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Sample records for 320-row multi-detector computed

  1. Image Quality of Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography with 320-Row Area Detector Computed Tomography in Children with Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Tada, Akihiro; Sato, Shuhei; Kanie, Yuichiro; Tanaka, Takashi; Inai, Ryota; Akagi, Noriaki; Morimitsu, Yusuke; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess factors affecting image quality of 320-row computed tomography angiography (CTA) of coronary arteries in children with congenital heart disease (CHD). We retrospectively reviewed 28 children up to 3 years of age with CHD who underwent prospective electrocardiography (ECG)-gated 320-row CTA with iterative reconstruction. We assessed image quality of proximal coronary artery segments using a five-point scale. Age, body weight, average heart rate, and heart rate variability were recorded and compared between two groups: patients with good diagnostic image quality in all four coronary artery segments and patients with at least one coronary artery segment with nondiagnostic image quality. Altogether, 96 of 112 segments (85.7 %) had diagnostic-quality images. Patients with nondiagnostic segments were significantly younger (10.0 ± 11.6 months) and had lower body weight (5.9 ± 2.9 kg) (each p < 0.05) than patients with diagnostic image quality of all four segments (20.6 ± 13.8 months and 8.4 ± 2.5 kg, respectively; each p < 0.05). Differences in heart rate and heart rate variability between the two imaging groups were not significant. Receiver operating characteristic analyses for predicting patients with nondiagnostic image quality revealed an optimal body weight cutoff of ≤5.6 kg and an optimal age cutoff of ≤12.5 months. Prospective ECG-gated 320-row CTA with iterative reconstruction provided feasible image quality of coronary arteries in children with CHD. Younger age and lower body weight were factors that led to poorer image quality of coronary arteries.

  2. Clinical application of 320-row multidetector computed tomography for a dynamic three-dimensional vascular study: imaging findings and initial experience.

    PubMed

    Nagamatsu, Shogo; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Kayano, Shuji; Koizumi, Takuya; Akazawa, Satoshi; Onitsuka, Tetsuro; Iida, Yoshiyuki; Endo, Masahiro; Nakaya, Yoshihiro; Urikura, Atsushi

    2010-10-01

    The 320-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is now used by both cardiologists and neurosurgeons. It enables dynamic 3D-CT angiography, because the wide-area detector eliminates helical scanning, thus achieving very fast scanning times for single 3D-CT volume data. Some microvascular surgeons are familiar with 64-row MDCT for perforator studies, but there are few reports of studies using 320-row MDCT. This MDCT system was used to follow the dynamic blood flow of small vessels. It is considered to have a great potential in the clinical field of microvascular surgery. PMID:20399163

  3. Absorbed Radiation Dose in Radiosensitive Organs Using 64- and 320-Row Multidetector Computed Tomography: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Atif N.; Nikolic, Boris; Khan, Mohammad K.; Kang, Jian; Khosa, Faisal

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To determine absorbed radiation dose (ARD) in radiosensitive organs during prospective and full phase dose modulation using ECG-gated MDCTA scanner under 64- and 320-row detector modes. Methods. Female phantom was used to measure organ radiation dose. Five DP-3 radiation detectors were used to measure ARD to lungs, breast, and thyroid using the Aquilion ONE scanner in 64- and 320-row modes using both prospective and dose modulation in full phase acquisition. Five measurements were made using three tube voltages: 100, 120, and 135 kVp at 400 mA at heart rate (HR) of 60 and 75 bpm for each protocol. Mean acquisition was recorded in milligrays (mGy). Results. Mean ARD was less for 320-row versus 64-row mode for each imaging protocol. Prospective EKG-gated imaging protocol resulted in a statistically lower ARD using 320-row versus 64-row modes for midbreast (6.728 versus 19.687 mGy, P < 0.001), lung (6.102 versus 21.841 mGy, P < 0.001), and thyroid gland (0.208 versus 0.913 mGy; P < 0.001). Retrospective imaging using 320- versus 64-row modes showed lower ARD for midbreast (10.839 versus 43.169 mGy, P < 0.001), lung (8.848 versus 47.877 mGy, P < 0.001), and thyroid gland (0.057 versus 2.091 mGy; P < 0.001). ARD reduction was observed at lower kVp and heart rate. Conclusions. Dose reduction to radiosensitive organs is achieved using 320-row compared to 64-row modes for both prospective and retrospective gating, whereas 64-row mode is equivalent to the same model 64-row MDCT scanner. PMID:25170427

  4. Multi-detector computed tomography of an aortic dissection in a cat.

    PubMed

    Scollan, Katherine; Sisson, David

    2014-03-01

    Contrast enhanced, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) is a useful diagnostic imaging modality that has become increasingly available in veterinary medicine. Multi-planar and three-dimensional reconstructions allow accurate and comprehensive assessment of cardiac and vascular lesions with short image acquisition times. ECG-gated, contrast enhanced MDCT was used to assess the lesion extent and therapeutic options in a case of aortic dissection diagnosed in a hypertensive cat. PMID:24485986

  5. Multi-Detector Computed Tomography Angiography for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Purpose Computed tomography (CT) scanning continues to be an important modality for the diagnosis of injury and disease, most notably for indications of the head and abdomen. (1) According to a recent report published by the Canadian Institutes of Health Information, (1) there were about 10.3 scanners per million people in Canada as of January 2004. Ontario had the fewest number of CT scanners per million compared to the other provinces (8 CT scanners per million). The wait time for CT in Ontario of 5 weeks approaches the Canadian median of 6 weeks. This health technology and policy appraisal systematically reviews the published literature on multidetector CT (MDCT) angiography as a diagnostic tool for the newest indication for CT, coronary artery disease (CAD), and will apply the results of the review to current health care practices in Ontario. This review does not evaluate MDCT to detect coronary calcification without contrast medium for CAD screening purposes. The Technology Compared with conventional CT scanning, MDCT can provide smaller pieces of information and can cover a larger area faster. (2) Advancing MDCT technology (8, 16, 32, 64 slice systems) is capable of producing more images in less time. For general CT scanning, this faster capability can reduce the time that patients must stay still during the procedure, thereby reducing potential movement artefact. However, the additional clinical utility of images obtained from faster scanners compared to the images obtained from conventional CT scanners for current CT indications (i.e., non-moving body parts) is not known. There are suggestions that the new fast scanners can reduce wait times for general CT. MDCT angiography that utilizes a contrast medium, has been proposed as a minimally invasive replacement to coronary angiography to detect coronary artery disease. MDCT may take between 15 to 45 minutes; coronary angiography may take up to 1 hour. Although 16-slice and 32-slice CT

  6. Identification of Cardiac and Aortic Injuries in Trauma with Multi-detector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shergill, Arvind K; Maraj, Tishan; Barszczyk, Mark S; Cheung, Helen; Singh, Navneet; Zavodni, Anna E

    2015-01-01

    Blunt and penetrating cardiovascular (CV) injuries are associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Rapid detection of these injuries in trauma is critical for patient survival. The advent of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has led to increased detection of CV injuries during rapid comprehensive scanning of stabilized major trauma patients. MDCT has the ability to acquire images with a higher temporal and spatial resolution, as well as the capability to create multiplanar reformats. This pictorial review illustrates several common and life-threatening traumatic CV injuries from a regional trauma center. PMID:26430541

  7. Multi-detector computed tomography imaging of large airway pathology: A pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Jugpal, Tejeshwar Singh; Garg, Anju; Sethi, Gulshan Rai; Daga, Mradul Kumar; Kumar, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    The tracheobronchial tree is a musculo-cartilagenous framework which acts as a conduit to aerate the lungs and consequently the entire body. A large spectrum of pathological conditions can involve the trachea and bronchial airways. These may be congenital anomalies, infections, post-intubation airway injuries, foreign body aspiration or neoplasms involving the airway. Appropriate management of airway disease requires an early and accurate diagnosis. In this pictorial essay review, we will comprehensively describe the various airway pathologies and their imaging findings by multi-detector computed tomography. PMID:26753061

  8. Derivation of Australian diagnostic reference levels for paediatric multi detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hayton, Anna; Wallace, Anthony

    2016-09-01

    Australian National Diagnostic Reference Levels for paediatric multi detector computed tomography were established for three protocols, Head, Chest and AbdoPelvis, across two age groups, Baby/Infant 0-4 years and Child 5-14 years by the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency in 2012. The establishment of Australian paediatric DRLs is an important step towards lowering patient CT doses on a national scale. While Adult DRLs were calculated with data collected from the web based Australian National Diagnostic Reference Level Service, no paediatric data was submitted in the first year of service operation. Data from an independent Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists Quality Use of Diagnostic Imaging paediatric optimisation survey was used. The paediatric DRLs were defined for CTDIvol (mGy) and DLP (mGy·cm) values that referenced the 16 cm PMMA phantom for the Head protocol and the 32 cm PMMA phantom for body protocols for both paediatric age groups. The Australian paediatric DRLs for multi detector computed tomography are for the Head, Chest and AbdoPelvis protocols respectively, 470, 60 and 170 mGy·cm for the Baby/Infant age group, and 600, 110 and 390 mGy·cm for the Child age group. A comparison with published international paediatric DRLs for computed tomography reveal the Australian paediatric DRLs to be lower on average. However, the comparison is complicated by misalignment of defined age ranges. It is the intention of ARPANSA to review the paediatric DRLs in conjunction with a review of the adult DRLs, which should occur within 5 years of their publication. PMID:27350262

  9. Quadricuspid pulmonary valve in an adult patient identified by transthoracic echocardiography and multi-detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Jung, Soo-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Quadricuspid pulmonary valve is a rare congenital heart disease. It is infrequently associated with significant clinical complications and tends to be clinically silent. Because of its benign nature, it has been diagnosed mainly post mortem. Its diagnosis by transthoracic echocardiography is very difficult because of the anatomical features. We describe a case of quadricuspid pulmonary valve diagnosed by transthoracic echocardiography and electrocardiography-gated multi-detector row computed tomography.

  10. Multi-Detector Computed Tomography in Evaluating Locally Aggressive and Malignant Bone Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Ramavathu, Kumar Venu Madhav; Garga, U.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the ability of Multi-Detector Computed Tomography in preoperative evaluation of locally aggressive and malignant bone tumours in correlation with histopathological findings. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients suspected of malignant bone tumours on the basis of their clinical profile were selected. Following a plain radiograph evaluation, all of them were subjected to CT scan examination. Multi Planar Reconstruction (MPR) was done in sagittal and coronal planes and also three-dimensional Volume Rendering (VR) and Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) images were obtained. Results: Of the 20 patients, 18 underwent surgery, and their histopathological findings were compared and correlated with MDCT findings. MDCT was 92.8% sensitive and 100% specific in determining the vascularity of the tumour and also can detect displacement/ encasement/ involvement of adjacent vessels. It has a sensitivity and specificity of 100% in determining cortical break, calcification and periosteal reaction. However, it is less sensitive in detecting joint involvement. Post contrast enhancement gives details of the extent of the soft tissue component. Conclusion: Although MRI is a preferred modality in preoperative evaluation of bone tumours, CT may be used an alternative in case of non-availability of MRI, which has faster acquisition time and better resolution. Using three dimensional MPR imaging, the location and extent of the tumour can be studied. It is also useful in determining cortical discontinuity, periosteal reaction, and calcification. By virtue of MIP and VR imaging, vascularity of the tumour and its relationship with the adjacent vasculature can be established. However, it is inferior to MRI in soft tissue characterization and has poor sensitivity in detecting marrow and joint involvement. PMID:26023618

  11. Role of Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) in the detection of pulmonary nodules on 64 row multi detector computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Prakashini, K; Babu, Satish; Rajgopal, KV; Kokila, K Raja

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To determine the overall performance of an existing CAD algorithm with thin-section computed tomography (CT) in the detection of pulmonary nodules and to evaluate detection sensitivity at a varying range of nodule density, size, and location. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional prospective study was conducted on 20 patients with 322 suspected nodules who underwent diagnostic chest imaging using 64-row multi-detector CT. The examinations were evaluated on reconstructed images of 1.4 mm thickness and 0.7 mm interval. Detection of pulmonary nodules, initially by a radiologist of 2 years experience (RAD) and later by CAD lung nodule software was assessed. Then, CAD nodule candidates were accepted or rejected accordingly. Detected nodules were classified based on their size, density, and location. The performance of the RAD and CAD system was compared with the gold standard that is true nodules confirmed by consensus of senior RAD and CAD together. The overall sensitivity and false-positive (FP) rate of CAD software was calculated. Observations and Results: Of the 322 suspected nodules, 221 were classified as true nodules on the consensus of senior RAD and CAD together. Of the true nodules, the RAD detected 206 (93.2%) and 202 (91.4%) by the CAD. CAD and RAD together picked up more number of nodules than either CAD or RAD alone. Overall sensitivity for nodule detection with the CAD program was 91.4%, and FP detection per patient was 5.5%. The CAD showed comparatively higher sensitivity for nodules of size 4–10 mm (93.4%) and nodules in hilar (100%) and central (96.5%) location when compared to RAD's performance. Conclusion: CAD performance was high in detecting pulmonary nodules including the small size and low-density nodules. CAD even with relatively high FP rate, assists and improves RAD's performance as a second reader, especially for nodules located in the central and hilar region and for small nodules by saving RADs time. PMID:27578931

  12. Thoracic Injuries in earthquake-related versus non-earthquake-related trauma patients: differentiation via Multi-detector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhi-hui; Yang, Zhi-gang; Chen, Tian-wu; Chu, Zhi-gang; Deng, Wen; Shao, Heng

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Massive earthquakes are harmful to humankind. This study of a historical cohort aimed to investigate the difference between earthquake-related crush thoracic traumas and thoracic traumas unrelated to earthquakes using a multi-detector Computed Tomography (CT). METHODS: We retrospectively compared an earthquake-exposed cohort of 215 thoracic trauma crush victims of the Sichuan earthquake to a cohort of 215 non-earthquake-related thoracic trauma patients, focusing on the lesions and coexisting injuries to the thoracic cage and the pulmonary parenchyma and pleura using a multi-detector CT. RESULTS: The incidence of rib fracture was elevated in the earthquake-exposed cohort (143 vs. 66 patients in the non-earthquake-exposed cohort, Risk Ratio (RR) = 2.2; p<0.001). Among these patients, those with more than 3 fractured ribs (106/143 vs. 41/66 patients, RR = 1.2; p<0.05) or flail chest (45/143 vs. 11/66 patients, RR = 1.9; p<0.05) were more frequently seen in the earthquake cohort. Earthquake-related crush injuries more frequently resulted in bilateral rib fractures (66/143 vs. 18/66 patients, RR = 1.7; p<0.01). Additionally, the incidence of non-rib fracture was higher in the earthquake cohort (85 vs. 60 patients, RR = 1.4; p<0.01). Pulmonary parenchymal and pleural injuries were more frequently seen in earthquake-related crush injuries (117 vs. 80 patients, RR = 1.5 for parenchymal and 146 vs. 74 patients, RR = 2.0 for pleural injuries; p<0.001). Non-rib fractures, pulmonary parenchymal and pleural injuries had significant positive correlation with rib fractures in these two cohorts. CONCLUSIONS: Thoracic crush traumas resulting from the earthquake were life threatening with a high incidence of bony thoracic fractures. The ribs were frequently involved in bilateral and severe types of fractures, which were accompanied by non-rib fractures, pulmonary parenchymal and pleural injuries. PMID:21789386

  13. Three-dimensional reconstruction of medieval child mummy in Yangju, Korea, using multi-detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Sun; Kim, Myeung Ju; Yoo, Dong Soo; Lee, Young Seok; Park, Sung Sil; Bok, Gi Dae; Han, Seung Ho; Chung, Yoon Hee; Chang, Byung Soo; Yi, Yang Su; Oh, Chang Seok; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2007-01-01

    Recently reported studies on the medieval mummies in Korea have been regarded as an invaluable source for studying the physical characteristics of medieval Koreans. However, since the reported medieval mummies were re-buried by their descendants without any scientific investigations, the development of a brief, non-invasive investigation technique was desperately needed among the researchers in Korea. In this regard, we tried to apply high-quality multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) with three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and multi-planar reformat (MPR) to investigate Korean mummies. In our study, after 1.25 or 2.5mm thin slice axial images were taken, 3D reconstruction and MPR were performed to get more accurate information about internal organs. In this trial, we successfully showed high-quality images for the brain, muscles, bones, heart and liver. During various trials for getting selected organs, we could make the 3D reconstructed images of them. Since we could show that the current MDCT technique could be useful for obtaining high-quality 3D reconstructed images of the internal organs of Korean mummies, this technique will be used in forthcoming similar cases, which could not be investigated using invasive techniques.

  14. [Motion analysis of target in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumors using 320-row multidetector CT].

    PubMed

    Imae, Toshikazu; Haga, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Ino, Kenji; Tanaka, Kenichirou; Okano, Yukari; Sasaki, Katsutake; Saegusa, Shigeki; Shiraki, Takashi; Oritate, Takashi; Yano, Keiichi; Shinohara, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has rapidly evolved and is increasingly used for treatment simulation of thoracic and abdominal radiotherapy. A 320-detector row CT scanner has recently become available that allows axial volumetric scanning of a 16-cm-long range in a patient without table movement. Current radiotherapy techniques require a generous margin around the presumed gross tumor volume (GTV) to account for uncertainties such as tumor motion and set up error. Motion analysis is useful to evaluate the internal margin of a moving target due to respiration and to improve therapeutic precision. The purpose of this study is to propose a method using phase-only correlation to automatically detect the target and to assess the motion of the target in numerical phantoms and patients. Free-breathing scans using 320-detector row CT were acquired for 4 patients with lung tumor(s). The proposed method was feasible for motion analysis of all numerical phantoms and patients. The results reproduced the facts that the motion of tumors in the patients varied in orbits during the respiratory cycle and exhibited hysteresis. The maximum distance between peak exhalation and inhalation increased as the tumors approached the diaphragm. The proposed method detected the three-dimensional position of the targets automatically and analyzed the trajectories. The tumor motion due to respiration differed by region and was greatest for the lower lobe. PMID:21471676

  15. Evaluation of renal vascular anatomy in live renal donors: Role of multi detector computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Vaidehi Kumudchandra; Patel, Alpeshkumar Shakerlal; Sutariya, Harsh Chandrakant; Gandhi, Shruti Pradipkumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evaluation of renal vascular variations is important in renal donors to avoid vascular complications during surgery. Venous variations, mainly resulting from the errors of the embryological development, are frequently observed. Aim: This retrospective cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the renal vascular variants with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography to provide valuable information for surgery and its correlations with surgical findings. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 patients underwent MDCT angiography as a routine work up for live renal donors. The number, course, and drainage patterns of the renal veins were retrospectively observed from the scans. Anomalies of renal veins and inferior vena cava (IVC) were recorded and classified. Multiplanar reformations (MPRs), maximum intensity projections, and volume rendering were used for analysis. The results obtained were correlated surgically. Results: In the present study, out of 200 healthy donors, the standard pattern of drainage of renal veins was observed in only 67% of donors on the right side and 92% of donors on the left side. Supernumerary renal veins in the form of dual and triple renal veins were seen on the right side in about 32.5% of donors (dual right renal veins in 30.5% cases and triple right renal veins in 2.5% cases). Variations on the left side were classified into four groups: supernumerary, retro-aortic, circumaortic, and plexiform left renal veins in 1%, 2.5%, 4%, 0.5%, cases respectively. Conclusions: Developmental variations in renal veins can be easily detected on computed tomography scan, which can go unnoticed and can pose a fatal threat during major surgeries such as donor nephrectomies in otherwise healthy donors if undiagnosed. PMID:27453646

  16. Sequential radial artery for coronary artery bypass grafting: five-year follow-up and evaluation with multi-detector row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Emir, Mustafa; Kunt, Ayşe Gül; Çiçek, Murat; Bozok, Şahin; Karakişi, Sedat Ozan; Uğuz, Emrah; Hidiroğlu, Mete; Çetin, Levent; Şener, Erol

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to compare early postoperative results, programmed multi-detector row computed tomography coronary angiographic patency and midterm results of revascularization by sequential radial artery grafting with those of single radial artery grafting during a five-year period. Patients were grouped as those with sequential radial artery grafts (Group A, n = 27) and single radial artery grafts (Group B, n = 26). Multi-detector row computed tomography coronary angiography was scheduled at 1 and 5 years postoperatively. Each distal anastomosis was accepted as nonfunctional if a radial artery graft was occluded proximally or there was a critical stenosis. One sequential radial artery graft and two single radial artery grafts failed in the 1-year period (p>0.05). In the 5-year period, three radial artery grafts failed in each group (p>0.05). In Group A, there was no mortality in the five-year period, but in Group B, one patient died four years after the operation due to cardiac problems (p>0.05). In addition to one death in Group B, there were three percutaneous interventions and two myocardial infarctions among the 26 patients during the five-year follow-up. In group A, among 27 patients, there were 4 percutaneous interventions and one myocardial infarction (p>0.05). Although the sample size is relatively small to be conclusive, these data suggest that sequential radial artery grafting may be considered as a method of choice for maximizing arterial graft survival and patency. Noninvasive control of sequential and single radial artery grafts with multi-detector row computed tomography is feasible with no discomfort for the patient and excellent visualization of grafts. PMID:22889883

  17. Technical note: Electrocardiogram electrode repositioning for 320-row coronary CT angiography in patients with regular and recurrent premature ventricular contractions.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takeshi; Matsutani, Hideyuki; Groarke, John; Takamura, Kazuhisa; Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Rybicki, Frank J; Kumamaru, Kanako K

    2014-01-01

    Arrhythmias can compromise image quality and increase radiation exposure during coronary CT angiography (CTA). However, premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) can occur in a predictable recurrent and regular pattern (ie, bigeminy, trigeminy, quadrigeminy) with post-PVC compensatory pauses. Electrocardiographic (ECG) electrode repositioning can achieve relative amplification of the R waves of PVCs compared with R waves of sinus beats. This technical note describes how simple ECG electrode repositioning, combined with an absolute-delay strategy, facilitated selective R waves of PVC ECG triggering of image acquisition in 6 patients with PVC bigeminy or quadrigeminy at the time of 320-row coronary CTA. All 6 studies were single heartbeat acquisition scans with excellent image quality and a median effective radiation dose of 2.9 mSv (interquartile range, 2.1-3.8 mSv). Standard ECG electrode positions used for 2 patients with PVC bigeminy undergoing coronary CTA were associated with an acquisition over 2 heartbeats and effective radiation doses of 6.8 and 10.3 mSv, respectively. In conclusion, ECG electrode repositioning combined with an absolute-delay strategy for regularly recurring PVCs, such as ventricular bigeminy, facilitates high image quality and lower radiation dose during coronary CTA. This simple and straightforward technique can be considered for all patients with regular and recurrent PVCs undergoing coronary CTA.

  18. Multi-Detector Row Computed Tomographic Evaluation of a Rare Type of Complete Vascular Ring: Double Aortic Arch with Atretic Left Arch Distal to the Origin of Left Subclavian Artery

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ying-Ying; Fu, Yun-Ching; Wei, Hao-Ji; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Double aortic arch with an atretic left arch distal to the origin of left subclavian artery was diagnosed with multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) in two children with dysphagia. This rare type of complete vascular ring is clinically important because it may be confused with right aortic arch in mirror imaging. Anatomic details of this rare type of complete vascular ring demonstrated on MDCT facilitated appropriate surgical treatment. PMID:24043984

  19. Perforated duodenal ulcer presenting with a subphrenic abscess revealed by plain abdominal X-ray films and confirmed by multi-detector computed tomography: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer disease is still the major cause of gastrointestinal perforation despite major improvements in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. While the diagnosis of a perforated ulcer is straightforward in typical cases, its clinical onset may be subtle because of comorbidities and/or concurrent therapies. Case presentation We report the case of a 53-year-old Caucasian man with a history of chronic myeloid leukemia on maintenance therapy (100mg/day) with imatinib who was found to have a subphrenic abscess resulting from a perforated duodenal ulcer that had been clinically overlooked. Our patient was febrile (38.5°C) with abdominal tenderness and hypoactive bowel sounds. On the abdominal plain X-ray films, a right subphrenic abscess could be seen. On contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography, a huge air-fluid collection extending from the subphrenic to the subhepatic anterior space was observed. After oral administration of 500cm3 of 3 percent diluted diatrizoate meglumine, an extraluminal leakage of the water-soluble iodinated contrast media could then be appreciated as a result of a perforated duodenal ulcer. During surgery, the abscess was drained and extensive adhesiolysis had to be performed to expose the duodenal bulb where the ulcer was first identified by methylene blue administration and then sutured. Conclusions While subphrenic abscesses are well known complications of perforated gastric or duodenal ulcers, they have nowadays become rare thanks to advances in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for peptic ulcer disease. However, when peptic ulcer disease is not clinically suspected, the contribution of imaging may be substantial. PMID:24215711

  20. [Evaluation of Slavic continuity for electrocardiograph (ECG)-gated non-helical scan using multi detector-row computed tomography with 64 data acquisition system].

    PubMed

    Shiotani, Masataka; Ogawa, Masato; Watanabe, Ryo; Shinohara, Tamotsu

    2012-01-01

    Multi detector-row computed tomography with 64 data acquisition systems are widely used for coronary CT angiography with an electrocardiograph (ECG) gated helical scan (HS). Step and shoot with ECG gated non-helical scan (snap shot pulse: SSP) could reduce exposure dose but banding artifact-like discontinuity was observed between adjacent slabs on volume rendering (VR) and curved planner reconstruction (CPR). Therefore, we investigated the factors that influence continuity of VR and CPR images by calculating image properties of Z-axis direction of slab. The observer performance studies were performed for evaluating continuity of simulated blood vessels of VR and CPR images at simulated heart rates: 50, 55, 57 and 60 beat per minute (bpm). As a result, the value of SD at both slab edges in SSP were 20.5% lower than middle part of slab and differences of value of SD were up to 4.4 between adjacent slab edges. Slice thickness of both slab edges were 20.3% thinner than that of the peripheral part of slab. At the border of the adjacent slab, the position of the simulated blood vessel was shifted. VR images of SSP at 57 bpm was indicated as the highest score and HS was significantly superior to SSP at 55 and 60 bpm (p<0.05). In CPR images, there were no significant differences at all simulated heart rates. In conclusion, we considered that VR images of SSP were influenced heart rates except 57 bpm (resonance case) and there was little difference of visibility for discontinuity of both CPR images obtained by SSP and HS.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging and multi-detector computed tomography assessment of extracellular compartment in ischemic and non-ischemic myocardial pathologies.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Maythem; Hetts, Steven W; Jablonowski, Robert; Wilson, Mark W

    2014-11-26

    Myocardial pathologies are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Early detection of loss of cellular integrity and expansion in extracellular volume (ECV) in myocardium is critical to initiate effective treatment. The three compartments in healthy myocardium are: intravascular (approximately 10% of tissue volume), interstitium (approximately 15%) and intracellular (approximately 75%). Myocardial cells, fibroblasts and vascular endothelial/smooth muscle cells represent intracellular compartment and the main proteins in the interstitium are types I/III collagens. Microscopic studies have shown that expansion of ECV is an important feature of diffuse physiologic fibrosis (e.g., aging and obesity) and pathologic fibrosis [heart failure, aortic valve disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, amyloidosis, congenital heart disease, aortic stenosis, restrictive cardiomyopathy (hypereosinophilic and idiopathic types), arrythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and hypertension]. This review addresses recent advances in measuring of ECV in ischemic and non-ischemic myocardial pathologies. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the ability to characterize tissue proton relaxation times (T1, T2, and T2*). Proton relaxation times reflect the physical and chemical environments of water protons in myocardium. Delayed contrast enhanced-MRI (DE-MRI) and multi-detector computed tomography (DE-MDCT) demonstrated hyper-enhanced infarct, hypo-enhanced microvascular obstruction zone and moderately enhanced peri-infarct zone, but are limited for visualizing diffuse fibrosis and patchy microinfarct despite the increase in ECV. ECV can be measured on equilibrium contrast enhanced MRI/MDCT and MRI longitudinal relaxation time mapping. Equilibrium contrast enhanced MRI/MDCT and MRI T1 mapping is currently used, but at a lower scale, as an alternative to invasive sub-endomyocardial biopsies to eliminate the need for anesthesia, coronary

  2. Non-invasive assessment of coronary artery bypass graft with retrospectively ECG-gated four-row multi-detector spiral computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Marano, Riccardo; Storto, Maria Luigia; Maddestra, Nicola; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of four-row multi-detector CT (MDCT) in the evaluation of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) in patients with at least a left internal mammary artery (LIMA) grafted to the left anterior descending artery (LAD), because of the conduit of choice in bypass surgery and the greater difficulty of evaluation with non-invasive diagnostic tools. Included in the study were 57 patients with a total of 122 grafts (95 arterial and 27 venous) who underwent MDCT (4x2.5-mm detector-collimation, 3-mm slice width, 1.5-mm reconstruction increment) with retrospective ECG gating. Twelve patients (21%) with high heart rates were given beta-blockers in order to obtain a heart rate lateral>posterior-inferior wall; P=0.002). In the remaining 30 patent grafts (33%), the assessment of stenoses was hampered by surgical clips, calcifications and motion artifacts. Sensitivity and specificity of MDCT for detection of significant graft stenoses were 80 and 96%, respectively. Inter-observer agreement was good ( K=0.73). MDCT seems to be a valuable diagnostic tool for non-invasive assessment of patency of both venous and arterial grafts. An accurate evaluation

  3. Non-invasive detection of aortic and coronary atherosclerosis in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia by 64 slice multi-detector row computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Santos, Raul D; Miname, Marcio H; Martinez, Lilton R C; Rochitte, Carlos E; Chacra, Ana P M; Nakandakare, Edna R; Chen, David; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2008-04-01

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare disorder characterized by the early onset of atherosclerosis, often at the ostia of coronary arteries. In this study we document for the first time that aortic and coronary atherosclerosis can be detected using 64 slice multiple detector row computed tomographic coronary angiography (CTCA). We studied five HoFH patients (three females, two males, mean age 19.8+/-2.9 years, age range 15-23 years, with a mean low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol 618+/-211 mg/dL) using 64 slice CTCA. None of the patients showed evidence of ischemia with standard exercise testing. Calcified and mixed atherosclerotic plaques adjacent to or compromising the coronary artery ostia were found in all study subjects. Coronary plaques causing significant obstruction were found in one patient, who had previously undergone coronary artery bypass surgery and aortic valve replacement. Two other patients were noted to have non-obstructive calcified, mixed and non-calcified coronary artery plaques. Our data suggest that CTCA could be a useful non-invasive method for detection of early aortic and coronary atherosclerosis specifically affecting the coronary ostia in HoFH subjects. PMID:17884061

  4. Image quality and radiation reduction of 320-row area detector CT coronary angiography with optimal tube voltage selection and an automatic exposure control system: comparison with body mass index-adapted protocol.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jiyeon; Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal; Shim, Hackjoon; Chung, Jin Wook

    2015-06-01

    To assess the image quality and radiation exposure of 320-row area detector computed tomography (320-ADCT) coronary angiography with optimal tube voltage selection with the guidance of an automatic exposure control system in comparison with a body mass index (BMI)-adapted protocol. Twenty-two patients (study group) underwent 320-ADCT coronary angiography using an automatic exposure control system with the target standard deviation value of 33 as the image quality index and the lowest possible tube voltage. For comparison, a sex- and BMI-matched group (control group, n = 22) using a BMI-adapted protocol was established. Images of both groups were reconstructed by an iterative reconstruction algorithm. For objective evaluation of the image quality, image noise, vessel density, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and contrast to noise ratio (CNR) were measured. Two blinded readers then subjectively graded the image quality using a four-point scale (1: nondiagnostic to 4: excellent). Radiation exposure was also measured. Although the study group tended to show higher image noise (14.1 ± 3.6 vs. 9.3 ± 2.2 HU, P = 0.111) and higher vessel density (665.5 ± 161 vs. 498 ± 143 HU, P = 0.430) than the control group, the differences were not significant. There was no significant difference between the two groups for SNR (52.5 ± 19.2 vs. 60.6 ± 21.8, P = 0.729), CNR (57.0 ± 19.8 vs. 67.8 ± 23.3, P = 0.531), or subjective image quality scores (3.47 ± 0.55 vs. 3.59 ± 0.56, P = 0.960). However, radiation exposure was significantly reduced by 42 % in the study group (1.9 ± 0.8 vs. 3.6 ± 0.4 mSv, P = 0.003). Optimal tube voltage selection with the guidance of an automatic exposure control system in 320-ADCT coronary angiography allows substantial radiation reduction without significant impairment of image quality, compared to the results obtained using a BMI-based protocol. PMID:25604967

  5. Image quality and radiation reduction of 320-row area detector CT coronary angiography with optimal tube voltage selection and an automatic exposure control system: comparison with body mass index-adapted protocol.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jiyeon; Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal; Shim, Hackjoon; Chung, Jin Wook

    2015-06-01

    To assess the image quality and radiation exposure of 320-row area detector computed tomography (320-ADCT) coronary angiography with optimal tube voltage selection with the guidance of an automatic exposure control system in comparison with a body mass index (BMI)-adapted protocol. Twenty-two patients (study group) underwent 320-ADCT coronary angiography using an automatic exposure control system with the target standard deviation value of 33 as the image quality index and the lowest possible tube voltage. For comparison, a sex- and BMI-matched group (control group, n = 22) using a BMI-adapted protocol was established. Images of both groups were reconstructed by an iterative reconstruction algorithm. For objective evaluation of the image quality, image noise, vessel density, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and contrast to noise ratio (CNR) were measured. Two blinded readers then subjectively graded the image quality using a four-point scale (1: nondiagnostic to 4: excellent). Radiation exposure was also measured. Although the study group tended to show higher image noise (14.1 ± 3.6 vs. 9.3 ± 2.2 HU, P = 0.111) and higher vessel density (665.5 ± 161 vs. 498 ± 143 HU, P = 0.430) than the control group, the differences were not significant. There was no significant difference between the two groups for SNR (52.5 ± 19.2 vs. 60.6 ± 21.8, P = 0.729), CNR (57.0 ± 19.8 vs. 67.8 ± 23.3, P = 0.531), or subjective image quality scores (3.47 ± 0.55 vs. 3.59 ± 0.56, P = 0.960). However, radiation exposure was significantly reduced by 42 % in the study group (1.9 ± 0.8 vs. 3.6 ± 0.4 mSv, P = 0.003). Optimal tube voltage selection with the guidance of an automatic exposure control system in 320-ADCT coronary angiography allows substantial radiation reduction without significant impairment of image quality, compared to the results obtained using a BMI-based protocol.

  6. Three-dimensional multi-detector row CT portal venography in the evaluation of portosystemic collateral vessels in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heoung Keun; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Choi, Jun Ho; Choi, Song; Chung, Tae Woong; Seo, Jeong Jin; Kim, Jae Kyu; Yoon, Woong; Park, Jin Gyoon

    2002-01-01

    Multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) offers distinct advantages over traditional spiral CT. Multi-detector row CT scanners are faster and allow thinner collimation than single-detector row spiral CT scanners. The use of multi-detector row CT combined with postprocessing of the imaging data with a variety of three-dimensional reformatting techniques (eg, maximum intensity projection, shaded surface display, volume rendering) allows creation of vascular maps whose quality equals or exceeds that of maps created at classic angiography for many applications. Three-dimensional multi-detector row CT portal venography can help determine the extent and location of portosystemic collateral vessels (eg, left gastric vein, short gastric vein, esophageal and paraesophageal varices, splenorenal and gastrorenal shunts, paraumbilical and abdominal wall veins) in patients with liver cirrhosis and is probably the optimal imaging technique in this setting.

  7. Toroid cavity/coil NMR multi-detector

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Meadows, Alexander D.; Gregar, Joseph S.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2007-09-18

    An analytical device for rapid, non-invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of multiple samples using a single spectrometer is provided. A modified toroid cavity/coil detector (TCD), and methods for conducting the simultaneous acquisition of NMR data for multiple samples including a protocol for testing NMR multi-detectors are provided. One embodiment includes a plurality of LC resonant circuits including spatially separated toroid coil inductors, each toroid coil inductor enveloping its corresponding sample volume, and tuned to resonate at a predefined frequency using a variable capacitor. The toroid coil is formed into a loop, where both ends of the toroid coil are brought into coincidence. Another embodiment includes multiple micro Helmholtz coils arranged on a circular perimeter concentric with a central conductor of the toroid cavity.

  8. Multi-detector row CT scanning in Paleoanthropology at various tube current settings and scanning mode.

    PubMed

    Badawi-Fayad, J; Yazbeck, C; Balzeau, A; Nguyen, T H; Istoc, A; Grimaud-Hervé, D; Cabanis, E- A

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal tube current setting and scanning mode for hominid fossil skull scanning, using multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Four fossil skulls (La Ferrassie 1, Abri Pataud 1, CroMagnon 2 and Cro-Magnon 3) were examined by using the CT scanner LightSpeed 16 (General Electric Medical Systems) with varying dose per section (160, 250, and 300 mAs) and scanning mode (helical and conventional). Image quality of two-dimensional (2D) multiplanar reconstructions, three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and native images was assessed by four reviewers using a four-point grading scale. An ANOVA (analysis of variance) model was used to compare the mean score for each sequence and the overall mean score according to the levels of the scanning parameters. Compared with helical CT (mean score=12.03), the conventional technique showed sustained poor image quality (mean score=4.17). With the helical mode, we observed a better image quality at 300 mAs than at 160 in the 3D sequences (P=0.03). Whereas in native images, a reduction in the effective tube current induced no degradation in image quality (P=0.05). Our study suggests a standardized protocol for fossil scanning with a 16 x 0.625 detector configuration, a 10 mm beam collimation, a 0.562:1 acquisition mode, a 0.625/0.4 mm slice thickness/reconstruction interval, a pitch of 5.62, 120 kV and 300 mAs especially when a 3D study is required.

  9. Novel ultrahigh resolution data acquisition and image reconstruction for multi-detector row CT

    SciTech Connect

    Flohr, T. G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Suess, C.; Schmidt, B.; Primak, A. N.; McCollough, C. H.

    2007-05-15

    We present and evaluate a special ultrahigh resolution mode providing considerably enhanced spatial resolution both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction for a routine medical multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) system. Data acquisition is performed by using a flying focal spot both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction in combination with tantalum grids that are inserted in front of the multi-row detector to reduce the aperture of the detector elements both in-plane and in the z-axis direction. The dose utilization of the system for standard applications is not affected, since the grids are moved into place only when needed and are removed for standard scanning. By means of this technique, image slices with a nominal section width of 0.4 mm (measured full width at half maximum=0.45 mm) can be reconstructed in spiral mode on a CT system with a detector configuration of 32x0.6 mm. The measured 2% value of the in-plane modulation transfer function (MTF) is 20.4 lp/cm, the measured 2% value of the longitudinal (z axis) MTF is 21.5 lp/cm. In a resolution phantom with metal line pair test patterns, spatial resolution of 20 lp/cm can be demonstrated both in the scan plane and along the z axis. This corresponds to an object size of 0.25 mm that can be resolved. The new mode is intended for ultrahigh resolution bone imaging, in particular for wrists, joints, and inner ear studies, where a higher level of image noise due to the reduced aperture is an acceptable trade-off for the clinical benefit brought about by the improved spatial resolution.

  10. Multi-detector row CT scanning in Paleoanthropology at various tube current settings and scanning mode.

    PubMed

    Badawi-Fayad, J; Yazbeck, C; Balzeau, A; Nguyen, T H; Istoc, A; Grimaud-Hervé, D; Cabanis, E- A

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal tube current setting and scanning mode for hominid fossil skull scanning, using multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Four fossil skulls (La Ferrassie 1, Abri Pataud 1, CroMagnon 2 and Cro-Magnon 3) were examined by using the CT scanner LightSpeed 16 (General Electric Medical Systems) with varying dose per section (160, 250, and 300 mAs) and scanning mode (helical and conventional). Image quality of two-dimensional (2D) multiplanar reconstructions, three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and native images was assessed by four reviewers using a four-point grading scale. An ANOVA (analysis of variance) model was used to compare the mean score for each sequence and the overall mean score according to the levels of the scanning parameters. Compared with helical CT (mean score=12.03), the conventional technique showed sustained poor image quality (mean score=4.17). With the helical mode, we observed a better image quality at 300 mAs than at 160 in the 3D sequences (P=0.03). Whereas in native images, a reduction in the effective tube current induced no degradation in image quality (P=0.05). Our study suggests a standardized protocol for fossil scanning with a 16 x 0.625 detector configuration, a 10 mm beam collimation, a 0.562:1 acquisition mode, a 0.625/0.4 mm slice thickness/reconstruction interval, a pitch of 5.62, 120 kV and 300 mAs especially when a 3D study is required. PMID:16211320

  11. Bent Si monochromator—multi-detector neutron diffractometer installed at B4 super-mirror thermal guide tube in KUR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achiwa, N.; Kawano, S.; Hino, M.; Mikula, P.; Ono, M.; Fukunaga, T.

