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Sample records for 31p nucleus polnaya

  1. A compilation of information on the {sup 31}P(p,{alpha}){sup 28}Si reaction and properties of excited levels in the compound nucleus {sup 32}S

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.E.; Smith, D.L.

    1997-11-01

    This report documents a survey of the literature, and provides a compilation of data contained therein, for the {sup 31}P(p,{alpha}){sup 28}Si reaction. Attention is paid here to resonance states in the compound-nuclear system {sup 32}S formed by {sup 31}P + p, with emphasis on the alpha-particle decay channels, {sup 28}Si + {alpha} which populate specific levels in {sup 28}Si. The energy region near the proton separation energy for {sup 32}S is especially important in this context for applications in nuclear astrophysics. Properties of the excited states in {sup 28}Si are also considered. Summaries of all the located references are provided and numerical data contained in them are compiled in EXFOR format where applicable.

  2. Probing phosphorylation by non-mammalian isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes using (1)H-(31)P-(31)P correlation NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Ananya; Shah, Meha H; Bitok, J Kipchirchir; Hassis-LeBeau, Maria E; Freel Meyers, Caren L

    2009-09-01

    The biogenesis of isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP) is accomplished by the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway in plants, bacteria and parasites, making it a potential target for the development of anti-infective agents and herbicides. The biosynthetic enzymes comprising this pathway catalyze intriguing chemical transformations on diphosphate scaffolds, offering an opportunity to generate novel analogs in this synthetically challenging compound class. Such a biosynthetic approach to generating new diphosphate analogs may involve transformation through discrete diphosphate species, presenting unique challenges in structure determination and characterization of unnatural enzyme-generated diphosphate products produced in tandem. We have developed (1)H-(31)P-(31)P correlation NMR spectroscopy techniques for the direct characterization of crude MEP pathway enzyme products at low concentrations (200 microM to 5 mM) on a room temperature (non-cryogenic) NMR probe. Coupling the 100% natural abundance of the (31)P nucleus with the high intrinsic sensitivity of proton NMR, (1)H-(31)P-(31)P correlation spectroscopy is particularly useful for characterization of unnatural diphosphate enzyme products in the MEP pathway. As proof of principle, we demonstrate the rapid characterization of natural enzyme products of the enzymes IspD, E and F in tandem enzyme incubations. In addition, we have characterized several unnatural enzyme products using this technique, including new products of cytidyltransferase IspD bearing erythritol, glycerol and ribose components. The results of this study indicate that IspD may be a useful biocatalyst and highlight (1)H-(31)P-(31)P correlation spectroscopy as a valuable tool for the characterization of other unnatural products in non-mammalian isoprenoid biosynthesis.

  3. Improving the Hyperpolarization of 31P Nuclei by Synthetic Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Traditional 31P NMR or MRI measurements suffer from low sensitivity relative to 1H detection and consequently require longer scan times. We show here that hyperpolarization of 31P nuclei through reversible interactions with parahydrogen can deliver substantial signal enhancements in a range of regioisomeric phosphonate esters containing a heteroaromatic motif which were synthesized in order to identify the optimum molecular scaffold for polarization transfer. A 3588-fold 31P signal enhancement (2.34% polarization) was returned for a partially deuterated pyridyl substituted phosphonate ester. This hyperpolarization level is sufficient to allow single scan 31P MR images of a phantom to be recorded at a 9.4 T observation field in seconds that have signal-to-noise ratios of up to 94.4 when the analyte concentration is 10 mM. In contrast, a 12 h 2048 scan measurement under standard conditions yields a signal-to-noise ratio of just 11.4. 31P-hyperpolarized images are also reported from a 7 T preclinical scanner. PMID:25811635

  4. 31P NMR spectroscopy of in vivo tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, T. C.; Evanochko, W. T.; Hiramoto, R. N.; Ghanta, V. K.; Lilly, M. B.; Lawson, A. J.; Corbett, T. H.; Durant, J. R.; Glickson, J. D.

    A probe, suitable for any wide-bore NMR spectrometer, was constructed for monitoring high-resolution spectra of in vivo subcutaneously implanted tumors in mice. Preliminary studies of a variety of murine tumors (MOPC 104E myeloma, Dunn osteosarcoma, colon-26, ovarian M5, and mammary adenocarcinoma as well as human colon, mammary, and lung tumors in athymic mice) indicate that the 31P NMR spectrum is a sensitive monitor of progressive metabolic changes that occur during untreated tumor growth and an early indicator of tumor response to chemotherapy, hyperthermia, and X radiation. Response to each of these therapeutic modalities is accompanied by distinctly different spectral changes.

  5. Evaluation of a New 1H/31P Dual-Tuned Birdcage Coil for 31P Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Potter, WM; Wang, L; McCully, KK; Zhao, Q

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new dual-tuned Hydrogen/Phosphorus (1H/31P) birdcage coil, referred to as split birdcage coil, and evaluate its performance using both simulations and magnetic resonance (MR) experiments on a 3 T MR scanner. The proposed coil simplifies the practical matters of tuning and matching, which makes the coil easily reproducible. Simulations were run with the Finite Difference in Time Domain (FDTD) method to evaluate the sensitivity and homogeneity of the magnetic field generated by the proposed 1H coils. Following simulations, MR experiments were conducted using both a phantom and human thigh to compare the proposed design with a currently available commercial dual-tuned flexible surface coil, referred to as flex surface coil, for signal to noise ratio (SNR) as well as homogeneity for the 31P coil. At regions deep within the human thigh, the split birdcage coil was able to acquire spectroscopic signal with a higher average SNR than the flex surface coil. For all regions except those close to the flex surface coil, the split birdcage coil matched or exceeded the performance of the flex surface coil. PMID:24039555

  6. Differential cross sections measurement of 31P(p,pγ1)31P reaction for PIGE applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokar, A.; Kakuee, O.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.

    2016-09-01

    Differential cross sections of proton induced gamma-ray emission from the 31P(p,pγ1)31P (Eγ = 1266 keV) nuclear reaction were measured in the proton energy range of 1886-3007 keV at the laboratory angle of 90°. For these measurements a thin Zn3P2 target evaporated onto a self-supporting C film was used. The gamma-rays and backscattered protons were detected simultaneously. An HPGe detector placed at an angle of 90° with respect to the beam direction was employed to collect gamma-rays while an ion implanted Si detector placed at a scattering angle of 165° was used to detect backscattered protons. Simultaneous collection of gamma-rays and RBS spectra is a great advantage of this approach which makes differential cross-section measurements independent on the collected beam charge. The obtained cross-sections were compared with the previously only measured data in the literature. The validity of the measured differential cross sections was verified through a thick target benchmarking experiment. The overall systematic uncertainty of cross section values was estimated to be better than ±9%.

  7. Versatile 1H-31P-31P COSY 2D NMR Techniques for the Characterization of Polyphosphorylated Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Ananya; Sun, Yan; Shah, Meha; Freel Meyers, Caren L.

    2010-01-01

    Di- and triphosphorylated small molecules represent key intermediates in a wide range of biological and chemical processes. The importance of polyphosphorylated species in biology and medicine underscores the need to develop methods for the detection and characterization of this compound class. We have reported two-dimensional HPP-COSY spectroscopy techniques to identify diphosphate-containing metabolic intermediates at sub-millimolar concentrations in the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway.1 In this work, we explore the scope of HPP-COSY based techniques to characterize a diverse group of small organic molecules bearing di- and tri-phosphorylated moieties. These include molecules containing P–O–P and P–C–P connectivities, multivalent P(III)–O–P(V) phosphorus nuclei with widely separated chemical shifts, as well as virtually overlapping 31P resonances exhibiting strong coupling effects. We also demonstrate the utility of these experiments to rapidly distinguish between mono- and diphosphates. A detailed protocol for optimizing these experiments to achieve best performance is presented. PMID:20408590

  8. Tendencies of 31P chemical shifts changes in NMR spectra of nucleotide derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Lebedev, A V; Rezvukhin, A I

    1984-01-01

    31P NMR chemical shifts of the selected mono- and oligonucleotide derivatives, including the compounds with P-N, P-C, P-S bonds and phosphite nucleotide analogues have been presented. The influence of substituents upon 31P chemical shifts has been discussed. The concrete examples of 31P chemical shifts data application in the field of nucleotide chemistry have been considered. PMID:6087290

  9. Formation of Po isotopes in the reactions {sup 27}Al + {sup 175}Lu and {sup 31}P + {sup 169}Tm

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, A.N.; Bogdanov, D.D.; Eremin, A.V.

    1995-05-01

    The excitation functions and the cross sections for the formation of {sup 192-198}Po isotopes in the reactions {sup 27}Al + {sup 175}Lu and {sup 31}P + {sup 169}Tm are measured. A comparison of the results obtained for these reactions with the data on the cross sections for the formation of Po isotopes in the reaction {sup 100}Mo + {sup 92-100}Mo leads to the conclusion that the characteristics of the evaporation channel do not depend on the mass of the bombarding ion up to the complete symmetry in the input channel. It is shown that the experimental data can be adequately described using the statistical approach to the deexcitation of a compound nucleus only under the assumption that the liquid-drop fission barrier is reduced significantly for neutron-deficient Po isotopes. 21 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Solid state {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al and {sup 31}P/{sup 23}Na MAS NMR dipolar dephasing investigations of connectivity in sodium aluminophosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    LANG,DAVID P.; ALAM,TODD M.; BENCOE,DENISE N.

    2000-05-01

    Solid state {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al and {sup 31}P/{sup 23}Na MAS NMR dipolar dephasing experiments have been used to investigate the spatial distribution of aluminum and sodium cations with respect to the phosphate backbone for a series of sodium aluminophosphate glasses, xAl{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}50Na{sub 2}O{center_dot}(50{minus}x)P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (0{le} x {le} 17.5). From the {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al and {sup 31}P/{sup 23}Na connectivity data gathered, information about the medium range order in these glasses is obtained. The expanded connectivity data allows for better identification and interpretation of the new resonances observed in the {sup 31}P MAS NMR spectra with the addition of alumina. The results of the dipolar dephasing experiments show that the sodium-phosphate distribution remains relatively unchanged for the glass series, and that the addition of aluminum occurs primarily through the depolymerization of the phosphate tetrahedral backbone.

  11. The effects of intramolecular and intermolecular coordination on (31)P nuclear shielding: phosphorylated azoles.

    PubMed

    Chernyshev, Kirill A; Larina, Ludmila I; Chirkina, Elena A; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2012-02-01

    The effects of intramolecular and intermolecular coordination on (31)P nuclear shielding have been investigated in the series of tetracoordinated, pentacoordinated and hexacoordinated N-vinylpyrazoles and intermolecular complexes of N-vinylimidazole and 1-allyl-3,5-dimethylpyrazole with phosphorous pentachloride both experimentally and theoretically. It was shown that either intramolecular or intermolecular coordination involving phosphorous results in a dramatic (31)P nuclear shielding amounting to approximately 150 ppm on changing the phosphorous coordination number by one. A major importance of solvent effects on (31)P nuclear shielding of intramolecular and intermolecular complexes involving N → P coordination bond has been demonstrated. It was found that the zeroth-order regular approximation-gauge-including atomic orbital-B1PW91/DZP method was sufficiently accurate for the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts, provided relativistic corrections are taken into account, the latter being of crucial importance in the description of (31)P nuclear shielding.

  12. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study of the proton-irradiated KTiOPO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se-Hun; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2013-08-01

    31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was employed to study the effects of proton irradiation on KTiOPO4 (KTP) in view of the previously studied paramagnetic impurity doping effects. High-resolution 31P NMR measurements showed significant increase in the isotropic chemical shifts of the two inequivalent phosphorus sites in the proton-irradiated KTP system, indicating decrease in the electron density around the phosphorous nuclei. The 31P NMR linewidths of the KTP system manifested anomalies associated with the superionic transition and with the polaron formation, which became much weaker after proton irradiation. Besides, the activation energy of the charge carriers increased significantly after proton irradiation.

  13. Bone Mineral 31P and Matrix-Bound Water Densities Measured by Solid-State 1H and 31P MRI

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Alan C.; Li, Cheng; Rajapakse, Chamith S.; Bashoor- Zadeh, Mahdieh; Bhagat, Yusuf A.; Wright, Alexander C.; Zemel, Babette S.; Zavaliangos, Antonios; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2014-01-01

    Bone is a composite material consisting of mineral and hydrated collagen fractions. MRI of bone is challenging due to extremely short transverse relaxation times, but solid-state imaging sequences exist that can acquire the short-lived signal from bone tissue. Previous work to quantify bone density via MRI used powerful experimental scanners. This work seeks to establish the feasibility of MRI-based measurement on clinical scanners of bone mineral and collagen-bound water densities, the latter as a surrogate of matrix density, and to examine the associations of these parameters with porosity and donors’ age. Mineral and matrix-bound water images of reference phantoms and cortical bone from 16 human donors, ages 27-97 years, were acquired by zero-echo-time 31P and 1H MRI on whole body 7T and 3T scanners, respectively. Images were corrected for relaxation and RF inhomogeneity to obtain density maps. Cortical porosity was measured by micro-CT, and apparent mineral density by pQCT. MRI-derived densities were compared to x-ray-based measurements by least-squares regression. Mean bone mineral 31P density was 6.74±1.22 mol/L (corresponding to 1129±204 mg/cc mineral), and mean bound water 1H density was 31.3±4.2 mol/L (corresponding to 28.3±3.7 %v/v). Both 31P and bound water (BW) densities were correlated negatively with porosity (31P: R2 = 0.32, p < 0.005; BW: R2 = 0.63, p < 0.0005) and age (31P: R2 = 0.39, p < 0.05; BW: R2 = 0.70, p < 0.0001), and positively with pQCT density (31P: R2 = 0.46, p < 0.05; BW: R2 = 0.50, p < 0.005). In contrast, the bone mineralization ratio (expressed here as the ratio of 31P density to bound water density), which is proportional to true bone mineralization, was found to be uncorrelated with porosity, age, or pQCT density. This work establishes the feasibility of image-based quantification of bone mineral and bound water densities using clinical hardware. PMID:24846186

  14. Quantitation of Localized 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectra Based on the Reciprocity Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreis, R.; Slotboom, J.; Pietz, J.; Jung, B.; Boesch, C.

    2001-04-01

    There is a need for absolute quantitation methods in 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, because none of the phosphorous-containing metabolites is necessarily constant in pathology. Here, a method for absolute quantitation of in vivo31P MR spectra that provides reproducible metabolite contents in institutional or standard units is described. It relies on the reciprocity principle, i.e., the proportionality between the B1 field map and the map of reception strength for a coil with identical relative current distributions in receive and transmit mode. Cerebral tissue contents of 31P metabolites were determined in a predominantly white matter-containing location in healthy subjects. The results are in good agreement with the literature and the interexamination coefficient of variance is better than that in most previous studies. A gender difference found for some of the 31P metabolites may be explained by different voxel composition.

  15. Study of hereditary fructose intolerance by use of 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Oberhaensli, R D; Rajagopalan, B; Taylor, D J; Radda, G K; Collins, J E; Leonard, J V; Schwarz, H; Herschkowitz, N

    1987-10-24

    The effect of fructose on liver metabolism in patients with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) and in heterozygotes for HFI was studied by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). In patients with HFI (n = 5) ingestion of small amounts of fructose was followed by an increase in sugar phosphates and decrease in inorganic phosphate (Pi) in the liver that could be detected by 31P-MRS. 31P-MRS could be used to diagnose fructose intolerance and to monitor the patients' compliance with a fructose-restricted diet. In heterozygotes (n = 8) 50 g fructose given orally led to accumulation of sugar phosphates and depletion of Pi in the liver. Fructose also induced a larger increase in plasma urate in heterozygotes than in control subjects. The effect of fructose on liver Pi and plasma urate was most pronounced in heterozygotes with gout (n = 3). Heterozygosity for HFI may predispose to hyperuricaemia.

  16. Advancement of 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Using GRAPPA Reconstruction on a 3D Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clevenger, Tony

    The overall objective of this research is to improve currently available metabolic imaging techniques for clinical use in monitoring and predicting treatment response to radiation therapy in liver cancer. Liver metabolism correlates with inflammatory and neoplastic liver diseases, which alter the intracellular concentration of phosphorus- 31 (31P) metabolites [1]. It is assumed that such metabolic changes occur prior to physical changes of the tissue. Therefore, information on regional changes of 31P metabolites in the liver, obtained by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) [1,2], can help in diagnosis and follow-up of various liver diseases. Specifically, there appears to be an immediate need of this technology for both the assessment of tumor response in patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) [3--5], as well as assessment of radiation toxicity, which can result in worsening liver dysfunction [6]. Pilot data from our lab has shown that 31P MRSI has the potential to identify treatment response five months sooner than conventional methods [7], and to assess the biological response of liver tissue to radiation 24 hours post radiation therapy [8]. While this data is very promising, commonly occurring drawbacks for 31P MRSI are patient discomfort due to long scan times and prone positioning within the scanner, as well as reduced data quality due to patient motion and respiration. To further advance the full potential of 31P MRSI as a clinical diagnostic tool in the management of liver cancer, this PhD research project had the following aims: I) Reduce the long acquisition time of 3D 31P MRS by formulating and imple- menting an appropriate GRAPPA undersampling scheme and reconstruction on a clinical MRI scanner II) Testing and quantitative validation of GRAPPA reconstruction on 3D 31P MRSI on developmental phantoms and healthy volunteers At completion, this work should considerably advance 31P MRSI

  17. TLC and 31P-NMR analysis of low polarity phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Vyssotski, Mikhail; MacKenzie, Andrew; Scott, Dawn

    2009-04-01

    High-performance TLC and (31)P-NMR were assessed as methods of observing the presence of numerous low polarity phospholipids: bis-phosphatidic acid (BPA), semi-lyso bis-phosphatidic acid (SLBPA), N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE), N-(1,1-dimethyl-3-oxo-butyl)-phosphatidylethanolamine (diacetone adduct of PE, DOBPE), N-acetyl PE, phosphatidylmethanol (PM), phosphatidylethanol (PEt), phosphatidyl-n-propanol (PP), phosphatidyl-n-butanol (PB). Both techniques are non-discriminative and do not require the prior isolation of individual lipids. It appears that 2D TLC is superior to (31)P NMR in the analysis of low polarity phospholipids. All phosphatidylalcohols were well separated by 2D TLC. However, some compounds which can present difficulty in separation by 2D-TLC (e.g., SLBPA and NAPE; or DOBPE and N-acetyl PE) were easily distinguished using (31)P NMR so the methods are complimentary. A disadvantage of 2D TLC is that Rf values can vary with different brands and batches of TLC plates. The chemical shifts of (31)P NMR were less variable, and so a library of standards may not be necessary for peak identification. Another advantage of (31)P NMR is the ease of quantification of phospholipids. The applicability of the methods was tested on natural extracts of fish brain and cabbage stem.

  18. sup 31 P NMR analysis of coal moieties bearing -OH, -NH, and -SH functions

    SciTech Connect

    Verkade, J.G.

    1991-08-31

    NMR reagents for the speciation and quantitation of labile-hydrogen functional groups and sulfur groups in coal ligands have been synthesized and evaluated. These reagents, which contain the NMR-active nuclei {sup 31}p, {sup 119}Sn or {sup 195}pt, were designed to possess improved chemical shift resolution over reagents reported in the literature. Our efforts were successful in the case of the new {sup 31}p and {sup 119}Sn reagents we developed, but the {sup 195}pt work on sulfur groups was only partially successful in as much as the grant came to a close and was not renewed. Our success with {sup 31}P and {sup 119}Sn NMR reagents came to the attention of Amoco and they have recently expressed interest in further supporting that work. A further measure of the success of our efforts can be seen in the nine publications supported by this grant which are cited in the reference list.

  19. Nuclear spin coherence of neutral 31P donors in isotopically enriched 28Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, E. S.; Tyryshkin, A. M.; Lyon, S. A.; Tojo, S.; Itoh, K. M.; Thewalt, M. L. W.; Riemann, H.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Becker, P.; Pohl, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    In natural silicon the nuclear spin coherence of neutral 31P donors is limited to about 1 second by flip-flopping 29Si nuclear spins. Here we eliminate this process by using isotopically enriched 28Si with 50 ppm of 29Si. This allows us to examine other processes which may decohere the 31P nuclear spins. We use X-band pulsed ENDOR at 1.7 K to examine isotopically enriched Si crystals with donor concentrations from 1014 to 4x1015 P/cm3 and find a dependence of 31P nuclear spin coherence time on donor concentration. The measured nuclear spin echo decays are fit by a stretched exponential function, exp(-(t/T2)n) , with n ranging from 0.7 to 1. This differs from n of about 2 commonly seen for spectral diffusion due to indirect spin flip-flops. The measured T2 times decrease significantly when the donor concentration increases, changing from 8 s at 1014 to 0.2 s at 4x1015 P/cm3. From the observed donor concentration dependence at higher densities, we conclude that direct electron spin flip-flops are responsible for 31P donor nuclear spin decoherence. This work was supported in part by NSF through the Materials World Network program (DMR-1107606) and the Princeton MRSEC (DMR-0819860), and in part by the U.S. Army Research Office (W911NF-13-1-0179).

  20. /sup 31/P-NMR differentiation between intracellular phosphate pools in Cosmarium (chlorophyta)

    SciTech Connect

    Elgavish, A.; Elgavish, G.A.

    1980-09-01

    /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of intact Cosmarium sp. cells is presented as a suitable tool for the differentiation of intracellular accumulation pools of polyphosphates. The cold trichloroacetic acid (TCA) insoluble fraction is shown to contain most of the total cellular phosphate in the phosphate rich Cosmarium cells. Moreover, evidence from a /sup 31/P-NMR study and electron microscopic observations of cold TCA treated Cosmarium cells indicate that this fraction consists mostly of polyphosphates which seem to retain the native morphological structure observed in the untreated cells. The determination of orthophosphate in the hot water extract of Cosmarium cells did not measure the polyphosphate pools. Determination of total phosphorus content in the hot water extract rendered a value three times higher than the frequently used orthophosphate determination procedure. However, as revealed by the /sup 31/P-NMR spectra and the chemical analyses of the extract and of the treated cells, even total phosphorus in the extract measured only 30% of the total cellular phosphorus. /sup 31/P-NMR enabled the unequivocal chemical identification of the major phosphate compounds in the hot water extract (Surplus P) as orthophosphate and polyphosphates of about 10 phosphate units chainlength. More than 70% of the accumulation pool of polyphosphates was still in the cells after extraction. However, the electron microscopy study revealed that the native granular structure of polyphosphates had been destroyed by the hot water extraction procedure.

  1. 31P to 77Se cross polarization in beta-P4Se3.

    PubMed

    Pietrass, T; Seydoux, R; Roth, R E; Eckert, H; Pines, A

    1997-08-01

    Cross polarization from 31P to 77Se is demonstrated in beta-P4Se3. This material, an inorganic glass, is readily synthesized from the elements and serves as a convenient sample for setting the Hartmann-Hahn condition.

  2. Comparison of phosphorus forms in three extracts of dairy feces by solution 31P NMR analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using solution 31P NMR spectroscopy, we compared three extractants, deionized water, sodium acetate buffer (pH 5.0) with fresh sodium dithionite (NaAc-SD), and 0.25 M NaOH-0.05 M EDTA (NaOH-EDTA), for the profile of P compounds in two dairy fecal samples. Phosphorus extracted was 35% for water, and...

  3. [Optimizing the method for 31P-NMR analysis of organic phosphorus from wetland sediments].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin; Wang, Hai-Wen; Hao, Hong; Gao, Bo; Jia, Jian-Li

    2013-11-01

    Solution 31P-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is an analysis technology which has been an effective means for the analysis of environmental organic phosphorus. However, the method is rarely applied in the study of wetlands so that the corresponding researches about wetland sediment sample preparation method also very deficient. The present study was aimed to find the most suitable sample preparation method for 31P-NMR analysis of the artificial wetland sediments, using different extractant (NaOH or 0.25 mol x L(-1) NaOH + 0.05 mol x L(-1) EDTA as main extractant, and 1M HCl as pre-extractant or not), sample to extractant ratio (1 : 8 or 1 : 10), centrifugation conditions and scans time and so on. The results showed that the best 31P-NMR spectrum could be obtained with freeze-ried, ground and sieved sediments, 1M HCl as pre-extractant for 16 h, NaOH + 0.05 mol x L(-1) EDTA as main extractant for 16 h, extraction ratio of 1 : 8, and low temperature and high-speed centrifugation (4 degrees C, 10 000 r x min(-1) for 30 min) for avoiding hydrolysis of certain components. Besides, choosing much longer NMR scan time, as 14-16 h (scans about 25 000 times), could get more complete spectral signals spectrum. And finally, four kinds of P-compounds (orthophosphate, orthophosphate monoesters, orthophosphate diesters and pyrophosphate) were detected in the NMR spectrum. But neither polyphosphate nor phosphonates was not found in all these experiments, which need further study. Compared with the traditional chemical analysis method, 31P-NMR method of sample preparation is relatively simple. Then it is less destructive with components distinguished completely. Using 31P-NMR technology, the cognition of wetland phosphorus cycle, especially organophosphate, will be expected to get new breakthrough.

  4. CD and 31P NMR studies of tachykinin and MSH neuropeptides in SDS and DPC micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Sydney C.; Brown, Taylor C.; Gonzalez, Javier D.; Levonyak, Nicholas S.; Rush, Lydia A.; Cremeens, Matthew E.

    2016-02-01

    Secondary structural characteristics of substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NKA), neurokinin B (NKB), α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide (α-MSH), γ1-MSH, γ2-MSH, and melittin were evaluated with circular dichroism in phosphite buffer, DPC micelles, and SDS micelles. CD spectral properties of γ1-MSH and γ2-MSH as well as 31P NMR of DPC micelles with all the peptides are reported for the first time. Although, a trend in the neuropeptide/micelle CD data appears to show increased α-helix content for the tachykinin peptides (SP, NKA, NKB) and increased β-sheet content for the MSH peptides (α-MSH, γ1-MSH, γ2-MSH) with increasing peptide charge, the lack of perturbed 31P NMR signals for all neuropeptides could suggest that the reported antimicrobial activity of SP and α-MSH might not be related to a membrane disruption mode of action.

  5. Excitation functions for actinides produced in the interactions of sup 31 P with sup 248 Cm

    SciTech Connect

    Leyba, J.D.; Henderson, R.A.; Hall, H.L.; Czerwinski, K.R.; Kadkhodayan, B.A.; Kreek, S.A.; Brady, E.K.; Gregorich, K.E.; Lee, D.M.; Nurmia, M.J.; Hoffman, D.C. Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California )

    1991-11-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for the production of various isotopes of Bk, Cf, Es, and Fm from the interactions of 174- and 239-MeV {sup 31}P projectiles with {sup 248}Cm. The isotopic distributions were symmetric and displayed full widths at half maximum of 2.5, 2.5, and 2.25 mass units for Bk, Cf, and Fm, respectively. The maxima of the isotopic distributions occur for those reaction channels which involve the exchange of the fewest number of nucleons between the target and projectile for which the calculated excitation energy is a positive quantity. The maxima of the excitation functions occur at those projectile energies which are consistent with the calculated reaction barriers based upon a binary reaction mechanism. The effects of the odd proton in the {sup 31}P projectile on the final isotopic distributions are discussed.

  6. Erythrocytes in muscular dystrophy. Investigation with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sarpel, G.; Lubansky, H.J.; Danon, M.J.; Omachi, A.

    1981-05-01

    Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) signals were recorded from intact human erythrocytes for 16 hours. Total phosphate concentration, which was estimated as the sum of the individual 31P signals, was 25% lower in erythrocytes from men with myotonic dystrophy than in control erythrocytes. The inorganic-phosphate fraction contained the highest average phosphate concentration over the 16-hour period, and made the major contribution to the difference in total phosphate between the two groups. This result was not observed in erythrocytes from either women with myotonic dystrophy or patients with Duchenne's dystrophy and may be due to a change in cell membrane permeability to inorganic phosphate, which lead to lower steady-state concentrations of the intracellular phosphates.

  7. Erythrocytes in muscular dystrophy. Investigation with /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sarpel, G.; Lubansky, H.J.; Danon, M.J.; Omachi, A.

    1981-05-01

    Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 31/P NMR) signals were recorded from intact human erythrocytes for 16 hours. Total phosphate concentration, which was estimated as the sum of the individual /sup 31/P signals, was 25% lower in erythrocytes from men with myotonic dystrophy than in control erythrocytes. The inorganic-phosphate fraction contained the highest average phosphate concentration over the 16-hour period, and made the major contribution to the difference in total phosphate between the two groups. This result was not observed in erythrocytes from either women with myotonic dystrophy or patients with Duchenne's dystrophy and may be due to a change in cell membrane permeability to inorganic phosphate, which leads to lower steady-state concentrations of the intracellular phosphates.

  8. Intermediate valence behavior of Yb2Ni12P7 studied by using 31P NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Sugiura, K.; Ueda, K.; Mito, T.; Kohara, T.; Satoh, R.; Tsuchiya, K.; Nakano, T.; Takeda, N.

    2013-08-01

    The Yb-based heavy-fermion compound Yb2Ni12P7 with a hexagonal Zr2Fe12P7-type crystal structure was investigated by using the 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique. The complicated NMR line changes its shape gradually with decreasing temperature, implying the presence of some Knight shift components. The temperature dependences of the Knight shift and the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/ T 1 suggest the delocalization of 4 f electrons.

  9. Pyrolysis temperature affects phosphorus transformation in biochar: Chemical fractionation and (31)P NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Zhang, You; Shao, Hongbo; Sun, Junna

    2016-11-01

    Phosphorus (P) recycling or reuse by pyrolyzing crop residue has recently elicited increased research interest. However, the effects of feedstock and pyrolysis conditions on P species have not been fully understood. Such knowledge is important in identifying the agronomic and environmental uses of biochar. Residues of three main Chinese agricultural crops and the biochars (produced at 300°C-600°C) derived from these crops were used to determine P transformations during pyrolysis. Hedley sequential fractionation and (31)P NMR analyses were used in the investigation. Our results showed that P transformation in biochar was significantly affected by pyrolysis temperature regardless of feedstock (Wheat straw, maize straw and peanut husk). Pyrolysis treatment transformed water soluble P into a labile (NaHCO3-Pi) or semi-labile pool (NaOH-Pi) and into a stable pool (Dil. HCl P and residual-P). At the same time, organic P was transformed into inorganic P fractions which was identified by the rapid decomposition of organic P detected with solution (31)P NMR. The P transformation during pyrolysis process suggested more stable P was formed at a higher pyrolysis temperature. This result was also evidenced by the presence of less soluble or stable P species, such as such as poly-P, crandallite (CaAl3(OH)5(PO4)2) and Wavellite (Al3(OH)3(PO4)2·5H2O), as detected by solid-state (31)P NMR in biochars formed at a higher pyrolysis temperature. Furthermore, a significant proportion of less soluble pyrophosphate was identified by solution (2%-35%) and solid-state (8%-53%) (31)P NMR, which was also responsible for the stable P forms at higher pyrolysis temperature although their solubility or stability requires further investigation. Results suggested that a relatively lower pyrolysis temperature retains P availability regardless of feedstock during pyrolysis process.

  10. In-depth investigation on quantitative characterization of pyrolysis oil by 31P NMR

    DOE PAGES

    Ben, Haoxi; Ferrell, III, Jack R.

    2016-01-29

    The characterization of different heteroatom functional groups by employing 31P NMR has been developed for almost 30 years. In this study, an in-depth investigation of this commonly used method has been accomplished for the analysis of pyrolysis oil. Several commonly used internal standards for 31P NMR have been examined by in situ monitoring. The results indicated that endo-N-hydroxy-5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboximide (NHND) is not stable after a long period of storage or experiment (>12 hours), but both cyclohexanol and triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO) can be used as internal standards if a long experiment or storage is required. The pyrolysis oil has also been investigatedmore » by both short time (16 hours) in situ monitoring and long time (14 days) ex situ monitoring. The results showed that aliphatic OH, carboxylic acids and water contents are not very stable after 2 hours, and thus a short time of preparation, storage, and experiment need to be considered to ensure a precise quantitative measurement. The decomposition products are still unclear, but some preliminary investigations for different acids, (e.g. formic acid) have been accomplished. The results indicated that the aromatic carboxylic acids (benzoic acid and vanillic acid) are more stable than formic acid and acetic acid. Interestingly, the formic acid will even decompose to some other compounds at the very beginning of the in situ monitoring test. Further characterization found that water is one of the major products for the decomposition of formic acid in the 31P NMR solution. Finally, as far as we know, this is the first report on such time-dependent changes when using 31P NMR to analyze the pyrolysis oil, and these results show that proper application of this method is essential to achieve reliable quantitative data.« less

  11. Assessing crop residue phosphorus speciation using chemical fractionation and solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Noack, Sarah R; Smernik, Ronald J; McBeath, Therese M; Armstrong, Roger D; McLaughlin, Mike J

    2014-08-01

    At physiological maturity, nutrients in crop residues can be released to the soil where they are incorporated into different labile and non-labile pools while the remainder is retained within the residue itself. The chemical speciation of phosphorus (P) in crop residues is an important determinant of the fate of this P. In this study, we used chemical fractionation and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, first separately and then together, to evaluate the P speciation of mature oat (Avena sativa) residue. Two water extracts (one employing shaking and the other sonication) and two acid extracts (0.2N perchloric acid and 10% trichloroacetic acid) of these residues contained similar concentrations of orthophosphate (molybdate-reactive P determined by colorimetry) as NaOH-EDTA extracts of whole plant material subsequently analysed by solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy. However, solution (31)P NMR analysis of the extracts and residues isolated during the water/acid extractions indicated that this similarity resulted from a fortuitous coincidence as the orthophosphate concentration in the water/acid extracts was increased by the hydrolysis of pyrophosphate and organic P forms while at the same time there was incomplete extraction of orthophosphate. Confirmation of this was the absence of pyrophosphate in both water and acid fractions (it was detected in the whole plant material) and the finding that speciation of organic P in the fractions differed from that in the whole plant material. Evidence for incomplete extraction of orthophosphate was the finding that most of the residual P in the crop residues following water/acid extractions was detected as orthophosphate using (31)P NMR. Two methods for isolating and quantifying phospholipid P were also tested, based on solubility in ethanol:ether and ethanol:ether:chloroform. While these methods were selective and appeared to extract only phospholipid P, they did not extract all phospholipid P, as some was

  12. Evaluation of Phosphorus Characterization in Broiler Ileal Digesta, Manure, and Litter Samples: 31P-NMR vs. HPLC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using 31-Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resosonance Spectroscopy (31P-NMR) to characterize phosphorus (P) in manures and litter has become prevalent in the area of nutrient management. To date, there has been no published work evaluating P quantification in manure/litter samples with 31P-NMR compared t...

  13. Exploring new Routes for Identifying Phosphorus Species in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems with 31P NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestergren, Johan; Persson, Per; Sundman, Annelie; Ilstedt, Ulrik; Giesler, Reiner; Schleucher, Jürgen; Gröbner, Gerhard

    2014-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) is the primary growth-limiting nutrient in some of the world's biomes. Rock phosphate is a non-renewable resource and the major source of agricultural fertilizers. Predictions of P consumption indicate that rock phosphate mining may peak within 35 years, with severe impacts on worldwide food production1. Organic P compounds constitute a major fraction of soil P, but little is known about the dynamics and bioavailability of organic P species. Our aim is to develop new liquid and solid state 31P-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) techniques to identify P-species in water and soils; information required for correlating P speciation with plant and soil processes2, and eventually to improve P use. Soil organic P is frequently extracted using NaOH/EDTA, followed by characterization of the extract by solution 31P-NMR. However, the obtained NMR spectra usually have poor resolution due to line broadening caused by the presence of paramagnetic ions. Therefore, we successfully developed an approach to avoid paramagnetic line broadening by precipitation of metal sulfides. Sulfide precipitation dramatically reduces NMR line widths for soil extracts, without affecting P-composition. The resulting highly improved resolution allowed us to apply for the first time 2D 1H,31P-NMR methods to identify different P monoesters in spectral regions which are extremely crowded in 1D NMR spectra.3 By exploiting 2D 1H-31P NMR spectra of soil extracts we were able to unambiguously identify individual organic P species by combining 31P and 1H chemical shifts and coupling constants. This approach is even suitable for a structural characterization of unknown P-components and for tracing degradation pathways between diesters and monoesters3,4.Currently we apply our approach on boreal4 and tropical soils with focus on Burkina Faso. In addition we also monitor P-species in aqueos ecosystems. For this purpose stream water from the Krycklan catchment in northern Sweden5 has been used to

  14. Optimized 31P MRS in the human brain at 7 T with a dedicated RF coil setup

    PubMed Central

    van de Bank, Bart L.; Orzada, Stephan; Smits, Frits; Lagemaat, Miriam W.; Rodgers, Christopher T.; Bitz, Andreas K.

    2015-01-01

    The design and construction of a dedicated RF coil setup for human brain imaging (1H) and spectroscopy (31P) at ultra‐high magnetic field strength (7 T) is presented. The setup is optimized for signal handling at the resonance frequencies for 1H (297.2 MHz) and 31P (120.3 MHz). It consists of an eight‐channel 1H transmit–receive head coil with multi‐transmit capabilities, and an insertable, actively detunable 31P birdcage (transmit–receive and transmit only), which can be combined with a seven‐channel receive‐only 31P array. The setup enables anatomical imaging and 31P studies without removal of the coil or the patient. By separating transmit and receive channels and by optimized addition of array signals with whitened singular value decomposition we can obtain a sevenfold increase in SNR of 31P signals in the occipital lobe of the human brain compared with the birdcage alone. These signals can be further enhanced by 30 ± 9% using the nuclear Overhauser effect by B 1‐shimmed low‐power irradiation of water protons. Together, these features enable acquisition of 31P MRSI at high spatial resolutions (3.0 cm3 voxel) in the occipital lobe of the human brain in clinically acceptable scan times (~15 min). © 2015 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26492089

  15. Gated in vivo examination of cardiac metabolites with /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kantor, H.L.; Briggs, R.W.; Metz, K.R.; Balaban, R.S.

    1986-07-01

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 31/P NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the temporal aspects of metabolism of canine heart in vivo. An NMR catheter coil was passed through the jugular vein of a dog into the apex of the right ventricle and spectra were recorded at four points in the cardiac cycle by triggering from the blood pressure trace of the animal. The /sup 31/P spin-lattice relaxation times of phosphocreatine (PC) and the ..gamma../sup -/,..cap alpha../sup -/, and ..beta..-phosphates of ATP at 1.89 Tesla are 4.4, 1.8, 1.7, and 1.6 s, respectively. The ratio of PC to ATP is 2.0. No changes in PC/ATP were noted in any of the four portions of the cardiac cycle examined, and difference spectra exhibited no observable signals, in contrast to previously reported results for glucose-perfused rat hearts. On the assumption that intracellular pH and the total creatine pool were constant, the expression for the creatine kinase reaction was used to deduce that free ADP concentrations were invariant throughout the cardiac cycle. This is in apparent disagreement with the proposed regulatory role for ADP in heart oxidative phosphorylation.

  16. Lateral diffusion of bilayer lipids measured via (31)P CODEX NMR.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Qasim; Lai, Angel; Morales, Hannah H; Macdonald, Peter M

    2012-10-01

    We have employed (31)P CODEX (centre-band-only-detection-of-exchange) NMR to measure lateral diffusion coefficients of phospholipids in unilamellar lipid bilayer vesicles consisting of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), alone or in mixtures with 30 mol% 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) or cholesterol (CHOL). The lateral diffusion coefficients of POPC and POPG were extracted from experimental CODEX signal decays as a function of increasing mixing time, after accounting for the vesicle's size and size distribution, as determined via dynamic light scattering, and the viscosity of the vesicular suspension, as determined via (1)H pulsed field gradient NMR. Lateral diffusion coefficients for POPC and POPG determined in this fashion fell in the range 1.0-3.2 × 10(-12) m(2) s(-1) at 10 °C, depending on the vesicular composition, in good agreement with accepted values. Thus, two advantages of (31)P CODEX NMR for phospholipid lateral diffusion measurements are demonstrated: no labelling of the molecule of interest is necessary, and multiple lateral diffusion coefficients can be measured simultaneously. It is expected that this approach will prove particularly useful in diagnosing heterogeneities in lateral diffusion behaviours, such as might be expected for specific lipid-lipid or lipid-protein interactions, and thermotropic or electrostatically induced phase inhomogeneities.

  17. Internuclear 31P-51V Distance Measurements in Polyoxoanionic Solids Using REAPDOR NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenlin; Vega, Alexander J.; Gullion, Terry; Polenova, Tatyana

    2014-01-01

    We report the first results establishing REAPDOR experiments for distance measurements between a spin-1/2 (31P) and spin-7/2 (51V) pair in a series of vanadium-substituted polyoxoanionic solids from the Keggin and Wells-Dawson families. We have quantitatively measured 31P-51V distances in mono-vanadium substituted K4PVW11O40, 1-K7P2VW17O62, and 4-K7P2VW17O62. Numerical simulations of the experimental data yield very good agreement with the averaged P-W/P-V distances determined from the X-ray diffraction measurements in the same or related compounds. REAPDOR is therefore a very sensitive P-V distance probe anticipated to be especially useful in the absence of long-range order. Our results suggest that REAPDOR spectroscopy could be broadly applicable for interatomic distance measurements in other spin-7/2-spin-1/2 nuclear pairs. PMID:17918932

  18. 13C and 31P NMR for the diagnosis of muscular phosphorylase-kinase deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehenson, P.; Duboc, D.; Laforet, P.; Eymard, B.; Lombès, A.; Fardeau, M.; Brunet, P.; Syrota, A.

    1998-02-01

    To further develop and specify the range of medical applications of in vivo NMR spectroscopy for the study of myopathies, it is ncessary to study the largest number of well characterized cases. We here report on the 31P and 13C NMR study of a purely muscular form of phosphorylase-kinase (PK) deficiency. Abnormalities were observed that agree with and increase our pathophysiological knowledge, in particular on the activation of phosphorylase and PK. Also, the abnormalities are different from those found in other clinically similar metabolic myopathies and could be used for the differential diagnosis. Afin de continuer à développer et préciser les applications médicales de la spectroscopie RMN in vivo, il faut étudier le plus grand nombre possible de cas bien caractérisés. Nous avons étudié ici une forme purement musculaire de déficit en phosphorylase-kinase (PK) par RMN du phosphore 31 et du carbone 13. Les altérations observées sont en accord avec et augmentent nos connaissances physiopathologiques, par exemple concernant l'activation de la phosphorylase et PK. Par ailleurs, la combinaison d'altérations observées en 31P et 13C est différente de celle retrouvée dans d'autres myopathies métaboliques cliniquement semblables et pourrait être utilisée pour le diagnostic différentiel.

  19. Quantitative 31P nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of metabolite concentrations in Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Gard, J K; Kichura, G M; Ackerman, J J; Eisenberg, J D; Billadello, J J; Sobel, B E; Gross, R W

    1985-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of the mobile high-energy phosphorus metabolites in isovolumic Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts has been performed by 31P NMR utilizing rapid pulse repetition to optimize sensitivity. Absolute quantification required reference to an external standard, determination of differential magnetization saturation and resonance peak area integration by Lorentzian lineshape analysis. Traditionally accepted hemodynamic indices (LVDP, dp/dt) and biochemical indices (lactate, pyruvate) of myocardial function were measured concomitantly with all NMR determinations. Hemodynamically and biochemically competent Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts were found to have intracellular PCr, ATP, GPC, and Pi concentrations of 14.95 +/- 0.25, 8.08 +/- 0.13, 5.20 +/- 0.58 and 2.61 +/- 0.47 mM respectively. Intracellular pH was 7.03 +/- 0.01. Cytosolic ADP concentration was derived from a creatine kinase equilibrium model and determined to be approximately 36 microM. Reduction of perfusate flow from 20 to 2.5 ml/min demonstrated statistically significant decreases in PCr, ATP, and pH as well as an increase in Pi that correlated closely with the independent hemodynamic and biochemical indices of myocardial function. The decrease in ATP and PCr concentrations precisely matched the increase in Pi during reduced flow. These results constitute the first quantitative determination of intracellular metabolite concentrations by 31P NMR in intact rabbit myocardium under physiologic and low flow conditions. PMID:4074839

  20. 31P-NMR study of resting in vitro rat diaphragm exposed to hypercapnia.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R S; Howell, S; Jacobus, W E

    1988-11-01

    We have reported previously that, when exposed to hypercapnia of various intensities, the diaphragm reduces its force of twitch and tetanic contractions in the in vitro rat preparation as well as in the in vivo dog preparation. The experiments reported here with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectroscopy attempt to examine cellular mechanisms that might be responsible for this deterioration in mechanical performance. Specifically they describe certain characteristics of this preparation and cautions needed to study the resting in vitro rat diaphragm with such techniques. Second, they report the response of intracellular pH (pHi), phosphocreatine (PCr), ATP, and inorganic phosphate (Pi) in the resting in vitro rat diaphragm exposed to long-term normocapnia or to long-term hypercapnia. The results show that 1) to maintain a viable preparation, it was necessary to keep the diaphragm extended to an area approximating that at functional residual capacity, 2) the diaphragm seemed quite capable of maintaining a constant pHi and constant contents of ATP and Pi during normocapnia, but there was a gradual decline in PCr, and 3) during hypercapnia there was a significant decrease in pHi, but the behavior of the phosphate metabolites was exactly as during normocapnia. The results suggest that the decrease in mechanical performance of the diaphragm is probably not due to a decrease in the availability of the high-energy phosphates, although they do not completely exclude this possibility or possibilities related to regional compartmentation.

  1. Intrauterine fetal brain NMR spectroscopy: 1H and 31P studies in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nakada, T.; Kwee, I.L.; Suzuki, N.; Houkin, K. )

    1989-11-01

    Fetal brain metabolism was investigated in utero noninvasively using multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in rats at two representative prenatal stages: early (17-18 days) and late (20-21 days) stages. Phosphorus-31 (31P) spectroscopy revealed that phosphocreatine is significantly lower in the early stage and increases to the level of early neonates by the late prenatal stage. Intracellular pH at the early stage was found to be strikingly high (7.52 +/- 0.21) and decreased to a level similar to that of neonates by the late stage (7.29 +/- 0.07). Phosphomonoester levels at both stages were similar to the values reported for early neonates. Water-suppressed proton (1H) spectroscopy demonstrated a distinctive in vivo fetal brain spectral pattern characterized by low levels of N-acetyl aspartate and high levels of taurine. High-resolution proton spectroscopy and homonuclear chemical-shift correlate spectroscopy of brain perchloric acid extracts confirmed these in vivo findings. In vitro 31P spectroscopy of acidified chloroform methanol extracts showed the characteristic membrane phospholipid profiles of fetal brain. The phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)-to-phosphatidylcholine (PC) ratio (PE/PC) did not show significant changes between the two stages at 0.40 +/- 0.11, a value similar to that of early neonates.

  2. Phospholipid composition of plasma and erythrocyte membranes in animal species by 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Ferlazzo, Alida Maria; Bruschetta, Giuseppe; Di Pietro, Patrizia; Medica, Pietro; Notti, Anna; Rotondo, Enrico

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to provide basal values of phospholipid (PL) composition in different animal species by 31P NMR analysis using detergents. This fast and accurate method allowed a quantitative analysis of PLs without any previous separation. Plasma and erythrocyte membrane PLs were investigated in mammals (pig, cow, horse). Moreover, for the first time, the composition of plasma PLs in avian (chicken and ostrich) was performed by 31P NMR. Significant qualitative and quantitative interspecies differences in plasma PL levels were found. Phosphatidilcholine (PC) and sphingomyelin (SPH) levels were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in chicken plasma than all the other species tested. In erythrocytes, cow PC and phosphatidylcholine diarachidoyl were significantly lower (P < 0.001) than for pigs and horses, whereas pig PC presented intermediate values among cows and horses. Inorganic phosphate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels were also significantly different between the species under investigation. The [SPH/total PLs] molar ratios in erythrocytes confirmed interspecies differences in phospholipid composition while the PC/SPH molar ratios could be related to a distinct erythrocyte flexibility and aggregability. Diet and nutrition may contribute primarily to the interspecies differences in plasma PL amounts detected. Significant differences between chicken plasma PC and SPH levels and those of the other animal species could be ascribed to a fat metabolism specific to egg production.

  3. How Bonding in Manganous Phosphates Affects their Mn(II)-(31)P Hyperfine Interactions.

    PubMed

    Un, Sun; Bruch, Eduardo M

    2015-11-02

    Manganous phosphates have been postulated to play an important role in cells as antioxidants. In situ Mn(II) electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy has been used to measure their speciation in cells. The analyses of such ENDOR spectra and the quantification of cellular Mn(II) phosphates has been based on comparisons to in vitro model complexes and heuristic modeling. In order to put such analyses on a more physical and theoretical footing, the Mn(II)-(31)P hyperfine interactions of various Mn(II) phosphate complexes have been measured by 95 GHz ENDOR spectroscopy. The dipolar components of these interactions remained relatively constant as a function of pH, esterification, and phosphate chain length, while the isotropic contributions were significantly affected. Counterintuitively, although the manganese-phosphate bonds are weakened by protonation and esterification, they lead to larger isotropic values, indicating higher unpaired-electron spin densities at the phosphorus nuclei. By comparison, extending the phosphate chain with additional phosphate groups lowers the spin density. Density functional theory calculations of model complexes quantitatively reproduced the measured hyperfine couplings and provided detailed insights into how bonding in Mn(II) phosphate complexes modulates the electron-spin polarization and consequently their isotropic hyperfine couplings. These results show that various classes of phosphates can be identified by their ENDOR spectra and provide a theoretical framework for understanding the in situ (31)P ENDOR spectra of cellular Mn(II) complexes.

  4. Whole-body radiofrequency coil for (31) P MRSI at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Löring, J; van der Kemp, W J M; Almujayyaz, S; van Oorschot, J W M; Luijten, P R; Klomp, D W J

    2016-06-01

    Widespread use of ultrahigh-field (31) P MRSI in clinical studies is hindered by the limited field of view and non-uniform radiofrequency (RF) field obtained from surface transceivers. The non-uniform RF field necessitates the use of high specific absorption rate (SAR)-demanding adiabatic RF pulses, limiting the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) per unit of time. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of using a body-sized volume RF coil at 7 T, which enables uniform excitation and ultrafast power calibration by pick-up probes. The performance of the body coil is examined by bench tests, and phantom and in vivo measurements in a 7-T MRI scanner. The accuracy of power calibration with pick-up probes is analyzed at a clinical 3-T MR system with a close to identical (1) H body coil integrated at the MR system. Finally, we demonstrate high-quality three-dimensional (31) P MRSI of the human body at 7 T within 5 min of data acquisition that includes RF power calibration. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Evaluation of cerebral 31-P chemical shift images utilizing statistical parametric mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehemann, Stefan; Gaser, Christian; Volz, Hans-Peter; Sauer, Heinrich

    1999-05-01

    We present an evaluation technique of two dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift images (CSI) to analyze spatial differences of metabolite distributions and/or concentrations between groups of probands. Thus, chemical shift imaging is not only used as localization technique for NMR-spectroscopy, but the information of the complete spectroscopic image is used for the evaluation process. 31P CSI of the human brain were acquired with a Philips Gyroscan ACSII whole-body scanner at 1.5 T. CSI for different phosphorus metabolites were generated, all representing the same anatomical location. For each metabolite the CSI of two groups of subjects were compared with each other using the general linear model implemented in the widely distributed SPM96 software package. With this approach, even covariates or confounding variables like age or medication can be considered. As an example for the application of this technique, variations in the distribution of the 31P metabolite phosphocreatin between unmedicated schizophrenic patients and healthy controls were visualized. To our knowledge, this is the first approach to analyze spatial variations in metabolite concentrations between groups of subjects on the basis of chemical shift images. The presented technique opens a new perspective in the evaluation of 2D NMR spectroscopic data.

  6. Synthesis of prostanoids; enantiomeric purity of alcohols by a /sup 31/P NMR technique

    SciTech Connect

    Penning, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    The enone, 2,2-diemthyl-3a..beta.., 6a..beta..-dihydro-4H-cyclopenta-1,3-dioxol-4-one, has been synthesized in six steps from cyclopentadiene, resolved using sulfoximine chemistry, and converted into (-)-prostaglandin E/sub 2/ methyl ester in three steps. Introduction of the optically pure omega side-chain using a conjugate addition of a stabilized organocopper reagent, followed by direct alkylation of the enolate with the ..cap alpha.. side-chain allylic iodide in the presence of hexamethylphosphoramide, afforded a trans, vicinally disubstituted cyclopentanone. Deprotection of the C-15 alcohol, followed by aluminum amalgam reduction of the C-10/oxygen bond, provided (-)-PGE/sub 2/ methyl ester in 47% overall yield from the enone. In an extension of previously described work, 2-chloro-3,4-dimethyl-5-phenyl-1,3,2-oxazaphospholidine 2-sulfide, prepared from l-ephedrine and thiophosphoryl chloride, was used to determine the enantiomeric excess of chiral alcohols in conjunction with /sup 31/P NMR. Chiral primary and secondary alcohols added quantitatively to the phospholidine to give diastereomers which could be analyzed by /sup 31/P NMR and HPLC. A number of other phosphorus heterocycles were also explored as potential chiral derivatizing reagents.

  7. Estimation of the specific surface area of apatites in human mineralized tissues using 31P MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Kolmas, Joanna; Slósarczyk, Anna; Wojtowicz, Andrzej; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2007-10-01

    Specific surface areas of apatites in whole human mineralized tissues were estimated from (31)P MAS NMR linewidths: 77 m(2)g(-1) for enamel and 94 m(2)g(-1) for dentin, dental cementum and cortical bone.

  8. Optical hyperpolarization and inductive readout of 31P donor nuclei in natural abundance single crystal 29Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Thomas; Haas, Holger; Deshpande, Rahul; Gumann, Patryk; Cory, David

    2016-05-01

    We optically polarize and inductively detect 31P donor nuclei in single crystal silicon at high magnetic fields (6 . 7T). Samples include both natural abundance 29Si and an isotopically purified 28Si sample. We observe dipolar order in the 29Si nuclear spins through a spin-locking measurement. This provides a means of characterizing spin transport in the vicinity of the 31P donors.

  9. Direct and simultaneous quantification of ATP, ADP and AMP by (1)H and (31)P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lian, Yakun; Jiang, Hua; Feng, Jinzhou; Wang, Xiaoyan; Hou, Xiandeng; Deng, Pengchi

    2016-04-01

    ATP, ADP and AMP are energy substances with vital biological significance. Based on the structural differences, a simple, rapid and comprehensive method has been established by (1)H and (31)P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H-NMR and (31)P-NMR) spectroscopies. Sodium 3-(trimethylsilyl) propionate-2,2,3,3-d4 (TMSP) and anhydrous disodium hydrogen phosphate (Na2HPO4) were selected as internal standards for (1)H-NMR and (31)P-NMR, respectively. Those three compounds and corresponding internal standards can be easily distinguished both by (1)H-NMR and (31)P-NMR. In addition, they all have perfect linearity in a certain range: 0.1-100mM for (1)H-NMR and 1-75 mM for (31)P-NMR. To validate the precision of this method, mixed samples of different concentrations were measured. Recovery experiments were conducted in serum (91-113% by (1)H-NMR and 89-113% by (31)P-NMR).

  10. Evaluation of phosphorus characterization in broiler ileal digesta, manure, and litter samples: (31)P-NMR vs. HPLC.

    PubMed

    Leytem, A B; Kwanyuen, P; Plumstead, P W; Maguire, R O; Brake, J

    2008-01-01

    Using 31-phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-NMR) to characterize phosphorus (P) in animal manures and litter has become a popular technique in the area of nutrient management. To date, there has been no published work evaluating P quantification in manure/litter samples with (31)P-NMR compared to other accepted methods such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). To evaluate the use of (31)P-NMR to quantify myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (phytate) in ileal digesta, manure, and litter from broilers, we compared results obtained from both (31)P-NMR and a more traditional HPLC method. The quantification of phytate in all samples was very consistent between the two methods, with linear regressions having slopes ranging from 0.94 to 1.07 and r(2) values of 0.84 to 0.98. We compared the concentration of total monoester P determined with (31)P-NMR with the total inositol P content determined with HPLC and found a strong linear relationship between the two measurements having slopes ranging from 0.91 to 1.08 and r(2) values of 0.73 to 0.95. This suggests that (31)P-NMR is a very reliable method for quantifying P compounds in manure/litter samples.

  11. sup 31 P saturation transfer and phosphocreatine imaging in the monkey brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mora, B.; Narasimhan, P.T.; Ross, B.D. California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena ); Allman, J. ); Barker, P.B. )

    1991-10-01

    {sup 31}P magnetic resonance imaging with chemical-shift discrimination by selective excitation has been employed to determine the phosphocreatine (PCr) distribution in the brains of three juvenile macaque monkeys. PCr images were also obtained while saturating the resonance of the {gamma}-phosphate of ATP, which allowed the investigation of the chemical exchange between PCr and the {gamma}-phosphate of ATP catalyzed by creatine kinase. Superposition of the PCr images over the proton image of the same monkey brain revealed topological variations in the distribution of PCr and creatine kinase activity. PCr images were also obtained with and without visual stimulation. In two out of four experiments, an apparently localized decrease in PCr concentration was noted in visual cortex upon visual stimulation. This result is interpreted in terms of a possible role for the local ADP concentration in stimulating the accompanying metabolic response.

  12. Degradation of black phosphorus: a real-time 31P NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Yang, Bingchao; Wan, Bensong; Xi, Xuekui; Zeng, Zhongming; Liu, Enke; Wu, Guangheng; Liu, Zhongyuan; Wang, Wenhong

    2016-09-01

    In this work, degradation behaviors and mechanisms of black phosphorus (BP) crystals in air under ambient conditions were investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It has been found that the 31P NMR line intensity for BP decreases exponentially during aging even at the very first several hours, suggesting the origin of the degradation of transport properties. In addition to phosphoric acid, new phosphorous acid was also well resolved in the final aging products. Moreover, BP has been found to be stable in water without the presence of oxygen molecules. These findings are relevant for better understanding of degradation behaviors of BP upon aging and should be helpful for overcoming a barrier that might hamper progress toward applications of BP as a 2D material.

  13. Detoxification of organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents through RSDL: efficacy evaluation by (31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Elsinghorst, Paul W; Worek, Franz; Koller, Marianne

    2015-03-04

    Intoxication by organophosphorus compounds, especially by pesticides, poses a considerable risk to the affected individual. Countermeasures involve both medical intervention by means of antidotes as well as external decontamination to reduce the risk of dermal absorption. One of the few decontamination options available is Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL), which was originally developed for military use. Here, we present a (31)P NMR spectroscopy based methodology to evaluate the detoxification efficacy of RSDL with respect to a series of organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents. Kinetic analysis of the obtained NMR data provided degradation half-lives proving that RSDL is also reasonably effective against organophosphorus pesticides. Unexpected observations of different RSDL degradation patterns are presented in view of its reported oximate-catalyzed mechanism of action.

  14. Decomposition of adsorbed VX on activated carbons studied by 31P MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Columbus, Ishay; Waysbort, Daniel; Shmueli, Liora; Nir, Ido; Kaplan, Doron

    2006-06-15

    The fate of the persistent OP nerve agent O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX) on granular activated carbons that are used for gas filtration was studied by means of 31P magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. VX as vapor or liquid was adsorbed on carbon granules, and MAS NMR spectra were recorded periodically. The results show that at least 90% of the adsorbed VX decomposes within 20 days or less to the nontoxic ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) and bis(S-2-diisopropylaminoethane) {(DES)2}. Decomposition occurred irrespective of the phase from which VX was loaded, the presence of metal impregnation on the carbon surface, and the water content of the carbon. Theoretical and practical aspects of the degradation are discussed.

  15. Physiologic significance of the phosphorylation potential in isolated perfused rat hearts (/sup 31/P NMR)

    SciTech Connect

    Watters, T.; Wikman-Coffelt, J.; Wu, S.; Wendland, M.; James, T.; Sievers, R.; Botvinick, E.; Parmley, W.

    1986-03-05

    The authors assessed the metabolic and mechanical effects of changes in coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) and afterload (A) in isolated working apex-ejecting rat hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing an excess of O/sub 2/ and substrate. Log(phosphorylation potential) or log (ATP)/(ADP)x (Pi), designated (L), and log (PCR)/(Pi), designated (L*), were calculated from HPLC measurements after rapid freeze-clamping. Increasing CPP from 80-140 cm H/sub 2/O caused an increase in coronary flow(flow), developed pressure(DevP), O/sub 2/ consumption (VO/sub 2/), L, L*, and CO. L and L* were directly related to VO/sub 2/ and CO. Increasing A from 80-140 cm H/sub 2/O caused an increase in DevP and VO/sub 2/, but a decrease in L, L*, and CO. L and L* were inversely linearly related to VO/sub 2/ but were directly linearly related to CO. In both experiments, L and L* are directly related to CO, suggesting that determination of L* (which can be done with /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy) may be a useful non-invasive method for determining cardiac pump function curves. L and L* may be related to the Frank-Starling mechanism. In a separate experiment using /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy of isovolumic (left ventricular balloon) perfused rat hearts, increasing CPP caused a direct linear increase in flow, DevP, and L*, confirming the L* results reported above with CPP experiments using the rapid freeze-clamp technique.

  16. Physiologic significance of the phosphorylation potential in isolated perfused rat hearts (31-P NMR)

    SciTech Connect

    Watters, T.; Wikman-Coffelt, J.; Wu, S.; Wendland, M.; James, T.; Sievers, R.; Botvinick, E.; Parmley, W.

    1986-03-05

    The authors assessed the metabolic and mechanical effects of changes in coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) and afterload (A) in isolated working apex-ejecting rat hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing an excess of O/sub 2/ and substrate. Log (phosphorylation potential) or log (ATP)/(ADP)x (Pi), designated (L), and log (PCR)/(Pi), designated (L*), were calculated from HPLC measurements after rapid freeze-clamping. Increasing CPP from 80-140 cm H/sub 2/O caused an increase in coronary flow (flow), developed pressure (DevP), O/sub 2/ consumption (VO/sub 2/), L, L*, and CO. L and L* were directly related to VO/sub 2/ and CO. Increasing A from 80-140 cm H/sub 2/O caused an increase in DevP and VO/sub 2/, but a decrease in L, L*, and CO. L and L* were inversely linearly related to VO/sub 2/ but were directly linearly related to CO. In both experiments, L and L* are directly related to CO, suggesting that determination of L* (which can be done with 31-P NMR spectroscopy) may be a useful non-invasive method for determining cardiac pump function curves. L and L* may be related to the Frank-Starling mechanism. In a separate experiment using 31-P NMR spectroscopy of isovolumic (left ventricular balloon) perfused rat hearts, increasing CPP caused a direct linear increase in flow, DevP, and L*, confirming the L* results reported above with CPP experiments using the rapid freeze-clamp technique.

  17. Age and gender dependence of human cardiac phosphorus metabolites determined by SLOOP 31P MR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Köstler, Herbert; Landschütz, Wilfried; Koeppe, Sabrina; Seyfarth, Tobias; Lipke, Claudia; Sandstede, Jörn; Spindler, Matthias; von Kienlin, Markus; Hahn, Dietbert; Beer, Meinrad

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to apply (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) using spatial localization with optimal point spread function (SLOOP) to investigate possible age and gender dependencies of the energy metabolite concentrations in the human heart. Thirty healthy volunteers (18 males and 12 females, 21-67 years old, mean = 40.7 years) were examined with the use of (31)P-MRS on a 1.5 T scanner. Intra- and interobserver variability measures (determined in eight of the volunteers) were both 3.8% for phosphocreatine (PCr), and 4.7% and 8.3%, respectively, for adenosine triphosphate (ATP). High-energy phosphate (HEP) concentrations in mmol/kg wet weight were 9.7 +/- 2.4 (age < 40 years, N = 16) and 7.7 +/- 2.5 (age >or= 40 years, N = 14) for PCr, and 5.1 +/- 1.0 (age < 40 years) and 4.1 +/- 0.8 (age >or= 40 years) for ATP, respectively. Separated by gender, PCr concentrations of 9.2 +/- 2.4 (men, N = 18) and 8.0 +/- 2.8 (women, N = 12) and ATP concentrations of 4.9 +/- 1.0 (men) and 4.2 +/- 0.9 (women) were measured. A significant decrease of PCr and ATP was found for volunteers older than 40 years (P < 0.05), but the differences in metabolic concentrations between both sexes were not significant. In conclusion, age has a minor but still significant impact on cardiac energy metabolism, and no significant gender differences were detected.

  18. Proton-decoupled 31P MRS in untreated pediatric brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Albers, Mark J; Krieger, Mark D; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Gilles, Floyd H; McComb, J Gordon; Nelson, Marvin D; Blüml, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Proton-decoupled (31)P and (1)H MRS was used to quantify markers of membrane synthesis and breakdown in eight pediatric patients with untreated brain tumors and in six controls. Quantitation of these compounds in vivo in humans may provide important indicators for tumor growth and malignancy, tumor classification, and provide prognostic information. The ratios of phosphoethanolamine to glycerophosphoethanolamine (PE/GPE) and phosphocholine to glycerophosphocholine (PC/GPC) were significantly higher in primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) (16.30 +/- 5.73 and 2.97 +/- 0.93) when compared with controls (3.42 +/- 1.62, P < 0.0001 and 0.45 +/- 0.13, P < 0.0001) and with other tumors (3.93 +/- 3.42, P < 0.001 and 0.65 +/- 0.30, P < 0.0001). Mean PC/PE was elevated in tumors relative to controls (0.48 +/- 0.11 versus 0.24 +/- 0.05, P < 0.001), but there was no difference between PNET and other tumors. Total choline concentration determined with quantitative (1)H MRS was significantly elevated (4.78 +/- 3.33 versus 1.73 +/- 0.56 mmol/kg, P < 0.05), whereas creatine was reduced in tumors (4.89 +/- 1.83 versus 8.28 +/- 1.50 mmol/kg, P < 0.05). A quantitative comparison of total phosphorylated cholines (PC+GPC)/ATP measured with (31)P MRS and total choline measured with (1)H MRS showed that in tumors a large fraction of the choline signal (>54 +/- 36%) was not accounted for by PC and GPC. The fraction of unaccounted choline was particularly large in PNET (>78 +/- 7%). The pH of tumor tissue was higher than the pH of normal brain tissue (7.06 +/- 0.03 versus. 6.98 +/- 0.03, P < 0.001).

  19. 39K, 23Na, and 31P NMR Studies of Ion Transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, T.; den Hollander, J. A.; Shulman, R. G.

    1983-09-01

    The relationship between efflux and influx of K+, Na+, and intracellular pH (pHin) in yeast cells upon energizing by oxygenation was studied by using the noninvasive technique of 39K, 23Na, and 31P NMR spectroscopy. By introducing an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent, Dy3+(P3O105-)2, into the medium, NMR signals of intra- and extracellular K+ and Na+ could be resolved, enabling us to study ion transport processes by NMR. Measurements showed that 40% of the intracellular K+ and Na+ in yeast cells contributed to the NMR intensities. By applying this correction factor, the intracellular ion concentrations were determined to be 130-170 mM K+ and 2.5 mM Na+ for fresh yeast cells. With the aid of a home-built solenoidal coil probe for 39K and a double-tuned probe for 23Na and 31P, we could follow time courses of K+ and Na+ transport and of pHin with a time resolution of 1 min. It was shown that H+ extrusion is correlated with K+ uptake and not with Na+ uptake upon energizing yeast cells by oxygenation. When the cells were deenergized after the aerobic period, K+ efflux, H+ influx, and Na+ influx were calculated to be 1.6, 1.5, and 0.15 μ mol/min per ml of cell water, respectively. Therefore, under the present conditions, K+ efflux is balanced by exchange for H+ with an approximate stoichiometry of 1:1.

  20. 31P NMR Relaxation of Cortical Bone Mineral at Multiple Magnetic Field Strengths and Levels of Demineralization

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Alan C.; Wright, Alexander C.; Wehrli, Suzanne L.; Ong, Henry H.; Li, Cheng; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Recent work has shown that solid-state 1H and 31P MRI can provide detailed insight into bone matrix and mineral properties, thereby potentially enabling differentiation of osteoporosis from osteomalacia. However, 31P MRI of bone mineral is hampered by unfavorable relaxation properties. Hence, accurate knowledge of these properties is critical to optimizing MRI of bone phosphorus. Methods In this work, 31P MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was predicted on the basis of T1 and T2* (effective transverse relaxation time) measured in lamb bone at six field strengths (1.5 – 11.7 T) and subsequently verified by 3-D ultra-short echo-time and zero echo-time imaging. Further, T1 was measured in deuterium-exchanged bone and partially demineralized bone. Results 31P T2* was found to decrease from 220.3 ± 4.3 μs to 98.0 ± 1.4 μs from 1.5 to 11.7 T, and T1 to increase from 12.8 ± 0.5 s to 97.3 ± 6.4 s. Deuteron substitution of exchangeable water showed that 76% of the 31P longitudinal relaxation rate is due to 1H-31P dipolar interactions. Lastly, hypomineralization was found to decrease T1, which may have implications for 31P MRI based mineralization density quantification. Conclusion Despite the steep decrease in the T2*/T1 ratio, SNR should increase with field strength as Bo0.4 for sample-dominated noise and as Bo1.1 for coil-dominated noise. This was confirmed by imaging experiments. PMID:23505120

  1. Incorporation of phosphorus guest ions in the calcium silicate phases of Portland cement from 31P MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Søren L; Jakobsen, Hans J; Skibsted, Jørgen

    2010-06-21

    Portland cements may contain small quantities of phosphorus (typically below 0.5 wt % P(2)O(5)), originating from either the raw materials or alternative sources of fuel used to heat the cement kilns. This work reports the first (31)P MAS NMR study of anhydrous and hydrated Portland cements that focuses on the phase and site preferences of the (PO(4))(3-) guest ions in the main clinker phases and hydration products. The observed (31)P chemical shifts (10 to -2 ppm), the (31)P chemical shift anisotropy, and the resemblance of the lineshapes in the (31)P and (29)Si MAS NMR spectra strongly suggest that (PO(4))(3-) units are incorporated in the calcium silicate phases, alite (Ca(3)SiO(5)) and belite (Ca(2)SiO(4)), by substitution for (SiO(4))(4-) tetrahedra. This assignment is further supported by a determination of the spin-lattice relaxation times for (31)P in alite and belite, which exhibit the same ratio as observed for the corresponding (29)Si relaxation times. From simulations of the intensities, observed in inversion-recovery spectra for a white Portland cement, it is deduced that 1.3% and 2.1% of the Si sites in alite and belite, respectively, are replaced by phosphorus. Charge balance may potentially be achieved to some extent by a coupled substitution mechanism where Ca(2+) is replaced by Fe(3+) ions, which may account for the interaction of the (31)P spins with paramagnetic Fe(3+) ions as observed for the ordinary Portland cements. A minor fraction of phosphorus may also be present in the separate phase Ca(3)(PO(4))(2), as indicated by the observation of a narrow resonance at delta((31)P) = 3.0 ppm for two of the studied cements. (31)P{(1)H} CP/MAS NMR spectra following the hydration of a white Portland cement show that the resonances from the hydrous phosphate species fall in the same spectral range as observed for (PO(4))(3-) incorporated in alite. This similarity and the absence of a large (31)P chemical shift ansitropy indicate that the hydrous (PO(4

  2. On Neglecting Chemical Exchange Effects When Correcting in Vivo 31P MRS Data for Partial Saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouwerkerk, Ronald; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2001-02-01

    Signal acquisition in most MRS experiments requires a correction for partial saturation that is commonly based on a single exponential model for T1 that ignores effects of chemical exchange. We evaluated the errors in 31P MRS measurements introduced by this approximation in two-, three-, and four-site chemical exchange models under a range of flip-angles and pulse sequence repetition times (TR) that provide near-optimum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In two-site exchange, such as the creatine-kinase reaction involving phosphocreatine (PCr) and γ-ATP in human skeletal and cardiac muscle, errors in saturation factors were determined for the progressive saturation method and the dual-angle method of measuring T1. The analysis shows that these errors are negligible for the progressive saturation method if the observed T1 is derived from a three-parameter fit of the data. When T1 is measured with the dual-angle method, errors in saturation factors are less than 5% for all conceivable values of the chemical exchange rate and flip-angles that deliver useful SNR per unit time over the range T1/5 ≤ TR ≤ 2T1. Errors are also less than 5% for three- and four-site exchange when TR ≥ T1*/2, the so-called "intrinsic" T1's of the metabolites. The effect of changing metabolite concentrations and chemical exchange rates on observed T1's and saturation corrections was also examined with a three-site chemical exchange model involving ATP, PCr, and inorganic phosphate in skeletal muscle undergoing up to 95% PCr depletion. Although the observed T1's were dependent on metabolite concentrations, errors in saturation corrections for TR = 2 s could be kept within 5% for all exchanging metabolites using a simple interpolation of two dual-angle T1 measurements performed at the start and end of the experiment. Thus, the single-exponential model appears to be reasonably accurate for correcting 31P MRS data for partial saturation in the presence of chemical exchange. Even in systems where

  3. {sup 31}P NMR analysis of coal moieties bearing -OH, -NH, and -SH functions. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Verkade, J.G.

