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Sample records for 30s ribosome assembly

  1. Assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit: positioning ribosomal protein S13 in the S7 assembly branch.

    PubMed

    Grondek, Joel F; Culver, Gloria M

    2004-12-01

    Studies of Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit assembly have revealed a hierarchical and cooperative association of ribosomal proteins with 16S ribosomal RNA; these results have been used to compile an in vitro 30S subunit assembly map. In single protein addition and omission studies, ribosomal protein S13 was shown to be dependent on the prior association of ribosomal protein S20 for binding to the ribonucleoprotein particle. While the overwhelming majority of interactions revealed in the assembly map are consistent with additional data, the dependency of S13 on S20 is not. Structural studies position S13 in the head of the 30S subunit > 100 A away from S20, which resides near the bottom of the body of the 30S subunit. All of the proteins that reside in the head of the 30S subunit, except S13, have been shown to be part of the S7 assembly branch, that is, they all depend on S7 for association with the assembling 30S subunit. Given these observations, the assembly requirements for S13 were investigated using base-specific chemical footprinting and primer extension analysis. These studies reveal that S13 can bind to 16S rRNA in the presence of S7, but not S20. Additionally, interaction between S13 and other members of the S7 assembly branch have been observed. These results link S13 to the 3' major domain family of proteins, and the S7 assembly branch, placing S13 in a new location in the 30S subunit assembly map where its position is in accordance with much biochemical and structural data.

  2. The effect of ribosome assembly cofactors on in vitro 30S subunit reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Bunner, Anne E; Nord, Stefan; Wikström, P Mikael; Williamson, James R

    2010-04-23

    Ribosome biogenesis is facilitated by a growing list of assembly cofactors, including helicases, GTPases, chaperones, and other proteins, but the specific functions of many of these assembly cofactors are still unclear. The effect of three assembly cofactors on 30S ribosome assembly was determined in vitro using a previously developed mass-spectrometry-based method that monitors the rRNA binding kinetics of ribosomal proteins. The essential GTPase Era caused several late-binding proteins to bind rRNA faster when included in a 30S reconstitution. RimP enabled faster binding of S9 and S19 and inhibited the binding of S12 and S13, perhaps by blocking those proteins' binding sites. RimM caused proteins S5 and S12 to bind dramatically faster. These quantitative kinetic data provide important clues about the roles of these assembly cofactors in the mechanism of 30S biogenesis.

  3. Concurrent Nucleation of 16S Folding and Induced Fit in 30S Ribosome Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Adilakshmi, T.; Bellur, D; Woodson, S

    2008-01-01

    Rapidly growing cells produce thousands of new ribosomes each minute, in a tightly regulated process that is essential to cell growth. How the Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA and the 20 proteins that make up the 30S ribosomal subunit can assemble correctly in a few minutes remains a challenging problem, partly because of the lack of real-time data on the earliest stages of assembly. By providing snapshots of individual RNA and protein interactions as they emerge in real time, here we show that 30S assembly nucleates concurrently from different points along the rRNA. Time-resolved hydroxyl radical footprinting3 was used to map changes in the structure of the rRNA within 20 milliseconds after the addition of total 30S proteins. Helical junctions in each domain fold within 100 ms. In contrast, interactions surrounding the decoding site and between the 5', the central and the 3' domains require 2-200 seconds to form. Unexpectedly, nucleotides contacted by the same protein are protected at different rates, indicating that initial RNA-protein encounter complexes refold during assembly. Although early steps in assembly are linked to intrinsically stable rRNA structure, later steps correspond to regions of induced fit between the proteins and the rRNA.

  4. Exploring assembly energetics of the 30S ribosomal subunit using an implicit solvent approach.

    PubMed

    Trylska, Joanna; McCammon, J Andrew; Brooks Iii, Charles L

    2005-08-10

    To explore the relationship between the assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit and interactions among the constituent components, 16S RNA and proteins, relative binding free energies of the T. thermophilus 30S proteins to the 16S RNA were studied based on an implicit solvent model of electrostatic, nonpolar, and entropic contributions. The late binding proteins in our assembly map were found not to bind to the naked 16S RNA. The 5' domain early kinetic class proteins, on average, carry the highest positive charge, get buried the most upon binding to 16S RNA, and show the most favorable binding. Some proteins (S10/S14, S6/S18, S13/S19) have more stabilizing interactions while binding as dimers. Our computed assembly map resembles that of E. coli; however, the central domain path is more similar to that of A. aeolicus, a hyperthermophilic bacteria.

  5. Tagging ribosomal protein S7 allows rapid identification of mutants defective in assembly and function of 30 S subunits.

    PubMed

    Fredrick, K; Dunny, G M; Noller, H F

    2000-05-01

    Ribosomal protein S7 nucleates folding of the 16 S rRNA 3' major domain, which ultimately forms the head of the 30 S ribosomal subunit. Recent crystal structures indicate that S7 lies on the interface side of the 30 S subunit, near the tRNA binding sites of the ribosome. To map the functional surface of S7, we have tagged the protein with a Protein Kinase A recognition site and engineered alanine substitutions that target each exposed, conserved residue. We have also deleted conserved features of S7, using its structure to guide our design. By radiolabeling the tag sequence using Protein Kinase A, we are able to track the partitioning of each mutant protein into 30 S, 70 S, and polyribosome fractions in vivo. Overexpression of S7 confers a growth defect, and we observe a striking correlation between this phenotype and proficiency in 30 S subunit assembly among our collection of mutants. We find that the side chain of K35 is required for efficient assembly of S7 into 30 S subunits in vivo, whereas those of at least 17 other conserved exposed residues are not required. In addition, an S7 derivative lacking the N-terminal 17 residues causes ribosomes to accumulate on mRNA to abnormally high levels, indicating that our approach can yield interesting mutant ribosomes.

  6. Independent in vitro assembly of all three major morphological parts of the 30S ribosomal subunit of Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Agalarov, S C; Selivanova, O M; Zheleznyakova, E N; Zheleznaya, L A; Matvienko, N I; Spirin, A S

    1999-12-01

    Fragments of the 16S rRNA of Thermus thermophilus representing the 3' domain (nucleotides 890-1515) and the 5' domain (nucleotides 1-539) have been prepared by transcription in vitro. Incubation of these fragments with total 30S ribosomal proteins of T. thermophilus resulted in formation of specific RNPs. The particle assembled on the 3' RNA domain contained seven proteins corresponding to Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins S3, S7, S9, S10, S13, S14, and S19. All of them have previously been shown to interact with the 3' domain of the 16S RNA and to be localized in the head of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The particle formed on the 5' RNA domain contained five ribosomal proteins corresponding to E. coli proteins S4, S12, S17, S16, and S20. These proteins are known to be localized in the main part of the body of the 30S subunit. Both types of particle were compact and had sedimentation coefficients of 15.5 S and 13 S, respectively. Together with our recent demonstration of the reconstitution of the RNA particle representing the platform of the T. thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit [Agalarov, S.C., Zheleznyakova, E.N., Selivanova, O.M., Zheleznaya, L.A., Matvienko, N.I., Vasiliev, V.D. & Spirin, A.S. (1998) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 95, 999-1003], these experiments establish that all three main structural lobes of the small ribosomal subunit can be reconstituted independently of each other and prepared in the individual state.

  7. A combined quantitative mass spectrometry and electron microscopy analysis of ribosomal 30S subunit assembly in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Sashital, Dipali G; Greeman, Candacia A; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Williamson, James R

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is a complex process involving the folding and processing of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), concomitant binding of ribosomal proteins (r-proteins), and participation of numerous accessory cofactors. Here, we use a quantitative mass spectrometry/electron microscopy hybrid approach to determine the r-protein composition and conformation of 30S ribosome assembly intermediates in Escherichia coli. The relative timing of assembly of the 3′ domain and the formation of the central pseudoknot (PK) structure depends on the presence of the assembly factor RimP. The central PK is unstable in the absence of RimP, resulting in the accumulation of intermediates in which the 3′-domain is unanchored and the 5′-domain is depleted for r-proteins S5 and S12 that contact the central PK. Our results reveal the importance of the cofactor RimP in central PK formation, and introduce a broadly applicable method for characterizing macromolecular assembly in cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04491.001 PMID:25313868

  8. Assembly of the central domain of the 30S ribosomal subunit: roles for the primary binding ribosomal proteins S15 and S8.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, Indu; Culver, Gloria M

    2003-07-01

    Assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit occurs in a highly ordered and sequential manner. The ordered addition of ribosomal proteins to the growing ribonucleoprotein particle is initiated by the association of primary binding proteins. These proteins bind specifically and independently to 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Two primary binding proteins, S8 and S15, interact exclusively with the central domain of 16S rRNA. Binding of S15 to the central domain results in a conformational change in the RNA and is followed by the ordered assembly of the S6/S18 dimer, S11 and finally S21 to form the platform of the 30S subunit. In contrast, S8 is not part of this major platform assembly branch. Of the remaining central domain binding proteins, only S21 association is slightly dependent on S8. Thus, although S8 is a primary binding protein that extensively contacts the central domain, its role in assembly of this domain remains unclear. Here, we used directed hydroxyl radical probing from four unique positions on S15 to assess organization of the central domain of 16S rRNA as a consequence of S8 association. Hydroxyl radical probing of Fe(II)-S15/16S rRNA and Fe(II)-S15/S8/16S rRNA ribonucleoprotein particles reveal changes in the 16S rRNA environment of S15 upon addition of S8. These changes occur predominantly in helices 24 and 26 near previously identified S8 binding sites. These S8-dependent conformational changes are consistent with 16S rRNA folding in complete 30S subunits. Thus, while S8 binding is not absolutely required for assembly of the platform, it appears to affect significantly the 16S rRNA environment of S15 by influencing central domain organization.

  9. Protein-RNA Dynamics in the Central Junction Control 30S Ribosome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kris Ann; Lamichhane, Rajan; Lamichhane, Tek; Rueda, David; Cunningham, Philip R

    2016-09-11

    Interactions between ribosomal proteins (rproteins) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) facilitate the formation of functional ribosomes. S15 is a central domain primary binding protein that has been shown to trigger a cascade of conformational changes in 16S rRNA, forming the functional structure of the central domain. Previous biochemical and structural studies in vitro have revealed that S15 binds a three-way junction of helices 20, 21, and 22, including nucleotides 652-654 and 752-754. All junction nucleotides except 653 are highly conserved among the Bacteria. To identify functionally important motifs within the junction, we subjected nucleotides 652-654 and 752-754 to saturation mutagenesis and selected and analyzed functional mutants. Only 64 mutants with greater than 10% ribosome function in vivo were isolated. S15 overexpression complemented mutations in the junction loop in each of the partially active mutants, although mutations that produced inactive ribosomes were not complemented by overexpression of S15. Single-molecule Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) was used to study the Mg(2+)- and S15-induced conformational dynamics of selected junction mutants. Comparison of the structural dynamics of these mutants with the wild type in the presence and absence of S15 revealed specific sequence and structural motifs in the central junction that are important in ribosome function. PMID:27192112

  10. Assembly of the 30S subunit from Escherichia coli ribosomes occurs via two assembly domains which are initiated by S4 and S7.

    PubMed

    Nowotny, V; Nierhaus, K H

    1988-09-01

    A protein which initiates assembly of ribosomes is defined as a protein which binds to the respective rRNA without cooperativity (i.e., without the help of other proteins) during the onset of assembly and is essential for the formation of active ribosomal subunits. The number of proteins binding without cooperativity was determined by monitoring the reconstitution output of active particles at various inputs of 16S rRNA, in the presence of constant amounts of 30S-derived proteins (TP30): This showed that only two of the proteins of the 30S subunit are assembly-initiator proteins. These two proteins are still present on a LiCl core particle comprising 16S rRNA and 12 proteins (including minor proteins). The 12 proteins were isolated, and a series of reconstitution experiments at various levels of rRNA excess demonstrated that S4 and S7 are the initiator proteins. Pulse-chase experiments performed during the early assembly with 14C- and 3H-labeled TP30 and the determination of the 14C/3H ratio of the individual proteins within the assembled particles revealed a bilobal structure of the 30S assembly: A group of six proteins headed by S4 (namely, S4, S20, S16, S15, S6, and S18) resisted the chasing most efficiently (S4 assembly domain). None of the proteins depending on S7 during assembly were found in this group but rather in a second group with intermediate chasing stability [S7 assembly domain; consisting of S7, S9, (S8), S19, and S3]. A number of proteins could be fully chased during the early assembly and therefore represent "late assembly proteins" (S10, S5, S13, S2, S21, S1). These findings fit well with the 30S assembly map.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Studies on the ability of partially iodinated 16S RNA to participate in 30S ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Schendel, P L; Craven, G R

    1976-11-01

    Deproteinated 16S RNA was iodinated at pH 5.0 in an aqueous solution containing TlCl3 plus KI for 1-5 hours at 42 degrees C. Under these conditions 33 moles of iodine are incorporated per mole of RNA. As judged by sucrose gradient sedimentation, the iodinated RNA does not exhibit any large alteration in conformation as compared to unmodified 16S. The iodinated RNA was examined for its ability to reconstitute with total 30S proteins. Sedimentation velocity analysis reveals that the reconstituted subunit has a sedimentation constant of approximately 20S. In addition, protein analysis of particles reconstituted with 16S RNA iodinated for 5 hours indicates that proteins S2, S10, S13, S14, S15, S17, S18, S19, and S21 are no longer able to participate in the 30S assembly process and that proteins S6, S16 and S20 are present in reduced amounts. The ramifications of these results concerning protein-RNA and RNA-RNA interactions occurring in ribosome assembly are discussed.

  12. RsgA releases RbfA from 30S ribosome during a late stage of ribosome biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Simon; Kato, Shingo; Kimura, Takatsugu; Muto, Akira; Himeno, Hyouta

    2011-01-01

    RsgA is a 30S ribosomal subunit-binding GTPase with an unknown function, shortage of which impairs maturation of the 30S subunit. We identified multiple gain-of-function mutants of Escherichia coli rbfA, the gene for a ribosome-binding factor, that suppress defects in growth and maturation of the 30S subunit of an rsgA-null strain. These mutations promote spontaneous release of RbfA from the 30S subunit, indicating that cellular disorders upon depletion of RsgA are due to prolonged retention of RbfA on the 30S subunit. We also found that RsgA enhances release of RbfA from the mature 30S subunit in a GTP-dependent manner but not from a precursor form of the 30S subunit. These findings indicate that the function of RsgA is to release RbfA from the 30S subunit during a late stage of ribosome biosynthesis. This is the first example of the action of a GTPase on the bacterial ribosome assembly described at the molecular level. PMID:21102555

  13. Efficient reconstitution of functional Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits from a complete set of recombinant small subunit ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Culver, G M; Noller, H F

    1999-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that the 30S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli can be reconstituted in vitro from individually purified ribosomal proteins and 16S ribosomal RNA, which were isolated from natural 30S subunits. We have developed a 30S subunit reconstitution system that uses only recombinant ribosomal protein components. The genes encoding E. coli ribosomal proteins S2-S21 were cloned, and all twenty of the individual proteins were overexpressed and purified. Reconstitution, following standard procedures, using the complete set of recombinant proteins and purified 16S ribosomal RNA is highly inefficient. Efficient reconstitution of 30S subunits using these components requires sequential addition of proteins, following either the 30S subunit assembly map (Mizushima & Nomura, 1970, Nature 226:1214-1218; Held et al., 1974, J Biol Chem 249:3103-3111) or following the order of protein assembly predicted from in vitro assembly kinetics (Powers et al., 1993, J MoI Biol 232:362-374). In the first procedure, the proteins were divided into three groups, Group I (S4, S7, S8, S15, S17, and S20), Group II (S5, S6, S9, Sll, S12, S13, S16, S18, and S19), and Group III (S2, S3, S10, S14, and S21), which were sequentially added to 16S rRNA with a 20 min incubation at 42 degrees C following the addition of each group. In the second procedure, the proteins were divided into Group I (S4, S6, S11, S15, S16, S17, S18, and S20), Group II (S7, S8, S9, S13, and S19), Group II' (S5 and S12) and Group III (S2, S3, S10, S14, and S21). Similarly efficient reconstitution is observed whether the proteins are grouped according to the assembly map or according to the results of in vitro 30S subunit assembly kinetics. Although reconstitution of 30S subunits using the recombinant proteins is slightly less efficient than reconstitution using a mixture of total proteins isolated from 30S subunits, it is much more efficient than reconstitution using proteins that were individually isolated

  14. Binding of 16S rRNA to chloroplast 30S ribosomal proteins blotted on nitrocellulose.

    PubMed

    Rozier, C; Mache, R

    1984-10-11

    Protein-RNA associations were studied by a method using proteins blotted on a nitrocellulose sheet. This method was assayed with Escherichia Coli 30S ribosomal components. In stringent conditions (300 mM NaCl or 20 degrees C) only 9 E. coli ribosomal proteins strongly bound to the 16S rRNA: S4, S5, S7, S9, S12, S13, S14, S19, S20. 8 of these proteins have been previously found to bind independently to the 16S rRNA. The same method was applied to determine protein-RNA interactions in spinach chloroplast 30S ribosomal subunits. A set of only 7 proteins was bound to chloroplast rRNA in stringent conditions: chloroplast S6, S10, S11, S14, S15, S17 and S22. They also bound to E. coli 16S rRNA. This set includes 4 chloroplast-synthesized proteins: S6, S11, S15 and S22. The core particles obtained after treatment by LiCl of chloroplast 30S ribosomal subunit contained 3 proteins (S6, S10 and S14) which are included in the set of 7 binding proteins. This set of proteins probably play a part in the early steps of the assembly of the chloroplast 30S ribosomal subunit.

  15. The ribosomal subunit assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Dlakić, Mensur

    2005-01-01

    Recent proteomic studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified nearly 200 proteins, other than the structural ribosomal proteins, that participate in the assembly of ribosomal subunits and their transport from the nucleus. In a separate line of research, proteomic studies of mature plant ribosomes have revealed considerable variability in the protein composition of individual ribosomes. PMID:16207363

  16. Ribosome Assembly as Antimicrobial Target.

    PubMed

    Nikolay, Rainer; Schmidt, Sabine; Schlömer, Renate; Deuerling, Elke; Nierhaus, Knud H

    2016-01-01

    Many antibiotics target the ribosome and interfere with its translation cycle. Since translation is the source of all cellular proteins including ribosomal proteins, protein synthesis and ribosome assembly are interdependent. As a consequence, the activity of translation inhibitors might indirectly cause defective ribosome assembly. Due to the difficulty in distinguishing between direct and indirect effects, and because assembly is probably a target in its own right, concepts are needed to identify small molecules that directly inhibit ribosome assembly. Here, we summarize the basic facts of ribosome targeting antibiotics. Furthermore, we present an in vivo screening strategy that focuses on ribosome assembly by a direct fluorescence based read-out that aims to identify and characterize small molecules acting as primary assembly inhibitors. PMID:27240412

  17. Ribosome Assembly as Antimicrobial Target

    PubMed Central

    Nikolay, Rainer; Schmidt, Sabine; Schlömer, Renate; Deuerling, Elke; Nierhaus, Knud H.

    2016-01-01

    Many antibiotics target the ribosome and interfere with its translation cycle. Since translation is the source of all cellular proteins including ribosomal proteins, protein synthesis and ribosome assembly are interdependent. As a consequence, the activity of translation inhibitors might indirectly cause defective ribosome assembly. Due to the difficulty in distinguishing between direct and indirect effects, and because assembly is probably a target in its own right, concepts are needed to identify small molecules that directly inhibit ribosome assembly. Here, we summarize the basic facts of ribosome targeting antibiotics. Furthermore, we present an in vivo screening strategy that focuses on ribosome assembly by a direct fluorescence based read-out that aims to identify and characterize small molecules acting as primary assembly inhibitors. PMID:27240412

  18. Cross-links between ribosomal proteins of 30S subunits in 70S tight couples and in 30S subunits.

    PubMed

    Lambert, J M; Boileau, G; Cover, J A; Traut, R R

    1983-08-01

    Ribosome 70S tight couples and 30S subunits derived from them were modified with 2-iminothiolane under conditions where about two sulfhydryl groups per protein were added to the ribosomal particles. The 70S and 30S particles were not treated with elevated concentrations of NH4Cl, in contrast to those used in earlier studies. The modified particles were oxidized to promote disulfide bond formation. Proteins were extracted from the cross-linked particles by using conditions to preclude disulfide interchange. Disulfide-linked protein complexes were fractionated on the basis of charge by electrophoresis in polyacrylamide/urea gels at pH 5.5. The proteins from sequential slices of the urea gels were analyzed by two-dimensional diagonal polyacrylamide/sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Final identification of proteins in cross-linked complexes was made by radioiodination of the proteins, followed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide/urea gel electrophoresis. Attention was focused on cross-links between 30S proteins. We report the identification of 27 cross-linked dimers and 2 trimers of 30S proteins, all but one of which were found in both 70S ribosomes and free 30S subunits in similar yield. Seven of the cross-links, S3-S13, S13-S21, S14-S19, S7-S12, S9-S13, S11-S21, and S6-S18-S21, have not been reported previously when 2-iminothiolane was used. Cross-links S3-S13, S13-S21, S7-S12, S11-S21, and S6-S18-S21 are reported for the first time. The identification of the seven new cross-links is illustrated and discussed in detail. Ten of the dimers reported in the earlier studies of Sommer & Traut (1976) [Sommer, A., & Traut, R. R. (1976) J. Mol. Biol. 106, 995-1015], using 30S subunits treated with high salt concentrations, were not found in the experiments reported here.

  19. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dao, E. Han; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Lemke, Henrik T.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Coey, Aaron; Larsen, Kevin; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; DeMirci, Hasan

    2015-04-30

    In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecond X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.

  20. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dao, E. Han; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Lemke, Henrik T.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Coey, Aaron; Larsen, Kevin; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; et al

    2015-04-30

    In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecondmore » X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.« less

  1. Mutations of ribosomal protein S5 suppress a defect in late-30S ribosomal subunit biogenesis caused by lack of the RbfA biogenesis factor

    PubMed Central

    Nord, Stefan; Bhatt, Monika J.; Tükenmez, Hasan; Farabaugh, Philip J.; Wikström, P. Mikael

    2015-01-01

    The in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits requires assistance by maturation proteins that are not part of mature ribosomes. One such protein, RbfA, associates with the 30S ribosomal subunits. Loss of RbfA causes cold sensitivity and defects of the 30S subunit biogenesis and its overexpression partially suppresses the dominant cold sensitivity caused by a C23U mutation in the central pseudoknot of 16S rRNA, a structure essential for ribosome function. We have isolated suppressor mutations that restore partially the growth of an RbfA-lacking strain. Most of the strongest suppressor mutations alter one out of three distinct positions in the carboxy-terminal domain of ribosomal protein S5 (S5) in direct contact with helix 1 and helix 2 of the central pseudoknot. Their effect is to increase the translational capacity of the RbfA-lacking strain as evidenced by an increase in polysomes in the suppressed strains. Overexpression of RimP, a protein factor that along with RbfA regulates formation of the ribosome's central pseudoknot, was lethal to the RbfA-lacking strain but not to a wild-type strain and this lethality was suppressed by the alterations in S5. The S5 mutants alter translational fidelity but these changes do not explain consistently their effect on the RbfA-lacking strain. Our genetic results support a role for the region of S5 modified in the suppressors in the formation of the central pseudoknot in 16S rRNA. PMID:26089326

  2. Neutron Scattering and the 30 S Ribosomal Subunit of E. Coli

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Moore, P. B.; Engelman, D. M.; Langer, J. A.; Ramakrishnan, V. R.; Schindler, D. G.; Schoenborn, B. P.; Sillers, I. Y.; Yabuki, S.

    1982-06-01

    This paper reviews the progress made in the study of the internal organization of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli by neutron scattering since 1975. A map of that particle showing the position of 14 of the subunit's 21 proteins is presented, and the methods currently used for collecting and analyzing such data are discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of extending the interpretation of neutron mapping data beyond the limits practical today.

  3. Neutron scattering and the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, P.B.; Engelman, D.M.; Langer, J.A.; Ramakrishnan, V.R.; Schindler, D.G.; Schoenborn, B.P.; Sillers, I.Y.; Yabuki, S.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the progress made in the study of the internal organization of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli by neutron scattering since 1975. A map of that particle showing the position of 14 of the subunit's 21 proteins is presented, and the methods currently used for collecting and analyzing such data are discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of extending the interpretation of neutron mapping data beyond the limits practical today. 30 references, 5 figures.

  4. A purified nucleoprotein fragment of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Spitnik-Elson, P; Elson, D; Abramowitz, R

    1979-02-27

    A '13 S' nucleoprotein fragment was isolated from a nuclease digest of Escherichia coli 30-S ribosomal subunits and purified to gel electrophoretic homogeneity. It contained two polynucleotides, of about 1.1 . 10(5) and 2.5 . 10(4) daltons, which separated when the fragment was deproteinized. The major protein components were S4, S7 and S9/11, with S15, S16, S18, S19 and S20 present in reduced amount.

  5. The protein composition of reconstituted 30S ribosomal subunits: the effects of single protein omission.

    PubMed

    Buck, M A; Olah, T V; Perrault, A R; Cooperman, B S

    1991-06-01

    Using reverse phase HPLC, we have been able to quantify the protein compositions of reconstituted 30S ribosomal subunits, formed either with the full complement of 30S proteins in the reconstitution mix or with a single protein omitted. We denote particles formed in the latter case as SPORE (single protein omission reconstitution) particles. An important goal in 30S reconstitution studies is the formation of reconstituted subunits having uniform protein composition, preferably corresponding to one copy of each protein per reconstituted particle. Here we describe procedures involving variation of the protein:rRNA ratio that approach this goal. In SPORE particles the omission of one protein often results in the partial loss in uptake of other proteins. We also describe procedures to increase the uptake of such proteins into SPORE particles, thus enhancing the utility of the SPORE approach in defining the role of specific proteins in 30S structure and function. The losses of proteins other than the omitted protein provide a measure of protein:protein interaction within the 30S subunit. Most of these losses are predictable on the basis of other such measures. However, we do find evidence for several long-range protein:protein interactions (S6:S3, S6:S12, S10:S16, and S6:S4) that have not been described previously.

  6. Seeing is Believing in Ribosome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jonathan R

    2016-07-14

    Many proteins have been implicated genetically and biochemically in the assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes. Now, Kornprobst et al. show us how they are put together with a cryoEM structure of the 90S processome that initiates ribosome assembly, revealing the arrangement of U3 RNA and the several UTP complexes that form a chaperone-like structure around and within the developing 40S ribosomal subunit. PMID:27419867

  7. Secondary structures of proteins from the 30S subunit of the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    PubMed

    Dzionara, M; Robinson, S M; Wittmann-Liebold, B

    1977-08-01

    The secondary structures of the proteins S4, S6, S8, S9, S12, S13, S15, S16, S18, S20 and S21 from the subunit of the E. coli ribosome were predicted according to four different methods. From the resultant diagrams indicating regions of helix, turn, extended structure and random coil, average values for the respective secondary structures could be calculated for each protein. Using the known relative distances for residues in the helical, turn and sheet or allowed random conformations, estimates are made of the maximum possible lengths of the proteins in order to correlate these with results obtained from antibody binding studies to the 30S subunit as determined by electron microscopy. The influence of amino acid changes on the predicted secondary structures of proteins from a few selected mutants was studied. The altered residues tend to be structurally conservative or to induce only minimal local changes.

  8. Crystal Structure of the 30S Ribosomal Subunit from Thermus Thermophilus. Purification, Crystallization and Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Clemons, William M.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; McCutcheonn, John P.; May, Joanna L.C.; Carter, Andrew P.; Morgan-Warren, Robert J.; Wimberly, Brian T.; Ramakrishnan, Venki

    2009-10-07

    We describe the crystallization and structure determination of the 30 S ribosomal subunit from Thermus thermophilus. Previous reports of crystals that diffracted to 10 {angstrom} resolution were used as a starting point to improve the quality of the diffraction. Eventually, ideas such as the addition of substrates or factors to eliminate conformational heterogeneity proved less important than attention to detail in yielding crystals that diffracted beyond 3 {angstrom} resolution. Despite improvements in technology and methodology in the last decade, the structure determination of the 30 S subunit presented some very challenging technical problems because of the size of the asymmetric unit, crystal variability and sensitivity to radiation damage. Some steps that were useful for determination of the atomic structure were: the use of anomalous scattering from the LIII edges of osmium and lutetium to obtain the necessary phasing signal; the use of tunable, third-generation synchrotron sources to obtain data of reasonable quality at high resolution; collection of derivative data precisely about a mirror plane to preserve small anomalous differences between Bijvoet mates despite extensive radiation damage and multi-crystal scaling; the pre-screening of crystals to ensure quality, isomorphism and the efficient use of scarce third-generation synchrotron time; pre-incubation of crystals in cobalt hexaammine to ensure isomorphism with other derivatives; and finally, the placement of proteins whose structures had been previously solved in isolation, in conjunction with biochemical data on protein-RNA interactions, to map out the architecture of the 30 S subunit prior to the construction of a detailed atomic-resolution model.

  9. Protein-guided RNA dynamics during early ribosome assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hajin; Abeysirigunawarden, Sanjaya C.; Chen, Ke; Mayerle, Megan; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Ha, Taekjip; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2014-02-01

    The assembly of 30S ribosomes requires the precise addition of 20 proteins to the 16S ribosomal RNA. How early binding proteins change the ribosomal RNA structure so that later proteins may join the complex is poorly understood. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to observe real-time encounters between Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S4 and the 16S 5' domain RNA at an early stage of 30S assembly. Dynamic initial S4-RNA complexes pass through a stable non-native intermediate before converting to the native complex, showing that non-native structures can offer a low free-energy path to protein-RNA recognition. Three-colour FRET and molecular dynamics simulations reveal how S4 changes the frequency and direction of RNA helix motions, guiding a conformational switch that enforces the hierarchy of protein addition. These protein-guided dynamics offer an alternative explanation for induced fit in RNA-protein complexes.

  10. Protein-guided RNA dynamics during early ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hajin; Abeysirigunawarden, Sanjaya C; Chen, Ke; Mayerle, Megan; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Ha, Taekjip; Woodson, Sarah A

    2014-02-20

    The assembly of 30S ribosomes requires the precise addition of 20 proteins to the 16S ribosomal RNA. How early binding proteins change the ribosomal RNA structure so that later proteins may join the complex is poorly understood. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to observe real-time encounters between Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S4 and the 16S 5' domain RNA at an early stage of 30S assembly. Dynamic initial S4-RNA complexes pass through a stable non-native intermediate before converting to the native complex, showing that non-native structures can offer a low free-energy path to protein-RNA recognition. Three-colour FRET and molecular dynamics simulations reveal how S4 changes the frequency and direction of RNA helix motions, guiding a conformational switch that enforces the hierarchy of protein addition. These protein-guided dynamics offer an alternative explanation for induced fit in RNA-protein complexes.

  11. Positions of proteins S14, S18 and S20 in the 30 S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, V; Capel, M; Kjeldgaard, M; Engelman, D M; Moore, P B

    1984-04-01

    A map of the 30 S ribosomal subunit is presented giving the positions of 15 of its 21 proteins. The components located in the map are S1, S3, S4, S5, S6, S7, S8, S9, S10, S11, S12, S14, S15, S18 and S20.

  12. Spatial Arrangement of Ribosomal Proteins: Reaction of the Escherichia coli 30S Subunit with bis-Imidoesters

    PubMed Central

    Bickle, T. A.; Hershey, J. W. B.; Traut, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    The 30S ribosomal subunit of E. coli was treated with the bifunctional reagent bis-(methyl)suberimidate. Crosslinked ribosomal proteins were identified as bands with increased molecular weight after electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels containing sodium dodecyl sulphate. The pattern of crosslinked products was altered when unfolded subunits were used. Free ribosomal protein was not crosslinked. Several of the crosslinked products were cleaved by ammonolysis to form the original monomeric protein constituents. The low yields of the reactions necessitated the use of radioactive proteins and auto-radiographic procedures. The crosslinked proteins were tentatively identified by coelectrophoresis of the radioactive ammonolysis products with carrier 30S protein in sodium dodecyl sulphate, and coelectrophoresis at pH 4.5 in buffers containing urea. Images PMID:4556460

  13. Protein-guided RNA dynamics during early ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hajin; Abeysirigunawardena, Sanjaya C.; Chen, Ke; Mayerle, Megan; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Ha, Taekjip; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    The assembly of 30S ribosomes requires the precise addition of 20 proteins to the 16S ribosomal RNA. How early binding proteins change the rRNA structure so that later proteins may join the complex is poorly understood. Here we use single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to observe real-time encounters between ribosomal protein S4 and the 16S 5′ domain RNA at an early stage of 30S assembly. Dynamic initial S4-RNA complexes pass through a stable non-native intermediate before converting to the native complex, showing that non-native structures can offer a low free energy path to protein-RNA recognition. Three-color FRET and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations reveal how S4 changes the frequency and direction of RNA helix motions, guiding a conformational switch that enforces the hierarchy of protein addition. This protein-guided dynamics offers an alternative explanation for induced fit in RNA-protein complexes. PMID:24522531

  14. A comparative study of ribosomal proteins: linkage between amino acid distribution and ribosomal assembly

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Assembly of the ribosome from its protein and RNA constituents must occur quickly and efficiently in order to synthesize the proteins necessary for all cellular activity. Since the early 1960’s, certain characteristics of possible assembly pathways have been elucidated, yet the mechanisms that govern the precise recognition events remain unclear. We utilize a comparative analysis to investigate the amino acid composition of ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) with respect to their role in the assembly process. We compared small subunit (30S) r-protein sequences to those of other housekeeping proteins from 560 bacterial species and searched for correlations between r-protein amino acid content and factors such as assembly binding order, environmental growth temperature, protein size, and contact with ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in the 30S complex. Results We find r-proteins have a significantly high percent of positive residues, which are highly represented at rRNA contact sites. An inverse correlation between the percent of positive residues and r-protein size was identified and is mainly due to the content of Lysine residues, rather than Arginine. Nearly all r-proteins carry a net positive charge, but no statistical correlation between the net charge and the binding order was detected. Thermophilic (high-temperature) r-proteins contain increased Arginine, Isoleucine, and Tyrosine, and decreased Serine and Threonine compared to mesophilic (lower-temperature), reflecting a known distinction between thermophiles and mesophiles, possibly to account for protein thermostability. However, this difference in amino acid content does not extend to rRNA contact sites, as the proportions of thermophilic and mesophilic contact residues are not significantly different. Conclusions Given the significantly higher level of positively charged residues in r-proteins and at contact sites, we conclude that ribosome assembly relies heavily on an electrostatic component of interaction

  15. Specific contacts between protein S4 and ribosomal RNA are required at multiple stages of ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Mayerle, Megan; Woodson, Sarah A

    2013-04-01

    Assembly of bacterial 30S ribosomal subunits requires structural rearrangements to both its 16S rRNA and ribosomal protein components. Ribosomal protein S4 nucleates 30S assembly and associates rapidly with the 5' domain of the 16S rRNA. In vitro, transformation of initial S4-rRNA complexes to long-lived, mature complexes involves refolding of 16S helix 18, which forms part of the decoding center. Here we use targeted mutagenesis of Geobacillus stearothermophilus S4 to show that remodeling of S4-rRNA complexes is perturbed by ram alleles associated with reduced translational accuracy. Gel mobility shift assays, SHAPE chemical probing, and in vivo complementation show that the S4 N-terminal extension is required for RNA binding and viability. Alanine substitutions in Y47 and L51 that interact with 16S helix 18 decrease S4 affinity and destabilize the helix 18 pseudoknot. These changes to the protein-RNA interface correlate with no growth (L51A) or cold-sensitive growth, 30S assembly defects, and accumulation of 17S pre-rRNA (Y47A). A third mutation, R200A, over-stabilizes the helix 18 pseudoknot yet results in temperature-sensitive growth, indicating that complex stability is finely tuned by natural selection. Our results show that early S4-RNA interactions guide rRNA folding and impact late steps of 30S assembly.

  16. Mitochondrial ribosome assembly in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Tu, Ya-Ting; Amunts, Alexey; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is a structurally and functionally conserved macromolecular machine universally responsible for catalyzing protein synthesis. Within eukaryotic cells, mitochondria contain their own ribosomes (mitoribosomes), which synthesize a handful of proteins, all essential for the biogenesis of the oxidative phosphorylation system. High-resolution cryo-EM structures of the yeast, porcine and human mitoribosomal subunits and of the entire human mitoribosome have uncovered a wealth of new information to illustrate their evolutionary divergence from their bacterial ancestors and their adaptation to synthesis of highly hydrophobic membrane proteins. With such structural data becoming available, one of the most important remaining questions is that of the mitoribosome assembly pathway and factors involved. The regulation of mitoribosome biogenesis is paramount to mitochondrial respiration, and thus to cell viability, growth and differentiation. Moreover, mutations affecting the rRNA and protein components produce severe human mitochondrial disorders. Despite its biological and biomedical significance, knowledge on mitoribosome biogenesis and its deviations from the much-studied bacterial ribosome assembly processes is scarce, especially the order of rRNA processing and assembly events and the regulatory factors required to achieve fully functional particles. This article focuses on summarizing the current available information on mitoribosome assembly pathway, factors that form the mitoribosome assembly machinery, and the effect of defective mitoribosome assembly on human health. PMID:26030272

  17. Mitochondrial ribosome assembly in health and disease.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Tu, Ya-Ting; Amunts, Alexey; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is a structurally and functionally conserved macromolecular machine universally responsible for catalyzing protein synthesis. Within eukaryotic cells, mitochondria contain their own ribosomes (mitoribosomes), which synthesize a handful of proteins, all essential for the biogenesis of the oxidative phosphorylation system. High-resolution cryo-EM structures of the yeast, porcine and human mitoribosomal subunits and of the entire human mitoribosome have uncovered a wealth of new information to illustrate their evolutionary divergence from their bacterial ancestors and their adaptation to synthesis of highly hydrophobic membrane proteins. With such structural data becoming available, one of the most important remaining questions is that of the mitoribosome assembly pathway and factors involved. The regulation of mitoribosome biogenesis is paramount to mitochondrial respiration, and thus to cell viability, growth and differentiation. Moreover, mutations affecting the rRNA and protein components produce severe human mitochondrial disorders. Despite its biological and biomedical significance, knowledge on mitoribosome biogenesis and its deviations from the much-studied bacterial ribosome assembly processes is scarce, especially the order of rRNA processing and assembly events and the regulatory factors required to achieve fully functional particles. This article focuses on summarizing the current available information on mitoribosome assembly pathway, factors that form the mitoribosome assembly machinery, and the effect of defective mitoribosome assembly on human health.

  18. Depletion of Free 30S Ribosomal Subunits in Escherichia coli by Expression of RNA Containing Shine-Dalgarno-Like Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mawn, Mary V.; Fournier, Maurille J.; Tirrell, David A.; Mason, Thomas L.

    2002-01-01

    We have constructed synthetic coding sequences for the expression of poly(α,l-glutamic acid) (PLGA) as fusion proteins with dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) in Escherichia coli. These PLGA coding sequences use both GAA and GAG codons for glutamic acid and contain sequence elements (5′-GAGGAGG-3′) that resemble the consensus Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence found at translation initiation sites in bacterial mRNAs. An unusual feature of DHFR-PLGA expression is that accumulation of the protein is inversely related to the level of induction of its mRNA. Cellular protein synthesis was inhibited >95% by induction of constructs for either translatable or untranslatable PLGA RNAs. Induction of PLGA RNA resulted in the depletion of free 30S ribosomal subunits and the appearance of new complexes in the polyribosome region of the gradient. Unlike normal polyribosomes, these complexes were resistant to breakdown in the presence of puromycin. The novel complexes contained 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, and PLGA RNA. We conclude that multiple noninitiator SD-like sequences in the PLGA RNA inhibit cellular protein synthesis by sequestering 30S small ribosomal subunits and 70S ribosomes in nonfunctional complexes on the PLGA mRNA. PMID:11751827

  19. Molecular interactions of ribosomal components. IV: Cooperative interactions during assembly in vitro.

    PubMed

    Green, M; Kurland, C G

    1973-08-01

    Cooperative interactions between different 30S ribosomal proteins during assembly in vitro are described. The site specific binding of S7 to 16S RNA is enhanced by S20; that of S16 requires S4 and S20; and S7 is required for the maximum binding of S9, S13 and S19. Some of these interactions are reflected in the protein neighborhoods of the functional ribosome, but this may not be a general rule. Finally, we suggest that the assembly cooperativety observed may not be a consequence of direct-protein interactions.

  20. Interrelationships between Yeast Ribosomal Protein Assembly Events and Transient Ribosome Biogenesis Factors Interactions in Early Pre-Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, Steffen; Ohmayer, Uli; Neueder, Andreas; Hierlmeier, Thomas; Perez-Fernandez, Jorge; Hochmuth, Eduard; Deutzmann, Rainer; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Tschochner, Herbert; Milkereit, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    Early steps of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis require a large set of ribosome biogenesis factors which transiently interact with nascent rRNA precursors (pre-rRNA). Most likely, concomitant with that initial contacts between ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) and ribosome precursors (pre-ribosomes) are established which are converted into robust interactions between pre-rRNA and r-proteins during the course of ribosome maturation. Here we analysed the interrelationship between r-protein assembly events and the transient interactions of ribosome biogenesis factors with early pre-ribosomal intermediates termed 90S pre-ribosomes or small ribosomal subunit (SSU) processome in yeast cells. We observed that components of the SSU processome UTP-A and UTP-B sub-modules were recruited to early pre-ribosomes independently of all tested r-proteins. On the other hand, groups of SSU processome components were identified whose association with early pre-ribosomes was affected by specific r-protein assembly events in the head-platform interface of the SSU. One of these components, Noc4p, appeared to be itself required for robust incorporation of r-proteins into the SSU head domain. Altogether, the data reveal an emerging network of specific interrelationships between local r-protein assembly events and the functional interactions of SSU processome components with early pre-ribosomes. They point towards some of these components being transient primary pre-rRNA in vivo binders and towards a role for others in coordinating the assembly of major SSU domains. PMID:22431976

  1. A ribonucleoprotein fragment of the 30 S ribosome of E. coli containing two contiguous domains of the 16 S RNA.

    PubMed

    Spitnik-Elson, P; Elson, D; Avital, S; Abramowitz, R

    1982-08-11

    Ribonucleoprotein fragments of the 30 S ribosome of E. coli have been prepared by limited ribonuclease digestion and mild heating of the ribosome in a constant ionic environment. One such fragment has been described previously. A second electrophoretically homogeneous fragment has now been isolated and its RNA and protein moieties have been characterized. It contains the 5' half of the 16 S RNA, encompassing domains I and II except for the extreme 5' terminus and several small gaps. Seven proteins are present: S4, S5, S6, S8, S12, S15 and S20. The RNA binding sites of five of these proteins are known, and all are RNA sequences that are present in the fragment. Published neutron scattering and immuno-electron microscopic data indicate that six of the proteins are clustered together in a cross sectional slice through the center of the subunit. After deproteinization, the RNA moiety gives two bands in gel electrophoresis, one containing domains I and II and the other, essentially only domain II. The former, although larger, migrates faster in gel electrophoresis, indicating that RNA domains I and II interact with each other in such a way as to become more compact than domain II by itself.

  2. Functions of ribosomal proteins in assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Jesús; Karbstein, Katrin; Woolford, John L

    2015-01-01

    The proteome of cells is synthesized by ribosomes, complex ribonucleoproteins that in eukaryotes contain 79-80 proteins and four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) more than 5,400 nucleotides long. How these molecules assemble together and how their assembly is regulated in concert with the growth and proliferation of cells remain important unanswered questions. Here, we review recently emerging principles to understand how eukaryotic ribosomal proteins drive ribosome assembly in vivo. Most ribosomal proteins assemble with rRNA cotranscriptionally; their association with nascent particles is strengthened as assembly proceeds. Each subunit is assembled hierarchically by sequential stabilization of their subdomains. The active sites of both subunits are constructed last, perhaps to prevent premature engagement of immature ribosomes with active subunits. Late-assembly intermediates undergo quality-control checks for proper function. Mutations in ribosomal proteins that affect mostly late steps lead to ribosomopathies, diseases that include a spectrum of cell type-specific disorders that often transition from hypoproliferative to hyperproliferative growth.

  3. Functions of ribosomal proteins in assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Jesús; Karbstein, Katrin; Woolford, John L

    2015-01-01

    The proteome of cells is synthesized by ribosomes, complex ribonucleoproteins that in eukaryotes contain 79-80 proteins and four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) more than 5,400 nucleotides long. How these molecules assemble together and how their assembly is regulated in concert with the growth and proliferation of cells remain important unanswered questions. Here, we review recently emerging principles to understand how eukaryotic ribosomal proteins drive ribosome assembly in vivo. Most ribosomal proteins assemble with rRNA cotranscriptionally; their association with nascent particles is strengthened as assembly proceeds. Each subunit is assembled hierarchically by sequential stabilization of their subdomains. The active sites of both subunits are constructed last, perhaps to prevent premature engagement of immature ribosomes with active subunits. Late-assembly intermediates undergo quality-control checks for proper function. Mutations in ribosomal proteins that affect mostly late steps lead to ribosomopathies, diseases that include a spectrum of cell type-specific disorders that often transition from hypoproliferative to hyperproliferative growth. PMID:25706898

  4. Functions of Ribosomal Proteins in Assembly of Eukaryotic Ribosomes In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The proteome of cells is synthesized by ribosomes, complex ribonucleoproteins that in eukaryotes contain 79–80 proteins and four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) more than 5,400 nucleotides long. How these molecules assemble together and how their assembly is regulated in concert with the growth and proliferation of cells remain important unanswered questions. Here, we review recently emerging principles to understand how eukaryotic ribosomal proteins drive ribosome assembly in vivo. Most ribosomal proteins assemble with rRNA cotranscriptionally; their association with nascent particles is strengthened as assembly proceeds. Each subunit is assembled hierarchically by sequential stabilization of their subdomains. The active sites of both subunits are constructed last, perhaps to prevent premature engagement of immature ribosomes with active subunits. Late-assembly intermediates undergo quality-control checks for proper function. Mutations in ribosomal proteins that affect mostly late steps lead to ribosomopathies, diseases that include a spectrum of cell type–specific disorders that often transition from hypoproliferative to hyperproliferative growth. PMID:25706898

  5. Photoinduced cross-linkage, in situ, of Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal proteins to 16S rRNA: identification of cross-linked proteins and relationships between reactivity and ribosome structure.

    PubMed

    Gorelic, L

    1976-08-10

    The kinetics of photoinduced cross-linkage of Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal proteins to the 16S-rRNA molecule in the intact Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit was studied in this report. All of the 30S ribosomal proteins become cross-linked to the 16S rRNA before changes in the sedimentation characteristics of the 30S ribosomal subunit can be detected. The proteins exhibit different reactivities in the cross-linkage reaction. One group of proteins-S3, S7-S9, S11, S12, and S15-S19-is cross-linked to the 16S rRNA by single-hit kinetics, or by photoprocesses of nonunity but low multiplicities. A second group of proteins--S1, S2, S4-S6, S10, S13, S14, and S21--is cross-linked to the 16S rRNA by photoprocesses of a complex nature. A comparison of these data with other properties of the individual 30S ribosomal proteins related to ribosome structure indicated that most of the 30S ribosomal proteins cross-linked to the 16S rRNA by photoprocesses of low multiplicities had been classified rRNA-binding proteins by nonphotochemical methods, and most of the proteins cross-linked to the 16S rRNA by photoprocesses of large multiplicities had been classified as nonbinding proteins. There were certain exceptions to these correlations. Proteins S4 and S20, both RNA-binding proteins, become cross-linked to the 16S rRNA by photoprocessses of large multiplicities, and proteins S3, S11, S12, and S18, none of which have been classified RNA-binding proteins, exhibited low multiplicities in the cross-linkage reaction. All of these exceptions could be explained in terms of limitations inherent in the photochemical methods used in this study and in other types of methods that have been used to study RNA-protein interactions in the 30S ribosomal subunit. The data presented here also suggest that labile RNA-protein cross-links are present in the uv-irradiated 30S ribosomal subunits, and that neither peptide-bond cleavage nor photoinduced modification of the charged side-chain groups in

  6. Characterisation of RNA fragments obtained by mild nuclease digestion of 30-S ribosomal subunits from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rinke, J; Ross, A; Brimacombe, R

    1977-06-01

    When Escherichia coli 30-S ribosomal subunits are hydrolysed under mild conditions, two ribonucleoprotein fragments of unequal size are produced. Knowledge of the RNA sequences contained in these hydrolysis products was required for the experiments described in the preceding paper, and the RNA sub-fragments have therefore been examined by oligonucleotide analysis. Two well-defined small fragments of free RNA, produced concomitantly with the ribonucleoprotein fragments, were also analysed. The larger ribonucleoprotein fragment, containing predominantly proteins S4, S5, S8, S15, S16 (17) and S20, contains a complex mixture of RNA sub-fragments varying from about 100 to 800 nucleotides in length. All these fragments arose from the 5'-terminal 900 nucleotides of 16-S RNA, corresponding to the well-known 12-S fragment. No long-range interactions could be detected within this RNA region in these experiments. The RNA from the smaller ribonucleoprotein fragment (containing proteins S7, S9 S10, S14 and S19) has been described in detail previously, and consists of about 450 nucleotides near the 3' end of the 16-S RNA, but lacking the 3'-terminal 150 nucleotides. The two small free RNA fragments (above) partly account for these missing 150 nucleotides; both fragments arose from section A of the 16-S RNA, but section J (the 3'-terminal 50 nucleotides) was not found. This result suggests that the 3' region of 16-S RNA is not involved in stable interactions with protein.

  7. The identification of spermine binding sites in 16S rRNA allows interpretation of the spermine effect on ribosomal 30S subunit functions

    PubMed Central

    Amarantos, Ioannis; Zarkadis, Ioannis K.; Kalpaxis, Dimitrios L.

    2002-01-01

    A photoreactive analogue of spermine, N1-azidobenzamidino (ABA)-spermine, was covalently attached after irradiation to Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits or naked 16S rRNA. By means of RNase H digestion and primer extension, the cross-linking sites of ABA-spermine in naked 16S rRNA were characterised and compared with those identified in 30S subunits. The 5′ domain, the internal and terminal loops of helix H24, as well as the upper part of helix H44 in naked 16S rRNA, were found to be preferable binding sites for polyamines. Association of 16S rRNA with ribosomal proteins facilitated its interaction with photoprobe, except for 530 stem–loop nt, whose modification by ABA-spermine was abolished. Association of 30S with 50S subunits, poly(U) and AcPhe-tRNA (complex C) further altered the susceptibility of ABA-spermine cross-linking to 16S rRNA. Complex C, modified in its 30S subunit by ABA-spermine, reacted with puromycin similarly to non-photolabelled complex. On the contrary, poly(U)-programmed 70S ribosomes reconstituted from photolabelled 30S subunits and untreated 50S subunits bound AcPhe-tRNA more efficiently than untreated ribosomes, but were less able to recognise and reject near cognate aminoacyl-tRNA. The above can be interpreted in terms of conformational changes in 16S rRNA, induced by the incorporation of ABA-spermine. PMID:12087167

  8. Functional Interaction between Ribosomal Protein L6 and RbgA during Ribosome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Joseph H.; Williamson, James R.; Britton, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    RbgA is an essential GTPase that participates in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit in Bacillus subtilis and its homologs are implicated in mitochondrial and eukaryotic large subunit assembly. How RbgA functions in this process is still poorly understood. To gain insight into the function of RbgA we isolated suppressor mutations that partially restored the growth of an RbgA mutation (RbgA-F6A) that caused a severe growth defect. Analysis of these suppressors identified mutations in rplF, encoding ribosomal protein L6. The suppressor strains all accumulated a novel ribosome intermediate that migrates at 44S in sucrose gradients. All of the mutations cluster in a region of L6 that is in close contact with helix 97 of the 23S rRNA. In vitro maturation assays indicate that the L6 substitutions allow the defective RbgA-F6A protein to function more effectively in ribosome maturation. Our results suggest that RbgA functions to properly position L6 on the ribosome, prior to the incorporation of L16 and other late assembly proteins. PMID:25330043

  9. Function of individual 30S subunit proteins of Escherichia coli. Effect of specific immunoglobulin fragments (Fab) on activities of ribosomal decoding sites.

    PubMed

    Lelong, J C; Gros, D; Gros, F; Bollen, A; Maschler, R; Stöffler, G

    1974-02-01

    Specific anti-30S protein immunoglobulin G fragments (Fab) were used to determine the contribution of each of the 30S ribosomal proteins to: (1) polyphenylalanine synthesis, (2) initiation factor-dependent binding of fMet-tRNA, (3) T-factor-dependent binding of phenylalanyl-tRNA, and (4) fixation of radioactive dihydrostreptomycin. Twenty of the 21 possible antibodies (antibody against S17 excepted) were used. In conditions where all the 30S proteins were accessible to Fabs, all of these monovalent antibodies strongly inhibited polyphenylalanine synthesis in vitro. Antibodies against S4, S6, S7, S12, S15, and S16, however, showed a weaker effect.30S proteins can be classified into four categories by their contributions to the function of sites "A" and "P": class I appears nonessential for tRNA positioning at either site (S4, S7, S15, and S16); class II includes proteins whose role in initiation is critical (S2, S5, S6, S12, and S13); class III (S8, S9, S11, and S18) corresponds to proteins whose blockade prevents internal (elongation factor Tudependent) positioning; and class IV includes entities that are essential for activities of both "A" and "P" sites (S1, S3, S10, S14, S19, S20, and S21). Dihydrostreptomycin fixation to the 30S or 70S ribosomes was inhibited by antibodies against S1, S10, S11, S18, S19, S20, and S21, but only weakly by the anti-S12 (Str A protein) Fab. The significance of these results is discussed in relation to 30S protein function, heterogeneity, and topography.

  10. Defective ribosome assembly in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi C; Traynor, David; Basse, Nicolas; Kay, Robert R; Warren, Alan J

    2011-10-20

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS), a recessive leukemia predisposition disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, skeletal abnormalities and poor growth, is caused by mutations in the highly conserved SBDS gene. Here, we test the hypothesis that defective ribosome biogenesis underlies the pathogenesis of SDS. We create conditional mutants in the essential SBDS ortholog of the ancient eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum using temperature-sensitive, self-splicing inteins, showing that mutant cells fail to grow at the restrictive temperature because ribosomal subunit joining is markedly impaired. Remarkably, wild type human SBDS complements the growth and ribosome assembly defects in mutant Dictyostelium cells, but disease-associated human SBDS variants are defective. SBDS directly interacts with the GTPase elongation factor-like 1 (EFL1) on nascent 60S subunits in vivo and together they catalyze eviction of the ribosome antiassociation factor eukaryotic initiation factor 6 (eIF6), a prerequisite for the translational activation of ribosomes. Importantly, lymphoblasts from SDS patients harbor a striking defect in ribosomal subunit joining whose magnitude is inversely proportional to the level of SBDS protein. These findings in Dictyostelium and SDS patient cells provide compelling support for the hypothesis that SDS is a ribosomopathy caused by corruption of an essential cytoplasmic step in 60S subunit maturation.

  11. Structural change induced by removal of magnesium ions on E. coli 70S ribosomes and 30S and 50S separated subunits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briganti, G.; Giansanti, A.; Bonincontro, A.; Mengoni, M.; Giordano, R.

    1996-09-01

    To clarify the intra- and inter-particle effects of magnesium ions on E. coli ribosomes we have performed measurements of light scattering intensity, index of refraction and small-angle neutron scattering on the 70S complex and 30S and 50S subunits with and without magnesium. The results indicate that magnesium has a specific intra-particle effect on the subunits as well as on the 70S complex. Besides, the distance distribution function shows that magnesium has an effect on the supra-ribosomal aggregation. The combination of these intra- and inter-particle effects completely hides, in the scattering experiments, any effect of magnesium on the degree of association of the two subunits into the 70S complex.

  12. Essential ribosome assembly factor Fap7 regulates a hierarchy of RNA–protein interactions during small ribosomal subunit biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hellmich, Ute A.; Weis, Benjamin L.; Lioutikov, Anatoli; Wurm, Jan Philip; Kaiser, Marco; Christ, Nina A.; Hantke, Katharina; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Schleiff, Enrico; Wöhnert, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Factor activating Pos9 (Fap7) is an essential ribosome biogenesis factor important for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit with an uncommon dual ATPase and adenylate kinase activity. Depletion of Fap7 or mutations in its ATPase motifs lead to defects in small ribosomal subunit rRNA maturation, the absence of ribosomal protein Rps14 from the assembled subunit, and retention of the nascent small subunit in a quality control complex with the large ribosomal subunit. The molecular basis for the role of Fap7 in ribosome biogenesis is, however, not yet understood. Here we show that Fap7 regulates multiple interactions between the precursor rRNA, ribosomal proteins, and ribosome assembly factors in a hierarchical manner. Fap7 binds to Rps14 with a very high affinity. Fap7 binding blocks both rRNA-binding elements of Rps14, suggesting that Fap7 inhibits premature interactions of Rps14 with RNA. The Fap7/Rps14 interaction is modulated by nucleotide binding to Fap7. Rps14 strongly activates the ATPase activity but not the adenylate kinase activity of Fap7, identifying Rps14 as an example of a ribosomal protein functioning as an ATPase-activating factor. In addition, Fap7 inhibits the RNA cleavage activity of Nob1, the endonuclease responsible for the final maturation step of the small subunit rRNA, in a nucleotide independent manner. Thus, Fap7 may regulate small subunit biogenesis at multiple stages. PMID:24003121

  13. Hierarchical RNA Processing Is Required for Mitochondrial Ribosome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Rackham, Oliver; Busch, Jakob D; Matic, Stanka; Siira, Stefan J; Kuznetsova, Irina; Atanassov, Ilian; Ermer, Judith A; Shearwood, Anne-Marie J; Richman, Tara R; Stewart, James B; Mourier, Arnaud; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Filipovska, Aleksandra

    2016-08-16

    The regulation of mitochondrial RNA processing and its importance for ribosome biogenesis and energy metabolism are not clear. We generated conditional knockout mice of the endoribonuclease component of the RNase P complex, MRPP3, and report that it is essential for life and that heart and skeletal-muscle-specific knockout leads to severe cardiomyopathy, indicating that its activity is non-redundant. Transcriptome-wide parallel analyses of RNA ends (PARE) and RNA-seq enabled us to identify that in vivo 5' tRNA cleavage precedes 3' tRNA processing, and this is required for the correct biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosomal subunits. We identify that mitoribosomal biogenesis proceeds co-transcriptionally because large mitoribosomal proteins can form a subcomplex on an unprocessed RNA containing the 16S rRNA. Taken together, our data show that RNA processing links transcription to translation via assembly of the mitoribosome. PMID:27498866

  14. Fluorescence bimolecular complementation enables facile detection of ribosome assembly defects in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Himanshu; Anand, Baskaran

    2016-09-01

    Assembly factors promote the otherwise non-spontaneous maturation of ribosome under physiological conditions inside the cell. Systematic identification and characterization of candidate assembly factors are fraught with bottlenecks due to lack of facile assay system to capture assembly defects. Here, we show that bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) allows detection of assembly defects that are induced by the loss of assembly factors. The fusion of N and C-terminal fragments of Venus fluorescent protein to the ribosomal proteins uS13 and uL5, respectively, in Escherichia coli facilitated the incorporation of the tagged uS13 and uL5 onto the respective ribosomal subunits. When the ribosomal subunits associated to form the 70S particle, the complementary fragments of Venus were brought into proximity and rendered the Venus fluorescent. Assembly defects that inhibit the subunits association were provoked by either the loss of the known assembly factors such as RsgA and SrmB or the presence of small molecule inhibitors of ribosome maturation such as Lamotrigine and several ribosome-targeting antibiotics and these showed abrogation of the fluorescence complementation. This suggests that BiFC can be employed as a surrogate measure to detect ribosome assembly defects proficiently by circumventing the otherwise cumbersome procedures. BiFC thus offers a facile platform not only for systematic screening to validate potential assembly factors but also to discover novel small molecule inhibitors of ribosome assembly toward mapping the complex assembly landscape of ribosome.

  15. New RNA-protein crosslinks in domains 1 and 2 of E. coli 30S ribosomal subunits obtained by means of an intrinsic photoaffinity probe.

    PubMed Central

    Hajnsdorf, E; Favre, A; Expert-Bezançon, A

    1989-01-01

    Functionally active 70S ribosomes containing 4-thiouridine (s4U) in place of uridine were prepared by a formerly described in vivo substitution method. Proteins were crosslinked to RNA by 366 nm photoactivation of s4U. We observe the systematic and characteristic formation of 30S dimers; they were eliminated for analysis of RNA-protein crosslinks. M13 probes containing rDNA inserts complementary to domains 1 and 2 of 16S RNA from the 5'end up to nucleotide 868 were used to select contiguous or overlapping RNA sections. The proteins covalently crosslinked to each RNA section were identified as S3, S4, S5, S7, S9, S18, S20 and S21. Several crosslinks are compatible with previously published sites for proteins S5, S18, S20 and S21; others for proteins S3, S4, S7, S9, S18 correspond necessarily to new sites. Images PMID:2646595

  16. Structural change of E. coli separated and complexed 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits due to Mg 2+ ions: SANS experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briganti, G.; Pedone, F.; Giansanti, A.; Giordano, R.

    1995-02-01

    Small-angle neutron-scattering experiments have been performed on E. Coli 70S ribosomes and on 50S and 30S separated subunits in the presence and absence of magnesium ions. In the 70S complex in presence of magnesium, the scattering intensity at Q = 0 ( I(0)) is roughly two times higher than without magnesium, in apparent agreement with the general view of an association-dissociation of the subunits induced by magnesium. But a similar increment is observed in both separated subunits too. The probability distribution functions of the intra-particle distance p( r), obtained by Fourier transforming, the experimental data, indicate that, even at low temperature (5°C) and concentration (0.1 wt%), the 70S and the separated subunits form aggregates. In all samples, the absence of Mg 2+ ions shifts and shrinks p( r) in the single-particle region, below 200 Å, and affects the shape of the curve in the aggregate region. Our results suggest that the presence of Mg 2+ ions does not strongly affect the degree of complexation of the subunits: the 70S complex retains its individuality even in the absence of magnesium, but undergoes structural rearrangements similar to those in 30S and 50S.

  17. Ribosomal Protein Rps26 Influences 80S Ribosome Assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Belyy, Alexander; Levanova, Nadezhda; Tabakova, Irina; Rospert, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The eukaryotic ribosome consists of a small (40S) and a large (60S) subunit. Rps26 is one of the essential ribosomal proteins of the 40S subunit and is encoded by two almost identical genes, RPS26a and RPS26b. Previous studies demonstrated that Rps26 interacts with the 5′ untranslated region of mRNA via the eukaryote-specific 62-YXXPKXYXK-70 (Y62–K70) motif. Those observations suggested that this peptide within Rps26 might play an important and specific role during translation initiation. By using alanine-scanning mutagenesis and engineered strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found that single amino acid substitutions within the Y62–K70 motif of Rps26 did not affect the in vivo function of the protein. In contrast, complete deletion of the Y62–K70 segment was lethal. The simultaneous replacement of five conserved residues within the Y62–K70 segment by alanines resulted in growth defects under stress conditions and produced distinct changes in polysome profiles that were indicative of the accumulation of free 60S subunits. Human Rps26 (Rps26-Hs), which displays significant homology with yeast Rps26, supported the growth of an S. cerevisiae Δrps26a Δrps26b strain. However, the Δrps26a Δrps26b double deletion strain expressing Rps26-Hs displayed substantial growth defects and an altered ratio of 40S/60S ribosomal subunits. The combined data strongly suggest that the eukaryote-specific motif within Rps26 does not play a specific role in translation initiation. Rather, the data indicate that Rps26 as a whole is necessary for proper assembly of the 40S subunit and the 80S ribosome in yeast. IMPORTANCE Rps26 is an essential protein of the eukaryotic small ribosomal subunit. Previous experiments demonstrated an interaction between the eukaryote-specific Y62–K70 segment of Rps26 and the 5′ untranslated region of mRNA. The data suggested a specific role of the Y62–K70 motif during translation initiation. Here, we report that single

  18. Toward a Whole-Cell Model of Ribosome Biogenesis: Kinetic Modeling of SSU Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Earnest, Tyler M.; Lai, Jonathan; Chen, Ke; Hallock, Michael J.; Williamson, James R.; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2015-01-01

    Central to all life is the assembly of the ribosome: a coordinated process involving the hierarchical association of ribosomal proteins to the RNAs forming the small and large ribosomal subunits. The process is further complicated by effects arising from the intracellular heterogeneous environment and the location of ribosomal operons within the cell. We provide a simplified model of ribosome biogenesis in slow-growing Escherichia coli. Kinetic models of in vitro small-subunit reconstitution at the level of individual protein/ribosomal RNA interactions are developed for two temperature regimes. The model at low temperatures predicts the existence of a novel 5′→3′→central assembly pathway, which we investigate further using molecular dynamics. The high-temperature assembly network is incorporated into a model of in vivo ribosome biogenesis in slow-growing E. coli. The model, described in terms of reaction-diffusion master equations, contains 1336 reactions and 251 species that dynamically couple transcription and translation to ribosome assembly. We use the Lattice Microbes software package to simulate the stochastic production of mRNA, proteins, and ribosome intermediates over a full cell cycle of 120 min. The whole-cell model captures the correct growth rate of ribosomes, predicts the localization of early assembly intermediates to the nucleoid region, and reproduces the known assembly timescales for the small subunit with no modifications made to the embedded in vitro assembly network. PMID:26333594

  19. Truncation of the Mrp20 protein reveals new ribosome-assembly subcomplex in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jasvinder; Stuart, Rosemary A

    2011-09-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomal protein 20 (Mrp20) is a component of the yeast mitochondrial large (54S) ribosomal subunit and is homologous to the bacterial L23 protein, located at the ribosomal tunnel exit site. The carboxy-terminal mitochondrial-specific domain of Mrp20 was found to have a crucial role in the assembly of the ribosomes. A new, membrane-bound, ribosomal-assembly subcomplex composed of known tunnel-exit-site proteins, an uncharacterized ribosomal protein, MrpL25, and the mitochondrial peroxiredoxin (Prx), Prx1, accumulates in an mrp20ΔC yeast mutant. Finally, data supporting the idea that the inner mitochondrial membrane acts as a platform for the ribosome assembly process are discussed.

  20. Yeast Ribosomal Protein L40 Assembles Late into Precursor 60 S Ribosomes and Is Required for Their Cytoplasmic Maturation*

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Most ribosomal proteins play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and function. Here, we have examined the contribution of the essential ribosomal protein L40 in these processes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Deletion of either the RPL40A or RPL40B gene and in vivo depletion of L40 impair 60 S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Polysome profile analyses reveal the accumulation of half-mers and a moderate reduction in free 60 S ribosomal subunits. Pulse-chase, Northern blotting, and primer extension analyses in the L40-depleted strain clearly indicate that L40 is not strictly required for the precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing reactions but contributes to optimal 27 SB pre-rRNA maturation. Moreover, depletion of L40 hinders the nucleo-cytoplasmic export of pre-60 S ribosomal particles. Importantly, all these defects most likely appear as the direct consequence of impaired Nmd3 and Rlp24 release from cytoplasmic pre-60 S ribosomal subunits and their inefficient recycling back into the nucle(ol)us. In agreement, we show that hemagglutinin epitope-tagged L40A assembles in the cytoplasm into almost mature pre-60 S ribosomal particles. Finally, we have identified that the hemagglutinin epitope-tagged L40A confers resistance to sordarin, a translation inhibitor that impairs the function of eukaryotic elongation factor 2, whereas the rpl40a and rpl40b null mutants are hypersensitive to this antibiotic. We conclude that L40 is assembled at a very late stage into pre-60 S ribosomal subunits and that its incorporation into 60 S ribosomal subunits is a prerequisite for subunit joining and may ensure proper functioning of the translocation process. PMID:22995916

  1. Fluorescence bimolecular complementation enables facile detection of ribosome assembly defects in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Himanshu; Anand, Baskaran

    2016-09-01

    Assembly factors promote the otherwise non-spontaneous maturation of ribosome under physiological conditions inside the cell. Systematic identification and characterization of candidate assembly factors are fraught with bottlenecks due to lack of facile assay system to capture assembly defects. Here, we show that bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) allows detection of assembly defects that are induced by the loss of assembly factors. The fusion of N and C-terminal fragments of Venus fluorescent protein to the ribosomal proteins uS13 and uL5, respectively, in Escherichia coli facilitated the incorporation of the tagged uS13 and uL5 onto the respective ribosomal subunits. When the ribosomal subunits associated to form the 70S particle, the complementary fragments of Venus were brought into proximity and rendered the Venus fluorescent. Assembly defects that inhibit the subunits association were provoked by either the loss of the known assembly factors such as RsgA and SrmB or the presence of small molecule inhibitors of ribosome maturation such as Lamotrigine and several ribosome-targeting antibiotics and these showed abrogation of the fluorescence complementation. This suggests that BiFC can be employed as a surrogate measure to detect ribosome assembly defects proficiently by circumventing the otherwise cumbersome procedures. BiFC thus offers a facile platform not only for systematic screening to validate potential assembly factors but also to discover novel small molecule inhibitors of ribosome assembly toward mapping the complex assembly landscape of ribosome. PMID:27388791

  2. Diverse roles of assembly factors revealed by structures of late nuclear pre-60S ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shan; Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Yan, Kaige; Brown, Hailey; Zhang, Yixiao; Tan, Dan; Gamalinda, Michael; Yuan, Yi; Li, Zhifei; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Ma, Chengying; Lei, Jianlin; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Woolford, John L; Gao, Ning

    2016-05-25

    Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex process in eukaryotes, involving temporally and spatially regulated ribosomal protein (r-protein) binding and ribosomal RNA remodelling events in the nucleolus, nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. Hundreds of assembly factors, organized into sequential functional groups, facilitate and guide the maturation process into productive assembly branches in and across different cellular compartments. However, the precise mechanisms by which these assembly factors function are largely unknown. Here we use cryo-electron microscopy to characterize the structures of yeast nucleoplasmic pre-60S particles affinity-purified using the epitope-tagged assembly factor Nog2. Our data pinpoint the locations and determine the structures of over 20 assembly factors, which are enriched in two areas: an arc region extending from the central protuberance to the polypeptide tunnel exit, and the domain including the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) that separates 5.8S and 25S ribosomal RNAs. In particular, two regulatory GTPases, Nog2 and Nog1, act as hub proteins to interact with multiple, distant assembly factors and functional ribosomal RNA elements, manifesting their critical roles in structural remodelling checkpoints and nuclear export. Moreover, our snapshots of compositionally and structurally different pre-60S intermediates provide essential mechanistic details for three major remodelling events before nuclear export: rotation of the 5S ribonucleoprotein, construction of the active centre and ITS2 removal. The rich structural information in our structures provides a framework to dissect molecular roles of diverse assembly factors in eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

  3. Diverse roles of assembly factors revealed by structures of late nuclear pre-60S ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shan; Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Yan, Kaige; Brown, Hailey; Zhang, Yixiao; Tan, Dan; Gamalinda, Michael; Yuan, Yi; Li, Zhifei; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Ma, Chengying; Lei, Jianlin; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Woolford, John L; Gao, Ning

    2016-06-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex process in eukaryotes, involving temporally and spatially regulated ribosomal protein (r-protein) binding and ribosomal RNA remodelling events in the nucleolus, nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. Hundreds of assembly factors, organized into sequential functional groups, facilitate and guide the maturation process into productive assembly branches in and across different cellular compartments. However, the precise mechanisms by which these assembly factors function are largely unknown. Here we use cryo-electron microscopy to characterize the structures of yeast nucleoplasmic pre-60S particles affinity-purified using the epitope-tagged assembly factor Nog2. Our data pinpoint the locations and determine the structures of over 20 assembly factors, which are enriched in two areas: an arc region extending from the central protuberance to the polypeptide tunnel exit, and the domain including the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) that separates 5.8S and 25S ribosomal RNAs. In particular, two regulatory GTPases, Nog2 and Nog1, act as hub proteins to interact with multiple, distant assembly factors and functional ribosomal RNA elements, manifesting their critical roles in structural remodelling checkpoints and nuclear export. Moreover, our snapshots of compositionally and structurally different pre-60S intermediates provide essential mechanistic details for three major remodelling events before nuclear export: rotation of the 5S ribonucleoprotein, construction of the active centre and ITS2 removal. The rich structural information in our structures provides a framework to dissect molecular roles of diverse assembly factors in eukaryotic ribosome assembly. PMID:27251291

  4. A hierarchical model for assembly of eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit domains.

    PubMed

    Gamalinda, Michael; Ohmayer, Uli; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Kumcuoglu, Beril; Woolford, Joshua; Mbom, Bertrade; Lin, Lawrence; Woolford, John L

    2014-01-15

    Despite having high-resolution structures for eukaryotic large ribosomal subunits, it remained unclear how these ribonucleoprotein complexes are constructed in living cells. Nevertheless, knowing where ribosomal proteins interact with ribosomal RNA (rRNA) provides a strategic platform to investigate the connection between spatial and temporal aspects of 60S subunit biogenesis. We previously found that the function of individual yeast large subunit ribosomal proteins (RPLs) in precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing correlates with their location in the structure of mature 60S subunits. This observation suggested that there is an order by which 60S subunits are formed. To test this model, we used proteomic approaches to assay changes in the levels of ribosomal proteins and assembly factors in preribosomes when RPLs functioning in early, middle, and late steps of pre-60S assembly are depleted. Our results demonstrate that structural domains of eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunits are formed in a hierarchical fashion. Assembly begins at the convex solvent side, followed by the polypeptide exit tunnel, the intersubunit side, and finally the central protuberance. This model provides an initial paradigm for the sequential assembly of eukaryotic 60S subunits. Our results reveal striking differences and similarities between assembly of bacterial and eukaryotic large ribosomal subunits, providing insights into how these RNA-protein particles evolved.

