region around helices alpha4 and alpha5 in T. maritima L4 more E. coli-like, had no influence on the incorporation of the protein into the large ribosomal subunit but considerably improved its regulatory potential. Therefore, the area around helices alpha4 and alpha5, which is critical for the initial folding steps of the large subunit, is also a central element of autogenous control, presumably by contacting the S10 mRNA leader. Ribosome association is compounded at later stages of assembly by additional rRNA contacts through L4 areas which do not participate in regulation. Similarly, sequences outside the alpha4/alpha5 region aid expression control.

  16. Ribosome dynamics and the evolutionary history of ribosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, George E.; Paci, Maxim; Tran, Quyen; Petrov, Anton S.; Williams, Loren D.

    2015-09-01

    The ribosome is a dynamic nanomachine responsible for coded protein synthesis. Its major subsystems were essentially in place at the time of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). Ribosome evolutionary history thus potentially provides a window into the pre- LUCA world. This history begins with the origins of the peptidyl transferase center where the actual peptide is synthesized and then continues over an extended timeframe as additional functional centers including the GTPase center are added. The large ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) have grown over time by an accretion process and a model exists that proposes a relative age of each accreted element. We have compared atomic resolution ribosome structures before and after EF-G bound GTP hydrolysis and thereby identified the location of 23 pivot points in the large rRNAs that facilitate ribosome dynamics. Pivots in small subunit helices h28 and h44 appear to be especially central to the process and according to the accretion model significantly older than the other helices containing pivots. Overall, the results suggest that ribosomal dynamics occurred in two phases. In the first phase, an inherently mobile h28/h44 combination provided the flexibility needed to create a dynamic ribosome that was essentially a Brownian machine. This addition likely made coded peptide synthesis possible by facilitating movement of a primitive mRNA. During the second phase, addition of pivoting elements and the creation of a factor binding site allowed the regulation of the inherent motion created by h28/h44. All of these events likely occurred before LUCA.

  17. Structures of the ribosome in intermediate states of ratcheting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Dunkle, Jack; Cate, Jamie H. D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Structures of the E. coli 70S ribosome show how the large and small subunits rotate to facilitate protein synthesis. Protein biosynthesis on the ribosome requires repeated cycles of ratcheting, which couples rotation of the two ribosomal subunits with respect to each other and swiveling of the head domain of the small subunit. However, the molecular basis for how the two ribosomal subunits rearrange contacts with each other during ratcheting while remaining stably associated is not known. Here we describe x-ray crystal structures of the intact Escherichia coli ribosome, either in the apo form (3.5 Å resolution) or with one (4.0 Å res) or two (4.0 Å res) anticodon stem-loop tRNA mimics bound, that reveal intermediate states of intersubunit rotation. In the structures, the interface between the small and large ribosomal subunits rearranges in discrete steps along the ratcheting pathway. Positioning of the head domain of the small subunit is controlled by interactions with the large subunit and with the tRNA bound in the peptidyl-tRNA site. The intermediates observed here provide insight into how tRNAs move into the hybrid state of binding that precedes the final steps of mRNA and tRNA translocation. PMID:19696352

  18. Import of ribosomal proteins into yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Woellhaf, Michael W; Hansen, Katja G; Garth, Christoph; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes of baker's yeast contain at least 78 protein subunits. All but one of these proteins are nuclear-encoded, synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes, and imported into the matrix for biogenesis. The import of matrix proteins typically relies on N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequences that form positively charged amphipathic helices. Interestingly, the N-terminal regions of many ribosomal proteins do not closely match the characteristics of matrix targeting sequences, suggesting that the import processes of these proteins might deviate to some extent from the general import route. So far, the biogenesis of only two ribosomal proteins, Mrpl32 and Mrp10, was studied experimentally and indeed showed surprising differences to the import of other preproteins. In this review article we summarize the current knowledge on the transport of proteins into the mitochondrial matrix, and thereby specifically focus on proteins of the mitochondrial ribosome.

