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Sample records for 30s ribosome assembly

  1. Assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Williamson, James R

    2005-11-01

    The assembly of ribosomes requires a significant fraction of the energy expenditure for rapidly growing bacteria. The ribosome is composed of three large RNA molecules and over 50 small proteins that must be rapidly and efficiently assembled into the molecular machine responsible for protein synthesis. For over 30 years, the 30S ribosome has been a key model system for understanding the process of ribosome biogenesis through in vitro assembly experiments. We have recently developed an isotope pulse-chase experiment using quantitative mass spectrometry that permits assembly kinetics to be measured in real time. Kinetic studies have revealed an assembly energy landscape that ensures efficient assembly by a flexible and robust pathway.

  2. An assembly landscape for the 30S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Talkington, Megan W T; Siuzdak, Gary; Williamson, James R

    2005-12-01

    Self-assembling macromolecular machines drive fundamental cellular processes, including transcription, messenger RNA processing, translation, DNA replication and cellular transport. The ribosome, which carries out protein synthesis, is one such machine, and the 30S subunit of the bacterial ribosome is the preeminent model system for biophysical analysis of large RNA-protein complexes. Our understanding of 30S assembly is incomplete, owing to the challenges of monitoring the association of many components simultaneously. Here we have developed a method involving pulse-chase monitored by quantitative mass spectrometry (PC/QMS) to follow the assembly of the 20 ribosomal proteins with 16S ribosomal RNA during formation of the functional particle. These data represent a detailed and quantitative kinetic characterization of the assembly of a large multicomponent macromolecular complex. By measuring the protein binding rates at a range of temperatures, we find that local transformations throughout the assembling subunit have similar but distinct activation energies. Thus, the prevailing view of 30S assembly as a pathway proceeding through a global rate-limiting conformational change must give way to one in which the assembly of the complex traverses a landscape dotted with various local conformational transitions.

  3. An assembly landscape for the 30S ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    Talkington, Megan W. T.; Siuzdak, Gary

    2005-01-01

    Self-assembling macromolecular machines drive fundamental cellular processes, including transcription, mRNA processing, translation, DNA replication, and cellular transport. The ribosome, which carries out protein synthesis, is one such machine, and the 30S subunit of the bacterial ribosome is the preeminent model system for biophysical analysis of large RNA-protein complexes. Our understanding of 30S assembly is incomplete, due to the challenges of monitoring the association of many components simultaneously. We have developed a new method involving pulse-chase monitored by quantitative mass spectrometry (PC/QMS) to follow the assembly of the 20 ribosomal proteins with 16S rRNA during formation of the functional particle. These data represent the first detailed and quantitative kinetic characterization of the assembly of a large multicomponent macromolecular complex. By measuring the protein binding rates at a range of temperatures, we have found that local transformations throughout the assembling subunit have similar but distinct activation energies. This observation shows that the prevailing view of 30S assembly as a pathway proceeding through a global rate-limiting conformational change must give way to a view in which the assembly of the complex traverses a landscape dotted with a variety of local conformational transitions. PMID:16319883

  4. Assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit: positioning ribosomal protein S13 in the S7 assembly branch.

    PubMed

    Grondek, Joel F; Culver, Gloria M

    2004-12-01

    Studies of Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit assembly have revealed a hierarchical and cooperative association of ribosomal proteins with 16S ribosomal RNA; these results have been used to compile an in vitro 30S subunit assembly map. In single protein addition and omission studies, ribosomal protein S13 was shown to be dependent on the prior association of ribosomal protein S20 for binding to the ribonucleoprotein particle. While the overwhelming majority of interactions revealed in the assembly map are consistent with additional data, the dependency of S13 on S20 is not. Structural studies position S13 in the head of the 30S subunit > 100 A away from S20, which resides near the bottom of the body of the 30S subunit. All of the proteins that reside in the head of the 30S subunit, except S13, have been shown to be part of the S7 assembly branch, that is, they all depend on S7 for association with the assembling 30S subunit. Given these observations, the assembly requirements for S13 were investigated using base-specific chemical footprinting and primer extension analysis. These studies reveal that S13 can bind to 16S rRNA in the presence of S7, but not S20. Additionally, interaction between S13 and other members of the S7 assembly branch have been observed. These results link S13 to the 3' major domain family of proteins, and the S7 assembly branch, placing S13 in a new location in the 30S subunit assembly map where its position is in accordance with much biochemical and structural data.

  5. The effect of ribosome assembly cofactors on in vitro 30S subunit reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Bunner, Anne E; Nord, Stefan; Wikström, P Mikael; Williamson, James R

    2010-04-23

    Ribosome biogenesis is facilitated by a growing list of assembly cofactors, including helicases, GTPases, chaperones, and other proteins, but the specific functions of many of these assembly cofactors are still unclear. The effect of three assembly cofactors on 30S ribosome assembly was determined in vitro using a previously developed mass-spectrometry-based method that monitors the rRNA binding kinetics of ribosomal proteins. The essential GTPase Era caused several late-binding proteins to bind rRNA faster when included in a 30S reconstitution. RimP enabled faster binding of S9 and S19 and inhibited the binding of S12 and S13, perhaps by blocking those proteins' binding sites. RimM caused proteins S5 and S12 to bind dramatically faster. These quantitative kinetic data provide important clues about the roles of these assembly cofactors in the mechanism of 30S biogenesis. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Visualizing ribosome biogenesis: parallel assembly pathways for the 30S subunit.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Anke M; Yoshioka, Craig; Beck, Andrea H; Bunner, Anne E; Milligan, Ronald A; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Williamson, James R

    2010-10-29

    Ribosomes are self-assembling macromolecular machines that translate DNA into proteins, and an understanding of ribosome biogenesis is central to cellular physiology. Previous studies on the Escherichia coli 30S subunit suggest that ribosome assembly occurs via multiple parallel pathways rather than through a single rate-limiting step, but little mechanistic information is known about this process. Discovery single-particle profiling (DSP), an application of time-resolved electron microscopy, was used to obtain more than 1 million snapshots of assembling 30S subunits, identify and visualize the structures of 14 assembly intermediates, and monitor the population flux of these intermediates over time. DSP results were integrated with mass spectrometry data to construct the first ribosome-assembly mechanism that incorporates binding dependencies, rate constants, and structural characterization of populated intermediates.

  7. Understanding ribosome assembly: the structure of in vivo assembled immature 30S subunits revealed by cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jomaa, Ahmad; Stewart, Geordie; Martín-Benito, Jaime; Zielke, Ryszard; Campbell, Tracey L; Maddock, Janine R; Brown, Eric D; Ortega, Joaquin

    2011-04-01

    Four decades after early in vitro assembly studies demonstrated that ribosome assembly is a controlled process, our understanding of ribosome assembly is still incomplete. Just as structure determination has been so important to understanding ribosome function, so too will it be critical to sorting out the assembly process. Here, we used a viable deletion in the yjeQ gene, a recognized ribosome assembly factor, to isolate and structurally characterize immature 30S subunits assembled in vivo. These small ribosome subunits contained unprocessed 17S rRNA and lacked some late ribosomal proteins. Cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions revealed that the presence of precursor sequences in the rRNA induces a severe distortion in the 3' minor domain of the subunit involved in the decoding of mRNA and interaction with the large ribosome subunit. These findings suggest that rRNA processing events induce key local conformational changes directing the structure toward the mature assembly. We concluded that rRNA processing, folding, and the entry of tertiary r-proteins are interdependent events in the late stages of 30S subunit assembly. In addition, we demonstrate how studies of emerging assembly factors in ribosome biogenesis can help to elucidate the path of subunit assembly in vivo.

  8. Concurrent Nucleation of 16S Folding and Induced Fit in 30S Ribosome Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Adilakshmi, T.; Bellur, D; Woodson, S

    2008-01-01

    Rapidly growing cells produce thousands of new ribosomes each minute, in a tightly regulated process that is essential to cell growth. How the Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA and the 20 proteins that make up the 30S ribosomal subunit can assemble correctly in a few minutes remains a challenging problem, partly because of the lack of real-time data on the earliest stages of assembly. By providing snapshots of individual RNA and protein interactions as they emerge in real time, here we show that 30S assembly nucleates concurrently from different points along the rRNA. Time-resolved hydroxyl radical footprinting3 was used to map changes in the structure of the rRNA within 20 milliseconds after the addition of total 30S proteins. Helical junctions in each domain fold within 100 ms. In contrast, interactions surrounding the decoding site and between the 5', the central and the 3' domains require 2-200 seconds to form. Unexpectedly, nucleotides contacted by the same protein are protected at different rates, indicating that initial RNA-protein encounter complexes refold during assembly. Although early steps in assembly are linked to intrinsically stable rRNA structure, later steps correspond to regions of induced fit between the proteins and the rRNA.

  9. Quantitation of ten 30S ribosomal assembly intermediates using fluorescence triple correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ridgeway, William K; Millar, David P; Williamson, James R

    2012-08-21

    The self-assembly of bacterial 30S ribosomes involves a large number of RNA folding and RNA-protein binding steps. The sequence of steps determines the overall assembly mechanism and the structure of the mechanism has ramifications for the robustness of biogenesis and resilience against kinetic traps. Thermodynamic interdependencies of protein binding inferred from omission-reconstitution experiments are thought to preclude certain assembly pathways and thus enforce ordered assembly, but this concept is at odds with kinetic data suggesting a more parallel assembly landscape. A major challenge is deconvolution of the statistical distribution of intermediates that are populated during assembly at high concentrations approaching in vivo assembly conditions. To specifically resolve the intermediates formed by binding of three ribosomal proteins to the full length 16S rRNA, we introduce Fluorescence Triple-Correlation Spectroscopy (F3CS). F3CS identifies specific ternary complexes by detecting coincident fluctuations in three-color fluorescence data. Triple correlation integrals quantify concentrations and diffusion kinetics of triply labeled species, and F3CS data can be fit alongside auto-correlation and cross-correlation data to quantify the populations of 10 specific ribosome assembly intermediates. The distribution of intermediates generated by binding three ribosomal proteins to the entire native 16S rRNA included significant populations of species that were not previously thought to be thermodynamically accessible, questioning the current interpretation of the classic omission-reconstitution experiments. F3CS is a general approach for analyzing assembly and function of macromolecular complexes, especially those too large for traditional biophysical methods.

  10. A combined quantitative mass spectrometry and electron microscopy analysis of ribosomal 30S subunit assembly in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Sashital, Dipali G; Greeman, Candacia A; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Williamson, James R

    2014-10-14

    Ribosome assembly is a complex process involving the folding and processing of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), concomitant binding of ribosomal proteins (r-proteins), and participation of numerous accessory cofactors. Here, we use a quantitative mass spectrometry/electron microscopy hybrid approach to determine the r-protein composition and conformation of 30S ribosome assembly intermediates in Escherichia coli. The relative timing of assembly of the 3' domain and the formation of the central pseudoknot (PK) structure depends on the presence of the assembly factor RimP. The central PK is unstable in the absence of RimP, resulting in the accumulation of intermediates in which the 3'-domain is unanchored and the 5'-domain is depleted for r-proteins S5 and S12 that contact the central PK. Our results reveal the importance of the cofactor RimP in central PK formation, and introduce a broadly applicable method for characterizing macromolecular assembly in cells.

  11. In vivo X-ray footprinting of pre-30S ribosomes reveals chaperone-dependent remodeling of late assembly intermediates.

    PubMed

    Clatterbuck Soper, Sarah F; Dator, Romel P; Limbach, Patrick A; Woodson, Sarah A

    2013-11-21

    Assembly of 30S ribosomal subunits from their protein and RNA components requires extensive refolding of the 16S rRNA and is assisted by 10-20 assembly factors in bacteria. We probed the structures of 30S assembly intermediates in E. coli cells, using a synchrotron X-ray beam to generate hydroxyl radical in the cytoplasm. Widespread differences between mature and pre-30S complexes in the absence of assembly factors RbfA and RimM revealed global reorganization of RNA-protein interactions prior to maturation of the 16S rRNA and showed how RimM reduces misfolding of the 16S 3' domain during transcription in vivo. Quantitative (14)N/(15)N mass spectrometry of affinity-purified pre-30S complexes confirmed the absence of tertiary assembly proteins and showed that N-terminal acetylation of proteins S18 and S5 correlates with correct folding of the platform and central pseudoknot. Our results indicate that cellular factors delay specific RNA folding steps to ensure the quality of assembly. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A combined quantitative mass spectrometry and electron microscopy analysis of ribosomal 30S subunit assembly in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Sashital, Dipali G; Greeman, Candacia A; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Williamson, James R

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is a complex process involving the folding and processing of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), concomitant binding of ribosomal proteins (r-proteins), and participation of numerous accessory cofactors. Here, we use a quantitative mass spectrometry/electron microscopy hybrid approach to determine the r-protein composition and conformation of 30S ribosome assembly intermediates in Escherichia coli. The relative timing of assembly of the 3′ domain and the formation of the central pseudoknot (PK) structure depends on the presence of the assembly factor RimP. The central PK is unstable in the absence of RimP, resulting in the accumulation of intermediates in which the 3′-domain is unanchored and the 5′-domain is depleted for r-proteins S5 and S12 that contact the central PK. Our results reveal the importance of the cofactor RimP in central PK formation, and introduce a broadly applicable method for characterizing macromolecular assembly in cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04491.001 PMID:25313868

  13. Stable isotope pulse-chase monitored by quantitative mass spectrometry applied to E. coli 30S ribosome assembly kinetics.

    PubMed

    Bunner, Anne E; Williamson, James R

    2009-10-01

    Stable isotope mass spectrometry has become a widespread tool in quantitative biology. Pulse-chase monitored by quantitative mass spectrometry (PC/QMS) is a recently developed stable isotope approach that provides a powerful means of studying the in vitro self-assembly kinetics of macromolecular complexes. This method has been applied to the Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit, but could be applied to any stable self-assembling complex that can be reconstituted from its component parts and purified from a mixture of components and complex. The binding rates of 18 out of the 20 ribosomal proteins have been measured at several temperatures using PC/QMS. Here, PC/QMS experiments on 30S ribosomal subunit assembly are described, and the potential application of the method to other complexes is discussed. A variation on the PC/QMS experiment is introduced that enables measurement of kinetic cooperativity between proteins. In addition, several related approaches to stable isotope labeling and quantitative mass spectrometry data analysis are compared and contrasted.

  14. Dissecting the in vivo assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit reveals the role of RimM and general features of the assembly process.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiang; Goto, Simon; Chen, Yuling; Feng, Boya; Xu, Yanji; Muto, Akira; Himeno, Hyouta; Deng, Haiteng; Lei, Jianlin; Gao, Ning

    2013-02-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a tightly regulated, multi-stepped process. The assembly of ribosomal subunits is a central step of the complex biogenesis process, involving nearly 30 protein factors in vivo in bacteria. Although the assembly process has been extensively studied in vitro for over 40 years, very limited information is known for the in vivo process and specific roles of assembly factors. Such an example is ribosome maturation factor M (RimM), a factor involved in the late-stage assembly of the 30S subunit. Here, we combined quantitative mass spectrometry and cryo-electron microscopy to characterize the in vivo 30S assembly intermediates isolated from mutant Escherichia coli strains with genes for assembly factors deleted. Our compositional and structural data show that the assembly of the 3'-domain of the 30S subunit is severely delayed in these intermediates, featured with highly underrepresented 3'-domain proteins and large conformational difference compared with the mature 30S subunit. Further analysis indicates that RimM functions not only to promote the assembly of a few 3'-domain proteins but also to stabilize the rRNA tertiary structure. More importantly, this study reveals intriguing similarities and dissimilarities between the in vitro and the in vivo assembly pathways, suggesting that they are in general similar but with subtle differences.

  15. Protein-RNA Dynamics in the Central Junction Control 30S Ribosome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kris Ann; Lamichhane, Rajan; Lamichhane, Tek; Rueda, David; Cunningham, Philip R

    2016-09-11

    Interactions between ribosomal proteins (rproteins) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) facilitate the formation of functional ribosomes. S15 is a central domain primary binding protein that has been shown to trigger a cascade of conformational changes in 16S rRNA, forming the functional structure of the central domain. Previous biochemical and structural studies in vitro have revealed that S15 binds a three-way junction of helices 20, 21, and 22, including nucleotides 652-654 and 752-754. All junction nucleotides except 653 are highly conserved among the Bacteria. To identify functionally important motifs within the junction, we subjected nucleotides 652-654 and 752-754 to saturation mutagenesis and selected and analyzed functional mutants. Only 64 mutants with greater than 10% ribosome function in vivo were isolated. S15 overexpression complemented mutations in the junction loop in each of the partially active mutants, although mutations that produced inactive ribosomes were not complemented by overexpression of S15. Single-molecule Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) was used to study the Mg(2+)- and S15-induced conformational dynamics of selected junction mutants. Comparison of the structural dynamics of these mutants with the wild type in the presence and absence of S15 revealed specific sequence and structural motifs in the central junction that are important in ribosome function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nonbridging phosphate oxygens in 16S rRNA important for 30S subunit assembly and association with the 50S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Srikanta; Joseph, Simpson

    2005-05-01

    Ribosomes are composed of RNA and protein molecules that associate together to form a supramolecular machine responsible for protein biosynthesis. Detailed information about the structure of the ribosome has come from the recent X-ray crystal structures of the ribosome and the ribosomal subunits. However, the molecular interactions between the rRNAs and the r-proteins that occur during the intermediate steps of ribosome assembly are poorly understood. Here we describe a modification-interference approach to identify nonbridging phosphate oxygens within 16S rRNA that are important for the in vitro assembly of the Escherichia coli 30S small ribosomal subunit and for its association with the 50S large ribosomal subunit. The 30S small subunit was reconstituted from phosphorothioate-substituted 16S rRNA and small subunit proteins. Active 30S subunits were selected by their ability to bind to the 50S large subunit and form 70S ribosomes. Analysis of the selected population shows that phosphate oxygens at specific positions in the 16S rRNA are important for either subunit assembly or for binding to the 50S subunit. The X-ray crystallographic structures of the 30S subunit suggest that some of these phosphate oxygens participate in r-protein binding, coordination of metal ions, or for the formation of intersubunit bridges in the mature 30S subunit. Interestingly, however, several of the phosphate oxygens identified in this study do not participate in any interaction in the mature 30S subunit, suggesting that they play a role in the early steps of the 30S subunit assembly.

  17. The C-terminal helix in the YjeQ zinc-finger domain catalyzes the release of RbfA during 30S ribosome subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Jeganathan, Ajitha; Razi, Aida; Thurlow, Brett; Ortega, Joaquin

    2015-06-01

    YjeQ (also called RsgA) and RbfA proteins in Escherichia coli bind to immature 30S ribosome subunits at late stages of assembly to assist folding of the decoding center. A key step for the subunit to enter the pool of actively translating ribosomes is the release of these factors. YjeQ promotes dissociation of RbfA during the final stages of maturation; however, the mechanism implementing this functional interplay has not been elucidated. YjeQ features an amino-terminal oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding domain, a central GTPase module and a carboxy-terminal zinc-finger domain. We found that the zinc-finger domain is comprised of two functional motifs: the region coordinating the zinc ion and a carboxy-terminal α-helix. The first motif is essential for the anchoring of YjeQ to the 30S subunit and the carboxy-terminal α-helix facilitates the removal of RbfA once the 30S subunit reaches the mature state. Furthermore, the ability of the mature 30S subunit to stimulate YjeQ GTPase activity also depends on the carboxy-terminal α-helix. Our data are consistent with a model in which YjeQ uses this carboxy-terminal α-helix as a sensor to gauge the conformation of helix 44, an essential motif of the decoding center. According to this model, the mature conformation of helix 44 is sensed by the carboxy-terminal α-helix, which in turn stimulates the YjeQ GTPase activity. Hydrolysis of GTP is believed to assist the release of YjeQ from the mature 30S subunit through a still uncharacterized mechanism. These results identify the structural determinants in YjeQ that implement the functional interplay with RbfA. © 2015 Jeganathan et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  18. Assembly of bacterial ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Shajani, Zahra; Sykes, Michael T; Williamson, James R

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of ribosomes from a discrete set of components is a key aspect of the highly coordinated process of ribosome biogenesis. In this review, we present a brief history of the early work on ribosome assembly in Escherichia coli, including a description of in vivo and in vitro intermediates. The assembly process is believed to progress through an alternating series of RNA conformational changes and protein-binding events; we explore the effects of ribosomal proteins in driving these events. Ribosome assembly in vivo proceeds much faster than in vitro, and we outline the contributions of several of the assembly cofactors involved, including Era, RbfA, RimJ, RimM, RimP, and RsgA, which associate with the 30S subunit, and CsdA, DbpA, Der, and SrmB, which associate with the 50S subunit.

  19. RNA folding and ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Woodson, Sarah A

    2008-12-01

    Ribosome synthesis is a tightly regulated process that is crucial for cell survival. Chemical footprinting, mass spectrometry, and cryo-electron microscopy are revealing how these complex cellular machines are assembled. Rapid folding of the rRNA provides a platform for protein-induced assembly of the bacterial 30S ribosome. Multiple assembly pathways increase the flexibility of the assembly process, while accessory factors and modification enzymes chaperone the late stages of assembly and control the quality of the mature subunits.

  20. Structural insights into the assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit in vivo: functional role of S5 and location of the 17S rRNA precursor sequence.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhixiu; Guo, Qiang; Goto, Simon; Chen, Yuling; Li, Ningning; Yan, Kaige; Zhang, Yixiao; Muto, Akira; Deng, Haiteng; Himeno, Hyouta; Lei, Jianlin; Gao, Ning

    2014-05-01

    The in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits is a highly complex process, with a tight coordination between protein assembly and rRNA maturation events, such as folding and processing of rRNA precursors, as well as modifications of selected bases. In the cell, a large number of factors are required to ensure the efficiency and fidelity of subunit production. Here we characterize the immature 30S subunits accumulated in a factor-null Escherichia coli strain (∆rsgA∆rbfA). The immature 30S subunits isolated with varying salt concentrations in the buffer system show interesting differences on both protein composition and structure. Specifically, intermediates derived under the two contrasting salt conditions (high and low) likely reflect two distinctive assembly stages, the relatively early and late stages of the 3' domain assembly, respectively. Detailed structural analysis demonstrates a mechanistic coupling between the maturation of the 5' end of the 17S rRNA and the assembly of the 30S head domain, and attributes a unique role of S5 in coordinating these two events. Furthermore, our structural results likely reveal the location of the unprocessed terminal sequences of the 17S rRNA, and suggest that the maturation events of the 17S rRNA could be employed as quality control mechanisms on subunit production and protein translation.

  1. Driving ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Kressler, Dieter; Hurt, Ed; Bassler, Jochen

    2010-06-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental process that provides cells with the molecular factories for cellular protein production. Accordingly, its misregulation lies at the heart of several hereditary diseases (e.g., Diamond-Blackfan anemia). The process of ribosome assembly comprises the processing and folding of the pre-rRNA and its concomitant assembly with the ribosomal proteins. Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis relies on a large number (>200) of non-ribosomal factors, which confer directionality and accuracy to this process. Many of these non-ribosomal factors fall into different families of energy-consuming enzymes, notably including ATP-dependent RNA helicases, AAA-ATPases, GTPases, and kinases. Ribosome biogenesis is highly conserved within eukaryotic organisms; however, due to the combination of powerful genetic and biochemical methods, it is best studied in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This review summarizes our current knowledge on eukaryotic ribosome assembly, with particular focus on the molecular role of the involved energy-consuming enzymes.

  2. Powering through ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Strunk, Bethany S.; Karbstein, Katrin

    2009-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is required for cell growth in all organisms. Classic in vitro work in bacteria has led to a detailed understanding of the biophysical, thermodynamic, and structural basis for the ordered and correct assembly of ribosomal proteins on ribosomal RNA. Furthermore, it has enabled reconstitution of active subunits from ribosomal RNA and proteins in vitro. Nevertheless, recent work has shown that eukaryotic ribosome assembly requires a large macromolecular machinery in vivo. Many of these assembly factors such as ATPases, GTPases, and kinases hydrolyze nucleotide triphosphates. Because these enzymes are likely regulatory proteins, much work to date has focused on understanding their role in the assembly process. Here, we review these factors, as well as other sources of energy, and their roles in the ribosome assembly process. In addition, we propose roles of energy-releasing enzymes in the assembly process, to explain why energy is used for a process that occurs largely spontaneously in bacteria. Finally, we use literature data to suggest testable models for how these enzymes could be used as targets for regulation of ribosome assembly. PMID:19850913

  3. Real-time assembly landscape of bacterial 30S translation initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Milón, Pohl; Maracci, Cristina; Filonava, Liudmila; Gualerzi, Claudio O; Rodnina, Marina V

    2012-05-06

    Initiation factors guide the ribosome in the selection of mRNA and translational reading frame. We determined the kinetically favored assembly pathway of the 30S preinitiation complex (30S PIC), an early intermediate in 30S initiation complex formation in Escherichia coli. IF3 and IF2 are the first factors to arrive, forming an unstable 30S-IF2-IF3 complex. Subsequently, IF1 joins and locks the factors in a kinetically stable 30S PIC to which fMet-tRNA(fMet) is recruited. Binding of mRNA is independent of initiation factors and can take place at any time during 30S PIC assembly, depending on the cellular concentration of the mRNA and the structural determinants at the ribosome-binding site. The kinetic analysis shows both specific and cumulative effects of initiation factors as well as kinetic checkpoints of mRNA selection at the entry into translation.

  4. Differential assembly of 16S rRNA domains during 30S subunit formation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhili; Culver, Gloria M

    2010-10-01

    Rapid and accurate assembly of the ribosomal subunits, which are responsible for protein synthesis, is required to sustain cell growth. Our best understanding of the interaction of 30S ribosomal subunit components (16S ribosomal RNA [rRNA] and 20 ribosomal proteins [r-proteins]) comes from in vitro work using Escherichia coli ribosomal components. However, detailed information regarding the essential elements involved in the assembly of 30S subunits still remains elusive. Here, we defined a set of rRNA nucleotides that are critical for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit in E. coli. Using an RNA modification interference approach, we identified 54 nucleotides in 16S rRNA whose modification prevents the formation of a functional small ribosomal subunit. The majority of these nucleotides are located in the head and interdomain junction of the 30S subunit, suggesting that these regions are critical for small subunit assembly. In vivo analysis of specific identified sites, using engineered mutations in 16S rRNA, revealed defective protein synthesis capability, aberrant polysome profiles, and abnormal 16S rRNA processing, indicating the importance of these residues in vivo. These studies reveal that specific segments of 16S rRNA are more critical for small subunit assembly than others, and suggest a hierarchy of importance.

  5. The ribosomal subunit assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Dlakić, Mensur

    2005-01-01

    Recent proteomic studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified nearly 200 proteins, other than the structural ribosomal proteins, that participate in the assembly of ribosomal subunits and their transport from the nucleus. In a separate line of research, proteomic studies of mature plant ribosomes have revealed considerable variability in the protein composition of individual ribosomes. PMID:16207363

  6. Analysis of conformational changes in 16 S rRNA during the course of 30 S subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Kristi L; Culver, Gloria M

    2005-11-25

    Ribosome biogenesis involves an integrated series of binding events coupled with conformational changes that ultimately result in the formation of a functional macromolecular complex. In vitro, Escherichia coli 30 S subunit assembly occurs in a cooperative manner with the ordered addition of 20 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) with 16 S rRNA. The assembly pathway for 30 S subunits has been dissected in vitro into three steps, where specific r-proteins associate with 16 S rRNA early in 30 S subunit assembly, followed by a mid-assembly conformational rearrangement of the complex that then enables the remaining r-proteins to associate in the final step. Although the three steps of 30 S subunit assembly have been known for some time, few details have been elucidated about changes that occur as a result of these three specific stages. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the concerted early and late stages of small ribosomal subunit assembly. Conformational changes, roles for base-pairing and r-proteins at specific stages of assembly, and a polar nature to the assembly process have been revealed. This work has allowed a more comprehensive and global view of E.coli 30 S ribosomal subunit assembly to be obtained.

  7. Quantitative proteomic analysis of ribosome assembly and turnover in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Michael T; Shajani, Zahra; Sperling, Edit; Beck, Andrea H; Williamson, James R

    2010-10-29

    Although high-resolution structures of the ribosome have been solved in a series of functional states, relatively little is known about how the ribosome assembles, particularly in vivo. Here, a general method is presented for studying the dynamics of ribosome assembly and ribosomal assembly intermediates. Since significant quantities of assembly intermediates are not present under normal growth conditions, the antibiotic neomycin is used to perturb wild-type Escherichia coli. Treatment of E. coli with the antibiotic neomycin results in the accumulation of a continuum of assembly intermediates for both the 30S and 50S subunits. The protein composition and the protein stoichiometry of these intermediates were determined by quantitative mass spectrometry using purified unlabeled and (15)N-labeled wild-type ribosomes as external standards. The intermediates throughout the continuum are heterogeneous and are largely depleted of late-binding proteins. Pulse-labeling with (15)N-labeled medium time-stamps the ribosomal proteins based on their time of synthesis. The assembly intermediates contain both newly synthesized proteins and proteins that originated in previously synthesized intact subunits. This observation requires either a significant amount of ribosome degradation or the exchange or reuse of ribosomal proteins. These specific methods can be applied to any system where ribosomal assembly intermediates accumulate, including strains with deletions or mutations of assembly factors. This general approach can be applied to study the dynamics of assembly and turnover of other macromolecular complexes that can be isolated from cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Eukaryotic ribosome assembly, transport and quality control.

    PubMed

    Peña, Cohue; Hurt, Ed; Panse, Vikram Govind

    2017-09-07

    Eukaryotic ribosome synthesis is a complex, energy-consuming process that takes place across the nucleolus, nucleoplasm and cytoplasm and requires more than 200 conserved assembly factors. Here, we discuss mechanisms by which the ribosome assembly and nucleocytoplasmic transport machineries collaborate to produce functional ribosomes. We also highlight recent cryo-EM studies that provided unprecedented snapshots of ribosomes during assembly and quality control.

  9. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Dao, E. Han; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; ...

    2015-04-30

    In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecondmore » X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.« less

  10. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dao, E. Han; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Lemke, Henrik T.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Coey, Aaron; Larsen, Kevin; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; DeMirci, Hasan

    2015-04-30

    In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecond X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.

  11. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals.

    PubMed

    Dao, E Han; Sierra, Raymond G; Laksmono, Hartawan; Lemke, Henrik T; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Coey, Aaron; Larsen, Kevin; Baxter, Elizabeth L; Cohen, Aina E; Soltis, S Michael; DeMirci, Hasan

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecond X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.

  12. Mutations of ribosomal protein S5 suppress a defect in late-30S ribosomal subunit biogenesis caused by lack of the RbfA biogenesis factor

    PubMed Central

    Nord, Stefan; Bhatt, Monika J.; Tükenmez, Hasan; Farabaugh, Philip J.; Wikström, P. Mikael

    2015-01-01

    The in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits requires assistance by maturation proteins that are not part of mature ribosomes. One such protein, RbfA, associates with the 30S ribosomal subunits. Loss of RbfA causes cold sensitivity and defects of the 30S subunit biogenesis and its overexpression partially suppresses the dominant cold sensitivity caused by a C23U mutation in the central pseudoknot of 16S rRNA, a structure essential for ribosome function. We have isolated suppressor mutations that restore partially the growth of an RbfA-lacking strain. Most of the strongest suppressor mutations alter one out of three distinct positions in the carboxy-terminal domain of ribosomal protein S5 (S5) in direct contact with helix 1 and helix 2 of the central pseudoknot. Their effect is to increase the translational capacity of the RbfA-lacking strain as evidenced by an increase in polysomes in the suppressed strains. Overexpression of RimP, a protein factor that along with RbfA regulates formation of the ribosome's central pseudoknot, was lethal to the RbfA-lacking strain but not to a wild-type strain and this lethality was suppressed by the alterations in S5. The S5 mutants alter translational fidelity but these changes do not explain consistently their effect on the RbfA-lacking strain. Our genetic results support a role for the region of S5 modified in the suppressors in the formation of the central pseudoknot in 16S rRNA. PMID:26089326

  13. Neutron scattering and the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, P.B.; Engelman, D.M.; Langer, J.A.; Ramakrishnan, V.R.; Schindler, D.G.; Schoenborn, B.P.; Sillers, I.Y.; Yabuki, S.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the progress made in the study of the internal organization of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli by neutron scattering since 1975. A map of that particle showing the position of 14 of the subunit's 21 proteins is presented, and the methods currently used for collecting and analyzing such data are discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of extending the interpretation of neutron mapping data beyond the limits practical today. 30 references, 5 figures.

  14. Neutron Scattering and the 30 S Ribosomal Subunit of E. Coli

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Moore, P. B.; Engelman, D. M.; Langer, J. A.; Ramakrishnan, V. R.; Schindler, D. G.; Schoenborn, B. P.; Sillers, I. Y.; Yabuki, S.

    1982-06-01

    This paper reviews the progress made in the study of the internal organization of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli by neutron scattering since 1975. A map of that particle showing the position of 14 of the subunit's 21 proteins is presented, and the methods currently used for collecting and analyzing such data are discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of extending the interpretation of neutron mapping data beyond the limits practical today.

  15. DnaK-facilitated ribosome assembly in Escherichia coli revisited

    PubMed Central

    ALIX, JEAN-HERVÉ; NIERHAUS, KNUD H.

    2003-01-01

    Assembly helpers exist for the formation of ribosomal subunits. Such a function has been suggested for the DnaK system of chaperones (DnaK, DnaJ, GrpE). Here we show that 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits from an Escherichia coli dnaK-null mutant (containing a disrupted dnaK gene) grown at 30°C are physically and functionally identical to wild-type ribosomes. Furthermore, ribosomal components derived from mutant 30S and 50S subunits are fully competent for in vitro reconstitution of active ribosomal subunits. On the other hand, the DnaK chaperone system cannot circumvent the necessary heat-dependent activation step for the in vitro reconstitution of fully active 30S ribosomal subunits. It is therefore questionable whether the requirement for DnaK observed during in vivo ribosome assembly above 37°C implicates a direct or indirect role for DnaK in this process. PMID:12810912

  16. Characteristic views of E. coli and B. stearothermophilus 30S ribosomal subunits in the electron microscope.

    PubMed Central

    van Heel, M; Stöffler-Meilicke, M

    1985-01-01

    Large sets of electron microscopic images of the 30S ribosomal subunits of Bacillus stearothermophilus (914 molecules) and Escherichia coli (422 molecules) were analysed with image processing techniques. Using computer alignment and a new multivariate statistical classification scheme, three predominant views of the subunit were found for both species. These views, which together account for approximately 90% of the population of images, were determined to a reproducible resolution of up to 1.7 nm, thus elucidating many new structural details. The angular spread of the molecular orientations around the three main stable positions is remarkably small (less than 8 degrees). Some of the current models for the small ribosomal subunit are incompatible with our new results. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3908096

  17. Recognition of Cognate Transfer RNA by the 30S Ribosomal Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Ogle, James M.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; Clemons, William M.; Tarry, Michael J.; Carter, Andrew P.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2009-10-07

    Crystal structures of the 30S ribosomal subunit in complex with messenger RNA and cognate transfer RNA in the A site, both in the presence and absence of the antibiotic paromomycin, have been solved at between 3.1 and 3.3 angstroms resolution. Cognate transfer RNA (tRNA) binding induces global domain movements of the 30S subunit and changes in the conformation of the universally conserved and essential bases A1492, A1493, and G530 of 16S RNA. These bases interact intimately with the minor groove of the first two base pairs between the codon and anticodon, thus sensing Watson-Crick base-pairing geometry and discriminating against near-cognate tRNA. The third, or 'wobble,' position of the codon is free to accommodate certain noncanonical base pairs. By partially inducing these structural changes, paromomycin facilitates binding of near-cognate tRNAs.

  18. The aminoglycoside resistance methyltransferases from the ArmA/Rmt family operate late in the 30S ribosomal biogenesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Zarubica, Tamara; Baker, Matthew R; Wright, H Tonie; Rife, Jason P

    2011-02-01

    Bacterial resistance to 4,6-type aminoglycoside antibiotics, which target the ribosome, has been traced to the ArmA/RmtA family of rRNA methyltransferases. These plasmid-encoded enzymes transfer a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to N7 of the buried G1405 in the aminoglycoside binding site of 16S rRNA of the 30S ribosomal subunit. ArmA methylates mature 30S subunits but not 16S rRNA, 50S, or 70S ribosomal subunits or isolated Helix 44 of the 30S subunit. To more fully characterize this family of enzymes, we have investigated the substrate requirements of ArmA and to a lesser extent its ortholog RmtA. We determined the Mg+² dependence of ArmA activity toward the 30S ribosomal subunits and found that the enzyme recognizes both low Mg+² (translationally inactive) and high Mg+² (translationally active) forms of this substrate. We tested the effects of LiCl pretreatment of the 30S subunits, initiation factor 3 (IF3), and gentamicin/kasugamycin resistance methyltransferase (KsgA) on ArmA activity and determined whether in vivo derived pre-30S ribosomal subunits are ArmA methylation substrates. ArmA failed to methylate the 30S subunits generated from LiCl washes above 0.75 M, despite the apparent retention of ribosomal proteins and a fully mature 16S rRNA. From our experiments, we conclude that ArmA is most active toward the 30S ribosomal subunits that are at or very near full maturity, but that it can also recognize more than one form of the 30S subunit.

  19. Insights into structure and function of 30S Ribosomal Protein S2 (30S2) in Chlamydophila pneumoniae: A potent target of pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Koteswara Reddy, G; Nagamalleswara Rao, K; Yarrakula, Kiran

    2017-02-01

    The gene 30S ribosomal protein S2 (30S2) is identified as a potential drug and vaccine target for Pneumonia. Its structural characterization is an important to understand the mechanism of action for identifying its receptor and/or other binding partners. The comparative genomics and proteomics studies are useful for structural characterization of 30S2 in C. Pneumoniae using different bioinformatics tools and web servers. In this study, the protein 30S2 structure was modelled and validated by Ramachandran plot. It is found that the modelled protein under most favoured "core" region was 88.7% and overall G-factor statistics with average score was -0.20. However, seven sequential motifs have been identified for 30S2 with reference codes (PR0095, PF0038, TIGR01012, PTHR11489, SSF52313 and PTHR11489). In addition, seven structural highly conserved residues have been identified in the large cleft are Lys160, Gly161and Arg162 with volume 1288.83Å(3) and average depth of the cleft was 10.75Å. Moreover, biological functions, biochemical process and structural constituents of ribosome are also explored. The study will be helped us to understand the sequential, structural, functional and evolutionary clues of unknown proteins available in C. Pneumoniae.

  20. Role of GTPases in bacterial ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Britton, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    The assembly of the ribosome, a complex molecular machine composed of RNA and protein, is a poorly understood process. Recent work has demonstrated that GTPases are likely to play key roles in the assembly of ribosomes in bacteria and eukaryotes. This review highlights several bacterial ribosome assembly GTPases (RA-GTPases) and discusses possible functions for these proteins in the biogenesis of individual ribosomal subunits and subunit joining. RA-GTPases appear to link various aspects of the cell cycle and metabolism with translation. How these RA-GTPases may coordinate these connections are discussed.

  1. Biophysical studies of bacterial ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Williamson, James R

    2008-06-01

    The assembly of the bacterial ribosome involves the association of over 50 proteins to 3 large RNA molecules, and it represents a major metabolic activity for rapidly growing bacteria. The availability of atomic structures of the ribosome and the application of biochemical and biophysical methods have led to rapid progress in understanding the mechanistic details of ribosome assembly. The basic steps required to assemble a ribosome are outlined, and the contributions of mass spectrometry, computational methods, and RNA-folding studies in understanding these steps are detailed. This complex process takes place with both sequential and parallel processing that is coordinated to ensure efficient and complete assembly of ribosomes to meet the demands of cell growth.

  2. Role of GTPases in ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Karbstein, Katrin

    2007-09-01

    GTPases are a universally conserved class of regulatory proteins involved in such diverse cellular functions as signal transduction, translation, cytoskeleton formation, and intracellular transport. GTPases are also required for ribosome assembly in eukaryotes and bacteria, where they present themselves as possible regulatory molecules. Strikingly, in bacteria they represent the largest class of essential assembly factors. A review of their common structural, biochemical and genetic interactions is presented and integrated with models for their function in ribosome assembly. 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  3. Crystal Structure of the 30S Ribosomal Subunit from Thermus Thermophilus. Purification, Crystallization and Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Clemons, William M.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; McCutcheonn, John P.; May, Joanna L.C.; Carter, Andrew P.; Morgan-Warren, Robert J.; Wimberly, Brian T.; Ramakrishnan, Venki

    2009-10-07

    We describe the crystallization and structure determination of the 30 S ribosomal subunit from Thermus thermophilus. Previous reports of crystals that diffracted to 10 {angstrom} resolution were used as a starting point to improve the quality of the diffraction. Eventually, ideas such as the addition of substrates or factors to eliminate conformational heterogeneity proved less important than attention to detail in yielding crystals that diffracted beyond 3 {angstrom} resolution. Despite improvements in technology and methodology in the last decade, the structure determination of the 30 S subunit presented some very challenging technical problems because of the size of the asymmetric unit, crystal variability and sensitivity to radiation damage. Some steps that were useful for determination of the atomic structure were: the use of anomalous scattering from the LIII edges of osmium and lutetium to obtain the necessary phasing signal; the use of tunable, third-generation synchrotron sources to obtain data of reasonable quality at high resolution; collection of derivative data precisely about a mirror plane to preserve small anomalous differences between Bijvoet mates despite extensive radiation damage and multi-crystal scaling; the pre-screening of crystals to ensure quality, isomorphism and the efficient use of scarce third-generation synchrotron time; pre-incubation of crystals in cobalt hexaammine to ensure isomorphism with other derivatives; and finally, the placement of proteins whose structures had been previously solved in isolation, in conjunction with biochemical data on protein-RNA interactions, to map out the architecture of the 30 S subunit prior to the construction of a detailed atomic-resolution model.

  4. Eukaryotic Ribosome Assembly and Nuclear Export.

    PubMed

    Nerurkar, Purnima; Altvater, Martin; Gerhardy, Stefan; Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Weirich, Christine; Panse, Vikram Govind

    2015-01-01

    Accurate translation of the genetic code into functional polypeptides is key to cellular growth and proliferation. This essential process is carried out by the ribosome, a ribonucleoprotein complex of remarkable size and intricacy. Although the structure of the mature ribosome has provided insight into the mechanism of translation, our knowledge regarding the assembly, quality control, and intracellular targeting of this molecular machine is still emerging. Assembly of the eukaryotic ribosome begins in the nucleolus and requires more than 350 conserved assembly factors, which transiently associate with the preribosome at specific maturation stages. After accomplishing their tasks, early-acting assembly factors are released, preparing preribosomes for nuclear export. Export competent preribosomal subunits are transported through nuclear pore complexes into the cytoplasm, where they undergo final maturation steps, which are closely connected to quality control, before engaging in translation. In this chapter, we focus on the final events that commit correctly assembled ribosomal subunits for translation.

  5. Protein-guided RNA dynamics during early ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hajin; Abeysirigunawarden, Sanjaya C; Chen, Ke; Mayerle, Megan; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Ha, Taekjip; Woodson, Sarah A

    2014-02-20

    The assembly of 30S ribosomes requires the precise addition of 20 proteins to the 16S ribosomal RNA. How early binding proteins change the ribosomal RNA structure so that later proteins may join the complex is poorly understood. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to observe real-time encounters between Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S4 and the 16S 5' domain RNA at an early stage of 30S assembly. Dynamic initial S4-RNA complexes pass through a stable non-native intermediate before converting to the native complex, showing that non-native structures can offer a low free-energy path to protein-RNA recognition. Three-colour FRET and molecular dynamics simulations reveal how S4 changes the frequency and direction of RNA helix motions, guiding a conformational switch that enforces the hierarchy of protein addition. These protein-guided dynamics offer an alternative explanation for induced fit in RNA-protein complexes.

  6. Protein-guided RNA dynamics during early ribosome assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hajin; Abeysirigunawarden, Sanjaya C.; Chen, Ke; Mayerle, Megan; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Ha, Taekjip; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2014-02-01

    The assembly of 30S ribosomes requires the precise addition of 20 proteins to the 16S ribosomal RNA. How early binding proteins change the ribosomal RNA structure so that later proteins may join the complex is poorly understood. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to observe real-time encounters between Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S4 and the 16S 5' domain RNA at an early stage of 30S assembly. Dynamic initial S4-RNA complexes pass through a stable non-native intermediate before converting to the native complex, showing that non-native structures can offer a low free-energy path to protein-RNA recognition. Three-colour FRET and molecular dynamics simulations reveal how S4 changes the frequency and direction of RNA helix motions, guiding a conformational switch that enforces the hierarchy of protein addition. These protein-guided dynamics offer an alternative explanation for induced fit in RNA-protein complexes.

  7. Bacterial ribosomal subunit assembly is an antibiotic target.

    PubMed

    Champney, W Scott

    2003-01-01

    A substantial number of antimicrobial agents target some activity of the bacterial ribosome for inhibition. Mechanistic studies and recent structural investigations of the ribosome have identified the binding sites and presumed mechanism of inhibitory activity for some compounds. A second target for many of these antibiotics has recently been examined. Formation of both 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits in bacterial cells is impaired by translational inhibitors. For many antimicrobial agents, inhibition of this target is equivalent to inhibition of translation in preventing cell growth. This review will describe features of this new target including the types of compounds which affect particle assembly and differences in the process in different microorganisms. The characteristics of this new target will be identified and aspects of a model to explain this new inhibitory activity will be explored.

  8. Evolution of protein-coupled RNA dynamics during hierarchical assembly of ribosomal complexes.

    PubMed

    Abeysirigunawardena, Sanjaya C; Kim, Hajin; Lai, Jonathan; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Rappé, Mollie C; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Ha, Taekjip; Woodson, Sarah A

    2017-09-08

    Assembly of 30S ribosomes involves the hierarchical addition of ribosomal proteins that progressively stabilize the folded 16S rRNA. Here, we use three-color single molecule FRET to show how combinations of ribosomal proteins uS4, uS17 and bS20 in the 16S 5' domain enable the recruitment of protein bS16, the next protein to join the complex. Analysis of real-time bS16 binding events shows that bS16 binds both native and non-native forms of the rRNA. The native rRNA conformation is increasingly favored after bS16 binds, explaining how bS16 drives later steps of 30S assembly. Chemical footprinting and molecular dynamics simulations show that each ribosomal protein switches the 16S conformation and dampens fluctuations at the interface between rRNA subdomains where bS16 binds. The results suggest that specific protein-induced changes in the rRNA dynamics underlie the hierarchy of 30S assembly and simplify the search for the native ribosome structure.Ribosomes assemble through the hierarchical addition of proteins to a ribosomal RNA scaffold. Here the authors use three-color single-molecule FRET to show how the dynamics of the rRNA dictate the order in which multiple proteins assemble on the 5' domain of the E. coli 16S rRNA.

  9. Protein-guided RNA dynamics during early ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hajin; Abeysirigunawardena, Sanjaya C.; Chen, Ke; Mayerle, Megan; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Ha, Taekjip; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    The assembly of 30S ribosomes requires the precise addition of 20 proteins to the 16S ribosomal RNA. How early binding proteins change the rRNA structure so that later proteins may join the complex is poorly understood. Here we use single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to observe real-time encounters between ribosomal protein S4 and the 16S 5′ domain RNA at an early stage of 30S assembly. Dynamic initial S4-RNA complexes pass through a stable non-native intermediate before converting to the native complex, showing that non-native structures can offer a low free energy path to protein-RNA recognition. Three-color FRET and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations reveal how S4 changes the frequency and direction of RNA helix motions, guiding a conformational switch that enforces the hierarchy of protein addition. This protein-guided dynamics offers an alternative explanation for induced fit in RNA-protein complexes. PMID:24522531

  10. Specific contacts between protein S4 and ribosomal RNA are required at multiple stages of ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Mayerle, Megan; Woodson, Sarah A

    2013-04-01

    Assembly of bacterial 30S ribosomal subunits requires structural rearrangements to both its 16S rRNA and ribosomal protein components. Ribosomal protein S4 nucleates 30S assembly and associates rapidly with the 5' domain of the 16S rRNA. In vitro, transformation of initial S4-rRNA complexes to long-lived, mature complexes involves refolding of 16S helix 18, which forms part of the decoding center. Here we use targeted mutagenesis of Geobacillus stearothermophilus S4 to show that remodeling of S4-rRNA complexes is perturbed by ram alleles associated with reduced translational accuracy. Gel mobility shift assays, SHAPE chemical probing, and in vivo complementation show that the S4 N-terminal extension is required for RNA binding and viability. Alanine substitutions in Y47 and L51 that interact with 16S helix 18 decrease S4 affinity and destabilize the helix 18 pseudoknot. These changes to the protein-RNA interface correlate with no growth (L51A) or cold-sensitive growth, 30S assembly defects, and accumulation of 17S pre-rRNA (Y47A). A third mutation, R200A, over-stabilizes the helix 18 pseudoknot yet results in temperature-sensitive growth, indicating that complex stability is finely tuned by natural selection. Our results show that early S4-RNA interactions guide rRNA folding and impact late steps of 30S assembly.

  11. Gateway role for rRNA precursors in ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Gutgsell, Nancy S; Jain, Chaitanya

    2012-12-01

    In Escherichia coli, rRNAs are initially transcribed with precursor sequences, which are subsequently removed through processing reactions. To investigate the role of precursor sequences, we analyzed ribosome assembly in strains containing mutations in the processing RNases. We observed that defects in 23S rRNA processing resulted in an accumulation of ribosomal subunits and caused a significant delay in ribosome assembly. These observations suggest that precursor residues in 23S rRNA control ribosome assembly and could be serving a regulatory role to couple ribosome assembly to rRNA processing. The possible mechanisms through which rRNA processing and ribosome assembly could be linked are discussed.

  12. Mitochondrial ribosome assembly in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Tu, Ya-Ting; Amunts, Alexey; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is a structurally and functionally conserved macromolecular machine universally responsible for catalyzing protein synthesis. Within eukaryotic cells, mitochondria contain their own ribosomes (mitoribosomes), which synthesize a handful of proteins, all essential for the biogenesis of the oxidative phosphorylation system. High-resolution cryo-EM structures of the yeast, porcine and human mitoribosomal subunits and of the entire human mitoribosome have uncovered a wealth of new information to illustrate their evolutionary divergence from their bacterial ancestors and their adaptation to synthesis of highly hydrophobic membrane proteins. With such structural data becoming available, one of the most important remaining questions is that of the mitoribosome assembly pathway and factors involved. The regulation of mitoribosome biogenesis is paramount to mitochondrial respiration, and thus to cell viability, growth and differentiation. Moreover, mutations affecting the rRNA and protein components produce severe human mitochondrial disorders. Despite its biological and biomedical significance, knowledge on mitoribosome biogenesis and its deviations from the much-studied bacterial ribosome assembly processes is scarce, especially the order of rRNA processing and assembly events and the regulatory factors required to achieve fully functional particles. This article focuses on summarizing the current available information on mitoribosome assembly pathway, factors that form the mitoribosome assembly machinery, and the effect of defective mitoribosome assembly on human health. PMID:26030272

  13. Mitochondrial ribosome assembly in health and disease.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Tu, Ya-Ting; Amunts, Alexey; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is a structurally and functionally conserved macromolecular machine universally responsible for catalyzing protein synthesis. Within eukaryotic cells, mitochondria contain their own ribosomes (mitoribosomes), which synthesize a handful of proteins, all essential for the biogenesis of the oxidative phosphorylation system. High-resolution cryo-EM structures of the yeast, porcine and human mitoribosomal subunits and of the entire human mitoribosome have uncovered a wealth of new information to illustrate their evolutionary divergence from their bacterial ancestors and their adaptation to synthesis of highly hydrophobic membrane proteins. With such structural data becoming available, one of the most important remaining questions is that of the mitoribosome assembly pathway and factors involved. The regulation of mitoribosome biogenesis is paramount to mitochondrial respiration, and thus to cell viability, growth and differentiation. Moreover, mutations affecting the rRNA and protein components produce severe human mitochondrial disorders. Despite its biological and biomedical significance, knowledge on mitoribosome biogenesis and its deviations from the much-studied bacterial ribosome assembly processes is scarce, especially the order of rRNA processing and assembly events and the regulatory factors required to achieve fully functional particles. This article focuses on summarizing the current available information on mitoribosome assembly pathway, factors that form the mitoribosome assembly machinery, and the effect of defective mitoribosome assembly on human health.

  14. Fluorescence-based monitoring of ribosome assembly landscapes.

    PubMed

    Nikolay, Rainer; Schloemer, Renate; Mueller, Silke; Deuerling, Elke

    2015-02-25

    Ribosomes and functional complexes of them have been analyzed at the atomic level. Far less is known about the dynamic assembly and degradation events that define the half-life of ribosomes and guarantee their quality control. We developed a system that allows visualization of intact ribosomal subunits and assembly intermediates (i.e. assembly landscapes) by convenient fluorescence-based analysis. To this end, we labeled the early assembly ribosomal proteins L1 and S15 with the fluorescent proteins mAzami green and mCherry, respectively, using chromosomal gene insertion. The reporter strain harbors fluorescently labeled ribosomal subunits that operate wild type-like, as shown by biochemical and growth assays. Using genetic and chemical perturbations by depleting genes encoding the ribosomal proteins L3 and S17, respectively, or using ribosome-targeting antibiotics, we provoked ribosomal subunit assembly defects. These defects were readily identified by fluorometric analysis after sucrose density centrifugation in unprecedented resolution. This strategy is useful to monitor and characterize subunit specific assembly defects caused by ribosome-targeting drugs that are currently used and to characterize new molecules that affect ribosome assembly and thereby constitute new classes of antibacterial agents.

  15. Subribosomal particle analysis reveals the stages of bacterial ribosome assembly at which rRNA nucleotides are modified

    PubMed Central

    Siibak, Triinu; Remme, Jaanus

    2010-01-01

    Modified nucleosides of ribosomal RNA are synthesized during ribosome assembly. In bacteria, each modification is made by a specialized enzyme. In vitro studies have shown that some enzymes need the presence of ribosomal proteins while other enzymes can modify only protein-free rRNA. We have analyzed the addition of modified nucleosides to rRNA during ribosome assembly. Accumulation of incompletely assembled ribosomal particles (25S, 35S, and 45S) was induced by chloramphenicol or erythromycin in an exponentially growing Escherichia coli culture. Incompletely assembled ribosomal particles were isolated from drug-treated and free 30S and 50S subunits and mature 70S ribosomes from untreated cells. Nucleosides of 16S and 23S rRNA were prepared and analyzed by reverse-phase, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Pseudouridines were identified by the chemical modification/primer extension method. Based on the results, the rRNA modifications were divided into three major groups: early, intermediate, and late assembly specific modifications. Seven out of 11 modified nucleosides of 16S rRNA were late assembly specific. In contrast, 16 out of 25 modified nucleosides of 23S rRNA were made during early steps of ribosome assembly. Free subunits of exponentially growing bacteria contain undermodified rRNA, indicating that a specific set of modifications is synthesized during very late steps of ribosome subunit assembly. PMID:20719918

  16. Subribosomal particle analysis reveals the stages of bacterial ribosome assembly at which rRNA nucleotides are modified.

    PubMed

    Siibak, Triinu; Remme, Jaanus

    2010-10-01

    Modified nucleosides of ribosomal RNA are synthesized during ribosome assembly. In bacteria, each modification is made by a specialized enzyme. In vitro studies have shown that some enzymes need the presence of ribosomal proteins while other enzymes can modify only protein-free rRNA. We have analyzed the addition of modified nucleosides to rRNA during ribosome assembly. Accumulation of incompletely assembled ribosomal particles (25S, 35S, and 45S) was induced by chloramphenicol or erythromycin in an exponentially growing Escherichia coli culture. Incompletely assembled ribosomal particles were isolated from drug-treated and free 30S and 50S subunits and mature 70S ribosomes from untreated cells. Nucleosides of 16S and 23S rRNA were prepared and analyzed by reverse-phase, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Pseudouridines were identified by the chemical modification/primer extension method. Based on the results, the rRNA modifications were divided into three major groups: early, intermediate, and late assembly specific modifications. Seven out of 11 modified nucleosides of 16S rRNA were late assembly specific. In contrast, 16 out of 25 modified nucleosides of 23S rRNA were made during early steps of ribosome assembly. Free subunits of exponentially growing bacteria contain undermodified rRNA, indicating that a specific set of modifications is synthesized during very late steps of ribosome subunit assembly.

  17. Non-ribosomal factors in ribosome subunit assembly are emerging targets for new antibacterial drugs.

    PubMed

    Comartin, David J; Brown, Eric D

    2006-10-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that bacterial ribosome assembly is catalyzed by a variety of non-ribosomal factors. Newly characterized factors in bacterial ribosome biogenesis are broadly conserved and often indispensable proteins that can be classified either as chaperones facilitating assembly, or enzymes with ribosomal RNA- and ribosomal protein-modifying functions. Accumulating evidence indicates that the proteins Era, Obg, YjeQ, YlqF and RimM are chaperones which may be crucial to bacterial ribosome assembly, and therefore represent novel targets for modern antibacterial drug discovery. Ongoing work aimed at understanding ribosome biogenesis is expected to continue to yield additional factors crucial to this process, and provide new targets with drug discovery potential.

  18. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature using an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Hasan; Sierra, Raymond G; Laksmono, Hartawan; Shoeman, Robert L; Botha, Sabine; Barends, Thomas R M; Nass, Karol; Schlichting, Ilme; Doak, R Bruce; Gati, Cornelius; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Jogl, Gerwald; Dahlberg, Albert E; Gregory, Steven T; Bogan, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    High-resolution ribosome structures determined by X-ray crystallography have provided important insights into the mechanism of translation. Such studies have thus far relied on large ribosome crystals kept at cryogenic temperatures to reduce radiation damage. Here, the application of serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain diffraction data from ribosome microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature is described. 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals diffracted to beyond 6 Å resolution, demonstrating the feasibility of using SFX for ribosome structural studies. The ability to collect diffraction data at near-physiological temperatures promises to provide fundamental insights into the structural dynamics of the ribosome and its functional complexes.

  19. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature using an X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Hasan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Shoeman, Robert L.; Botha, Sabine; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Nass, Karol; Schlichting, Ilme; Doak, R. Bruce; Gati, Cornelius; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Jogl, Gerwald; Dahlberg, Albert E.; Gregory, Steven T.; Bogan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution ribosome structures determined by X-ray crystallography have provided important insights into the mechanism of translation. Such studies have thus far relied on large ribosome crystals kept at cryogenic temperatures to reduce radiation damage. Here, the application of serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain diffraction data from ribosome microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature is described. 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals diffracted to beyond 6 Å resolution, demonstrating the feasibility of using SFX for ribosome structural studies. The ability to collect diffraction data at near-physiological temperatures promises to provide fundamental insights into the structural dynamics of the ribosome and its functional complexes. PMID:23989164

  20. Mutant DnaK chaperones cause ribosome assembly defects in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Alix, J H; Guérin, M F

    1993-01-01

    To determine whether the biogenesis of ribosomes in Escherichia coli is the result of the self-assembly of their different constituents or involves the participation of additional factors, we have studied the influence of a chaperone, the product of the gene dnaK, on ribosome assembly in vivo. Using three thermosensitive (ts) mutants carrying the mutations dnaK756-ts, dnaK25-ts, and dnaK103-ts, we have observed the accumulation at nonpermissive temperature (45 degrees C) of ribosomal particles with different sedimentation constants--namely, 45S, 35S, and 25S along with the normal 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits. This is the result of a defect not in thermostability but in ribosome assembly at the nonpermissive temperature. These abnormal ribosomal particles are rescued if the mutant cells are returned to 30 degrees C. Thus, the product of the dnaK gene is implicated in ribosome biogenesis at high temperature. PMID:8105482

  1. In vitro integration of ribosomal RNA synthesis, ribosome assembly, and translation

    PubMed Central

    Jewett, Michael C; Fritz, Brian R; Timmerman, Laura E; Church, George M

    2013-01-01

    Purely in vitro ribosome synthesis could provide a critical step towards unraveling the systems biology of ribosome biogenesis, constructing minimal cells from defined components, and engineering ribosomes with new functions. Here, as an initial step towards this goal, we report a method for constructing Escherichia coli ribosomes in crude S150 E. coli extracts. While conventional methods for E. coli ribosome reconstitution are non-physiological, our approach attempts to mimic chemical conditions in the cytoplasm, thus permitting several biological processes to occur simultaneously. Specifically, our integrated synthesis, assembly, and translation (iSAT) technology enables one-step co-activation of rRNA transcription, assembly of transcribed rRNA with native ribosomal proteins into functional ribosomes, and synthesis of active protein by these ribosomes in the same compartment. We show that iSAT makes possible the in vitro construction of modified ribosomes by introducing a 23S rRNA mutation that mediates resistance against clindamycin. We anticipate that iSAT will aid studies of ribosome assembly and open new avenues for making ribosomes with altered properties. PMID:23799452

  2. In vitro integration of ribosomal RNA synthesis, ribosome assembly, and translation.

    PubMed

    Jewett, Michael C; Fritz, Brian R; Timmerman, Laura E; Church, George M

    2013-06-25

    Purely in vitro ribosome synthesis could provide a critical step towards unraveling the systems biology of ribosome biogenesis, constructing minimal cells from defined components, and engineering ribosomes with new functions. Here, as an initial step towards this goal, we report a method for constructing Escherichia coli ribosomes in crude S150 E. coli extracts. While conventional methods for E. coli ribosome reconstitution are non-physiological, our approach attempts to mimic chemical conditions in the cytoplasm, thus permitting several biological processes to occur simultaneously. Specifically, our integrated synthesis, assembly, and translation (iSAT) technology enables one-step co-activation of rRNA transcription, assembly of transcribed rRNA with native ribosomal proteins into functional ribosomes, and synthesis of active protein by these ribosomes in the same compartment. We show that iSAT makes possible the in vitro construction of modified ribosomes by introducing a 23S rRNA mutation that mediates resistance against clindamycin. We anticipate that iSAT will aid studies of ribosome assembly and open new avenues for making ribosomes with altered properties.

  3. Interrelationships between yeast ribosomal protein assembly events and transient ribosome biogenesis factors interactions in early pre-ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Steffen; Ohmayer, Uli; Neueder, Andreas; Hierlmeier, Thomas; Perez-Fernandez, Jorge; Hochmuth, Eduard; Deutzmann, Rainer; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Tschochner, Herbert; Milkereit, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    Early steps of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis require a large set of ribosome biogenesis factors which transiently interact with nascent rRNA precursors (pre-rRNA). Most likely, concomitant with that initial contacts between ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) and ribosome precursors (pre-ribosomes) are established which are converted into robust interactions between pre-rRNA and r-proteins during the course of ribosome maturation. Here we analysed the interrelationship between r-protein assembly events and the transient interactions of ribosome biogenesis factors with early pre-ribosomal intermediates termed 90S pre-ribosomes or small ribosomal subunit (SSU) processome in yeast cells. We observed that components of the SSU processome UTP-A and UTP-B sub-modules were recruited to early pre-ribosomes independently of all tested r-proteins. On the other hand, groups of SSU processome components were identified whose association with early pre-ribosomes was affected by specific r-protein assembly events in the head-platform interface of the SSU. One of these components, Noc4p, appeared to be itself required for robust incorporation of r-proteins into the SSU head domain. Altogether, the data reveal an emerging network of specific interrelationships between local r-protein assembly events and the functional interactions of SSU processome components with early pre-ribosomes. They point towards some of these components being transient primary pre-rRNA in vivo binders and towards a role for others in coordinating the assembly of major SSU domains.

  4. Inhibition of bacterial ribosome assembly: a suitable drug target?

    PubMed

    Maguire, Bruce A

    2009-03-01

    The assembly of bacterial ribosomes is viewed with increasing interest as a potential target for new antibiotics. The in vivo synthesis and assembly of ribosomes are briefly reviewed here, highlighting the many ways in which assembly can be perturbed. The process is compared with the model in vitro process from which much of our knowledge is derived. The coordinate synthesis of the ribosomal components is essential for their ordered and efficient assembly; antibiotics interfere with this coordination and therefore affect assembly. It has also been claimed that the binding of antibiotics to nascent ribosomes prevents their assembly. These two contrasting models of antibiotic action are compared and evaluated. Finally, the suitability and tractability of assembly as a drug target are assessed.

  5. Single protein omission reconstitution studies of tetracycline binding to the 30S subunit of Escherichia coli ribosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, M.; Cooperman, B.S. )

    1990-06-05

    In previous work the authors showed that on photolysis of Escherichia coli ribosomes in the presence of ({sup 3}H)tetracycline (TC) the major protein labeled is S7, and they presented strong evidence that such labeling takes place from a high-affinity site related to the inhibitory action of TC. In this work they use single protein omission reconstitution (SPORE) experiments to identify those proteins that are important for high-affinity TC binding to the 30S subunit, as measured by both cosedimentation and filter binding assays. With respect to both sedimentation coefficients and relative Phe-tRNA{sup Phe} binding, the properties of the SPORE particles they obtain parallel very closely those measured earlier, with the exception of the SPORE particle lacking S13. A total of five proteins, S3, S7, S8, S14, and S19, are shown to be important for TC binding, with the largest effects seen on omission of proteins S7 and S14. Determination of the protein compositions of the corresponding SPORE particles demonstrates that the observed effects are, for the most part, directly attributable to the omission of the given protein rather than reflecting an indirect effect of omitting one protein on the uptake of another. A large body of evidence supports the notion that four of these proteins, S3, S7, S14, and S19, are included, along with 16S rRNA bases 920-1,396, in one of the major domains of the 30S subunit. The results support the conclusion that the structure of this domain is important for the binding of TC and that, within this domain, TC binds directly to S7.

  6. Functions of Ribosomal Proteins in Assembly of Eukaryotic Ribosomes In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The proteome of cells is synthesized by ribosomes, complex ribonucleoproteins that in eukaryotes contain 79–80 proteins and four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) more than 5,400 nucleotides long. How these molecules assemble together and how their assembly is regulated in concert with the growth and proliferation of cells remain important unanswered questions. Here, we review recently emerging principles to understand how eukaryotic ribosomal proteins drive ribosome assembly in vivo. Most ribosomal proteins assemble with rRNA cotranscriptionally; their association with nascent particles is strengthened as assembly proceeds. Each subunit is assembled hierarchically by sequential stabilization of their subdomains. The active sites of both subunits are constructed last, perhaps to prevent premature engagement of immature ribosomes with active subunits. Late-assembly intermediates undergo quality-control checks for proper function. Mutations in ribosomal proteins that affect mostly late steps lead to ribosomopathies, diseases that include a spectrum of cell type–specific disorders that often transition from hypoproliferative to hyperproliferative growth. PMID:25706898

  7. Functions of ribosomal proteins in assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Jesús; Karbstein, Katrin; Woolford, John L

    2015-01-01

    The proteome of cells is synthesized by ribosomes, complex ribonucleoproteins that in eukaryotes contain 79-80 proteins and four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) more than 5,400 nucleotides long. How these molecules assemble together and how their assembly is regulated in concert with the growth and proliferation of cells remain important unanswered questions. Here, we review recently emerging principles to understand how eukaryotic ribosomal proteins drive ribosome assembly in vivo. Most ribosomal proteins assemble with rRNA cotranscriptionally; their association with nascent particles is strengthened as assembly proceeds. Each subunit is assembled hierarchically by sequential stabilization of their subdomains. The active sites of both subunits are constructed last, perhaps to prevent premature engagement of immature ribosomes with active subunits. Late-assembly intermediates undergo quality-control checks for proper function. Mutations in ribosomal proteins that affect mostly late steps lead to ribosomopathies, diseases that include a spectrum of cell type-specific disorders that often transition from hypoproliferative to hyperproliferative growth.