    1991-08-31

    NMR reagents for the speciation and quantitation of labile-hydrogen functional groups and sulfur groups in coal ligands have been synthesized and evaluated. These reagents, which contain the NMR-active nuclei {sup 31}p, {sup 119}Sn or {sup 195}pt, were designed to possess improved chemical shift resolution over reagents reported in the literature. Our efforts were successful in the case of the new {sup 31}p and {sup 119}Sn reagents we developed, but the {sup 195}pt work on sulfur groups was only partially successful in as much as the grant came to a close and was not renewed. Our success with {sup 31}P and {sup 119}Sn NMR reagents came to the attention of Amoco and they have recently expressed interest in further supporting that work. A further measure of the success of our efforts can be seen in the nine publications supported by this grant which are cited in the reference list.

  4. Ongoing Dual-Angle Measurements for the Correction of Partial Saturation in 31P MR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Damian J.; Lopez, Orlando; Cole, Mark A.; Carr, Carolyn A.; Stuckey, Daniel J.; Lakatta, Edward; Clarke, Kieran; Spencer, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    Use of a repetition time similar to, or shorter than, metabolite T1's is common in NMR spectroscopy of biological samples to improve the signal–to–noise ratio. Conventionally, the partial saturation that results from this is corrected using saturation factors. However, this can lead to erroneous results in the presence of chemical exchange or non-constant T1's. We describe an alternative approach to correction for saturation, based on ongoing dual–angle T1 measurements (O-DAM). Using 31P MR spectroscopy of the perfused rat heart undergoing ischaemia-reperfusion, we demonstrate that signal alternations in the data acquired by the dual-angle approach are eliminated by the O-DAM correction scheme, meaning that metabolite concentration and T1 measurements can be made throughout the course of the ischaemia-reperfusion protocol. Simulations, based on parameters pertinent to the perfused rat heart, demonstrate that accurate saturation correction is possible with this method except at times of rapid concentration change. Additionally, compared to the conventional saturation factor correction method, the O-DAM correction scheme results in improved accuracy in determining the [PCr] recovery time constant. Thus, the O-DAM procedure permits accurate monitoring of metabolite concentrations even in the setting of chemical exchange and T1 changes, and allows more accurate analysis of bioenergetic status. PMID:20740663

  5. Modified Prony Method to Resolve and Quantify in Vivo31P NMR Spectra of Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, P.; Guidoni, L.; Ragona, R.; Viti, V.; Furman, E.; Degani, H.

    Prony's method, successfully used in processing NMR signals, performs poorly at low signal-to-noise ratios. To overcome this problem, a statistical approach has been adopted by using Prony's method as a sampling device from the distribution associated with the true spectrum. Specifically, Prony's method is applied for each regression order p and number of data points n, both considered in a suitable range, and the estimates of frequencies, amplitudes, and decay factors are pooled separately. A histogram of the pooled frequencies is computed and, looking at the histogram, a lower and an upper frequency bound for each line of interest is determined. All frequency estimates in each of the determined intervals as well as associated decay factors and amplitudes are considered to be independent normal variates. A mean value and a corresponding 95% confidence interval are computed for each parameter. 31P NMR signals from MCF7 human breast cancer cells, inoculated into athymic mice and which developed into tumors, have been processed with traditional methods and with this modified Prony's method. The main components of the phosphomonoester peak, namely those deriving from phosphorylcholine and phosphorylethanolamine, are always well resolved with this new approach and their relative amplitudes can be consequently evaluated. Peak intensities of these two signals show different behavior during treatment of tumors with the antiestrogenic drug tamoxifen. The results of this new approach are compared with those obtainable with traditional techniques.

  6. The structure of phosphate glass biomaterials from neutron diffraction and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance data.

    PubMed

    Pickup, D M; Ahmed, I; Guerry, P; Knowles, J C; Smith, M E; Newport, R J

    2007-10-17

    Neutron diffraction and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to probe the structure of phosphate glass biomaterials of general composition (CaO)0.5-x(Na2O)x(P2O5)0.5 (x = 0, 0.1 and 0.5). The results suggest that all three glasses have structures based on chains of Q(2) phosphate groups. Clear structural differences are observed between the glasses containing Na2O and CaO. The P-O bonds to bridging and non-bridging oxygens are less well resolved in the neutron data from the samples containing CaO, suggesting a change in the nature of the bonding as the field strength of the cation increases [Formula: see text]. In the (CaO)0.5(P2O5)0.5 glass most of the Ca(2+) ions are present in isolated CaOx polyhedra whereas in the (Na2O)0.5(P2O5)0.5 glass the NaOx polyhedra share edges leading to a Na-Na correlation. The results of the structural study are related to the properties of the (CaO)0.4(Na2O)0.1(P2O5)0.5 biomaterial.

  7. Transport of phosphocholine in higher plant cells: sup 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gout, E.; Bligny, R.; Roby, C.; Douce, R. )

    1990-06-01

    Phosphocholine (PC) is an abundant primary form of organic phosphate that is transported in plant xylem sap. Addition of PC to the perfusate of compressed P{sub i}-starved sycamore cells monitored by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy resulted in an accumulation of PC and all the other phosphate esters in the cytoplasmic compartment. Addition of hemicholinium-3, an inhibitor of choline uptake, to the perfusate inhibited PC accumulation but not inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}). When the P{sub i}-starved cells were perfused with a medium containing either P{sub i} or PC, the resulting P{sub i} distribution in the cell was the same. Addition of choline instead of PC to the perfusate of compressed cells resulted in an accumulation of PC in the cytoplasmic compartment from choline kinase activity. In addition, PC phosphatase activity has been discovered associated with the cell wall. These results indicate that PC was rapidly hydrolyzed outside the cell and that choline and P{sub i} entered the cytosolic compartment where choline kinase re-forms PC.

  8. Effect of glyphosate on plant cell metabolism. 31P and 13C NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Gout, E; Bligny, R; Genix, P; Tissut, M; Douce, R

    1992-01-01

    The effect of glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl glycine; the active ingredient of Roundup herbicide) on plant cells metabolism was analysed by 31P and 13C NMR using suspension-cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L) cells. Cells were compressed in the NMR tube and perfused with an original arrangement enabling a tight control of the circulating nutrient medium. Addition of 1 mM glyphosate to the nutrient medium triggered the accumulation of shikimate (20-30 mumol g-1 cell wet weight within 50 h) and shikimate 3-phosphate (1-1.5 mumol g-1 cell wet weight within 50 h). From in vivo spectra it was demonstrated that these two compounds were accumulated in the cytoplasm where their concentrations reached potentially lethal levels. On the other hand, glyphosate present in the cytoplasmic compartment was extensively metabolized to yield aminomethylphosphonic acid which also accumulated in the cytoplasm. Finally, the results presented in this paper indicate that although the cell growth was stopped by glyphosate the cell respiration rates and the level of energy metabolism intermediates remained unchanged.

  9. Transport of phosphocholine in higher plant cells: 31P nuclear magnetic resonance studies.

    PubMed Central

    Gout, E; Bligny, R; Roby, C; Douce, R

    1990-01-01

    Phosphocholine (PC) is an abundant primary form of organic phosphate that is transported in plant xylem sap. Addition of PC to the perfusate of compressed Pi-starved sycamore cells monitored by 31P NMR spectroscopy resulted in an accumulation of PC and all the other phosphate esters in the cytoplasmic compartment. Addition of hemicholinium-3, an inhibitor of choline uptake, to the perfusate inhibited PC accumulation but not inorganic phosphate (Pi). When the Pi-starved cells were perfused with a medium containing either Pi or PC, the resulting Pi distribution in the cell was the same. Addition of choline instead of PC to the perfusate of compressed cells resulted in an accumulation of PC in the cytoplasmic compartment from choline kinase activity. In addition, PC phosphatase activity has been discovered associated with the cell wall. These results indicate that PC was rapidly hydrolyzed outside the cell and that choline and Pi entered the cytosolic compartment where choline kinase re-forms PC. PMID:11607080

  10. 31P NMR study of erythrocytes from a patient with hereditary pyrimidine-5'-nucleotidase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, M S; Angle, C R; Stohs, S J; Wu, S T; Salhany, J M; Eliot, R S; Markin, R S

    1983-01-01

    The composition of phosphate metabolites and the intracellular pH in erythrocytes from a patient with hereditary pyrimidine-5'-nucleotidase deficiency were examined using 31P NMR spectroscopy. Several resonances were identified in spectra from intact cells and from extracts. The 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate line intensities were normal but the NTP resonances were about twice normal due to the presence of millimolar quantities of pyrimidine phosphates. Several intense resonances were also observed in the diphosphodiester region of the spectrum. One compound contributing to these lines has been identified as cytidine diphosphocholine. The resonances of NTPs were in a position indicating that the additional triphosphates were also bound by Mg2+. Direct measurement shows that there is a nearly proportional increase in total cell Mg2+ in the patient's cells, in agreement with the interpretation of the spectra. The intracellular pH was about 0.2 unit lower in the patient's erythrocytes. This lower pH is due to the elevation in intracellular fixed negative charges and the shift in permeable anions consequent to the Donnan equilibrium. We suggest that the lower intracellular pH may explain the lower oxygen affinity of these cells in the presence of otherwise normal 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate levels and the increased Mg2+ triphosphates level, because the Mg2+ form of NTPs is known not to alter the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin under physiologic conditions. Furthermore, the lower intracellular pH can also explain the abnormalities in glycolytic intermediates observed for these cells. PMID:6296865

  11. Gated /sup 31/P NMR study of tetanic contraction in rat muscle depleted of phosphocreatine

    SciTech Connect

    Shoubridge, E.A.; Radda, G.K.

    1987-05-01

    Rats were fed a diet containing 1% ..beta..-guanidino-propionic acid (GPA) for 6-12 wk to deplete their muscles of phosphocreatine (PCr). Gated /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were obtained from the gastrocnemius-plantaris muscle at various time points during either a 1- or 3-s isometric tetanic contraction using a surface coil. The energy cost of a 1-s tetanus in unfatigued control rat muscle was 48.4 ..mu..mol ATP x g dry wt/sup -1/ x s/sup -1/ and was largely supplied by PCr; anaerobic glycogenolysis was negligible. In GPA-fed rats PCr was undetectable after 400 ms. This had no effect on initial force generated per gram, which was not significantly different from controls. Developed tension in a 3-s tetanus in GPA-fed rats could be divided into a peak phase (duration 0.8-0.9 s) and a plateau phase (65% peak tension) in which PCr was undetectable and the (ATP) was < 20% of that in control muscle. Energy from glycogenolysis was sufficient to maintain force generation at this submaximal level. Mean net glycogen utilization per 3-s tetanus was 78% greater than in control muscle. However, the observed decrease in intracellular pH was less than that expected from energy budget calculations, suggesting either increased buffering capacity or modulation of ATP hydrolysis in the muscles of GPA-fed rats. The results demonstrate that the transport role of PCr is not essential in contracting muscle in GPA-fed rats. PCr is probably important in this regard in the larger fibers of control muscle. Although fast-twitch muscles depleted of PCr have nearly twice the glycogen reserves of control muscle, glycogenolysis is limited in its capacity to fill the role of PCr as an energy buffer under conditions of maximum ATP turnover.

  12. High energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wosiek, B.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results on high energy nucleus-nucleus interactions are presented. The data are discussed within the framework of standard super-position models and from the point-of-view of the possible formation of new states of matter in heavy ion collisions.

  13. Detergent-like properties of magainin antibiotic peptides: a 31P solid-state NMR spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Bechinger, Burkhard

    2005-06-15

    (31)P solid-state NMR spectroscopy has been used to investigate the macroscopic phase behavior of phospholipid bilayers in the presence of increasing amounts of magainin antibiotic peptides. Addition of >1 mol% magainin 2 to gel-phase DMPC or liquid crystalline POPC membranes respectively, results in (31)P NMR spectra that are characterized by the coexistence of isotropic signals and line shapes typical for phospholipid bilayers. The isotropic signal intensity is a function of temperature and peptide concentration. At peptide concentrations >4 mol% of the resulting phospholipid (31)P NMR spectra are characteristic of magnetically oriented POPC bilayers suggesting the formation of small disk-like micelles or perforated sheets. In contrast, addition of magainin to acidic phospholipids results in homogenous bilayer-type (31)P NMR spectra with reduced chemical shift anisotropies. The results presented are in good agreement with the interfacial insertion of magainin helices with an alignment parallel to the surface of the phospholipid bilayers. The resulting curvature strain results in detergent-like properties of the amphipathic helical peptides.

  14. Forms and lability of phosphorus in algae and aquatic macrophytes characterized by solution 31P NMR coupled with enzymatic hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased information on forms and lability of phosphorus (P) in aquatic macrophytes and algae is crucial for better understanding of P biogeochemical cycling in eutrophic lakes. In this work, solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy coupled with enzymatic hydrolysis (EH) was used ...

  15. Anisotropic indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling in InP: 31P CP NMR study under slow MAS condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Takahiro; Hashi, Kenjiro; Goto, Atsushi; Shimizu, Tadashi; Ohki, Shinobu

    2006-02-01

    The indirect nuclear spin-spin interaction tensor between neighboring 113,115In- 31P spins in Fe-doped InP semiconductor has been studied by 31P NMR spectra measured using CP of 113In → 31P and 115In → 31P under slow MAS condition. The isotropic ( Jiso) and anisotropic ( Janiso = 2/3[ J∥ - J⊥]) parts of the indirect interaction tensor are obtained from the spectral simulation. The acceptable combinations of these values are found to be as follows: ( Jiso, Janiso) = (224 ± 5, 500 ± 100 Hz) or (-224 ± 5, 2100 ± 100 Hz). Although, the coupling constants estimated in this study are slightly different from previously reported values of ∣ Jiso∣ = 350 Hz, Janiso = 1298 Hz [M. Engelsberg, R.E. Norberg, Phys. Rev. B 5 (1972) 3395] and of ∣ Jiso∣ = 225 ± 10, Janiso = (813 ± 50) or (1733 ± 50) Hz [M. Tomaselli et al., Phys. Rev. B 58 (1998) 8627], all of these has the trend that Janiso is rather larger than Jiso.

  16. Chemical Characterization and Water Content Determination of Bio-Oils Obtained from Various Biomass Species using 31P NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    David, K.; Ben, H.; Muzzy, J.; Feik, C.; Iisa, K.; Ragauskas, A.

    2012-03-01

    Pyrolysis is a promising approach to utilize biomass for biofuels. One of the key challenges for this conversion is how to analyze complicated components in the pyrolysis oils. Water contents of pyrolysis oils are normally analyzed by Karl Fischer titration. The use of 2-chloro-4,4,5,5,-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by {sup 31}P NMR analysis has been used to quantitatively analyze the structure of hydroxyl groups in lignin and whole biomass. Results: {sup 31}P NMR analysis of pyrolysis oils is a novel technique to simultaneously characterize components and analyze water contents in pyrolysis oils produced from various biomasses. The water contents of various pyrolysis oils range from 16 to 40 wt%. The pyrolysis oils obtained from Loblolly pine had higher guaiacyl content, while that from oak had a higher syringyl content. Conclusion: The comparison with Karl Fischer titration shows that {sup 31}P NMR could also reliably be used to measure the water content of pyrolysis oils. Simultaneously with analysis of water content, quantitative characterization of hydroxyl groups, including aliphatic, C-5 substituted/syringyl, guaiacyl, p-hydroxyl phenyl and carboxylic hydroxyl groups, could also be provided by {sup 31}P NMR analysis.

  17. Simultaneous determination of phenolic compounds and triterpenic acids in oregano growing wild in Greece by 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Agiomyrgianaki, Alexia; Dais, Photis

    2012-11-01

    (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to detect and quantify simultaneously a large number of phenolic compounds and the two triterpenic acids, ursolic acid and oleanolic acid, extracted from two oregano species Origanum onites and Origanum vulgare ssp. Hirtum using two different organic solvents ethanol and ethyl acetate. This analytical method is based on the derivatization of the hydroxyl and carboxyl groups of these compounds with the phosphorous reagent 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxa phospholane and the identification of the phosphitylated compounds on the basis of the (31)P chemical shifts. Unambiguous assignment of the (31)P NMR chemical shifts of the dihydroxy- and polyhydroxy-phenols in oregano species as well as those of the triterpenic acids was achieved upon comparison with the chemical shifts of model compounds assigned by using two-dimensional NMR techniques. Furthermore, the integration of the appropriate signals of the hydroxyl derivatives in the corresponding (31)P NMR spectra and the use of the phosphitylated cyclohexanol as an internal standard allowed the quantification of these compounds. The validity of this technique for quantitative measurements was thoroughly examined.

  18. Towards the versatile DFT and MP2 computational schemes for 31P NMR chemical shifts taking into account relativistic corrections.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Sergey V; Rusakov, Yury Yu; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2014-11-01

    The main factors affecting the accuracy and computational cost of the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts in the representative series of organophosphorous compounds are examined at the density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) levels. At the DFT level, the best functionals for the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts are those of Keal and Tozer, KT2 and KT3. Both at the DFT and MP2 levels, the most reliable basis sets are those of Jensen, pcS-2 or larger, and those of Pople, 6-311G(d,p) or larger. The reliable basis sets of Dunning's family are those of at least penta-zeta quality that precludes their practical consideration. An encouraging finding is that basically, the locally dense basis set approach resulting in a dramatic decrease in computational cost is justified in the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts within the 1-2-ppm error. Relativistic corrections to (31)P NMR absolute shielding constants are of major importance reaching about 20-30 ppm (ca 7%) improving (not worsening!) the agreement of calculation with experiment. Further better agreement with the experiment by 1-2 ppm can be obtained by taking into account solvent effects within the integral equation formalism polarizable continuum model solvation scheme. We recommend the GIAO-DFT-KT2/pcS-3//pcS-2 scheme with relativistic corrections and solvent effects taken into account as the most versatile computational scheme for the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts characterized by a mean absolute error of ca 9 ppm in the range of 550 ppm.

  19. Regional Differences in Muscle Energy Metabolism in Human Muscle by 31P-Chemical Shift Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kime, Ryotaro; Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Hongo, Yoshinori; Ohno, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Ayumi; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported significant region-dependent differences in the fiber-type composition of human skeletal muscle. It is therefore hypothesized that there is a difference between the deep and superficial parts of muscle energy metabolism during exercise. We hypothesized that the inorganic phosphate (Pi)/phosphocreatine (PCr) ratio of the superficial parts would be higher, compared with the deep parts, as the work rate increases, because the muscle fiber-type composition of the fast-type may be greater in the superficial parts compared with the deep parts. This study used two-dimensional 31Phosphorus Chemical Shift Imaging (31P-CSI) to detect differences between the deep and superficial parts of the human leg muscles during dynamic knee extension exercise. Six healthy men participated in this study (age 27±1 year, height 169.4±4.1 cm, weight 65.9±8.4 kg). The experiments were carried out with a 1.5-T superconducting magnet with a 5-in. diameter circular surface coil. The subjects performed dynamic one-legged knee extension exercise in the prone position, with the transmit-receive coil placed under the right quadriceps muscles in the magnet. The subjects pulled down an elastic rubber band attached to the ankle at a frequency of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 Hz for 320 s each. The intracellular pH (pHi) was calculated from the median chemical shift of the Pi peak relative to PCr. No significant difference in Pi/PCr was observed between the deep and the superficial parts of the quadriceps muscles at rest. The Pi/PCr of the superficial parts was not significantly increased with increasing work rate. Compared with the superficial areas, the Pi/PCr of the deep parts was significantly higher (p<0.05) at 1 Hz. The pHi showed no significant difference between the two parts. These results suggest that muscle oxidative metabolism is different between deep and superficial parts of quadriceps muscles during dynamic exercise.

  20. Discovery and Classification of Nova in M31 : P60-M31-081230

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, M. M.; Rau, A.; Salvato, M.; Cenko, S. B.; Ofek, E. O.; Quimby, R.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    2009-01-01

    On UT 2008 Dec 30.207, P60-FasTING (Palomar 60-inch Fast Transients In Nearby Galaxies) discovered an optical transient in M31 at RA(J2000) = 00:43:05.027, DEC(J2000)=+41:17:52.25, offset from the nucleus by 233.4"E,103.8"N. P60-M31-081230 had a brightness of g = 20.5 +/- 0.2 at discovery. It was not detected by P60 to g > 22.0 on Dec 29.140. There is no counterpart in SIMBAD. Follow-up spectroscopy with the Double Beam Spectrograph on the Palomar Hale telescope on Dec 31.104 revealed prominent Balmer emission and strong P Cygni profiles of several Fe II lines.

  1. Discovery of Possible Nova in M31 : P60-M31-080913

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, M. M.; Cenko, S. B.; Rau, A.; Ofek, E. O.; Quimby, R.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    2008-09-01

    On UT 2008 Sep 13.18, P60-FasTING (Palomar 60-inch Fast Transients In Nearby Galaxies) discovered a possible nova in M31 at RA(J2000) = 00:41:46.72, DEC(J2000) = 41:07:52.1, offset from the nucleus by 10.8'W, 8.3'S. P60- M31-080913 has a brightness of g = 19.0 +/- 0.2 at discovery (photometric calibration wrt NOMAD catalog). It is further confirmed to rise to g=18.1 on Sep 14.18. It is not detected to g > 21.5 on images obtained on Sep 12.30.

  2. Discovery of Possible Nova in M31 : P60-M31-080915

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, M. M.; Cenko, S. B.; Rau, A.; Ofek, E. O.; Quimby, R.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    2008-09-01

    On UT 2008 Sep 15.36, P60-FasTING (Palomar 60-inch Fast Transients In Nearby Galaxies) discovered a possible nova in M31 at RA(J2000) = 00:42:51.42, DEC(J2000) = 41:01:54.0, offset from the nucleus by 1.34'E, 14.24'S. P60-M31-080915 has a brightness of g=19.1 +/- 0.2 at discovery (photometric calibration wrt NOMAD catalog). It is further confirmed to rise to g=17.6 on Sep 16.16. It is not detected, with 3-sigma upper limits of g > 20.5, g > 21.0, g > 21.7 on Sep 14.16, Sep 13.39 and Sep 11.39 respectively.

  3. Site-specificity of ethanol-induced dephosphorylation of rat hepatocyte keratins 8 and 18: A 31P NMR study.

    PubMed

    Eckert, B S; Yeagle, P L

    1996-01-01

    Chronic feeding of ethanol to rats results in disorganization of the keratin intermediate filament network within hepatocytes. Previous studies from this laboratory have shown that intermediate filament organization in cultured cells is related to the phosphorylation state of the proteins. Therefore, we have examined the phosphorylation state of hepatocyte keratins from control and ethanol-fed rats. Feeding ethanol to rats results in dephosphorylation of one site on keratin 8 and one site on keratin 18 at all time points beginning with 6 weeks of ethanol treatment. Dephosphorylation was detected by phosphate analysis and by two-dimensional electrophoresis in which a change in isoelectric point of keratins from ethanol-fed rats was observed. These observations indicate that dephosphorylation of keratins in ethanol-fed animals may be an early step in alcoholic hepatitis which has occurred by 6 weeks of ethanol treatment. To further characterize keratin dephosphorylation in ethanol-fed rats, we used 31P NMR spectroscopy to classify the dephosphorylation site(s). Hepatocyte keratins were purified and solubilized in 9.5 M urea, 10 mM Tris-Cl, pH 8.1. 31P NMR spectra were obtained at 109 MHz, in 10 mm tubes at 30 degrees C. Samples of hepatocyte keratins were phosphorylated with A-kinase, protein kinase C, casein kinase II or Ca/CAM kinase and these samples were analyzed by 31P NMR spectroscopy. The resulting spectra were used as standards to compare the 31P chemical shifts of the resonances produced by these kinases with the phosphorus resonances of control and experimental samples. The 31P NMR spectrum of control hepatocyte keratins shows three resonances at 0.7, 4 and 5 ppm. In vitro phosphorylation by A-kinase produces a resonance at 4 ppm which is distinctly different from the resonance produced by each of the other kinases. In hepatocyte keratins from ethanol-fed animals, the resonance at 4 ppm was missing from the spectrum. These observations indicate that the

  4. Calculating the response of NMR shielding tensor σ(31P) and 2J(31P,13C) coupling constants in nucleic acid phosphate to coordination of the Mg2+ cation.

    PubMed

    Benda, Ladislav; Schneider, Bohdan; Sychrovský, Vladimír

    2011-03-24

    Dependence of NMR (31)P shielding tensor and (2)J(P,C) coupling constants on solvation of nucleic acid phosphate by Mg(2+) and water was studied using methods of bioinformatic structural analyses of crystallographic data and DFT B3LYP calculations of NMR parameters. The effect of solvent dynamics on NMR parameters was calculated using molecular dynamic. The NMR calculations for representative solvation patterns determined in crystals of B-DNA and A-RNA molecules pointed out the crucial importance of local Mg(2+) coordination geometry, including hydration by explicit water molecules and necessity of dynamical averaging over the solvent reorientation. The dynamically averaged (31)P chemical shift decreased by 2-9.5 ppm upon Mg(2+) coordination, the chemical shielding anisotropy increased by 0-20 ppm, and the (2)J(P,C5') coupling magnitude decreased by 0.2-1.8 Hz upon Mg(2+) coordination. The calculated decrease of the (31)P chemical shift is in excellent agreement with the 1.5-10 ppm decrease of the phosphorothioate (31)P chemical shift upon Cd(2+) coordination probed experimentally in hammerhead ribozyme (Suzumura; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 8230-8236; Osborne; et al., Biochemistry 2009, 48, 10654-10664). None of the dynamically averaged NMR parameters unequivocally distinguishes the site-specific Mg(2+) coordination to one of the two nonesterified phosphate oxygen atoms of the phosphate determined by bioinformatic analyses. By comparing the limit cases of static and dynamically averaged solvation, we propose that mobility of the solvent has a dramatic impact on NMR parameters of nucleic acid phosphate and must be taken into account for their accurate modeling.

  5. A simple ergometer for 31P NMR spectroscopy during dynamic forearm exercise in a whole body magnetic resonance imaging system.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, H; Nishida, M; Anzai, T; Yonezawa, K; Fukuda, H; Sato, I; Yasuda, H

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct a simple ergometer for the 31P NMR spectroscopic study of dynamic forearm exercise in a whole body magnetic resonance imaging system and to evaluate the total system and the physiological response to this type of exercise using a multistage protocol. The system consisted of a completely nonmagnetic assembly including a rope, pulley and weights. The work of lifting weights was quantitated. The exercise protocol of 1-min increments in work load enabled subjects to reach maximal effort. Phosphocreatine decreased linearly with an increase in work load and was accompanied by a fall in pH and an increase in lactate level in the antecubital vein of the exercising forearm; concomitantly, there was a slight increase in whole body oxygen uptake and heart rate. Spectroscopy gave reproducible results using this exercise protocol. These results demonstrate that this system provides a reliable means for performing 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies during forearm exercise.

  6. 31P and 19F NMR studies of glycophorin-reconstituted membranes: preferential interaction of glycophorin with phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Glycophorin A, a major glycoprotein of the erythrocyte membrane, has been incorporated into small unilamellar vesicles composed of a variety of pure and mixed phospholipids. Nuclear spin labels including 31P and 19F have been used at natural abundance or have been synthetically incorporated in lipids to act as probes of lipid-protein interaction. Interactions produce broadening of resonances in several cases and it can be used to demonstrate preferential interaction of certain lipids with glycophorin. 31P and 19F probes show a strong preferential interaction of glycophorin with phosphatidylserine over phosphatidylcholine. There is some evidence that interactions are more pronounced at the inner surface of the bilayer and these results are rationalized in terms of the asymmetric distribution of protein and lipid.

  7. 2D 31P solid state NMR spectroscopy, electronic structure and thermochemistry of PbP7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benndorf, Christopher; Hohmann, Andrea; Schmidt, Peer; Eckert, Hellmut; Johrendt, Dirk; Schäfer, Konrad; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Phase pure polycrystalline PbP7 was prepared from the elements via a lead flux. Crystalline pieces with edge-lengths up to 1 mm were obtained. The assignment of the previously published 31P solid state NMR spectrum to the seven distinct crystallographic sites was accomplished by radio-frequency driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR) experiments. As commonly found in other solid polyphosphides there is no obvious correlation between the 31P chemical shift and structural parameters. PbP7 decomposes incongruently under release of phosphorus forming liquid lead as remainder. The thermal decomposition starts at T>550 K with a vapor pressure almost similar to that of red phosphorus. Electronic structure calculations reveal PbP7 as a semiconductor according to the Zintl description and clearly shows the stereo-active Pb-6s2 lone pairs in the electron localization function ELF.

  8. Distinguishing Bicontinuous Lipid Cubic Phases from Isotropic Membrane Morphologies Using 31P Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu; Yao, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Nonlamellar lipid membranes are frequently induced by proteins that fuse, bend, and cut membranes. Understanding the mechanism of action of these proteins requires the elucidation of the membrane morphologies that they induce. While hexagonal phases and lamellar phases are readily identified by their characteristic solid-state NMR lineshapes, bicontinuous lipid cubic phases are more difficult to discern, since the static NMR spectra of cubic-phase lipids consist of an isotropic 31P or 2H peak, indistinguishable from the spectra of isotropic membrane morphologies such as micelles and small vesicles. To date, small-angle X-ray scattering is the only method to identify bicontinuous lipid cubic phases. To explore unique NMR signatures of lipid cubic phases, we first describe the orientation distribution of lipid molecules in cubic phases and simulate the static 31P chemical shift lineshapes of oriented cubic-phase membranes in the limit of slow lateral diffusion. We then show that 31P T2 relaxation times differ significantly between isotropic micelles and cubic-phase membranes: the latter exhibit two-orders-of magnitude shorter T2 relaxation times. These differences are explained by the different timescales of lipid lateral diffusion on the cubic-phase surface versus the timescales of micelle tumbling. Using this relaxation NMR approach, we investigated a DOPE membrane containing the transmembrane domain (TMD) of a viral fusion protein. The static 31P spectrum of DOPE shows an isotropic peak, whose T2 relaxation times correspond to that of a cubic phase. Thus, the viral fusion protein TMD induces negative Gaussian curvature, which is an intrinsic characteristic of cubic phases, to the DOPE membrane. This curvature induction has important implications to the mechanism of virus-cell fusion. This study establishes a simple NMR diagnostic probe of lipid cubic phases, which is expected to be useful for studying many protein-induced membrane remodeling phenomena in biology

  9. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from {sup 31}P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McElderry, John-David P.; Zhu, Peizhi; Mroue, Kamal H.; Xu, Jiadi; Pavan, Barbara; Fang, Ming; Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Franceschi, Renny T.; Holl, Mark M.Banaszak; Tecklenburg, Mary M.J.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-10-15

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and {sup 31}P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse {sup 31}P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}ν{sub 1} bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3–10.3 wt% CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the {sup 31}P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ν{sub 1} band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals. - Graphical abstract: Carbonated apatite shows an abrupt change in spectral (NMR, Raman) and morphological (AFM) properties at a composition of about one carbonate substitution per unit cell. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Crystallinity (XRD), particle size (AFM) of carbonated apatites and bone mineral. • Linear relationships among crystallinity, {sup 31}P NMR and Raman inverse bandwidths. • Low and high carbonated apatites use different charge-balancing ion-loss mechanism.

  10. Improvement of (31)P NMR spectral resolution by 8-hydroxyquinoline precipitation of paramagnetic Fe and Mn in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shiming; Xu, Di; Li, Bin; Fan, Chengxin; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2010-04-01

    Solution (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is currently the main method for the characterization of phosphorus (P) forms in environment samples. However, identification and quantification of P compounds may be hampered by poor resolution of spectra caused by paramagnetic Fe and Mn. In this study, a novel technique was developed to improve spectral resolution by removing paramagnetic Fe and Mn from alkaline extracts via 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HOQ) precipitation. Batch experiments showed that both Fe and Mn were effectively removed by the precipitation at pH 9.0, with the removal efficiencies of 83-91% for Fe and 67-78% for Mn from the extracts of five different environmental samples, while little effect was found on concentration of total P. The (31)P NMR analysis of a model P solution showed that addition of 8-HOQ and its precipitation with metal ions did not alter P forms. Further analyses of the five extracts with (31)P NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that the 8-HOQ precipitation was an ideal method compared with the present postextraction techniques, such as bicarbonate dithionate (BD), EDTA and Chelex-100 treatments, by improving spectral resolution to a large extent with no detrimental effects on P forms.

  11. Forms and Lability of Phosphorus in Algae and Aquatic Macrophytes Characterized by Solution 31P NMR Coupled with Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Weiying; Zhu, Yuanrong; Wu, Fengchang; He, Zhongqi; Zhang, Chen; Giesy, John P.

    2016-11-01

    Solution Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy coupled with enzymatic hydrolysis (EH) with commercially available phosphatases was used to characterize phosphorus (P) compounds in extracts of the dominant aquatic macrophytes and algae in a eutrophic lake. Total extractable organic P (Po) concentrations ranged from 504 to 1643 mg kg‑1 and 2318 to 8395 mg kg‑1 for aquatic macrophytes and algae, respectively. Using 31P NMR spectroscopy, 11 Po species were detected in the mono- and diester region. Additionally, orthophosphate, pyrophosphate and phosphonates were also detected. Using EH, phytate-like P was identified as the prevalent class of enzyme-labile Po, followed by labile monoester- and diester-P. Comparison of the NMR and EH data indicated that the distribution pattern of major P forms in the samples determined by the two methods was similar (r = 0.712, p < 0.05). Additional 31P NMR spectroscopic analysis of extracts following EH showed significant decreases in the monoester and pyrophosphate regions, with a corresponding increase in the orthophosphate signal, as compared to unhydrolyzed extracts. Based on these quantity and hydrolysis data, we proposed that recycling of Po in vegetative biomass residues is an important mechanism for long-term self-regulation of available P for algal blooming in eutrophic lakes.

  12. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from 31P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis

    PubMed Central

    McElderry, John-David P.; Zhu, Peizhi; Mroue, Kamal H.; Xu, Jiadi; Pavan, Barbara; Fang, Ming; Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Franceschi, Renny T.; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak; Tecklenburg, Mary M.J.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and 31P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse 31P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO43− ν1 bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3–10.3 wt% CO32− range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the 31P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ν1 band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals. PMID:24273344

  13. Analysis of monoglycerides, diglycerides, sterols, and free fatty acids in coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) oil by 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dayrit, Fabian M; Buenafe, Olivia Erin M; Chainani, Edward T; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S

    2008-07-23

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( (31)P NMR) was used to differentiate virgin coconut oil (VCO) from refined, bleached, deodorized coconut oil (RCO). Monoglycerides (MGs), diglycerides (DGs), sterols, and free fatty acids (FFAs) in VCO and RCO were converted into dioxaphospholane derivatives and analyzed by (31)P NMR. On the average, 1-MG was found to be higher in VCO (0.027%) than RCO (0.019%). 2-MG was not detected in any of the samples down to a detection limit of 0.014%. On the average, total DGs were lower in VCO (1.55%) than RCO (4.10%). When plotted in terms of the ratio [1,2-DG/total DGs] versus total DGs, VCO and RCO samples grouped separately. Total sterols were higher in VCO (0.096%) compared with RCO (0.032%), and the FFA content was 8 times higher in VCO than RCO (0.127% vs 0.015%). FFA determination by (31)P NMR and titration gave comparable results. Principal components analysis shows that the 1,2-DG, 1,3-DG, and FFAs are the most important parameters for differentiating VCO from RCO.

  14. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from (31)P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis.

    PubMed

    McElderry, John-David P; Zhu, Peizhi; Mroue, Kamal H; Xu, Jiadi; Pavan, Barbara; Fang, Ming; Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H; Franceschi, Renny T; Holl, Mark M Banaszak; Tecklenburg, Mary M J; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Morris, Michael D

    2013-10-01

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and (31)P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse (31)P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO4(3-) ν1 bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3-10.3 wt% CO3(2-) range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the (31)P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ν1 band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals.

  15. Ab initio and DFT study of 31P-NMR chemical shifts of sphingomyelin and dihydrosphingomyelin lipid molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimori, K.; Kawabe, H.; Nagao, H.; Nishikawa, K.

    One of the phospholipids, sphingomyelin (SM, N-acyl-sphingosine-1-phosphorylcholine) is the most abundant component of mammalian membranes in brain, nervous tissues, and human ocular lens. It plays an important role for apoptosis, aging, and signal transduction. Recently, Yappert and coworkers have shown that human lens sphingomyelin and its hydrogenated derivative, dihydrosphingomyelin (DHSM) are interacted with Ca2+ ions to develop human cataracts. Previously, we have investigated conformational differences between an isolated SM/DHSM molecule and Ca2+-coordinated form by using density functional theory (DFT) for geometry optimization and normal mode analysis. As a result, one of stable conformers of SMs has a hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl group and phosphate group, whereas another conformer has a hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl and phosphate amide group. In this study, 31P-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) shielding constants of the obtained conformers are investigated by using ab initio and DFT with NMR-gauge invariant atomic orbitals (NMR-GIAO) calculations. The experimental 31P-NMR chemical shifts of SMs and DHSMs have significant small value around 0.1 ppm. We consider the relative conformational changes between SMs and DHSMs affect the slight deviations of 31P-NMR chemical shifts, and discuss intramolecular hydrogen bondings and the solvent effect in relation to NMR experimental reference.

  16. Forms and Lability of Phosphorus in Algae and Aquatic Macrophytes Characterized by Solution 31P NMR Coupled with Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Weiying; Zhu, Yuanrong; Wu, Fengchang; He, Zhongqi; Zhang, Chen; Giesy, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Solution Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy coupled with enzymatic hydrolysis (EH) with commercially available phosphatases was used to characterize phosphorus (P) compounds in extracts of the dominant aquatic macrophytes and algae in a eutrophic lake. Total extractable organic P (Po) concentrations ranged from 504 to 1643 mg kg−1 and 2318 to 8395 mg kg−1 for aquatic macrophytes and algae, respectively. Using 31P NMR spectroscopy, 11 Po species were detected in the mono- and diester region. Additionally, orthophosphate, pyrophosphate and phosphonates were also detected. Using EH, phytate-like P was identified as the prevalent class of enzyme-labile Po, followed by labile monoester- and diester-P. Comparison of the NMR and EH data indicated that the distribution pattern of major P forms in the samples determined by the two methods was similar (r = 0.712, p < 0.05). Additional 31P NMR spectroscopic analysis of extracts following EH showed significant decreases in the monoester and pyrophosphate regions, with a corresponding increase in the orthophosphate signal, as compared to unhydrolyzed extracts. Based on these quantity and hydrolysis data, we proposed that recycling of Po in vegetative biomass residues is an important mechanism for long-term self-regulation of available P for algal blooming in eutrophic lakes. PMID:27849040

  17. (31)P-MRS of healthy human brain: ATP synthesis, metabolite concentrations, pH, and T1 relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jimin; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2015-11-01

    The conventional method for measuring brain ATP synthesis is (31)P saturation transfer (ST), a technique typically dependent on prolonged pre-saturation with γ-ATP. In this study, ATP synthesis rate in resting human brain is evaluated using EBIT (exchange kinetics by band inversion transfer), a technique based on slow recovery of γ-ATP magnetization in the absence of B1 field following co-inversion of PCr and ATP resonances with a short adiabatic pulse. The unidirectional rate constant for the Pi → γ-ATP reaction is 0.21 ± 0.04 s(-1) and the ATP synthesis rate is 9.9 ± 2.1 mmol min(-1)  kg(-1) in human brain (n = 12 subjects), consistent with the results by ST. Therefore, EBIT could be a useful alternative to ST in studying brain energy metabolism in normal physiology and under pathological conditions. In addition to ATP synthesis, all detectable (31)P signals are analyzed to determine the brain concentration of phosphorus metabolites, including UDPG at around 10 ppm, a previously reported resonance in liver tissues and now confirmed in human brain. Inversion recovery measurements indicate that UDPG, like its diphosphate analogue NAD, has apparent T1 shorter than that of monophosphates (Pi, PMEs, and PDEs) but longer than that of triphosphate ATP, highlighting the significance of the (31)P-(31)P dipolar mechanism in T1 relaxation of polyphosphates. Another interesting finding is the observation of approximately 40% shorter T1 for intracellular Pi relative to extracellular Pi, attributed to the modulation by the intracellular phosphoryl exchange reaction Pi ↔ γ-ATP. The sufficiently separated intra- and extracellular Pi signals also permit the distinction of pH between intra- and extracellular environments (pH 7.0 versus pH 7.4). In summary, quantitative (31)P MRS in combination with ATP synthesis, pH, and T1 relaxation measurements may offer a promising tool to detect biochemical alterations at early stages of brain dysfunctions and diseases.

  18. Chemical characterization of a prominent phosphomonoester resonance from mammalian brain. 31P and 1H NMR analysis at 4.7 and 14.1 tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettegrew, J. W.; Kopp, S. J.; Dadok, J.; Minshew, N. J.; Feliksik, J. M.; Glonek, T.; Cohen, M. M.

    A prominent 31P NMR resonance at 3.84 ppm in mammalian brain has been identified as ethanolamine phosphate. The identification was based on 1H and 31P NMR findings (including pH titrations) at 4.7 and 14.1 T, as well as thin-layer chromatography studies. We previously incorrectly assigned the 3.84 ppm resonance to ribose-5-phosphate. The incorrect assignment occurred because the two compounds have very similar 31P chemical shifts, and because we did not carefully consider the effects of counter ions and ionic strengths when interpreting the 31P chemical shifts. In separate preliminary studies we have demonstrated ethanolamine phosphate to be high in immature developing brain and in the degenerating brain of Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease patients. Ethanolamine phosphate may therefore serve as a sensitive marker of membrane phospholipid turnover for both in vitro and in vivo31P NMR studies.

  19. sup 31 P and sup 2 H NMR studies of structure and motion in bilayers of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, R. )

    1988-10-04

    The structural and motional properties of mixed bilayers of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) have been examined by using wide-line {sup 31}P, {sup 14}N, and {sup 2H} NMR. {sup 2}H and {sup 14}N NMR data showed that in mixed bilayers containing both PC and PE the conformations of the head-group moieties are essentially identical with those observed for bilayers containing a single phospholipid species. Equimolar amounts of cholesterol induce also only a small change in head-group conformation. For all phospholipid mixtures studied, the {sup 31}P T{sub 1} relaxation was homogeneous over the whole powder spectrum and could be fitted to a single-exponential decay. The {sup 31}P vs temperature profiles were analyzed by a simple correlation model. The presence of equimolar amounts of PE containing either the same (POPE) or a different (Escherichia coli PE) fatty acid composition had essentially no effect on the rate of rotational diffusion of the phosphate groups, with the correlation time being found to be 0.68 ns at 20{degree}C. The presence of equimolar amounts of cholesterol decreased the correlation time to 0.65 ns, and also the activation energy was reduced to 22.6 kJ mol{sup {minus}1}. The authors interpret the decrease in activation energy as being due to the spacing effect of cholesterol which reduces the H-bonding interactions between head-groups, allowing them to rotate more freely. For all cases examined, the rotational diffusion of the phosphate moieties was slower than that observed for the rigid glycerol backbone of the molecule, the latter probably corresponding to overall phospholipid rotation.

  20. Quantitative ATP synthesis in human liver measured by localized 31P spectroscopy using the magnetization transfer experiment.

    PubMed

    Schmid, A I; Chmelík, M; Szendroedi, J; Krssák, M; Brehm, A; Moser, E; Roden, M

    2008-06-01

    The liver plays a central role in intermediate metabolism. Accumulation of liver fat (steatosis) predisposes to various liver diseases. Steatosis and abnormal muscle energy metabolism are found in insulin-resistant and type-2 diabetic states. To examine hepatic energy metabolism, we measured hepatocellular lipid content, using proton MRS, and rates of hepatic ATP synthesis in vivo, using the 31P magnetization transfer experiment. A suitable localization scheme was developed and applied to the measurements of longitudinal relaxation times (T1) in six healthy volunteers and the ATP-synthesis experiment in nine healthy volunteers. Liver 31P spectra were modelled and quantified successfully using a time domain fit and the AMARES (advanced method for accurate, robust and efficient spectral fitting of MRS data with use of prior knowledge) algorithm describing the essential components of the dataset. The measured T1 relaxation times are comparable to values reported previously at lower field strengths. All nine subjects in whom saturation transfer was measured had low hepatocellular lipid content (1.5 +/- 0.2% MR signal; mean +/- SEM). The exchange rate constant (k) obtained was 0.30 +/- 0.02 s(-1), and the rate of ATP synthesis was 29.5 +/- 1.8 mM/min. The measured rate of ATP synthesis is about three times higher than in human skeletal muscle and human visual cortex, but only about half of that measured in perfused rat liver. In conclusion, 31P MRS at 3 T provides sufficient sensitivity to detect magnetization transfer effects and can therefore be used to assess ATP synthesis in human liver.

  1. Using 31P-NMR to investigate dynamics of soil phosphorus compounds in the Rothamsted Long Term Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Martin; Turner, Ben; Granger, Steve; Hooper, Tony; Darch, Tegan; Hawkins, Jane; Yuan, Huimin; McGrath, Steve

    2015-04-01

    The technique of 31P-NMR spectroscopy has done more to advance the knowledge of phosphorus forms (especially organic phosphorus) in environmental samples than any other method. The technique has advanced such that specific compounds can be identified where previously only broad categories such as orthophosphate monoesters and diesters were distinguishable. The Soil Archive and Long Term Experiments at Rothamsted Research, UK, potentially provides an unequalled opportunity to use this technique to observe changes in soil phosphorus compounds with time and under different treatments, thereby enhancing our understanding of phosphorus cycling and use by plants. Some of the earliest work using this technique on soils was carried out by Hawkes et al. in 1984 and this used soils from two of the oldest Rothamsted Long Term Experiments, namely Highfield and Park Grass. Here we revisit the samples studied in this early work and reanalyse them using current methodology to demonstrate how the 31P-NMR technique has advanced. We also present results from a study on the phosphorus chemistry in soils along the Hoosfield acid strip (Rothamsted, UK), where a pH gradient from 3.7 to 7.8 occurs in a single soil with little variation in total phosphorus (mean ± standard deviation 399 ± 27 mg P kg-1). Soil pH was found to be an important factor in determining the proportion of phosphomonoesters and phosphodiesters in the soil organic phosphorus, although total organic phosphorus concentrations were a relatively consistent proportion of the total soil phosphorus (36 ± 2%) irrespective of soil pH. Key words. 31P-NMR, soil organic phosphorus, long term experiments, Hoosfield acid strip

  2. Assessment of membrane protection by /sup 31/P-NMR effects of lidocaine on calcium-paradox in myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Hirosumi; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Teragaki, Masakazu; Takeuchi, Kazuhide; Takeda, Takeda; Ikata, Mari; Ishikawa, Makoto; Miura, Iwao

    1989-01-01

    In studying calcium paradox, perfused rat hearts were used to investigate the myocardial protective effects of lidocaine. Intracellular contents of phosphates were measured using the /sup 31/P-NMR method. In hearts reexposed to calcium, following 3 minute calcium-free perfusion, a rapid contracture occurred, followed by rapid and complete disappearance of intracellular phosphates with no resumption of cardiac function. In hearts where lidocaine was administered from the onset of the calcium-free perfusion until 2 minutes following the onset of reexposure to calcium, both intracellular phosphates and cardiac contractility were maintained. Therefore, it can be said that cell membranes were protected by lidocaine.

  3. Phytate degradation by lactic acid bacteria and yeasts during the wholemeal dough fermentation: a 31P NMR study.

    PubMed

    Reale, Anna; Mannina, Luisa; Tremonte, Patrizio; Sobolev, Anatoli P; Succi, Mariantonietta; Sorrentino, Elena; Coppola, Raffaele

    2004-10-06

    myo-Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) is the main source of phosphorus in cereal grains, and therefore, in bakery products. Different microorganisms such as yeasts and lactic acid bacteria have phytase enzymes able to hydrolyze IP6 during the wholemeal breadmaking. In this paper, the phytase activity of Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus curvatus, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, isolated from southern Italian sourdoughs, is assayed using the (31)P NMR technique. The sourdough technology based on the use of lactic acid bacteria in the breadmaking is finally suggested.

  4. 31P{1H}NMR and carbonyl force constants of unsymmetrical bidentate phosphine complexes of group (VI) metal carbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesu Raj, Joe Gerald; Pathak, Devendra Deo; Kapoor, Pramesh N.

    2015-05-01

    In our present work we report synthesis of an unsymmetrical diphos ligand, 1-diphenylphosphino-2-di-m-tolylphosphinoethane and its coordinate complexes with group (VI) metal carbonyls such as Cr(CO)6 Mo(CO)6 and W(CO)6. The synthesized ligand and its complexes have been completely characterized by elemental analyses, FTIR, 1HNMR, 31P{1H}NMR and FAB mass spectrometry methods. Special emphasis has been given to calculations of carbonyl force constants. Based on the spectroscopic evidences it has been confirmed that these metal carbonyl complexes with the ditertiary phosphine ligand showed cis geometry in their molecular structure.

  5. Detection of Phosphomonoester Signals in Proton-Decoupled 31P NMR Spectra of the Myocardium of Patients with Myocardial Hypertrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Wulf-Ingo; Sieverding, Ludger; Breuer, Johannes; Schmidt, Oliver; Widmaier, Stefan; Bunse, Michael; van Erckelens, Franz; Apitz, Jürgen; Dietze, Guenther J.; Lutz, Otto

    1998-07-01

    Proton-decoupled31P NMR spectroscopy at 1.5 T of the anterior left ventricular myocardium was used to monitor myocardial phosphate metabolism in asymptomatic patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM,n= 14) and aortic stenosis (AS,n= 12). In addition to the well-known phosphorus signals a phosphomonoester (PME) signal was detected at about 6.9 ppm in 7 HCM and 2 AS patients. This signal was not observed in the spectra of normal controls (n= 11). We suggest that in spectra of patients with myocardial hypertrophy the presence of a PME signal reflects alterations in myocardial glucose metabolism.

  6. Fluorescence anisotropy, FT-IR spectroscopy and 31-P NMR studies on the interaction of paclitaxel with lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Dhanikula, Anand Babu; Panchagnula, Ramesh

    2008-06-01

    To understand the bilayer interaction with paclitaxel, fluorescence polarization, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and 31-phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) studies were performed on paclitaxel bearing liposomes. Fluorescence anisotropy of three probes namely, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH), 12-(9-anthroyloxy) stearic acid (12AS) and 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS) were monitored as a function of paclitaxel concentration in the unsaturated bilayers. The incorporation of paclitaxel decreased anisotropy of 12AS and ANS probes, while slightly increased anisotropy of DPH. Paclitaxel has a fluidizing effect in the upper region of the bilayer whereas the hydrophobic core is slightly rigidized. FT-IR spectroscopy showed an increase in the asymmetric and symmetric methylene stretching frequencies, splitting of methylene scissoring band and broadening of carbonyl stretching mode. These studies collectively ascertained that paclitaxel mainly occupies the cooperativity region and interact with the interfacial region of unsaturated bilayers and induces fluidity in the headgroup region of bilayer. At higher loadings (>3 mol%), paclitaxel might gradually tend to accumulate at the interface and eventually partition out of bilayer as a result of solute exclusion phenomenon, resulting in crystallization; seed non-bilayer phases, as revealed by 31P-NMR, thereby destabilizing liposomal formulations. In general, any membrane component which has a rigidization effect will decrease, while that with a fluidizing effect will increase, with a bearing on headgroup interactions, partitioning of paclitaxel into bilayers and stability of the liposomes.

  7. /sup 31/P NMR analysis of membrane phospholipid organization in viable, reversibly electropermeabilized Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.; Rols, M.P.; Teissie, J.

    1988-02-23

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were reversibly permeabilized by submitting them to short, high-intensity, square wave pulses (1.8 kV/cm, 100 ..mu..s). The cells remained in a permeable state without loss of viability for several hours at 4/sup 0/C. A new anisotropic peak with respect to control cells was observed on /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopic analysis of the phospholipid components. This peak is only present when the cells are permeable, and normal anisotropy is recovered after resealing. Taking into account the fusogenicity of electropermeabilized cells, comparative studies were performed on 5% poly(ethylene glycol) treated cells. The /sup 31/P NMR spectra of the phospholipids displayed the same anisotropic peak as in the case of the electropermeabilized cells. In the two cases, this anisotropic peak was located downfield from the main peak associated to the phospholipids when organized in bilayers. The localization of this anisotropic peak is very different from the one of a hexagonal phase. The authors proposed a reorganization of the polar head group region leading to a weakening of the hydration layer to account for these observations. This was also thought to explain the electric field induced fusogenicity of these cells.

  8. Solid state 31P cross-polarization/magic angle sample spinning nuclear magnetic resonance studies of crystalline glycogen phosphorylase b

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Jocelyn E.; Heyes, Stephen J.; Barford, David; Johnson, Louise N.; Dobson, Christopher M.

    1993-01-01

    31P cross-polarization/magic angle sample spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra have been obtained for pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) bound to glycogen phosphorylase b (GPb) in two different crystalline forms, monoclinic and tetragonal. Analysis of the intensities of the spinning sidebands in the nuclear magnetic resonance spectra has enabled estimates of the principal values of the 31P chemical shift tensors to be obtained. Differences between the two sets of values suggest differences in the environment of the phosphate moiety of the pyridoxal phosphate in the two crystalline forms. The tensor for the tetragonal crystalline form, T state GPb, is fully consistent with those found for dianionic phosphate groups in model compounds. The spectrum for the monoclinic crystalline form, R state GPb, although closer to that of dianionic than monoanionic model phosphate compounds, deviates significantly from that expected for a simple dianion or monoanion. This is likely to result from specific interactions between the PLP phosphate group and residues in its binding site in the protein. A possible explanation for the spectrum of the monoclinic crystals is that the shift tensor is averaged by a proton exchange process between different ionization states of the PLP associated with the presence of a sulfate ion bound in the vicinity of the PLP. PMID:8457673

  9. Relationship between /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and pulmonary vasomotor tone in hypoxic pig lobes

    SciTech Connect

    Buescher, P.; Pillain, R.; Pearse, D.; Eichhorn, G.; Sylvester, J.

    1986-03-01

    To investigate the relationship between lung tissue energy state and vasomotor tone, the authors measured /sup 31/P NMR spectra during repeated exposures to hypoxia in 5 isolated degassed left lower lobes perfused with blood at a constant flow (500ml/min) and left atrial pressure (<0mmHg). Perfusate O/sub 2/ tension (PpO/sub 2/) was changed by varying the gas mixtures (40, 7, 0% O/sub 2/) flowing through a bubble oxygenator in the perfusion circuit. /sup 31/P spectra obtained after stabilization of pulmonary artery pressure (Ppa) at each PpO/sub 2/ revealed peaks for ATP, inorganic phosphate (Pi) phosphomono and diesters (PME and PDE). During 7% O/sub 2/, Ppa and ATP increased but Pi did not change suggesting that lung tissue energy state improved during hypoxic vasoconstriction. During 0% O/sub 2/, there was a reversible deterioration of energy state (high Pi, low ATP). Thus, it appears that lung tissue energy state and vasomotor tone were related, but the precise nature of the relationship remains to be determined.

  10. Solid state {sup 31}P NMR study of phosphonate binding sites in guanidine-functionalized, molecular imprinted silica xerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, D.Y.; Alam, T.D.

    2000-01-03

    Phosphonate binding sites in guanidine and ammonium surface-functionalized silica xerogels were prepared via the molecular imprinting technique and characterized using solid state {sup 31}P MAS NMR. One-point, two-point, and non-specific host-guest interactions between phenylphosphonic acid (PPA) and the functionalized gels were distinguished by characteristic chemical shifts of the observed absorption peaks. Using solid state as well as solution phase NMR analyses, absorptions observed at 15.5 ppm and 6.5 ppm were identified as resulting from the 1:1 (one-point) and 2:1 (two-point) guanidine to phosphonate interactions, respectively. Similar absorptions were observed with the ammonium functionalized gels. By examining the host-guest interactions within the gels, the efficiency of the molecular imprinting procedure with regard to the functional monomer-to-template interaction could be readily assessed. Template removal followed by substrate adsorption studies conducted on the guanidine functionalized gels provided a method to evaluate the binding characteristics of the receptor sites to a phosphonate substrate. During these experiments, {sup 29}Si and {sup 31}P MAS NMR acted as diagnostic monitors to identify structural changes occurring in the gel matrix and at the receptor site from solvent mediated processes.

  11. Characterization of the testicular cell types present in the rat by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    van der Grond, J.; Van Pelt, A.M.; van Echteld, C.J.; Dijkstra, G.; Grootegoed, J.A.; de Rooij, D.G.; Mali, W.P. )

    1991-07-01

    Testes of vitamin A-deficient Wistar rats before and after vitamin A replacement, of rats irradiated in utero, and of control rats were investigated by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy. The testicular phosphomonoester/ATP (PM/ATP) ratio ranged from 0.79 {plus minus} 0.05 for testes that contained only interstitial tissue and Sertoli cells to 1.64 {plus minus} 0.04 for testes in which spermatocytes were the most advanced cell types present. When new generations of spermatids entered the seminiferous epithelium, this ratio decreased. The testicular phosphodiester/ATP (PD/ATP) ratio amounted to 0.16 {plus minus} 0.06 for testes in which Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, or spermatocytes were the most advanced cell type present. When new generations of spermatids entered the seminiferous epithelium, the PD/ATP ratio rapidly increased and finally reached a value of 0.71 {plus minus} 0.06 for fully developed testes. Taken together, specific patterns of the PM/ATP ratio, the PD/ATP ratio, and pH were obtained that were correlated to the presence of spermatogonia, spermatocytes, round spermatids, and elongated spermatids or to the absence of spermatogenic cells. Hence, a good impression of the status of the seminiferous epithelium in the rat can be obtained by in vivo 31P MR spectroscopy.

  12. 31P electron-nuclear double resonance of the PIn antisite in InP:Zn detected via luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crookham, H. C.; Kennedy, T. A.; Treacy, D. J.

    1992-07-01

    Optically detected electron-nuclear double resonance (ODENDOR) has been observed via photoluminescence from the first-neighbor 31P shell of the phosphorus antisite in zinc-doped InP. Analysis of the ENDOR data confirms a tetrahedral arrangement of 31P nuclei. The hyperfine interaction for each of these nuclei is axial with ||A∥||/h=368.0+/-0.5 MHz and ||A⊥||/h=247.8+/-0.5 MHz. These parameters are slightly different from those reported by Jeon et al. [Phys. Rev. B 36, 1324 (1987)]. A shift of the ENDOR frequencies correlated with a change in the central nuclear-spin state has also been observed. We have been able to account for this shift with a perturbation treatment in which the electronic spin and central nuclear spin are treated exactly and a neighboring nuclear spin provides the perturbation. The best ENDOR signals are obtained with low optical-excitation-power density (~0.1 W/cm2) and low microwave modulation frequency (17 Hz). These conditions emphasize the contributions to the optically detected magnetic-resonance signal from distant donor-acceptor pairs.

  13. Inhibition mechanisms of Zn precipitation on aluminum oxide by glyphosate: a 31P NMR and Zn EXAFS study.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Yu-Jun; Zhu, Mengqiang; Fan, Ting-Ting; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Phillips, Brian L; Sparks, Donald L

    2013-05-07

    In this research, the effects of glyphosate (GPS) on Zn sorption/precipitation on γ-alumina were investigated using a batch technique, Zn K-edge EXAFS, and (31)P NMR spectroscopy. The EXAFS analysis revealed that, in the absence of glyphosate, Zn adsorbed on the aluminum oxide surface mainly as bidentate mononuclear surface complexes at pH 5.5, whereas Zn-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) precipitates formed at pH 8.0. In the presence of glyphosate, the EXAFS spectra of Zn sorption samples at pH 5.5 and 8.0 were very similar, both of which demonstrated that Zn did not directly bind to the mineral surface but bonded with the carboxyl group of glyphosate. Formation of γ-alumina-GPS-Zn ternary surface complexes was further suggested by (31)P solid state NMR data which indicated the glyphosate binds to γ-alumina via a phosphonate group, bridging the mineral surface and Zn. Additionally, we showed the sequence of additional glyphosate and Zn can influence the sorption mechanism. At pH 8, Zn-Al LDH precipitates formed if Zn was added first, and no precipitates formed if glyphosate was added first or simultaneously with Zn. In contrast, at pH 5.5, only γ-alumina-GPS-Zn ternary surface complexes formed regardless of whether glyphosate or Zn was added first or both were added simultaneously.

  14. Fructose-induced aberration of metabolism in familial gout identified by sup 31 P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Seegmiller, J.E. Univ. of California, San Diego ); Dixon, R.M.; Kemp, G.J.; Rajagopalan, B.; Radda, G.K. ); Angus, P.W. Austin Hospital, Heidelburg, Victoria ); McAlindon, T.E.; Dieppe, P. )

    1990-11-01

    The hyperuricemia responsible for the development of gouty arthritis results from a wide range of environmental factors and underlying genetically determined aberrations of metabolism. {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies of children with hereditary fructose intolerance revealed a readily detectable rise in phosphomonoesters with a marked fall in inorganic phosphate in their liver in vivo and a rise in serum urate in response to very low doses of oral fructose. Parents and some family members heterozygous for this enzyme deficiency showed a similar pattern when given a substantially larger dose of fructose. Three of the nine heterozygotes thus identified also had clinical gout, suggesting the possibility of this defect being a fairly common cause of gout. In the present study this same noninvasive technology was used to identify the same spectral pattern in 2 of the 11 families studied with hereditary gout. In one family, the index patient's three brothers and his mother all showed the fructose-induced abnormality of metabolism, in agreement with the maternal inheritance of metabolism, in agreement with the maternal inheritance of the gout in this family group. The test dose of fructose used produced a significantly larger increment in the concentration of serum urate in the patients showing the changes in {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectra than in the other patients with familial gout or in nonaffected members, thus suggesting a simpler method for initial screening for the defect.

  15. The Nucleus Introduced

    PubMed Central

    Pederson, Thoru

    2011-01-01

    Now is an opportune moment to address the confluence of cell biological form and function that is the nucleus. Its arrival is especially timely because the recognition that the nucleus is extremely dynamic has now been solidly established as a paradigm shift over the past two decades, and also because we now see on the horizon numerous ways in which organization itself, including gene location and possibly self-organizing bodies, underlies nuclear functions. PMID:20660024

  16. Distance measurements in disodium ATP hydrates by means of 31P double quantum two-dimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Potrzebowski, M J; Gajda, J; Ciesielski, W; Montesinos, I M

    2006-04-01

    POST-C7 measurements provide constraints allowing distinguishing crystal lattice organization and establishing intra and/or intermolecular distances between phosphorus atoms of triphosphate chains for different hydrates of disodium ATP salts. Double-quantum efficiency in function of excitation time obtained from series of two-dimensional spectra for POST-C7 experiments was used to set up of buildup curves and semi-quantitative measure of 31P-31P length.

  17. Skeletal muscle ATP turnover by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during moderate and heavy bilateral knee extension

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Daniel T; Bimson, William E; Hampson, Sophie A; Bowen, T Scott; Murgatroyd, Scott R; Marwood, Simon; Kemp, Graham J; Rossiter, Harry B

    2014-01-01

    During constant-power high-intensity exercise, the expected increase in oxygen uptake () is supplemented by a  slow component (), reflecting reduced work efficiency, predominantly within the locomotor muscles. The intracellular source of inefficiency is postulated to be an increase in the ATP cost of power production (an increase in P/W). To test this hypothesis, we measured intramuscular ATP turnover with 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and whole-body during moderate (MOD) and heavy (HVY) bilateral knee-extension exercise in healthy participants (n = 14). Unlocalized 31P spectra were collected from the quadriceps throughout using a dual-tuned (1H and 31P) surface coil with a simple pulse-and-acquire sequence. Total ATP turnover rate (ATPtot) was estimated at exercise cessation from direct measurements of the dynamics of phosphocreatine (PCr) and proton handling. Between 3 and 8 min during MOD, there was no discernable (mean ± SD, 0.06 ± 0.12 l min−1) or change in [PCr] (30 ± 8 vs. 32 ± 7 mm) or ATPtot (24 ± 14 vs. 17 ± 14 mm min−1; each P = n.s.). During HVY, the was 0.37 ± 0.16 l min−1 (22 ± 8%), [PCr] decreased (19 ± 7 vs. 18 ± 7 mm, or 12 ± 15%; P < 0.05) and ATPtot increased (38 ± 16 vs. 44 ± 14 mm min−1, or 26 ± 30%; P < 0.05) between 3 and 8 min. However, the increase in ATPtot (ΔATPtot) was not correlated with the during HVY (r2 = 0.06; P = n.s.). This lack of relationship between ΔATPtot and , together with a steepening of the [PCr]– relationship in HVY, suggests that reduced work efficiency during heavy exercise arises from both contractile (P/W) and mitochondrial sources (the O2 cost of ATP resynthesis; P/O). PMID:25281731

  18. sup 31 P NMR measurements of the ADP concentration in yeast cells genetically modified to express creatine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Brindle, K.; Braddock, P.; Fulton, S. )

    1990-04-03

    Rabbit muscle creatine kinase has been introduced into the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by transforming cells with a multicopy plasmid containing the coding sequence for the enzyme under the control of the yeast phosphoglycerate kinase promoter. The transformed cells showed creating kinase activities similar to those found in mammalian heart muscle. {sup 31}P NMR measurements of the near-equilibrium concentrations of phosphocreatine and cellular pH together with measurements of the total extractable concentrations of phosphocreatine and creatine allowed calculation of the free ADP/ATP ratio in the cell. The calculated ratio of approximately 2 was considerably higher than the ratio of between 0.06 and 0.1 measured directly in cell extracts.

  19. Use of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and electron microscopy to study phosphorus metabolism of microorganisms from wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Florentz, M; Granger, P; Hartemann, P

    1984-03-01

    We used 31P nuclear magentic resonance to study the transfer of phosphorus between Pis and polyphosphates in microorganisms involved in wastewater treatment. We showed that the transfer process is reversible and of the first order in accordance with the polyphosphate concentration. The presence of nitrates in the anoxic phase led to results similar to those obtained during the aerobic phase. (Anoxic implies absence of oxygen but presence of nitrate, whereas anaerobic implies absence of oxygen and nitrate. In bacteriology, the term anoxic is not common, and the term anaerobic implies absence of oxygen and includes the conditions under which nitrate is present.) We observed that carbon dioxide lowers the pH, which entails a hydrolysis of polyphosphates, and helium seems to stop the evolution of the cells. Further, 2,4-dinitrophenol decouples the oxidative phosphorylation and brings about a decrease in the polyphosphate pool.

  20. NMR shielding constants in PH3, absolute shielding scale, and the nuclear magnetic moment of 31P.

    PubMed

    Lantto, Perttu; Jackowski, Karol; Makulski, Włodzimierz; Olejniczak, Małgorzata; Jaszuński, Michał

    2011-09-29

    Ab initio values of the absolute shielding constants of phosphorus and hydrogen in PH(3) were determined, and their accuracy is discussed. In particular, we analyzed the relativistic corrections to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, comparing the constants computed using the four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock approach, the four-component density functional theory (DFT), and the Breit-Pauli perturbation theory (BPPT) with nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock or DFT reference functions. For the equilibrium geometry, we obtained σ(P) = 624.309 ppm and σ(H) = 29.761 ppm. Resonance frequencies of both nuclei were measured in gas-phase NMR experiments, and the results were extrapolated to zero density to provide the frequency ratio for an isolated PH(3) molecule. This ratio, together with the computed shielding constants, was used to determine a new value of the nuclear magnetic dipole moment of (31)P: μ(P) = 1.1309246(50) μ(N).

  1. Characterization of phosphorus forms in lake macrophytes and algae by solution (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Weiying; Zhu, Yuanrong; Wu, Fengchang; Meng, Wei; Giesy, John P; He, Zhongqi; Song, Lirong; Fan, Mingle

    2016-04-01

    Debris from aquatic macrophytes and algae are important recycling sources of phosphorus (P), which can result in continuing blooms of algae by recycling bioavailable P in the eutrophic lakes. However, knowledge of forms of P in aquatic macrophytes and algae and their contribution to internal loads of P in lakes is limited. Without such knowledge, it is difficult to develop appropriate strategies to remediate and or restore aquatic ecosystems that have become eutrophic. Therefore, in this work, P was extracted from six types of aquatic macrophytes and algae collected from Tai Lake of China and characterized by use of solution (31)P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. When extracted by 0.5 M NaOH-25 mM EDTA, extraction recovery of total P(TP) and organic P(Po) exceeded 90 %. Concentrations of Po in algae and aquatic macrophytes were 5552 mg kg(-1) and 1005 mg kg(-1) and accounted for 56.0 and 47.2 % of TP, respectively. When Po, including condensed P, was characterized by solution (31)P-NMR Po in algae included orthophosphate monoesters (79.8 %), pyrophosphate (18.2 %), and orthophosphate diester (2.0 %), and Po in aquatic macrophytes included orthophosphate monoesters (90.3 %), pyrophosphate (4.2 %), and orthophosphate diester (5.5 %). Additionally, orthophosphate monoesters in algal debris mainly included β-glycerophosphate (44.1 %), α-glycerophosphate (13.5 %), and glucose 6-phosphate (13.5 %). Orthophosphate monoesters in aquatic macrophytes mainly included β-glycerophosphate (27.9 %), α-glycerophosphate (24.6 %), and adenosine 5' monophosphate (8.2 %). Results derived from this study will be useful in better understanding nutrient cycling, relevant eutrophication processes, and pollution control for freshwater lakes.

  2. sup 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance study of the effect of azide on xylose fermentation by Candida tropicalis

    SciTech Connect

    Lohmeier-Vogel, E.; Vogel, H. ); Skoog, K.; Hahn-Haegerdal, B. )

    1989-08-01

    Maximal ethanol production by Candida tropicalis grown on xylose was obtained at an oxygen transfer rate of 5 to 7 mmol/liter per h. Addition of 0.2 mM azide increased the ethanol yield by a factor of 3 to 4, based on the cell mass produced, and decreased the formation of the by-product xylitol by 80%. In the presence of azide, ethanol was reassimilated before the carbon source was depleted. At all oxygenation levels studied, azide caused 25 to 60% of the carbon to be lost, most probable as carbon dioxide. Identical spectra were obtained with {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy performed on extracts of C. tropicalis grown on xylose in the absence and presence of azide. Azide lowered the levels of sugar phosphates. Enzymatic analysis showed extremely low levels of fructose 1,6-diphosphate compared with the levels obtained in the absence of azide, while the level of malate, a citric acid cycle intermediate, was not influenced by azide. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy performed on xylose-grown whole cells of C. tropicalis showed that azide lowered the intracellular pH, inhibited the uptake of external P{sub i}, and decreased the buildup of polyphosphate in relation to results with untreated cells. Similar results were obtained with the uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), except that CCCP treatment led to extremely high levels of internal P{sub i}. The dual effect of azide as a respiratory inhibitor and as an uncoupler is discussed with respect to the metabolism and product formation in xylose-assimilating C. tropicalis.