  19. Functions of Ribosomal Proteins in Assembly of Eukaryotic Ribosomes In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The proteome of cells is synthesized by ribosomes, complex ribonucleoproteins that in eukaryotes contain 79–80 proteins and four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) more than 5,400 nucleotides long. How these molecules assemble together and how their assembly is regulated in concert with the growth and proliferation of cells remain important unanswered questions. Here, we review recently emerging principles to understand how eukaryotic ribosomal proteins drive ribosome assembly in vivo. Most ribosomal proteins assemble with rRNA cotranscriptionally; their association with nascent particles is strengthened as assembly proceeds. Each subunit is assembled hierarchically by sequential stabilization of their subdomains. The active sites of both subunits are constructed last, perhaps to prevent premature engagement of immature ribosomes with active subunits. Late-assembly intermediates undergo quality-control checks for proper function. Mutations in ribosomal proteins that affect mostly late steps lead to ribosomopathies, diseases that include a spectrum of cell type–specific disorders that often transition from hypoproliferative to hyperproliferative growth. PMID:25706898

  20. Sequestration of Ribosome during Protein Aggregate Formation: Contribution of ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Bani K.; Mondal, Surojit; Banerjee, Senjuti; Ghosh, Amar Nath; Barat, Chandana

    2017-01-01

    An understanding of the mechanisms underlying protein aggregation and cytotoxicity of the protein aggregates is crucial in the prevention of several diseases in humans. Ribosome, the cellular protein synthesis machine is capable of acting as a protein folding modulator. The peptidyltransferase center residing in the domain V of large ribosomal subunit 23S rRNA is the centre for the protein folding ability of the ribosome and is also the cellular target of several antiprion compounds. Our in vitro studies unexpectedly reveal that the partial unfolding or aggregation of lysozyme under reducing conditions in presence of the ribosome can induce aggregation of ribosomal components. Electrostatic interactions complemented by specific rRNA-protein interaction drive the ribosome-protein aggregation process. Under similar conditions the rRNA, especially the large subunit rRNA and in vitro transcribed RNA corresponding to domain V of 23S rRNA (bDV RNA) stimulates lysozyme aggregation leading to RNA-protein aggregate formation. Protein aggregation during the refolding of non-disulfide containing protein BCAII at high concentrations also induces ribosome aggregation. BCAII aggregation was also stimulated in presence of the large subunit rRNA. Our observations imply that the specific sequestration of the translation machine by aggregating proteins might contribute to their cytotoxicity. PMID:28169307

  1. Functions of ribosomal proteins in assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Jesús; Karbstein, Katrin; Woolford, John L

    2015-01-01

    The proteome of cells is synthesized by ribosomes, complex ribonucleoproteins that in eukaryotes contain 79-80 proteins and four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) more than 5,400 nucleotides long. How these molecules assemble together and how their assembly is regulated in concert with the growth and proliferation of cells remain important unanswered questions. Here, we review recently emerging principles to understand how eukaryotic ribosomal proteins drive ribosome assembly in vivo. Most ribosomal proteins assemble with rRNA cotranscriptionally; their association with nascent particles is strengthened as assembly proceeds. Each subunit is assembled hierarchically by sequential stabilization of their subdomains. The active sites of both subunits are constructed last, perhaps to prevent premature engagement of immature ribosomes with active subunits. Late-assembly intermediates undergo quality-control checks for proper function. Mutations in ribosomal proteins that affect mostly late steps lead to ribosomopathies, diseases that include a spectrum of cell type-specific disorders that often transition from hypoproliferative to hyperproliferative growth.

  2. [Binding of human ribosomal protein S13 to the central domain of 18S rRNA].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A V; Malygin, A A; Karpova, G G

    2011-01-01

    Human ribosomal protein S13 is a structural element of the small subunit of ribosome. It is a homologue of eubacterial ribosomal protein S15, and, besides, it possesses an extended N-terminal region, characteristic of the S15p family in eukaryotes and archaea. In the present study, we investigated binding of recombinant ribosomal protein S13 and its mutants containing deletions or substitutions of amino acid residues in different regions with an RNA transcript corresponding to a fragment of the central domain of 18S rRNA. We found that replacement of ultra-conservative residues H101 and D108 as well as deletions of either 29 C-terminal or 27 N-terminal residues substantially reduced affinity of the protein to the RNA transcript. Deletion of 54 C-terminal or 80 N-terminal residues completely deprived the protein of binding capacity. Using a footprinting assay, we identified sites in the RNA transcript changing their accessibilities to action of hydroxyl radicals under binding of either full-length protein S13 or its mutant lacking 27 N-terminal residues. It is shown that these sites are located mainly in helix H22 of the 18S rRNA and in the region of its junction with helix H20 and are consistent predominantly with contacts of the rRNA with the conserved part of the protein. We concluded that binding of ribosomal protein S13 to 18S rRNA is provided mainly by conserved motifs of the protein corresponding to those motifs in its eubacterial homologue that are involved in the interaction with 16S rRNA in the 30S subunit. Role of the N-terminal region of the protein in its binding to the central domain of 18S rRNA is discussed.