  8. Modular Assembly of the Bacterial Large Ribosomal Subunit.

    PubMed

    Davis, Joseph H; Tan, Yong Zi; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Williamson, James R

    2016-12-01

    The ribosome is a complex macromolecular machine and serves as an ideal system for understanding biological macromolecular assembly. Direct observation of ribosome assembly in vivo is difficult, as few intermediates have been isolated and thoroughly characterized. Herein, we deploy a genetic system to starve cells of an essential ribosomal protein, which results in the accumulation of assembly intermediates that are competent for maturation. Quantitative mass spectrometry and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy reveal 13 distinct intermediates, which were each resolved to ∼4-5 Å resolution and could be placed in an assembly pathway. We find that ribosome biogenesis is a parallel process, that blocks of structured rRNA and proteins assemble cooperatively, and that the entire process is dynamic and can be "re-routed" through different pathways as needed. This work reveals the complex landscape of ribosome assembly in vivo and provides the requisite tools to characterize additional assembly pathways for ribosomes and other macromolecular machines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Antibiotic-induced ribosomal assembly defects result from changes in the synthesis of ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Siibak, Triinu; Peil, Lauri; Dönhöfer, Alexandra; Tats, Age; Remm, Maido; Wilson, Daniel N; Tenson, Tanel; Remme, Jaanus

    2011-04-01

    Inhibitors of protein synthesis cause defects in the assembly of ribosomal subunits. In response to treatment with the antibiotics erythromycin or chloramphenicol, precursors of both large and small ribosomal subunits accumulate. We have used a pulse-labelling approach to demonstrate that the accumulating subribosomal particles maturate into functional 70S ribosomes. The protein content of the precursor particles is heterogeneous and does not correspond with known assembly intermediates. Mass spectrometry indicates that production of ribosomal proteins in the presence of the antibiotics correlates with the amounts of the individual ribosomal proteins within the precursor particles. Thus, treatment of cells with chloramphenicol or erythromycin leads to an unbalanced synthesis of ribosomal proteins, providing the explanation for formation of assembly-defective particles. The operons for ribosomal proteins show a characteristic pattern of antibiotic inhibition where synthesis of the first proteins is inhibited weakly but gradually increases for the subsequent proteins in the operon. This phenomenon most likely reflects translational coupling and allows us to identify other putative coupled non-ribosomal operons in the Escherichia coli chromosome. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal protein L26 is not essential for ribosome assembly and function.

    PubMed

    Babiano, Reyes; Gamalinda, Michael; Woolford, John L; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2012-08-01

    Ribosomal proteins play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and function. Here, we study the evolutionarily conserved L26 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which assembles into pre-60S ribosomal particles in the nucle(ol)us. Yeast L26 is one of the many ribosomal proteins encoded by two functional genes. We have disrupted both genes; surprisingly, the growth of the resulting rpl26 null mutant is apparently identical to that of the isogenic wild-type strain. The absence of L26 minimally alters 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Polysome analysis revealed the appearance of half-mers. Analysis of pre-rRNA processing indicated that L26 is mainly required to optimize 27S pre-rRNA maturation, without which the release of pre-60S particles from the nucle(ol)us is partially impaired. Ribosomes lacking L26 exhibit differential reactivity to dimethylsulfate in domain I of 25S/5.8S rRNAs but apparently are able to support translation in vivo with wild-type accuracy. The bacterial homologue of yeast L26, L24, is a primary rRNA binding protein required for 50S ribosomal subunit assembly in vitro and in vivo. Our results underscore potential differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosome assembly. We discuss the reasons why yeast L26 plays such an apparently nonessential role in the cell.

  11. Ribosome biogenesis; the KsgA protein throws a methyl-mediated switch in ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Mangat, Chand S; Brown, Eric D

    2008-12-01

    Many trans-acting factors that aid in ribosome biogenesis have been identified in higher organisms but relatively few such factors are known in prokaryotes. In bacteria, the list of such factors includes ATP-energized helicases and chaperones as well as an emerging cadre of switch GTPases. The KsgA protein is a universally conserved methyltransferase that dimethylates both A1518 and A1519 of the 16S rRNA of the small ribosomal subunit. Methylation has long been thought to be solely for fine-tuning of protein translation. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Connolly et al. present data suggesting KsgA might function in the assembly of the small subunit of the ribosome. Indeed, the work indicates that KsgA might have a checkpoint role in ribosome biogenesis where methylation by this protein marks the completion of its assembly role. These findings open our thinking to new candidate assembly factors and provide a new direction for understanding ribosome assembly.

  12. A RanGTP-independent mechanism allows ribosomal protein nuclear import for ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Altvater, Martin; Nerurkar, Purnima; Peña, Cohue; Gerber, Michaela; Chang, Yiming; Caesar, Stefanie; Schubert, Olga T; Schlenstedt, Gabriel; Panse, Vikram G

    2014-01-01

    Within a single generation time a growing yeast cell imports ∼14 million ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) into the nucleus for ribosome production. After import, it is unclear how these intrinsically unstable and aggregation-prone proteins are targeted to the ribosome assembly site in the nucleolus. Here, we report the discovery of a conserved nuclear carrier Tsr2 that coordinates transfer of the r-protein eS26 to the earliest assembling pre-ribosome, the 90S. In vitro studies revealed that Tsr2 efficiently dissociates importin:eS26 complexes via an atypical RanGTP-independent mechanism that terminates the import process. Subsequently, Tsr2 binds the released eS26, shields it from proteolysis, and ensures its safe delivery to the 90S pre-ribosome. We anticipate similar carriers—termed here escortins—to securely connect the nuclear import machinery with pathways that deposit r-proteins onto developing pre-ribosomal particles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03473.001 PMID:25144938

  13. A RanGTP-independent mechanism allows ribosomal protein nuclear import for ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Altvater, Martin; Nerurkar, Purnima; Peña, Cohue; Gerber, Michaela; Chang, Yiming; Caesar, Stefanie; Schubert, Olga T; Schlenstedt, Gabriel; Panse, Vikram G

    2014-08-21

    Within a single generation time a growing yeast cell imports ∼14 million ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) into the nucleus for ribosome production. After import, it is unclear how these intrinsically unstable and aggregation-prone proteins are targeted to the ribosome assembly site in the nucleolus. Here, we report the discovery of a conserved nuclear carrier Tsr2 that coordinates transfer of the r-protein eS26 to the earliest assembling pre-ribosome, the 90S. In vitro studies revealed that Tsr2 efficiently dissociates importin:eS26 complexes via an atypical RanGTP-independent mechanism that terminates the import process. Subsequently, Tsr2 binds the released eS26, shields it from proteolysis, and ensures its safe delivery to the 90S pre-ribosome. We anticipate similar carriers-termed here escortins-to securely connect the nuclear import machinery with pathways that deposit r-proteins onto developing pre-ribosomal particles. Copyright © 2014, Schütz et al.

  14. Functional Interaction between Ribosomal Protein L6 and RbgA during Ribosome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Joseph H.; Williamson, James R.; Britton, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    RbgA is an essential GTPase that participates in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit in Bacillus subtilis and its homologs are implicated in mitochondrial and eukaryotic large subunit assembly. How RbgA functions in this process is still poorly understood. To gain insight into the function of RbgA we isolated suppressor mutations that partially restored the growth of an RbgA mutation (RbgA-F6A) that caused a severe growth defect. Analysis of these suppressors identified mutations in rplF, encoding ribosomal protein L6. The suppressor strains all accumulated a novel ribosome intermediate that migrates at 44S in sucrose gradients. All of the mutations cluster in a region of L6 that is in close contact with helix 97 of the 23S rRNA. In vitro maturation assays indicate that the L6 substitutions allow the defective RbgA-F6A protein to function more effectively in ribosome maturation. Our results suggest that RbgA functions to properly position L6 on the ribosome, prior to the incorporation of L16 and other late assembly proteins. PMID:25330043

  15. Functional interaction between ribosomal protein L6 and RbgA during ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Megha; Jain, Nikhil; Davis, Joseph H; Williamson, James R; Britton, Robert A

    2014-10-01

    RbgA is an essential GTPase that participates in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit in Bacillus subtilis and its homologs are implicated in mitochondrial and eukaryotic large subunit assembly. How RbgA functions in this process is still poorly understood. To gain insight into the function of RbgA we isolated suppressor mutations that partially restored the growth of an RbgA mutation (RbgA-F6A) that caused a severe growth defect. Analysis of these suppressors identified mutations in rplF, encoding ribosomal protein L6. The suppressor strains all accumulated a novel ribosome intermediate that migrates at 44S in sucrose gradients. All of the mutations cluster in a region of L6 that is in close contact with helix 97 of the 23S rRNA. In vitro maturation assays indicate that the L6 substitutions allow the defective RbgA-F6A protein to function more effectively in ribosome maturation. Our results suggest that RbgA functions to properly position L6 on the ribosome, prior to the incorporation of L16 and other late assembly proteins.

  16. Assembly of ribosomes and spliceosomes: complex ribonucleoprotein machines

    PubMed Central

    Staley, Jonathan P; Woolford, John L

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ribosomes and spliceosomes are ribonucleoprotein nanomachines that catalyze translation of mRNA to synthesize proteins and splicing of introns from pre-mRNAs, respectively. Assembly of ribosomes involves more than 300 proteins and RNAs, and that of spliceosomes over 100 proteins and RNAs. Construction of these enormous ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) is a dynamic process, in which the nascent RNPs undergo numerous ordered rearrangements of RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, and protein-protein interactions. Here we outline similar principles that have emerged from studies of ribosome and spliceosome assembly. Constituents of both RNPs form subassembly complexes, which can simplify the task of assembly and segregate functions of assembly factors. Reorganization of RNP topology, and proofreading of proper assembly, are catalyzed by protein- or RNA- dependent ATPases or GTPases. Dynamics of intermolecular interactions may be facilitated or regulated by cycles of posttranslational modifications. Despite this repertoire of tools, mistakes occur in RNP assembly or in processing of RNA substrates. Quality control mechanisms recognize and turnover misassembled RNPs and reject improper substrates. PMID:19167202

  17. How to avoid undesirable interactions during ribosome assembly?

    PubMed

    Remme, Jaanus

    2011-10-01

    Ribosome subunit assembly in bacteria is assisted by several non-ribosomal proteins, the absence of which leads to assembly defects. The two DEAD-box RNA helicases SrmB and DeaD/CsdA are required for efficient assembly of the ribosome large subunit, in particular at low temperature, but their sites of action on rRNA were not known until now. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Proux et al. show that SrmB acts far away from its tethering site on the assembly intermediate particle. A genetic screen identified mutations in complementary sequences of 23S and 5S rRNA that help to bypass SrmB deficiency, partially correcting the large subunit assembly defect. The results suggest that 5S rRNA and 23S rRNA can interact via base-pairing, forming a non-native structure that needs to be corrected. The authors discuss attractive hypotheses on SrmB acts during large subunit assembly. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Assembly of ribosomes and spliceosomes: complex ribonucleoprotein machines.

    PubMed

    Staley, Jonathan P; Woolford, John L

    2009-02-01

    Ribosomes and spliceosomes are ribonucleoprotein nanomachines that catalyze translation of mRNA to synthesize proteins and splicing of introns from pre-mRNAs, respectively. Assembly of ribosomes involves more than 300 proteins and RNAs, and that of spliceosomes over 100 proteins and RNAs. Construction of these enormous ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) is a dynamic process, in which the nascent RNPs undergo numerous ordered rearrangements of RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, and protein-protein interactions. Here we outline similar principles that have emerged from studies of ribosome and spliceosome assembly. Constituents of both RNPs form subassembly complexes, which can simplify the task of assembly and segregate functions of assembly factors. Reorganization of RNP topology, and proofreading of proper assembly, are catalyzed by protein- or RNA-dependent ATPases or GTPases. Dynamics of intermolecular interactions may be facilitated or regulated by cycles of post-translational modifications. Despite this repertoire of tools, mistakes occur in RNP assembly or in processing of RNA substrates. Quality control mechanisms recognize and turnover misassembled RNPs and reject improper substrates.

  19. Assembly constraints drive co-evolution among ribosomal constituents.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Saurav; Akashi, Hiroshi; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-06-23

    Ribosome biogenesis, a central and essential cellular process, occurs through sequential association and mutual co-folding of protein-RNA constituents in a well-defined assembly pathway. Here, we construct a network of co-evolving nucleotide/amino acid residues within the ribosome and demonstrate that assembly constraints are strong predictors of co-evolutionary patterns. Predictors of co-evolution include a wide spectrum of structural reconstitution events, such as cooperativity phenomenon, protein-induced rRNA reconstitutions, molecular packing of different rRNA domains, protein-rRNA recognition, etc. A correlation between folding rate of small globular proteins and their topological features is known. We have introduced an analogous topological characteristic for co-evolutionary network of ribosome, which allows us to differentiate between rRNA regions subjected to rapid reconstitutions from those hindered by kinetic traps. Furthermore, co-evolutionary patterns provide a biological basis for deleterious mutation sites and further allow prediction of potential antibiotic targeting sites. Understanding assembly pathways of multicomponent macromolecules remains a key challenge in biophysics. Our study provides a 'proof of concept' that directly relates co-evolution to biophysical interactions during multicomponent assembly and suggests predictive power to identify candidates for critical functional interactions as well as for assembly-blocking antibiotic target sites. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. The antibiotic Furvina® targets the P-site of 30S ribosomal subunits and inhibits translation initiation displaying start codon bias

    PubMed Central

    Fabbretti, Attilio; Brandi, Letizia; Petrelli, Dezemona; Pon, Cynthia L.; Castañedo, Nilo R.; Medina, Ricardo; Gualerzi, Claudio O.

    2012-01-01

    Furvina®, also denominated G1 (MW 297), is a synthetic nitrovinylfuran [2-bromo-5-(2-bromo-2-nitrovinyl)-furan] antibiotic with a broad antimicrobial spectrum. An ointment (Dermofural®) containing G1 as the only active principle is currently marketed in Cuba and successfully used to treat dermatological infections. Here we describe the molecular target and mechanism of action of G1 in bacteria and demonstrate that in vivo G1 preferentially inhibits protein synthesis over RNA, DNA and cell wall synthesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that G1 targets the small ribosomal subunit, binds at or near the P-decoding site and inhibits its function interfering with the ribosomal binding of fMet-tRNA during 30S initiation complex (IC) formation ultimately inhibiting translation. Notably, this G1 inhibition displays a bias for the nature (purine vs. pyrimidine) of the 3′-base of the codon, occurring efficiently only when the mRNA directing 30S IC formation and translation contains the canonical AUG initiation triplet or the rarely found AUA triplet, but hardly occurs when the mRNA start codon is either one of the non-canonical triplets AUU or AUC. This codon discrimination by G1 is reminiscent, though of opposite type of that displayed by IF3 in its fidelity function, and remarkably does not occur in the absence of this factor. PMID:22941660

  1. Principles of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly emerging from recent studies in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Konikkat, Salini; Woolford, John L.

    2017-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis requires the intertwined processes of folding, modification, and processing of ribosomal RNA, together with binding of ribosomal proteins. In eukaryotic cells, ribosome assembly begins in the nucleolus, continues in the nucleoplasm, and is not completed until after nascent particles are exported to the cytoplasm. The efficiency and fidelity of ribosome biogenesis are facilitated by >200 assembly factors and ~76 different small nucleolar RNAs. The pathway is driven forward by numerous remodeling events to rearrange the ribonucleoprotein architecture of pre-ribosomes. Here, we describe principles of ribosome assembly that have emerged from recent studies of biogenesis of the large ribosomal subunit in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We describe tools that have empowered investigations of ribosome biogenesis, and then summarize recent discoveries about each of the consecutive steps of subunit assembly. PMID:28062837

  2. Principles of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly emerging from recent studies in yeast.

    PubMed

    Konikkat, Salini; Woolford, John L

    2017-01-15

    Ribosome biogenesis requires the intertwined processes of folding, modification, and processing of ribosomal RNA, together with binding of ribosomal proteins. In eukaryotic cells, ribosome assembly begins in the nucleolus, continues in the nucleoplasm, and is not completed until after nascent particles are exported to the cytoplasm. The efficiency and fidelity of ribosome biogenesis are facilitated by >200 assembly factors and ∼76 different small nucleolar RNAs. The pathway is driven forward by numerous remodeling events to rearrange the ribonucleoprotein architecture of pre-ribosomes. Here, we describe principles of ribosome assembly that have emerged from recent studies of biogenesis of the large ribosomal subunit in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae We describe tools that have empowered investigations of ribosome biogenesis, and then summarize recent discoveries about each of the consecutive steps of subunit assembly. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  3. Structure and RNA recognition of ribosome assembly factor Utp30.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianfei; Zhu, Xing; Ye, Keqiong

    2017-09-26

    The 90S pre-ribosomes are gigantic early assembly intermediates of small ribosomal subunits. Cryo-EM structures of 90S were recently determined, but many of its components have not been accurately modelled. Here we determine the crystal structure of yeast Utp30, a ribosomal L1 domain-containing protein in 90S, at 2.65 Å resolution, revealing a classic two-domain fold. The structure of Utp30 fits well into the cryo-EM density of 90S, confirming its previously assigned location. Utp30 binds to the rearranged helix 41 of 18S rRNA and helix 4 of 5' external transcribed spacer in 90S. Comparison of RNA-binding modes of different L1 domains illustrates that they consistently recognize a short RNA duplex with the concaved surface of domain I, but are versatile in RNA recognition outside the core interface. Cic1 is a paralog of Utp30 associating with large subunit pre-ribosomes. Utp30 and Cic1 share similar RNA binding mode, suggesting that their distinct functions may be executed by a single protein in other organisms. Deletion of Utp30 does not affect the composition of 90S. The nonessential role of Utp30 could be ascribed to its peripheral localization and redundant interactions in 90S. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  4. Erythromycin- and chloramphenicol-induced ribosomal assembly defects are secondary effects of protein synthesis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Siibak, Triinu; Peil, Lauri; Xiong, Liqun; Mankin, Alexander; Remme, Jaanus; Tenson, Tanel

    2009-02-01

    Several protein synthesis inhibitors are known to inhibit ribosome assembly. This may be a consequence of direct binding of the antibiotic to ribosome precursor particles, or it could result indirectly from loss of coordination in the production of ribosomal components due to the inhibition of protein synthesis. Here we demonstrate that erythromycin and chloramphenicol, inhibitors of the large ribosomal subunit, affect the assembly of both the large and small subunits. Expression of a small erythromycin resistance peptide acting in cis on mature ribosomes relieves the erythromycin-mediated assembly defect for both subunits. Erythromycin treatment of bacteria expressing a mixture of erythromycin-sensitive and -resistant ribosomes produced comparable effects on subunit assembly. These results argue in favor of the view that erythromycin and chloramphenicol affect the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit indirectly.

  5. Kinase Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-01

    ribosome assembly pathway for tumor cell growth and death induced by novel anti-tumor agents. Here we propose to further dissect the role and...cancer cells ; if bypass of the CK1δ-dependent regulation of 40S ribosome assembly augments the tumorigenic potential of cancer cells . In Aim 2 we will...confirm preliminary observations that the autophagy and exosome pathways degrade stalled assembling ribosomes, leading to cell death; and test if

  6. Coordinated Ribosomal L4 Protein Assembly into the Pre-Ribosome Is Regulated by Its Eukaryote-Specific Extension.

    PubMed

    Stelter, Philipp; Huber, Ferdinand M; Kunze, Ruth; Flemming, Dirk; Hoelz, André; Hurt, Ed

    2015-06-04

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis requires nuclear import and hierarchical incorporation of ∼80 ribosomal proteins (RPs) into the ribosomal RNA core. In contrast to prokaryotes, many eukaryotic RPs possess long extensions that interdigitate in the mature ribosome. RpL4 is a prime example, with an ∼80-residue-long surface extension of unknown function. Here, we identify assembly chaperone Acl4 that initially binds the universally conserved internal loop of newly synthesized RpL4 via its superhelical TPR domain, thereby restricting RpL4 loop insertion at its cognate nascent rRNA site. RpL4 release from Acl4 is orchestrated with pre-ribosome assembly, during which the eukaryote-specific RpL4 extension makes several distinct interactions with the 60S surface, including a co-evolved site on neighboring RpL18. Consequently, mutational inactivation of this contact site, on either RpL4 or RpL18, impairs RpL4-Acl4 disassembly and RpL4 pre-ribosome incorporation. We propose that hierarchical ribosome assembly can be achieved by eukaryotic RP extensions and dedicated assembly chaperones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Toward a Whole-Cell Model of Ribosome Biogenesis: Kinetic Modeling of SSU Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Earnest, Tyler M.; Lai, Jonathan; Chen, Ke; Hallock, Michael J.; Williamson, James R.; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2015-01-01

    Central to all life is the assembly of the ribosome: a coordinated process involving the hierarchical association of ribosomal proteins to the RNAs forming the small and large ribosomal subunits. The process is further complicated by effects arising from the intracellular heterogeneous environment and the location of ribosomal operons within the cell. We provide a simplified model of ribosome biogenesis in slow-growing Escherichia coli. Kinetic models of in vitro small-subunit reconstitution at the level of individual protein/ribosomal RNA interactions are developed for two temperature regimes. The model at low temperatures predicts the existence of a novel 5′→3′→central assembly pathway, which we investigate further using molecular dynamics. The high-temperature assembly network is incorporated into a model of in vivo ribosome biogenesis in slow-growing E. coli. The model, described in terms of reaction-diffusion master equations, contains 1336 reactions and 251 species that dynamically couple transcription and translation to ribosome assembly. We use the Lattice Microbes software package to simulate the stochastic production of mRNA, proteins, and ribosome intermediates over a full cell cycle of 120 min. The whole-cell model captures the correct growth rate of ribosomes, predicts the localization of early assembly intermediates to the nucleoid region, and reproduces the known assembly timescales for the small subunit with no modifications made to the embedded in vitro assembly network. PMID:26333594

  8. Truncation of the Mrp20 protein reveals new ribosome-assembly subcomplex in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jasvinder; Stuart, Rosemary A

    2011-09-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomal protein 20 (Mrp20) is a component of the yeast mitochondrial large (54S) ribosomal subunit and is homologous to the bacterial L23 protein, located at the ribosomal tunnel exit site. The carboxy-terminal mitochondrial-specific domain of Mrp20 was found to have a crucial role in the assembly of the ribosomes. A new, membrane-bound, ribosomal-assembly subcomplex composed of known tunnel-exit-site proteins, an uncharacterized ribosomal protein, MrpL25, and the mitochondrial peroxiredoxin (Prx), Prx1, accumulates in an mrp20ΔC yeast mutant. Finally, data supporting the idea that the inner mitochondrial membrane acts as a platform for the ribosome assembly process are discussed.

  9. Deletion of L4 domains reveals insights into the importance of ribosomal protein extensions in eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Gamalinda, Michael; Woolford, John L

    2014-11-01

    Numerous ribosomal proteins have a striking bipartite architecture: a globular body positioned on the ribosomal exterior and an internal loop buried deep into the rRNA core. In eukaryotes, a significant number of conserved r-proteins have evolved extra amino- or carboxy-terminal tail sequences, which thread across the solvent-exposed surface. The biological importance of these extended domains remains to be established. In this study, we have investigated the universally conserved internal loop and the eukaryote-specific extensions of yeast L4. We show that in contrast to findings with bacterial L4, deleting the internal loop of yeast L4 causes severely impaired growth and reduced levels of large ribosomal subunits. We further report that while depleting the entire L4 protein blocks early assembly steps in yeast, deletion of only its extended internal loop affects later steps in assembly, revealing a second role for L4 during ribosome biogenesis. Surprisingly, deletion of the entire eukaryote-specific carboxy-terminal tail of L4 has no effect on viability, production of 60S subunits, or translation. These unexpected observations provide impetus to further investigate the functions of ribosomal protein extensions, especially eukaryote-specific examples, in ribosome assembly and function. © 2014 Gamalinda and Woolford; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  10. Interaction network of the ribosome assembly machinery from a eukaryotic thermophile.

    PubMed

    Baßler, Jochen; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Kallas, Martina; Kornprobst, Markus; Calviño, Fabiola R; Gnädig, Marén; Thoms, Matthias; Stier, Gunter; Ismail, Sherif; Kharde, Satyavati; Castillo, Nestor; Griesel, Sabine; Bastuck, Sonja; Bradatsch, Bettina; Thomson, Emma; Flemming, Dirk; Sinning, Irmgard; Hurt, Ed

    2017-02-01

    Ribosome biogenesis in eukaryotic cells is a highly dynamic and complex process innately linked to cell proliferation. The assembly of ribosomes is driven by a myriad of biogenesis factors that shape pre-ribosomal particles by processing and folding the ribosomal RNA and incorporating ribosomal proteins. Biochemical approaches allowed the isolation and characterization of pre-ribosomal particles from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which lead to a spatiotemporal map of biogenesis intermediates along the path from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm. Here, we cloned almost the entire set (∼180) of ribosome biogenesis factors from the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum in order to perform an in-depth analysis of their protein-protein interaction network as well as exploring the suitability of these thermostable proteins for structural studies. First, we performed a systematic screen, testing about 80 factors for crystallization and structure determination. Next, we performed a yeast 2-hybrid analysis and tested about 32,000 binary combinations, which identified more than 1000 protein-protein contacts between the thermophilic ribosome assembly factors. To exemplary verify several of these interactions, we performed biochemical reconstitution with the focus on the interaction network between 90S pre-ribosome factors forming the ctUTP-A and ctUTP-B modules, and the Brix-domain containing assembly factors of the pre-60S subunit. Our work provides a rich resource for biochemical reconstitution and structural analyses of the conserved ribosome assembly machinery from a eukaryotic thermophile. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  11. Fluorescence bimolecular complementation enables facile detection of ribosome assembly defects in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Himanshu; Anand, Baskaran

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Assembly factors promote the otherwise non-spontaneous maturation of ribosome under physiological conditions inside the cell. Systematic identification and characterization of candidate assembly factors are fraught with bottlenecks due to lack of facile assay system to capture assembly defects. Here, we show that bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) allows detection of assembly defects that are induced by the loss of assembly factors. The fusion of N and C-terminal fragments of Venus fluorescent protein to the ribosomal proteins uS13 and uL5, respectively, in Escherichia coli facilitated the incorporation of the tagged uS13 and uL5 onto the respective ribosomal subunits. When the ribosomal subunits associated to form the 70S particle, the complementary fragments of Venus were brought into proximity and rendered the Venus fluorescent. Assembly defects that inhibit the subunits association were provoked by either the loss of the known assembly factors such as RsgA and SrmB or the presence of small molecule inhibitors of ribosome maturation such as Lamotrigine and several ribosome-targeting antibiotics and these showed abrogation of the fluorescence complementation. This suggests that BiFC can be employed as a surrogate measure to detect ribosome assembly defects proficiently by circumventing the otherwise cumbersome procedures. BiFC thus offers a facile platform not only for systematic screening to validate potential assembly factors but also to discover novel small molecule inhibitors of ribosome assembly toward mapping the complex assembly landscape of ribosome. PMID:27388791

  12. Diverse roles of assembly factors revealed by structures of late nuclear pre-60S ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shan; Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Yan, Kaige; Brown, Hailey; Zhang, Yixiao; Tan, Dan; Gamalinda, Michael; Yuan, Yi; Li, Zhifei; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Ma, Chengying; Lei, Jianlin; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Woolford, John L; Gao, Ning

    2016-06-02

    Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex process in eukaryotes, involving temporally and spatially regulated ribosomal protein (r-protein) binding and ribosomal RNA remodelling events in the nucleolus, nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. Hundreds of assembly factors, organized into sequential functional groups, facilitate and guide the maturation process into productive assembly branches in and across different cellular compartments. However, the precise mechanisms by which these assembly factors function are largely unknown. Here we use cryo-electron microscopy to characterize the structures of yeast nucleoplasmic pre-60S particles affinity-purified using the epitope-tagged assembly factor Nog2. Our data pinpoint the locations and determine the structures of over 20 assembly factors, which are enriched in two areas: an arc region extending from the central protuberance to the polypeptide tunnel exit, and the domain including the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) that separates 5.8S and 25S ribosomal RNAs. In particular, two regulatory GTPases, Nog2 and Nog1, act as hub proteins to interact with multiple, distant assembly factors and functional ribosomal RNA elements, manifesting their critical roles in structural remodelling checkpoints and nuclear export. Moreover, our snapshots of compositionally and structurally different pre-60S intermediates provide essential mechanistic details for three major remodelling events before nuclear export: rotation of the 5S ribonucleoprotein, construction of the active centre and ITS2 removal. The rich structural information in our structures provides a framework to dissect molecular roles of diverse assembly factors in eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

  13. Requirement of rRNA Methylation for 80S Ribosome Assembly on a Cohort of Cellular Internal Ribosome Entry Sites▿

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Abhijit; Das, Priyanka; Chaudhuri, Sujan; Bevilacqua, Elena; Andrews, Joel; Barik, Sailen; Hatzoglou, Maria; Komar, Anton A.; Mazumder, Barsanjit

    2011-01-01

    Protein syntheses mediated by cellular and viral internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) are believed to have many features in common. Distinct mechanisms for ribosome recruitment and preinitiation complex assembly between the two processes have not been identified thus far. Here we show that the methylation status of rRNA differentially influenced the mechanism of 80S complex formation on IRES elements from the cellular sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) versus the hepatitis C virus mRNA. Translation initiation involves the assembly of the 48S preinitiation complex, followed by joining of the 60S ribosomal subunit and formation of the 80S complex. Abrogation of rRNA methylation did not affect the 48S complex but resulted in impairment of 80S complex assembly on the cellular, but not the viral, IRESs tested. Impairment of 80S complex assembly on the amino acid transporter SNAT2 IRES was rescued by purified 60S subunits containing fully methylated rRNA. We found that rRNA methylation did not affect the activity of any of the viral IRESs tested but affected the activity of numerous cellular IRESs. This work reveals a novel mechanism operating on a cohort of cellular IRESs that involves rRNA methylation for proper 80S complex assembly and efficient translation initiation. PMID:21930789

  14. A hierarchical model for assembly of eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit domains.

    PubMed

    Gamalinda, Michael; Ohmayer, Uli; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Kumcuoglu, Beril; Woolford, Joshua; Mbom, Bertrade; Lin, Lawrence; Woolford, John L

    2014-01-15

    Despite having high-resolution structures for eukaryotic large ribosomal subunits, it remained unclear how these ribonucleoprotein complexes are constructed in living cells. Nevertheless, knowing where ribosomal proteins interact with ribosomal RNA (rRNA) provides a strategic platform to investigate the connection between spatial and temporal aspects of 60S subunit biogenesis. We previously found that the function of individual yeast large subunit ribosomal proteins (RPLs) in precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing correlates with their location in the structure of mature 60S subunits. This observation suggested that there is an order by which 60S subunits are formed. To test this model, we used proteomic approaches to assay changes in the levels of ribosomal proteins and assembly factors in preribosomes when RPLs functioning in early, middle, and late steps of pre-60S assembly are depleted. Our results demonstrate that structural domains of eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunits are formed in a hierarchical fashion. Assembly begins at the convex solvent side, followed by the polypeptide exit tunnel, the intersubunit side, and finally the central protuberance. This model provides an initial paradigm for the sequential assembly of eukaryotic 60S subunits. Our results reveal striking differences and similarities between assembly of bacterial and eukaryotic large ribosomal subunits, providing insights into how these RNA-protein particles evolved.

  15. A hierarchical model for assembly of eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit domains

    PubMed Central

    Gamalinda, Michael; Ohmayer, Uli; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Kumcuoglu, Beril; Woolford, Joshua; Mbom, Bertrade; Lin, Lawrence; Woolford, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite having high-resolution structures for eukaryotic large ribosomal subunits, it remained unclear how these ribonucleoprotein complexes are constructed in living cells. Nevertheless, knowing where ribosomal proteins interact with ribosomal RNA (rRNA) provides a strategic platform to investigate the connection between spatial and temporal aspects of 60S subunit biogenesis. We previously found that the function of individual yeast large subunit ribosomal proteins (RPLs) in precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing correlates with their location in the structure of mature 60S subunits. This observation suggested that there is an order by which 60S subunits are formed. To test this model, we used proteomic approaches to assay changes in the levels of ribosomal proteins and assembly factors in preribosomes when RPLs functioning in early, middle, and late steps of pre-60S assembly are depleted. Our results demonstrate that structural domains of eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunits are formed in a hierarchical fashion. Assembly begins at the convex solvent side, followed by the polypeptide exit tunnel, the intersubunit side, and finally the central protuberance. This model provides an initial paradigm for the sequential assembly of eukaryotic 60S subunits. Our results reveal striking differences and similarities between assembly of bacterial and eukaryotic large ribosomal subunits, providing insights into how these RNA–protein particles evolved. PMID:24449272

  16. Sequential domain assembly of ribosomal protein S3 drives 40S subunit maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mitterer, Valentin; Murat, Guillaume; Réty, Stéphane; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Stanborough, Tamsyn; Bergler, Helmut; Leulliot, Nicolas; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes assemble by association of ribosomal RNA with ribosomal proteins into nuclear precursor particles, which undergo a complex maturation pathway coordinated by non-ribosomal assembly factors. Here, we provide functional insights into how successive structural re-arrangements in ribosomal protein S3 promote maturation of the 40S ribosomal subunit. We show that S3 dimerizes and is imported into the nucleus with its N-domain in a rotated conformation and associated with the chaperone Yar1. Initial assembly of S3 with 40S precursors occurs via its C-domain, while the N-domain protrudes from the 40S surface. Yar1 is replaced by the assembly factor Ltv1, thereby fixing the S3 N-domain in the rotated orientation and preventing its 40S association. Finally, Ltv1 release, triggered by phosphorylation, and flipping of the S3 N-domain into its final position results in the stable integration of S3. Such a stepwise assembly may represent a new paradigm for the incorporation of ribosomal proteins. PMID:26831757

  17. Validation of a fluorescence-based screening concept to identify ribosome assembly defects in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nikolay, Rainer; Schloemer, Renate; Schmidt, Sabine; Mueller, Silke; Heubach, Anja; Deuerling, Elke

    2014-07-01

    While the structure of mature ribosomes is analyzed in atomic detail considerably less is known about their assembly process in living cells. This is mainly due to technical and conceptual hurdles. To analyze ribosome assembly in vivo, we designed and engineered an Escherichiacoli strain--using chromosomal gene knock-in techniques--that harbors large and small ribosomal subunits labeled with the fluorescent proteins EGFP and mCherry, respectively. A thorough characterization of this reporter strain revealed that its growth properties and translation apparatus were wild-type like. Alterations in the ratio of EGFP over mCherry fluorescence are supposed to indicate ribosome assembly defects. To provide proof of principle, subunit specific assembly defects were provoked and could be identified by both manual and fully automated fluorometric in vivo assays. This is to our knowledge the first methodology that directly detects ribosome assembly defects in vivo in a high-throughput compatible format. Screening of knock-out collections and small molecule libraries will allow identification of new ribosome assembly factors and possible inhibitors. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Validation of a fluorescence-based screening concept to identify ribosome assembly defects in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nikolay, Rainer; Schloemer, Renate; Schmidt, Sabine; Mueller, Silke; Heubach, Anja; Deuerling, Elke

    2014-01-01

    While the structure of mature ribosomes is analyzed in atomic detail considerably less is known about their assembly process in living cells. This is mainly due to technical and conceptual hurdles. To analyze ribosome assembly in vivo, we designed and engineered an Escherichiacoli strain—using chromosomal gene knock-in techniques—that harbors large and small ribosomal subunits labeled with the fluorescent proteins EGFP and mCherry, respectively. A thorough characterization of this reporter strain revealed that its growth properties and translation apparatus were wild-type like. Alterations in the ratio of EGFP over mCherry fluorescence are supposed to indicate ribosome assembly defects. To provide proof of principle, subunit specific assembly defects were provoked and could be identified by both manual and fully automated fluorometric in vivo assays. This is to our knowledge the first methodology that directly detects ribosome assembly defects in vivo in a high-throughput compatible format. Screening of knock-out collections and small molecule libraries will allow identification of new ribosome assembly factors and possible inhibitors. PMID:24792169

  19. The Putative GTPase Encoded by MTG3 Functions in a Novel Pathway for Regulating Assembly of the Small Subunit of Yeast Mitochondrial Ribosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Marie-Françoise; Alushin, Gregory M.; Barros, Mario H.; Rak, Malgorzata; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Very little is known about biogenesis of mitochondrial ribosomes. The GTPases encoded by the nuclear MTG1 and MTG2 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been reported to play a role in assembly of the ribosomal 54 S subunit. In the present study biochemical screens of a collection of respiratory deficient yeast mutants have enabled us to identify a third gene essential for expression of mitochondrial ribosomes. This gene codes for a member of the YqeH family of GTPases, which we have named MTG3 in keeping with the earlier convention. Mutations in MTG3 cause the accumulation of the 15 S rRNA precursor, previously shown to have an 80-nucleotide 5′ extension. Sucrose gradient sedimentation of mitochondrial ribosomes from temperature-sensitive mtg3 mutants grown at the permissive and restrictive temperatures, combined with immunobloting with subunit-specific antibodies, indicate that Mtg3p is required for assembly of the 30 S but not 54 S ribosomal subunit. The respiratory deficient growth phenotype of an mtg3 null mutant is partially rescued by overexpression of the Mrpl4p constituent located at the peptide exit site of the 54 S subunit. The rescue is accompanied by an increase in processed 15 S rRNA. This suggests that Mtg3p and Mrpl4p jointly regulate assembly of the small subunit by modulating processing of the 15 S rRNA precursor. PMID:22621929

  20. The putative GTPase encoded by MTG3 functions in a novel pathway for regulating assembly of the small subunit of yeast mitochondrial ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Paul, Marie-Françoise; Alushin, Gregory M; Barros, Mario H; Rak, Malgorzata; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2012-07-13

    Very little is known about biogenesis of mitochondrial ribosomes. The GTPases encoded by the nuclear MTG1 and MTG2 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been reported to play a role in assembly of the ribosomal 54 S subunit. In the present study biochemical screens of a collection of respiratory deficient yeast mutants have enabled us to identify a third gene essential for expression of mitochondrial ribosomes. This gene codes for a member of the YqeH family of GTPases, which we have named MTG3 in keeping with the earlier convention. Mutations in MTG3 cause the accumulation of the 15 S rRNA precursor, previously shown to have an 80-nucleotide 5' extension. Sucrose gradient sedimentation of mitochondrial ribosomes from temperature-sensitive mtg3 mutants grown at the permissive and restrictive temperatures, combined with immunobloting with subunit-specific antibodies, indicate that Mtg3p is required for assembly of the 30 S but not 54 S ribosomal subunit. The respiratory deficient growth phenotype of an mtg3 null mutant is partially rescued by overexpression of the Mrpl4p constituent located at the peptide exit site of the 54 S subunit. The rescue is accompanied by an increase in processed 15 S rRNA. This suggests that Mtg3p and Mrpl4p jointly regulate assembly of the small subunit by modulating processing of the 15 S rRNA precursor.

  1. Efficient Assembly of Ribosomes Is Inhibited by Deletion of bipA in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Promisree

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial BipA protein belongs to the EF-G family of translational GTPases and has been postulated to be either a regulatory translation factor or a ribosome assembly factor. To distinguish between these hypotheses, we analyzed the effect of bipA deletion on three phenotypes associated with ribosome assembly factors: cold sensitivity, ribosome subunit distribution, and rRNA processing. We demonstrated that a ΔbipA strain exhibits a cold-sensitive phenotype that is similar to, and synergistic with, that of a strain with a known ribosome assembly factor, deaD. Additionally, the bipA deletion strain displayed a perturbed ribosome subunit distribution when grown at low temperature, similar to that of a deaD mutant, and again, the double mutant showed additive effects. The primary ribosomal deficiency noted was a decreased level of the 50S subunit and the appearance of a presumed pre-50S particle. Finally, deletion of bipA resulted in accumulation of pre23S rRNA, as did deletion of deaD. We further found that deletion of rluC, which encodes a pseudouridine synthase that modifies the 23S rRNA at three sites, suppressed all three phenotypes of the bipA mutant, supporting and extending previous findings. Together, these results suggest that BipA is important for the correct and efficient assembly of the 50S subunit of the ribosome at low temperature but when unmodified by RluC, the ribosomes become BipA independent for assembly. IMPORTANCE The ribosome is the complex ribonucleoprotein machine responsible for protein synthesis in all cells. Although much has been learned about the structure and function of the ribosome, we do not fully understand how it is assembled or the accessory proteins that increase efficiency of biogenesis and function. This study examined one such protein, BipA. Our results indicate that BipA either directly or indirectly enhances the formation of the 50S subunit of the ribosome, particularly at low temperature. In addition, ribosomes

  2. Efficient assembly of ribosomes is inhibited by deletion of bipA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Promisree; Flower, Ann M

    2015-05-01

    The bacterial BipA protein belongs to the EF-G family of translational GTPases and has been postulated to be either a regulatory translation factor or a ribosome assembly factor. To distinguish between these hypotheses, we analyzed the effect of bipA deletion on three phenotypes associated with ribosome assembly factors: cold sensitivity, ribosome subunit distribution, and rRNA processing. We demonstrated that a ΔbipA strain exhibits a cold-sensitive phenotype that is similar to, and synergistic with, that of a strain with a known ribosome assembly factor, deaD. Additionally, the bipA deletion strain displayed a perturbed ribosome subunit distribution when grown at low temperature, similar to that of a deaD mutant, and again, the double mutant showed additive effects. The primary ribosomal deficiency noted was a decreased level of the 50S subunit and the appearance of a presumed pre-50S particle. Finally, deletion of bipA resulted in accumulation of pre23S rRNA, as did deletion of deaD. We further found that deletion of rluC, which encodes a pseudouridine synthase that modifies the 23S rRNA at three sites, suppressed all three phenotypes of the bipA mutant, supporting and extending previous findings. Together, these results suggest that BipA is important for the correct and efficient assembly of the 50S subunit of the ribosome at low temperature but when unmodified by RluC, the ribosomes become BipA independent for assembly. The ribosome is the complex ribonucleoprotein machine responsible for protein synthesis in all cells. Although much has been learned about the structure and function of the ribosome, we do not fully understand how it is assembled or the accessory proteins that increase efficiency of biogenesis and function. This study examined one such protein, BipA. Our results indicate that BipA either directly or indirectly enhances the formation of the 50S subunit of the ribosome, particularly at low temperature. In addition, ribosomes contain a large

  3. Three distinct ribosome assemblies modulated by translation are the building blocks of polysomes

    PubMed Central

    Lunelli, Lorenzo; Passerini, Andrea; Bianchini, Paolo; Gilbert, Robert J.; Bernabò, Paola; Tebaldi, Toma; Diaspro, Alberto; Pederzolli, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Translation is increasingly recognized as a central control layer of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. The overall organization of mRNA and ribosomes within polysomes, as well as the possible role of this organization in translation are poorly understood. Here we show that polysomes are primarily formed by three distinct classes of ribosome assemblies. We observe that these assemblies can be connected by naked RNA regions of the transcript. We show that the relative proportions of the three classes of ribosome assemblies reflect, and probably dictate, the level of translational activity. These results reveal the existence of recurrent supra-ribosomal building blocks forming polysomes and suggest the presence of unexplored translational controls embedded in the polysome structure. PMID:25713412

  4. Assembling the archaeal ribosome: roles for translation-factor-related GTPases.

    PubMed

    Blombach, Fabian; Brouns, Stan J J; van der Oost, John

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of ribosomal subunits from their individual components (rRNA and ribosomal proteins) requires the assistance of a multitude of factors in order to control and increase the efficiency of the assembly process. GTPases of the TRAFAC (translation-factor-related) class constitute a major type of ribosome-assembly factor in Eukaryota and Bacteria. They are thought to aid the stepwise assembly of ribosomal subunits through a 'molecular switch' mechanism that involves conformational changes in response to GTP hydrolysis. Most conserved TRAFAC GTPases are involved in ribosome assembly or other translation-associated processes. They typically interact with ribosomal subunits, but in many cases, the exact role that these GTPases play remains unclear. Previous studies almost exclusively focused on the systems of Bacteria and Eukaryota. Archaea possess several conserved TRAFAC GTPases as well, with some GTPase families being present only in the archaeo-eukaryotic lineage. In the present paper, we review the occurrence of TRAFAC GTPases with translation-associated functions in Archaea.

  5. Studies on the Assembly Characteristics of Large Subunit Ribosomal Proteins in S. cerevisae

    PubMed Central

    Ohmayer, Uli; Gamalinda, Michael; Sauert, Martina; Ossowski, Julius; Pöll, Gisela; Linnemann, Jan; Hierlmeier, Thomas; Perez-Fernandez, Jorge; Kumcuoglu, Beril; Leger-Silvestre, Isabelle; Faubladier, Marlène; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Woolford, John; Tschochner, Herbert; Milkereit, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    During the assembly process of ribosomal subunits, their structural components, the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and the ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) have to join together in a highly dynamic and defined manner to enable the efficient formation of functional ribosomes. In this work, the assembly of large ribosomal subunit (LSU) r-proteins from the eukaryote S. cerevisiae was systematically investigated. Groups of LSU r-proteins with specific assembly characteristics were detected by comparing the protein composition of affinity purified early, middle, late or mature LSU (precursor) particles by semi-quantitative mass spectrometry. The impact of yeast LSU r-proteins rpL25, rpL2, rpL43, and rpL21 on the composition of intermediate to late nuclear LSU precursors was analyzed in more detail. Effects of these proteins on the assembly states of other r-proteins and on the transient LSU precursor association of several ribosome biogenesis factors, including Nog2, Rsa4 and Nop53, are discussed. PMID:23874617

  6. Disruption of ribosome assembly in yeast blocks cotranscriptional pre-rRNA processing and affects the global hierarchy of ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Talkish, Jason; Biedka, Stephanie; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Zhang, Jingyu; Tang, Lan; Strahler, John R.; Andrews, Philip C.; Maddock, Janine R.; Woolford, John L.

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, pre-rRNA processing occurs almost exclusively post-transcriptionally. This is not the case in rapidly dividing yeast, as the majority of nascent pre-rRNAs are processed cotranscriptionally, with cleavage at the A2 site first releasing a pre-40S ribosomal subunit followed by release of a pre-60S ribosomal subunit upon transcription termination. Ribosome assembly is driven in part by hierarchical association of assembly factors and r-proteins. Groups of proteins are thought to associate with pre-ribosomes cotranscriptionally during early assembly steps, whereas others associate later, after transcription is completed. Here we describe a previously uncharacterized phenotype observed upon disruption of ribosome assembly, in which normally late-binding proteins associate earlier, with pre-ribosomes containing 35S pre-rRNA. As previously observed by many other groups, we show that disruption of 60S subunit biogenesis results in increased amounts of 35S pre-rRNA, suggesting that a greater fraction of pre-rRNAs are processed post-transcriptionally. Surprisingly, we found that early pre-ribosomes containing 35S pre-rRNA also contain proteins previously thought to only associate with pre-ribosomes after early pre-rRNA processing steps have separated maturation of the two subunits. We believe the shift to post-transcriptional processing is ultimately due to decreased cellular division upon disruption of ribosome assembly. When cells are grown under stress or to high density, a greater fraction of pre-rRNAs are processed post-transcriptionally and follow an alternative processing pathway. Together, these results affirm the principle that ribosome assembly occurs through different, parallel assembly pathways and suggest that there is a kinetic foot-race between the formation of protein binding sites and pre-rRNA processing events. PMID:27036125

  7. Disruption of ribosome assembly in yeast blocks cotranscriptional pre-rRNA processing and affects the global hierarchy of ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Talkish, Jason; Biedka, Stephanie; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Zhang, Jingyu; Tang, Lan; Strahler, John R; Andrews, Philip C; Maddock, Janine R; Woolford, John L

    2016-06-01

    In higher eukaryotes, pre-rRNA processing occurs almost exclusively post-transcriptionally. This is not the case in rapidly dividing yeast, as the majority of nascent pre-rRNAs are processed cotranscriptionally, with cleavage at the A2 site first releasing a pre-40S ribosomal subunit followed by release of a pre-60S ribosomal subunit upon transcription termination. Ribosome assembly is driven in part by hierarchical association of assembly factors and r-proteins. Groups of proteins are thought to associate with pre-ribosomes cotranscriptionally during early assembly steps, whereas others associate later, after transcription is completed. Here we describe a previously uncharacterized phenotype observed upon disruption of ribosome assembly, in which normally late-binding proteins associate earlier, with pre-ribosomes containing 35S pre-rRNA. As previously observed by many other groups, we show that disruption of 60S subunit biogenesis results in increased amounts of 35S pre-rRNA, suggesting that a greater fraction of pre-rRNAs are processed post-transcriptionally. Surprisingly, we found that early pre-ribosomes containing 35S pre-rRNA also contain proteins previously thought to only associate with pre-ribosomes after early pre-rRNA processing steps have separated maturation of the two subunits. We believe the shift to post-transcriptional processing is ultimately due to decreased cellular division upon disruption of ribosome assembly. When cells are grown under stress or to high density, a greater fraction of pre-rRNAs are processed post-transcriptionally and follow an alternative processing pathway. Together, these results affirm the principle that ribosome assembly occurs through different, parallel assembly pathways and suggest that there is a kinetic foot-race between the formation of protein binding sites and pre-rRNA processing events. © 2016 Talkish et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  8. rRNA maturation as a "quality" control step in ribosomal subunit assembly in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Chiaberge, S; Bulfone, S

    1997-10-31

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, newly assembled ribosomal subunits enter polyribosomes while they still contain immature rRNA. rRNA maturation requires the engagement of the subunits in protein synthesis and leads to stabilization of their structure. Maturation of pre-17 S rRNA occurs only after the newly formed 40 S ribosomal particle has entered an 80 S ribosome and participated at least in the formation of one peptide bond or in one translocation event; maturation of pre-26 S rRNA requires the presence on the 80 S particle of a peptidyl-tRNA containing at least 6 amino acids. Newly assembled particles that cannot fulfill these requirements for structural reasons are disassembled into free immature rRNA and ribosomal proteins.

  9. Structure and Assembly Pathway of the Ribosome Quality Control Complex

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Sichen; Brown, Alan; Santhanam, Balaji; Hegde, Ramanujan S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary During ribosome-associated quality control, stalled ribosomes are split into subunits and the 60S-housed nascent polypeptides are poly-ubiquitinated by Listerin. How this low-abundance ubiquitin ligase targets rare stall-generated 60S among numerous empty 60S is unknown. Here, we show that Listerin specificity for nascent chain-60S complexes depends on nuclear export mediator factor (NEMF). The 3.6 Å cryo-EM structure of a nascent chain-containing 60S-Listerin-NEMF complex revealed that NEMF makes multiple simultaneous contacts with 60S and peptidyl-tRNA to sense nascent chain occupancy. Structural and mutational analyses showed that ribosome-bound NEMF recruits and stabilizes Listerin’s N-terminal domain, while Listerin’s C-terminal RWD domain directly contacts the ribosome to position the adjacent ligase domain near the nascent polypeptide exit tunnel. Thus, highly specific nascent chain targeting by Listerin is imparted by the avidity gained from a multivalent network of context-specific individually weak interactions, highlighting a new principle of client recognition during protein quality control. PMID:25578875

  10. Multiple GTPases participate in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Laura; Uicker, William C; Wicker-Planquart, Catherine; Foucher, Anne-Emmanuelle; Jault, Jean-Michel; Britton, Robert A

    2006-12-01

    GTPases have been demonstrated to be necessary for the proper assembly of the ribosome in bacteria and eukaryotes. Here, we show that the essential GTPases YphC and YsxC are required for large ribosomal subunit biogenesis in Bacillus subtilis. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation of large ribosomal subunits isolated from YphC-depleted cells and YsxC-depleted cells indicates that they are similar to the 45S intermediate previously identified in RbgA-depleted cells. The sedimentation of the large-subunit intermediate isolated from YphC-depleted cells was identical to the intermediate found in RbgA-depleted cells, while the intermediate isolated from YsxC-depleted cells sedimented slightly slower than 45S, suggesting that it is a novel intermediate. Analysis of the protein composition of the large-subunit intermediates isolated from either YphC-depleted cells or YsxC-depleted cells indicated that L16 and L36 are missing. Purified YphC and YsxC are able to interact with the ribosome in vitro, supporting a direct role for these two proteins in the assembly of the 50S subunit. Our results indicate that, as has been demonstrated for Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosome biogenesis, bacterial 50S ribosome assembly requires the function of multiple essential GTPases.

  11. The extended loops of ribosomal proteins uL4 and uL22 of Escherichia coli contribute to ribosome assembly and protein translation.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Marlon G; Shamsuzzaman, Md; Kondopaka, Maithri; Pascual, Clarence; Zengel, Janice M; Lindahl, Lasse

    2016-07-08

    Nearly half of ribosomal proteins are composed of a domain on the ribosome surface and a loop or extension that penetrates into the organelle's RNA core. Our previous work showed that ribosomes lacking the loops of ribosomal proteins uL4 or uL22 are still capable of entering polysomes. However, in those experiments we could not address the formation of mutant ribosomes, because we used strains that also expressed wild-type uL4 and uL22. Here, we have focused on ribosome assembly and function in strains in which loop deletion mutant genes are the ONLY: sources of uL4 or uL22 protein. The uL4 and uL22 loop deletions have different effects, but both mutations result in accumulation of immature particles that do not accumulate in detectable amounts in wild-type strains. Thus, our results suggest that deleting the loops creates kinetic barriers in the normal assembly pathway, possibly resulting in assembly via alternate pathway(s). Furthermore, deletion of the uL4 loop results in cold-sensitive ribosome assembly and function. Finally, ribosomes carrying either of the loop-deleted proteins responded normally to the secM translation pausing peptide, but the uL4 mutant responded very inefficiently to the cmlA(crb) pause peptide. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. The extended loops of ribosomal proteins uL4 and uL22 of Escherichia coli contribute to ribosome assembly and protein translation

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Marlon G.; Shamsuzzaman, Md; Kondopaka, Maithri; Pascual, Clarence; Zengel, Janice M.; Lindahl, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of ribosomal proteins are composed of a domain on the ribosome surface and a loop or extension that penetrates into the organelle's RNA core. Our previous work showed that ribosomes lacking the loops of ribosomal proteins uL4 or uL22 are still capable of entering polysomes. However, in those experiments we could not address the formation of mutant ribosomes, because we used strains that also expressed wild-type uL4 and uL22. Here, we have focused on ribosome assembly and function in strains in which loop deletion mutant genes are the only sources of uL4 or uL22 protein. The uL4 and uL22 loop deletions have different effects, but both mutations result in accumulation of immature particles that do not accumulate in detectable amounts in wild-type strains. Thus, our results suggest that deleting the loops creates kinetic barriers in the normal assembly pathway, possibly resulting in assembly via alternate pathway(s). Furthermore, deletion of the uL4 loop results in cold-sensitive ribosome assembly and function. Finally, ribosomes carrying either of the loop-deleted proteins responded normally to the secM translation pausing peptide, but the uL4 mutant responded very inefficiently to the cmlAcrb pause peptide. PMID:27257065

  13. Structures of the human mitochondrial ribosome in native states of assembly.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alan; Rathore, Sorbhi; Kimanius, Dari; Aibara, Shintaro; Bai, Xiao-Chen; Rorbach, Joanna; Amunts, Alexey; Ramakrishnan, V

    2017-09-11

    Mammalian mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes) have less rRNA content and 36 additional proteins compared with the evolutionarily related bacterial ribosome. These differences make the assembly of mitoribosomes more complex than the assembly of bacterial ribosomes, but the molecular details of mitoribosomal biogenesis remain elusive. Here, we report the structures of two late-stage assembly intermediates of the human mitoribosomal large subunit (mt-LSU) isolated from a native pool within a human cell line and solved by cryo-EM to ∼3-Å resolution. Comparison of the structures reveals insights into the timing of rRNA folding and protein incorporation during the final steps of ribosomal maturation and the evolutionary adaptations that are required to preserve biogenesis after the structural diversification of mitoribosomes. Furthermore, the structures redefine the ribosome silencing factor (RsfS) family as multifunctional biogenesis factors and identify two new assembly factors (L0R8F8 and mt-ACP) not previously implicated in mitoribosomal biogenesis.

  14. Has1 regulates consecutive maturation and processing steps for assembly of 60S ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Dembowski, Jill A.; Kuo, Benjamin; Woolford, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis requires ∼200 assembly factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The pre-ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing defects associated with depletion of most of these factors have been characterized. However, how assembly factors drive the construction of ribonucleoprotein neighborhoods and how structural rearrangements are coupled to pre-rRNA processing are not understood. Here, we reveal ATP-independent and ATP-dependent roles of the Has1 DEAD-box RNA helicase in consecutive pre-rRNA processing and maturation steps for construction of 60S ribosomal subunits. Has1 associates with pre-60S ribosomes in an ATP-independent manner. Has1 binding triggers exonucleolytic trimming of 27SA3 pre-rRNA to generate the 5′ end of 5.8S rRNA and drives incorporation of ribosomal protein L17 with domain I of 5.8S/25S rRNA. ATP-dependent activity of Has1 promotes stable association of additional domain I ribosomal proteins that surround the polypeptide exit tunnel, which are required for downstream processing of 27SB pre-rRNA. Furthermore, in the absence of Has1, aberrant 27S pre-rRNAs are targeted for irreversible turnover. Thus, our data support a model in which Has1 helps to establish domain I architecture to prevent pre-rRNA turnover and couples domain I folding with consecutive pre-rRNA processing steps. PMID:23788678

  15. The N-terminal extension of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L20 is important for ribosome assembly, but dispensable for translational feedback control.

    PubMed

    Guillier, Maude; Allemand, Frédéric; Graffe, Monique; Raibaud, Sophie; Dardel, Frédéric; Springer, Mathias; Chiaruttini, Claude

    2005-05-01

    The Escherichia coli autoregulatory ribosomal protein L20 consists of two structurally distinct domains. The C-terminal domain is globular and sits on the surface of the large ribosomal subunit whereas the N-terminal domain has an extended shape and penetrates deep into the RNA-rich core of the subunit. Many other ribosomal proteins have analogous internal or terminal extensions. However, the biological functions of these extended domains remain obscure. Here we show that the N-terminal tail of L20 is important for ribosome assembly in vivo. Indeed, a truncated version of L20 without its N-terminal tail is unable to complement the deletion of rplT, the gene encoding L20. In addition, this L20 truncation confers a lethal-dominant phenotype, suggesting that the N-terminal domain is essential for cell growth because it could be required for ribosome assembly. Supporting this hypothesis, partial deletions of the N-terminal tail of the protein are shown to cause a slow-growth phenotype due to altered ribosome assembly in vivo as large amounts of intermediate 40S ribosomal particles accumulate. In addition to being a ribosomal protein, L20 also acts as an autogenous repressor. Using L20 truncations, we also show that the N-terminal tail of L20 is dispensable for autogenous control.

  16. Involvement of ribosomal protein L6 in assembly of functional 50S ribosomal subunit in Escherichia coli cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shigeno, Yuta; Uchiumi, Toshio; Nomura, Takaomi

    2016-04-22

    Ribosomal protein L6, an essential component of the large (50S) subunit, primarily binds to helix 97 of 23S rRNA and locates near the sarcin/ricin loop of helix 95 that directly interacts with GTPase translation factors. Although L6 is believed to play important roles in factor-dependent ribosomal function, crucial biochemical evidence for this hypothesis has not been obtained. We constructed and characterized an Escherichia coli mutant bearing a chromosomal L6 gene (rplF) disruption and carrying a plasmid with an arabinose-inducible L6 gene. Although this ΔL6 mutant grew more slowly than its wild-type parent, it proliferated in the presence of arabinose. Interestingly, cell growth in the absence of arabinose was biphasic. Early growth lasted only a few generations (LI-phase) and was followed by a suspension of growth for several hours (S-phase). This suspension was followed by a second growth phase (LII-phase). Cells harvested at both LI- and S-phases contained ribosomes with reduced factor-dependent GTPase activity and accumulated 50S subunit precursors (45S particles). The 45S particles completely lacked L6. Complete 50S subunits containing L6 were observed in all growth phases regardless of the L6-depleted condition, implying that the ΔL6 mutant escaped death because of a leaky expression of L6 from the complementing plasmid. We conclude that L6 is essential for the assembly of functional 50S subunits at the late stage. We thus established conditions for the isolation of L6-depleted 50S subunits, which are essential to study the role of L6 in translation. - Highlights: • We constructed an in vivo functional assay system for Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L6. • Growth of an E. coli ΔL6 mutant was biphasic when L6 levels were depleted. • The ΔL6 mutant accumulated 50S ribosomal subunit precursors that sedimented at 45S. • L6 is a key player in the late stage of E. coli 50S subunit assembly.

  17. YsxC, an essential protein in Staphylococcus aureus crucial for ribosome assembly/stability.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Elizabeth L; García-Lara, Jorge; Foster, Simon J

    2009-12-18

    Bacterial growth and division requires a core set of essential proteins, several of which are still of unknown function. They are also attractive targets for the development of new antibiotics. YsxC is a member of a family of GTPases highly conserved across eubacteria with a possible ribosome associated function. Here, we demonstrate by the creation of a conditional lethal mutant that ysxC is apparently essential for growth in S. aureus. To begin to elucidate YsxC function, a translational fusion of YsxC to the CBP-ProteinA tag in the staphylococcal chromosome was made, enabling Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP) of YsxC-interacting partners. These included the ribosomal proteins S2, S10 and L17, as well as the beta' subunit of the RNA polymerase. YsxC was then shown to copurify with ribosomes as an accessory protein specifically localizing to the 50 S subunit. YsxC depletion led to a decrease in the presence of mature ribosomes, indicating a role in ribosome assembly and/or stability in S. aureus. In this study we demonstrate that YsxC of S. aureus localizes to the ribosomes, is crucial for ribosomal stability and is apparently essential for the life of S. aureus.

  18. Biochemical characterization of ribosome assembly GTPase RbgA in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Achila, David; Gulati, Megha; Jain, Nikhil; Britton, Robert A

    2012-03-09

    The ribosome biogenesis GTPase A protein RbgA is involved in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit in Bacillus subtilis, and homologs of RbgA are implicated in the biogenesis of mitochondrial, chloroplast, and cytoplasmic ribosomes in archaea and eukaryotes. The precise function of how RbgA contributes to ribosome assembly is not understood. Defects in RbgA give rise to a large ribosomal subunit that is immature and migrates at 45 S in sucrose density gradients. Here, we report a detailed biochemical analysis of RbgA and its interaction with the ribosome. We found that RbgA, like most other GTPases, exhibits a very slow k(cat) (14 h(-1)) and has a high K(m) (90 μM). Homology modeling of the RbgA switch I region using the K-loop GTPase MnmE as a template suggested that RbgA requires K(+) ions for GTPase activity, which was confirmed experimentally. Interaction with 50 S subunits, but not 45 S intermediates, increased GTPase activity by ∼55-fold. Stable association with 50 S subunits and 45 S intermediates was nucleotide-dependent, and GDP did not support strong interaction with either of the subunits. GTP and guanosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate (GMPPNP) were sufficient to promote association with the 45 S intermediate, whereas only GMPPNP was able to support binding to the 50 S subunit, presumably due to the stimulation of GTP hydrolysis. These results support a model in which RbgA promotes a late step in ribosome biogenesis and that one role of GTP hydrolysis is to stimulate dissociation of RbgA from the ribosome.

  19. Oxa1-Ribosome Complexes Coordinate the Assembly of Cytochrome c Oxidase in Mitochondria*

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Melanie; Bareth, Bettina; Woellhaf, Michael W.; Peleh, Valentina; Prestele, Martin; Rehling, Peter; Herrmann, Johannes M.

    2012-01-01

    The terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, cytochrome c oxidase, consists of a hydrophobic reaction center formed by three mitochondrially encoded subunits with which 9–10 nuclear encoded subunits are associated. The three core subunits are synthesized on mitochondrial ribosomes and inserted into the inner membrane in a co-translational reaction facilitated by the Oxa1 insertase. Oxa1 consists of an N-terminal insertase domain and a C-terminal ribosome-binding region. Mutants lacking the C-terminal region show specific defects in co-translational insertion, suggesting that the close contact of the ribosome with the insertase promotes co-translational insertion of nascent chains. In this study, we inserted flexible linkers of 100 or 200 amino acid residues between the insertase domain and ribosome-binding region of Oxa1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the absence of the ribosome receptor Mba1, these linkers caused a length-dependent decrease in mitochondrial respiratory activity caused by diminished levels of cytochrome c oxidase. Interestingly, considerable amounts of mitochondrial translation products were still integrated into the inner membrane in these linker mutants. However, they showed severe defects in later stages of the biogenesis process, presumably during assembly into functional complexes. Our observations suggest that the close proximity of Oxa1 to ribosomes is not only used to improve membrane insertion but is also critical for the productive assembly of the subunits of the cytochrome c oxidase. This points to a role for Oxa1 in the spatial coordination of the ribosome with assembly factors that are critical for enzyme biogenesis. PMID:22904327

  20. The DEAD-box helicase DDX3 supports the assembly of functional 80S ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Rene; Golbik, Ralph P.; Behrens, Sven-Erik

    2012-01-01

    The DEAD-box helicase DDX3 has suggested functions in innate immunity, mRNA translocation and translation, and it participates in the propagation of assorted viruses. Exploring initially the role of DDX3 in the life cycle of hepatitis C virus, we observed the protein to be involved in translation directed by different viral internal ribosomal entry sites. Extension of these studies revealed a general supportive role of DDX3 in translation initiation. DDX3 was found to interact in an RNA-independent manner with defined components of the translational pre-initiation complex and to specifically associate with newly assembling 80S ribosomes. DDX3 knock down and in vitro reconstitution experiments revealed a significant function of the protein in the formation of 80S translation initiation complexes. Our study implies that DDX3 assists the 60S subunit joining process to assemble functional 80S ribosomes. PMID:22323517

  1. The N-terminal extension of yeast ribosomal protein L8 is involved in two major remodeling events during late nuclear stages of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly

    PubMed Central

    Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Wu, Shan; Gao, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Assaying effects on pre-rRNA processing and ribosome assembly upon depleting individual ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) provided an initial paradigm for assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo—that each structural domain of ribosomal subunits assembles in a hierarchical fashion. However, two features suggest that a more complex pathway may exist: (i) Some r-proteins contain extensions that reach long distances across ribosomes to interact with multiple rRNA domains as well as with other r-proteins. (ii) Individual r-proteins may assemble in a stepwise fashion. For example, the globular domain of an r-protein might assemble separately from its extensions. Thus, these extensions might play roles in assembly that could not be revealed by depleting the entire protein. Here, we show that deleting or mutating extensions of r-proteins L7 (uL30) and L35 (uL29) from yeast reveal important roles in early and middle steps during 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Detailed analysis of the N-terminal terminal extension of L8 (eL8) showed that it is necessary for late nuclear stages of 60S subunit assembly involving two major remodeling events: removal of the ITS2 spacer; and reorganization of the central protuberance (CP) containing 5S rRNA and r-proteins L5 (uL18) and L11 (uL5). Mutations in the L8 extension block processing of 7S pre-rRNA, prevent release of assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 from pre-ribosomes, which is required for rotation of the CP, and block association of Sda1, the Rix1 complex, and the Rea1 ATPase involved in late steps of remodeling. PMID:27390266

  2. Hierarchical recruitment into nascent ribosomes of assembly factors required for 27SB pre-rRNA processing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Talkish, Jason; Zhang, Jingyu; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Horsey, Edward W.; Woolford, John L.