  3. Direct Speciation of Phosphorus in Alum-Amended Poultry Litter: Solid-State 31P NMR Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hunger, Stefan; Cho, Herman M.; Sims, James T.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2004-02-01

    Amending poultry litter (PL) with aluminum sulfate (alum) has proven to be effective in reducing water-soluble phosphorus (P) in the litter and in runoff from fields that have received PL applications; it has therefore been suggested as a best management practice. Although its effectiveness has been demonstrated on a macroscopic scale in the field, little is known about P speciation in either alumamended or unamended litter. This knowledge is important for the evaluation of the long-term stability and bioavailability of P, which is a necessary prerequisite for the assessment of the sustainability of intensive poultry operations. Both solid state MAS and CP-MAS {sup 31}P NMR as well as {sup 31}P({sup 27}Al) TRAPDOR were used to investigate P speciation in alumamended and unamended PL. The results indicate the presence of a complex mixture of organic and inorganic orthophosphate phases. A calcium phosphate phase, probably a surface precipitate on calcium carbonate, could be identified in both unamended and alum-amended PL, as well as physically bound HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. Phosphate associated with Al was found in the alum-amended PL, most probably a mixture of a poorly ordered wavellite and phosphate surface complexes on aluminum hydroxide that had been formed by the hydrolysis of alum. However, a complex mixture of organic and inorganic phosphate species could not be resolved. Phosphate associated with Al comprised on average 40{+-}14% of the total P in alum-amended PL, whereas calcium phosphate phases comprised on average 7{+-}4% in the alum-amended PL and 14{+-}5% in the unamended PL.

  4. Preservation of bilayer structure in human erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts after phospholipase treatment. A 31P-NMR study.

    PubMed

    van Meer, G; de Kruijff, B; op den Kamp, J A; van Deenen, L L

    1980-02-15

    1. Fresh human erythrocytes were treated with lytic and non-lytic combinations of phospholipases A2, C and sphingomyelinase. The 31P-NMR spectra of ghosts derived from such erythrocytes show that, in all cases, the residual phospholipids and lysophospholipids remain organized in a bilayer configuration. 2. A bilayer configuration of the (lyso)phospholipids was also observed after treatment of erythrocyte ghosts with various phospholipases even in the case that 98% of the phospholipid was converted into lysophospholipid (72%) and ceramides (26%). 3. A slightly decreased order of the phosphate group of phospholipid molecules, seen as reduced effective chemical shift anisotropy in the 31P-NMR spectra, was found following the formation of diacyglycerols and ceramides in the membrane of intact erythrocytes. Treatment of ghosts always resulted in an extensive decrease in the order of the phosphate groups. 4. The results allow the following conclusions to made: a. Hydrolysis of phospholipids in intact red cells and ghosts does not result in the formation of non-bilayer configuration of residual phospholipids and lysophospholipids. b. Haemolysis, which is obtained by subsequent treatment of intact cells with sphingomyelinase and phospholipase A2, or with phospholipase C, cannot be ascribed to the formation of non-bilayer configuration of phosphate-containing lipids. c. Preservation of bilayer structure, even after hydrolysis of all phospholipid, shows that other membrane constitutents, e.g. cholesterol and/or membrane proteins play an important role in stabilizing the structure of the erythrocyte membrane. d. A major prerequisite for the application of phospholipases in lipid localization studies, the preservation of a bilayer configuration during phospholipid hydrolysis, is met for the erythrocyte membrane.

  5. Feasibility of assessing bone matrix and mineral properties in vivo by combined solid-state 1H and 31P MRI

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hee Kwon; Seifert, Alan C.; Li, Cheng; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate an integrated imaging protocol for bone water and phosphorus quantification in vivo by solid-state 1H and 31P MRI. Materials and methods All studies were HIPAA-compliant and were performed with institutional review board approval and written informed consent. Proton (1H) ultra-short echo-time (UTE) and phosphorus (31P) zero echo-time (ZTE) sequences were designed and implemented on a 3 T clinical MR scanner to quantify bone water and mineral in vivo. The left tibia of ten healthy subjects (including both genders, 49±15 y/o) was examined with a custom-built 1H/31P dual-frequency extremity RF coil. Total bone water (TW), water bound to the collagen matrix (BW) and bone 31P were quantified from MR images with respect to reference samples of known 1H or 31P concentration, and pore water (PW) was subsequently determined from TW and BW. Porosity index (PI) was calculated as the ratio between UTE images acquired at two echo times. MRI parameters were compared with bone density measures obtained by high-resolution peripheral quantitative CT (HR-pQCT). Results The total scan time for the bone water and 31P quantification protocol was about 50 minutes. Average TW, BW, PW and 31P concentrations were 13.99±1.26, 10.39±0.80, 3.34±1.41 mol/L and 7.06±1.53 mol/L for the studied cohort, respectively, in good agreement with previous results conducted ex vivo. Average intra-subject coefficients of variation were 3.47%, 2.60% and 7.50% for TW, BW and PW and 5.60% for 31P. Negative correlations were observed between PW and vBMD (p<0.05) as well as between PI and 31P (p<0.05), while bone mineral content (BMC) estimated from 31P MRI and HR-pQCT were strongly positively correlated (p<0.0001). Conclusion This work demonstrates the feasibility of quantifying bone water and mineral phosphorus in human subjects in a single MRI session with a clinically practical imaging protocol. PMID:28296979

  6. Kaon-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Byungsik; Maung, Khin Maung; Wilson, John W.; Buck, Warren W.

    1989-01-01

    The derivations of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation and Watson multiple scattering are given. A simple optical potential is found to be the first term of that series. The number density distribution models of the nucleus, harmonic well, and Woods-Saxon are used without t-matrix taken from the scattering experiments. The parameterized two-body inputs, which are kaon-nucleon total cross sections, elastic slope parameters, and the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, are presented. The eikonal approximation was chosen as our solution method to estimate the total and absorptive cross sections for the kaon-nucleus scattering.

  7. Kaon-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Byungsik; Buck, Warren W.; Maung, Khin M.

    1989-01-01

    Two kinds of number density distributions of the nucleus, harmonic well and Woods-Saxon models, are used with the t-matrix that is taken from the scattering experiments to find a simple optical potential. The parameterized two body inputs, which are kaon-nucleon total cross sections, elastic slope parameters, and the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, are shown. The eikonal approximation was chosen as the solution method to estimate the total and absorptive cross sections for the kaon-nucleus scattering.

  8. A chelate-stabilized ruthenium(sigma-pyrrolato) complex: resolving ambiguities in nuclearity and coordination geometry through 1H PGSE and 31P solid-state NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Heather M; Bryce, David L; Fogg, Deryn E

    2006-12-11

    Reaction of RuCl2(PPh3)3 with LiNN' (NN' = 2-[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]pyrrolide) affords a single product, with the empirical formula RuCl[(2,6-iPr2C6H3)N=CHC4H3N](PPh3)2. We identify this species as a sigma-pyrrolato complex, [Ru(NN')(PPh3)2]2(mu-Cl)2 (3b), rather than mononuclear RuCl(NN')(PPh3)2 (3a), on the basis of detailed 1D and 2D NMR characterization in solution and in the solid state. Retention of the chelating, sigma-bound iminopyrrolato unit within 3b, despite the presence of labile (dative) chloride and PPh3 donors, indicates that the chelate effect is sufficient to inhibit sigma --> pi isomerization of 3b to a piano-stool, pi-pyrrolato structure. 2D COSY, SECSY, and J-resolved solid-state 31P NMR experiments confirm that the PPh3 ligands on each metal center are magnetically and crystallographically inequivalent, and 31P CP/MAS NMR experiments reveal the largest 99Ru-31P spin-spin coupling constant (1J(99Ru,31P) = 244 +/- 20 Hz) yet measured. Finally, 31P dipolar-chemical shift spectroscopy is applied to determine benchmark phosphorus chemical shift tensors for phosphine ligands in hexacoordinate ruthenium complexes.

  9. In vivo absolute quantification for mouse muscle metabolites using an inductively coupled synthetic signal injection method and newly developed 1H/31P dual tuned probe

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Donghoon; Marro, Kenneth; Mathis, Mark; Shankland, Eric; Hayes, Cecil

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To obtain robust estimates of 31P metabolite content in mouse skeletal muscles using our recently developed MR absolute quantification method and a custom-built 1H/31P dual tuned radiofrequency (RF) coil optimized for mouse leg. Materials and Methods We designed and fabricated a probe consisting of two dual tuned 1H/31P solenoid coils: one leg was inserted to each solenoid. The mouse leg volume coil was incorporated with injector coils for MR absolute quantification. The absolute quantification method uses a synthetic reference signal injection approach and solves several challenges in MR absolute quantification including changes of coil loading and receiver gains. Results The 1H/31P dual tuned probe was composed of two separate solenoid coils, one for each leg, to increase coil filling factors and signal-to-noise ratio. Each solenoid was equipped with a second coil to allow injection of reference signals. 31P metabolite concentrations determined for normal mice were well within the expected range reported in the literature. Conclusion We developed an RF probe and an absolute quantification approach adapted for mouse skeletal muscle. PMID:24464912

  10. Onset of deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gazdzicki, M.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Seyboth, P.

    2012-05-15

    The energy dependence of hadron production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions reveals anomalies-the kink, horn, and step. They were predicted as signals of the deconfinement phase transition and observed by the NA49 Collaboration in central PbPb collisions at the CERN SPS. This indicates the onset of the deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions at about 30 A GeV.

  11. Simple and effective exercise design for assessing in vivo mitochondrial function in clinical applications using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sleigh, Alison; Lupson, Victoria; Thankamony, Ajay; Dunger, David B.; Savage, David B.; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Kemp, Graham J.

    2016-01-01

    The growing recognition of diseases associated with dysfunction of mitochondria poses an urgent need for simple measures of mitochondrial function. Assessment of the kinetics of replenishment of the phosphocreatine pool after exercise using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy can provide an in vivo measure of mitochondrial function; however, the wider application of this technique appears limited by complex or expensive MR-compatible exercise equipment and protocols not easily tolerated by frail participants or those with reduced mental capacity. Here we describe a novel in-scanner exercise method which is patient-focused, inexpensive, remarkably simple and highly portable. The device exploits an MR-compatible high-density material (BaSO4) to form a weight which is attached directly to the ankle, and a one-minute dynamic knee extension protocol produced highly reproducible measurements of post-exercise PCr recovery kinetics in both healthy subjects and patients. As sophisticated exercise equipment is unnecessary for this measurement, our extremely simple design provides an effective and easy-to-implement apparatus that is readily translatable across sites. Its design, being tailored to the needs of the patient, makes it particularly well suited to clinical applications, and we argue the potential of this method for investigating in vivo mitochondrial function in new cohorts of growing clinical interest. PMID:26751849

  12. Phospholipid fingerprints of milk from different mammalians determined by 31P NMR: towards specific interest in human health.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Cyrielle; Lutz, Norbert W; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Cozzone, Patrick J; Armand, Martine; Bernard, Monique

    2012-12-01

    Our objective was to identify and quantify phospholipids in milk from different species (human HM, cow CoM, camel CaM, and mare MM) using an optimised (31)P NMR spectroscopy procedure. The phospholipid fingerprints were species-specific with a broader variety of classes found in HM and MM; HM and CaM were richer in sphingomyelin (78.3 and 117.5μg/ml) and plasmalogens (27.3 and 24μg/ml), possibly important for infant development. Total phospholipid content was higher in CaM (0.503mM) and lower in MM (0.101mM) compared to HM (0.324mM) or CoM (0.265mM). Our optimised method showed good sensitivity, high resolution, and easy sample preparation with minimal loss of target molecules. It is suitable for determining the accurate composition of a large number of bioactive phospholipids with putative health benefits, including plasmalogens, and should aid in selecting appropriate ingredient sources for infant milk substitutes or fortifiers, and for functional foods dedicated to adults.

  13. A 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D J; Krige, D; Barnes, P R; Kemp, G J; Carroll, M T; Mann, V M; Cooper, J M; Marsden, C D; Schapira, A H

    1994-08-01

    The activity of complex I of the respiratory chain is decreased in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) but the presence of this defect in skeletal muscle is controversial. Therefore, the mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in patients with PD was investigated in vivo using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results from 7 PD patients, 11 age matched controls and 9 mitochondrial myopathy patients with proven complex I deficiency were obtained from finger flexor muscle at rest, during exercise and in recovery from exercise. In resting muscle, the patients with mitochondrial myopathy showed a low PCr/ATP ratio, a low phosphorylation potential, a high P(i)/PCr ratio and a high calculated free [ADP]. During exercise, stores of high energy phosphate were depleted more rapidly than normal, while in recovery, the concentration of phosphocreatine and free ADP returned to pre-exercise values more slowly than normal. In contrast, the patients with PD were not significantly different from normal for any of these variables, and no abnormality of muscle energetics was detected. Three of the PD patients also had mitochondrial function assessed biochemically in muscle biopsies. No respiratory chain defect was identified in any of these patients by polarography or enzyme analysis when compared with age-matched controls. These results suggest that skeletal muscle is not a suitable tissue for the investigation and identification of the biochemical basis of the nigral complex I deficiency in PD.

  14. Semi-LASER localized dynamic 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy in exercising muscle at ultra-high magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Meyerspeer, Martin; Scheenen, Tom; Schmid, Albrecht Ingo; Mandl, Thomas; Unger, Ewald; Moser, Ewald

    2011-05-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can benefit from increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of high magnetic fields. In this work, the SNR gain of dynamic 31P MRS at 7 T was invested in temporal and spatial resolution. Using conventional slice selective excitation combined with localization by adiabatic selective refocusing (semi-LASER) with short echo time (TE = 23 ms), phosphocreatine quantification in a 38 mL voxel inside a single exercising muscle becomes possible from single acquisitions, with SNR = 42 ± 4 in resting human medial gastrocnemius. The method was used to quantify the phosphocreatine time course during 5 min of plantar flexion exercise and recovery with a temporal resolution of 6 s (the chosen repetition time for moderate T1 saturation). Quantification of inorganic phosphate and pH required accumulation of consecutively acquired spectra when (resting) Pi concentrations were low. The localization performance was excellent while keeping the chemical shift displacement acceptably small. The SNR and spectral line widths with and without localization were compared between 3T and 7 T systems in phantoms and in vivo. The results demonstrate that increased sensitivity of ultra-high field can be used to dynamically acquire metabolic information from a clearly defined region in a single exercising muscle while reaching a temporal resolution previously available with MRS in non-localizing studies only. The method may improve the interpretation of dynamic muscle MRS data.

  15. Localized Spectroscopy from Anatomically Matched Compartments: Improved Sensitivity and Localization for Cardiac 31P MRS in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löffler, Ralf; Sauter, Rolf; Kolem, Heinrich; Haase, Axel; von Kienlin, Markus

    1998-10-01

    Several pioneering studies have demonstrated that localized31P NMR spectroscopy of the human heart might become an important diagnostic tool in cardiology. The main limitation is due to the low sensitivity of these experiments, allowing only crude spatial resolution. We have implemented a three-dimensional version of SLOOP ("spectral localization with optimal pointspread function") on a clinical instrument. SLOOP takes advantage of all availablea prioriinformation to match the size and the shape of the sensitive volumes to the anatomical structures in the examined subject. Thus, SLOOP reduces the contamination from adjacent organs and improves the sensitivity compared to conventional techniques such as ISIS or chemical shift imaging (CSI). Initial studies were performed on six healthy volunteers at 1.5 T. The good localization properties are demonstrated by the absence of resonances from blood in the heart spectra, and by PCr-free spectra from the liver. Compared to conventional CSI, the signal-to-noise ratio of the SLOOP heart spectra was improved by approximately 30%. Taking into account the varying excitation angle in the inhomogeneous B1field of the surface coil, the SLOOP model computes the local spin saturation at every point in space. Therefore, no global saturation correction is required in the quantitative evaluation of local spectra. In this study, we found a PCr/γ-ATP ratio in the left ventricular wall of 1.90 ± 0.33 (mean ± standard deviation).

  16. Two protocols to measure mitochondrial capacity in women and adolescent girls: a 31P-MRS preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Willcocks, Rebecca Jane; Fulford, Jon; Barker, Alan Robert; Armstrong, Neil; Williams, Craig Anthony

    2014-05-01

    The phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery time constant (τ) following exercise provides a measure of mitochondrial oxidative capacity. The purpose of this investigation was to use 2 different protocols to determine τ in adolescent females. 31P-MR spectra were collected during 2 exercise tests in 6 adolescent girls (13.8 ± 0.3 y) and 7 women (23.2 ± 3.4 y). The first test consisted of 23 repeated 4 seconds maximal isometric calf contractions separated by 12-second recovery; PCr recovery between the final 18 contractions was used to calculate τ. The second test was a sustained 20-second maximal contraction; recovery was fitted with an exponential function to measure τ. PCr τ did not significantly differ between groups: (gated exercise: 4 girls: 16 ± 5 s, 7 women: 17 ± 5 s, p; sustained exercise: 6 girls: 19 ± 6 s, 7 women: 19 ± 4 s). Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated a close agreement between sustained and gated exercise. Both gated and sustained exercise appear feasible in a pediatric population, and offer a noninvasive evaluation of mitochondrial oxidative capacity.

  17. Dynamic structures of intact chicken erythrocyte chromatins as studied by 1H-31P cross-polarization NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Akutsu, H; Nishimoto, S; Kyogoku, Y

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic properties of DNA in intact chicken erythrocyte cells, nuclei, nondigested chromatins, digested soluble chromatins, H1, H5-depleted soluble chromatins and nucleosome cores were investigated by means of single-pulse and 1H-31P cross-polarization NMR. The temperature dependence of the phosphorus chemical shift anisotropy was identical for the former three in the presence of 3 mM MgCl2, suggesting that the local higher order structure is identical for these chromatins. The intrinsic phosphorus chemical shift anisotropy of the nucleosome cores was -159 ppm. The chemical shift anisotropy of DNA in the chromatins can be further averaged by the motion of the linker DNA. The spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame of the proton spins (T1p) of the nondigested chromatins was measured at various locking fields. The result was analyzed on the assumption of the isotropic motion to get a rough value of the correlation time of the motion efficient for the relaxation, which was eventually ascribed to the segmental motion of the linker DNA with restricted amplitude. The 30 nm filament structure induced by NaCl was shown to be dynamically different from that induced by MgCl2. Side-by-side compaction of 30-nm filaments was suggested to be induced in the MgCl2 concentration range higher than 0.3 mM. Biological significance of the dynamic structure was discussed in connection with the results obtained. PMID:7948693

  18. Characterization of the phosphoserine of pepsinogen using /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance: corroboration of X-ray crystallographic results

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.P.; Bridger, W.A.; James, M.N.G.

    1986-10-21

    The endogenous phosphoserine residue in porcine pepsinogen has been titrated with use of phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 31/P NMR). It has an observed pK/sub a/sub 2// of 6.7 and a narrow line width (approx. =10 Hz). The phosphate can be readily removed by an acid phosphatase from potato; however, it is resistant to hydrolysis by several alkaline phosphatases. The X-ray crystal structure of porcine pepsinogen at 1.8-A resolution shows a rather weak and diffuse region of electron density in the vicinity of the phosphorylated serine residue. This suggests considerable dynamic mobility or conformational disorder of the phosphate. In order to define more fully this behavior the NMR data have been used to corroborate these crystallographic results. All these physical data are consistent with a highly mobile phosphoserine residue on the surface of the zymogen and freely exposed to solvent. In addition, certain properties of this phosphoserine moiety on pepsinogen are similar to those of one of the phosphorylated residues of ovalbumin. The possible significance of this is discussed.

  19. Skeletal muscle ATP synthesis and cellular H+ handling measured by localized 31P-MRS during exercise and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Georg B.; Schmid, Albrecht I.; Goluch, Sigrun; Schewzow, Kiril; Laistler, Elmar; Niess, Fabian; Unger, Ewald; Wolzt, Michael; Mirzahosseini, Arash; Kemp, Graham J.; Moser, Ewald; Meyerspeer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is widely used for non-invasive investigation of muscle metabolism dynamics. This study aims to extend knowledge on parameters derived from these measurements in detail and comprehensiveness: proton (H+) efflux, buffer capacity and the contributions of glycolytic (L) and oxidative (Q) rates to ATP synthesis were calculated from the evolutions of phosphocreatine (PCr) and pH. Data are reported for two muscles in the human calf, for each subject and over a wide range of exercise intensities. 22 subjects performed plantar flexions in a 7T MR-scanner, leading to PCr changes ranging from barely noticeable to almost complete depletion, depending on exercise protocol and muscle studied by localized MRS. Cytosolic buffer capacity was quantified for the first time non-invasively and individually, as was proton efflux evolution in early recovery. Acidification started once PCr depletion reached 60–75%. Initial and end-exercise L correlated with end-exercise levels of PCr and approximately linear with pH. Q calculated directly from PCr and pH derivatives was plausible, requiring fewer assumptions than the commonly used ADP-model. In conclusion, the evolution of parameters describing cellular energy metabolism was measured over a wide range of exercise intensities, revealing a relatively complete picture of muscle metabolism. PMID:27562396

  20. Quantitative 31P NMR analysis of solid wood offers an insight into the acetylation of its components.

    PubMed

    Sadeghifar, Hasan; Dickerson, James P; Argyropoulos, Dimitris S

    2014-11-26

    As a solid substrate, wood and its components are almost invariably examined via spectroscopic or indirect methods of analysis. Unlike earlier approaches, in this effort we dissolve pulverized wood in ionic liquid and then directly derive its functional group contents by quantitative (31)P NMR. As such, this novel analytical methodology is thoroughly examined and an insight into the detailed way acetylation proceeds on solid wood and its components is provided as a function of wood density and within its various anatomical features. As anticipated, the efficiency of acetylation was found to be greater within low density wood than in high density wood. The lignin, the cellulose and the hemicelluloses of the low density wood was found to be acetylated nearly twice as fast with remarkable differences in their quantitative degree of acetylation amongst them. This direct analytical data validates the applied methodology and confirms, for the first time, that the order of acetylation in solid wood is lignin>hemicellulose>cellulose and no reactivity differences exist between early wood and late wood.

  1. Modification of the 31P magnetic resonance spectra of a rat tumour using vasodilators and its relationship to hypotension.

    PubMed Central

    Tozer, G. M.; Maxwell, R. J.; Griffiths, J. R.; Pham, P.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of different doses of hydralazine and prostacyclin on the 31P magnetic resonance spectra of the LBDS1 fibrosarcoma were investigated and related to their effects on mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and heart rate. The effect of reducing MABP by bleeding the animals, via the tail artery, was also investigated. Tumour spectral changes following high dose drug treatment (an increase in inorganic phosphate, a reduction in nucleotide triphosphates and a reduction in pH) were consistent with nutrient deprivation. These changes were dose dependent. Changes in MABP and heart rate were consistent with vasodilatation in normal tissues. However, for the same fall in MABP, hydralazine produced a greater rise in tumour inorganic phosphate (Pi) and a greater fall in tumour pH than did prostacyclin. Controlled bleeding was effective in reducing MABP. It also reduced tumour pH but had no significant effect on tumour Pi. The clinical application of the two drugs for reducing tumour blood flow and pH for therapy is likely to be limited by the large degree of hypotension necessary to produce an effect. The differential effect of the two drugs for the same fall in MABP may be related to different degrees of direct tumour vasodilatation or to a direct effect of hydralazine on tumour energy metabolism. The observation that controlled bleeding does not change tumour Pi is further evidence indicating that the degree of arterial hypotension is not the sole factor in determining tumour energy status. PMID:2223572

  2. 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy assessment of subnormal oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle of renal failure patients.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, G E; Bertocci, L A; Painter, P L

    1993-01-01

    In hemodialysis patients, erythropoietin increases hemoglobin, but often the corresponding increase in peak oxygen uptake is low. The disproportionality may be caused by impaired energy metabolism. 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to study muscle energy metabolism in 11 hemodialysis patients, 11 renal transplant recipients, and 9 controls. Measurements were obtained during rest, static hand-grip, and rhythmic hand-grip; recoveries were followed to baseline. During static hand-grip, there were no between-group differences in phosphocreatine (PCr), inorganic phosphate (Pi), or PCr/(PCr + Pi), although intracellular pH was higher in hemodialysis patients than transplant recipients. During rhythmic hand-grip, hemodialysis patients exhibited greater fatigue than transplant recipients or controls, and more reduction in PCr/(PCr + Pi) than transplant recipients. Intracellular pH was higher in controls than either hemodialysis patients or transplant recipients. Recoveries from both exercises were similar in all groups, indicating that subnormal oxidative metabolism was not caused by inability to make ATP. The rhythmic data suggest transplantation normalizes PCr/(PCr + Pi), but not pH. In hemodialysis patients, subnormal oxidative metabolism is apparently caused by limited exchange of metabolites between blood and muscle, rather than intrinsic oxidative defects in skeletal muscle. PMID:8432850

  3. Energetics of acute pressure overload of the porcine right ventricle. In vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, G G; Steinman, S; Garcia, J; Greyson, C; Massie, B; Weiner, M W

    1992-01-01

    In vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of the right ventricular (RV) free wall was employed to determine (a) whether phosphorus energy metabolites vary reciprocally with workload in the RV and (b) the mechanisms that limit RV contractile function in acute pressure overload. In 20 open-chest pigs, phosphocreatine (PCr)/ATP ratio (an index of energy metabolism inversely related to free ADP concentration), myocardial blood flow (microspheres), and segment shortening (sonomicrometry, n = 14) were measured at control (RV systolic pressure 31 +/- 1 mm Hg), and with pulmonary artery constriction to produce moderate pressure overload (RV systolic pressure 45 +/- 1 mm Hg), and maximal pressure overload before overt RV failure and systemic hypotension (RV systolic pressure 60 +/- 1 mm Hg). With moderate pressure overload, PCr/ATP declined to 89% of control (P = 0.01), while contractile function increased. Adenosine (n = 10, mean dose 0.16 mg/kg-min) increased RV blood flow by an additional 41% without increasing PCr/ATP, indicating that coronary reserve was not depleted and that the decrease in PCr/ATP from control was not due to ischemia. With maximal pressure overload and incipient RV failure, PCr/ATP fell further to 81% of control and RV blood flow did not increase further, even with adenosine. Thus: (a) The decline in PCr/ATP with moderate RV pressure overload, without evident ischemia or contractile dysfunction, supports the positive regulation of oxidative phosphorylation by ATP hydrolysis products. (b) Depletion of RV coronary flow reserve accompanies the onset of RV failure at maximal pressure overload. Images PMID:1541681

  4. Effect of Ca:Mg ratio on precipitated P species identified using 31P solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manimel Wadu, M.

    2009-04-01

    M.C.W. Manimel Wadu1, O.O Akinremi1, S. Kroeker2 1Department of Soil Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, R3T 2N2, Canada 2Department of Chemistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, R3T 2N2, Canada Agronomic efficiency of added P fertilizer is reduced by the precipitation reactions with the exchangeable Ca and Mg in calcareous soils. We hypothesized that the ratio of Ca to Mg on the soil exchange complex will affect the species of P that is precipitated and its solubility in the soil. A laboratory experiment was conducted using a model calcareous soil system which was composed of resin (Amberlite IRP69) and sand coated with CaCO3 packed into a column. The resin was pre saturated with Ca and Mg in order to achieve five different saturation ratios of Ca:Mg approximately as 100:0, 70:30, 50:50, 30:70 and 0:100. Monoammonium Phosphate was applied to the soil surface to simulate one-dimensional diffusive transport. The column was then incubated for 2 weeks. Chemical analysis for water and acid soluble P, pH, NH4, Ca and Mg was performed on 2mm sections of the soil to a depth of 10 cm. This paper will present and discuss the distribution of P along the soil column. Unlike similar studies that have speculated on the precipitation of P, this study will identify and quantify the P species that is formed using 31P solid state NMR technique. Such knowledge will be helpful in understanding the effect of Ca and Mg on P availability in calcareous system and the role of each cation on P precipitation. Key words: P fertilizers, Ca, Mg, model system, solid state NMR

  5. Response of a non-Hodgkin lymphoma to /sup 60/Co therapy monitored by 31P MRS in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, T.C.; Vijayakumar, S.; Majors, A.W.; Thomas, F.J.; Meaney, T.F.; Baldwin, N.J.

    1987-10-01

    High quality /sup 31/P MR spectra (signal to noise ratio (S/N) approximately 18, 15 min acquisition for each spectrum) were consistently obtained with surface coils over a period of 6-week RT. Both transient and steady state alterations in metabolites in response to RT were found in this case. The transient changes occurred during the first 3 hr immediately after the 3rd fractionated RT, these changes include the transient elevation of the PCr resonance, a decrease in PDE and an increase in intracellular pH. The monitoring showed that the metabolites approached steady state approximately 2 hr after the fractionated radiation intervention, suggesting that in vivo MRS can be useful for studying the dynamics of tumor response to RT such as repair of potential lethal damage, growth delay, and reoxygenation etc. The steady-state MR spectra showed the net response to each intervention and can clinically be useful for predicting and measuring the result of the fractionated RT. In this case study, the PDE peak which contains the phospholipid metabolites GPC and GPE, is the most sensitive resonance in response to RT. After the 3rd RT, prior to tumor size reduction, the PDE to ATP ratio decreased 33% and intracellular pH increased to 7.34 +/- 0.05 from 7.27 +/- 0.05. In the subsequent RT interventions, both the tumor size and PDE/ATP ratio continually decreased whereas the pH values remained alkaline and fluctuated around 7.34 to 7.65. The data suggest that the phospholipid metabolite PDE may signal important alterations in membrane metabolism that eventually lead to cell death.

  6. Partial trisomy 2q due to a maternal balanced translocation t(2;22) (q31;p12)

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, L.S.; Bleiman, M.; Punnett, H.H.

    1994-09-01

    Features consistent among reported patients with 2q duplications due to familial translocations or de novo duplications include pre- and postnatal growth failure, ocular defects such as congenital glaucoma, cardiac defects, micrognathia, urogenital defects, renal defects, connective tissue laxity, neurologic defects, and dermatologic abnormalities. Genotype/phenotype correlations of patients with trisomy 2q due to familial translocations are complicated by the presence of the deletions of the other chromosome involved. We have had the opportunity to observe `pure` trisomy 2q31-qter resulting from adjacent-1 segregation from 46,XX,t(2;22)(q31;p12) in a carrier mother with apparent loss of the 22 NOR region. He was the 2453 gm product of a gestation complicated by gestational diabetes to a 29-year-old G1 P0 mother and a 30-year-old father. At birth, he was noted to have hypotonia, micrognathia, microphthalmia, left cryptorchidism, hypospadias, bilateral clinodactyly of the fifth digits, mild hyperextensibility of the joints, dry skin disorder, and bilateral hydronephrosis by ultrasound. He was treated for hypoglycemia in the nursery and had a vesicostomy at two months for vesicoureteral reflux. A hearing test at two months found moderate hearing loss in the right ear and mild to moderate hearing loss in the left ear. At 3 months he had surgery for a PDA and bilateral glaucoma and was treated for periods of hypothermia and type IV renal tubular acidosis. This patient and others with unbalanced translocations involving the NOR region of an acrocentric chromosome allow for genotype/phenotype correlation of the `pure` trisomic region.

  7. Dietary fat modulation of mammary tumor growth and metabolism demonstrated by /sup 31/P-nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, K.L.; Buckman, D.K.; Hubbard, N.E.; Ross, B.

    1986-03-05

    The relationship of dietary fat concentration and saturation on the growth and metabolic activity of line 168 was studied using syngeneic mice fed 6 experimental diets before and during tumor growth. Tumor latency was significantly greater for mice fed a diet containing the minimum of essential fatty acids (EFA, 0.5% corn oil) or 8% coconut oil (SF) than for mice fed 8 or 20% safflower oil (PUF) or 20% SF. Changes in dietary fat resulted in alterations of tumor cell and serum fatty acid composition but not the number of inflammatory cells infiltrating the tumor. /sup 31/P-surface coil NMR was used to measure possible changes in tumor metabolism in vivo. Although pH decreased from 7.2 to 6.6 as the tumor volume increased, there was no difference in pH among dietary groups. There was an inverse relationship between both sugar phosphate (SP)/Pi and ATP/Pi ratios and tumor volume; those ratios for mice fed an EFA deficient or minimal EFA diet decreased at a different rate than ratios for mice fed diets with additional fat. Tumors of mice fed diets containing no or a low level (0.3%) of 18:2 had higher SP/ATP ratios than mice fed diets containing a moderate level (approx. 4%) of 18:2. Thus, high levels of dietary fat had a significant effect on promotion of mammary tumors during early stages of tumor growth. Differences in tumor volume associated with dietary fat may be related to changes in the levels of high energy phosphate metabolites.

  8. Interrelations of muscle functional MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI and (31) P-MRS in exercised lower back muscles.

    PubMed

    Hiepe, Patrick; Gussew, Alexander; Rzanny, Reinhard; Anders, Christoph; Walther, Mario; Scholle, Hans-Christoph; Reichenbach, Jürgen R

    2014-08-01

    Exercise-induced changes of transverse proton relaxation time (T2 ), tissue perfusion and metabolic turnover were investigated in the lower back muscles of volunteers by applying muscle functional MRI (mfMRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) before and after as well as dynamic (31) P-MRS during the exercise. Inner (M. multifidus, MF) and outer lower back muscles (M. erector spinae, ES) were examined in 14 healthy young men performing a sustained isometric trunk-extension. Significant phosphocreatine (PCr) depletions ranging from 30% (ES) to 34% (MF) and Pi accumulations between 95% (left ES) and 120%-140% (MF muscles and right ES) were observed during the exercise, which were accompanied by significantly decreased pH values in all muscles (∆pH ≈ -0.05). Baseline T2 values were similar across all investigated muscles (approximately 27 ms at 3 T), but revealed right-left asymmetric increases (T2 ,inc ) after the exercise (right ES/MF: T2 ,inc  = 11.8/9.7%; left ES/MF: T2 ,inc  = 4.6/8.9%). Analyzed muscles also showed load-induced increases in molecular diffusion D (p = .007) and perfusion fraction f (p = .002). The latter parameter was significantly higher in the MF than in the ES muscles both at rest and post exercise. Changes in PCr (p = .03), diffusion (p < .01) and perfusion (p = .03) were strongly associated with T2,inc , and linear mixed model analysis revealed that changes in PCr and perfusion both affect T2,inc (p < .001). These findings support previous assumptions that T2 changes are not only an intra-cellular phenomenon resulting from metabolic stress but are also affected by increased perfusion in loaded muscles.

  9. Creatine and cyclocreatine treatment of human colon adenocarcinoma xenografts: 31P and 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, C A; Askenasy, N; Jain, R K; Koretsky, A P

    1999-01-01

    Creatine (Cr) and cyclocreatine (cyCr) have been shown to inhibit the growth of a variety of human and murine tumours. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anti-tumour effect of these molecules in relation to drug accumulation, energy metabolism, tumour water accumulation and toxicity. Nude mice carrying a human colon adenocarcinoma (LS174T) with a creatine kinase (CK) activity of 2.12 units mg−1 protein were fed Cr (2.5% or 5%) or cyCr (0.025%, 0.1% or 0.5%) for 2 weeks and compared with controls fed standard diet. Cr concentrations of 2.5% and 5% significantly inhibited tumour growth, as did 0.1% and 0.5% cyCr. In vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) after 2 weeks of treatment showed an increase in [phosphocreatine (PCr)+phosphocyclocreatine (PcyCr)]/nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) with increasing concentrations of dietary Cr and cyCr, without changes in absolute NTP contents. The antiproliferative effect of the substrates of CK was not related to energy deficiency but was associated with acidosis. Intratumoral substrate concentrations (measured by 1H-MRS) of 4.8 μmol g−1 wet weight Cr (mice fed 2.5% Cr) and 6.2 μmol g−1 cyCr (mice fed 0.1% cyCr) induced a similar decrease in growth rate, indicating that both substrates were equally potent in tumour growth inhibition. The best correlant of growth inhibition was the total Cr or (cyCr+Cr) concentrations in the tissue. In vivo, these agents did not induce excessive water accumulation and had no systemic effects on the mice (weight loss, hypoglycaemia) that may have caused growth inhibition. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:9888469

  10. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Estimation of total phenol concentrations in coal liquefaction resids by [sup 31]P NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, J.T.; Verkade, J.G. )

    1992-11-01

    In this study, Iowa State University researchers used [sub 31]P-tagged reagents to derivatize the labile hydrogen functional groups in the THF-soluble portion of 850[degrees]F[sup +] distillation resid materials and the THF-soluble portion of process oils derived from direct coal liquefaction.[sup 31]P-NMR was used to analyze the derivatized samples. NMR peak assignments can be made by comparison to model compounds similarly derivatized. Species can be quantified by integration of the NMR signals. Different [sup 31]P-NMR tagged reagents can be used to produce different degrees of peak resolution in the NMR spectrum. This, in turn, partially dictates the degree of speciation and/or quantification of species, or classes of compounds, that can be accomplished. Iowa State chose a [sup 31]P-tagged reagent (ClPOCMe[sub 2]CMe[sub 2]O) which was shown previously to be particularly useful in the derivatization of phenols. The derivatized samples all exhibited a small group of peaks attributed to amines and a broad group of peaks in the phenol region. The presence of paramagnetic species in the samples caused the NMR signals to broaden. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra confirmed the presence of paramagnetic organic free radicals in selected samples. Various methods were employed to process the NMR data. The complexity and broadness of the phenol peak, however, made speciation of the phenols impractical.

  11. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Estimation of total phenol concentrations in coal liquefaction resids by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, J.T.; Verkade, J.G.

    1992-11-01

    In this study, Iowa State University researchers used {sub 31}P-tagged reagents to derivatize the labile hydrogen functional groups in the THF-soluble portion of 850{degrees}F{sup +} distillation resid materials and the THF-soluble portion of process oils derived from direct coal liquefaction.{sup 31}P-NMR was used to analyze the derivatized samples. NMR peak assignments can be made by comparison to model compounds similarly derivatized. Species can be quantified by integration of the NMR signals. Different {sup 31}P-NMR tagged reagents can be used to produce different degrees of peak resolution in the NMR spectrum. This, in turn, partially dictates the degree of speciation and/or quantification of species, or classes of compounds, that can be accomplished. Iowa State chose a {sup 31}P-tagged reagent (ClPOCMe{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}O) which was shown previously to be particularly useful in the derivatization of phenols. The derivatized samples all exhibited a small group of peaks attributed to amines and a broad group of peaks in the phenol region. The presence of paramagnetic species in the samples caused the NMR signals to broaden. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra confirmed the presence of paramagnetic organic free radicals in selected samples. Various methods were employed to process the NMR data. The complexity and broadness of the phenol peak, however, made speciation of the phenols impractical.

  12. Brief Report: Approaches to [Superscript 31]P-MRS in Awake, Non-Sedated Children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Laura C.; Scott-Van Zeeland, Ashley A.; Hamilton, Gavin; Lincoln, Alan; Golomb, Beatrice A.

    2012-01-01

    We piloted a suite of approaches aimed to facilitate a successful series of up to four brain and muscle [superscript 31]Phosphorus-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ([superscript 31]P-MRS) scans performed in one session in 12 "awake", non-sedated subjects (ages 6-18), 6 with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and 6 controls. We targeted advanced…

  13. In vivo mouse myocardial (31)P MRS using three-dimensional image-selected in vivo spectroscopy (3D ISIS): technical considerations and biochemical validations.

    PubMed

    Bakermans, Adrianus J; Abdurrachim, Desiree; van Nierop, Bastiaan J; Koeman, Anneke; van der Kroon, Inge; Baartscheer, Antonius; Schumacher, Cees A; Strijkers, Gustav J; Houten, Sander M; Zuurbier, Coert J; Nicolay, Klaas; Prompers, Jeanine J

    2015-10-01

    (31)P MRS provides a unique non-invasive window into myocardial energy homeostasis. Mouse models of cardiac disease are widely used in preclinical studies, but the application of (31)P MRS in the in vivo mouse heart has been limited. The small-sized, fast-beating mouse heart imposes challenges regarding localized signal acquisition devoid of contamination with signal originating from surrounding tissues. Here, we report the implementation and validation of three-dimensional image-selected in vivo spectroscopy (3D ISIS) for localized (31)P MRS of the in vivo mouse heart at 9.4 T. Cardiac (31)P MR spectra were acquired in vivo in healthy mice (n = 9) and in transverse aortic constricted (TAC) mice (n = 8) using respiratory-gated, cardiac-triggered 3D ISIS. Localization and potential signal contamination were assessed with (31)P MRS experiments in the anterior myocardial wall, liver, skeletal muscle and blood. For healthy hearts, results were validated against ex vivo biochemical assays. Effects of isoflurane anesthesia were assessed by measuring in vivo hemodynamics and blood gases. The myocardial energy status, assessed via the phosphocreatine (PCr) to adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) ratio, was approximately 25% lower in TAC mice compared with controls (0.76 ± 0.13 versus 1.00 ± 0.15; P < 0.01). Localization with one-dimensional (1D) ISIS resulted in two-fold higher PCr/ATP ratios than measured with 3D ISIS, because of the high PCr levels of chest skeletal muscle that contaminate the 1D ISIS measurements. Ex vivo determinations of the myocardial PCr/ATP ratio (0.94 ± 0.24; n = 8) confirmed the in vivo observations in control mice. Heart rate (497 ± 76 beats/min), mean arterial pressure (90 ± 3.3 mmHg) and blood oxygen saturation (96.2 ± 0.6%) during the experimental conditions of in vivo (31)P MRS were within the normal physiological range. Our results show that respiratory-gated, cardiac-triggered 3D ISIS allows for non-invasive assessments of in vivo

  14. Differences in nucleotide compartmentation and energy state in isolated and in situ rat heart: assessment by 31P-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Williams, J P; Headrick, J P

    1996-08-07

    Free cytosolic concentrations of ATP, PCr, ADP and 5'-AMP, and the cytosolic [ATP]/[ADP].[Pi] ratio, were determined in isolated and in situ rat hearts using 31P-NMR spectroscopy. Total tissue metabolite concentrations were determined by HPLC analysis of freeze-clamped, perchloric acid-extracted tissue. In in situ myocardium the PCr/ATP ratio was 2.7 +/- 0.2 determined from 31P-NMR data (using either PCr/beta-NTP or PCr/gamma-NTP), and 1.9 +/- 0.1 (P < 0.01) determined from total tissue concentrations. 31P-NMR-determined and total tissue [PCr] were in excellent agreement (49.6 +/- 8.4 and 49.5 +/- 1.0 mumol.g-1 dry wt, respectively), whereas 31P-NMR-determined [ATP] (18.6 +/- 3.2 mumol.g-1 dry wt) was only 71% of the total tissue concentration (26.1 +/- 1.7 mumol.g-1 dry wt, P < 0.01). Isolation and Langendorff perfusion of rat hearts with glucose as substrate reduced total tissue [ATP] and [PCr] and the 31P-NMR-determined PCr/ATP ratio fell to 1.5 +/- 0.1. This value agreed well with the total tissue ratio of 1.4 +/- 0.1, and there was excellent agreement between 31P-NMR-determined and total tissue [PCr] and [ATP] values in the perfused heart. Addition of pyruvate to perfusate increased the 31P-NMR-determined PCr/ATP ratio to 1.7 +/- 0.1 due to elevated [PCr], and there remained excellent agreement between NMR-determined and total tissue [PCr] and [ATP] values. Free cytosolic [ADP] (from the creatine kinase equilibrium) was 5% of total tissue ADP, and free cytosolic [5'-AMP] (from the adenylate kinase equilibrium) ranged from 0.2-0.3% of total tissue 5'-AMP. Bioenergetic state, indexed by [ATP]/[ADP].[Pi], was much lower in isolated perfused hearts (30 mM-1) vs. in situ myocardium (approximately 150 mM-1). In summary, we observe a substantial disproportionality between total tissue PCr/ATP and 31P-NMR-determined PCr/ATP in highly energised in situ myocardium but not in isolated perfused hearts. This appears due to an NMR invisible ATP compartment approximating 29

  15. Myosin-binding protein C DNA variants in domestic cats (A31P, A74T, R820W) and their association with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    LONGERI, M.; FERRARI, P.; KNAFELZ, P.; MEZZELANI, A.; MARABOTTI, A.; MILANESI, L.; PERTICA, G.; POLLI, M.; BRAMBILLA, P.G.; KITTLESON, M.; LYONS, L.A.; PORCIELLO, F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Two mutations in the MYBPC3 gene have been identified in Maine Coon (MCO) and Ragdoll (RD) cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Objective The present study examines the frequency of these mutations and of the A74T polymorphism to describe their worldwide distribution and correlation with echocardiography. Animals 1855 cats representing 28 breeds and random bred cats world-wide of which 446 underwent echocardiographic examination. Methods This is a prospective cross sectional study. Polymorphisms were genotyped using Illumina VeraCode GoldenGate or by direct sequencing. The disease status was defined by echocardiography according to established guidelines. Odds ratios for the joint probability of having HCM and the alleles were calculated by meta-analysis. Functional analysis was simulated. Results The MYBPC3 A31P and R820W were restricted to MCO and RD respectively. Both purebred and random bred cats had HCM and the incidence increased with age. The A74T polymorphism was not associated with any phenotype. HCM was most prevalent in MCO homozygote for the A31P mutation and the penetrance increased with age. The penetrance of the heterozygote genotype was lower (0.08) compared to the P/P genotype (0.58) in MCO. Conclusions and Clinical Importance A31P mutation occurs frequently in MCO cats. The high incidence of HCM in homozygotes for the mutation supports the causal nature of the A31P mutation. Penetrance is incomplete for heterozygotes at A31P locus, at least at a young age. The A74T variant does not appear to be correlated with HCM. PMID:23323744

  16. Blood flow and muscle bio-energetics by 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance after local cold acclimation.

    PubMed

    Savourey, G; Clerc, L; Vallerand, A L; Leftheriotis, G; Mehier, H; Bittel, J H

    1992-01-01

    To clarify the origin of local cold adaptation and to define precisely its influence on muscle bio-energetics during local exercise, five subjects were subjected to repeated 5 degrees C cold water immersion of the right hand and forearm. The first aim of our investigation was therefore carried out by measuring local skin temperatures and peripheral blood flow during a cold hand test (5 degrees C, 5 min) followed by a 10-min recovery period. The 31P by nuclear magnetic resonance (31PNMR) muscle bio-energetic changes, indicating possible heat production changes, were measured during the recovery period. The second aim of our investigation was carried out by measuring 31PNMR muscle bioenergetics during handgrip exercise (10% of the maximal voluntary contraction for 5 min followed by a 10-min recovery period) performed both at a comfortable ambient temperature (22 degrees C; E) and after a cold hand test (EC), before and after local cold adaptation. Local cold adaptation, confirmed by warmer skin temperatures of the extremities (+30%, P less than 0.05), was related more to an increased peripheral blood flow, as shown by the smaller decrease in systolic peak [-245 (SEM 30) Hz vs -382 (SEM 95) Hz, P less than 0.05] than to a change in local heat production, because muscle bioenergetics did not vary. Acute local cold immersion decreased the inorganic phosphate:phosphocreatine (PC) ratio during EC compared to E [+0.006 (SEM 0.010) vs +0.078 (SEM 0.002) before acclimation and +0.029 (SEM 0.002) vs +0.090 (SEM 0.002) after acclimation respectively, P less than 0.05] without significant change in the PC:beta-adenosine triphosphate ratio and pH. Local adaptation did not modify these results statistically. The recovery of PC during E increased after acclimation [9.0 (SEM 0.2) min vs 3.0 (SEM 0.4) min, P less than 0.05]. These results suggested that local cold adaptation is related more to peripheral blood flow changes than to increased metabolic heat production in the muscle.

  17. Neutrino-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, H.; Garvey, G.; Zeller, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The study of neutrino oscillations has necessitated a new generation of neutrino experiments that are exploring neutrino-nuclear scattering processes. We focus in particular on charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, a particularly important channel that has been extensively investigated both in the bubble-chamber era and by current experiments. Recent results have led to theoretical reexamination of this process. We review the standard picture of quasi-elastic scattering as developed in electron scattering, review and discuss experimental results, and discuss additional nuclear effects such as exchange currents and short-range correlations that may play a significant role in neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  18. Reality of comet nucleus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyttleton, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The prime problem of a comet mission must be to settle whether the cometary nucleus has an actual tangible material existence, or whether it arises from some optical effect present only at times within comets. The absence of any large particles in a comet seems to be demonstrated by certain meteor showers. A feature that would seem to indicate that a comet consists primarily of a swarm of particles is that the coma in general contracts as the comet approaches the sun, roughly in proportion within the distance, and then expands again as it recedes.

  19. Nucleus from string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Morita, Takeshi

    2011-08-01

    In generic holographic QCD, we find that baryons are bound to form a nucleus, and that its radius obeys the empirically-known mass-number (A) dependence r∝A1/3 for large A. Our result is robust, since we use only a generic property of D-brane actions in string theory. We also show that nucleons are bound completely in a finite volume. Furthermore, employing a concrete holographic model (derived by Hashimoto, Iizuka, and Yi, describing a multibaryon system in the Sakai-Sugimoto model), the nuclear radius is evaluated as O(1)×A1/3[fm], which is consistent with experiments.

  20. Higgs-boson production in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Cross-section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two-photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two-photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  1. Higgs-Boson Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Cross section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  2. Networking the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Rajapakse, Indika; Scalzo, David; Tapscott, Stephen J; Kosak, Steven T; Groudine, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The nuclei of differentiating cells exhibit several fundamental principles of self-organization. They are composed of many dynamical units connected physically and functionally to each other—a complex network—and the different parts of the system are mutually adapted and produce a characteristic end state. A unique cell-specific signature emerges over time from complex interactions among constituent elements that delineate coordinate gene expression and chromosome topology. Each element itself consists of many interacting components, all dynamical in nature. Self-organizing systems can be simplified while retaining complex information using approaches that examine the relationship between elements, such as spatial relationships and transcriptional information. These relationships can be represented using well-defined networks. We hypothesize that during the process of differentiation, networks within the cell nucleus rewire according to simple rules, from which a higher level of order emerges. Studying the interaction within and among networks provides a useful framework for investigating the complex organization and dynamic function of the nucleus. PMID:20664641

  3. Comparison of (31)P saturation and inversion magnetization transfer in human liver and skeletal muscle using a clinical MR system and surface coils.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Tania; Kreis, Roland; Boesch, Chris

    2015-02-01

    (31)P MRS magnetization transfer ((31)P-MT) experiments allow the estimation of exchange rates of biochemical reactions, such as the creatine kinase equilibrium and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. Although various (31)P-MT methods have been successfully used on isolated organs or animals, their application on humans in clinical scanners poses specific challenges. This study compared two major (31)P-MT methods on a clinical MR system using heteronuclear surface coils. Although saturation transfer (ST) is the most commonly used (31)P-MT method, sequences such as inversion transfer (IT) with short pulses might be better suited for the specific hardware and software limitations of a clinical scanner. In addition, small NMR-undetectable metabolite pools can transfer MT to NMR-visible pools during long saturation pulses, which is prevented with short pulses. (31)P-MT sequences were adapted for limited pulse length, for heteronuclear transmit-receive surface coils with inhomogeneous B1 , for the need for volume selection and for the inherently low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on a clinical 3-T MR system. The ST and IT sequences were applied to skeletal muscle and liver in 10 healthy volunteers. Monte-Carlo simulations were used to evaluate the behavior of the IT measurements with increasing imperfections. In skeletal muscle of the thigh, ATP synthesis resulted in forward reaction constants (k) of 0.074 ± 0.022 s(-1) (ST) and 0.137 ± 0.042 s(-1) (IT), whereas the creatine kinase reaction yielded 0.459 ± 0.089 s(-1) (IT). In the liver, ATP synthesis resulted in k = 0.267 ± 0.106 s(-1) (ST), whereas the IT experiment yielded no consistent results. ST results were close to literature values; however, the IT results were either much larger than the corresponding ST values and/or were widely scattered. To summarize, ST and IT experiments can both be implemented on a clinical body scanner with heteronuclear transmit-receive surface coils; however, ST results are

  4. Quantitative (31)P NMR spectroscopy and (1)H MRI measurements of bone mineral and matrix density differentiate metabolic bone diseases in rat models.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haihui; Nazarian, Ara; Ackerman, Jerome L; Snyder, Brian D; Rosenberg, Andrew E; Nazarian, Rosalynn M; Hrovat, Mirko I; Dai, Guangping; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Wu, Yaotang

    2010-06-01

    In this study, bone mineral density (BMD) of normal (CON), ovariectomized (OVX), and partially nephrectomized (NFR) rats was measured by (31)P NMR spectroscopy; bone matrix density was measured by (1)H water- and fat-suppressed projection imaging (WASPI); and the extent of bone mineralization (EBM) was obtained by the ratio of BMD/bone matrix density. The capability of these MR methods to distinguish the bone composition of the CON, OVX, and NFR groups was evaluated against chemical analysis (gravimetry). For cortical bone specimens, BMD of the CON and OVX groups was not significantly different; BMD of the NFR group was 22.1% (by (31)P NMR) and 17.5% (by gravimetry) lower than CON. For trabecular bone specimens, BMD of the OVX group was 40.5% (by (31)P NMR) and 24.6% (by gravimetry) lower than CON; BMD of the NFR group was 26.8% (by (31)P NMR) and 21.5% (by gravimetry) lower than CON. No significant change of cortical bone matrix density between CON and OVX was observed by WASPI or gravimetry; NFR cortical bone matrix density was 10.3% (by WASPI) and 13.9% (by gravimetry) lower than CON. OVX trabecular bone matrix density was 38.0% (by WASPI) and 30.8% (by gravimetry) lower than CON, while no significant change in NFR trabecular bone matrix density was observed by either method. The EBMs of OVX cortical and trabecular specimens were slightly higher than CON but not significantly different from CON. Importantly, EBMs of NFR cortical and trabecular specimens were 12.4% and 26.3% lower than CON by (31)P NMR/WASPI, respectively, and 4.0% and 11.9% lower by gravimetry. Histopathology showed evidence of osteoporosis in the OVX group and severe secondary hyperparathyroidism (renal osteodystrophy) in the NFR group. These results demonstrate that the combined (31)P NMR/WASPI method is capable of discerning the difference in EBM between animals with osteoporosis and those with impaired bone mineralization.

  5. Meson multiplicity versus energy in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, T. W.; Freier, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic study of meson multiplicity as a function of energy at energies up to 100 GeV/u in nucleus-nucleus collisions has been made, using cosmic-ray data in nuclear emulsion. The data are consistent with simple nucleon-nucleon superposition models. Multiplicity per interacting nucleon in AA collisions does not appear to differ significantly from pp collisions.

  6. Momentum loss in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Ferdous; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    An optical model description, based on multiple scattering theory, of longitudinal momentum loss in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. The crucial role of the imaginary component of the nucleon-nucleon transition matrix in accounting for longitudinal momentum transfer is demonstrated. Results obtained with this model are compared with Intranuclear Cascade (INC) calculations, as well as with predictions from Vlasov-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (VUU) and quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations. Comparisons are also made with experimental data where available. These indicate that the present model is adequate to account for longitudinal momentum transfer in both proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions over a wide range of energies.

  7. 31P NMR spectroscopy in the quality control and authentication of extra-virgin olive oil: a review of recent progress.

    PubMed

    Dais, Photis; Spyros, Apostolos

    2007-05-01

    This review is a brief account on the application of a novel methodology to the quality control and authentication of extra-virgin olive oil. This methodology is based on the derivatization of the labile hydrogens of functional groups, such as hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, of olive oil constituents with the phosphorus reagent 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyldioxaphospholane, and the use of the (31)P chemical shifts to identify the phosphitylated compounds. Various experimental aspects such as pertinent instrumentation, sample preparation, acquisition parameters and properties of the phosphorus reagent are reviewed. The strategy to assign the (31)P signals of the phosphitylated model compounds and olive oil constituents by employing 1D and 2D NMR experiments is presented. Finally, the capability of this technique to assess the quality and the genuineness of extra-virgin olive oil and to detect fraud is discussed.

  8. Ionization behavior of polyphosphoinositides determined via the preparation of pH titration curves using solid-state 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Graber, Zachary T; Kooijman, Edgar E

    2013-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the degree of ionization of lipid titratable groups is important for the evaluation of protein-lipid and lipid-lipid interactions. The degree of ionization is commonly evaluated by acid-base titration, but for lipids localized in a multicomponent membrane interface this is not a suitable technique. For phosphomonoester-containing lipids such as the polyphosphoinositides, phosphatidic acid, and ceramide-1-phosphate, this is more conveniently accomplished by (31)P NMR. Here, we describe a solid-state (31)P NMR procedure to construct pH titration curves to determine the degree of ionization of phosphomonoester groups in polyphosphoinositides. This procedure can also be used, with suitable sample preparation conditions, for other important signaling lipids. Access to a solid-state, i.e., magic angle spinning, capable NMR spectrometer is assumed. The procedures described here are valid for a Bruker instrument, but can be adapted for other spectrometers as needed.

  9. Muscle metabolism and activation heterogeneity by combined 31P chemical shift and T2 imaging, and pulmonary O2 uptake during incremental knee-extensor exercise.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Daniel T; Howe, Franklyn A; Whipp, Brian J; Ward, Susan A; McIntyre, Dominick J; Ladroue, Christophe; Griffiths, John R; Kemp, Graham J; Rossiter, Harry B

    2013-09-01

    The integration of skeletal muscle substrate depletion, metabolite accumulation, and fatigue during large muscle-mass exercise is not well understood. Measurement of intramuscular energy store degradation and metabolite accumulation is confounded by muscle heterogeneity. Therefore, to characterize regional metabolic distribution in the locomotor muscles, we combined 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, chemical shift imaging, and T2-weighted imaging with pulmonary oxygen uptake during bilateral knee-extension exercise to intolerance. Six men completed incremental tests for the following: (1) unlocalized 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy; and (2) spatial determination of 31P metabolism and activation. The relationship of pulmonary oxygen uptake to whole quadriceps phosphocreatine concentration ([PCr]) was inversely linear, and three of four knee-extensor muscles showed activation as assessed by change in T2. The largest changes in [PCr], [inorganic phosphate] ([Pi]) and pH occurred in rectus femoris, but no voxel (72 cm3) showed complete PCr depletion at exercise cessation. The most metabolically active voxel reached 11 ± 9 mM [PCr] (resting, 29 ± 1 mM), 23 ± 11 mM [Pi] (resting, 7 ± 1 mM), and a pH of 6.64 ± 0.29 (resting, 7.08 ± 0.03). However, the distribution of 31P metabolites and pH varied widely between voxels, and the intervoxel coefficient of variation increased between rest (∼10%) and exercise intolerance (∼30-60%). Therefore, the limit of tolerance was attained with wide heterogeneity in substrate depletion and fatigue-related metabolite accumulation, with extreme metabolic perturbation isolated to only a small volume of active muscle (<5%). Regional intramuscular disturbances are thus likely an important requisite for exercise intolerance. How these signals integrate to limit muscle power production, while regional "recruitable muscle" energy stores are presumably still available, remains uncertain.

  10. Analysis of the urinary excretion of ifosfamide and its N-dechloroethylated metabolites in children using 31P-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Misiura, Konrad; Zubowska, Małgorzata; Zielińska, Elzbieta

    2003-01-01

    Amounts of ifosfamide (CAS 3778-73-2) and its N-dechloroethylated metabolites excreted in the urine were measured using 31P-NMR spectroscopy in 26 cancer children treated with this drug. Strong inter-patient variation in levels of these compounds were found. These differences were independent from patients age, body surface area, and sex, the dose of the drug, suggesting genetic base of observed variations in ifosfamide metabolism.

  11. {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance study of proton-irradiated KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Se-Hun; Lee, Kyu Won; Oh, B. H.; Lee, Cheol Eui; Hong, K. S.

    2007-11-01

    We have studied the microscopic structure and dynamics in a proton-irradiated KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} single crystal. Our {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance measurements indicate that proton irradiation gives rise to a decrease in the local dipolar order of the rigid lattice protons and an increase in interstitial protons as well as structural distortion of the PO{sub 4} tetrahedra.

  12. A Chinese benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy pedigree suggesting linkage to chromosome 5p15.31-p15.1.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Hu, Xinyu; Chen, Qiuhui; Zhang, Yizhi; Zhang, Ying; Hu, Guohua

    2014-07-01

    Benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy (BAFME) has been mapped to chromosome 8q23.3-q24.1, 2p11.1-q12.1, 5p15.31-p15.1, and 3q26.32-3q28, in Japanese, Italian, Thai, and French pedigrees, respectively. Recently, we investigated a Chinese BAFME family. Clinical and electrophysiological studies revealed that nine individuals were affected with BAFME. We aimed to establish the causative gene for this pedigree. We genotyped 17 microsatellite markers covering the four previously identified chromosome regions and performed linkage analyses. The linkage analysis data showed that the LOD score was 2.80 for D5S486 at no recombination. This suggested linkage to 5p15.31-p15.1 and excluded linkage to the other three loci (LOD score <0 at no recombination). Our study suggests that the causative gene responsible for BAFME in the Chinese pedigree may be located on chromosome 5p15.31-p15.1.

  13. Differently saturated fatty acids can be differentiated by 31P NMR subsequent to derivatization with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyldioxaphospholane: a cautionary note.

    PubMed

    Eibisch, Mandy; Riemer, Thomas; Fuchs, Beate; Schiller, Jürgen

    2013-03-20

    The analysis of free fatty acid (FFA) mixtures is a very important but, even nowadays, challenging task. This particularly applies as the so far most commonly used technique-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-is tedious and time-consuming. It has been convincingly shown ( Spyros, A.; Dais, P. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2000, 48, 802 - 5) that FFA may be analyzed by (31)P NMR subsequent to derivatization with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyldioxaphospholane (CTDP). However, it was also indicated that differently unsaturated FFAs result in the same (31)P NMR chemical shift and cannot be differentiated. Therefore, only the overall fatty acid content of a sample can be determined by the CTDP assay. In contrast, we will show here by using high-field NMR (600 MHz spectrometer, i.e., 242.884 MHz for (31)P) that the CTDP assay may be used to differentiate FFAs that have pronounced differences in their double bond contents: saturated fatty acids (16:0), moderately unsaturated (18:1, 18:2), highly unsaturated (20:4), and extremely unsaturated fatty acids (22:6) result in slightly different chemical shifts. The same applies for oxidized fatty acids. Finally, it will also be shown that the CTDP derivatization products decompose in a time-dependent manner. Therefore, all investigations must adhere to a strict time regime.

  14. A Solid-State Study of a Novel 31P Spin Pair Using Magic-Angle-Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challoner, R.; Mcdowell, C. A.; Yoshifuji, M.; Toyota, K.; Tossell, J. A.

    The present investigation concerns the solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the 31P spin pair in the novel three-membered heterocyclic compound 3-(dichloromethylene)- trans-1,2-bis( 2,4,6-tri- tert-butylphenyl)- 1,2-diphosphirane using the magic-angle-spinning (MAS) technique. The homogeneous 31P lineshapes are analyzed to extract the principal components of the shielding tensors using the Maricq and Waugh description of homonuclear spin-pair systems by average-Hamiltonian theory, modified to encompass the n = 0 rotational resonance situation. The experimental values of the shielding-tensor components are compared with those obtained from ab initio calculations performed on the model molecule P 2C 2H 4 to aid further the interpretation of the 31P MAS NMR spectrum of the chloromethylene-diphosphirane. The magnitudes and orientations of calculated shielding-tensor components of the model compound methylene-diphosphirane P 2C 2H 4 are compared with those for the phosphorus spin pair in the molecular environments of P 2, P 2H 2, and P 2H 4. The electronic structures and bonding in all of those molecular species are discussed.

  15. Detailed Chemical Composition of Condensed Tannins via Quantitative (31)P NMR and HSQC Analyses: Acacia catechu, Schinopsis balansae, and Acacia mearnsii.

    PubMed

    Crestini, Claudia; Lange, Heiko; Bianchetti, Giulia

    2016-09-23

    The chemical composition of Acacia catechu, Schinopsis balansae, and Acacia mearnsii proanthocyanidins has been determined using a novel analytical approach that rests on the concerted use of quantitative (31)P NMR and two-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. This approach has offered significant detailed information regarding the structure and purity of these complex and often elusive proanthocyanidins. More specifically, rings A, B, and C of their flavan-3-ol units show well-defined and resolved absorbance regions in both the quantitative (31)P NMR and HSQC spectra. By integrating each of these regions in the (31)P NMR spectra, it is possible to identify the oxygenation patterns of the flavan-3-ol units. At the same time it is possible to acquire a fingerprint of the proanthocyanidin sample and evaluate its purity via the HSQC information. This analytical approach is suitable for both the purified natural product proanthocyanidins and their commercial analogues. Overall, this effort demonstrates the power of the concerted use of these two NMR techniques for the structural elucidation of natural products containing labile hydroxy protons and a carbon framework that can be traced out via HSQC.

  16. {sup 31}P NMR study of the complexation of TBP with lanthanides and actinides in solution and in a clay matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Hartzell, C.J.

    1994-07-24

    Goal was to use NMR to study TBP/lanthanide complexes in the interlayer or on edge sites of clays. Work in this laboratory yielded details of the complexation of Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} with TBP in hexane solution; this information is crucial to interpretation of results of NMR studies of the complexes exchanged into clays. The solution {sup 31}P-chemical shift values were improved by repeating the studies on the lanthanide salts dissolved directly into neat TBP. NMR studies of these neat solutions of the Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex and the Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex show that the {sup 31}P chemical shift remains relatively constant for TBP: lanthanide ratios below 3: 1. At higher ratios, the chemical shift approaches that of free TBP, indicating rapid exchange of TBP between the free and complexed state. Exchange of these complexes into the clay hectorite yielded discrete {sup 31}P-NMR signals for the Eu{lg_bullet}TBP complex at -190 ppm and free TBP at -6 ppm. Adsorption of the Pr{lg_bullet}TBP complex yielded broad signals at 76 ppm for the complex and -6 ppm for free TBP. There was no evidence of exchange between the incorporated complex and the free TBP.

  17. The intercalatus nucleus of Staderini.

    PubMed

    Cascella, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Rutilio Staderini was one of the leading Italian anatomists of the twentieth century, together with some scientists, such as Giulio Chiarugi, Giovanni Vitali, and others. He was also a member of a new generation of anatomists. They had continued the tradition of the most famous Italian scientists, which started from the Renaissance up until the nineteenth century. Although he carried out important studies of neuroanatomy and comparative anatomy, as well as embryology, his name is rarely remembered by most medical historians. His name is linked to the nucleus he discovered: the Staderini nucleus or intercalated nucleus, a collection of nerve cells in the medulla oblongata located lateral to the hypoglossal nucleus. This article focuses on the biography of the neuroanatomist as well as the nucleus that carries his name and his other research, especially on comparative anatomy and embryology.

  18. Gray Matter-Specific Changes in Brain Bioenergetics after Acute Sleep Deprivation: A 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study at 4 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Plante, David T.; Trksak, George H.; Jensen, J. Eric; Penetar, David M.; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Riedner, Brady A.; Tartarini, Wendy L.; Dorsey, Cynthia M.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Lukas, Scott E.; Harper, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: A principal function of sleep may be restoration of brain energy metabolism caused by the energetic demands of wakefulness. Because energetic demands in the brain are greater in gray than white matter, this study used linear mixed-effects models to examine tissue-type specific changes in high-energy phosphates derived using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) after sleep deprivation and recovery sleep. Design: Experimental laboratory study. Setting: Outpatient neuroimaging center at a private psychiatric hospital. Participants: A total of 32 MRS scans performed in eight healthy individuals (mean age 35 y; range 23-51 y). Interventions: Phosphocreatine (PCr) and β-nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) were measured using 31P MRS three dimensional-chemical shift imaging at high field (4 Tesla) after a baseline night of sleep, acute sleep deprivation, and 2 nights of recovery sleep. Novel linear mixed-effects models were constructed using spectral and tissue segmentation data to examine changes in bioenergetics in gray and white matter. Measurements and Results: PCr increased in gray matter after 2 nights of recovery sleep relative to sleep deprivation with no significant changes in white matter. Exploratory analyses also demonstrated that increases in PCr were associated with increases in electroencephalographic slow wave activity during recovery sleep. No significant changes in β-NTP were observed. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that sleep deprivation and subsequent recovery-induced changes in high-energy phosphates primarily occur in gray matter, and increases in phosphocreatine after recovery sleep may be related to sleep homeostasis. Citation: Plante DT, Trksak GH, Jensen JE, Penetar DM, Ravichandran C, Riedner BA, Tartarini WL, Dorsey CM, Renshaw PF, Lukas SE, Harper DG. Gray matter-specific changes in brain bioenergetics after acute sleep deprivation: a 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study at 4 Tesla. SLEEP 2014

  19. In vivo (1)H MRS and (31)P MRSI of the response to cyclocreatine in transgenic mouse liver expressing creatine kinase.

    PubMed

    Cui, Min-Hui; Jayalakshmi, Kamaiah; Liu, Laibin; Guha, Chandan; Branch, Craig A

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has been explored as a therapeutic alternative to liver transplantation, but a means to monitor the success of the procedure is lacking. Published findings support the use of in vivo (31)P MRSI of creatine kinase (CK)-expressing hepatocytes to monitor proliferation of implanted hepatocytes. Phosphocreatine tissue level depends upon creatine (Cr) input to the CK enzyme reaction, but Cr measurement by (1)H MRS suffers from low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We examine the possibility of using the Cr analog cyclocreatine (CCr, a substrate for CK), which is quickly phosphorylated to phosphocyclocreatine (PCCr), as a higher SNR alternative to Cr. (1)H MRS and (31)P MRSI were employed to measure the effect of incremental supplementation of CCr upon PCCr, γ-ATP, pH and Pi /ATP in the liver of transgenic mice expressing the BB isoform of CK (CKBB) in hepatocytes. Water supplementation with 0.1% CCr led to a peak total PCCr level of 17.15 ± 1.07 mmol/kg wet weight by 6 weeks, while adding 1.0% CCr led to a stable PCCr liver level of 18.12 ± 3.91 mmol/kg by the fourth day of feeding. PCCr was positively correlated with CCr, and ATP concentration and pH declined with increasing PCCr. Feeding with 1% CCr in water induced an apparent saturated level of PCCr, suggesting that CCr quantization may not be necessary for quantifying expression of CK in mice. These findings support the possibility of using (31)P MRS to noninvasively monitor hepatocyte transplant success with CK-expressing hepatocytes.

  20. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus combines intrinsic phosphotransferase and cyclic phosphodiesterase activities: A sup 31 P NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Shashidhar, M.S.; Kuppe, A. ); Volwerk, J.J.; Griffith, O.H.