  3. Bases in 16S rRNA Important for Subunit Association, tRNA binding, and Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xinying; Chiu, Katie; Ghosh, Srikanta; Joseph, Simpson

    2009-01-01

    Ribosomes are the cellular machinery responsible for protein synthesis. A well-orchestrated step in the elongation cycle of protein synthesis is the precise translocation of the tRNA-mRNA complex within the ribosome. Here we report the application of a new in vitro modification-interference method for the identification of bases in 16S rRNA that are essential for translocation. Our results suggest that conserved bases U56, U723, A1306, A1319, and A1468 in 16S rRNA are important for translocation. These five bases were deleted or mutated in order to study their role in translation. Depending on the type of mutation, we observed inhibition of growth rate, subunit association, tRNA binding and/or translocation. Interestingly, deletion of U56 or A1319 or mutation of A1319 to C showed a lethal phenotype and were defective in protein synthesis in vitro. Further analysis showed that deletion of U56 or A1319 caused defects in 30S subunit assembly, subunit association and tRNA binding. In contrast, A1319C mutation showed no defects in subunit association; however, the extent of tRNA binding and translocation was significantly reduced. These results show that conserved bases located as far away as 100 Å from the tRNA binding sites can be important for translation. PMID:19545171

  4. The Structure and Function of the Eukaryotic Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Daniel N.; Doudna Cate, Jamie H.

    2012-01-01

    Structures of the bacterial ribosome have provided a framework for understanding universal mechanisms of protein synthesis. However, the eukaryotic ribosome is much larger than it is in bacteria, and its activity is fundamentally different in many key ways. Recent cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions and X-ray crystal structures of eukaryotic ribosomes and ribosomal subunits now provide an unprecedented opportunity to explore mechanisms of eukaryotic translation and its regulation in atomic detail. This review describes the X-ray crystal structures of the Tetrahymena thermophila 40S and 60S subunits and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 80S ribosome, as well as cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of translating yeast and plant 80S ribosomes. Mechanistic questions about translation in eukaryotes that will require additional structural insights to be resolved are also presented. PMID:22550233

  5. Fluctuations between multiple EF-G-induced chimeric tRNA states during translocation on the ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adio, Sarah; Senyushkina, Tamara; Peske, Frank; Fischer, Niels; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V.

    2015-06-01

    The coupled translocation of transfer RNA and messenger RNA through the ribosome entails large-scale structural rearrangements, including step-wise movements of the tRNAs. Recent structural work has visualized intermediates of translocation induced by elongation factor G (EF-G) with tRNAs trapped in chimeric states with respect to 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits. The functional role of the chimeric states is not known. Here we follow the formation of translocation intermediates by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Using EF-G mutants, a non-hydrolysable GTP analogue, and fusidic acid, we interfere with either translocation or EF-G release from the ribosome and identify several rapidly interconverting chimeric tRNA states on the reaction pathway. EF-G engagement prevents backward transitions early in translocation and increases the fraction of ribosomes that rapidly fluctuate between hybrid, chimeric and posttranslocation states. Thus, the engagement of EF-G alters the energetics of translocation towards a flat energy landscape, thereby promoting forward tRNA movement.

  6. Comparison of sequencing the D2 region of the large subunit ribosomal RNA gene (MicroSEQ®) versus the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions using two public databases for identification of common and uncommon clinically relevant fungal species.

