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Sample records for 31p solid-state nmr

  1. Solid state {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al and {sup 31}P/{sup 23}Na MAS NMR dipolar dephasing investigations of connectivity in sodium aluminophosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    LANG,DAVID P.; ALAM,TODD M.; BENCOE,DENISE N.

    2000-05-01

    Solid state {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al and {sup 31}P/{sup 23}Na MAS NMR dipolar dephasing experiments have been used to investigate the spatial distribution of aluminum and sodium cations with respect to the phosphate backbone for a series of sodium aluminophosphate glasses, xAl{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}50Na{sub 2}O{center_dot}(50{minus}x)P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (0{le} x {le} 17.5). From the {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al and {sup 31}P/{sup 23}Na connectivity data gathered, information about the medium range order in these glasses is obtained. The expanded connectivity data allows for better identification and interpretation of the new resonances observed in the {sup 31}P MAS NMR spectra with the addition of alumina. The results of the dipolar dephasing experiments show that the sodium-phosphate distribution remains relatively unchanged for the glass series, and that the addition of aluminum occurs primarily through the depolymerization of the phosphate tetrahedral backbone.

  2. Detergent-like properties of magainin antibiotic peptides: a 31P solid-state NMR spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Bechinger, Burkhard

    2005-06-15

    (31)P solid-state NMR spectroscopy has been used to investigate the macroscopic phase behavior of phospholipid bilayers in the presence of increasing amounts of magainin antibiotic peptides. Addition of >1 mol% magainin 2 to gel-phase DMPC or liquid crystalline POPC membranes respectively, results in (31)P NMR spectra that are characterized by the coexistence of isotropic signals and line shapes typical for phospholipid bilayers. The isotropic signal intensity is a function of temperature and peptide concentration. At peptide concentrations >4 mol% of the resulting phospholipid (31)P NMR spectra are characteristic of magnetically oriented POPC bilayers suggesting the formation of small disk-like micelles or perforated sheets. In contrast, addition of magainin to acidic phospholipids results in homogenous bilayer-type (31)P NMR spectra with reduced chemical shift anisotropies. The results presented are in good agreement with the interfacial insertion of magainin helices with an alignment parallel to the surface of the phospholipid bilayers. The resulting curvature strain results in detergent-like properties of the amphipathic helical peptides.

  3. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from 31P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis

    PubMed Central

    McElderry, John-David P.; Zhu, Peizhi; Mroue, Kamal H.; Xu, Jiadi; Pavan, Barbara; Fang, Ming; Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Franceschi, Renny T.; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak; Tecklenburg, Mary M.J.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and 31P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse 31P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO43− ν1 bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3–10.3 wt% CO32− range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the 31P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ν1 band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals. PMID:24273344

  4. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from (31)P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis.

    PubMed

    McElderry, John-David P; Zhu, Peizhi; Mroue, Kamal H; Xu, Jiadi; Pavan, Barbara; Fang, Ming; Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H; Franceschi, Renny T; Holl, Mark M Banaszak; Tecklenburg, Mary M J; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Morris, Michael D

    2013-10-01

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and (31)P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse (31)P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO4(3-) ν1 bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3-10.3 wt% CO3(2-) range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the (31)P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ν1 band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals.

  5. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from {sup 31}P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McElderry, John-David P.; Zhu, Peizhi; Mroue, Kamal H.; Xu, Jiadi; Pavan, Barbara; Fang, Ming; Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Franceschi, Renny T.; Holl, Mark M.Banaszak; Tecklenburg, Mary M.J.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-10-15

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and {sup 31}P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse {sup 31}P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}ν{sub 1} bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3–10.3 wt% CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the {sup 31}P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ν{sub 1} band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals. - Graphical abstract: Carbonated apatite shows an abrupt change in spectral (NMR, Raman) and morphological (AFM) properties at a composition of about one carbonate substitution per unit cell. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Crystallinity (XRD), particle size (AFM) of carbonated apatites and bone mineral. • Linear relationships among crystallinity, {sup 31}P NMR and Raman inverse bandwidths. • Low and high carbonated apatites use different charge-balancing ion-loss mechanism.

  6. Solid state {sup 31}P NMR study of phosphonate binding sites in guanidine-functionalized, molecular imprinted silica xerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, D.Y.; Alam, T.D.

    2000-01-03

    Phosphonate binding sites in guanidine and ammonium surface-functionalized silica xerogels were prepared via the molecular imprinting technique and characterized using solid state {sup 31}P MAS NMR. One-point, two-point, and non-specific host-guest interactions between phenylphosphonic acid (PPA) and the functionalized gels were distinguished by characteristic chemical shifts of the observed absorption peaks. Using solid state as well as solution phase NMR analyses, absorptions observed at 15.5 ppm and 6.5 ppm were identified as resulting from the 1:1 (one-point) and 2:1 (two-point) guanidine to phosphonate interactions, respectively. Similar absorptions were observed with the ammonium functionalized gels. By examining the host-guest interactions within the gels, the efficiency of the molecular imprinting procedure with regard to the functional monomer-to-template interaction could be readily assessed. Template removal followed by substrate adsorption studies conducted on the guanidine functionalized gels provided a method to evaluate the binding characteristics of the receptor sites to a phosphonate substrate. During these experiments, {sup 29}Si and {sup 31}P MAS NMR acted as diagnostic monitors to identify structural changes occurring in the gel matrix and at the receptor site from solvent mediated processes.

  7. Distinguishing Bicontinuous Lipid Cubic Phases from Isotropic Membrane Morphologies Using 31P Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu; Yao, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Nonlamellar lipid membranes are frequently induced by proteins that fuse, bend, and cut membranes. Understanding the mechanism of action of these proteins requires the elucidation of the membrane morphologies that they induce. While hexagonal phases and lamellar phases are readily identified by their characteristic solid-state NMR lineshapes, bicontinuous lipid cubic phases are more difficult to discern, since the static NMR spectra of cubic-phase lipids consist of an isotropic 31P or 2H peak, indistinguishable from the spectra of isotropic membrane morphologies such as micelles and small vesicles. To date, small-angle X-ray scattering is the only method to identify bicontinuous lipid cubic phases. To explore unique NMR signatures of lipid cubic phases, we first describe the orientation distribution of lipid molecules in cubic phases and simulate the static 31P chemical shift lineshapes of oriented cubic-phase membranes in the limit of slow lateral diffusion. We then show that 31P T2 relaxation times differ significantly between isotropic micelles and cubic-phase membranes: the latter exhibit two-orders-of magnitude shorter T2 relaxation times. These differences are explained by the different timescales of lipid lateral diffusion on the cubic-phase surface versus the timescales of micelle tumbling. Using this relaxation NMR approach, we investigated a DOPE membrane containing the transmembrane domain (TMD) of a viral fusion protein. The static 31P spectrum of DOPE shows an isotropic peak, whose T2 relaxation times correspond to that of a cubic phase. Thus, the viral fusion protein TMD induces negative Gaussian curvature, which is an intrinsic characteristic of cubic phases, to the DOPE membrane. This curvature induction has important implications to the mechanism of virus-cell fusion. This study establishes a simple NMR diagnostic probe of lipid cubic phases, which is expected to be useful for studying many protein-induced membrane remodeling phenomena in biology

  8. 2D 31P solid state NMR spectroscopy, electronic structure and thermochemistry of PbP7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benndorf, Christopher; Hohmann, Andrea; Schmidt, Peer; Eckert, Hellmut; Johrendt, Dirk; Schäfer, Konrad; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Phase pure polycrystalline PbP7 was prepared from the elements via a lead flux. Crystalline pieces with edge-lengths up to 1 mm were obtained. The assignment of the previously published 31P solid state NMR spectrum to the seven distinct crystallographic sites was accomplished by radio-frequency driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR) experiments. As commonly found in other solid polyphosphides there is no obvious correlation between the 31P chemical shift and structural parameters. PbP7 decomposes incongruently under release of phosphorus forming liquid lead as remainder. The thermal decomposition starts at T>550 K with a vapor pressure almost similar to that of red phosphorus. Electronic structure calculations reveal PbP7 as a semiconductor according to the Zintl description and clearly shows the stereo-active Pb-6s2 lone pairs in the electron localization function ELF.

  9. Effect of Ca:Mg ratio on precipitated P species identified using 31P solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manimel Wadu, M.

    2009-04-01

    M.C.W. Manimel Wadu1, O.O Akinremi1, S. Kroeker2 1Department of Soil Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, R3T 2N2, Canada 2Department of Chemistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, R3T 2N2, Canada Agronomic efficiency of added P fertilizer is reduced by the precipitation reactions with the exchangeable Ca and Mg in calcareous soils. We hypothesized that the ratio of Ca to Mg on the soil exchange complex will affect the species of P that is precipitated and its solubility in the soil. A laboratory experiment was conducted using a model calcareous soil system which was composed of resin (Amberlite IRP69) and sand coated with CaCO3 packed into a column. The resin was pre saturated with Ca and Mg in order to achieve five different saturation ratios of Ca:Mg approximately as 100:0, 70:30, 50:50, 30:70 and 0:100. Monoammonium Phosphate was applied to the soil surface to simulate one-dimensional diffusive transport. The column was then incubated for 2 weeks. Chemical analysis for water and acid soluble P, pH, NH4, Ca and Mg was performed on 2mm sections of the soil to a depth of 10 cm. This paper will present and discuss the distribution of P along the soil column. Unlike similar studies that have speculated on the precipitation of P, this study will identify and quantify the P species that is formed using 31P solid state NMR technique. Such knowledge will be helpful in understanding the effect of Ca and Mg on P availability in calcareous system and the role of each cation on P precipitation. Key words: P fertilizers, Ca, Mg, model system, solid state NMR

  10. Direct Speciation of Phosphorus in Alum-Amended Poultry Litter: Solid-State 31P NMR Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hunger, Stefan; Cho, Herman M.; Sims, James T.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2004-02-01

    Amending poultry litter (PL) with aluminum sulfate (alum) has proven to be effective in reducing water-soluble phosphorus (P) in the litter and in runoff from fields that have received PL applications; it has therefore been suggested as a best management practice. Although its effectiveness has been demonstrated on a macroscopic scale in the field, little is known about P speciation in either alumamended or unamended litter. This knowledge is important for the evaluation of the long-term stability and bioavailability of P, which is a necessary prerequisite for the assessment of the sustainability of intensive poultry operations. Both solid state MAS and CP-MAS {sup 31}P NMR as well as {sup 31}P({sup 27}Al) TRAPDOR were used to investigate P speciation in alumamended and unamended PL. The results indicate the presence of a complex mixture of organic and inorganic orthophosphate phases. A calcium phosphate phase, probably a surface precipitate on calcium carbonate, could be identified in both unamended and alum-amended PL, as well as physically bound HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. Phosphate associated with Al was found in the alum-amended PL, most probably a mixture of a poorly ordered wavellite and phosphate surface complexes on aluminum hydroxide that had been formed by the hydrolysis of alum. However, a complex mixture of organic and inorganic phosphate species could not be resolved. Phosphate associated with Al comprised on average 40{+-}14% of the total P in alum-amended PL, whereas calcium phosphate phases comprised on average 7{+-}4% in the alum-amended PL and 14{+-}5% in the unamended PL.

  11. Ionization behavior of polyphosphoinositides determined via the preparation of pH titration curves using solid-state 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Graber, Zachary T; Kooijman, Edgar E

    2013-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the degree of ionization of lipid titratable groups is important for the evaluation of protein-lipid and lipid-lipid interactions. The degree of ionization is commonly evaluated by acid-base titration, but for lipids localized in a multicomponent membrane interface this is not a suitable technique. For phosphomonoester-containing lipids such as the polyphosphoinositides, phosphatidic acid, and ceramide-1-phosphate, this is more conveniently accomplished by (31)P NMR. Here, we describe a solid-state (31)P NMR procedure to construct pH titration curves to determine the degree of ionization of phosphomonoester groups in polyphosphoinositides. This procedure can also be used, with suitable sample preparation conditions, for other important signaling lipids. Access to a solid-state, i.e., magic angle spinning, capable NMR spectrometer is assumed. The procedures described here are valid for a Bruker instrument, but can be adapted for other spectrometers as needed.

  12. 31P Solid State NMR Studies of ZrP, Mg3P2, and CdPS3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    valence , in contrast to that in ZrP, Mg3P2, and MgP4. The 3 1 p solid state NMR spectra are shown in Figure 9. The MAS spectrum reveals a single...orange crystals were recovered from hot concentrated HCa . In one experi- RESULTS AND DISCUSSION ment, brilliant black polyhedral crystals of ZnSnP, were

  13. A chelate-stabilized ruthenium(sigma-pyrrolato) complex: resolving ambiguities in nuclearity and coordination geometry through 1H PGSE and 31P solid-state NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Heather M; Bryce, David L; Fogg, Deryn E

    2006-12-11

    Reaction of RuCl2(PPh3)3 with LiNN' (NN' = 2-[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]pyrrolide) affords a single product, with the empirical formula RuCl[(2,6-iPr2C6H3)N=CHC4H3N](PPh3)2. We identify this species as a sigma-pyrrolato complex, [Ru(NN')(PPh3)2]2(mu-Cl)2 (3b), rather than mononuclear RuCl(NN')(PPh3)2 (3a), on the basis of detailed 1D and 2D NMR characterization in solution and in the solid state. Retention of the chelating, sigma-bound iminopyrrolato unit within 3b, despite the presence of labile (dative) chloride and PPh3 donors, indicates that the chelate effect is sufficient to inhibit sigma --> pi isomerization of 3b to a piano-stool, pi-pyrrolato structure. 2D COSY, SECSY, and J-resolved solid-state 31P NMR experiments confirm that the PPh3 ligands on each metal center are magnetically and crystallographically inequivalent, and 31P CP/MAS NMR experiments reveal the largest 99Ru-31P spin-spin coupling constant (1J(99Ru,31P) = 244 +/- 20 Hz) yet measured. Finally, 31P dipolar-chemical shift spectroscopy is applied to determine benchmark phosphorus chemical shift tensors for phosphine ligands in hexacoordinate ruthenium complexes.

  14. Combining solid-state and solution-state 31P NMR to study in vivo phosphorus metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Cholli, A L; Yamane, T; Jelinski, L W

    1985-01-01

    Otherwise unavailable information concerning the distribution of phosphorylated compounds in biological systems is obtained by a combined solid-state/solution-state NMR approach, illustrated here for oocytes from Rana pipiens. General methodology is developed, and further extensions are proposed. The following conclusions pertain to the specific system under examination. (i) Nucleoside phosphates can be observed by magic-angle sample spinning of the lyophilized material. (ii) The solid-state NMR technique of dipolar decoupling provides no additional resolution of the phospholipid and phosphoprotein components of the yolk. However, cellular death produces sufficient pH changes to cause the phospholipid and protein phosphate peaks to become resolvable. The concentration of nucleoside phosphates also decreases. (iii) The phospholipid and phosphoprotein components are shown by computer simulation to be present in a ratio of 40:60, respectively. (iv) The amounts of inorganic phosphate, nucleoside phosphates, and sugar phosphates are determined by solution-state NMR observation of the perchloric acid extract of the oocytes. PMID:3871524

  15. Distribution and mobility of phosphates and sodium ions in cheese by solid-state 31P and double-quantum filtered 23Na NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gobet, Mallory; Rondeau-Mouro, Corinne; Buchin, Solange; Le Quéré, Jean-Luc; Guichard, Elisabeth; Foucat, Loïc; Moreau, Céline

    2010-04-01

    The feasibility of solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and (23)Na NMR spectroscopy to investigate both phosphates and Na(+) ions distribution in semi-hard cheeses in a non-destructive way was studied. Two semi-hard cheeses of known composition were made with two different salt contents. (31)P Single-pulse excitation and cross-polarization MAS experiments allowed, for the first time, the identification and quantification of soluble and insoluble phosphates in the cheeses. The presence of a relatively 'mobile' fraction of colloidal phosphates was evidenced. The detection by (23)Na single-quantum NMR experiments of all the sodium ions in the cheeses was validated. The presence of a fraction of 'bound' sodium ions was evidenced by (23)Na double-quantum filtered NMR experiments. We demonstrated that NMR is a suitable tool to investigate both phosphates and Na(+) ions distributions in cheeses. The impact of the sodium content on the various phosphorus forms distribution was discussed and results demonstrated that NMR would be an important tool for the cheese industry for the processes controls.

  16. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: Insights from solid-state (13)C NMR and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shasha; Zhu, Yuanrong; Meng, Wei; He, Zhongqi; Feng, Weiying; Zhang, Chen; Giesy, John P

    2016-02-01

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions and degradation of WEOM derived from six aquatic macrophytes species of Tai Lake, China, were investigated by use of solid-state (13)C NMR and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Carbohydrates were the predominant constituents of WEOM fractions, followed by carboxylic acid. Orthophosphate (ortho-P) was the dominant form of P (78.7% of total dissolved P) in the water extracts, followed by monoester P (mono-P) (20.6%) and little diester P (0.65%). The proportion of mono-P in total P species increased with the percentage of O-alkyl and O-C-O increasing in the WEOM, which is likely due to degradation and dissolution of biological membranes and RNA from aquatic plants. Whereas the proportion of mono-P decreased with alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O increasing, which may be owing to the insoluble compounds including C functional groups of alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O, such as aliphatic biopolymers, lignin and peptides. Based on the results of this study and information in the literature about water column and sediment, we propose that WEOM, dominated by polysaccharides, are the most labile and bioavailable component in debris of macrophytes. Additionally, these WEOMs would also be a potential source for bioavailable organic P (e.g., RNA, DNA and phytate) for lakes.

  17. Conformation and dynamics of melittin bound to magnetically oriented lipid bilayers by solid-state (31)P and (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Naito, A; Nagao, T; Norisada, K; Mizuno, T; Tuzi, S; Saitô, H

    2000-01-01

    The conformation and dynamics of melittin bound to the dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer and the magnetic orientation in the lipid bilayer systems were investigated by solid-state (31)P and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Using (31)P NMR, it was found that melittin-lipid bilayers form magnetically oriented elongated vesicles with the long axis parallel to the magnetic field above the liquid crystalline-gel phase transition temperature (T(m) = 24 degrees C). The conformation, orientation, and dynamics of melittin bound to the membrane were further determined by using this magnetically oriented lipid bilayer system. For this purpose, the (13)C NMR spectra of site-specifically (13)C-labeled melittin bound to the membrane in the static, fast magic angle spinning (MAS) and slow MAS conditions were measured. Subsequently, we analyzed the (13)C chemical shift tensors of carbonyl carbons in the peptide backbone under the conditions where they form an alpha-helix and reorient rapidly about the average helical axis. Finally, it was found that melittin adopts a transmembrane alpha-helix whose average axis is parallel to the bilayer normal. The kink angle between the N- and C-terminal helical rods of melittin in the lipid bilayer is approximately 140 degrees or approximately 160 degrees, which is larger than the value of 120 degrees determined by x-ray diffraction studies. Pore formation was clearly observed below the T(m) in the initial stage of lysis by microscope. This is considered to be caused by the association of melittin molecules in the lipid bilayer. PMID:10777736

  18. Solid state {sup 31}P MAS NMR spectroscopy and conductivity measurements on NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Risskov Sørensen, Daniel; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Skou, Eivind M.

    2014-11-15

    A systematic study of composite powders of niobium oxide phosphate (NbOPO{sub 4}) and phosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) has been performed in order to characterize the material's ability to perform as an electrolyte material in medium temperature fuel cells and electrolyzers. Powders of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} contents between 13.1 and 74.2 M% were produced and characterized with powder X-ray diffraction, {sup 31}P MAS NMR and impedance spectroscopy. NMR revealed that a significant degree of dehydration and vaporization of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} takes place above 200 °C, and increases with temperature. At 500 °C the NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} has reacted to form niobium pyrophosphate (Nb{sub 2}P{sub 4}O{sub 15}). Impedance spectroscopy showed an increase in conductivity with increasing acid concentration, whereas the conductivity decreased slightly with increasing temperature. The highest conductivity measured was 2.5·10{sup −3} S/cm for a sample containing 74.2 M% of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Lastly, it was shown that NbOPO{sub 4} has no significant conductivity of its own. - Graphical abstract: Conductivity of NbOPO{sub 4}/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} composites as a function of equivalent P{sub 2}O{sub 5} content. The conductivity is insignificant for pure NbOPO{sub 4}. - Highlights: • Composites have been made from NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. • The composites composition has been investigated with solid state NMR. • The composites have shown clear signs of acid dehydration upon heating. • The conductivity of the composites increases for increasing acid content. • NbOPO{sub 4} has no significant conductivity of its own.

  19. Distance measurements in disodium ATP hydrates by means of 31P double quantum two-dimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Potrzebowski, M J; Gajda, J; Ciesielski, W; Montesinos, I M

    2006-04-01

    POST-C7 measurements provide constraints allowing distinguishing crystal lattice organization and establishing intra and/or intermolecular distances between phosphorus atoms of triphosphate chains for different hydrates of disodium ATP salts. Double-quantum efficiency in function of excitation time obtained from series of two-dimensional spectra for POST-C7 experiments was used to set up of buildup curves and semi-quantitative measure of 31P-31P length.

  20. Two-dimensional and variable temperature 31P solid-state NMR studies of single crystals containing symmetrical/unsymmetrical bis[6-O,6-O'-(1,2:3,4-diisopropylidene-alpha-D- galactopyranosyl)thiophosphoryl] dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Potrzebowski, M J; Helinski, J; Ciesielski, W

    2002-08-07

    The organisation and phase transition of single crystals containing three isostructural bis[6-O,6-O'-(1,2:3,4-diisopropylidene-alpha- D-galactopyranosyl)thiophosphoryl] dichalcogenide derivatives: disulfide 1, diselenide 2 and mixed seleno-sulfide 3, was deduced upon 1D, 2D and variable temperature 31P NMR experiments.

  1. Scalar operators in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Boqin

    1991-11-01

    Selectivity and resolution of solid-state NMR spectra are determined by dispersion of local magnetic fields originating from relaxation effects and orientation-dependent resonant frequencies of spin nuclei. Theoretically, the orientation-dependent resonant frequencies can be represented by a set of irreducible tensors. Among these tensors, only zero rank tensors (scalar operators) are capable of providing high resolution NMR spectra. This thesis presents a series of new developments in high resolution solid-state NMR concerning the reconstruction of various scalar operators motion in solid C{sub 60} is analyzed.

  2. Solid-state NMR for bacterial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria associate with surfaces and one another by elaborating an extracellular matrix to encapsulate cells, creating communities termed biofilms. Biofilms are beneficial in some ecological niches, but also contribute to the pathogenesis of serious and chronic infectious diseases. New approaches and quantitative measurements are needed to define the composition and architecture of bacterial biofilms to help drive the development of strategies to interfere with biofilm assembly. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is uniquely suited to the examination of insoluble and complex macromolecular and whole-cell systems. This article highlights three examples that implement solid-state NMR to deliver insights into bacterial biofilm composition and changes in cell-wall composition as cells transition to the biofilm lifestyle. Most recently, solid-state NMR measurements provided a total accounting of the protein and polysaccharide components in the extracellular matrix of an Escherichia coli biofilm and transformed our qualitative descriptions of matrix composition into chemical parameters that permit quantitative comparisons among samples. We present additional data for whole biofilm samples (cells plus the extracellular matrix) that complement matrix-only analyses. The study of bacterial biofilms by solid-state NMR is an exciting avenue ripe with many opportunities and we close the article by articulating some outstanding questions and future directions in this area.

  3. Solid-state NMR of inorganic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Yesinowski, James P

    2012-01-01

    Studies of inorganic semiconductors by solid-state NMR vary widely in terms of the nature of the samples investigated, the techniques employed to observe the NMR signal, and the types of information obtained. Compared with the NMR of diamagnetic non-semiconducting substances, important differences often result from the presence of electron or hole carriers that are the hallmark of semiconductors, and whose theoretical interpretation can be involved. This review aims to provide a broad perspective on the topic for the non-expert by providing: (1) a basic introduction to semiconductor physical concepts relevant to NMR, including common crystal structures and the various methods of making samples; (2) discussions of the NMR spin Hamiltonian, details of some of the NMR techniques and strategies used to make measurements and theoretically predict NMR parameters, and examples of how each of the terms in the Hamiltonian has provided useful information in bulk semiconductors; (3) a discussion of the additional considerations needed to interpret the NMR of nanoscale semiconductors, with selected examples. The area of semiconductor NMR is being revitalized by this interest in nanoscale semiconductors, the great improvements in NMR detection sensitivity and resolution that have occurred, and the current interest in optical pumping and spintronics-related studies. Promising directions for future research will be noted throughout.

  4. A Solid-State NMR Experiment: Analysis of Local Structural Environments in Phosphate Glasses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Stanley E.; Saiki, David; Eckert, Hellmut; Meise-Gresch, Karin

    2004-01-01

    An experiment that can be used to directly study the local chemical environments of phosphorus in solid amorphous materials is demonstrated. The experiment aims at familiarizing the students of chemistry with the principles of solid-state NMR, by having them synthesize a simple phosphate glass, and making them observe the (super 31)P NMR spectrum,…

  5. A solid-state NMR study of the formation of molecular sieve SAPO-34.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhimin; Chen, Banghao; Huang, Yining

    2009-04-01

    This work examined the formation of a catalytically important microporous material, SAPO-34, in the presence of HF under hydrothermal synthesis conditions. The local environments of P, Al, F and Si atoms in several solid phases obtained at different stages of crystallization were characterized by several solid-state NMR techniques including (31)P, (27)Al, (19)F and (29)Si MAS, (27)Al triple-quantum MAS, (31)P{(27)Al} transfer of populations in double-resonance, (27)Al{(31)P} rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR), (27)Al-->(31)P heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy, (31)P{(19)F} and (27)Al{(19)F} REDOR as well as (1)H-->(31)P cross polarization. The NMR results provide the new insights into the formation of SAPO-34.

  6. Lithium Polymer Electrolytes and Solid State NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkeley, Emily R.

    2004-01-01

    Research is being done at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) developing new kinds of batteries that do not depend on a solution. Currently, batteries use liquid electrolytes containing lithium. Problems with the liquid electrolyte are (1) solvents used can leak out of the battery, so larger, more restrictive, packages have to be made, inhibiting the diversity of application and decreasing the power density; (2) the liquid is incompatible with the lithium metal anode, so alternative, less efficient, anodes are required. The Materials Department at GRC has been working to synthesize polymer electrolytes that can replace the liquid electrolytes. The advantages are that polymer electrolytes do not have the potential to leak so they can be used for a variety of tasks, small or large, including in the space rover or in space suits. The polymers generated by Dr. Mary Ann Meador's group are in the form of rod -coil structures. The rod aspect gives the polymer structural integrity, while the coil makes it flexible. Lithium ions are used in these polymers because of their high mobility. The coils have repeating units of oxygen which stabilize the positive lithium by donating electron density. This aids in the movement of the lithium within the polymer, which contributes to higher conductivity. In addition to conductivity testing, these polymers are characterized using DSC, TGA, FTIR, and solid state NMR. Solid state NMR is used in classifying materials that are not soluble in solvents, such as polymers. The NMR spins the sample at a magic angle (54.7') allowing the significant peaks to emerge. Although solid state NMR is a helpful technique in determining bonding, the process of preparing the sample and tuning it properly are intricate jobs that require patience; especially since each run takes about six hours. The NMR allows for the advancement of polymer synthesis by showing if the expected results were achieved. Using the NMR, in addition to looking at polymers, allows for

  7. Solid-state NMR of proteins sedimented by ultracentrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Bertini, Ivano; Luchinat, Claudio; Parigi, Giacomo; Ravera, Enrico; Reif, Bernd; Turano, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Relatively large proteins in solution, spun in NMR rotors for solid samples at typical ultracentrifugation speeds, sediment at the rotor wall. The sedimented proteins provide high-quality solid-state-like NMR spectra suitable for structural investigation. The proteins fully revert to the native solution state when spinning is stopped, allowing one to study them in both conditions. Transiently sedimented proteins can be considered a novel phase as far as NMR is concerned. NMR of transiently sedimented molecules under fast magic angle spinning has the advantage of overcoming protein size limitations of solution NMR without the need of sample crystallization/precipitation required by solid-state NMR. PMID:21670262

  8. Pyrolysis temperature affects phosphorus transformation in biochar: Chemical fractionation and (31)P NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Zhang, You; Shao, Hongbo; Sun, Junna

    2016-11-01

    Phosphorus (P) recycling or reuse by pyrolyzing crop residue has recently elicited increased research interest. However, the effects of feedstock and pyrolysis conditions on P species have not been fully understood. Such knowledge is important in identifying the agronomic and environmental uses of biochar. Residues of three main Chinese agricultural crops and the biochars (produced at 300°C-600°C) derived from these crops were used to determine P transformations during pyrolysis. Hedley sequential fractionation and (31)P NMR analyses were used in the investigation. Our results showed that P transformation in biochar was significantly affected by pyrolysis temperature regardless of feedstock (Wheat straw, maize straw and peanut husk). Pyrolysis treatment transformed water soluble P into a labile (NaHCO3-Pi) or semi-labile pool (NaOH-Pi) and into a stable pool (Dil. HCl P and residual-P). At the same time, organic P was transformed into inorganic P fractions which was identified by the rapid decomposition of organic P detected with solution (31)P NMR. The P transformation during pyrolysis process suggested more stable P was formed at a higher pyrolysis temperature. This result was also evidenced by the presence of less soluble or stable P species, such as such as poly-P, crandallite (CaAl3(OH)5(PO4)2) and Wavellite (Al3(OH)3(PO4)2·5H2O), as detected by solid-state (31)P NMR in biochars formed at a higher pyrolysis temperature. Furthermore, a significant proportion of less soluble pyrophosphate was identified by solution (2%-35%) and solid-state (8%-53%) (31)P NMR, which was also responsible for the stable P forms at higher pyrolysis temperature although their solubility or stability requires further investigation. Results suggested that a relatively lower pyrolysis temperature retains P availability regardless of feedstock during pyrolysis process.

  9. Solid-State NMR Studies of Amyloid Fibril Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Current interest in amyloid fibrils stems from their involvement in neurodegenerative and other diseases and from their role as an alternative structural state for many peptides and proteins. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have the unique capability of providing detailed structural constraints for amyloid fibrils, sufficient for the development of full molecular models. In this article, recent progress in the application of solid-state NMR to fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, prion fibrils, and related systems is reviewed, along with relevant developments in solid-state NMR techniques and technology.

  10. 31P NMR spectroscopy of in vivo tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, T. C.; Evanochko, W. T.; Hiramoto, R. N.; Ghanta, V. K.; Lilly, M. B.; Lawson, A. J.; Corbett, T. H.; Durant, J. R.; Glickson, J. D.

    A probe, suitable for any wide-bore NMR spectrometer, was constructed for monitoring high-resolution spectra of in vivo subcutaneously implanted tumors in mice. Preliminary studies of a variety of murine tumors (MOPC 104E myeloma, Dunn osteosarcoma, colon-26, ovarian M5, and mammary adenocarcinoma as well as human colon, mammary, and lung tumors in athymic mice) indicate that the 31P NMR spectrum is a sensitive monitor of progressive metabolic changes that occur during untreated tumor growth and an early indicator of tumor response to chemotherapy, hyperthermia, and X radiation. Response to each of these therapeutic modalities is accompanied by distinctly different spectral changes.

  11. Bone Mineral 31P and Matrix-Bound Water Densities Measured by Solid-State 1H and 31P MRI

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Alan C.; Li, Cheng; Rajapakse, Chamith S.; Bashoor- Zadeh, Mahdieh; Bhagat, Yusuf A.; Wright, Alexander C.; Zemel, Babette S.; Zavaliangos, Antonios; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2014-01-01

    Bone is a composite material consisting of mineral and hydrated collagen fractions. MRI of bone is challenging due to extremely short transverse relaxation times, but solid-state imaging sequences exist that can acquire the short-lived signal from bone tissue. Previous work to quantify bone density via MRI used powerful experimental scanners. This work seeks to establish the feasibility of MRI-based measurement on clinical scanners of bone mineral and collagen-bound water densities, the latter as a surrogate of matrix density, and to examine the associations of these parameters with porosity and donors’ age. Mineral and matrix-bound water images of reference phantoms and cortical bone from 16 human donors, ages 27-97 years, were acquired by zero-echo-time 31P and 1H MRI on whole body 7T and 3T scanners, respectively. Images were corrected for relaxation and RF inhomogeneity to obtain density maps. Cortical porosity was measured by micro-CT, and apparent mineral density by pQCT. MRI-derived densities were compared to x-ray-based measurements by least-squares regression. Mean bone mineral 31P density was 6.74±1.22 mol/L (corresponding to 1129±204 mg/cc mineral), and mean bound water 1H density was 31.3±4.2 mol/L (corresponding to 28.3±3.7 %v/v). Both 31P and bound water (BW) densities were correlated negatively with porosity (31P: R2 = 0.32, p < 0.005; BW: R2 = 0.63, p < 0.0005) and age (31P: R2 = 0.39, p < 0.05; BW: R2 = 0.70, p < 0.0001), and positively with pQCT density (31P: R2 = 0.46, p < 0.05; BW: R2 = 0.50, p < 0.005). In contrast, the bone mineralization ratio (expressed here as the ratio of 31P density to bound water density), which is proportional to true bone mineralization, was found to be uncorrelated with porosity, age, or pQCT density. This work establishes the feasibility of image-based quantification of bone mineral and bound water densities using clinical hardware. PMID:24846186

  12. Functional groups identified by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure is generally high in organic matter intensity so it is well suitable for 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Solid-state 13C NMR techniques used in characterizing organic matter and its components include, but are not limited to, cross-polarization /magic angle spinning (CP...

  13. Exploring new Routes for Identifying Phosphorus Species in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems with 31P NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestergren, Johan; Persson, Per; Sundman, Annelie; Ilstedt, Ulrik; Giesler, Reiner; Schleucher, Jürgen; Gröbner, Gerhard

    2014-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) is the primary growth-limiting nutrient in some of the world's biomes. Rock phosphate is a non-renewable resource and the major source of agricultural fertilizers. Predictions of P consumption indicate that rock phosphate mining may peak within 35 years, with severe impacts on worldwide food production1. Organic P compounds constitute a major fraction of soil P, but little is known about the dynamics and bioavailability of organic P species. Our aim is to develop new liquid and solid state 31P-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) techniques to identify P-species in water and soils; information required for correlating P speciation with plant and soil processes2, and eventually to improve P use. Soil organic P is frequently extracted using NaOH/EDTA, followed by characterization of the extract by solution 31P-NMR. However, the obtained NMR spectra usually have poor resolution due to line broadening caused by the presence of paramagnetic ions. Therefore, we successfully developed an approach to avoid paramagnetic line broadening by precipitation of metal sulfides. Sulfide precipitation dramatically reduces NMR line widths for soil extracts, without affecting P-composition. The resulting highly improved resolution allowed us to apply for the first time 2D 1H,31P-NMR methods to identify different P monoesters in spectral regions which are extremely crowded in 1D NMR spectra.3 By exploiting 2D 1H-31P NMR spectra of soil extracts we were able to unambiguously identify individual organic P species by combining 31P and 1H chemical shifts and coupling constants. This approach is even suitable for a structural characterization of unknown P-components and for tracing degradation pathways between diesters and monoesters3,4.Currently we apply our approach on boreal4 and tropical soils with focus on Burkina Faso. In addition we also monitor P-species in aqueos ecosystems. For this purpose stream water from the Krycklan catchment in northern Sweden5 has been used to

  14. A Solid-State Study of a Novel 31P Spin Pair Using Magic-Angle-Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challoner, R.; Mcdowell, C. A.; Yoshifuji, M.; Toyota, K.; Tossell, J. A.

    The present investigation concerns the solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the 31P spin pair in the novel three-membered heterocyclic compound 3-(dichloromethylene)- trans-1,2-bis( 2,4,6-tri- tert-butylphenyl)- 1,2-diphosphirane using the magic-angle-spinning (MAS) technique. The homogeneous 31P lineshapes are analyzed to extract the principal components of the shielding tensors using the Maricq and Waugh description of homonuclear spin-pair systems by average-Hamiltonian theory, modified to encompass the n = 0 rotational resonance situation. The experimental values of the shielding-tensor components are compared with those obtained from ab initio calculations performed on the model molecule P 2C 2H 4 to aid further the interpretation of the 31P MAS NMR spectrum of the chloromethylene-diphosphirane. The magnitudes and orientations of calculated shielding-tensor components of the model compound methylene-diphosphirane P 2C 2H 4 are compared with those for the phosphorus spin pair in the molecular environments of P 2, P 2H 2, and P 2H 4. The electronic structures and bonding in all of those molecular species are discussed.

  15. Diamond Deposition and Defect Chemistry Studied via Solid State NMR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-30

    same integrated NMR signal, regardless of its chemical environment, provided complete spin-lattice relaxation occurs between averages 3 . Gem -quality...occurs between averages, and broadening from years, a large research effort has been devoted to the study paramagnetic centers is insignificant. Gem ...information on the distribution and motion mond’s durability very attractive. However, while gem - of hydrogen can be obtained from the solid-state NMR

  16. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnun, Jacob J.; Leftin, Avigdor; Brown, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy finds growing application to inorganic and organic materials, biological samples, polymers, proteins, and cellular membranes. However, this technique is often neither included in laboratory curricula nor typically covered in undergraduate courses. On the other hand, spectroscopy and…

  17. Probing phosphorylation by non-mammalian isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes using (1)H-(31)P-(31)P correlation NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Ananya; Shah, Meha H; Bitok, J Kipchirchir; Hassis-LeBeau, Maria E; Freel Meyers, Caren L

    2009-09-01

    The biogenesis of isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP) is accomplished by the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway in plants, bacteria and parasites, making it a potential target for the development of anti-infective agents and herbicides. The biosynthetic enzymes comprising this pathway catalyze intriguing chemical transformations on diphosphate scaffolds, offering an opportunity to generate novel analogs in this synthetically challenging compound class. Such a biosynthetic approach to generating new diphosphate analogs may involve transformation through discrete diphosphate species, presenting unique challenges in structure determination and characterization of unnatural enzyme-generated diphosphate products produced in tandem. We have developed (1)H-(31)P-(31)P correlation NMR spectroscopy techniques for the direct characterization of crude MEP pathway enzyme products at low concentrations (200 microM to 5 mM) on a room temperature (non-cryogenic) NMR probe. Coupling the 100% natural abundance of the (31)P nucleus with the high intrinsic sensitivity of proton NMR, (1)H-(31)P-(31)P correlation spectroscopy is particularly useful for characterization of unnatural diphosphate enzyme products in the MEP pathway. As proof of principle, we demonstrate the rapid characterization of natural enzyme products of the enzymes IspD, E and F in tandem enzyme incubations. In addition, we have characterized several unnatural enzyme products using this technique, including new products of cytidyltransferase IspD bearing erythritol, glycerol and ribose components. The results of this study indicate that IspD may be a useful biocatalyst and highlight (1)H-(31)P-(31)P correlation spectroscopy as a valuable tool for the characterization of other unnatural products in non-mammalian isoprenoid biosynthesis.

  18. DFT calculations of quadrupolar solid-state NMR properties: Some examples in solid-state inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Jerome; Messaoudi, Sabri; Alonzo, Veronique; Furet, Eric; Halet, Jean-François; Le Fur, Eric; Ashbrook, Sharon E; Pickard, Chris J; Gautier, Regis; Le Polles, Laurent

    2008-10-01

    This article presents results of first-principles calculations of quadrupolar parameters measured by solid-state nuclear magnetic measurement (NMR) spectroscopy. Different computational methods based on density functional theory were used to calculate the quadrupolar parameters. Through a series of illustrations from different areas of solid state inorganic chemistry, it is shown how quadrupolar solid-state NMR properties can be tackled by a theoretical approach and can yield structural information.

  19. 15N chemical shift referencing in solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Philippe; Raya, Jésus; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has much advanced during the last decade and provides a multitude of data that can be used for high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules, polymers, inorganic compounds or macromolecules. In some cases the chemical shift referencing has become a limiting factor to the precision of the structure calculations and we have therefore evaluated a number of methods used in proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy adamantane is generally accepted as an external standard, but to calibrate the (15)N chemical shift scale several standards are in use. As a consequence the published chemical shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 22 ppm). In this paper we report the (15)N chemical shift of several commonly used references compounds in order to allow for comparison and recalibration of published data and future work. We show that (15)NH4Cl in its powdered form (at 39.3 ppm with respect to liquid NH3) is a suitable external reference as it produces narrow lines when compared to other reference compounds and at the same time allows for the set-up of cross-polarization NMR experiments. The compound is suitable to calibrate magic angle spinning and static NMR experiments. Finally the temperature variation of (15)NH4Cl chemical shift is reported.

  20. Advances in solid-state NMR of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Foston, Marcus

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a well-established analytical and enabling technology in biofuel research. Over the past few decades, lignocellulosic biomass and its conversion to supplement or displace non-renewable feedstocks has attracted increasing interest. The application of solid-state NMR spectroscopy has long been seen as an important tool in the study of cellulose and lignocellulose structure, biosynthesis, and deconstruction, especially considering the limited number of effective solvent systems and the significance of plant cell wall three-dimensional microstructure and component interaction to conversion yield and rate profiles. This article reviews common and recent applications of solid-state NMR spectroscopy methods that provide insight into the structural and dynamic processes of cellulose that control bulk properties and biofuel conversion.

  1. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR.

    PubMed

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

  2. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

  3. The characterization of phospholipid functional group probe species on respirable silicon-containing dusts by solid-state 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Murray, David K

    2010-03-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies are reported for the interactions of probe molecules with respirable silicon-containing dusts as experimental evidence complementing computational studies reported by Snyder and Madura recently in J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 7095 (2008). The selected probe molecules represent the individual functional groups of a model lung surfactant dipalmitoylphosphatidyl choline (DPPC) deposited on a respirable silica and kaolin from water solution. (13)C and (31)P solid-state NMR spectroscopies were employed to detect chemical shift, line width, and chemical shift anisotropy, providing experimental evidence of mobility and relaxation changes describing the site and orientation of surface-associated species. NMR results confirm that only the phosphate and adjacent carbons are immobilized by surface hydroxyls on kaolin, while these and the carbons of the cationic head group are likewise immobilized by surface silanols on Miu-U-Sil 5. The phosphates in phosphoryl- and phosphatidyl-cholines were the primary interaction sites, with additional weak coordination with the trimethylammonium cation species. Covalent Al-O-P formation is not likely a factor in in vivo or in vitro toxicity mechanisms of respirable silicon-containing materials, but is rather the result of dehydration or demethoxylation reactions occurring over time or during heating or reduced pressure used in preparing materials for NMR spectroscopic study. Hydration is a critical factor in the formation and preparation for spectroscopic observation of coated dusts. Care must be taken to ensure that products formed and studied correspond to species formed in vivo under suitable concentration and hydration conditions.

  4. Spatially resolved solid-state MAS-NMR-spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Scheler, U; Schauss, G; Blümich, B; Spiess, H W

    1996-07-01

    A comprehensive account of spatially resolved solid-state MAS NMR of 13C is given. A device generating field gradients rotating synchronously with the magic angle spinner is described. Spatial resolution and sensitivity are compared for phase and frequency encoding of spatial information. The suppression of spinning sidebands is demonstrated for both cases. Prior knowledge about the involved materials can be used for the reduction of data from spatially resolved spectra to map chemical structure. Indirect detection via 13C NMR gives access to the information about mobility from proton-wideline spectra. Two-dimensional solid-state spectroscopy with spatial resolution is demonstrated for a rotor synchronized MAS experiment which resolves molecular order as a function of space. By comparison of different experiments the factors affecting the spatial resolution are investigated.

  5. Solid state NMR of porous materials : zeolites and related materials.

    PubMed

    Koller, Hubert; Weiss, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Solid state NMR spectroscopy applied to the science of crystalline micro- and mesoporous silica materials over the past 10 years is reviewed. A survey is provided of framework structure and connectivity analyses from chemical shift effects of various elements in zeolites including heteroatom substitutions, framework defects and pentacoordinated silicon for zeolites containing fluoride ions. New developments in the field of NMR crystallography are included. Spatial host-guest ordering and confinement effects of zeolite-sorbate complexes are outlined, with special emphasis on NMR applications utilizing the heteronuclear dipolar interaction. The characterization of zeolite acid sites and in situ NMR on catalytic conversions is also included. Finally, the motion of extra-framework cations is investigated in two tutorial cases of sodium hopping in sodalite and cancrinite.

  6. Protein structure determination with paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Ishita; Nadaud, Philippe S; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2013-09-17

    Many structures of the proteins and protein assemblies that play central roles in fundamental biological processes and disease pathogenesis are not readily accessible via the conventional techniques of single-crystal X-ray diffraction and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). On the other hand, many of these challenging biological systems are suitable targets for atomic-level structural and dynamic analysis by magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that has far less stringent limitations on the molecular size and crystalline state. Over the past decade, major advances in instrumentation and methodology have prompted rapid growth in the field of biological solid-state NMR. However, despite this progress, one challenge for the elucidation of three-dimensional (3D) protein structures via conventional MAS NMR methods is the relative lack of long-distance data. Specifically, extracting unambiguous interatomic distance restraints larger than ∼5 Å from through-space magnetic dipole-dipole couplings among the protein (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N nuclei has proven to be a considerable challenge for researchers. It is possible to circumvent this problem by extending the structural studies to include several analogs of the protein of interest, intentionally modified to contain covalently attached paramagnetic tags at selected sites. In these paramagnetic proteins, the hyperfine couplings between the nuclei and unpaired electrons can manifest themselves in NMR spectra in the form of relaxation enhancements of the nuclear spins that depend on the electron-nucleus distance. These effects can be significant for nuclei located up to ∼20 Å away from the paramagnetic center. In this Account, we discuss MAS NMR structural studies of nitroxide and EDTA-Cu(2+) labeled variants of a model 56 amino acid globular protein, B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB1), in the microcrystalline solid phase. We used a set of six EDTA-Cu(2

  7. Microcoils and microsamples in solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports on microcoils are reviewed. The first part of the review includes a discussion of how the geometries of the sample and coil affect the NMR signal intensity. In addition to derivation of the well-known result that the signal intensity increases as the coil size decreases, the prediction that dilution of a small sample with magnetically inert matter leads to better sensitivity if a tiny coil is not available is given. The second part of the review focuses on the issues specific to solid-state NMR. They include realization of magic-angle spinning (MAS) using a microcoil and harnessing of such strong pulses that are feasible only with a microcoil. Two strategies for microcoil MAS, the piggyback method and magic-angle coil spinning (MACS), are reviewed. In addition, MAS of flat, disk-shaped samples is discussed in the context of solid-state NMR of small-volume samples. Strong RF irradiation, which has been exploited in wide-line spectral excitation, multiple-quantum MAS (MQMAS), and dipolar decoupling experiments, has been accompanied by new challenges regarding the Bloch-Siegert effect, the minimum time resolution of the spectrometer, and the time scale of pulse transient effects. For a possible solution to the latter problem, recent reports on active compensation of pulse transients are described.

  8. Solvent suppression in DNP enhanced solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarava, Jayasubba Reddy; Chaudhari, Sachin Rama; Rossini, Aaron J.; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon

    2017-04-01

    We show how DNP enhanced solid-state NMR spectra can be dramatically simplified by suppression of solvent signals. This is achieved by (i) exploiting the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of solvent signals relative to materials substrates, or (ii) by using short cross-polarization contact times to transfer hyperpolarization to only directly bonded carbon-13 nuclei in frozen solutions. The methods are evaluated for organic microcrystals, surfaces and frozen solutions. We show how this allows for the acquisition of high-resolution DNP enhanced proton-proton correlation experiments to measure inter-nuclear proximities in an organic solid.

  9. A Hall effect angle detector for solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Mamone, Salvatore; Dorsch, André; Johannessen, Ole G; Naik, Manoj V; Madhu, P K; Levitt, Malcolm H

    2008-01-01

    We describe a new method for independent monitoring of the angle between the spinning axis and the magnetic field in solid-state NMR. A Hall effect magnetic flux sensor is fixed to the spinning housing, so that a change in the stator orientation leads to a change in the angle between the Hall plane and the static magnetic field. This leads to a change in the Hall voltage generated by the sensor when an electric current is passed through it. The Hall voltage may be measured externally by a precision voltmeter, allowing the spinning angle to be measured non-mechanically and independent of the NMR experiment. If the Hall sensor is mounted so that the magnetic field is approximately parallel to the Hall plane, the Hall voltage becomes highly sensitive to the stator orientation. The current angular accuracy is around 10 millidegrees. The precautions needed to achieve higher angular accuracy are described.

  10. High-resolution solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Michael D.; Smith, Karen A.; Kinsey, Robert A.; Rothgeb, T. Michael; Skarjune, Robert P.; Oldfield, Eric

    1982-01-01

    We report the observation of high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra of 23Na (I = [unk]), 27Al (I = [unk]) and 51V (I = [unk]) in various inorganic systems. We show that, contrary to popular belief, relatively high-resolution (≈10 ppm linewidth) spectra may be obtained from quadrupolar systems, in which electric quadrupole coupling constants (e2qQ/h) are in the range ≈1-5 MHz, by means of observation of the (½, -½) spin transition. The (½, -½) transition for all nonintegral spin quadrupolar nuclei (I = [unk], [unk], [unk], or [unk]) is only normally broadened by dipolar, chemical shift (or Knight shift) anisotropy or second-order quadrupolar effects, all of which are to a greater or lesser extent averaged under fast magic-angle sample rotation. In the case of 23Na and 27Al, high-resolution spectra of 23NaNO3 (e2qQ/h ≈300 kHz) and α-27Al2O3 (e2qQ/h ≈2-3 MHz) are presented; in the case of 51V2O5 (e2qQ/h ≈800 kHz), rotational echo decays are observed due to the presence of a ≈103-ppm chemical shift anisotropy. The observation of high-resolution solid-state spectra of systems having spins I = [unk], [unk], and [unk] in asymmetric environments opens up the possibility of examining about two out of three nuclei by solid-state NMR that were previously thought of as “inaccessible” due to the presence of large (a few megahertz) quadrupole coupling constants. Preliminary results for an I = [unk] system, 93Nb, having e2qQ/h ≈19.5 MHz, are also reported. PMID:16593165

  11. Solid-state NMR characterization of Mowry Formation shales

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-04-01

    Solid-state {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si NMR measurements were carried out on a series of petroleum source rocks from the Mowry Formation of the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. The objectives of this study wereto use CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR measurements to monitor changes in the carbon structure of the kerogen that result from depth of burial, and to examine the feasibility of {sup 29}Si NMR for studying the thermal alteration of clay minerals during diagenesis. Carbon and silicon NMR measurements were made on a suite of samples covering a present-day depth interval of 3,000 to 11,500 ft.In general, the NMR results endorsed other geochemical analyses that were performed on the source rocks as part of another study to examine pressure compartmentalization in the Mowry Formation. The carbon aromaticity of the kerogen increased with depth of burial, and at depths greater that approximately 10,000 ft the kerogen showed little capacity to generate additional oil because of the small fraction of residual aliphatic carbon. By combining NMR and Rock-Eval measurements, an estimate of the hydrogen budget was obtained. The calculations indicated that approximately 20% of the kerogen was converted to hydrocarbons, and that sufficient hydrogen was liberated from aromatization and condensation reactions to stabilize the generated products. The {sup 29}Si NMR spectra were characterized by a relatively sharp quartz resonance and a broad resonance from the clay minerals. With increasing depth of burial, the clay resonance became broader and shifted slightly downfield. These changes qualitatively support X-ray analysis that shows progressive alteration of illite to smectite with depth of burial.

  12. Solid-state NMR characterization of Mowry Formation shales

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-04-01

    Solid-state [sup 13]C and [sup 29]Si NMR measurements were carried out on a series of petroleum source rocks from the Mowry Formation of the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. The objectives of this study wereto use CP/MAS [sup 13]C NMR measurements to monitor changes in the carbon structure of the kerogen that result from depth of burial, and to examine the feasibility of [sup 29]Si NMR for studying the thermal alteration of clay minerals during diagenesis. Carbon and silicon NMR measurements were made on a suite of samples covering a present-day depth interval of 3,000 to 11,500 ft.In general, the NMR results endorsed other geochemical analyses that were performed on the source rocks as part of another study to examine pressure compartmentalization in the Mowry Formation. The carbon aromaticity of the kerogen increased with depth of burial, and at depths greater that approximately 10,000 ft the kerogen showed little capacity to generate additional oil because of the small fraction of residual aliphatic carbon. By combining NMR and Rock-Eval measurements, an estimate of the hydrogen budget was obtained. The calculations indicated that approximately 20% of the kerogen was converted to hydrocarbons, and that sufficient hydrogen was liberated from aromatization and condensation reactions to stabilize the generated products. The [sup 29]Si NMR spectra were characterized by a relatively sharp quartz resonance and a broad resonance from the clay minerals. With increasing depth of burial, the clay resonance became broader and shifted slightly downfield. These changes qualitatively support X-ray analysis that shows progressive alteration of illite to smectite with depth of burial.

  13. Solid state NMR studies of materials for energy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambukara Kodiweera Arachchilage, Chandana K.

    Presented in this dissertation are NMR investigations of the dynamical and structural properties of materials for energy conversion and storage devices. 1H and 2H NMR was used to study water and methanol transportation in sulfonated poly(arylene ether ketone) based membranes for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC). These results are presented in chapter 3. The amount of liquid in the membrane and ion exchange capacity (IEC) are two main factors that govern the dynamics in these membranes. Water and methanol diffusion coefficients also are comparable. Chapters 4 and 5 are concerned with 31P and 1H NMR in phosphoric acid doped PBI membranes (para-PBI and 2OH-PBI) as well as PBI membranes containing ionic liquids (H3PO4/PMIH2PO4/PBI). These membranes are designed for higher-temperature fuel cell operation. In general, stronger short and long range interactions were observed in the 2OH-PBI matrix, yielding reduced proton transport compared to that of para-PBI. In the case of H3PO4/PMIH2PO 4/PBI, both conductivity and diffusion are higher for the sample with molar ratio 2/4/1. Finally, chapter 6 is devoted to the 31P NMR MAS study of phosphorus-containing structural groups on the surfaces of micro/mesoporous activated carbons. Two spectral features were observed and the narrow feature identifies surface phosphates while the broad component identifies heterogeneous subsurface phosphorus environments including phosphate and more complex structure multiple P-C, P-N and P=N bonds.

  14. Tendencies of 31P chemical shifts changes in NMR spectra of nucleotide derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Lebedev, A V; Rezvukhin, A I

    1984-01-01

    31P NMR chemical shifts of the selected mono- and oligonucleotide derivatives, including the compounds with P-N, P-C, P-S bonds and phosphite nucleotide analogues have been presented. The influence of substituents upon 31P chemical shifts has been discussed. The concrete examples of 31P chemical shifts data application in the field of nucleotide chemistry have been considered. PMID:6087290

  15. Probing the interaction of U(vi) with phosphonate-functionalized mesoporous silica using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Eva C; Mason, Harris E; Shusterman, Jennifer A; Bruchet, Anthony; Nitsche, Heino

    2016-06-21

    The fundamental interaction of U(vi) with diethylphosphatoethyl triethoxysilane functionalized SBA-15 mesoporous silica is studied by macroscopic batch experiments and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. DPTS-functionalized silica has been shown to extract U(vi) from nitric acid solutions at or above pH 3. Extraction is dependent on pH and ionic strength. Single-pulse (31)P NMR on U(vi) contacted samples revealed that U(vi) only interacts with a fraction of the ligands present on the surface. At pH 4 the U(vi) extraction capacity of the material is limited to 27-37% of the theoretical capacity, based on ligand loading. We combined single pulse (31)P NMR on U(vi)-contacted samples with batch studies to measure a ligand-to-metal ratio of approximately 2 : 1 at pH 3 and 4. Batch studies and cross-polarization NMR measurements reveal that U(vi) binds to deprotonated phosphonate and/or silanol sites. We use (31)P-(31)P DQ-DRENAR NMR studies to compare the average dipolar coupling between phosphorus spins for both U(vi)-complexed and non-complexed ligand environments. These measurements reveal that U(vi) extraction is not limited by inadequate surface distribution of ligands, but rather by low stability of the surface phosphonate complex.

  16. Solid State NMR Studies of the Aluminum Hydride Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Son-Jong; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Graetz, Jason; Reilly, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Several solid state NMR techniques including magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and multiple-quantum (MQ) MAS experiments have been used to characterize various AlH3 samples. MAS-NMR spectra for the 1H and 27Al nuclei have been obtained on a variety of AlH3 samples that include the (beta)- and (gamma)- phases as well as the most stable (alpha)-phase. While the dominant components in these NMR spectra correspond to the aluminum hydride phases, other species were found that include Al metal, molecular hydrogen (H2), as well as peaks that can be assigned to Al-O species in different configurations. The occurrence and concentration of these extraneous components are dependent upon the initial AlH3 phase composition and preparation procedures. Both the (beta)-AlH3 and (gamma)-AlH3 phases were found to generate substantial amounts of Al metal when the materials were stored at room temperature while the (alpha)-phase materials do not exhibit these changes.

  17. Solid State NMR Studies of Energy Conversion and Storage Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankuru Hennadige, Sohan Roshel De Silva

    NMR (Nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy is utilized to study energy conversion and storage materials. Different types of NMR techniques including Magic Angle Spinning, Cross-polarization and relaxation measurement experiments were employed. Four different projects are discussed in this dissertation. First, three types of CFx battery materials were investigated. Electrochemical studies have demonstrated different electrochemical performances by one type, delivering superior performance over the other two. 13C and 19F MAS NMR techniques are employed to identify the atomic/molecular structural factors that might account for differences in electrochemical performance among different types. Next as the second project, layered polymer dielectrics were investigated by NMR. Previous studies have shown that thin film capacitors are improved by using alternate layers of two polymers with complementary properties: one with a high breakdown strength and one with high dielectric constant as opposed to monolithic layers. 13C to 1H cross-polarization techniques were used to investigate any inter-layer properties that may cause the increase in the dielectric strength. The third project was to study two types of thermoelectric materials. These samples were made of heavily doped phosphorous and boron in silicon by two different methods: ball-milled and annealed. These samples were investigated by NMR to determine the degree of disorder and obtain insight into the doping efficiency. The last ongoing project is on a lithium-ion battery system. The nature of passivating layers or the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formed on the electrodes surface is important because of the direct correlation between the SEI and the battery life time/durability. Multinuclear (7Li, 19F, 31P) techniques are employed to identify the composition of the SEI formation of both positive and negative electrodes.

  18. A Solid-State NMR Investigation of MQ Silicone Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, Sergey G; Volkov, Vitaly I; Tatarinova, Elena A; Muzafarov, Aziz M

    2013-01-01

    The structure of MQ copolymers of the general chemical formula [(CH3)3SiO0.5]m [SiO2]n was characterized by means of solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The MQ copolymers are highly branched polycyclic compounds (densely cross-linked nanosized networks). MQ copolymers were prepared by hydrolytic polycondensation in active medium. (29)Si NMR spectra were obtained by single pulse excitation (or direct polarization, DP) and cross-polarization (CP) (29)Si{(1)H} techniques in concert with MAS. It was shown that material consist of monofunctional M (≡SiO Si (CH3)3) and two types of tetrafunctional Q units: Q(4) ((≡SiO)4Si) and Q(3) ((≡SiO)3SiOH). Spin-lattice relaxation times T1 measurements of (29)Si nuclei and analysis of (29)Si{(1)H} variable contact time signal intensities allowed us to obtain quantitative data on the relative content of different sites in copolymers. These investigations indicate that MQ copolymers represent dense structure with core and shell.

  19. TLC and 31P-NMR analysis of low polarity phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Vyssotski, Mikhail; MacKenzie, Andrew; Scott, Dawn

    2009-04-01

    High-performance TLC and (31)P-NMR were assessed as methods of observing the presence of numerous low polarity phospholipids: bis-phosphatidic acid (BPA), semi-lyso bis-phosphatidic acid (SLBPA), N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE), N-(1,1-dimethyl-3-oxo-butyl)-phosphatidylethanolamine (diacetone adduct of PE, DOBPE), N-acetyl PE, phosphatidylmethanol (PM), phosphatidylethanol (PEt), phosphatidyl-n-propanol (PP), phosphatidyl-n-butanol (PB). Both techniques are non-discriminative and do not require the prior isolation of individual lipids. It appears that 2D TLC is superior to (31)P NMR in the analysis of low polarity phospholipids. All phosphatidylalcohols were well separated by 2D TLC. However, some compounds which can present difficulty in separation by 2D-TLC (e.g., SLBPA and NAPE; or DOBPE and N-acetyl PE) were easily distinguished using (31)P NMR so the methods are complimentary. A disadvantage of 2D TLC is that Rf values can vary with different brands and batches of TLC plates. The chemical shifts of (31)P NMR were less variable, and so a library of standards may not be necessary for peak identification. Another advantage of (31)P NMR is the ease of quantification of phospholipids. The applicability of the methods was tested on natural extracts of fish brain and cabbage stem.

  20. The determination of enantiomeric excess of valine by ODESSA solid-state NMR experiment.

    PubMed

    Tadeusiak, Elzbieta J; Ciesielski, Włodzimierz; Olejniczak, Sebastian

    2006-10-01

    The enantiomeric excess (ee) can be determined by many methods; one among them is nuclear magnetic resonance in solid-state (SS NMR). In this study we used the SS NMR ODESSA experiment for determination of the ee of valine.

  1. Probing the interaction of U(VI) with phosphonate-functionalized mesoporous silica using solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Uribe, Eva C.; Mason, Harris E.; Shusterman, Jennifer A.; ...

    2016-05-30

    The fundamental interaction of U(VI) with diethylphosphatoethyl triethoxysilane functionalized SBA-15 mesoporous silica is studied by macroscopic batch experiments and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. DPTS-functionalized silica has been shown to extract U(VI) from nitric acid solutions at or above pH 3. Extraction is dependent on pH and ionic strength. Single-pulse 31P NMR on U(VI) contacted samples revealed that U(VI)only interacts with a fraction of the ligands present on the surface. At pH 4 the U(VI) extraction capacity of the material is limited to 27–37% of the theoretical capacity, based on ligand loading. We combined single pulse 31P NMR on U(VI)-contacted samples withmore » batch studies to measure a ligand-to-metal ratio of approximately 2 : 1 at pH 3 and 4. Batch studies and cross-polarization NMR measurements reveal that U(VI) binds to deprotonated phosphonate and/or silanol sites. We use 31P–31P DQ-DRENAR NMR studies to compare the average dipolar coupling between phosphorus spins for both U(VI)-complexed and non-complexed ligand environments. Furthermore, these measurements reveal that U(VI) extraction is not limited by inadequate surface distribution of ligands, but rather by low stability of the surface phosphonate complex.« less

  2. (1)H NMR spectra dataset and solid-state NMR data of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata).

    PubMed

    Alves Filho, Elenilson G; Silva, Lorena M A; Teofilo, Elizita M; Larsen, Flemming H; de Brito, Edy S

    2017-04-01

    In this article the NMR data from chemical shifts, coupling constants, and structures of all the characterized compounds were provided, beyond a complementary PCA evaluation for the corresponding manuscript (E.G. Alves Filho, L.M.A. Silva, E.M. Teofilo, F.H. Larsen, E.S. de Brito, 2017) [3]. In addition, a complementary assessment from solid-state NMR data was provided. For further chemometric analysis, numerical matrices from the raw (1)H NMR data were made available in Microsoft Excel workbook format (.xls).

  3. sup 31 P NMR analysis of coal moieties bearing -OH, -NH, and -SH functions

    SciTech Connect

    Verkade, J.G.

    1991-08-31

    NMR reagents for the speciation and quantitation of labile-hydrogen functional groups and sulfur groups in coal ligands have been synthesized and evaluated. These reagents, which contain the NMR-active nuclei {sup 31}p, {sup 119}Sn or {sup 195}pt, were designed to possess improved chemical shift resolution over reagents reported in the literature. Our efforts were successful in the case of the new {sup 31}p and {sup 119}Sn reagents we developed, but the {sup 195}pt work on sulfur groups was only partially successful in as much as the grant came to a close and was not renewed. Our success with {sup 31}P and {sup 119}Sn NMR reagents came to the attention of Amoco and they have recently expressed interest in further supporting that work. A further measure of the success of our efforts can be seen in the nine publications supported by this grant which are cited in the reference list.

  4. Multidimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Phyo, Pyae; Hong, Mei

    2016-09-01

    Plant biomass has become an important source of bio-renewable energy in modern society. The molecular structure of plant cell walls is difficult to characterize by most atomic-resolution techniques due to the insoluble and disordered nature of the cell wall. Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is uniquely suited for studying native hydrated plant cell walls at the molecular level with chemical resolution. Significant progress has been made in the last five years to elucidate the molecular structures and interactions of cellulose and matrix polysaccharides in plant cell walls. These studies have focused on primary cell walls of growing plants in both the dicotyledonous and grass families, as represented by the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana, Brachypodium distachyon, and Zea mays. To date, these SSNMR results have shown that 1) cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins form a single network in the primary cell wall; 2) in dicot cell walls, the protein expansin targets the hemicellulose-enriched region of the cellulose microfibril for its wall-loosening function; and 3) primary wall cellulose has polymorphic structures that are distinct from the microbial cellulose structures. This article summarizes these key findings, and points out future directions of investigation to advance our fundamental understanding of plant cell wall structure and function.

  5. integrating Solid State NMR and Computations in Membrane Protein Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Helical membrane protein structures are influenced by their native environment. Therefore the characterization of their structure in an environment that models as closely as possible their native environment is critical for achieving not only structural but functional understanding of these proteins. Solid state NMR spectroscopy in liquid crystalline lipid bilayers provides an excellent tool for such characterizations. Two classes of restraints can be obtained - absolute restraints that constrain the structure to a laboratory frame of reference when using uniformly oriented samples (approximately 1° of mosaic spread) and relative restraints that restrain one part of the structure with respect to another part such as torsional and distance restraints. Here, I will discuss unique restraints derived from uniformly oriented samples and the characterization of initial structures utilizing both restraint types, followed by restrained molecular dynamics refinement in the same lipid bilayer environment as that used for the experimental restraint collection. Protein examples will be taken from Influenza virus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. When available comparisons of structures to those obtained using different membrane mimetic environments will be shown and the causes for structural distortions explained based on an understanding of membrane biophysics and its sophisticated influence on membrane proteins.

  6. Coherent and stochastic averaging in solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevzorov, Alexander A.

    2014-12-01

    A new approach for calculating solid-state NMR lineshapes of uniaxially rotating membrane proteins under the magic-angle spinning conditions is presented. The use of stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) allows one to account for both coherent sample rotation and stochastic motional averaging of the spherical dipolar powder patterns by uniaxial diffusion of the spin-bearing molecules. The method is illustrated via simulations of the dipolar powder patterns of rigid samples under the MAS conditions, as well as the recent method of rotational alignment in the presence of both MAS and rotational diffusion under the conditions of dipolar recoupling. It has been found that it is computationally more advantageous to employ direct integration over a spherical grid rather than to use a full angular basis set for the SLE solution. Accuracy estimates for the bond angles measured from the recoupled amide 1H-15N dipolar powder patterns have been obtained at various rotational diffusion coefficients. It has been shown that the rotational alignment method is applicable to membrane proteins approximated as cylinders with radii of approximately 20 Å, for which uniaxial rotational diffusion within the bilayer is sufficiently fast and exceeds the rate 2 × 105 s-1.

  7. [Optimizing the method for 31P-NMR analysis of organic phosphorus from wetland sediments].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin; Wang, Hai-Wen; Hao, Hong; Gao, Bo; Jia, Jian-Li

    2013-11-01

    Solution 31P-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is an analysis technology which has been an effective means for the analysis of environmental organic phosphorus. However, the method is rarely applied in the study of wetlands so that the corresponding researches about wetland sediment sample preparation method also very deficient. The present study was aimed to find the most suitable sample preparation method for 31P-NMR analysis of the artificial wetland sediments, using different extractant (NaOH or 0.25 mol x L(-1) NaOH + 0.05 mol x L(-1) EDTA as main extractant, and 1M HCl as pre-extractant or not), sample to extractant ratio (1 : 8 or 1 : 10), centrifugation conditions and scans time and so on. The results showed that the best 31P-NMR spectrum could be obtained with freeze-ried, ground and sieved sediments, 1M HCl as pre-extractant for 16 h, NaOH + 0.05 mol x L(-1) EDTA as main extractant for 16 h, extraction ratio of 1 : 8, and low temperature and high-speed centrifugation (4 degrees C, 10 000 r x min(-1) for 30 min) for avoiding hydrolysis of certain components. Besides, choosing much longer NMR scan time, as 14-16 h (scans about 25 000 times), could get more complete spectral signals spectrum. And finally, four kinds of P-compounds (orthophosphate, orthophosphate monoesters, orthophosphate diesters and pyrophosphate) were detected in the NMR spectrum. But neither polyphosphate nor phosphonates was not found in all these experiments, which need further study. Compared with the traditional chemical analysis method, 31P-NMR method of sample preparation is relatively simple. Then it is less destructive with components distinguished completely. Using 31P-NMR technology, the cognition of wetland phosphorus cycle, especially organophosphate, will be expected to get new breakthrough.