    1990-09-04

    The inositol phosphate products formed during the cleavage of phosphatidylinositol by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus were analyzed by {sup 31}P NMR. {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy can distinguish between the inositol phosphate species and phosphatidylinositol. Chemical shift values (with reference to phosphoric acid) observed are {minus}0.41, 3.62, 4.45, and 16.30 ppm for phosphatidylinositol, myo-inositol 1-monophosphate, myo-inositol 2-monophosphate, and myo-inositol 1,2-cyclic monophosphate, respectively. It is shown that under a variety of experimental conditions this phospholipase C cleaves phosphatidylinositol via an intramolecular phosphotransfer reaction producing diacylglycerol and D-myo-inositol 1,2-cyclic monophosphate. The authors also report the new and unexpected observation that the phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from B. cereus is able to hydrolyze the inositol cyclic phosphate to form D-myo-inositol 1-monophosphate. The enzyme, therefore, possesses phosphotransferase and cyclic phosphodiesterase activities. The second reaction requires thousandfold higher enzyme concentrations to be observed by {sup 31}P NMR. This reaction was shown to be regiospecific in that only the 1-phosphate was produced and stereospecific in that only D-myo-inositol 1,2-cyclic monophosphate was hydrolyzed. Inhibition with a monoclonal antibody specific for the B.cereus phospholipase C showed that the cyclic phosphodiesterase activity is intrinsic to the bacterial enzyme. They propose a two-step mechanism for the phosphatidyl-inositol-specific phospholipase C from B. cereus involving sequential phosphotransferase and cyclic phosphodiesterase activities. This mechanism bears a resemblance to the well-known two-step mechanism of pancreatic ribonuclease, RNase A.

  1. 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and 2H-magnetic resonance imaging studies of a panel of early-generation transplanted murine tumour models.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, S. P.; van den Boogaart, A.; Maxwell, R. J.; Griffiths, J. R.; Hamilton, E.; Waterton, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was first to determine whether three slowly growing early-generation murine transplantable tumours, the T40 fibrosarcoma, T115 mammary carcinoma and T237 lung carcinoma, exhibit patterns of energetics and blood flow during growth that are different from those of the faster growing RIF-1 fibrosarcoma. Serial measurements were made with 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), relating to nutritive blood flow and 2H-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is sensitive to both nutritive and large-vessel (non-nutritive) flow. All four tumour lines showed a decrease in betaNTP/Pi and pH with growth; however, each line showed a different pattern of blood flow that did not correlate with the decrease in energetics. Qualitative histological analysis strongly correlated with the 2H-MRI. Second, their response to 5 mg kg(-1) hydralazine i.v. was monitored by 31P-MRS. A marked decrease in betaNTP/Pi and pH was observed in both the RIF-1 fibrosarcoma and the third-generation T115 mammary carcinoma after hydralazine challenge. In contrast, the fourth generation T40 fibrosarcoma and T237 lung carcinoma showed no change in 31P-MRS parameters. However, a fifth-generation T237 cohort, which grew approximately three times faster than fourth-generation T237 cohorts, exhibited a significant deterioration in betaNTP/Pi and pH in response to hydralazine. These data are consistent with a decoupling between large-vessel and nutritive blood flow and indicate that early-generation transplants that have a slow growth rate and vascular tone are more appropriate models of human tumour vasculature than more rapidly growing, repeatedly transplanted tumours. Images Figure 2 PMID:9667643

  2. Measurement of changes in high-energy phosphates in the cardiac cycle by using gated /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Fossel, E.T.; Morgan, H.E.; Ingwall, J.S.

    1980-06-01

    Levels of the high-energy phosphate-containing compounds, ATP and creatine phosphate, and of inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/ were measured as a function of position in the cardiac cycle. Measurements were made on isolated, perfused, working rat hearts through the use of gated /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Levels of ATP and creatine phosphate were found to vary during the cardiac cycle and were maximal at minimal aortic pressure and minimal at maximal aortic pressure. P/sub i/ varied inversely with the high-energy phosphates.

  3. Phosphatidylcholine and cholesteryl esters identify the infiltrating behaviour of a clear cell renal carcinoma: 1H, 13C and 31P MRS evidence.

    PubMed

    Tugnoli, V; Poerio, A; Tosi, M R

    2004-08-01

    This study presents a multinuclear (1H, 13C and 31P) magnetic resonance spectroscopy characterization of the total lipid fraction extracted from different regions of a human kidney affected by a clear cell renal carcinoma. It was thus possible to demonstrate that cholesteryl esters and phosphatidylcholine are markers of the tumor infiltration, histologically confirmed, in the kidney medulla. The tumor tissue contains twice the amount of phosphatidylcholine compared to normal cortex. The results appear relevant in light of new clinical applications based on the biochemical composition of human tissues.

  4. Surface albedo of cometary nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, T.; Mukai, S.

    A variation of the albedo on the illuminated disk of a comet nucleus is estimated, taking into account the multiple reflection of incident light due to small scale roughness. The dependences of the average albedo over the illuminated disk on the degree of roughness and on the complex refractive index of the surface materials are examined. The variation estimates are compared with measurements of the nucleus albedo of Comet Halley (Reitsema et al., 1987).

  5. Sensitivity of cross sections for elastic nucleus-nucleus scattering to halo nucleus density distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhazov, G. D.; Sarantsev, V. V.

    2012-12-15

    In order to clear up the sensitivity of the nucleus-nucleus scattering to the nuclear matter distributions in exotic halo nuclei, we have calculated differential cross sections for elastic scattering of the {sup 6}He and {sup 11}Li nuclei on several nuclear targets at the energy of 0.8 GeV/nucleon with different assumed nuclear density distributions in {sup 6}He and {sup 11}Li.

  6. On the use of 31P NMR for the quantification of hydrosoluble phosphorus-containing compounds in coral host tissues and cultured zooxanthellae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinot, Claire; Gaysinski, Marc; Thomas, Olivier P.; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Grover, Renaud

    2016-02-01

    31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was assessed to investigate the phosphorus-containing compounds present in the tissues of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata as well as of cultured zooxanthellae (CZ). Results showed that phosphorus-containing compounds observed in CZ were mainly phosphate and phosphate esters. Phosphate accounted for 19 ± 2% of the total phosphorus compounds observed in CZ maintained under low P-levels (0.02 μM). Adding 5 mM of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (KH2PO4) to the CZ culture medium led to a 3.1-fold increase in intracellular phosphate, while adding 5 mM of dissolved organic phosphorus led to a reduction in the concentration of phosphorus compounds, including a 2.5-fold intracellular phosphate decrease. In sharp contrast to zooxanthellae, the host mainly contained phosphonates, and to a lesser extent, phosphate esters and phosphate. Two-months of host starvation decreased the phosphate content by 2.4 fold, while bleaching of fed corals did not modify this content. Based on 31P NMR analyses, this study highlights the importance of phosphonates in the composition of coral host tissues, and illustrates the impact of phosphorus availability on the phosphorus composition of host tissues and CZ, both through feeding of the host and inorganic phosphorus enrichment of the CZ.

  7. Free magnesium levels in normal human brain and brain tumors: sup 31 P chemical-shift imaging measurements at 1. 5 T

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.S.; Vigneron, D.B.; Murphy-Boesch, J.; Nelson, S.J.; Kessler, H.B.; Coia, L.; Curran, W.; Brown, T.R. )

    1991-08-01

    The authors have studied a series of normal subjects and patients with brain tumors, by using {sup 31}P three-dimensional chemical shift imaging to obtain localized {sup 31}P spectra of the brain. A significant proportion of brain cytosolic ATP in normal brain is not complexed to Mg{sup 2+}, as indicated by the chemical shift {delta} of the {beta}-P resonance of ATP. The ATP {beta}P resonance position in brain thus is sensitive to changes in intracellular free Mg{sup 2+} concentration and in the proportion of ATP complexed with Mg because this shift lies on the rising portion of the {delta} vs. Mg{sup 2+} titration curve for ATP. They have measured the ATP {beta}-P shift and compared intracellular free Mg{sup 2+} concentration and fractions of free ATP for normal individuals and a limited series of patients with brain tumors. In four of the five spectra obtained from brain tissue containing a substantial proportion of tumor, intracellular free Mg{sup 2+} was increased, and the fraction of free ATP was decreased, compared with normal brain.

  8. Quantitative 31P NMR for Simultaneous Trace Analysis of Organophosphorus Pesticides in Aqueous Media Using the Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, S.; Talebpour, Z.; Molaabasi, F.; Bijanzadeh, H. R.; Khazaeli, S.

    2016-09-01

    The analysis of pesticides in water samples is of primary concern for quality control laboratories due to the toxicity of these compounds and their associated public health risk. A novel analytical method based on stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE), followed by 31P quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (31P QNMR), has been developed for simultaneously monitoring and determining four organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) in aqueous media. The effects of factors on the extraction efficiency of OPPs were investigated using a Draper-Lin small composite design. An optimal sample volume of 4.2 mL, extraction time of 96 min, extraction temperature of 42°C, and desorption time of 11 min were obtained. The results showed reasonable linearity ranges for all pesticides with correlation coefficients greater than 0.9920. The limit of quantification (LOQ) ranged from 0.1 to 2.60 mg/L, and the recoveries of spiked river water samples were from 82 to 94% with relative standard deviation (RSD) values less than 4%. The results show that this method is simple, selective, rapid, and can be applied to other sample matrices.

  9. In Vivo 31P-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Glyphosate Uptake, Vacuolar Sequestration, and Tonoplast Pump Activity in Glyphosate-Resistant Horseweed1[W

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xia; d’Avignon, D. André; Ackerman, Joseph J.H.; Sammons, R. Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Horseweed (Conyza canadensis) is considered a significant glyphosate-resistant (GR) weed in agriculture, spreading to 21 states in the United States and now found globally on five continents. This laboratory previously reported rapid vacuolar sequestration of glyphosate as the mechanism of resistance in GR horseweed. The observation of vacuole sequestration is consistent with the existence of a tonoplast-bound transporter. 31P-Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments performed in vivo with GR horseweed leaf tissue show that glyphosate entry into the plant cell (cytosolic compartment) is (1) first order in extracellular glyphosate concentration, independent of pH and dependent upon ATP; (2) competitively inhibited by alternative substrates (aminomethyl phosphonate [AMPA] and N-methyl glyphosate [NMG]), which themselves enter the plant cell; and (3) blocked by vanadate, a known inhibitor/blocker of ATP-dependent transporters. Vacuole sequestration of glyphosate is (1) first order in cytosolic glyphosate concentration and dependent upon ATP; (2) competitively inhibited by alternative substrates (AMPA and NMG), which themselves enter the plant vacuole; and (3) saturable. 31P-Nuclear magnetic resonance findings with GR horseweed are consistent with the active transport of glyphosate and alternative substrates (AMPA and NMG) across the plasma membrane and tonoplast in a manner characteristic of ATP-binding cassette transporters, similar to those that have been identified in mammalian cells. PMID:25185124

  10. Distribution and mobility of phosphates and sodium ions in cheese by solid-state 31P and double-quantum filtered 23Na NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gobet, Mallory; Rondeau-Mouro, Corinne; Buchin, Solange; Le Quéré, Jean-Luc; Guichard, Elisabeth; Foucat, Loïc; Moreau, Céline

    2010-04-01

    The feasibility of solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and (23)Na NMR spectroscopy to investigate both phosphates and Na(+) ions distribution in semi-hard cheeses in a non-destructive way was studied. Two semi-hard cheeses of known composition were made with two different salt contents. (31)P Single-pulse excitation and cross-polarization MAS experiments allowed, for the first time, the identification and quantification of soluble and insoluble phosphates in the cheeses. The presence of a relatively 'mobile' fraction of colloidal phosphates was evidenced. The detection by (23)Na single-quantum NMR experiments of all the sodium ions in the cheeses was validated. The presence of a fraction of 'bound' sodium ions was evidenced by (23)Na double-quantum filtered NMR experiments. We demonstrated that NMR is a suitable tool to investigate both phosphates and Na(+) ions distributions in cheeses. The impact of the sodium content on the various phosphorus forms distribution was discussed and results demonstrated that NMR would be an important tool for the cheese industry for the processes controls.

  11. In vivo and in vitro 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies of the hepatic response of healthy rats and rats with acute hepatic damage to fructose loading.

    PubMed

    Lu, W; Locke, S J; Brauer, M

    1994-05-01

    The hepatic response to a fructose challenge for control rats, and rats subjected to an acute sublethal dose of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) or bromobenzene (BB), was compared using dynamic in vivo 31P MRS. Fructose loading conditions were used in which control rats showed only a modest increase in hepatic phosphomonoester (PME), and a small decrease in ATP, Pi, and intracellular pH after fructose administration. Both CCl4 and BB-treated rats showed a much greater fructose-induced accumulation of PME than did controls. Trolox C, a free radical scavenger, prevented most of this PME increase. BB-treated rats, given sufficient time to recover from the hepatotoxic insult, responded to the fructose load similarly to controls. Liver aldolase activities of control, toxicant-treated rats, and toxicant plus Trolox C-treated rats correlated inversely with PME accumulation after fructose loading (correlation coefficient: -0.834, P < 0.05). Perchloric acid extracts of rat livers studied by in vitro 31P MRS confirmed that the PME accumulation after fructose loading is mainly due to an increase in fructose 1-phosphate. These studies are consistent with the aldolase-catalyzed cleavage of fructose 1-phosphate being rate-limiting in hepatic fructose metabolism, and that the CCl4 and BB treatment modify and inactivate the aldolase enzyme.

  12. On the use of 31P NMR for the quantification of hydrosoluble phosphorus-containing compounds in coral host tissues and cultured zooxanthellae.

    PubMed

    Godinot, Claire; Gaysinski, Marc; Thomas, Olivier P; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Grover, Renaud

    2016-02-23

    (31)P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was assessed to investigate the phosphorus-containing compounds present in the tissues of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata as well as of cultured zooxanthellae (CZ). Results showed that phosphorus-containing compounds observed in CZ were mainly phosphate and phosphate esters. Phosphate accounted for 19 ± 2% of the total phosphorus compounds observed in CZ maintained under low P-levels (0.02 μM). Adding 5 mM of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (KH2PO4) to the CZ culture medium led to a 3.1-fold increase in intracellular phosphate, while adding 5 mM of dissolved organic phosphorus led to a reduction in the concentration of phosphorus compounds, including a 2.5-fold intracellular phosphate decrease. In sharp contrast to zooxanthellae, the host mainly contained phosphonates, and to a lesser extent, phosphate esters and phosphate. Two-months of host starvation decreased the phosphate content by 2.4 fold, while bleaching of fed corals did not modify this content. Based on (31)P NMR analyses, this study highlights the importance of phosphonates in the composition of coral host tissues, and illustrates the impact of phosphorus availability on the phosphorus composition of host tissues and CZ, both through feeding of the host and inorganic phosphorus enrichment of the CZ.

  13. Probing the PI3K/Akt/mTor pathway using 31P-NMR spectroscopy: routes to glycogen synthase kinase 3

    PubMed Central

    Phyu, Su M.; Tseng, Chih-Chung; Fleming, Ian N.; Smith, Tim A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Akt is an intracellular signalling pathway that serves as an essential link between cell surface receptors and cellular processes including proliferation, development and survival. The pathway has many downstream targets including glycogen synthase kinase3 which is a major regulatory kinase for cell cycle transit as well as controlling glycogen synthase activity. The Akt pathway is frequently up-regulated in cancer due to overexpression of receptors such as the epidermal growth factor receptor, or mutation of signalling pathway kinases resulting in inappropriate survival and proliferation. Consequently anticancer drugs have been developed that target this pathway. MDA-MB-468 breast and HCT8 colorectal cancer cells were treated with inhibitors including LY294002, MK2206, rapamycin, AZD8055 targeting key kinases in/associated with Akt pathway and the consistency of changes in 31P-NMR-detecatable metabolite content of tumour cells was examined. Treatment with the Akt inhibitor MK2206 reduced phosphocholine levels in MDA-MB-468 cells. Treatment with either the phosphoinositide-3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002 and pan-mTOR inhibitor, AZD8055 but not pan-Akt inhibitor MK2206 increased uridine-5′-diphosphate-hexose cell content which was suppressed by co-treatment with glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitor SB216763. This suggests that there is an Akt-independent link between phosphoinositol-3-kinase and glycogen synthase kinase3 and demonstrates the potential of 31P-NMR to probe intracellular signalling pathways. PMID:27811956

  14. On the use of 31P NMR for the quantification of hydrosoluble phosphorus-containing compounds in coral host tissues and cultured zooxanthellae

    PubMed Central

    Godinot, Claire; Gaysinski, Marc; Thomas, Olivier P.; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Grover, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was assessed to investigate the phosphorus-containing compounds present in the tissues of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata as well as of cultured zooxanthellae (CZ). Results showed that phosphorus-containing compounds observed in CZ were mainly phosphate and phosphate esters. Phosphate accounted for 19 ± 2% of the total phosphorus compounds observed in CZ maintained under low P-levels (0.02 μM). Adding 5 mM of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (KH2PO4) to the CZ culture medium led to a 3.1-fold increase in intracellular phosphate, while adding 5 mM of dissolved organic phosphorus led to a reduction in the concentration of phosphorus compounds, including a 2.5-fold intracellular phosphate decrease. In sharp contrast to zooxanthellae, the host mainly contained phosphonates, and to a lesser extent, phosphate esters and phosphate. Two-months of host starvation decreased the phosphate content by 2.4 fold, while bleaching of fed corals did not modify this content. Based on 31P NMR analyses, this study highlights the importance of phosphonates in the composition of coral host tissues, and illustrates the impact of phosphorus availability on the phosphorus composition of host tissues and CZ, both through feeding of the host and inorganic phosphorus enrichment of the CZ. PMID:26902733

  15. 31P NMR characterization and efficiency of new types of water-insoluble phosphate fertilizers to supply plant-available phosphorus in diverse soil types.

    PubMed

    Erro, Javier; Baigorri, Roberto; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Garcia-Mina, Jose M

    2011-03-09

    Hydroponic plant experiments demonstrated the efficiency of a type of humic acid-based water-insoluble phosphate fertilizers, named rhizosphere controlled fertilizers (RCF), to supply available phosphorus (P) to different plant species. This effect was well correlated to the root release of specific organic acids. In this context, the aims of this study are (i) to study the chemical nature of RCF using solid-state (31)P NMR and (ii) to evaluate the real efficiency of RCF matrix as a source of P for wheat plants cultivated in an alkaline and acid soil in comparison with traditional water-soluble (simple superphosphate, SSP) and water-insoluble (dicalcium phosphate, DCP) P fertilizers. The (31)P NMR study revealed the formation of multimetal (double and triple, MgZn and/or MgZnCa) phosphates associated with chelating groups of the humic acid through the formation of metal bridges. With regard to P fertilizer efficiency, the results obtained show that the RCF matrix produced higher plant yields than SSP in both types of soil, with DCP and the water-insoluble fraction from the RCF matrix (WI) exhibiting the best results in the alkaline soil. By contrast, in the acid soil, DCP showed very low efficiency, WI performed on a par with SSP, and RCF exhibited the highest efficiency, thus suggesting a protector effect of humic acid from soil fixation.

  16. In vivo 31P NMR Study of the Metabolism of Murine Mammary 16/C Adenocarcinoma and Its Response to Chemotherapy, X-Radiation, and Hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evanochko, W. T.; Ng, T. C.; Lilly, M. B.; Lawson, A. J.; Corbett, T. H.; Durant, J. R.; Glickson, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    31P NMR spectroscopy with surface coils has been used to monitor, in vivo, the phosphate metabolism of subcutaneously implanted mammary 16/C adenocarcinoma in C3H/He mice. This model tumor was studied during untreated tumor growth and after treatment with adriamycin, hyperthermia, and x-radiation. The mammary 16/C tumor exhibited a Gompertzian growth pattern. Levels of high-energy phosphate metabolites--phosphocreatine and ATP--decreased with increases in tumor mass. There was a concomitant increase in the level of Pi and a decrease in the apparent pH of the tumor. These spectral changes appear to reflect changes in tumor vascularization that accompany tumor growth, the tumor becoming progressively more hypoxic. Partial response of this tumor to chemotherapy with adriamycin was reflected in a small but measurable increase in the phosphocreatine resonance, a decrease in Pi, and a return of the intratumor pH to neutral. Hyperthermia resulted in progressive conversion of the 31P NMR spectrum to that of a dead tumor (high levels of Pi, small levels of residual sugar phosphates and pyridine dinucleotides, and acidic pH). X-irradiation (14.0 Gy) led to disappearance of the phosphocreatine peak within 15 min of treatment. Subsequently, this resonance grew back beyond its pretreatment level. As the tumor receded, its spectrum reflected the characteristics of aerobically metabolizing tissue (high levels of phosphocreatine and ATP and low levels of Pi and sugar phosphates).

  17. In vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of experimental murine tumours and human tumour xenografts: effects of blood flow modification.

    PubMed Central

    Bremner, J. C.; Counsell, C. J.; Adams, G. E.; Stratford, I. J.; Wood, P. J.; Dunn, J. F.; Radda, G. K.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of hydralazine on tumours appears to vary depending on tumour type. Blood flow and radiation sensitivity decrease more in murine tumours than human tumour xenografts. In this study a comparison between various tumour types has been made using in vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS) to follow the metabolic responses occurring after clamping or intravenous administration of hydralazine (5 mg kg-1). Large increases in the Pi/total phosphate ratio were found with the murine sarcomas, KHT and RIF-1 implanted into C3H/He mice. However little or no effect was seen for the two human xenografted tumours, HX118 and HT29 implanted in MFI nu/nu/01a mice. An intermediate response was observed for KHT tumours grown in nu/nu mice. All tumours showed a large response to clamping. The anaesthetic Hypnorm/Hypnovel has a great influence on the response of the tumour metabolism to hydralazine appearing to both prolong and increase the changes induced. There is evidence to support the theory that the changes in 31P spectra are related to the oxygen status of the tumours. PMID:1931606

  18. Non-invasive assessment of phosphate metabolism and oxidative capacity in working skeletal muscle in healthy young Chinese volunteers using (31)P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Chen, Fei; Wang, Huiting; Wu, Wenbo; Zhang, Xin; Tian, Chuanshuai; Yu, Haiping; Liu, Renyuan; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Bing; Dai, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    Background. Generally, males display greater strength and muscle capacity than females while performing a task. Muscle biopsy is regarded as the reference method of evaluating muscle functions; however, it is invasive and has sampling errors, and is not practical for longitudinal studies and dynamic measurement during excise. In this study, we built an in-house force control and gauge system for quantitatively applying force to quadriceps while the subjects underwent (31)P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS); our aim was to investigate if there is a sex difference of phosphate metabolite change in working muscles in young heathy Chinese volunteers. Methods. Volunteers performed knee-extending excises using a force control and gauge system while lying prone in a Philips 3T Magnetic Resonance (MR) scanner. The (31)P-MRS coil was firmly placed under the middle of the quadriceps . (31)P-MRS measurements of inorganic phosphate (Pi), phosphocreatine (PCr) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were acquired from quadriceps while subjects were in a state of pre-, during- and post-exercise. The PCr, Pi, PCr/Pi, PCr/ATP, pH, work/energy cost ratio (WE), kPCr and oxidative capacity were compared between males and females. Results. A total of 17 volunteers underwent the study. Males: N = 10, age = 23.30 ± 1.25years; females: N = 7, age = 23.57 ± 0.79 years. In this study, males had significantly greater WE (16.33 ± 6.46 vs. 7.82 ± 2.16, p = 0.002) than females. Among PCr, Pi, PCr/Pi, PCr/ATP, pH, kPCr and oxidative capacity at different exercise status, only PCr/Pi (during-exercise, males = 5.630 ± 1.647, females = 4.014 ± 1.298, p = 0.047), PCr/ATP (during-exercise, males =1.273 ± 0.219, females = 1.523 ± 0.167, p = 0.025), and ATP (post-exercise, males = 24.469 ± 3.911 mmol/kg, females = 18.353 ± 4.818 mmol/kg, p = 0.035) had significant sex differences. Males had significantly greater PCr/Pi, but less PCr/ATP than females during exercise, suggesting males had

  19. Correcting human heart 31P NMR spectra for partial saturation. Evidence that saturation factors for PCr/ATP are homogeneous in normal and disease states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottomley, Paul A.; Hardy, Christopher J.; Weiss, Robert G.

    Heart PCr/ATP ratios measured from spatially localized 31P NMR spectra can be corrected for partial saturation effects using saturation factors derived from unlocalized chest surface-coil spectra acquired at the heart rate and approximate Ernst angle for phosphor creatine (PCr) and again under fully relaxed conditions during each 31P exam. To validate this approach in studies of normal and disease states where the possibility of heterogeneity in metabolite T1 values between both chest muscle and heart and normal and disease states exists, the properties of saturation factors for metabolite ratios were investigated theoretically under conditions applicable in typical cardiac spectroscopy exams and empirically using data from 82 cardiac 31P exams in six study groups comprising normal controls ( n = 19) and patients with dilated ( n = 20) and hypertrophic ( n = 5) cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease ( n = 16), heart transplants ( n = 19), and valvular heart disease ( n = 3). When TR ≪ T1,(PCr), with T1(PCr) ⩾ T1(ATP), the saturation factor for PCr/ATP lies in the range 1.5 ± 0.5, regardless of the T1 values. The precise value depends on the ratio of metabolite T1 values rather than their absolute values and is insensitive to modest changes in TR. Published data suggest that the metabolite T1 ratio is the same in heart and muscle. Our empirical data reveal that the saturation factors do not vary significantly with disease state, nor with the relative fractions of muscle and heart contributing to the chest surface-coil spectra. Also, the corrected myocardial PCr/ATP ratios in each normal or disease state bear no correlation with the corresponding saturation factors nor the fraction of muscle in the unlocalized chest spectra. However, application of the saturation correction (mean value, 1.36 ± 0.03 SE) significantly reduced scatter in myocardial PCr/ATP data by 14 ± 11% (SD) ( p ⩽ 0.05). The findings suggest that the relative T1 values of PCr and ATP are

  20. Depth-resolved surface coil MRS (DRESS)-localized dynamic (31) P-MRS of the exercising human gastrocnemius muscle at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Valkovič, Ladislav; Chmelík, Marek; Just Kukurová, Ivica; Jakubová, Michaela; Kipfelsberger, Monika Christina; Krumpolec, Patrik; Tušek Jelenc, Marjeta; Bogner, Wolfgang; Meyerspeer, Martin; Ukropec, Jozef; Frollo, Ivan; Ukropcová, Barbara; Trattnig, Siegfried; Krššák, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic (31) P-MRS with sufficiently high temporal resolution enables the non-invasive evaluation of oxidative muscle metabolism through the measurement of phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery after exercise. Recently, single-voxel localized (31) P-MRS was compared with surface coil localization in a dynamic fashion, and was shown to provide higher anatomical and physiological specificity. However, the relatively long TE needed for the single-voxel localization scheme with adiabatic pulses limits the quantification of J-coupled spin systems [e.g. adenosine triphosphate (ATP)]. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate depth-resolved surface coil MRS (DRESS) as an alternative localization method capable of free induction decay (FID) acquisition for dynamic (31) P-MRS at 7 T. The localization performance of the DRESS sequence was tested in a phantom. Subsequently, two dynamic examinations of plantar flexions at 25% of maximum voluntary contraction were conducted in 10 volunteers, one examination with and one without spatial localization. The DRESS slab was positioned obliquely over the gastrocnemius medialis muscle, avoiding other calf muscles. Under the same load, significant differences in PCr signal drop (31.2 ± 16.0% versus 43.3 ± 23.4%), end exercise pH (7.06 ± 0.02 versus 6.96 ± 0.11), initial recovery rate (0.24 ± 0.13 mm/s versus 0.35 ± 0.18 mm/s) and maximum oxidative flux (0.41 ± 0.14 mm/s versus 0.54 ± 0.16 mm/s) were found between the non-localized and DRESS-localized data, respectively. Splitting of the inorganic phosphate (Pi) signal was observed in several non-localized datasets, but in none of the DRESS-localized datasets. Our results suggest that the application of the DRESS localization scheme yielded good spatial selection, and provided muscle-specific insight into oxidative metabolism, even at a relatively low exercise load. In addition, the non-echo-based FID acquisition allowed for reliable detection of ATP resonances, and therefore

  1. Formin' actin in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Many if not most proteins can, under certain conditions, change cellular compartments, such as, for example, shuttling from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Thus, many proteins may exert functions in various and very different subcellular locations, depending on the signaling context. A large amount of actin regulatory proteins has been detected in the mammalian cell nucleus, although their potential roles are much debated and are just beginning to emerge. Recently, members of the formin family of actin nucleators were also reported to dynamically localize to the nuclear environment. Here we discuss our findings that specific diaphanous-related formins can promote nuclear actin assembly in a signal-dependent manner.

  2. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  3. Determination of glucan phosphorylation using heteronuclear 1H, 13C double and 1H, 13C, 31P triple-resonance NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Peter; Nitschke, Felix; Steup, Martin; Mallow, Keven; Specker, Edgar

    2013-10-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of starch and glycogen are important for their physicochemical properties and also their physiological functions. It is therefore desirable to reliably determine the phosphorylation sites. Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR-spectroscopy is in principle a straightforward analytical approach even for complex carbohydrate molecules. With heterogeneous samples from natural sources, however, the task becomes more difficult because a full assignment of the resonances of the carbohydrates is impossible to obtain. Here, we show that the combination of heteronuclear (1) H,(13) C and (1) H,(13) C,(31) P techniques and information derived from spectra of a set of reference compounds can lead to an unambiguous determination of the phosphorylation sites even in heterogeneous samples.

  4. Observation of fatigue unrelated to gross energy reserve of skeletal muscle during tetanic contraction--an application of 31P-MRS.

    PubMed

    Takata, S; Takai, H; Ikata, T; Miura, I

    1988-11-30

    The mechanism of muscle fatigue was studied by 31P-MRS. During tetanic contraction for 2 minutes(min), the tension measured with a strain gauge and Phosphocreatine(PCr)/Inorganic phosphate(Pi)+ Phosphomonoester(PME) ratio decreased to 31.5 +/- 4.4% of the control value and 0.6 +/- 0.1, respectively. The intracellular pH(pH) also decreased to 6.62 +/- 0.04. Toward the end of the stimulation, the tension decreased to 25.3 +/- 1.9% of the control value. However, during 20min stimulation, the PCr/(Pi+PME) ratio increased to 2.5 +/- 0.5 and the pH to 6.91 +/- 0.04. These results show that muscular fatigue is ascribable not to a decreased level of high energy metabolites required for actomyosin ATPase, but to an increase in the threshold intensity of excitation in excitation-contraction coupling.

  5. In vitro (31)P NMR studies on biopsy skeletal muscle samples compared with meat quality of normal and heterozygous malignant hyperthermia pigs.

    PubMed

    Lahucky, R; Baulain, U; Henning, M; Demo, P; Krska, P; Liptaj, T

    2002-07-01

    Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P NMR) measurements were made to determine muscle energetic metabolism on muscle biopsy samples of heterozygote malignant hyperthermia (Nn) and normal (NN) pigs DNA tested on occurrence of mutation in RYR 1 gene. Biopsy samples (approx. 1 g) were obtained by spring-loaded biopsy instrument (Biotech, Slovakia) from Longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle at 80 kg live weight. The spectra were recorded at 121 MHz on a VXR 300 (Varian) spectrometer in 10 mm diameter tube (maintained at 39 °C) for 50 min. pH of bioptates after NMR measurements were also measured at 60 min. The changes in inorganic phosphate (Pi), phosophocreatine (PCr) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were faster in heterozygote malignant hyperthermia (MH; 29 crossbred White Meaty×Pietrain) than in normal (13 Duroc, Yorkshire and White Meaty). The values of PCr at 20 min and pH at 60 min after taking biopsy allowed discrimination between NN and Nn pigs and significant (P<0.05) differences were also found between two subgroups in heterozygote MH pigs with different rate of post mortem muscle metabolism. The values of PCr and pH as measured at definite time on the biopsies, were significantly (P<0.05) correlated with the rate of post mortem metabolism (pH) and with meat quality traits (r approx. 0.4-0.6). The (31)P NMR measurements pointed to impaired muscle energetic metabolism connected with the occurrence of mutation on the RYR 1 gene in heterozygote MH pigs.

  6. 31P NMR 2D Mapping of Creatine Kinase Forward Flux Rate in Hearts with Postinfarction Left Ventricular Remodeling in Response to Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ling; Cui, Weina; Zhang, Pengyuan; Jang, Albert; Zhu, Wuqiang; Zhang, Jianyi

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing a fast 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) 2-dimensional chemical shift imaging (2D-CSI) method, this study examined the heterogeneity of creatine kinase (CK) forward flux rate of hearts with postinfarction left ventricular (LV) remodeling. Immunosuppressed Yorkshire pigs were assigned to 4 groups: 1) A sham-operated normal group (SHAM, n = 6); 2) A 60 minutes distal left anterior descending coronary artery ligation and reperfusion (MI, n = 6); 3) Open patch group; ligation injury plus open fibrin patch over the site of injury (Patch, n = 6); and 4) Cell group, hiPSCs-cardiomyocytes, -endothelial cells, and -smooth muscle cells (2 million, each) were injected into the injured myocardium pass through a fibrin patch (Cell+Patch, n = 5). At 4 weeks, the creatine phosphate (PCr)/ATP ratio, CK forward flux rate (Flux PCr→ATP), and k constant of CK forward flux rate (kPCr→ATP) were severely decreased at border zone myocardium (BZ) adjacent to MI. Cell treatment results in significantly increase of PCr/ATP ratio and improve the value of kPCr→ATP and Flux PCr→ATP in BZ myocardium. Moreover, the BZ myocardial CK total activity and protein expression of CK mitochondria isozyme and CK myocardial isozyme were significantly reduced, but recovered in response to cell treatment. Thus, cell therapy results in improvement of BZ bioenergetic abnormality in hearts with postinfarction LV remodeling, which is accompanied by significantly improvements in BZ CK activity and CK isozyme expression. The fast 2D 31P MR CSI mapping can reliably measure the heterogeneity of bioenergetics in hearts with post infarction LV remodeling. PMID:27606901

  7. Structural and {sup 31}P NMR investigation of Bi(MM'){sub 2}PO{sub 6} statistic solid solutions: Deconvolution of lattice constraints and cationic influences

    SciTech Connect

    Colmont, Marie; Delevoye, Laurent; Ketatni, El Mostafa; Montagne, Lionel; Mentre, Olivier . E-mail: mentre@ensc-lille.fr

    2006-07-15

    Two solid solutions BiM{sub x} Mg{sub (2-x)}PO{sub 6} (with M {sup 2+}=Zn or Cd) have been studied through {sup 31}P MAS NMR. The analysis has been performed on the basis of refined crystal structures through X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction. The BiZn {sub x} Mg{sub (2-x)}PO{sub 6} does not provide direct evidence for sensitive changes in the phosphorus local symmetry. This result is in good agreement with structural data which show nearly unchanged lattices and atomic separations through the Zn{sup 2+} for Mg{sup 2+} substitution. On the other hand, the Cd{sup 2+} for Mg{sup 2+} substitution behaves differently. Indeed, up to five resonances are observed, each corresponding to one of the five first-cationic neighbour distributions, i.e. 4Mg/0Cd, 3Mg/1Cd, 2Mg/2Cd, 1Mg/3Cd and 0Mg/4Cd. Their intensities match rather well the expected weight for each configuration of the statistical Cd{sup 2+}/Mg{sup 2+} mixed occupancy. The match is further improved when one takes into account the influence of the 2nd cationic sphere that is available from high-field NMR data (18.8 T). Finally, the fine examination of the chemical shift for each resonance versus x allows to de-convolute the mean Z/a {sup 2} effective field into two sub-effects: a lattice constraint-only term and a chemical-only term whose effects are directly quantifiable. - Graphical abstract: First (CdMg){sub 4} cationic sphere influence on the {sup 31}P NMR signal in Bi(Cd,Mg){sub 2}PO{sub 6}. Display Omitted.

  8. β,γ-CHF- and β,γ-CHCl-dGTP diastereomers: synthesis, discrete 31P NMR signatures and absolute configurations of new stereochemical probes for DNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yue; Zakharova, Valeria M.; Kashemirov, Boris A.; Goodman, Myron F.; Batra, Vinod K.; Wilson, Samuel H.; McKenna, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Deoxynucleoside 5′-triphosphate analogues in which the β,γ-bridging oxygen has been replaced with a CXY group are useful chemical probes to investigate DNA polymerase catalytic and base selection mechanisms. A limitation of such probes has been that conventional synthetic methods generate a mixture of diastereomers when the bridging carbon substitution is non-equivalent (X ≠ Y). We report here a general solution to this long-standing problem with four examples of individual β,γ-CXY dNTP diastereomers: (S)- and (R)-β,γ-CHCl dGTP (12a-1, 12a-2) and (S)- and (R)-β,γ-CHF dGTP (12b-1, 12b-2). Central to their preparation was conversion of the achiral parent bisphosphonic acids to P,C-dimorpholinamide derivatives (7) of their (R)-mandelic acid monoesters (6), which provided access to the individual diastereomers 7a-1, 7a-2, 7b-1, and 7b-2 by preparative HPLC. Selective acidic hydrolysis of the P-N bond then afforded the “ portal ” diastereomers 10, which were readily coupled to morpholine-activated dGMP. Removal of the chiral auxiliary by H2 (Pd/C) afforded the four individual diastereomeric nucleotides (12), which were characterized by 31P, 1H and 19F NMR, and by MS. After treatment with Chelex®-100 to remove traces of paramagnetic ions, at pH ~10 the diastereomer pairs 12a and 12b exhibit discrete Pα and Pβ 31P resonances. The more upfield Pα and more downfield Pβ resonances (and also the more upfield 19F NMR resonance in 12b) are assigned to the (R) configuration at the Pβ-CHX-Pγ carbons, based on the absolute configurations of the individual diastereomers as determined by X-ray crystallographic structures of their ternary complexes with DNA-pol β. PMID:22397499

  9. Conformation and dynamics of melittin bound to magnetically oriented lipid bilayers by solid-state (31)P and (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Naito, A; Nagao, T; Norisada, K; Mizuno, T; Tuzi, S; Saitô, H

    2000-01-01

    The conformation and dynamics of melittin bound to the dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer and the magnetic orientation in the lipid bilayer systems were investigated by solid-state (31)P and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Using (31)P NMR, it was found that melittin-lipid bilayers form magnetically oriented elongated vesicles with the long axis parallel to the magnetic field above the liquid crystalline-gel phase transition temperature (T(m) = 24 degrees C). The conformation, orientation, and dynamics of melittin bound to the membrane were further determined by using this magnetically oriented lipid bilayer system. For this purpose, the (13)C NMR spectra of site-specifically (13)C-labeled melittin bound to the membrane in the static, fast magic angle spinning (MAS) and slow MAS conditions were measured. Subsequently, we analyzed the (13)C chemical shift tensors of carbonyl carbons in the peptide backbone under the conditions where they form an alpha-helix and reorient rapidly about the average helical axis. Finally, it was found that melittin adopts a transmembrane alpha-helix whose average axis is parallel to the bilayer normal. The kink angle between the N- and C-terminal helical rods of melittin in the lipid bilayer is approximately 140 degrees or approximately 160 degrees, which is larger than the value of 120 degrees determined by x-ray diffraction studies. Pore formation was clearly observed below the T(m) in the initial stage of lysis by microscope. This is considered to be caused by the association of melittin molecules in the lipid bilayer. PMID:10777736

  10. Dynamic in vivo (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in glucose-limited chemostat culture during the aerobic-anaerobic shift.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, B; de Graaf, A; Renaud, M; Sahm, H

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to analyse in vivo the influence of sudden oxygen depletion on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, grown in glucose-limited chemostat culture, using a recently developed cyclone reactor coupled with (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Before, during and after the transition, intracellular and extracellular phosphorylated metabolites as well as the pHs in the different cellular compartments were monitored with a time resolution of 2.5 min. The employed integrated NMR bioreactor system allowed the defined glucose-limited continuous cultivation of yeast at a density of 75 g DW/l and a p(O(2)) of 30% air saturation. A purely oxidative metabolism was maintained at all times. In vivo (31)P NMR spectra obtained were of excellent quality and even allowed the detection of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). During the switch from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, a rapid, significant decrease of intracellular ATP and PEP levels was observed and the cytoplasmic pH decreased from 7.5 to 6.8. This change, which was accompanied by a transient influx of extracellular inorganic phosphate (P(i)), appeared to correlate linearly with the decrease of the ATP concentration, suggesting that the cause of the partial collapse of the plasma membrane pH gradient was a reduced availability of ATP. The complete phosphorous balance established from our measurement data showed that polyphosphate was not the source of the increased intracellular P(i). The derived intracellular P(i), ATP and ADP concentration data confirmed that the glycolytic flux at the level of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, 3-phosphoglycerate kinase and enolase enzymes is mainly controlled by thermodynamic constraints.

  11. Effects of Coenzyme Q10 on Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Metabolism in Statin Users Assessed Using 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: a Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Buettner, Catherine; Greenman, Robert L.; Ngo, Long H.; Wu, Jim S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Statins partially block the production of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an essential component for mitochondrial function. Reduced skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity has been proposed to be a cause of statin myalgia and can be measured using 31phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of CoQ10 oral supplementation on mitochondrial function in statin users using 31P-MRS. Design/Setting In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study, 21 adults aged 47–73 were randomized to statin+placebo (n=9) or statin+CoQ10 (n=12). Phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery kinetics of calf muscles were assessed at baseline (off statin and CoQ10) and 4 weeks after randomization to either statin+CoQ10 or statin+placebo. Results Baseline and post-treatment PCr recovery kinetics were assessed for 19 participants. After 4 weeks of statin+ CoQ10 or statin+placebo, the overall relative percentage change (100*(baseline−follow up)/baseline) in PCr recovery time was −15.1% compared with baseline among all participants, (p-value=0.258). Participants randomized to statin+placebo (n=9) had a relative percentage change in PCr recovery time of −18.9%, compared to −7.7% among participants (n=10) receiving statin+CoQ10 (p-value=0.448). Conclusions In this pilot study, there was no significant change in mitochondrial function in patients receiving 4 weeks of statin+CoQ10 oral therapy when compared to patients on statin+placebo. PMID:27610419

  12. Higgs and Particle Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhe

    We apply a diagrammatic approach to study Higgs boson, a color-neutral heavy particle, pro- duction in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the saturation framework without quantum evolution. We assume the strong coupling constant much smaller than one. Due to the heavy mass and colorless nature of Higgs particle, final state interactions are absent in our calculation. In order to treat the two nuclei dynamically symmetric, we use the Coulomb gauge which gives the appropriate light cone gauge for each nucleus. To further eliminate initial state interactions we choose specific prescriptions in the light cone propagators. We start the calculation from only two nucleons in each nucleus and then demonstrate how to generalize the calculation to higher orders diagrammatically. We simplify the diagrams by the Slavnov-Taylor-Ward identities. The resulting cross section is factorized into a product of two Weizsacker-Williams gluon distributions of the two nuclei when the transverse momentum of the produced scalar particle is around the saturation momentum. To our knowledge this is the first process where an exact analytic formula has been formed for a physical process, involving momenta on the order of the saturation momentum, in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the quasi-classical approximation. Since we have performed the calculation in an unconventional gauge choice, we further confirm our results in Feynman gauge where the Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution is interpreted as a transverse momentum broadening of a hard gluons traversing a nuclear medium. The transverse momentum factorization manifests itself in light cone gauge but not so clearly in Feynman gauge. In saturation physics there are two different unintegrated gluon distributions usually encountered in the literature: the Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution and the dipole gluon distribution. The first gluon distribution is constructed by solving classical Yang-Mills equation of motion in the Mc

  13. Single nucleon emission in relativistic nucleus-nucleus reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1992-01-01

    Significant discrepancies between theory and experiment have previously been noted for nucleon emission via electromagnetic processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The present work investigates the hypothesis that these discrepancies have arisen due to uncertainties about how to deduce the experimental electromagnetic cross section from the total measured cross section. An optical-model calculation of single neutron removal is added to electromagnetic cross sections and compared to the total experimental cross sections. Good agreement is found thereby resolving some of the earlier noted discrepancies. A detailed comparison to the recent work of Benesh, Cook, and Vary is made for both the impact parameter and the nuclear cross section. Good agreement is obtained giving an independent confirmation of the parameterized formulas developed by those authors.

  14. Analysis of relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a computer-assisted method is reported for the determination of the angular distribution data for secondary particles produced in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in emulsions. The method is applied to emulsion detectors that were placed in a constant, uniform magnetic field and exposed to beams of 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon O-16 ions at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) of the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Linear regression analysis is used to determine the azimuthal and polar emission angles from measured track coordinate data. The software, written in BASIC, is designed to be machine independent, and adaptable to an automated system for acquiring the track coordinates. The fitting algorithm is deterministic, and takes into account the experimental uncertainty in the measured points. Further, a procedure for using the track data to estimate the linear momenta of the charged particles observed in the detectors is included.

  15. Dynamical nucleus-nucleus potential at short distances

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Yongying; Wang Ning; Li Zhuxia; Scheid, Werner

    2010-04-15

    The dynamical nucleus-nucleus potentials for fusion reactions {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca, {sup 48}Ca+{sup 208}Pb, and {sup 126}Sn+{sup 130}Te are studied with the improved quantum molecular dynamics model together with the extended Thomas-Fermi approximation for the kinetic energies of nuclei. The obtained fusion barrier for {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca is in good agreement with the extracted fusion barrier from the measured fusion excitation function, and the depths of the fusion pockets are close to the results of time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations. The energy dependence of the fusion barrier is also investigated. The fusion pocket becomes shallow for a heavy fusion system and almost disappears for heavy nearly symmetric systems, and the obtained potential at short distances is higher than the adiabatic potential.

  16. Azimuthal correlation and collective behavior in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Mali, P.; Mukhopadhyay, A. Sarkar, S.; Singh, G.

    2015-03-15

    Various flow effects of nuclear and hadronic origin are investigated in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Nuclear emulsion data collected from {sup 84}Kr + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 1.52 GeV per nucleon and from {sup 28}Si + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 14.5 GeV per nucleon are used in the investigation. The transverse momentum distribution and the flow angle analysis show that collective behavior, like a bounce-off effect of the projectile spectators and a sidesplash effect of the target spectators, are present in our event samples. From an azimuthal angle analysis of the data we also see a direct flow of the projectile fragments and of the produced charged particles. On the other hand, for both data samples the target fragments exhibit a reverse flow, while the projectile fragments exhibit an elliptic flow. Relevant flow parameters are measured.

  17. Hummingbird Comet Nucleus Analysis Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel; Carle, Glenn C.; Lasher, Larry E.

    2000-01-01

    Hummingbird is a highly focused scientific mission, proposed to NASA s Discovery Program, designed to address the highest priority questions in cometary science-that of the chemical composition of the cometary nucleus. After rendezvous with the comet, Hummingbird would first methodically image and map the comet, then collect and analyze dust, ice and gases from the cometary atmosphere to enrich characterization of the comet and support landing site selection. Then, like its namesake, Hummingbird would carefully descend to a pre-selected surface site obtaining a high-resolution image, gather a surface material sample, acquire surface temperature and then immediately return to orbit for detailed chemical and elemental analyses followed by a high resolution post-sampling image of the site. Hummingbird s analytical laboratory contains instrumentation for a comprehensive molecular and elemental analysis of the cometary nucleus as well as an innovative surface sample acquisition device.

  18. Energy metabolism of the untrained muscle of elite runners as observed by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy: evidence suggesting a genetic endowment for endurance exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Park, J H; Brown, R L; Park, C R; Cohn, M; Chance, B

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether genetically determined properties of muscle metabolism contribute to the exceptional physical endurance of world-class distance runners. ATP, phosphocreatine, inorganic phosphate, and pH were quantitatively determined by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the wrist flexor muscles of elite long-distance runners and sedentary control subjects. These muscles had not been exposed to any specific program of exercise training in either group of subjects. The "untrained" muscles were examined at rest, during two cycles of three grades of exercise, and in recovery. The flexor muscles of the athletes had higher concentrations of phosphocreatine and ATP than did those of the control subjects at rest and during exercise. The athletes' muscles possessed a higher capacity for generation of ATP by oxidative metabolism than did control subjects' muscles according to the following criteria: (i) high force output, 60% of maximum voluntary contraction, was more easily reached and better maintained in both exercise cycles; (ii) the ratio of inorganic phosphate to phosphocreatine rose less during exercise and recovered faster in the postexercise period; (iii) there was no loss of adenine nucleotides or total phosphate from the athletes' muscles but significant losses from the control subjects' muscles; and (iv) the pH decreased no more than 0.1 unit in the athletes' muscles during exercise, attesting to a relatively slow glycolysis and/or a rapid oxidation of lactate. In the muscles of the control subjects, on the other hand, the pH decreased nearly 0.4 unit early in the first exercise cycle, indicating a relatively fast glycolysis and/or slower oxidation of lactate. In the second exercise cycle, the pH returned to near normal in the control subjects' muscles, reflecting diminished lactate formation because of glycogen depletion and lactate washout by the high blood flow induced by exercise. By the end of the exercise

  19. Energy Deregulation Precedes Alteration in Heart Energy Balance in Young Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats: A Non Invasive In Vivo 31P-MR Spectroscopy Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Deschodt-Arsac, Veronique; Arsac, Laurent; Magat, Julie; Naulin, Jerome; Quesson, Bruno; Dos Santos, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gradual alterations in cardiac energy balance, as assessed by the myocardial PCr/ATP-ratio, are frequently associated with the development of cardiac disease. Despite great interest for the follow-up of myocardial PCr and ATP content, cardiac MR-spectroscopy in rat models in vivo is challenged by sensitivity issues and cross-contamination from other organs. Methods Here we combined MR-Imaging and MR-Spectroscopy (Bruker BioSpec 9.4T) to follow-up for the first time in vivo the cardiac energy balance in the SHR, a genetic rat model of cardiac hypertrophy known to develop early disturbances in cytosolic calcium dynamics. Results We obtained consistent 31P-spectra with high signal/noise ratio from the left ventricle in vivo by using a double-tuned (31P/1H) surface coil. Reasonable acquisition time (<3.2min) allowed assessing the PCr/ATP-ratio comparatively in SHR and age-matched control rats (WKY): i) weekly from 12 to 21 weeks of age; ii) in response to a bolus injection of the ß-adrenoreceptor agonist isoproterenol at age 21 weeks. Discussion Along weeks, the cardiac PCr/ATP-ratio was highly reproducible, steady and similar (2.35±0.06) in SHR and WKY, in spite of detectable ventricular hypertrophy in SHR. At the age 21 weeks, PCr/ATP dropped more markedly (-17.1%±0.8% vs. -3,5%±1.4%, P<0.001) after isoproterenol injection in SHR and recovered slowly thereafter (time constant 21.2min vs. 6.6min, P<0.05) despite similar profiles of tachycardia among rats. Conclusion The exacerbated PCr/ATP drop under ß-adrenergic stimulation indicates a defect in cardiac energy regulation possibly due to calcium-mediated abnormalities in the SHR heart. Of note, defects in energy regulation were present before detectable abnormalities in cardiac energy balance at rest. PMID:27622548

  20. 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance and kinetic studies of the active site structure of chloroplast CF1 ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Devlin, C C; Grisham, C M

    1990-07-03

    The interaction of nucleotides and nucleotide analogues and their metal complexes with Mn2+ bound to both the latent and dithiothreitol-activated CF1 ATP synthase has been examined by means of steady-state kinetics, water proton relaxation rate (PRR) measurements, and 1H and 31P nuclear relaxation measurements. Titration of both the latent and activated Mn(2+)-CF1 complexes with ATP, ADP, Pi, Co(NH3)4ATP, Co(NH3)4ADP, and Co(NH3)4AMPPCP leads to increases in the water relaxation enhancement, consistent with enhanced metal binding and a high ternary complex enhancement. Steady-state kinetic studies are consistent with competitive inhibition of CF1 by Co(NH3)4AMPPCP with respect to CaATP. The data are consistent with a Ki for Co(NH3)4AMPPCP of 650 microM, in good agreement with a previous Ki of 724 microM for Cr(H2O)4ATP [Frasch, W., & Selman, B. (1982) Biochemistry 21, 3636-3643], and a best fit KD of 209 microM from the water PRR measurements. 1H and 31P nuclear relaxation measurements in solutions of CF1 and Co(NH3)4AMPPCP were used to determine the conformation of the bound substrate analogue and the arrangement with respect to this structure of high- and low-affinity sites for Mn2+. The bound nucleotide analogue adopts a bent conformation, with the low-affinity Mn2+ site situated between the adenine and triphosphate moieties and the high-affinity metal site located on the far side of the triphosphate chain. The low-affinity metal forms a distorted inner-sphere complex with the beta-P and gamma-P of the substrate. The distances from Mn2+ to the triphosphate chain are too large for first coordination sphere complexes but are appropriate for second-sphere complexes involving, for example, intervening hydrogen-bonded water molecules or residues from the protein.

  1. sup 1 H and sup 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance and kinetic studies of the active site structure of chloroplast CF sub 1 ATP synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, C.C.; Grisham, C.M. )

    1990-07-03

    The interaction of nucleotides and nucleotide analogues and their complexes with Mn{sup 2+} bound to both the latent and dithiothreitol-activated CF{sub 1} ATP synthase has been examined by means of steady-state kinetics, water proton relaxation rate (PRR) measurements, and {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear relaxation measurements. Titration of both the latent and activated Mn{sup 2+}-CF{sub 1} complexes with ATP, ADP, P{sub i}, Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}ATP, Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}ADP, and Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}AMPPCP leads to increases in the water relaxation enhancement, consistent with enhanced metal binding and a high ternary complex enhancement. Steady-state kinetic studies are consistent with competitive inhibition of CF{sub 1} by Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}AMPPCP with respect to CaATP. {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear relaxation measurements in solutions of CF{sub 1} and Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}AMPPCP were used to determine the conformation of the bound substrate analogue and the arrangement with respect to this structure of high- and low-affinity sites for Mn{sup 2+}. The bound nucleotide analogue adopts a bent conformation, with the low-affinity sites for Mn{sup 2+}. The bound nucleotide analogue adopts a bent conformation, with the low-affinity Mn{sup 2+} site situated between the adenine and triphosphate moieties and the high-affinity metal site located on the far side of the triphosphate chain. The low-affinity metal forms a distorted inner-sphere complex with the {beta}-P and {gamma}-P of the substrate. The distances from Mn{sup 2+} to the triphosphate chain are too large for first coordination sphere complexes but are appropriate for second-sphere complexes involving, for example, intervening hydrogen-bonded water molecules or residues from the protein.

  2. Checkerboard Theory of the Nucleus.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore

    2006-04-01

    The Checker Board Model (CBM) is a 2D model of the nucleus that proposes that the synchronization of the 2 outer rotating quarks in the nucleons accounts for magnetic moment of the nucleons and that the magnetic flux from the nucleons couples (weaves) into the 2D checker board array structures and this magnetic coupling in addition to electrostatic forces of the rotating and stationary quarks accounts for the apparent strong nuclear force. The symmetry of the He nucleus helps explain why this 2D structure is so stable. This model explain the mass of the proton and neutron, along with their magnetic moments and their absolute and relative sizes in terms of the above structure and predict the masses of two newly proposed quarks ^(1): the ``up'' and the ``dn'' quarks. Since the masses of the ``up'' and ``dn'' quark determined by the CBM (237.31 MeV and 42.392 MeV respectively) did not fit within the standard model as candidates for u and d, a new model (New Physics) had to be invented. This new particle physics model predicts that nature has 5 generations not 3. (1). T.M. Lach, Checkerboard Structure of the Nucleus, Infinite Energy, Vol. 5, issue 30, (2000). (2). T.M. Lach, Masses of the Sub-Nuclear Particles, nucl-th/0008026, @http://xxx.lanl.gov/

  3. Time Averaging and Fitting of Nonlinear Metabolic Changes: The Issue of the Time Index Choice Applied to 31P MRS Investigation of Muscle Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simond, G.; Bendahan, D.; Cozzone, P. J.

    2001-03-01

    We present an exact analytical method dedicated to fitting time-dependent exponential-like changes in MR spectra. As an illustration, this method has been applied to fitting metabolic changes recorded by 31P MRS in human skeletal muscle occurring during a rest-exercise-recovery protocol. When recording metabolic changes with the accumulative method, the time averaging of the MR signals implies the choice of a time index for fitting any changes in the features of the associated MR spectra. A critical examination of the different ways (constant, linear, and exponential) of choosing the time index is reported. By numerical analysis, we have calculated the errors generated by the three methods and we have compared their sensitivity to noise. In the case of skeletal muscle, both constant and linear methods introduce large and uncontrolled errors for the whole set of metabolic parameters derived from [PCr] changes. In contrast, the exponential method affords a reliable estimation of critical parameters in muscle bioenergetics in both normal and pathological situations. This method is very easy to implement and provides an exact analytical solution to fitting changes in MR spectra recorded by the accumulative method.

  4. Rate equation for creatine kinase predicts the in vivo reaction velocity: /sup 31/P NMR surface coil studies in brain, heart, and skeletal muscle of the living rat

    SciTech Connect

    Bittl, J.A.; DeLayre, J.; Ingwall, J.S.

    1987-09-22

    Brain, heart, and skeletal muscle contain four different creatine kinase isozymes and various concentrations of substrates for the creatine kinase reaction. To identify if the velocity of the creatine kinase reaction under cellular conditions is regulated by enzyme activity and substrate concentrations as predicted by the rate equation, the authors used /sup 31/P NMR and spectrophotometric techniques to measure reaction velocity, enzyme content, isozyme distribution, and concentrations of substrates in brain, heart, and skeletal muscle of living rat under basal or resting conditions. The total tissue activity of creatine kinase in the direction of MgATP synthesis provided an estimate for V/sub max/ and exceeded the NMR-determined in vivo reaction velocities by an order of magnitude. The isozyme composition varied among the three tissues: >99% BB for brain; 14% MB, 61% MM, and 25% mitochondrial for heart; and 98% MM and 2% mitochondrial for skeletal muscle. The NMR-determined reaction velocities agreed with predicted values from the creatine kinase rate equation. The concentrations of free creatine and cytosolic MgADP, being less than or equal to the dissociation constants for each isozyme, were dominant terms in the creatine kinase rate equation for predicting the in vivo reaction velocity. Thus, they observed that the velocity of the creatine kinase reaction is regulated by total tissue enzyme activity and by the concentrations of creatine and MgADP in a manner that is independent of isozyme distribution.

  5. Phospholipid compositions of sera and synovial fluids from dog, human and horse: a comparison by 31P-NMR and MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, B; Bondzio, A; Wagner, U; Schiller, J

    2009-08-01

    Alterations of the phospholipid (PL) compositions of body fluids are assumed to be indicative of inflammatory diseases, e.g. rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Recently, we have shown that particularly the phosphatidylcholine/lysophosphatidylcholine (PC/LPC) ratio determined in human synovial fluids (SF) and sera represents a reliable measure of the inflammatory state in RA patients. However, it is not yet clear to what extent the PC/LPC ratio is also affected by nutrition habits. In the present study, the PL and the corresponding acyl chain compositions of human body fluids (SF and serum of RA patients as well as serum from healthy volunteers) are compared with those of two other mammalian species (horses and dogs suffering from degenerative joint diseases as well as healthy controls) by high-resolution 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The most important result of this study is that the PL compositions of SF and serum of horse and dog are comparable with those of human body fluids. Compared with humans, however, the horse body fluid contains less PCs with highly unsaturated arachidonoyl residues, while that of dogs possesses the highest content of arachidonoyl-containing PC. These species-related differences stem primarily from different nutrition habits (meat vs. plants).

  6. Synthesis, crystal structure, vibrational and 31P-NMR spectroscopy of the thiophosphate NaMg[PO3S]·9H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höppe, Henning A.; Scharinger, Stefan W.; Heck, Joachim G.; Gross, Peter; Netzsch, Philip; Kazmierczak, Karolina

    2016-12-01

    NaMg[PO3S]·9H2O was obtained as single-phase crystalline powder starting from NaOH, PSCl3 and MgCl2·6H2O. At room temperature NaMg[PO3S]·9H2O crystallises in space group Cmc21 (no. 36) (a=638.58(4) pm, b=1632.31(10) pm, c=1217.16(7) pm, Z = 4; Rint = 0.032, Rσ = 0.034, R1 = 0.036, wR2 = 0.071). The data collection at 100 K reveals an ordering of the PO3S tetrahedra by undergoing a symmetry reduction to P21 (no. 4) and an according formation of twins (C1121, unconv. setting of P21, a=631.41(3) pm, b=1630.00(7) pm, c=1219.24(5) pm, γ=90.00(2)°, Z = 4; Rint = 0.115, Rσ = 0.064, R1 = 0.045, wR2 = 0.070). NaMg[PO3S]·9H2O comprises isolated PO3S tetrahedra, distorted MgO6 octahedra and trigonal NaO6 prisms. 31P NMR spectroscopy showed a chemical shift of 33.7 ppm. The vibrational spectra of NaMg[PO3S]·9H2O were recorded and the relevant bands were assigned.

  7. Early estrogen-induced metabolic changes and their inhibition by actinomycin D and cycloheximide in human breast cancer cells: sup 31 P and sup 13 C NMR studies

    SciTech Connect

    Neeman, M.; Degani, H. )

    1989-07-01

    Metabolic changes following estrogen stimulation and the inhibition of these changes in the presence of actinomycin D and cycloheximide were monitored continuously in perfused human breast cancer T47D clone 11 cells with {sup 31}P and {sup 13}C NMR techniques. The experiments were performed by estrogen rescue of tamoxifen-treated cells. Immediately after perfusion with estrogen-containing medium, a continuous enhancement in the rates of glucose consumption, lactate production by glycolysis, and glutamate synthesis by the Krebs cycle occurred with a persistent 2-fold increase at 4 hr. Pretreatment with either actinomycin D or cycloheximide, at concentrations known to inhibit mRNA and protein synthesis, respectively, and simultaneous treatment with estrogen and each inhibitor prevented the estrogen-induced changes in glucose metabolism. This suggested that the observed estrogen stimulation required synthesis of mRNA and protein. These inhibitors also modulated several metabolic activities that were not related to estrogen stimulation. The observed changes in the in vivo kinetics of glucose metabolism may provide a means for the early detection of the response of human breast cancer cells to estrogen versus tamoxifen treatment.

  8. In vivo (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and morphometric analysis of the perfused vascular architecture of human glioma xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed Central

    van der Sanden, B. P.; Rijken, P. F.; Heerschap, A.; Bernsen, H. J.; van der Kogel, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between the bioenergetic status of human glioma xenografts in nude mice and morphometric parameters of the perfused vascular architecture was studied using (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), fluorescence microscopy and two-dimensional digital image analysis. Two tumour lines with a different vascular architecture were used for this study. Intervascular distances and non-perfused area fractions varied greatly between tumours of the same line and tumours of different lines. The inorganic phosphate-nucleoside triphosphate (P(i)/NTP) ratio increased rapidly as mean intervascular distances increased from 100 microm to 300 microm. Two morphometric parameters - the percentage of intervascular distances larger than 200 microm (ivd200) and the non-perfused area fraction at a distance larger than 100 microm from a nearest perfused vessel (area100), - were deduced from these experiments and related to the P(i)/NTP ratio of the whole tumour. It is assumed that an aerobic to anaerobic transition influences the bioenergetic status, i.e. the P(i)/NTP ratio increased linearly with the percentage of ivd200 and the area100. PMID:9166934

  9. Variations of different dissolved and particulate phosphorus classes during an algae bloom in a eutrophic lake by (31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiuling; Sun, Jinhua; Zhou, Yunkai; Gu, Lei; Zhao, Hongyan; Wang, Jiehua

    2017-02-01

    Characterization of phosphorus (P) pools is vital to understanding the contribution of P to water eutrophication. In this study, dissolved and particulate P classes during an algae bloom in Lake Taihu, as well as their relationships with the main environmental factors, were analyzed based on solution (31)P NMR. The results showed that dissolved P was dominated by orthophosphate (Ortho-P) in heavily polluted regions and by orthophosphate monoester (Mono-P) and orthophosphate diester (Diester-P) in lightly polluted regions, indicating that the main dissolved P classes varied with the degree of lake pollution. The difference in the temporal variation patterns of dissolved P classes revealed that dissolved Ortho-P is the preferred class, and its concentration may be affected by major primary producers. It also revealed that dissolved Mono-P is prone to accumulation under the effects of algal blooms, especially in heavily polluted regions. The main particulate P classes were similar to those of dissolved P, but their variation trends were the same in different lake regions. There were significant positive correlations between the major particulate P classes and Chl a during the majority of the sampling period, indicating that living algal cells have a major contribution to particulate P. Obvious temporal variations of P classes may affect the bioavailability and dynamics of P in the water of Lake Taihu, but the particle reactivities of the main inorganic and organic P classes were similar. Therefore, they have little effect on P partitioning between the dissolved and particulate phases.

  10. High Resolution NMR ^15N and ^31P NMR Of Antiferroelectric Phase Transition in Ammonium Dihydrogen Arsenate and Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunaydin-Sen, Ozge

    2005-03-01

    Natural abundance ^15N CPMAS NMR has been used to investigate the paraelectric-antiferroelectric phase transition of NH4H2AsO4 (ADA) (TN˜216K) and of NH4H2PO4 (ADP) (148K), with a focus on the role of the NH4^+ ion. Isotropic chemical shift of ^15N for ADA exhibits an almost linear temperature dependence to within TN±1K, and then changes discontinuously, followed by another almost linear dependence. The spectra of the paraelectric and antiferroelectric phases coexist around the TN. The sharp anomaly around TN implies that the NH4^+ ions undergo a displacive transition, whereas the protons in the O-HO bonds undergo an order-disorder transition. The ^15N data thus support a mixed order-disorder-displacive mechanism for this transition. The ^15N data on ADP exhibit somewhat different behavior. ^31P CPMAS measurements will also be presented and discussed in terms of the above model.

  11. Insulin Resistance Is Associated With Reduced Mitochondrial Oxidative Capacity Measured by 31P-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Participants Without Diabetes From the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Elisa; Chia, Chee W; Spencer, Richard G; Fishbein, Kenneth W; Reiter, David A; Cameron, Donnie; Zane, Ariel C; Moore, Zenobia A; Gonzalez-Freire, Marta; Zoli, Marco; Studenski, Stephanie A; Kalyani, Rita R; Egan, Josephine M; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Whether individuals with insulin resistance (IR) but without criteria for diabetes exhibit reduced mitochondrial oxidative capacity is unclear; addressing this question could guide research for new therapeutics. We investigated 248 participants without diabetes from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) to determine whether impaired mitochondrial capacity is associated with prediabetes, IR, and duration and severity of hyperglycemia exposure. Mitochondrial capacity was assessed as the postexercise phosphocreatine recovery time constant (τPCr) by (31)P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, with higher τPCr values reflecting reduced capacity. Prediabetes was defined using the American Diabetes Association criteria from fasting and 2-h glucose measurements. IR and sensitivity were calculated using HOMA-IR and Matsuda indices. The duration and severity of hyperglycemia exposure were estimated as the number of years from prediabetes onset and the average oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) 2-h glucose measurement over previous BLSA visits. Covariates included age, sex, body composition, physical activity, and other confounders. Higher likelihood of prediabetes, higher HOMA-IR, and lower Matsuda index were associated with longer τPCr. Among 205 participants with previous OGTT data, greater severity and longer duration of hyperglycemia were independently associated with longer τPC In conclusion, in individuals without diabetes a more impaired mitochondrial capacity is associated with greater IR and a higher likelihood of prediabetes.

  12. Studies of vanadium-phosphorus-oxygen selective oxidation catalysts by sup 31 P and sup 51 V NMR spin-echo and volume susceptibility measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Juan.

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize the vanadium-phosphorous oxide (V-P-O) catalysts for the selective oxidation of n-butane and 1-butene to maleic anhydride. The utility of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance as an analytical tool in this investigation lies in its sensitivity to the electronic environment surrounding the phosphorous and vanadium nuclei, and proximity of paramagnetic species. Spin-echo mapping NMR of {sup 31}p and {sup 51}v and volume magnetic susceptibility measurements were used as local microscopic probes of the presence of V{sup 5+}, V{sup 4+}, V{sup 3+} species in the model compounds: {beta}-VOPO{sub 4}, {beta}-VOPO{sub 4} treated with n-butane/1-butene, (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} treated with n-butane/1-butene; and industrial catalysts with P/V (phosphorus to vanadium) ratio of 0.9, 1.0 and 1.1, before and after treatment with n-butane and 1-butene. The NMR spectra provide a picture of how the oxidation states of vanadium are distributed in these catalysts. 73 refs., 32 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. Geographical characterization of greek virgin olive oils (cv. Koroneiki) using 1H and 31P NMR fingerprinting with canonical discriminant analysis and classification binary trees.

    PubMed

    Petrakis, Panos V; Agiomyrgianaki, Alexia; Christophoridou, Stella; Spyros, Apostolos; Dais, Photis

    2008-05-14

    This work deals with the prediction of the geographical origin of monovarietal virgin olive oil (cv. Koroneiki) samples from three regions of southern Greece, namely, Peloponnesus, Crete, and Zakynthos, and collected in five harvesting years (2001-2006). All samples were chemically analyzed by means of 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy and characterized according to their content in fatty acids, phenolics, diacylglycerols, total free sterols, free acidity, and iodine number. Biostatistical analysis showed that the fruiting pattern of the olive tree complicates the geographical separation of oil samples and the selection of significant chemical compounds. In this way the inclusion of the harvesting year improved the classification of samples, but increased the dimensionality of the data. Discriminant analysis showed that the geographical prediction at the level of three regions is very high (87%) and becomes (74%) when we pass to the thinner level of six sites (Chania, Sitia, and Heraklion in Crete; Lakonia and Messinia in Peloponnesus; Zakynthos). The use of classification and binary trees made possible the construction of a geographical prediction algorithm for unknown samples in a self-improvement fashion, which can be readily extended to other varieties and areas.

  14. The effect of ethanol on hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine: (31)P-NMR and (19)F-NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Celikbag, Yusuf; Via, Brian K; Adhikari, Sushil; Buschle-Diller, Gisela; Auad, Maria L

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the role of ethanol and temperature on the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced from hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine (Pinus spp.) carried out at 250, 300, 350 and 390°C for 30min. Water and water/ethanol mixture (1/1, wt/wt) were used as liquefying solvent in the HTL experiments. HTL in water and water/ethanol is donated as W-HTL and W/E-HTL, respectively. It was found that 300°C and water/ethanol solvent was the optimum liquefaction temperature and solvent, yielding up to 68.1wt.% bio-oil and 2.4wt.% solid residue. (31)P-NMR analysis showed that biopolyol produced by W-HTL was rich in phenolic OH while W/E-HTL produced more aliphatic OH rich biopolyols. Moreover, biopolyols with higher hydroxyl concentration were produced by W/E-HTL. Carbonyl groups were analyzed by (19)F-NMR, which showed that ethanol reduced the concentration of carbonyl groups.

  15. Synthesis, structure, and /sup 31/P and /sup 183/W NMR spectra of P/sub 4/W/sub 14/O/sub 58//sup 12/minus//

    SciTech Connect

    Thouvenot, R.; Teze, A.; Contant, R.; Herve, G.

    1988-02-10

    The P/sub 4/W/sub 14/O/sub 58//sup 12/minus// anion was obtained from the reaction of sodium tungstate and sodium phosphate in acetic acid. The structure of K/sub 12/P/sub 4/W/sub 14/O/sub 58/ /times/ 21H/sub 2/O (monoclinic, C2/c; a = 22.145 (6) /angstrom/, b = 15.823 (2) /angstrom/, c = 21.860 (4) /angstrom/, /beta/ = 109.54 (2)/degree/; Z = 4) has been refined to final indices R and R/sub w/ of 0.048 and 0.055. The polyanion consists on two PW/sub 7/O/sub 29/ subunits linked by two phosphorus atoms. This dimeric structure is preserved in aqueous solution as shown by /sup 183/W and /sup 31/P NMR spectra. Unusual spin-spin coupling constants, i.e. /sup 2/J/sub W-P/ = 18, 10.2 Hz and /sup 2/J/sub W-W/ = 37 Hz, as well as a four-bond coupling (/sup 4/j/sub W-P/ of about 2 Hz) are discussed in relation to the structural parameters. Some characteristic features of the vibrational (IR and Raman) spectra are also discussed. 20 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Integrating muscle cell biochemistry and whole-body physiology in humans:31P-MRS data from the InSight trial

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Lindsay M.; Kemp, Graham J.; Dwyer, Renee M.; Walls, Justin T.; Fuller, Huddy; Smith, Steven R.; Earnest, Conrad P.