    PubMed

    Arbefeville, S; Harris, A; Ferrieri, P

    2017-09-01

    Fungal infections cause considerable morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Rapid and accurate identification of fungi is essential to guide accurately targeted antifungal therapy. With the advent of molecular methods, clinical laboratories can use new technologies to supplement traditional phenotypic identification of fungi. The aims of the study were to evaluate the sole commercially available MicroSEQ® D2 LSU rDNA Fungal Identification Kit compared to the in-house developed internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions assay in identifying moulds, using two well-known online public databases to analyze sequenced data. 85 common and uncommon clinically relevant fungi isolated from clinical specimens were sequenced for the D2 region of the large subunit (LSU) of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene with the MicroSEQ® Kit and the ITS regions with the in house developed assay. The generated sequenced data were analyzed with the online GenBank and MycoBank public databases. The D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene identified 89.4% or 92.9% of the 85 isolates to the genus level and the full ITS region (f-ITS) 96.5% or 100%, using GenBank or MycoBank, respectively, when compared to the consensus ID. When comparing species-level designations to the consensus ID, D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene aligned with 44.7% (38/85) or 52.9% (45/85) of these isolates in GenBank or MycoBank, respectively. By comparison, f-ITS possessed greater specificity, followed by ITS1, then ITS2 regions using GenBank or MycoBank. Using GenBank or MycoBank, D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene outperformed phenotypic based ID at the genus level. Comparing rates of ID between D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene and the ITS regions in GenBank or MycoBank at the species level against the consensus ID, f-ITS and ITS2 exceeded performance of the D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene, but ITS1 had similar performance to the D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene using MycoBank. Our results indicated that the MicroSEQ® D2 LSU r

  7. Error-prone and error-restrictive mutations affecting ribosomal protein S12.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Deepali; Gregory, Steven T; O'Connor, Michael

    2011-07-01

    Ribosomal protein S12 plays a pivotal role in decoding functions on the ribosome. X-ray crystallographic analyses of ribosomal complexes have revealed that S12 is involved in the inspection of codon-anticodon pairings in the ribosomal A site, as well as in the succeeding domain rearrangements of the 30S subunit that are essential for accommodation of aminoacyl-tRNA. A role for S12 in tRNA selection is also well supported by classical genetic analyses; mutations affecting S12 are readily isolated in bacteria and organelles, since specific alterations in S12 confer resistance to the error-inducing antibiotic streptomycin, and the ribosomes from many such streptomycin-resistant S12 mutants display decreased levels of miscoding. However, substitutions that confer resistance to streptomycin likely represent a very distinct class of all possible S12 mutants. Until recently, the technical difficulties in generating random, unselectable mutations in essential genes in complex operons have generally precluded the analysis of other classes of S12 alterations. Using a recombineering approach, we have targeted the Escherichia coli rpsL gene, encoding S12, for random mutagenesis and screened the resulting mutants for effects on decoding fidelity. We have recovered over 40 different substitutions located throughout the S12 protein that alter the accuracy of translation without substantially affecting the sensitivity to streptomycin. Moreover, this collection includes mutants that promote miscoding, as well as those that restrict decoding errors. These results affirm the importance of S12 in decoding processes and indicate that alterations in this essential protein can have diverse effects on the accuracy of decoding.

  8. Differential scanning calorimetry of whole Escherichia coli treated with the antimicrobial peptide MSI-78 indicate a multi-hit mechanism with ribosomes as a novel target.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Alexander M; Whelan, William A; Cole, Emma; Booth, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) of intact Escherichia coli (E. coli) was used to identify non-lipidic targets of the antimicrobial peptide (AMP) MSI-78. The DSC thermograms revealed that, in addition to its known lytic properties, MSI-78 also has a striking effect on ribosomes. MSI-78's effect on DSC scans of bacteria was similar to that of kanamycin, an antibiotic drug known to target the 30S small ribosomal subunit. An in vitro transcription/translation assay helped confirm MSI-78's targeting of ribosomes. The scrambled version of MSI-78 also affected the ribosome peak of the DSC scans, but required greater amounts of peptide to cause a similar effect to the unscrambled peptide. Furthermore, the effect of the scrambled peptide was not specific to the ribosomes; other regions of the DSC thermogram were also affected. These results suggest that MSI-78's effects on E. coli are at least somewhat dependent on its particular structural features, rather than a sole function of its overall charge and hydrophobicity. When considered along with earlier work detailing MSI-78's membrane lytic properties, it appears that MSI-78 operates via a multi-hit mechanism with multiple targets.