    2004-08-01

    A new multi-detector neutron diffractometer has been installed at B4 thermal supermirror neutron guide in KUR, using a new bent Si monochromator developed by Mikula et al. and Ono et al.. Here we report resolutions of powder diffraction patterns by the multi-detector neutron diffractometer, which mainly depend on a radius of sample. Bragg diffraction optics by bent perfect crystal shows improvement of resolution without loss of luminosity and the multi- detector on the same 2 θ arm can gain the intensity without loosing resolution.

  12. Control electronics for a multi-laser/multi-detector scanning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, W.

    1980-01-01

    The Mars Rover Laser Scanning system uses a precision laser pointing mechanism, a photodetector array, and the concept of triangulation to perform three dimensional scene analysis. The system is used for real time terrain sensing and vision. The Multi-Laser/Multi-Detector laser scanning system is controlled by a digital device called the ML/MD controller. A next generation laser scanning system, based on the Level 2 controller, is microprocessor based. The new controller capabilities far exceed those of the ML/MD device. The first draft circuit details and general software structure are presented.

  13. Secondary aortoenteric fistula: active bleeding detected with multi-detector-row CT.

    PubMed

    Roos, Justus E; Willmann, Jürgen K; Hilfiker, Paul R

    2002-12-01

    We report a case of active bleeding of a secondary aortoenteric fistula (SAEF), in which CT angiography with multi-detector-row CT (MDCT) was finally diagnostic after negative catheter angiography and unsatisfactory endoscopy. The MDCT angiography clearly demonstrated the fistulous tract between the abdominal aortic graft and the duodenum. The dynamic process of bleeding was confirmed as a net increase of contrast agent accumulation in the duodenum through different phases. The MDCT angiography with its excellent 3D image quality is therefore a valuable method in the assessment of active SAEF bleeding. PMID:12522640

  14. Novel wearable and wireless ring-type pulse oximeter with multi-detectors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng-Yang; Chan, Ming-Che; Chen, Chien-Yue; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2014-01-01

    The pulse oximeter is a popular instrument to monitor the arterial oxygen saturation (SPO2). Although a fingertip-type pulse oximeter is the mainstream one on the market at present, it is still inconvenient for long-term monitoring, in particular, with respect to motion. Therefore, the development of a wearable pulse oximeter, such as a finger base-type pulse oximeter, can effectively solve the above issue. However, the tissue structure of the finger base is complex, and there is lack of detailed information on the effect of the light source and detector placement on measuring SPO2. In this study, the practicability of a ring-type pulse oximeter with a multi-detector was investigated by optical human tissue simulation. The optimal design of a ring-type pulse oximeter that can provide the best efficiency of measuring SPO2 was discussed. The efficiency of ring-type pulse oximeters with a single detector and a multi-detector was also discussed. Finally, a wearable and wireless ring-type pulse oximeter was also implemented to validate the simulation results and was compared with the commercial fingertip-type pulse oximeter.

  15. Novel Wearable and Wireless Ring-Type Pulse Oximeter with Multi-Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng-Yang; Chan, Ming-Che; Chen, Chien-Yue; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2014-01-01

    The pulse oximeter is a popular instrument to monitor the arterial oxygen saturation (SPO2). Although a fingertip-type pulse oximeter is the mainstream one on the market at present, it is still inconvenient for long-term monitoring, in particular, with respect to motion. Therefore, the development of a wearable pulse oximeter, such as a finger base-type pulse oximeter, can effectively solve the above issue. However, the tissue structure of the finger base is complex, and there is lack of detailed information on the effect of the light source and detector placement on measuring SPO2. In this study, the practicability of a ring-type pulse oximeter with a multi-detector was investigated by optical human tissue simulation. The optimal design of a ring-type pulse oximeter that can provide the best efficiency of measuring SPO2 was discussed. The efficiency of ring-type pulse oximeters with a single detector and a multi-detector was also discussed. Finally, a wearable and wireless ring-type pulse oximeter was also implemented to validate the simulation results and was compared with the commercial fingertip-type pulse oximeter. PMID:25244586

  16. Acute pulmonary embolism in the era of multi-detector CT: a reality in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The advantages of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) have made it the imaging modality of choice for some patients with suspected cardiothoracic disease, of which pulmonary embolism (PE) is an exponent. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of PE in patients with clinical suspicion of acute PE using MDCT in a sub-Saharan setting, and to describe the demographic characteristics of these patients. Methods Consecutive records of patients who underwent MDCT pulmonary angiography for suspected acute PE over a two-year period at the Radiology Department of a university-affiliated hospital were systematically reviewed. All MDCT pulmonary angiograms were performed with a 16-detector computed tomography (CT) scanner using real-time bolus tracking technique. Authorization for the study was obtained from the institutional authorities. Results Forty-one MDCT pulmonary angiograms were reviewed of which 37 were retained. Of the 4 excluded studies, 3 were repeat angiograms and 1 study was not technically adequate. Twelve of 37 patients (32.4%) had CT angiograms that were positive for PE, of which 7 were males. The mean age of these patients was 47.6±10.5 years (age range from 33 to 65 years). Twenty five patients out of 37 (67.6%) had CT angiograms that were negative for PE. Eleven PE-positive patients (91.7%) had at least 1 identifiable thromboembolic risk factor whilst 5 PE-negative patients (20%) also had at least a thromboembolic risk factor. The relative risk of the occurrence of PE in patients with at least a thromboembolic risk factor was estimated at 14.4. Conclusion Acute PE is a reality in sub-Saharan Africa, with an increased likelihood of MDCT evidence in patients with clinical suspicion of PE who have at least a thromboembolic risk factor. The increasing availability of MDCT will help provide more information on the occurrence of PE in these settings. PMID:23072500

  17. Assessment of coronary bypass graft patency by first-line multi-detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Pesenti-Rossi, D; Baron, N; Georges, J-L; Augusto, S; Gibault-Genty, G; Livarek, B

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess whether a strategy based on a MDCT performed routinely before CA can reduce the radiation dose during the CA, without increased global exposure in patients who need imaging of CABG. A total of 147 consecutive patients were included. The radiation dose during CA (KAP 12.1 vs 22.0 Gy/cm(2), P<.01) and the volume of iodinated contrast (155 vs 200 mL, P<.02) were reduced when preceded by a MDCT. Patients' cumulative exposures were not different in the 2 strategies (5.0 vs 5.1 mSv, P=.76). MDCT performed in first line is a valuable strategy for the assessment of CABG. PMID:25258019

  18. Collimated prompt gamma TOF measurements with multi-slit multi-detector configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimmer, J.; Chevallier, M.; Constanzo, J.; Dauvergne, D.; De Rydt, M.; Dedes, G.; Freud, N.; Henriquet, P.; La Tessa, C.; Létang, J. M.; Pleskač, R.; Pinto, M.; Ray, C.; Reithinger, V.; Richard, M. H.; Rinaldi, I.; Roellinghoff, F.; Schuy, C.; Testa, E.; Testa, M.

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal prompt-gamma ray profiles have been measured with a multi-slit multi-detector configuration at a 75 MeV/u 13C beam and with a PMMA target. Selections in time-of-flight and energy have been applied in order to discriminate prompt-gamma rays produced in the target from background events. The ion ranges which have been extracted from each individual detector module agree amongst each other and are consistent with theoretical expectations. In a separate dedicated experiment with 200 MeV/u 12C ions the fraction of inter-detector scattering has been determined to be on the 10%-level via a combination of experimental results and simulations. At the same experiment different collimator configurations have been tested and the shielding properties of tungsten and lead for prompt-gamma rays have been measured.

  19. Multi-Detector Coronary CT Imaging for the Identification of Coronary Artery Stenoses in a “Real-World” Population

    PubMed Central

    Makaryus, Amgad N; Henry, Sonia; Loewinger, Lee; Makaryus, John N; Boxt, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Multi-detector computed tomography (CT) has emerged as a modality for the non-invasive assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD). Prior studies have selected patients for evaluation and have excluded many of the “real-world” patients commonly encountered in daily practice. We compared 64-detector-CT (64-CT) to conventional coronary angiography (CA) to investigate the accuracy of 64-CT in determining significant coronary stenoses in a “real-world” clinical population. METHODS A total of 1,818 consecutive patients referred for 64-CT were evaluated. CT angiography was performed using the GE LightSpeed VCT (GE® Healthcare). Forty-one patients in whom 64-CT results prompted CA investigation were further evaluated, and results of the two diagnostic modalities were compared. RESULTS A total of 164 coronary arteries and 410 coronary segments were evaluated in 41 patients (30 men, 11 women, age 39–85 years) who were identified by 64-CT to have significant coronary stenoses and who thereafter underwent CA. The overall per-vessel sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy at the 50% stenosis level were 86%, 84%, 65%, 95%, and 85%, respectively, and 77%, 93%, 61%, 97%, and 91%, respectively, in the per-segment analysis at the 50% stenosis level. CONCLUSION 64-CT is an accurate imaging tool that allows a non-invasive assessment of significant CAD with a high diagnostic accuracy in a “real-world” population of patients. The sensitivity and specificity that we noted are not as high as those in prior reports, but we evaluated a population of patients that is typically encountered in clinical practice and therefore see more “real-world” results. PMID:25628513

  20. [Characteristics of pneumoconiosis on multi-detector row CT and its' anatomic-pathologic basis].

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuanchun; Yang, Zhigang; Li, Yuan; Chen, Tianwu; Wang, Qiling; Deng, Wen

    2011-04-01

    In order to investigate the fine distinction of the tomographic images and the dominant anatomic distributions, we carefully reviewed and analyzed the features and predominant anatomic distribution of forty-nine pneumoconiosis patients with confirmed diagnosis on multi-detector row CT (MDCT). It was found that the round and small opacity p and irregular small opacity were mostly shown in the MDCT features of pneumoconiosis, while the large opacity and progressive massive fibrosis (PMF) were less frequently depicted in the MDCT. Distributions of round and small opacity and irregular small opacity in the six lung lobes were significantly different (P < 0.01). The most common p opacity was significantly seen in the upper and lower left lungs as well as in the upper right lung's opacity was in the upper left lung as well as lower left and right lungs. The large opacity commonly distributed in upper left and right lungs, while the PMF was often shown in both of two lungs. The results demonstrated that the MDCT could be an effective modality for detecting tiny lesions and anatomic distribution of pneumoconiosis, and it would be helpful for early diagnosis and accurate staging of the pneumoconiosis disease.

  1. Comparison of methods for assessing geometric efficiency on multi-detector CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Berris, Theocharis; Perisinakis, Kostas; Papadakis, Antonios E; Damilakis, John

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare the film method against the method based on a new CT slice detector in assessing geometric efficiency (GE) of x-ray beams utilized by a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Measurements of GE were performed using radiographic films and a solid state CT slice detector for all beam qualities, collimations and focal spot sizes available on an MDCT scanner. Repeatability of GE measurements was assessed. The radiographic film and the solid state detector methods were compared to each other in regard to efficacy in measuring free-in-air GE. The values of GE determined using the radiographic film method were found to range between 48.5% and 90.6%. Differences between values obtained with the radiographic film method and corresponding values obtained with the solid state detector were less than 10% exceeding 5% for only one case. Both methods show that wide beams have higher GE values compared to thin ones. The use of large instead of small focal spot was found to deteriorate GE values by up to 23.1%. Beam quality did not seem to influence GE of the various collimations. When thin beam collimations are employed, a considerable amount of the radiation is wasted for non-imaging purposes. Both film and solid state probe methods are capable of measuring GE of thin as well as wide collimations. The solid state detector is the easiest to use, however its usefulness is reduced by the fact that it cannot measure dose profiles of beam collimations available for step-and-shoot mode of operation.

  2. Anomalous Morphology of an Ectopic Tooth in the Maxillary Sinus on Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Images

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yee-Tak Alta; Luk, Yiu Shiobhon; Fung, Kai-Hung

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of an incidentally-diagnosed ectopic tooth showing anomalous morphology in the maxillary antrum, using three-dimensional reconstruction of computed tomography images of the tooth obtained by multi-detector computed tomography. PMID:23705035

  3. Can 64-row computed tomography replace angiography after coronary bypass?

    PubMed

    Doi, Hirosato; Koshima, Ryuji; Suzuki, Masato; Takahashi, Ken; Yokoyama, Hiroichi; Yoshida, Naoya

    2008-12-01

    Multi-detector (64-row) computed tomography has become an alternative to coronary angiography to diagnose graft occlusion and stenosis after coronary artery bypass. We compared the power of evaluation of multi-detector computed tomography with that of conventional coronary angiography in 60 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass with 135 grafts and 210 graft anastomoses. The diagnostic power of multi-detector computed tomography for graft occlusion was: 100% (2/2) sensitivity, 98.5% (131/133) specificity, 50% (2/4) positive predictive value, and 100% (133/133) negative predictive value; there were no significant differences in rates of occlusion among the different types of graft. The diagnostic power of multi-detector computed tomography for stenosis of the graft anastomosis was: 100% (2/2) sensitivity, 95.1% (194/204) specificity, 16.6% (2/12) positive predictive value, and 100% (194/194) negative predictive value, with no significant differences among grafts. Multi-detector computed tomography permits evaluation of bypass grafts and is much less invasive for the patients. PMID:18984751

  4. Effect of reducing field of view on multi-detector quantitative computed tomography parameters of airway wall thickness in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sheshadri, Ajay; Rodriguez, Alfonso; Chen, Ryan; Kozlowski, James; Burgdorf, Dana; Koch, Tammy; Tarsi, Jaime; Schutz, Rebecca; Wilson, Brad; Schechtman, Kenneth; Leader, Joseph K.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Castro, Mario; Fain, Sean B.; Gierada, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We reduced the CT-reconstructed field of view (FOV), increasing pixel density across airway structures and reducing partial volume effects, to determine whether this would improve accuracy of airway wall thickness quantification. Methods We performed CT imaging on a lung phantom and 29 subjects. Images were reconstructed at 30, 15, and 10 cm FOV using a medium-smooth kernel. Cross-sectional airway dimensions were compared at each FOV with repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results Phantom measurements were more accurate when FOV decreased from 30 to 15 cm (p<0.05). Decreasing FOV further to 10 cm did not significantly improve accuracy. Human airway measurements similarly decreased by decreasing FOV (p<0.001). Percent changes in all measurements when reducing FOV from 30 to 15 cm were less than 3%. Conclusions Airway measurements at 30 cm FOV are near the limits of CT resolution using a medium-smooth kernel. Reducing reconstructed FOV would minimally increase sensitivity to detect differences in airway dimensions. PMID:25938213

  5. Design and characterization of a compact multi-detector gamma spectrometer for studies of triggered energy release from nuclear isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugorowski, Philip; Propri, Ronald J.; Caldwell, Nathan; Lazich, Joseph; Carroll, James J.

    2004-10-01

    Nuclear Isomers are long-lived nuclear excited states, with lifetimes ranging up to decades or longer. Recently, attention has focused on the second isomeric state of 178-Hf (31-year natural half-life). The spontaneous decay takes the form of a cascade of gamma photons, totaling 2.45 MeV of energy per nucleus and corresponding to an energy density of 1.3 GigaJoules/gram. Since the ground state is stable, there is no radioactive residue and the 2.4 MeV therefore represents a ``clean'' release of energy. It has been suggested that isomers like this could be used for applications and that would require some means of causing an energy release upon demand. Thus, experiments have been performed to determine the cross-sections for x-ray induced decay, if it occurs. Positive indications by one group have been plagued by poor statistical accuracy in looking for triggered increases in the numbers of photons that correspond to the natural decay cascades. A refined technique based on calorimetry of gamma cascades has been devised to avoid these problems and a portable multi-detector array has been constructed for this purpose. This talk will discuss the design and characterization of this system.

  6. The influence of novel CT reconstruction technique and ECG-gated technique on image quality and patient dose of cardiac computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Dyakov, I; Stoinova, V; Groudeva, V; Vassileva, J

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare image quality and patient dose in cardiac computed tomography angiography (CTA) in terms of volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI vol), dose length product (DLP) and effective dose, when changing from filtered back projection (FBP) to adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR) reconstruction techniques. Further aim was to implement prospective electrocardiogram (ECG) gating for patient dose reduction. The study was performed with Aquilion ONE 320-row CT of Toshiba Medical Systems. Analysis of cardiac CT protocols was performed before and after integration of the new software. The AIDR technique showed more than 50 % reduction in CTDIvol values and 57 % in effective dose. The subjective evaluation of clinical images confirmed the adequate image quality acquired by the AIDR technique. The preliminary results indicated significant dose reduction when using prospective ECG gating by keeping the adequate diagnostic quality of clinical images. PMID:25836680

  7. A retrospective comparison of smart prep and test bolus multi-detector CT pulmonary angiography protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Suckling, Tara; Smith, Tony; Reed, Warren

    2013-06-15

    Optimal arterial opacification is crucial in imaging the pulmonary arteries using computed tomography (CT). This poses the challenge of precisely timing data acquisition to coincide with the transit of the contrast bolus through the pulmonary vasculature. The aim of this quality assurance exercise was to investigate if a change in CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) scanning protocol resulted in improved opacification of the pulmonary arteries. Comparison was made between the smart prep protocol (SPP) and the test bolus protocol (TBP) for opacification in the pulmonary trunk. A total of 160 CTPA examinations (80 using each protocol) performed between January 2010 and February 2011 were assessed retrospectively. CT attenuation coefficients were measured in Hounsfield Units (HU) using regions of interest at the level of the pulmonary trunk. The average pixel value, standard deviation (SD), maximum, and minimum were recorded. For each of these variables a mean value was then calculated and compared for these two CTPA protocols. Minimum opacification of 200 HU was achieved in 98% of the TBP sample but only 90% of the SPP sample. The average CT attenuation over the pulmonary trunk for the SPP was 329 (SD = ±21) HU, whereas for the TBP it was 396 (SD = ±22) HU (P = 0.0017). The TBP also recorded higher maximum (P = 0.0024) and minimum (P = 0.0039) levels of opacification. This study has found that a TBP resulted in significantly better opacification of the pulmonary trunk than the SPP.

  8. Improving Image Quality of On-Board Cone-Beam CT in Radiation Therapy Using Image Information Provided by Planning Multi-Detector CT: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Chen, Fong-Lin; Lo, Yeh-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to improve the image quality of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) mounted on the gantry of a linear accelerator used in radiation therapy based on the image information provided by planning multi-detector CT (MDCT). Methods MDCT-based shading correction for CBCT and virtual monochromatic CT (VMCT) synthesized using the dual-energy method were performed. In VMCT, the high-energy data were obtained from CBCT, while the low-energy data were obtained from MDCT. An electron density phantom was used to investigate the efficacy of shading correction and VMCT on improving the target detectability, Hounsfield unit (HU) accuracy and variation, which were quantified by calculating the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the percent difference (%Diff) and the standard deviation of the CT numbers for tissue equivalent background material, respectively. Treatment plan studies for a chest phantom were conducted to investigate the effects of image quality improvement on dose planning. Results For the electron density phantom, the mean value of CNR was 17.84, 26.78 and 34.31 in CBCT, shading-corrected CBCT and VMCT, respectively. The mean value of %Diff was 152.67%, 11.93% and 7.66% in CBCT, shading-corrected CBCT and VMCT, respectively. The standard deviation within a uniform background of CBCT, shading-corrected CBCT and VMCT was 85, 23 and 15 HU, respectively. With regards to the chest phantom, the monitor unit (MU) difference between the treatment plan calculated using MDCT and those based on CBCT, shading corrected CBCT and VMCT was 6.32%, 1.05% and 0.94%, respectively. Conclusions Enhancement of image quality in on-board CBCT can contribute to daily patient setup and adaptive dose delivery, thus enabling higher confidence in patient treatment accuracy in radiation therapy. Based on our results, VMCT has the highest image quality, followed by the shading corrected CBCT and the original CBCT. The research results presented in this study should be

  9. Sample size requirements for estimating effective dose from computed tomography using solid-state metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Trattner, Sigal; Cheng, Bin; Pieniazek, Radoslaw L.; Hoffmann, Udo; Douglas, Pamela S.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Effective dose (ED) is a widely used metric for comparing ionizing radiation burden between different imaging modalities, scanners, and scan protocols. In computed tomography (CT), ED can be estimated by performing scans on an anthropomorphic phantom in which metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) solid-state dosimeters have been placed to enable organ dose measurements. Here a statistical framework is established to determine the sample size (number of scans) needed for estimating ED to a desired precision and confidence, for a particular scanner and scan protocol, subject to practical limitations. Methods: The statistical scheme involves solving equations which minimize the sample size required for estimating ED to desired precision and confidence. It is subject to a constrained variation of the estimated ED and solved using the Lagrange multiplier method. The scheme incorporates measurement variation introduced both by MOSFET calibration, and by variation in MOSFET readings between repeated CT scans. Sample size requirements are illustrated on cardiac, chest, and abdomen–pelvis CT scans performed on a 320-row scanner and chest CT performed on a 16-row scanner. Results: Sample sizes for estimating ED vary considerably between scanners and protocols. Sample size increases as the required precision or confidence is higher and also as the anticipated ED is lower. For example, for a helical chest protocol, for 95% confidence and 5% precision for the ED, 30 measurements are required on the 320-row scanner and 11 on the 16-row scanner when the anticipated ED is 4 mSv; these sample sizes are 5 and 2, respectively, when the anticipated ED is 10 mSv. Conclusions: Applying the suggested scheme, it was found that even at modest sample sizes, it is feasible to estimate ED with high precision and a high degree of confidence. As CT technology develops enabling ED to be lowered, more MOSFET measurements are needed to estimate ED with the same

  10. Sample size requirements for estimating effective dose from computed tomography using solid-state metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Trattner, Sigal; Cheng, Bin; Pieniazek, Radoslaw L.; Hoffmann, Udo; Douglas, Pamela S.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Effective dose (ED) is a widely used metric for comparing ionizing radiation burden between different imaging modalities, scanners, and scan protocols. In computed tomography (CT), ED can be estimated by performing scans on an anthropomorphic phantom in which metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) solid-state dosimeters have been placed to enable organ dose measurements. Here a statistical framework is established to determine the sample size (number of scans) needed for estimating ED to a desired precision and confidence, for a particular scanner and scan protocol, subject to practical limitations. Methods: The statistical scheme involves solving equations which minimize the sample size required for estimating ED to desired precision and confidence. It is subject to a constrained variation of the estimated ED and solved using the Lagrange multiplier method. The scheme incorporates measurement variation introduced both by MOSFET calibration, and by variation in MOSFET readings between repeated CT scans. Sample size requirements are illustrated on cardiac, chest, and abdomen–pelvis CT scans performed on a 320-row scanner and chest CT performed on a 16-row scanner. Results: Sample sizes for estimating ED vary considerably between scanners and protocols. Sample size increases as the required precision or confidence is higher and also as the anticipated ED is lower. For example, for a helical chest protocol, for 95% confidence and 5% precision for the ED, 30 measurements are required on the 320-row scanner and 11 on the 16-row scanner when the anticipated ED is 4 mSv; these sample sizes are 5 and 2, respectively, when the anticipated ED is 10 mSv. Conclusions: Applying the suggested scheme, it was found that even at modest sample sizes, it is feasible to estimate ED with high precision and a high degree of confidence. As CT technology develops enabling ED to be lowered, more MOSFET measurements are needed to estimate ED with the same

  11. Application of an asymmetric flow field flow fractionation multi-detector approach for metallic engineered nanoparticle characterization--prospects and limitations demonstrated on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hagendorfer, Harald; Kaegi, Ralf; Traber, Jacqueline; Mertens, Stijn F L; Scherrers, Roger; Ludwig, Christian; Ulrich, Andrea

    2011-11-14

    In this work we discuss about the method development, applicability and limitations of an asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (A4F) system in combination with a multi-detector setup consisting of UV/vis, light scattering, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The overall aim was to obtain a size dependent-, element specific-, and quantitative method appropriate for the characterization of metallic engineered nanoparticle (ENP) dispersions. Thus, systematic investigations of crucial method parameters were performed by employing well characterized Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) as a defined model system. For good separation performance, the A4F flow-, membrane-, and carrier conditions were optimized. To obtain reliable size information, the use of laser light scattering based detectors was evaluated, where an online dynamic light scattering (DLS) detector showed good results for the investigated Au-NP up to a size of 80 nm in hydrodynamic diameter. To adapt large sensitivity differences of the various detectors, as well as to guarantee long term stability and minimum contamination of the mass spectrometer a split-flow concept for coupling ICPMS was evaluated. To test for reliable quantification, the ICPMS signal response of ionic Au standards was compared to that of Au-NP. Using proper stabilization with surfactants, no difference for concentrations of 1-50 μg Au L(-1) in the size range from 5 to 80 nm for citrate stabilized dispersions was observed. However, studies using different A4F channel membranes showed unspecific particle-membrane interaction resulting in retention time shifts and unspecific loss of nanoparticles, depending on the Au-NP system as well as membrane batch and type. Thus, reliable quantification and discrimination of ionic and particular species was performed using ICPMS in combination with ultracentrifugation instead of direct quantification with the A4F multi-detector setup. Figures of merit were obtained, by comparing the

  12. Application of an asymmetric flow field flow fractionation multi-detector approach for metallic engineered nanoparticle characterization--prospects and limitations demonstrated on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hagendorfer, Harald; Kaegi, Ralf; Traber, Jacqueline; Mertens, Stijn F L; Scherrers, Roger; Ludwig, Christian; Ulrich, Andrea

    2011-11-14

    In this work we discuss about the method development, applicability and limitations of an asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (A4F) system in combination with a multi-detector setup consisting of UV/vis, light scattering, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The overall aim was to obtain a size dependent-, element specific-, and quantitative method appropriate for the characterization of metallic engineered nanoparticle (ENP) dispersions. Thus, systematic investigations of crucial method parameters were performed by employing well characterized Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) as a defined model system. For good separation performance, the A4F flow-, membrane-, and carrier conditions were optimized. To obtain reliable size information, the use of laser light scattering based detectors was evaluated, where an online dynamic light scattering (DLS) detector showed good results for the investigated Au-NP up to a size of 80 nm in hydrodynamic diameter. To adapt large sensitivity differences of the various detectors, as well as to guarantee long term stability and minimum contamination of the mass spectrometer a split-flow concept for coupling ICPMS was evaluated. To test for reliable quantification, the ICPMS signal response of ionic Au standards was compared to that of Au-NP. Using proper stabilization with surfactants, no difference for concentrations of 1-50 μg Au L(-1) in the size range from 5 to 80 nm for citrate stabilized dispersions was observed. However, studies using different A4F channel membranes showed unspecific particle-membrane interaction resulting in retention time shifts and unspecific loss of nanoparticles, depending on the Au-NP system as well as membrane batch and type. Thus, reliable quantification and discrimination of ionic and particular species was performed using ICPMS in combination with ultracentrifugation instead of direct quantification with the A4F multi-detector setup. Figures of merit were obtained, by comparing the

  13. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Radiation Dose-Equivalent Radiography, Multidetector Computed Tomography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Fractures of Adult Cadaveric Wrists

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Reidelbach, Carolin; Krauß, Tobias; Lampert, Florian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Fiebich, Martin; Goerke, Sebastian M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic accuracy of radiography, to radiography equivalent dose multidetector computed tomography (RED-MDCT) and to radiography equivalent dose cone beam computed tomography (RED-CBCT) for wrist fractures. Methods As study subjects we obtained 10 cadaveric human hands from body donors. Distal radius, distal ulna and carpal bones (n = 100) were artificially fractured in random order in a controlled experimental setting. We performed radiation dose equivalent radiography (settings as in standard clinical care), RED-MDCT in a 320 row MDCT with single shot mode and RED-CBCT in a device dedicated to musculoskeletal imaging. Three raters independently evaluated the resulting images for fractures and the level of confidence for each finding. Gold standard was evaluated by consensus reading of a high-dose MDCT. Results Pooled sensitivity was higher in RED-MDCT with 0.89 and RED-MDCT with 0.81 compared to radiography with 0.54 (P = < .004). No significant differences were detected concerning the modalities’ specificities (with values between P = .98). Raters' confidence was higher in RED-MDCT and RED-CBCT compared to radiography (P < .001). Conclusion The diagnostic accuracy of RED-MDCT and RED-CBCT for wrist fractures proved to be similar and in some parts even higher compared to radiography. Readers are more confident in their reporting with the cross sectional modalities. Dose equivalent cross sectional computed tomography of the wrist could replace plain radiography for fracture diagnosis in the long run. PMID:27788215

  14. Development of adaptive noise reduction filter algorithm for pediatric body images in a multi-detector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimaru, Eiji; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Okita, Izumi; Ninomiya, Yuuji; Tomoshige, Yukihiro; Kurokawa, Takehiro; Ono, Yutaka; Nakamura, Yuko; Suzuki, Masayuki

    2008-03-01

    Recently, several kinds of post-processing image filters which reduce the noise of computed tomography (CT) images have been proposed. However, these image filters are mostly for adults. Because these are not very effective in small (< 20 cm) display fields of view (FOV), we cannot use them for pediatric body images (e.g., premature babies and infant children). We have developed a new noise reduction filter algorithm for pediatric body CT images. This algorithm is based on a 3D post-processing in which the output pixel values are calculated by nonlinear interpolation in z-directions on original volumetric-data-sets. This algorithm does not need the in-plane (axial plane) processing, so the spatial resolution does not change. From the phantom studies, our algorithm could reduce SD up to 40% without affecting the spatial resolution of x-y plane and z-axis, and improved the CNR up to 30%. This newly developed filter algorithm will be useful for the diagnosis and radiation dose reduction of the pediatric body CT images.

  15. Non-invasive Detection of Aortic and Coronary Atherosclerosis in Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia by 64 Slice Multi-detector Row Computed Tomography Angiography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare disorder characterized by the early onset of atherosclerosis, often at the ostia of coronary arteries. In this study we document for the first time that aortic and coronary atherosclerosis can be detected using 64 slice multiple detector-row ...

  16. Non-invasive detection of aortic and coronary atherosclerosis in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia by 64 slice multi-detector row computed tomography angiography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare disorder characterized by the early onset of atherosclerosis, often at the ostia of coronary arteries. In this study we document for the first time that aortic and coronary atherosclerosis can be detected using 64 slice multiple detector row ...

  17. The development, validation and application of a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner model for assessing organ doses to the pregnant patient and the fetus using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, J.; Bednarz, B.; Caracappa, P. F.; Xu, X. G.

    2009-05-01

    The latest multiple-detector technologies have further increased the popularity of x-ray CT as a diagnostic imaging modality. There is a continuing need to assess the potential radiation risk associated with such rapidly evolving multi-detector CT (MDCT) modalities and scanning protocols. This need can be met by the use of CT source models that are integrated with patient computational phantoms for organ dose calculations. Based on this purpose, this work developed and validated an MDCT scanner using the Monte Carlo method, and meanwhile the pregnant patient phantoms were integrated into the MDCT scanner model for assessment of the dose to the fetus as well as doses to the organs or tissues of the pregnant patient phantom. A Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, was used to simulate the x-ray source including the energy spectrum, filter and scan trajectory. Detailed CT scanner components were specified using an iterative trial-and-error procedure for a GE LightSpeed CT scanner. The scanner model was validated by comparing simulated results against measured CTDI values and dose profiles reported in the literature. The source movement along the helical trajectory was simulated using the pitch of 0.9375 and 1.375, respectively. The validated scanner model was then integrated with phantoms of a pregnant patient in three different gestational periods to calculate organ doses. It was found that the dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. The paper also discusses how these fetal dose values can be used to evaluate imaging procedures and to assess risk using recommendations of the report from AAPM Task Group 36. This work demonstrates the ability of modeling and validating an MDCT scanner by the Monte Carlo method, as well as

  18. Monte Carlo simulations in multi-detector CT (MDCT) for two PET/CT scanner models using MASH and FASH adult phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belinato, W.; Santos, W. S.; Paschoal, C. M. M.; Souza, D. N.

    2015-06-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) has been extensively used in oncology for diagnosis and staging of tumors, radiotherapy planning and follow-up of patients with cancer, as well as in cardiology and neurology. This study determines by the Monte Carlo method the internal organ dose deposition for computational phantoms created by multidetector CT (MDCT) beams of two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. The different MDCT beam parameters were largely related to the total filtration that provides a beam energetic change inside the gantry. This parameter was determined experimentally with the Accu-Gold Radcal measurement system. The experimental values of the total filtration were included in the simulations of two MCNPX code scenarios. The absorbed organ doses obtained in MASH and FASH phantoms indicate that bowtie filter geometry and the energy of the X-ray beam have significant influence on the results, although this influence can be compensated by adjusting other variables such as the tube current-time product (mAs) and pitch during PET/CT procedures.

  19. The Impact of Different Levels of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction 3D on Image Quality of 320-Row Coronary CT Angiography: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Sarah; Rief, Matthias; Zimmermann, Elke; Martus, Peter; Schuijf, Joanne Désirée; Blobel, Jörg; Richter, Felicitas; Dewey, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was the systematic image quality evaluation of coronary CT angiography (CTA), reconstructed with the 3 different levels of adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR 3D) and compared to filtered back projection (FBP) with quantum denoising software (QDS). Methods Standard-dose CTA raw data of 30 patients with mean radiation dose of 3.2 ± 2.6 mSv were reconstructed using AIDR 3D mild, standard, strong and compared to FBP/QDS. Objective image quality comparison (signal, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), contour sharpness) was performed using 21 measurement points per patient, including measurements in each coronary artery from proximal to distal. Results Objective image quality parameters improved with increasing levels of AIDR 3D. Noise was lowest in AIDR 3D strong (p≤0.001 at 20/21 measurement points; compared with FBP/QDS). Signal and contour sharpness analysis showed no significant difference between the reconstruction algorithms for most measurement points. Best coronary SNR and CNR were achieved with AIDR 3D strong. No loss of SNR or CNR in distal segments was seen with AIDR 3D as compared to FBP. Conclusions On standard-dose coronary CTA images, AIDR 3D strong showed higher objective image quality than FBP/QDS without reducing contour sharpness. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00967876 PMID:25945924

  20. Anatomy of the larynx and pharynx: effects of age, gender and height revealed by multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Inamoto, Y; Saitoh, E; Okada, S; Kagaya, H; Shibata, S; Baba, M; Onogi, K; Hashimoto, S; Katada, K; Wattanapan, P; Palmer, J B

    2015-09-01

    Although oropharyngeal and laryngeal structures are essential for swallowing, the three-dimensional (3D) anatomy is not well understood, due in part to limitations of available measuring techniques. This study uses 3D images acquired by 320-row area detector computed tomography ('320-ADCT'), to measure the pharynx and larynx and to investigate the effects of age, gender and height. Fifty-four healthy volunteers (30 male, 24 female, 23-77 years) underwent one single-phase volume scan (0.35 s) with 320-ADCT during resting tidal breathing. Six measurements of the pharynx and two of larynx were performed. Bivariate statistical methods were used to analyse the effects of gender, age and height on these measurements. Length and volume were significantly larger for men than for women for every measurement (P < 0.05) and increased with height (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis was performed to understand the interactions of gender, height and age. Gender, height and age each had significant effects on certain values. The volume of the larynx and hypopharynx was significantly affected by height and age. The length of pharynx was associated with gender and age. Length of the vocal folds and distance from the valleculae to the vocal folds were significantly affected by gender (P < 0.05). These results suggest that age, gender and height have independent and interacting effects on the morphology of the pharynx and larynx. Three-dimensional imaging and morphometrics using 320-ADCT are powerful tools for efficiently and reliably observing and measuring the pharynx and larynx.

  1. Imaging of the heart with computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Flohr, Thomas G; Ohnesorge, Bernd M

    2008-03-01

    Imaging of the heart with computed tomography (CT) was already introduced in the 1980Is and has meanwhile entered clinical routine as a consequence of the rapid evolution of CT technology during the last decade. In this review article, we give an overview on the technology and clinical performance of different CT-scanner generations used for cardiac imaging, such as Electron Beam CT (EBCT), single-slice CT und multi-detector row CT (MDCT) with 4, 16 and 64 simultaneously acquired slices. We identify the limitations of current CT-scanners, indicate potential of improvement and discuss alternative system concepts such as CT with area detectors and dual source CT (DSCT). PMID:18324372

  2. Radiological protection in computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Rehani, M M

    2015-06-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has sustained interest in radiological protection in computed tomography (CT), and ICRP Publications 87 and 102 focused on the management of patient doses in CT and multi-detector CT (MDCT) respectively. ICRP forecasted and 'sounded the alarm' on increasing patient doses in CT, and recommended actions for manufacturers and users. One of the approaches was that safety is best achieved when it is built into the machine, rather than left as a matter of choice for users. In view of upcoming challenges posed by newer systems that use cone beam geometry for CT (CBCT), and their widened usage, often by untrained users, a new ICRP task group has been working on radiological protection issues in CBCT. Some of the issues identified by the task group are: lack of standardisation of dosimetry in CBCT; the false belief within the medical and dental community that CBCT is a 'light', low-dose CT whereas mobile CBCT units and newer applications, particularly C-arm CT in interventional procedures, involve higher doses; lack of training in radiological protection among clinical users; and lack of dose information and tracking in many applications. This paper provides a summary of approaches used in CT and MDCT, and preliminary information regarding work just published for radiological protection in CBCT.

  3. Multidetector computed tomography of temporomandibular joint: A road less travelled

    PubMed Central

    Pahwa, Shivani; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Roychaudhary, Ajoy; Bhutia, Ongkila

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the imaging anatomy of temporomandibular joint (TMJ), describes the technique of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) of the TMJ, and describes in detail various osseous pathologic afflictions affecting the joint. Traumatic injuries affecting the mandibular condyle are most common, followed by joint ankylosis as a sequel to arthritis. The congenital anomalies are less frequent, hemifacial microsomia being the most commonly encountered anomaly involving the TMJ. Neoplastic afflictions of TMJ are distinctly uncommon, osteochondroma being one of the most common lesions. MDCT enables comprehensive evaluation of osseous afflictions of TMJ, and is a valuable tool for surgical planning. Sagittal, coronal and 3D reformatted images well depict osseous TMJ lesions, and their relationship to adjacent structures. PMID:25984518

  4. Novel clinical applications of dual energy computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kraśnicki, Tomasz; Podgórski, Przemysław; Guziński, Maciej; Czarnecka, Anna; Tupikowski, Krzysztof; Garcarek, Jerzy; Marek Sąsiadek, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Dual energy CT (DECT) was conceived at the very beginning of the computed tomography era. However the first DECT scanner was developed in 2006. Nowadays there are three different types of DECT available: dual-source CT with 80(100) kVp and 140 kVp tubes (Siemens Medical Solution); dual-layer multi-detector scanner with acquisition 120 or 140kVp (Philips Healthcare); CT unit with one rapid kVp switching source and new detector based on gemstone scintillator materials (GE Healthcare). This article describes the physical background and principles of DECT imaging as well as applications of this innovative method in routine clinical practice (renal stone differentiation, pulmonary perfusion, neuroradiology and metallic implant imaging). The particular applications are illustrated by cases from author's material.