    2013-01-01

    We acquired 31P-MRS data from skeletal muscle of subjects of mixed gender and ethnicity, combined with a panel of physiological characteristics, and tested several long-standing hypotheses regarding relationships between muscle cell biochemistry and whole-body physiology with unusually high statistical power. We hypothesized that i) whole-body VO2max would correlate with muscle respiratory capacity, ii) resting muscle phosphocreatine concentration ([PCr]) would negatively correlate with delta efficiency and iii) muscle mitochondrial function would positively correlate with both resting VO2 and total daily energy expenditure (TDEE). Muscle respiratory capacity explained a quarter of the variation in VO2max (r2 = 26, p < .001, n = 87). There was an inverse correlation between muscle [PCr] and delta efficiency (r = −23, p = 046, n = 87). There was also a correlation between [PCr] recovery halftime and TDEE (r = −23, p = 035, n = 87). Our data not only provide insights into muscle cell chemistry and whole-body physiology but our mixed cohort means that our findings are broadly generalizable. PMID:23378914

  17. T(1) measurement of (31)P metabolites at rest and during steady-state dynamic exercise using a clinical nuclear magnetic resonance scanner.

    PubMed

    Cettolo, V; Piorico, C; Francescato, M P

    2006-03-01

    This article illustrates some problems and possible solutions to determine the apparent spin-lattice relaxation time (T(1)) of the muscular (31)P metabolites at rest and during dynamic steady-state exercise using a clinical 1.5 T NMR scanner and a surface coil. T(1) was first estimated on a phosphates solution (phantom) using four different acquisition protocols, all based on the multiple-point "progressive saturation" method, and by fitting each data set with two different mathematical models. Subsequently, two of the four protocols and both models were used to estimate T(1) both at rest and during exercise on the calf muscles of 10 healthy volunteers. Experimental results obtained on the phantom showed that T(1) is greatly affected by the longest nominal explored repetition time (P<0.001) and by the mathematical model (P<0.001), ranging from 0.65+/-0.10 to 8.4+/-0.8 s. The two acquisition protocols applied on volunteers yielded significantly different T(1) (P<0.001), which were also rather different from the literature values for the same metabolites. Nevertheless, independently of the acquisition protocol and/or the fitting procedure, T(1) of all muscular phosphagens did not change statistically from rest to steady-state aerobic exercise.

  18. Two configurations of the four-ring birdcage coil for 1H imaging and 1H-decoupled 31P spectroscopy of the human head.

    PubMed

    Murphy-Boesch, J; Srinivasan, R; Carvajal, L; Brown, T R

    1994-02-01

    The four-ring birdcage resonator, a new class of dual-tuned birdcage resonators, is described. We report two configurations of the coil: the low-pass, high-pass (LP-HP) and the low-pass, low-pass (LP-LP), both of which can be operated in dual quadrature mode at 1.5 T. As head coils, both configurations exhibit greatly reduced tuning interactions between frequencies, permitting rapid, noniterative tuning. Compared with single-tuned, two-ring birdcage resonators of similar volume, the sensitivity and transmitter efficiencies of the resonators are better than 85% for the proton frequency and the same to within 5% for the phosphorus frequency. Circuit models have been developed to refine coil tuning and aid the calculation of B1 field contour plots. Both configurations have been used for integrated examinations involving acquisition of high-quality 1H images and 1H-decoupled 31P CSI spectra of the human head. A scaled-down version of the LP-LP configuration has been demonstrated for use with the human calf.

  19. Two Configurations of the Four-Ring Birdcage Coil for 1H Imaging and 1H-Decoupled 31P Spectroscopy of the Human Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphyboesch, J.; Srinivasan, R.; Carvajal, L.; Brown, T. R.

    The four-ring birdcage resonator, a new class of dual-tuned birdeage resonators, is described. We report two configurations of the coil: the low-pass, high-pass (LP-HP) and the low-pass, low-pass (LP-LP), both of which can be operated in dual quadrature mode at 1.5 T. As head coils, both configurations exhibit greatly reduced tuning interactions between frequencies, permitting rapid, noniterative tuning. Compared with single-tuned, two-ring birdcage resonators of similar volume, the sensitivity and transmitter efficiencies of the resonators are better than 85% for the proton frequency and the same to within 5% for the phosphorus frequency. Circuit models have been developed to refine coil tuning and aid the calculation of B1 field contour plots. Both configurations have been used for integrated examinations involving acquisition of high-quality 1H images and 1H-decoupled 31P CSI spectra of the human head. A scaled-down version of the LP-LP configuration has been demonstrated for use with the human calf.

  20. Concurrent quantification of tissue metabolism and blood flow via 2H/31P NMR in vivo. III. Alterations of muscle blood flow and metabolism during sepsis.

    PubMed

    Song, S K; Hotchkiss, R S; Karl, I E; Ackerman, J J

    1992-05-01

    In the conclusion of this series of reports, the application of 31P/2H NMR to investigate the pathophysiology of sepsis in rat hindlimb muscle is demonstrated. Sepsis decreased muscle [PCr] by 18%, 18 +/- 4 SD vs 22 +/- 4 SD mmol/kg tissue wet wt (P = 0.01) in control rats but [ATP] was unchanged, 6 mmol/kg tissue wet wt (P = 0.2). The derived free cytosolic [ADP] in the two groups was similar, [ADP]septic = 0.023 +/- 0.004 SD and [ADP]control = 0.021 +/- 0.003 SD mmol/kg tissue wet wt, and not statistically different (P = 0.14). Likewise [Pi] in the septic and control groups was not statistically different, [Pi]septic = 1.1 +/- 0.5 SD and [Pi]control = 1.2 +/- 0.4 SD mmol/kg tissue wet wt (P = 0.2). Septic rats presented the symptom of respiratory alkalosis evidenced by elevated blood pH. Sepsis decreased muscle blood flow by 33%, P = 0.003, but examination of individual subjects did not demonstrate a correlation with the reduction in [PCr]. Thus, a metabolic energy deficit caused by cellular ischemia/hypoxia is not a likely cause of cellular abnormality in rat hindlimb muscle during sepsis.

  1. In vivo sup 23 Na and sup 31 P NMR measurement of a tonoplast Na sup + /H sup + exchange process and its characteristics in two barley cultivars

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, T.W.M.; Norlyn, J.; Epstein, E. ); Higashi, R.M. )

    1989-12-01

    A Na{sup +} uptake-associated vacuolar alkalinization was observed in roots of two barley cultivars (Arivat and the more salt-tolerant California Mariout) by using {sup 23}Na and {sup 31}P in vivo NMR spectroscopy. A NaCl uptake-associated broadening was also noted for both vacuolar P{sub i} and intracellular Na NMR peaks, consistent with Na{sup +} uptake into the same compartment as the vacuolar P{sub i}. A close coupling of Na{sup +} with H{sup +} transport (presumably the Na{sup +}/H{sup +} antiport) in vivo was evidence by qualitative and quantitative correlations between Na{sup +} accumulation and vacuolar alkalinization for both cultivars. Prolongation of the low NaCl pretreatment (30 mM) increased the activity of the putative antiport in Arivat but reduced it in California Mariout. This putative antiport also showed a dependence on NaCl concentration for California Mariout but not for Arivat. No cytoplasmic acidification accompanied the antiporter activity for either cultivar. The response of adenosine phosphates indicated that ATP utilization exceeded the capacity for ATP synthesis in Arivat, but the two processes seemed balanced in California Mariout. These comparisons provide clues to the role of the tonoplast Na{sup +}/H{sup +} antiport and compensatory cytoplasmic adjustments including pH, osymolytes, and energy phosphates in governing the different salt tolerance of the two cultivars.

  2. Cooperation and Competition between Adenylate Kinase, Nucleoside Diphosphokinase, Electron Transport, and ATP Synthase in Plant Mitochondria Studied by 31P-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, JKM.; Aubert, S.; Gout, E.; Bligny, R.; Douce, R.

    1997-01-01

    Nucleotide metabolism in potato (Solanum tuberosum) mitochondria was studied using 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the O2 electrode. Immediately following the addition of ADP, ATP synthesis exceeded the rate of oxidative phosphorylation, fueled by succinate oxidation, due to mitochondrial adenylate kinase (AK) activity two to four times the maximum activity of ATP synthase. Only when the AK reaction approached equilibrium was oxidative phosphorylation the primary mechanism for net ATP synthesis. A pool of sequestered ATP in mitochondria enabled AK and ATP synthase to convert AMP to ATP in the presence of exogenous inorganic phosphate. During this conversion, AK activity can indirectly influence rates of oxidation of both succinate and NADH via changes in mitochondrial ATP. Mitochondrial nucleoside diphosphokinase, in cooperation with ATP synthase, was found to facilitate phosphorylation of nucleoside diphosphates other than ADP at rates similar to the maximum rate of oxidative phosphorylation. These results demonstrate that plant mitochondria contain all of the machinery necessary to rapidly regenerate nucleoside triphosphates from AMP and nucleoside diphosphates made during cellular biosynthesis and that AK activity can affect both the amount of ADP available to ATP synthase and the level of ATP regulating electron transport. PMID:12223600

  3. Facilitated transport of Mn2+ in sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells and excised maize root tips. A comparative 31P n.m.r. study in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Roby, C; Bligny, R; Douce, R; Tu, S I; Pfeffer, P E

    1988-01-01

    Movement of paramagnetic Mn2+ into sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells has been indirectly examined by observing the line broadening exhibited in its 31P n.m.r. spectra. Mn2+ was observed to pass into the vacuole, while exhibiting a very minor accumulation in the cytoplasm. With time, gradual leakage of phosphate from the vacuole to the cytoplasm was observed along with an increase in glucose-6-phosphate. Anoxia did not appear to affect the relative distribution of Mn2+ in the cytoplasm and vacuole. Under hypoxic conditions restriction of almost all movement of Mn2+ across the plasmalemma as well as the tonoplast was observed. In contrast, maize root tips showed entry and complete complexation of nucleotide triphosphate by Mn2+ during hypoxia. The rate of passage of Mn2+ across the tonoplast in both sycamore and maize root cells is approximately the same. However, the rates of facilitated movement across the respective plasma membranes appear to differ. More rapid movement of Mn2+ across the plasmalemma in maize root tip cells allows a gradual build-up of metal ion in the cytoplasm prior to its diffusion across the tonoplast. Sycamore cells undergo a slower uptake of Mn2+ into their cytoplasms (comparable with the rate of diffusion through the tonoplast), so little or no observable accumulation of Mn2+ is observed in this compartment. PMID:3415663

  4. Classifiers for centrality determination in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altsybeev, Igor; Kovalenko, Vladimir

    2017-03-01

    Centrality, as a geometrical property of the collision, is crucial for the physical interpretation of nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus experimental data. However, it cannot be directly accessed in event-by-event data analysis. Common methods for centrality estimation in A-A and p-A collisions usually rely on a single detector (either on the signal in zero-degree calorimeters or on the multiplicity in some semi-central rapidity range). In the present work, we made an attempt to develop an approach for centrality determination that is based on machine-learning techniques and utilizes information from several detector subsystems simultaneously. Different event classifiers are suggested and evaluated for their selectivity power in terms of the number of nucleons-participants and the impact parameter of the collision. Finer centrality resolution may allow to reduce impact from so-called volume fluctuations on physical observables being studied in heavy-ion experiments like ALICE at the LHC and fixed target experiment NA61/SHINE on SPS.

  5. Photoproduction of lepton pairs in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, B. D.; Goncalves, V. P.; De Santana Amaral, J. T.

    2013-03-25

    In this contribution we study coherent interactions as a probe of the nonlinear effects in the Quantum Electrodynamics (QED). In particular, we study the multiphoton effects in the production of leptons pairs for proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions for heavy nuclei. In the proton-nucleus we assume the ultrarelativistic proton as a source of photons and estimate the photoproduction of lepton pairs on nuclei at RHIC and LHC energies considering the multiphoton effects associated to multiple rescattering of the projectile photon on the proton of the nucleus. In nucleus - nucleus colllisions we consider the two nuclei as a source of photons. As each scattering contributes with a factor {alpha}Z to the cross section, this contribution must be taken into account for heavy nuclei. We consider the Coulomb corrections to calculate themultiple scatterings and estimate the total cross section for muon and tau pair production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies.

  6. Exceptionally bright, compact starburst nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Margon, B.; Anderson, S.F.; Mateo, M.; Fich, M.; Massey, P.

    1988-11-01

    Observations are reported of a remarkably bright (V about 13) starburst nucleus, 0833 + 652, which has been detected at radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray wavelengths. Despite an observed flux at each of these wavelengths which is comparable to that of NGC 7714, often considered the 'prototypical' example of the starburst phenomenon, 0833 + 652 appears to be a previously uncataloged object. Its ease of detectability throughout the electromagnetic spectrum should make it useful for a variety of problems in the study of compact emission-line galaxies. 30 references.

  7. Nucleus morphology of Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitsema, H. J.; Delamere, W. A.; Huebner, W. F.; Keller, H. U.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Wilhelm, K.; Schmidt, H. U.; Whipple, Fred L.

    1986-01-01

    Images obtained by the Halley multicolor camera were used to determine the projected size and shape of the nucleus. The location of the terminator and numerous surface features were determined. There is good correlation between the brightest surface features and the dust jets; however, many bright features are seen which are not associated with jets. Most of the observed features are circular and appear to be related to surface elevation. The angularity of the terminator gives an indication of the three-dimensional structure of the face which was observed.

  8. Intersample fluctuations in phosphocreatine concentration determined by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and parameter estimation of metabolic responses to exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Rossiter, H B; Howe, F A; Ward, S A; Kowalchuk, J M; Griffiths, J R; Whipp, B J

    2000-10-15

    The ATP turnover rate during constant-load exercise is often estimated from the initial rate of change of phosphocreatine concentration ([PCr]) using 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). However, the phase and amplitude characteristics of the sample-to-sample fluctuations can markedly influence this estimation (as well as that for the time constant (tau) of the [PCr] change) and confound its physiological interpretation especially for small amplitude responses. This influence was investigated in six healthy males who performed repeated constant-load quadriceps exercise of a moderate intensity in a whole-body MRS system. A transmit- receive surface coil was placed under the right quadriceps, allowing determination of intramuscular [PCr]; pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2) was simultaneously determined, breath-by-breath, using a mass spectrometer and a turbine volume measuring module. The probability density functions (PDF) of [PCr] and VO2 fluctuations were determined for each test during the steady states of rest and exercise and the PDF was then fitted to a Gaussian function. The standard deviation of the [PCr] and VO2 fluctuations at rest and during exercise (sr and sw, respectively) and the peak centres of the distributions (xc(r) and xc(w)) were determined, as were the skewness (gamma1) and kurtosis (gamma2) coefficients. There was no difference between sr and sw for [PCr] relative to the resting control baseline (s(r) = 1.554 %delta (s.d. = 0.44), s(w) = 1.514 %delta (s.d. = 0.35)) or the PDF peak centres (xc(r) = -0.013 %delta (s.d. = 0.09), xc(w) -0.197 %delta (s.d. = 0.18)). The standard deviation and peak centre of the 'noise' in VO2 also did not vary between rest and exercise (sr = 0.0427 l min(-1) (s.d. = 0.0104), s(w) = 0.0640 l min(-1) (s.d. = 0.0292); xc(r) = -0.0051 l min(-1) (s.d. = 0.0069), xc(w) 0.0022 l min(-1) (s.d. = 0.0034)). Our results demonstrate that the intersample 'noise' associated with [PCr] determination by 31P-MRS may be

  9. Functional pools of fast and slow twitch fibers observed by /sup 31/P-NMR during exercise of flexor wrist muscles in man

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Park, C.R.; Brown, R.L.; Chance, B.

    1987-05-01

    Functional compartments of fast and slow twitch fibers have been observed by /sup 31/P-NMR spectroscopy during exercise of the wrist flexor muscles in a sedentary, young male subject. Values of Pi, phosphocreatine (PCr) and adenine nucleotides were determined at rest and during an exercise protocol. The subject flexed his wrist muscles at 20% of maximum strength every 5 sec for 6 min and then increased his effort in the next two 6 min intervals to 40% and 60% of maximum. With exercise, the Pi/PCr rose rapidly to the exceptionally high value of 2.2 at 60% effort. As the Pi increased, the initial single peak (pH 7.0-6.9) split into two distinct components with pH values of 6.8 and 6.3. Quantitatively, distribution of the Pi was 40% in the pH 6.8 peak and 60% in the pH 6.3 peak as determined by area estimation following curve fitting. This presumably reflects two pools of Pi corresponding to the oxidative (slow twitch, high pH) and glycolytic (fast twitch, low pH) fibers. In the second identical exercise sequence which followed immediately, only one Pi peak (pH 6.8-6.9) appeared. This suggested that the glycolytic contribution to energy production was largely exhausted and the residual energy was derived from oxidative metabolism. During exercise at high levels, total phosphate decreased due primarily to loss of NMR visible adenine nucleotides. Similar phenomena have been observed in three other sedentary individuals, but not in trained athletes.

  10. Wheat germ 5S ribosomal RNA common arm fragment conformations observed by sup 1 H and sup 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jiejun; Marshall, A.G. )

    1990-02-20

    The nonexchangeable protons of the common arm fragment of wheat germ (Triticum aestivum) ribosomal 5S RNA have been observed by means of high-resolution 500-MHz {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy in D{sub 2}O solution. Although NMR studies on the exchangeable protons support the presence of two distinct solution structures of the common arm fragment (and of the same base-paired segment in intact 5S rRNA), only a single conformation is manifested in the {sup 1}H NMR behavior of all of the H6 and H5 pyrimidine and most of the H8/H2 purine protons under the same salt conditions. The nonexchangeable protons near the base-paired helix have been assigned by a sequential strategy. Conformational features such as the presence of a cytidine-uridine (C{center dot}U) pair at the loop-helix junction and base stacking into the hairpin loop are evaluated from nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY) data. Double-quantum filtered correlation spectroscopy (DQF-COSY) experiments show that most of the 26 riboses are in the C3{prime}-endo conformation. Finally, backbone conformational changes induced by Mg{sup 2+} and heating have been monitored by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy. The results show that the common arm RNA segment can assume two conformations which produce distinguishably different NMR environments at the base-pair hydrogen-bond imino protons but not at nonexchangeable base or ribose proton or backbone phosphate sites.

  11. An examination of the metabolic processes underpinning critical swimming in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) using in vivo 31P-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lurman, Glenn J; Bock, Christian H; Pörtner, Hans-O

    2007-11-01

    Traditionally, critical swimming speed has been defined as the speed when a fish can no longer propel itself forward, and is exhausted. To gain a better understanding of the metabolic processes at work during a U(crit) swim test, and that lead to fatigue, we developed a method using in vivo (31)P-NMR spectroscopy in combination with a Brett-type swim tunnel. Our data showed that a metabolic transition point is reached when the fish change from using steady state aerobic metabolism to non-steady state anaerobic metabolism, as indicated by a significant increase in inorganic phosphate levels from 0.3+/-0.3 to 9.5+/-3.4 mol g(-1), and a drop in intracellular pH from 7.48+/-0.03 to 6.81+/-0.05 in muscle. This coincides with the point when the fish change gait from subcarangiform swimming to kick-and-glide bursts. As the number of kicks increased, so too did the Pi concentration, and the pH(i) dropped. Both changes were maximal at U(crit). A significant drop in Gibbs free energy change of ATP hydrolysis from -55.6+/-1.4 to -49.8+/-0.7 kJ mol(-1) is argued to have been involved in fatigue. This confirms earlier findings that the traditional definition of U(crit), unlike other critical points that are typically marked by a transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, is the point of complete exhaustion of both aerobic and anaerobic resources.

  12. Modeling sickle cell vasoocculsion in the rat leg: Quantification of trapped sickle cells and correlation with sup 31 P metabolic and sup 1 H magnetic resonance imaging changes

    SciTech Connect

    Fabry, M.E.; Rajanayagam, V.; Fine, E.; Holland, S.; Gore, J.C.; Nagel, R.L.; Kaul, D.K. )

    1989-05-01

    The authors have developed an animal model to elucidate the acute effects of perfusion abnormalities on muscle metabolism induced by different density-defined classes of erythrocytes isolated from sickle cell anemia patients. Technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc)-labeled, saline-washed normal (AA), homozygous sickle (SS), or high-density SS (SS4) erythrocytes were injected into the femoral artery of the rat and quantitative {sup 99m}Tc imaging, {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopy by surface coil at 2 teslas, and {sup 1}H magnetic resonance imaging at 0.15 tesla were performed. Between 5 and 25 {mu}l of SS4 cells was trapped in the microcirculation of the thigh. In contrast, fewer SS discocytes (SS2) or AA cells were trapped. After injection of SS4 cells an initial increase in inorganic phosphate was observed in the region of the thigh served by the femoral artery, intracellular pH decreased, and subsequently the proton relaxation time T{sub 1} reached a broad maximum at 18-28 hr. When T{sub 1} obtained at this time was plotted against the volume of cells trapped, an increase of T{sub 1} over the control value of 411 {plus minus} 48 msec was found that was proportional to the number of cells trapped. They conclude that the densest SS cells are most effective at producing vasoocclusion. The extent of the change detected by {sup 1}H magnetic resonance imaging is dependent on the amount of cells trapped in the microcirculation and the magnitude of the initial increase of inorganic phosphate.

  13. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: Insights from solid-state (13)C NMR and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shasha; Zhu, Yuanrong; Meng, Wei; He, Zhongqi; Feng, Weiying; Zhang, Chen; Giesy, John P

    2016-02-01

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions and degradation of WEOM derived from six aquatic macrophytes species of Tai Lake, China, were investigated by use of solid-state (13)C NMR and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Carbohydrates were the predominant constituents of WEOM fractions, followed by carboxylic acid. Orthophosphate (ortho-P) was the dominant form of P (78.7% of total dissolved P) in the water extracts, followed by monoester P (mono-P) (20.6%) and little diester P (0.65%). The proportion of mono-P in total P species increased with the percentage of O-alkyl and O-C-O increasing in the WEOM, which is likely due to degradation and dissolution of biological membranes and RNA from aquatic plants. Whereas the proportion of mono-P decreased with alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O increasing, which may be owing to the insoluble compounds including C functional groups of alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O, such as aliphatic biopolymers, lignin and peptides. Based on the results of this study and information in the literature about water column and sediment, we propose that WEOM, dominated by polysaccharides, are the most labile and bioavailable component in debris of macrophytes. Additionally, these WEOMs would also be a potential source for bioavailable organic P (e.g., RNA, DNA and phytate) for lakes.

  14. The characterization of phospholipid functional group probe species on respirable silicon-containing dusts by solid-state 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Murray, David K

    2010-03-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies are reported for the interactions of probe molecules with respirable silicon-containing dusts as experimental evidence complementing computational studies reported by Snyder and Madura recently in J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 7095 (2008). The selected probe molecules represent the individual functional groups of a model lung surfactant dipalmitoylphosphatidyl choline (DPPC) deposited on a respirable silica and kaolin from water solution. (13)C and (31)P solid-state NMR spectroscopies were employed to detect chemical shift, line width, and chemical shift anisotropy, providing experimental evidence of mobility and relaxation changes describing the site and orientation of surface-associated species. NMR results confirm that only the phosphate and adjacent carbons are immobilized by surface hydroxyls on kaolin, while these and the carbons of the cationic head group are likewise immobilized by surface silanols on Miu-U-Sil 5. The phosphates in phosphoryl- and phosphatidyl-cholines were the primary interaction sites, with additional weak coordination with the trimethylammonium cation species. Covalent Al-O-P formation is not likely a factor in in vivo or in vitro toxicity mechanisms of respirable silicon-containing materials, but is rather the result of dehydration or demethoxylation reactions occurring over time or during heating or reduced pressure used in preparing materials for NMR spectroscopic study. Hydration is a critical factor in the formation and preparation for spectroscopic observation of coated dusts. Care must be taken to ensure that products formed and studied correspond to species formed in vivo under suitable concentration and hydration conditions.

  15. Muscle metabolic responses during high-intensity intermittent exercise measured by (31)P-MRS: relationship to the critical power concept.

    PubMed

    Chidnok, Weerapong; DiMenna, Fred J; Fulford, Jonathan; Bailey, Stephen J; Skiba, Philip F; Vanhatalo, Anni; Jones, Andrew M

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the responses of intramuscular phosphate-linked metabolites and pH (as assessed by (31)P-MRS) during intermittent high-intensity exercise protocols performed with different recovery-interval durations. Following estimation of the parameters of the power-duration relationship, i.e., the critical power (CP) and curvature constant (W'), for severe-intensity constant-power exercise, nine male subjects completed three intermittent exercise protocols to exhaustion where periods of high-intensity constant-power exercise (60 s) were separated by different durations of passive recovery (18 s, 30 s and 48 s). The tolerable duration of exercise was 304 ± 68 s, 516 ± 142 s, and 847 ± 240 s for the 18-s, 30-s, and 48-s recovery protocols, respectively (P < 0.05). The work done >CP (W>CP) was significantly greater for all intermittent protocols compared with the subjects' W', and this difference became progressively greater as recovery-interval duration was increased. The restoration of intramuscular phosphocreatine concentration during recovery was greatest, intermediate, and least for 48 s, 30 s, and 18 s of recovery, respectively (P < 0.05). The W>CP in excess of W' increased with greater durations of recovery, and this was correlated with the mean magnitude of muscle phosphocreatine reconstitution between work intervals (r = 0.61; P < 0.01). The results of this study show that during intermittent high-intensity exercise, recovery intervals allow intramuscular homeostasis to be restored, with the degree of restoration being related to the duration of the recovery interval. Consequently, and consistent with the intermittent CP model, the ability to perform W>CP during intermittent high-intensity exercise and, therefore, exercise tolerance, increases when recovery-interval duration is extended.

  16. Fully adiabatic 31P 2D-CSI with reduced chemical shift displacement error at 7 T--GOIA-1D-ISIS/2D-CSI.

    PubMed

    Chmelík, M; Kukurová, I Just; Gruber, S; Krššák, M; Valkovič, L; Trattnig, S; Bogner, W

    2013-05-01

    A fully adiabatic phosphorus (31P) two-dimensional (2D) chemical shift spectroscopic imaging sequence with reduced chemical shift displacement error for 7 T, based on 1D-image-selected in vivo spectroscopy, combined with 2D-chemical shift spectroscopic imaging selection, was developed. Slice-selective excitation was achieved by a spatially selective broadband GOIA-W(16,4) inversion pulse with an interleaved subtraction scheme before nonselective adiabatic excitation, and followed by 2D phase encoding. The use of GOIA-W(16,4) pulses (bandwidth 4.3-21.6 kHz for 10-50 mm slices) reduced the chemical shift displacement error in the slice direction ∼1.5-7.7 fold, compared to conventional 2D-chemical shift spectroscopic imaging with Sinc3 selective pulses (2.8 kHz). This reduction was experimentally demonstrated with measurements of an MR spectroscopy localization phantom and with experimental evaluation of pulse profiles. In vivo experiments in clinically acceptable measurement times were demonstrated in the calf muscle (nominal voxel volume, 5.65 ml in 6 min 53 s), brain (10 ml, 6 min 32 s), and liver (8.33 ml, 8 min 14 s) of healthy volunteers at 7 T. High reproducibility was found in the calf muscle at 7 T. In combination with adiabatic excitation, this sequence is insensitive to the B1 inhomogeneities associated with surface coils. This sequence, which is termed GOIA-1D-ISIS/2D-CSI (goISICS), has the potential to be applied in both clinical research and in the clinical routine.

  17. Hyposmotic shock: effects on rubidium/potassium efflux in normal and ischemic rat hearts, assessed by 87Rb and 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Jilkina, Olga; Kuzio, Bozena; Kupriyanov, Valery V

    2003-01-20

    The study evaluated effects of hyposmotic shock on the rate of Rb(+)/K(+) efflux, intracellular pH and energetics in Langendorff-perfused rat hearts with the help of 87Rb- and 31P-NMR. Two models of hyposmotic shock were compared: (1) normosmotic hearts perfused with low [NaCl] (70 mM) buffer, (2) hyperosmotic hearts equilibrated with additional methyl alpha-D-glucopyranoside (Me-GPD, 90 or 33 mM) or urea (90 mM) perfused with normosmotic buffer. Four minutes after hyposmotic shock, Rb(+) efflux rate constant transiently increased approximately two-fold, while pH transiently decreased by 0.08 and 0.06 units, in the first and the second models, respectively, without significant changes in phosphocreatine and ATP. Hyposmotic shock (second model) did not change the rate of Rb(+)/K(+) uptake, indicating that the activity of Na(+)/K(+) ATPase was not affected. Dimethylamiloride (DMA) (10 microM) abolished activation of the Rb(+)/K(+) efflux in the second model; however, Na(+)/H(+) exchanger was not involved, because intracellular acidosis induced by the hyposmotic shock was not enhanced by DMA treatment. After 12 or 20 min of global ischemia, the rate of Rb(+)/K(+) efflux increased by 120%. Inhibitor of the ATP-sensitive potassium channels, glibenclamide (5 microM), partially (40%) decreased the rate constant; however, reperfusion with hyperosmolar buffer (90 mM Me-GPD) did not. We concluded that the shock-induced stimulation of Rb(+)/K(+) efflux occurred, at least partially, through the DMA-sensitive cation/H(+) exchanger and swelling-induced mechanisms did not considerably contribute to the ischemia-reperfusion-induced activation of Rb(+)/K(+) efflux.

  18. Structural investigations of silicate-phosphate glasses containing MoO3 by FTIR, Raman and 31P MAS NMR spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szumera, Magdalena

    2014-09-01

    Molybdenum is a transition metal (refers to the “d” block of the periodic table) whose atom has an incomplete d sub-shell. It is known that in silicate glasses molybdenum may exist under four oxidation states: Mo6+, Mo5+, Mo4+ and Mo3+, simultaneously molybdenum cations, depending on their content in the glass network, may either be a glass forming component, or act as a modifier. The contemporary literature data show studies conducted mostly on the structure of silicate, phosphate, borate and borosilicate glasses containing molybdenum ions, but not silicate-phosphate glasses. Therefore, the author has undertaken detailed studies using FTIR, Raman and 31P MAS NMR techniques in order to examine the effect of MoO3 addition into the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses from SiO2sbnd P2O5sbnd K2Osbnd CaOsbnd MgO system. On the basis of obtained results it was concluded that molybdenum ions in the analysed glasses act as a modifier, which follows from the gradual breakage of oxygen bridges, i.e. Psbnd Osbnd P, Sisbnd Osbnd Si, and Sisbnd Osbnd P, and the following formation of connections such as Mo[MoO4]sbnd Osbnd Si and/or Mo[MoO4]sbnd Osbnd P. In summary, it is concluded that the increase of MoO3 content (up to 4.4 mol.%) in the structure of glasses of SiO2sbnd P2O5sbnd K2Osbnd MgOsbnd CaO system results in weakening of the structure and gradual increase of the degree of silico-oxygen and phosphor-oxygen frameworks depolymerisation.

  19. Structural investigations of silicate-phosphate glasses containing MoO3 by FTIR, Raman and 31P MAS NMR spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Szumera, M

    2014-09-15

    Molybdenum is a transition metal (refers to the "d" block of the periodic table) whose atom has an incomplete d sub-shell. It is known that in silicate glasses molybdenum may exist under four oxidation states: Mo6+, Mo5+, Mo4+ and Mo3+, simultaneously molybdenum cations, depending on their content in the glass network, may either be a glass forming component, or act as a modifier. The contemporary literature data show studies conducted mostly on the structure of silicate, phosphate, borate and borosilicate glasses containing molybdenum ions, but not silicate-phosphate glasses. Therefore, the author has undertaken detailed studies using FTIR, Raman and 31P MAS NMR techniques in order to examine the effect of MoO3 addition into the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses from SiO2P2O5K2OCaOMgO system. On the basis of obtained results it was concluded that molybdenum ions in the analysed glasses act as a modifier, which follows from the gradual breakage of oxygen bridges, i.e. POP, SiOSi, and SiOP, and the following formation of connections such as Mo[MoO4]OSi and/or Mo[MoO4]OP. In summary, it is concluded that the increase of MoO3 content (up to 4.4 mol.%) in the structure of glasses of SiO2P2O5K2OMgOCaO system results in weakening of the structure and gradual increase of the degree of silico-oxygen and phosphor-oxygen frameworks depolymerisation.

  20. Using solid 13C NMR coupled with solution 31P NMR spectroscopy to investigate molecular species and lability of organic carbon and phosphorus from aquatic plants in Tai Lake, China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquatic plants are involved in the storage and release capacity for organic matter and nutrients. In this study, solid 13C and solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the biomass samples of six aquatic plants. Solid 13C NMR spectroscopy revealed the domin...

  1. Two-dimensional and variable temperature 31P solid-state NMR studies of single crystals containing symmetrical/unsymmetrical bis[6-O,6-O'-(1,2:3,4-diisopropylidene-alpha-D- galactopyranosyl)thiophosphoryl] dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Potrzebowski, M J; Helinski, J; Ciesielski, W

    2002-08-07

    The organisation and phase transition of single crystals containing three isostructural bis[6-O,6-O'-(1,2:3,4-diisopropylidene-alpha- D-galactopyranosyl)thiophosphoryl] dichalcogenide derivatives: disulfide 1, diselenide 2 and mixed seleno-sulfide 3, was deduced upon 1D, 2D and variable temperature 31P NMR experiments.

  2. Modeling Ti/Ge Distribution in LiTi2-xGex(PO4)3 NASICON Series by (31)P MAS NMR and First-Principles DFT Calculations.

    PubMed

    Diez-Gómez, Virginia; Arbi, Kamel; Sanz, Jesús

    2016-08-03

    Ti/Ge distribution in rhombohedral LiTi2-xGex(PO4)3 NASICON series has been analyzed by (31)P magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Nuclear magnetic resonance is an excellent probe to follow Ti/Ge disorder, as it is sensitive to the atomic scale environment without long-range periodicity requirements. In the samples considered here, PO4 units are surrounded by four Ti/Ge octahedra, and then, five different components ascribed to P(OTi)4, P(OTi)3(OGe), P(OTi)2(OGe)2, P(OTi)(OGe)3, and P(OGe)4 environments are expected in (31)P MAS NMR spectra of R3̅c NASICON samples. However, (31)P MAS NMR spectra of analyzed series display a higher number of signals, suggesting that, although the overall symmetry remains R3̅c, partial substitution causes a local decrement in symmetry. With the aid of first-principles DFT calculations, 10 detected (31)P NMR signals have been assigned to different Ti4-nGen arrangements in the R3 subgroup symmetry. In this assignment, the influence of octahedra of the same or different R2(PO4)3 structural units has been considered. The influence of bond distances, angles and atom charges on (31)P NMR chemical shieldings has been discussed. Simulation of the LiTi2-xGex(PO4)3 series suggests that detection of 10 P environments is mainly due to the existence of two oxygen types, O1 and O2, whose charges are differently affected by Ge and Ti occupation of octahedra. From the quantitative analysis of detected components, a random Ti/Ge distribution has been deduced in next nearest neighbor (NNN) sites that surround tetrahedral PO4 units. This random distribution was supported by XRD data displaying Vegard's law.

  3. CXCL8((3-73))K11R/G31P antagonizes the neutrophil chemoattractants present in pasteurellosis and mastitis lesions and abrogates neutrophil influx into intradermal endotoxin challenge sites in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Zhang, Xiaobei; Mizzi, Chris; Gordon, John R

    2002-11-01

    The ELR(+) CXC chemokines are critical for protective neutrophil responses to most bacterial infections, but nevertheless can contribute importantly to the pathogenic effects of many inflammatory responses. We recently engineered a series of high affinity CXCL8/IL-8 antagonists, one of which, CXCL8((3-73))K11R/G31P, binds very strongly to neutrophils via the CXCR1 and CXCR2. Herein we show in competitive 125I-ligand binding assays that bovine CXCL8((3-73))K11R/G31P has an affinity for neutrophils that is 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than that of CXCL8/IL-8. Furthermore, when used at approximately 0.5 nM, CXCL8((3-73))K11R/G31P inhibited by 50% the chemotactic responses of neutrophils to 129 nM CXCL8/IL-8, but it also blocked chemotactic responses to the alternate ELR-CXC chemokines CXCL1/GRO alpha and CXCL5/ENA-78. Furthermore, CXCL8((3-73))K11R/G31P could inhibit by 93-97% the spectrum of neutrophil chemotactic activities present within wash fluids from clinical bacterial pneumonia or experimental endotoxin-induced mastitis lesions. Finally, intramuscular or subcutaneous application of CXCL8((3-73))K11R/G31P (75 micro g/kg) reduced by up to 97% neutrophil infiltration into intradermal endotoxin challenge sites in cattle, and prevented their circulating neutrophils from responding to CXCL8/IL-8 or ENA-78 in vitro. This data thus encourages further investigation of the potential impact of this novel antagonist on ELR-CXC chemokine-driven inflammatory disorders.

  4. Responders to Wide-Pulse, High-Frequency Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Show Reduced Metabolic Demand: A 31P-MRS Study in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Wegrzyk, Jennifer; Fouré, Alexandre; Le Fur, Yann; Maffiuletti, Nicola A.; Vilmen, Christophe; Guye, Maxime; Mattei, Jean-Pierre; Place, Nicolas; Bendahan, David; Gondin, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Conventional (CONV) neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) (i.e., short pulse duration, low frequencies) induces a higher energetic response as compared to voluntary contractions (VOL). In contrast, wide-pulse, high-frequency (WPHF) NMES might elicit–at least in some subjects (i.e., responders)–a different motor unit recruitment compared to CONV that resembles the physiological muscle activation pattern of VOL. We therefore hypothesized that for these responder subjects, the metabolic demand of WPHF would be lower than CONV and comparable to VOL. 18 healthy subjects performed isometric plantar flexions at 10% of their maximal voluntary contraction force for CONV (25 Hz, 0.05 ms), WPHF (100 Hz, 1 ms) and VOL protocols. For each protocol, force time integral (FTI) was quantified and subjects were classified as responders and non-responders to WPHF based on k-means clustering analysis. Furthermore, a fatigue index based on FTI loss at the end of each protocol compared with the beginning of the protocol was calculated. Phosphocreatine depletion (ΔPCr) was assessed using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Responders developed four times higher FTI’s during WPHF (99 ± 37 ×103 N.s) than non-responders (26 ± 12 ×103 N.s). For both responders and non-responders, CONV was metabolically more demanding than VOL when ΔPCr was expressed relative to the FTI. Only for the responder group, the ∆PCr/FTI ratio of WPHF (0.74 ± 0.19 M/N.s) was significantly lower compared to CONV (1.48 ± 0.46 M/N.s) but similar to VOL (0.65 ± 0.21 M/N.s). Moreover, the fatigue index was not different between WPHF (-16%) and CONV (-25%) for the responders. WPHF could therefore be considered as the less demanding NMES modality–at least in this subgroup of subjects–by possibly exhibiting a muscle activation pattern similar to VOL contractions. PMID:26619330

  5. Solid state {sup 31}P MAS NMR spectroscopy and conductivity measurements on NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Risskov Sørensen, Daniel; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Skou, Eivind M.

    2014-11-15

    A systematic study of composite powders of niobium oxide phosphate (NbOPO{sub 4}) and phosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) has been performed in order to characterize the material's ability to perform as an electrolyte material in medium temperature fuel cells and electrolyzers. Powders of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} contents between 13.1 and 74.2 M% were produced and characterized with powder X-ray diffraction, {sup 31}P MAS NMR and impedance spectroscopy. NMR revealed that a significant degree of dehydration and vaporization of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} takes place above 200 °C, and increases with temperature. At 500 °C the NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} has reacted to form niobium pyrophosphate (Nb{sub 2}P{sub 4}O{sub 15}). Impedance spectroscopy showed an increase in conductivity with increasing acid concentration, whereas the conductivity decreased slightly with increasing temperature. The highest conductivity measured was 2.5·10{sup −3} S/cm for a sample containing 74.2 M% of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Lastly, it was shown that NbOPO{sub 4} has no significant conductivity of its own. - Graphical abstract: Conductivity of NbOPO{sub 4}/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} composites as a function of equivalent P{sub 2}O{sub 5} content. The conductivity is insignificant for pure NbOPO{sub 4}. - Highlights: • Composites have been made from NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. • The composites composition has been investigated with solid state NMR. • The composites have shown clear signs of acid dehydration upon heating. • The conductivity of the composites increases for increasing acid content. • NbOPO{sub 4} has no significant conductivity of its own.

  6. 31P and 1H MRS of DB-1 Melanoma Xenografts: Lonidamine Selectively Decreases Tumor Intracellular pH and Energy Status and Sensitizes Tumors to Melphalan

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Kavindra; Nelson, David S.; Ho, Andrew; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Darpolor, Moses M.; Pickup, Stephen; Zhou, Rong; Heitjan, Daniel F.; Leeper, Dennis B.; Glickson, Jerry D.

    2012-01-01

    In vivo 31P MRS demonstrates that human melanoma xenografts in immunosuppressed mice treated with lonidamine (LND, 100 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibit a decrease in intracellular pH (pHi) from 6.90 ± 0.05 to 6.33 ± 0.10 (p < 0.001), a slight decrease in extracellular pH (pHe) from 7.00 ± 0.04 to 6.80 ± 0.07 (p > 0.05), and a monotonic decline in bioenergetics (NTP/Pi) by 66.8 ± 5.7% (p < 0.001) relative to the baseline level. Both bioenergetics and pHi decreases were sustained for at least 3 hr following LND treatment. Liver exhibited a transient intracellular acidification by 0.2 ± 0.1 pH units (p > 0.05) at 20 min post-LND with no significant change in pHe and a small transient decrease in bioenergetics, 32.9 ± 10.6 % (p > 0.05), at 40 min post-LND. No changes in pHi or ATP/Pi were detected in the brain (pHi, bioenergetics; p > 0.1) or skeletal muscle (pHi, pHe, bioenergetics; p > 0.1) for at least 120 min post-LND. Steady-state tumor lactate monitored by 1H MRS with a selective multiquantum pulse sequence with Hadamard localization increased ~3-fold (p = 0.009). Treatment with LND increased systemic melanoma response to melphalan (LPAM; 7.5 mg/kg, i.v.) producing a growth delay of 19.9 ± 2.0 d (tumor doubling time = 6.15 ± 0.31d, log10 cell-kill = 0.975 ± 0.110, cell-kill = 89.4 ± 2.2%) compared to LND alone of 1.1 ± 0.1 d and LPAM alone of 4.0 ± 0.0 d. The study demonstrates that the effects of LND on tumor pHi and bioenergetics may sensitize melanoma to pH-dependent therapeutics such as chemotherapy with alkylating agents or hyperthermia. PMID:22745015

  7. Projections from the central amygdaloid nucleus to the precuneiform nucleus in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huazheng; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2015-01-01

    The mouse precuneiform nucleus has been proposed as the midbrain locomotion center, a function ascribed to its caudal neighbor, cuneiform nucleus, in the rat, cat and other species. The present study investigated the projections from the central amygdaloid nucleus to the precuneiform nucleus in the mouse using retrograde tracer injections (fluoro-gold) into the precuneiform nucleus and anterograde tracer injections (biotinylated dextran amine) into the central amygdaloid nucleus. The entire central amygdaloid nucleus except the rostral pole had retrogradely labeled neurons, especially in the middle portion where labeled neurons were densely packed. Anterogradely labeled amygdaloid fibers approached the precuneiform nucleus from the area ventrolateral to it and terminated in the entire precuneiform nucleus. Labeled fibers were also found in laminae 5 and 6 in the upper cervical cord on the ipsilateral side. The present study is the first demonstration of projections from the central amygdaloid nucleus to the precuneiform nucleus. This projection may underpin the role of the precuneiform nucleus in the modulation of the cardiovascular activity.

  8. Actomyosin contractility rotates the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Maitra, Ananyo; Sumit, Madhuresh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Shivashankar, G V

    2014-01-21

    The cell nucleus functions amidst active cytoskeletal filaments, but its response to their contractile stresses is largely unexplored. We study the dynamics of the nuclei of single fibroblasts, with cell migration suppressed by plating onto micro-fabricated patterns. We find the nucleus undergoes noisy but coherent rotational motion. We account for this observation through a hydrodynamic approach, treating the nucleus as a highly viscous inclusion residing in a less viscous fluid of orientable filaments endowed with active stresses. Lowering actin contractility selectively by introducing blebbistatin at low concentrations drastically reduced the speed and coherence of the angular motion of the nucleus. Time-lapse imaging of actin revealed a correlated hydrodynamic flow around the nucleus, with profile and magnitude consistent with the results of our theoretical approach. Coherent intracellular flows and consequent nuclear rotation thus appear to be an intrinsic property of cells.

  9. Hepatic lipid profiling of deer mice fed ethanol using {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy: A dose-dependent subchronic study

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, Harshica; Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Boor, Paul J.; Ansari, G.A. Shakeel; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.

    2012-11-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse is a 2nd major cause of liver disease resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is characterized by a wide spectrum of pathologies starting from fat accumulation (steatosis) in early reversible stage to inflammation with or without fibrosis and cirrhosis in later irreversible stages. Previously, we reported significant steatosis in the livers of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH{sup −}) vs. hepatic ADH-normal (ADH{sup +}) deer mice fed 4% ethanol daily for 2 months [Bhopale et al., 2006, Alcohol 39, 179–188]. However, ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 4% ethanol also showed a significant mortality. Therefore, a dose-dependent study was conducted to understand the mechanism and identify lipid(s) involved in the development of ethanol-induced fatty liver. ADH{sup −} and ADH{sup +} deer mice fed 1, 2 or 3.5% ethanol daily for 2 months and fatty infiltration in the livers were evaluated by histology and by measuring dry weights of extracted lipids. Lipid metabolomic changes in extracted lipids were determined by proton ({sup 1}H) and {sup 31}phosphorus ({sup 31}P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The NMR data was analyzed by hierarchical clustering (HC) and principle component analysis (PCA) for pattern recognition. Extensive vacuolization by histology and significantly increased dry weights of total lipids found only in the livers of ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol vs. pair-fed controls suggest a dose-dependent formation of fatty liver in ADH{sup −} deer mouse model. Analysis of NMR data of ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol vs. pair-fed controls shows increases for total cholesterol, esterified cholesterol, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), triacylglycerides and unsaturation, and decreases for free cholesterol, phospholipids and allylic and diallylic protons. Certain classes of neutral lipids (cholesterol esters, fatty acyl chain (-COCH{sub 2}-) and FAMEs) were

  10. Music and the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Mavridis, Ioannis N

    2015-03-01

    Music is a universal feature of human societies over time, mainly because it allows expression and regulation of strong emotions, thus influencing moods and evoking pleasure. The nucleus accumbens (NA), the most important pleasure center of the human brain (dominates the reward system), is the 'king of neurosciences' and dopamine (DA) can be rightfully considered as its 'crown' due to the fundamental role that this neurotransmitter plays in the brain's reward system. Purpose of this article was to review the existing literature regarding the relation between music and the NA. Studies have shown that reward value for music can be coded by activity levels in the NA, whose functional connectivity with auditory and frontal areas increases as a function of increasing musical reward. Listening to music strongly modulates activity in a network of mesolimbic structures involved in reward processing including the NA. The functional connectivity between brain regions mediating reward, autonomic and cognitive processing provides insight into understanding why listening to music is one of the most rewarding and pleasurable human experiences. Musical stimuli can significantly increase extracellular DA levels in the NA. NA DA and serotonin were found significantly higher in animals exposed to music. Finally, passive listening to unfamiliar although liked music showed activations in the NA.

  11. sup 31 P and sup 1 H NMR studies of the structure of enzyme-bound substrate complexes of lobster muscle arginine kinase: Relaxation measurements with Mn(II) and Co(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Jarori, G.K.; Ray, B.D.; Rao, B.D.N. )

    1989-11-28

    The paramagnetic effects of Mn(II) and Co(II) on the spin-lattice relaxation rates of {sup 31}P nuclei of ATP and ADP and of Mn(II) on the spin-lattice relaxation rate of the {delta} protons of arginine bound to arginine kinase from lobster tail muscle have been measured. Temperature variation of {sup 31}P relaxation rates in E-MnADP and E-MnATP yields activation energies ({Delta}E) in the range 6-10 kcal/mol. Thus, the {sup 31}P relaxation rates in these complexes are exchange limited and cannot provide structural information. However, the relaxation rates in E-CoADP and E-CoATP exhibit frequency dependence and {Delta}E values in the range 1-2 kcal/mol; i.e., these rates depend upon {sup 31}P-Co(II) distances. These distances were calculated to be in the range 3.2-4.5 {angstrom}, appropriate for direct coordination between Co(II) and the phosphoryl groups. The paramagnetic effect of Mn(II) on the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate of the {delta} protons of arginine in the E-MnADP-Arg complex was also measured at three frequencies. From the frequency dependence of the relaxation rate an effective {tau}{sub C} of 0.6 ns has also been calculated, which is most likely to be the electron spin relaxation rate ({tau}{sub S1}) for Mn(II) in this complex. The distance estimated on the basis of the reciprocal sixth root of the average relaxation rate of the {delta} protons was 10.9 {plus minus} 0.3 {angstrom}.

  12. Classification of edible oils by employing 31P and 1H NMR spectroscopy in combination with multivariate statistical analysis. A proposal for the detection of seed oil adulteration in virgin olive oils.

    PubMed

    Vigli, Georgia; Philippidis, Angelos; Spyros, Apostolos; Dais, Photis

    2003-09-10

    A combination of (1)H NMR and (31)P NMR spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analysis was used to classify 192 samples from 13 types of vegetable oils, namely, hazelnut, sunflower, corn, soybean, sesame, walnut, rapeseed, almond, palm, groundnut, safflower, coconut, and virgin olive oils from various regions of Greece. 1,2-Diglycerides, 1,3-diglycerides, the ratio of 1,2-diglycerides to total diglycerides, acidity, iodine value, and fatty acid composition determined upon analysis of the respective (1)H NMR and (31)P NMR spectra were selected as variables to establish a classification/prediction model by employing discriminant analysis. This model, obtained from the training set of 128 samples, resulted in a significant discrimination among the different classes of oils, whereas 100% of correct validated assignments for 64 samples were obtained. Different artificial mixtures of olive-hazelnut, olive-corn, olive-sunflower, and olive-soybean oils were prepared and analyzed by (1)H NMR and (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Subsequent discriminant analysis of the data allowed detection of adulteration as low as 5% w/w, provided that fresh virgin olive oil samples were used, as reflected by their high 1,2-diglycerides to total diglycerides ratio (D > or = 0.90).

  13. Dynamic risk control by human nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Nachev, Parashkev; Lopez-Sosa, Fernando; Gonzalez-Rosa, Javier Jesus; Galarza, Ana; Avecillas, Josue; Pineda-Pardo, Jose Angel; Lopez-Ibor, Juan José; Reneses, Blanca; Barcia, Juan Antonio; Strange, Bryan

    2015-12-01

    Real-world decisions about reward often involve a complex counterbalance of risk and value. Although the nucleus accumbens has been implicated in the underlying neural substrate, its criticality to human behaviour remains an open question, best addressed with interventional methodology that probes the behavioural consequences of focal neural modulation. Combining a psychometric index of risky decision-making with transient electrical modulation of the nucleus accumbens, here we reveal profound, highly dynamic alteration of the relation between probability of reward and choice during therapeutic deep brain stimulation in four patients with treatment-resistant psychiatric disease. Short-lived phasic electrical stimulation of the region of the nucleus accumbens dynamically altered risk behaviour, transiently shifting the psychometric function towards more risky decisions only for the duration of stimulation. A critical, on-line role of human nucleus accumbens in dynamic risk control is thereby established.

  14. Microtubules move the nucleus to quiescence.

    PubMed

    Laporte, Damien; Sagot, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus is a cellular compartment that hosts several macro-molecular machines displaying a highly complex spatial organization. This tight architectural orchestration determines not only DNA replication and repair but also regulates gene expression. In budding yeast microtubules play a key role in structuring the nucleus since they condition the Rabl arrangement in G1 and chromosome partitioning during mitosis through their attachment to centromeres via the kinetochore proteins. Recently, we have shown that upon quiescence entry, intranuclear microtubules emanating from the spindle pole body elongate to form a highly stable bundle that spans the entire nucleus. Here, we examine some molecular mechanisms that may underlie the formation of this structure. As the intranuclear microtubule bundle causes a profound re-organization of the yeast nucleus and is required for cell survival during quiescence, we discuss the possibility that the assembly of such a structure participates in quiescence establishment.

  15. Dynamic risk control by human nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Sosa, Fernando; Gonzalez-Rosa, Javier Jesus; Galarza, Ana; Avecillas, Josue; Pineda-Pardo, Jose Angel; Lopez-Ibor, Juan José; Reneses, Blanca; Barcia, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Real-world decisions about reward often involve a complex counterbalance of risk and value. Although the nucleus accumbens has been implicated in the underlying neural substrate, its criticality to human behaviour remains an open question, best addressed with interventional methodology that probes the behavioural consequences of focal neural modulation. Combining a psychometric index of risky decision-making with transient electrical modulation of the nucleus accumbens, here we reveal profound, highly dynamic alteration of the relation between probability of reward and choice during therapeutic deep brain stimulation in four patients with treatment-resistant psychiatric disease. Short-lived phasic electrical stimulation of the region of the nucleus accumbens dynamically altered risk behaviour, transiently shifting the psychometric function towards more risky decisions only for the duration of stimulation. A critical, on-line role of human nucleus accumbens in dynamic risk control is thereby established. PMID:26428667

  16. Improved Cloud Condensation Nucleus Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    2010-01-01

    An improved thermal-gradient cloud condensation nucleus spectrometer (CCNS) has been designed to provide several enhancements over prior thermal- gradient counters, including fast response and high-sensitivity detection covering a wide range of supersaturations. CCNSs are used in laboratory research on the relationships among aerosols, supersaturation of air, and the formation of clouds. The operational characteristics of prior counters are such that it takes long times to determine aerosol critical supersaturations. Hence, there is a need for a CCNS capable of rapid scanning through a wide range of supersaturations. The present improved CCNS satisfies this need. The improved thermal-gradient CCNS (see Figure 1) incorporates the following notable features: a) The main chamber is bounded on the top and bottom by parallel thick copper plates, which are joined by a thermally conductive vertical wall on one side and a thermally nonconductive wall on the opposite side. b) To establish a temperature gradient needed to establish a supersaturation gradient, water at two different regulated temperatures is pumped through tubes along the edges of the copper plates at the thermally-nonconductive-wall side. Figure 2 presents an example of temperature and supersaturation gradients for one combination of regulated temperatures at the thermally-nonconductive-wall edges of the copper plates. c) To enable measurement of the temperature gradient, ten thermocouples are cemented to the external surfaces of the copper plates (five on the top plate and five on the bottom plate), spaced at equal intervals along the width axis of the main chamber near the outlet end. d) Pieces of filter paper or cotton felt are cemented onto the interior surfaces of the copper plates and, prior to each experimental run, are saturated with water to establish a supersaturation field inside the main chamber. e) A flow of monodisperse aerosol and a dilution flow of humid air are introduced into the main

  17. BFKL Pomeron calculus: solution to equations for nucleus-nucleus scattering in the saturation domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Carlos; Levin, Eugene; Meneses, Rodrigo

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we solve the equation for nucleus-nucleus scattering in the BFKL Pomeron calculus, suggested by Braun [1-3]. We find these solutions analytically at high energies as well as numerically in the entire region of energies inside the saturation region. The semi-classical approximation is used to select out the infinite set of the parasite solutions. The nucleus-nucleus cross sections at high energy are estimated and compared with the Glauber-Gribov approach. It turns out that the exact formula gives the estimates that are very close to the ones based on Glauber-Gribov formula which is important for the practical applications.

  18. Dynamical evolution of comet nucleus rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeres, D. J.; Sidorenko, V. V.; Neishtadt, A. I.; Vasiliev, A. A.

    2001-11-01

    The rotational dynamics of outgassing cometary nuclei are investigated analytically using dynamical systems theory. We develop a general theory for the averaged evolution of a comet nucleus rotation state assuming that the nucleus is a spheroid (either prolate or oblate) and that the outgassing torques are a function of solar insolation and heliocentric distance. The resulting solutions are a function of the comet outgassing properties, its heliocentric orbit, and the assumed distribution of active regions on its surface. We find that the long-term evolution of the comet nucleus rotation is a strong function of the distribution of active regions over its surface. Specifically, we find that a comet nucleus with a uniformly active surface will tend towards a rotation state with a nutation angle of ~ 55 degrees and an angular momentum perpendicular to the sun-perihelion direction. Conversely, a comet nucleus with an isolated active region will tend towards a zero nutation angle with its symmetry axis and angular momentum aligned parallel to the sun-perihelion direction. For active surface regions between these extremes we find 4 qualitatively different dynamical outcomes. In all cases, the theory predicts that the comet nucleus angular momentum will have a secular increase, a phenomenon that could contribute to nucleus splitting of active comets. These results can be used to discriminate between competing theories of comet outgassing based on a nucelus' rotation state. They also allow for a range of plausible a priori constraints to be placed on a comet's rotation state to aid in the interpretation of its outgassing structure. This work was supported by the NASA JURRISS program under Grant NAG5-8715. AIN, AAV and VVS acknowledge support from Russian Foundation for Basic research via Grants 00-01-00538 and 00-01-0174 respectively. DJS acknowledges support from the PG&G program via Grant NAG5-9017.

  19. Thermotropic phase behavior of model membranes composed of phosphatidylcholines containing cis-monounsaturated acyl chain homologues of oleic acid: differential scanning calorimetric and /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, R.N.A.H.; Sykes, B.D.; McElhaney, R.N.

    1988-02-09

    The thermotropic phase behavior of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine and six of its longer chain homologues was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Aqueous dispersions of these compounds all exhibit a single endotherm upon heating but upon cooling exhibit at least two exotherms, both of which occur at temperatures lower than those of their heating endotherm. The single transition observed upon heating was shown by /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy to be a net conversion from a condensed, subgel-like phase (L/sub c/ phase) to the liquid-crystalline state. Aqueous ethylene glycol dispersions of these compounds also exhibit single endotherms upon heating and cooling exotherms centered at temperatures lower than those of their corresponding heating endotherm. However, the behavior of the aqueous ethylene glycol dispersions differs with respect to their transition temperatures and enthalpies as well as the extent of undercooling observed, and there is some evidence of discontinuities in the cooling behavior of the odd- and even-numbered members of the homologous series. Like the aqueous dispersions, /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy also shows that the calorimetric events observed in aqueous ethylene glycol involve net interconversions between an L/sub c/-like phase and the liquid-crystalline state. These results demonstrate that although the presence of a cis double bond can perturb the solid-state packing of the acyl chains, its presence does not preclude the formation of highly ordered subgel-like phases in lipid bilayers. In the particular case of these unsaturated phosphatidylcholines, the formation of the subgel phases is more kinetically favorable than is the case with their saturated n-acyl counterparts.

  20. Characteristics and assessment of biogenic phosphorus in sediments from the multi-polluted Haihe River, China, using phosphorus fractionation and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. Q.; Zhang, H.; Tang, W. Z.; Shan, B. Q.

    2013-10-01

    We studied the phosphorus (P) pollution, as described by concentrations, distribution and transformation potential, of sediments of the water scarce and heavily polluted Fuyang River, a tributary of the Haihe River, using P fractionation and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR).The sediments of the Fuyang River accumulate significant amounts of inorganic phosphorus (Pi) and organic phosphorus (Po) from industrial and domestic wastewater and agricultural non-point pollution. In terms of their contribution to total phosphorus, the rank order of the P fractions was as follows: H2SO4-P > NaOH-Pi > Res-P > NaOH-Po > KCl-P and their average relative proportions were 69.7:47.5:15.9:2.9:1.0 (the proportion was based on the average proportion of the KCl-P). Seven P compounds were detected by the 31P-NMR analysis. Orthophosphate (Ortho-P: 45.2-92.4%) and orthophosphate monoesters (mono-P: 6.6-45.7%) were the dominant forms. Smaller amounts of pyrophosphates (pyro-P: 0.1-6.6%), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA-P: 0.3-3.9%), phosphonates (phon-P: 0-3.3%), phospholipids (lipids-P: 0-2.7%) and polyphosphate (poly-P: 0-0.04%) were observed in the sediments. Results of P fractionation and 31P-NMR analysis showed that 35% of Pi was labile P, including KCl-P and NaOH-Pi (Fe-P and Al-P). Biogenic-P accounted for 24% of P in the sediments. Analysis of the relationships between P species and water quality indicated that the Po compounds would mineralize to form ortho-P and would be potentially bioavailable for recycling to surface water, supporting further growth of phytoplankton and leading to algal blooms.

  1. Determination of the enantiomeric excess of chiral carboxylic acids by 31P NMR with phosphorylated derivatizing agents from C2-symmetrical diamines containing the (S)-alpha-phenylethyl group.

    PubMed

    Mastranzo, Virginia M; Quintero, Leticia; de Parrodi, Cecilia Anaya

    2007-06-01

    The use of P(III) and P(V) organophosphorus derivatizing agents prepared from C(2) symmetrical (1R,2R)- and (1S,2S)-trans-N,N'-bis-[(S)-alpha-phenylethyl]-cyclohexane-1,2-diamines 1 and 2, as well as (1R,2R)- and (1S,2S)-trans-N,N'-bis-[(S)-alpha-phenylethyl]-4-cyclohexene-1,2-diamines 3 and 4 for the determination of enantiomeric composition of chiral carboxylic acids by (31)P NMR, is described.

  2. The dynamic landscape of the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Austin, Christopher M; Bellini, Michel

    2010-01-01

    While the cell nucleus was described for the first time almost two centuries ago, our modern view of the nuclear architecture is primarily based on studies from the last two decades. This surprising late start coincides with the development of new, powerful strategies to probe for the spatial organization of nuclear activities in both fixed and live cells. As a result, three major principles have emerged: first, the nucleus is not just a bag filled with nucleic acids and proteins. Rather, many distinct functional domains, including the chromosomes, resides within the confines of the nuclear envelope. Second, all these nuclear domains are highly dynamic, with molecules exchanging rapidly between them and the surrounding nucleoplasm. Finally, the motion of molecules within the nucleoplasm appears to be mostly driven by random diffusion. Here, the emerging roles of several subnuclear domains are discussed in the context of the dynamic functions of the cell nucleus.

  3. Organisation of the human dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Koutcherov, Yuri; Mai, Juergen K; Ashwell, Ken W; Paxinos, George

    2004-01-19

    This study used acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry to reveal the organization of the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DM) in the human. Topographically, the human DM is similar to DM in the monkey and rat. It is wedged between the paraventricular nucleus, dorsally, and the ventromedial nucleus, ventrally. Laterally, DM borders the lateral hypothalamic area while medially it approaches the 3rd ventricle. The AChE staining distinguished two subcompartments of the human DM: the larger diffuse and the smaller compact DM. The subcompartmental organization of the human DM appears homologous to that found in the monkey and less complex than that reported in rats. Understanding of the organization of DM creates meaningful anatomical reference for physiological and pharmacological studies in the human hypothalamus.

  4. Nucleus model for periodic Comet Tempel 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    1991-01-01

    Observational data obtained primarily during 1988 are analyzed and synthesized to develop a comprehensive physical model for the nucleus of Periodic Comet Tempel 2, one of the best studied members of Jupiter's family of short-period comets. It is confirmed that a previous investigation provided reliable information on the comet's spin-axis orientation, which implies and obliquity of 54 degrees of the orbit plane to the equatorial plane and which appears to have varied little - if at all - with time. This conclusion is critical for fitting a triaxial ellipsoid to approximate the figure of the nucleus.

  5. UNCOVERING THE NUCLEUS CANDIDATE FOR NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Günthardt, G. I.; Camperi, J. A.; Agüero, M. P.; Díaz, R. J.; Gomez, P. L.; Schirmer, M.; Bosch, G. E-mail: camperi@oac.uncor.edu E-mail: rdiaz@gemini.edu E-mail: mschirmer@gemini.edu

    2015-11-15

    NGC 253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst that becomes the best candidate for studying the relationship between starburst and active galactic nucleus activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus to the point that there is no strong evidence that the galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole co-evolving with the starburst as was supposed earlier. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, especially NIR emission line analysis, could be advantageous in shedding light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis of the central structure and through the brightest infrared source. In this work, we present evidence showing that the brightest NIR and mid-infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a large stellar supercluster, in fact presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. Mentioning some distinctive aspects, it is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.″0 of the symmetry center of the galactic bar, as measured in the K-band emission. Moreover, our data indicate that this object is surrounded by a large circumnuclear stellar disk and it is also located at the rotation center of the large molecular gas disk of NGC 253. Furthermore, a kinematic residual appears in the H{sub 2} rotation curve with a sinusoidal shape consistent with an outflow centered in the candidate nucleus position. The maximum outflow velocity is located about 14 pc from TH7, which is consistent with the radius of a shell detected around the nucleus candidate, observed at 18.3 μm (Qa) and 12.8 μm ([Ne ii]) with T-ReCS. Also, the Brγ emission line profile shows a pronounced blueshift and this emission line also has the highest equivalent width at this

  6. Uncovering the Nucleus Candidate for NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günthardt, G. I.; Agüero, M. P.; Camperi, J. A.; Díaz, R. J.; Gomez, P. L.; Bosch, G.; Schirmer, M.

    2015-11-01

    NGC 253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst that becomes the best candidate for studying the relationship between starburst and active galactic nucleus activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus to the point that there is no strong evidence that the galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole co-evolving with the starburst as was supposed earlier. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, especially NIR emission line analysis, could be advantageous in shedding light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis of the central structure and through the brightest infrared source. In this work, we present evidence showing that the brightest NIR and mid-infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a large stellar supercluster, in fact presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. Mentioning some distinctive aspects, it is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.″0 of the symmetry center of the galactic bar, as measured in the K-band emission. Moreover, our data indicate that this object is surrounded by a large circumnuclear stellar disk and it is also located at the rotation center of the large molecular gas disk of NGC 253. Furthermore, a kinematic residual appears in the H2 rotation curve with a sinusoidal shape consistent with an outflow centered in the candidate nucleus position. The maximum outflow velocity is located about 14 pc from TH7, which is consistent with the radius of a shell detected around the nucleus candidate, observed at 18.3 μm (Qa) and 12.8 μm ([Ne ii]) with T-ReCS. Also, the Brγ emission line profile shows a pronounced blueshift and this emission line also has the highest equivalent width at this

  7. Interaction Study of an Amorphous Solid Dispersion of Cyclosporin A in Poly-Alpha-Cyclodextrin with Model Membranes by (1)H-, (2)H-, (31)P-NMR and Electron Spin Resonance.

    PubMed

    Debouzy, Jean-Claude; Crouzier, David; Bourbon, Fréderic; Lahiani-Skiba, Malika; Skiba, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The properties of an amorphous solid dispersion of cyclosporine A (ASD) prepared with the copolymer alpha cyclodextrin (POLYA) and cyclosporine A (CYSP) were investigated by (1)H-NMR in solution and its membrane interactions were studied by (1)H-NMR in small unilamellar vesicles and by (31)P (2)H NMR in phospholipidic dispersions of DMPC (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) in comparison with those of POLYA and CYSP alone. (1)H-NMR chemical shift variations showed that CYSP really interacts with POLYA, with possible adduct formation, dispersion in the solid matrix of the POLYA, and also complex formation. A coarse approach to the latter mechanism was tested using the continuous variations method, indicating an apparent 1 : 1 stoichiometry. Calculations gave an apparent association constant of log Ka = 4.5. A study of the interactions with phospholipidic dispersions of DMPC showed that only limited interactions occurred at the polar head group level ((31)P). Conversely, by comparison with the expected chain rigidification induced by CYSP, POLYA induced an increase in the fluidity of the layer while ASD formation led to these effects almost being overcome at 298 K. At higher temperature, while the effect of CYSP seems to vanish, a resulting global increase in chain fluidity was found in the presence of ASD.

  8. 31P-NMR analysis of the B to Z transition in double-stranded (dC-dG)3 and (dC-dG)4 in high salt solution.

    PubMed Central

    Holak, T A; Borer, P N; Levy, G C; van Boom, J H; Wang, A H

    1984-01-01

    In 4M NaCl solutions (dC-dG)n (n = 3,4; approximately 9 mM) exist as a mixture o +/- B and Z forms. The low and high field components of two 31P NMR resonances originating from internal phosphodiester groups are assigned to the GpC and CpG linkages, respectively. Low temperatures stabilize the Z-forms, which completely disappear above 50 degrees C (n = 3) and 65 degrees C (n = 4). delta H = -44 and -17 kJ/mol for B to Z transition in the hexamer and octamer duplexes, respectively. Temperature dependent changes (0-50 degrees C range) in the spin-lattice relaxation times at 145.7 MHz are distinctly different for the 31P nuclei o +/- GpC and CpG groups. The relaxation data can be explained by assuming that the GpC phosphodiester groups undergo more local internal motion than do the CpG groups. PMID:6547530

  9. Fermi-motion effect on the intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, G. W.; Kong, W. Y.; Han, T. F.; Li, X. C.; Ma, J. B.; Sheng, Z. Q.; Shi, G. Z.; Tian, F.; Wang, J.; Zhang, C.

    2016-11-01

    The Glauber model is modified with the Fermi-motion effect in the calculation of elastic differential cross-sections and momentum distributions of a fragment from mother nucleus. Different reaction systems at low energies are calculated with the modified Glauber model. It is found that calculations including the Fermi-motion provide a better prescription relating the model to a proper nuclear density distribution by comparing with the experimental data. On the basis of the studies, the influence of the correction on the extracted nuclear radius is quantified. The results further confirm the importance of the Fermi-motion in the nucleus-nucleus collision reactions at low energies.

  10. The Checkerboard Model of the Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore

    2015-04-01

    The Checker Board Model (CBM) of the nucleus and the associated extended standard model predicts that nature has 5 generations of quarks not 3 and that Nucleus is 2 dimensional. The CBM theory began with an insight into the structure of the He nucleus around the year 1989. Details of how this theory evolved which took many years, and is found on my web site (http://checkerboard.dnsalias.net) or in the following references One independent check of this model is that the wavelength of the ``up'' quark orbiting inside the proton at 84.8123% the speed of light (around the ``dn'' quark in the center of the proton) turns out to be exactly one de Broglie wavelength something determined after the mass and speed of the up quark were determined by other means. This theory explains the mass of the proton and neutron and their magnetic moments and this along with the beautiful symmetric 2D structure of the He nucleus led to the evolution of this theory. When this theory was first presented at Argonne in 1996, it was the first time that anyone had predicted the quarks orbited inside the proton at relativistic speeds and it was met with skepticism.

  11. New developments in nucleus pulposus replacement technology.

    PubMed

    Carl, Allen; Ledet, Eric; Yuan, Hansen; Sharan, Alok

    2004-01-01

    Attempts to alleviate the pain attributed to degeneration of the nucleus pulposus using replacement or reinforcement techniques dating back to the 1950s are reviewed. The various materials and their insertion techniques are discussed as are results available from early clinical experiences. These techniques are in evolution and clinical outcomes will be necessary to establish the efficacy of these approaches.

  12. Nucleus-associated actin in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Berdieva, Mariia; Bogolyubov, Dmitry; Podlipaeva, Yuliya; Goodkov, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The presence, spatial distribution and forms of intranuclear and nucleus-associated cytoplasmic actin were studied in Amoeba proteus with immunocytochemical approaches. Labeling with different anti-actin antibodies and staining with TRITC-phalloidin and fluorescent deoxyribonuclease I were used. We showed that actin is abundant within the nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm of A. proteus cells. According to DNase I experiments, the predominant form of intranuclear actin is G-actin which is associated with chromatin strands. Besides, unpolymerized actin was shown to participate in organization of a prominent actin layer adjacent to the outer surface of nuclear envelope. No significant amount of F-actin was found in the nucleus. At the same time, the amoeba nucleus is enclosed in a basket-like structure formed by circumnuclear actin filaments and bundles connected with global cytoplasmic actin cytoskeleton. A supposed architectural function of actin filaments was studied by treatment with actin-depolymerizing agent latrunculin A. It disassembled the circumnuclear actin system, but did not affect the intranuclear chromatin structure. The results obtained for amoeba cells support the modern concept that actin is involved in fundamental nuclear processes that have evolved in the cells of multicellular organisms.