  9. Differential scanning calorimetry of whole Escherichia coli treated with the antimicrobial peptide MSI-78 indicate a multi-hit mechanism with ribosomes as a novel target

    PubMed Central

    Brannan, Alexander M.; Whelan, William A.; Cole, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) of intact Escherichia coli (E. coli) was used to identify non-lipidic targets of the antimicrobial peptide (AMP) MSI-78. The DSC thermograms revealed that, in addition to its known lytic properties, MSI-78 also has a striking effect on ribosomes. MSI-78’s effect on DSC scans of bacteria was similar to that of kanamycin, an antibiotic drug known to target the 30S small ribosomal subunit. An in vitro transcription/translation assay helped confirm MSI-78’s targeting of ribosomes. The scrambled version of MSI-78 also affected the ribosome peak of the DSC scans, but required greater amounts of peptide to cause a similar effect to the unscrambled peptide. Furthermore, the effect of the scrambled peptide was not specific to the ribosomes; other regions of the DSC thermogram were also affected. These results suggest that MSI-78’s effects on E. coli are at least somewhat dependent on its particular structural features, rather than a sole function of its overall charge and hydrophobicity. When considered along with earlier work detailing MSI-78’s membrane lytic properties, it appears that MSI-78 operates via a multi-hit mechanism with multiple targets. PMID:26713257

  10. Identification and characterization of a Dictyostelium discoideum ribosomal protein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Szymkowski, D E; Deering, R A

    1990-01-01

    We have identified a developmentally repressed large-subunit ribosomal protein gene of Dictyostelium discoideum based on sequence similarity to other ribosomal proteins. Protein rpl7 is homologous to large subunit ribosomal proteins from the rat and possibly to Mycoplasma capricolum and Escherichia coli, but is not similar to three sequenced ribosomal proteins in Dictyostelium. The rpl7 gene is present at one copy per genome, as are six other cloned Dictyostelium ribosomal proteins. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms exist for ribosomal protein genes rpl7, rp1024, and rp110 in strain HU182; most Dictyostelium ribosomal protein genes examined are linked no closer than 30-100 kb to each other in the genome. Dictyostelium ribosomal proteins are known to be developmentally regulated, and levels of rpl7 transcript gradually decrease during the 24-hour development cycle. This drop correlates with that of rp1024, indicating these and other ribosomal protein genes may be coordinately regulated. To determine the cellular location of the protein, we raised antibodies to an rpl7-derived branched synthetic peptide. These antibodies cross-reacted with one protein of the expected size in a ribosomal protein fraction of Dictyostelium, indicating that the product of gene rpl7 is localized in the ribosome. Images PMID:1975664

  11. Synthesis of ribosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, J R

    1989-01-01

    , the protein itself causes a feedback inhibition of the splicing of the transcript of its own gene. The synthesis of ribosomes involves a massive transfer of material across the nuclear envelope in both directions. Nuclear localization signals have been identified for at least three ribosomal proteins; they are similar but not identical to those identified for the simian virus 40 T antigen. There is no information about how ribosomal subunits are transported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2666845

  12. Antibiotic-induced ribosomal assembly defects result from changes in the synthesis of ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Siibak, Triinu; Peil, Lauri; Dönhöfer, Alexandra; Tats, Age; Remm, Maido; Wilson, Daniel N; Tenson, Tanel; Remme, Jaanus

    2011-04-01

    Inhibitors of protein synthesis cause defects in the assembly of ribosomal subunits. In response to treatment with the antibiotics erythromycin or chloramphenicol, precursors of both large and small ribosomal subunits accumulate. We have used a pulse-labelling approach to demonstrate that the accumulating subribosomal particles maturate into functional 70S ribosomes. The protein content of the precursor particles is heterogeneous and does not correspond with known assembly intermediates. Mass spectrometry indicates that production of ribosomal proteins in the presence of the antibiotics correlates with the amounts of the individual ribosomal proteins within the precursor particles. Thus, treatment of cells with chloramphenicol or erythromycin leads to an unbalanced synthesis of ribosomal proteins, providing the explanation for formation of assembly-defective particles. The operons for ribosomal proteins show a characteristic pattern of antibiotic inhibition where synthesis of the first proteins is inhibited weakly but gradually increases for the subsequent proteins in the operon. This phenomenon most likely reflects translational coupling and allows us to identify other putative coupled non-ribosomal operons in the Escherichia coli chromosome. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal protein L26 is not essential for ribosome assembly and function.