  5. Sequential domain assembly of ribosomal protein S3 drives 40S subunit maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mitterer, Valentin; Murat, Guillaume; Réty, Stéphane; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Stanborough, Tamsyn; Bergler, Helmut; Leulliot, Nicolas; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes assemble by association of ribosomal RNA with ribosomal proteins into nuclear precursor particles, which undergo a complex maturation pathway coordinated by non-ribosomal assembly factors. Here, we provide functional insights into how successive structural re-arrangements in ribosomal protein S3 promote maturation of the 40S ribosomal subunit. We show that S3 dimerizes and is imported into the nucleus with its N-domain in a rotated conformation and associated with the chaperone Yar1. Initial assembly of S3 with 40S precursors occurs via its C-domain, while the N-domain protrudes from the 40S surface. Yar1 is replaced by the assembly factor Ltv1, thereby fixing the S3 N-domain in the rotated orientation and preventing its 40S association. Finally, Ltv1 release, triggered by phosphorylation, and flipping of the S3 N-domain into its final position results in the stable integration of S3. Such a stepwise assembly may represent a new paradigm for the incorporation of ribosomal proteins. PMID:26831757

  6. A hierarchical model for assembly of eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit domains

    PubMed Central

    Gamalinda, Michael; Ohmayer, Uli; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Kumcuoglu, Beril; Woolford, Joshua; Mbom, Bertrade; Lin, Lawrence; Woolford, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite having high-resolution structures for eukaryotic large ribosomal subunits, it remained unclear how these ribonucleoprotein complexes are constructed in living cells. Nevertheless, knowing where ribosomal proteins interact with ribosomal RNA (rRNA) provides a strategic platform to investigate the connection between spatial and temporal aspects of 60S subunit biogenesis. We previously found that the function of individual yeast large subunit ribosomal proteins (RPLs) in precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing correlates with their location in the structure of mature 60S subunits. This observation suggested that there is an order by which 60S subunits are formed. To test this model, we used proteomic approaches to assay changes in the levels of ribosomal proteins and assembly factors in preribosomes when RPLs functioning in early, middle, and late steps of pre-60S assembly are depleted. Our results demonstrate that structural domains of eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunits are formed in a hierarchical fashion. Assembly begins at the convex solvent side, followed by the polypeptide exit tunnel, the intersubunit side, and finally the central protuberance. This model provides an initial paradigm for the sequential assembly of eukaryotic 60S subunits. Our results reveal striking differences and similarities between assembly of bacterial and eukaryotic large ribosomal subunits, providing insights into how these RNA–protein particles evolved. PMID:24449272

  7. Three distinct ribosome assemblies modulated by translation are the building blocks of polysomes.

    PubMed

    Viero, Gabriella; Lunelli, Lorenzo; Passerini, Andrea; Bianchini, Paolo; Gilbert, Robert J; Bernabò, Paola; Tebaldi, Toma; Diaspro, Alberto; Pederzolli, Cecilia; Quattrone, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    Translation is increasingly recognized as a central control layer of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. The overall organization of mRNA and ribosomes within polysomes, as well as the possible role of this organization in translation are poorly understood. Here we show that polysomes are primarily formed by three distinct classes of ribosome assemblies. We observe that these assemblies can be connected by naked RNA regions of the transcript. We show that the relative proportions of the three classes of ribosome assemblies reflect, and probably dictate, the level of translational activity. These results reveal the existence of recurrent supra-ribosomal building blocks forming polysomes and suggest the presence of unexplored translational controls embedded in the polysome structure.

  8. The extended loops of ribosomal proteins uL4 and uL22 of Escherichia coli contribute to ribosome assembly and protein translation

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Marlon G.; Shamsuzzaman, Md; Kondopaka, Maithri; Pascual, Clarence; Zengel, Janice M.; Lindahl, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of ribosomal proteins are composed of a domain on the ribosome surface and a loop or extension that penetrates into the organelle's RNA core. Our previous work showed that ribosomes lacking the loops of ribosomal proteins uL4 or uL22 are still capable of entering polysomes. However, in those experiments we could not address the formation of mutant ribosomes, because we used strains that also expressed wild-type uL4 and uL22. Here, we have focused on ribosome assembly and function in strains in which loop deletion mutant genes are the only sources of uL4 or uL22 protein. The uL4 and uL22 loop deletions have different effects, but both mutations result in accumulation of immature particles that do not accumulate in detectable amounts in wild-type strains. Thus, our results suggest that deleting the loops creates kinetic barriers in the normal assembly pathway, possibly resulting in assembly via alternate pathway(s). Furthermore, deletion of the uL4 loop results in cold-sensitive ribosome assembly and function. Finally, ribosomes carrying either of the loop-deleted proteins responded normally to the secM translation pausing peptide, but the uL4 mutant responded very inefficiently to the cmlAcrb pause peptide. PMID:27257065

  9. Studies on the Coordination of Ribosomal Protein Assembly Events Involved in Processing and Stabilization of Yeast Early Large Ribosomal Subunit Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Sauert, Martina; Martín-Marcos, Pilar; Tamame, Mercedes; Tschochner, Herbert; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Milkereit, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Cellular production of ribosomes involves the formation of highly defined interactions between ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) and ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs). Moreover in eukaryotic cells, efficient ribosome maturation requires the transient association of a large number of ribosome biogenesis factors (RBFs) with newly forming ribosomal subunits. Here, we investigated how r-protein assembly events in the large ribosomal subunit (LSU) rRNA domain II are coordinated with each other and with the association of RBFs in early LSU precursors of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Specific effects on the pre-ribosomal association of RBFs could be observed in yeast mutants blocked in LSU rRNA domain II assembly. Moreover, formation of a cluster of r-proteins was identified as a downstream event in LSU rRNA domain II assembly. We analyzed in more detail the functional relevance of eukaryote specific bridges established by this r-protein cluster between LSU rRNA domain II and VI and discuss how they can support the stabilization and efficient processing of yeast early LSU precursor RNAs. PMID:26642313

  10. Stage-specific assembly events of the 6-MDa small-subunit processome initiate eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chaker-Margot, Malik; Hunziker, Mirjam; Barandun, Jonas; Dill, Brian D; Klinge, Sebastian

    2015-11-01

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves a plethora of ribosome-assembly factors, and their temporal order of association with preribosomal RNA is largely unknown. By using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism, we developed a system that recapitulates and arrests ribosome assembly at early stages, thus providing in vivo snapshots of nascent preribosomal particles. Here we report the stage-specific order in which 70 ribosome-assembly factors associate with preribosomal RNA domains, thereby forming the 6-MDa small-subunit processome. PMID:26479197

  11. The N-terminal extension of yeast ribosomal protein L8 is involved in two major remodeling events during late nuclear stages of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Wu, Shan; Gao, Ning; Woolford, John L

    2016-09-01

    Assaying effects on pre-rRNA processing and ribosome assembly upon depleting individual ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) provided an initial paradigm for assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo-that each structural domain of ribosomal subunits assembles in a hierarchical fashion. However, two features suggest that a more complex pathway may exist: (i) Some r-proteins contain extensions that reach long distances across ribosomes to interact with multiple rRNA domains as well as with other r-proteins. (ii) Individual r-proteins may assemble in a stepwise fashion. For example, the globular domain of an r-protein might assemble separately from its extensions. Thus, these extensions might play roles in assembly that could not be revealed by depleting the entire protein. Here, we show that deleting or mutating extensions of r-proteins L7 (uL30) and L35 (uL29) from yeast reveal important roles in early and middle steps during 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Detailed analysis of the N-terminal terminal extension of L8 (eL8) showed that it is necessary for late nuclear stages of 60S subunit assembly involving two major remodeling events: removal of the ITS2 spacer; and reorganization of the central protuberance (CP) containing 5S rRNA and r-proteins L5 (uL18) and L11 (uL5). Mutations in the L8 extension block processing of 7S pre-rRNA, prevent release of assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 from pre-ribosomes, which is required for rotation of the CP, and block association of Sda1, the Rix1 complex, and the Rea1 ATPase involved in late steps of remodeling. PMID:27390266

  12. The N-terminal extension of yeast ribosomal protein L8 is involved in two major remodeling events during late nuclear stages of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Wu, Shan; Gao, Ning; Woolford, John L

    2016-09-01

    Assaying effects on pre-rRNA processing and ribosome assembly upon depleting individual ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) provided an initial paradigm for assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo-that each structural domain of ribosomal subunits assembles in a hierarchical fashion. However, two features suggest that a more complex pathway may exist: (i) Some r-proteins contain extensions that reach long distances across ribosomes to interact with multiple rRNA domains as well as with other r-proteins. (ii) Individual r-proteins may assemble in a stepwise fashion. For example, the globular domain of an r-protein might assemble separately from its extensions. Thus, these extensions might play roles in assembly that could not be revealed by depleting the entire protein. Here, we show that deleting or mutating extensions of r-proteins L7 (uL30) and L35 (uL29) from yeast reveal important roles in early and middle steps during 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Detailed analysis of the N-terminal terminal extension of L8 (eL8) showed that it is necessary for late nuclear stages of 60S subunit assembly involving two major remodeling events: removal of the ITS2 spacer; and reorganization of the central protuberance (CP) containing 5S rRNA and r-proteins L5 (uL18) and L11 (uL5). Mutations in the L8 extension block processing of 7S pre-rRNA, prevent release of assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 from pre-ribosomes, which is required for rotation of the CP, and block association of Sda1, the Rix1 complex, and the Rea1 ATPase involved in late steps of remodeling.

  13. Hierarchical recruitment into nascent ribosomes of assembly factors required for 27SB pre-rRNA processing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Talkish, Jason; Zhang, Jingyu; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Horsey, Edward W.; Woolford, John L.

    2012-01-01

    To better define the roles of assembly factors required for eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis, we have focused on one specific step in maturation of yeast 60 S ribosomal subunits: processing of 27SB pre-ribosomal RNA. At least 14 assembly factors, the ‘B-factor’ proteins, are required for this step. These include most of the major functional classes of assembly factors: RNA-binding proteins, scaffolding protein, DEAD-box ATPases and GTPases. We have investigated the mechanisms by which these factors associate with assembling ribosomes. Our data establish a recruitment model in which assembly of the B-factors into nascent ribosomes ultimately leads to the recruitment of the GTPase Nog2. A more detailed analysis suggests that this occurs in a hierarchical manner via two largely independent recruiting pathways that converge on Nog2. Understanding recruitment has allowed us to better determine the order of association of all assembly factors functioning in one step of ribosome assembly. Furthermore, we have identified a novel subcomplex composed of the B-factors Nop2 and Nip7. Finally, we identified a means by which this step in ribosome biogenesis is regulated in concert with cell growth via the TOR protein kinase pathway. Inhibition of TOR kinase decreases association of Rpf2, Spb4, Nog1 and Nog2 with pre-ribosomes. PMID:22735702

  14. Ribonucleic acid-protein cross-linking within the intact Escherichia coli ribosome, utilizing ethylene glycol bis[3-(2-ketobutyraldehyde) ether], a reversible, bifunctional reagent: identification of 30S proteins.

    PubMed

    Brewer, L A; Noller, H F

    1983-08-30

    To obtain detailed topographical information concerning the spatial arrangement of the multitude of ribosomal proteins with respect to specific sequences in the three RNA chains of intact ribosomes, a reagent capable of covalently and reversibly joining RNA to protein has been synthesized [Brewer, L.A., Goelz, S., & Noller, H. F. (1983) Biochemistry (preceding paper in this issue)]. This compound, ethylene glycol bis[3-(2-ketobutyraldehyde) ether] which we term "bikethoxal", possesses two reactive ends similar to kethoxal. Accordingly, it reacts selectively with guanine in single-stranded regions of nucleic acid and with arginine in protein. The cross-linking is reversible in that the arginine- and guanine-bikethoxal linkage can be disrupted by treatment with mild base, allowing identification of the linked RNA and protein components by standard techniques. Further, since the sites of kethoxal modification within the RNA sequences of intact subunits are known, the task of identifying the components of individual ribonucleoprotein complexes should be considerably simplified. About 15% of the ribosomal protein was covalently cross-linked to 16S RNA by bikethoxal under our standard reaction conditions, as monitored by comigration of 35S-labeled protein with RNA on Sepharose 4B in urea. Cross-linked 30S proteins were subsequently removed from 16S RNA by treatment with T1 ribonuclease and/or mild base cleavage of the reagent and were identified by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The major 30S proteins found in cross-linked complexes are S4, S5, S6, S7, S8, S9 (S11), S16, and S18. The minor ones are S2, S3, S12, S13, S14, S15, and S17.

  15. MPV17L2 is required for ribosome assembly in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Durigon, Romina; Pearce, Sarah F.; Rorbach, Joanna; Hirst, Elizabeth M.A.; Vidoni, Sara; Reyes, Aurelio; Brea-Calvo, Gloria; Minczuk, Michal; Woellhaf, Michael W.; Herrmann, Johannes M.; Huynen, Martijn A.; Holt, Ian J.; Spinazzola, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    MPV17 is a mitochondrial protein of unknown function, and mutations in MPV17 are associated with mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) maintenance disorders. Here we investigated its most similar relative, MPV17L2, which is also annotated as a mitochondrial protein. Mitochondrial fractionation analyses demonstrate MPV17L2 is an integral inner membrane protein, like MPV17. However, unlike MPV17, MPV17L2 is dependent on mitochondrial DNA, as it is absent from ρ0 cells, and co-sediments on sucrose gradients with the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome and the monosome. Gene silencing of MPV17L2 results in marked decreases in the monosome and both subunits of the mitochondrial ribosome, leading to impaired protein synthesis in the mitochondria. Depletion of MPV17L2 also induces mitochondrial DNA aggregation. The DNA and ribosome phenotypes are linked, as in the absence of MPV17L2 proteins of the small subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome are trapped in the enlarged nucleoids, in contrast to a component of the large subunit. These findings suggest MPV17L2 contributes to the biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosome, uniting the two subunits to create the translationally competent monosome, and provide evidence that assembly of the small subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome occurs at the nucleoid. PMID:24948607

  16. Nucleolin provides a link between RNA polymerase I transcription and pre-ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Roger, Benoit; Moisand, André; Amalric, François; Bouvet, Philippe

    2003-03-01

    Despite the identification of numerous factors involved in ribosomal RNA synthesis and maturation, the molecular mechanisms of ribosome biogenesis, and in particular the relationship between the different steps, are still largely unknown. We have investigated the consequences of an increased amount of a major nucleolar non-ribosomal protein, nucleolin, in Xenopus laevisstage VI oocytes on the production of ribosomal subunits. We show that a threefold increase in nucleolin leads to the complete absence of pre-rRNA maturation in addition to significant repression of RNA polymerase I transcription. Observation of "Christmas trees" by electron microscopy and analysis of the sedimentation properties of 40S pre-ribosomal particles suggest that an increased amount of nucleolin leads to incorrect packaging of the 40S particle. Interestingly, nucleolin affects the maturation of the 40S particle only when it is present at the time of transcription. These results indicate that nucleolin participates in the co-transcriptional packaging of the pre-rRNA, and that the quality of this packaging will determine whether the 40S precursor undergoes maturation or is degraded. The interaction of nucleolin with nascent pre-rRNA could help the co-transcriptional assembly on pre-rRNA of factors necessary for the subsequent maturation of the pre-ribosomal particle containing the 40S pre-rRNA.

  17. Classification of images of biomolecular assemblies: a study of ribosomes and ribosomal subunits of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Frank, J; Bretaudiere, J P; Carazo, J M; Verschoor, A; Wagenknecht, T

    1988-05-01

    Images of macromolecules obtained in the electron microscope are subjected to correspondence analysis. The structure inherent in the data in the resulting low-dimensional factor space is characterized by a mixed classification method which combines the dynamic clouds clustering technique with hierarchical ascendant classification (HAC). For our data, the rejection of marginal clusters obtained by dynamic clouds clustering appears as a crucial prerequisite for a stable performance of HAC. The method is applied to two sets of 204 and 177 images that show the 70S ribosome of Escherichia coli, in the range of overlap views as defined by A. Verschoor and co-workers, and to two sets of 480 and 496 images of the 50S subunit of E. coli depleted of L7/L12 proteins in the well-defined crown view. Reproducible classes are obtained, which are characterized by images reconstituted from factorial coordinates. These classes appear to be related to different orientations on the specimen grid (in the case of the 70S particle) and to different conformational states (50S subunit).

  18. Characterization of the Ribosome Biogenesis Landscape in E. coli using Quantitative Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Stephen S.; Williamson, James R.

    2012-01-01

    The ribosome is an essential and highly complex biological system in all living cells. A large body of literature is available on the assembly of the ribosome in vitro, but a clear picture of this process inside the cell has yet to emerge. Here, we directly characterized in vivo ribosome assembly intermediates and associated assembly factors from wild-type E. coli cells using a general quantitative mass spectrometry (qMS) approach. The presence of distinct populations of ribosome assembly intermediates was verified using an in vivo stable isotope pulse-labeling approach, and their exact ribosomal protein (r-protein) contents were characterized against an isotopically labeled standard. The model-free clustering analysis of the resultant protein levels for the different ribosomal particles produced four 30S assembly groups that correlate very well with previous in vitro assembly studies of the small ribosomal subunit, and six 50S assembly groups that clearly define an in vivo assembly landscape for the larger ribosomal subunit. In addition, de novo proteomics identified a total of 21 known and potentially new ribosome assembly factors co-localized with various ribosomal particles. These results represent new in vivo assembly maps of the E. coli 30S and 50S subunits, and the general qMS approach should be a solid platform for future studies of ribosome biogenesis across a host of model organisms. PMID:23228329

  19. Pattern of 4-thiouridine-induced cross-linking in 16S ribosomal RNA in the Escherichia coli 30S subunit.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Kavita; Wollenzien, Paul

    2004-07-20

    The locations of RNA-RNA cross-links in 16S rRNA were determined after in vivo incorporation of 4-thiouridine (s(4)U) into RNA in a strain of Escherichia coli deficient in pyrimidine synthesis and irradiation at >320 nm. This was done as an effort to find RNA cross-links different from UVB-induced cross-links that would be valuable for monitoring the 30S subunit in functional complexes. Cross-linked 16S rRNA was separated on the basis of loop size, and cross-linking sites were identified by reverse transcription, RNase H cleavage, and RNA sequencing. A limited number of RNA-RNA cross-links in nine regions were observed. In five regions-s(4)U562 x C879-U884, s(4)U793 x A1519, s(4)U1189 x U1060-G1064, s(4)U1183 x A1092, and s(4)U991 x C1210-U1212-the s(4)U-induced cross-links are similar to UVB-induced cross-links observed previously. In four other regions-s(4)U960 x A1225, s(4)U820 x G570, s(4)U367 x A55-U56, and s(4)U239 x A120-the s(4)U-induced cross-links are different from UVB-induced cross-links. The pattern of cross-linking is not limited by the distribution of s(4)U, because there are at least 112 s(4)U substitution sites in the 16S rRNA. The relatively small number of s(4)U-mediated cross-links is probably determined by the organization of the RNA in the 30S subunit, which allows RNA conformational flexibility needed for cross-link formation in just a limited region.

  20. The localization of multiple sites on 16S RNA which are cross-linked to proteins S7 and S8 in Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits by treatment with 2-iminothiolane.

    PubMed

    Wower, I; Brimacombe, R

    1983-03-11

    RNA-protein cross-links were introduced into E. coli 30S ribosomal subunits by reaction with 2-iminothiolane followed by a mild ultraviolet irradiation treatment. After removal of non-reacted protein and partial nuclease digestion of the cross-linked 16S RNA-protein moiety, a number of individual cross-linked complexes could be isolated and the sites of attachment of the proteins to the RNA determined. Protein S8 was cross-linked to the RNA at three different positions, within oligo-nucleotides encompassing positions 629-633, 651-654, and (tentatively) 593-597 in the 16S sequence. Protein S7 was cross-linked within two oligonucleotides encompassing positions 1238-1240, and 1377-1378. In addition, a site at position 723-724 was observed, cross-linked to protein S19, S20 or S21.

  1. Stepwise and dynamic assembly of the earliest precursors of small ribosomal subunits in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liman; Wu, Chen; Cai, Gaihong; Chen, She

    2016-01-01

    The eukaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is associated cotranscriptionally with numerous factors into an enormous 90S preribosomal particle that conducts early processing of small ribosomal subunits. The assembly pathway and structure of the 90S particle is poorly understood. Here, we affinity-purified and analyzed the constituents of yeast 90S particles that were assembled on a series of plasmid-encoded 3′-truncated pre-18S RNAs. We determined the assembly point of 65 proteins and the U3, U14, and snR30 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), revealing a stepwise and dynamic assembly map. The 5′ external transcribed spacer (ETS) alone can nucleate a large complex. When the 18S rRNA is nearly complete, the 90S structure undergoes a dramatic reorganization, releasing U14, snR30, and 14 protein factors that bind earlier. We also identified a reference state of 90S that is fully assembled yet has not undergone 5′ETS processing. The assembly map present here provides a new framework to understand small subunit biogenesis. PMID:26980190

  2. Stepwise and dynamic assembly of the earliest precursors of small ribosomal subunits in yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liman; Wu, Chen; Cai, Gaihong; Chen, She; Ye, Keqiong

    2016-03-15

    The eukaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is associated cotranscriptionally with numerous factors into an enormous 90S preribosomal particle that conducts early processing of small ribosomal subunits. The assembly pathway and structure of the 90S particle is poorly understood. Here, we affinity-purified and analyzed the constituents of yeast 90S particles that were assembled on a series of plasmid-encoded 3'-truncated pre-18S RNAs. We determined the assembly point of 65 proteins and the U3, U14, and snR30 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), revealing a stepwise and dynamic assembly map. The 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS) alone can nucleate a large complex. When the 18S rRNA is nearly complete, the 90S structure undergoes a dramatic reorganization, releasing U14, snR30, and 14 protein factors that bind earlier. We also identified a reference state of 90S that is fully assembled yet has not undergone 5'ETS processing. The assembly map present here provides a new framework to understand small subunit biogenesis. PMID:26980190

  3. Stepwise and dynamic assembly of the earliest precursors of small ribosomal subunits in yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liman; Wu, Chen; Cai, Gaihong; Chen, She; Ye, Keqiong

    2016-03-15

    The eukaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is associated cotranscriptionally with numerous factors into an enormous 90S preribosomal particle that conducts early processing of small ribosomal subunits. The assembly pathway and structure of the 90S particle is poorly understood. Here, we affinity-purified and analyzed the constituents of yeast 90S particles that were assembled on a series of plasmid-encoded 3'-truncated pre-18S RNAs. We determined the assembly point of 65 proteins and the U3, U14, and snR30 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), revealing a stepwise and dynamic assembly map. The 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS) alone can nucleate a large complex. When the 18S rRNA is nearly complete, the 90S structure undergoes a dramatic reorganization, releasing U14, snR30, and 14 protein factors that bind earlier. We also identified a reference state of 90S that is fully assembled yet has not undergone 5'ETS processing. The assembly map present here provides a new framework to understand small subunit biogenesis.

  4. The DEAD box protein Mrh4 functions in the assembly of the mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2013-11-01

    Proteins in a cell are universally synthesized by ribosomes. Mitochondria contain their own ribosomes, which specialize in the synthesis of a handful of proteins required for oxidative phosphorylation. The pathway of mitoribosomal biogenesis and factors involved are poorly characterized. An example is the DEAD box proteins, widely known to participate in the biogenesis of bacterial and cytoplasmic eukaryotic ribosomes as either RNA helicases or RNA chaperones, whose mitochondrial counterparts remain completely unknown. Here, we have identified the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DEAD box protein Mrh4 as essential for large mitoribosome subunit biogenesis. Mrh4 interacts with the 21S rRNA, mitoribosome subassemblies, and fully assembled mitoribosomes. In the absence of Mrh4, the 21S rRNA is matured and forms part of a large on-pathway assembly intermediate missing proteins Mrpl16 and Mrpl39. We conclude that Mrh4 plays an essential role during the late stages of mitoribosome assembly by promoting remodeling of the 21S rRNA-protein interactions.

  5. UtpA and UtpB chaperone nascent pre-ribosomal RNA and U3 snoRNA to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Hunziker, Mirjam; Barandun, Jonas; Petfalski, Elisabeth; Tan, Dongyan; Delan-Forino, Clémentine; Molloy, Kelly R; Kim, Kelly H; Dunn-Davies, Hywel; Shi, Yi; Chaker-Margot, Malik; Chait, Brian T; Walz, Thomas; Tollervey, David; Klinge, Sebastian

    2016-06-29

    Early eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves large multi-protein complexes, which co-transcriptionally associate with pre-ribosomal RNA to form the small subunit processome. The precise mechanisms by which two of the largest multi-protein complexes-UtpA and UtpB-interact with nascent pre-ribosomal RNA are poorly understood. Here, we combined biochemical and structural biology approaches with ensembles of RNA-protein cross-linking data to elucidate the essential functions of both complexes. We show that UtpA contains a large composite RNA-binding site and captures the 5' end of pre-ribosomal RNA. UtpB forms an extended structure that binds early pre-ribosomal intermediates in close proximity to architectural sites such as an RNA duplex formed by the 5' ETS and U3 snoRNA as well as the 3' boundary of the 18S rRNA. Both complexes therefore act as vital RNA chaperones to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

  6. UtpA and UtpB chaperone nascent pre-ribosomal RNA and U3 snoRNA to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunziker, Mirjam; Barandun, Jonas; Petfalski, Elisabeth; Tan, Dongyan; Delan-Forino, Clémentine; Molloy, Kelly R.; Kim, Kelly H.; Dunn-Davies, Hywel; Shi, Yi; Chaker-Margot, Malik; Chait, Brian T.; Walz, Thomas; Tollervey, David; Klinge, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    Early eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves large multi-protein complexes, which co-transcriptionally associate with pre-ribosomal RNA to form the small subunit processome. The precise mechanisms by which two of the largest multi-protein complexes--UtpA and UtpB--interact with nascent pre-ribosomal RNA are poorly understood. Here, we combined biochemical and structural biology approaches with ensembles of RNA-protein cross-linking data to elucidate the essential functions of both complexes. We show that UtpA contains a large composite RNA-binding site and captures the 5' end of pre-ribosomal RNA. UtpB forms an extended structure that binds early pre-ribosomal intermediates in close proximity to architectural sites such as an RNA duplex formed by the 5' ETS and U3 snoRNA as well as the 3' boundary of the 18S rRNA. Both complexes therefore act as vital RNA chaperones to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

  7. UtpA and UtpB chaperone nascent pre-ribosomal RNA and U3 snoRNA to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hunziker, Mirjam; Barandun, Jonas; Petfalski, Elisabeth; Tan, Dongyan; Delan-Forino, Clémentine; Molloy, Kelly R.; Kim, Kelly H.; Dunn-Davies, Hywel; Shi, Yi; Chaker-Margot, Malik; Chait, Brian T.; Walz, Thomas; Tollervey, David; Klinge, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Early eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves large multi-protein complexes, which co-transcriptionally associate with pre-ribosomal RNA to form the small subunit processome. The precise mechanisms by which two of the largest multi-protein complexes—UtpA and UtpB—interact with nascent pre-ribosomal RNA are poorly understood. Here, we combined biochemical and structural biology approaches with ensembles of RNA–protein cross-linking data to elucidate the essential functions of both complexes. We show that UtpA contains a large composite RNA-binding site and captures the 5′ end of pre-ribosomal RNA. UtpB forms an extended structure that binds early pre-ribosomal intermediates in close proximity to architectural sites such as an RNA duplex formed by the 5′ ETS and U3 snoRNA as well as the 3′ boundary of the 18S rRNA. Both complexes therefore act as vital RNA chaperones to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly. PMID:27354316

  8. Cyclization of polyketides and non-ribosomal peptides on and off their assembly lines.

    PubMed

    Pang, Bo; Wang, Min; Liu, Wen

    2016-02-01

    Modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are multifunctional megaenzymes that serve as templates to program the assembly of short carboxylic acids and amino acids in a primarily co-linear manner. The variation, combination, permutation and evolution of their functional units (e.g., modules, domains and proteins) along with their association with external enzymes have resulted in the generation of numerous versions of templates, the roles of which have not been fully recognized in the structural diversification of polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides and their hybrids present in nature. In this Highlight, we focus on the assembly-line enzymology and associated chemistry by providing examples of some newly characterized cyclization reactions that occur on and off the assembly lines during and after chain elongation for the purpose of elucidating the template effects of PKSs and NRPSs. A fundamental understanding of the underlying biosynthetic logic would facilitate the elucidation of chemical information contained within the PKS or NRPS templates and benefit the development of strategies for genome mining, biosynthesis-inspired chemical synthesis and combinatorial biosynthesis. PMID:26604034

  9. Cyclization of polyketides and non-ribosomal peptides on and off their assembly lines.

    PubMed

    Pang, Bo; Wang, Min; Liu, Wen

    2016-02-01

    Modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are multifunctional megaenzymes that serve as templates to program the assembly of short carboxylic acids and amino acids in a primarily co-linear manner. The variation, combination, permutation and evolution of their functional units (e.g., modules, domains and proteins) along with their association with external enzymes have resulted in the generation of numerous versions of templates, the roles of which have not been fully recognized in the structural diversification of polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides and their hybrids present in nature. In this Highlight, we focus on the assembly-line enzymology and associated chemistry by providing examples of some newly characterized cyclization reactions that occur on and off the assembly lines during and after chain elongation for the purpose of elucidating the template effects of PKSs and NRPSs. A fundamental understanding of the underlying biosynthetic logic would facilitate the elucidation of chemical information contained within the PKS or NRPS templates and benefit the development of strategies for genome mining, biosynthesis-inspired chemical synthesis and combinatorial biosynthesis.

  10. Hrr25/CK1δ-directed release of Ltv1 from pre-40S ribosomes is necessary for ribosome assembly and cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Ghalei, Homa; Schaub, Franz X.; Doherty, Joanne R.; Noguchi, Yoshihiko; Roush, William R.; Cleveland, John L.; Stroupe, M. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Casein kinase 1δ/ε (CK1δ/ε) and their yeast homologue Hrr25 are essential for cell growth. Further, CK1δ is overexpressed in several malignancies, and CK1δ inhibitors have shown promise in several preclinical animal studies. However, the substrates of Hrr25 and CK1δ/ε that are necessary for cell growth and survival are unknown. We show that Hrr25 is essential for ribosome assembly, where it phosphorylates the assembly factor Ltv1, which causes its release from nascent 40S subunits and allows subunit maturation. Hrr25 inactivation or expression of a nonphosphorylatable Ltv1 variant blocked Ltv1 release in vitro and in vivo, and prevented entry into the translation-like quality control cycle. Conversely, phosphomimetic Ltv1 variants rescued viability after Hrr25 depletion. Finally, Ltv1 knockdown in human breast cancer cells impaired apoptosis induced by CK1δ/ε inhibitors, establishing that the antiproliferative activity of these inhibitors is due, at least in part, to disruption of ribosome assembly. These findings validate the ribosome assembly pathway as a novel target for the development of anticancer therapeutics. PMID:25778921

  11. Integrative structural analysis of the UTPB complex, an early assembly factor for eukaryotic small ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Sun, Qi; Chen, Rongchang; Chen, Xining; Lin, Jinzhong; Ye, Keqiong

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is an essential and conserved cellular process in eukaryotes that requires numerous assembly factors. The six-subunit UTPB complex is an essential component of the 90S precursor of the small ribosomal subunit. Here, we analyzed the molecular architecture of UTPB using an integrative structural biology approach. We mapped the major interactions that associate each of six UTPB proteins. Crystallographic studies showed that Utp1, Utp21, Utp12 and Utp13 are evolutionarily related and form a dimer of dimers (Utp1–Utp21, Utp12–Utp13) through their homologous helical C-terminal domains. Molecular docking with crosslinking restraints showed that the WD domains of Utp12 and Utp13 are associated, as are the WD domains of Utp1, Utp21 and Utp18. Electron microscopy images of the entire UTPB complex revealed that it predominantly adopts elongated conformations and possesses internal flexibility. We also determined crystal structures of the WD domain of Utp18 and the HAT and deviant HAT domains of Utp6. A structural model of UTPB was derived based on these data. PMID:27330138

  12. The eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension of ribosomal protein S31 contributes to the assembly and function of 40S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Martín-Villanueva, Sara; Murat, Guillaume; Lacombe, Thierry; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2016-09-19

    The archaea-/eukaryote-specific 40S-ribosomal-subunit protein S31 is expressed as an ubiquitin fusion protein in eukaryotes and consists of a conserved body and a eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension. In yeast, S31 is a practically essential protein, which is required for cytoplasmic 20S pre-rRNA maturation. Here, we have studied the role of the N-terminal extension of the yeast S31 protein. We show that deletion of this extension partially impairs cell growth and 40S subunit biogenesis and confers hypersensitivity to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Moreover, the extension harbours a nuclear localization signal that promotes active nuclear import of S31, which associates with pre-ribosomal particles in the nucleus. In the absence of the extension, truncated S31 inefficiently assembles into pre-40S particles and two subpopulations of mature small subunits, one lacking and another one containing truncated S31, can be identified. Plasmid-driven overexpression of truncated S31 partially suppresses the growth and ribosome biogenesis defects but, conversely, slightly enhances the hypersensitivity to aminoglycosides. Altogether, these results indicate that the N-terminal extension facilitates the assembly of S31 into pre-40S particles and contributes to the optimal translational activity of mature 40S subunits but has only a minor role in cytoplasmic cleavage of 20S pre-rRNA at site D. PMID:27422873

  13. The eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension of ribosomal protein S31 contributes to the assembly and function of 40S ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Martín-Villanueva, Sara; Murat, Guillaume; Lacombe, Thierry; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    The archaea-/eukaryote-specific 40S-ribosomal-subunit protein S31 is expressed as an ubiquitin fusion protein in eukaryotes and consists of a conserved body and a eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension. In yeast, S31 is a practically essential protein, which is required for cytoplasmic 20S pre-rRNA maturation. Here, we have studied the role of the N-terminal extension of the yeast S31 protein. We show that deletion of this extension partially impairs cell growth and 40S subunit biogenesis and confers hypersensitivity to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Moreover, the extension harbours a nuclear localization signal that promotes active nuclear import of S31, which associates with pre-ribosomal particles in the nucleus. In the absence of the extension, truncated S31 inefficiently assembles into pre-40S particles and two subpopulations of mature small subunits, one lacking and another one containing truncated S31, can be identified. Plasmid-driven overexpression of truncated S31 partially suppresses the growth and ribosome biogenesis defects but, conversely, slightly enhances the hypersensitivity to aminoglycosides. Altogether, these results indicate that the N-terminal extension facilitates the assembly of S31 into pre-40S particles and contributes to the optimal translational activity of mature 40S subunits but has only a minor role in cytoplasmic cleavage of 20S pre-rRNA at site D. PMID:27422873

  14. The eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension of ribosomal protein S31 contributes to the assembly and function of 40S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Martín-Villanueva, Sara; Murat, Guillaume; Lacombe, Thierry; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2016-09-19

    The archaea-/eukaryote-specific 40S-ribosomal-subunit protein S31 is expressed as an ubiquitin fusion protein in eukaryotes and consists of a conserved body and a eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension. In yeast, S31 is a practically essential protein, which is required for cytoplasmic 20S pre-rRNA maturation. Here, we have studied the role of the N-terminal extension of the yeast S31 protein. We show that deletion of this extension partially impairs cell growth and 40S subunit biogenesis and confers hypersensitivity to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Moreover, the extension harbours a nuclear localization signal that promotes active nuclear import of S31, which associates with pre-ribosomal particles in the nucleus. In the absence of the extension, truncated S31 inefficiently assembles into pre-40S particles and two subpopulations of mature small subunits, one lacking and another one containing truncated S31, can be identified. Plasmid-driven overexpression of truncated S31 partially suppresses the growth and ribosome biogenesis defects but, conversely, slightly enhances the hypersensitivity to aminoglycosides. Altogether, these results indicate that the N-terminal extension facilitates the assembly of S31 into pre-40S particles and contributes to the optimal translational activity of mature 40S subunits but has only a minor role in cytoplasmic cleavage of 20S pre-rRNA at site D.

  15. A unique combination of rare mitochondrial ribosomal RNA variants affects the kinetics of complex I assembly.

    PubMed

    Porcelli, Anna Maria; Calvaruso, Maria Antonietta; Iommarini, Luisa; Kurelac, Ivana; Zuntini, Roberta; Ferrari, Simona; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in respiratory complexes subunits contribute to a large spectrum of human diseases. Nonetheless, ribosomal RNA variants remain largely under-investigated from a functional point of view. We here report a unique combination of two rare mitochondrial rRNA variants detected by serendipity in a subject with chronic granulomatous disease and never reported to co-occur within the same mitochondrial haplotype. In silico prediction of the mitochondrial ribosomal structure showed a dramatic rearrangement of the rRNA secondary structure. Functional investigation of cybrids carrying this unique haplotype demonstrated that the co-occurrence of the two rRNA variants determines a slow-down of the mitochondrial protein synthesis, especially in cells with an elevated metabolic rate, which impairs the assembly kinetics of Complex I, induces a bioenergetic defect and stimulates reactive oxygen species production. In conclusion, our results point to a sub-pathogenic role for these two rare mitochondrial rRNA variants, when found in the unique combination here reported in a single individual. PMID:27102412

  16. Effects of Detergents on Ribosomal Precursor Subunits of Bacillus megaterium

    PubMed Central

    Body, Barbara A.; Brownstein, Bernard H.

    1978-01-01

    Cell extracts prepared by osmotic lysis of protoplasts were analyzed by sucrose gradient sedimentation. In the absence of detergents, ribosomal precursor particles were found in a gradient fraction which sedimented faster than mature 50S subunits and in two other fractions coincident with mature 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits. Phospholipid, an indicator of membrane, was shown to be associated with only the fastest-sedimenting ribosomal precursor particle fraction. After the extracts were treated with detergents, all phospholipid was found at the top of the gradients. Brij 58, Triton X-100, and Nonidet P-40 did not cause a change in the sedimentation values of precursors; however, the detergents deoxycholate or LOC (Amway Corp.) disrupted the fastest-sedimenting precursor and converted the ribosomal precursor subunits which sedimented at the 50S and 30S positions to five different classes of more slowly sedimenting particles. Earlier reports on the in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits have shown that several stages of ribosomal precursor subunits exist, and, in the presence of the detergents deoxycholate and LOC, which had been used to prepare cell extracts, the precursors sedimented more slowly. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that those detergents selectively modify the structure of ribosomal precursors and lend further support to the hypothesis that the in vivo ribosomal precursor subunits have 50S and 30S sedimentation values. In addition, these data support the idea that the ribosomal precursor particles found in the fast-sedimenting fraction may constitute a unique precursor fraction. PMID:412833

  17. Effects of detergents on ribosomal precursor subunits of Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Body, A; Brownstein, B H

    1978-01-01

    Cell extracts prepared by osmotic lysis of protoplasts were analyzed by sucrose gradient sedimentation. In the absence of detergents, ribosomal precursor particles were found in a gradient fraction which sedimented faster than mature 50S subunits and in two other fractions coincident with mature 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits. Phospholipid, an indicator of membrane, was shown to be associated with only the fastest-sedimenting ribosomal precursor particle fraction. After the extracts were treated with detergents, all phospholipid was found at the top of the gradients. Brij 58, Triton X-100, and Nonidet P-40 did not cause a change in the sedimentation values of precursors; however, the detergents deoxycholate or LOC (Amway Corp.) disrupted the fastest-sedimenting precursor and converted the ribosomal precursor subunits which sedimented at the 50S and 30S positions to five different classes of more slowly sedimenting particles. Earlier reports on the in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits have shown that several stages of ribosomal precursor subunits exist, and, in the presence of the detergents deoxycholate and LOC, which had been used to prepare cell extracts, the precursors sedimented more slowly. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that those detergents selectively modify the structure of ribosomal precursors and lend further support to the hypothesis that the in vivo ribosomal precursor subunits have 50S and 30S sedimentation values. In addition, these data support the idea that the ribosomal precursor particles found in the fast-sedimenting fraction may constitute a unique precursor fraction.

  18. Structural insights into the function of a unique tandem GTPase EngA in bacterial ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Yan, Kaige; Zhang, Yixiao; Li, Ningning; Ma, Chengying; Li, Zhifei; Zhang, Yanqing; Feng, Boya; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yadong; Xu, Yanji; Lei, Jianlin; Gao, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Many ribosome-interacting GTPases, with proposed functions in ribosome biogenesis, are also implicated in the cellular regulatory coupling between ribosome assembly process and various growth control pathways. EngA is an essential GTPase in bacteria, and intriguingly, it contains two consecutive GTPase domains (GD), being one-of-a-kind among all known GTPases. EngA is required for the 50S subunit maturation. However, its molecular role remains elusive. Here, we present the structure of EngA bound to the 50S subunit. Our data show that EngA binds to the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) and induces dramatic conformational changes on the 50S subunit, which virtually returns the 50S subunit to a state similar to that of the late-stage 50S assembly intermediates. Very interestingly, our data show that the two GDs exhibit a pseudo-two-fold symmetry in the 50S-bound conformation. Our results indicate that EngA recognizes certain forms of the 50S assembly intermediates, and likely facilitates the conformational maturation of the PTC of the 23S rRNA in a direct manner. Furthermore, in a broad context, our data also suggest that EngA might be a sensor of the cellular GTP/GDP ratio, endowed with multiple conformational states, in response to fluctuations in cellular nucleotide pool, to facilitate and regulate ribosome assembly. PMID:25389271

  19. Ribosomal proteins: functions beyond the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Liao, Wen-Juan; Liao, Jun-Ming; Liao, Peng; Lu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Although ribosomal proteins are known for playing an essential role in ribosome assembly and protein translation, their ribosome-independent functions have also been greatly appreciated. Over the past decade, more than a dozen of ribosomal proteins have been found to activate the tumor suppressor p53 pathway in response to ribosomal stress. In addition, these ribosomal proteins are involved in various physiological and pathological processes. This review is composed to overview the current understanding of how ribosomal stress provokes the accumulation of ribosome-free ribosomal proteins, as well as the ribosome-independent functions of ribosomal proteins in tumorigenesis, immune signaling, and development. We also propose the potential of applying these pieces of knowledge to the development of ribosomal stress-based cancer therapeutics. PMID:25735597

  20. Late-assembly of human ribosomal protein S20 in the cytoplasm is essential for the functioning of the small subunit ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Lin-Ru; Chou, Chang-Wei; Wu, Jing-Ying; Kirby, Ralph; Lin, Alan

    2013-11-15

    Using immuno-fluorescent probing and Western blotting analysis, we reveal the exclusive cytoplasm nature of the small subunit ribosomal protein S20. To illustrate the importance of the cellular compartmentation of S20 to the function of small subunit 40S, we created a nuclear resident S20{sub NLS} mutant gene and examined polysome profile of cells that had been transfected with the S20{sub NLS} gene. As a result, we observed the formation of recombinant 40S carried S20{sub NLS} but this recombinant 40S was never found in the polysome, suggesting such a recombinant 40S was translation incompetent. Moreover, by the tactic of the energy depletion and restoration, we were able to restrain the nuclear-resided S20{sub NLS} in the cytoplasm. Yet, along a progressive energy restoration, we observed the presence of recombinant 40S subunits carrying the S20{sub NLS} in the polysome. This proves that S20 needs to be cytoplasmic in order to make a functional 40S subunit. Furthermore, it also implies that the assembly order of ribosomal protein in eukaryote is orderly regulated. - Highlights: • The step of S20 assembled on 40S is happened in the cytoplasm. • A small subunit assembled with a nuclear S20{sub NLS} is translational incompetence. • Using energy depletion and recovery to manipulate the cellular compartment of S20{sub NLS}. • Cytoplasm-retained S20{sub NLS} is crucial for creating a functional small subunit.

  1. The Ribosome Cooperates with the Assembly Chaperone pICln to Initiate Formation of snRNPs.

    PubMed

    Paknia, Elham; Chari, Ashwin; Stark, Holger; Fischer, Utz

    2016-09-20

    The formation of macromolecular complexes within the crowded environment of cells often requires aid from assembly chaperones. PRMT5 and SMN complexes mediate this task for the assembly of the common core of pre-mRNA processing small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs). Core formation is initiated by the PRMT5-complex subunit pICln, which pre-arranges the core proteins into spatial positions occupied in the assembled snRNP. The SMN complex then accepts these pICln-bound proteins and unites them with small nuclear RNA (snRNA). Here, we have analyzed how newly synthesized snRNP proteins are channeled into the assembly pathway to evade mis-assembly. We show that they initially remain bound to the ribosome near the polypeptide exit tunnel and dissociate upon association with pICln. Coincident with its release activity, pICln ensures the formation of cognate heterooligomers and their chaperoned guidance into the assembly pathway. Our study identifies the ribosomal quality control hub as a site where chaperone-mediated assembly of macromolecular complexes can be initiated. PMID:27653676

  2. Nucleotide excision repair of the 5 S ribosomal RNA gene assembled into a nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Smerdon, M J

    2000-08-01

    A-175-base pair fragment containing the Xenopus borealis somatic 5 S ribosomal RNA gene was used as a model system to determine the effect of nucleosome assembly on nucleotide excision repair (NER) of the major UV photoproduct (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD)) in DNA. Xenopus oocyte nuclear extracts were used to carry out repair in vitro on reconstituted, positioned 5 S rDNA nucleosomes. Nucleosome structure strongly inhibits NER at many CPD sites in the 5 S rDNA fragment while having little effect at a few sites. The time course of CPD removal at 35 different sites indicates that >85% of the CPDs in the naked DNA fragment have t(12) values <2 h, whereas <26% of the t(12) values in nucleosomes are <2 h, and 15% are >8 h. Moreover, removal of histone tails from these mononucleosomes has little effect on the repair rates. Finally, nucleosome inhibition of repair shows no correlation with the rotational setting of a 14-nucleotide-long pyrimidine tract located 30 base pairs from the nucleosome dyad. These results suggest that inhibition of NER by mononucleosomes is not significantly influenced by the rotational orientation of CPDs on the histone surface, and histone tails play little (or no) role in this inhibition. PMID:10821833

  3. The Dedicated Chaperone Acl4 Escorts Ribosomal Protein Rpl4 to Its Nuclear Pre-60S Assembly Site

    PubMed Central

    Pillet, Benjamin; García-Gómez, Juan J.; Pausch, Patrick; Falquet, Laurent; Bange, Gert; de la Cruz, Jesús; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes are the highly complex macromolecular assemblies dedicated to the synthesis of all cellular proteins from mRNA templates. The main principles underlying the making of ribosomes are conserved across eukaryotic organisms and this process has been studied in most detail in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast ribosomes are composed of four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and 79 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins). Most r-proteins need to be transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus where they get incorporated into the evolving pre-ribosomal particles. Due to the high abundance and difficult physicochemical properties of r-proteins, their correct folding and fail-safe targeting to the assembly site depends largely on general, as well as highly specialized, chaperone and transport systems. Many r-proteins contain universally conserved or eukaryote-specific internal loops and/or terminal extensions, which were shown to mediate their nuclear targeting and association with dedicated chaperones in a growing number of cases. The 60S r-protein Rpl4 is particularly interesting since it harbours a conserved long internal loop and a prominent C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension. Here we show that both the long internal loop and the C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension are strictly required for the functionality of Rpl4. While Rpl4 contains at least five distinct nuclear localization signals (NLS), the C-terminal part of the long internal loop associates with a specific binding partner, termed Acl4. Absence of Acl4 confers a severe slow-growth phenotype and a deficiency in the production of 60S subunits. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that Acl4 can be considered as a dedicated chaperone of Rpl4. Notably, Acl4 localizes to both the cytoplasm and nucleus and it has the capacity to capture nascent Rpl4 in a co-translational manner. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dedicated chaperone Acl4 accompanies Rpl4 from the cytoplasm to its pre-60S

  4. A unique phosphorylation-dependent eIF4E assembly on 40S ribosomes co-ordinated by hepatitis C virus protein NS5A that activates internal ribosome entry site translation.

    PubMed

    Panda, Swarupa; Vedagiri, Dhiviya; Viveka, Thangaraj Soundara; Harshan, Krishnan Harinivas

    2014-09-01

    We previously reported that the HCV (hepatitis C virus) protein NS5A up-regulated mRNA cap binding eIF4F (eukaryotic initiation factor 4F) complex assembly through mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin)-4EBP1 (eIF4E-binding protein 1) pathway and that NS5A (non-structural protein 5A) physically interacted with translation apparatus. In the present study, we demonstrate that NS5A co-ordinates a unique assembly of the cap binding protein eIF4E and 40S ribosome to form a complex that we call ENR (eIF4E-NS5A-ribosome). Recruitment of NS5A and eIF4E to 40S ribosome was confirmed by polysome fractionation, subcellular fractionation and high-salt-wash immunoprecipitation. These observations were also confirmed in HCV-infected cells, validating its biological significance. eIF4E phosphorylation was critical for ENR assembly. 80S ribosome dissociation and RNase integrity assays revealed that, once associated, the ENR complex is stable and RNA interaction is dispensable. Both the N- and C-terminal regions of NS5A domain 1 were indispensable for this assembly and for the NS5A-induced HCV IRES (internal ribosome entry site) activation. The present study demonstrates that NS5A initially associates with phosphorylated eIF4E of eIF4F complex and subsequently recruits it to 40S ribosomes. This is the first time the interaction of viral protein with both eIF4E and ribosomes has been reported. We propose that this assembly would determine the outcome of HCV infection and pathogenesis through regulation of viral and host translation.

  5. Single methylation of 23S rRNA triggers late steps of 50S ribosomal subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Arai, Taiga; Ishiguro, Kensuke; Kimura, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Yuriko; Suzuki, Takeo; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2015-08-25

    Ribosome biogenesis requires multiple assembly factors. In Escherichia coli, deletion of RlmE, the methyltransferase responsible for the 2'-O-methyluridine modification at position 2552 (Um2552) in helix 92 of the 23S rRNA, results in slow growth and accumulation of the 45S particle. We demonstrate that the 45S particle that accumulates in ΔrlmE is a genuine precursor that can be assembled into the 50S subunit. Indeed, 50S formation from the 45S precursor could be promoted by RlmE-mediated Um2552 formation in vitro. Ribosomal protein L36 (encoded by rpmJ) was completely absent from the 45S precursor in ΔrlmE, and we observed a strong genetic interaction between rlmE and rpmJ. Structural probing of 23S rRNA and high-salt stripping of 45S components revealed that RlmE-mediated methylation promotes interdomain interactions via the association between helices 92 and 71, stabilized by the single 2'-O-methylation of Um2552, in concert with the incorporation of L36, triggering late steps of 50S subunit assembly. PMID:26261349

  6. Single methylation of 23S rRNA triggers late steps of 50S ribosomal subunit assembly

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Taiga; Ishiguro, Kensuke; Kimura, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Yuriko; Suzuki, Takeo; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis requires multiple assembly factors. In Escherichia coli, deletion of RlmE, the methyltransferase responsible for the 2′-O-methyluridine modification at position 2552 (Um2552) in helix 92 of the 23S rRNA, results in slow growth and accumulation of the 45S particle. We demonstrate that the 45S particle that accumulates in ΔrlmE is a genuine precursor that can be assembled into the 50S subunit. Indeed, 50S formation from the 45S precursor could be promoted by RlmE-mediated Um2552 formation in vitro. Ribosomal protein L36 (encoded by rpmJ) was completely absent from the 45S precursor in ΔrlmE, and we observed a strong genetic interaction between rlmE and rpmJ. Structural probing of 23S rRNA and high-salt stripping of 45S components revealed that RlmE-mediated methylation promotes interdomain interactions via the association between helices 92 and 71, stabilized by the single 2′-O-methylation of Um2552, in concert with the incorporation of L36, triggering late steps of 50S subunit assembly. PMID:26261349

  7. ppGpp negatively impacts ribosome assembly affecting growth and antimicrobial tolerance in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Rebecca M; Bellows, Lauren E; Wood, Alison; Gründling, Angelika

    2016-03-22

    The stringent response is a survival mechanism used by bacteria to deal with stress. It is coordinated by the nucleotides guanosine tetraphosphate and pentaphosphate [(p)ppGpp], which interact with target proteins to promote bacterial survival. Although this response has been well characterized in proteobacteria, very little is known about the effectors of this signaling system in Gram-positive species. Here, we report on the identification of seven target proteins for the stringent response nucleotides in the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus We demonstrate that the GTP synthesis enzymes HprT and Gmk bind with a high affinity, leading to an inhibition of GTP production. In addition, we identified five putative GTPases--RsgA, RbgA, Era, HflX, and ObgE--as (p)ppGpp target proteins. We show that RsgA, RbgA, Era, and HflX are functional GTPases and that their activity is promoted in the presence of ribosomes but strongly inhibited by the stringent response nucleotides. By characterizing the function of RsgA in vivo, we ascertain that this protein is involved in ribosome assembly, with an rsgA deletion strain, or a strain inactivated for GTPase activity, displaying decreased growth, a decrease in the amount of mature 70S ribosomes, and an increased level of tolerance to antimicrobials. We additionally demonstrate that the interaction of ppGpp with cellular GTPases is not unique to the staphylococci, as homologs from Bacillus subtilis and Enterococcus faecalis retain this ability. Taken together, this study reveals ribosome inactivation as a previously unidentified mechanism through which the stringent response functions in Gram-positive bacteria.

  8. ppGpp negatively impacts ribosome assembly affecting growth and antimicrobial tolerance in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Rebecca M.; Bellows, Lauren E.; Wood, Alison

    2016-01-01

    The stringent response is a survival mechanism used by bacteria to deal with stress. It is coordinated by the nucleotides guanosine tetraphosphate and pentaphosphate [(p)ppGpp], which interact with target proteins to promote bacterial survival. Although this response has been well characterized in proteobacteria, very little is known about the effectors of this signaling system in Gram-positive species. Here, we report on the identification of seven target proteins for the stringent response nucleotides in the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. We demonstrate that the GTP synthesis enzymes HprT and Gmk bind with a high affinity, leading to an inhibition of GTP production. In addition, we identified five putative GTPases—RsgA, RbgA, Era, HflX, and ObgE—as (p)ppGpp target proteins. We show that RsgA, RbgA, Era, and HflX are functional GTPases and that their activity is promoted in the presence of ribosomes but strongly inhibited by the stringent response nucleotides. By characterizing the function of RsgA in vivo, we ascertain that this protein is involved in ribosome assembly, with an rsgA deletion strain, or a strain inactivated for GTPase activity, displaying decreased growth, a decrease in the amount of mature 70S ribosomes, and an increased level of tolerance to antimicrobials. We additionally demonstrate that the interaction of ppGpp with cellular GTPases is not unique to the staphylococci, as homologs from Bacillus subtilis and Enterococcus faecalis retain this ability. Taken together, this study reveals ribosome inactivation as a previously unidentified mechanism through which the stringent response functions in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:26951678

  9. Structural basis for the methylation of A1408 in 16S rRNA by a panaminoglycoside resistance methyltransferase NpmA from a clinical isolate and analysis of the NpmA interactions with the 30S ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Nilofer; Obranić, Sonja; Koscinski, Lukasz; Seetharaman, J.; Babić, Fedora; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Maravić-Vlahoviček, Gordana; Sivaraman, J.

    2011-01-01

    NpmA, a methyltransferase that confers resistance to aminoglycosides was identified in an Escherichia coli clinical isolate. It belongs to the kanamycin–apramycin methyltransferase (Kam) family and specifically methylates the 16S rRNA at the N1 position of A1408. We determined the structures of apo-NpmA and its complexes with S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy) at 2.4, 2.7 and 1.68 Å, respectively. We generated a number of NpmA variants with alanine substitutions and studied their ability to bind the cofactor, to methylate A1408 in the 30S subunit, and to confer resistance to kanamycin in vivo. Residues D30, W107 and W197 were found to be essential. We have also analyzed the interactions between NpmA and the 30S subunit by footprinting experiments and computational docking. Helices 24, 42 and 44 were found to be the main NpmA-binding site. Both experimental and theoretical analyses suggest that NpmA flips out the target nucleotide A1408 to carry out the methylation. NpmA is plasmid-encoded and can be transferred between pathogenic bacteria; therefore it poses a threat to the successful use of aminoglycosides in clinical practice. The results presented here will assist in the development of specific NpmA inhibitors that could restore the potential of aminoglycoside antibiotics. PMID:21062819

  10. Symportin 1 chaperones 5S RNP assembly during ribosome biogenesis by occupying an essential rRNA-binding site.

    PubMed

    Calviño, Fabiola R; Kharde, Satyavati; Ori, Alessandro; Hendricks, Astrid; Wild, Klemens; Kressler, Dieter; Bange, Gert; Hurt, Ed; Beck, Martin; Sinning, Irmgard

    2015-04-07

    During 60S biogenesis, mature 5S RNP consisting of 5S RNA, RpL5 and RpL11, assembles into a pre-60S particle, where docking relies on RpL11 interacting with helix 84 (H84) of the 25S RNA. How 5S RNP is assembled for recruitment into the pre-60S is not known. Here we report the crystal structure of a ternary symportin Syo1-RpL5-N-RpL11 complex and provide biochemical and structural insights into 5S RNP assembly. Syo1 guards the 25S RNA-binding surface on RpL11 and competes with H84 for binding. Pull-down experiments show that H84 releases RpL11 from the ternary complex, but not in the presence of 5S RNA. Crosslinking mass spectrometry visualizes structural rearrangements on incorporation of 5S RNA into the Syo1-RpL5-RpL11 complex supporting the formation of a pre-5S RNP. Our data underline the dual role of Syo1 in ribosomal protein transport and as an assembly platform for 5S RNP.

  11. Symportin 1 chaperones 5S RNP assembly during ribosome biogenesis by occupying an essential rRNA-binding site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calviño, Fabiola R.; Kharde, Satyavati; Ori, Alessandro; Hendricks, Astrid; Wild, Klemens; Kressler, Dieter; Bange, Gert; Hurt, Ed; Beck, Martin; Sinning, Irmgard

    2015-04-01

    During 60S biogenesis, mature 5S RNP consisting of 5S RNA, RpL5 and RpL11, assembles into a pre-60S particle, where docking relies on RpL11 interacting with helix 84 (H84) of the 25S RNA. How 5S RNP is assembled for recruitment into the pre-60S is not known. Here we report the crystal structure of a ternary symportin Syo1-RpL5-N-RpL11 complex and provide biochemical and structural insights into 5S RNP assembly. Syo1 guards the 25S RNA-binding surface on RpL11 and competes with H84 for binding. Pull-down experiments show that H84 releases RpL11 from the ternary complex, but not in the presence of 5S RNA. Crosslinking mass spectrometry visualizes structural rearrangements on incorporation of 5S RNA into the Syo1-RpL5-RpL11 complex supporting the formation of a pre-5S RNP. Our data underline the dual role of Syo1 in ribosomal protein transport and as an assembly platform for 5S RNP.

  12. Paradigms of ribosome synthesis: Lessons learned from ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gamalinda, Michael; Woolford, John L

    2015-01-01

    The proteome in all cells is manufactured via the intricate process of translation by multimolecular factories called ribosomes. Nevertheless, these ribonucleoprotein particles, the largest of their kind, also have an elaborate assembly line of their own. Groundbreaking discoveries that bacterial ribosomal subunits can be self-assembled in vitro jumpstarted studies on how ribosomes are constructed. Until recently, ribosome assembly has been investigated almost entirely in vitro with bacterial small subunits under equilibrium conditions. In light of high-resolution ribosome structures and a more sophisticated toolkit, the past decade has been defined by a burst of kinetic studies in vitro and, importantly, also a shift to examining ribosome maturation in living cells, especially in eukaryotes. In this review, we summarize the principles governing ribosome assembly that emerged from studies focusing on ribosomal proteins and their interactions with rRNA. Understanding these paradigms has taken center stage, given the linkage between anomalous ribosome biogenesis and proliferative disorders. PMID:26779413

  13. Purification of 70S ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Maria C; Maguire, Bruce; Lake, James A

    2015-03-01

    Here we describe the further purification of prokaryotic ribosomal particles obtained after the centrifugation of a crude cell lysate through a sucrose cushion. In this final purification step, a fraction containing ribosomes, ribosomal subunits, and polysomes is centrifuged through a 7%-30% (w/w) linear sucrose gradient to isolate tight couple 70S ribosomes, as well as dissociated 30S and 50S subunits. The tight couples fraction, or translationally active ribosome fraction, is composed of intact vacant ribosomes that can be used in cell-free translation systems.

  14. Escherichia coli rimM and yjeQ null strains accumulate immature 30S subunits of similar structure and protein complement

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Vivian; Kent, Meredith; Jomaa, Ahmad; Ortega, Joaquin

    2013-01-01

    Assembly of the Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits proceeds through multiple parallel pathways. The protein factors RimM, YjeQ, RbfA, and Era work in conjunction to assist at the late stages of the maturation process of the small subunit. However, it is unclear how the functional interplay between these factors occurs in the context of multiple parallel pathways. To understand how these factors work together, we have characterized the immature 30S subunits that accumulate in ΔrimM cells and compared them with immature 30S subunits from a ΔyjeQ strain. The cryo-EM maps obtained from these particles showed that the densities representing helices 44 and 45 in the rRNA were partially missing, suggesting mobility of these motifs. These 30S subunits were also partially depleted in all tertiary ribosomal proteins, particularly those binding in the head domain. Using image classification, we identified four subpopulations of ΔrimM immature 30S subunits differing in the amount of missing density for helices 44 and 45, as well as the amount of density existing in these maps for the underrepresented proteins. The structural defects found in these immature subunits resembled those of the 30S subunits that accumulate in the ΔyjeQ strain. These findings are consistent with an “early convergency model” in which multiple parallel assembly pathways of the 30S subunit converge into a late assembly intermediate, as opposed to the mature state. Functionally related factors will bind to this intermediate to catalyze the last steps of maturation leading to the mature 30S subunit. PMID:23611982

  15. The DEAD-box Protein Rok1 Orchestrates 40S and 60S Ribosome Assembly by Promoting the Release of Rrp5 from Pre-40S Ribosomes to Allow for 60S Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Khoshnevis, Sohail; Askenasy, Isabel; Dattolo, Maria D.; Young-Erdos, Crystal L.; Stroupe, M. Elizabeth; Karbstein, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    DEAD-box proteins are ubiquitous regulators of RNA biology. While commonly dubbed “helicases,” their activities also include duplex annealing, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent RNA binding, and RNA-protein complex remodeling. Rok1, an essential DEAD-box protein, and its cofactor Rrp5 are required for ribosome assembly. Here, we use in vivo and in vitro biochemical analyses to demonstrate that ATP-bound Rok1, but not adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-bound Rok1, stabilizes Rrp5 binding to 40S ribosomes. Interconversion between these two forms by ATP hydrolysis is required for release of Rrp5 from pre-40S ribosomes in vivo, thereby allowing Rrp5 to carry out its role in 60S subunit assembly. Furthermore, our data also strongly suggest that the previously described accumulation of snR30 upon Rok1 inactivation arises because Rrp5 release is blocked and implicate a previously undescribed interaction between Rrp5 and the DEAD-box protein Has1 in mediating snR30 accumulation when Rrp5 release from pre-40S subunits is blocked. PMID:27280440

  16. The DEAD-box Protein Rok1 Orchestrates 40S and 60S Ribosome Assembly by Promoting the Release of Rrp5 from Pre-40S Ribosomes to Allow for 60S Maturation.

    PubMed

    Khoshnevis, Sohail; Askenasy, Isabel; Johnson, Matthew C; Dattolo, Maria D; Young-Erdos, Crystal L; Stroupe, M Elizabeth; Karbstein, Katrin

    2016-06-01

    DEAD-box proteins are ubiquitous regulators of RNA biology. While commonly dubbed "helicases," their activities also include duplex annealing, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent RNA binding, and RNA-protein complex remodeling. Rok1, an essential DEAD-box protein, and its cofactor Rrp5 are required for ribosome assembly. Here, we use in vivo and in vitro biochemical analyses to demonstrate that ATP-bound Rok1, but not adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-bound Rok1, stabilizes Rrp5 binding to 40S ribosomes. Interconversion between these two forms by ATP hydrolysis is required for release of Rrp5 from pre-40S ribosomes in vivo, thereby allowing Rrp5 to carry out its role in 60S subunit assembly. Furthermore, our data also strongly suggest that the previously described accumulation of snR30 upon Rok1 inactivation arises because Rrp5 release is blocked and implicate a previously undescribed interaction between Rrp5 and the DEAD-box protein Has1 in mediating snR30 accumulation when Rrp5 release from pre-40S subunits is blocked. PMID:27280440

  17. Ribosomal Initiation Complex Assembly within the Wild-Strain of Coxsackievirus B3 and Live-Attenuated Sabin3-like IRESes during the Initiation of Translation

    PubMed Central

    Souii, Amira; M’hadheb-Gharbi, Manel Ben; Sargueil, Bruno; Brossard, Audrey; Chamond, Nathalie; Aouni, Mahjoub; Gharbi, Jawhar

    2013-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is an enterovirus of the family of Picornaviridae. The Group B coxsackieviruses include six serotypes (B1 to B6) that cause a variety of human diseases, including myocarditis, meningitis, and diabetes. Among the group B, the B3 strain is mostly studied for its cardiovirulence and its ability to cause acute and persistent infections. Translation initiation of CVB3 RNA has been shown to be mediated by a highly ordered structure of the 5′-untranslated region (5′UTR), which harbors an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Translation initiation is a complex process in which initiator tRNA, 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits are assembled by eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) into an 80S ribosome at the initiation codon of the mRNA. We have previously addressed the question of whether the attenuating mutations of domain V of the poliovirus IRES were specific for a given genomic context or whether they could be transposed and extrapolated to a genomic related virus, i.e., CVB3 wild-type strain. In this context, we have described that Sabin3-like mutation (U473→C) introduced in CVB3 genome led to a defective mutant with a serious reduction in translation efficiency. In this study, we analyzed the efficiency of formation of ribosomal initiation complexes 48S and 80S through 10%–30% and 10%–50% sucrose gradients using rabbit reticulocyte lysates (RRLs) and stage-specific translation inhibitors: 5′-Guanylyl-imidodiphosphate (GMP-PNP) and Cycloheximide (CHX), respectively. We demonstrated that the interaction of 48S and 80S ribosomal complexes within the mutant CVB3 RNA was abolished compared with the wild-type RNA by ribosome assembly analysis. Taken together, it is possible that the mutant RNA was unable to interact with some trans-acting factors critical for enhanced IRES function. PMID:23439549

  18. SrmB, a DEAD-box helicase involved in Escherichia coli ribosome assembly, is specifically targeted to 23S rRNA in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Trubetskoy, Dmitrii; Proux, Florence; Allemand, Frédéric; Dreyfus, Marc; Iost, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    DEAD-box proteins play specific roles in remodeling RNA or ribonucleoprotein complexes. Yet, in vitro, they generally behave as nonspecific RNA-dependent ATPases, raising the question of what determines their specificity in vivo. SrmB, one of the five Escherichia coli DEAD-box proteins, participates in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit. Moreover, when overexpressed, it compensates for a mutation in L24, the ribosomal protein (r-protein) thought to initiate assembly. Here, using the tandem affinity purification (TAP) procedure, we show that SrmB forms a complex with r-proteins L4, L24 and a region near the 5′-end of 23S rRNA that binds these proteins. In vitro reconstitution experiments show that the stability of this complex reflects cooperative interactions of SrmB with L4, L24 and rRNA. These observations are consistent with an early role of SrmB in assembly and explain the genetic link between SrmB and L24. Besides its catalytic core, SrmB possesses a nonconserved C-terminal extension that, we show, is not essential for SrmB function and specificity. In this regard, SrmB differs from DbpA, another DEAD-box protein involved in ribosome assembly. PMID:19734346

  19. SrmB, a DEAD-box helicase involved in Escherichia coli ribosome assembly, is specifically targeted to 23S rRNA in vivo.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, Dmitrii; Proux, Florence; Allemand, Frédéric; Dreyfus, Marc; Iost, Isabelle

    2009-10-01

    DEAD-box proteins play specific roles in remodeling RNA or ribonucleoprotein complexes. Yet, in vitro, they generally behave as nonspecific RNA-dependent ATPases, raising the question of what determines their specificity in vivo. SrmB, one of the five Escherichia coli DEAD-box proteins, participates in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit. Moreover, when overexpressed, it compensates for a mutation in L24, the ribosomal protein (r-protein) thought to initiate assembly. Here, using the tandem affinity purification (TAP) procedure, we show that SrmB forms a complex with r-proteins L4, L24 and a region near the 5'-end of 23S rRNA that binds these proteins. In vitro reconstitution experiments show that the stability of this complex reflects cooperative interactions of SrmB with L4, L24 and rRNA. These observations are consistent with an early role of SrmB in assembly and explain the genetic link between SrmB and L24. Besides its catalytic core, SrmB possesses a nonconserved C-terminal extension that, we show, is not essential for SrmB function and specificity. In this regard, SrmB differs from DbpA, another DEAD-box protein involved in ribosome assembly.