  8. Inhibition mechanisms of Zn precipitation on aluminum oxide by glyphosate: a 31P NMR and Zn EXAFS study.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Yu-Jun; Zhu, Mengqiang; Fan, Ting-Ting; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Phillips, Brian L; Sparks, Donald L

    2013-05-07

    In this research, the effects of glyphosate (GPS) on Zn sorption/precipitation on γ-alumina were investigated using a batch technique, Zn K-edge EXAFS, and (31)P NMR spectroscopy. The EXAFS analysis revealed that, in the absence of glyphosate, Zn adsorbed on the aluminum oxide surface mainly as bidentate mononuclear surface complexes at pH 5.5, whereas Zn-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) precipitates formed at pH 8.0. In the presence of glyphosate, the EXAFS spectra of Zn sorption samples at pH 5.5 and 8.0 were very similar, both of which demonstrated that Zn did not directly bind to the mineral surface but bonded with the carboxyl group of glyphosate. Formation of γ-alumina-GPS-Zn ternary surface complexes was further suggested by (31)P solid state NMR data which indicated the glyphosate binds to γ-alumina via a phosphonate group, bridging the mineral surface and Zn. Additionally, we showed the sequence of additional glyphosate and Zn can influence the sorption mechanism. At pH 8, Zn-Al LDH precipitates formed if Zn was added first, and no precipitates formed if glyphosate was added first or simultaneously with Zn. In contrast, at pH 5.5, only γ-alumina-GPS-Zn ternary surface complexes formed regardless of whether glyphosate or Zn was added first or both were added simultaneously.

  9. Action of the multifunctional peptide BP100 on native biomembranes examined by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Misiewicz, Julia; Afonin, Sergii; Grage, Stephan L; van den Berg, Jonas; Strandberg, Erik; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-04-01

    Membrane composition is a key factor that regulates the destructive activity of antimicrobial peptides and the non-leaky permeation of cell penetrating peptides in vivo. Hence, the choice of model membrane is a crucial aspect in NMR studies and should reflect the biological situation as closely as possible. Here, we explore the structure and dynamics of the short multifunctional peptide BP100 using a multinuclear solid-state NMR approach. The membrane alignment and mobility of this 11 amino acid peptide was studied in various synthetic lipid bilayers with different net charge, fluidity, and thickness, as well as in native biomembranes harvested from prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. (19)F-NMR provided the high sensitivity and lack of natural abundance background that are necessary to observe a labelled peptide even in protoplast membranes from Micrococcus luteus and in erythrocyte ghosts. Six selectively (19)F-labeled BP100 analogues gave remarkably similar spectra in all of the macroscopically oriented membrane systems, which were studied under quasi-native conditions of ambient temperature and full hydration. This similarity suggests that BP100 has the same surface-bound helical structure and high mobility in the different biomembranes and model membranes alike, independent of charge, thickness or cholesterol content of the system. (31)P-NMR spectra of the phospholipid components did not indicate any bilayer perturbation, so the formation of toroidal wormholes or micellarization can be excluded as a mechanism of its antimicrobial or cell penetrating action. However, (2)H-NMR analysis of the acyl chain order parameter profiles showed that BP100 leads to considerable membrane thinning and thereby local destabilization.

  10. Feasibility of assessing bone matrix and mineral properties in vivo by combined solid-state 1H and 31P MRI

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hee Kwon; Seifert, Alan C.; Li, Cheng; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate an integrated imaging protocol for bone water and phosphorus quantification in vivo by solid-state 1H and 31P MRI. Materials and methods All studies were HIPAA-compliant and were performed with institutional review board approval and written informed consent. Proton (1H) ultra-short echo-time (UTE) and phosphorus (31P) zero echo-time (ZTE) sequences were designed and implemented on a 3 T clinical MR scanner to quantify bone water and mineral in vivo. The left tibia of ten healthy subjects (including both genders, 49±15 y/o) was examined with a custom-built 1H/31P dual-frequency extremity RF coil. Total bone water (TW), water bound to the collagen matrix (BW) and bone 31P were quantified from MR images with respect to reference samples of known 1H or 31P concentration, and pore water (PW) was subsequently determined from TW and BW. Porosity index (PI) was calculated as the ratio between UTE images acquired at two echo times. MRI parameters were compared with bone density measures obtained by high-resolution peripheral quantitative CT (HR-pQCT). Results The total scan time for the bone water and 31P quantification protocol was about 50 minutes. Average TW, BW, PW and 31P concentrations were 13.99±1.26, 10.39±0.80, 3.34±1.41 mol/L and 7.06±1.53 mol/L for the studied cohort, respectively, in good agreement with previous results conducted ex vivo. Average intra-subject coefficients of variation were 3.47%, 2.60% and 7.50% for TW, BW and PW and 5.60% for 31P. Negative correlations were observed between PW and vBMD (p<0.05) as well as between PI and 31P (p<0.05), while bone mineral content (BMC) estimated from 31P MRI and HR-pQCT were strongly positively correlated (p<0.0001). Conclusion This work demonstrates the feasibility of quantifying bone water and mineral phosphorus in human subjects in a single MRI session with a clinically practical imaging protocol. PMID:28296979

  11. Arabidopsis thalianafrom Polarization Transfer Solid-State NMR

    SciTech Connect

    White, Paul B; Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Hong, Mei

    2014-07-23

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are hydrated under functional conditions, but the molecular interactions between water and polysaccharides in the wall have not been investigated. In this work, we employ polarization transfer solid-state NMR techniques to study the hydration of primary-wall polysaccharides of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. By transferring water 1H polarization to polysaccharides through distance- and mobility-dependent 1H–1H dipolar couplings and detecting it through polysaccharide 13C signals, we obtain information about water proximity to cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins as well as water mobility. Both intact and partially extracted cell wall samples are studied. Our results show that water–pectin polarization transfer is much faster than water–cellulose polarization transfer in all samples, but the extent of extraction has a profound impact on the water–polysaccharide spin diffusion. Removal of calcium ions and the consequent extraction of homogalacturonan (HG) significantly slowed down spin diffusion, while further extraction of matrix polysaccharides restored the spin diffusion rate. These trends are observed in cell walls with similar water content, thus they reflect inherent differences in the mobility and spatial distribution of water. Combined with quantitative analysis of the polysaccharide contents, our results indicate that calcium ions and HG gelation increase the amount of bound water, which facilitates spin diffusion, while calcium removal disrupts the gel and gives rise to highly dynamic water, which slows down spin diffusion. The recovery of spin diffusion rates after more extensive extraction is attributed to increased water-exposed surface areas of the polysaccharides. Water–pectin spin diffusion precedes water–cellulose spin diffusion, lending support to the single-network model of plant primary walls in which a substantial fraction of the cellulose surface is surrounded by pectins.

  12. Intermediate valence behavior of Yb2Ni12P7 studied by using 31P NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Sugiura, K.; Ueda, K.; Mito, T.; Kohara, T.; Satoh, R.; Tsuchiya, K.; Nakano, T.; Takeda, N.

    2013-08-01

    The Yb-based heavy-fermion compound Yb2Ni12P7 with a hexagonal Zr2Fe12P7-type crystal structure was investigated by using the 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique. The complicated NMR line changes its shape gradually with decreasing temperature, implying the presence of some Knight shift components. The temperature dependences of the Knight shift and the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/ T 1 suggest the delocalization of 4 f electrons.

  13. /sup 31/P-NMR differentiation between intracellular phosphate pools in Cosmarium (chlorophyta)

    SciTech Connect

    Elgavish, A.; Elgavish, G.A.

    1980-09-01

    /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of intact Cosmarium sp. cells is presented as a suitable tool for the differentiation of intracellular accumulation pools of polyphosphates. The cold trichloroacetic acid (TCA) insoluble fraction is shown to contain most of the total cellular phosphate in the phosphate rich Cosmarium cells. Moreover, evidence from a /sup 31/P-NMR study and electron microscopic observations of cold TCA treated Cosmarium cells indicate that this fraction consists mostly of polyphosphates which seem to retain the native morphological structure observed in the untreated cells. The determination of orthophosphate in the hot water extract of Cosmarium cells did not measure the polyphosphate pools. Determination of total phosphorus content in the hot water extract rendered a value three times higher than the frequently used orthophosphate determination procedure. However, as revealed by the /sup 31/P-NMR spectra and the chemical analyses of the extract and of the treated cells, even total phosphorus in the extract measured only 30% of the total cellular phosphorus. /sup 31/P-NMR enabled the unequivocal chemical identification of the major phosphate compounds in the hot water extract (Surplus P) as orthophosphate and polyphosphates of about 10 phosphate units chainlength. More than 70% of the accumulation pool of polyphosphates was still in the cells after extraction. However, the electron microscopy study revealed that the native granular structure of polyphosphates had been destroyed by the hot water extraction procedure.

  14. Comparison of phosphorus forms in three extracts of dairy feces by solution 31P NMR analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using solution 31P NMR spectroscopy, we compared three extractants, deionized water, sodium acetate buffer (pH 5.0) with fresh sodium dithionite (NaAc-SD), and 0.25 M NaOH-0.05 M EDTA (NaOH-EDTA), for the profile of P compounds in two dairy fecal samples. Phosphorus extracted was 35% for water, and...

  15. Solid state 31P cross-polarization/magic angle sample spinning nuclear magnetic resonance studies of crystalline glycogen phosphorylase b

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Jocelyn E.; Heyes, Stephen J.; Barford, David; Johnson, Louise N.; Dobson, Christopher M.

    1993-01-01

    31P cross-polarization/magic angle sample spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra have been obtained for pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) bound to glycogen phosphorylase b (GPb) in two different crystalline forms, monoclinic and tetragonal. Analysis of the intensities of the spinning sidebands in the nuclear magnetic resonance spectra has enabled estimates of the principal values of the 31P chemical shift tensors to be obtained. Differences between the two sets of values suggest differences in the environment of the phosphate moiety of the pyridoxal phosphate in the two crystalline forms. The tensor for the tetragonal crystalline form, T state GPb, is fully consistent with those found for dianionic phosphate groups in model compounds. The spectrum for the monoclinic crystalline form, R state GPb, although closer to that of dianionic than monoanionic model phosphate compounds, deviates significantly from that expected for a simple dianion or monoanion. This is likely to result from specific interactions between the PLP phosphate group and residues in its binding site in the protein. A possible explanation for the spectrum of the monoclinic crystals is that the shift tensor is averaged by a proton exchange process between different ionization states of the PLP associated with the presence of a sulfate ion bound in the vicinity of the PLP. PMID:8457673

  16. Phase identification and quantification in a devitrified glass using homo- and heteronuclear solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Tricot, Grégory; Delevoye, Laurent; Palavit, Gérard; Montagne, Lionel

    2005-11-14

    A complex mixture resulting from the devitrification of an aluminophosphate glass has been studied for the first time using a combination of homo- and heteronuclear solid-state NMR sequences that offers the advantage of subsequent quantification.

  17. 14N solid-state NMR: a sensitive probe of the local order in zeolites.

    PubMed

    Dib, Eddy; Mineva, Tzonka; Gaveau, Philippe; Alonso, Bruno

    2013-11-14

    Local order in as-synthesised zeolites templated by tetraalkylammonium cations is proven from solid-state (14)N NMR and related quadrupolar parameters, opening new perspectives in the study of porous materials.

  18. Isotope Labeling for Solution and Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Verardi, Raffaello; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.; Masterson, Larry R.; Vostrikov, Vitaly V.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, we summarize the isotopic labeling strategies used to obtain high-quality solution and solid-state NMR spectra of biological samples, with emphasis on integral membrane proteins (IMPs). While solution NMR is used to study IMPs under fast tumbling conditions, such as in the presence of detergent micelles or isotropic bicelles, solid-state NMR is used to study the structure and orientation of IMPs in lipid vesicles and bilayers. In spite of the tremendous progress in biomolecular NMR spectroscopy, the homogeneity and overall quality of the sample is still a substantial obstacle to overcome. Isotopic labeling is a major avenue to simplify overlapped spectra by either diluting the NMR active nuclei or allowing the resonances to be separated in multiple dimensions. In the following we will discuss isotopic labeling approaches that have been successfully used in the study of IMPs by solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. PMID:23076578

  19. Investigation of the interface in silica-encapsulated liposomes by combining solid state NMR and first principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Folliet, Nicolas; Roiland, Claire; Bégu, Sylvie; Aubert, Anne; Mineva, Tzonka; Goursot, Annick; Selvaraj, Kaliaperumal; Duma, Luminita; Tielens, Frederik; Mauri, Francesco; Laurent, Guillaume; Bonhomme, Christian; Gervais, Christel; Babonneau, Florence; Azaïs, Thierry

    2011-10-26

    In the context of nanomedicine, liposils (liposomes and silica) have a strong potential for drug storage and release schemes: such materials combine the intrinsic properties of liposome (encapsulation) and silica (increased rigidity, protective coating, pH degradability). In this work, an original approach combining solid state NMR, molecular dynamics, first principles geometry optimization, and NMR parameters calculation allows the building of a precise representation of the organic/inorganic interface in liposils. {(1)H-(29)Si}(1)H and {(1)H-(31)P}(1)H Double Cross-Polarization (CP) MAS NMR experiments were implemented in order to explore the proton chemical environments around the silica and the phospholipids, respectively. Using VASP (Vienna Ab Initio Simulation Package), DFT calculations including molecular dynamics, and geometry optimization lead to the determination of energetically favorable configurations of a DPPC (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine) headgroup adsorbed onto a hydroxylated silica surface that corresponds to a realistic model of an amorphous silica slab. These data combined with first principles NMR parameters calculations by GIPAW (Gauge Included Projected Augmented Wave) show that the phosphate moieties are not directly interacting with silanols. The stabilization of the interface is achieved through the presence of water molecules located in-between the head groups of the phospholipids and the silica surface forming an interfacial H-bonded water layer. A detailed study of the (31)P chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) parameters allows us to interpret the local dynamics of DPPC in liposils. Finally, the VASP/solid state NMR/GIPAW combined approach can be extended to a large variety of organic-inorganic hybrid interfaces.

  20. Evaluation of Phosphorus Characterization in Broiler Ileal Digesta, Manure, and Litter Samples: 31P-NMR vs. HPLC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using 31-Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resosonance Spectroscopy (31P-NMR) to characterize phosphorus (P) in manures and litter has become prevalent in the area of nutrient management. To date, there has been no published work evaluating P quantification in manure/litter samples with 31P-NMR compared t...

  1. Optimized multiple quantum MAS lineshape simulations in solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, William J.; Davis, Michael C.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2009-10-01

    The majority of nuclei available for study in solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance have half-integer spin I>1/2, with corresponding electric quadrupole moment. As such, they may couple with a surrounding electric field gradient. This effect introduces anisotropic line broadening to spectra, arising from distinct chemical species within polycrystalline solids. In Multiple Quantum Magic Angle Spinning (MQMAS) experiments, a second frequency dimension is created, devoid of quadrupolar anisotropy. As a result, the center of gravity of peaks in the high resolution dimension is a function of isotropic second order quadrupole and chemical shift alone. However, for complex materials, these parameters take on a stochastic nature due in turn to structural and chemical disorder. Lineshapes may still overlap in the isotropic dimension, complicating the task of assignment and interpretation. A distributed computational approach is presented here which permits simulation of the two-dimensional MQMAS spectrum, generated by random variates from model distributions of isotropic chemical and quadrupole shifts. Owing to the non-convex nature of the residual sum of squares (RSS) function between experimental and simulated spectra, simulated annealing is used to optimize the simulation parameters. In this manner, local chemical environments for disordered materials may be characterized, and via a re-sampling approach, error estimates for parameters produced. Program summaryProgram title: mqmasOPT Catalogue identifier: AEEC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3650 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 73 853 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C, OCTAVE Computer: UNIX

  2. CD and 31P NMR studies of tachykinin and MSH neuropeptides in SDS and DPC micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Sydney C.; Brown, Taylor C.; Gonzalez, Javier D.; Levonyak, Nicholas S.; Rush, Lydia A.; Cremeens, Matthew E.

    2016-02-01

    Secondary structural characteristics of substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NKA), neurokinin B (NKB), α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide (α-MSH), γ1-MSH, γ2-MSH, and melittin were evaluated with circular dichroism in phosphite buffer, DPC micelles, and SDS micelles. CD spectral properties of γ1-MSH and γ2-MSH as well as 31P NMR of DPC micelles with all the peptides are reported for the first time. Although, a trend in the neuropeptide/micelle CD data appears to show increased α-helix content for the tachykinin peptides (SP, NKA, NKB) and increased β-sheet content for the MSH peptides (α-MSH, γ1-MSH, γ2-MSH) with increasing peptide charge, the lack of perturbed 31P NMR signals for all neuropeptides could suggest that the reported antimicrobial activity of SP and α-MSH might not be related to a membrane disruption mode of action.

  3. Revisiting magnesium chelation by teichoic acid with phosphorus solid-state NMR and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Wickham, Jason R; Halye, Jeffrey L; Kashtanov, Stepan; Khandogin, Jana; Rice, Charles V

    2009-02-19

    Teichoic acids are essential components of the Gram-positive bacterial cell wall. One of their many functions is metal binding, a vital process for bacterial growth. With the combination of phosphorus-31 solid-state NMR spectroscopy and theoretical calculations using density functional theory (DFT), we have determined that the binding mode between teichoic acids and magnesium involves bidentate coordination by the phosphate groups of teichoic acid. Measurement of chemical shift anisotropy tensors gave a reduced anisotropy (delta) of 49.25 ppm and an asymmetry (eta) of 0.7. DFT calculations with diglycerol phosphate and triglycerol diphosphate model compounds were completed with Mg(2+) in anhydrous as well as partially hydrated bidentate and fully hydrated monodentate, bidentate, and bridging binding modes. (31)P CSA tensors were calculated from the energy-minimized model compounds using the combined DFT and GIAO methods, resulting in dramatically different tensor values for each binding mode. The anhydrous bidentate chelation mode was found to be a good approximation of the experimental data, an observation that alters the current monodentate paradigm for metal chelation by teichoic acids.

  4. In-depth investigation on quantitative characterization of pyrolysis oil by 31P NMR

    DOE PAGES

    Ben, Haoxi; Ferrell, III, Jack R.

    2016-01-29

    The characterization of different heteroatom functional groups by employing 31P NMR has been developed for almost 30 years. In this study, an in-depth investigation of this commonly used method has been accomplished for the analysis of pyrolysis oil. Several commonly used internal standards for 31P NMR have been examined by in situ monitoring. The results indicated that endo-N-hydroxy-5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboximide (NHND) is not stable after a long period of storage or experiment (>12 hours), but both cyclohexanol and triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO) can be used as internal standards if a long experiment or storage is required. The pyrolysis oil has also been investigatedmore » by both short time (16 hours) in situ monitoring and long time (14 days) ex situ monitoring. The results showed that aliphatic OH, carboxylic acids and water contents are not very stable after 2 hours, and thus a short time of preparation, storage, and experiment need to be considered to ensure a precise quantitative measurement. The decomposition products are still unclear, but some preliminary investigations for different acids, (e.g. formic acid) have been accomplished. The results indicated that the aromatic carboxylic acids (benzoic acid and vanillic acid) are more stable than formic acid and acetic acid. Interestingly, the formic acid will even decompose to some other compounds at the very beginning of the in situ monitoring test. Further characterization found that water is one of the major products for the decomposition of formic acid in the 31P NMR solution. Finally, as far as we know, this is the first report on such time-dependent changes when using 31P NMR to analyze the pyrolysis oil, and these results show that proper application of this method is essential to achieve reliable quantitative data.« less

  5. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Timothy A.; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed - neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins.

  6. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Cross, Timothy A; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed - neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins.

  7. A solid-state NMR study of hydrogen-bonding networks and ion dynamics in benzimidazole salts.

    PubMed

    Traer, Jason W; Britten, James F; Goward, Gillian R

    2007-05-24

    On the basis of our solid-state NMR characterization of dynamics in two model salts, we draw the analogy to the fuel cell membrane candidate, phosphoric acid-doped poly(benzimidazole), and conclude that phosphate anion dynamics contribute to long-range proton transport, whereas the mobility of the polymer itself is not a contributing factor. This is contrasted with emerging membrane candidates, which rely on fully covalently bonded acid donors and acceptors, and target high-temperature PEM fuel cell operation in the absence of liquid electrolyte. The hydrogen-bonding structures of benzimidazolium phosphate and benzimidazolium methane phosphonate are established using X-ray diffraction paired with solid-state 1H DQF NMR. By comparing the dynamics of the phosphate and methane phosphonate anions with the dynamics of imidazolium and benzimidazolium cations, the relative importance of these processes in proton transport is determined. The imidazolium cation is known to undergo two-site ring reorientation on the millisecond time scale. In contrast, it is shown here that the benzimidazolium rings are immobile in analogous salts, on a time scale extending into the tens of seconds. Therefore, we look to the phosphate anions and demonstrate that the time scale of tetrahedral reorientation is comparably fast (50 ms). Moreover, the 31P CODEX NMR data clearly indicate a four-site jump process. In contrast, the methane phosphonate undergoes a three-site jump on a slower time scale (75 ms). A mechanism for a zigzag pathway of proton transport through the phosphonate salt crystallites is developed based on the 31P CODEX and 1H variable-temperature MAS NMR data.

  8. Natural-abundance solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy at high magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Abil E; Mann, Sam E; Iuga, Dinu; Hughes, Colan E; Harris, Kenneth D M

    2011-06-09

    High-resolution solid-state (2)H NMR spectroscopy provides a method for measuring (1)H NMR chemical shifts in solids and is advantageous over the direct measurement of high-resolution solid-state (1)H NMR spectra, as it requires only the application of routine magic angle sample spinning (MAS) and routine (1)H decoupling methods, in contrast to the requirement for complex pulse sequences for homonuclear (1)H decoupling and ultrafast MAS in the case of high-resolution solid-state (1)H NMR. However, a significant obstacle to the routine application of high-resolution solid-state (2)H NMR is the very low natural abundance of (2)H, with the consequent problem of inherently low sensitivity. Here, we explore the feasibility of measuring (2)H MAS NMR spectra of various solids with natural isotopic abundances at high magnetic field (850 MHz), focusing on samples of amino acids, peptides, collagen, and various organic solids. The results show that high-resolution solid-state (2)H NMR can be used successfully to measure isotropic (1)H chemical shifts in favorable cases, particularly for mobile functional groups, such as methyl and -N(+)H(3) groups, and in some cases phenyl groups. Furthermore, we demonstrate that routine (2)H MAS NMR measurements can be exploited for assessing the relative dynamics of different functional groups in a molecule and for assessing whole-molecule motions in the solid state. The magnitude and field-dependence of second-order shifts due to the (2)H quadrupole interaction are also investigated, on the basis of analysis of simulated and experimental (1)H and (2)H MAS NMR spectra of fully deuterated and selectively deuterated samples of the α polymorph of glycine at two different magnetic field strengths.

  9. Solid-State NMR-Restrained Ensemble Dynamics of a Membrane Protein in Explicit Membranes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xi; Jo, Sunhwan; Qi, Yifei; Marassi, Francesca M; Im, Wonpil

    2015-04-21

    Solid-state NMR has been used to determine the structures of membrane proteins in native-like lipid bilayer environments. Most structure calculations based on solid-state NMR observables are performed using simulated annealing with restrained molecular dynamics and an energy function, where all nonbonded interactions are represented by a single, purely repulsive term with no contributions from van der Waals attractive, electrostatic, or solvation energy. To our knowledge, this is the first application of an ensemble dynamics technique performed in explicit membranes that uses experimental solid-state NMR observables to obtain the refined structure of a membrane protein together with information about its dynamics and its interactions with lipids. Using the membrane-bound form of the fd coat protein as a model membrane protein and its experimental solid-state NMR data, we performed restrained ensemble dynamics simulations with different ensemble sizes in explicit membranes. For comparison, a molecular dynamics simulation of fd coat protein was also performed without any restraints. The average orientation of each protein helix is similar to a structure determined by traditional single-conformer approaches. However, their variations are limited in the resulting ensemble of structures with one or two replicas, as they are under the strong influence of solid-state NMR restraints. Although highly consistent with all solid-state NMR observables, the ensembles of more than two replicas show larger orientational variations similar to those observed in the molecular dynamics simulation without restraints. In particular, in these explicit membrane simulations, Lys(40), residing at the C-terminal side of the transmembrane helix, is observed to cause local membrane curvature. Therefore, compared to traditional single-conformer approaches in implicit environments, solid-state NMR restrained ensemble simulations in explicit membranes readily characterize not only protein

  10. The topology of lysine-containing amphipathic peptides in bilayers by circular dichroism, solid-state NMR, and molecular modeling.

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, B; Ducarme, P; Schinzel, S; Brasseur, R; Bechinger, B

    2000-01-01

    In order to better understand the driving forces that determine the alignment of amphipathic helical polypeptides with respect to the surface of phospholipid bilayers, lysine-containing peptide sequences were designed, prepared by solid-phase chemical synthesis, and reconstituted into membranes. CD spectroscopy indicates that all peptides exhibit a high degree of helicity in the presence of SDS micelles or POPC small unilamellar vesicles. Proton-decoupled (31)P-NMR solid-state NMR spectroscopy demonstrates that in the presence of peptides liquid crystalline phosphatidylcholine membranes orient well along glass surfaces. The orientational distribution and dynamics of peptides labeled with (15)N at selected sites were investigated by proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Polypeptides with a single lysine residue adopt a transmembrane orientation, thereby locating this polar amino acid within the core region of the bilayer. In contrast, peptides with > or = 3 lysines reside along the surface of the membrane. With 2 lysines in the center of an otherwise hydrophobic amino acid sequence the peptides assume a broad orientational distribution. The energy of lysine discharge, hydrophobic, polar, and all other interactions are estimated to quantitatively describe the polypeptide topologies observed. Furthermore, a molecular modeling algorithm based on the hydrophobicities of atoms in a continuous hydrophilic-hydrophobic-hydrophilic potential describes the experimentally observed peptide topologies well. PMID:11053137

  11. Instrumentation for solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization with magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Rosay, Melanie; Blank, Monica; Engelke, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Advances in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) instrumentation and methodology have been key factors in the recent growth of solid-state DNP NMR applications. We review the current state of the art of solid-state DNP NMR instrumentation primarily based on available commercial platforms. We start with a general system overview, including options for microwave sources and DNP NMR probes, and then focus on specific developments for DNP at 100K with magic angle spinning (MAS). Gyrotron microwave sources, passive components to transmit microwaves, the DNP MAS probe, a cooling device for low-temperature MAS, and sample preparation procedures including radicals for DNP are considered.

  12. Instrumentation for solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization with magic angle spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosay, Melanie; Blank, Monica; Engelke, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Advances in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) instrumentation and methodology have been key factors in the recent growth of solid-state DNP NMR applications. We review the current state of the art of solid-state DNP NMR instrumentation primarily based on available commercial platforms. We start with a general system overview, including options for microwave sources and DNP NMR probes, and then focus on specific developments for DNP at 100 K with magic angle spinning (MAS). Gyrotron microwave sources, passive components to transmit microwaves, the DNP MAS probe, a cooling device for low-temperature MAS, and sample preparation procedures including radicals for DNP are considered.

  13. Solid state NMR methods for coal science. Progress report, January 1-March 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1984-04-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project. The solid state NMR spectrometer has been completed and test results are presented. A number of alternative probe circuits have been evaluated for our solid state work. One has been found to be particularly efficient in use of decoupling power. Some progress has also been made in construction of a magic angle spinner for our probes as well. 2 figures, 1 table.

  14. Lateral diffusion of bilayer lipids measured via (31)P CODEX NMR.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Qasim; Lai, Angel; Morales, Hannah H; Macdonald, Peter M

    2012-10-01

    We have employed (31)P CODEX (centre-band-only-detection-of-exchange) NMR to measure lateral diffusion coefficients of phospholipids in unilamellar lipid bilayer vesicles consisting of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), alone or in mixtures with 30 mol% 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) or cholesterol (CHOL). The lateral diffusion coefficients of POPC and POPG were extracted from experimental CODEX signal decays as a function of increasing mixing time, after accounting for the vesicle's size and size distribution, as determined via dynamic light scattering, and the viscosity of the vesicular suspension, as determined via (1)H pulsed field gradient NMR. Lateral diffusion coefficients for POPC and POPG determined in this fashion fell in the range 1.0-3.2 × 10(-12) m(2) s(-1) at 10 °C, depending on the vesicular composition, in good agreement with accepted values. Thus, two advantages of (31)P CODEX NMR for phospholipid lateral diffusion measurements are demonstrated: no labelling of the molecule of interest is necessary, and multiple lateral diffusion coefficients can be measured simultaneously. It is expected that this approach will prove particularly useful in diagnosing heterogeneities in lateral diffusion behaviours, such as might be expected for specific lipid-lipid or lipid-protein interactions, and thermotropic or electrostatically induced phase inhomogeneities.

  15. Characterization of phosphate sequestration by a lanthanum modified bentonite clay: A solid- state NMR, EXAFS and PXRD study

    SciTech Connect

    Dithmer, Line; Lipton, Andrew S.; Reitzel, Kasper; Warner, Terence E.; Lundberg, Daniel; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2015-04-07

    Phosphate (P) sequestration by a lanthanum (La) exchanged bentonite (a clay mineral), which is extensively used in chemical lake restoration, was investigated on the molecular level using a combination of 31P and 139La solid state NMR spectroscopy (SSNMR), extended X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EX-AFS) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) in combination with sorption studies. 31P SSNMR show that all phosphate is immobilized as rhabdophane, LaPO4·xH2O, which is further supported by 139La SSNMR and EXAFS; whereas PXRD results are ambiguous with respect to rhabdophane and monazite (LaPO4). Adsorption studies show that, at humic acids (HA) concentrations above ca. 250 μM the binding capacity is only 50 % of the theoretical value or even less. No other lanthanum or phosphate phases are detected by SSNMR and EXAFS indicating the effect of HA is kinetic. Moreover, 31P SSNMR shows that rhabdophane formed upon P sequestration is in close proximity to the clay matrix.

  16. Solid-state NMR studies of form I of atorvastatin calcium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei David; Gao, Xudong; Strohmeier, Mark; Wang, Wei; Bai, Shi; Dybowski, Cecil

    2012-03-22

    Solid-state (13)C, (19)F, and (15)N magic angle spinning NMR studies of Form I of atorvastatin calcium are reported, including chemical shift tensors of all resolvable carbon sites and fluorine sites. The complete (13)C and (19)F chemical shift assignments are given based on an extensive analysis of (13)C-(1)H HETCOR and (13)C-(19)F HETCOR results. The solid-state NMR data indicate that the asymmetric unit of this material contains two atorvastatin molecules. A possible structure of Form I of atorvastatin calcium (ATC-I), derived from solid-state NMR data and density functional theory calculations of various structures, is proposed for this important active pharmaceutical ingredient (API).

  17. Estimation of the specific surface area of apatites in human mineralized tissues using 31P MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Kolmas, Joanna; Slósarczyk, Anna; Wojtowicz, Andrzej; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2007-10-01

    Specific surface areas of apatites in whole human mineralized tissues were estimated from (31)P MAS NMR linewidths: 77 m(2)g(-1) for enamel and 94 m(2)g(-1) for dentin, dental cementum and cortical bone.

  18. Perspectives in enzymology of membrane proteins by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Sandra J; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2013-09-17

    Membrane proteins catalyze reactions at the cell membrane and facilitate thetransport of molecules or signals across the membrane. Recently researchers have made great progress in understanding the structural biology of membrane proteins, mainly based on X-ray crystallography. In addition, the application of complementary spectroscopic techniques has allowed researchers to develop a functional understanding of these proteins. Solid-state NMR has become an indispensable tool for the structure-function analysis of insoluble proteins and protein complexes. It offers the possibility of investigating membrane proteins directly in their environment, which provides essential information about the intrinsic coupling of protein structure and functional dynamics within the lipid bilayer. However, to date, researchers have hardly explored the enzymology of mem-brane proteins. In this Account, we review the perspectives for investigating membrane-bound enzymes by solid-state NMR. Understanding enzyme mechanisms requires access to kinetic parameters, structural analysis of the catalytic center, knowledge of the 3D structure and methods to follow the structural dynamics of the enzyme during the catalytic cycle. In principle, solid-state NMR can address all of these issues. Researchers can characterize the enzyme kinetics by observing substrate turnover within the membrane or at the membrane interphase in a time-resolved fashion as shown for diacylglycerol kinase. Solid-state NMR has also provided a mechanistic understanding of soluble enzymes including triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) and different metal-binding proteins, which demonstrates a promising perspective also for membrane proteins. The increasing availability of high magnetic fields and the development of new experimental schemes and computational protocols have made it easier to determine 3D structure using solid-state NMR. Dynamic nuclear polarization, a key technique to boost sensitivity of solid-state NMR at low

  19. In-Cell Solid-State NMR: An Emerging Technique for the Study of Biological Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Warnet, Xavier L.; Arnold, Alexandre A.; Marcotte, Isabelle; Warschawski, Dror E.

    2015-01-01

    Biological molecular processes are often studied in model systems, which simplifies their inherent complexity but may cause investigators to lose sight of the effects of the molecular environment. Information obtained in this way must therefore be validated by experiments in the cell. NMR has been used to study biological cells since the early days of its development. The first NMR structural studies of a protein inside a cell (by solution-state NMR) and of a membrane protein (by solid-state NMR) were published in 2001 and 2011, respectively. More recently, dynamic nuclear polarization, which has been used to enhance the signal in solid-state NMR, has also been applied to the study of frozen cells. Much progress has been made in the past 5 years, and in this review we take stock of this new technique, which is particularly appropriate for the study of biological membranes. PMID:26682804

  20. A multinuclear solid state NMR spectroscopic study of the structural evolution of disordered calcium silicate sol-gel biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhongjie; Jones, Julian R; Hanna, John V; Smith, Mark E

    2015-01-28

    Disordered sol-gel prepared calcium silicate biomaterials show significant, composition dependent ability to bond with bone. Bone bonding is attributed to rapid hydroxycarbonate apatite (HCA) formation on the glass surface after immersion in body fluid (or implantation). Atomic scale details of the development of the structure of (CaO)x(SiO2)1-x (x = 0.2, 0.3 and 0.5) under heat treatment and subsequent dissolution in simulated body fluid (SBF) are revealed through a multinuclear solid state NMR approach using one-dimensional (17)O, (29)Si, (31)P and (1)H. Central to this study is the combination of conventional static and magic angle spinning (MAS) and two-dimensional (2D) triple quantum (3Q) (17)O NMR experiments that can readily distinguish and quantify the bridging (BOs) and non-bridging (NBOs) oxygens in the silicate network. Although soluble calcium is present in the sol, the (17)O NMR results reveal that the sol-gel produced network structure is initially dominated by BOs after gelation, aging and drying (e.g. at 120 °C), indicating a nanoscale mixture of the calcium salt and a predominantly silicate network. Only once the calcium salt is decomposed at elevated temperatures do the Ca(2+) ions become available to break BO. Apatite forming ability in SBF depends strongly on the surface OH and calcium content. The presence of calcium aids HCA formation via promotion of surface hydration and the ready availability of Ca(2+) ions. (17)O NMR shows the rapid loss of NBOs charge balanced by calcium as it is leached into the SBF. The formation of nanocrystalline, partially ordered HCA can be detected via(31)P NMR. This data indicates the importance of achieving the right balance of BO/NBO for optimal biochemical response and network properties.

  1. Solid state NMR studies of gels derived from low molecular mass gelators.

    PubMed

    Nonappa; Kolehmainen, E

    2016-07-13

    Since its invention more than six decades ago, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has evolved as an inevitable part of chemical as well as structural analysis of small molecules, polymers, biomaterials and hybrid materials. In the solution state, due to the increased viscosity of complex viscoelastic fluids such as gels, liquid crystals and other soft materials, the rate of molecular tumbling is reduced, which in turn affects the chemical shift anisotropy, dipolar and quadrupolar interactions. As a consequence the solution state NMR spectra show broad lines, and therefore, extracting detailed structural information is a challenging task. In this context, solid state (SS) NMR has the ability to distinguish between a minute amount of polymorphic forms, conformational changes, and the number of non-equivalent molecules in an asymmetric unit of a crystal lattice, and to provide both qualitative as well as quantitative analytical data with a short-range order. Therefore, SS NMR has continued to evolve as an indispensable tool for structural analysis and gave birth to a new field called NMR crystallography. Solid state cross polarization (CP) and high resolution (HR) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been used to study weak interactions in polymer gels. However, the application of SS NMR spectroscopy to study gels derived from low molecular weight gelators has been limited until recently. In this review, we will focus on the importance of solid state NMR spectroscopy in understanding and elucidating the structure of supramolecular gels derived from low molecular weight gelators with selected examples.

  2. Solid state NMR studies of gels derived from low molecular mass gelators

    PubMed Central

    Kolehmainen, E.

    2016-01-01

    Since its invention more than six decades ago, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has evolved as an inevitable part of chemical as well as structural analysis of small molecules, polymers, biomaterials and hybrid materials. In the solution state, due to the increased viscosity of complex viscoelastic fluids such as gels, liquid crystals and other soft materials, the rate of molecular tumbling is reduced, which in turn affects the chemical shift anisotropy, dipolar and quadrupolar interactions. As a consequence the solution state NMR spectra show broad lines, and therefore, extracting detailed structural information is a challenging task. In this context, solid state (SS) NMR has the ability to distinguish between a minute amount of polymorphic forms, conformational changes, and the number of non-equivalent molecules in an asymmetric unit of a crystal lattice, and to provide both qualitative as well as quantitative analytical data with a short-range order. Therefore, SS NMR has continued to evolve as an indispensable tool for structural analysis and gave birth to a new field called NMR crystallography. Solid state cross polarization (CP) and high resolution (HR) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been used to study weak interactions in polymer gels. However, the application of SS NMR spectroscopy to study gels derived from low molecular weight gelators has been limited until recently. In this review, we will focus on the importance of solid state NMR spectroscopy in understanding and elucidating the structure of supramolecular gels derived from low molecular weight gelators with selected examples. PMID:27374054

  3. Detoxification of organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents through RSDL: efficacy evaluation by (31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Elsinghorst, Paul W; Worek, Franz; Koller, Marianne

    2015-03-04

    Intoxication by organophosphorus compounds, especially by pesticides, poses a considerable risk to the affected individual. Countermeasures involve both medical intervention by means of antidotes as well as external decontamination to reduce the risk of dermal absorption. One of the few decontamination options available is Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL), which was originally developed for military use. Here, we present a (31)P NMR spectroscopy based methodology to evaluate the detoxification efficacy of RSDL with respect to a series of organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents. Kinetic analysis of the obtained NMR data provided degradation half-lives proving that RSDL is also reasonably effective against organophosphorus pesticides. Unexpected observations of different RSDL degradation patterns are presented in view of its reported oximate-catalyzed mechanism of action.

  4. Decomposition of adsorbed VX on activated carbons studied by 31P MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Columbus, Ishay; Waysbort, Daniel; Shmueli, Liora; Nir, Ido; Kaplan, Doron

    2006-06-15

    The fate of the persistent OP nerve agent O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX) on granular activated carbons that are used for gas filtration was studied by means of 31P magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. VX as vapor or liquid was adsorbed on carbon granules, and MAS NMR spectra were recorded periodically. The results show that at least 90% of the adsorbed VX decomposes within 20 days or less to the nontoxic ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) and bis(S-2-diisopropylaminoethane) {(DES)2}. Decomposition occurred irrespective of the phase from which VX was loaded, the presence of metal impregnation on the carbon surface, and the water content of the carbon. Theoretical and practical aspects of the degradation are discussed.

  5. Evaluation of phosphorus characterization in broiler ileal digesta, manure, and litter samples: (31)P-NMR vs. HPLC.

    PubMed

    Leytem, A B; Kwanyuen, P; Plumstead, P W; Maguire, R O; Brake, J

    2008-01-01

    Using 31-phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-NMR) to characterize phosphorus (P) in animal manures and litter has become a popular technique in the area of nutrient management. To date, there has been no published work evaluating P quantification in manure/litter samples with (31)P-NMR compared to other accepted methods such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). To evaluate the use of (31)P-NMR to quantify myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (phytate) in ileal digesta, manure, and litter from broilers, we compared results obtained from both (31)P-NMR and a more traditional HPLC method. The quantification of phytate in all samples was very consistent between the two methods, with linear regressions having slopes ranging from 0.94 to 1.07 and r(2) values of 0.84 to 0.98. We compared the concentration of total monoester P determined with (31)P-NMR with the total inositol P content determined with HPLC and found a strong linear relationship between the two measurements having slopes ranging from 0.91 to 1.08 and r(2) values of 0.73 to 0.95. This suggests that (31)P-NMR is a very reliable method for quantifying P compounds in manure/litter samples.

  6. 39K, 23Na, and 31P NMR Studies of Ion Transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, T.; den Hollander, J. A.; Shulman, R. G.

    1983-09-01

    The relationship between efflux and influx of K+, Na+, and intracellular pH (pHin) in yeast cells upon energizing by oxygenation was studied by using the noninvasive technique of 39K, 23Na, and 31P NMR spectroscopy. By introducing an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent, Dy3+(P3O105-)2, into the medium, NMR signals of intra- and extracellular K+ and Na+ could be resolved, enabling us to study ion transport processes by NMR. Measurements showed that 40% of the intracellular K+ and Na+ in yeast cells contributed to the NMR intensities. By applying this correction factor, the intracellular ion concentrations were determined to be 130-170 mM K+ and 2.5 mM Na+ for fresh yeast cells. With the aid of a home-built solenoidal coil probe for 39K and a double-tuned probe for 23Na and 31P, we could follow time courses of K+ and Na+ transport and of pHin with a time resolution of 1 min. It was shown that H+ extrusion is correlated with K+ uptake and not with Na+ uptake upon energizing yeast cells by oxygenation. When the cells were deenergized after the aerobic period, K+ efflux, H+ influx, and Na+ influx were calculated to be 1.6, 1.5, and 0.15 μ mol/min per ml of cell water, respectively. Therefore, under the present conditions, K+ efflux is balanced by exchange for H+ with an approximate stoichiometry of 1:1.

  7. Investigations of the structure and "interfacial" surface chemistry of Bioglass (RTM) materials by solid-state multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Gautam

    Bioactive materials such as BioglassRTM 45S5 (45% SiO 2, 24.5% CaO, 24.5% Na2O, and 6% P2O5 by weight) are sodium-phosphosilicate glasses containing independent three-dimensional silicate and phosphate networks and Na+ and Ca2+ ions as modifying cations. Due to their bioactivity, these materials are currently used as implants and for other surgical and clinical applications. The bioactivity of BioglassesRTM is due to their unique capability to form chemical bonds to tissues through an octacalciumphosphate (OCP)- and/or hydroxyapatite-like (HA) "interfacial" matrix. The formation of OCP and/or HA is preceded by the formation of a silica-rich surface layer and the subsequent growth of an amorphous calcium phosphate (a-CP) layer. Structural characterization of a series of commercial and synthesized Bioglass materials 45S5 52S, 55S, 60S, and synthesized 17O-labelled "Bioglass materials 45S, 52S, 55S and 60S" have been obtained using solid-state single-pulse magic-angle spinning (SP/MAS) 17O, 23Na, 29Si and 31P NMR. The 17O NMR isotropic chemical shifts and estimates of the quadrupole coupling constants (Cq) [at fixed asymmetry parameter ( hQ ) values of zero] have been obtained from solid-state spin-echo 17O SP/MAS NMR spectra of 17O-labelled "Bioglasses". The simulation results of these spectra reveal the presence of both bridging-oxygens (BO, i.e. ≡ Si-17OSi ≡ ) and non-bridging oxygens (NBO, i.e. ≡ Si-17O-Na+/Ca2+ ) in the silicate networks in these materials. 17O NMR spectra of these Bioglass materials do not show any direct evidence for the presence of BO and NBO atoms in the phosphate units; however, they are expected to be present in small amounts. In vitro reactions of BioglassRTM 45S5, 60S and 77S powders have been used to study the "interfacial" surface chemistry of these materials in simulated body-fluid (SBF, Kyoto or K9 solution) and/or 17O-enriched tris-buffer solution. 29Si and 31P SP/MAS NMR have been used to identify and quantify the extent of

  8. A "special perspectives" issue: Recent achievements and new directions in biomolecular solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Twenty years ago, applications of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods to real problems involving biological systems or biological materials were few and far between. Starting in the 1980s, a small number of research groups had begun to explore the possibility of obtaining structural and dynamical information about peptides, proteins, and other biopolymers from solid state NMR spectra. Progress was initially slow due to the relatively primitive state of solid state NMR probes, spectrometers, sample preparation methods, and pulse sequence techniques, coupled with the small number of people contributing to this research area. By the early 1990s, with the advent of new ideas about pulse sequence techniques such as dipolar recoupling, improvements in techniques for orienting membrane proteins and in technology for magic-angle spinning (MAS), improvements in the capabilities of commercial NMR spectrometers, and general developments in multidimensional spectroscopy, it began to appear that biomolecular solid state NMR might have a viable future. It was not until 1993 that the annual number of publications in this area crept above twenty.

  9. 13C and 31P NMR for the diagnosis of muscular phosphorylase-kinase deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehenson, P.; Duboc, D.; Laforet, P.; Eymard, B.; Lombès, A.; Fardeau, M.; Brunet, P.; Syrota, A.

    1998-02-01

    To further develop and specify the range of medical applications of in vivo NMR spectroscopy for the study of myopathies, it is ncessary to study the largest number of well characterized cases. We here report on the 31P and 13C NMR study of a purely muscular form of phosphorylase-kinase (PK) deficiency. Abnormalities were observed that agree with and increase our pathophysiological knowledge, in particular on the activation of phosphorylase and PK. Also, the abnormalities are different from those found in other clinically similar metabolic myopathies and could be used for the differential diagnosis. Afin de continuer à développer et préciser les applications médicales de la spectroscopie RMN in vivo, il faut étudier le plus grand nombre possible de cas bien caractérisés. Nous avons étudié ici une forme purement musculaire de déficit en phosphorylase-kinase (PK) par RMN du phosphore 31 et du carbone 13. Les altérations observées sont en accord avec et augmentent nos connaissances physiopathologiques, par exemple concernant l'activation de la phosphorylase et PK. Par ailleurs, la combinaison d'altérations observées en 31P et 13C est différente de celle retrouvée dans d'autres myopathies métaboliques cliniquement semblables et pourrait être utilisée pour le diagnostic différentiel.

  10. Phospholipid composition of plasma and erythrocyte membranes in animal species by 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Ferlazzo, Alida Maria; Bruschetta, Giuseppe; Di Pietro, Patrizia; Medica, Pietro; Notti, Anna; Rotondo, Enrico

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to provide basal values of phospholipid (PL) composition in different animal species by 31P NMR analysis using detergents. This fast and accurate method allowed a quantitative analysis of PLs without any previous separation. Plasma and erythrocyte membrane PLs were investigated in mammals (pig, cow, horse). Moreover, for the first time, the composition of plasma PLs in avian (chicken and ostrich) was performed by 31P NMR. Significant qualitative and quantitative interspecies differences in plasma PL levels were found. Phosphatidilcholine (PC) and sphingomyelin (SPH) levels were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in chicken plasma than all the other species tested. In erythrocytes, cow PC and phosphatidylcholine diarachidoyl were significantly lower (P < 0.001) than for pigs and horses, whereas pig PC presented intermediate values among cows and horses. Inorganic phosphate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels were also significantly different between the species under investigation. The [SPH/total PLs] molar ratios in erythrocytes confirmed interspecies differences in phospholipid composition while the PC/SPH molar ratios could be related to a distinct erythrocyte flexibility and aggregability. Diet and nutrition may contribute primarily to the interspecies differences in plasma PL amounts detected. Significant differences between chicken plasma PC and SPH levels and those of the other animal species could be ascribed to a fat metabolism specific to egg production.

  11. Synthesis of prostanoids; enantiomeric purity of alcohols by a /sup 31/P NMR technique

    SciTech Connect

    Penning, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    The enone, 2,2-diemthyl-3a..beta.., 6a..beta..-dihydro-4H-cyclopenta-1,3-dioxol-4-one, has been synthesized in six steps from cyclopentadiene, resolved using sulfoximine chemistry, and converted into (-)-prostaglandin E/sub 2/ methyl ester in three steps. Introduction of the optically pure omega side-chain using a conjugate addition of a stabilized organocopper reagent, followed by direct alkylation of the enolate with the ..cap alpha.. side-chain allylic iodide in the presence of hexamethylphosphoramide, afforded a trans, vicinally disubstituted cyclopentanone. Deprotection of the C-15 alcohol, followed by aluminum amalgam reduction of the C-10/oxygen bond, provided (-)-PGE/sub 2/ methyl ester in 47% overall yield from the enone. In an extension of previously described work, 2-chloro-3,4-dimethyl-5-phenyl-1,3,2-oxazaphospholidine 2-sulfide, prepared from l-ephedrine and thiophosphoryl chloride, was used to determine the enantiomeric excess of chiral alcohols in conjunction with /sup 31/P NMR. Chiral primary and secondary alcohols added quantitatively to the phospholidine to give diastereomers which could be analyzed by /sup 31/P NMR and HPLC. A number of other phosphorus heterocycles were also explored as potential chiral derivatizing reagents.

  12. Versatile 1H-31P-31P COSY 2D NMR Techniques for the Characterization of Polyphosphorylated Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Ananya; Sun, Yan; Shah, Meha; Freel Meyers, Caren L.

    2010-01-01

    Di- and triphosphorylated small molecules represent key intermediates in a wide range of biological and chemical processes. The importance of polyphosphorylated species in biology and medicine underscores the need to develop methods for the detection and characterization of this compound class. We have reported two-dimensional HPP-COSY spectroscopy techniques to identify diphosphate-containing metabolic intermediates at sub-millimolar concentrations in the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway.1 In this work, we explore the scope of HPP-COSY based techniques to characterize a diverse group of small organic molecules bearing di- and tri-phosphorylated moieties. These include molecules containing P–O–P and P–C–P connectivities, multivalent P(III)–O–P(V) phosphorus nuclei with widely separated chemical shifts, as well as virtually overlapping 31P resonances exhibiting strong coupling effects. We also demonstrate the utility of these experiments to rapidly distinguish between mono- and diphosphates. A detailed protocol for optimizing these experiments to achieve best performance is presented. PMID:20408590

  13. In situ solid-state NMR for heterogeneous catalysis: a joint experimental and theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiping; Xu, Shutao; Han, Xiuwen; Bao, Xinhe

    2012-01-07

    In situ solid-state NMR is a well-established tool for investigations of the structures of the adsorbed reactants, intermediates and products on the surface of solid catalysts. The techniques allow identifications of both the active sites such as acidic sites and reaction processes after introduction of adsorbates and reactants inside an NMR rotor under magic angle spinning (MAS). The in situ solid-state NMR studies of the reactions can be achieved in two ways, i.e. under batch-like or continuous-flow conditions. The former technique is low cost and accessible to the commercial instrument while the latter one is close to the real catalytic reactions on the solids. This critical review describes the research progress on the in situ solid-state NMR techniques and the applications in heterogeneous catalysis under batch-like and continuous-flow conditions in recent years. Some typical probe molecules are summarized here to detect the Brønsted and Lewis acidic sites by MAS NMR. The catalytic reactions discussed in this review include methane aromatization, olefin selective oxidation and olefin metathesis on the metal oxide-containing zeolites. With combining the in situ MAS NMR spectroscopy and the density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations, the intermediates on the catalyst can be identified, and the reaction mechanism is revealed. Reaction kinetic analysis in the nanospace instead of in the bulk state can also be performed by employing laser-enhanced MAS NMR techniques in the in situ flow mode (163 references).

  14. Genetic algorithms and solid state NMR pulse sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechmann, Matthias; Clark, John; Sebald, Angelika

    2013-03-01

    The use of genetic algorithms for the optimisation of magic angle spinning NMR pulse sequences is discussed. The discussion uses as an example the optimisation of the C721 dipolar recoupling pulse sequence, aiming to achieve improved efficiency for spin systems characterised by large chemical shielding anisotropies and/or small dipolar coupling interactions. The optimised pulse sequence is found to be robust over a wide range of parameters, requires only minimal a priori knowledge of the spin system for experimental implementations with buildup rates being solely determined by the magnitude of the dipolar coupling interaction, but is found to be less broadbanded than the original C721 pulse sequence. The optimised pulse sequence breaks the synchronicity between r.f. pulses and sample spinning.

  15. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a new approach to study humic material?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike; Lange, Sascha; van Rossum, Barth; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Compared to solution NMR spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectra suffer from broad resonance lines and low resolution. This could be overcome by the use of 2-dimenstional solid-state NMR pulse sequences. Until recently, this approach has been unfeasible as a routine tool in soil chemistry, mainly because of the low NMR sensitivity of the respective samples. A possibility to circumvent those sensitivity problems represents high-field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy (Barnes et al., 2008), allowing considerable signal enhancements (Akbey et al., 2010). This is achieved by a microwave-driven transfer of polarization from a paramagnetic center to nuclear spins. Application of DNP to MAS spectra of biological systems (frozen solutions) showed enhancements of the factor 40 to 50 (Hall et al., 1997). Enhancements of this magnitude, thus may enable the use of at least some of the 2D solid-state NMR techniques that are presently already applied for pure proteins but are difficult to apply to soil peptides in their complex matrix. After adjusting the required acquisition parameters to the system "soil organic matter", lower but still promising enhancement factors were achieved. Additional optimization was performed and allowed the acquisition of 2D 13C and 15N solid-state NMR spectra of humified 13C and 15N enriched plant residues. Within the present contribution, the first solid-state DNP NMR spectra of humic material are presented. Those data demonstrate the great potential of this approach which certainly opens new doors for a better understanding of biochemical processes in soils, sediments and water. Akbey, Ü., Franks, W.T., Linden, A., Lange, S., Griffin, R.G., van Rossum, B.-J., Oschkinat, H., 2010. Dynamic nuclear polarization of deuterated proteins. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 49, 7803-7806. Barnes, A.B., De Paëpe, G., van der Wel, P.C.A., Hu, K.N., Joo, C.G., Bajaj, V.S., Mak-Jurkauskas, M.L., Sirigiri, J.R., Herzfeld, J

  16. Studies of Molecular Dynamics by Solid State Deuterium NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Baiyi

    The rotational dynamics of molecules in a number of solid systems were followed by variable temperature deuterium (^2H), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy via changes in the spectral lineshapes and spin-lattice relaxation times (T _1). First the pure solid trimethylamine-borane adduct, (CH_3)_3NBH_3, was studied. For a methyl deuterated sample, T _1 measurements yielded two T_1 minima, 6.9 ms and 4.3 ms corresponding to the slowing of methyl and trimethyl rotation, respectively, with decreasing temperature. Activation energies for methyl and trimethyl rotation, obtained from fitting the T _1 curve as a function of temperature, were 32.8 and 15.0 kJ/mol, respectively; simulations of the spectral lineshapes gave 26.6 and 18.9 kT/mol, respectively. Fitting of the ^2H T_1 curve for the borane deuterated sample gave a BH _3 rotation activation energy of 14.1 kT/mol and a ^2H quadrupolar coupling constant, chi, of 101 kHz. The activation energy for BH_3 rotation obtained from the spectral lineshape simulations gave 12.6 kT/mol. A series of deuterated organic chalcogen cations: (CH_3)_3S^+, (CH_3)_3Se^+ and (CH_3)_3Te^+, were ion exchanged into the cavities of sodium Mordenite LZ-M5 and the dynamics of these guests within the hydrated zeolite were followed by ^2H NMR. All three undergo isotropic motion above about -80 to -90^circC. Below this temperature two superimposed ^2H powder spectra appear; the broad lineshape is consistent with only methyl rotation in a hindered, coordinated site, and the other narrow lineshape is due to both methyl and trimethyl rotation in a less hindered, uncoordinated site. As the temperature is lowered the population of the lower energy coordinated site increases. Relative peak areas yield adsorption enthalpies of 6.7, 7.8 and 10.0 kJ/mol for (CH_3)_3S^+, (CH_3)_3Se^+ and (CH_3)_3Te^+, respectively. The series of methyl deuterated ammonium and phosphonium cations: (CH_3)NH_3^+ , (CH_3)_2NH^+ , (CH_3)_3NH^+ and (CH_3)_4P^+ , were

  17. Solid-state NMR and ESR studies of activated carbons produced from pecan shells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activated carbon from pecan shells has shown promise as an adsorbent in water treatment and sugar refining. However, the chemistry of the material is complex and not fully understood. We report here the application of solid state NMR and ESR to study the chemical structure, mobility, and pore volu...

  18. Solid-state 87Rb NMR signatures for rubidium cations bound to a G-quadruplex.

    PubMed

    Ida, Ramsey; Wu, Gang

    2005-09-14

    We report the first solid-state 87Rb NMR characterization for rubidium cations bound to G-quartet structures formed by self-association of guanosine 5'-monophosphate and 5'-tert-butyl-dimethylsilyl-2', 3'-O-isopropylidene guanosine.

  19. High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Characterization of Polymorphism in Cimetidine, a Pharmaceutical Compound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacilio, Julia E.; Tokarski, John T.; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Iuliucci, Robbie J.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy has many advantages as a tool to characterize solid-phase material that finds applications in polymer chemistry, nanotechnology, materials science, biomolecular structure determination, and others, including the pharmaceutical industry. The technology associated with achieving high resolution…

  20. Investigation of Rhodopsin Dynamics in its Signaling State by Solid-State Deuterium NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Struts, Andrey V.; Chawla, Udeep; Perera, Suchithranga M.D.C.; Brown, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    Site-directed deuterium NMR spectroscopy is a valuable tool to study the structural dynamics of biomolecules in cases where solution NMR is inapplicable. Solid-state 2H NMR spectral studies of aligned membrane samples of rhodopsin with selectively labeled retinal provide information on structural changes of the chromophore in different protein states. In addition, solid-state 2H NMR relaxation time measurements allow one to study the dynamics of the ligand during the transition from the inactive to the active state. Here we describe the methodological aspects of solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy for functional studies of rhodopsin, with an emphasis on the dynamics of the retinal cofactor. We provide complete protocols for the preparation of NMR samples of rhodopsin with 11-cis-retinal selectively deuterated at the methyl groups in aligned membranes. In addition, we review optimized conditions for trapping the rhodopsin photointermediates; and lastly we address the challenging problem of trapping the signaling state of rhodopsin in aligned membrane films. PMID:25697522

  1. 31P-NMR study of resting in vitro rat diaphragm exposed to hypercapnia.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R S; Howell, S; Jacobus, W E

    1988-11-01

    We have reported previously that, when exposed to hypercapnia of various intensities, the diaphragm reduces its force of twitch and tetanic contractions in the in vitro rat preparation as well as in the in vivo dog preparation. The experiments reported here with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectroscopy attempt to examine cellular mechanisms that might be responsible for this deterioration in mechanical performance. Specifically they describe certain characteristics of this preparation and cautions needed to study the resting in vitro rat diaphragm with such techniques. Second, they report the response of intracellular pH (pHi), phosphocreatine (PCr), ATP, and inorganic phosphate (Pi) in the resting in vitro rat diaphragm exposed to long-term normocapnia or to long-term hypercapnia. The results show that 1) to maintain a viable preparation, it was necessary to keep the diaphragm extended to an area approximating that at functional residual capacity, 2) the diaphragm seemed quite capable of maintaining a constant pHi and constant contents of ATP and Pi during normocapnia, but there was a gradual decline in PCr, and 3) during hypercapnia there was a significant decrease in pHi, but the behavior of the phosphate metabolites was exactly as during normocapnia. The results suggest that the decrease in mechanical performance of the diaphragm is probably not due to a decrease in the availability of the high-energy phosphates, although they do not completely exclude this possibility or possibilities related to regional compartmentation.

  2. Degradation of black phosphorus: a real-time 31P NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Yang, Bingchao; Wan, Bensong; Xi, Xuekui; Zeng, Zhongming; Liu, Enke; Wu, Guangheng; Liu, Zhongyuan; Wang, Wenhong

    2016-09-01

    In this work, degradation behaviors and mechanisms of black phosphorus (BP) crystals in air under ambient conditions were investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It has been found that the 31P NMR line intensity for BP decreases exponentially during aging even at the very first several hours, suggesting the origin of the degradation of transport properties. In addition to phosphoric acid, new phosphorous acid was also well resolved in the final aging products. Moreover, BP has been found to be stable in water without the presence of oxygen molecules. These findings are relevant for better understanding of degradation behaviors of BP upon aging and should be helpful for overcoming a barrier that might hamper progress toward applications of BP as a 2D material.

  3. Characterization of covalent protein conjugates using solid-state sup 13 C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Garbow, J.R.; Fujiwara, Hideji; Sharp, C.R.; Logusch, E.W. )

    1991-07-23

    Cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CPMAS) {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy has been used to characterize covalent conjugates of alachlor, an {alpha}-chloroacetamide hapten, with glutathione (GSH) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). The solid-state NMR method demonstrates definitively the covalent nature of these conjugates and can also be used to characterize the sites of hapten attachment to proteins. Three different sites of alachlor binding are observed in the BSA system. Accurate quantitation of the amount of hapten covalently bound to GSH and BSA is reported. The solid-state {sup 13}C NMR technique can easily be generalized to study other small molecule/protein conjugates and can be used to assist the development and refinement of synthetic methods needed for the successful formation of such protein alkylation products.

  4. Physiologic significance of the phosphorylation potential in isolated perfused rat hearts (/sup 31/P NMR)

    SciTech Connect

    Watters, T.; Wikman-Coffelt, J.; Wu, S.; Wendland, M.; James, T.; Sievers, R.; Botvinick, E.; Parmley, W.

    1986-03-05

    The authors assessed the metabolic and mechanical effects of changes in coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) and afterload (A) in isolated working apex-ejecting rat hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing an excess of O/sub 2/ and substrate. Log(phosphorylation potential) or log (ATP)/(ADP)x (Pi), designated (L), and log (PCR)/(Pi), designated (L*), were calculated from HPLC measurements after rapid freeze-clamping. Increasing CPP from 80-140 cm H/sub 2/O caused an increase in coronary flow(flow), developed pressure(DevP), O/sub 2/ consumption (VO/sub 2/), L, L*, and CO. L and L* were directly related to VO/sub 2/ and CO. Increasing A from 80-140 cm H/sub 2/O caused an increase in DevP and VO/sub 2/, but a decrease in L, L*, and CO. L and L* were inversely linearly related to VO/sub 2/ but were directly linearly related to CO. In both experiments, L and L* are directly related to CO, suggesting that determination of L* (which can be done with /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy) may be a useful non-invasive method for determining cardiac pump function curves. L and L* may be related to the Frank-Starling mechanism. In a separate experiment using /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy of isovolumic (left ventricular balloon) perfused rat hearts, increasing CPP caused a direct linear increase in flow, DevP, and L*, confirming the L* results reported above with CPP experiments using the rapid freeze-clamp technique.

  5. Physiologic significance of the phosphorylation potential in isolated perfused rat hearts (31-P NMR)

    SciTech Connect

    Watters, T.; Wikman-Coffelt, J.; Wu, S.; Wendland, M.; James, T.; Sievers, R.; Botvinick, E.; Parmley, W.

    1986-03-05

    The authors assessed the metabolic and mechanical effects of changes in coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) and afterload (A) in isolated working apex-ejecting rat hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing an excess of O/sub 2/ and substrate. Log (phosphorylation potential) or log (ATP)/(ADP)x (Pi), designated (L), and log (PCR)/(Pi), designated (L*), were calculated from HPLC measurements after rapid freeze-clamping. Increasing CPP from 80-140 cm H/sub 2/O caused an increase in coronary flow (flow), developed pressure (DevP), O/sub 2/ consumption (VO/sub 2/), L, L*, and CO. L and L* were directly related to VO/sub 2/ and CO. Increasing A from 80-140 cm H/sub 2/O caused an increase in DevP and VO/sub 2/, but a decrease in L, L*, and CO. L and L* were inversely linearly related to VO/sub 2/ but were directly linearly related to CO. In both experiments, L and L* are directly related to CO, suggesting that determination of L* (which can be done with 31-P NMR spectroscopy) may be a useful non-invasive method for determining cardiac pump function curves. L and L* may be related to the Frank-Starling mechanism. In a separate experiment using 31-P NMR spectroscopy of isovolumic (left ventricular balloon) perfused rat hearts, increasing CPP caused a direct linear increase in flow, DevP, and L*, confirming the L* results reported above with CPP experiments using the rapid freeze-clamp technique.

  6. Hydration properties and phosphorous speciation in native, gelatinized and enzymatically modified potato starch analyzed by solid-state MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Kasprzak, Mirosław M; Lærke, Helle N; Knudsen, Knud Erik B; Pedersen, Sven; Jørgensen, Anne S; Blennow, Andreas

    2013-09-12

    Hydration of granular, gelatinized and molecularly modified states of potato starch in terms of molecular mobility were analyzed by (13)C and (31)P solid-state MAS NMR. Gelatinization (GEL) tremendously reduced the immobile fraction compared to native (NA) starch granules. This effect was enhanced by enzyme-assisted catalytic branching with branching enzyme (BE) or combined BE and β-amylase (BB) catalyzed exo-hydrolysis. Carbons of the glycosidic α-1,6 linkages required high hydration rates before adopting uniform chemical shifts indicating solid-state disorder and poor water accessibility. Comparative analysis of wheat and waxy maize starches demonstrated that starches were similar upon gelatinization independent of botanical origin and that the torsion angles of the glycosidic linkages were averages of the crystalline A and B type structures. In starch suspension phosphorous in immobile regions was only observed in NA starch. Moreover phosphorous was observed in a minor pH-insensitive form and as major phosphate in hydrated GEL and BE starches.

  7. Modified Prony Method to Resolve and Quantify in Vivo31P NMR Spectra of Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, P.; Guidoni, L.; Ragona, R.; Viti, V.; Furman, E.; Degani, H.

    Prony's method, successfully used in processing NMR signals, performs poorly at low signal-to-noise ratios. To overcome this problem, a statistical approach has been adopted by using Prony's method as a sampling device from the distribution associated with the true spectrum. Specifically, Prony's method is applied for each regression order p and number of data points n, both considered in a suitable range, and the estimates of frequencies, amplitudes, and decay factors are pooled separately. A histogram of the pooled frequencies is computed and, looking at the histogram, a lower and an upper frequency bound for each line of interest is determined. All frequency estimates in each of the determined intervals as well as associated decay factors and amplitudes are considered to be independent normal variates. A mean value and a corresponding 95% confidence interval are computed for each parameter. 31P NMR signals from MCF7 human breast cancer cells, inoculated into athymic mice and which developed into tumors, have been processed with traditional methods and with this modified Prony's method. The main components of the phosphomonoester peak, namely those deriving from phosphorylcholine and phosphorylethanolamine, are always well resolved with this new approach and their relative amplitudes can be consequently evaluated. Peak intensities of these two signals show different behavior during treatment of tumors with the antiestrogenic drug tamoxifen. The results of this new approach are compared with those obtainable with traditional techniques.

  8. Effect of glyphosate on plant cell metabolism. 31P and 13C NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Gout, E; Bligny, R; Genix, P; Tissut, M; Douce, R

    1992-01-01

    The effect of glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl glycine; the active ingredient of Roundup herbicide) on plant cells metabolism was analysed by 31P and 13C NMR using suspension-cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L) cells. Cells were compressed in the NMR tube and perfused with an original arrangement enabling a tight control of the circulating nutrient medium. Addition of 1 mM glyphosate to the nutrient medium triggered the accumulation of shikimate (20-30 mumol g-1 cell wet weight within 50 h) and shikimate 3-phosphate (1-1.5 mumol g-1 cell wet weight within 50 h). From in vivo spectra it was demonstrated that these two compounds were accumulated in the cytoplasm where their concentrations reached potentially lethal levels. On the other hand, glyphosate present in the cytoplasmic compartment was extensively metabolized to yield aminomethylphosphonic acid which also accumulated in the cytoplasm. Finally, the results presented in this paper indicate that although the cell growth was stopped by glyphosate the cell respiration rates and the level of energy metabolism intermediates remained unchanged.

  9. {sup 31}P NMR analysis of coal moieties bearing -OH, -NH, and -SH functions. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Verkade, J.G.

    1991-08-31

    NMR reagents for the speciation and quantitation of labile-hydrogen functional groups and sulfur groups in coal ligands have been synthesized and evaluated. These reagents, which contain the NMR-active nuclei {sup 31}p, {sup 119}Sn or {sup 195}pt, were designed to possess improved chemical shift resolution over reagents reported in the literature. Our efforts were successful in the case of the new {sup 31}p and {sup 119}Sn reagents we developed, but the {sup 195}pt work on sulfur groups was only partially successful in as much as the grant came to a close and was not renewed. Our success with {sup 31}P and {sup 119}Sn NMR reagents came to the attention of Amoco and they have recently expressed interest in further supporting that work. A further measure of the success of our efforts can be seen in the nine publications supported by this grant which are cited in the reference list.