  13. Nucleon-nucleus interactions from JACEE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.; Lord, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Results on hadron-nucleus interactions from the Japanese-American Cooperation Emulsion Experiment experiment are presented. Angular distributions for charged particles, and angular and transverse momentum spectra for photons have been measured for a sample of events with sigma epsilon sub gamma. Results on central rapidity density and transverse energy flow are discussed.

  14. Average transverse momentum and energy density in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.; Lord, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Emulsion chambers were used to measure the transverse momenta of photons or pi(0) mesons produced in high-energy cosmic-ray nucleus-nucleus collisions. A group of events having large average transverse momenta has been found which apparently exceeds the expected limiting values. Analysis of the events at early interaction times, of the order of 1 fm/c, indicates that the observed transverse momentum increases with both rapidity density and energy density.

  15. The Neutrophil Nucleus and Its Role in Neutrophilic Function.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Leonardo Olivieri; Aquino, Elaine Nascimento; Neves, Anne Caroline Dias; Fontes, Wagner

    2015-09-01

    The cell nucleus plays a key role in differentiation processes in eukaryotic cells. It is not the nucleus in particular, but the organization of the genes and their remodeling that provides the data for the adjustments to be made according to the medium. The neutrophil nucleus has a different morphology. It is a multi-lobed nucleus where some researchers argue no longer function. However, studies indicate that it is very probable the occurrence of chromatin remodeling during activation steps. It may be that the human neutrophil nucleus also contributes to the mobility of neutrophils through thin tissue spaces. Questions like these will be discussed in this small review. The topics include morphology of human neutrophil nucleus, maturation process and modifications of the neutrophil nucleus, neutrophil activation and chromatin modifications, causes and consequences of multi-lobulated segmented morphology, and importance of the nucleus in the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs).

  16. Why do we have a caudate nucleus?

    PubMed

    Villablanca, Jaime R

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand the physiological role of the caudate nucleus, we combine here our laboratory data on cats with reports of patients with selective damage to this nucleus. Cats with bilateral removal of the caudate nuclei showed a stereotyped behavior consisting of persistently approaching and then following a person, another cat, or any object, and attempting to contact the target. Simultaneously, the animals exhibited a friendly disposition and persistent docility together with purring and forelimbs treading/kneading. The magnitude and duration of this behavior was proportional to the extent of the removal reaching a maximum after ablations of 65% or more of the caudate tissue. These cats were hyperactive but they had lost the feline elegance of movements. Additional features of acaudate cats were: (1) postural and accuracy deficits (plus perseveration) in paw usage tasks including bar pressing for food reward; (2) cognitive and perceptual impairments on a T-maze battery of tasks and on the bar pressing tasks; (3) blockage or blunting of the species-specific behavioral response to a single injection of morphine; Unilateral caudate nucleus removal did not produce global behavioral effects, but only deficit in the contralateral paw contact placing reaction and paw usage/bar pressing. Moreover and surprisingly, we found hypertrophy of the ipsilateral caudate nucleus following prenatal focal neocortical removal. The findings in human were also behavioral (not neurological) and also occurred with unilateral caudate damage. The main manifestations consisted of loss of drive (apathy), obsessive-compulsive behavior, cognitive deficits, stimulus-bound perseverative behavior, and hyperactivity. Based on all of the above data we propose that the specific function of the caudate nucleus is to control approach-attachment behavior, ranging from plain approach to a target, to romantic love. This putative function would account well for the caudate involvement in the

  17. Collateral projections from the lateral parabrachial nucleus to the paraventricular thalamic nucleus and the central amygdaloid nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shao-Hua; Yin, Jun-Bin; Sun, Yi; Bai, Yang; Zhou, Kai-Xiang; Zhao, Wen-Jun; Wang, Wei; Dong, Yu-Lin; Li, Yun-Qing

    2016-08-26

    Combined the retrograde double tracing with immunofluorescence histochemical staining, we examined the neurons in the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPB) sent collateral projections to the paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT) and central amygdaloid nucleus (CeA) and their roles in the nociceptive transmission in the rat. After the injection of Fluoro-gold (FG) into the PVT and tetramethylrhodamine-dextran (TMR) into the CeA, respectively, FG/TMR double-labeled neurons were observed in the LPB. The percentages of FG/TMR double-labeled neurons to the total number of FG- or TMR-labeled neurons were 6.18% and 9.09%, respectively. Almost all of the FG/TMR double-labeled neurons (95%) exhibited calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunoreactivity. In the condition of neuropathic pain, 94% of these neurons showed FOS immunoreactivity. The present data indicates that some of CGRP-expressing neurons in the LPB may transmit nociceptive information toward the PVT and CeA by way of axon collaterals.

  18. Multiple quantum correlated spectroscopy revamped by asymmetric z-gradient echo detection signal intensity as a function of the read pulse flip angle as verified by heteronuclear 1H/31P experiments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Liu, Huili; Liu, Maili; Ye, Chaohui; Mao, Xi-an

    2007-02-07

    Heteronuclear multiple quantum (n=+/-0 and n=+/-2) correlated spectroscopy revamped by asymmetric z-gradient echo detection (CRAZED) experiments were performed on the spins 31P and 1H in a H3PO4 solution in order to determine the optimum flip angle for the read pulse. It has been shown that for the negative quantum signals, the maximum signals appear at beta=0, and for the positive quantum signals, the maximum signals appear at beta=pi. The CRAZED signals were compared to the single quantum signals in two-pulse two-gradient experiments. It is found that the CRAZED signals can also be distinguished into gradient echoes and spin echoes. The gradient-echo-type CRAZED signal requires beta=0 and the spin-echo-type CRAZED signal requires beta=pi for maximum echo intensities, in the same way as in single quantum experiments.

  19. In situ preparation and fate of cis-4-hydroxycyclophosphamide and aldophosphamide: 1H and 31P NMR evidence for equilibration of cis- and trans-4-hydroxycyclophosphamide with aldophosphamide and its hydrate in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Borch, R F; Hoye, T R; Swanson, T A

    1984-04-01

    cis-4-Hydroxycyclophosphamide (2) and aldophosphamide (4) were generated in aqueous phosphate or cacodylate buffer by dimethyl sulfide reduction of cis-4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (8) and by sodium periodate cleavage of 3,4-dihydroxybutyl N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)phosphorodiamidate (9), respectively; the reactions of 2 and 4 were examined by 1H and 31P NMR. Within 30-60 min (pH or pD 7.0, 25 degrees C) the same pseudoequilibrium mixture was established in both reactions, with cis- and trans-4-hydroxycyclophosphamide (2 and 3), aldophosphamide (4), and its hydrate (5) present in the approximate ratio of 4:2:0.3:1. Structures of the intermediates were assigned unambiguously based upon analysis of the chemical shifts and coupling constants in the proton spectra determined in D2O buffers, and the 31P assignments followed by correlation of component ratios at equilibrium. Free energy differences of 0.4, 0.4, and 0.7 kcal/mol at 25 degrees C were estimated between 2, 3, 5, and 4, respectively, with 2 being the most stable. The aldehyde 4 reacted most rapidly with water to give hydrate 5; cyclization of 4 to 3 occurred faster than to 2, and the rate of cyclization to 2 was comparable to that for elimination to 6. Compound 5 is formed much faster than 3 from the diol cleavage, but 5 and 3 are produced at comparable rates from 2, suggesting that conversion of 2 to 3 can proceed by a mechanism other than ring opening. The rate of equilibration appears to be independent of buffer structure, indicating that bifunctional catalysis is not important in the ring-opening reaction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. 31P MAS-NMR study of flux-grown rare-earth element orthophosphate (monazite/xenotime) solid solutions: Evidence of random cation distribution from paramagnetically shifted NMR resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Palke, A. C.; Stebbins, J. F.; Boatner, Lynn A

    2013-01-01

    We present 31P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectra of flux-grown solid solutions of La1-xCexPO4 ( x between 0.027 and 0.32) having the monoclinic monazite structure, and of Y1-xMxPO4 (M = Vn+, Ce3+, Nd3+, x between 0.001 and 0.014) having the tetragonal zircon structure. Paramagnetically shifted NMR resonances are observed in all samples due to the presence of paramagnetic Vn+, Ce3+, and Nd3+ in the diamagnetic LaPO4 or YPO4. As a first-order observation, the number and relative intensity of these peaks is related to the symmetry and structure of the diamagnetic host phase. The presence of paramagnetic shifts allows for increased resolution between NMR resonances for distinct atomic species which leads to the observation of low intensity peaks related to PO4 species having more than one paramagnetic neighbor two or four atomic bonds away. Through careful analysis of peak areas and comparison with predictions for simple models, it was determined that solid solutions in the systems examined here are characterized by complete disorder (random distribution) of diamagnetic La3+ or Y3+ with the paramagnetic substitutional species Ce3+ and Nd3+. The increased resolution given by the paramagnetic interactions also leads to the observation of splitting of specific resonances in the 31P NMR spectra that may be caused by local, small-scale distortions from the substitution of ions having dissimilar ionic radii.

  1. Using solid (13)C NMR coupled with solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy to investigate molecular species and lability of organic carbon and phosphorus from aquatic plants in Tai Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shasha; Zhu, Yuanrong; Wu, Fengchang; Meng, Wei; Wang, Hao; He, Zhongqi; Guo, Wenjing; Song, Fanhao; Giesy, John P

    2017-01-01

    Forms and labilities of plant-derived organic matters (OMs) including carbon (C) and phosphorus (P) were fundamental for understanding their release, degradation and environmental behaviour in lake ecosystems. Thus, solid (13)C and solution (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to characterize biomass of six aquatic plants in Tai Lake, China. The results showed that carbohydrates (61.2% of the total C) were predominant C functional group in the solid (13)C NMR spectra of plant biomass, which may indicate high lability and bioavailability of aquatic plants-derived organic matter in lakes. There was 72.6-103.7% of the total P in aquatic plant biomass extracted by NaOH-EDTA extracts. Solution (31)P NMR analysis of these NaOH-EDTA extracts further identified several molecular species of P including orthophosphate (50.1%), orthophosphate monoesters (46.8%), DNA (1.6%) and pyrophosphate (1.4%). Orthophosphate monoesters included β-glycerophosphate (17.7%), hydrolysis products of RNA (11.7%), α-glycerophosphate (9.2%) and other unknown monoesters (2.1%). Additionally, phytate, the major form of organic P in many lake sediments, was detected in floating plant water poppy. These inorganic P (e.g. orthophosphate and pyrophosphate) and organic P (e.g. diester and its degradation products) identified in plant biomass were all labile and bioavailable P, which would play an important role in recycling of P in lakes. These results increased knowledge of chemical composition and bioavailability of OMs derived from aquatic plants in lakes.

  2. Synthesis and structure of tridentate bis(phosphinic amide)-phosphine oxide complexes of yttrium nitrate. Applications of 31P,89Y NMR methods in structural elucidation in solution.

    PubMed

    Popovici, Cristinel; Fernández, Ignacio; Oña-Burgos, Pascual; Roces, Laura; García-Granda, Santiago; Ortiz, Fernando López

    2011-07-07

    The synthesis and characterisation of a tridentate ligand containing two diphenylphosphinic amide side-arms connected through the ortho position to a phenylphosphine oxide moiety and the 1:1 and 2:1 complexes formed with yttrium nitrate are reported for the first time. The free ligand (R(P1)*,S(P3)*)-11 is obtained diastereoselectively by reaction of ortho-lithiated N,N-diisopropyl-P,P-diphenylphosphinic amide with phenylphosphonic dichloride. Complexes [Y((R(P1)*,S(P3)*)-11)(NO(3))(3)] and [Y((R(P1)*,S(P3)*)-11)(2)(NO(3))](NO(3))(2) were isolated by mixing ligand 11 with Y(NO(3))(3)·6H(2)O in acetonitrile at room temperature in a ligand to metal molar ratio of 1:1 and 2:1, respectively. The 1:1 derivative is the product of thermodynamic control when a molar ratio of ligand to yttrium salt of 1:1 is used. The new compounds have been characterised both as the solid (X-ray diffraction) and in solution (multinuclear magnetic resonance). In both yttrium complexes the ligand acts as a tridentate chelate. The arrangement of the two ligands in the 2:1 complex affords a pseudo-meso structure. Tridentate chelation of yttrium(III) in both complexes is retained in solution as evidenced by (89)Y NMR data obtained via(31)P,(89)Y-HMQC, and (89)Y,(31)P-DEPT experiments. The investigation of the solution behaviour of the Y(III) complexes through PGSE NMR diffusion measurements showed that average structures in agreement with the 1:1 and 1:2 stoichiometries are retained in acetonitrile.

  3. Cell Nucleus-Targeting Zwitterionic Carbon Dots

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yun Kyung; Shin, Eeseul; Kim, Byeong-Su

    2015-01-01

    An innovative nucleus-targeting zwitterionic carbon dot (CD) vehicle has been developed for anticancer drug delivery and optical monitoring. The zwitterionic functional groups of the CDs introduced by a simple one-step synthesis using β-alanine as a passivating and zwitterionic ligand allow cytoplasmic uptake and subsequent nuclear translocation of the CDs. Moreover, multicolor fluorescence improves the accuracy of the CDs as an optical code. The CD-based drug delivery system constructed by non-covalent grafting of doxorubicin, exhibits superior antitumor efficacy owing to enhanced nuclear delivery in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo, resulting in highly effective tumor growth inhibition. Since the zwitterionic CDs are highly biocompatible and effectively translocated into the nucleus, it provides a compelling solution to a multifunctional nanoparticle for substantially enhanced nuclear uptake of drugs and optical monitoring of translocation. PMID:26689549

  4. Gustatory Reward and the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Norgren, R.; Hajnal, A.; Mungarndee, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    The concept of reward is central to psychology, but remains a cipher for neuroscience. Considerable evidence implicates dopamine in the process of reward and much of the data derives from the nucleus accumbens. Gustatory stimuli are widely used for animal studies of reward, but the connections between the taste and reward systems are unknown. In a series of experiments, our laboratory has addressed this issue using functional neurochemistry and neuroanatomy. First, using microdialysis probes, we demonstrated that sapid sucrose releases dopamine in the nucleus accumbens. The effect is dependent on oral stimulation and concentration. We subsequently determined that this response was independent of the thalamocortical gustatory system, but substantially blunted by damage to the parabrachial limbic taste projection. Further experiments using c-fos histochemistry confirmed that the limbic pathway was the prime carrier for the gustatory afferent activity that drives accumbens dopamine release. PMID:16822531

  5. Cell Nucleus-Targeting Zwitterionic Carbon Dots.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yun Kyung; Shin, Eeseul; Kim, Byeong-Su

    2015-12-22

    An innovative nucleus-targeting zwitterionic carbon dot (CD) vehicle has been developed for anticancer drug delivery and optical monitoring. The zwitterionic functional groups of the CDs introduced by a simple one-step synthesis using β-alanine as a passivating and zwitterionic ligand allow cytoplasmic uptake and subsequent nuclear translocation of the CDs. Moreover, multicolor fluorescence improves the accuracy of the CDs as an optical code. The CD-based drug delivery system constructed by non-covalent grafting of doxorubicin, exhibits superior antitumor efficacy owing to enhanced nuclear delivery in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo, resulting in highly effective tumor growth inhibition. Since the zwitterionic CDs are highly biocompatible and effectively translocated into the nucleus, it provides a compelling solution to a multifunctional nanoparticle for substantially enhanced nuclear uptake of drugs and optical monitoring of translocation.

  6. Core-nucleus distortation in hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1995-08-01

    We are completing a study of the effects of the spherical distortion of the {open_quotes}core{close_quotes} nucleus by the {Lambda} in a hypernucleus. The response of the core was determined by an appropriately chosen energy-density functional which depends, in particular, on the nuclear compressibility. The forcing action of the A is determined by the nuclear density dependence of the {Lambda} binding in nuclear matter which is obtained from our work on the {Lambda} single-particle energies. Because of the strongly repulsive {Lambda}NN forces, this {Lambda} binding {open_quotes}saturates{close_quotes} at a density close to the central density of nuclei, and results in a reduced core-nucleus distortion much less than would otherwise be obtained. The effects of the core distortion then turn out to be very small even for quite light hypernuclei. This result justifies the assumption that spherical core nuclei are effectively undistorted in a hypernucleus.

  7. Finite nucleus effects on relativistic energy corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.; Faegri, Knut, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of using a finite nucleus model in quantum-chemical calculations is examined. Relativistic corrections from the first order Foldy-Wouthuysen terms are affected indirectly by the change in wavefunction, but also directly as a result of revised expressions for the Darwin and spin-orbit terms due to the change in nuclear potential. A calculation for the Rn atom indicates that the mass-velocity and Darwin corrections are much more sensitive to the finite nucleus than the non-relativistic total energy, but that the total contribution for these two terms is quite stable provided the revised form of the Darwin term is used. The spin-orbit interaction is not greatly affected by the choice of nuclear model.

  8. Physical Properties of Cometary Nucleus Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David; Hillman, John (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In this proposal we aim to study the physical properties of the Centaurs and the dead comets, these being the precursors to, and the remnants from, the active cometary nuclei. The nuclei themselves are very difficult to study, because of the contaminating effects of near-nucleus coma. Systematic investigation of the nuclei both before they enter the zone of strong sublimation and after they have depleted their near-surface volatiles should neatly bracket the properties of these objects, revealing evolutionary effects.

  9. Pygmy dipole response in 238U nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guliyev, Ekber; Kuliev, Ali Akbar; Quliyev, Huseynqulu

    2017-02-01

    The presence of the El pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) in the actinide nucleus 238U was shown via QRPA. Below the particle threshold energy, 24 excitation states were calculated. The calculations, is demonstrating the presence of a PDR with evidence for K splitting. The calculations further suggest that the PDR in 238U is predominantly K=0. The obtained results show universality of the PDR in atomic nuclei.

  10. Absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, O. A.

    1993-11-01

    The program SEEF is a Fortran IV computer code for the extraction of absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions. When the evaporation residue is fed by its parents, only cumulative cross sections will be obtained from off-line gamma ray measurements. But, if one has the parent excitation function (experimental or calculated), this code will make it possible to determine absolute cross sections of any exit channel.

  11. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, Gregory; Kulkarni, Gourihar

    2014-07-10

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70°C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  12. How to build a yeast nucleus.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hua; Arbona, Jean-Michel; Zimmer, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Biological functions including gene expression and DNA repair are affected by the 3D architecture of the genome, but the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. Notably, it remains unclear to what extent nuclear architecture is driven by generic physical properties of polymers or by specific factors such as proteins binding particular DNA sequences. The budding yeast nucleus has been intensely studied by imaging and biochemical techniques, resulting in a large quantitative data set on locus positions and DNA contact frequencies. We recently described a quantitative model of the interphase yeast nucleus in which chromosomes are represented as passively moving polymer chains. This model ignores the DNA sequence information except for specific constraints at the centromeres, telomeres, and the ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Despite its simplicity, the model accounts for a large majority of experimental data, including absolute and relative locus positions and contact frequency patterns at chromosomal and subchromosomal scales. Here, we also illustrate the model's ability to reproduce observed features of chromatin movements. Our results strongly suggest that the dynamic large-scale architecture of the yeast nucleus is dominated by statistical properties of randomly moving polymers with a few sequence-specific constraints, rather than by a large number of DNA-specific factors or epigenetic modifications. In addition, we show that our model accounts for recently measured variations in homologous recombination efficiency, illustrating its potential for quantitatively understanding functional consequences of nuclear architecture.

  13. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-06-01

    Three Advanced Design Projects have been completed this academic year at Penn State. At the beginning of the fall semester the students were organized into eight groups and given their choice of either a comet nucleus or an asteroid sample return mission. Once a mission had been chosen, the students developed conceptual designs. These were evaluated at the end of the fall semester and combined into three separate mission plans, including a comet nucleus same return (CNSR), a single asteroid sample return (SASR), and a multiple asteroid sample return (MASR). To facilitate the work required for each mission, the class was reorganized in the spring semester by combining groups to form three mission teams. An integration team consisting of two members from each group was formed for each mission so that communication and information exchange would be easier among the groups. The types of projects designed by the students evolved from numerous discussions with Penn State faculty and mission planners at the Johnson Space Center Human/Robotic Spacecraft Office. Robotic sample return missions are widely considered valuable precursors to manned missions in that they can provide details about a site's environment and scientific value. For example, a sample return from an asteroid might reveal valuable resources that, once mined, could be utilized for propulsion. These missions are also more adaptable when considering the risk to humans visiting unknown and potentially dangerous locations, such as a comet nucleus.

  14. Theoretical predictions for the nucleus 296118

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobiczewski, A.

    2016-11-01

    Theoretical predictions for the α -decay chain of the nucleus 296118 are performed. The synthesis of this nucleus is being attempted in experiments running in Dubna. The α -decay energies Qα, and the α -decay and spontaneous-fission half-lives, Tα and Tsf, are studied. The analysis of the α decay is based on a phenomenological model using only three parameters. The calculations are performed in nine variants using masses obtained within nine nuclear-mass models describing masses of the heaviest nuclei. The experimental Qα energies, known from earlier experiments for the potential daughter, 292Lv, and grand-daughter, 288Fl, nuclei are reproduced with an average of the absolute values of the discrepancies: from 0.13 to 1.52 MeV within the considered variants. Measured half-lives Tα are reconstructed within average ratios: from 1.7 to 1054. Within all variants considered, the half-life Tα of the nucleus 296118 is obtained larger than needed (around 1 μ s ) for its observation.

  15. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Three Advanced Design Projects have been completed this academic year at Penn State. At the beginning of the fall semester the students were organized into eight groups and given their choice of either a comet nucleus or an asteroid sample return mission. Once a mission had been chosen, the students developed conceptual designs. These were evaluated at the end of the fall semester and combined into three separate mission plans, including a comet nucleus same return (CNSR), a single asteroid sample return (SASR), and a multiple asteroid sample return (MASR). To facilitate the work required for each mission, the class was reorganized in the spring semester by combining groups to form three mission teams. An integration team consisting of two members from each group was formed for each mission so that communication and information exchange would be easier among the groups. The types of projects designed by the students evolved from numerous discussions with Penn State faculty and mission planners at the Johnson Space Center Human/Robotic Spacecraft Office. Robotic sample return missions are widely considered valuable precursors to manned missions in that they can provide details about a site's environment and scientific value. For example, a sample return from an asteroid might reveal valuable resources that, once mined, could be utilized for propulsion. These missions are also more adaptable when considering the risk to humans visiting unknown and potentially dangerous locations, such as a comet nucleus.

  16. Dynamical evolution of comet nucleus rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeres, D. J.; Sidorenko, V. V.; Neishtadt, A. I.; Vasiliev, A. A.

    2002-09-01

    The rotational dynamics of outgassing cometary nuclei are investigated analytically. We develop a general theory for the evolution of a comet nucleus' rotation state using averaging theory and assuming that the outgassing torques are a function of solar insolation and heliocentric distance. The resulting solutions are a function of the nucleus inertia ellipsoid, its outgassing properties, its heliocentric orbit, and the assumed distribution of active regions on its surface. We find that the long-term evolution of the comet nucleus rotation is a strong function of the distribution of active regions over its surface. In particular, we find that nuclei with nearly axisymmetric inertia ellipsoids and a uniformly active surface will tend towards a rotation state that has a nutation angle of ~ 55 degrees and its angular momentum perpendicular to the sun-perihelion direction. If such a comet nucleus has only one isolated active region, it will tend towards a zero nutation angle with its approximate symmetry axis and rotational angular momentum aligned parallel to the sun-perihelion direction. In the general case for an inertia ellipsoid that is not close to being axisymmetric we find a much richer set of possible steady-state solutions that are stable, ranging from rotation about the maximum moment of the inertia axis, to SAM and LAM non-principal axis rotation states. The resulting stable rotation states are a strong function of outgassing activity distribution, which we show using a simplified model of the comet Halley nucleus. Also, we demonstrate that comet Borrely observations are consistent with a stable rotation state. Our results can be used to discriminate between competing theories of comet outgassing based on a nucelus' rotation state. They also allow for a range of plausible a priori constraints to be placed on a comet's rotation state to aid in the interpretation of its outgassing structure. This work was supported by the NASA JURRISS program under Grant NAG5

  17. Nuclear radii calculations in various theoretical approaches for nucleus-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Merino, C.; Novikov, I. S.; Shabelski, Yu.

    2009-12-15

    The information about sizes and nuclear density distributions in unstable (radioactive) nuclei is usually extracted from the data on interaction of radioactive nuclear beams with a nuclear target. We show that in the case of nucleus-nucleus collisions the values of the parameters depend somewhat strongly on the considered theoretical approach and on the assumption about the parametrization of the nuclear density distribution. The obtained values of root-mean-square radii (R{sub rms}) for stable nuclei with atomic weights A=12-40 vary by approximately 0.1 fm when calculated in the optical approximation, in the rigid target approximation, and using the exact expression of the Glauber theory. We present several examples of R{sub rms} radii calculations using these three theoretical approaches and compare these results with the data obtained from electron-nucleus scattering.

  18. Pion and Kaon Lab Frame Differential Cross Sections for Intermediate Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes require accurate models for hadron production in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Codes require cross sections to be written in terms of lab frame variables and it is important to be able to verify models against experimental data in the lab frame. Several models are compared to lab frame data. It is found that models based on algebraic parameterizations are unable to describe intermediate energy differential cross section data. However, simple thermal model parameterizations, when appropriately transformed from the center of momentum to the lab frame, are able to account for the data.

  19. Electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions relating to space radiation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Most of the papers within this report deal with electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions which are of concern in the space radiation program. In particular, the removal of one and two nucleons via both electromagnetic and strong interaction processes has been extensively investigated. The theory of relativistic Coulomb fission has also been developed. Several papers on quark models also appear. Finally, note that the theoretical methods developed in this work have been directly applied to the task of radiation protection of astronauts. This has been done by parameterizing the theoretical formalism in such a fashion that it can be used in cosmic ray transport codes.

  20. Observation of direct hadronic pairs in nucleus-nucleus collisions in JACEE emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.

    1985-01-01

    In a number of high energy ( or = 1 TeV/amu) nucleus-nucleus collisions observed in Japanese-American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment (JACEE) emulsion chambers, nonrandom spatial association of produced charged particles, mostly hadronic pairs, are observed. Similar narrow pairs are observed in about 100 events at much low energy (20 to 60 GeV/amu). Analysis shows that 30 to 50% of Pair abundances are understood by the Hambury-Brown-Twiss effect, and the remainder seems to require other explanations.

  1. The Checkerboard Model of the Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore

    2014-03-01

    The Lach Checker Board Model (CBM) of the nucleus and the associated ESM predicts that nature has 5 generations of quarks not 3. The heaviest generation in the Extended Standard Model (ESM) has a t' quark of mass 65 GeV and a b' quark of 42.4 GeV. The lepton in this generation has a mass of 27 GeV. Part of this theory evolved because it appears that the quarks and lepton of each generation have masses related by the geometric mean. The Geometric mean of 65 and 27 is 42. Charge is conserved (+2/3 and -1 is -1/3). Details of how this theory evolved is found on my web site (http://checkerboard.dnsalias.net) or in the following references [T.M. Lach, Checkerboard Structure of the Nucleus, Infinite Energy, Vol. 5, issue 30, (2000); T.M. Lach, Masses of the Sub-Nuclear Particles, nucl-th/0008026, @http://xxx.lanl.gov/] One independent check of this CB model is that the wavelength of the ``up'' quark orbiting inside the proton at 84.8123% the speed of light around the ``dn'' quark in the center turns out to be exactly one DeBroglie wavelength. This explains the mass of the proton and neutron and their magnetic moments. This along with the beautiful symmetric 2D structure of the He nucleus led to the evolution of this theory. One would expect a t'-anti t' meson of mass of about 130 GeV.

  2. Surface Photometric Variation of Comet Borrelly's Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; A'Hearn, M. F.; McFadden, L. A.

    2004-11-01

    Comet Borrelly was visited by Deep Space 1 in Sept. 2001 (Soderblom et al. 2004) The images of comet Borrelly's nucleus show large brightness variation over the surface even after the effect of shape is taken into account (Oberst et al. 2004, Kirk et al. 2004). It is not yet known whether this variation is caused by albedo variation (Oberst et al. 2004, Buratti et al. 2004) or the variation of other physical properties such as surface roughness (Kirk et al. 2004) or solar phase function. In our analysis, the disk-resolved images from the DS1 spacecraft (Soderblom et al. 2004) were used, coupled with the shape model of Borrelly's nucleus developed from stereo imaging (Oberst et al. 2004, Kirk et al. 2004), to fit the bidirectional reflectance as a function of local illumination and viewing geometry for individual terrains as defined by Britt et al. (2004). Results show that the surface reflectance variation is, contrary to previous interpretations, most likely due to the combination of albedo variation (a factor of 1.5) and the variation of the asymmetry factor (g) of the single-particle phase function. We find the roughness parameter (theta_bar) is <25o over the surface. The surface on Borrelly's nucleus can be highly back-scattering (g <= -0.7) for mottled terrain, and close to isotropic scattering (g -0.15) for smooth terrain, with single scattering albedo ranging from 0.05 to 0.07. This work is supported by NASA grant NNG04GA92G.

  3. Dust activity of Comet Halley's nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, H. U.; Delamere, W. A.; Huebner, W. F.; Reitsema, H.; Schmidt, H. U.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Whipple, Fred L.; Wilhelm, K.

    1986-01-01

    Images obtained by the Halley multicolor camera using the clear filter with a pass band from 300 to 1000 nm were used to study dust activity in the comet nucleus. Comparisons with ground based observations confirm that dust production towards the Sun increases in activity relative to the southern background source while the Giotto spacecraft was approaching. This is in agreement with the assumption that the sunward activity becomes stronger when the source rotates towards the Sun. Estimated dust column density is 90 billion/sqm, with optical thickness less than or = 0.3. Surface reflectivity is less than 1%, indicating a very rough surface with large fractions of shadowed areas.

  4. [The perichromatin compartment of the cell nucleus].

    PubMed

    Bogoliubov, D S

    2014-01-01

    In this review, the data on the structure and composition of the perichromatin compartment, a special border area between the condensed chromatin and the interchromatin space of the cell nucleus, are discussed in the light of the concept of nuclear functions in complex nuclear architectonics. Morphological features, molecular composition and functions of main extrachromosomal structures of the perichromatin compartment, perichromatin fibrils (PFs) and perichromatin granules (PGs) including nuclear stress-bodies (nSBs) that are derivates of the PGs under heat shock, are presented. A special attention was paid to the features of the molecular compositions of PFs and PGs in different cell types and at different physiological conditions.

  5. Interplay between Fe 3d and Ce 4f magnetism and Kondo interaction in CeFeAs(1-x)P(x)O probed by 75As and 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, R; Baenitz, M; Jesche, A; Geibel, C; Steglich, F

    2012-04-04

    A detailed (31)P (I = 1/2) and (75)As (I = 3/2) NMR study on polycrystalline CeFeAs(1-x)P(x)O alloys is presented. The magnetism of CeFeAsO changes drastically upon P substitution on the As site. CeFePO is a heavy fermion system without long-range order whereas CeFeAsO exhibits an Fe 3d SDW type of ordering accompanied by a structural transition from tetragonal (TT) to orthorhombic (OT) structure. Furthermore, Ce 4f(1) orders antiferromagnetically (AFM) at low temperature. At the critical concentration where the Fe magnetism is diminished the Ce-Ce interaction changes to a ferromagnetic (FM) type of ordering. Three representative samples of the CeFeAs(1-x)P(x)O (x = 0.05, 0.3 and 0.9) series are systematically investigated. (1) For the x = 0.05 alloy a drastic change of the linewidth at 130 K indicates the AFM-SDW type of ordering of Fe and the structural change from the TT to the OT phase. The linewidth roughly measures the internal field in the ordered state and the transition is most likely first order. The small and nearly constant shift from (31)P and (75)As NMR suggests the presence of competing hyperfine interactions between the nuclear spins and the 4f and 3d ions of Ce and Fe. (2) For the x = 0.3 alloy, the evolution of the Fe-SDW type of order takes place at around 70 K corroborating the results of bulk measurement and μSR. Here we found evidence for phase separation of paramagnetic and magnetic SDW phases. (3) In contrast to the heavy fermion CeFePO for the x = 0.9 alloy a phase transition is found at 2 K. The field-dependent NMR shift gives evidence of FM ordering. Above the ordering the spin-lattice relaxation rate (31)(1/T(1)) shows unconventional, non-Korringa-like behaviour which indicates a complex interplay of Kondo and FM fluctuations.

  6. Nuclear mean field and double-folding model of the nucleus-nucleus optical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoa, Dao T.; Phuc, Nguyen Hoang; Loan, Doan Thi; Loc, Bui Minh

    2016-09-01

    Realistic density dependent CDM3Yn versions of the M3Y interaction have been used in an extended Hartree-Fock (HF) calculation of nuclear matter (NM), with the nucleon single-particle potential determined from the total NM energy based on the Hugenholtz-van Hove theorem that gives rise naturally to a rearrangement term (RT). Using the RT of the single-nucleon potential obtained exactly at different NM densities, the density and energy dependence of the CDM3Yn interactions was modified to account properly for both the RT and observed energy dependence of the nucleon optical potential. Based on a local density approximation, the double-folding model of the nucleus-nucleus optical potential has been extended to take into account consistently the rearrangement effect and energy dependence of the nuclear mean-field potential, using the modified CDM3Yn interactions. The extended double-folding model was applied to study the elastic 12C+12C and 16O+12C scattering at the refractive energies, where the Airy structure of the nuclear rainbow has been well established. The RT was found to affect significantly the real nucleus-nucleus optical potential at small internuclear distances, giving a potential strength close to that implied by the realistic optical model description of the Airy oscillation.

  7. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Robert G.; Thompson, Roger C.; Starchville, Thomas F., Jr.; Adams, C.; Aldo, A.; Dobson, K.; Flotta, C.; Gagliardino, J.; Lear, M.; Mcmillan, C.

    1992-01-01

    During the 1991-92 academic year, the Pennsylvania State University has developed three sample return missions: one to the nucleus of comet Wild 2, one to the asteroid Eros, and one to three asteroids located in the Main Belt. The primary objective of the comet nucleus sample return mission is to rendezvous with a short period comet and acquire a 10 kg sample for return to Earth. Upon rendezvous with the comet, a tethered coring and sampler drill will contact the surface and extract a two-meter core sample from the target site. Before the spacecraft returns to Earth, a monitoring penetrator containing scientific instruments will be deployed for gathering long-term data about the comet. A single asteroid sample return mission to the asteroid 433 Eros (chosen for proximity and launch opportunities) will extract a sample from the asteroid surface for return to Earth. To limit overall mission cost, most of the mission design uses current technologies, except the sampler drill design. The multiple asteroid sample return mission could best be characterized through its use of future technology including an optical communications system, a nuclear power reactor, and a low-thrust propulsion system. A low-thrust trajectory optimization code (QuickTop 2) obtained from the NASA LeRC helped in planning the size of major subsystem components, as well as the trajectory between targets.

  8. Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation Modulates Thalamic Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weidong; Russo, Gary S.; Hashimoto, Takao; Zhang, Jianyu; Vitek, Jerrold L.

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective tool for the treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease. The mechanism by which STN DBS elicits its beneficial effect, however, remains unclear. We previously reported STN stimulation increased the rate and produced a more regular and periodic pattern of neuronal activity in the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi). Here we extend our observations to neurons in the pallidal (ventralis lateralis pars oralis (VLo) and ventralis anterior (VA)) and cerebellar (ventralis lateralis posterior pars oralis (VPLo)) receiving areas of the motor thalamus during STN DBS. Stimulation parameters that produced improvement in rigidity and bradykinesia resulted in changes in the pattern and power of oscillatory activity of neuronal activity that were similar in both regions of the motor thalamus. Neurons in both VA/VLo and VPLo tended to become more periodic and regular with a shift in oscillatory activity from low to high frequencies. Burst activity was reduced in VA/VLo, but was not significantly changed in VPLo. There was also a significant shift in the population of VA/VLo neurons that were inhibited during STN DBS, while VPLo neurons tended to be activated. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that STN DBS increases output from the nucleus and produces a change in the pattern and periodicity of neuronal activity in the basal ganglia thalamic network, and that these changes include cerebellar pathways likely via activation of adjacent cerebello-thalamic fiber bundles. PMID:19005057

  9. On M31's Double Nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, B. F.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The recent HST discovery of a double nucleus in M31 brings into prominence the question how long, a second core can survive within the nuclear regions of a galaxy. Physical conditions in the nuclear regions of a typical galaxy help a second core survive, so it can orbit for a long time. possibly for thousands of orbits. Given the nearly uniform mass density in a core, tidal forces within a core radius are compressive in all directions and help the core survive the buffeting it takes as it orbits near the center of the galaxy. We use numerical experiments to illustrate these physical principles. Our method allows the full power of the experiments to be concentrated on the nuclear regions. Spatial resolution of about 0.2 pc comfortably resolves detail within the 1.4 parsec core radius of the second, but brighter core (P1) in M31. We use these physical principles to discuss M31's double nucleus, but they apply to other galaxies as well. and in other astronomical situations such as dumbbell galaxies. galaxies orbiting near the center of a galaxy cluster, and subclustering in galaxy clusters. The experiments also illustrate that galaxy encounters and merging are quite sensitive to external tidal forces, such as those produced by the gravitational potential in a group or cluster of galaxies.

  10. Spectrin repeat proteins in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Young, Kevin G; Kothary, Rashmi

    2005-02-01

    Spectrin repeat sequences are among the more common repeat elements identified in proteins, typically occurring in large structural proteins. Examples of spectrin repeat-containing proteins include dystrophin, alpha-actinin and spectrin itself--all proteins with well-demonstrated roles of establishing and maintaining cell structure. Over the past decade, it has become clear that, although these proteins display a cytoplasmic and plasma membrane distribution, several are also found both at the nuclear envelope, and within the intranuclear space. In this review, we provide an overview of recent work regarding various spectrin repeat-containing structural proteins in the nucleus. As well, we hypothesize about the regulation of their nuclear localization and possible nuclear functions based on domain architecture, known interacting proteins and evolutionary relationships. Given their large size, and their potential for interacting with multiple proteins and with chromatin, spectrin repeat-containing proteins represent strong candidates for important organizational proteins within the nucleus. Supplementary material for this article can be found on the BioEssays website (http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0265-9247/suppmat/index.html).

  11. Odyssey Comet Nucleus Orbiter: The Next Step in Cometary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, P. R.; Nilsen, E. N.; Smythe, W. D.; Marriott, J.; Reinert, R.

    2001-01-01

    Cometary nuclei are the most primitive bodies in the solar system, containing a cosmo-chemical record of the primordial solar nebula. Flyby missions to comets, such as those that encountered Comet Halley in 1986, provide a glimpse at this record. However, to study a cometary nucleus in detail requires a rendezvous mission, i.e., a nucleus orbiter. Only an orbiter provides the ability to map the entire nucleus surface at high resolution, to study the complex chemistry in the cometary coma and its variation with time, and to determine the mass and bulk density of the nucleus, key parameters in understanding how small bodies first formed in the solar nebula. A nucleus orbiter also provides the opportunity to sense the nucleus surface in preparation for more ambitious landing and sample return missions in the future. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. A search for ϕ meson nucleus bound state using antiproton annihilation on nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, H.; Bühler, P.; Cargnelli, M.; Curceanu, C.; Guaraldo, C.; Hartmann, O.; Hicks, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Kienle, P.; Marton, J.; Muto, R.; Naruki, M.; Niiyama, M.; Noumi, H.; Okada, S.; Vidal, A. Romero; Sakaguchi, A.; Sakuma, F.; Sawada, S.; Sirghi, D.; Sirghi, F.; Suzuki, K.; Tsukada, K.; Doce, O. Vazquez; Widmann, E.; Yokkaichi, S.; Zmeskal, J.

    The mass shift of the vector mesons in nuclei is known to be a powerful tool for investigating the mechanism of generating hadron mass from the QCD vacuum. The mechanism is known to be the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. In 2007, KEK-PS E325 experiment reported about 3.4 % mass reduction of the ϕ meson in medium-heavy nuclei (Cu). This result is possibly one of the indications of the partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclei, however, unfortunately it is hard to make strong conclusions from the data. One of the ways to conclude the strength of the ϕ meson mass shift in nuclei will be by trying to produce only slowly moving ϕ mesons where the maximum nuclear matter effect can be probed. The observed mass reduction of the ϕ meson in the nucleus can be translated as the existence of an attractive force between ϕ meson and nucleus. Thus, one of the extreme conditions that can be achieved in the laboratory is indeed the formation of a ϕ-nucleus bound state, where the ϕ meson is "trapped" in the nucleus. The purpose of the experiment is to search for a ϕ-nucleus bound state and measure the binding energy of the system. We will demonstrate that a completely background-free missing-mass spectrum can be obtained efficiently by (bar{p}, φ) spectroscopy together with K + Λ tagging, using the primary reaction channel bar{p} p rightarrow φ φ. This paper gives an overview of the physics motivation and the detector concept, and explains the direction of the initial research and development effort.

  13. A search for ϕ meson nucleus bound state using antiproton annihilation on nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, H.; Bühler, P.; Cargnelli, M.; Curceanu, C.; Guaraldo, C.; Hartmann, O.; Hicks, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Kienle, P.; Marton, J.; Muto, R.; Naruki, M.; Niiyama, M.; Noumi, H.; Okada, S.; Vidal, A. Romero; Sakaguchi, A.; Sakuma, F.; Sawada, S.; Sirghi, D.; Sirghi, F.; Suzuki, K.; Tsukada, K.; Doce, O. Vazquez; Widmann, E.; Yokkaichi, S.; Zmeskal, J.

    2012-12-01

    The mass shift of the vector mesons in nuclei is known to be a powerful tool for investigating the mechanism of generating hadron mass from the QCD vacuum. The mechanism is known to be the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. In 2007, KEK-PS E325 experiment reported about 3.4 % mass reduction of the ϕ meson in medium-heavy nuclei (Cu). This result is possibly one of the indications of the partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclei, however, unfortunately it is hard to make strong conclusions from the data. One of the ways to conclude the strength of the ϕ meson mass shift in nuclei will be by trying to produce only slowly moving ϕ mesons where the maximum nuclear matter effect can be probed. The observed mass reduction of the ϕ meson in the nucleus can be translated as the existence of an attractive force between ϕ meson and nucleus. Thus, one of the extreme conditions that can be achieved in the laboratory is indeed the formation of a ϕ-nucleus bound state, where the ϕ meson is "trapped" in the nucleus. The purpose of the experiment is to search for a ϕ-nucleus bound state and measure the binding energy of the system. We will demonstrate that a completely background-free missing-mass spectrum can be obtained efficiently by (bar{p}, φ) spectroscopy together with K + Λ tagging, using the primary reaction channel bar{p} p rightarrow φ φ. This paper gives an overview of the physics motivation and the detector concept, and explains the direction of the initial research and development effort.

  14. Catalytic mechanism of α-phosphate attack in dUTPase is revealed by X-ray crystallographic snapshots of distinct intermediates, 31P-NMR spectroscopy and reaction path modelling.

    PubMed

    Barabás, Orsolya; Németh, Veronika; Bodor, Andrea; Perczel, András; Rosta, Edina; Kele, Zoltán; Zagyva, Imre; Szabadka, Zoltán; Grolmusz, Vince I; Wilmanns, Matthias; Vértessy, Beáta G

    2013-12-01

    Enzymatic synthesis and hydrolysis of nucleoside phosphate compounds play a key role in various biological pathways, like signal transduction, DNA synthesis and metabolism. Although these processes have been studied extensively, numerous key issues regarding the chemical pathway and atomic movements remain open for many enzymatic reactions. Here, using the Mason-Pfizer monkey retrovirus dUTPase, we study the dUTPase-catalyzed hydrolysis of dUTP, an incorrect DNA building block, to elaborate the mechanistic details at high resolution. Combining mass spectrometry analysis of the dUTPase-catalyzed reaction carried out in and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulation, we show that the nucleophilic attack occurs at the α-phosphate site. Phosphorus-31 NMR spectroscopy ((31)P-NMR) analysis confirms the site of attack and shows the capability of dUTPase to cleave the dUTP analogue α,β-imido-dUTP, containing the imido linkage usually regarded to be non-hydrolyzable. We present numerous X-ray crystal structures of distinct dUTPase and nucleoside phosphate complexes, which report on the progress of the chemical reaction along the reaction coordinate. The presently used combination of diverse structural methods reveals details of the nucleophilic attack and identifies a novel enzyme-product complex structure.

  15. Liquid-liquid extraction of metal ions by neutral phosphoramides. Part I. Extraction of uranyl ions from nitrate and sulphate media. Examination of extracted species by UV/VIS and {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodehueser, L.; Rubini, P.R.; Bokolo, K.; Laakel, N.; Delpuech, J.J.

    1992-09-01

    The extraction of uranyl nitrate and uranyl sulphate from aqueous media by the neutral chelating diphosphoramides CH{sub 3}-N[P(O)(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}]{sub 2} (NIPA) and its less hydrophilic homologs R-N[P(O)(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}]{sub 2} (R = -C{sub 12}H{sub 25} (ODIPA) or -C{sub 16}H{sub 33} (OHDIPA)), diluted in CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2} or toluene, has been studied. In the presence of HNO{sub 3}, NaNO{sub 3}, NaCl, and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} as salting-out agents, extraction is generally excellent. Some of the extracted complex species have been identified by comparing their {sup 31}P NMR and UV/vis spectra with those of pure complexes of known structure. The results are compared with extractions using tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) as the complexing agent. 20 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. In vitro and in silico investigations of disc nucleus replacement.

    PubMed

    Reitmaier, Sandra; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Bashkuev, Maxim; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Gloria, Antonio; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2012-08-07

    Currently, numerous hydrogels are under examination as potential nucleus replacements. The clinical success, however, depends on how well the mechanical function of the host structure is restored. This study aimed to evaluate the extent to and mechanisms by which surgery for nucleus replacements influence the mechanical behaviour of the disc. The effects of an annulus defect with and without nucleus replacement on disc height and nucleus pressure were measured using 24 ovine motion segments. The following cases were considered: intact; annulus incision repaired by suture and glue; annulus incision with removal and re-implantation of nucleus tissue repaired by suture and glue or plug. To identify the likely mechanisms observed in vitro, a finite-element model of a human disc (L4-L5) was employed. Both studies were subjected to physiological cycles of compression and recovery. A repaired annulus defect did not influence the disc behaviour in vitro, whereas additional nucleus removal and replacement substantially decreased disc stiffness and nucleus pressure. Model predictions demonstrated the substantial effects of reductions in replaced nucleus water content, bulk modulus and osmotic potential on disc height loss and pressure, similar to measurements. In these events, the compression load transfer in the disc markedly altered by substantially increasing the load on the annulus when compared with the nucleus. The success of hydrogels for nucleus replacements is not only dependent on the implant material itself but also on the restoration of the environment perturbed during surgery. The substantial effects on the disc response of disruptions owing to nucleus replacements can be simulated by reduced nucleus water content, elastic modulus and osmotic potential.

  17. In vitro and in silico investigations of disc nucleus replacement

    PubMed Central

    Reitmaier, Sandra; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Bashkuev, Maxim; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Gloria, Antonio; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Currently, numerous hydrogels are under examination as potential nucleus replacements. The clinical success, however, depends on how well the mechanical function of the host structure is restored. This study aimed to evaluate the extent to and mechanisms by which surgery for nucleus replacements influence the mechanical behaviour of the disc. The effects of an annulus defect with and without nucleus replacement on disc height and nucleus pressure were measured using 24 ovine motion segments. The following cases were considered: intact; annulus incision repaired by suture and glue; annulus incision with removal and re-implantation of nucleus tissue repaired by suture and glue or plug. To identify the likely mechanisms observed in vitro, a finite-element model of a human disc (L4–L5) was employed. Both studies were subjected to physiological cycles of compression and recovery. A repaired annulus defect did not influence the disc behaviour in vitro, whereas additional nucleus removal and replacement substantially decreased disc stiffness and nucleus pressure. Model predictions demonstrated the substantial effects of reductions in replaced nucleus water content, bulk modulus and osmotic potential on disc height loss and pressure, similar to measurements. In these events, the compression load transfer in the disc markedly altered by substantially increasing the load on the annulus when compared with the nucleus. The success of hydrogels for nucleus replacements is not only dependent on the implant material itself but also on the restoration of the environment perturbed during surgery. The substantial effects on the disc response of disruptions owing to nucleus replacements can be simulated by reduced nucleus water content, elastic modulus and osmotic potential. PMID:22337630

  18. Dynamic exchange between the covalent and dative metal-metal bonded isomers of the heterodinuclear complex (NiPd(CNMe) sub 3 (dppm) sub 2 )(PF sub 6 ) sub 2 by sup 31 P l brace sup 1 H r brace NOESY

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Jinfeng; Kubiak, C.P. )

    1990-10-17

    The first quantitative dynamic study by {sup 31}P({sup 1}H) Nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY) is described herein. The exchange between a pair of isomers of the complex (NiPd(CNMe){sub 3}(dppm){sub 2})(PF{sub 6}){sub 2} that differ in their mode of metal-metal bonding has been measured. The {sup 31}P({sup 1}H) NOSEY for this complex is ascribed to the relatively slow interconversion between the covalent and dative Ni-Pd bonded isomers. 13 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sherwood

    1997-12-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted by the Program Committee for presentation at the Workshop on Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples, held in Milpitas, California, January 16-18, 1989. Conveners are Sherwood Chang (NASA Ames Research Center) and Larry Nyquist (NASA Johnson Space Center). Program Committee members are Thomas Ahrens (ex-officio; California Institute of Technology), Lou Allamandola (NASA Ames Research Center), David Blake (NASA Ames Research Center), Donald Brownlee (University of Washington, Seattle), Theodore E. Bunch (NASA Ames Research Center), Humberto Campins (Planetary Science Institute), Jeff Cuzzi (NASA Ames Research Center), Eberhard Griin (Max-Plank-Institut fiir Kemphysik), Martha Hanner (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Alan Harris (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), John Kerrid-e (University of Califomia, Los Angeles), Yves Langevin (University of Paris), Gerhard Schwehm (ESTEC), and Paul Weissman (Jet Propulsion Laboratory). Logistics and administrative support for the workshop were provided by the Lunar and Planetary Institute Projects Office.

  20. Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1983-10-01

    The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta ..delta..(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe ..delta..-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented. (WHK)

  1. In situ hybridization of suprachiasmatic nucleus slices.

    PubMed

    de la Iglesia, Horacio O

    2007-01-01

    The progress in the understanding of the molecular machinery of mammalian circadian clocks, in combination with the well-established role of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) as a master circadian clock, has provided an invaluable system for the study of the molecular basis of circadian rhythmicity. Using in situ hybridization (ISH) techniques that label specific clock-gene mRNAs within the SCN, researchers can now elucidate the core molecular oscillatory mechanisms underlying specific circadian physiological and behavioral phenotypes. In this chapter, two methods for ISH within the SCN are described. The first method is based on the fluorescent labeling of mRNA and is suitable for confocal microscopy analysis and double labeling techniques. The second method is based on the radioactive labeling of mRNA and is more sensitive and more adequate for the relative quantification of mRNA species.

  2. The nucleus of the Cygnus A galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestergaard, M.; Barthel, P. D.

    1993-02-01

    New obtained high resolution optical images of the prototypical luminous radio galaxy Cygnus A (3C 405) indicate an inhomogeneous distribution of obscuring dust and, in combination with previous data, three types of radiation (stellar and blue featureless continuum as well as luminous line emission) in its central regions. The alleged double nucleus finds its origin in heavy obscuration coupled to excess line emission in the central regions of an otherwise normal giant elliptical galaxy. A strongly reddened nuclear component, coincident with the Cygnus A radio core, is found to emit faint but concentrated narrow line emission. All data appear consistent with identification of Cygnus A as a radio-loud quasar having its radio axis oriented at about 35 deg from the sky plane. The presumed dust torus obscuring the quasar continuum is inferred to be smaller than 800 parsec.

  3. Nature of multiple-nucleus cluster galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, D.

    1984-05-01

    In models for the evolution of galaxy clusters which include dynamical friction with the dark binding matter, the distribution of galaxies becomes more concentrated to the cluster center with time. In a cluster like Coma, this evolution could increase by a factor of approximately 3 the probability of finding a galaxy very close to the cluster center, without decreasing the typical velocity of such a galaxy significantly below the cluster mean. Such an enhancement is roughly what is needed to explain the large number of first-ranked cluster galaxies which are observed to have extra ''nuclei''; it is also consistent with the high velocities typically measured for these ''nuclei.'' Unlike the cannibalism model, this model predicts that the majority of multiple-nucleus systems are transient phenomena, and not galaxies in the process of merging.

  4. Nucleus of Comet P/Arend-Rigaux

    SciTech Connect

    Brooke, T.Y.; Knacke, R.F.

    1986-07-01

    Photometry data at 1-20 microns taken of Comet P/Arend-Rigaux are reported. The observations were carried out to test the possibility of observing the nuclei of low activity, nearly extinct comets at visible and IR wavelengths. The data were collected in February 1985 using the NASA 3 m IR telescope on Mauna Kea. The comet was at 1.67 AU heliocentric distance at the time. Attempts were made to detect rotation of the core on the bases of variations in the J, H and K light curves. The images obtained were those of a rotating nucleus with a radius of 4.0-6.2 km surrounded by a faint coma. The comet had a geometric albedo of 0.01-0.03 and a near-IR red slope that exhibited no evidence of the presence of ice. 32 references.

  5. Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sherwood (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted by the Program Committee for presentation at the Workshop on Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples, held in Milpitas, California, January 16-18, 1989. Conveners are Sherwood Chang (NASA Ames Research Center) and Larry Nyquist (NASA Johnson Space Center). Program Committee members are Thomas Ahrens (ex-officio; California Institute of Technology), Lou Allamandola (NASA Ames Research Center), David Blake (NASA Ames Research Center), Donald Brownlee (University of Washington, Seattle), Theodore E. Bunch (NASA Ames Research Center), Humberto Campins (Planetary Science Institute), Jeff Cuzzi (NASA Ames Research Center), Eberhard Griin (Max-Plank-Institut fiir Kemphysik), Martha Hanner (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Alan Harris (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), John Kerrid-e (University of Califomia, Los Angeles), Yves Langevin (University of Paris), Gerhard Schwehm (ESTEC), and Paul Weissman (Jet Propulsion Laboratory). Logistics and administrative support for the workshop were provided by the Lunar and Planetary Institute Projects Office.

  6. Novel associated hydrogels for nucleus pulposus replacement.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jonathan; Lowman, Anthony; Marcolongo, Michele

    2003-12-15

    Hydrogels of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) blends may provide a material suitable for replacement of the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc. This research examined the stability of these hydrogels under simulated physiological conditions. Polymer dissolution and stability were characterized over 120 days immersion, chemical surface analysis over 56 days immersion, and tensile mechanical behavior over 56 days immersion. Rubber elasticity theory was used by combining mechanical results with swelling data to calculate network characteristics such as the molecular weight between physical crosslinks and density of crosslinks. Properties were examined as a function of PVA/PVP composition as well as PVA molecular weight and PVP molecular weight. Results indicated that PVA/PVP blends prepared with moderate amounts of PVP (0.5-5%) resulted in a polymer network stabilized through interchain hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl groups on PVA chains and carbonyl groups on PVP chains. Most notably, a significant decrease in percentage of polymer mass loss was seen for blends prepared with 143K molecular weight PVA. Surface chemical analysis revealed that PVP unincorporated in the network structure suffered significant dissolution out of the polymer network and into solution. The molecular weight of PVA and PVP were shown to have a significant influence on the blends' network properties. Gels prepared with lower molecular weight PVA resulted in a more stable blend containing a higher density of crosslinks. However, blends prepared with a higher molecular weight PVA showed superior polymer network stability in dissolution studies. The blend that had the best combination of network stability under physiological conditions and a relatively tight, stable, and crosslinked network was prepared with 99% PVA (143K) and 1% PVP (40K). This material is proposed as an implant material for replacement of the degenerated nucleus pulposus.

  7. Nonlinear osmotic properties of the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Finan, John D.; Chalut, Kevin J.; Wax, Adam; Guilak, Farshid

    2009-01-01

    Summary In the absence of active volume regulation processes, cell volume is inversely proportional to osmolarity, as predicted by the Boyle Van’t Hoff relation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that nuclear volume has a similar relationship with extracellular osmolarity in articular chondrocytes, cells that are exposed to changes in the osmotic environment in vivo, and furthermore, we explored the mechanism of the relationships between osmolarity and nuclear size and shape. Nuclear size was quantified using two independent techniques, confocal laser scanning microscopy and angle-resolved low coherence interferometry. Nuclear volume was osmotically-sensitive but this relationship was not linear, showing a decline in the osmotic sensitivity in the hypo-osmotic range. Nuclear shape was also influenced by extracellular osmolarity, becoming smoother as the osmolarity decreased. The osmotically-induced changes in nuclear size paralleled the changes in nuclear shape, suggesting that shape and volume are interdependent. The osmotic sensitivity of shape and volume persisted after disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. Isolated nuclei contracted in response to physiologic changes in macromolecule concentration but not in response to physiologic changes in ion concentration, suggesting solute size has an important influence on the osmotic pressurization of the nucleus. This finding in turn implies that the diffusion barrier that causes osmotic effects is not a semi-permeable membrane, but rather due to size constraints that prevent large solute molecules from entering small spaces in the nucleus. As nuclear morphology has been associated previously with cell phenotype, these findings may provide new insight into the role of mechanical and osmotic signals in regulating cell physiology. PMID:19107599

  8. Pedunculopontine nucleus evoked potentials from subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Neagu, Bogdan; Tsang, Eric; Mazzella, Filomena; Hamani, Clement; Moro, Elena; Hodaie, Mojgan; Lozano, Andres M; Chen, Robert

    2013-12-01

    The effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation on the pedunculopontine nucleus area (PPNR) evoked activities were examined in two patients with Parkinson's disease. The patients had previously undergone bilateral STN deep brain stimulation (DBS) and subsequently received unilateral DBS electrodes in the PPNR. Evoked potentials were recorded from the local field potentials (LFP) from the PPNR with STN stimulation at different frequencies and bipolar contacts. Ipsilateral and contralateral short latency (<2ms) PPNR responses were evoked from left but not from right STN stimulation. In both patients, STN stimulation evoked contralateral PPNR responses at medium latencies between 41 and 45ms. Cortical evoked potentials to single pulse STN stimulation were observed at latencies between 18 and 27ms. These results demonstrate a functional connection between the STN and the PPNR. It likely involves direct projections between the STN and PPNR or polysynaptic pathways with thalamic or cortical relays.

  9. Experimental evidence and the Landau-Zener promotion in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cindro, N.; Freeman, R.M.; Haas, F.

    1986-04-01

    Recent data from C+O collisions are analyzed in terms of the Landau-Zener promotion in nuclei. Evidence for the presence of this mechanism in nuclear collisions is of considerable interest, since it provides a signature of single-particle orbitals in molecular-type potentials and, at the same time, paves the way to a microscopic understanding of the collision dynamics, in particular of the energy dissipation rate. The analyzed data are of two types: integrated cross sections and angular distributions of inelastically scattered particles. The first set of data shows structure qualitatively consistent with recent calculations of the Landau-Zener effect; for this set of data no other reasonable explanation is presently available. The second set of data, while consistent with the presence of the Landau-Zener promotion, is examined in terms of other possible explanations too. The combined data show evidence favoring the presence of the Landau-Zener promotion in nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  10. Fluctuation analysis of relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1988-01-01

    An analytical technique was developed for identifying enhanced fluctuations in the angular distributions of secondary particles produced from relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The method is applied under the assumption that the masses of the produced particles are small compared to their linear momenta. The importance of particles rests in the fact that enhanced fluctuations in the rapidity distributions is considered to be an experimental signal for the creation of the quark-gluon-plasma (QGP), a state of nuclear matter predicted from the quantum chromodynamics theory (QCD). In the approach, Monte Carlo simulations are employed that make use of a portable random member generator that allow the calculations to be performed on a desk-top computer. The method is illustrated with data taken from high altitude emulsion exposures and is immediately applicable to similar data from accelerator-based emulsion exposures.

  11. A 0.31pJ/Conversion-Step 12-Bit 100MS/s 0.13μm CMOS A/D Converter for 3G Communication Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Ju; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Myung-Hwan; Lee, Seung-Hoon

    This work describes a 12-bit 100MS/s 0.13μm CMOS ADC for 3G wireless communication systems such as two-carrier W-CDMA applications. The proposed ADC employs a four-step pipeline architecture to optimize power consumption and chip area at the target resolution and sampling rate. Area-efficient gate-bootstrapped sampling switches of the input SHA maintain high signal linearity over the Nyquist rate even at a 1.0V supply. The cascode compensation using a low-impedance feedback path in two-stage amplifiers of the SHA and MDACs achieves the required conversion speed and phase margin with less power consumption and area compared to the Miller compensation. A low-glitch dynamic latch in the sub-ranging flash ADCs reduces kickback noise referred to the input of comparator by isolating the pre-amplifier from the regeneration latch output. The proposed on-chip current and voltage references are based on triple negative TC circuits. The prototype ADC in a 0.13μm 1P8M CMOS technology demonstrates the measured DNL and INL within 0.38LSB and 0.96LSB at 12-bit, respectively. The ADC shows a maximum SNDR and SFDR of 64.5dB and 78.0dB at 100MS/s, respectively. The ADC with an active die area of 1.22mm2 consumes 42.0mW at 100MS/s and a 1.2V supply, corresponding to a figure-of-merit of 0.31pJ/conversion-step.

  12. Magnetism of the spin-trimer compound CaNi 3(P 2O 7)2: Microscopic insight from combined 31P NMR and first-principles studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, M.; Kanungo, S.; Ghoshray, A.; Ghosh, M.; Ghoshray, K.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetization, 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study, and first-principles electronic structure calculations have been performed in the spin-1 trimer chain compound CaNi3(P2O7 )2. Two separate spectra arising from magnetically and crystallographically inequivalent P sites are observed. In the ordered state, the resonance lines for both the P sites (P1 and P2) are found to be split into two, which is clear microscopic evidence of the development of two-sublattice AFM order below TM. A nonnegligible contribution of ferromagnetic hyperfine field and dipolar field have also been seen in the ordered state. The first-principles calculations show that the intratrimer (J1) and intertrimer interactions (J2) are of weak ferromagnetic type with the values 2.85 and 1.49 meV, respectively, whereas the interchain interaction (J3) is of strong antiferromagnetic type with a value of 5.63 meV. The anisotropy of the imaginary part of dynamical spin susceptibility around TM along with the exponential decrement of 1 /T1 below TM indicate the probable participation of the Ni -3 d electron's orbital degrees of freedom in the ferrimagnetic transition. The dominance of orbital fluctuations over the spin fluctuations seems to be responsible for showing low value of the binding energy u of the local spin configuration (estimated from local spin models) and an unusually weak exponent in the power-law behavior of 1 /T1 below 50 K, in the paramagnetic state. Electronic structure calculations also reveal the importance of orbital degrees of freedom of Ni -3 d moments, which is consistent with our NMR data analysis.

  13. Nucleus and nucleus-cytoskeleton connections in 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lingling; Luo, Qing; Sun, Jinghui; Song, Guanbin

    2016-10-15

    Cell migration plays an important role in many physiological and pathological settings, ranging from embryonic development to cancer metastasis. Currently, accumulating data suggest that cells migrating in three-dimensional (3D) environments show well-defined differences compared to their well-established two-dimensional (2D) counterparts. During 3D migration, the cell body and nucleus must deform to allow cellular passage through the available spaces, and the deformability of the relatively rigid nucleus may constitute a limiting step. Here, we highlight the key evidence regarding the role of the nuclear mechanics in 3D migration, including the molecular components that govern the stiffness of the nucleus and review how the nuclear dynamics are connected to and controlled by cytoskeleton-based migration machinery. Intriguingly, nuclear movement must be coordinated with the cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading and trailing edges, which in turn impact the cytoplasmic dynamics that affect the migration efficiency. Thus, we suggest that alterations in the nuclear structure may facilitate cellular reorganizations that are necessary for efficient migration.

  14. The Confined Hydrogen Atom with a Moving Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the hydrogen atom confined to a spherical box with impenetrable walls but, unlike earlier pedagogical articles on the subject, we assume that the nucleus also moves. We obtain the ground-state energy approximately by means of first-order perturbation theory and show that it is greater than that for the case in which the nucleus is clamped…

  15. Mission CaMKIIγ: shuttle calmodulin from membrane to nucleus.

    PubMed

    Malik, Zulfiqar A; Stein, Ivar S; Navedo, Manuel F; Hell, Johannes W

    2014-10-09

    Neuronal plasticity depends on plasma membrane Ca(2+) influx, resulting in activity-dependent gene transcription. Calmodulin (CaM) activated by Ca(2+) initiates the nuclear events, but how CaM makes its way to the nucleus has remained elusive. Ma et al. now show that CaMKIIγ transports CaM from cell surface Ca(2+) channels to the nucleus.

  16. Cytotoxicity of nucleus-targeting fluorescent gold nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Ya; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Mingxi; Xie, Zhi-Xiong; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2014-11-07

    Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell morphology, cell apoptosis/necrosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and mitochondrial membrane potential examinations were performed on different cell lines exposed to the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs. We found that the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs caused cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. A possible mechanism for the cytotoxicity of the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs was proposed as follows: the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs induce the production of ROS, resulting in the oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components, in turn leading to apoptosis via a mitochondrial damage pathway. This work facilitates a better understanding of the toxicity of AuNCs, especially nucleus-targeting AuNCs.

  17. Glutamatergic projection from the nucleus incertus to the septohippocampal system.

    PubMed

    Cervera-Ferri, Ana; Rahmani, Yasamin; Martínez-Bellver, Sergio; Teruel-Martí, Vicent; Martínez-Ricós, Joana

    2012-05-31

    Recent findings support a relevant role of the nucleus incertus in the control of the hippocampal activity through the modulation of theta rhythm. Previous studies from our group have shown that this nucleus is a critical relay between reticularis pontis oralis and the medial septum/diagonal band, regarded as the main activator and the pacemaker of the hippocampal oscillations, respectively. Besides, the nucleus incertus is highly linked to activated states related to the arousal response. The neurotransmission of the nucleus incertus, however, remains uncertain. Only GABA and the neuromodulator relaxin 3 are usually considered to be involved in its contribution to the septohippocampal system. In this work, we have analyzed the existence of an excitatory projection from the nucleus incertus to the medial septum. We have found a group of glutamatergic neurons in the nucleus incertus projecting to the medial septum. Moreover, we were able to describe a segregated distribution of calbindin and calretinin neurons. While calretinin expression was restricted to the nucleus incertus pars compacta, calbindin positive neurons where observed both in the pars dissipata and the pars compacta of the nucleus. The present work provides innovative data supporting an excitatory component in the pontoseptal pathway.

  18. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of HIV Fusion Peptide 13CO to Lipid 31P Proximities Support Similar Partially Inserted Membrane Locations of the α Helical and β Sheet Peptide Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrys, Charles M.; Qiang, Wei; Sun, Yan; Xie, Li; Schmick, Scott D.; Weliky, David P.

    2013-10-01

    Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) membrane and the host cell membrane is an initial step of infection of the host cell. Fusion is catalyzed by gp41, which is an integral membrane protein of HIV. The fusion peptide (FP) is the -25 N-terminal residues of gp41 and is a domain of gp41 that plays a key role in fusion catalysis likely through interaction with the host cell membrane. Much of our understanding of the FP domain has been accomplished with studies of -HFP-, i.e., a -25-residue peptide composed of the FP sequence but lacking the rest of gp41. HFP catalyzes fusion between membrane vesicles and serves as a model system to understand fusion catalysis. HFP binds to membranes and the membrane location of HFP is likely a significant determinant of fusion catalysis perhaps because the consequent membrane perturbation reduces the fusion activation energy. In the present study, many HFPs were synthesized and differed in the residue position that was 13CO backbone labeled. Samples were then prepared that each contained a singly 13CO labeled HFP incorporated into membranes that lacked cholesterol. HFP had distinct molecular populations with either α helical or oligomeric - sheet structure. Proximity between the HFP 13CO nuclei and 31P nuclei in the membrane headgroups was probed by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) measurements. For many samples, there were distinct 13CO shifts for the α helical and - sheet structures so that the proximities to 31P nuclei could be determined for each structure. Data from several differently labeled HFPs were then incorporated into a membrane location model for the particular structure. In addition to the 13CO labeled residue position, the HFPs also differed in sequence and/or chemical structure. -HFPmn- was a linear peptide that contained the 23 N-terminal residues of gp41. -HFPmn_V2E- contained the V2E mutation that for HIV leads to greatly reduced extent of fusion and infection. The

  19. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of HIV fusion peptide 13CO to lipid 31P proximities support similar partially inserted membrane locations of the α helical and β sheet peptide structures.

    PubMed

    Gabrys, Charles M; Qiang, Wei; Sun, Yan; Xie, Li; Schmick, Scott D; Weliky, David P

    2013-10-03

    Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) membrane and the host cell membrane is an initial step of infection of the host cell. Fusion is catalyzed by gp41, which is an integral membrane protein of HIV. The fusion peptide (FP) is the ∼25 N-terminal residues of gp41 and is a domain of gp41 that plays a key role in fusion catalysis likely through interaction with the host cell membrane. Much of our understanding of the FP domain has been accomplished with studies of "HFP", i.e., a ∼25-residue peptide composed of the FP sequence but lacking the rest of gp41. HFP catalyzes fusion between membrane vesicles and serves as a model system to understand fusion catalysis. HFP binds to membranes and the membrane location of HFP is likely a significant determinant of fusion catalysis perhaps because the consequent membrane perturbation reduces the fusion activation energy. In the present study, many HFPs were synthesized and differed in the residue position that was (13)CO backbone labeled. Samples were then prepared that each contained a singly (13)CO labeled HFP incorporated into membranes that lacked cholesterol. HFP had distinct molecular populations with either α helical or oligomeric β sheet structure. Proximity between the HFP (13)CO nuclei and (31)P nuclei in the membrane headgroups was probed by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) measurements. For many samples, there were distinct (13)CO shifts for the α helical and β sheet structures so that the proximities to (31)P nuclei could be determined for each structure. Data from several differently labeled HFPs were then incorporated into a membrane location model for the particular structure. In addition to the (13)CO labeled residue position, the HFPs also differed in sequence and/or chemical structure. "HFPmn" was a linear peptide that contained the 23 N-terminal residues of gp41. "HFPmn_V2E" contained the V2E mutation that for HIV leads to greatly reduced extent of fusion and

  20. Afferent projections to the deep mesencephalic nucleus in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Veazey, R.B.; Severin, C.M.