  20. 16Stimator: statistical estimation of ribosomal gene copy numbers from draft genome assemblies.

    PubMed

    Perisin, Matthew; Vetter, Madlen; Gilbert, Jack A; Bergelson, Joy

    2016-04-01

    The 16S rRNA gene (16S) is an accepted marker of bacterial taxonomic diversity, even though differences in copy number obscure the relationship between amplicon and organismal abundances. Ancestral state reconstruction methods can predict 16S copy numbers through comparisons with closely related reference genomes; however, the database of closed genomes is limited. Here, we extend the reference database of 16S copy numbers to de novo assembled draft genomes by developing 16Stimator, a method to estimate 16S copy numbers when these repetitive regions collapse during assembly. Using a read depth approach, we estimate 16S copy numbers for 12 endophytic isolates from Arabidopsis thaliana and confirm estimates by qPCR. We further apply this approach to draft genomes deposited in NCBI and demonstrate accurate copy number estimation regardless of sequencing platform, with an overall median deviation of 14%. The expanded database of isolates with 16S copy number estimates increases the power of phylogenetic correction methods for determining organismal abundances from 16S amplicon surveys. PMID:26359911

  1. The small subunit of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome. Identification of the full complement of ribosomal proteins present.

    PubMed

    Cavdar Koc, E; Burkhart, W; Blackburn, K; Moseley, A; Spremulli, L L

    2001-06-01

    Identification of all the protein components of the small subunit (28 S) of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome has been achieved by carrying out proteolytic digestions of whole 28 S subunits followed by analysis of the resultant peptides by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Peptide sequence information was used to search the human EST data bases and complete coding sequences of the proteins were assembled. The human mitochondrial ribosome has 29 distinct proteins in the small subunit. Fourteen of this group of proteins are homologs of the Escherichia coli 30 S ribosomal proteins S2, S5, S6, S7, S9, S10, S11, S12, S14, S15, S16, S17, S18, and S21. All of these proteins have homologs in Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial ribosomes. Surprisingly, three variants of ribosomal protein S18 are found in the mammalian and D. melanogaster mitochondrial ribosomes while C. elegans has two S18 homologs. The S18 homologs tend to be more closely related to chloroplast S18s than to prokaryotic S18s. No mitochondrial homologs to prokaryotic ribosomal proteins S1, S3, S4, S8, S13, S19, and S20 could be found in the peptides obtained from the whole 28 S subunit digests or by analysis of the available data bases. The remaining 15 proteins present in mammalian mitochondrial 28 S subunits (MRP-S22 through MRP-S36) are specific to mitochondrial ribosomes. Proteins in this group have no apparent homologs in bacterial, chloroplast, archaebacterial, or cytosolic ribosomes. All but two of these proteins have a clear homolog in D. melanogaster while all but three can be found in the genome of C. elegans. Five of the mitochondrial specific ribosomal proteins have homologs in S. cerevisiae.

  2. Constructing ribosomes along the Danube

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Jonathan R.

    2010-01-01

    The EMBO Conference on Ribosome Synthesis held last summer explored the latest breakthroughs in ribosome assembly and how it affects disease. Both of these topics have recently seen important advances that enlighten how almost 200 proteins cooperate to produce a ribosome and how the cell responds to a malfunction in this process. PMID:20010797

  3. Ribosomal protein-dependent orientation of the 16 S rRNA environment of S15.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, Indu; Culver, Gloria M

    2004-01-30

    Ribosomal protein S15 binds specifically to the central domain of 16 S ribosomal RNA (16 S rRNA) and directs the assembly of four additional proteins to this domain. The central domain of 16 S rRNA along with these five proteins form the platform of the 30 S subunit. Previously, directed hydroxyl radical probing from Fe(II)-S15 in small ribonucleoprotein complexes was used to study assembly of the central domain of 16 S rRNA. Here, this same approach was used to understand the 16 S rRNA environment of Fe(II)-S15 in 30 S subunits and to determine the ribosomal proteins that are involved in forming the mature S15-16 S rRNA environment. We have identified additional sites of Fe(II)-S15-directed cleavage in 30S subunits compared to the binary complex of Fe(II)-S15/16 S rRNA. Along with novel targets in the central domain, sites within the 5' and 3' minor domains are also cleaved. This suggests that during the course of 30S subunit assembly these elements are positioned in the vicinity of S15. Besides the previously determined role for S8, roles for S5, S6+S18, and S16 in altering the 16 S rRNA environment of S15 were established. These studies reveal that ribosomal proteins can alter the assembly of regions of the 30 S subunit from a considerable distance and influence the overall conformation of this ribonucleoprotein particle.

  4. Rrp12 and the Exportin Crm1 participate in late assembly events in the nucleolus during 40S ribosomal subunit biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Moriggi, Giulia; Nieto, Blanca; Dosil, Mercedes

    2014-12-01

    During the biogenesis of small ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes, the pre-40S particles formed in the nucleolus are rapidly transported to the cytoplasm. The mechanisms underlying the nuclear export of these particles and its coordination with other biogenesis steps are mostly unknown. Here we show that yeast Rrp12 is required for the exit of pre-40S particles to the cytoplasm and for proper maturation dynamics of upstream 90S pre-ribosomes. Due to this, in vivo elimination of Rrp12 leads to an accumulation of nucleoplasmic 90S to pre-40S transitional particles, abnormal 35S pre-rRNA processing, delayed elimination of processing byproducts, and no export of intermediate pre-40S complexes. The exportin Crm1 is also required for the same pre-ribosome maturation events that involve Rrp12. Thus, in addition to their implication in nuclear export, Rrp12 and Crm1 participate in earlier biosynthetic steps that take place in the nucleolus. Our results indicate that, in the 40S subunit synthesis pathway, the completion of early pre-40S particle assembly, the initiation of byproduct degradation and the priming for nuclear export occur in an integrated manner in late 90S pre-ribosomes.

  5. Human acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins P0, P1, and P2: Analysis of cDNA clones, in vitro synthesis, and assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, B.E.; Steitz, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    cDNA clones encoding three antigenically related human ribosomal phosophoproteins (P-proteins) P0, P1, and P2 were isolated and sequenced. P1 and P2 are analogous to Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L7/L12, and P0 is likely to be an analog of L10. The three proteins have a nearly identical carboxy-terminal 17-amino-acid sequence (KEESEESD(D/E)DMGFGLFD-COOH) that is the basis of their immunological cross-reactivity. The identifies of the P1 and P2 cDNAs were confirmed by the strong similarities of their encoded amino acid sequences to published primary structures of the homologous rat, brine shrimp, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins. The P0 cDNA was initially identified by translation of hybrid-selected mRNA and immunoprecipitation of the products. To demonstrate that the coding sequences are full length, the P0, P1, and P2 cDNAs were transcribed in vitro by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase and the resulting mRNAs were translated in vitro. The synthetic P0, P1, and P2 proteins were serologically and electrophoretically identical to P-proteins extracted from HeLa cells. These synthetic P-proteins were incorporated into 60S but not 40S ribosomes and also assembled into a complex similar to that described for E. coli L7/L12 and L10.

  6. Identification of Novel RNA-Protein Contact in Complex of Ribosomal Protein S7 and 3'-Terminal Fragment of 16S rRNA in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Golovin, A V; Khayrullina, G A; Kraal, B; Kopylov, Capital A Cyrillic М

    2012-10-01

    For prokaryotes in vitro, 16S rRNA and 20 ribosomal proteins are capable of hierarchical self- assembly yielding a 30S ribosomal subunit. The self-assembly is initiated by interactions between 16S rRNA and three key ribosomal proteins: S4, S8, and S7. These proteins also have a regulatory function in the translation of their polycistronic operons recognizing a specific region of mRNA. Therefore, studying the RNA-protein interactions within binary complexes is obligatory for understanding ribosome biogenesis. The non-conventional RNA-protein contact within the binary complex of recombinant ribosomal protein S7 and its 16S rRNA binding site (236 nucleotides) was identified. UV-induced RNA-protein cross-links revealed that S7 cross-links to nucleotide U1321 of 16S rRNA. The careful consideration of the published RNA- protein cross-links for protein S7 within the 30S subunit and their correlation with the X-ray data for the 30S subunit have been performed. The RNA - protein cross-link within the binary complex identified in this study is not the same as the previously found cross-links for a subunit both in a solution, and in acrystal. The structure of the binary RNA-protein complex formed at the initial steps of self-assembly of the small subunit appears to be rearranged during the formation of the final structure of the subunit.

  7. Development, Antibiotic Production, and Ribosome Assembly in Streptomyces venezuelae Are Impacted by RNase J and RNase III Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephanie E.; Leong, Vivian; Ortega, Joaquin

    2014-01-01

    RNA metabolism is a critical but frequently overlooked control element affecting virtually every cellular process in bacteria. RNA processing and degradation is mediated by a suite of ribonucleases having distinct cleavage and substrate specificity. Here, we probe the role of two ribonucleases (RNase III and RNase J) in the emerging model system Streptomyces venezuelae. We show that each enzyme makes a unique contribution to the growth and development of S. venezuelae and further affects the secondary metabolism and antibiotic production of this bacterium. We demonstrate a connection between the action of these ribonucleases and translation, with both enzymes being required for the formation of functional ribosomes. RNase III mutants in particular fail to properly process 23S rRNA, form fewer 70S ribosomes, and show reduced translational processivity. The loss of either RNase III or RNase J additionally led to the appearance of a new ribosomal species (the 100S ribosome dimer) during exponential growth and dramatically sensitized these mutants to a range of antibiotics. PMID:25266378

  8. Discovery of a small molecule that inhibits bacterial ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Jonathan M; Davis, Joseph H; Mangat, Chand S; Williamson, James R; Brown, Eric D

    2014-01-01

    While small molecule inhibitors of the bacterial ribosome have been instrumental in understanding protein translation, no such probes exist to study ribosome biogenesis. We screened a diverse chemical collection that included previously approved drugs for compounds that induced cold sensitive growth inhibition in the model bacterium Escherichia coli. Among the most cold sensitive was lamotrigine, an anticonvulsant drug. Lamotrigine treatment resulted in the rapid accumulation of immature 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits at 15°C. Importantly, this was not the result of translation inhibition, as lamotrigine was incapable of perturbing protein synthesis in vivo or in vitro. Spontaneous suppressor mutations blocking lamotrigine activity mapped solely to the poorly characterized domain II of translation initiation factor IF2 and prevented the binding of lamotrigine to IF2 in vitro. This work establishes lamotrigine as a widely available chemical probe of bacterial ribosome biogenesis and suggests a role for E. coli IF2 in ribosome assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03574.001 PMID:25233066

  9. Dissociation of ribosomes into large and small subunits.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Maria C; Maguire, Bruce; Lake, James A

    2015-04-01

    Structural and functional studies of ribosomal subunits require the dissociation of intact ribosomes into individual small and large ribosomal subunits. The dissociation of the prokaryotic 70S ribosomes into the 50S and 30S subunits is achieved by dialysis against a buffer containing a lower Mg(2+) concentration. Eukaryotic 80S ribosomes are dissociated into 60S and 40S subunits by incubation in a buffer containing puromycin and higher KCl and Mg(2+) concentrations.

  10. A 'garbage can' for ribosomes: how eukaryotes degrade their ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Lafontaine, Denis L J

    2010-05-01

    Ribosome synthesis is a major metabolic activity that involves hundreds of individual reactions, each of which is error-prone. Ribosomal insults occur in cis (alteration in rRNA sequences) and in trans (failure to bind to, or loss of, an assembly factor or ribosomal protein). In addition, specific growth conditions, such as starvation, require that excess ribosomes are turned over efficiently. Recent work indicates that cells evolved multiple strategies to recognize specifically, and target for clearance, ribosomes that are structurally and/or functionally deficient, as well as in excess. This surveillance is active at every step of the ribosome synthesis pathway and on mature ribosomes, involves nearly entirely different mechanisms for the small and large subunits, and requires specialized subcellular organelles. PMID:20097077

  11. Molecular mechanics of 30S subunit head rotation.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Srividya; Donohue, John Paul; Noller, Harry F

    2014-09-16

    During ribosomal translocation, a process central to the elongation phase of protein synthesis, movement of mRNA and tRNAs requires large-scale rotation of the head domain of the small (30S) subunit of the ribosome. It has generally been accepted that the head rotates by pivoting around the neck helix (h28) of 16S rRNA, its sole covalent connection to the body domain. Surprisingly, we observe that the calculated axis of rotation does not coincide with the neck. Instead, comparative structure analysis across 55 ribosome structures shows that 30S head movement results from flexing at two hinge points lying within conserved elements of 16S rRNA. Hinge 1, although located within the neck, moves by straightening of the kinked helix h28 at the point of contact with the mRNA. Hinge 2 lies within a three-way helix junction that extends to the body through a second, noncovalent connection; its movement results from flexing between helices h34 and h35 in a plane orthogonal to the movement of hinge 1. Concerted movement at these two hinges accounts for the observed magnitudes of head rotation. Our findings also explain the mode of action of spectinomycin, an antibiotic that blocks translocation by binding to hinge 2.

  12. A fail-safe system for the ribosome under zinc-limiting conditions in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Natori, Yousuke; Nanamiya, Hideaki; Akanuma, Genki; Kosono, Saori; Kudo, Toshiaki; Ochi, Kozo; Kawamura, Fujio

    2007-01-01

    As zinc is an essential trace metal ion for all living cells, cells elaborate a variety of strategies to cope with zinc starvation. In Bacillus subtilis, genes encoding ribosomal proteins L31 and S14 are duplicated into two types: one type contains a zinc-binding motif (RpmE or RpsN), whereas the other does not (YtiA or YhzA). We have previously shown that displacement of RpmE (L31) by YtiA from already assembled ribosomes is controlled by zinc, and this replacement could contribute to zinc mobilization under zinc-limiting conditions. We propose here that the switch between the two types of S14 has a different significance. rpsN is indispensable for growth and depletion of RpsN results in defective 30S subunits. YhzA can functionally replace RpsN to allow continued ribosome assembly under zinc-limiting conditions. Unlike YtiA, YhzA appeared in the ribosome at a slower rate consistent with incorporation into newly synthesized, rather than pre-existing ribosomes. These results raise the possibility that YhzA is involved in a fail-safe system for the de novo synthesis of ribosomes under zinc-limiting conditions.

  13. Effect of an uncE ribosome-binding site mutation on the synthesis and assembly of the Escherichia coli proton-translocating ATPase.

    PubMed

    Solomon, K A; Brusilow, W S

    1988-04-15

    Plasmid pRPG54, which carries the genes for the eight subunits of the proton-translocating ATPase of Escherichia coli, has been found to carry a single base change of a G to an A in the ribosome-binding site for uncE, the gene which codes for the N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-binding subunit c of the Fo. This noncoding region mutation both lowers expression of uncE by a factor of 2-3 and affects the function of the ATPase, specifically of the Fo sector. The presence of the mutation results in a decrease in the proton permeability of the Fo or of the entire F1Fo-ATPase complex when either is synthesized from genes on a multicopy plasmid. Expression of uncE from an F1Fo plasmid carrying the wild type ribosome binding site results in increased membrane proton permeability and decreased ability of the resultant ATPase to couple a transmembrane proton gradient to ATP synthesis both in vitro and in vivo. Also, although an Fo plasmid carrying the correct ribosome-binding site causes harmful, F1-dependent proton permeability in unc+ cells (Brusilow, W. S. S. (1987) J. Bacteriol. 169, 4984-4990), an identical plasmid carrying the mutation does not, even though it still codes for a functional reconstitutable Fo. The results show a relationship between the relative level of expression of uncE from a multicopy plasmid and the assembly pathway, proton permeability, and energy-coupling characteristics of the ATPase. PMID:2895768

  14. Dynamic reorganization of the functionally active ribosome explored by normal mode analysis and cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tama, Florence; Valle, Mikel; Frank, Joachim; Brooks, Charles L

    2003-08-01

    Combining structural data for the ribosome from x-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy with dynamic models based on elastic network normal mode analysis, an atomically detailed picture of functionally important structural rearrangements that occur during translocation is elucidated. The dynamic model provides a near-atomic description of the ratchet-like rearrangement of the 70S ribosome seen in cryo-electron microscopy, and permits the identification of bridging interactions that either facilitate the conformational switching or maintain structural integrity of the 50S/30S interface. Motions of the tRNAs residing in the A and P sites also suggest the early stages of tRNA translocation as a result of this ratchet-like movement. Displacement of the L1 stalk, alternately closing and opening the intersubunit space near the E site, is observed in the dynamic model, in line with growing experimental evidence for the role of this structural component in facilitating the exiting of tRNA. Finally, a hinge-like transition in the 30S ribosomal subunit, similar to that observed in crystal structures of this complex, is also manifest as a dynamic mode of the ribosome. The coincidence of these dynamic transitions with the individual normal modes of the ribosome and the good correspondence between these motions and those observed in experiment suggest an underlying principle of nature to exploit the shape of molecular assemblies such as the ribosome to provide robustness to functionally important motions. PMID:12878726

  15. The Synthesis of Ribosomes in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Britten, R. J.; McCarthy, B. J.; Roberts, R. B.

    1962-01-01

    The incorporation of C14 leucine into the protein moiety of ribosomes has been studied as a sequel to the studies of ribosomal RNA synthesis. In contrast to the latter studies, labeled leucine is incorporated directly into 50S and 30S ribosomes without measurable delay by precursor stages. There is, however, evidence of some transfer of radioactivity from the 43S group of particles to the 50S. The inhibition of protein synthesis by chloramphenicol results in the accumulation of material similar to the eosome—the primary precursor in ribosome synthesis. There is also evidence for the synthesis of some neosome. The results of the studies of ribosomal RNA and protein synthesis are combined into a model of ribosome synthesis. Finally, consideration is made of the significance of these studies of ribosome synthesis for general problems of protein synthesis and information transfer. PMID:13873182

  16. Modulation of decoding fidelity by ribosomal proteins S4 and S5.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Deepali; Kamath, Divya; Gregory, Steven T; O'Connor, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Ribosomal proteins S4 and S5 participate in the decoding and assembly processes on the ribosome and the interaction with specific antibiotic inhibitors of translation. Many of the characterized mutations affecting these proteins decrease the accuracy of translation, leading to a ribosomal-ambiguity phenotype. Structural analyses of ribosomal complexes indicate that the tRNA selection pathway involves a transition between the closed and open conformations of the 30S ribosomal subunit and requires disruption of the interface between the S4 and S5 proteins. In agreement with this observation, several of the mutations that promote miscoding alter residues located at the S4-S5 interface. Here, the Escherichia coli rpsD and rpsE genes encoding the S4 and S5 proteins were targeted for mutagenesis and screened for accuracy-altering mutations. While a majority of the 38 mutant proteins recovered decrease the accuracy of translation, error-restrictive mutations were also recovered; only a minority of the mutant proteins affected rRNA processing, ribosome assembly, or interactions with antibiotics. Several of the mutations affect residues at the S4-S5 interface. These include five nonsense mutations that generate C-terminal truncations of S4. These truncations are predicted to destabilize the S4-S5 interface and, consistent with the domain closure model, all have ribosomal-ambiguity phenotypes. A substantial number of the mutations alter distant locations and conceivably affect tRNA selection through indirect effects on the S4-S5 interface or by altering interactions with adjacent ribosomal proteins and 16S rRNA.

  17. Ribosome recycling defects modify the balance between the synthesis and assembly of specific subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes in yeast mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Ostojić, Jelena; Panozzo, Cristina; Bourand-Plantefol, Alexa; Herbert, Christopher J.; Dujardin, Geneviève; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria have their own translation machinery that produces key subunits of the OXPHOS complexes. This machinery relies on the coordinated action of nuclear-encoded factors of bacterial origin that are well conserved between humans and yeast. In humans, mutations in these factors can cause diseases; in yeast, mutations abolishing mitochondrial translation destabilize the mitochondrial DNA. We show that when the mitochondrial genome contains no introns, the loss of the yeast factors Mif3 and Rrf1 involved in ribosome recycling neither blocks translation nor destabilizes mitochondrial DNA. Rather, the absence of these factors increases the synthesis of the mitochondrially-encoded subunits Cox1, Cytb and Atp9, while strongly impairing the assembly of OXPHOS complexes IV and V. We further show that in the absence of Rrf1, the COX1 specific translation activator Mss51 accumulates in low molecular weight forms, thought to be the source of the translationally-active form, explaining the increased synthesis of Cox1. We propose that Rrf1 takes part in the coordination between translation and OXPHOS assembly in yeast mitochondria. These interactions between general and specific translation factors might reveal an evolutionary adaptation of the bacterial translation machinery to the set of integral membrane proteins that are translated within mitochondria. PMID:27257059

  18. Ribosome recycling defects modify the balance between the synthesis and assembly of specific subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Jelena; Panozzo, Cristina; Bourand-Plantefol, Alexa; Herbert, Christopher J; Dujardin, Geneviève; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria have their own translation machinery that produces key subunits of the OXPHOS complexes. This machinery relies on the coordinated action of nuclear-encoded factors of bacterial origin that are well conserved between humans and yeast. In humans, mutations in these factors can cause diseases; in yeast, mutations abolishing mitochondrial translation destabilize the mitochondrial DNA. We show that when the mitochondrial genome contains no introns, the loss of the yeast factors Mif3 and Rrf1 involved in ribosome recycling neither blocks translation nor destabilizes mitochondrial DNA. Rather, the absence of these factors increases the synthesis of the mitochondrially-encoded subunits Cox1, Cytb and Atp9, while strongly impairing the assembly of OXPHOS complexes IV and V. We further show that in the absence of Rrf1, the COX1 specific translation activator Mss51 accumulates in low molecular weight forms, thought to be the source of the translationally-active form, explaining the increased synthesis of Cox1. We propose that Rrf1 takes part in the coordination between translation and OXPHOS assembly in yeast mitochondria. These interactions between general and specific translation factors might reveal an evolutionary adaptation of the bacterial translation machinery to the set of integral membrane proteins that are translated within mitochondria. PMID:27257059

  19. Ribosome biogenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Woolford, John L; Baserga, Susan J

    2013-11-01

    Ribosomes are highly conserved ribonucleoprotein nanomachines that translate information in the genome to create the proteome in all cells. In yeast these complex particles contain four RNAs (>5400 nucleotides) and 79 different proteins. During the past 25 years, studies in yeast have led the way to understanding how these molecules are assembled into ribosomes in vivo. Assembly begins with transcription of ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus, where the RNA then undergoes complex pathways of folding, coupled with nucleotide modification, removal of spacer sequences, and binding to ribosomal proteins. More than 200 assembly factors and 76 small nucleolar RNAs transiently associate with assembling ribosomes, to enable their accurate and efficient construction. Following export of preribosomes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, they undergo final stages of maturation before entering the pool of functioning ribosomes. Elaborate mechanisms exist to monitor the formation of correct structural and functional neighborhoods within ribosomes and to destroy preribosomes that fail to assemble properly. Studies of yeast ribosome biogenesis provide useful models for ribosomopathies, diseases in humans that result from failure to properly assemble ribosomes. PMID:24190922

  20. mRNA bound to the 30S subunit is a HigB toxin substrate.

    PubMed

    Schureck, Marc A; Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Miles, Stacey J; Marquez, Jhomar; Dunham, Christine M

    2016-08-01

    Activation of bacterial toxins during stress results in cleavage of mRNAs in the context of the ribosome. These toxins are thought to function as global translational inhibitors yet recent studies suggest each may have distinct mRNA specificities that result in selective translation for bacterial survival. Here we demonstrate that mRNA in the context of a bacterial 30S subunit is sufficient for ribosome-dependent toxin HigB endonucleolytic activity, suggesting that HigB interferes with the initiation step of translation. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of HigB bound to the 30S, revealing that two solvent-exposed clusters of HigB basic residues directly interact with 30S 16S rRNA helices 18, 30, and 31. We further show that these HigB residues are essential for ribosome recognition and function. Comparison with other ribosome-dependent toxins RelE and YoeB reveals that each interacts with similar features of the 30S aminoacyl (A) site yet does so through presentation of diverse structural motifs.

  1. The structure of Erb1-Ytm1 complex reveals the functional importance of a high-affinity binding between two β-propellers during the assembly of large ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Wegrecki, Marcin; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; de la Cruz, Jesús; Bravo, Jeronimo

    2015-12-15

    Ribosome biogenesis is one of the most essential pathways in eukaryotes although it is still not fully characterized. Given the importance of this process in proliferating cells, it is obvious that understanding the macromolecular details of the interactions that take place between the assembly factors, ribosomal proteins and nascent pre-rRNAs is essentially required for the development of new non-genotoxic treatments for cancer. Herein, we have studied the association between the WD40-repeat domains of Erb1 and Ytm1 proteins. These are essential factors for the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes that form a heterotrimeric complex together with the also essential Nop7 protein. We provide the crystal structure of a dimer formed by the C-terminal part of Erb1 and Ytm1 from Chaetomium thermophilum at 2.1 Å resolution. Using a multidisciplinary approach we show that the β-propeller domains of these proteins interact in a novel manner that leads to a high-affinity binding. We prove that a point mutation within the interface of the complex impairs the interaction between the two proteins and negatively affects growth and ribosome production in yeast. Our study suggests insights into the association of the Erb1-Ytm1 dimer with pre-ribosomal particles. PMID:26476442

  2. The structure of Erb1-Ytm1 complex reveals the functional importance of a high-affinity binding between two β-propellers during the assembly of large ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Wegrecki, Marcin; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; de la Cruz, Jesús; Bravo, Jeronimo

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is one of the most essential pathways in eukaryotes although it is still not fully characterized. Given the importance of this process in proliferating cells, it is obvious that understanding the macromolecular details of the interactions that take place between the assembly factors, ribosomal proteins and nascent pre-rRNAs is essentially required for the development of new non-genotoxic treatments for cancer. Herein, we have studied the association between the WD40-repeat domains of Erb1 and Ytm1 proteins. These are essential factors for the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes that form a heterotrimeric complex together with the also essential Nop7 protein. We provide the crystal structure of a dimer formed by the C-terminal part of Erb1 and Ytm1 from Chaetomium thermophilum at 2.1 Å resolution. Using a multidisciplinary approach we show that the β-propeller domains of these proteins interact in a novel manner that leads to a high-affinity binding. We prove that a point mutation within the interface of the complex impairs the interaction between the two proteins and negatively affects growth and ribosome production in yeast. Our study suggests insights into the association of the Erb1-Ytm1 dimer with pre-ribosomal particles. PMID:26476442

  3. A functional interaction between ribosomal proteins S7 and S11 within the bacterial ribosome.

    PubMed

    Robert, Francis; Brakier-Gingras, Léa

    2003-11-01

    In this study, we used site-directed mutagenesis to disrupt an interaction that had been detected between ribosomal proteins S7 and S11 in the crystal structure of the bacterial 30 S subunit. This interaction, which is located in the E site, connects the head of the 30 S subunit to the platform and is involved in the formation of the exit channel through which passes the 30 S-bound messenger RNA. Neither mutations in S7 nor mutations in S11 prevented the incorporation of the proteins into the 30 S subunits but they perturbed the function of the ribosome. In vivo assays showed that ribosomes with either mutated S7 or S11 were altered in the control of translational fidelity, having an increased capacity for frameshifting, readthrough of a nonsense codon and codon misreading. Toeprinting and filter-binding assays showed that 30 S subunits with either mutated S7 or S11 have an enhanced capacity to bind mRNA. The effects of the S7 and S11 mutations can be related to an increased flexibility of the head of the 30 S, to an opening of the mRNA exit channel and to a perturbation of the proposed allosteric coupling between the A and E sites. Altogether, our results demonstrate that S7 and S11 interact in a functional manner and support the notion that protein-protein interactions contribute to the dynamics of the ribosome.

  4. [About the ribosomal biogenesis in human].

    PubMed

    Tafforeau, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes are cellular ribonucleoprotein particles required for a fundamental mechanism, translation of the genetic information into proteins. Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex pathway involving many maturation steps: ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, rRNA processing, pre-rRNA modifications, its assembly with ribosomal proteins in the nuceolus, export of the subunit precursors to the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm. Ribosome biogenesis has mainly being investigated in yeast during these last 25 years. However, recent works have shown that, despite many similarities between yeast and human ribosome structure and biogenesis, human pre-rRNA processing is far more complex than in yeast. In order to better understand diseases related to a malfunction in ribosome synthesis, the ribosomopathies, research should be conducted directly in human cells and animal models. PMID:26152166

  5. The nucleolus and transcription of ribosomal genes.

    PubMed

    Raska, Ivan; Koberna, Karel; Malínský, Jan; Fidlerová, Helena; Masata, Martin

    2004-10-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a highly dynamic, steady-state nucleolar process that involves synthesis and maturation of rRNA, its transient interactions with non-ribosomal proteins and RNPs and assembly with ribosomal proteins. In the few years of the 21st century, an exciting progress in the molecular understanding of rRNA and ribosome biogenesis has taken place. In this review, we discuss the recent results on the regulation of rRNA synthesis in relation to the functional organization of the nucleolus, and put an emphasis on the situation encountered in mammalian somatic cells.

  6. A role for the 30S subunit E site in maintenance of the translational reading frame

    PubMed Central

    Devaraj, Aishwarya; Shoji, Shinichiro; Holbrook, Eric D.; Fredrick, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    The exit (E) site has been implicated in several ribosomal activities, including translocation, decoding, and maintenance of the translational reading frame. Here, we target the 30S subunit E site by introducing a deletion in rpsG that truncates the β-hairpin of ribosomal protein S7. This mutation (S7ΔR77–Y84) increases both −1 and +1 frameshifting but does not increase miscoding, providing evidence that the 30S E site plays a specific role in frame maintenance. Mutation S7ΔR77–Y84 also stimulates +1 programmed frameshifting during prfB′-lacZ translation in many synthetic contexts. However, no effect is seen when the E codon of the frameshift site corresponds to those found in nature, suggesting that E-tRNA release does not normally limit the rate of prfB frameshifting. Ribosomes containing S7ΔR77–Y84 exhibit an elevated rate of spontaneous reverse translocation and an increased K 1/2 for E-tRNA. These effects are of similar magnitude, suggesting that both result from destabilization of E-tRNA. Finally, this mutation of the 30S E site does not inhibit EF-G-dependent translocation, consistent with a primary role for the 50S E site in the mechanism. PMID:19095617

  7. Analysis of r-protein and RNA conformation of 30S subunit intermediates in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Napper, Nathan; Culver, Gloria M.

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is a large macromolecular complex that must be assembled efficiently and accurately for the viability of all organisms. In bacteria, this process must be robust and tunable to support life in diverse conditions from the ice of arctic glaciers to thermal hot springs. Assembly of the Small ribosomal SUbunit (SSU) of Escherichia coli has been extensively studied and is highly temperature-dependent. However, a lack of data on SSU assembly for other bacteria is problematic given the importance of the ribosome in bacterial physiology. To broaden the understanding of how optimal growth temperature may affect SSU assembly, in vitro SSU assembly of two thermophilic bacteria, Geobacillus kaustophilus and Thermus thermophilus, was compared with that of E. coli. Using these phylogenetically, morphologically, and environmentally diverse bacteria, we show that SSU assembly is highly temperature-dependent and efficient SSU assembly occurs at different temperatures for each organism. Surprisingly, the assembly landscape is characterized by at least two distinct intermediate populations in the organisms tested. This novel, second intermediate, is formed in the presence of the full complement of r-proteins, unlike the previously observed RI* particle formed in the absence of late-binding r-proteins in E. coli. This work reveals multiple distinct intermediate populations are present during SSU assembly in vitro for several bacteria, yielding insights into RNP formation and possible antimicrobial development toward this common SSU target. PMID:25999315

  8. Identification of nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) as an interacting partner of plant ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) and a positive regulator of rDNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Shin, Yun-Jeong; Kim, Woo-Young; Koh, Hee-Jong; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2015-09-18

    The ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) is a downstream component of the signaling mediated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase that acts as a central regulator of the key metabolic processes, such as protein translation and ribosome biogenesis, in response to various environmental cues. In our previous study, we identified a novel role of plant RPS6, which negatively regulates rDNA transcription, forming a complex with a plant-specific histone deacetylase, AtHD2B. Here we report that the Arabidopsis RPS6 interacts additionally with a histone chaperone, nucleosome assembly protein 1(AtNAP1;1). The interaction does not appear to preclude the association of RPS6 with AtHD2B, as the AtNAP1 was also able to interact with AtHD2B as well as with an RPS6-AtHD2B fusion protein in the BiFC assay and pulldown experiment. Similar to a positive effect of the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) on rDNA transcription observed in this study, overexpression or down regulation of the AtNAP1;1 resulted in concomitant increase and decrease, respectively, in rDNA transcription suggesting a positive regulatory role played by AtNAP1 in plant rDNA transcription, possibly through derepression of the negative effect of the RPS6-AtHD2B complex. PMID:26241676

  9. [Study of the surface of Escherichia coli ribosomes and ribosomal particles by the tritium bombardment method].

    PubMed

    Iusupov, M M; Spirin, A S

    1986-11-01

    A new technique of atomic tritium bombardment has been used to study the surface topography of Escherichia coli ribosomes and ribosomal subunits. The technique provides for the labeling of proteins exposed on the surface of ribosomal particles, the extent of protein labeling being proportional to the degree of exposure. The following proteins were considerably tritiated in the 70S ribosomes: S1, S4, S7, S9 and/or S11, S12 and/or L20, S13, S18, S20, S21, L1, L5, L6, L7/L12, L10, L11, L16, L17, L24, L26 and L27. A conclusion is drawn that these proteins are exposed on the ribosome surface to an essentially greater extent than the others. Dissociation of 70S ribosomes into the ribosomal subunits by decreasing Mg2+ concentration does not lead to the exposure of additional ribosomal proteins. This implies that there are no proteins on the contacting surfaces of the subunits. However, if a mixture of subunits has been subjected to centrifugation in a low Mg2+ concentration at high concentrations of a monovalent cation, proteins S3, S5, S7, S14, S18 and L16 are more exposed on the surface of the isolated 30S and 50S subunits than in the subunit mixture or in the 70S ribosomes. The exposure of additional proteins is explained by distortion of the native quaternary structure of ribosomal subunits as a result of the separation procedure. Reassociation of isolated subunits at high Mg2+ concentration results in shielding of proteins S3, S5, S7 and S18 and can be explained by reconstitution of the intact 30S subunit structure. PMID:3542056

  10. Identification of nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) as an interacting partner of plant ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) and a positive regulator of rDNA transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Shin, Yun-jeong; Kim, Woo-Young; Koh, Hee-Jong; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2015-09-18

    The ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) is a downstream component of the signaling mediated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase that acts as a central regulator of the key metabolic processes, such as protein translation and ribosome biogenesis, in response to various environmental cues. In our previous study, we identified a novel role of plant RPS6, which negatively regulates rDNA transcription, forming a complex with a plant-specific histone deacetylase, AtHD2B. Here we report that the Arabidopsis RPS6 interacts additionally with a histone chaperone, nucleosome assembly protein 1(AtNAP1;1). The interaction does not appear to preclude the association of RPS6 with AtHD2B, as the AtNAP1 was also able to interact with AtHD2B as well as with an RPS6-AtHD2B fusion protein in the BiFC assay and pulldown experiment. Similar to a positive effect of the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) on rDNA transcription observed in this study, overexpression or down regulation of the AtNAP1;1 resulted in concomitant increase and decrease, respectively, in rDNA transcription suggesting a positive regulatory role played by AtNAP1 in plant rDNA transcription, possibly through derepression of the negative effect of the RPS6-AtHD2B complex. - Highlights: • Nucleosome assembly protein 1 (AtNAP1) interacts with RPS6 as well as with AtHD2B. • rDNA transcription is regulated S6K1. • Overexpression or down regulation of AtNAP1 results in concomitant increase or decrease in rDNA transcription.

  11. The Crystal Structure of the Ubiquitin-like Domain of Ribosome Assembly Factor Ytm1 and Characterization of Its Interaction with the AAA-ATPase Midasin.

    PubMed

    Romes, Erin M; Sobhany, Mack; Stanley, Robin E

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of eukaryotic ribosomes is a complex, energetically demanding process requiring the aid of numerous non-ribosomal factors, such as the PeBoW complex. The mammalian PeBoW complex, composed of Pes1, Bop1, and WDR12, is essential for the processing of the 32S preribosomal RNA. Previous work in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has shown that release of the homologous proteins in this complex (Nop7, Erb1, and Ytm1, respectively) from preribosomal particles requires Rea1 (midasin or MDN1 in humans), a large dynein-like protein. Midasin contains a C-terminal metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) domain that interacts with the N-terminal ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain of Ytm1/WDR12 as well as the UBL domain of Rsa4/Nle1 in a later step in the ribosome maturation pathway. Here we present the crystal structure of the UBL domain of the WDR12 homologue from S. cerevisiae at 1.7 Å resolution and demonstrate that human midasin binds to WDR12 as well as Nle1 through their respective UBL domains. Midasin contains a well conserved extension region upstream of the MIDAS domain required for binding WDR12 and Nle1, and the interaction is dependent upon metal ion coordination because removal of the metal or mutation of residues that coordinate the metal ion diminishes the interaction. Mammalian WDR12 displays prominent nucleolar localization that is dependent upon active ribosomal RNA transcription. Based upon these results, we propose that release of the PeBoW complex and subsequent release of Nle1 by midasin is a well conserved step in the ribosome maturation pathway in both yeast and mammalian cells. PMID:26601951

  12. Chloroplast ribosomes and protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, E H; Boynton, J E; Gillham, N W

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with their postulated origin from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria, chloroplasts of plants and algae have ribosomes whose component RNAs and proteins are strikingly similar to those of eubacteria. Comparison of the secondary structures of 16S rRNAs of chloroplasts and bacteria has been particularly useful in identifying highly conserved regions likely to have essential functions. Comparative analysis of ribosomal protein sequences may likewise prove valuable in determining their roles in protein synthesis. This review is concerned primarily with the RNAs and proteins that constitute the chloroplast ribosome, the genes that encode these components, and their expression. It begins with an overview of chloroplast genome structure in land plants and algae and then presents a brief comparison of chloroplast and prokaryotic protein-synthesizing systems and a more detailed analysis of chloroplast rRNAs and ribosomal proteins. A description of the synthesis and assembly of chloroplast ribosomes follows. The review concludes with discussion of whether chloroplast protein synthesis is essential for cell survival. PMID:7854253

  13. Synthesis of ribosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, J R

    1989-01-01

    The assembly of a eucaryotic ribosome requires the synthesis of four ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules and more than 75 ribosomal proteins. It utilizes all three RNA polymerases; it requires the cooperation of the nucleus and the cytoplasm, the processing of RNA, and the specific interaction of RNA and protein molecules. It is carried out efficiently and is exquisitely sensitive to the needs of the cell. Our current understanding of this process in the genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reviewed. The ribosomal RNA genes are arranged in a tandem array of 100 to 200 copies. This tandem array has led to unique ways of carrying out a number of functions. Replication is asymmetric and does not initiate from every autonomously replicating sequence. Recombination is suppressed. Transcription of the major ribosomal RNA appears to involve coupling between adjacent transcription units, which are separated by the 5S RNA transcription unit. Genes for many ribosomal proteins have been cloned and sequenced. Few are linked; most are duplicated; most have an intron. There is extensive homology between yeast ribosomal proteins and those of other species. Most, but not all, of the ribosomal protein genes have one or two sites that are essential for their transcription and that bind a common transcription factor. This factor binds also to many other places in the genome, including the telomeres. There is coordinated transcription of the ribosomal protein genes under a variety of conditions. However, the cell seems to possess no mechanism for regulating the transcription of individual ribosomal protein genes in response either to a deficiency or an excess of a particular ribosomal protein. A deficiency causes slow growth. Any excess ribosomal protein is degraded very rapidly, with a half-life of 1 to 5 min. Unlike most types of cells, yeast cells appear not to regulate the translation of ribosomal proteins. However, in the case of ribosomal protein L32

  14. Structure of ERA in complex with the 3′ end of 16S rRNA: Implications for ribosome biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Chao; Zhou, Xiaomei; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Waugh, David S.; Court, Donald L.; Ji, Xinhua

    2009-10-09

    ERA, composed of an N-terminal GTPase domain followed by an RNA-binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal subunit. However, its RNA-binding site, the functional relationship between the two domains, and its role in ribosome biogenesis remain unclear. We have determined two crystal structures of ERA, a binary complex with GDP and a ternary complex with a GTP-analog and the {sub 1531}AUCACCUCCUUA{sub 1542} sequence at the 3' end of 16S rRNA. In the ternary complex, the first nine of the 12 nucleotides are recognized by the protein. We show that GTP binding is a prerequisite for RNA recognition by ERA and that RNA recognition stimulates its GTP-hydrolyzing activity. Based on these and other data, we propose a functional cycle of ERA, suggesting that the protein serves as a chaperone for processing and maturation of 16S rRNA and a checkpoint for assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The AUCA sequence is highly conserved among bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, whereas the CCUCC, known as the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence, is conserved in noneukaryotes only. Therefore, these data suggest a common mechanism for a highly conserved ERA function in all three kingdoms of life by recognizing the AUCA, with a 'twist' for noneukaryotic ERA proteins by also recognizing the CCUCC.

  15. Structure of ERA in Complex with the 3 End of 16s rRNBA Implications for Ribosome Biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, C.; Zhou, X; Tropea, J; Austin, B; Waugh, D; Court, D; Ji, X

    2009-01-01

    ERA, composed of an N-terminal GTPase domain followed by an RNA-binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal subunit. However, its RNA-binding site, the functional relationship between the two domains, and its role in ribosome biogenesis remain unclear. We have determined two crystal structures of ERA, a binary complex with GDP and a ternary complex with a GTP-analog and the 1531AUCACCUCCUUA1542 sequence at the 3? end of 16S rRNA. In the ternary complex, the first nine of the 12 nucleotides are recognized by the protein. We show that GTP binding is a prerequisite for RNA recognition by ERA and that RNA recognition stimulates its GTP-hydrolyzing activity. Based on these and other data, we propose a functional cycle of ERA, suggesting that the protein serves as a chaperone for processing and maturation of 16S rRNA and a checkpoint for assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The AUCA sequence is highly conserved among bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, whereas the CCUCC, known as the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence, is conserved in noneukaryotes only. Therefore, these data suggest a common mechanism for a highly conserved ERA function in all three kingdoms of life by recognizing the AUCA, with a 'twist' for noneukaryotic ERA proteins by also recognizing the CCUCC.

  16. Structure of Ribosomal Silencing Factor Bound to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojun; Sun, Qingan; Jiang, Cai; Yang, Kailu; Hung, Li-Wei; Zhang, Junjie; Sacchettini, James C

    2015-10-01

    The ribosomal silencing factor RsfS slows cell growth by inhibiting protein synthesis during periods of diminished nutrient availability. The crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) RsfS, together with the cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structure of the large subunit 50S of Mtb ribosome, reveals how inhibition of protein synthesis by RsfS occurs. RsfS binds to the 50S at L14, which, when occupied, blocks the association of the small subunit 30S. Although Mtb RsfS is a dimer in solution, only a single subunit binds to 50S. The overlap between the dimer interface and the L14 binding interface confirms that the RsfS dimer must first dissociate to a monomer in order to bind to L14. RsfS interacts primarily through electrostatic and hydrogen bonding to L14. The EM structure shows extended rRNA density that it is not found in the Escherichia coli ribosome, the most striking of these being the extended RNA helix of H54a.

  17. Methylation of ribosomal protein S10 by protein-arginine methyltransferase 5 regulates ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jinqi; Wang, Yaqing; Liang, Yuheng; Zhang, Yongqing; Bao, Shilai; Xu, Zhiheng

    2010-04-23

    Modulation of ribosomal assembly is a fine tuning mechanism for cell number and organ size control. Many ribosomal proteins undergo post-translational modification, but their exact roles remain elusive. Here, we report that ribosomal protein s10 (RPS10) is a novel substrate of an oncoprotein, protein-arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5). We show that PRMT5 interacts with RPS10 and catalyzes its methylation at the Arg(158) and Arg(160) residues. The methylation of RPS10 at Arg(158) and Arg(160) plays a role in the proper assembly of ribosomes, protein synthesis, and optimal cell proliferation. The RPS10-R158K/R160K mutant is not efficiently assembled into ribosomes and is unstable and prone to degradation by the proteasomal pathway. In nucleoli, RPS10 interacts with nucleophosmin/B23 and is predominantly concentrated in the granular component region, which is required for ribosome assembly. The RPS10 methylation mutant interacts weakly with nucleophosmin/B23 and fails to concentrate in the granular component region. Our results suggest that PRMT5 is likely to regulate cell proliferation through the methylation of ribosome proteins, and thus reveal a novel mechanism for PRMT5 in tumorigenesis.

  18. SuhB Associates with Nus Factors To Facilitate 30S Ribosome Biogenesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Navjot; Bubunenko, Mikhail; Smith, Carol; Abbott, David M.; Stringer, Anne M.; Shi, Ronald; Court, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A complex of highly conserved proteins consisting of NusB, NusE, NusA, and NusG is required for robust expression of rRNA in Escherichia coli. This complex is proposed to prevent Rho-dependent transcription termination by a process known as “antitermination.” The mechanism of this antitermination in rRNA is poorly understood but requires association of NusB and NusE with a specific RNA sequence in rRNA known as BoxA. Here, we identify a novel member of the rRNA antitermination machinery: the inositol monophosphatase SuhB. We show that SuhB associates with elongating RNA polymerase (RNAP) at rRNA in a NusB-dependent manner. Although we show that SuhB is required for BoxA-mediated antitermination in a reporter system, our data indicate that the major function of the NusB/E/A/G/SuhB complex is not to prevent Rho-dependent termination of rRNA but rather to promote correct rRNA maturation. This occurs through formation of a SuhB-mediated loop between NusB/E/BoxA and RNAP/NusA/G. Thus, we have reassigned the function of these proteins at rRNA and identified another key player in this complex. PMID:26980831

  19. Affinity of ribosomal protein S8 from mesophilic and (hyper)thermophilic archaea and bacteria for 16S rRNA correlates with the growth temperatures of the organisms.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Thomas; Köhrer, Caroline; Lung, Birgit; Shcherbakov, Dmitri; Piendl, Wolfgang

    2003-08-14

    The ribosomal protein S8 plays a pivotal role in the assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. Using filter binding assays, S8 proteins from mesophilic, and (hyper)thermophilic species of the archaeal genus Methanococcus and from the bacteria Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus were tested for their affinity to their specific 16S rRNA target site. S8 proteins from hyperthermophiles exhibit a 100-fold and S8 from thermophiles exhibit a 10-fold higher affinity than their mesophilic counterparts. Thus, there is a striking correlation of affinity of S8 proteins for their specific RNA binding site and the optimal growth temperatures of the respective organisms. The stability of individual rRNA-protein complexes might modulate the stability of the ribosome, providing a maximum of thermostability and flexibility at the growth temperature of the organism.

  20. Molecular morphology of ribosomes. Iodination of Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins with solid-state lactoperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Michalski, C J; Sells, B H

    1975-03-17

    Using either soluble or solid-state lactoperoxidase, a comparison was made between the enzymic iodination of ribosomal proteins iodinated as 30-S and 50-S subunits or as 70-S monosomes. Proteins S7, S11 and S12 of the 30-S subunit and proteins L2, L11, L26 and L28 of the 50-S subunit were labelled to a greater extent in isolated particles than in the 70-S ribosome. In contrast, proteins S4, S19 and S20 were labelled to a lesser extent in the isolated subunit. No significant differences were observed in the iodination patterns of ribosomes iodinated in the presence of soluble lactoperoxidase and those iodinated in the presence of lactoperoxidase bound to Sepharose 4B. It is suggested that the 30-S subunit undergoes a conformational change during its association with the 50-S subunit to form a 70-S monosome. Implications from results obtained with solid-state lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination of ribosomal proteins are also discussed.

  1. The Synthesis of Ribosomes in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, B. J.; Britten, R. J.; Roberts, R. B.

    1962-01-01

    Techniques of chromatography on columns of DEAE1 cellulose and sedimentation analysis through a sucrose gradient have been used to study the flow of C14-uracil label through precursors to completed ribosomes. Analysis by chromatography shows the existence of two sequential precursors constituting together some 10 per cent of the total ribosomal RNA. The chromatographic separation into three fractions is ascribed to the lower protein/RNA ratios of the precursor. By sedimentation the primary precursor (eosome) is identified as a component of average sedimentation coefficient 14S. The second precursor stage (neosome) is divided among at least two particles, one of 43S and the other of about 30S. Detailed kinetic analysis shows that all the radioactivity passes through the eosome on its way to finished 50S and 30S ribosomes. The delay in the entry of radioactivity to ribosomes is that expected from the quantity of eosome precursor. The obvious conclusion that there exists a precursor-product relationship is discussed together with possible interpretations. PMID:19431315

  2. In vitro synthesis of ribosomal proteins directed by Escherichia coli DNA.

    PubMed

    Kaltschmidt, E; Kahan, L; Nomura, M

    1974-02-01

    In vitro synthesis of a number of E. coli 30S ribosomal proteins has been demonstrated in a cell-free system consisting of ribosomes, initiation factors, RNA polymerase, a fraction containing soluble enzymes and factors, and E. coli DNA. DNA-dependent synthesis of the following 30S proteins has been demonstrated: S4, S5, S7, S8, S9, S10, S13, S14, S16, S19, and S20.

  3. Chemical modulators of ribosome biogenesis as biological probes.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jonathan M; Brown, Eric D

    2015-12-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of protein biosynthesis have been instrumental in the dissection of the complexities of ribosome structure and function. Ribosome biogenesis, on the other hand, is a complex and largely enigmatic process for which there is a paucity of chemical probes. Indeed, ribosome biogenesis has been studied almost exclusively using genetic and biochemical approaches without the benefit of small-molecule inhibitors of this process. Here, we provide a perspective on the promise of chemical inhibitors of ribosome assembly for future research. We explore key obstacles that complicate the interpretation of studies aimed at perturbing ribosome biogenesis in vivo using genetic methods, and we argue that chemical inhibitors are especially powerful because they can be used to induce perturbations in a manner that obviates these difficulties. Thus, in combination with leading-edge biochemical and structural methods, chemical probes offer unique advantages toward elucidating the molecular events that define the assembly of ribosomes. PMID:26575239

  4. Protein synthesis by ribosomes with tethered subunits.

    PubMed

    Orelle, Cédric; Carlson, Erik D; Szal, Teresa; Florin, Tanja; Jewett, Michael C; Mankin, Alexander S

    2015-08-01

    The ribosome is a ribonucleoprotein machine responsible for protein synthesis. In all kingdoms of life it is composed of two subunits, each built on its own ribosomal RNA (rRNA) scaffold. The independent but coordinated functions of the subunits, including their ability to associate at initiation, rotate during elongation, and dissociate after protein release, are an established model of protein synthesis. Furthermore, the bipartite nature of the ribosome is presumed to be essential for biogenesis, since dedicated assembly factors keep immature ribosomal subunits apart and prevent them from translation initiation. Free exchange of the subunits limits the development of specialized orthogonal genetic systems that could be evolved for novel functions without interfering with native translation. Here we show that ribosomes with tethered and thus inseparable subunits (termed Ribo-T) are capable of successfully carrying out protein synthesis. By engineering a hybrid rRNA composed of both small and large subunit rRNA sequences, we produced a functional ribosome in which the subunits are covalently linked into a single entity by short RNA linkers. Notably, Ribo-T was not only functional in vitro, but was also able to support the growth of Escherichia coli cells even in the absence of wild-type ribosomes. We used Ribo-T to create the first fully orthogonal ribosome-messenger RNA system, and demonstrate its evolvability by selecting otherwise dominantly lethal rRNA mutations in the peptidyl transferase centre that facilitate the translation of a problematic protein sequence. Ribo-T can be used for exploring poorly understood functions of the ribosome, enabling orthogonal genetic systems, and engineering ribosomes with new functions.

  5. A short fragment of 23S rRNA containing the binding sites for two ribosomal proteins, L24 and L4, is a key element for rRNA folding during early assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Stelzl, U; Nierhaus, K H

    2001-01-01

    Previously we described an in vitro selection variant abbreviated SERF (in vitro selection from random rRNA fragments) that identifies protein binding sites within large RNAs. With this method, a small rRNA fragment derived from the 23S rRNA was isolated that binds simultaneously and independently the ribosomal proteins L4 and L24 from Escherichia coli. Until now the rRNA structure within the ternary complex L24-rRNA-L4 could not be studied due to the lack of an appropriate experimental strategy. Here we tackle the issue by separating the various complexes via native gel-electrophoresis and analyzing the rRNA structure by in-gel iodine cleavage of phosphorothioated RNA. The results demonstrate that during the transition from either the L4 or L24 binary complex to the ternary complex the structure of the rRNA fragment changes significantly. The identified protein binding sites are in excellent agreement with the recently reported crystal structure of the 50S subunit. Because both proteins play a prominent role in early assembly of the large subunit, the results suggest that the identified rRNA fragment is a key element for the folding of the 23S RNA during early assembly. The introduced in-gel cleavage method should be useful when an RNA structure within mixed populations of different but related complexes should be studied. PMID:11345438

  6. A short fragment of 23S rRNA containing the binding sites for two ribosomal proteins, L24 and L4, is a key element for rRNA folding during early assembly.

    PubMed

    Stelzl, U; Nierhaus, K H

    2001-04-01

    Previously we described an in vitro selection variant abbreviated SERF (in vitro selection from random rRNA fragments) that identifies protein binding sites within large RNAs. With this method, a small rRNA fragment derived from the 23S rRNA was isolated that binds simultaneously and independently the ribosomal proteins L4 and L24 from Escherichia coli. Until now the rRNA structure within the ternary complex L24-rRNA-L4 could not be studied due to the lack of an appropriate experimental strategy. Here we tackle the issue by separating the various complexes via native gel-electrophoresis and analyzing the rRNA structure by in-gel iodine cleavage of phosphorothioated RNA. The results demonstrate that during the transition from either the L4 or L24 binary complex to the ternary complex the structure of the rRNA fragment changes significantly. The identified protein binding sites are in excellent agreement with the recently reported crystal structure of the 50S subunit. Because both proteins play a prominent role in early assembly of the large subunit, the results suggest that the identified rRNA fragment is a key element for the folding of the 23S RNA during early assembly. The introduced in-gel cleavage method should be useful when an RNA structure within mixed populations of different but related complexes should be studied.

  7. [Topography of ribosomal proteins: reconsideration of of protein map of small ribosomal subunit].

    PubMed

    Spirin, A S; Agafonov, D E; Kolb, V A; Kommer, A

    1996-11-01

    Exposure of proteins on the surface of the small (30S) ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli was studied by the hot tritium bombardment technique. Eight of 21 proteins of the 30 S subunit (S3, S8, S10, S12, S15, S16, S17, and S19) had virtually no groups exposed on the surface of the particle, i.e., they were mainly hidden inside. Seven proteins (S1, S4, S5, S7, S18, S20, and S21) were all well exposed on the surface of the particle, thus being outside proteins. The remaining proteins (S2, S6, S9 and/or S11, S13, and S14) were partially exposed. On the basis of these results a reconcilement of the three-dimensional protein map of the small ribosomal subunit has been done and corrected model is proposed.

  8. YphC and YsxC GTPases assist the maturation of the central protuberance, GTPase associated region and functional core of the 50S ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xiaodan; Davis, Joseph H.; Jain, Nikhil; Razi, Aida; Benlekbir, Samir; McArthur, Andrew G.; Rubinstein, John L.; Britton, Robert A.; Williamson, James R.; Ortega, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    YphC and YsxC are GTPases in Bacillus subtilis that facilitate the assembly of the 50S ribosomal subunit, however their roles in this process are still uncharacterized. To explore their function, we used strains in which the only copy of the yphC or ysxC genes were under the control of an inducible promoter. Under depletion conditions, they accumulated incomplete ribosomal subunits that we named 45SYphC and 44.5SYsxC particles. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis and the 5–6 Å resolution cryo-EM maps of the 45SYphC and 44.5SYsxC particles revealed that the two GTPases participate in the maturation of the central protuberance, GTPase associated region and key RNA helices in the A, P and E functional sites of the 50S subunit. We observed that YphC and YsxC bind specifically to the two immature particles, suggesting that they represent either on-pathway intermediates or that their structure has not significantly diverged from that of the actual substrate. These results describe the nature of these immature particles, a widely used tool to study the assembly process of the ribosome. They also provide the first insights into the function of YphC and YsxC in 50S subunit assembly and are consistent with this process occurring through multiple parallel pathways, as it has been described for the 30S subunit. PMID:27484475

  9. YphC and YsxC GTPases assist the maturation of the central protuberance, GTPase associated region and functional core of the 50S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiaodan; Davis, Joseph H; Jain, Nikhil; Razi, Aida; Benlekbir, Samir; McArthur, Andrew G; Rubinstein, John L; Britton, Robert A; Williamson, James R; Ortega, Joaquin

    2016-09-30

    YphC and YsxC are GTPases in Bacillus subtilis that facilitate the assembly of the 50S ribosomal subunit, however their roles in this process are still uncharacterized. To explore their function, we used strains in which the only copy of the yphC or ysxC genes were under the control of an inducible promoter. Under depletion conditions, they accumulated incomplete ribosomal subunits that we named 45SYphC and 44.5SYsxC particles. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis and the 5-6 Å resolution cryo-EM maps of the 45SYphC and 44.5SYsxC particles revealed that the two GTPases participate in the maturation of the central protuberance, GTPase associated region and key RNA helices in the A, P and E functional sites of the 50S subunit. We observed that YphC and YsxC bind specifically to the two immature particles, suggesting that they represent either on-pathway intermediates or that their structure has not significantly diverged from that of the actual substrate. These results describe the nature of these immature particles, a widely used tool to study the assembly process of the ribosome. They also provide the first insights into the function of YphC and YsxC in 50S subunit assembly and are consistent with this process occurring through multiple parallel pathways, as it has been described for the 30S subunit. PMID:27484475

  10. {sup 30}S Beam Development and X-ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.; Binh, D. N.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Ohshiro, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Chen, A. A.; Chen, J.; Setoodeh nia, K.; Kaji, D.; Nishimura, S.; Kim, A.; Lee, N. H.; Wakabayashi, Y.

    2010-03-01

    Over the past three years, we have worked on developing a well-characterized {sup 30}S radioactive beam to be used in a future experiment aiming to directly measure to extrapolate the {sup 30}S(alpha,p) stellar reaction rate within the Gamow window of Type I X-ray bursts. The importance of the {sup 30}S(alpha,p) reaction to X-ray bursts is discussed. Given the astrophysical motivation, the successful results of and challenges involved in the production of a low-energy {sup 30}S beam are detailed. Finally, an overview of our future plans regarding this on-going project are presented.

  11. Leucine does not affect mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 assembly but is required for maximal ribosomal protein s6 kinase 1 activity in human skeletal muscle following resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Apró, William; Moberg, Marcus; Hamilton, D Lee; Ekblom, Björn; Rooyackers, Olav; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Blomstrand, Eva

    2015-10-01

    We examined how the stimulatory effect of leucine on the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway is affected by the presence of the remaining essential amino acids (EAAs). Nine male subjects performed resistance exercise on 4 occasions and were randomly supplied EAAs with leucine, EAAs without leucine (EAA-Leu), leucine alone, or flavored water (placebo; control). Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis before and 60 and 90 min after exercise. Biopsies were analyzed for protein phosphorylation, kinase activity, protein-protein interactions, amino acid concentrations, and tracer incorporation. Leucine alone stimulated ribosomal protein s6 kinase 1 (S6K1) phosphorylation ∼280% more than placebo and EAA-Leu after exercise. Moreover, this response was enhanced by 60-75% after intake of EAAs compared with that of leucine alone (P < 0.05). Kinase activity of S6K1 reflected that of S6K1 phosphorylation; 60 min after exercise, the activity was elevated 3.3- and 4.2-fold with intake of leucine alone and with EAAs, respectively (P < 0.05). The interaction between mammalian target of rapamycin and regulatory-associated protein of mammalian target of rapamycin was unaltered in response to both resistance exercise and amino acid provision. Leucine alone stimulates mTORC1 signaling, although this response is enhanced by other EAAs and does not appear to be caused by alterations in mTORC1 assembly.

  12. The Ribosomal Database Project.

    PubMed Central

    Maidak, B L; Larsen, N; McCaughey, M J; Overbeek, R; Olsen, G J; Fogel, K; Blandy, J; Woese, C R

    1994-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services, and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams, and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server/rdp.life.uiuc.edu) and gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu). The electronic mail server also provides ribosomal probe checking, approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences, screening for chimeric nature of newly sequenced rRNAs, and automated alignment. PMID:7524021

  13. Initial bridges between two ribosomal subunits are formed within 9.4 milliseconds, as studied by time-resolved cryo-EM.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Tanvir R; Yassin, Aymen S; Lu, Zonghuan; Barnard, David; Meng, Xing; Lu, Toh-Ming; Wagenknecht, Terence; Agrawal, Rajendra K

    2014-07-01

    Association of the two ribosomal subunits during the process of translation initiation is a crucial step of protein synthesis. The two subunits (30S and 50S) of the bacterial 70S ribosome are held together by 12 dynamic bridges involving RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, and protein-protein interactions. The process of bridge formation, such as whether all these bridges are formed simultaneously or in a sequential order, is poorly understood. To understand such processes, we have developed and implemented a class of microfluidic devices that mix two components to completion within 0.4 ms and spray the mixture in the form of microdroplets onto an electron microscopy grid, yielding a minimum reaction time of 9.4 ms before cryofixation. Using these devices, we have obtained cryo-EM data corresponding to reaction times of 9.4 and 43 ms and have determined 3D structures of ribosomal subunit association intermediates. Molecular analyses of the cryo-EM maps reveal that eight intersubunit bridges (bridges B1a, B1b, B2a, B2b, B3, B7a, B7b, and B8) form within 9.4 ms, whereas the remaining four bridges (bridges B2c, B4, B5, and B6) take longer than 43 ms to form, suggesting that bridges are formed in a stepwise fashion. Our approach can be used to characterize sequences of various dynamic functional events on complex macromolecular assemblies such as ribosomes.

  14. Isolation, crystallization, and investigation of ribosomal protein S8 complexed with specific fragments of rRNA of bacterial or archaeal origin.

    PubMed

    Tishchenko, S V; Vassilieva, J M; Platonova, O B; Serganov, A A; Fomenkova, N P; Mudrik, E S; Piendl, W; Ehresmann, C; Ehresmann, B; Garber, M B

    2001-09-01

    The core ribosomal protein S8 binds to the central domain of 16S rRNA independently of other ribosomal proteins and is required for assembling the 30S subunit. It has been shown with E. coli ribosomes that a short rRNA fragment restricted by nucleotides 588-602 and 636-651 is sufficient for strong and specific protein S8 binding. In this work, we studied the complexes formed by ribosomal protein S8 from Thermus thermophilus and Methanococcus jannaschii with short rRNA fragments isolated from the same organisms. The dissociation constants of the complexes of protein S8 with rRNA fragments were determined. Based on the results of binding experiments, rRNA fragments of different length were designed and synthesized in preparative amounts in vitro using T7 RNA-polymerase. Stable S8-RNA complexes were crystallized. Crystals were obtained both for homologous bacterial and archaeal complexes and for hybrid complexes of archaeal protein with bacterial rRNA. Crystals of the complex of protein S8 from M. jannaschii with the 37-nucleotide rRNA fragment from the same organism suitable for X-ray analysis were obtained.

  15. The Ribosomal Database Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G. J.; Overbeek, R.; Larsen, N.; Marsh, T. L.; McCaughey, M. J.; Maciukenas, M. A.; Kuan, W. M.; Macke, T. J.; Xing, Y.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) complies ribosomal sequences and related data, and redistributes them in aligned and phylogenetically ordered form to its user community. It also offers various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying sequences. In addition, the RDP offers (or will offer) certain analytic services. At present the project is in an intermediate stage of development.

  16. Ribosomal proteins produced in excess are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Sung, Min-Kyung; Reitsma, Justin M; Sweredoski, Michael J; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2016-09-01

    Ribosome assembly is an essential process that consumes prodigious quantities of cellular resources. Ribosomal proteins cannot be overproduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae because the excess proteins are rapidly degraded. However, the responsible quality control (QC) mechanisms remain poorly characterized. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of multiple proteins of the small and large yeast ribosomal subunits is suppressed. Rpl26 overexpressed from a plasmid can be detected in the nucleolus and nucleoplasm, but it largely fails to assemble into ribosomes and is rapidly degraded. However, if the endogenous RPL26 loci are deleted, plasmid-encoded Rpl26 assembles into ribosomes and localizes to the cytosol. Chemical and genetic perturbation studies indicate that overexpressed ribosomal proteins are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system and not by autophagy. Inhibition of the proteasome led to accumulation of multiple endogenous ribosomal proteins in insoluble aggregates, consistent with the operation of this QC mechanism in the absence of ribosomal protein overexpression. Our studies reveal that ribosomal proteins that fail to assemble into ribosomes are rapidly distinguished from their assembled counterparts and ubiquitinated and degraded within the nuclear compartment. PMID:27385339

  17. Adenosylcobalamin inhibits ribosome binding to btuB RNA.

    PubMed

    Nou, X; Kadner, R J

    2000-06-20

    Expression of the btuB gene encoding the outer membrane cobalamin transporter in Escherichia coli is strongly reduced on growth with cobalamins. Previous studies have shown that this regulation occurs in response to adenosylcobalamin (Ado-Cbl) and operates primarily at the translational level. Changes in the level and stability of btuB RNA are consequences of the modulated translation initiation. To examine how Ado-Cbl affects translation, the binding of E. coli 30S ribosomal subunits to btuB RNA was investigated by using a primer extension inhibition assay. Ribosome binding to btuB RNA was much less efficient than to other RNAs and was preferentially lost when the ribosomes were subjected to a high-salt wash. Ribosome binding to btuB RNA was inhibited by Ado-Cbl but not by cyanocobalamin, with half-maximal inhibition around 0.3 microM Ado-Cbl. Ribosome-binding activity was increased or decreased by mutations in the btuB leader region, which affected two predicted RNA hairpins and altered expression of btuB-lacZ reporters. Finally, the presence of Ado-Cbl elicited formation of a single primer extension-inhibition product with the same specificity and Cbl-concentration dependence as the inhibition of ribosome binding. These results indicate that btuB expression is controlled by the specific binding of Ado-Cbl to btuB RNA, which then affects access to its ribosome-binding sequence. PMID:10852957

  18. Adenosylcobalamin inhibits ribosome binding to btuB RNA

    PubMed Central

    Nou, Xiangwu; Kadner, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the btuB gene encoding the outer membrane cobalamin transporter in Escherichia coli is strongly reduced on growth with cobalamins. Previous studies have shown that this regulation occurs in response to adenosylcobalamin (Ado-Cbl) and operates primarily at the translational level. Changes in the level and stability of btuB RNA are consequences of the modulated translation initiation. To examine how Ado-Cbl affects translation, the binding of E. coli 30S ribosomal subunits to btuB RNA was investigated by using a primer extension inhibition assay. Ribosome binding to btuB RNA was much less efficient than to other RNAs and was preferentially lost when the ribosomes were subjected to a high-salt wash. Ribosome binding to btuB RNA was inhibited by Ado-Cbl but not by cyanocobalamin, with half-maximal inhibition around 0.3 μM Ado-Cbl. Ribosome-binding activity was increased or decreased by mutations in the btuB leader region, which affected two predicted RNA hairpins and altered expression of btuB-lacZ reporters. Finally, the presence of Ado-Cbl elicited formation of a single primer extension-inhibition product with the same specificity and Cbl-concentration dependence as the inhibition of ribosome binding. These results indicate that btuB expression is controlled by the specific binding of Ado-Cbl to btuB RNA, which then affects access to its ribosome-binding sequence. PMID:10852957

  19. Interaction between Bacillus subtilis YsxC and ribosomes (or rRNAs).

    PubMed

    Wicker-Planquart, Catherine; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2015-04-13

    YsxC is an essential P-loop GTPase, that binds to the 50S ribosomal subunit, and is required for the proper assembly of the ribosome. The aim of this study was to characterize YsxC ribosome interactions. The stoichiometry of YsxC ribosome subunit complex was evaluated. We showed that YsxC binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit is not affected by GTP, but in the presence of GDP the stoichiometry of YsxC-ribosome is decreased. YsxC GTPase activity was stimulated upon 50S ribosomal subunit binding. In addition, it is shown for the first time that YsxC binds both 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs.

  20. Crystal Structures of EF-G-Ribosome Complexes Trapped in Intermediate States of Translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jie; Lancaster, Laura; Donohue, John Paul; Noller, Harry F.

    2013-11-12

    Translocation of messenger and transfer RNA (mRNA and tRNA) through the ribosome is a crucial step in protein synthesis, whose mechanism is not yet understood. The crystal structures of three Thermus ribosome-tRNA-mRNA–EF-G complexes trapped with β,γ-imidoguanosine 5'-triphosphate (GDPNP) or fusidic acid reveal conformational changes occurring during intermediate states of translocation, including large-scale rotation of the 30S subunit head and body. In all complexes, the tRNA acceptor ends occupy the 50S subunit E site, while their anticodon stem loops move with the head of the 30S subunit to positions between the P and E sites, forming chimeric intermediate states. Two universally conserved bases of 16S ribosomal RNA that intercalate between bases of the mRNA may act as “pawls” of a translocational ratchet. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of ribosomal translocation.

  1. Comprehensive Analysis of Phosphorylated Proteins of E. coli Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Soung, George Y.; Miller, Jennifer L.; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in twenty-four E. coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Specific detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr, or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and the loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given site of the phosphorylation in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins. PMID:19469554

  2. [Study of the mRNA-binding region of ribosomes at different steps of translation. II. Affinity modification of Escherichia coli ribosomes by benzylidene derivative of AUGU6 in the 70S initiation complex].

    PubMed

    Babkina, G T; Karpova, G G; Matasova, N B; Berzin', V M; Gren, E Ia

    1985-01-01

    2',3'-O-(4-[N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-methylamino]) benzylidene derivative of AUGU6 was used for identification of the proteins in the region of the mRNA-binding centre of E. coli ribosomes. This derivative alkylated ribosomes (preferentially 30S ribosomal) with high efficiency within the 70S initiation complex. In both 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits proteins and rRNA were modified. Specificity of the alkylation of ribosomal proteins and rRNA with the reagent was proved by the inhibitory action of AUGU6. Using the method of two-dimensional electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel the proteins S4, S12, S13, S14, S15, S18, S19 and S20/L26 which are labelled by the analog of mRNA were identified.