  10. Crystal Structures and Vibrational and Solid-State (CPMAS) NMR Spectroscopy of Some Bis(triphenylphosphine)silver(I) Sulfate, Selenate and Phosphate Systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowmaker, Graham A.; Hanna, John V.; Rickard, Clifton E.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2001-01-01

    The complexes [Ag2(PPh3)4EO4].2H2O(E=S, Se) (1,2), [Ag(PPh3)2HEO4].H2O (E=S, Se)(3,4) and [Ag9PPh3)2H2PO4].2EtOH (5) have been prepared and studied by X-ray crystallography and by infrared and solid-state 13C and 31 P cross-polarization, magic-angle-spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectroscopy.

  11. Oxygen-17 dynamic nuclear polarisation enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy at 18.8 T.

    PubMed

    Brownbill, Nick J; Gajan, David; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Blanc, Frédéric

    2017-02-23

    We report (17)O dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP) enhanced solid-state NMR experiments at 18.8 T. Several formulations were investigated on the Mg(OH)2 compound. A signal enhancement factor of 17 could be obtained when the solid particles were incorporated into a glassy o-terphenyl matrix doped with BDPA using the Overhauser polarisation transfer scheme whilst the cross effect mechanism enabled by TEKPol yielded a slightly lower enhancement but more time efficient data acquisition.

  12. 31P NMR characterization and efficiency of new types of water-insoluble phosphate fertilizers to supply plant-available phosphorus in diverse soil types.

    PubMed

    Erro, Javier; Baigorri, Roberto; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Garcia-Mina, Jose M

    2011-03-09

    Hydroponic plant experiments demonstrated the efficiency of a type of humic acid-based water-insoluble phosphate fertilizers, named rhizosphere controlled fertilizers (RCF), to supply available phosphorus (P) to different plant species. This effect was well correlated to the root release of specific organic acids. In this context, the aims of this study are (i) to study the chemical nature of RCF using solid-state (31)P NMR and (ii) to evaluate the real efficiency of RCF matrix as a source of P for wheat plants cultivated in an alkaline and acid soil in comparison with traditional water-soluble (simple superphosphate, SSP) and water-insoluble (dicalcium phosphate, DCP) P fertilizers. The (31)P NMR study revealed the formation of multimetal (double and triple, MgZn and/or MgZnCa) phosphates associated with chelating groups of the humic acid through the formation of metal bridges. With regard to P fertilizer efficiency, the results obtained show that the RCF matrix produced higher plant yields than SSP in both types of soil, with DCP and the water-insoluble fraction from the RCF matrix (WI) exhibiting the best results in the alkaline soil. By contrast, in the acid soil, DCP showed very low efficiency, WI performed on a par with SSP, and RCF exhibited the highest efficiency, thus suggesting a protector effect of humic acid from soil fixation.

  13. LARGE SCALE PRODUCTION, PURIFICATION, AND 65CU SOLID STATE NMR OF AZURIN

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, A.; Heck, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper details a way to produce azurin with an effi ciency over 10 times greater than previously described and demonstrates the fi rst solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of 65Cu(I) in a metalloprotein. A synthetic gene for azurin based upon the DNA sequence from Pseudomonas aeruginosa including the periplasmic targeting sequence was subcloned into a T7 overexpression vector to create the plasmid pGS-azurin, which was transformed into BL21 (DE3) competent cells. The leader sequence on the expressed protein causes it to be exported to the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli. Bacteria grown in a fermentation unit were induced to overexpress the azurin, which was subsequently purifi ed through an endosmotic shock procedure followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). 1,500 mg of azurin were purifi ed per liter of culture. 65Cu(II) was added to apo-azurin and then reduced. The 65Cu metal cofactor in azurin was observed with solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to determine any structural variations that accompanied copper reduction. This is the fi rst solid state NMR spectra of a copper(I) metalloprotein. Analysis of the NMR spectra is being used to complement hypotheses set forth by x-ray diffraction and computational calculations of electron transfer mechanisms in azurin.

  14. Mechanism of dilute-spin-exchange in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-03-28

    In the stationary, aligned samples used in oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR, {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings are not attenuated as they are in magic angle spinning solid-state NMR; consequently, they are available for participation in dipolar coupling-based spin-exchange processes. Here we describe analytically the pathways of {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N spin-exchange mediated by {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings. The mixed-order proton-relay mechanism can be differentiated from the third spin assisted recoupling mechanism by setting the {sup 1}H to an off-resonance frequency so that it is at the “magic angle” during the spin-exchange interval in the experiment, since the “magic angle” irradiation nearly quenches the former but only slightly attenuates the latter. Experimental spectra from a single crystal of N-acetyl leucine confirm that this proton-relay mechanism plays the dominant role in {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N dilute-spin-exchange in OS solid-state NMR in crystalline samples. Remarkably, the “forbidden” spin-exchange condition under “magic angle” irradiation results in {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N cross-peaks intensities that are comparable to those observed with on-resonance irradiation in applications to proteins. The mechanism of the proton relay in dilute-spin-exchange is crucial for the design of polarization transfer experiments.

  15. Solid state 19F NMR parameters of fluorine-labeled amino acids. Part I: Aromatic substituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürr, Ulrich H. N.; Grage, Stephan L.; Witter, Raiker; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2008-03-01

    Structural parameters of peptides and proteins in biomembranes can be directly measured by solid state NMR of selectively labeled amino acids. The 19F nucleus is a promising label to overcome the low sensitivity of 2H, 13C or 15N, and to serve as a background-free reporter group in biological compounds. To make the advantages of solid state 19F NMR fully available for structural studies of polypeptides, we have systematically measured the chemical shift anisotropies and relaxation properties of the most relevant aromatic and aliphatic 19F-labeled amino acids. In this first part of two consecutive contributions, six different 19F-substituents on representative aromatic side chains were characterized as polycrystalline powders by static and MAS experiments. The data are also compared with results on the same amino acids incorporated in synthetic peptides. The spectra show a wide variety of lineshapes, from which the principal values of the CSA tensors were extracted. In addition, temperature-dependent T1 and T2 relaxation times were determined by 19F NMR in the solid state, and isotropic chemical shifts and scalar couplings were obtained in solution.

  16. Study of molecular dynamics and the solid state phase transition mechanism for unsymmetrical thiopyrophosphate using X-ray diffraction, DFT calculations and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Potrzebowski, Marek J; Bujacz, Grzegorz D; Bujacz, Anna; Olejniczak, Sebastian; Napora, Paweł; Heliński, Jan; Ciesielski, Włodzimierz; Gajda, Jarosław

    2006-01-19

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and low-temperature X-ray diffraction studies showed that 2-thio-(5,5-dimethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinanyl)2'-oxo-dineopentyl-thiophosphate (compound 1) undergoes reversible phase transition at 203 K related to the change of symmetry of the crystallographic unit. Solid state NMR spectroscopy was used to establish the dynamic processes of aliphatic groups and the phosphorus skeleton. 13C and 31P variable temperature NMR studies as well as T1 and T1rho measurements of relaxation times revealed the different mode of molecular motion for each neopentyl residue directly bonded to phosphorus. It is concluded that molecular dynamics of aliphatic groups causes different van der Waals interactions in the crystal lattice and is the driving force of phase transition for compound 1. Finally, we showed that very sharp phase transition temperature makes compound 1 an excellent candidate as a low-temperature NMR thermometer in the solid phase.

  17. Recent progress in solid-state NMR studies of drugs confined within drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Skorupska, Ewa; Jeziorna, Agata; Kazmierski, Slawomir; Potrzebowski, Marek J

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in the application of solid-state NMR (SS NMR) spectroscopy in structural studies of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) embedded in different drug carriers is detailed. This article is divided into sections. The first part reports short characterization of the nanoparticles and microparticles that can be used as drug delivery systems (DDSs). The second part shows the applicability of SS NMR to study non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In this section, problems related to API-DDS interactions, morphology, local molecular dynamics, nature of inter- or intramolecular connections, and pore filling are reviewed for different drug carriers (e.g. mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), cyclodextrins, polymeric matrices and others). The third and fourth sections detail the recent applications of SS NMR for searching for antibiotics and anticancer drugs confined in zeolites, MSNs, amorphous calcium phosphate and other carriers.

  18. 31P NMR Relaxation of Cortical Bone Mineral at Multiple Magnetic Field Strengths and Levels of Demineralization

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Alan C.; Wright, Alexander C.; Wehrli, Suzanne L.; Ong, Henry H.; Li, Cheng; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Recent work has shown that solid-state 1H and 31P MRI can provide detailed insight into bone matrix and mineral properties, thereby potentially enabling differentiation of osteoporosis from osteomalacia. However, 31P MRI of bone mineral is hampered by unfavorable relaxation properties. Hence, accurate knowledge of these properties is critical to optimizing MRI of bone phosphorus. Methods In this work, 31P MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was predicted on the basis of T1 and T2* (effective transverse relaxation time) measured in lamb bone at six field strengths (1.5 – 11.7 T) and subsequently verified by 3-D ultra-short echo-time and zero echo-time imaging. Further, T1 was measured in deuterium-exchanged bone and partially demineralized bone. Results 31P T2* was found to decrease from 220.3 ± 4.3 μs to 98.0 ± 1.4 μs from 1.5 to 11.7 T, and T1 to increase from 12.8 ± 0.5 s to 97.3 ± 6.4 s. Deuteron substitution of exchangeable water showed that 76% of the 31P longitudinal relaxation rate is due to 1H-31P dipolar interactions. Lastly, hypomineralization was found to decrease T1, which may have implications for 31P MRI based mineralization density quantification. Conclusion Despite the steep decrease in the T2*/T1 ratio, SNR should increase with field strength as Bo0.4 for sample-dominated noise and as Bo1.1 for coil-dominated noise. This was confirmed by imaging experiments. PMID:23505120

  19. Solid-state 17O NMR of pharmaceutical compounds: salicylic acid and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xianqi; Shan, Melissa; Terskikh, Victor; Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong; Wu, Gang

    2013-08-22

    We report solid-state NMR characterization of the (17)O quadrupole coupling (QC) and chemical shift (CS) tensors in five site-specifically (17)O-labeled samples of salicylic acid and o-acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin). High-quality (17)O NMR spectra were obtained for these important pharmaceutical compounds under both static and magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions at two magnetic fields, 14.0 and 21.1 T. A total of 14 (17)O QC and CS tensors were experimentally determined for the seven oxygen sites in salicylic acid and Aspirin. Although both salicylic acid and Aspirin form hydrogen bonded cyclic dimers in the solid state, we found that the potential curves for the concerted double proton transfer in these two compounds are significantly different. In particular, while the double-well potential curve in Aspirin is nearly symmetrical, it is highly asymmetrical in salicylic acid. This difference results in quite different temperature dependencies in (17)O MAS spectra of the two compounds. A careful analysis of variable-temperature (17)O MAS NMR spectra of Aspirin allowed us to obtain the energy asymmetry (ΔE) of the double-well potential, ΔE = 3.0 ± 0.5 kJ/mol. We were also able to determine a lower limit of ΔE for salicylic acid, ΔE > 10 kJ/mol. These asymmetrical features in potential energy curves were confirmed by plane-wave DFT computations, which yielded ΔE = 3.7 and 17.8 kJ/mol for Aspirin and salicylic acid, respectively. To complement the solid-state (17)O NMR data, we also obtained solid-state (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra for salicylic acid and Aspirin. Using experimental NMR parameters obtained for all magnetic nuclei present in salicylic acid and Aspirin, we found that plane-wave DFT computations can produce highly accurate NMR parameters in well-defined crystalline organic compounds.

  20. Structure and dynamics of retinal in rhodopsin elucidated by deuterium solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Gilmar Fernandes De Jesus

    Rhodopsin is a seven transmembrane helix GPCR found which mediates dim light vision, in which the binding pocket is occupied by the ligand 11- cis-retinal. A site-directed 2H-labeling approach utilizing solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the structure and dynamics of retinal within its binding pocket in the dark state of rhodopsin, and as well the MetaI and MetaII. 11-cis-[5-C 2H3]-, 11-cis-[9-C 2H3]-, and 11-cis-[13-C2H 3]-retinal were used to regenerate bleached rhodopsin. Recombinant membranes comprising purified rhodopsin and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) were prepared (1:50 molar ratio). Solid-state 2H NMR spectra were obtained for the aligned rhodopsin/POPC recombinant membranes at temperatures below the order-disorder phase transition temperature of POPC. The solid-state NMR studies of aligned samples, give the orientations of the 2H nuclear coupling tensor relative to the membrane frame, which involve both the conformation and orientation of the bound retinal chromophore. Theoretical simulations of the experimental 2H NMR spectra employed a new lineshape treatment for a semi-random distribution due to static uniaxial disorder. The analysis gives the orientation of the 2H-labeled C-C2H3 methyl bond axes relative to the membrane plane as well as the extent of three-dimensional alignment disorder (mosaic spread). These results clearly demonstrate the applicability of site-directed 2H NMR methods for investigating conformational changes and dynamics of ligands bound to rhodopsin and other GPCRs in relation to their characteristic mechanisms of action.

  1. Forms and lability of phosphorus in algae and aquatic macrophytes characterized by solution 31P NMR coupled with enzymatic hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased information on forms and lability of phosphorus (P) in aquatic macrophytes and algae is crucial for better understanding of P biogeochemical cycling in eutrophic lakes. In this work, solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy coupled with enzymatic hydrolysis (EH) was used ...

  2. Chemical Characterization and Water Content Determination of Bio-Oils Obtained from Various Biomass Species using 31P NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    David, K.; Ben, H.; Muzzy, J.; Feik, C.; Iisa, K.; Ragauskas, A.

    2012-03-01

    Pyrolysis is a promising approach to utilize biomass for biofuels. One of the key challenges for this conversion is how to analyze complicated components in the pyrolysis oils. Water contents of pyrolysis oils are normally analyzed by Karl Fischer titration. The use of 2-chloro-4,4,5,5,-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by {sup 31}P NMR analysis has been used to quantitatively analyze the structure of hydroxyl groups in lignin and whole biomass. Results: {sup 31}P NMR analysis of pyrolysis oils is a novel technique to simultaneously characterize components and analyze water contents in pyrolysis oils produced from various biomasses. The water contents of various pyrolysis oils range from 16 to 40 wt%. The pyrolysis oils obtained from Loblolly pine had higher guaiacyl content, while that from oak had a higher syringyl content. Conclusion: The comparison with Karl Fischer titration shows that {sup 31}P NMR could also reliably be used to measure the water content of pyrolysis oils. Simultaneously with analysis of water content, quantitative characterization of hydroxyl groups, including aliphatic, C-5 substituted/syringyl, guaiacyl, p-hydroxyl phenyl and carboxylic hydroxyl groups, could also be provided by {sup 31}P NMR analysis.

  3. Simultaneous determination of phenolic compounds and triterpenic acids in oregano growing wild in Greece by 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Agiomyrgianaki, Alexia; Dais, Photis

    2012-11-01

    (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to detect and quantify simultaneously a large number of phenolic compounds and the two triterpenic acids, ursolic acid and oleanolic acid, extracted from two oregano species Origanum onites and Origanum vulgare ssp. Hirtum using two different organic solvents ethanol and ethyl acetate. This analytical method is based on the derivatization of the hydroxyl and carboxyl groups of these compounds with the phosphorous reagent 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxa phospholane and the identification of the phosphitylated compounds on the basis of the (31)P chemical shifts. Unambiguous assignment of the (31)P NMR chemical shifts of the dihydroxy- and polyhydroxy-phenols in oregano species as well as those of the triterpenic acids was achieved upon comparison with the chemical shifts of model compounds assigned by using two-dimensional NMR techniques. Furthermore, the integration of the appropriate signals of the hydroxyl derivatives in the corresponding (31)P NMR spectra and the use of the phosphitylated cyclohexanol as an internal standard allowed the quantification of these compounds. The validity of this technique for quantitative measurements was thoroughly examined.

  4. Ab initio and DFT study of 31P-NMR chemical shifts of sphingomyelin and dihydrosphingomyelin lipid molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimori, K.; Kawabe, H.; Nagao, H.; Nishikawa, K.

    One of the phospholipids, sphingomyelin (SM, N-acyl-sphingosine-1-phosphorylcholine) is the most abundant component of mammalian membranes in brain, nervous tissues, and human ocular lens. It plays an important role for apoptosis, aging, and signal transduction. Recently, Yappert and coworkers have shown that human lens sphingomyelin and its hydrogenated derivative, dihydrosphingomyelin (DHSM) are interacted with Ca2+ ions to develop human cataracts. Previously, we have investigated conformational differences between an isolated SM/DHSM molecule and Ca2+-coordinated form by using density functional theory (DFT) for geometry optimization and normal mode analysis. As a result, one of stable conformers of SMs has a hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl group and phosphate group, whereas another conformer has a hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl and phosphate amide group. In this study, 31P-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) shielding constants of the obtained conformers are investigated by using ab initio and DFT with NMR-gauge invariant atomic orbitals (NMR-GIAO) calculations. The experimental 31P-NMR chemical shifts of SMs and DHSMs have significant small value around 0.1 ppm. We consider the relative conformational changes between SMs and DHSMs affect the slight deviations of 31P-NMR chemical shifts, and discuss intramolecular hydrogen bondings and the solvent effect in relation to NMR experimental reference.

  5. 1H to 13C Energy Transfer in Solid State NMR Spectroscopy of Natural Organic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berns, Anne E.; Conte, Pellegrino

    2010-05-01

    Cross polarization (CP) magic angle spinning (MAS) 13C-NMR spectroscopy is a solid state NMR technique widely used to study chemical composition of organic materials with low or no solubility in the common deuterated solvents used to run liquid state NMR experiments. Based on the magnetization transfer from abundant nuclei (with spin of 1 -2) having a high gyromagnetic ratio (γ), such as protons, to the less abundant 13C nuclei with low γ values, 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy is often applied in environmental chemistry to obtain quantitative information on the chemical composition of natural organic matter (NOM) (Conte et al., 2004), although its quantitative assessment is still matter of heavy debates. Many authors (Baldock et al., 1997; Conte et al., 1997, 2002; Dria et al., 2002; Kiem et al., 2000; Kögel-Knabner, 2000; Preston, 2001), reported that the application of appropriate instrument setup as well as the use of special pulse sequences and correct spectra elaboration may provide signal intensities that are directly proportional to the amount of nuclei creating a NMR signal. However, many other papers dealt with the quantitative unsuitability of 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. Among those, Mao et al. (2000), Smernik and Oades (2000 a,b), and Preston (2001) reported that cross-polarized NMR techniques may fail in a complete excitation of the 13C nuclei. In fact, the amount of observable carbons via 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy appeared, in many cases, lower than that measured by a direct observation of the 13C nuclei. As a consequence, cross-polarized NMR techniques may provide spectra where signal distribution may not be representative of the quantitative distribution of the different natural organic matter components. Cross-polarization is obtained after application of an initial 90° x pulse on protons and a further spin lock pulse (along the y axis) having a fixed length (contact time) for both nuclei (1H and 13C) once the Hartmann-Hahn condition is matched

  6. Stacking structure of confined 1-butanol in SBA-15 investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yun-Chih; Chou, Hung-Lung; Sarma, Loka Subramanyam; Hwang, Bing-Joe

    2009-10-12

    Understanding the complex thermodynamic behavior of confined amphiphilic molecules in biological or mesoporous hosts requires detailed knowledge of the stacking structures. Here, we present detailed solid-state NMR spectroscopic investigations on 1-butanol molecules confined in the hydrophilic mesoporous SBA-15 host. A range of NMR spectroscopic measurements comprising of (1)H spin-lattice (T(1)), spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation, (13)C cross-polarization (CP), and (1)H,(1)H two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy ((1)H,(1)H 2D NOESY) with the magic angle spinning (MAS) technique as well as static wide-line (2)H NMR spectra have been used to investigate the dynamics and to observe the stacking structure of confined 1-butanol in SBA-15. The results suggest that not only the molecular reorientation but also the exchange motions of confined molecules of 1-butanol are extremely restricted in the confined space of the SBA-15 pores. The dynamics of the confined molecules of 1-butanol imply that the (1)H,(1)H 2D NOESY should be an appropriate technique to observe the stacking structure of confined amphiphilc molecules. This study is the first to observe that a significant part of confined 1-butanol molecules are orientated as tilted bilayered structures on the surface of the host SBA-15 pores in a time-average state by solid-state NMR spectroscopy with the (1)H,(1)H 2D NOESY technique.

  7. Solid-state NMR characterization of 69Ga and 71Ga in crystalline solids.

    PubMed

    Ash, Jason T; Grandinetti, Philip J

    2006-09-01

    Gallium model systems containing four- and six-coordinate gallium sites have been investigated using solid-state NMR. Measurement of the isotropic chemical shift and electric field gradient (EFG) have been performed at 9.4 T on alpha-Ga2O3, beta-Ga2O3, LiGaO2, NaGaO2, KGaO2, Ga2(SO4)3, and LaGaO3 using a variety of techniques on both NMR active nuclei (69Ga and 71Ga) including static, high speed magic-angle spinning (MAS), satellite transition (ST) spectroscopy, and rotor-assisted population transfer (RAPT). The chemical shift is found to correlate well with the coordination number, with four-coordinate gallium having values of approximately 50 ppm and six-coordinate gallium having values near 225 ppm (referenced to 1 M gallium nitrate solution). The magnitude of the EFG is found to be correlated to the distortion of the gallium polyhedra, with the strained systems having EFGs of 3 x 10(21) Vm(-2) or more, while the less strained systems have values of 1.5 x 10(21) Vm(-2) or less. A plot of chemical shift versus EFG suggests that solid-state NMR of gallium oxyanions can be more discriminating than liquid state NMR chemical shifts alone.

  8. Immobilization of soluble protein complexes in MAS solid-state NMR: Sedimentation versus viscosity.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Riddhiman; Mainz, Andi; Busi, Baptiste; Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Kranz, Maximilian; Hofmann, Thomas; Reif, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, MAS solid-state NMR has emerged as a technique for the investigation of soluble protein complexes. It was found that high molecular weight complexes do not need to be crystallized in order to obtain an immobilized sample for solid-state NMR investigations. Sedimentation induced by sample rotation impairs rotational diffusion of proteins and enables efficient dipolar coupling based cross polarization transfers. In addition, viscosity contributes to the immobilization of the molecules in the sample. Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents (NADES) have very high viscosities, and can replace water in living organisms. We observe a considerable amount of cross polarization transfers for NADES solvents, even though their molecular weight is too low to yield significant sedimentation. We discuss how viscosity and sedimentation both affect the quality of the obtained experimental spectra. The FROSTY/sedNMR approach holds the potential to study large protein complexes, which are otherwise not amenable for a structural characterization using NMR. We show that using this method, backbone assignments of the symmetric proteasome activator complex (1.1MDa), and high quality correlation spectra of non-symmetric protein complexes such as the prokaryotic ribosome 50S large subunit binding to trigger factor (1.4MDa) are obtained.

  9. Towards the versatile DFT and MP2 computational schemes for 31P NMR chemical shifts taking into account relativistic corrections.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Sergey V; Rusakov, Yury Yu; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2014-11-01

    The main factors affecting the accuracy and computational cost of the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts in the representative series of organophosphorous compounds are examined at the density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) levels. At the DFT level, the best functionals for the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts are those of Keal and Tozer, KT2 and KT3. Both at the DFT and MP2 levels, the most reliable basis sets are those of Jensen, pcS-2 or larger, and those of Pople, 6-311G(d,p) or larger. The reliable basis sets of Dunning's family are those of at least penta-zeta quality that precludes their practical consideration. An encouraging finding is that basically, the locally dense basis set approach resulting in a dramatic decrease in computational cost is justified in the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts within the 1-2-ppm error. Relativistic corrections to (31)P NMR absolute shielding constants are of major importance reaching about 20-30 ppm (ca 7%) improving (not worsening!) the agreement of calculation with experiment. Further better agreement with the experiment by 1-2 ppm can be obtained by taking into account solvent effects within the integral equation formalism polarizable continuum model solvation scheme. We recommend the GIAO-DFT-KT2/pcS-3//pcS-2 scheme with relativistic corrections and solvent effects taken into account as the most versatile computational scheme for the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts characterized by a mean absolute error of ca 9 ppm in the range of 550 ppm.

  10. Combining insights from solid-state NMR and first principles calculation: applications to the 19F NMR of octafluoronaphthalene.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Andrew J; Ng, William T K; Jochym, Dominik; Keal, Thomas W; Clark, Stewart J; Tozer, David J; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2007-05-21

    Advances in solid-state NMR methodology and computational chemistry are applied to the (19)F NMR of solid octafluoronaphthalene. It is demonstrated experimentally, and confirmed by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, that the spectral resolution in the magic-angle spinning spectrum is limited by the anisotropy of the bulk magnetic susceptibility (ABMS). This leads to the unusual observation that the resolution improves as the sample is diluted. DFT calculations provide assignments of each of the peaks in the (19)F spectrum, but the predictions are close to the limits of accuracy and correlation information from 2-D NMR is invaluable in confirming the assignments. The effects of non-Gaussian lineshapes on the use of 2-D NMR for mapping correlations of spectral frequencies (e.g. due to the ABMS) are also discussed.

  11. Application and Reliability of Solid-State NMR in Environmental Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike

    2010-05-01

    For the characterization of soil organic matter, a suite of analytical approaches are available. Chemical degradative methods involve an extraction scheme with which the soluble part of the mixture is isolated and analyzed by colorimetrical or chromatographic means. Macromolecular structures can be subjected to thermolytic or combined thermochemolytic degradation. Because secondary reactions (rearrangement, cracking, hydrogenation and polymerization) in a heterogeneous mixture cannot be excluded, it is obvious that conclusions regarding the original structure in the macromolecular phase have to be drawn with caution. A powerful alternative represents solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, allowing the examination of the bulk sample without major pre-treatment In environmental sciences, this technique mostly involves the isotope 13C to study the chemical composition of organic matter in soils, sediments or compost to study the temporal development of humic material or chemical alterations due to variation in environmental parameters. Due to its low sensibility solid-state 15N NMR studies on such samples are only found occasionally. The emphasis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy is not only to determine the gross chemical composition of the material under study via a chemical shift assignment but also a quantitative correlation between the different signal intensities and the relative contribution of the respective C or N types to the total organic C or N content. However, despite increasing popularity, this approach is still viewed as mysterious techniques, in particular with respect to quantification. Accordingly, the purpose of this review is to give a short overview on the possibilities and limitations of this technique in environmental science and in particular for the study of soil organic matter. In general, solid-state 13C NMR spectra of soil organic matter are obtained with the cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) technique. This

  12. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of the quadrupolar halogens: chlorine-35/37, bromine-79/81, and iodine-127.

    PubMed

    Bryce, David L; Sward, Gregory D

    2006-04-01

    A thorough review of 35/37Cl, 79/81Br, and 127I solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) data is presented. Isotropic chemical shifts (CS), quadrupolar coupling constants, and other available information on the magnitude and orientation of the CS and electric field gradient (EFG) tensors for chlorine, bromine, and iodine in diverse chemical compounds is tabulated on the basis of over 200 references. Our coverage is through July 2005. Special emphasis is placed on the information available from the study of powdered diamagnetic solids in high magnetic fields. Our survey indicates a recent notable increase in the number of applications of solid-state quadrupolar halogen NMR, particularly 35Cl NMR, as high magnetic fields have become more widely available to solid-state NMR spectroscopists. We conclude with an assessment of possible future directions for research involving 35/37Cl, 79/81Br, and 127I solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

  13. Intercalation complex of proflavine with DNA: Structure and dynamics by solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Pei; Juang, Chilong; Harbison, G.S. )

    1990-07-06

    The structure of the complex formed between the intercalating agent proflavine and fibrous native DNA was studied by one- and two-dimensional high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Carbon-13-labeled proflavine was used to show that the drug is stacked with the aromatic ring plane perpendicular to the fiber axis and that it is essentially immobile. Natural abundance carbon-13 NMR of the DNA itself shows that proflavine binding does not change the puckering of the deoxyribose ring. However, phosphorus-31 NMR spectra show profound changes in the orientation of the phosphodiester grouping on proflavine binding, with some of the phosphodiesters tilting almost parallel to the helix axis, and a second set almost perpendicular. The first group to the phosphodiesters probably spans the intercalation sites, whereas the tilting of the second set likely compensates for the unwinding of the DNA by the intercalator.

  14. Probing the surface structure of divalent transition metals using surface specific solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mason, Harris E; Harley, Stephen J; Maxwell, Robert S; Carroll, Susan A

    2012-03-06

    Environmental and geochemical systems containing paramagnetic species could benefit by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy due to the sensitivity of the spectral response to small amounts paramagnetic interactions. In this study, we apply commonly used solid-state NMR spectroscopic methods combined with chemometrics analysis to probe sorption behavior of the paramagnetic cations Cu(2+) and Ni(2+)at the amorphous silica surface. We exploit the unique properties of paramagnets to derive meaningful structural information in these systems at low, environmentally relevant cation surface loadings by comparing the NMR response of sorption samples to paramagnetic free samples. These data suggest that a simple sorption model where the cation sorbs as inner sphere complexes at negatively charged, deprotonated silanol sites is appropriate. These results help constrain sorption models that are used to describe metal fate and transport.

  15. Freezing point depression of water in phospholipid membranes: a solid-state NMR study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Kuk; Kwon, Byung Soo; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2008-12-02

    Lipid-water interaction plays an important role in the properties of lipid bilayers, cryoprotectants, and membrane-associated peptides and proteins. The temperature at which water bound to lipid bilayers freezes is lower than that of free water. Here, we report a solid-state NMR investigation on the freezing point depression of water in phospholipid bilayers in the presence and absence of cholesterol. Deuterium NMR spectra at different temperatures ranging from -75 to + 10 degrees C were obtained from fully (2)H2O-hydrated POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine) multilamellar vesicles (MLVs), prepared with and without cholesterol, to determine the freezing temperature of water and the effect of cholesterol on the freezing temperature of water in POPC bilayers. Our 2H NMR experiments reveal the motional behavior of unfrozen water molecules in POPC bilayers even at temperatures significantly below 0 degrees C and show that the presence of cholesterol further lowered the freezing temperature of water in POPC bilayers. These results suggest that in the presence of cholesterol the fluidity and dynamics of lipid bilayers can be retained even at very low temperatures as exist in the liquid crystalline phase of the lipid. Therefore, bilayer samples prepared with a cryoprotectant like cholesterol should enable the performance of multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments to investigate the structure, dynamics, and topology of membrane proteins at a very low temperature with enhanced sample stability and possibly a better sensitivity. Phosphorus-31 NMR data suggest that lipid bilayers can be aligned at low temperatures, while 15N NMR experiments demonstrate that such aligned samples can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of is 15N chemical shift spectra of a 37-residue human antimicrobial peptide, LL-37.

  16. Incorporation of phosphorus guest ions in the calcium silicate phases of Portland cement from 31P MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Søren L; Jakobsen, Hans J; Skibsted, Jørgen

    2010-06-21

    Portland cements may contain small quantities of phosphorus (typically below 0.5 wt % P(2)O(5)), originating from either the raw materials or alternative sources of fuel used to heat the cement kilns. This work reports the first (31)P MAS NMR study of anhydrous and hydrated Portland cements that focuses on the phase and site preferences of the (PO(4))(3-) guest ions in the main clinker phases and hydration products. The observed (31)P chemical shifts (10 to -2 ppm), the (31)P chemical shift anisotropy, and the resemblance of the lineshapes in the (31)P and (29)Si MAS NMR spectra strongly suggest that (PO(4))(3-) units are incorporated in the calcium silicate phases, alite (Ca(3)SiO(5)) and belite (Ca(2)SiO(4)), by substitution for (SiO(4))(4-) tetrahedra. This assignment is further supported by a determination of the spin-lattice relaxation times for (31)P in alite and belite, which exhibit the same ratio as observed for the corresponding (29)Si relaxation times. From simulations of the intensities, observed in inversion-recovery spectra for a white Portland cement, it is deduced that 1.3% and 2.1% of the Si sites in alite and belite, respectively, are replaced by phosphorus. Charge balance may potentially be achieved to some extent by a coupled substitution mechanism where Ca(2+) is replaced by Fe(3+) ions, which may account for the interaction of the (31)P spins with paramagnetic Fe(3+) ions as observed for the ordinary Portland cements. A minor fraction of phosphorus may also be present in the separate phase Ca(3)(PO(4))(2), as indicated by the observation of a narrow resonance at delta((31)P) = 3.0 ppm for two of the studied cements. (31)P{(1)H} CP/MAS NMR spectra following the hydration of a white Portland cement show that the resonances from the hydrous phosphate species fall in the same spectral range as observed for (PO(4))(3-) incorporated in alite. This similarity and the absence of a large (31)P chemical shift ansitropy indicate that the hydrous (PO(4

  17. 31P NMR study of erythrocytes from a patient with hereditary pyrimidine-5'-nucleotidase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, M S; Angle, C R; Stohs, S J; Wu, S T; Salhany, J M; Eliot, R S; Markin, R S

    1983-01-01

    The composition of phosphate metabolites and the intracellular pH in erythrocytes from a patient with hereditary pyrimidine-5'-nucleotidase deficiency were examined using 31P NMR spectroscopy. Several resonances were identified in spectra from intact cells and from extracts. The 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate line intensities were normal but the NTP resonances were about twice normal due to the presence of millimolar quantities of pyrimidine phosphates. Several intense resonances were also observed in the diphosphodiester region of the spectrum. One compound contributing to these lines has been identified as cytidine diphosphocholine. The resonances of NTPs were in a position indicating that the additional triphosphates were also bound by Mg2+. Direct measurement shows that there is a nearly proportional increase in total cell Mg2+ in the patient's cells, in agreement with the interpretation of the spectra. The intracellular pH was about 0.2 unit lower in the patient's erythrocytes. This lower pH is due to the elevation in intracellular fixed negative charges and the shift in permeable anions consequent to the Donnan equilibrium. We suggest that the lower intracellular pH may explain the lower oxygen affinity of these cells in the presence of otherwise normal 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate levels and the increased Mg2+ triphosphates level, because the Mg2+ form of NTPs is known not to alter the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin under physiologic conditions. Furthermore, the lower intracellular pH can also explain the abnormalities in glycolytic intermediates observed for these cells. PMID:6296865

  18. Gated /sup 31/P NMR study of tetanic contraction in rat muscle depleted of phosphocreatine

    SciTech Connect

    Shoubridge, E.A.; Radda, G.K.

    1987-05-01

    Rats were fed a diet containing 1% ..beta..-guanidino-propionic acid (GPA) for 6-12 wk to deplete their muscles of phosphocreatine (PCr). Gated /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were obtained from the gastrocnemius-plantaris muscle at various time points during either a 1- or 3-s isometric tetanic contraction using a surface coil. The energy cost of a 1-s tetanus in unfatigued control rat muscle was 48.4 ..mu..mol ATP x g dry wt/sup -1/ x s/sup -1/ and was largely supplied by PCr; anaerobic glycogenolysis was negligible. In GPA-fed rats PCr was undetectable after 400 ms. This had no effect on initial force generated per gram, which was not significantly different from controls. Developed tension in a 3-s tetanus in GPA-fed rats could be divided into a peak phase (duration 0.8-0.9 s) and a plateau phase (65% peak tension) in which PCr was undetectable and the (ATP) was < 20% of that in control muscle. Energy from glycogenolysis was sufficient to maintain force generation at this submaximal level. Mean net glycogen utilization per 3-s tetanus was 78% greater than in control muscle. However, the observed decrease in intracellular pH was less than that expected from energy budget calculations, suggesting either increased buffering capacity or modulation of ATP hydrolysis in the muscles of GPA-fed rats. The results demonstrate that the transport role of PCr is not essential in contracting muscle in GPA-fed rats. PCr is probably important in this regard in the larger fibers of control muscle. Although fast-twitch muscles depleted of PCr have nearly twice the glycogen reserves of control muscle, glycogenolysis is limited in its capacity to fill the role of PCr as an energy buffer under conditions of maximum ATP turnover.

  19. Anomalous Diffusion in a Gel-Fluid Lipid Environment: A Combined Solid-State NMR and Obstructed Random-Walk Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Alexandre; Paris, Michaël; Auger, Michèle

    2004-01-01

    Lateral diffusion is an essential process for the functioning of biological membranes. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is, a priori, a well-suited technique to study lateral diffusion within a heterogeneous environment such as the cell membrane. Moreover, restriction of lateral motions by lateral heterogeneities can be used as a means to characterize their geometry. The goal of this work is to understand the advantages and limitations of solid-state NMR exchange experiments in the study of obstructed lateral diffusion in model membranes. For this purpose, simulations of lateral diffusion on a sphere with varying numbers and sizes of immobile obstacles and different percolation properties were performed. From the results of these simulations, two-dimensional 31P NMR exchange maps and time-dependent autocorrelation functions were calculated. The results indicate that the technique is highly sensitive to percolation properties, total obstacle area, and, within certain limits, obstacle size. A practical example is shown, namely the study of the well-characterized DMPC-DSPC binary mixture. The comparison of experimental and simulated results yielded obstacle sizes in the range of hundreds of nanometers, therefore bridging the gap between previously published NMR and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching results. The method could also be applied to the study of membrane protein lateral diffusion in model membranes. PMID:15454443

  20. Microscopic description of the polyamorphic phases of triphenyl phosphite by means of multidimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Senker, Jürgen; Sehnert, Jan; Correll, Sascha

    2005-01-12

    The structural properties of a second, apparently amorphous phase (aII) of the molecular glass former triphenyl phosphite were studied by means of multidimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Phase aII was prepared by annealing the supercooled liquid in the temperature range 210 K 31)P spectra and spin-lattice relaxation data, we used (31)P radio-frequency-driven spin-diffusion exchange spectroscopy to analyze the arrangement of neighboring TPP molecules on both a local and intermediate scale. For the first time, our results give a detailed microscopic description of phase aII. For T(a) > 223 K a nano- or microcrystalline material is formed, whereas for T(a) < 223 K phase aII is homogeneous and disordered. Our data strongly suggest that some of the TPP molecules in phase aII tend toward a parallel alignment. The regions, where the molecules preferentially align appear to be spatially separated and consist of only a few molecules. Whereas the mean cubic expansion of an individual region does not change within the experimental error, the percentage of correlated molecules increases with rising T(a). Based on our results, phase aII can consistently be described as a second liquid, where a part of the molecules exhibit structural correlations. The transformation of the supercooled liquid into phase aII is therefore considered as a liquid-liquid phase transition.

  1. Solid-state 207Pb NMR studies of mixed lead halides, PbFX (X=Cl, Br, or I).

    PubMed

    Glatfelter, Alicia; Dybowski, Cecil; Kragten, David D; Bai, Shi; Perry, Dale L; Lockard, Jenny

    2007-04-01

    Solid-state 207Pb NMR studies have been conducted on mixed lead(II) halides of the type PbFX, where X=Cl, Br, or I. NMR data for the mixed halides are compared to the solid-state NMR data for the divalent, binary lead halides, PbX2 (X=F, Cl, Br, I). The NMR data are evaluated in the context of the structures of the compounds and the effects of the mixed halides on the electronic structure of the divalent lead. Data sets for the mixed halides are discussed and compared to those for the regular lead(II) halides.

  2. Toxin-induced conformational changes in a potassium channel revealed by solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Adam; Giller, Karin; Hornig, Sönke; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Pongs, Olaf; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc

    2006-04-01

    The active site of potassium (K+) channels catalyses the transport of K+ ions across the plasma membrane-similar to the catalytic function of the active site of an enzyme-and is inhibited by toxins from scorpion venom. On the basis of the conserved structures of K+ pore regions and scorpion toxins, detailed structures for the K+ channel-scorpion toxin binding interface have been proposed. In these models and in previous solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies using detergent-solubilized membrane proteins, scorpion toxins were docked to the extracellular entrance of the K+ channel pore assuming rigid, preformed binding sites. Using high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy, here we show that high-affinity binding of the scorpion toxin kaliotoxin to a chimaeric K+ channel (KcsA-Kv1.3) is associated with significant structural rearrangements in both molecules. Our approach involves a combined analysis of chemical shifts and proton-proton distances and demonstrates that solid-state NMR is a sensitive method for analysing the structure of a membrane protein-inhibitor complex. We propose that structural flexibility of the K+ channel and the toxin represents an important determinant for the high specificity of toxin-K+ channel interactions.

  3. Computer-intensive simulation of solid-state NMR experiments using SIMPSON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tošner, Zdeněk; Andersen, Rasmus; Stevensson, Baltzar; Edén, Mattias; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Vosegaard, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Conducting large-scale solid-state NMR simulations requires fast computer software potentially in combination with efficient computational resources to complete within a reasonable time frame. Such simulations may involve large spin systems, multiple-parameter fitting of experimental spectra, or multiple-pulse experiment design using parameter scan, non-linear optimization, or optimal control procedures. To efficiently accommodate such simulations, we here present an improved version of the widely distributed open-source SIMPSON NMR simulation software package adapted to contemporary high performance hardware setups. The software is optimized for fast performance on standard stand-alone computers, multi-core processors, and large clusters of identical nodes. We describe the novel features for fast computation including internal matrix manipulations, propagator setups and acquisition strategies. For efficient calculation of powder averages, we implemented interpolation method of Alderman, Solum, and Grant, as well as recently introduced fast Wigner transform interpolation technique. The potential of the optimal control toolbox is greatly enhanced by higher precision gradients in combination with the efficient optimization algorithm known as limited memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno. In addition, advanced parallelization can be used in all types of calculations, providing significant time reductions. SIMPSON is thus reflecting current knowledge in the field of numerical simulations of solid-state NMR experiments. The efficiency and novel features are demonstrated on the representative simulations.

  4. Motion-adapted pulse sequences for oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR of biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Lu, George J; Opella, Stanley J

    2013-08-28

    One of the main applications of solid-state NMR is to study the structure and dynamics of biopolymers, such as membrane proteins, under physiological conditions where the polypeptides undergo global motions as they do in biological membranes. The effects of NMR radiofrequency irradiations on nuclear spins are strongly influenced by these motions. For example, we previously showed that the MSHOT-Pi4 pulse sequence yields spectra with resonance line widths about half of those observed using the conventional pulse sequence when applied to membrane proteins undergoing rapid uniaxial rotational diffusion in phospholipid bilayers. In contrast, the line widths were not changed in microcrystalline samples where the molecules did not undergo global motions. Here, we demonstrate experimentally and describe analytically how some Hamiltonian terms are susceptible to sample motions, and it is their removal through the critical π/2 Z-rotational symmetry that confers the "motion adapted" property to the MSHOT-Pi4 pulse sequence. This leads to the design of separated local field pulse sequence "Motion-adapted SAMPI4" and is generalized to an approach for the design of decoupling sequences whose performance is superior in the presence of molecular motions. It works by cancelling the spin interaction by explicitly averaging the reduced Wigner matrix to zero, rather than utilizing the 2π nutation to average spin interactions. This approach is applicable to both stationary and magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments.

  5. Computer-intensive simulation of solid-state NMR experiments using SIMPSON.

    PubMed

    Tošner, Zdeněk; Andersen, Rasmus; Stevensson, Baltzar; Edén, Mattias; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Vosegaard, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Conducting large-scale solid-state NMR simulations requires fast computer software potentially in combination with efficient computational resources to complete within a reasonable time frame. Such simulations may involve large spin systems, multiple-parameter fitting of experimental spectra, or multiple-pulse experiment design using parameter scan, non-linear optimization, or optimal control procedures. To efficiently accommodate such simulations, we here present an improved version of the widely distributed open-source SIMPSON NMR simulation software package adapted to contemporary high performance hardware setups. The software is optimized for fast performance on standard stand-alone computers, multi-core processors, and large clusters of identical nodes. We describe the novel features for fast computation including internal matrix manipulations, propagator setups and acquisition strategies. For efficient calculation of powder averages, we implemented interpolation method of Alderman, Solum, and Grant, as well as recently introduced fast Wigner transform interpolation technique. The potential of the optimal control toolbox is greatly enhanced by higher precision gradients in combination with the efficient optimization algorithm known as limited memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno. In addition, advanced parallelization can be used in all types of calculations, providing significant time reductions. SIMPSON is thus reflecting current knowledge in the field of numerical simulations of solid-state NMR experiments. The efficiency and novel features are demonstrated on the representative simulations.

  6. Solid-State NMR Studies of HIV-1 Capsid Protein Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yun; Ahn, Jinwoo; Concel, Jason; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Yang, Jun; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2010-02-17

    In mature HIV-1 virions, the 26.6 kDa CA protein is assembled into a characteristic cone-shaped core (capsid) that encloses the RNA viral genome. The assembled capsid structure is best described by a fullerene cone model that is made up from a hexameric lattice containing a variable number of CA pentamers, thus allowing for closure of tubular or conical structures. In this paper, we present a solid-state NMR analysis of the wild-type HIV-1 CA protein, prepared as conical and spherical assemblies that are stable and are not affected by magic angle spinning of the samples at frequencies between 10 and 25 kHz. Multidimensional homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra of CA assemblies of uniformly 13C,15Nlabeled CA exhibit narrow lines, indicative of the conformational homogeneity of the protein in these assemblies. For the conical assemblies, partial residue-specific resonance assignments were obtained. Analysis of the NMR spectra recorded for the conical and spherical assemblies indicates that the CA protein structure is not significantly different in the different morphologies. The present results demonstrate that the assemblies of CA protein are amenable to detailed structural analysis by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

  7. Solid-state (19)F-NMR of peptides in native membranes.

    PubMed

    Koch, Katja; Afonin, Sergii; Ieronimo, Marco; Berditsch, Marina; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-01-01

    To understand how membrane-active peptides (MAPs) function in vivo, it is essential to obtain structural information about them in their membrane-bound state. Most biophysical approaches rely on the use of bilayers prepared from synthetic phospholipids, i.e. artificial model membranes. A particularly successful structural method is solid-state NMR, which makes use of macroscopically oriented lipid bilayers to study selectively isotope-labelled peptides. Native biomembranes, however, have a far more complex lipid composition and a significant non-lipidic content (protein and carbohydrate). Model membranes, therefore, are not really adequate to address questions concerning for example the selectivity of these membranolytic peptides against prokaryotic vs eukaryotic cells, their varying activities against different bacterial strains, or other related biological issues.Here, we discuss a solid-state (19)F-NMR approach that has been developed for structural studies of MAPs in lipid bilayers, and how this can be translated to measurements in native biomembranes. We review the essentials of the methodology and discuss key objectives in the practice of (19)F-labelling of peptides. Furthermore, the preparation of macroscopically oriented biomembranes on solid supports is discussed in the context of other membrane models. Two native biomembrane systems are presented as examples: human erythrocyte ghosts as representatives of eukaryotic cell membranes, and protoplasts from Micrococcus luteus as membranes from Gram-positive bacteria. Based on our latest experimental experience with the antimicrobial peptide gramicidin S, the benefits and some implicit drawbacks of using such supported native membranes in solid-state (19)F-NMR analysis are discussed.

  8. Forms and Lability of Phosphorus in Algae and Aquatic Macrophytes Characterized by Solution 31P NMR Coupled with Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Weiying; Zhu, Yuanrong; Wu, Fengchang; He, Zhongqi; Zhang, Chen; Giesy, John P.

    2016-11-01

    Solution Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy coupled with enzymatic hydrolysis (EH) with commercially available phosphatases was used to characterize phosphorus (P) compounds in extracts of the dominant aquatic macrophytes and algae in a eutrophic lake. Total extractable organic P (Po) concentrations ranged from 504 to 1643 mg kg‑1 and 2318 to 8395 mg kg‑1 for aquatic macrophytes and algae, respectively. Using 31P NMR spectroscopy, 11 Po species were detected in the mono- and diester region. Additionally, orthophosphate, pyrophosphate and phosphonates were also detected. Using EH, phytate-like P was identified as the prevalent class of enzyme-labile Po, followed by labile monoester- and diester-P. Comparison of the NMR and EH data indicated that the distribution pattern of major P forms in the samples determined by the two methods was similar (r = 0.712, p < 0.05). Additional 31P NMR spectroscopic analysis of extracts following EH showed significant decreases in the monoester and pyrophosphate regions, with a corresponding increase in the orthophosphate signal, as compared to unhydrolyzed extracts. Based on these quantity and hydrolysis data, we proposed that recycling of Po in vegetative biomass residues is an important mechanism for long-term self-regulation of available P for algal blooming in eutrophic lakes.

  9. Forms and Lability of Phosphorus in Algae and Aquatic Macrophytes Characterized by Solution 31P NMR Coupled with Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Weiying; Zhu, Yuanrong; Wu, Fengchang; He, Zhongqi; Zhang, Chen; Giesy, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Solution Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy coupled with enzymatic hydrolysis (EH) with commercially available phosphatases was used to characterize phosphorus (P) compounds in extracts of the dominant aquatic macrophytes and algae in a eutrophic lake. Total extractable organic P (Po) concentrations ranged from 504 to 1643 mg kg−1 and 2318 to 8395 mg kg−1 for aquatic macrophytes and algae, respectively. Using 31P NMR spectroscopy, 11 Po species were detected in the mono- and diester region. Additionally, orthophosphate, pyrophosphate and phosphonates were also detected. Using EH, phytate-like P was identified as the prevalent class of enzyme-labile Po, followed by labile monoester- and diester-P. Comparison of the NMR and EH data indicated that the distribution pattern of major P forms in the samples determined by the two methods was similar (r = 0.712, p < 0.05). Additional 31P NMR spectroscopic analysis of extracts following EH showed significant decreases in the monoester and pyrophosphate regions, with a corresponding increase in the orthophosphate signal, as compared to unhydrolyzed extracts. Based on these quantity and hydrolysis data, we proposed that recycling of Po in vegetative biomass residues is an important mechanism for long-term self-regulation of available P for algal blooming in eutrophic lakes. PMID:27849040

  10. Methanol carbonylation over copper-modified mordenite zeolite: A solid-state NMR study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Li, Shenhui; Qi, Guodong; Su, Yongchao; Li, Jing; Zheng, Anmin; Yi, Xianfeng; Wang, Qiang; Deng, Feng

    2016-11-01

    The carbonylation of methanol with carbon monoxide to generate methyl acetate over Cu-H-MOR and H-MOR zeolites is studied using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. It is found that the catalytic activity of Cu-H-MOR zeolite is much higher than that of H-MOR zeolite. The presence of Cu(+) species enables the stabilization of dimethyl ether, which efficiently suppresses the hydrocarbon formation during carbonylation process over Cu-H-MOR zeolite. In addition, the carbon monoxide adsorbed on Cu(+) site is not an active species to produce either methyl acetate or acetic acid.

  11. Understanding Surface and Interfacial Chemistry in Functional Nanomaterials via Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Alessandro; Chen, Juner; Pang, Zhenfeng; Li, Shenhui; Ling, Daishun; Deng, Feng; Kong, Xueqian

    2017-03-01

    Surface and interfacial chemistry is of fundamental importance in functional nanomaterials applied in catalysis, energy storage and conversion, medicine, and other nanotechnologies. It has been a perpetual challenge for the scientific community to get an accurate and comprehensive picture of the structures, dynamics, and interactions at interfaces. Here, some recent examples in the major disciplines of nanomaterials are selected (e.g., nanoporous materials, battery materials, nanocrystals and quantum dots, supramolecular assemblies, drug-delivery systems, ionomers, and graphite oxides) and it is shown how interfacial chemistry can be addressed through the perspective of solid-state NMR characterization techniques.

  12. 6-Aminopenicillanic acid revisited: A combined solid state NMR and in silico refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Daniel Lima Marques de; San Gil, Rosane Aguiar da Silva; Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca de; Souza, Eugenio Furtado de; Borré, Leandro Bandeira; Vaiss, Viviane da Silva; Leitão, Alexandre Amaral

    2016-09-01

    13C/15N (experimental and ab initio) solid-state NMR was used to achieve an affordable way to improve hydrogen refinement of 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) structure. The lattice effect on the isotropic chemical shifts was probed by using two different magnetic shielding calculations: isolated molecules and periodic crystal structure. The electron density difference maps of optimized and non-optimized structures were calculated in order to investigate the interactions inside the 6-APA unit cell. The 13C and 15N chemical shifts assignments were unambiguously stablished. In addition, some of the literature 13C resonances ambiguities could be properly solved.

  13. Structural modeling of Vpu from HIV-1 based on solid-state NMR observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, SeonJoo; Lim, GyuTae; Nam, Seungyoon; Lee, Jinhyuk

    2014-04-01

    Vpu is one of the accessory proteins of HIV-1, and is involved in viral particle release. Viral particle release is enhanced by two proposed functions of Vpu: (i) tetherin interaction and (ii) membrane polarization. Two Vpu functions in viral particle release are still controversial. Here, we investigated the proposed functions by extensive structural modeling of Vpu based on solid-state NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) observables. We found that Vpu can co-exist in two structural forms: left-handed and right-handed conformation. The co-existence of the two conformations provides a clue to reconcile the controversial issue of its two functions in virus particle release.

  14. Efficient solid state NMR powder simulations using SMP and MPP parallel computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Jørgen Holm; Farnan, Ian

    2003-04-01

    Methods for parallel simulation of solid state NMR powder spectra are presented for both shared and distributed memory parallel supercomputers. For shared memory architectures the performance of simulation programs implementing the OpenMP application programming interface is evaluated. It is demonstrated that the design of correct and efficient shared memory parallel programs is difficult as the performance depends on data locality and cache memory effects. The distributed memory parallel programming model is examined for simulation programs using the MPI message passing interface. The results reveal that both shared and distributed memory parallel computation are very efficient with an almost perfect application speedup and may be applied to the most advanced powder simulations.

  15. Solid-state NMR study of geopolymer prepared by sol-gel chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yi-Ling; Hanna, John V.; Lee, Yuan-Ling; Smith, Mark E.; Chan, Jerry C. C.

    2010-12-01

    Geopolymers are a new class of materials formed by the condensation of aluminosilicates and silicates obtained from natural minerals or industrial wastes. In this work, the sol-gel method is used to synthesize precursor materials for the preparation of geopolymers. The geopolymer samples prepared by our synthetic route have been characterized by a series of physical techniques, including Fourier-transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, and multinuclear solid-state NMR. The results are very similar to those obtained for the geopolymers prepared from natural kaolinite. We believe that our synthetic approach can offer a good opportunity for the medical applications of geopolymer.

  16. Dynamic Structure of Bombolitin II Bound to Lipid Bilayers as Revealed by Solid-state NMR and Molecular-Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Toraya, Shuichi; Javkhlantugs, Namsrai; Mishima, Daisuke; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Ueda, Kazuyoshi; Naito, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Bombolitin II (BLT2) is one of the hemolytic heptadecapeptides originally isolated from the venom of a bumblebee. Structure and orientation of BLT2 bound to 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) membranes were determined by solid-state 31P and 13C NMR spectroscopy. 31P NMR spectra showed that BLT2-DPPC membranes were disrupted into small particles below the gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transition temperature (Tc) and fused to form a magnetically oriented vesicle system where the membrane surface is parallel to the magnetic fields above the Tc. 13C NMR spectra of site-specifically 13C-labeled BLT2 at the carbonyl carbons were observed and the chemical shift anisotropies were analyzed to determine the dynamic structure of BLT2 bound to the magnetically oriented vesicle system. It was revealed that the membrane-bound BLT2 adopted an α-helical structure, rotating around the membrane normal with the tilt angle of the helical axis at 33°. Interatomic distances obtained from rotational-echo double-resonance experiments further showed that BLT2 adopted a straight α-helical structure. Molecular dynamics simulation performed in the BLT2-DPPC membrane system showed that the BLT2 formed a straight α-helix and that the C-terminus was inserted into the membrane. The α-helical axis is tilted 30° to the membrane normal, which is almost the same as the value obtained from solid-state NMR. These results suggest that the membrane disruption induced by BLT2 is attributed to insertion of BLT2 into the lipid bilayers. PMID:21081076

  17. Dynamics and interactions of ibuprofen in cyclodextrin nanosponges by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Monica; Castiglione, Franca; Pastori, Nadia; Punta, Carlo; Melone, Lucio; Panzeri, Walter; Rossi, Barbara; Trotta, Francesco; Mele, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Two different formulations of cyclodextrin nanosponges (CDNS), obtained by polycondensation of β-cyclodextrin with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid dianhydride (EDTAn), were treated with aqueous solutions of ibuprofen sodium salt (IbuNa) affording hydrogels that, after lyophilisation, gave two solid CDNS-drug formulations. (1)H fast MAS NMR and (13)C CP-MAS NMR spectra showed that IbuNa was converted in situ into its acidic and dimeric form (IbuH) after freeze-drying. (13)C CP-MAS NMR spectra also indicated that the structure of the nanosponge did not undergo changes upon drug loading compared to the unloaded system. However, the (13)C NMR spectra collected under variable contact time cross-polarization (VCT-CP) conditions showed that the polymeric scaffold CDNS changed significantly its dynamic regime on passing from the empty CDNS to the drug-loaded CDNS, thus showing that the drug encapsulation can be seen as the formation of a real supramolecular aggregate rather than a conglomerate of two solid components. Finally, the structural features obtained from the different solid-state NMR approaches reported matched the information from powder X-ray diffraction profiles.

  18. Prediction of recrystallization behavior of troglitazone/polyvinylpyrrolidone solid dispersion by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Ito, Atsutoshi; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Yada, Shuichi; Hamaura, Takeshi; Nakagami, Hiroaki; Higashi, Kenjirou; Moribe, Kunikazu; Yamamoto, Keiji

    2010-01-04

    The purpose of this study was to elaborate the relationship between the (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra and the recrystallization behavior during the storage of troglitazone solid dispersions. The solid dispersions were prepared by either the solvent method or by co-grinding. The recrystallization behavior under storage conditions at 40 degrees C/94% RH was evaluated by the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) equation. Solid dispersions prepared by the solvent method or by prolonged grinding brought about inhibition of the nucleation and the nuclei growth at the same time. No differences in the PXRD profiles were found in the samples prepared by the co-grinding and solvent methods, however, (13)C CP/MAS NMR showed significant differences in the spectra. The correlation coefficients using partial least square regression analysis between the PXRD profiles and the apparent nuclei-growth constant or induction period to nucleation were 0.1305 or 0.6350, respectively. In contrast, those between the (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra and the constant or the period were 0.9916 or 0.9838, respectively. The (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra had good correlation with the recrystallization kinetic parameters evaluated by the KJMA equation. Consequently, solid-state NMR was judged to be a useful tool for the prediction of the recrystallization behavior of solid dispersions.

  19. Proton-Detected Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Bone with Ultrafast Magic Angle Spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Kumar Pandey, Manoj; Gong, Bo; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    While obtaining high-resolution structural details from bone is highly important to better understand its mechanical strength and the effects of aging and disease on bone ultrastructure, it has been a major challenge to do so with existing biophysical techniques. Though solid-state NMR spectroscopy has the potential to reveal the structural details of bone, it suffers from poor spectral resolution and sensitivity. Nonetheless, recent developments in magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR technology have made it possible to spin solid samples up to 110 kHz frequency. With such remarkable capabilities, 1H-detected NMR experiments that have traditionally been challenging on rigid solids can now be implemented. Here, we report the first application of multidimensional 1H-detected NMR measurements on bone under ultrafast MAS conditions to provide atomistic-level elucidation of the complex heterogeneous structure of bone. Our investigations demonstrate that two-dimensional 1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectra for bone are obtainable using fp-RFDR (finite-pulse radio-frequency-driven dipolar recoupling) pulse sequence under ultrafast MAS. Our results infer that water exhibits distinct 1H-1H dipolar coupling networks with the backbone and side-chain regions in collagen. These results show the promising potential of proton-detected ultrafast MAS NMR for monitoring structural and dynamic changes caused by mechanical loading and disease in bone.

  20. Dynamics and interactions of ibuprofen in cyclodextrin nanosponges by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Monica; Pastori, Nadia; Punta, Carlo; Melone, Lucio; Panzeri, Walter; Rossi, Barbara; Trotta, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Two different formulations of cyclodextrin nanosponges (CDNS), obtained by polycondensation of β-cyclodextrin with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid dianhydride (EDTAn), were treated with aqueous solutions of ibuprofen sodium salt (IbuNa) affording hydrogels that, after lyophilisation, gave two solid CDNS-drug formulations. 1H fast MAS NMR and 13C CP-MAS NMR spectra showed that IbuNa was converted in situ into its acidic and dimeric form (IbuH) after freeze-drying. 13C CP-MAS NMR spectra also indicated that the structure of the nanosponge did not undergo changes upon drug loading compared to the unloaded system. However, the 13C NMR spectra collected under variable contact time cross-polarization (VCT-CP) conditions showed that the polymeric scaffold CDNS changed significantly its dynamic regime on passing from the empty CDNS to the drug-loaded CDNS, thus showing that the drug encapsulation can be seen as the formation of a real supramolecular aggregate rather than a conglomerate of two solid components. Finally, the structural features obtained from the different solid-state NMR approaches reported matched the information from powder X-ray diffraction profiles. PMID:28228859

  1. 2H-DNP-enhanced 2H–13C solid-state NMR correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Thorsten; Andreas, Loren B.; Smith, Albert A.

    2015-01-01

    Perdeuteration of biological macromolecules for magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy can yield high-resolution 2H–13C correlation spectra and the method is therefore of great interest for the structural biology community. Here we demonstrate that the combination of sample deuteration and dynamic nuclear polarization yields resolved 2H–13C correlation spectra with a signal enhancement of ε ≥ 700 compared to a spectrum recorded with microwaves off and otherwise identical conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first time that 2H-DNP has been employed to enhance MAS-NMR spectra of a biologically relevant system. The DNP process is studied using several polarizing agents and the technique is applied to obtain 2H–13C correlation spectra of U-[2H, 13C] proline. PMID:20458422

  2. Solid-state NMR and EPR Spectroscopy of Mn(2+) -Substituted ATP-Fueled Protein Engines.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Thomas; Lacabanne, Denis; Keller, Katharina; Cadalbert, Riccardo; Lecoq, Lauriane; Yulikov, Maxim; Terradot, Laurent; Jeschke, Gunnar; Meier, Beat H; Böckmann, Anja

    2017-02-13

    Paramagnetic metal ions deliver structural information both in EPR and solid-state NMR experiments, offering a profitable synergetic approach to study bio-macromolecules. We demonstrate the spectral consequences of Mg(2+) / Mn(2+) substitution and the resulting information contents for two different ATP:Mg(2+) -fueled protein engines, a DnaB helicase from Helicobacter pylori active in the bacterial replisome, and the ABC transporter BmrA, a bacterial efflux pump. We show that, while EPR spectra report on metal binding and provide information on the geometry of the metal centers in the proteins, paramagnetic relaxation enhancements identified in the NMR spectra can be used to localize residues at the binding site. Protein engines are ubiquitous and the methods described herein should be applicable in a broad context.

  3. Quantifying the chemical composition of soil organic carbon with solid-state 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldock, J. A.; Sanderman, J.

    2011-12-01

    The vulnerability of soil organic carbon (SOC) to biological decomposition and mineralisation to CO2 is defined at least partially by its chemical composition. Highly aromatic charcoal-like SOC components are more stable to biological decomposition than other forms of carbon including cellulose. Solid-state 13C NMR has gained wide acceptance as a method capable of defining SOC chemical composition and mathematical fitting processes have been developed to estimate biochemical composition. Obtaining accurate estimates depends on an ability to quantitatively detect all carbon present in a sample. Often little attention has been paid to defining the proportion of organic carbon present in a soil that is observable in solid-state 13C NMR analyses of soil samples. However, if such data is to be used to inform carbon cycling studies, it is critical that quantitative assessments of SOC observability be undertaken. For example, it is now well established that a significant discrimination exists against the detection of the low proton content polyaromatic structures typical of charcoal using cross polarisation 13C NMR analyses. Such discrimination does not exist where direct polarisation analyses are completed. In this study, the chemical composition of SOC as defined by cross polarisation and direct polarisation13C NMR analyses will be compared for Australian soils collected from under a diverse range of agricultural managements and climatic conditions. Results indicate that where significant charcoal C contents exist, it is highly under-represented in the acquired CP spectra. For some soils, a discrimination against alkyl carbon was also evident. The ability to derive correction factors to compensate for such discriminations will be assessed and presented.

  4. Applications of high-resolution 1H solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven P

    2012-02-01

    This article reviews the large increase in applications of high-resolution (1)H magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR, in particular two-dimensional heteronuclear and homonuclear (double-quantum and spin-diffusion NOESY-like exchange) experiments, in the last five years. These applications benefit from faster MAS frequencies (up to 80 kHz), higher magnetic fields (up to 1 GHz) and pulse sequence developments (e.g., homonuclear decoupling sequences applicable under moderate and fast MAS). (1)H solid-state NMR techniques are shown to provide unique structural insight for a diverse range of systems including pharmaceuticals, self-assembled supramolecular structures and silica-based inorganic-organic materials, such as microporous and mesoporous materials and heterogeneous organometallic catalysts, for which single-crystal diffraction structures cannot be obtained. The power of NMR crystallography approaches that combine experiment with first-principles calculations of NMR parameters (notably using the GIPAW approach) are demonstrated, e.g., to yield quantitative insight into hydrogen-bonding and aromatic CH-π interactions, as well as to generate trial three-dimensional packing arrangements. It is shown how temperature-dependent changes in the (1)H chemical shift, linewidth and DQ-filtered signal intensity can be analysed to determine the thermodynamics and kinetics of molecular level processes, such as the making and breaking of hydrogen bonds, with particular application to proton-conducting materials. Other applications to polymers and biopolymers, inorganic compounds and bioinorganic systems, paramagnetic compounds and proteins are presented. The potential of new technological advances such as DNP methods and new microcoil designs is described.

  5. β-Helical architecture of cytoskeletal bactofilin filaments revealed by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Vasa, Suresh; Lin, Lin; Shi, Chaowei; Habenstein, Birgit; Riedel, Dietmar; Kühn, Juliane; Thanbichler, Martin; Lange, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Bactofilins are a widespread class of bacterial filament-forming proteins, which serve as cytoskeletal scaffolds in various cellular pathways. They are characterized by a conserved architecture, featuring a central conserved domain (DUF583) that is flanked by variable terminal regions. Here, we present a detailed investigation of bactofilin filaments from Caulobacter crescentus by high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy. De novo sequential resonance assignments were obtained for residues Ala39 to Phe137, spanning the conserved DUF583 domain. Analysis of the secondary chemical shifts shows that this core region adopts predominantly β-sheet secondary structure. Mutational studies of conserved hydrophobic residues located in the identified β-strand segments suggest that bactofilin folding and polymerization is mediated by an extensive and redundant network of hydrophobic interactions, consistent with the high intrinsic stability of bactofilin polymers. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a propensity of bactofilin to form filament bundles as well as sheet-like, 2D crystalline assemblies, which may represent the supramolecular arrangement of bactofilin in the native context. Based on the diffraction pattern of these 2D crystalline assemblies, scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements of the mass per length of BacA filaments, and the distribution of β-strand segments identified by solid-state NMR, we propose that the DUF583 domain adopts a β-helical architecture, in which 18 β-strand segments are arranged in six consecutive windings of a β-helix. PMID:25550503

  6. Improvement of (31)P NMR spectral resolution by 8-hydroxyquinoline precipitation of paramagnetic Fe and Mn in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shiming; Xu, Di; Li, Bin; Fan, Chengxin; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2010-04-01

    Solution (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is currently the main method for the characterization of phosphorus (P) forms in environment samples. However, identification and quantification of P compounds may be hampered by poor resolution of spectra caused by paramagnetic Fe and Mn. In this study, a novel technique was developed to improve spectral resolution by removing paramagnetic Fe and Mn from alkaline extracts via 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HOQ) precipitation. Batch experiments showed that both Fe and Mn were effectively removed by the precipitation at pH 9.0, with the removal efficiencies of 83-91% for Fe and 67-78% for Mn from the extracts of five different environmental samples, while little effect was found on concentration of total P. The (31)P NMR analysis of a model P solution showed that addition of 8-HOQ and its precipitation with metal ions did not alter P forms. Further analyses of the five extracts with (31)P NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that the 8-HOQ precipitation was an ideal method compared with the present postextraction techniques, such as bicarbonate dithionate (BD), EDTA and Chelex-100 treatments, by improving spectral resolution to a large extent with no detrimental effects on P forms.

  7. Analysis of monoglycerides, diglycerides, sterols, and free fatty acids in coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) oil by 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dayrit, Fabian M; Buenafe, Olivia Erin M; Chainani, Edward T; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S

    2008-07-23

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( (31)P NMR) was used to differentiate virgin coconut oil (VCO) from refined, bleached, deodorized coconut oil (RCO). Monoglycerides (MGs), diglycerides (DGs), sterols, and free fatty acids (FFAs) in VCO and RCO were converted into dioxaphospholane derivatives and analyzed by (31)P NMR. On the average, 1-MG was found to be higher in VCO (0.027%) than RCO (0.019%). 2-MG was not detected in any of the samples down to a detection limit of 0.014%. On the average, total DGs were lower in VCO (1.55%) than RCO (4.10%). When plotted in terms of the ratio [1,2-DG/total DGs] versus total DGs, VCO and RCO samples grouped separately. Total sterols were higher in VCO (0.096%) compared with RCO (0.032%), and the FFA content was 8 times higher in VCO than RCO (0.127% vs 0.015%). FFA determination by (31)P NMR and titration gave comparable results. Principal components analysis shows that the 1,2-DG, 1,3-DG, and FFAs are the most important parameters for differentiating VCO from RCO.