    2012-01-01

    To better define the roles of assembly factors required for eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis, we have focused on one specific step in maturation of yeast 60 S ribosomal subunits: processing of 27SB pre-ribosomal RNA. At least 14 assembly factors, the ‘B-factor’ proteins, are required for this step. These include most of the major functional classes of assembly factors: RNA-binding proteins, scaffolding protein, DEAD-box ATPases and GTPases. We have investigated the mechanisms by which these factors associate with assembling ribosomes. Our data establish a recruitment model in which assembly of the B-factors into nascent ribosomes ultimately leads to the recruitment of the GTPase Nog2. A more detailed analysis suggests that this occurs in a hierarchical manner via two largely independent recruiting pathways that converge on Nog2. Understanding recruitment has allowed us to better determine the order of association of all assembly factors functioning in one step of ribosome assembly. Furthermore, we have identified a novel subcomplex composed of the B-factors Nop2 and Nip7. Finally, we identified a means by which this step in ribosome biogenesis is regulated in concert with cell growth via the TOR protein kinase pathway. Inhibition of TOR kinase decreases association of Rpf2, Spb4, Nog1 and Nog2 with pre-ribosomes. PMID:22735702

  3. Ribosomal proteins L7 and L8 function in concert with six A3 assembly factors to propagate assembly of domains I and II of 25S rRNA in yeast 60S ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Jakovljevic, Jelena; Ohmayer, Uli; Gamalinda, Michael; Talkish, Jason; Alexander, Lisa; Linnemann, Jan; Milkereit, Philipp; Woolford, John L.

    2012-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a complex multistep process that involves alternating steps of folding and processing of pre-rRNAs in concert with assembly of ribosomal proteins. Recently, there has been increased interest in the roles of ribosomal proteins in eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis in vivo, focusing primarily on their function in pre-rRNA processing. However, much less is known about participation of ribosomal proteins in the formation and rearrangement of preribosomal particles as they mature to functional subunits. We have studied ribosomal proteins L7 and L8, which are required for the same early steps in pre-rRNA processing during assembly of 60S subunits but are located in different domains within ribosomes. Depletion of either leads to defects in processing of 27SA3 to 27SB pre-rRNA and turnover of pre-rRNAs destined for large ribosomal subunits. A specific subset of proteins is diminished from these residual assembly intermediates: six assembly factors required for processing of 27SA3 pre-rRNA and four ribosomal proteins bound to domain I of 25S and 5.8S rRNAs surrounding the polypeptide exit tunnel. In addition, specific sets of ribosomal proteins are affected in each mutant: In the absence of L7, proteins bound to domain II, L6, L14, L20, and L33 are greatly diminished, while proteins L13, L15, and L36 that bind to domain I are affected in the absence of L8. Thus, L7 and L8 might establish RNP structures within assembling ribosomes necessary for the stable association and function of the A3 assembly factors and for proper assembly of the neighborhoods containing domains I and II. PMID:22893726

  4. MPV17L2 is required for ribosome assembly in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Durigon, Romina; Pearce, Sarah F.; Rorbach, Joanna; Hirst, Elizabeth M.A.; Vidoni, Sara; Reyes, Aurelio; Brea-Calvo, Gloria; Minczuk, Michal; Woellhaf, Michael W.; Herrmann, Johannes M.; Huynen, Martijn A.; Holt, Ian J.; Spinazzola, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    MPV17 is a mitochondrial protein of unknown function, and mutations in MPV17 are associated with mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) maintenance disorders. Here we investigated its most similar relative, MPV17L2, which is also annotated as a mitochondrial protein. Mitochondrial fractionation analyses demonstrate MPV17L2 is an integral inner membrane protein, like MPV17. However, unlike MPV17, MPV17L2 is dependent on mitochondrial DNA, as it is absent from ρ0 cells, and co-sediments on sucrose gradients with the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome and the monosome. Gene silencing of MPV17L2 results in marked decreases in the monosome and both subunits of the mitochondrial ribosome, leading to impaired protein synthesis in the mitochondria. Depletion of MPV17L2 also induces mitochondrial DNA aggregation. The DNA and ribosome phenotypes are linked, as in the absence of MPV17L2 proteins of the small subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome are trapped in the enlarged nucleoids, in contrast to a component of the large subunit. These findings suggest MPV17L2 contributes to the biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosome, uniting the two subunits to create the translationally competent monosome, and provide evidence that assembly of the small subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome occurs at the nucleoid. PMID:24948607

  5. Nucleolin provides a link between RNA polymerase I transcription and pre-ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Roger, Benoit; Moisand, André; Amalric, François; Bouvet, Philippe

    2003-03-01

    Despite the identification of numerous factors involved in ribosomal RNA synthesis and maturation, the molecular mechanisms of ribosome biogenesis, and in particular the relationship between the different steps, are still largely unknown. We have investigated the consequences of an increased amount of a major nucleolar non-ribosomal protein, nucleolin, in Xenopus laevisstage VI oocytes on the production of ribosomal subunits. We show that a threefold increase in nucleolin leads to the complete absence of pre-rRNA maturation in addition to significant repression of RNA polymerase I transcription. Observation of "Christmas trees" by electron microscopy and analysis of the sedimentation properties of 40S pre-ribosomal particles suggest that an increased amount of nucleolin leads to incorrect packaging of the 40S particle. Interestingly, nucleolin affects the maturation of the 40S particle only when it is present at the time of transcription. These results indicate that nucleolin participates in the co-transcriptional packaging of the pre-rRNA, and that the quality of this packaging will determine whether the 40S precursor undergoes maturation or is degraded. The interaction of nucleolin with nascent pre-rRNA could help the co-transcriptional assembly on pre-rRNA of factors necessary for the subsequent maturation of the pre-ribosomal particle containing the 40S pre-rRNA.

  6. Disruption of rimP-SC, encoding a ribosome assembly cofactor, markedly enhances the production of several antibiotics in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuanyuan; Lu, Cheng; Dong, Hailing; Yu, Lingjun; Liu, Gang; Tan, Huarong

    2013-07-02

    Ribosome assembly cofactor RimP is one of the auxiliary proteins required for maturation of the 30S subunit in Escherichia coli. Although RimP in protein synthesis is important, its role in secondary metabolites biosynthesis has not been reported so far. Considering the close relationship between protein synthesis and the production of secondary metabolites, the function of ribosome assembly cofactor RimP on antibiotics production was studied in Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces venezuelae. In this study, the rimP homologue rimP-SC was identified and cloned from Streptomyces coelicolor. Disruption of rimP-SC led to enhanced production of actinorhodin and calcium-dependent antibiotics by promoting the transcription of actII-ORF4 and cdaR. Further experiments demonstrated that MetK was one of the reasons for the increment of antibiotics production. In addition, rimP-SC disruption mutant could be used as a host to produce more peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics (polyoxin or nikkomycin) than the wild-type strain. Likewise, disruption of rimP-SV of Streptomyces venezuelae also significantly stimulated jadomycin production, suggesting that enhanced antibiotics production might be widespread in many other Streptomyces species. These results established an important relationship between ribosome assembly cofactor and secondary metabolites biosynthesis and provided an approach for yield improvement of secondary metabolites in Streptomyces.

  7. Assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 recruit 5S rRNA and ribosomal proteins rpL5 and rpL11 into nascent ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingyu; Harnpicharnchai, Piyanun; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Tang, Lan; Guo, Yurong; Oeffinger, Marlene; Rout, Michael P.; Hiley, Shawna L.; Hughes, Timothy; Woolford, John L.

    2007-01-01

    More than 170 proteins are necessary for assembly of ribosomes in eukaryotes. However, cofactors that function with each of these proteins, substrates on which they act, and the precise functions of assembly factors—e.g., recruiting other molecules into preribosomes or triggering structural rearrangements of pre-rRNPs—remain mostly unknown. Here we investigated the recruitment of two ribosomal proteins and 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) into nascent ribosomes. We identified a ribonucleoprotein neighborhood in preribosomes that contains two yeast ribosome assembly factors, Rpf2 and Rrs1, two ribosomal proteins, rpL5 and rpL11, and 5S rRNA. Interactions between each of these four proteins have been confirmed by binding assays in vitro. These molecules assemble into 90S preribosomal particles containing 35S rRNA precursor (pre-rRNA). Rpf2 and Rrs1 are required for recruiting rpL5, rpL11, and 5S rRNA into preribosomes. In the absence of association of these molecules with pre-rRNPs, processing of 27SB pre-rRNA is blocked. Consequently, the abortive 66S pre-rRNPs are prematurely released from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm, and cannot be exported to the cytoplasm. PMID:17938242

  8. Assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 recruit 5S rRNA and ribosomal proteins rpL5 and rpL11 into nascent ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyu; Harnpicharnchai, Piyanun; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Tang, Lan; Guo, Yurong; Oeffinger, Marlene; Rout, Michael P; Hiley, Shawna L; Hughes, Timothy; Woolford, John L

    2007-10-15

    More than 170 proteins are necessary for assembly of ribosomes in eukaryotes. However, cofactors that function with each of these proteins, substrates on which they act, and the precise functions of assembly factors--e.g., recruiting other molecules into preribosomes or triggering structural rearrangements of pre-rRNPs--remain mostly unknown. Here we investigated the recruitment of two ribosomal proteins and 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) into nascent ribosomes. We identified a ribonucleoprotein neighborhood in preribosomes that contains two yeast ribosome assembly factors, Rpf2 and Rrs1, two ribosomal proteins, rpL5 and rpL11, and 5S rRNA. Interactions between each of these four proteins have been confirmed by binding assays in vitro. These molecules assemble into 90S preribosomal particles containing 35S rRNA precursor (pre-rRNA). Rpf2 and Rrs1 are required for recruiting rpL5, rpL11, and 5S rRNA into preribosomes. In the absence of association of these molecules with pre-rRNPs, processing of 27SB pre-rRNA is blocked. Consequently, the abortive 66S pre-rRNPs are prematurely released from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm, and cannot be exported to the cytoplasm.

  9. Characterization of the ribosome biogenesis landscape in E. coli using quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Stephen S; Williamson, James R

    2013-02-22

    The ribosome is an essential and highly complex biological system in all living cells. A large body of literature on the assembly of the ribosome in vitro is available, but a clear picture of this process inside the cell has yet to emerge. Here, we directly characterized in vivo ribosome assembly intermediates and associated assembly factors from wild-type Escherichia coli cells using a general quantitative mass spectrometry (qMS) approach. The presence of distinct populations of ribosome assembly intermediates was verified using an in vivo stable isotope pulse-labeling approach, and their exact ribosomal protein contents were characterized against an isotopically labeled standard. The model-free clustering analysis of the resultant protein levels for the different ribosomal particles produced four 30S assembly groups that correlate very well with previous in vitro assembly studies of the small ribosomal subunit and six 50S assembly groups that clearly define an in vivo assembly landscape for the larger ribosomal subunit. In addition, de novo proteomics identified a total of 21 known and potentially new ribosome assembly factors co-localized with various ribosomal particles. These results represent new in vivo assembly maps of the E. coli 30S and 50S subunits, and the general qMS approach should prove to be a solid platform for future studies of ribosome biogenesis across a host of model organisms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Stepwise and dynamic assembly of the earliest precursors of small ribosomal subunits in yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liman; Wu, Chen; Cai, Gaihong; Chen, She; Ye, Keqiong

    2016-03-15

    The eukaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is associated cotranscriptionally with numerous factors into an enormous 90S preribosomal particle that conducts early processing of small ribosomal subunits. The assembly pathway and structure of the 90S particle is poorly understood. Here, we affinity-purified and analyzed the constituents of yeast 90S particles that were assembled on a series of plasmid-encoded 3'-truncated pre-18S RNAs. We determined the assembly point of 65 proteins and the U3, U14, and snR30 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), revealing a stepwise and dynamic assembly map. The 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS) alone can nucleate a large complex. When the 18S rRNA is nearly complete, the 90S structure undergoes a dramatic reorganization, releasing U14, snR30, and 14 protein factors that bind earlier. We also identified a reference state of 90S that is fully assembled yet has not undergone 5'ETS processing. The assembly map present here provides a new framework to understand small subunit biogenesis. © 2016 Zhang et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  11. Stepwise and dynamic assembly of the earliest precursors of small ribosomal subunits in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liman; Wu, Chen; Cai, Gaihong; Chen, She

    2016-01-01

    The eukaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is associated cotranscriptionally with numerous factors into an enormous 90S preribosomal particle that conducts early processing of small ribosomal subunits. The assembly pathway and structure of the 90S particle is poorly understood. Here, we affinity-purified and analyzed the constituents of yeast 90S particles that were assembled on a series of plasmid-encoded 3′-truncated pre-18S RNAs. We determined the assembly point of 65 proteins and the U3, U14, and snR30 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), revealing a stepwise and dynamic assembly map. The 5′ external transcribed spacer (ETS) alone can nucleate a large complex. When the 18S rRNA is nearly complete, the 90S structure undergoes a dramatic reorganization, releasing U14, snR30, and 14 protein factors that bind earlier. We also identified a reference state of 90S that is fully assembled yet has not undergone 5′ETS processing. The assembly map present here provides a new framework to understand small subunit biogenesis. PMID:26980190

  12. The DEAD box protein Mrh4 functions in the assembly of the mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2013-11-05

    Proteins in a cell are universally synthesized by ribosomes. Mitochondria contain their own ribosomes, which specialize in the synthesis of a handful of proteins required for oxidative phosphorylation. The pathway of mitoribosomal biogenesis and factors involved are poorly characterized. An example is the DEAD box proteins, widely known to participate in the biogenesis of bacterial and cytoplasmic eukaryotic ribosomes as either RNA helicases or RNA chaperones, whose mitochondrial counterparts remain completely unknown. Here, we have identified the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DEAD box protein Mrh4 as essential for large mitoribosome subunit biogenesis. Mrh4 interacts with the 21S rRNA, mitoribosome subassemblies, and fully assembled mitoribosomes. In the absence of Mrh4, the 21S rRNA is matured and forms part of a large on-pathway assembly intermediate missing proteins Mrpl16 and Mrpl39. We conclude that Mrh4 plays an essential role during the late stages of mitoribosome assembly by promoting remodeling of the 21S rRNA-protein interactions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. In vivo assembling of bacterial ribosomal protein L11 into yeast ribosomes makes the particles sensitive to the prokaryotic specific antibiotic thiostrepton.

    PubMed

    García-Marcos, Alberto; Morreale, Antonio; Guarinos, Esther; Briones, Elisa; Remacha, Miguel; Ortiz, Angel R; Ballesta, Juan P G

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomal stalk protein L12 and its bacterial orthologue L11 play a central role on ribosomal conformational changes during translocation. Deletion of the two genes encoding L12 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in a very slow-growth phenotype. Gene RPL12B, but not the RPL12A, cloned in centromeric plasmids fully restored control protein level and the growth rate when expressed in a L12-deprived strain. The same strain has been transformed to express Escherichia coli protein EcL11 under the control of yeast RPL12B promoter. The bacterial protein has been found in similar amounts in washed ribosomes from the transformed yeast strain and from control E. coli cells, however, EcL11 was unable to restore the defective acidic protein stalk composition caused by the absence of ScL12 in the yeast ribosome. Protein EcL11 induced a 10% increase in L12-defective cell growth rate, although the in vitro polymerizing capacity of the EcL11-containing ribosomes is restored in a higher proportion, and, moreover, the particles became partially sensitive to the prokaryotic specific antibiotic thiostrepton. Molecular dynamic simulations using modelled complexes support the correct assembly of bacterial L11 into the yeast ribosome and confirm its direct implication of its CTD in the binding of thiostrepton to ribosomes.

  14. Thermus thermophilus L11 methyltransferase, PrmA, is dispensable for growth and preferentially modifies free ribosomal protein L11 prior to ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Dale M; Gregory, Steven T; Thompson, Jill; Suh, Moo-Jin; Limbach, Patrick A; Dahlberg, Albert E

    2004-09-01

    The ribosomal protein L11 in bacteria is posttranslationally trimethylated at multiple amino acid positions by the L11 methyltransferase PrmA, the product of the prmA gene. The role of L11 methylation in ribosome function or assembly has yet to be determined, although the deletion of Escherichia coli prmA has no apparent phenotype. We have constructed a mutant of the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus in which the prmA gene has been disrupted with the htk gene encoding a heat-stable kanamycin adenyltransferase. This mutant shows no growth defects, indicating that T. thermophilus PrmA, like its E. coli homolog, is dispensable. Ribosomes prepared from this mutant contain unmethylated L11, as determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), and are effective substrates for in vitro methylation by cloned and purified T. thermophilus PrmA. MALDI-TOF MS also revealed that T. thermophilus L11 contains a total of 12 methyl groups, in contrast to the 9 methyl groups found in E. coli L11. Finally, we found that, as with the E. coli methyltransferase, the ribosomal protein L11 dissociated from ribosomes is a more efficient substrate for in vitro methylation by PrmA than intact 70S ribosomes, suggesting that methylation in vivo occurs on free L11 prior to its incorporation into ribosomes.

  15. Human ERAL1 is a mitochondrial RNA chaperone involved in the assembly of the 28S small mitochondrial ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    Dennerlein, Sven; Rozanska, Agata; Wydro, Mateusz; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M. A.; Lightowlers, Robert N.

    2010-01-01

    The bacterial Ras-like protein Era has been reported previously to bind 16S rRNA within the 30S ribosomal subunit and to play a crucial role in ribosome assembly. An orthologue of this essential GTPase ERAL1 (Era G-protein-like 1) exists in higher eukaryotes and although its exact molecular function and cellular localization is unknown, its absence has been linked to apoptosis. In the present study we show that human ERAL1 is a mitochondrial protein important for the formation of the 28S small mitoribosomal subunit. We also show that ERAL1 binds in vivo to the rRNA component of the small subunit [12S mt (mitochondrial)-rRNA]. Bacterial Era associates with a 3′ unstructured nonanucleotide immediately downstream of the terminal stem–loop (helix 45) of 16S rRNA. This site contains an AUCA sequence highly conserved across all domains of life, immediately upstream of the anti-Shine–Dalgarno sequence, which is conserved in bacteria. Strikingly, this entire region is absent from 12S mt-rRNA. We have mapped the ERAL1-binding site to a 33 nucleotide section delineating the 3′ terminal stem–loop region of 12S mt-rRNA. This loop contains two adenine residues that are reported to be dimethylated on mitoribosome maturation. Furthermore, and also in contrast with the bacterial orthologue, loss of ERAL1 leads to rapid decay of nascent 12S mt-rRNA, consistent with a role as a mitochondrial RNA chaperone. Finally, whereas depletion of ERAL1 leads to apoptosis, cell death occurs prior to any appreciable loss of mitochondrial protein synthesis or reduction in the stability of mitochondrial mRNA. PMID:20604745

  16. The extended loops of ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 are not required for ribosome assembly or L4-mediated autogenous control

    PubMed Central

    ZENGEL, JANICE M.; JERAULD, ADAM; WALKER, ANDRE; WAHL, MARKUS C.; LINDAHL, LASSE

    2003-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 both have a globular domain that sits on the surface of the large ribosomal subunit and an extended loop that penetrates its core. The tips of both loops contribute to the lining of the peptide exit tunnel and have been implicated in a gating mechanism that might regulate the exit of nascent peptides. Also, the extensions of L4 and L22 contact multiple domains of 23S rRNA, suggesting they might facilitate rRNA folding during ribosome assembly. To learn more about the roles of these extensions, we constructed derivatives of both proteins that lack most of their extended loops. Our analysis of ribosomes carrying L4 or L22 deletion proteins did not detect any significant difference in their sedimentation property or polysome distribution. Also, the role of L4 in autogenous control was not affected. We conclude that these extensions are not required for ribosome assembly or for L4-mediated autogenous control of the S10 operon. PMID:13130133

  17. The extended loops of ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 are not required for ribosome assembly or L4-mediated autogenous control.

    PubMed

    Zengel, Janice M; Jerauld, Adam; Walker, Andre; Wahl, Markus C; Lindahl, Lasse

    2003-10-01

    Ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 both have a globular domain that sits on the surface of the large ribosomal subunit and an extended loop that penetrates its core. The tips of both loops contribute to the lining of the peptide exit tunnel and have been implicated in a gating mechanism that might regulate the exit of nascent peptides. Also, the extensions of L4 and L22 contact multiple domains of 23S rRNA, suggesting they might facilitate rRNA folding during ribosome assembly. To learn more about the roles of these extensions, we constructed derivatives of both proteins that lack most of their extended loops. Our analysis of ribosomes carrying L4 or L22 deletion proteins did not detect any significant difference in their sedimentation property or polysome distribution. Also, the role of L4 in autogenous control was not affected. We conclude that these extensions are not required for ribosome assembly or for L4-mediated autogenous control of the S10 operon.

  18. UtpA and UtpB chaperone nascent pre-ribosomal RNA and U3 snoRNA to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunziker, Mirjam; Barandun, Jonas; Petfalski, Elisabeth; Tan, Dongyan; Delan-Forino, Clémentine; Molloy, Kelly R.; Kim, Kelly H.; Dunn-Davies, Hywel; Shi, Yi; Chaker-Margot, Malik; Chait, Brian T.; Walz, Thomas; Tollervey, David; Klinge, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    Early eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves large multi-protein complexes, which co-transcriptionally associate with pre-ribosomal RNA to form the small subunit processome. The precise mechanisms by which two of the largest multi-protein complexes--UtpA and UtpB--interact with nascent pre-ribosomal RNA are poorly understood. Here, we combined biochemical and structural biology approaches with ensembles of RNA-protein cross-linking data to elucidate the essential functions of both complexes. We show that UtpA contains a large composite RNA-binding site and captures the 5' end of pre-ribosomal RNA. UtpB forms an extended structure that binds early pre-ribosomal intermediates in close proximity to architectural sites such as an RNA duplex formed by the 5' ETS and U3 snoRNA as well as the 3' boundary of the 18S rRNA. Both complexes therefore act as vital RNA chaperones to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

  19. Protein L5 is crucial for in vivo assembly of the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit central protuberance.

    PubMed

    Korepanov, Alexey P; Korobeinikova, Anna V; Shestakov, Sergey A; Garber, Maria B; Gongadze, George M

    2012-10-01

    In the present work, ribosomes assembled in bacterial cells in the absence of essential ribosomal protein L5 were obtained. After arresting L5 synthesis, Escherichia coli cells divide a limited number of times. During this time, accumulation of defective large ribosomal subunits occurs. These 45S particles lack most of the central protuberance (CP) components (5S rRNA and proteins L5, L16, L18, L25, L27, L31, L33 and L35) and are not able to associate with the small ribosomal subunit. At the same time, 5S rRNA is found in the cytoplasm in complex with ribosomal proteins L18 and L25 at quantities equal to the amount of ribosomes. Thus, it is the first demonstration that protein L5 plays a key role in formation of the CP during assembly of the large ribosomal subunit in the bacterial cell. A possible model for the CP assembly in vivo is discussed in view of the data obtained.

  20. Random pseuoduridylation in vivo reveals critical region of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA for ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Leppik, Margus; Liiv, Aivar

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pseudouridine is the most common modified nucleoside in RNA, which is found in stable RNA species and in eukaryotic mRNAs. Functional analysis of pseudouridine is complicated by marginal effect of its absence. We demonstrate that excessive pseudouridines in rRNA inhibit ribosome assembly. Ten-fold increase of pseudouridines in the 16S and 23S rRNA made by a chimeric pseudouridine synthase leads to accumulation of the incompletely assembled large ribosome subunits. Hyper modified 23S rRNA is found in the r-protein assembly defective particles and are selected against in the 70S and polysome fractions showing modification interference. Eighteen positions of 23S rRNA were identified where isomerization of uridines interferes with ribosome assembly. Most of the interference sites are located in the conserved core of the large subunit, in the domain 0 of 23S rRNA, around the peptide exit tunnel. A plausible reason for pseudouridine-dependent inhibition of ribosome assembly is stabilization of rRNA structure, which leads to the folding traps of rRNA and to the retardation of the ribosome assembly. PMID:28334881

  1. Random pseuoduridylation in vivo reveals critical region of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA for ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Leppik, Margus; Liiv, Aivar; Remme, Jaanus

    2017-06-02

    Pseudouridine is the most common modified nucleoside in RNA, which is found in stable RNA species and in eukaryotic mRNAs. Functional analysis of pseudouridine is complicated by marginal effect of its absence. We demonstrate that excessive pseudouridines in rRNA inhibit ribosome assembly. Ten-fold increase of pseudouridines in the 16S and 23S rRNA made by a chimeric pseudouridine synthase leads to accumulation of the incompletely assembled large ribosome subunits. Hyper modified 23S rRNA is found in the r-protein assembly defective particles and are selected against in the 70S and polysome fractions showing modification interference. Eighteen positions of 23S rRNA were identified where isomerization of uridines interferes with ribosome assembly. Most of the interference sites are located in the conserved core of the large subunit, in the domain 0 of 23S rRNA, around the peptide exit tunnel. A plausible reason for pseudouridine-dependent inhibition of ribosome assembly is stabilization of rRNA structure, which leads to the folding traps of rRNA and to the retardation of the ribosome assembly. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Products transcribed from rearranged rrn genes of Escherichia coli can assemble to form functional ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Zaporojets, Dmitry; French, Sarah; Squires, Catherine L

    2003-12-01

    To examine the flexibility of rRNA operons with respect to fundamental organization, transcription, processing, and assembly of ribosomes, operon variations were introduced by a plasmid into an Escherichia coli strain that has deletions of all chromosomal copies of rRNA genes. In the reconstructed operons, a Salmonella intervening sequence (IVS) from 23S helix 45 was introduced into the E. coli 23S gene at the same position. Three different constructs of the E. coli 16S gene were then placed wholly within the IVS sequence, and the 16S gene was deleted from its normal position. The resulting plasmids thus had the normal operon promoters and the leader region followed by the 5' one-third of the 23S gene, the entire 16S gene within the IVS, the last two-thirds of the 23S gene, and the normal end of the operon. The three constructs differed in the amount of 16S leader and spacer regions they contained. Only two of the three constructs, those with redundant leader and spacer antiterminator signals, resulted in viable cultures of the rrn deletion strain. Electron micrographs of the variant operon suggest that the 23S rRNA is made in two separate parts which then must form subassemblies before assembling into a functional 50S subunit. Cells containing only the reshuffled genes were debilitated in their growth properties and ribosome contents. The fact that such out of the ordinary manipulation of rRNA sequences in E. coli is possible paves the way for detailed analysis of ribosome assembly and evolution.

  3. Hrr25/CK1δ-directed release of Ltv1 from pre-40S ribosomes is necessary for ribosome assembly and cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Ghalei, Homa; Schaub, Franz X.; Doherty, Joanne R.; Noguchi, Yoshihiko; Roush, William R.; Cleveland, John L.; Stroupe, M. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Casein kinase 1δ/ε (CK1δ/ε) and their yeast homologue Hrr25 are essential for cell growth. Further, CK1δ is overexpressed in several malignancies, and CK1δ inhibitors have shown promise in several preclinical animal studies. However, the substrates of Hrr25 and CK1δ/ε that are necessary for cell growth and survival are unknown. We show that Hrr25 is essential for ribosome assembly, where it phosphorylates the assembly factor Ltv1, which causes its release from nascent 40S subunits and allows subunit maturation. Hrr25 inactivation or expression of a nonphosphorylatable Ltv1 variant blocked Ltv1 release in vitro and in vivo, and prevented entry into the translation-like quality control cycle. Conversely, phosphomimetic Ltv1 variants rescued viability after Hrr25 depletion. Finally, Ltv1 knockdown in human breast cancer cells impaired apoptosis induced by CK1δ/ε inhibitors, establishing that the antiproliferative activity of these inhibitors is due, at least in part, to disruption of ribosome assembly. These findings validate the ribosome assembly pathway as a novel target for the development of anticancer therapeutics. PMID:25778921

  4. Integrative structural analysis of the UTPB complex, an early assembly factor for eukaryotic small ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Sun, Qi; Chen, Rongchang; Chen, Xining; Lin, Jinzhong; Ye, Keqiong

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is an essential and conserved cellular process in eukaryotes that requires numerous assembly factors. The six-subunit UTPB complex is an essential component of the 90S precursor of the small ribosomal subunit. Here, we analyzed the molecular architecture of UTPB using an integrative structural biology approach. We mapped the major interactions that associate each of six UTPB proteins. Crystallographic studies showed that Utp1, Utp21, Utp12 and Utp13 are evolutionarily related and form a dimer of dimers (Utp1–Utp21, Utp12–Utp13) through their homologous helical C-terminal domains. Molecular docking with crosslinking restraints showed that the WD domains of Utp12 and Utp13 are associated, as are the WD domains of Utp1, Utp21 and Utp18. Electron microscopy images of the entire UTPB complex revealed that it predominantly adopts elongated conformations and possesses internal flexibility. We also determined crystal structures of the WD domain of Utp18 and the HAT and deviant HAT domains of Utp6. A structural model of UTPB was derived based on these data. PMID:27330138

  5. Integrative structural analysis of the UTPB complex, an early assembly factor for eukaryotic small ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Sun, Qi; Chen, Rongchang; Chen, Xining; Lin, Jinzhong; Ye, Keqiong

    2016-09-06

    Ribosome assembly is an essential and conserved cellular process in eukaryotes that requires numerous assembly factors. The six-subunit UTPB complex is an essential component of the 90S precursor of the small ribosomal subunit. Here, we analyzed the molecular architecture of UTPB using an integrative structural biology approach. We mapped the major interactions that associate each of six UTPB proteins. Crystallographic studies showed that Utp1, Utp21, Utp12 and Utp13 are evolutionarily related and form a dimer of dimers (Utp1-Utp21, Utp12-Utp13) through their homologous helical C-terminal domains. Molecular docking with crosslinking restraints showed that the WD domains of Utp12 and Utp13 are associated, as are the WD domains of Utp1, Utp21 and Utp18. Electron microscopy images of the entire UTPB complex revealed that it predominantly adopts elongated conformations and possesses internal flexibility. We also determined crystal structures of the WD domain of Utp18 and the HAT and deviant HAT domains of Utp6. A structural model of UTPB was derived based on these data.

  6. Insights into remodeling events during eukaryotic large ribosomal subunit assembly provided by high resolution cryo-EM structures.

    PubMed

    Biedka, Stephanie; Wu, Shan; LaPeruta, Amber J; Gao, Ning; Woolford, John L

    2017-03-07

    Ribosomes are responsible for translating the genome, in the form of mRNA, into the proteome in all organisms. Biogenesis of ribosomes in eukaryotes is a complex process involving numerous remodeling events driven in part by the concerted actions of hundreds of protein assembly factors. A major challenge in studying eukaryotic ribosome assembly has, until recently, been a lack of structural data to facilitate understanding of the conformational and compositional changes the pre-ribosome undergoes during its construction. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has begun filling these gaps; recent advances in cryo-EM have enabled the determination of several high resolution pre-ribosome structures. This review focuses mainly on lessons learned from the study of pre-60S particles purified from yeast using the assembly factor Nog2 as bait. These Nog2 particles provide insight into many aspects of nuclear stages of 60S subunit assembly, including construction of major 60S subunit functional centers and processing of the ITS2 spacer RNA.

  7. Assembly of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal stalk: binding of P1 proteins is required for the interaction of P2 proteins.

    PubMed

    Zurdo, J; Parada, P; van den Berg, A; Nusspaumer, G; Jimenez-Diaz, A; Remacha, M; Ballesta, J P

    2000-08-01

    The yeast ribosomal stalk is formed by a protein pentamer made of the 38 kDa P0 and four 12 kDa acidic P1/P2. The interaction of recombinant acidic proteins P1 alpha and P2 beta with ribosomes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae D4567, lacking all the 12 kDa stalk components, has been used to study the in vitro assembly of this important ribosomal structure. Stimulation of the ribosome activity was obtained by incubating simultaneously the particles with both proteins, which were nonphosphorylated initially and remained unmodified afterward. The N-terminus state, free or blocked, did not affect either the binding or reactivating activity of both proteins. Independent incubation with each protein did not affect the activity of the particles, however, protein P2 beta alone was unable to bind the ribosome whereas P1 alpha could. The binding of P1 alpha alone is a saturable process in acidic-protein-deficient ribosomes and does not take place in complete wild-type particles. Binding of P1 proteins in the absence of P2 proteins takes also place in vivo, when protein P1 beta is overexpressed in S. cerevisiae. In contrast, protein P2 beta is not detected in the ribosome in the P1-deficient D67 strain despite being accumulated in the cytoplasm. The results confirm that neither phosphorylation nor N-terminal blocking of the 12 kDa acidic proteins is required for the assembly and function of the yeast stalk. More importantly, and regardless of the involvement of other elements, they indicate that stalk assembling is a coordinated process, in which P1 proteins would provide a ribosomal anchorage to P2 proteins, and P2 components would confer functionality to the complex.

  8. Inferring the Ancient History of the Translation Machinery and Genetic Code via Recapitulation of Ribosomal Subunit Assembly Orders

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Gregory P.; Neumann, Justin E.; Gogarten, J. Peter

    2010-01-01

    Universally conserved positions in ribosomal proteins have significant biases in amino acid usage, likely indicating the expansion of the genetic code at the time leading up to the most recent common ancestor(s) (MRCA). Here, we apply this principle to the evolutionary history of the ribosome before the MRCA. It has been proposed that the experimentally determined order of assembly for ribosomal subunits recapitulates their evolutionary chronology. Given this model, we produce a probabilistic evolutionary ordering of the universally conserved small subunit (SSU) and large subunit (LSU) ribosomal proteins. Optimizing the relative ordering of SSU and LSU evolutionary chronologies with respect to minimizing differences in amino acid usage bias, we find strong compositional evidence for a more ancient origin for early LSU proteins. Furthermore, we find that this ordering produces several trends in specific amino acid usages compatible with models of genetic code evolution. PMID:20208990

  9. Inferring the ancient history of the translation machinery and genetic code via recapitulation of ribosomal subunit assembly orders.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Gregory P; Neumann, Justin E; Gogarten, J Peter

    2010-03-01

    Universally conserved positions in ribosomal proteins have significant biases in amino acid usage, likely indicating the expansion of the genetic code at the time leading up to the most recent common ancestor(s) (MRCA). Here, we apply this principle to the evolutionary history of the ribosome before the MRCA. It has been proposed that the experimentally determined order of assembly for ribosomal subunits recapitulates their evolutionary chronology. Given this model, we produce a probabilistic evolutionary ordering of the universally conserved small subunit (SSU) and large subunit (LSU) ribosomal proteins. Optimizing the relative ordering of SSU and LSU evolutionary chronologies with respect to minimizing differences in amino acid usage bias, we find strong compositional evidence for a more ancient origin for early LSU proteins. Furthermore, we find that this ordering produces several trends in specific amino acid usages compatible with models of genetic code evolution.

  10. The eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension of ribosomal protein S31 contributes to the assembly and function of 40S ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Martín-Villanueva, Sara; Murat, Guillaume; Lacombe, Thierry; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    The archaea-/eukaryote-specific 40S-ribosomal-subunit protein S31 is expressed as an ubiquitin fusion protein in eukaryotes and consists of a conserved body and a eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension. In yeast, S31 is a practically essential protein, which is required for cytoplasmic 20S pre-rRNA maturation. Here, we have studied the role of the N-terminal extension of the yeast S31 protein. We show that deletion of this extension partially impairs cell growth and 40S subunit biogenesis and confers hypersensitivity to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Moreover, the extension harbours a nuclear localization signal that promotes active nuclear import of S31, which associates with pre-ribosomal particles in the nucleus. In the absence of the extension, truncated S31 inefficiently assembles into pre-40S particles and two subpopulations of mature small subunits, one lacking and another one containing truncated S31, can be identified. Plasmid-driven overexpression of truncated S31 partially suppresses the growth and ribosome biogenesis defects but, conversely, slightly enhances the hypersensitivity to aminoglycosides. Altogether, these results indicate that the N-terminal extension facilitates the assembly of S31 into pre-40S particles and contributes to the optimal translational activity of mature 40S subunits but has only a minor role in cytoplasmic cleavage of 20S pre-rRNA at site D. PMID:27422873

  11. Identification of the binding site of Rlp7 on assembling 60S ribosomal subunits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Dembowski, Jill A.; Ramesh, Madhumitha; McManus, C. Joel; Woolford, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosome assembly requires over 200 assembly factors that facilitate rRNA folding, ribosomal protein binding, and pre-rRNA processing. One such factor is Rlp7, an essential RNA binding protein required for consecutive pre-rRNA processing steps for assembly of yeast 60S ribosomal subunits: exonucleolytic processing of 27SA3 pre-rRNA to generate the 5′ end of 5.8S rRNA and endonucleolytic cleavage of the 27SB pre-rRNA to initiate removal of internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2). To better understand the functions of Rlp7 in 27S pre-rRNA processing steps, we identified where it crosslinks to pre-rRNA. We found that Rlp7 binds at the junction of ITS2 and the ITS2-proximal stem, between the 3′ end of 5.8S rRNA and the 5′ end of 25S rRNA. Consistent with Rlp7 binding to this neighborhood during assembly, two-hybrid and affinity copurification assays showed that Rlp7 interacts with other assembly factors that bind to or near ITS2 and the proximal stem. We used in vivo RNA structure probing to demonstrate that the proximal stem forms prior to Rlp7 binding and that Rlp7 binding induces RNA conformational changes in ITS2 that may chaperone rRNA folding and regulate 27S pre-rRNA processing. Our findings contradict the hypothesis that Rlp7 functions as a placeholder for ribosomal protein L7, from which Rlp7 is thought to have evolved in yeast. The binding site of Rlp7 is within eukaryotic-specific RNA elements, which are not found in bacteria. Thus, we propose that Rlp7 coevolved with these RNA elements to facilitate eukaryotic-specific functions in ribosome assembly and pre-rRNA processing. PMID:24129494

  12. Structural insights into the function of a unique tandem GTPase EngA in bacterial ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Yan, Kaige; Zhang, Yixiao; Li, Ningning; Ma, Chengying; Li, Zhifei; Zhang, Yanqing; Feng, Boya; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yadong; Xu, Yanji; Lei, Jianlin; Gao, Ning

    2014-12-01

    Many ribosome-interacting GTPases, with proposed functions in ribosome biogenesis, are also implicated in the cellular regulatory coupling between ribosome assembly process and various growth control pathways. EngA is an essential GTPase in bacteria, and intriguingly, it contains two consecutive GTPase domains (GD), being one-of-a-kind among all known GTPases. EngA is required for the 50S subunit maturation. However, its molecular role remains elusive. Here, we present the structure of EngA bound to the 50S subunit. Our data show that EngA binds to the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) and induces dramatic conformational changes on the 50S subunit, which virtually returns the 50S subunit to a state similar to that of the late-stage 50S assembly intermediates. Very interestingly, our data show that the two GDs exhibit a pseudo-two-fold symmetry in the 50S-bound conformation. Our results indicate that EngA recognizes certain forms of the 50S assembly intermediates, and likely facilitates the conformational maturation of the PTC of the 23S rRNA in a direct manner. Furthermore, in a broad context, our data also suggest that EngA might be a sensor of the cellular GTP/GDP ratio, endowed with multiple conformational states, in response to fluctuations in cellular nucleotide pool, to facilitate and regulate ribosome assembly. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Effects of detergents on ribosomal precursor subunits of Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Body, A; Brownstein, B H

    1978-01-01

    Cell extracts prepared by osmotic lysis of protoplasts were analyzed by sucrose gradient sedimentation. In the absence of detergents, ribosomal precursor particles were found in a gradient fraction which sedimented faster than mature 50S subunits and in two other fractions coincident with mature 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits. Phospholipid, an indicator of membrane, was shown to be associated with only the fastest-sedimenting ribosomal precursor particle fraction. After the extracts were treated with detergents, all phospholipid was found at the top of the gradients. Brij 58, Triton X-100, and Nonidet P-40 did not cause a change in the sedimentation values of precursors; however, the detergents deoxycholate or LOC (Amway Corp.) disrupted the fastest-sedimenting precursor and converted the ribosomal precursor subunits which sedimented at the 50S and 30S positions to five different classes of more slowly sedimenting particles. Earlier reports on the in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits have shown that several stages of ribosomal precursor subunits exist, and, in the presence of the detergents deoxycholate and LOC, which had been used to prepare cell extracts, the precursors sedimented more slowly. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that those detergents selectively modify the structure of ribosomal precursors and lend further support to the hypothesis that the in vivo ribosomal precursor subunits have 50S and 30S sedimentation values. In addition, these data support the idea that the ribosomal precursor particles found in the fast-sedimenting fraction may constitute a unique precursor fraction.

  14. Effects of Detergents on Ribosomal Precursor Subunits of Bacillus megaterium

    PubMed Central

    Body, Barbara A.; Brownstein, Bernard H.

    1978-01-01

    Cell extracts prepared by osmotic lysis of protoplasts were analyzed by sucrose gradient sedimentation. In the absence of detergents, ribosomal precursor particles were found in a gradient fraction which sedimented faster than mature 50S subunits and in two other fractions coincident with mature 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits. Phospholipid, an indicator of membrane, was shown to be associated with only the fastest-sedimenting ribosomal precursor particle fraction. After the extracts were treated with detergents, all phospholipid was found at the top of the gradients. Brij 58, Triton X-100, and Nonidet P-40 did not cause a change in the sedimentation values of precursors; however, the detergents deoxycholate or LOC (Amway Corp.) disrupted the fastest-sedimenting precursor and converted the ribosomal precursor subunits which sedimented at the 50S and 30S positions to five different classes of more slowly sedimenting particles. Earlier reports on the in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits have shown that several stages of ribosomal precursor subunits exist, and, in the presence of the detergents deoxycholate and LOC, which had been used to prepare cell extracts, the precursors sedimented more slowly. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that those detergents selectively modify the structure of ribosomal precursors and lend further support to the hypothesis that the in vivo ribosomal precursor subunits have 50S and 30S sedimentation values. In addition, these data support the idea that the ribosomal precursor particles found in the fast-sedimenting fraction may constitute a unique precursor fraction. PMID:412833

  15. Time course of large ribosomal subunit assembly in E. coli cells overexpressing a helicase inactive DbpA protein.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Riley C; Childs, Jared J; Gevorkyan, Jirair; Gerasimova, Yulia V; Koculi, Eda

    2016-07-01

    DbpA is a DEAD-box RNA helicase implicated in Escherichia coli large ribosomal subunit assembly. Previous studies have shown that when the ATPase and helicase inactive DbpA construct, R331A, is expressed in E. coli cells, a large ribosomal subunit intermediate accumulates. The large subunit intermediate migrates as a 45S particle in a sucrose gradient. Here, using a number of structural and fluorescent assays, we investigate the ribosome profiles of cells lacking wild-type DbpA and overexpressing the R331A DbpA construct. Our data show that in addition to the 45S particle previously described, 27S and 35S particles are also present in the ribosome profiles of cells overexpressing R331A DbpA. The 27S, 35S, and 45S independently convert to the 50S subunit, suggesting that ribosome assembly in the presence of R331A and the absence of wild-type DbpA occurs via multiple pathways. © 2016 Gentry et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  16. Late-assembly of human ribosomal protein S20 in the cytoplasm is essential for the functioning of the small subunit ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Lin-Ru; Chou, Chang-Wei; Wu, Jing-Ying; Kirby, Ralph; Lin, Alan

    2013-11-15

    Using immuno-fluorescent probing and Western blotting analysis, we reveal the exclusive cytoplasm nature of the small subunit ribosomal protein S20. To illustrate the importance of the cellular compartmentation of S20 to the function of small subunit 40S, we created a nuclear resident S20{sub NLS} mutant gene and examined polysome profile of cells that had been transfected with the S20{sub NLS} gene. As a result, we observed the formation of recombinant 40S carried S20{sub NLS} but this recombinant 40S was never found in the polysome, suggesting such a recombinant 40S was translation incompetent. Moreover, by the tactic of the energy depletion and restoration, we were able to restrain the nuclear-resided S20{sub NLS} in the cytoplasm. Yet, along a progressive energy restoration, we observed the presence of recombinant 40S subunits carrying the S20{sub NLS} in the polysome. This proves that S20 needs to be cytoplasmic in order to make a functional 40S subunit. Furthermore, it also implies that the assembly order of ribosomal protein in eukaryote is orderly regulated. - Highlights: • The step of S20 assembled on 40S is happened in the cytoplasm. • A small subunit assembled with a nuclear S20{sub NLS} is translational incompetence. • Using energy depletion and recovery to manipulate the cellular compartment of S20{sub NLS}. • Cytoplasm-retained S20{sub NLS} is crucial for creating a functional small subunit.

  17. Rpd3- and Spt16-Mediated Nucleosome Assembly and Transcriptional Regulation on Yeast Ribosomal DNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Joseph M.; French, Sarah L.; Osheim, Yvonne N.; Li, Mingguang; Hall, Lindsey; Beyer, Ann L.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) genes in eukaryotes are organized into multicopy tandem arrays and transcribed by RNA polymerase I. During cell proliferation, ∼50% of these genes are active and have a relatively open chromatin structure characterized by elevated accessibility to psoralen cross-linking. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transcription of rDNA genes becomes repressed and chromatin structure closes when cells enter the diauxic shift and growth dramatically slows. In this study, we found that nucleosomes are massively depleted from the active rDNA genes during log phase and reassembled during the diauxic shift, largely accounting for the differences in psoralen accessibility between active and inactive genes. The Rpd3L histone deacetylase complex was required for diauxic shift-induced H4 and H2B deposition onto rDNA genes, suggesting involvement in assembly or stabilization of the entire nucleosome. The Spt16 subunit of FACT, however, was specifically required for H2B deposition, suggesting specificity for the H2A/H2B dimer. Miller chromatin spreads were used for electron microscopic visualization of rDNA genes in an spt16 mutant, which was found to be deficient in the assembly of normal nucleosomes on inactive genes and the disruption of nucleosomes on active genes, consistent with an inability to fully reactivate polymerase I (Pol I) transcription when cells exit stationary phase. PMID:23689130

  18. The Dedicated Chaperone Acl4 Escorts Ribosomal Protein Rpl4 to Its Nuclear Pre-60S Assembly Site

    PubMed Central

    Pillet, Benjamin; García-Gómez, Juan J.; Pausch, Patrick; Falquet, Laurent; Bange, Gert; de la Cruz, Jesús; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes are the highly complex macromolecular assemblies dedicated to the synthesis of all cellular proteins from mRNA templates. The main principles underlying the making of ribosomes are conserved across eukaryotic organisms and this process has been studied in most detail in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast ribosomes are composed of four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and 79 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins). Most r-proteins need to be transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus where they get incorporated into the evolving pre-ribosomal particles. Due to the high abundance and difficult physicochemical properties of r-proteins, their correct folding and fail-safe targeting to the assembly site depends largely on general, as well as highly specialized, chaperone and transport systems. Many r-proteins contain universally conserved or eukaryote-specific internal loops and/or terminal extensions, which were shown to mediate their nuclear targeting and association with dedicated chaperones in a growing number of cases. The 60S r-protein Rpl4 is particularly interesting since it harbours a conserved long internal loop and a prominent C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension. Here we show that both the long internal loop and the C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension are strictly required for the functionality of Rpl4. While Rpl4 contains at least five distinct nuclear localization signals (NLS), the C-terminal part of the long internal loop associates with a specific binding partner, termed Acl4. Absence of Acl4 confers a severe slow-growth phenotype and a deficiency in the production of 60S subunits. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that Acl4 can be considered as a dedicated chaperone of Rpl4. Notably, Acl4 localizes to both the cytoplasm and nucleus and it has the capacity to capture nascent Rpl4 in a co-translational manner. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dedicated chaperone Acl4 accompanies Rpl4 from the cytoplasm to its pre-60S

  19. The Dedicated Chaperone Acl4 Escorts Ribosomal Protein Rpl4 to Its Nuclear Pre-60S Assembly Site.

    PubMed

    Pillet, Benjamin; García-Gómez, Juan J; Pausch, Patrick; Falquet, Laurent; Bange, Gert; de la Cruz, Jesús; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Ribosomes are the highly complex macromolecular assemblies dedicated to the synthesis of all cellular proteins from mRNA templates. The main principles underlying the making of ribosomes are conserved across eukaryotic organisms and this process has been studied in most detail in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast ribosomes are composed of four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and 79 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins). Most r-proteins need to be transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus where they get incorporated into the evolving pre-ribosomal particles. Due to the high abundance and difficult physicochemical properties of r-proteins, their correct folding and fail-safe targeting to the assembly site depends largely on general, as well as highly specialized, chaperone and transport systems. Many r-proteins contain universally conserved or eukaryote-specific internal loops and/or terminal extensions, which were shown to mediate their nuclear targeting and association with dedicated chaperones in a growing number of cases. The 60S r-protein Rpl4 is particularly interesting since it harbours a conserved long internal loop and a prominent C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension. Here we show that both the long internal loop and the C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension are strictly required for the functionality of Rpl4. While Rpl4 contains at least five distinct nuclear localization signals (NLS), the C-terminal part of the long internal loop associates with a specific binding partner, termed Acl4. Absence of Acl4 confers a severe slow-growth phenotype and a deficiency in the production of 60S subunits. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that Acl4 can be considered as a dedicated chaperone of Rpl4. Notably, Acl4 localizes to both the cytoplasm and nucleus and it has the capacity to capture nascent Rpl4 in a co-translational manner. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dedicated chaperone Acl4 accompanies Rpl4 from the cytoplasm to its pre-60S

  20. The impact of recent improvements in cryo-electron microscopy technology on the understanding of bacterial ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Razi, Aida; Britton, Robert A; Ortega, Joaquin

    2016-12-08

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) had played a central role in the study of ribosome structure and the process of translation in bacteria since the development of this technique in the mid 1980s. Until recently cryo-EM structures were limited to ∼10 Å in the best cases. However, the recent advent of direct electron detectors has greatly improved the resolution of cryo-EM structures to the point where atomic resolution is now achievable. This improved resolution will allow cryo-EM to make groundbreaking contributions in essential aspects of ribosome biology, including the assembly process. In this review, we summarize important insights that cryo-EM, in combination with chemical and genetic approaches, has already brought to our current understanding of the ribosomal assembly process in bacteria using previous detector technology. More importantly, we discuss how the higher resolution structures now attainable with direct electron detectors can be leveraged to propose precise testable models regarding this process. These structures will provide an effective platform to develop new antibiotics that target this fundamental cellular process.

  1. Structural insights into the role of rRNA modifications in protein synthesis and ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Polikanov, Yury S; Melnikov, Sergey V; Söll, Dieter; Steitz, Thomas A

    2015-04-01

    We report crystal structures of the Thermus thermophilus ribosome at 2.3- to 2.5-Å resolution, which have enabled modeling of rRNA modifications. The structures reveal contacts of modified nucleotides with mRNA and tRNAs or protein pY, and contacts within the ribosome interior stabilizing the functional fold of rRNA. Our work provides a resource to explore the roles of rRNA modifications and yields a more comprehensive atomic model of a bacterial ribosome.

  2. In vivo formation of Plasmodium falciparum ribosomal stalk - a unique mode of assembly without stable heterodimeric intermediates.

    PubMed

    Wawiórka, Leszek; Krokowski, Dawid; Gordiyenko, Yuliya; Krowarsch, Daniel; Robinson, Carol V; Adam, Ishag; Grankowski, Nikodem; Tchórzewski, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The ribosomal stalk composed of P-proteins constitutes a structure on the large ribosomal particle responsible for recruitment of translation factors and stimulation of factor-dependent GTP hydrolysis during translation. The main components of the stalk are P-proteins, which form a pentamer. Despite the conserved basic function of the stalk, the P-proteins do not form a uniform entity, displaying heterogeneity in the primary structure across the eukaryotic lineage. The P-proteins from protozoan parasites are among the most evolutionarily divergent stalk proteins. We have assembled P-stalk complex of Plasmodium falciparum in vivo in bacterial system using tricistronic expression cassette and provided its characteristics by biochemical and biophysical methods. All three individual P-proteins, namely uL10/P0, P1 and P2, are indispensable for acquisition of a stable structure of the P stalk complex and the pentameric uL10/P0-(P1-P2)₂form represents the most favorable architecture for parasite P-proteins. The formation of P. falciparum P-stalk is driven by trilateral interaction between individual elements which represents unique mode of assembling, without stable P1-P2 heterodimeric intermediate. On the basis of our mass-spectrometry analysis supported by the bacterial two-hybrid assay and biophysical analyses, a unique pathway of the parasite stalk assembling has been proposed. We suggest that the absence of P1/P2 heterodimer, and the formation of a stable pentamer in the presence of all three proteins, indicate a one-step formation to be the main pathway for the vital ribosomal stalk assembly, whereas the P2 homo-oligomer may represent an off-pathway product with physiologically important nonribosomal role. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Single methylation of 23S rRNA triggers late steps of 50S ribosomal subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Arai, Taiga; Ishiguro, Kensuke; Kimura, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Yuriko; Suzuki, Takeo; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2015-08-25

    Ribosome biogenesis requires multiple assembly factors. In Escherichia coli, deletion of RlmE, the methyltransferase responsible for the 2'-O-methyluridine modification at position 2552 (Um2552) in helix 92 of the 23S rRNA, results in slow growth and accumulation of the 45S particle. We demonstrate that the 45S particle that accumulates in ΔrlmE is a genuine precursor that can be assembled into the 50S subunit. Indeed, 50S formation from the 45S precursor could be promoted by RlmE-mediated Um2552 formation in vitro. Ribosomal protein L36 (encoded by rpmJ) was completely absent from the 45S precursor in ΔrlmE, and we observed a strong genetic interaction between rlmE and rpmJ. Structural probing of 23S rRNA and high-salt stripping of 45S components revealed that RlmE-mediated methylation promotes interdomain interactions via the association between helices 92 and 71, stabilized by the single 2'-O-methylation of Um2552, in concert with the incorporation of L36, triggering late steps of 50S subunit assembly.

  4. Single methylation of 23S rRNA triggers late steps of 50S ribosomal subunit assembly

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Taiga; Ishiguro, Kensuke; Kimura, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Yuriko; Suzuki, Takeo; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis requires multiple assembly factors. In Escherichia coli, deletion of RlmE, the methyltransferase responsible for the 2′-O-methyluridine modification at position 2552 (Um2552) in helix 92 of the 23S rRNA, results in slow growth and accumulation of the 45S particle. We demonstrate that the 45S particle that accumulates in ΔrlmE is a genuine precursor that can be assembled into the 50S subunit. Indeed, 50S formation from the 45S precursor could be promoted by RlmE-mediated Um2552 formation in vitro. Ribosomal protein L36 (encoded by rpmJ) was completely absent from the 45S precursor in ΔrlmE, and we observed a strong genetic interaction between rlmE and rpmJ. Structural probing of 23S rRNA and high-salt stripping of 45S components revealed that RlmE-mediated methylation promotes interdomain interactions via the association between helices 92 and 71, stabilized by the single 2′-O-methylation of Um2552, in concert with the incorporation of L36, triggering late steps of 50S subunit assembly. PMID:26261349

  5. Mapping of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Oxa1-mitochondrial ribosome interface and identification of MrpL40, a ribosomal protein in close proximity to Oxa1 and critical for oxidative phosphorylation complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lixia; Kaur, Jasvinder; Stuart, Rosemary A

    2009-11-01

    The Oxa1 protein plays a central role in facilitating the cotranslational insertion of the nascent polypeptide chains into the mitochondrial inner membrane. Mitochondrially encoded proteins are synthesized on matrix-localized ribosomes which are tethered to the inner membrane and in physical association with the Oxa1 protein. In the present study we used a chemical cross-linking approach to map the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Oxa1-ribosome interface, and we demonstrate here a close association of Oxa1 and the large ribosomal subunit protein, MrpL40. Evidence to indicate that a close physical and functional relationship exists between MrpL40 and another large ribosomal protein, the Mrp20/L23 protein, is also provided. MrpL40 shares sequence features with the bacterial ribosomal protein L24, which like Mrp20/L23 is known to be located adjacent to the ribosomal polypeptide exit site. We propose therefore that MrpL40 represents the Saccharomyces cerevisiae L24 homolog. MrpL40, like many mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, contains a C-terminal extension region that bears no similarity to the bacterial counterpart. We show that this C-terminal mitochondria-specific region is important for MrpL40's ability to support the synthesis of the correct complement of mitochondrially encoded proteins and their subsequent assembly into oxidative phosphorylation complexes.

  6. Role of pseudouridine in structural rearrangements of helix 69 during bacterial ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Yogo; Chow, Christine S

    2012-05-18

    As part of the central core domain of the ribosome, helix 69 of 23S rRNA participates in an important intersubunit bridge and contacts several protein translation factors. Helix 69 is believed to play key roles in protein synthesis. Even though high-resolution crystal structures of the ribosome exist, the solution dynamics and roles of individual nucleotides in H69 are still not well-defined. To better understand the influence of modified nucleotides, specifically pseudouridine, on the multiple conformational states of helix 69 in the context of 50S subunits and 70S ribosomes, chemical probing analyses were performed on wild-type and pseudouridine-deficient bacterial ribosomes. Local structural rearrangements of helix 69 upon ribosomal subunit association and interactions with its partner, helix 44 of 16S rRNA, are observed. The helix 69 conformational states are also magnesium-dependent. The probing data presented in this study provide insight into the functional role of helix 69 dynamics and regulation of these conformational states by post-transcriptional pseudouridine modification.

  7. Discovery of a small molecule that inhibits bacterial ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jonathan M; Davis, Joseph H; Mangat, Chand S; Williamson, James R; Brown, Eric D

    2014-09-18

    While small molecule inhibitors of the bacterial ribosome have been instrumental in understanding protein translation, no such probes exist to study ribosome biogenesis. We screened a diverse chemical collection that included previously approved drugs for compounds that induced cold sensitive growth inhibition in the model bacterium Escherichia coli. Among the most cold sensitive was lamotrigine, an anticonvulsant drug. Lamotrigine treatment resulted in the rapid accumulation of immature 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits at 15 °C. Importantly, this was not the result of translation inhibition, as lamotrigine was incapable of perturbing protein synthesis in vivo or in vitro. Spontaneous suppressor mutations blocking lamotrigine activity mapped solely to the poorly characterized domain II of translation initiation factor IF2 and prevented the binding of lamotrigine to IF2 in vitro. This work establishes lamotrigine as a widely available chemical probe of bacterial ribosome biogenesis and suggests a role for E. coli IF2 in ribosome assembly.

  8. ppGpp negatively impacts ribosome assembly affecting growth and antimicrobial tolerance in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Rebecca M.; Bellows, Lauren E.; Wood, Alison

    2016-01-01

    The stringent response is a survival mechanism used by bacteria to deal with stress. It is coordinated by the nucleotides guanosine tetraphosphate and pentaphosphate [(p)ppGpp], which interact with target proteins to promote bacterial survival. Although this response has been well characterized in proteobacteria, very little is known about the effectors of this signaling system in Gram-positive species. Here, we report on the identification of seven target proteins for the stringent response nucleotides in the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. We demonstrate that the GTP synthesis enzymes HprT and Gmk bind with a high affinity, leading to an inhibition of GTP production. In addition, we identified five putative GTPases—RsgA, RbgA, Era, HflX, and ObgE—as (p)ppGpp target proteins. We show that RsgA, RbgA, Era, and HflX are functional GTPases and that their activity is promoted in the presence of ribosomes but strongly inhibited by the stringent response nucleotides. By characterizing the function of RsgA in vivo, we ascertain that this protein is involved in ribosome assembly, with an rsgA deletion strain, or a strain inactivated for GTPase activity, displaying decreased growth, a decrease in the amount of mature 70S ribosomes, and an increased level of tolerance to antimicrobials. We additionally demonstrate that the interaction of ppGpp with cellular GTPases is not unique to the staphylococci, as homologs from Bacillus subtilis and Enterococcus faecalis retain this ability. Taken together, this study reveals ribosome inactivation as a previously unidentified mechanism through which the stringent response functions in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:26951678

  9. ppGpp negatively impacts ribosome assembly affecting growth and antimicrobial tolerance in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Rebecca M; Bellows, Lauren E; Wood, Alison; Gründling, Angelika

    2016-03-22

    The stringent response is a survival mechanism used by bacteria to deal with stress. It is coordinated by the nucleotides guanosine tetraphosphate and pentaphosphate [(p)ppGpp], which interact with target proteins to promote bacterial survival. Although this response has been well characterized in proteobacteria, very little is known about the effectors of this signaling system in Gram-positive species. Here, we report on the identification of seven target proteins for the stringent response nucleotides in the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus We demonstrate that the GTP synthesis enzymes HprT and Gmk bind with a high affinity, leading to an inhibition of GTP production. In addition, we identified five putative GTPases--RsgA, RbgA, Era, HflX, and ObgE--as (p)ppGpp target proteins. We show that RsgA, RbgA, Era, and HflX are functional GTPases and that their activity is promoted in the presence of ribosomes but strongly inhibited by the stringent response nucleotides. By characterizing the function of RsgA in vivo, we ascertain that this protein is involved in ribosome assembly, with an rsgA deletion strain, or a strain inactivated for GTPase activity, displaying decreased growth, a decrease in the amount of mature 70S ribosomes, and an increased level of tolerance to antimicrobials. We additionally demonstrate that the interaction of ppGpp with cellular GTPases is not unique to the staphylococci, as homologs from Bacillus subtilis and Enterococcus faecalis retain this ability. Taken together, this study reveals ribosome inactivation as a previously unidentified mechanism through which the stringent response functions in Gram-positive bacteria.

  10. Cryo-EM structures of the late-stage assembly intermediates of the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Li, Ningning; Chen, Yuling; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Yixiao; Yuan, Yi; Ma, Chengying; Deng, Haiteng; Lei, Jianlin; Gao, Ning

    2013-08-01

    Ribosome assembly is a process fundamental for all cellular activities. The efficiency and accuracy of the subunit assembly are tightly regulated and closely monitored. In the present work, we characterized, both compositionally and structurally, a set of in vivo 50S subunit precursors (45S), isolated from a mutant bacterial strain. Our qualitative mass spectrometry data indicate that L28, L16, L33, L36 and L35 are dramatically underrepresented in the 45S particles. This protein spectrum shows interesting similarity to many qualitatively analyzed 50S precursors from different genetic background, indicating the presence of global rate-limiting steps in the late-stage assembly of 50S subunit. Our structural data reveal two major intermediate states for the 45S particles. Consistently, both states severally lack those proteins, but they also differ in the stability of the functional centers of the 50S subunit, demonstrating that they are translationally inactive. Detailed analysis indicates that the orientation of H38 accounts for the global conformational differences in these intermediate structures, and suggests that the reorientation of H38 to its native position is rate-limiting during the late-stage assembly. Especially, H38 plays an essential role in stabilizing the central protuberance, through the interaction with the 5S rRNA, and the correctly orientated H38 is likely a prerequisite for further maturation of the 50S subunit.

  11. Cryo-EM structures of the late-stage assembly intermediates of the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ningning; Chen, Yuling; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Yixiao; Yuan, Yi; Ma, Chengying; Deng, Haiteng; Lei, Jianlin; Gao, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is a process fundamental for all cellular activities. The efficiency and accuracy of the subunit assembly are tightly regulated and closely monitored. In the present work, we characterized, both compositionally and structurally, a set of in vivo 50S subunit precursors (45S), isolated from a mutant bacterial strain. Our qualitative mass spectrometry data indicate that L28, L16, L33, L36 and L35 are dramatically underrepresented in the 45S particles. This protein spectrum shows interesting similarity to many qualitatively analyzed 50S precursors from different genetic background, indicating the presence of global rate-limiting steps in the late-stage assembly of 50S subunit. Our structural data reveal two major intermediate states for the 45S particles. Consistently, both states severally lack those proteins, but they also differ in the stability of the functional centers of the 50S subunit, demonstrating that they are translationally inactive. Detailed analysis indicates that the orientation of H38 accounts for the global conformational differences in these intermediate structures, and suggests that the reorientation of H38 to its native position is rate-limiting during the late-stage assembly. Especially, H38 plays an essential role in stabilizing the central protuberance, through the interaction with the 5S rRNA, and the correctly orientated H38 is likely a prerequisite for further maturation of the 50S subunit. PMID:23700310

  12. Symportin 1 chaperones 5S RNP assembly during ribosome biogenesis by occupying an essential rRNA-binding site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calviño, Fabiola R.; Kharde, Satyavati; Ori, Alessandro; Hendricks, Astrid; Wild, Klemens; Kressler, Dieter; Bange, Gert; Hurt, Ed; Beck, Martin; Sinning, Irmgard

    2015-04-01

    During 60S biogenesis, mature 5S RNP consisting of 5S RNA, RpL5 and RpL11, assembles into a pre-60S particle, where docking relies on RpL11 interacting with helix 84 (H84) of the 25S RNA. How 5S RNP is assembled for recruitment into the pre-60S is not known. Here we report the crystal structure of a ternary symportin Syo1-RpL5-N-RpL11 complex and provide biochemical and structural insights into 5S RNP assembly. Syo1 guards the 25S RNA-binding surface on RpL11 and competes with H84 for binding. Pull-down experiments show that H84 releases RpL11 from the ternary complex, but not in the presence of 5S RNA. Crosslinking mass spectrometry visualizes structural rearrangements on incorporation of 5S RNA into the Syo1-RpL5-RpL11 complex supporting the formation of a pre-5S RNP. Our data underline the dual role of Syo1 in ribosomal protein transport and as an assembly platform for 5S RNP.