  3. The structure of Aquifex aeolicus ribosomal protein S8 reveals a unique subdomain that contributes to an extremely tight association with 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Menichelli, Elena; Edgcomb, Stephen P; Recht, Michael I; Williamson, James R

    2012-01-20

    The assembly of ribonucleoprotein complexes occurs under a broad range of conditions, but the principles that promote assembly and allow function at high temperature are poorly understood. The ribosomal protein S8 from Aquifex aeolicus (AS8) is unique in that there is a 41-residue insertion in the consensus S8 sequence. In addition, AS8 exhibits an unusually high affinity for the 16S ribosomal RNA, characterized by a picomolar dissociation constant that is approximately 26,000-fold tighter than the equivalent interaction from Escherichia coli. Deletion analysis demonstrated that binding to the minimal site on helix 21 occurred at the same nanomolar affinity found for other bacterial species. The additional affinity required the presence of a three-helix junction between helices 20, 21, and 22. The crystal structure of AS8 was solved, revealing the helix-loop-helix geometry of the unique AS8 insertion region, while the core of the molecule is conserved with known S8 structures. The AS8 structure was modeled onto the structure of the 30S ribosomal subunit from E. coli, suggesting the possibility that the unique subdomain provides additional backbone and side-chain contacts between the protein and an unpaired base within the three-way junction of helices 20, 21, and 22. Point mutations in the protein insertion subdomain resulted in a significantly reduced RNA binding affinity with respect to wild-type AS8. These results indicate that the AS8-specific subdomain provides additional interactions with the three-way junction that contribute to the extremely tight binding to ribosomal RNA.

  4. Crystallography of ribosomal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonath, A.; Frolow, F.; Shoham, M.; Müssig, J.; Makowski, I.; Glotz, C.; Jahn, W.; Weinstein, S.; Wittmann, H. G.

    1988-07-01

    Several forms of three-dimensional crystals and two-dimensional sheets of intact ribosomes and their subunits have been obtained as a result of: (a) an extensive systematic investigation of the parameters involved in crystallization, (b) a development of an experimental procedure for controlling the volumes of the crystallization droplets, (c) a study of the nucleation process, and (d) introducing a delicate seeding procedure coupled with variations in the ratios of mono- and divalent ions in the crystallization medium. In all cases only biologically active particles could be crystallized, and the crystalline material retains its integrity and activity. Crystallographic data have been collected from crystals of 50S ribosomal subunits, using synchrotron radiation at temperatures between + 19 and - 180°C. Although at 4°C the higher resolution reflections decay within minutes in the synchrotron beam, at cryo-temperature there was hardly any radiation damage, and a complete set of data to about 6Åresolution could be collected from a single crystal. Heavy-atom clusters were used for soaking as well as for specific binding to the surface of the ribosomal subunits prior to crystallization. The 50S ribosomal subunits from a mutant of B. stearothermophilus which lacks the ribosomal protein BL11 crystallize isomorphously with in the native ones. Models, aimed to be used for low resolution phasing, have been reconstructed from two-dimensional sheets of 70S ribosomes and 50S subunits at 47 and 30Å, respectively. These models show the overall structure of these particles, the contact areas between the large and small subunits, the space where protein synthesis might take place and a tunnel which may provide the path for the nascent protein chain.

  5. When stable RNA becomes unstable: the degradation of ribosomes in bacteria and beyond.

    PubMed

    Maiväli, Ülo; Paier, Anton; Tenson, Tanel

    2013-07-01

    This review takes a comparative look at the various scenarios where ribosomes are degraded in bacteria and eukaryotes with emphasis on studies involving Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. While the molecular mechanisms of degradation in bacteria and yeast appear somewhat different, we argue that the underlying causes of ribosome degradation are remarkably similar. In both model organisms during ribosomal assembly, partially formed pre-ribosomal particles can be degraded by at least two different sequentially-acting quality control pathways and fully assembled but functionally faulty ribosomes can be degraded in a separate quality control pathway. In addition, ribosomes that are both structurally- and functionally-sound can be degraded as an adaptive measure to stress.

  6. Kinetic pathway of 40S ribosomal subunit recruitment to hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Gabriele; Petrov, Alexey N.; Marceau, Caleb D.; Popov, Lauren M.; Chen, Jin; O’Leary, Seán E.; Wang, Richard; Carette, Jan E.; Sarnow, Peter; Puglisi, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Translation initiation can occur by multiple pathways. To delineate these pathways by single-molecule methods, fluorescently labeled ribosomal subunits are required. Here, we labeled human 40S ribosomal subunits with a fluorescent SNAP-tag at ribosomal protein eS25 (RPS25). The resulting ribosomal subunits could be specifically labeled in living cells and in vitro. Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between RPS25 and domain II of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES), we measured the rates of 40S subunit arrival to the HCV IRES. Our data support a single-step model of HCV IRES recruitment to 40S subunits, irreversible on the initiation time scale. We furthermore demonstrated that after binding, the 40S:HCV IRES complex is conformationally dynamic, undergoing slow large-scale rearrangements. Addition of translation extracts suppresses these fluctuations, funneling the complex into a single conformation on the 80S assembly pathway. These findings show that 40S:HCV IRES complex formation is accompanied by dynamic conformational rearrangements that may be modulated by initiation factors. PMID:25516984

  7. Expanding the ribosomal universe.

    PubMed

    Dinman, Jonathan D; Kinzy, Terri Goss

    2009-12-01

    In this issue of Structure, Taylor et al. (2009) present the most complete model of an eukaryotic ribosome to date. This achievement represents a critical milestone along the path to structurally defining the unique aspects of the eukaryotic protein synthetic machinery.

  8. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges.

    PubMed

    Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Baram, David; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Breiner, Elinor; Davidovich, Chen; Cimicata, Giuseppe; Eyal, Zohar; Halfon, Yehuda; Krupkin, Miri; Matzov, Donna; Metz, Markus; Rufayda, Mruwat; Peretz, Moshe; Pick, Ophir; Pyetan, Erez; Rozenberg, Haim; Shalev-Benami, Moran; Wekselman, Itai; Zarivach, Raz; Zimmerman, Ella; Assis, Nofar; Bloch, Joel; Israeli, Hadar; Kalaora, Rinat; Lim, Lisha; Sade-Falk, Ofir; Shapira, Tal; Taha-Salaime, Leena; Tang, Hua; Yonath, Ada

    2016-06-29

    Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of "pathogen-specific antibiotics," in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification.

  9. Ribosome-inactivating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Matthew J; Dodd, Jennifer E; Hautbergue, Guillaume M

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were first isolated over a century ago and have been shown to be catalytic toxins that irreversibly inactivate protein synthesis. Elucidation of atomic structures and molecular mechanism has revealed these proteins to be a diverse group subdivided into two classes. RIPs have been shown to exhibit RNA N-glycosidase activity and depurinate the 28S rRNA of the eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit. In this review, we compare archetypal RIP family members with other potent toxins that abolish protein synthesis: the fungal ribotoxins which directly cleave the 28S rRNA and the newly discovered Burkholderia lethal factor 1 (BLF1). BLF1 presents additional challenges to the current classification system since, like the ribotoxins, it does not possess RNA N-glycosidase activity but does irreversibly inactivate ribosomes. We further discuss whether the RIP classification should be broadened to include toxins achieving irreversible ribosome inactivation with similar turnovers to RIPs, but through different enzymatic mechanisms. PMID:24071927

  10. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges.

    PubMed

    Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Baram, David; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Breiner, Elinor; Davidovich, Chen; Cimicata, Giuseppe; Eyal, Zohar; Halfon, Yehuda; Krupkin, Miri; Matzov, Donna; Metz, Markus; Rufayda, Mruwat; Peretz, Moshe; Pick, Ophir; Pyetan, Erez; Rozenberg, Haim; Shalev-Benami, Moran; Wekselman, Itai; Zarivach, Raz; Zimmerman, Ella; Assis, Nofar; Bloch, Joel; Israeli, Hadar; Kalaora, Rinat; Lim, Lisha; Sade-Falk, Ofir; Shapira, Tal; Taha-Salaime, Leena; Tang, Hua; Yonath, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of "pathogen-specific antibiotics," in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification. PMID:27367739

  11. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Baram, David; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Breiner, Elinor; Davidovich, Chen; Cimicata, Giuseppe; Eyal, Zohar; Halfon, Yehuda; Krupkin, Miri; Matzov, Donna; Metz, Markus; Rufayda, Mruwat; Peretz, Moshe; Pick, Ophir; Pyetan, Erez; Rozenberg, Haim; Shalev-Benami, Moran; Wekselman, Itai; Zarivach, Raz; Zimmerman, Ella; Assis, Nofar; Bloch, Joel; Israeli, Hadar; Kalaora, Rinat; Lim, Lisha; Sade-Falk, Ofir; Shapira, Tal; Taha-Salaime, Leena; Tang, Hua; Yonath, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of “pathogen-specific antibiotics,” in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification. PMID:27367739

  12. The role of the ribosome in the regulation of longevity and lifespan extension.

    PubMed

    MacInnes, Alyson W

    2016-01-01

    The most energy-consuming process that a cell must undertake to stay viable is the continuous biogenesis of ribosomes for the translation of RNA into protein. Given the inextricable links between energy consumption and cellular lifespan, it is not surprising that mutations and environmental cues that reduce ribosome biogenesis result in an extension of eukaryotic lifespan. This review goes into detail describing recent discoveries of different and often unexpected elements that play a role in the regulation of longevity by virtue of their ribosome biogenesis functions. These roles include controlling the transcription and processing of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), the translation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes, and the number of ribosomes overall. Together these findings suggest that a fundamental mechanism across eukaryotic species for extending lifespan is to slow down or halt the expenditure of cellular energy that is normally absorbed by the manufacturing and assembly of new ribosomes. PMID:26732699

  13. Head swivel on the ribosome facilitates translocation via intra-subunit tRNA hybrid sites

    PubMed Central

    Ratje, Andreas H.; Loerke, Justus; Mikolajka, Aleksandra; Brünner, Matthias; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Starosta, Agata L.; Dönhöfer, Alexandra; Connell, Sean R.; Fucini, Paola; Mielke, Thorsten; Whitford, Paul C.; Onuchic, Jose’ N; Yu, Yanan; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.; Hartmann, Roland K.; Penczek, Pawel A.; Wilson, Daniel N.; Spahn, Christian M.T.

    2011-01-01

    The elongation cycle of protein synthesis involves the delivery of aminoacyl-tRNAs to the A-site of the ribosome, followed by peptide-bond formation and translocation of the tRNAs through the ribosome to reopen the A-site1,2. The translocation reaction is catalyzed by elongation factor G (EF-G) in a GTP-dependent fashion3. Despite the availability of structures of various EF-G-ribosome complexes, the precise mechanism by which tRNAs move through the ribosome still remains unclear. Here we use multiparticle cryo-EM analysis to resolve two previously unseen subpopulations within EF-G-ribosome complexes at sub-nanometer resolution, one of them with a partially translocated tRNA. Comparison of these sub-states reveals that translocation of tRNA on the 30S subunit parallels the swiveling of the 30S-head and is coupled to un-ratcheting of the 30S-body. Since the tRNA maintains contact with the P-site on the 30S-head and simultaneously establishes interaction with the E-site on the 30S-platform, a novel intra-subunit pe/E hybrid state is formed. This state is stabilized by domain IV of EF-G, which interacts with the swiveled 30S-head conformation. These findings provide direct structural and mechanistic insight into the “missing link” in terms of tRNA intermediates involved in the universally conserved translocation process. PMID:21124459

  14. Yeast ribosomal protein L7 and its homologue Rlp7 are simultaneously present at distinct sites on pre-60S ribosomal particles

    PubMed Central

    Babiano, Reyes; Badis, Gwenael; Saveanu, Cosmin; Namane, Abdelkader; Doyen, Antonia; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Jacquier, Alain; Fromont-Racine, Micheline; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis requires >300 assembly factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Ribosome assembly factors Imp3, Mrt4, Rlp7 and Rlp24 have sequence similarity to ribosomal proteins S9, P0, L7 and L24, suggesting that these pre-ribosomal factors could be placeholders that prevent premature assembly of the corresponding ribosomal proteins to nascent ribosomes. However, we found L7 to be a highly specific component of Rlp7-associated complexes, revealing that the two proteins can bind simultaneously to pre-ribosomal particles. Cross-linking and cDNA analysis experiments showed that Rlp7 binds to the ITS2 region of 27S pre-rRNAs, at two sites, in helix III and in a region adjacent to the pre-rRNA processing sites C1 and E. However, L7 binds to mature 25S and 5S rRNAs and cross-linked predominantly to helix ES7Lb within 25S rRNA. Thus, despite their predicted structural similarity, our data show that Rlp7 and L7 clearly bind at different positions on the same pre-60S particles. Our results also suggest that Rlp7 facilitates the formation of the hairpin structure of ITS2 during 60S ribosomal subunit maturation. PMID:23945946

  15. Measuring the dynamics of E. coli ribosome biogenesis using pulse-labeling and quantitative mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Stephen S.; Sperling, Edit; Silverman, Joshua M.; Davis, Joseph H.; Williamson, James R.

    2012-01-01

    The ribosome is an essential organelle responsible for cellular protein synthesis. Until recently, the study of ribosome assembly has been largely limited to in vitro assays, with few attempts to reconcile these results with the more complex in vivo ribosome biogenesis process. Here, we characterize the ribosome synthesis and assembly pathway for each E. coli ribosomal protein (r-protein) in vivo using a stable isotope pulse-labeling timecourse. Isotope incorporation into assembled ribosomes was measured by quantitative mass spectrometry (qMS) and fit using steady-state flux models. Most r-proteins exhibit precursor pools ranging in size from 0% to 7% of completed ribosomes, and that the sizes of these individual r-protein pools correlate well with the order of r-protein binding in vitro. Additionally, we observe anomalously large precursor pools for specific r-proteins with known extra-ribosomal functions and we have detected three r-proteins with significant turnover during steady-state growth. Taken together, this highly precise, time-dependent proteomic qMS approach should prove useful in future studies of ribosome biogenesis and could be easily extended to explore other complex biological processes in a cellular context. PMID:23090316

  16. Reduced ribosomes of the apicoplast and mitochondrion of Plasmodium spp. and predicted interactions with antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ankit; Shah, Priyanka; Haider, Afreen; Gupta, Kirti; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Ralph, Stuart A; Habib, Saman

    2014-05-01

    Apicomplexan protists such as Plasmodium and Toxoplasma contain a mitochondrion and a relic plastid (apicoplast) that are sites of protein translation. Although there is emerging interest in the partitioning and function of translation factors that participate in apicoplast and mitochondrial peptide synthesis, the composition of organellar ribosomes remains to be elucidated. We carried out an analysis of the complement of core ribosomal protein subunits that are encoded by either the parasite organellar or nuclear genomes, accompanied by a survey of ribosome assembly factors for the apicoplast and mitochondrion. A cross-species comparison with other apicomplexan, algal and diatom species revealed compositional differences in apicomplexan organelle ribosomes and identified considerable reduction and divergence with ribosomes of bacteria or characterized organelle ribosomes from other organisms. We assembled structural models of sections of Plasmodium falciparum organellar ribosomes and predicted interactions with translation inhibitory antibiotics. Differences in predicted drug-ribosome interactions with some of the modelled structures suggested specificity of inhibition between the apicoplast and mitochondrion. Our results indicate that Plasmodium and Toxoplasma organellar ribosomes have a unique composition, resulting from the loss of several large and small subunit proteins accompanied by significant sequence and size divergences in parasite orthologues of ribosomal proteins.

  17. Isolation of ribosomes and polysomes.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Maria C; Maguire, Bruce; Lake, James A

    2015-03-01

    Here we describe a preparative differential centrifugation protocol for the isolation of ribosomes from a crude cell homogenate. The subcellular fraction obtained is enriched in ribosome monomers and polysomes. The protocol has been optimized for the homogenization and collection of the ribosomal fraction from prokaryotic cells, mammalian and plant tissues, reticulocytes, and chloroplasts. The quality of the ribosomal preparation is enhanced by the removal of the remaining cellular components and adsorbed proteins by pelleting through a sucrose cushion with a high concentration of monovalent salts, NH4Cl or KCl. The different components of the ribosomal fraction isolated using this protocol can be further purified by sucrose gradient centrifugation.

  18. Potent, Reversible, and Specific Chemical Inhibitors of Eukaryotic Ribosome Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Shigehiro A; Chen, Zhen; Aoi, Yuki; Patgiri, Anupam; Kobayashi, Yuki; Nurse, Paul; Kapoor, Tarun M

    2016-10-01

    All cellular proteins are synthesized by ribosomes, whose biogenesis in eukaryotes is a complex multi-step process completed within minutes. Several chemical inhibitors of ribosome function are available and used as tools or drugs. By contrast, we lack potent validated chemical probes to analyze the dynamics of eukaryotic ribosome assembly. Here, we combine chemical and genetic approaches to discover ribozinoindoles (or Rbins), potent and reversible triazinoindole-based inhibitors of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis. Analyses of Rbin sensitivity and resistance conferring mutations in fission yeast, along with biochemical assays with recombinant proteins, provide evidence that Rbins' physiological target is Midasin, an essential ∼540-kDa AAA+ (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) protein. Using Rbins to acutely inhibit or activate Midasin function, in parallel experiments with inhibitor-sensitive or inhibitor-resistant cells, we uncover Midasin's role in assembling Nsa1 particles, nucleolar precursors of the 60S subunit. Together, our findings demonstrate that Rbins are powerful probes for eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

  19. Structural Basis for the Rescue of Stalled Ribosomes: Structure of YaeJ Bound to the Ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, Matthieu G.; Seetharaman, Sai V.; Bulkley, David; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2012-06-19

    In bacteria, the hybrid transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) rescues ribosomes stalled on defective messenger RNAs (mRNAs). However, certain gram-negative bacteria have evolved proteins that are capable of rescuing stalled ribosomes in a tmRNA-independent manner. Here, we report a 3.2 angstrom-resolution crystal structure of the rescue factor YaeJ bound to the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome in complex with the initiator tRNA{sub i}{sup fMet} and a short mRNA. The structure reveals that the C-terminal tail of YaeJ functions as a sensor to discriminate between stalled and actively translating ribosomes by binding in the mRNA entry channel downstream of the A site between the head and shoulder of the 30S subunit. This allows the N-terminal globular domain to sample different conformations, so that its conserved GGQ motif is optimally positioned to catalyze the hydrolysis of peptidyl-tRNA. This structure gives insights into the mechanism of YaeJ function and provides a basis for understanding how it rescues stalled ribosomes.

  20. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  1. Aggregation of Ribosomal Protein S6 at Nucleolus Is Cell Cycle-Controlled and Its Function in Pre-rRNA Processing Is Phosphorylation Dependent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Duo; Chen, Hui-Peng; Duan, Hai-Feng; Gao, Li-Hua; Shao, Yong; Chen, Ke-Yan; Wang, You-Liang; Lan, Feng-Hua; Hu, Xian-Wen

    2016-07-01

    Ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) has long been regarded as one of the primary r-proteins that functions in the early stage of 40S subunit assembly, but its actual role is still obscure. The correct forming of 18S rRNA is a key step in the nuclear synthesis of 40S subunit. In this study, we demonstrate that rpS6 participates in the processing of 30S pre-rRNA to 18S rRNA only when its C-terminal five serines are phosphorylated, however, the process of entering the nucleus and then targeting the nucleolus does not dependent its phosphorylation. Remarkably, we also find that the aggregation of rpS6 at the nucleolus correlates to the phasing of cell cycle, beginning to concentrate in the nucleolus at later S phase and disaggregate at M phase. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1649-1657, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Mapping contacts of the S12-S7 intercistronic region of str operon mRNA with ribosomal protein S7 of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Golovin, Andrey; Spiridonova, Vera; Kopylov, Alexei

    2006-10-30

    In E. coli, S7 initiates 30S ribosome assembly by binding to 16S rRNA. It also regulates translation of the S12 and S7 cistrons of the 'streptomycin' operon transcript by binding to the S12-S7 intercistronic region. Here, we describe the contacts of N-terminally His(6)-tagged S7 with this region as mapped by UV-induced cross-linking. The cross-links are located at U(-34), U(-35), quite distant from the start codons of the two cistrons. In order to explain the mechanism of translational repression of S12-S7, we consider a possible conformational rearrangement of the intercistronic RNA structure induced by S7 binding.

  3. Structural studies of E. coli ribosomes by spectroscopic techniques: A specialized review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonicontro, Adalberto; Risuleo, Gianfranco

    2005-12-01

    We present a review on our interdisciplinary line of research based on strategies of molecular biology and biophysics. These have been applied to the study of the prokaryotic ribosome of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Our investigations on this organelle have continued for more than a decade and we have adopted different spectroscopic biophysical techniques such as: dielectric and fluorescence spectroscopy as well as light scattering (photon correlation spectroscopy). Here we report studies on the whole 70S ribosomes and on the separated subunits 30S and 50S. Our results evidence intrinsic structural features of the subunits: the small shows a more "floppy" structure, while the large one appears to be more rigid. Also, an inner "kernel" formed by the RNA/protein association is found within the ribosome. This kernel is surrounded by a ribonucleoprotein complex more exposed to the solvent. Initial analyses were done on the so called Kaldtschmit-Wittmann ribosome: more recently we have extended the studies to the "tight couple" ribosome known for its better functional performance in vitro. Data evidence a phenomenological correlation between the differential biological activity and the intrinsic structural properties of the two-ribosome species. Finally, investigations were also conducted on particles treated at sub-denaturing temperatures and on ribosomes partially deproteinized by salt treatment (ribosomal cores). Results suggest that the thermal treatment and the selective removal of proteins cause analogous structural alterations.

  4. Ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins in the nucleolus: multitasking tools for a ribosome factory.

    PubMed

    Shcherbik, Natalia; Pestov, Dimitri G

    2010-07-01

    Synthesis of new ribosomes is an essential process upregulated during cell growth and proliferation. Here, we review our current understanding of the role that ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins (UBLs) play in ribosome biogenesis, with a focus on mammalian cells. One important function of the nuclear ubiquitin-proteasome system is to control the supply of ribosomal proteins for the assembly of new ribosomal subunits in the nucleolus. Mutations in ribosomal proteins or ribosome assembly factors, stress, and many anticancer drugs have been shown to disrupt normal ribosome biogenesis, triggering a p53-dependent response. We discuss how p53 can be activated by the aberrant ribosome formation, centering on the current models of the interaction between ribosomal proteins released from the nucleolus and the ubiquitin ligase Mdm2. Recent studies also revealed multiple ubiquitin- and UBL-conjugated forms of nucleolar proteins with largely unknown functions, indicating that many new details about the role of these modifications in the nucleolus await to be discovered.

  5. Isolation of ribosomes by chromatography.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Bruce A

    2015-04-01

    Mixed-mode chromatography on cysteine-SulfoLink resin efficiently separates ribosomes from cell lysates and is particularly effective at rapidly removing endogenous proteases and nucleases, resulting in ribosomes of improved purity, integrity, and activity. Binding occurs partly by anion exchange of the RNA of the ribosomes, so that cells must be lysed in a buffer of moderate ionic strength (conductivity no more than 20 mS for chromatography of bacterial ribosomes) without any highly charged additives (e.g., heparin, which is used to inhibit RNases in yeast). A robust protocol for Escherichia coli is given here as an example.

  6. On the expansion of ribosomal proteins and RNAs in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael S; Sah, Renu; Balasubramaniam, Ambikaipakan; Sallee, Floyd R; Park, Edwards A; Parker, Steven L

    2014-07-01

    While the ribosome constitution is similar in all biota, there is a considerable increase in size of both ribosomal proteins (RPs) and RNAs in eukaryotes as compared to archaea and bacteria. This is pronounced in the large (60S) ribosomal subunit (LSU). In addition to enlargement (apparently maximized already in lower eukarya), the RP changes include increases in fraction, segregation and clustering of basic residues, and decrease in hydrophobicity. The acidic fraction is lower in eukaryote as compared to prokaryote RPs. In all eukaryote groups tested, the LSU RPs have significantly higher content of basic residues and homobasic segments than the SSU RPs. The vertebrate LSU RPs have much higher sequestration of basic residues than those of bacteria, archaea and even of the lower eukarya. The basic clusters are highly aligned in the vertebrate, but less in the lower eukarya, and only within families in archaea and bacteria. Increase in the basicity of RPs, besides helping transport to the nucleus, should promote stability of the assembled ribosome as well as the association with translocons and other intracellular matrix proteins. The size and GC nucleotide bias of the expansion segments of large LSU rRNAs also culminate in the vertebrate, and should support ribosome association with the endoplasmic reticulum and other intracellular networks. However, the expansion and nucleotide bias of eukaryote LSU rRNAs do not clearly correlate with changes in ionic parameters of LSU ribosomal proteins.

  7. [Affinity modification of Escherichia coli ribosomes with photoactivated analogs of mRNA].

    PubMed

    Gimautdinova, O I; Zenkova, M A; Karpova, G G; Podust, L M

    1984-01-01

    Oligoribonucleotide derivatives containing the photoactivated arylazidogroup at 5'-end of the oligonucleotide fragment [2-(N-2,4-dinitro-5-azidophenyl) aminoethyl] phosphamides of the oligoribonucleotides, azido-NH (CH2)2NHpN (pN) n-1, were prepared. It was demonstrated that azido-NH(CH2)2NHpA(pA)4 and azido-NH (CH2)2NHpU (pU)3 stimulate the binding of the codonspecific aminoacyl-tRNA with ribosome. After irradiation of the ternary complex ribosome-azido-NH (CH2)2NHpU (pU) n-1 X tRNA with UV-light (lambda greater than 350 nm) covalent binding of the reagent to ribosome occurs. Up to 10% of the reagent, bound in the ternary complex with ribosome, is cross-linked with the ribosomal proteins of 30S and 50S subunits. The ribosomal RNA are not modified by azido-NH (CH2)2NHpU (pU) n-1. The proteins of 30S and 50S subunits, modified with azido-NH (CH2)2NHpU (pU) n-1 with n = 4,7 and 8, were identified. It is shown that proteins of 30S subunits S3, S4, S9, S11, S12, S14, S17, S19, S20 undergo modification. The proteins of 50S subunits L2, L13, L16, L27, L32, L33 are modified. The set of the modified proteins essentially depends on the length of the oligonucleotide part of the reagent and on occupancy of ribosome A-site by a molecule of tRNA.

  8. Ribosome Shut-Down by 16S rRNA Fragmentation in Stationary-Phase Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Luidalepp, Hannes; Berger, Stefan; Joss, Oliver; Tenson, Tanel; Polacek, Norbert

    2016-05-22

    Stationary-phase bacterial cells are characterized by vastly reduced metabolic activities yielding a dormant-like phenotype. Several hibernation programs ensure the establishment and maintenance of this resting growth state. Some of the stationary phase-specific modulations affect the ribosome and its translational activity directly. In stationary-phase Escherichia coli, we observed the appearance of a 16S rRNA fragmentation event at the tip of helix 6 within the small ribosomal subunit (30S). Stationary-phase 30S subunits showed markedly reduced activities in protein biosynthesis. On the other hand, the functional performance of stationary-phase large ribosomal subunits (50S) was indistinguishable from particles isolated from exponentially growing cells. Introduction of the 16S rRNA cut in vitro at helix 6 of exponential phase 30S subunits renders them less efficient in protein biosynthesis. This indicates that the helix 6 fragmentation is necessary and sufficient to attenuate translational activities of 30S ribosomal subunits. These results suggest that stationary phase-specific cleavage of 16S rRNA within the 30S subunit is an efficient means to reduce global translation activities under non-proliferating growth conditions. PMID:27067112

  9. Exploring Ribosome Positioning on Translating Transcripts with Ribosome Profiling.

    PubMed

    Spealman, Pieter; Wang, Hao; May, Gemma; Kingsford, Carl; McManus, C Joel

    2016-01-01

    Recent technological advances (e.g., microarrays and massively parallel sequencing) have facilitated genome-wide measurement of many aspects of gene regulation. Ribosome profiling is a high-throughput sequencing method used to measure gene expression at the level of translation. This is accomplished by quantifying both the number of translating ribosomes and their locations on mRNA transcripts. The inventors of this approach have published several methods papers detailing its implementation and addressing the basics of ribosome profiling data analysis. Here we describe our lab's procedure, which differs in some respects from those published previously. In addition, we describe a data analysis pipeline, Ribomap, for ribosome profiling data. Ribomap allocates sequence reads to alternative mRNA isoforms, normalizes sequencing bias along transcripts using RNA-seq data, and outputs count vectors of per-codon ribosome occupancy for each transcript.

  10. Interaction of the HIV-1 frameshift signal with the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Mazauric, Marie-Hélène; Seol, Yeonee; Yoshizawa, Satoko; Visscher, Koen; Fourmy, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Ribosomal frameshifting on viral RNAs relies on the mechanical properties of structural elements, often pseudoknots and more rarely stem-loops, that are unfolded by the ribosome during translation. In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 type B a long hairpin containing a three-nucleotide bulge is responsible for efficient frameshifting. This three-nucleotide bulge separates the hairpin in two domains: an unstable lower stem followed by a GC-rich upper stem. Toeprinting and chemical probing assays suggest that a hairpin-like structure is retained when ribosomes, initially bound at the slippery sequence, were allowed multiple EF-G catalyzed translocation cycles. However, while the upper stem remains intact the lower stem readily melts. After the first, and single step of translocation of deacylated tRNA to the 30 S P site, movement of the mRNA stem-loop in the 5′ direction is halted, which is consistent with the notion that the downstream secondary structure resists unfolding. Mechanical stretching of the hairpin using optical tweezers only allows clear identification of unfolding of the upper stem at a force of 12.8 ± 1.0 pN. This suggests that the lower stem is unstable and may indeed readily unfold in the presence of a translocating ribosome. PMID:19812214

  11. Structural Basis for Translation Termination on the 70S Ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Laurberg, M.; Asahara, H.; Korostelev, A.; Zhu, J.; Trakhanov, S.; Noller, H.F.

    2009-05-20

    At termination of protein synthesis, type I release factors promote hydrolysis of the peptidyl-transfer RNA linkage in response to recognition of a stop codon. Here we describe the crystal structure of the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome in complex with the release factor RF1, tRNA and a messenger RNA containing a UAA stop codon, at 3.2 {angstrom} resolution. The stop codon is recognized in a pocket formed by conserved elements of RF1, including its PxT recognition motif, and 16S ribosomal RNA. The codon and the 30S subunit A site undergo an induced fit that results in stabilization of a conformation of RF1 that promotes its interaction with the peptidyl transferase centre. Unexpectedly, the main-chain amide group of Gln 230 in the universally conserved GGQ motif of the factor is positioned to contribute directly to peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis.

  12. The quaternary structure of the ribosome from E. coli. A neutron small-angle scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowotny, V.; Nowotny, P.; Voß, H.; Nierhaus, K. H.; May, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    Ribosomes synthesize proteins in living cells. The E. coli ribosome is composed of a small (30S) and a large subunit (50S). They consist of different proteins (21 or 34, respectively) and of ribosomal RNAs (16S or 23S and 5S). The inter-protein distances within the ribosomal subunits can be measured from scattering experiments with selectively labeled protein pairs from which the quaternary distribution of the proteins is reconstructed. We have developed the strategy of the “glassy ribosome”: the rRNAs and the proteins are deuterated such that they reach the same scattering density and are “invisible” in a corresponding buffer solution. A preliminary quaternary map of the 50S subunit which is the result of our new method for the extraction of the distances from the scattering data as well as shape parameters of proteins in situ will be presented.

  13. Ribosomes in the balance: structural equilibrium ensures translational fidelity and proper gene expression.

    PubMed

    Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2014-12-01

    At equilibrium, empty ribosomes freely transit between the rotated and un-rotated states. In the cell, the binding of two translation elongation factors to the same general region of the ribosome stabilizes one state over the other. These stabilized states are resolved by expenditure of energy in the form of GTP hydrolysis. A prior study employing mutants of a late assembling peripheral ribosomal protein suggested that ribosome rotational status determines its affinity for elongation factors, and hence translational fidelity and gene expression. Here, mutants of the early assembling integral ribosomal protein uL2 are used to test the generality of this hypothesis. rRNA structure probing analyses reveal that mutations in the uL2 B7b bridge region shift the equilibrium toward the rotated state, propagating rRNA structural changes to all of the functional centers of ribosome. Structural disequilibrium unbalances ribosome biochemically: rotated ribosomes favor binding of the eEF2 translocase and disfavor that of the elongation ternary complex. This manifests as specific translational fidelity defects, impacting the expression of genes involved in telomere maintenance. A model is presented describing how cyclic intersubunit rotation ensures the unidirectionality of translational elongation, and how perturbation of rotational equilibrium affects specific aspects of translational fidelity and cellular gene expression.

  14. Ribosomes in the balance: structural equilibrium ensures translational fidelity and proper gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    At equilibrium, empty ribosomes freely transit between the rotated and un-rotated states. In the cell, the binding of two translation elongation factors to the same general region of the ribosome stabilizes one state over the other. These stabilized states are resolved by expenditure of energy in the form of GTP hydrolysis. A prior study employing mutants of a late assembling peripheral ribosomal protein suggested that ribosome rotational status determines its affinity for elongation factors, and hence translational fidelity and gene expression. Here, mutants of the early assembling integral ribosomal protein uL2 are used to test the generality of this hypothesis. rRNA structure probing analyses reveal that mutations in the uL2 B7b bridge region shift the equilibrium toward the rotated state, propagating rRNA structural changes to all of the functional centers of ribosome. Structural disequilibrium unbalances ribosome biochemically: rotated ribosomes favor binding of the eEF2 translocase and disfavor that of the elongation ternary complex. This manifests as specific translational fidelity defects, impacting the expression of genes involved in telomere maintenance. A model is presented describing how cyclic intersubunit rotation ensures the unidirectionality of translational elongation, and how perturbation of rotational equilibrium affects specific aspects of translational fidelity and cellular gene expression. PMID:25389262

  15. Reduced expression of the mouse ribosomal protein Rpl17 alters the diversity of mature ribosomes by enhancing production of shortened 5.8S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minshi; Parshin, Andrey V; Shcherbik, Natalia; Pestov, Dimitri G

    2015-07-01

    Processing of rRNA during ribosome assembly can proceed through alternative pathways but it is unclear whether this could affect the structure of the ribosome. Here, we demonstrate that shortage of a ribosomal protein can change pre-rRNA processing in a way that over time alters ribosome diversity in the cell. Reducing the amount of Rpl17 in mouse cells led to stalled 60S subunit maturation, causing degradation of most of the synthesized precursors. A fraction of pre-60S subunits, however, were able to complete maturation, but with a 5'-truncated 5.8S rRNA, which we named 5.8SC. The 5' exoribonuclease Xrn2 is involved in the generation of both 5.8S(C) and the canonical long form of 5.8S rRNA. Ribosomes containing 5.8S(C) rRNA are present in various mouse and human cells and engage in translation. These findings uncover a previously undescribed form of mammalian 5.8S rRNA and demonstrate that perturbations in ribosome assembly can be a source of heterogeneity in mature ribosomes.

  16. Reduced expression of the mouse ribosomal protein Rpl17 alters the diversity of mature ribosomes by enhancing production of shortened 5.8S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minshi; Parshin, Andrey V.; Shcherbik, Natalia; Pestov, Dimitri G.

    2015-01-01

    Processing of rRNA during ribosome assembly can proceed through alternative pathways but it is unclear whether this could affect the structure of the ribosome. Here, we demonstrate that shortage of a ribosomal protein can change pre-rRNA processing in a way that over time alters ribosome diversity in the cell. Reducing the amount of Rpl17 in mouse cells led to stalled 60S subunit maturation, causing degradation of most of the synthesized precursors. A fraction of pre-60S subunits, however, were able to complete maturation, but with a 5′-truncated 5.8S rRNA, which we named 5.8SC. The 5′ exoribonuclease Xrn2 is involved in the generation of both 5.8SC and the canonical long form of 5.8S rRNA. Ribosomes containing 5.8SC rRNA are present in various mouse and human cells and engage in translation. These findings uncover a previously undescribed form of mammalian 5.8S rRNA and demonstrate that perturbations in ribosome assembly can be a source of heterogeneity in mature ribosomes. PMID:25995445

  17. Linezolid-Dependent Function and Structure Adaptation of Ribosomes in a Staphylococcus epidermidis Strain Exhibiting Linezolid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Kokkori, Sofia; Apostolidi, Maria; Tsakris, Athanassios; Pournaras, Spyros

    2014-01-01

    Linezolid-dependent growth was recently reported in Staphylococcus epidermidis clinical strains carrying mutations associated with linezolid resistance. To investigate this unexpected behavior at the molecular level, we isolated active ribosomes from one of the linezolid-dependent strains and we compared them with ribosomes isolated from a wild-type strain. Both strains were grown in the absence and presence of linezolid. Detailed biochemical and structural analyses revealed essential differences in the function and structure of isolated ribosomes which were assembled in the presence of linezolid. The catalytic activity of peptidyltransferase was found to be significantly higher in the ribosomes derived from the linezolid-dependent strain. Interestingly, the same ribosomes exhibited an abnormal ribosomal subunit dissociation profile on a sucrose gradient in the absence of linezolid, but the profile was restored after treatment of the ribosomes with an excess of the antibiotic. Our study suggests that linezolid most likely modified the ribosomal assembly procedure, leading to a new functional ribosomal population active only in the presence of linezolid. Therefore, the higher growth rate of the partially linezolid-dependent strains could be attributed to the functional and structural adaptations of ribosomes to linezolid. PMID:24890589

  18. Linezolid-dependent function and structure adaptation of ribosomes in a Staphylococcus epidermidis strain exhibiting linezolid dependence.

    PubMed

    Kokkori, Sofia; Apostolidi, Maria; Tsakris, Athanassios; Pournaras, Spyros; Stathopoulos, Constantinos; Dinos, George

    2014-08-01

    Linezolid-dependent growth was recently reported in Staphylococcus epidermidis clinical strains carrying mutations associated with linezolid resistance. To investigate this unexpected behavior at the molecular level, we isolated active ribosomes from one of the linezolid-dependent strains and we compared them with ribosomes isolated from a wild-type strain. Both strains were grown in the absence and presence of linezolid. Detailed biochemical and structural analyses revealed essential differences in the function and structure of isolated ribosomes which were assembled in the presence of linezolid. The catalytic activity of peptidyltransferase was found to be significantly higher in the ribosomes derived from the linezolid-dependent strain. Interestingly, the same ribosomes exhibited an abnormal ribosomal subunit dissociation profile on a sucrose gradient in the absence of linezolid, but the profile was restored after treatment of the ribosomes with an excess of the antibiotic. Our study suggests that linezolid most likely modified the ribosomal assembly procedure, leading to a new functional ribosomal population active only in the presence of linezolid. Therefore, the higher growth rate of the partially linezolid-dependent strains could be attributed to the functional and structural adaptations of ribosomes to linezolid.

  19. Single Molecule Force Measurement for Protein Synthesis on the Ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Sotaro

    2008-04-01

    The ribosome is a molecular machine that translates the genetic code described on the messenger RNA (mRNA) into an amino acid sequence through repetitive cycles of transfer RNA (tRNA) selection, peptide bond formation and translocation. Although the detailed interactions between the translation components have been revealed by extensive structural and biochemical studies, it is not known how the precise regulation of macromolecular movements required at each stage of translation is achieved. Here we demonstrate an optical tweezer assay to measure the rupture force between a single ribosome complex and mRNA. The rupture force was compared between ribosome complexes assembled on an mRNA with and without a strong Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence. The removal of the SD sequence significantly reduced the rupture force, indicating that the SD interactions contribute significantly to the stability of the ribosomal complex on the mRNA in a pre-peptidyl transfer state. In contrast, the post-peptidyl transfer state weakened the rupture force as compared to the complex in a pre-peptidyl transfer state and it was the same for both the SD-containing and SD-deficient mRNAs. The results suggest that formation of the first peptide bond destabilizes the SD interaction, resulting in the weakening of the force with which the ribosome grips an mRNA. This might be an important requirement to facilitate movement of the ribosome along mRNA during the first translocation step. In this article, we discuss about the above new results including the introduction of the ribosome translation mechanism and the optical tweezer method.

  20. The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP).

    PubMed Central

    Maidak, B L; Olsen, G J; Larsen, N; Overbeek, R; McCaughey, M J; Woese, C R

    1996-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server@rdp.life.uiuc.edu), gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu) and World Wide Web (WWW)(http://rdpwww.life.uiuc.edu/). The electronic mail and WWW servers provide ribosomal probe checking, screening for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment and approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences on an existing phylogenetic tree. PMID:8594608

  1. The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP).

    PubMed

    Maidak, B L; Olsen, G J; Larsen, N; Overbeek, R; McCaughey, M J; Woese, C R

    1996-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server@rdp.life.uiuc.edu), gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu) and World Wide Web (WWW)(http://rdpwww.life.uiuc.edu/). The electronic mail and WWW servers provide ribosomal probe checking, screening for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment and approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences on an existing phylogenetic tree.

  2. Feedback regulation of ribosomal protein gene expression in Escherichia coli: structural homology of ribosomal RNA and ribosomal protein MRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, M; Yates, J L; Dean, D; Post, L E

    1980-01-01

    Certain ribosomal proteins (r proteins) in Escherichia coli, such as S4 and S7, function as feedback repressors in the regulation of r-protein synthesis. These proteins inhibit the translation of their own mRNA. The repressor r proteins so far identified are also known to bind specifically to rRNA at an initial stage in ribosome assembly. We have found structural homology between the S7 binding region on 16S rRNA and a region of the mRNA where S7 acts as a translational repressor. Similarly, there is structural homology between one of the reported S4 binding regions on 16S rRNA and the mRNA target site for S4. The observed homology supports the concept that regulation by repressor r proteins is based on competition between rRNA and mRNA for these proteins and that the same structural features and of the r proteins are used in their interactions with both rRNA and mRNA. PMID:7012833

  3. Feedback regulation of ribosomal protein gene expression in Escherichia coli: structural homology of ribosomal RNA and ribosomal protein MRNA.

    PubMed

    Nomura, M; Yates, J L; Dean, D; Post, L E

    1980-12-01

    Certain ribosomal proteins (r proteins) in Escherichia coli, such as S4 and S7, function as feedback repressors in the regulation of r-protein synthesis. These proteins inhibit the translation of their own mRNA. The repressor r proteins so far identified are also known to bind specifically to rRNA at an initial stage in ribosome assembly. We have found structural homology between the S7 binding region on 16S rRNA and a region of the mRNA where S7 acts as a translational repressor. Similarly, there is structural homology between one of the reported S4 binding regions on 16S rRNA and the mRNA target site for S4. The observed homology supports the concept that regulation by repressor r proteins is based on competition between rRNA and mRNA for these proteins and that the same structural features and of the r proteins are used in their interactions with both rRNA and mRNA.

  4. Architecture of the 90S Pre-ribosome: A Structural View on the Birth of the Eukaryotic Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Kornprobst, Markus; Turk, Martin; Kellner, Nikola; Cheng, Jingdong; Flemming, Dirk; Koš-Braun, Isabelle; Koš, Martin; Thoms, Matthias; Berninghausen, Otto; Beckmann, Roland; Hurt, Ed

    2016-07-14

    The 90S pre-ribosome is an early biogenesis intermediate formed during co-transcriptional ribosome formation, composed of ∼70 assembly factors and several small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) that associate with nascent pre-rRNA. We report the cryo-EM structure of the Chaetomium thermophilum 90S pre-ribosome, revealing how a network of biogenesis factors including 19 β-propellers and large α-solenoid proteins engulfs the pre-rRNA. Within the 90S pre-ribosome, we identify the UTP-A, UTP-B, Mpp10-Imp3-Imp4, Bms1-Rcl1, and U3 snoRNP modules, which are organized around 5'-ETS and partially folded 18S rRNA. The U3 snoRNP is strategically positioned at the center of the 90S particle to perform its multiple tasks during pre-rRNA folding and processing. The architecture of the elusive 90S pre-ribosome gives unprecedented structural insight into the early steps of pre-rRNA maturation. Nascent rRNA that is co-transcriptionally folded and given a particular shape by encapsulation within a dedicated mold-like structure is reminiscent of how polypeptides use chaperone chambers for their protein folding.

  5. Ribosome dynamics and the evolutionary history of ribosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, George E.; Paci, Maxim; Tran, Quyen; Petrov, Anton S.; Williams, Loren D.

    2015-09-01

    The ribosome is a dynamic nanomachine responsible for coded protein synthesis. Its major subsystems were essentially in place at the time of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). Ribosome evolutionary history thus potentially provides a window into the pre- LUCA world. This history begins with the origins of the peptidyl transferase center where the actual peptide is synthesized and then continues over an extended timeframe as additional functional centers including the GTPase center are added. The large ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) have grown over time by an accretion process and a model exists that proposes a relative age of each accreted element. We have compared atomic resolution ribosome structures before and after EF-G bound GTP hydrolysis and thereby identified the location of 23 pivot points in the large rRNAs that facilitate ribosome dynamics. Pivots in small subunit helices h28 and h44 appear to be especially central to the process and according to the accretion model significantly older than the other helices containing pivots. Overall, the results suggest that ribosomal dynamics occurred in two phases. In the first phase, an inherently mobile h28/h44 combination provided the flexibility needed to create a dynamic ribosome that was essentially a Brownian machine. This addition likely made coded peptide synthesis possible by facilitating movement of a primitive mRNA. During the second phase, addition of pivoting elements and the creation of a factor binding site allowed the regulation of the inherent motion created by h28/h44. All of these events likely occurred before LUCA.

  6. [Ribosomal RNA Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    It is generally believed that an RNA World existed at an early stage in the history of life. During this early period, RNA molecules are seen to be potentially involved in both catalysis and the storage of genetic information. Translation presents several interrelated themes of inquiry for exobiology. First, it is essential, for understanding the very origin of life, how peptides and eventually proteins might have come to be made on the early Earth in a template directed manner. Second, it is necessary to understand how a machinery of similar complexity to that found in the ribosomes of modern organisms came to exist by the time of the last common ancestor (as detected by 16S rRNA sequence studies). Third, the ribosomal RNAs themselves likely had a very early origin and studies of their history may be very informative about the nature of the RNA World. Moreover, studies of these RNAs will contribute to a better understanding of the potential roles of RNA in early evolution.During the past year we have ave conducted a comparative study of four completely sequenced bacterial genoames. We have focused initially on conservation of gene order. The second component of the project continues to build on the model system for studying the validity of variant 5S rRNA sequences in the vicinity of the modern Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA that we established earlier. This system has made it possible to conduct a detailed and extensive analysis of a local portion of the sequence space. These core methods have been used to construct numerous mutants during the last several years. Although it has been a secondary focus, this work has continued over the last year such that we now have in excess of 125 V. proteolyticus derived constructs which have been made and characterized. We have also continued high resolution NMR work on RNA oligomers originally initiated by G. Kenneth Smith who was funded by a NASA Graduate Student Researcher's Fellowship Award until May of 1996. Mr. Smith

  7. Neuron-Like Networks Between Ribosomal Proteins Within the Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Poirot, Olivier; Timsit, Youri

    2016-01-01

    From brain to the World Wide Web, information-processing networks share common scale invariant properties. Here, we reveal the existence of neural-like networks at a molecular scale within the ribosome. We show that with their extensions, ribosomal proteins form complex assortative interaction networks through which they communicate through tiny interfaces. The analysis of the crystal structures of 50S eubacterial particles reveals that most of these interfaces involve key phylogenetically conserved residues. The systematic observation of interactions between basic and aromatic amino acids at the interfaces and along the extension provides new structural insights that may contribute to decipher the molecular mechanisms of signal transmission within or between the ribosomal proteins. Similar to neurons interacting through "molecular synapses", ribosomal proteins form a network that suggest an analogy with a simple molecular brain in which the "sensory-proteins" innervate the functional ribosomal sites, while the "inter-proteins" interconnect them into circuits suitable to process the information flow that circulates during protein synthesis. It is likely that these circuits have evolved to coordinate both the complex macromolecular motions and the binding of the multiple factors during translation. This opens new perspectives on nanoscale information transfer and processing. PMID:27225526

  8. Neuron-Like Networks Between Ribosomal Proteins Within the Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Poirot, Olivier; Timsit, Youri

    2016-01-01

    From brain to the World Wide Web, information-processing networks share common scale invariant properties. Here, we reveal the existence of neural-like networks at a molecular scale within the ribosome. We show that with their extensions, ribosomal proteins form complex assortative interaction networks through which they communicate through tiny interfaces. The analysis of the crystal structures of 50S eubacterial particles reveals that most of these interfaces involve key phylogenetically conserved residues. The systematic observation of interactions between basic and aromatic amino acids at the interfaces and along the extension provides new structural insights that may contribute to decipher the molecular mechanisms of signal transmission within or between the ribosomal proteins. Similar to neurons interacting through “molecular synapses”, ribosomal proteins form a network that suggest an analogy with a simple molecular brain in which the “sensory-proteins” innervate the functional ribosomal sites, while the “inter-proteins” interconnect them into circuits suitable to process the information flow that circulates during protein synthesis. It is likely that these circuits have evolved to coordinate both the complex macromolecular motions and the binding of the multiple factors during translation. This opens new perspectives on nanoscale information transfer and processing. PMID:27225526

  9. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by their dedicated chaperones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pausch, Patrick; Singh, Ujjwala; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Pillet, Benjamin; Murat, Guillaume; Altegoer, Florian; Stier, Gunter; Thoms, Matthias; Hurt, Ed; Sinning, Irmgard; Bange, Gert; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-06-01

    Exponentially growing yeast cells produce every minute >160,000 ribosomal proteins. Owing to their difficult physicochemical properties, the synthesis of assembly-competent ribosomal proteins represents a major challenge. Recent evidence highlights that dedicated chaperone proteins recognize the N-terminal regions of ribosomal proteins and promote their soluble expression and delivery to the assembly site. Here we explore the intuitive possibility that ribosomal proteins are captured by dedicated chaperones in a co-translational manner. Affinity purification of four chaperones (Rrb1, Syo1, Sqt1 and Yar1) selectively enriched the mRNAs encoding their specific ribosomal protein clients (Rpl3, Rpl5, Rpl10 and Rps3). X-ray crystallography reveals how the N-terminal, rRNA-binding residues of Rpl10 are shielded by Sqt1's WD-repeat β-propeller, providing mechanistic insight into the incorporation of Rpl10 into pre-60S subunits. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by dedicated chaperones constitutes an elegant mechanism to prevent unspecific interactions and aggregation of ribosomal proteins on their road to incorporation.

  10. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by their dedicated chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Pausch, Patrick; Singh, Ujjwala; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Pillet, Benjamin; Murat, Guillaume; Altegoer, Florian; Stier, Gunter; Thoms, Matthias; Hurt, Ed; Sinning, Irmgard; Bange, Gert; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Exponentially growing yeast cells produce every minute >160,000 ribosomal proteins. Owing to their difficult physicochemical properties, the synthesis of assembly-competent ribosomal proteins represents a major challenge. Recent evidence highlights that dedicated chaperone proteins recognize the N-terminal regions of ribosomal proteins and promote their soluble expression and delivery to the assembly site. Here we explore the intuitive possibility that ribosomal proteins are captured by dedicated chaperones in a co-translational manner. Affinity purification of four chaperones (Rrb1, Syo1, Sqt1 and Yar1) selectively enriched the mRNAs encoding their specific ribosomal protein clients (Rpl3, Rpl5, Rpl10 and Rps3). X-ray crystallography reveals how the N-terminal, rRNA-binding residues of Rpl10 are shielded by Sqt1's WD-repeat β-propeller, providing mechanistic insight into the incorporation of Rpl10 into pre-60S subunits. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by dedicated chaperones constitutes an elegant mechanism to prevent unspecific interactions and aggregation of ribosomal proteins on their road to incorporation. PMID:26112308

  11. Time-dependent effects of transcription- and translation-halting drugs on the spatial distributions of the Escherichia coli chromosome and ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Somenath; Choi, Heejun; Mondal, Jagannath; Weisshaar, James C

    2014-11-01

    Previously observed effects of rifampicin and chloramphenicol indicate that transcription and translation activity strongly affect the coarse spatial organization of the bacterial cytoplasm. Single-cell, time-resolved, quantitative imaging of chromosome and ribosome spatial distributions and ribosome diffusion in live Escherichia coli provides insight into the underlying mechanisms. Monte Carlo simulations of model DNA-ribosome mixtures support a novel nucleoid-ribosome mixing hypothesis. In normal conditions, 70S-polysomes and the chromosomal DNA segregate, while 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits are able to penetrate the nucleoids. Growth conditions and drug treatments determine the partitioning of ribosomes into 70S-polysomes versus free 30S and 50S subunits. Entropic and excluded volume effects then dictate the resulting chromosome and ribosome spatial distributions. Direct observation of radial contraction of the nucleoids 0-5 min after treatment with either transcription- or translation-halting drugs supports the hypothesis that simultaneous transcription, translation, and insertion of proteins into the membrane ('transertion') exerts an expanding force on the chromosomal DNA. Breaking of the DNA-RNA polymerase-mRNA-ribosome-membrane chain in either of two ways causes similar nucleoid contraction on a similar timescale. We suggest that chromosomal expansion due to transertion enables co-transcriptional translation throughout the nucleoids.

  12. The structure of the archaebacterial ribosomal protein S7 and its possible interaction with 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, H; Yao, M; Kimura, M; Tanaka, I

    2001-11-01

    Ribosomal protein S7 is one of the ubiquitous components of the small subunit of the ribosome. It is a 16S rRNA-binding protein positioned close to the exit of the tRNA, and it plays a role in initiating assembly of the head of the 30S subunit. Previous structural analyses of eubacterial S7 have shown that it has a stable alpha-helix core and a flexible beta-arm. Unlike these eubacterial proteins, archaebacterial or eukaryotic S7 has an N-terminal extension of approximately 60 residues. The crystal structure of S7 from archaebacterium Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhoS7) has been determined at 2.1 A resolution. The final model of PhoS7 consists of six major alpha-helices, a short 3(10)-helix and two beta-stands. The major part (residues 18-45) of the N-terminal extension of PhoS7 reinforces the alpha-helical core by well-extended hydrophobic interactions, while the other part (residues 46-63) is not visible in the crystal and is possibly fixed only by interacting with 16S rRNA. These differences in the N-terminal extension as well as in the insertion (between alpha1 and alpha2) of the archaebacterial S7 structure from eubacterial S7 are such that they do not necessitate a major change in the structure of the currently available eubacterial 16S rRNA. Some of the inserted chains might pass through gaps formed by helices of the 16S rRNA.

  13. RatA (YfjG), An Escherichia Coli Toxin, Inhibits 70S Ribosome Association to Block Translation Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yonglong; Inouye, Masayori

    2011-01-01

    Summary RatA (YfjG) is a toxin encoded by the ratA-ratB (yfjG-yfjF) operon on the Escherichia coli genome. Induction of RatA led to the inhibition of protein synthesis, while DNA and RNA synthesis was not affected. The stability of mRNAs was also unchanged as judged by in vivo primer extension experiments and by Northern blotting analysis. The ribosome profile of the cells overexpressing RatA showed that 70S ribosomes as well as polysomes significantly decreased with concomitant increase of 50S and 30S subunits. The addition of purified RatA to a cell-free system inhibited the formation of 70S ribosomes even in the presence of 6 mM Mg2+. RatA was specifically associated with 50S subunits, indicating that it binds to 50S subunits to block its association with 30S subunits leading to the inhibition of formation of 70S ribosomes. However, RatA did not cause dissociation of 70S ribosomes and its anti-association activity was blocked by paromomycin, an inhibitor for IF3, an essential initiation factor, having 21% sequence homology with RatA. Here we demonstrate that RatA is a new E. coli toxin, which effectively blocks the translation initiation step. We propose that this toxin of previously unknown function be renamed as RatA (Ribosome association toxin A). PMID:21323758

  14. The importance of ribosome production, and the 5S RNP-MDM2 pathway, in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Pelava, Andria; Schneider, Claudia; Watkins, Nicholas J

    2016-08-15

    Ribosomes are abundant, large RNA-protein complexes that are the source of all protein synthesis in the cell. The production of ribosomes is an extremely energetically expensive cellular process that has long been linked to human health and disease. More recently, it has been shown that ribosome biogenesis is intimately linked to multiple cellular signalling pathways and that defects in ribosome production can lead to a wide variety of human diseases. Furthermore, changes in ribosome production in response to nutrient levels in the diet lead to metabolic re-programming of the liver. Reduced or abnormal ribosome production in response to cellular stress or mutations in genes encoding factors critical for ribosome biogenesis causes the activation of the tumour suppressor p53, which leads to re-programming of cellular transcription. The ribosomal assembly intermediate 5S RNP (ribonucleoprotein particle), containing RPL5, RPL11 and the 5S rRNA, accumulates when ribosome biogenesis is blocked. The excess 5S RNP binds to murine double minute 2 (MDM2), the main p53-suppressor in the cell, inhibiting its function and leading to p53 activation. Here, we discuss the involvement of ribosome biogenesis in the homoeostasis of p53 in the cell and in human health and disease. PMID:27528756

  15. The importance of ribosome production, and the 5S RNP-MDM2 pathway, in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Pelava, Andria; Schneider, Claudia; Watkins, Nicholas J

    2016-08-15

    Ribosomes are abundant, large RNA-protein complexes that are the source of all protein synthesis in the cell. The production of ribosomes is an extremely energetically expensive cellular process that has long been linked to human health and disease. More recently, it has been shown that ribosome biogenesis is intimately linked to multiple cellular signalling pathways and that defects in ribosome production can lead to a wide variety of human diseases. Furthermore, changes in ribosome production in response to nutrient levels in the diet lead to metabolic re-programming of the liver. Reduced or abnormal ribosome production in response to cellular stress or mutations in genes encoding factors critical for ribosome biogenesis causes the activation of the tumour suppressor p53, which leads to re-programming of cellular transcription. The ribosomal assembly intermediate 5S RNP (ribonucleoprotein particle), containing RPL5, RPL11 and the 5S rRNA, accumulates when ribosome biogenesis is blocked. The excess 5S RNP binds to murine double minute 2 (MDM2), the main p53-suppressor in the cell, inhibiting its function and leading to p53 activation. Here, we discuss the involvement of ribosome biogenesis in the homoeostasis of p53 in the cell and in human health and disease.

  16. The importance of ribosome production, and the 5S RNP–MDM2 pathway, in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Pelava, Andria; Schneider, Claudia; Watkins, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomes are abundant, large RNA–protein complexes that are the source of all protein synthesis in the cell. The production of ribosomes is an extremely energetically expensive cellular process that has long been linked to human health and disease. More recently, it has been shown that ribosome biogenesis is intimately linked to multiple cellular signalling pathways and that defects in ribosome production can lead to a wide variety of human diseases. Furthermore, changes in ribosome production in response to nutrient levels in the diet lead to metabolic re-programming of the liver. Reduced or abnormal ribosome production in response to cellular stress or mutations in genes encoding factors critical for ribosome biogenesis causes the activation of the tumour suppressor p53, which leads to re-programming of cellular transcription. The ribosomal assembly intermediate 5S RNP (ribonucleoprotein particle), containing RPL5, RPL11 and the 5S rRNA, accumulates when ribosome biogenesis is blocked. The excess 5S RNP binds to murine double minute 2 (MDM2), the main p53-suppressor in the cell, inhibiting its function and leading to p53 activation. Here, we discuss the involvement of ribosome biogenesis in the homoeostasis of p53 in the cell and in human health and disease. PMID:27528756

  17. Profiling of Mycoplasma gallisepticum Ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Fisunov, G Y; Evsyutina, D V; Arzamasov, A A; Butenko, I O; Govorun, V M

    2015-01-01

    The development of high-throughput technologies is increasingly resulting in identification of numerous cases of low correlation between mRNA and the protein level in cells. These controversial observations were made on various bacteria, such as E. coli, Desulfovibrio vulgaris, and Lactococcus lactis. Thus, it is important to develop technologies, including high-throughput techniques, aimed at studying gene expression regulation at the level of translation. In the current study, we performed proteomic profiling of M. gallisepticum ribosomes and identified high abundant noncanonical proteins. We found that binding of mRNAs to ribosomes is mainly determined by two parameters: (1) abundance of mRNA itself and (2) complimentary interactions between the 3' end of 16S rRNA and the ribosome binding site in the 5'-untranslated region of mRNA. PMID:26798497

  18. Interaction of neomycin with ribosomes and ribosomal ribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, A E; Horodyski, F; Keller, P

    1978-02-01

    Neomycin binds ribosomes and ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) in vivo and in vitro producing changes detectable by increases in gel electrophoretic mobility. These changes were observed in gels that contain ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or no added magnesium ion. The progressive increase in gel electrophoretic mobility with increasing antibiotic concentrations suggests that neomycin is binding at multiple sites on RNA. The binding was reversible but sufficiently stable to survive dialysis and electrophoresis. It is proposed that bound neomycin stabilizes the ribosome and RNA structures, restricting the unfolding of the particles during electrophoresis and thus allowing for a more rapid migration in the gel. Gentamicin produced an effect similar to that of neomycin. Paromomycin, differing from neomycin by only one amino group, had considerably less effect on ribosome and rRNA mobilities. The binding of neomycin to rRNA improved the linearity of the plot of log molecular weight versus mobility and thus may be of benefit in providing a more accurate estimation of molecular weights of large RNAs.

  19. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter offers an overview of the use of ribosomal RNA sequences. A history of the technology traces the evolution of techniques to measure bacterial phylogenetic relationships and recent advances in obtaining rRNA sequence information. The manual also describes procedu...

  20. {sup 30}S({alpha}, p) in X-Ray Bursts at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.; Binh, D. N.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Ohshiro, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Chen, A. A.; Chen, J.; Setoodeh nia, K.; Kaji, D.; Nishimura, S.; Kim, A.; Lee, N. H.; Wakabayashi, Y.

    2010-08-12

    Over the past three years, we have worked on developing a well-characterized {sup 30}S radioactive beam to be used in a future experiment aiming to directly measure the {sup 30}S({alpha}, p) stellar reaction rate within the Gamow window of Type I X-ray bursts.

  1. All Ribosomes Are Created Equal. Really?

    PubMed

    Preiss, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Ribosomes are generally thought of as molecular machines with a constitutive rather than regulatory role during protein synthesis. A study by Slavov et al.[1] now shows that ribosomes of distinct composition and functionality exist within eukaryotic cells, giving credence to the concept of 'specialized' ribosomes.

  2. Deletions in a ribosomal protein-coding gene are associated with tigecycline resistance in Enterococcus faecium.

    PubMed

    Niebel, Marc; Quick, Joshua; Prieto, Ana Maria Guzman; Hill, Robert L R; Pike, Rachel; Huber, Damon; David, Miruna; Hornsey, Michael; Wareham, David; Oppenheim, Beryl; Woodford, Neil; van Schaik, Willem; Loman, Nicholas

    2015-11-01

    Enterococcus faecium is an emerging nosocomial pathogen associated with antibiotic therapy in the hospital environment. Whole-genome sequences were determined for three pairs of related, consecutively collected E. faecium clinical isolates to determine putative mechanisms of resistance to tigecycline. The first isolates (1S, 2S and 3S) in each of the three pairs were sensitive to tigecycline [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.125 mg/L]. Following tigecycline therapy, the second isolate in each pair demonstrated increased resistance to tigecycline. Two isolates (1R and 2R) were resistant (MIC of 8 mg/L) and one isolate (3I) demonstrated reduced susceptibility (MIC of 0.5 mg/L). Mutations distinguishing each pair of sensitive and resistant isolates were determined through alignment to a reference genome and variant detection. In addition, a de novo assembly of each isolate genome was constructed to confirm mutations. A total of 16 mutations in eleven coding sequences were determined. Mutations in the rpsJ gene, which encodes a structural protein forming part of the 30S ribosomal subunit, were detected in each of the pairs. Mutations were in regions proximal to the predicted tigecycline-binding site. Predicted amino acid substitutions were detected in 1R and 3I. The resistant strains were additionally associated with deletions of 15 nucleotides (2R) and 3 nucleotides (1R). This study confirms that amino acid substitutions in rpsJ contribute towards reduced susceptibility to tigecycline and suggests that deletions may be required for tigecycline resistance in E. faecium.

  3. NEDDylation promotes stress granule assembly

    PubMed Central

    Jayabalan, Aravinth Kumar; Sanchez, Anthony; Park, Ra Young; Yoon, Sang Pil; Kang, Gum-Yong; Baek, Je-Hyun; Anderson, Paul; Kee, Younghoon; Ohn, Takbum

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) harbour translationally stalled messenger ribonucleoproteins and play important roles in regulating gene expression and cell fate. Here we show that neddylation promotes SG assembly in response to arsenite-induced oxidative stress. Inhibition or depletion of key components of the neddylation machinery concomitantly inhibits stress-induced polysome disassembly and SG assembly. Affinity purification and subsequent mass-spectrometric analysis of Nedd8-conjugated proteins from translationally stalled ribosomal fractions identified ribosomal proteins, translation factors and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), including SRSF3, a previously known SG regulator. We show that SRSF3 is selectively neddylated at Lys85 in response to arsenite. A non-neddylatable SRSF3 (K85R) mutant do not prevent arsenite-induced polysome disassembly, but fails to support the SG assembly, suggesting that the neddylation pathway plays an important role in SG assembly. PMID:27381497

  4. Steric interactions lead to collective tilting motion in the ribosome during mRNA-tRNA translocation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kien; Whitford, Paul C

    2016-01-01

    Translocation of mRNA and tRNA through the ribosome is associated with large-scale rearrangements of the head domain in the 30S ribosomal subunit. To elucidate the relationship between 30S head dynamics and mRNA-tRNA displacement, we apply molecular dynamics simulations using an all-atom structure-based model. Here we provide a statistical analysis of 250 spontaneous transitions between the A/P-P/E and P/P-E/E ensembles. Consistent with structural studies, the ribosome samples a chimeric ap/P-pe/E intermediate, where the 30S head is rotated ∼18°. It then transiently populates a previously unreported intermediate ensemble, which is characterized by a ∼10° tilt of the head. To identify the origins of head tilting, we analyse 781 additional simulations in which specific steric features are perturbed. These calculations show that head tilting may be attributed to specific steric interactions between tRNA and the 30S subunit (PE loop and protein S13). Taken together, this study demonstrates how molecular structure can give rise to large-scale collective rearrangements. PMID:26838673

  5. Steric interactions lead to collective tilting motion in the ribosome during mRNA-tRNA translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Kien; Whitford, Paul C.

    2016-02-01

    Translocation of mRNA and tRNA through the ribosome is associated with large-scale rearrangements of the head domain in the 30S ribosomal subunit. To elucidate the relationship between 30S head dynamics and mRNA-tRNA displacement, we apply molecular dynamics simulations using an all-atom structure-based model. Here we provide a statistical analysis of 250 spontaneous transitions between the A/P-P/E and P/P-E/E ensembles. Consistent with structural studies, the ribosome samples a chimeric ap/P-pe/E intermediate, where the 30S head is rotated ~18°. It then transiently populates a previously unreported intermediate ensemble, which is characterized by a ~10° tilt of the head. To identify the origins of head tilting, we analyse 781 additional simulations in which specific steric features are perturbed. These calculations show that head tilting may be attributed to specific steric interactions between tRNA and the 30S subunit (PE loop and protein S13). Taken together, this study demonstrates how molecular structure can give rise to large-scale collective rearrangements.

  6. Steric interactions lead to collective tilting motion in the ribosome during mRNA–tRNA translocation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kien; Whitford, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Translocation of mRNA and tRNA through the ribosome is associated with large-scale rearrangements of the head domain in the 30S ribosomal subunit. To elucidate the relationship between 30S head dynamics and mRNA–tRNA displacement, we apply molecular dynamics simulations using an all-atom structure-based model. Here we provide a statistical analysis of 250 spontaneous transitions between the A/P–P/E and P/P–E/E ensembles. Consistent with structural studies, the ribosome samples a chimeric ap/P–pe/E intermediate, where the 30S head is rotated ∼18°. It then transiently populates a previously unreported intermediate ensemble, which is characterized by a ∼10° tilt of the head. To identify the origins of head tilting, we analyse 781 additional simulations in which specific steric features are perturbed. These calculations show that head tilting may be attributed to specific steric interactions between tRNA and the 30S subunit (PE loop and protein S13). Taken together, this study demonstrates how molecular structure can give rise to large-scale collective rearrangements. PMID:26838673

  7. Recognition of the 70S ribosome and polysome by the RNA degradosome in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Chun; Du, Dijun; Domínguez-Malfavón, Lilianha; Dimastrogiovanni, Daniela; Cross, Jonathan; Callaghan, Anastasia J; García-Mena, Jaime; Luisi, Ben F

    2012-11-01

    The RNA degradosome is a multi-enzyme assembly that contributes to key processes of RNA metabolism, and it engages numerous partners in serving its varied functional roles. Small domains within the assembly recognize collectively a diverse range of macromolecules, including the core protein components, the cytoplasmic lipid membrane, mRNAs, non-coding regulatory RNAs and precursors of structured RNAs. We present evidence that the degradosome can form a stable complex with the 70S ribosome and polysomes, and we demonstrate the proximity in vivo of ribosomal proteins and the scaffold of the degradosome, RNase E. The principal interactions are mapped to two, independent, RNA-binding domains from RNase E. RhlB, the RNA helicase component of the degradosome, also contributes to ribosome binding, and this is favoured through an activating interaction with RNase E. The catalytic activity of RNase E for processing 9S RNA (the ribosomal 5S RNA precursor) is repressed in the presence of the ribosome, whereas there is little affect on the cleavage of single-stranded substrates mediated by non-coding RNA, suggestings that the enzyme retains capacity to cleave unstructured substrates when associated with the ribosome. We propose that polysomes may act as antennae that enhance the rates of capture of the limited number of degradosomes, so that they become recruited to sites of active translation to act on mRNAs as they become exposed or tagged for degradation.

  8. Direct interaction of the N-terminal domain of ribosomal protein S1 with protein S2 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Byrgazov, Konstantin; Manoharadas, Salim; Kaberdina, Anna C; Vesper, Oliver; Moll, Isabella

    2012-01-01

    Despite of the high resolution structure available for the E. coli ribosome, hitherto the structure and localization of the essential ribosomal protein S1 on the 30 S subunit still remains to be elucidated. It was previously reported that protein S1 binds to the ribosome via protein-protein interaction at the two N-terminal domains. Moreover, protein S2 was shown to be required for binding of protein S1 to the ribosome. Here, we present evidence that the N-terminal domain of S1 (amino acids 1-106; S1(106)) is necessary and sufficient for the interaction with protein S2 as well as for ribosome binding. We show that over production of protein S1(106) affects E. coli growth by displacing native protein S1 from its binding pocket on the ribosome. In addition, our data reveal that the coiled-coil domain of protein S2 (S2α(2)) is sufficient to allow protein S1 to bind to the ribosome. Taken together, these data uncover the crucial elements required for the S1/S2 interaction, which is pivotal for translation initiation on canonical mRNAs in gram-negative bacteria. The results are discussed in terms of a model wherein the S1/S2 interaction surface could represent a possible target to modulate the selectivity of the translational machinery and thereby alter the translational program under distinct conditions.