  8. Chemical structure and heterogeneity differences of two lignins from loblolly pine as investigated by advanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advanced solid-state NMR was employed to investigate differences in chemical structure and heterogeneity between milled wood lignin (MWL) and residual enzyme lignin (REL). Wiley and conventional milled woods were also studied. The advanced NMR techniques included 13C quantitative direct polarization...

  9. β-Sheet nanocrystalline domains formed from phosphorylated serine-rich motifs in caddisfly larval silk: a solid state NMR and XRD study.

    PubMed

    Addison, J Bennett; Ashton, Nicholas N; Weber, Warner S; Stewart, Russell J; Holland, Gregory P; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2013-04-08

    Adhesive silks spun by aquatic caddisfly (order Trichoptera) larvae are used to build both intricate protective shelters and food harvesting nets underwater. In this study, we use (13)C and (31)P solid-state NMR and wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) as tools to elucidate molecular protein structure of caddisfly larval silk from the species Hesperophylax consimilis . Caddisfly larval silk is a fibroin protein based biopolymer containing mostly repetitive amino acid motifs. NMR and X-ray results provide strong supporting evidence for a structural model in which phosphorylated serine repeats (pSX)4 complex with divalent cations Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) to form rigid nanocrystalline β-sheet structures in caddisfly silk. (13)C NMR data suggests that both phosphorylated serine and neighboring valine residues exist in a β-sheet conformation while glycine and leucine residues common in GGX repeats likely reside in random coil conformations. Additionally, (31)P chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) analysis indicates that the phosphates on phosphoserine residues are doubly ionized, and are charge-stabilized by divalent cations. Positively charged arginine side chains also likely play a role in charge stabilization. Finally, WAXD results finds that the silk is at least 7-8% crystalline, with β-sheet interplane spacings of 3.7 and 4.5 Å.

  10. Site-specificity of ethanol-induced dephosphorylation of rat hepatocyte keratins 8 and 18: A 31P NMR study.

    PubMed

    Eckert, B S; Yeagle, P L

    1996-01-01

    Chronic feeding of ethanol to rats results in disorganization of the keratin intermediate filament network within hepatocytes. Previous studies from this laboratory have shown that intermediate filament organization in cultured cells is related to the phosphorylation state of the proteins. Therefore, we have examined the phosphorylation state of hepatocyte keratins from control and ethanol-fed rats. Feeding ethanol to rats results in dephosphorylation of one site on keratin 8 and one site on keratin 18 at all time points beginning with 6 weeks of ethanol treatment. Dephosphorylation was detected by phosphate analysis and by two-dimensional electrophoresis in which a change in isoelectric point of keratins from ethanol-fed rats was observed. These observations indicate that dephosphorylation of keratins in ethanol-fed animals may be an early step in alcoholic hepatitis which has occurred by 6 weeks of ethanol treatment. To further characterize keratin dephosphorylation in ethanol-fed rats, we used 31P NMR spectroscopy to classify the dephosphorylation site(s). Hepatocyte keratins were purified and solubilized in 9.5 M urea, 10 mM Tris-Cl, pH 8.1. 31P NMR spectra were obtained at 109 MHz, in 10 mm tubes at 30 degrees C. Samples of hepatocyte keratins were phosphorylated with A-kinase, protein kinase C, casein kinase II or Ca/CAM kinase and these samples were analyzed by 31P NMR spectroscopy. The resulting spectra were used as standards to compare the 31P chemical shifts of the resonances produced by these kinases with the phosphorus resonances of control and experimental samples. The 31P NMR spectrum of control hepatocyte keratins shows three resonances at 0.7, 4 and 5 ppm. In vitro phosphorylation by A-kinase produces a resonance at 4 ppm which is distinctly different from the resonance produced by each of the other kinases. In hepatocyte keratins from ethanol-fed animals, the resonance at 4 ppm was missing from the spectrum. These observations indicate that the

  11. Solid-state and unilateral NMR study of deterioration of a Dead Sea Scroll fragment.

    PubMed

    Masic, A; Chierotti, M R; Gobetto, R; Martra, G; Rabin, I; Coluccia, S

    2012-02-01

    Unilateral and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses were performed on a parchment fragment of the Dead Sea Scroll (DSS). The analyzed sample belongs to the collection of non-inscribed and nontreated fragments of known archaeological provenance from the John Rylands University Library in Manchester. Therefore, it can be considered as original DSS material free from any contamination related to the post-discovery period. Considering the paramount significance of the DSS, noninvasive approaches and portable in situ nondestructive methods are of fundamental importance for the determination of composition, structure, and chemical-physical properties of the materials under study. NMR studies reveal low amounts of water content associated with very short proton relaxation times, T(1), indicating a high level of deterioration of collagen molecules within scroll fragments. In addition, (13)C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectroscopy shows characteristic peaks of lipids whose presence we attribute to the production technology that did not involve liming. Extraction with chloroform led to the reduction of both lipid and protein signals in the (13)C CPMAS spectrum indicating probable involvement of lipids in parchment degradation processes. NMR absorption and relaxation measurements provide nondestructive, discriminative, and sensitive tools for studying the deterioration effects on the organization and properties of water and collagen within ancient manuscripts.

  12. Solid state (13)C NMR analysis of human gallstones from cancer and benign gall bladder diseases.

    PubMed

    Jayalakshmi, K; Sonkar, Kanchan; Behari, Anu; Kapoor, V K; Sinha, Neeraj

    2009-09-01

    Natural abundance (13)C cross polarized (CP) magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of human gall bladder stones collected from patients suffering from malignant and benign gall bladder disease was carried out which revealed different polymorphs of cholesterol in these stones. All gall bladder stones in present study had cholesterol as their main constituent. (13)C CP-MAS NMR analysis revealed three forms of cholesterol molecules in these stones, which are anhydrous form, monohydrate crystalline with amorphous form and monohydrate crystalline form. Our study revealed that stones collected from patients associated with chronic cholecystitis (CC) disease have mostly different polymorph of cholesterol than stones collected from patients associated with gall bladder cancer (GBC). Such study will be helpful in understanding the mechanism of formation of gallstones which are associated with different gall bladder diseases. This is the first study by solid state NMR revealing different crystal polymorphism of cholesterol in human gallstones, extending the applicability of (13)C CP-MAS NMR technique for the routine study of gallstones.

  13. Solid state NMR methods for coal science. Progress report, October 1, 1983-December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1984-12-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the last quarter. While a good deal of our time has been spent setting up our new NMR laboratory, we have made several significant advances in solid state NMR techniques development that will have important applications in structure determination of coal, coal products and other fossil fuels. We have developed a CP/MAS probe that is routinely capable of producing decoupling fields in excess of 100 KHz without excessive power consumption and that has a very homogeneous frequency field. This piece of equipment has proven crucial to the success of a number of new techniques we are developing. In addition to increasing our sensitivity, the intensity, and homogeneity of the R.F. field, this probe now makes a number of multiple pulse techniques feasible. One avenue has been pursued this quarter is to use multiple pulse decoupling to make 2-D spectroscopy feasible in solids and this has resulted in the first proton-carbon chemical shift correlation spectrum of coal. The homogeneity of the R.F. field has also been helpful in some relaxation studies of coals aimed at an improved understanding of the quantitative aspects of /sup 13/C CP/MAS of coals, i.e., are all the carbons observed. Other techniques being investigated include high field /sup 2/D NMR and /sup 2/D zero field NMR. 8 figures, 1 table.

  14. Studies of vanadium-phosphorus-oxygen selective oxidation catalysts by sup 31 P and sup 51 V NMR spin-echo and volume susceptibility measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Juan.

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize the vanadium-phosphorous oxide (V-P-O) catalysts for the selective oxidation of n-butane and 1-butene to maleic anhydride. The utility of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance as an analytical tool in this investigation lies in its sensitivity to the electronic environment surrounding the phosphorous and vanadium nuclei, and proximity of paramagnetic species. Spin-echo mapping NMR of {sup 31}p and {sup 51}v and volume magnetic susceptibility measurements were used as local microscopic probes of the presence of V{sup 5+}, V{sup 4+}, V{sup 3+} species in the model compounds: {beta}-VOPO{sub 4}, {beta}-VOPO{sub 4} treated with n-butane/1-butene, (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} treated with n-butane/1-butene; and industrial catalysts with P/V (phosphorus to vanadium) ratio of 0.9, 1.0 and 1.1, before and after treatment with n-butane and 1-butene. The NMR spectra provide a picture of how the oxidation states of vanadium are distributed in these catalysts. 73 refs., 32 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Solid state NMR and LVSEM studies on the hardening of latex modified tile mortar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rottstegge, J.; Arnold, M.; Herschke, L.; Glasser, G.; Wilhelm, M.; Spiess, H.W. . E-mail: spiess@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Hergeth, W.D.

    2005-12-15

    Construction mortars contain a broad variety of both inorganic and organic additives beside the cement powder. Here we present a study of tile mortar systems based on portland cement, quartz, methyl cellulose and different latex additives. As known, the methyl cellulose stabilizes the freshly prepared cement paste, the latex additive enhances final hydrophobicity, flexibility and adhesion. Measurements were performed by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and low voltage scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM) to probe the influence of the latex additives on the hydration, hardening and the final tile mortar properties. While solid state NMR enables monitoring of the bulk composition, scanning electron microscopy affords visualization of particles and textures with respect to their shape and the distribution of the different phases. Within the alkaline cement paste, the poly(vinyl acetate) (VAc)-based latex dispersions stabilized by poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were found to be relatively stable against hydrolysis. The influence of the combined organic additives methyl cellulose, poly(vinyl alcohol) and latexes stabilized by poly(vinyl alcohol) on the final silicate structure of the cement hydration products is small. But even small amounts of additives result in an increased ratio of ettringite to monosulfate within the final hydrated tile mortar as monitored by {sup 27}Al NMR. The latex was found to be adsorbed to the inorganic surfaces, acting as glue to the inorganic components. For similar latex water interfaces built up by poly(vinyl alcohol), a variation in the latex polymer composition results in modified organic textures. In addition to the networks of the inorganic cement and of the latex, there is a weak network build up by thin polymer fibers, most probably originating from poly(vinyl alcohol). Besides the weak network, polymer fibers form well-ordered textures covering inorganic crystals such as portlandite.

  16. Development of solid-state NMR techniques for the characterisation of pharmaceutical compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatton, Andrew S.

    Structural characterisation in the solid state is an important step in understanding the physical and chemical properties of a material. Solid-state NMR techniques applied to solid delivery forms are presented as an alternative to more established structural characterisation methods. The effect of homonuclear decoupling upon heteronuclear couplings is investigated using a combination of experimental and density-matrix simulation results acquired from a 13C-1H spinecho pulse sequence, modulated by scalar couplings. It is found that third-order cross terms under MAS and homonuclear decoupling contribute to strong dephasing effects in the NMR signal. Density-matrix simulations allow access to parameters currently unattainable in experiment, and demonstrate that higher homonuclear decoupling rf nutation frequencies reduce the magnitude of third-order cross terms. 15N-1H spinecho experiments were applied to pharmaceutically relevant samples to differentiate between the number of directly attached protons. Using this method, proton transfer in an acid-base reaction is proven in pharmaceutical salts. The indirect detection of 14N lineshapes via protons obtained using 2D 14N-1H HMQC experiments is presented, where coherence transfer is achieved via heteronuclear through-space dipolar couplings. The importance of fast MAS frequencies is demonstrated, and it is found that increasing the recoupling duration reveals longer range NH proximities. The 2D 14N-1H HMQC method is used to demonstrate the presence of specific hydrogen bonding interactions, and thus aid in identifying molecular association in a cocrystal and an amorphous dispersion. In addition, hydrogen bonding motifs were identified by observing the changes in the 14N quadrupolar parameters between individual molecular components relative to the respective solid delivery form. First-principles calculations of NMR chemical shifts and quadrupolar parameters using the GIPAW method were combined with 14N-1H experimental

  17. Anisotropic indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling in InP: 31P CP NMR study under slow MAS condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Takahiro; Hashi, Kenjiro; Goto, Atsushi; Shimizu, Tadashi; Ohki, Shinobu

    2006-02-01

    The indirect nuclear spin-spin interaction tensor between neighboring 113,115In- 31P spins in Fe-doped InP semiconductor has been studied by 31P NMR spectra measured using CP of 113In → 31P and 115In → 31P under slow MAS condition. The isotropic ( Jiso) and anisotropic ( Janiso = 2/3[ J∥ - J⊥]) parts of the indirect interaction tensor are obtained from the spectral simulation. The acceptable combinations of these values are found to be as follows: ( Jiso, Janiso) = (224 ± 5, 500 ± 100 Hz) or (-224 ± 5, 2100 ± 100 Hz). Although, the coupling constants estimated in this study are slightly different from previously reported values of ∣ Jiso∣ = 350 Hz, Janiso = 1298 Hz [M. Engelsberg, R.E. Norberg, Phys. Rev. B 5 (1972) 3395] and of ∣ Jiso∣ = 225 ± 10, Janiso = (813 ± 50) or (1733 ± 50) Hz [M. Tomaselli et al., Phys. Rev. B 58 (1998) 8627], all of these has the trend that Janiso is rather larger than Jiso.

  18. Solid state NMR study of SEI formation in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dachun

    Recently, rechargeable lithium ion batteries, which offer high energy density and long cycle life, are in great demand as power sources for our mobile electronic society. The formation of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on the surface of electrodes in lithium ion batteries plays an essential role in their performance. This thesis presents solid state NMR and MAS NMR results on the SEI, which contribute to our understanding of SEI formation on both cathodes and anodes. This thesis is organized as following: Chapter 1 surveys the history of batteries and the challenges to further development of the lithium ion battery. Fundamental aspects and SEI formation mechanisms are also included in Chapter l. Chapter 2 deals with the principles and experimental techniques of solid state NMR. Chapter 3 presents studies of SEI formation on anode and cathode in lithium ion batteries using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and NMR. The results provide EIS and NMR evidence that cells containing electrolytes with high EC content display less irreversible capacity after high temperature storage. The irreversible capacity is attributed to SEI growth on electrode surfaces. NMR results on cathodes, on the other hand, imply that the presence of Ni in the cathode may reduce cell performance due to the oxidation of Ni 3+ to Ni4+. Our simulations show that a lower EC/DMC ratio is associated with a smaller SEI intensity for the cathode and higher intensity for the anode. Chapter 4 discusses the effect of temperature on SEI formation on anodes and cathodes. NMR measurements show that MCMB graphite based anodes exhibit high stability no chemical shift is evident over a wide temperature range. On cathodes, however, NMR does reveal changes in SEI intensity as a function of temperature. These changes are believed to be the result of decomposition of the SEI. Evidently, then, changes in the performance of the cell as a factor of temperature are, at least in part, due to changes in

  19. Application of Solid-State NMR Relaxometry for Characterization and Formulation Optimization of Grinding-Induced Drug Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Keisuke; Higashi, Kenjirou; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2016-03-07

    The formation mechanism of drug nanoparticles was investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for the efficient discovery of an optimized nanoparticle formulation. The cogrinding of nifedipine (NIF) with polymers, including hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was performed to prepare the NIF nanoparticle formulations. Then, solid-state NMR relaxometry was used for the nanometer-order characterization of NIF in the polymer matrix. Solid-state NMR measurements revealed that the crystal size of NIF was reduced to several tens of nanometers with amorphization of NIF by cogrinding with HPMC and SDS for 100 min. Similarly, the size of the NIF crystal was reduced to less than 90 nm in the 40 min ground mixture of NIF/PVP/SDS. Furthermore, 100 min grinding of NIF/PVP/SDS induced amorphization of almost all the NIF crystals followed by nanosizing. The hydrogen bond between NIF and PVP led to the efficient amorphization of NIF in the NIF/PVP/SDS system compared with NIF/HPMC/SDS system. The efficient nanosizing of the NIF crystal in the solid state, revealed by the solid-state NMR relaxation time measurements, enabled the formation of large amounts of NIF nanoparticles in water followed by the polymer dissolution. In contrast, excess amorphization of the NIF crystals failed to efficiently prepare the NIF nanoparticles. The solid-state characterization of the crystalline NIF revealed good correlation with the NIF nanoparticles formation during aqueous dispersion. Furthermore, the solid-state NMR measurements including relaxometry successfully elucidated the nanometer-order dispersion state of NIF in polymer matrix, leading to the discovery of optimized conditions for the preparation of suitable drug nanoparticles.

  20. Acidity characterization of heterogeneous catalysts by solid-state NMR spectroscopy using probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the surface acidic properties of solid acid catalysts is a key issue in heterogeneous catalysis. Important acid features of solid acids, such as their type (Brønsted vs. Lewis acid), distribution and accessibility (internal vs. external sites), concentration (amount), and strength of acid sites are crucial factors dictating their reactivity and selectivity. This short review provides information on different solid-state NMR techniques used for acidity characterization of solid acid catalysts. In particular, different approaches using probe molecules containing a specific nucleus of interest, such as pyridine-d5, 2-(13)C-acetone, trimethylphosphine, and trimethylphosphine oxide, are compared. Incorporation of valuable information (such as the adsorption structure, deprotonation energy, and NMR parameters) from density functional theory (DFT) calculations can yield explicit correlations between the chemical shift of adsorbed probe molecules and the intrinsic acid strength of solid acids. Methods that combine experimental NMR data with DFT calculations can therefore provide both qualitative and quantitative information on acid sites.

  1. 15N Solid-State NMR as a Probe of Flavin H-bonding

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Dongtao; Koder, Ronald L.; Dutton, P. Leslie; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2011-01-01

    Flavins mediate a wide variety of different chemical reactions in biology. To learn how one cofactor can be made to execute different reactions in different enzymes, we are developing solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to probe the flavin electronic structure, via the 15N chemical shift tensor principal values (δii). We find that SSNMR has superior responsiveness to H-bonds, compared to solution NMR. H-bonding to a model of the flavodoxin active site produced an increase of 10 ppm in the δ11 of N5 although none of the H-bonds directly engage N5, and solution NMR detected only a 4 ppm increase in the isotropic chemical shift (δiso). Moreover SSNMR responded differently to different H-bonding environments as H-bonding with water caused δ11 to decrease by 6 ppm whereas δiso increased by less than 1 ppm. Our density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations reproduce the observations, validating the use of computed electronic structures to understand how H-bonds modulate the flavin’s reactivity. PMID:21619002

  2. Molecular ordering of mixed surfactants in mesoporous silicas: A solid-state NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Mao, Kanmi; Wang, Shy-Guey; Lin, Victor S.-Y.; Pruski, Marek

    2011-02-17

    The use of mixed surfactants in the synthesis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) is of importance in the context of adjusting pore structures, sizes and morphologies. In the present study, the arrangement of molecules in micelles produced from a mixture of two surfactants, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) was detailed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Proximities of methyl protons in the trimethylammonium headgroup of CTAB and protons in the pyridinium headgroup of CPB were observed under fast magic angle spinning (MAS) by {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H double quantum (DQ) MAS NMR and NOESY. This result suggested that CTAB and CPB co-exist in the pores without forming significant monocomponent domain structures. {sup 1}H-{sup 29}Si heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR showed that protons in the headgroups of CTAB are in closer proximity to the silica surface than those in the CPB headgroups. The structural information obtained in this investigation leads to better understanding of the mechanisms of self-assembly and their role in determining the structure and morphology of mesoporous materials.

  3. Solid-state (49/47)Ti NMR of titanium-based MCM-41 hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Ruth; Fajardo, Mariano; Sierra, Isabel; Force, Carmen; del Hierro, Isabel

    2009-11-03

    Titanium solid-state NMR spectroscopy data for a series of organic-inorganic titanium MCM-41 based materials have been collected. These materials have been synthesized by first modifying the mesoporous silica MCM-41 in one step with a mixture of silanes: a triazine propyl triethoxysilane acting as functional linker and methyltrimethoxysilane or hexamethyldisilizane as capped agents to mask the remaining silanol groups. Second, the appropiate titanium precursor Ti(OPr(i))(4), [{Ti(OPr(i))(3)(OMent)}(2)] (OMent = 1R,2S,5R-(-)-menthoxo), Ti(OPr(i))(4), or [Ti(eta(5)-C(5)HMe(4))Cl(3)], has been immobilized by reaction with the modified MCM-41. Finally, after Ti(OPr(i))(4) immobilization onto the organomodified support the reaction with the chiral (+)-diethyl-l-tartrate was accomplished. The materials without functional linker have been also prepared by reaction in one step of the capped agent and the titanium precursor with the mesoporous silica. Relevant correlations of titanium NMR resonance chemical shifts and line widths can be inferred depending on different factors. The immobilization procedure used to prepare titanium-based MCM-41 hybrid materials and the choice of the silylating reagents employed to mask the silanol groups present on the silica surfaces produce significant differences in the Ti NMR spectra. Furthermore, depending on the electronic and sterical influence of the substituents directly attached to the titanium center, chemical shifts and line widths are modified providing novel information about titanium structure.

  4. Atomic-resolution structure of cytoskeletal bactofilin by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chaowei; Fricke, Pascal; Lin, Lin; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Wegstroth, Melanie; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Thanbichler, Martin; Lange, Adam

    2015-12-01

    Bactofilins are a recently discovered class of cytoskeletal proteins of which no atomic-resolution structure has been reported thus far. The bacterial cytoskeleton plays an essential role in a wide range of processes, including morphogenesis, cell division, and motility. Among the cytoskeletal proteins, the bactofilins are bacteria-specific and do not have a eukaryotic counterpart. The bactofilin BacA of the species Caulobacter crescentus is not amenable to study by x-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) because of its inherent noncrystallinity and insolubility. We present the atomic structure of BacA calculated from solid-state NMR-derived distance restraints. We show that the core domain of BacA forms a right-handed β helix with six windings and a triangular hydrophobic core. The BacA structure was determined to 1.0 Å precision (heavy-atom root mean square deviation) on the basis of unambiguous restraints derived from four-dimensional (4D) HN-HN and 2D C-C NMR spectra.

  5. Methodology for solid state NMR off-resonance study of molecular dynamics in heteronuclear systems.

    PubMed

    Jurga, Kazimierz; Woźniak-Braszak, Aneta; Baranowski, Mikołaj

    2015-10-01

    Methodology for the study of dynamics in heteronuclear systems in the laboratory frame was described in the previous paper [1]. Now the methodology for the study of molecular dynamics in the solid state heteronuclear systems in the rotating frame is presented. The solid state NMR off-resonance experiments were carried out on a homemade pulse spectrometer operating at the frequency of 30.2 MHz for protons. This spectrometer includes a specially designed probe which contains two independently tuned and electrically isolated coils installed in the coaxial position on the dewar. A unique probe design allows working at three slightly differing frequencies off and on resonance for protons and at the frequency of 28.411 MHz for fluorine nuclei with complete absence of their electrical interference. The probe allows simultaneously creating rf magnetic fields at off-resonance frequencies within the range of 30.2-30.6 MHz and at the frequency of 28.411 MHz. Presented heteronuclear cross-relaxation off-resonance experiments in the rotating frame provide information about molecular dynamics.

  6. Solid state and solution 43Ca NMR of calcium peroxides involved in the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide by calcium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Trokiner, Arlette; Bessière, Aurélie; Thouvenot, René; Hau, Damien; Marko, Jean; Nardello, Véronique; Pierlot, Christel; Aubry, Jean-Marie

    2004-06-01

    In order to get some insight into the mechanism of the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by calcium hydroxide, 43Ca NMR spectra of enriched samples of calcium peroxides and of their precursors have been studied in both solution and solid state. This study demonstrates that no well-defined peroxidized calcium species are formed in solution, showing that the catalytic role of calcium is likely restricted to the solid state. Most of the calcium compounds that could be involved in the catalytic process have been investigated with solid state NMR. The shift and quadrupolar parameters of Ca(OH)2, CaO2.8H2O and CaO2.2H2O2 are reported for the first time. These parameters are different enough to allow the quantitative analysis of a complex mixture of these compounds by NMR.

  7. Orientational order of Australian spider silks as determined by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bonev, B; Grieve, S; Herberstein, M E; Kishore, A I; Watts, A; Separovic, F

    2006-06-05

    A simple solid-state NMR method was used to study the structure of (13)C- and (15)N-enriched silk from two Australian orb-web spider species, Nephila edulis and Argiope keyserlingi. Carbon-13 and (15)N spectra from alanine- or glycine-labeled oriented dragline silks were acquired with the fiber axis aligned parallel or perpendicular to the magnetic field. The fraction of oriented component was determined from each amino acid, alanine and glycine, using each nucleus independently, and attributed to the ordered crystalline domains in the silk. The relative fraction of ordered alanine was found to be higher than the fraction of ordered glycine, akin to the observation of alanine-rich domains in silk-worm (Bombyx mori) silk. A higher degree of crystallinity was observed in the dragline silk of N. edulis compared with A. keyserlingi, which correlates with the superior mechanical properties of the former.

  8. Structural studies of methyl brevifolincarboxylate in solid state by means of NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolniak, Michał; Tomczyk, Michał; Gudej, Jan; Wawer, Iwona

    2006-12-01

    Methyl brevifolincarboxylate isolated from the herb of Potentilla argentea L. (Rosaceae) is a representative of the naturally occurring polyphenols. The compound is of pharmaceutical interest mainly because of its antiviral and antioxidant properties. 13C NMR spectra were recorded for solution and solid phase. 13C CPMAS spectra were assigned by comparison with solution data, dipolar dephasing and short contact time experiments. The correctness of assignments was verified by GIAO DFT calculations of shielding constants. The differences between the solution and solid state chemical shift values were explained in terms of orientation of OH groups and intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The splitting of the C1 dbnd O resonance shows that there exists a polymorphism in the solid phase, which might be due to the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bond involving carbonyl or methoxy oxygen (i.e. C10 sbnd OH⋯O dbnd C or C10 sbnd OH⋯OCH 3).

  9. Formation of Organic Molecular Nanocrystals under Rigid Confinement with Analysis by Solid State NMR.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Ong, T C; Michaelis, V K; Heng, S; Huang, J; Griffin, R G; Myerson, A S

    2014-10-21

    Crystallization in rigid confinement is a promising method to obtain organic molecular nanocrystals. However, the crystallization behavior and the related characterization methods are not well studied. Here we present a systematic study of the nucleation of organic molecular nanocrystals in rigid pores. Four different compounds were studied, ibuprofen, fenofibrate, griseofulvin, and indomethacin, which range from simple to complex molecules. Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was employed to analyse the structure of these compounds inside pores which are difficult to characterize by other analytical methods. We successfully demonstrated the production of nano-crystalline ibuprofen, fenofibrate and griseofulvin in porous silica particles with ~ 40 nm pores. These nanocrystals showed significant enhancement in dissolution rates. These results help advance the fundamental understanding of nucleation under rigid confinement and may lead to potential applications in developing new formulations in the pharmaceutical industry.

  10. Natural abundance 14N and 15N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs

    DOE PAGES

    Veinberg, Stanislav L.; Johnston, Karen E.; Jaroszewicz, Michael J.; ...

    2016-06-08

    14N ultra-wideline (UW), 1H{15N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and 15N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 14N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. Here, a case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW 14N SSNMR spectra of stationarymore » samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R"NH+ and RR'NH2+) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments.« less

  11. Formation of Organic Molecular Nanocrystals under Rigid Confinement with Analysis by Solid State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X.; Ong, T. C.; Michaelis, V. K.; Heng, S.; Huang, J.; Griffin, R. G.; Myerson, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Crystallization in rigid confinement is a promising method to obtain organic molecular nanocrystals. However, the crystallization behavior and the related characterization methods are not well studied. Here we present a systematic study of the nucleation of organic molecular nanocrystals in rigid pores. Four different compounds were studied, ibuprofen, fenofibrate, griseofulvin, and indomethacin, which range from simple to complex molecules. Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was employed to analyse the structure of these compounds inside pores which are difficult to characterize by other analytical methods. We successfully demonstrated the production of nano-crystalline ibuprofen, fenofibrate and griseofulvin in porous silica particles with ~ 40 nm pores. These nanocrystals showed significant enhancement in dissolution rates. These results help advance the fundamental understanding of nucleation under rigid confinement and may lead to potential applications in developing new formulations in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25258590

  12. Proton decoupling and recoupling under double-nutation irradiation in solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kazuyuki; Wakisaka, Asato; Takegoshi, K.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of 1H decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR is studied under radiofrequency irradiation causing simultaneous nutations around a pair of orthogonal axes. Double-nutation with an arbitrary pair of nutation frequencies is implemented through modulation of the amplitude, phase, and frequency of the transmitting pulses. Similarity and difference of double-nutation decoupling and two-pulse phase-modulation decoupling schemes [A. E. Bennett, C. M. Rienstra, M. Auger, K. V. Lakshmi, and R. G. Griffin, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 6951-6958 (1995) and I. Scholz, P. Hodgkinson, B. H. Meier, and M. Ernst, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] are discussed. The structure of recoupling bands caused by interference of the 1H spin nutation with sample spinning is studied by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  13. Intensity and mosaic spread analysis from PISEMA tensors in solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Quine, J R; Achuthan, S; Asbury, T; Bertram, R; Chapman, M S; Hu, J; Cross, T A

    2006-04-01

    The solid-state NMR experiment PISEMA, is a technique for determining structures of proteins, especially membrane proteins, from oriented samples. One method for determining the structure is to find orientations of local molecular frames (peptide planes) with respect to the unit magnetic field direction, B0. This is done using equations that compute the coordinates of this vector in the frames. This requires an analysis of the PISEMA function and its degeneracies. As a measure of the sensitivity of peptide plane orientations to the data, we use these equations to derive a formula for the intensity function in the powder pattern. With this function and other measures, we investigate the effect of small changes in peptide plane orientations depending on the location of the resonances in the powder pattern spectrum. This gives us an indication of the change in lineshape due to mosaic spread and a way to interpret these in terms of an orientational error bar.

  14. Proton decoupling and recoupling under double-nutation irradiation in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Kazuyuki Wakisaka, Asato; Takegoshi, K.

    2014-12-14

    The effect of {sup 1}H decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR is studied under radiofrequency irradiation causing simultaneous nutations around a pair of orthogonal axes. Double-nutation with an arbitrary pair of nutation frequencies is implemented through modulation of the amplitude, phase, and frequency of the transmitting pulses. Similarity and difference of double-nutation decoupling and two-pulse phase-modulation decoupling schemes [A. E. Bennett, C. M. Rienstra, M. Auger, K. V. Lakshmi, and R. G. Griffin, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 6951–6958 (1995) and I. Scholz, P. Hodgkinson, B. H. Meier, and M. Ernst, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] are discussed. The structure of recoupling bands caused by interference of the {sup 1}H spin nutation with sample spinning is studied by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  15. Solid-state NMR studies of proteins immobilized on inorganic surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-10-29

    Solid state NMR is the primary tool for studying the quantitative, site-specific structure, orientation, and dynamics of biomineralization proteins under biologically relevant conditions. Two calcium phosphate proteins, statherin and leucine rich amelogenin protein (LRAP), have been studied in depth and have different features, challenging our ability to extract design principles. More recent studies of the significantly larger full-length amelogenin represent a challenging but necessary step to ultimately investigate the full diversity of biomineralization proteins. Interactions of amino acids and silaffin peptide with silica are also being studied, along with qualitative studies of proteins interacting with calcium carbonate. Dipolar recoupling techniquesmore » have formed the core of the quantitative studies, yet, the need for isolated spin pairs makes this approach costly and time intensive. The use of multi-dimensional techniques is advancing, methodology which, despite its challenges with these difficult-to-study proteins, will continue to drive future advancements in this area.« less

  16. A solid-state NMR method to determine domain sizes in multi-component polymer formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlagnitweit, Judith; Tang, Mingxue; Baias, Maria; Richardson, Sara; Schantz, Staffan; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-12-01

    Polymer domain sizes are related to many of the physical properties of polymers. Here we present a solid-state NMR experiment that is capable of measuring domain sizes in multi-component mixtures. The method combines selective excitation of carbon magnetization to isolate a specific component with proton spin diffusion to report on domain size. We demonstrate the method in the context of controlled release formulations, which represents one of today's challenges in pharmaceutical science. We show that we can measure domain sizes of interest in the different components of industrial pharmaceutical formulations at natural isotopic abundance containing various (modified) cellulose derivatives, such as microcrystalline cellulose matrixes that are film-coated with a mixture of ethyl cellulose (EC) and hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC).

  17. Molecular dynamics of neutral polymer bonding agent (NPBA) as revealed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Su, Yongchao; Zhou, Lei; Pang, Aimin; Cai, Rulin; Ma, Xingang; Li, Shenhui

    2014-01-22

    Neutral polymer bonding agent (NPBA) is one of the most promising polymeric materials, widely used in nitrate ester plasticized polyether (NEPE) propellant as bonding agent. The structure and dynamics of NPBA under different conditions of temperatures and sample processing are comprehensively investigated by solid state NMR (SSNMR). The results indicate that both the main chain and side chain of NPBA are quite rigid below its glass transition temperature (Tg). In contrast, above the Tg, the main chain remains relatively immobilized, while the side chains become highly flexible, which presumably weakens the interaction between bonding agent and the binder or oxidant fillers and in turn destabilizes the high modulus layer formed around the oxidant fillers. In addition, no obvious variation is found for the microstructure of NPBA upon aging treatment or soaking with acetone. These experimental results provide useful insights for understanding the structural properties of NPBA and its interaction with other constituents of solid composite propellants under different processing and working conditions.

  18. Solid-state NMR studies of proteins immobilized on inorganic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-10-29

    Solid state NMR is the primary tool for studying the quantitative, site-specific structure, orientation, and dynamics of biomineralization proteins under biologically relevant conditions. Two calcium phosphate proteins, statherin and leucine rich amelogenin protein (LRAP), have been studied in depth and have different features, challenging our ability to extract design principles. More recent studies of the significantly larger full-length amelogenin represent a challenging but necessary step to ultimately investigate the full diversity of biomineralization proteins. Interactions of amino acids and silaffin peptide with silica are also being studied, along with qualitative studies of proteins interacting with calcium carbonate. Dipolar recoupling techniques have formed the core of the quantitative studies, yet, the need for isolated spin pairs makes this approach costly and time intensive. The use of multi-dimensional techniques is advancing, methodology which, despite its challenges with these difficult-to-study proteins, will continue to drive future advancements in this area.

  19. Folding of xylan onto cellulose fibrils in plant cell walls revealed by solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Thomas J.; Mortimer, Jenny C.; Bernardinelli, Oigres D.; Pöppler, Ann-Christin; Brown, Steven P.; Deazevedo, Eduardo R.; Dupree, Ray; Dupree, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Exploitation of plant lignocellulosic biomass is hampered by our ignorance of the molecular basis for its properties such as strength and digestibility. Xylan, the most prevalent non-cellulosic polysaccharide, binds to cellulose microfibrils. The nature of this interaction remains unclear, despite its importance. Here we show that the majority of xylan, which forms a threefold helical screw in solution, flattens into a twofold helical screw ribbon to bind intimately to cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall. 13C solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, supported by in silico predictions of chemical shifts, shows both two- and threefold screw xylan conformations are present in fresh Arabidopsis stems. The twofold screw xylan is spatially close to cellulose, and has similar rigidity to the cellulose microfibrils, but reverts to the threefold screw conformation in the cellulose-deficient irx3 mutant. The discovery that induced polysaccharide conformation underlies cell wall assembly provides new principles to understand biomass properties.

  20. Intensity and mosaic spread analysis from PISEMA tensors in solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quine, J. R.; Achuthan, S.; Asbury, T.; Bertram, R.; Chapman, M. S.; Hu, J.; Cross, T. A.

    2006-04-01

    The solid-state NMR experiment PISEMA, is a technique for determining structures of proteins, especially membrane proteins, from oriented samples. One method for determining the structure is to find orientations of local molecular frames (peptide planes) with respect to the unit magnetic field direction, B0. This is done using equations that compute the coordinates of this vector in the frames. This requires an analysis of the PISEMA function and its degeneracies. As a measure of the sensitivity of peptide plane orientations to the data, we use these equations to derive a formula for the intensity function in the powder pattern. With this function and other measures, we investigate the effect of small changes in peptide plane orientations depending on the location of the resonances in the powder pattern spectrum. This gives us an indication of the change in lineshape due to mosaic spread and a way to interpret these in terms of an orientational error bar.

  1. Solid-state NMR study of geopolymer prepared by sol-gel chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Yi-Ling; Hanna, John V.; Lee, Yuan-Ling; Smith, Mark E.; Chan, Jerry C.C.

    2010-12-15

    Geopolymers are a new class of materials formed by the condensation of aluminosilicates and silicates obtained from natural minerals or industrial wastes. In this work, the sol-gel method is used to synthesize precursor materials for the preparation of geopolymers. The geopolymer samples prepared by our synthetic route have been characterized by a series of physical techniques, including Fourier-transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, and multinuclear solid-state NMR. The results are very similar to those obtained for the geopolymers prepared from natural kaolinite. We believe that our synthetic approach can offer a good opportunity for the medical applications of geopolymer. -- Graphical abstract: Geopolymer prepared by the sol-gel route has the same spectroscopic properties as the sample prepared from the natural kaolinite. Display Omitted

  2. A simple ergometer for 31P NMR spectroscopy during dynamic forearm exercise in a whole body magnetic resonance imaging system.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, H; Nishida, M; Anzai, T; Yonezawa, K; Fukuda, H; Sato, I; Yasuda, H

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct a simple ergometer for the 31P NMR spectroscopic study of dynamic forearm exercise in a whole body magnetic resonance imaging system and to evaluate the total system and the physiological response to this type of exercise using a multistage protocol. The system consisted of a completely nonmagnetic assembly including a rope, pulley and weights. The work of lifting weights was quantitated. The exercise protocol of 1-min increments in work load enabled subjects to reach maximal effort. Phosphocreatine decreased linearly with an increase in work load and was accompanied by a fall in pH and an increase in lactate level in the antecubital vein of the exercising forearm; concomitantly, there was a slight increase in whole body oxygen uptake and heart rate. Spectroscopy gave reproducible results using this exercise protocol. These results demonstrate that this system provides a reliable means for performing 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies during forearm exercise.

  3. Chemical reactivity of graphene oxide towards amines elucidated by solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacchi, Isabella A.; Spinato, Cinzia; Raya, Jésus; Bianco, Alberto; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2016-07-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by amidation. We also prove that there is a negligible amount of carboxylic acid groups in two GO samples obtained by a different synthesis process, hence eliminating the possibility of amidation reactions with amine derivatives. This work brings additional insights into the chemical reactivity of GO, which is fundamental to control its functionalization, and highlights the major role of MAS NMR spectroscopy for a comprehensive characterization of derivatized GO.Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by

  4. Chemical characterization of a prominent phosphomonoester resonance from mammalian brain. 31P and 1H NMR analysis at 4.7 and 14.1 tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettegrew, J. W.; Kopp, S. J.; Dadok, J.; Minshew, N. J.; Feliksik, J. M.; Glonek, T.; Cohen, M. M.

    A prominent 31P NMR resonance at 3.84 ppm in mammalian brain has been identified as ethanolamine phosphate. The identification was based on 1H and 31P NMR findings (including pH titrations) at 4.7 and 14.1 T, as well as thin-layer chromatography studies. We previously incorrectly assigned the 3.84 ppm resonance to ribose-5-phosphate. The incorrect assignment occurred because the two compounds have very similar 31P chemical shifts, and because we did not carefully consider the effects of counter ions and ionic strengths when interpreting the 31P chemical shifts. In separate preliminary studies we have demonstrated ethanolamine phosphate to be high in immature developing brain and in the degenerating brain of Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease patients. Ethanolamine phosphate may therefore serve as a sensitive marker of membrane phospholipid turnover for both in vitro and in vivo31P NMR studies.

  5. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of electrochemical cells: batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Frédéric; Leskes, Michal; Grey, Clare P

    2013-09-17

    Electrochemical cells, in the form of batteries (or supercapacitors) and fuel cells, are efficient devices for energy storage and conversion. These devices show considerable promise for use in portable and static devices to power electronics and various modes of transport and to produce and store electricity both locally and on the grid. For example, high power and energy density lithium-ion batteries are being developed for use in hybrid electric vehicles where they improve the efficiency of fuel use and help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To gain insight into the chemical reactions involving the multiple components (electrodes, electrolytes, interfaces) in the electrochemical cells and to determine how cells operate and how they fail, researchers ideally should employ techniques that allow real-time characterization of the behavior of the cells under operating conditions. This Account reviews the recent use of in situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that probes local structure and dynamics, to study these devices. In situ NMR studies of lithium-ion batteries are performed on the entire battery, by using a coin cell design, a flat sealed plastic bag, or a cylindrical cell. The battery is placed inside the NMR coil, leads are connected to a potentiostat, and the NMR spectra are recorded as a function of state of charge. (7)Li is used for many of these experiments because of its high sensitivity, straightforward spectral interpretation, and relevance to these devices. For example, (7)Li spectroscopy was used to detect intermediates formed during electrochemical cycling such as LixC and LiySiz species in batteries with carbon and silicon anodes, respectively. It was also used to observe and quantify the formation and growth of metallic lithium microstructures, which can cause short circuits and battery failure. This approach can be utilized to identify conditions that promote dendrite formation and whether different electrolytes and additives can help

  6. Sparse (13)C labelling for solid-state NMR studies of P. pastoris expressed eukaryotic seven-transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Chang; Fan, Ying; Munro, Rachel A; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Brown, Leonid S; Wang, Shenlin

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a novel sparse (13)C labelling approach for methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris expression system, towards solid-state NMR studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins. The labelling scheme was achieved by co-utilizing natural abundance methanol and specifically (13)C labelled glycerol as carbon sources in the expression medium. This strategy improves the spectral resolution by 1.5 fold, displays site-specific labelling patterns, and has advantages for collecting long-range distance restraints for structure determination of large eukaryotic membrane proteins by solid-state NMR.

  7. SPAM-MQ-HETCOR: an improved method for heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy between quadrupolar and spin-1/2 nuclei in solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Wiench, Jerzy W; Tricot, Gregory; Delevoye, Laurent; Trebosc, Julien; Frye, James; Montagne, Lionel; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Pruski, Marek

    2006-01-07

    The recently introduced concept of soft pulse added mixing (SPAM) is used in two-dimensional heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR experiments between half-integer quadrupolar and spin-1/2 nuclei. The experiments employ multiple quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) to remove the second order quadrupolar broadening and cross polarization (CP) or refocused INEPT for magnetization transfer. By using previously unexploited coherence pathways, the efficiency of SPAM-MQ-HETCOR NMR is increased by a factor of almost two without additional optimization. The sensitivity gain is demonstrated on a test sample, AlPO(4)-14, using CP and INEPT to correlate (27)Al and (31)P nuclei. SPAM-3Q-HETCOR is then applied to generate (27)Al-(31)P spectra of the devitrified 41Na(2)O-20.5Al(2)O(3)-38.5P(2)O(5) glass and the silicoaluminophosphate ECR-40. Finally, the method allowed the acquisition of the first high resolution solid-state correlation spectra between (27)Al and (29)Si.

  8. Solid-state NMR identification and quantification of newly formed aluminosilicate phases in weathered kaolinite systems.

    PubMed

    Crosson, Garry S; Choi, Sunkyung; Chorover, Jon; Amistadi, Mary Kay; O'Day, Peggy A; Mueller, Karl T

    2006-01-19

    The weathering of a specimen kaolinite clay was studied over the course of 369 d via solid-state 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and high-field 27Al MAS NMR. The chosen baseline solution conditions (0.05 mol kg-1 of Al, 2 mol kg-1 of Na+, 1 mol kg-1 of NO3-, 1 mol kg-1 of OH-, and pH approximately 13.8) approximate those of solutions leaking from waste tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA. Nonradioactive Cs and Sr cations were added to this synthetic tank waste leachate (STWL) solution at concentrations of 10(-3), 10(-4), and 10(-5) molal (m) to represent their radionuclide counterparts. The transformations of silicon- and aluminum-containing solid phase species were monitored quantitatively by using NMR spectroscopy, with the resulting spectra directly reporting the influence of the initial Cs and Sr on formation and transformation of the neo-formed solids. At the lowest concentration of Cs and Sr employed (10(-5) m in each cation) peaks consistent with the formation of zeolite-like minerals were detected via 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR as early as 33 d. At concentrations of 10(-3) m in each cation, new silicon species are not detected until 93 d, although neophases containing four-coordinate aluminum were detectable at earlier reaction times via 27Al MAS NMR. At the highest magnetic field strengths employed in this NMR study, deconvolutions of resonances detected in the tetrahedral region of the 27Al MAS spectra yielded multiple components, indicating the existence of at least four new aluminum-containing phases. Two of these phases are identified as sodalite and cancrinite through comparison with diffuse-reflectance infrared (DRIFT) spectra and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) results, while a third phase may correlate with a previously detected aluminum-rich chabazite phase. All measurable solid reaction products have been quantified via their 27Al MAS resonances acquired at high magnetic field strengths (17.6 T), and

  9. Solid-State NMR Identification and Quantification of Newly Formed Aluminosilicate Phases in Weathered Kaolinite Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Crosson, Garry S.; Choi, Sunkyung; Chorover, Jon; Amistadi, Mary K.; O'Day, Peggy A.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2006-01-19

    The weathering of a specimen kaolinite clay was studied over the course of 369 d via solid-state 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and high-field 27Al MAS NMR. The chosen baseline solution conditions (0.05 mol kg-1 of Al, 2 mol kg-1 of Na+, 1 mol kg-1 of NO3 -, 1 mol kg-1 of OH-, and pH ~13.8) approximate those of solutions leaking from waste tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA. Nonradioactive Cs and Sr cations were added to this synthetic tank waste leachate (STWL) solution at concentrations of 10-3, 10-4, and 10-5 molal (m) to represent their radionuclide counterparts. The transformations of silicon- and aluminum-containing solid phase species were monitored quantitatively by using NMR spectroscopy, with the resulting spectra directly reporting the influence of the initial Cs and Sr on formation and transformation of the neo-formed solids. At the lowest concentration of Cs and Sr employed (10-5 m in each cation) peaks consistent with the formation of zeolite-like minerals were detected via 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR as early as 33 d. At concentrations of 10-3 m in each cation, new silicon species are not detected until 93 d, although neophases containing four-coordinate aluminum were detectable at earlier reaction times via 27Al MAS NMR. At the highest magnetic field strengths employed in this NMR study, deconvolutions of resonances detected in the tetrahedral region of the 27Al MAS spectra yielded multiple components, indicating the existence of at least four new aluminum-containing phases. Two of these phases are identified as sodalite and cancrinite through comparison with diffuse-reflectance infrared (DRIFT) spectra and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) results, while a third phase may correlate with a previously detected aluminum-rich chabazite phase. All measurable solid reaction products have been quantified via their 27Al MAS resonances acquired at high magnetic field strengths (17.6 T), and the quantitative

  10. Solid state NMR method development and studies of biological and biomimetic nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yanyan

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes application and development of advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for complex materials, in particular organic-inorganic nanocomposites and thermoelectric tellurides. The apatite-collagen interface, essential for understanding the biomineralization process in bone and engineering the interface for controlled bio-mimetic synthesis and optimized mechanical properties, is buried within the nanocomposite of bone. We used multinuclear solid-state NMR to study the composition and structure of the interface. Citrate has been identified as the main organic molecule strongly bound to the apatite surface with a density of 1/(2 nm)2, covering 1/6 of the total surface area in bovine bone. Citrate provides more carboxylate groups, one of the key functional groups found to affect apatite nucleation and growth, than all the non-collagenous proteins all together in bone; thus we propose that citrate stabilizes apatite crystals at a very small thickness of ~3 nm (4 unit cells) to increase bone fracture tolerance. The hypothesis has been confirmed in vitro by adding citrate in the bio-mimetic synthesis of polymerhydroxyapatite nanocomposites. The results have shown that the size of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals decreases as increasing citrate concentration. With citrate concentrations comparable to that in body fluids, similar-sized nanocrystals as in bone have been produced. Besides the dimensions of the apatite crystals, the composition of bone also affects its biofunctional and macroscopic mechanical properties; therefore, our team also extended its effort to enhance the inorganic portion in our bio-mimetic synthesis from originally 15 wt% to current 50 wt% compared to 65 wt% in bovine bone, by using Lysine-Leucine hydroxyapatite nucleating diblock co-polypeptide, which forms a gel at very low concentration. In this thesis, various advanced solid state NMR techniques have been employed to characterize nanocomposites

  11. REDOR solid-state NMR as a probe of the membrane locations of membrane-associated peptides and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Lihui; Liang, Shuang; Sackett, Kelly; Xie, Li; Ghosh, Ujjayini; Weliky, David P.

    2015-04-01

    Rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) solid-state NMR is applied to probe the membrane locations of specific residues of membrane proteins. Couplings are measured between protein 13CO nuclei and membrane lipid or cholesterol 2H and 31P nuclei. Specific 13CO labeling is used to enable unambiguous assignment and 2H labeling covers a small region of the lipid or cholesterol molecule. The 13CO-31P and 13CO-2H REDOR respectively probe proximity to the membrane headgroup region and proximity to specific insertion depths within the membrane hydrocarbon core. One strength of the REDOR approach is use of chemically-native proteins and membrane components. The conventional REDOR pulse sequence with 100 kHz 2H π pulses is robust with respect to the 2H quadrupolar anisotropy. The 2H T1's are comparable to the longer dephasing times (τ's) and this leads to exponential rather than sigmoidal REDOR buildups. The 13CO-2H buildups are well-fitted to A × (1 - e-γτ) where A and γ are fitting parameters that are correlated as the fraction of molecules (A) with effective 13CO-2H coupling d = 3γ/2. The REDOR approach is applied to probe the membrane locations of the "fusion peptide" regions of the HIV gp41 and influenza virus hemagglutinin proteins which both catalyze joining of the viral and host cell membranes during initial infection of the cell. The HIV fusion peptide forms an intermolecular antiparallel β sheet and the REDOR data support major deeply-inserted and minor shallowly-inserted molecular populations. A significant fraction of the influenza fusion peptide molecules form a tight hairpin with antiparallel N- and C-α helices and the REDOR data support a single peptide population with a deeply-inserted N-helix. The shared feature of deep insertion of the β and α fusion peptide structures may be relevant for fusion catalysis via the resultant local perturbation of the membrane bilayer. Future applications of the REDOR approach may include samples that contain cell

  12. SIMPSON: A general simulation program for solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Mads; Rasmussen, Jimmy T.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2011-12-01

    A computer program for fast and accurate numerical simulation of solid-state NMR experiments is described. The program is designed to emulate a NMR spectrometer by letting the user specify high-level NMR concepts such as spin systems, nuclear spin interactions, RF irradiation, free precession, phase cycling, coherence-order filtering, and implicit/explicit acquisition. These elements are implemented using the Tel scripting language to ensure a minimum of programming overhead and direct interpretation without the need for compilation, while maintaining the flexibility of a full-featured programming language. Basicly, there are no intrinsic limitations to the number of spins, types of interactions, sample conditions (static or spinning, powders, uniaxially oriented molecules, single crystals, or solutions), and the complexity or number of spectral dimensions for the pulse sequence. The applicability ranges from simple ID experiments to advanced multiple-pulse and multiple-dimensional experiments, series of simulations, parameter scans, complex data manipulation/visualization, and iterative fitting of simulated to experimental spectra. A major effort has been devoted to optimizing the computation speed using state-of-the-art algorithms for the time-consuming parts of the calculations implemented in the core of the program using the C programming language. Modification and maintenance of the program are facilitated by releasing the program as open source software (General Public License) currently at http://nmr.imsb.au.dk. The general features of the program are demonstrated by numerical simulations of various aspects for REDOR, rotational resonance, DRAMA, DRAWS, HORROR, C7, TEDOR, POST-C7, CW decoupling, TPPM, F-SLG, SLF, SEMA-CP, PISEMA, RFDR, QCPMG-MAS, and MQ-MAS experiments.

  13. SIMPSON: A General Simulation Program for Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Mads; Rasmussen, Jimmy T.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2000-12-01

    A computer program for fast and accurate numerical simulation of solid-state NMR experiments is described. The program is designed to emulate a NMR spectrometer by letting the user specify high-level NMR concepts such as spin systems, nuclear spin interactions, RF irradiation, free precession, phase cycling, coherence-order filtering, and implicit/explicit acquisition. These elements are implemented using the Tcl scripting language to ensure a minimum of programming overhead and direct interpretation without the need for compilation, while maintaining the flexibility of a full-featured programming language. Basicly, there are no intrinsic limitations to the number of spins, types of interactions, sample conditions (static or spinning, powders, uniaxially oriented molecules, single crystals, or solutions), and the complexity or number of spectral dimensions for the pulse sequence. The applicability ranges from simple 1D experiments to advanced multiple-pulse and multiple-dimensional experiments, series of simulations, parameter scans, complex data manipulation/visualization, and iterative fitting of simulated to experimental spectra. A major effort has been devoted to optimizing the computation speed using state-of-the-art algorithms for the time-consuming parts of the calculations implemented in the core of the program using the C programming language. Modification and maintenance of the program are facilitated by releasing the program as open source software (General Public License) currently at http://nmr.imsb.au.dk. The general features of the program are demonstrated by numerical simulations of various aspects for REDOR, rotational resonance, DRAMA, DRAWS, HORROR, C7, TEDOR, POST-C7, CW decoupling, TPPM, F-SLG, SLF, SEMA-CP, PISEMA, RFDR, QCPMG-MAS, and MQ-MAS experiments.

  14. Structural investigation of aluminium doped ZnO nanoparticles by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Avadhut, Yamini S; Weber, Johannes; Hammarberg, Elin; Feldmann, Claus; Schmedt auf der Günne, Jörn

    2012-09-07

    The electrical conductivity of aluminium doped zinc oxide (AZO, ZnO:Al) materials depends on doping induced defects and grain structure. This study aims at relating macroscopic electrical conductivity of AZO nanoparticles with their atomic structure, which is non-trivial because the derived materials are heavily disordered and heterogeneous in nature. For this purpose we synthesized AZO nanoparticles with different doping levels and narrow size distribution by a microwave assisted polyol method followed by drying and a reductive treatment with forming gas. From these particles electrically conductive, optically transparent films were obtained by spin-coating. Characterization involved energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, wet chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, which provided a basis for a detailed structural solid-state NMR study. A multinuclear ((27)Al, (13)C, (1)H) spectroscopic investigation required a number of 1D MAS NMR and 2D MAS NMR techniques (T(1)-measurements, (27)Al-MQMAS, (27)Al-(1)H 2D-PRESTO-III heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy), which were corroborated by quantum chemical calculations with an embedded cluster method (EEIM) at the DFT level. From the combined data we conclude that only a small part of the provided Al is incorporated into the ZnO structure by substitution of Zn. The related (27)Al NMR signal undergoes a Knight shift when the material is subjected to a reductive treatment with forming gas. At higher (formal) doping levels Al forms insulating (Al, H and C containing) side-phases, which cover the surface of the ZnO:Al particles and increase the sheet resistivity of spin-coated material. Moreover, calculated (27)Al quadrupole coupling constants serve as a spectroscopic fingerprint by which previously suggested point-defects can be identified and in their great majority be ruled out.

  15. Using 31P-NMR to investigate dynamics of soil phosphorus compounds in the Rothamsted Long Term Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Martin; Turner, Ben; Granger, Steve; Hooper, Tony; Darch, Tegan; Hawkins, Jane; Yuan, Huimin; McGrath, Steve

    2015-04-01

    The technique of 31P-NMR spectroscopy has done more to advance the knowledge of phosphorus forms (especially organic phosphorus) in environmental samples than any other method. The technique has advanced such that specific compounds can be identified where previously only broad categories such as orthophosphate monoesters and diesters were distinguishable. The Soil Archive and Long Term Experiments at Rothamsted Research, UK, potentially provides an unequalled opportunity to use this technique to observe changes in soil phosphorus compounds with time and under different treatments, thereby enhancing our understanding of phosphorus cycling and use by plants. Some of the earliest work using this technique on soils was carried out by Hawkes et al. in 1984 and this used soils from two of the oldest Rothamsted Long Term Experiments, namely Highfield and Park Grass. Here we revisit the samples studied in this early work and reanalyse them using current methodology to demonstrate how the 31P-NMR technique has advanced. We also present results from a study on the phosphorus chemistry in soils along the Hoosfield acid strip (Rothamsted, UK), where a pH gradient from 3.7 to 7.8 occurs in a single soil with little variation in total phosphorus (mean ± standard deviation 399 ± 27 mg P kg-1). Soil pH was found to be an important factor in determining the proportion of phosphomonoesters and phosphodiesters in the soil organic phosphorus, although total organic phosphorus concentrations were a relatively consistent proportion of the total soil phosphorus (36 ± 2%) irrespective of soil pH. Key words. 31P-NMR, soil organic phosphorus, long term experiments, Hoosfield acid strip

  16. Studying Dynamics by Magic-Angle Spinning Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Principles and Applications to Biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Schanda, Paul; Ernst, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy is an important technique to study molecular structure, dynamics and interactions, and is rapidly gaining importance in biomolecular sciences. Here we provide an overview of experimental approaches to study molecular dynamics by MAS solid-state NMR, with an emphasis on the underlying theoretical concepts and differences of MAS solid-state NMR compared to solution-state NMR. The theoretical foundations of nuclear spin relaxation are revisited, focusing on the particularities of spin relaxation in solid samples under magic-angle spinning. We discuss the range of validity of Redfield theory, as well as the inherent multi-exponential behavior of relaxation in solids. Experimental challenges for measuring relaxation parameters in MAS solid-state NMR and a few recently proposed relaxation approaches are discussed, which provide information about time scales and amplitudes of motions ranging from picoseconds to milliseconds. We also discuss the theoretical basis and experimental measurements of anisotropic interactions (chemical-shift anisotropies, dipolar and quadrupolar couplings), which give direct information about the amplitude of motions. The potential of combining relaxation data with such measurements of dynamically-averaged anisotropic interactions is discussed. Although the focus of this review is on the theoretical foundations of dynamics studies rather than their application, we close by discussing a small number of recent dynamics studies, where the dynamic properties of proteins in crystals are compared to those in solution. PMID:27110043

  17. Preparation of uniformly isotope labeled KcsA for solid state NMR: Expression, purification, reconstitution into liposomes and functional assay

    PubMed Central

    Bhate, Manasi P.; Wylie, Benjamin J.; Thompson, Ameer; Tian, Lin; Nimigean, Crina; McDermott, Ann E.

    2013-01-01

    We report the expression, purification, liposome reconstitution and functional validation of uniformly 13C and 15N isotope labeled KcsA, a bacterial potassium channel that has high homology with mammalian channels, for solid-state NMR studies. The expression and purification is optimized for an average yield of ~ 35–40 milligrams per liter of M9 media in a time-efficient way. The protein purity is confirmed by gel electrophoresis and the protein concentration is quantified by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. Protocols to efficiently reconstitute KcsA into liposomes are also presented. The presence of liposomes is confirmed by cryo-electron microscopy images and the effect of magic angle spinning on liposome packing is shown. High-resolution solid-state NMR spectra of uniformly isotope labeled KcsA in these liposomes reveal that our protocol yields to a very homogenous KcsA sample with high signal to noise and several well-resolved residues in NMR spectra. Electrophysiology of our samples before and after solid-state NMR show that channel function and selectivity remain intact after the solid-state NMR. PMID:23916531

  18. Assessment of membrane protection by /sup 31/P-NMR effects of lidocaine on calcium-paradox in myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Hirosumi; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Teragaki, Masakazu; Takeuchi, Kazuhide; Takeda, Takeda; Ikata, Mari; Ishikawa, Makoto; Miura, Iwao

    1989-01-01

    In studying calcium paradox, perfused rat hearts were used to investigate the myocardial protective effects of lidocaine. Intracellular contents of phosphates were measured using the /sup 31/P-NMR method. In hearts reexposed to calcium, following 3 minute calcium-free perfusion, a rapid contracture occurred, followed by rapid and complete disappearance of intracellular phosphates with no resumption of cardiac function. In hearts where lidocaine was administered from the onset of the calcium-free perfusion until 2 minutes following the onset of reexposure to calcium, both intracellular phosphates and cardiac contractility were maintained. Therefore, it can be said that cell membranes were protected by lidocaine.

  19. Phytate degradation by lactic acid bacteria and yeasts during the wholemeal dough fermentation: a 31P NMR study.

    PubMed

    Reale, Anna; Mannina, Luisa; Tremonte, Patrizio; Sobolev, Anatoli P; Succi, Mariantonietta; Sorrentino, Elena; Coppola, Raffaele

    2004-10-06

    myo-Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) is the main source of phosphorus in cereal grains, and therefore, in bakery products. Different microorganisms such as yeasts and lactic acid bacteria have phytase enzymes able to hydrolyze IP6 during the wholemeal breadmaking. In this paper, the phytase activity of Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus curvatus, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, isolated from southern Italian sourdoughs, is assayed using the (31)P NMR technique. The sourdough technology based on the use of lactic acid bacteria in the breadmaking is finally suggested.

  20. 31P{1H}NMR and carbonyl force constants of unsymmetrical bidentate phosphine complexes of group (VI) metal carbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesu Raj, Joe Gerald; Pathak, Devendra Deo; Kapoor, Pramesh N.

    2015-05-01

    In our present work we report synthesis of an unsymmetrical diphos ligand, 1-diphenylphosphino-2-di-m-tolylphosphinoethane and its coordinate complexes with group (VI) metal carbonyls such as Cr(CO)6 Mo(CO)6 and W(CO)6. The synthesized ligand and its complexes have been completely characterized by elemental analyses, FTIR, 1HNMR, 31P{1H}NMR and FAB mass spectrometry methods. Special emphasis has been given to calculations of carbonyl force constants. Based on the spectroscopic evidences it has been confirmed that these metal carbonyl complexes with the ditertiary phosphine ligand showed cis geometry in their molecular structure.

  1. Detection of Phosphomonoester Signals in Proton-Decoupled 31P NMR Spectra of the Myocardium of Patients with Myocardial Hypertrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Wulf-Ingo; Sieverding, Ludger; Breuer, Johannes; Schmidt, Oliver; Widmaier, Stefan; Bunse, Michael; van Erckelens, Franz; Apitz, Jürgen; Dietze, Guenther J.; Lutz, Otto

    1998-07-01

    Proton-decoupled31P NMR spectroscopy at 1.5 T of the anterior left ventricular myocardium was used to monitor myocardial phosphate metabolism in asymptomatic patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM,n= 14) and aortic stenosis (AS,n= 12). In addition to the well-known phosphorus signals a phosphomonoester (PME) signal was detected at about 6.9 ppm in 7 HCM and 2 AS patients. This signal was not observed in the spectra of normal controls (n= 11). We suggest that in spectra of patients with myocardial hypertrophy the presence of a PME signal reflects alterations in myocardial glucose metabolism.

  2. Solid-state NMR reveals differential carbohydrate utilization in diapausing Culex pipiens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, James; Singh, Jugeshwar; Kim, Sungshil; Hockaday, William C.; Sim, Cheolho; Kim, Sung Joon

    2016-11-01

    Culex pipiens is the mosquito that vectors West Nile Virus and other human-pathogenic flavivruses in North America. In response to shortened day length and lower temperatures, female Cx. pipiense prepares for the diapause by actively feeding on carbohydrates to increase the biosynthesis of glycogen and lipid to store energy for overwintering. The effect of feeding different carbohydrates on glycogen and lipid biosynthesis in diapausing mosquitoes was investigated in vivo using 13C solid-state NMR. Diapause-destined adult females and nondiapausing counterparts after adult eclosion were fed with three different carbohydrate sources for 7 days: 1) 10% sucrose, 2) 10% D-[13C6]glucose, and 3) 1% D-[13C6]glucose co-provisioned with 10% sucrose. NMR measurements show that sucrose and glucose are metabolized differently in diapausing mosquitoes. Mosquitoes fed on sucrose primarily accumulate glycogen with increased branching structures, but less of lipids. In contrast, mosquitoes fed exclusively on glucose show accumulation of both glycogen and lipid with increased aliphatic chain length. Glucose is exclusively metabolized for the biosynthesis of triacylglyceride when mosquitoes were co-fed with sucrose. Our findings provide novel insights into the insect carbohydrate metabolism that governs glycogen and lipid biosynthesis during diapause, which is fundamental for the insect survival during inimical environments.

  3. Characterisation of pitch fractions by quantitative solid state {sup 13}C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, J.M.; Dennison, P.R.; Maroto-Valer, M.M.

    1994-12-31

    Thermal and other pretreatments of pitch fractions are being widely investigated as a means to increase the extent of mesophase formation in relation to the production of high performance carbons. The structural changes that occur can be assessed using carbon skeletal parameters but, although solid state {sup 13}C NMR has been used for this purpose, the quantitative reliability of the technique has still to be established for pitch fractions. It was demonstrated previously that, as for coals, cross-polarisation (CP) can vastly underestimate quaternary aromatic carbon concentrations. A combination of a low magnetic field strength to avoid problems with spinning sidebands and the simple Bloch decay or single pulse excitation (SPE) technique is now generally recognised as offering the most satisfactory approach for obtaining quantitative {sup 13}C NMR results for coals and related materials. In this study, single pulse excitation (SPE) and associated relaxation measurements have been conducted at low field on coal-derived pitches and their toluene-insoluble (TI) fractions, together with a biomass-derived pitch and the results compared with those from CP.

  4. Heat Management Strategies for Solid-state NMR of Functional Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Daniel J.; Harris, Michael J.; Thompson, Lynmarie K.

    2012-01-01

    Modern solid-state NMR methods can acquire high-resolution protein spectra for structure determination. However, these methods use rapid sample spinning and intense decoupling fields that can heat and denature the protein being studied. Here we present a strategy to avoid destroying valuable samples. We advocate first creating a sacrificial sample, which contains unlabeled protein (or no protein) in buffer conditions similar to the intended sample. This sample is then doped with the chemical shift thermometer Sm2Sn2O7. We introduce a pulse scheme called TCUP (for Temperature Calibration Under Pulseload) that can characterize the heating of this sacrificial sample rapidly, under a variety of experimental conditions, and with high temporal resolution. Sample heating is discussed with respect to different instrumental variables such as spinning speed, decoupling strength and duration, and cooling gas flow rate. The effects of different sample preparation variables are also discussed, including ionic strength, the inclusion of cryoprotectants, and the physical state of the sample (i.e. liquid, solid, or slurry). Lastly, we discuss probe detuning as a measure of sample thawing that does not require retuning the probe or using chemical shift thermometer compounds. Use of detuning tests and chemical shift thermometers with representative sample conditions makes it possible to maximize the efficiency of the NMR experiment while retaining a functional sample. PMID:22868258

  5. Solid-state NMR reveals differential carbohydrate utilization in diapausing Culex pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Chang, James; Singh, Jugeshwar; Kim, Sungshil; Hockaday, William C.; Sim, Cheolho; Kim, Sung Joon

    2016-01-01

    Culex pipiens is the mosquito that vectors West Nile Virus and other human-pathogenic flavivruses in North America. In response to shortened day length and lower temperatures, female Cx. pipiense prepares for the diapause by actively feeding on carbohydrates to increase the biosynthesis of glycogen and lipid to store energy for overwintering. The effect of feeding different carbohydrates on glycogen and lipid biosynthesis in diapausing mosquitoes was investigated in vivo using 13C solid-state NMR. Diapause-destined adult females and nondiapausing counterparts after adult eclosion were fed with three different carbohydrate sources for 7 days: 1) 10% sucrose, 2) 10% D-[13C6]glucose, and 3) 1% D-[13C6]glucose co-provisioned with 10% sucrose. NMR measurements show that sucrose and glucose are metabolized differently in diapausing mosquitoes. Mosquitoes fed on sucrose primarily accumulate glycogen with increased branching structures, but less of lipids. In contrast, mosquitoes fed exclusively on glucose show accumulation of both glycogen and lipid with increased aliphatic chain length. Glucose is exclusively metabolized for the biosynthesis of triacylglyceride when mosquitoes were co-fed with sucrose. Our findings provide novel insights into the insect carbohydrate metabolism that governs glycogen and lipid biosynthesis during diapause, which is fundamental for the insect survival during inimical environments. PMID:27853281

  6. Comparison among Magnus/Floquet/Fer expansion schemes in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Takegoshi, K. Miyazawa, Norihiro; Sharma, Kshama; Madhu, P. K.

    2015-04-07

    We here revisit expansion schemes used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for the calculation of effective Hamiltonians and propagators, namely, Magnus, Floquet, and Fer expansions. While all the expansion schemes are powerful methods there are subtle differences among them. To understand the differences, we performed explicit calculation for heteronuclear dipolar decoupling, cross-polarization, and rotary-resonance experiments in solid-state NMR. As the propagator from the Fer expansion takes the form of a product of sub-propagators, it enables us to appreciate effects of time-evolution under Hamiltonians with different orders separately. While 0th-order average Hamiltonian is the same for the three expansion schemes with the three cases examined, there is a case that the 2nd-order term for the Magnus/Floquet expansion is different from that obtained with the Fer expansion. The difference arises due to the separation of the 0th-order term in the Fer expansion. The separation enables us to appreciate time-evolution under the 0th-order average Hamiltonian, however, for that purpose, we use a so-called left-running Fer expansion. Comparison between the left-running Fer expansion and the Magnus expansion indicates that the sign of the odd orders in Magnus may better be reversed if one would like to consider its effect in order.