    1982-01-10

    Afferent projections to the deep mesencephalic nucleus (DMN) of the rat were demonstrated with axonal transport techniques. Potential sources for projections to the DMN were first identified by injecting the nucleus with HRP and examining the cervical spinal cord, brain stem, and cortex for retrogradely labeled neurons. Areas consistently labeled were then injected with a tritiated radioisotope, the tissue processed for autoradiography, and the DMN examined for anterograde labeling. Afferent projections to the medial and/or lateral parts of the DMN were found to originate from a number of spinal, bulbar, and cortical centers. Rostral brain centers projecting to both medial and lateral parts of the DMN include the ipsilateral motor and somatosensory cortex, the entopeduncular nucleus, and zona incerta. at the level of the midbrain, the ipsilateral substantia nigra and contralateral DMN likewise project to the DMN. Furthermore, the ipsilateral superior colliculus projects to the DMN, involving mainly the lateral part of the nucleus. Afferents from caudal centers include bilateral projections from the sensory nucleus of the trigeminal complex and the nucleus medulla oblongata centralis, as well as from the contralateral dentate nucleus. The projections from the trigeminal complex and nucleus medullae oblongatae centralis terminate in the intermediate and medial parts of the DMN, whereas projections from the contralateral dentate nucleus terminate mainly in its lateral part. In general, the afferent connections of the DMN arise from diverse areas of the brain. Although most of these projections distribute throughout the entire extent of the DMN, some of them project mainly to either medial or lateral parts of the nucleus, thus suggesting that the organization of the DMN is comparable, at least in part, to that of the reticular formation of the pons and medulla, a region in which hodological differences between medial and lateral subdivisions are known to exist.

  1. Nucleon emission via electromagnetic excitation in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions: Re-analysis of the Weizsacker-Williams method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    Previous analyses of the comparison of Weizsacker-Williams (WW) theory to experiment for nucleon emission via electromagnetic (EM) excitations in nucleus-nucleus collisions were not definitive because of different assumptions concerning the value of the minimum impact parameter. This situation is corrected by providing criteria that allows definitive statements to be made concerning agreement or disagreement between WW theory and experiment.

  2. Glycine immunoreactivity of multipolar neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus which project to the dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Doucet, J R; Ross, A T; Gillespie, M B; Ryugo, D K

    1999-06-14

    Certain distinct populations of neurons in the dorsal cochlear nucleus are inhibited by a neural source that is responsive to a wide range of acoustic frequencies. In this study, we examined the glycine immunoreactivity of two types of ventral cochlear nucleus neurons (planar and radiate) in the rat which project to the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) and thus, might be responsible for this inhibition. Previously, we proposed that planar neurons provided a tonotopic and narrowly tuned input to the DCN, whereas radiate neurons provided a broadly tuned input and thus, were strong candidates as the source of broadband inhibition (Doucet and Ryugo [1997] J. Comp. Neurol. 385:245-264). We tested this idea by combining retrograde labeling and glycine immunohistochemical protocols. Planar and radiate neurons were first retrogradely labeled by injecting biotinylated dextran amine into a restricted region of the dorsal cochlear nucleus. The labeled cells were visualized using streptavidin conjugated to indocarbocyanine (Cy3), a fluorescent marker. Sections that contained planar or radiate neurons were then processed for glycine immunocytochemistry using diaminobenzidine as the chromogen. Immunostaining of planar neurons was light, comparable to that of excitatory neurons (pyramidal neurons in the DCN), whereas immunostaining of radiate neurons was dark, comparable to that of glycinergic neurons (cartwheel cells in the dorsal cochlear nucleus and principal cells in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that radiate neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus subserve the wideband inhibition observed in the dorsal cochlear nucleus.

  3. Control of nucleus accumbens activity with neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Greer, Stephanie M; Trujillo, Andrew J; Glover, Gary H; Knutson, Brian

    2014-08-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) plays critical roles in healthy motivation and learning, as well as in psychiatric disorders (including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). Thus, techniques that confer control of NAcc activity might inspire new therapeutic interventions. By providing second-to-second temporal resolution of activity in small subcortical regions, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can resolve online changes in NAcc activity, which can then be presented as "neurofeedback." In an fMRI-based neurofeedback experiment designed to elicit NAcc activity, we found that subjects could increase their own NAcc activity, and that display of neurofeedback significantly enhanced their ability to do so. Subjects were not as capable of decreasing their NAcc activity, however, and enhanced control did not persist after subsequent removal of neurofeedback. Further analyses suggested that individuals who recruited positive aroused affect were better able to increase NAcc activity in response to neurofeedback, and that NAcc neurofeedback also elicited functionally correlated activity in the medial prefrontal cortex. Together, these findings suggest that humans can modulate their own NAcc activity and that fMRI-based neurofeedback may augment their efforts. The observed association between positive arousal and effective NAcc control further supports an anticipatory affect account of NAcc function.

  4. Functional network inference of the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Abel, John H.; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; St. John, Peter C.; Wang, Thomas J.; Bales, Benjamin B.; Doyle, Francis J.; Herzog, Erik D.; Petzold, Linda R.

    2016-01-01

    In the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), noisy cellular oscillators communicate within a neuronal network to generate precise system-wide circadian rhythms. Although the intracellular genetic oscillator and intercellular biochemical coupling mechanisms have been examined previously, the network topology driving synchronization of the SCN has not been elucidated. This network has been particularly challenging to probe, due to its oscillatory components and slow coupling timescale. In this work, we investigated the SCN network at a single-cell resolution through a chemically induced desynchronization. We then inferred functional connections in the SCN by applying the maximal information coefficient statistic to bioluminescence reporter data from individual neurons while they resynchronized their circadian cycling. Our results demonstrate that the functional network of circadian cells associated with resynchronization has small-world characteristics, with a node degree distribution that is exponential. We show that hubs of this small-world network are preferentially located in the central SCN, with sparsely connected shells surrounding these cores. Finally, we used two computational models of circadian neurons to validate our predictions of network structure. PMID:27044085

  5. Functional network inference of the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, John H.; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; St. John, Peter C.; Wang, Thomas J.; Bales, Benjamin B.; Doyle, Francis J.; Herzog, Erik D.; Petzold, Linda R.

    2016-04-04

    In the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), noisy cellular oscillators communicate within a neuronal network to generate precise system-wide circadian rhythms. Although the intracellular genetic oscillator and intercellular biochemical coupling mechanisms have been examined previously, the network topology driving synchronization of the SCN has not been elucidated. This network has been particularly challenging to probe, due to its oscillatory components and slow coupling timescale. In this work, we investigated the SCN network at a single-cell resolution through a chemically induced desynchronization. We then inferred functional connections in the SCN by applying the maximal information coefficient statistic to bioluminescence reporter data from individual neurons while they resynchronized their circadian cycling. Our results demonstrate that the functional network of circadian cells associated with resynchronization has small-world characteristics, with a node degree distribution that is exponential. We show that hubs of this small-world network are preferentially located in the central SCN, with sparsely connected shells surrounding these cores. Finally, we used two computational models of circadian neurons to validate our predictions of network structure.

  6. Development of the human dentate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Mihajlovic, P; Zecevic, N

    1986-01-01

    The developing human dentate nucleus (DN) was studied in a series of specimens of various pre- and postnatal ages ranging from 8 gestational weeks (gw) to 10 years, in Golgi-impregnated and Nissl-stained material. The DN emerges from the cerebellar white matter at around 16 gestational weeks (gw) as a thick band of cells (600-700 micron in width) that gradually attenuates to a final width of 150-250 micron as it undergoes extensive infolding beginning around 24 gw. The highly convoluted configuration of the adult DN is recognizable by 35 gw. Around 16 gw, two basic classes of DN neurons can be identified. Differentiation of these neurons is especially intensive during the mid-gestational period (20-25 gw). At this time the size of cell bodies increases, dendrites branch profusely and acquire spines. A second, slower phase of maturation consisting of addition of secondary and tertiary branches, continues into the postnatal period. At all prenatal ages examined, dentate neurons are morphologically more mature than the Purkinje cells in the overlying cortex. DN neurons of premature infants did not show cytomorphological differences when compared with babies born at term.

  7. Calretinin Neurons in the Rat Suprachiasmatic Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Moore, Robert Y

    2016-08-01

    The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a circadian pacemaker, is present in all mammalian brains. It has a complex organization of peptide-containing neurons that is similar among species, but calcium-binding proteins are expressed variably. Neurons containing calretinin have been described in the SCN in a number of species but not with association to circadian function. The objective of the present study is to characterize a calretinin neuron (CAR) group in the rat anterior hypothalamus anatomically and functionally with a detailed description of its location and a quantitative analysis of neuronal calretinin immunoreactivity at 3 times of day, 0600, 1400, and 1900 h, from animals in either light-dark or constant dark conditions. CAR neurons occupy a region in the dorsal and lateral SCN with a circadian rhythm in CAR immunoreactivity with a peak at 0600 h and a rhythm in cytoplasmic CAR distribution with a peak at 1400 h. CAR neurons should be viewed as an anatomical and functional component of the rat SCN that expands the definition from observations with cell stains. CAR neurons are likely to modulate temporal regulation of calcium in synaptic transmission.

  8. Comparing Realistic Subthalamic Nucleus Neuron Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njap, Felix; Claussen, Jens C.; Moser, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2011-06-01

    The mechanism of action of clinically effective electrical high frequency stimulation is still under debate. However, recent evidence points at the specific activation of GABA-ergic ion channels. Using a computational approach, we analyze temporal properties of the spike trains emitted by biologically realistic neurons of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) as a function of GABA-ergic synaptic input conductances. Our contribution is based on a model proposed by Rubin and Terman and exhibits a wide variety of different firing patterns, silent, low spiking, moderate spiking and intense spiking activity. We observed that most of the cells in our network turn to silent mode when we increase the GABAA input conductance above the threshold of 3.75 mS/cm2. On the other hand, insignificant changes in firing activity are observed when the input conductance is low or close to zero. We thus reproduce Rubin's model with vanishing synaptic conductances. To quantitatively compare spike trains from the original model with the modified model at different conductance levels, we apply four different (dis)similarity measures between them. We observe that Mahalanobis distance, Victor-Purpura metric, and Interspike Interval distribution are sensitive to different firing regimes, whereas Mutual Information seems undiscriminative for these functional changes.

  9. Development of the human dorsal nucleus of the vagus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gang; Zhu, Hua; Zhou, Xiangtian; Qu, Jia; Ashwell, K W S; Paxinos, G

    2008-01-01

    The dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve plays an integral part in the control of visceral function. The aim of the present study was to correlate structural and chemical changes in the developing nucleus with available data concerning functional maturation of human viscera and reflexes. The fetal development (ages 9 to 26 weeks) of the human dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve has been examined with the aid of Nissl staining and immunocytochemistry for calbindin and tyrosine hydroxylase. By 13 weeks, the dorsal vagal nucleus emerges as a distinct structure with at least two subnuclei visible in Nissl stained preparations. By 15 weeks, three subnuclei (dorsal intermediate, centrointermediate and ventrointermediate) were clearly discernible at the open medulla level with caudal and caudointermediate subnuclei visible at the level of the area postrema. All subnuclei known to exist in the adult were visible by 21 weeks and cytoarchitectonic differentiation of the nucleus was largely completed by 25 weeks. The adult distribution pattern of calbindin and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons was also largely completed by 21 weeks, although morphological differentiation of labeled neurons continued until the last age examined (26 weeks). The structural development of the dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve appears to occur in parallel with functional maturation of the cardiovascular and gastric movements, which the nucleus controls.

  10. Did Struve observe the nucleus of Halley's comet in 1835?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Axel D.

    During its apparition in 1835 Halley's comet reached its minimum distance from the earth (0.187 au) on 13 October in the constellation of Ursa Major. Telescopic visual observations were made, e.g., by F.W. Bessel at Königsberg and by F.G.W. Struve at Dorpat (Tartu). In particular a drawing made by Struve on 8 October of what he calls the `nucleus' and describes as a small, slightly yellowish glowing piece of coal of elongated shape bears such a striking resemblance to the images of Halley's nucleus obtained in 1986 by the Giotto spacecraft that it merits further examination: Could Struve, who had been using a 24.4 cm refractor at 254-fold magnification, possibly have observed the real nucleus? Closer examination shows that neither Struve's maximum possible resolution (0.13 arc seconds or 23 km at the comet), nor his measured size of the nucleus (160 x 400 km), nor his verbal description of the nucleus (as a bright object) support this idea: It rather seems that the term `nucleus' was used at the time for the brightest, innermost part of the coma. It is concluded that, nevertheless, Struve quite correctly envisaged the structure of the innermost coma, and to a considerable degree of accuracy anticipated the correct shape and structure of the nucleus (elongated, 1:2) and its localized sources of outstreaming gas.

  11. Angiotensin receptor binding and pressor effects in cat subretrofacial nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, A.M.; Dampney, R.A.L.; Mendelsohn, F.A.O. Univ. of Sydney )

    1988-11-01

    Central administration of angiotensin II (ANG II) increases arterial blood pressure via increased sympathetic activity. The authors have examined the possibility that one site of action of ANG II is the subretrofacial (SRF) nucleus in the rostral ventrolateral medulla, since this nucleus is known to play a critical role in the tonic and phasic control of arterial pressure. In vitro autoradiography, employing {sup 125}I-labeled (Sar{sup 1}, Ile{sup 8})ANG II as radioligand, was used to localize binding sites for ANG-II in the cat ventrolateral medulla. A high density of ANG II-receptor binding sites was found confined to the SRF nucleus. In a second group of experiments in anesthetized cats, microinjections of ANG II, in doses ranging from 10 to 50 pmol, were made into histologically identified sites within and outside the SRF nucleus. Microinjections into the nucleus resulted in a dose-dependent increase in arterial pressure, which was abolished by systemic administration of the ganglion-blocking drug hexamethonium bromide. In contrast, microinjections just outside the SRF nucleus had no effect on arterial pressure. It is concluded that activation of ANG II-receptor binding sites within the SRF nucleus leads to an increase in arterial pressure via increased sympathetic efferent activity.

  12. Role of magnesium and calcium in alcohol-induced hypertension and strokes as probed by in vivo television microscopy, digital image microscopy, optical spectroscopy, 31P-NMR, spectroscopy and a unique magnesium ion-selective electrode.

    PubMed

    Altura, B M; Altura, B T

    1994-10-01

    It is not known why alcohol ingestion poses a risk for development of hypertension, stroke and sudden death. Of all drugs, which result in body depletion of magnesium (Mg), alcohol is now known to be the most notorious cause of Mg-wasting. Recent data obtained through the use of biophysical (and noninvasive) technology suggest that alcohol may induce hypertension, stroke, and sudden death via its effects on intracellular free Mg2+ ([Mg2+]i), which in turn alter cellular and subcellular bioenergetics and promote calcium ion (Ca2+) overload. Evidence is reviewed that demonstrates that the dietary intake of Mg modulates the hypertensive actions of alcohol. Experiments with intact rats indicates that chronic ethanol ingestion results in both structural and hemodynamic alterations in the microcirculation, which, in themselves, could account for increased vascular resistance. Chronic ethanol increases the reactivity of intact microvessels to vasoconstrictors and results in decreased reactivity to vasodilators. Chronic ethanol ingestion clearly results in vascular smooth muscle cells that exhibit a progressive increase in exchangeable and cellular Ca2+ concomitant with a progressive reduction in Mg content. Use of 31P-NMR spectroscopy coupled with optical-backscatter reflectance spectroscopy revealed that acute ethanol administration to rats results in dose-dependent deficits in phosphocreatine (PCr), the [PCr]/[ATP] ratio, intracellular pH (pHi), oxyhemoglobin, and the mitochondrial level of oxidized cytochrome oxidase aa3 concomitant with a rise in brain-blood volume and inorganic phosphate. Temporal studies performed in vivo, on the intact brain, indicate that [Mg2+]i is depleted before any of the bioenergetic changes. Pretreatment of animals with Mg2+ prevents ethanol from inducing stroke and prevents all of the adverse bioenergetic changes from taking place. Use of quantitative digital imaging microscopy, and mag-fura-2, on single-cultured canine cerebral vascular

  13. The Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Modulates the Sensitivity of Arcuate Nucleus to Hypoglycemia in the Male Rat.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Moro Chao, D; León-Mercado, L; Foppen, E; Guzmán-Ruiz, M; Basualdo, M C; Escobar, C; Buijs, R M

    2016-09-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and arcuate nucleus (ARC) have reciprocal connections; catabolic metabolic information activates the ARC and inhibits SCN neuronal activity. Little is known about the influence of the SCN on the ARC. Here, we investigated whether the SCN modulated the sensitivity of the ARC to catabolic metabolic conditions. ARC neuronal activity, as determined by c-Fos immunoreactivity, was increased after a hypoglycemic stimulus by 2-deoxyglucose (2DG). The highest ARC neuronal activity after 2DG was found at the end of the light period (zeitgeber 11, ZT11) with a lower activity in the beginning of the light period (zeitgeber 2, ZT2), suggesting the involvement of the SCN. The higher activation of ARC neurons after 2DG at ZT11 was associated with higher 2DG induced blood glucose levels as compared with ZT2. Unilateral SCN-lesioned animals, gave a mainly ipsilateral activation of ARC neurons at the lesioned side, suggesting an inhibitory role of the SCN on ARC neurons. The 2DG-induced counterregulatory glucose response correlated with increased ARC neuronal activity and was significantly higher in unilateral SCN-lesioned animals. Finally, the ARC as site where 2DG may, at least partly, induce a counterregulatory response was confirmed by local microdialysis of 2DG. 2DG administration in the ARC produced a higher increase in circulating glucose compared with 2DG administration in surrounding areas such as the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH). We conclude that the SCN uses neuronal pathways to the ARC to gate sensory metabolic information to the brain, regulating ARC glucose sensitivity and counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemic conditions.

  14. Multiple pion and kaon production in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions: measurements versus specific models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guptaroy, P.; de, Bh.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Bhattacharyya, D. P.

    The pion and kaon rapidity densities and the nature of kaon-pion ratios offer two very prominent and crucial physical observables on which modestly sufficient data for heavy nucleus collisions are available to date. In the light of two sets of models - one purely phenomenological and the other with a modest degree of a dynamical basis - we try to examine the state of agreement between calculations and experimental results obtainable from the past and the latest measurements. Impact and implications of all these would also finally be spelt out.

  15. Quarkonium-nucleus bound states from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S.  R.; Chang, E.; Cohen, S.  D.; Detmold, W.; Lin, H. -W.; Orginos, K.; Parreño, A.; Savage, M.  J.

    2015-06-11

    Quarkonium-nucleus systems are composed of two interacting hadronic states without common valence quarks, which interact primarily through multi-gluon exchanges, realizing a color van der Waals force. We present lattice QCD calculations of the interactions of strange and charm quarkonia with light nuclei. Both the strangeonium-nucleus and charmonium-nucleus systems are found to be relatively deeply bound when the masses of the three light quarks are set equal to that of the physical strange quark. Extrapolation of these results to the physical light-quark masses suggests that the binding energy of charmonium to nuclear matter is B < 40 MeV.

  16. Determination of electron-nucleus collisions geometry with forward neutrons

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, L.; Aschenauer, E.; Lee, J. H.

    2014-12-29

    There are a large number of physics programs one can explore in electron-nucleus collisions at a future electron-ion collider. Collision geometry is very important in these studies, while the measurement for an event-by-event geometric control is rarely discussed in the prior deep-inelastic scattering experiments off a nucleus. This paper seeks to provide some detailed studies on the potential of tagging collision geometries through forward neutron multiplicity measurements with a zero degree calorimeter. As a result, this type of geometry handle, if achieved, can be extremely beneficial in constraining nuclear effects for the electron-nucleus program at an electron-ion collider.

  17. Observation of the antimatter helium-4 nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Agakishiev, H.; Tang, A.; et al.

    2011-04-24

    High-energy nuclear collisions create an energy density similar to that of the Universe microseconds after the Big Bang; in both cases, matter and antimatter are formed with comparable abundance. However, the relatively short-lived expansion in nuclear collisions allows antimatter to decouple quickly from matter, and avoid annihilation. Thus, a high-energy accelerator of heavy nuclei provides an efficient means of producing and studying antimatter. The antimatter helium-4 nucleus ({sup 4}He), also known as the anti-{alpha} ({alpha}), consists of two antiprotons and two antineutrons (baryon number B = -4). It has not been observed previously, although the {alpha}-particle was identified a century ago by Rutherford and is present in cosmic radiation at the ten per cent level. Antimatter nuclei with B < -1 have been observed only as rare products of interactions at particle accelerators, where the rate of antinucleus production in high-energy collisions decreases by a factor of about 1,000 with each additional antinucleon. Here we report the observation of {sup 4}He, the heaviest observed antinucleus to date. In total, 18 {sup 4}He counts were detected at the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in 10{sup 9} recorded gold-on-gold (Au+Au) collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 200 GeV and 62 GeV per nucleon-nucleon pair. The yield is consistent with expectations from thermodynamic and coalescent nucleosynthesis models, providing an indication of the production rate of even heavier antimatter nuclei and a benchmark for possible future observations of {sup 4}He in cosmic radiation.

  18. Nucleus accumbens invulnerability to methamphetamine neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Donald M; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Thomas, David M

    2011-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is a neurotoxic drug of abuse that damages neurons and nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. Emerging studies of human Meth addicts using both postmortem analyses of brain tissue and noninvasive imaging studies of intact brains have confirmed that Meth causes persistent structural abnormalities. Animal and human studies have also defined a number of significant functional problems and comorbid psychiatric disorders associated with long-term Meth abuse. This review summarizes the salient features of Meth-induced neurotoxicity with a focus on the dopamine (DA) neuronal system. DA nerve endings in the caudate-putamen (CPu) are damaged by Meth in a highly delimited manner. Even within the CPu, damage is remarkably heterogeneous, with ventral and lateral aspects showing the greatest deficits. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is largely spared the damage that accompanies binge Meth intoxication, but relatively subtle changes in the disposition of DA in its nerve endings can lead to dramatic increases in Meth-induced toxicity in the CPu and overcome the normal resistance of the NAc to damage. In contrast to the CPu, where DA neuronal deficiencies are persistent, alterations in the NAc show a partial recovery. Animal models have been indispensable in studies of the causes and consequences of Meth neurotoxicity and in the development of new therapies. This research has shown that increases in cytoplasmic DA dramatically broaden the neurotoxic profile of Meth to include brain structures not normally targeted for damage. The resistance of the NAc to Meth-induced neurotoxicity and its ability to recover reveal a fundamentally different neuroplasticity by comparison to the CPu. Recruitment of the NAc as a target of Meth neurotoxicity by alterations in DA homeostasis is significant in light of the numerous important roles played by this brain structure.

  19. Pion production at 180/sup 0/ in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chessin, S.A.

    1983-05-01

    A survey experiment of pion production at 180/sup 0/ in nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. Beams of 1.05 GeV/A and 2.1 GeV/A protons, alphas, and carbon were used, as well as proton beams of 0.80 GeV, 3.5 GeV, and 4.89 GeV, and argon beams of 1.05 GeV/A and 1.83 GeV/A. This is the first such experiment to use the heavier beams. Targets used ranged from carbon to lead. An in-depth review of the literature, both experimental and theoretical, is also presented. The systematics of the data are discussed, and comparisons are made both with prior experiments and with the predictions of the models reviewed. The cross sections appear consistent with a simple single nucleon-nucleon collision picture, without the need for collective or other exotic effects. Suggestions for future work are made.

  20. Statistical analysis of secondary particle distributions in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1987-01-01

    The use is described of several statistical techniques to characterize structure in the angular distributions of secondary particles from nucleus-nucleus collisions in the energy range 24 to 61 GeV/nucleon. The objective of this work was to determine whether there are correlations between emitted particle intensity and angle that may be used to support the existence of the quark gluon plasma. The techniques include chi-square null hypothesis tests, the method of discrete Fourier transform analysis, and fluctuation analysis. We have also used the method of composite unit vectors to test for azimuthal asymmetry in a data set of 63 JACEE-3 events. Each method is presented in a manner that provides the reader with some practical detail regarding its application. Of those events with relatively high statistics, Fe approaches 0 at 55 GeV/nucleon was found to possess an azimuthal distribution with a highly non-random structure. No evidence of non-statistical fluctuations was found in the pseudo-rapidity distributions of the events studied. It is seen that the most effective application of these methods relies upon the availability of many events or single events that possess very high multiplicities.

  1. Interaction between hypothalamic dorsomedial nucleus and the suprachiasmatic nucleus determines intensity of food anticipatory behavior

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Galvan, Guadalupe; Yi, Chun-Xia; van der Vliet, Jan; Jhamandas, Jack H.; Panula, Pertti; Angeles-Castellanos, Manuel; del Carmen Basualdo, María; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2011-01-01

    Food anticipatory behavior (FAA) is induced by limiting access to food for a few hours daily. Animals anticipate this scheduled meal event even without the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the biological clock. Consequently, a food-entrained oscillator has been proposed to be responsible for meal time estimation. Recent studies suggested the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) as the site for this food-entrained oscillator, which has led to considerable controversy in the literature. Herein we demonstrate by means of c-Fos immunohistochemistry that the neuronal activity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which signals the rest phase in nocturnal animals, is reduced when animals anticipate the scheduled food and, simultaneously, neuronal activity within the DMH increases. Using retrograde tracing and confocal analysis, we show that inhibition of SCN neuronal activity is the consequence of activation of GABA-containing neurons in the DMH that project to the SCN. Next, we show that DMH lesions result in a loss or diminution of FAA, simultaneous with increased activity in the SCN. A subsequent lesion of the SCN restored FAA. We conclude that in intact animals, FAA may only occur when the DMH inhibits the activity of the SCN, thus permitting locomotor activity. As a result, FAA originates from a neuronal network comprising an interaction between the DMH and SCN. Moreover, this study shows that the DMH–SCN interaction may serve as an intrahypothalamic system to gate activity instead of rest overriding circadian predetermined temporal patterns. PMID:21402951

  2. Quantitative analysis of the fusion cross sections using different microscopic nucleus-nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adel, A.; Alharbi, T.

    2017-01-01

    The fusion cross sections for reactions involving medium and heavy nucleus-nucleus systems are investigated near and above the Coulomb barrier using the one-dimensional barrier penetration model. The microscopic nuclear interaction potential is computed by four methods, namely: the double-folding model based on a realistic density-dependent M3Y NN interaction with a finite-range exchange part, the Skyrme energy density functional in the semiclassical extended Thomas-Fermi approximation, the generalized Proximity potential, and the Akyüz-Winther interaction. The comparison between the calculated and the measured values of the fusion excitation functions indicates that the calculations of the DFM give quite satisfactory agreement with the experimental data, being much better than the other methods. New parameterized forms for the fusion barrier heights and positions are presented. Furthermore, the effects of deformation and orientation degrees of freedom on the distribution of the Coulomb barrier characteristics as well as the fusion cross sections are studied for the reactions 16 O + 70 Ge and 28 Si + 100 Mo. The calculated values of the total fusion cross sections are compared with coupled channel calculations using the code CCFULL and compared with the experimental data. Our results reveal that the inclusion of deformations and orientation degrees of freedom improves the comparison with the experimental data.

  3. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Interaction with the Arcuate Nucleus; Essential for Organizing Physiological Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Ruiz, Mara

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is generally considered the master clock, independently driving all circadian rhythms. We recently demonstrated the SCN receives metabolic and cardiovascular feedback adeptly altering its neuronal activity. In the present study, we show that microcuts effectively removing SCN-arcuate nucleus (ARC) interconnectivity in Wistar rats result in a loss of rhythmicity in locomotor activity, corticosterone levels, and body temperature in constant dark (DD) conditions. Elimination of these reciprocal connections did not affect SCN clock gene rhythmicity but did cause the ARC to desynchronize. Moreover, unilateral SCN lesions with contralateral retrochiasmatic microcuts resulted in identical arrhythmicity, proving that for the expression of physiological rhythms this reciprocal SCN-ARC interaction is essential. The unaltered SCN c-Fos expression following glucose administration in disconnected animals as compared to a significant decrease in controls demonstrates the importance of the ARC as metabolic modulator of SCN neuronal activity. Together, these results indicate that the SCN is more than an autonomous clock, and forms an essential component of a larger network controlling homeostasis. The present novel findings illustrate how an imbalance between SCN and ARC communication through circadian disruption could be involved in the etiology of metabolic disorders. PMID:28374011

  4. Cytotoxicity of nucleus-targeting fluorescent gold nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing-Ya; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Mingxi; Xie, Zhi-Xiong; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2014-10-01

    Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell morphology, cell apoptosis/necrosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and mitochondrial membrane potential examinations were performed on different cell lines exposed to the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs. We found that the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs caused cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. A possible mechanism for the cytotoxicity of the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs was proposed as follows: the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs induce the production of ROS, resulting in the oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components, in turn leading to apoptosis via a mitochondrial damage pathway. This work facilitates a better understanding of the toxicity of AuNCs, especially nucleus-targeting AuNCs.Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell

  5. Low-energy antinucleon-nucleus interaction revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.

    2015-08-01

    Annihilation cross sections of antiprotons and antineutrons on the proton between 50 and 400 MeV/c show Coulomb focusing below 200 MeV/c and almost no charge-dependence above 200 MeV/c. Similar comparisons for heavier targets are not possible for lack of overlap between nuclear targets studied with and beams. Interpolating between -nucleus annihilation cross sections with the help of an optical potential to compare with -nucleus annihilation cross sections reveal unexpected features of Coulomb interactions in the latter. Direct comparisons between -nucleus and -nucleus annihilations at very low energies could be possible if cross sections are measured on the same targets and at the same energies as the available cross sections for . Such measurements may be feasible in the foreseeable future.

  6. 3D Protein Dynamics in the Cell Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anand P; Galland, Rémi; Finch-Edmondson, Megan L; Grenci, Gianluca; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Studer, Vincent; Viasnoff, Virgile; Saunders, Timothy E

    2017-01-10

    The three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the cell nucleus plays an important role in protein dynamics and in regulating gene expression. However, protein dynamics within the 3D nucleus are poorly understood. Here, we present, to our knowledge, a novel combination of 1) single-objective based light-sheet microscopy, 2) photoconvertible proteins, and 3) fluorescence correlation microscopy, to quantitatively measure 3D protein dynamics in the nucleus. We are able to acquire >3400 autocorrelation functions at multiple spatial positions within a nucleus, without significant photobleaching, allowing us to make reliable estimates of diffusion dynamics. Using this tool, we demonstrate spatial heterogeneity in Polymerase II dynamics in live U2OS cells. Further, we provide detailed measurements of human-Yes-associated protein diffusion dynamics in a human gastric cancer epithelial cell line.

  7. Cloud condensation nucleus-sulfate mass relationship and cloud albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegg, Dean A.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of previously published, simultaneous measurements of cloud condensation nucleus number concentration and sulfate mass concentration suggest a nonlinear relationship between the two variables. This nonlinearity reduces the sensitivity of cloud albedo to changes in the sulfur cycle.

  8. Deconvolving the Nucleus of Centaurus A Using Chandra PSF Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karovska, Margarita

    2000-01-01

    Centaurus A (NGC 5128) is a giant early-type galaxy containing the nearest (at 3.5 Mpc) radio-bright Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). Cen A was observed with the High Resolution Camera (HRC) on the Chandra X-ray Observatory on several occasions since the launch in July 1999. The high-angular resolution (less than 0.5 arcsecond) Chandra/HRC images reveal X ray multi-scale structures in this object with unprecedented detail and clarity, including the bright nucleus believed to be associated with a supermassive black hole. We explored the spatial extent of the Cen A nucleus using deconvolution techniques on the full resolution Chandra images. Model point spread functions (PSFs) were derived from the standard Chandra raytrace PSF library as well as unresolved point sources observed with Chandra. The deconvolved images show that the Cen A nucleus is resolved and asymmetric. We discuss several possible causes of this extended emission and of the asymmetries.

  9. Under Pressure: Mechanical Stress Management in the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Belaadi, Néjma; Aureille, Julien; Guilluy, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Cells are constantly adjusting to the mechanical properties of their surroundings, operating a complex mechanochemical feedback, which hinges on mechanotransduction mechanisms. Whereas adhesion structures have been shown to play a central role in mechanotransduction, it now emerges that the nucleus may act as a mechanosensitive structure. Here, we review recent advances demonstrating that mechanical stress emanating from the cytoskeleton can activate pathways in the nucleus which eventually impact both its structure and the transcriptional machinery. PMID:27314389

  10. Truncal ataxia from infarction involving the inferior olivary nucleus.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyun; Ryoo, Sookyung; Moon, So Young; Seo, Sand Won; Na, Duk L

    2012-08-01

    Truncal ataxia in medullary infarction may be caused by involvement of the lateral part of the medulla; however, truncal ataxia in infarction involving the inferior olivary nucleus (ION) has received comparatively little attention. We report a patient with truncal ataxia due to medial medullary infarction located in the ION. A lesion in the ION could produce a contralateral truncal ataxia due to increased inhibitory input to the contralesional vestibular nucleus from the contralesional flocculus.

  11. Radiometric observations of the nucleus of Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delamere, W. A.; Reitsema, H. J.; Huebner, W. F.; Schmidt, H. U.; Keller, H. U.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Wilhelm, K.; Whipple, Fred L.

    1986-01-01

    Images obtained by the Halley multicolor camera (HMC) were used to determine the surface brightness of the nucleus. Radiometric values of jet-free areas of the surface are presented and a range of possible surface brightness values are derived. These direct measures are compared with brightnesses derived from the size of the nucleus, as determined from HMC images, and ground-based observations obtained before the onset of coma activity.

  12. The Galactic nucleus: A unique region in the Galactic ecosystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genzel, Reinhard; Poglitsch, Albrecht

    1995-01-01

    The nucleus is a unique region in the Galactic ecosystem. It is also superb laboratory of modern astrophysics where astronomers can study, at unprecedented spatial resolution and across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, physical processes that may also happen at the cores of other galaxies. Infrared observations from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory have made important contributions to unraveling the mysteries of the Galactic nucleus and this review highlights some of these measurements, as well as recent results regarding the central parsec.

  13. International Halley Watch: Discipline specialists for near-nucleus studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, S.; Sekanina, Z.; Rahe, J.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the Near-Nucleus Studies Net is to study the processes taking place in the near-nucleus environment as they relate to the nature of nucleus. This is accomplisghed by measuring the spatial and temporal distribution of dust, gases and ions in the coma on high resolution images taken from many observatories around the world. By modeling the motions of discrete dust features in Comet Halley, it is often possible to determine the locations of the emission sources on the surface and learn about the nucleus structure. In addition to the general goals shared by all IHW nets, the scientific goals of the net has been to determine (1)the gross surface structure of the nucleus, (2)the nucleus spin vector, (3)the distribution and evolution of jet sources and (4)the interrelationships between the gas, dust and ion components of the coma. An additional Comet Giacobini-Zinner watch was carried out by the NNSN in support of the NASA International Cometary Explorer flyby.

  14. A FIBER APPARATUS IN THE NUCLEUS OF THE YEAST CELL

    PubMed Central

    Robinow, C. F.; Marak, J.

    1966-01-01

    The structure and mode of division of the nucleus of budding yeast cells have been studied by phase-contrast microscopy during life and by ordinary microscopy after Helly fixation. The components of the nucleus were differentially stained by the Feulgen procedure, with Giemsa solution after hydrolysis, and with iron alum haematoxylin. New information was obtained in cells fixed in Helly's by directly staining them with 0.005% acid fuchsin in 1% acetic acid in water. Electron micrographs have been made of sections of cells that were first fixed with 3% glutaraldehyde, then divested of their walls with snail juice, and postfixed with osmium tetroxide. Light and electron microscopy have given concordant information about the organization of the yeast nucleus. A peripheral segment of the nucleus is occupied by relatively dense matter (the "peripheral cluster" of Mundkur) which is Feulgen negative. The greater part of the nucleus is filled with fine-grained Feulgen-positive matter of low density in which chromosomes could not be identified. Chromosomes become visible in this region under the light microscope at meiosis. In the chromatin lies a short fiber with strong affinity for acid fuchsin. The nucleus divides by elongation and constriction, and during this process the fiber becomes long and thin. Electron microscopy has resolved it into a bundle of dark-edged 150 to 180 A filaments which extends between "centriolar plaques" that are attached to the nuclear envelope. PMID:5331666

  15. Cytoarchitecture and saccular innervation of nucleus y in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Frederickson, C J; Trune, D R

    1986-10-15

    The cytoarchitecture and saccular innervation of the mouse nucleus y were investigated by using Golgi, Nissl, and myelin stains and anterograde axonal transport of horseradish peroxidase. Nucleus y was found to be a compact group of cells in a small fiber-free region dorsal to the restiform body. Qualitative and morphometric analyses showed that most (75%) of the nucleus y neurons could not be reliably subdivided into morphologic subgroups, but varied continuously in soma size (15-25 microns), shape (fusiform to stellate), and number of dendrites (two to four), and had sparsely branched dendrites with an average of 3 to 4 spines per 10 microns of length. Three groups of cells that were identified morphometrically accounted for 10% (type I: large stellate cells), 9% (type II: long-dendrite cells), and 6% (type III: elongated soma cells) of the y neurons. Vestibular nerve axons transporting horseradish peroxidase after injury at their origin in the saccular neuroepithelium were found to form a dense terminal meshwork that was virtually co-extensive with the cytoarchitectonic boundaries of nucleus y. Nucleus y was distinguished from the overlying infracerebellar nucleus on the basis of anatomical, cytoarchitectural, and hodological features.

  16. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Neuropeptide Expression in Patients with Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    van Wamelen, Daniel J.; Aziz, N. Ahmad; Anink, Jasper J.; van Steenhoven, Robin; Angeloni, Debora; Fraschini, Franco; Jockers, Ralf; Roos, Raymund A. C.; Swaab, Dick F.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: To study whether sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances in patients with Huntington's disease (HD) arise from dysfunction of the body's master clock, the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. Design: Postmortem cohort study. Patients: Eight patients with HD and eight control subjects matched for sex, age, clock time and month of death, postmortem delay, and fixation time of paraffin-embedded hypothalamic tissue. Measurements and Results: Using postmortem paraffin-embedded tissue, we assessed the functional integrity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus in patients with HD and control subjects by determining the expression of two major regulatory neuropeptides, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and arginine vasopressin. Additionally, we studied melatonin 1 and 2 receptor expression. Compared with control subjects, the suprachiasmatic nucleus contained 85% fewer neurons immunoreactive for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and 33% fewer neurons for arginine vasopressin in patients with HD (P = 0.002 and P = 0.027). The total amount of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and arginine vasopressin messenger RNA was unchanged. No change was observed in the number of melatonin 1 or 2 receptor immunoreactive neurons. Conclusions: These findings indicate posttranscriptional neuropeptide changes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of patients with HD, and suggest that sleep and circadian rhythm disorders in these patients may at least partly arise from suprachiasmatic nucleus dysfunction. Citation: van Wamelen DJ; Aziz NA; Anink JJ; van Steenhoven R; Angeloni D; Fraschini F; Jockers R; Roos RAC; Swaab DF. Suprachiasmatic nucleus neuropeptide expression in patients with Huntington's disease. SLEEP 2013;36(1):117–125. PMID:23288978

  17. 3200 Phaethon, Asteroid or Comet Nucleus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, Daniel C.; Benkhoff, Johannes

    2015-08-01

    Physico-chemical modeling is central to understand the important physical processes in small solar system bodies. We have developed a computer simulation, SUISEI, that includes the physico-chemical processes relevant to comets within a global modeling framework. Our goals are to gain valuable insights into the intrinsic properties of cometary nuclei so we can better understand observations and in situ measurements. SUISEI includes a 3-D model of gas and heat transport in porous sub-surface layers in the interior of the nucleus.We present results on the application of SUISEI to the near-Sun object, Phaethon. Discovered in 1983 and classified as an asteroid, it has recently exhibited an active dust coma. Phaethon has long been associated as the source of the Geminids meteor shower so the dust activity provides a clear link to the meteor shower. The observed dust activity would traditionally lead to Phaethon being also classified as a comet (e.g., 2060-95P/Chiron, 133P/Elst-Pizarro). This is unusual since the orbit of Phaethon has a perihelion of 0.14 AU, resulting in surface temperatures of more than 1025K, much too hot for water ice or other volatiles to exist near the surface and drive the activity. This situation and others such as the “Active Asteroids” necessitates a revision of how we understand and classify these small asteroid-comet transition objects.We conclude the following for Phaethon:1. It is likely to contain relatively pristine volatiles in its interior despite repeated near perihelion passages of 0.14 AU during its history in its present orbit,2. Steady water gas fluxes at perihelion and throughout its orbit are insufficient to entrain the currently observed dust production,3. Thermal gradients into the surface as well as those caused by diurnal rotation are consistent with the mechanism of dust release due to thermal fracture,4. The initial large gas release during the first perihelion passage may be sufficient to produce enough dust to explain

  18. Stopping powers and cross sections due to two-photon processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Wang K.; Norbury, John W.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of electromagnetic-production processes due to two-photon exchange in nucleus-nucleus collisions are discussed. Feynman diagrams for two-photon exchange are evaluated using quantum electrodynamics. The total cross section and stopping power for projectile and target nuclei of identical charge are found to be significant for heavy nuclei above a few GeV per nucleon-incident energy.

  19. Some morphological features of a visual thalamic nucleus in a reptile: observations on nucleus rotundus in Caiman crocodilus.

    PubMed

    Pritz, M B

    1997-01-01

    The morphology of nucleus rotundus, a visual thalamic nucleus, was investigated in one species of reptiles. Caiman crocodilus, using Nisst stained material in transverse, sagittal, and horizontal planes. The topographical location of nucleus rotundus and its relationship to surrounding thalamic nuclear groups are described. Nucleus rotundus in Caiman can be subdivided into three areas: (1) an outer shell; (2) an inner core; and (3) a cell poor zone located between the shell and core. Most rotundal core neurons were round, fusiform, triangular, pear-shaped, or elliptical. Core neurons were not distributed evenly throughout the nucleus but, in many instances, were arranged in clusters composed of two to ten neurons. Quantitative measurements of area, perimeter, and eccentricity (greatest width/greatest length), which served as an index of cell roundness, were made on rotundal core neuron profiles in transverse, sagittal, and horizontal planes of section. Qualitative and quantitative observations were not appreciably different regardless of the plane of orientation. Both qualitative and quantitative data suggest that relay cells located in the core of nucleus rotundus are not a homogeneous population of neurons but comprise several subtypes.

  20. The interfascicular trigeminal nucleus: a precerebellar nucleus in the mouse defined by retrograde neuronal tracing and genetic fate mapping.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuhong; Tvrdik, Petr; Makki, Nadja; Machold, Robert; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2013-02-15

    We have found a previously unreported precerebellar nucleus located among the emerging fibers of the motor root of the trigeminal nerve in the mouse, which we have called the interfascicular trigeminal nucleus (IF5). This nucleus had previously been named the tensor tympani part of the motor trigeminal nucleus (5TT) in rodent brain atlases, because it was thought to be a subset of small motor neurons of the motor trigeminal nucleus innervating the tensor tympani muscle. However, following injection of retrograde tracer in the cerebellum, the labeled neurons in IF5 were found to be choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) negative, indicating that they are not motor neurons. The cells of IF5 are strongly labeled in mice from Wnt1Cre and Atoh1 CreER lineage fate mapping, in common with the major precerebellar nuclei that arise from the rhombic lip and that issue mossy fibers. Analysis of sections from mouse Hoxa3, Hoxb1, and Egr2 Cre labeled lineages shows that the neurons of IF5 arise from rhombomeres caudal to rhombomere 4, most likely from rhombomeres 6-8. We conclude that IF5 is a significant precerebellar nucleus in the mouse that shares developmental gene expression characteristics with mossy fiber precerebellar nuclei that arise from the caudal rhombic lip.

  1. The turtle thalamic anterior entopeduncular nucleus shares connectional and neurochemical characteristics with the mammalian thalamic reticular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kenigfest, Natalia; Belekhova, Margarita; Repérant, Jacques; Rio, Jean Paul; Ward, Roger; Vesselkin, Nikolai

    2005-10-01

    Neurochemical and key connectional characteristics of the anterior entopeduncular nucleus (Enta) of the turtle (Testudo horsfieldi) were studied by axonal tracing techniques and immunohistochemistry of parvalbumin, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). We showed that the Enta, which is located within the dorsal peduncle of the lateral forebrain bundle (Pedd), has roughly topographically organized reciprocal connections with the dorsal thalamic visual nuclei, the nucleus rotundus (Rot) and dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (GLd). The Enta receives projections from visual telencephalic areas, the anterior dorsal ventricular ridge and dorsolateral cortex/pallial thickening. Most Enta neurons contained GABA and parvalbumin, and some of them were retrogradely labeled when the tracer was injected into the visual dorsal thalamic nuclei. Further experiments using double immunofluorescence revealed colocalization of GAD and parvalbumin in the vast majority of Enta neurons, and many of these cells showed retrograde labeling with Fluoro-gold injected into the Rot and/or GLd. According to these data, the Enta may be considered as a structural substrate for recurrent inhibition of the visual thalamic nuclei. Based on morphological and neurochemical similarity of the turtle Enta, caiman Pedd nucleus, the superior reticular nucleus in birds, and the thalamic reticular nucleus in mammals, we suggest that these structures represent a characteristic component which is common to the thalamic organization in amniotes.

  2. Nucleus-nucleus cold fusion reactions analyzed with the l-dependent 'fusion by diffusion' model

    SciTech Connect

    Cap, T.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Wilczynski, J.

    2011-05-15

    We present a modified version of the Fusion by Diffusion (FBD) model aimed at describing the synthesis of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, in which a low excited compound nucleus emits only one neutron. The modified FBD model accounts for the angular momentum dependence of three basic factors determining the evaporation residue cross section: the capture cross section {sigma}{sub cap}(l), the fusion probability P{sub fus}(l), and the survival probability P{sub surv}(l). The fusion hindrance factor, the inverse of P{sub fus}(l), is treated in terms of thermal fluctuations in the shape degrees of freedom and is expressed as a solution of the Smoluchowski diffusion equation. The l dependence of P{sub fus}(l) results from the l-dependent potential energy surface of the colliding system. A new parametrization of the distance of starting point of the diffusion process is introduced. An analysis of a complete set of 27 excitation functions for production of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, studied in experiments at GSI Darmstadt, RIKEN Tokyo, and LBNL Berkeley, is presented. The FBD model satisfactorily reproduces shapes and absolute cross sections of all the cold fusion excitation functions. It is shown that the peak position of the excitation function for a given 1n reaction is determined by the Q value of the reaction and the height of the fission barrier of the final nucleus. This fact could possibly be used in future experiments (with well-defined beam energy) for experimental determination of the fission barrier heights.

  3. Dynamics of strange, charm and high momentum hadrons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassing, W.; Gallmeister, K.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Greiner, C.; Stöcker, H.

    2004-07-01

    We investigate hadron production and attenuation of hadrons with strange and charm quarks (or antiquarks) as well as high transverse momentum hadrons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions from 2 A GeV to 21.3 A TeV within two independent transport approaches (UrQMD and HSD). Both transport models are based on quark, diquark, string and hadronic degrees of freedom, but do not include any explicit phase transition to a quark-gluon plasma. From our dynamical calculations we find that both models do not describe the maximum in the K+/ π+ ratio at 20-30 A GeV in central Au+Au collisions found experimentally, though the excitation functions of strange mesons are reproduced well in HSD and UrQMD. Furthermore, the transport calculations show that the charmonium recreation by D+ D¯→J/Ψ+ meson reactions is comparable to the dissociation by ‘comoving’ mesons at RHIC energies contrary to SPS energies. This leads to the final result that the total J/ Ψ suppression as a function of centrality at RHIC should be less than the suppression seen at SPS energies where the ‘comover’ dissociation is substantial and the backward channels play no role. Furthermore, our transport calculations-in comparison to experimental data on transverse momentum spectra from pp, d+Au and Au+Au reactions-show that pre-hadronic effects are responsible for both the hardening of the hadron spectra for low transverse momenta (Cronin effect) as well as the suppression of high pT hadrons. The mutual interactions of formed hadrons are found to be negligible in central Au+Au collisions at s=200 GeV for p T≥6 GeV/c and the sizeable suppression seen experimentally is attributed to a large extent to the interactions of ‘leading’ pre-hadrons with the dense environment.

  4. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bao-An; Natowitz, Joseph B.

    2013-03-01

    The 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012) was held from 27 May to 1 June 2012, in San Antonio, Texas, USA. It was jointly organized and hosted by The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University, College Station and The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Texas A&M University-Commerce. Among the approximately 300 participants were a large number of graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. The Keynote Talk of the conference, 'The State of Affairs of Present and Future Nucleus-Nucleus Collision Science', was given by Dr Robert Tribble, University Distinguished Professor and Director of the TAMU Cyclotron Institute. During the conference a very well-received public lecture on neutrino astronomy, 'The ICEcube project', was given by Dr Francis Halzen, Hilldale and Gregory Breit Distinguished Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The Scientific program continued in the general spirit and intention of this conference series. As is typical of this conference a broad range of topics including fundamental areas of nuclear dynamics, structure, and applications were addressed in 42 plenary session talks, 150 parallel session talks, and 21 posters. The high quality of the work presented emphasized the vitality and relevance of the subject matter of this conference. Following the tradition, the NN2012 International Advisory Committee selected the host and site of the next conference in this series. The 12th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2015) will be held 21-26 June 2015 in Catania, Italy. It will be hosted by The INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania and the Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia of the University of Catania. The NN2012 Proceedings contains the conference program and 165 articles organized into the following 10 sections 1. Heavy and Superheavy Elements 2. QCD and Hadron Physics 3. Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions 4. Nuclear Structure 5. Nuclear Energy and Applications of

  5. The red nucleus and the rubrospinal projection in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huazheng; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2012-04-01

    We studied the organization and spinal projection of the mouse red nucleus with a range of techniques (Nissl stain, immunofluorescence, retrograde tracer injections into the spinal cord, anterograde tracer injections into the red nucleus, and in situ hybridization) and counted the number of neurons in the red nucleus (3,200.9 ± 230.8). We found that the rubrospinal neurons were mainly located in the parvicellular region of the red nucleus, more lateral in the rostral part and more medial in the caudal part. Labeled neurons were least common in the rostral and caudal most parts of the red nucleus. Neurons projecting to the cervical cord were predominantly dorsomedially placed and neurons projecting to the lumbar cord were predominantly ventrolaterally placed. Immunofluorescence staining with SMI-32 antibody showed that ~60% of SMI-32-positive neurons were cervical cord-projecting neurons and 24% were lumbar cord-projecting neurons. SMI-32-positive neurons were mainly located in the caudomedial part of the red nucleus. A study of vGluT2 expression showed that the number and location of glutamatergic neurons matched with those of the rubrospinal neurons. In the anterograde tracing experiments, rubrospinal fibers travelled in the dorsal portion of the lateral funiculus, between the lateral spinal nucleus and the calretinin-positive fibers of the lateral funiculus. Rubrospinal fibers terminated in contralateral laminae 5, 6, and the dorsal part of lamina 7 at all spinal cord levels. A few fibers could be seen next to the neurons in the dorsolateral part of lamina 9 at levels of C8-T1 (hand motor neurons) and L5-L6 (foot motor neurons), which is consistent with a view that rubrospinal fibers may play a role in distal limb movement in rodents.

  6. The subthalamic nucleus influences visuospatial attention in humans.

    PubMed

    Schmalbach, Barbara; Günther, Veronika; Raethjen, Jan; Wailke, Stefanie; Falk, Daniela; Deuschl, Günther; Witt, Karsten

    2014-03-01

    Spatial attention is a lateralized feature of the human brain. Whereas the role of cortical areas of the nondominant hemisphere on spatial attention has been investigated in detail, the impact of the BG, and more precisely the subthalamic nucleus, on signs and symptoms of spatial attention is not well understood. Here we used unilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus to reversibly, specifically, and intraindividually modify the neuronal BG outflow and its consequences on signs and symptoms of visuospatial attention in patients suffering from Parkinson disease. We tested 13 patients with Parkinson disease and chronic deep brain stimulation in three stimulation settings: unilateral right and left deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus as well as bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. In all three stimulation settings, the patients viewed a set of pictures while an eye-tracker system recorded eye movements. During the exploration of the visual stimuli, we analyzed the time spent in each visual hemispace, as well as the number, duration, amplitude, peak velocity, acceleration peak, and speed of saccades. In the unilateral left-sided stimulation setting, patients show a shorter ipsilateral exploration time of the extrapersonal space, whereas number, duration, and speed of saccades did not differ between the different stimulation settings. These results demonstrated reduced visuospatial attention toward the side contralateral to the right subthalamic nucleus that was not being stimulated in a unilateral left-sided stimulation. Turning on the right stimulator, the reduced visuospatial attention vanished. These results support the involvement of the subthalamic nucleus in modulating spatial attention. Therefore, the subthalamic nucleus is part of the subcortical network that subserves spatial attention.

  7. Calculated dynamical evolution of the nucleus of comet Hartley 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksanfomality, Leonid

    2013-04-01

    The nucleus of comet Hartley 2 has a relatively regular dumbbell shape with unequal heads. The narrow part of elongated shape contains a relatively smooth region whose covering material is highly different in its shallow structure compared to other parts of this celestial body. The surface of crudely spherical parts of the nucleus is different from the surface of the "neck", which implies a hypothesis that the shape of the nucleus of Hartley 2 is indicative of destruction of this celestial body occurring in our days. The nucleus rotates around its axis passing through the center of mass, and centrifugal forces arise. This process is hindered by gravitation between parts of the nucleus and gradual slowing of rotation due to body lengthening because of the increase in the moment of inertia (proportional to R2) and due to friction losses in the neck material. We posed the task to determine centrifugal and gravitational forces in the neck (and, respectively, the strains of stretching and compression), the moment of inertia of the body and supply of its rotational energy E, the volume of the nucleus and its average density, and the position of the barycenter and center of rotation. It can be assumed that these forces cause slow but progressive lengthening of the neck which should eventually result in fragmentation of the nucleus. Centrifugal forces can be found as a result of summation of forces produced by parts of the body. According to the calculation model, the total stretching forces in the section passing through the narrowest cut of the neck are 1.21E6 N. The corresponding compression forces in the section passing through the narrow section are 1.04E6 N. The comparison of these values indicates a paradoxical result: stretching strains dominate in the neck, while compressions are dominant in the section passing through the common center of mass. The excess of stretching strains in the neck is 11%. The inference is as follows: the right part of the neck and the

  8. The midbrain precommand nucleus of the mormyrid electromotor network.

    PubMed

    von der Emde, G; Sena, L G; Niso, R; Grant, K

    2000-07-15

    The functional role of the midbrain precommand nucleus (PCN) of the electromotor system was explored in the weakly electric mormyrid fish Gnathonemus petersii, using extracellular recording of field potentials, single unit activity, and microstimulation in vivo. Electromotor-related field potentials in PCN are linked in a one-to-one manner and with a fixed time relationship to the electric organ discharge (EOD) command cycle, but occur later than EOD command activity in the medulla. It is suggested that PCN electromotor-related field potentials arise from two sources: (1) antidromically, by backpropagation across electrotonic synapses between PCN axons and command nucleus neurons, and (2) as corollary discharge-driven feedback arriving from the command nucleus indirectly, via multisynaptic pathways. PCN neurons can be activated by electrosensory input, but this does not necessarily activate the whole motor command chain. Microstimulation of PCN modulates the endogenous pattern of electromotor command in a way that can mimic the structure of certain stereotyped behavioral patterns. PCN activity is regulated, and to a certain extent synchronized, by corollary discharge feedback inhibition. However, PCN does not generally function as a synchronized pacemaker driving the electromotor command chain. We propose that PCN neurons integrate information of various origins and individually relay this to the command nucleus in the medulla. Some may also have intrinsic, although normally nonsynchronized, pacemaker properties. This descending activity, integrated in the electromotor command nucleus, will play an important modulatory role in the central pattern generator decision process.

  9. Development of the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    McClellan, Kristy M; Parker, Keith L; Tobet, Stuart

    2006-07-01

    The ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) is important in the regulation of female sexual behavior, feeding, energy balance, and cardiovascular function. It is a highly conserved nucleus across species and a good model for studying neuronal organization into nuclei. Expression of various transcription factors, receptors, and neurotransmitters are important for the development of this nucleus and for mapping the position of identified cells within the nucleus. The VMH is subdivided into regions, all of which may project to specific locations to carry out various functions. For example, the ventrolateral quadrant contains a subset of neurons that highly express estrogen receptors. These neurons specifically are involved in the lordosis response pathway through projections to other estrogen receptor containing regions. In development, neurons that form the VMH generate from the proliferative zone surrounding the third ventricle. Neurons then migrate along radial glial fibers to final positions within the nucleus. Migration and positioning of neurons is an important step in setting up connections to and from the VMH and hence in its function. As compared to other developing brain regions, cell death may play a minor role in sculpting the VMH. We review the processes involved in forming a functional nuclear group and some of the factors known to be involved particularly focusing on the positioning of identified neurons within the VMH.

  10. Coordinated Dynamics of RNA Splicing Speckles in the Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao; Kota, Krishna P; Alam, Samer G; Nickerson, Jeffrey A; Dickinson, Richard B; Lele, Tanmay P

    2016-06-01

    Despite being densely packed with chromatin, nuclear bodies and a nucleoskeletal network, the nucleus is a remarkably dynamic organelle. Chromatin loops form and relax, RNA transcripts and transcription factors move diffusively, and nuclear bodies move. We show here that RNA splicing speckled domains (splicing speckles) fluctuate in constrained nuclear volumes and remodel their shapes. Small speckles move in a directed way toward larger speckles with which they fuse. This directed movement is reduced upon decreasing cellular ATP levels or inhibiting RNA polymerase II activity. The random movement of speckles is reduced upon decreasing cellular ATP levels, moderately reduced after inhibition of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling and modestly increased upon inhibiting RNA polymerase II activity. To define the paths through which speckles can translocate in the nucleus, we generated a pressure gradient to create flows in the nucleus. In response to the pressure gradient, speckles moved along curvilinear paths in the nucleus. Collectively, our results demonstrate a new type of ATP-dependent motion in the nucleus. We present a model where recycling splicing factors return as part of small sub-speckles from distal sites of RNA processing to larger splicing speckles by a directed ATP-driven mechanism through interchromatin spaces.

  11. Growth dynamics of the developing lateral geniculate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Williams, A L; Jeffery, G

    2001-02-12

    Segregated binocular maps in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) develop from stages where they initially completely overlap. Here, we show that segregation occurs at different rates across the depth of the nucleus and that the volume of the ipsilateral projection does not decrease significantly during this period, rather LGN volume expands markedly and its shape changes. Hence, we have examined the differential growth of the ferret LGN during the process of segregation by using novel shape modelling techniques. These have facilitated quantification of its three-dimensional structure at successive developmental stages as well as the definition of growth vectors which illustrate shape change. This has been undertaken in direct representations of the LGN and those normalised for size and orientation. Spatiotemporal aspects of shape change have then been compared with different measurements of its cellular population. Initial stages of segregation are associated with a large expansion of the rostrocaudal axis of the nucleus along which segregation takes place, and an expansion of caudal regions that will eventually contain the binocular representation. Later stages are associated with dorsoventral expansions and a consolidation of the rostrocaudal axis. The pace of shape change peaks toward the end of the period of segregation when the nucleus has adopted approximately 50% of its adult shape. After segregation, nuclear growth is mainly isotropic. The mature shape of the nucleus is achieved before it reaches its full size and while cell density and cell sizes are still changing.

  12. Nucleus of Comet IRAS-Araki-Alcock (1983 VII)

    SciTech Connect

    Sekanina, Z.

    1988-06-01

    Optical, radar, infrared, UV, and microwave-continuum observations of Comet IRAS-Araki-Alcok were obtained in May 1983, the week of the comet's close approach to earth. The comet has a nucleus dimension and a rotation period which are similar to those of Comet Halley, but a different morphological signature (a persisting sunward fan-shaped coma). Time variations are noted in the projected nucleus cross section. Results suggest significant limb-darkening effects in the relevant domains of radio waves, and that the comet's interior must be extremely cold. It is found that the thermal-infrared fluxes from the inner coma of the comet are dominated by the nucleus. 63 references.

  13. The Potential Roles of Actin in The Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Falahzadeh, Khadijeh; Banaei-Esfahani, Amir; Shahhoseini, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, actin’s presence in the nucleus has been demonstrated. Actin is a key protein necessary for different nuclear processes. Although actin is well known for its functional role in dynamic behavior of the cytoskeleton, emerging studies are now highlighting new roles for actin. At the present time there is no doubt about the presence of actin in the nucleus. A number of studies have uncovered the functional involvement of actin in nuclear processes. Actin as one of the nuclear components has its own structured and functional rules, such as nuclear matrix association, chromatin remodeling, transcription by RNA polymerases I, II, III and mRNA processing. In this historical review, we attempt to provide an overview of our current understanding of the functions of actin in the nucleus. PMID:25870830

  14. Reaction cross sections of the deformed halo nucleus 31Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urata, Y.; Hagino, K.; Sagawa, H.

    2012-10-01

    Using the Glauber theory, we calculate reaction cross sections for the deformed halo nucleus 31Ne. To this end, we assume that the 31Ne nucleus takes the 30Ne+n structure. To take into account the rotational excitation of the core nucleus 30Ne, we employ the particle-rotor model (PRM). We compare the results to those in the adiabatic limit of PRM, that is, the Nilsson model, and show that the Nilsson model works reasonably well for the reaction cross sections of 31Ne. We also investigate the dependence of the reaction cross sections on the ground-state properties of 31Ne, such as the deformation parameter and the p-wave component in the ground-state wave function.

  15. Response Properties of Cochlear Nucleus Neurons in Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Roth, G. Linn; Recio, A.

    2009-01-01

    Much of what is known about how the cochlear nuclei participate in mammalian hearing comes from studies of non-primate mammalian species. To determine to what extent the cochlear nuclei of primates resemble those of other mammalian orders, we have recorded responses to sound in three primate species: marmosets, Cynomolgus macaques, and squirrel monkeys. These recordings show that the same types of temporal firing patterns are found in primates that have been described in other mammals. Responses to tones of neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus have similar tuning, latencies, post-stimulus time and interspike interval histograms as those recorded in non-primate cochlear nucleus neurons. In the dorsal cochlear nucleus, too, responses were similar. From these results it is evident that insights gained from non-primate studies can be applied to the peripheral auditory system of primates. PMID:19531377

  16. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation-induced regional blood flow responses correlate with improvement of motor signs in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Karimi, M; Golchin, N; Tabbal, S D; Hershey, T; Videen, T O; Wu, J; Usche, J W M; Revilla, F J; Hartlein, J M; Wernle, A R; Mink, J W; Perlmutter, J S

    2008-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) improves motor symptoms in idiopathic Parkinson's disease, yet the mechanism of action remains unclear. Previous studies indicate that STN DBS increases regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in immediate downstream targets but does not reveal which brain regions may have functional changes associated with improved motor manifestations. We studied 48 patients with STN DBS who withheld medication overnight and underwent PET scans to measure rCBF responses to bilateral STN DBS. PET scans were performed with bilateral DBS OFF and ON in a counterbalanced order followed by clinical ratings of motor manifestations using Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale 3 (UPDRS 3). We investigated whether improvement in UPDRS 3 scores in rigidity, bradykinesia, postural stability and gait correlate with rCBF responses in a priori determined regions. These regions were selected based on a previous study showing significant STN DBS-induced rCBF change in the thalamus, midbrain and supplementary motor area (SMA). We also chose the pedunculopontine nucleus region (PPN) due to mounting evidence of its involvement in locomotion. In the current study, bilateral STN DBS improved rigidity (62%), bradykinesia (44%), gait (49%) and postural stability (56%) (paired t-tests: P < 0.001). As expected, bilateral STN DBS also increased rCBF in the bilateral thalami, right midbrain, and decreased rCBF in the right premotor cortex (P < 0.05, corrected). There were significant correlations between improvement of rigidity and decreased rCBF in the SMA (r(s) = -0.4, P < 0.02) and between improvement in bradykinesia and increased rCBF in the thalamus (r(s) = 0.31, P < 0.05). In addition, improved postural reflexes correlated with decreased rCBF in the PPN (r(s) = -0.38, P < 0.03). These modest correlations between selective motor manifestations and rCBF in specific regions suggest possible regional selectivity for improvement of different motor

  17. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of the nucleus 139Ce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucurescu, D.; Căta-Danil, G.; Căta-Danil, I.; Ivaşcu, M.; Mărginean, N.; Mărginean, R.; Mihăilescu, L. C.; Rusu, C.; Suliman, G.

    2006-03-01

    Gamma-ray coincidence techniques are used to determine new level structures in the N = 81 nucleus 139Ce, at low spins and excitation energies with the 139La(p, nγ) reaction at 5.0 and 6.0MeV incident energy, and at high spins with the 130Te(12C, 3nγ) reaction at 50.5MeV, respectively. Lifetime determinations are also made in the (p, nγ) reaction with the centroid DSA method. The observed level structures are discussed by comparison with existing calculations and with those in the neighbouring nucleus 140Ce.

  18. Neutral current neutrino-nucleus interactions at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Gay Ducati, M. B.; Machado, M. M.; Machado, M. V. T.

    2009-04-01

    We present a QCD analysis of the neutral current (NC) neutrino-nucleus interaction at the small-x region using the color dipole formalism. This phenomenological approach is quite successful in describing experimental results in deep inelastic ep scattering and charged current neutrino-nucleus interactions at high energies. We present theoretical predictions for the relevant structure functions and the corresponding implications for the total NC neutrino cross section. It is shown that at small x, the NC boson-nucleon cross section should exhibit the geometric scaling property that has important consequences for ultrahigh energy neutrino phenomenology.

  19. Figure Caption for pair of images of 'Comet Nucleus Q

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Figure Caption for pair of images of 'Comet Nucleus Q'. 21Jul94 Last Look at the Q-nuclei First image - March 30, 1994. Two Q-nuclei and a split nucleus, P. Second image - July 20, 1994. at T - 10 hours. Both nuclei still show no sign of further fragmentation, although the coma near each is being stretched out along the direction of motion. Both images were taken with the WFPC2 Planetary Camera using a red filter. Credit: H. A. Weaver and T. E. Smith

  20. Morphology of multiple-nucleus brightest cluster galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Lauer, T.R.

    1988-02-01

    The morphology of high SNR CCD images of 16 multiple-nucleus brightest cluster galaxies is studied using an algorithm that models images of the systems as the line-of-sight superposition of normal elliptical galaxies. The algorithm is applied initially to the classic multiple-nucleus cD galaxy in A2199. Evidence is found suggestive of deep interpenetrating high-speed encounters by its secondaries. The interactions effects studied include noncentric isophotes, brightness profile effects, excess light around primary galaxies, and dynamical friction wakes. The results show that in many cases multiple systems are interacting systems. 42 references.

  1. The morphology of multiple-nucleus brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, Tod R.

    1988-01-01

    The morphology of high SNR CCD images of 16 multiple-nucleus brightest cluster galaxies is studied using an algorithm that models images of the systems as the line-of-sight superposition of normal elliptical galaxies. The algorithm is applied initially to the classic multiple-nucleus cD galaxy in A2199. Evidence is found suggestive of deep interpenetrating high-speed encounters by its secondaries. The interactions effects studied include noncentric isophotes, brightness profile effects, excess light around primary galaxies, and dynamical friction wakes. The results show that in many cases multiple systems are interacting systems.

  2. Recent Developments in Neutrino/Antineutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Morfín, Jorge G.; Nieves, Juan; Sobczyk, Jan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental results and developments in the theoretical treatment of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the energy range of 1–10 GeV are discussed. Difficulties in extracting neutrino-nucleon cross sections from neutrino-nucleus scattering data are explained and significance of understanding nuclear effects for neutrino oscillation experiments is stressed. Detailed discussions of the status of two-body current contribution in the kinematic region dominated by quasielastic scattering and specific features of partonic nuclear effects in weak DIS scattering are presented.

  3. Recent Developments in Neutrino/Antineutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Morfín, Jorge G.; Nieves, Juan; Sobczyk, Jan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental results and developments in the theoretical treatment of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the energy range of 1–10 GeV are discussed. Difficulties in extracting neutrino-nucleon cross sections from neutrino-nucleus scattering data are explained and significance of understanding nuclear effects for neutrino oscillation experiments is stressed. Detailed discussions of the status of two-body current contribution in the kinematic region dominated by quasielastic scattering and specific features of partonic nuclear effects in weak DIS scattering are presented.

  4. The Development of Hypertrophic Inferior Olivary Nucleus in Oculopalatal Tremor.

    PubMed

    Jun, Bokkwan

    2016-12-01

    Oculopalatal tremor is an acquired clinical condition resulting from the interruption of the dentato-rubro-olivary neuronal pathway. The signal change in inferior olivary nucleus and its hypertrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be observed prior to the development of symptomatic oculopalatal tremor. This is a case of the fourth cranial nerve palsy followed by oculopalatal tremor, and increased signal intensity in inferior olivary nucleus on MRI was observed in 7 months after damage to the dentate-rubro-olivary pathway and 5 months prior to the development of oscillopsia and oculopalatal tremor.

  5. Ice crystal and ice nucleus measurements in cap clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vali, G.; Rogers, D. C.; Deshler, T. L.

    1982-01-01

    Ice nucleation in cap clouds over a mountain in Wyoming was examined with airborne instrumentation. Crosswind and wind parallel passes were made through the clouds, with data being taken on the ice crystal concentrations and sizes. A total of 141 penetrations of 26 separate days in temperatures ranging from -7 to -24 C were performed. Subsequent measurements were also made 100 km away from the mountain. The ice crystal concentrations measured showed good correlation with the ice nucleus content in winter time, midcontinental air masses in Wyoming. Further studies are recommended to determine if the variations in the ice nucleus population are the cause of the variability if ice crystal content.

  6. Analysis of organic compounds in returned comet nucleus samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques for analysis of organic compounds in returned comet nucleus samples are described. Interstellar, chondritic and transitional organic components are discussed. Appropriate sampling procedures will be essential to the success of these analyses. It will be necessary to return samples that represent all the various regimes found in the nucleus, e.g., a complete core, volatile components (deep interior), and crustal components (surface minerals, rocks, processed organics such as macromolecular carbon and polymers). Furthermore, sampling, storage, return, and distribution of samples must be done under conditions that preclude contamination of the samples by terrestrial matter.

  7. Dual efferent projections of the trigeminal principal sensory nucleus to the thalamic ventroposteromedial nucleus in the squirrel monkey.

    PubMed

    Ganchrow, D; Mehler, W R

    1986-07-24

    Anterograde degeneration methods demonstrated two efferent components from the trigeminal principal sensory nucleus (PrV) to the thalamic ventroposteromedial nucleus (VPM) in the squirrel monkey: fibers from the dorsal PrV coursed within the central tegmental tract and terminated in a dorsoventromedial strip of the ipsilateral VPM; fibers from the ventral PrV mainly decussated caudal to the interpeduncular nucleus and terminated in the contralateral VPM exclusive of the sector receiving the dorsal PrV component, contralaterally. Adjacent Nissl sections showed an apparent increase in glial profiles accompanying an intense somal staining among the deafferented neuronal population in the VPM, coextensive with those regions in the VPM exhibiting terminal field degeneration.

  8. High-spin states in the 94Nb nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mărginean, N.; Bucurescu, D.; Căta-Danil, Ghe.; Căta-Danil, I.; Ivaşcu, M.; Ur, C. A.

    2000-09-01

    High-spin states have been studied for the first time in the 94Nb nucleus with the reaction 82Se(19F,α3nγ) at 68 MeV. A cascade of transitions has been observed, based on the (6)+ ground state and extending up to 6.5 MeV excitation and spin of about 19.

  9. Motility proteins and the origin of the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Michael F; Melnitsky, Hannah; Margulis, Lynn; Kolnicki, Robin

    2002-11-01

    Hypotheses on the origin of eukaryotic cells must account for the origin of the microtubular cytoskeletal structures (including the mitotic spindle, undulipodium/cilium (so-called flagellum) and other structures underlain by the 9(2)+2 microtubular axoneme) in addition to the membrane-bounded nucleus. Whereas bacteria with membrane-bounded nucleoids have been described, no precedent for mitotic, cytoskeletal, or axonemal microtubular structures are known in prokaryotes. Molecular phylogenetic analyses indicate that the cells of the earliest-branching lineages of eukaryotes contain the karyomastigont cytoskeletal system. These protist cells divide via an extranuclear spindle and a persistent nuclear membrane. We suggest that this association between the centriole/kinetosome axoneme (undulipodium) and the nucleus existed from the earliest stage of eukaryotic cell evolution. We interpret the karyomastigont to be a legacy of the symbiosis between thermoacidophilic archaebacteria and motile eubacteria from which the first eukaryote evolved. Mutually inconsistent hypotheses for the origin of the nucleus are reviewed and sequenced proteins of cell motility are discussed because of their potential value in resolving this problem. A correlation of fossil evidence with modern cell and microbiological studies leads us to the karyomastigont theory of the origin of the nucleus.