  9. Chaperoning 5S RNA assembly.

    PubMed

    Madru, Clément; Lebaron, Simon; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Pipoli, Juliana; Pasmant, Eric; Réty, Stéphane; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    In eukaryotes, three of the four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs)—the 5.8S, 18S, and 25S/28S rRNAs—are processed from a single pre-rRNA transcript and assembled into ribosomes. The fourth rRNA, the 5S rRNA, is transcribed by RNA polymerase III and is assembled into the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP), containing ribosomal proteins Rpl5/uL18 and Rpl11/uL5, prior to its incorporation into preribosomes. In mammals, the 5S RNP is also a central regulator of the homeostasis of the tumor suppressor p53. The nucleolar localization of the 5S RNP and its assembly into preribosomes are performed by a specialized complex composed of Rpf2 and Rrs1 in yeast or Bxdc1 and hRrs1 in humans. Here we report the structural and functional characterization of the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex alone, in complex with the 5S RNA, and within pre-60S ribosomes. We show that the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex contains a specialized 5S RNA E-loop-binding module, contacts the Rpl5 protein, and also contacts the ribosome assembly factor Rsa4 and the 25S RNA. We propose that the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex establishes a network of interactions that guide the incorporation of the 5S RNP in preribosomes in the initial conformation prior to its rotation to form the central protuberance found in the mature large ribosomal subunit.

  10. Chaperoning 5S RNA assembly

    PubMed Central

    Madru, Clément; Lebaron, Simon; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Pipoli, Juliana; Pasmant, Eric; Réty, Stéphane; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, three of the four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs)—the 5.8S, 18S, and 25S/28S rRNAs—are processed from a single pre-rRNA transcript and assembled into ribosomes. The fourth rRNA, the 5S rRNA, is transcribed by RNA polymerase III and is assembled into the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP), containing ribosomal proteins Rpl5/uL18 and Rpl11/uL5, prior to its incorporation into preribosomes. In mammals, the 5S RNP is also a central regulator of the homeostasis of the tumor suppressor p53. The nucleolar localization of the 5S RNP and its assembly into preribosomes are performed by a specialized complex composed of Rpf2 and Rrs1 in yeast or Bxdc1 and hRrs1 in humans. Here we report the structural and functional characterization of the Rpf2–Rrs1 complex alone, in complex with the 5S RNA, and within pre-60S ribosomes. We show that the Rpf2–Rrs1 complex contains a specialized 5S RNA E-loop-binding module, contacts the Rpl5 protein, and also contacts the ribosome assembly factor Rsa4 and the 25S RNA. We propose that the Rpf2–Rrs1 complex establishes a network of interactions that guide the incorporation of the 5S RNP in preribosomes in the initial conformation prior to its rotation to form the central protuberance found in the mature large ribosomal subunit. PMID:26159998

  11. Evolution of the holozoan ribosome biogenesis regulon

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Seth J; Cole, Michael D; Erives, Albert J

    2008-01-01

    Background The ribosome biogenesis (RiBi) genes encode a highly-conserved eukaryotic set of nucleolar proteins involved in rRNA transcription, assembly, processing, and export from the nucleus. While the mode of regulation of this suite of genes has been studied in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, how this gene set is coordinately regulated in the larger and more complex metazoan genomes is not understood. Results Here we present genome-wide analyses indicating that a distinct mode of RiBi regulation co-evolved with the E(CG)-binding, Myc:Max bHLH heterodimer complex in a stem-holozoan, the ancestor of both Metazoa and Choanoflagellata, the protozoan group most closely related to animals. These results show that this mode of regulation, characterized by an E(CG)-bearing core-promoter, is specific to almost all of the known genes involved in ribosome biogenesis in these genomes. Interestingly, this holozoan RiBi promoter signature is absent in nematode genomes, which have not only secondarily lost Myc but are marked by invariant cell lineages typically producing small body plans of 1000 somatic cells. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of 10 fungal genomes shows that this holozoan signature in RiBi genes is not found in hemiascomycete fungi, which evolved their own unique regulatory signature for the RiBi regulon. Conclusion These results indicate that a Myc regulon, which is activated in proliferating cells during normal development as well as during tumor progression, has primordial roots in the evolution of an inducible growth regime in a protozoan ancestor of animals. Furthermore, by comparing divergent bHLH repertoires, we conclude that regulation by Myc but not by other bHLH genes is responsible for the evolutionary maintenance of E(CG) sites across the RiBi suite of genes. PMID:18816399

  12. The RNA-binding protein Gemin5 binds directly to the ribosome and regulates global translation

    PubMed Central

    Francisco-Velilla, Rosario; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Ramajo, Jorge; Martinez-Salas, Encarnación

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play crucial roles in all organisms. The protein Gemin5 harbors two functional domains. The N-terminal domain binds to snRNAs targeting them for snRNPs assembly, while the C-terminal domain binds to IRES elements through a non-canonical RNA-binding site. Here we report a comprehensive view of the Gemin5 interactome; most partners copurified with the N-terminal domain via RNA bridges. Notably, Gemin5 sediments with the subcellular ribosome fraction, and His-Gemin5 binds to ribosome particles via its N-terminal domain. The interaction with the ribosome was lost in F381A and Y474A Gemin5 mutants, but not in W14A and Y15A. Moreover, the ribosomal proteins L3 and L4 bind directly with Gemin5, and conversely, Gemin5 mutants impairing the binding to the ribosome are defective in the interaction with L3 and L4. The overall polysome profile was affected by Gemin5 depletion or overexpression, concomitant to an increase or a decrease, respectively, of global protein synthesis. Gemin5, and G5-Nter as well, were detected on the polysome fractions. These results reveal the ribosome-binding capacity of the N-ter moiety, enabling Gemin5 to control global protein synthesis. Our study uncovers a crosstalk between this protein and the ribosome, and provides support for the view that Gemin5 may control translation elongation. PMID:27507887

  13. Eukaryote-specific rRNA expansion segments function in ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Madhumitha; Woolford, John L

    2016-08-01

    The secondary structure of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is largely conserved across all kingdoms of life. However, eukaryotes have evolved extra blocks of rRNA sequences, relative to those of prokaryotes, called expansion segments (ES). A thorough characterization of the potential roles of ES remains to be done, possibly because of limitations in the availability of robust systems to study rRNA mutants. We sought to systematically investigate the potential functions, if any, of the ES in 25S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by deletion mutagenesis. We deleted 14 of the 16 different eukaryote-specific ES in yeast 25S rRNA individually and assayed their phenotypes. Our results show that all but two of the ES tested are necessary for optimal growth and are required for production of 25S rRNA, suggesting that ES play roles in ribosome biogenesis. Further, we classified expansion segments into groups that participate in early nucleolar, middle, and late nucleoplasmic steps of ribosome biogenesis, by assaying their pre-rRNA processing phenotypes. This study is the first of its kind to systematically identify the functions of eukaryote-specific expansion segments by showing that they play roles in specific steps of ribosome biogenesis. The catalog of phenotypes we identified, combined with previous investigations of the roles ribosomal proteins in large subunit biogenesis, leads us to infer that assembling ribosomes are composed of distinct RNA and protein structural neighborhood clusters that participate in specific steps of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:27317789

  14. Revealing unique properties of the ribosome using a network based analysis

    PubMed Central

    David-Eden, Hilda; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2008-01-01

    The ribosome is a complex molecular machine that offers many potential sites for functional interference, therefore representing a major target for antibacterial drugs. The growing number of high-resolution structures of ribosomes from different organisms, in free form and in complex with various ligands, provides unique data for structural and comparative analyses of RNA structures. We model the ribosome structure as a network, where nucleotides are represented as nodes and intermolecular interactions as edges. As shown previously for proteins, we found that the major functional sites of the ribosome exhibit significantly high centrality measures. Specifically, we demonstrate that mutations that strongly affect ribosome function and assembly can be distinguished from mild mutations based on their network properties. Furthermore, we observed that closeness centrality of the rRNA nucleotides is highly conserved in the bacteria, suggesting the network representation as a comparative tool for the ribosome analysis. Finally, we suggest a global topology perspective to characterize functional sites and to reveal the unique properties of the ribosome. PMID:18625614

  15. A reconstituted cell-free assay for the evaluation of the intrinsic activity of purified human ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Penzo, Marianna; Carnicelli, Domenica; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Brigotti, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    We describe a cell-free translation system for evaluating the activity of ribosomes stringently purified from human cells. This system is based on in vitro reconstitution of the cellular translation machinery, in which a ribosome-free rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL) is reassembled with human ribosomes and in vitro-transcribed reporter mRNAs. The protocol describes the preparation of the RRL-derived fractions, purification of ribosomes devoid of detectable nonribosomal-associated factors, and assembly of the reactions to evaluate ribosomal translational efficiency and fidelity using appropriate reporter transcripts. The whole procedure can be completed in ∼2.5 d (plus 2 weeks for RRL preparation and cell expansion time). This protocol can be applied to study intrinsic functional properties (cis-acting element-mediated translation initiation or translational fidelity) of ribosome populations from different sources (including nonhuman origin). It is therefore useful for the characterization of ribosomal function in ribosomopathies and cancer, and it will be applicable in the emerging fields of ribosome diversity and specialized ribosomes.

  16. A reconstituted cell-free assay for the evaluation of the intrinsic activity of purified human ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Penzo, Marianna; Carnicelli, Domenica; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Brigotti, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    We describe a cell-free translation system for evaluating the activity of ribosomes stringently purified from human cells. This system is based on in vitro reconstitution of the cellular translation machinery, in which a ribosome-free rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL) is reassembled with human ribosomes and in vitro-transcribed reporter mRNAs. The protocol describes the preparation of the RRL-derived fractions, purification of ribosomes devoid of detectable nonribosomal-associated factors, and assembly of the reactions to evaluate ribosomal translational efficiency and fidelity using appropriate reporter transcripts. The whole procedure can be completed in ∼2.5 d (plus 2 weeks for RRL preparation and cell expansion time). This protocol can be applied to study intrinsic functional properties (cis-acting element-mediated translation initiation or translational fidelity) of ribosome populations from different sources (including nonhuman origin). It is therefore useful for the characterization of ribosomal function in ribosomopathies and cancer, and it will be applicable in the emerging fields of ribosome diversity and specialized ribosomes. PMID:27336708

  17. Characterizing inactive ribosomes in translational profiling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Botao; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    The broad impact of translational regulation has emerged explosively in the last few years in part due to the technological advance in genome-wide interrogation of gene expression. During mRNA translation, the majority of actively translating ribosomes exist as polysomes in cells with multiple ribosomes loaded on a single transcript. The importance of the monosome, however, has been less appreciated in translational profiling analysis. Here we report that the monosome fraction isolated by sucrose sedimentation contains a large quantity of inactive ribosomes that do not engage on mRNAs to direct translation. We found that the elongation factor eEF2, but not eEF1A, stably resides in these non-translating ribosomes. This unique feature permits direct evaluation of ribosome status under various stress conditions and in the presence of translation inhibitors. Ribosome profiling reveals that the monosome has a similar but not identical pattern of ribosome footprints compared to the polysome. We show that the association of free ribosomal subunits minimally contributes to ribosome occupancy outside of the coding region. Our results not only offer a quantitative method to monitor ribosome availability, but also uncover additional layers of ribosome status needed to be considered in translational profiling analysis. PMID:27335722

  18. Alcoholic Liver Disease and the Mitochondrial Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Alan; Sykora, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Summary Chronic alcohol consumption has been shown to severely compromise mitochondrial protein synthesis. Hepatic mitochondria isolated from alcoholic animals contain decreased levels of respiratory complexes and display depressed respiration rates when compared to pair-fed controls. One underlying mechanism for this involves ethanol-elicited alterations in the structural and functional integrity of the mitochondrial ribosome. Ethanol feeding results in ribosomal changes that include decreased sedimentation rates, larger hydrodynamic volumes, increased levels of unassociated subunits and changes in the levels of specific ribosomal proteins. The methods presented in this chapter detail how to isolate mitochondrial ribosomes, determine ribosomal activity, separate ribosomes into nucleic acid and protein, and perform two-dimensional nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoretic polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to separate and subsequently identify mitochondrial ribosomal proteins. PMID:18369931

  19. Crystal structure of the eukaryotic ribosome.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shem, Adam; Jenner, Lasse; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2010-11-26

    Crystal structures of prokaryotic ribosomes have described in detail the universally conserved core of the translation mechanism. However, many facets of the translation process in eukaryotes are not shared with prokaryotes. The crystal structure of the yeast 80S ribosome determined at 4.15 angstrom resolution reveals the higher complexity of eukaryotic ribosomes, which are 40% larger than their bacterial counterparts. Our model shows how eukaryote-specific elements considerably expand the network of interactions within the ribosome and provides insights into eukaryote-specific features of protein synthesis. Our crystals capture the ribosome in the ratcheted state, which is essential for translocation of mRNA and transfer RNA (tRNA), and in which the small ribosomal subunit has rotated with respect to the large subunit. We describe the conformational changes in both ribosomal subunits that are involved in ratcheting and their implications in coordination between the two associated subunits and in mRNA and tRNA translocation.

  20. 5S rRNA and ribosome.

    PubMed

    Gongadze, G M

    2011-12-01

    5S rRNA is an integral component of the ribosome of all living organisms. It is known that the ribosome without 5S rRNA is functionally inactive. However, the question about the specific role of this RNA in functioning of the translation apparatus is still open. This review presents a brief history of the discovery of 5S rRNA and studies of its origin and localization in the ribosome. The previously expressed hypotheses about the role of this RNA in the functioning of the ribosome are discussed considering the unique location of 5S rRNA in the ribosome and its intermolecular contacts. Based on analysis of the current data on ribosome structure and its functional complexes, the role of 5S rRNA as an intermediary between ribosome functional domains is discussed.

  1. Pathways to Specialized Ribosomes: The Brussels Lecture.

    PubMed

    Dinman, Jonathan D

    2016-05-22

    "Specialized ribosomes" is a topic of intense debate and research whose provenance can be traced to the earliest days of molecular biology. Here, the history of this idea is reviewed, and critical literature in which the specialized ribosomes have come to be presently defined is discussed. An argument supporting the evolution of a variety of ribosomes with specialized functions as a consequence of selective pressures acting on a near-infinite set of possible ribosomes is presented, leading to a discussion of how this may also serve as a biological buffering mechanism. The possible relationship between specialized ribosomes and human health is explored. A set of criteria and possible approaches are also presented to help guide the definitive identification of "specialized" ribosomes, and this is followed by a discussion of how synthetic biology approaches might be used to create new types of special ribosomes.

  2. Ribosomal targets for antibiotic drug discovery

    DOEpatents

    Blanchard, Scott C.; Feldman, Michael Brian; Wang, Leyi; Doudna Cate, James H.; Pulk, Arto; Altman, Roger B.; Wasserman, Michael R

    2016-09-13

    The present invention relates to methods to identify molecules that binds in the neomycin binding pocket of a bacterial ribosome using structures of an intact bacterial ribosome that reveal how the ribosome binds tRNA in two functionally distinct states, determined by x-ray crystallography. One state positions tRNA in the peptidyl-tRNA binding site. The second, a fully rotated state, is stabilized by ribosome recycling factor (RRF) and binds tRNA in a highly bent conformation in a hybrid peptidyl/exit (P/E) site. Additionally, the invention relates to various assays, including single-molecule assay for ribosome recycling, and methods to identify compounds that interfere with ribosomal function by detecting newly identified intermediate FRET states using known and novel FRET pairs on the ribosome. The invention also provides vectors and compositions with an N-terminally tagged S13 protein.

  3. Pathways to Specialized Ribosomes: The Brussels Lecture.

    PubMed

    Dinman, Jonathan D

    2016-05-22

    "Specialized ribosomes" is a topic of intense debate and research whose provenance can be traced to the earliest days of molecular biology. Here, the history of this idea is reviewed, and critical literature in which the specialized ribosomes have come to be presently defined is discussed. An argument supporting the evolution of a variety of ribosomes with specialized functions as a consequence of selective pressures acting on a near-infinite set of possible ribosomes is presented, leading to a discussion of how this may also serve as a biological buffering mechanism. The possible relationship between specialized ribosomes and human health is explored. A set of criteria and possible approaches are also presented to help guide the definitive identification of "specialized" ribosomes, and this is followed by a discussion of how synthetic biology approaches might be used to create new types of special ribosomes. PMID:26764228

  4. [Structure and function of the eukaryotic ribosome].

    PubMed

    Bakowska-Zywicka, Kamilla; Twardowski, Tomasz

    2008-01-01

    The protein biosynthesis is a complicated process and not fully understood yet. According to smaller size and less complicated structure, understanding of prokaryotic 70S ribosomes is much more advanced. Eucaryotic 80S ribosomes are more complex and generate more difficulties in research. The morphology of 80S ribosome has been pretty well resolved and we know a lot about mechanism of functioning. Determination of the interactions between the ribosomes and the factors taking part in protein biosynthesis is still a great challenge. Dynamic changes of these interactions during particular steps of elongation cycle are quite difficult to understand. Conformational changes of the ribosome are of great functional and regulatory importance during protein biosynthesis. They are essential for the whole gene expression process. Only further research of the structure and function of the ribosome will lead us to knowledge about specificity of the mechanism of their action. In this article we present current opinions concerning structure and function of the eukaryotic ribosomes.

  5. Phylogenomics of Prokaryotic Ribosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yutin, Natalya; Puigbò, Pere; Koonin, Eugene V.; Wolf, Yuri I.

    2012-01-01

    Archaeal and bacterial ribosomes contain more than 50 proteins, including 34 that are universally conserved in the three domains of cellular life (bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes). Despite the high sequence conservation, annotation of ribosomal (r-) protein genes is often difficult because of their short lengths and biased sequence composition. We developed an automated computational pipeline for identification of r-protein genes and applied it to 995 completely sequenced bacterial and 87 archaeal genomes available in the RefSeq database. The pipeline employs curated seed alignments of r-proteins to run position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based BLAST searches against six-frame genome translations, mitigating possible gene annotation errors. As a result of this analysis, we performed a census of prokaryotic r-protein complements, enumerated missing and paralogous r-proteins, and analyzed the distributions of ribosomal protein genes among chromosomal partitions. Phyletic patterns of bacterial and archaeal r-protein genes were mapped to phylogenetic trees reconstructed from concatenated alignments of r-proteins to reveal the history of likely multiple independent gains and losses. These alignments, available for download, can be used as search profiles to improve genome annotation of r-proteins and for further comparative genomics studies. PMID:22615861

  6. Nuclear structure of 30S and its implications for nucleosynthesis in classical novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setoodehnia, K.; Chen, A. A.; Kahl, D.; Komatsubara, T.; José, J.; Longland, R.; Abe, Y.; Binh, D. N.; Chen, J.; Cherubini, S.; Clark, J. A.; Deibel, C. M.; Fukuoka, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, T.; Hendriks, J.; Ishibashi, Y.; Ito, Y.; Kubono, S.; Lennard, W. N.; Moriguchi, T.; Nagae, D.; Nishikiori, R.; Niwa, T.; Ozawa, A.; Parker, P. D.; Seiler, D.; Shizuma, T.; Suzuki, H.; Wrede, C.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yuasa, T.

    2013-06-01

    Background: The uncertainty in the 29P(p,γ)30S reaction rate over 0.1 ≤ T ≤ 1.3 GK was previously determined to span approximately four orders of magnitude due to the uncertain location of two previously unobserved 3+ and 2+ resonances in the Ex=4.7-4.8 MeV region in 30S. Therefore, the abundances of silicon isotopes synthesized in novae, which are relevant for the identification of presolar grains of putative nova origin, were uncertain by a factor of 3.Purpose: (a) To investigate the level structure of 30S above the proton threshold [4394.9(7) keV] via charged-particle spectroscopy using the 32S(p,t)30S reaction and in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy using the 28Si(3He, nγ)30S reaction to calculate the 29P(p,γ)30S reaction rate. (b) To explore the impact of this rate on the abundances of silicon isotopes synthesized in novae.Methods: Differential cross sections of the 32S(p,t)30S reaction were measured at 34.5 MeV. Distorted-wave Born approximation calculations were performed to constrain the spin-parity assignments of the observed levels, including the two astrophysically important levels. An energy-level scheme was deduced from γ-γ coincidence measurements using the 28Si(3He, nγ)30S reaction. Spin-parity assignments based on measurements of γ-ray angular distributions and γ-γ directional correlation from oriented nuclei were made for most of the observed levels of 30S.Results: The resonance energies corresponding to the states with 4.5 MeV ≲ Ex ≲ 6 MeV, including the two astrophysically important states predicted previously, are measured with significantly better precision than before. The spin-parity assignments of both astrophysically important resonances are confirmed. The uncertainty in the rate of the 29P(p,γ)30S reaction is substantially reduced over the temperature range of interest. Finally, the influence of this rate on the abundance ratios of silicon isotopes synthesized in novae are obtained via 1D hydrodynamic nova simulations

  7. Neutron scattering in the ribosome structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdyuk, Igor N.

    1997-02-01

    Thermal neutron scattering has become a powerful instrument for studying the ribosome and its components. The application of neutron scattering allowed to establish some principal features of the ribosome structure: non-homogeneous distribution of the RNA and protein within ribosomal particles, the RNA role as a framework in the arrangement and maintenance of the structure of ribosomal particles, and the globular character of ribosomal proteins. The use of selective deuteration of separate ribosomal proteins in combination with the triangulation method revealed mutual spatial arrangement (the 3D-map) of all the ribosomal proteins within the small particle and in the most part of the large ribosomal particle. An essential impact has been made in the structural studies of ribosomes with the development of novel experimental approaches: triple isotopic substitution and spin contrast variation. These approaches with direct interpretation of spherical harmonics provide new possibilities for constructing models of ribosomal particles, opening principally new perspectives for joint use of X-ray synchrotron diffraction in crystals and small-angle neutron scattering in solution.

  8. Ribosome engineering to promote new crystal forms

    SciTech Connect

    Selmer, Maria; Gao, Yong-Gui; Weixlbaumer, Albert; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2012-05-01

    Truncation of ribosomal protein L9 in T. thermophilus allows the generation of new crystal forms and the crystallization of ribosome–GTPase complexes. Crystallographic studies of the ribosome have provided molecular details of protein synthesis. However, the crystallization of functional complexes of ribosomes with GTPase translation factors proved to be elusive for a decade after the first ribosome structures were determined. Analysis of the packing in different 70S ribosome crystal forms revealed that regardless of the species or space group, a contact between ribosomal protein L9 from the large subunit and 16S rRNA in the shoulder of a neighbouring small subunit in the crystal lattice competes with the binding of GTPase elongation factors to this region of 16S rRNA. To prevent the formation of this preferred crystal contact, a mutant strain of Thermus thermophilus, HB8-MRCMSAW1, in which the ribosomal protein L9 gene has been truncated was constructed by homologous recombination. Mutant 70S ribosomes were used to crystallize and solve the structure of the ribosome with EF-G, GDP and fusidic acid in a previously unobserved crystal form. Subsequent work has shown the usefulness of this strain for crystallization of the ribosome with other GTPase factors.

  9. Pseudouridines and pseudouridine synthases of the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Ofengand, J; Malhotra, A; Remme, J; Gutgsell, N S; Del Campo, M; Jean-Charles, S; Peil, L; Kaya, Y

    2001-01-01

    psi are ubiquitous in ribosomal RNA. Eubacteria, Archaea, and eukaryotes all contain psi, although their number varies widely, with eukaryotes having the most. The small ribosomal subunit can apparently do without psi in some organisms, even though others have as many as 40 or more. Large subunits appear to need at least one psi but can have up to 50-60. psi is made by a set of site-specific enzymes in eubacteria, and in eukaryotes by a single enzyme complexed with auxiliary proteins and specificity-conferring guide RNAs. The mechanism is not known in Archaea, but based on an analysis of the kinds of psi synthases found in sequenced archaeal genomes, it is likely to involve use of guide RNAs. All psi synthases can be classified into one of four related groups, virtually all of which have a conserved aspartate residue in a conserved sequence motif. The aspartate is essential for psi formation in all twelve synthases examined so far. When the need for psi in E. coli was examined, the only synthase whose absence caused a major decrease in growth rate under normal conditions was RluD, the synthase that makes psi 1911, psi 1915, and psi 1917 in the helix 69 end-loop. This growth defect was the result of a major failure in assembly of the large ribosomal subunit. The defect could be prevented by supplying the rluD structural gene in trans, and also by providing a point mutant gene that made a synthase unable to make psi. Therefore, the RluD synthase protein appears to be directly involved in 50S subunit assembly, possibly as an RNA chaperone, and this activity is independent of its ability to form psi. This result is not without precedent. Depletion of PET56, a 2'-O-methyltransferase specific for G2251 (E. coli numbering) in yeast mitochondria virtually blocks 50S subunit assembly and mitochondrial function (Sirum-Connolly et al. 1995), but the methylation activity of the enzyme is not required (T. Mason, pers. comm.). The absence of FtsJ, a heat shock protein that makes

  10. Modification of Escherichia coli ribosomes with the fluorescent reagent N-[[(iodoacetyl)amino]ethyl]-5-naphthylamine-1-sulfonic acid. Identification of derivatized L31' and studies on its intraribosomal properties.

    PubMed

    Hanas, J S; Simpson, M V

    1985-12-01

    N-[[(Iodoacetyl)amino]ethyl]-5-naphthylamine-1-sulfonic acid (IAEDANS) is a fluorescent reagent which reacts covalently with the free thiol groups of proteins. When the reagent is reacted with the Escherichia coli ribosome under mild conditions, gel electrophoresis shows modification of predominantly two proteins, S18 and L31', which become labeled to an equal extent. When the native (i.e., untreated) ribosome is dissociated into 30S and 50S subunits, only the 30S ribosomal protein S18 reacts with IAEDANS despite the fact that L31' is still present on the large subunit. Upon heat activation of the subunits, a procedure which alters subunit conformation, S18 plus a number of higher molecular weight proteins is modified, but not L31'; the latter reacts with IAEDANS only in the 70S ribosome or when it is free. In contrast to the relatively stable association of L31' with native or with dissociated ribosomes, dissociation of N-[(acetylamino)ethyl]-5-naphthylaminesulfonic acid (AEDANS)-treated ribosomes weakens the AEDANS-L31'/ribosome interaction, resulting, upon gel filtration analysis, in ribosomes devoid of this derivatized protein.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of ribosomal protein gene coregulation

    PubMed Central

    Reja, Rohit; Vinayachandran, Vinesh; Ghosh, Sujana; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    The 137 ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) of Saccharomyces provide a model for gene coregulation. We examined the positional and functional organization of their regulators (Rap1 [repressor activator protein 1], Fhl1, Ifh1, Sfp1, and Hmo1), the transcription machinery (TFIIB, TFIID, and RNA polymerase II), and chromatin at near-base-pair resolution using ChIP-exo, as RPGs are coordinately reprogrammed. Where Hmo1 is enriched, Fhl1, Ifh1, Sfp1, and Hmo1 cross-linked broadly to promoter DNA in an RPG-specific manner and demarcated by general minor groove widening. Importantly, Hmo1 extended 20–50 base pairs (bp) downstream from Fhl1. Upon RPG repression, Fhl1 remained in place. Hmo1 dissociated, which was coupled to an upstream shift of the +1 nucleosome, as reflected by the Hmo1 extension and core promoter region. Fhl1 and Hmo1 may create two regulatable and positionally distinct barriers, against which chromatin remodelers position the +1 nucleosome into either an activating or a repressive state. Consistent with in vitro studies, we found that specific TFIID subunits, in addition to cross-linking at the core promoter, made precise cross-links at Rap1 sites, which we interpret to reflect native Rap1–TFIID interactions. Our findings suggest how sequence-specific DNA binding regulates nucleosome positioning and transcription complex assembly >300 bp away and how coregulation coevolved with coding sequences. PMID:26385964

  12. Ribosome-associated protein quality control

    PubMed Central

    Brandman, Onn; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis by the ribosome can fail for numerous reasons including faulty mRNA, insufficient availability of charged tRNAs and genetic errors. All organisms have evolved mechanisms to recognize stalled ribosomes and initiate pathways for recycling, quality control and stress signaling. Here we review the discovery and molecular dissection of the eukaryotic ribosome-associated quality-control pathway for degradation of nascent polypeptides arising from interrupted translation. PMID:26733220

  13. Plastid ribosomal protein S5 is involved in photosynthesis, plant development, and cold stress tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junxiang; Yuan, Hui; Yang, Yong; Fish, Tara; Lyi, Sangbom M.; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Zhang, Lugang; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Plastid ribosomal proteins are essential components of protein synthesis machinery and have diverse roles in plant growth and development. Mutations in plastid ribosomal proteins lead to a range of developmental phenotypes in plants. However, how they regulate these processes is not fully understood, and the functions of some individual plastid ribosomal proteins remain unknown. To identify genes responsible for chloroplast development, we isolated and characterized a mutant that exhibited pale yellow inner leaves with a reduced growth rate in Arabidopsis. The mutant (rps5) contained a missense mutation of plastid ribosomal protein S5 (RPS5), which caused a dramatically reduced abundance of chloroplast 16S rRNA and seriously impaired 16S rRNA processing to affect ribosome function and plastid translation. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed that the rps5 mutation suppressed the expression of a large number of core components involved in photosystems I and II as well as many plastid ribosomal proteins. Unexpectedly, a number of proteins associated with cold stress responses were greatly decreased in rps5, and overexpression of the plastid RPS5 improved plant cold stress tolerance. Our results indicate that RPS5 is an important constituent of the plastid 30S subunit and affects proteins involved in photosynthesis and cold stress responses to mediate plant growth and development. PMID:27006483

  14. Highly conserved base A55 of 16S ribosomal RNA is important for the elongation cycle of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Bhubanananda; Khade, Prashant K; Joseph, Simpson

    2013-09-24

    Accurate decoding of mRNA requires the precise interaction of protein factors and tRNAs with the ribosome. X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy have provided detailed structural information about the 70S ribosome with protein factors and tRNAs trapped during translation. Crystal structures showed that one of the universally conserved 16S rRNA bases, A55, in the shoulder domain of the 30S subunit interacts with elongation factors Tu and G (EF-Tu and EF-G, respectively). The exact functional role of A55 in protein synthesis is not clear. We changed A55 to U and analyzed the effect of the mutation on the elongation cycle of protein synthesis using functional assays. Expression of 16S rRNA with the A55U mutation in cells confers a dominant lethal phenotype. Additionally, ribosomes with the A55U mutation in 16S rRNA show substantially reduced in vitro protein synthesis activity. Equilibrium binding studies showed that the A55U mutation considerably inhibited the binding of the EF-Tu·GTP·tRNA ternary complex to the ribosome. Furthermore, the A55U mutation slightly inhibited the peptidyl transferase reaction, the binding of EF-G·GTP to the ribosome, and mRNA-tRNA translocation. These results indicate that A55 is important for fine-tuning the activity of the ribosome during the elongation cycle of protein synthesis.

  15. Scattering studies on ribosomes in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, V.

    1986-02-01

    Ribosomes are organelles that play a central role in protein synthesis. They are complexes of protein and nucleic acid, and can be analysed as two-component systems by neutron scattering. Moreover, ribosomes can be biochemically prepared that have specific proteins deuterated. Both these properties have been exploited to study the structure of the ribosome by neutron scattering. This article reviews the studies carried out on the small ribosomal subunit, and describes a recent study that has resolved a conflict between the results of two classes of experiments.

  16. A tRNA methyltransferase paralog is important for ribosome stability and cell division in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Ian M. C.; Paris, Zdeněk; Gaston, Kirk W.; Balakrishnan, R.; Fredrick, Kurt; Rubio, Mary Anne T.; Alfonzo, Juan D.

    2016-01-01

    Most eukaryotic ribosomes contain 26/28S, 5S, and 5.8S large subunit ribosomal RNAs (LSU rRNAs) in addition to the 18S rRNA of the small subunit (SSU rRNA). However, in kinetoplastids, a group of organisms that include medically important members of the genus Trypanosoma and Leishmania, the 26/28S large subunit ribosomal RNA is uniquely composed of 6 rRNA fragments. In addition, recent studies have shown the presence of expansion segments in the large ribosomal subunit (60S) of Trypanosoma brucei. Given these differences in structure, processing and assembly, T. brucei ribosomes may require biogenesis factors not found in other organisms. Here, we show that one of two putative 3-methylcytidine methyltransferases, TbMTase37 (a homolog of human methyltransferase-like 6, METTL6), is important for ribosome stability in T. brucei. TbMTase37 localizes to the nucleolus and depletion of the protein results in accumulation of ribosomal particles lacking srRNA 4 and reduced levels of polysome associated ribosomes. We also find that TbMTase37 plays a role in cytokinesis, as loss of the protein leads to multi-flagellated and multi-nucleated cells. PMID:26888608

  17. A tRNA methyltransferase paralog is important for ribosome stability and cell division in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ian M C; Paris, Zdeněk; Gaston, Kirk W; Balakrishnan, R; Fredrick, Kurt; Rubio, Mary Anne T; Alfonzo, Juan D

    2016-01-01

    Most eukaryotic ribosomes contain 26/28S, 5S, and 5.8S large subunit ribosomal RNAs (LSU rRNAs) in addition to the 18S rRNA of the small subunit (SSU rRNA). However, in kinetoplastids, a group of organisms that include medically important members of the genus Trypanosoma and Leishmania, the 26/28S large subunit ribosomal RNA is uniquely composed of 6 rRNA fragments. In addition, recent studies have shown the presence of expansion segments in the large ribosomal subunit (60S) of Trypanosoma brucei. Given these differences in structure, processing and assembly, T. brucei ribosomes may require biogenesis factors not found in other organisms. Here, we show that one of two putative 3-methylcytidine methyltransferases, TbMTase37 (a homolog of human methyltransferase-like 6, METTL6), is important for ribosome stability in T. brucei. TbMTase37 localizes to the nucleolus and depletion of the protein results in accumulation of ribosomal particles lacking srRNA 4 and reduced levels of polysome associated ribosomes. We also find that TbMTase37 plays a role in cytokinesis, as loss of the protein leads to multi-flagellated and multi-nucleated cells. PMID:26888608

  18. Maize reas1 Mutant Stimulates Ribosome Use Efficiency and Triggers Distinct Transcriptional and Translational Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Weiwei; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Qiao; Wang, Qun; Li, Xia; Yao, Dongsheng; Jin, Ying; Wang, Gang; Wang, Guifeng

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental cellular process in all cells. Impaired ribosome biogenesis causes developmental defects; however, its molecular and cellular bases are not fully understood. We cloned a gene responsible for a maize (Zea mays) small seed mutant, dek* (for defective kernel), and found that it encodes Ribosome export associated1 (ZmReas1). Reas1 is an AAA-ATPase that controls 60S ribosome export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after ribosome maturation. dek* is a weak mutant allele with decreased Reas1 function. In dek* cells, mature 60S ribosome subunits are reduced in the nucleus and cytoplasm, but the proportion of actively translating polyribosomes in cytosol is significantly increased. Reduced phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α and the increased elongation factor 1α level indicate an enhancement of general translational efficiency in dek* cells. The mutation also triggers dramatic changes in differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs. Discrepancy was observed between differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs, indicating distinct cellular responses at transcription and translation levels to the stress of defective ribosome processing. DNA replication and nucleosome assembly-related gene expression are selectively suppressed at the translational level, resulting in inhibited cell growth and proliferation in dek* cells. This study provides insight into cellular responses due to impaired ribosome biogenesis. PMID:26645456

  19. The Ribosome-Sec61 Translocon Complex Forms a Cytosolically Restricted Environment for Early Polytopic Membrane Protein Folding.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Melissa A; Bandyopadhyay, Anannya; Devaraneni, Prasanna K; Woodward, Josha; Rooney, LeeAnn; Yang, Zhongying; Skach, William R

    2015-11-27

    Transmembrane topology of polytopic membrane proteins (PMPs) is established in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by the ribosome Sec61-translocon complex (RTC) through iterative cycles of translocation initiation and termination. It remains unknown, however, whether tertiary folding of transmembrane domains begins after the nascent polypeptide integrates into the lipid bilayer or within a proteinaceous environment proximal to translocon components. To address this question, we used cysteine scanning mutagenesis to monitor aqueous accessibility of stalled translation intermediates to determine when, during biogenesis, hydrophilic peptide loops of the aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel are delivered to cytosolic and lumenal compartments. Results showed that following ribosome docking on the ER membrane, the nascent polypeptide was shielded from the cytosol as it emerged from the ribosome exit tunnel. Extracellular loops followed a well defined path through the ribosome, the ribosome translocon junction, the Sec61-translocon pore, and into the ER lumen coincident with chain elongation. In contrast, intracellular loops (ICLs) and C-terminalresidues exited the ribosome into a cytosolically shielded environment and remained inaccessible to both cytosolic and lumenal compartments until translation was terminated. Shielding of ICL1 and ICL2, but not the C terminus, became resistant to maneuvers that disrupt electrostatic ribosome interactions. Thus, the early folding landscape of polytopic proteins is shaped by a spatially restricted environment localized within the assembled ribosome translocon complex. PMID:26254469

  20. Mammalian HCA66 protein is required for both ribosome synthesis and centriole duplication

    PubMed Central

    Gérus, Marie; Hoareau-Aveilla, Coralie; Kiss, Tamás; Caizergues-Ferrer, Michèle; Henry, Yves; Henras, Anthony K.

    2012-01-01

    Ribosome production, one of the most energy-consuming biosynthetic activities in living cells, is adjusted to growth conditions and coordinated with the cell cycle. Connections between ribosome synthesis and cell cycle progression have been described, but the underlying mechanisms remain only partially understood. The human HCA66 protein was recently characterized as a component of the centrosome, the major microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) in mammalian cells, and was shown to be required for centriole duplication and assembly of the mitotic spindle. We show here that HCA66 is also required for nucleolar steps of the maturation of the 40S ribosomal subunit and therefore displays a dual function. Overexpression of a dominant negative version of HCA66, accumulating at the centrosome but absent from the nucleoli, alters centrosome function but has no effect on pre-rRNA processing, suggesting that HCA66 acts independently in each process. In yeast and HeLa cells, depletion of MTOC components does not impair ribosome synthesis. Hence our results suggest that both in yeast and human cells, assembly of a functional MTOC and ribosome synthesis are not closely connected processes. PMID:22434888

  1. Translation Initiation is Controlled by RNA Folding Kinetics via a Ribosome Drafting Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Espah Borujeni, Amin; Salis, Howard M

    2016-06-01

    RNA folding plays an important role in controlling protein synthesis as well as other cellular processes. Existing models have focused on how RNA folding energetics control translation initiation rate under equilibrium conditions but have largely ignored the effects of nonequilibrium RNA folding. We introduce a new mechanism, called "ribosome drafting", that explains how a mRNA's folding kinetics and the ribosome's binding rate collectively control its translation initiation rate. During cycles of translation, ribosome drafting emerges whenever successive ribosomes bind to a mRNA faster than the mRNA can refold, maintaining it in a nonequilibrium state with an acceleration of protein synthesis. Using computational design, time-correlated single photon counting, and expression measurements, we demonstrate that slow-folding and fast-folding RNA structures with equivalent folding energetics can vary protein synthesis rates by 1000-fold. We determine the necessary conditions for ribosome drafting by characterizing mRNAs with rationally designed ribosome binding rates, folding kinetics, and folding energetics, confirming the predictions of a nonequilibrium Markov model of translation. Our results have widespread implications, illustrating how competitive folding and assembly kinetics can shape the gene expression machinery's sequence-structure-function relationship inside cells. PMID:27199273

  2. Snapshots of pre-rRNA structural flexibility reveal eukaryotic 40S assembly dynamics at nucleotide resolution

    PubMed Central

    Hector, Ralph D.; Burlacu, Elena; Aitken, Stuart; Bihan, Thierry Le; Tuijtel, Maarten; Zaplatina, Alina; Cook, Atlanta G.; Granneman, Sander

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome assembly in eukaryotes involves the activity of hundreds of assembly factors that direct the hierarchical assembly of ribosomal proteins and numerous ribosomal RNA folding steps. However, detailed insights into the function of assembly factors and ribosomal RNA folding events are lacking. To address this, we have developed ChemModSeq, a method that combines structure probing, high-throughput sequencing and statistical modeling, to quantitatively measure RNA structural rearrangements during the assembly of macromolecular complexes. By applying ChemModSeq to purified 40S assembly intermediates we obtained nucleotide-resolution maps of ribosomal RNA flexibility revealing structurally distinct assembly intermediates and mechanistic insights into assembly dynamics not readily observed in cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions. We show that RNA restructuring events coincide with the release of assembly factors and predict that completion of the head domain is required before the Rio1 kinase enters the assembly pathway. Collectively, our results suggest that 40S assembly factors regulate the timely incorporation of ribosomal proteins by delaying specific folding steps in the 3′ major domain of the 20S pre-ribosomal RNA. PMID:25200078

  3. Ribosomal protein methyltransferases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadid, Qais; White, Jonelle; Clarke, Steven

    2016-02-12

    A significant percentage of the methyltransferasome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes is devoted to methylation of the translational machinery. Methylation of the RNA components of the translational machinery has been studied extensively and is important for structure stability, ribosome biogenesis, and translational fidelity. However, the functional effects of ribosomal protein methylation by their cognate methyltransferases are still largely unknown. Previous work has shown that the ribosomal protein Rpl3 methyltransferase, histidine protein methyltransferase 1 (Hpm1), is important for ribosome biogenesis and translation elongation fidelity. In this study, yeast strains deficient in each of the ten ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae were examined for potential defects in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Like Hpm1-deficient cells, loss of four of the nine other ribosomal protein methyltransferases resulted in defects in ribosomal subunit synthesis. All of the mutant strains exhibited resistance to the ribosome inhibitors anisomycin and/or cycloheximide in plate assays, but not in liquid culture. Translational fidelity assays measuring stop codon readthrough, amino acid misincorporation, and programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, revealed that eight of the ten enzymes are important for translation elongation fidelity and the remaining two are necessary for translation termination efficiency. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation. PMID:26801560

  4. Ribosomal protein methyltransferases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadid, Qais; White, Jonelle; Clarke, Steven

    2016-02-12

    A significant percentage of the methyltransferasome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes is devoted to methylation of the translational machinery. Methylation of the RNA components of the translational machinery has been studied extensively and is important for structure stability, ribosome biogenesis, and translational fidelity. However, the functional effects of ribosomal protein methylation by their cognate methyltransferases are still largely unknown. Previous work has shown that the ribosomal protein Rpl3 methyltransferase, histidine protein methyltransferase 1 (Hpm1), is important for ribosome biogenesis and translation elongation fidelity. In this study, yeast strains deficient in each of the ten ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae were examined for potential defects in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Like Hpm1-deficient cells, loss of four of the nine other ribosomal protein methyltransferases resulted in defects in ribosomal subunit synthesis. All of the mutant strains exhibited resistance to the ribosome inhibitors anisomycin and/or cycloheximide in plate assays, but not in liquid culture. Translational fidelity assays measuring stop codon readthrough, amino acid misincorporation, and programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, revealed that eight of the ten enzymes are important for translation elongation fidelity and the remaining two are necessary for translation termination efficiency. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

  5. Biphasic character of ribosomal translocation and non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics of translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ping

    2014-12-01

    We study theoretically the kinetics of mRNA translocation in the wild-type (WT) Escherichia coli ribosome, which is composed of a small 30 S and large 50 S subunit, and the ribosomes with mutations to some intersubunit bridges such as B1a, B4, B7a, and B8. The theoretical results reproduce well the available in vitro experimental data on the biphasic kinetics of the forward mRNA translocation catalyzed by elongation factor G (EF-G) hydrolyzing GTP, which can be best fit by the sum of two exponentials, and the monophasic kinetics of the spontaneous reverse mRNA translocation in the absence of the elongation factor, which can be best fit by a single-exponential function, in both the WT and mutant ribosomes. We show that both the mutation-induced increase in the maximal rate of the slow phase for the forward mRNA translocation and that in the rate of the spontaneous reverse mRNA translocation result from a reduction in the intrinsic energy barrier to resist the rotational movements between the two subunits, giving the same degree of increase in the two rates. The mutation-induced increase in the maximal rate of the fast phase for the forward mRNA translocation results mainly from the increase in the rate of the ribosomal unlocking, a conformational change in the ribosome that widens the mRNA channel for the mRNA translocation to take place, which could be partly due to the effect of the mutation on the intrasubunit 30S head rotation. Moreover, we study the translation rate of the WT and mutant ribosomes. It is shown that the translation rate versus the concentration of EF-G-GTP does not follow the Michaelis-Menten (MM) kinetics, which is in sharp contrast to the general property of other enzymes that the rate of the enzymatic reaction versus the concentration of a substrate follows the MM kinetics. The physical origin of this non-MM kinetics for the ribosome is revealed.

  6. Ribosome biogenesis in replicating cells: Integration of experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Earnest, Tyler M; Cole, John A; Peterson, Joseph R; Hallock, Michael J; Kuhlman, Thomas E; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2016-10-01

    Ribosomes-the primary macromolecular machines responsible for translating the genetic code into proteins-are complexes of precisely folded RNA and proteins. The ways in which their production and assembly are managed by the living cell is of deep biological importance. Here we extend a recent spatially resolved whole-cell model of ribosome biogenesis in a fixed volume [Earnest et al., Biophys J 2015, 109, 1117-1135] to include the effects of growth, DNA replication, and cell division. All biological processes are described in terms of reaction-diffusion master equations and solved stochastically using the Lattice Microbes simulation software. In order to determine the replication parameters, we construct and analyze a series of Escherichia coli strains with fluorescently labeled genes distributed evenly throughout their chromosomes. By measuring these cells' lengths and number of gene copies at the single-cell level, we could fit a statistical model of the initiation and duration of chromosome replication. We found that for our slow-growing (120 min doubling time) E. coli cells, replication was initiated 42 min into the cell cycle and completed after an additional 42 min. While simulations of the biogenesis model produce the correct ribosome and mRNA counts over the cell cycle, the kinetic parameters for transcription and degradation are lower than anticipated from a recent analytical time dependent model of in vivo mRNA production. Describing expression in terms of a simple chemical master equation, we show that the discrepancies are due to the lack of nonribosomal genes in the extended biogenesis model which effects the competition of mRNA for ribosome binding, and suggest corrections to parameters to be used in the whole-cell model when modeling expression of the entire transcriptome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 735-751, 2016. PMID:27294303

  7. Ribosome biogenesis in replicating cells: Integration of experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Earnest, Tyler M; Cole, John A; Peterson, Joseph R; Hallock, Michael J; Kuhlman, Thomas E; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2016-10-01

    Ribosomes-the primary macromolecular machines responsible for translating the genetic code into proteins-are complexes of precisely folded RNA and proteins. The ways in which their production and assembly are managed by the living cell is of deep biological importance. Here we extend a recent spatially resolved whole-cell model of ribosome biogenesis in a fixed volume [Earnest et al., Biophys J 2015, 109, 1117-1135] to include the effects of growth, DNA replication, and cell division. All biological processes are described in terms of reaction-diffusion master equations and solved stochastically using the Lattice Microbes simulation software. In order to determine the replication parameters, we construct and analyze a series of Escherichia coli strains with fluorescently labeled genes distributed evenly throughout their chromosomes. By measuring these cells' lengths and number of gene copies at the single-cell level, we could fit a statistical model of the initiation and duration of chromosome replication. We found that for our slow-growing (120 min doubling time) E. coli cells, replication was initiated 42 min into the cell cycle and completed after an additional 42 min. While simulations of the biogenesis model produce the correct ribosome and mRNA counts over the cell cycle, the kinetic parameters for transcription and degradation are lower than anticipated from a recent analytical time dependent model of in vivo mRNA production. Describing expression in terms of a simple chemical master equation, we show that the discrepancies are due to the lack of nonribosomal genes in the extended biogenesis model which effects the competition of mRNA for ribosome binding, and suggest corrections to parameters to be used in the whole-cell model when modeling expression of the entire transcriptome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 735-751, 2016.

  8. Experimental investigation of the 30S(α, p) thermonuclear reaction in x-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, D.; Chen, A. A.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Binh, D. N.; Chen, J.; Cherubini, S.; Duy, N. N.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Iwasa, N.; Jung, H. S.; Kato, S.; Kwon, Y. K.; Nishimura, S.; Ota, S.; Setoodehnia, K.; Teranishi, T.; Tokieda, H.; Yamada, T.; Yun, C. C.; Zhang, L. Y.

    2016-02-01

    We performed the first measurement of 30S+α resonant elastic scattering to experimentally examine the 30S(α, p) stellar reaction rate in type I x-ray bursts. These bursts are the most frequent thermonuclear explosions in the galaxy, resulting from thermonuclear runaway on the surface of accreting neutron star binaries. The 30S(α, p) reaction plays a critical role in burst models, yet very little is known about the compound nucleus 34Ar at these energies nor the reaction rate itself. We performed a measurement of alpha elastic scattering with a radioactive beam of 30S to experimentally probe the entrance channel. Utilizing a gaseous active target system and silicon detector array, we extracted the excitation function from 1.8 to 5.5 MeV near 160° in the center-of-mass frame. The experimental data were analyzed with an R-Matrix calculation, and we discovered several new resonances and extracted their quantum properties (resonance energy, width, spin, and parity). Finally, we calculated the narrow resonant thermonuclear reaction rate of 30S(α, p) for these new resonances.

  9. Compensatory evolution reveals functional interactions between ribosomal proteins S12, L14 and L19.

    PubMed

    Maisnier-Patin, Sophie; Paulander, Wilhelm; Pennhag, Alexandra; Andersson, Dan I

    2007-02-01

    Certain mutations in S12, a ribosomal protein involved in translation elongation rate and translation accuracy, confer resistance to the aminoglycoside streptomycin. Previously we showed in Salmonella typhimurium that the fitness cost, i.e. reduced growth rate, due to the amino acid substitution K42N in S12 could be compensated by at least 35 different mutations located in the ribosomal proteins S4, S5 and L19. Here, we have characterized in vivo the fitness, translation speed and translation accuracy of four different L19 mutants. When separated from the resistance mutation located in S12, the three different compensatory amino acid substitutions in L19 at position 40 (Q40H, Q40L and Q40R) caused a decrease in fitness while the G104A change had no effect on bacterial growth. The rate of protein synthesis was unaffected or increased by the mutations at position 40 and the level of read-through of a UGA nonsense codon was increased in vivo, indicating a loss of translational accuracy. The mutations in L19 increased sensitivity to aminoglycosides active at the A-site, further indicating a perturbation of the decoding step. These phenotypes are similar to those of the classical S4 and S5 ram (ribosomal ambiguity) mutants. By evolving low-fitness L19 mutants by serial passage, we showed that the fitness cost conferred by the L19 mutations could be compensated by additional mutations in the ribosomal protein L19 itself, in S12 and in L14, a protein located close to L19. Our results reveal a novel functional role for the 50 S ribosomal protein L19 during protein synthesis, supporting published structural data suggesting that the interaction of L14 and L19 with 16 S rRNA could influence function of the 30 S subunit. Moreover, our study demonstrates how compensatory fitness-evolution can be used to discover new molecular functions of ribosomal proteins.

  10. Study of the functional interaction of the 900 Tetraloop of 16S ribosomal RNA with helix 24 within the bacterial ribosome.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, François; Gagnon, Matthieu G; Steinberg, Sergey V; Cunningham, Philip R; Brakier-Gingras, Léa

    2004-05-01

    The 900 tetraloop that caps helix 27 of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is amongst the most conserved regions of rRNA. This tetraloop forms a GNRA motif that docks into the minor groove of three base-pairs at the bottom of helix 24 of 16S rRNA in the 30S subunit. Both the tetraloop and its receptor in helix 24 contact the 23S rRNA, forming the intersubunit bridge B2c. Here, we investigated the interaction between the 900 tetraloop and its receptor by genetic complementation. We used a specialized ribosome system in combination with an in vivo instant evolution approach to select mutations in helix 24 compensating for a mutation in the 900 tetraloop (A900G) that severely decreases ribosomal activity, impairing subunit association and translational fidelity. We selected two mutants where the G769-C810 base-pair of helix 24 was substituted with either U-A or C x A. When these mutations in helix 24 were investigated in the context of a wild-type 900 tetraloop, the C x A but not the U-A mutation severely impaired ribosome activity, interfering with subunit association and decreasing translational fidelity. In the presence of the A900G mutation, both mutations in helix 24 increased the ribosome activity to the same extent. Subunit association and translational fidelity were increased to the same level. Computer modeling was used to analyze the effect of the mutations in helix 24 on the interaction between the tetraloop and its receptor. This study demonstrates the functional importance of the interaction between the 900 tetraloop and helix 24.

  11. Solution Structure of Ribosomal Protein S28E From Methanobacterium Thermoautotrophicum

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Bin; Yee, Adelinda; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Semesi, Anthony; Ramelot, Theresa A.; Cort, John R.; Jung, Jin-Won; Edwards, Aled M.; Lee, Weontae; Kennedy, Michael A.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2003-12-01

    The ribosomal protein S28E from the archaeon Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum is a component of the 30S ribosomal subunit. Sequence homologs of S28E are found only in archaea and eukaryotes. Here we report the three-dimensional solution structure of S28E by NMR spectroscopy. S28E contains a globular region and a long C-terminal tail protruding from the core. The globular region consists of four antiparallel {beta}-strands which are arranged in a Greek-key topology. Unique features of S28E include an extended loop L2-3 that folds back onto the protein and a 12-residue charged C-terminal tail with no regular secondary structure and greater flexibility relative to the rest of the protein.

  12. Combinatorial action of transcription factors orchestrates cell cycle-dependent expression of the ribosomal protein genes and ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nosrati, Nagisa; Kapoor, Neetu R; Kumar, Vijay

    2014-05-01

    Nucleolar assembly begins at the early G1 phase of the cell cycle and is a hub of ribosomal DNA transcription and rRNA biosynthesis. The newly-formed rRNAs together with ribosomal proteins (RPs) constitute the building block of the ribosomal machinery. Although RPs play a major role in protein biosynthesis, their own regulation and expression is rather poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the regulation of RP genes RPS27a, RPS24, RPS6, RPL9 and RPL4 in synchronized mammalian cell culture. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated their expression during the mid to late G1 phase, whereas the rRNA genes were expressed during the early G1 phase of the cell cycle. The promoter reporter analysis of the RPS27a gene revealed that it could be synergistically stimulated by the transcription factors specificity protein 1 (Sp1) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). However, E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F1) appeared to negatively regulate gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies confirmed the promoter occupancy of Sp1, CREB and E2F1. Although Sp1 and CREB binding enhanced the promoter occupancy of histone acetyltransferases PCAF, p300 and CREB binding protein, E2F1 facilitated the recruitment of histone deacetylases. Both acetylation (histone H4 pan-acetyl, histone H3 acetyl Lys 14) and methylation (histone H3 trimethyl Lys 9) marks were observed in the RPS27a promoter region, suggesting their important regulatory role in gene expression. Because the promoter regions of most RP genes are well conserved, we propose that their orchestrated regulation and synthesis during the cell cycle facilitates ribosome biogenesis. PMID:24646001

  13. In vitro translation in a hybrid cell free lysate with exogenous cellular ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Panthu, Baptiste; Décimo, Didier; Balvay, Laurent; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2015-05-01

    Cell free protein synthesis systems (CFPS) have been widely used to express proteins and to explore the pathways of gene expression. In the present manuscript, we describe the design of a novel adaptable hybrid in vitro translation system which is assembled with ribosomes isolated from many different origins. We first show that this hybrid system exhibits all important features such as efficiency, sensitivity, reproducibility and the ability to translate specialized mRNAs in less than 1 h. In addition, the unique design of this cell free assay makes it highly adaptable to utilize ribosomes isolated from many different organs, tissues or cell types.

  14. Evolution of the ribosome at atomic resolution

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Anton S.; Bernier, Chad R.; Hsiao, Chiaolong; Norris, Ashlyn M.; Kovacs, Nicholas A.; Waterbury, Chris C.; Stepanov, Victor G.; Harvey, Stephen C.; Fox, George E.; Wartell, Roger M.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2014-01-01

    The origins and evolution of the ribosome, 3–4 billion years ago, remain imprinted in the biochemistry of extant life and in the structure of the ribosome. Processes of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) expansion can be “observed” by comparing 3D rRNA structures of bacteria (small), yeast (medium), and metazoans (large). rRNA size correlates well with species complexity. Differences in ribosomes across species reveal that rRNA expansion segments have been added to rRNAs without perturbing the preexisting core. Here we show that rRNA growth occurs by a limited number of processes that include inserting a branch helix onto a preexisting trunk helix and elongation of a helix. rRNA expansions can leave distinctive atomic resolution fingerprints, which we call “insertion fingerprints.” Observation of insertion fingerprints in the ribosomal common core allows identification of probable ancestral expansion segments. Conceptually reversing these expansions allows extrapolation backward in time to generate models of primordial ribosomes. The approach presented here provides insight to the structure of pre-last universal common ancestor rRNAs and the subsequent expansions that shaped the peptidyl transferase center and the conserved core. We infer distinct phases of ribosomal evolution through which ribosomal particles evolve, acquiring coding and translocation, and extending and elaborating the exit tunnel. PMID:24982194

  15. Ribosomes: lifting the nuclear export ban.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Arlen W

    2014-02-01

    A recent study shows that nuclear export of the large ribosomal subunit is regulated by a GTPase that blocks recruitment of the nuclear export factor Nmd3 until remodeling of the pre-ribosome by the AAA-ATPase Rea1 (Midasin).

  16. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Slavov, Nikolai; Semrau, Stefan; Airoldi, Edoardo; Budnik, Bogdan; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Summary Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs), some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function. PMID:26565899

  17. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Nikolai; Semrau, Stefan; Airoldi, Edoardo; Budnik, Bogdan; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs), some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function. PMID:26565899

  18. Ribosome defects in disorders of erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Narla, Anupama; Hurst, Slater N; Ebert, Benjamin L

    2011-02-01

    Over the past decade, genetic lesions that cause ribosome dysfunction have been identified in both congenital and acquired human disorders. These discoveries have established a new category of disorders, known as ribosomopathies, in which the primary pathophysiology is related to impaired ribosome function. The protoptypical disorders are Diamond-Blackfan anemia, a congenital bone marrow failure syndrome, and the 5q- syndrome, a subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome. In both of these disorders, impaired ribosome function causes a severe macrocytic anemia. In this review, we will discuss the evidence that defects in ribosomal biogenesis cause the hematologic phenotype of Diamond-Blackfan anemia and the 5q- syndrome. We will also explore the potential mechanisms by which a ribosomal defect, which would be expected to have widespread consequences, may lead to specific defects in erythropoiesis. PMID:21279816

  19. Concentric-Flow Electrokinetic Injector Enables Serial Crystallography of Ribosome and Photosystem-II

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Raymond G.; Gati, Cornelius; Laksmono, Hartawan; Dao, E. Han; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin; Kern, Jan; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Brewster, Aaron S.; Young, Iris D.; Michels-Clark, Tara; Aquila, Andrew; Liang, Mengning; Hunter, Mark S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Boutet, Sébastien; Junco, Elia A.; Hayes, Brandon; Bogan, Michael J.; Hampton, Christina Y.; Puglisi, Elisabetta V.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Stan, Claudiu A.; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Soltis, S. Michael; Puglisi, Joseph D.; DeMirci, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a concentric-flow electrokinetic injector delivered microcrystals of Geobacillus stearothermophilus thermolysin (2.2 Å structure), Thermosynechococcus elongatus photosystem II (< 3 Å diffraction) and Thermus thermophilus small ribosomal subunit (3.4 Å structure). The first ambient-temperature X-ray crystal structure of the 30S subunit bound to the antibiotic paromomycin was obtained in its native mother liquor. Compared to previous cryo-cooled structures, this new structure showed that paromomycin binds to the decoding center in a different conformation. PMID:26619013

  20. Ribosome regulation by the nascent peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Lovett, P S; Rogers, E J

    1996-01-01

    Studies of bacterial and eukaryotic systems have identified two-gene operons in which the translation product of the upstream gene influences translation of the downstream gene. The upstream gene, referred to as a leader (gene) in bacterial systems or an upstream open reading frame (uORF) in eukaryotes, encodes a peptide that interferes with a function(s) of its translating ribosome. The peptides are therefore cis-acting negative regulators of translation. The inhibitory peptides typically consist of fewer than 25 residues and function prior to emergence from the ribosome. A biological role for this class of translation inhibitor is demonstrated in translation attenuation, a form or regulation that controls the inducible translation of the chloramphenicol resistance genes cat and cmlA in bacteria. Induction of cat or cmlA requires ribosome stalling at a particular codon in the leader region of the mRNA. Stalling destabilizes an adjacent, downstream mRNA secondary structure that normally sequesters the ribosome-binding site for the cat or cmlA coding regions. Genetic studies indicate that the nascent, leader-encoded peptide is the selector of the site of ribosome stalling in leader mRNA by cis interference with translation. Synthetic leader peptides inhibit ribosomal peptidyltransferase in vitro, leading to the prediction that this activity is the basis for stall site selection. Recent studies have shown that the leader peptides are rRNA-binding peptides with targets at the peptidyl transferase center of 23S rRNA. uORFs associated with several eukaryotic genes inhibit downstream translation. When inhibition depends on the specific codon sequence of the uORF, it has been proposed that the uORF-encoded nascent peptide prevents ribosome release from the mRNA at the uORF stop codon. This sets up a blockade to ribosome scanning which minimizes downstream translation. Segments within large proteins also appear to regulate ribosome activity in cis, although in most of the

  1. Mechanism of eIF6-mediated Inhibition of Ribosomal Subunit Joining*

    PubMed Central

    Gartmann, Marco; Blau, Michael; Armache, Jean-Paul; Mielke, Thorsten; Topf, Maya; Beckmann, Roland

    2010-01-01

    During the process of ribosomal assembly, the essential eukaryotic translation initiation factor 6 (eIF6) is known to act as a ribosomal anti-association factor. However, a molecular understanding of the anti-association activity of eIF6 is still missing. Here we present the cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of a complex of the large ribosomal subunit with eukaryotic eIF6 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The structure reveals that the eIF6 binding site involves mainly rpL23 (L14p in Escherichia coli). Based on our structural data, we propose that the mechanism of the anti-association activity of eIF6 is based on steric hindrance of intersubunit bridge formation around the dynamic bridge B6. PMID:20356839

  2. Ribosomes and Ribosomal Protein from Neurospora crassa I. Physical, Chemical, and Immunochemical Properties1

    PubMed Central

    Alberghina, F. A. M.; Suskind, S. R.

    1967-01-01

    Ribosomes from Neurospora crassa, initially characterized by ultracentrifugal and immunochemical analyses, have been used to prepare ribosomal protein for physical, chemical, and immunochemical study. The acrylamide gel disc electrophoretic profiles of Neurospora ribosomal protein exhibit a degree of heterogeneity comparable to what has been observed in other systems. Only by chemical modification or by aggregation of the protein do alterations in the profile become apparent. Disulfide-bond formation appears to play a role in the aggregation of ribosomal protein to complexes of S20,w = 200. The aggregation can be prevented by alkylation of −SH groups, and protein treated in this fashion has a subunit molecular weight of about 20,000 as determined by equilibrium centrifugation. Finger-printing of tryptic peptides indicates that more than one unique sequence of amino acids must be present in ribosomal protein, although gross primary structural heterogeneity is questioned. Antigenic heterogeneity is much less apparent; only a few precipitin bands are resolved by immunodiffusion tests, although complete reactivity of total ribosomal protein is suggested by quantitative precipitin analysis. The antigenically active ribosomal protein components appear to reside in at least two fractions; one is removed readily from the ribosome by CsC1 treatment. Ribosomal protein of N. crassa possesses antigenic determinants present in E. coli ribosomal protein as judged by spur formation in immunodiffusion tests. Images PMID:4962303

  3. Ribosomopathies: human disorders of ribosome dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Narla, Anupama; Ebert, Benjamin L

    2010-04-22

    Ribosomopathies compose a collection of disorders in which genetic abnormalities cause impaired ribosome biogenesis and function, resulting in specific clinical phenotypes. Congenital mutations in RPS19 and other genes encoding ribosomal proteins cause Diamond-Blackfan anemia, a disorder characterized by hypoplastic, macrocytic anemia. Mutations in other genes required for normal ribosome biogenesis have been implicated in other rare congenital syndromes, Schwachman-Diamond syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, cartilage hair hypoplasia, and Treacher Collins syndrome. In addition, the 5q- syndrome, a subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome, is caused by a somatically acquired deletion of chromosome 5q, which leads to haploinsufficiency of the ribosomal protein RPS14 and an erythroid phenotype highly similar to Diamond-Blackfan anemia. Acquired abnormalities in ribosome function have been implicated more broadly in human malignancies. The p53 pathway provides a surveillance mechanism for protein translation as well as genome integrity and is activated by defects in ribosome biogenesis; this pathway appears to be a critical mediator of many of the clinical features of ribosomopathies. Elucidation of the mechanisms whereby selective abnormalities in ribosome biogenesis cause specific clinical syndromes will hopefully lead to novel therapeutic strategies for these diseases. PMID:20194897

  4. Final pre-40S maturation depends on the functional integrity of the 60S subunit ribosomal protein L3.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, Juan J; Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Lebaron, Simon; Rosado, Iván V; Tollervey, David; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2014-03-01

    Ribosomal protein L3 is an evolutionarily conserved protein that participates in the assembly of early pre-60S particles. We report that the rpl3[W255C] allele, which affects the affinity and function of translation elongation factors, impairs cytoplasmic maturation of 20S pre-rRNA. This was not seen for other mutations in or depletion of L3 or other 60S ribosomal proteins. Surprisingly, pre-40S particles containing 20S pre-rRNA form translation-competent 80S ribosomes, and translation inhibition partially suppresses 20S pre-rRNA accumulation. The GTP-dependent translation initiation factor Fun12 (yeast eIF5B) shows similar in vivo binding to ribosomal particles from wild-type and rpl3[W255C] cells. However, the GTPase activity of eIF5B failed to stimulate processing of 20S pre-rRNA when assayed with ribosomal particles purified from rpl3[W255C] cells. We conclude that L3 plays an important role in the function of eIF5B in stimulating 3' end processing of 18S rRNA in the context of 80S ribosomes that have not yet engaged in translation. These findings indicate that the correct conformation of the GTPase activation region is assessed in a quality control step during maturation of cytoplasmic pre-ribosomal particles.

  5. Origin and evolution of the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Fox, George E

    2010-09-01

    The modern ribosome was largely formed at the time of the last common ancestor, LUCA. Hence its earliest origins likely lie in the RNA world. Central to its development were RNAs that spawned the modern tRNAs and a symmetrical region deep within the large ribosomal RNA, (rRNA), where the peptidyl transferase reaction occurs. To understand pre-LUCA developments, it is argued that events that are coupled in time are especially useful if one can infer a likely order in which they occurred. Using such timing events, the relative age of various proteins and individual regions within the large rRNA are inferred. An examination of the properties of modern ribosomes strongly suggests that the initial peptides made by the primitive ribosomes were likely enriched for l-amino acids, but did not completely exclude d-amino acids. This has implications for the nature of peptides made by the first ribosomes. From the perspective of ribosome origins, the immediate question regarding coding is when did it arise rather than how did the assignments evolve. The modern ribosome is very dynamic with tRNAs moving in and out and the mRNA moving relative to the ribosome. These movements may have become possible as a result of the addition of a template to hold the tRNAs. That template would subsequently become the mRNA, thereby allowing the evolution of the code and making an RNA genome useful. Finally, a highly speculative timeline of major events in ribosome history is presented and possible future directions discussed. PMID:20534711

  6. Intersubunit Bridges of the Bacterial Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Fredrick, Kurt

    2016-05-22

    The ribosome is a large two-subunit ribonucleoprotein machine that translates the genetic code in all cells, synthesizing proteins according to the sequence of the mRNA template. During translation, the primary substrates, transfer RNAs, pass through binding sites formed between the two subunits. Multiple interactions between the ribosomal subunits, termed intersubunit bridges, keep the ribosome intact and at the same time govern dynamics that facilitate the various steps of translation such as transfer RNA-mRNA movement. Here, we review the molecular nature of these intersubunit bridges, how they change conformation during translation, and their functional roles in the process.

  7. A new system for naming ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Nenad; Beckmann, Roland; Cate, Jamie HD; Dinman, Jonathan D; Dragon, François; Ellis, Steven R; Lafontaine, Denis LJ; Lindahl, Lasse; Liljas, Anders; Lipton, Jeffrey M; McAlear, Michael A; Moore, Peter B; Noller, Harry F; Ortega, Joaquin; Panse, Vikram Govind; Ramakrishnan, V; Spahn, Christian MT; Steitz, Thomas A; Tchorzewski, Marek; Tollervey, David; Warren, Alan J; Williamson, James R; Wilson, Daniel; Yonath, Ada; Yusupov, Marat

    2015-01-01

    A system for naming ribosomal proteins is described that the authors intend to use in the future. They urge others to adopt it. The objective is to eliminate the confusion caused by the assignment of identical names to ribosomal proteins from different species that are unrelated in structure and function. In the system proposed here, homologous ribosomal proteins are assigned the same name, regardless of species. It is designed so that new names are similar enough to old names to be easily recognized, but are written in a format that unambiguously identifies them as ‘new system’ names. PMID:24524803

  8. Crystal structure of release factor RF3 trapped in the GTP state on a rotated conformation of the ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jie; Lancaster, Laura; Trakhanov, Sergei; Noller, Harry F.

    2012-03-26

    The class II release factor RF3 is a GTPase related to elongation factor EF-G, which catalyzes release of class I release factors RF1 and RF2 from the ribosome after termination of protein synthesis. The 3.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of the RF3 {center_dot} GDPNP {center_dot} ribosome complex provides a high-resolution description of interactions and structural rearrangements that occur when binding of this translational GTPase induces large-scale rotational movements in the ribosome. RF3 induces a 7{sup o} rotation of the body and 14{sup o} rotation of the head of the 30S ribosomal subunit, and itself undergoes inter- and intradomain conformational rearrangements. We suggest that ordering of critical elements of switch loop I and the P loop, which help to form the GTPase catalytic site, are caused by interactions between the G domain of RF3 and the sarcin-ricin loop of 23S rRNA. The rotational movements in the ribosome induced by RF3, and its distinctly different binding orientation to the sarcin-ricin loop of 23S rRNA, raise interesting implications for the mechanism of action of EF-G in translocation.

  9. Insertion of the Biogenesis Factor Rei1 Probes the Ribosomal Tunnel during 60S Maturation.

    PubMed

    Greber, Basil Johannes; Gerhardy, Stefan; Leitner, Alexander; Leibundgut, Marc; Salem, Michèle; Boehringer, Daniel; Leulliot, Nicolas; Aebersold, Ruedi; Panse, Vikram Govind; Ban, Nenad

    2016-01-14

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis depends on several hundred assembly factors to produce functional 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits. The final phase of 60S subunit biogenesis is cytoplasmic maturation, which includes the proofreading of functional centers of the 60S subunit and the release of several ribosome biogenesis factors. We report the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the yeast 60S subunit in complex with the biogenesis factors Rei1, Arx1, and Alb1 at 3.4 Å resolution. In addition to the network of interactions formed by Alb1, the structure reveals a mechanism for ensuring the integrity of the ribosomal polypeptide exit tunnel. Arx1 probes the entire set of inner-ring proteins surrounding the tunnel exit, and the C terminus of Rei1 is deeply inserted into the ribosomal tunnel, where it forms specific contacts along almost its entire length. We provide genetic and biochemical evidence that failure to insert the C terminus of Rei1 precludes subsequent steps of 60S maturation. PMID:26709046

  10. The size and conformation of Artemia (brine-shrimp) ribosomal RNA free in solution.

    PubMed Central

    Donceel, K; Nieuwenhuysen, P; Clauwaert, J

    1982-01-01

    The RNA was isolated from the large ribosomal subunits of the brine shrimp Artemia, and its conformation free in solution was studied by determining its sedimentation and diffusion coefficients. A comparison was made of the hydrodynamic radius of the ribosomal subunit and its isolated RNA in various buffers. The conformation of the rRNA free in solution is more extended than when it is incorporated in the ribosome. This is not only the case when the rRNA solution lacks bivalent and polyvalent cations, but even in the presence of Mg2+ and spermidine, which cause a tightening of RNA. Thus the ribosomal proteins should induce a further tightening of the rRNA during the assembly of the ribosome. In the discussion, the reported data on Escherichia coli rRNA species are presented in such a way that large discrepancies between various studied are revealed, and that they can be compared with the data reported here on the larger rRNA of an eukaryote. PMID:7150228

  11. A Cross-Kingdom Internal Ribosome Entry Site Reveals a Simplified Mode of Internal Ribosome Entry

    PubMed Central

    Terenin, Ilya M.; Dmitriev, Sergei E.; Andreev, Dmitri E.; Royall, Elizabeth; Belsham, Graham J.; Roberts, Lisa O.; Shatsky, Ivan N.