  13. Symportin 1 chaperones 5S RNP assembly during ribosome biogenesis by occupying an essential rRNA-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Calviño, Fabiola R.; Kharde, Satyavati; Ori, Alessandro; Hendricks, Astrid; Wild, Klemens; Kressler, Dieter; Bange, Gert; Hurt, Ed; Beck, Martin; Sinning, Irmgard

    2015-01-01

    During 60S biogenesis, mature 5S RNP consisting of 5S RNA, RpL5 and RpL11, assembles into a pre-60S particle, where docking relies on RpL11 interacting with helix 84 (H84) of the 25S RNA. How 5S RNP is assembled for recruitment into the pre-60S is not known. Here we report the crystal structure of a ternary symportin Syo1–RpL5-N–RpL11 complex and provide biochemical and structural insights into 5S RNP assembly. Syo1 guards the 25S RNA-binding surface on RpL11 and competes with H84 for binding. Pull-down experiments show that H84 releases RpL11 from the ternary complex, but not in the presence of 5S RNA. Crosslinking mass spectrometry visualizes structural rearrangements on incorporation of 5S RNA into the Syo1–RpL5–RpL11 complex supporting the formation of a pre-5S RNP. Our data underline the dual role of Syo1 in ribosomal protein transport and as an assembly platform for 5S RNP. PMID:25849277

  14. Symportin 1 chaperones 5S RNP assembly during ribosome biogenesis by occupying an essential rRNA-binding site.

    PubMed

    Calviño, Fabiola R; Kharde, Satyavati; Ori, Alessandro; Hendricks, Astrid; Wild, Klemens; Kressler, Dieter; Bange, Gert; Hurt, Ed; Beck, Martin; Sinning, Irmgard

    2015-04-07

    During 60S biogenesis, mature 5S RNP consisting of 5S RNA, RpL5 and RpL11, assembles into a pre-60S particle, where docking relies on RpL11 interacting with helix 84 (H84) of the 25S RNA. How 5S RNP is assembled for recruitment into the pre-60S is not known. Here we report the crystal structure of a ternary symportin Syo1-RpL5-N-RpL11 complex and provide biochemical and structural insights into 5S RNP assembly. Syo1 guards the 25S RNA-binding surface on RpL11 and competes with H84 for binding. Pull-down experiments show that H84 releases RpL11 from the ternary complex, but not in the presence of 5S RNA. Crosslinking mass spectrometry visualizes structural rearrangements on incorporation of 5S RNA into the Syo1-RpL5-RpL11 complex supporting the formation of a pre-5S RNP. Our data underline the dual role of Syo1 in ribosomal protein transport and as an assembly platform for 5S RNP.

  15. A functional RNAi screen links O-GlcNAc modification of ribosomal proteins to stress granule and processing body assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ohn, Takbum; Kedersha, Nancy; Hickman, Tyler; Tisdale, Sarah; Anderson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) and processing bodies (PBs) are microscopically visible ribonucleoprotein granules that cooperatively regulate the translation and decay of messenger RNA1–3. Using an RNA-mediated interference-based screen, we identify 101 human genes required for SG assembly, 39 genes required for PB assembly, and 31 genes required for coordinate SG and PB assembly. Although 51 genes encode proteins involved in mRNA translation, splicing and transcription, most are not obviously associated with RNA metabolism. We find that several components of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, which reversibly modifies proteins with O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) in response to stress, are required for SG and PB assembly. O-GlcNAc-modified proteins are prominent components of SGs but not PBs, and include RACK1 (receptor for activated C kinase 1), prohibitin-2, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and numerous ribosomal proteins. Our results suggest that O-GlcNAc modification of the translational machinery is required for aggregation of untranslated messenger ribonucleoproteins into SGs. The lack of enzymes of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway in budding yeast may contribute to differences between mammalian SGs and related yeast EGP (eIF4E, 4G and Pab1 containing) bodies. PMID:18794846

  16. Ribosome-Associated Mba1 Escorts Cox2 from Insertion Machinery to Maturing Assembly Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Isotta; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Ronsör, Christin; Bareth, Bettina; Warscheid, Bettina; Dennerlein, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The three conserved core subunits of the cytochrome c oxidase are encoded by mitochondria in close to all eukaryotes. The Cox2 subunit spans the inner membrane twice, exposing the N and C termini to the intermembrane space. For this, the N terminus is exported cotranslationally by Oxa1 and subsequently undergoes proteolytic maturation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Little is known about the translocation of the C terminus, but Cox18 has been identified to be a critical protein in this process. Here we find that the scaffold protein Cox20, which promotes processing of Cox2, is in complex with the ribosome receptor Mba1 and translating mitochondrial ribosomes in a Cox2-dependent manner. The Mba1-Cox20 complex accumulates when export of the C terminus of Cox2 is blocked by the loss of the Cox18 protein. While Cox20 engages with Cox18, Mba1 is no longer present at this stage. Our analyses indicate that Cox20 associates with nascent Cox2 and Mba1 to promote Cox2 maturation cotranslationally. We suggest that Mba1 stabilizes the Cox20-ribosome complex and supports the handover of Cox2 to the Cox18 tail export machinery. PMID:27550809

  17. Diurnal Oscillations in Liver Mass and Cell Size Accompany Ribosome Assembly Cycles.

    PubMed

    Sinturel, Flore; Gerber, Alan; Mauvoisin, Daniel; Wang, Jingkui; Gatfield, David; Stubblefield, Jeremy J; Green, Carla B; Gachon, Frédéric; Schibler, Ueli

    2017-05-04

    The liver plays a pivotal role in metabolism and xenobiotic detoxification, processes that must be particularly efficient when animals are active and feed. A major question is how the liver adapts to these diurnal changes in physiology. Here, we show that, in mice, liver mass, hepatocyte size, and protein levels follow a daily rhythm, whose amplitude depends on both feeding-fasting and light-dark cycles. Correlative evidence suggests that the daily oscillation in global protein accumulation depends on a similar fluctuation in ribosome number. Whereas rRNA genes are transcribed at similar rates throughout the day, some newly synthesized rRNAs are polyadenylated and degraded in the nucleus in a robustly diurnal fashion with a phase opposite to that of ribosomal protein synthesis. Based on studies with cultured fibroblasts, we propose that rRNAs not packaged into complete ribosomal subunits are polyadenylated by the poly(A) polymerase PAPD5 and degraded by the nuclear exosome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Elucidation of the assembly events required for the recruitment of Utp20, Imp4 and Bms1 onto nascent pre-ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Fernández, Jorge; Martín-Marcos, Pilar; Dosil, Mercedes

    2011-01-01

    The 90S pre-ribosome, also known as the small subunit (SSU) processome, is a large multisubunit particle required for the production of the 18S rRNA from a pre-rRNA precursor. Recently, it has been shown that the formation of this particle entails the initial association of the tUTP subunit with the nascent pre-RNA and, subsequently, the binding of Rrp5/UTP-C and U3 snoRNP/UTP-B subunits in two independent assembly branches. However, the mode of assembly of other 90S pre-ribosome components remains obscure as yet. In this study, we have investigated the assembly of three proteins (Utp20, Imp4 and Bms1) previously regarded as potential nucleating factors of the 90S particle. Here, we demonstrate that the loading of those three proteins onto the pre-rRNA takes place independently of Rrp5/UTP-C and, instead, occurs downstream of the tUTP and U3/UTP-B subcomplexes. We also demonstrate that Bms1 and Utp20 are required for the recruitment of a subset of proteins to nascent pre-ribosomes. Finally, we show that proteins associated through secondary steps condition the stability of the two assembly branches in partially assembled pre-ribosomes. These results provide new information about the functional relationships among 90S particle components and the events that are required for their stepwise incorporation onto the primary pre-rRNA. PMID:21724601

  19. De novo Synthesis and Assembly of rRNA into Ribosomal Subunits during Cold Acclimation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Piersimoni, Lolita; Giangrossi, Mara; Marchi, Paolo; Brandi, Anna; Gualerzi, Claudio O; Pon, Cynthia L

    2016-04-24

    During the cold adaptation that follows a cold stress, bacterial cells undergo many physiological changes and extensive reprogramming of their gene expression pattern. Bulk gene expression is drastically reduced, while a set of cold shock genes is selectively and transiently expressed. The initial stage of cold acclimation is characterized by the establishment of a stoichiometric imbalance of the translation initiation factors (IFs)/ribosomes ratio that contributes to the preferential translation of cold shock transcripts. Whereas de novo synthesis of the IFs following cold stress has been documented, nothing was known concerning the activity of the rrn operons during the cold acclimation period. In this work, we focus on the expression of the rrn operons and the fate of rRNA after temperature downshift. We demonstrate that in Escherichia coli, rRNA synthesis does not stop during the cold acclimation phase, but continues with greater contribution of the P2 compared to the P1 promoter and all seven rrn operons are active, although their expression levels change with respect to pre-stress conditions. Eight hours after the 37°→10 °C temperature downshift, the newly transcribed rRNA represents up to 20% of total rRNA and is preferentially found in the polysomes. However, with respect to the de novo synthesis of the IFs, both rRNA transcription and maturation are slowed down drastically by cold stress, thereby accounting in part for the stoichiometric imbalance of the IFs/ribosomes. Overall, our data indicate that new ribosomes, which are possibly suitable to function at low temperature, are slowly assembled during cold acclimation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of the sites of action of SrmB, a DEAD-box RNA helicase involved in Escherichia coli ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Proux, Florence; Dreyfus, Marc; Iost, Isabelle

    2011-10-01

    DEAD-box RNA-dependent ATPases are ubiquitous enzymes that participate in nearly all processes involving RNA, but their detailed molecular functions remain generally unknown. SrmB, one of the five Escherichia coli DEAD-box proteins, participates in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit notably by facilitating the incorporation of L13, one of the ribosomal proteins that bind 23S rRNA earliest. Previously, we showed that SrmB is tethered to nascent ribosome through interactions with L4, L24 and the region from domain I of 23S rRNA that binds them. To identify the sites of action of SrmB, we have characterized rRNA mutations that bypass SrmB requirement. Five of them affect the same position from two repeated heptanucleotides in domain II of 23S rRNA, whereas two others affect a complementary hexanucleotide in 5S rRNA. Thus the sites of action of SrmB differ from its tethering site. In the mature ribosome, one of the heptanucleotides participates in a highly compact structure that contacts L13, the '1024 G-ribo wrench'. In addition, we have observed that the assembly defect of ΔsrmB cells worsens as rRNA synthesis increases. Based on these results, we propose two non-exclusive scenarios for the role of SrmB in ribosome assembly. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Paradigms of ribosome synthesis: Lessons learned from ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gamalinda, Michael; Woolford, John L

    2015-01-01

    The proteome in all cells is manufactured via the intricate process of translation by multimolecular factories called ribosomes. Nevertheless, these ribonucleoprotein particles, the largest of their kind, also have an elaborate assembly line of their own. Groundbreaking discoveries that bacterial ribosomal subunits can be self-assembled in vitro jumpstarted studies on how ribosomes are constructed. Until recently, ribosome assembly has been investigated almost entirely in vitro with bacterial small subunits under equilibrium conditions. In light of high-resolution ribosome structures and a more sophisticated toolkit, the past decade has been defined by a burst of kinetic studies in vitro and, importantly, also a shift to examining ribosome maturation in living cells, especially in eukaryotes. In this review, we summarize the principles governing ribosome assembly that emerged from studies focusing on ribosomal proteins and their interactions with rRNA. Understanding these paradigms has taken center stage, given the linkage between anomalous ribosome biogenesis and proliferative disorders. PMID:26779413

  2. Reading the Evolution of Compartmentalization in the Ribosome Assembly Toolbox: The YRG Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Pulido, Antonio J.; Reynaud, Emmanuel G.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    Reconstructing the transition from a single compartment bacterium to a highly compartmentalized eukaryotic cell is one of the most studied problems of evolutionary cell biology. However, timing and details of the establishment of compartmentalization are unclear and difficult to assess. Here, we propose the use of molecular markers specific to cellular compartments to set up a framework to advance the understanding of this complex intracellular process. Specifically, we use a protein family related to ribosome biogenesis, YRG (YlqF related GTPases), whose evolution is linked to the establishment of cellular compartments, leveraging the current genomic data. We analyzed orthologous proteins of the YRG family in a set of 171 proteomes for a total of 370 proteins. We identified ten YRG protein subfamilies that can be associated to six subcellular compartments (nuclear bodies, nucleolus, nucleus, cytosol, mitochondria, and chloroplast), and which were found in archaeal, bacterial and eukaryotic proteomes. Our analysis reveals organism streamlining related events in specific taxonomic groups such as Fungi. We conclude that the YRG family could be used as a compartmentalization marker, which could help to trace the evolutionary path relating cellular compartments with ribosome biogenesis. PMID:28072865

  3. Reading the Evolution of Compartmentalization in the Ribosome Assembly Toolbox: The YRG Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Mier, Pablo; Pérez-Pulido, Antonio J; Reynaud, Emmanuel G; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2017-01-01

    Reconstructing the transition from a single compartment bacterium to a highly compartmentalized eukaryotic cell is one of the most studied problems of evolutionary cell biology. However, timing and details of the establishment of compartmentalization are unclear and difficult to assess. Here, we propose the use of molecular markers specific to cellular compartments to set up a framework to advance the understanding of this complex intracellular process. Specifically, we use a protein family related to ribosome biogenesis, YRG (YlqF related GTPases), whose evolution is linked to the establishment of cellular compartments, leveraging the current genomic data. We analyzed orthologous proteins of the YRG family in a set of 171 proteomes for a total of 370 proteins. We identified ten YRG protein subfamilies that can be associated to six subcellular compartments (nuclear bodies, nucleolus, nucleus, cytosol, mitochondria, and chloroplast), and which were found in archaeal, bacterial and eukaryotic proteomes. Our analysis reveals organism streamlining related events in specific taxonomic groups such as Fungi. We conclude that the YRG family could be used as a compartmentalization marker, which could help to trace the evolutionary path relating cellular compartments with ribosome biogenesis.

  4. Cbp3–Cbp6 interacts with the yeast mitochondrial ribosomal tunnel exit and promotes cytochrome b synthesis and assembly

    PubMed Central

    Gruschke, Steffi; Kehrein, Kirsten; Römpler, Katharina; Gröne, Kerstin; Israel, Lars; Imhof, Axel; Herrmann, Johannes M.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria contain their own genetic system to express a small number of hydrophobic polypeptides, including cytochrome b, an essential subunit of the bc1 complex of the respiratory chain. In this paper, we show in yeast that Cbp3, a bc1 complex assembly factor, and Cbp6, a regulator of cytochrome b translation, form a complex that associates with the polypeptide tunnel exit of mitochondrial ribosomes and that exhibits two important functions in the biogenesis of cytochrome b. On the one hand, the interaction of Cbp3 and Cbp6 with mitochondrial ribosomes is necessary for efficient translation of cytochrome b transcript. On the other hand, the Cbp3–Cbp6 complex interacts directly with newly synthesized cytochrome b in an assembly intermediate that is not ribosome bound and that contains the assembly factor Cbp4. Our results suggest that synthesis of cytochrome b occurs preferentially on those ribosomes that have the Cbp3–Cbp6 complex bound to their tunnel exit, an arrangement that may ensure tight coordination of cytochrome b synthesis and assembly. PMID:21670217

  5. Purification of 70S ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Maria C; Maguire, Bruce; Lake, James A

    2015-03-02

    Here we describe the further purification of prokaryotic ribosomal particles obtained after the centrifugation of a crude cell lysate through a sucrose cushion. In this final purification step, a fraction containing ribosomes, ribosomal subunits, and polysomes is centrifuged through a 7%-30% (w/w) linear sucrose gradient to isolate tight couple 70S ribosomes, as well as dissociated 30S and 50S subunits. The tight couples fraction, or translationally active ribosome fraction, is composed of intact vacant ribosomes that can be used in cell-free translation systems.

  6. Assembly of Regulatory Factors on rRNA and Ribosomal Protein Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Koji; Ohtsuki, Kazushige; Ki, Sewon; Aoyama, Kayo; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Takehiko; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Kokubo, Tetsuro

    2007-01-01

    HMO1 is a high-mobility group B protein that plays a role in transcription of genes encoding rRNA and ribosomal proteins (RPGs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This study uses genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation to study the roles of HMO1, FHL1, and RAP1 in transcription of these genes as well as other RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes in yeast. The results show that HMO1 associates with the 35S rRNA gene in an RNA polymerase I-dependent manner and that RPG promoters (138 in total) can be classified into several distinct groups based on HMO1 abundance at the promoter and the HMO1 dependence of FHL1 and/or RAP1 binding to the promoter. FHL1, a key regulator of RPGs, binds to most of the HMO1-enriched and transcriptionally HMO1-dependent RPG promoters in an HMO1-dependent manner, whereas it binds to HMO1-limited RPG promoters in an HMO1-independent manner, irrespective of whether they are transcribed in an HMO1-dependent manner. Reporter gene assays indicate that these functional properties are determined by the promoter sequence. PMID:17646381

  7. Short Proline-Rich Antimicrobial Peptides Inhibit Either the Bacterial 70S Ribosome or the Assembly of its Large 50S Subunit.

    PubMed

    Krizsan, Andor; Prahl, Caroline; Goldbach, Tina; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2015-11-02

    Short proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs) are a promising class of antibiotics that use novel mechanisms, thus offering the potential to overcome the health threat of multiresistant pathogens. The peptides bind to the bacterial 70S ribosome and can inhibit protein translation. We report that PrAMPs can be divided into two classes, with each class binding to a different site, and thus use different lethal mechanisms. Oncocin-type peptides inhibit protein translation in Escherichia coli by binding to the exit tunnel of the 70S ribosome with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50 values) of around 2 to 6 μmol  L(-1), whereas apidaecin-type peptides block the assembly of the large (50S) subunit of the ribosome, resulting in similar IC50 values. The revealed mechanisms should allow the design of new antibiotics to overcome current bacterial resistance mechanisms. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Crosstalk in gene expression: coupling and co-regulation of rDNA transcription, pre-ribosome assembly and pre-rRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Granneman, Sander; Baserga, Susan J

    2005-06-01

    Ribosomes, the large RNPs that translate mRNA into protein in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, are synthesized in a subcompartment of the nucleus, the nucleolus. There, transcription by Pol I yields a pre-rRNA which is modified, cleaved and assembled with ribosomal proteins to make functional ribosomes. Previously, rRNA transcription and pre-rRNA cleavage in eukaryotes were considered to be separable steps in gene expression. However, recent findings suggest that these two steps in gene expression can be concurrent and are co-regulated. Unexpectedly, optimal rDNA transcription requires the presence of a defined subset of components of the pre-rRNA processing machinery.

  9. The DEAD-box Protein Rok1 Orchestrates 40S and 60S Ribosome Assembly by Promoting the Release of Rrp5 from Pre-40S Ribosomes to Allow for 60S Maturation.

    PubMed

    Khoshnevis, Sohail; Askenasy, Isabel; Johnson, Matthew C; Dattolo, Maria D; Young-Erdos, Crystal L; Stroupe, M Elizabeth; Karbstein, Katrin

    2016-06-01

    DEAD-box proteins are ubiquitous regulators of RNA biology. While commonly dubbed "helicases," their activities also include duplex annealing, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent RNA binding, and RNA-protein complex remodeling. Rok1, an essential DEAD-box protein, and its cofactor Rrp5 are required for ribosome assembly. Here, we use in vivo and in vitro biochemical analyses to demonstrate that ATP-bound Rok1, but not adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-bound Rok1, stabilizes Rrp5 binding to 40S ribosomes. Interconversion between these two forms by ATP hydrolysis is required for release of Rrp5 from pre-40S ribosomes in vivo, thereby allowing Rrp5 to carry out its role in 60S subunit assembly. Furthermore, our data also strongly suggest that the previously described accumulation of snR30 upon Rok1 inactivation arises because Rrp5 release is blocked and implicate a previously undescribed interaction between Rrp5 and the DEAD-box protein Has1 in mediating snR30 accumulation when Rrp5 release from pre-40S subunits is blocked.

  10. The DEAD-box Protein Rok1 Orchestrates 40S and 60S Ribosome Assembly by Promoting the Release of Rrp5 from Pre-40S Ribosomes to Allow for 60S Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Khoshnevis, Sohail; Askenasy, Isabel; Dattolo, Maria D.; Young-Erdos, Crystal L.; Stroupe, M. Elizabeth; Karbstein, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    DEAD-box proteins are ubiquitous regulators of RNA biology. While commonly dubbed “helicases,” their activities also include duplex annealing, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent RNA binding, and RNA-protein complex remodeling. Rok1, an essential DEAD-box protein, and its cofactor Rrp5 are required for ribosome assembly. Here, we use in vivo and in vitro biochemical analyses to demonstrate that ATP-bound Rok1, but not adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-bound Rok1, stabilizes Rrp5 binding to 40S ribosomes. Interconversion between these two forms by ATP hydrolysis is required for release of Rrp5 from pre-40S ribosomes in vivo, thereby allowing Rrp5 to carry out its role in 60S subunit assembly. Furthermore, our data also strongly suggest that the previously described accumulation of snR30 upon Rok1 inactivation arises because Rrp5 release is blocked and implicate a previously undescribed interaction between Rrp5 and the DEAD-box protein Has1 in mediating snR30 accumulation when Rrp5 release from pre-40S subunits is blocked. PMID:27280440

  11. [Fragment reaction catalyzed by E. coli ribosomes].

    PubMed

    Kotusov, V V; Kukhanova, M K; Sal'nikova, N E; Nikolaeva, L V; Kraevskiĭ, A A

    1977-01-01

    It has been shown that 50S subunits of E. coli MRE-600 ribosomes catalyze the reaction of N-(formyl)-methionyl ester of adenosine 5'-phosphate acting as peptide donor, with Phe-tRNA or CACCA-Phe serving as a peptide acceptor. The reaction is stimulated by cytidine 5'phosphate and inhibited by lincomycin, puromycin and chloramphenicol. The obtained results show that the structure of the donor site of peptidyltransferase is completely assembled on the 50S subunit and 30S subunit is not required for its formation.

  12. Spb4p, an essential putative RNA helicase, is required for a late step in the assembly of 60S ribosomal subunits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    de la Cruz, J; Kressler, D; Rojo, M; Tollervey, D; Linder, P

    1998-01-01

    Spb4p is a putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase that is required for synthesis of 60S ribosomal subunits. Polysome analyses of strains genetically depleted of Spb4p or carrying the cold-sensitive spb4-1 mutation revealed an underaccumulation of 60S ribosomal subunits. Analysis of pre-rRNA processing by pulse-chase labeling, northern hybridization, and primer extension indicated that these strains exhibited a reduced synthesis of the 25S/5.8S rRNAs, due to inhibition of processing of the 27SB pre-rRNAs. At later times of depletion of Spb4p or following transfer of the spb4-1 strain to more restrictive temperatures, the early pre-rRNA processing steps at sites A0, Al, and A2 were also inhibited. Sucrose gradient fractionation showed that the accumulated 27SB pre-rRNAs are associated with a high-molecular-weight complex, most likely the 66S pre-ribosomal particle. An HA epitope-tagged Spb4p is localized to the nucleolus and the adjacent nucleoplasmic area. On sucrose gradients, HA-Spb4p was found almost exclusively in rapidly sedimenting complexes and showed a peak in the fractions containing the 66S pre-ribosomes. We propose that Spb4p is involved directly in a late and essential step during assembly of 60S ribosomal subunits, presumably by acting as an rRNA helicase. PMID:9769101

  13. Yeast polypeptide exit tunnel ribosomal proteins L17, L35 and L37 are necessary to recruit late-assembling factors required for 27SB pre-rRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Gamalinda, Michael; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Babiano, Reyes; Talkish, Jason; de la Cruz, Jesús; Woolford, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis involves the coordinated folding and processing of pre-rRNAs with assembly of ribosomal proteins. In eukaryotes, these events are facilitated by trans-acting factors that propel ribosome maturation from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm. However, there is a gap in understanding how ribosomal proteins configure pre-ribosomes in vivo to enable processing to occur. Here, we have examined the role of adjacent yeast r-proteins L17, L35 and L37 in folding and processing of pre-rRNAs, and binding of other proteins within assembling ribosomes. These three essential ribosomal proteins, which surround the polypeptide exit tunnel, are required for 60S subunit formation as a consequence of their role in removal of the ITS2 spacer from 27SB pre-rRNA. L17-, L35- and L37-depleted cells exhibit turnover of aberrant pre-60S assembly intermediates. Although the structure of ITS2 does not appear to be grossly affected in their absence, these three ribosomal proteins are necessary for efficient recruitment of factors required for 27SB pre-rRNA processing, namely, Nsa2 and Nog2, which associate with pre-60S ribosomal particles containing 27SB pre-rRNAs. Altogether, these data support that L17, L35 and L37 are specifically required for a recruiting step immediately preceding removal of ITS2. PMID:23268442

  14. Biochemical evidence for the heptameric complex L10(L12)6 in the Thermus thermophilus ribosome: in vitro analysis of its molecular assembly and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Takaomi; Nakatsuchi, Masato; Sugita, Daiyu; Nomura, Mamoru; Kaminishi, Tatsuya; Takemoto, Chie; Shirouzu, Mikako; Miyoshi, Tomohiro; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Hachimori, Akira; Uchiumi, Toshio

    2008-11-01

    The stalk protein L12 is the only multiple component in 50S ribosomal subunit. In Escherichia coli, two L12 dimers bind to the C-terminal domain of L10 to form a pentameric complex, L10[(L12)(2)](2), while the recent X-ray crystallographic study and tandem MS analyses revealed the presence of a heptameric complex, L10[(L12)(2)](3), in some thermophilic bacteria. We here characterized the complex of Thermus thermophilus (Tt-) L10 and Tt-L12 stalk proteins by biochemical approaches using C-terminally truncated variants of Tt-L10. The C-terminal 44-residues removal (Delta44) resulted in complete loss of interactions with Tt-L12. Quantitative analysis of Tt-L12 assembled onto E. coli 50S core particles, together with Tt-L10 variants, indicated that the wild-type, Delta13 and Delta23 variants bound three, two and one Tt-L12 dimers, respectively. The hybrid ribosomes that contained the T. thermophilus proteins were highly accessible to E. coli elongation factors. The progressive removal of Tt-L12 dimers caused a stepwise reduction of ribosomal activities, which suggested that each individual stalk dimer contributed to ribosomal function. Interestingly, the hybrid ribosomes showed higher EF-G-dependent GTPase activity than E. coli ribosomes, even when two or one Tt-L12 dimer. This result seems to be due to a structural characteristic of Tt-L12 dimer.

  15. The essential GTPase RbgA (YlqF) is required for 50S ribosome assembly in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Uicker, William C; Schaefer, Laura; Britton, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the essential GTPase YlqF is shown to participate in the biogenesis of the 50S ribosomal subunit in Bacillus subtilis. Cells depleted of YlqF displayed gene expression profiles and nucleoid morphologies that were consistent with a function for YlqF in translation. In addition, YlqF is evolutionarily linked to two eukaryotic GTPases, Nog2p and Nug1p, that are involved in the biogenesis and the nuclear export of the 60S ribosomal subunit. Analysis of ribosomes from cells depleted of YlqF demonstrated that the formation of 70S ribosomes was greatly reduced and the large subunit sedimented at 45S. Cells grown with varying depleted levels of YlqF, yielding doubling times ranging from 38 min to 150 min, all displayed the 45S intermediate. Purified YlqF-His(6) protein associates with the 45S intermediate, but not the mature 50S subunit in vitro. Analysis of proteins from the 45S intermediate indicated that ribosomal protein L16, which is added late during in vitro Escherichia coli 50S ribosome biogenesis, was missing from the 45S intermediate. These results support a model in which YlqF participates in the formation of active 70S ribosomes in the cell by functioning in a late step of 50S subunit biogenesis. Based on these results we propose to rename the ylqF gene rbgA (ribosome biogenesis GTPase A).

  16. Synthetic Lethality with Conditional dbp6 Alleles Identifies Rsa1p, a Nucleoplasmic Protein Involved in the Assembly of 60S Ribosomal Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Kressler, Dieter; Doère, Monique; Rojo, Manuel; Linder, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Dbp6p is an essential putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase that is required for 60S-ribosomal-subunit assembly in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (D. Kressler, J. de la Cruz, M. Rojo, and P. Linder, Mol. Cell. Biol. 18:1855–1865, 1998). To identify factors that are functionally interacting with Dbp6p, we have performed a synthetic lethal screen with conditional dbp6 mutants. Here, we describe the cloning and the phenotypic analysis of the previously uncharacterized open reading frame YPL193W, which we renamed RSA1 (ribosome assembly 1). Rsa1p is not essential for cell viability; however, rsa1 null mutant strains display a slow-growth phenotype, which is exacerbated at elevated temperatures. The rsa1 null allele synthetically enhances the mild growth defect of weak dbp6 alleles and confers synthetic lethality when combined with stronger dbp6 alleles. Polysome profile analysis shows that the absence of Rsa1p results in the accumulation of half-mer polysomes. However, the pool of free 60S ribosomal subunits is only moderately decreased; this is reminiscent of polysome profiles from mutants defective in 60S-to-40S subunit joining. Pulse-chase labeling of pre-rRNA in the rsa1 null mutant strain indicates that formation of the mature 25S rRNA is decreased at the nonpermissive temperature. Interestingly, free 60S ribosomal subunits of a rsa1 null mutant strain that was grown for two generations at 37°C are practically devoid of the 60S-ribosomal-subunit protein Qsr1p/Rpl10p, which is required for joining of 60S and 40S subunits (D. P. Eisinger, F. A. Dick, and B. L. Trumpower, Mol. Cell. Biol. 17:5136–5145, 1997). Moreover, the combination of the Δrsa1 and qsr1-1 mutations leads to a strong synthetic growth inhibition. Finally, a hemagglutinin epitope-tagged Rsa1p localizes predominantly to the nucleoplasm. Together, these results point towards a function for Rsa1p in a late nucleoplasmic step of 60S-ribosomal-subunit assembly. PMID:10567587

  17. Rrp12 and the Exportin Crm1 Participate in Late Assembly Events in the Nucleolus during 40S Ribosomal Subunit Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Moriggi, Giulia; Nieto, Blanca; Dosil, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    During the biogenesis of small ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes, the pre-40S particles formed in the nucleolus are rapidly transported to the cytoplasm. The mechanisms underlying the nuclear export of these particles and its coordination with other biogenesis steps are mostly unknown. Here we show that yeast Rrp12 is required for the exit of pre-40S particles to the cytoplasm and for proper maturation dynamics of upstream 90S pre-ribosomes. Due to this, in vivo elimination of Rrp12 leads to an accumulation of nucleoplasmic 90S to pre-40S transitional particles, abnormal 35S pre-rRNA processing, delayed elimination of processing byproducts, and no export of intermediate pre-40S complexes. The exportin Crm1 is also required for the same pre-ribosome maturation events that involve Rrp12. Thus, in addition to their implication in nuclear export, Rrp12 and Crm1 participate in earlier biosynthetic steps that take place in the nucleolus. Our results indicate that, in the 40S subunit synthesis pathway, the completion of early pre-40S particle assembly, the initiation of byproduct degradation and the priming for nuclear export occur in an integrated manner in late 90S pre-ribosomes. PMID:25474739

  18. Dbp7p, a putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is required for 60S ribosomal subunit assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Daugeron, M C; Linder, P

    1998-01-01

    Putative ATP-dependent RNA helicases are ubiquitous, highly conserved proteins that are found in most organisms and they are implicated in all aspects of cellular RNA metabolism. Here we present the functional characterization of the Dbp7 protein, a putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase of the DEAD-box protein family from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The complete deletion of the DBP7 ORF causes a severe slow-growth phenotype. In addition, the absence of Dbp7p results in a reduced amount of 60S ribosomal subunits and an accumulation of halfmer polysomes. Subsequent analysis of pre-rRNA processing indicates that this 60S ribosomal subunit deficit is due to a strong decrease in the production of 27S and 7S precursor rRNAs, which leads to reduced levels of the mature 25S and 5.8S rRNAs. Noticeably, the overall decrease of the 27S pre-rRNA species is neither associated with the accumulation of preceding precursors nor with the emergence of abnormal processing intermediates, suggesting that these 27S pre-rRNA species are degraded rapidly in the absence of Dbp7p. Finally, an HA epitope-tagged Dbp7 protein is localized in the nucleolus. We propose that Dbp7p is involved in the assembly of the pre-ribosomal particle during the biogenesis of the 60S ribosomal subunit. PMID:9582098

  19. Constructing ribosomes along the Danube

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Jonathan R.

    2010-01-01

    The EMBO Conference on Ribosome Synthesis held last summer explored the latest breakthroughs in ribosome assembly and how it affects disease. Both of these topics have recently seen important advances that enlighten how almost 200 proteins cooperate to produce a ribosome and how the cell responds to a malfunction in this process. PMID:20010797

  20. Ribosome maturation in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Silengo, L; Altruda, F; Dotto, G P; Lacquaniti, F; Perlo, C; Turco, E; Mangiarotti, G

    1977-01-01

    In vivo and in vitro experiments have shown that processing of ribosomal RNA is a late event in ribosome biogenesis. The precursor form of RNA is probably necessary to speed up the assembly of ribomal proteins. Newly formed ribosomal particles which have already entered polyribosomes differ from mature ribosomes not only in their RNA content but also in their susceptibility to unfolding in low Mg concentration and to RNase attack. Final maturation of new ribosomes is probably dependent on their functioning in protein synthesis. Thus only those ribosomes which have proven to be functional may be converted into stable cellular structures.

  1. RBF1, a Plant Homolog of the Bacterial Ribosome-Binding Factor RbfA, Acts in Processing of the Chloroplast 16S Ribosomal RNA1[W

    PubMed Central

    Fristedt, Rikard; Scharff, Lars B.; Clarke, Cornelia A.; Wang, Qin; Lin, Chentao; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Bock, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Plastids (chloroplasts) possess 70S ribosomes that are very similar in structure and function to the ribosomes of their bacterial ancestors. While most components of the bacterial ribosome (ribosomal RNAs [rRNAs] and ribosomal proteins) are well conserved in the plastid ribosome, little is known about the factors mediating the biogenesis of plastid ribosomes. Here, we have investigated a putative homolog of the bacterial RbfA (for ribosome-binding factor A) protein that was identified as a cold-shock protein and an auxiliary factor acting in the 5′ maturation of the 16S rRNA. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the vascular plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) both encode a single RbfA-like protein in their nuclear genomes. By generating specific antibodies against this protein, we show that the plant RbfA-like protein functions exclusively in the plastid, where it is associated with thylakoid membranes. Analysis of mutants for the corresponding gene (termed RBF1) reveals that the gene function is essential for photoautotrophic growth. Weak mutant alleles display reduced levels of plastid ribosomes, a specific depletion in 30S ribosomal subunits, and reduced activity of plastid protein biosynthesis. Our data suggest that, while the function in ribosome maturation and 16S rRNA 5′ end processing is conserved, the RBF1 protein has assumed an additional role in 3′ end processing. Together with the apparent absence of a homologous protein from plant mitochondria, our findings illustrate that the assembly process of the 70S ribosome is not strictly conserved and has undergone some modifications during organelle evolution. PMID:24214533

  2. Multiple in vivo pathways for E. coli small ribosomal subunit assembly occur on one pre-rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Processing of transcribed precursor ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) to a mature state is a conserved aspect of ribosome biogenesis in vivo. We developed an affinity purification system to isolate and analyze in vivo formed pre-rRNA containing ribonucleoprotein particles (rRNPs) from wild-type E. coli. We observed that the first processing intermediate of pre-SSU rRNA is a platform for biogenesis. These pre-SSU containing RNPs have differing ribosomal protein and auxiliary factors association and rRNA folding. Each RNP lacks the proper architecture in functional regions suggesting that checkpoints preclude immature subunits from entering the translational cycle. This work offers in vivo snapshots of SSU biogenesis and reveals that multiple pathways exist for the entire SSU biogenesis process in wild-type E. coli. These findings have important implications in understanding SSU biogenesis in vivo and offer a general strategy for analysis of RNP biogenesis. PMID:25195050

  3. Dynamics of the Putative RNA Helicase Spb4 during Ribosome Assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae ▿†

    PubMed Central

    García-Gómez, Juan José; Lebaron, Simon; Froment, Carine; Monsarrat, Bernard; Henry, Yves; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Spb4 is a putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase that is required for proper processing of 27SB pre-rRNAs and therefore for 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. To define the timing of association of this protein with preribosomal particles, we have studied the composition of complexes that copurify with Spb4 tagged by tandem affinity purification (TAP-tagged Spb4). These complexes contain mainly the 27SB pre-rRNAs and about 50 ribosome biogenesis proteins, primarily components of early pre-60S ribosomal particles. To a lesser extent, some protein factors of 90S preribosomal particles and the 35S and 27SA pre-rRNAs also copurify with TAP-tagged Spb4. Moreover, we have obtained by site-directed mutagenesis an allele that results in the R360A substitution in the conserved motif VI of the Spb4 helicase domain. This allele causes a dominant-negative phenotype when overexpressed in the wild-type strain. Cells expressing Spb4(R360A) display an accumulation of 35S and 27SB pre-rRNAs and a net 40S ribosomal subunit defect. TAP-tagged Spb4(R360A) displays a greater steady-state association with 90S preribosomal particles than TAP-tagged wild-type Spb4. Together, our data indicate that Spb4 is a component of early nucle(ol)ar pre-60S ribosomal particles containing 27SB pre-rRNA. Apparently, Spb4 binds 90S preribosomal particles and dissociates from pre-60S ribosomal particles after processing of 27SB pre-rRNA. PMID:21825077

  4. Molecular mechanics of 30S subunit head rotation

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Srividya; Donohue, John Paul; Noller, Harry F.

    2014-01-01

    During ribosomal translocation, a process central to the elongation phase of protein synthesis, movement of mRNA and tRNAs requires large-scale rotation of the head domain of the small (30S) subunit of the ribosome. It has generally been accepted that the head rotates by pivoting around the neck helix (h28) of 16S rRNA, its sole covalent connection to the body domain. Surprisingly, we observe that the calculated axis of rotation does not coincide with the neck. Instead, comparative structure analysis across 55 ribosome structures shows that 30S head movement results from flexing at two hinge points lying within conserved elements of 16S rRNA. Hinge 1, although located within the neck, moves by straightening of the kinked helix h28 at the point of contact with the mRNA. Hinge 2 lies within a three-way helix junction that extends to the body through a second, noncovalent connection; its movement results from flexing between helices h34 and h35 in a plane orthogonal to the movement of hinge 1. Concerted movement at these two hinges accounts for the observed magnitudes of head rotation. Our findings also explain the mode of action of spectinomycin, an antibiotic that blocks translocation by binding to hinge 2. PMID:25187561

  5. Production of the non-ribosomal peptide plipastatin in Bacillus subtilis regulated by three relevant gene blocks assembled in a single movable DNA segment.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Kenji; Matsui, Kuniko; Itaya, Mitsuhiro

    2007-05-10

    Methods that allow the assembly of genes in one single DNA segment are of great use in bioengineering and synthetic biology. The biosynthesis of plipastatin, a lipopeptide antibiotic synthesized non-ribosomally by Bacillus subtilis 168, requires three gene blocks at different genome loci, i.e. the peptide synthetase operon ppsABCDE (38-kb), degQ (0.6kb), and sfp (1.0kb). We applied a DNA assembly protocol in B. subtilis, named ordered gene assembly in B. subtilis (OGAB) method, to incorporate those three gene blocks into a one-unit plasmid via one ligation-reaction. High yields of correct assembly, above 87%, allowed us to screen for the plasmid that produced plipastatin at a level approximately 10-fold higher than in the wild-type. In contrast to that recombinogenic technologies used in E. coli require repetitive assembly steps and/or several selection markers, our method features high fidelity and efficiency, is completed in one ligation using only one selection marker associating with plasmid vector, and is applicable to DNA fragments larger than 40kb.

  6. Development, antibiotic production, and ribosome assembly in Streptomyces venezuelae are impacted by RNase J and RNase III deletion.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stephanie E; Leong, Vivian; Ortega, Joaquin; Elliot, Marie A

    2014-12-01

    RNA metabolism is a critical but frequently overlooked control element affecting virtually every cellular process in bacteria. RNA processing and degradation is mediated by a suite of ribonucleases having distinct cleavage and substrate specificity. Here, we probe the role of two ribonucleases (RNase III and RNase J) in the emerging model system Streptomyces venezuelae. We show that each enzyme makes a unique contribution to the growth and development of S. venezuelae and further affects the secondary metabolism and antibiotic production of this bacterium. We demonstrate a connection between the action of these ribonucleases and translation, with both enzymes being required for the formation of functional ribosomes. RNase III mutants in particular fail to properly process 23S rRNA, form fewer 70S ribosomes, and show reduced translational processivity. The loss of either RNase III or RNase J additionally led to the appearance of a new ribosomal species (the 100S ribosome dimer) during exponential growth and dramatically sensitized these mutants to a range of antibiotics. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Development, Antibiotic Production, and Ribosome Assembly in Streptomyces venezuelae Are Impacted by RNase J and RNase III Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephanie E.; Leong, Vivian; Ortega, Joaquin

    2014-01-01

    RNA metabolism is a critical but frequently overlooked control element affecting virtually every cellular process in bacteria. RNA processing and degradation is mediated by a suite of ribonucleases having distinct cleavage and substrate specificity. Here, we probe the role of two ribonucleases (RNase III and RNase J) in the emerging model system Streptomyces venezuelae. We show that each enzyme makes a unique contribution to the growth and development of S. venezuelae and further affects the secondary metabolism and antibiotic production of this bacterium. We demonstrate a connection between the action of these ribonucleases and translation, with both enzymes being required for the formation of functional ribosomes. RNase III mutants in particular fail to properly process 23S rRNA, form fewer 70S ribosomes, and show reduced translational processivity. The loss of either RNase III or RNase J additionally led to the appearance of a new ribosomal species (the 100S ribosome dimer) during exponential growth and dramatically sensitized these mutants to a range of antibiotics. PMID:25266378

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of the Staphylococcus aureus YsxC protein: molecular insights into ribosome assembly and allosteric inhibition of the protein.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Amit; Muthu, Kannan; Panneerselvam, Manivel; Pole, Anil Kumar; Ramadas, Krishna

    2011-12-01

    YsxC from Staphylococcus aureus is a member of the GTPase protein family, and is involved in the ribosomal assembly and stability of this microorganism through its interactions with the L17, S2 and S10 ribosomal proteins. Inhibition of its interactions with L17, S2, S10 and the β' subunit of RNA polymerase influences ribosomal assembly, which may affect the growth of the microorganism. This makes YsxC a novel target for the design of inhibitors to treat the disease caused by S. aureus. Understanding the interaction mechanism between YsxC and its partners would aid in the identification of potential catalytic residues, which could then be targeted to inhibit its function. Accordingly, in the present study, an in silico analysis of the interactions between YsxC and L17, S2 and S10 was performed, and the potential residues involved in these interactions were identified. Based on the simulation results, a possible mechanism for the interactions between these proteins was also proposed. Finally, six ligands from among a library of 81,000 chemical molecules were found to interact with parts of the G2 and switch II regions of the YsxC protein. Moreover, their interactions with the YsxC protein were observed to provoke changes at its GTP-binding site, which suggests that the binding of these ligands leads to a reduction in GTPase activity, and they were also found to affect the interactions of YsxC with its partners. This observation indicates that the proposed interacting site of YsxC may act as an allosteric site, and disrupting interactions at this site might lead to novel allosteric inhibition of the YsxC protein.

  9. The GTP-binding protein YlqF participates in the late step of 50 S ribosomal subunit assembly in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yoshitaka; Morimoto, Takuya; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Loh, Pek Chin; Oshima, Taku; Ogasawara, Naotake

    2006-03-24

    Bacillus subtilis YlqF belongs to the Era/Obg subfamily of small GTP-binding proteins and is essential for bacterial growth. Here we report that YlqF participates in the late step of 50 S ribosomal subunit assembly. YlqF was co-fractionated with the 50 S subunit, depending on the presence of noncleavable GTP analog. Moreover, the GTPase activity of YlqF was stimulated specifically by the 50 S subunit in vitro. Dimethyl sulfate footprinting analysis disclosed that YlqF binds to a unique position in 23 S rRNA. Yeast two-hybrid data revealed interactions between YlqF and the B. subtilis L25 protein (Ctc). The interaction was confirmed by the pull-down assay of the purified proteins. Specifically, YlqF is positioned around the A-site and P-site on the 50 S subunit. Proteome analysis of the abnormal 50 S subunits that accumulated in YlqF-depleted cells showed that L16 and L27 proteins, located near the YlqF-binding domain, are missing. Our results collectively indicate that YlqF will organize the late step of 50 S ribosomal subunit assembly.

  10. Identification of Novel RNA-Protein Contact in Complex of Ribosomal Protein S7 and 3'-Terminal Fragment of 16S rRNA in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Golovin, A V; Khayrullina, G A; Kraal, B; Kopylov, Capital A Cyrillic М

    2012-10-01

    For prokaryotes in vitro, 16S rRNA and 20 ribosomal proteins are capable of hierarchical self- assembly yielding a 30S ribosomal subunit. The self-assembly is initiated by interactions between 16S rRNA and three key ribosomal proteins: S4, S8, and S7. These proteins also have a regulatory function in the translation of their polycistronic operons recognizing a specific region of mRNA. Therefore, studying the RNA-protein interactions within binary complexes is obligatory for understanding ribosome biogenesis. The non-conventional RNA-protein contact within the binary complex of recombinant ribosomal protein S7 and its 16S rRNA binding site (236 nucleotides) was identified. UV-induced RNA-protein cross-links revealed that S7 cross-links to nucleotide U1321 of 16S rRNA. The careful consideration of the published RNA- protein cross-links for protein S7 within the 30S subunit and their correlation with the X-ray data for the 30S subunit have been performed. The RNA - protein cross-link within the binary complex identified in this study is not the same as the previously found cross-links for a subunit both in a solution, and in acrystal. The structure of the binary RNA-protein complex formed at the initial steps of self-assembly of the small subunit appears to be rearranged during the formation of the final structure of the subunit.

  11. Massively convergent evolution for ribosomal protein gene content in plastid and mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Maier, Uwe-G; Zauner, Stefan; Woehle, Christian; Bolte, Kathrin; Hempel, Franziska; Allen, John F; Martin, William F

    2013-01-01

    Plastid and mitochondrial genomes have undergone parallel evolution to encode the same functional set of genes. These encode conserved protein components of the electron transport chain in their respective bioenergetic membranes and genes for the ribosomes that express them. This highly convergent aspect of organelle genome evolution is partly explained by the redox regulation hypothesis, which predicts a separate plastid or mitochondrial location for genes encoding bioenergetic membrane proteins of either photosynthesis or respiration. Here we show that convergence in organelle genome evolution is far stronger than previously recognized, because the same set of genes for ribosomal proteins is independently retained by both plastid and mitochondrial genomes. A hitherto unrecognized selective pressure retains genes for the same ribosomal proteins in both organelles. On the Escherichia coli ribosome assembly map, the retained proteins are implicated in 30S and 50S ribosomal subunit assembly and initial rRNA binding. We suggest that ribosomal assembly imposes functional constraints that govern the retention of ribosomal protein coding genes in organelles. These constraints are subordinate to redox regulation for electron transport chain components, which anchor the ribosome to the organelle genome in the first place. As organelle genomes undergo reduction, the rRNAs also become smaller. Below size thresholds of approximately 1,300 nucleotides (16S rRNA) and 2,100 nucleotides (26S rRNA), all ribosomal protein coding genes are lost from organelles, while electron transport chain components remain organelle encoded as long as the organelles use redox chemistry to generate a proton motive force.

  12. Massively Convergent Evolution for Ribosomal Protein Gene Content in Plastid and Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Uwe-G; Zauner, Stefan; Woehle, Christian; Bolte, Kathrin; Hempel, Franziska; Allen, John F.; Martin, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Plastid and mitochondrial genomes have undergone parallel evolution to encode the same functional set of genes. These encode conserved protein components of the electron transport chain in their respective bioenergetic membranes and genes for the ribosomes that express them. This highly convergent aspect of organelle genome evolution is partly explained by the redox regulation hypothesis, which predicts a separate plastid or mitochondrial location for genes encoding bioenergetic membrane proteins of either photosynthesis or respiration. Here we show that convergence in organelle genome evolution is far stronger than previously recognized, because the same set of genes for ribosomal proteins is independently retained by both plastid and mitochondrial genomes. A hitherto unrecognized selective pressure retains genes for the same ribosomal proteins in both organelles. On the Escherichia coli ribosome assembly map, the retained proteins are implicated in 30S and 50S ribosomal subunit assembly and initial rRNA binding. We suggest that ribosomal assembly imposes functional constraints that govern the retention of ribosomal protein coding genes in organelles. These constraints are subordinate to redox regulation for electron transport chain components, which anchor the ribosome to the organelle genome in the first place. As organelle genomes undergo reduction, the rRNAs also become smaller. Below size thresholds of approximately 1,300 nucleotides (16S rRNA) and 2,100 nucleotides (26S rRNA), all ribosomal protein coding genes are lost from organelles, while electron transport chain components remain organelle encoded as long as the organelles use redox chemistry to generate a proton motive force. PMID:24259312

  13. [Study of the binding of the S7 protein with 16S rRNA fragment 926-986/1219-1393 as a key step in the assembly of the small subunit of prokaryotic ribosomes].

    PubMed

    Rassokhin, T I; Golovin, A V; Petrova, E B; Spiridonova, V A; Karginova, O A; Rozhdestvenskiĭ, T S; Brosius, J; Kopylov, A M

    2001-01-01

    Both structural and thermodynamic studies are necessary to understand the ribosome assembly. An initial step was made in studying the interaction between a 16S rRNA fragment and S7, a key protein in assembling the prokaryotic ribosome small subunit. The apparent dissociation constant was obtained for complexes of recombinant Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus S7 with a fragment of the 3' domain of the E. coli 16S rRNA. Both proteins showed a high rRNA-binding activity, which was not observed earlier. Since RNA and proteins are conformationally labile, their folding must be considered to correctly describe the RNA-protein interactions.

  14. Cell-free compartmentalized protein synthesis inside double emulsion templated liposomes with in vitro synthesized and assembled ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Caschera, Filippo; Lee, Jin Woo; Ho, Kenneth K Y; Liu, Allen P; Jewett, Michael C

    2016-04-07

    A cell-free expression platform for making bacterial ribosomes encapsulated within giant liposomes was capable of synthesizing sfGFP. The liposomes were prepared using a double emulsion template, and compartmentalized in vitro protein synthesis was analysed using spinning disk confocal microscopy. Two different liposome phospholipid formulations were investigated to characterize their effects on the compartmentalized reaction kinetics. This study was performed as a necessary step towards the synthesis of minimal cells.

  15. Discovery of a small molecule that inhibits bacterial ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Jonathan M; Davis, Joseph H; Mangat, Chand S; Williamson, James R; Brown, Eric D

    2014-01-01

    While small molecule inhibitors of the bacterial ribosome have been instrumental in understanding protein translation, no such probes exist to study ribosome biogenesis. We screened a diverse chemical collection that included previously approved drugs for compounds that induced cold sensitive growth inhibition in the model bacterium Escherichia coli. Among the most cold sensitive was lamotrigine, an anticonvulsant drug. Lamotrigine treatment resulted in the rapid accumulation of immature 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits at 15°C. Importantly, this was not the result of translation inhibition, as lamotrigine was incapable of perturbing protein synthesis in vivo or in vitro. Spontaneous suppressor mutations blocking lamotrigine activity mapped solely to the poorly characterized domain II of translation initiation factor IF2 and prevented the binding of lamotrigine to IF2 in vitro. This work establishes lamotrigine as a widely available chemical probe of bacterial ribosome biogenesis and suggests a role for E. coli IF2 in ribosome assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03574.001 PMID:25233066

  16. Ribosome recycling defects modify the balance between the synthesis and assembly of specific subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Jelena; Panozzo, Cristina; Bourand-Plantefol, Alexa; Herbert, Christopher J; Dujardin, Geneviève; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2016-07-08

    Mitochondria have their own translation machinery that produces key subunits of the OXPHOS complexes. This machinery relies on the coordinated action of nuclear-encoded factors of bacterial origin that are well conserved between humans and yeast. In humans, mutations in these factors can cause diseases; in yeast, mutations abolishing mitochondrial translation destabilize the mitochondrial DNA. We show that when the mitochondrial genome contains no introns, the loss of the yeast factors Mif3 and Rrf1 involved in ribosome recycling neither blocks translation nor destabilizes mitochondrial DNA. Rather, the absence of these factors increases the synthesis of the mitochondrially-encoded subunits Cox1, Cytb and Atp9, while strongly impairing the assembly of OXPHOS complexes IV and V. We further show that in the absence of Rrf1, the COX1 specific translation activator Mss51 accumulates in low molecular weight forms, thought to be the source of the translationally-active form, explaining the increased synthesis of Cox1. We propose that Rrf1 takes part in the coordination between translation and OXPHOS assembly in yeast mitochondria. These interactions between general and specific translation factors might reveal an evolutionary adaptation of the bacterial translation machinery to the set of integral membrane proteins that are translated within mitochondria. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Ribonuclease Sensitivity of Escherichia coli Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Santer, Melvin; Smith, Josephine R.

    1966-01-01

    Santer, Melvin (Haverford College, Haverford, Pa.), and Josephine R. Smith. Ribonuclease sensitivity of Escherichia coli ribosomes. J. Bacteriol. 92:1099–1110. 1966.—The ribonucleic acid (RNA) contained in 70S ribosomes and in 50S and 30S subunits was hydrolyzed by pancreatic ribonuclease. A 7% amount of the RNA was removed from the 70S particle; at 10−4m magnesium concentration, a maximum of 24 and 30% of the RNA in the 50S and the 30S fractions, respectively, was removed by ribonuclease. At the two lower magnesium ion concentrations, 50S ribosomes did not lose any protein, whereas 30S ribosomes lost protein as a result of ribonuclease treatment. A number of proteins were removed from the 30S particles by ribonuclease, and these proteins were antigenically related to proteins present in 50S ribosomes. The differential effect of ribonuclease on 50S and 30S ribosomes suggested that they have structural dissimilarities. Images PMID:5332866

  18. Simulating activity of the bacterial ribosome.

    PubMed

    Trylska, Joanna

    2009-11-01

    Computational modeling studies that investigate activity of the bacterial ribosome were reviewed. Computational approaches became possible with the availability of three-dimensional atomic resolution structures of the ribosomal subunits. However, due to the enormous size of the system, theoretical efforts to study the ribosome are few and challenging. For example, to extend the simulation timescales to biologically relevant ones, often, reduced models that require tedious parameterizations need to be applied. To that end, modeling of the ribosome focused on its internal dynamics, electrostatic properties, inhibition by antibiotics, polypeptide folding in the ribosome tunnel and assembly mechanisms driving the formation of the small ribosomal subunit.

  19. Ribosome biogenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Woolford, John L; Baserga, Susan J

    2013-11-01

    Ribosomes are highly conserved ribonucleoprotein nanomachines that translate information in the genome to create the proteome in all cells. In yeast these complex particles contain four RNAs (>5400 nucleotides) and 79 different proteins. During the past 25 years, studies in yeast have led the way to understanding how these molecules are assembled into ribosomes in vivo. Assembly begins with transcription of ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus, where the RNA then undergoes complex pathways of folding, coupled with nucleotide modification, removal of spacer sequences, and binding to ribosomal proteins. More than 200 assembly factors and 76 small nucleolar RNAs transiently associate with assembling ribosomes, to enable their accurate and efficient construction. Following export of preribosomes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, they undergo final stages of maturation before entering the pool of functioning ribosomes. Elaborate mechanisms exist to monitor the formation of correct structural and functional neighborhoods within ribosomes and to destroy preribosomes that fail to assemble properly. Studies of yeast ribosome biogenesis provide useful models for ribosomopathies, diseases in humans that result from failure to properly assemble ribosomes.

  20. Ribosome Biogenesis in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Woolford, John L.; Baserga, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomes are highly conserved ribonucleoprotein nanomachines that translate information in the genome to create the proteome in all cells. In yeast these complex particles contain four RNAs (>5400 nucleotides) and 79 different proteins. During the past 25 years, studies in yeast have led the way to understanding how these molecules are assembled into ribosomes in vivo. Assembly begins with transcription of ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus, where the RNA then undergoes complex pathways of folding, coupled with nucleotide modification, removal of spacer sequences, and binding to ribosomal proteins. More than 200 assembly factors and 76 small nucleolar RNAs transiently associate with assembling ribosomes, to enable their accurate and efficient construction. Following export of preribosomes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, they undergo final stages of maturation before entering the pool of functioning ribosomes. Elaborate mechanisms exist to monitor the formation of correct structural and functional neighborhoods within ribosomes and to destroy preribosomes that fail to assemble properly. Studies of yeast ribosome biogenesis provide useful models for ribosomopathies, diseases in humans that result from failure to properly assemble ribosomes. PMID:24190922

  1. The structure of Erb1-Ytm1 complex reveals the functional importance of a high-affinity binding between two β-propellers during the assembly of large ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Wegrecki, Marcin; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; de la Cruz, Jesús; Bravo, Jeronimo

    2015-12-15

    Ribosome biogenesis is one of the most essential pathways in eukaryotes although it is still not fully characterized. Given the importance of this process in proliferating cells, it is obvious that understanding the macromolecular details of the interactions that take place between the assembly factors, ribosomal proteins and nascent pre-rRNAs is essentially required for the development of new non-genotoxic treatments for cancer. Herein, we have studied the association between the WD40-repeat domains of Erb1 and Ytm1 proteins. These are essential factors for the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes that form a heterotrimeric complex together with the also essential Nop7 protein. We provide the crystal structure of a dimer formed by the C-terminal part of Erb1 and Ytm1 from Chaetomium thermophilum at 2.1 Å resolution. Using a multidisciplinary approach we show that the β-propeller domains of these proteins interact in a novel manner that leads to a high-affinity binding. We prove that a point mutation within the interface of the complex impairs the interaction between the two proteins and negatively affects growth and ribosome production in yeast. Our study suggests insights into the association of the Erb1-Ytm1 dimer with pre-ribosomal particles.

  2. The structure of Erb1-Ytm1 complex reveals the functional importance of a high-affinity binding between two β-propellers during the assembly of large ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Wegrecki, Marcin; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; de la Cruz, Jesús; Bravo, Jeronimo

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is one of the most essential pathways in eukaryotes although it is still not fully characterized. Given the importance of this process in proliferating cells, it is obvious that understanding the macromolecular details of the interactions that take place between the assembly factors, ribosomal proteins and nascent pre-rRNAs is essentially required for the development of new non-genotoxic treatments for cancer. Herein, we have studied the association between the WD40-repeat domains of Erb1 and Ytm1 proteins. These are essential factors for the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes that form a heterotrimeric complex together with the also essential Nop7 protein. We provide the crystal structure of a dimer formed by the C-terminal part of Erb1 and Ytm1 from Chaetomium thermophilum at 2.1 Å resolution. Using a multidisciplinary approach we show that the β-propeller domains of these proteins interact in a novel manner that leads to a high-affinity binding. We prove that a point mutation within the interface of the complex impairs the interaction between the two proteins and negatively affects growth and ribosome production in yeast. Our study suggests insights into the association of the Erb1-Ytm1 dimer with pre-ribosomal particles. PMID:26476442

  3. A new technique for the characterization of long-range tertiary contacts in large RNA molecules: insertion of a photolabel at a selected position in 16S rRNA within the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    PubMed Central

    Baranov, P V; Dokudovskaya, S S; Oretskaya, T S; Dontsova, O A; Bogdanov, A A; Brimacombe, R

    1997-01-01

    A new approach for inserting a photo-label at a selected position within the long ribosomal RNA molecules has been developed. The Escherichia coli 16S rRNA was cleaved at a single internucleotide bond, 1141-1142, with RNase H in the presence of a complementary chimeric oligonucleotide. 4-Thiouridine 5', 3'-diphosphate was ligated to the 3'-end of the 5'fragment at the cleavage site with T4 RNA ligase. The 16S rRNA fragments containing this added photo-reactive nucleotide were assembled together with total 30S ribosomal proteins into small ribosomal subunits. The ability of such 30S particles containing fragmented rRNA to form 70S ribosomes has been demonstrated previously. Crosslinks were induced within the 30S subunits by mild UV irradiation. The sites of crosslinking within the 16S rRNA were then analyzed using RNase H digestion and reverse transcription. Two crosslinks from the thio-nucleotide attached to nt C1141 of 16S rRNA were observed, namely to nt U1295 and G1272. These results are in agreement with the established proximity of helix 39 and 41 in the 3D structure of the 30S ribosomal subunit, as shown by other intra RNA crosslinking data. These data furthermore allow us to refine the structural arrangement of helices 41 and 39 relative to one another. PMID:9171076

  4. GTPases involved in bacterial ribosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Goto, Simon; Muto, Akira; Himeno, Hyouta

    2013-05-01

    The ribosome is an RNA- and protein-based macromolecule having multiple functional domains to facilitate protein synthesis, and it is synthesized through multiple steps including transcription, stepwise cleavages of the primary transcript, modifications of ribosomal proteins and RNAs and assemblies of ribosomal proteins with rRNAs. This process requires dozens of trans-acting factors including GTP- and ATP-binding proteins to overcome several energy-consuming steps. Despite accumulation of genetic, biochemical and structural data, the entire process of bacterial ribosome synthesis remains elusive. Here, we review GTPases involved in bacterial ribosome maturation.

  5. Dealing with stable structures at ribosome binding sites: bacterial translation and ribosome standby.

    PubMed

    Unoson, Cecilia; Wagner, E Gerhart H

    2007-11-01

    Bacterial ribosomes have great difficulties to initiate translation on stable structures within mRNAs. Translational coupling and induced structure changes are strategies to open up inhibitory RNA structures encompassing ribosome binding sites (RBS). There are, however, mRNAs in which stable structures are not unfolded, but that are nevertheless efficiently initiated at high rates. de Smit and van Duin(1) proposed a "ribosome standby" model to theoretically solve this paradox: the 30S ribosome binds nonspecifically to an accessible site on the mRNA (standby site), waiting for a transient opening of a stable RBS hairpin. Upon unfolding, the 30S subunit relocates to form a productive initiation complex. Recent reports have provided experimental support for this model. This review will describe and compare two different flavors of standby sites, their properties, and their likely implications. We also discuss the possibility that ribosome standby may be a more general strategy to obtain high translation rates.

  6. Hold on to your friends: Dedicated chaperones of ribosomal proteins: Dedicated chaperones mediate the safe transfer of ribosomal proteins to their site of pre-ribosome incorporation.

    PubMed

    Pillet, Benjamin; Mitterer, Valentin; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes are assembled from their components, the ribosomal RNAs and ribosomal proteins, in a tremendously complex, multi-step process, which primarily takes place in the nuclear compartment. Therefore, most ribosomal proteins have to travel from the cytoplasm to their incorporation site on pre-ribosomes within the nucleus. However, due to their particular characteristics, such as a highly basic amino acid composition and the presence of unstructured extensions, ribosomal proteins are especially prone to aggregation and degradation in their unassembled state, hence specific mechanisms must operate to ensure their safe delivery. Recent studies have uncovered a group of proteins, termed dedicated chaperones, specialized in accompanying and guarding individual ribosomal proteins. In this essay, we review how these dedicated chaperones utilize different folds to interact with their ribosomal protein clients and how they ensure their soluble expression and interconnect their intracellular transport with their efficient assembly into pre-ribosomes.

  7. Anti-peptide antibodies for examining the conformation, molecular assembly and localization of an intracellular protein, ribosomal protein S6, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masatoshi; Ohmido, Nobuko; Ishikawa, Katsumi; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fukui, Kiichi; Azuma, Takachika

    2008-03-01

    Ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) is known to relate to cell proliferation. Our recent proteome analysis of human metaphase chromosomes revealed the enrichment of rpS6 during mitosis. Here, structure, localization and molecular assembly in vitro and in vivo of a human rpS6, were examined using antibodies (Abs) prepared by immunizing rabbits with synthetic peptides. Five peptides, Ser6-Asp20 (S6-1), Ile52-Gly66 (S6-2), Asp103-Gly117 (S6-3), Asn146-Lys160 (S6-4) and Arg178-Ile192 (S6-5) were chosen as epitopes of human rpS6. These peptides except for S6-3 induced strong Ab production, and with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, anti-S6-2, anti-S6-4 and anti-S6-5, showed high reactivity to recombinant rpS6 (r-rpS6), while anti-S6-1 did not, suggesting that S6-2, S6-4 and S6-5 were exposed on the r-rpS6 surface, while S6-1 was less exposed or possessed a different conformation. The immunostaining of HeLa cells as well as isolated chromosomes suggested that rpS6 occurs in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but less possible on chromosomes since no Abs showed localization of rpS6 to chromosomes. In addition, the immunostaining suggested that only S6-4 is exposed on the protein surface, while S6-2 and S6-5 are buried by the interaction with other macromolecules in HeLa cells. Present our result shows new possibility of antibodies as tools for structure-oriented cell biology.

  8. [About the ribosomal biogenesis in human].

    PubMed

    Tafforeau, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes are cellular ribonucleoprotein particles required for a fundamental mechanism, translation of the genetic information into proteins. Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex pathway involving many maturation steps: ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, rRNA processing, pre-rRNA modifications, its assembly with ribosomal proteins in the nuceolus, export of the subunit precursors to the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm. Ribosome biogenesis has mainly being investigated in yeast during these last 25 years. However, recent works have shown that, despite many similarities between yeast and human ribosome structure and biogenesis, human pre-rRNA processing is far more complex than in yeast. In order to better understand diseases related to a malfunction in ribosome synthesis, the ribosomopathies, research should be conducted directly in human cells and animal models. © 2015 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  9. Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis at a glance.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Emma; Ferreira-Cerca, Sébastien; Hurt, Ed

    2013-11-01

    Ribosomes play a pivotal role in the molecular life of every cell. Moreover, synthesis of ribosomes is one of the most energetically demanding of all cellular processes. In eukaryotic cells, ribosome biogenesis requires the coordinated activity of all three RNA polymerases and the orchestrated work of many (>200) transiently associated ribosome assembly factors. The biogenesis of ribosomes is a tightly regulated activity and it is inextricably linked to other fundamental cellular processes, including growth and cell division. Furthermore, recent studies have demonstrated that defects in ribosome biogenesis are associated with several hereditary diseases. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we summarise the current knowledge on eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis, with an emphasis on the yeast model system.

  10. Identification of proteins important for tetracycline (TC) binding to ribosomes by single protein omission reconstitution (SPORE) experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, M.; Cooperman, B.S.

    1987-05-01

    TC inhibits protein synthesis in E. coli by interfering with aminoacyl-tRNA binding to the ribosomal A site, and there is strong evidence that such inhibition results from TC binding to a high affinity site on the 30S subunit. The SPORE approach has been used to define those 30S proteins that are potentially important for high affinity TC binding, measured as the (/sup 3/H)-TC co-sedimenting with the reconstitution particle through a sucrose density gradient. Reverse phase-HPLC has been used both to prepare ribosomal proteins and to analyze the protein content of reconstituted particles. The results obtained so far show that protein S7, as well as some proteins linked to S7 in the 30S assembly map, are important for TC binding, whereas other ribosomal proteins are not. These results are in very good accord with their earlier photoaffinity labeling studies that strongly implicated S7 as forming part of the TC binding site. Interestingly, protein S18, which is photolabeled by TC to a high extent but in a non-site specific manner, appears to be unimportant for TC binding.