  5. The role of computed tomography in terminal ballistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rutty, G N; Boyce, P; Robinson, C E; Jeffery, A J; Morgan, B

    2008-01-01

    Terminal ballistics concerns the science of projectile behaviour within a target and includes wound ballistics that considers what happens when a projectile strikes a living being. A number of soft tissue ballistic simulants have been used to assess the damage to tissue caused by projectiles. Standard assessment of these materials, such as ballistic soap or ordnance gelatine, requires the block to be opened or that a mould to be made to visualize the wound track. This is time consuming and may affect the accuracy of the findings especially if the block dries and alters shape during the process. Therefore, accurate numerical analysis of the permanent or temporary cavity is limited. Computed tomography (CT) potentially offers a quicker non-invasive analysis tool for this task. Four commercially purchased ballistic glycerine soap blocks were used. Each had a single firearm discharged into it from a distance of approximately 15 cm using both gunshot and shotgun projectiles. After discharge, each block was imaged by a modern 16 slice multi-detector CT scanner and analysed using 3-D reconstruction software. Using the anterior-posterior and lateral scout views and the multi-plane reconstructed images, it was possible to visualize the temporary cavity, as well as the fragmentation and dispersal pattern of the projectiles, the distance travelled and angle of dispersal within the block of each projectile or fragment. A virtual cast of the temporary cavity can be also be made. Multi-detector CT with 3-D analysis software is shown to create a reliable permanent record of the projectile path allowing rapid analysis of different firearms and projectiles. PMID:17205351

  6. The role of computed tomography in terminal ballistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rutty, G N; Boyce, P; Robinson, C E; Jeffery, A J; Morgan, B

    2008-01-01

    Terminal ballistics concerns the science of projectile behaviour within a target and includes wound ballistics that considers what happens when a projectile strikes a living being. A number of soft tissue ballistic simulants have been used to assess the damage to tissue caused by projectiles. Standard assessment of these materials, such as ballistic soap or ordnance gelatine, requires the block to be opened or that a mould to be made to visualize the wound track. This is time consuming and may affect the accuracy of the findings especially if the block dries and alters shape during the process. Therefore, accurate numerical analysis of the permanent or temporary cavity is limited. Computed tomography (CT) potentially offers a quicker non-invasive analysis tool for this task. Four commercially purchased ballistic glycerine soap blocks were used. Each had a single firearm discharged into it from a distance of approximately 15 cm using both gunshot and shotgun projectiles. After discharge, each block was imaged by a modern 16 slice multi-detector CT scanner and analysed using 3-D reconstruction software. Using the anterior-posterior and lateral scout views and the multi-plane reconstructed images, it was possible to visualize the temporary cavity, as well as the fragmentation and dispersal pattern of the projectiles, the distance travelled and angle of dispersal within the block of each projectile or fragment. A virtual cast of the temporary cavity can be also be made. Multi-detector CT with 3-D analysis software is shown to create a reliable permanent record of the projectile path allowing rapid analysis of different firearms and projectiles.

  7. Computed tomographic angiography in evaluation of superficial temporal to middle cerebral artery bypass.

    PubMed

    Besachio, David A; Ziegler, Jordan I; Duncan, Timothy D; Wanebo, John S

    2010-01-01

    Catheter-directed digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is considered the standard for evaluation of superficial temporal to middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) bypass patency. Few clinical investigations have been performed that evaluate the efficacy of computed tomographic angiography (CTA) in the assessment of extracranial-intracranial bypass. Using multi-detector row CTA, STA-MCA bypass patency was assessed in the initial postoperative period and several months afterward and compared with DSA. No significant difference was identified in the evaluation of graft patency between DSA and CTA. Although multiple modalities exist to evaluate STA-MCA bypass graft patency, the multidetector CTA is widely available and allows for rapid, accurate patency assessment. PMID:20498550

  8. Multi-Detector Analysis System for Spent Nuclear Fuel Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Reber, Edward Lawrence; Aryaeinejad, Rahmat; Cole, Jerald Donald; Drigert, Mark William; Jewell, James Keith; Egger, Ann Elizabeth; Cordes, Gail Adele

    1999-09-01

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Non-Destructive Analysis (NDA) program at INEEL is developing a system to characterize SNF for fissile mass, radiation source term, and fissile isotopic content. The system is based on the integration of the Fission Assay Tomography System (FATS) and the Gamma-Neutron Analysis Technique (GNAT) developed under programs supported by the DOE Office of Non-proliferation and National Security. Both FATS and GNAT were developed as separate systems to provide information on the location of special nuclear material in weapons configuration (FATS role), and to measure isotopic ratios of fissile material to determine if the material was from a weapon (GNAT role). FATS is capable of not only determining the presence and location of fissile material but also the quantity of fissile material present to within 50%. GNAT determines the ratios of the fissile and fissionable material by coincidence methods that allow the two prompt (immediately) produced fission fragments to be identified. Therefore, from the combination of FATS and GNAT, MDAS is able to measure the fissile material, radiation source term, and fissile isotopics content.

  9. Diagnosis of High Bifurcation of the Abdominal Aorta with Associated Vascular Variations: Case Report with Multidedector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Atalar, Mehmet Haydar; Salk, Ismail; Bozbiyik, Nisa; Cetin, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Variations of the branches and bifurcation of the abdominal aorta and their relations with other abdominal structures and organs are important concerning abdominal and spinal surgery. Case Report In this report, authors present a high -positioned bifurcation of the abdominal aorta at the level of the L3 vertebral body and its associations with multiple variations of other abdominal arteries during contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) examination of the abdomen. Conclusions We reported on a unique clinically and surgically significant case of variations of the abdominal aorta as related to the location and type of bifurcation. The awareness of the variations of the abdominal aorta is of great importance for surgeons in order to reduce complications during abdominal and spinal interventions, as well as for radiologists for precise interpretation of angiograms. PMID:26688701

  10. Computers and Computer Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitter, Gary

    1980-01-01

    This resource directory provides brief evaluative descriptions of six popular home computers and lists selected sources of educational software, computer books, and magazines. For a related article on microcomputers in the schools, see p53-58 of this journal issue. (SJL)

  11. Angio computed tomography preoperative evaluation for anterolateral thigh flap harvesting.

    PubMed

    Ribuffo, Diego; Atzeni, Matteo; Saba, Luca; Milia, Arianna; Guerra, Maristella; Mallarini, Giorgio

    2009-04-01

    The vascular anatomy of the anterolateral thigh flap (ALTF) has many possible variations, and none of the currently used mapping techniques (eg, Echo Color Doppler) gives a thorough knowledge of all details. Among the last generation of angiographic diagnostic techniques, multi detector computed tomography, popularly known as Angio CT, has emerged as an outstanding noninvasive operator independent option, and has been described for deep inferior epigastric perforator and pedicled transverse rectus abdominis muscle planning. This study was conducted to evaluate its usefulness prior to ALTF harvesting.Nine consecutive patients were considered for oral or lower extremity reconstruction with the ALTF. After written informed consent was obtained from all patients, a preoperative Angio-CT study was performed for surgical planning. Accurate identification of septocutaneous or musculocutaneous perforator vessels was achieved and their location, course, and anatomic variations were reported and influenced surgery. Angio CT allows a complete vascular study of the donor area of the ALTF and evaluation of the best perforator vessels before surgery allows surgeons to get an ideal planning of the flap. This imaging method is currently proposed to every patient undergoing ALT flap reconstruction. PMID:19325338

  12. [Contribution of X-ray computed tomography in the evaluation of kidney performance].

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Sandrine; Rognant, Nicolas; Collet-Benzaquen, Diane; Juillard, Laurent

    2012-07-01

    X-ray computer assisted tomography scanner is an imaging method based on the use of X-ray attenuation in tissue. This attenuation is proportional to the density of the tissue (without or after contrast media injection) in each pixel image of the image. Spiral scanner, the electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) scanner and multidetector computed tomography scanner allow renal anatomical measurements, such as cortical and medullary volume, but also the measurement of renal functional parameters, such as regional renal perfusion, renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. These functional parameters are extracted from the modeling of the kinetics of the contrast media concentration in the vascular space and the renal tissue, using two main mathematical models (the gamma variate model and the Patlak model). Renal functional imaging allows measuring quantitative parameters on each kidney separately, in a non-invasive manner, providing significant opportunities in nephrology, both for experimental and clinical studies. However, this method uses contrast media that may alter renal function, thus limiting its use in patients with chronic renal failure. Moreover, the increase irradiation delivered to the patient with multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) should be considered. PMID:22019734

  13. Computers and Computer Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papert, Seymour

    1981-01-01

    Instruction using computers is viewed as different from most other approaches to education, by allowing more than right or wrong answers, by providing models for systematic procedures, by shifting the boundary between formal and concrete processes, and by influencing the development of thinking in many new ways. (MP)

  14. Quantification of global left ventricular function: comparison of multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. a meta-analysis and review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    van der Vleuten, P A; Willems, T P; Götte, M J W; Tio, R A; Greuter, M J W; Zijlstra, F; Oudkerk, M

    2006-12-01

    Cardiac morbidity and mortality are closely related to cardiac volumes and global left ventricular (LV) function, expressed as left ventricular ejection fraction. Accurate assessment of these parameters is required for the prediction of prognosis in individual patients as well as in entire cohorts. The current standard of reference for left ventricular function is analysis by short-axis magnetic resonance imaging. In recent years, major extensive technological improvements have been achieved in computed tomography. The most marked development has been the introduction of the multidetector CT (MDCT), which has significantly improved temporal and spatial resolutions. In order to assess the current status of MDCT for analysis of LV function, the current available literature on this subject was reviewed. The data presented in this review indicate that the global left ventricular functional parameters measured by contemporary multi-detector row systems combined with adequate reconstruction algorithms and post-processing tools show a narrow diagnostic window and are interchangeable with those obtained by MRI.

  15. Computer Music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Perry R.

    This chapter covers algorithms, technologies, computer languages, and systems for computer music. Computer music involves the application of computers and other digital/electronic technologies to music composition, performance, theory, history, and the study of perception. The field combines digital signal processing, computational algorithms, computer languages, hardware and software systems, acoustics, psychoacoustics (low-level perception of sounds from the raw acoustic signal), and music cognition (higher-level perception of musical style, form, emotion, etc.).

  16. Computer Music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Perry

    This chapter covers algorithms, technologies, computer languages, and systems for computer music. Computer music involves the application of computers and other digital/electronic technologies to music composition, performance, theory, history, and perception. The field combines digital signal processing, computational algorithms, computer languages, hardware and software systems, acoustics, psychoacoustics (low-level perception of sounds from the raw acoustic signal), and music cognition (higher-level perception of musical style, form, emotion, etc.). Although most people would think that analog synthesizers and electronic music substantially predate the use of computers in music, many experiments and complete computer music systems were being constructed and used as early as the 1950s.

  17. Cooling Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birken, Marvin N.

    1967-01-01

    Numerous decisions must be made in the design of computer air conditioning, each determined by a combination of economics, physical, and esthetic characteristics, and computer requirements. Several computer air conditioning systems are analyzed--(1) underfloor supply and overhead return, (2) underfloor plenum and overhead supply with computer unit…

  18. Pygmalion's Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peelle, Howard A.

    Computers have undoubtedly entered the educational arena, mainly in the areas of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) and artificial intelligence, but whether educators should embrace computers and exactly how they should use them are matters of great debate. The use of computers in support of educational administration is widely accepted.…

  19. Computational dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, B.R.L.; Thomas, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a definition of the term ``Computational Dosimetry`` that is interpreted as the sub-discipline of computational physics which is devoted to radiation metrology. It is shown that computational dosimetry is more than a mere collection of computational methods. Computational simulations directed at basic understanding and modelling are important tools provided by computational dosimetry, while another very important application is the support that it can give to the design, optimization and analysis of experiments. However, the primary task of computational dosimetry is to reduce the variance in the determination of absorbed dose (and its related quantities), for example in the disciplines of radiological protection and radiation therapy. In this paper emphasis is given to the discussion of potential pitfalls in the applications of computational dosimetry and recommendations are given for their avoidance. The need for comparison of calculated and experimental data whenever possible is strongly stressed.

  20. Computer Recreations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewdney, A. K.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the performance of computer programs for writing poetry and prose, including MARK V. SHANEY, MELL, POETRY GENERATOR, THUNDER THOUGHT, and ORPHEUS. Discusses the writing principles of the programs. Provides additional information on computer magnification techniques. (YP)

  1. Computational Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational toxicology’ is a broad term that encompasses all manner of computer-facilitated informatics, data-mining, and modeling endeavors in relation to toxicology, including exposure modeling, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling, dose-response modeling, ...

  2. Female Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Melba Roy heads the group of NASA mathematicians, known as 'computers,' who track the Echo satellites. Roy's computations help produce the orbital element timetables by which millions can view the satellite from Earth as it passes overhead.

  3. Cloud Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Pete Beckman and Ian Foster

    2009-12-04

    Chicago Matters: Beyond Burnham (WTTW). Chicago has become a world center of "cloud computing." Argonne experts Pete Beckman and Ian Foster explain what "cloud computing" is and how you probably already use it on a daily basis.

  4. Quantum computing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Shen; Long, Gui-Lu; Bai, Feng-Shan; Feng, Song-Lin; Zheng, Hou-Zhi

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computing is a quickly growing research field. This article introduces the basic concepts of quantum computing, recent developments in quantum searching, and decoherence in a possible quantum dot realization. PMID:11562459

  5. Computer Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavelle, Richard; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes the nature and use of computer algebra and its applications to various physical sciences. Includes diagrams illustrating, among others, a computer algebra system and flow chart of operation of the Euclidean algorithm. (SK)

  6. Computer Ease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drenning, Susan; Getz, Lou

    1992-01-01

    Computer Ease is an intergenerational program designed to put an Ohio elementary school's computer lab, software library, staff, and students at the disposal of older adults desiring to become computer literate. Three 90-minute instructional sessions allow seniors to experience 1-to-1 high-tech instruction by enthusiastic, nonthreatening…

  7. Parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Treveaven, P.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to object-oriented, functional, and logic parallel computing on which the fifth generation of computer systems will be based. Coverage includes concepts for parallel computing languages, a parallel object-oriented system (DOOM) and its language (POOL), an object-oriented multilevel VLSI simulator using POOL, and implementation of lazy functional languages on parallel architectures.

  8. Computer Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    This manual designed to provide the teacher with methods of understanding the computer and its potential in the classroom includes four units with exercises and an answer sheet. Unit 1 covers computer fundamentals, the mini computer, programming languages, an introduction to BASIC, and control instructions. Variable names and constants described…

  9. Computer Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Marcos Unified School District, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: After viewing many computer-literacy programs, we believe San Marcos Junior High School has developed a unique program which will truly develop computer literacy. Our hope is to give all students a comprehensive look at computers as they go through their two years here. They will not only learn the…

  10. Computer software.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, L E

    1986-10-01

    Software is the component in a computer system that permits the hardware to perform the various functions that a computer system is capable of doing. The history of software and its development can be traced to the early nineteenth century. All computer systems are designed to utilize the "stored program concept" as first developed by Charles Babbage in the 1850s. The concept was lost until the mid-1940s, when modern computers made their appearance. Today, because of the complex and myriad tasks that a computer system can perform, there has been a differentiation of types of software. There is software designed to perform specific business applications. There is software that controls the overall operation of a computer system. And there is software that is designed to carry out specialized tasks. Regardless of types, software is the most critical component of any computer system. Without it, all one has is a collection of circuits, transistors, and silicone chips.

  11. Computer sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Paul H.

    1988-01-01

    The Computer Science Program provides advanced concepts, techniques, system architectures, algorithms, and software for both space and aeronautics information sciences and computer systems. The overall goal is to provide the technical foundation within NASA for the advancement of computing technology in aerospace applications. The research program is improving the state of knowledge of fundamental aerospace computing principles and advancing computing technology in space applications such as software engineering and information extraction from data collected by scientific instruments in space. The program includes the development of special algorithms and techniques to exploit the computing power provided by high performance parallel processors and special purpose architectures. Research is being conducted in the fundamentals of data base logic and improvement techniques for producing reliable computing systems.

  12. Computer Literacy: Teaching Computer Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troutner, Joanne

    1986-01-01

    Suggests learning activities for teaching computer ethics in three areas: (1) equal access; (2) computer crime; and (3) privacy. Topics include computer time, advertising, class enrollments, copyright law, sabotage ("worms"), the Privacy Act of 1974 and the Freedom of Information Act of 1966. (JM)

  13. Computational psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Montague, P Read; Dolan, Raymond J; Friston, Karl J; Dayan, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Computational ideas pervade many areas of science and have an integrative explanatory role in neuroscience and cognitive science. However, computational depictions of cognitive function have had surprisingly little impact on the way we assess mental illness because diseases of the mind have not been systematically conceptualized in computational terms. Here, we outline goals and nascent efforts in the new field of computational psychiatry, which seeks to characterize mental dysfunction in terms of aberrant computations over multiple scales. We highlight early efforts in this area that employ reinforcement learning and game theoretic frameworks to elucidate decision-making in health and disease. Looking forwards, we emphasize a need for theory development and large-scale computational phenotyping in human subjects.

  14. Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Isabel; Geleijns, Jacob

    After its clinical introduction in 1973, computed tomography developed from an x-ray modality for axial imaging in neuroradiology into a versatile three dimensional imaging modality for a wide range of applications in for example oncology, vascular radiology, cardiology, traumatology and even in interventional radiology. Computed tomography is applied for diagnosis, follow-up studies and screening of healthy subpopulations with specific risk factors. This chapter provides a general introduction in computed tomography, covering a short history of computed tomography, technology, image quality, dosimetry, room shielding, quality control and quality criteria.

  15. Computer Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Alan

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature and development of computer software. Programing, programing languages, types of software (including dynamic spreadsheets), and software of the future are among the topics considered. (JN)

  16. Computer News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities: Classroom Projects and Curriculum Ideas, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents several news stories about computers and technology. (1) Applied Science Associates of Narragansett, Rhode Island is providing computer modeling technology to help locate the remains to the USS Bonhomme Richard, which sank in 1779 after claiming a Revolutionary War victory. (2) Whyville, the leading edu-tainment virtual world…

  17. Cafeteria Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dervarics, Charles

    1992-01-01

    By relying on new computer hardware and software, school food service departments can keep better records of daily food consumption, free and reduced-price meals, inventory, production, and other essentials. The most commonly used systems fall into two basic categories: point-of-sale computers and behind-the-counter systems. State funding efforts…

  18. Computer Recreations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewdney, A. K.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are three examples of computer graphics including biomorphs, Truchet tilings, and fractal popcorn. The graphics are shown and the basic algorithm using multiple iteration of a particular function or mathematical operation is described. An illustration of a snail shell created by computer graphics is presented. (YP)

  19. Computer Insecurity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David L.

    1994-01-01

    College administrators recently appealed to students and faculty to change their computer passwords after security experts announced that tens of thousands had been stolen by computer hackers. Federal officials are investigating. Such attacks are not uncommon, but the most effective solutions are either inconvenient or cumbersome. (MSE)

  20. Computer Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Jeanne W.

    1970-01-01

    Computer graphics have been called the most exciting development in computer technology. At the University of Michigan, three kinds of graphics output equipment are now being used: symbolic printers, line plotters or drafting devices, and cathode-ray tubes (CRT). Six examples are given that demonstrate the range of graphics use at the University.…

  1. Computing Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Computer advances now let researchers quickly search through DNA sequences to find gene variations that could lead to disease, simulate how flu might spread through one's school, and design three-dimensional animations of molecules that rival any video game. By teaming computers and biology, scientists can answer new and old questions that could…

  2. Grid Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Ian

    2001-08-01

    The term "Grid Computing" refers to the use, for computational purposes, of emerging distributed Grid infrastructures: that is, network and middleware services designed to provide on-demand and high-performance access to all important computational resources within an organization or community. Grid computing promises to enable both evolutionary and revolutionary changes in the practice of computational science and engineering based on new application modalities such as high-speed distributed analysis of large datasets, collaborative engineering and visualization, desktop access to computation via "science portals," rapid parameter studies and Monte Carlo simulations that use all available resources within an organization, and online analysis of data from scientific instruments. In this article, I examine the status of Grid computing circa 2000, briefly reviewing some relevant history, outlining major current Grid research and development activities, and pointing out likely directions for future work. I also present a number of case studies, selected to illustrate the potential of Grid computing in various areas of science.

  3. Computational astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Richard H.

    1987-01-01

    Astronomy is an area of applied physics in which unusually beautiful objects challenge the imagination to explain observed phenomena in terms of known laws of physics. It is a field that has stimulated the development of physical laws and of mathematical and computational methods. Current computational applications are discussed in terms of stellar and galactic evolution, galactic dynamics, and particle motions.

  4. Computational Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Louis, David N.; Feldman, Michael; Carter, Alexis B.; Dighe, Anand S.; Pfeifer, John D.; Bry, Lynn; Almeida, Jonas S.; Saltz, Joel; Braun, Jonathan; Tomaszewski, John E.; Gilbertson, John R.; Sinard, John H.; Gerber, Georg K.; Galli, Stephen J.; Golden, Jeffrey A.; Becich, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Context We define the scope and needs within the new discipline of computational pathology, a discipline critical to the future of both the practice of pathology and, more broadly, medical practice in general. Objective To define the scope and needs of computational pathology. Data Sources A meeting was convened in Boston, Massachusetts, in July 2014 prior to the annual Association of Pathology Chairs meeting, and it was attended by a variety of pathologists, including individuals highly invested in pathology informatics as well as chairs of pathology departments. Conclusions The meeting made recommendations to promote computational pathology, including clearly defining the field and articulating its value propositions; asserting that the value propositions for health care systems must include means to incorporate robust computational approaches to implement data-driven methods that aid in guiding individual and population health care; leveraging computational pathology as a center for data interpretation in modern health care systems; stating that realizing the value proposition will require working with institutional administrations, other departments, and pathology colleagues; declaring that a robust pipeline should be fostered that trains and develops future computational pathologists, for those with both pathology and non-pathology backgrounds; and deciding that computational pathology should serve as a hub for data-related research in health care systems. The dissemination of these recommendations to pathology and bioinformatics departments should help facilitate the development of computational pathology. PMID:26098131

  5. I, Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barack, Lauren

    2005-01-01

    What child hasn't chatted with friends through a computer? But chatting with a computer? Some Danish scientists have literally put a face on their latest software program, bringing to virtual life storyteller Hans Christian Andersen, who engages users in actual conversations. The digitized Andersen resides at the Hans Christian Andersen Museum in…

  6. Scanning protocol optimization and dose evaluation in coronary stenosis using multi-slices computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yung-hui; Chen, Chia-lin; Sheu, Chin-yin; Lee, Jason J. S.

    2007-02-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common incidence for premature death in developed countries. A major fraction is attributable to atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, which may result in sudden cardiac failure. A reduction of mortality caused by myocardial infarction may be achieved if coronary atherosclerosis can be detected and treated at an early stage before symptoms occur. Therefore, there is need for an effective tool that allows identification of patients at increased risk for future cardiac events. The current multi-detector CT has been widely used for detection and quantification of coronary calcifications as a sign of coronary atherosclerosis. The aim of this study is to optimize the diagnostic values and radiation exposure in coronary artery calcium-screening examination using multi-slice CT (MSCT) with different image scan protocols. The radiation exposure for all protocols is evaluated by using computed tomography dose index (CTDI) phantom measurements. We chose an optimal scanning protocol and evaluated patient radiation dose in the MSCT coronary artery screenings and preserved its expecting diagnostic accuracy. These changes make the MSCT have more operation flexibility and provide more diagnostic values in current practice.

  7. Assessing vertebral fracture risk on volumetric quantitative computed tomography by geometric characterization of trabecular bone structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checefsky, Walter A.; Abidin, Anas Z.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Bauer, Jan S.; Baum, Thomas; Wismüller, Axel

    2016-03-01

    The current clinical standard for measuring Bone Mineral Density (BMD) is dual X-ray absorptiometry, however more recently BMD derived from volumetric quantitative computed tomography has been shown to demonstrate a high association with spinal fracture susceptibility. In this study, we propose a method of fracture risk assessment using structural properties of trabecular bone in spinal vertebrae. Experimental data was acquired via axial multi-detector CT (MDCT) from 12 spinal vertebrae specimens using a whole-body 256-row CT scanner with a dedicated calibration phantom. Common image processing methods were used to annotate the trabecular compartment in the vertebral slices creating a circular region of interest (ROI) that excluded cortical bone for each slice. The pixels inside the ROI were converted to values indicative of BMD. High dimensional geometrical features were derived using the scaling index method (SIM) at different radii and scaling factors (SF). The mean BMD values within the ROI were then extracted and used in conjunction with a support vector machine to predict the failure load of the specimens. Prediction performance was measured using the root-mean-square error (RMSE) metric and determined that SIM combined with mean BMD features (RMSE = 0.82 +/- 0.37) outperformed MDCT-measured mean BMD (RMSE = 1.11 +/- 0.33) (p < 10-4). These results demonstrate that biomechanical strength prediction in vertebrae can be significantly improved through the use of SIM-derived texture features from trabecular bone.

  8. Does preoperative computed tomography reduce the risks associated with re-do cardiac surgery?

    PubMed

    Khan, Nouman U; Yonan, Nizar

    2009-07-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to the structured protocol. The question addressed was whether preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan reduces the risk associated with re-do cardiac surgery. A Medline search revealed 412 papers, of which seven were deemed relevant to the topic. We conclude that preoperative CT angiography using ECG-gated multi-detector scan enables excellent anatomical details of heart, aorta and previous grafts, and highlights high-risk cases due to adherent grafts or ventricle or aortic atherosclerosis. This allows for better risk stratification and change of surgical strategy to reduce the potential risk in patients coming for re-do cardiac surgery. According to published reports, high-risk CT-scan findings in these patients caused clinicians to cancel surgery in up to 13% of cases, while preventive surgical strategies including non-midline approach, peripheral vascular exposure or establishing cardiopulmonary bypass prior to re-sternotomy have been reported in over two-thirds of patients with significant reduction in the operative risk. The risk of damage to vital structures, including previous grafts, heart or larger vessels is generally reported fewer than 10%, with evidence of significantly lower incidence of intra-operative injuries in patients who had prior CT-scans compared to those who did not. Hence, adequate preoperative imaging using ECG-gated multi-slice CT is essential for optimum planning of re-do cardiac surgery. PMID:19339275

  9. Personal Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toong, Hoo-min D.; Gupta, Amar

    1982-01-01

    Describes the hardware, software, applications, and current proliferation of personal computers (microcomputers). Includes discussions of microprocessors, memory, output (including printers), application programs, the microcomputer industry, and major microcomputer manufacturers (Apple, Radio Shack, Commodore, and IBM). (JN)

  10. Sort computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorband, John E.

    1988-01-01

    Sorting has long been used to organize data in preparation for further computation, but sort computation allows some types of computation to be performed during the sort. Sort aggregation and sort distribution are the two basic forms of sort computation. Sort aggregation generates an accumulative or aggregate result for each group of records and places this result in one of the records. An aggregate operation can be any operation that is both associative and commutative, i.e., any operation whose result does not depend on the order of the operands or the order in which the operations are performed. Sort distribution copies the value from a field of a specific record in a group into that field in every record of that group.

  11. LHC Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-07-28

    The LHC is the world’s highest energy particle accelerator and scientists use it to record an unprecedented amount of data. This data is recorded in electronic format and it requires an enormous computational infrastructure to convert the raw data into conclusions about the fundamental rules that govern matter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln gives us a sense of just how much data is involved and the incredible computer resources that makes it all possible.

  12. Advanced computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Advanced concepts in hardware, software and algorithms are being pursued for application in next generation space computers and for ground based analysis of space data. The research program focuses on massively parallel computation and neural networks, as well as optical processing and optical networking which are discussed under photonics. Also included are theoretical programs in neural and nonlinear science, and device development for magnetic and ferroelectric memories.

  13. Computational chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  14. Chromatin Computation

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In living cells, DNA is packaged along with protein and RNA into chromatin. Chemical modifications to nucleotides and histone proteins are added, removed and recognized by multi-functional molecular complexes. Here I define a new computational model, in which chromatin modifications are information units that can be written onto a one-dimensional string of nucleosomes, analogous to the symbols written onto cells of a Turing machine tape, and chromatin-modifying complexes are modeled as read-write rules that operate on a finite set of adjacent nucleosomes. I illustrate the use of this “chromatin computer” to solve an instance of the Hamiltonian path problem. I prove that chromatin computers are computationally universal – and therefore more powerful than the logic circuits often used to model transcription factor control of gene expression. Features of biological chromatin provide a rich instruction set for efficient computation of nontrivial algorithms in biological time scales. Modeling chromatin as a computer shifts how we think about chromatin function, suggests new approaches to medical intervention, and lays the groundwork for the engineering of a new class of biological computing machines. PMID:22567109

  15. From macro-scale to micro-scale computational anatomy: a perspective on the next 20 years.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kensaku

    2016-10-01

    This paper gives our perspective on the next two decades of computational anatomy, which has made great strides in the recognition and understanding of human anatomy from conventional clinical images. The results from this field are now used in a variety of medical applications, including quantitative analysis of organ shapes, interventional assistance, surgical navigation, and population analysis. Several anatomical models have also been used in computational anatomy, and these mainly target millimeter-scale shapes. For example, liver-shape models are almost completely modeled at the millimeter scale, and shape variations are described at such scales. Most clinical 3D scanning devices have had just under 1 or 0.5 mm per voxel resolution for over 25 years, and this resolution has not changed drastically in that time. Although Z-axis (head-to-tail direction) resolution has been drastically improved by the introduction of multi-detector CT scanning devices, in-plane resolutions have not changed very much either. When we look at human anatomy, we can see different anatomical structures at different scales. For example, pulmonary blood vessels and lung lobes can be observed in millimeter-scale images. If we take 10-µm-scale images of a lung specimen, the alveoli and bronchiole regions can be located in them. Most work in millimeter-scale computational anatomy has been done by the medical-image analysis community. In the next two decades, we encourage our community to focus on micro-scale computational anatomy. In this perspective paper, we briefly review the achievements of computational anatomy and its impacts on clinical applications; furthermore, we show several possibilities from the viewpoint of microscopic computational anatomy by discussing experimental results from our recent research activities.

  16. Computational structures for robotic computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. S. G.; Chang, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    The computational problem of inverse kinematics and inverse dynamics of robot manipulators by taking advantage of parallelism and pipelining architectures is discussed. For the computation of inverse kinematic position solution, a maximum pipelined CORDIC architecture has been designed based on a functional decomposition of the closed-form joint equations. For the inverse dynamics computation, an efficient p-fold parallel algorithm to overcome the recurrence problem of the Newton-Euler equations of motion to achieve the time lower bound of O(log sub 2 n) has also been developed.

  17. [DNA computing].

    PubMed

    Błasiak, Janusz; Krasiński, Tadeusz; Popławski, Tomasz; Sakowski, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Biocomputers can be an alternative for traditional "silicon-based" computers, which continuous development may be limited due to further miniaturization (imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle) and increasing the amount of information between the central processing unit and the main memory (von Neuman bottleneck). The idea of DNA computing came true for the first time in 1994, when Adleman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using short DNA oligomers and DNA ligase. In the early 2000s a series of biocomputer models was presented with a seminal work of Shapiro and his colleguas who presented molecular 2 state finite automaton, in which the restriction enzyme, FokI, constituted hardware and short DNA oligomers were software as well as input/output signals. DNA molecules provided also energy for this machine. DNA computing can be exploited in many applications, from study on the gene expression pattern to diagnosis and therapy of cancer. The idea of DNA computing is still in progress in research both in vitro and in vivo and at least promising results of these research allow to have a hope for a breakthrough in the computer science. PMID:21735816

  18. Computational mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Goudreau, G.L.

    1993-03-01

    The Computational Mechanics thrust area sponsors research into the underlying solid, structural and fluid mechanics and heat transfer necessary for the development of state-of-the-art general purpose computational software. The scale of computational capability spans office workstations, departmental computer servers, and Cray-class supercomputers. The DYNA, NIKE, and TOPAZ codes have achieved world fame through our broad collaborators program, in addition to their strong support of on-going Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) programs. Several technology transfer initiatives have been based on these established codes, teaming LLNL analysts and researchers with counterparts in industry, extending code capability to specific industrial interests of casting, metalforming, and automobile crash dynamics. The next-generation solid/structural mechanics code, ParaDyn, is targeted toward massively parallel computers, which will extend performance from gigaflop to teraflop power. Our work for FY-92 is described in the following eight articles: (1) Solution Strategies: New Approaches for Strongly Nonlinear Quasistatic Problems Using DYNA3D; (2) Enhanced Enforcement of Mechanical Contact: The Method of Augmented Lagrangians; (3) ParaDyn: New Generation Solid/Structural Mechanics Codes for Massively Parallel Processors; (4) Composite Damage Modeling; (5) HYDRA: A Parallel/Vector Flow Solver for Three-Dimensional, Transient, Incompressible Viscous How; (6) Development and Testing of the TRIM3D Radiation Heat Transfer Code; (7) A Methodology for Calculating the Seismic Response of Critical Structures; and (8) Reinforced Concrete Damage Modeling.

  19. Computational Method for Identifying and Quantifying Shape Features of Human Left Ventricular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ardekani, Siamak; Weiss, Robert G.; Lardo, Albert C.; George, Richard T.; Lima, Joao A. C.; Wu, Katherine C.; Miller, Michael I.; Winslow, Raimond L.; Younes, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Left ventricular remodeling during the development of heart failure is a strong predictor of cardiovascular mortality. However, methods to objectively quantify remodeling-associated shape changes are not routinely available but may be possible with new computational anatomy tools. In this study, we analyzed and compared multi-detector computed tomographic (MDCT) images of ventricular shape at endsystole (ES) and end-diastole (ED) to determine whether regional structural characteristics could be identified and, as a proof of principle, whether differences in hearts of patients with anterior myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) could be distinguished from those with global nonischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM). MDCT images of hearts from 11 patients (5 with ICM) with ejection fractions (EF) > 35% were analyzed. An average ventricular shape model (template) was constructed for each cardiac phase by bringing heart shapes into correspondence using linear and nonlinear image matching algorithms. Next, transformation fields were computed between the template image and individual heart images in the population. Principal component analysis (PCA) method was used to quantify ventricular shape differences described by the transformation vector fields. Statistical analysis of PCA coefficients revealed significant ventricular shape differences at ED (p = 0.03) and ES (p = 0.03). For validation, a second set of 14 EF-matched patients (8 with ICM) were evaluated. The discrimination rule learned from the training data set was able to differentiate ICM from NICM patients (p = 0.008). Application of a novel shape analysis method to in vivo human cardiac images acquired on a clinical scanner is feasible and can quantify regional shape differences at end-systole in remodeled myopathic human myocardium. This approach may be useful in identifying differences in the remodeling process between ICM and NICM populations and possibly in differentiating the populations

  20. Computational Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Jing; Krystal, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia arise from abnormalities in brain systems that underlie cognitive, emotional and social functions. The brain is enormously complex and its abundant feedback loops on multiple scales preclude intuitive explication of circuit functions. In close interplay with experiments, theory and computational modeling are essential for understanding how, precisely, neural circuits generate flexible behaviors and their impairments give rise to psychiatric symptoms. This Perspective highlights recent progress in applying computational neuroscience to the study of mental disorders. We outline basic approaches, including identification of core deficits that cut across disease categories, biologically-realistic modeling bridging cellular and synaptic mechanisms with behavior, model-aided diagnosis. The need for new research strategies in psychiatry is urgent. Computational psychiatry potentially provides powerful tools for elucidating pathophysiology that may inform both diagnosis and treatment. To achieve this promise will require investment in cross-disciplinary training and research in this nascent field. PMID:25442941

  1. Computational mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Raboin, P J

    1998-01-01

    The Computational Mechanics thrust area is a vital and growing facet of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This work supports the development of computational analysis tools in the areas of structural mechanics and heat transfer. Over 75 analysts depend on thrust area-supported software running on a variety of computing platforms to meet the demands of LLNL programs. Interactions with the Department of Defense (DOD) High Performance Computing and Modernization Program and the Defense Special Weapons Agency are of special importance as they support our ParaDyn project in its development of new parallel capabilities for DYNA3D. Working with DOD customers has been invaluable to driving this technology in directions mutually beneficial to the Department of Energy. Other projects associated with the Computational Mechanics thrust area include work with the Partnership for a New Generation Vehicle (PNGV) for ''Springback Predictability'' and with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for the ''Development of Methodologies for Evaluating Containment and Mitigation of Uncontained Engine Debris.'' In this report for FY-97, there are five articles detailing three code development activities and two projects that synthesized new code capabilities with new analytic research in damage/failure and biomechanics. The article this year are: (1) Energy- and Momentum-Conserving Rigid-Body Contact for NIKE3D and DYNA3D; (2) Computational Modeling of Prosthetics: A New Approach to Implant Design; (3) Characterization of Laser-Induced Mechanical Failure Damage of Optical Components; (4) Parallel Algorithm Research for Solid Mechanics Applications Using Finite Element Analysis; and (5) An Accurate One-Step Elasto-Plasticity Algorithm for Shell Elements in DYNA3D.

  2. Computer viruses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    The worm, Trojan horse, bacterium, and virus are destructive programs that attack information stored in a computer's memory. Virus programs, which propagate by incorporating copies of themselves into other programs, are a growing menace in the late-1980s world of unprotected, networked workstations and personal computers. Limited immunity is offered by memory protection hardware, digitally authenticated object programs,and antibody programs that kill specific viruses. Additional immunity can be gained from the practice of digital hygiene, primarily the refusal to use software from untrusted sources. Full immunity requires attention in a social dimension, the accountability of programmers.

  3. LHC Computing

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The LHC is the world’s highest energy particle accelerator and scientists use it to record an unprecedented amount of data. This data is recorded in electronic format and it requires an enormous computational infrastructure to convert the raw data into conclusions about the fundamental rules that govern matter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln gives us a sense of just how much data is involved and the incredible computer resources that makes it all possible.

  4. Computational vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrow, H. G.; Tenenbaum, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The range of fundamental computational principles underlying human vision that equally apply to artificial and natural systems is surveyed. There emerges from research a view of the structuring of vision systems as a sequence of levels of representation, with the initial levels being primarily iconic (edges, regions, gradients) and the highest symbolic (surfaces, objects, scenes). Intermediate levels are constrained by information made available by preceding levels and information required by subsequent levels. In particular, it appears that physical and three-dimensional surface characteristics provide a critical transition from iconic to symbolic representations. A plausible vision system design incorporating these principles is outlined, and its key computational processes are elaborated.

  5. Computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Lola

    1992-01-01

    In addition to the discussions, Ocean Climate Data Workshop hosts gave participants an opportunity to hear about, see, and test for themselves some of the latest computer tools now available for those studying climate change and the oceans. Six speakers described computer systems and their functions. The introductory talks were followed by demonstrations to small groups of participants and some opportunities for participants to get hands-on experience. After this familiarization period, attendees were invited to return during the course of the Workshop and have one-on-one discussions and further hands-on experience with these systems. Brief summaries or abstracts of introductory presentations are addressed.

  6. Computer Routing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Roger

    1991-01-01

    Computerized bus-routing systems plot the most efficient routes, cut the time it takes to draw routes, and generate reports quickly and accurately. However, school districts often underestimate the amount of work necessary to get information into the computer database. (MLF)

  7. Computer Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Margie

    1985-01-01

    This article: describes how to prevent pins on game paddles from breaking; suggests using needlepoint books for ideas to design computer graphics; lists a BASIC program to create a Christmas tree, with extension activities; suggests a LOGO Christmas activity; and describes a book on the development of microcomputers. (JN)

  8. Business Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canipe, Stephen L.

    A brief definition of some fundamentals of microcomputers and of the ways they may be used in small businesses can help potential buyers make informed purchases. Hardware (the mechanical devices from which computers are made) described here are the video display, keyboard, central processing unit, "random access" and "read only" memories, cassette…

  9. Computational trigonometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, K.

    1994-12-31

    By means of the author`s earlier theory of antieigenvalues and antieigenvectors, a new computational approach to iterative methods is presented. This enables an explicit trigonometric understanding of iterative convergence and provides new insights into the sharpness of error bounds. Direct applications to Gradient descent, Conjugate gradient, GCR(k), Orthomin, CGN, GMRES, CGS, and other matrix iterative schemes will be given.