    PubMed

    Babiano, Reyes; Gamalinda, Michael; Woolford, John L; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2012-08-01

    Ribosomal proteins play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and function. Here, we study the evolutionarily conserved L26 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which assembles into pre-60S ribosomal particles in the nucle(ol)us. Yeast L26 is one of the many ribosomal proteins encoded by two functional genes. We have disrupted both genes; surprisingly, the growth of the resulting rpl26 null mutant is apparently identical to that of the isogenic wild-type strain. The absence of L26 minimally alters 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Polysome analysis revealed the appearance of half-mers. Analysis of pre-rRNA processing indicated that L26 is mainly required to optimize 27S pre-rRNA maturation, without which the release of pre-60S particles from the nucle(ol)us is partially impaired. Ribosomes lacking L26 exhibit differential reactivity to dimethylsulfate in domain I of 25S/5.8S rRNAs but apparently are able to support translation in vivo with wild-type accuracy. The bacterial homologue of yeast L26, L24, is a primary rRNA binding protein required for 50S ribosomal subunit assembly in vitro and in vivo. Our results underscore potential differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosome assembly. We discuss the reasons why yeast L26 plays such an apparently nonessential role in the cell.

  14. SuhB Associates with Nus Factors To Facilitate 30S Ribosome Biogenesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Navjot; Bubunenko, Mikhail; Smith, Carol; Abbott, David M.; Stringer, Anne M.; Shi, Ronald; Court, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A complex of highly conserved proteins consisting of NusB, NusE, NusA, and NusG is required for robust expression of rRNA in Escherichia coli. This complex is proposed to prevent Rho-dependent transcription termination by a process known as “antitermination.” The mechanism of this antitermination in rRNA is poorly understood but requires association of NusB and NusE with a specific RNA sequence in rRNA known as BoxA. Here, we identify a novel member of the rRNA antitermination machinery: the inositol monophosphatase SuhB. We show that SuhB associates with elongating RNA polymerase (RNAP) at rRNA in a NusB-dependent manner. Although we show that SuhB is required for BoxA-mediated antitermination in a reporter system, our data indicate that the major function of the NusB/E/A/G/SuhB complex is not to prevent Rho-dependent termination of rRNA but rather to promote correct rRNA maturation. This occurs through formation of a SuhB-mediated loop between NusB/E/BoxA and RNAP/NusA/G. Thus, we have reassigned the function of these proteins at rRNA and identified another key player in this complex. PMID:26980831

  15. Studies on structural stability of thermophilic Sulfolobus acidocaldarius ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Yangala, Kalavathi; Suryanarayana, Tangirala

    2007-02-01

    Structural stability of thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius ribosomes, with respect their susceptibility to pancreatic RNase A and stability to temperature (deltaTm), on treatment with various stabilizing (polyamines) and destabilizing (sulfhydryl and intercalating) agents were studied and compared with mesophilic E. coli ribosomes, to understand the structural differences between thermophilic and mesophilic ribosomes. Thermophilic archaeal ribosomes and their subunits were 10-times less susceptible to pancreatic RNase A, compared to mesophilic ribosomes, showing the presence of strong and compact structural organization in them. Thermophilic ribosomes treated with destabilizing agents, such as sulfhydryl reagents [5,5'-Dithio-bis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid), N-ethylmaleimide and p-hydroxymercurybenzoate) and intercalating agents (ethidium bromide, EtBr) showed higher stability to RNase A, compared to similarly treated mesophilic ribosomes, indicating the unavailability of thiol-reactive groups and the presence of strong solvent inaccessible inner core. Higher stability of thermophilic ribosomes compared to mesophilic ribosomes to unfolding agents like urea further supported the presence of strong inner core particle. Thermophilic ribosomes treated with intercalating agents, such as EtBr were less susceptible to RNase A, though they bound to more reagent, showing the rigidity or resilience of their macromolecular structure to alterations caused by destabilizing agents. Overall, these results indicated that factors such as presence of strong solvent inaccessible inner core and rigidity of ribosome macromolecular structure contributed stability of thermophilic ribosomes to RNase A and other destabilizing agents, when compared to mesophilic ribosomes.