  11. Characterization of hibernating ribosomes in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Mithu; Mullins, Michael R; Yuan, Celvie L; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Merrick, William C; Komar, Anton A

    2011-01-01

    Protein synthesis across kingdoms involves the assembly of 70S (prokaryotes) or 80S (eukaryotes) ribosomes on the mRNAs to be translated. 70S ribosomes are protected from degradation in bacteria during stationary growth or stress conditions by forming dimers that migrate in polysome profiles as 100S complexes. Formation of ribosome dimers in Escherichia coli is mediated by proteins, namely the ribosome modulation factor (RMF), which is induced in the stationary phase of cell growth. It is reported here a similar ribosomal complex of 110S in eukaryotic cells, which forms during nutrient starvation. The dynamic nature of the 110S ribosomal complex (mammalian equivalent of the bacterial 100S) was supported by the rapid conversion into polysomes upon nutrient-refeeding via a mechanism sensitive to inhibitors of translation initiation. Several experiments were used to show that the 110S complex is a dimer of nontranslating ribosomes. Cryo-electron microscopy visualization of the 110S complex revealed that two 80S ribosomes are connected by a flexible, albeit localized, interaction. We conclude that, similarly to bacteria, rat cells contain stress-induced ribosomal dimers. The identification of ribosomal dimers in rat cells will bring new insights in our thinking of the ribosome structure and its function during the cellular response to stress conditions. PMID:21768774

  12. Characterization of hibernating ribosomes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Krokowski, Dawid; Gaccioli, Francesca; Majumder, Mithu; Mullins, Michael R; Yuan, Celvie L; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Merrick, William C; Komar, Anton A; Taylor, Derek; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2011-08-15

    Protein synthesis across kingdoms involves the assembly of 70S (prokaryotes) or 80S (eukaryotes) ribosomes on the mRNAs to be translated. 70S ribosomes are protected from degradation in bacteria during stationary growth or stress conditions by forming dimers that migrate in polysome profiles as 100S complexes. Formation of ribosome dimers in Escherichia coli is mediated by proteins, namely the ribosome modulation factor (RMF), which is induced in the stationary phase of cell growth. It is reported here a similar ribosomal complex of 110S in eukaryotic cells, which forms during nutrient starvation. The dynamic nature of the 110S ribosomal complex (mammalian equivalent of the bacterial 100S) was supported by the rapid conversion into polysomes upon nutrient-refeeding via a mechanism sensitive to inhibitors of translation initiation. Several experiments were used to show that the 110S complex is a dimer of nontranslating ribosomes. Cryo-electron microscopy visualization of the 110S complex revealed that two 80S ribosomes are connected by a flexible, albeit localized, interaction. We conclude that, similarly to bacteria, rat cells contain stress-induced ribosomal dimers. The identification of ribosomal dimers in rat cells will bring new insights in our thinking of the ribosome structure and its function during the cellular response to stress conditions.

  13. Highly purified spermatozoal RNA obtained by a novel method indicates an unusual 28S/18S rRNA ratio and suggests impaired ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Cappallo-Obermann, Heike; Schulze, Wolfgang; Jastrow, Holger; Baukloh, Vera; Spiess, Andrej-Nikolai

    2011-11-01

    Human spermatozoal RNA features special characteristics such as a significantly reduced quantity within spermatozoa compared with somatic cells is described as being devoid of ribosomal RNAs and is difficult to isolate due to a massive excess of genomic DNA in the lysates. Using a novel two-round column-based protocol for human ejaculates delivering highly purified spermatozoal RNA, we uncovered a heterogeneous, but specific banding pattern in microelectrophoresis with 28S ribosomal RNA being indicative for the amount of round cell contamination. Ejaculates with different round cell quantities and density-purified spermatozoa revealed that 18S rRNA but not 28S rRNA is inherent to a pure spermatozoal fraction. Transmission electron microscopy showed monoribosomes and polyribosomes in spermatozoal cytoplasm, while immunohistochemical results suggest the presence of proteins from small and large ribosomal subunits in retained spermatozoal cytoplasm irrespective of 28S rRNA absence.

  14. Analysis of ribosome biogenesis factor-modules in yeast cells depleted from pre-ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Merl, Juliane; Jakob, Steffen; Ridinger, Katrin; Hierlmeier, Thomas; Deutzmann, Rainer; Milkereit, Philipp; Tschochner, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    Formation of eukaryotic ribosomes requires more than 150 biogenesis factors which transiently interact with the nascent ribosomal subunits. Previously, many pre-ribosomal intermediates could be distinguished by their protein composition and rRNA precursor (pre-rRNA) content. We purified complexes of ribosome biogenesis factors from yeast cells in which de novo synthesis of rRNA precursors was down-regulated by genetic means. We compared the protein composition of these largely pre-rRNA free assemblies with the one of analogous pre-ribosomal preparations by semi-quantitative mass spectrometry. The experimental setup minimizes the possibility that the analysed pre-rRNA free protein modules were derived from (partially) disrupted pre-ribosomal particles and provides thereby strong evidence for their pre-ribosome independent existence. In support of the validity of this approach (i) the predicted composition of the analysed protein modules was in agreement with previously described rRNA-free complexes and (ii) in most of the cases we could identify new candidate members of reported protein modules. An unexpected outcome of these analyses was that free large ribosomal subunits are associated with a specific set of ribosome biogenesis factors in cells where neo-production of nascent ribosomes was blocked. The data presented strengthen the idea that assembly of eukaryotic pre-ribosomal particles can result from transient association of distinct building blocks. PMID:20100801

  15. Identification of nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) as an interacting partner of plant ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) and a positive regulator of rDNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Shin, Yun-Jeong; Kim, Woo-Young; Koh, Hee-Jong; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2015-09-18

    The ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) is a downstream component of the signaling mediated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase that acts as a central regulator of the key metabolic processes, such as protein translation and ribosome biogenesis, in response to various environmental cues. In our previous study, we identified a novel role of plant RPS6, which negatively regulates rDNA transcription, forming a complex with a plant-specific histone deacetylase, AtHD2B. Here we report that the Arabidopsis RPS6 interacts additionally with a histone chaperone, nucleosome assembly protein 1(AtNAP1;1). The interaction does not appear to preclude the association of RPS6 with AtHD2B, as the AtNAP1 was also able to interact with AtHD2B as well as with an RPS6-AtHD2B fusion protein in the BiFC assay and pulldown experiment. Similar to a positive effect of the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) on rDNA transcription observed in this study, overexpression or down regulation of the AtNAP1;1 resulted in concomitant increase and decrease, respectively, in rDNA transcription suggesting a positive regulatory role played by AtNAP1 in plant rDNA transcription, possibly through derepression of the negative effect of the RPS6-AtHD2B complex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Distribution and diversity of ribosome binding sites in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Omotajo, Damilola; Tate, Travis; Cho, Hyuk; Choudhary, Madhusudan

    2015-08-14

    Prokaryotic translation initiation involves the proper docking, anchoring, and accommodation of mRNA to the 30S ribosomal subunit. Three initiation factors (IF1, IF2, and IF3) and some ribosomal proteins mediate the assembly and activation of the translation initiation complex. Although the interaction between Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence and its complementary sequence in the 16S rRNA is important in initiation, some genes lacking an SD ribosome binding site (RBS) are still well expressed. The objective of this study is to examine the pattern of distribution and diversity of RBS in fully sequenced bacterial genomes. The following three hypotheses were tested: SD motifs are prevalent in bacterial genomes; all previously identified SD motifs are uniformly distributed across prokaryotes; and genes with specific cluster of orthologous gene (COG) functions differ in their use of SD motifs. Data for 2,458 bacterial genomes, previously generated by Prodigal (PROkaryotic DYnamic programming Gene-finding ALgorithm) and currently available at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), were analyzed. Of the total genes examined, ~77.0% use an SD RBS, while ~23.0% have no RBS. Majority of the genes with the most common SD motifs are distributed in a manner that is representative of their abundance for each COG functional category, while motifs 13 (5'-GGA-3'/5'-GAG-3'/5'-AGG-3') and 27 (5'-AGGAGG-3') appear to be predominantly used by genes for information storage and processing, and translation and ribosome biogenesis, respectively. These findings suggest that an SD sequence is not obligatory for translation initiation; instead, other signals, such as the RBS spacer, may have an overarching influence on translation of mRNAs. Subsequent analyses of the 5' secondary structure of these mRNAs may provide further insight into the translation initiation mechanism.

  17. Dynamic reorganization of the functionally active ribosome explored by normal mode analysis and cryo-electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tama, Florence; Valle, Mikel; Frank, Joachim; Brooks, Charles L., III

    2003-08-01

    Combining structural data for the ribosome from x-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy with dynamic models based on elastic network normal mode analysis, an atomically detailed picture of functionally important structural rearrangements that occur during translocation is elucidated. The dynamic model provides a near-atomic description of the ratchet-like rearrangement of the 70S ribosome seen in cryo-electron microscopy, and permits the identification of bridging interactions that either facilitate the conformational switching or maintain structural integrity of the 50S/30S interface. Motions of the tRNAs residing in the A and P sites also suggest the early stages of tRNA translocation as a result of this ratchet-like movement. Displacement of the L1 stalk, alternately closing and opening the intersubunit space near the E site, is observed in the dynamic model, in line with growing experimental evidence for the role of this structural component in facilitating the exiting of tRNA. Finally, a hinge-like transition in the 30S ribosomal subunit, similar to that observed in crystal structures of this complex, is also manifest as a dynamic mode of the ribosome. The coincidence of these dynamic transitions with the individual normal modes of the ribosome and the good correspondence between these motions and those observed in experiment suggest an underlying principle of nature to exploit the shape of molecular assemblies such as the ribosome to provide robustness to functionally important motions. dynamical transitions | ratchet-like reorganization | translocation | molecular machines

  18. Mapping the interaction of SmpB with ribosomes by footprinting of ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Natalia; Pavlov, Michael Y.; Bouakaz, Elli; Ehrenberg, Måns; Schiavone, Lovisa Holmberg

    2005-01-01

    In trans-translation transfer messenger RNA (tmRNA) and small protein B (SmpB) rescue ribosomes stalled on truncated or in other ways problematic mRNAs. SmpB promotes the binding of tmRNA to the ribosome but there is uncertainty about the number of participating SmpB molecules as well as their ribosomal location. Here, the interaction of SmpB with ribosomal subunits and ribosomes was studied by isolation of SmpB containing complexes followed by chemical modification of ribosomal RNA with dimethyl sulfate, kethoxal and hydroxyl radicals. The results show that SmpB binds 30S and 50S subunits with 1:1 molar ratios and the 70S ribosome with 2:1 molar ratio. SmpB-footprints are similar on subunits and the ribosome. In the 30S subunit, SmpB footprints nucleotides that are in the vicinity of the P-site facing the E-site, and in the 50S subunit SmpB footprints nucleotides that are located below the L7/L12 stalk in the 3D structure of the ribosome. Based on these results, we suggest a mechanism where two molecules of SmpB interact with tmRNA and the ribosome during trans-translation. The first SmpB molecule binds near the factor-binding site on the 50S subunit helping tmRNA accommodation on the ribosome, whereas the second SmpB molecule may functionally substitute for a missing anticodon stem–loop in tmRNA during later steps of trans-translation. PMID:15972795

  19. Insights into the Mechanism of Ribosomal Incorporation of Mammalian L13a Protein during Ribosome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Priyanka; Basu, Abhijit; Biswas, Aditi; Poddar, Darshana; Andrews, Joel; Barik, Sailen; Komar, Anton A.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to prokaryotes, the precise mechanism of incorporation of ribosomal proteins into ribosomes in eukaryotes is not well understood. For the majority of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins, residues critical for rRNA binding, a key step in the hierarchical assembly of ribosomes, have not been well defined. In this study, we used the mammalian ribosomal protein L13a as a model to investigate the mechanism(s) underlying eukaryotic ribosomal protein incorporation into ribosomes. This work identified the arginine residue at position 68 of L13a as being essential for L13a binding to rRNA and incorporation into ribosomes. We also demonstrated that incorporation of L13a takes place during maturation of the 90S preribosome in the nucleolus, but that translocation of L13a into the nucleolus is not sufficient for its incorporation into ribosomes. Incorporation of L13a into the 90S preribosome was required for rRNA methylation within the 90S complex. However, mutations abolishing ribosomal incorporation of L13a did not affect its ability to be phosphorylated or its extraribosomal function in GAIT element-mediated translational silencing. These results provide new insights into the mechanism of ribosomal incorporation of L13a and will be useful in guiding future studies aimed at fully deciphering mammalian ribosome biogenesis. PMID:23689135

  20. Mitochondrial ribosomes in cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Maiti, Priyanka; Barrientos, Antoni

    2017-04-23

    Mitochondria play fundamental roles in the regulation of life and death of eukaryotic cells. They mediate aerobic energy conversion through the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system, and harbor and control the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. As a descendant of a bacterial endosymbiont, mitochondria retain a vestige of their original genome (mtDNA), and its corresponding full gene expression machinery. Proteins encoded in the mtDNA, all components of the multimeric OXPHOS enzymes, are synthesized in specialized mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes). Mitoribosomes are therefore essential in the regulation of cellular respiration. Additionally, an increasing body of literature has been reporting an alternative role for several mitochondrial ribosomal proteins as apoptosis-inducing factors. No surprisingly, the expression of genes encoding for mitoribosomal proteins, mitoribosome assembly factors and mitochondrial translation factors is modified in numerous cancers, a trait that has been linked to tumorigenesis and metastasis. In this article, we will review the current knowledge regarding the dual function of mitoribosome components in protein synthesis and apoptosis and their association with cancer susceptibility and development. We will also highlight recent developments in targeting mitochondrial ribosomes for the treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) as an interacting partner of plant ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) and a positive regulator of rDNA transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Shin, Yun-jeong; Kim, Woo-Young; Koh, Hee-Jong; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2015-09-18

    The ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) is a downstream component of the signaling mediated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase that acts as a central regulator of the key metabolic processes, such as protein translation and ribosome biogenesis, in response to various environmental cues. In our previous study, we identified a novel role of plant RPS6, which negatively regulates rDNA transcription, forming a complex with a plant-specific histone deacetylase, AtHD2B. Here we report that the Arabidopsis RPS6 interacts additionally with a histone chaperone, nucleosome assembly protein 1(AtNAP1;1). The interaction does not appear to preclude the association of RPS6 with AtHD2B, as the AtNAP1 was also able to interact with AtHD2B as well as with an RPS6-AtHD2B fusion protein in the BiFC assay and pulldown experiment. Similar to a positive effect of the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) on rDNA transcription observed in this study, overexpression or down regulation of the AtNAP1;1 resulted in concomitant increase and decrease, respectively, in rDNA transcription suggesting a positive regulatory role played by AtNAP1 in plant rDNA transcription, possibly through derepression of the negative effect of the RPS6-AtHD2B complex. - Highlights: • Nucleosome assembly protein 1 (AtNAP1) interacts with RPS6 as well as with AtHD2B. • rDNA transcription is regulated S6K1. • Overexpression or down regulation of AtNAP1 results in concomitant increase or decrease in rDNA transcription.

  2. The Crystal Structure of the Ubiquitin-like Domain of Ribosome Assembly Factor Ytm1 and Characterization of Its Interaction with the AAA-ATPase Midasin.

    PubMed

    Romes, Erin M; Sobhany, Mack; Stanley, Robin E

    2016-01-08

    The synthesis of eukaryotic ribosomes is a complex, energetically demanding process requiring the aid of numerous non-ribosomal factors, such as the PeBoW complex. The mammalian PeBoW complex, composed of Pes1, Bop1, and WDR12, is essential for the processing of the 32S preribosomal RNA. Previous work in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has shown that release of the homologous proteins in this complex (Nop7, Erb1, and Ytm1, respectively) from preribosomal particles requires Rea1 (midasin or MDN1 in humans), a large dynein-like protein. Midasin contains a C-terminal metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) domain that interacts with the N-terminal ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain of Ytm1/WDR12 as well as the UBL domain of Rsa4/Nle1 in a later step in the ribosome maturation pathway. Here we present the crystal structure of the UBL domain of the WDR12 homologue from S. cerevisiae at 1.7 Å resolution and demonstrate that human midasin binds to WDR12 as well as Nle1 through their respective UBL domains. Midasin contains a well conserved extension region upstream of the MIDAS domain required for binding WDR12 and Nle1, and the interaction is dependent upon metal ion coordination because removal of the metal or mutation of residues that coordinate the metal ion diminishes the interaction. Mammalian WDR12 displays prominent nucleolar localization that is dependent upon active ribosomal RNA transcription. Based upon these results, we propose that release of the PeBoW complex and subsequent release of Nle1 by midasin is a well conserved step in the ribosome maturation pathway in both yeast and mammalian cells.

  3. Challenges in describing ribosome dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Kien; Whitford, Paul Charles

    2017-04-01

    For decades, protein folding and functional dynamics have been described in terms of diffusive motion across an underlying energy landscape. With continued advances in structural biology and high-performance computing, the field is positioned to extend these approaches to large biomolecular assemblies. Through the application of energy landscape techniques to the ribosome, one may work towards establishing a comprehensive description of the dynamics, which will bridge theoretical concepts and experimental observations. In this perspective, we discuss a few of the challenges that will need to be addressed as we extend the application of landscape principles to the ribosome.

  4. Identification of Novel RNA-Protein Contact in Complex of Ribosomal Protein S7 and 3’-Terminal Fragment of 16S rRNA in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Golovin, A.V.; Khayrullina, G.A.; Kraal, B.; Kopylov, А.М.

    2012-01-01

    For prokaryotes in vitro, 16S rRNA and 20 ribosomal proteins are capable of hierarchical self- assembly yielding a 30S ribosomal subunit. The self-assembly is initiated by interactions between 16S rRNA and three key ribosomal proteins: S4, S8, and S7. These proteins also have a regulatory function in the translation of their polycistronic operons recognizing a specific region of mRNA. Therefore, studying the RNA–protein interactions within binary complexes is obligatory for understanding ribosome biogenesis. The non-conventional RNA–protein contact within the binary complex of recombinant ribosomal protein S7 and its 16S rRNA binding site (236 nucleotides) was identified. UV–induced RNA–protein cross-links revealed that S7 cross-links to nucleotide U1321 of 16S rRNA. The careful consideration of the published RNA– protein cross-links for protein S7 within the 30S subunit and their correlation with the X-ray data for the 30S subunit have been performed. The RNA – protein cross–link within the binary complex identified in this study is not the same as the previously found cross-links for a subunit both in a solution, and in acrystal. The structure of the binary RNA–protein complex formed at the initial steps of self-assembly of the small subunit appears to be rearranged during the formation of the final structure of the subunit. PMID:23346381

  5. SuhB Associates with Nus Factors To Facilitate 30S Ribosome Biogenesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Navjot; Bubunenko, Mikhail; Smith, Carol; Abbott, David M.; Stringer, Anne M.; Shi, Ronald; Court, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A complex of highly conserved proteins consisting of NusB, NusE, NusA, and NusG is required for robust expression of rRNA in Escherichia coli. This complex is proposed to prevent Rho-dependent transcription termination by a process known as “antitermination.” The mechanism of this antitermination in rRNA is poorly understood but requires association of NusB and NusE with a specific RNA sequence in rRNA known as BoxA. Here, we identify a novel member of the rRNA antitermination machinery: the inositol monophosphatase SuhB. We show that SuhB associates with elongating RNA polymerase (RNAP) at rRNA in a NusB-dependent manner. Although we show that SuhB is required for BoxA-mediated antitermination in a reporter system, our data indicate that the major function of the NusB/E/A/G/SuhB complex is not to prevent Rho-dependent termination of rRNA but rather to promote correct rRNA maturation. This occurs through formation of a SuhB-mediated loop between NusB/E/BoxA and RNAP/NusA/G. Thus, we have reassigned the function of these proteins at rRNA and identified another key player in this complex. PMID:26980831

  6. [Study of the surface of Escherichia coli ribosomes and ribosomal particles by the tritium bombardment method].

    PubMed

    Iusupov, M M; Spirin, A S

    1986-11-01

    A new technique of atomic tritium bombardment has been used to study the surface topography of Escherichia coli ribosomes and ribosomal subunits. The technique provides for the labeling of proteins exposed on the surface of ribosomal particles, the extent of protein labeling being proportional to the degree of exposure. The following proteins were considerably tritiated in the 70S ribosomes: S1, S4, S7, S9 and/or S11, S12 and/or L20, S13, S18, S20, S21, L1, L5, L6, L7/L12, L10, L11, L16, L17, L24, L26 and L27. A conclusion is drawn that these proteins are exposed on the ribosome surface to an essentially greater extent than the others. Dissociation of 70S ribosomes into the ribosomal subunits by decreasing Mg2+ concentration does not lead to the exposure of additional ribosomal proteins. This implies that there are no proteins on the contacting surfaces of the subunits. However, if a mixture of subunits has been subjected to centrifugation in a low Mg2+ concentration at high concentrations of a monovalent cation, proteins S3, S5, S7, S14, S18 and L16 are more exposed on the surface of the isolated 30S and 50S subunits than in the subunit mixture or in the 70S ribosomes. The exposure of additional proteins is explained by distortion of the native quaternary structure of ribosomal subunits as a result of the separation procedure. Reassociation of isolated subunits at high Mg2+ concentration results in shielding of proteins S3, S5, S7 and S18 and can be explained by reconstitution of the intact 30S subunit structure.

  7. On the pathway of ribosomal translocation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2016-11-01

    The translocation of tRNAs coupled with mRNA in the ribosome is a critical process in the elongation cycle of protein synthesis. The translocation entails large-scale conformational changes of the ribosome and involves several intermediate states with tRNAs in different positions with respect to 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits. However, the detailed role of the intermediate states is unknown and the detailed mechanism and pathway of translocation is unclear. Here based on previous structural, biochemical and single-molecule data we present a translocation pathway by incorporating several intermediate states. With the pathway, we study theoretically (i) the kinetics of 30S head rotation associated with translocation catalyzed by wild-type EF-G, (ii) the dynamics of fluctuations between different tRNA states during translocation interfered with EF-G mutants and translocation-specific antibiotics, (iii) the kinetics of tRNA movement in 50S subunit and mRNA movement in 30S subunit in the presence of wild-type EF-G, EF-G mutants and translocation-specific antibiotics, (iv) the dynamics of EF-G sampling to the ribosome during translocation, etc., providing consistent and quantitative explanations of various available biochemical and single-molecule experimental data published in the literature. Moreover, we study the kinetics of 30S head rotation in the presence of EF-G mutants, providing predicted results. These have significant implications for the molecular mechanism and pathway of ribosomal translocation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Chloroplast ribosomes and protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, E H; Boynton, J E; Gillham, N W

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with their postulated origin from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria, chloroplasts of plants and algae have ribosomes whose component RNAs and proteins are strikingly similar to those of eubacteria. Comparison of the secondary structures of 16S rRNAs of chloroplasts and bacteria has been particularly useful in identifying highly conserved regions likely to have essential functions. Comparative analysis of ribosomal protein sequences may likewise prove valuable in determining their roles in protein synthesis. This review is concerned primarily with the RNAs and proteins that constitute the chloroplast ribosome, the genes that encode these components, and their expression. It begins with an overview of chloroplast genome structure in land plants and algae and then presents a brief comparison of chloroplast and prokaryotic protein-synthesizing systems and a more detailed analysis of chloroplast rRNAs and ribosomal proteins. A description of the synthesis and assembly of chloroplast ribosomes follows. The review concludes with discussion of whether chloroplast protein synthesis is essential for cell survival. PMID:7854253

  9. Structure of ERA in Complex with the 3 End of 16s rRNBA Implications for Ribosome Biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, C.; Zhou, X; Tropea, J; Austin, B; Waugh, D; Court, D; Ji, X

    2009-01-01

    ERA, composed of an N-terminal GTPase domain followed by an RNA-binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal subunit. However, its RNA-binding site, the functional relationship between the two domains, and its role in ribosome biogenesis remain unclear. We have determined two crystal structures of ERA, a binary complex with GDP and a ternary complex with a GTP-analog and the 1531AUCACCUCCUUA1542 sequence at the 3? end of 16S rRNA. In the ternary complex, the first nine of the 12 nucleotides are recognized by the protein. We show that GTP binding is a prerequisite for RNA recognition by ERA and that RNA recognition stimulates its GTP-hydrolyzing activity. Based on these and other data, we propose a functional cycle of ERA, suggesting that the protein serves as a chaperone for processing and maturation of 16S rRNA and a checkpoint for assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The AUCA sequence is highly conserved among bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, whereas the CCUCC, known as the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence, is conserved in noneukaryotes only. Therefore, these data suggest a common mechanism for a highly conserved ERA function in all three kingdoms of life by recognizing the AUCA, with a 'twist' for noneukaryotic ERA proteins by also recognizing the CCUCC.

  10. Structure of ERA in complex with the 3′ end of 16S rRNA: Implications for ribosome biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Chao; Zhou, Xiaomei; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Waugh, David S.; Court, Donald L.; Ji, Xinhua

    2009-10-09

    ERA, composed of an N-terminal GTPase domain followed by an RNA-binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal subunit. However, its RNA-binding site, the functional relationship between the two domains, and its role in ribosome biogenesis remain unclear. We have determined two crystal structures of ERA, a binary complex with GDP and a ternary complex with a GTP-analog and the {sub 1531}AUCACCUCCUUA{sub 1542} sequence at the 3' end of 16S rRNA. In the ternary complex, the first nine of the 12 nucleotides are recognized by the protein. We show that GTP binding is a prerequisite for RNA recognition by ERA and that RNA recognition stimulates its GTP-hydrolyzing activity. Based on these and other data, we propose a functional cycle of ERA, suggesting that the protein serves as a chaperone for processing and maturation of 16S rRNA and a checkpoint for assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The AUCA sequence is highly conserved among bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, whereas the CCUCC, known as the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence, is conserved in noneukaryotes only. Therefore, these data suggest a common mechanism for a highly conserved ERA function in all three kingdoms of life by recognizing the AUCA, with a 'twist' for noneukaryotic ERA proteins by also recognizing the CCUCC.

  11. Two trypanosome-specific proteins are essential factors for 5S rRNA abundance and ribosomal assembly in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Hellman, Kristina M; Ciganda, Martin; Brown, Silvia V; Li, Jinlei; Ruyechan, William; Williams, Noreen

    2007-10-01

    We have previously identified and characterized two novel nuclear RNA binding proteins, p34 and p37, which have been shown to bind 5S rRNA in Trypanosoma brucei. These two proteins are nearly identical, with one major difference, an 18-amino-acid insert in the N-terminal region of p37, as well as three minor single-amino-acid differences. Homologues to p34 and p37 have been found only in other trypanosomatids, suggesting that these proteins are unique to this ancient family. We have employed RNA interference (RNAi) studies in order to gain further insight into the interaction between p34 and p37 with 5S rRNA in T. brucei. In our p34/p37 RNAi cells, decreased expression of the p34 and p37 proteins led to morphological alterations, including loss of cell shape and vacuolation, as well as to growth arrest and ultimately to cell death. Disruption of a higher-molecular-weight complex containing 5S rRNA occurs as well as a dramatic decrease in 5S rRNA levels, suggesting that p34 and p37 serve to stabilize 5S rRNA. In addition, an accumulation of 60S ribosomal subunits was observed, accompanied by a significant decrease in overall protein synthesis within p34/p37 RNAi cells. Thus, the loss of the trypanosomatid-specific proteins p34 and p37 correlates with a diminution in 5S rRNA levels as well as a decrease in ribosome activity and an alteration in ribosome biogenesis.

  12. Synthesis of ribosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, J R

    1989-01-01

    The assembly of a eucaryotic ribosome requires the synthesis of four ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules and more than 75 ribosomal proteins. It utilizes all three RNA polymerases; it requires the cooperation of the nucleus and the cytoplasm, the processing of RNA, and the specific interaction of RNA and protein molecules. It is carried out efficiently and is exquisitely sensitive to the needs of the cell. Our current understanding of this process in the genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reviewed. The ribosomal RNA genes are arranged in a tandem array of 100 to 200 copies. This tandem array has led to unique ways of carrying out a number of functions. Replication is asymmetric and does not initiate from every autonomously replicating sequence. Recombination is suppressed. Transcription of the major ribosomal RNA appears to involve coupling between adjacent transcription units, which are separated by the 5S RNA transcription unit. Genes for many ribosomal proteins have been cloned and sequenced. Few are linked; most are duplicated; most have an intron. There is extensive homology between yeast ribosomal proteins and those of other species. Most, but not all, of the ribosomal protein genes have one or two sites that are essential for their transcription and that bind a common transcription factor. This factor binds also to many other places in the genome, including the telomeres. There is coordinated transcription of the ribosomal protein genes under a variety of conditions. However, the cell seems to possess no mechanism for regulating the transcription of individual ribosomal protein genes in response either to a deficiency or an excess of a particular ribosomal protein. A deficiency causes slow growth. Any excess ribosomal protein is degraded very rapidly, with a half-life of 1 to 5 min. Unlike most types of cells, yeast cells appear not to regulate the translation of ribosomal proteins. However, in the case of ribosomal protein L32

  13. The Bowen-Conradi syndrome protein Nep1 (Emg1) has a dual role in eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis, as an essential assembly factor and in the methylation of Ψ1191 in yeast 18S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Britta; Wurm, Jan Philip; Kötter, Peter; Leisegang, Matthias S; Schilling, Valeska; Buchhaupt, Markus; Held, Martin; Bahr, Ute; Karas, Michael; Heckel, Alexander; Bohnsack, Markus T; Wöhnert, Jens; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2011-03-01

    The Nep1 (Emg1) SPOUT-class methyltransferase is an essential ribosome assembly factor and the human Bowen-Conradi syndrome (BCS) is caused by a specific Nep1(D86G) mutation. We recently showed in vitro that Methanocaldococcus jannaschii Nep1 is a sequence-specific pseudouridine-N1-methyltransferase. Here, we show that in yeast the in vivo target site for Nep1-catalyzed methylation is located within loop 35 of the 18S rRNA that contains the unique hypermodification of U1191 to 1-methyl-3-(3-amino-3-carboxypropyl)-pseudouri-dine (m1acp3Ψ). Specific (14)C-methionine labelling of 18S rRNA in yeast mutants showed that Nep1 is not required for acp-modification but suggested a function in Ψ1191 methylation. ESI MS analysis of acp-modified Ψ-nucleosides in a Δnep1-mutant showed that Nep1 catalyzes the Ψ1191 methylation in vivo. Remarkably, the restored growth of a nep1-1(ts) mutant upon addition of S-adenosylmethionine was even observed after preventing U1191 methylation in a Δsnr35 mutant. This strongly suggests a dual Nep1 function, as Ψ1191-methyltransferase and ribosome assembly factor. Interestingly, the Nep1 methyltransferase activity is not affected upon introduction of the BCS mutation. Instead, the mutated protein shows enhanced dimerization propensity and increased affinity for its RNA-target in vitro. Furthermore, the BCS mutation prevents nucleolar accumulation of Nep1, which could be the reason for reduced growth in yeast and the Bowen-Conradi syndrome.

  14. Cryo-EM structure of the spinach chloroplast ribosome reveals the location of plastid-specific ribosomal proteins and extensions.

    PubMed

    Graf, Michael; Arenz, Stefan; Huter, Paul; Dönhöfer, Alexandra; Nováček, Jiří; Wilson, Daniel N

    2016-12-15

    Ribosomes are the protein synthesizing machines of the cell. Recent advances in cryo-EM have led to the determination of structures from a variety of species, including bacterial 70S and eukaryotic 80S ribosomes as well as mitoribosomes from eukaryotic mitochondria, however, to date high resolution structures of plastid 70S ribosomes have been lacking. Here we present a cryo-EM structure of the spinach chloroplast 70S ribosome, with an average resolution of 5.4 Å for the small 30S subunit and 3.6 Å for the large 50S ribosomal subunit. The structure reveals the location of the plastid-specific ribosomal proteins (RPs) PSRP1, PSRP4, PSRP5 and PSRP6 as well as the numerous plastid-specific extensions of the RPs. We discover many features by which the plastid-specific extensions stabilize the ribosome via establishing additional interactions with surrounding ribosomal RNA and RPs. Moreover, we identify a large conglomerate of plastid-specific protein mass adjacent to the tunnel exit site that could facilitate interaction of the chloroplast ribosome with the thylakoid membrane and the protein-targeting machinery. Comparing the Escherichia coli 70S ribosome with that of the spinach chloroplast ribosome provides detailed insight into the co-evolution of RP and rRNA.

  15. Functional analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal protein Rpl3p in ribosome synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Iván V.; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2007-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis in eukaryotes requires a multitude of trans-acting factors. These factors act at many steps as the pre-ribosomal particles travel from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm. In contrast to the well-studied trans-acting factors, little is known about the contribution of the ribosomal proteins to ribosome biogenesis. Herein, we have analysed the role of ribosomal protein Rpl3p in 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. In vivo depletion of Rpl3p results in a deficit in 60S ribosomal subunits and the appearance of half-mer polysomes. This phenotype is likely due to the instability of early and intermediate pre-ribosomal particles, as evidenced by the low steady-state levels of 27SA3, 27SBS and 7SL/S precursors. Furthermore, depletion of Rpl3p impairs the nucleocytoplasmic export of pre-60S ribosomal particles. Interestingly, flow cytometry analysis indicates that Rpl3p-depleted cells arrest in the G1 phase. Altogether, we suggest that upon depletion of Rpl3p, early assembly of 60S ribosomal subunits is aborted and subsequent steps during their maturation and export prevented. PMID:17569673

  16. Structure of Ribosomal Silencing Factor Bound to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojun; Sun, Qingan; Jiang, Cai; Yang, Kailu; Hung, Li-Wei; Zhang, Junjie; Sacchettini, James C

    2015-10-06

    The ribosomal silencing factor RsfS slows cell growth by inhibiting protein synthesis during periods of diminished nutrient availability. The crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) RsfS, together with the cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structure of the large subunit 50S of Mtb ribosome, reveals how inhibition of protein synthesis by RsfS occurs. RsfS binds to the 50S at L14, which, when occupied, blocks the association of the small subunit 30S. Although Mtb RsfS is a dimer in solution, only a single subunit binds to 50S. The overlap between the dimer interface and the L14 binding interface confirms that the RsfS dimer must first dissociate to a monomer in order to bind to L14. RsfS interacts primarily through electrostatic and hydrogen bonding to L14. The EM structure shows extended rRNA density that it is not found in the Escherichia coli ribosome, the most striking of these being the extended RNA helix of H54a.

  17. Reductive alkylation of ribosomes as a probe to the topography of ribosomal proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Graham; Crichton, Robert R.

    1974-01-01

    Escherichia coli ribosomes were treated with a number of different aldehydes of various sizes in the presence of NaBH4. After incorporation of either 3H or 14C, the ribosomal proteins were separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and the extent of alkylation of the lysine residues in each protein was measured. The same pattern of alkylation was observed with the four reagents used, namely formaldehyde, acetone, benzaldehyde and 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzaldehyde. Every protein in 30S and 50S subunits was modified, although there was considerable variation in the degree of alkylation of individual proteins. A topographical classification of ribosomal proteins is presented, based on the degree of exposure of lysine residues. The data indicate that every protein of the ribosome has at least one lysine residue exposed at or near the surface of the ribonucleo-protein complex. PMID:4462744

  18. Atomic mutagenesis at the ribosomal decoding site.

    PubMed

    Schrode, Pius; Huter, Paul; Clementi, Nina; Erlacher, Matthias

    2017-01-02

    Ribosomal decoding is an essential process in every living cell. During protein synthesis the 30S ribosomal subunit needs to accomplish binding and accurate decoding of mRNAs. From mutational studies and high-resolution crystal structures nucleotides G530, A1492 and A1493 of the 16S rRNA came into focus as important elements for the decoding process. Recent crystallographic data challenged the so far accepted model for the decoding mechanism. To biochemically investigate decoding in greater detail we applied an in vitro reconstitution approach to modulate single chemical groups at A1492 and A1493. The modified ribosomes were subsequently tested for their ability to efficiently decode the mRNA. Unexpectedly, the ribosome was rather tolerant toward modifications of single groups either at the base or at the sugar moiety in terms of translation activity. Concerning translation fidelity, the elimination of single chemical groups involved in a hydrogen bonding network between the tRNA, mRNA and rRNA did not change the accuracy of the ribosome. These results indicate that the contribution of those chemical groups and the formed hydrogen bonds are not crucial for ribosomal decoding.

  19. Atomic mutagenesis at the ribosomal decoding site

    PubMed Central

    Schrode, Pius; Huter, Paul; Clementi, Nina; Erlacher, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ribosomal decoding is an essential process in every living cell. During protein synthesis the 30S ribosomal subunit needs to accomplish binding and accurate decoding of mRNAs. From mutational studies and high-resolution crystal structures nucleotides G530, A1492 and A1493 of the 16S rRNA came into focus as important elements for the decoding process. Recent crystallographic data challenged the so far accepted model for the decoding mechanism. To biochemically investigate decoding in greater detail we applied an in vitro reconstitution approach to modulate single chemical groups at A1492 and A1493. The modified ribosomes were subsequently tested for their ability to efficiently decode the mRNA. Unexpectedly, the ribosome was rather tolerant toward modifications of single groups either at the base or at the sugar moiety in terms of translation activity. Concerning translation fidelity, the elimination of single chemical groups involved in a hydrogen bonding network between the tRNA, mRNA and rRNA did not change the accuracy of the ribosome. These results indicate that the contribution of those chemical groups and the formed hydrogen bonds are not crucial for ribosomal decoding. PMID:27841727

  20. A recent intermezzo at the Ribosome Club.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Liljas, Anders; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2017-03-19

    Two sets of ribosome structures have recently led to two different interpretations of what limits the accuracy of codon translation by transfer RNAs. In this review, inspired by this intermezzo at the Ribosome Club, we briefly discuss accuracy amplification by energy driven proofreading and its implementation in genetic code translation. We further discuss general ways by which the monitoring bases of 16S rRNA may enhance the ultimate accuracy (d-values) and how the codon translation accuracy is reduced by the actions of Mg(2+) ions and the presence of error inducing aminoglycoside antibiotics. We demonstrate that complete freezing-in of cognate-like tautomeric states of ribosome-bound nucleotide bases in transfer RNA or messenger RNA is not compatible with recent experiments on initial codon selection by transfer RNA in ternary complex with elongation factor Tu and GTP. From these considerations, we suggest that the sets of 30S subunit structures from the Ramakrishnan group and 70S structures from the Yusupov/Yusupova group may, after all, reflect two sides of the same coin and how the structurally based intermezzo at the Ribosome Club may be resolved simply by taking the dynamic aspects of ribosome function into account.This article is part of the themed issue 'Perspectives on the ribosome'.

  1. {sup 30}S Beam Development and X-ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.; Binh, D. N.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Ohshiro, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Chen, A. A.; Chen, J.; Setoodeh nia, K.; Kaji, D.; Nishimura, S.; Kim, A.; Lee, N. H.; Wakabayashi, Y.

    2010-03-01

    Over the past three years, we have worked on developing a well-characterized {sup 30}S radioactive beam to be used in a future experiment aiming to directly measure to extrapolate the {sup 30}S(alpha,p) stellar reaction rate within the Gamow window of Type I X-ray bursts. The importance of the {sup 30}S(alpha,p) reaction to X-ray bursts is discussed. Given the astrophysical motivation, the successful results of and challenges involved in the production of a low-energy {sup 30}S beam are detailed. Finally, an overview of our future plans regarding this on-going project are presented.

  2. Resonance assignment of the ribosome binding domain of E. coli ribosomal protein S1.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Pierre; Créchet, Jean-Bernard; Uzan, Marc; Bontems, François; Sizun, Christina

    2015-04-01

    Ribosomal protein S1 is an essential actor for protein synthesis in Escherichia coli. It is involved in mRNA recruitment by the 30S ribosomal subunit and recognition of the correct start codon during translation initiation. E. coli S1 is a modular protein that contains six repeats of an S1 motif, which have distinct functions despite structural homology. Whereas the three central repeats have been shown to be involved in mRNA recognition, the two first repeats that constitute the N-terminal domain of S1 are responsible for binding to the 30S subunit. Here we report the almost complete (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignment of two fragments of the 30S binding region of S1. The first fragment comprises only the first repeat. The second corresponds to the entire ribosome binding domain. Since S1 is absent from all high resolution X-ray structures of prokaryotic ribosomes, these data provide a first step towards atomic level structural characterization of this domain by NMR. Chemical shift analysis of the first repeat provides evidence for structural divergence from the canonical OB-fold of an S1 motif. In contrast the second domain displays the expected topology for an S1 motif, which rationalizes the functional specialization of the two subdomains.

  3. Conformational Response of 30S-bound IF3 to A-Site Binders Streptomycin and Kanamycin.

    PubMed

    Chulluncuy, Roberto; Espiche, Carlos; Nakamoto, Jose Alberto; Fabbretti, Attilio; Milón, Pohl

    2016-12-13

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are widely used to treat infectious diseases. Among them, streptomycin and kanamycin (and derivatives) are of importance to battle multidrug-resistant (MDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Both drugs bind the small ribosomal subunit (30S) and inhibit protein synthesis. Genetic, structural, and biochemical studies indicate that local and long-range conformational rearrangements of the 30S subunit account for this inhibition. Here, we use intramolecular FRET between the C- and N-terminus domains of the flexible IF3 to monitor real-time perturbations of their binding sites on the 30S platform. Steady and pre-steady state binding experiments show that both aminoglycosides bring IF3 domains apart, promoting an elongated state of the factor. Binding of Initiation Factor IF1 triggers closure of IF3 bound to the 30S complex, while both aminoglycosides revert the IF1-dependent conformation. Our results uncover dynamic perturbations across the 30S subunit, from the A-site to the platform, and suggest that both aminoglycosides could interfere with prokaryotic translation initiation by modulating the interaction between IF3 domains with the 30S platform.

  4. Conformational Response of 30S-bound IF3 to A-Site Binders Streptomycin and Kanamycin

    PubMed Central

    Chulluncuy, Roberto; Espiche, Carlos; Nakamoto, Jose Alberto; Fabbretti, Attilio; Milón, Pohl

    2016-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are widely used to treat infectious diseases. Among them, streptomycin and kanamycin (and derivatives) are of importance to battle multidrug-resistant (MDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Both drugs bind the small ribosomal subunit (30S) and inhibit protein synthesis. Genetic, structural, and biochemical studies indicate that local and long-range conformational rearrangements of the 30S subunit account for this inhibition. Here, we use intramolecular FRET between the C- and N-terminus domains of the flexible IF3 to monitor real-time perturbations of their binding sites on the 30S platform. Steady and pre-steady state binding experiments show that both aminoglycosides bring IF3 domains apart, promoting an elongated state of the factor. Binding of Initiation Factor IF1 triggers closure of IF3 bound to the 30S complex, while both aminoglycosides revert the IF1-dependent conformation. Our results uncover dynamic perturbations across the 30S subunit, from the A-site to the platform, and suggest that both aminoglycosides could interfere with prokaryotic translation initiation by modulating the interaction between IF3 domains with the 30S platform. PMID:27983590

  5. RIBOSOME-MEMBRANE INTERACTION

    PubMed Central

    Adelman, M. R.; Sabatini, David D.; Blobel, Günter

    1973-01-01

    In a medium of high ionic strength, rat liver rough microsomes can be nondestructively disassembled into ribosomes and stripped membranes if nascent polypeptides are discharged from the bound ribosomes by reaction with puromycin. At 750 mM KCl, 5 mM MgCl2, 50 mM Tris·HCl, pH 7 5, up to 85% of all bound ribosomes are released from the membranes after incubation at room temperature with 1 mM puromycin. The ribosomes are released as subunits which are active in peptide synthesis if programmed with polyuridylic acid. The ribosome-denuded, or stripped, rough microsomes (RM) can be recovered as intact, essentially unaltered membranous vesicles Judging from the incorporation of [3H]puromycin into hot acid-insoluble material and from the release of [3H]leucine-labeled nascent polypeptide chains from bound ribosomes, puromycin coupling occurs almost as well at low (25–100 mM) as at high (500–1000 mM) KCl concentrations. Since puromycin-dependent ribosome release only occurs at high ionic strength, it appears that ribosomes are bound to membranes via two types of interactions: a direct one between the membrane and the large ribosomal subunit (labile at high KCl concentration) and an indirect one in which the nascent chain anchors the ribosome to the membrane (puromycin labile). The nascent chains of ribosomes specifically released by puromycin remain tightly associated with the stripped membranes. Some membrane-bound ribosomes (up to 40%) can be nondestructively released in high ionic strength media without puromycin; these appear to consist of a mixture of inactive ribosomes and ribosomes containing relatively short nascent chains. A fraction (∼15%) of the bound ribosomes can only be released from membranes by exposure of RM to ionic conditions which cause extensive unfolding of ribosomal subunits, the nature and significance of these ribosomes is not clear. PMID:4682341

  6. Isolation of Mitochondrial Ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Adam J

    2017-01-01

    Translation of mitochondrial encoded mRNAs by mitochondrial ribosomes is thought to play a major role in regulating the expression of mitochondrial proteins. However, the structure and function of plant mitochondrial ribosomes remains poorly understood. To study mitochondrial ribosomes, it is necessary to separate them from plastidic and cytosolic ribosomes that are generally present at much higher concentrations. Here, a straight forward protocol for the preparation of fractions highly enriched in mitochondrial ribosomes from plant cells is described. The method begins with purification of mitochondria followed by mitochondrial lysis and ultracentrifugation of released ribosomes through sucrose cushions and gradients. Dark-grown Arabidopsis cells were used in this example because of the ease with which good yields of pure mitochondria can be obtained from them. However, the steps for isolation of ribosomes from mitochondria could be applied to mitochondria obtained from other sources. Proteomic analyses of resulting fractions have confirmed strong enrichment of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins.

  7. Protein synthesis by ribosomes with tethered subunits.

    PubMed

    Orelle, Cédric; Carlson, Erik D; Szal, Teresa; Florin, Tanja; Jewett, Michael C; Mankin, Alexander S

    2015-08-06

    The ribosome is a ribonucleoprotein machine responsible for protein synthesis. In all kingdoms of life it is composed of two subunits, each built on its own ribosomal RNA (rRNA) scaffold. The independent but coordinated functions of the subunits, including their ability to associate at initiation, rotate during elongation, and dissociate after protein release, are an established model of protein synthesis. Furthermore, the bipartite nature of the ribosome is presumed to be essential for biogenesis, since dedicated assembly factors keep immature ribosomal subunits apart and prevent them from translation initiation. Free exchange of the subunits limits the development of specialized orthogonal genetic systems that could be evolved for novel functions without interfering with native translation. Here we show that ribosomes with tethered and thus inseparable subunits (termed Ribo-T) are capable of successfully carrying out protein synthesis. By engineering a hybrid rRNA composed of both small and large subunit rRNA sequences, we produced a functional ribosome in which the subunits are covalently linked into a single entity by short RNA linkers. Notably, Ribo-T was not only functional in vitro, but was also able to support the growth of Escherichia coli cells even in the absence of wild-type ribosomes. We used Ribo-T to create the first fully orthogonal ribosome-messenger RNA system, and demonstrate its evolvability by selecting otherwise dominantly lethal rRNA mutations in the peptidyl transferase centre that facilitate the translation of a problematic protein sequence. Ribo-T can be used for exploring poorly understood functions of the ribosome, enabling orthogonal genetic systems, and engineering ribosomes with new functions.

  8. The Ribosome Filter Redux

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Vincent P.; Edelman, Gerald M.

    2010-01-01

    The ribosome filter hypothesis postulates that ribosomes are not simply translation machines but also function as regulatory elements that differentially affect or filter the translation of particular mRNAs. On the basis of new information, we take the opportunity here to review the ribosome filter hypothesis, suggest specific mechanisms of action, and discuss recent examples from the literature that support it. PMID:17890902

  9. Illuminating parasite protein production by ribosome profiling

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Marilyn; Myler, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    While technologies for global enumeration of transcript abundance are well-developed, those that assess protein abundance require tailoring to penetrate to low abundance proteins. Ribosome profiling circumvents this challenge by measuring global protein production via sequencing small mRNA fragments protected by the assembled ribosome. This powerful approach is now being applied to protozoan parasites, including trypanosomes and Plasmodium. It has been used to identify new protein coding sequences (CDSs) and clarify the boundaries of previously annotated CDSs in Trypanosoma brucei. Ribosome profiling has demonstrated that translation efficiencies vary widely between genes and, for trypanosomes at least, for the same gene across stages. The ribosomal proteins are themselves subjected to translational control, suggesting a means of reinforcing global translational regulation. PMID:27061497

  10. Features of 80S mammalian ribosome and its subunits

    PubMed Central

    Budkevich, Tatyana V.; El'skaya, Anna V.; Nierhaus, Knud H.

    2008-01-01

    It is generally believed that basic features of ribosomal functions are universally valid, but a systematic test still stands out for higher eukaryotic 80S ribosomes. Here we report: (i) differences in tRNA and mRNA binding capabilities of eukaryotic and bacterial ribosomes and their subunits. Eukaryotic 40S subunits bind mRNA exclusively in the presence of cognate tRNA, whereas bacterial 30S do bind mRNA already in the absence of tRNA. 80S ribosomes bind mRNA efficiently in the absence of tRNA. In contrast, bacterial 70S interact with mRNA more productively in the presence rather than in the absence of tRNA. (ii) States of initiation (Pi), pre-translocation (PRE) and post-translocation (POST) of the ribosome were checked and no significant functional differences to the prokaryotic counterpart were observed including the reciprocal linkage between A and E sites. (iii) Eukaryotic ribosomes bind tetracycline with an affinity 15 times lower than that of bacterial ribosomes (Kd 30 μM and 1–2 μM, respectively). The drug does not effect enzymatic A-site occupation of 80S ribosomes in contrast to non-enzymatic tRNA binding to the A-site. Both observations explain the relative resistance of eukaryotic ribosomes to this antibiotic. PMID:18632761

  11. YphC and YsxC GTPases assist the maturation of the central protuberance, GTPase associated region and functional core of the 50S ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xiaodan; Davis, Joseph H.; Jain, Nikhil; Razi, Aida; Benlekbir, Samir; McArthur, Andrew G.; Rubinstein, John L.; Britton, Robert A.; Williamson, James R.; Ortega, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    YphC and YsxC are GTPases in Bacillus subtilis that facilitate the assembly of the 50S ribosomal subunit, however their roles in this process are still uncharacterized. To explore their function, we used strains in which the only copy of the yphC or ysxC genes were under the control of an inducible promoter. Under depletion conditions, they accumulated incomplete ribosomal subunits that we named 45SYphC and 44.5SYsxC particles. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis and the 5–6 Å resolution cryo-EM maps of the 45SYphC and 44.5SYsxC particles revealed that the two GTPases participate in the maturation of the central protuberance, GTPase associated region and key RNA helices in the A, P and E functional sites of the 50S subunit. We observed that YphC and YsxC bind specifically to the two immature particles, suggesting that they represent either on-pathway intermediates or that their structure has not significantly diverged from that of the actual substrate. These results describe the nature of these immature particles, a widely used tool to study the assembly process of the ribosome. They also provide the first insights into the function of YphC and YsxC in 50S subunit assembly and are consistent with this process occurring through multiple parallel pathways, as it has been described for the 30S subunit. PMID:27484475

  12. Three-dimensional placement of the conserved 530 loop of 16 S rRNA and of its neighboring components in the 30 S subunit.

    PubMed

    Wang, R; Alexander, R W; VanLoock, M; Vladimirov, S; Bukhtiyarov, Y; Harvey, S C; Cooperman, B S

    1999-02-19

    Nucleotides 518-533 form a loop in ribosomal 30 S subunits that is almost universally conserved. Both biochemical and genetic evidence clearly implicate the 530 loop in ribosomal function, with respect both to the accuracy control mechanism and to tRNA binding. Here, building on earlier work, we identify proteins and nucleotides (or limited sequences) site-specifically photolabeled by radioactive photolabile oligoDNA probes targeted toward the 530 loop of 30 S subunits. The probes we employ are complementary to 16 S rRNA nucleotides 517-527, and have aryl azides attached to nucleotides complementary to nucleotides 518, 522, and 525-527, positioning the photogenerated nitrene a maximum of 19-26 A from the complemented rRNA base. The crosslinks obtained are used as constraints to revise an earlier model of 30 S structure, using the YAMMP molecular modeling package, and to place the 530 loop region within that structure. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  13. A recent intermezzo at the Ribosome Club

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Michael Y.; Liljas, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Two sets of ribosome structures have recently led to two different interpretations of what limits the accuracy of codon translation by transfer RNAs. In this review, inspired by this intermezzo at the Ribosome Club, we briefly discuss accuracy amplification by energy driven proofreading and its implementation in genetic code translation. We further discuss general ways by which the monitoring bases of 16S rRNA may enhance the ultimate accuracy (d-values) and how the codon translation accuracy is reduced by the actions of Mg2+ ions and the presence of error inducing aminoglycoside antibiotics. We demonstrate that complete freezing-in of cognate-like tautomeric states of ribosome-bound nucleotide bases in transfer RNA or messenger RNA is not compatible with recent experiments on initial codon selection by transfer RNA in ternary complex with elongation factor Tu and GTP. From these considerations, we suggest that the sets of 30S subunit structures from the Ramakrishnan group and 70S structures from the Yusupov/Yusupova group may, after all, reflect two sides of the same coin and how the structurally based intermezzo at the Ribosome Club may be resolved simply by taking the dynamic aspects of ribosome function into account. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Perspectives on the ribosome’. PMID:28138071

  14. Stepwise splitting of ribosomal proteins from yeast ribosomes by LiCl.

    PubMed

    Piir, Kerli; Tamm, Tiina; Kisly, Ivan; Tammsalu, Triin; Remme, Jaanus

    2014-01-01

    Structural studies have revealed that the core of the ribosome structure is conserved among ribosomes of all kingdoms. Kingdom-specific ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) are located in peripheral parts of the ribosome. In this work, the interactions between rRNA and r-proteins of eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosome were investigated applying LiCl induced splitting and quantitative mass spectrometry. R-proteins were divided into four groups according to their binding properties to the rRNA. Most yeast r-proteins are removed from rRNA by 0.5-1 M LiCl. Eukaryote-specific r-proteins are among the first to dissociate. The majority of the strong binders are known to be required for the early ribosome assembly events. As compared to the bacterial ribosome, yeast r-proteins are dissociated from rRNA at lower ionic strength. Our results demonstrate that the nature of protein-RNA interactions in the ribosome is not conserved between different kingdoms.

  15. Comparative anatomy of a regulatory ribosomal protein.

    PubMed

    Worbs, Michael; Wahl, Markus C; Lindahl, Lasse; Zengel, Janice M

    2002-08-01

    Ribosomal protein L4 is a crucial folding mediator and an important architectural component of the large ribosomal subunit. Furthermore, Escherichia coli L4 produced in excess of its rRNA binding sites downregulates the transcription and translation of its own S10 operon, encoding 11 ribosomal proteins. Genetic experiments and the crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima L4 had implicated separable regions on L4 in ribosome association and expression control while RNA competition experiments and the regulatory capacity of heterologous L4 had suggested an overlap of the protein sequences involved in the two functions. We report herein that contrary to other foreign bacterial L4 proteins, L4 from T. maritima only weakly controlled expression of the S10 operon in E. coli. Also, wildtype T. maritima L4 was more weakly associated with E. coli ribosomes than with the E. coli analog. Rational mutageneses were performed to try to increase the regulatory competence of T. maritima L4. The ribosome incorporation of the mutant proteins was also investigated. Two different deletions removing T. maritima-specific sequences had little effects on regulation although one did improve ribosome association. Interestingly, a set of multiple mutations, which rendered the region around helices alpha4 and alpha5 in T. maritima L4 more E. coli-like, had no influence on the incorporation of the protein into the large ribosomal subunit but considerably improved its regulatory potential. Therefore, the area around helices alpha4 and alpha5, which is critical for the initial folding steps of the large subunit, is also a central element of autogenous control, presumably by contacting the S10 mRNA leader. Ribosome association is compounded at later stages of assembly by additional rRNA contacts through L4 areas which do not participate in regulation. Similarly, sequences outside the alpha4/alpha5 region aid expression control.

  16. Leucine does not affect mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 assembly but is required for maximal ribosomal protein s6 kinase 1 activity in human skeletal muscle following resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Apró, William; Moberg, Marcus; Hamilton, D Lee; Ekblom, Björn; Rooyackers, Olav; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Blomstrand, Eva

    2015-10-01

    We examined how the stimulatory effect of leucine on the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway is affected by the presence of the remaining essential amino acids (EAAs). Nine male subjects performed resistance exercise on 4 occasions and were randomly supplied EAAs with leucine, EAAs without leucine (EAA-Leu), leucine alone, or flavored water (placebo; control). Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis before and 60 and 90 min after exercise. Biopsies were analyzed for protein phosphorylation, kinase activity, protein-protein interactions, amino acid concentrations, and tracer incorporation. Leucine alone stimulated ribosomal protein s6 kinase 1 (S6K1) phosphorylation ∼280% more than placebo and EAA-Leu after exercise. Moreover, this response was enhanced by 60-75% after intake of EAAs compared with that of leucine alone (P < 0.05). Kinase activity of S6K1 reflected that of S6K1 phosphorylation; 60 min after exercise, the activity was elevated 3.3- and 4.2-fold with intake of leucine alone and with EAAs, respectively (P < 0.05). The interaction between mammalian target of rapamycin and regulatory-associated protein of mammalian target of rapamycin was unaltered in response to both resistance exercise and amino acid provision. Leucine alone stimulates mTORC1 signaling, although this response is enhanced by other EAAs and does not appear to be caused by alterations in mTORC1 assembly.

  17. The evolving ribosome: from non-coded peptide bond formation to sophisticated translation machinery.

    PubMed

    Davidovich, Chen; Belousoff, Matthew; Bashan, Anat; Yonath, Ada

    2009-09-01

    Structural analysis supported by biochemical, mutagenesis and computational evidence, revealed that the contemporary ribosome's active site is a universal symmetrical pocket made of ribosomal RNA. This pocket seems to be the remnant of the proto-ribosome, a dimeric RNA assembly evolved by gene duplication, capable of autonomously catalyzing peptide bond formation and non-coded amino acid polymerization.

  18. The Modular Adaptive Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anupama; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Panda, Anshuman; Singh, Amartya; Sinha, Himanshu; Bhanot, Gyan

    2016-01-01

    The ribosome is an ancient machine, performing the same function across organisms. Although functionally unitary, recent experiments suggest specialized roles for some ribosomal proteins. Our central thesis is that ribosomal proteins function in a modular fashion to decode genetic information in a context dependent manner. We show through large data analyses that although many ribosomal proteins are essential with consistent effect on growth in different conditions in yeast and similar expression across cell and tissue types in mice and humans, some ribosomal proteins are used in an environment specific manner. The latter set of variable ribosomal proteins further function in a coordinated manner forming modules, which are adapted to different environmental cues in different organisms. We show that these environment specific modules of ribosomal proteins in yeast have differential genetic interactions with other pathways and their 5'UTRs show differential signatures of selection in yeast strains, presumably to facilitate adaptation. Similarly, we show that in higher metazoans such as mice and humans, different modules of ribosomal proteins are expressed in different cell types and tissues. A clear example is nervous tissue that uses a ribosomal protein module distinct from the rest of the tissues in both mice and humans. Our results suggest a novel stratification of ribosomal proteins that could have played a role in adaptation, presumably to optimize translation for adaptation to diverse ecological niches and tissue microenvironments.

  19. The Modular Adaptive Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Anupama; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Panda, Anshuman; Singh, Amartya; Sinha, Himanshu; Bhanot, Gyan

    2016-01-01

    The ribosome is an ancient machine, performing the same function across organisms. Although functionally unitary, recent experiments suggest specialized roles for some ribosomal proteins. Our central thesis is that ribosomal proteins function in a modular fashion to decode genetic information in a context dependent manner. We show through large data analyses that although many ribosomal proteins are essential with consistent effect on growth in different conditions in yeast and similar expression across cell and tissue types in mice and humans, some ribosomal proteins are used in an environment specific manner. The latter set of variable ribosomal proteins further function in a coordinated manner forming modules, which are adapted to different environmental cues in different organisms. We show that these environment specific modules of ribosomal proteins in yeast have differential genetic interactions with other pathways and their 5’UTRs show differential signatures of selection in yeast strains, presumably to facilitate adaptation. Similarly, we show that in higher metazoans such as mice and humans, different modules of ribosomal proteins are expressed in different cell types and tissues. A clear example is nervous tissue that uses a ribosomal protein module distinct from the rest of the tissues in both mice and humans. Our results suggest a novel stratification of ribosomal proteins that could have played a role in adaptation, presumably to optimize translation for adaptation to diverse ecological niches and tissue microenvironments. PMID:27812193

  20. How Ribosomes Translate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sulima, Sergey O; Hofman, Isabel J F; De Keersmaecker, Kim; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2017-09-18

    A wealth of novel findings, including congenital ribosomal mutations in ribosomopathies and somatic ribosomal mutations in various cancers, have significantly increased our understanding of the relevance of ribosomes in oncogenesis. Here, we explore the growing list of mechanisms by which the ribosome is involved in carcinogenesis-from the hijacking of ribosomes by oncogenic factors and dysregulated translational control, to the effects of mutations in ribosomal components on cellular metabolism. Of clinical importance, the recent success of RNA polymerase inhibitors highlights the dependence on "onco-ribosomes" as an Achilles' heel of cancer cells and a promising target for further therapeutic intervention.Significance: The recent discovery of somatic mutations in ribosomal proteins in several cancers has strengthened the link between ribosome defects and cancer progression, while also raising the question of which cellular mechanisms such defects exploit. Here, we discuss the emerging molecular mechanisms by which ribosomes support oncogenesis, and how this understanding is driving the design of novel therapeutic strategies. Cancer Discov; 7(10); 1-19. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Ribosome-messenger recognition: mRNA target sites for ribosomal protein S1.

    PubMed Central

    Boni, I V; Isaeva, D M; Musychenko, M L; Tzareva, N V

    1991-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S1 is known to play an important role in translational initiation, being directly involved in recognition and binding of mRNAs by 30S ribosomal particles. Using a specially developed procedure based on efficient crosslinking of S1 to mRNA induced by UV irradiation, we have identified S1 binding sites on several phage RNAs in preinitiation complexes. Targets for S1 on Q beta and fr RNAs are localized upstream from the coat protein gene and contain oligo(U)-sequences. In the case of Q beta RNA, this S1 binding site overlaps the S-site for Q beta replicase and the site for S1 binding within a binary complex. It is reasonable that similar U-rich sequences represent S1 binding sites on bacterial mRNAs. To test this idea we have used E. coli ssb mRNA prepared in vitro with the T7 promoter/RNA polymerase system. By the methods of toeprinting, enzymatic footprinting, and UV crosslinking we have shown that binding of the ssb mRNA to 30S ribosomes is S1-dependent. The oligo(U)-sequence preceding the SD domain was found to be the target for S1. We propose that S1 binding sites, represented by pyrimidine-rich sequences upstream from the SD region, serve as determinants involved in recognition of mRNA by the ribosome. Images PMID:2011495

  2. The ribosomal database project.

    PubMed

    Larsen, N; Olsen, G J; Maidak, B L; McCaughey, M J; Overbeek, R; Macke, T J; Marsh, T L; Woese, C R

    1993-07-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome data along with related programs and services. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams and various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via ftp and electronic mail. Certain analytic services are also provided by the electronic mail server.

  3. The ribosomal database project.

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, N; Olsen, G J; Maidak, B L; McCaughey, M J; Overbeek, R; Macke, T J; Marsh, T L; Woese, C R

    1993-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome data along with related programs and services. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams and various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via ftp and electronic mail. Certain analytic services are also provided by the electronic mail server. PMID:8332524

  4. The Ribosomal Database Project.

    PubMed

    Maidak, B L; Larsen, N; McCaughey, M J; Overbeek, R; Olsen, G J; Fogel, K; Blandy, J; Woese, C R

    1994-09-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services, and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams, and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server/rdp.life.uiuc.edu) and gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu). The electronic mail server also provides ribosomal probe checking, approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences, screening for chimeric nature of newly sequenced rRNAs, and automated alignment.

  5. Chemical Inhibition of Bacterial Ribosome Biogenesis Shows Efficacy in a Worm Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Jonathan M.; Selin, Carrie; Cardona, Silvia T.

    2015-01-01

    The development of antibacterial compounds that perturb novel processes is an imperative in the challenge presented by widespread antibiotic resistance. While many antibiotics target the ribosome, molecules that inhibit ribosome assembly have yet to be used in this manner. Here we show that a novel inhibitor of ribosome biogenesis, lamotrigine, is capable of rescuing Caenorhabditis elegans from an established Salmonella infection, revealing that ribosome biogenesis is a promising target for the development of new antibiotics. PMID:25712357

  6. Initial bridges between two ribosomal subunits are formed within 9.4 milliseconds, as studied by time-resolved cryo-EM.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Tanvir R; Yassin, Aymen S; Lu, Zonghuan; Barnard, David; Meng, Xing; Lu, Toh-Ming; Wagenknecht, Terence; Agrawal, Rajendra K

    2014-07-08

    Association of the two ribosomal subunits during the process of translation initiation is a crucial step of protein synthesis. The two subunits (30S and 50S) of the bacterial 70S ribosome are held together by 12 dynamic bridges involving RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, and protein-protein interactions. The process of bridge formation, such as whether all these bridges are formed simultaneously or in a sequential order, is poorly understood. To understand such processes, we have developed and implemented a class of microfluidic devices that mix two components to completion within 0.4 ms and spray the mixture in the form of microdroplets onto an electron microscopy grid, yielding a minimum reaction time of 9.4 ms before cryofixation. Using these devices, we have obtained cryo-EM data corresponding to reaction times of 9.4 and 43 ms and have determined 3D structures of ribosomal subunit association intermediates. Molecular analyses of the cryo-EM maps reveal that eight intersubunit bridges (bridges B1a, B1b, B2a, B2b, B3, B7a, B7b, and B8) form within 9.4 ms, whereas the remaining four bridges (bridges B2c, B4, B5, and B6) take longer than 43 ms to form, suggesting that bridges are formed in a stepwise fashion. Our approach can be used to characterize sequences of various dynamic functional events on complex macromolecular assemblies such as ribosomes.