  10. Computational Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borcherds, P. H.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an optional course in "computational physics" offered at the University of Birmingham. Includes an introduction to numerical methods and presents exercises involving fast-Fourier transforms, non-linear least-squares, Monte Carlo methods, and the three-body problem. Recommends adding laboratory work into the course in the future. (TW)

  11. Computer Recreations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewdney, A. K.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the creation of the computer program "BOUNCE," designed to simulate a weighted piston coming into equilibrium with a cloud of bouncing balls. The model follows the ideal gas law. Utilizes the critical event technique to create the model. Discusses another program, "BOOM," which simulates a chain reaction. (CW)

  12. Networking computers.

    PubMed

    McBride, D C

    1997-03-01

    This decade the role of the personal computer has shifted dramatically from a desktop device designed to increase individual productivity and efficiency to an instrument of communication linking people and machines in different places with one another. A computer in one city can communicate with another that may be thousands of miles away. Networking is how this is accomplished. Just like the voice network used by the telephone, computer networks transmit data and other information via modems over these same telephone lines. A network can be created over both short and long distances. Networks can be established within a hospital or medical building or over many hospitals or buildings covering many geographic areas. Those confined to one location are called LANs, local area networks. Those that link computers in one building to those at other locations are known as WANs, or wide area networks. The ultimate wide area network is the one we've all been hearing so much about these days--the Internet, and its World Wide Web. Setting up a network is a process that requires careful planning and commitment. To avoid potential pitfalls and to make certain the network you establish meets your needs today and several years down the road, several steps need to be followed. This article reviews the initial steps involved in getting ready to network.

  13. Computational Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fung, Maria G.; Latulippe, Christine L.

    2010-01-01

    Elementary school teachers are responsible for constructing the foundation of number sense in youngsters, and so it is recommended that teacher-training programs include an emphasis on number sense to ensure the development of dynamic, productive computation and estimation skills in students. To better prepare preservice elementary school teachers…

  14. Computational Musicology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bel, Bernard; Vecchione, Bernard

    1993-01-01

    Asserts that a revolution has been occurring in musicology since the 1970s. Contends that music has change from being only a source of emotion to appearing more open to science and techniques based on computer technology. Describes recent research and other writings about the topic and provides an extensive bibliography. (CFR)

  15. Amorphous Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, Gerald

    2002-03-01

    Digital computers have always been constructed to behave as precise arrangements of reliable parts, and our techniques for organizing computations depend upon this precision and reliability. Two emerging technologies, however, are begnning to undercut these assumptions about constructing and programming computers. These technologies -- microfabrication and bioengineering -- will make it possible to assemble systems composed of myriad information- processing units at almost no cost, provided: 1) that not all the units need to work correctly; and 2) that there is no need to manufacture precise geometrical arrangements or interconnection patterns among them. Microelectronic mechanical components are becoming so inexpensive to manufacture that we can anticipate combining logic circuits, microsensors, actuators, and communications devices integrated on the same chip to produce particles that could be mixed with bulk materials, such as paints, gels, and concrete. Imagine coating bridges or buildings with smart paint that can sense and report on traffic and wind loads and monitor structural integrity of the bridge. A smart paint coating on a wall could sense vibrations, monitor the premises for intruders, or cancel noise. Even more striking, there has been such astounding progress in understanding the biochemical mechanisms in individual cells, that it appears we'll be able to harness these mechanisms to construct digital- logic circuits. Imagine a discipline of cellular engineering that could tailor-make biological cells that function as sensors and actuators, as programmable delivery vehicles for pharmaceuticals, as chemical factories for the assembly of nanoscale structures. Fabricating such systems seem to be within our reach, even if it is not yet within our grasp Fabrication, however, is only part of the story. We can envision producing vast quantities of individual computing elements, whether microfabricated particles, engineered cells, or macromolecular computing

  16. Bacteria as computers making computers

    PubMed Central

    Danchin, Antoine

    2009-01-01

    Various efforts to integrate biological knowledge into networks of interactions have produced a lively microbial systems biology. Putting molecular biology and computer sciences in perspective, we review another trend in systems biology, in which recursivity and information replace the usual concepts of differential equations, feedback and feedforward loops and the like. Noting that the processes of gene expression separate the genome from the cell machinery, we analyse the role of the separation between machine and program in computers. However, computers do not make computers. For cells to make cells requires a specific organization of the genetic program, which we investigate using available knowledge. Microbial genomes are organized into a paleome (the name emphasizes the role of the corresponding functions from the time of the origin of life), comprising a constructor and a replicator, and a cenome (emphasizing community-relevant genes), made up of genes that permit life in a particular context. The cell duplication process supposes rejuvenation of the machine and replication of the program. The paleome also possesses genes that enable information to accumulate in a ratchet-like process down the generations. The systems biology must include the dynamics of information creation in its future developments. PMID:19016882

  17. RATIO COMPUTER

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1958-11-11

    An electronic computer circuit is described for producing an output voltage proportional to the product or quotient of tbe voltages of a pair of input signals. ln essence, the disclosed invention provides a computer having two channels adapted to receive separate input signals and each having amplifiers with like fixed amplification factors and like negatlve feedback amplifiers. One of the channels receives a constant signal for comparison purposes, whereby a difference signal is produced to control the amplification factors of the variable feedback amplifiers. The output of the other channel is thereby proportional to the product or quotient of input signals depending upon the relation of input to fixed signals in the first mentioned channel.

  18. Computational Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Mizobuchi, Y; Poinsot, T J; Smith, P J; Warnatz, J

    2004-08-26

    Progress in the field of computational combustion over the past 50 years is reviewed. Particular attention is given to those classes of models that are common to most system modeling efforts, including fluid dynamics, chemical kinetics, liquid sprays, and turbulent flame models. The developments in combustion modeling are placed into the time-dependent context of the accompanying exponential growth in computer capabilities and Moore's Law. Superimposed on this steady growth, the occasional sudden advances in modeling capabilities are identified and their impacts are discussed. Integration of submodels into system models for spark ignition, diesel and homogeneous charge, compression ignition engines, surface and catalytic combustion, pulse combustion, and detonations are described. Finally, the current state of combustion modeling is illustrated by descriptions of a very large jet lifted 3D turbulent hydrogen flame with direct numerical simulation and 3D large eddy simulations of practical gas burner combustion devices.

  19. Computer Game

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Using NASA studies of advanced lunar exploration and colonization, KDT Industries, Inc. and Wesson International have developed MOONBASE, a computer game. The player, or team commander, must build and operate a lunar base using NASA technology. He has 10 years to explore the surface, select a site and assemble structures brought from Earth into an efficient base. The game was introduced in 1991 by Texas Space Grant Consortium.

  20. Computer centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The National Science Foundation has renewed grants to four of its five supercomputer centers. Average annual funding will rise from $10 million to $14 million so facilities can be upgraded and training and education expanded. As cooperative projects, the centers also receive money from states, universities, computer vendors and industry. The centers support research in fluid dynamics, atmospheric modeling, engineering geophysics and many other scientific disciplines.

  1. Singularity computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swedlow, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    An approach is described for singularity computations based on a numerical method for elastoplastic flow to delineate radial and angular distribution of field quantities and measure the intensity of the singularity. The method is applicable to problems in solid mechanics and lends itself to certain types of heat flow and fluid motion studies. Its use is not limited to linear, elastic, small strain, or two-dimensional situations.

  2. A radioanatomic study of the internal mammary artery and its perforators using multidetector computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Tan, Onder; Yuce, Ihsan; Aydin, Osman Enver; Kantarci, Mecit

    2014-05-01

    The Internal Mammary Artery (IMA) and its perforators play an important role in coronary bypass grafting and reconstructive breast, head, and neck surgery. This study aimed to obtain anatomic data pertaining to these vessels using Multi Detector Computed Tomography Angiography (MDCTA) and to demonstrate that the MDCTA could be a considerable assessment tool prior to surgery. In 50 outpatients (27 males and 23 females), the above-mentioned arteries were bilaterally evaluated with a 16-detector spiral computed tomography scanner. Based on the obtained images, diameters of the bilateral IMAs were separately measured in each intercostal spaces from 1 to 5 through their traces. IMAPs greater than 0.5 mm in diameter were bilaterally evaluated in terms of distance from the sternal border to the ramification point under the muscular layer, maximal external diameter at ramification from the IMA, and the length between the ramification point from the IMA and enter point to the subcutaneous fat tissue. Mean diameters of the left and right IMAs were 2.05 ± 0.50 mm and 2.20 ± 0.57 mm, respectively. Mean diameters, distances, and lengths of the perforators were 1.30 ± 0.30 mm, 6.80 ± 3.40 mm, 17.05 ± 6.07 mm on the left side and 1.32 ± 0.25 mm, 6.71 ± 3.43 mm, 17.35 ± 3.48 mm on the right side, respectively. No statistically difference was found between the sides (P > 0.05). About 20 of 36 perforators appeared in the second intercostal space, whereas there were eight in the first and eight in the third intercostal space. MDCTA, as a non-invasive vascular imaging method, can be a valuable tool for investigating the anatomic characteristics of the IMA and its perforators before planning an operation. PMID:24105707

  3. New computer architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberghien, J.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on supercomputers. Topics considered include decentralized computer architecture, new programming languages, data flow computers, reduction computers, parallel prefix calculations, structural and behavioral descriptions of digital systems, instruction sets, software generation, personal computing, and computer architecture education.

  4. Computer vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gennery, D.; Cunningham, R.; Saund, E.; High, J.; Ruoff, C.

    1981-01-01

    The field of computer vision is surveyed and assessed, key research issues are identified, and possibilities for a future vision system are discussed. The problems of descriptions of two and three dimensional worlds are discussed. The representation of such features as texture, edges, curves, and corners are detailed. Recognition methods are described in which cross correlation coefficients are maximized or numerical values for a set of features are measured. Object tracking is discussed in terms of the robust matching algorithms that must be devised. Stereo vision, camera control and calibration, and the hardware and systems architecture are discussed.

  5. Computational crystallization.

    PubMed

    Altan, Irem; Charbonneau, Patrick; Snell, Edward H

    2016-07-15

    Crystallization is a key step in macromolecular structure determination by crystallography. While a robust theoretical treatment of the process is available, due to the complexity of the system, the experimental process is still largely one of trial and error. In this article, efforts in the field are discussed together with a theoretical underpinning using a solubility phase diagram. Prior knowledge has been used to develop tools that computationally predict the crystallization outcome and define mutational approaches that enhance the likelihood of crystallization. For the most part these tools are based on binary outcomes (crystal or no crystal), and the full information contained in an assembly of crystallization screening experiments is lost. The potential of this additional information is illustrated by examples where new biological knowledge can be obtained and where a target can be sub-categorized to predict which class of reagents provides the crystallization driving force. Computational analysis of crystallization requires complete and correctly formatted data. While massive crystallization screening efforts are under way, the data available from many of these studies are sparse. The potential for this data and the steps needed to realize this potential are discussed.

  6. Computational Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Astsatryan, H. V.

    2015-07-01

    Present astronomical archives that contain billions of objects, both Galactic and extragalactic, and the vast amount of data on them allow new studies and discoveries. Astrophysical Virtual Observatories (VO) use available databases and current observing material as a collection of interoperating data archives and software tools to form a research environment in which complex research programs can be conducted. Most of the modern databases give at present VO access to the stored information, which makes possible also a fast analysis and managing of these data. Cross-correlations result in revealing new objects and new samples. Very often dozens of thousands of sources hide a few very interesting ones that are needed to be discovered by comparison of various physical characteristics. VO is a prototype of Grid technologies that allows distributed data computation, analysis and imaging. Particularly important are data reduction and analysis systems: spectral analysis, SED building and fitting, modelling, variability studies, cross correlations, etc. Computational astrophysics has become an indissoluble part of astronomy and most of modern research is being done by means of it.

  7. Computational introspection

    SciTech Connect

    Batali, J.

    1983-02-01

    Introspection is the process of thinking about one's own thoughts and feelings. In this paper, the author discusses recent attempts to make computational systems that exhibit introspective behavior. Each presents a system capable of manipulating representations of its own program and current context. He argues that introspective ability is crucial for intelligent systems--without it an agent cannot represent certain problems that it must be able to solve. A theory of intelligent action would describe how and why certain actions intelligently achieve an agent's goals. The agent would both embody and represent this theory: it would be implemented as the program for the agent; and the importance of introspection suggests that the agent represent its theory of action to itself.

  8. Computer vision

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    This paper discusses material from areas such as artificial intelligence, psychology, computer graphics, and image processing. The intent is to assemble a selection of this material in a form that will serve both as a senior/graduate-level academic text and as a useful reference to those building vision systems. This book has a strong artificial intelligence flavour, emphasising the belief that both the intrinsic image information and the internal model of the world are important in successful vision systems. The book is organised into four parts, based on descriptions of objects at four different levels of abstraction. These are: generalised images-images and image-like entities; segmented images-images organised into subimages that are likely to correspond to interesting objects; geometric structures-quantitative models of image and world structures; relational structures-complex symbolic descriptions of image and world structures. The book contains author and subject indexes.

  9. Characterizing trabecular bone structure for assessing vertebral fracture risk on volumetric quantitative computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Checefsky, Walter A.; Abidin, Anas Z.; Tsai, Halley; Wang, Xixi; Hobbs, Susan K.; Bauer, Jan S.; Baum, Thomas; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-03-01

    While the proximal femur is preferred for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) in fracture risk estimation, the introduction of volumetric quantitative computed tomography has revealed stronger associations between BMD and spinal fracture status. In this study, we propose to capture properties of trabecular bone structure in spinal vertebrae with advanced second-order statistical features for purposes of fracture risk assessment. For this purpose, axial multi-detector CT (MDCT) images were acquired from 28 spinal vertebrae specimens using a whole-body 256-row CT scanner with a dedicated calibration phantom. A semi-automated method was used to annotate the trabecular compartment in the central vertebral slice with a circular region of interest (ROI) to exclude cortical bone; pixels within were converted to values indicative of BMD. Six second-order statistical features derived from gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) and the mean BMD within the ROI were then extracted and used in conjunction with a generalized radial basis functions (GRBF) neural network to predict the failure load of the specimens; true failure load was measured through biomechanical testing. Prediction performance was evaluated with a root-mean-square error (RMSE) metric. The best prediction performance was observed with GLCM feature `correlation' (RMSE = 1.02 ± 0.18), which significantly outperformed all other GLCM features (p < 0.01). GLCM feature correlation also significantly outperformed MDCTmeasured mean BMD (RMSE = 1.11 ± 0.17) (p< 10-4). These results suggest that biomechanical strength prediction in spinal vertebrae can be significantly improved through characterization of trabecular bone structure with GLCM-derived texture features.

  10. Prediction of Intimal Tear Site by Computed Tomography in Acute Aortic Dissection Type A

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Sung; Lim, Cheong; Kim, Dong Jin; Jung, Yochun; Shin, Yoon Cheol; Choi, Sang Il; Chun, Eun Ju; Yoo, Jin Young

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Preoperative identification of intimal tear site in acute type A dissection will help procedural planning. The objective of this study was to determine the key findings of computed tomography (CT)-based prediction for tear site and compare the accuracy between radiologists and surgeons. Subjects and Methods Multi-detector CT (MDCT) images from 50 patients who underwent surgical repair of type A aortic dissection were retrospectively reviewed by 4 cardiac surgeons with limited experience or by 3 radiologists specialized in cardiovascular imaging. Surgical findings of intimal tear site were used as references. Results In surgical findings, the locations of intimal tear that were identified in 43 patients included aorta (n=25), ascending with arch (n=7), and arch only (n=11). The rest were retrograde dissections from the tear of descending aorta. Key CT findings that were most frequently found were defect in the intimal flap shadow (30.0±4.0 patients/reviewer, accuracy 87.0±11.7%) and differential filling of false lumen by phase and location (9.4±2.9 patients/reviewer, 84.8±10.4%). Surgeons predicted tear site (75.0±7.7% vs. 86.7±1.2%, p=0.055) and specified flap defect (80.5±10.3% vs. 95.7±7.4%, p=0.073) with lower accuracy than radiologists. Conclusions With MDCT imaging, well-educated surgeons could be accurate in three fourths of cases. There was room for improvement through experience. Considering the substantial possibility of inaccuracy, critical decisions on CT images should be made through thorough reviewing by as many experienced radiologists and surgeons as possible. PMID:26798385

  11. Ultrasonography in the diagnosis of nasal bone fractures: a comparison with conventional radiography and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Sook; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Woo, Chang-Ki; Kim, Hak Jin; Sol, Yu Li; Song, Jong Woon; Cho, Kyu-Sup

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the diagnostic efficacy of ultrasonography (US) with radiography and multi-detector computed tomography (CT) for the detection of nasal bone fractures. Forty-one patients with a nasal bone fracture who underwent prospective US examinations were included. Plain radiographs and CT images were obtained on the day of trauma. For US examinations, radiologist used a linear array transducer (L17-5 MHz) in 24 patients and hockey-stick probe (L15-7 MHz) in 17. The bony component of the nose was divided into three parts (right and left lateral nasal walls, and midline of nasal bone). Fracture detection by three modalities was subjected to analysis. Furthermore, findings made by each modality were compared with intraoperative findings. Nasal bone fractures were located in the right lateral wall (n = 28), midline of nasal bone (n = 31), or left lateral wall (n = 31). For right and left lateral nasal walls, CT had greater sensitivity and specificity than US or radiography, and better agreed with intraoperative findings. However, for midline fractures of nasal bone, US had higher specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value than CT. Although two US evaluations showed good agreements at all three sites, US findings obtained by the hockey-stick probe showed closer agreement with intraoperative findings for both lateral nasal wall and midline of nasal bone. Although CT showed higher sensitivity and specificity than US or radiography, US found to be helpful for evaluating the midline of nasal bone. Furthermore, for US examinations of the nasal bone, a smaller probe and higher frequency may be required.

  12. Computed tomography, endoscopic, laparoscopic, and intra-operative sonography for assessing resectability of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Long, Eliza E; Van Dam, Jacques; Weinstein, Stefanie; Jeffrey, Brooke; Desser, Terry; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2005-08-01

    Pancreas cancer is the fourth leading cancer killer in adults. Cure of pancreas cancer is dependent on the complete surgical removal of localized tumor. A complete surgical resection is dependent on accurate preoperative and intra-operative imaging of tumor and its relationship to vital structures. Imaging of pancreatic tumors preoperatively and intra-operatively is achieved by pancreatic protocol computed tomography (CT), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), laparoscopic ultrasound (LUS), and intra-operative ultrasound (IOUS). Multi-detector CT with three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of images is the most useful preoperative modality to assess resectability. It has a sensitivity and specificity of 90 and 99%, respectively. It is not observer dependent. The images predict operative findings. EUS and LUS have sensitivities of 77 and 78%, respectively. They both have a very high specificity. Further, EUS has the ability to biopsy tumor and obtain a definitive tissue diagnosis. IOUS is a very sensitive (93%) method to assess tumor resectability during surgery. It adds little time and no morbidity to the operation. It greatly facilitates the intra-operative decision-making. In reality, each of these methods adds some information to help in determining the extent of tumor and the surgeon's ability to remove it. We rely on pancreatic protocol CT with 3-D reconstruction and either EUS or IOUS depending on the tumor location and operability of the tumor and patient. With these modern imaging modalities, it is now possible to avoid major operations that only determine an inoperable tumor. With proper preoperative selection, surgery is able to remove tumor in the majority of patients.

  13. Advanced Computing for Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rennels, Glenn D.; Shortliffe, Edward H.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses contributions that computers and computer networks are making to the field of medicine. Emphasizes the computer's speed in storing and retrieving data. Suggests that doctors may soon be able to use computers to advise on diagnosis and treatment. (TW)

  14. Computer security in DOE distributed computing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hunteman, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    The modernization of DOE facilities amid limited funding is creating pressure on DOE facilities to find innovative approaches to their daily activities. Distributed computing systems are becoming cost-effective solutions to improved productivity. This paper defines and describes typical distributed computing systems in the DOE. The special computer security problems present in distributed computing systems are identified and compared with traditional computer systems. The existing DOE computer security policy supports only basic networks and traditional computer systems and does not address distributed computing systems. A review of the existing policy requirements is followed by an analysis of the policy as it applies to distributed computing systems. Suggested changes in the DOE computer security policy are identified and discussed. The long lead time in updating DOE policy will require guidelines for applying the existing policy to distributed systems. Some possible interim approaches are identified and discussed. 2 refs.

  15. Computers and occupational therapy.

    PubMed

    English, C B

    1975-01-01

    The benefits and applications of computer science for occupational therapy are explored and a basic, functional description of the computer and computer programming is presented. Potential problems and advantages of computer utilization are compared and examples of existing computer systems in health fields are cited. Methods for successfully introducing computers are discussed.

  16. Changes in entrance surface dose in relation to the location of shielding material in chest computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Y. M.; Cho, J. H.; Kim, S. C.

    2015-07-01

    This study examined the effects of entrance surface dose (ESD) on the abdomen and pelvis of the patient when undergoing chest computed tomography (CT) procedure, and evaluated the effects of ESD reduction depending on the location of radiation shield. For CT scanner, the 64-slice multi-detector computed tomography was used. The alderson radiation therapy phantom and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD), which enabled measurement from low to high dose, were also used. For measurement of radiation dose, the slice number from 9 to 21 of the phantom was set as the test range, which included apex up to both costophrenic angles. A total of 10 OSLD nanoDots were attached for measurement of the front and rear ESD. Cyclic tests were performed using the low-dose chest CT and high-resolution CT (HRCT) protocol on the following set-ups: without shielding; shielding only on the front side; shielding only on the rear side; and shielding for both front and rear sides. According to the test results, ESD for both front and rear sides was higher in HRCT than low-dose CT when radiation shielding was not used. It was also determined that, compared to the set-up that did not use the radiation shield, locating the radiation shield on the front side was effective in reducing front ESD, while locating the radiation shield on the rear side reduced rear ESD level. Shielding both the front and rear sides resulted in ESD reduction. In conclusion, it was confirmed that shielding the front and rear sides was the most effective method to reduce the ESD effect caused by scatter ray during radiography.

  17. Real-time operating system for a multi-laser/multi-detector system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, G.

    1980-01-01

    The laser-one hazard detector system, used on the Rensselaer Mars rover, is reviewed briefly with respect to the hardware subsystems, the operation, and the results obtained. A multidetector scanning system was designed to improve on the original system. Interactive support software was designed and programmed to implement real time control of the rover or platform with the elevation scanning mast. The formats of both the raw data and the post-run data files were selected. In addition, the interface requirements were selected and some initial hardware-software testing was completed.

  18. Characterizing a spheroidal nanocage drug delivery vesicle using multi-detector hydrodynamic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Amandaa K; Striegel, André M

    2011-02-01

    The biological application of nanoparticles has resulted in an increased need for the development of robust, accurate, and precise methods for quality control analysis and characterization. Parameters such as particle size, particle shape, and their distributions affect end-use properties such as chemical reactivity, diffusivity, permeability, and transport. Introduced here is a hydrodynamic chromatography (HDC) method utilizing multi-angle static light scattering, quasi-elastic light scattering, differential viscometry, and differential refractometry detection for characterizing nanoscale vesicles. Quadruple-detector HDC was used to determine multiple sizing parameters and their statistical moments and distributions. Molar mass and molar mass averages were determined in a calibrant-independent fashion. Both the sizing parameters and the molar mass were measured across the HDC elution profile. The shape and structure of the nanoparticle were monitored as a function of HDC elution volume through the dimensionless ratio ρ≡R(G,z)/R(H,z). The HDC results were comparable to those obtained by transmission electron microscopy, but more extensive characterization was possible by HDC, which provided distributions of both particle size and particle shape.

  19. The assumptions of computing

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, J.K.

    1994-12-31

    The use of computers, like any technological activity, is not content-neutral. Users of computers constantly interact with assumptions regarding worthwhile activity which are embedded in any computing system. Directly questioning these assumptions in the context of computing allows us to develop an understanding of responsible computing.

  20. Computers in Teaching English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, James E., Ed.; Davis, Hazel K., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The 26 articles in this journal issue discuss the use of the computer in the English classroom. Among the topics and applications discussed are (1) computer assisted invention, (2) word processing, (3) overcoming computer anxiety, (4) using computers in technical writing classes, (5) grading student essays by computer, (6) the experiences of an…

  1. The Old Computers' Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angier, Natalie

    1983-01-01

    The Computer Museum in Marlborough, Massachusetts houses old and not-so-old calculators, famous old computers and parts of computers, photographs and assorted memorabilia, computer-generated murals, and even a computer made of Tinkertoys that plays tick-tack-toe. The development of the museum and selected exhibits is described. (Author/JN)

  2. Democratizing Computer Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Jane; Goode, Joanna; Ryoo, Jean J.

    2015-01-01

    Computer science programs are too often identified with a narrow stratum of the student population, often white or Asian boys who have access to computers at home. But because computers play such a huge role in our world today, all students can benefit from the study of computer science and the opportunity to build skills related to computing. The…

  3. Computers for Everybody.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Jerry; Miller, Merl

    This book explains how computers can be used in the home, office or school, and provides a consumer's guide to computer equipment for the novice user. The first sections of the book offer a brief sketch of computer history, a listing of entertaining and easily available computer programs, a step-by-step guide to buying a computer, and advice on…

  4. GeoComputation 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Yong; Hoffman, Forrest M; Liu, Dingsheng

    2009-01-01

    The tremendous computing requirements of today's algorithms and the high costs of high-performance supercomputers drive us to share computing resources. The emerging computational Grid technologies are expected to make feasible the creation of a computational environment handling many PetaBytes of distributed data, tens of thousands of heterogeneous computing resources, and thousands of simultaneous users from multiple research institutions.

  5. Tying into Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canipe, Stephen L.

    Topics in this paper include: sources of computer programs, public domain software, copyright violations, purposes of computers in classrooms (drill/practice and interactive learning), computer assisted instruction, flow charts, and computer clubs (such as App-le-kations in Charlotte, North Carolina). A complete listing of two computer programs…

  6. Computational thinking and thinking about computing.

    PubMed

    Wing, Jeannette M

    2008-10-28

    Computational thinking will influence everyone in every field of endeavour. This vision poses a new educational challenge for our society, especially for our children. In thinking about computing, we need to be attuned to the three drivers of our field: science, technology and society. Accelerating technological advances and monumental societal demands force us to revisit the most basic scientific questions of computing.

  7. Computational thinking and thinking about computing

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Jeannette M.

    2008-01-01

    Computational thinking will influence everyone in every field of endeavour. This vision poses a new educational challenge for our society, especially for our children. In thinking about computing, we need to be attuned to the three drivers of our field: science, technology and society. Accelerating technological advances and monumental societal demands force us to revisit the most basic scientific questions of computing. PMID:18672462

  8. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN DOSE MODELING: APPLICATION OF COMPUTATIONAL BIOPHYSICAL TRANSPORT, COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational toxicology (CompTox) leverages the significant gains in computing power and computational techniques (e.g., numerical approaches, structure-activity relationships, bioinformatics) realized over the last few years, thereby reducing costs and increasing efficiency i...

  9. PR Educators Stress Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    Surveys the varied roles computers play in public relations education. Asserts that, because computers are used extensively in the public relations field, students should become acquainted with the varied capabilities of computers and their role in public relations practice. (MM)

  10. On Teaching Computer Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Er, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Points out difficulties associated with teaching introductory computer programing courses, discussing the importance of computer programing and explains activities associated with its use. Possible solutions to help teachers resolve problem areas in computer instruction are also offered. (ML)

  11. Computers: Instruments of Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkume, Megan

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the impact of computers in the home, the school, and the workplace. Looks at changes in computer use by occupations and by industry. Provides information on new job titles in computer occupations. (JOW)

  12. Selecting Appropriate Computing Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetlow, William L.

    1990-01-01

    Selecting computer tools requires analyzing information requirements and audiences, assessing existing institutional research and computing capacities, creating or improving a planning database, using computer experts, determining software needs, obtaining sufficient resources for independent operations, acquiring quality, and insisting on…

  13. Avoiding Computer Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Joyce; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The threat of computer sabotage is a real concern to business teachers and others responsible for academic computer facilities. Teachers can minimize the possibility. Eight suggestions for avoiding computer viruses are given. (JOW)

  14. Computer Viruses: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmion, Dan

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the early history and current proliferation of computer viruses that occur on Macintosh and DOS personal computers, mentions virus detection programs, and offers suggestions for how libraries can protect themselves and their users from damage by computer viruses. (LRW)

  15. Computing technology in the 1980's. [computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. S.

    1978-01-01

    Advances in computing technology have been led by consistently improving semiconductor technology. The semiconductor industry has turned out ever faster, smaller, and less expensive devices since transistorized computers were first introduced 20 years ago. For the next decade, there appear to be new advances possible, with the rate of introduction of improved devices at least equal to the historic trends. The implication of these projections is that computers will enter new markets and will truly be pervasive in business, home, and factory as their cost diminishes and their computational power expands to new levels. The computer industry as we know it today will be greatly altered in the next decade, primarily because the raw computer system will give way to computer-based turn-key information and control systems.

  16. Symbolic and algebraic computation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book contains subjects under the following headings: Foundations of symbolic computation; Computational logics; systems Algorithms on polynormal; Integrative and differential equations; and Differential equations.

  17. Computer Lab Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodarz, Nan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the layout and elements of an effective school computer lab. Includes configuration, storage spaces, cabling and electrical requirements, lighting, furniture, and computer hardware and peripherals. (PKP)

  18. Computer hardware fault administration

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-09-14

    Computer hardware fault administration carried out in a parallel computer, where the parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes. The compute nodes are coupled for data communications by at least two independent data communications networks, where each data communications network includes data communications links connected to the compute nodes. Typical embodiments carry out hardware fault administration by identifying a location of a defective link in the first data communications network of the parallel computer and routing communications data around the defective link through the second data communications network of the parallel computer.

  19. Computational aerodynamics and supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the progress in computational aerodynamics over the last decade is reviewed. The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program objectives, computational goals, and implementation plans are described.

  20. Computational physics with PetaFlops computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attig, Norbert

    2009-04-01

    Driven by technology, Scientific Computing is rapidly entering the PetaFlops era. The Jülich Supercomputing Centre (JSC), one of three German national supercomputing centres, is focusing on the IBM Blue Gene architecture to provide computer resources of this class to its users, the majority of whom are computational physicists. Details of the system will be discussed and applications will be described which significantly benefit from this new architecture.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) activities at the Langley Research Center is given. The role of supercomputers in CFD research, algorithm development, multigrid approaches to computational fluid flows, aerodynamics computer programs, computational grid generation, turbulence research, and studies of rarefied gas flows are among the topics that are briefly surveyed.

  2. Computer-Based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Peggy, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Three essays on the ways in which colleges and universities use the computer as a teaching tool are presented, along with descriptions of 10 school programs that reflect the diversity of computer applications across the United States. In "A Place for Computing in Liberal Education," Karl L. Zinn likens the computer to personal resource tools, such…

  3. Computers and Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Sheila; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Includes "Role of Computers in Reshaping the Work Force" (McConnell); "Semiconductors" (Moris); "Computer Manufacturing" (Warnke); "Commercial Banking Transformed by Computer Technology" (Morisi); "Software, Engineering Industries: Threatened by Technological Change?" (Goodman); "Job Creation and the Emerging Home Computer Market" (Freeman); and…

  4. Computer Viruses. Technology Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponder, Tim, Comp.; Ropog, Marty, Comp.; Keating, Joseph, Comp.

    This document provides general information on computer viruses, how to help protect a computer network from them, measures to take if a computer becomes infected. Highlights include the origins of computer viruses; virus contraction; a description of some common virus types (File Virus, Boot Sector/Partition Table Viruses, Trojan Horses, and…

  5. My Computer Romance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Gardner

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author relates the big role of computers in his life as a writer. The author narrates that he has been using a computer for nearly twenty years now. He relates that computers has set his writing free. When he started writing, he was just using an electric typewriter. He also relates that his romance with computers is also a…

  6. Overview 1993: Computational applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benek, John A.

    1993-01-01

    Computational applications include projects that apply or develop computationally intensive computer programs. Such programs typically require supercomputers to obtain solutions in a timely fashion. This report describes two CSTAR projects involving Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technology. The first, the Parallel Processing Initiative, is a joint development effort and the second, the Chimera Technology Development, is a transfer of government developed technology to American industry.

  7. Computer Innovations in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Andrew R.

    Computers in education are put in context by a brief review of current social and technological trends, a short history of the development of computers and the vast expansion of their use, and a brief description of computers and their use. Further chapters describe instructional applications, administrative uses, uses of computers for libraries…

  8. Elementary School Computer Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY.

    This curriculum guide presents lessons for computer literacy instruction in the elementary grades. The first section of the guide includes 22 lessons on hardware, covering such topics as how computers work, keyboarding, word processing, and computer peripherals. The 13 lessons in the second section cover social topics related to the computer,…

  9. The Computer Manpower Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooney, Joseph J.

    1975-01-01

    Advances and employment outlook in the field of computer science are discussed as well as the problems related to improving the quality of computer education. Specific computer jobs discussed include: data processing machine repairers, systems analysts, programmers, computer and peripheral equipment operators, and keypunch operators. (EA)

  10. The Glass Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paesler, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Digital computers use different kinds of memory, each of which is either volatile or nonvolatile. On most computers only the hard drive memory is nonvolatile, i.e., it retains all information stored on it when the power is off. When a computer is turned on, an operating system stored on the hard drive is loaded into the computer's memory cache and…

  11. How Computer Graphics Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prosise, Jeff

    This document presents the principles behind modern computer graphics without straying into the arcane languages of mathematics and computer science. Illustrations accompany the clear, step-by-step explanations that describe how computers draw pictures. The 22 chapters of the book are organized into 5 sections. "Part 1: Computer Graphics in…

  12. Computers and Conceptual Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, John

    A systematic study was conducted with a group of 10- to 12-year-olds using computer assisted instruction in a unit on fire which included a computer simulation of combustion. Three research questions were addressed to learn more about how the computer experience challenged the students' preconceptions: what the students thought the computer knew,…

  13. French Computer Terminology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Eugene F.

    1985-01-01

    Characteristics, idiosyncrasies, borrowings, and other aspects of the French terminology for computers and computer-related matters are discussed and placed in the context of French computer use. A glossary provides French equivalent terms or translations of English computer terminology. (MSE)

  14. The Story of Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meadow, Charles T.

    The aim of this book is to interest young people from the ages of ten to fourteen in computers, particularly to show them that computers are exciting machines, controlled by people, and to dispel myths that computers can do magic. This is not a detailed exposition of computers, nor is it a textbook. It is an attempt to impart flavor and general…

  15. Multidetector computed tomography angiography for assessment of in-stent restenosis: meta-analysis of diagnostic performance

    PubMed Central

    Vanhoenacker, Piet K; Decramer, Isabel; Bladt, Olivier; Sarno, Giovanna; Van Hul, Erik; Wijns, William; Dwamena, Ben A

    2008-01-01

    Background Multi-detector computed tomography angiography (MDCTA)of the coronary arteries after stenting has been evaluated in multiple studies. The purpose of this study was to perform a structured review and meta-analysis of the diagnostic performance of MDCTA for the detection of in-stent restenosis in the coronary arteries. Methods A Pubmed and manual search of the literature on in-stent restenosis (ISR) detected on MDCTA compared with conventional coronary angiography (CA) was performed. Bivariate summary receiver operating curve (SROC) analysis, with calculation of summary estimates was done on a stent and patient basis. In addition, the influence of study characteristics on diagnostic performance and number of non-assessable segments (NAP) was investigated with logistic meta-regression. Results Fourteen studies were included. On a stent basis, Pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.82(0.72–0.89) and 0.91 (0.83–0.96). Pooled negative likelihood ratio and positive likelihood ratio were 0.20 (0.13–0.32) and 9.34 (4.68–18.62) respectively. The exclusion of non-assessable stents and the strut thickness of the stents had an influence on the diagnostic performance. The proportion of non-assessable stents was influenced by the number of detectors, stent diameter, strut thickness and the use of an edge-enhancing kernel. Conclusion The sensitivity of MDTCA for the detection of in-stent stenosis is insufficient to use this test to select patients for further invasive testing as with this strategy around 20% of the patients with in-stent stenosis would be missed. Further improvement of scanner technology is needed before it can be recommended as a triage instrument in practice. In addition, the number of non-assessable stents is also high. PMID:18671850

  16. CT features and common causes of arc of Riolan expansion: an analysis with 64-detector-row computed tomographic angiography

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuanliang; Jin, Chaolin; Zhang, Shutong; Wang, Xiang; Jiang, Yanping

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the manifestations of arc of Riolan expansion (ARE) using multi-detector computed tomography angiography (MDCTA). Materials and methods: The manifestations and clinical data of 626 consecutive mesentery CTA images were retrospectively analyzed. The 47 cases with ARE and 47 patients without expansion were involved. The average diameter of arc of Riolan was measured. Two radiologists after reaching consensus analyzed the shapes of mesenteric artery, CT findings and the occurrence and causes of ARE. Results: The mean diameter of arc of Riolan was 1.2 mm, 4.6 mm, 2.5 mm, 2.3 mm, 1.9 mm, 2.5 mm, and 2.0 mm at baseline and following obstruction of superior mesenteric artery (SMA), stenosis of SMA, obstruction of inferior mesenteric artery (IMA), stenosis of IMA, colon cancer, and active ulcerative colitis, respectively. The expansion of arc of Riolan was the most significant following obstruction of SMA. The diameters of arc of Riolan were significantly different between the upward flow group and the downward or the two-way flow groups, and between the colon tumor group and the active ulcerative colitis group. CT findings such as bowel wall thickening, contrast enhancement, intestinal obstruction, marginal artery expansion, lymph node enlargement varied and were help to identify the cause of ARE. Conclusions: ARE often suggests the occurrence of obstructed intestinal feeding artery or intestinal lesions. MDCTA can clearly display the situation of arc of Riolan and collateral circulation, and together with CT symptoms, can guide the selection of diagnosis and treatment schemes in clinic. PMID:26064208

  17. Parallel computing works

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-23

    An account of the Caltech Concurrent Computation Program (C{sup 3}P), a five year project that focused on answering the question: Can parallel computers be used to do large-scale scientific computations '' As the title indicates, the question is answered in the affirmative, by implementing numerous scientific applications on real parallel computers and doing computations that produced new scientific results. In the process of doing so, C{sup 3}P helped design and build several new computers, designed and implemented basic system software, developed algorithms for frequently used mathematical computations on massively parallel machines, devised performance models and measured the performance of many computers, and created a high performance computing facility based exclusively on parallel computers. While the initial focus of C{sup 3}P was the hypercube architecture developed by C. Seitz, many of the methods developed and lessons learned have been applied successfully on other massively parallel architectures.

  18. (Computer vision and robotics)

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.P.

    1989-02-13

    The traveler attended the Fourth Aalborg International Symposium on Computer Vision at Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. The traveler presented three invited lectures entitled, Concurrent Computer Vision on a Hypercube Multicomputer'', The Butterfly Accumulator and its Application in Concurrent Computer Vision on Hypercube Multicomputers'', and Concurrency in Mobile Robotics at ORNL'', and a ten-minute editorial entitled, It Concurrency an Issue in Computer Vision.'' The traveler obtained information on current R D efforts elsewhere in concurrent computer vision.

  19. Computational Biology, Advanced Scientific Computing, and Emerging Computational Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-27

    This CRADA was established at the start of FY02 with $200 K from IBM and matching funds from DOE to support post-doctoral fellows in collaborative research between International Business Machines and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to explore effective use of emerging petascale computational architectures for the solution of computational biology problems. 'No cost' extensions of the CRADA were negotiated with IBM for FY03 and FY04.

  20. Future Computer Requirements for Computational Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Recent advances in computational aerodynamics are discussed as well as motivations for and potential benefits of a National Aerodynamic Simulation Facility having the capability to solve fluid dynamic equations at speeds two to three orders of magnitude faster than presently possible with general computers. Two contracted efforts to define processor architectures for such a facility are summarized.