  10. Calcium-regulated import of myosin IC into the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Maly, Ivan V; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2016-06-01

    Myosin IC is a molecular motor involved in intracellular transport, cell motility, and transcription. Its mechanical properties are regulated by calcium via calmodulin binding, and its functions in the nucleus depend on import from the cytoplasm. The import has recently been shown to be mediated by the nuclear localization signal located within the calmodulin-binding domain. In the present paper, it is demonstrated that mutations in the calmodulin-binding sequence shift the intracellular distribution of myosin IC to the nucleus. The redistribution is displayed by isoform B, described originally as the "nuclear myosin," but is particularly pronounced with isoform C, the normally cytoplasmic isoform. Furthermore, experimental elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration induces a rapid import of myosin into the nucleus. The import is blocked by the importin β inhibitor importazole. These findings are consistent with a mechanism whereby calmodulin binding prevents recognition of the nuclear localization sequence by importin β, and the steric inhibition of import is released by cell signaling leading to the intracellular calcium elevation. The results establish a mechanistic connection between the calcium regulation of the motor function of myosin IC in the cytoplasm and the induction of its import into the nucleus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. High-energy pion-nucleus scattering at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.L.

    1993-01-01

    Recent data obtained for pion-nucleus interactions above the [triangle](1232) is presented. The expected long mean-free path at pion energies above the [3,3] resonance is demonstrated in elastic scattering. Evidence for unexpected nuclear transparency for outgoing pions at resonance energies is presented. A new technique measuring virtual [triangle] components of the nuclear wave function is suggested.

  12. High-energy pion-nucleus scattering at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.L.

    1993-02-01

    Recent data obtained for pion-nucleus interactions above the {triangle}(1232) is presented. The expected long mean-free path at pion energies above the [3,3] resonance is demonstrated in elastic scattering. Evidence for unexpected nuclear transparency for outgoing pions at resonance energies is presented. A new technique measuring virtual {triangle} components of the nuclear wave function is suggested.

  13. A continuing controversy: Has the cometary nucleus been resolved?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Z.

    1976-01-01

    Evidence is presented for classifying cometary nuclei into two basic types, described by core mantle and coreless models. Mass loss related nongravitational effects in a comet's motion as a function of time are included in considering gradual evaporation of an icy envelope surrounding the meteoric matrix in the core of the nucleus.

  14. Study of the variability of the nucleus of Centaurus A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes de Mello Rabaca, D.; Abraham, Z.

    1990-11-01

    ABSTRACT. This work consists in the study of the variability of the nucleus of the peculiar galaxy NGC 5128 (Centaurus A) at the radio continuum frequency of 43 GHz. The data were obtained with the 13.7 m itapetinga Radiotelescope. The radio source presents a pair of inner radio lobes and a compact variable nucleus. The observational technique used was scans through the inner radio lobes and the nucleus. The quasi- simultaneous measurements of the flux density of each source allowed us to derive accurately the relative flux between them, and to obtain the real variability of the nucleus. RESUMO. Este trabalho consiste no estudo da variabilidade do nucleo da galaxia peculiar NGC 5128 (Centaurus A) no de radio na de 43 GHz. Os dados foram obtidos com 0 Radiotelescopio do Itapetinga. A radio fonte apresenta um par de lobulos internos e um nucleo compacto variavel. A tetnica observacional utilizada foi a de varreduras passando pelos lobulos e pelo nucleo. As medidas quase simultaneas da densidade de fluxo de cada fonte permitiu obter precisa- mente 0 fluxo relativo entre elas e a variabilidade real do nucleo. Keq woit : GALAXIES-RADIO

  15. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, Ke-Mian; Chang, Chia-Chun; Shen, Qing-Ji; Sung, Li-Ying; Liu, Ji-Long

    2014-04-15

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  16. Measuring neutrino-nucleus interactions with MINERνA

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, P. A.

    2015-07-15

    We present results from the MINERνA experiment for neutrino-nucleus scattering in the few-GeV energy region. These measurements cover a range of processes that must be modeled correctly in neutrino oscillation experiments, and in which recent results from other experiments have suggested deficiencies in the models currently used.

  17. Antidromic activation of the isthmo-optic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Holden, A. L.

    1968-01-01

    1. This paper describes experiments carried out to record from output cells in the isthmo-optic nucleus. 2. One-hundred and twenty-seven axonal responses were fired at fixed latency from the optic nerve-head. 3. Ninety-nine cell responses were fired trans-synaptically from the optic nerve-head. 4. Ninety-four cells were activated antidromically from the optic nerve-head. 5. Tectal tracks could be recognized by the field potential profile of the N-wave, R-wave and P-wave, and by the occurrence of fixed latency axonal responses and trans-synaptically fired cells. 6. Tectal tracks were verified histologically. 7. Tracks yielding antidromically activated cells were traced histologically to the isthmo-optic nucleus. 8. The antidromic A-wave could be recorded from the nucleus, corresponding in timing to the invasion of cell bodies. 9. Somatic records in the nucleus could be recognized by their duration, conformation, and A—B blocking. 10. When antidromic discharge was interacted with orthodromic firing, collision evidence could be provided, showing that the orthodromic impulse travels centrifugally to the retina. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:5675042

  18. Turn Up the Volume: Uncovering Nucleus Size Control Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Good, Matthew C

    2015-06-08

    Reporting in Developmental Cell, Hara and Merten (2015) apply the use of microfabrication and in vitro analysis in cell-free extracts to the old problem of nuclear size control. The authors make insights into the regulation of nuclear growth that potentially explain the widely reported correlation between nucleus size and cell size.

  19. mRNA-Producing Pseudo-nucleus System.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung Won; Park, Kyung Soo; Shin, Woo Jung; Um, Soong Ho

    2015-11-04

    A pseudo-eukaryotic nucleus (PEN) system consisting of a gene-containing DNA hydrogel encapsulated in a liposome is fabricated. Owing to the structural characteristics of gene-containing DNA hydrogel, mRNA transcription efficiency is promoted 2.57-fold. Through the use of PEN as a platform for mRNA delivery to the cytosol, prolonged protein translation is achieved.

  20. Synthesis of the Furan Nucleus Promoted by Ytterbium Triflate.

    PubMed

    Taddeo, Vito Alessandro; Genovese, Salvatore; Epifano, Francesco; Fiorito, Serena

    2015-11-01

    An efficient synthesis of differently substituted furans from acetylene dicarboxylates and β-dicarbonyl compounds is described. The furan nucleus was built by means of an Yb(OTf)3 catalyzed cycloaddition reaction yielding desired adducts in 91%-98% yield.

  1. Physical interrelation of volatile and refractories in a cometary nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulle, Marco; Alice Team; Stern, Alan; CONSTERT Team; Kofman, Wlodek; COSIMA Team; Hilchenbach, Martin; GIADA Team; Rotundi, Alessandra; MIDAS Team; Bentley, Mark; MIRO Team; Hofstadter, Mark; OSIRIS Team; Sierks, Holger; ROSINA Team; Altwegg, Kathrin; RPC Team; Nilsson, Hans; Burch, James; Eriksson, Anders; Heinz-Glassmeier, Karl; Henri, Pierre; Carr, Christopher; RSI Team; Paetzold, Martin; , VIRTIS Team; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Lander Team; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; IDS Team; Gruen, Eberhard; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Weissman, Paul; Project Scientist Team; Taylor, Matt; Buratti, Bonnie; Altobelli, Nicolas; Choukroun, Mathieu; Ground-Based Observations Team; Snodgrass, Colin

    2016-10-01

    The Rosetta mission has been taking measurements of its target comet Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since early 2014 and will complete operations at the end of September 2016. The mission Science Management Plan, in 1994, laid out the the prime goals and themes of the mission. These five themes were: 1) To study the global characterisation of the Nuclues, the determination of the dynamics properties , surface morpholy and composition of the comet. 2) Examination of the Chemical, Mineralogical and isotopic compositions of volatiles and refractories in a cometary nucleus.3) Physical interrelation of volatile and refractories in a cometary nucleus4) Study the development of cometary activity and the process in the surface layer of the nucleus and in the inner coma5) The origins of comets, the relationship between cometary and interstellar material and the implications for the origin of the solar system,To cover all aspects of the Rosetta mission in this special Show case session, this abstracts is one of 5, with this particular presentation focusing on theme 3, in particular on a) The dust-to-gas ratio; b) distributed sources of volatiles; c) seasonal evolution of the dust size distribution.a) The dust-to-gas ratio has been provided by coma observations measuring the gas and dust loss rates from the nucleus surface. The ratio of these two loss rates provides a lower limit of the dust-to-gas ratio at the nucleus surface, since it does not take into account the largest chunks unable to leave the nucleus, or falling back due to the dominant gravity. We review the value inferred so far, its time evolution, and new techniques to directly measure it in the nucleus.b) Evidences offered by Rosetta observations of gas sublimating from dust particles are up to now faint. We report the few available observations and an estimate of the probable average water content in dust particles inferred by 3D gas-dynamical codes of 67P coma.c) The dust-size distribution tunes the sizes

  2. Structures and functions in the crowded nucleus: new biophysical insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Ronald

    2014-09-01

    Concepts and methods from the physical sciences have catalysed remarkable progress in understanding the cell nucleus in recent years. To share this excitement with physicists and encourage their interest in this field, this review offers an overview of how the physics which underlies structures and functions in the nucleus is becoming more clear thanks to methods which have been developed to simulate and study macromolecules, polymers, and colloids. The environment in the nucleus is very crowded with macromolecules, making entropic (depletion) forces major determinants of interactions. Simulation and experiments are consistent with their key role in forming membraneless compartments such as nucleoli, PML and Cajal bodies, and discrete "territories" for chromosomes. The chromosomes, giant linear polyelectrolyte polymers, exist in vivo in a state like a polymer melt. Looped conformations are predicted in crowded conditions, and have been confirmed experimentally and are central to the regulation of gene expression. Polymer theory has revealed how the chromosomes are so highly compacted in the nucleus, forming a "crumpled globule" with fractal properties which avoids knots and entanglements in DNA while allowing facile accessibility for its replication and transcription. Entropic repulsion between looped polymers can explain the confinement of each chromosome to a discrete region of the nucleus. Crowding and looping are predicted to facilitate finding the specific targets of factors which modulate activities of DNA. Simulation shows that entropic effects contribute to finding and repairing potentially lethal double-strand breaks in DNA by increasing the mobility of the broken ends, favouring their juxtaposition for repair. Signaling pathways are strongly influenced by crowding, which favours a processive mode of response (consecutive reactions without releasing substrates). This new information contributes to understanding the sometimes counter-intuitive consequences.

  3. Ultrastructural study of the nucleus Cuneiformis in the cat.

    PubMed

    Gioia, M; Bianchi, R

    1987-01-01

    The Cuneiformis nucleus (Cu.n.) is a reticular nucleus of the mesencephalic tegmentum which is involved in several functions and particularly in locomotor activities. While the physiological properties and the nervous connections of the nucleus have been studied, there is no data about its ultrastructure. Therefore, we investigated this region in cat at the electron microscope and with morphoquantitative methods to clarify its ultrastructural organization and particularly the characteristics of its synaptic complex. The neurons are small and medium in size, with a high nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio and a modest rough endoplasmic reticulum organization. The neuropil is very extensive. Myelinated axons are very numerous. Dendritic profiles whose plasmalemma is almost completely covered by synaptic boutons are observed frequently. There are few somatic synapses; 81% have symmetrical junctions and 23% have round vesicles only. There are numerous synapses in the neuropil, 40% having asymmetrical junctions and 60% containing round vesicles only. The greater functional complexity indicated by the morphological data and the greater extension of the neuropil synapses with respect to that of the somatic ones, suggest that the neuropil is the main site of modulation and integration of the inputs to the nucleus. A highly significant statistical difference between the sizes of the somatic vesicles and those of the neuropil was found. This may point to the presence of distinct populations of vesicles, which may be correlated with the variety of substances (neurotransmitters, neuropeptides etc ...) found in the nucleus. The remarkable ultrastructural similarity between the Cu.n. and the periaqueductal gray matter is discussed.

  4. Cytoskeletal tension induces the polarized architecture of the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hwee; Wirtz, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is a thin filamentous meshwork that provides mechanical support to the nucleus and regulates essential cellular processes such as DNA replication, chromatin organization, cell division, and differentiation. Isolated horizontal imaging using fluorescence and electron microscopy has long suggested that the nuclear lamina is composed of structurally different A-type and B-type lamin proteins and nuclear lamin-associated membrane proteins that together form a thin layer that is spatially isotropic with no apparent difference in molecular content or density between the top and bottom of the nucleus. Chromosomes are condensed differently along the radial direction from the periphery of the nucleus to the nuclear center; therefore, chromatin accessibility for gene expression is different along the nuclear radius. However, 3D confocal reconstruction reveals instead that major lamin protein lamin A/C forms an apically polarized Frisbee-like dome structure in the nucleus of adherent cells. Here we show that both A-type lamins and transcriptionally active chromatins are vertically polarized by the tension exercised by the perinuclear actin cap (or actin cap) that is composed of highly contractile actomyosin fibers organized at the apical surface of the nucleus. Mechanical coupling between actin cap and lamina through LINC (linkers of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) protein complexes induces an apical distribution of transcription-active subnucleolar compartments and epigenetic markers of transcription-active genes. This study reveals that intranuclear structures, such as nuclear lamina and chromosomal architecture, are apically polarized through the extranuclear perinuclear actin cap in a wide range of somatic adherent cells. PMID:25701041

  5. Critical evaluation of the anatomical location of the Barrington nucleus: relevance for deep brain stimulation surgery of pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Lisette; Yuste, Jose Enrique; Carrillo-de Sauvage, María Angeles; Gómez, Aurora; Fernández-Villalba, Emiliano; Avilés-Olmos, Itciar; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Herrero, María Trinidad

    2013-09-05

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become the standard surgical procedure for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently, the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPN) has emerged as a potential target for DBS in patients whose quality of life is compromised by freezing of gait and falls. To date, only a few groups have published their long-term clinical experience with PPN stimulation. Bearing in mind that the Barrington (Bar) nucleus and some adjacent nuclei (also known as the micturition centre) are close to the PPN and may be affected by DBS, the aim of the present study was to review the anatomical location of this structure in human and other species. To this end, the Bar nucleus area was analysed in mouse, monkey and human tissues, paying particular attention to the anatomical position in humans, where it has been largely overlooked. Results confirm that anatomical location renders the Bar nucleus susceptible to influence by the PPN DBS lead or to diffusion of electrical current. This may have an undesirable impact on the quality of life of patients.

  6. Responses of primate caudal parabrachial nucleus and Kolliker-fuse nucleus neurons to whole body rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balaban, Carey D.; McGee, David M.; Zhou, Jianxun; Scudder, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    The caudal aspect of the parabrachial (PBN) and Kolliker-Fuse (KF) nuclei receive vestibular nuclear and visceral afferent information and are connected reciprocally with the spinal cord, hypothalamus, amygdala, and limbic cortex. Hence, they may be important sites of vestibulo-visceral integration, particularly for the development of affective responses to gravitoinertial challenges. Extracellular recordings were made from caudal PBN cells in three alert, adult female Macaca nemestrina through an implanted chamber. Sinusoidal and position trapezoid angular whole body rotation was delivered in yaw, roll, pitch, and vertical semicircular canal planes. Sites were confirmed histologically. Units that responded during rotation were located in lateral and medial PBN and KF caudal to the trochlear nerve at sites that were confirmed anatomically to receive superior vestibular nucleus afferents. Responses to whole-body angular rotation were modeled as a sum of three signals: angular velocity, a leaky integration of angular velocity, and vertical position. All neurons displayed angular velocity and integrated angular velocity sensitivity, but only 60% of the neurons were position-sensitive. These responses to vertical rotation could display symmetric, asymmetric, or fully rectified cosinusoidal spatial tuning about a best orientation in different cells. The spatial properties of velocity and integrated velocity and position responses were independent for all position-sensitive neurons; the angular velocity and integrated angular velocity signals showed independent spatial tuning in the position-insensitive neurons. Individual units showed one of three different orientations of their excitatory axis of velocity rotation sensitivity: vertical-plane-only responses, positive elevation responses (vertical plane plus ipsilateral yaw), and negative elevation axis responses (vertical plane plus negative yaw). The interactions between the velocity and integrated velocity components

  7. Regional difference in sex steroid action on formation of morphological sex differences in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus and principal nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Moeko; Tsuda, Mumeko C; Sagoshi, Shoko; Nagata, Kazuyo; Morimoto, Chihiro; Thu, Chaw Kyi Tha; Toda, Katsumi; Kato, Shigeaki; Ogawa, Sonoko; Tsukahara, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Sex steroid action is critical to form sexually dimorphic nuclei, although it is not fully understood. We previously reported that masculinization of the principal nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNSTp), which is larger and has more neurons in males than in females, involves aromatized testosterone that acts via estrogen receptor-α (ERα), but not estrogen receptor-β (ERβ). Here, we examined sex steroid action on the formation of the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) that is larger and has more neurons in females. Morphometrical analysis of transgenic mice lacking aromatase, ERα, or ERβ genes revealed that the volume and neuron number of the male AVPV were significantly increased by deletion of aromatase and ERα genes, but not the ERβ gene. We further examined the AVPV and BNSTp of androgen receptor knockout (ARKO) mice. The volume and neuron number of the male BNSTp were smaller in ARKO mice than those in wild-type mice, while no significant effect of ARKO was found on the AVPV and female BNSTp. We also examined aromatase, ERα, and AR mRNA levels in the AVPV and BNSTp of wild-type and ARKO mice on embryonic day (ED) 18 and postnatal day (PD) 4. AR mRNA in the BNSTp and AVPV of wild-type mice was not expressed on ED18 and emerged on PD4. In the AVPV, the aromatase mRNA level was higher on ED18, although the ERα mRNA level was higher on PD4 without any effect of AR gene deletion. Aromatase and ERα mRNA levels in the male BNSTp were significantly increased on PD4 by AR gene deletion. These results suggest that estradiol signaling via ERα during the perinatal period and testosterone signaling via AR during the postnatal period are required for masculinization of the BNSTp, whereas the former is sufficient to defeminize the AVPV.

  8. Regional Difference in Sex Steroid Action on Formation of Morphological Sex Differences in the Anteroventral Periventricular Nucleus and Principal Nucleus of the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis

    PubMed Central

    Kanaya, Moeko; Tsuda, Mumeko C.; Sagoshi, Shoko; Nagata, Kazuyo; Morimoto, Chihiro; Tha Thu, Chaw Kyi; Toda, Katsumi; Kato, Shigeaki; Ogawa, Sonoko; Tsukahara, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Sex steroid action is critical to form sexually dimorphic nuclei, although it is not fully understood. We previously reported that masculinization of the principal nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNSTp), which is larger and has more neurons in males than in females, involves aromatized testosterone that acts via estrogen receptor-α (ERα), but not estrogen receptor-β (ERβ). Here, we examined sex steroid action on the formation of the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) that is larger and has more neurons in females. Morphometrical analysis of transgenic mice lacking aromatase, ERα, or ERβ genes revealed that the volume and neuron number of the male AVPV were significantly increased by deletion of aromatase and ERα genes, but not the ERβ gene. We further examined the AVPV and BNSTp of androgen receptor knockout (ARKO) mice. The volume and neuron number of the male BNSTp were smaller in ARKO mice than those in wild-type mice, while no significant effect of ARKO was found on the AVPV and female BNSTp. We also examined aromatase, ERα, and AR mRNA levels in the AVPV and BNSTp of wild-type and ARKO mice on embryonic day (ED) 18 and postnatal day (PD) 4. AR mRNA in the BNSTp and AVPV of wild-type mice was not expressed on ED18 and emerged on PD4. In the AVPV, the aromatase mRNA level was higher on ED18, although the ERα mRNA level was higher on PD4 without any effect of AR gene deletion. Aromatase and ERα mRNA levels in the male BNSTp were significantly increased on PD4 by AR gene deletion. These results suggest that estradiol signaling via ERα during the perinatal period and testosterone signaling via AR during the postnatal period are required for masculinization of the BNSTp, whereas the former is sufficient to defeminize the AVPV. PMID:25398007

  9. Development of injectable hydrogels for nucleus pulposus replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jonathan D.

    Intervertebral disc degeneration has been reported as the underlying cause for 75% of cases of lower back pain and is marked by dehydration of the nucleus pulposus within the intervertebral disc. There have been many implant designs to replace the nucleus pulposus. Some researchers have proposed the replacement of the nucleus pulposus with hydrogel materials. The insertion of devices made from these materials further compromises the annulus of the disc. An ideal nucleus replacement could be injected into the disc space and form a solid in vivo. However, injectable replacements using curing elastomers and thermoplastic materials are not ideal because of the potentially harmful exothermic heat evolved from their reactions and the toxicity of the reactants used. We propose a hydrogel system that can be injected as a liquid at 25°C and solidified to yield a hydrogel within the intervertebral disc at 37°C. In aqueous solutions, these polymers have Lower Critical Solution Temperatures (LCST) between 25-37°C, making them unique candidate materials for this application. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) is the most widely studied LCST polymer due to its drastic transition near body temperature. However, by itself, pure PNIPAAm forms a hydrogel that has low water content and can readily undergo plastic deformation. To increase the water content and impart elasticity to PNIPAAm hydrogels, grafted and branched hydrogel systems were created that incorporated the thermogelling PNIPAAm and hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). In this research, the effects of polymer composition and monomer to initiator ratio, which controls polymer MW, on the in vitro swelling properties (mass, chemical, and compressive mechanical stability) of hydrogels formed from aqueous solutions of these polymers were evaluated. Immersion studies were also conducted in solutions to simulate the osmotic environment of the nucleus pulposus. The effects of repeated compression and unloading cycles

  10. The Nucleus of Translating as One Critical Concern in Translation Pedagogy and Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Helen Chau

    1999-01-01

    Studies the translation of nonliterary texts. The objective is to associate the nucleus of translating with the value of a source-language text, advancing the claim that appropriately translating the nucleus is among the most important concerns, and to propose an approach to assessment for translation quality based on how the nucleus is rendered.…

  11. Actomyosin pulls to advance the nucleus in a migrating tissue cell.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Kent, Ian A; Shekhar, Nandini; Chancellor, T J; Mendonca, Agnes; Dickinson, Richard B; Lele, Tanmay P

    2014-01-07

    The cytoskeletal forces involved in translocating the nucleus in a migrating tissue cell remain unresolved. Previous studies have variously implicated actomyosin-generated pushing or pulling forces on the nucleus, as well as pulling by nucleus-bound microtubule motors. We found that the nucleus in an isolated migrating cell can move forward without any trailing-edge detachment. When a new lamellipodium was triggered with photoactivation of Rac1, the nucleus moved toward the new lamellipodium. This forward motion required both nuclear-cytoskeletal linkages and myosin activity. Apical or basal actomyosin bundles were found not to translate with the nucleus. Although microtubules dampen fluctuations in nuclear position, they are not required for forward translocation of the nucleus during cell migration. Trailing-edge detachment and pulling with a microneedle produced motion and deformation of the nucleus suggestive of a mechanical coupling between the nucleus and the trailing edge. Significantly, decoupling the nucleus from the cytoskeleton with KASH overexpression greatly decreased the frequency of trailing-edge detachment. Collectively, these results explain how the nucleus is moved in a crawling fibroblast and raise the possibility that forces could be transmitted from the front to the back of the cell through the nucleus.

  12. Progressive activation of paratrigeminal nucleus during entrance to hibernation

    SciTech Connect

    Kilduff, T.S.; Sharp, F.R.; Heller, H.C. Univ. of California, San Francisco Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Francisco, CA )

    1988-07-01

    The paratrigeminal nucleus (Pa5) undergoes a progressive increase in its uptake of 2-({sup 14}C)deoxyglucose (2DG) relative to other brain structures during entrance to hibernation in the ground squirrel. This highly significant increase results in the Pa5 becoming the most highly labeled brain region during hibernation, even though it exhibits one of the lowest levels of 2DG uptake in the brain during the nonhibernating state. The progressive activation of the Pa5 observed during entrance is reversed during arousal from hibernation. These observations and the neuroanatomical projections of the Pa5 implicate this nucleus as playing a role in the entrance and maintenance of the hibernating state.

  13. Leading neutrons from polarized proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    Leading neutron production on protons is known to be subject to strong absorptive corrections, which have been under debate for a long time. On nuclear targets these corrections are significantly enhanced and push the partial cross sections of neutron production to the very periphery of the nucleus. As a result, the A-dependences of inclusive and diffractive neutron production turn out to be similar. The mechanism of π-a1 interference, which successfully explained the observed single-spin asymmetry of neutrons in polarized pp interactions, is extended here to polarized pA collisions. Corrected for nuclear effects it explains quite well the magnitude and sign of the asymmetry AN observed in inelastic events, resulting in a violent break up of the nucleus. However the excessive magnitude of AN observed in the diffractive sample, remains a challenge.

  14. Triple F - A Comet Nucleus Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kueppers, Michael; Keller, Horst Uwe; Kuhrt, Ekkehard; A'Hearn, Michael; Altwegg, Kathrin; Betrand, Regis; Busemann, Henner; Capria, Maria Teresa; Colangeli, Luigi

    2008-01-01

    The Triple F (Fresh From the Fridge) mission, a Comet Nucleus Sample Return, has been proposed to ESA s Cosmic Vision program. A sample return from a comet enables us to reach the ultimate goal of cometary research. Since comets are the least processed bodies in the solar system, the proposal goes far beyond cometary science topics (like the explanation of cometary activity) and delivers invaluable information about the formation of the solar system and the interstellar molecular cloud from which it formed. The proposed mission would extract three samples of the upper 50 cm from three locations on a cometary nucleus and return them cooled to Earth for analysis in the laboratory. The simple mission concept with a touch-and-go sampling by a single spacecraft was proposed as an M-class mission in collaboration with the Russian space agency ROSCOSMOS.

  15. Triple F - A Comet Nucleus Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kueppers, Michael; Keller, H. U.; Kuehrt, E.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Altwegg, K.; Bertrand, R.; Busemann, H.; Capria, M. T.; Colangeli, L.; Davidsson, B.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Knollenberg, J.; Mottola, S.; Weiss, P.; Zolensky, M.; Akim, E.; Basilevsky, A.; Galimov, E.; Gerasimov, M.; Korablev, O.; Charnley, S.; Nittler, L. R.; Sandford, S.; Weissman, P.

    2008-01-01

    The Triple F (Fresh From the Fridge) mission, a Comet Nucleus Sample Return, has been proposed to ESA's Cosmic Vision program. A sample return from a comet enables us to reach the ultimate goal of cometary research. Since comets are the least processed bodies in the solar system, the proposal goes far beyond cometary science topics (like the explanation of cometary activity) and delivers invaluable information about the formation of the solar system and the interstellar molecular cloud from which it formed. The proposed mission would extract three sample cores of the upper 50 cm from three locations on a cometary nucleus and return them cooled to Earth for analysis in the laboratory. The simple mission concept with a touch-andgo sampling by a single spacecraft was proposed as an M-class mission in collaboration with the Russian space agency ROSCOSMOS.

  16. Direct Observation of Nanoparticle-Cancer Cell Nucleus Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Dam, Duncan Hieu M.; Lee, Jung Heon; Sisco, Patrick N.; Co, Dick T.; Zhang, Ming; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Odom, Teri W.

    2012-01-01

    We report the direct visualization of interactions between drug-loaded nanoparticles and the cancer cell nucleus. Nanoconstructs composed of nucleolin-specific aptamers and gold nanostars were actively transported to the nucleus and induced major changes to the nuclear phenotype via nuclear envelope invaginations near the site of the construct. The number of local deformations could be increased by ultra-fast, light-triggered release of the aptamers from the surface of the gold nanostars. Cancer cells with more nuclear envelope folding showed increased caspase 3 and 7 activity (apoptosis) as well as decreased cell viability. This newly revealed correlation between drug-induced changes in nuclear phenotype and increased therapeutic efficacy could provide new insight for nuclear-targeted cancer therapy. PMID:22424173

  17. IC5063: A merger with a hidden luminous active nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colina, L.; Sparks, W. B.; Macchetto, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    IC5063 is a nearby galaxy classified as an SO and containing a system of dust lanes parallel to its major optical axis (Danziger, Goss and Wellington, 1981; Bergeron, Durret and Boksenberg, 1983). Extended emission line regions with high excitation properties have been detected over distances of up to 19 kpc from the nucleus. This galaxy has been classified as Seyfert 2 on the basis of its emission line spectrum. These characteristics make IC5063 one of the best candidates for a merger remnant and an excellent candidate for a hidden luminous active nucleus. Based on new broad and narrow band images and long-slit spectroscopy obtained at the ESO 3.6 m telescope, the authors present some preliminary results supporting this hypothesis.

  18. Volume regulation and shape bifurcation in the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hwee; Li, Bo; Si, Fangwei; Phillip, Jude M.; Wirtz, Denis; Sun, Sean X.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Alterations in nuclear morphology are closely associated with essential cell functions, such as cell motility and polarization, and correlate with a wide range of human diseases, including cancer, muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiomyopathy and progeria. However, the mechanics and forces that shape the nucleus are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that when an adherent cell is detached from its substratum, the nucleus undergoes a large volumetric reduction accompanied by a morphological transition from an almost smooth to a heavily folded surface. We develop a mathematical model that systematically analyzes the evolution of nuclear shape and volume. The analysis suggests that the pressure difference across the nuclear envelope, which is influenced by changes in cell volume and regulated by microtubules and actin filaments, is a major factor determining nuclear morphology. Our results show that physical and chemical properties of the extracellular microenvironment directly influence nuclear morphology and suggest that there is a direct link between the environment and gene regulation. PMID:26243474

  19. K+-nucleus potentials from K+-nucleon amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.

    2016-10-01

    Optical potentials for K+-nucleus interactions are constructed from K+-nucleon amplitudes using recently developed algorithm based on K+-N kinematics in the nuclear medium. With the deep penetration of K+ mesons into the nucleus at momenta below 800 MeV / c it is possible to test this approach with greater sensitivity than hitherto done with K- and pions. The energy-dependence of experimental reaction and total cross sections on nuclei is better reproduced with this approach compared to fixed-energy amplitudes. The inclusion of Pauli correlations in the medium also improves the agreement between calculation and experiment. The absolute scale of the cross sections is reproduced very well for 6Li but for C, Si and Ca calculated cross sections are (23 ± 4)% smaller than experiment, in agreement with earlier analyses. Two phenomenological models that produce such missing strength suggest that the imaginary part of the potential needs about 40% enhancement.

  20. Cell Autonomy and Synchrony of Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Circadian Oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Mohawk, Jennifer A.; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is the site of the master circadian pacemaker in mammals. The individual cells of the SCN are capable of functioning independently from one another and therefore must form a cohesive circadian network through intercellular coupling. The network properties of the SCN lead to coordination of circadian rhythms among its neurons and neuronal subpopulations. There is increasing evidence for multiple interconnected oscillators within the SCN, and in this Review, we will highlight recent advances in our understanding of the complex organization and function of the cellular and network-level SCN clock. Understanding the way in which synchrony is achieved between cells in the SCN will provide insight into the means by which this important nucleus orchestrates circadian rhythms throughout the organism. PMID:21665298

  1. Towards a Deeper Understanding of the Nucleus with Exotic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormand, Erich

    2006-10-01

    Despite more than fifty years of study, many questions about now nuclei are put together remain. While nuclei near the valley of stability have provided a wealth of information, they are not sufficient to provide us with a comprehensive and unified description of the nucleus. Especially lacking is an accurate picture of those exotic species that are the basis of cosmic alchemy. The missing pieces in the puzzle can be filled in with a determined experimental and theoretical effort focusing on nuclei lying far from the valley of stability. Here, I will outline the intellectual challenges that can be addressed by proposed exotic-beam facilities, and how new experimental data will quide and refine theoretical descriptions of the nucleus.

  2. Deformations and magnetic rotations in the Ni60 nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, D. A.; Cristancho, F.; Andersson, L.-L.; Johansson, E. K.; Rudolph, D.; Fahlander, C.; Ekman, J.; Du Rietz, R.; Andreoiu, C.; Carpenter, M. P.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.; Charity, R. J.; Chiara, C. J.; Hoel, C.; Pechenaya, O. L.; Reviol, W.; Sarantites, D. G.; Sobotka, L. G.; Baktash, C.; Yu, C.-H.; Carlsson, B. G.; Ragnarsson, I.

    2008-11-01

    Data from three experiments using the heavy-ion fusion evaporation-reaction 36Ar+28Si have been combined to study high-spin states in the residual nucleus Ni60, which is populated via the evaporation of four protons from the compound nucleus Ge64. The GAMMASPHERE array was used for all the experiments in conjunction with a 4π charged-particle detector arrays (MICROBALL, LUWUSIA) and neutron detectors (NEUTRON SHELL) to allow for the detection of γ rays in coincidence with the evaporated particles. An extended Ni60 level scheme is presented, comprising more than 270γ-ray transitions and 110 excited states. Their spins and parities have been assigned via directional correlations of γ rays emitted from oriented states. Spherical shell-model calculations in the fp-shell characterize some of the low-spin states, while the experimental results of the rotational bands are analyzed with configuration-dependent cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations.

  3. The abnormal nucleus as a cause of congenital facial palsy

    PubMed Central

    Jemec, B.; Grobbelaar, A.; Harrison, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Congenital facial palsy (CFP) is clinically defined as facial palsy present at birth. It is associated with considerable disfigurement and causes functional and emotional problems for the affected child. The aetiology of the majority of cases however, remains elusive.
AIMS—To investigate the role of a neuroanatomical abnormality as a cause of unilateral CFP.
METHODS—Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were performed on 21 patients with unilateral CFP. Fifteen patients had unilateral CFP only; six suffered from syndromes which can include unilateral CFP.
RESULTS—Of the 15 patients with unilateral CFP only, four (27%) had an abnormal nucleus or an abnormal weighting of this area on the MRI scan, compared to one (17%) of the remaining six patients.
CONCLUSION—Developmental abnormalities of the facial nucleus itself constitute an important, and previously ignored, cause of monosymptomatic unilateral CFP.

 PMID:10952650

  4. Neutrino-nucleus interactions at the LBNF near detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mosel, Ulrich

    2015-10-15

    The reaction mechanisms for neutrino interactions with an {sup 40}Ar nucleus with the LBNF flux are calculated with the Giessen-Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) transport-theoretical implementation of these interactions. Quasielastic scattering, many-body effects, pion production and absorption and Deep Inelastic Scattering are discussed; they all play a role at the LBNF energies and are experimentally entangled with each other. Quasielastic scattering makes up for only about 1/3 of the total cross section whereas pion production channels make up about 2/3 of the total. This underlines the need for a consistent description of the neutrino-nucleus reaction that treats all channels on an equal, consistent footing. The results discussed here can also serve as useful guideposts for the Intermediate Neutrino Program.

  5. Coulomb Excitation of the N = 50 nucleus 80Zn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Walle, J.; Aksouh, F.; Ames, F.; Behrens, T.; Bildstein, V.; Blazhev, A.; Cederkäll, J.; Clément, E.; Cocolios, T. E.; Davinson, T.; Delahaye, P.; Eberth, J.; Ekström, A.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Fraile, L. M.; Franchoo, S.; Gernhauser, R.; Georgiev, G.; Habs, D.; Heyde, K.; Huber, G.; Huyse, M.; Ibrahim, F.; Ivanov, O.; Iwanicki, J.; Jolie, J.; Kester, O.; Köster, U.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Lauer, M.; Lisetskiy, A. F.; Lutter, R.; Marsh, B. A.; Mayet, P.; Niedermaier, O.; Nilsson, T.; Pantea, M.; Perru, O.; Raabe, R.; Reiter, P.; Sawicka, M.; Scheit, H.; Schrieder, G.; Schwalm, D.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Sieber, T.; Sletten, G.; Smirnova, N.; Stanoiu, M.; Stefanescu, I.; Thomas, J.-C.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; van Duppen, P.; Verney, D.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Weisshaar, D.; Wenander, F.; Wolf, B. H.; Zielińska, M.

    2008-05-01

    Neutron rich Zinc isotopes, including the N = 50 nucleus 80Zn, were produced and post-accelerated at the Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility REX-ISOLDE (CERN). Low-energy Coulomb excitation was induced on these isotopes after post-acceleration, yielding B(E2) strengths to the first excited 2+ states. For the first time, an excited state in 80Zn was observed and the 21+ state in 78Zn was established. The measured B(E2,21+-->01+) values are compared to two sets of large scale shell model calculations. Both calculations reproduce the observed B(E2) systematics for the full Zinc isotopic chain. The results for N = 50 isotones indicate a good N = 50 shell closure and a strong Z = 28 proton core polarization. The new results serve as benchmarks to establish theoretical models, predicting the nuclear properties of the doubly magic nucleus 78Ni.

  6. Control of cell nucleus shapes via micropillar patterns.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhen; Yan, Ce; Peng, Rong; Zhao, Yingchun; He, Yao; Ding, Jiandong

    2012-02-01

    We herein report a material technique to control the shapes of cell nuclei by the design of the microtopography of substrates to which the cells adhere. Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) micropillars or micropits of a series of height or depth were fabricated, and some surprising self deformation of the nuclei of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) was found in the case of micropillars with a sufficient height. Despite severe nucleus deformation, BMSCs kept the ability of proliferation and differentiation. We further demonstrated that the shapes of cell nuclei could be regulated by the appropriate micropillar patterns. Besides circular and elliptoid shapes, some unusual nucleus shapes of BMSCs have been achieved, such as square, cross, dumbbell, and asymmetric sphere-protrusion.

  7. Direct observation of nanoparticle-cancer cell nucleus interactions.

    PubMed

    Dam, Duncan Hieu M; Lee, Jung Heon; Sisco, Patrick N; Co, Dick T; Zhang, Ming; Wasielewski, Michael R; Odom, Teri W

    2012-04-24

    We report the direct visualization of interactions between drug-loaded nanoparticles and the cancer cell nucleus. Nanoconstructs composed of nucleolin-specific aptamers and gold nanostars were actively transported to the nucleus and induced major changes to the nuclear phenotype via nuclear envelope invaginations near the site of the construct. The number of local deformations could be increased by ultrafast, light-triggered release of the aptamers from the surface of the gold nanostars. Cancer cells with more nuclear envelope folding showed increased caspase 3 and 7 activity (apoptosis) as well as decreased cell viability. This newly revealed correlation between drug-induced changes in nuclear phenotype and increased therapeutic efficacy could provide new insight for nuclear-targeted cancer therapy.

  8. Volume regulation and shape bifurcation in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hwee; Li, Bo; Si, Fangwei; Phillip, Jude M; Wirtz, Denis; Sun, Sean X

    2015-09-15

    Alterations in nuclear morphology are closely associated with essential cell functions, such as cell motility and polarization, and correlate with a wide range of human diseases, including cancer, muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiomyopathy and progeria. However, the mechanics and forces that shape the nucleus are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that when an adherent cell is detached from its substratum, the nucleus undergoes a large volumetric reduction accompanied by a morphological transition from an almost smooth to a heavily folded surface. We develop a mathematical model that systematically analyzes the evolution of nuclear shape and volume. The analysis suggests that the pressure difference across the nuclear envelope, which is influenced by changes in cell volume and regulated by microtubules and actin filaments, is a major factor determining nuclear morphology. Our results show that physical and chemical properties of the extracellular microenvironment directly influence nuclear morphology and suggest that there is a direct link between the environment and gene regulation.

  9. Electromagnetic properties of the Beryllium-11 nucleus in Halo EFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D. R.; Hammer, H.-W.

    2010-04-01

    We compute electromagnetic properties of the Beryllium-11 nucleus using an effective field theory that exploits the separation of scales in this halo system. We fix the parameters of the EFT from measured data on levels and scattering lengths in the 10Be plus neutron system. We then obtain predictions for the B(E1) strength of the 1/2+ to 1/2- transition in the 11Be nucleus. We also compute the charge radius of the ground state of 11Be. Agreement with experiment within the expected accuracy of a leading-order computation in this EFT is obtained. We also indicate how higher-order corrections that affect both s-wave and p-wave 10 Be-neutron interactions will affect our results.

  10. The cellular mastermind(?) – Mechanotransduction and the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Ashley; Fedorchak, Gregory R.; Lammerding, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical stimulation by activation of specific signaling pathways and genes that allow the cell to adapt to its dynamic physical environment. How cells sense the various mechanical inputs and translate them into biochemical signals remains an area of active investigation. Recent reports suggest that the cell nucleus may be directly implicated in this cellular mechanotransduction process. In this chapter, we discuss how forces applied to the cell surface and cytoplasm induce changes in nuclear structure and organization, which could directly affect gene expression, while also highlighting the complex interplay between nuclear structural proteins and transcriptional regulators that may further modulate mechanotransduction signaling. Taken together, these findings paint a picture of the nucleus as a central hub in cellular mechanotransduction—both structurally and biochemically—with important implications in physiology and disease. PMID:25081618

  11. Exporting RNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Alwin; Hurt, Ed

    2007-10-01

    The transport of RNA molecules from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is fundamental for gene expression. The different RNA species that are produced in the nucleus are exported through the nuclear pore complexes via mobile export receptors. Small RNAs (such as tRNAs and microRNAs) follow relatively simple export routes by binding directly to export receptors. Large RNAs (such as ribosomal RNAs and mRNAs) assemble into complicated ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles and recruit their exporters via class-specific adaptor proteins. Export of mRNAs is unique as it is extensively coupled to transcription (in yeast) and splicing (in metazoa). Understanding the mechanisms that connect RNP formation with export is a major challenge in the field.

  12. Soluble spiroperidol binding factors from bovine caudate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Winkler, M H; Berl, S

    1982-09-01

    Several properties of soluble spiroperidol binding factors separated from bovine caudate nucleus have been investigated by a previously unreported procedure. Data consistent with high particle weight and rapid binding equilibration are reported for high-affinity (+)butaclamol-sensitive components of a digitonin extract. A slower sedimenting component is found that also exhibits high affinity for spiroperidol but is not sensitive to (+)butaclamol. Centrifugation of a caudate nucleus homogenate yields a supernatant that appears to contain a component that exhibits spiroperidol binding that is more sensitive to displacement by (-) than by (+)butaclamol. The procedure used effects rapid separation of bound from unbound tritiated ligand on short columns of Sephadex G-15 followed by extrusion and sectioning of the Sephadex. The radioactivity remaining with each section is determined. The procedure is very rapid; the addition of active phases or the changing of the ionic environment, which may disturb the equilibrium, is avoided; and recovery of the protein free of bound ligand is easily affected.

  13. High-spin states in the 96Tc nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucurescu, D.; Căta-Danil, Gh.; Căta-Danil, I.; Ivaşcu, M.; Mărginean, N.; Rusu, C.; Stroe, L.; Ur, C. A.; Gizon, A.; Gizon, J.; Nyakó, B.; Timár, J.; Zolnai, L.; Boston, A. J.; Joss, D. T.; Paul, E. S.; Semple, A. T.; Parry, C. M.

    High-spin states in the 96Tc nucleus have been studied with the reactions 82Se(19F,5nγ) at 68 MeV and Zn(36S,αpxn) at 130 MeV. Two γ-ray cascades (irregular bandlike structures) have been observed up to an excitation energy of about 10 MeV and spin 21-22?.

  14. High-spin states in the 97Tc nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucurescu, D.; Gadea, A.; Căta-Danil, Ghe.; Căta-Danil, I.; Ivaşcu, M.; Mărginean, N.; Rusu, C.; Stroe, L.; Ur, C. A.

    High-spin states in the 97Tc nucleus have been studied by in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy with the reaction 82Se(19F,4nγ) at 68 MeV incident energy. Excited states have been observed up to about 8 MeV excitation and spin 43/2ℎ. The observed level scheme is compared with results of shell model calculations.

  15. Dynamics of Galectin-3 in the Nucleus and Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Haudek, Kevin C.; Spronk, Kimberly J.; Voss, Patricia G.; Patterson, Ronald J.; Wang, John L.; Arnoys, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    This review summarizes selected studies on galectin-3 (Gal3) as an example of the dynamic behavior of a carbohydrate-binding protein in the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells. Within the 15-member galectin family of proteins, Gal3 (Mr ~30,000) is the sole representative of the chimera subclass in which a proline- and glycine-rich NH2-terminal domain is fused onto a COOH-terminal carbohydrate recognition domain responsible for binding galactose-containing glycoconjugates. The protein shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus on the basis of targeting signals that are recognized by importin(s) for nuclear localization and exportin-1 (CRM1) for nuclear export. Depending on the cell type, specific experimental conditions in vitro, or tissue location, Gal3 has been reported to be exclusively cytoplasmic, predominantly nuclear, or distributed between the two compartments. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic distribution of the protein must reflect, then, some balance between nuclear import and export, as well as mechanisms of cytoplasmic anchorage or binding to a nuclear component. Indeed, a number of ligands have been reported for Gal3 in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Most of the ligands appear to bind Gal3, however, through protein-protein interactions rather than through protein-carbohydrate recognition. In the cytoplasm, for example, Gal3 interacts with the apoptosis repressor Bcl-2 and this interaction may be involved in Gal3’s anti-apoptotic activity. In the nucleus, Gal3 is a required pre-mRNA splicing factor; the protein is incorporated into spliceosomes via its association with the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) complex. Although the majority of these interactions occur via the carbohydrate recognition domain of Gal3 and saccharide ligands such as lactose can perturb some of these interactions, the significance of the protein’s carbohydrate-binding activity, per se, remains a challenge for future investigations. PMID:19616076

  16. Decay of the N =126 , 213Fr nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pragati, Deo, A. Y.; Podolyák, Zs.; Walker, P. M.; Algora, A.; Rubio, B.; Agramunt, J.; Fraile, L. M.; Al-Dahan, N.; Alkhomashi, N.; Briz, J. A.; Aguado, M. E. Estevez; Farrelly, G.; Gelletly, W.; Herlert, A.; Köster, U.; Maira, A.

    2016-12-01

    γ rays following the EC/β+ and α decay of the N = 126, 213Fr nucleus have been observed at the CERN isotope separator on-line (ISOLDE) facility with the help of γ -ray and conversion-electron spectroscopy. These γ rays establish several hitherto unknown excited states in 213Rn. Also, five new α -decay branches from the 213Fr ground state have been discovered. Shell model calculations have been performed to understand the newly observed states in 213Rn.

  17. K--Nucleus Potentials Consistent with Kaonic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieply, A.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mares, J.

    2004-03-01

    Various models of the K- nucleus potential have been compared and tested in fits to kaonic atom data. The calculations give basically two vastly different predictions for the depth of the K- optical potential at the nuclear density. The study of the (K-stop, π ) reaction could help to distinguish between K- optical potentials as the Λ -hypernuclear formation rates are sensitive to the details of the initial-state K- wave function.

  18. The Ionization Source in the Nucleus of M84

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, G. A.; Green, R. F.; Quillen, A. C.; Danks, A.; Malumuth, E. M.; Gull, T.; Woodgate, B.; Hutchings, J.; Joseph, C.; Kaiser, M. E.

    2000-01-01

    We have obtained new Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of M84, a nearby massive elliptical galaxy whose nucleus contains a approximately 1.5 X 10(exp 9) solar mass dark compact object, which presumably is a supermassive black hole. Our Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) spectrum provides the first clear detection of emission lines in the blue (e.g., [0 II] lambda 3727, HBeta and [0 III] lambda lambda4959,5007), which arise from a compact region approximately 0".28 across centered on the nucleus. Our Near Infrared Camera and MultiObject Spectrometer (NICMOS) images exhibit the best view through the prominent dust lanes evident at optical wavelengths and provide a more accurate correction for the internal extinction. The relative fluxes of the emission lines we have detected in the blue together with those detected in the wavelength range 6295 - 6867 A by Bower et al. indicate that the gas at the nucleus is photoionized by a nonstellar process, instead of hot stars. Stellar absorption features from cool stars at the nucleus are very weak. We update the spectral energy distribution of the nuclear point source and find that although it is roughly flat in most bands, the optical to UV continuum is very red, similar to the spectral energy distribution of BL Lac. Thus, the nuclear point source seen in high-resolution optical images is not a star cluster but is instead a nonstellar source. Assuming isotropic emission from this source, we estimate that the ratio of bolometric luminosity to Eddington luminosity is about 5 x 10(exp -7). However, this could be underestimated if this source is a misaligned BL Lac object, which is a possibility suggested by the spectral energy distribution and the evidence of optical variability we describe.

  19. Ion channels at the nucleus: electrophysiology meets the genome.

    PubMed

    Matzke, Antonius J M; Weiger, Thomas M; Matzke, Marjori

    2010-07-01

    The nuclear envelope is increasingly viewed from an electrophysiological perspective by researchers interested in signal transduction pathways that influence gene transcription and other processes in the nucleus. Here, we describe evidence for ion channels and transporters in the nuclear membranes and for possible ion gating by the nuclear pores. We argue that a systems-level understanding of cellular regulation is likely to require the assimilation of nuclear electrophysiology into molecular and biochemical signaling pathways.

  20. Nucleus incertus inactivation impairs spatial learning and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Nategh, Mohsen; Nikseresht, Sara; Khodagholi, Fariba; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2015-02-01

    Nucleus incertus (NI) is a pontine nucleus which releases mainly GABA and relaxin-3 in rats. Its suggested functions include response to stress, arousal, and modulation of hippocampal theta rhythm. Since the role of NI in learning and memory has not been well characterized, therefore the involvement of this nucleus in spatial learning and memory and the aftermath hippocampal levels of c-fos and pCREB were evaluated. NI was targeted by implanting cannula in male rats. For reference memory, NI was inactivated by lidocaine (0.4 μl, 4%) at three stages of acquisition, consolidation and retrieval in Morris water maze paradigm. For working memory, NI was inactivated in acquisition and retrieval phases. Injection of lidocaine prior to the first training session of reference memory significantly increased the distance moved, suggesting that inactivation of NI delays acquisition in this spatial task. Inactivation also interfered with the retrieval phase of spatial reference memory, as the time in target quadrant for lidocaine group was less, and the escape latency was higher compared to the control group. However, no difference was observed in the consolidation phase. In the working memory task, with inter-trial intervals of 75 min, the escape latency was higher when NI was inactivated in the retrieval phase. In addition, c-fos and pCREB/CREB levels decreased in NI-inhibited rats. This study suggests that nucleus incertus might participate in acquisition of spatial reference, and retrieval of both spatial reference and working memory. Further studies should investigate possible roles of NI in the hippocampal plasticity.

  1. Study of Comet Nucleus Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Penetration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, G. L.; Amundsen, R. J.; Beardsley, R. W.; Cash, R. H.; Clark, B. C.; Knight, T. C. D.; Martin, J. P.; Monti, P.; Outteridge, D. A.; Plaster, W. D.

    1986-01-01

    A penetrator system has been suggested as an approach for making in situ measurements of the composition and physical properties of the nucleus of a comet. This study has examined in detail the feasibility of implementing the penetrator concept. The penetrator system and mission designs have been developed and iterated in sufficient detail to provide a high level of confidence that the concept can be implemented within the constraints of the Mariner Mark 2 spacecraft.

  2. Analysis about the force of electrons revolve around the nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongquan, Han

    1, Let's compare the difference of two algorithms: the electrostatic force between protons and electrons, F1 = ke2 / r2, r is the radius of the electron around the nucleus movement - within 10-10 meters; Electronic movement speed is close to the light- about 107 meters per second, the size of the centripetal force F2 = v2m/r. F1 should be approximately equal to F2,calculate the ratio of F1 and F2, F2 / F1 = (v2m/r) (ke2 / r2) / = (107 * 107 * 0.91 * 10-30 / r)/(9 * 109 * 1.6* 10-19*1.6*10-19 / r2) = 4 x 103.The calculation shows that not only the electrostatic force and other force. 2, The radius of the electron orbiting around the nucleus named r, F = Ke2 / r2 = 9 x 109 x #¨1.6 x 10 -19) 2 / r2 = v2m/r, r = 2.5 x 10-14 meters, namely that the radius of hydrogen atom is about 2.5 x 10- 14 meters, that is different with the observed result (10-10 meters).Electrons revolve around the nucleus may faster than 107 m/s, can almost reach 108 meters per second, if the electronic moves by 108 meters per second, hydrogen atom radius is approximately 2. 5 x 10 -16 meters, has converged in the interior of the nucleus, it is not possible. Use density to instead of electricity, can solve this problem. Author: hanyongquan TEL: 15611860790

  3. Theory and phenomenology of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, Gail

    2015-07-15

    We review the theory and phenomenology of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEνNS). After a brief introduction, we summarize the places where CEνNS is already in use and then turn to future physics opportunities from CEνNS. CEνNS has been proposed as a way to limit or discover beyond the standard model physics, measure the nuclear-neutron radius and constrain the Weinberg angle.

  4. Methods and compositions for targeting macromolecules into the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Chook, Yuh Min

    2013-06-25

    The present invention includes compositions, methods and kits for directing an agent across the nuclear membrane of a cell. The present invention includes a Karyopherin beta2 translocation motif in a polypeptide having a slightly positively charged region or a slightly hydrophobic region and one or more R/K/H-X.sub.(2-5)-P-Y motifs. The polypeptide targets the agent into the cell nucleus.

  5. Emission of charged particles from excited compound nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Kalandarov, Sh. A.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2010-11-24

    The formation and decay of excited compound nucleus are studied within the dinuclear system model[1]. The cross sections of complex fragment emission are calculated and compared with experimental data for the reactions {sup 3}He+{sup 108}Ag, {sup 78,82}Kr+{sup 12}C. Angular momentum dependence of cluster emission in {sup 78}Kr+{sup 12}C and {sup 40}Ca+{sup 78}Kr reactions is demonstrated.

  6. Nucleus caudalis lesioning: Case report of chronic traumatic headache relief

    PubMed Central

    Sandwell, Stephen E.; El-Naggar, Amr O.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The nucleus caudalis dorsal root entry zone (DREZ) surgery is used to treat intractable central craniofacial pain. This is the first journal publication of DREZ lesioning used for the long-term relief of an intractable chronic traumatic headache. Case Description: A 40-year-old female experienced new-onset bi-temporal headaches following a traumatic head injury. Despite medical treatment, her pain was severe on over 20 days per month, 3 years after the injury. The patient underwent trigeminal nucleus caudalis DREZ lesioning. Bilateral single-row lesions were made at 1-mm interval between the level of the obex and the C2 dorsal nerve roots, using angled radiofrequency electrodes, brought to 80°C for 15 seconds each, along a path 1 to 1.2 mm posterior to the accessory nerve rootlets. The headache improved, but gradually returned. Five years later, her headaches were severe on over 24 days per month. The DREZ surgery was then repeated. Her headaches improved and the relief has continued for 5 additional years. She has remained functional, with no limitation in instrumental activities of daily living. Conclusions: The nucleus caudalis DREZ surgery brought long-term relief to a patient suffering from chronic traumatic headache. PMID:22059123

  7. Presynaptic and extrasynaptic regulation of posterior nucleus of thalamus.

    PubMed

    Park, Anthony; Li, Ying; Masri, Radi; Keller, Asaf

    2017-03-22

    The posterior nucleus of thalamus (PO) is a higher-order nucleus involved in sensorimotor processing, including nociception. An important characteristic of PO is its wide range of activity profiles that vary across states of arousal, thought to underlie differences in somatosensory perception subject to attention and degree of consciousness. Further, PO loses the ability to down-regulate its activity level in some forms of chronic pain, suggesting that regulatory mechanisms underlying the normal modulation of PO activity may be pathologically altered. Yet, the mechanisms responsible for regulating such a wide dynamic range of activity are unknown. Here, we test a series of hypotheses regarding the function of several presynaptic receptors on both GABAergic and glutamatergic afferents targeting PO in mouse, using acute slice electrophysiology. We found that presynaptic GABAB receptors are present on both GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals in PO, but only those on GABAergic terminals are tonically active. We also found that release from GABAergic terminals, but not glutamatergic terminals, is suppressed by cholinergic activation, and that a subpopulation of GABAergic terminals is regulated by cannabinoids. Finally, we discovered the presence of tonic currents mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors in PO that are heterogeneously distributed across the nucleus. Thus, we demonstrate that multiple regulatory mechanisms concurrently exist in PO, and we propose that regulation of inhibition, rather than excitation, is the more consequential mechanism by which PO activity can be regulated.

  8. Structure of Tz = 3 / 2 , 33P Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubna, Rebeka Sultana; Tripathi, Vandana; Tabor, Samuel; Tai, Pei-Laun; Bender, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The excited states of the nucleus 33P were populated by the 18O(18O, p-2n γ)33P fusion evaporation reaction at Elab = 25 MeV.Gammasphere was used along with the particle detector Microball to detect the γ emissions in coincidence with the emitted charged particles from the compound nucleus 36S. The auxiliary detector Microball was used to select the charged particle channel and to determine the exact position and the energy of the emitted proton. The purpose of finding the position and energy of proton was to determine a more precise angle between the recoil nucleus and the emitted γ which was later employed to get a better Doppler correction. Along with the selection of the proton channel, the γ- γ coincidence technique helped to isolate 33P from the other phosphorus isotopes and also reduced the contaminations from the dominant pure neutron channels. A number of transitions and states was identified that were not observed before. The 4 π arrangement of Gammasphere offered an excellent opportunity to measure the angular distribution of the electromagnetic emissions leading to the assignment of the spins for most of the new states. The experimental observations were compared to the shell model calculation using Work supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1401574.

  9. Relief memory consolidation requires protein synthesis within the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Bruning, Johann E A; Breitfeld, Tino; Kahl, Evelyn; Bergado-Acosta, Jorge R; Fendt, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Relief learning refers to the association of a stimulus with the relief from an aversive event. The thus-learned relief stimulus then can induce, e.g., an attenuation of the startle response or approach behavior, indicating positive valence. Previous studies revealed that the nucleus accumbens is essential for the acquisition and retrieval of relief memory. Here, we ask whether the nucleus accumbens is also the brain site for consolidation of relief memory into a long-term form. In rats, we blocked local protein synthesis within the nucleus accumbens by local infusions of anisomycin at different time points during a relief conditioning experiment. Accumbal anisomycin injections immediately after the relief conditioning session, but not 4 h later, prevented the consolidation into long-term relief memory. The retention of already consolidated relief memory was not affected by anisomycin injections. This identifies a time window and site for relief memory consolidation. These findings should complement our understanding of the full range of effects of adverse experiences, including cases of their distortion in humans such as post-traumatic stress disorder and/or phobias.

  10. Nucleus- and cell-specific gene expression in monkey thalamus.

    PubMed

    Murray, Karl D; Choudary, Prabhakara V; Jones, Edward G

    2007-02-06

    Nuclei of the mammalian thalamus are aggregations of neurons with unique architectures and input-output connections, yet the molecular determinants of their organizational specificity remain unknown. By comparing expression profiles of thalamus and cerebral cortex in adult rhesus monkeys, we identified transcripts that are unique to dorsal thalamus or to individual nuclei within it. Real-time quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization analyses confirmed the findings. Expression profiling of individual nuclei microdissected from the dorsal thalamus revealed additional subsets of nucleus-specific genes. Functional annotation using Gene Ontology (GO) vocabulary and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis revealed overrepresentation of GO categories related to development, morphogenesis, cell-cell interactions, and extracellular matrix within the thalamus- and nucleus-specific genes, many involved in the Wnt signaling pathway. Examples included the transcription factor TCF7L2, localized exclusively to excitatory neurons; a calmodulin-binding protein PCP4; the bone extracellular matrix molecules SPP1 and SPARC; and other genes involved in axon outgrowth and cell matrix interactions. Other nucleus-specific genes such as CBLN1 are involved in synaptogenesis. The genes identified likely underlie nuclear specification, cell phenotype, and connectivity during development and their maintenance in the adult thalamus.

  11. AN OFF-CENTERED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS IN NGC 3115

    SciTech Connect

    Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.; Ricci, T. V.

    2014-11-20

    NGC 3115 is an S0 galaxy that has always been considered to have a pure absorption-line spectrum. Some recent studies have detected a compact radio-emitting nucleus in this object, coinciding with the photometric center and with a candidate for the X-ray nucleus. This is evidence of the existence of a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the galaxy, although no emission line has ever been observed. We report the detection of an emission-line spectrum of a type 1 AGN in NGC 3115, with an Hα luminosity of L {sub Hα} = (4.2 ± 0.4) × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1}. Our analysis revealed that this AGN is located at a projected distance of ∼0.''29 ± 0.''05 (corresponding to ∼14.3 ± 2.5 pc) from the stellar bulge center, which is coincident with the kinematic center of this object's stellar velocity map. The black hole corresponding to the observed off-centered AGN may form a binary system with a black hole located at the stellar bulge center. However, it is also possible that the displaced black hole is the merged remnant of the binary system coalescence, after the ''kick'' caused by the asymmetric emission of gravitational waves. We propose that certain features in the stellar velocity dispersion map are the result of perturbations caused by the off-centered AGN.

  12. By moonlighting in the nucleus, villin regulates epithelial plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Srinivas; George, Sudeep P.; Pham, Eric; Roy, Swati; Singh, Kanchan; Mariadason, John M.; Khurana, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Villin is a tissue-specific, actin-binding protein involved in the assembly and maintenance of microvilli in polarized epithelial cells. Conversely, villin is also linked with the loss of epithelial polarity and gain of the mesenchymal phenotype in migrating, invasive cells. In this study, we describe for the first time how villin can switch between these disparate functions to change tissue architecture by moonlighting in the nucleus. Our study reveals that the moonlighting function of villin in the nucleus may play an important role in tissue homeostasis and disease. Villin accumulates in the nucleus during wound repair, and altering the cellular microenvironment by inducing hypoxia increases the nuclear accumulation of villin. Nuclear villin is also associated with mouse models of tumorigenesis, and a systematic analysis of a large cohort of colorectal cancer specimens confirmed the nuclear distribution of villin in a subset of tumors. Our study demonstrates that nuclear villin regulates epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Altering the nuclear localization of villin affects the expression and activity of Slug, a key transcriptional regulator of EMT. In addition, we find that villin directly interacts with a transcriptional corepressor and ligand of the Slug promoter, ZBRK1. The outcome of this study underscores the role of nuclear villin and its binding partner ZBRK1 in the regulation of EMT and as potential new therapeutic targets to inhibit tumorigenesis. PMID:26658611

  13. Dorsal raphe nucleus projecting retinal ganglion cells: Why Y cells?

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Gary E.; So, Kwok-Fai; Pu, Mingliang

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion Y (alpha) cells are found in retinas ranging from frogs to mice to primates. The highly conserved nature of the large, fast conducting retinal Y cell is a testament to its fundamental task, although precisely what this task is remained ill-defined. The recent discovery that Y-alpha retinal ganglion cells send axon collaterals to the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in addition to the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), medial interlaminar nucleus (MIN), pretectum and the superior colliculus (SC) has offered new insights into the important survival tasks performed by these cells with highly branched axons. We propose that in addition to its role in visual perception, the Y-alpha retinal ganglion cell provides concurrent signals via axon collaterals to the DRN, the major source of serotonergic afferents to the forebrain, to dramatically inhibit 5-HT activity during orientation or alerting/escape responses, which dis-facilitates ongoing tonic motor activity while dis-inhibiting sensory information processing throughout the visual system. The new data provide a fresh view of these evolutionarily old retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26363667

  14. Integration of sensory quanta in cuneate nucleus neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Fredrik; Brasselet, Romain; Johansson, Roland S; Arleo, Angelo; Jörntell, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Discriminative touch relies on afferent information carried to the central nervous system by action potentials (spikes) in ensembles of primary afferents bundled in peripheral nerves. These sensory quanta are first processed by the cuneate nucleus before the afferent information is transmitted to brain networks serving specific perceptual and sensorimotor functions. Here we report data on the integration of primary afferent synaptic inputs obtained with in vivo whole cell patch clamp recordings from the neurons of this nucleus. We find that the synaptic integration in individual cuneate neurons is dominated by 4-8 primary afferent inputs with large synaptic weights. In a simulation we show that the arrangement with a low number of primary afferent inputs can maximize transfer over the cuneate nucleus of information encoded in the spatiotemporal patterns of spikes generated when a human fingertip contact objects. Hence, the observed distributions of synaptic weights support high fidelity transfer of signals from ensembles of tactile afferents. Various anatomical estimates suggest that a cuneate neuron may receive hundreds of primary afferents rather than 4-8. Therefore, we discuss the possibility that adaptation of synaptic weight distribution, possibly involving silent synapses, may function to maximize information transfer in somatosensory pathways.

  15. The Nuclear Option: Evidence Implicating the Cell Nucleus in Mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Szczesny, Spencer E; Mauck, Robert L

    2017-02-01

    Biophysical stimuli presented to cells via microenvironmental properties (e.g., alignment and stiffness) or external forces have a significant impact on cell function and behavior. Recently, the cell nucleus has been identified as a mechanosensitive organelle that contributes to the perception and response to mechanical stimuli. However, the specific mechanotransduction mechanisms that mediate these effects have not been clearly established. Here, we offer a comprehensive review of the evidence supporting (and refuting) three hypothetical nuclear mechanotransduction mechanisms: physical reorganization of chromatin, signaling at the nuclear envelope, and altered cytoskeletal structure/tension due to nuclear remodeling. Our goal is to provide a reference detailing the progress that has been made and the areas that still require investigation regarding the role of nuclear mechanotransduction in cell biology. Additionally, we will briefly discuss the role that mathematical models of cell mechanics can play in testing these hypotheses and in elucidating how biophysical stimulation of the nucleus drives changes in cell behavior. While force-induced alterations in signaling pathways involving lamina-associated polypeptides (LAPs) (e.g., emerin and histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3)) and transcription factors (TFs) located at the nuclear envelope currently appear to be the most clearly supported mechanism of nuclear mechanotransduction, additional work is required to examine this process in detail and to more fully test alternative mechanisms. The combination of sophisticated experimental techniques and advanced mathematical models is necessary to enhance our understanding of the role of the nucleus in the mechanotransduction processes driving numerous critical cell functions.

  16. The TLC: a novel auditory nucleus of the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Saldaña, Enrique; Viñuela, Antonio; Marshall, Allen F; Fitzpatrick, Douglas C; Aparicio, M-Auxiliadora

    2007-11-28

    We have identified a novel nucleus of the mammalian brain and termed it the tectal longitudinal column (TLC). Basic histologic stains, tract-tracing techniques and three-dimensional reconstructions reveal that the rat TLC is a narrow, elongated structure spanning the midbrain tectum longitudinally. This paired nucleus is located close to the midline, immediately dorsal to the periaqueductal gray matter. It occupies what has traditionally been considered the most medial region of the deep superior colliculus and the most medial region of the inferior colliculus. The TLC differs from the neighboring nuclei of the superior and inferior colliculi and the periaqueductal gray by its distinct connections and cytoarchitecture. Extracellular electrophysiological recordings show that TLC neurons respond to auditory stimuli with physiologic properties that differ from those of neurons in the inferior or superior colliculi. We have identified the TLC in rodents, lagomorphs, carnivores, nonhuman primates, and humans, which indicates that the nucleus is conserved across mammals. The discovery of the TLC reveals an unexpected level of longitudinal organization in the mammalian tectum and raises questions as to the participation of this mesencephalic region in essential, yet completely unexplored, aspects of multisensory and/or sensorimotor integration.

  17. Coexistence of central nucleus, cores, and rods: Diagnostic relevance

    PubMed Central

    Dhinakaran, Sathiyabama; Kumar, Rashmi Santhosh; Thakkar, Ravindra; Narayanappa, Gayathri

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital myopathies (CMs) though considered distinct disorders, simultaneous occurrence of central nucleus, nemaline rods, and cores in the same biopsy are scarcely reported. Objective: A retrospective reassessment of cases diagnosed as CMs to look for multiple pathologies missed, if any, during the initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: Enzyme histochemical, and immunohistochemical-stained slides from 125 cases diagnosed as congenital myopathy were reassessed. Results: The study revealed 15 cases (12%) of congenital myopathy with more than one morphological feature. Central nucleus with cores (n = 11), central nucleus, nemaline rods and cores (n = 3), and nemaline rods with cores (n = 1). 4/11 cases were diagnosed as centronuclear myopathy (CNM) in the first instance; in addition, cores were revealed on reassessment. Discussion: The prevalence of CMs of all neuromuscular disorders is approximately 6 in 100,000 live births, with regional variations. Three main defined CMs include centro nuclear myopathy (CNM), nemaline rod myopathy (NRM), and central core disease (CCD). However, they are more diverse with overlapping clinical and histopathological features, thus broadening the spectra within each category of congenital myopathy. Conclusion: Identification of cases with overlap of pathological features has diagnostic relevance. PMID:27293330

  18. Experimental studies of pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This report summarizes the work on experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear physics carried out at New Mexico State University in 1991 under a great from the US Department of Energy. Most of these studies have involved investigations of various pion-nucleus interactions. The work has been carried out both with the LAMPF accelerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and with the cyclotron at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) near Zurich, Switzerland. Part of the experimental work involves measurements of new data on double-charge-exchange scattering, using facilities at LAMPF which we helped modify, and on pion absorption, using a new detector system at PSI that covers nearly the full solid-angle region which we helped construct. Other work involved preparation for future experiments using polarized nuclear targets and a new high-resolution spectrometer system for detecting {pi}{sup 0} mesons. We also presented several proposals for works to be done in future years, involving studies related to pi-mesonic atoms, fundamental pion-nucleon interactions, studies of the difference between charged and neutral pion interactions with the nucleon, studies of the isospin structure of pion-nucleus interactions, and pion scattering from polarized {sup 3}He targets. This work is aimed at improving our understanding of the pion-nucleon interaction, of the pion-nucleus interaction mechanism, and of nuclear structure.

  19. Action at a Distance in the Cell's Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondev, Jane

    Various functions performed by chromosomes involve long-range communication between DNA sequences that are tens of thousands of bases apart along the genome, and microns apart in the nucleus. In this talk I will discuss experiments and theory relating to two distinct modes of long-range communication in the nucleus, chromosome looping and protein hopping along the chromosome, both in the context of DNA-break repair in yeast. Yeast is an excellent model system for studies that link chromosome conformations to their function as there is ample experimental evidence that yeast chromosome conformations are well described by a simple, random-walk polymer model. Using a combination of polymer physics theory and experiments on yeast cells, I will demonstrate that loss of polymer entropy due to chromosome looping is the driving force for homology search during repair of broken DNA by homologous recombination. I will also discuss the spread of histone modifications along the chromosome and away from the DNA break point in the context of simple physics models based on chromosome looping and kinase hopping, and show how combining physics theory and cell-biology experiment can be used to dissect the molecular mechanism of the spreading process. These examples demonstrate how combined theoretical and experimental studies can reveal physical principles of long-range communication in the nucleus, which play important roles in regulation of gene expression, DNA recombination, and chromatin modification. This work was supported by the NSF DMR-1206146.

  20. Distinct effect of orphanin FQ in nucleus raphe magnus and nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis on the rat tail flick reflex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Z; Zhang, Y; Wu, G

    2001-06-22

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of orphanin FQ (OFQ) microinjected into the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) and the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NGC) on pain modulation. The tail-flick latency (TFL) was used as a behavioral index of nociceptive responsiveness. The result showed microinjection of OFQ into the NRM significantly increased the TFL, whereas microinjection of OFQ into the NGC decreased the TFL, suggesting the analgesic effect of OFQ in the NRM and the hyperalgesic effect of OFQ in the NGC. As there are three classes of putative pain modulating neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM), the hyperalgesic or analgesic effect of OFQ in the RVM might depend upon the different class of the neurons being acted.