  7. Solid state NMR methods for coal science. Progress report, July 1, 1983-September 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1984-12-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the last quarter. While a good deal of our time has been spent setting up our new NMR laboratory, we have made several significant advances in solid state NMR technique development that will have important applications in structure determination of coal, coal products and other fossil fuels. We have developed a CP/MAS probe that is routinely capable of producing decoupling fields in excess of 100 KHz without excessive power consumption and that has a very homogeneous radio frequency field. This piece of equipment has proven crucial to the success of a number of new techniques we are developing. In addition to increasing our sensitivity, the intensity, and homogeneity of the R.F. field, this probe now makes a number of multiple pulse techniques feasible. One avenue that has been pursued this quarter is understanding how to better decouple and thus increase the resolution of /sup 13/C CP/MAS spectra. It has been found that improved decoupling does lead to an increase in resolution in coal C-13 CP-MAS spectra. Preliminary results indicate it is now possible to resolve four bands in the aliphatic region and to substantially narrow CH/sub 2/ resonances in whole coals. 4 figures.

  8. Thin-film solid-state proton NMR measurements using a synthetic mica substrate: Polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderHart, David L.; Prabhu, Vivek M.; Lavery, Kristopher A.; Dennis, Cindi L.; Rao, Ashwin B.; Lin, Eric K.

    2009-11-01

    Solid-state proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements are performed successfully on polymer blend thin films through the use of synthetic mica as a substrate. When used as a substrate, synthetic fluorophlogopite mica with its proton-free, diamagnetic character, allows for adequate measurement sensitivity while minimally perturbing the proton thin-film spectra, especially relative to more commonly available natural micas. Specifically, we use multiple-pulse techniques in the presence of magic-angle spinning to measure the degree of mixing in two different polymer blend thin films, polystyrene/poly(xylylene ether) and poly(1-methyladamantyl methacrylate) (PMAdMA)/triphenylsulfonium perfluorobutanesulfonate (TPS-PFBS), spin-coated onto mica substrates. Our earlier studies had focused on bulk systems where NMR signals are stronger, but may not be representative of thin films of the same systems that are relevant to many applications such as photoresist formulations in the electronics industry. The superiority of synthetic over natural paramagnetic mica is demonstrated by the maintenance of resolution and spinning sideband intensities (relative to bulk samples) for the synthetic mica samples. In contrast, degraded resolution and large spinning sidebands are shown to typify spectra of the natural mica samples. This approach can be applied to many other proton measurements of solid thin films, thereby greatly extending the types of systems to be investigated. Magnetic susceptibility measurements are also reported for all micas used.

  9. Thin-film solid-state proton NMR measurements using a synthetic mica substrate: polymer blends.

    PubMed

    VanderHart, David L; Prabhu, Vivek M; Lavery, Kristopher A; Dennis, Cindi L; Rao, Ashwin B; Lin, Eric K

    2009-11-01

    Solid-state proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements are performed successfully on polymer blend thin films through the use of synthetic mica as a substrate. When used as a substrate, synthetic fluorophlogopite mica with its proton-free, diamagnetic character, allows for adequate measurement sensitivity while minimally perturbing the proton thin-film spectra, especially relative to more commonly available natural micas. Specifically, we use multiple-pulse techniques in the presence of magic-angle spinning to measure the degree of mixing in two different polymer blend thin films, polystyrene/poly(xylylene ether) and poly(1-methyladamantyl methacrylate) (PMAdMA)/triphenylsulfonium perfluorobutanesulfonate (TPS-PFBS), spin-coated onto mica substrates. Our earlier studies had focused on bulk systems where NMR signals are stronger, but may not be representative of thin films of the same systems that are relevant to many applications such as photoresist formulations in the electronics industry. The superiority of synthetic over natural paramagnetic mica is demonstrated by the maintenance of resolution and spinning sideband intensities (relative to bulk samples) for the synthetic mica samples. In contrast, degraded resolution and large spinning sidebands are shown to typify spectra of the natural mica samples. This approach can be applied to many other proton measurements of solid thin films, thereby greatly extending the types of systems to be investigated. Magnetic susceptibility measurements are also reported for all micas used.

  10. Chemical reactivity of graphene oxide towards amines elucidated by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Vacchi, Isabella A; Spinato, Cinzia; Raya, Jésus; Bianco, Alberto; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2016-07-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by amidation. We also prove that there is a negligible amount of carboxylic acid groups in two GO samples obtained by a different synthesis process, hence eliminating the possibility of amidation reactions with amine derivatives. This work brings additional insights into the chemical reactivity of GO, which is fundamental to control its functionalization, and highlights the major role of MAS NMR spectroscopy for a comprehensive characterization of derivatized GO.

  11. Detection of chiral defects in crystalline organic solids using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Berendt, Robert T; Munson, Eric J

    2011-05-01

    The marketing of enantiopure pharmaceuticals has become more common due to regulatory and safety concerns surrounding the potential differences in biological activity of opposite enantiomers. However, achieving the desired enantiopurity can be a challenge, and low levels of the undesired enantiomer (chiral impurity) may be present in the final product. The location and nature of this impurity can potentially alter pharmaceutically relevant properties. In this article, we show that it is possible to identify and quantitate the crystallographic locations of small amounts of one enantiomer (l) in the presence of predominantly the opposite D-enantiomer using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Proline was used as a model compound, and crystalline samples containing both D- and L-proline were prepared by solvent evaporation, lyophilization, spray drying, and cryogrinding. Isotopic labeling, (13)C cross polarization-magic angle spinning NMR spectral subtractions, and (1)H T(1) spin-lattice relaxation measurements allowed selective observation and characterization of the crystal environments into which the L-proline impurity was incorporated upon concurrent crystallization with D-proline. Results show that L-proline was incorporated in up to four different crystalline forms, including L-proline as a kinetically trapped substitutional chiral defect in the D-proline host crystal lattice.

  12. Solid-State 17O NMR Study of Benzoic Acid Adsorption On Metal Oxide Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaman, Edward {Ed} W; Chen, Banghao; Jiao, Jian; Parsons, Williams

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state 17O NMR spectra of 17O-labeled benzoic and anisic acids are reported and benzoic acid is used to probe the surface of metal oxides. Complexes formed when benzoic acid is dry-mixed with mesoporous silica, and nonporous titania and alumina are characterized. Chemical reactions with silica are not observed. The nature of benzoic acid on silica is a function of the water content of the oxide. The acid disperses in the pores of the silica if the silica is in equilibrium with ambient laboratory humidity. The acid displays high mobility as evidenced by a liquid-like, Lorentzian resonance. Excess benzoic acid remains as the crystalline hydrogen-bonded dimer. Benzoic acid reacts with titania and alumina surfaces in equilibrium with laboratory air to form the corresponding titanium and aluminum benzoates. In both materials the oxygen of the 17O-labeled acid is bound to the metal, showing the reaction proceeds by bond formation between oxygen deficient metal sites and the oxygen of the carboxylic acid. 27Al MAS NMR confirms this mechanism for the reaction on alumina. Dry mixing of benzoic acid with alumina rapidly quenches pentacoordinate aluminum sites, excellent evidence that these sites are confined to the surface of the alumina particles.

  13. Origin of the different emission wavelengths in Alq 3 analyzed by solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, Hironori; Fukushima, Tatsuya; Takami, Kousuke; Kusaka, Yasunari

    2007-09-01

    Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum(III) (Alq 3) is one of the most widely used materials in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), and the relationship between the structures and the luminescent wavelengths is of recent interest; yellowish-green emissions are observed for the α- and amorphous Alq 3, whereas blue emissions are found for the γ- and δ-Alq 3. In order to clarify the relationship between the structures and the emission wavelengths, we carried out solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments on the different polymorphs of Alq 3 and the amorphous state. Based on 27Al and 13C magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments, it is found that the isomeric state of the amorphous Alq 3 is the same as that of α-Alq 3 and is different from those of γ- and δ-Alq 3. Not only for the amorphous, but also for α-Alq 3, the local structures are found to be disordered. We also obtained clear evidence that γ-Alq 3 is in the facial isomeric state. It is suggested that δ-Alq 3 is also facial. The difference between γ- and δ-Alq 3 is the intermolecular packing; the effect of intermolecular packing is found only for δ-Alq 3. A further confirmation of the isomeric states of these Alq 3 samples is obtained from temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction experiments.

  14. Probing Silica-Biomolecule Interactions by Solid-State NMR and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Stephan Ingmar; Donets, Sergii; Dianat, Arezoo; Bobeth, Manfred; Gutiérrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Brunner, Eike

    2016-11-08

    Understanding the molecular interactions between inorganic phases such as silica and organic material is fundamental for chromatographic applications, for tailoring silica-enzyme interactions, and for elucidating the mechanisms of biomineralization. The formation, structure, and properties of the organic/inorganic interface is crucial in this context. Here, we investigate the interaction of selectively (13)C-labeled choline with (29)Si-labeled monosilicic acid/silica at the molecular level. Silica/choline nanocomposites were analyzed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy in combination with extended molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand the silica/organic interface. Cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP MAS)-based NMR experiments like (1)H-(13)C CP-REDOR (rotational-echo double resonance), (1)H-(13)C HETCOR (heteronuclear correlation), and (1)H-(29)Si-(1)H double CP are employed to determine spatial parameters. The measurement of (29)Si-(13)C internuclear distances for selectively (13)C-labeled choline provides an experimental parameter that allows the direct verification of MD simulations. Atomistic modeling using classical MD methodologies is performed using the INTERFACE force field. The modeling results are in excellent agreement with the experimental data and reveal the relevant molecular conformations as well as the nature and interplay of the interactions between the choline cation and the silica surface. Electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding are both important and depend strongly on the hydration level as well as the charge state of the silica surface.

  15. Comparison among Magnus/Floquet/Fer expansion schemes in solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegoshi, K.; Miyazawa, Norihiro; Sharma, Kshama; Madhu, P. K.

    2015-04-01

    We here revisit expansion schemes used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for the calculation of effective Hamiltonians and propagators, namely, Magnus, Floquet, and Fer expansions. While all the expansion schemes are powerful methods there are subtle differences among them. To understand the differences, we performed explicit calculation for heteronuclear dipolar decoupling, cross-polarization, and rotary-resonance experiments in solid-state NMR. As the propagator from the Fer expansion takes the form of a product of sub-propagators, it enables us to appreciate effects of time-evolution under Hamiltonians with different orders separately. While 0th-order average Hamiltonian is the same for the three expansion schemes with the three cases examined, there is a case that the 2nd-order term for the Magnus/Floquet expansion is different from that obtained with the Fer expansion. The difference arises due to the separation of the 0th-order term in the Fer expansion. The separation enables us to appreciate time-evolution under the 0th-order average Hamiltonian, however, for that purpose, we use a so-called left-running Fer expansion. Comparison between the left-running Fer expansion and the Magnus expansion indicates that the sign of the odd orders in Magnus may better be reversed if one would like to consider its effect in order.

  16. Comparison among Magnus/Floquet/Fer expansion schemes in solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Takegoshi, K; Miyazawa, Norihiro; Sharma, Kshama; Madhu, P K

    2015-04-07

    We here revisit expansion schemes used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for the calculation of effective Hamiltonians and propagators, namely, Magnus, Floquet, and Fer expansions. While all the expansion schemes are powerful methods there are subtle differences among them. To understand the differences, we performed explicit calculation for heteronuclear dipolar decoupling, cross-polarization, and rotary-resonance experiments in solid-state NMR. As the propagator from the Fer expansion takes the form of a product of sub-propagators, it enables us to appreciate effects of time-evolution under Hamiltonians with different orders separately. While 0th-order average Hamiltonian is the same for the three expansion schemes with the three cases examined, there is a case that the 2nd-order term for the Magnus/Floquet expansion is different from that obtained with the Fer expansion. The difference arises due to the separation of the 0th-order term in the Fer expansion. The separation enables us to appreciate time-evolution under the 0th-order average Hamiltonian, however, for that purpose, we use a so-called left-running Fer expansion. Comparison between the left-running Fer expansion and the Magnus expansion indicates that the sign of the odd orders in Magnus may better be reversed if one would like to consider its effect in order.

  17. Internuclear 31P-51V Distance Measurements in Polyoxoanionic Solids Using REAPDOR NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenlin; Vega, Alexander J.; Gullion, Terry; Polenova, Tatyana

    2014-01-01

    We report the first results establishing REAPDOR experiments for distance measurements between a spin-1/2 (31P) and spin-7/2 (51V) pair in a series of vanadium-substituted polyoxoanionic solids from the Keggin and Wells-Dawson families. We have quantitatively measured 31P-51V distances in mono-vanadium substituted K4PVW11O40, 1-K7P2VW17O62, and 4-K7P2VW17O62. Numerical simulations of the experimental data yield very good agreement with the averaged P-W/P-V distances determined from the X-ray diffraction measurements in the same or related compounds. REAPDOR is therefore a very sensitive P-V distance probe anticipated to be especially useful in the absence of long-range order. Our results suggest that REAPDOR spectroscopy could be broadly applicable for interatomic distance measurements in other spin-7/2-spin-1/2 nuclear pairs. PMID:17918932

  18. Intrauterine fetal brain NMR spectroscopy: 1H and 31P studies in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nakada, T.; Kwee, I.L.; Suzuki, N.; Houkin, K. )

    1989-11-01

    Fetal brain metabolism was investigated in utero noninvasively using multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in rats at two representative prenatal stages: early (17-18 days) and late (20-21 days) stages. Phosphorus-31 (31P) spectroscopy revealed that phosphocreatine is significantly lower in the early stage and increases to the level of early neonates by the late prenatal stage. Intracellular pH at the early stage was found to be strikingly high (7.52 +/- 0.21) and decreased to a level similar to that of neonates by the late stage (7.29 +/- 0.07). Phosphomonoester levels at both stages were similar to the values reported for early neonates. Water-suppressed proton (1H) spectroscopy demonstrated a distinctive in vivo fetal brain spectral pattern characterized by low levels of N-acetyl aspartate and high levels of taurine. High-resolution proton spectroscopy and homonuclear chemical-shift correlate spectroscopy of brain perchloric acid extracts confirmed these in vivo findings. In vitro 31P spectroscopy of acidified chloroform methanol extracts showed the characteristic membrane phospholipid profiles of fetal brain. The phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)-to-phosphatidylcholine (PC) ratio (PE/PC) did not show significant changes between the two stages at 0.40 +/- 0.11, a value similar to that of early neonates.

  19. NMR shielding constants in PH3, absolute shielding scale, and the nuclear magnetic moment of 31P.

    PubMed

    Lantto, Perttu; Jackowski, Karol; Makulski, Włodzimierz; Olejniczak, Małgorzata; Jaszuński, Michał

    2011-09-29

    Ab initio values of the absolute shielding constants of phosphorus and hydrogen in PH(3) were determined, and their accuracy is discussed. In particular, we analyzed the relativistic corrections to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, comparing the constants computed using the four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock approach, the four-component density functional theory (DFT), and the Breit-Pauli perturbation theory (BPPT) with nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock or DFT reference functions. For the equilibrium geometry, we obtained σ(P) = 624.309 ppm and σ(H) = 29.761 ppm. Resonance frequencies of both nuclei were measured in gas-phase NMR experiments, and the results were extrapolated to zero density to provide the frequency ratio for an isolated PH(3) molecule. This ratio, together with the computed shielding constants, was used to determine a new value of the nuclear magnetic dipole moment of (31)P: μ(P) = 1.1309246(50) μ(N).

  20. A stable amorphous statin: solid-state NMR and dielectric studies on dynamic heterogeneity of simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Teresa G; Viciosa, M Teresa; Correia, Natália T; Danède, F; Nunes, Rita G; Diogo, Hermínio P

    2014-03-03

    Statins have been widely used as cholesterol-lowering agents. However, low aqueous solubility of crystalline statins and, consequently, reduced biovailability require seeking for alternative forms and formulations to ensure an accurate therapeutic window. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the stability of amorphous simvastatin by probing molecular dynamics using two nondestructive techniques: solid-state NMR and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. Glassy simvastatin was obtained by the melt quench technique. (13)C cross-polarization/magic-angle-spinning (CP/MAS) NMR spectra and (1)H MAS NMR spectra were obtained from 293 K up to 333 K (Tg ≈ 302 K). The (13)C spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame, T1ρ, were measured as a function of temperature, and the correlation time and activation energy data obtained for local motions in different frequency scales revealed strong dynamic heterogeneity, which appears to be essential for the stability of the amorphous form of simvastatin. In addition, the (1)H MAS measurements presented evidence for mobility of the hydrogen atoms in hydroxyl groups which was assigned to noncooperative secondary relaxations. The complex dielectric permittivity of simvastatin was monitored in isochronal mode at five frequencies (from 0.1 to 1000 kHz), by carrying out a heating/cooling cycle allowing to obtain simvastatin in the supercooled and glassy states. The results showed that no dipolar moment was lost due to immobilization, thus confirming that no crystallization had taken place. Complementarily, the present study focused on the thermal stability of simvastatin using thermogravimetric analysis while the thermal events were followed up by differential scanning calorimetry and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. Overall, the results confirm that the simvastatin in the glass form reveals a potential use in the solid phase formulation on the pharmaceutical industry.

  1. Fluorescence anisotropy, FT-IR spectroscopy and 31-P NMR studies on the interaction of paclitaxel with lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Dhanikula, Anand Babu; Panchagnula, Ramesh

    2008-06-01

    To understand the bilayer interaction with paclitaxel, fluorescence polarization, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and 31-phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) studies were performed on paclitaxel bearing liposomes. Fluorescence anisotropy of three probes namely, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH), 12-(9-anthroyloxy) stearic acid (12AS) and 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS) were monitored as a function of paclitaxel concentration in the unsaturated bilayers. The incorporation of paclitaxel decreased anisotropy of 12AS and ANS probes, while slightly increased anisotropy of DPH. Paclitaxel has a fluidizing effect in the upper region of the bilayer whereas the hydrophobic core is slightly rigidized. FT-IR spectroscopy showed an increase in the asymmetric and symmetric methylene stretching frequencies, splitting of methylene scissoring band and broadening of carbonyl stretching mode. These studies collectively ascertained that paclitaxel mainly occupies the cooperativity region and interact with the interfacial region of unsaturated bilayers and induces fluidity in the headgroup region of bilayer. At higher loadings (>3 mol%), paclitaxel might gradually tend to accumulate at the interface and eventually partition out of bilayer as a result of solute exclusion phenomenon, resulting in crystallization; seed non-bilayer phases, as revealed by 31P-NMR, thereby destabilizing liposomal formulations. In general, any membrane component which has a rigidization effect will decrease, while that with a fluidizing effect will increase, with a bearing on headgroup interactions, partitioning of paclitaxel into bilayers and stability of the liposomes.

  2. /sup 31/P NMR analysis of membrane phospholipid organization in viable, reversibly electropermeabilized Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.; Rols, M.P.; Teissie, J.

    1988-02-23

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were reversibly permeabilized by submitting them to short, high-intensity, square wave pulses (1.8 kV/cm, 100 ..mu..s). The cells remained in a permeable state without loss of viability for several hours at 4/sup 0/C. A new anisotropic peak with respect to control cells was observed on /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopic analysis of the phospholipid components. This peak is only present when the cells are permeable, and normal anisotropy is recovered after resealing. Taking into account the fusogenicity of electropermeabilized cells, comparative studies were performed on 5% poly(ethylene glycol) treated cells. The /sup 31/P NMR spectra of the phospholipids displayed the same anisotropic peak as in the case of the electropermeabilized cells. In the two cases, this anisotropic peak was located downfield from the main peak associated to the phospholipids when organized in bilayers. The localization of this anisotropic peak is very different from the one of a hexagonal phase. The authors proposed a reorganization of the polar head group region leading to a weakening of the hydration layer to account for these observations. This was also thought to explain the electric field induced fusogenicity of these cells.

  3. sup 31 P and sup 2 H NMR studies of structure and motion in bilayers of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, R. )

    1988-10-04

    The structural and motional properties of mixed bilayers of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) have been examined by using wide-line {sup 31}P, {sup 14}N, and {sup 2H} NMR. {sup 2}H and {sup 14}N NMR data showed that in mixed bilayers containing both PC and PE the conformations of the head-group moieties are essentially identical with those observed for bilayers containing a single phospholipid species. Equimolar amounts of cholesterol induce also only a small change in head-group conformation. For all phospholipid mixtures studied, the {sup 31}P T{sub 1} relaxation was homogeneous over the whole powder spectrum and could be fitted to a single-exponential decay. The {sup 31}P vs temperature profiles were analyzed by a simple correlation model. The presence of equimolar amounts of PE containing either the same (POPE) or a different (Escherichia coli PE) fatty acid composition had essentially no effect on the rate of rotational diffusion of the phosphate groups, with the correlation time being found to be 0.68 ns at 20{degree}C. The presence of equimolar amounts of cholesterol decreased the correlation time to 0.65 ns, and also the activation energy was reduced to 22.6 kJ mol{sup {minus}1}. The authors interpret the decrease in activation energy as being due to the spacing effect of cholesterol which reduces the H-bonding interactions between head-groups, allowing them to rotate more freely. For all cases examined, the rotational diffusion of the phosphate moieties was slower than that observed for the rigid glycerol backbone of the molecule, the latter probably corresponding to overall phospholipid rotation.

  4. Investigation of Local Structures in Layered Niobates by Solid-state NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting

    Research on ion-exchangeable layered niobates has attracted great attention due to their unique structures and corresponding variations in properties and applications, such as ion conductors, solid acids, and water splitting catalysts. Families of layered niobates include double-layered or triple-layered Dion-Jacobson type perovskites (ALaNb2O7, A = Cs, Rb, K, H; AM2Nb3O10, A = Rb, K, H; M = Sr, Ca), layered niobates with both edge and corner sharing of NbO6 octahedra (KNb3O8, HNb3O6, Nb 6O17 and H4Nb6O17) and many others. Lately, more developments in the layered niobates through a variety of topochemical manipulations have been achieved. The topochemical reactions include ion exchange, exfoliation, substitution, and etc. As a result, many new materials have been successfully prepared, for example, solid solutions (ALa2NbTi2O10, ACaLaNb2TiO 10 and ACa2Nb3-xTaxO10, etc.), nanosheets (HNb3O8, H4Nb6O17, HLaNb2O7, HCa2Nb3O10, etc., to intercalate with organic molecules such as tetrabutylammonium hydroxide or n-butylamines), and nanoscrolls (from H2K2Nb 6O17). While these structural modifications often induce improvements in properties, the fundamental mechanisms of improvements in properties upon the modifications, especially local structural arrangements are poorly understood, which is often limited by structural characterizations. Particularly, the characterizations of the exfoliated nanosheets can be difficult by conventional X-ray diffraction (XRD) method due to disordered structures. Alternatively, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a useful tool to study local structures in solids. The structural information can be extracted by examining intrinsic interactions, such as quadrupolar, chemical shielding, and dipolar interactions, which are all associated with local environments surrounding a specific nucleus, 1H or 93Nb in layered niobates. The ultimate goal of this dissertation is to understand the relationships between local structures of

  5. Calculating the response of NMR shielding tensor σ(31P) and 2J(31P,13C) coupling constants in nucleic acid phosphate to coordination of the Mg2+ cation.

    PubMed

    Benda, Ladislav; Schneider, Bohdan; Sychrovský, Vladimír

    2011-03-24

    Dependence of NMR (31)P shielding tensor and (2)J(P,C) coupling constants on solvation of nucleic acid phosphate by Mg(2+) and water was studied using methods of bioinformatic structural analyses of crystallographic data and DFT B3LYP calculations of NMR parameters. The effect of solvent dynamics on NMR parameters was calculated using molecular dynamic. The NMR calculations for representative solvation patterns determined in crystals of B-DNA and A-RNA molecules pointed out the crucial importance of local Mg(2+) coordination geometry, including hydration by explicit water molecules and necessity of dynamical averaging over the solvent reorientation. The dynamically averaged (31)P chemical shift decreased by 2-9.5 ppm upon Mg(2+) coordination, the chemical shielding anisotropy increased by 0-20 ppm, and the (2)J(P,C5') coupling magnitude decreased by 0.2-1.8 Hz upon Mg(2+) coordination. The calculated decrease of the (31)P chemical shift is in excellent agreement with the 1.5-10 ppm decrease of the phosphorothioate (31)P chemical shift upon Cd(2+) coordination probed experimentally in hammerhead ribozyme (Suzumura; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 8230-8236; Osborne; et al., Biochemistry 2009, 48, 10654-10664). None of the dynamically averaged NMR parameters unequivocally distinguishes the site-specific Mg(2+) coordination to one of the two nonesterified phosphate oxygen atoms of the phosphate determined by bioinformatic analyses. By comparing the limit cases of static and dynamically averaged solvation, we propose that mobility of the solvent has a dramatic impact on NMR parameters of nucleic acid phosphate and must be taken into account for their accurate modeling.

  6. Uniaxial plastic deformation of isotactic polypropylene studied by solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jia

    At alleviated temperatures, some semicrystralline polymers can be stretched to very large deformation ratios. Such deformations of semicrystalline polymers have been extensively studied since 1960s. Based on experimental observations and theoretical investigations, solid-state transformation (three stage model) proposed in 1971 and local melting and recrystallization in 1978 have been considered two major mechanisms to explain the deformations of polymer crystals. With the elucidation of molecular dynamics in the last two decades, it was proposed in 1999 that helical jump motion plays an important role in crystal deformation. On the other hand, the new structures induced by deformation also influence the molecular motions and resultant properties of deformed polymers. Such processing-structure-property relationship is very important to understand the polymer behaviors as well as to inform the polymer industry. In this dissertation, using the advanced tool of solid-state NMR (ss-NMR), we achieve three goals: Firstly, we investigate the hierarchical crystalline structural changes of isotactic polypropylene (i PP) upon high temperature stretching to understand the deformation process. Secondly, we evaluate the roles of local packing structure and crystal thickness in determining the stem motions and thermal properties of deformed alpha-form iPP. Thirdly, we utilize 13C-labeled isotactic polypropylene (iPP) to trace the change of chain folding number as a function of e to conclude molecular-level deformation mechanism. To realize the first and second goals, the chain packing, crystal thickness, molecular dynamics, and melting temperature (Tm) of a-form iPP drawn uniaxially at high temperatures of 100 - 150 °C were investigated using solid-state (SS) NMR and DSC. Two types of iPP samples with disordered (alpha1) and relatively ordered (alpha2-rich) packing structures were prepared via different thermal treatments and drawn up to an engineering strain ( e) of

  7. Molecular ordering and molecular dynamics in isotactic-polypropylene characterized by solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Toshikazu; Mamun, Al; Hu, Wei

    2010-01-14

    The order-disorder phenomenon of local packing structures, space heterogeneity, and molecular dynamics and average lamellar thickness, , of the alpha form of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) crystallized at various supercooling temperatures, DeltaT, are investigated by solid-state (SS) NMR and SAXS, respectively. increases with lowering DeltaT, and extrapolations of (-1) versus averaged melting point, , gives an equilibrium melting temperature, T(m)(0) = 457 +/- 4 K. High-power TPPM decoupling with a field strength of 110 kHz extremely improves (13)C high-resolution SS-NMR spectral resolution of the ordered crystalline signals at various DeltaT. A high-resolution (13)C SS-NMR spectrum combined with a conventional spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame (T(1rhoH)) filter easily accesses an order-disorder phenomenon for upward and downward orientations of stems and their packing in the crystalline region. It is found that ordered packing fraction, f(order), increases with lowering DeltaT and reaches a maximum value of 62% at DeltaT = 34 K. The ordering phenomenon of stem packing indicates that chain-folding direction changes from random in the disordered packing to order in the ordered packing along the a sin theta axis under a hypothesis of adjacent re-entry structures. It is also found that f(order) significantly increases prior to enhancement of lamellar thickness. Additionally, annealing experiments indicate that is significantly enhanced after a simultaneous process of partial melting and recrystallization/reorganization into the ordered packing at annealing temperature >/=423 K. Furthermore, the center-bands only detection of exchange (CODEX) NMR method demonstrates that time-kinetic parameters of helical jump motions are highly influenced by DeltaT. These dynamic constraints are interpreted in terms of increment of and packing ordering. Through these new results related to molecular structures and dynamics, roles of polymer

  8. Determining the Mode of Action Involved in the Antimicrobial Activity of Synthetic Peptides: A Solid-State NMR and FTIR Study

    PubMed Central

    Lorin, Aurélien; Noël, Mathieu; Provencher, Marie-Ève; Turcotte, Vanessa; Cardinal, Sébastien; Lagüe, Patrick; Voyer, Normand; Auger, Michèle

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that leucine to lysine substitution(s) in neutral synthetic crown ether containing 14-mer peptide affect the peptide structure and its ability to permeabilize bilayers. Depending on the substitution position, the peptides adopt mainly either a α-helical structure able to permeabilize dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) vesicles (nonselective peptides) or an intermolecular β-sheet structure only able to permeabilize DMPG vesicles (selective peptides). In this study, we have used a combination of solid-state NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to investigate the effects of nonselective α-helical and selective intermolecular β-sheet peptides on both types of bilayers. 31P NMR results indicate that both types of peptides interact with the headgroups of DMPC and DMPG bilayers. 2H NMR and Fourier transform infrared results reveal an ordering of the hydrophobic core of bilayers when leakage is noted, i.e., for DMPG vesicles in the presence of both types of peptides and DMPC vesicles in the presence of nonselective peptides. However, selective peptides have no significant effect on the ordering of DMPC acyl chains. The ability of these 14-mer peptides to permeabilize lipid vesicles therefore appears to be related to their ability to increase the order of the bilayer hydrophobic core. PMID:23062339

  9. 35Cl dynamic nuclear polarization solid-state NMR of active pharmaceutical ingredients

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsh, David A.; Rossini, Aaron J.; Emsley, Lyndon; Schurko, Robert W.

    2016-08-24

    In this paper, we show how to obtain efficient dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced 35Cl solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectra at 9.4 T and demonstrate how they can be used to characterize the molecular-level structure of hydrochloride salts of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in both bulk and low wt% API dosage forms. 35Cl SSNMR central-transition powder patterns of chloride ions are typically tens to hundreds of kHz in breadth, and most cannot be excited uniformly with high-power rectangular pulses or acquired under conditions of magic-angle spinning (MAS). Herein, we demonstrate the combination of DNP and 1H–35Cl broadband adiabatic inversion cross polarization (BRAIN-CP) experiments for the acquisition of high quality wideline spectra of APIs under static sample conditions, and obtain signals up to 50 times greater than in spectra acquired without the use of DNP at 100 K. We report a new protocol, called spinning-on spinning-off (SOSO) acquisition, where MAS is applied during part of the polarization delay to increase the DNP enhancements and then the MAS rotation is stopped so that a wideline 35Cl NMR powder pattern free from the effects of spinning sidebands can be acquired under static conditions. This method provides an additional two-fold signal enhancement compared to DNP-enhanced SSNMR spectra acquired under purely static conditions. DNP-enhanced 35Cl experiments are used to characterize APIs in bulk and dosage forms with Cl contents as low as 0.45 wt%. These results are compared to DNP-enhanced 1H–13C CP/MAS spectra of APIs in dosage forms, which are often hindered by interfering signals arising from the binders, fillers and other excipient materials.

  10. High-Resolution NMR of Quadrupolar Nuclei in the Solid State

    SciTech Connect

    Gann, Sheryl Lee

    1995-11-01

    This dissertation describes recent developments in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), for the most part involving the use of dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) NMR to study quadrupolar nuclei. Chapter 1 introduces some of the basic concepts and theory that will be referred to in later chapters, such as the density operator, product operators, rotations, coherence transfer pathways, phase cycling, and the various nuclear spin interactions, including the quadrupolar interaction. Chapter 2 describes the theory behind motional averaging experiments, including DAS, which is a technique where a sample is spun sequentially about two axis oriented at different angles with respect to the external magnetic field such that the chemical shift and quadrupolar anisotropy are averaged to zero. Work done on various rubidium-87 salts is presented as a demonstration of DAS. Chapter 3 explains how to remove sidebands from DAS and magic-angle spinning (MAS) experiments, which result from the time-dependence of the Hamiltonian under sample spinning conditions, using rotor-synchronized π-pulses. Data from these experiments, known as DAH-180 and MAH-180, respectively, are presented for both rubidium and lead salts. In addition, the applicability of this technique to double rotation (DOR) experiments is discussed. Chapter 4 concerns the addition of cross-polarization to DAS (CPDAS). The theory behind spin locking and cross polarizing quadrupolar nuclei is explained and a method of avoiding the resulting problems by performing cross polarization at 0° $\\parallel$ with respect to the magnetic field is presented. Experimental results are shown for a sodium-23 compound, sodium pyruvate, and for oxygen-17 labeled L-akmine. In Chapter 5, a method for broadening the Hartmann-Hahn matching condition under MAS, called variable effective field cross-polarization (VEFCP), is presented, along with experimental work on adamantane and polycarbonate.

  11. 15N solid-state NMR provides a sensitive probe of oxidized flavin reactive sites.

    PubMed

    Koder, Ronald L; Walsh, Joseph D; Pometun, Maxim S; Dutton, P Leslie; Wittebort, Richard J; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2006-11-29

    Flavins are central to the reactivity of a wide variety of enzymes and electron transport proteins. There is great interest in understanding the basis for the different reactivities displayed by flavins in different protein contexts. We propose solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR) as a tool for directly observing reactive positions of the flavin ring and thereby obtaining information on their frontier orbitals. We now report the SS-NMR signals of the redox-active nitrogens N1 and N5, as well as that of N3. The chemical shift tensor of N5 is over 720 ppm wide, in accordance with the predictions of theory and our calculations. The signal of N3 can be distinguished on the basis of coupling to 1H absent for N1 and N5, as well as the shift tensor span of only 170 ppm, consistent with N3's lower aromaticity and lack of a nonbonding lone pair. The isotropic shifts and spans of N5 and N1 reflect two opposite extremes of the chemical shift range for "pyridine-type" N's, consistent with their electrophilic and nucleophilic chemical reactivities, respectively. Upon flavin reduction, N5's chemical shift tensor contracts dramatically to a span of less than 110 ppm, and the isotropic chemical shift changes by approximately 300 ppm. Both are consistent with loss of N5's nonbonding lone pair and decreased aromaticity, and illustrate the responsiveness of the 15N chemical shift principal values to electronic structure. Thus. 15N chemical shift principal values promise to be valuable tools for understanding electronic differences that underlie variations in flavin reactivity, as well as the reactivities of other heterocyclic cofactors.

  12. 35Cl dynamic nuclear polarization solid-state NMR of active pharmaceutical ingredients

    DOE PAGES

    Hirsh, David A.; Rossini, Aaron J.; Emsley, Lyndon; ...

    2016-08-24

    In this paper, we show how to obtain efficient dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced 35Cl solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectra at 9.4 T and demonstrate how they can be used to characterize the molecular-level structure of hydrochloride salts of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in both bulk and low wt% API dosage forms. 35Cl SSNMR central-transition powder patterns of chloride ions are typically tens to hundreds of kHz in breadth, and most cannot be excited uniformly with high-power rectangular pulses or acquired under conditions of magic-angle spinning (MAS). Herein, we demonstrate the combination of DNP and 1H–35Cl broadband adiabatic inversion cross polarizationmore » (BRAIN-CP) experiments for the acquisition of high quality wideline spectra of APIs under static sample conditions, and obtain signals up to 50 times greater than in spectra acquired without the use of DNP at 100 K. We report a new protocol, called spinning-on spinning-off (SOSO) acquisition, where MAS is applied during part of the polarization delay to increase the DNP enhancements and then the MAS rotation is stopped so that a wideline 35Cl NMR powder pattern free from the effects of spinning sidebands can be acquired under static conditions. This method provides an additional two-fold signal enhancement compared to DNP-enhanced SSNMR spectra acquired under purely static conditions. DNP-enhanced 35Cl experiments are used to characterize APIs in bulk and dosage forms with Cl contents as low as 0.45 wt%. These results are compared to DNP-enhanced 1H–13C CP/MAS spectra of APIs in dosage forms, which are often hindered by interfering signals arising from the binders, fillers and other excipient materials.« less

  13. Testing the limits of sensitivity in a solid-state structural investigation by combined X-ray powder diffraction, solid-state NMR, and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Filip, Xenia; Borodi, Gheorghe; Filip, Claudiu

    2011-10-28

    A solid state structural investigation of ethoxzolamide is performed on microcrystalline powder by using a multi-technique approach that combines X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data analysis based on direct space methods with information from (13)C((15)N) solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) and molecular modeling. Quantum chemical computations of the crystal were employed for geometry optimization and chemical shift calculations based on the Gauge Including Projector Augmented-Wave (GIPAW) method, whereas a systematic search in the conformational space was performed on the isolated molecule using a molecular mechanics (MM) approach. The applied methodology proved useful for: (i) removing ambiguities in the XRPD crystal structure determination process and further refining the derived structure solutions, and (ii) getting important insights into the relationship between the complex network of non-covalent interactions and the induced supra-molecular architectures/crystal packing patterns. It was found that ethoxzolamide provides an ideal case study for testing the accuracy with which this methodology allows to distinguish between various structural features emerging from the analysis of the powder diffraction data.

  14. Indirect detection of infinite-speed MAS solid-state NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perras, Frédéric A.; Venkatesh, Amrit; Hanrahan, Michael P.; Goh, Tian Wei; Huang, Wenyu; Rossini, Aaron J.; Pruski, Marek

    2017-03-01

    Heavy spin-1/2 nuclides are known to possess very large chemical shift anisotropies that can challenge even the most advanced magic-angle-spinning (MAS) techniques. Wide manifolds of overlapping spinning sidebands and insufficient excitation bandwidths often obfuscate meaningful spectral information and force the use of static, low-resolution solid-state (SS)NMR methods for the characterization of materials. To address these issues, we have merged fast-magic-angle-turning (MAT) and dipolar heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (D-HMQC) experiments to obtain D-HMQC-MAT pulse sequences which enable the rapid acquisition of 2D SSNMR spectra that correlate isotropic 1H chemical shifts to the indirectly detected isotropic ;infinite-MAS; spectra of heavy spin-1/2 nuclides. For these nuclides, the combination of fast MAS and 1H detection provides a high sensitivity, which rivals the DNP-enhanced ultra-wideline SSNMR. The new pulse sequences were used to determine the Pt coordination environments in a complex mixture of decomposition products of transplatin and in a metal-organic framework with Pt ions coordinated to the linker ligands.

  15. Distinguishing Polymorphs of the Semiconducting Pigment Copper Phthalocyanine by Solid-state NMR and Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shaibat, Medhat A.; Casabianca, Leah B.; Siberio-Pérez, Diana Y.; Matzger, Adam J; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2010-01-01

    Cu(II)(phthalocyanine) (CuPc) is broadly utilized as an archetypal molecular semiconductor and is the most widely used blue printing pigment. CuPc crystallizes in six different forms; the chemical and physical properties are substantially modulated by its molecular packing among these polymorphs. Despite the growing importance of this system, spectroscopic identification of different polymorphs for CuPc has posed difficulties. This study presents the first example of spectroscopic distinction of α- and β-forms of CuPc, the most widely used polymorphs, by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) and Raman spectroscopy. 13C high-resolution SSNMR spectra of α- and β-CuPc using very-fast magic angle spinning (VFMAS) at 20 kHz show that hyperfine shifts sensitively reflect polymorphs of CuPc. The experimental results were confirmed by ab initio chemical shift calculations. 13C and 1H SSNMR relaxation times of α- and β-CuPc under VFMAS also showed marked differences, presumably because of the difference in electronic spin correlation times in the two forms. Raman spectroscopy also provided another reliable method of differentiation between the two polymorphs. PMID:20225842

  16. High-resolution solid-state NMR structure of Alanyl-Prolyl-Glycine

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Andreas, Loren B.; Huber, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramesh; van der Wel, Patrick C.A.; Veshtort, Mikhail; Griffin, Robert G.; Mehta, Manish A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a de novo high-resolution structure of the peptide Alanyl-Prolyl-Glycine using a combination of sensitive solid-state NMR techniques that each yield precise structural constraints. High-quality 13C–13C distance constraints are extracted by fitting rotational resonance width (R2W) experiments using Multimode Multipole Floquet Theory and experimental chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) orientations. In this strategy, a structure is first calculated using DANTE-REDOR and torsion angle measurements and the resulting relative CSA orientations are used as an input parameter in the 13C–13C distance calculations. Finally, a refined structure is calculated using all the constraints. We investigate the effect of different structural constraints on structure quality, as determined by comparison to the crystal structure and also self-consistency of the calculated structures. Inclusion of all or subsets of these constraints into CNS calculations resulted in high-quality structures (0.02 Å backbone RMSD using all 11 constraints). PMID:19596601

  17. Protein fold determined by paramagnetic magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Ishita; Nadaud, Philippe S.; Helmus, Jonathan J.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Jaroniec, Christopher P.

    2012-05-01

    Biomacromolecules that are challenging for the usual structural techniques can be studied with atomic resolution by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. However, the paucity of distance restraints >5 Å, traditionally derived from measurements of magnetic dipole-dipole couplings between protein nuclei, is a major bottleneck that hampers such structure elucidation efforts. Here, we describe a general approach that enables the rapid determination of global protein fold in the solid phase via measurements of nuclear paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) in several analogues of the protein of interest containing covalently attached paramagnetic tags, without the use of conventional internuclear distance restraints. The method is demonstrated using six cysteine-EDTA-Cu2+ mutants of the 56-residue B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G, for which ~230 longitudinal backbone 15N PREs corresponding to distances of ~10-20 Å were obtained. The mean protein fold determined in this manner agrees with the X-ray structure with a backbone atom root-mean-square deviation of 1.8 Å.

  18. Folding of xylan onto cellulose fibrils in plant cell walls revealed by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Thomas J.; Mortimer, Jenny C.; Bernardinelli, Oigres D.; Pöppler, Ann-Christin; Brown, Steven P.; deAzevedo, Eduardo R.; Dupree, Ray; Dupree, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Exploitation of plant lignocellulosic biomass is hampered by our ignorance of the molecular basis for its properties such as strength and digestibility. Xylan, the most prevalent non-cellulosic polysaccharide, binds to cellulose microfibrils. The nature of this interaction remains unclear, despite its importance. Here we show that the majority of xylan, which forms a threefold helical screw in solution, flattens into a twofold helical screw ribbon to bind intimately to cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall. 13C solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, supported by in silico predictions of chemical shifts, shows both two- and threefold screw xylan conformations are present in fresh Arabidopsis stems. The twofold screw xylan is spatially close to cellulose, and has similar rigidity to the cellulose microfibrils, but reverts to the threefold screw conformation in the cellulose-deficient irx3 mutant. The discovery that induced polysaccharide conformation underlies cell wall assembly provides new principles to understand biomass properties. PMID:28000667

  19. Solid-state NMR chemical shift assignments for AL-09 VL immunoglobulin light chain fibrils.

    PubMed

    Piehl, Dennis W; Blancas-Mejía, Luis M; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Rienstra, Chad M

    2017-04-01

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is a systemic disease characterized by the formation of immunoglobulin light-chain fibrils in critical organs of the body. The light-chain protein AL-09 presents one severe case of cardiac AL amyloidosis, which contains seven mutations in the variable domain (VL) relative to its germline counterpart, κI O18/O8 VL. Three of these mutations are non-conservative-Y87H, N34I, and K42Q-and previous work has shown that they are responsible for significantly reducing the protein's thermodynamic stability, allowing fibril formation to occur with fast kinetics and across a wide-range of pH conditions. Currently, however, there is extremely limited structural information available which explicitly describes the residues that are involved in supporting the misfolded fibril structure. Here, we assign the site-specific (15)N and (13)C chemical shifts of the rigid residues of AL-09 VL fibrils by solid-state NMR, reporting on the regions of the protein involved in the fibril as well as the extent of secondary structure.

  20. Structure and backbone dynamics of a microcrystalline metalloprotein by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Michael J.; Pell, Andrew J.; Bertini, Ivano; Felli, Isabella C.; Gonnelli, Leonardo; Pierattelli, Roberta; Herrmann, Torsten; Emsley, Lyndon; Pintacuda, Guido

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new approach to improve structural and dynamical determination of large metalloproteins using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with 1H detection under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS). The approach is based on the rapid and sensitive acquisition of an extensive set of 15N and 13C nuclear relaxation rates. The system on which we demonstrate these methods is the enzyme Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), which coordinates a Cu ion available either in Cu+ (diamagnetic) or Cu2+ (paramagnetic) form. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements are obtained from the difference in rates measured in the two forms and are employed as structural constraints for the determination of the protein structure. When added to 1H-1H distance restraints, they are shown to yield a twofold improvement of the precision of the structure. Site-specific order parameters and timescales of motion are obtained by a Gaussian axial fluctuation (GAF) analysis of the relaxation rates of the diamagnetic molecule, and interpreted in relation to backbone structure and metal binding. Timescales for motion are found to be in the range of the overall correlation time in solution, where internal motions characterized here would not be observable. PMID:22723345

  1. Distinguishing polymorphs of the semiconducting pigment copper phthalocyanine by solid-state NMR and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shaibat, Medhat A; Casabianca, Leah B; Siberio-Pérez, Diana Y; Matzger, Adam J; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2010-04-08

    Cu(II)(phthalocyanine) (CuPc) is broadly utilized as an archetypal molecular semiconductor and is the most widely used blue printing pigment. CuPc crystallizes in six different forms; the chemical and physical properties are substantially modulated by its molecular packing among these polymorphs. Despite the growing importance of this system, spectroscopic identification of different polymorphs for CuPc has posed difficulties. This study presents the first example of spectroscopic distinction of alpha- and beta-forms of CuPc, the most widely used polymorphs, by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) and Raman spectroscopy. (13)C high-resolution SSNMR spectra of alpha- and beta-CuPc using very-fast magic angle spinning (VFMAS) at 20 kHz show that hyperfine shifts sensitively reflect polymorphs of CuPc. The experimental results were confirmed by ab initio chemical shift calculations. (13)C and (1)H SSNMR relaxation times of alpha- and beta-CuPc under VFMAS also showed marked differences, presumably because of the difference in electronic spin correlation times in the two forms. Raman spectroscopy also provided another reliable method of differentiation between the two polymorphs.

  2. A (13)C solid-state NMR investigation of four cocrystals of caffeine and theophylline.

    PubMed

    Vigilante, Nicolas J; Mehta, Manish A

    2017-03-01

    We report an analysis of the (13)C solid-state NMR chemical shift data in a series of four cocrystals involving two active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) mimics (caffeine and theophylline) and two diacid coformers (malonic acid and glutaric acid). Within this controlled set, we make comparisons of the isotropic chemical shifts and the principal values of the chemical shift tensor. The dispersion at 14.1 T (600 MHz (1)H) shows crystallographic splittings in some of the resonances in the magic angle spinning spectra. By comparing the isotropic chemical shifts of individual C atoms across the four cocrystals, we are able to identify pronounced effects on the local electronic structure at some sites. We perform a similar analysis of the principal values of the chemical shift tensors for the anisotropic C atoms (most of the ring C atoms for the API mimics and the carbonyl C atoms of the diacid coformers) and link them to differences in the known crystal structures. We discuss the future prospects for extending this type of study to incorporate the full chemical shift tensor, including its orientation in the crystal frame of reference.

  3. Solid-state NMR and EPR study of fluorinated carbon nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Wei Dubois, Marc Guerin, Katia Hamwi, Andre Giraudet, Jerome Masin, Francis

    2008-08-15

    Carbon nanofibers were fluorinated in two manners, in pure fluorine gas (direct fluorination) and with a fluorinating agent (TbF{sub 4} during the so-called controlled fluorination). The resulting fluorinated nanofibers have been investigated by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). This underlines that the fluorination mechanisms differ since a (CF){sub n} structural type is obtained, whatever the temperature, with the controlled reaction, whereas, during the direct process, a (C{sub 2}F){sub n} type is formed over a wide temperature range. Through a careful characterization of the products, i.e. density of dangling bonds (as internal paramagnetic centers), structural type (acting on molecular motion) and specific surface area (related to the amount of physisorbed O{sub 2}), the effect of atmospheric oxygen molecules on the spin-lattice nuclear relaxation has been underlined. - Graphical abstract: Scheme of the fluorination process using F{sub 2} and TbF{sub 4} as fluorinating agent.

  4. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of HIV Fusion Peptide 13CO to Lipid 31P Proximities Support Similar Partially Inserted Membrane Locations of the α Helical and β Sheet Peptide Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrys, Charles M.; Qiang, Wei; Sun, Yan; Xie, Li; Schmick, Scott D.; Weliky, David P.

    2013-10-01

    Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) membrane and the host cell membrane is an initial step of infection of the host cell. Fusion is catalyzed by gp41, which is an integral membrane protein of HIV. The fusion peptide (FP) is the -25 N-terminal residues of gp41 and is a domain of gp41 that plays a key role in fusion catalysis likely through interaction with the host cell membrane. Much of our understanding of the FP domain has been accomplished with studies of -HFP-, i.e., a -25-residue peptide composed of the FP sequence but lacking the rest of gp41. HFP catalyzes fusion between membrane vesicles and serves as a model system to understand fusion catalysis. HFP binds to membranes and the membrane location of HFP is likely a significant determinant of fusion catalysis perhaps because the consequent membrane perturbation reduces the fusion activation energy. In the present study, many HFPs were synthesized and differed in the residue position that was 13CO backbone labeled. Samples were then prepared that each contained a singly 13CO labeled HFP incorporated into membranes that lacked cholesterol. HFP had distinct molecular populations with either α helical or oligomeric - sheet structure. Proximity between the HFP 13CO nuclei and 31P nuclei in the membrane headgroups was probed by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) measurements. For many samples, there were distinct 13CO shifts for the α helical and - sheet structures so that the proximities to 31P nuclei could be determined for each structure. Data from several differently labeled HFPs were then incorporated into a membrane location model for the particular structure. In addition to the 13CO labeled residue position, the HFPs also differed in sequence and/or chemical structure. -HFPmn- was a linear peptide that contained the 23 N-terminal residues of gp41. -HFPmn_V2E- contained the V2E mutation that for HIV leads to greatly reduced extent of fusion and infection. The

  5. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of HIV fusion peptide 13CO to lipid 31P proximities support similar partially inserted membrane locations of the α helical and β sheet peptide structures.

    PubMed

    Gabrys, Charles M; Qiang, Wei; Sun, Yan; Xie, Li; Schmick, Scott D; Weliky, David P

    2013-10-03

    Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) membrane and the host cell membrane is an initial step of infection of the host cell. Fusion is catalyzed by gp41, which is an integral membrane protein of HIV. The fusion peptide (FP) is the ∼25 N-terminal residues of gp41 and is a domain of gp41 that plays a key role in fusion catalysis likely through interaction with the host cell membrane. Much of our understanding of the FP domain has been accomplished with studies of "HFP", i.e., a ∼25-residue peptide composed of the FP sequence but lacking the rest of gp41. HFP catalyzes fusion between membrane vesicles and serves as a model system to understand fusion catalysis. HFP binds to membranes and the membrane location of HFP is likely a significant determinant of fusion catalysis perhaps because the consequent membrane perturbation reduces the fusion activation energy. In the present study, many HFPs were synthesized and differed in the residue position that was (13)CO backbone labeled. Samples were then prepared that each contained a singly (13)CO labeled HFP incorporated into membranes that lacked cholesterol. HFP had distinct molecular populations with either α helical or oligomeric β sheet structure. Proximity between the HFP (13)CO nuclei and (31)P nuclei in the membrane headgroups was probed by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) measurements. For many samples, there were distinct (13)CO shifts for the α helical and β sheet structures so that the proximities to (31)P nuclei could be determined for each structure. Data from several differently labeled HFPs were then incorporated into a membrane location model for the particular structure. In addition to the (13)CO labeled residue position, the HFPs also differed in sequence and/or chemical structure. "HFPmn" was a linear peptide that contained the 23 N-terminal residues of gp41. "HFPmn_V2E" contained the V2E mutation that for HIV leads to greatly reduced extent of fusion and

  6. Raftlike Mixtures of Sphingomyelin and Cholesterol Investigated by Solid-State 2H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Tim; Lankalapalli, Ravi S.; Bittman, Robert; Beyer, Klaus; Brown, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    Sphingomyelin is a lipid that is abundant in the nervous systems of mammals, where it is associated with putative microdomains in cellular membranes and undergoes alterations due to aging or neurodegeneration. We investigated the effect of varying the concentration of cholesterol in binary and ternary mixtures with N-palmitoylsphingomyelin (PSM) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) using deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (2H NMR) spectroscopy in both macroscopically aligned and unoriented multilamellar dispersions. In our experiments, we used PSM and POPC perdeuterated on the N-acyl and sn-1 acyl chains, respectively. By measuring solid-state 2H NMR spectra of the two lipids separately in mixtures with the same compositions as a function of cholesterol mole fraction and temperature, we obtained clear evidence for the coexistence of two liquid-crystalline domains in distinct regions of the phase diagram. According to our analysis of the first moments M1 and the observed 2H NMR spectra, one of the domains appears to be a liquid-ordered phase. We applied a mean-torque potential model as an additional tool to calculate the average hydrocarbon thickness, the area per lipid, and structural parameters such as chain extension and thermal expansion coefficient in order to further define the two coexisting phases. Our data imply that phase separation takes place in raftlike ternary PSM/POPC/cholesterol mixtures over a broad temperature range but vanishes at cholesterol concentrations equal to or greater than a mole fraction of 0.33. Cholesterol interacts preferentially with sphingomyelin only at smaller mole fractions, above which a homogeneous liquid-ordered phase is present. The reasons for these phase separation phenomena seem to be differences in the effects of cholesterol on the configurational order of the palmitoyl chains in PSM-d31 and POPC-d31 and a difference in the affinity of cholesterol for sphingomyelin observed at low temperatures

  7. Thermal decomposition of t-butylamine borane studied by in situ solid state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Feigerle, J.; Smyrl, N. R.; Morrell, J. S.; Stowe, A. C.

    2010-03-18

    of the amine borane fuel more feasible [22]. In the present study, tert-butylamine borane is investigated by heteronuclear in situ solid state NMR to understand hydrogen release from a hydrocarbon containing amine borane. tbutylamine borane has similar physical properties to amine borane with a melting point of 96 C. A single proton has been replaced with a t-butylamine group resulting in a weakening of the dihydrogen bonding framework. t-butylamine borane has a theoretical gravimetric hydrogen density of 15.1%; however, isobutane can also be evolved rather than hydrogen. If decomposition yields one mole isobutane and two moles hydrogen, 4.5 wt% H2 gas will be evolved. More importantly for the present work, the resulting spent fuel should be comprised of both (BNH)n and (CBNH)n polyimidoboranes.

  8. sup 31 P NMR measurements of the ADP concentration in yeast cells genetically modified to express creatine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Brindle, K.; Braddock, P.; Fulton, S. )

    1990-04-03

    Rabbit muscle creatine kinase has been introduced into the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by transforming cells with a multicopy plasmid containing the coding sequence for the enzyme under the control of the yeast phosphoglycerate kinase promoter. The transformed cells showed creating kinase activities similar to those found in mammalian heart muscle. {sup 31}P NMR measurements of the near-equilibrium concentrations of phosphocreatine and cellular pH together with measurements of the total extractable concentrations of phosphocreatine and creatine allowed calculation of the free ADP/ATP ratio in the cell. The calculated ratio of approximately 2 was considerably higher than the ratio of between 0.06 and 0.1 measured directly in cell extracts.

  9. Elastic deformation and area per lipid of membranes: atomistic view from solid-state deuterium NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kinnun, Jacob J; Mallikarjunaiah, K J; Petrache, Horia I; Brown, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the application of solid-state ²H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for investigating the deformation of lipid bilayers at the atomistic level. For liquid-crystalline membranes, the average structure is manifested by the segmental order parameters (SCD) of the lipids. Solid-state ²H NMR yields observables directly related to the stress field of the lipid bilayer. The extent to which lipid bilayers are deformed by osmotic pressure is integral to how lipid-protein interactions affect membrane functions. Calculations of the average area per lipid and related structural properties are pertinent to bilayer remodeling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of membranes. To establish structural quantities, such as area per lipid and volumetric bilayer thickness, a mean-torque analysis of ²H NMR order parameters is applied. Osmotic stress is introduced by adding polymer solutions or by gravimetric dehydration, which are thermodynamically equivalent. Solid-state NMR studies of lipids under osmotic stress probe membrane interactions involving collective bilayer undulations, order-director fluctuations, and lipid molecular protrusions. Removal of water yields a reduction of the mean area per lipid, with a corresponding increase in volumetric bilayer thickness, by up to 20% in the liquid-crystalline state. Hydrophobic mismatch can shift protein states involving mechanosensation, transport, and molecular recognition by G-protein-coupled receptors. Measurements of the order parameters versus osmotic pressure yield the elastic area compressibility modulus and the corresponding bilayer thickness at an atomistic level. Solid-state ²H NMR thus reveals how membrane deformation can affect protein conformational changes within the stress field of the lipid bilayer.

  10. Structure of the Dimerization Interface in the Mature HIV-1 Capsid Protein Lattice from Solid State NMR of Tubular Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Bayro, Marvin J; Tycko, Robert

    2016-07-13

    The HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) forms the capsid shell that encloses RNA within a mature HIV-1 virion. Previous studies by electron microscopy have shown that the capsid shell is primarily a triangular lattice of CA hexamers, with variable curvature that destroys the ideal symmetry of a planar lattice. The mature CA lattice depends on CA dimerization, which occurs through interactions between helix 9 segments of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of CA. Several high-resolution structures of the CTD-CTD dimerization interface have been reported, based on X-ray crystallography and multidimensional solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with significant differences in amino acid side chain conformations and helix 9-helix 9 orientations. In a structural model for tubular CA assemblies based on cryogenic electron microscopy (cryoEM) [Zhao et al. Nature, 2013, 497, 643-646], the dimerization interface is substantially disordered. The dimerization interface structure in noncrystalline CA assemblies and the extent to which this interface is structurally ordered within a curved lattice have therefore been unclear. Here we describe solid state NMR measurements on the dimerization interface in tubular CA assemblies, which contain the curved triangular lattice of a mature virion, including quantitative measurements of intermolecular and intramolecular distances using dipolar recoupling techniques, solid state NMR chemical shifts, and long-range side chain-side chain contacts. When combined with restraints on the distance and orientation between helix 9 segments from the cryoEM study, the solid state NMR data lead to a unique high-resolution structure for the dimerization interface in the noncrystalline lattice of CA tubes. These results demonstrate that CA lattice curvature is not dependent on disorder or variability in the dimerization interface. This work also demonstrates the feasibility of local structure determination within large noncrystalline assemblies formed by high

  11. Preservation of bilayer structure in human erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts after phospholipase treatment. A 31P-NMR study.

    PubMed

    van Meer, G; de Kruijff, B; op den Kamp, J A; van Deenen, L L

    1980-02-15

    1. Fresh human erythrocytes were treated with lytic and non-lytic combinations of phospholipases A2, C and sphingomyelinase. The 31P-NMR spectra of ghosts derived from such erythrocytes show that, in all cases, the residual phospholipids and lysophospholipids remain organized in a bilayer configuration. 2. A bilayer configuration of the (lyso)phospholipids was also observed after treatment of erythrocyte ghosts with various phospholipases even in the case that 98% of the phospholipid was converted into lysophospholipid (72%) and ceramides (26%). 3. A slightly decreased order of the phosphate group of phospholipid molecules, seen as reduced effective chemical shift anisotropy in the 31P-NMR spectra, was found following the formation of diacyglycerols and ceramides in the membrane of intact erythrocytes. Treatment of ghosts always resulted in an extensive decrease in the order of the phosphate groups. 4. The results allow the following conclusions to made: a. Hydrolysis of phospholipids in intact red cells and ghosts does not result in the formation of non-bilayer configuration of residual phospholipids and lysophospholipids. b. Haemolysis, which is obtained by subsequent treatment of intact cells with sphingomyelinase and phospholipase A2, or with phospholipase C, cannot be ascribed to the formation of non-bilayer configuration of phosphate-containing lipids. c. Preservation of bilayer structure, even after hydrolysis of all phospholipid, shows that other membrane constitutents, e.g. cholesterol and/or membrane proteins play an important role in stabilizing the structure of the erythrocyte membrane. d. A major prerequisite for the application of phospholipases in lipid localization studies, the preservation of a bilayer configuration during phospholipid hydrolysis, is met for the erythrocyte membrane.

  12. Fine refinement of solid state structure of racemic form of phospho-tyrosine employing NMR Crystallography approach.

    PubMed

    Paluch, Piotr; Pawlak, Tomasz; Oszajca, Marcin; Lasocha, Wieslaw; Potrzebowski, Marek J

    2015-02-01

    We present step by step facets important in NMR Crystallography strategy employing O-phospho-dl-tyrosine as model sample. The significance of three major techniques being components of this approach: solid state NMR (SS NMR), X-ray diffraction of powdered sample (PXRD) and theoretical calculations (Gauge Invariant Projector Augmented Wave; GIPAW) is discussed. Each experimental technique provides different set of structural constraints. From the PXRD measurement the size of the unit cell, space group and roughly refined molecular structure are established. SS NMR provides information about content of crystallographic asymmetric unit, local geometry, molecular motion in the crystal lattice and hydrogen bonding pattern. GIPAW calculations are employed for validation of quality of elucidation and fine refinement of structure. Crystal and molecular structure of O-phospho-dl-tyrosine solved by NMR Crystallography is deposited at Cambridge Crystallographic Data Center under number CCDC 1005924.

  13. Visualization and processing of computed solid-state NMR parameters: MagresView and MagresPython.

    PubMed

    Sturniolo, Simone; Green, Timothy F G; Hanson, Robert M; Zilka, Miri; Refson, Keith; Hodgkinson, Paul; Brown, Steven P; Yates, Jonathan R

    2016-09-01

    We introduce two open source tools to aid the processing and visualisation of ab-initio computed solid-state NMR parameters. The Magres file format for computed NMR parameters (as implemented in CASTEP v8.0 and QuantumEspresso v5.0.0) is implemented. MagresView is built upon the widely used Jmol crystal viewer, and provides an intuitive environment to display computed NMR parameters. It can provide simple pictorial representation of one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra as well as output a selected spin-system for exact simulations with dedicated spin-dynamics software. MagresPython provides a simple scripting environment to manipulate large numbers of computed NMR parameters to search for structural correlations.

  14. Glass Structure by Scattering Methods and Spectroscopy — D. SOLID STATE NMR AS A STRUCTURAL TOOL IN GLASS SCIENCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Hellmut

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Fundamentals of Solid State NMR * Nuclear magnetism and resonance * Spectroscopic technique * Internal interactions * Chemical shielding interaction * Direct magnetic dipole-dipole coupling * Nuclear electric quadrupolar interaction * Experimental separation strategies * Magic-angle spinning * Multi-dimensional NMR * Structural Issues in Non-crystalline Solids and Glasses * Short-Range Order in Oxide Glasses * Local coordination number and symmetry * Bond angle distribution functions * Spatial distribution of modifier cations and structural implications of the mixed-alkali effect * Short-Range Order in Non-Oxide Glasses * Chemical bond distribution and intermediate range order * Chemical equilibria and kinetics in glassforming liquids * Future Perspectives * Towards higher resolution for quadrupolar nuclei * Recovery of dipolar interactions in MAS-NMR: site connectivities * Double resonance NMR in heteronuclear systems * Zero- and double quantum NMR in homonuclear systems * Acknowledgments * References

  15. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Estimation of total phenol concentrations in coal liquefaction resids by [sup 31]P NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, J.T.; Verkade, J.G. )

    1992-11-01

    In this study, Iowa State University researchers used [sub 31]P-tagged reagents to derivatize the labile hydrogen functional groups in the THF-soluble portion of 850[degrees]F[sup +] distillation resid materials and the THF-soluble portion of process oils derived from direct coal liquefaction.[sup 31]P-NMR was used to analyze the derivatized samples. NMR peak assignments can be made by comparison to model compounds similarly derivatized. Species can be quantified by integration of the NMR signals. Different [sup 31]P-NMR tagged reagents can be used to produce different degrees of peak resolution in the NMR spectrum. This, in turn, partially dictates the degree of speciation and/or quantification of species, or classes of compounds, that can be accomplished. Iowa State chose a [sup 31]P-tagged reagent (ClPOCMe[sub 2]CMe[sub 2]O) which was shown previously to be particularly useful in the derivatization of phenols. The derivatized samples all exhibited a small group of peaks attributed to amines and a broad group of peaks in the phenol region. The presence of paramagnetic species in the samples caused the NMR signals to broaden. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra confirmed the presence of paramagnetic organic free radicals in selected samples. Various methods were employed to process the NMR data. The complexity and broadness of the phenol peak, however, made speciation of the phenols impractical.

  16. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Estimation of total phenol concentrations in coal liquefaction resids by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, J.T.; Verkade, J.G.

    1992-11-01

    In this study, Iowa State University researchers used {sub 31}P-tagged reagents to derivatize the labile hydrogen functional groups in the THF-soluble portion of 850{degrees}F{sup +} distillation resid materials and the THF-soluble portion of process oils derived from direct coal liquefaction.{sup 31}P-NMR was used to analyze the derivatized samples. NMR peak assignments can be made by comparison to model compounds similarly derivatized. Species can be quantified by integration of the NMR signals. Different {sup 31}P-NMR tagged reagents can be used to produce different degrees of peak resolution in the NMR spectrum. This, in turn, partially dictates the degree of speciation and/or quantification of species, or classes of compounds, that can be accomplished. Iowa State chose a {sup 31}P-tagged reagent (ClPOCMe{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}O) which was shown previously to be particularly useful in the derivatization of phenols. The derivatized samples all exhibited a small group of peaks attributed to amines and a broad group of peaks in the phenol region. The presence of paramagnetic species in the samples caused the NMR signals to broaden. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra confirmed the presence of paramagnetic organic free radicals in selected samples. Various methods were employed to process the NMR data. The complexity and broadness of the phenol peak, however, made speciation of the phenols impractical.

  17. Solid-state NMR/NQR and first-principles study of two niobium halide cluster compounds.

    PubMed

    Perić, Berislav; Gautier, Régis; Pickard, Chris J; Bosiočić, Marko; Grbić, Mihael S; Požek, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Two hexanuclear niobium halide cluster compounds with a [Nb6X12](2+) (X=Cl, Br) diamagnetic cluster core, have been studied by a combination of experimental solid-state NMR/NQR techniques and PAW/GIPAW calculations. For niobium sites the NMR parameters were determined by using variable Bo field static broadband NMR measurements and additional NQR measurements. It was found that they possess large positive chemical shifts, contrary to majority of niobium compounds studied so far by solid-state NMR, but in accordance with chemical shifts of (95)Mo nuclei in structurally related compounds containing [Mo6Br8](4+) cluster cores. Experimentally determined δiso((93)Nb) values are in the range from 2,400 to 3,000 ppm. A detailed analysis of geometrical relations between computed electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift (CS) tensors with respect to structural features of cluster units was carried out. These tensors on niobium sites are almost axially symmetric with parallel orientation of the largest EFG and the smallest CS principal axes (Vzz and δ33) coinciding with the molecular four-fold axis of the [Nb6X12](2+) unit. Bridging halogen sites are characterized by large asymmetry of EFG and CS tensors, the largest EFG principal axis (Vzz) is perpendicular to the X-Nb bonds, while intermediate EFG principal axis (Vyy) and the largest CS principal axis (δ11) are oriented in the radial direction with respect to the center of the cluster unit. For more symmetrical bromide compound the PAW predictions for EFG parameters are in better correspondence with the NMR/NQR measurements than in the less symmetrical chlorine compound. Theoretically predicted NMR parameters of bridging halogen sites were checked by (79/81)Br NQR and (35)Cl solid-state NMR measurements.

  18. Hetergeneous tumour response to photodynamic therapy assessed by in vivo localised 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ceckler, T. L.; Gibson, S. L.; Kennedy, S. D.; Hill, R.; Bryant, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is efficacious in the treatment of small malignant lesions when all cells in the tumour receive sufficient drug, oxygen and light to induce a photodynamic effect capable of complete cytotoxicity. In large tumours, only partial effectiveness is observed presumably because of insufficient light penetration into the tissue. The heterogeneity of the metabolic response in mammary tumours following PDT has been followed in vivo using localised phosphorus NMR spectroscopy. Alterations in nucleoside triphosphates (NTP), inorganic phosphate (Pi) and pH within localised regions of the tumour were monitored over 24-48 h following PDT irradiation of the tumour. Reduction of NTP and increases in Pi were observed at 4-6 h after PDT irradiation in all regions of treated tumours. The uppermost regions of the tumours (those nearest the skin surface and exposed to the greatest light fluence) displayed the greatest and most prolonged reduction of NTP and concomitant increase in Pi resulting in necrosis. The metabolite concentrations in tumour regions located towards the base of the tumour returned a near pre-treatment levels by 24-48 h after irradiation. The ability to follow heterogeneous metabolic responses in situ provides one means to assess the degree of metabolic inhibition which subsequently leads to tumour necrosis. Images Figure 4 PMID:1829953

  19. On The Potential of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced Diamonds in Solid-State and Dissolution (13) C NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bretschneider, Christian O; Akbey, Ümit; Aussenac, Fabien; Olsen, Greg L; Feintuch, Akiva; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-09-05

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a versatile option to improve the sensitivity of NMR and MRI. This versatility has elicited interest for overcoming potential limitations of these techniques, including the achievement of solid-state polarization enhancement at ambient conditions, and the maximization of (13) C signal lifetimes for performing in vivo MRI scans. This study explores whether diamond's (13) C behavior in nano- and micro-particles could be used to achieve these ends. The characteristics of diamond's DNP enhancement were analyzed for different magnetic fields, grain sizes, and sample environments ranging from cryogenic to ambient temperatures, in both solution and solid-state experiments. It was found that (13) C NMR signals could be boosted by orders of magnitude in either low- or room-temperature solid-state DNP experiments by utilizing naturally occurring paramagnetic P1 substitutional nitrogen defects. We attribute this behavior to the unusually long electronic/nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times characteristic of diamond, coupled with a time-independent cross-effect-like polarization transfer mechanism facilitated by a matching of the nitrogen-related hyperfine coupling and the (13) C Zeeman splitting. The efficiency of this solid-state polarization process, however, is harder to exploit in dissolution DNP-enhanced MRI contexts. The prospects for utilizing polarized diamond approaching nanoscale dimensions for both solid and solution applications are briefly discussed.