  1. Computers and Computation. Readings from Scientific American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Robert R.; Weizenbaum, Joseph

    A collection of articles from "Scientific American" magazine has been put together at this time because the current period in computer science is one of consolidation rather than innovation. A few years ago, computer science was moving so swiftly that even the professional journals were more archival than informative; but today it is much easier…

  2. Understanding student computational thinking with computational modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiken, John M.; Caballero, Marcos D.; Douglas, Scott S.; Burk, John B.; Scanlon, Erin M.; Thoms, Brian D.; Schatz, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the National Research Council's framework for next generation science standards highlighted "computational thinking" as one of its "fundamental practices". 9th Grade students taking a physics course that employed the Arizona State University's Modeling Instruction curriculum were taught to construct computational models of physical systems. Student computational thinking was assessed using a proctored programming assignment, written essay, and a series of think-aloud interviews, where the students produced and discussed a computational model of a baseball in motion via a high-level programming environment (VPython). Roughly a third of the students in the study were successful in completing the programming assignment. Student success on this assessment was tied to how students synthesized their knowledge of physics and computation. On the essay and interview assessments, students displayed unique views of the relationship between force and motion; those who spoke of this relationship in causal (rather than observational) terms tended to have more success in the programming exercise.

  3. Heterotic computing: exploiting hybrid computational devices.

    PubMed

    Kendon, Viv; Sebald, Angelika; Stepney, Susan

    2015-07-28

    Current computational theory deals almost exclusively with single models: classical, neural, analogue, quantum, etc. In practice, researchers use ad hoc combinations, realizing only recently that they can be fundamentally more powerful than the individual parts. A Theo Murphy meeting brought together theorists and practitioners of various types of computing, to engage in combining the individual strengths to produce powerful new heterotic devices. 'Heterotic computing' is defined as a combination of two or more computational systems such that they provide an advantage over either substrate used separately. This post-meeting collection of articles provides a wide-ranging survey of the state of the art in diverse computational paradigms, together with reflections on their future combination into powerful and practical applications.

  4. Cloud Computing for radiologists.

    PubMed

    Kharat, Amit T; Safvi, Amjad; Thind, Ss; Singh, Amarjit

    2012-07-01

    Cloud computing is a concept wherein a computer grid is created using the Internet with the sole purpose of utilizing shared resources such as computer software, hardware, on a pay-per-use model. Using Cloud computing, radiology users can efficiently manage multimodality imaging units by using the latest software and hardware without paying huge upfront costs. Cloud computing systems usually work on public, private, hybrid, or community models. Using the various components of a Cloud, such as applications, client, infrastructure, storage, services, and processing power, Cloud computing can help imaging units rapidly scale and descale operations and avoid huge spending on maintenance of costly applications and storage. Cloud computing allows flexibility in imaging. It sets free radiology from the confines of a hospital and creates a virtual mobile office. The downsides to Cloud computing involve security and privacy issues which need to be addressed to ensure the success of Cloud computing in the future.

  5. Polymorphous computing fabric

    DOEpatents

    Wolinski, Christophe Czeslaw; Gokhale, Maya B.; McCabe, Kevin Peter

    2011-01-18

    Fabric-based computing systems and methods are disclosed. A fabric-based computing system can include a polymorphous computing fabric that can be customized on a per application basis and a host processor in communication with said polymorphous computing fabric. The polymorphous computing fabric includes a cellular architecture that can be highly parameterized to enable a customized synthesis of fabric instances for a variety of enhanced application performances thereof. A global memory concept can also be included that provides the host processor random access to all variables and instructions associated with the polymorphous computing fabric.

  6. Computational aerodynamics and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The role of computational aerodynamics in design is reviewed with attention given to the design process; the proper role of computations; the importance of calibration, interpretation, and verification; the usefulness of a given computational capability; and the marketing of new codes. Examples of computational aerodynamics in design are given with particular emphasis on the Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology. Finally, future prospects are noted, with consideration given to the role of advanced computers, advances in numerical solution techniques, turbulence models, complex geometries, and computational design procedures. Previously announced in STAR as N82-33348

  7. Scientific Grid computing.

    PubMed

    Coveney, Peter V

    2005-08-15

    We introduce a definition of Grid computing which is adhered to throughout this Theme Issue. We compare the evolution of the World Wide Web with current aspirations for Grid computing and indicate areas that need further research and development before a generally usable Grid infrastructure becomes available. We discuss work that has been done in order to make scientific Grid computing a viable proposition, including the building of Grids, middleware developments, computational steering and visualization. We review science that has been enabled by contemporary computational Grids, and associated progress made through the widening availability of high performance computing.

  8. Structural mechanics computations on parallel computing platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.; Plaskacz, E.J.; Pfeiffer, P.A.

    1995-06-01

    With recent advances in parallel supercomputers and network-connected workstations, the solution to large scale structural engineering problems has now become tractable. High-performance computer architectures, which are usually available at large universities and national laboratories, now can solve large nonlinear problems. At the other end of the spectrum, network connected workstations can be configured to become a distributed-parallel computer. This approach is attractive to small, medium and large engineering firms. This paper describes the development of a parallelized finite element computer program for the solution of static, nonlinear structural mechanics problems.

  9. Cognitive Computing for Security.

    SciTech Connect

    Debenedictis, Erik; Rothganger, Fredrick; Aimone, James Bradley; Marinella, Matthew; Evans, Brian Robert; Warrender, Christina E.; Mickel, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Final report for Cognitive Computing for Security LDRD 165613. It reports on the development of hybrid of general purpose/ne uromorphic computer architecture, with an emphasis on potential implementation with memristors.

  10. Computer Intrusions and Attacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Howard

    1999-01-01

    Examines some frequently encountered unsolicited computer intrusions, including computer viruses, worms, Java applications, trojan horses or vandals, e-mail spamming, hoaxes, and cookies. Also discusses virus-protection software, both for networks and for individual users. (LRW)

  11. Computers in Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Advances in factory computerization (computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing) are reviewed, including discussions of robotics, human factors engineering, and the sociological impact of automation. (JN)

  12. ICASE Computer Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering computer science program is discussed in outline form. Information is given on such topics as problem decomposition, algorithm development, programming languages, and parallel architectures.

  13. Computational Toxicology (S)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emerging field of computational toxicology applies mathematical and computer models and molecular biological and chemical approaches to explore both qualitative and quantitative relationships between sources of environmental pollutant exposure and adverse health outcomes. Th...

  14. Computers in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, John W.; Moore, Elizabeth A.

    1988-01-01

    Surveys the types of computers being used in high school and university chemistry courses. Identifies types of hardware found on Apple and MS-DOS computers. Makes recommendations for the upgrading of current equipment. (ML)

  15. The Interpersonal Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, John S.

    1994-01-01

    Provides helpful tips regarding classroom use of computers in a cooperative-learning environment. Comments on student computer ratio, interdependence, individual accountability, heterogeneous grouping, shared responsibility, and good working relationships. (ZWH)

  16. Space Spurred Computer Graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Dicomed Corporation was asked by NASA in the early 1970s to develop processing capabilities for recording images sent from Mars by Viking spacecraft. The company produced a film recorder which increased the intensity levels and the capability for color recording. This development led to a strong technology base resulting in sophisticated computer graphics equipment. Dicomed systems are used to record CAD (computer aided design) and CAM (computer aided manufacturing) equipment, to update maps and produce computer generated animation.

  17. Introduction to Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekert, A.

    A computation is a physical process. It may be performed by a piece of electronics or on an abacus, or in your brain, but it is a process that takes place in nature and as such it is subject to the laws of physics. Quantum computers are machines that rely on characteristically quantum phenomena, such as quantum interference and quantum entanglement in order to perform computation. In this series of lectures I want to elaborate on the computational power of such machines.

  18. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT,J.

    2004-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security.

  19. Quantum computing and probability.

    PubMed

    Ferry, David K

    2009-11-25

    Over the past two decades, quantum computing has become a popular and promising approach to trying to solve computationally difficult problems. Missing in many descriptions of quantum computing is just how probability enters into the process. Here, we discuss some simple examples of how uncertainty and probability enter, and how this and the ideas of quantum computing challenge our interpretations of quantum mechanics. It is found that this uncertainty can lead to intrinsic decoherence, and this raises challenges for error correction.

  20. Nanoelectronics: Metrology and Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, Mark; Clark, Jason V.; Klimeck, Gerhard; Raman, Arvind

    2007-09-26

    Research in nanoelectronics poses new challenges for metrology, but advances in theory, simulation and computing and networking technology provide new opportunities to couple simulation and metrology. This paper begins with a brief overview of current work in computational nanoelectronics. Three examples of how computation can assist metrology will then be discussed. The paper concludes with a discussion of how cyberinfrastructure can help connect computing and metrology using the nanoHUB (www.nanoHUB.org) as a specific example.

  1. Expanding Computer Service with Personal Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bomzer, Herbert

    1983-01-01

    A planning technique, the mission justification document, and the evaluation procedures developed at Central Michigan University to ensure the orderly growth of computer-dependent resources within the constraints of tight budgets are described. (Author/MLW)

  2. Computer Literacy. Focus 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benderson, Albert

    One of a series on the responses by the Educational Testing Service (ETS) and others to critical problems in education, this overview addresses a variety of issues related to computer literacy. Topics discussed include the pace of the transition to the computer age, the development of microprocessors, and the computer as fad or revolution.…

  3. BNL ATLAS Grid Computing

    ScienceCinema

    Michael Ernst

    2016-07-12

    As the sole Tier-1 computing facility for ATLAS in the United States and the largest ATLAS computing center worldwide Brookhaven provides a large portion of the overall computing resources for U.S. collaborators and serves as the central hub for storing,

  4. Computers in Scientific Instrumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enke, C. G.

    1982-01-01

    Computer applications in scientific instrumentation are traced from early data processing to modern computer-based instruments. Probable pathways toward instruments with increased "intelligence" include, among others, implementation of hierarchical computer networks and microprocessor controllers and the simplification of programing. The…

  5. Dietary Interviewing by Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slack, Warner V.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    A computer based dietary interviewing program enhanced self awareness for overweight participants. In a three part interview designed for direct interaction between patient and computer, questions dealt with general dietary behavior and details of food intake. The computer assisted the patient in planning a weight reducing diet of approximately…

  6. Coping with Computing Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslin, Richard D.

    Elements of computing success of Iona College, the challenges it currently faces, and the strategies conceived to cope with future computing needs are discussed. The college has mandated computer literacy for students and offers nine degrees in the computerized information system/management information system areas. Since planning is needed in…

  7. The fifth generation computer

    SciTech Connect

    Moto-Oka, T.; Kitsuregawa, M.

    1985-01-01

    The leader of Japan's Fifth Generation computer project, known as the 'Apollo' project, and a young computer scientist elucidate in this book the process of how the idea came about, international reactions, the basic technology, prospects for realization, and the abilities of the Fifth Generation computer. Topics considered included forecasting, research programs, planning, and technology impacts.

  8. The Computer Goes Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirone, Bill

    2001-01-01

    A partnership between local community, business, and education leaders and the Santa Barbara County Education Office spawned Computers for Families--a program putting computers in needy families' homes. Adjudicated youth at a residential boys' camp gain vocational skills when refurbishing donated computers for families' use. (MLH)

  9. Writing, Thinking and Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, James

    1993-01-01

    Reviews the potential of word processors for changing the ways in which students process written text and think about writing. Three levels of computer-aided writing are considered: simple word processors; computer-aided writing programs; and higher-level computer-aided processing; and improvements in writing quality. (41 references) (LRW)

  10. Mathematics Unipac. Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parma City School District, OH.

    Five activities are presented in this student workbook designed for exploration of a career in computers, and the mathematics related to that career. Included are activities on basic computer language, flow charts, and basic computer programming. Each activity includes the objective, materials needed, and information for completing the activity.…

  11. Personal Computers on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldrop, M. Mitchell

    1985-01-01

    Examines issues involving the use of on-line databases, magnetic and optical data storage, digital telecommunications, and microcomputers on college campuses. These issues include access to computers and computer networking, and educational uses of the computers. Examples of efforts at four universities are included. (JN)

  12. Understanding Computer Terms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilly, Edward R.

    Designed to assist teachers and administrators approaching the subject of computers for the first time to acquire a feel for computer terminology, this document presents a computer term glossary on three levels. (1) The terms most frequently used, called a "basic vocabulary," are presented first in three paragraphs which explain their meanings:…

  13. Computer Applications for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dulsky, Dwight; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Four articles discuss computer-assisted instruction, including (1) a middle school art and computer departments project that used LOGO to create rose window designs; (2) student journals; (3) the application of Piaget constructivism and Vygotskin social interaction to LOGO learning; and (4) computer lab writing workshops for elementary school…

  14. BBC Computer Literacy Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salkeld, Bob

    1982-01-01

    Describes the development and purpose of The Computer Programme, a 10-part television series produced by the BBC's Continuing Education Television Department and designed to provide a beginner's guide to the world of computers and computing. The history of the project is reviewed and the creation of the BBC microcomputer is recounted. (Author/JL)

  15. Education for Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heslep, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    The computer engineers who refer to the education of computers do not have a definite idea of education and do not bother to justify the fuzzy ones to which they allude. Hence, they logically cannot specify the features a computer must have in order to be educable. This paper puts forth a non-standard, but not arbitrary, concept of education that…

  16. BNL ATLAS Grid Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Ernst

    2008-10-02

    As the sole Tier-1 computing facility for ATLAS in the United States and the largest ATLAS computing center worldwide Brookhaven provides a large portion of the overall computing resources for U.S. collaborators and serves as the central hub for storing,

  17. The Computer Delusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppenheimer, Todd

    1997-01-01

    Challenges research and prevailing attitudes that maintain that computers improve teaching and academic achievement. Criticizes and questions research methodology, computer literacy education, the need for computer skills to make a competitive workforce, support from the business community resulting from technology programs, and Internet use. (LRW)

  18. Computational Thinking Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ioannidou, Andri; Bennett, Vicki; Repenning, Alexander; Koh, Kyu Han; Basawapatna, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    The iDREAMS project aims to reinvent Computer Science education in K-12 schools, by using game design and computational science for motivating and educating students through an approach we call Scalable Game Design, starting at the middle school level. In this paper we discuss the use of Computational Thinking Patterns as the basis for our…

  19. Teaching with Personal Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stonebraker, Peter W.; Coye, Ray W.

    1988-01-01

    A discussion of computer integration in the college curriculum describes its impact on courses and classroom interaction, looks at levels of computer integration, and examines strategies for developing such a course. It is proposed that, although computer integration is inevitable, it will cause a turbulent transition period for classroom…

  20. Getting To Know Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundgren, Mary Beth

    Originally written for adult new readers involved in literacy programs, this book is also helpful to those individuals who want a basic book about computers. It uses the carefully controlled vocabulary with which adult new readers are familiar. Chapter 1 addresses the widespread use of computers. Chapter 2 discusses what a computer is and…

  1. The Computer Bulletin Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batt, Russell H., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Four applications of microcomputers in the chemical laboratory are presented. Included are "Mass Spectrometer Interface with an Apple II Computer,""Interfacing the Spectronic 20 to a Computer,""A pH-Monitoring and Control System for Teaching Laboratories," and "A Computer-Aided Optical Melting Point Device." Software, instrumentation, and uses are…

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a diagnostic imaging ... Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  3. Computing environment logbook

    DOEpatents

    Osbourn, Gordon C; Bouchard, Ann M

    2012-09-18

    A computing environment logbook logs events occurring within a computing environment. The events are displayed as a history of past events within the logbook of the computing environment. The logbook provides search functionality to search through the history of past events to find one or more selected past events, and further, enables an undo of the one or more selected past events.

  4. Quantum walk computation

    SciTech Connect

    Kendon, Viv

    2014-12-04

    Quantum versions of random walks have diverse applications that are motivating experimental implementations as well as theoretical studies. Recent results showing quantum walks are “universal for quantum computation” relate to algorithms, to be run on quantum computers. We consider whether an experimental implementation of a quantum walk could provide useful computation before we have a universal quantum computer.

  5. On Understanding Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olds, Henry F., Jr.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Three articles discuss the use of computers in education: (1) "References for a Broader Vision" (Henry F. Olds, Jr.); (2) "What Every Teacher Should Know About Computer Simulations" (David Grady); and (3) "The Computer as Palette and Model Builder" (Interview of Alan Kay). (CJ)

  6. The Challenge of Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leger, Guy

    Computers may change teachers' lifestyles, teaching styles, and perhaps even their personal values. A brief survey of the history of computers demonstrates the incredible pace at which computer technology is moving ahead. The cost and size of microchips will continue to decline dramatically over the next 20 years, while the capability and variety…

  7. Computer Center: CIBE Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crovello, Theodore J.

    1982-01-01

    Differentiates between computer systems and Computers in Biological Education (CIBE) systems (computer system intended for use in biological education). Describes several CIBE stand alone systems: single-user microcomputer; single-user microcomputer/video-disc; multiuser microcomputers; multiuser maxicomputer; and local and long distance computer…

  8. Advanced Computing for Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hut, Piet; Sussman, Gerald Jay

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the contributions that high-speed computing is making to the study of science. Emphasizes the use of computers in exploring complicated systems without the simplification required in traditional methods of observation and experimentation. Provides examples of computer assisted investigations in astronomy and physics. (TW)

  9. Computers in Engineering Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushby, N. J.

    This bibliography cites 26 books, papers, and reports dealing with various uses of computers in engineering education; and describes several computer programs available for use in teaching aeronautical, chemical, civil, electrical and electronic, mechanical, and nuclear engineering. Each computer program entry is presented by name, author,…

  10. Computer animation challenges for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vines, Mauricio; Lee, Won-Sook; Mavriplis, Catherine

    2012-07-01

    Computer animation requirements differ from those of traditional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) investigations in that visual plausibility and rapid frame update rates trump physical accuracy. We present an overview of the main techniques for fluid simulation in computer animation, starting with Eulerian grid approaches, the Lattice Boltzmann method, Fourier transform techniques and Lagrangian particle introduction. Adaptive grid methods, precomputation of results for model reduction, parallelisation and computation on graphical processing units (GPUs) are reviewed in the context of accelerating simulation computations for animation. A survey of current specific approaches for the application of these techniques to the simulation of smoke, fire, water, bubbles, mixing, phase change and solid-fluid coupling is also included. Adding plausibility to results through particle introduction, turbulence detail and concentration on regions of interest by level set techniques has elevated the degree of accuracy and realism of recent animations. Basic approaches are described here. Techniques to control the simulation to produce a desired visual effect are also discussed. Finally, some references to rendering techniques and haptic applications are mentioned to provide the reader with a complete picture of the challenges of simulating fluids in computer animation.

  11. The science of computing - Parallel computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    Although parallel computation architectures have been known for computers since the 1920s, it was only in the 1970s that microelectronic components technologies advanced to the point where it became feasible to incorporate multiple processors in one machine. Concommitantly, the development of algorithms for parallel processing also lagged due to hardware limitations. The speed of computing with solid-state chips is limited by gate switching delays. The physical limit implies that a 1 Gflop operational speed is the maximum for sequential processors. A computer recently introduced features a 'hypercube' architecture with 128 processors connected in networks at 5, 6 or 7 points per grid, depending on the design choice. Its computing speed rivals that of supercomputers, but at a fraction of the cost. The added speed with less hardware is due to parallel processing, which utilizes algorithms representing different parts of an equation that can be broken into simpler statements and processed simultaneously. Present, highly developed computer languages like FORTRAN, PASCAL, COBOL, etc., rely on sequential instructions. Thus, increased emphasis will now be directed at parallel processing algorithms to exploit the new architectures.

  12. Neural Computation and the Computational Theory of Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piccinini, Gualtiero; Bahar, Sonya

    2013-01-01

    We begin by distinguishing computationalism from a number of other theses that are sometimes conflated with it. We also distinguish between several important kinds of computation: computation in a generic sense, digital computation, and analog computation. Then, we defend a weak version of computationalism--neural processes are computations in the…

  13. An artificial muscle computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marc O'Brien, Benjamin; Alexander Anderson, Iain

    2013-03-01

    We have built an artificial muscle computer based on Wolfram's "2, 3" Turing machine architecture, the simplest known universal Turing machine. Our computer uses artificial muscles for its instruction set, output buffers, and memory write and addressing mechanisms. The computer is very slow and large (0.15 Hz, ˜1 m3); however by using only 13 artificial muscle relays, it is capable of solving any computable problem given sufficient memory, time, and reliability. The development of this computer shows that artificial muscles can think—paving the way for soft robots with reflexes like those seen in nature.

  14. Scalable optical quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Manykin, E A; Mel'nichenko, E V

    2014-12-31

    A way of designing a scalable optical quantum computer based on the photon echo effect is proposed. Individual rare earth ions Pr{sup 3+}, regularly located in the lattice of the orthosilicate (Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}) crystal, are suggested to be used as optical qubits. Operations with qubits are performed using coherent and incoherent laser pulses. The operation protocol includes both the method of measurement-based quantum computations and the technique of optical computations. Modern hybrid photon echo protocols, which provide a sufficient quantum efficiency when reading recorded states, are considered as most promising for quantum computations and communications. (quantum computer)

  15. Computer algebra and operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fateman, Richard; Grossman, Robert

    1989-01-01

    The symbolic computation of operator expansions is discussed. Some of the capabilities that prove useful when performing computer algebra computations involving operators are considered. These capabilities may be broadly divided into three areas: the algebraic manipulation of expressions from the algebra generated by operators; the algebraic manipulation of the actions of the operators upon other mathematical objects; and the development of appropriate normal forms and simplification algorithms for operators and their actions. Brief descriptions are given of the computer algebra computations that arise when working with various operators and their actions.

  16. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2005-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include, for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security. To achieve our goals we have established a close alliance with applied mathematicians and computer scientists at Stony Brook and Columbia Universities.

  17. Richard Feynman and computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, Tony

    1999-04-01

    The enormous contribution of Richard Feynman to modern physics is well known, both to teaching through his famous Feynman Lectures on Physics, and to research with his Feynman diagram approach to quantum field theory and his path integral formulation of quantum mechanics. Less well known perhaps is his long-standing interest in the physics of computation and this is the subject of this paper. Feynman lectured on computation at Caltech for most of the last decade of his life, first with John Hopfield and Carver Mead, and then with Gerry Sussman. The story of how these lectures came to be written up as the Feynman Lectures on Computation is briefly recounted. Feynman also discussed the fundamentals of computation with other legendary figures of the computer science and physics community such as Ed Fredkin, Rolf Landauer, Carver Mead, Marvin Minsky and John Wheeler. He was also instrumental in stimulating developments in both nanotechnology and quantum computing. During the 1980s Feynman re-visited long-standing interests both in parallel computing with Geoffrey Fox and Danny Hillis, and in reversible computation and quantum computing with Charles Bennett, Norman Margolus, Tom Toffoli and Wojciech Zurek. This paper records Feynman's links with the computational community and includes some reminiscences about his involvement with the fundamentals of computing.

  18. ALMA correlator computer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisano, Jim; Amestica, Rodrigo; Perez, Jesus

    2004-09-01

    We present a design for the computer systems which control, configure, and monitor the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) correlator and process its output. Two distinct computer systems implement this functionality: a rack- mounted PC controls and monitors the correlator, and a cluster of 17 PCs process the correlator output into raw spectral results. The correlator computer systems interface to other ALMA computers via gigabit Ethernet networks utilizing CORBA and raw socket connections. ALMA Common Software provides the software infrastructure for this distributed computer environment. The control computer interfaces to the correlator via multiple CAN busses and the data processing computer cluster interfaces to the correlator via sixteen dedicated high speed data ports. An independent array-wide hardware timing bus connects to the computer systems and the correlator hardware ensuring synchronous behavior and imposing hard deadlines on the control and data processor computers. An aggregate correlator output of 1 gigabyte per second with 16 millisecond periods and computational data rates of approximately 1 billion floating point operations per second define other hard deadlines for the data processing computer cluster.

  19. Multidisciplinary computational aerosciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, Paul

    1992-01-01

    As the challenges of single disciplinary computational physics are met, such as computational fluid dynamics, computational structural mechanics, computational propulsion, computational aeroacoustics, computational electromagnetics, etc., scientists have begun investigating the combination of these single disciplines into what is being called multidisciplinary computational aerosciences (MCAS). The combination of several disciplines not only offers simulation realism but also formidable computational challenges. The solution of such problems will require computers orders of magnitude larger than those currently available. Such computer power can only be supplied by massively parallel machines because of the current speed-of-light limitation of conventional serial systems. Even with such machines, MCAS problems will require hundreds of hours for their solution. To efficiently utilize such a machine, research is required in three areas that include parallel architectures, systems software, and applications software. The main emphasis of this paper is the applications software element. Examples that demonstrate application software for multidisciplinary problems currently being solved at NASA Ames Research Center are presented. Pacing items for MCAS are discussed such as solution methodology, physical modeling, computer power, and multidisciplinary validation experiments.

  20. Computer-assisted psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jesse H.; Wright, Andrew S.

    1997-01-01

    The rationale for using computers in psychotherapy includes the possibility that therapeutic software could improve the efficiency of treatment and provide access for greater numbers of patients. Computers have not been able to reliably duplicate the type of dialogue typically used in clinician-administered therapy. However, computers have significant strengths that can be used to advantage in designing treatment programs. Software developed for computer-assisted therapy generally has been well accepted by patients. Outcome studies have usually demonstrated treatment effectiveness for this form of therapy. Future development of computer tools may be influenced by changes in health care financing and rapid growth of new technologies. An integrated care delivery model incorporating the unique attributes of both clinicians and computers should be adopted for computer-assisted therapy. PMID:9292446

  1. Hyperswitch Communication Network Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John C.; Chow, Edward T.; Priel, Moshe; Upchurch, Edwin T.

    1993-01-01

    Hyperswitch Communications Network (HCN) computer is prototype multiple-processor computer being developed. Incorporates improved version of hyperswitch communication network described in "Hyperswitch Network For Hypercube Computer" (NPO-16905). Designed to support high-level software and expansion of itself. HCN computer is message-passing, multiple-instruction/multiple-data computer offering significant advantages over older single-processor and bus-based multiple-processor computers, with respect to price/performance ratio, reliability, availability, and manufacturing. Design of HCN operating-system software provides flexible computing environment accommodating both parallel and distributed processing. Also achieves balance among following competing factors; performance in processing and communications, ease of use, and tolerance of (and recovery from) faults.

  2. Navier-Stokes Computations on Commodity Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Faulkner, Thomas R.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we discuss and demonstrate the feasibility of solving high-fidelity, nonlinear computational fluid dynamics (CFD) problems of practical interest on commodity machines, namely Pentium Pro PC's. Such calculations have now become possible due to the progress in computational power and memory of the off-the-shelf commodity computers, along with the growth in bandwidth and communication speeds of networks. A widely used CFD code known as TLNS3D, which was developed originally on large shared memory computers was selected for this effort. This code has recently been ported to massively parallel processor (MPP) type machines, where natural partitioning along grid blocks is adopted in which one or more blocks are distributed to each of the available processors. In this paper, a similar approach is adapted to port this code to a cluster of Pentium Pro computers. The message passing among the processors is accomplished through the use of standard message passing interface (MPI) libraries. Scaling studies indicate fairly high level of parallelism on such clusters of commodity machines, thus making solutions to Navier-Stokes equations for practical problems more affordable.

  3. Computational Biology and High Performance Computing 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Horst D.; Zorn, Manfred D.; Spengler, Sylvia J.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Stewart, Craig; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2000-10-19

    The pace of extraordinary advances in molecular biology has accelerated in the past decade due in large part to discoveries coming from genome projects on human and model organisms. The advances in the genome project so far, happening well ahead of schedule and under budget, have exceeded any dreams by its protagonists, let alone formal expectations. Biologists expect the next phase of the genome project to be even more startling in terms of dramatic breakthroughs in our understanding of human biology, the biology of health and of disease. Only today can biologists begin to envision the necessary experimental, computational and theoretical steps necessary to exploit genome sequence information for its medical impact, its contribution to biotechnology and economic competitiveness, and its ultimate contribution to environmental quality. High performance computing has become one of the critical enabling technologies, which will help to translate this vision of future advances in biology into reality. Biologists are increasingly becoming aware of the potential of high performance computing. The goal of this tutorial is to introduce the exciting new developments in computational biology and genomics to the high performance computing community.

  4. Computers and neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Shaikhouni, Ammar; Elder, J Bradley

    2012-11-01

    At the turn of the twentieth century, the only computational device used in neurosurgical procedures was the brain of the surgeon. Today, most neurosurgical procedures rely at least in part on the use of a computer to help perform surgeries accurately and safely. The techniques that revolutionized neurosurgery were mostly developed after the 1950s. Just before that era, the transistor was invented in the late 1940s, and the integrated circuit was invented in the late 1950s. During this time, the first automated, programmable computational machines were introduced. The rapid progress in the field of neurosurgery not only occurred hand in hand with the development of modern computers, but one also can state that modern neurosurgery would not exist without computers. The focus of this article is the impact modern computers have had on the practice of neurosurgery. Neuroimaging, neuronavigation, and neuromodulation are examples of tools in the armamentarium of the modern neurosurgeon that owe each step in their evolution to progress made in computer technology. Advances in computer technology central to innovations in these fields are highlighted, with particular attention to neuroimaging. Developments over the last 10 years in areas of sensors and robotics that promise to transform the practice of neurosurgery further are discussed. Potential impacts of advances in computers related to neurosurgery in developing countries and underserved regions are also discussed. As this article illustrates, the computer, with its underlying and related technologies, is central to advances in neurosurgery over the last half century.

  5. Quantum analogue computing.

    PubMed

    Kendon, Vivien M; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J

    2010-08-13

    We briefly review what a quantum computer is, what it promises to do for us and why it is so hard to build one. Among the first applications anticipated to bear fruit is the quantum simulation of quantum systems. While most quantum computation is an extension of classical digital computation, quantum simulation differs fundamentally in how the data are encoded in the quantum computer. To perform a quantum simulation, the Hilbert space of the system to be simulated is mapped directly onto the Hilbert space of the (logical) qubits in the quantum computer. This type of direct correspondence is how data are encoded in a classical analogue computer. There is no binary encoding, and increasing precision becomes exponentially costly: an extra bit of precision doubles the size of the computer. This has important consequences for both the precision and error-correction requirements of quantum simulation, and significant open questions remain about its practicality. It also means that the quantum version of analogue computers, continuous-variable quantum computers, becomes an equally efficient architecture for quantum simulation. Lessons from past use of classical analogue computers can help us to build better quantum simulators in future.

  6. Computers and neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Shaikhouni, Ammar; Elder, J Bradley

    2012-11-01

    At the turn of the twentieth century, the only computational device used in neurosurgical procedures was the brain of the surgeon. Today, most neurosurgical procedures rely at least in part on the use of a computer to help perform surgeries accurately and safely. The techniques that revolutionized neurosurgery were mostly developed after the 1950s. Just before that era, the transistor was invented in the late 1940s, and the integrated circuit was invented in the late 1950s. During this time, the first automated, programmable computational machines were introduced. The rapid progress in the field of neurosurgery not only occurred hand in hand with the development of modern computers, but one also can state that modern neurosurgery would not exist without computers. The focus of this article is the impact modern computers have had on the practice of neurosurgery. Neuroimaging, neuronavigation, and neuromodulation are examples of tools in the armamentarium of the modern neurosurgeon that owe each step in their evolution to progress made in computer technology. Advances in computer technology central to innovations in these fields are highlighted, with particular attention to neuroimaging. Developments over the last 10 years in areas of sensors and robotics that promise to transform the practice of neurosurgery further are discussed. Potential impacts of advances in computers related to neurosurgery in developing countries and underserved regions are also discussed. As this article illustrates, the computer, with its underlying and related technologies, is central to advances in neurosurgery over the last half century. PMID:22985531

  7. Architecture Adaptive Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorband, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Architecture Adaptive Computing Environment (aCe) is a software system that includes a language, compiler, and run-time library for parallel computing. aCe was developed to enable programmers to write programs, more easily than was previously possible, for a variety of parallel computing architectures. Heretofore, it has been perceived to be difficult to write parallel programs for parallel computers and more difficult to port the programs to different parallel computing architectures. In contrast, aCe is supportable on all high-performance computing architectures. Currently, it is supported on LINUX clusters. aCe uses parallel programming constructs that facilitate writing of parallel programs. Such constructs were used in single-instruction/multiple-data (SIMD) programming languages of the 1980s, including Parallel Pascal, Parallel Forth, C*, *LISP, and MasPar MPL. In aCe, these constructs are extended and implemented for both SIMD and multiple- instruction/multiple-data (MIMD) architectures. Two new constructs incorporated in aCe are those of (1) scalar and virtual variables and (2) pre-computed paths. The scalar-and-virtual-variables construct increases flexibility in optimizing memory utilization in various architectures. The pre-computed-paths construct enables the compiler to pre-compute part of a communication operation once, rather than computing it every time the communication operation is performed.

  8. Assessment of sub-milli-sievert abdominal computed tomography with iterative reconstruction techniques of different vendors

    PubMed Central

    Padole, Atul; Sainani, Nisha; Lira, Diego; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Pourjabbar, Sarvenaz; Lo Gullo, Roberto; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess diagnostic image quality of reduced dose (RD) abdominal computed tomography (CT) with 9 iterative reconstruction techniques (IRTs) from 4 different vendors to the standard of care (SD) CT. METHODS: In an Institutional Review Board approved study, 66 patients (mean age 60 ± 13 years, 44 men, and 22 women) undergoing routine abdomen CT on multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners from vendors A, B, and C (≥ 64 row CT scanners) (22 patients each) gave written informed consent for acquisition of an additional RD CT series. Sinogram data of RD CT was reconstructed with two vendor-specific and a vendor-neutral IRTs (A-1, A-2, A-3; B-1, B-2, B-3; and C-1, C-2, C-3) and SD CT series with filtered back projection. Subjective image evaluation was performed by two radiologists for each SD and RD CT series blinded and independently. All RD CT series (198) were assessed first followed by SD CT series (66). Objective image noise was measured for SD and RD CT series. Data were analyzed by Wilcoxon signed rank, kappa, and analysis of variance tests. RESULTS: There were 13/50, 18/57 and 9/40 missed lesions (size 2-7 mm) on RD CT for vendor A, B, and C, respectively. Missed lesions includes liver cysts, kidney cysts and stone, gall stone, fatty liver, and pancreatitis. There were also 5, 4, and 4 pseudo lesions (size 2-3 mm) on RD CT for vendor A, B, and C, respectively. Lesions conspicuity was sufficient for clinical diagnostic performance for 6/24 (RD-A-1), 10/24 (RD-A-2), and 7/24 (RD-A-3) lesions for vendor A; 5/26 (RD-B-1), 6/26 (RD-B-2), and 7/26 (RD-B-3) lesions for vendor B; and 4/20 (RD-C-1) 6/20 (RD-C-2), and 10/20 (RD-C-3) lesions for vendor C (P = 0.9). Mean objective image noise in liver was significantly lower for RD A-1 compared to both RD A-2 and RD A-3 images (P < 0.001). Similarly, mean objective image noise lower for RD B-2 (compared to RD B-1, RD B-3) and RD C-3 (compared to RD C-1 and C-2) (P = 0.016). CONCLUSION: Regardless of IRTs and MDCT vendors

  9. Parallel computation and computers for artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalik, J.S. )

    1988-01-01

    This book discusses Parallel Processing in Artificial Intelligence; Parallel Computing using Multilisp; Execution of Common Lisp in a Parallel Environment; Qlisp; Restricted AND-Parallel Execution of Logic Programs; PARLOG: Parallel Programming in Logic; and Data-driven Processing of Semantic Nets. Attention is also given to: Application of the Butterfly Parallel Processor in Artificial Intelligence; On the Range of Applicability of an Artificial Intelligence Machine; Low-level Vision on Warp and the Apply Programming Mode; AHR: A Parallel Computer for Pure Lisp; FAIM-1: An Architecture for Symbolic Multi-processing; and Overview of Al Application Oriented Parallel Processing Research in Japan.

  10. Computational approaches to computational aero-acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C.

    1996-01-01

    The various techniques by which the goal of computational aeroacoustics (the calculation and noise prediction of a fluctuating fluid flow) may be achieved are reviewed. The governing equations for compressible fluid flow are presented. The direct numerical simulation approach is shown to be computationally intensive for high Reynolds number viscous flows. Therefore, other approaches, such as the acoustic analogy, vortex models and various perturbation techniques that aim to break the analysis into a viscous part and an acoustic part are presented. The choice of the approach is shown to be problem dependent.

  11. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to bring together

  12. Computational engine structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Johns, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    A significant research activity at the NASA Lewis Research Center is the computational simulation of complex multidisciplinary engine structural problems. This simulation is performed using computational engine structural analysis (CESA) which consists of integrated multidisciplinary computer codes in conjunction with computer post-processing for problem-specific application. A variety of the computational simulations of specific cases are described in some detail in this paper. These case studies include: (1) aeroelastic behavior of bladed rotors, (2) high velocity impact of fan blades, (3) blade-loss transient response, (4) rotor/stator/squeeze-film/bearing interaction, (5) blade-fragment/rotor-burst containment, and (6) structural behavior of advanced swept turboprops. These representative case studies are selected to demonstrate the breath of the problems analyzed and the role of the computer including post-processing and graphical display of voluminous output data.

  13. Personal computers on campus.

    PubMed

    Waldrop, M M

    1985-04-26

    Colleges and universities are becoming test beds for the much-heralded "information society" as they incorporate a new series of information technologies. These include on-line databases, magnetic and optical data storage, digital telecommunications, computer networks, and, most visibly and dramatically, personal computers. The transition is presenting administrators and faculty with major challenges, however. This article discusses some of the issues involved, including access to computers and to computer networking, managing the transition, and the educational uses of personal computers. A final section discusses efforts at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Brown University, and Camegie-Mellon University to shape a new-generation personal computer, the so-called "scholar's workstation." PMID:17746874

  14. Adiabatic topological quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesare, Chris; Landahl, Andrew J.; Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T.; Neels, Alice

    2015-07-01

    Topological quantum computing promises error-resistant quantum computation without active error correction. However, there is a worry that during the process of executing quantum gates by braiding anyons around each other, extra anyonic excitations will be created that will disorder the encoded quantum information. Here, we explore this question in detail by studying adiabatic code deformations on Hamiltonians based on topological codes, notably Kitaev's surface codes and the more recently discovered color codes. We develop protocols that enable universal quantum computing by adiabatic evolution in a way that keeps the energy gap of the system constant with respect to the computation size and introduces only simple local Hamiltonian interactions. This allows one to perform holonomic quantum computing with these topological quantum computing systems. The tools we develop allow one to go beyond numerical simulations and understand these processes analytically.

  15. Trends; Integrating computer systems

    SciTech Connect

    de Buyl, M. )

    1991-11-04

    This paper reports that computers are invaluable tools in assisting E and P managers with their information management and analysis tasks. Oil companies and software houses are striving to adapt their products and work practices to capitalize on the rapid evolution in computer hardware performance and affordability. Ironically, an investment in computers aimed at reducing risk and cost also contains an element of added risk and cost. Hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent by the oil industry in purchasing hardware and software and in developing software. Unfortunately, these investments may not have completely fulfilled the industry's expectations. The lower return on computer science investments is due to: Unmet expectations in productivity gains. Premature computer hardware and software obsolescence. Inefficient data transfer between software applications. Hidden costs of computer support personnel and vendors.

  16. New computing systems and their impact on computational mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in computer technology that are likely to impact computational mechanics are reviewed. The technical needs for computational mechanics technology are outlined. The major features of new and projected computing systems, including supersystems, parallel processing machines, special-purpose computing hardware, and small systems are described. Advances in programming environments, numerical algorithms, and computational strategies for new computing systems are reviewed, and a novel partitioning strategy is outlined for maximizing the degree of parallelism on multiprocessor computers with a shared memory.

  17. Computer aided production engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the following contents: CIM in avionics; computer analysis of product designs for robot assembly; a simulation decision mould for manpower forecast and its application; development of flexible manufacturing system; advances in microcomputer applications in CAD/CAM; an automated interface between CAD and process planning; CAM and computer vision; low friction pneumatic actuators for accurate robot control; robot assembly of printed circuit boards; information systems design for computer integrated manufacture; and a CAD engineering language to aid manufacture.

  18. Sensor sentinel computing device

    DOEpatents

    Damico, Joseph P.

    2016-08-02

    Technologies pertaining to authenticating data output by sensors in an industrial environment are described herein. A sensor sentinel computing device receives time-series data from a sensor by way of a wireline connection. The sensor sentinel computing device generates a validation signal that is a function of the time-series signal. The sensor sentinel computing device then transmits the validation signal to a programmable logic controller in the industrial environment.