  7. Escherichia coli Ribosomal Protein S1 Unfolds Structured mRNAs Onto the Ribosome for Active Translation Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Mélodie; Korepanov, Alexey; Fuchsbauer, Olivier; Fechter, Pierre; Haller, Andrea; Fabbretti, Attilio; Choulier, Laurence; Micura, Ronald; Klaholz, Bruno P.; Romby, Pascale; Springer, Mathias; Marzi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of translation initiation is well appropriate to adapt cell growth in response to stress and environmental changes. Many bacterial mRNAs adopt structures in their 5′ untranslated regions that modulate the accessibility of the 30S ribosomal subunit. Structured mRNAs interact with the 30S in a two-step process where the docking of a folded mRNA precedes an accommodation step. Here, we used a combination of experimental approaches in vitro (kinetic of mRNA unfolding and binding experiments to analyze mRNA–protein or mRNA–ribosome complexes, toeprinting assays to follow the formation of ribosomal initiation complexes) and in vivo (genetic) to monitor the action of ribosomal protein S1 on the initiation of structured and regulated mRNAs. We demonstrate that r-protein S1 endows the 30S with an RNA chaperone activity that is essential for the docking and the unfolding of structured mRNAs, and for the correct positioning of the initiation codon inside the decoding channel. The first three OB-fold domains of S1 retain all its activities (mRNA and 30S binding, RNA melting activity) on the 30S subunit. S1 is not required for all mRNAs and acts differently on mRNAs according to the signals present at their 5′ ends. This work shows that S1 confers to the ribosome dynamic properties to initiate translation of a large set of mRNAs with diverse structural features. PMID:24339747

  8. An overview of pre-ribosomal RNA processing in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Henras, Anthony K; Plisson-Chastang, Célia; O'Donohue, Marie-Françoise; Chakraborty, Anirban; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal RNAs are the most abundant and universal noncoding RNAs in living organisms. In eukaryotes, three of the four ribosomal RNAs forming the 40S and 60S subunits are borne by a long polycistronic pre-ribosomal RNA. A complex sequence of processing steps is required to gradually release the mature RNAs from this precursor, concomitant with the assembly of the 79 ribosomal proteins. A large set of trans-acting factors chaperone this process, including small nucleolar ribonucleoparticles. While yeast has been the gold standard for studying the molecular basis of this process, recent technical advances have allowed to further define the mechanisms of ribosome biogenesis in animals and plants. This renewed interest for a long-lasting question has been fueled by the association of several genetic diseases with mutations in genes encoding both ribosomal proteins and ribosome biogenesis factors, and by the perspective of new anticancer treatments targeting the mechanisms of ribosome synthesis. A consensus scheme of pre-ribosomal RNA maturation is emerging from studies in various kinds of eukaryotic organisms. However, major differences between mammalian and yeast pre-ribosomal RNA processing have recently come to light. WIREs RNA 2015, 6:225–242. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1269 PMID:25346433

  9. Placeholder factors in ribosome biogenesis: please, pave my way

    PubMed Central

    Espinar-Marchena, Francisco J.; Babiano, Reyes; Cruz, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of cytoplasmic eukaryotic ribosomes is an extraordinarily energy-demanding cellular activity that occurs progressively from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm. In the nucleolus, precursor rRNAs associate with a myriad of trans-acting factors and some ribosomal proteins to form pre-ribosomal particles. These factors include snoRNPs, nucleases, ATPases, GTPases, RNA helicases, and a vast list of proteins with no predicted enzymatic activity. Their coordinate activity orchestrates in a spatiotemporal manner the modification and processing of precursor rRNAs, the rearrangement reactions required for the formation of productive RNA folding intermediates, the ordered assembly of the ribosomal proteins, and the export of pre-ribosomal particles to the cytoplasm; thus, providing speed, directionality and accuracy to the overall process of formation of translation-competent ribosomes. Here, we review a particular class of trans-acting factors known as "placeholders". Placeholder factors temporarily bind selected ribosomal sites until these have achieved a structural context that is appropriate for exchanging the placeholder with another site-specific binding factor. By this strategy, placeholders sterically prevent premature recruitment of subsequently binding factors, premature formation of structures, avoid possible folding traps, and act as molecular clocks that supervise the correct progression of pre-ribosomal particles into functional ribosomal subunits. We summarize the current understanding of those factors that delay the assembly of distinct ribosomal proteins or subsequently bind key sites in pre-ribosomal particles. We also discuss recurrent examples of RNA-protein and protein-protein mimicry between rRNAs and/or factors, which have clear functional implications for the ribosome biogenesis pathway. PMID:28685141

  10. An Introduction to the Structure and Function of the Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Dunkle, Jack A; Cate, Jamie H D

    2013-02-01

    E. coli continues to serve as a key model for the structure and function of the ribosome, structures of ribosome from other organisms and domains of life have also greatly contributed to our knowledge of protein synthesis. Many structural models of the ribosome in a number of steps of the protein synthesis cycle have been solved by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and x-ray crystallography. This chapter introduces the structure and dynamics of the ribosome based on these structures and ends with a brief discussion of the many questions that the structures leave unanswered. Protein synthesis is a multistep process, and the structural features of the ribosome along with the large number of cofactors reflect the complexity of translation. Numerous protein factors in addition to the ribosome contribute to translation in bacteria during the steps of initiation, elongation, termination, and recycling. These protein factors make intimate contacts to key regions of the ribosome, and this aspect is discussed in the chapter in light of our present understanding of the structure and function of the ribosome. The intact ribosome contains three binding sites for substrate tRNAs that are termed as the aminoacyl-tRNA site (A site), peptidyl-tRNA site (P site), and exit-tRNA site (E site). These three binding sites span the interface between the 30S and 50S subunits. The central activity of the ribosome is catalysis of peptide bond formation. The region of the ribosome responsible for catalyzing the reaction is called the peptidyl transferase center (PTC).

  11. Ribosomal proteins produced in excess are degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome system

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Min-Kyung; Reitsma, Justin M.; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is an essential process that consumes prodigious quantities of cellular resources. Ribosomal proteins cannot be overproduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae because the excess proteins are rapidly degraded. However, the responsible quality control (QC) mechanisms remain poorly characterized. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of multiple proteins of the small and large yeast ribosomal subunits is suppressed. Rpl26 overexpressed from a plasmid can be detected in the nucleolus and nucleoplasm, but it largely fails to assemble into ribosomes and is rapidly degraded. However, if the endogenous RPL26 loci are deleted, plasmid-encoded Rpl26 assembles into ribosomes and localizes to the cytosol. Chemical and genetic perturbation studies indicate that overexpressed ribosomal proteins are degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome system and not by autophagy. Inhibition of the proteasome led to accumulation of multiple endogenous ribosomal proteins in insoluble aggregates, consistent with the operation of this QC mechanism in the absence of ribosomal protein overexpression. Our studies reveal that ribosomal proteins that fail to assemble into ribosomes are rapidly distinguished from their assembled counterparts and ubiquitinated and degraded within the nuclear compartment. PMID:27385339

  12. The Ribosomal Database Project

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Gary J.; Overbeek, Ross; Larsen, Niels; Marsh, Terry L.; McCaughey, Michael J.; Maciukenas, Michael A.; Kuan, Wen-Min; Macke, Thomas J.; Xing, Yuqing; Woese, Carl R.

    1992-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) compiles ribosomal sequences and related data, and redistributes them in aligned and phylogenetically ordered form to its user community. It also offers various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying sequences. In addition, the RDP offers (or will offer) certain analytic services. At present the project is in an intermediate stage of development. PMID:1598241

  13. The Ribosomal Database Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G. J.; Overbeek, R.; Larsen, N.; Marsh, T. L.; McCaughey, M. J.; Maciukenas, M. A.; Kuan, W. M.; Macke, T. J.; Xing, Y.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) complies ribosomal sequences and related data, and redistributes them in aligned and phylogenetically ordered form to its user community. It also offers various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying sequences. In addition, the RDP offers (or will offer) certain analytic services. At present the project is in an intermediate stage of development.

  14. The Ribosomal Database Project.

    PubMed

    Olsen, G J; Overbeek, R; Larsen, N; Marsh, T L; McCaughey, M J; Maciukenas, M A; Kuan, W M; Macke, T J; Xing, Y; Woese, C R

    1992-05-11

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) complies ribosomal sequences and related data, and redistributes them in aligned and phylogenetically ordered form to its user community. It also offers various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying sequences. In addition, the RDP offers (or will offer) certain analytic services. At present the project is in an intermediate stage of development.

  15. Functional Specialization of Ribosomes?

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Wendy V.

    2011-01-01

    Ribosomes are highly conserved macromolecular machines responsible for protein synthesis in all living organisms. Work published in the past year shows that changes to the ribosome core can affect the mechanism of translation initiation that is favored in the cell, potentially leading to specific changes in the relative efficiencies with which different proteins are made. Here I examine recent data from expression and proteomic studies suggesting that cells make slightly different ribosomes under different growth conditions and discuss genetic evidence that such differences are functional. In particular, I will argue that eukaryotic cells likely produce ribosomes that lack one or more ‘core’ ribosomal proteins (RPs) under some conditions, and that ‘core’ RPs contribute differentially to translation of distinct subpopulations of mRNAs. PMID:21242088

  16. Arabidopsis protein arginine methyltransferase 3 is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting precursor ribosomal RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Runlai; Liu, Chunyan; Ahmad, Ayaz; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Falong; Cao, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental and tightly regulated cellular process, including synthesis, processing, and assembly of rRNAs with ribosomal proteins. Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) have been implicated in many important biological processes, such as ribosome biogenesis. Two alternative precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing pathways coexist in yeast and mammals; however, how PRMT affects ribosome biogenesis remains largely unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis PRMT3 (AtPRMT3) is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting pre-rRNA processing. Disruption of AtPRMT3 results in pleiotropic developmental defects, imbalanced polyribosome profiles, and aberrant pre-rRNA processing. We further identify an alternative pre-rRNA processing pathway in Arabidopsis and demonstrate that AtPRMT3 is required for the balance of these two pathways to promote normal growth and development. Our work uncovers a previously unidentified function of PRMT in posttranscriptional regulation of rRNA, revealing an extra layer of complexity in the regulation of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:25352672

  17. Interaction between Bacillus subtilis YsxC and ribosomes (or rRNAs).

    PubMed

    Wicker-Planquart, Catherine; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2015-04-13

    YsxC is an essential P-loop GTPase, that binds to the 50S ribosomal subunit, and is required for the proper assembly of the ribosome. The aim of this study was to characterize YsxC ribosome interactions. The stoichiometry of YsxC ribosome subunit complex was evaluated. We showed that YsxC binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit is not affected by GTP, but in the presence of GDP the stoichiometry of YsxC-ribosome is decreased. YsxC GTPase activity was stimulated upon 50S ribosomal subunit binding. In addition, it is shown for the first time that YsxC binds both 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. DExD/H-box RNA helicases in ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Roman; Straub, Annika U.; Doebele, Carmen; Bohnsack, Markus T.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis requires a multitude of cofactors, among them DExD/H-box RNA helicases. Bacterial RNA helicases involved in ribosome assembly are not essential, while eukaryotes strictly require multiple DExD/H-box proteins that are involved in the much more complex ribosome biogenesis pathway. Here, RNA helicases are thought to act in structural remodeling of the RNPs including the modulation of protein binding, and they are required for allowing access or the release of specific snoRNPs from pre-ribosomes. Interestingly, helicase action is modulated by specific cofactors that can regulate recruitment and enzymatic activity. This review summarizes the current knowledge and focuses on recent findings and open questions on RNA helicase function and regulation in ribosome synthesis. PMID:22922795

  19. The SSU Processome in Ribosome Biogenesis – Progress and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Kathleen R.; Charette, J. Michael; Baserga, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    The small subunit (SSU) processome is a 2.2 MDa ribonucleoprotein complex involved in the processing, assembly and maturation of the SSU of eukaryotic ribosomes. The identities of many of the factors involved in SSU biogenesis have been elucidated over the past 40 years. However, as our understanding increases, so do the number of questions about the nature of this complicated process. Cataloguing the components is the first step towards understanding the molecular workings of a system. This review will focus on how identifying components of ribosome biogenesis has led to the knowledge of how these factors, protein and RNA alike, associate with one another into sub-complexes, with a concentration on the small ribosomal subunit. We will also explore how this knowledge of sub-complex assembly has informed our understanding of the workings of the ribosome synthesis system as a whole. PMID:21318072

  20. Charge segregation and low hydrophobicity are key features of ribosomal proteins from different organisms.

    PubMed

    Fedyukina, Daria V; Jennaro, Theodore S; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2014-03-07

    Ribosomes are large and highly charged macromolecular complexes consisting of RNA and proteins. Here, we address the electrostatic and nonpolar properties of ribosomal proteins that are important for ribosome assembly and interaction with other cellular components and may influence protein folding on the ribosome. We examined 50 S ribosomal subunits from 10 species and found a clear distinction between the net charge of ribosomal proteins from halophilic and non-halophilic organisms. We found that ∼67% ribosomal proteins from halophiles are negatively charged, whereas only up to ∼15% of ribosomal proteins from non-halophiles share this property. Conversely, hydrophobicity tends to be lower for ribosomal proteins from halophiles than for the corresponding proteins from non-halophiles. Importantly, the surface electrostatic potential of ribosomal proteins from all organisms, especially halophiles, has distinct positive and negative regions across all the examined species. Positively and negatively charged residues of ribosomal proteins tend to be clustered in buried and solvent-exposed regions, respectively. Hence, the majority of ribosomal proteins is characterized by a significant degree of intramolecular charge segregation, regardless of the organism of origin. This key property enables the ribosome to accommodate proteins within its complex scaffold regardless of their overall net charge.

  1. Charge Segregation and Low Hydrophobicity Are Key Features of Ribosomal Proteins from Different Organisms*

    PubMed Central

    Fedyukina, Daria V.; Jennaro, Theodore S.; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomes are large and highly charged macromolecular complexes consisting of RNA and proteins. Here, we address the electrostatic and nonpolar properties of ribosomal proteins that are important for ribosome assembly and interaction with other cellular components and may influence protein folding on the ribosome. We examined 50 S ribosomal subunits from 10 species and found a clear distinction between the net charge of ribosomal proteins from halophilic and non-halophilic organisms. We found that ∼67% ribosomal proteins from halophiles are negatively charged, whereas only up to ∼15% of ribosomal proteins from non-halophiles share this property. Conversely, hydrophobicity tends to be lower for ribosomal proteins from halophiles than for the corresponding proteins from non-halophiles. Importantly, the surface electrostatic potential of ribosomal proteins from all organisms, especially halophiles, has distinct positive and negative regions across all the examined species. Positively and negatively charged residues of ribosomal proteins tend to be clustered in buried and solvent-exposed regions, respectively. Hence, the majority of ribosomal proteins is characterized by a significant degree of intramolecular charge segregation, regardless of the organism of origin. This key property enables the ribosome to accommodate proteins within its complex scaffold regardless of their overall net charge. PMID:24398678

  2. Crystal Structures of EF-G-Ribosome Complexes Trapped in Intermediate States of Translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jie; Lancaster, Laura; Donohue, John Paul; Noller, Harry F.

    2013-11-12

    Translocation of messenger and transfer RNA (mRNA and tRNA) through the ribosome is a crucial step in protein synthesis, whose mechanism is not yet understood. The crystal structures of three Thermus ribosome-tRNA-mRNA–EF-G complexes trapped with β,γ-imidoguanosine 5'-triphosphate (GDPNP) or fusidic acid reveal conformational changes occurring during intermediate states of translocation, including large-scale rotation of the 30S subunit head and body. In all complexes, the tRNA acceptor ends occupy the 50S subunit E site, while their anticodon stem loops move with the head of the 30S subunit to positions between the P and E sites, forming chimeric intermediate states. Two universally conserved bases of 16S ribosomal RNA that intercalate between bases of the mRNA may act as “pawls” of a translocational ratchet. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of ribosomal translocation.

  3. Ribosome dynamics during decoding.

    PubMed

    Rodnina, Marina V; Fischer, Niels; Maracci, Cristina; Stark, Holger

    2017-03-19

    Elongation factors Tu (EF-Tu) and SelB are translational GTPases that deliver aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs) to the ribosome. In each canonical round of translation elongation, aa-tRNAs, assisted by EF-Tu, decode mRNA codons and insert the respective amino acid into the growing peptide chain. Stop codons usually lead to translation termination; however, in special cases UGA codons are recoded to selenocysteine (Sec) with the help of SelB. Recruitment of EF-Tu and SelB together with their respective aa-tRNAs to the ribosome is a multistep process. In this review, we summarize recent progress in understanding the role of ribosome dynamics in aa-tRNA selection. We describe the path to correct codon recognition by canonical elongator aa-tRNA and Sec-tRNA(Sec) and discuss the local and global rearrangements of the ribosome in response to correct and incorrect aa-tRNAs. We present the mechanisms of GTPase activation and GTP hydrolysis of EF-Tu and SelB and summarize what is known about the accommodation of aa-tRNA on the ribosome after its release from the elongation factor. We show how ribosome dynamics ensures high selectivity for the cognate aa-tRNA and suggest that conformational fluctuations, induced fit and kinetic discrimination play major roles in maintaining the speed and fidelity of translation.This article is part of the themed issue 'Perspectives on the ribosome'.

  4. Comprehensive Analysis of Phosphorylated Proteins of E. coli Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Soung, George Y.; Miller, Jennifer L.; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in twenty-four E. coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Specific detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr, or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and the loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given site of the phosphorylation in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins. PMID:19469554

  5. Comprehensive analysis of phosphorylated proteins of Escherichia coli ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Soung, George Y; Miller, Jennifer L; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C

    2009-07-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in 24 Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining, and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr; or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, and L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given phosphorylation sites in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins.

  6. Roles of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins in maturation and transport of pre-18S rRNA and ribosome function.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Cerca, Sébastien; Pöll, Gisela; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel; Tschochner, Herbert; Milkereit, Philipp

    2005-10-28

    Despite the rising knowledge about ribosome function and structure and how ribosomal subunits assemble in vitro in bacteria, the in vivo role of many ribosomal proteins remains obscure both in pro- and eukaryotes. Our systematic analysis of yeast ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) of the small subunit revealed that most eukaryotic r-proteins fulfill different roles in ribosome biogenesis, making them indispensable for growth. Different r-proteins control distinct steps of nuclear and cytoplasmic pre-18S rRNA processing and, thus, ensure that only properly assembled ribosomes become engaged in translation. Comparative analysis of dynamic and steady-state maturation assays revealed that several r-proteins are required for efficient nuclear export of pre-18S rRNA, suggesting that they form an interaction platform with the export machinery. In contrast, the presence of other r-proteins is mainly required before nuclear export is initiated. Our studies draw a correlation between the in vitro assembly, structural localization, and in vivo function of r-proteins.

  7. The impact of transcriptional tuning on in vitro integrated rRNA transcription and ribosome construction

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Brian R.; Jewett, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro ribosome construction could enable studies of ribosome assembly and function, provide a route toward constructing minimal cells for synthetic biology, and permit the construction of ribosome variants with new functions. Toward these long-term goals, we recently reported on an integrated, one-pot ribosomal RNA synthesis (rRNA), ribosome assembly, and translation technology (termed iSAT) for the construction of Escherichia coli ribosomes in crude ribosome-free S150 extracts. Here, we aimed to improve the activity of iSAT through transcriptional tuning. Specifically, we increased transcriptional efficiency through 3′ modifications to the rRNA gene sequences, optimized plasmid and polymerase concentrations, and demonstrated the use of a T7-promoted rRNA operon for stoichiometrically balanced rRNA synthesis and native rRNA processing. Our modifications produced a 45-fold improvement in iSAT protein synthesis activity, enabling synthesis of 429 ± 15 nmol/l green fluorescent protein in 6 h batch reactions. Further, we show that the translational activity of ribosomes purified from iSAT reactions is about 20% the activity of native ribosomes purified directly from E. coli cells. Looking forward, we believe iSAT will enable unique studies to unravel the systems biology of ribosome biogenesis and open the way to new methods for making and studying ribosomal variants. PMID:24792158

  8. Ribosome dynamics during decoding

    PubMed Central

    Maracci, Cristina; Stark, Holger

    2017-01-01

    Elongation factors Tu (EF-Tu) and SelB are translational GTPases that deliver aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs) to the ribosome. In each canonical round of translation elongation, aa-tRNAs, assisted by EF-Tu, decode mRNA codons and insert the respective amino acid into the growing peptide chain. Stop codons usually lead to translation termination; however, in special cases UGA codons are recoded to selenocysteine (Sec) with the help of SelB. Recruitment of EF-Tu and SelB together with their respective aa-tRNAs to the ribosome is a multistep process. In this review, we summarize recent progress in understanding the role of ribosome dynamics in aa-tRNA selection. We describe the path to correct codon recognition by canonical elongator aa-tRNA and Sec-tRNASec and discuss the local and global rearrangements of the ribosome in response to correct and incorrect aa-tRNAs. We present the mechanisms of GTPase activation and GTP hydrolysis of EF-Tu and SelB and summarize what is known about the accommodation of aa-tRNA on the ribosome after its release from the elongation factor. We show how ribosome dynamics ensures high selectivity for the cognate aa-tRNA and suggest that conformational fluctuations, induced fit and kinetic discrimination play major roles in maintaining the speed and fidelity of translation. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Perspectives on the ribosome’. PMID:28138068

  9. When stable RNA becomes unstable: the degradation of ribosomes in bacteria and beyond.

    PubMed

    Maiväli, Ülo; Paier, Anton; Tenson, Tanel

    2013-07-01

    This review takes a comparative look at the various scenarios where ribosomes are degraded in bacteria and eukaryotes with emphasis on studies involving Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. While the molecular mechanisms of degradation in bacteria and yeast appear somewhat different, we argue that the underlying causes of ribosome degradation are remarkably similar. In both model organisms during ribosomal assembly, partially formed pre-ribosomal particles can be degraded by at least two different sequentially-acting quality control pathways and fully assembled but functionally faulty ribosomes can be degraded in a separate quality control pathway. In addition, ribosomes that are both structurally- and functionally-sound can be degraded as an adaptive measure to stress.

  10. Direct monitoring of initiation factor dynamics through formation of 30S and 70S translation-initiation complexes on a quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shuntaro; Isobe, Hidemi; Ueda, Takuya; Okahata, Yoshio

    2013-05-17

    Translation initiation is a dynamic and complicated process requiring the building a 70S initiation complex (70S-IC) composed of a ribosome, mRNA, and an initiator tRNA. During the formation of the 70S-IC, initiation factors (IFs: IF1, IF2, and IF3) interact with a ribosome to form a 30S initiation complex (30S-IC) and a 70S-IC. Although some spectroscopic analyses have been performed, the mechanism of binding and dissociation of IFs remains unclear. Here, we employed a 27 MHz quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to evaluate the process of bacterial IC formation in translation initiation by following frequency changes (mass changes). IFs (IF1, IF2, and IF3), N-terminally fused to biotin carboxyl carrier protein (bio-BCCP), were immobilized on a Neutravidin-covered QCM plate. By using bio-BCCP-IF2 immobilized to the QCM, three steps of the formation of ribosomal initiation complex could be sequentially observed as simple mass changes in real time: binding of a 30S complex to the immobilized IF2, a recruitment of 50S to the 30S-IC, and formation of the 70S-IC. The kinetic parameters implied that the release of IF2 from the 70S-IC could be the rate-limiting step in translation initiation. The IF3-immobilized QCM revealed that the affinity of IF3 for the 30S complex decreased upon the addition of mRNA and fMet-tRNA(fMet) but did not lead to complete dissociation from the 30S-IC. These results suggest that IF3 binds and stays bound to ICs, and its interaction mode is altered during the formation of 30S-IC and 70S-IC and is finally induced to dissociate from ICs by 50S binding. This methodology demonstrated here is applicable to investigate the role of IFs in translation initiation driven by other pathways. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Dynamics of Ribosomal Protein S1 on a Bacterial Ribosome with Cross-Linking and Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Lauber, Matthew A.; Rappsilber, Juri; Reilly, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S1 has been shown to be a significant effector of prokaryotic translation. The protein is in fact capable of efficiently initiating translation, regardless of the presence of a Shine-Dalgarno sequence in mRNA. Structural insights into this process have remained elusive, as S1 is recalcitrant to traditional techniques of structural analysis, such as x-ray crystallography. Through the application of protein cross-linking and high resolution mass spectrometry, we have detailed the ribosomal binding site of S1 and have observed evidence of its dynamics. Our results support a previous hypothesis that S1 acts as the mRNA catching arm of the prokaryotic ribosome. We also demonstrate that in solution the major domains of the 30S subunit are remarkably flexible, capable of moving 30–50Å with respect to one another. PMID:23033476

  12. The role of the ribosome in the regulation of longevity and lifespan extension.

    PubMed

    MacInnes, Alyson W

    2016-01-01

    The most energy-consuming process that a cell must undertake to stay viable is the continuous biogenesis of ribosomes for the translation of RNA into protein. Given the inextricable links between energy consumption and cellular lifespan, it is not surprising that mutations and environmental cues that reduce ribosome biogenesis result in an extension of eukaryotic lifespan. This review goes into detail describing recent discoveries of different and often unexpected elements that play a role in the regulation of longevity by virtue of their ribosome biogenesis functions. These roles include controlling the transcription and processing of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), the translation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes, and the number of ribosomes overall. Together these findings suggest that a fundamental mechanism across eukaryotic species for extending lifespan is to slow down or halt the expenditure of cellular energy that is normally absorbed by the manufacturing and assembly of new ribosomes.

  13. EXPANDING THE RIBOSOMAL UNIVERSE

    PubMed Central

    Dinman, Jonathan D.; Kinzy, Terri Goss

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY In this issue of Structure, Frank and colleagues (Taylor et al., 2009) present the most complete model of a eukaryotic ribosome to date. This achievement represents a critical milestone along the path to structurally defining the unique aspects of the eukaryotic protein synthetic machinery. PMID:20004156

  14. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Baram, David; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Breiner, Elinor; Davidovich, Chen; Cimicata, Giuseppe; Eyal, Zohar; Halfon, Yehuda; Krupkin, Miri; Matzov, Donna; Metz, Markus; Rufayda, Mruwat; Peretz, Moshe; Pick, Ophir; Pyetan, Erez; Rozenberg, Haim; Shalev-Benami, Moran; Wekselman, Itai; Zarivach, Raz; Zimmerman, Ella; Assis, Nofar; Bloch, Joel; Israeli, Hadar; Kalaora, Rinat; Lim, Lisha; Sade-Falk, Ofir; Shapira, Tal; Taha-Salaime, Leena; Tang, Hua; Yonath, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of “pathogen-specific antibiotics,” in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification. PMID:27367739

  15. Expanding the ribosomal universe.

    PubMed

    Dinman, Jonathan D; Kinzy, Terri Goss

    2009-12-09

    In this issue of Structure, Taylor et al. (2009) present the most complete model of an eukaryotic ribosome to date. This achievement represents a critical milestone along the path to structurally defining the unique aspects of the eukaryotic protein synthetic machinery.

  16. Ribosome-inactivating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Matthew J; Dodd, Jennifer E; Hautbergue, Guillaume M

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were first isolated over a century ago and have been shown to be catalytic toxins that irreversibly inactivate protein synthesis. Elucidation of atomic structures and molecular mechanism has revealed these proteins to be a diverse group subdivided into two classes. RIPs have been shown to exhibit RNA N-glycosidase activity and depurinate the 28S rRNA of the eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit. In this review, we compare archetypal RIP family members with other potent toxins that abolish protein synthesis: the fungal ribotoxins which directly cleave the 28S rRNA and the newly discovered Burkholderia lethal factor 1 (BLF1). BLF1 presents additional challenges to the current classification system since, like the ribotoxins, it does not possess RNA N-glycosidase activity but does irreversibly inactivate ribosomes. We further discuss whether the RIP classification should be broadened to include toxins achieving irreversible ribosome inactivation with similar turnovers to RIPs, but through different enzymatic mechanisms. PMID:24071927

  17. Mechanisms of In Vivo Ribosome Maintenance Change in Response to Nutrient Signals*

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Andrew D.; Naylor, Bradley C.; Carson, Richard H.; Evans, Eric; Harwell, Justin; Knecht, Jared; Hexem, Eric; Peelor, Fredrick F.; Miller, Benjamin F.; Hamilton, Karyn L.; Transtrum, Mark K.; Bikman, Benjamin T.; Price, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Control of protein homeostasis is fundamental to the health and longevity of all organisms. Because the rate of protein synthesis by ribosomes is a central control point in this process, regulation, and maintenance of ribosome function could have amplified importance in the overall regulatory circuit. Indeed, ribosomal defects are commonly associated with loss of protein homeostasis, aging, and disease (1–4), whereas improved protein homeostasis, implying optimal ribosomal function, is associated with disease resistance and increased lifespan (5–7). To maintain a high-quality ribosome population within the cell, dysfunctional ribosomes are targeted for autophagic degradation. It is not known if complete degradation is the only mechanism for eukaryotic ribosome maintenance or if they might also be repaired by replacement of defective components. We used stable-isotope feeding and protein mass spectrometry to measure the kinetics of turnover of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and 71 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) in mice. The results indicate that exchange of individual proteins and whole ribosome degradation both contribute to ribosome maintenance in vivo. In general, peripheral r-proteins and those with more direct roles in peptide-bond formation are replaced multiple times during the lifespan of the assembled structure, presumably by exchange with a free cytoplasmic pool, whereas the majority of r-proteins are stably incorporated for the lifetime of the ribosome. Dietary signals impact the rates of both new ribosome assembly and component exchange. Signal-specific modulation of ribosomal repair and degradation could provide a mechanistic link in the frequently observed associations among diminished rates of protein synthesis, increased autophagy, and greater longevity (5, 6, 8, 9). PMID:27932527

  18. Crystal structure of elongation factor 4 bound to a clockwise ratcheted ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, M. G.; Lin, J.; Bulkley, D.; Steitz, T. A.

    2014-08-08

    Elongation factor 4 (EF4/LepA) is a highly conserved guanosine triphosphatase translation factor. It was shown to promote back-translocation of tRNAs on posttranslocational ribosome complexes and to compete with elongation factor G for interaction with pretranslocational ribosomes, inhibiting the elongation phase of protein synthesis. Here, we report a crystal structure of EF4–guanosine diphosphate bound to the Thermus thermophilus ribosome with a P-site tRNA at 2.9 angstroms resolution. The C-terminal domain of EF4 reaches into the peptidyl transferase center and interacts with the acceptor stem of the peptidyl-tRNA in the P site. The ribosome is in an unusual state of ratcheting with the 30S subunit rotated clockwise relative to the 50S subunit, resulting in a remodeled decoding center. The structure is consistent with EF4 functioning either as a back-translocase or a ribosome sequester.

  19. Reduced ribosomes of the apicoplast and mitochondrion of Plasmodium spp. and predicted interactions with antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ankit; Shah, Priyanka; Haider, Afreen; Gupta, Kirti; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Ralph, Stuart A; Habib, Saman

    2014-05-01

    Apicomplexan protists such as Plasmodium and Toxoplasma contain a mitochondrion and a relic plastid (apicoplast) that are sites of protein translation. Although there is emerging interest in the partitioning and function of translation factors that participate in apicoplast and mitochondrial peptide synthesis, the composition of organellar ribosomes remains to be elucidated. We carried out an analysis of the complement of core ribosomal protein subunits that are encoded by either the parasite organellar or nuclear genomes, accompanied by a survey of ribosome assembly factors for the apicoplast and mitochondrion. A cross-species comparison with other apicomplexan, algal and diatom species revealed compositional differences in apicomplexan organelle ribosomes and identified considerable reduction and divergence with ribosomes of bacteria or characterized organelle ribosomes from other organisms. We assembled structural models of sections of Plasmodium falciparum organellar ribosomes and predicted interactions with translation inhibitory antibiotics. Differences in predicted drug-ribosome interactions with some of the modelled structures suggested specificity of inhibition between the apicoplast and mitochondrion. Our results indicate that Plasmodium and Toxoplasma organellar ribosomes have a unique composition, resulting from the loss of several large and small subunit proteins accompanied by significant sequence and size divergences in parasite orthologues of ribosomal proteins.

  20. Reduced ribosomes of the apicoplast and mitochondrion of Plasmodium spp. and predicted interactions with antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ankit; Shah, Priyanka; Haider, Afreen; Gupta, Kirti; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Ralph, Stuart A.; Habib, Saman

    2014-01-01

    Apicomplexan protists such as Plasmodium and Toxoplasma contain a mitochondrion and a relic plastid (apicoplast) that are sites of protein translation. Although there is emerging interest in the partitioning and function of translation factors that participate in apicoplast and mitochondrial peptide synthesis, the composition of organellar ribosomes remains to be elucidated. We carried out an analysis of the complement of core ribosomal protein subunits that are encoded by either the parasite organellar or nuclear genomes, accompanied by a survey of ribosome assembly factors for the apicoplast and mitochondrion. A cross-species comparison with other apicomplexan, algal and diatom species revealed compositional differences in apicomplexan organelle ribosomes and identified considerable reduction and divergence with ribosomes of bacteria or characterized organelle ribosomes from other organisms. We assembled structural models of sections of Plasmodium falciparum organellar ribosomes and predicted interactions with translation inhibitory antibiotics. Differences in predicted drug–ribosome interactions with some of the modelled structures suggested specificity of inhibition between the apicoplast and mitochondrion. Our results indicate that Plasmodium and Toxoplasma organellar ribosomes have a unique composition, resulting from the loss of several large and small subunit proteins accompanied by significant sequence and size divergences in parasite orthologues of ribosomal proteins. PMID:24850912

  1. Head swivel on the ribosome facilitates translocation via intra-subunit tRNA hybrid sites

    PubMed Central

    Ratje, Andreas H.; Loerke, Justus; Mikolajka, Aleksandra; Brünner, Matthias; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Starosta, Agata L.; Dönhöfer, Alexandra; Connell, Sean R.; Fucini, Paola; Mielke, Thorsten; Whitford, Paul C.; Onuchic, Jose’ N; Yu, Yanan; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.; Hartmann, Roland K.; Penczek, Pawel A.; Wilson, Daniel N.; Spahn, Christian M.T.

    2011-01-01

    The elongation cycle of protein synthesis involves the delivery of aminoacyl-tRNAs to the A-site of the ribosome, followed by peptide-bond formation and translocation of the tRNAs through the ribosome to reopen the A-site1,2. The translocation reaction is catalyzed by elongation factor G (EF-G) in a GTP-dependent fashion3. Despite the availability of structures of various EF-G-ribosome complexes, the precise mechanism by which tRNAs move through the ribosome still remains unclear. Here we use multiparticle cryo-EM analysis to resolve two previously unseen subpopulations within EF-G-ribosome complexes at sub-nanometer resolution, one of them with a partially translocated tRNA. Comparison of these sub-states reveals that translocation of tRNA on the 30S subunit parallels the swiveling of the 30S-head and is coupled to un-ratcheting of the 30S-body. Since the tRNA maintains contact with the P-site on the 30S-head and simultaneously establishes interaction with the E-site on the 30S-platform, a novel intra-subunit pe/E hybrid state is formed. This state is stabilized by domain IV of EF-G, which interacts with the swiveled 30S-head conformation. These findings provide direct structural and mechanistic insight into the “missing link” in terms of tRNA intermediates involved in the universally conserved translocation process. PMID:21124459

  2. Potent, Reversible, and Specific Chemical Inhibitors of Eukaryotic Ribosome Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Shigehiro A; Chen, Zhen; Aoi, Yuki; Patgiri, Anupam; Kobayashi, Yuki; Nurse, Paul; Kapoor, Tarun M

    2016-10-06

    All cellular proteins are synthesized by ribosomes, whose biogenesis in eukaryotes is a complex multi-step process completed within minutes. Several chemical inhibitors of ribosome function are available and used as tools or drugs. By contrast, we lack potent validated chemical probes to analyze the dynamics of eukaryotic ribosome assembly. Here, we combine chemical and genetic approaches to discover ribozinoindoles (or Rbins), potent and reversible triazinoindole-based inhibitors of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis. Analyses of Rbin sensitivity and resistance conferring mutations in fission yeast, along with biochemical assays with recombinant proteins, provide evidence that Rbins' physiological target is Midasin, an essential ∼540-kDa AAA+ (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) protein. Using Rbins to acutely inhibit or activate Midasin function, in parallel experiments with inhibitor-sensitive or inhibitor-resistant cells, we uncover Midasin's role in assembling Nsa1 particles, nucleolar precursors of the 60S subunit. Together, our findings demonstrate that Rbins are powerful probes for eukaryotic ribosome assembly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Implications of macromolecular crowding and reducing conditions for in vitro ribosome construction

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Brian R.; Jamil, Osman K.; Jewett, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro construction of Escherichia coli ribosomes could elucidate a deeper understanding of these complex molecular machines and make possible the production of synthetic variants with new functions. Toward this goal, we recently developed an integrated synthesis, assembly and translation (iSAT) system that allows for co-activation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription and ribosome assembly, mRNA transcription and protein translation without intact cells. Here, we discovered that macromolecular crowding and reducing agents increase overall iSAT protein synthesis; the combination of 6% w/v Ficoll 400 and 2 mM DTBA yielded approximately a five-fold increase in overall iSAT protein synthesis activity. By utilizing a fluorescent RNA aptamer, fluorescent reporter proteins and ribosome sedimentation analysis, we showed that crowding agents increase iSAT yields by enhancing translation while reducing agents increase rRNA transcription and ribosome assembly. Finally, we showed that iSAT ribosomes possess ∼70% of the protein synthesis activity of in vivo-assembled E. coli ribosomes. This work improves iSAT protein synthesis through the addition of crowding and reducing agents, provides a thorough understanding of the effect of these additives within the iSAT system and demonstrates how iSAT allows for manipulation and analysis of ribosome biogenesis in the context of an in vitro transcription-translation system. PMID:25897121

  4. Are there proteins between the ribosomal subunits? Hot tritium bombardment experiments.

    PubMed

    Yusupov, M M; Spirin, A S

    1986-03-03

    The hot tritium bombardment technique [(1976) Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 228, 1237-1238] was used for studying the surface localization of ribosomal proteins on Escherichia coli ribosomes. The degree of tritium labeling of proteins was considered as a measure of their exposure (surface localization). Proteins S1, S4, S7, S9 and/or S11, S12 and/or L20, S13, S18, S20, S21, L5, L6, L7/L12, L10, L11, L16, L17, L24, L26 and L27 were shown to be the most exposed on the ribosome surface. The sets of exposed ribosomal proteins on the surface of 70 S ribosomes, on the one hand, and the surfaces of 50 S and 30 S ribosomal subunits in the dissociated state, on the other, were compared. It was found that the dissociation of ribosomes into subunits did not result in exposure of additional ribosomal proteins. The conclusion was drawn that proteins are absent from the contacting surfaces of the ribosomal subunits.

  5. Isolation of ribosomes and polysomes.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Maria C; Maguire, Bruce; Lake, James A

    2015-03-02

    Here we describe a preparative differential centrifugation protocol for the isolation of ribosomes from a crude cell homogenate. The subcellular fraction obtained is enriched in ribosome monomers and polysomes. The protocol has been optimized for the homogenization and collection of the ribosomal fraction from prokaryotic cells, mammalian and plant tissues, reticulocytes, and chloroplasts. The quality of the ribosomal preparation is enhanced by the removal of the remaining cellular components and adsorbed proteins by pelleting through a sucrose cushion with a high concentration of monovalent salts, NH4Cl or KCl. The different components of the ribosomal fraction isolated using this protocol can be further purified by sucrose gradient centrifugation.

  6. Mapping contacts of the S12-S7 intercistronic region of str operon mRNA with ribosomal protein S7 of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Golovin, Andrey; Spiridonova, Vera; Kopylov, Alexei

    2006-10-30

    In E. coli, S7 initiates 30S ribosome assembly by binding to 16S rRNA. It also regulates translation of the S12 and S7 cistrons of the 'streptomycin' operon transcript by binding to the S12-S7 intercistronic region. Here, we describe the contacts of N-terminally His(6)-tagged S7 with this region as mapped by UV-induced cross-linking. The cross-links are located at U(-34), U(-35), quite distant from the start codons of the two cistrons. In order to explain the mechanism of translational repression of S12-S7, we consider a possible conformational rearrangement of the intercistronic RNA structure induced by S7 binding.

  7. Ribosomal protein L2 is involved in the association of the ribosomal subunits, tRNA binding to A and P sites and peptidyl transfer

    PubMed Central

    Diedrich, Gundo; Spahn, Christian M.T.; Stelzl, Ulrich; Schäfer, Markus A.; Wooten, Tammy; Bochkariov, Dmitry E.; Cooperman, Barry S.; Traut, Robert R.; Nierhaus, Knud H.

    2000-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins L2, L3 and L4, together with the 23S RNA, are the main candidates for catalyzing peptide bond formation on the 50S subunit. That L2 is evolutionarily highly conserved led us to perform a thorough functional analysis with reconstituted 50S particles either lacking L2 or harboring a mutated L2. L2 does not play a dominant role in the assembly of the 50S subunit or in the fixation of the 3′-ends of the tRNAs at the peptidyl-transferase center. However, it is absolutely required for the association of 30S and 50S subunits and is strongly involved in tRNA binding to both A and P sites, possibly at the elbow region of the tRNAs. Furthermore, while the conserved histidyl residue 229 is extremely important for peptidyl-transferase activity, it is apparently not involved in other measured functions. None of the other mutagenized amino acids (H14, D83, S177, D228, H231) showed this strong and exclusive participation in peptide bond formation. These results are used to examine critically the proposed direct involvement of His229 in catalysis of peptide synthesis. PMID:11013226

  8. Structural basis for the rescue of stalled ribosomes: structure of YaeJ bound to the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Matthieu G; Seetharaman, Sai V; Bulkley, David; Steitz, Thomas A

    2012-03-16

    In bacteria, the hybrid transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) rescues ribosomes stalled on defective messenger RNAs (mRNAs). However, certain gram-negative bacteria have evolved proteins that are capable of rescuing stalled ribosomes in a tmRNA-independent manner. Here, we report a 3.2 angstrom-resolution crystal structure of the rescue factor YaeJ bound to the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome in complex with the initiator tRNA(i)(fMet) and a short mRNA. The structure reveals that the C-terminal tail of YaeJ functions as a sensor to discriminate between stalled and actively translating ribosomes by binding in the mRNA entry channel downstream of the A site between the head and shoulder of the 30S subunit. This allows the N-terminal globular domain to sample different conformations, so that its conserved GGQ motif is optimally positioned to catalyze the hydrolysis of peptidyl-tRNA. This structure gives insights into the mechanism of YaeJ function and provides a basis for understanding how it rescues stalled ribosomes.

  9. Structural Basis for the Rescue of Stalled Ribosomes: Structure of YaeJ Bound to the Ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, Matthieu G.; Seetharaman, Sai V.; Bulkley, David; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2012-06-19

    In bacteria, the hybrid transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) rescues ribosomes stalled on defective messenger RNAs (mRNAs). However, certain gram-negative bacteria have evolved proteins that are capable of rescuing stalled ribosomes in a tmRNA-independent manner. Here, we report a 3.2 angstrom-resolution crystal structure of the rescue factor YaeJ bound to the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome in complex with the initiator tRNA{sub i}{sup fMet} and a short mRNA. The structure reveals that the C-terminal tail of YaeJ functions as a sensor to discriminate between stalled and actively translating ribosomes by binding in the mRNA entry channel downstream of the A site between the head and shoulder of the 30S subunit. This allows the N-terminal globular domain to sample different conformations, so that its conserved GGQ motif is optimally positioned to catalyze the hydrolysis of peptidyl-tRNA. This structure gives insights into the mechanism of YaeJ function and provides a basis for understanding how it rescues stalled ribosomes.

  10. Structural insights into ribosome translocation

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Clarence

    2016-01-01

    During protein synthesis, tRNA and mRNA are translocated from the A to P to E sites of the ribosome thus enabling the ribosome to translate one codon of mRNA after the other. Ribosome translocation along mRNA is induced by the universally conserved ribosome GTPase, elongation factor G (EF‐G) in bacteria and elongation factor 2 (EF‐2) in eukaryotes. Recent structural and single‐molecule studies revealed that tRNA and mRNA translocation within the ribosome is accompanied by cyclic forward and reverse rotations between the large and small ribosomal subunits parallel to the plane of the intersubunit interface. In addition, during ribosome translocation, the ‘head’ domain of small ribosomal subunit undergoes forward‐ and back‐swiveling motions relative to the rest of the small ribosomal subunit around the axis that is orthogonal to the axis of intersubunit rotation. tRNA/mRNA translocation is also coupled to the docking of domain IV of EF‐G into the A site of the small ribosomal subunit that converts the thermally driven motions of the ribosome and tRNA into the forward translocation of tRNA/mRNA inside the ribosome. Despite recent and enormous progress made in the understanding of the molecular mechanism of ribosome translocation, the sequence of structural rearrangements of the ribosome, EF‐G and tRNA during translocation is still not fully established and awaits further investigation. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:620–636. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1354 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27117863

  11. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  12. Chemical inhibition of bacterial ribosome biogenesis shows efficacy in a worm infection model.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jonathan M; Selin, Carrie; Cardona, Silvia T; Brown, Eric D

    2015-05-01

    The development of antibacterial compounds that perturb novel processes is an imperative in the challenge presented by widespread antibiotic resistance. While many antibiotics target the ribosome, molecules that inhibit ribosome assembly have yet to be used in this manner. Here we show that a novel inhibitor of ribosome biogenesis, lamotrigine, is capable of rescuing Caenorhabditis elegans from an established Salmonella infection, revealing that ribosome biogenesis is a promising target for the development of new antibiotics. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. An inventory of yeast proteins associated with nucleolar and ribosomal components

    PubMed Central

    Staub, Eike; Mackowiak, Sebastian; Vingron, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Background Although baker's yeast is a primary model organism for research on eukaryotic ribosome assembly and nucleoli, the list of its proteins that are functionally associated with nucleoli or ribosomes is still incomplete. We trained a naïve Bayesian classifier to predict novel proteins that are associated with yeast nucleoli or ribosomes based on parts lists of nucleoli in model organisms and large-scale protein interaction data sets. Phylogenetic profiling and gene expression analysis were carried out to shed light on evolutionary and regulatory aspects of nucleoli and ribosome assembly. Results We predict that, in addition to 439 known proteins, a further 62 yeast proteins are associated with components of the nucleolus or the ribosome. The complete set comprises a large core of archaeal-type proteins, several bacterial-type proteins, but mostly eukaryote-specific inventions. Expression of nucleolar and ribosomal genes tends to be strongly co-regulated compared to other yeast genes. Conclusion The number of proteins associated with nucleolar or ribosomal components in yeast is at least 14% higher than known before. The nucleolus probably evolved from an archaeal-type ribosome maturation machinery by recruitment of several bacterial-type and mostly eukaryote-specific factors. Not only expression of ribosomal protein genes, but also expression of genes encoding the 90S processosome, are strongly co-regulated and both regulatory programs are distinct from each other. PMID:17067374

  14. Ribosome recycling induces optimal translation rate at low ribosomal availability.

    PubMed

    Marshall, E; Stansfield, I; Romano, M C

    2014-09-06

    During eukaryotic cellular protein synthesis, ribosomal translation is made more efficient through interaction between the two ends of the messenger RNA (mRNA). Ribosomes reaching the 3' end of the mRNA can thus recycle and begin translation again on the same mRNA, the so-called 'closed-loop' model. Using a driven diffusion lattice model of translation, we study the effects of ribosome recycling on the dynamics of ribosome flow and density on the mRNA. We show that ribosome recycling induces a substantial increase in ribosome current. Furthermore, for sufficiently large values of the recycling rate, the lattice does not transition directly from low to high ribosome density, as seen in lattice models without recycling. Instead, a maximal current phase becomes accessible for much lower values of the initiation rate, and multiple phase transitions occur over a wide region of the phase plane. Crucially, we show that in the presence of ribosome recycling, mRNAs can exhibit a peak in protein production at low values of the initiation rate, beyond which translation rate decreases. This has important implications for translation of certain mRNAs, suggesting that there is an optimal concentration of ribosomes at which protein synthesis is maximal, and beyond which translational efficiency is impaired.

  15. Mitochondrial ribosomes in a trypanosome.

    PubMed

    Tittawella, Ivor; Yasmin, Lubna; Baranov, Vladimir

    2003-08-01

    The nature, and even the existence, of trypanosome mitochondrial ribosomes has been the subject of some debate. We investigated this further in the insect trypanosome, Crithidia fasciculata. In sucrose gradients of parasite lysates, mitochondrial ribosomal RNA co-sediments at approximately 35S with nascent peptides synthesized in the presence of the cytosolic translational inhibitor, cycloheximide. Co-sedimenting peptides in this peak are much reduced when the parasites are treated with the bacterial translational inhibitor, chloramphenicol. In CsCl gradients this peak resolves at a buoyant density of 1.42 g/cm(3), a value typical for mito-ribosomes. Electron microscopy of peak material shows particles smaller than cytosolic ribosomes, but with characteristic ribosomal shapes. We propose that these particles represent the parasite's mitochondrial ribosomes.

  16. Structures and dynamics of hibernating ribosomes from Staphylococcus aureus mediated by intermolecular interactions of HPF.

    PubMed

    Khusainov, Iskander; Vicens, Quentin; Ayupov, Rustam; Usachev, Konstantin; Myasnikov, Alexander; Simonetti, Angelita; Validov, Shamil; Kieffer, Bruno; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat; Hashem, Yaser

    2017-07-14

    In bacteria, ribosomal hibernation shuts down translation as a response to stress, through reversible binding of stress-induced proteins to ribosomes. This process typically involves the formation of 100S ribosome dimers. Here, we present the structures of hibernating ribosomes from human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus containing a long variant of the hibernation-promoting factor (SaHPF) that we solved using cryo-electron microscopy. Our reconstructions reveal that the N-terminal domain (NTD) of SaHPF binds to the 30S subunit as observed for shorter variants of HPF in other species. The C-terminal domain (CTD) of SaHPF protrudes out of each ribosome in order to mediate dimerization. Using NMR, we characterized the interactions at the CTD-dimer interface. Secondary interactions are provided by helix 26 of the 16S ribosomal RNA We also show that ribosomes in the 100S particle adopt both rotated and unrotated conformations. Overall, our work illustrates a specific mode of ribosome dimerization by long HPF, a finding that may help improve the selectivity of antimicrobials. © 2017 The Authors.

  17. Yeast Rrp14p is a nucleolar protein involved in both ribosome biogenesis and cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hiroko; Horigome, Chihiro; Okada, Takafumi; Shirai, Chiharu; Mizuta, Keiko

    2007-01-01

    We previously cloned RRP14/YKL082c, whose product exhibits two-hybrid interaction with Ebp2p, a regulatory factor of assembly of 60S ribosomal subunits. Depletion of Rrp14p results in shortage of 60S ribosomal subunits and retardation of processing from 27S pre-rRNA to 25S rRNA. Furthermore, 35S pre-rRNA synthesis appears to decline in Rrp14p-depleted cells. Rrp14p interacts with regulatory factors of 60S subunit assembly and also with Utp11p and Faf1p, which are regulatory factors required for assembly of 40S ribosomal subunits. We propose that Rrp14p is involved in ribosome synthesis from the beginning of 35S pre-rRNA synthesis to assembly of the 60S ribosomal subunit. Disruption of RRP14 causes an extremely slow growth rate of the cell, a severe defect in ribosome synthesis, and a depolarized localization of cortical actin patches throughout the cell cycle. These results suggest that Rrp14p has dual functions in ribosome synthesis and polarized cell growth. PMID:17804645

  18. Ribosomal Proteins Control or Bypass p53 during Nucleolar Stress

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Annapina; Russo, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    The nucleolus is the site of ribosome biogenesis, a complex process that requires the coordinate activity of all three RNA polymerases and hundreds of non-ribosomal factors that participate in the maturation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and assembly of small and large subunits. Nevertheless, emerging studies have highlighted the fundamental role of the nucleolus in sensing a variety of cellular stress stimuli that target ribosome biogenesis. This condition is known as nucleolar stress and triggers several response pathways to maintain cell homeostasis, either p53-dependent or p53-independent. The mouse double minute (MDM2)-p53 stress signaling pathways are activated by multiple signals and are among the most important regulators of cellular homeostasis. In this review, we will focus on the role of ribosomal proteins in p53-dependent and p53-independent response to nucleolar stress considering novel identified regulators of these pathways. We describe, in particular, the role of ribosomal protein uL3 (rpL3) in p53-independent nucleolar stress signaling pathways. PMID:28085118

  19. BALANCED PRODUCTION OF RIBOSOMAL PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Robert P.

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes contain one molecule each of 79 different proteins. The genes encoding these proteins are usually at widely scattered loci and have distinctive promoters with certain common features. This minireview discusses the means by which cells manage to balance the production of ribosomal proteins so as to end up with equimolar quantities in the ribosome. Regulation at all levels of gene expression, from transcription to protein turnover, is considered. PMID:17689889

  20. Isolation of ribosomes by chromatography.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Bruce A

    2015-04-01

    Mixed-mode chromatography on cysteine-SulfoLink resin efficiently separates ribosomes from cell lysates and is particularly effective at rapidly removing endogenous proteases and nucleases, resulting in ribosomes of improved purity, integrity, and activity. Binding occurs partly by anion exchange of the RNA of the ribosomes, so that cells must be lysed in a buffer of moderate ionic strength (conductivity no more than 20 mS for chromatography of bacterial ribosomes) without any highly charged additives (e.g., heparin, which is used to inhibit RNases in yeast). A robust protocol for Escherichia coli is given here as an example.

  1. Ribonuclease selection for ribosome profiling

    PubMed Central

    Gerashchenko, Maxim V.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2017-01-01

    Ribosome profiling has emerged as a powerful method to assess global gene translation, but methodological and analytical challenges often lead to inconsistencies across labs and model organisms. A critical issue in ribosome profiling is nuclease treatment of ribosome–mRNA complexes, as it is important to ensure both stability of ribosomal particles and complete conversion of polysomes to monosomes. We performed comparative ribosome profiling in yeast and mice with various ribonucleases including I, A, S7 and T1, characterized their cutting preferences, trinucleotide periodicity patterns and coverage similarities across coding sequences, and showed that they yield comparable estimations of gene expression when ribosome integrity is not compromised. However, ribosome coverage patterns of individual transcripts had little in common between the ribonucleases. We further examined their potency at converting polysomes to monosomes across other commonly used model organisms, including bacteria, nematodes and fruit flies. In some cases, ribonuclease treatment completely degraded ribosome populations. Ribonuclease T1 was the only enzyme that preserved ribosomal integrity while thoroughly converting polysomes to monosomes in all examined species. This study provides a guide for ribonuclease selection in ribosome profiling experiments across most common model systems. PMID:27638886

  2. Molecular inventory control in ribosome biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Warner, J R; Johnson, S P

    1986-11-01

    The eukaryotic cell coordinates the accumulation of each ribosomal protein with every other ribosomal protein, with ribosomal RNA and with the needs of the cell. To do so it regulates the transcription, processing, translation and lifetime of the mRNA for ribosomal proteins. When all else fails, it rapidly degrades any excess ribosomal protein which is synthesized.

  3. Inhibition of Escherichia coli ribosome subunit dissociation by chloramphenicol and Blasticidin: a new mode of action of the antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Pathak, B K; Mondal, S; Barat, C

    2017-01-01

    The ability of the ribosome to assist in folding of proteins both in vitro and in vivo is well documented and is a nontranslational function of the ribosome. The interaction of the unfolded protein with the peptidyl transferase centre (PTC) of the bacterial large ribosomal subunit is followed by release of the protein in the folding competent state and rapid dissociation of ribosomal subunits. Our study demonstrates that the PTC-specific antibiotics, chloramphenicol and blasticidin S inhibit unfolded protein-mediated subunit dissociation. During post-termination stage of translation in bacteria, ribosome recycling factor (RRF) is used together with elongation factor G to recycle the 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits for the next round of translation. Ribosome dissociation mediated by RRF and induced at low magnesium concentration was also inhibited by the antibiotics indicating that the PTC antibiotics exert an associative effect on ribosomal subunits. In vivo, the antibiotics can also reduce the ribosomal degradation during carbon starvation, a process requiring ribosome subunit dissociation. This study reveals a new mode of action of the broad-spectrum antibiotics chloramphenicol and blasticidin. Ribosome synthesizes protein in all organisms and is the target for multiple antimicrobial agents. Our study demonstrates that chloramphenicol and blasticidin S that target the peptidyl transferase centre of the bacterial ribosome can then inhibit dissociation of 70S ribosome mediated by (i) unfolded protein, (ii) translation factors or (iii) low Mg(+2) concentrations in vitro and thereby suppresses ribosomal degradation during carbon starvation in vivo. The demonstration of this new mode of action furthers the understanding of these broad-spectrum antibiotics that differentially inhibit protein synthesis in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Ribosomal vaccines. I. Immunogenicity of ribosomal fractions isolated from Salmonella typhimurium and Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W

    1972-06-01

    The immunogenicity of ribosomes and ribosomal subfractions isolated from Yersina pestis and Salmonella typhimurium has been studied. Ribosomes and ribosomal protein isolated from S. typhimurium protected mice against lethal challenge. Ribosomal ribonucleic acid isolated by phenol extraction failed to induce any significant level of protection in mice. None of the ribosomes or ribosomal subfractions isolated from Y. pestis were effective in inducing immunity to lethal challenge. These results suggest that the immunogen of the ribosomal vaccine is protein.

  5. Ribosomes in a Stacked Array

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yui; Kadokura, Yoshitomo; Sotta, Naoyuki; Fujiwara, Toru; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Satake, Akiko; Onouchi, Hitoshi; Naito, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Expression of CGS1, which codes for an enzyme of methionine biosynthesis, is feedback-regulated by mRNA degradation in response to S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet). In vitro studies revealed that AdoMet induces translation arrest at Ser-94, upon which several ribosomes stack behind the arrested one, and mRNA degradation occurs at multiple sites that presumably correspond to individual ribosomes in a stacked array. Despite the significant contribution of stacked ribosomes to inducing mRNA degradation, little is known about the ribosomes in the stacked array. Here, we assigned the peptidyl-tRNA species of the stacked second and third ribosomes to their respective codons and showed that they are arranged at nine-codon intervals behind the Ser-94 codon, indicating tight stacking. Puromycin reacts with peptidyl-tRNA in the P-site, releasing the nascent peptide as peptidyl-puromycin. This reaction is used to monitor the activity of the peptidyltransferase center (PTC) in arrested ribosomes. Puromycin reaction of peptidyl-tRNA on the AdoMet-arrested ribosome, which is stalled at the pre-translocation step, was slow. This limited reactivity can be attributed to the peptidyl-tRNA occupying the A-site at this step rather than to suppression of PTC activity. In contrast, puromycin reactions of peptidyl-tRNA with the stacked second and third ribosomes were slow but were not as slow as pre-translocation step ribosomes. We propose that the anticodon end of peptidyl-tRNA resides in the A-site of the stacked ribosomes and that the stacked ribosomes are stalled at an early step of translocation, possibly at the P/E hybrid state. PMID:24652291

  6. The path of messenger RNA through the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Yusupova, G Z; Yusupov, M M; Cate, J H; Noller, H F

    2001-07-27

    Using X-ray crystallography, we have directly observed the path of mRNA in the 70S ribosome in Fourier difference maps at 7 A resolution. About 30 nucleotides of the mRNA are wrapped in a groove that encircles the neck of the 30S subunit. The Shine-Dalgarno helix is bound in a large cleft between the head and the back of the platform. At the interface, only about eight nucleotides (-1 to +7), centered on the junction between the A and P codons, are exposed, and bond almost exclusively to 16S rRNA. The mRNA enters the ribosome around position +13 to +15, the location of downstream pseudoknots that stimulate -1 translational frame shifting.

  7. Structural Basis for Translation Termination on the 70S Ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Laurberg, M.; Asahara, H.; Korostelev, A.; Zhu, J.; Trakhanov, S.; Noller, H.F.

    2009-05-20

    At termination of protein synthesis, type I release factors promote hydrolysis of the peptidyl-transfer RNA linkage in response to recognition of a stop codon. Here we describe the crystal structure of the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome in complex with the release factor RF1, tRNA and a messenger RNA containing a UAA stop codon, at 3.2 {angstrom} resolution. The stop codon is recognized in a pocket formed by conserved elements of RF1, including its PxT recognition motif, and 16S ribosomal RNA. The codon and the 30S subunit A site undergo an induced fit that results in stabilization of a conformation of RF1 that promotes its interaction with the peptidyl transferase centre. Unexpectedly, the main-chain amide group of Gln 230 in the universally conserved GGQ motif of the factor is positioned to contribute directly to peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis.

  8. Molecular signatures of ribosomal evolution.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Elijah; Sethi, Anurag; Montoya, Jonathan; Woese, Carl R; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2008-09-16

    Ribosomal signatures, idiosyncrasies in the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and/or proteins, are characteristic of the individual domains of life. As such, insight into the early evolution of the domains can be gained from a comparative analysis of their respective signatures in the translational apparatus. In this work, we identify signatures in both the sequence and structure of the rRNA and analyze their contributions to the universal phylogenetic tree using both sequence- and structure-based methods. Domain-specific ribosomal proteins can be considered signatures in their own right. Although it is commonly assumed that they developed after the universal ribosomal proteins, we present evidence that at least one may have been present before the divergence of the organismal lineages. We find correlations between the rRNA signatures and signatures in the ribosomal proteins showing that the rRNA signatures coevolved with both domain-specific and universal ribosomal proteins. Finally, we show that the genomic organization of the universal ribosomal components contains these signatures as well. From these studies, we propose the ribosomal signatures are remnants of an evolutionary-phase transition that occurred as the cell lineages began to coalesce and so should be reflected in corresponding signatures throughout the fabric of the cell and its genome.

  9. Molecular signatures of ribosomal evolution

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Elijah; Sethi, Anurag; Montoya, Jonathan; Woese, Carl R.; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2008-01-01

    Ribosomal signatures, idiosyncrasies in the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and/or proteins, are characteristic of the individual domains of life. As such, insight into the early evolution of the domains can be gained from a comparative analysis of their respective signatures in the translational apparatus. In this work, we identify signatures in both the sequence and structure of the rRNA and analyze their contributions to the universal phylogenetic tree using both sequence- and structure-based methods. Domain-specific ribosomal proteins can be considered signatures in their own right. Although it is commonly assumed that they developed after the universal ribosomal proteins, we present evidence that at least one may have been present before the divergence of the organismal lineages. We find correlations between the rRNA signatures and signatures in the ribosomal proteins showing that the rRNA signatures coevolved with both domain-specific and universal ribosomal proteins. Finally, we show that the genomic organization of the universal ribosomal components contains these signatures as well. From these studies, we propose the ribosomal signatures are remnants of an evolutionary-phase transition that occurred as the cell lineages began to coalesce and so should be reflected in corresponding signatures throughout the fabric of the cell and its genome. PMID:18768810

  10. Ribosomes in the balance: structural equilibrium ensures translational fidelity and proper gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    At equilibrium, empty ribosomes freely transit between the rotated and un-rotated states. In the cell, the binding of two translation elongation factors to the same general region of the ribosome stabilizes one state over the other. These stabilized states are resolved by expenditure of energy in the form of GTP hydrolysis. A prior study employing mutants of a late assembling peripheral ribosomal protein suggested that ribosome rotational status determines its affinity for elongation factors, and hence translational fidelity and gene expression. Here, mutants of the early assembling integral ribosomal protein uL2 are used to test the generality of this hypothesis. rRNA structure probing analyses reveal that mutations in the uL2 B7b bridge region shift the equilibrium toward the rotated state, propagating rRNA structural changes to all of the functional centers of ribosome. Structural disequilibrium unbalances ribosome biochemically: rotated ribosomes favor binding of the eEF2 translocase and disfavor that of the elongation ternary complex. This manifests as specific translational fidelity defects, impacting the expression of genes involved in telomere maintenance. A model is presented describing how cyclic intersubunit rotation ensures the unidirectionality of translational elongation, and how perturbation of rotational equilibrium affects specific aspects of translational fidelity and cellular gene expression. PMID:25389262

  11. Ribosomes in the balance: structural equilibrium ensures translational fidelity and proper gene expression.

    PubMed

    Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2014-12-01

    At equilibrium, empty ribosomes freely transit between the rotated and un-rotated states. In the cell, the binding of two translation elongation factors to the same general region of the ribosome stabilizes one state over the other. These stabilized states are resolved by expenditure of energy in the form of GTP hydrolysis. A prior study employing mutants of a late assembling peripheral ribosomal protein suggested that ribosome rotational status determines its affinity for elongation factors, and hence translational fidelity and gene expression. Here, mutants of the early assembling integral ribosomal protein uL2 are used to test the generality of this hypothesis. rRNA structure probing analyses reveal that mutations in the uL2 B7b bridge region shift the equilibrium toward the rotated state, propagating rRNA structural changes to all of the functional centers of ribosome. Structural disequilibrium unbalances ribosome biochemically: rotated ribosomes favor binding of the eEF2 translocase and disfavor that of the elongation ternary complex. This manifests as specific translational fidelity defects, impacting the expression of genes involved in telomere maintenance. A model is presented describing how cyclic intersubunit rotation ensures the unidirectionality of translational elongation, and how perturbation of rotational equilibrium affects specific aspects of translational fidelity and cellular gene expression.

  12. Reduced expression of the mouse ribosomal protein Rpl17 alters the diversity of mature ribosomes by enhancing production of shortened 5.8S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minshi; Parshin, Andrey V.; Shcherbik, Natalia; Pestov, Dimitri G.

    2015-01-01

    Processing of rRNA during ribosome assembly can proceed through alternative pathways but it is unclear whether this could affect the structure of the ribosome. Here, we demonstrate that shortage of a ribosomal protein can change pre-rRNA processing in a way that over time alters ribosome diversity in the cell. Reducing the amount of Rpl17 in mouse cells led to stalled 60S subunit maturation, causing degradation of most of the synthesized precursors. A fraction of pre-60S subunits, however, were able to complete maturation, but with a 5′-truncated 5.8S rRNA, which we named 5.8SC. The 5′ exoribonuclease Xrn2 is involved in the generation of both 5.8SC and the canonical long form of 5.8S rRNA. Ribosomes containing 5.8SC rRNA are present in various mouse and human cells and engage in translation. These findings uncover a previously undescribed form of mammalian 5.8S rRNA and demonstrate that perturbations in ribosome assembly can be a source of heterogeneity in mature ribosomes. PMID:25995445

  13. Reduced expression of the mouse ribosomal protein Rpl17 alters the diversity of mature ribosomes by enhancing production of shortened 5.8S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minshi; Parshin, Andrey V; Shcherbik, Natalia; Pestov, Dimitri G

    2015-07-01

    Processing of rRNA during ribosome assembly can proceed through alternative pathways but it is unclear whether this could affect the structure of the ribosome. Here, we demonstrate that shortage of a ribosomal protein can change pre-rRNA processing in a way that over time alters ribosome diversity in the cell. Reducing the amount of Rpl17 in mouse cells led to stalled 60S subunit maturation, causing degradation of most of the synthesized precursors. A fraction of pre-60S subunits, however, were able to complete maturation, but with a 5'-truncated 5.8S rRNA, which we named 5.8SC. The 5' exoribonuclease Xrn2 is involved in the generation of both 5.8S(C) and the canonical long form of 5.8S rRNA. Ribosomes containing 5.8S(C) rRNA are present in various mouse and human cells and engage in translation. These findings uncover a previously undescribed form of mammalian 5.8S rRNA and demonstrate that perturbations in ribosome assembly can be a source of heterogeneity in mature ribosomes.

  14. Binding of Dihydrostreptomycin to Escherichia coli Ribosomes: Kinetics of the Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, F. N.; Flaks, Joel G.

    1972-01-01

    Investigations were carried out on the binding of dihydrostreptomycin to purified (and reassociated) 70S ribosomes and 30S subunits from streptomycin-susceptible strains, and the results were compared with those of similar studies with native (run-off) 70S ribosomes. At 0 C, only a small fraction of purified 70S ribosomes and 30S sub-units bound 1 molecule of the antibiotic tightly, and at a rate comparable to the binding occurring with native 70S ribosomes. At temperatures of 10 C and above, there was a temperature-dependent increase in the extent of antibiotic binding to purified 70S and 30S particles up to a maximum of 1 molecule/ribosomal particle, but the kinetics of binding was slow in comparison to that taking place at 0 C. These and other results suggest that a major fraction of 30S subunits and purified (or reassociated) 70S ribosomes are inactive in binding the antibiotic. This has been localized to an instability of the free 30S subunit, which in solution at 0 C has a half-life of 5 hr or less. Inactive 30S or 70S particles could be thermally activated, with the latter being identical in their streptomycin-binding properties to native 70S ribosomes. The activation kinetics were slow in comparison to the binding kinetics for the antibiotic and were indicative of a conformational change in ribosomal structure. There thus appears to be a reversible transition between active and inactive forms of the ribosomal particles for streptomycin binding, but additional binding sites for the antibiotic are not created by the transitions. The active form of the 30S subunit can be stabilized in the presence of polyuridylic acid, but much more effectively by association with the 50S subunit to form a 70S ribosome. The kinetics of dihydrostreptomycin binding were studied in both directions of the reaction, and the reaction in the direction of binding was found to be several orders of magnitude faster than that of the reverse, or debinding, direction. The kinetics of the

  15. Ribosomal Peptide Natural Products: Bridging the Ribosomal and Nonribosomal Worlds

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, John A.; Donia, Mohamed S.; Schmidt, Eric W.