    2005-01-01

    Rhopalosiphum padi virus (RhPV) is an insect virus of the Dicistroviridae family. Recently, the 579-nucleotide-long 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of RhPV has been shown to contain an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that functions efficiently in mammalian, plant, and insect in vitro translation systems. Here, the mechanism of action of the RhPV IRES has been characterized by reconstitution of mammalian 48S initiation complexes on the IRES from purified components combined with the toeprint assay. There is an absolute requirement for the initiation factors eIF2 and eIF3 and the scanning factor eIF1 to form 48S complexes on the IRES. In addition, eIF1A, eIF4F (or the C-terminal fragment of eIF4G), and eIF4A strongly stimulated the assembly of this complex, whereas eIF4B had no effect. Although the eIF4-dependent pathway is dominant in the RhPV IRES-directed cell-free translation, omission of either eIF4G or eIF4A or both still allowed the assembly of 48S complexes from purified components with ∼23% of maximum efficiency. Deletions of up to 100 nucleotides throughout the 5′-UTR sequence produced at most a marginal effect on the IRES activity, suggesting the absence of specific binding sites for initiation factors. Only deletion of the U-rich unstructured 380-nucleotide region proximal to the initiation codon resulted in a complete loss of the IRES activity. We suggest that the single-stranded nature of the RhPV IRES accounts for its strong but less selective potential to bind key mRNA recruiting components of the translation initiation apparatus from diverse origins. PMID:16107731

  12. The tails of ubiquitin precursors are ribosomal proteins whose fusion to ubiquitin facilitates ribosome biogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finley, Daniel; Bartel, Bonnie; Varshavsky, Alexander

    1989-03-01

    Three of the four yeast ubiquitin genes encode hybrid proteins which are cleaved to yield ubiquitin and previously unidentified ribosomal proteins. The transient association between ubiquitin and these proteins promotes their incorporation into nascent ribosomes and is required for efficient ribosome biogenesis. These results suggest a novel 'chaperone' function for ubiquitin, in which its covalent association with other proteins promotes the formation of specific cellular structures.

  13. The immunological properties of Brucella ribosomal preparations.

    PubMed

    Corbel, M J

    1976-01-01

    Ribosomes were isolated from Brucella abortus strains 19 and 45/20 by disruption of the cells followed by differential ultracentrifugation. The ribosome preparations contained 2-3 components reacting in immunodiffusion tests but were free of detectable lipopolysaccharide-protein agglutinogen. They crossreacted with antisera to Br. abortus, Br. melitensis, Br. suis and Br. ovis and elicited intradermal delayed hypersensitivity reactions in animals infected with Br. abortus, Br. melitensis or Br. suis. The ribosomes were antigenic in rabbits, guinea pigs and mice. Those from Br. abortus S19 induced agglutinins reaction with smooth brucella strains whereas those from Br. abortus 45/20 induced agglutinins reacting with rough brucella strains. Cattle vaccinated with S19 or 45/20 vaccines or infected with Br. abortus developed pricipitins to ribosomal components at an early stage in the immune response. PMID:816681

  14. The tmRNA ribosome rescue system

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Brian D.; Hayes, Christopher S.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial tmRNA quality control system monitors protein synthesis and recycles stalled translation complexes in a process termed “ribosome rescue”. During rescue, tmRNA acts first as a transfer RNA to bind stalled ribosomes, then as a messenger RNA to add the ssrA peptide tag to the C-terminus of the nascent polypeptide chain. The ssrA peptide targets tagged peptides for proteolysis, ensuring rapid degradation of potentially deleterious truncated polypeptides. Ribosome rescue also facilitates turnover of the damaged messages responsible for translational arrest. Thus, tmRNA increases the fidelity of gene expression by promoting the synthesis of full-length proteins. In addition to serving as a global quality control system, tmRNA also plays important roles in bacterial development, pathogenesis and environmental stress responses. This review focuses on the mechanism of tmRNA-mediated ribosome rescue and the role of tmRNA in bacterial physiology. PMID:22243584

  15. Potential extra-ribosomal functions of ribosomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Zhu, Yi-Fei; Xiong, Juan; Wang, Rong; Jia, Zhengping

    2015-08-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs), are essential components of the ribosomes, the molecular machines that turn mRNA blueprints into proteins, as they serve to stabilize the structure of the rRNA, thus improving protein biosynthesis. In addition, growing evidence suggests that RPs can function in other cellular roles. In the present review, we summarize several potential extra-ribosomal functions of RPs in ribosomal biogenesis, transcription activity, translation process, DNA repair, replicative life span, adhesive growth, and morphological transformation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the future in-depth studies are needed to identify these novel secondary functions of RPs in S. cerevisiae.

  16. Growth, Persistence, and Desistance of Alcohol Use for At-Risk Men in Their 30s

    PubMed Central

    Capaldi, Deborah M.; Tiberio, Stacey S.; Washburn, Isaac J.; Yoerger, Karen; Feingold, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about heterogeneity in men's drinking behaviors and their related consequences across midadulthood, and moreover, whether individual or social factors may predict such differences. The present study examined 3 indicators of alcohol use; namely, alcohol volume, heavy episodic drinking (HED), and drinking-related problems for men in their 30s. Methods Participants were 197 at-risk men from the Oregon Youth Study assessed 5 times across ages 29–38 years. Growth mixture modeling with count outcomes was used to examine unobserved heterogeneity in alcohol trajectories. Associations of latent classes of alcohol users with (i) classes for the other alcohol indicators, (ii) alcohol use by peers and romantic partners, (iii) alcohol classes previously extracted from ages 18–29 years, and (iv) past year alcohol use disorder (AUD) diagnostic status at ages 35–36 years was examined. Results A 3-class solution afforded the best fit for each alcohol indicator. Alcohol problems were relatively established in the 30s, with an ascending use class found only for volume. Although relatively few men were in higher classes for all 3 indicators, 45% of the sample was in the highest class on at least 2 indicators of use. Peer drunkenness was a robust predictor of the alcohol classes. Concordance among classes of alcohol users was seen from the 20s to the 30s, with prior desistance likely to be maintained for alcohol volume and HED. AUD diagnoses at ages 35–36 years were more common in the higher classes obtained for alcohol volume and alcohol problems. Conclusions Many men in their 30s engaged in high volume of alcohol without frequent engagement in HED, likely relating to continuing alcohol problems. The convergence of men's alcohol use with that of their peers found at younger ages was maintained into early midadulthood. PMID:26010338

  17. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Rosaceae.

    PubMed

    Shang, Chenjing; Rougé, Pierre; Van Damme, Els J M

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are widespread among higher plants of different taxonomic orders. In this study, we report on the RIP sequences found in the genome/transcriptome of several important Rosaceae species, including many economically important edible fruits such as apple, pear, peach, apricot, and strawberry. All RIP domains from Rosaceae share high sequence similarity with conserved residues in the catalytic site and the carbohydrate binding sites. The genomes of Malus domestica and Pyrus communis contain both type 1 and type 2 RIP sequences, whereas for Prunus mume, Prunus persica, Pyrus bretschneideri, and Pyrus communis a complex set of type 1 RIP sequences was retrieved. Heterologous expression and purification of the type 1 as well as the type 2 RIP from apple allowed to characterize the biological activity of the proteins. Both RIPs from Malus domestica can inhibit protein synthesis. Furthermore, molecular modelling suggests that RIPs from Rosaceae possess three-dimensional structures that are highly similar to the model proteins and can bind to RIP substrates. Screening of the recombinant type 2 RIP from apple on a glycan array revealed that this type 2 RIP interacts with terminal sialic acid residues. Our data suggest that the RIPs from Rosaceae are biologically active proteins. PMID:27556443

  18. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Rosaceae.

    PubMed

    Shang, Chenjing; Rougé, Pierre; Van Damme, Els J M

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are widespread among higher plants of different taxonomic orders. In this study, we report on the RIP sequences found in the genome/transcriptome of several important Rosaceae species, including many economically important edible fruits such as apple, pear, peach, apricot, and strawberry. All RIP domains from Rosaceae share high sequence similarity with conserved residues in the catalytic site and the carbohydrate binding sites. The genomes of Malus domestica and Pyrus communis contain both type 1 and type 2 RIP sequences, whereas for Prunus mume, Prunus persica, Pyrus bretschneideri, and Pyrus communis a complex set of type 1 RIP sequences was retrieved. Heterologous expression and purification of the type 1 as well as the type 2 RIP from apple allowed to characterize the biological activity of the proteins. Both RIPs from Malus domestica can inhibit protein synthesis. Furthermore, molecular modelling suggests that RIPs from Rosaceae possess three-dimensional structures that are highly similar to the model proteins and can bind to RIP substrates. Screening of the recombinant type 2 RIP from apple on a glycan array revealed that this type 2 RIP interacts with terminal sialic acid residues. Our data suggest that the RIPs from Rosaceae are biologically active proteins.

  19. Frozen spin targets in ribosomal structure research.

    PubMed

    Stuhrmann, H B

    1991-01-01

    Polarized neutron scattering strongly depends on nuclear spin polarisation, particularly on proton spin polarisation. A single proton in a deuterated environment then is as efficient as 10 electrons in X-ray anomalous diffraction. Neutron scattering from the nuclear spin label is controlled by the polarisation of neutron spins and nuclear spins. Pure deuteron spin labels and proton spin labels are created by NMR saturation. We report on results obtained from the large subunit of E. coli ribosomes which have been obtained at the research reactor of GKSS using the polarized target facility developed by CERN. The nuclear spins were oriented with respect to an external field by dynamic nuclear polarisation. Proton spin polarisations of more than 80% were obtained in ribosomes at temperatures below 0.5 K. At T = 130 mK the relaxation time of the polarized target is one month (frozen spin target). Polarized small-angle neutron scattering of the in situ structure of rRNA and the total ribosomal protein (TP) has been determined from the frozen spin targets of the large ribosomal subunit, which has been deuterated in the TP and rRNA respectively. The results agree with those from neutron scattering in H2O/D2O mixtures obtained at room temperature. This is a necessary prerequisite for the planned determination of the in situ structure of individual ribosomal proteins and especially of that of ribosome bound mRNA and tRNAs. PMID:1720669

  20. 5S ribosomal RNA is an essential component of a nascent ribosomal precursor complex that regulates the Hdm2-p53 checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Donati, Giulio; Peddigari, Suresh; Mercer, Carol A; Thomas, George

    2013-07-11

    Recently, we demonstrated that RPL5 and RPL11 act in a mutually dependent manner to inhibit Hdm2 and stabilize p53 following impaired ribosome biogenesis. Given that RPL5 and RPL11 form a preribosomal complex with noncoding 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and the three have been implicated in the p53 response, we reasoned they may be part of an Hdm2-inhibitory complex. Here, we show that small interfering RNAs directed against 5S rRNA have no effect on total or nascent levels of the noncoding rRNA, though they prevent the reported Hdm4 inhibition of p53. To achieve efficient inhibition of 5S rRNA synthesis, we targeted TFIIIA, a specific RNA polymerase III cofactor, which, like depletion of either RPL5 or RPL11, did not induce p53. Instead, 5S rRNA acts in a dependent manner with RPL5 and RPL11 to inhibit Hdm2 and stabilize p53. Moreover, depletion of any one of the three components abolished the binding of the other two to Hdm2, explaining their common dependence. Finally, we demonstrate that the RPL5/RPL11/5S rRNA preribosomal complex is redirected from assembly into nascent 60S ribosomes to Hdm2 inhibition as a consequence of impaired ribosome biogenesis. Thus, the activation of the Hdm2-inhibitory complex is not a passive but a regulated event, whose potential role in tumor suppression has been recently noted.

  1. Single mutations introduced in the essential ribosomal proteins L3 and S10 cause a sporulation defect in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Akanuma, Genki; Suzuki, Shota; Yano, Koichi; Nanamiya, Hideaki; Natori, Yousuke; Namba, Eri; Watanabe, Kazuya; Tagami, Kazumi; Takeda, Takuya; Iizuka, Yuka; Kobayashi, Ako; Ishizuka, Morio; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Kawamura, Fujio

    2013-01-01

    We introduced single mutations into the rplC and rpsJ genes, which encode the essential ribosomal proteins L3 (RplC) and S10 (RpsJ), respectively, and are located in the S10 gene cluster of the gram-positive, endospore-forming bacterium Bacillus subtilis, and examined whether these mutations affected their growth rate, sporulation, competence development and 70S ribosome formation. Mutant cells harboring the G52D mutation in the L3 ribosomal protein, which is located at the peptidyl transferase center of 50S, accumulated 30S subunit at 45°C, probably due to a defect in 50S formation, and exhibited a reduction in the sporulation frequency at high temperature. On the other hand, mutant cells harboring the H56R mutation in the S10 protein, which is located near the aminoacyl-tRNA site of 30S, showed severe growth defect and deficiency in spore formation, and also exhibited significant delay in competence development.

  2. Influence of magnesium and polyamines on the reactivity of individual ribosomal subunit proteins to lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination.

    PubMed

    Michalski, C J; Boyle, S M; Sells, B H

    1979-03-01

    30S and 50S subunits, in the presence of either 20 mM Mg2+ or 6 mM Mg2+ and 5mM spermidine plus 25 mM putrescine, were observed to completely associate to form 70S monosomes as monitored by sucrose gradient sedimentation. Subunits maintained under the above ionic conditions were compared with 30S and 50S particles at low (6 mM) magnesium concentration with respect to the reactivity of individual ribosomal proteins to lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination. Altered reactivity to enzymatic iodination of ribosomal proteins S4, S9, S10, S14, S17, S19, and S20 in the small subunit of ribosomal proteins, L2, L9, L11, L27, and L30 in the large subunit following incubation with high magnesium or magnesium and polyamines suggests that a conformation change in both subunits accompanies the formation of 70S monosomes. The results further demonstrate that the effect of Mg2+ on subunit conformation is mimicked when polyamines are substituted for magnesium necessary for subunit association.

  3. Distribution of rRNA introns in the three-dimensional structure of the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Scott; Cannone, Jamie; Lee, Jung; Gutell, Robin; Woodson, Sarah

    2002-10-11

    More than 1200 introns have been documented at over 150 unique sites in the small and large subunit ribosomal RNA genes (as of February 2002). Nearly all of these introns are assigned to one of four main types: group I, group II, archaeal and spliceosomal. This sequence information has been organized into a relational database that is accessible through the Comparative RNA Web Site (http://www.rna.icmb.utexas.edu/) While the rRNA introns are distributed across the entire tree of life, the majority of introns occur within a few phylogenetic groups. We analyzed the distributions of rRNA introns within the three-dimensional structures of the 30S and 50S ribosomes. Most sites in rRNA genes that contain introns contain only one type of intron. While the intron insertion sites occur at many different coordinates, the majority are clustered near conserved residues that form tRNA binding sites and the subunit interface. Contrary to our expectations, many of these positions are not accessible to solvent in the mature ribosome. The correlation between the frequency of intron insertions and proximity of the insertion site to functionally important residues suggests an association between intron evolution and rRNA function.

  4. Distribution of dwell times of a ribosome: effects of infidelity, kinetic proofreading and ribosome crowding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ajeet K.; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2011-04-01

    Ribosome is a molecular machine that polymerizes a protein where the sequence of the amino acid residues, the monomers of the protein, is dictated by the sequence of codons (triplets of nucleotides) on a messenger RNA (mRNA) that serves as the template. The ribosome is a molecular motor that utilizes the template mRNA strand also as the track. Thus, in each step the ribosome moves forward by one codon and, simultaneously, elongates the protein by one amino acid. We present a theoretical model that captures most of the main steps in the mechanochemical cycle of a ribosome. The stochastic movement of the ribosome consists of an alternating sequence of pause and translocation; the sum of the durations of a pause and the following translocation is the time of dwell of the ribosome at the corresponding codon. We derive the analytical expression for the distribution of the dwell times of a ribosome in our model. Wherever experimental data are available, our theoretical predictions are consistent with those results. We suggest appropriate experiments to test the new predictions of our model, particularly the effects of the quality control mechanism of the ribosome and that of their crowding on the mRNA track.

  5. HflX is a ribosome-splitting factor rescuing stalled ribosomes under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanqing; Mandava, Chandra Sekhar; Cao, Wei; Li, Xiaojing; Zhang, Dejiu; Li, Ningning; Zhang, Yixiao; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Qin, Yan; Mi, Kaixia; Lei, Jianlin; Sanyal, Suparna; Gao, Ning

    2015-11-01

    Adverse cellular conditions often lead to nonproductive translational stalling and arrest of ribosomes on mRNAs. Here, we used fast kinetics and cryo-EM to characterize Escherichia coli HflX, a GTPase with unknown function. Our data reveal that HflX is a heat shock-induced ribosome-splitting factor capable of dissociating vacant as well as mRNA-associated ribosomes with deacylated tRNA in the peptidyl site. Structural data demonstrate that the N-terminal effector domain of HflX binds to the peptidyl transferase center in a strikingly similar manner as that of the class I release factors and induces dramatic conformational changes in central intersubunit bridges, thus promoting subunit dissociation. Accordingly, loss of HflX results in an increase in stalled ribosomes upon heat shock. These results suggest a primary role of HflX in rescuing translationally arrested ribosomes under stress conditions. PMID:26458047

  6. The structure of ribosome-lankacidin complex reveals ribosomal sites for synergistic antibiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, Tamar; Mermershtain, Inbal; Davidovich, Chen; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Wekselman, Itai; Zimmerman, Ella; Xiong, Liqun; Klepacki, Dorota; Arakawa, Kenji; Kinashi, Haruyasu; Mankin, Alexander S.; Yonath, Ada

    2010-04-26

    Crystallographic analysis revealed that the 17-member polyketide antibiotic lankacidin produced by Streptomyces rochei binds at the peptidyl transferase center of the eubacterial large ribosomal subunit. Biochemical and functional studies verified this finding and showed interference with peptide bond formation. Chemical probing indicated that the macrolide lankamycin, a second antibiotic produced by the same species, binds at a neighboring site, at the ribosome exit tunnel. These two antibiotics can bind to the ribosome simultaneously and display synergy in inhibiting bacterial growth. The binding site of lankacidin and lankamycin partially overlap with the binding site of another pair of synergistic antibiotics, the streptogramins. Thus, at least two pairs of structurally dissimilar compounds have been selected in the course of evolution to act synergistically by targeting neighboring sites in the ribosome. These results underscore the importance of the corresponding ribosomal sites for development of clinically relevant synergistic antibiotics and demonstrate the utility of structural analysis for providing new directions for drug discovery.

  7. HflX is a ribosome-splitting factor rescuing stalled ribosomes under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanqing; Mandava, Chandra Sekhar; Cao, Wei; Li, Xiaojing; Zhang, Dejiu; Li, Ningning; Zhang, Yixiao; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Qin, Yan; Mi, Kaixia; Lei, Jianlin; Sanyal, Suparna; Gao, Ning

    2015-11-01

    Adverse cellular conditions often lead to nonproductive translational stalling and arrest of ribosomes on mRNAs. Here, we used fast kinetics and cryo-EM to characterize Escherichia coli HflX, a GTPase with unknown function. Our data reveal that HflX is a heat shock-induced ribosome-splitting factor capable of dissociating vacant as well as mRNA-associated ribosomes with deacylated tRNA in the peptidyl site. Structural data demonstrate that the N-terminal effector domain of HflX binds to the peptidyl transferase center in a strikingly similar manner as that of the class I release factors and induces dramatic conformational changes in central intersubunit bridges, thus promoting subunit dissociation. Accordingly, loss of HflX results in an increase in stalled ribosomes upon heat shock. These results suggest a primary role of HflX in rescuing translationally arrested ribosomes under stress conditions.

  8. High-resolution structure of the Escherichia coli ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Noeske, Jonas; Wasserman, Michael R.; Terry, Daniel S.; Altman, Roger B.; Blanchard, Scott C.; Cate, Jamie H. D.

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis by the ribosome is highly dependent on the ionic conditions in the cellular environment, but the roles of ribosome solvation remain poorly understood. Moreover, the function of modifications to ribosomal RNA and ribosomal proteins are unclear. Here we present the structure of the Escherichia coli 70S ribosome to 2.4 Å resolution. The structure reveals details of the ribosomal subunit interface that are conserved in all domains of life, and suggest how solvation contributes to ribosome integrity and function. The structure also suggests how the conformation of ribosomal protein uS12 likely impacts its contribution to messenger RNA decoding. This structure helps to explain the phylogenetic conservation of key elements of the ribosome, including posttranscriptional and posttranslational modifications and should serve as a basis for future antibiotic development. PMID:25775265

  9. Characterizing and alleviating substrate limitations for improved in vitro ribosome construction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Fritz, Brian R; Anderson, Mark J; Schoborg, Jennifer A; Jewett, Michael C

    2015-04-17

    Complete cell-free synthesis of ribosomes could make possible minimal cell projects and the construction of variant ribosomes with new functions. Recently, we reported the development of an integrated synthesis, assembly, and translation (iSAT) method for in vitro construction of Escherichia coli ribosomes. iSAT allows simultaneous rRNA synthesis, ribosome assembly, and reporter protein expression as a measure of ribosome activity. Here, we explore causes of iSAT reaction termination to improve efficiency and yields. We discovered that phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), the secondary energy substrate, and nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs) were rapidly degraded during iSAT reactions. In turn, we observed a significant drop in the adenylate energy charge and termination of protein synthesis. Furthermore, we identified that the accumulation of inorganic phosphate is inhibitory to iSAT. Fed-batch replenishment of PEP and magnesium glutamate (to offset the inhibitory effects of accumulating phosphate by repeated additions of PEP) prior to energy depletion prolonged the reaction duration 2-fold and increased superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP) yield by ~75%. By adopting a semi-continuous method, where passive diffusion enables substrate replenishment and byproduct removal, we prolonged iSAT reaction duration 5-fold and increased sfGFP yield 7-fold to 7.5 ± 0.7 μmol L(-1). This protein yield is the highest ever reported for iSAT reactions. Our results underscore the critical role energy substrates play in iSAT and highlight the importance of understanding metabolic processes that influence substrate depletion for cell-free synthetic biology.

  10. Zfrp8/PDCD2 Interacts with RpS2 Connecting Ribosome Maturation and Gene-Specific Translation

    PubMed Central

    Minakhina, Svetlana; Naryshkina, Tatyana; Changela, Neha; Tan, William; Steward, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Zfrp8/PDCD2 is a highly conserved protein essential for stem cell maintenance in both flies and mammals. It is also required in fast proliferating cells such as cancer cells. Our previous studies suggested that Zfrp8 functions in the formation of mRNP (mRNA ribonucleoprotein) complexes and also controls RNA of select Transposable Elements (TEs). Here we show that in Zfrp8/PDCD2 knock down (KD) ovaries, specific mRNAs and TE transcripts show increased nuclear accumulation. We also show that Zfrp8/PDCD2 interacts with the (40S) small ribosomal subunit through direct interaction with RpS2 (uS5). By studying the distribution of endogenous and transgenic fluorescently tagged ribosomal proteins we demonstrate that Zfrp8/PDCD2 regulates the cytoplasmic levels of components of the small (40S) ribosomal subunit, but does not control nuclear/nucleolar localization of ribosomal proteins. Our results suggest that Zfrp8/PDCD2 functions at late stages of ribosome assembly and may regulate the binding of specific mRNA-RNPs to the small ribosomal subunit ultimately controlling their cytoplasmic localization and translation. PMID:26807849

  11. Global shape mimicry of tRNA within a viral internal ribosome entry site mediates translational reading frame selection

    PubMed Central

    Au, Hilda H.; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Mouzakis, Kathryn D.; Ren, Qian; Burke, Jordan E.; Lee, Seonghoon; Butcher, Samuel E.; Jan, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The dicistrovirus intergenic region internal ribosome entry site (IRES) adopts a triple-pseudoknotted RNA structure and occupies the core ribosomal E, P, and A sites to directly recruit the ribosome and initiate translation at a non-AUG codon. A subset of dicistrovirus IRESs directs translation in the 0 and +1 frames to produce the viral structural proteins and a +1 overlapping open reading frame called ORFx, respectively. Here we show that specific mutations of two unpaired adenosines located at the core of the three-helical junction of the honey bee dicistrovirus Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) IRES PKI domain can uncouple 0 and +1 frame translation, suggesting that the structure adopts distinct conformations that contribute to 0 or +1 frame translation. Using a reconstituted translation system, we show that ribosomes assembled on mutant IRESs that direct exclusive 0 or +1 frame translation lack reading frame fidelity. Finally, a nuclear magnetic resonance/small-angle X-ray scattering hybrid approach reveals that the PKI domain of the IAPV IRES adopts an RNA structure that resembles a complete tRNA. The tRNA shape-mimicry enables the viral IRES to gain access to the ribosome tRNA-binding sites and form intermolecular contacts with the ribosome that are necessary for initiating IRES translation in a specific reading frame. PMID:26554019

  12. Global shape mimicry of tRNA within a viral internal ribosome entry site mediates translational reading frame selection.

    PubMed

    Au, Hilda H; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Mouzakis, Kathryn D; Ren, Qian; Burke, Jordan E; Lee, Seonghoon; Butcher, Samuel E; Jan, Eric

    2015-11-24

    The dicistrovirus intergenic region internal ribosome entry site (IRES) adopts a triple-pseudoknotted RNA structure and occupies the core ribosomal E, P, and A sites to directly recruit the ribosome and initiate translation at a non-AUG codon. A subset of dicistrovirus IRESs directs translation in the 0 and +1 frames to produce the viral structural proteins and a +1 overlapping open reading frame called ORFx, respectively. Here we show that specific mutations of two unpaired adenosines located at the core of the three-helical junction of the honey bee dicistrovirus Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) IRES PKI domain can uncouple 0 and +1 frame translation, suggesting that the structure adopts distinct conformations that contribute to 0 or +1 frame translation. Using a reconstituted translation system, we show that ribosomes assembled on mutant IRESs that direct exclusive 0 or +1 frame translation lack reading frame fidelity. Finally, a nuclear magnetic resonance/small-angle X-ray scattering hybrid approach reveals that the PKI domain of the IAPV IRES adopts an RNA structure that resembles a complete tRNA. The tRNA shape-mimicry enables the viral IRES to gain access to the ribosome tRNA-binding sites and form intermolecular contacts with the ribosome that are necessary for initiating IRES translation in a specific reading frame. PMID:26554019

  13. Zfrp8/PDCD2 Interacts with RpS2 Connecting Ribosome Maturation and Gene-Specific Translation.

    PubMed

    Minakhina, Svetlana; Naryshkina, Tatyana; Changela, Neha; Tan, William; Steward, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Zfrp8/PDCD2 is a highly conserved protein essential for stem cell maintenance in both flies and mammals. It is also required in fast proliferating cells such as cancer cells. Our previous studies suggested that Zfrp8 functions in the formation of mRNP (mRNA ribonucleoprotein) complexes and also controls RNA of select Transposable Elements (TEs). Here we show that in Zfrp8/PDCD2 knock down (KD) ovaries, specific mRNAs and TE transcripts show increased nuclear accumulation. We also show that Zfrp8/PDCD2 interacts with the (40S) small ribosomal subunit through direct interaction with RpS2 (uS5). By studying the distribution of endogenous and transgenic fluorescently tagged ribosomal proteins we demonstrate that Zfrp8/PDCD2 regulates the cytoplasmic levels of components of the small (40S) ribosomal subunit, but does not control nuclear/nucleolar localization of ribosomal proteins. Our results suggest that Zfrp8/PDCD2 functions at late stages of ribosome assembly and may regulate the binding of specific mRNA-RNPs to the small ribosomal subunit ultimately controlling their cytoplasmic localization and translation. PMID:26807849

  14. Global shape mimicry of tRNA within a viral internal ribosome entry site mediates translational reading frame selection.

    PubMed

    Au, Hilda H; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Mouzakis, Kathryn D; Ren, Qian; Burke, Jordan E; Lee, Seonghoon; Butcher, Samuel E; Jan, Eric

    2015-11-24

    The dicistrovirus intergenic region internal ribosome entry site (IRES) adopts a triple-pseudoknotted RNA structure and occupies the core ribosomal E, P, and A sites to directly recruit the ribosome and initiate translation at a non-AUG codon. A subset of dicistrovirus IRESs directs translation in the 0 and +1 frames to produce the viral structural proteins and a +1 overlapping open reading frame called ORFx, respectively. Here we show that specific mutations of two unpaired adenosines located at the core of the three-helical junction of the honey bee dicistrovirus Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) IRES PKI domain can uncouple 0 and +1 frame translation, suggesting that the structure adopts distinct conformations that contribute to 0 or +1 frame translation. Using a reconstituted translation system, we show that ribosomes assembled on mutant IRESs that direct exclusive 0 or +1 frame translation lack reading frame fidelity. Finally, a nuclear magnetic resonance/small-angle X-ray scattering hybrid approach reveals that the PKI domain of the IAPV IRES adopts an RNA structure that resembles a complete tRNA. The tRNA shape-mimicry enables the viral IRES to gain access to the ribosome tRNA-binding sites and form intermolecular contacts with the ribosome that are necessary for initiating IRES translation in a specific reading frame.

  15. In vitro expression of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein genes: autogenous inhibition of translation.

    PubMed Central

    Yates, J L; Arfsten, A E; Nomura, M

    1980-01-01

    Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L1 (0.5 micro M) was found to inhibit the synthesis of both proteins of the L11 operon, L11 and L1, but not the synthesis of other proteins directed by lambda rifd 18 DNA. Similarly, S4 (1 micro M) selectively inhibited the synthesis of three proteins of the alpha operon, S13, S11, and S4, directed by lambda spcI DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment obtained from this DNA. S8 (3.6 micro M) also showed preferential inhibitory effects on the synthesis of some proteins encoded in the spc operon, L24 and L5 (and probably S14 and S8), directed by lambda spcl DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment carrying the genes for these proteins. The inhibitory effect of L1 was observed only with L1 and not with other proteins examined, including S4 and S8. Similarly, the effect of S4 was not observed with L1 or S8, and that of S8 was not seen with L1 or S4. Inhibition was shown to take place at the level of translation rather than transcription. Thus, at least some ribosomal proteins (L1 S4, and S8) have the ability to cause selective translational inhibition of the synthesis of certain ribosomal proteins whose genes are in the same operon as their own. These results support the hypothesis that certain free ribosomal proteins not assembled into ribosomes act as "autogenous" feedback inhibitors to regulate the synthesis of ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:6445562

  16. Ribosomes in the squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Bleher, R; Martin, R

    2001-01-01

    Ribosome clusters, referred to as endoaxoplasmic plaques, were documented and quantitatively analyzed in the squid giant axon at the light and electron microscopic levels. The methods included nonspecific high affinity fluorescence staining of RNA by YOYO-1, specific immunofluorescence labeling of ribosomal RNA, electron energy loss spectroscopic mapping of ribosomal phosphorus, and conventional transmission electron microscopy. The endoaxoplasmic plaques were sharply defined, oval in shape, and less than 2 microm in diameter. While they were very numerous in the postsynaptic axonal area of the giant synapse, the frequency of occurrence was much lower in the peripheral giant axon, with a density of about 1 plaque/1000 microm3. Their distribution was random within axoplasm, with no preferential localization near the membrane. The several thousand ribosomes in a plaque usually were not membrane bound, but vesicular structures were observed in or near plaques; plaques were often surrounded by mitochondria. We conclude that ribosomes, a requisite machinery for protein synthesis, are present in the squid giant axon in discrete configurations.

  17. Does power indicate capacity? 30-s Wingate anaerobic test vs. maximal accumulated O2 deficit.

    PubMed

    Minahan, C; Chia, M; Inbar, O

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between anaerobic power and capacity. Seven men and seven women performed a 30-s Wingate Anaerobic Test on a cycle ergometer to determine peak power, mean power, and the fatigue index. Subjects also cycled at a work rate predicted to elicit 120 % of peak oxygen uptake to exhaustion to determine the maximal accumulated O (2) deficit. Peak power and the maximal accumulated O (2) deficit were significantly correlated (r = 0.782, p = 0.001). However, when the absolute difference in exercise values between groups (men and women) was held constant using a partial correlation, the relationship diminished (r = 0.531, p = 0.062). In contrast, we observed a significant correlation between fatigue index and the maximal accumulated O (2) deficit when controlling for gender (r = - 0.597, p = 0.024) and the relationship remained significant when values were expressed relative to active muscle mass. A higher anaerobic power does not indicate a greater anaerobic capacity. Furthermore, we suggest that the ability to maintain power output during a 30-s cycle sprint is related to anaerobic capacity.

  18. The effect of aminoacyl- or peptidyl-tRNA at the A-site on the arrangement of deacylated tRNA at the ribosomal P-site.

    PubMed

    Babkina, G T; Bausk, E V; Graifer, D M; Karpova, G G; Matasova, N B

    1984-05-21

    Photoreactive derivatives of E. coli tRNAPhe bearing arylazido groups on guanine residues (azido-tRNA) were used for affinity labelling of E. coli ribosomes in the region of the P-site when the A-site was either free or occupied by aminoacyl- or peptidyl-tRNA. Corresponding complexes of azido-tRNA with ribosomes and poly(U) were obtained both nonenzymatically and with the use of elongation factors. UV-irradiation of the complexes resulted in labelling of ribosomal proteins (preferentially of 30 S subunit). Proteins S9 and S21 were labelled only when the A-site was free; S14 - only when it was occupied; S11, S13, S19 - in both cases; S5, S7, S12, S20 - in some states.

  19. Genome Mining for Ribosomally Synthesized Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Velásquez, Juan E.; van der Donk, Wilfred

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the number of known peptide natural products that are synthesized via the ribosomal pathway has rapidly grown. Taking advantage of sequence homology among genes encoding precursor peptides or biosynthetic proteins, in silico mining of genomes combined with molecular biology approaches has guided the discovery of a large number of new ribosomal natural products, including lantipeptides, cyanobactins, linear thiazole/oxazole-containing peptides, microviridins, lasso peptides, amatoxins, cyclotides, and conopeptides. In this review, we describe the strategies used for the identification of these ribosomally-synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs) and the structures of newly identified compounds. The increasing number of chemical entities and their remarkable structural and functional diversity may lead to novel pharmaceutical applications. PMID:21095156

  20. Structural snapshots of actively translating human ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Behrmann, Elmar; Loerke, Justus; Budkevich, Tatyana V; Yamamoto, Kaori; Schmidt, Andrea; Penczek, Pawel A; Vos, Matthijn R; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Scheerer, Patrick; Spahn, Christian M T

    2015-05-01

    Macromolecular machines, such as the ribosome, undergo large-scale conformational changes during their functional cycles. Although their mode of action is often compared to that of mechanical machines, a crucial difference is that, at the molecular dimension, thermodynamic effects dominate functional cycles, with proteins fluctuating stochastically between functional states defined by energetic minima on an energy landscape. Here, we have used cryo-electron microscopy to image ex-vivo-derived human polysomes as a source of actively translating ribosomes. Multiparticle refinement and 3D variability analysis allowed us to visualize a variety of native translation intermediates. Significantly populated states include not only elongation cycle intermediates in pre- and post-translocational states, but also eEF1A-containing decoding and termination/recycling complexes. Focusing on the post-translocational state, we extended this assessment to the single-residue level, uncovering striking details of ribosome-ligand interactions and identifying both static and functionally important dynamic elements.

  1. Single-molecule observations of ribosome function.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Scott C

    2009-02-01

    Single-molecule investigations promise to greatly advance our understanding of basic and regulated ribosome functions during the process of translation. Here, recent progress towards directly imaging the elemental translation elongation steps using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based imaging methods is discussed, which provide striking evidence of the highly dynamic nature of the ribosome. In this view, global rates and fidelities of protein synthesis reactions may be regulated by interactions of the ribosome with mRNA, tRNA, translation factors and potentially many other cellular ligands that modify intrinsic conformational equilibria in the translating particle. Future investigations probing this model must aim to visualize translation processes from multiple structural and kinetic perspectives simultaneously, to provide direct correlations between factor binding and conformational events.

  2. Analysis of the conformation of the 3' major domain of Escherichia coli16S ribosomal RNA using site-directed photoaffinity crosslinking.

    PubMed Central

    Montpetit, A; Payant, C; Nolan, J M; Brakier-Gingras, L

    1998-01-01

    The 3' major domain of Escherichia coli 16S rRNA, which occupies the head of the small ribosomal subunit, is involved in several functions of the ribosome. We have used a site-specific crosslinking procedure to gain further insights into the higher-order structure of this domain. Circularly permuted RNAs were used to introduce an azidophenacyl group at specific positions within the 3' major domain. Crosslinks were generated in a high-ionic strength buffer that has been used for ribosome reconstitution studies and so enables the RNA to adopt a structure recognized by ribosomal proteins. The crosslinking sites were identified by primer extension and confirmed by assessing the mobility of the crosslinked RNA lariats in denaturing polyacrylamide gels. Eight crosslinks were characterized. Among them, one crosslink demonstrates that helix 28 is proximal to the top of helix 34, and two others show that the 1337 region, located in an internal loop at the junction of helices 29, 30, 41, and 42, is proximal to the center of helix 30 and to a segment connecting helix 28 to helix 29. These relationships of vicinity have previously been observed in native 30S subunits, which suggests that the free domain adopts a conformation similar to that within the 30S subunit. Furthermore, crosslinks were obtained in helix 34, which suggest that the upper and lower portions of this helix are in close proximity. PMID:9814765

  3. Ribosome-dependent activation of stringent control.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alan; Fernández, Israel S; Gordiyenko, Yuliya; Ramakrishnan, V

    2016-06-01

    In order to survive, bacteria continually sense, and respond to, environmental fluctuations. Stringent control represents a key bacterial stress response to nutrient starvation that leads to rapid and comprehensive reprogramming of metabolic and transcriptional patterns. In general, transcription of genes for growth and proliferation is downregulated, while those important for survival and virulence are upregulated. Amino acid starvation is sensed by depletion of the aminoacylated tRNA pools, and this results in accumulation of ribosomes stalled with non-aminoacylated (uncharged) tRNA in the ribosomal A site. RelA is recruited to stalled ribosomes and activated to synthesize a hyperphosphorylated guanosine analogue, (p)ppGpp, which acts as a pleiotropic secondary messenger. However, structural information about how RelA recognizes stalled ribosomes and discriminates against aminoacylated tRNAs is missing. Here we present the cryo-electron microscopy structure of RelA bound to the bacterial ribosome stalled with uncharged tRNA. The structure reveals that RelA utilizes a distinct binding site compared to the translational factors, with a multi-domain architecture that wraps around a highly distorted A-site tRNA. The TGS (ThrRS, GTPase and SpoT) domain of RelA binds the CCA tail to orient the free 3' hydroxyl group of the terminal adenosine towards a β-strand, such that an aminoacylated tRNA at this position would be sterically precluded. The structure supports a model in which association of RelA with the ribosome suppresses auto-inhibition to activate synthesis of (p)ppGpp and initiate the stringent response. Since stringent control is responsible for the survival of pathogenic bacteria under stress conditions, and contributes to chronic infections and antibiotic tolerance, RelA represents a good target for the development of novel antibacterial therapeutics. PMID:27279228

  4. Fluctuations between multiple EF-G-induced chimeric tRNA states during translocation on the ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adio, Sarah; Senyushkina, Tamara; Peske, Frank; Fischer, Niels; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V.

    2015-06-01

    The coupled translocation of transfer RNA and messenger RNA through the ribosome entails large-scale structural rearrangements, including step-wise movements of the tRNAs. Recent structural work has visualized intermediates of translocation induced by elongation factor G (EF-G) with tRNAs trapped in chimeric states with respect to 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits. The functional role of the chimeric states is not known. Here we follow the formation of translocation intermediates by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Using EF-G mutants, a non-hydrolysable GTP analogue, and fusidic acid, we interfere with either translocation or EF-G release from the ribosome and identify several rapidly interconverting chimeric tRNA states on the reaction pathway. EF-G engagement prevents backward transitions early in translocation and increases the fraction of ribosomes that rapidly fluctuate between hybrid, chimeric and posttranslocation states. Thus, the engagement of EF-G alters the energetics of translocation towards a flat energy landscape, thereby promoting forward tRNA movement.

  5. Ribosomal RNA pseudouridines and pseudouridine synthases.

    PubMed

    Ofengand, James

    2002-03-01

    Pseudouridines are found in virtually all ribosomal RNAs but their function is unknown. There are four to eight times more pseudouridines in eukaryotes than in eubacteria. Mapping 19 Haloarcula marismortui pseudouridines on the three-dimensional 50S subunit does not show clustering. In bacteria, specific enzymes choose the site of pseudouridine formation. In eukaryotes, and probably also in archaea, selection and modification is done by a guide RNA-protein complex. No unique specific role for ribosomal pseudouridines has been identified. We propose that pseudouridine's function is as a molecular glue to stabilize required RNA conformations that would otherwise be too flexible.

  6. DISSOCIATION OF 70S RIBOSOMES: SOME PROPERTIES OF THE DISSOCIATING FACTOR FROM Bacillus stearothermophilus AND Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Bade, Ernesto G.; González, Nelida S.; Algranati, Israel D.

    1969-01-01

    A protein factor which produces in vitro dissociation of 70S particles into 30S and 50S subunits has been obtained from Bacillus stearothermophilus and Escherichia coli. The factor could be extracted from ribosomes, polyribosomes, and S100 supernatant. The kinetics and temperature curve of the dissociation process in the B. stearothermophilus system have been studied and compared with the reaction in the E. coli system. No species specificity was observed when hybrid mixtures of ribosomes and dissociating factor from both bacteria were used. The wide variations of dissociating activity in cells at different stages of growth and the capacity of the liberated subunits to carry out polypeptide synthesis suggest that the dissociating factor has a physiological role. PMID:4901704

  7. The Sambucus nigra type-2 ribosome-inactivating protein SNA-I' exhibits in planta antiviral activity in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Peumans, Willy J; Van Damme, Els J M

    2002-04-10

    Transgenic tobacco (Samsun NN) plants transformed with a cDNA clone encoding SNA-I' from Sambucus nigra synthesize, and correctly process and assemble, a fully active type-2 ribosome-inactivating protein. Expression of SNA-I' under the control of the 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter enhances the plant's resistance against infection with tobacco mosaic virus. In contrast to type-1 ribosome-inactivating proteins, the expression of SNA-I' does not affect the growth and fertility of the transgenic plants and is not accompanied by an increased expression of pathogenesis-related proteins indicating that its antiviral activity most probably differs from that of pokeweed antiviral protein.

  8. A conserved quality-control pathway that mediates degradation of unassembled ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Min-Kyung; Porras-Yakushi, Tanya R; Reitsma, Justin M; Huber, Ferdinand M; Sweredoski, Michael J; Hoelz, André; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    Overproduced yeast ribosomal protein (RP) Rpl26 fails to assemble into ribosomes and is degraded in the nucleus/nucleolus by a ubiquitin-proteasome system quality control pathway comprising the E2 enzymes Ubc4/Ubc5 and the ubiquitin ligase Tom1. tom1 cells show reduced ubiquitination of multiple RPs, exceptional accumulation of detergent-insoluble proteins including multiple RPs, and hypersensitivity to imbalances in production of RPs and rRNA, indicative of a profound perturbation to proteostasis. Tom1 directly ubiquitinates unassembled RPs primarily via residues that are concealed in mature ribosomes. Together, these data point to an important role for Tom1 in normal physiology and prompt us to refer to this pathway as ERISQ, for excess ribosomal protein quality control. A similar pathway, mediated by the Tom1 homolog Huwe1, restricts accumulation of overexpressed hRpl26 in human cells. We propose that ERISQ is a key element of the quality control machinery that sustains protein homeostasis and cellular fitness in eukaryotes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19105.001 PMID:27552055

  9. A conserved quality-control pathway that mediates degradation of unassembled ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Sung, Min-Kyung; Porras-Yakushi, Tanya R; Reitsma, Justin M; Huber, Ferdinand M; Sweredoski, Michael J; Hoelz, André; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    Overproduced yeast ribosomal protein (RP) Rpl26 fails to assemble into ribosomes and is degraded in the nucleus/nucleolus by a ubiquitin-proteasome system quality control pathway comprising the E2 enzymes Ubc4/Ubc5 and the ubiquitin ligase Tom1. tom1 cells show reduced ubiquitination of multiple RPs, exceptional accumulation of detergent-insoluble proteins including multiple RPs, and hypersensitivity to imbalances in production of RPs and rRNA, indicative of a profound perturbation to proteostasis. Tom1 directly ubiquitinates unassembled RPs primarily via residues that are concealed in mature ribosomes. Together, these data point to an important role for Tom1 in normal physiology and prompt us to refer to this pathway as ERISQ, for excess ribosomal protein quality control. A similar pathway, mediated by the Tom1 homolog Huwe1, restricts accumulation of overexpressed hRpl26 in human cells. We propose that ERISQ is a key element of the quality control machinery that sustains protein homeostasis and cellular fitness in eukaryotes. PMID:27552055

  10. The linkage between ribosomal crystallography, metal ions, heteropolytungstates and functional flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashan, Anat; Yonath, Ada

    2008-11-01

    Crystallography of ribosomes, the universal cell nucleoprotein assemblies facilitating the translation of the genetic-code into proteins, met with severe problems owing to the large size, complex structure, inherent flexibility and high conformational variability of the ribosome. For the case of the small ribosomal subunit, which caused extreme difficulties, post-crystallization treatment by minute amounts of a heteropolytungstate cluster allowed structure determination at atomic resolution. This cluster played a dual role: providing anomalous phasing power and dramatically increased the resolution, by stabilization of a selected functional conformation. Thus, four out of the fourteen clusters that bind to each of the crystallized small subunits are attached to a specific ribosomal protein in a fashion that may control a significant component of the subunit internal flexibility, by "gluing" symmetrical related subunits. Here, we highlight basic issues in the relationship between metal ions and macromolecules and present common traits controlling in the interactions between polymetalates and various macromolecules, which may be extended towards the exploitation of polymetalates for therapeutical treatment.

  11. The Arabidopsis Cytosolic Ribosomal Proteome: From form to Function

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Adam J.

    2013-01-01

    The cytosolic ribosomal proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana has been studied intensively by a range of proteomics approaches and is now one of the most well characterized eukaryotic ribosomal proteomes. Plant cytosolic ribosomes are distinguished from other eukaryotic ribosomes by unique proteins, unique post-translational modifications and an abundance of ribosomal proteins for which multiple divergent paralogs are expressed and incorporated. Study of the A. thaliana ribosome has now progressed well beyond a simple cataloging of protein parts and is focused strongly on elucidating the functions of specific ribosomal proteins, their paralogous isoforms and covalent modifications. This review summarises current knowledge concerning the Arabidopsis cytosolic ribosomal proteome and highlights potentially fruitful areas of future research in this fast moving and important area. PMID:23459595

  12. Dom34 rescues ribosomes in 3' untranslated regions.

    PubMed

    Guydosh, Nicholas R; Green, Rachel

    2014-02-27

    Ribosomes that stall before completing peptide synthesis must be recycled and returned to the cytoplasmic pool. The protein Dom34 and cofactors Hbs1 and Rli1 can dissociate stalled ribosomes in vitro, but the identity of targets in the cell is unknown. Here, we extend ribosome profiling methodology to reveal a high-resolution molecular characterization of Dom34 function in vivo. Dom34 removes stalled ribosomes from truncated mRNAs, but, in contrast, does not generally dissociate ribosomes on coding sequences known to trigger stalling, such as polyproline. We also show that Dom34 targets arrested ribosomes near the ends of 3' UTRs. These ribosomes appear to gain access to the 3' UTR via a mechanism that does not require decoding of the mRNA. These results suggest that ribosomes frequently enter downstream noncoding regions and that Dom34 carries out the important task of rescuing them.

  13. Evaluation of a ribosomal vaccine against pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Field, L H; Parker, C D; Manclark, C R; Berry, L J

    1979-01-01

    A crude ribosomal vaccine derived from Bordetella pertussis administered to ICR and N:NIH (SW) strains of mice protected them effectively against a standardized intracranial challenge. The dose of vaccine that protected half the mice was less for N:NIH (SW) than for ICR mice and compared favorably with a killed reference vaccine. Ribosomes prepared from bacteria ground with washed sea sand were more immunogenic than those obtained by rupture with alumina or with a Braun homogenizer. The protective effect of the crude ribosomes was not an innate part of the organelle but was due to a substance or substances that could be removed from them by a 1 M NH4Cl wash. The material in the wash was highly immunogenic and retained both the histamine-sensitizing and leukocytosis-promoting properties. It lost much of the dermonecrotic activity and was poorly pyrogenic in rabbits. The most potent pyrogen was present in the washed ribosomes, which apparently, retained the endotoxic components of the cell wall. The best vaccines permitted acceptable weight gain in the immunized mice. PMID:222684

  14. Peptide Bond Formation Mechanism Catalyzed by Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Świderek, Katarzyna; Marti, Sergio; Tuñón, Iñaki; Moliner, Vicent; Bertran, Juan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a study of the peptide bond formation reaction catalyzed by ribosome. Different mechanistic proposals have been explored by means of Free Energy Perturbation methods within hybrid QM/MM potentials, where the chemical system has been described by the M06-2X functional and the environment by means of the AMBER force field. According to our results, the most favourable mechanism in the ribosome would proceed through an eight-membered ring transition state, involving a proton shuttle mechanism through the hydroxyl group of the sugar and a water molecule. This transition state is similar to that described for the reaction in solution (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, 8708–8719) but the reaction mechanisms are noticeable different. Our simulations reproduce the experimentally determined catalytic effect of ribosome that can be explained by the different behaviour of the two environments. While the solvent reorganizes during the chemical process involving an entropic penalty, the ribosome is preorganized in the formation of the Michaelis complex and does not suffer important changes along the reaction, dampening the charge redistribution of the chemical system. PMID:26325003

  15. Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6, an evolutionarily conserved regulator of ribosome biogenesis and protein translation

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianjun; Jin, Zhaoqing; Yang, Xiaohan; Li, Jian-Feng; Chen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) as one of the molecular links between abscisic acid (ABA) signaling and its regulation on protein translation. Moreover, we identified Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6 (eIF6) as an interacting partner of RACK1. Because the interaction between RACK1 and eIF6 in mammalian cells is known to regulate the ribosome assembly step of protein translation initiation, it was hypothesized that the same process of protein translation in Arabidopsis is also regulated by RACK1 and eIF6. In this article, we analyzed the amino acid sequences of eIF6 in different species from different lineages and discovered some intriguing differences in protein phosphorylation sites that may contribute to its action in ribosome assembly and biogenesis. In addition, we discovered that, distinct from non-plant organisms in which eIF6 is encoded by a single gene, all sequenced plant genomes contain two or more copies of eIF6 genes. While one copy of plant eIF6 is expressed ubiquitously and might possess the conserved function in ribosome biogenesis and protein translation, the other copy seems to be only expressed in specific organs and therefore may have gained some new functions. We proposed some important studies that may help us better understand the function of eIF6 in plants.

  16. Murine Leukemia Virus Nucleocapsid Mutant Particles Lacking Viral RNA Encapsidate Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Muriaux, Delphine; Mirro, Jane; Nagashima, Kunio; Harvin, Demetria; Rein, Alan

    2002-01-01

    A single retroviral protein, termed Gag, is sufficient for assembly of retrovirus-like particles in mammalian cells. Gag normally selects the genomic RNA of the virus with high specificity; the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of Gag plays a crucial role in this selection process. However, encapsidation of the viral RNA is completely unnecessary for particle assembly. We previously showed that mutant murine leukemia virus (MuLV) particles that lack viral RNA because of a deletion in the cis-acting packaging signal (“Ψ”) in the genomic RNA compensate for the loss of the viral RNA by incorporating cellular mRNA. The RNA in wild-type and Ψ− particles was also found to be necessary for virion core structure. In the present work, we explored the role of RNA in MuLV particles that lack genomic RNA because of mutations in the NC domain of Gag. Using a fluorescent dye assay, we observed that NC mutant particles contain the same amount of RNA that wild-type virions do. Surprisingly enough, these particles contained large amounts of rRNAs. Furthermore, ribosomal proteins were detected by immunoblotting, and ribosomes were observed inside the particles by electron microscopy. The biological significance of the presence of ribosomes in NC mutant particles lacking genomic RNA is discussed. PMID:12388701

  17. A new model for the three-dimensional folding of Escherichia coli 16 S ribosomal RNA. II. The RNA-protein interaction data.

    PubMed

    Mueller, F; Brimacombe, R

    1997-08-29

    The map of the mass centres of the 21 proteins from the Escherichia coli 30 S ribosomal subunit, as determined by neutron scattering, was fitted to a cryoelectron microscopic (cryo-EM) model at a resolution of 20 A of 70 S ribosomes in the pre-translocational state, carrying tRNA molecules at the A and P sites. The fit to the 30 S moiety of the 70 S particles was accomplished with the help of the well-known distribution of the ribosomal proteins in the head, body and side lobe regions of the 30 S subunit, as determined by immuno electron microscopy (IEM). Most of the protein mass centres were found to lie close to the surface (or even outside) of the cryo-EM contour of the 30 S subunit, supporting the idea that the ribosomal proteins are arranged peripherally around the rRNA. The ribosomal protein distribution was then compared with the corresponding model for the 16 S rRNA, fitted to the same EM contour (described in an accompanying paper), in order to analyse the mutual compatibility of the arrangement of proteins and rRNA in terms of the available RNA-protein interaction data. The information taken into account included the hydroxyl radical and base foot-printing data from Noller's laboratory, and our own in situ cross-linking results. Proteins S1 and S14 were not considered, due to the lack of RNA-protein data. Among the 19 proteins analysed, 12 (namely S2, S4, S5, S7, S8, S9, S10, S11, S12, S15, S17 and S21) showed a fit to the rRNA model that varied from being excellent to at least acceptable. Of the remaining 7, S3 and S13 showed a rather poor fit, as did S18 (which is considered in combination with S6 in the foot-printing experiments). S16 was difficult to evaluate, as the foot-print data for this protein cover a large area of the rRNA. S19 and S20 showed a bad fit in terms of the neutron map, but their foot-print and cross-link sites were clustered into compact groups in the rRNA model in those regions of the 30 S subunit where these proteins have

  18. Ribosome crystals in the oocyte of Gerris najas (Heteroptera).

    PubMed

    Choi, W C; Nagl, W

    1977-01-01

    Oocytes of the pond skater, Gerris najas, display ribosome tetramers that are arranged in the form of sheets in the vicinity of the nucleus. This is the first finding of ribosome crystals in an insect and suggests that ribosome crystallization may be a common phenomenon of cells that are inactive in protein synthesis.

  19. Mescaline-induced changes of brain-cortex ribosomes. Effect of mescaline on the stability of brain-cortex ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Datta, R K; Ghosh, J J

    1970-05-01

    1. During the action of mescaline sulphate on goat brain-cortex slices the ribosomal particles become susceptible to breakdown, releasing protein, RNA, acidsoluble nucleotides and ninhydrin-positive materials, resulting in loss of ribosomal enzyme activities. 2. Ribosomes of the mescaline-treated cortex slices undergo rapid degradation in the presence of trypsin and ribonuclease. 3. Mescaline does not alter the chemical and nucleotide compositions or the u.v.-absorption characteristics of ribosomal particles, however.

  20. Post-transcriptional regulation of ribosomal protein genes during serum starvation in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Ahamad, Jamaluddin; Ojha, Sandeep; Srivastava, Ankita; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2015-06-01

    Ribosome synthesis involves all three RNA polymerases which are co-ordinately regulated to produce equimolar amounts of rRNAs and ribosomal proteins (RPs). Unlike model organisms where transcription of rRNA and RP genes slows down during stress, in E. histolytica rDNA transcription continues but pre-rRNA processing slows down and unprocessed pre-rRNA accumulates during serum starvation. To investigate the regulation of RP genes under stress we measured transcription of six selected RP genes from the small- and large-ribosomal subunits (RPS6, RPS3, RPS19, RPL5, RPL26, RPL30) representing the early-, mid-, and late-stages of ribosomal assembly. Transcripts of these genes persisted in growth-stressed cells. Expression of luciferase reporter under the control of two RP genes (RPS19 and RPL30) was studied during serum starvation and upon serum replenishment. Although luciferase transcript levels remained unchanged during starvation, luciferase activity steadily declined to 7.8% and 15% of control cells, respectively. After serum replenishment the activity increased to normal levels, suggesting post-transcriptional regulation of these genes. Mutations in the sequence -2 to -9 upstream of AUG in the RPL30 gene resulted in the phenotype expected of post-transcriptional regulation. Transcription of luciferase reporter was unaffected in this mutant, and luciferase activity did not decline during serum starvation, showing that this sequence is required to repress translation of RPL30 mRNA, and mutations in this region relieve repression. Our data show that during serum starvation E. histolytica blocks ribosome biogenesis post-transcriptionally by inhibiting pre-rRNA processing on the one hand, and the translation of RP mRNAs on the other.

  1. Ribosome recycling depends on a mechanistic link between the FeS cluster domain and a conformational switch of the twin-ATPase ABCE1.

    PubMed

    Barthelme, Dominik; Dinkelaker, Stephanie; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Londei, Paola; Ermler, Ulrich; Tampé, Robert

    2011-02-22

    Despite some appealing similarities of protein synthesis across all phyla of life, the final phase of mRNA translation has yet to be captured. Here, we reveal the ancestral role and mechanistic principles of the newly identified twin-ATPase ABCE1 in ribosome recycling. We demonstrate that the unique iron-sulfur cluster domain and an ATP-dependent conformational switch of ABCE1 are essential both for ribosome binding and recycling. By direct (11) interaction, the peptide release factor aRF1 is shown to synergistically promote ABCE1 function in posttermination ribosome recycling. Upon ATP binding, ABCE1 undergoes a conformational switch from an open to a closed ATP-occluded state, which drives ribosome dissociation as well as the disengagement of aRF1. ATP hydrolysis is not required for a single round of ribosome splitting but for ABCE1 release from the 30S subunit to reenter a new cycle. These results provide a mechanistic understanding of final phases in mRNA translation.

  2. Differential scanning calorimetry of whole Escherichia coli treated with the antimicrobial peptide MSI-78 indicate a multi-hit mechanism with ribosomes as a novel target

    PubMed Central

    Brannan, Alexander M.; Whelan, William A.; Cole, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) of intact Escherichia coli (E. coli) was used to identify non-lipidic targets of the antimicrobial peptide (AMP) MSI-78. The DSC thermograms revealed that, in addition to its known lytic properties, MSI-78 also has a striking effect on ribosomes. MSI-78’s effect on DSC scans of bacteria was similar to that of kanamycin, an antibiotic drug known to target the 30S small ribosomal subunit. An in vitro transcription/translation assay helped confirm MSI-78’s targeting of ribosomes. The scrambled version of MSI-78 also affected the ribosome peak of the DSC scans, but required greater amounts of peptide to cause a similar effect to the unscrambled peptide. Furthermore, the effect of the scrambled peptide was not specific to the ribosomes; other regions of the DSC thermogram were also affected. These results suggest that MSI-78’s effects on E. coli are at least somewhat dependent on its particular structural features, rather than a sole function of its overall charge and hydrophobicity. When considered along with earlier work detailing MSI-78’s membrane lytic properties, it appears that MSI-78 operates via a multi-hit mechanism with multiple targets. PMID:26713257

  3. Ribosome biogenesis requires a highly diverged XRN family 5'->3' exoribonuclease for rRNA processing in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Sakyiama, Joseph; Zimmer, Sara L; Ciganda, Martin; Williams, Noreen; Read, Laurie K

    2013-10-01

    Although biogenesis of ribosomes is a crucial process in all organisms and is thus well conserved, Trypanosoma brucei ribosome biogenesis, of which maturation of rRNAs is an early step, has multiple points of divergence. Our aim was to determine whether in the processing of the pre-rRNA precursor molecule, 5'→3' exoribonuclease activity in addition to endonucleolytic cleavage is necessary in T. brucei as in other organisms. Our approach initiated with the bioinformatic identification of a putative 5'→3' exoribonuclease, XRNE, which is highly diverged from the XRN2/Rat1 enzyme responsible for rRNA processing in other organisms. Tagging this protein in vivo allowed us to classify XRNE as nucleolar by indirect immunofluorescence and identify by copurification interacting proteins, many of which were ribosomal proteins, ribosome biogenesis proteins, and/or RNA processing proteins. To determine whether XRNE plays a role in ribosome biogenesis in procyclic form cells, we inducibly depleted the protein by RNA interference. This resulted in the generation of aberrant preprocessed 18S rRNA and 5' extended 5.8S rRNA, implicating XRNE in rRNA processing. Polysome profiles of XRNE-depleted cells demonstrated abnormal features including an increase in ribosome small subunit abundance, a decrease in large subunit abundance, and defects in polysome assembly. Furthermore, the 5' extended 5.8S rRNA in XRNE-depleted cells was observed in the large subunit, monosomes, and polysomes in this gradient. Therefore, the function of XRNE in rRNA processing, presumably due to exonucleolytic activity very early in ribosome biogenesis, has consequences that persist throughout all biogenesis stages.

  4. The Functional Role of eL19 and eB12 Intersubunit Bridge in the Eukaryotic Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Kisly, Ivan; Gulay, Suna P; Mäeorg, Uno; Dinman, Jonathan D; Remme, Jaanus; Tamm, Tiina

    2016-05-22

    During translation, the two eukaryotic ribosomal subunits remain associated through 17 intersubunit bridges, five of which are eukaryote specific. These are mainly localized to the peripheral regions and are believed to stabilize the structure of the ribosome. The functional importance of these bridges remains largely unknown. Here, the essentiality of the eukaryote-specific bridge eB12 has been investigated. The main component of this bridge is ribosomal protein eL19 that is composed of an N-terminal globular domain, a middle region, and a long C-terminal α-helix. The analysis of deletion mutants demonstrated that the globular domain and middle region of eL19 are essential for cell viability, most likely functioning in ribosome assembly. The eB12 bridge, formed by contacts between the C-terminal α-helix of eL19 and 18S rRNA in concert with additional stabilizing interactions involving either eS7 or uS17, is dispensable for viability. Nevertheless, eL19 mutants impaired in eB12 bridge formation displayed slow growth phenotypes, altered sensitivity/resistance to translational inhibitors, and enhanced hyperosmotic stress tolerance. Biochemical analyses determined that the eB12 bridge contributes to the stability of ribosome subunit interactions in vitro. 60S subunits containing eL19 variants defective in eB12 bridge formation failed to form 80S ribosomes regardless of Mg(2+) concentration. The reassociation of 40S and mutant 60S subunits was markedly improved in the presence of deacetylated tRNA, emphasizing the importance of tRNAs during the subunit association. We propose that the eB12 bridge plays an important role in subunit joining and in optimizing ribosome functionality. PMID:27038511

  5. Reduction of Ribosome Level Triggers Flocculation of Fission Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongpeng; Li, Xuesong; Sun, Lei; Chen, Feifei; Liu, Zhenxing; Gu, Yuyu; Gong, Xiaoyan; Liu, Zhonghua; Wei, Hua; Huang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Deletion of ribosomal protein L32 genes resulted in a nonsexual flocculation of fission yeast. Nonsexual flocculation also occurred when two other ribosomal protein genes, rpl21-2 and rpl9-2, were deleted. However, deletion of two nonribosomal protein genes, mpg and fbp, did not cause flocculation. Overall transcript levels of rpl32 in rpl32-1Δ and rpl32-2Δ cells were reduced by 35.9% and 46.9%, respectively, and overall ribosome levels in rpl32-1Δ and rpl32-2Δ cells dropped 31.1% and 27.8%, respectively, compared to wild-type cells. Interestingly, ribosome protein expression levels and ribosome levels were also reduced greatly in sexually flocculating diploid YHL6381/WT (h+/h−) cells compared to a mixture of YHL6381 (h+) and WT (h−) nonflocculating haploid cells. Transcriptome analysis indicated that the reduction of ribosomal levels in sexual flocculating cells was caused by more-extensive suppression of ribosomal biosynthesis gene expression, while the reduction of ribosomal levels caused by deleting ribosomal protein genes in nonsexual flocculating cells was due to an imbalance between ribosomal proteins. We propose that once the reduction of ribosomal levels is below a certain threshold value, flocculation is triggered. PMID:23355005

  6. History of the ribosome and the origin of translation

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Anton S.; Gulen, Burak; Norris, Ashlyn M.; Kovacs, Nicholas A.; Lanier, Kathryn A.; Fox, George E.; Harvey, Stephen C.; Wartell, Roger M.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2015-01-01

    We present a molecular-level model for the origin and evolution of the translation system, using a 3D comparative method. In this model, the ribosome evolved by accretion, recursively adding expansion segments, iteratively growing, subsuming, and freezing the rRNA. Functions of expansion segments in the ancestral ribosome are assigned by correspondence with their functions in the extant ribosome. The model explains the evolution of the large ribosomal subunit, the small ribosomal subunit, tRNA, and mRNA. Prokaryotic ribosomes evolved in six phases, sequentially acquiring capabilities for RNA folding, catalysis, subunit association, correlated evolution, decoding, energy-driven translocation, and surface proteinization. Two additional phases exclusive to eukaryotes led to tentacle-like rRNA expansions. In this model, ribosomal proteinization was a driving force for the broad adoption of proteins in other biological processes. The exit tunnel was clearly a central theme of all phases of ribosomal evolution and was continuously extended and rigidified. In the primitive noncoding ribosome, proto-mRNA and the small ribosomal subunit acted as cofactors, positioning the activated ends of tRNAs within the peptidyl transferase center. This association linked the evolution of the large and small ribosomal subunits, proto-mRNA, and tRNA. PMID:26621738

  7. Immunogenicity of Ribosomal Preparations from Yeast Cells of Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Feit, Carl; Tewari, Ram P.

    1974-01-01

    Protective immunity was elicited by immunization of mice with ribosomal preparations from yeast cells of Histoplasma capsulatum. Ribosomes from disrupted cells were isolated by differential centrifugation using sodium dodecyl sulfate. These preparations contained 55% protein and 45% ribonucleic acid and sedimented as a single peak with a sedimentation coefficient of 77S on sucrose density gradient analysis. Mice immunized subcutaneously with ribosomes, with or without adjuvant, were challenged intravenously with 8 × 106 yeast cells of H. capsulatum. Significant protection was induced by ribosomes and was greatly enhanced by adjuvants. Protection measured by 30-day survival compared favorably with the immunoprotection assessed by absence of lung lesions and negative spleen cultures. Treatment of ribosomes with ribonuclease before immunization reduced protection by 85%, whereas trypsin and Pronase reduced the protection by 50 to 55%. These findings indicate that both intact ribosomal ribonucleic acid and protein are necessary for maximal immunogenicity of Histoplasma ribosomes. PMID:16558095

  8. Knockdown of ribosomal protein S7 causes developmental abnormalities via p53 dependent and independent pathways in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Duan, Juan; Ba, Qian; Wang, Ziliang; Hao, Miao; Li, Xiaoguang; Hu, Pingting; Zhang, Deyi; Zhang, Ruiwen; Wang, Hui

    2011-08-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs), structural components of the ribosome involved in protein synthesis, are of significant importance in all organisms. Previous studies have suggested that some RPs may have other functions in addition to assembly of the ribosome. The small ribosomal subunits RPS7, has been reported to modulate the mdm2-p53 interaction. To further investigate the biological functions of RPS7, we used morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (MO) to specifically knockdown RPS7 in zebrafish. In RPS7-deficient embryos, p53 was activated, and its downstream target genes and biological events were induced, including apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Hematopoiesis was also impaired seriously in RPS7-deficient embryos, which was confirmed by the hemoglobin O-dianisidine staining of blood cells, and the expression of scl, gata1 and α-E1 globin were abnormal. The matrix metalloproteinase (mmp) family genes were also activated in RPS7 morphants, indicating that improper cell migration might also cause development defects. Furthermore, simultaneously knockdown of the p53 protein by co-injecting a p53 MO could partially reverse the abnormal phenotype in the morphants. These results strengthen the hypothesis that specific ribosomal proteins regulate p53 and that their deficiency affects hematopoiesis. Moreover, our data implicate that RPS7 is a regulator of matrix metalloproteinase (mmp) family in zebrafish system. These specific functions of RPS7 may provide helpful clues to study the roles of RPs in human disease.

  9. [Study of the photoaffinity modification of Escherichia coli ribosomes near the donor tRNA-binding center].

    PubMed

    Bausk, E V; Graĭfer, D M; Karpova, G G

    1985-01-01

    Affinity labelling of E. coli ribosomes near the donor tRNA-binding (P) site was studied with the use of photoreactive derivatives of tRNAPhe bearing arylazidogroups on N7 atoms of guanine residues (azido-tRNA). UV-irradiation of complexes 70S ribosome.poly(U).azido- tRNA(P-site) and 70S ribosome.poly(U).azido-tRNA(P-site).Phe- tRNAPhe(A-site) resulted in covalent attachment of azido-tRNA to ribosomes, both subunits being labelled. In both cases modification extent of 30S subunit was two-fold than that of the 50S one. It was shown that when the A-site was free the azido-tRNA located in P-site labelled proteins S9, S11, S12, S13, S21 and L14, L27, L31. Azido-tRNA located in P-site when the A-site was occupied with Phe-tRNAPhe labelled proteins S11, S12, S13, S14, S19, L32/L33 and possibly L23, L25. From the comparison of the sets of proteins labelled when A-site was free or occupied a conclusion was drawn that aminoacyl-tRNA located in ribosomal A-site affects the arrangement of deacylated tRNA in P-site. Data obtained allow to propose that proteins S5, S19, S20 and L24, L33 interact with guanine residues important for the tRNA tertiary structure formation.