  19. Research in computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Various graduate research activities in the field of computer science are reported. Among the topics discussed are: (1) failure probabilities in multi-version software; (2) Gaussian Elimination on parallel computers; (3) three dimensional Poisson solvers on parallel/vector computers; (4) automated task decomposition for multiple robot arms; (5) multi-color incomplete cholesky conjugate gradient methods on the Cyber 205; and (6) parallel implementation of iterative methods for solving linear equations.

  20. Computation of Standard Errors

    PubMed Central

    Dowd, Bryan E; Greene, William H; Norton, Edward C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We discuss the problem of computing the standard errors of functions involving estimated parameters and provide the relevant computer code for three different computational approaches using two popular computer packages. Study Design We show how to compute the standard errors of several functions of interest: the predicted value of the dependent variable for a particular subject, and the effect of a change in an explanatory variable on the predicted value of the dependent variable for an individual subject and average effect for a sample of subjects. Empirical Application Using a publicly available dataset, we explain three different methods of computing standard errors: the delta method, Krinsky–Robb, and bootstrapping. We provide computer code for Stata 12 and LIMDEP 10/NLOGIT 5. Conclusions In most applications, choice of the computational method for standard errors of functions of estimated parameters is a matter of convenience. However, when computing standard errors of the sample average of functions that involve both estimated parameters and nonstochastic explanatory variables, it is important to consider the sources of variation in the function's values. PMID:24800304

  1. The Social Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serugendo, Giovanna Di Marzo; Risoldi, Matteo; Solemayni, Mohammad

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Problem and Research Questions * State of the Art * TSC Structure and Computational Awareness * Methodology and Research Directions * Case Study: Democracy * Conclusions

  2. Computing by Observing Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaliere, Matteo; Leupold, Peter

    Computing by Observing is a paradigm for the implementation of models of Natural Computing. It was inspired by the setup of experiments in biochemistry. One central feature is an observer that translates the evolution of an underlying observed system into sequences over a finite alphabet. We take a step toward more realistic observers by allowing them to notice only an occurring change in the observed system rather than to read the system's entire configuration. Compared to previous implementations of the Computing by Observing paradigm, this decreases the computational power; but with relatively simple systems we still obtain the language class generated by matrix grammars.

  3. Optimization of computations

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhalevich, V.S.; Sergienko, I.V.; Zadiraka, V.K.; Babich, M.D.

    1994-11-01

    This article examines some topics of optimization of computations, which have been discussed at 25 seminar-schools and symposia organized by the V.M. Glushkov Institute of Cybernetics of the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences since 1969. We describe the main directions in the development of computational mathematics and present some of our own results that reflect a certain design conception of speed-optimal and accuracy-optimal (or nearly optimal) algorithms for various classes of problems, as well as a certain approach to optimization of computer computations.

  4. Cloud Computing: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Ling; Luo, Zhiguo; Du, Yujian; Guo, Leitao

    In order to support the maximum number of user and elastic service with the minimum resource, the Internet service provider invented the cloud computing. within a few years, emerging cloud computing has became the hottest technology. From the publication of core papers by Google since 2003 to the commercialization of Amazon EC2 in 2006, and to the service offering of AT&T Synaptic Hosting, the cloud computing has been evolved from internal IT system to public service, from cost-saving tools to revenue generator, and from ISP to telecom. This paper introduces the concept, history, pros and cons of cloud computing as well as the value chain and standardization effort.

  5. Forensic webwatch: Forensic computing.

    PubMed

    Bouhaidar, R

    2005-02-01

    With the rapid and continuous development of information technology, policing faces new challenges. As computer equipments are becoming cheaper and the internet more readily available, computer crime and criminal exploitation is on the increase. Investigating such crimes requires identification, preservation, analysis and presentation of digital evidence, the key elements of forensic computing. This is helped by the fact that Locard's principle is applicable to this branch of science as much as in other areas of forensic science. This webwatch considers the ever evolving area of Forensic Computing.

  6. Computational approaches to vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrow, H. G.; Tenenbaum, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Vision is examined in terms of a computational process, and the competence, structure, and control of computer vision systems are analyzed. Theoretical and experimental data on the formation of a computer vision system are discussed. Consideration is given to early vision, the recovery of intrinsic surface characteristics, higher levels of interpretation, and system integration and control. A computational visual processing model is proposed and its architecture and operation are described. Examples of state-of-the-art vision systems, which include some of the levels of representation and processing mechanisms, are presented.

  7. Beyond Computer Planning: Managing Educational Computer Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Wenifort

    The vast underutilization of technology in educational environments suggests the need for more research to develop models to successfully adopt and diffuse computer systems in schools. Of 980 surveys mailed to various Ohio public schools, 529 were completed and returned to help determine current attitudes and perceptions of teachers and…

  8. Educational Computer Utilization and Computer Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Jai P.; Morgan, Robert P.

    As part of an analysis of educational needs and telecommunications requirements for future educational satellite systems, three studies were carried out. 1) The role of the computer in education was examined and both current status and future requirements were analyzed. Trade-offs between remote time sharing and remote batch process were explored…

  9. Computer Confrontation: Suppes and Albrecht

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suppes, Patrick; Albrecht, Bob

    1973-01-01

    Two well-known computer specialists argue about the function of computers in schools. Patrick Suppes believes mastery of basic skills is the prime function of computers. Bob Albrecht believes computers should be learning devices and not drill masters. (DS)

  10. Introduction: The Computer After Me

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt, Jeremy

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Computer Awareness in Science Fiction * Computer Awareness and Self-Awareness * How many senses does a computer have? * Does a computer know that it is a computer? * Does metal know when it is weakening? * Why Does Computer Awareness Matter? * Chapter Overviews * Summary and Conclusions

  11. Computer Awareness for Rural Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Bruce O.

    The meteoric rise of the computer age is a challenge for public educators, many of whom are still unfamiliar with basic computer technology. Yet many educators are finding that they can correct their misconceptions about computers by becoming "computer aware." Computer awareness comes from gaining a knowledge of computer history; a basic…

  12. Computers in Composition Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shostak, Robert, Ed.

    This volume consists of nine conference papers and journal articles concerned with microcomputer applications in the teaching of writing. After a general introduction entitled "Computer-Assisted Composition Instruction: The State of the Art," by Robert Shostak, four papers are devoted to how computers may help with the writing process. In…

  13. Computer Virus Protection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajala, Judith B.

    2004-01-01

    A computer virus is a program--a piece of executable code--that has the unique ability to replicate. Like biological viruses, computer viruses can spread quickly and are often difficult to eradicate. They can attach themselves to just about any type of file, and are spread by replicating and being sent from one individual to another. Simply having…

  14. Preventing Computer Glitches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsborough, Reid

    2009-01-01

    It has been said that a computer lets a person make more mistakes faster than any other invention in human history, with the possible exceptions of handguns and tequila. Computers also make mistakes on their own, whether they're glitches, conflicts, bugs, crashes, or failures. Avoiding glitches is considerably less frustrating than trying to fix…

  15. Flexible Animation Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Scott S.

    1990-01-01

    FLEXAN (Flexible Animation), computer program animating structural dynamics on Evans and Sutherland PS300-series graphics workstation with VAX/VMS host computer. Typical application is animation of spacecraft undergoing structural stresses caused by thermal and vibrational effects. Displays distortions in shape of spacecraft. Program displays single natural mode of vibration, mode history, or any general deformation of flexible structure. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  16. Computer Anxiety and Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgarte, Roger

    While the computer is commonly viewed as a tool for simplifying and enriching lives, many individuals react to this technology with feelings of anxiety, paranoia, and alienation. These reactions may have potentially serious career and educational consequences. Fear of computers reflects a generalized fear of current technology and is most…

  17. Profiling Computing Coordinators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Sigrid; Morton, Allan

    The people responsible for managing school computing resources in Australia have become known as Computing Coordinators. To date there has been no large systematic study of the role, responsibilities and characteristics of this position. This paper represents a first attempt to provide information on the functions and attributes of the Computing…

  18. Computational physics: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Stoneham, A M

    2002-06-15

    Computing comprises three distinct strands: hardware, software and the ways they are used in real or imagined worlds. Its use in research is more than writing or running code. Having something significant to compute and deploying judgement in what is attempted and achieved are especially challenging. In science or engineering, one must define a central problem in computable form, run such software as is appropriate and, last but by no means least, convince others that the results are both valid and useful. These several strands are highly interdependent. A major scientific development can transform disparate aspects of information and computer technologies. Computers affect the way we do science, as well as changing our personal worlds. Access to information is being transformed, with consequences beyond research or even science. Creativity in research is usually considered uniquely human, with inspiration a central factor. Scientific and technological needs are major forces in innovation, and these include hardware and software opportunities. One can try to define the scientific needs for established technologies (atomic energy, the early semiconductor industry), for rapidly developing technologies (advanced materials, microelectronics) and for emerging technologies (nanotechnology, novel information technologies). Did these needs define new computing, or was science diverted into applications of then-available codes? Regarding credibility, why is it that engineers accept computer realizations when designing engineered structures, whereas predictive modelling of materials has yet to achieve industrial confidence outside very special cases? The tensions between computing and traditional science are complex, unpredictable and potentially powerful.

  19. Campus Computing Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCredie, John W., Ed.

    Ten case studies that describe the planning process and strategies employed by colleges who use computing and communication systems are presented, based on a 1981-1982 study conducted by EDUCOM. An introduction by John W. McCredie summarizes several current and future effects of the rapid spread and integration of computing and communication…

  20. Computer-assisted Crystallization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semeister, Joseph J., Jr.; Dowden, Edward

    1989-01-01

    To avoid a tedious task for recording temperature, a computer was used for calculating the heat of crystallization for the compound sodium thiosulfate. Described are the computer-interfacing procedures. Provides pictures of laboratory equipment and typical graphs from experiments. (YP)

  1. COMPUTER MODELS/EPANET

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pipe network flow analysis was among the first civil engineering applications programmed for solution on the early commercial mainframe computers in the 1960s. Since that time, advancements in analytical techniques and computing power have enabled us to solve systems with tens o...

  2. Computers and Personal Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Willis H.

    Privacy is an issue that arises from the intersection of a demand for improved recordkeeping processes, and computing technology as the response to the demand. Recordkeeping in the United States centers on information about people. Modern day computing technology has the ability to maintain, store, and retrieve records quickly; however, this…

  3. Computer Assisted Learning Feature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Peter; Minogue, Claire

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the goals of the Computer Working Party in Great Britain, presenting their assessment of current computer hardware and the market for economics software. Examines "Running the British Economy," a macroeconomic policy simulation that investigates the links between values and policy objectives and encourages questioning of economic models.…

  4. Administration of Computer Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Gene F.

    Computing at Stanford University has, until recently, been performed at one of five facilities. The Stanford hospital operates an IBM 370/135 mainly for administrative use. The university business office has an IBM 370/145 for its administrative needs and support of the medical clinic. Under the supervision of the Stanford Computation Center are…

  5. African Studies Computer Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Patricia S.

    African studies computer resources that are readily available in the United States with linkages to Africa are described, highlighting those most directly corresponding to African content. Africanists can use the following four fundamental computer systems: (1) Internet/Bitnet; (2) Fidonet; (3) Usenet; and (4) dial-up bulletin board services. The…

  6. Decoding Technology: Computer Shortcuts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Tim; Donohue, Chip

    2008-01-01

    For the typical early childhood administrator, there will never be enough hours in a day to finish the work that needs to be done. This includes numerous hours spent on a computer tracking enrollment, managing the budget, researching curriculum ideas online, and many other administrative tasks. Improving an administrator's computer efficiency can…

  7. Computer Series, 78.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, John W., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Presents six brief articles dealing with the use of computers in teaching various topics in chemistry. Describes hardware and software applications which relate to protein graphics, computer simulated metabolism, interfaces between microcomputers and measurement devices, courseware available for spectrophotometers, and the calculation of elemental…

  8. Computer Series, 112.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birk, James P., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Four microcomputer applications are presented including: "Computer Simulated Process of 'Lead Optimization': A Student-Interactive Program,""A PROLOG Program for the Generation of Molecular Formulas,""Determination of Inflection Points from Experimental Data," and "LAOCOON PC: NMR Simulation on a Personal Computer." Software, availability,…

  9. The Overdominance of Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monke, Lowell W.

    2006-01-01

    Most schools are unwilling to consider decreasing computer use at school because they fear that without screen time, students will not be prepared for the demands of a high-tech 21st century. Monke argues that having young children spend a significant amount of time on computers in school is harmful, particularly when children spend so much…

  10. ELECTRONIC DIGITAL COMPUTER

    DOEpatents

    Stone, J.J. Jr.; Bettis, E.S.; Mann, E.R.

    1957-10-01

    The electronic digital computer is designed to solve systems involving a plurality of simultaneous linear equations. The computer can solve a system which converges rather rapidly when using Von Seidel's method of approximation and performs the summations required for solving for the unknown terms by a method of successive approximations.

  11. Computer analysis of arteriograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, R. H.; Armstrong, J. H.; Beckenbach, E. B.; Blankenhorn, D. H.; Crawford, D. W.; Brooks, S. H.; Sanmarco, M. E.

    1977-01-01

    A computer system has been developed to quantify the degree of atherosclerosis in the human femoral artery. The analysis involves first scanning and digitizing angiographic film, then tracking the outline of the arterial image and finally computing the relative amount of roughness or irregularity in the vessel wall. The image processing system and method are described.

  12. Teaching Computer Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundgren, Carol A.; And Others

    This document, which is designed to provide classroom teachers at all levels with practical ideas for a computer applications course, examines curricular considerations, teaching strategies, delivery techniques, and assessment methods applicable to a course focusing on applications of computers in business. The guide is divided into three…

  13. Computers, Networks and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Alan C.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is how globally networked, easy-to-use computers can enhance learning only within an educational environment that encourages students to question "facts" and seek challenges. The strengths and weaknesses of computers used as amplifiers for learning are described. (KR)

  14. Can Computers Create?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hausman, Carl R.

    1985-01-01

    To be creative, an act must have as its outcome something new in the way it is intelligible and valuable. Computers have restricted contexts of information and have no ability to weigh bits of information. Computer optimists presuppose either determinism or indeterminism, either of which abandons creativity. (MT)

  15. Computer Dictionary and Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sippl, Charles J.; Sippl, Charles P.

    Designed to provide a useful tool for the instruction and increased awareness of the growing number of computer users throughout the world, this edition of the dictionary was based on an information search which provided 22,000 separate definitions and concept explanations. Appended are an introduction to computer system principles and procedures,…

  16. The Computer Bulletin Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batt, Russell, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes three situations in which computer software was used in a chemistry laboratory. Discusses interfacing voltage output instruments with Apple II computers and using spreadsheet programs to simulate gas chromatography and analysis of kinetic data. Includes information concerning procedures, hardware, and software used in each situation. (CW)

  17. Teaching Using Computer Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lee Dee; Shell, Duane; Khandaker, Nobel; Soh, Leen-Kiat

    2011-01-01

    Computer games have long been used for teaching. Current reviews lack categorization and analysis using learning models which would help instructors assess the usefulness of computer games. We divide the use of games into two classes: game playing and game development. We discuss the Input-Process-Outcome (IPO) model for the learning process when…

  18. Uncertainty in Computational Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.; Hemsch, M. J.; Morrison, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    An approach is presented to treat computational aerodynamics as a process, subject to the fundamental quality assurance principles of process control and process improvement. We consider several aspects affecting uncertainty for the computational aerodynamic process and present a set of stages to determine the level of management required to meet risk assumptions desired by the customer of the predictions.

  19. Quantum Analog Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum analog computing is based upon similarity between mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics and phenomena to be computed. It exploits a dynamical convergence of several competing phenomena to an attractor which can represent an externum of a function, an image, a solution to a system of ODE, or a stochastic process.

  20. Connecting Kids and Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Rebecca McMahon

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to cell phones, DVD players, video games, computers, digital cameras, and iPods has made today's young people more technologically advanced than those of any previous generation. As a result, parents are now concerned that their children are spending too much time in front of the computer. In this article, the author focuses her…

  1. Computer Yearbook 72.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1972

    Recent and expected developments in the computer industry are discussed in this 628-page yearbook, successor to "The Punched Card Annual." The first section of the report is an overview of current computer hardware and software and includes articles about future applications of mainframes, an analysis of the software industry, and a summary of the…

  2. Computer Aided Art Major.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Jim

    The Computer Aided Art program offered at Northern State State University (Aberdeen, South Dakota), is coordinated with the traditional art major. The program is designed to familiarize students with a wide range of art-related computer hardware and software and their applications and to prepare students for problem-solving with unfamiliar…

  3. Computer Support Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This publication contains 18 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the occupation of computer support technician, 1 of 12 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Each unit consists of a number of competencies; a list of competency builders is provided for each competency. Titles of the 18 units are as…

  4. Computer Programmer/Analyst.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This publication contains 25 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the occupation of computer programmer/analyst, 1 of 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Each unit consists of a number of competencies; a list of competency builders is provided for each competency. Titles of the 25 units are as…

  5. Computer Communications and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellman, Beryl L.

    1992-01-01

    Computer conferencing offers many opportunities for linking college students and faculty at a distance. From the Binational English and Spanish Telecommunications Network (BESTNET) has evolved a variety of bilingual video/computer/face-to-face instructional packages to serve institutions and nontraditional students on several continents. (MSE)

  6. Computer controlled antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raumann, N. A.

    1972-01-01

    The application of small computers using digital techniques for operating the servo and control system of large antennas is discussed. The advantages of the system are described. The techniques were evaluated with a forty foot antenna and the Sigma V computer. Programs have been completed which drive the antenna directly without the need for a servo amplifier, antenna position programmer or a scan generator.

  7. Computers and Classroom Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schofield, Janet Ward

    This book explores the meaning of computer technology in schools. The book is based on data gathered from a two-year observation of more than 30 different classrooms in an urban high school: geometry classes in which students used artificially intelligent tutors; business classes in which students learned word processing; and computer science…

  8. Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haugo, John E.

    The state of Minnesota has established the Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium (MECC) to coordinate the state's educational computing activities. The Consortium is governed by a board of directors representing the State Department of Education, the State Junior Colleges, the State Colleges, the State University and the public and is…

  9. Learning through Computer Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Ludwig

    Prior to the relatively easy access to computers which began in the mid-1960's, simulation was a tool only of researchers. Even now, students are frequently excluded from direct laboratory experiences for many reasons. However, computer simulation can open up these experiences, providing a powerful teaching tool for individuals, for small and…

  10. The Case for Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCEL Newsletter for the Business Community, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Given the large gap between the millions of adults in need of basic literacy skills and the shortage of teachers, tutors, and funds to serve them, computer-assisted instruction (CAI) has the potential to reduce the gap. The merits of CAI include its holding power, provision of a positive learning environment, opportunity to learn about computers,…

  11. Computer Processor Allocator

    2004-03-01

    The Compute Processor Allocator (CPA) provides an efficient and reliable mechanism for managing and allotting processors in a massively parallel (MP) computer. It maintains information in a database on the health. configuration and allocation of each processor. This persistent information is factored in to each allocation decision. The CPA runs in a distributed fashion to avoid a single point of failure.

  12. Computers as Cognitive Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lajoie, Susanne P., Ed.; Derry, Sharon J., Ed.

    This book provides exemplars of the types of computer-based learning environments represented by the theoretical camps within the field and the practical applications of the theories. The contributors discuss a variety of computer applications to learning, ranging from school-related topics such as geometry, algebra, biology, history, physics, and…

  13. The Computer Bulletin Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batt, Russell H., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are some uses of computers in chemistry classrooms. Described are: (1) interactive chromatographic analysis software; (2) computer interface for a digital frequency-period-counter-ratio meter and analog interface based on a voltage-to-frequency converter; and (3) use of spectrometer/microcomputer arrangement for teaching atomic theory.…

  14. Programming the social computer.

    PubMed

    Robertson, David; Giunchiglia, Fausto

    2013-03-28

    The aim of 'programming the global computer' was identified by Milner and others as one of the grand challenges of computing research. At the time this phrase was coined, it was natural to assume that this objective might be achieved primarily through extending programming and specification languages. The Internet, however, has brought with it a different style of computation that (although harnessing variants of traditional programming languages) operates in a style different to those with which we are familiar. The 'computer' on which we are running these computations is a social computer in the sense that many of the elementary functions of the computations it runs are performed by humans, and successful execution of a program often depends on properties of the human society over which the program operates. These sorts of programs are not programmed in a traditional way and may have to be understood in a way that is different from the traditional view of programming. This shift in perspective raises new challenges for the science of the Web and for computing in general.

  15. K-12 Computer Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Review, 1993

    1993-01-01

    The "ERIC Review" is published three times a year and announces research results, publications, and new programs relevant to each issue's theme topic. This issue explores computer networking in elementary and secondary schools via two principal articles: "Plugging into the 'Net'" (Michael B. Eisenberg and Donald P. Ely); and "Computer Networks for…

  16. Logic via Computer Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieschenberg, Agnes A.

    This paper proposed the question "How do we teach logical thinking and sophisticated mathematics to unsophisticated college students?" One answer among many is through the writing of computer programs. The writing of computer algorithms is mathematical problem solving and logic in disguise and it may attract students who would otherwise stop…

  17. Chippy's Computer Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willing, Kathlene R.; Girard, Suzanne

    Intended for young children just becoming familiar with computers, this naming book introduces and reinforces new computer vocabulary and concepts. The 20 words are presented alphabetically, along with illustrations, providing room for different activities in which children can match and name the pictures and words. The 20 vocabulary items are…

  18. Computer Series, 97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Jack G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two applications of the microcomputer for laboratory exercises. Explores radioactive decay using the Batemen equations on a Macintosh computer. Provides examples and screen dumps of data. Investigates polymer configurations using a Monte Carlo simulation on an IBM personal computer. (MVL)

  19. Computer Technology for Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In this age of the computer, more and more business firms are automating their operations for increased efficiency in a great variety of jobs, from simple accounting to managing inventories, from precise machining to analyzing complex structures. In the interest of national productivity, NASA is providing assistance both to longtime computer users and newcomers to automated operations. Through a special technology utilization service, NASA saves industry time and money by making available already developed computer programs which have secondary utility. A computer program is essentially a set of instructions which tells the computer how to produce desired information or effect by drawing upon its stored input. Developing a new program from scratch can be costly and time-consuming. Very often, however, a program developed for one purpose can readily be adapted to a totally different application. To help industry take advantage of existing computer technology, NASA operates the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC)(registered TradeMark),located at the University of Georgia. COSMIC maintains a large library of computer programs developed for NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy and other technology-generating agencies of the government. The Center gets a continual flow of software packages, screens them for adaptability to private sector usage, stores them and informs potential customers of their availability.

  20. Videodisc-Computer Interfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zollman, Dean

    1984-01-01

    Lists microcomputer-videodisc interfaces currently available from 26 sources, including home use systems connected through remote control jack and industrial/educational systems utilizing computer ports and new laser reflective and stylus technology. Information provided includes computer and videodisc type, language, authoring system, educational…

  1. Computed body tomography.

    PubMed

    Alfidi, R J; Haaga, J R

    1976-12-01

    Only the surface of the diagnostic possibilities inherent in CT imaging has been scratched. Solic organ pathology is readily visible in most instances by computed tomography. With further extension of present knowledge and development of newer contrast agents, the ability of computed body tomography to image a wide range of diseases appears almost limitless.

  2. Marketing via Computer Diskette.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thombs, Michael

    This report describes the development and evaluation of an interactive marketing diskette which describes the characteristics, advantages, and application procedures for each of the major computer-based graduate programs at Nova University. Copies of the diskettes were distributed at the 1988 Florida Instructional Computing Conference and were…

  3. Computers in Fundamental Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Computer Information Services.

    This manual provides a resource for mathematics teachers who wish to take advantage of the extensive library of computer software materials available to expand and strengthen classroom instruction. Classroom management procedures, software duplication guidelines, copying procedures of diskettes for MS DOS and Apple II computers, and methods for…

  4. Learning with Ubiquitous Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenheck, Louisa

    2008-01-01

    If ubiquitous computing becomes a reality and is widely adopted, it will inevitably have an impact on education. This article reviews the background of ubiquitous computing and current research projects done involving educational "ubicomp." Finally it explores how ubicomp may and may not change education in both formal and informal settings and…

  5. The Economics of Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharpe, William F.

    A microeconomic theory is applied in this book to computer services and costs and for the benefit of those who are decision-makers in the selection, financing, and use of computers. Subtopics of the theory discussed include value and demand; revenue and profits; time and risk; and costs, inputs, and outputs. Application of the theory is explained…

  6. Computations in Plasma Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Bruce I.; Killeen, John

    1983-01-01

    Discusses contributions of computers to research in magnetic and inertial-confinement fusion, charged-particle-beam propogation, and space sciences. Considers use in design/control of laboratory and spacecraft experiments and in data acquisition; and reviews major plasma computational methods and some of the important physics problems they…

  7. A Home Computer Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Antonia

    1982-01-01

    Provides general information on currently available microcomputers, computer programs (software), hardware requirements, software sources, costs, computer games, and programing. Includes a list of popular microcomputers, providing price category, model, list price, software (cassette, tape, disk), monitor specifications, amount of random access…

  8. Computational Modeling of Tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Tanner, John A. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains presentations and discussions from the joint UVA/NASA Workshop on Computational Modeling of Tires. The workshop attendees represented NASA, the Army and Air force, tire companies, commercial software developers, and academia. The workshop objectives were to assess the state of technology in the computational modeling of tires and to provide guidelines for future research.

  9. Computer Experience of Nurses.

    PubMed

    Schleder Gonçalves, Luciana; Cândida Castro, Talita; Fialek, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the computing experience of nurses in southern Brazil, through exploratory survey research. The results, which were obtained from the application of The Staggers Nursing Computer Experience Questionnaire®, were analyzed by statistical tests. The survey was conducted with nurses working both in hospitals, as in public health, in a capital in southern Brazil. There is the predominance of novice nurses in the application of computer tools in their practices but most often declare the use the computers to develop their professional and also personal life activities. We conclude that the computer and health information systems are part of the working reality of the participants, being considered indispensable resources his activity, while noting limitations on the potential use of these tools. This study reflects on how the issue has been addressed in educational schools and the challenges of inclusion of the theme of Nursing Informatics in the curricula in Brazil. PMID:26262313

  10. Symmetry Effects in Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Andrew Chi-Chih

    2008-12-01

    The concept of symmetry has played a key role in the development of modern physics. For example, using symmetry, C.N. Yang and other physicists have greatly advanced our understanding of the fundamental laws of physics. Meanwhile, computer scientists have been pondering why some computational problems seem intractable, while others are easy. Just as in physics, the laws of computation sometimes can only be inferred indirectly by considerations of general principles such as symmetry. The symmetry properties of a function can indeed have a profound effect on how fast the function can be computed. In this talk, we present several elegant and surprising discoveries along this line, made by computer scientists using symmetry as their primary tool. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  11. Indirection and computer security.

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Michael J.

    2011-09-01

    The discipline of computer science is built on indirection. David Wheeler famously said, 'All problems in computer science can be solved by another layer of indirection. But that usually will create another problem'. We propose that every computer security vulnerability is yet another problem created by the indirections in system designs and that focusing on the indirections involved is a better way to design, evaluate, and compare security solutions. We are not proposing that indirection be avoided when solving problems, but that understanding the relationships between indirections and vulnerabilities is key to securing computer systems. Using this perspective, we analyze common vulnerabilities that plague our computer systems, consider the effectiveness of currently available security solutions, and propose several new security solutions.

  12. (Computer) Vision without Sight

    PubMed Central

    Manduchi, Roberto; Coughlan, James

    2012-01-01

    Computer vision holds great promise for helping persons with blindness or visual impairments (VI) to interpret and explore the visual world. To this end, it is worthwhile to assess the situation critically by understanding the actual needs of the VI population and which of these needs might be addressed by computer vision. This article reviews the types of assistive technology application areas that have already been developed for VI, and the possible roles that computer vision can play in facilitating these applications. We discuss how appropriate user interfaces are designed to translate the output of computer vision algorithms into information that the user can quickly and safely act upon, and how system-level characteristics affect the overall usability of an assistive technology. Finally, we conclude by highlighting a few novel and intriguing areas of application of computer vision to assistive technology. PMID:22815563

  13. Next-generation computers

    SciTech Connect

    Torrero, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    Developments related to tomorrow's computers are discussed, taking into account advances toward the fifth generation in Japan, the challenge to U.S. supercomputers, plans concerning the creation of supersmart computers for the U.S. military, a U.S. industry response to the Japanese challenge, a survey of U.S. and European research, Great Britain, the European Common Market, codifying human knowledge for machine reading, software engineering, the next-generation softwave, plans for obtaining the million-transistor chip, and fabrication issues for next-generation circuits. Other topics explored are related to a status report regarding artificial intelligence, an assessment of the technical challenges, aspects of sociotechnology, and defense advanced research projects. Attention is also given to expert systems, speech recognition, computer vision, function-level programming and automated programming, computing at the speed limit, VLSI, and superpower computers.

  14. Onward to Petaflops Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    With programs such as the US High Performance Computing and Communications Program (HPCCP), the attention of scientists and engineers worldwide has been focused on the potential of very high performance scientific computing, namely systems that are hundreds or thousands of times more powerful than those typically available in desktop systems at any given point in time. Extending the frontiers of computing in this manner has resulted in remarkable advances, both in computing technology itself and also in the various scientific and engineering disciplines that utilize these systems. Within the month or two, a sustained rate of 1 Tflop/s (also written 1 teraflops, or 10(exp 12) floating-point operations per second) is likely to be achieved by the 'ASCI Red' system at Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico. With this objective in sight, it is reasonable to ask what lies ahead for high-end computing.

  15. Pen-based computers: Computers without keys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conklin, Cheryl L.

    1994-01-01

    The National Space Transportation System (NSTS) is comprised of many diverse and highly complex systems incorporating the latest technologies. Data collection associated with ground processing of the various Space Shuttle system elements is extremely challenging due to the many separate processing locations where data is generated. This presents a significant problem when the timely collection, transfer, collation, and storage of data is required. This paper describes how new technology, referred to as Pen-Based computers, is being used to transform the data collection process at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Pen-Based computers have streamlined procedures, increased data accuracy, and now provide more complete information than previous methods. The end results is the elimination of Shuttle processing delays associated with data deficiencies.

  16. Computational electromagnetics and parallel dense matrix computations

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, K.; Kettunen, L.; Gropp, W.; Levine, D.

    1995-06-01

    We present computational results using CORAL, a parallel, three-dimensional, nonlinear magnetostatic code based on a volume integral equation formulation. A key feature of CORAL is the ability to solve, in parallel, the large, dense systems of linear equations that are inherent in the use of integral equation methods. Using the Chameleon and PSLES libraries ensures portability and access to the latest linear algebra solution technology.

  17. Coping with distributed computing

    SciTech Connect

    Cormell, L.

    1992-09-01

    The rapid increase in the availability of high performance, cost-effective RISC/UNIX workstations has been both a blessing and a curse. The blessing of having extremely powerful computing engines available on the desk top is well-known to many users. The user has tremendous freedom, flexibility, and control of his environment. That freedom can, however, become the curse of distributed computing. The user must become a system manager to some extent, he must worry about backups, maintenance, upgrades, etc. Traditionally these activities have been the responsibility of a central computing group. The central computing group, however, may find that it can no longer provide all of the traditional services. With the plethora of workstations now found on so many desktops throughout the entire campus or lab, the central computing group may be swamped by support requests. This talk will address several of these computer support and management issues by providing some examples of the approaches taken at various HEP institutions. In addition, a brief review of commercial directions or products for distributed computing and management will be given.

  18. Computing with synthetic protocells.

    PubMed

    Courbet, Alexis; Molina, Franck; Amar, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    In this article we present a new kind of computing device that uses biochemical reactions networks as building blocks to implement logic gates. The architecture of a computing machine relies on these generic and composable building blocks, computation units, that can be used in multiple instances to perform complex boolean functions. Standard logical operations are implemented by biochemical networks, encapsulated and insulated within synthetic vesicles called protocells. These protocells are capable of exchanging energy and information with each other through transmembrane electron transfer. In the paradigm of computation we propose, protoputing, a machine can solve only one problem and therefore has to be built specifically. Thus, the programming phase in the standard computing paradigm is represented in our approach by the set of assembly instructions (specific attachments) that directs the wiring of the protocells that constitute the machine itself. To demonstrate the computing power of protocellular machines, we apply it to solve a NP-complete problem, known to be very demanding in computing power, the 3-SAT problem. We show how to program the assembly of a machine that can verify the satisfiability of a given boolean formula. Then we show how to use the massive parallelism of these machines to verify in less than 20 min all the valuations of the input variables and output a fluorescent signal when the formula is satisfiable or no signal at all otherwise.

  19. Community Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinos, Alexandros; Briscoe, Gerard

    Cloud Computing is rising fast, with its data centres growing at an unprecedented rate. However, this has come with concerns over privacy, efficiency at the expense of resilience, and environmental sustainability, because of the dependence on Cloud vendors such as Google, Amazon and Microsoft. Our response is an alternative model for the Cloud conceptualisation, providing a paradigm for Clouds in the community, utilising networked personal computers for liberation from the centralised vendor model. Community Cloud Computing (C3) offers an alternative architecture, created by combing the Cloud with paradigms from Grid Computing, principles from Digital Ecosystems, and sustainability from Green Computing, while remaining true to the original vision of the Internet. It is more technically challenging than Cloud Computing, having to deal with distributed computing issues, including heterogeneous nodes, varying quality of service, and additional security constraints. However, these are not insurmountable challenges, and with the need to retain control over our digital lives and the potential environmental consequences, it is a challenge we must pursue.

  20. Computers as tools

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, I.V.

    1994-12-31

    The following message was recently posted on a bulletin board and clearly shows the relevance of the conference theme: {open_quotes}The computer and digital networks seem poised to change whole regions of human activity -- how we record knowledge, communicate, learn, work, understand ourselves and the world. What`s the best framework for understanding this digitalization, or virtualization, of seemingly everything? ... Clearly, symbolic tools like the alphabet, book, and mechanical clock have changed some of our most fundamental notions -- self, identity, mind, nature, time, space. Can we say what the computer, a purely symbolic {open_quotes}machine,{close_quotes} is doing to our thinking in these areas? Or is it too early to say, given how much more powerful and less expensive the technology seems destinated to become in the next few decades?{close_quotes} (Verity, 1994) Computers certainly affect our lives and way of thinking but what have computers to do with ethics? A narrow approach would be that on the one hand people can and do abuse computer systems and on the other hand people can be abused by them. Weli known examples of the former are computer comes such as the theft of money, services and information. The latter can be exemplified by violation of privacy, health hazards and computer monitoring. Broadening the concept from computers to information systems (ISs) and information technology (IT) gives a wider perspective. Computers are just the hardware part of information systems which also include software, people and data. Information technology is the concept preferred today. It extends to communication, which is an essential part of information processing. Now let us repeat the question: What has IT to do with ethics? Verity mentioned changes in {open_quotes}how we record knowledge, communicate, learn, work, understand ourselves and the world{close_quotes}.

  1. NEMAR plotting computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myler, T. R.

    1981-01-01

    A FORTRAN coded computer program which generates CalComp plots of trajectory parameters is examined. The trajectory parameters are calculated and placed on a data file by the Near Earth Mission Analysis Routine computer program. The plot program accesses the data file and generates the plots as defined by inputs to the plot program. Program theory, user instructions, output definitions, subroutine descriptions and detailed FORTRAN coding information are included. Although this plot program utilizes a random access data file, a data file of the same type and formatted in 102 numbers per record could be generated by any computer program and used by this plot program.

  2. Interactive computer graphics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purser, K.

    1980-08-01

    Design layouts have traditionally been done on a drafting board by drawing a two-dimensional representation with section cuts and side views to describe the exact three-dimensional model. With the advent of computer graphics, a three-dimensional model can be created directly. The computer stores the exact three-dimensional model, which can be examined from any angle and at any scale. A brief overview of interactive computer graphics, how models are made and some of the benefits/limitations are described.

  3. Computational biology for ageing.

    PubMed

    Wieser, Daniela; Papatheodorou, Irene; Ziehm, Matthias; Thornton, Janet M

    2011-01-12

    High-throughput genomic and proteomic technologies have generated a wealth of publicly available data on ageing. Easy access to these data, and their computational analysis, is of great importance in order to pinpoint the causes and effects of ageing. Here, we provide a description of the existing databases and computational tools on ageing that are available for researchers. We also describe the computational approaches to data interpretation in the field of ageing including gene expression, comparative and pathway analyses, and highlight the challenges for future developments. We review recent biological insights gained from applying bioinformatics methods to analyse and interpret ageing data in different organisms, tissues and conditions.

  4. High Performance Computing Today

    SciTech Connect

    Dongarra, Jack; Meuer,Hans; Simon,Horst D.; Strohmaier,Erich

    2000-04-01

    In last 50 years, the field of scientific computing has seen a rapid change of vendors, architectures, technologies and the usage of systems. Despite all these changes the evolution of performance on a large scale however seems to be a very steady and continuous process. Moore's Law is often cited in this context. If the authors plot the peak performance of various computers of the last 5 decades in Figure 1 that could have been called the supercomputers of their time they indeed see how well this law holds for almost the complete lifespan of modern computing. On average they see an increase in performance of two magnitudes of order every decade.

  5. Human Computer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwani, Akhilesh; Sengar, Chitransh; Talwaniper, Jyotsna; Sharma, Shaan

    2012-08-01

    The paper basically deals with the study of HCI (Human computer interaction) or BCI(Brain-Computer-Interfaces) Technology that can be used for capturing brain signals and translating them into commands that allow humans to control (just by thinking) devices such as computers, robots, rehabilitation technology and virtual reality environments. The HCI is based as a direct communication pathway between the brain and an external device. BCIs are often aimed at assisting, augmenting, or repairing human cognitive or sensory-motor functions.The paper also deals with many advantages of BCI Technology along with some of its applications and some major drawbacks.

  6. Optoelectronic reservoir computing.

    PubMed

    Paquot, Y; Duport, F; Smerieri, A; Dambre, J; Schrauwen, B; Haelterman, M; Massar, S

    2012-01-01

    Reservoir computing is a recently introduced, highly efficient bio-inspired approach for processing time dependent data. The basic scheme of reservoir computing consists of a non linear recurrent dynamical system coupled to a single input layer and a single output layer. Within these constraints many implementations are possible. Here we report an optoelectronic implementation of reservoir computing based on a recently proposed architecture consisting of a single non linear node and a delay line. Our implementation is sufficiently fast for real time information processing. We illustrate its performance on tasks of practical importance such as nonlinear channel equalization and speech recognition, and obtain results comparable to state of the art digital implementations.

  7. Computational Tractability - Beyond Turing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcer, Peter; Rowlands, Peter

    A fundamental problem in the theory of computing concerns whether descriptions of systems at all times remain tractable, that is whether the complexity that inevitably results can be reduced to a polynomial form (P) or whether some problems lead to a non-polynomial (NP) exponential growth in complexity. Here, we propose that the universal computational rewrite system that can be shown to be responsible ultimately for the development of mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology and even human consciousness, is so structured that Nature will always be structured as P at any scale and so will be computationally tractable.

  8. Computational biology for ageing

    PubMed Central

    Wieser, Daniela; Papatheodorou, Irene; Ziehm, Matthias; Thornton, Janet M.

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput genomic and proteomic technologies have generated a wealth of publicly available data on ageing. Easy access to these data, and their computational analysis, is of great importance in order to pinpoint the causes and effects of ageing. Here, we provide a description of the existing databases and computational tools on ageing that are available for researchers. We also describe the computational approaches to data interpretation in the field of ageing including gene expression, comparative and pathway analyses, and highlight the challenges for future developments. We review recent biological insights gained from applying bioinformatics methods to analyse and interpret ageing data in different organisms, tissues and conditions. PMID:21115530

  9. Research in Computational Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina; Colombano, Silvano; Scargle, Jeff; New, Michael H.; Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    We report on several projects in the field of computational astrobiology, which is devoted to advancing our understanding of the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the Universe using theoretical and computational tools. Research projects included modifying existing computer simulation codes to use efficient, multiple time step algorithms, statistical methods for analysis of astrophysical data via optimal partitioning methods, electronic structure calculations on water-nuclei acid complexes, incorporation of structural information into genomic sequence analysis methods and calculations of shock-induced formation of polycylic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds.