  20. Probing membrane protein structure using water polarization transfer solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jonathan K.; Hong, Mei

    2014-10-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, lipid membranes and other biological macromolecules. Solid-state NMR heteronuclear-detected 1H polarization transfer from water to biomolecules is a versatile approach for studying water-protein, water-membrane, and water-carbohydrate interactions in biology. We review radiofrequency pulse sequences for measuring water polarization transfer to biomolecules, the mechanisms of polarization transfer, and the application of this method to various biological systems. Three polarization transfer mechanisms, chemical exchange, spin diffusion and NOE, manifest themselves at different temperatures, magic-angle-spinning frequencies, and pulse irradiations. Chemical exchange is ubiquitous in all systems examined so far, and spin diffusion plays the key role in polarization transfer within the macromolecule. Tightly bound water molecules with long residence times are rare in proteins at ambient temperature. The water polarization-transfer technique has been used to study the hydration of microcrystalline proteins, lipid membranes, and plant cell wall polysaccharides, and to derive atomic-resolution details of the kinetics and mechanism of ion conduction in channels and pumps. Using this approach, we have measured the water polarization transfer to the transmembrane domain of the influenza M2 protein to obtain information on the structure of this tetrameric proton channel. At short mixing times, the polarization transfer rates are site-specific and depend on the pH, labile protons, sidechain conformation, as well as the radial position of the residues in this four-helix bundle. Despite the multiple dependences, the initial transfer rates reflect the periodic nature of the residue positions from the water-filled pore, thus this technique provides a way of gleaning secondary structure information, helix tilt angle, and the oligomeric structure of membrane proteins.

  1. Rheological and solid-state NMR assessments of copovidone/clotrimazole model solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fengyuan; Su, Yongchao; Zhu, Lei; Brown, Chad D; Rosen, Lawrence A; Rosenberg, Kenneth J

    2016-03-16

    This study aims to assess several model solid dispersions by using dynamic oscillatory rheology, solid-state NMR and other solid phase characterization techniques, and correlate their viscoelastic responses with processing methods and microstructures. A model active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), clotrimazole, was compounded with copovidone to form solid dispersions via various techniques with different mixing capabilities. Physicochemical characterizations of the resulting solid dispersions demonstrated that simple physical mixing led to a poorly mixed blend manifested by existence of large API crystalline content and heterogeneous distribution. Cryogenic milling significantly improved mixing of two components as a result of reduced particle size and increased contact surface area, but produced limited amorphous content. In contrast, hot melt extrusion (HME) processing resulted in a homogenous amorphous solid dispersion because of its inherent mixing efficiency. Storage modulus and viscosities versus frequency of different solid dispersions indicated that the incorporation of API into the polymer matrix resulted in a plasticizing effect which reduced the viscosity. The crystalline/aggregated forms of API also exhibited more elastic response than its amorphous/dispersed counterpart. Temperature ramps of the physical mixture with high API concentration captured a critical temperature, at which a bump was observed in damping factor. This bump was attributed to the dissolution of crystalline API into the polymer. In addition, heating-cooling cycles of various solid dispersions suggested that cryomilling and HME processing could form a homogeneous solid dispersion at low API content, whereas high drug concentration led to a relatively unstable dispersion due to supersaturation of API in the polymer.

  2. Susceptibility corrections in solid-state NMR experiments with oriented membrane samples. Part I: applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Ralf W.; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2003-09-01

    Chemical shift referencing of solid-state NMR experiments on oriented membranes has to compensate for bulk magnetic susceptibility effects that are associated with the non-spherical sample shape, as described in the accompanying paper [J. Magn. Reson. 164 (2003) 115-127]. The resulting frequency deviations can be on the order of 10 ppm, which is serious for nuclei with a narrow chemical shift anisotropy such as 1H or 13C, and in some cases even 19F. Two referencing schemes are proposed here to compensate for these effects: A flat (0.4 mm) glass container with an isotropic reference molecule dissolved in a thin film of liquid is stacked on top of the oriented membrane sample. Alternatively, the intrinsic proton signal of the hydrated lipid can be used for chemical shift referencing. Further aspects related to magnetic susceptibility are discussed, such as air gaps in susceptibility-matched probeheads, the benefits of shimming, and limitations in the accuracy of orientational constraints. A biological application is illustrated by a series of experiments on the antimicrobial peptide PGLa, aimed at understanding its concentration-dependent membranolytic effect. To address a wide range of molar peptide/lipid ratios between 1:3000 and 1:8, multilayers of hydrated DMPC containing a 19F-labeled peptide were oriented between stacked glass plates. Maintaining an approximately constant amount of peptide gives rise to thick samples (18 plates) at low, and thin samples (3 plates) at high peptide/lipid ratio. Accurate referencing was critical to reveal a small but significant change over 5 ppm in the anisotropic chemical shift of the 19F label on the peptide, indicative of a change in the orientation and/or dynamics of PGLa in the membrane.

  3. Probing membrane protein structure using water polarization transfer solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan K; Hong, Mei

    2014-10-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, lipid membranes and other biological macromolecules. Solid-state NMR heteronuclear-detected (1)H polarization transfer from water to biomolecules is a versatile approach for studying water-protein, water-membrane, and water-carbohydrate interactions in biology. We review radiofrequency pulse sequences for measuring water polarization transfer to biomolecules, the mechanisms of polarization transfer, and the application of this method to various biological systems. Three polarization transfer mechanisms, chemical exchange, spin diffusion and NOE, manifest themselves at different temperatures, magic-angle-spinning frequencies, and pulse irradiations. Chemical exchange is ubiquitous in all systems examined so far, and spin diffusion plays the key role in polarization transfer within the macromolecule. Tightly bound water molecules with long residence times are rare in proteins at ambient temperature. The water polarization-transfer technique has been used to study the hydration of microcrystalline proteins, lipid membranes, and plant cell wall polysaccharides, and to derive atomic-resolution details of the kinetics and mechanism of ion conduction in channels and pumps. Using this approach, we have measured the water polarization transfer to the transmembrane domain of the influenza M2 protein to obtain information on the structure of this tetrameric proton channel. At short mixing times, the polarization transfer rates are site-specific and depend on the pH, labile protons, sidechain conformation, as well as the radial position of the residues in this four-helix bundle. Despite the multiple dependences, the initial transfer rates reflect the periodic nature of the residue positions from the water-filled pore, thus this technique provides a way of gleaning secondary structure information, helix tilt angle, and the oligomeric structure of membrane proteins.

  4. Solid-state 13C NMR and molecular modeling studies of acetyl aleuritolic acid obtained from Croton cajucara Benth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva San Gil, Rosane Aguiar; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; da Cunha Pinto, Angelo; do Espírito Santo Gomes, Fabiano; de Castro Dantas, Tereza Neuma; Maciel, Maria Aparecida Medeiros

    2008-08-01

    Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance ( 13C NMR) with magic-angle spinning (MAS) and with cross-polarization and magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) spectra, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques were used to obtain structural data from a sample of acetyl aleuritolic acid (AAA) extracted from the stem bark of Croton cajucara Benth. (Euphorbiaceae) and recrystallized from acetone. Since solid-state 13C NMR results suggested the presence of more than one molecule in the unitary cell for the AAA, DSC analysis and molecular modeling calculations were used to access this possibility. The absence of phase transition peaks in the DSC spectra and the dimeric models of AAA simulated using the semi-empirical PM3 method are in agreement with that proposal.

  5. Sodium ion effect on silk fibroin conformation characterized by solid-state NMR and generalized 2D NMR NMR correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Qing-Xia; Zhou, Ping

    2008-07-01

    In the present work, we investigated Na + ion effect on the silk fibroin (SF) conformation. Samples are Na +-involved regenerated silk fibroin films. 13C CP-MAS NMR demonstrates that as added [Na +] increases, partial silk fibroin conformation transit from helix-form to β-form at certain Na + ion concentration which is much higher than that in Bombyx mori silkworm gland. The generalized two-dimensional NMR-NMR correlation analysis reveals that silk fibroin undergoes several intermediate states during its conformation transition process as [Na +] increase. The appearance order of the intermediates is followed as: helix and/or random coil → helix-like → β-sheet-like → β-sheet, which is the same as that produced by pH decrease from 6.8 to 4.8 in the resultant regenerated silk fibroin films. The binding sites of Na + to silk fibroin might involve the carbonyl oxygen atom of certain amino acids sequence which could promote the formation of β-sheet conformation. Since the Na +sbnd O bond is weak, the ability of Na + inducing the secondary structure transition is weaker than those of Ca 2+, Cu 2+ and even K +. It is maybe a reason why the sodium content is much lower than potassium in the silkworm gland.

  6. Solid-state NMR as an effective method of polymorphic analysis: solid dosage forms of clopidogrel hydrogensulfate.

    PubMed

    Pindelska, Edyta; Szeleszczuk, Lukasz; Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Mazurek, Andrzej; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2015-01-01

    Clopidogrel hydrogensulfate (HSCL) is an antiplatelet agent, one of top-selling drugs in the world. In this paper, we have described a rapid and convenient method of verification which polymorph of HSCL is present in its final solid dosage form. Our methodology based on solid-state NMR spectroscopy and ab initio gauge-including projector-augmented wave calculations of NMR shielding constants is appropriate for currently available commercial solid dosage forms of HSCL. Furthermore, such structural characterization can assist with the development of new pharmaceutical products containing HSCL and also be useful in the identification of counterfeit drugs.

  7. Molecular characterization and quantification using state of the art solid-state adiabatic TOBSY NMR in burn trauma.

    PubMed

    Righi, Valeria; Andronesi, Ovidiu; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Tzika, A Aria

    2009-12-01

    We describe a novel solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method that maximizes the advantages of high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS), relative conventional liquid-state NMR approaches, when applied to intact biopsies of skeletal muscle specimens collected from burn trauma patients. This novel method, termed optimized adiabatic TOtal through Bond correlation SpectroscopY (TOBSY) solid-state NMR pulse sequence for two-dimensional (2D) 1H-1H homonuclear scalar-coupling longitudinal isotropic mixing, was demonstrated to provide a 40-60% improvement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) relative to its liquid-state analogue TOCSY (TOtal Correlation SpectroscopY). Using 1- and 2-dimensional HRMAS NMR experiments, we identified several metabolites in burned tissues. Quantification of metabolites in burned tissues showed increased levels of lipid compounds, intracellular metabolites (e.g., taurine and phosphocreatine) and substantially decreased water-soluble metabolites (e.g., glutathione, carnosine, glucose, glutamine/glutamate and alanine). These findings demonstrate that HRMAS NMR Spectroscopy using TOBSY is a feasible technique that reveals new insights into the pathophysiology of burn trauma. Moreover, this method has applications that facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  8. The contribution of solid-state NMR spectroscopy to understanding biomineralization: Atomic and molecular structure of bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duer, Melinda J.

    2015-04-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has had a major impact on our understanding of the structure of mineralized tissues, in particular bone. Bone exemplifies the organic-inorganic composite structure inherent in mineralized tissues. The organic component of the extracellular matrix in bone is primarily composed of ordered fibrils of collagen triple-helical molecules, in which the inorganic component, calcium phosphate particles, composed of stacks of mineral platelets, are arranged around the fibrils. This perspective argues that key factors in our current structural model of bone mineral have come about through NMR spectroscopy and have yielded the primary information on how the mineral particles interface and bind with the underlying organic matrix. The structure of collagen within the organic matrix of bone or any other structural tissue has yet to be determined, but here too, this perspective shows there has been real progress made through application of solid-state NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with other techniques. In particular, NMR spectroscopy has highlighted the fact that even within these structural proteins, there is considerable dynamics, which suggests that one should be cautious when using inherently static structural models, such as those arising from X-ray diffraction analyses, to gain insight into molecular roles. It is clear that the NMR approach is still in its infancy in this area, and that we can expect many more developments in the future, particularly in understanding the molecular mechanisms of bone diseases and ageing.

  9. Thermotropic phase behavior of model membranes composed of phosphatidylcholines containing cis-monounsaturated acyl chain homologues of oleic acid: differential scanning calorimetric and /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, R.N.A.H.; Sykes, B.D.; McElhaney, R.N.

    1988-02-09

    The thermotropic phase behavior of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine and six of its longer chain homologues was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Aqueous dispersions of these compounds all exhibit a single endotherm upon heating but upon cooling exhibit at least two exotherms, both of which occur at temperatures lower than those of their heating endotherm. The single transition observed upon heating was shown by /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy to be a net conversion from a condensed, subgel-like phase (L/sub c/ phase) to the liquid-crystalline state. Aqueous ethylene glycol dispersions of these compounds also exhibit single endotherms upon heating and cooling exotherms centered at temperatures lower than those of their corresponding heating endotherm. However, the behavior of the aqueous ethylene glycol dispersions differs with respect to their transition temperatures and enthalpies as well as the extent of undercooling observed, and there is some evidence of discontinuities in the cooling behavior of the odd- and even-numbered members of the homologous series. Like the aqueous dispersions, /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy also shows that the calorimetric events observed in aqueous ethylene glycol involve net interconversions between an L/sub c/-like phase and the liquid-crystalline state. These results demonstrate that although the presence of a cis double bond can perturb the solid-state packing of the acyl chains, its presence does not preclude the formation of highly ordered subgel-like phases in lipid bilayers. In the particular case of these unsaturated phosphatidylcholines, the formation of the subgel phases is more kinetically favorable than is the case with their saturated n-acyl counterparts.

  10. Powder-XRD and (14) N magic angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy of some metal nitrides.

    PubMed

    Kempgens, Pierre; Britton, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Some metal nitrides (TiN, ZrN, InN, GaN, Ca3 N2 , Mg3 N2 , and Ge3 N4 ) have been studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and (14) N magic angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For Ca3 N2 , Mg3 N2 , and Ge3 N4 , no (14) N NMR signal was observed. Low speed (νr  = 2 kHz for TiN, ZrN, and GaN; νr  = 1 kHz for InN) and 'high speed' (νr  = 15 kHz for TiN; νr  = 5 kHz for ZrN; νr  = 10 kHz for InN and GaN) MAS NMR experiments were performed. For TiN, ZrN, InN, and GaN, powder-XRD was used to identify the phases present in each sample. The number of peaks observed for each sample in their (14) N MAS solid-state NMR spectrum matches perfectly well with the number of nitrogen-containing phases identified by powder-XRD. The (14) N MAS solid-state NMR spectra are symmetric and dominated by the quadrupolar interaction. The envelopes of the spinning sidebands manifold are Lorentzian, and it is concluded that there is a distribution of the quadrupolar coupling constants Qcc 's arising from structural defects in the compounds studied.

  11. Methionine bound to Pd/γ-Al2O3 catalysts studied by solid-state (13)C NMR.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert L; Schwartz, Thomas J; Dumesic, James A; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2015-11-01

    The chemisorption and breakdown of methionine (Met) adsorbed on Pd/γ-Al2O3 catalysts were investigated by solid-state NMR. (13)C-enriched Met (ca. 0.4mg) impregnated onto γ-Al2O3 or Pd/γ-Al2O3 gives NMR spectra with characteristic features of binding to γ-Al2O3, to Pd nanoparticles, and oxidative or reductive breakdown of Met. The SCH3 groups of Met showed characteristic changes in chemical shift on γ-Al2O3 (13ppm) vs. Pd (19ppm), providing strong evidence for preferential binding to Pd, while the NC carbon generates a small resonance at 96ppm assigned to a distinct nonprotonated species bound to O or Pd. Additionally, NMR shows that the SCH3 groups of Met are mobile on γ-Al2O3 but immobilized by binding to Pd particles; on small Pd particles (ca. 4nm), the NCH groups undergo large-amplitude motions. In a reducing environment, Met breaks down by C-S bond cleavage followed by formation of C2-C4 organic acids. The SCH3 signal shifts to 22ppm, which is likely the signature of the principal species responsible for strong catalyst inhibition. These experiments demonstrate that solid-state magic-angle spinning NMR of (13)C-enriched Met can be a sensitive probe to investigate catalyst surfaces and characterize catalyst inhibition both before reaction and postmortem.

  12. Differences in nucleotide compartmentation and energy state in isolated and in situ rat heart: assessment by 31P-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Williams, J P; Headrick, J P

    1996-08-07

    Free cytosolic concentrations of ATP, PCr, ADP and 5'-AMP, and the cytosolic [ATP]/[ADP].[Pi] ratio, were determined in isolated and in situ rat hearts using 31P-NMR spectroscopy. Total tissue metabolite concentrations were determined by HPLC analysis of freeze-clamped, perchloric acid-extracted tissue. In in situ myocardium the PCr/ATP ratio was 2.7 +/- 0.2 determined from 31P-NMR data (using either PCr/beta-NTP or PCr/gamma-NTP), and 1.9 +/- 0.1 (P < 0.01) determined from total tissue concentrations. 31P-NMR-determined and total tissue [PCr] were in excellent agreement (49.6 +/- 8.4 and 49.5 +/- 1.0 mumol.g-1 dry wt, respectively), whereas 31P-NMR-determined [ATP] (18.6 +/- 3.2 mumol.g-1 dry wt) was only 71% of the total tissue concentration (26.1 +/- 1.7 mumol.g-1 dry wt, P < 0.01). Isolation and Langendorff perfusion of rat hearts with glucose as substrate reduced total tissue [ATP] and [PCr] and the 31P-NMR-determined PCr/ATP ratio fell to 1.5 +/- 0.1. This value agreed well with the total tissue ratio of 1.4 +/- 0.1, and there was excellent agreement between 31P-NMR-determined and total tissue [PCr] and [ATP] values in the perfused heart. Addition of pyruvate to perfusate increased the 31P-NMR-determined PCr/ATP ratio to 1.7 +/- 0.1 due to elevated [PCr], and there remained excellent agreement between NMR-determined and total tissue [PCr] and [ATP] values. Free cytosolic [ADP] (from the creatine kinase equilibrium) was 5% of total tissue ADP, and free cytosolic [5'-AMP] (from the adenylate kinase equilibrium) ranged from 0.2-0.3% of total tissue 5'-AMP. Bioenergetic state, indexed by [ATP]/[ADP].[Pi], was much lower in isolated perfused hearts (30 mM-1) vs. in situ myocardium (approximately 150 mM-1). In summary, we observe a substantial disproportionality between total tissue PCr/ATP and 31P-NMR-determined PCr/ATP in highly energised in situ myocardium but not in isolated perfused hearts. This appears due to an NMR invisible ATP compartment approximating 29

  13. Solid-state NMR studies of a diverged microsomal amino-proximate delta12 desaturase peptide reveal causes of stability in bilayer: tyrosine anchoring and arginine snorkeling.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, William J; Karp, Ethan S; Cellar, Nick A; Minto, Robert E; Lorigan, Gary A

    2006-02-15

    This study reports the solid-state NMR spectroscopic characterization of the amino-proximate transmembrane domain (TM-A) of a diverged microsomal delta12-desaturase (CREP-1) in a phospholipid bilayer. A series of TM-A peptides were synthesized with 2H-labeled side chains (Ala-53, -56, and -63, Leu-62, Val-50), and their dynamic properties were studied in 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers at various temperatures. At 6 mol % peptide to lipid, 31P NMR spectra indicated that the peptides did not significantly disrupt the phospholipid bilayer in the L(alpha) phase. The 2H NMR spectra from Ala-53 and Ala-56 samples revealed broad Pake patterns with quadrupolar splittings of 16.9 kHz and 13.3 kHz, respectively, indicating restricted motion confined within the hydrocarbon core of the phospholipid bilayer. Conversely, the deuterated Ala-63 sample revealed a peak centered at 0 kHz with a linewidth of 1.9 kHz, indicating increased side-chain motion and solvent exposure relative to the spectra of the other Ala residues. Val-50 and Leu-62 showed Pake patterns, with quadrupolar splittings of 3.5 kHz and 3.7 kHz, respectively, intermediate to Ala-53/Ala-56 and Ala-63. This indicates partial motional averaging and supports a model with the Val and Leu residues embedded inside the lipid bilayer. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy performed on the 2H-labeled Ala-56 TM-A peptide incorporated into magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers indicated that the peptide is tilted 8 degrees with respect to the membrane normal of the lipid bilayer. Snorkeling and anchoring interactions of Arg-44 and Tyr-60, respectively, with the polar region or polar hydrophobic interface of the lipid bilayer are suggested as control elements for insertional depth and orientation of the helix in the lipid matrix. Thus, this study defines the location of key residues in TM-A with respect to the lipid bilayer, describes the conformation of TM-A in a biomembrane mimic, presents a

  14. Solid-state 19F-NMR analysis of 19F-labeled tryptophan in gramicidin A in oriented membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Grage, Stephan L; Wang, Junfeng; Cross, Timothy A; Ulrich, Anne S

    2002-01-01

    The response of membrane-associated peptides toward the lipid environment or other binding partners can be monitored by solid-state NMR of suitably labeled side chains. Tryptophan is a prominent amino acid in transmembrane helices, and its (19)F-labeled analogues are generally biocompatible and cause little structural perturbation. Hence, we use 5F-Trp as a highly sensitive NMR probe to monitor the conformation and dynamics of the indole ring. To establish this (19)F-NMR strategy, gramicidin A was labeled with 5F-Trp in position 13 or 15, whose chi(1)/chi(2) torsion angles are known from previous (2)H-NMR studies. First, the alignment of the (19)F chemical shift anisotropy tensor within the membrane was deduced by lineshape analysis of oriented samples. Next, the three principal axes of the (19)F chemical shift anisotropy tensor were assigned within the molecular frame of the indole ring. Finally, determination of chi(1)/chi(2) for 5F-Trp in the lipid gel phase showed that the side chain alignment differs by up to 20 degrees from its known conformation in the liquid crystalline state. The sensitivity gain of (19)F-NMR and the reduction in the amount of material was at least 10-fold compared with previous (2)H-NMR studies on the same system and 100-fold compared with (15)N-NMR. PMID:12496101

  15. Investigation of the Curvature Induction and Membrane Localization of the Influenza Virus M2 Protein Using Static and Off-Magic-Angle Spinning Solid-State NMR of Oriented Bicelles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tuo; Hong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of membrane proteins induce membrane curvature for function, thus it is important to develop new methods to simultaneously determine membrane curvature and protein binding sites in membranes with multiple curvatures. We introduce solid-state NMR methods based on magnetically oriented bicelles and off-magic-angle spinning (OMAS) to measure membrane curvature and the binding site of proteins in mixed-curvature membranes. We demonstrate these methods on the influenza virus M2 protein, which not only acts as a proton channel but also mediates virus assembly and membrane scission. An M2 peptide encompassing the transmembrane (TM) domain and an amphipathic helix, M2(21-61), was studied and compared with the TM peptide (M2TM). Static 31P NMR spectra of magnetically oriented DMPC/DHPC bicelles exhibit a temperature-independent isotropic chemical shift in the presence of M2(21-61) but not M2TM, indicating that the amphipathic helix confers the peptide with the ability to generate a high-curvature phase. 2D 31P spectra indicate that this high-curvature phase is associated with the DHPC bicelle edges, suggestive of the structure of budding viruses from the host cell. 31P- and 13C-detected 1H relaxation times of the lipids indicate that the majority of M2(21-61) is bound to the high-curvature phase. Using OMAS experiments, we resolved the 31P signals of lipids with identical headgroups based on their distinct chemical shift anisotropies. Based on this resolution, 2D 1H-31P correlation spectra show that the amide protons in M2(21-61) correlate with the DMPC but not the DHPC 31P signal of the bicelle, indicating that a small percentage of M2(21-61) partitions into the planar region of the bicelles. These results show that the M2 amphipathic helix induces high membrane curvature and localizes the protein to this phase, in excellent agreement with the membrane-scission function of the protein. These bicelle-based relaxation and OMAS solid-state NMR techniques are

  16. Phospholipid fingerprints of milk from different mammalians determined by 31P NMR: towards specific interest in human health.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Cyrielle; Lutz, Norbert W; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Cozzone, Patrick J; Armand, Martine; Bernard, Monique

    2012-12-01

    Our objective was to identify and quantify phospholipids in milk from different species (human HM, cow CoM, camel CaM, and mare MM) using an optimised (31)P NMR spectroscopy procedure. The phospholipid fingerprints were species-specific with a broader variety of classes found in HM and MM; HM and CaM were richer in sphingomyelin (78.3 and 117.5μg/ml) and plasmalogens (27.3 and 24μg/ml), possibly important for infant development. Total phospholipid content was higher in CaM (0.503mM) and lower in MM (0.101mM) compared to HM (0.324mM) or CoM (0.265mM). Our optimised method showed good sensitivity, high resolution, and easy sample preparation with minimal loss of target molecules. It is suitable for determining the accurate composition of a large number of bioactive phospholipids with putative health benefits, including plasmalogens, and should aid in selecting appropriate ingredient sources for infant milk substitutes or fortifiers, and for functional foods dedicated to adults.

  17. Dynamic structures of intact chicken erythrocyte chromatins as studied by 1H-31P cross-polarization NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Akutsu, H; Nishimoto, S; Kyogoku, Y

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic properties of DNA in intact chicken erythrocyte cells, nuclei, nondigested chromatins, digested soluble chromatins, H1, H5-depleted soluble chromatins and nucleosome cores were investigated by means of single-pulse and 1H-31P cross-polarization NMR. The temperature dependence of the phosphorus chemical shift anisotropy was identical for the former three in the presence of 3 mM MgCl2, suggesting that the local higher order structure is identical for these chromatins. The intrinsic phosphorus chemical shift anisotropy of the nucleosome cores was -159 ppm. The chemical shift anisotropy of DNA in the chromatins can be further averaged by the motion of the linker DNA. The spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame of the proton spins (T1p) of the nondigested chromatins was measured at various locking fields. The result was analyzed on the assumption of the isotropic motion to get a rough value of the correlation time of the motion efficient for the relaxation, which was eventually ascribed to the segmental motion of the linker DNA with restricted amplitude. The 30 nm filament structure induced by NaCl was shown to be dynamically different from that induced by MgCl2. Side-by-side compaction of 30-nm filaments was suggested to be induced in the MgCl2 concentration range higher than 0.3 mM. Biological significance of the dynamic structure was discussed in connection with the results obtained. PMID:7948693

  18. Quantitative 31P NMR analysis of solid wood offers an insight into the acetylation of its components.

    PubMed

    Sadeghifar, Hasan; Dickerson, James P; Argyropoulos, Dimitris S

    2014-11-26

    As a solid substrate, wood and its components are almost invariably examined via spectroscopic or indirect methods of analysis. Unlike earlier approaches, in this effort we dissolve pulverized wood in ionic liquid and then directly derive its functional group contents by quantitative (31)P NMR. As such, this novel analytical methodology is thoroughly examined and an insight into the detailed way acetylation proceeds on solid wood and its components is provided as a function of wood density and within its various anatomical features. As anticipated, the efficiency of acetylation was found to be greater within low density wood than in high density wood. The lignin, the cellulose and the hemicelluloses of the low density wood was found to be acetylated nearly twice as fast with remarkable differences in their quantitative degree of acetylation amongst them. This direct analytical data validates the applied methodology and confirms, for the first time, that the order of acetylation in solid wood is lignin>hemicellulose>cellulose and no reactivity differences exist between early wood and late wood.

  19. Heating and temperature gradients of lipid bilayer samples induced by RF irradiation in MAS solid-state NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Zhengfeng; Zhao, Weijing; Wang, Liying; Yang, Jun

    2016-05-09

    The MAS solid-state NMR has been a powerful technique for studying membrane proteins within the native-like lipid bilayer environment. In general, RF irradiation in MAS NMR experiments can heat and potentially destroy expensive membrane protein samples. However, under practical MAS NMR experimental conditions, detailed characterization of RF heating effect of lipid bilayer samples is still lacking. Herein, using (1) H chemical shift of water for temperature calibration, we systematically study the dependence of RF heating on hydration levels and salt concentrations of three lipids in MAS NMR experiments. Under practical (1) H decoupling conditions used in biological MAS NMR experiments, three lipids show different dependence of RF heating on hydration levels as well as salt concentrations, which are closely associated with the properties of lipids. The maximum temperature elevation of about 10 °C is similar for the three lipids containing 200% hydration, which is much lower than that in static solid-state NMR experiments. The RF heating due to salt is observed to be less than that due to hydration, with a maximum temperature elevation of less than 4 °C in the hydrated samples containing 120 mmol l(-1) of salt. Upon RF irradiation, the temperature gradient across the sample is observed to be greatly increased up to 20 °C, as demonstrated by the remarkable broadening of (1) H signal of water. Based on detailed characterization of RF heating effect, we demonstrate that RF heating and temperature gradient can be significantly reduced by decreasing the hydration levels of lipid bilayer samples from 200% to 30%. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Spin-transfer pathways in paramagnetic lithium transition-metal phosphates from combined broadband isotropic solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Clément, Raphaële J; Pell, Andrew J; Middlemiss, Derek S; Strobridge, Fiona C; Miller, Joel K; Whittingham, M Stanley; Emsley, Lyndon; Grey, Clare P; Pintacuda, Guido

    2012-10-17

    Substituted lithium transition-metal (TM) phosphate LiFe(x)Mn(1-x)PO(4) materials with olivine-type structures are among the most promising next generation lithium ion battery cathodes. However, a complete atomic-level description of the structure of such phases is not yet available. Here, a combined experimental and theoretical approach to the detailed assignment of the (31)P NMR spectra of the LiFe(x)Mn(1-x)PO(4) (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1) pure and mixed TM phosphates is developed and applied. Key to the present work is the development of a new NMR experiment enabling the characterization of complex paramagnetic materials via the complete separation of the individual isotropic chemical shifts, along with solid-state hybrid DFT calculations providing the separate hyperfine contributions of all distinct Mn-O-P and Fe-O-P bond pathways. The NMR experiment, referred to as aMAT, makes use of short high-powered adiabatic pulses (SHAPs), which can achieve 100% inversion over a range of isotropic shifts on the order of 1 MHz and with anisotropies greater than 100 kHz. In addition to complete spectral assignments of the mixed phases, the present study provides a detailed insight into the differences in electronic structure driving the variations in hyperfine parameters across the range of materials. A simple model delimiting the effects of distortions due to Mn/Fe substitution is also proposed and applied. The combined approach has clear future applications to TM-bearing battery cathode phases in particular and for the understanding of complex paramagnetic phases in general.

  1. Protein secondary structure of Green Lynx spider dragline silk investigated by solid-state NMR and X-ray diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dian; Shi, Xiangyan; Thompson, Forrest; Weber, Warner S.; Mou, Qiushi; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the secondary structure of the major ampullate silk from Peucetia viridans (Green Lynx) spiders is characterized by X-ray diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. From X-ray diffraction measurement, β-sheet nanocrystallites were observed and found to be highly oriented along the fiber axis, with an orientational order, fc ≈ 0.98. The size of the nanocrystallites was determined to be on average 2.5 nm × 3.3 nm × 3.8 nm. Besides a prominent nanocrystalline region, a partially oriented amorphous region was also observed with an fa ≈ 0.89. Two-dimensional 13C–13C through-space and through-bond solid-state NMR experiments were employed to elucidate structure details of P. viridans silk proteins. It reveals that β-sheet nanocrystallites constitutes 40.0 ± 1.2% of the protein and are dominated by alanine-rich repetitive motifs. Furthermore, based upon the NMR data, 18 ± 1% of alanine, 60 ± 2% glycine and 54 ± 2% serine are incorporated into helical conformations. PMID:26226457

  2. Solid-State (17)O NMR of Oxygen-Nitrogen Singly Bonded Compounds: Hydroxylammonium Chloride and Sodium Trioxodinitrate (Angeli's Salt).

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiasheng; Kong, Xianqi; Terskikh, Victor; Wu, Gang

    2015-07-23

    We report a solid-state NMR study of (17)O-labeled hydroxylammonium chloride ([H(17)O-NH3]Cl) and sodium trioxodinitrate monohydrate (Na2[(17)ONNO2]·H2O, Angeli's salt). The common feature in these two compounds is that they both contain oxygen atoms that are singly bonded to nitrogen. For this class of oxygen-containing functional groups, there is very limited solid-state (17)O NMR data in the literature. In this work, we experimentally measured the (17)O chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling tensors. With the aid of plane-wave DFT computation, the (17)O NMR tensor orientations were determined in the molecular frame of reference. We found that the characteristic feature of an O-N single bond is that the (17)O nucleus exhibits a large quadrupolar coupling constant (13-15 MHz) but a rather small chemical shift anisotropy (100-250 ppm), in sharp contrast with the nitroso (O═N) functional group for which both quantities are very large (e.g., 16 MHz and 3000 ppm, respectively).

  3. Bottom-up and top-down solid-state NMR approaches for bacterial biofilm matrix composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-04-01

    The genomics and proteomics revolutions have been enormously successful in providing crucial "parts lists" for biological systems. Yet, formidable challenges exist in generating complete descriptions of how the parts function and assemble into macromolecular complexes and whole-cell assemblies. Bacterial biofilms are complex multicellular bacterial communities protected by a slime-like extracellular matrix that confers protection to environmental stress and enhances resistance to antibiotics and host defenses. As a non-crystalline, insoluble, heterogeneous assembly, the biofilm extracellular matrix poses a challenge to compositional analysis by conventional methods. In this perspective, bottom-up and top-down solid-state NMR approaches are described for defining chemical composition in complex macrosystems. The "sum-of-the-parts" bottom-up approach was introduced to examine the amyloid-integrated biofilms formed by Escherichia coli and permitted the first determination of the composition of the intact extracellular matrix from a bacterial biofilm. An alternative top-down approach was developed to define composition in Vibrio cholerae biofilms and relied on an extensive panel of NMR measurements to tease out specific carbon pools from a single sample of the intact extracellular matrix. These two approaches are widely applicable to other heterogeneous assemblies. For bacterial biofilms, quantitative parameters of matrix composition are needed to understand how biofilms are assembled, to improve the development of biofilm inhibitors, and to dissect inhibitor modes of action. Solid-state NMR approaches will also be invaluable in obtaining parameters of matrix architecture.

  4. Ab Initio Quality NMR Parameters in Solid-State Materials Using a High-Dimensional Neural-Network Representation.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Jérôme; Xie, Yu; Pickard, Chris J; Hassanali, Ali A

    2016-02-09

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most powerful experimental tools to probe the local atomic order of a wide range of solid-state compounds. However, due to the complexity of the related spectra, in particular for amorphous materials, their interpretation in terms of structural information is often challenging. These difficulties can be overcome by combining molecular dynamics simulations to generate realistic structural models with an ab initio evaluation of the corresponding chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling tensors. However, due to computational constraints, this approach is limited to relatively small system sizes which, for amorphous materials, prevents an adequate statistical sampling of the distribution of the local environments that is required to quantitatively describe the system. In this work, we present an approach to efficiently and accurately predict the NMR parameters of very large systems. This is achieved by using a high-dimensional neural-network representation of NMR parameters that are calculated using an ab initio formalism. To illustrate the potential of this approach, we applied this neural-network NMR (NN-NMR) method on the (17)O and (29)Si quadrupolar coupling and chemical shift parameters of various crystalline silica polymorphs and silica glasses. This approach is, in principal, general and has the potential to be applied to predict the NMR properties of various materials.

  5. Proton clouds to measure long-range contacts between nonexchangeable side chain protons in solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Sinnige, Tessa; Daniëls, Mark; Baldus, Marc; Weingarth, Markus

    2014-03-26

    We show that selective labeling of proteins with protonated amino acids embedded in a perdeuterated matrix, dubbed 'proton clouds', provides general access to long-range contacts between nonexchangeable side chain protons in proton-detected solid-state NMR, which is important to study protein tertiary structure. Proton-cloud labeling significantly improves spectral resolution by simultaneously reducing proton line width and spectral crowding despite a high local proton density in clouds. The approach is amenable to almost all canonical amino acids. Our method is demonstrated on ubiquitin and the β-barrel membrane protein BamA.

  6. 1H-detected solid-state NMR of proteins entrapped in bioinspired silica: a new tool for biomaterials characterization

    PubMed Central

    Ravera, Enrico; Cerofolini, Linda; Martelli, Tommaso; Louka, Alexandra; Fragai, Marco; Luchinat, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Proton-detection in solid-state NMR, enabled by high magnetic fields (>18 T) and fast magic angle spinning (>50 kHz), allows for the acquisition of traditional 1H-15N experiments on systems that are too big to be observed in solution. Among those, proteins entrapped in a bioinspired silica matrix are an attractive target that is receiving a large share of attention. We demonstrate that 1H-detected SSNMR provides a novel approach to the rapid assessment of structural integrity in proteins entrapped in bioinspired silica. PMID:27279168

  7. 1H-detected solid-state NMR of proteins entrapped in bioinspired silica: a new tool for biomaterials characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravera, Enrico; Cerofolini, Linda; Martelli, Tommaso; Louka, Alexandra; Fragai, Marco; Luchinat, Claudio

    2016-06-01

    Proton-detection in solid-state NMR, enabled by high magnetic fields (>18 T) and fast magic angle spinning (>50 kHz), allows for the acquisition of traditional 1H-15N experiments on systems that are too big to be observed in solution. Among those, proteins entrapped in a bioinspired silica matrix are an attractive target that is receiving a large share of attention. We demonstrate that 1H-detected SSNMR provides a novel approach to the rapid assessment of structural integrity in proteins entrapped in bioinspired silica.

  8. Use of microcoil probehead for determination of the structure of oriented silk fibers by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, K; Imada, T; Asakura, T

    2005-09-22

    A microcoil probehead for solid-state NMR was developed with a two-channel radio-frequency circuit, and 13C observation with a proton-decoupling probehead was performed to obtain information on the distribution of the orientation of silk fibroin molecules in the fiber. The coil (1 mm (diameter) x 5 mm (length)) of the probehead was placed at the angles 90 degrees and 30 degrees , relative to the static magnetic field. Only 70 mug of [1-13C]Gly silk fibroin fiber was used in a magnet of 9.4 T (400 MHz for proton channel).

  9. Detailed Chemical Composition of Condensed Tannins via Quantitative (31)P NMR and HSQC Analyses: Acacia catechu, Schinopsis balansae, and Acacia mearnsii.

    PubMed

    Crestini, Claudia; Lange, Heiko; Bianchetti, Giulia

    2016-09-23

    The chemical composition of Acacia catechu, Schinopsis balansae, and Acacia mearnsii proanthocyanidins has been determined using a novel analytical approach that rests on the concerted use of quantitative (31)P NMR and two-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. This approach has offered significant detailed information regarding the structure and purity of these complex and often elusive proanthocyanidins. More specifically, rings A, B, and C of their flavan-3-ol units show well-defined and resolved absorbance regions in both the quantitative (31)P NMR and HSQC spectra. By integrating each of these regions in the (31)P NMR spectra, it is possible to identify the oxygenation patterns of the flavan-3-ol units. At the same time it is possible to acquire a fingerprint of the proanthocyanidin sample and evaluate its purity via the HSQC information. This analytical approach is suitable for both the purified natural product proanthocyanidins and their commercial analogues. Overall, this effort demonstrates the power of the concerted use of these two NMR techniques for the structural elucidation of natural products containing labile hydroxy protons and a carbon framework that can be traced out via HSQC.

  10. Characterization of Non-Innocent Metal Complexes Using Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: o-Dioxolene Vanadium Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Pabitra B.; Goncharov-Zapata, Olga; Quinn, Laurence L.; Hou, Guangjin; Hamaed, Hiyam; Schurko, Robert W.; Polenova, Tatyana; Crans, Debbie C.

    2012-01-01

    51V solid-state NMR (SSNMR) studies of a series of non-innocent vanadium(V) catechol complexes have been conducted to evaluate the possibility that 51V NMR observables, quadrupolar and chemical shift anisotropies, and electronic structures of such compounds can be used to characterize these compounds. The vanadium(V) catechol complexes described in these studies have relatively small quadrupolar coupling constants, which cover a surprisingly small range from 3.4 to 4.2 MHz. On the other hand, isotropic 51V NMR chemical shifts cover a wide range from −200 ppm to 400 ppm in solution and from −219 to 530 ppm in the solid state. A linear correlation of 51V NMR isotropic solution and solid-state chemical shifts of complexes containing non-innocent ligands is observed. These experimental results provide the information needed for the application of 51V SSNMR spectroscopy in characterizing the electronic properties of a wide variety of vanadium-containing systems, and in particular those containing non-innocent ligands and that have chemical shifts outside the populated range of −300 ppm to −700 ppm. The studies presented in this report demonstrate that the small quadrupolar couplings covering a narrow range of values reflect the symmetric electronic charge distribution, which is also similar across these complexes. These quadrupolar interaction parameters alone are not sufficient to capture the rich electronic structure of these complexes. In contrast, the chemical shift anisotropy tensor elements accessible from 51V SSNMR experiments are a highly sensitive probe of subtle differences in electronic distribution and orbital occupancy in these compounds. Quantum chemical (DFT) calculations of NMR parameters for [VO(hshed)(Cat)] yield 51V CSA tensor in reasonable agreement with the experimental results, but surprisingly, the calculated quadrupolar coupling constant is significantly greater than the experimental value. The studies demonstrate that substitution of the

  11. Using solid 13C NMR coupled with solution 31P NMR spectroscopy to investigate molecular species and lability of organic carbon and phosphorus from aquatic plants in Tai Lake, China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquatic plants are involved in the storage and release capacity for organic matter and nutrients. In this study, solid 13C and solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the biomass samples of six aquatic plants. Solid 13C NMR spectroscopy revealed the domin...

  12. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: insights from solid-state 13C NMR and solution 31P NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions...

  13. Dynamic nuclear polarization solid-state NMR in heterogeneous catalysis research

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Perras, Frédéric A.; Slowing, Igor I.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Pruski, Marek

    2015-10-20

    In this study, a revolution in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy is taking place, attributable to the rapid development of high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), a technique yielding sensitivity improvements of 2–3 orders of magnitude. This higher sensitivity in SSNMR has already impacted materials research, and the implications of new methods on catalytic sciences are expected to be profound.

  14. Dynamic nuclear polarization solid-state NMR in heterogeneous catalysis research

    DOE PAGES

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Perras, Frédéric A.; Slowing, Igor I.; ...

    2015-10-20

    In this study, a revolution in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy is taking place, attributable to the rapid development of high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), a technique yielding sensitivity improvements of 2–3 orders of magnitude. This higher sensitivity in SSNMR has already impacted materials research, and the implications of new methods on catalytic sciences are expected to be profound.

  15. The effect of ethanol on hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine: (31)P-NMR and (19)F-NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Celikbag, Yusuf; Via, Brian K; Adhikari, Sushil; Buschle-Diller, Gisela; Auad, Maria L

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the role of ethanol and temperature on the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced from hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine (Pinus spp.) carried out at 250, 300, 350 and 390°C for 30min. Water and water/ethanol mixture (1/1, wt/wt) were used as liquefying solvent in the HTL experiments. HTL in water and water/ethanol is donated as W-HTL and W/E-HTL, respectively. It was found that 300°C and water/ethanol solvent was the optimum liquefaction temperature and solvent, yielding up to 68.1wt.% bio-oil and 2.4wt.% solid residue. (31)P-NMR analysis showed that biopolyol produced by W-HTL was rich in phenolic OH while W/E-HTL produced more aliphatic OH rich biopolyols. Moreover, biopolyols with higher hydroxyl concentration were produced by W/E-HTL. Carbonyl groups were analyzed by (19)F-NMR, which showed that ethanol reduced the concentration of carbonyl groups.

  16. Toward a structure determination method for biomineral-associated protein using combined solid- state NMR and computational structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Masica, David L; Ash, Jason T; Ndao, Moise; Drobny, Gary P; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2010-12-08

    Protein-biomineral interactions are paramount to materials production in biology, including the mineral phase of hard tissue. Unfortunately, the structure of biomineral-associated proteins cannot be determined by X-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Here we report a method for determining the structure of biomineral-associated proteins. The method combines solid-state NMR (ssNMR) and ssNMR-biased computational structure prediction. In addition, the algorithm is able to identify lattice geometries most compatible with ssNMR constraints, representing a quantitative, novel method for investigating crystal-face binding specificity. We use this method to determine most of the structure of human salivary statherin interacting with the mineral phase of tooth enamel. Computation and experiment converge on an ensemble of related structures and identify preferential binding at three crystal surfaces. The work represents a significant advance toward determining structure of biomineral-adsorbed protein using experimentally biased structure prediction. This method is generally applicable to proteins that can be chemically synthesized.

  17. Wheat-germ cell-free production of prion proteins for solid-state NMR structural studies.

    PubMed

    Noirot, Claire; Habenstein, Birgit; Bousset, Luc; Melki, Ronald; Meier, Beat H; Endo, Yaeta; Penin, François; Böckmann, Anja

    2011-04-30

    The expression of soluble, functional protein on a preparative scale poses a central challenge for structural studies. Cell-free protein expression has become a valuable alternative to cell-based methods, and allows today the expression of milligram quantities of protein. Its use is particularly attractive for NMR studies as it allows a multitude of isotopic labeling schemes. We have implemented and further developed protocols to prepare cell-free extracts from wheat germ to produce recombinant protein for solid-state NMR studies. Furthermore, we established the Renilla luciferase model to optimise and evaluate extract quality, and report first productions of the prions Ure2p and HET-s devoted to structural studies currently ongoing in our laboratories.

  18. Light activation of rhodopsin: insights from molecular dynamics simulations guided by solid-state NMR distance restraints

    PubMed Central

    Hornak, Viktor; Ahuja, Shivani; Eilers, Markus; Goncalves, Joseph A.; Sheves, Mordechai; Reeves, Philip J.; Smith, Steven O.

    2009-01-01

    Structural restraints provided by solid-state NMR measurements of the metarhodopsin II intermediate are combined with molecular dynamics simulations to help visualize the structural changes in the light activation of rhodopsin. Since the time scale for the formation of the metarhodopsin II intermediate (> 1 ms) is beyond that readily accessible by molecular dynamics, we use NMR distance restraints derived from 13C dipolar recoupling measurements to guide the simulations. The simulations yield a working model for how photoisomerization of the 11-cis retinylidene chromophore bound within the interior of rhodopsin is coupled to transmembrane helix motion and receptor activation. The mechanism of activation that emerges is that multiple switches on the extracellular (or intradiscal) side of rhodopsin trigger structural changes that converge to disrupt the ionic lock between helices H3 and H6 on the intracellular side of the receptor. PMID:20004206

  19. Characterization by solid-state NMR and selective dissolution techniques of anhydrous and hydrated CEM V cement pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Brunet, F.; Charpentier, T.; Chao, C.N.; Peycelon, H.; Nonat, A.

    2010-02-15

    The long term behaviour of cement based materials is strongly dependent on the paste microstructure and also on the internal chemistry. A CEM V blended cement containing pulverised fly ash (PFA) and blastfurnace slag (BFS) has been studied in order to understand hydration processes which influence the paste microstructure. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy with complementary X-ray diffraction analysis and selective dissolution techniques have been used for the characterization of the various phases (C{sub 3}S, C{sub 2}S, C{sub 3}A and C{sub 4}AF) of the clinker and additives and then for estimation of the degree of hydration of these same phases. Their quantification after simulation of experimental {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectra has allowed us to follow the hydration of recent (28 days) and old (10 years) samples that constitutes a basis of experimental data for the prediction of hydration model.

  20. Quantitative (31)P NMR spectroscopy and (1)H MRI measurements of bone mineral and matrix density differentiate metabolic bone diseases in rat models.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haihui; Nazarian, Ara; Ackerman, Jerome L; Snyder, Brian D; Rosenberg, Andrew E; Nazarian, Rosalynn M; Hrovat, Mirko I; Dai, Guangping; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Wu, Yaotang

    2010-06-01

    In this study, bone mineral density (BMD) of normal (CON), ovariectomized (OVX), and partially nephrectomized (NFR) rats was measured by (31)P NMR spectroscopy; bone matrix density was measured by (1)H water- and fat-suppressed projection imaging (WASPI); and the extent of bone mineralization (EBM) was obtained by the ratio of BMD/bone matrix density. The capability of these MR methods to distinguish the bone composition of the CON, OVX, and NFR groups was evaluated against chemical analysis (gravimetry). For cortical bone specimens, BMD of the CON and OVX groups was not significantly different; BMD of the NFR group was 22.1% (by (31)P NMR) and 17.5% (by gravimetry) lower than CON. For trabecular bone specimens, BMD of the OVX group was 40.5% (by (31)P NMR) and 24.6% (by gravimetry) lower than CON; BMD of the NFR group was 26.8% (by (31)P NMR) and 21.5% (by gravimetry) lower than CON. No significant change of cortical bone matrix density between CON and OVX was observed by WASPI or gravimetry; NFR cortical bone matrix density was 10.3% (by WASPI) and 13.9% (by gravimetry) lower than CON. OVX trabecular bone matrix density was 38.0% (by WASPI) and 30.8% (by gravimetry) lower than CON, while no significant change in NFR trabecular bone matrix density was observed by either method. The EBMs of OVX cortical and trabecular specimens were slightly higher than CON but not significantly different from CON. Importantly, EBMs of NFR cortical and trabecular specimens were 12.4% and 26.3% lower than CON by (31)P NMR/WASPI, respectively, and 4.0% and 11.9% lower by gravimetry. Histopathology showed evidence of osteoporosis in the OVX group and severe secondary hyperparathyroidism (renal osteodystrophy) in the NFR group. These results demonstrate that the combined (31)P NMR/WASPI method is capable of discerning the difference in EBM between animals with osteoporosis and those with impaired bone mineralization.

  1. Study of cross - relaxation and molecular dynamics in the solid 3-(trifluoromethyl) benzoic acid by solid state NMR off - resonance.

    PubMed

    Woźniak-Braszak, Aneta

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics of the solid 3-(trifluoromethyl) benzoic acid containing proton (1)H and fluorine (19)F nuclei was explored by the solid-state NMR off - resonance technique. Contrary to the previous experiments the proton nuclei system I relaxed in the off - resonance effective field B→e while fluorine nuclei system S was saturated for short time in comparison to the relaxation time T1I. New cross - relaxation solid - state NMR off - resonance experiments were conducted on a homebuilt pulse spectrometer operating at the on-resonance frequency of 30.2MHz, at the off - resonance frequency varied between 30.2 and 30.6MHz for protons and at the frequency of 28.411MHz for fluorines, respectively. Based on the experimental data the dispersions of the proton off - resonance spin - lattice relaxation rate ρρ(I), the fluorine off - resonance spin - lattice relaxation rate ρρ(S) and the cross - relaxation rate σρ in the rotating frame were determined.

  2. Effective Hamiltonians by optimal control: solid-state NMR double-quantum planar and isotropic dipolar recoupling.

    PubMed

    Tosner, Zdenek; Glaser, Steffen J; Khaneja, Navin; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2006-11-14

    We report the use of optimal control algorithms for tailoring the effective Hamiltonians in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy through sophisticated radio-frequency (rf) pulse irradiation. Specifically, we address dipolar recoupling in solid-state NMR of powder samples for which case pulse sequences offering evolution under planar double-quantum and isotropic mixing dipolar coupling Hamiltonians are designed. The pulse sequences are constructed numerically to cope with a range of experimental conditions such as inhomogeneous rf fields, spread of chemical shifts, the intrinsic orientation dependencies of powder samples, and sample spinning. While the vast majority of previous dipolar recoupling sequences are operating through planar double-or zero-quantum effective Hamiltonians, we present here not only improved variants of such experiments but also for the first time homonuclear isotropic mixing sequences which transfers all I(x), I(y), and I(z) polarizations from one spin to the same operators on another spin simultaneously and with equal efficiency. This property may be exploited to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of two-dimensional experiments by a factor of square root 2 compared to conventional solid-state methods otherwise showing the same efficiency. The sequences are tested numerically and experimentally for a powder of (13)C(alpha),(13)C(beta)-L-alanine and demonstrate substantial sensitivity gains over previous dipolar recoupling experiments.

  3. Structure of uniaxially aligned 13C labeled silk fibroin fibers with solid state 13C-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demura, Makoto; Yamazaki, Yasunobu; Asakura, Tetsuo; Ogawa, Katsuaki

    1998-01-01

    Carbon-13 isotopic labeling of B. mori silk fibroin was achieved biosynthetically with [1- 13C] glycine in order to determine the carbonyl bond orientation angle of glycine sites with the silk fibroin. Angular dependence of 13C solid state NMR spectra of uniaxially oriented silk fibroin fiber block sample due to the carbonyl 13C chemical shift anisotropy was simulated according to the chemical shift transformation with Euler angles, αF and βF, from principal axis system (PAS) to fiber axis system (FAS). The another Euler angles, αDCO and βDCO, for transformation from PAS to the molecular symmetry axis were determined from the [1- 13C] glycine sequence model compounds for the silk fibroin. By the combination of these Euler angles, the carbonyl bond orientation angle with respect to FAS of the [1- 13C] glycine sites of the silk fibroin was determined to be 90 ± 5°. This value is in agreement with the X-ray diffraction and our previous solid state NMR data of B. mori silk fibroin fiber (a typical β-pleated sheet) within experimental error.

  4. Probing hydrogen bonding in cocrystals and amorphous dispersions using (14)N-(1)H HMQC solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Tatton, Andrew S; Pham, Tran N; Vogt, Frederick G; Iuga, Dinu; Edwards, Andrew J; Brown, Steven P

    2013-03-04

    Cocrystals and amorphous solid dispersions have generated interest in the pharmaceutical industry as an alternative to more established solid delivery forms. The identification of intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions in a nicotinamide palmitic acid cocrystal and a 50% w/w acetaminophen-polyvinylpyrrolidone solid dispersion are reported using advanced solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR methods. The application of a novel (14)N-(1)H HMQC experiment, where coherence transfer is achieved via through-space couplings, is shown to identify specific hydrogen bonding motifs. Additionally, (1)H isotropic chemical shifts and (14)N electric field gradient (EFG) parameters, both accessible from (14)N-(1)H HMQC experiments, are shown to be sensitive to changes in hydrogen bonding geometry. Numerous indicators of molecular association are accessible from this experiment, including NH cross-peaks occurring from intermolecular hydrogen bonds and changes in proton chemical shifts or electric field gradient parameters. First-principles calculations using the GIPAW approach that yield accurate estimates of isotropic chemical shifts, and EFG parameters were used to assist in assignment. It is envisaged that (14)N-(1)H HMQC solid state NMR experiments could become a valuable screening technique of solid delivery forms in the pharmaceutical industry.

  5. {sup 31}P NMR study of the complexation of TBP with lanthanides and actinides in solution and in a clay matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Hartzell, C.J.

    1994-07-24

    Goal was to use NMR to study TBP/lanthanide complexes in the interlayer or on edge sites of clays. Work in this laboratory yielded details of the complexation of Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} with TBP in hexane solution; this information is crucial to interpretation of results of NMR studies of the complexes exchanged into clays. The solution {sup 31}P-chemical shift values were improved by repeating the studies on the lanthanide salts dissolved directly into neat TBP. NMR studies of these neat solutions of the Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex and the Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex show that the {sup 31}P chemical shift remains relatively constant for TBP: lanthanide ratios below 3: 1. At higher ratios, the chemical shift approaches that of free TBP, indicating rapid exchange of TBP between the free and complexed state. Exchange of these complexes into the clay hectorite yielded discrete {sup 31}P-NMR signals for the Eu{lg_bullet}TBP complex at -190 ppm and free TBP at -6 ppm. Adsorption of the Pr{lg_bullet}TBP complex yielded broad signals at 76 ppm for the complex and -6 ppm for free TBP. There was no evidence of exchange between the incorporated complex and the free TBP.

  6. Combining (27)Al Solid-State NMR and First-Principles Simulations To Explore Crystal Structure in Disordered Aluminum Oxynitride.

    PubMed

    Tu, Bingtian; Liu, Xin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Weimin; Zhai, Pengcheng; Fu, Zhengyi

    2016-12-19

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique gives insight into the local information in a crystal structure, while Rietveld refinement of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) sketches out the framework of a crystal lattice. In this work, first-principles calculations were combined with the solid-state NMR technique and Rietveld refinement to explore the crystal structure of a disordered aluminum oxynitride (γ-alon). The theoretical NMR parameters (chemical shift, δiso, quadrupolar coupling constants, CQ, and asymmetry parameter, η) of Al22.5O28.5N3.5, predicted by the gauge-including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) algorithm, were used to facilitate the analytical investigation of the (27)Al magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra of the as-prepared sample, whose formula was confirmed to be Al2.811O3.565N0.435 by quantitative analysis. The experimental δiso, CQ, and η of (27)Al showed a small discrepancy compared with theoretical models. The ratio of aluminum located at the 8a to 16d sites was calculated to be 0.531 from the relative integration of peaks in the (27)Al NMR spectra. The occupancies of aluminum at the 8a and 16d positions were determined through NMR investigations to be 0.9755 and 0.9178, respectively, and were used in the Rietveld refinement to obtain the lattice parameter and anion parameter of Al2.811O3.565N0.435. The results from (27)Al NMR investigations and PXRD structural refinement complemented each other. This work provides a powerful and accessible strategy to precisely understand the crystal structure of novel oxynitride materials with multiple disorder.

  7. Solid-State (17) O NMR Reveals Hydrogen-Bonding Energetics: Not All Low-Barrier Hydrogen Bonds Are Strong.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiasheng; Hung, Ivan; Brinkmann, Andreas; Gan, Zhehong; Kong, Xianqi; Wu, Gang

    2017-02-22

    While NMR and IR spectroscopic signatures and structural characteristics of low-barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB) formation are well documented in the literature, direct measurement of the LBHB energy is difficult. Here, we show that solid-state (17) O NMR spectroscopy can provide unique information about the energy required to break a LBHB. Our solid-state (17) O NMR data show that the HB enthalpy of the O⋅⋅⋅H⋅⋅⋅N LBHB formed in crystalline nicotinic acid is only 7.7±0.5 kcal mol(-1) , suggesting that not all LBHBs are particularly strong.

  8. Identification of Li-Ion Battery SEI Compounds through (7)Li and (13)C Solid-State MAS NMR Spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huff, Laura A; Tavassol, Hadi; Esbenshade, Jennifer L; Xing, Wenting; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-01-13

    Solid-state (7)Li and (13)C MAS NMR spectra of cycled graphitic Li-ion anodes demonstrate SEI compound formation upon lithiation that is followed by changes in the SEI upon delithiation. Solid-state (13)C DPMAS NMR shows changes in peaks associated with organic solvent compounds (ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate, EC/DMC) upon electrochemical cycling due to the formation of and subsequent changes in the SEI compounds. Solid-state (13)C NMR spin-lattice (T1) relaxation time measurements of lithiated Li-ion anodes and reference poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) powders, along with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry results, indicate that large-molecular-weight polymers are formed in the SEI layers of the discharged anodes. MALDI-TOF MS and NMR spectroscopy results additionally indicate that delithiated anodes exhibit a larger number of SEI products than is found in lithiated anodes.

  9. Rapid and accurate determination of the lignin content of lignocellulosic biomass by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li; McCallum, Scott A; Miao, Jianjun; Hart, Courtney; Tudryn, Gregory J; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2015-02-01

    Biofuels and biomaterials, produced from lignocellulosic feedstock, require facile access to cellulose and hemicellulose to be competitive with petroleum processing and sugar-based fermentation. Physical-chemical barriers resulting from lignin complicates the hydrolysis biomass into fermentable sugars. Thus, the amount of lignin within a substrate is critical in determining biomass processing. The application of (13)C cross-polarization, magic-angle spinning, and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance for the direct quantification of lignin content in biomass is examined. Using a standard curve constructed from pristine lignin and cellulose, the lignin content of a biomass sample is accurately determined through direct measurement without chemical or enzymatic pre-treatment.

  10. Characterisation of different polymorphs of tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminium(III) using solid-state NMR and DFT calculations

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Mithun; Nayak, Pabitra K; Periasamy, N; Madhu, PK

    2009-01-01

    Background Organic light emitting devices (OLED) are becoming important and characterisation of them, in terms of structure, charge distribution, and intermolecular interactions, is important. Tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)-aluminium(III), known as Alq3, an organomettalic complex has become a reference material of great importance in OLED. It is important to elucidate the structural details of Alq3 in its various isomeric and solvated forms. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a useful tool for this which can also complement the information obtained with X-ray diffraction studies. Results We report here 27Al one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR studies of the meridional (α-phase) and the facial (δ-phase) isomeric forms of Alq3. Quadrupolar parameters are estimated from the 1D spectra under MAS and anisotropic slices of the 2D spectra and also calculated using DFT (density functional theory) quantum-chemical calculations. We have also studied solvated phase of Alq3 containing ethanol in its lattice. We show that both the XRD patterns and the quadrupolar parameters of the solvated phase are different from both the α-phase and the δ-phase, although the fluorescence emission shows no substantial difference between the α-phase and the solvated phase. Moreover, we have shown that after the removal of ethanol from the matrix the solvated Alq3 has similar XRD patterns and quadrupolar parameters to that of the α-phase. Conclusion The 2D MQMAS experiments have shown that all the different modifications of Alq3 have 27Al in single unique crystallographic site. The quadrupolar parameters predicted using the DFT calculation under the isodensity polarisable continuum model resemble closely the experimentally obtained values. The solvated phase of Alq3 containing ethanol has structural difference from the α-phase of Alq3 (containing meridional isomer) from the solid-state NMR studies. Solid-state NMR can

  11. Regenerated silk fibers: Structural studies and solid state NMR techniques for efficient multiple distance determinations in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liivak, Oskar

    2000-09-01

    Material Science is the science of understanding the relationship between the molecular level structure of a material and its macroscopic properties. Such research requires both the ability to determine molecular structure and the ability to control and modify the molecular structure. The present research into silks, especially the dragline silk from the spider Nephila clavipes , is occurring at a time when these two criteria are beginning to be met for proteins like spider silk. Genetic engineering has evolved to the point where material scientists have full control over the primary sequence of amino acids that comprise proteins. In addition, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques exist which allow us to probe molecular structure. This work applies solid state NMR to the study of the structure of silk fibers. In particular, we focus on techniques of fiber regeneration from solution. The purpose is not only to develop the techniques by which genetically engineered fibers could be spun into fibers for mass production but also as a tool into fundamental silk research. Results on these regenerated fibers show a correlation between the fraction of the silk's alanine residues which are in the β-sheet conformation and the ultimate tensile strength of the fibers. In addition, in a clever mating of the fiber regeneration technique and the solid state NMR distance measurement experiment, rotational echo double resonance (REDOR), we investigate the supramolecular topology of the alanine β-sheet crystals. Even though the REDOR technique has failings for the complicated ISn spin systems found in the silk samples, a qualitative analysis does indicate that the β-sheet crystals are intermolecular. Finally, we investigate a new class of REDOR-like experiments which are designed to overcome the failings of REDOR in ISn spin systems. Experimental data is shown to validate these ideas. An alternate pulse sequence is also introduced and verified with experimental

  12. Synthesis and solid-state NMR characterization of cubic mesoporous silica SBA-1 functionalized with sulfonic acid groups.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hui-Hsu Gavin; Chiu, Po-Jui; Jheng, Guang-Liang; Ting, Chun-Chiang; Pan, Yu-Chi; Kao, Hsien-Ming

    2011-07-01

    Well-ordered cubic mesoporous silicas SBA-1 functionalized with sulfonic acid groups have been synthesized through in situ oxidation of mercaptopropyl groups with H(2)O(2) via co-condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) templated by cetyltriethylammonium bromide (CTEABr) under strong acidic conditions. Various synthesis parameters such as the amounts of H(2)O(2) and MPTMS on the structural ordering of the resultant materials were systematically investigated. The materials thus obtained were characterized by a variety of techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), multinuclear solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, (29)Si{(1)H} 2D HETCOR (heteronuclear correlation) NMR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and nitrogen sorption measurements. By using (13)C CPMAS NMR technique, the status of the incorporated thiol groups and their transformation to sulfonic acid groups can be monitored and, as an extension, to define the optimum conditions to be used for the oxidation reaction to be quantitative. In particular, (29)Si{(1)H} 2D HETCOR NMR revealed that the protons in sulfonic acid groups are in close proximity to the silanol Q(3) species, but not close enough to form a hydrogen bond.

  13. Exploring electrolyte organization in supercapacitor electrodes with solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, Michaël; Gilbert, Edouard; Azais, Philippe; Raymundo-Piñero, Encarnación; Ammar, Mohammed Ramzi; Simon, Patrick; Massiot, Dominique; Béguin, François

    2013-04-01

    Supercapacitors are electrochemical energy-storage devices that exploit the electrostatic interaction between high-surface-area nanoporous electrodes and electrolyte ions. Insight into the molecular mechanisms at work inside supercapacitor carbon electrodes is obtained with 13C and 11B ex situ magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR). In activated carbons soaked with an electrolyte solution, two distinct adsorption sites are detected by NMR, both undergoing chemical exchange with the free electrolyte molecules. On charging, anions are substituted by cations in the negative carbon electrode and cations by anions in the positive electrode, and their proportions in each electrode are quantified by NMR. Moreover, acetonitrile molecules are expelled from the adsorption sites at the negative electrode alone. Two nanoporous carbon materials were tested, with different nanotexture orders (using Raman and 13C MAS-NMR spectroscopies), and the more disordered carbon shows a better capacitance and a better tolerance to high voltages.

  14. Solid-state Hadamard NMR spectroscopy: simultaneous measurements of multiple selective homonuclear scalar couplings.

    PubMed

    Kakita, Veera Mohana Rao; Kupče, Eriks; Bharatam, Jagadeesh

    2015-02-01

    Unambiguous measurement of homonuclear scalar couplings (J) in multi-spin scalar network systems is not straightforward. Further, the direct measurement of J-couplings is obscured in solid-state samples due to the dipolar and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA)-dominated line broadening, even under the magic angle spinning (MAS). We present a new multiple frequency selective spin-echo method based on Hadamard matrix encoding, for simultaneous measurement of multiple homonuclear scalar couplings (J) in the solid-state. In contrast to the Hadamard encoded selective excitation schemes known for the solution-state, herein the selectivity is achieved during refocusing period. The Hadamard encoded refocusing scheme concurrently allows to create the spin-spin commutation property between number of spin-pairs of choice in uniformly labelled molecules, which, therefore avoids (1) the repetition of the double selective refocusing experiments for each spin-pair and (2) the synthesis of expensive selective labelled molecules. The experimental scheme is exemplified for determining (1)JCC and (3)JCC values in (13)C6l-Histidine.HCl molecule, which are found to be in excellent agreement with those measured in conventional double frequency selective refocusing mode as well as in the solution-state. This method can be simply extended to 2D/3D pulse schemes and be applied to small bio-molecular solids.

  15. Reorientational dynamics and solid-phase transformation of ammonium dicyanamide into dicyandiamide: a (2)H solid-state NMR study.

    PubMed

    Lotsch, Bettina V; Schnick, Wolfgang; Naumann, Ernst; Senker, Jürgen

    2007-10-11

    The reorientational dynamics of ammonium dicyanamide ND4[N(C[triple bond]N)2] and the kinetics as well as the mechanism of the solid-state isomerization reaction from ammonium dicyanamide into dicyandiamide (N[triple bond]C-N==C(NH2)2) was studied by means of 2H and 14N solid-state NMR spectroscopy in a temperature range between 38 and 390 K. Whereas in previous investigations the mechanism of the solid-state transformation was investigated by means of vibrational and magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy as well as neutron diffraction, we here present a comprehensive 2H study of the ammonium ion dynamics prior to and during the course of the reaction, thereby highlighting possible cross correlations between dynamics and reactivity involving the ammonium ion. The ND4+ group was found to undergo thermally activated random jumps in a tetrahedral potential, which is increasingly distorted with increasing temperature, giving rise to an asymmetrically compressed or elongated tetrahedron with deviations from the tetrahedral angle of up to 6 degrees . The correlation time follows an Arrhenius law with an activation energy of Ea = 25.8(2) kJ mol(-1) and an attempt frequency of tau0(-1) = 440(80) THz. The spin-lattice relaxation times were fitted according to a simple Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound type model with a T1 minimum of 4 ms at 230 K. Temperature-dependent librational amplitudes were extracted by line-shape simulations between 38 and 390 K and contrasted with those obtained by neutron diffraction, their values ranging between 5 and 28 degrees . The onset and progress of the solid-phase transformation were followed in situ at temperatures above 372 K and could be classified as a strongly temperature-dependent, heterogeneous two-step reaction proceeding with rapid evolution of ammonia and comparatively slow subsequent reintegration into the solid. On the microscopic level, this correlates with a rapid proton transfer -- possibly triggered by a coupling

  16. Analysis of the urinary excretion of ifosfamide and its N-dechloroethylated metabolites in children using 31P-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Misiura, Konrad; Zubowska, Małgorzata; Zielińska, Elzbieta

    2003-01-01

    Amounts of ifosfamide (CAS 3778-73-2) and its N-dechloroethylated metabolites excreted in the urine were measured using 31P-NMR spectroscopy in 26 cancer children treated with this drug. Strong inter-patient variation in levels of these compounds were found. These differences were independent from patients age, body surface area, and sex, the dose of the drug, suggesting genetic base of observed variations in ifosfamide metabolism.