  10. Switching off the tackiness of a nanocomposite adhesive in 30 s via infrared sintering.

    PubMed

    Gurney, Robert S; Dupin, Damien; Nunes, Juliana S; Ouzineb, Keltoum; Siband, Elodie; Asua, José M; Armes, Steven P; Keddie, Joseph L

    2012-10-24

    Soft adhesives require an optimum balance of viscous and elastic properties. Adhesion is poor when the material is either too solidlike or too liquidlike. The ability to switch tack adhesion off at a desired time has many applications, such as in recycling, disassembly of electronics, and painless removal of wound dressings. Here, we describe a new strategy to switch off the tack adhesion in a model nanocomposite adhesive in which temperature is the trigger. The nanocomposite comprises hard methacrylic nanoparticles blended with a colloidal dispersion of soft copolymer particles. At relatively low volume fractions, the nanoparticles (50 nm diameter) accumulate near the film surface, where they pack around the larger soft particles (270 nm). The viscoelasticity of the nanocomposite is adjusted via the nanoparticle concentration. When the nanocomposite is heated above the glass transition temperature of the nanoparticles (T(g) = 130 °C), they sinter together to create a rigid network that raises the elastic modulus at room temperature. The tackiness is switched off. Intense infrared radiation is used to heat the nanocomposites, leading to a fast temperature rise. Tack adhesion is switched off within 30 s in optimized compositions. These one-way switchable adhesives have the potential to be patterned through localized heating. PMID:22974179

  11. Switching off the tackiness of a nanocomposite adhesive in 30 s via infrared sintering.

    PubMed

    Gurney, Robert S; Dupin, Damien; Nunes, Juliana S; Ouzineb, Keltoum; Siband, Elodie; Asua, José M; Armes, Steven P; Keddie, Joseph L

    2012-10-24

    Soft adhesives require an optimum balance of viscous and elastic properties. Adhesion is poor when the material is either too solidlike or too liquidlike. The ability to switch tack adhesion off at a desired time has many applications, such as in recycling, disassembly of electronics, and painless removal of wound dressings. Here, we describe a new strategy to switch off the tack adhesion in a model nanocomposite adhesive in which temperature is the trigger. The nanocomposite comprises hard methacrylic nanoparticles blended with a colloidal dispersion of soft copolymer particles. At relatively low volume fractions, the nanoparticles (50 nm diameter) accumulate near the film surface, where they pack around the larger soft particles (270 nm). The viscoelasticity of the nanocomposite is adjusted via the nanoparticle concentration. When the nanocomposite is heated above the glass transition temperature of the nanoparticles (T(g) = 130 °C), they sinter together to create a rigid network that raises the elastic modulus at room temperature. The tackiness is switched off. Intense infrared radiation is used to heat the nanocomposites, leading to a fast temperature rise. Tack adhesion is switched off within 30 s in optimized compositions. These one-way switchable adhesives have the potential to be patterned through localized heating.

  12. Multiple ribosomal proteins are expressed at high levels in developing zebrafish endoderm and are required for normal exocrine pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Provost, Elayne; Weier, Christopher A; Leach, Steven D

    2013-06-01

    Ribosomal protein L (rpl) genes are essential for assembly of the 60S subunit of the eukaryotic ribosome and may also carry out additional extra-ribosomal functions. We have identified a common expression pattern for rpl genes in developing zebrafish larvae. After initially widespread expression in early embryos, the expression of multiple rpl genes becomes increasingly restricted to the endoderm. With respect to the pancreas, rpl genes are highly expressed in ptf1a-expressing pancreatic progenitors at 48 hpf, suggesting possible functional roles in pancreatic morphogenesis and/or differentiation. Utilizing two available mutant lines, rpl23a(hi2582) and rpl6(hi3655b), we found that ptf1a-expressing pancreatic progenitors fail to properly expand in embryos homozygous for either of these genes. In addition to these durable homozygous phenotypes, we also demonstrated recoverable delays in ptf1a-expressing pancreatic progenitor expansion in rpl23a(hi2582) and rpl6(hi3655b) heterozygotes. Disruptions in ribosome assembly are generally understood to initiate a p53-dependent cellular stress response. However, concomitant p53 knockdown was unable to rescue normal pancreatic progenitor expansion in either rpl23a(hi2582) or rpl6(hi3655b) mutant embryos, suggesting required and p53-independent roles for rpl23a and rpl6 in pancreas development.

  13. Tertiary interactions within the ribosomal exit tunnel.

    PubMed

    Kosolapov, Andrey; Deutsch, Carol

    2009-04-01

    Although tertiary folding of whole protein domains is prohibited by the cramped dimensions of the ribosomal tunnel, dynamic tertiary interactions may permit folding of small elementary units within the tunnel. To probe this possibility, we used a beta-hairpin and an alpha-helical hairpin from the cytosolic N terminus of a voltage-gated potassium channel and determined a probability of folding for each at defined locations inside and outside the tunnel. Minimalist tertiary structures can form near the exit port of the tunnel, a region that provides an entropic window for initial exploration of local peptide conformations. Tertiary subdomains of the nascent peptide fold sequentially, but not independently, during translation. These studies offer an approach for diagnosing the molecular basis for folding defects that lead to protein malfunction and provide insight into the role of the ribosome during early potassium channel biogenesis.

  14. Tertiary Interactions within the Ribosomal Exit Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Kosolapov, Andrey; Deutsch, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Although tertiary folding of whole protein domains is prohibited by the cramped dimensions of the ribosomal tunnel, dynamic tertiary interactions may permit folding of small elementary units within the tunnel. To probe this possibility, we used a β-hairpin as well as an α-helical hairpin from the cytosolic N-terminus of a voltage-gated potassium channel and determined a probability of folding for each at defined locations inside and outside the tunnel. Minimalist tertiary structures can form near the exit port of the tunnel, a region that provides an entropic window for initial exploration of local peptide conformations. Tertiary subdomains of the nascent peptide fold sequentially, but not independently, during translation. These studies offer an approach for diagnosing the molecular basis for folding defects that lead to protein malfunction and provide insight into the role of the ribosome during early potassium channel biogenesis. PMID:19270700

  15. Disassembly of yeast 80S ribosomes into subunits is a concerted action of ribosome-assisted folding of denatured protein.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Biprashekhar; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-22

    It has been shown by several groups that ribosome can assist folding of denatured protein in vitro and the process is conserved across the species. Domain V of large ribosomal rRNA which occupies the intersubunit side of the large subunit was identified as the key player responsible for chaperoning the folding process. Thus, it is conceivable that denatured protein needs to access the intersubunit space of the ribosome in order to get folded. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism of release of the protein from the eukaryotic ribosome following reactivation. We have observed significant splitting of yeast 80S ribosome when incubated with the denatured BCAII protein. Energy-free disassembly mechanism functions in low Mg(+2) ion concentration for prokaryotic ribosomes. Eukaryotic ribosomes do not show significant splitting even at low Mg(+2) ion concentration. In this respect, denatured protein-induced disassembly of eukaryotic ribosome without the involvement of any external energy source is intriguing. For prokaryotic ribosomes, it was reported that the denatured protein induces ribosome splitting into subunits in order to access domain V-rRNA. In contrast, our results suggest an alternative mechanism for eukaryotic ribosomal rRNA-mediated protein folding and subsequent separation of the subunits by which release of the activated-protein occurs.

  16. Structure and Function of the Mitochondrial Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Greber, Basil J; Ban, Nenad

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes) perform protein synthesis inside mitochondria, the organelles responsible for energy conversion and adenosine triphosphate production in eukaryotic cells. Throughout evolution, mitoribosomes have become functionally specialized for synthesizing mitochondrial membrane proteins, and this has been accompanied by large changes to their structure and composition. We review recent high-resolution structural data that have provided unprecedented insight into the structure and function of mitoribosomes in mammals and fungi. PMID:27023846

  17. Structural snapshots of actively translating human ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Behrmann, Elmar; Loerke, Justus; Budkevich, Tatyana V.; Yamamoto, Kaori; Schmidt, Andrea; Penczek, Pawel A.; Vos, Matthijn R.; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Scheerer, Patrick; Spahn, Christian M.T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Macromolecular machines, such as the ribosome, undergo large-scale conformational changes during their functional cycles. While their mode of action is often compared to that of mechanical machines, a crucial difference is that at the molecular dimension, thermodynamic effects dominate functional cycles, with proteins fluctuating stochastically between functional states defined by energetic minima on an energy landscape. Here, we have used cryo-electron microscopy to image ex vivo-derived human polysomes as a source of actively translating ribosomes. Multiparticle refinement and three-dimensional variability analysis allowed us to visualize a variety of native translation intermediates. Significantly populated states include not only elongation cycle intermediates in pre- and post-translocational states, but also eEF1A-containing decoding and termination/recycling complexes. Focusing on the post-translocational state, we extended this assessment to the single-residue level, uncovering striking details of ribosome-ligand interactions and identifying both static and functionally important dynamic elements. PMID:25957688

  18. Quantitative profiling of initiating ribosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiangwei; Wan, Ji; Liu, Botao; Ma, Ming; Shen, Ben; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2015-02-01

    Cells have evolved exquisite mechanisms to fine-tune the rate of protein synthesis in response to stress. Systemic mapping of start-codon positions and precise measurement of the corresponding initiation rate would transform our understanding of translational control. Here we present quantitative translation initiation sequencing (QTI-seq), with which the initiating ribosomes can be profiled in real time at single-nucleotide resolution. Resultant initiation maps not only delineated variations of start-codon selection but also highlighted a dynamic range of initiation rates in response to nutrient starvation. The integrated data set provided unique insights into principles of alternative translation and mechanisms controlling different aspects of translation initiation. With RiboTag mice, QTI-seq permitted tissue-specific profiling of initiating ribosomes in vivo. Liver cell-specific ribosome profiling uncovered a robust translational reprogramming of the proteasome system in fasted mice. Our findings illuminated the prevalence and dynamic nature of translational regulation pivotal to physiological adaptation in vivo.

  19. Pseudomonas ribosomal vaccines: preparation, properties, and immunogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, M M

    1978-01-01

    The preparation, properties, and immunogenicity of ribosomal vaccines from Pseudomonas aeruginosa are described. These preparations, containing protein and RNA, were tested for immunogenicity by active immunization of mice and subsequent challenge with homologous, live bacteria. The results demonstrated that vaccines prepared from a majority of serotypes used were immunogenic, i.e., afforded 60 to 100% mouse protection against a challenge inoculum containing 8 to 50 50% lethal doses. In some cases vaccine doses as low as 1 microgram of RNA provided 100% mouse protection. Molecular sieve chromatography of a highly immunogenic ribosomal preparation on Sepharose 4B demonstrated the presence of two molecular weight fractions: (i) peak A, an excluded peak (thus having a molecular weight of at least 2 times 10(7)), and (ii) peak B, considerably retarded, with an elution position corresponding to a molecular weight of about 2.2 X 10(6), approximating that of typical 70S ribosomes. Both peaks A and B were immunogenic; however, the immunogenicity of peak A was greater (i.e., a smaller immunizing dose was required) than that of peak B. Peak A was shown to contain components of lipopolysaccharide in addition to protein and RNA (which comprised 80% of the dry weight of peak A). On the other hand, peak B was shown to be free of lipopolysaccharide, and 100% of its dry weight consisted of protein and RNA. PMID:101464

  20. The ribosome challenge to the RNA world.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Jessica C; Hud, Nicholas V; Williams, Loren Dean

    2015-04-01

    An RNA World that predated the modern world of polypeptide and polynucleotide is one of the most widely accepted models in origin of life research. In this model, the translation system shepherded the RNA World into the extant biology of DNA, RNA, and protein. Here, we examine the RNA World Hypothesis in the context of increasingly detailed information available about the origins, evolution, functions, and mechanisms of the translation system. We conclude that the translation system presents critical challenges to RNA World Hypotheses. Firstly, a timeline of the RNA World is problematic when the ribosome is incorporated. The mechanism of peptidyl transfer of the ribosome appears distinct from evolved enzymes, signaling origins in a chemical rather than biological milieu. Secondly, we have no evidence that the basic biochemical toolset of life is subject to substantive change by Darwinian evolution, as required for the transition from the RNA world to extant biology. Thirdly, we do not see specific evidence for biological takeover of ribozyme function by protein enzymes. Finally, we can find no basis for preservation of the ribosome as ribozyme or the universality of translation, if it were the case that other information transducing ribozymes, such as ribozyme polymerases, were replaced by protein analogs and erased from the phylogenetic record. We suggest that an updated model of the RNA World should address the current state of knowledge of the translation system. PMID:25739364

  1. The ribosome challenge to the RNA world.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Jessica C; Hud, Nicholas V; Williams, Loren Dean

    2015-04-01

    An RNA World that predated the modern world of polypeptide and polynucleotide is one of the most widely accepted models in origin of life research. In this model, the translation system shepherded the RNA World into the extant biology of DNA, RNA, and protein. Here, we examine the RNA World Hypothesis in the context of increasingly detailed information available about the origins, evolution, functions, and mechanisms of the translation system. We conclude that the translation system presents critical challenges to RNA World Hypotheses. Firstly, a timeline of the RNA World is problematic when the ribosome is incorporated. The mechanism of peptidyl transfer of the ribosome appears distinct from evolved enzymes, signaling origins in a chemical rather than biological milieu. Secondly, we have no evidence that the basic biochemical toolset of life is subject to substantive change by Darwinian evolution, as required for the transition from the RNA world to extant biology. Thirdly, we do not see specific evidence for biological takeover of ribozyme function by protein enzymes. Finally, we can find no basis for preservation of the ribosome as ribozyme or the universality of translation, if it were the case that other information transducing ribozymes, such as ribozyme polymerases, were replaced by protein analogs and erased from the phylogenetic record. We suggest that an updated model of the RNA World should address the current state of knowledge of the translation system.

  2. Ribosome origins: The relative age of 23S rRNA Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hury, James; Nagaswamy, Uma; Larios-Sanz, Maia; Fox, George E.

    2006-08-01

    The modern ribosome and its component RNAs are quite large and it is likely that at an earlier time they were much smaller. Hence, not all regions of the modern ribosomal RNAs (rRNA) are likely to be equally old. In the work described here, it is hypothesized that the oldest regions of the RNAs will usually be highly integrated into the machinery. When this is the case, an examination of the interconnectivity between local RNA regions can provide insight to the relative age of the various regions. Herein, we describe an analysis of all known long-range RNA/RNA interactions within the 23S rRNA and between the 23S rRNA and the 16S rRNA in order to assess the interconnectivity between the usual Domains as defined by secondary structure. Domain V, which contains the peptidyl transferase center is centrally located, extensively connected, and therefore likely to be the oldest region. Domain IV and Domain II are extensively interconnected with both themselves and Domain V. A portion of Domain IV is also extensively connected with the 30S subunit and hence Domain IV may be older than Domain II. These results are consistent with other evidence relating to the relative age of RNA regions. Although the relative time of addition of the GTPase center can not be reliably deduced it is pointed out that the development of this may have dramatically affected the progenotes that preceded the last common ancestor.

  3. Involvement of human ribosomal proteins in nucleolar structure and p53-dependent nucleolar stress

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Emilien; Parisot, Pascaline; Pinto-Monteiro, Celina; de Walque, Roxane; De Vleeschouwer, Christophe; Lafontaine, Denis L. J.

    2016-01-01

    The nucleolus is a potent disease biomarker and a target in cancer therapy. Ribosome biogenesis is initiated in the nucleolus where most ribosomal (r-) proteins assemble onto precursor rRNAs. Here we systematically investigate how depletion of each of the 80 human r-proteins affects nucleolar structure, pre-rRNA processing, mature rRNA accumulation and p53 steady-state level. We developed an image-processing programme for qualitative and quantitative discrimination of normal from altered nucleolar morphology. Remarkably, we find that uL5 (formerly RPL11) and uL18 (RPL5) are the strongest contributors to nucleolar integrity. Together with the 5S rRNA, they form the late-assembling central protuberance on mature 60S subunits, and act as an Hdm2 trap and p53 stabilizer. Other major contributors to p53 homeostasis are also strictly late-assembling large subunit r-proteins essential to nucleolar structure. The identification of the r-proteins that specifically contribute to maintaining nucleolar structure and p53 steady-state level provides insights into fundamental aspects of cell and cancer biology. PMID:27265389

  4. RNA mimicry by the fap7 adenylate kinase in ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Loc'h, Jérôme; Blaud, Magali; Réty, Stéphane; Lebaron, Simon; Deschamps, Patrick; Bareille, Joseph; Jombart, Julie; Robert-Paganin, Julien; Delbos, Lila; Chardon, Florian; Zhang, Elodie; Charenton, Clément; Tollervey, David; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    During biogenesis of the 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits, the pre-40S particles are exported to the cytoplasm prior to final cleavage of the 20S pre-rRNA to mature 18S rRNA. Amongst the factors involved in this maturation step, Fap7 is unusual, as it both interacts with ribosomal protein Rps14 and harbors adenylate kinase activity, a function not usually associated with ribonucleoprotein assembly. Human hFap7 also regulates Cajal body assembly and cell cycle progression via the p53-MDM2 pathway. This work presents the functional and structural characterization of the Fap7-Rps14 complex. We report that Fap7 association blocks the RNA binding surface of Rps14 and, conversely, Rps14 binding inhibits adenylate kinase activity of Fap7. In addition, the affinity of Fap7 for Rps14 is higher with bound ADP, whereas ATP hydrolysis dissociates the complex. These results suggest that Fap7 chaperones Rps14 assembly into pre-40S particles via RNA mimicry in an ATP-dependent manner. Incorporation of Rps14 by Fap7 leads to a structural rearrangement of the platform domain necessary for the pre-rRNA to acquire a cleavage competent conformation.

  5. Ribosomal History Reveals Origins of Modern Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Harish, Ajith; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the ribosome is central to our understanding of the cellular world. Most hypotheses posit that the ribosome originated in the peptidyl transferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. However, these proposals do not link protein synthesis to RNA recognition and do not use a phylogenetic comparative framework to study ribosomal evolution. Here we infer evolution of the structural components of the ribosome. Phylogenetic methods widely used in morphometrics are applied directly to RNA structures of thousands of molecules and to a census of protein structures in hundreds of genomes. We find that components of the small subunit involved in ribosomal processivity evolved earlier than the catalytic peptidyl transferase center responsible for protein synthesis. Remarkably, subunit RNA and proteins coevolved, starting with interactions between the oldest proteins (S12 and S17) and the oldest substructure (the ribosomal ratchet) in the small subunit and ending with the rise of a modern multi-subunit ribosome. Ancestral ribonucleoprotein components show similarities to in vitro evolved RNA replicase ribozymes and protein structures in extant replication machinery. Our study therefore provides important clues about the chicken-or-egg dilemma associated with the central dogma of molecular biology by showing that ribosomal history is driven by the gradual structural accretion of protein and RNA structures. Most importantly, results suggest that functionally important and conserved regions of the ribosome were recruited and could be relics of an ancient ribonucleoprotein world. PMID:22427882

  6. Ribosomal history reveals origins of modern protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Harish, Ajith; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the ribosome is central to our understanding of the cellular world. Most hypotheses posit that the ribosome originated in the peptidyl transferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. However, these proposals do not link protein synthesis to RNA recognition and do not use a phylogenetic comparative framework to study ribosomal evolution. Here we infer evolution of the structural components of the ribosome. Phylogenetic methods widely used in morphometrics are applied directly to RNA structures of thousands of molecules and to a census of protein structures in hundreds of genomes. We find that components of the small subunit involved in ribosomal processivity evolved earlier than the catalytic peptidyl transferase center responsible for protein synthesis. Remarkably, subunit RNA and proteins coevolved, starting with interactions between the oldest proteins (S12 and S17) and the oldest substructure (the ribosomal ratchet) in the small subunit and ending with the rise of a modern multi-subunit ribosome. Ancestral ribonucleoprotein components show similarities to in vitro evolved RNA replicase ribozymes and protein structures in extant replication machinery. Our study therefore provides important clues about the chicken-or-egg dilemma associated with the central dogma of molecular biology by showing that ribosomal history is driven by the gradual structural accretion of protein and RNA structures. Most importantly, results suggest that functionally important and conserved regions of the ribosome were recruited and could be relics of an ancient ribonucleoprotein world. PMID:22427882

  7. Structure of the ribosomal interacting GTPase YjeQ from the enterobacterial species Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, C. E.; Johnson, C.; Lamb, H. K.; Lockyer, M.; Charles, I. G.; Hawkins, A. R.; Stammers, D. K.

    2007-11-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the GTPase YjeQ from S. typhimurium is presented and compared with those of orthologues from T. maritima and B. subtilis. The YjeQ class of P-loop GTPases assist in ribosome biogenesis and also bind to the 30S subunit of mature ribosomes. YjeQ ribosomal binding is GTP-dependent and thought to specifically direct protein synthesis, although the nature of the upstream signal causing this event in vivo is as yet unknown. The attenuating effect of YjeQ mutants on bacterial growth in Escherichia coli makes it a potential target for novel antimicrobial agents. In order to further explore the structure and function of YjeQ, the isolation, crystallization and structure determination of YjeQ from the enterobacterial species Salmonella typhimurium (StYjeQ) is reported. Whilst the overall StYjeQ fold is similar to those of the previously reported Thematoga maritima and Bacillus subtilis orthologues, particularly the GTPase domain, there are larger differences in the three OB folds. Although the zinc-finger secondary structure is conserved, significant sequence differences alter the nature of the external surface in each case and may reflect varying signalling pathways. Therefore, it may be easier to develop YjeQ-specific inhibitors that target the N- and C-terminal regions, disrupting the metabolic connectivity rather than the GTPase activity. The availability of coordinates for StYjeQ will provide a significantly improved basis for threading Gram-negative orthologue sequences and in silico compound-screening studies, with the potential for the development of species-selective drugs.

  8. Deletion of the RluD pseudouridine synthase promotes SsrA peptide tagging of ribosomal protein S7.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Ryan E; Hayes, Christopher S

    2011-01-01

    RluD catalyses formation of three pseudouridine residues within helix 69 of the 50S ribosome subunit. Helix 69 makes important contacts with the decoding centre on the 30S subunit and deletion of rluD was recently shown to interfere with translation termination in Escherichia coli. Here, we show that deletion of rluD increases tmRNA activity on ribosomes undergoing release factor 2 (RF2)-mediated termination at UGA stop codons. Strikingly, tmRNA-mediated SsrA peptide tagging of two proteins, ribosomal protein S7 and LacI, was dramatically increased in ΔrluD cells. S7 tagging was due to a unique C-terminal peptide extension found in E. coli K-12 strains. Introduction of the rpsG gene (encoding S7) from an E. coli B strain abrogated S7 tagging in the ΔrluD background, and partially complemented the mutant's slow-growth phenotype. Additionally, exchange of the K-12 prfB gene (encoding RF2) with the B strain allele greatly reduced tagging in ΔrluD cells. In contrast to E. coli K-12 cells, deletion of rluD in an E. coli B strain resulted in no growth phenotype. These findings indicate that the originally observed rluD phenotypes result from synthetic interactions with rpsG and prfB alleles found within E. coli K-12 strains.

  9. The structure and function of the eukaryotic ribosome.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Daniel N; Doudna Cate, Jamie H

    2012-05-01

    Structures of the bacterial ribosome have provided a framework for understanding universal mechanisms of protein synthesis. However, the eukaryotic ribosome is much larger than it is in bacteria, and its activity is fundamentally different in many key ways. Recent cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions and X-ray crystal structures of eukaryotic ribosomes and ribosomal subunits now provide an unprecedented opportunity to explore mechanisms of eukaryotic translation and its regulation in atomic detail. This review describes the X-ray crystal structures of the Tetrahymena thermophila 40S and 60S subunits and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 80S ribosome, as well as cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of translating yeast and plant 80S ribosomes. Mechanistic questions about translation in eukaryotes that will require additional structural insights to be resolved are also presented.

  10. The properties of ribosomal proteins from a moderate halophile.

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, P; Matheson, A T; Rollin, C F

    1976-06-15

    The ribosomes from the extreme halophile Halobacterium cutirubrum are unusual in that their ribosomal proteins are acidic rather than basic as is the case with almost all bacterial ribosomes (Bayley, S.T. (1966) J. Mol. Biol. 15, 420-427). To determine whether the ribosomes of a moderate halophile show similar properties the ribosomal proteins from an unidentified moderate halophile, which grows over a wide range of NaCl concentrations (0.04-4.3 M), were compared to those of Escherichia coli and H. cutirubrum. The proteins are slightly more acidic than those of E. coli but much less acidic than those from the extreme halophile as judged by their mobility on polyacrylamide gels and their amino acid composition. The electrophoretic profile on polyacrylamide gels of the ribosomal proteins from the moderate halophile is similar whether the cells are grown in 0.5 M or 4.25 M NaCl.

  11. PPARA intron polymorphism associated with power performance in 30-s anaerobic Wingate Test.

    PubMed

    Petr, Miroslav; Stastny, Petr; Št'astný, Petr; Pecha, Ondřej; Šteffl, Michal; Šeda, Ondřej; Kohlíková, Eva

    2014-01-01

    To date, polymorphisms in several genes have been associated with a strength/power performance including alpha 3 actinin, ciliary neurotrophic factor, vitamin D receptor, or angiotensin I converting enzyme, underlining the importance of genetic component of the multifactorial strength/power-related phenotypes. The single nucleotide variation in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha gene (PPARA) intron 7 G/C (rs4253778; g.46630634G>C) has been repeatedly found to play a significant role in response to different types of physical activity. We investigated the effect of PPARA intron 7 G/C polymorphism specifically on anaerobic power output in a group of 77 elite male Czech ice hockey players (18-36 y). We determined the relative peak power per body weight (Pmax.kg(-1)) and relative peak power per fat free mass (W.kg(-1)FFM) during the 30-second Wingate Test (WT30) on bicycle ergometer (Monark 894E Peak bike, MONARK, Sweden). All WT30s were performed during the hockey season. Overall genotype frequencies were 50.6% GG homozygotes, 40.3% CG heterozygotes, and 9.1% CC homozygotes. We found statistically significant differences in Pmax.kg(-1) and marginally significant differences in Pmax.kg(-1)FFM values in WT30 between carriers and non-carriers for C allele (14.6 ± 0.2 vs. 13.9 ± 0.3 W.kg(-1) and 15.8 ± 0.2 vs. 15.2 ± 0.3 W.kg(-1)FFM, P = 0.036 and 0.12, respectively). Furthermore, Pmax.kg(-1)FFM strongly positively correlated with the body weight only in individuals with GG genotypes (R = 0.55; p<0.001). Our results indicate that PPARA 7C carriers exhibited higher speed strength measures in WT30. We hypothesize that C allele carriers within the cohort of trained individuals may possess a metabolic advantage towards anaerobic metabolism.

  12. Functional analysis of transcribed spacers of yeast ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Musters, W; Boon, K; van der Sande, C A; van Heerikhuizen, H; Planta, R J

    1990-01-01

    Making use of an rDNA unit, containing oligonucleotide tags in both the 17S and 26S rRNA gene, we have analyzed the effect of various deletions in the External Transcribed Spacer (ETS) and in one of the Internal Transcribed Spacers 1 (ITS1) on the process of ribosome formation in yeast. By following the fate of the tagged transcripts of this rDNA unit in vivo by Northern hybridization we found that deleting various parts of the ETS prevents the accumulation of tagged 17S rRNA and its assembly into 40S subunits, but not the formation of 60S subunits. Deleting the central region of ITS1, including a processing site that is used in an early stage of the maturation process, was also found to prevent the accumulation of functional 49 S subunits, whereas no effect on the formation of 60S subunits was detected. The implications of these findings for yeast pre-rRNA processing are discussed. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2249660

  13. Epistasis analysis of 16S rRNA ram mutations helps define the conformational dynamics of the ribosome that influence decoding.

    PubMed

    Ying, Lanqing; Fredrick, Kurt

    2016-04-01

    The ribosome actively participates in decoding, with a tRNA-dependent rearrangement of the 30S A site playing a key role. Ribosomal ambiguity (ram) mutations have mapped not only to the A site but also to the h12/S4/S5 region and intersubunit bridge B8, implicating other conformational changes such as 30S shoulder rotation and B8 disruption in the mechanism of decoding. Recent crystallographic data have revealed that mutation G299A in helix h12 allosterically promotes B8 disruption, raising the question of whether G299A and/or other ram mutations act mainly via B8. Here, we compared the effects of each of several ram mutations in the absence and presence of mutation h8Δ2, which effectively takes out bridge B8. The data obtained suggest that a subset of mutations including G299A act in part via B8 but predominantly through another mechanism. We also found that G299A in h12 and G347U in h14 each stabilize tRNA in the A site. Collectively, these data support a model in which rearrangement of the 30S A site, inward shoulder rotation, and bridge B8 disruption are loosely coupled events, all of which promote progression along the productive pathway toward peptide bond formation.

  14. Circular non-coding RNA ANRIL modulates ribosomal RNA maturation and atherosclerosis in humans

    PubMed Central

    Holdt, Lesca M.; Stahringer, Anika; Sass, Kristina; Pichler, Garwin; Kulak, Nils A.; Wilfert, Wolfgang; Kohlmaier, Alexander; Herbst, Andreas; Northoff, Bernd H.; Nicolaou, Alexandros; Gäbel, Gabor; Beutner, Frank; Scholz, Markus; Thiery, Joachim; Musunuru, Kiran; Krohn, Knut; Mann, Matthias; Teupser, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are broadly expressed in eukaryotic cells, but their molecular mechanism in human disease remains obscure. Here we show that circular antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus (circANRIL), which is transcribed at a locus of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease on chromosome 9p21, confers atheroprotection by controlling ribosomal RNA (rRNA) maturation and modulating pathways of atherogenesis. CircANRIL binds to pescadillo homologue 1 (PES1), an essential 60S-preribosomal assembly factor, thereby impairing exonuclease-mediated pre-rRNA processing and ribosome biogenesis in vascular smooth muscle cells and macrophages. As a consequence, circANRIL induces nucleolar stress and p53 activation, resulting in the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation, which are key cell functions in atherosclerosis. Collectively, these findings identify circANRIL as a prototype of a circRNA regulating ribosome biogenesis and conferring atheroprotection, thereby showing that circularization of long non-coding RNAs may alter RNA function and protect from human disease. PMID:27539542

  15. Identification and Expression Analysis of Ribosome Biogenesis Factor Co-orthologs in Solanum lycopersicum

    PubMed Central

    Simm, Stefan; Fragkostefanakis, Sotirios; Paul, Puneet; Keller, Mario; Einloft, Jens; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter; Schleiff, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis involves a large inventory of proteinaceous and RNA cofactors. More than 250 ribosome biogenesis factors (RBFs) have been described in yeast. These factors are involved in multiple aspects like rRNA processing, folding, and modification as well as in ribosomal protein (RP) assembly. Considering the importance of RBFs for particular developmental processes, we examined the complexity of RBF and RP (co-)orthologs by bioinformatic assignment in 14 different plant species and expression profiling in the model crop Solanum lycopersicum. Assigning (co-)orthologs to each RBF revealed that at least 25% of all predicted RBFs are encoded by more than one gene. At first we realized that the occurrence of multiple RBF co-orthologs is not globally correlated to the existence of multiple RP co-orthologs. The transcript abundance of genes coding for predicted RBFs and RPs in leaves and anthers of S. lycopersicum was determined by next generation sequencing (NGS). In combination with existing expression profiles, we can conclude that co-orthologs of RBFs by large account for a preferential function in different tissue or at distinct developmental stages. This notion is supported by the differential expression of selected RBFs during male gametophyte development. In addition, co-regulated clusters of RBF and RP coding genes have been observed. The relevance of these results is discussed. PMID:25698879

  16. Architecture of the Rix1-Rea1 checkpoint machinery during pre-60S-ribosome remodeling.

    PubMed

    Barrio-Garcia, Clara; Thoms, Matthias; Flemming, Dirk; Kater, Lukas; Berninghausen, Otto; Baßler, Jochen; Beckmann, Roland; Hurt, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis is catalyzed by ∼200 assembly factors, which facilitate efficient production of mature ribosomes. Here, we determined the cryo-EM structure of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleoplasmic pre-60S particle containing the dynein-related 550-kDa Rea1 AAA(+) ATPase and the Rix1 subcomplex. This particle differs from its preceding state, the early Arx1 particle, by two massive structural rearrangements: an ∼180° rotation of the 5S ribonucleoprotein complex and the central protuberance (CP) rRNA helices, and the removal of the 'foot' structure from the 3' end of the 5.8S rRNA. Progression from the Arx1 to the Rix1 particle was blocked by mutational perturbation of the Rix1-Rea1 interaction but not by a dominant-lethal Rea1 AAA(+) ATPase-ring mutant. After remodeling, the Rix1 subcomplex and Rea1 become suitably positioned to sense correct structural maturation of the CP, which allows unidirectional progression toward mature ribosomes. PMID:26619264

  17. A preformed compact ribosome-binding domain in the cricket paralysis-like virus IRES RNAs

    PubMed Central

    COSTANTINO, DAVID; KIEFT, JEFFREY S.

    2005-01-01

    The internal ribosome site RNA of the cricket paralysis-like viruses (CrPV-like) binds directly to the ribosome, assembling the translation machinery without initiation factors. This mechanism does not require initiator tRNA, and translation starts from a non-AUG codon. A wealth of biochemical data has yielded a working model for this process, but the three-dimensional structure and biophysical characteristics of the unbound CrPV-like IRES RNAs are largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that the CrPV-like IRESes prefold into a two-part structure in the presence of magnesium ions. The largest part is a prefolded compact RNA domain that shares folding and structural characteristics with other compactly folded RNAs such as group I intron RNAs and RNase P RNA. Chemical probing reveals that the CrPV-like IRES’ compact domain contains RNA helices that are packed tightly enough to exclude solvent, and analytical ultracentrifugation indicates a large change in the shape of the IRES upon folding. Formation of this compact domain is necessary for binding of the 40S subunit, and the structural organization of the unbound IRES RNA is consistent with the hypothesis that the IRES is functionally and structurally preorganized before ribosome binding. PMID:15701733

  18. Non-Diamond Blackfan anemia disorders of ribosome function: Shwachman Diamond syndrome and 5q- syndrome.

    PubMed

    Burwick, Nicholas; Shimamura, Akiko; Liu, Johnson M

    2011-04-01

    A number of human disorders, dubbed ribosomopathies, are linked to impaired ribosome biogenesis or function. These include but are not limited to Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA), Shwachman Diamond syndrome (SDS), and the 5q- myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). This review focuses on the latter two non-DBA disorders of ribosome function. Both SDS and 5q- syndrome lead to impaired hematopoiesis and a predisposition to leukemia. SDS, due to bi-allelic mutations of the SBDS gene, is a multi-system disorder that also includes bony abnormalities, and pancreatic and neurocognitive dysfunction. SBDS associates with the 60S subunit in human cells and has a role in subunit joining and translational activation in yeast models. In contrast, 5q- syndrome is associated with acquired haplo-insufficiency of RPS14, a component of the small 40S subunit. RPS14 is critical for 40S assembly in yeast models, and depletion of RPS14 in human CD34(+) cells is sufficient to recapitulate the 5q- erythroid defect. Both SDS and the 5q- syndrome represent important models of ribosome function and may inform future treatment strategies for the ribosomopathies. PMID:21435510

  19. Architecture of the Rix1-Rea1 checkpoint machinery during pre-60S-ribosome remodeling.

    PubMed

    Barrio-Garcia, Clara; Thoms, Matthias; Flemming, Dirk; Kater, Lukas; Berninghausen, Otto; Baßler, Jochen; Beckmann, Roland; Hurt, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis is catalyzed by ∼200 assembly factors, which facilitate efficient production of mature ribosomes. Here, we determined the cryo-EM structure of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleoplasmic pre-60S particle containing the dynein-related 550-kDa Rea1 AAA(+) ATPase and the Rix1 subcomplex. This particle differs from its preceding state, the early Arx1 particle, by two massive structural rearrangements: an ∼180° rotation of the 5S ribonucleoprotein complex and the central protuberance (CP) rRNA helices, and the removal of the 'foot' structure from the 3' end of the 5.8S rRNA. Progression from the Arx1 to the Rix1 particle was blocked by mutational perturbation of the Rix1-Rea1 interaction but not by a dominant-lethal Rea1 AAA(+) ATPase-ring mutant. After remodeling, the Rix1 subcomplex and Rea1 become suitably positioned to sense correct structural maturation of the CP, which allows unidirectional progression toward mature ribosomes.

  20. Extrachromosomal circular ribosomal DNA in the yeast Saccharomyces carlsbergensis.

    PubMed Central

    Meyerink, J H; Klootwijk, J; Planta, R J; van der Ende, A; van Bruggen, E F

    1979-01-01

    Purified ribosomal DNA from Saccharomyces carlsbergensis contains a small proportion of circular DNA molecules with a contour length of 3 micron or integral multiples thereof. Hybridization of yeast ribosomal DNA with 26 S rRNA, using the R-loop technique, reveals that these circular molecules contain sequences complementary to yeast ribosomal RNA. We suggest that these extrachromosomal rRNA genes may be intermediates in the amplification of rRNA genes in yeast. Images PMID:493145

  1. Joint assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A joint assembly is provided which includes a drive assembly and a swivel mechanism. The drive assembly features a motor operatively associated with a plurality of drive shafts for driving auxiliary elements, and a plurality of swivel shafts for pivoting the drive assembly. The swivel mechanism engages the swivel shafts and has a fixable element that may be attached to a foundation. The swivel mechanism is adapted to cooperate with the swivel shafts to pivot the drive assembly with at least two degrees of freedom relative to the foundation. The joint assembly allows for all components to remain encased in a tight, compact, and sealed package, making it ideal for space, exploratory, and commercial applications.

  2. -1 Programmed Ribosomal Frameshifting as a Force-Dependent Process.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Koen

    2016-01-01

    -1 Programmed ribosomal frameshifting is a translational recoding event in which ribosomes slip backward along messenger RNA presumably due to increased tension disrupting the codon-anticodon interaction at the ribosome's coding site. Single-molecule physical methods and recent experiments characterizing the physical properties of mRNA's slippery sequence as well as the mechanical stability of downstream mRNA structure motifs that give rise to frameshifting are discussed. Progress in technology, experimental assays, and data analysis methods hold promise for accurate physical modeling and quantitative understanding of -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting. PMID:26970190

  3. Ribosome hibernation factor promotes Staphylococcal survival and differentially represses translation

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Arnab; Yap, Mee-Ngan F.

    2016-01-01

    In opportunistic Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, a small protein called hibernation-promoting factor (HPFSa) is sufficient to dimerize 2.5-MDa 70S ribosomes into a translationally inactive 100S complex. Although the 100S dimer is observed in only the stationary phase in Gram-negative gammaproteobacteria, it is ubiquitous throughout all growth phases in S. aureus. The biological significance of the 100S ribosome is poorly understood. Here, we reveal an important role of HPFSa in preserving ribosome integrity and poising cells for translational restart, a process that has significant clinical implications for relapsed staphylococcal infections. We found that the hpf null strain is severely impaired in long-term viability concomitant with a dramatic loss of intact ribosomes. Genome-wide ribosome profiling shows that eliminating HPFSa drastically increased ribosome occupancy at the 5′ end of specific mRNAs under nutrient-limited conditions, suggesting that HPFSa may suppress translation initiation. The protective function of HPFSa on ribosomes resides at the N-terminal conserved basic residues and the extended C-terminal segment, which are critical for dimerization and ribosome binding, respectively. These data provide significant insight into the functional consequences of 100S ribosome loss for protein synthesis and stress adaptation. PMID:27001516

  4. Dynamic Behavior of Trigger Factor on the Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Deeng, J; Chan, K Y; van der Sluis, E O; Berninghausen, O; Han, W; Gumbart, J; Schulten, K; Beatrix, B; Beckmann, R

    2016-09-11

    Trigger factor (TF) is the only ribosome-associated chaperone in bacteria. It interacts with hydrophobic segments in nascent chain (NCs) as they emerge from the ribosome. TF binds via its N-terminal ribosome-binding domain (RBD) mainly to ribosomal protein uL23 at the tunnel exit on the large ribosomal subunit. Whereas earlier structural data suggested that TF binds as a rigid molecule to the ribosome, recent comparisons of structural data on substrate-bound, ribosome-bound, and TF in solution from different species suggest that this chaperone is a rather flexible molecule. Here, we present two cryo-electron microscopy structures of TF bound to ribosomes translating an mRNA coding for a known TF substrate from Escherichia coli of a different length. The structures reveal distinct degrees of flexibility for the different TF domains, a conformational rearrangement of the RBD upon ribosome binding, and an increase in rigidity within TF when the NC is extended. Molecular dynamics simulations agree with these data and offer a molecular basis for these observations. PMID:27320387

  5. Ribosome hibernation factor promotes Staphylococcal survival and differentially represses translation.

    PubMed

    Basu, Arnab; Yap, Mee-Ngan F

    2016-06-01

    In opportunistic Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, a small protein called hibernation-promoting factor (HPFSa) is sufficient to dimerize 2.5-MDa 70S ribosomes into a translationally inactive 100S complex. Although the 100S dimer is observed in only the stationary phase in Gram-negative gammaproteobacteria, it is ubiquitous throughout all growth phases in S. aureus The biological significance of the 100S ribosome is poorly understood. Here, we reveal an important role of HPFSa in preserving ribosome integrity and poising cells for translational restart, a process that has significant clinical implications for relapsed staphylococcal infections. We found that the hpf null strain is severely impaired in long-term viability concomitant with a dramatic loss of intact ribosomes. Genome-wide ribosome profiling shows that eliminating HPFSa drastically increased ribosome occupancy at the 5' end of specific mRNAs under nutrient-limited conditions, suggesting that HPFSa may suppress translation initiation. The protective function of HPFSa on ribosomes resides at the N-terminal conserved basic residues and the extended C-terminal segment, which are critical for dimerization and ribosome binding, respectively. These data provide significant insight into the functional consequences of 100S ribosome loss for protein synthesis and stress adaptation. PMID:27001516

  6. Dissociability of free and peptidyl-tRNA bound ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Surguchov, A P; Fominykch, E S; Lyzlova, L V

    1978-06-16

    The influence of peptidyl-tRNA on the dissociation of yeast 80 S ribosomes into subunits was studied. For this purpose temperature-sensitive (ts) suppressor strain of yeast Saccharomyces cervisiae carrying a defect in peptide chain termination was used. It was found that peptidyl-tRNA did not influence the dissociation of ribosomes either at high salt concentration or in the presence of dissociation factor (DF) from yeast. After dissociation of yeast ribosomes in 0.5 M KCl, peptidyl-tRNA remains bound to the 60 S subunit. Some characteristics of the termination process and release of nascent polypeptides from yeast ribosomes are discussed. PMID:355860

  7. Can Structures Lead to Better Drugs? Lessons from Ribosome Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonath, Ada

    Ribosome research has undergone astonishing progress in recent years. Crystal structures have shed light on the functional properties of the translation machinery and revealed how the ribosome's striking architecture is ingeniously designed as the framework for its unique capabilities: precise decoding, substrate mediated peptide-bond formation and efficient poly-merase activity. New findings include the two concerted elements of tRNA translocation: sideways shift and a ribosomal-navigated rotatory motion; the dynamics of the nascent chain exit tunnel and the shelter formed by the ribosome-bound trigger-factor, which acts as a chaperone to prevent nascent chain aggregation and misfolding.

  8. Homoiterons and expansion in ribosomal RNAs.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael S; Sallee, Floyd R; Park, Edwards A; Parker, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal RNAs in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes feature numerous repeats of three or more nucleotides with the same nucleobase (homoiterons). In prokaryotes these repeats are much more frequent in thermophile compared to mesophile or psychrophile species, and have similar frequency in both large RNAs. These features point to use of prokaryotic homoiterons in stabilization of both ribosomal subunits. The two large RNAs of eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomes have expanded to a different degree across the evolutionary ladder. The big RNA of the larger subunit (60S LSU) evolved expansion segments of up to 2400 nucleotides, and the smaller subunit (40S SSU) RNA acquired expansion segments of not more than 700 nucleotides. In the examined eukaryotes abundance of rRNA homoiterons generally follows size and nucleotide bias of the expansion segments, and increases with GC content and especially with phylogenetic rank. Both the nucleotide bias and frequency of homoiterons are much larger in metazoan and angiosperm LSU compared to the respective SSU RNAs. This is especially pronounced in the tetrapod vertebrates and seems to culminate in the hominid mammals. The stability of secondary structure in polyribonucleotides would significantly connect to GC content, and should also relate to G and C homoiteron content. RNA modeling points to considerable presence of homoiteron-rich double-stranded segments especially in vertebrate LSU RNAs, and homoiterons with four or more nucleotides in the vertebrate and angiosperm LSU RNAs are largely confined to the expansion segments. These features could mainly relate to protein export function and attachment of LSU to endoplasmic reticulum and other subcellular networks. PMID:26636029

  9. Homoiterons and expansion in ribosomal RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Michael S.; Sallee, Floyd R.; Park, Edwards A.; Parker, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal RNAs in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes feature numerous repeats of three or more nucleotides with the same nucleobase (homoiterons). In prokaryotes these repeats are much more frequent in thermophile compared to mesophile or psychrophile species, and have similar frequency in both large RNAs. These features point to use of prokaryotic homoiterons in stabilization of both ribosomal subunits. The two large RNAs of eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomes have expanded to a different degree across the evolutionary ladder. The big RNA of the larger subunit (60S LSU) evolved expansion segments of up to 2400 nucleotides, and the smaller subunit (40S SSU) RNA acquired expansion segments of not more than 700 nucleotides. In the examined eukaryotes abundance of rRNA homoiterons generally follows size and nucleotide bias of the expansion segments, and increases with GC content and especially with phylogenetic rank. Both the nucleotide bias and frequency of homoiterons are much larger in metazoan and angiosperm LSU compared to the respective SSU RNAs. This is especially pronounced in the tetrapod vertebrates and seems to culminate in the hominid mammals. The stability of secondary structure in polyribonucleotides would significantly connect to GC content, and should also relate to G and C homoiteron content. RNA modeling points to considerable presence of homoiteron-rich double-stranded segments especially in vertebrate LSU RNAs, and homoiterons with four or more nucleotides in the vertebrate and angiosperm LSU RNAs are largely confined to the expansion segments. These features could mainly relate to protein export function and attachment of LSU to endoplasmic reticulum and other subcellular networks. PMID:26636029

  10. Bms1p, a novel GTP-binding protein, and the related Tsr1p are required for distinct steps of 40S ribosome biogenesis in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Gelperin, D; Horton, L; Beckman, J; Hensold, J; Lemmon, S K

    2001-01-01

    Bms1p and Tsr1p define a novel family of proteins required for synthesis of 40S ribosomal subunits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both are essential and localize to the nucleolus. Tsr1p shares two extended regions of similarity with Bms1p, but the two proteins function at different steps in 40S ribosome maturation. Inactivation of Bms1p blocks at an early step, leading to disappearance of 20S and 18S rRNA precursors. Also, slight accumulation of an aberrant 23S product and significant 35S accumulation are observed, indicating that pre-rRNA processing at sites A0, A1, and A2 is inhibited. In contrast, depletion of Tsr1p results in accumulation of 20S rRNA. Because processing of 20S to 18S rRNA occurs in the cytoplasm, this suggests that Tsr1p is required for assembly of a transport- or maturation-competent particle or is specifically required for transport of 43S pre-ribosomal particles, but not 60S ribosome precursors, from the nucleus to the cytosol. Finally, Bms1p is a GTP-binding protein, the first found to function in ribosome assembly or rRNA processing. PMID:11565749

  11. The conserved interaction of C7orf30 with MRPL14 promotes biogenesis of the mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit and mitochondrial translation

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Stephen; Nishimura, Tamiko; Sasarman, Florin; Shoubridge, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian mitochondria harbor a dedicated translation apparatus that is required for the synthesis of 13 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded polypeptides, all of which are essential components of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes. Little is known about the mechanism of assembly of the mitoribosomes that catalyze this process. Here we show that C7orf30, a member of the large family of DUF143 proteins, associates with the mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit (mt-LSU). Knockdown of C7orf30 by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) does not alter the sedimentation profile of the mt-LSU, but results in the depletion of several mt-LSU proteins and decreased monosome formation. This leads to a mitochondrial translation defect, involving the majority of mitochondrial polypeptides, and a severe OXPHOS assembly defect. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analyses identified mitochondrial ribosomal protein (MRP)L14 as the specific interacting protein partner of C7orf30 in the mt-LSU. Reciprocal experiments in which MRPL14 was depleted by small interfering RNA (siRNA) phenocopied the C7orf30 knockdown. Members of the DUF143 family have been suggested to be universally conserved ribosomal silencing factors, acting by sterically inhibiting the association of the small and large ribosomal subunits. Our results demonstrate that, although the interaction between C7orf30 and MRPL14 has been evolutionarily conserved, human C7orf30 is, on the contrary, essential for mitochondrial ribosome biogenesis and mitochondrial translation. PMID:23171548

  12. Ribosomal RNA: a key to phylogeny

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R.

    1993-01-01

    As molecular phylogeny increasingly shapes our understanding of organismal relationships, no molecule has been applied to more questions than have ribosomal RNAs. We review this role of the rRNAs and some of the insights that have been gained from them. We also offer some of the practical considerations in extracting the phylogenetic information from the sequences. Finally, we stress the importance of comparing results from multiple molecules, both as a method for testing the overall reliability of the organismal phylogeny and as a method for more broadly exploring the history of the genome.

  13. Developmental Trajectories of Marijuana Use among Men: Examining Linkages with Criminal Behavior and Psychopathic Features into the Mid-30s

    PubMed Central

    Pardini, Dustin; Bechtold, Jordan; Loeber, Rolf; White, Helene

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Examine whether young men who chronically use marijuana are at risk for engaging in drug-related and non-drug-related criminal offending and exhibiting psychopathic personality features in their mid-30s. Methods Patterns of marijuana use were delineated in a sample of predominately Black and White young men from adolescence to the mid-20s using latent class growth curve analysis. Self-report and official records of criminal offending and psychopathic personality features were assessed in the mid-30s. Analyses controlled for multiple factors indicative of a preexisting antisocial lifestyle and co-occurring use of other substances and tested for moderation by race. Results Four latent marijuana trajectory groups were identified: chronic high, adolescence-limited, late increasing, and low/nonusers. Relative to low/nonusers, chronic high and late increasing marijuana users exhibited more adult psychopathic features and were more likely to engage in drug-related offending during their mid-30s. Adolescence-limited users were similar to low/nonusers in terms of psychopathic features but were more likely to be arrested for drug-related crimes. No trajectory group differences were found for violence or theft, and the group differences were not moderated by race. Conclusions Young men who engage in chronic marijuana use from adolescence into their 20s are at increased risk for exhibiting psychopathic features, dealing drugs, and enduring drug-related legal problems in their mid-30s relative to men who remain abstinent or use infrequently. PMID:26568641

  14. Molecular architecture of the ribosome-bound Hepatitis C Virus internal ribosomal entry site RNA.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Collier, Marianne; Loerke, Justus; Ismer, Jochen; Schmidt, Andrea; Hilal, Tarek; Sprink, Thiemo; Yamamoto, Kaori; Mielke, Thorsten; Bürger, Jörg; Shaikh, Tanvir R; Dabrowski, Marylena; Hildebrand, Peter W; Scheerer, Patrick; Spahn, Christian M T

    2015-12-14

    Internal ribosomal entry sites (IRESs) are structured cis-acting RNAs that drive an alternative, cap-independent translation initiation pathway. They are used by many viruses to hijack the translational machinery of the host cell. IRESs facilitate translation initiation by recruiting and actively manipulating the eukaryotic ribosome using only a subset of canonical initiation factor and IRES transacting factors. Here we present cryo-EM reconstructions of the ribosome 80S- and 40S-bound Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) IRES. The presence of four subpopulations for the 80S•HCV IRES complex reveals dynamic conformational modes of the complex. At a global resolution of 3.9 Å for the most stable complex, a derived atomic model reveals a complex fold of the IRES RNA and molecular details of its interaction with the ribosome. The comparison of obtained structures explains how a modular architecture facilitates mRNA loading and tRNA binding to the P-site. This information provides the structural foundation for understanding the mechanism of HCV IRES RNA-driven translation initiation. PMID:26604301

  15. Molecular contacts of ribose-phosphate backbone of mRNA with human ribosome.

    PubMed

    Sharifulin, Dmitri E; Grosheva, Anastasia S; Bartuli, Yulia S; Malygin, Alexey A; Meschaninova, Maria I; Ven'yaminova, Aliya G; Stahl, Joachim; Graifer, Dmitri M; Karpova, Galina G

    2015-08-01

    In this work, intimate contacts of riboses of mRNA stretch from nucleotides in positions +3 to +12 with respect to the first nucleotide of the P site codon were studied using cross-linking of short mRNA analogs with oxidized 3'-terminal riboses bound to human ribosomes in the complexes stabilized by codon-anticodon interactions and in the binary complexes. It was shown that in all types of complexes cross-links of the mRNA analogs to ribosomal protein (rp) uS3 occur and the yield of these cross-links does not depend on the presence of tRNA and on sequences of the mRNA analogs. Site of the mRNA analogs cross-linking in rp uS3 was mapped to the peptide in positions 55-64 that is located away from the mRNA binding site. Additionally, in complexes with P site-bound tRNA, riboses of mRNA nucleotides in positions +4 to +7 cross-linked to the C-terminal tail of rp uS19 displaying a contact specific to the decoding site of the mammalian ribosome, and tRNA bound at the A site completely blocked this cross-linking. Remarkably, rps uS3 and uS19 were also able to cross-link to the fragment of HCV IRES containing unstructured 3'-terminal part restricted by the AUGC tetraplet with oxidized 3'-terminal ribose. However, no cross-linking to rp uS3 was observed in the 48S preinitiation complex assembled in reticulocyte lysate with this HCV IRES derivative. The results obtained show an ability of rp uS3 to interact with single-stranded RNAs. Possible roles of rp uS3 region 55-64 in the functioning of ribosomes are discussed.

  16. Ribosome Flow Model on a Ring.

    PubMed

    Raveh, Alon; Zarai, Yoram; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    The asymmetric simple exclusion process (ASEP) is an important model from statistical physics describing particles that hop randomly from one site to the next along an ordered lattice of sites, but only if the next site is empty. ASEP has been used to model and analyze numerous multiagent systems with local interactions including the flow of ribosomes along the mRNA strand. In ASEP with periodic boundary conditions a particle that hops from the last site returns to the first one. The mean field approximation of this model is referred to as the ribosome flow model on a ring (RFMR). The RFMR may be used to model both synthetic and endogenous gene expression regimes. We analyze the RFMR using the theory of monotone dynamical systems. We show that it admits a continuum of equilibrium points and that every trajectory converges to an equilibrium point. Furthermore, we show that it entrains to periodic transition rates between the sites. We describe the implications of the analysis results to understanding and engineering cyclic mRNA translation in-vitro and in-vivo. PMID:26671812

  17. Organization of ribosomal genes in Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The macronuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of the ciliated protozoan Paramecium tetraurelia (stock 51) was analyzed by digestion with restriction endonucleases. The fragments which contained ribosomal RNA (rRNA) coding sequences and spacer sequences were identified. The spacer sequences exhibited some heterogeneity in size. The genes coding for 5.8S RNA, but not for 5S RNA, are linked to the 17S and 25S rRNA genes. Complementary RNA, synthesized from rDNA of stock 51, was hybridized with restriction digests of whole cell DNA from six other allopatric stocks of this species. The restriction patterns of the rDNA from these seven stocks were, in general, very similar, and the sizes of the coding sequences were identical in all seven stocks. Only the restriction pattern of rDNA from stock 127 differed significantly from that of stock 51. The rDNA from stock 127 was isolated and characterized, and with the exception of the restriction pattern of its spacer, it resembled the rDNA from stock 51. It is concluded that the rDNA repeat in Paramecium, including the spacer, has, in general, been conserved during the course of evolution. It is suggested that in some species, even in the absence of genetic exchange among geographically separated populations, selection pressure may act to conserve spacers of tandemly repeated rDNA. The conservation may be related to the number of rDNA copies in the germinal nucleus. PMID:6244317

  18. MALDI-TOF MS analysis of ribosomal proteins coded in S10 and spc operons rapidly classified the Sphingomonadaceae as alkylphenol polyethoxylate-degrading bacteria from the environment.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Yudai; Sato, Hiroaki; Hosoda, Akifumi; Tamura, Hiroto

    2012-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) using ribosomal subunit proteins coded in the S10-spc-alpha operon as biomarkers was applied for the classification of the Sphingomonadaceae from the environment. To construct a ribosomal protein database, S10-spc-alpha operon of type strains of the Sphingomonadaceae and their related alkylphenol polyethoxylate (APEO(n) )-degrading bacteria were sequenced using specific primers designed based on nucleotide sequences of genome-sequenced strains. The observed MALDI mass spectra of intact cells were compared with the theoretical mass of the constructed ribosomal protein database. The nine selected biomarkers coded in the S10-spc-alpha operon, L18, L22, L24, L29, L30, S08, S14, S17, and S19, could successfully distinguish the Sphingopyxis terrae NBRC 15098(T) and APEO(n) -degrading bacteria strain BSN20, despite only one base difference in the 16S rRNA gene sequence. This method, named the S10-GERMS (S10-spc-alpha operon gene-encoded ribosomal protein mass spectrum) method, is a significantly useful tool for bacterial discrimination of the Sphingomonadaceae at the strain level and can detect and monitor the main APEO(n) -degrading bacteria in the environment.

  19. Initiation factor IF 2 binds to the alpha-sarcin loop and helix 89 of Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed Central

    La Teana, A; Gualerzi, C O; Dahlberg, A E

    2001-01-01

    During initiation of protein synthesis in bacteria, translation initiation factor IF2 is responsible for the recognition of the initiator tRNA (fMet-tRNA). To perform this function, IF2 binds to the ribosome interacting with both 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits. Here we report the topographical localization of translation initiation factor IF2 on the 70S ribosome determined by base-specific chemical probing. Our results indicate that IF2 specifically protects from chemical modification two sites in domain V of 23S rRNA, namely A2476 and A2478, and residues around position 2660 in domain VI, the so-called sarcin-ricin loop. These footprints are generated by IF2 regardless of the presence of fMet-tRNA, GTP, mRNA, and IF1. IF2 causes no specific protection of 16S rRNA. We observe a decreased reactivity of residues A1418 and A1483, which is an indication that the initiation factor has a tightening effect on the association of ribosomal subunits. This result, confirmed by sucrose density gradient analysis, seems to be a universally conserved property of IF2. PMID:11497435

  20. [Internal structure of ribosomes using different types of emission].

    PubMed

    Serdiuk, I N

    1979-01-01

    A review is made of the experimental results obtained by the author and co-workers on the study of the structural organization of the RNA and the protein in ribosomes by the method of joint use of light, X-ray and neutron scattering and by the method of contrast variation in neutron scattering. Two rules are formulated for the folding of the ribonucleoprotein strand in ribosomes: (1) in each ribosomal subparticle the RNA is concentrated predominantly closer to the center of the particle whereas the protein has a more peripherical localization; (2) the compact ("crystallic") packing of hydrated RNA helices is an essential feature of the nucleus (nuclei) organization of the particles. An analysis of the experimental data on neutron scattering by ribosomal proteins has been done and the globulin conformation in solution of some of these proteins has been established. The widespread concept according to which the majority of ribosomal proteins on the ribosome and in solution are enlongated expanded structures is disputed. It is suggested that all, or almost all, ribosomal proteins are usual globular proteins recognizing the specific sequence of RNA on the periphery of the particles, and , hence, that the formation of functional centrers on the ribosome is, in principle, analogous to the formation of functional centers of other complex proteins with a quaternary structure. PMID:388192

  1. Role of ribosomal protein mutations in tumor development (Review).

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Kaveh M; Lindström, Mikael S

    2016-04-01

    Ribosomes are cellular machines essential for protein synthesis. The biogenesis of ribosomes is a highly complex and energy consuming process that initiates in the nucleolus. Recently, a series of studies applying whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing techniques have led to the discovery of ribosomal protein gene mutations in different cancer types. Mutations in ribosomal protein genes have for example been found in endometrial cancer (RPL22), T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (RPL10, RPL5 and RPL11), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (RPS15), colorectal cancer (RPS20), and glioma (RPL5). Moreover, patients suffering from Diamond-Blackfan anemia, a bone marrow failure syndrome caused by mutant ribosomal proteins are also at higher risk for developing leukemia, or solid tumors. Different experimental models indicate potential mechanisms whereby ribosomal proteins may initiate cancer development. In particular, deregulation of the p53 tumor suppressor network and altered mRNA translation are mechanisms likely to be involved. We envisage that changes in expression and the occurrence of ribosomal protein gene mutations play important roles in cancer development. Ribosome biology constitutes a re-emerging vital area of basic and translational cancer research.

  2. [Analysis of ribosomes by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ledoigt, G; Curgy, J J; Stevens, B J; André, J

    1975-10-01

    Ribosomal polymers, monomers and subunits from several eukaryotes and prokaryotes were isolated and analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Extraction of RNA from ribosomal particles after their migration in a polyacrylamide gel, analyses by sedimentation in sucrose gradients and observations in the electron microscope were carried out in parallel. Attention was directed to the reproducibility, the precision and the limitations of the electrophoresis technique.

  3. Motion of individual ribosomes along mRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visscher, Koen

    2004-11-01

    Ribosomes move along messenger RNA to translate a sequence of ribonucleotides into a corresponding sequence of amino acids that make up a protein. Efficient motion of ribosomes along the mRNA requires hydrolysis of GTP, converting chemical energy into mechanical work, like better known molecular motors such as kinesin. However, motion is just one of the many tasks of the ribosome, whereas for kinesin, motion itself is the main goal. In keeping with these functional differences, the ribosome is also much larger consisting of more than 50 proteins and with half of its mass made up of ribosomal RNA. Such structural complexity enables indirect ways of coupling GTP hydrolysis to directed motion. In order to elucidate the mechanochemical coupling in ribosomes we have developed a single-molecule assay based on using optical tweezers to record the motion of individual ribosomes along mRNA. Translation rates of 2-4 codons/s have been observed. However, when increasing the force opposing motion, we observe backward slippage of ribosomes along homopolymeric poly(U) messages. Currently, it is not clear if the motor operates in reverse or if backward motion has become completely uncoupled from GTP hydrolysis. Interestingly, force-induced backward motion is of biological relevance because of its possible role in -1 frameshifting, a mechanism used by viruses to regulate gene expression at the level of translation.

  4. Role of ribosomal protein mutations in tumor development (Review)

    PubMed Central

    GOUDARZI, KAVEH M.; LINDSTRÖM, MIKAEL S.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomes are cellular machines essential for protein synthesis. The biogenesis of ribosomes is a highly complex and energy consuming process that initiates in the nucleolus. Recently, a series of studies applying whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing techniques have led to the discovery of ribosomal protein gene mutations in different cancer types. Mutations in ribosomal protein genes have for example been found in endometrial cancer (RPL22), T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (RPL10, RPL5 and RPL11), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (RPS15), colorectal cancer (RPS20), and glioma (RPL5). Moreover, patients suffering from Diamond-Blackfan anemia, a bone marrow failure syndrome caused by mutant ribosomal proteins are also at higher risk for developing leukemia, or solid tumors. Different experimental models indicate potential mechanisms whereby ribosomal proteins may initiate cancer development. In particular, deregulation of the p53 tumor suppressor network and altered mRNA translation are mechanisms likely to be involved. We envisage that changes in expression and the occurrence of ribosomal protein gene mutations play important roles in cancer development. Ribosome biology constitutes a re-emerging vital area of basic and translational cancer research. PMID:26892688

  5. Proteopedia Entry: The Large Ribosomal Subunit of "Haloarcula Marismortui"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decatur, Wayne A.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a "Proteopedia" page that shows the refined version of the structure of the "Haloarcula" large ribosomal subunit as solved by the laboratories of Thomas Steitz and Peter Moore. The landmark structure is of great impact as it is the first atomic-resolution structure of the highly conserved ribosomal subunit which harbors…

  6. Self-similarity of biopolymer backbones in the ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Yong

    2008-08-01

    Self-similar properties of the biopolymer backbones in the ribosome are investigated in terms of the fractal dimension. We especially estimate the chain fractal and capacity dimensions of the ribosomal RNAs and proteins, which are constituents of the ribosome. The fractal dimensions of both biopolymers are compared with that of the self-avoiding walk, which is a typical model of a polymer without interaction between monomers. We demonstrate that the fractality found in the ribosomal RNAs is pertinent to explain their structural characteristics: local helix formation and long-range tertiary interaction forming three-dimensional structures. The fractal dimension of the ribosomal protein supports the existence of the long and extended domain, which is hardly seen in the globular protein. The self-similarity also upholds the fact that the ribosomal proteins function primarily to stabilize the structure of the ribosome by both the long-extended domain of the protein penetrating into the inside of the RNA, and the globular domain interacting with the RNA on the exterior of it. These results partially, if not whole, unravel the structural characteristics of the biopolymers in the ribosome.

  7. Studies on the origin of ribosomes in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Craig, N; Goldstein, L

    1969-03-01

    The origin of cytoplasmic RNA and ribosomes was studied in Amoeba proteus by transplantation of a radioactive nucleus into an unlabeled cell followed by examination of the cytoplasm of the recipient for the presence of label. When a RNA-labeled nucleus was used, label appeared in the ribosomes, ribosomal RNA, and soluble RNA. Since the kinetics of appearance of labeled RNA indicates that the nucleus was not injured during the transfer, and since the transferred nuclear pool of labeled acid-soluble RNA precursors is inadequate to account for the amount of cytoplasmic RNA label, it is concluded that cytoplasmic ribosomal RNA is derived from acid-insoluble nuclear RNA and is probably transported as an intact molecule. Likewise, cytoplasmic soluble RNA probably originated in the nucleus, although labeling by terminal exchange in the cytoplasm is also possible. The results were completely different when a protein-labeled nucleus was grafted into an unlabeled host. In this case, label was found only in soluble proteins in the host cell cytoplasm, and there were no (or very few) radioactive ribosomes. This suggests that the nuclear pool of ribosomal protein and ribosomal protein precursors is relatively small and perhaps nonexistent (and, furthermore, shows that there was no cytoplasmic ribosomal contamination of the transferred nucleus). PMID:5765758

  8. Concerted removal of the Erb1-Ytm1 complex in ribosome biogenesis relies on an elaborate interface.

    PubMed

    Thoms, Matthias; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Maddi, Karthik; Hurt, Ed; Sinning, Irmgard

    2016-01-29

    The complicated process of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves about 200 assembly factors that transiently associate with the nascent pre-ribosome in a spatiotemporally ordered way. During the early steps of 60S subunit formation, several proteins, collectively called A3 cluster factors, participate in the removal of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) from 27SA3 pre-rRNA. Among these factors is the conserved hetero-trimeric Nop7-Erb1-Ytm1 complex (or human Pes1-Bop1-Wdr12), which is removed from the evolving pre-60S particle by the AAA ATPase Rea1 to allow progression in the pathway. Here, we clarify how Ytm1 and Erb1 interact, which has implications for the release mechanism of both factors from the pre-ribosome. Biochemical studies show that Ytm1 and Erb1 bind each other via their ß-propeller domains. The crystal structure of the Erb1-Ytm1 heterodimer determined at 2.67Å resolution reveals an extended interaction surface between the propellers in a rarely observed binding mode. Structure-based mutations in the interface that impair the Erb1-Ytm1 interaction do not support growth, with specific defects in 60S subunit synthesis. Under these mutant conditions, it becomes clear that an intact Erb1-Ytm1 complex is required for 60S maturation and that loss of this stable interaction prevents ribosome production. PMID:26657628

  9. Probing the mechanisms underlying human diseases in making ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Farley, Katherine I; Baserga, Susan J

    2016-08-15

    Ribosomes are essential, highly complex machines responsible for protein synthesis in all growing cells. Because of their importance, the process of building these machines is intricately regulated. Although the proteins involved in regulating ribosome biogenesis are just beginning to be understood, especially in human cells, the consequences for dysregulating this process have been even less studied. Such interruptions in ribosome synthesis result in a collection of human disorders known as ribosomopathies. Ribosomopathies, which occur due to mutations in proteins involved in the global process of ribosome biogenesis, result in tissue-specific defects. The questions posed by this dichotomy and the steps taken to address these questions are therefore the focus of this review: How can tissue-specific disorders result from alterations in global processes? Could ribosome specialization account for this difference? PMID:27528749

  10. Prediction of ribosome footprint profile shapes from transcript sequences

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tzu-Yu; Song, Yun S.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Ribosome profiling is a useful technique for studying translational dynamics and quantifying protein synthesis. Applications of this technique have shown that ribosomes are not uniformly distributed along mRNA transcripts. Understanding how each transcript-specific distribution arises is important for unraveling the translation mechanism. Results: Here, we apply kernel smoothing to construct predictive features and build a sparse model to predict the shape of ribosome footprint profiles from transcript sequences alone. Our results on Saccharomyces cerevisiae data show that the marginal ribosome densities can be predicted with high accuracy. The proposed novel method has a wide range of applications, including inferring isoform-specific ribosome footprints, designing transcripts with fast translation speeds and discovering unknown modulation during translation. Availability and implementation: A software package called riboShape is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/riboshape Contact: yss@berkeley.edu PMID:27307616

  11. Structures of eukaryotic ribosomal stalk proteins and its complex with trichosanthin, and their implications in recruiting ribosome-inactivating proteins to the ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Andrew K H; Wong, Eddie C K; Lee, Ka-Ming; Wong, Kam-Bo

    2015-03-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIP) are RNA N-glycosidases that inactivate ribosomes by specifically depurinating a conserved adenine residue at the α-sarcin/ricin loop of 28S rRNA. Recent studies have pointed to the involvement of the C-terminal domain of the eukaryotic stalk proteins in facilitating the toxic action of RIPs. This review highlights how structural studies of eukaryotic stalk proteins provide insights into the recruitment of RIPs to the ribosomes. Since the C-terminal domain of eukaryotic stalk proteins is involved in specific recognition of elongation factors and some eukaryote-specific RIPs (e.g., trichosanthin and ricin), we postulate that these RIPs may have evolved to hijack the translation-factor-recruiting function of ribosomal stalk in reaching their target site of rRNA.

  12. Structures of Eukaryotic Ribosomal Stalk Proteins and Its Complex with Trichosanthin, and Their Implications in Recruiting Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins to the Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Andrew K. H.; Wong, Eddie C. K.; Lee, Ka-Ming; Wong, Kam-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIP) are RNA N-glycosidases that inactivate ribosomes by specifically depurinating a conserved adenine residue at the α-sarcin/ricin loop of 28S rRNA. Recent studies have pointed to the involvement of the C-terminal domain of the eukaryotic stalk proteins in facilitating the toxic action of RIPs. This review highlights how structural studies of eukaryotic stalk proteins provide insights into the recruitment of RIPs to the ribosomes. Since the C-terminal domain of eukaryotic stalk proteins is involved in specific recognition of elongation factors and some eukaryote-specific RIPs (e.g., trichosanthin and ricin), we postulate that these RIPs may have evolved to hijack the translation-factor-recruiting function of ribosomal stalk in reaching their target site of rRNA. PMID:25723321

  13. BASIC: A Simple and Accurate Modular DNA Assembly Method.

    PubMed

    Storch, Marko; Casini, Arturo; Mackrow, Ben; Ellis, Tom; Baldwin, Geoff S

    2017-01-01

    Biopart Assembly Standard for Idempotent Cloning (BASIC) is a simple, accurate, and robust DNA assembly method. The method is based on linker-mediated DNA assembly and provides highly accurate DNA assembly with 99 % correct assemblies for four parts and 90 % correct assemblies for seven parts [1]. The BASIC standard defines a single entry vector for all parts flanked by the same prefix and suffix sequences and its idempotent nature means that the assembled construct is returned in the same format. Once a part has been adapted into the BASIC format it can be placed at any position within a BASIC assembly without the need for reformatting. This allows laboratories to grow comprehensive and universal part libraries and to share them efficiently. The modularity within the BASIC framework is further extended by the possibility of encoding ribosomal binding sites (RBS) and peptide linker sequences directly on the linkers used for assembly. This makes BASIC a highly versatile library construction method for combinatorial part assembly including the construction of promoter, RBS, gene variant, and protein-tag libraries. In comparison with other DNA assembly standards and methods, BASIC offers a simple robust protocol; it relies on a single entry vector, provides for easy hierarchical assembly, and is highly accurate for up to seven parts per assembly round [2]. PMID:27671933

  14. BASIC: A Simple and Accurate Modular DNA Assembly Method.

    PubMed

    Storch, Marko; Casini, Arturo; Mackrow, Ben; Ellis, Tom; Baldwin, Geoff S

    2017-01-01

    Biopart Assembly Standard for Idempotent Cloning (BASIC) is a simple, accurate, and robust DNA assembly method. The method is based on linker-mediated DNA assembly and provides highly accurate DNA assembly with 99 % correct assemblies for four parts and 90 % correct assemblies for seven parts [1]. The BASIC standard defines a single entry vector for all parts flanked by the same prefix and suffix sequences and its idempotent nature means that the assembled construct is returned in the same format. Once a part has been adapted into the BASIC format it can be placed at any position within a BASIC assembly without the need for reformatting. This allows laboratories to grow comprehensive and universal part libraries and to share them efficiently. The modularity within the BASIC framework is further extended by the possibility of encoding ribosomal binding sites (RBS) and peptide linker sequences directly on the linkers used for assembly. This makes BASIC a highly versatile library construction method for combinatorial part assembly including the construction of promoter, RBS, gene variant, and protein-tag libraries. In comparison with other DNA assembly standards and methods, BASIC offers a simple robust protocol; it relies on a single entry vector, provides for easy hierarchical assembly, and is highly accurate for up to seven parts per assembly round [2].