  10. Convergence: Computing and communications

    SciTech Connect

    Catlett, C.

    1996-12-31

    This paper highlights the operations of the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). NCSA is developing and implementing a national strategy to create, use, and transfer advanced computing and communication tools and information technologies for science, engineering, education, and business. The primary focus of the presentation is historical and expected growth in the computing capacity, personal computer performance, and Internet and WorldWide Web sites. Data are presented to show changes over the past 10 to 20 years in these areas. 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Teaching Physics with Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botet, R.; Trizac, E.

    2005-09-01

    Computers are now so common in our everyday life that it is difficult to imagine the computer-free scientific life of the years before the 1980s. And yet, in spite of an unquestionable rise, the use of computers in the realm of education is still in its infancy. This is not a problem with students: for the new generation, the pre-computer age seems as far in the past as the the age of the dinosaurs. It may instead be more a question of teacher attitude. Traditional education is based on centuries of polished concepts and equations, while computers require us to think differently about our method of teaching, and to revise the content accordingly. Our brains do not work in terms of numbers, but use abstract and visual concepts; hence, communication between computer and man boomed when computers escaped the world of numbers to reach a visual interface. From this time on, computers have generated new knowledge and, more importantly for teaching, new ways to grasp concepts. Therefore, just as real experiments were the starting point for theory, virtual experiments can be used to understand theoretical concepts. But there are important differences. Some of them are fundamental: a virtual experiment may allow for the exploration of length and time scales together with a level of microscopic complexity not directly accessible to conventional experiments. Others are practical: numerical experiments are completely safe, unlike some dangerous but essential laboratory experiments, and are often less expensive. Finally, some numerical approaches are suited only to teaching, as the concept necessary for the physical problem, or its solution, lies beyond the scope of traditional methods. For all these reasons, computers open physics courses to novel concepts, bringing education and research closer. In addition, and this is not a minor point, they respond naturally to the basic pedagogical needs of interactivity, feedback, and individualization of instruction. This is why one can

  12. Optoelectronic Reservoir Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquot, Y.; Duport, F.; Smerieri, A.; Dambre, J.; Schrauwen, B.; Haelterman, M.; Massar, S.

    2012-02-01

    Reservoir computing is a recently introduced, highly efficient bio-inspired approach for processing time dependent data. The basic scheme of reservoir computing consists of a non linear recurrent dynamical system coupled to a single input layer and a single output layer. Within these constraints many implementations are possible. Here we report an optoelectronic implementation of reservoir computing based on a recently proposed architecture consisting of a single non linear node and a delay line. Our implementation is sufficiently fast for real time information processing. We illustrate its performance on tasks of practical importance such as nonlinear channel equalization and speech recognition, and obtain results comparable to state of the art digital implementations.

  13. Computer aided surface representation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, R.E.

    1990-02-19

    The central research problem of this project is the effective representation, computation, and display of surfaces interpolating to information in three or more dimensions. If the given information is located on another surface, then the problem is to construct a surface defined on a surface''. Sometimes properties of an already defined surface are desired, which is geometry processing''. Visualization of multivariate surfaces is possible by means of contouring higher dimensional surfaces. These problems and more are discussed below. The broad sweep from constructive mathematics through computational algorithms to computer graphics illustrations is utilized in this research. The breadth and depth of this research activity makes this research project unique.

  14. Computer surety: computer system inspection guidance. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    This document discusses computer surety in NRC-licensed nuclear facilities from the perspective of physical protection inspectors. It gives background information and a glossary of computer terms, along with threats and computer vulnerabilities, methods used to harden computer elements, and computer audit controls.

  15. Neural computation and the computational theory of cognition.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, Gualtiero; Bahar, Sonya

    2013-04-01

    We begin by distinguishing computationalism from a number of other theses that are sometimes conflated with it. We also distinguish between several important kinds of computation: computation in a generic sense, digital computation, and analog computation. Then, we defend a weak version of computationalism-neural processes are computations in the generic sense. After that, we reject on empirical grounds the common assimilation of neural computation to either analog or digital computation, concluding that neural computation is sui generis. Analog computation requires continuous signals; digital computation requires strings of digits. But current neuroscientific evidence indicates that typical neural signals, such as spike trains, are graded like continuous signals but are constituted by discrete functional elements (spikes); thus, typical neural signals are neither continuous signals nor strings of digits. It follows that neural computation is sui generis. Finally, we highlight three important consequences of a proper understanding of neural computation for the theory of cognition. First, understanding neural computation requires a specially designed mathematical theory (or theories) rather than the mathematical theories of analog or digital computation. Second, several popular views about neural computation turn out to be incorrect. Third, computational theories of cognition that rely on non-neural notions of computation ought to be replaced or reinterpreted in terms of neural computation.

  16. Impact of Classroom Computer Use on Computer Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Matthew E.; And Others

    Increasing use of computer programs for undergraduate psychology education has raised concern over the impact of computer anxiety on educational performance. Additionally, some researchers have indicated that classroom computer use can exacerbate pre-existing computer anxiety. To evaluate the relationship between in-class computer use and computer…

  17. Neural computation and the computational theory of cognition.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, Gualtiero; Bahar, Sonya

    2013-04-01

    We begin by distinguishing computationalism from a number of other theses that are sometimes conflated with it. We also distinguish between several important kinds of computation: computation in a generic sense, digital computation, and analog computation. Then, we defend a weak version of computationalism-neural processes are computations in the generic sense. After that, we reject on empirical grounds the common assimilation of neural computation to either analog or digital computation, concluding that neural computation is sui generis. Analog computation requires continuous signals; digital computation requires strings of digits. But current neuroscientific evidence indicates that typical neural signals, such as spike trains, are graded like continuous signals but are constituted by discrete functional elements (spikes); thus, typical neural signals are neither continuous signals nor strings of digits. It follows that neural computation is sui generis. Finally, we highlight three important consequences of a proper understanding of neural computation for the theory of cognition. First, understanding neural computation requires a specially designed mathematical theory (or theories) rather than the mathematical theories of analog or digital computation. Second, several popular views about neural computation turn out to be incorrect. Third, computational theories of cognition that rely on non-neural notions of computation ought to be replaced or reinterpreted in terms of neural computation. PMID:23126542

  18. Ant-based computing.

    PubMed

    Michael, Loizos

    2009-01-01

    A biologically and physically plausible model for ants and pheromones is proposed. It is argued that the mechanisms described in this model are sufficiently powerful to reproduce the necessary components of universal computation. The claim is supported by illustrating the feasibility of designing arbitrary logic circuits, showing that the interactions of ants and pheromones lead to the expected behavior, and presenting computer simulation results to verify the circuits' working. The conclusions of this study can be taken as evidence that coherent deterministic and centralized computation can emerge from the collective behavior of simple distributed Markovian processes such as those followed by biological ants, but also, more generally, by artificial agents with limited computational and communication abilities. PMID:19239348

  19. Computers Transform an Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simich, Jack

    1982-01-01

    Describes the use of computer technology in the graphics communication industry. Areas that are examined include typesetting, color scanners, communications satellites, page make-up systems, and the business office. (CT)

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... further information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. The risk of serious allergic ... Angiography (CTA) Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... further information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. The risk of serious allergic ... X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses About ...

  2. Quantum steady computation

    SciTech Connect

    Castagnoli, G. )

    1991-08-10

    This paper reports that current conceptions of quantum mechanical computers inherit from conventional digital machines two apparently interacting features, machine imperfection and temporal development of the computational process. On account of machine imperfection, the process would become ideally reversible only in the limiting case of zero speed. Therefore the process is irreversible in practice and cannot be considered to be a fundamental quantum one. By giving up classical features and using a linear, reversible and non-sequential representation of the computational process - not realizable in classical machines - the process can be identified with the mathematical form of a quantum steady state. This form of steady quantum computation would seem to have an important bearing on the notion of cognition.

  3. Computer Assisted Bioreview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballou, Walter E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Documentation and complete listing are provided for an Apple computer program designed to assist students in reviewing biology course content. All questions and answers are contained in data statements which are read into two separate question/answer arrays. (JN)

  4. Computers boost structural technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Venneri, Samuel L.

    1989-01-01

    Derived from matrix methods of structural analysis and finite element methods developed over the last three decades, computational structures technology (CST) blends computer science, numerical analysis, and approximation theory into structural analysis and synthesis. Recent significant advances in CST include stochastic-based modeling, strategies for performing large-scale structural calculations on new computing systems, and the integration of CST with other disciplinary modules for multidisciplinary analysis and design. New methodologies have been developed at NASA for integrated fluid-thermal structural analysis and integrated aerodynamic-structure-control design. The need for multiple views of data for different modules also led to the development of a number of sophisticated data-base management systems. For CST to play a role in the future development of structures technology and in the multidisciplinary design of future flight vehicles, major advances and computational tools are needed in a number of key areas.

  5. Cloud computing security.

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Dongwan; Claycomb, William R.; Urias, Vincent E.

    2010-10-01

    Cloud computing is a paradigm rapidly being embraced by government and industry as a solution for cost-savings, scalability, and collaboration. While a multitude of applications and services are available commercially for cloud-based solutions, research in this area has yet to fully embrace the full spectrum of potential challenges facing cloud computing. This tutorial aims to provide researchers with a fundamental understanding of cloud computing, with the goals of identifying a broad range of potential research topics, and inspiring a new surge in research to address current issues. We will also discuss real implementations of research-oriented cloud computing systems for both academia and government, including configuration options, hardware issues, challenges, and solutions.

  6. Computers in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigg, S. F.

    1986-01-01

    Some ways computers are used in classrooms today and their potential as a tool to enhance instruction are explored. Considered are graphics, lesson planning, test preparation, drill and practice, remedial work, demonstrations, simulations, and introduction to programming. (MNS)

  7. Cars, Computers, and Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suhor, Charles

    1983-01-01

    After comparing the effect of the automobile on society and education in the early 1900's, the author states that present day arguments for drastic educational change because of the power of the computer are premature. (MLF)

  8. Computer security engineering management

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    For best results, computer security should be engineered into a system during its development rather than being appended later on. This paper addresses the implementation of computer security in eight stages through the life cycle of the system; starting with the definition of security policies and ending with continuing support for the security aspects of the system throughout its operational life cycle. Security policy is addressed relative to successive decomposition of security objectives (through policy, standard, and control stages) into system security requirements. This is followed by a discussion of computer security organization and responsibilities. Next the paper directs itself to analysis and management of security-related risks, followed by discussion of design and development of the system itself. Discussion of security test and evaluation preparations, and approval to operate (certification and accreditation), is followed by discussion of computer security training for users is followed by coverage of life cycle support for the security of the system.

  9. Brain-Computer Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Schalk, Gerwin

    2009-01-01

    The theoretical groundwork of the 1930’s and 1940’s and the technical advance of computers in the following decades provided the basis for dramatic increases in human efficiency. While computers continue to evolve, and we can still expect increasing benefits from their use, the interface between humans and computers has begun to present a serious impediment to full realization of the potential payoff. This article is about the theoretical and practical possibility that direct communication between the brain and the computer can be used to overcome this impediment by improving or augmenting conventional forms of human communication. It is about the opportunity that the limitations of our body’s input and output capacities can be overcome using direct interaction with the brain, and it discusses the assumptions, possible limitations, and implications of a technology that I anticipate will be a major source of pervasive changes in the coming decades. PMID:18310804

  10. Modular missile borne computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramseyer, R.; Arnold, R.; Applewhite, H.; Berg, R.

    1980-01-01

    The modular missile borne computer's architecture with emphasis on how that architecture evolved is discussed. A careful analysis is given of both the physical constraints and the processing requirements.

  11. Computers and Early Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banet, Bernard

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect that microelectronic technology will have on elementary education in the decades ahead, and some of the uses of computers as learning aids for young children, including interactive games, tutorial systems, creative activity, and simulation. (MP)

  12. Computers, Networks and Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sproull, Lee; Kiesler, Sara

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are how computer networks can affect the nature of work and the relationships between managers and employees. The differences between face-to-face exchanges and electronic interactions are described. (KR)

  13. Communications, Computers and Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dertouzos, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    The infrastructure created by fusing computing and communications technologies is described. The effect of this infrastructure on the economy and society of the United States is discussed. The importance of knowing the value and role of information is emphasized. (KR)

  14. CMS computing model evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandi, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Colling, D.; Fisk, I.; Girone, M.

    2014-06-01

    The CMS Computing Model was developed and documented in 2004. Since then the model has evolved to be more flexible and to take advantage of new techniques, but many of the original concepts remain and are in active use. In this presentation we will discuss the changes planned for the restart of the LHC program in 2015. We will discuss the changes planning in the use and definition of the computing tiers that were defined with the MONARC project. We will present how we intend to use new services and infrastructure to provide more efficient and transparent access to the data. We will discuss the computing plans to make better use of the computing capacity by scheduling more of the processor nodes, making better use of the disk storage, and more intelligent use of the networking.

  15. The Computer Bulletin Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larrabee, C. E., Jr.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of computer spreadsheet programs in physical chemistry classrooms. Stresses the application of bar graphs to fundamental quantum and statistical mechanics. Lists the advantages of the use of spreadsheets and gives examples of possible uses. (ML)

  16. Goldstone (GDSCC) administrative computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, H.

    1981-01-01

    The GDSCC Data Processing Unit provides various administrative computing services for Goldstone. Those activities, including finance, manpower and station utilization, deep-space station scheduling and engineering change order (ECO) control are discussed.

  17. Biomarkers in Computational Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biomarkers are a means to evaluate chemical exposure and/or the subsequent impacts on toxicity pathways that lead to adverse health outcomes. Computational toxicology can integrate biomarker data with knowledge of exposure, chemistry, biology, pharmacokinetics, toxicology, and e...

  18. Computational Aeroacoustics: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.

    2003-01-01

    An overview of recent advances in computational aeroacoustics (CAA) is presented. CAA algorithms must not be dispersive and dissipative. It should propagate waves supported by the Euler equations with the correct group velocities. Computation domains are inevitably finite in size. To avoid the reflection of acoustic and other outgoing waves at the boundaries of the computation domain, it is required that special boundary conditions be imposed at the boundary region. These boundary conditions either absorb all the outgoing waves without reflection or allow the waves to exit smoothly. High-order schemes, invariably, supports spurious short waves. These spurious waves tend to pollute the numerical solution. They must be selectively damped or filtered out. All these issues and relevant computation methods are briefly reviewed. Jet screech tones are known to have caused structural fatigue in military combat aircrafts. Numerical simulation of the jet screech phenomenon is presented as an example of a successful application of CAA.

  19. The Computer in Lexicography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Richard W.; Robinson, Jay L.

    1973-01-01

    Expanded version of a paper presented to the section on Computer Research in Language and Literature of the Midwest Modern Language Association, October 24, 1969. Article is part of Lexicography and Dialect Geography, Festgabe for Hans Kurath''. (DD)

  20. Quantum information and computation

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.H.

    1995-10-01

    A new quantum theory of communication and computation is emerging, in which the stuff transmitted or processed is not classical information, but arbitrary superpositions of quantum states. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  1. Resurrecting the computer graveyard

    SciTech Connect

    McAdams, C.L.

    1995-02-01

    What eventually happens to all the old monitors, circuit boards, and other peripherial computer equipment when they die or simply become obsolete Disposal has been made difficult by a US EPA landfill ban on some circuit boards with high lead content, and other computer parts that contain what some call dangerous amounts of toxic substances. With few other options, most companies simply store the obsolete equipment. Often referred to as computer or dinosaur graveyards'', these increasingly numerous office purgatories can seem like permanent fixtures in the modern work-place. Not to worry, according to a new and expanding branch of the recycling industry. While there are some companies cashing in on the refurbishment and resale of these old computers, a growing number are successfully recycling the component parts--selling the plastics, metal, and circuit boards--and doing it safely.

  2. Computer Center: Software Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duhrkopf, Richard, Ed.; Belshe, John F., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews a software package, "Mitosis-Meiosis," available for Apple II or IBM computers with colorgraphics capabilities. Describes the documentation, presentation and flexibility of the program. Rates the program based on graphics and usability in a biology classroom. (CW)

  3. Quantum computational webs

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, D.; Eisert, J.

    2010-10-15

    We discuss the notion of quantum computational webs: These are quantum states universal for measurement-based computation, which can be built up from a collection of simple primitives. The primitive elements--reminiscent of building blocks in a construction kit--are (i) one-dimensional states (computational quantum wires) with the power to process one logical qubit and (ii) suitable couplings, which connect the wires to a computationally universal web. All elements are preparable by nearest-neighbor interactions in a single pass, of the kind accessible in a number of physical architectures. We provide a complete classification of qubit wires, a physically well-motivated class of universal resources that can be fully understood. Finally, we sketch possible realizations in superlattices and explore the power of coupling mechanisms based on Ising or exchange interactions.

  4. Computer Programs (Turbomachinery)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA computer programs are extensively used in design of industrial equipment. Available from the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) at the University of Georgia, these programs are employed as analysis tools in design, test and development processes, providing savings in time and money. For example, two NASA computer programs are used daily in the design of turbomachinery by Delaval Turbine Division, Trenton, New Jersey. The company uses the NASA splint interpolation routine for analysis of turbine blade vibration and the performance of compressors and condensers. A second program, the NASA print plot routine, analyzes turbine rotor response and produces graphs for project reports. The photos show examples of Delaval test operations in which the computer programs play a part. In the large photo below, a 24-inch turbine blade is undergoing test; in the smaller photo, a steam turbine rotor is being prepared for stress measurements under actual operating conditions; the "spaghetti" is wiring for test instrumentation

  5. Computer Aided Braille Trainer

    PubMed Central

    Sibert, Thomas W.

    1984-01-01

    The problems involved in teaching visually impaired persons to Braille are numerous. Training while the individual is still sighted and using a computer to assist is one way of shortening the learning curve. Such a solution is presented here.

  6. [Computers in surgery].

    PubMed

    Grande, M; Torquati, A; Bellisario, A

    1990-01-01

    The introduction of computers in medicine, particularly for what surgery is concerned, has many implications related to its optimal utilization. Possible applications as well as advantages and limits of such recording system in a surgical ward are examined. Emphasis is placed on the clinical data management model and the ways the different structures of the system are related. The computer processing of these data provides valid material for either clinical and surgical research or statistical studies.

  7. Computation in electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, Earl J

    2016-01-01

    Some uses of the computer and computation in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy are reviewed. The theory of image calculation using Bloch wave and multislice methods with and without aberration correction is reviewed and some applications are discussed. The inverse problem of reconstructing the specimen structure from an experimentally measured electron microscope image is discussed. Some future directions of software development are given. PMID:26697863

  8. SLAC B Factory computing

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, P.F.

    1992-02-01

    As part of the research and development program in preparation for a possible B Factory at SLAC, a group has been studying various aspects of HEP computing. In particular, the group is investigating the use of UNIX for all computing, from data acquisition, through analysis, and word processing. A summary of some of the results of this study will be given, along with some personal opinions on these topics.

  9. Recent computational chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Taku

    2015-12-31

    Now we can investigate quantum phenomena for the real materials and molecules, and can design functional materials by computation, due to the previous developments of quantum theory and calculation methods. As there still exist the limit and problem in theory, the cooperation between theory and computation is getting more important to clarify the unknown quantum mechanism, and discover more efficient functional materials. It would be next-generation standard. Finally, our theoretical methodology for boundary solid is introduced.

  10. Computer Games and Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobias, Sigmund, Ed.; Fletcher, J. D., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    There is intense interest in computer games. A total of 65 percent of all American households play computer games, and sales of such games increased 22.9 percent last year. The average amount of game playing time was found to be 13.2 hours per week. The popularity and market success of games is evident from both the increased earnings from games,…

  11. Computer Models of Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Dr. Marc Pusey (seated) and Dr. Craig Kundrot use computers to analyze x-ray maps and generate three-dimensional models of protein structures. With this information, scientists at Marshall Space Flight Center can learn how proteins are made and how they work. The computer screen depicts a proten structure as a ball-and-stick model. Other models depict the actual volume occupied by the atoms, or the ribbon-like structures that are crucial to a protein's function.

  12. Computer-assisted instruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    The results are presented of a project of research and development on strategies for optimizing the instructional process, and dissemination of information about the applications of such research to the instructional medium of computer-assisted instruction. Accomplishments reported include construction of the author language INSTRUCT, construction of a practical CAI course in the area of computer science, and a number of investigations into the individualization of instruction, using the course as a vehicle.

  13. Partnership in Computational Science

    SciTech Connect

    Huray, Paul G.

    1999-02-24

    This is the final report for the "Partnership in Computational Science" (PICS) award in an amount of $500,000 for the period January 1, 1993 through December 31, 1993. A copy of the proposal with its budget is attached as Appendix A. This report first describes the consequent significance of the DOE award in building infrastructure of high performance computing in the Southeast and then describes the work accomplished under this grant and a list of publications resulting from it.

  14. Professionalism in Computer Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irons, Alastair D.; Konstadopoulou, Anastasia

    The paper seeks to address the need to consider issues regarding professionalism in computer forensics in order to allow the discipline to develop and to ensure the credibility of the discipline from the differing perspectives of practitioners, the criminal justice system and in the eyes of the public. There is a need to examine and develop professionalism in computer forensics in order to promote the discipline and maintain the credibility of the discipline.

  15. Reconfigurable environmentally adaptive computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coxe, Robin L. (Inventor); Galica, Gary E. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Described are methods and apparatus, including computer program products, for reconfigurable environmentally adaptive computing technology. An environmental signal representative of an external environmental condition is received. A processing configuration is automatically selected, based on the environmental signal, from a plurality of processing configurations. A reconfigurable processing element is reconfigured to operate according to the selected processing configuration. In some examples, the environmental condition is detected and the environmental signal is generated based on the detected condition.

  16. Computers and clinical arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Knoebel, S B; Lovelace, D E

    1983-02-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are ubiquitous in normal and abnormal hearts. These disorders may be life-threatening or benign, symptomatic or unrecognized. Arrhythmias may be the precursor of sudden death, a cause or effect of cardiac failure, a clinical reflection of acute or chronic disorders, or a manifestation of extracardiac conditions. Progress is being made toward unraveling the diagnostic and therapeutic problems involved in arrhythmogenesis. Many of the advances would not be possible, however, without the availability of computer technology. To preserve the proper balance and purposeful progression of computer usage, engineers and physicians have been exhorted not to work independently in this field. Both should learn some of the other's trade. The two disciplines need to come together to solve important problems with computers in cardiology. The intent of this article was to acquaint the practicing cardiologist with some of the extant and envisioned computer applications and some of the problems with both. We conclude that computer-based database management systems are necessary for sorting out the clinical factors of relevance for arrhythmogenesis, but computer database management systems are beset with problems that will require sophisticated solutions. The technology for detecting arrhythmias on routine electrocardiograms is quite good but human over-reading is still required, and the rationale for computer application in this setting is questionable. Systems for qualitative, continuous monitoring and review of extended time ECG recordings are adequate with proper noise rejection algorithms and editing capabilities. The systems are limited presently for clinical application to the recognition of ectopic rhythms and significant pauses. Attention should now be turned to the clinical goals for detection and quantification of arrhythmias. We should be asking the following questions: How quantitative do systems need to be? Are computers required for the detection of

  17. Research in computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Synopses are given for NASA supported work in computer science at the University of Virginia. Some areas of research include: error seeding as a testing method; knowledge representation for engineering design; analysis of faults in a multi-version software experiment; implementation of a parallel programming environment; two computer graphics systems for visualization of pressure distribution and convective density particles; task decomposition for multiple robot arms; vectorized incomplete conjugate gradient; and iterative methods for solving linear equations on the Flex/32.

  18. The promise of analog computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLennan, B. J.

    2014-10-01

    Future computing paradigms and technologies will have to be more like the physical processes by which they are realized, and because these processes are primarily continuous, post-Moore's law computing will involve an increased use of analog computation. Traditionally analog computers have computed ordinary differential equations of time, but analog field computation permits massively parallel temporal integration of partial differential equations. In principle many different physical media - not just electronics - can be exploited to implement the basic operations of analog computing, a small number of which are sufficient to approximate a wide variety of analog computations, thus providing a basis for universal analog computation and general-purpose analog computers. The contentious issue of the computational power of analog computers is addressed best on its own terms, rather by asking it within the context of Church-Turing computation, which distorts the relevant questions and their answers.

  19. Computing with neural synchrony.

    PubMed

    Brette, Romain

    2012-01-01

    Neurons communicate primarily with spikes, but most theories of neural computation are based on firing rates. Yet, many experimental observations suggest that the temporal coordination of spikes plays a role in sensory processing. Among potential spike-based codes, synchrony appears as a good candidate because neural firing and plasticity are sensitive to fine input correlations. However, it is unclear what role synchrony may play in neural computation, and what functional advantage it may provide. With a theoretical approach, I show that the computational interest of neural synchrony appears when neurons have heterogeneous properties. In this context, the relationship between stimuli and neural synchrony is captured by the concept of synchrony receptive field, the set of stimuli which induce synchronous responses in a group of neurons. In a heterogeneous neural population, it appears that synchrony patterns represent structure or sensory invariants in stimuli, which can then be detected by postsynaptic neurons. The required neural circuitry can spontaneously emerge with spike-timing-dependent plasticity. Using examples in different sensory modalities, I show that this allows simple neural circuits to extract relevant information from realistic sensory stimuli, for example to identify a fluctuating odor in the presence of distractors. This theory of synchrony-based computation shows that relative spike timing may indeed have computational relevance, and suggests new types of neural network models for sensory processing with appealing computational properties.

  20. Is thinking computable?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    Strong artificial intelligence claims that conscious thought can arise in computers containing the right algorithms even though none of the programs or components of those computers understand which is going on. As proof, it asserts that brains are finite webs of neurons, each with a definite function governed by the laws of physics; this web has a set of equations that can be solved (or simulated) by a sufficiently powerful computer. Strong AI claims the Turing test as a criterion of success. A recent debate in Scientific American concludes that the Turing test is not sufficient, but leaves intact the underlying premise that thought is a computable process. The recent book by Roger Penrose, however, offers a sharp challenge, arguing that the laws of quantum physics may govern mental processes and that these laws may not be computable. In every area of mathematics and physics, Penrose finds evidence of nonalgorithmic human activity and concludes that mental processes are inherently more powerful than computational processes.

  1. Computing with Neural Synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Brette, Romain

    2012-01-01

    Neurons communicate primarily with spikes, but most theories of neural computation are based on firing rates. Yet, many experimental observations suggest that the temporal coordination of spikes plays a role in sensory processing. Among potential spike-based codes, synchrony appears as a good candidate because neural firing and plasticity are sensitive to fine input correlations. However, it is unclear what role synchrony may play in neural computation, and what functional advantage it may provide. With a theoretical approach, I show that the computational interest of neural synchrony appears when neurons have heterogeneous properties. In this context, the relationship between stimuli and neural synchrony is captured by the concept of synchrony receptive field, the set of stimuli which induce synchronous responses in a group of neurons. In a heterogeneous neural population, it appears that synchrony patterns represent structure or sensory invariants in stimuli, which can then be detected by postsynaptic neurons. The required neural circuitry can spontaneously emerge with spike-timing-dependent plasticity. Using examples in different sensory modalities, I show that this allows simple neural circuits to extract relevant information from realistic sensory stimuli, for example to identify a fluctuating odor in the presence of distractors. This theory of synchrony-based computation shows that relative spike timing may indeed have computational relevance, and suggests new types of neural network models for sensory processing with appealing computational properties. PMID:22719243

  2. Word To Compute By: Keeping Up with Personal Computing Terminology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Walt

    1997-01-01

    Reviews current terminology related to personal computing, referring to a previous article written five years ago. Highlights include Macintosh processors; Pentium processors; computer memory; computer buses; video displays; storage devices; newer media; and miscellaneous terms and concepts. (LRW)

  3. Publishing Trends in Educational Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hair, Marilyn; Johnson, D. LaMont

    1989-01-01

    Describes results of a survey of secondary school and college teachers that was conducted to determine subject matter that should be included in educational computing journals. Areas of interest included computer applications; artificial intelligence; computer-aided instruction; computer literacy; computer-managed instruction; databases; distance…

  4. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  5. Computer Technology in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slider, Patty; Hodges, Kathy; Carter, Cea; White, Barbara

    This publication provides materials to help adult educators use computer technology in their teaching. Section 1, Computer Basics, contains activities and materials on these topics: increasing computer literacy, computer glossary, parts of a computer, keyboard, disk care, highlighting text, scrolling and wrap-around text, setting up text,…

  6. New Computing in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Steven W.; Green, Kenneth C.

    1986-01-01

    With the advent of the computer revolution, major changes are underway in the ways campuses deal with computing and computers. One change is the gathering momentum of faculty members and administrators to become computer users. Another is the vast amount of individual and institutional effort invested in plans for integrating computing into the…

  7. Science Teaching and Computer Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bork, Alfred M.

    Computer languages are analyzed and compared from the standpoint of the science teacher using computers in the classroom. Computers have three basic uses in teaching, to compute, to instruct, and to motivate; effective computer languages should be responsive to these three modes. Widely-used languages, including FORTRAN, ALGOL, PL/1, and APL, are…

  8. Computer-aided design and computer science technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, R. E.; Voigt, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    A description is presented of computer-aided design requirements and the resulting computer science advances needed to support aerospace design. The aerospace design environment is examined, taking into account problems of data handling and aspects of computer hardware and software. The interactive terminal is normally the primary interface between the computer system and the engineering designer. Attention is given to user aids, interactive design, interactive computations, the characteristics of design information, data management requirements, hardware advancements, and computer science developments.

  9. Computer automated design and computer automated manufacture.

    PubMed

    Brncick, M

    2000-08-01

    The introduction of computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing into the field of prosthetics and orthotics did not arrive without concern. Many prosthetists feared that the computer would provide other allied health practitioners who had little or no experience in prosthetics the ability to fit and manage amputees. Technicians in the field felt their jobs may be jeopardized by automated fabrication techniques. This has not turned out to be the case. Prosthetists who use CAD-CAM techniques are finding they have more time for patient care and clinical assessment. CAD-CAM is another tool for them to provide better care for the patients/clients they serve. One of the factors that deterred the acceptance of CAD-CAM techniques in its early stages was that of cost. It took a significant investment in software and hardware for the prosthetists to begin to use the new systems. This new technique was not reimbursed by insurance coverage. Practitioners did not have enough information about this new technique to make a sound decision on their investment of time and money. Ironically, it is the need to hold health care costs down that may prove to be the catalyst for the increased use of CAD-CAM in the field. Providing orthoses and prostheses to patients who require them is a very labor intensive process. Practitioners are looking for better, faster, and more economical ways in which to provide their services under the pressure of managed care. CAD-CAM may be the answer. The author foresees shape sensing departments in hospitals where patients would be sent to be digitized, similar to someone going for radiograph or ultrasound. Afterwards, an orthosis or prosthesis could be provided from a central fabrication facility at a remote site, most likely on the same day. Not long ago, highly skilled practitioners with extensive technical ability would custom make almost every orthosis. One now practices in an atmosphere where off-the-shelf orthoses are the standard. This

  10. Parallel Computing in SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, Mark D; Williams, Mark L; Bowman, Stephen M

    2010-01-01

    The SCALE computational architecture has remained basically the same since its inception 30 years ago, although constituent modules and capabilities have changed significantly. This SCALE concept was intended to provide a framework whereby independent codes can be linked to provide a more comprehensive capability than possible with the individual programs - allowing flexibility to address a wide variety of applications. However, the current system was designed originally for mainframe computers with a single CPU and with significantly less memory than today's personal computers. It has been recognized that the present SCALE computation system could be restructured to take advantage of modern hardware and software capabilities, while retaining many of the modular features of the present system. Preliminary work is being done to define specifications and capabilities for a more advanced computational architecture. This paper describes the state of current SCALE development activities and plans for future development. With the release of SCALE 6.1 in 2010, a new phase of evolutionary development will be available to SCALE users within the TRITON and NEWT modules. The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) code system developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a comprehensive and integrated package of codes and nuclear data for a wide range of applications in criticality safety, reactor physics, shielding, isotopic depletion and decay, and sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) analysis. Over the last three years, since the release of version 5.1 in 2006, several important new codes have been introduced within SCALE, and significant advances applied to existing codes. Many of these new features became available with the release of SCALE 6.0 in early 2009. However, beginning with SCALE 6.1, a first generation of parallel computing is being introduced. In addition to near-term improvements, a plan for longer term SCALE enhancement

  11. Making It in Computer Sales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Robert L., III

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the possibilities for careers in computer sales. Describes some of the attributes of quality computer salespersons, as illustrated by interviews with two experts on computer sales. (TW)

  12. Experimental verification of quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barz, Stefanie; Fitzsimons, Joseph F.; Kashefi, Elham; Walther, Philip

    2013-11-01

    Quantum computers are expected to offer substantial speed-ups over their classical counterparts and to solve problems intractable for classical computers. Beyond such practical significance, the concept of quantum computation opens up fundamental questions, among them the issue of whether quantum computations can be certified by entities that are inherently unable to compute the results themselves. Here we present the first experimental verification of quantum computation. We show, in theory and experiment, how a verifier with minimal quantum resources can test a significantly more powerful quantum computer. The new verification protocol introduced here uses the framework of blind quantum computing and is independent of the experimental quantum-computation platform used. In our scheme, the verifier is required only to generate single qubits and transmit them to the quantum computer. We experimentally demonstrate this protocol using four photonic qubits and show how the verifier can test the computer's ability to perform quantum computation.

  13. Computer Use and Computer Anxiety in Older Korean Americans.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyunwoo; Jang, Yuri; Xie, Bo

    2016-09-01

    Responding to the limited literature on computer use in ethnic minority older populations, the present study examined predictors of computer use and computer anxiety in older Korean Americans. Separate regression models were estimated for computer use and computer anxiety with the common sets of predictors: (a) demographic variables (age, gender, marital status, and education), (b) physical health indicators (chronic conditions, functional disability, and self-rated health), and (c) sociocultural factors (acculturation and attitudes toward aging). Approximately 60% of the participants were computer-users, and they had significantly lower levels of computer anxiety than non-users. A higher likelihood of computer use and lower levels of computer anxiety were commonly observed among individuals with younger age, male gender, advanced education, more positive ratings of health, and higher levels of acculturation. In addition, positive attitudes toward aging were found to reduce computer anxiety. Findings provide implications for developing computer training and education programs for the target population. PMID:25698717

  14. The ATLAS computing model & distributed computing evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Roger W. L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    Despite only a brief availability of beam-related data, the typical usage patterns and operational requirements of the ATLAS computing model have been exercised, and the model as originally constructed remains remarkably unchanged. Resource requirements have been revised, and cosmic ray running has exercised much of the model in both duration and volume. The operational model has been adapted in several ways to increase performance and meet the asdelivered functionality of the available middleware. There are also changes reflecting the emerging roles of the different data formats. The model continues to evolve with a heightened focus on end-user performance; the key tools developed in the operational system are outlined, with an emphasis on those under recent development.

  15. Computational chemistry on commodity-type computers.

    PubMed

    Nicklaus, M C; Williams, R W; Bienfait, B; Billings, E S; Hodoscek, M

    1998-01-01

    A number of inexpensive computers were benchmarked with the ab initio program Gaussian 94, using both small standard test jobs and larger density functional (DFT) calculations. Several varieties of Pentium (x86) and Alpha CPU based systems were tested. Most of them were running under the open source code operating system Linux. They were compared with several workstations and supercomputers. The most powerful of today's commodity-type processors surpassed current supercomputers in speed. The choice of compilers and compilation options was often found to have a larger influence on job CPU times than details of the hardware. Especially on the x86 type machines, the jobs always ran faster the less memory (RAM) they were given. The fastest machine on a per-CPU basis was an Alpha/Linux system. For the DFT calculation, it was close to twice as fast as a Cray J90 supercomputer. PMID:9770303

  16. Highly parallel computer architecture for robotic computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir (Inventor); Bejczy, Anta K. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    In a computer having a large number of single instruction multiple data (SIMD) processors, each of the SIMD processors has two sets of three individual processor elements controlled by a master control unit and interconnected among a plurality of register file units where data is stored. The register files input and output data in synchronism with a minor cycle clock under control of two slave control units controlling the register file units connected to respective ones of the two sets of processor elements. Depending upon which ones of the register file units are enabled to store or transmit data during a particular minor clock cycle, the processor elements within an SIMD processor are connected in rings or in pipeline arrays, and may exchange data with the internal bus or with neighboring SIMD processors through interface units controlled by respective ones of the two slave control units.

  17. Computational Physics' Greatest Hits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bug, Amy

    2011-03-01

    The digital computer, has worked its way so effectively into our profession that now, roughly 65 years after its invention, it is virtually impossible to find a field of experimental or theoretical physics unaided by computational innovation. It is tough to think of another device about which one can make that claim. In the session ``What is computational physics?'' speakers will distinguish computation within the field of computational physics from this ubiquitous importance across all subfields of physics. This talk will recap the invited session ``Great Advances...Past, Present and Future'' in which five dramatic areas of discovery (five of our ``greatest hits'') are chronicled: The physics of many-boson systems via Path Integral Monte Carlo, the thermodynamic behavior of a huge number of diverse systems via Monte Carlo Methods, the discovery of new pharmaceutical agents via molecular dynamics, predictive simulations of global climate change via detailed, cross-disciplinary earth system models, and an understanding of the formation of the first structures in our universe via galaxy formation simulations. The talk will also identify ``greatest hits'' in our field from the teaching and research perspectives of other members of DCOMP, including its Executive Committee.

  18. Verifiable Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashefi, Elham

    Over the next five to ten years we will see a state of flux as quantum devices become part of the mainstream computing landscape. However adopting and applying such a highly variable and novel technology is both costly and risky as this quantum approach has an acute verification and validation problem: On the one hand, since classical computations cannot scale up to the computational power of quantum mechanics, verifying the correctness of a quantum-mediated computation is challenging; on the other hand, the underlying quantum structure resists classical certification analysis. Our grand aim is to settle these key milestones to make the translation from theory to practice possible. Currently the most efficient ways to verify a quantum computation is to employ cryptographic methods. I will present the current state of the art of various existing protocols where generally there exists a trade-off between the practicality of the scheme versus their generality, trust assumptions and security level. EK gratefully acknowledges funding through EPSRC Grants EP/N003829/1 and EP/M013243/1.

  19. Computer Assisted Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arámbula Cosío, F.; Padilla Castañeda, M. A.

    2003-09-01

    Computer assisted surgery (CAS) systems can provide different levels of assistance to a surgeon during training and execution of a surgical procedure. This is done through the integration of : measurements taken on medical images; computer graphics techniques; and positioning or tracking mechanisms which accurately locate the surgical instruments inside the operating site. According to the type of assistance that is provided to the surgeon, CAS systems can be classified as: Image guided surgery systems; Assistant robots for surgery; and Training simulators for surgery. In this work are presented the main characteristics of CAS systems. It is also described the development of a computer simulator for training on Transurethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP) based on a computer model of the prostate gland which is able to simulate, in real time, deformations and resections of tissue. The model is constructed as a 3D mesh with physical properties such as elasticity. We describe the main characteristics of the prostate model and its performance. The prostate model will also be used in the development of a CAS system designed to assist the surgeon during a real TURP procedure. The system will provide 3D views of the shape of the prostate of the patient, and the position of the surgical instrument during the operation. The development of new computer graphics models which are able to simulate, in real time, the mechanical behavior of an organ during a surgical procedure, can improve significantly the training and execution of other minimally invasive surgical procedures such as laparoscopic gall bladder surgery.

  20. Optical computer motherboards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannson, Tomasz P.; Xu, Guoda; Bartha, John M.; Gruntman, Michael A.