    2010-01-01

    Ribosomally synthesized bacterial natural products rival the nonribosomal peptides in their structural and functional diversity. The last decade has seen substantial progress in the identification and characterization of biosynthetic pathways leading to ribosomal peptide natural products with new and unusual structural motifs. In some of these cases, the motifs are similar to those found in nonribosomal peptides, and many are constructed by convergent or even paralogous enzymes. Here, we summarize the major structural and biosynthetic categories of ribosomally synthesized bacterial natural products and, where applicable, compare them to their homologs from nonribosomal biosynthesis. PMID:19642421

  16. Linezolid-Dependent Function and Structure Adaptation of Ribosomes in a Staphylococcus epidermidis Strain Exhibiting Linezolid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Kokkori, Sofia; Apostolidi, Maria; Tsakris, Athanassios; Pournaras, Spyros

    2014-01-01

    Linezolid-dependent growth was recently reported in Staphylococcus epidermidis clinical strains carrying mutations associated with linezolid resistance. To investigate this unexpected behavior at the molecular level, we isolated active ribosomes from one of the linezolid-dependent strains and we compared them with ribosomes isolated from a wild-type strain. Both strains were grown in the absence and presence of linezolid. Detailed biochemical and structural analyses revealed essential differences in the function and structure of isolated ribosomes which were assembled in the presence of linezolid. The catalytic activity of peptidyltransferase was found to be significantly higher in the ribosomes derived from the linezolid-dependent strain. Interestingly, the same ribosomes exhibited an abnormal ribosomal subunit dissociation profile on a sucrose gradient in the absence of linezolid, but the profile was restored after treatment of the ribosomes with an excess of the antibiotic. Our study suggests that linezolid most likely modified the ribosomal assembly procedure, leading to a new functional ribosomal population active only in the presence of linezolid. Therefore, the higher growth rate of the partially linezolid-dependent strains could be attributed to the functional and structural adaptations of ribosomes to linezolid. PMID:24890589

  17. Linezolid-dependent function and structure adaptation of ribosomes in a Staphylococcus epidermidis strain exhibiting linezolid dependence.

    PubMed

    Kokkori, Sofia; Apostolidi, Maria; Tsakris, Athanassios; Pournaras, Spyros; Stathopoulos, Constantinos; Dinos, George

    2014-08-01

    Linezolid-dependent growth was recently reported in Staphylococcus epidermidis clinical strains carrying mutations associated with linezolid resistance. To investigate this unexpected behavior at the molecular level, we isolated active ribosomes from one of the linezolid-dependent strains and we compared them with ribosomes isolated from a wild-type strain. Both strains were grown in the absence and presence of linezolid. Detailed biochemical and structural analyses revealed essential differences in the function and structure of isolated ribosomes which were assembled in the presence of linezolid. The catalytic activity of peptidyltransferase was found to be significantly higher in the ribosomes derived from the linezolid-dependent strain. Interestingly, the same ribosomes exhibited an abnormal ribosomal subunit dissociation profile on a sucrose gradient in the absence of linezolid, but the profile was restored after treatment of the ribosomes with an excess of the antibiotic. Our study suggests that linezolid most likely modified the ribosomal assembly procedure, leading to a new functional ribosomal population active only in the presence of linezolid. Therefore, the higher growth rate of the partially linezolid-dependent strains could be attributed to the functional and structural adaptations of ribosomes to linezolid.

  18. Supernumerary proteins of mitochondrial ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Rackham, Oliver; Filipovska, Aleksandra

    2014-04-01

    Messenger RNAs encoded by mitochondrial genomes are translated on mitochondrial ribosomes that have unique structure and protein composition compared to prokaryotic and cytoplasmic ribosomes. Mitochondrial ribosomes are a patchwork of core proteins that share homology with prokaryotic ribosomal proteins and new, supernumerary proteins that can be unique to different organisms. In mammals, there are specific supernumerary ribosomal proteins that are not present in other eukaryotes. Here we discuss the roles of supernumerary proteins in the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression and compare them among different eukaryotic systems. Furthermore, we consider if differences in the structure and organization of mitochondrial genomes may have contributed to the acquisition of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins with new functions. The distinct and diverse compositions of mitochondrial ribosomes illustrate the high evolutionary divergence found between mitochondrial genetic systems. Elucidating the role of the organism-specific supernumerary proteins may provide a window into the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression through evolution in response to distinct evolutionary paths taken by mitochondria in different organisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Frontiers of Mitochondrial Research. © 2013.

  19. Single Molecule Force Measurement for Protein Synthesis on the Ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Sotaro

    2008-04-01

    The ribosome is a molecular machine that translates the genetic code described on the messenger RNA (mRNA) into an amino acid sequence through repetitive cycles of transfer RNA (tRNA) selection, peptide bond formation and translocation. Although the detailed interactions between the translation components have been revealed by extensive structural and biochemical studies, it is not known how the precise regulation of macromolecular movements required at each stage of translation is achieved. Here we demonstrate an optical tweezer assay to measure the rupture force between a single ribosome complex and mRNA. The rupture force was compared between ribosome complexes assembled on an mRNA with and without a strong Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence. The removal of the SD sequence significantly reduced the rupture force, indicating that the SD interactions contribute significantly to the stability of the ribosomal complex on the mRNA in a pre-peptidyl transfer state. In contrast, the post-peptidyl transfer state weakened the rupture force as compared to the complex in a pre-peptidyl transfer state and it was the same for both the SD-containing and SD-deficient mRNAs. The results suggest that formation of the first peptide bond destabilizes the SD interaction, resulting in the weakening of the force with which the ribosome grips an mRNA. This might be an important requirement to facilitate movement of the ribosome along mRNA during the first translocation step. In this article, we discuss about the above new results including the introduction of the ribosome translation mechanism and the optical tweezer method.

  20. Ribosome Biogenesis and the Translation Process in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kaczanowska, Magdalena; Rydén-Aulin, Monica

    2007-01-01

    Summary: Translation, the decoding of mRNA into protein, is the third and final element of the central dogma. The ribosome, a nucleoprotein particle, is responsible and essential for this process. The bacterial ribosome consists of three rRNA molecules and approximately 55 proteins, components that are put together in an intricate and tightly regulated way. When finally matured, the quality of the particle, as well as the amount of active ribosomes, must be checked. The focus of this review is ribosome biogenesis in Escherichia coli and its cross-talk with the ongoing protein synthesis. We discuss how the ribosomal components are produced and how their synthesis is regulated according to growth rate and the nutritional contents of the medium. We also present the many accessory factors important for the correct assembly process, the list of which has grown substantially during the last few years, even though the precise mechanisms and roles of most of the proteins are not understood. PMID:17804668

  1. Transcriptome-wide measurement of ribosomal occupancy by ribosome profiling.

    PubMed

    Aeschimann, Florian; Xiong, Jieyi; Arnold, Andreas; Dieterich, Christoph; Grosshans, Helge

    2015-09-01

    Gene expression profiling provides a tool to analyze the internal states of cells or organisms, and their responses to perturbations. While global measurements of mRNA levels have thus been widely used for many years, it is only through the recent development of the ribosome profiling technique that an analogous examination of global mRNA translation programs has become possible. Ribosome profiling reveals which RNAs are being translated to what extent and where the translated open reading frames are located. In addition, different modes of translation regulation can be distinguished and characterized. Here, we present an optimized, step-by-step protocol for ribosome profiling. Although established in Caenorhabditis elegans, our protocol and optimization approaches should be equally usable for other model organisms or cell culture with little adaptation. Next to providing a protocol, we compare two different methods for isolation of single ribosomes and two different library preparations, and describe strategies to optimize the RNase digest and to reduce ribosomal RNA contamination in the libraries. Moreover, we discuss bioinformatic strategies to evaluate the quality of the data and explain how the data can be analyzed for different applications. In sum, this article seeks to facilitate the understanding, execution, and optimization of ribosome profiling experiments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Architecture of the 90S Pre-ribosome: A Structural View on the Birth of the Eukaryotic Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Kornprobst, Markus; Turk, Martin; Kellner, Nikola; Cheng, Jingdong; Flemming, Dirk; Koš-Braun, Isabelle; Koš, Martin; Thoms, Matthias; Berninghausen, Otto; Beckmann, Roland; Hurt, Ed

    2016-07-14

    The 90S pre-ribosome is an early biogenesis intermediate formed during co-transcriptional ribosome formation, composed of ∼70 assembly factors and several small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) that associate with nascent pre-rRNA. We report the cryo-EM structure of the Chaetomium thermophilum 90S pre-ribosome, revealing how a network of biogenesis factors including 19 β-propellers and large α-solenoid proteins engulfs the pre-rRNA. Within the 90S pre-ribosome, we identify the UTP-A, UTP-B, Mpp10-Imp3-Imp4, Bms1-Rcl1, and U3 snoRNP modules, which are organized around 5'-ETS and partially folded 18S rRNA. The U3 snoRNP is strategically positioned at the center of the 90S particle to perform its multiple tasks during pre-rRNA folding and processing. The architecture of the elusive 90S pre-ribosome gives unprecedented structural insight into the early steps of pre-rRNA maturation. Nascent rRNA that is co-transcriptionally folded and given a particular shape by encapsulation within a dedicated mold-like structure is reminiscent of how polypeptides use chaperone chambers for their protein folding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Multiple enzymatic digestions and ion mobility separation improve quantification of bacterial ribosomal proteins by data independent acquisition liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dator, Romel P; Gaston, Kirk W; Limbach, Patrick A

    2014-05-06

    Mass spectrometry-based quantification of ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) associated with mature ribosomes and ribosome assembly complexes is typically accomplished by relative quantification strategies. These strategies provide information on the relative stoichiometry of proteins within the complex compared to a wild-type strain. Here we have evaluated the applicability of a label-free approach, enhanced liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS(E)), for absolute "ribosome-centric" quantification of r-proteins in Escherichia coli mature ribosomes. Because the information obtained in this experiment is related to the number of peptides identified per protein, experimental conditions that allow accurate and reproducible quantification of r-proteins were found. Using an additional dimension of gas-phase separation through ion mobility and the use of multiple endoproteinase digestion significantly improved quantification of proteins associated with mature ribosomes. The actively translating ribosomes (polysomes) contain amounts of proteins consistent with their known stoichiometry within the complex. These measurements exhibited technical and biological reproducibilities at %CV less than 15% and 35%, respectively. The improved LC-MS(E) approach described here can be used to characterize in vivo ribosome assembly complexes captured during ribosome biogenesis and assembly under different perturbations (e.g., antibiotics, deletion mutants of assembly factors, oxidative stress, nutrient deprivation). Quantitative analysis of these captured complexes will provide information relating to the interplay and dynamics of how these perturbations interfere with the assembly process.

  4. {sup 30}S({alpha}, p) in X-Ray Bursts at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.; Binh, D. N.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Ohshiro, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Chen, A. A.; Chen, J.; Setoodeh nia, K.; Kaji, D.; Nishimura, S.; Kim, A.; Lee, N. H.; Wakabayashi, Y.

    2010-08-12

    Over the past three years, we have worked on developing a well-characterized {sup 30}S radioactive beam to be used in a future experiment aiming to directly measure the {sup 30}S({alpha}, p) stellar reaction rate within the Gamow window of Type I X-ray bursts.

  5. Structural and functional analyses of a yeast mitochondrial ribosomal protein homologous to ribosomal protein S15 of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dang, H; Ellis, S R

    1990-01-01

    We have purified a small subunit mitochondrial ribosomal protein, MRPS28p, from the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sequence from the amino terminus of MRPS28p was used to design a degenerate oligonucleotide that was complementary to the MRPS28 gene. The MRPS28 gene was isolated and its sequence determined. The MRPS28 sequence encodes a 28 kDa protein that has a region of homology with ribosomal protein S15 of E. coli. This region spans the entire length of the E. coli protein, but as MRPS28p is larger, includes only the portion of the MRPS28p sequence from amino acids 150 to 238. Based on this homology, we predict that MRPS28p, like E. coli S15, interacts directly with small subunit rRNA and functions as an early protein in ribosome assembly. Cells carrying a disrupted chromosomal copy of MRPS28 are unable to respire and spontaneously lose portions of their mitochondrial genomes at a high frequency. These phenotypes are consistent with an essential role for MRPS28p in the assembly and/or function of the mitochondrial ribosome. Images PMID:2263452

  6. The RDP (Ribosomal Database Project).

    PubMed

    Maidak, B L; Olsen, G J; Larsen, N; Overbeek, R; McCaughey, M J; Woese, C R

    1997-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams, and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous FTP (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server@rdp.life.uiuc.edu), gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu) and WWW (http://rdpwww.life.uiuc.edu/ ). The electronic mail and WWW servers provide ribosomal probe checking, approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences, screening for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment, and a suggested placement of an unknown sequence on an existing phylogenetic tree.

  7. The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP).

    PubMed

    Maidak, B L; Olsen, G J; Larsen, N; Overbeek, R; McCaughey, M J; Woese, C R

    1996-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server@rdp.life.uiuc.edu), gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu) and World Wide Web (WWW)(http://rdpwww.life.uiuc.edu/). The electronic mail and WWW servers provide ribosomal probe checking, screening for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment and approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences on an existing phylogenetic tree.

  8. The RDP (Ribosomal Database Project).

    PubMed Central

    Maidak, B L; Olsen, G J; Larsen, N; Overbeek, R; McCaughey, M J; Woese, C R

    1997-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams, and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous FTP (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server@rdp.life.uiuc.edu), gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu) and WWW (http://rdpwww.life.uiuc.edu/ ). The electronic mail and WWW servers provide ribosomal probe checking, approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences, screening for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment, and a suggested placement of an unknown sequence on an existing phylogenetic tree. PMID:9016515

  9. Molecular basis for protection of ribosomal protein L4 from cellular degradation

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Ferdinand M.; Hoelz, André

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis requires the nuclear import of ∼80 nascent ribosomal proteins and the elimination of excess amounts by the cellular degradation machinery. Assembly chaperones recognize nascent unassembled ribosomal proteins and transport them together with karyopherins to their nuclear destination. We report the crystal structure of ribosomal protein L4 (RpL4) bound to its dedicated assembly chaperone of L4 (Acl4), revealing extensive interactions sequestering 70 exposed residues of the extended RpL4 loop. The observed molecular recognition fundamentally differs from canonical promiscuous chaperone–substrate interactions. We demonstrate that the eukaryote-specific RpL4 extension harbours overlapping binding sites for Acl4 and the nuclear transport factor Kap104, facilitating its continuous protection from the cellular degradation machinery. Thus, Acl4 serves a dual function to facilitate nuclear import and simultaneously protect unassembled RpL4 from the cellular degradation machinery. PMID:28148929

  10. Targeting ricin to the ribosome.

    PubMed

    May, Kerrie L; Yan, Qing; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2013-07-01

    The plant toxin ricin is highly toxic for mammalian cells and is of concern for bioterrorism. Ricin belongs to a family of functionally related toxins, collectively referred to as ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs), which disable ribosomes and halt protein synthesis. Currently there are no specific antidotes against ricin or related RIPs. The catalytic subunit of ricin is an N-glycosidase that depurinates a universally conserved adenine residue within the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) of the 28S rRNA. This depurination activity inhibits translation and its biochemistry has been intensively studied. Yet, recent developments paint a more complex picture of toxicity, with ribosomal proteins and cellular signaling pathways contributing to the potency of ricin. In particular, several studies have now established the importance of the ribosomal stalk structure in facilitating the depurination activity and ribosome specificity of ricin and other RIPs. This review highlights recent developments defining toxin-ribosome interactions and examines the significance of these interactions for toxicity and therapeutic intervention.

  11. Mutations in ribosomal proteins S4 and S12 influence the higher order structure of 16 S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Allen, P N; Noller, H F

    1989-08-05

    We have studied the effects of protein mutations on the higher order structure of 16 S rRNA in Escherichia coli ribosomes, using a set of structure-sensitive chemical probes. Ten mutant strains were studied, which contained alterations in ribosomal proteins S4 and S12, including double mutants containing both altered S4 and S12. Two ribosomal ambiguity (ram) S4 mutant strains, four streptomycin resistant (SmR) S12 mutant strains, one streptomycin pseudodependent (SmP) S12 mutant strain, one streptomycin dependent (SmD) S12 mutant strain and two streptomycin independent (Sm1) double mutants (containing both-SmD and ram mutations) were probed and compared to an isogenic wild-type strain. In ribosomes from strains containing S4 ram mutations, nucleotides A8 and A26 become more reactive to dimethyl sulfate (DMS) at their N-1 positions. In ribosomes from strains bearing the SmD allele, A908, A909, A1413 and G1487 are significantly less reactive to chemical probes. These same effects are observed when the S4 and S12 mutations are present simultaneously in the double mutants. An interesting correlation is found between the reactivity of A908 and the miscoding potential of SmR, SmD, SmP and wild-type ribosomes; the reactivity of A908 increases as the translational error frequency of the ribosomes increases. In the case of ram ribosomes, the reactivity of A908 resembles that of wild-type, unless tRNA is bound, in which case it becomes hyper-reactive. Similarly, streptomycin has little effect on A908 in wild-type ribosomes unless tRNA is bound, in which case its reactivity increases to resemble that of ram ribosomes with bound tRNA. Finally, interaction of streptomycin with SmP and SmD ribosomes causes the reactivity of A908 to increase to near-wild-type levels. A simple model is proposed, in which the reactivity of A908 reflects the position of an equilibrium between two conformational states of the 30 S subunit, one of which is DMS-reactive, and the other DMS

  12. Ribosome dynamics and the evolutionary history of ribosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, George E.; Paci, Maxim; Tran, Quyen; Petrov, Anton S.; Williams, Loren D.

    2015-09-01

    The ribosome is a dynamic nanomachine responsible for coded protein synthesis. Its major subsystems were essentially in place at the time of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). Ribosome evolutionary history thus potentially provides a window into the pre- LUCA world. This history begins with the origins of the peptidyl transferase center where the actual peptide is synthesized and then continues over an extended timeframe as additional functional centers including the GTPase center are added. The large ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) have grown over time by an accretion process and a model exists that proposes a relative age of each accreted element. We have compared atomic resolution ribosome structures before and after EF-G bound GTP hydrolysis and thereby identified the location of 23 pivot points in the large rRNAs that facilitate ribosome dynamics. Pivots in small subunit helices h28 and h44 appear to be especially central to the process and according to the accretion model significantly older than the other helices containing pivots. Overall, the results suggest that ribosomal dynamics occurred in two phases. In the first phase, an inherently mobile h28/h44 combination provided the flexibility needed to create a dynamic ribosome that was essentially a Brownian machine. This addition likely made coded peptide synthesis possible by facilitating movement of a primitive mRNA. During the second phase, addition of pivoting elements and the creation of a factor binding site allowed the regulation of the inherent motion created by h28/h44. All of these events likely occurred before LUCA.

  13. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by their dedicated chaperones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pausch, Patrick; Singh, Ujjwala; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Pillet, Benjamin; Murat, Guillaume; Altegoer, Florian; Stier, Gunter; Thoms, Matthias; Hurt, Ed; Sinning, Irmgard; Bange, Gert; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-06-01

    Exponentially growing yeast cells produce every minute >160,000 ribosomal proteins. Owing to their difficult physicochemical properties, the synthesis of assembly-competent ribosomal proteins represents a major challenge. Recent evidence highlights that dedicated chaperone proteins recognize the N-terminal regions of ribosomal proteins and promote their soluble expression and delivery to the assembly site. Here we explore the intuitive possibility that ribosomal proteins are captured by dedicated chaperones in a co-translational manner. Affinity purification of four chaperones (Rrb1, Syo1, Sqt1 and Yar1) selectively enriched the mRNAs encoding their specific ribosomal protein clients (Rpl3, Rpl5, Rpl10 and Rps3). X-ray crystallography reveals how the N-terminal, rRNA-binding residues of Rpl10 are shielded by Sqt1's WD-repeat β-propeller, providing mechanistic insight into the incorporation of Rpl10 into pre-60S subunits. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by dedicated chaperones constitutes an elegant mechanism to prevent unspecific interactions and aggregation of ribosomal proteins on their road to incorporation.

  14. [Mg2+ ions affect the structure of the central domain of the 18S rRNA in the vicinity of the ribosomal protein S13 binding site].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A V; Malygin, A A; Karpova, G G

    2013-01-01

    It is known that Mg2+ ions at high concentrations stabilize the structure of the 16S rRNA in a conformation favorable for binding to the ribosomal proteins in the course of the eubacterial 30S ribosomal subunits assembly in vitro. Effect of Mg2+ on the formation of the 18S rRNA structure at the 40S subunit assembly remains poorly explored. In this paper, we show that the sequentional increase of the Mg2+ concentration from 0.5 mM to 20 mM leads to a significant decrease of the affinity of recombinant human ribosomal protein S13 (rpS13e) to a RNA transcript corresponding to the central domain fragment of the 18S rRNA (18SCD). The regions near the rpS13e binding site in 18SCD (including the nucleotides of helices H20 and H22), whose availabilities to hydroxyl radicals were dependent on the Mg2+ concentration, were determined. It was found that increase of the concentrations of Mg2+ results in the enhanced accessibilities of nucleotides G933-C937 and C1006-A1009 in helix H22 and reduces those of nucleotides A1023, A1024, and A1028-S1026 in the helix H20. Comparison of the results obtained with the crystallographic data on the structure of the central domain of 18S rRNA in the 40S ribosomal subunit led to conclusion that increase of Mg2+ concentrations results in the reorientation of helices H20 and H24 relatively helices H22 and H23 to form a structure, in which these helices are positioned the same way as in 40S subunits. Hence, saturation of the central domain of 18S rRNA with coordinated Mg2+ ions causes the same changes in its structure as rpS13e binding does, and leads to decreasing of this domain affinity to the protein.

  15. A protein inventory of human ribosome biogenesis reveals an essential function of exportin 5 in 60S subunit export.

    PubMed

    Wild, Thomas; Horvath, Peter; Wyler, Emanuel; Widmann, Barbara; Badertscher, Lukas; Zemp, Ivo; Kozak, Karol; Csucs, Gabor; Lund, Elsebet; Kutay, Ulrike

    2010-10-26

    The assembly of ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes is a complex, multistep process so far mostly studied in yeast. In S. cerevisiae, more than 200 factors including ribosomal proteins and trans-acting factors are required for the ordered assembly of 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits. To date, only few human homologs of these yeast ribosome synthesis factors have been characterized. Here, we used a systematic RNA interference (RNAi) approach to analyze the contribution of 464 candidate factors to ribosomal subunit biogenesis in human cells. The screen was based on visual readouts, using inducible, fluorescent ribosomal proteins as reporters. By performing computer-based image analysis utilizing supervised machine-learning techniques, we obtained evidence for a functional link of 153 human proteins to ribosome synthesis. Our data show that core features of ribosome assembly are conserved from yeast to human, but differences exist for instance with respect to 60S subunit export. Unexpectedly, our RNAi screen uncovered a requirement for the export receptor Exportin 5 (Exp5) in nuclear export of 60S subunits in human cells. We show that Exp5, like the known 60S exportin Crm1, binds to pre-60S particles in a RanGTP-dependent manner. Interference with either Exp5 or Crm1 function blocks 60S export in both human cells and frog oocytes, whereas 40S export is compromised only upon inhibition of Crm1. Thus, 60S subunit export is dependent on at least two RanGTP-binding exportins in vertebrate cells.

  16. [Ribosomal RNA Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    It is generally believed that an RNA World existed at an early stage in the history of life. During this early period, RNA molecules are seen to be potentially involved in both catalysis and the storage of genetic information. Translation presents several interrelated themes of inquiry for exobiology. First, it is essential, for understanding the very origin of life, how peptides and eventually proteins might have come to be made on the early Earth in a template directed manner. Second, it is necessary to understand how a machinery of similar complexity to that found in the ribosomes of modern organisms came to exist by the time of the last common ancestor (as detected by 16S rRNA sequence studies). Third, the ribosomal RNAs themselves likely had a very early origin and studies of their history may be very informative about the nature of the RNA World. Moreover, studies of these RNAs will contribute to a better understanding of the potential roles of RNA in early evolution.During the past year we have ave conducted a comparative study of four completely sequenced bacterial genoames. We have focused initially on conservation of gene order. The second component of the project continues to build on the model system for studying the validity of variant 5S rRNA sequences in the vicinity of the modern Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA that we established earlier. This system has made it possible to conduct a detailed and extensive analysis of a local portion of the sequence space. These core methods have been used to construct numerous mutants during the last several years. Although it has been a secondary focus, this work has continued over the last year such that we now have in excess of 125 V. proteolyticus derived constructs which have been made and characterized. We have also continued high resolution NMR work on RNA oligomers originally initiated by G. Kenneth Smith who was funded by a NASA Graduate Student Researcher's Fellowship Award until May of 1996. Mr. Smith

  17. Neuron-Like Networks Between Ribosomal Proteins Within the Ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirot, Olivier; Timsit, Youri

    2016-05-01

    From brain to the World Wide Web, information-processing networks share common scale invariant properties. Here, we reveal the existence of neural-like networks at a molecular scale within the ribosome. We show that with their extensions, ribosomal proteins form complex assortative interaction networks through which they communicate through tiny interfaces. The analysis of the crystal structures of 50S eubacterial particles reveals that most of these interfaces involve key phylogenetically conserved residues. The systematic observation of interactions between basic and aromatic amino acids at the interfaces and along the extension provides new structural insights that may contribute to decipher the molecular mechanisms of signal transmission within or between the ribosomal proteins. Similar to neurons interacting through “molecular synapses”, ribosomal proteins form a network that suggest an analogy with a simple molecular brain in which the “sensory-proteins” innervate the functional ribosomal sites, while the “inter-proteins” interconnect them into circuits suitable to process the information flow that circulates during protein synthesis. It is likely that these circuits have evolved to coordinate both the complex macromolecular motions and the binding of the multiple factors during translation. This opens new perspectives on nanoscale information transfer and processing.

  18. Time-dependent Effects of Transcription- and Translation-halting Drugs on the Spatial Distributions of the E. coli Chromosome and Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Somenath; Choi, Heejun; Mondal, Jagannath; Weisshaar, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Previously observed effects of rifampicin and chloramphenicol indicate that transcription and translation activity strongly affect the coarse spatial organization of the bacterial cytoplasm. Single-cell, time-resolved, quantitative imaging of chromosome and ribosome spatial distributions and ribosome diffusion in live E. coli provides insight into the underlying mechanisms. Monte Carlo simulations of model DNA-ribosome mixtures support a novel nucleoid-ribosome mixing hypothesis. In normal conditions, 70S-polysomes and the chromosomal DNA segregate, while 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits are able to penetrate the nucleoids. Growth conditions and drug treatments determine the partitioning of ribosomes into 70S-polysomes vs free 30S and 50S subunits. Entropic and excluded volume effects then dictate the resulting chromosome and ribosome spatial distributions. Direct observation of radial contraction of the nucleoids 0-5 min after treatment with either transcription- or translation-halting drugs supports the hypothesis that simultaneous transcription, translation, and insertion of proteins into the membrane (“transertion”) exerts an expanding force on the chromosomal DNA. Breaking of the DNA-RNA polymerase-mRNA-ribosome-membrane chain in either of two ways causes similar nucleoid contraction on a similar timescale. We suggest that chromosomal expansion due to transertion enables co-transcriptional translation throughout the nucleoids. PMID:25250841

  19. NEDDylation promotes stress granule assembly

    PubMed Central

    Jayabalan, Aravinth Kumar; Sanchez, Anthony; Park, Ra Young; Yoon, Sang Pil; Kang, Gum-Yong; Baek, Je-Hyun; Anderson, Paul; Kee, Younghoon; Ohn, Takbum

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) harbour translationally stalled messenger ribonucleoproteins and play important roles in regulating gene expression and cell fate. Here we show that neddylation promotes SG assembly in response to arsenite-induced oxidative stress. Inhibition or depletion of key components of the neddylation machinery concomitantly inhibits stress-induced polysome disassembly and SG assembly. Affinity purification and subsequent mass-spectrometric analysis of Nedd8-conjugated proteins from translationally stalled ribosomal fractions identified ribosomal proteins, translation factors and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), including SRSF3, a previously known SG regulator. We show that SRSF3 is selectively neddylated at Lys85 in response to arsenite. A non-neddylatable SRSF3 (K85R) mutant do not prevent arsenite-induced polysome disassembly, but fails to support the SG assembly, suggesting that the neddylation pathway plays an important role in SG assembly. PMID:27381497

  20. Maize reas1 Mutant Stimulates Ribosome Use Efficiency and Triggers Distinct Transcriptional and Translational Responses.

    PubMed

    Qi, Weiwei; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Qiao; Wang, Qun; Li, Xia; Yao, Dongsheng; Jin, Ying; Wang, Gang; Wang, Guifeng; Song, Rentao

    2016-02-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental cellular process in all cells. Impaired ribosome biogenesis causes developmental defects; however, its molecular and cellular bases are not fully understood. We cloned a gene responsible for a maize (Zea mays) small seed mutant, dek* (for defective kernel), and found that it encodes Ribosome export associated1 (ZmReas1). Reas1 is an AAA-ATPase that controls 60S ribosome export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after ribosome maturation. dek* is a weak mutant allele with decreased Reas1 function. In dek* cells, mature 60S ribosome subunits are reduced in the nucleus and cytoplasm, but the proportion of actively translating polyribosomes in cytosol is significantly increased. Reduced phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α and the increased elongation factor 1α level indicate an enhancement of general translational efficiency in dek* cells. The mutation also triggers dramatic changes in differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs. Discrepancy was observed between differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs, indicating distinct cellular responses at transcription and translation levels to the stress of defective ribosome processing. DNA replication and nucleosome assembly-related gene expression are selectively suppressed at the translational level, resulting in inhibited cell growth and proliferation in dek* cells. This study provides insight into cellular responses due to impaired ribosome biogenesis. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Effects of chronic ethanol feeding on the protein composition of mitochondrial ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Cahill, A; Cunningham, C C

    2000-10-01

    Chronic ethanol feeding has been shown to decrease the number of functionally active mitochondrial ribosomes by 55%. In this work, 55S mitochondrial ribosomes were isolated from rat liver and their constitutive proteins characterized by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and quantified by densitometry. A total of 86 proteins were found to be associated with the mitochondrial ribosome. This compares with 70 isolated from cytoplasmic ribosomes. In addition, mitochondrial ribosomal proteins were found to be significantly less basic than their cytoplasmic counterparts. Chronic ethanol feeding was found to significantly decrease the levels of a number of constitutive proteins of the mitochondrial ribosome when compared to those isolated from pair-fed controls. Sucrose density gradient analyses revealed a significant decrease in the number of intact 55S ribosomes. It is suggested that ethanol-elicited alterations in specific constitutive proteins of the mitochondrial ribosome may lead to impaired assembly of the monosome and that this may result in lower levels of those displaying functional activity.

  2. New insights into the enzymatic role of EF-G in ribosome recycling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dejiu; Yan, Kaige; Zhang, Yiwei; Liu, Guangqiao; Cao, Xintao; Song, Guangtao; Xie, Qiang; Gao, Ning; Qin, Yan

    2015-12-02

    During translation, elongation factor G (EF-G) plays a catalytic role in tRNA translocation and a facilitative role in ribosome recycling. By stabilizing the rotated ribosome and interacting with ribosome recycling factor (RRF), EF-G was hypothesized to induce the domain rotations of RRF, which subsequently performs the function of splitting the major intersubunit bridges and thus separates the ribosome into subunits for recycling. Here, with systematic mutagenesis, FRET analysis and cryo-EM single particle approach, we analyzed the interplay between EF-G/RRF and post termination complex (PoTC). Our data reveal that the two conserved loops (loop I and II) at the tip region of EF-G domain IV possess distinct roles in tRNA translocation and ribosome recycling. Specifically, loop II might be directly involved in disrupting the main intersubunit bridge B2a between helix 44 (h44 from the 30S subunit) and helix 69 (H69 from the 50S subunit) in PoTC. Therefore, our data suggest a new ribosome recycling mechanism which requires an active involvement of EF-G. In addition to supporting RRF, EF-G plays an enzymatic role in destabilizing B2a via its loop II. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. New insights into the enzymatic role of EF-G in ribosome recycling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dejiu; Yan, Kaige; Zhang, Yiwei; Liu, Guangqiao; Cao, Xintao; Song, Guangtao; Xie, Qiang; Gao, Ning; Qin, Yan

    2015-01-01

    During translation, elongation factor G (EF-G) plays a catalytic role in tRNA translocation and a facilitative role in ribosome recycling. By stabilizing the rotated ribosome and interacting with ribosome recycling factor (RRF), EF-G was hypothesized to induce the domain rotations of RRF, which subsequently performs the function of splitting the major intersubunit bridges and thus separates the ribosome into subunits for recycling. Here, with systematic mutagenesis, FRET analysis and cryo-EM single particle approach, we analyzed the interplay between EF-G/RRF and post termination complex (PoTC). Our data reveal that the two conserved loops (loop I and II) at the tip region of EF-G domain IV possess distinct roles in tRNA translocation and ribosome recycling. Specifically, loop II might be directly involved in disrupting the main intersubunit bridge B2a between helix 44 (h44 from the 30S subunit) and helix 69 (H69 from the 50S subunit) in PoTC. Therefore, our data suggest a new ribosome recycling mechanism which requires an active involvement of EF-G. In addition to supporting RRF, EF-G plays an enzymatic role in destabilizing B2a via its loop II. PMID:26432831

  4. Key Intermediates in Ribosome Recycling Visualized by Time-Resolved Cryoelectron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ziao; Kaledhonkar, Sandip; Borg, Anneli; Sun, Ming; Chen, Bo; Grassucci, Robert A; Ehrenberg, Måns; Frank, Joachim

    2016-12-06

    Upon encountering a stop codon on mRNA, polypeptide synthesis on the ribosome is terminated by release factors, and the ribosome complex, still bound with mRNA and P-site-bound tRNA (post-termination complex, PostTC), is split into ribosomal subunits, ready for a new round of translational initiation. Separation of post-termination ribosomes into subunits, or "ribosome recycling," is promoted by the joint action of ribosome-recycling factor (RRF) and elongation factor G (EF-G) in a guanosine triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis-dependent manner. Here we used a mixing-spraying-based method of time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to visualize the short-lived intermediates of the recycling process. The two complexes that contain (1) both RRF and EF-G bound to the PostTC or (2) deacylated tRNA bound to the 30S subunit are of particular interest. Our observations of the native form of these complexes demonstrate the strong potential of time-resolved cryo-EM for visualizing previously unobservable transient structures.

  5. Preparation and proteomic analysis of chloroplast ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kenichi

    2011-01-01

    Proteomics of chloroplast ribosomes in spinach and Chlamydomonas revealed unique protein composition and structures of plastid ribosomes. These studies have suggested the presence of some ribosomal proteins unique to plastid ribosomes which may be involved in plastid-unique translation regulation. Considering the strong background of genetic analysis and molecular biology in Arabidopsis, the in-depth proteomic characterization of Arabidopsis plastid ribosomes would facilitate further understanding of plastid translation in higher plants. Here, I describe simple and rapid methods for the preparation of plastid ribosomes from Chlamydomonas and Arabidopsis using sucrose gradients. I also describe purity criteria and methods for yield estimation of the purified plastid ribosomes and subunits, methods for the preparation of plastid ribosomal proteins, as well as the identification of some Arabidopsis plastid ribosomal proteins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

  6. Chaperoning 5S RNA assembly

    PubMed Central

    Madru, Clément; Lebaron, Simon; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Pipoli, Juliana; Pasmant, Eric; Réty, Stéphane; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, three of the four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs)—the 5.8S, 18S, and 25S/28S rRNAs—are processed from a single pre-rRNA transcript and assembled into ribosomes. The fourth rRNA, the 5S rRNA, is transcribed by RNA polymerase III and is assembled into the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP), containing ribosomal proteins Rpl5/uL18 and Rpl11/uL5, prior to its incorporation into preribosomes. In mammals, the 5S RNP is also a central regulator of the homeostasis of the tumor suppressor p53. The nucleolar localization of the 5S RNP and its assembly into preribosomes are performed by a specialized complex composed of Rpf2 and Rrs1 in yeast or Bxdc1 and hRrs1 in humans. Here we report the structural and functional characterization of the Rpf2–Rrs1 complex alone, in complex with the 5S RNA, and within pre-60S ribosomes. We show that the Rpf2–Rrs1 complex contains a specialized 5S RNA E-loop-binding module, contacts the Rpl5 protein, and also contacts the ribosome assembly factor Rsa4 and the 25S RNA. We propose that the Rpf2–Rrs1 complex establishes a network of interactions that guide the incorporation of the 5S RNP in preribosomes in the initial conformation prior to its rotation to form the central protuberance found in the mature large ribosomal subunit. PMID:26159998

  7. Chaperoning 5S RNA assembly.

    PubMed

    Madru, Clément; Lebaron, Simon; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Pipoli, Juliana; Pasmant, Eric; Réty, Stéphane; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    In eukaryotes, three of the four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs)—the 5.8S, 18S, and 25S/28S rRNAs—are processed from a single pre-rRNA transcript and assembled into ribosomes. The fourth rRNA, the 5S rRNA, is transcribed by RNA polymerase III and is assembled into the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP), containing ribosomal proteins Rpl5/uL18 and Rpl11/uL5, prior to its incorporation into preribosomes. In mammals, the 5S RNP is also a central regulator of the homeostasis of the tumor suppressor p53. The nucleolar localization of the 5S RNP and its assembly into preribosomes are performed by a specialized complex composed of Rpf2 and Rrs1 in yeast or Bxdc1 and hRrs1 in humans. Here we report the structural and functional characterization of the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex alone, in complex with the 5S RNA, and within pre-60S ribosomes. We show that the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex contains a specialized 5S RNA E-loop-binding module, contacts the Rpl5 protein, and also contacts the ribosome assembly factor Rsa4 and the 25S RNA. We propose that the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex establishes a network of interactions that guide the incorporation of the 5S RNP in preribosomes in the initial conformation prior to its rotation to form the central protuberance found in the mature large ribosomal subunit. © 2015 Madru et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  8. The importance of ribosome production, and the 5S RNP-MDM2 pathway, in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Pelava, Andria; Schneider, Claudia; Watkins, Nicholas J

    2016-08-15

    Ribosomes are abundant, large RNA-protein complexes that are the source of all protein synthesis in the cell. The production of ribosomes is an extremely energetically expensive cellular process that has long been linked to human health and disease. More recently, it has been shown that ribosome biogenesis is intimately linked to multiple cellular signalling pathways and that defects in ribosome production can lead to a wide variety of human diseases. Furthermore, changes in ribosome production in response to nutrient levels in the diet lead to metabolic re-programming of the liver. Reduced or abnormal ribosome production in response to cellular stress or mutations in genes encoding factors critical for ribosome biogenesis causes the activation of the tumour suppressor p53, which leads to re-programming of cellular transcription. The ribosomal assembly intermediate 5S RNP (ribonucleoprotein particle), containing RPL5, RPL11 and the 5S rRNA, accumulates when ribosome biogenesis is blocked. The excess 5S RNP binds to murine double minute 2 (MDM2), the main p53-suppressor in the cell, inhibiting its function and leading to p53 activation. Here, we discuss the involvement of ribosome biogenesis in the homoeostasis of p53 in the cell and in human health and disease. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. Nuclear structure of 30S and its implications for nucleosynthesis in classical novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setoodehnia, K.; Chen, A. A.; Kahl, D.; Komatsubara, T.; José, J.; Longland, R.; Abe, Y.; Binh, D. N.; Chen, J.; Cherubini, S.; Clark, J. A.; Deibel, C. M.; Fukuoka, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, T.; Hendriks, J.; Ishibashi, Y.; Ito, Y.; Kubono, S.; Lennard, W. N.; Moriguchi, T.; Nagae, D.; Nishikiori, R.; Niwa, T.; Ozawa, A.; Parker, P. D.; Seiler, D.; Shizuma, T.; Suzuki, H.; Wrede, C.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yuasa, T.

    2013-06-01

    Background: The uncertainty in the 29P(p,γ)30S reaction rate over 0.1 ≤ T ≤ 1.3 GK was previously determined to span approximately four orders of magnitude due to the uncertain location of two previously unobserved 3+ and 2+ resonances in the Ex=4.7-4.8 MeV region in 30S. Therefore, the abundances of silicon isotopes synthesized in novae, which are relevant for the identification of presolar grains of putative nova origin, were uncertain by a factor of 3.Purpose: (a) To investigate the level structure of 30S above the proton threshold [4394.9(7) keV] via charged-particle spectroscopy using the 32S(p,t)30S reaction and in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy using the 28Si(3He, nγ)30S reaction to calculate the 29P(p,γ)30S reaction rate. (b) To explore the impact of this rate on the abundances of silicon isotopes synthesized in novae.Methods: Differential cross sections of the 32S(p,t)30S reaction were measured at 34.5 MeV. Distorted-wave Born approximation calculations were performed to constrain the spin-parity assignments of the observed levels, including the two astrophysically important levels. An energy-level scheme was deduced from γ-γ coincidence measurements using the 28Si(3He, nγ)30S reaction. Spin-parity assignments based on measurements of γ-ray angular distributions and γ-γ directional correlation from oriented nuclei were made for most of the observed levels of 30S.Results: The resonance energies corresponding to the states with 4.5 MeV ≲ Ex ≲ 6 MeV, including the two astrophysically important states predicted previously, are measured with significantly better precision than before. The spin-parity assignments of both astrophysically important resonances are confirmed. The uncertainty in the rate of the 29P(p,γ)30S reaction is substantially reduced over the temperature range of interest. Finally, the influence of this rate on the abundance ratios of silicon isotopes synthesized in novae are obtained via 1D hydrodynamic nova simulations

  10. Structural characterization of an alternative mode of tigecycline binding to the bacterial ribosome.

    PubMed

    Schedlbauer, Andreas; Kaminishi, Tatsuya; Ochoa-Lizarralde, Borja; Dhimole, Neha; Zhou, Shu; López-Alonso, Jorge P; Connell, Sean R; Fucini, Paola

    2015-05-01

    Although both tetracycline and tigecycline inhibit protein synthesis by sterically hindering the binding of tRNA to the ribosomal A site, tigecycline shows increased efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo activity assays and escapes the most common resistance mechanisms associated with the tetracycline class of antibiotics. These differences in activities are attributed to the tert-butyl-glycylamido side chain found in tigecycline. Our structural analysis by X-ray crystallography shows that tigecycline binds the bacterial 30S ribosomal subunit with its tail in an extended conformation and makes extensive interactions with the 16S rRNA nucleotide C1054. These interactions restrict the mobility of C1054 and contribute to the antimicrobial activity of tigecycline, including its resistance to the ribosomal protection proteins. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Peeling the onion: ribosomes are ancient molecular fossils.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chiaolong; Mohan, Srividya; Kalahar, Benson K; Williams, Loren Dean

    2009-11-01

    We describe a method to establish chronologies of ancient ribosomal evolution. The method uses structure-based and sequence-based comparison of the large subunits (LSUs) of Haloarcula marismortui and Thermus thermophilus. These are the highest resolution ribosome structures available and represent disparate regions of the evolutionary tree. We have sectioned the superimposed LSUs into concentric shells, like an onion, using the site of peptidyl transfer as the origin (the PT-origin). This spherical approximation combined with a shell-by-shell comparison captures significant information along the evolutionary time line revealing, for example, that sequence and conformational similarity of the 23S rRNAs are greatest near the PT-origin and diverge smoothly with distance from it. The results suggest that the conformation and interactions of both RNA and protein can be described as changing, in an observable manner, over evolutionary time. The tendency of macromolecules to assume regular secondary structural elements such as A-form helices with Watson-Crick base pairs (RNA) and alpha-helices and beta-sheets (protein) is low at early time points but increases as time progresses. The conformations of ribosomal protein components near the PT-origin suggest that they may be molecular fossils of the peptide ancestors of ribosomal proteins. Their abbreviated length may have proscribed formation of secondary structure, which is indeed nearly absent from the region of the LSU nearest the PT-origin. Formation and evolution of the early PT center may have involved Mg(2+)-mediated assembly of at least partially single-stranded RNA oligomers or polymers. As one moves from center to periphery, proteins appear to replace magnesium ions. The LSU is known to have undergone large-scale conformation changes upon assembly. The T. thermophilus LSU analyzed here is part of a fully assembled ribosome, whereas the H. marismortui LSU analyzed here is dissociated from other ribosomal components

  12. Comprehensive Molecular Structure of the Eukaryotic Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Derek J.; Devkota, Batsal; Huang, Andrew D.; Topf, Maya; Narayanan, Eswar; Sali, Andrej; Harvey, Stephen C.; Frank, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Despite the emergence of a large number of X-ray crystallographic models of the bacterial 70S ribosome over the past decade, an accurate atomic model of the eukaryotic 80S ribosome is still not available. Eukaryotic ribosomes possess more ribosomal proteins and ribosomal RNA than bacterial ribosomes, which are implicated in extra-ribosomal functions in the eukaryotic cells. By combining cryo-EM with RNA and protein homology modeling, we obtained an atomic model of the yeast 80S ribosome complete with all ribosomal RNA expansion segments and all ribosomal proteins for which a structural homolog can be identified. Mutation or deletion of 80S ribosomal proteins can abrogate maturation of the ribosome, leading to several human diseases. We have localized one such protein unique to eukaryotes, rpS19e, whose mutations are associated with Diamond-Blackfan anemia in humans. Additionally, we characterize crucial and novel interactions between the dynamic stalk base of the ribosome with eukaryotic elongation factor 2. PMID:20004163

  13. Chromatographic purification of highly active yeast ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Meskauskas, Arturas; Leshin, Jonathan A; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2011-10-24

    Eukaryotic ribosomes are much more labile as compared to their eubacterial and archael counterparts, thus posing a significant challenge to researchers. Particularly troublesome is the fact that lysis of cells releases a large number of proteases and nucleases which can degrade ribosomes. Thus, it is important to separate ribosomes from these enzymes as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, conventional differential ultracentrifugation methods leaves ribosomes exposed to these enzymes for unacceptably long periods of time, impacting their structural integrity and functionality. To address this problem, we utilize a chromatographic method using a cysteine charged Sulfolink resin. This simple and rapid application significantly reduces co-purifying proteolytic and nucleolytic activities, producing high yields of intact, highly biochemically active yeast ribosomes. We suggest that this method should also be applicable to mammalian ribosomes. The simplicity of the method, and the enhanced purity and activity of chromatographically purified ribosome represents a significant technical advancement for the study of eukaryotic ribosomes.

  14. Recognition of the 70S ribosome and polysome by the RNA degradosome in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Chun; Du, Dijun; Domínguez-Malfavón, Lilianha; Dimastrogiovanni, Daniela; Cross, Jonathan; Callaghan, Anastasia J; García-Mena, Jaime; Luisi, Ben F

    2012-11-01

    The RNA degradosome is a multi-enzyme assembly that contributes to key processes of RNA metabolism, and it engages numerous partners in serving its varied functional roles. Small domains within the assembly recognize collectively a diverse range of macromolecules, including the core protein components, the cytoplasmic lipid membrane, mRNAs, non-coding regulatory RNAs and precursors of structured RNAs. We present evidence that the degradosome can form a stable complex with the 70S ribosome and polysomes, and we demonstrate the proximity in vivo of ribosomal proteins and the scaffold of the degradosome, RNase E. The principal interactions are mapped to two, independent, RNA-binding domains from RNase E. RhlB, the RNA helicase component of the degradosome, also contributes to ribosome binding, and this is favoured through an activating interaction with RNase E. The catalytic activity of RNase E for processing 9S RNA (the ribosomal 5S RNA precursor) is repressed in the presence of the ribosome, whereas there is little affect on the cleavage of single-stranded substrates mediated by non-coding RNA, suggestings that the enzyme retains capacity to cleave unstructured substrates when associated with the ribosome. We propose that polysomes may act as antennae that enhance the rates of capture of the limited number of degradosomes, so that they become recruited to sites of active translation to act on mRNAs as they become exposed or tagged for degradation.

  15. Nuclear export of the small ribosomal subunit requires the Ran–GTPase cycle and certain nucleoporins

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Terence I.; Silver, Pamela A.

    1999-01-01

    After their assembly in the nucleolus, ribosomal subunits are exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. After export, the 20S rRNA in the small ribosomal subunit is cleaved to yield 18S rRNA and the small 5′ ITS1 fragment. The 5′ ITS1 RNA is normally degraded by the cytoplasmic Xrn1 exonuclease, but in strains lacking XRN1, the 5′ ITS1 fragment accumulates in the cytoplasm. Using the cytoplasmic localization of the 5′ ITS1 fragment as an indicator for the export of the small ribosomal subunit, we have identified genes that are required for ribosome export. Ribosome export is dependent on the Ran–GTPase as mutations in Ran or its regulators caused 5′ ITS1 to accumulate in the nucleoplasm. Mutations in the genes encoding the nucleoporin Nup82 and in the NES exporter Xpo1/Crm1 also caused the nucleoplasmic accumulation of 5′ ITS1. Mutants in a subset of nucleoporins and in the nuclear transport factors Srp1, Kap95, Pse1, Cse1, and Mtr10 accumulate the 5′ ITS1 in the nucleolus and affect ribosome assembly. In contrast, we did not detect nuclear accumulation of 5′ ITS1 in 28 yeast strains that have mutations in other genes affecting nuclear trafficking. PMID:10465789

  16. Molecular architecture of the 90S small subunit pre-ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qi; Zhu, Xing; Qi, Jia; An, Weidong; Lan, Pengfei; Tan, Dan; Chen, Rongchang; Wang, Bing; Zheng, Sanduo; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Xining; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jing; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Ye, Keqiong

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic small ribosomal subunits are first assembled into 90S pre-ribosomes. The complete 90S is a gigantic complex with a molecular mass of approximately five megadaltons. Here, we report the nearly complete architecture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 90S determined from three cryo-electron microscopy single particle reconstructions at 4.5 to 8.7 angstrom resolution. The majority of the density maps were modeled and assigned to specific RNA and protein components. The nascent ribosome is assembled into isolated native-like substructures that are stabilized by abundant assembly factors. The 5' external transcribed spacer and U3 snoRNA nucleate a large subcomplex that scaffolds the nascent ribosome. U3 binds four sites of pre-rRNA, including a novel site on helix 27 but not the 3' side of the central pseudoknot, and crucially organizes the 90S structure. The 90S model provides significant insight into the principle of small subunit assembly and the function of assembly factors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22086.001 PMID:28244370

  17. Molecular architecture of the 90S small subunit pre-ribosome.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Zhu, Xing; Qi, Jia; An, Weidong; Lan, Pengfei; Tan, Dan; Chen, Rongchang; Wang, Bing; Zheng, Sanduo; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Xining; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jing; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Ye, Keqiong

    2017-02-28

    Eukaryotic small ribosomal subunits are first assembled into 90S pre-ribosomes. The complete 90S is a gigantic complex with a molecular mass of approximately five megadaltons. Here, we report the nearly complete architecture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 90S determined from three cryo-electron microscopy single particle reconstructions at 4.5 to 8.7 angstrom resolution. The majority of the density maps were modeled and assigned to specific RNA and protein components. The nascent ribosome is assembled into isolated native-like substructures that are stabilized by abundant assembly factors. The 5' external transcribed spacer and U3 snoRNA nucleate a large subcomplex that scaffolds the nascent ribosome. U3 binds four sites of pre-rRNA, including a novel site on helix 27 but not the 3' side of the central pseudoknot, and crucially organizes the 90S structure. The 90S model provides significant insight into the principle of small subunit assembly and the function of assembly factors.

  18. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter offers an overview of the use of ribosomal RNA sequences. A history of the technology traces the evolution of techniques to measure bacterial phylogenetic relationships and recent advances in obtaining rRNA sequence information. The manual also describes procedu...

  19. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter offers an overview of the use of ribosomal RNA sequences. A history of the technology traces the evolution of techniques to measure bacterial phylogenetic relationships and recent advances in obtaining rRNA sequence information. The manual also describes procedu...

  20. All Ribosomes Are Created Equal. Really?

    PubMed

    Preiss, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Ribosomes are generally thought of as molecular machines with a constitutive rather than regulatory role during protein synthesis. A study by Slavov et al.[1] now shows that ribosomes of distinct composition and functionality exist within eukaryotic cells, giving credence to the concept of 'specialized' ribosomes.

  1. Steric interactions lead to collective tilting motion in the ribosome during mRNA-tRNA translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Kien; Whitford, Paul C.

    2016-02-01

    Translocation of mRNA and tRNA through the ribosome is associated with large-scale rearrangements of the head domain in the 30S ribosomal subunit. To elucidate the relationship between 30S head dynamics and mRNA-tRNA displacement, we apply molecular dynamics simulations using an all-atom structure-based model. Here we provide a statistical analysis of 250 spontaneous transitions between the A/P-P/E and P/P-E/E ensembles. Consistent with structural studies, the ribosome samples a chimeric ap/P-pe/E intermediate, where the 30S head is rotated ~18°. It then transiently populates a previously unreported intermediate ensemble, which is characterized by a ~10° tilt of the head. To identify the origins of head tilting, we analyse 781 additional simulations in which specific steric features are perturbed. These calculations show that head tilting may be attributed to specific steric interactions between tRNA and the 30S subunit (PE loop and protein S13). Taken together, this study demonstrates how molecular structure can give rise to large-scale collective rearrangements.

  2. Steric interactions lead to collective tilting motion in the ribosome during mRNA–tRNA translocation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kien; Whitford, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Translocation of mRNA and tRNA through the ribosome is associated with large-scale rearrangements of the head domain in the 30S ribosomal subunit. To elucidate the relationship between 30S head dynamics and mRNA–tRNA displacement, we apply molecular dynamics simulations using an all-atom structure-based model. Here we provide a statistical analysis of 250 spontaneous transitions between the A/P–P/E and P/P–E/E ensembles. Consistent with structural studies, the ribosome samples a chimeric ap/P–pe/E intermediate, where the 30S head is rotated ∼18°. It then transiently populates a previously unreported intermediate ensemble, which is characterized by a ∼10° tilt of the head. To identify the origins of head tilting, we analyse 781 additional simulations in which specific steric features are perturbed. These calculations show that head tilting may be attributed to specific steric interactions between tRNA and the 30S subunit (PE loop and protein S13). Taken together, this study demonstrates how molecular structure can give rise to large-scale collective rearrangements. PMID:26838673

  3. Direct Interaction of the N-Terminal Domain of Ribosomal Protein S1 with Protein S2 in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Byrgazov, Konstantin; Manoharadas, Salim; Kaberdina, Anna C.; Vesper, Oliver; Moll, Isabella

    2012-01-01

    Despite of the high resolution structure available for the E. coli ribosome, hitherto the structure and localization of the essential ribosomal protein S1 on the 30 S subunit still remains to be elucidated. It was previously reported that protein S1 binds to the ribosome via protein-protein interaction at the two N-terminal domains. Moreover, protein S2 was shown to be required for binding of protein S1 to the ribosome. Here, we present evidence that the N-terminal domain of S1 (amino acids 1–106; S1106) is necessary and sufficient for the interaction with protein S2 as well as for ribosome binding. We show that over production of protein S1106 affects E. coli growth by displacing native protein S1 from its binding pocket on the ribosome. In addition, our data reveal that the coiled-coil domain of protein S2 (S2α2) is sufficient to allow protein S1 to bind to the ribosome. Taken together, these data uncover the crucial elements required for the S1/S2 interaction, which is pivotal for translation initiation on canonical mRNAs in Gram-negative bacteria. The results are discussed in terms of a model wherein the S1/S2 interaction surface could represent a possible target to modulate the selectivity of the translational machinery and thereby alter the translational program under distinct conditions. PMID:22412910

  4. The RNA-binding protein Gemin5 binds directly to the ribosome and regulates global translation

    PubMed Central

    Francisco-Velilla, Rosario; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Ramajo, Jorge; Martinez-Salas, Encarnación

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play crucial roles in all organisms. The protein Gemin5 harbors two functional domains. The N-terminal domain binds to snRNAs targeting them for snRNPs assembly, while the C-terminal domain binds to IRES elements through a non-canonical RNA-binding site. Here we report a comprehensive view of the Gemin5 interactome; most partners copurified with the N-terminal domain via RNA bridges. Notably, Gemin5 sediments with the subcellular ribosome fraction, and His-Gemin5 binds to ribosome particles via its N-terminal domain. The interaction with the ribosome was lost in F381A and Y474A Gemin5 mutants, but not in W14A and Y15A. Moreover, the ribosomal proteins L3 and L4 bind directly with Gemin5, and conversely, Gemin5 mutants impairing the binding to the ribosome are defective in the interaction with L3 and L4. The overall polysome profile was affected by Gemin5 depletion or overexpression, concomitant to an increase or a decrease, respectively, of global protein synthesis. Gemin5, and G5-Nter as well, were detected on the polysome fractions. These results reveal the ribosome-binding capacity of the N-ter moiety, enabling Gemin5 to control global protein synthesis. Our study uncovers a crosstalk between this protein and the ribosome, and provides support for the view that Gemin5 may control translation elongation. PMID:27507887

  5. Arabidopsis small nucleolar RNA monitors the efficient pre-rRNA processing during ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pan; Wang, Yuqiu; Qin, Nanxun; Wang, Feng; Wang, Jia; Deng, Xing Wang; Zhu, Danmeng

    2016-10-18

    Ribosome production in eukaryotes requires the complex and precise coordination of several hundred assembly factors, including many small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs). However, at present, the distinct role of key snoRNAs in ribosome biogenesis remains poorly understood in higher plants. Here we report that a previously uncharacterized C (RUGAUGA)/D (CUGA) type snoRNA, HIDDEN TREASURE 2 (HID2), acts as an important regulator of ribosome biogenesis through a snoRNA-rRNA interaction. Nucleolus-localized HID2 is actively expressed in Arabidopsis proliferative tissues, whereas defects in HID2 cause a series of developmental defects reminiscent of ribosomal protein mutants. HID2 associates with the precursor 45S rRNA and promotes the efficiency and accuracy of pre-rRNA processing. Intriguingly, disrupting HID2 in Arabidopsis appears to impair the integrity of 27SB, a key pre-rRNA intermediate that generates 25S and 5.8S rRNA and is known to be vital for the synthesis of the 60S large ribosomal subunit and also produces an imbalanced ribosome profile. Finally, we demonstrate that the antisense-box of HID2 is both functionally essential and highly conserved in eukaryotes. Overall, our study reveals the vital and possibly conserved role of a snoRNA in monitoring the efficiency of pre-rRNA processing during ribosome biogenesis.

  6. Eukaryote-specific rRNA expansion segments function in ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Madhumitha; Woolford, John L.

    2016-01-01

    The secondary structure of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is largely conserved across all kingdoms of life. However, eukaryotes have evolved extra blocks of rRNA sequences, relative to those of prokaryotes, called expansion segments (ES). A thorough characterization of the potential roles of ES remains to be done, possibly because of limitations in the availability of robust systems to study rRNA mutants. We sought to systematically investigate the potential functions, if any, of the ES in 25S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by deletion mutagenesis. We deleted 14 of the 16 different eukaryote-specific ES in yeast 25S rRNA individually and assayed their phenotypes. Our results show that all but two of the ES tested are necessary for optimal growth and are required for production of 25S rRNA, suggesting that ES play roles in ribosome biogenesis. Further, we classified expansion segments into groups that participate in early nucleolar, middle, and late nucleoplasmic steps of ribosome biogenesis, by assaying their pre-rRNA processing phenotypes. This study is the first of its kind to systematically identify the functions of eukaryote-specific expansion segments by showing that they play roles in specific steps of ribosome biogenesis. The catalog of phenotypes we identified, combined with previous investigations of the roles ribosomal proteins in large subunit biogenesis, leads us to infer that assembling ribosomes are composed of distinct RNA and protein structural neighborhood clusters that participate in specific steps of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:27317789

  7. Arabidopsis small nucleolar RNA monitors the efficient pre-rRNA processing during ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pan; Wang, Yuqiu; Qin, Nanxun; Wang, Feng; Wang, Jia; Deng, Xing Wang; Zhu, Danmeng

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome production in eukaryotes requires the complex and precise coordination of several hundred assembly factors, including many small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs). However, at present, the distinct role of key snoRNAs in ribosome biogenesis remains poorly understood in higher plants. Here we report that a previously uncharacterized C (RUGAUGA)/D (CUGA) type snoRNA, HIDDEN TREASURE 2 (HID2), acts as an important regulator of ribosome biogenesis through a snoRNA–rRNA interaction. Nucleolus-localized HID2 is actively expressed in Arabidopsis proliferative tissues, whereas defects in HID2 cause a series of developmental defects reminiscent of ribosomal protein mutants. HID2 associates with the precursor 45S rRNA and promotes the efficiency and accuracy of pre-rRNA processing. Intriguingly, disrupting HID2 in Arabidopsis appears to impair the integrity of 27SB, a key pre-rRNA intermediate that generates 25S and 5.8S rRNA and is known to be vital for the synthesis of the 60S large ribosomal subunit and also produces an imbalanced ribosome profile. Finally, we demonstrate that the antisense-box of HID2 is both functionally essential and highly conserved in eukaryotes. Overall, our study reveals the vital and possibly conserved role of a snoRNA in monitoring the efficiency of pre-rRNA processing during ribosome biogenesis. PMID:27708161

  8. Ribosomal mutations promote the evolution of antibiotic resistance in a multidrug environment.

    PubMed

    Gomez, James E; Kaufmann-Malaga, Benjamin B; Wivagg, Carl N; Kim, Peter B; Silvis, Melanie R; Renedo, Nikolai; Ioerger, Thomas R; Ahmad, Rushdy; Livny, Jonathan; Fishbein, Skye; Sacchettini, James C; Carr, Steven A; Hung, Deborah T

    2017-02-21

    Antibiotic resistance arising via chromosomal mutations is typically specific to a particular antibiotic or class of antibiotics. We have identified mutations in genes encoding ribosomal components in Mycobacterium smegmatis that confer resistance to several structurally and mechanistically unrelated classes of antibiotics and enhance survival following heat shock and membrane stress. These mutations affect ribosome assembly and cause large-scale transcriptomic and proteomic changes, including the downregulation of the catalase KatG, an activating enzyme required for isoniazid sensitivity, and upregulation of WhiB7, a transcription factor involved in innate antibiotic resistance. Importantly, while these ribosomal mutations have a fitness cost in antibiotic-free medium, in a multidrug environment they promote the evolution of high-level, target-based resistance. Further, suppressor mutations can then be easily acquired to restore wild-type growth. Thus, ribosomal mutations can serve as stepping-stones in an evolutionary path leading to the emergence of high-level, multidrug resistance.

  9. The pathway of hepatitis C virus mRNA recruitment to the human ribosome.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Christopher S; Hershey, John W B; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2009-04-01

    Eukaryotic protein synthesis begins with mRNA positioning in the ribosomal decoding channel in a process typically controlled by translation-initiation factors. Some viruses use an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) in their mRNA to harness ribosomes independently of initiation factors. We show here that a ribosome conformational change that is induced upon hepatitis C viral IRES binding is necessary but not sufficient for correct mRNA positioning. Using directed hydroxyl radical probing to monitor the assembly of IRES-containing translation-initiation complexes, we have defined a crucial step in which mRNA is stabilized upon initiator tRNA binding. Unexpectedly, however, this stabilization occurs independently of the AUG codon, underscoring the importance of initiation factor-mediated interactions that influence the configuration of the decoding channel. These results reveal how an IRES RNA supplants some, but not all, of the functions normally carried out by protein factors during initiation of protein synthesis.

  10. The unfolded protein response triggers site-specific regulatory ubiquitylation of 40S ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rising, Lisa; Mak, Raymond; Webb, Kristofor; Kaiser, Stephen E.; Zuzow, Nathan; Riviere, Paul; Yang, Bing; Fenech, Emma; Tang, Xin; Lindsay, Scott A.; Christianson, John C.; Hampton, Randolph Y.; Wasserman, Steven A.; Bennett, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Insults to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis activate the unfolded protein response (UPR), which elevates protein folding and degradation capacity and attenuates protein synthesis. While a role for ubiquitin in regulating the degradation of misfolded ER-resident proteins is well described, ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translational reprogramming during the UPR remains uncharacterized. Using global quantitative ubiquitin proteomics, we identify evolutionarily conserved, site-specific regulatory ubiquitylation of 40S ribosomal proteins. We demonstrate that these events occur on assembled cytoplasmic ribosomes and are stimulated by both UPR activation and translation inhibition. We further show that ER stress-stimulated regulatory 40S ribosomal ubiquitylation occurs on a timescale similar to eIF2α phosphorylation, is dependent upon PERK signaling, and is required for optimal cell survival during chronic UPR activation. In total, these results reveal regulatory 40S ribosomal ubiquitylation as a previously uncharacterized and important facet of eukaryotic translational control. PMID:26051182

  11. Reconstitution of functional eukaryotic ribosomes from Dictyostelium discoideum ribosomal proteins and RNA.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Chiaberge, S

    1997-08-08

    40 and 60 S ribosomal subunits have been reconstituted in vitro from purified ribosomal RNA and ribosomal proteins of Dictyostelium discoideum. The functionality of the reconstituted ribosomes was demonstrated in in vitro mRNA-directed protein synthesis. The reassembly proceeded well with immature precursors of ribosomal RNA but poorly if at all with mature cytoplasmic RNA species. Reassembly also required a preparation of small nuclear RNA(s), acting as morphopoietic factor(s).

  12. Distinct ribosome maturation defects in yeast models of Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Shwachman-Diamond syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moore, Joseph B; Farrar, Jason E; Arceci, Robert J; Liu, Johnson M; Ellis, Steven R

    2010-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Shwachman-Diamond syndrome are inherited bone marrow failure syndromes linked to defects in ribosome synthesis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether yeast models for Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Shwachman-Diamond syndrome differed in the mechanism by which ribosome synthesis was affected. Northern blotting, pulse-chase analysis, and polysome profiling were used to study ribosome synthesis in yeast models. Localization of 60S ribosomal subunits was assessed using RPL25eGFP. Relative to wild-type controls, each disease model showed defects in 60S subunit maturation, but with distinct underlying mechanisms. In the model of Diamond-Blackfan anemia, 60S subunit maturation was disrupted at a relatively early stage with abortive complexes subject to rapid degradation. 5S ribosomal RNA, unlike other large subunit ribosomal RNA in this model, accumulated as an extra-ribosomal species. In contrast, subunit maturation in the Shwachman-Diamond syndrome model was affected at a later step, giving rise to relatively stable pre-60S particles with associated 5S ribosomal RNA retained in the nucleus. Conclusions These differences between the yeast Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Shwachman-Diamond syndrome models have implications for signaling mechanisms linking abortive ribosome assembly to cell fate decisions and may contribute to the divergent clinical presentations of Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Shwachman-Diamond syndrome.