  17. NMR crystallography to probe the breathing effect of the MIL-53(Al) metal-organic framework using solid-state NMR measurements of (13)C-(27)Al distances.

    PubMed

    Giovine, Raynald; Volkringer, Christophe; Trébosc, Julien; Amoureux, Jean Paul; Loiseau, Thierry; Lafon, Olivier; Pourpoint, Frédérique

    2017-03-01

    The metal-organic framework MIL-53(Al) (aluminium terephthalate) exhibits a structural transition between two porous structures with large pore (lp) or narrow pore (np) configurations. This transition, called the breathing effect, is observed upon changes in temperature or external pressure, as well as with the adsorption of guest molecules, such as H2O, within the pores. We show here how these different pore openings can be detected by observing the dephasing of (13)C magnetization under (13)C-(27)Al dipolar couplings using Rotational-Echo Saturation-Pulse Double-Resonance (RESPDOR) solid-state NMR experiments with Simultaneous Frequency and Amplitude Modulation (SFAM) recoupling. These double-resonance NMR experiments between (13)C and (27)Al nuclei, which have close Larmor frequencies, are feasible thanks to the use of a frequency splitter. The experimental SFAM-RESPDOR signal fractions agree well with those simulated from the MIL-53(Al)-lp and -np crystal structures obtained from powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Hence, these (13)C-(27)Al solid-state NMR experiments validate these structures and confirm their rigidity. A similar agreement is reported for the framework ligands in the as-synthesized (as) MIL-53(Al), in which the pores contain free ligands. Furthermore, in this case, (13)C-{(27)Al} SFAM-RESPDOR experiments allow an estimation of the average distance between the free ligands and the (27)Al nuclei of the framework.

  18. Differently saturated fatty acids can be differentiated by 31P NMR subsequent to derivatization with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyldioxaphospholane: a cautionary note.

    PubMed

    Eibisch, Mandy; Riemer, Thomas; Fuchs, Beate; Schiller, Jürgen

    2013-03-20

    The analysis of free fatty acid (FFA) mixtures is a very important but, even nowadays, challenging task. This particularly applies as the so far most commonly used technique-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-is tedious and time-consuming. It has been convincingly shown ( Spyros, A.; Dais, P. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2000, 48, 802 - 5) that FFA may be analyzed by (31)P NMR subsequent to derivatization with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyldioxaphospholane (CTDP). However, it was also indicated that differently unsaturated FFAs result in the same (31)P NMR chemical shift and cannot be differentiated. Therefore, only the overall fatty acid content of a sample can be determined by the CTDP assay. In contrast, we will show here by using high-field NMR (600 MHz spectrometer, i.e., 242.884 MHz for (31)P) that the CTDP assay may be used to differentiate FFAs that have pronounced differences in their double bond contents: saturated fatty acids (16:0), moderately unsaturated (18:1, 18:2), highly unsaturated (20:4), and extremely unsaturated fatty acids (22:6) result in slightly different chemical shifts. The same applies for oxidized fatty acids. Finally, it will also be shown that the CTDP derivatization products decompose in a time-dependent manner. Therefore, all investigations must adhere to a strict time regime.

  19. Synthesis and solid-state NMR structural characterization of 13C-labeled graphite oxide.

    PubMed

    Cai, Weiwei; Piner, Richard D; Stadermann, Frank J; Park, Sungjin; Shaibat, Medhat A; Ishii, Yoshitaka; Yang, Dongxing; Velamakanni, Aruna; An, Sung Jin; Stoller, Meryl; An, Jinho; Chen, Dongmin; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2008-09-26

    The detailed chemical structure of graphite oxide (GO), a layered material prepared from graphite almost 150 years ago and a precursor to chemically modified graphenes, has not been previously resolved because of the pseudo-random chemical functionalization of each layer, as well as variations in exact composition. Carbon-13 (13C) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectra of GO for natural abundance 13C have poor signal-to-noise ratios. Approximately 100% 13C-labeled graphite was made and converted to 13C-labeled GO, and 13C SSNMR was used to reveal details of the chemical bonding network, including the chemical groups and their connections. Carbon-13-labeled graphite can be used to prepare chemically modified graphenes for 13C SSNMR analysis with enhanced sensitivity and for fundamental studies of 13C-labeled graphite and graphene.

  20. Rapid and accurate determination of the lignin content of lignocellulosic biomass by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Li; McCallum, Scott A.; Miao, Jianjun; Hart, Courtney; Tudryn, Gregory J.; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Biofuels and biomaterials, produced from lignocellulosic feedstock, require facile access to cellulose and hemicellulose to be competitive with petroleum processing and sugar-based fermentation. Physical-chemical barriers resulting from lignin complicates the hydrolysis biomass into fermentable sugars. Thus, the amount of lignin within a substrate is critical in determining biomass processing. The application of 13C cross-polarization, magic-angle spinning, and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance for the direct quantification of lignin content in biomass is examined. Using a standard curve constructed from pristine lignin and cellulose, the lignin content of a biomass sample is accurately determined through direct measurement without chemical or enzymatic pre-treatment. PMID:25404762

  1. The use of multinuclear solid-state NMR to evaluate polystyrene/silica composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Regina F.; Tavares, Maria Inês B.; Ferreira, Antônio G.

    2012-08-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials have attracted much interest because of their novel and specific characteristics. One method to obtain these materials is in situ polymerization through free-radical polymerization. In this study, styrene monomers were covalently linked to silica (SiO2) using the suspension polymerization technique. In the reaction process, benzoyl peroxide was used as an initiator; poly(vinyl alcohol) was used as a suspension agent and water was used as the reaction environment. The styrene/silica composites were characterized in relation to chemical structure and microstructure using solution and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, and thermal analysis was performed by differential scanning calorimetry to evaluate the thermal transition temperature ( T g). All results showed that styrene/silica nanocomposites were obtained. The material with 2.5 % SiO2 showed the best characteristics.

  2. High Resolution NMR ^15N and ^31P NMR Of Antiferroelectric Phase Transition in Ammonium Dihydrogen Arsenate and Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunaydin-Sen, Ozge

    2005-03-01

    Natural abundance ^15N CPMAS NMR has been used to investigate the paraelectric-antiferroelectric phase transition of NH4H2AsO4 (ADA) (TN˜216K) and of NH4H2PO4 (ADP) (148K), with a focus on the role of the NH4^+ ion. Isotropic chemical shift of ^15N for ADA exhibits an almost linear temperature dependence to within TN±1K, and then changes discontinuously, followed by another almost linear dependence. The spectra of the paraelectric and antiferroelectric phases coexist around the TN. The sharp anomaly around TN implies that the NH4^+ ions undergo a displacive transition, whereas the protons in the O-HO bonds undergo an order-disorder transition. The ^15N data thus support a mixed order-disorder-displacive mechanism for this transition. The ^15N data on ADP exhibit somewhat different behavior. ^31P CPMAS measurements will also be presented and discussed in terms of the above model.

  3. High-field 19.6 T 27Al solid-state MAS NMR of in vitro aluminated brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Pamela L.; Lukiw, Walter J.; Gan, Zhehong; Hall, Randall W.; Butler, Leslie G.

    2004-10-01

    The combination of 27Al high-field solid-state NMR (19.6 T) with rapid spinning speeds (17.8 kHz) is used to acquire 27Al NMR spectra of total RNA human brain temporal lobe tissues exposed to 0.10 mM Al 3+ (as AlCl 3) and of human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19), grown in 0.10 mM AlCl 3. The spectra of these model systems show multiple Al 3+ binding sites, good signal/noise ratios and apparent chemical shift dispersions. A single broad peak (-3 to 11 ppm) is seen for the aluminated ARPE-19 cells, consistent with reported solution-state NMR chemical shifts of Al-transferrin. The aluminated brain tissue has a considerably different 27Al MAS NMR spectrum. In addition to the transferrin-type resonance, additional peaks are seen. Tentative assignments include: -9 to -3 ppm, octahedral AlO 6 (phosphate and water); 9 ppm, condensed AlO 6 units (Al-O-Al bridges); 24 ppm, tetrahedral AlO 3N and/or octahedral Al-carbonate; and 35 ppm, more N-substituted aluminum and /or tetrahedral AlO 4. Thus, brain tissue is susceptible to a broad range of coordination by aluminum. Furthermore, the moderate 27Al C Q values (all less than 10 MHz) suggest future NMR studies may be performed at 9.4 T and a spin rate of 20 kHz.

  4. Quantitative solid state NMR analysis of residues from acid hydrolysis of loblolly pine wood.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Carsten; Marzialetti, Teresita; Hoskins, Travis J C; Valenzuela Olarte, Mariefel B; Agrawal, Pradeep K; Jones, Christopher W

    2009-10-01

    The composition of solid residues from hydrolysis reactions of loblolly pine wood with dilute mineral acids is analyzed by (13)C Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CP MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Using this method, the carbohydrate and lignin fractions are quantified in less than 3h as compared to over a day using wet chemical methods. In addition to the quantitative information, (13)C CP MAS NMR spectroscopy provides information on the formation of additional extractives and pseudo lignin from the carbohydrates. Being a non-destructive technique, NMR spectroscopy provides unambiguous evidence of the presence of side reactions and products, which is a clear advantage over the wet chemical analytical methods. Quantitative results from NMR spectroscopy and proximate analysis are compared for the residues from hydrolysis of loblolly pine wood under 13 different conditions; samples were treated either at 150 degrees C or 200 degrees C in the presence of various acids (HCl, H(2)SO(4), H(3)PO(4), HNO(3) and TFA) or water. The lignin content determined by both methods differed on averaged by 2.9 wt% resulting in a standard deviation of 3.5 wt%. It is shown that solid degradation products are formed from saccharide precursors under harsh reaction conditions. These degradation reactions limit the total possible yield of monosaccharides from any subsequent reaction.

  5. Solid State NMR Investigations of Chain Dynamics and Network Order in Model Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Lewicki, J P; Mayer, B P; Wilson, T S; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S

    2010-12-09

    This work is at a relatively early stage, however it has been demonstrated that we can reliably probe basic network architectures using the MQ-NMR technique. The initial results are in good agreement with what is known from standard network theory and will serve as a basis for the study of progressively increasing structural complexity in Siloxane network systems.

  6. Solid-state NMR analysis of soil organic matter fractions from integrated physical-chemical extraction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fractions of soil organic matter (SOM) are usually extracted from soil by either physical (size, density) or chemical (e.g., base, acid) procedures. In this study we used 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to chemically characterize the fractions that were obtained by an integrated pr...

  7. Hydration water dynamics in bovine serum albumin at low temperatures as studied by deuterium solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyatou, Tatsuya; Araya, Takashi; Ohashi, Ryutaro; Ida, Tomonori; Mizuno, Motohiro

    2016-10-01

    Solid state 2H NMR was used to investigate changes in the structure and dynamics of hydration waters of bovine serum albumin (BSA) due to glass transitions. The 2H NMR spectra were separated into fast and slow components based on differences in spin-lattice relaxation time T1. The fast components corresponded to water molecules interacting with protein while the slow components were the water molecules similar to bulk water and deuterons of the protein backbone. Simulation analysis of the 2H NMR spectra of the fast components was used to assess the mode and rate of motions of hydration waters around the protein. At low temperatures, the water molecules underwent a 180° flip and slow reorientation in the tetrahedral sites. The distribution of the rate of the 180° flip and the D-O-D angle of water molecules were clarified. The distribution of the D-O-D angle of water molecules spread with decreasing temperature. The marked slowing down in the reorientation of water molecules was observed at a glass transition of around 200 K, which is linked to the disordered region of the protein. In contrast, the 180° flip of water molecules occurred frequently, even below 200 K. A freeze of the 180° flip of water molecules was observed around the glass transition temperature of 110 K, where primary hydrate water formed a direct hydrogen bond with the protein, making it perfectly immobile.

  8. Probing the nanostructure, interfacial interaction, and dynamics of chitosan-based nanoparticles by multiscale solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fenfen; Zhang, Rongchun; Wu, Qiang; Chen, Tiehong; Sun, Pingchuan; Shi, An-Chang

    2014-12-10

    Chitosan-based nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used in drug and gene delivery, therapy, and medical imaging, but a molecular-level understanding of the internal morphology and nanostructure size, interface, and dynamics, which is critical for building fundamental knowledge for the precise design and efficient biological application of the NPs, remains a great challenge. Therefore, the availability of a multiscale (0.1-100 nm) and nondestructive analytical technique for examining such NPs is of great importance for nanotechnology. Herein, we present a new multiscale solid-state NMR approach to achieve this goal for the investigation of chitosan-poly(N-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid) NPs. First, a recently developed (13)C multiple cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (MAS) method enabled fast quantitative determination of the NPs' composition and detection of conformational changes in chitosan. Then, using an improved (1)H spin-diffusion method with (13)C detection and theoretical simulations, the internal morphology and nanostructure size were quantitatively determined. The interfacial coordinated interaction between chitosan and phenylboronic acid was revealed by one-dimensional MAS and two-dimensional (2D) triple-quantum MAS (11)B NMR. Finally, dynamic-editing (13)C MAS and 2D (13)C-(1)H wide-line separation experiments provided details regarding the componential dynamics of the NPs in the solid and swollen states. On the basis of these NMR results, a model of the unique nanostructure, interfacial interaction, and componential dynamics of the NPs was proposed.

  9. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state {sup 13}C NMR and elemental analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, S.M.; Chen, C.R.; Xu, Z.H.; Nelson, P.N.; Boyd, S.E.; Meszaros, I.; Chan, K.Y.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Model estimated the molecular C components well for most RO wastes. • Molecular nature of organic matter in RO wastes varied widely. • Molecular composition by NMR modelling preferable to extraction techniques. • Some model shortcomings in estimating molecular composition of biochars. • Waste molecular composition important for carbon/nutrient outcomes in soil. - Abstract: Using solid state {sup 13}C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes.

  10. Hydration properties of regioselectively etherified celluloses monitored by 2H and 13C solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Schöbitz, Michael; Schaller, Jens

    2012-06-20

    The hydration properties of 2,3-O-hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) and 2,3-O-hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) were analyzed by multi-nuclear solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy. By 13C single-pulse (SP) MAS and cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR, differences between the immobile regions and all parts of the polysaccharides were detected as a function of hydration. Complementary information about the water environments was observed by 2H MAS NMR. By this approach it was demonstrated that side chains in 2,3-O-HPC and 2,3-O-HEC were easier to hydrate than the cellulose backbone. Furthermore the motion of water was more restricted (slower) in 2,3-O-HPC than in 2,3-O-HEC. For both polysaccharides the hydration could be explained by a two-step process: in step one increased ordering of the immobile regions occurs after which the entire polymer is hydrated in step two.

  11. (11)B Solid-State NMR Interaction Tensors of Linear Two-Coordinate Boron: The Dimesitylborinium Cation.

    PubMed

    Alain, Amanda E; Shoji, Yoshiaki; Fukushima, Takanori; Bryce, David L

    2015-12-21

    Borinium cations (R2B(+)) are of particular fundamental and applied interest in part due to their pronounced Lewis acidity which enables unique chemical transformations. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of magic-angle spinning and stationary powdered samples of the dicoordinate boron cation in the recently reported dimesitylborinium tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate compound (Shoji et al. Nature Chem. 2014, 6, 498) is applied to characterize the (11)B electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift (CS) tensors. The experimental data are consistent with linear C-B(+)-C geometry. The (11)B quadrupolar coupling constant, 5.44 ± 0.08 MHz, and the span of the CS tensor, 130 ± 1 ppm, are both particularly large relative to literature data for a variety of boron functional groups, and represent the first such data for the linear C-B(+)-C borinium moiety. The NMR data are similar to those for the neutral tricoordinate analogue, trimesitylborane, but contrast with those of the Cp*2B(+) cation. Quantum chemical calculations are applied to provide additional insights into the relationship between the NMR observables and the molecular and electronic structure of the dimesitylborinium cation.

  12. Investigating miscibility and molecular mobility of nifedipine-PVP amorphous solid dispersions using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaoda; Sperger, Diana; Munson, Eric J

    2014-01-06

    Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) (1)H T1 and T1ρ relaxation times were used to evaluate the miscibility of amorphous solid dispersions of nifedipine (NIF) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) prepared by three different methods: melt quenching in the typical lab setting, spray drying and melt quenching in the NMR rotor while spinning. Of the five compositions prepared by melt quenching in the lab setting, the 95:5 and 90:10 NIF:PVP (w:w) amorphous solid dispersions were not miscible while 75:25, 60:40, and 50:50 NIF:PVP dispersions were miscible by the (1)H T1ρ measurements. The domain size of the miscible systems was estimated to be less than 4.5 nm. Amorphous solid dispersions with composition of 90:10 NIF:PVP prepared by spray drying and melt quenching in the NMR rotor showed miscibility by (1)H T1ρ values. Variable-temperature SSNMR (1)H T1ρ relaxation measurements revealed a change in relaxation time at approximately 20 °C below Tg, suggesting increased molecular mobility above that temperature.

  13. A solid state NMR study of layered double hydroxides intercalated with para-amino salicylate, a tuberculosis drug.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Nicholai Daugaard; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2016-09-01

    Para-amino salicylate (PAS), a tuberculosis drug, was intercalated in three different layered double hydroxides (MgAl, ZnAl, and CaAl-LDH) and the samples were studied by multi-nuclear ((1)H, (13)C, and (27)Al) solid state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy in combination with powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), elemental analysis and IR-spectroscopy to gain insight into the bulk and atomic level structure of these LDHs especially with a view to the purity of the LDH-PAS materials and the concentration of impurities. The intercalations of PAS in MgAl-, ZnAl-, and CaAl-LDH's were confirmed by (13)C SSNMR and PXRD. Moreover, (13)C MAS NMR and infrared spectroscopy show that PAS did not decompose during synthesis. Large amounts (20-41%) of amorphous aluminum impurities were detected in the structure using (27)Al single pulse and 3QMAS NMR spectra, which in combination with (1)H single and double quantum experiments also showed that the M(II):Al ratio was higher than predicted from the bulk metal composition of MgAl-PAS and ZnAl-PAS. Moreover, the first high-resolution (1)H SSNMR spectra of a CaAl LDH is reported and assigned using (1)H single and double quantum experiments in combination with (27)Al{(1)H} HETCOR.

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of nitroxide-based oligoradicals for low-temperature dynamic nuclear polarization in solid state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Wai-Ming; Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of new nitroxide-based biradical, triradical, and tetraradical compounds and the evaluation of their performance as paramagnetic dopants in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with magic-angle spinning (MAS). Under our experimental conditions, which include temperatures in the 25–30 K range, a 9.4 T magnetic field, MAS frequencies of 6.2–6.8 kHz, and microwave irradiation at 264.0 GHz from a 800 mW extended interaction oscillator source, the most effective compounds are triradicals that are related to the previously-described compound DOTOPA-TEMPO (see Thurber et al., 2010), but have improved solubility in glycerol/water solvent near neutral pH. Using these compounds at 30 mM total nitroxide concentration, we observe DNP enhancement factors of 92–128 for cross-polarized 13C NMR signals from 15N,13C-labeled melittin in partially protonated glycerol/water, and build-up times of 2.6–3.8 s for 1H spin polarizations. Net sensitivity enhancements with biradical and tetraradical dopants, taking into account absolute 13C NMR signal amplitudes and build-up times, are approximately 2–4 times lower than with the best triradicals. PMID:24887201

  15. Expression, Functional Characterization, and Solid-State NMR Investigation of the G Protein-Coupled GHS Receptor in Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Schrottke, Stefanie; Kaiser, Anette; Vortmeier, Gerrit; Els-Heindl, Sylvia; Worm, Dennis; Bosse, Mathias; Schmidt, Peter; Scheidt, Holger A.; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Huster, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The expression, functional reconstitution and first NMR characterization of the human growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) receptor reconstituted into either DMPC or POPC membranes is described. The receptor was expressed in E. coli. refolded, and reconstituted into bilayer membranes. The molecule was characterized by 15N and 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy in the absence and in the presence of its natural agonist ghrelin or an inverse agonist. Static 15N NMR spectra of the uniformly labeled receptor are indicative of axially symmetric rotational diffusion of the G protein-coupled receptor in the membrane. In addition, about 25% of the 15N sites undergo large amplitude motions giving rise to very narrow spectral components. For an initial quantitative assessment of the receptor mobility, 1H-13C dipolar coupling values, which are scaled by molecular motions, were determined quantitatively. From these values, average order parameters, reporting the motional amplitudes of the individual receptor segments can be derived. Average backbone order parameters were determined with values between 0.56 and 0.69, corresponding to average motional amplitudes of 40–50° of these segments. Differences between the receptor dynamics in DMPC or POPC membranes were within experimental error. Furthermore, agonist or inverse agonist binding only insignificantly influenced the average molecular dynamics of the receptor. PMID:28387359

  16. Solid-state NMR analysis of the {beta}-strand orientation of the protofibrils of amyloid {beta}-protein

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Takashi; Masuda, Yuichi; Irie, Kazuhiro; Akagi, Ken-ichi; Monobe, Youko; Imazawa, Takayoshi; Takegoshi, K.

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The supramolecular structure of A{beta}42 protofibrils was analyzed by solid-state NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala-21 residue in the A{beta}42 protofibrils is included in a slightly disordered {beta}-strand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The A{beta}42 protofibrils do not form intermolecular in-register parallel {beta}-sheets. -- Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is caused by abnormal deposition (fibrillation) of a 42-residue amyloid {beta}-protein (A{beta}42) in the brain. During the process of fibrillation, the A{beta}42 takes the form of protofibrils with strong neurotoxicity, and is thus believed to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of AD. To elucidate the supramolecular structure of the A{beta}42 protofibrils, the intermolecular proximity of the Ala-21 residues in the A{beta}42 protofibrils was analyzed by {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C rotational resonance experiments in the solid state. Unlike the A{beta}42 fibrils, an intermolecular {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C correlation was not found in the A{beta}42 protofibrils. This result suggests that the {beta}-strands of the A{beta}42 protofibrils are not in an in-register parallel orientation. A{beta}42 monomers would assemble to form protofibrils with the {beta}-strand conformation, then transform into fibrils by forming intermolecular parallel {beta}-sheets.

  17. A theoretical perspective on the accuracy of rotational resonance (R 2)-based distance measurements in solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2010-03-01

    The application of solid-state NMR methodology for bio-molecular structure determination requires the measurement of constraints in the form of 13C-13C and 13C-15N distances, torsion angles and, in some cases, correlation of the anisotropic interactions. Since the availability of structurally important constraints in the solid state is limited due to lack of sufficient spectral resolution, the accuracy of the measured constraints become vital in studies relating the three-dimensional structure of proteins to its biological functions. Consequently, the theoretical methods employed to quantify the experimental data become important. To accentuate this aspect, we re-examine analytical two-spin models currently employed in the estimation of 13C-13C distances based on the rotational resonance (R 2) phenomenon. Although the error bars for the estimated distances tend to be in the range 0.5-1.0 Å, R 2 experiments are routinely employed in a variety of systems ranging from simple peptides to more complex amyloidogenic proteins. In this article we address this aspect by highlighting the systematic errors introduced by analytical models employing phenomenological damping terms to describe multi-spin effects. Specifically, the spin dynamics in R 2 experiments is described using Floquet theory employing two different operator formalisms. The systematic errors introduced by the phenomenological damping terms and their limitations are elucidated in two analytical models and analysed by comparing the results with rigorous numerical simulations.

  18. Reassessment of MxiH subunit orientation and fold within native Shigella T3SS needles using surface labelling and solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Verasdonck, Joeri; Shen, Da-Kang; Treadgold, Alexander; Arthur, Christopher; Böckmann, Anja; Meier, Beat H.; Blocker, Ariel J.

    2015-01-01

    T3SSs are essential virulence determinants of many Gram-negative bacteria, used to inject bacterial effectors of virulence into eukaryotic host cells. Their major extracellular portion, a ∼50 nm hollow, needle-like structure, is essential to host cell sensing and the conduit for effector secretion. It is formed of a small, conserved subunit arranged as a helical polymer. The structure of the subunit has been studied by electron cryomicroscopy within native polymers and by solid-state NMR in recombinant polymers, yielding two incompatible atomic models. To resolve this controversy, we re-examined the native polymer used for electron cryomicroscopy via surface labelling and solid-state NMR. Our data show the orientation and overall fold of the subunit within this polymer is as established by solid-state NMR for recombinant polymers. PMID:26439285

  19. The use of 13C labeling to enhance the sensitivity of 13C solid-state CPMAS NMR to study polymorphism in low dose solid formulations.

    PubMed

    Booy, Kees-Jan; Wiegerinck, Peter; Vader, Jan; Kaspersen, Frans; Lambregts, Dorette; Vromans, Herman; Kellenbach, Edwin

    2005-02-01

    (13)C labeling was used to enhance the sensitivity of (13)C solid-state NMR to study the effect of tabletting on the polymorphism of a steroidal drug. The steroidal drug Org OD 14 was (13)C labeled and formulated into tablets containing only 0.5-2.5% active ingredient. The tablets were subsequently studied by solid-state (13)C CPMAS NMR. The crystalline form present in tablets could readily be analyzed in tablets. No change in crystalline form was observed as a result of formulation or in subsequent stability studies. Solid-state NMR in combination with (13)C labeling can, in suitable cases, be used as a strategy to study the effect of formulation on the polymorphism of low dose drugs.

  20. The structure, dynamics and orientation of antimicrobial peptides in membranes by multidimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bechinger, B

    1999-12-15

    Linear peptide antibiotics have been isolated from amphibians, insects and humans and used as templates to design cheaper and more potent analogues for medical applications. Peptides such as cecropins or magainins are < or = 40 amino acids in length. Many of them have been prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis with isotopic labels incorporated at selected sites. Structural analysis by solid-state NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical techniques indicates that these peptide antibiotics strongly interact with lipid membranes. In bilayer environments they exhibit amphipathic alpha-helical conformations and alignments of the helix axis parallel to the membrane surface. This contrasts the transmembrane orientations observed for alamethicin or gramicidin A. Models that have been proposed to explain the antibiotic and pore-forming activities of membrane-associated peptides, as well as other experimental results, include transmembrane helical bundles, wormholes, carpets, detergent-like effects or the in-plane diffusion of peptide-induced bilayer instabilities.

  1. Homogeneous nanoparticles to enhance the efficiency of a hydrophobic drug, antihyperlipidemic probucol, characterized by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Io, Takeshi; Fukami, Toshiro; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Suzuki, Toyofumi; Xu, Jiadi; Tomono, Kazuo; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2010-02-01

    A low absorption in the gastrointestinal tract of hydrophobic pharmaceutical compounds in use today considerably limits their bioavailability, and therefore they are taken in large doses in order to reach the therapeutic plasma concentration, which inevitably results in undesired side effects. In this study, we demonstrate a new nanoparticle approach to overcome this problem, and our experimental results show that this approach has a high efficiency of drug loading and is easily adaptable to industrial scale. Characterization of nanoparticles containing a cholesterol-lowering hydrophobic drug, probucol, using a variety of biophysical techniques revealed higher homogeneity of these particles compared to those prepared using other approaches. Intermolecular interactions of these nanoparticles are probed at high resolution by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments.

  2. Solid-state proton NMR of paramagnetic metal complexes: DANTE spin echoes for selective excitation in inhomogeneously broadened lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, Diego; Perez Linde, A. J.; Bauer, Gerald; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2013-08-01

    The paramagnetic complex bis(oxazolinylphenyl)amine-Fe(III)Cl2 is investigated by means of solid-state proton NMR at 18.8 T (800 MHz) using magic-angle spinning at 65 kHz. Spin echoes that are excited and refocused by combs of rotor-synchronized pulses in the manner of 'Delays Alternating with Nutation for Tailored Excitation' (DANTE) allow one to characterize different chemical environments that severely overlap in conventional MAS spectra. Such sequences combine two apparently contradictory features: an overall bandwidth exceeding several MHz, and very selective irradiation of a few kHz within inhomogeneously broadened sidebands. The experimental hyperfine interactions correlate well with DFT calculations.

  3. Unique molecular dynamics of structural elements in an asymmetric Janus bisamide supramolecule characterized by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Sun, Hao-Jan; Miyoshi, Toshikazu

    2013-10-31

    An asymmetric tapered Janus bisamide supramolecule consisting of 1,4-bis[3,4,5-tris(alkan-1-yloxy)benzamido]benzene bisamide (abbreviated as C22PhBAEO3) can possess three-dimensional (3D) long-range order under mild thermal treatment conditions. To understand its structural formation and unique phase-transition processes, the locally detailed structure and molecular dynamics of its structural elements in disordered and ordered phases of C22PhBAEO3 were investigated using various solid-state (SS) NMR techniques at the atomic level. On the basis of the determined conformations and packing structures of the alkyl chains in ordered and disordered crystalline phases, along with the geometry and kinetic parameters of the structural elements' dynamics, this study addresses the self-assembly, the phase-transition mechanisms, and the relationship between the structure and dynamics of these asymmetric Janus bisamide supramolecules.

  4. Proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a zinc diffusion facilitator protein in native nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Bersch, Beate; Dörr, Jonas M.; Hessel, Audrey; Killian, J. Antoinette; Schanda, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The structure, dynamics and function of membrane proteins are intimately linked to the properties of the membrane environment in which the proteins are embedded. For structural and biophysical characterization, membrane proteins generally need to be extracted from the membrane, and reconstituted in a suitable membrane-mimicking environment. Ensuring functional and structural integrity in these environments is often a major concern. The styrene/maleic acid co-polymer has recently been shown to be able to extract lipid/membrane protein patches directly from native membranes, forming nanosize discoidal proteolipid particles, also referred to as native nanodiscs. Here we show, for the first time, that high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra can be obtained from an integral membrane protein in native nanodiscs, as exemplified with the 2 x 34 kDa-large bacterial cation diffusion facilitator CzcD from Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34. PMID:28128538

  5. Cationic Membrane Peptides: Atomic-Level Insight of Structure-Activity Relationships from Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yongchao; Li, Shenhui; Hong, Mei

    2012-01-01

    Many membrane-active peptides, such as cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), conduct their biological functions by interacting with the cell membrane. The interactions of charged residues with lipids and water facilitate membrane insertion, translocation or disruption of these highly hydrophobic species. In this mini-review we will summarize high-resolution structural and dynamic findings towards the understanding of the structure-activity relationship of lipid membrane-bound CPPs and AMPs, as examples of the current development of solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques for studying membrane peptides. We will present the most recent atomic-resolution structure of the guanidinium-phosphate complex, as constrained from experimentally measured site-specific distances. These SSNMR results will be valuable specifically for understanding the intracellular translocation pathway of CPPs and antimicrobial mechanism of AMPs, and more generally broaden our insight into how cationic macromolecules interact with and cross the lipid membrane. PMID:23108593

  6. Investigation of gamma-irradiated vegetable seeds with high-resolution solid-state 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Michel; Maron, Sébastien; Foray, Marie Françoise; Berger, Maurice; Guillermo, Armel

    2004-04-01

    13C solid-state NMR was used to investigate the effects of gamma radiation on vegetable seeds, Pisum sativum and Latuca sativa, at absorbed doses that inhibit their germination. By combining single-pulse excitation and cross-polarization experiments under magic angle spinning, both liquid and solid domains of seeds can be characterized. We showed that the liquid domains, mostly made of triacylglycerols (TAG), of vegetable seeds are not sensitive to radiation. The main structural changes have been observed in the embryonic axes of seeds when the seeds are water-imbibed before irradiation. These results rule out a starting hypothesis concerning the potential role of TAG contained in oil bodies as a potential source of aldehydes that could further react with DNA moiety.

  7. Solid state 13C NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy of the cocoon silk of two common spiders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramanti, Emilia; Catalano, Donata; Forte, Claudia; Giovanneschi, Mario; Masetti, Massimo; Veracini, Carlo Alberto

    2005-11-01

    The structure of the silk from cocoons of two common spiders, Araneus diadematus (family Araneidae) and Achaearanea tepidariorum (family Theridiidae) was investigated by means of 13C solid state NMR and FT-IR spectroscopies. The combined use of these two techniques allowed us to highlight differences in the two samples. The cocoon silk of Achaearanea tepidariorum is essentially constituted by helical and β-sheet structures, whereas that of Araneus diadematus shows a more complex structure, containing also β-strands and β-turns. Moreover, the former silk is essentially crystalline while the latter contains more mobile domains. The structural differences of the two cocoon silks are ascribed to the different habitat of the two species.

  8. An efficient method and device for transfer of semisolid materials into solid-state NMR spectroscopy rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisao, Grant S.; Harland, Michael A.; Brown, Robert A.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Wilson, Thomas E.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2016-04-01

    The study of mass-limited biological samples by magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy critically relies upon the high-yield transfer of material from a biological preparation into the MAS rotor. This issue is particularly important for maintaining biological activity and hydration of semi-solid samples such as membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, pharmaceutical formulations, microcrystalline proteins and protein fibrils. Here we present protocols and designs for rotor-packing devices specifically suited for packing hydrated samples into Pencil-style 1.6 mm, 3.2 mm standard, and 3.2 mm limited speed MAS rotors. The devices are modular and therefore readily adaptable to other rotor and/or ultracentrifugation tube geometries.

  9. Easy-Going On-Spectrometer Optimisation of Phase Modulated Homonuclear Decoupling Sequences in Solid-State NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimminck, Dennis L. A. G.; Vasa, Suresh K.; Meerts, W. Leo; Kentgens, P. M.

    2011-06-01

    A global optimisation scheme for phase modulated proton homonuclear decoupling sequences in solid-state NMR is presented. Phase modulations, parameterised by DUMBO Fourier coefficients, were optimized using a Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategies algorithm. Our method, denoted EASY-GOING homonuclear decoupling, starts with featureless spectra and optimises proton-proton decoupling, during either proton or carbon signal detection. On the one hand, our solutions closely resemble (e)DUMBO for moderate sample spinning frequencies and medium radio-frequency (rf) field strengths. On the other hand, the EASY-GOING approach resulted in a superior solution, achieving significantly better resolved proton spectra at very high 680 kHz rf field strength. N. Hansen, and A. Ostermeier. Evol. Comput. 9 (2001) 159-195 B. Elena, G. de Paepe, L. Emsley. Chem. Phys. Lett. 398 (2004) 532-538

  10. Characterizing the secondary protein structure of black widow dragline silk using solid-state NMR and X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Janelle E; Sampath, Sujatha; Butler, Emily; Kim, Jihyun; Henning, Robert W; Holland, Gregory P; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2013-10-14

    This study provides a detailed secondary structural characterization of major ampullate dragline silk from Latrodectus hesperus (black widow) spiders. X-ray diffraction results show that the structure of black widow major ampullate silk fibers is comprised of stacked β-sheet nanocrystallites oriented parallel to the fiber axis and an amorphous region with oriented (anisotropic) and isotropic components. The combination of two-dimensional (2D) (13)C-(13)C through-space and through-bond solid-state NMR experiments provide chemical shifts that are used to determine detailed information about the amino acid motif secondary structure in black widow spider dragline silk. Individual amino acids are incorporated into different repetitive motifs that make up the majority of this protein-based biopolymer. From the solid-state NMR measurements, we assign distinct secondary conformations to each repetitive amino acid motif and, hence, to the amino acids that make up the motifs. Specifically, alanine is incorporated in β-sheet (poly(Alan) and poly(Gly-Ala)), 3(1)-helix (poly(Gly-Gly-Xaa), and α-helix (poly(Gln-Gln-Ala-Tyr)) components. Glycine is determined to be in β-sheet (poly(Gly-Ala)) and 3(1)-helical (poly(Gly-Gly-X(aa))) regions, while serine is present in β-sheet (poly(Gly-Ala-Ser)), 3(1)-helix (poly(Gly-Gly-Ser)), and β-turn (poly(Gly-Pro-Ser)) structures. These various motif-specific secondary structural elements are quantitatively correlated to the primary amino acid sequence of major ampullate spidroin 1 and 2 (MaSp1 and MaSp2) and are shown to form a self-consistent model for black widow dragline silk.

  11. Improving resolution in proton solid-state NMR by removing nitrogen-14 residual dipolar broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Robin S.; Elena, Bénédicte; Emsley, Lyndon

    2008-06-01

    Residual dipolar coupling between quadrupolar and other nuclei under MAS has not usually been thought to be important in high field NMR spectroscopy. We show that coupling to 14N broadens 1H lineshapes significantly even at 11.7 T, and that we can decouple 14N from 1H during 1H homonuclear decoupling to successfully improve 1H resolution. The method used for decoupling is the application of evenly spaced pulses to the quadrupolar nucleus.

  12. A unified heteronuclear decoupling strategy for magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Equbal, Asif; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr. E-mail: ncn@inano.au.dk; Madhu, P. K. E-mail: ncn@inano.au.dk

    2015-05-14

    A unified strategy of two-pulse based heteronuclear decoupling for solid-state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance is presented. The analysis presented here shows that different decoupling sequences like two-pulse phase-modulation (TPPM), X-inverse-X (XiX), and finite pulse refocused continuous wave (rCW{sup A}) are basically specific solutions of a more generalized decoupling scheme which incorporates the concept of time-modulation along with phase-modulation. A plethora of other good decoupling conditions apart from the standard, TPPM, XiX, and rCW{sup A} decoupling conditions are available from the unified decoupling approach. The importance of combined time- and phase-modulation in order to achieve the best decoupling conditions is delineated. The consequences of different indirect dipolar interactions arising from cross terms comprising of heteronuclear and homonuclear dipolar coupling terms and also those between heteronuclear dipolar coupling and chemical-shift anisotropy terms are presented in order to unfold the effects of anisotropic interactions under different decoupling conditions. Extensive numerical simulation results are corroborated with experiments on standard amino acids.

  13. Characterization of pyrogenic organic matter by 2-dimenstional HETeronucleus CORelation solid-state 13C NMR (HETCOR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike

    2016-04-01

    During the last years, increasing evidences are provided that the common view of charcoal as a polyaromatic network is too much simplified. Experiments with model compounds indicated that it represents a heterogeneous mixture of thermally altered biomacromolecules with N, O and likely also S substitutions as common features. If produced from a N-rich feedstock, the so called black nitrogen (BN) has to be considered as an integral part of the aromatic charcoal network. In order to study this network one-dimensional (1D) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is often applied. However, this technique suffers from broad resonance lines and low resolution. Applying 2D techniques can help but until recently, this was unfeasible for natural organic matter (NOM) due to sensitivity problems and the high complexity of the material. On the other hand, during the last decade, the development of stronger magnetic field instruments and advanced pulse sequences has put them into reach for NOM research. Although 2D NMR spectroscopy has many different applications, all pulse sequences are based on the introduction of a preparation time during which the magnetization of a spin system is adjusted into a state appropriate to whatever properties are to be detected in the indirect dimension. Then, the spins are allowed to evolve with the given conditions and after their additional manipulation during a mixing period the modulated magnetization is detected. Assembling several 1D spectra with incrementing evolution time creates a data set which is two-dimensional in time (t1, t2). Fourier transformation of both dimensions leads to a 2D contour plot correlating the interactions detected in the indirect dimension t1 with the signals detected in the direct dimension t2. The so called solid-state heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR spectroscopy represents a 2D technique allows the determination which protons are interacting with which carbons. In the present work this

  14. Biomolecular solid state NMR with magic-angle spinning at 25 K

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A magic-angle spinning (MAS) probe has been constructed which allows the sample to be cooled with helium, while the MAS bearing and drive gases are nitrogen. The sample can be cooled to 25 K using roughly 3 liters/hour of liquid helium, while the 4 mm diameter rotor spins at 6.7 kHz with good stability (±5 Hz) for many hours. Proton decoupling fields up to at least 130 kHz can be applied. This helium-cooled MAS probe enables a variety of one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR experiments on biomolecular solids and other materials at low temperatures, with signal-to-noise proportional to 1/T. We show examples of low-temperature 13C NMR data for two biomolecular samples, namely the peptide Aβ14–23 in the form of amyloid fibrils and the protein HP35 in frozen glycerol/water solution. Issues related to temperature calibration, spin-lattice relaxation at low temperatures, paramagnetic doping of frozen solutions, and 13C MAS NMR linewidths are discussed. PMID:18922715

  15. Solid state NMR methods for coal science. Progress report, July 1, 1985-September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1986-02-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the last quarter. During the last three months we have concentrated on further developing a new 2-D NMR method that should be useful for coals. As outlined in a previous report this new technique separates the contribution of methines, methylenes and methyl or quaternary carbons to the carbon-13 CPMAS spectra of coals. In contrast to the heteronuclear shift correlation method, which observes only protonated carbons, this method observes all carbon centers seen in a standard CPMAS spectrum. The method has been successfully applied to polystyrene in which a methylene and methine resonance overlap. In this system we have a worst case as the interpretation is somewhat complicated by molecular motion in the solid. The results are still close to quantitative even with this complication. We have also investigated a new series of pulse sequences that we call Echo train NMR that were discovered in our earlier studies on decoupling methods. These sequences will be principally useful in enhancing the sensitivity of powder NMR spectra. In many cases the peak signal to noise of powder spectra can be enhanced by factors of up to 100. 6 figs.

  16. Biphenyl Bicelle Disks Align Perpendicular to Magnetic Fields on Large Temperature Scales: A Study Combining Synthesis, Solid-State NMR, TEM, and SAXS

    PubMed Central

    Loudet, Cécile; Manet, Sabine; Gineste, Stéphane; Oda, Reïko; Achard, Marie-France; Dufourc, Erick J.

    2007-01-01

    A phosphatidylcholine lipid (PC) containing a biphenyl group in one of its acyl chains (1-tetradecanoyl-2-(4-(4-biphenyl)butanoyl)-sn-glycero-3-PC, TBBPC) was successfully synthesized with high yield. Water mixtures of TBBPC with a short-chain C6 lipid, dicaproyl-PC (DCPC), lead to bicelle systems formation. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy evidenced the presence of flat bilayered disks of 800 Å diameter for adequate composition, hydration, and temperature conditions. Because of the presence of the biphenyl group, which confers to the molecule a positive magnetic anisotropy Δχ, the disks align with their normal, n, parallel to the magnetic field B0, as directly detected by 31P, 14N, 2H solid-state NMR and also using small-angle x-ray scattering after annealing in the field. Temperature-composition and temperature-hydration diagrams were established. Domains where disks of TBBPC/DCPC align with their normal parallel to the field were compared to chain-saturated lipid bicelles made of DMPC(dimyristoylPC)/DCPC, which orient with their normal perpendicular to B0. TBBPC/DCPC bicelles exist on a narrow range of long- versus short-chain lipid ratios (3%) but over a large temperature span around room temperature (10–75°C), whereas DMPC/DCPC bicelles exhibit the reverse situation, i.e., large compositional range (22%) and narrow temperature span (25–45°C). The two types of bicelles present orienting properties up to 95% dilution but with the peculiarity that water trapped in biphenyl bicelles exhibits ordering properties twice as large as those observed in the saturated-chains analog, which offers very interesting properties for structural studies on hydrophilic or hydrophobic embedded biomolecules. PMID:17307824

  17. Cryoprotection of Lipid Membranes for High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Studies of Membrane Peptides and Proteins at Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myungwoon; Hong, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectra of membrane proteins often show significant line broadening at cryogenic temperatures. Here we investigate the effects of several cryoprotectants to preserve the spectral resolution of lipid membranes and membrane peptides at temperatures down to ~200 K. Trehalose, glycerol, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), dimethylformamide (DMF), and polyethylene glycol (PEG), were chosen. These compounds are commonly used in protein crystallography and cryobiology. 13C and 1H MAS spectra of several types of lipid membranes show that DMSO provides the best resolution enhancement over unprotected membranes and also best retards ice formation at low temperature. DMF and PEG-400 show slightly weaker cryoprotection, while glycerol and trehalose neither prevent membrane line broadening nor prevent ice formation under the conditions of our study. Neutral saturated-chain phospholipids are the most amenable to cryoprotection, whereas negatively charged and unsaturated lipids attenuate cryoprotection. 13C-1H dipolar couplings and 31P chemical shift anisotropies indicate that high spectral resolution at low temperature is correlated with stronger immobilization of the lipids at high temperature, indicating that line narrowing results from reduction of the conformational space sampled by the lipid molecules at high temperature. DMSO selectively narrowed the linewidths of the most disordered residues in the influenza M2 transmembrane peptide, while residues that exhibit narrow linewidths in the unprotected membrane are less impacted. A relatively rigid β-hairpin antimicrobial peptide, PG-1, showed a linewidth increase of ~0.5 ppm over a ~70 K temperature drop both with and without cryoprotection. Finally, a short-chain saturated lipid, DLPE, exhibits excellent linewidths, suggesting that it may be a good medium for membrane protein structure determination. The three best cryoprotectants found in this work – DMSO, PEG, and DMF - should be useful for low

  18. Cryoprotection of lipid membranes for high-resolution solid-state NMR studies of membrane peptides and proteins at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myungwoon; Hong, Mei

    2014-08-01

    Solid-state NMR spectra of membrane proteins often show significant line broadening at cryogenic temperatures. Here we investigate the effects of several cryoprotectants to preserve the spectral resolution of lipid membranes and membrane peptides at temperatures down to ~200 K. Trehalose, glycerol, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), dimethylformamide (DMF), and polyethylene glycol (PEG), were chosen. These compounds are commonly used in protein crystallography and cryobiology. 13C and 1H magic-angle-spinning spectra of several types of lipid membranes show that DMSO provides the best resolution enhancement over unprotected membranes and also best retards ice formation at low temperature. DMF and PEG-400 show slightly weaker cryoprotection, while glycerol and trehalose neither prevent membrane line broadening nor prevent ice formation under the conditions of our study. Neutral saturated-chain phospholipids are the most amenable to cryoprotection, whereas negatively charged and unsaturated lipids attenuate cryoprotection. 13C-1H dipolar couplings and 31P chemical shift anisotropies indicate that high spectral resolution at low temperature is correlated with stronger immobilization of the lipids at high temperature, indicating that line narrowing results from reduction of the conformational space sampled by the lipid molecules at high temperature. DMSO selectively narrowed the linewidths of the most disordered residues in the influenza M2 transmembrane peptide, while residues that exhibit narrow linewidths in the unprotected membrane are less impacted. A relatively rigid β-hairpin antimicrobial peptide, PG-1, showed a linewidth increase of ~0.5 ppm over a ~70 K temperature drop both with and without cryoprotection. Finally, a short-chain saturated lipid, DLPE, exhibits excellent linewidths, suggesting that it may be a good medium for membrane protein structure determination. The three best cryoprotectants found in this work-DMSO, PEG, and DMF-should be useful for low

  19. Toward a Rational Design of Bioactive Glasses with Optimal Structural Features: Composition–Structure Correlations Unveiled by Solid-State NMR and MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The physiological responses of silicate-based bioactive glasses (BGs) are known to depend critically on both the P content (nP) of the glass and its silicate network connectivity (N̅BOSi). However, while the bioactivity generally displays a nonmonotonic dependence on nP itself, recent work suggest that it is merely the net orthophosphate content that directly links to the bioactivity. We exploit molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with 31P and 29Si solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to explore the quantitative relationships between N̅BOSi, nP, and the silicate and phosphate speciations in a series of Na2O–CaO–SiO2–P2O5 glasses spanning 2.1 ≤ N̅BOSi ≤ 2.9 and variable P2O5 contents up to 6.0 mol %. The fractional population of the orthophosphate groups remains independent of nP at a fixed N̅BOSi-value, but is reduced slightly as N̅BOSi increases. Nevertheless, P remains predominantly as readily released orthophosphate ions, whose content may be altered essentially independently of the network connectivity, thereby offering a route to optimize the glass bioactivity. We discuss the observed composition-structure links in relation to known composition-bioactivity correlations, and define how Na2O–CaO–SiO2–P2O5 compositions exhibiting an optimal bioactivity can be designed by simultaneously altering three key parameters: the silicate network connectivity, the (ortho)phosphate content, and the nNa/nCa molar ratio. PMID:24364818

  20. Conformational analysis of opioid peptides in the solid states and the membrane environments by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Naito, Aira; Nishimura, Katsuyuki

    2004-01-01

    Determination of conformations and structures of opioid peptides in the membrane environments is an essential step to understand the action of the peptide to the specialized receptors. This information not only gains insight into the structure-function relationship of opioid peptide but also gives proper guidelines to design a new drug to have same neuroendocrine functions. This review provides the structural studies of three types of opioid peptide families such as enkephalin, beta-endorphin and dynorphin in the solid states and the membrane environments. The structures of enkephalins show that they take beta-bend, extended and double beta-bend structures in the crystals. Moreover, enkephalin molecules take a variety of structures in the crystals and are easily converted to the other structures with slightly different torsion angles. On the other hand, beta-bend structures are mostly seen in the membrane environments. Membrane bound structure of dynorphin shows that the N-terminus forms alpha-helical structure and is inserted into the membrane with the helical axis almost perpendicular to the membrane surface. It is discussed that the helical region of the extracellular loop II of the kappa-opioid receptor may interact with the helical region of dynorphin with a high affinity in the membrane environments. beta-endorphin takes alpha-helical structure at N-terminus and the central regions and the rest of regions take unordered structure when the bind to the membrane. Since the membrane bound structures of opioid peptides differ from those of the solution states, membrane association is an important process for exerting the affinity and the selectivity to the specific opioid receptors.

  1. 250 GHz CW gyrotron oscillator for dynamic nuclear polarization in biological solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, Vikram S.; Hornstein, Melissa K.; Kreischer, Kenneth E.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Woskov, Paul P.; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator, a critical component of an integrated system for magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments at 9 T, corresponding to 380 MHz 1H frequency. The 250 GHz gyrotron is the first gyro-device designed with the goal of seamless integration with an NMR spectrometer for routine DNP enhanced NMR spectroscopy and has operated under computer control for periods of up to 21 days with a 100% duty cycle. Following a brief historical review of the field, we present studies of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) using DNP enhanced multidimensional NMR. These results include assignment of active site resonances in [U- 13C, 15N]-bR and demonstrate the utility of DNP for studies of membrane proteins. Next, we review the theory of gyro-devices from quantum mechanical and classical viewpoints and discuss the unique considerations that apply to gyrotron oscillators designed for DNP experiments. We then characterize the operation of the 250 GHz gyrotron in detail, including its long-term stability and controllability. We have measured the spectral purity of the gyrotron emission using both homodyne and heterodyne techniques. Radiation intensity patterns from the corrugated waveguide that delivers power to the NMR probe were measured using two new techniques to confirm pure mode content: a thermometric approach based on the temperature-dependent color of liquid crystalline media applied to a substrate and imaging with a pyroelectric camera. We next present a detailed study of the mode excitation characteristics of the gyrotron. Exploration of the operating characteristics of several fundamental modes reveals broadband continuous frequency tuning of up to 1.8 GHz as a function of the magnetic field alone, a feature that may be exploited in future tunable gyrotron designs. Oscillation of the 250 GHz gyrotron at the second harmonic of cyclotron resonance begins at extremely low beam currents (as

  2. 250 GHz CW Gyrotron Oscillator for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization in Biological Solid State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Vikram S.; Hornstein, Melissa K.; Kreischer, Kenneth E.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Woskov, Paul P.; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator, a critical component of an integrated system for magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments at 9T, corresponding to 380 MHz 1H frequency. The 250 GHz gyrotron is the first gyro-device designed with the goal of seamless integration with an NMR spectrometer for routine DNP-enhanced NMR spectroscopy and has operated under computer control for periods of up to 21 days with a 100% duty cycle. Following a brief historical review of the field, we present studies of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) using DNP-enhanced multidimensional NMR. These results include assignment of active site resonances in [U-13C,15N]-bR and demonstrate the utility of DNP for studies of membrane proteins. Next, we review the theory of gyro-devices from quantum mechanical and classical viewpoints and discuss the unique considerations that apply to gyrotron oscillators designed for DNP experiments. We then characterize the operation of the 250 GHz gyrotron in detail, including its long-term stability and controllability. We have measured the spectral purity of the gyrotron emission using both homodyne and heterodyne techniques. Radiation intensity patterns from the corrugated waveguide that delivers power to the NMR probe were measured using two new techniques to confirm pure mode content: a thermometric approach based on the temperature-dependent color of liquid crystalline media applied to a substrate and imaging with a pyroelectric camera. We next present a detailed study of the mode excitation characteristics of the gyrotron. Exploration of the operating characteristics of several fundamental modes reveals broadband continuous frequency tuning of up to 1.8 GHz as a function of the magnetic field alone, a feature that may be exploited in future tunable gyrotron designs. Oscillation of the 250 GHz gyrotron at the second harmonic of cyclotron resonance begins at extremely low beam currents (as low

  3. High Resolution Solid State 13C NMR Spectroscopy of Sporopollenins from Different Plant Taxa

    PubMed Central

    Guilford, William J.; Schneider, Diane M.; Labovitz, Jeffrey; Opella, Stanley J.

    1988-01-01

    The extremely chemically resistant component of the cell wall of spores, pollens, and some microorganisms, sporopollenin, is generally accepted to be derived from carotenoids or carotenoid esters. However, we report here that 13C NMR analyses of sporopollenin from several sources shows that this widely held view is incorrect, with one possible exception. Sporopollenin is not a unique substance but rather a series of related biopolymers derived from largely saturated precursors such as fatty acids. The biopolymers contain widely varying amounts of oxygen in the form of ether, hydroxyl, carboxylic acid, ester, and ketone groups. PMID:16665854

  4. Solid state NMR study of dietary fiber powders from aronia, bilberry, black currant and apple.

    PubMed

    Wawer, I; Wolniak, M; Paradowska, K

    2006-09-01

    13C CPMAS NMR spectra of dietary fiber powders from aronia (chokeberry), bilberry, black currant and apple were recorded. The spectra are complex owing to superposition of resonances from different polysaccharides and polyphenolic compounds. Standard, dipolar dephased and the TH(1rho) partially relaxed spectra enabled the identification of several constituents: microcrystalline cellulose, pectins, lignins, cutin-like polymers and condensed tannins. The fiber powders obtained from berries contain significant amounts of anthocyanins, as indicated by their dark violet color, but not verified by chemical shifts. The anthocyanin-rich extract from aronia berries and its major components, cyanidin-3-O-galactoside and (-)epicatechin were also studied.

  5. Identification of different oxygen species in oxide nanostructures with 17O solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Wu, Xin-Ping; Zheng, Sujuan; Zhao, Li; Li, Lei; Shen, Li; Gao, Yuxian; Xue, Nianhua; Guo, Xuefeng; Huang, Weixin; Gan, Zhehong; Blanc, Frédéric; Yu, Zhiwu; Ke, Xiaokang; Ding, Weiping; Gong, Xue-Qing; Grey, Clare P.; Peng, Luming

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured oxides find multiple uses in a diverse range of applications including catalysis, energy storage, and environmental management, their higher surface areas, and, in some cases, electronic properties resulting in different physical properties from their bulk counterparts. Developing structure-property relations for these materials requires a determination of surface and subsurface structure. Although microscopy plays a critical role owing to the fact that the volumes sampled by such techniques may not be representative of the whole sample, complementary characterization methods are urgently required. We develop a simple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) strategy to detect the first few layers of a nanomaterial, demonstrating the approach with technologically relevant ceria nanoparticles. We show that the 17O resonances arising from the first to third surface layer oxygen ions, hydroxyl sites, and oxygen species near vacancies can be distinguished from the oxygen ions in the bulk, with higher-frequency 17O chemical shifts being observed for the lower coordinated surface sites. H217O can be used to selectively enrich surface sites, allowing only these particular active sites to be monitored in a chemical process. 17O NMR spectra of thermally treated nanosized ceria clearly show how different oxygen species interconvert at elevated temperature. Density functional theory calculations confirm the assignments and reveal a strong dependence of chemical shift on the nature of the surface. These results open up new strategies for characterizing nanostructured oxides and their applications. PMID:26601133

  6. Identification of different oxygen species in oxide nanostructures with (17)O solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Wu, Xin-Ping; Zheng, Sujuan; Zhao, Li; Li, Lei; Shen, Li; Gao, Yuxian; Xue, Nianhua; Guo, Xuefeng; Huang, Weixin; Gan, Zhehong; Blanc, Frédéric; Yu, Zhiwu; Ke, Xiaokang; Ding, Weiping; Gong, Xue-Qing; Grey, Clare P; Peng, Luming

    2015-02-01

    Nanostructured oxides find multiple uses in a diverse range of applications including catalysis, energy storage, and environmental management, their higher surface areas, and, in some cases, electronic properties resulting in different physical properties from their bulk counterparts. Developing structure-property relations for these materials requires a determination of surface and subsurface structure. Although microscopy plays a critical role owing to the fact that the volumes sampled by such techniques may not be representative of the whole sample, complementary characterization methods are urgently required. We develop a simple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) strategy to detect the first few layers of a nanomaterial, demonstrating the approach with technologically relevant ceria nanoparticles. We show that the (17)O resonances arising from the first to third surface layer oxygen ions, hydroxyl sites, and oxygen species near vacancies can be distinguished from the oxygen ions in the bulk, with higher-frequency (17)O chemical shifts being observed for the lower coordinated surface sites. H2 (17)O can be used to selectively enrich surface sites, allowing only these particular active sites to be monitored in a chemical process. (17)O NMR spectra of thermally treated nanosized ceria clearly show how different oxygen species interconvert at elevated temperature. Density functional theory calculations confirm the assignments and reveal a strong dependence of chemical shift on the nature of the surface. These results open up new strategies for characterizing nanostructured oxides and their applications.

  7. 31P NMR spectroscopy in the quality control and authentication of extra-virgin olive oil: a review of recent progress.

    PubMed

    Dais, Photis; Spyros, Apostolos

    2007-05-01

    This review is a brief account on the application of a novel methodology to the quality control and authentication of extra-virgin olive oil. This methodology is based on the derivatization of the labile hydrogens of functional groups, such as hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, of olive oil constituents with the phosphorus reagent 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyldioxaphospholane, and the use of the (31)P chemical shifts to identify the phosphitylated compounds. Various experimental aspects such as pertinent instrumentation, sample preparation, acquisition parameters and properties of the phosphorus reagent are reviewed. The strategy to assign the (31)P signals of the phosphitylated model compounds and olive oil constituents by employing 1D and 2D NMR experiments is presented. Finally, the capability of this technique to assess the quality and the genuineness of extra-virgin olive oil and to detect fraud is discussed.

  8. 31P and 19F NMR studies of glycophorin-reconstituted membranes: preferential interaction of glycophorin with phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Glycophorin A, a major glycoprotein of the erythrocyte membrane, has been incorporated into small unilamellar vesicles composed of a variety of pure and mixed phospholipids. Nuclear spin labels including 31P and 19F have been used at natural abundance or have been synthetically incorporated in lipids to act as probes of lipid-protein interaction. Interactions produce broadening of resonances in several cases and it can be used to demonstrate preferential interaction of certain lipids with glycophorin. 31P and 19F probes show a strong preferential interaction of glycophorin with phosphatidylserine over phosphatidylcholine. There is some evidence that interactions are more pronounced at the inner surface of the bilayer and these results are rationalized in terms of the asymmetric distribution of protein and lipid.

  9. Probing physical and chemical changes in cortical bone due to osteoporosis and type 2 diabetes by solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Donghua; Taylor, Amanda; Rendina, Beth; Smith, Brenda; Department of Physics Collaboration; Department of Nutritional Sciences Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Approximately 1.5 million fractures occur each year in the U.S. due to osteoporosis, which is characterized by decreased bone mineral density and deterioration of bone micro-architecture. On the other hand, type 2 diabetes also significantly increases fracture risks, despite having a normal or even higher bone mineral density. Solid-state NMR has been applied to bone tissues from normal and disease-inflicted mouse models to study structural and chemical dynamics as the disease progresses. Proton relaxation experiments were performed to measure water populations in the bone matrix and pores. Collagen-bound water has strong influence on bone resilience, while water content in the pores reveals amount and size of pores from micro- to millimeter range. Other biochemical and atomic-scale structural alterations in the mineral and organic phases and their interface were investigated by proton, phosphorus, and carbon NMR spectroscopy. Experiments were designed to individually detect different types of phosphorus environments: near the mineral surface, similar to hydroxyapatite, and deficient of hydrogens due to substitution of the hydroxyl group by other ions. A new method was also developed for accurate quantification of each phosphorus species. The authors appreciate financial support for this project from the College of Human Sciences and the College of Arts and Sciences, Oklahoma State University.

  10. DNP-enhanced ultrawideline (207)Pb solid-state NMR spectroscopy: an application to cultural heritage science.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Perras, Frédéric A; Murphy, Anna; Yao, Yao; Catalano, Jaclyn; Centeno, Silvia A; Dybowski, Cecil; Zumbulyadis, Nicholas; Pruski, Marek

    2017-03-14

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is used to enhance the (ultra)wideline (207)Pb solid-state NMR spectra of lead compounds of relevance in the preservation of cultural heritage objects. The DNP SSNMR experiments enabled, for the first time, the detection of the basic lead carbonate phase of the lead white pigment by (207)Pb SSNMR spectroscopy. Variable-temperature experiments revealed that the short T'2 relaxation time of the basic lead carbonate phase hinders the acquisition of the NMR signal at room temperature. We additionally observe that the DNP enhancement is twice as large for lead palmitate (a lead soap, which is a degradation product implicated in the visible deterioration of lead-based oil paintings), than it is for the basic lead carbonate. This enhancement has allowed us to detect the formation of a lead soap in an aged paint film by (207)Pb SSNMR spectroscopy; which may aid in the detection of deterioration products in smaller samples removed from works of art.

  11. Quantitative analysis of Bordeaux red wine precipitates by solid-state NMR: Role of tartrates and polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Shipra; Iturmendi, Nerea; Grelard, Axelle; Moine, Virginie; Dufourc, Erick

    2016-05-15

    Stability of wines is of great importance in oenology matters. Quantitative estimation of dark red precipitates formed in Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon wine from Bordeaux region for vintages 2012 and 2013 was performed during the oak barrel ageing process. Precipitates were obtained by placing wine at -4°C or 4°C for 2-6 days and monitored by periodic sampling during a one-year period. Spectroscopic identification of the main families of components present in the precipitate powder was performed with (13)C solid-state CPMAS NMR and 1D and 2D solution NMR of partially water re-solubilized precipitates. The study revealed that the amount of precipitate obtained is dependent on vintage, temperature and grape variety. Major components identified include potassium bitartrate, polyphenols, polysaccharides, organic acids and free amino acids. No evidence was found for the presence of proteins. The influence of main compounds found in the precipitates is discussed in relation to wine stability.

  12. Using solid-state NMR to monitor the molecular consequences of Cryptococcus neoformans melanization with different catecholamine precursors.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Frases, Susana; Itin, Boris; Casadevall, Arturo; Stark, Ruth E

    2012-08-07

    Melanins are a class of natural pigments associated with a wide range of biological functions, including microbial virulence, energy transduction, and protection against solar radiation. Because of their insolubility and structural heterogeneity, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides an unprecedented means to define the molecular architecture of these enigmatic pigments. The requirement of obligatory catecholamines for melanization of the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans also offers unique opportunities for investigating melanin development. In the current study, pigments produced with L-dopa, methyl-L-dopa, epinephrine, and norepinephrine precursors are compared structurally using (13)C and (1)H magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR. Striking structural differences were observed for both aromatic and aliphatic molecular constituents of the mature fungal pigment assemblies, thus making it possible to redefine the molecular prerequisites for formation of the aromatic domains of insoluble indole-based biopolymers, to rationalize their distinctive physical characteristics, and to delineate the role of cellular constituents in assembly of the melanized macromolecules with polysaccharides and fatty acyl chain-containing moieties. By achieving an augmented understanding of the mechanisms of C. neoformans melanin biosynthesis and cellular assembly, such studies can guide future drug discovery efforts related to melanin-associated virulence, resistance to tumor therapy, and production of melanin mimetics under cell-free conditions.

  13. Direct assessment of substrate binding to the Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporter LeuT by solid state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Erlendsson, Simon; Gotfryd, Kamil; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Mortensen, Jonas Sigurd; Geiger, Michel-Andreas; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Gether, Ulrik; Teilum, Kaare; Loland, Claus J

    2017-01-01

    The Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters (NSSs) represent an important class of proteins mediating sodium-dependent uptake of neurotransmitters from the extracellular space. The substrate binding stoichiometry of the bacterial NSS protein, LeuT, and thus the principal transport mechanism, has been heavily debated. Here we used solid state NMR to specifically characterize the bound leucine ligand and probe the number of binding sites in LeuT. We were able to produce high-quality NMR spectra of substrate bound to microcrystalline LeuT samples and identify one set of sodium-dependent substrate-specific chemical shifts. Furthermore, our data show that the binding site mutants F253A and L400S, which probe the major S1 binding site and the proposed S2 binding site, respectively, retain sodium-dependent substrate binding in the S1 site similar to the wild-type protein. We conclude that under our experimental conditions there is only one detectable leucine molecule bound to LeuT. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19314.001 PMID:28117663

  14. Handling the influence of chemical shift in amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basse, Kristoffer; Shankar, Ravi; Bjerring, Morten; Vosegaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Nielsen, Anders B.

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the influence of chemical shifts on amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling experiments in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The method is demonstrated using the Rotor Echo Short Pulse IRrAdiaTION mediated Cross-Polarization (RESPIRATIONCP) experiment as an example. By going into the pulse sequence rf interaction frame and employing a quintuple-mode operator-based Floquet approach, we describe how chemical shift offset and anisotropic chemical shift affect the efficiency of heteronuclear polarization transfer. In this description, it becomes transparent that the main attribute leading to non-ideal performance is a fictitious field along the rf field axis, which is generated from second-order cross terms arising mainly between chemical shift tensors and themselves. This insight is useful for the development of improved recoupling experiments. We discuss the validity of this approach and present quaternion calculations to determine the effective resonance conditions in a combined rf field and chemical shift offset interaction frame transformation. Based on this, we derive a broad-banded version of the RESPIRATIONCP experiment. The new sequence is experimentally verified using SNNFGAILSS amyloid fibrils where simultaneous 15N → 13CO and 15N → 13Cα coherence transfer is demonstrated on high-field NMR instrumentation, requiring great offset stability.

  15. Solid-state NMR investigations of cellulose structure and interactions with matrix polysaccharides in plant primary cell walls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Hong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, the 3D architecture of plant cell walls was poorly understood due to the lack of high-resolution techniques for characterizing the molecular structure, dynamics, and intermolecular interactions of the wall polysaccharides in these insoluble biomolecular mixtures. We introduced multidimensional solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy, coupled with (13)C labelling of whole plants, to determine the spatial arrangements of macromolecules in near-native plant cell walls. Here we review key evidence from 2D and 3D correlation NMR spectra that show relatively few cellulose-hemicellulose cross peaks but many cellulose-pectin cross peaks, indicating that cellulose microfibrils are not extensively coated by hemicellulose and all three major polysaccharides exist in a single network rather than two separate networks as previously proposed. The number of glucan chains in the primary-wall cellulose microfibrils has been under active debate recently. We show detailed analysis of quantitative (13)C SSNMR spectra of cellulose in various wild-type (WT) and mutant Arabidopsis and Brachypodium primary cell walls, which consistently indicate that primary-wall cellulose microfibrils contain at least 24 glucan chains.

  16. Parameter independent low-power heteronuclear decoupling for fast magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Equbal, Asif; Madhu, P. K.; Meier, Beat H.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Ernst, Matthias; Agarwal, Vipin

    2017-02-01

    Major advances have recently been made in the field of heteronuclear dipolar decoupling in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). These developments have improved the resolution and sensitivity of the NMR spectrum of spins coupled to protons. One such new scheme, denoted as rCWApA, has proven to be robust with practically no need for parameter optimization [A. Equbal et al. Chem. Phys. Lett., 635, 339 (2015)]. Most of the experiments with rCWApA have been carried out in the regimes of slow to moderate magic-angle spinning while simultaneously applying high decoupling radio-frequency amplitudes. Here, we explore the performance of the rCWApA sequence and its predecessor rCWA in the regime of low-power radio-frequency irradiation and fast magic-angle spinning. The robustness of the refocused continuous-wave (rCW) schemes to experimental parameters such as pulse lengths and offset irradiation is demonstrated. Numerical simulations and analytical theory have been used to understand the effects of various nuclear spin interactions on the decoupling performance of the low-power rCW decoupling scheme relative to other decoupling methods. This has lead to the design of an "optimum low-power decoupling sequence" that can be used without parameter optimization. This result is particularly important in the context of samples with low signal to noise.