    1997-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the application of precision plastic optics into a communication/computer sub-system, such as a hybrid computer motherboard. We believe that using optical waveguides for next-generation computer motherboards can provide a high performance alternative for present multi-layer printed circuit motherboards. In response to this demand, we suggest our novel concept of a hybrid motherboard based on an internal-fiber-coupling (IFC) wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) optical backplane. The IFC/WDM backplane provides dedicated Tx/Rx connections, and applies low-cost, high-performance components, including CD LDs, GRIN plastic fibers, molding housing, and nonimaging optics connectors. Preliminary motherboard parameters are: speed 100 MHz/100 m, or 1 GHz/10 m; fiber loss approximately 0.01 dB/m; almost zero fan-out/fan-in optical power loss, and eight standard wavelength channels. The proposed hybrid computer motherboard, based on innovative optical backplane technology, should solve low-speed, low-parallelism bottlenecks in present electric computer motherboards.

  1. Extensible Computational Chemistry Environment

    2012-08-09

    ECCE provides a sophisticated graphical user interface, scientific visualization tools, and the underlying data management framework enabling scientists to efficiently set up calculations and store, retrieve, and analyze the rapidly growing volumes of data produced by computational chemistry studies. ECCE was conceived as part of the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory construction to solve the problem of researchers being able to effectively utilize complex computational chemistry codes and massively parallel high performance compute resources. Bringing themore » power of these codes and resources to the desktops of researcher and thus enabling world class research without users needing a detailed understanding of the inner workings of either the theoretical codes or the supercomputers needed to run them was a grand challenge problem in the original version of the EMSL. ECCE allows collaboration among researchers using a web-based data repository where the inputs and results for all calculations done within ECCE are organized. ECCE is a first of kind end-to-end problem solving environment for all phases of computational chemistry research: setting up calculations with sophisticated GUI and direct manipulation visualization tools, submitting and monitoring calculations on remote high performance supercomputers without having to be familiar with the details of using these compute resources, and performing results visualization and analysis including creating publication quality images. ECCE is a suite of tightly integrated applications that are employed as the user moves through the modeling process.« less

  2. Computational Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Jason E.; Samudrala, Ram; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Montogomery, Kristina; Ireton, Renee

    2009-05-01

    Computational systems biology is the term that we use to describe computational methods to identify, infer, model, and store relationships between the molecules, pathways, and cells (“systems”) involved in a living organism. Based on this definition, the field of computational systems biology has been in existence for some time. However, the recent confluence of high throughput methodology for biological data gathering, genome-scale sequencing and computational processing power has driven a reinvention and expansion of this field. The expansions include not only modeling of small metabolic{Ishii, 2004 #1129; Ekins, 2006 #1601; Lafaye, 2005 #1744} and signaling systems{Stevenson-Paulik, 2006 #1742; Lafaye, 2005 #1744} but also modeling of the relationships between biological components in very large systems, incluyding whole cells and organisms {Ideker, 2001 #1124; Pe'er, 2001 #1172; Pilpel, 2001 #393; Ideker, 2002 #327; Kelley, 2003 #1117; Shannon, 2003 #1116; Ideker, 2004 #1111}{Schadt, 2003 #475; Schadt, 2006 #1661}{McDermott, 2002 #878; McDermott, 2005 #1271}. Generally these models provide a general overview of one or more aspects of these systems and leave the determination of details to experimentalists focused on smaller subsystems. The promise of such approaches is that they will elucidate patterns, relationships and general features that are not evident from examining specific components or subsystems. These predictions are either interesting in and of themselves (for example, the identification of an evolutionary pattern), or are interesting and valuable to researchers working on a particular problem (for example highlight a previously unknown functional pathway). Two events have occurred to bring about the field computational systems biology to the forefront. One is the advent of high throughput methods that have generated large amounts of information about particular systems in the form of genetic studies, gene expression analyses (both protein and

  3. Optoelectronic Reservoir Computing

    PubMed Central

    Paquot, Y.; Duport, F.; Smerieri, A.; Dambre, J.; Schrauwen, B.; Haelterman, M.; Massar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Reservoir computing is a recently introduced, highly efficient bio-inspired approach for processing time dependent data. The basic scheme of reservoir computing consists of a non linear recurrent dynamical system coupled to a single input layer and a single output layer. Within these constraints many implementations are possible. Here we report an optoelectronic implementation of reservoir computing based on a recently proposed architecture consisting of a single non linear node and a delay line. Our implementation is sufficiently fast for real time information processing. We illustrate its performance on tasks of practical importance such as nonlinear channel equalization and speech recognition, and obtain results comparable to state of the art digital implementations. PMID:22371825

  4. Constructing computer virus phylogenies

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.A.; Goldberg, P.W.; Phillips, C.A.; Sorkin, G.B.

    1996-03-01

    There has been much recent algorithmic work on the problem of reconstructing the evolutionary history of biological species. Computer virus specialists are interested in finding the evolutionary history of computer viruses--a virus is often written using code fragments from one or more other viruses, which are its immediate ancestors. A phylogeny for a collection of computer viruses is a directed acyclic graph whose nodes are the viruses and whose edges map ancestors to descendants and satisfy the property that each code fragment is ``invented`` only once. To provide a simple explanation for the data, we consider the problem of constructing such a phylogeny with a minimal number of edges. In general, this optimization problem cannot be solved in quasi-polynomial time unless NQP=QP; we present positive and negative results for associated approximated problems. When tree solutions exist, they can be constructed and randomly sampled in polynomial time.

  5. Computer integrated laboratory testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Charles C.

    1992-01-01

    The objective is the integration of computers into the Engineering Materials Science Laboratory course, where existing test equipment is not computerized. The first lab procedure is to demonstrate and produce a material phase change curve. The second procedure is a demonstration of the modulus of elasticity and related stress-strain curve, plastic performance, maximum and failure strength. The process of recording data by sensors that are connected to a data logger which adds a time base, and the data logger in turn connected to a computer, places the materials labs into a computer integrated mode with minimum expense and maximum flexibility. The sensor signals are input into a spread sheet for tabular records, curve generation, and graph printing.

  6. Computer networking at FERMILAB

    SciTech Connect

    Chartrand, G.

    1986-05-01

    Management aspects of data communications facilities at Fermilab are described. Local area networks include Ferminet, a broadband CATV system which serves as a backbone-type carrier for high-speed data traffic between major network nodes; micom network, four Micom Micro-600/2A port selectors via private twisted pair cables, dedicated telephone circuits, or Micom 800/2 statistical multiplexors; and Decnet/Ethernet, several small local area networks which provide host-to-host communications for about 35 VAX computers systems. Wide area (off site) computer networking includes an off site Micom network which provides access to all of Fermilab's computer systems for 10 universities via leased lines or modem; Tymnet, used by many European and Japanese collaborations: Physnet, used for shared data processing task communications by large collaborations of universities; Bitnet, used for file transfer, electronic mail, and communications with CERN; and Mfenet, for access to supercomputers. Plans to participate in Hepnet are also addressed. 3 figs. (DWL)

  7. Human-computer interface

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2004-12-21

    The present invention provides a method of human-computer interfacing. Force feedback allows intuitive navigation and control near a boundary between regions in a computer-represented space. For example, the method allows a user to interact with a virtual craft, then push through the windshield of the craft to interact with the virtual world surrounding the craft. As another example, the method allows a user to feel transitions between different control domains of a computer representation of a space. The method can provide for force feedback that increases as a user's locus of interaction moves near a boundary, then perceptibly changes (e.g., abruptly drops or changes direction) when the boundary is traversed.

  8. Computational Analysis of Behavior.

    PubMed

    Egnor, S E Roian; Branson, Kristin

    2016-07-01

    In this review, we discuss the emerging field of computational behavioral analysis-the use of modern methods from computer science and engineering to quantitatively measure animal behavior. We discuss aspects of experiment design important to both obtaining biologically relevant behavioral data and enabling the use of machine vision and learning techniques for automation. These two goals are often in conflict. Restraining or restricting the environment of the animal can simplify automatic behavior quantification, but it can also degrade the quality or alter important aspects of behavior. To enable biologists to design experiments to obtain better behavioral measurements, and computer scientists to pinpoint fruitful directions for algorithm improvement, we review known effects of artificial manipulation of the animal on behavior. We also review machine vision and learning techniques for tracking, feature extraction, automated behavior classification, and automated behavior discovery, the assumptions they make, and the types of data they work best with.

  9. The future of computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Michelle

    2016-05-01

    Down-scaling has been the leading paradigm of the semiconductor industry since the invention of the first transistor in 1947. However miniaturization will soon reach the ultimate limit, set by the discreteness of matter, leading to intensified research in alternative approaches for creating logic devices. This talk will discuss the development of a radical new technology for creating atomic-scale devices which is opening a new frontier of research in electronics globally. We will introduce single atom transistors where we can measure both the charge and spin of individual dopants with unique capabilities in controlling the quantum world. To this end, we will discuss how we are now demonstrating atom by atom, the best way to build a quantum computer - a new type of computer that exploits the laws of physics at very small dimensions in order to provide an exponential speed up in computational processing power.

  10. Visual Computing Environment Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Charles (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    The Visual Computing Environment (VCE) is a framework for intercomponent and multidisciplinary computational simulations. Many current engineering analysis codes simulate various aspects of aircraft engine operation. For example, existing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes can model the airflow through individual engine components such as the inlet, compressor, combustor, turbine, or nozzle. Currently, these codes are run in isolation, making intercomponent and complete system simulations very difficult to perform. In addition, management and utilization of these engineering codes for coupled component simulations is a complex, laborious task, requiring substantial experience and effort. To facilitate multicomponent aircraft engine analysis, the CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC) is developing the VCE system. This system, which is part of NASA's Numerical Propulsion Simulation System (NPSS) program, can couple various engineering disciplines, such as CFD, structural analysis, and thermal analysis.

  11. Stopping computer crimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1989-01-01

    Two new books about intrusions and computer viruses remind us that attacks against our computers on networks are the actions of human beings. Cliff Stoll's book about the hacker who spent a year, beginning in Aug. 1986, attempting to use the Lawrence Berkeley Computer as a stepping-stone for access to military secrets is a spy thriller that illustrates the weaknesses of our password systems and the difficulties in compiling evidence against a hacker engaged in espionage. Pamela Kane's book about viruses that attack IBM PC's shows that viruses are the modern version of the old problem of a Trojan horse attack. It discusses the most famous viruses and their countermeasures, and it comes with a floppy disk of utility programs that will disinfect your PC and thwart future attack.

  12. Optical quantum computing.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jeremy L

    2007-12-01

    In 2001, all-optical quantum computing became feasible with the discovery that scalable quantum computing is possible using only single-photon sources, linear optical elements, and single-photon detectors. Although it was in principle scalable, the massive resource overhead made the scheme practically daunting. However, several simplifications were followed by proof-of-principle demonstrations, and recent approaches based on cluster states or error encoding have dramatically reduced this worrying resource overhead, making an all-optical architecture a serious contender for the ultimate goal of a large-scale quantum computer. Key challenges will be the realization of high-efficiency sources of indistinguishable single photons, low-loss, scalable optical circuits, high-efficiency single-photon detectors, and low-loss interfacing of these components.

  13. Computational Analysis of Behavior.

    PubMed

    Egnor, S E Roian; Branson, Kristin

    2016-07-01

    In this review, we discuss the emerging field of computational behavioral analysis-the use of modern methods from computer science and engineering to quantitatively measure animal behavior. We discuss aspects of experiment design important to both obtaining biologically relevant behavioral data and enabling the use of machine vision and learning techniques for automation. These two goals are often in conflict. Restraining or restricting the environment of the animal can simplify automatic behavior quantification, but it can also degrade the quality or alter important aspects of behavior. To enable biologists to design experiments to obtain better behavioral measurements, and computer scientists to pinpoint fruitful directions for algorithm improvement, we review known effects of artificial manipulation of the animal on behavior. We also review machine vision and learning techniques for tracking, feature extraction, automated behavior classification, and automated behavior discovery, the assumptions they make, and the types of data they work best with. PMID:27090952

  14. Auto covariance computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepner, T. E.; Meyers, J. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A laser velocimeter covariance processor which calculates the auto covariance and cross covariance functions for a turbulent flow field based on Poisson sampled measurements in time from a laser velocimeter is described. The device will process a block of data that is up to 4096 data points in length and return a 512 point covariance function with 48-bit resolution along with a 512 point histogram of the interarrival times which is used to normalize the covariance function. The device is designed to interface and be controlled by a minicomputer from which the data is received and the results returned. A typical 4096 point computation takes approximately 1.5 seconds to receive the data, compute the covariance function, and return the results to the computer.

  15. Hierarchical Approximate Bayesian Computation

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Brandon M.; Van Zandt, Trisha

    2013-01-01

    Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) is a powerful technique for estimating the posterior distribution of a model’s parameters. It is especially important when the model to be fit has no explicit likelihood function, which happens for computational (or simulation-based) models such as those that are popular in cognitive neuroscience and other areas in psychology. However, ABC is usually applied only to models with few parameters. Extending ABC to hierarchical models has been difficult because high-dimensional hierarchical models add computational complexity that conventional ABC cannot accommodate. In this paper we summarize some current approaches for performing hierarchical ABC and introduce a new algorithm called Gibbs ABC. This new algorithm incorporates well-known Bayesian techniques to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the ABC approach for estimation of hierarchical models. We then use the Gibbs ABC algorithm to estimate the parameters of two models of signal detection, one with and one without a tractable likelihood function. PMID:24297436

  16. Computers, Nanotechnology and Mind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekdahl, Bertil

    2008-10-01

    In 1958, two years after the Dartmouth conference, where the term artificial intelligence was coined, Herbert Simon and Allen Newell asserted the existence of "machines that think, that learn and create." They were further prophesying that the machines' capacity would increase and be on par with the human mind. Now, 50 years later, computers perform many more tasks than one could imagine in the 1950s but, virtually, no computer can do more than could the first digital computer, developed by John von Neumann in the 1940s. Computers still follow algorithms, they do not create them. However, the development of nanotechnology seems to have given rise to new hopes. With nanotechnology two things are supposed to happen. Firstly, due to the small scale it will be possible to construct huge computer memories which are supposed to be the precondition for building an artificial brain, secondly, nanotechnology will make it possible to scan the brain which in turn will make reverse engineering possible; the mind will be decoded by studying the brain. The consequence of such a belief is that the brain is no more than a calculator, i.e., all that the mind can do is in principle the results of arithmetical operations. Computers are equivalent to formal systems which in turn was an answer to an idea by Hilbert that proofs should contain ideal statements for which operations cannot be applied in a contentual way. The advocates of artificial intelligence will place content in a machine that is developed not only to be free of content but also cannot contain content. In this paper I argue that the hope for artificial intelligence is in vain.

  17. Computer Component Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Carlos Horvath of the Burroughs Corporation, inspired by information published in NASA Tech Briefs, developed the AC/DC tester which checks out ECL (Emitter Coupled Logic) devices and their functionality within the computer. Each ECL device has a specific task in the computer's operation; the tester determines whether the device is performing that function properly. Horvath's invention allows rapid manual checking without extensive programming as it is required by other test methods; thus the ECL tester makes it easier to find out what is malfunctioning, and does the job faster.

  18. Adventures in Computational Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Sometimes one supercomputer is not enough. Or your local supercomputers are busy, or not configured for your job. Or you don't have any supercomputers. You might be trying to simulate worldwide weather changes in real time, requiring more compute power than you could get from any one machine. Or you might be collecting microbiological samples on an island, and need to examine them with a special microscope located on the other side of the continent. These are the times when you need a computational grid.

  19. Computational peptide vaccinology.

    PubMed

    Söllner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Immunoinformatics focuses on modeling immune responses for better understanding of the immune system and in many cases for proposing agents able to modify the immune system. The most classical of these agents are vaccines derived from living organisms such as smallpox or polio. More modern vaccines comprise recombinant proteins, protein domains, and in some cases peptides. Generating a vaccine from peptides however requires technologies and concepts very different from classical vaccinology. Immunoinformatics therefore provides the computational tools to propose peptides suitable for formulation into vaccines. This chapter introduces the essential biological concepts affecting design and efficacy of peptide vaccines and discusses current methods and workflows applied to design successful peptide vaccines using computers.

  20. Computer Programs for Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A NASA computer program aids Hudson Engineering Corporation, Houston, Texas in the design and construction of huge petrochemical processing plants like the one shown, which is located at Ju'aymah, Saud Arabia. The pipes handling the flow of chemicals are subject to a variety of stresses, such as weight and variations in temperature. Hudson Engineering uses a COSMIC piping flexibility analysis computer program to analyze and insure the necessary strength and flexibility of the pipes. This program helps the company realize substantial savings in reduced engineering time.

  1. Computer networking for scientists.

    PubMed

    Jennings, D M; Landweber, L H; Fuchs, I H; Farber, D J; Adrion, W R

    1986-02-28

    Scientific research has always relied on communication for gathering and providing access to data; for exchanging information; for holding discussions, meetings, and seminars; for collaborating with widely dispersed researchers; and for disseminating results. The pace and complexity of modern research, especially collaborations of researchers in different institutions, has dramatically increased scientists' communications needs. Scientists now need immediate access to data and information, to colleagues and collaborators, and to advanced computing and information services. Furthermore, to be really useful, communication facilities must be integrated with the scientist's normal day-to-day working environment. Scientists depend on computing and communications tools and are handicapped without them. PMID:17740290

  2. Balancing Computation and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Farber, Rob

    2007-04-01

    How do you know when the science being performed on a supercomputer reflects what actually occurs inside a test tube, or in real life? The answer can be stated simply enough: “run the model on the computer, get the result, and then perform an experiment to test the result”. The adage “easier said than done” truly applies – especially when the focus is on innovative science to benefit government and industry. The trick in this case is to find the right balance of science-driven computing integrated with experiment.

  3. Highly parallel computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.; Tichy, Walter F.

    1990-01-01

    Highly parallel computing architectures are the only means to achieve the computation rates demanded by advanced scientific problems. A decade of research has demonstrated the feasibility of such machines and current research focuses on which architectures designated as multiple instruction multiple datastream (MIMD) and single instruction multiple datastream (SIMD) have produced the best results to date; neither shows a decisive advantage for most near-homogeneous scientific problems. For scientific problems with many dissimilar parts, more speculative architectures such as neural networks or data flow may be needed.

  4. Computational quantum chemistry website

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-22

    This report contains the contents of a web page related to research on the development of quantum chemistry methods for computational thermochemistry and the application of quantum chemistry methods to problems in material chemistry and chemical sciences. Research programs highlighted include: Gaussian-2 theory; Density functional theory; Molecular sieve materials; Diamond thin-film growth from buckyball precursors; Electronic structure calculations on lithium polymer electrolytes; Long-distance electronic coupling in donor/acceptor molecules; and Computational studies of NOx reactions in radioactive waste storage.

  5. Exercises in Molecular Computing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Conspectus The successes of electronic digital logic have transformed every aspect of human life over the last half-century. The word “computer” now signifies a ubiquitous electronic device, rather than a human occupation. Yet evidently humans, large assemblies of molecules, can compute, and it has been a thrilling challenge to develop smaller, simpler, synthetic assemblies of molecules that can do useful computation. When we say that molecules compute, what we usually mean is that such molecules respond to certain inputs, for example, the presence or absence of other molecules, in a precisely defined but potentially complex fashion. The simplest way for a chemist to think about computing molecules is as sensors that can integrate the presence or absence of multiple analytes into a change in a single reporting property. Here we review several forms of molecular computing developed in our laboratories. When we began our work, combinatorial approaches to using DNA for computing were used to search for solutions to constraint satisfaction problems. We chose to work instead on logic circuits, building bottom-up from units based on catalytic nucleic acids, focusing on DNA secondary structures in the design of individual circuit elements, and reserving the combinatorial opportunities of DNA for the representation of multiple signals propagating in a large circuit. Such circuit design directly corresponds to the intuition about sensors transforming the detection of analytes into reporting properties. While this approach was unusual at the time, it has been adopted since by other groups working on biomolecular computing with different nucleic acid chemistries. We created logic gates by modularly combining deoxyribozymes (DNA-based enzymes cleaving or combining other oligonucleotides), in the role of reporting elements, with stem–loops as input detection elements. For instance, a deoxyribozyme that normally exhibits an oligonucleotide substrate recognition region is

  6. Computation in gene networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Hur, Asa; Siegelmann, Hava T.

    2004-03-01

    Genetic regulatory networks have the complex task of controlling all aspects of life. Using a model of gene expression by piecewise linear differential equations we show that this process can be considered as a process of computation. This is demonstrated by showing that this model can simulate memory bounded Turing machines. The simulation is robust with respect to perturbations of the system, an important property for both analog computers and biological systems. Robustness is achieved using a condition that ensures that the model equations, that are generally chaotic, follow a predictable dynamics.

  7. Distributed computing systems programme

    SciTech Connect

    Duce, D.

    1984-01-01

    Publication of this volume coincides with the completion of the U.K. Science and Engineering Research Council's coordinated programme of research in Distributed Computing Systems (DCS) which ran from 1977 to 1984. The volume is based on presentations made at the programme's final conference. The first chapter explains the origins and history of DCS and gives an overview of the programme and its achievements. The remaining sixteen chapters review particular research themes (including imperative and declarative languages, and performance modelling), and describe particular research projects in technical areas including local area networks, design, development and analysis of concurrent systems, parallel algorithm design, functional programming and non-von Neumann computer architectures.

  8. Demonstration of blind quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Barz, Stefanie; Kashefi, Elham; Broadbent, Anne; Fitzsimons, Joseph F; Zeilinger, Anton; Walther, Philip

    2012-01-20

    Quantum computers, besides offering substantial computational speedups, are also expected to preserve the privacy of a computation. We present an experimental demonstration of blind quantum computing in which the input, computation, and output all remain unknown to the computer. We exploit the conceptual framework of measurement-based quantum computation that enables a client to delegate a computation to a quantum server. Various blind delegated computations, including one- and two-qubit gates and the Deutsch and Grover quantum algorithms, are demonstrated. The client only needs to be able to prepare and transmit individual photonic qubits. Our demonstration is crucial for unconditionally secure quantum cloud computing and might become a key ingredient for real-life applications, especially when considering the challenges of making powerful quantum computers widely available.

  9. Center for computer security: Computer Security Group conference. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    Topics covered include: computer security management; detection and prevention of computer misuse; certification and accreditation; protection of computer security, perspective from a program office; risk analysis; secure accreditation systems; data base security; implementing R and D; key notarization system; DOD computer security center; the Sandia experience; inspector general's report; and backup and contingency planning. (GHT)

  10. The Relationship between Computer Anxiety and Computer Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simsek, Ali

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between computer anxiety and computer self-efficacy of students and teachers in elementary and secondary schools. The sample included a total of 845 subjects from two private school systems in Turkey. The Oetting's Computer Anxiety Scale was used to measure computer anxiety whereas the Murphy's Computer…

  11. Redirecting Under-Utilised Computer Laboratories into Cluster Computing Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, John S.; Spenneman, Dirk H. R.; Cornforth, David

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To provide administrators at an Australian university with data on the feasibility of redirecting under-utilised computer laboratories facilities into a distributed high performance computing facility. Design/methodology/approach: The individual log-in records for each computer located in the computer laboratories at the university were…

  12. Coronary Atherosclerotic Plaque Detected by Computed Tomographic Angiography in Subjects with Diabetes Compared to Those without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Khazai, Bahram; Luo, Yanting; Rosenberg, Steven; Wingrove, James; Budoff, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Little data are available regarding coronary plaque composition and semi-quantitative scores in individuals with diabetes; the extent to which diabetes may affect the presence and extent of Coronary Artery Calcium (CAC) needs more evaluation. Considering that this information may be of great value in formulating preventive interventions in this population, we compared these findings in individuals with diabetes to those without. Methods Multi-Detector Computed Tomographic (MDCT) images of 861 consecutive patients with diabetes who were referred to Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute from January 2000 to September 2012, were evaluated using a 15–coronary segment model. All 861 patients underwent calcium scoring and from these; 389 had coronary CT angiography (CTA). CAC score was compared to 861 age, sex and ethnicity matched controls without diabetes after adjustment for Body Mass Index (BMI), family history of coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and smoking. Segment Involvement Score (SIS; the total number of segments with any plaque), Segment Stenosis Score (SSS; the sum of maximal stenosis score per segment), Total Plaque Score (TPS; the sum of the plaque amount per segment) and plaque compositionwere compared to 389 age, sex and ethnicity matched controls without diabetes after adjustment for BMI, family history of coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and smoking. Results Diabetes was positively correlated to the presence and extent of CAC (P<0.0001 for both). SIS, SSS and TPS were significantly higher in those with diabetes (P<0.0001). Number of mixed and calcified plaques were significantly higher in those with diabetes (P = 0.018 and P<0.001 respectively) but there was no significant difference in the number of non-calcified plaques between the two groups (P = 0.398). Conclusions Patients with diabetes have higher CAC and semi-quantitative coronary plaque scores compared to the age, gender and ethnicity

  13. Organ dose measurements from multiple-detector computed tomography using a commercial dosimetry system and tomographic, physical phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, Lindsey K.

    The technology of computed tomography (CT) imaging has soared over the last decade with the use of multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners that are capable of performing studies in a matter of seconds. While the diagnostic information obtained from MDCT imaging is extremely valuable, it is important to ensure that the radiation doses resulting from these studies are at acceptably safe levels. This research project focused on the measurement of organ doses resulting from modern MDCT scanners. A commercially-available dosimetry system was used to measure organ doses. Small dosimeters made of optically-stimulated luminescent (OSL) material were analyzed with a portable OSL reader. Detailed verification of this system was performed. Characteristics studied include energy, scatter, and angular responses; dose linearity, ability to erase the exposed dose and ability to reuse dosimeters multiple times. The results of this verification process were positive. While small correction factors needed to be applied to the dose reported by the OSL reader, these factors were small and expected. Physical, tomographic pediatric and adult phantoms were used to measure organ doses. These phantoms were developed from CT images and are composed of tissue-equivalent materials. Because the adult phantom is comprised of numerous segments, dosimeters were placed in the phantom at several organ locations, and doses to select organs were measured using three clinical protocols: pediatric craniosynostosis, adult brain perfusion and adult cardiac CT angiography (CTA). A wide-beam, 320-slice, volumetric CT scanner and a 64-slice, MDCT scanner were used for organ dose measurements. Doses ranged from 1 to 26 mGy for the pediatric protocol, 1 to 1241 mGy for the brain perfusion protocol, and 2-100 mGy for the cardiac protocol. In most cases, the doses measured on the 64-slice scanner were higher than those on the 320-slice scanner. A methodology to measure organ doses with OSL dosimeters received from CT

  14. An introduction to computer viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.R.

    1992-03-01

    This report on computer viruses is based upon a thesis written for the Master of Science degree in Computer Science from the University of Tennessee in December 1989 by David R. Brown. This thesis is entitled An Analysis of Computer Virus Construction, Proliferation, and Control and is available through the University of Tennessee Library. This paper contains an overview of the computer virus arena that can help the reader to evaluate the threat that computer viruses pose. The extent of this threat can only be determined by evaluating many different factors. These factors include the relative ease with which a computer virus can be written, the motivation involved in writing a computer virus, the damage and overhead incurred by infected systems, and the legal implications of computer viruses, among others. Based upon the research, the development of a computer virus seems to require more persistence than technical expertise. This is a frightening proclamation to the computing community. The education of computer professionals to the dangers that viruses pose to the welfare of the computing industry as a whole is stressed as a means of inhibiting the current proliferation of computer virus programs. Recommendations are made to assist computer users in preventing infection by computer viruses. These recommendations support solid general computer security practices as a means of combating computer viruses.

  15. Synchronizing compute node time bases in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Faraj, Daniel A; Gooding, Thomas M; Heidelberger, Philip

    2015-01-27

    Synchronizing time bases in a parallel computer that includes compute nodes organized for data communications in a tree network, where one compute node is designated as a root, and, for each compute node: calculating data transmission latency from the root to the compute node; configuring a thread as a pulse waiter; initializing a wakeup unit; and performing a local barrier operation; upon each node completing the local barrier operation, entering, by all compute nodes, a global barrier operation; upon all nodes entering the global barrier operation, sending, to all the compute nodes, a pulse signal; and for each compute node upon receiving the pulse signal: waking, by the wakeup unit, the pulse waiter; setting a time base for the compute node equal to the data transmission latency between the root node and the compute node; and exiting the global barrier operation.

  16. Synchronizing compute node time bases in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Faraj, Daniel A; Gooding, Thomas M; Heidelberger, Philip

    2014-12-30

    Synchronizing time bases in a parallel computer that includes compute nodes organized for data communications in a tree network, where one compute node is designated as a root, and, for each compute node: calculating data transmission latency from the root to the compute node; configuring a thread as a pulse waiter; initializing a wakeup unit; and performing a local barrier operation; upon each node completing the local barrier operation, entering, by all compute nodes, a global barrier operation; upon all nodes entering the global barrier operation, sending, to all the compute nodes, a pulse signal; and for each compute node upon receiving the pulse signal: waking, by the wakeup unit, the pulse waiter; setting a time base for the compute node equal to the data transmission latency between the root node and the compute node; and exiting the global barrier operation.

  17. EDITORIAL: Computational materials science Computational materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, Gerhard; Kresse, Georg

    2011-10-01

    Special issue in honour of Jürgen Hafner On 30 September 2010, Jürgen Hafner, one of the most prominent and influential members within the solid state community, retired. His remarkably broad scientific oeuvre has made him one of the founding fathers of modern computational materials science: more than 600 scientific publications, numerous contributions to books, and a highly cited monograph, which has become a standard reference in the theory of metals, witness not only the remarkable productivity of Jürgen Hafner but also his impact in theoretical solid state physics. In an effort to duly acknowledge Jürgen Hafner's lasting impact in this field, a Festsymposium was held on 27-29 September 2010 at the Universität Wien. The organizers of this symposium (and authors of this editorial) are proud to say that a large number of highly renowned scientists in theoretical condensed matter theory—co-workers, friends and students—accepted the invitation to this celebration of Hafner's jubilee. Some of these speakers also followed our invitation to submit their contribution to this Festschrift, published in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, a journal which Jürgen Hafner served in 2000-2003 and 2003-2006 as a member of the Advisory Editorial Board and member of the Executive Board, respectively. In the subsequent article, Volker Heine, friend and co-worker of Jürgen Hafner over many decades, gives an account of Hafner's impact in the field of theoretical condensed matter physics. Computational materials science contents Theoretical study of structural, mechanical and spectroscopic properties of boehmite (γ-AlOOH) D Tunega, H Pašalić, M H Gerzabek and H Lischka Ethylene epoxidation catalyzed by chlorine-promoted silver oxide M O Ozbek, I Onal and R A Van Santen First-principles study of Cu2ZnSnS4 and the related band offsets for photovoltaic applicationsA Nagoya, R Asahi and G Kresse Renormalization group study of random quantum magnetsIstván A Kovács and

  18. "Starry Night" on Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freifeld, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Discusses an exploration of depth in landscape painting using Vincent van Gogh's "Starry Night" as an example. Used computer drawing software for children to allow students to create their own interpretations of "Starry Night" while exploring means of portraying depth in two-dimensional art. (DSK)

  19. Computing Logarithms by Hand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    How can old-fashioned tables of logarithms be computed without technology? Today, of course, no practicing mathematician, scientist, or engineer would actually use logarithms to carry out a calculation, let alone worry about deriving them from scratch. But high school students may be curious about the process. This article develops a…

  20. Low-Carbon Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hignite, Karla

    2009-01-01

    Green information technology (IT) is grabbing more mainstream headlines--and for good reason. Computing, data processing, and electronic file storage collectively account for a significant and growing share of energy consumption in the business world and on higher education campuses. With greater scrutiny of all activities that contribute to an…

  1. Introduction to Computer Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robin; McKnight, Terri; Tackett, Beverly

    This document is designed for high school teachers to use in teaching a course that introduces students to computing through hands-on experience with databases, spreadsheets, desktop publishing, and word processing. The document begins with a rationale, brief course description, list of course objectives, and list of 10 innovative teaching…

  2. American History. Computer Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lengel, James G.

    1983-01-01

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: Seven interactive computer programs are available to help with the study of American History. They cover the period of the 17th century up through the present day, and involve a variety of approaches to instruction. These programs were conceived and programmed by Jim Lengel, a former state social…

  3. Accounting & Computing Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avani, Nathan T.; And Others

    This curriculum guide consists of materials for use in teaching a competency-based accounting and computing course that is designed to prepare students for employability in the following occupational areas: inventory control clerk, invoice clerk, payroll clerk, traffic clerk, general ledger bookkeeper, accounting clerk, account information clerk,…

  4. Hypercube matrix computation task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calalo, R.; Imbriale, W.; Liewer, P.; Lyons, J.; Manshadi, F.; Patterson, J.

    1987-01-01

    The Hypercube Matrix Computation (Year 1986-1987) task investigated the applicability of a parallel computing architecture to the solution of large scale electromagnetic scattering problems. Two existing electromagnetic scattering codes were selected for conversion to the Mark III Hypercube concurrent computing environment. They were selected so that the underlying numerical algorithms utilized would be different thereby providing a more thorough evaluation of the appropriateness of the parallel environment for these types of problems. The first code was a frequency domain method of moments solution, NEC-2, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The second code was a time domain finite difference solution of Maxwell's equations to solve for the scattered fields. Once the codes were implemented on the hypercube and verified to obtain correct solutions by comparing the results with those from sequential runs, several measures were used to evaluate the performance of the two codes. First, a comparison was provided of the problem size possible on the hypercube with 128 megabytes of memory for a 32-node configuration with that available in a typical sequential user environment of 4 to 8 megabytes. Then, the performance of the codes was anlyzed for the computational speedup attained by the parallel architecture.

  5. Diagnosis by Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Kevin

    1982-01-01

    Describes a computer program to aid physicians in diagnosing diseases. The program begins by recording available information about the patient and consults a library of about 4,000 characteristics associated with approximately 550 maladies and makes a tally to determine the most likely disease candidate. (Author/JN)

  6. Teaching Astronomy With Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Claire J.; Carr, Everett Q.

    1982-01-01

    Details of the services offered by a school planetarium in upstate New York are provided. The use of computers includes a full-day simulation of a voyage to Mars and back, the finding of great-circle distances, and deriving sunrise and sunset times, moon positions, and eclipse seasons. (MP)

  7. Computer Series, 103.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birk, James P., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Describes two computer programs for chemistry: (1) "A Microcomputer Simulation of Fractal Electrodeposition" (provides for the study of fractal aggregrates, BASIC 4.0); and (2) "Counters on Grids" (a game to illustrate the distribution of energy). Notes the programs are available from the authors. (MVL)

  8. Radiation Hardening of Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, D. K.; Smith, L. S.; Zoutendyk, J. A.; Giddings, A. E.; Hewlett, F. W.; Treece, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    Single-event upsets reduced by use of oversize transistors. Computers made less susceptible to ionizing radiation by replacing bipolar integrated circuits with properly designed, complementary metaloxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuits. CMOS circuit chips made highly resistant to single-event upset (SEU), especially when certain feedback resistors are incorporated. Redesigned chips also consume less power than original chips.

  9. The Computer as Interpreter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, J. David

    1990-01-01

    Reported are the results of a study at the Royal British Columbia Museum where an interactive computer program, "Explore the Seashore," was added to an exhibit to test its effects on visitor enjoyment and learning. Details of the presentation and structure of the hypercard media are presented. (CW)

  10. Computers and Chinese Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kierman, Frank A.; Barber, Elizabeth

    This survey of the field of Chinese language computational linguistics was prepared as a background study for the Chinese Linguistics Project at Princeton. Since the authors' main purpose was "critical reconnaissance," quantitative emphasis is on systems with which they are most familiar. The complexity of the Chinese writing system has presented…

  11. Hypercube matrix computation task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calalo, Ruel H.; Imbriale, William A.; Jacobi, Nathan; Liewer, Paulett C.; Lockhart, Thomas G.; Lyzenga, Gregory A.; Lyons, James R.; Manshadi, Farzin; Patterson, Jean E.

    1988-01-01

    A major objective of the Hypercube Matrix Computation effort at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is to investigate the applicability of a parallel computing architecture to the solution of large-scale electromagnetic scattering problems. Three scattering analysis codes are being implemented and assessed on a JPL/California Institute of Technology (Caltech) Mark 3 Hypercube. The codes, which utilize different underlying algorithms, give a means of evaluating the general applicability of this parallel architecture. The three analysis codes being implemented are a frequency domain method of moments code, a time domain finite difference code, and a frequency domain finite elements code. These analysis capabilities are being integrated into an electromagnetics interactive analysis workstation which can serve as a design tool for the construction of antennas and other radiating or scattering structures. The first two years of work on the Hypercube Matrix Computation effort is summarized. It includes both new developments and results as well as work previously reported in the Hypercube Matrix Computation Task: Final Report for 1986 to 1987 (JPL Publication 87-18).

  12. Computer Algebra versus Manipulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zand, Hossein; Crowe, David

    2004-01-01

    In the UK there is increasing concern about the lack of skill in algebraic manipulation that is evident in students entering mathematics courses at university level. In this note we discuss how the computer can be used to ameliorate some of the problems. We take as an example the calculations needed in three dimensional vector analysis in polar…

  13. Home, Hearth and Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seelig, Anita

    1982-01-01

    Advantages of having children use microcomputers at school and home include learning about sophisticated concepts early in life without a great deal of prodding, playing games that expand knowledge, and becoming literate in computer knowledge needed later in life. Includes comments from parents on their experiences with microcomputers and…

  14. Computers in Cardiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Charles L.

    The utilization of computers in the interpretation of electrocardiograms (EKG's) and vectorcardiograms is the subject of this report. A basic introduction into the operations of the electrocardiograms and vectorcardiograms is provided via an illustrated text. A historical development of the EKG starts with the 1950's with the first attempts to use…

  15. Computer Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pronskikh, V. S.

    2014-05-09

    Verification and validation of computer codes and models used in simulation are two aspects of the scientific practice of high importance and have recently been discussed by philosophers of science. While verification is predominantly associated with the correctness of the way a model is represented by a computer code or algorithm, validation more often refers to model’s relation to the real world and its intended use. It has been argued that because complex simulations are generally not transparent to a practitioner, the Duhem problem can arise for verification and validation due to their entanglement; such an entanglement makes it impossible to distinguish whether a coding error or model’s general inadequacy to its target should be blamed in the case of the model failure. I argue that in order to disentangle verification and validation, a clear distinction between computer modeling (construction of mathematical computer models of elementary processes) and simulation (construction of models of composite objects and processes by means of numerical experimenting with them) needs to be made. Holding on to that distinction, I propose to relate verification (based on theoretical strategies such as inferences) to modeling and validation, which shares the common epistemology with experimentation, to simulation. To explain reasons of their intermittent entanglement I propose a weberian ideal-typical model of modeling and simulation as roles in practice. I suggest an approach to alleviate the Duhem problem for verification and validation generally applicable in practice and based on differences in epistemic strategies and scopes

  16. Women in Computer Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Clare; Menninger, Sally Ann

    The keynote address of a conference that focused on the future of women in science and engineering fields and the opportunities available to them in the computer sciences is presented. Women's education in the sciences and education and entry into the job market in these fields has steadily been increasing. Excellent employment opportunities are…

  17. Thomas Jefferson's Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Catherine F.

    1996-01-01

    Notes that taken together, Thomas Jefferson's contributions to the history of writing technology demonstrate a virtual "computer." Links Jefferson's development of writing technology to his democratic political philosophy. Argues that this link should interest writing teachers. Suggests that Jeffersonian optimism effectively counters Foucaultian…

  18. Computer Narrative Assessment Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Walter M.

    The use of narrative test reports overcomes the major barrier to understanding reports, understanding the language that is used. Early attempts to utilize the computer in generating narrative reports include: (1) Teaching Information Processing System (TIPS), involving periodic collection of information from students regarding courses, which is…

  19. Computer Series, 32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, John W., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Ten computer programs (available from authors) and a noncomputer calculation of the electron in one-dimensional, one-Bohr box are described, including programs for analytical chemistry, space group generation using Pascal, mass-spectral search system (Applesoft), microcomputer-simulated liquid chromatography, voltammetry/amperometric titrations,…

  20. Computer Literacy 113.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huse, Vanessa

    A course syllabus and descriptive outline are provided for an introductory, three-credit college course at Lon Morris College, Jacksonville, Texas, covering logical operations and the development of basic algorithmic processes using the BASIC computer programming language. Overall goals, specific objectives, and a brief description of lesson…