  16. Ribosomal protein S18e as a putative molecular staple for the 18S rRNA 3'-major domain core.

    PubMed

    Ilin, Aleksey A; Malygin, Alexey A; Karpova, Galina G

    2011-04-01

    Ribosomal protein S18e is a structural constituent of the 40S ribosomal subunit. We obtained recombinant human ribosomal protein S18e and studied its structural and functional properties. With the use of CD spectroscopy we showed that the protein secondary structure is mainly helical and stable in the neutral pH range and at low urea concentrations. Applying multiple sequence alignment, we revealed that the protein structure has characteristics of the eukaryotic members of the ribosomal protein S13p family with additional extensions in the N-terminal and central parts that contain α-helices according to our prediction. S18e binds specifically and independently to an RNA transcript corresponding to the evolutionary core of the 3'-major domain of 18S rRNA. Hydroxyl radical footprinting showed that the binding site of S18e on the 18S rRNA is similar in general to the binding site of S13p on the 16S rRNA in the 30S ribosomal subunit, albeit the rRNA regions attributed to binding of the eukaryote-specific extensions of S18e were also detected. With magnesium ion concentration close to cellular conditions (2mM), protein binding caused substantial rearrangements in the rRNA transcript making it compact in such a manner that helices H29/H30 and H41-H43 form a bundle resembling their arrangement in the ribosome. Thus, S18e seems to act as a molecular staple fixing the 18S rRNA 3'-major domain core. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. How are tRNAs and mRNA arranged in the ribosome? An attempt to correlate the stereochemistry of the tRNA-mRNA interaction with constraints imposed by the ribosomal topography.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, V; Venclovas, C; Spirin, A; Brimacombe, R; Mitchell, P; Müller, F

    1992-01-01

    Two tRNA molecules at the ribosomal A- and P-sites, with a relatively small angle between the planes of the L-shaped molecules, can be arranged in two mutually exclusive orientations. In one (the 'R'-configuration), the T-loop of the A-site tRNA faces the D-loop of the P-site tRNA, whereas in the other (the 'S'-configuration) the D-loop of the A-site tRNA faces the T-loop of the P-site tRNA. A number of stereochemical arguments, based on the crystal structure of 'free' tRNA, favour the R-configuration. In the ribosome, the CCA-ends of the tRNA molecules are 'fixed' at the base of the central protuberance (the peptidyl transferase centre) of the 50S subunit, and the anticodon loops lie in the neck region (the decoding site) of the 30S subunit. The translocation step is essentially a rotational movement of the tRNA from the A- to the P-site, and there is convincing evidence that the A-site must be located nearest to the L7/L12 protuberance of the 50S subunit. The mRNA in the two codon-anticodon duplexes lies on the 'inside' of the 'elbows' of the tRNA molecules (in both the S-type and R-type configurations), and runs up between the two molecules from the A- to the P-site in the 3' to 5'-direction. These considerations have the consequence that in the S-configuration the mRNA in the codon-anticodon duplexes is directed towards the 50S subunit, whereas in the R-configuration it is directed towards the 30S subunit. The results of site-directed cross-linking experiments, in particular cross-links to mRNA at positions within or very close to the codons interacting with A- or P-site tRNA, favour the latter situation. This conclusion is in direct contradiction to other current models for the arrangement of mRNA and tRNA on the ribosome. Images PMID:1614849

  18. The structure of ribosome-lankacidin complex reveals ribosomal sites for synergistic antibiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, Tamar; Mermershtain, Inbal; Davidovich, Chen; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Wekselman, Itai; Zimmerman, Ella; Xiong, Liqun; Klepacki, Dorota; Arakawa, Kenji; Kinashi, Haruyasu; Mankin, Alexander S.; Yonath, Ada