  17. DNP-enhanced ultrawideline solid-state NMR spectroscopy: Studies of platinum in metal–organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Perras, Frederic A.; Goh, Tian Wei; Metz, Tanner L.; Huang, Wenyu; Pruski, Marek

    2016-06-06

    Ultrawideline dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced 195Pt solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy and theoretical calculations are used to determine the coordination of atomic Pt species supported within the pores of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs). The 195Pt SSNMR spectra, with breadths reaching 10,000 ppm, were obtained by combining DNP with broadbanded cross-polarization and CPMG acquisition. Although the DNP enhancements in static samples are lower than those typically observed under magic-angle spinning conditions, the presented measurements would be very challenging using the conventional SSNMR methods. The DNP-enhanced ultrawideline NMR spectra served to separate signals from cis- and trans-coordinated atomic Pt2+ species supported on the UiO-66-NH2 MOF. Here, the data revealed a dominance of kinetic effects in the formation of Pt2+ complexes and the thermodynamic effects in their reduction to nanoparticles. A single cis-coordinated Pt2+ complex was confirmed in MOF-253.

  18. Variability of cork from Portuguese Quercus suber studied by solid-state (13)C-NMR and FTIR spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Lopes, M H; Barros, A S; Pascoal Neto, C; Rutledge, D; Delgadillo, I; Gil, A M

    2001-01-01

    A new approach is presented for the study of the variability of Portuguese reproduction cork using solid-state (13)C-NMR spectroscopy and photoacoustic (PAS) FTIR (FTIR-PAS) spectroscopy combined with chemometrics. Cork samples were collected from 12 different geographical sites, and their (13)C-cross-polarization with magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) and FTIR spectra were registered. A large spectral variability among the cork samples was detected by principal component analysis and found to relate to the suberin and carbohydrate contents. This variability was independent of the sample geographical origin but significantly dependent on the cork quality, thus enabling the distinction of cork samples according to the latter property. The suberin content of the cork samples was predicted using multivariate regression models based on the (13)C-NMR and FTIR spectra of the samples as reported previously. Finally, the relationship between the variability of the (13)C-CP/MAS spectra with that of the FTIR-PAS spectra was studied by outer product analysis. This type of multivariate analysis enabled a clear correlation to be established between the peaks assigned to suberin and carbohydrate in the FTIR spectrum and those appearing in the (13)C-CP/MAS spectra.

  19. DNP-enhanced ultrawideline solid-state NMR spectroscopy: Studies of platinum in metal–organic frameworks

    DOE PAGES

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Perras, Frederic A.; Goh, Tian Wei; ...

    2016-06-06

    Ultrawideline dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced 195Pt solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy and theoretical calculations are used to determine the coordination of atomic Pt species supported within the pores of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs). The 195Pt SSNMR spectra, with breadths reaching 10,000 ppm, were obtained by combining DNP with broadbanded cross-polarization and CPMG acquisition. Although the DNP enhancements in static samples are lower than those typically observed under magic-angle spinning conditions, the presented measurements would be very challenging using the conventional SSNMR methods. The DNP-enhanced ultrawideline NMR spectra served to separate signals from cis- and trans-coordinated atomic Pt2+ species supported on the UiO-66-NH2more » MOF. Here, the data revealed a dominance of kinetic effects in the formation of Pt2+ complexes and the thermodynamic effects in their reduction to nanoparticles. A single cis-coordinated Pt2+ complex was confirmed in MOF-253.« less

  20. Solvation and hydrogen bonding in alanine- and glycine-containing dipeptides probed using solution- and solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bhate, Manasi P; Woodard, Jaie C; Mehta, Manish A

    2009-07-15

    The NMR chemical shift is a sensitive reporter of peptide secondary structure and its solvation environment, and it is potentially rich with information about both backbone dihedral angles and hydrogen bonding. We report results from solution- and solid-state (13)C and (15)N NMR studies of four zwitterionic model dipeptides, L-alanyl-L-alanine, L-alanyl-glycine, glycyl-L-alanine, and glycyl-glycine, in which we attempt to isolate structural and environmental contributions to the chemical shift. We have mapped hydrogen-bonding patterns in the crystalline states of these dipeptides using the published crystal structures and correlated them with (13)C and (15)N magic angle spinning chemical shift data. To aid in the interpretation of the solvated chemical shifts, we performed ab initio quantum chemical calculations to determine the low-energy conformers and their chemical shifts. Assuming low energy barriers to interconversion between thermally accessible conformers, we compare the Boltzmann-averaged chemical shifts with the experimentally determined solvated-state shifts. The results allow us to correlate the observed differences in chemical shifts between the crystalline and solvated states to changes in conformation and hydrogen bonding that occur upon solvation.

  1. Parameter independent low-power heteronuclear decoupling for fast magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Equbal, Asif; Madhu, P K; Meier, Beat H; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Ernst, Matthias; Agarwal, Vipin

    2017-02-28

    Major advances have recently been made in the field of heteronuclear dipolar decoupling in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). These developments have improved the resolution and sensitivity of the NMR spectrum of spins coupled to protons. One such new scheme, denoted as rCW(ApA), has proven to be robust with practically no need for parameter optimization [A. Equbal et al. Chem. Phys. Lett., 635, 339 (2015)]. Most of the experiments with rCW(ApA) have been carried out in the regimes of slow to moderate magic-angle spinning while simultaneously applying high decoupling radio-frequency amplitudes. Here, we explore the performance of the rCW(ApA) sequence and its predecessor rCW(A) in the regime of low-power radio-frequency irradiation and fast magic-angle spinning. The robustness of the refocused continuous-wave (rCW) schemes to experimental parameters such as pulse lengths and offset irradiation is demonstrated. Numerical simulations and analytical theory have been used to understand the effects of various nuclear spin interactions on the decoupling performance of the low-power rCW decoupling scheme relative to other decoupling methods. This has lead to the design of an "optimum low-power decoupling sequence" that can be used without parameter optimization. This result is particularly important in the context of samples with low signal to noise.

  2. Orientation and dynamics of an antimicrobial peptide in the lipid bilayer by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, S; Huster, D; Waring, A; Lehrer, R I; Kearney, W; Tack, B F; Hong, M

    2001-01-01

    The orientation and dynamics of an 18-residue antimicrobial peptide, ovispirin, has been investigated using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Ovispirin is a cathelicidin-like model peptide (NH(2)-KNLRRIIRKIIHIIKKYG-COOH) with potent, broad-spectrum bactericidal activity. (15)N NMR spectra of oriented ovispirin reconstituted into synthetic phospholipids show that the helical peptide is predominantly oriented in the plane of the lipid bilayer, except for a small portion of the helix, possibly at the C-terminus, which deviates from the surface orientation. This suggests differential insertion of the peptide backbone into the lipid bilayer. (15)N spectra of both oriented and unoriented peptides show a reduced (15)N chemical shift anisotropy at room temperature compared with that of rigid proteins, indicating that the peptide undergoes uniaxial rotational diffusion around the bilayer normal with correlation times shorter than 10(-4) s. This motion is frozen below the gel-to-liquid crystalline transition temperature of the lipids. Ovispirin interacts strongly with the lipid bilayer, as manifested by the significantly reduced (2)H quadrupolar splittings of perdeuterated palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine acyl chains upon peptide binding. Therefore, ovispirin is a curved helix residing in the membrane-water interface that executes rapid uniaxial rotation. These structural and dynamic features are important for understanding the antimicrobial function of this peptide. PMID:11566791

  3. Direct assessment of substrate binding to the Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporter LeuT by solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Erlendsson, Simon; Gotfryd, Kamil; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Mortensen, Jonas Sigurd; Geiger, Michel-Andreas; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Gether, Ulrik; Teilum, Kaare; Loland, Claus J

    2017-01-24

    The Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters (NSSs) represent an important class of proteins mediating sodium-dependent uptake of neurotransmitters from the extracellular space. The substrate binding stoichiometry of the bacterial NSS protein, LeuT, and thus the principal transport mechanism, has been heavily debated. Here we used solid state NMR to specifically characterize the bound leucine ligand and probe the number of binding sites in LeuT. We were able to produce high-quality NMR spectra of substrate bound to microcrystalline LeuT samples and identify one set of sodium-dependent substrate-specific chemical shifts. Furthermore, our data show that the binding site mutants F253A and L400S, which probe the major S1 binding site and the proposed S2 binding site, respectively, retain sodium-dependent substrate binding in the S1 site similar to the wild-type protein. We conclude that under our experimental conditions there is only one detectable leucine molecule bound to LeuT.

  4. Solid-state NMR characterization of pyrene-cuticular matter interactions.

    PubMed

    Sachleben, Joseph R; Chefetz, Benny; Deshmukh, Ashish; Hatcher, Patrick G

    2004-08-15

    One- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments were performed on Agave americana cutan and tomato cutin to examine the interactions between a hydrophobic pollutant, pyrene, and cuticular material. Variable-temperature NMR experiments show that cutan, an acid- and base-resistant cuticular biopolymer, undergoes the characteristic melting behavior of "polyethylene-like" crystallites, while the tomato cutin does not. The melting point of A. americana cutan was found to be approximately 360 K, which is consistent with the thickness of the polyethylene crystallites of 30-40 methylene units. Sorption models predict that the sorption behavior of hydrophobic pollutants should depend on the phase of the cuticular material. 13C NMR experiments on labeled pyrene were performed. The 13C T1 of pyrene decreases significantly from that of crystalline pyrene upon sorption to both tomato fruit cutin and A. americana cutan, indicating that the pyrene is mobile upon sorption. Magic angle spinning experiments at low spinning frequencies (2-4 kHz) provided the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) parameters delta, the anisotropy, and eta, the asymmetry parameter, for crystalline and sorbed pyrene. For crystalline pyrene, two types of crystallographically distinctive pyrenes were observed. The first had delta = -97.4+/-0.5 ppm and eta = 0.934+/-0.006, while the second had delta = -98.1+/-0.5 ppm and eta = 0.823+/-0.008. After sorption to cutan, these CSA parameters were found to be delta = -78.9+/-5.3 ppm and eta < 0.70 independent of the length of time since completion of the sorption procedure. In tomato cutin, the CSA parameters were found to be dependent upon the time since completion of the sorption procedure. One and one-half months after sorption, delta was found to have a value of -30.4 ppm < delta < 0.0 ppm and eta was undeterminable, while after 22 months these values become delta = -80.0 +/-3.3 ppm and eta< 0.42. These changes in the CSA parameters

  5. Solid state NMR methods for coal science. Progress report, April 1, 1985-June 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1985-09-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the last quarter. During the last three months we have concentrated on developing a new 2-D NMR method that should be useful for coals. This new technique separates the contribution of methines, methylenes and methyl or quaternary carbons to the carbon-13 CPMAS spectra of coals. In contrast to the heteronuclear shift correlation method, which observes only protonated carbons, this method observes all carbon centers seen in a standard CPMAS spectrum. The separation is based on the different patterns that are characteristic of the dipolar spectra of carbons with differing numbers of attached protons. Some progress has also been made in understanding intensity distortions that can arise in carbon-13/proton shift correlation spectra. 3 figs.

  6. Neutron scattering, solid state NMR and quantum chemistry studies of 11-keto-progesterone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szyczewski, A.; Hołderna-Natkaniec, K.; Natkaniec, I.

    2004-07-01

    The molecule geometry, frequency and intensity of the IINS and IR vibrational bands of 11-ketoprogesterone have been obtained by the HF, PM3 and density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP functionals and 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The optimised bond lengths and bond angles of the steroid skeleton are in good agreement with the X-ray data. The IR and IINS spectra of ketoprogesterone, computed at the DFT level, well reproduce the vibrational wavenumbers and intensities to an accuracy allowing reliable vibrational assignments. The molecular dynamic study by 1H NMR has confirmed the sequence of onset of reorientations of subsequent methyl groups indicated by the results of quantum chemistry calculations and INS spectra.

  7. Solid state NMR and IR characterization of wood polymer structure in relation to tree provenance.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Ilaria; Callone, Emanuela; Sandak, Anna; Sandak, Jakub; Dirè, Sandra

    2015-03-06

    (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance and mid-infrared spectroscopies were used for characterizing changes in the chemical structure of wood polymers (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) in relation to the tree growth location. Samples of three provenances in Europe (Finland, Poland and Italy) were selected for studies. The requirement was to use untreated solid wood samples to minimize any manipulation to the nanostructure of native wood. The results confirm that the chemical and physical properties of samples belonging to the same wood species (Picea abies Karst.) differ due to the origin. Both FT-IR and dynamic NMR spectroscopies were able to correctly discriminate samples originating from three different provenances in Europe. Such methods might be very useful for both, research and understanding of wood microstructure and its variability due to the growth conditions.

  8. Mechanism of Solid-State Thermolysis of Ammonia Boraine: 15N NMR Study Using Fast Magic-Angle Spinning and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Gupta, Shalabh; Caporini, Marc A; Pecharsky, Vitalij K; Pruski, Marek

    2014-08-28

    The solid-state thermolysis of ammonia borane (NH3BH3, AB) was explored using state-of-the-art 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy, including 2D indirectly detected 1H{15N} heteronuclear correlation and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced 15N{1H} cross-polarization experiments as well as 11B NMR. The complementary use of 15N and 11B NMR experiments, supported by density functional theory calculations of the chemical shift tensors, provided insights into the dehydrogenation mechanism of AB—insights that have not been available by 11B NMR alone. Specifically, highly branched polyaminoborane derivatives were shown to form from AB via oligomerization in the “head-to-tail” manner, which then transform directly into hexagonal boron nitride analog through the dehydrocyclization reaction, bypassing the formation of polyiminoborane.

  9. Characterization of the myristoyl lipid modification of membrane-bound GCAP-2 by 2H solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Alexander; Schröder, Thomas; Lange, Christian; Huster, Daniel

    2007-12-01

    Guanylate cyclase-activating protein-2 (GCAP-2) is a retinal Ca2+ sensor protein. It is responsible for the regulation of both isoforms of the transmembrane photoreceptor guanylate cyclase, a key enzyme of vertebrate phototransduction. GCAP-2 is N-terminally myristoylated and full activation of its target proteins requires the presence of this lipid modification. The structural role of the myristoyl moiety in the interaction of GCAP-2 with the guanylate cyclases and the lipid membrane is currently not well understood. In the present work, we studied the binding of Ca2+-free myristoylated and non-myristoylated GCAP-2 to phospholipid vesicles consisting of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine or of a lipid mixture resembling the physiological membrane composition by a biochemical binding assay and 2H solid-state NMR. The NMR results clearly demonstrate the full-length insertion of the aliphatic chain of the myristoyl group into the membrane. Very similar geometrical parameters were determined from the 2H NMR spectra of the myristoyl group of GCAP-2 and the acyl chains of the host membranes, respectively. The myristoyl chain shows a moderate mobility within the lipid environment, comparable to the acyl chains of the host membrane lipids. This is in marked contrast to the behavior of other lipid-modified model proteins. Strikingly, the contribution of the myristoyl group to the free energy of membrane binding of GCAP-2 is only on the order of -0.5 kJ/mol, and the electrostatic contribution is slightly unfavorable, which implies that the main driving forces for membrane localization arises through other, mainly hydrophobic, protein side chain-lipid interactions. These results suggest a role of the myristoyl group in the direct interaction of GCAP-2 with its target proteins, the retinal guanylate cyclases.

  10. Solid-state NMR characterization of amphomycin effects on peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acid biosyntheses in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manmilan; Chang, James; Coffman, Lauryn; Kim, Sung Joon

    2016-01-01

    Amphomycin and MX-2401 are cyclic lipopeptides exhibiting bactericidal activities against Gram-positive pathogens. Amphomycin and MX-2401 share structural similarities with daptomycin, but unlike daptomycin they do not target bacterial membrane. In this study, we investigate in vivo modes of action for amphomycin and MX-2401 in intact whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus by measuring the changes of peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acid compositions using solid-state NMR. S. aureus were grown in a defined media containing isotope labels [1-13C]glycine and L-[ε-15N]lysin, L-[1-13C]lysine and D-[15N]alanine, or D-[1-13C]alanine and [15N]glycine, to selectively 13C-15N pair label peptidoglycan bridge-link, stem-link, and cross-link, respectively. 13C{15N} and 15N{13C} rotational-echo double resonance NMR measurements determined that cyclic lipopeptide-treated S. aureus exhibited thinning of the cell wall, accumulation of Park’s nucleotide, inhibition of glycine utilization for purine biosynthesis, reduction of ester-linked D-Ala in teichoic acids, and reduction of peptidoglycan cross-linking. Whole cell NMR analysis also revealed that S. aureus, in presence of amphomycin and MX-2401, maintained the incorporation of D-Ala during peptidoglycan biosynthesis while the incorporation of D-Ala into teichoic acids was inhibited. These effects are consistent with amphomycin’s dual inhibition of both peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acid biosyntheses in S. aureus. PMID:27538449

  11. Sensitivity-enhanced solid-state NMR detection of expansin’s target in plant cell walls

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Caporini, Marc A.; Rosay, Melanie; Zhong, Linghao; Cosgrove, Daniel J.; Hong, Mei

    2013-01-01

    Structure determination of protein binding to noncrystalline macromolecular assemblies such as plant cell walls (CWs) poses a significant structural biology challenge. CWs are loosened during growth by expansin proteins, which weaken the noncovalent network formed by cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins, but the CW target of expansins has remained elusive because of the minute amount of the protein required for activity and the complex nature of the CW. Using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, combined with sensitivity-enhancing dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and differential isotopic labeling of expansin and polysaccharides, we have now determined the functional binding target of expansin in the Arabidopsis thaliana CW. By transferring the electron polarization of a biradical dopant to the nuclei, DNP allowed selective detection of 13C spin diffusion from trace concentrations of 13C, 15N-labeled expansin in the CW to nearby polysaccharides. From the spin diffusion data of wild-type and mutant expansins, we conclude that to loosen the CW, expansin binds highly specific cellulose domains enriched in xyloglucan, whereas more abundant binding to pectins is unrelated to activity. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate short 13C-13C distances of 4–6 Å between a hydrophobic surface of the cellulose microfibril and an aromatic motif on the expansin surface, consistent with the observed NMR signals. DNP-enhanced 2D 13C correlation spectra further reveal that the expansin-bound cellulose has altered conformation and is enriched in xyloglucan, thus providing unique insight into the mechanism of CW loosening. DNP-enhanced NMR provides a powerful, generalizable approach for investigating protein binding to complex macromolecular targets. PMID:24065828

  12. Phase separation in ceramide[NP] containing lipid model membranes: neutron diffraction and solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Annett; Stahlberg, Sören; Školová, Barbora; Sonnenberger, Stefan; Eichner, Adina; Huster, Daniel; Vávrová, Kateřina; Hauß, Thomas; Dobner, Bodo; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Vogel, Alexander

    2017-03-08

    The stratum corneum is the outermost layer of the skin and protects the organism against external influences as well as water loss. It consists of corneocytes embedded in a mixture of ceramides, fatty acids, and cholesterol in a molar ratio of roughly 1 : 1 : 1. The unique structural and compositional arrangement of these stratum corneum lipids is responsible for the skin barrier properties. Many studies investigated the organization of these barrier lipids and, in particular, the exact conformation of ceramides. However, so far no consensus has been reached. In this study, we investigate a model system comprised of N-(non-hydroxy-tetracosanoyl)-phytosphingosine/cholesterol/tetracosanoic acid (CER[NP]-C24/CHOL/TA) at a 1 : 1 : 1 molar ratio using neutron diffraction and (2)H solid-state NMR spectroscopy at temperatures from 25 °C to 80 °C. Deuterated variants of all three lipid components of the model system were used to enable their separate investigation in the NMR spectra and quantification of the amount of molecules in each phase. Neutron scattering experiments show the coexistence of two lipid phases at low temperatures with repeat spacings of 54.2 Å and 43.0 Å at a physiological skin temperature of 32 °C. They appear to be indistinguishable in the (2)H NMR spectra as both phases are crystalline and ceramide molecules do not rotate around their long axis on a microsecond timescale. The evolution of these phases upon heating is followed and with increasing temperature fluid and even isotropically mobile molecules are observed. A model of the organization of the lamellar phases is proposed in which the thicker phase consists of CER[NP]-C24 in a hairpin conformation mixed with CHOL and TA, while the phase with a repeat spacing of 43.0 Å contains CER[NP]-C24 in a V-shape conformation.

  13. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus combines intrinsic phosphotransferase and cyclic phosphodiesterase activities: A sup 31 P NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Shashidhar, M.S.; Kuppe, A. ); Volwerk, J.J.; Griffith, O.H.

    1990-09-04

    The inositol phosphate products formed during the cleavage of phosphatidylinositol by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus were analyzed by {sup 31}P NMR. {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy can distinguish between the inositol phosphate species and phosphatidylinositol. Chemical shift values (with reference to phosphoric acid) observed are {minus}0.41, 3.62, 4.45, and 16.30 ppm for phosphatidylinositol, myo-inositol 1-monophosphate, myo-inositol 2-monophosphate, and myo-inositol 1,2-cyclic monophosphate, respectively. It is shown that under a variety of experimental conditions this phospholipase C cleaves phosphatidylinositol via an intramolecular phosphotransfer reaction producing diacylglycerol and D-myo-inositol 1,2-cyclic monophosphate. The authors also report the new and unexpected observation that the phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from B. cereus is able to hydrolyze the inositol cyclic phosphate to form D-myo-inositol 1-monophosphate. The enzyme, therefore, possesses phosphotransferase and cyclic phosphodiesterase activities. The second reaction requires thousandfold higher enzyme concentrations to be observed by {sup 31}P NMR. This reaction was shown to be regiospecific in that only the 1-phosphate was produced and stereospecific in that only D-myo-inositol 1,2-cyclic monophosphate was hydrolyzed. Inhibition with a monoclonal antibody specific for the B.cereus phospholipase C showed that the cyclic phosphodiesterase activity is intrinsic to the bacterial enzyme. They propose a two-step mechanism for the phosphatidyl-inositol-specific phospholipase C from B. cereus involving sequential phosphotransferase and cyclic phosphodiesterase activities. This mechanism bears a resemblance to the well-known two-step mechanism of pancreatic ribonuclease, RNase A.

  14. Exploration of structure and function in biomolecules through solid-state NMR and computational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heider, Elizabeth M.

    Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy and quantum mechanical calculations are powerful analysis tools. Leveraged independently, each method yields important nuclear and molecular information. Used in concert, SSNMR and computational techniques provide complementary data about the structure of solids. These methods are particularly useful in characterizing the structures of microcrystalline organic compounds and revealing mechanisms of biological activity. Such applications may possess special relevance in analysis of pharmaceutical products; 90% of all pharmaceuticals are marketed as solids and bioactivity is strongly linked with molecular conformation. Accordingly, this dissertation employs both SSNMR and quantum mechanical computation to study three bioactive molecules: citrinin, two forms of Atrasentan (Abt-627), and paclitaxel (Taxol RTM). First, a computational study is utilized to determine the mechanism for unusual antioxidant activity in citrinin. Here, molecular geometries and bond dissociation enthalpies (BDE) of the citrinin O--H groups are calculated from first principles (ab initio). The total molecular Hamiltonian is determined by approximating the individual contributors to energy including electronic energy and contributions from modes of molecular vibration. This study of citrinin clearly identifies specific reaction sites in the active form, establishing the central role of intramolecular hydrogen bonding in this activity. Notably, it is discovered that citrinin itself is not the active species. Instead, a pair of hydrated Michael addition products of citrinin act as radical scavengers via O--H bond dissociation. Next, two separate compounds of the anticancer drug Abt-627 (form I and form II) are examined via SSNMR. The three principal values of the 13C diagonalized chemical shift tensor are acquired through the high resolution 2D experiment, FIREMAT. Isotropic chemical shift assignments are made utilizing both dipolar

  15. Chemical structures of swine-manure chars produced under different carbonization conditions investigated by advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two types of swine manure chars, hydrothermally-produced hydrochar and slow-pyrolysis pyrochar, and their raw swine manure solid were characterized using advanced 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Compared with the parent raw swine manure, both hydrochars and pyrochar di...

  16. Solid-state NMR Study of Ion Adsorption and Charge Storage in Graphene Film Supercapacitor Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kecheng; Bo, Zheng; Yan, Jianhua; Cen, Kefa

    2016-01-01

    Graphene film has been demonstrated as promising active materials for electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs), mainly due to its excellent mechanical flexibility and freestanding morphology. In this work, the distribution and variation pattern of electrolyte ions in graphene-film based EDLC electrodes are investigated with a 11B magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopy. For neutral graphene films soaked with different amounts of electrolytes (1 M TEABF4/ACN), weakly and strongly adsorbed anions are identified based on the resonances at different 11B chemical shifts. Unlike other porous carbonaceous materials, the strongly adsorbed anions are found as the major electrolyte anions components in graphene films. Further measurements on the ion population upon charging are carried out with applying different charging voltages on the graphene films. Results indicate that the charging process of graphene-film based EDLCs can be divided into two distinct charge storage stages (i.e., ejection of co-ions and adsorption of counter-ions) for different voltages. The as-obtained results will be useful for the design and fabrication of high performance graphene-film based EDLCs. PMID:28000786

  17. Solid-state NMR Study of Ion Adsorption and Charge Storage in Graphene Film Supercapacitor Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kecheng; Bo, Zheng; Yan, Jianhua; Cen, Kefa

    2016-12-01

    Graphene film has been demonstrated as promising active materials for electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs), mainly due to its excellent mechanical flexibility and freestanding morphology. In this work, the distribution and variation pattern of electrolyte ions in graphene-film based EDLC electrodes are investigated with a 11B magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopy. For neutral graphene films soaked with different amounts of electrolytes (1 M TEABF4/ACN), weakly and strongly adsorbed anions are identified based on the resonances at different 11B chemical shifts. Unlike other porous carbonaceous materials, the strongly adsorbed anions are found as the major electrolyte anions components in graphene films. Further measurements on the ion population upon charging are carried out with applying different charging voltages on the graphene films. Results indicate that the charging process of graphene-film based EDLCs can be divided into two distinct charge storage stages (i.e., ejection of co-ions and adsorption of counter-ions) for different voltages. The as-obtained results will be useful for the design and fabrication of high performance graphene-film based EDLCs.

  18. Solid-state NMR Study of Ion Adsorption and Charge Storage in Graphene Film Supercapacitor Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Kecheng; Bo, Zheng; Yan, Jianhua; Cen, Kefa

    2016-12-21

    Graphene film has been demonstrated as promising active materials for electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs), mainly due to its excellent mechanical flexibility and freestanding morphology. In this work, the distribution and variation pattern of electrolyte ions in graphene-film based EDLC electrodes are investigated with a (11)B magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopy. For neutral graphene films soaked with different amounts of electrolytes (1 M TEABF4/ACN), weakly and strongly adsorbed anions are identified based on the resonances at different (11)B chemical shifts. Unlike other porous carbonaceous materials, the strongly adsorbed anions are found as the major electrolyte anions components in graphene films. Further measurements on the ion population upon charging are carried out with applying different charging voltages on the graphene films. Results indicate that the charging process of graphene-film based EDLCs can be divided into two distinct charge storage stages (i.e., ejection of co-ions and adsorption of counter-ions) for different voltages. The as-obtained results will be useful for the design and fabrication of high performance graphene-film based EDLCs.

  19. Structure of (KIAGKIA)3 aggregates in phospholipid bilayers by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Toke, Orsolya; O'Connor, R D; Weldeghiorghis, Thomas K; Maloy, W Lee; Glaser, Ralf W; Ulrich, Anne S; Schaefer, Jacob

    2004-07-01

    The interchain (13)C-(19)F dipolar coupling measured in a rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) experiment performed on mixtures of differently labeled KIAGKIA-KIAGKIA-KIAGKIA (K3) peptides (one specifically (13)C labeled, and the other specifically (19)F labeled) in multilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (1:1) shows that K3 forms close-packed clusters, primarily dimers, in bilayers at a lipid/peptide molar ratio (L/P) of 20. Dipolar coupling to additional peptides is weaker than that within the dimers, consistent with aggregates of monomers and dimers. Analysis of the sideband dephasing rates indicates a preferred orientation between the peptide chains of the dimers. The combination of the distance and orientation information from REDOR is consistent with a parallel (N-N) dimer structure in which two K3 helices intersect at a cross-angle of approximately 20 degrees. Static (19)F NMR experiments performed on K3 in oriented lipid bilayers show that between L/P = 200 and L/P = 20, K3 chains change their absolute orientation with respect to the membrane normal. This result suggests that the K3 dimers detected by REDOR at L/P = 20 are not on the surface of the bilayer but are in a membrane pore.

  20. Solid state NMR methods for coal science. Progress report, October 1-December 31, 1985. [Cholesteryl acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1986-04-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the last quarter. During the last three months we have concentrated on further developing a new 2-D NMR method that should be useful for coals. As outlined in a previous report this new technique separates the contribution of methines, methylenes and methyl or quaternary carbons to the carbon-13 CPMAS spectra of coals. In contrast to the heteronuclear shift correlation method, which observes only protonated carbons, this method observes all carbon centers seen in a standard CPMAS spectrum. The method has been successfully applied to a rather complex molecule, cholesteryl acetate. Even though there is severe spectral overlap in this model compound's CPMAS spectrum, the dipolar-shift correlation method allows us to assign each resonance. The distribution of functional types of carbon determined in this experiment appears to be close to quantitative. In addition we have begun to test our ultra high field CPMAS equipment on chemically modified coals. 4 figs.

  1. Energy transformations early in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle revealed by DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L; Bajaj, Vikram S; Hornstein, Melissa K; Belenky, Marina; Griffin, Robert G; Herzfeld, Judith

    2008-01-22

    By exploiting dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 90 K, we observe the first NMR spectrum of the K intermediate in the ion-motive photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin. The intermediate is identified by its reversion to the resting state of the protein in red light and by its thermal decay to the L intermediate. The (15)N chemical shift of the Schiff base in K indicates that contact has been lost with its counterion. Under these circumstances, the visible absorption of K is expected to be more red-shifted than is observed and this suggests torsion around single bonds of the retinylidene chromophore. This is in contrast to the development of a strong counterion interaction and double bond torsion in L. Thus, photon energy is stored in electrostatic modes in K and is transferred to torsional modes in L. This transfer is facilitated by the reduction in bond alternation that occurs with the initial loss of the counterion interaction, and is driven by the attraction of the Schiff base to a new counterion. Nevertheless, the process appears to be difficult, as judged by the multiple L substates, with weaker counterion interactions, that are trapped at lower temperatures. The double-bond torsion ultimately developed in the first half of the photocycle is probably responsible for enforcing vectoriality in the pump by causing a decisive switch in the connectivity of the active site once the Schiff base and its counterion are neutralized by proton transfer.

  2. Dynamics of Hydrophobic Core Phenylalanine Residues Probed by Solid-State Deuteron NMR

    PubMed Central

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Villafranca, Toni; Sharp, Janelle; Xu, Wei; Lipton, Andrew S.; Hoatson, Gina L.; Vold, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a detailed investigation of the dynamics of two phenylalanine side chains in the hydrophobic core of the villin headpiece subdomain protein (HP36) in the hydrated powder state over the 298–80 K temperature range. Our main tools were static deuteron NMR measurements of longitudinal relaxation and line shapes supplemented with computational modeling. The temperature dependence of the relaxation times reveals the presence of two main mechanisms that can be attributed to the ring-flips, dominating at high temperatures, and small-angle fluctuations, dominating at low temperatures. The relaxation is non-exponential at all temperatures with the extent of non-exponentiality increasing from higher to lower temperatures. This behavior suggests a distribution of conformers with unique values of activation energies. The central values of the activation energies for the ring-flipping motions are among the smallest reported for aromatic residues in peptides and proteins and point to a very mobile hydrophobic core. The analysis of the widths of the distributions, in combination with the earlier results on the dynamics of flanking methyl groups (Vugmeyster et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 2013, 117, 6129–6137), suggests that the hydrophobic core undergoes slow concerted fluctuations. There is a pronounced effect of dehydration on the ring-flipping motions, which shifts the distribution toward more rigid conformers. The cross-over temperature between the regions of dominance of the small-angle fluctuations and ring-flips shifts from 195 K in the hydrated protein to 278 K in the dry one. This result points to the role of solvent in softening the core and highlights aromatic residues as markers of the protein dynamical transitions. PMID:26529128

  3. Ultra-high resolution 17O solid-state NMR spectroscopy of biomolecules: a comprehensive spectral analysis of monosodium L-glutamate·monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alan; Howes, Andy P; Yates, Jonathan R; Watts, Anthony; Anupõld, Tiit; Past, Jaan; Samoson, Ago; Dupree, Ray; Smith, Mark E

    2011-07-14

    Monosodium L-glutamate monohydrate, a multiple oxygen site (eight) compound, is used to demonstrate that a combination of high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopic techniques opens up new possibilities for (17)O as a nuclear probe of biomolecules. Eight oxygen sites have been resolved by double rotation (DOR) and multiple quantum (MQ) NMR experiments, despite the (17)O chemical shifts lying within a narrow shift range of <50 ppm. (17)O DOR NMR not only provides high sensitivity and spectral resolution, but also allows a complete set of the NMR parameters (chemical shift anisotropy and electric-field gradient) to be determined from the DOR spinning-sideband manifold. These (17)O NMR parameters provide an important multi-parameter comparison with the results from the quantum chemical NMR calculations, and enable unambiguous oxygen-site assignment and allow the hydrogen positions to be refined in the crystal lattice. The difference in sensitivity between DOR and MQ NMR experiments of oxygen in bio/organic molecules is also discussed. The data presented here clearly illustrates that a high resolution (17)O solid-state NMR methodology is now available for the study of biomolecules, offering new opportunities for resolving structural information and hence new molecular insights.

  4. Modeling an in-register, parallel "iowa" aβ fibril structure using solid-state NMR data from labeled samples with rosetta.

    PubMed

    Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Yau, Wai-Ming; Qiang, Wei

    2015-01-06

    Determining the structures of amyloid fibrils is an important first step toward understanding the molecular basis of neurodegenerative diseases. For β-amyloid (Aβ) fibrils, conventional solid-state NMR structure determination using uniform labeling is limited by extensive peak overlap. We describe the characterization of a distinct structural polymorph of Aβ using solid-state NMR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Rosetta model building. First, the overall fibril arrangement is established using mass-per-length measurements from TEM. Then, the fibril backbone arrangement, stacking registry, and "steric zipper" core interactions are determined using a number of solid-state NMR techniques on sparsely (13)C-labeled samples. Finally, we perform Rosetta structure calculations with an explicitly symmetric representation of the system. We demonstrate the power of the hybrid Rosetta/NMR approach by modeling the in-register, parallel "Iowa" mutant (D23N) at high resolution (1.2Å backbone rmsd). The final models are validated using an independent set of NMR experiments that confirm key features.

  5. Significance of symmetry in the nuclear spin Hamiltonian for efficient heteronuclear dipolar decoupling in solid-state NMR: A Floquet description of supercycled rCW schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Equbal, Asif; Shankar, Ravi; Leskes, Michal; Vega, Shimon; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Madhu, P. K.

    2017-03-01

    Symmetry plays an important role in the retention or annihilation of a desired interaction Hamiltonian in NMR experiments. Here, we explore the role of symmetry in the radio-frequency interaction frame Hamiltonian of the refocused-continuous-wave (rCW) pulse scheme that leads to efficient 1H heteronuclear decoupling in solid-state NMR. It is demonstrated that anti-periodic symmetry of single-spin operators (Ix, Iy, Iz) in the interaction frame can lead to complete annihilation of the 1H-1H homonuclear dipolar coupling effects that induce line broadening in solid-state NMR experiments. This symmetry also plays a critical role in cancelling or minimizing the effect of 1H chemical-shift anisotropy in the effective Hamiltonian. An analytical description based on Floquet theory is presented here along with experimental evidences to understand the decoupling efficiency of supercycled (concatenated) rCW scheme.

  6. Significance of symmetry in the nuclear spin Hamiltonian for efficient heteronuclear dipolar decoupling in solid-state NMR: A Floquet description of supercycled rCW schemes.

    PubMed

    Equbal, Asif; Shankar, Ravi; Leskes, Michal; Vega, Shimon; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Madhu, P K

    2017-03-14

    Symmetry plays an important role in the retention or annihilation of a desired interaction Hamiltonian in NMR experiments. Here, we explore the role of symmetry in the radio-frequency interaction frame Hamiltonian of the refocused-continuous-wave (rCW) pulse scheme that leads to efficient (1)H heteronuclear decoupling in solid-state NMR. It is demonstrated that anti-periodic symmetry of single-spin operators (Ix, Iy, Iz) in the interaction frame can lead to complete annihilation of the (1)H-(1)H homonuclear dipolar coupling effects that induce line broadening in solid-state NMR experiments. This symmetry also plays a critical role in cancelling or minimizing the effect of (1)H chemical-shift anisotropy in the effective Hamiltonian. An analytical description based on Floquet theory is presented here along with experimental evidences to understand the decoupling efficiency of supercycled (concatenated) rCW scheme.

  7. Orientation of fluorinated cholesterol in lipid bilayers analyzed by 19F tensor calculation and solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Matsumori, Nobuaki; Kasai, Yusuke; Oishi, Tohru; Murata, Michio; Nomura, Kaoru

    2008-04-09

    6-F-cholesterol was reported to exhibit biological and interfacial properties similar to unmodified cholesterol. We have also found that 6-F-cholesterol mimicked the cholesterol activity observed in the systems of amphotericin B and lipid rafts. However, to use 6-F-cholesterol as a molecular probe to explore molecular recognition in membranes, it is indispensable to have detailed knowledge of the dynamic and orientation properties of the molecule in membrane environments. In this paper, we present the molecular orientation of 6-F-cholesterol (30 mol %) in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers revealed by combined use of 19F chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), 2H NMR, and C-F rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) experiments. The axis of rotation of 6-F-cholesterol was shown to be in a similar direction to that of cholesterol in DMPC bilayers, which is almost parallel to the long axis of the molecular frame. The molecular order parameter of 6-F-cholesterol was determined to be ca. 0.85, which is within the range of reported values of cholesterol. These findings suggest that the dynamic properties of 6-F-cholesterol in DMPC are quite similar to those of unmodified cholesterol; therefore, the introduction of a fluorine atom at C6 has virtually no effect on cholesterol dynamics in membranes. In addition, this study demonstrates the practical utility of theoretical calculations for determining the 19F CSA principal axes, which would be extremely difficult to obtain experimentally. The combined use of quantum calculations and solid-state 19F NMR will make it possible to apply the orientation information of 19F CSA tensors to membrane systems.

  8. Distortional binding of transition state analogs to human purine nucleoside phosphorylase probed by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Vetticatt, Mathew J.; Itin, Boris; Evans, Gary B.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2013-01-01

    Transition state analogs mimic the geometry and electronics of the transition state of enzymatic reactions. These molecules bind to the active site of the enzyme much tighter than substrate and are powerful noncovalent inhibitors. Immucillin-H (ImmH) and 4′-deaza-1′-aza-2′-deoxy-9-methylene Immucillin-H (DADMe-ImmH) are picomolar inhibitors of human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (hPNP). Although both molecules are electronically similar to the oxocarbenium-like dissociative hPNP transition state, DADMe-ImmH is more potent than ImmH. DADMe-ImmH captures more of the transition state binding energy by virtue of being a closer geometric match to the hPNP transition state than ImmH. A consequence of these similarities is that the active site of hPNP exerts greater distortional forces on ImmH than on DADMe-ImmH to “achieve” the hPNP transition state geometry. By using magic angle spinning solid-state NMR to investigate stable isotope-labeled ImmH and DADMe-ImmH, we have explored the difference in distortional binding of these two inhibitors to hPNP. High-precision determinations of internuclear distances from NMR recoupling techniques, rotational echo double resonance, and rotational resonance, have provided unprecedented atomistic insight into the geometric changes that occur upon binding of transition state analogs. We conclude that hPNP stabilizes conformations of these chemically distinct analogs having distances between the cation and leaving groups resembling those of the known transition state. PMID:24043827

  9. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  10. On the use of 31P NMR for the quantification of hydrosoluble phosphorus-containing compounds in coral host tissues and cultured zooxanthellae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinot, Claire; Gaysinski, Marc; Thomas, Olivier P.; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Grover, Renaud

    2016-02-01

    31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was assessed to investigate the phosphorus-containing compounds present in the tissues of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata as well as of cultured zooxanthellae (CZ). Results showed that phosphorus-containing compounds observed in CZ were mainly phosphate and phosphate esters. Phosphate accounted for 19 ± 2% of the total phosphorus compounds observed in CZ maintained under low P-levels (0.02 μM). Adding 5 mM of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (KH2PO4) to the CZ culture medium led to a 3.1-fold increase in intracellular phosphate, while adding 5 mM of dissolved organic phosphorus led to a reduction in the concentration of phosphorus compounds, including a 2.5-fold intracellular phosphate decrease. In sharp contrast to zooxanthellae, the host mainly contained phosphonates, and to a lesser extent, phosphate esters and phosphate. Two-months of host starvation decreased the phosphate content by 2.4 fold, while bleaching of fed corals did not modify this content. Based on 31P NMR analyses, this study highlights the importance of phosphonates in the composition of coral host tissues, and illustrates the impact of phosphorus availability on the phosphorus composition of host tissues and CZ, both through feeding of the host and inorganic phosphorus enrichment of the CZ.

  11. On the use of 31P NMR for the quantification of hydrosoluble phosphorus-containing compounds in coral host tissues and cultured zooxanthellae.

    PubMed

    Godinot, Claire; Gaysinski, Marc; Thomas, Olivier P; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Grover, Renaud

    2016-02-23

    (31)P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was assessed to investigate the phosphorus-containing compounds present in the tissues of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata as well as of cultured zooxanthellae (CZ). Results showed that phosphorus-containing compounds observed in CZ were mainly phosphate and phosphate esters. Phosphate accounted for 19 ± 2% of the total phosphorus compounds observed in CZ maintained under low P-levels (0.02 μM). Adding 5 mM of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (KH2PO4) to the CZ culture medium led to a 3.1-fold increase in intracellular phosphate, while adding 5 mM of dissolved organic phosphorus led to a reduction in the concentration of phosphorus compounds, including a 2.5-fold intracellular phosphate decrease. In sharp contrast to zooxanthellae, the host mainly contained phosphonates, and to a lesser extent, phosphate esters and phosphate. Two-months of host starvation decreased the phosphate content by 2.4 fold, while bleaching of fed corals did not modify this content. Based on (31)P NMR analyses, this study highlights the importance of phosphonates in the composition of coral host tissues, and illustrates the impact of phosphorus availability on the phosphorus composition of host tissues and CZ, both through feeding of the host and inorganic phosphorus enrichment of the CZ.

  12. Probing the PI3K/Akt/mTor pathway using 31P-NMR spectroscopy: routes to glycogen synthase kinase 3

    PubMed Central

    Phyu, Su M.; Tseng, Chih-Chung; Fleming, Ian N.; Smith, Tim A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Akt is an intracellular signalling pathway that serves as an essential link between cell surface receptors and cellular processes including proliferation, development and survival. The pathway has many downstream targets including glycogen synthase kinase3 which is a major regulatory kinase for cell cycle transit as well as controlling glycogen synthase activity. The Akt pathway is frequently up-regulated in cancer due to overexpression of receptors such as the epidermal growth factor receptor, or mutation of signalling pathway kinases resulting in inappropriate survival and proliferation. Consequently anticancer drugs have been developed that target this pathway. MDA-MB-468 breast and HCT8 colorectal cancer cells were treated with inhibitors including LY294002, MK2206, rapamycin, AZD8055 targeting key kinases in/associated with Akt pathway and the consistency of changes in 31P-NMR-detecatable metabolite content of tumour cells was examined. Treatment with the Akt inhibitor MK2206 reduced phosphocholine levels in MDA-MB-468 cells. Treatment with either the phosphoinositide-3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002 and pan-mTOR inhibitor, AZD8055 but not pan-Akt inhibitor MK2206 increased uridine-5′-diphosphate-hexose cell content which was suppressed by co-treatment with glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitor SB216763. This suggests that there is an Akt-independent link between phosphoinositol-3-kinase and glycogen synthase kinase3 and demonstrates the potential of 31P-NMR to probe intracellular signalling pathways. PMID:27811956

  13. On the use of 31P NMR for the quantification of hydrosoluble phosphorus-containing compounds in coral host tissues and cultured zooxanthellae

    PubMed Central

    Godinot, Claire; Gaysinski, Marc; Thomas, Olivier P.; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Grover, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was assessed to investigate the phosphorus-containing compounds present in the tissues of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata as well as of cultured zooxanthellae (CZ). Results showed that phosphorus-containing compounds observed in CZ were mainly phosphate and phosphate esters. Phosphate accounted for 19 ± 2% of the total phosphorus compounds observed in CZ maintained under low P-levels (0.02 μM). Adding 5 mM of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (KH2PO4) to the CZ culture medium led to a 3.1-fold increase in intracellular phosphate, while adding 5 mM of dissolved organic phosphorus led to a reduction in the concentration of phosphorus compounds, including a 2.5-fold intracellular phosphate decrease. In sharp contrast to zooxanthellae, the host mainly contained phosphonates, and to a lesser extent, phosphate esters and phosphate. Two-months of host starvation decreased the phosphate content by 2.4 fold, while bleaching of fed corals did not modify this content. Based on 31P NMR analyses, this study highlights the importance of phosphonates in the composition of coral host tissues, and illustrates the impact of phosphorus availability on the phosphorus composition of host tissues and CZ, both through feeding of the host and inorganic phosphorus enrichment of the CZ. PMID:26902733

  14. In vivo 31P NMR Study of the Metabolism of Murine Mammary 16/C Adenocarcinoma and Its Response to Chemotherapy, X-Radiation, and Hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evanochko, W. T.; Ng, T. C.; Lilly, M. B.; Lawson, A. J.; Corbett, T. H.; Durant, J. R.; Glickson, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    31P NMR spectroscopy with surface coils has been used to monitor, in vivo, the phosphate metabolism of subcutaneously implanted mammary 16/C adenocarcinoma in C3H/He mice. This model tumor was studied during untreated tumor growth and after treatment with adriamycin, hyperthermia, and x-radiation. The mammary 16/C tumor exhibited a Gompertzian growth pattern. Levels of high-energy phosphate metabolites--phosphocreatine and ATP--decreased with increases in tumor mass. There was a concomitant increase in the level of Pi and a decrease in the apparent pH of the tumor. These spectral changes appear to reflect changes in tumor vascularization that accompany tumor growth, the tumor becoming progressively more hypoxic. Partial response of this tumor to chemotherapy with adriamycin was reflected in a small but measurable increase in the phosphocreatine resonance, a decrease in Pi, and a return of the intratumor pH to neutral. Hyperthermia resulted in progressive conversion of the 31P NMR spectrum to that of a dead tumor (high levels of Pi, small levels of residual sugar phosphates and pyridine dinucleotides, and acidic pH). X-irradiation (14.0 Gy) led to disappearance of the phosphocreatine peak within 15 min of treatment. Subsequently, this resonance grew back beyond its pretreatment level. As the tumor receded, its spectrum reflected the characteristics of aerobically metabolizing tissue (high levels of phosphocreatine and ATP and low levels of Pi and sugar phosphates).

  15. Comparison of celery (Apium graveolens L.) collenchyma and parenchyma cell wall polysaccharides enabled by solid-state (13)C NMR.

    PubMed

    Zujovic, Zoran; Chen, Da; Melton, Laurence D

    2016-02-01

    Collenchyma cells with their thickened walls are one of specific mechanical support tissues for plants, while parenchyma cells are thin walled and serve multiple functions. The parenchyma tissue is what you enjoy eating, while collenchyma, because of its fibrous nature, is not so attractive. Celery is a useful model for comparing the cell walls (CWs) of the two cell types such as collenchyma and parenchyma. However, to date, the structural characteristics of collenchyma and parenchyma cell walls from the same plant have not been compared. Monosaccharide composition suggested the collenchyma cell walls contained less pectin but more hemicellulose in comparison to parenchyma. High-resolution solid-state NMR spectra of highly mobile pectins revealed that the arabinan signals were more evident in the collenchyma spectrum, while galactan showed a much stronger resonance in the parenchyma spectrum. In addition, methyl esterified and non-esterified galacturonic acid signals were observed in parenchyma CWs, but only the latter one appeared in the collenchyma. The ratio of cellulose surface/interior obtained from CP/MAS spectra for collenchyma suggested the cellulose microfibrils were ~2.4 nm, while in the parenchyma, these were somewhat larger. X-ray diffraction indicated the size of the cellulose microfibrils were the same for both types of CWs.

  16. Quadrupolar solid-state NMR and repetitive experiments: Some aspects in the Liouville space. Application to spins I=1.

    PubMed

    Odin, Christophe

    2016-12-29

    The aim of this work is to generalize the Ernst-Anderson model developed to account of the steady-state regime of isolated spins I=1/2 subject to a train of strictly identical pulse sequences separated by free evolution periods of same duration. We generalize this model to the general case of spins I≥1 and general pulse sequence within the framework of the Liouville space. In particular, it is proved that under reasonable assumptions, a well defined steady-state regime is reached which is independent of the initial conditions. The general formal expressions obeyed by the steady-state density operator are given as a function of pulse propagators and relaxation operator for single and two-pulse sequences. In solid-state NMR where recycle time can be made, at the same time, much longer than typical coherence relaxation times and smaller than typical population relaxation times, further simplification leads to more tractable formula. As an example, the formalism is applied to I=1 spins with hard and soft single pulse sequence, or to the solid echo sequence. In particular, we were able to generalize the Ernst-Anderson formula to spins I=1. The pertinence of the theory is verified by comparing the theoretical and numerical simulations outputs to (2)H single crystal experiments performed on nonadecane/urea C19D40/urea-H4 compound.

  17. Solid-State NMR Structure Determination from Diagonal-Compensated, Sparsely Nonuniform-Sampled 4D Proton–Proton Restraints

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report acquisition of diagonal-compensated protein structural restraints from four-dimensional solid-state NMR spectra on extensively deuterated and 1H back-exchanged proteins. To achieve this, we use homonuclear 1H–1H correlations with diagonal suppression and nonuniform sampling (NUS). Suppression of the diagonal allows the accurate identification of cross-peaks which are otherwise obscured by the strong autocorrelation or whose intensity is biased due to partial overlap with the diagonal. The approach results in unambiguous spectral interpretation and relatively few but reliable restraints for structure calculation. In addition, the diagonal suppression produces a spectrum with low dynamic range for which ultrasparse NUS data sets can be readily reconstructed, allowing straightforward application of NUS with only 2% sampling density with the advantage of more heavily sampling time-domain regions of high signal intensity. The method is demonstrated here for two proteins, α-spectrin SH3 microcrystals and hydrophobin functional amyloids. For the case of SH3, suppression of the diagonal results in facilitated identification of unambiguous restraints and improvement of the quality of the calculated structural ensemble compared to nondiagonal-suppressed 4D spectra. For the only partly assigned hydrophobin rodlets, the structure is yet unknown. Applied to this protein of biological significance with large inhomogeneous broadening, the method allows identification of unambiguous crosspeaks that are otherwise obscured by the diagonal. PMID:24988008

  18. Advanced solid-state NMR techniques for characterization of membrane protein structure and dynamics: Application to Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Meaghan E.; Brown, Leonid S.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Studies of the structure, dynamics, and function of membrane proteins (MPs) have long been considered one of the main applications of solid-state NMR (SSNMR). Advances in instrumentation, and the plethora of new SSNMR methodologies developed over the past decade have resulted in a number of high-resolution structures and structural models of both bitopic and polytopic α-helical MPs. The necessity to retain lipids in the sample, the high proportion of one type of secondary structure, differential dynamics, and the possibility of local disorder in the loop regions all create challenges for structure determination. In this Perspective article we describe our recent efforts directed at determining the structure and functional dynamics of Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin, a heptahelical transmembrane (7TM) protein. We review some of the established and emerging methods which can be utilized for SSNMR-based structure determination, with a particular focus on those used for ASR, a bacterial protein which shares its 7TM architecture with G-protein coupled receptors.

  19. Solid-State (13)C NMR Delineates the Architectural Design of Biopolymers in Native and Genetically Altered Tomato Fruit Cuticles.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Matas, Antonio J; Isaacson, Tal; Kehlet, Cindie; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Stark, Ruth E

    2016-01-11

    Plant cuticles on outer fruit and leaf surfaces are natural macromolecular composites of waxes and polyesters that ensure mechanical integrity and mitigate environmental challenges. They also provide renewable raw materials for cosmetics, packaging, and coatings. To delineate the structural framework and flexibility underlying the versatile functions of cutin biopolymers associated with polysaccharide-rich cell-wall matrices, solid-state NMR spectra and spin relaxation times were measured in a tomato fruit model system, including different developmental stages and surface phenotypes. The hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance of the cutin ensures compatibility with the underlying polysaccharide cell walls; the hydroxy fatty acid structures of outer epidermal cutin also support deposition of hydrophobic waxes and aromatic moieties while promoting the formation of cell-wall cross-links that rigidify and strengthen the cuticle composite during fruit development. Fruit cutin-deficient tomato mutants with compromised microbial resistance exhibit less efficient local and collective biopolymer motions, stiffening their cuticular surfaces and increasing their susceptibility to fracture.

  20. Solid-State Selective 13C Excitation and Spin Diffusion NMR to Resolve Spatial Dimensions in Plant Cell Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Foston, M.; Katahira, R.; Gjersing, E.; Davis, M. F.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2012-02-15

    The average spatial dimensions between major biopolymers within the plant cell wall can be resolved using a solid-state NMR technique referred to as a {sup 13}C cross-polarization (CP) SELDOM (selectively by destruction of magnetization) with a mixing time delay for spin diffusion. Selective excitation of specific aromatic lignin carbons indicates that lignin is in close proximity to hemicellulose followed by amorphous and finally crystalline cellulose. {sup 13}C spin diffusion time constants (T{sub SD}) were extracted using a two-site spin diffusion theory developed for {sup 13}C nuclei under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. These time constants were then used to calculate an average lower-limit spin diffusion length between chemical groups within the plant cell wall. The results on untreated {sup 13}C enriched corn stover stem reveal that the lignin carbons are, on average, located at distances {approx}0.7-2.0 nm from the carbons in hemicellulose and cellulose, whereas the pretreated material had larger separations.

  1. Refocused continuous-wave decoupling: A new approach to heteronuclear dipolar decoupling in solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinther, Joachim M.; Nielsen, Anders B.; Bjerring, Morten; van Eck, Ernst R. H.; Kentgens, Arno P. M.; Khaneja, Navin; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2012-12-01

    A novel strategy for heteronuclear dipolar decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented, which eliminates residual static high-order terms in the effective Hamiltonian originating from interactions between oscillating dipolar and anisotropic shielding tensors. The method, called refocused continuous-wave (rCW) decoupling, is systematically established by interleaving continuous wave decoupling with appropriately inserted rotor-synchronized high-power π refocusing pulses of alternating phases. The effect of the refocusing pulses in eliminating residual effects from dipolar coupling in heteronuclear spin systems is rationalized by effective Hamiltonian calculations to third order. In some variants the π pulse refocusing is supplemented by insertion of rotor-synchronized π/2 purging pulses to further reduce the residual dipolar coupling effects. Five different rCW decoupling sequences are presented and their performance is compared to state-of-the-art decoupling methods. The rCW decoupling sequences benefit from extreme broadbandedness, tolerance towards rf inhomogeneity, and improved potential for decoupling at relatively low average rf field strengths. In numerical simulations, the rCW schemes clearly reveal superior characteristics relative to the best decoupling schemes presented so far, which we to some extent also are capable of demonstrating experimentally. A major advantage of the rCW decoupling methods is that they are easy to set up and optimize experimentally.

  2. Highly efficient (19)F heteronuclear decoupling in solid-state NMR spectroscopy using supercycled refocused-CW irradiation.

    PubMed

    Equbal, Asif; Basse, Kristoffer; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2016-12-07

    We present heteronuclear (19)F refocused CW (rCW) decoupling pulse sequences for solid-state magic-angle-spinning NMR applications. The decoupling sequences have been designed specifically to ensure suppression of the pertinent (13)C-(19)F dipolar coupling interactions while simultaneously suppressing strong anisotropic chemical shift as well as homonuclear (19)F-(19)F dipolar coupling effects as typically present in perfluorated compounds. In an extensive numerical and experimental analysis using a rigid, organic solid as a model compound, it becomes evident that the supercycled rCW schemes markedly improve the decoupling efficiency, leading to substantial enhancements in resolution and sensitivity when compared to previous state-of-the-art methods. Furthermore, considerable gains in robustness toward rf mismatch as well as offset in the radio-frequency carrier frequency are observed, all of which clearly render the new rCW schemes the methods of choice for (19)F decoupling in rigid, fluorinated compounds - which is further supported by a Floquet-based theoretical analysis.

  3. Solid-State NMR Structure of a Pathogenic Fibril of Full-Length Human α-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, Marcus D.; Comellas, Gemma; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Covell, Dustin J.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Kloepper, Kathryn D.; Courtney, Joseph M.; Kim, Jae K.; Barclay, Alexander M.; Kendall, Amy; Wan, William; Stubbs, Gerald; Schwieters, Charles D.; Lee, Virginia M. Y.; George, Julia M.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2016-01-01

    Misfolded α-synuclein amyloid fibrils are the principal components of Lewy bodies and neurites, hallmarks of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Here we present a high-resolution structure of an α-synuclein fibril, in a form that induces robust pathology in primary neuronal culture, determined by solid-state NMR spectroscopy and validated by electron microscopy and X-ray fiber diffraction. Over 200 unique long-range distance restraints define a consensus structure with common amyloid features including parallel in-register β-sheets and hydrophobic core residues, but also substantial complexity, arising from diverse structural features: an intermolecular salt bridge, a glutamine ladder, close backbone interactions involving small residues, and several steric zippers stabilizing a novel, orthogonal Greek-key topology. These characteristics contribute to the robust propagation of this fibril form, as evidenced by structural similarity of early-onset PD mutants. The structure provides a framework for understanding the interactions of α-synuclein with other proteins and small molecules to diagnose and treat PD. PMID:27018801

  4. Analysis of amorphous solid dispersions using 2D solid-state NMR and (1)H T(1) relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tran N; Watson, Simon A; Edwards, Andrew J; Chavda, Manisha; Clawson, Jacalyn S; Strohmeier, Mark; Vogt, Frederick G

    2010-10-04

    Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) can provide detailed structural information about amorphous solid dispersions of pharmaceutical small molecules. In this study, the ability of SSNMR experiments based on dipolar correlation, spin diffusion, and relaxation measurements to characterize the structure of solid dispersions is explored. Observation of spin diffusion effects using the 2D (1)H-(13)C cross-polarization heteronuclear correlation (CP-HETCOR) experiment is shown to be a useful probe of association between the amorphous drug and polymer that is capable of directly proving glass solution formation. Dispersions of acetaminophen and indomethacin in different polymers are examined using this approach, as well as (1)H double-quantum correlation experiments to probe additional structural features. (1)H-(19)F CP-HETCOR serves a similar role for fluorinated drug molecules such as diflunisal in dispersions, providing a rapid means to prove the formation of a glass solution. Phase separation is detected using (13)C, (19)F, and (23)Na-detected (1)H T(1) experiments in crystalline and amorphous solid dispersions that contain small domains. (1)H T(1) measurements of amorphous nanosuspensions of trehalose and dextran illustrate the ability of SSNMR to detect domain size effects in dispersions that are not glass solutions via spin diffusion effects. Two previously unreported amorphous solid dispersions involving up to three components and containing voriconazole and telithromycin are analyzed using these experiments to demonstrate the general applicability of the approach.

  5. Structure and Dynamics Characterization of HMDI- and MDI-based Poly(urethane urea) Elastomers via Solid- State NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Weiguo; Hsieh, Alex; Rinderspacher, B. Christopher; Chantawansri, Tanya

    2013-03-01

    High performance elastomers have recently gained considerable interest throughout DoD, particularly for their potential in ballistic impact protection and blast mitigation capabilities. Recent simulation results based on coarse-grained modeling have revealed the role of the intermolecular interaction and the flexibility of interface between hard and soft segments on the morphology and mechanical deformation behavior of poly(urethane urea), PUU, elastomers. In this work, we exploit solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to investigate the influence of hard domain size on molecular dynamics by comparing the diisocyanate chemistry (aliphatic 4,4'-dicyclohexylmethane diisocyanate (HMDI) vs. aromatic 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI)) in PUU elastomers. Despite identical stoichiometry and soft segment chemical structure, large difference in the molecular dynamics, indicated by the 1H dipolar dephasing time (Td) , is observed. The Td of HMDI-PUU is shorter and it exhibits higher activation energy, suggesting finer phase mixing. Results from 1H spin echo measurements are also included for comparison.

  6. 13C and 15N spectral editing inside histidine imidazole ring through solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenhui; Zhou, Lei; Su, Yongchao; Han, Bin; Deng, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Histidine usually exists in three different forms (including biprotonated species, neutral τ and π tautomers) at physiological pH in biological systems. The different protonation and tautomerization states of histidine can be characteristically determined by (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts of imidazole ring. In this work, solid-state NMR techniques were developed for spectral editing of (13)C and (15)N sites in histidine imidazole ring, which provides a benchmark to distinguish the existing forms of histidine. The selections of (13)Cγ, (13)Cδ2, (15)Nδ1, and (15)Nε2 sites were successfully achieved based on one-bond homo- and hetero-nuclear dipole interactions. Moreover, it was demonstrated that (1)H, (13)C, and (15) chemical shifts were roughly linearly correlated with the corresponding atomic charge in histidine imidazole ring by theoretical calculations. Accordingly, the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts variation in different protonation and tautomerization states could be ascribed to the atomic charge change due to proton transfer in biological process.

  7. Solid-state 19F MAS NMR study on the conformation and molecular mobility of poly(chlorotrifluoroethylene).

    PubMed

    Tatsuno, Hiroto; Aimi, Keitaro; Ando, Shinji

    2007-05-01

    The temperature dependence of molecular mobility and conformational changes of poly(chlorotrifluoro- ethylene) (PCTFE) have been investigated by solid-state (19)F magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. The pulse techniques of dipolar-filter and T(1rho)-filter allow selective observation of the amorphous and crystalline domains, respectively. The temperature dependence of T(1rho) (F) revealed that the segmental motion in the amorphous domain becomes vigorous above ca 80 degrees C, which is well above the glass transition (T(g)) temperature (52 degrees C) and more close to the beta-relaxation temperature (95 degrees C). On the other hand, vigorous molecular motions in the crystalline domain occur above 120 degrees C, which is much below the melting temperature (212 degrees C). This indicates that the polymer chains in the PCTFE crystallites are more mobile than those of typical semicrystalline fluoropolymers like poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF), which can be associated with structural imperfections in the crystallites. In addition, the density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (19)F magnetic shielding suggest that the high-frequency shifts observed for the crystalline signals above 80 degrees C can be ascribed to the conformational change around meso diads toward more twisted and/or helical conformations in the main chain.

  8. Investigation of drug-excipient interactions in lapatinib amorphous solid dispersions using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Yang, Xinghao; Chen, Xin; Nie, Haichen; Byrn, Stephen; Lubach, Joseph W

    2015-03-02

    This study investigated the presence of specific drug-excipient interactions in amorphous solid dispersions of lapatinib (LB) and four commonly used pharmaceutical polymers, including Soluplus, polyvinylpyrrolidone vinyl acetate (PVPVA), hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS), and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose phthalate (HPMCP). Based on predicted pKa differences, LB was hypothesized to exhibit a specific ionic interaction with HPMCP, and possibly with HPMCAS, while Soluplus and PVPVA were studied as controls without ionizable functionality. Thermal studies showed a single glass transition (Tg) for each dispersion, in close agreement with predicted values for Soluplus, PVPVA, and HPMCAS systems. However, the Tg values of LB-HPMCP solid dispersions were markedly higher than predicted values, indicating a strong intermolecular interaction between LB and HPMCP. (15)N solid-state NMR provided direct spectroscopic evidence for protonation of LB (i.e., salt formation) within the HPMCP solid dispersions. (1)H T1 and (1)H T1ρ relaxation studies of the dispersions supported the ionic interaction hypothesis, and indicated multiple phases in the cases of excess drug or polymer. In addition, the dissolution and stability behavior of each system was examined. Both acidic polymers, HPMCAS and HPMCP, effectively inhibited the crystallization of LB on accelerated stability, likely owing to beneficial strong intermolecular hydrogen and/or specific ionic bonds with the acidic polymers. Soluplus and PVPVA showed poor physical properties on stability and subsequently poor crystallization inhibition.

  9. Static solid-state (14)N NMR and computational studies of nitrogen EFG tensors in some crystalline amino acids.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, Luke A; Schurko, Robert W

    2009-08-28

    The recently reported direct enhancement of integer spin magnetization (DEISM) methodology for signal enhancement in solid-state NMR of integer spins has been used to obtain static (14)N powder patterns from alpha-glycine, L-leucine and L-proline in relatively short experimental times at 9.4 T, allowing accurate determination of the quadrupolar parameters. Proton decoupling and deuteration of the nitrogen sites were used to reduce the (1)H-(14)N dipolar contribution to the transverse relaxation time allowing more echoes to be acquired per scan. In addition, ab initio calculations using molecular clusters (Gaussian 03) and the full crystal lattice (CASTEP) have been employed to confirm these results, to obtain the orientation of the electric field gradient (EFG) tensors in the molecular frame, and also to correctly assign the two sets of parameters for L-leucine. The (14)N EFG tensor is shown to be highly sensitive to the surrounding environment, particularly to nearby hydrogen bonding.

  10. Solid-state and solution /sup 13/C NMR in the conformational analysis of methadone-hydrochloride and related narcotic analgesics

    SciTech Connect

    Sumner, S.C.J.

    1986-01-01

    Solid state and solution /sup 13/C NMR have been used to study the conformations of the racemic mixtures and single enantiomers of methadone hydrochloride, alpha and beta methadol hydrochloride, and alpha and beta acetylmethadol hydrochloride. The NMR spectra acquired for the compounds as solids, and in polar and nonpolar solvents are compared, in order to determine the conformation of the molecules in solution. To determine the reliability of assigning solution conformations by comparing solution and solid state chemical shift data, three bond coupling constants measured in solution are compared with those calculated from X-ray data. The conformations of the racemic mixture and plus enantiomer of methadone hydrochloride have been shown to be very similar in the solid state, where minor differences in conformation can be seen by comparing NMR spectra obtained for the solids. Also shown is that the molecules of methadone hydrochloride have conformations in polar and in nonpolar solvents which are very similar to the conformation of the molecules in the solid state.

  11. Quantification of ammonia binding sites in Davison (Type 3A) zeolite desiccant : a solid-state Nitrogen-15 MAS NMR spectroscopy investigation.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd Michael; Holland, Gregory P.; Cherry, Brian Ray

    2004-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of ammonia binding sites in the Davison (Type 3A) zeolite desiccant using solid-state {sup 15}N MAS NMR spectroscopy is reported. By utilizing 15N enriched ammonia ({sup 15}NH{sub 3}) gas, the different adsorption/binding sites within the zeolite were investigated as a function of NH{sub 3} loading. Using {sup 15}N MAS NMR multiple sites were resolved that have distinct cross-polarization dynamics and chemical shift behavior. These differences in the {sup 15}N NMR were used to characterize the adsorption environments in both the pure 3A zeolite and the silicone-molded forms of the desiccant.

  12. Genotype evaluation of cowpea seeds (Vigna unguiculata) using (1)H qNMR combined with exploratory tools and solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Alves Filho, Elenilson G; Silva, Lorena M A; Teofilo, Elizita M; Larsen, Flemming H; de Brito, Edy S

    2017-01-01

    The ultimate aim of this study was to apply a non-targeted chemometric analysis (principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis using the heat map approach) of NMR data to investigate the variability of organic compounds in nine genotype cowpea seeds, without any complex pre-treatment. In general, both exploratory tools show that Tvu 233, CE-584, and Setentão genotypes presented higher amount mainly of raffinose and Tvu 382 presented the highest content of choline and least content of raffinose. The evaluation of the aromatic region showed the Setentão genotype with highest content of niacin/vitamin B3 whereas Tvu 382 with lowest amount. To investigate rigid and mobile components in the seeds cotyledon, (13)C CP and SP/MAS solid-state NMR experiments were performed. The cotyledon of the cowpea comprised a rigid part consisting of starch as well as a soft portion made of starch, fatty acids, and protein. The variable contact time experiment suggests the presence of lipid-amylose complexes.

  13. In vitro (31)P NMR studies on biopsy skeletal muscle samples compared with meat quality of normal and heterozygous malignant hyperthermia pigs.

    PubMed

    Lahucky, R; Baulain, U; Henning, M; Demo, P; Krska, P; Liptaj, T

    2002-07-01

    Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P NMR) measurements were made to determine muscle energetic metabolism on muscle biopsy samples of heterozygote malignant hyperthermia (Nn) and normal (NN) pigs DNA tested on occurrence of mutation in RYR 1 gene. Biopsy samples (approx. 1 g) were obtained by spring-loaded