  13. A reconstituted cell-free assay for the evaluation of the intrinsic activity of purified human ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Penzo, Marianna; Carnicelli, Domenica; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Brigotti, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    We describe a cell-free translation system for evaluating the activity of ribosomes stringently purified from human cells. This system is based on in vitro reconstitution of the cellular translation machinery, in which a ribosome-free rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL) is reassembled with human ribosomes and in vitro-transcribed reporter mRNAs. The protocol describes the preparation of the RRL-derived fractions, purification of ribosomes devoid of detectable nonribosomal-associated factors, and assembly of the reactions to evaluate ribosomal translational efficiency and fidelity using appropriate reporter transcripts. The whole procedure can be completed in ∼2.5 d (plus 2 weeks for RRL preparation and cell expansion time). This protocol can be applied to study intrinsic functional properties (cis-acting element-mediated translation initiation or translational fidelity) of ribosome populations from different sources (including nonhuman origin). It is therefore useful for the characterization of ribosomal function in ribosomopathies and cancer, and it will be applicable in the emerging fields of ribosome diversity and specialized ribosomes.

  14. Rescue of endogenous 30S retroviral sequences from mouse cells by baboon type C virus.

    PubMed Central

    Sherwin, S A; Rapp, U R; Benveniste, R E; Sen, A; Todaro, G J

    1978-01-01

    Mus musculus SC-1 cells were infected with M7 baboon type C virus. The progeny of this infection included viral pseudotypes that contained M7 helper virus and endogenous 30S retrovirus-associated sequences derived from SC-1 cells (RAS). The RAS sequences are unrelated by nucleic acid hybridization criteria to previously described types of murine retroviruses and do not code for known murine viral structural proteins. The RAS genome is present in multiple copies in the DNA of laboratory (M. musculus) and Asian (M. caroli and M. cervicolor) mice, is expressed in the RNA of uninfected mouse cells, and can be efficiently rescued by type C, but not type B, viruses. RAS is closely related to 30S virus-associated RNA in NIH/3T3 and BALB/c JLSV-9 cells and may be analogous to the defective 30S RNA sequences found in rats. PMID:207887

  15. Engineering the ribosomal DNA in a megabase synthetic chromosome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weimin; Zhao, Guanghou; Luo, Zhouqing; Lin, Yicong; Wang, Lihui; Guo, Yakun; Wang, Ann; Jiang, Shuangying; Jiang, Qingwen; Gong, Jianhui; Wang, Yun; Hou, Sha; Huang, Jing; Li, Tianyi; Qin, Yiran; Dong, Junkai; Qin, Qin; Zhang, Jiaying; Zou, Xinzhi; He, Xi; Zhao, Li; Xiao, Yibo; Xu, Meng; Cheng, Erchao; Huang, Ning; Zhou, Tong; Shen, Yue; Walker, Roy; Luo, Yisha; Kuang, Zheng; Mitchell, Leslie A; Yang, Kun; Richardson, Sarah M; Wu, Yi; Li, Bing-Zhi; Yuan, Ying-Jin; Yang, Huanming; Lin, Jiwei; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Wu, Qingyu; Bader, Joel S; Cai, Yizhi; Boeke, Jef D; Dai, Junbiao

    2017-03-10

    We designed and synthesized a 976,067-base pair linear chromosome, synXII, based on native chromosome XII in Saccharomyces cerevisiae SynXII was assembled using a two-step method, specified by successive megachunk integration and meiotic recombination-mediated assembly, producing a functional chromosome in S. cerevisiae. Minor growth defect "bugs" detected in synXII, caused by deletion of tRNA genes, were rescued by introducing an ectopic copy of a single tRNA gene. The ribosomal gene cluster (rDNA) on synXII was left intact during the assembly process and subsequently replaced by a modified rDNA unit used to regenerate rDNA at three distinct chromosomal locations. The signature sequences within rDNA, which can be used to determine species identity, were swapped to generate a Saccharomyces synXII strain that would be identified as Saccharomyces bayanus by standard DNA barcoding procedures.

  16. The translational fidelity function of IF3 during transition from the 30 S initiation complex to the 70 S initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Grigoriadou, Christina; Marzi, Stefano; Pan, Dongli; Gualerzi, Claudio O; Cooperman, Barry S

    2007-10-26

    IF3 has a fidelity function in the initiation of translation, inducing the dissociation of fMet-tRNA(fMet) from the 30 S initiation complexes (30SIC) containing a non-canonical initiation triplet (e.g. AUU) in place of a canonical initiation triplet (e.g., AUG). IF2 has a complementary role, selectively promoting initiator tRNA binding to the ribosome. Here, we used parallel rapid kinetics measurements of GTP hydrolysis, Pi release, light-scattering, and changes in intensities of fluorophore-labeled IF2 and fMet-tRNA(fMet) to determine the effects on both 30SIC formation and 30SIC conversion to 70 S initiation complexes (70SIC) of (a) substituting AUG with AUU, and/or (b) omitting IF3, and/or (c) replacing GTP with the non-hydrolyzable analog GDPCP. We demonstrate that the presence or absence of IF3 has, at most, minor effects on the rate of 30SIC formation using either AUG or AUU as the initiation codon, and conclude that the high affinity of IF2 for both 30 S subunit and initiator tRNA overrides any perturbation of the codon-anticodon interaction resulting from AUU for AUG substitution. In contrast, replacement of AUG by AUU leads to a dramatic reduction in the rate of 70SIC formation from 30SIC upon addition of 50 S subunits. Interpreting our results in the framework of a quantitative kinetic scheme leads to the conclusion that, within the overall process of 70SIC formation, the step most affected by substituting AUU for AUG involves the conversion of an initially labile 70 S ribosome into a more stable complex. In the absence of IF3, the difference between AUG and AUU largely disappears, with each initiation codon affording rapid 70SIC formation, leading to the hypothesis that it is the rate of IF3 dissociation from the 70 S ribosome during IC70S formation that is critical to its fidelity function.

  17. Ribosomes lacking protein S20 are defective in mRNA binding and subunit association.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Christina; Mandava, Chandra Sekhar; Ehrenberg, Måns; Andersson, Dan I; Sanyal, Suparna

    2010-04-02

    The functional significance of ribosomal proteins is still relatively unclear. Here, we examined the role of small subunit protein S20 in translation using both in vivo and in vitro techniques. By means of lambda red recombineering, the rpsT gene, encoding S20, was removed from the chromosome of Salmonella enterica var. Typhimurium LT2 to produce a DeltaS20 strain that grew markedly slower than the wild type while maintaining a wild-type rate of peptide elongation. Removal of S20 conferred a significant reduction in growth rate that was eliminated upon expression of the rpsT gene on a high-copy-number plasmid. The in vitro phenotype of mutant ribosomes was investigated using a translation system composed of highly active, purified components from Escherichia coli. Deletion of S20 conferred two types of initiation defects to the 30S subunit: (i) a significant reduction in the rate of mRNA binding and (ii) a drastic decrease in the yield of 70S complexes caused by an impairment in association with the 50S subunit. Both of these impairments were partially relieved by an extended incubation time with mRNA, fMet-tRNA(fMet), and initiation factors, indicating that absence of S20 disturbs the structural integrity of 30S subunits. Considering the topographical location of S20 in complete 30S subunits, the molecular mechanism by which it affects mRNA binding and subunit docking is not entirely obvious. We speculate that its interaction with helix 44 of the 16S ribosomal RNA is crucial for optimal ribosome function. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterizing inactive ribosomes in translational profiling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Botao; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The broad impact of translational regulation has emerged explosively in the last few years in part due to the technological advance in genome-wide interrogation of gene expression. During mRNA translation, the majority of actively translating ribosomes exist as polysomes in cells with multiple ribosomes loaded on a single transcript. The importance of the monosome, however, has been less appreciated in translational profiling analysis. Here we report that the monosome fraction isolated by sucrose sedimentation contains a large quantity of inactive ribosomes that do not engage on mRNAs to direct translation. We found that the elongation factor eEF2, but not eEF1A, stably resides in these non-translating ribosomes. This unique feature permits direct evaluation of ribosome status under various stress conditions and in the presence of translation inhibitors. Ribosome profiling reveals that the monosome has a similar but not identical pattern of ribosome footprints compared to the polysome. We show that the association of free ribosomal subunits minimally contributes to ribosome occupancy outside of the coding region. Our results not only offer a quantitative method to monitor ribosome availability, but also uncover additional layers of ribosome status needed to be considered in translational profiling analysis. PMID:27335722

  19. Physicochemical and Light Scattering Studies on Ribosome Particles

    PubMed Central

    Scafati, Anna Reale; Stornaiuolo, Maria Rosaria; Novaro, Patrizia

    1971-01-01

    The light scattering technique has been used to measure the molecular weight of Escherichia coli ribosomes. The 30S, 50S, and 70S components have been isolated and purified. The refractive index increment dn/dc was found to have the same value, (0.20 ±0.01) cm3/g, for the three species. The molecular weights are (1.0 ±0.1)·106, (1.7 ±0.1)·106, and (2.9 ±0.3)·106 daltons respectively. Some information about the dimensions in solution (radius of gyration) and the interaction constant (second virial coefficient) have been obtained, and their significance is discussed. PMID:4931397

  20. Crystal structure of the eukaryotic ribosome.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shem, Adam; Jenner, Lasse; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2010-11-26

    Crystal structures of prokaryotic ribosomes have described in detail the universally conserved core of the translation mechanism. However, many facets of the translation process in eukaryotes are not shared with prokaryotes. The crystal structure of the yeast 80S ribosome determined at 4.15 angstrom resolution reveals the higher complexity of eukaryotic ribosomes, which are 40% larger than their bacterial counterparts. Our model shows how eukaryote-specific elements considerably expand the network of interactions within the ribosome and provides insights into eukaryote-specific features of protein synthesis. Our crystals capture the ribosome in the ratcheted state, which is essential for translocation of mRNA and transfer RNA (tRNA), and in which the small ribosomal subunit has rotated with respect to the large subunit. We describe the conformational changes in both ribosomal subunits that are involved in ratcheting and their implications in coordination between the two associated subunits and in mRNA and tRNA translocation.

  1. 5S rRNA and ribosome.

    PubMed

    Gongadze, G M

    2011-12-01

    5S rRNA is an integral component of the ribosome of all living organisms. It is known that the ribosome without 5S rRNA is functionally inactive. However, the question about the specific role of this RNA in functioning of the translation apparatus is still open. This review presents a brief history of the discovery of 5S rRNA and studies of its origin and localization in the ribosome. The previously expressed hypotheses about the role of this RNA in the functioning of the ribosome are discussed considering the unique location of 5S rRNA in the ribosome and its intermolecular contacts. Based on analysis of the current data on ribosome structure and its functional complexes, the role of 5S rRNA as an intermediary between ribosome functional domains is discussed.

  2. Ribosomal targets for antibiotic drug discovery

    DOEpatents

    Blanchard, Scott C.; Feldman, Michael Brian; Wang, Leyi; Doudna Cate, James H.; Pulk, Arto; Altman, Roger B.; Wasserman, Michael R

    2016-09-13

    The present invention relates to methods to identify molecules that binds in the neomycin binding pocket of a bacterial ribosome using structures of an intact bacterial ribosome that reveal how the ribosome binds tRNA in two functionally distinct states, determined by x-ray crystallography. One state positions tRNA in the peptidyl-tRNA binding site. The second, a fully rotated state, is stabilized by ribosome recycling factor (RRF) and binds tRNA in a highly bent conformation in a hybrid peptidyl/exit (P/E) site. Additionally, the invention relates to various assays, including single-molecule assay for ribosome recycling, and methods to identify compounds that interfere with ribosomal function by detecting newly identified intermediate FRET states using known and novel FRET pairs on the ribosome. The invention also provides vectors and compositions with an N-terminally tagged S13 protein.

  3. Nop6, a component of 90S pre-ribosomal particles, is required for 40S ribosomal subunit biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, Juan José; Babiano, Reyes; Lebaron, Simon; Froment, Carine; Monsarrat, Bernard; Henry, Yves; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ribosome biogenesis requires, in addition to rRNA and ribosomal proteins, a myriad of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and over two hundred protein trans-acting factors. There are protein trans-acting factors predicted to participate in ribosome biogenesis that have not been so far characterized. Here, we report the functional analysis of the Nucleolar protein 6 (Nop6) in ribosome biogenesis. Our results show that Nop6 is needed for optimal 40S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Deletion of NOP6 leads to an appropriate 20% reduction in 18S rRNA levels and therefore in 40S ribosomal subunits. This is due to mild inhibition of pre-rRNA processing at cleavage site A 2. Tandem affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry and northern blot analyses indicate that Nop6 is a component of 90S pre-ribosomal particles. rDNA chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments and analysis of the intracellular localisation of Nop6-eGFP after in vivo shut down of pre-rRNA transcription strongly suggest that Nop6 binds to the pre-rRNA early during transcription. Genetic data suggest that Nop6 and the snoRNA snR57 both interact similarly with the protein trans-acting factor Nep1. It has been proposed that snR57 and Nep1 participate in a pre-rRNA conformational switch that allows the proper assembly of 40S ribosomal protein S19. Our results strongly suggest that the role Nop6 might have in this conformational switch is independent of snR57.

  4. The sedimentation behaviour of ribonuclease-active and -inactive ribosomes from bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cammack, K. A.; Wade, H. E.

    1965-01-01

    1. The `30s' and `50s' ribosomes from ribonuclease-active (Escherichia coli B) and -inactive (Pseudomonas fluorescens and Escherichia coli MRE600) bacteria have been studied in the ultracentrifuge. Charge anomalies were largely overcome by using sodium chloride–magnesium chloride solution, I 0·16, made 0–50mm with respect to Mg2+. 2. Differentiation of enzymic and physical breakdown at Mg2+ concentrations less than 5mm was made by comparing the properties of E. coli B and P. fluorescens ribosomes. 3. Ribonuclease-active ribosomes alone showed a transformation of `50s' into 40–43s components. This was combined with the release of a small amount of `5s' material which may be covalently bound soluble RNA. Other transformations of the `50s' into 34–37s components were observed in both ribonuclease-active and -inactive ribosomes at 1·0–2·5mm-Mg2+, and also with E. coli MRE600 when EDTA (0·2mm) was added to a solution in 0·16m-sodium chloride. 4. Degradation of ribonuclease-active E. coli B ribosomes at Mg2+ concentration 0·25mm or less was coincident with the formation of 16s and 21s ribonucleoprotein in P. fluorescens, and this suggested that complete dissociation of RNA from protein was not an essential prelude to breakdown of the RNA by the enzyme. 5. As high Cs+/Mg2+ ratios cause ribosomal degradation great care is necessary in the interpretation of equilibrium-density-gradient experiments in which high concentrations of caesium chloride or similar salts are used. 6. The importance of the RNA moiety in understanding the response of ribosomes to their ionic environment is discussed. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 7.Fig. 8. PMID:5324303

  5. Relationship between anaerobic capacity estimated using a single effort and 30-s tethered running outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Miyagi, Willian Eiji; Sousa, Filipe Antônio de Barros; Gobatto, Claudio Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the relationship between alternative anaerobic capacity method (MAODALT) and a 30-s all-out tethered running test. Fourteen male recreational endurance runners underwent a graded exercise test, a supramaximal exhaustive effort and a 30-s all-out test on different days, interspaced by 48h. After verification of data normality (Shapiro-Wilk test), the Pearson’s correlation test was used to verify the association between the anaerobic estimates from the MAODALT and the 30-s all-out tethered running outputs. Absolute MAODALT was correlated with mean power (r = 0.58; P = 0.03), total work (r = 0.57; P = 0.03), and mean force (r = 0.79; P = 0.001). In addition, energy from the glycolytic pathway (E[La-]) was correlated with mean power (r = 0.58; P = 0.03). Significant correlations were also found at each 5s interval between absolute MAODALT and force values (r between 0.75 and 0.84), and between force values and E[La-] (r between 0.73 to 0.80). In conclusion, the associations between absolute MAODALT and the mechanical outputs from the 30-s all-out tethered running test evidenced the importance of the anaerobic capacity for maintaining force during the course of time in short efforts. PMID:28182775

  6. RIBOSOME PRECURSOR PARTICLES IN NUCLEOLI

    PubMed Central

    Liau, Ming C.; Perry, Robert P.

    1969-01-01

    Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles containing the precursors of ribosomal RNA were extracted from L cell nucleoli and analyzed under conditions comparable to those used in the characterization of cytoplasmic ribosomes. Using nucleoli from cells suitably labeled with 3H-uridine, we detected three basic RNP components, sedimenting at approximately 62S, 78S, and 110S in sucrose gradients containing magnesium. A fourth particle, sedimenting at about 95S, appears to be a dimer of the 62S and 78S components. When centrifuged in gradients containing EDTA, the 62S, 78S, and 110S particles sediment at about 55S, 65S, and 80S, respectively. RNA was extracted from RNP particles which were prepared by two cycles of zonal centrifugation. The 62S particles yielded 32S RNA and a detectable amount of 28S RNA, the 78S structures, 32S RNA and possibly some 36S RNA, and the 110S particles, a mixture of 45S, 36S, and 32S RNA's. When cells were pulsed briefly and further incubated in the presence of actinomycin D, there was a gradual shift of radioactivity from heavier to lighter particles. This observation is consistent with the scheme of maturation: 110S → 78S → 62S. The principal buoyant densities in cesium chloride of the 110S, 78S, and 62S particles are 1.465, 1.490, and 1.545, respectively. These densities are all significantly lower than 1.570, which is characteristic of the mature large subunit of cytoplasmic ribosomes, suggesting that the precursor particles have a relatively higher ratio of protein to RNA, and that ribosome maturation involves, in addition to decrease in the size of the RNA molecules, a progressive decrease in the proportion of associated protein. PMID:5815062

  7. A Possible Role of the Full-Length Nascent Protein in Post-Translational Ribosome Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debasis; Samanta, Dibyendu; Bhattacharya, Arpita; Basu, Arunima; Das, Anindita; Ghosh, Jaydip; Chakrabarti, Abhijit; Das Gupta, Chanchal

    2017-01-01

    Each cycle of translation initiation in bacterial cell requires free 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits originating from the post-translational dissociation of 70S ribosome from the previous cycle. Literature shows stable dissociation of 70S from model post-termination complexes by the concerted action of Ribosome Recycling Factor (RRF) and Elongation Factor G (EF-G) that interact with the rRNA bridge B2a/B2b joining 50S to 30S. In such experimental models, the role of full-length nascent protein was never considered seriously. We observed relatively slow release of full-length nascent protein from 50Sof post translation ribosome, and in that process, its toe prints on the rRNA in vivo and in in vitro translation with E.coli S30 extract. We reported earlier that a number of chemically unfolded proteins like bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), lysozyme, ovalbumin etc., when added to free 70Sin lieu of the full length nascent proteins, also interact with identical RNA regions of the 23S rRNA. Interestingly the rRNA nucleotides that slow down release of the C-terminus of full-length unfolded protein were found in close proximity to the B2a/B2b bridge. It indicated a potentially important chemical reaction conserved throughout the evolution. Here we set out to probe that conserved role of unfolded protein conformation in splitting the free or post-termination 70S. How both the RRF-EFG dependent and the plausible nascent protein–EFG dependent ribosome recycling pathways might be relevant in bacteria is discussed here. PMID:28099529

  8. A Possible Role of the Full-Length Nascent Protein in Post-Translational Ribosome Recycling.

    PubMed

    Das, Debasis; Samanta, Dibyendu; Bhattacharya, Arpita; Basu, Arunima; Das, Anindita; Ghosh, Jaydip; Chakrabarti, Abhijit; Das Gupta, Chanchal

    2017-01-01

    Each cycle of translation initiation in bacterial cell requires free 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits originating from the post-translational dissociation of 70S ribosome from the previous cycle. Literature shows stable dissociation of 70S from model post-termination complexes by the concerted action of Ribosome Recycling Factor (RRF) and Elongation Factor G (EF-G) that interact with the rRNA bridge B2a/B2b joining 50S to 30S. In such experimental models, the role of full-length nascent protein was never considered seriously. We observed relatively slow release of full-length nascent protein from 50Sof post translation ribosome, and in that process, its toe prints on the rRNA in vivo and in in vitro translation with E.coli S30 extract. We reported earlier that a number of chemically unfolded proteins like bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), lysozyme, ovalbumin etc., when added to free 70Sin lieu of the full length nascent proteins, also interact with identical RNA regions of the 23S rRNA. Interestingly the rRNA nucleotides that slow down release of the C-terminus of full-length unfolded protein were found in close proximity to the B2a/B2b bridge. It indicated a potentially important chemical reaction conserved throughout the evolution. Here we set out to probe that conserved role of unfolded protein conformation in splitting the free or post-termination 70S. How both the RRF-EFG dependent and the plausible nascent protein-EFG dependent ribosome recycling pathways might be relevant in bacteria is discussed here.

  9. Ribosome engineering to promote new crystal forms

    SciTech Connect

    Selmer, Maria; Gao, Yong-Gui; Weixlbaumer, Albert; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2012-05-01

    Truncation of ribosomal protein L9 in T. thermophilus allows the generation of new crystal forms and the crystallization of ribosome–GTPase complexes. Crystallographic studies of the ribosome have provided molecular details of protein synthesis. However, the crystallization of functional complexes of ribosomes with GTPase translation factors proved to be elusive for a decade after the first ribosome structures were determined. Analysis of the packing in different 70S ribosome crystal forms revealed that regardless of the species or space group, a contact between ribosomal protein L9 from the large subunit and 16S rRNA in the shoulder of a neighbouring small subunit in the crystal lattice competes with the binding of GTPase elongation factors to this region of 16S rRNA. To prevent the formation of this preferred crystal contact, a mutant strain of Thermus thermophilus, HB8-MRCMSAW1, in which the ribosomal protein L9 gene has been truncated was constructed by homologous recombination. Mutant 70S ribosomes were used to crystallize and solve the structure of the ribosome with EF-G, GDP and fusidic acid in a previously unobserved crystal form. Subsequent work has shown the usefulness of this strain for crystallization of the ribosome with other GTPase factors.

  10. The pre-existing population of 5S rRNA effects p53 stabilization during ribosome biogenesis inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Onofrillo, Carmine; Galbiati, Alice; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Derenzini, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Pre-ribosomal complex RPL5/RPL11/5S rRNA (5S RNP) is considered the central MDM2 inhibitory complex that control p53 stabilization during ribosome biogenesis inhibition. Despite its role is well defined, the dynamic of 5S RNP assembly still requires further characterization. In the present work, we report that MDM2 inhibition is dependent by a pre-existing population of 5S rRNA. PMID:28032591

  11. The pre-existing population of 5S rRNA effects p53 stabilization during ribosome biogenesis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Onofrillo, Carmine; Galbiati, Alice; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Derenzini, Massimo

    2017-01-17

    Pre-ribosomal complex RPL5/RPL11/5S rRNA (5S RNP) is considered the central MDM2 inhibitory complex that control p53 stabilization during ribosome biogenesis inhibition. Despite its role is well defined, the dynamic of 5S RNP assembly still requires further characterization. In the present work, we report that MDM2 inhibition is dependent by a pre-existing population of 5S rRNA.

  12. Secondary structure features of ribosomal RNA species within intact ribosomal subunits and efficiency of RNA-protein interactions in thermoacidophilic (Caldariella acidophila, Bacillus acidocaldarius) and mesophilic (Escherichia coli) bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cammarano, P; Mazzei, F; Londei, P; Teichner, A; de Rosa, M; Gambacorta, A

    1983-08-02

    RNA from Celite-bound E. coli ribosomes. Compared to E. coli the C. acidophila 50 and 30 S ribosomal subunits are considerably less susceptible to treatment designed to promote ribosome unfolding through depletion of magnesium ions.

  13. Exploring human 40S ribosomal proteins binding to the 18S rRNA fragment containing major 3'-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Gopanenko, Alexander V; Malygin, Alexey A; Karpova, Galina G

    2015-02-01

    Association of ribosomal proteins with rRNA during assembly of ribosomal subunits is an intricate process, which is strictly regulated in vivo. As for the assembly in vitro, it was reported so far only for prokaryotic subunits. Bacterial ribosomal proteins are capable of selective binding to 16S rRNA as well as to its separate morphological domains. In this work, we explored binding of total protein of human 40S ribosomal subunit to the RNA transcript corresponding to the major 3'-domain of 18S rRNA. We showed that the resulting ribonucleoprotein particles contained almost all of the expected ribosomal proteins, whose binding sites are located in this 18S rRNA domain in the 40S subunit, together with several nonspecific proteins. The binding in solution was accompanied with aggregation of the RNA-protein complexes. Ribosomal proteins bound to the RNA transcript protected from chemical modification mostly those 18S rRNA nucleotides that are known to be involved in binding with the proteins in the 40S subunit and thereby demonstrated their ability to selectively bind to the rRNA in vitro. The possible implication of unstructured extensions of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins in their nonspecific binding with rRNA and in subsequent aggregation of the resulting complexes is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. S1 ribosomal protein and the interplay between translation and mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Delvillani, Francesco; Papiani, Giulia; Dehò, Gianni; Briani, Federica

    2011-01-01

    S1 is an ‘atypical’ ribosomal protein weakly associated with the 30S subunit that has been implicated in translation, transcription and control of RNA stability. S1 is thought to participate in translation initiation complex formation by assisting 30S positioning in the translation initiation region, but little is known about its role in other RNA transactions. In this work, we have analysed in vivo the effects of different intracellular S1 concentrations, from depletion to overexpression, on translation, decay and intracellular distribution of leadered and leaderless messenger RNAs (mRNAs). We show that the cspE mRNA, like the rpsO transcript, may be cleaved by RNase E at multiple sites, whereas the leaderless cspE transcript may also be degraded via an alternative pathway by an unknown endonuclease. Upon S1 overexpression, RNase E-dependent decay of both cspE and rpsO mRNAs is suppressed and these transcripts are stabilized, whereas cleavage of leaderless cspE mRNA by the unidentified endonuclease is not affected. Overall, our data suggest that ribosome-unbound S1 may inhibit translation and that part of the Escherichia coli ribosomes may actually lack S1. PMID:21685451

  15. Molecular mechanisms of ribosomal protein gene coregulation

    PubMed Central

    Reja, Rohit; Vinayachandran, Vinesh; Ghosh, Sujana; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    The 137 ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) of Saccharomyces provide a model for gene coregulation. We examined the positional and functional organization of their regulators (Rap1 [repressor activator protein 1], Fhl1, Ifh1, Sfp1, and Hmo1), the transcription machinery (TFIIB, TFIID, and RNA polymerase II), and chromatin at near-base-pair resolution using ChIP-exo, as RPGs are coordinately reprogrammed. Where Hmo1 is enriched, Fhl1, Ifh1, Sfp1, and Hmo1 cross-linked broadly to promoter DNA in an RPG-specific manner and demarcated by general minor groove widening. Importantly, Hmo1 extended 20–50 base pairs (bp) downstream from Fhl1. Upon RPG repression, Fhl1 remained in place. Hmo1 dissociated, which was coupled to an upstream shift of the +1 nucleosome, as reflected by the Hmo1 extension and core promoter region. Fhl1 and Hmo1 may create two regulatable and positionally distinct barriers, against which chromatin remodelers position the +1 nucleosome into either an activating or a repressive state. Consistent with in vitro studies, we found that specific TFIID subunits, in addition to cross-linking at the core promoter, made precise cross-links at Rap1 sites, which we interpret to reflect native Rap1–TFIID interactions. Our findings suggest how sequence-specific DNA binding regulates nucleosome positioning and transcription complex assembly >300 bp away and how coregulation coevolved with coding sequences. PMID:26385964

  16. Molecular mechanisms of ribosomal protein gene coregulation.

    PubMed

    Reja, Rohit; Vinayachandran, Vinesh; Ghosh, Sujana; Pugh, B Franklin

    2015-09-15

    The 137 ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) of Saccharomyces provide a model for gene coregulation. We examined the positional and functional organization of their regulators (Rap1 [repressor activator protein 1], Fhl1, Ifh1, Sfp1, and Hmo1), the transcription machinery (TFIIB, TFIID, and RNA polymerase II), and chromatin at near-base-pair resolution using ChIP-exo, as RPGs are coordinately reprogrammed. Where Hmo1 is enriched, Fhl1, Ifh1, Sfp1, and Hmo1 cross-linked broadly to promoter DNA in an RPG-specific manner and demarcated by general minor groove widening. Importantly, Hmo1 extended 20-50 base pairs (bp) downstream from Fhl1. Upon RPG repression, Fhl1 remained in place. Hmo1 dissociated, which was coupled to an upstream shift of the +1 nucleosome, as reflected by the Hmo1 extension and core promoter region. Fhl1 and Hmo1 may create two regulatable and positionally distinct barriers, against which chromatin remodelers position the +1 nucleosome into either an activating or a repressive state. Consistent with in vitro studies, we found that specific TFIID subunits, in addition to cross-linking at the core promoter, made precise cross-links at Rap1 sites, which we interpret to reflect native Rap1-TFIID interactions. Our findings suggest how sequence-specific DNA binding regulates nucleosome positioning and transcription complex assembly >300 bp away and how coregulation coevolved with coding sequences. © 2015 Reja et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  17. Thermoplastic elastomer with advanced hydrophilization and bonding performances for rapid (30 s) and easy molding of microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Lachaux, Julie; Alcaine, Clara; Gómez-Escoda, Blanca; Perrault, Cécile M; Duplan, David Olea; Wu, Pei-Yun Jenny; Ochoa, Iñaki; Fernandez, Luis; Mercier, Olaf; Coudreuse, Damien; Roy, Emmanuel

    2017-07-25

    One of the most important areas of research on microfluidic technologies focuses on the identification and characterisation of novel materials with enhanced properties and versatility. Here we present a fast, easy and inexpensive microstructuration method for the fabrication of novel, flexible, transparent and biocompatible microfluidic devices. Using a simple hot press, we demonstrate the rapid (30 s) production of various microfluidic prototypes embossed in a commercially available soft thermoplastic elastomer (sTPE). This styrenic block copolymer (BCP) material is as flexible as PDMS and as thermoformable as classical thermoplastics. It exhibits high fidelity of replication using SU-8 and epoxy master molds in a highly convenient low-isobar (0.4 bar) and iso-thermal process. Microfluidic devices can then be easily sealed using either a simple hot plate or even a room-temperature assembly, allowing them to sustain liquid pressures of 2 and 0.6 bar, respectively. The excellent sorption and biocompatibility properties of the microchips were validated via a standard rhodamine dye assay as well as a sensitive yeast cell-based assay. The morphology and composition of the surface area after plasma treatment for hydrophilization purposes are stable and show constant and homogenous distribution of block nanodomains (∼22° after 4 days). These domains, which are evenly distributed on the nanoscale, therefore account for the uniform and convenient surface of a "microfluidic scale device". To our knowledge, this is the first thermoplastic elastomer material that can be used for fast and reliable fabrication and assembly of microdevices while maintaining a high and stable hydrophilicity.

  18. The Ribosome Modulates Nascent Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Christian M.; Goldman, Daniel H.; Chodera, John D.; Tinoco, Ignacio; Bustamante, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are synthesized by the ribosome and generally must fold to become functionally active. Although it is commonly assumed that the ribosome affects the folding process, this idea has been extremely difficult to demonstrate. We have developed an experimental system to investigate the folding of single ribosome-bound stalled nascent polypeptides with optical tweezers. In T4 lysozyme, synthesized in a reconstituted in vitro translation system, the ribosome slows the formation of stable tertiary interactions and the attainment of the native state relative to the free protein. Incomplete T4 lysozyme polypeptides misfold and aggregate when free in solution, but they remain folding-competent near the ribosomal surface. Altogether, our results suggest that the ribosome not only decodes the genetic information and synthesizes polypeptides, but also promotes efficient de novo attainment of the native state. PMID:22194581

  19. Mammalian HCA66 protein is required for both ribosome synthesis and centriole duplication

    PubMed Central

    Gérus, Marie; Hoareau-Aveilla, Coralie; Kiss, Tamás; Caizergues-Ferrer, Michèle; Henry, Yves; Henras, Anthony K.

    2012-01-01

    Ribosome production, one of the most energy-consuming biosynthetic activities in living cells, is adjusted to growth conditions and coordinated with the cell cycle. Connections between ribosome synthesis and cell cycle progression have been described, but the underlying mechanisms remain only partially understood. The human HCA66 protein was recently characterized as a component of the centrosome, the major microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) in mammalian cells, and was shown to be required for centriole duplication and assembly of the mitotic spindle. We show here that HCA66 is also required for nucleolar steps of the maturation of the 40S ribosomal subunit and therefore displays a dual function. Overexpression of a dominant negative version of HCA66, accumulating at the centrosome but absent from the nucleoli, alters centrosome function but has no effect on pre-rRNA processing, suggesting that HCA66 acts independently in each process. In yeast and HeLa cells, depletion of MTOC components does not impair ribosome synthesis. Hence our results suggest that both in yeast and human cells, assembly of a functional MTOC and ribosome synthesis are not closely connected processes. PMID:22434888

  20. Maize reas1 Mutant Stimulates Ribosome Use Efficiency and Triggers Distinct Transcriptional and Translational Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Weiwei; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Qiao; Wang, Qun; Li, Xia; Yao, Dongsheng; Jin, Ying; Wang, Gang; Wang, Guifeng

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental cellular process in all cells. Impaired ribosome biogenesis causes developmental defects; however, its molecular and cellular bases are not fully understood. We cloned a gene responsible for a maize (Zea mays) small seed mutant, dek* (for defective kernel), and found that it encodes Ribosome export associated1 (ZmReas1). Reas1 is an AAA-ATPase that controls 60S ribosome export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after ribosome maturation. dek* is a weak mutant allele with decreased Reas1 function. In dek* cells, mature 60S ribosome subunits are reduced in the nucleus and cytoplasm, but the proportion of actively translating polyribosomes in cytosol is significantly increased. Reduced phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α and the increased elongation factor 1α level indicate an enhancement of general translational efficiency in dek* cells. The mutation also triggers dramatic changes in differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs. Discrepancy was observed between differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs, indicating distinct cellular responses at transcription and translation levels to the stress of defective ribosome processing. DNA replication and nucleosome assembly-related gene expression are selectively suppressed at the translational level, resulting in inhibited cell growth and proliferation in dek* cells. This study provides insight into cellular responses due to impaired ribosome biogenesis. PMID:26645456

  1. Topography of Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins. The order of reactivity of thiol groups*

    PubMed Central

    Bakardjieva, Anastasia; Crichton, Robert R.

    1974-01-01

    1. 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits of Escherichia coli were treated with N-[2,3-14C]-ethylmaleimide and iodo[14C]acetamide. 2. The proteins in the native subunits which reacted with the reagents were S1,‡ S2, S12, S13, S18, S21, L2, L5, L6, L10, L11, L15, L17, L20, L26+28 and L27. 3. Several proteins, such as S1, S12, S14, S18, L2, L6, L10, L11 and either L26 or 28, had thiol groups in an oxidized form and reacted to a greater extent after reduction with β-mercaptoethanol or dithiothreitol. 4. The total number of thiol groups in 30S and 50S subunits was determined as 16–17 and 26–27 respectively. The total number of thiol groups in each ribosomal protein was also determined. 5. The reaction of 30S and 50S subunits with iodoacetamide under several different conditions established the order of reactivity of thiol groups. PMID:4618476

  2. The Intersubunit Bridge B1b of the Bacterial Ribosome Facilitates Initiation of Protein Synthesis and Maintenance of Translational Fidelity.

    PubMed

    Lilleorg, Silva; Reier, Kaspar; Remme, Jaanus; Liiv, Aivar

    2017-04-07

    In bacteria, ribosomal subunits are connected via 12 intersubunit bridges involving RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, and protein-protein interactions. The only protein-protein bridge in the ribosome is ribosomal intersubunit bridge 1b (B1b), which is mainly formed by the bacterial protein L31 (bL31) and connects the head domain of 30S subunit and the central protuberance of the 50S subunit. It is known to be the most dynamic intersubunit bridge. Here, we have evaluated the role of bL31 and thereby the bridge B1b in the working cycle of the ribosome. First, bL31-deficient ribosomes are severely compromised in their ability to ensure translational fidelity particularly in reading frame maintenance in vivo. Second, in the absence of bL31, the rate of initiation is significantly reduced both in vivo and in vitro. Third, polysome profile and subunit reassociation assays demonstrate that bL31 is important for stabilizing subunit joining in vivo and in vitro. Together, our results demonstrate that bL31 is important for determining translational fidelity and stabilizing subunit association. We conclude that the only protein-protein intersubunit bridge of the bacterial ribosome facilitates translation initiation and is essential for maintaining the reading frame of mRNA translation.

  3. Structural basis for 5'-ETS recognition by Utp4 at the early stages of ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Calviño, Fabiola R.; Kornprobst, Markus; Schermann, Géza; Birkle, Fabienne; Wild, Klemens; Fischer, Tamas; Hurt, Ed; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis begins with the co-transcriptional assembly of the 90S pre-ribosome. The ‘U three protein’ (UTP) complexes and snoRNP particles arrange around the nascent pre-ribosomal RNA chaperoning its folding and further maturation. The earliest event in this hierarchical process is the binding of the UTP-A complex to the 5'-end of the pre-ribosomal RNA (5'-ETS). This oligomeric complex predominantly consists of β-propeller and α-solenoidal proteins. Here we present the structure of the Utp4 subunit from the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum at 2.15 Å resolution and analyze its function by UV RNA-crosslinking (CRAC) and in context of a recent cryo-EM structure of the 90S pre-ribosome. Utp4 consists of two orthogonal and highly basic β-propellers that perfectly fit the EM-data. The Utp4 structure highlights an unusual Velcro-closure of its C-terminal β-propeller as relevant for protein integrity and potentially Utp8 recognition in the context of the pre-ribosome. We provide a first model of the 5'-ETS RNA from the internally hidden 5'-end up to the region that hybridizes to the 3'-hinge sequence of U3 snoRNA and validate a specific Utp4/5'-ETS interaction by CRAC analysis. PMID:28575120

  4. Nuclear import of dimerized ribosomal protein Rps3 in complex with its chaperone Yar1

    PubMed Central

    Mitterer, Valentin; Gantenbein, Nadine; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Murat, Guillaume; Bergler, Helmut; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    After their cytoplasmic synthesis, ribosomal proteins need to be transported into the nucleus, where they assemble with ribosomal RNA into pre-ribosomal particles. Due to their physicochemical properties, they need protection from aggregation on this path. Newly synthesized ribosomal protein Rps3 forms a dimer that is associated with one molecule of its specific chaperone Yar1. Here we report that redundant pathways contribute to the nuclear import of Rps3, with the classical importin α/β pathway (Kap60/Kap95 in yeast) constituting a main import route. The Kap60/Kap95 heterodimer mediates efficient nuclear import of Rps3 by recognition of an N-terminal monopartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). This Rps3-NLS is located directly adjacent to the Yar1-binding site and, upon binding of Kap60 to Rps3, Yar1 is displaced from the ribosomal protein in vitro. While Yar1 does not directly interact with Kap60 in vitro, affinity purifications of Yar1 and Rps3, however, revealed that Kap60 is present in the Rps3/Yar1 complex in vivo. Indeed we could reconstitute such a protein complex containing Rps3 and both Yar1 and Kap60 in vitro. Our data suggest that binding of Yar1 to one N-domain and binding of Kap60 to the second N-domain of dimerized Rps3 orchestrates import and protection of the ribosomal protein. PMID:27819319

  5. Organization of proteins in mammalian mitochondrial ribosomes: accessibility to lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination

    SciTech Connect

    Denslow, N.D.; O'Brien, T.W.

    1984-08-10

    To assess the relative exposure of individual ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) in the large and small subunits of the bovine mitochondrial ribosome, double label iodination technique was used. Regions of r-proteins exposed in purified ribosomal subunits were labeled with /sup 131/I using the lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination system, and additional reactive groups available upon denaturing the r-proteins in urea were labeled with /sup 125/I using the chloramine-T mediated reaction. The ratio of /sup 131/I to /sup 125/I incorporated into individual proteins under these conditions is representative of the degree of exposure for each of the proteins in the subunits. In this manner, the r-proteins have been grouped into 3 classes depending on their degree of exposure: high exposure, intermediate exposure, and essentially buried. While both subunits have a few proteins in the highly exposed group, and a large number of proteins in the intermediate exposure group, only the large ribosomal subunit has an appreciable number of proteins which appear essentially buried. The more buried proteins may serve mainly structural roles, perhaps acting as assembly proteins, since many from this group bind to ribosomal RNA. The more superficially disposed proteins may comprise binding sites for macromolecules that interact with ribosomes during protein synthesis, as well as stabilizing the association of the large and small subribosomal particles.

  6. Signal recognition particle RNA localization within the nucleolus differs from the classical sites of ribosome synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Politz, Joan C.; Lewandowski, Laura B.; Pederson, Thoru

    2002-01-01

    The nucleolus is the site of ribosome biosynthesis, but is now known to have other functions as well. In the present study we have investigated how the distribution of signal recognition particle (SRP) RNA within the nucleolus relates to the known sites of ribosomal RNA synthesis, processing, and nascent ribosome assembly (i.e., the fibrillar centers, the dense fibrillar component (DFC), and the granular component). Very little SRP RNA was detected in fibrillar centers or the DFC of the nucleolus, as defined by the RNA polymerase I–specific upstream binding factor and the protein fibrillarin, respectively. Some SRP RNA was present in the granular component, as marked by the protein B23, indicating a possible interaction with ribosomal subunits at a later stage of maturation. However, a substantial portion of SRP RNA was also detected in regions of the nucleolus where neither B23, UBF, or fibrillarin were concentrated. Dual probe in situ hybridization experiments confirmed that a significant fraction of nucleolar SRP RNA was not spatially coincident with 28S ribosomal RNA. These results demonstrate that SRP RNA concentrates in an intranucleolar location other than the classical stations of ribosome biosynthesis, suggesting that there may be nucleolar regions that are specialized for other functions. PMID:12427865

  7. Structural basis for 5'-ETS recognition by Utp4 at the early stages of ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Calviño, Fabiola R; Kornprobst, Markus; Schermann, Géza; Birkle, Fabienne; Wild, Klemens; Fischer, Tamas; Hurt, Ed; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Sinning, Irmgard

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis begins with the co-transcriptional assembly of the 90S pre-ribosome. The 'U three protein' (UTP) complexes and snoRNP particles arrange around the nascent pre-ribosomal RNA chaperoning its folding and further maturation. The earliest event in this hierarchical process is the binding of the UTP-A complex to the 5'-end of the pre-ribosomal RNA (5'-ETS). This oligomeric complex predominantly consists of β-propeller and α-solenoidal proteins. Here we present the structure of the Utp4 subunit from the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum at 2.15 Å resolution and analyze its function by UV RNA-crosslinking (CRAC) and in context of a recent cryo-EM structure of the 90S pre-ribosome. Utp4 consists of two orthogonal and highly basic β-propellers that perfectly fit the EM-data. The Utp4 structure highlights an unusual Velcro-closure of its C-terminal β-propeller as relevant for protein integrity and potentially Utp8 recognition in the context of the pre-ribosome. We provide a first model of the 5'-ETS RNA from the internally hidden 5'-end up to the region that hybridizes to the 3'-hinge sequence of U3 snoRNA and validate a specific Utp4/5'-ETS interaction by CRAC analysis.

  8. Balanced Production of Ribosome Components Is Required for Proper G1/S Transition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae *

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Herreros, Fernando; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; Morillo-Huesca, Macarena; Maya, Douglas; Arista-Romero, María; de la Cruz, Jesús; Chávez, Sebastián; Muñoz-Centeno, Mari Cruz

    2013-01-01

    Cell cycle regulation is a very accurate process that ensures cell viability and the genomic integrity of daughter cells. A fundamental part of this regulation consists in the arrest of the cycle at particular points to ensure the completion of a previous event, to repair cellular damage, or to avoid progression in potentially risky situations. In this work, we demonstrate that a reduction in nucleotide levels or the depletion of RNA polymerase I or III subunits generates a cell cycle delay at the G1/S transition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This delay is concomitant with an imbalance between ribosomal RNAs and proteins which, among others, provokes an accumulation of free ribosomal protein L5. Consistently with a direct impact of free L5 on the G1/S transition, rrs1 mutants, which weaken the assembly of L5 and L11 on pre-60S ribosomal particles, enhance both the G1/S delay and the accumulation of free ribosomal protein L5. We propose the existence of a surveillance mechanism that couples the balanced production of yeast ribosomal components and cell cycle progression through the accumulation of free ribosomal proteins. This regulatory pathway resembles the p53-dependent nucleolar-stress checkpoint response described in human cells, which indicates that this is a general control strategy extended throughout eukaryotes. PMID:24043628

  9. Ribosome-associated protein quality control

    PubMed Central

    Brandman, Onn; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis by the ribosome can fail for numerous reasons including faulty mRNA, insufficient availability of charged tRNAs and genetic errors. All organisms have evolved mechanisms to recognize stalled ribosomes and initiate pathways for recycling, quality control and stress signaling. Here we review the discovery and molecular dissection of the eukaryotic ribosome-associated quality-control pathway for degradation of nascent polypeptides arising from interrupted translation. PMID:26733220

  10. Ribosomes are optimized for autocatalytic production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuveni, Shlomi; Ehrenberg, Måns; Paulsson, Johan

    2017-07-01

    Many fine-scale features of ribosomes have been explained in terms of function, revealing a molecular machine that is optimized for error-correction, speed and control. Here we demonstrate mathematically that many less well understood, larger-scale features of ribosomes—such as why a few ribosomal RNA molecules dominate the mass and why the ribosomal protein content is divided into 55-80 small, similarly sized segments—speed up their autocatalytic production.

  11. Growth, Persistence, and Desistance of Alcohol Use for At-Risk Men in Their 30s.

    PubMed

    Capaldi, Deborah M; Tiberio, Stacey S; Washburn, Isaac J; Yoerger, Karen; Feingold, Alan

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about heterogeneity in men's drinking behaviors and their related consequences across mid-adulthood, and moreover, whether individual or social factors may predict such differences. This study examined 3 indicators of alcohol use, namely alcohol volume, heavy episodic drinking (HED), and drinking-related problems for men in their 30s. Participants were 197 at-risk men from the Oregon Youth Study assessed 5 times across ages 29 to 38 years. Growth mixture modeling with count outcomes was used to examine unobserved heterogeneity in alcohol trajectories. Associations of latent classes of alcohol users with (i) classes for the other alcohol indicators, (ii) alcohol use by peers and romantic partners, (iii) alcohol classes previously extracted from ages 18 to 29 years, and (iv) past year alcohol use disorder (AUD) diagnostic status at ages 35 to 36 years were examined. A 3-class solution afforded the best fit for each alcohol indicator. Alcohol problems were relatively established in the 30s, with an ascending use class found only for volume. Although relatively few men were in higher classes for all 3 indicators, 45% of the sample was in the highest class on at least 2 indicators of use. Peer drunkenness was a robust predictor of the alcohol classes. Concordance among classes of alcohol users was seen from the 20s to the 30s, with prior desistance likely to be maintained for alcohol volume and HED. AUD diagnoses at ages 35 to 36 years were more common in the higher classes obtained for alcohol volume and alcohol problems. Many men in their 30s engaged in a high volume of alcohol use without frequent engagement in HED, likely relating to continuing alcohol problems. The convergence of men's alcohol use with that of their peers found at younger ages was maintained into early mid-adulthood. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  12. Growth, Persistence, and Desistance of Alcohol Use for At-Risk Men in Their 30s

    PubMed Central

    Capaldi, Deborah M.; Tiberio, Stacey S.; Washburn, Isaac J.; Yoerger, Karen; Feingold, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about heterogeneity in men's drinking behaviors and their related consequences across midadulthood, and moreover, whether individual or social factors may predict such differences. The present study examined 3 indicators of alcohol use; namely, alcohol volume, heavy episodic drinking (HED), and drinking-related problems for men in their 30s. Methods Participants were 197 at-risk men from the Oregon Youth Study assessed 5 times across ages 29–38 years. Growth mixture modeling with count outcomes was used to examine unobserved heterogeneity in alcohol trajectories. Associations of latent classes of alcohol users with (i) classes for the other alcohol indicators, (ii) alcohol use by peers and romantic partners, (iii) alcohol classes previously extracted from ages 18–29 years, and (iv) past year alcohol use disorder (AUD) diagnostic status at ages 35–36 years was examined. Results A 3-class solution afforded the best fit for each alcohol indicator. Alcohol problems were relatively established in the 30s, with an ascending use class found only for volume. Although relatively few men were in higher classes for all 3 indicators, 45% of the sample was in the highest class on at least 2 indicators of use. Peer drunkenness was a robust predictor of the alcohol classes. Concordance among classes of alcohol users was seen from the 20s to the 30s, with prior desistance likely to be maintained for alcohol volume and HED. AUD diagnoses at ages 35–36 years were more common in the higher classes obtained for alcohol volume and alcohol problems. Conclusions Many men in their 30s engaged in high volume of alcohol without frequent engagement in HED, likely relating to continuing alcohol problems. The convergence of men's alcohol use with that of their peers found at younger ages was maintained into early midadulthood. PMID:26010338

  13. 30S(α , p) Thermonuclear Reaction Rate from Experimental Level Structure of 34Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, D.; Chen, A. A.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Binh, D. N.; Chen, J.; Cherubini, S.; Duy, N. N.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Iwasa, N.; Jung, H. S.; Kato, S.; Kwon, Y. K.; Nishimura, S.; Ota, S.; Setoodehnia, K.; Teranishi, T.; Tokieda, H.; Yamada, T.; Yun, C. C.; Zhang, L. Y.

    Type I X-ray bursts are the most frequent thermonuclear explosions in the galaxy. Owing to their recurrence from known astronomical objects, burst morphology is extensively documented, and they are modeled very successfully as neutron-deficient, thermonuclear runaway on the surface of accreting neutron stars. While reaction networks include hundreds of isotopes and thousands of nuclear processes, only a small subset appear to play a pivotal role. One such reaction is the 30S(α , p) reaction, which is believed to be a crucial link in the explosive helium burning which is responsible for the large energy flux. However, very little experimental information is available concerning the cross section itself, nor the 34Ar compound nucleus at the relevant energies. We performed the first study of the entrance channel via 30S alpha resonant elastic scattering using a state-of-the-art, low-energy, 30S radioactive ion beam. The measurement was performed in inverse kinematics using a newly-developed active target. An R-matrix analysis of the excitation function reveals previously unknown resonances, including their quantum properties of spin, parity, width, and energy.

  14. Ribosome biogenesis in replicating cells: Integration of experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Earnest, Tyler M; Cole, John A; Peterson, Joseph R; Hallock, Michael J; Kuhlman, Thomas E; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2016-10-01

    Ribosomes-the primary macromolecular machines responsible for translating the genetic code into proteins-are complexes of precisely folded RNA and proteins. The ways in which their production and assembly are managed by the living cell is of deep biological importance. Here we extend a recent spatially resolved whole-cell model of ribosome biogenesis in a fixed volume [Earnest et al., Biophys J 2015, 109, 1117-1135] to include the effects of growth, DNA replication, and cell division. All biological processes are described in terms of reaction-diffusion master equations and solved stochastically using the Lattice Microbes simulation software. In order to determine the replication parameters, we construct and analyze a series of Escherichia coli strains with fluorescently labeled genes distributed evenly throughout their chromosomes. By measuring these cells' lengths and number of gene copies at the single-cell level, we could fit a statistical model of the initiation and duration of chromosome replication. We found that for our slow-growing (120 min doubling time) E. coli cells, replication was initiated 42 min into the cell cycle and completed after an additional 42 min. While simulations of the biogenesis model produce the correct ribosome and mRNA counts over the cell cycle, the kinetic parameters for transcription and degradation are lower than anticipated from a recent analytical time dependent model of in vivo mRNA production. Describing expression in terms of a simple chemical master equation, we show that the discrepancies are due to the lack of nonribosomal genes in the extended biogenesis model which effects the competition of mRNA for ribosome binding, and suggest corrections to parameters to be used in the whole-cell model when modeling expression of the entire transcriptome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 735-751, 2016.

  15. Ribosomal protein methyltransferases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadid, Qais; White, Jonelle; Clarke, Steven

    2016-02-12

    A significant percentage of the methyltransferasome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes is devoted to methylation of the translational machinery. Methylation of the RNA components of the translational machinery has been studied extensively and is important for structure stability, ribosome biogenesis, and translational fidelity. However, the functional effects of ribosomal protein methylation by their cognate methyltransferases are still largely unknown. Previous work has shown that the ribosomal protein Rpl3 methyltransferase, histidine protein methyltransferase 1 (Hpm1), is important for ribosome biogenesis and translation elongation fidelity. In this study, yeast strains deficient in each of the ten ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae were examined for potential defects in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Like Hpm1-deficient cells, loss of four of the nine other ribosomal protein methyltransferases resulted in defects in ribosomal subunit synthesis. All of the mutant strains exhibited resistance to the ribosome inhibitors anisomycin and/or cycloheximide in plate assays, but not in liquid culture. Translational fidelity assays measuring stop codon readthrough, amino acid misincorporation, and programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, revealed that eight of the ten enzymes are important for translation elongation fidelity and the remaining two are necessary for translation termination efficiency. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

  16. Biphasic character of ribosomal translocation and non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics of translation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2014-12-01

    We study theoretically the kinetics of mRNA translocation in the wild-type (WT) Escherichia coli ribosome, which is composed of a small 30S and large 50S subunit, and the ribosomes with mutations to some intersubunit bridges such as B1a, B4, B7a, and B8. The theoretical results reproduce well the available in vitro experimental data on the biphasic kinetics of the forward mRNA translocation catalyzed by elongation factor G (EF-G) hydrolyzing GTP, which can be best fit by the sum of two exponentials, and the monophasic kinetics of the spontaneous reverse mRNA translocation in the absence of the elongation factor, which can be best fit by a single-exponential function, in both the WT and mutant ribosomes. We show that both the mutation-induced increase in the maximal rate of the slow phase for the forward mRNA translocation and that in the rate of the spontaneous reverse mRNA translocation result from a reduction in the intrinsic energy barrier to resist the rotational movements between the two subunits, giving the same degree of increase in the two rates. The mutation-induced increase in the maximal rate of the fast phase for the forward mRNA translocation results mainly from the increase in the rate of the ribosomal unlocking, a conformational change in the ribosome that widens the mRNA channel for the mRNA translocation to take place, which could be partly due to the effect of the mutation on the intrasubunit 30S head rotation. Moreover, we study the translation rate of the WT and mutant ribosomes. It is shown that the translation rate versus the concentration of EF-G-GTP does not follow the Michaelis-Menten (MM) kinetics, which is in sharp contrast to the general property of other enzymes that the rate of the enzymatic reaction versus the concentration of a substrate follows the MM kinetics. The physical origin of this non-MM kinetics for the ribosome is revealed.

  17. Biphasic character of ribosomal translocation and non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics of translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ping

    2014-12-01

    We study theoretically the kinetics of mRNA translocation in the wild-type (WT) Escherichia coli ribosome, which is composed of a small 30 S and large 50 S subunit, and the ribosomes with mutations to some intersubunit bridges such as B1a, B4, B7a, and B8. The theoretical results reproduce well the available in vitro experimental data on the biphasic kinetics of the forward mRNA translocation catalyzed by elongation factor G (EF-G) hydrolyzing GTP, which can be best fit by the sum of two exponentials, and the monophasic kinetics of the spontaneous reverse mRNA translocation in the absence of the elongation factor, which can be best fit by a single-exponential function, in both the WT and mutant ribosomes. We show that both the mutation-induced increase in the maximal rate of the slow phase for the forward mRNA translocation and that in the rate of the spontaneous reverse mRNA translocation result from a reduction in the intrinsic energy barrier to resist the rotational movements between the two subunits, giving the same degree of increase in the two rates. The mutation-induced increase in the maximal rate of the fast phase for the forward mRNA translocation results mainly from the increase in the rate of the ribosomal unlocking, a conformational change in the ribosome that widens the mRNA channel for the mRNA translocation to take place, which could be partly due to the effect of the mutation on the intrasubunit 30S head rotation. Moreover, we study the translation rate of the WT and mutant ribosomes. It is shown that the translation rate versus the concentration of EF-G-GTP does not follow the Michaelis-Menten (MM) kinetics, which is in sharp contrast to the general property of other enzymes that the rate of the enzymatic reaction versus the concentration of a substrate follows the MM kinetics. The physical origin of this non-MM kinetics for the ribosome is revealed.

  18. Aggregation of Ribosomal Protein S6 at Nucleolus Is Cell Cycle-Controlled and Its Function in Pre-rRNA Processing Is Phosphorylation Dependent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Duo; Chen, Hui-Peng; Duan, Hai-Feng; Gao, Li-Hua; Shao, Yong; Chen, Ke-Yan; Wang, You-Liang; Lan, Feng-Hua; Hu, Xian-Wen

    2016-07-01

    Ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) has long been regarded as one of the primary r-proteins that functions in the early stage of 40S subunit assembly, but its actual role is still obscure. The correct forming of 18S rRNA is a key step in the nuclear synthesis of 40S subunit. In this study, we demonstrate that rpS6 participates in the processing of 30S pre-rRNA to 18S rRNA only when its C-terminal five serines are phosphorylated, however, the process of entering the nucleus and then targeting the nucleolus does not dependent its phosphorylation. Remarkably, we also find that the aggregation of rpS6 at the nucleolus correlates to the phasing of cell cycle, beginning to concentrate in the nucleolus at later S phase and disaggregate at M phase. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1649-1657, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Ribosome Biogenesis in African Trypanosomes Requires Conserved and Trypanosome-Specific Factors

    PubMed Central

    Umaer, Khan; Ciganda, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Large ribosomal subunit protein L5 is responsible for the stability and trafficking of 5S rRNA to the site of eukaryotic ribosomal assembly. In Trypanosoma brucei, in addition to L5, trypanosome-specific proteins P34 and P37 also participate in this process. These two essential proteins form a novel preribosomal particle through interactions with both the ribosomal protein L5 and 5S rRNA. We have generated a procyclic L5 RNA interference cell line and found that L5 itself is a protein essential for trypanosome growth, despite the presence of other 5S rRNA binding proteins. Loss of L5 decreases the levels of all large-subunit rRNAs, 25/28S, 5.8S, and 5S rRNAs, but does not alter small-subunit 18S rRNA. Depletion of L5 specifically reduced the levels of the other large ribosomal proteins, L3 and L11, whereas the steady-state levels of the mRNA for these proteins were increased. L5-knockdown cells showed an increase in the 40S ribosomal subunit and a loss of the 60S ribosomal subunits, 80S monosomes, and polysomes. In addition, L5 was involved in the processing and maturation of precursor rRNAs. Analysis of polysomal fractions revealed that unprocessed rRNA intermediates accumulate in the ribosome when L5 is depleted. Although we previously found that the loss of P34 and P37 does not result in a change in the levels of L5, the loss of L5 resulted in an increase of P34 and P37 proteins, suggesting the presence of a compensatory feedback loop. This study demonstrates that ribosomal protein L5 has conserved functions, in addition to nonconserved trypanosome-specific features, which could be targeted for drug intervention. PMID:24706018

  20. In vitro translation in a hybrid cell free lysate with exogenous cellular ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Panthu, Baptiste; Décimo, Didier; Balvay, Laurent; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2015-05-01

    Cell free protein synthesis systems (CFPS) have been widely used to express proteins and to explore the pathways of gene expression. In the present manuscript, we describe the design of a novel adaptable hybrid in vitro translation system which is assembled with ribosomes isolated from many different origins. We first show that this hybrid system exhibits all important features such as efficiency, sensitivity, reproducibility and the ability to translate specialized mRNAs in less than 1 h. In addition, the unique design of this cell free assay makes it highly adaptable to utilize ribosomes isolated from many different organs, tissues or cell types.

  1. Identification of nucleotides in E. coli 16S rRNA essential for ribosome subunit association

    PubMed Central

    Pulk, Arto; Maiväli, Ülo; Remme, Jaanus

    2006-01-01

    The ribosome consists of two unequal subunits, which associate via numerous intersubunit contacts. Medium-resolution structural studies have led to grouping of the intersubunit contacts into 12 directly visualizable intersubunit bridges. Most of the intersubunit interactions involve RNA. We have used an RNA modification interference approach to determine Escherichia coli 16S rRNA positions that are essential for the association of functionally active 70S ribosomes. Modification of the N1 position of A702, A1418, and A1483 with DMS, and of the N3 position of U793, U1414, and U1495 with CMCT in 30S subunits strongly interferes with 70S ribosome formation. Five of these positions localize into previously recognized intersubunit bridges, namely, B2a (U1495), B2b (U793), B3 (A1483), B5 (A1418), and B7a (A702). The remaining position displaying interference, U1414, forms a base pair with G1486, which is a part of bridge B3. We contend that these five intersubunit bridges are essential for reassociation of the 70S ribosome, thus forming the functional core of the intersubunit contacts. PMID:16556933

  2. Identification of nucleotides in E. coli 16S rRNA essential for ribosome subunit association.

    PubMed

    Pulk, Arto; Maiväli, Ulo; Remme, Jaanus

    2006-05-01

    The ribosome consists of two unequal subunits, which associate via numerous intersubunit contacts. Medium-resolution structural studies have led to grouping of the intersubunit contacts into 12 directly visualizable intersubunit bridges. Most of the intersubunit interactions involve RNA. We have used an RNA modification interference approach to determine Escherichia coli 16S rRNA positions that are essential for the association of functionally active 70S ribosomes. Modification of the N1 position of A702, A1418, and A1483 with DMS, and of the N3 position of U793, U1414, and U1495 with CMCT in 30S subunits strongly interferes with 70S ribosome formation. Five of these positions localize into previously recognized intersubunit bridges, namely, B2a (U1495), B2b (U793), B3 (A1483), B5 (A1418), and B7a (A702). The remaining position displaying interference, U1414, forms a base pair with G1486, which is a part of bridge B3. We contend that these five intersubunit bridges are essential for reassociation of the 70S ribosome, thus forming the functional core of the intersubunit contacts.

  3. Specific interaction between EF-G and RRF and its implication for GTP-dependent ribosome splitting into subunits

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ning; Zavialov, Andrey V.; Ehrenberg, Måns; Frank, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Summary After termination of protein synthesis, the bacterial ribosome is split into its 30S and 50S subunits by the action of ribosome recycling factor (RRF) and elongation factor G (EF-G) in a GTP-hydrolysis dependent manner. Based on a previous cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) study of ribosomal complexes, we have proposed that the binding of EF-G to an RRF containing post-termination ribosome triggers an inter-domain rotation of RRF, which destabilizes two strong intersubunit bridges (B2a and B3) and, ultimately, separates the two subunits. Here, we present a 9 Å (FSC at 0.5 cutoff) cryo-EM map of a 50S EFG GDPNP RRF complex and a quasi-atomic model derived from it, showing the interaction between EF-G and RRF on the 50S subunit in the presence of the non-cleavable GTP analogue GDPNP. The detailed information in this model and a comparative analysis of EF-G structures in various nucleotide- and ribosome-bound states show how rotation of the RRF head domain may be triggered by various domains of EF-G. For validation of our structural model, all known mutations in EF-G and RRF that relate to ribosome recycling have been taken into account. More importantly, our results indicate a substantial conformational change in the Switch I region of EF-G, suggesting that a conformational signal transduction mechanism, similar to that employed in tRNA translocation on the ribosome by EF-G, translates a large-scale movement of EF-G’s domain IV, induced by GTP hydrolysis, into the domain rotation of RRF that eventually splits the ribosome into subunits. PMID:17996252

  4. The other lives of ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Despite the fact that ribosomal proteins are the constituents of an organelle that is present in every cell, they show a surprising level of regulation, and several of them have also been shown to have other extra-ribosomal functions, such in replication, transcription, splicing or even ageing. This review provides a comprehensive summary of these important aspects. PMID:20650820

  5. Complementary roles of initiation factor 1 and ribosome recycling factor in 70S ribosome splitting

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Antoun, Ayman; Lovmar, Martin; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that ribosomes containing a messenger RNA (mRNA) with a strong Shine–Dalgarno sequence are rapidly split into subunits by initiation factors 1 (IF1) and 3 (IF3), but slowly split by ribosome recycling factor (RRF) and elongation factor G (EF-G). Post-termination-like (PTL) ribosomes containing mRNA and a P-site-bound deacylated transfer RNA (tRNA) are split very rapidly by RRF and EF-G, but extremely slowly by IF1 and IF3. Vacant ribosomes are split by RRF/EF-G much more slowly than PTL ribosomes and by IF1/IF3 much more slowly than mRNA-containing ribosomes. These observations reveal complementary splitting of different ribosomal complexes by IF1/IF3 and RRF/EF-G, and suggest the existence of two major pathways for ribosome splitting into subunits in the living cell. We show that the identity of the deacylated tRNA in the PTL ribosome strongly affects the rate by which it is split by RRF/EF-G and that IF3 is involved in the mechanism of ribosome splitting by IF1/IF3 but not by RRF/EF-G. With support from our experimental data, we discuss the principally different mechanisms of ribosome splitting by IF1/IF3 and by RRF/EF-G. PMID:18497739

  6. GTP hydrolysis by EF-G synchronizes tRNA movement on small and large ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Holtkamp, Wolf; Cunha, Carlos E; Peske, Frank; Konevega, Andrey L; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V

    2014-01-01

    Elongation factor G (EF-G) promotes the movement of two tRNAs and the mRNA through the ribosome in each cycle of peptide elongation. During translocation, the tRNAs transiently occupy intermediate positions on both small (30S) and large (50S) ribosomal subunits. How EF-G and GTP hydrolysis control these movements is still unclear. We used fluorescence labels that specifically monitor movements on either 30S or 50S subunits in combination with EF-G mutants and translocation-specific antibiotics to investigate timing and energetics of translocation. We show that EF-G–GTP facilitates synchronous movements of peptidyl-tRNA on the two subunits into an early post-translocation state, which resembles a chimeric state identified by structural studies. EF-G binding without GTP hydrolysis promotes only partial tRNA movement on the 50S subunit. However, rapid 30S translocation and the concomitant completion of 50S translocation require GTP hydrolysis and a functional domain 4 of EF-G. Our results reveal two distinct modes for utilizing the energy of EF-G binding and GTP hydrolysis and suggest that coupling of GTP hydrolysis to translocation is mediated through rearrangements of the 30S subunit. PMID:24614227

  7. Optimal loads for a 30-s maximal power cycle ergometer test using a stationary start.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Nicole T; Robergs, Robert A; Klopp, Dawn M

    2015-05-01

    A stationary start modification to the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) has become increasingly common. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the traditional 85 g kg(-1) body weight (BW) load (TRAD), or an individualized optimal load (OPT), is more suitable for obtaining peak and mean power outputs (PPO and MPO, respectively) for a stationary start. Twelve recreationally active males and 10 females (mean age 30 ± 9.1 and 25 ± 5.5 years, respectively) completed three trials. The first determined the OPT load and included a familiarization of the 30-s stationary start test, followed by two randomized sessions testing the OPT and TRAD loads during the 30-s stationary start test on separate days. For each test, measures of power (watts), time, and cadence were collected to determine PPO, MPO, rate of power decline (rPD) and time to peak power (TtPP). All power data were corrected for flywheel moment of inertia. Results revealed significant differences between OPT and TRAD load settings for males (95.1 ± 10.7 and 85.06 ± 0.40 g kg(-1) BW; p = 0.008) but not for females (84.71 ± 8.72 and 85.2 ± 0.61 g kg(-1) BW; p = 0.813). Relative PPO was not different for OPT or TRAD loads for males (p = 0.485) or females (p = 0.488). It is not necessary to use an OPT load setting to acquire maxima