    2010-04-26

    Crystallographic analysis revealed that the 17-member polyketide antibiotic lankacidin produced by Streptomyces rochei binds at the peptidyl transferase center of the eubacterial large ribosomal subunit. Biochemical and functional studies verified this finding and showed interference with peptide bond formation. Chemical probing indicated that the macrolide lankamycin, a second antibiotic produced by the same species, binds at a neighboring site, at the ribosome exit tunnel. These two antibiotics can bind to the ribosome simultaneously and display synergy in inhibiting bacterial growth. The binding site of lankacidin and lankamycin partially overlap with the binding site of another pair of synergistic antibiotics, the streptogramins. Thus, at least two pairs of structurally dissimilar compounds have been selected in the course of evolution to act synergistically by targeting neighboring sites in the ribosome. These results underscore the importance of the corresponding ribosomal sites for development of clinically relevant synergistic antibiotics and demonstrate the utility of structural analysis for providing new directions for drug discovery.

  19. The structure of ribosome-lankacidin complex reveals ribosomal sites for synergistic antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Tamar; Mermershtain, Inbal; Davidovich, Chen; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Wekselman, Itai; Zimmerman, Ella; Xiong, Liqun; Klepacki, Dorota; Arakawa, Kenji; Kinashi, Haruyasu; Mankin, Alexander S.; Yonath, Ada

    2010-01-01

    Crystallographic analysis revealed that the 17-member polyketide antibiotic lankacidin produced by Streptomyces rochei binds at the peptidyl transferase center of the eubacterial large ribosomal subunit. Biochemical and functional studies verified this finding and showed interference with peptide bond formation. Chemical probing indicated that the macrolide lankamycin, a second antibiotic produced by the same species, binds at a neighboring site, at the ribosome exit tunnel. These two antibiotics can bind to the ribosome simultaneously and display synergy in inhibiting bacterial growth. The binding site of lankacidin and lankamycin partially overlap with the binding site of another pair of synergistic antibiotics, the streptogramins. Thus, at least two pairs of structurally dissimilar compounds have been selected in the course of evolution to act synergistically by targeting neighboring sites in the ribosome. These results underscore the importance of the corresponding ribosomal sites for development of clinically relevant synergistic antibiotics and demonstrate the utility of structural analysis for providing new directions for drug discovery. PMID:20080686

  20. HflX is a ribosome-splitting factor rescuing stalled ribosomes under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanqing; Mandava, Chandra Sekhar; Cao, Wei; Li, Xiaojing; Zhang, Dejiu; Li, Ningning; Zhang, Yixiao; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Qin, Yan; Mi, Kaixia; Lei, Jianlin; Sanyal, Suparna; Gao, Ning

    2015-11-01

    Adverse cellular conditions often lead to nonproductive translational stalling and arrest of ribosomes on mRNAs. Here, we used fast kinetics and cryo-EM to characterize Escherichia coli HflX, a GTPase with unknown function. Our data reveal that HflX is a heat shock-induced ribosome-splitting factor capable of dissociating vacant as well as mRNA-associated ribosomes with deacylated tRNA in the peptidyl site. Structural data demonstrate that the N-terminal effector domain of HflX binds to the peptidyl transferase center in a strikingly similar manner as that of the class I release factors and induces dramatic conformational changes in central intersubunit bridges, thus promoting subunit dissociation. Accordingly, loss of HflX results in an increase in stalled ribosomes upon heat shock. These results suggest a primary role of HflX in rescuing translationally arrested ribosomes under stress conditions.

  1. Convergent evolution led ribosome inactivating proteins to interact with ribosomal stalk.

    PubMed

    Lapadula, Walter J; Sanchez-Puerta, M Virginia; Ayub, Maximiliano Juri

    2012-03-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) inhibit protein synthesis by depurinating an adenine on the sarcin-ricin loop (SRL) of the large subunit ribosomal RNA. Several RIPs interact with the C-terminal end of ribosomal stalk P proteins, and this interaction is required for their full activity. In contrast, the activity of Pokeweed Antiviral Protein is not affected by blocking this stalk component. Here, we provide evidence from phylogenetic analyses and sequence alignments suggesting that the interaction with the C-terminal end of P proteins evolved independently in different RIPs by convergent evolution.

  2. The ribosome-recycling step: consensus or controversy?

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Go; Demeshkina, Natalia; Iwakura, Nobuhiro; Kaji, Hidek