  15. Regulation of ribosomal DNA amplification by the TOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Carmen V.; Cruz, Cristina; Hull, Ryan M.; Keller, Markus A.; Ralser, Markus; Houseley, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Repeated regions are widespread in eukaryotic genomes, and key functional elements such as the ribosomal DNA tend to be formed of high copy repeated sequences organized in tandem arrays. In general, high copy repeats are remarkably stable, but a number of organisms display rapid ribosomal DNA amplification at specific times or under specific conditions. Here we demonstrate that target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling stimulates ribosomal DNA amplification in budding yeast, linking external nutrient availability to ribosomal DNA copy number. We show that ribosomal DNA amplification is regulated by three histone deacetylases: Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. These enzymes control homologous recombination-dependent and nonhomologous recombination-dependent amplification pathways that act in concert to mediate rapid, directional ribosomal DNA copy number change. Amplification is completely repressed by rapamycin, an inhibitor of the nutrient-responsive TOR pathway; this effect is separable from growth rate and is mediated directly through Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. Caloric restriction is known to up-regulate expression of nicotinamidase Pnc1, an enzyme that enhances Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4 activity. In contrast, normal glucose concentrations stretch the ribosome synthesis capacity of cells with low ribosomal DNA copy number, and we find that these cells show a previously unrecognized transcriptional response to caloric excess by reducing PNC1 expression. PNC1 down-regulation forms a key element in the control of ribosomal DNA amplification as overexpression of PNC1 substantially reduces ribosomal DNA amplification rate. Our results reveal how a signaling pathway can orchestrate specific genome changes and demonstrate that the copy number of repetitive DNA can be altered to suit environmental conditions. PMID:26195783

  16. Regulation of ribosomal DNA amplification by the TOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Jack, Carmen V; Cruz, Cristina; Hull, Ryan M; Keller, Markus A; Ralser, Markus; Houseley, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    Repeated regions are widespread in eukaryotic genomes, and key functional elements such as the ribosomal DNA tend to be formed of high copy repeated sequences organized in tandem arrays. In general, high copy repeats are remarkably stable, but a number of organisms display rapid ribosomal DNA amplification at specific times or under specific conditions. Here we demonstrate that target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling stimulates ribosomal DNA amplification in budding yeast, linking external nutrient availability to ribosomal DNA copy number. We show that ribosomal DNA amplification is regulated by three histone deacetylases: Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. These enzymes control homologous recombination-dependent and nonhomologous recombination-dependent amplification pathways that act in concert to mediate rapid, directional ribosomal DNA copy number change. Amplification is completely repressed by rapamycin, an inhibitor of the nutrient-responsive TOR pathway; this effect is separable from growth rate and is mediated directly through Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. Caloric restriction is known to up-regulate expression of nicotinamidase Pnc1, an enzyme that enhances Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4 activity. In contrast, normal glucose concentrations stretch the ribosome synthesis capacity of cells with low ribosomal DNA copy number, and we find that these cells show a previously unrecognized transcriptional response to caloric excess by reducing PNC1 expression. PNC1 down-regulation forms a key element in the control of ribosomal DNA amplification as overexpression of PNC1 substantially reduces ribosomal DNA amplification rate. Our results reveal how a signaling pathway can orchestrate specific genome changes and demonstrate that the copy number of repetitive DNA can be altered to suit environmental conditions.

  17. Modifying the maker: Oxygenases target ribosome biology

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Qinqin; Feng, Tianshu; Coleman, Mathew L

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of the eukaryotic protein synthesis machinery is partly driven by extensive and diverse modifications to associated proteins and RNAs. These modifications can have important roles in regulating translation factor activity and ribosome biogenesis and function. Further investigation of ‘translational modifications’ is warranted considering the growing evidence implicating protein synthesis as a critical point of gene expression control that is commonly deregulated in disease. New evidence suggests that translation is a major new target for oxidative modifications, specifically hydroxylations and demethylations, which generally are catalyzed by a family of emerging oxygenase enzymes that act at the interface of nutrient availability and metabolism. This review summarizes what is currently known about the role or these enzymes in targeting rRNA synthesis, protein translation and associated cellular processes. PMID:26779412

  18. Ribosome-Inactivating and Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schrot, Joachim; Weng, Alexander; Melzig, Matthias F.

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are toxins that act as N-glycosidases (EC 3.2.2.22). They are mainly produced by plants and classified as type 1 RIPs and type 2 RIPs. There are also RIPs and RIP related proteins that cannot be grouped into the classical type 1 and type 2 RIPs because of their different sizes, structures or functions. In addition, there is still not a uniform nomenclature or classification existing for RIPs. In this review, we give the current status of all known plant RIPs and we make a suggestion about how to unify those RIPs and RIP related proteins that cannot be classified as type 1 or type 2 RIPs. PMID:26008228

  19. Compilation of small ribosomal subunit RNA structures.

    PubMed Central

    Neefs, J M; Van de Peer, Y; De Rijk, P; Chapelle, S; De Wachter, R

    1993-01-01

    The database on small ribosomal subunit RNA structure contained 1804 nucleotide sequences on April 23, 1993. This number comprises 365 eukaryotic, 65 archaeal, 1260 bacterial, 30 plastidial, and 84 mitochondrial sequences. These are stored in the form of an alignment in order to facilitate the use of the database as input for comparative studies on higher-order structure and for reconstruction of phylogenetic trees. The elements of the postulated secondary structure for each molecule are indicated by special symbols. The database is available on-line directly from the authors by ftp and can also be obtained from the EMBL nucleotide sequence library by electronic mail, ftp, and on CD ROM disk. PMID:8332525

  20. Crew Assembly

    NASA Video Gallery

    Train to improve your dexterity and hand-eye coordination by assembling a puzzle.The Train Like an Astronaut project uses the excitement of exploration to challenge students to set goals, practice ...

  1. Ribosomal protein uS19 mutants reveal its role in coordinating ribosome structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Alicia M; Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A; Gulay, Suna P; Mirvis, Mary; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies identified allosteric information pathways connecting functional centers in the large ribosomal subunit to the decoding center in the small subunit through the B1a and B1b/c intersubunit bridges in yeast. In prokaryotes a single SSU protein, uS13, partners with H38 (the A-site finger) and uL5 to form the B1a and B1b/c bridges respectively. In eukaryotes, the SSU component was split into 2 separate proteins during the course of evolution. One, also known as uS13, participates in B1b/c bridge with uL5 in eukaryotes. The other, called uS19 is the SSU partner in the B1a bridge with H38. Here, polyalanine mutants of uS19 involved in the uS19/uS13 and the uS19/H38 interfaces were used to elucidate the important amino acid residues involved in these intersubunit communication pathways. Two key clusters of amino acids were identified: one located at the junction between uS19 and uS13, and a second that appears to interact with the distal tip of H38. Biochemical analyses reveal that these mutations shift the ribosomal rotational equilibrium toward the unrotated state, increasing ribosomal affinity for tRNAs in the P-site and for ternary complex in the A-site, and inhibit binding of the translocase, eEF2. These defects in turn affect specific aspects of translational fidelity. These findings suggest that uS19 plays a critical role as a conduit of information exchange between the large and small ribosomal subunits directly through the B1a, and indirectly through the B1b/c bridges. PMID:26824029

  2. Ribosomal ribonucleic acid and ribosomal precursor ribonucleic acid in Anacystis nidulans.

    PubMed

    Szalay, A; Munsche, D; Wolligiehn, R; Parthier, B

    1972-08-01

    The RNA of the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans contains three ribosomal RNA species with molecular weights of 0.56x10(6), 0.9x10(6), and 1.1x10(6) if the RNA is extracted in the absence of Mg(2+). The 0.9x10(6)mol.wt. rRNA is extremely slowly labelled in (32)P-incorporation experiments. This rRNA may be a cleavage product of the 1.1x10(6)mol.wt. rRNA from the ribosomes of cells in certain physiological states (e.g. light-deficiency during growth). The cleavage of the 1.1x10(6)mol.wt. rRNA during the extraction procedure can be prevented by the addition of 10mm-MgCl(2). (32)P-pulse-labelling studies demonstrate the rapid synthesis of two ribosomal precursor RNA species. One precursor RNA migrating slightly slower than the 1.1x10(6)mol.wt. rRNA appears much less stable than the other precursor RNA, which shows the electrophoretic behaviour of the 0.7x10(6)mol.wt. rRNA. Our observations support the close relationship between bacteria and blue-green algae also with respect to rRNA maturation. The conversion of the ribosomal precursor RNA species into 0.56x10(6)- and 1.1x10(6)-mol.wt. rRNA species requires Mg(2+) in the incubation medium.

  3. Ribosomal Alteration-Derived Signals for Cytokine Induction in Mucosal and Systemic Inflammation: Noncanonical Pathways by Ribosomal Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Yuseok

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal inactivation damages 28S ribosomal RNA by interfering with its functioning during gene translation, leading to stress responses linked to a variety of inflammatory disease processes. Although the primary effect of ribosomal inactivation in cells is the functional inhibition of global protein synthesis, early responsive gene products including proinflammatory cytokines are exclusively induced by toxic stress in highly dividing tissues such as lymphoid tissue and epithelia. In the present study, ribosomal inactivation-related modulation of cytokine production was reviewed in leukocyte and epithelial pathogenesis models to characterize mechanistic evidence of ribosome-derived cytokine induction and its implications for potent therapeutic targets of mucosal and systemic inflammatory illness, particularly those triggered by organellar dysfunctions. PMID:24523573

  4. Ribosomal alteration-derived signals for cytokine induction in mucosal and systemic inflammation: noncanonical pathways by ribosomal inactivation.

    PubMed

    Moon, Yuseok

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal inactivation damages 28S ribosomal RNA by interfering with its functioning during gene translation, leading to stress responses linked to a variety of inflammatory disease processes. Although the primary effect of ribosomal inactivation in cells is the functional inhibition of global protein synthesis, early responsive gene products including proinflammatory cytokines are exclusively induced by toxic stress in highly dividing tissues such as lymphoid tissue and epithelia. In the present study, ribosomal inactivation-related modulation of cytokine production was reviewed in leukocyte and epithelial pathogenesis models to characterize mechanistic evidence of ribosome-derived cytokine induction and its implications for potent therapeutic targets of mucosal and systemic inflammatory illness, particularly those triggered by organellar dysfunctions.

  5. Seal assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Roger Neal; Longfritz, William David

    2001-01-01

    A seal assembly that seals a gap formed by a groove comprises a seal body, a biasing element, and a connection that connects the seal body to the biasing element to form the seal assembly. The seal assembly further comprises a concave-shaped center section and convex-shaped contact portions at each end of the seal body. The biasing element is formed from an elastic material and comprises a convex-shaped center section and concave-shaped biasing zones that are opposed to the convex-shaped contact portions. The biasing element is adapted to be compressed to change a width of the seal assembly from a first width to a second width that is smaller than the first width. In the compressed state, the seal assembly can be disposed in the groove. After release of the compressing force, the seal assembly expands. The contact portions will move toward a surface of the groove and the biasing zones will move into contact with another surface of the groove. The biasing zones will bias the contact portions of the seal body against the surface of the groove.

  6. Selecting rRNA binding sites for the ribosomal proteins L4 and L6 from randomly fragmented rRNA: application of a method called SERF.

    PubMed

    Stelzl, U; Spahn, C M; Nierhaus, K H

    2000-04-25

    Two-thirds of the 54 proteins of the Escherichia coli ribosome interact directly with the rRNAs, but the rRNA binding sites of only a very few proteins are known. We present a method (selection of random RNA fragments; SERF) that can identify the minimal binding region for proteins within ribonucleo-protein complexes such as the ribosome. The power of the method is exemplified with the ribosomal proteins L4 and L6. Binding sequences are identified for both proteins and characterized by phosphorothioate footprinting. Surprisingly, the binding region of L4, a 53-nt rRNA fragment of domain I of 23S rRNA, can simultaneously and independently bind L24, one of the two assembly initiator proteins of the large subunit.

  7. Rli1/ABCE1 Recycles Terminating Ribosomes and Controls Translation Reinitiation in 3'UTRs In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Young, David J; Guydosh, Nicholas R; Zhang, Fan; Hinnebusch, Alan G; Green, Rachel

    2015-08-13

    To study the function of Rli1/ABCE1 in vivo, we used ribosome profiling and biochemistry to characterize its contribution to ribosome recycling. When Rli1 levels were diminished, 80S ribosomes accumulated both at stop codons and in the adjoining 3'UTRs of most mRNAs. Frequently, these ribosomes reinitiated translation without the need for a canonical start codon, as small peptide products predicted by 3'UTR ribosome occupancy in all three reading frames were confirmed by western analysis and mass spectrometry. Eliminating the ribosome-rescue factor Dom34 dramatically increased 3'UTR ribosome occupancy in Rli1 depleted cells, indicating that Dom34 clears the bulk of unrecycled ribosomes. Thus, Rli1 is crucial for ribosome recycling in vivo and controls ribosome homeostasis. 3'UTR translation occurs in wild-type cells as well, and observations of elevated 3'UTR ribosomes during stress suggest that modulating recycling and reinitiation is involved in responding to environmental changes.

  8. Crystal structure of the 80S yeast ribosome.

    PubMed

    Jenner, Lasse; Melnikov, Sergey; Garreau de Loubresse, Nicolas; Ben-Shem, Adam; Iskakova, Madina; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Meskauskas, Arturas; Dinman, Jonathan; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2012-12-01

    The first X-ray structure of the eukaryotic ribosome at 3.0Å resolution was determined using ribosomes isolated and crystallized from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Ben-Shem A, Garreau de Loubresse N, Melnikov S, Jenner L, Yusupova G, Yusupov M: The structure of the eukaryotic ribosome at 3.0 A resolution. Science 2011, 334:1524-1529). This accomplishment was possible due to progress in yeast ribosome biochemistry as well as recent advances in crystallographic methods developed for structure determination of prokaryotic ribosomes isolated from Thermus thermophilus and Escherichia coli. In this review we will focus on the development of isolation procedures that allowed structure determination (both cryo-EM and X-ray crystallography) to be successful for the yeast S. cerevisiae. Additionally we will introduce a new nomenclature that facilitates comparison of ribosomes from different species and kingdoms of life. Finally we will discuss the impact of the yeast 80S ribosome crystal structure on perspectives for future investigations.

  9. Stochastic kinetics of ribosomes: Single motor properties and collective behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, Ashok; Chowdhury, Debanjan; Chowdhury, Debashish; Ramakrishnan, T. V.

    2009-07-01

    Syntheses of protein molecules in a cell are carried out by ribosomes. A ribosome can be regarded as a molecular motor which utilizes the input chemical energy to move on a messenger RNA (mRNA) track that also serves as a template for the polymerization of the corresponding protein. The forward movement, however, is characterized by an alternating sequence of translocation and pause. Using a quantitative model, which captures the mechanochemical cycle of an individual ribosome, we derive an exact analytical expression for the distribution of its dwell times at the successive positions on the mRNA track. Inverse of the average dwell time satisfies a “Michaelis-Menten-type” equation and is consistent with the general formula for the average velocity of a molecular motor with an unbranched mechanochemical cycle. Extending this formula appropriately, we also derive the exact force-velocity relation for a ribosome. Often many ribosomes simultaneously move on the same mRNA track, while each synthesizes a copy of the same protein. We extend the model of a single ribosome by incorporating steric exclusion of different individuals on the same track. We draw the phase diagram of this model of ribosome traffic in three-dimensional spaces spanned by experimentally controllable parameters. We suggest new experimental tests of our theoretical predictions.

  10. Bmi1 promotes erythroid development through regulating ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Rui; Chen, Sisi; Kobayashi, Michihiro; Yu, Hao; Zhang, Yingchi; Wan, Yang; Young, Sara K.; Soltis, Anthony; Yu, Ming; Vemula, Sasidhar; Fraenkel, Ernest; Cantor, Alan; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Xu, Yang; Yoder, Mervin C.; Wek, Ronald C.; Ellis, Steven R.; Kapur, Reuben; Zhu, Xiaofan; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    While Polycomb group protein Bmi1 is important for stem cell maintenance, its role in lineage commitment is largely unknown. We have identified Bmi1 as a novel regulator of erythroid development. Bmi1 is highly expressed in mouse erythroid progenitor cells and its deficiency impairs erythroid differentiation. BMI1 is also important for human erythroid development. Furthermore, we discovered that loss of Bmi1 in erythroid progenitor cells results in down-regulation of transcription of multiple ribosomal protein genes and impaired ribosome biogenesis. Bmi1 deficiency stabilizes p53 protein, leading to upregulation of p21 expression and subsequent G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Genetic inhibition of p53 activity rescues the erythroid defects seen in the Bmi1 null mice, demonstrating that a p53-dependent mechanism underlies the pathophysiology of the anemia. Mechanistically, Bmi1 is associated with multiple ribosomal protein genes and may positively regulate their expression in erythroid progenitor cells. Thus, Bmi1 promotes erythroid development, at least in part through regulating ribosome biogenesis. Ribosomopathies are human disorders of ribosome dysfunction, including diamond blackfan anemia (DBA) and 5q- syndrome, in which genetic abnormalities cause impaired ribosome biogenesis, resulting in specific clinical phenotypes. We observed that BMI1 expression in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from patients with DBA is correlated with the expression of some ribosomal protein genes, suggesting that BMI1 deficiency may play a pathological role in DBA and other ribosomopathies. PMID:25385494

  11. Bmi1 promotes erythroid development through regulating ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rui; Chen, Sisi; Kobayashi, Michihiro; Yu, Hao; Zhang, Yingchi; Wan, Yang; Young, Sara K; Soltis, Anthony; Yu, Ming; Vemula, Sasidhar; Fraenkel, Ernest; Cantor, Alan; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Xu, Yang; Yoder, Mervin C; Wek, Ronald C; Ellis, Steven R; Kapur, Reuben; Zhu, Xiaofan; Liu, Yan

    2015-03-01

    While Polycomb group protein Bmi1 is important for stem cell maintenance, its role in lineage commitment is largely unknown. We have identified Bmi1 as a novel regulator of erythroid development. Bmi1 is highly expressed in mouse erythroid progenitor cells and its deficiency impairs erythroid differentiation. BMI1 is also important for human erythroid development. Furthermore, we discovered that loss of Bmi1 in erythroid progenitor cells results in decreased transcription of multiple ribosomal protein genes and impaired ribosome biogenesis. Bmi1 deficiency stabilizes p53 protein, leading to upregulation of p21 expression and subsequent G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Genetic inhibition of p53 activity rescues the erythroid defects seen in the Bmi1 null mice, demonstrating that a p53-dependent mechanism underlies the pathophysiology of the anemia. Mechanistically, Bmi1 is associated with multiple ribosomal protein genes and may positively regulate their expression in erythroid progenitor cells. Thus, Bmi1 promotes erythroid development, at least in part through regulating ribosome biogenesis. Ribosomopathies are human disorders of ribosome dysfunction, including Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) and 5q- syndrome, in which genetic abnormalities cause impaired ribosome biogenesis, resulting in specific clinical phenotypes. We observed that BMI1 expression in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from patients with DBA is correlated with the expression of some ribosomal protein genes, suggesting that BMI1 deficiency may play a pathological role in DBA and other ribosomopathies. PMID:25385494

  12. Compact structure of ribosomal chromatin in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Spadafora, C; Crippa, M

    1984-01-01

    Micrococcal nuclease digestion was used as a tool to study the organization of the ribosomal chromatin in liver, blood and embryo cells of X. laevis. It was found that in liver and blood cells, ribosomal DNA is efficiently protected from nuclease attack in comparison to bulk chromatin. Although ribosomal chromatin is fragmented in a typical nucleosomal pattern, a considerable portion of ribosomal DNA retains a high molecular weight even after extensive digestion. A greater accessibility of the coding region in comparison to the non-coding spacer was found. In embryos, when ribosomal DNA is fully transcribed, these genes are even more highly protected than in adult tissues: in fact, the nucleosomal ladder can hardly be detected and rDNA is preserved in high molecular weight. Treatment of chromatin with 0.8 M NaCl abolishes the specific resistance of the ribosomal chromatin to digestion. The ribosomal chromatin, particularly in its active state, seems to be therefore tightly complexed with chromosomal proteins which protect its DNA from nuclease degradation. Images PMID:6709502

  13. RiboVision suite for visualization and analysis of ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Chad R; Petrov, Anton S; Waterbury, Chris C; Jett, James; Li, Fengbo; Freil, Larry E; Xiong, Xiao; Wang, Lan; Migliozzi, Blacki L R; Hershkovits, Eli; Xue, Yuzhen; Hsiao, Chiaolong; Bowman, Jessica C; Harvey, Stephen C; Grover, Martha A; Wartell, Zachary J; Williams, Loren Dean

    2014-01-01

    RiboVision is a visualization and analysis tool for the simultaneous display of multiple layers of diverse information on primary (1D), secondary (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) structures of ribosomes. The ribosome is a macromolecular complex containing ribosomal RNA and ribosomal proteins and is a key component of life responsible for the synthesis of proteins in all living organisms. RiboVision is intended for rapid retrieval, analysis, filtering, and display of a variety of ribosomal data. Preloaded information includes 1D, 2D, and 3D structures augmented by base-pairing, base-stacking, and other molecular interactions. RiboVision is preloaded with rRNA secondary structures, rRNA domains and helical structures, phylogeny, crystallographic thermal factors, etc. RiboVision contains structures of ribosomal proteins and a database of their molecular interactions with rRNA. RiboVision contains preloaded structures and data for two bacterial ribosomes (Thermus thermophilus and Escherichia coli), one archaeal ribosome (Haloarcula marismortui), and three eukaryotic ribosomes (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, and Homo sapiens). RiboVision revealed several major discrepancies between the 2D and 3D structures of the rRNAs of the small and large subunits (SSU and LSU). Revised structures mapped with a variety of data are available in RiboVision as well as in a public gallery (). RiboVision is designed to allow users to distill complex data quickly and to easily generate publication-quality images of data mapped onto secondary structures. Users can readily import and analyze their own data in the context of other work. This package allows users to import and map data from CSV files directly onto 1D, 2D, and 3D levels of structure. RiboVision has features in rough analogy with web-based map services capable of seamlessly switching the type of data displayed and the resolution or magnification of the display. RiboVision is available at .

  14. Quantitative assessment of ribosome drop-off in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Celine; Chiarugi, Davide; Valleriani, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Premature ribosome drop-off is one of the major errors in translation of mRNA by ribosomes. However, repeated analyses of Ribo-seq data failed to quantify its strength in E. coli. Relying on a novel highly sensitive data analysis method we show that a significant rate of ribosome drop-off is measurable and can be quantified also when cells are cultured under non-stressing conditions. Moreover, we find that the drop-off rate is highly variable, depending on multiple factors. In particular, under environmental stress such as amino acid starvation or ethanol intoxication, the drop-off rate markedly increases. PMID:26935582

  15. Whither Ribosome Structure and Dynamics Research? (A Perspective).

    PubMed

    Frank, Joachim

    2016-09-11

    As high-resolution cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of ribosomes proliferate, at resolutions that allow atomic interactions to be visualized, this article attempts to give a perspective on the way research on ribosome structure and dynamics may be headed, and particularly the new opportunities we have gained through recent advances in cryo-EM. It is pointed out that single-molecule FRET and cryo-EM form natural complements in the characterization of ribosome dynamics and transitions among equilibrating states of in vitro translational systems. PMID:27178840

  16. Effects of ribosomes on the kinetics of Qβ replication.

    PubMed

    Usui, Kimihito; Ichihashi, Norikazu; Kazuta, Yasuaki; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage Qβ utilizes some host cell translation factors during replication. Previously, we constructed a kinetic model that explains replication of long RNA molecules by Qβ replicase. Here, we expanded the previous kinetic model to include the effects of ribosome concentration on RNA replication. The expanded model quantitatively explained single- and double-strand formation kinetics during replication with various ribosome concentrations for two artificial long RNAs. This expanded model and the knowledge obtained in this study provide useful frameworks to understand the precise replication mechanism of Qβ replicase with ribosomes and to design amplifiable RNA genomes in translation-coupling systems.

  17. Expression of a small (p)ppGpp synthetase, YwaC, in the (p)ppGpp(0) mutant of Bacillus subtilis triggers YvyD-dependent dimerization of ribosome.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Kazumi; Nanamiya, Hideaki; Kazo, Yuka; Maehashi, Marie; Suzuki, Shota; Namba, Eri; Hoshiya, Masahiro; Hanai, Ryo; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Morimoto, Takuya; Ogasawara, Naotake; Kageyama, Yasushi; Ara, Katsutoshi; Ozaki, Katsuya; Yoshida, Masaki; Kuroiwa, Haruko; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi; Ohashi, Yoshiaki; Kawamura, Fujio

    2012-06-01

    To elucidate the biological functions of small (p)ppGpp synthetases YjbM and YwaC of Bacillus subtilis, we constructed RIK1059 and RIK1066 strains carrying isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) inducible yjbM and ywaC genes, respectively, in the ΔrelA ΔyjbM ΔywaC triple mutant background. While the uninduced and IPTG-induced RIK1059 cells grew similarly in LB medium, the growth of RIK1066 cells was arrested following the addition of IPTG during the early exponential growth phase. Induction of YwaC expression by IPTG also severely decreased the intracellular GTP level and drastically altered the transcriptional profile in RIK1066 cells. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation analysis of the ribosomal fractions prepared from the IPTG-induced RIK1066 cells revealed three peaks corresponding to 30S, 50S, and 70S ribosome particles, and also an extra peak. Electron microscope studies revealed that the extra peak fraction contained dimers of 70S ribosomes, which were similar to the Escherichia coli 100S ribosomes. Proteomic analysis revealed that the 70S dimer contained an extra protein, YvyD, in addition to those found in the 70S ribosome. Accordingly, strain resulting from the disruption of the yvyD gene in the RIK1066 cells was unable to form 70S dimers following IPTG induction, indicating that YvyD is required for the formation of these dimers in B. subtilis.

  18. Proteomic analysis of rodent ribosomes revealed heterogeneity including ribosomal proteins L10-like, L22-like 1, and L39-like.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Yoshihiko; Honda, Hiroki; Iida, Tomoharu; Morinaga, Takuma; Hino, Shingo; Okajima, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Nadano, Daita

    2010-03-01

    Heterogeneity of ribosome structure, due to variations in ribosomal protein composition, has been shown to be of physiological significance in plants and yeast. Mammalian genomics have demonstrated numerous genes that are paralogous to genes encoding ribosomal proteins. Although the vast majority are considered to be pseudogenes, mRNA expression of a few paralogues, such as human ribosomal protein L39-like/L39-2, has been reported. In the present study, ribosomes from the liver, mammary gland, and testis of rodents were analyzed using a combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis under radical-free and highly reducing conditions, and mass spectrometry. This system allowed identification of 78 ribosomal proteins and Rack1 from a single gel. The degree of heterogeneity was far less than that reported for plant and yeast ribosomes, and was in accord with published biochemical and genetic data for mammalian ribosomes. Nevertheless, an uncharacterized paralogue of ribosomal protein L22, ribosomal protein L22-like 1, was identified as a minor ribosomal component. Ribosomal proteins L10-like and L39-like, paralogues of ribosomal proteins L10 and L39, respectively, were found in ribosomes only from the testis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction yielded supportive evidence for specific expression of L10-like and L39-like in the testis. Newly synthesized L39-like is likely to be transported to the nucleolus, where ribosome biosynthesis occurs, and then incorporated into translating ribosomes in the cytoplasm. Heterogeneity of mammalian testicular ribosomes is structurally non-negligible, and may offer valuable insights into the function of the customized ribosome.

  19. Effect of alpha-sarcin and ribosome-inactivating proteins on the interaction of elongation factors with ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Brigotti, M; Rambelli, F; Zamboni, M; Montanaro, L; Sperti, S

    1989-02-01

    alpha-Sarcin from Aspergillus giganteus and the ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) from higher plants inactivate the 60 S ribosomal subunit. The former is an RNAase, whereas RIPs are N-glycosidases. The site of cleavage of RNA and that of N-glycosidic depurinization are at one nucleotide distance in 28 S rRNA [Endo & Tsurugi (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 8128-8130]. The effect of alpha-sarcin and that of RIPs on the interaction of elongation factors with Artemia salina (brine shrimp) ribosomes have been investigated. alpha-Sarcin inhibits both the EF1 (elongation factor 1)-dependent binding of aminoacyl-tRNA and the GTP-dependent binding of EF2 (elongation factor 2) to ribosomes, whereas two of the RIPs tested, ricin from Ricinus communis (castor bean) and volkensin from Adenia volkensii (kilyambiti), inhibit only the latter reaction. EF2 protects ribosomes from inactivation by both alpha-sarcin and ricin. The EF1-binding site is affected only by alpha-sarcin. The sensitivity of this site to alpha-sarcin is increased by pretreatment of ribosomes with ricin. A. salina ribosomes were highly resistant to the third RIP tested, namely gelonin from Gelonium multiflorum. All four proteins tested have, however, a comparable activity on the rabbit reticulocyte-lysate system. PMID:2930482

  20. The sequential addition of ribosomal proteins during the formation of the small ribosomal subunit in Friend erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Todorov, I T; Noll, F; Hadjiolov, A A

    1983-03-15

    Nucleolar '80-S' and '40-S' preribosomes (containing 45-S and 21-S pre-rRNA, respectively), as well as cytoplasmic ribosomes, were isolated from Friend erythroleukemia cells. The presence of structural ribosomal proteins in the isolated particles was studied by using antisera against individual rat liver small ribosomal subunit proteins. The analysis is based on the established crossreactivity between rat and mouse ribosomes [F. Noll and H. Bielka (1970) Mol. Gen. Genet. 106, 106-113]. The identification of the proteins was achieved by two independent immunological techniques: the passive haemagglutination test and the enzyme immunoassay of electrophoretically fractionated proteins, blotted on nitrocellulose. All 17 proteins tested are present in cytoplasmic ribosomes. A large number of proteins (S3a, S6, S7, S8, S11, S14, S18, S20, S23/24 and S25) are present in the '80-S' preribosome. Only two proteins (S3 and S21) are added during the formation of the '40-S' preribosome in the nucleolus. Four proteins (S2, S19, S26 and S29) are added at later, possibly extranucleolar, stages of ribosome formation. The results obtained provide evidence for the sequential addition of proteins during the formation of the small ribosomal subunit in Friend erythroleukemia cells.

  1. Hinge assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vandergriff, D.H.

    1999-08-31

    A hinge assembly is disclosed having a first leaf, a second leaf and linking member. The first leaf has a contact surface. The second leaf has a first contact surface and a second contact surface. The linking member pivotally connects to the first leaf and to the second leaf. The hinge assembly is capable of moving from a closed position to an open position. In the closed position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the first contact surface of the second leaf. In the open position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the second contact surface of the second leaf. The hinge assembly can include a seal on the contact surface of the first leaf. 8 figs.

  2. Hinge assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vandergriff, David Houston

    1999-01-01

    A hinge assembly having a first leaf, a second leaf and linking member. The first leaf has a contact surface. The second leaf has a first contact surface and a second contact surface. The linking member pivotally connects to the first leaf and to the second leaf. The hinge assembly is capable of moving from a closed position to an open position. In the closed position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the first contact surface of the second leaf. In the open position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the second contact surface of the second leaf. The hinge assembly can include a seal on the contact surface of the first leaf.

  3. The reduction in small ribosomal subunit abundance in ethanol-stressed cells of Bacillus subtilis is mediated by a SigB-dependent antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Mars, Ruben A T; Mendonça, Karoline; Denham, Emma L; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2015-10-01

    One of the best-characterized general stress responses in bacteria is the σB-mediated stress response of the Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis. The σB regulon contains approximately 200 protein-encoding genes and 136 putative regulatory RNAs. One of these σB-dependent RNAs, named S1136-S1134, was recently mapped as being transcribed from the S1136 promoter on the opposite strand of the essential rpsD gene, which encodes the ribosomal primary-binding protein S4. Accordingly, S1136-S1134 transcription results in an rpsD-overlapping antisense RNA (asRNA). Upon exposure of B. subtilis to ethanol, the S1136 promoter was found to be induced, while rpsD transcription was downregulated. By quantitative PCR, we show that the activation of transcription from the S1136 promoter is directly responsible for the downregulation of rpsD upon ethanol exposure. We also show that this downregulation of rpsD leads to a reduced level of the small (30S) ribosomal subunit upon ethanol stress. The activation of the S1136 promoter thus represents the first example of antisense transcription-mediated regulation in the general stress response of B. subtilis and implicates the reduction of ribosomal protein abundance as a new aspect in the σB-dependent stress response. We propose that the observed reduction in the level of the small ribosomal subunit, which contains the ribosome-decoding center, may protect B. subtilis cells against misreading and spurious translation of possibly toxic aberrant peptides under conditions of ethanol stress. PMID:26115952

  4. Latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Frederickson, James R.; Harper, William H.; Perez, Raymond

    1986-01-01

    A latch assembly for releasably securing an article in the form of a canister within a container housing. The assembly includes a cam pivotally mounted on the housing wall and biased into the housing interior. The cam is urged into a disabled position by the canister as it enters the housing and a latch release plate maintains the cam disabled when the canister is properly seated in the housing. Upon displacement of the release plate, the cam snaps into latching engagement against the canister for securing the same within the housing.

  5. Latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Frederickson, J.R.; Harper, W.H.; Perez, R.

    1984-08-17

    A latch assembly for releasably securing an article in the form of a canister within a container housing. The assembly includes a cam pivotally mounted on the housing wall and biased into the housing interior. The cam is urged into a disabled position by the canister as it enters the housing and a latch release plate maintains the cam disabled when the canister is properly seated in the housing. Upon displacement of the release plate, the cam snaps into latching engagement against the canister for securing the same within the housing. 2 figs.

  6. Valve assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Marshala, D.L.

    1986-12-16

    This patent describes a subsurface pump actuated by a reciprocatable sucker rod for producing well liquids from a subsurface reservoir involving a piston adapted to reciprocate within a cylinder immersed in the reservoir, the piston being provided with a traveling valve. The improvement described here comprises valve means connected to the sucker tod for lifting a body of fluid during upstrokes of the sucker rod, the valve means comprising: a barrel assembly having an internal bore and comprising: a lower barrel member; and an upper barrel assembly connected to the lower barrel and having a beveled seating surface with at least one fluid port therethrough.

  7. Antibacterial Action of Primaquine: Effects In Vitro on Polypeptide Synthesis and In Vivo on Ribosomes and Ribosomal Ribonucleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Olenick, John G.

    1975-01-01

    Primaquine inhibited polyphenylalanine formation directed by poly(U) in a cell-free system obtained from Bacillus megaterium only when the drug was preincubated with transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA), poly(U), or ribosomes. Considerably less inhibition was produced when the ionic strength of the preincubation mixture of tRNA or poly(U) plus primaquine was increased; with ribosomes, the extent of inhibition was only slightly reduced. In cultures of B. megaterium, primaquine induced the breakdown of ribosomes and their RNA. PMID:813574

  8. Ribosome heterogeneity in tumorigenesis: the rRNA point of view

    PubMed Central

    Marcel, Virginie; Catez, Frédéric; Diaz, Jean-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    The "specialized ribosome" concept proposes that ribosome variants are produced and differentially regulate translation. Examples supporting this notion demonstrated heterogeneity of ribosomal protein composition. However, ribosome translational activity is carried out by rRNA. We, and others, recently showed that rRNA heterogeneity regulates translation to generate distinct translatomes promoting tumorigenesis. PMID:27305893

  9. Complete Sequence Construction of the Highly Repetitive Ribosomal RNA Gene Repeats in Eukaryotes Using Whole Genome Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Saumya; Ganley, Austen R D

    2016-01-01

    The ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) encode the major rRNA species of the ribosome, and thus are essential across life. These genes are highly repetitive in most eukaryotes, forming blocks of tandem repeats that form the core of nucleoli. The primary role of the rDNA in encoding rRNA has been long understood, but more recently the rDNA has been implicated in a number of other important biological phenomena, including genome stability, cell cycle, and epigenetic silencing. Noncoding elements, primarily located in the intergenic spacer region, appear to mediate many of these phenomena. Although sequence information is available for the genomes of many organisms, in almost all cases rDNA repeat sequences are lacking, primarily due to problems in assembling these intriguing regions during whole genome assemblies. Here, we present a method to obtain complete rDNA repeat unit sequences from whole genome assemblies. Limitations of next generation sequencing (NGS) data make them unsuitable for assembling complete rDNA unit sequences; therefore, the method we present relies on the use of Sanger whole genome sequence data. Our method makes use of the Arachne assembler, which can assemble highly repetitive regions such as the rDNA in a memory-efficient way. We provide a detailed step-by-step protocol for generating rDNA sequences from whole genome Sanger sequence data using Arachne, for refining complete rDNA unit sequences, and for validating the sequences obtained. In principle, our method will work for any species where the rDNA is organized into tandem repeats. This will help researchers working on species without a complete rDNA sequence, those working on evolutionary aspects of the rDNA, and those interested in conducting phylogenetic footprinting studies with the rDNA. PMID:27576718

  10. Structural basis for the inhibition of the eukaryotic ribosome.

    PubMed

    Garreau de Loubresse, Nicolas; Prokhorova, Irina; Holtkamp, Wolf; Rodnina, Marina V; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2014-09-25

    The ribosome is a molecular machine responsible for protein synthesis and a major target for small-molecule inhibitors. Compared to the wealth of structural information available on ribosome-targeting antibiotics in bacteria, our understanding of the binding mode of ribosome inhibitors in eukaryotes is currently limited. Here we used X-ray crystallography to determine 16 high-resolution structures of 80S ribosomes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in complexes with 12 eukaryote-specific and 4 broad-spectrum inhibitors. All inhibitors were found associated with messenger RNA and transfer RNA binding sites. In combination with kinetic experiments, the structures suggest a model for the action of cycloheximide and lactimidomycin, which explains why lactimidomycin, the larger compound, specifically targets the first elongation cycle. The study defines common principles of targeting and resistance, provides insights into translation inhibitor mode of action and reveals the structural determinants responsible for species selectivity which could guide future drug development.

  11. Cotranslational protein folding on the ribosome monitored in real time.

    PubMed

    Holtkamp, Wolf; Kokic, Goran; Jäger, Marcus; Mittelstaet, Joerg; Komar, Anton A; Rodnina, Marina V

    2015-11-27

    Protein domains can fold into stable tertiary structures while they are synthesized on the ribosome. We used a high-performance, reconstituted in vitro translation system to investigate the folding of a small five-helix protein domain-the N-terminal domain of Escherichia coli N5-glutamine methyltransferase HemK-in real time. Our observations show that cotranslational folding of the protein, which folds autonomously and rapidly in solution, proceeds through a compact, non-native conformation that forms within the peptide tunnel of the ribosome. The compact state rearranges into a native-like structure immediately after the full domain sequence has emerged from the ribosome. Both folding transitions are rate-limited by translation, allowing for quasi-equilibrium sampling of the conformational space restricted by the ribosome. Cotranslational folding may be typical of small, intrinsically rapidly folding protein domains. PMID:26612953

  12. Cotranslational Protein Folding inside the Ribosome Exit Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Ola B.; Hedman, Rickard; Marino, Jacopo; Wickles, Stephan; Bischoff, Lukas; Johansson, Magnus; Müller-Lucks, Annika; Trovato, Fabio; Puglisi, Joseph D.; O’Brien, Edward P.; Beckmann, Roland; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Summary At what point during translation do proteins fold? It is well established that proteins can fold cotranslationally outside the ribosome exit tunnel, whereas studies of folding inside the exit tunnel have so far detected only the formation of helical secondary structure and collapsed or partially structured folding intermediates. Here, using a combination of cotranslational nascent chain force measurements, inter-subunit fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies on single translating ribosomes, molecular dynamics simulations, and cryoelectron microscopy, we show that a small zinc-finger domain protein can fold deep inside the vestibule of the ribosome exit tunnel. Thus, for small protein domains, the ribosome itself can provide the kind of sheltered folding environment that chaperones provide for larger proteins. PMID:26321634

  13. A process yields large quantities of pure ribosome subunits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, M.; Lu, P.; Rich, A.

    1972-01-01

    Development of process for in-vitro protein synthesis from living cells followed by dissociation of ribosomes into subunits is discussed. Process depends on dialysis or use of chelating agents. Operation of process and advantages over previous methods are outlined.

  14. Sequence-dependent elongation dynamics on macrolide-bound ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Magnus; Chen, Jin; Tsai, Albert; Kornberg, Guy; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2014-06-12

    The traditional view of macrolide antibiotics as plugs inside the ribosomal nascent peptide exit tunnel (NPET) has lately been challenged in favor of a more complex, heterogeneous mechanism, where drug-peptide interactions determine the fate of a translating ribosome. To investigate these highly dynamic processes, we applied single-molecule tracking of elongating ribosomes during inhibition of elongation by erythromycin of several nascent chains, including ErmCL and H-NS, which were shown to be, respectively, sensitive and resistant to erythromycin. Peptide sequence-specific changes were observed in translation elongation dynamics in the presence of a macrolide-obstructed NPET. Elongation rates were not severely inhibited in general by the presence of the drug; instead, stalls or pauses were observed as abrupt events. The dynamic pathways of nascent-chain-dependent elongation pausing in the presence of macrolides determine the fate of the translating ribosome stalling or readthrough.

  15. Database on the structure of large ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    De Rijk, P; Van de Peer, Y; Chapelle, S; De Wachter, R

    1994-01-01

    A database on large ribosomal subunit RNA is made available. It contains 258 sequences. It provides sequence, alignment and secondary structure information in computer-readable formats. Files can be obtained using ftp. PMID:7524023

  16. Metabolic Labeling in the Study of Mammalian Ribosomal RNA Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Stefanovsky, Victor Y; Moss, Tom

    2016-01-01

    RNA metabolic labeling is a method of choice in the study of dynamic changes in the rate of gene transcription and RNA processing. It is particularly applicable to transcription of the ribosomal RNA genes and their processing products due to the very high levels of ribosomal RNA synthesis. Metabolic labeling can detect changes in ribosomal RNA transcription that occur within a few minutes as opposed to the still widely used RT-PCR or Northern blot procedures that measure RNA pool sizes and at best are able to detect changes occurring over several hours or several days. Here, we describe a metabolic labeling technique applicable to the measurement of ribosomal RNA synthesis and processing rates, as well as to the determination of RNA Polymerase I transcription elongation rates. PMID:27576716

  17. [Protein synthesis by the ribosome: a pathway full of pitfalls].

    PubMed

    Macé, Kevin; Giudice, Emmanuel; Gillet, Reynald

    2015-03-01

    Protein synthesis is accomplished through a process known as translation and is carried out by the ribosome, a large macromolecular complex found in every living organism. Given the huge amount of biological data that must be deciphered, it is not uncommon for ribosomes to regularly stall during the process of translation. Any disruption of this finely tuned process will jeopardize the viability of the cell. In bacteria, the main quality-control mechanism for rescuing ribosomes that undergo arrest during translation is trans-translation, which is performed by transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) in association with small protein B (SmPB). However, other rescue systems have been discovered recently, revealing a far more complicated network of factors dedicated to ribosome rescue. These discoveries make it possible to consider inhibition of these pathways as a very promising target for the discovery of new antibiotics.

  18. [Intracellular transport of nuclear ribosomal RNA in Acetabularia mediterranea].

    PubMed

    Naumova, L P; Pressman, E K; Sandakhchiev, L S

    1976-01-01

    The ribosomal RNA transport from a nucleus to a perinuclear cytoplasm and its following distribution in the cytoplasm of Acetabularia mediterranea cells were studied using transplantation of RNA-labeled rhizoid into unlabeled stalk. In addition rifamycin treatment was used for inhibition of cytoplasmic RNA synthesis. Acetabularia nuclei contain the stable RNA fractions similar to those present in some other eukaryotes. Nuclear 25S and 17S ribosomal RNA rapidly enter the rhizoid cytoplasm whereas the following trasfer of them to other regions of the cell is a very slow process. Within two days only an insignificant part of 25S and 17S ribosomal RNA is transferred from the rhizoid to the stalk and is distributed there over the base-apical gradient. No preferential transfer of the nuclear ribosomal RNA to the apical region was observed.

  19. A network of assembly factors is involved in remodeling rRNA elements during preribosome maturation

    PubMed Central

    Baßler, Jochen; Paternoga, Helge; Holdermann, Iris; Thoms, Matthias; Granneman, Sander; Barrio-Garcia, Clara; Nyarko, Afua; Stier, Gunter; Clark, Sarah A.; Schraivogel, Daniel; Kallas, Martina; Beckmann, Roland; Tollervey, David

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves ∼200 assembly factors, but how these contribute to ribosome maturation is poorly understood. Here, we identify a network of factors on the nascent 60S subunit that actively remodels preribosome structure. At its hub is Rsa4, a direct substrate of the force-generating ATPase Rea1. We show that Rsa4 is connected to the central protuberance by binding to Rpl5 and to ribosomal RNA (rRNA) helix 89 of the nascent peptidyl transferase center (PTC) through Nsa2. Importantly, Nsa2 binds to helix 89 before relocation of helix 89 to the PTC. Structure-based mutations of these factors reveal the functional importance of their interactions for ribosome assembly. Thus, Rsa4 is held tightly in the preribosome and can serve as a “distribution box,” transmitting remodeling energy from Rea1 into the developing ribosome. We suggest that a relay-like factor network coupled to a mechano-enzyme is strategically positioned to relocate rRNA elements during ribosome maturation. PMID:25404745

  20. A network of assembly factors is involved in remodeling rRNA elements during preribosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Baßler, Jochen; Paternoga, Helge; Holdermann, Iris; Thoms, Matthias; Granneman, Sander; Barrio-Garcia, Clara; Nyarko, Afua; Lee, Woonghee; Stier, Gunter; Clark, Sarah A; Schraivogel, Daniel; Kallas, Martina; Beckmann, Roland; Tollervey, David; Barbar, Elisar; Sinning, Irmi; Hurt, Ed

    2014-11-24

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves ∼200 assembly factors, but how these contribute to ribosome maturation is poorly understood. Here, we identify a network of factors on the nascent 60S subunit that actively remodels preribosome structure. At its hub is Rsa4, a direct substrate of the force-generating ATPase Rea1. We show that Rsa4 is connected to the central protuberance by binding to Rpl5 and to ribosomal RNA (rRNA) helix 89 of the nascent peptidyl transferase center (PTC) through Nsa2. Importantly, Nsa2 binds to helix 89 before relocation of helix 89 to the PTC. Structure-based mutations of these factors reveal the functional importance of their interactions for ribosome assembly. Thus, Rsa4 is held tightly in the preribosome and can serve as a "distribution box," transmitting remodeling energy from Rea1 into the developing ribosome. We suggest that a relay-like factor network coupled to a mechano-enzyme is strategically positioned to relocate rRNA elements during ribosome maturation.

  1. The ribosomal gene spacer region in archaebacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achenbach-Richter, L.; Woese, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    Sequences for the spacer regions that separate the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA genes have been determined for four more (strategically placed) archaebacteria. These confirm the general rule that methanogens and extreme halophiles have spacers that contain a single tRNAala gene, while tRNA genes are not found in the spacer region of the true extreme thermophiles. The present study also shows that the spacer regions from the sulfate reducing Archaeglobus and the extreme thermophile Thermococcus (both of which cluster phylogenetically with the methanogens and extreme halophiles) contain each a tRNAala gene. Thus, not only all methanogens and extreme halophiles show this characteristic, but all organisms on the "methanogen branch" of the archaebacterial tree appear to do so. The finding of a tRNA gene in the spacer region of the extreme thermophile Thermococcus celer is the first known phenotypic property that links this organism with its phylogenetic counterparts, the methanogens, rather than with its phenotypic counterparts, the sulfur-dependent extreme thermophiles.

  2. Nonenzymatic microorganism identification based on ribosomal RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Jeffrey T.; Pierini, Alicia M.; Stokes, Jeffrey A.; Wahlund, Thomas M.; Read, Betsy; Bechtel, James H.; Bronk, Burt V.

    1999-11-01

    Effective defense against biological warfare (BW) agents requires rapid, fieldable and accurate systems. For micro- organisms like bacteria and viruses, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) provides a valuable target with multiple advantages of species specificity and intrinsic target amplification. Vegetative and spore forms of bacteria contain approximately 104 copies of rRNA. Direct detection of rRNA copies can eliminate some of the interference and preparation difficulties involved in enzymatic amplification methods. In order to apply the advantages of rRNA to BW defense, we are developing a fieldable system based on 16S rRNA, physical disruption of the micro-organism, solid phase hybridization, and fluorescence detection. Our goals include species-specific identification, complete operation from raw sample to identification in 15 minutes or less, and compact, fieldable instrumentation. Initial work on this project has investigated the lysis and hybridization steps, the species-specificity of oligonucleotides probes, and the development of a novel electromagnetic method to physically disrupt the micro- organisms. Target bacteria have been Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis). Continuing work includes further development of methods to rapidly disrupt the micro-organisms and release the rRNA, improved integration and processing, and extension to bacterial and mammalian viruses like MS2 and vesicular stomatitis virus.

  3. The RDP-II (Ribosomal Database Project).

    PubMed

    Maidak, B L; Cole, J R; Lilburn, T G; Parker, C T; Saxman, P R; Farris, R J; Garrity, G M; Olsen, G J; Schmidt, T M; Tiedje, J M

    2001-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP-II), previously described by Maidak et al. [Nucleic Acids Res. (2000), 28, 173-174], continued during the past year to add new rRNA sequences to the aligned data and to improve the analysis commands. Release 8.0 (June 1, 2000) consisted of 16 277 aligned prokaryotic small subunit (SSU) rRNA sequences while the number of eukaryotic and mitochondrial SSU rRNA sequences in aligned form remained at 2055 and 1503, respectively. The number of prokaryotic SSU rRNA sequences more than doubled from the previous release 14 months earlier, and approximately 75% are longer than 899 bp. An RDP-II mirror site in Japan is now available (http://wdcm.nig.ac.jp/RDP/html/index.h tml). RDP-II provides aligned and annotated rRNA sequences, derived phylogenetic trees and taxonomic hierarchies, and analysis services through its WWW server (http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/). Analysis services include rRNA probe checking, approximate phylogenetic placement of user sequences, screening user sequences for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment, production of similarity matrices and services to plan and analyze terminal restriction fragment polymorphism experiments. The RDP-II email address for questions and comments has been changed from curator@cme.msu.edu to rdpstaff@msu.edu.

  4. Predicting the Flexibility Profile of Ribosomal RNAs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feifei; Zhang, Chun; Fan, Xia; Yang, Xue; Wang, Xi; Liang, Huaping

    2010-10-11

    Flexibility in biomolecules is an important determinant of biological functionality, which can be measured quantitatively by atomic Debye-Waller factor or B-factor. Although numerous works have been addressed on theoretical and computational studies of the B-factor profiles of proteins, the methods used for predicting B-factor values of nucleic acids, especially the complicated ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), which are very functionally similar to proteins in providing matrix structures and in catalyzing biochemical reactions, still remain unexploited. In this article, we present a quantitative structure-flexibility relationship (QSFR) study with the aim at the quantitative prediction of rRNA B-factor based on primary sequences (sequence-based) and advanced structures (structure-based) by using both linear and nonlinear machine learning approaches, including partial least squares regression (PLS), least squares support vector machine (LSSVM), and Gaussian process (GP). By rigorously examining the performance and reliability of constructed statistical models and by comparing our models in detail to those developed previously for protein B-factors, we demonstrate that (i) rRNA B-factors could be predicted at a similar level of accuracy with that of protein, (ii) a structure-based approach performed much better as compared to sequence-based methods in modeling of rRNA B-factors, and (iii) rRNA flexibility is primarily governed by the local features of nonbonding potential landscapes, such as electrostatic and van der Waals forces.

  5. Emerging functions of ribosomal proteins in gene-specific transcription and translation

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstroem, Mikael S.

    2009-02-06

    Ribosomal proteins have remained highly conserved during evolution presumably reflecting often critical functions in ribosome biogenesis or mature ribosome function. In addition, several ribosomal proteins possess distinct extra-ribosomal functions in apoptosis, DNA repair and transcription. An increasing number of ribosomal proteins have been shown to modulate the trans-activation function of important regulatory proteins such as NF-{kappa}B, p53, c-Myc and nuclear receptors. Furthermore, a subset of ribosomal proteins can bind directly to untranslated regions of mRNA resulting in transcript-specific translational control outside of the ribosome itself. Collectively, these findings suggest that ribosomal proteins may have a wider functional repertoire within the cell than previously thought. The future challenge is to identify and validate these novel functions in the background of an often essential primary function in ribosome biogenesis and cell growth.

  6. Co-evolution of Bacterial Ribosomal Protein S15 with Diverse mRNA Regulatory Structures

    PubMed Central

    Slinger, Betty L.; Newman, Hunter; Lee, Younghan; Pei, Shermin; Meyer, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    RNA-protein interactions are critical in many biological processes, yet how such interactions affect the evolution of both partners is still unknown. RNA and protein structures are impacted very differently by mechanisms of genomic change. While most protein families are identifiable at the nucleotide level across large phylogenetic distances, RNA families display far less nucleotide similarity and are often only shared by closely related bacterial species. Ribosomal protein S15 has two RNA binding functions. First, it is a ribosomal protein responsible for organizing the rRNA during ribosome assembly. Second, in many bacterial species S15 also interacts with a structured portion of its own transcript to negatively regulate gene expression. While the first interaction is conserved in most bacteria, the second is not. Four distinct mRNA structures interact with S15 to enable regulation, each of which appears to be independently derived in different groups of bacteria. With the goal of understanding how protein-binding specificity may influence the evolution of such RNA regulatory structures, we examine whether examples of these mRNA structures are able to interact with, and regulate in response to, S15 homologs from organisms containing distinct mRNA structures. We find that despite their shared RNA binding function in the rRNA, S15 homologs have distinct RNA recognition profiles. We present a model to explain the specificity patterns observed, and support this model by with further mutagenesis. After analyzing the patterns of conservation for the S15 protein coding sequences, we also identified amino acid changes that alter the binding specificity of an S15 homolog. In this work we demonstrate that homologous RNA-binding proteins have different specificity profiles, and minor changes to amino acid sequences, or to RNA structural motifs, can have large impacts on RNA-protein recognition. PMID:26675164

  7. Genomic location of the major ribosomal protein gene locus determines Vibrio cholerae global growth and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Soler-Bistué, Alfonso; Mondotte, Juan A; Bland, Michael Jason; Val, Marie-Eve; Saleh, María-Carla; Mazel, Didier

    2015-04-01

    The effects on cell physiology of gene order within the bacterial chromosome are poorly understood. In silico approaches have shown that genes involved in transcription and translation processes, in particular ribosomal protein (RP) genes, localize near the replication origin (oriC) in fast-growing bacteria suggesting that such a positional bias is an evolutionarily conserved growth-optimization strategy. Such genomic localization could either provide a higher dosage of these genes during fast growth or facilitate the assembly of ribosomes and transcription foci by keeping physically close the many components of these macromolecular machines. To explore this, we used novel recombineering tools to create a set of Vibrio cholerae strains in which S10-spec-α (S10), a locus bearing half of the ribosomal protein genes, was systematically relocated to alternative genomic positions. We show that the relative distance of S10 to the origin of replication tightly correlated with a reduction of S10 dosage, mRNA abundance and growth rate within these otherwise isogenic strains. Furthermore, this was accompanied by a significant reduction in the host-invasion capacity in Drosophila melanogaster. Both phenotypes were rescued in strains bearing two S10 copies highly distal to oriC, demonstrating that replication-dependent gene dosage reduction is the main mechanism behind these alterations. Hence, S10 positioning connects genome structure to cell physiology in Vibrio cholerae. Our results show experimentally for the first time that genomic positioning of genes involved in the flux of genetic information conditions global growth control and hence bacterial physiology and potentially its evolution.

  8. Improvement and efficient display of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins on M13 phages and ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Sabino; Cantón, Emiliano; Zuñiga-Navarrete, Fernando; Pecorari, Frédéric; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) produces insecticidal proteins that have been used worldwide in the control of insect-pests in crops and vectors of human diseases. However, different insect species are poorly controlled by the available Bt toxins or have evolved resistance to these toxins. Evolution of Bt toxicity could provide novel toxins to control insect pests. To this aim, efficient display systems to select toxins with increased binding to insect membranes or midgut proteins involved in toxicity are likely to be helpful. Here we describe two display systems, phage display and ribosome display, that allow the efficient display of two non-structurally related Bt toxins, Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa. Improved display of Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa on M13 phages was achieved by changing the commonly used peptide leader sequence of the coat pIII-fusion protein, that relies on the Sec translocation pathway, for a peptide leader sequence that relies on the signal recognition particle pathway (SRP) and by using a modified M13 helper phage (Phaberge) that has an amber mutation in its pIII genomic sequence and preferentially assembles using the pIII-fusion protein. Also, both Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa were efficiently displayed on ribosomes, which could allow the construction of large libraries of variants. Furthermore, Cry1Ac or Cyt1Aa displayed on M13 phages or ribosomes were specifically selected from a mixture of both toxins depending on which antigen was immobilized for binding selection. These improved systems may allow the selection of Cry toxin variants with improved insecticidal activities that could counter insect resistances. PMID:26606918

  9. Furnace assembly

    DOEpatents

    Panayotou, N.F.; Green, D.R.; Price, L.S.

    A method of and apparatus for heating test specimens to desired elevated temperatures for irradiation by a high energy neutron source. A furnace assembly is provided for heating two separate groups of specimens to substantially different, elevated, isothermal temperatures in a high vacuum environment while positioning the two specimen groups symmetrically at equivalent neutron irradiating positions.

  10. Furnace assembly

    DOEpatents

    Panayotou, Nicholas F.; Green, Donald R.; Price, Larry S.

    1985-01-01

    A method of and apparatus for heating test specimens to desired elevated temperatures for irradiation by a high energy neutron source. A furnace assembly is provided for heating two separate groups of specimens to substantially different, elevated, isothermal temperatures in a high vacuum environment while positioning the two specimen groups symmetrically at equivalent neutron irradiating positions.

  11. Interaction Between Aminoglycoside Uptake and Ribosomal Resistance Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, M. H.; Rechenmacher, Angelika; Böck, August

    1980-01-01

    Mutants resistant to the 2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycosides hygromycin B and gentamicin were analyzed biochemically and genetically. In hygromycin B-resistant strains, ribosomal alterations were not detectable by electrophoretic or genetic experiments. Rather, as was demonstrated for one strain in detail, resistance to this drug seems to be the consequence of several mutations, each impairing drug accumulation, namely of a deletion of a gene close to the proC marker which potentiates the effect of a second mutation in the unc gene cluster. Three mutants resistant to gentamicin which were previously demonstrated to harbor an altered ribosomal protein, L6, were shown in addition to contain unc. Both the unc and the ribosomal mutation greatly impair the drug accumulation ability of the mutants. Further evidence for the direct effect of ribosomal mutations on the uptake of aminoglycosides was obtained with strains that possess ribosomes with increased affinity for dihydrostreptomycin. Dihydrostreptomycin transport by these cells is greatly stimulated; thus, the hypersensitivity of these mutants is caused by increased binding affinity for dihydrostreptomycin and its secondary effect on the uptake process. Experiments were also performed on the biochemical basis of the third phase of aminoglycoside transport (acceleration phase). The condition for its onset is that ribosomes are active in protein synthesis irrespective of whether the proteins synthesized are functional. This, and the failure to observe the synthesis of new proteins upon the addition of aminoglycosides, do not support the view of autoinduction of a cognate or related transport system. Images PMID:7004349

  12. Allosteric control of the ribosome by small-molecule antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leyi; Pulk, Arto; Wasserman, Michael R; Feldman, Michael B; Altman, Roger B; Cate, Jamie H. Doudna; Blanchard, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    Protein synthesis is targeted by numerous, chemically distinct antibiotics that bind and inhibit key functional centers of the ribosome. Using single-molecule imaging and X-ray crystallography, we show that the aminoglycoside neomycin blocks aminoacyl–transfer RNA (aa-tRNA) selection and translocation as well as ribosome recycling by binding to helix 69 (H69) of 23S ribosomal RNA within the large subunit of the Escherichia coli ribosome. There, neomycin prevents the remodeling of intersubunit bridges that normally accompanies the process of subunit rotation to stabilize a partially rotated ribosome configuration in which peptidyl (P)-site tRNA is constrained in a previously unidentified hybrid position. Direct measurements show that this neomycin-stabilized intermediate is incompatible with the translation factor binding that is required for distinct protein synthesis reactions. These findings reveal the functional importance of reversible intersubunit rotation to the translation mechanism and shed new light on the allosteric control of ribosome functions by small-molecule antibiotics. PMID:22902368

  13. Purification, characterization and crystallization of the human 80S ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Khatter, Heena; Myasnikov, Alexander G.; Mastio, Leslie; Billas, Isabelle M. L.; Birck, Catherine; Stella, Stefano; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomes are key macromolecular protein synthesis machineries in the cell. Human ribosomes have so far not been studied to atomic resolution because of their particularly complex structure as compared with other eukaryotic or prokaryotic ribosomes, and they are difficult to prepare to high homogeneity, which is a key requisite for high-resolution structural work. We established a purification protocol for human 80S ribosomes isolated from HeLa cells that allows obtaining large quantities of homogenous samples as characterized by biophysical methods using analytical ultracentrifugation and multiangle laser light scattering. Samples prepared under different conditions were characterized by direct single particle imaging using cryo electron microscopy, which helped optimizing the preparation protocol. From a small data set, a 3D reconstruction at subnanometric resolution was obtained showing all prominent structural features of the human ribosome, and revealing a salt concentration dependence of the presence of the exit site tRNA, which we show is critical for obtaining crystals. With these well-characterized samples first human 80S ribosome crystals were obtained from several crystallization conditions in capillaries and sitting drops, which diffract to 26 Å resolution at cryo temperatures and for which the crystallographic parameters were determined, paving the way for future high-resolution work. PMID:24452798

  14. Heterogeneity in men's marijuana use in the 20s: adolescent antecedents and consequences in the 30s.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Isaac J; Capaldi, Deborah M

    2015-02-01

    Adolescent psychopathology is commonly connected to marijuana use. How changes in these adolescent antecedents and in adolescent marijuana use are connected to patterns of marijuana use in the 20s is little understood. Another issue not clearly understood is psychopathology in the 30s as predicted by marijuana use in the 20s. This study sought to examine these two issues and the associations with marijuana disorder diagnoses using a longitudinal data set of 205 men with essentially annual reports. Individual psychopathology and family characteristics from the men's adolescence were used to predict their patterns of marijuana use across their 20s, and aspects of the men's psychopathology in their mid-30s were predicted from these patterns. Three patterns of marijuana use in the 20s were identified using growth mixture modeling and were associated with diagnoses of marijuana disorders at age 26 years. Parental marijuana use predicted chronic use for the men in adulthood. Patterns of marijuana use in the 20s predicted antisocial behavior and deviant peer association at age 36 years (controlling for adolescent levels of the outcomes by residualization). These findings indicate that differential patterns of marijuana use in early adulthood are associated with psychopathology toward midlife.

  15. 70S-scanning initiation is a novel and frequent initiation mode of ribosomal translation in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Wittek, Daniela; Gupta, Romi; Qin, Bo; Ueda, Takuya; Krause, Roland; Yamamoto, Kaori; Albrecht, Renate; Pech, Markus; Nierhaus, Knud H.

    2016-01-01

    According to the standard model of bacterial translation initiation, the small ribosomal 30S subunit binds to the initiation site of an mRNA with the help of three initiation factors (IF1–IF3). Here, we describe a novel type of initiation termed “70S-scanning initiation,” where the 70S ribosome does not necessarily dissociate after translation of a cistron, but rather scans to the initiation site of the downstream cistron. We detailed the mechanism of 70S-scanning initiation by designing unique monocistronic and polycistronic mRNAs harboring translation reporters, and by reconstituting systems to characterize each distinct mode of initiation. Results show that 70S scanning is triggered by fMet-tRNA and does not require energy; the Shine–Dalgarno sequence is an essential recognition element of the initiation site. IF1 and IF3 requirements for the various initiation modes were assessed by the formation of productive initiation complexes leading to synthesis of active proteins. IF3 is essential and IF1 is highly stimulating for the 70S-scanning mode. The task of IF1 appears to be the prevention of untimely interference by ternary aminoacyl (aa)-tRNA•elongation factor thermo unstable (EF-Tu)•GTP complexes. Evidence indicates that at least 50% of bacterial initiation events use the 70S-scanning mode, underscoring the relative importance of this translation initiation mechanism. PMID:26888283

  16. Affinity labelling of Escherichia coli ribosomes with a benzylidene derivative of AUGU6 within initiation and pretranslocational complexes.

    PubMed

    Babkina, G T; Veniaminova, A G; Vladimirov, S N; Karpova, G G; Yamkovoy, V I; Berzin, V A; Gren, E J; Cielens, I E

    1986-07-01

    Affinity labelling of E. coli ribosomes with the 2',3'-O-[4-(N-2-chloroethyl)-N-methylamino]benzylidene derivative of AUGU6 was studied within the initiation complex (complex I) obtained by using fMet-tRNAMetf and initiation factors and within the pretranslocational complex (complex II) obtained by treatment of complex I with the ternary complex Phe-tRNAPhe.GTP.EF-Tu. Both proteins and rRNA of 30 S as well as 50 S subunits were found to be labelled. Sets of proteins labelled within complexes I and II differ considerably. Within complex II, proteins S13 and L10 were labelled preferentially. On the other hand, within complex I, multiple modification is observed (proteins S4, S12, S13, S14, S15, S18, S19, S20/L26 were found to be alkylated) despite the single fixation of a template in the ribosome by interaction of the AUG codon with fMet-tRNAMetf.

  17. A mutation in ribosomal protein L9 affects ribosomal hopping during translation of gene 60 from bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, K L; Nichols, L M; Gesteland, R F; Weiss, R B

    1994-01-01

    Ribosomes hop over a 50-nt coding gap during translation of gene 60 mRNA from bacteriophage T4. This event occurs with near-unitary efficiency when gene 60-lacZ fusions are expressed in Escherichia coli. One of the components necessary for this hop is an RNA hairpin structure containing the 5' junction of the 50-nt coding gap. A mutant E. coli was isolated and found to significantly increase hopping when carrying gene 60-lacZ constructs with altered hairpins. The mutation, hop-1, changed Ser93 to Phe in rplI, the gene coding for ribosomal large-subunit protein L9. Ribosomal hopping on a synthetic sequence in the absence of a hairpin was also increased by this mutation. These data suggest that hop-1 may substitute for the function of the hairpin during ribosomal hopping. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7809071

  18. Increased ribosome density associated to positively charged residues is evident in ribosome profiling experiments performed in the absence of translation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Requião, Rodrigo D; de Souza, Henrique José Araujo; Rossetto, Silvana; Domitrovic, Tatiana; Palhano, Fernando L

    2016-06-01

    It has been proposed that polybasic peptides cause slower movement of ribosomes through an electrostatic interaction with the highly negative ribosome exit tunnel. Ribosome profiling data-the sequencing of short ribosome-bound fragments of mRNA-is a powerful tool for the analysis of mRNA translation. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model, we showed that reduced translation efficiency associated with polybasic protein sequences could be inferred from ribosome profiling. However, an increase in ribosome density at polybasic sequences was evident only when the commonly used translational inhibitors cycloheximide and anisomycin were omitted during mRNA isolation. Since ribosome profiling performed without inhibitors agrees with experimental evidence obtained by other methods, we conclude that cycloheximide and anisomycin must be avoided in ribosome profiling experiments.

  19. Connecting the kinetics and energy landscape of tRNA translocation on the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Whitford, Paul C; Blanchard, Scott C; Cate, Jamie H D; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2013-01-01

    Functional rearrangements in biomolecular assemblies result from diffusion across an underlying energy landscape. While bulk kinetic measurements rely on discrete state-like approximations to the energy landscape, single-molecule methods can project the free energy onto specific coordinates. With measures of the diffusion, one may establish a quantitative bridge between state-like kinetic measurements and the continuous energy landscape. We used an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of the 70S ribosome (2.1 million atoms; 1.3 microseconds) to provide this bridge for specific conformational events associated with the process of tRNA translocation. Starting from a pre-translocation configuration, we identified sets of residues that collectively undergo rotary rearrangements implicated in ribosome function. Estimates of the diffusion coefficients along these collective coordinates for translocation were then used to interconvert between experimental rates and measures of the energy landscape. This analysis, in conjunction with previously reported experimental rates of translocation, provides an upper-bound estimate of the free-energy barriers associated with translocation. While this analysis was performed for a particular kinetic scheme of translocation, the quantitative framework is general and may be applied to energetic and kinetic descriptions that include any number of intermediates and transition states.

  20. Recognition of Ribosomal Protein L11 by the Protein Trimethyltransferase PrmA

    SciTech Connect

    Demirci,H.; Gregory, S.; Dahlberg, A.; Jogl, G.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial ribosomal protein L11 is post-translationally trimethylated at multiple residues by a single methyltransferase, PrmA. Here, we describe four structures of PrmA from the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus. Two apo-PrmA structures at 1.59 and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution and a third with bound cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine at 1.75 {angstrom} each exhibit distinct relative positions of the substrate recognition and catalytic domains, revealing how PrmA can position the L11 substrate for multiple, consecutive side-chain methylation reactions. The fourth structure, the PrmA-L11 enzyme-substrate complex at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution, illustrates the highly specific interaction of the N-terminal domain with its substrate and places Lys39 in the PrmA active site. The presence of a unique flexible loop in the cofactor-binding site suggests how exchange of AdoMet with the reaction product S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine can occur without necessitating the dissociation of PrmA from L11. Finally, the mode of interaction of PrmA with L11 explains its observed preference for L11 as substrate before its assembly into the 50S ribosomal subunit.